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Jazz Keyboard 1 Lesson 1-Dick Grove

Jazz Keyboard 1 Lesson 1-Dick Grove

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. JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 [PROGD~

LESSON 1

Definitive Voicings

© 1994

Greve/Rasch Music Education Systems

~,..,~ - ----

JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

Definitive Voicings

LESSON 1

© 1994

Grove/Rasch Music Education Systems

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

i

INDEX

LESSON 1

TEXTBOOK

Introduction 1

The Foundation 3

Diagram #1 4

Playing the 7 - 3 Definitive Voicings 6

Definitive Chords In Major , 7

Plural Substitute Chords in Major 1 0

Voiceleading 13

Diagram #2 13

Putting It 'All Together' 15

Modulation 16

The Major 6th 20

WORKBOOK

Introduction 21

Exercise #1: 7 - 3 Voicings Applied to Maj.7th Chords : 23

Exercise #2: 7 - 3 Voicings Applied to Min.7th Chords 24

Exercise #3: 7 - 3 Voicings Applied to Dom.7th Chords 25

Exercises #4 & 5: Voiceleading Triads Through the Circle of 5ths 26

Exercise #6: Voiceleading Modulating Triads By 'TI - DO' Pivots 28

Exercise #7: Exercise #6 in 'F' 29

Exercise #8: Exercise #6 in 'G' 30

Exercise #9: Exercise #6 in 'Bb' 31

Exercise #10: Voiceleading Modulating Triads By 'TI- DO' Pivots in Lower Voice 32

Exercise #11: Exercise #10 in 'F' 33

Exercise #12: Exercise #10 in 'G' 34

Exercise #13: Exercise #10 in 'Bb' .35

Exercise #14: Voiceleading 4-part Chords, Modulating Into Flat Keys 36

Exercise #15: Exercise #14 in 'G' .37

Exercise #16: Exercise #14 in 'Bb' 38

Exercise #17: Voiceleading 4-part Chords, Modulating Into Sharp Keys 39

Exercise #18: Exercise #17 in 'F' 40

Exercise #19: Exercise #17 in 'G' .41

Exercise #20: Exercise #17 in 'Bb' .42

Exercise #21: Exercise #17 in 'Ab' .43

Exercise #22: Voiceleading 4-part " - V - 1 Chords, Modulating Into Flat Keys .44

Exercise #23: Exercise #22 in 'F' 46

Exercise #24: Exercise #22 in 'G' .48

Exercise #25: Exercise #22 in 'Eb' 50

Exercise #26: Exercise #22 in 'Db' 52

Exercise #27: 7 - 3 Voicings Applied to the Blues 54

Exercise #28: Exercise #27 in 'F' 55

Exercise #29: Exercise #27 in 'G' 56

Exercise #30: Exercise #27 in 'Bb' 57

ii

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

LESSON 1

INDEX - Continued

Exercise #31: II - V - I Chord Progression Combinations with 7 - 3 Voicings 58

Exercise #32: Exercise #31 in IF' 59

Exercise #33: Exercise #31 in 'G' 60

Exercise #34: Exercise #31 in '8b' 61

Exercise #35: Exercise #31 in 'Eb' 62

Exercise #36: Plural Substitution Chord Progression Combinations with 7 - 3 Voicings 63

Exercise #37: Exercise #36 in 'F' 64

Exercise #38: Exercise #36 in 'G' , 65

Exercise #39: Exercise #36 in '8b' 66

The 'Home Stretch' 67

Exercise #40-41 : Hearing and Playing Chromatically Descending Key Centers 68

Exercise #42: Exercise #40-41 in 'C' 70

Exercise #43: Hearing and Playing Symmetrically Descending Key Centers 72

Exercise #44 in 'C' 74

Lead Sheet for Dick Grove Trio performance, "And Then I Knew" 76

Here We Are 78

Recommended Practice Schedule 79

Practice Log 82

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

Page 1

INTRODUCTION

The goal of this video self-study Jazz Keyboard course is that you will be able to actually 'hear' what you play, as you play. You will understand what you should be hearing. It brings the music to 'life' in a real way. To be able to play spontaneously is essential for the real enjoyment and satisfaction of contemporary music. It is necessary to attaining the foundation required for playing the jazz style on keyboards.

Without this ability, all results you might attain are painfully slow, and impossible to perform

in a true jazz style and feeling. Rhythmic phrasing is the cornerstone of jazz, as is improvisation. Executing melody, chords and rhythm simultaneously can only be done by ear. It can not really be 'thought' as you play, nor can it be mentally memorized. Focusing your practice and energies on developing your ear is a much more practical strategy than trying to teach your fingers what notes to play, and when to play them. You have to be able to 'listen' in a musical way. Furthermore, this ability to hear is where the real pleasure of playing comes in.

Your previous experience, or the foundation received in the 'See It - Hear It / Hear It - Play It' course has prepared you to start this course. In the course, we will be taking the concepts introduced in 'See It', and actually applying it to playing. When this happens, and done in context to real songs - played in tempo- the true value of the concepts of shapes, plurality, pivoting from key to key, and solfeg can all be appreciated. They will enable you to cross the line from 'can't'to 'can'.

The more you can use your 'educated ear' productively, the more you will be motivated to go deeper into developing your abilities. To aid you in this experience, this course will provide you with CD/cassette practice tracks for each step of the way. This will support your practicing, give you the feel and experience of playing with others, and even more importantly, give you the 'ear' experience of learning to listen to others as you play your own part. This is absolutely critical to achieving a real ability to play spontaneously.

These support tracks will be of greater help then just playing with 'play-along' records or

CD's found on the market today .. Our tracks take you through each step of the learning process, enabling you to master all the components of the creative process. They work with you at the point you are at. Many of these lessons are foundations to being able to 'put it all together',

and so practicing with tracks to master the foundation is the trick. They are tailor-made to support each aspect we will introduce.

To.play is a 'doing' experience. Each lesson in the course, as well as the subsequent Dick Grove Jazz Keyboard 2, 3, 4, etc. courses, will provide a well-defined road for you to travel down. These is much to be covered. These courses, presented in the correct order, will work

with the aspects of rhythmic phrasing of both melody and harmony, voicings, comping

(or accompanying others), embellishments, and solo piano.

Areas such as jazz improvisation and chord substitution are individual courses,and my self,

or your Dick Grove 'School Without Walls' consultant, can advise you which course to take next, as you move up the 'educational tree' we provide. However, we will be dealing with rhythmic phrasing, embellishments, fills, and establishing the foundation for improvisation, in this course.

Page 2

DICK GROVE e JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

LESSON 1

Your supportive practice tracks in this course should make your practice time more enjoyable. This, plus our structure of allowing you to move at your own pace, should guarantee steady progress. Start by watching the video, following the text portion of the lesson. When you get ready to practice, there is a detailed practice schedule at the end of the lesson on pages 78 and 79. In each exercise, practice slowly at first, trying to completely understand what you are trying to accomplish in each area discussed in the text portion of the lesson.

The practice schedule will suggest how to practice, and what to practice on each practice session you have. You can improvise on this schedule, but should basically stay on the recommended order of exercises.

Take your personal schedule, write it down, and 'reserve' time out of your busy schedule,

for your practicing (see page 77). Keep notes on the material covered each time you practice (there is a Practice Log on page 80), make a note of questions that arise, and problems you encounter, etc. You should refer to your Practice Log when filling out your Satisfactory Progress Report you send in to us, as you finish each lesson. You can contact us if you feel it is necessary. You are in a school, so you have access to help if you need it. It is in our best interests if you make good progress, and feel good about your improving and having a real focus to your playing.

You are about to start a wonderful, fulfilling experience. We're with you all the way!

HERE WE GO!!

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

Page 3

LESSON 1

THE FOUNDATION

1. Our goal of 'hearing' what we play will start with a review of information you should be familiar with. To begin, our contemporary music is based on a 'tonality' or key center. We relate to this tonality by hearing the 'tonic' of each key center, or DO. The solfeg system of DO-RE-MI-FA-SO-lA-TI-DO establishes a 'sound' for each tone of a tonality, in relation to the key note or DO, (either diatonic to the key, or chromatic).

2. The unit of tunes, called a major tetrachord, is the basis of a major tonality, in that it's construction (whole step -2, whole step -2, halfstep-1), creates either the lower half of a major scale (FA, MI, RE, DO), or the upper half (SO-lA-TI-DO). See Examples 1 and 2.

Example 1

Example 2
MI RE DO SO lA TI DO
I~ 8
[g~ II
e
e n
e 0
-
1 2 2 2 2 1 FA

Between tones:

3. When positioned as a major scale, we then create a 'character' or 'sound' for each tone in the scale. That character or sound is comprised of four types of sounds:

a. Resting tones: DO - MI

b. Active whole steps: RE - lA (they do not predict where they are resolving to)

c. Leading active half-steps: TI (resolving to DO), and FA (resolving to MI)

d. Leading SO (resolving to DO)

Example 3

II

o

e n

e

o

e

II

II

Iii

Page4

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

LESSON 1

4. The basic definitive resting tone of a major tonality is MI, while the definitive active tone of a major tonality is FA. This means that these tones define to the ear, if the harmony functions primarily as a resting chord or active chord. A definitive melody is a melody that is built around these definitive resting and active tones. The melodies of standards and jazz compositions are definitive melodies.This is the primary character of our contemporary music.

I 7 - 3 DEFINITIVE VOICINGS I

5. In jazz, melody and harmony are more sophisticated, and for the most part, harmony is found in 4, 5, 6 and even 7-part chord forms, instead of the 3 and 4-part forms found mainly in rock, pop, country, and other contemporary styles. The consequence of this characteristic is that the overlapping of two or more shapes creates the presence of more than one definitive scale degrees.

6. As we are dealing with the jazz style, we will be using these larger chord forms. Starting with 4-part harmony, the definitive scale degrees will be:

DIAGRAM #1

DEFINITIVE CHORDS DEFINITIVE SCALE DEG ADDITIONAL SCALE DEG

V7:

FA FA MI

DO

IImi7:

Ima7:

TI TI

7. These 3rds and 7ths of the llmi? - V7 - Ima7 chords define the major scale tonality, or key center to the ear, and represent what you should be hearing as you play. The next example demonstrates the natural leading of these definitive scale degree tones.

Example 4

Dmi7

G7

Cma7

"

IImi7

V7

Ima7

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE· JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

PageS

8. Pianistically, if we isolate the definite tones, play them in a keyboard setting in which the right hand plays the 3rd and 7th of the chord while the left hand plays the root, we would get the following result. (Either tone, the 3rd or 7th can be the higher tone in the right hand.)

Example Sa

Example sb

Dmi7

G7

Cma7

"
.1
.L"Io .: r..
~, !"'- ~ -
~ ". 'c. ". ......
tJ ~ 7 ~ .)
<)
IImi7 V7 Ima7
)
f .".
,. ~
~.
r..
- 1\
,
~ !"'-
\0: _J .1 "11 r:
) tJ 7 G"1. 'O'· J
3 '0': 7
IImi7 V7 Ima7
)
I ".

L - ~
..-..
" Dmi7

G7

Cma7

9. By doing this, we accomplish the following goals:

a. we are stati ng the defi n itive tones of the active and resti ng chords of all major key centers or scales

b. we are pianistically 'spreading' the tones out to be played in an 'open' setting, and distributing the tones between the two hands to achieve a bigger, fuller sound

c. we are creating horizontal 'voices', in this transparent setting that allows each voice to be clearly heard. Each of the three voices has a projecting presence.

d. We are playing, in each of the three voices, leading intervals of the major scale

e. the 3rds and 7ths are present in 99% of all possible keyboard voicings.

All other possible voicings consist of the 3rds and 7ths PLUS other scale degree tones, organized in some combination of shapes (triads, open or closed 4ths, and their variations).lf MI or FA are not present, a chord voicing does not sound with the required definition and does not 'ring true'.

A good ear realizes that a voicing must include these definitive tones.

f. they allow us to play rapidly changing chords, with a minimum of notes, creating a simple 'physical" solution in fast moving situations

Page 6

DICK GROVE· JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

LESSON 1

PLAYING THE 7 - 3 DEFINITIVE VOICINGS

10. Our first goals, therefore, are to attain the ability to hear and ~ these essential tones in alillmi7 - V7 - !ma7 combinations, in all keys and at different tempos. When a foundation like this has been accomplished, then we can apply them to comping the chords of songs, and then supporting melodies with these definitive, horizontal voicings.

11. Melodically, these definitive scale degrees become the basis of real improvisation, creating fills, introductions and endings. So as you practice the exercises in this lesson, you are laying the groundwork to apply your music to the various goals just mentioned.

12. These 3 - 7 solutions can also be applied to the plural substitute chords in major. This includes the !!!mi7, IVma7, Vlmi7 and Vllmi7(b5). Any four-part chord in major can be voiced with this 'solution'.

Example 6

3rds & 7ths

1'\
IJ ...... ... ~
I ...... .... '-'" ......
'J ~ _L"'Io.
~j ...... .... - ...... _1l.J
) tJ '-'" -G u '-'"
u
Cma7 Dmi7 Emi7 Fma7 G7 Ami7 Bmi7(b5) Cma7
....,. 0 -G
• ......
I I· ...... _1l.J -
./ ""~ '-'" Ima7 IIm7 II1mi7 IVma7

V7 Vlmi7 Vllmi7(b5) Ima7

13. This example demonstrates the definitive 3rds and 7ths of all the diatonic four-part chord forms of a major scale or tonality. Again, they represent the tones you should be able to hear in your head, as you play.

14. As you become proficient at executing these 'easy-to-play' solutions, you will have accomplished the first, essential goal to attaining the ability to play spontaneously. When you can recognize the IImi7 - V7 - Ima7 combinations in all keys, you will have basically practiced the chord progressions to all songs in major.

7 - 3 RECOGNITION

15. In the same way as our eye can recognize words, (without individually looking at each letter in a word), we can recognize and react to the IImi7 - V7 - Ima7 combinations as well as their plural substitute combinations in a chord progression. They can be thought of as 'chord sentences',and as these chords define the active and resting scale degrees of a major tonality, it is essential that we become proficient at recognizing them in all possible combi nations.

16. In the next example, we will look at all the definitive chord combinations, from the standpoint of finding one, two Of all three chords of the IImi7 - V7 - Ima7 definitive chords in major .. (See Example 7 on the following page.)

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE B JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

Page 7

DEFINITIVE CHORDS IN MAJOR

Example 7 (the solfeg allows us to 'sing' the definitive tones, like a melody)

SUNG & HEARD

PLAYED

IImi7 - V7 - Ima7

Dmi7 G7 Cma7

FA DO TI FA MI TI

Dmi7

G7

Cma7

II
~ r.
..... , /i
-" "'" T. " ~
<'
tJ " -6 '., ?; '/U-
, ,(
< IImi7 V7 Ima7
/<
t -,.. I ""/
.•• --z.:t:...,-:-c ~ ~
~
I ._. 2

Ima7 - IImi7 - V7

Cma7 Dmi7 G7

I J 1 J J II

Cma7 Dmi7 G7

II
, ~ r.
.....

) tJ "-' -6 c:;
u-
) Ima7 IImi7 V7
, ,. r;

./ r.
..... ,j
1 ._. 2

TI MI FA DO TI FA

Dmi7 G7

IImi7 - V7

Dmi7 G7

Dmi7 G7

Dmi7 G7

II
~ r.
I .....
-, "" t: /
tJ -6 ~, "l: -6 "l:
..
< IImi7 V7 IImi7 V7
",. r.
I , ...... - -
./ r. -p -p
I .... I ...... 2

FA DOTI FA FA DO TI FA

Continued on next page

Page 8

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

LESSON 1

Example 7 continued

r

I~i J

ma7-V7

Cma7

G7
I j J II &3 Cma7 G7 Cma7 G7
j~ I I j II
II tsJ
) ~ :a" -d- :a ?J-
Ima7 V7 Ima7 V7
I I
.c:~. r.
' .. ~
,
q. -l ..,j
<J
2 G7 Ima7

G7 Cma7

"
~ ''''
" ~ r.
~ ,J q. -,
-~ ~ ~ "l:' i
< V7 Ima7 V7 Ima7
)
I I
f ,. r.
,. q.
-/ T.. -, r.J
...,< ,-" 2

,I tt i Cma7 Dmi7 Cma7 Dmi7
I", ,I I I .. J;. II
) ~ :a, 4 :a ?J-
) Ima7 IImi7 Ima7 V7
I I
j .c:". r.
,. q. - -.
,/ 7 --p
I 2 I
II i G7 G7
4 I'
~, ~,
) ~ '0 '0'
) V7 V7
I .,.. '"
,. q.
-,/
~
2
Continued on next page TI MI FA TI

V7 -lmi7

G7 Cma7
I I~i
j I j II
J J
TI FA MI TI

1---

a

ma7 -lImi7

Cma7 Dmi7
I~i j I j J II
J TI MI ,FA DO

G7

G7

J

II

J

FA TI TI FA

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

Page 9

Example 7 continued

Cma7

Ima7

Cma7 Cma7
1;1
J I J II
J J MI TI TI MI

Cma7

fl
, ~ '"
~ ...
_~ "-:I.' r.. r..
) ~ - -
u- u-
J Ima7 Ima7
-'-_,. "'-
f ,. "-:1.'-
./ '" «. • «..
... 2

IImi7

Dmi7 Dmi7
1;1 j j II
I
J J FA DO DO' FA

Dmi7

Dmi7

fl
t "-:I.'_
~. ~ ,~ _,0
~..I ... ... .. .
) ~ -e- -e- "
IImi7 IImi7
)

I ,. '"11:. ...... r..
/' ,~ - -
... 2

17. All the chords shown in Example 7 should be played. You see the 7 - 3 voicings on the right. Play these tones, and as you play them, sing the definitive tones as shown below each chord progression on the right. Take some time on this, as your workbook assignments will require you execute playing and singing at the same time, moving through different keys. Playing and singing this example prepares you to do the workbook assignments.

I

Page 70

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

LESSON 1

PLURAL SUBSTITUTE CHORDS IN MAJOR

18. Plural substitute chords will be found used in connection with the definitive IImi7 - V7 - Ima7 combinations. Conventional progressions utilizing both definitive and plural substitutes would include:

Example 8

Emi7 Ami7 Rmi7 G7

IIImi7 - Vlmi7 -lImi7 - V7

" .. Cf: ; (4.- .~
y T. " ., f7 \i+- '
I ,
, .... "" '-" ,
) @.l -c .-6 ;7: -6 c::
k
IIImi7 \'hi 7 IImi7 V7
)

I , ..... n -
./ T.. f-"
7' ,I
\ 1 - Emi7 Ami7 Dmi7 G7

RE SO SO DO DO FA TI -

2

Cma7 Dmi7 Emi7

Ima7 - IImi7 - IIImi7

"
, y
,,...... T. ~
" . ./ .... , "
-~ ~ ~ -u-
< Ima7 IImi7 IIImi7
-.,. .

./ T.
....
1~ ~ 2° Cma7 Dmi7 Emi7

II

MI TI 00 FA SO RE

Emi7 Dmi7

Cma7

IIImi7 - IImi7 - Ima7

"
~ y "
, !"'\
, .... .'" I ~
) -~ c; -6 U
IIImi7 IImi7 Ima7
)
I -.,.. -,.
,.~
./ ,.
....
l-:e ij- 2 - Emi7 Dmi7 Cma7

J

II

MI TI DO FA MI rr

Continued on next page

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

Page 11

Example 8 continued

Ima7 - IImi7 - IIImiT - IVma7

Cma7 Dmi7 Emi7 Fma7

1'1
j .....
, '!"\, r:
~ .IL:I- 7' --.,..
~ i -6 c; -
)
) Ima7 IImi7 IIImi7 IVma7

I •
./ t.
.....
1~ -J 2~ 0 Cma7 Dmi7 Emi7 Fma7

It i j J J 11 j J J j II

MI TI FA DO SO RE LA MI

Fma7 G7 Cma7

1'1
u 7..
I " !"'\ t.
~ ,J ..... -
-~ ~ c:: '-"
-6 U
< IVma7 G7 Ima7

, ......
/ t.
..... ~
r:::I <;;iT - Cma7 Ami7

IVma7 - V7 - Ima7

Dmi7 G7

1'1
, 1JI r.
" ~ t. -
" ,_} ..... >; <J ,
, -~- ~-c- -6 -6 'z
) Ima7 Vlmi7 IImi7 V7
I

I , ...... -
'" r. , f"'"
~
I ~ 2

Fma7 G7 Cma7

II

Fma7 Emi7

Dmi7Cma7

LA MI FA TI TI MI

Ima7 - Vlmi7 - IImi7 - V7

IVma7 IIImi7 IImi7 Ima7

Continued on next page

Cma7 Ami7 Dmi7 G7

MI TI DO SO FA DO TI FA

IVma7 - IIImi7 - IImi7 - Ima7

Fma7 Emi7

Dmi7Cma7

MI LA RE SO FA DO TI Ml

Page 12

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

LESSON 1

Example 8 continued

Cma7

Ami7

- Ima7 - Vlmi7

Cma7 Ami7
It! ] I ] II
J J Vlmi7

MI TI DO SO -

2

Ima7 - IIImi7 - IVma7

Emi7 Fma7

Cma7 Emi7 Fma7

II

Ima7 IIImi7 IVma7

MI TI RE SO LA MI

19. Again, all the chords shown in Example 8 should be played. You see the 7 - 3 voicings on the right. Play these tones, and as you play them, sing the definitive tones as shown below each chord progression on the left. These may take more practice and time, as the combinations of diatonic chords appear more varied that the ones illustrated in Example 7. Remember, your study and practice with these will prepare you for your workbook assignments, executing the playing and singing of these 'chord sentences' through different keys.

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE· JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

Page 13

VOICELEADING

20. As chords progress from one to the next, the goal is to move each voice as smoothly as possible to the next tone. When applying the definitive 3rds and 7ths of the IImi7 - V7 - Ima7 I definitive chords, or plural substitutes chords in combinations shown in Example 8, the total voiceleading possibilities will only be four movements.

DIAGRAM #2

II

II

TOP VOICE: 3rd to the 7th 2nd VOICE: 7th to the 3rd

21. These formulas will hold true when moving from chord to chord within a key center,

or when changing from key center to another key center. Remember, when a voicing is applied to a chord symbol, you are always moving scale degrees to scale degrees.

If they move in a natural resolution, the result 'sounds' professional and musical.

It is a matter of playing multiple notes in a horizontal, 'leading' fashion. This in turn, makes it possible to 'hear ahead' as we execute the music spontaneously.

22. As we introduce and practice playing and singing these voicings and chord progressions, you will 'hear' what you are playing, and get to where you can instinctively get your hands on the notes. A critical part of developing these abilities is to literally sing as you play.

This can be done aloud or silently in your head. When doing this you may have to 'adjust' octaves to stay in your singable range.

TOP VOICE: 7th to the 3rd 2nd VOICE: 3rd to the 7th

II

2nd VOICE: 7th to the 7th

TOP VOICE: 7th to the 7th

TOP VOICE: 3rd to the 3rd

2nd VOICE: 3rd to the 3rd

Page 14

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

LESSON 1

23. With this goal in mind, all musical examples will include the solfeg syllables by each

note. You should sing the pitch in solfeg as you play the notes. Singing focuses and connects your ear to the keyboard and your fingers. You can gradually get more and more proficient at this, and it will get easier and more natural. It will become 'second nature'.

Remember - you are not really playing with your ear if you are not singing!!!

24. When you voicelead the 7 - 31s, the top voice or middle voice becomes a melody that your natural ear can learn. It reacts to these harmonic melodies in the same way as it does to the melody of an actual tune. This is the area where you develop the instinctive capacity to hear what you are playing, even though you are playing many notes at once.

The voiceleading of 7 - 31s makes the voices singable, because you are moving from tone to tone in a leading fashion (by half-step), by commontone (you are already on the tone), or by a diatonic scale movement (by whole step or min3rd interval).

RHYTHM

25. As we proceed through the lessons of this course, we will also develop your rhythmic ear to operate in a natural, instinctive manner. Starting with Lesson 2, we will execute syncopated jazz rhythms, applied to the chord progressions when comping, and later to solo piano, playing the melody and chords at the same time. In Lesson 1 however, you should play your voicings rhythmically sustained or connected. This also helps you to hear the tones, as they 'sound' constant as you are playing the voicings.

26. Rhythmic phrasing is the essence of playing jazz and modern styles. To coordinate your hands, the notes and definition of the harmony into flowing rhythmic sentences is essential if you wish to play with a group of musicians. The energy and 'forward motion' of the rhythm makes the music come alive. Without this 'spark', your efforts will never 'get off the ground' and the results will be frustrating and uninspired.

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

Page 15

PUTTING IT 'All TOGETHER'

27. In your workbook, you will be asked to practice (with the tracks), in a specific way.

By proceeding in a step-by-step manner, each step will prepare you for the next.

At a point in this lesson's exercises, you will be voiceleading the 7 - 31s through the progressions that are combinations of the definitive IImi7 - V7 - Ima7, as well as combining the definitive chords with the plural substitutes.

28. You will be required to sing as you play. The technique we use to accomplish this

is to create the 'harmonic melodies' mentioned previously. They are the sound of the voices moving from the 3rd to the 7th of each chord (as shown in Diagram #2).

We are literally making a horizontal melody out of vertical combinations of tones.

In the next example, a IImi7 - V7 - Ima7 in 'C' major is shown, first in a 7 - 3 voicing.

29. Below the notes is the harmonic melody you are to sing, while playing the voicings. (practicing Examples 7 and 8 is your study to prepare for this.) You can first play the

top voice, or melody you are to sing, by itself. Listen to it! Sing it back, without playing. Now slowly play the 7 - 3 voicings and sing as you play. The notes you are playing support your ear, and make it easier - just listen!.

Example 10

FA DO TI FA MI TI

f\
, lL IL
~ ":t_
" l"\ ,.
~ ~ c C I"'-
~ -6 "li ~
) , u
Dmi7 G7 Cma7
)

I ,. ":Ie "
./ ,. ~ '".
~ "
I ~ 2

30. Your practice tracks are presented with the solfeg melodies. You will be required to voice the 7 - 31s and sing the solfeg. Each is recorded twice, first changing chords every measure, (to get the notes under your fingers), then changing chords every two beats, making you react faster. All are in the same key, with the same DO as a tonal reference point.

Page 16

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

LESSON 1

MODULATION

31. It is always a challenge to hear a change of key center. The keyboard responsibility in group playing is to provide the definition of each new scale for all players. The 7 - 3 voicing is the ideal solution for this task, as we are playing the definitive tones of each major scale (remembering that the 7th and 3rd of IImi7 - V7 -lma7 are the active, leading half-steps TI to DO, and FA to MI).

32. We know from Chapter Two of the 'See It' musicianship course, that modulation means

that a scale degree changes it's function. Although any scale degree function can pivot and function as any other scale degree function, when the tone that pivots is a definitive leading half-step of the new key center, then the ear will hear the new scale instantly.

33. We will now apply this principle to conditioning you to play progressions in different keys.

It will allow you to hear the new key each time.

34. There are a total of 12 different major tonalities (there are 15 if we consider enharmonic keys (Cb/B - Db/C# - Gb/F#). Any key center can pivot to go to any of the other eleven key centers in an evolving fashion. In the following example, we see a song in the key of 'C' major, momentarily modulating (by pivoting definitive scale degrees) and moving through a number of new key centers. This represents how you are to understand the progressions of any tune. In Example 11, the key centers are shown in reverse print. Each key center is represented by some combination of definitive chords.

Example 11

,---------a

II Dmi7

G7

Cma7

I r ------II·r---------, I Bmi7

E7

I Ama7

Ami7

II a-------r

D7 I Dmi7 G7

~------------ImIr-----------~1

II

Fmi7

Bb7

I Ebma7

35. We will start in this lesson, then continue in the following lessons, to practice playing and hearing modulations, until we have complete all eleven possible modulations.

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

Page 17

36. Example 11 modulates from the key of 'C' to the key of 'A', then to the key of 'G', and 'C', ending in the key of 'Eb'. This kind of movement into momentary key centers is typical of all standards and most jazz standards. At the point of key center change, in each instance, we need to hear a tone of the first key, change its scale function to become a definitive scale degree (active or resting), of the new key center. In this sense, the critical definitive note of the new key is prepared by a tone of the old key. We need to learn how to hear each of these tones that prepare and then pivot to define the new tonality.

37. In many cases, the 'link' between keys is a commontone. If not a commontone, the new definitive tone will be a half-step above or below the preparation tone. In some instances, it will be a whole step, but in all situations, the established tonality of the first key 'allows' you to hear the tones necessary. When chord progressions allow this preparation to occur, we consider it a good chord progression.

38. To demonstrate this event we will look at a modulation in which the key center moves down chromatically (i.e, 'C'to '8' to '8b',etc.).

Example 12

G7

II

Cma7

II

Dmi7

C#mi7

F#7

Bma7( Cbma7)

fI
, .~ "t.
F. 1"\ r: r .,
" j~ ;.>r_ r: 'T'~ ,.j
) .J i-6 /1 "l,; - cr jj/'/) ?J #~ #*~
.J }.
Fa Do Ti Fa Mi Mi/Fa Do Ti Fa Mi
) Re So Do 1>f.fl*Di(Re So Do
I -".. "" A
• tff,> "l.l.
L fL r- IffY tc .~'"- U ......
~ """ ,.j I.l. ~
1 I ._ *0
2 ,_3 4 "., .... eWlt"Wjll

Cmi7

F7

I!J Bbma7

Bmi7

E7

II Ama7

'"
./1.
I •. (1· r:<:
F n
\: .r
4V bV"l,; s: ~ zs: ~>#.r... 'i#~~
-6 -& 1'- -6 ~"l,;
< Mi/Fa Do Ti Fa Mi Mi/Fa Do Ti Fa Mi
~e So Do *Di/Re So Do
I. ,.
I , .
./ ~.
v~ - tc.
5 0 6 7 4 8
,- Page 78

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

LESSON 1

39. The slash ( / ) always indicates a pivot; where one scale degree changes function to a tone of the new key or scale. We can see in this example that (in treble clef), the tone MI in bar 2, moves by commontone to the next chord, changing its function to become the definitive FA active scale degree of the new key. As soon as FA is heard, the ear can hear the entire new scale - all tones have now pivoted. In the bass clef, DO of the first key moves up chromatically (DO becomes DI), then pivots to become RE of the new key. The asterisk ( * ) indicates this pivot in Example 12.

Example 13

'C' Major Scale

'8' Major Scale

III

1\
, ~
...... ~~
...... ... -
) tJ -e- u -
t
) 1\
f ~
,'"' _ff_~
'\: J U. - n ... 1/11-
tJ i-e- ~u 11 40. The emphasis here is on realizing that when the tone that pivots is the leading definitive active scale degree FA, then the ear hears the new scale, with all the tones of the new scale pivoting instantly.

41. In Example 14 below, the same approach is applied to the scales of 'C' and 'Bb'. When this specific modulation occurs, two tones of the 'C' scale (MI and TI) move down a half-step, becoming ME and TE, then pivoting to become FA and DO of the new major scale of 'Bb'. The black noteheads draw your attention to the commontone pivot, where ME changes its function to become FA of the new key.

Example 14

'e' Major Scale

'8b' Major Scale

III

m

1\
- ...
" ~ I""- ... -
" .... -
) tJ -e- u ~
;
) It III III
f ~
h_ ...
" ~ I""- .... v-
'\: _}
tJ -e- u v- LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

Page 19

42. Example 15 illustrates this modulation of 'C' to the key center a whole step below.

Example 15

Dmi7

Cma7 uJ.If!lW Cmi7

F7

Bbma7 I':'Jt!l&J

G7

1\ ttl t
I 1J/ '"
"+
-" _.
[. .r... _h
~ -6 "l: '-" b"i ~ ~
) U -6
Fa Do Ti Fa Mi Me/Fa Do Ti Fa Mi
) Re So Do Do/Re So Do
I
I -,.. '"
.•• "+ .~
,.j _.,
I ~ (.;I
Commontone Commontone 2

3

4

"
1J/
I ~J
) ~ brJ~ s: -e- bt1i ~ bn:
-z: u -6 -e-
Me/Fa Do Ti Fa Mi Me/Fa Do Ti Fa Mi
) Do/Re So Do Do/Re So Do
" ,.
I . , .
./ k...-l
IL~ IJ h~
5 t14 6 7 b?:f 8 "
Commontone Commontone Bbmi7

Eb7

II U:·M,''4

Abma7 Abmi7

ma I':'M,I",

Gbma7

Db7

43. In this example, MI in the first key, 'C', is altered by moving down a half-step (ME of the first key), and then pivoting to become the definitive FA of the new key of '8b'. TI also moves down a half-step to TE, and pivots to become DO of the new key of '8b'. In the bass clef, there is a commontone pivot in which DO in the key of 'C', becomes RE in the new key of '8b'. As all three tones are pivoting and changing function, the challenge is for your ear to hear the top voice pivot from ME to FA. FA is always the most important of all the pivots, because when the ear hears this definitive active scale degree, all the other tones instantly pivot also.

44. In conclusion, physically, the voicings 'lay' very well under your fingers, making it very natural and easy to execute. When you play the two tones in the right hand, you have several options to use for fingering the notes. Depending on the use of white and black keys, it feels comfortable to optionally play these two tones with these fingers: 1 and 4; 2 and 5;

2 and 4, even 1 and 5. You should try to hear and 'see' where your fingers are going, before you play the tones.

45. Lesson by lesson, we will work with two more of the possible eleven modulations until you have experience with all of the them. Later, we will use this technique to learn how to memorize songs, and transpose them into other keys, by ear!!!.

Page 20

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

LESSON 1

THE MAJOR 6th

46. We know from Chapter Seven of the 'See It' course, that when playing the I chord in major in four-part harmony, there is an interchangeability between the major 7th and major 6th of the chord. The 6th (LA) of the chord and major scale is an active, non-leading scale degree and therefore is not definitive. It is used in conjunction with the spread, 7 - 3 voicings in two contexts.

47. The first one is that in certain instances, for example when the melody note is LA, or when DO is in the melody. In these cases, we will use the 6th because in normal usage, both TI and LA are not used together in the same voicing. Therefore, LA is in effect, substituted in place of TI. The idea is to avoid placing TI below DO. This creates a vertical 'clash' of a minor 9th dissonance, which in most cases is not a preferred sound. It is because one tone is a resting tone, and the other a leading half-step. The lower of the two, (TI), makes the sound active, but as the chord is resting (containing MI), the ear hears this as a clash.

48. The second instance is one in which when the Ima chord receives 4 beats to 8 beats of time, the static sound of the scale degrees can be enhanced by moving the 7th of the major chord to the 6th (TI to LA). This, theoretically, is always an option when you have a I major chord. The same motion is sometimes found when the Ima7 chord is followed by a IVma7. The 3rd of the IVma7 is LA of the scale.

49. The next example demonstrates the use of the 6th, either as a replacement of LA for TI (16a) as a resolution of the 7th to the 6th (16b) or as the 3rd of the IVma7 chord.

Example 16a Dmi7

G7

C6

Example 16b

Dmi7 G7

Cma7 C6(Fma7)

1\
I ~
rJ :"'\
" J .. ~ .. ~ r..
~ -e- u -
-e-
< II

_,_. .....
./ - .. ~
...... ~
'>L_ f"-
<-t
r, ~ '"
" .... r: r:
tJ -6 c:; 7j -
I f
) I m II
"_lIo.. f,,-
,. <-t ....!
./ '" ..., .. ~
- 2

50. In playing your exercises for this lesson, you will be directed to use the 6th of the major chord, in one or another of these contexts.

Dick Grove's JAZZ KEYBOARD 1

PROGD fi

LESSON" 1 '

I I

Play-Along Exercises

© 1994

Grove/Rasch Music Education Systems

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 21

INTRODUCTION

A WORD FROM DICK GROVE:

The most exciting part of this course is how you work, at home, with the information contained in the course. The text part of each lesson is guiding you and giving you priorities. This is in the sense that in proceeding in a step-by-step, programmed teaching approach, each step will enable you to move instinctively to the next. You don't want to get 'ahead of yourself'.

Obviously, as you are involved with a 'performance' oriented goal, 'doing it' becomes the measure of your success. We have organized the material in the course so that you practice each element to achieve that instinctive ability to actually play. Always remember that the goal is to be able to play, and hear what you are playing.

As you go through the many Jazz Keyboard levels, each will continue to add a greater vocabulary of sounds, styles and impressions to your repertoire as a player.

If you want to be a player, then you have to play! That is a problem. If a teacher or book instructs you to "practice this exercise", or "go over this material" - it is really a bit vague. Sitting at your keyboard, you may not understand exactly what the instruction means, and in your attempt to practice, not accomplish the desired result. A lot is left to you to figure out. It is also next to impossible to find live players that will play with you as you go through the necessary exercises to build the abilities you need. We have solved that problem. We're with you at 2:00pm or am.

Our approach is to organize the practicing so that you always know exactly what you should be accomplishing, and making sure that you have a clearly-described structure to follow. That way it is possible to achieve quality practice time. The pay-off to all of this, and the reason that it is so important, is that you will make real progress. You'll see yourself making important strides towards feeling like you really are becoming a player. That motivation, of knowing you are making strides, is the energy you need to get into more complex and demanding situations.

As you receive your lesson each month, you should be able to devote a minimum of 16-24 hours of practice time weekly, absorbing and executing the material. If you can put in more than

six hours a week, say 30 hours of practicing for each chapter, you will be in even better shape. And because our approach helps you so much, you'll accomplish more in time you devote, than you would in 60 hours without our help.

The point we are making is that we will now take the material covered in Lesson 1, and break it down into over 80 play-along tracks for you to practice with. It works like this:

You have received a cassette from us. On this audio supplement, you will be guided through the assignments in the following pages. The instructions, in each case, will direct you to a specific track to play with. Below each exercise number (1 a, 3b, etc) you will find the cassette footage number, when you need to move to different places on the cassette (you will be reviewing exercises as you proceed through the month). You should get the room volume level at a comfortable level so that you can hear yourself play, as well as the tracks.

On each track, there will be a bass and drum accompaniment. On your left channel, you can hear me play what you are supposed to play. At this point you have the option of going to the right channel (so you don't hear me), and you alone are playing with the rhythm section.

Page22

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1

It is very important that, in playing with in jazz style, that you practice with the right 'feel'.

On these and future tracks, Adrian Rosen (bass) and Jack Lacompte (drums) play your rhythm section parts with a great groove and feel. You need to be listening to this as you play. Half of your attention should be on your own playing, and the other half on listening and being sensitive to what is going on behind you. It is sometimes a good idea to tap your foot or move your body as you play. It helps you feel the rhythm more naturally.

At the top of each page you will find the CASSETTE FOOTAGE for each exercise, as well as

the CD TRACK number. There are two CD's: half of the tracks are on COl, the balance on C02.

In each exercise, instructions will give you information about how to practice the material.

To start each track, there will be a two-measure (strong/weak) count off played by Jack on drums. You will hear two measures of time before you start. In some exercises there may be two or four measure repeats, which of course means you repeat each section once. In others, you go through the entire exercise once, and if instructed, repeat the entire exercise once. In many of the exercises, you are shown blank measures, with chord symbols above. The blank measures are for you to use if you need to write in notes that will help you play the voicings. It is best to D.Q1 write in notes, but you may need to. If you do, write them in lightly in pencil, so that you can erase them later, when you are more comfortable playing the exercise.

If you have the equipment at home, it is often helpful to tape yourself, playing with the tracks. Then later you can listen to yourself to determine if, for example, your rhythmic playing is really with the bass and drums. It is all about listening with your ear. It is an easy trap to get into where you are so totally engrossed in playing your part, that you (particularly in the beginning), really don't hear everything else. When playing with a rhythm section,it important is to know what the composite of the entire section sounds like (you and them!).

Organize your practice time. Do not try to play the exercises in a different order that presented in the workbook. Don't move on to the next exercise until you can play with the track, in tempo. We present many tracks in two tempos: the first track slow, and the second tempo moderately fast. I recommend that first you first practice without the tape, to get the notes under your fingers and fully understand how a particular exercise works. Then follow the practice schedule as given at the end of the lesson. This gives you a chance to get the notes under your fingers slowly, and then move to the faster version. (slow tempos first, then faster tempos when you review).

You are encouraged to sing along as your play. You should be singing all the time, either aloud or in your head. If you are not singing, you are not practicing!!

If, in starting to work with the exercises in this first lesson, you have questions or problems, call us. Perhaps we can help.

Here is the good part! Dick Grove

PS - Take a listen to CD TRACK 20 (CD2), or Cassette ( footage 620, side B) - the Dick Grove Trio with Adrian Rosen and Jack Lacompte. The lead sheet for this selection, can be found on pages 76 and 77.

Hope you enjoy it.

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 23

EXER. #1 a:

Cassette: 000

EXERCISE #1 CD1-TRACK #1

EXER. #1 b:

Cassette: 027

1. On Exercises 1 a and 1 b, you are to play major 7th chords in 7 - 3 voicing.

2. VERSION 1: Play through the track placing the 3rd of each major 7th chord on top.

Center the top note between Middle I A' to 'C' above Middle IC' on the keyboard (see bracket). The root is best played in the fundamental register. Play it in this low range, even though there is a bass part on the track. Play Exercise #1 a first.

3. VERSION 2: Now play major 7th chords with the 7th of each chord as the top note.

Play Exercise #1 a first.

4. VERSION 3: Play through the track, voiceleading the 3rds and 7th as smoothly as possible.

With the progression in this track, you will be moving the 3rds and 7ths in an alternating fashion.(Review Diagram #2 on page 13, Panels A and B). Play Exercise #1 a first.

5. The chords are written over blank measures. If you wish, you can write the 3rds and 7ths in on the treble clef. It is best if you do not!, but you can write them lightly, in pencil, and later erase the notes.

6. VERSION 4: Play through the track, voiceleading as above. In this version, resolve the ma7th to the ma6th.

7. The exercises are played through two times on the recording.

MAJOR 7ths

Fma7

Bbma7

Ebma7

Abma7

2 Dbma7(C#ma7)

3

4

Gbma7(F#ma7)

Cbma7(Bma7)

Ema7

6 7 8
Ama7 Dma7 Gma7
:11
10 11 12 Page 24

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1

EXERCISE #2 CD1- TRACK #2

EXER.2a:

Cassette: 052

EXER.2b:

Cassette: 079

1. On Exercises 2a and 2b, you are to play minor 7th chords in 7 - 3 voicing.

2. VERSION 1: Play through the track placing the 3rd of each minor 7th chord on top.

Keep the top note within the bracket shown below and the root in the fundamental register. Play Exercise 2a first.

3. VERSION 2: Now play minor 7th chords with the 7th of each chord as the top note.

Play Exercise 2a first.

4. VERSION 3: Play through the track, voiceleading the 3rds and 7th as smoothly as possible.

With the progression in this track, you will be moving the 3rds and 7ths in an alternating fashion. Play Exercise 2a first.

S. The chords are written over blank measures. If you wish, you can write the 3rds and 7ths in on the treble clef. It is best if you do not!, but you can write them lightly, in pencil, and later erase the notes.

6. The exercises are played through two times on the recording ..

MINOR 7ths

Center Top Note:

I Cmi7 Fmi7 Bbmi7 Ebmi7
~Itl

L 1 2 3 4
Abmi7 Dbmi7(C#mi7) Gbmi7(F#mi7) Cbmi7(Bmi7)
It5
6 7 8
Emi7 Ami7 Dmi7 Gmi7
It9 :11

10 11 12 LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page2S

EXER.3a:

Cassette: 1 03

EXERCISE #3 CD1- TRACK #2

EXER.3b:

Cassette: 129

1. On Exercises 3a and 3b, you are to play dominant 7th chords in 7 - 3 voicing.

2. VERSION 1: Play through the track placing the 3rd of each 7th chord on top. Keep the top note within the bracket shown below and the root in the fundamental register.

Play Exercise 3a first.

3. VERSION 2: Now play 7th chords with the 7th of each chord as the top note.

Play Exercise 3a first.

4. VERSION 3: Play through the track, voiceleading the 3rds and 7th as smoothly as possible.

With the progression in this track, you will be moving the 3rds and 7ths in an alternating fashion. Play Exercise 3a first.

5. The chords are written over blank measures. If you wish, you can write the 3rds and 7ths in on the treble clef. It is best if you do not! So you can write them lightly, in pencil, and later erase the notes.

6. The exercises are played through two times on the recording.

DOMINANT 7ths
:
C7 F7 Bb7 Eb7
[I~i,

2 3 4
Ab7 Db7(C#7) Gb7(F#7) Cb7(B7)
I~s


6 7 8
E7 A7 D7 G7
1~9
:11

10 11 12 Page26

DICK GROVE ~ JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1

EXER.4a:

Cassette: 150

EXERCISE #4 I CD1- TRACK #3

EXER.4b:

Cassette: 176

1. In this set of exercises, you are to voice lead open triads, through the sequence of keys shown below. This exercise also demonstrates how a definitive scale degree changes function, and allows your ear to hear the new key definition.

2. First we have an example of the way you are to practice the exercise. In the example you will see the rhythm with which you play the chords to the track. As the chords change, you are to move each voice to the closest possible note in the next chord. Play with the tracks.

3. The leading tones (shown in reverse print) represent what you should be hearing. You should sing the leading TI - DO movement that occurs each measure. The pivot is shown in bar 1. MI pivots and changes its function a 5th higher, and becomes TI.This pivot reoccurs each bar.

EXAMPLE

C

F

Bb

Eb

,...
I
r-. n .
I . . /"'7
) ~ III m 03 m
m 03 I~lrjll .~I
) ~- ..
" I I , r; .; ? ..
- ./
I - ~ r
"", . 0 . J 2

3

4

Ab

Db

Gb

B

1\ I I I I I
\
/ IL •
,
) ~- 03 03 I m al I
m ~ ~ rIjD
J i ~(2' 7 ,~~ , ~(2'
FJ-' ~ '4 I ~(2'
I - /j .
" fL-
<, / 5

6

7

8

E

A

D

G

C

I /
I '" • r
I
r , ,
) ~ i ;p '\'l am 103 1
03 m m r&j3
) •
! J.I. i~. "" r' ~. - Ii. n. C .. :i&
I • ""11.- . • !"'" -l- f-" -l- N ,/
- ~
9

10

11

12

13

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 27

EXER. Sa:

Cassette: 1 98

EXERCISE #5 CD1-TRACK #3

EXER. Sb:

Cassette: 198

1. In this set of exercises, you are to now voicelead through the chords and key changes in the progression shown below. You are actually playing the example on page 26 by ear, without the notes bei ng written out.

2. You are to use your ear to hear the leading tone (TI), and to hear and be aware of the pivot, wherein MI pivots to become TI of the new key. At that point you should be able to hear the tone a half-step higher that you move into on the downbeat of the next measure.

, 3. Practice slowly, without the play-along track, then move on to Exercise Sa.

C

F

Bb

F.b

1\
I
·
~
1m m a m a m a m
I I
· ·
I •
· 2

3

4

Ab

Db

Gb

B

1\
I
~
< a m a m a m D3 m
I •
, /l_O
5

6

7

8

E

A

D

G

C

1\
I

) ~ a m a m a m am a
J
I •

9

10

11

12

13

Page28

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1

EXERCISE #6 CD1- TRACK #4

EXER.6a:

Cassette: 205

EXER.6b:

Cassette: 228

1. In this set of exercises, you are to voicelead open triads, through the sequence of keys shown below. This exercise also demonstrates how a definitive scale degree changes function, and allows your ear to hear the new key definition. The 12-bar sequence is played twice on the track.

2. Notice the top voice. It ascends by half-step in bars 1 - 6 and 9 - 13. The bottom voice ascends chromatically each measure. As the chords change, you are to move each voice to the closest possible note in the next chord. The chord symbol qualifies the chord type (rna], min.)

3. The leading tones (shown in reverse print) represent what you should be hearing. You should sing the leading TI - DO movement that occurs each measure. The pivot is shown in bar 1. MI pivots and changes its function a 5th higher, and becomes TI.This pivot reoccurs each bar.

EXAMPLE

C

Emi

E

A

Dmi

B

2

F

D

G

fI
,
. .
) ~ -6. .. c.. • • " . •
5~ .!J , ]IJ ,
6 7 8
0_·
_j,_Jt,_. ~ ! L>_. - fL ..... '- • -- t:. •
, • . r /
E

Ami

F#

Bmi

fI I I
, " -; . ~
~-
. .
~ - - - - n n
< 9 , , 11 ]IJ ,
12
II : 10 1 ~ , 0
. .
I _L. .n. .I LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 29

EXER.7a:

Cassette: 247

EXERCISE #7 CD1-TRACK #4

EXER.7b:

Cassette: 271

1. Exercise 7 is the same exercise but in the key of F. Again, you are to voicelead the three voices by ear, following the triad chord symbols and the leading bottom voice. The reverse print solfeg will guide you as you play The 12-bar sequence is played twice on the track.

2. As the chords change, you are to move each voice to the closest possible note in the next chord. The chord symbol qualifies the chord type (rna], min.)

3. Sing the solfeg bottom voice as you play. You are now transposing, and letting your ear guide you fingers as you play.

KEY OF 'F'

F

D

Gmi

E

1\ I I
,
,'"' V 14 . _-
~
1 I!I .. 2m 3a 4m
~ .
· .
I • Ami

A

Bb

G

C

1\
(

~
sum m 6a 7m aa
f ·
6_·
A

Dmi

B

Emi

f1_
( .

) .J 9m lOa m 12 a
) 11
( •

1----

Page30

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1

EXERCISE #8 CD1- TRACK #5

EXER.8a:

Cassette: 290

EXER.8b:

Cassette: 31 2

1. Exercise 8 is now in the key of G. Follow the same approach as Exercises #6 and 7.

The 12-bar sequence is played twice on the track.

2. Remember to sing the solfeg bottom voice as you play. You are now transposing, and letting your ear guide you fingers as you play

KEY OF 'G'

G

E

Ami

F#

" Jot
, ~

) .J -d. -,J
~ m rI3 m
)
I :-lo~_'" -"-
• .
2

3

4

Bmi

B

C

A

D

1\ Jot
I I(
~
< Ii! m rI3 m rI3
I ~.'"
·
5

6

7

8

B

Emi

C#

F#mi

1\ _~
I
,'""
t.l
m rI3 m rI3
I •

9

10

11

12

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE· JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 31

EXER.9a:

Cassette: 329

EXERCISE #9 COl-TRACK #5

EXER.9b:

Cassette: 348

1. Exercise 9 is now in the key of Bb. Follow the same approach as in the previous exercises.

The 12-bar sequence is played twice on the track.

2. Remember to sing the solfeg bottom voice as you play. You are now transposing, and letting your ear guide you fingers as you play. Try to get a sense of 'hearing ahead' as you move through the progression. This means that you have an aural sense of where you are going to move (in the next measure), before you get there.

KEY OF 'Bb'

Bb

G

Cmi

A

fI I
,
~~. .'":1:
~ "'. •
1 ~ 2m 3. 4 m
·
I .,.

I I Dmi

D

Eb

C

F

fI I
(

~
< 5113 m 6. 7m 8.
( ·
·
D

Gmi

E

Ami

fI I
( lL [)

) ~
9m 10. 11 m 12 •
)
( ·
_L.
Page32

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1

EXER. lOa:

Cassette: 365

,

. EXERCISE #10

CD1- TRAcK #6

EXER. lob:

Cassette: 384

1. Exercise lOis the same as Exercise 9, but without the notes written out. The top note moves up chromatically, and in each instance, every sharped tone of the Ie scale pivots and functions as II of the new key center. You are to play, voiceleading the progression, following the natural resolutions.

2. Play all dominant 7th chords as 7 - 3 voicings, and I major chords as only two roots and a 3rd.

You are playing the notes the scale degrees naturally lead to. Try to hear this!

3. As you play the exercise, sing DO, DO - II, II - DO. Your ear needs to hear the modulation, and the FA and II define each new key. The reversed type details the actual pivots.

KEY Of Ie'

C

A7

D

B7

II.
, 1'.

@J ",. rsI~ ~~ : ~ , .. ~~ : ~
!: . "I ~
< DID DID
II
( •
·

1~' ~ 2 3 -d. -,J 4 E

C7

F

D7

G

II.
,
.
) @J ,.:::: b-i- ~. ~ 1'-6 • ... !:. "I
#!: .
) om II om DID om
( .~.
·
.
5 4' ~ o· ... 7 -d . -,J 8 .,
6 II.
, ~'L
,~ ff. •
)~- • ~-6' .. ~c..' ~
om DID om II om
t •
,.

9 4' .. 10 11 ~ o : ., 12 - 13 it E7

A

F#7

B

G7

C

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 33

EXER. 11 a:

Cassette: 401

EXERCISE #11 TRACK #5

EXER. 11 b:

Cassette: 420

1. Exercise 11 now takes page 34 into the key of 'F'. The top note moves up chromatically, and in each instance, every sharped tone of the 'E' scale pivots and functions as II of the new key center.You are to play, voiceleading the progression, following the natural resolutions.

2. Play all dominant 7th chords as 7 - 3 voicings, and I major chords as only two roots and a 3rd.

You are playing the notes the scale degrees naturally lead to. Try to hear this!

3. As you play the exercise, sing DO, DO - II, II - DO. Your ear needs to hear the modulation, and the FA and II define each new key. The reversed type details the actual pivots.

KEY OF 'F'

F

07

G

E7

II
, \L ,.

) ~ -It ~
) •• - ti3 -
( •
·

o· • 2

3

4

A

F7

Bb

G7

C

II
~
._;
} ti3 m ti3 - ti3
I •
'1· 5

6

7

8

A7

D

B7

E

C7

F

II
I w

~
- ti3 - ti3 m ti3

I ·
9

10

11

12

13

Page34

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1

EXERCISE #12 TRACK #6

EXER.12a:

Cassette: 436

EXER.12b:

Cassette: 456

1. Exercise 12 now takes the example shown in Exercise 10 into the key of 'G'. You are to play voiceleading the progression,in the same manner as the last two exercises.

2. Again, try to 'hear ahead', Singing the solfeg is anatural technique to accomplish this.

Remember, the singing connects your fingers to your ear. The leading half-steps of the key, in this case TI to DO focuses on what you are trying to hear. When we do this, this way, we are hearing harmony as melody!

KEY OF 'G'

G

E7

A

F#7

fI _~
,n:o.. lL .
) ~ £I ..
) III !i3 III
f •
,. 2

3

4

B

G7

C

A7

o

fI ~
, OJ

) ~
) !i3 II !i3 III !i3
f ·
·
5

6

7

8

B7

E

C#7

F#

07

G

fI ~
, OJ ,if

) ~
III !i3 III !i3 II !i3
}
I •
·
9

10

11

12

13

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 35

EXERCISE #13 TRACK #6

EXER.13a:

Cassette: 471

EXER.13b:

Cassette: 490

1. Exercise 13 now takes example shown on page 32 into the key of 'Bb'. You are to play, voiceleading the progression,in the same manner as the last two exercises.

2. What you should be discovering is that the 'sound' of the definitive scale degrees, within every possible key center, is exactly the same. Your ear is memorizing this 'sound', and gradually learning it to the point that it is instinctive.

KEY OF 'Bb'

Bb

G7

C

A7

fI I
,~
-':::I:
} ~ Z·rI~
~. ~ mill 113 mill
) ••
I •
·

1 :d. ~ 2 3 4 D

Bb7

Eb

C7

F

fI I
I [J
-,~
~
< 113 m 113 mill 113
·
I I. [J
5

6

7

8

D7

G

E7

A

F7

Bb

fI I
,

~
) mill 113 mill 113m 113
f ·

L _h_ 9

10

11

12

13

Page 36

DICK GROVE· JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1

EXERCISE #14 TRACK #7

EXER.14a:

Cassette: 505

EXER.14b:

Cassette: 524

1. Exercise 12 is a progression of changing key centers in which each flatted tone of the scale of the key signature (Bb, Ab, etc.), pivots and become the definitive tone FA, of the new key center. You are to read the notes, and play with the tracks, noticing the pivots and leading tones.

2. All chords are either the V7 or I triad of a key center. They are to be voiced in a spread voicing as they move through the progression. Notice that the top note moves down chromatically through the entire octave, and in doing so, moves into the keys of 'F', 'Bb', 'Ab', 'C', 'Bb', 'Ab', back to the key of 'C'. When scale tones are sharped, they pivot and become TI of the new key. In Exercise #14, the scale tones are lowered, pivoting to function as FA of the new key.

KEY OF -c

EXAMPLE

c

C7

f

Cma7

Bb7

II- I
, .
.
'"'-lL .. ":10 ....!.
) ~ ,- , -6' , .. c. • , •
) 1 111 I IIB1 II III
I I
( •
·
_'""
U' • 2

3

Eb

Ab7

Db

G7

C

4

f7

1\
, I.

) ~ ~', .. VL.o', .. 4', ... -d., --- ~,
~' :4j !::. "ill
} II III I III '~~l'JI. om

I ·
· OC' ~
-
11 tJ4' .. - -
10 12 13 5 tJ4'

7 ~-d, Ab

-

8~' Ab7 G7

6

Bb

Eb7

u'

9

C

14

r

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 37

EXER.15a: 539

EXERCISE #15 TRACK #7

EXER.15b: 557

1. Exercise #15 now transposes this progression into the key of 'G'.

KEY OF 'G'

G

Gma7 G7

C

F7

_'" jf_ rJ·
I

~
) iii III II ram
( • .
·
Lt:_ 2

3

4

Bb

Eb7

Ab

D7

G

C7

1\ ..
I

~
< II ram II II II -
l •
'I· l/l_ 5

6

7

8

9

" J,f
I ~

) .J II ram
} II lEI mm
I ·
'I. iIl_ F

Bb7

Eb

E b7 D7

G

10

11

12

13

14

EXER.16a: 572

EXERCISE.#16 TRACK #7

LESSON 1 I
I
I
EXER.16b:
590
I
I
I
I Page38

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Ab

Db7

Gb

Gb7 F7

Bb

I I I I I I I I I I I I

1. Exercise #16 now transposes this progression into the key of 'Bb'.

KEY OF 'Bb'

Bb

Bbma7 Bb7 Eb

Ab7

1\ I
, ~ [J LL
~IJ_
) ~ " . •
m l1li II - I
I
)
f •

. , 2

3

4

Db

Gb7

Cb

F7

Bb

Eb7

1\ I
,
I
~J
) ~ II - II II II -
)
f L:h
5

6

7

8

9

1\ I
I
~J
) ~ II - II l1li r:!
}
I _j;:1o..

10

11

12

13

14

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 39

EXERCISE #17 TRACK #8

EXER.17a: EXER.17b:

605 623

1. In this series of exercises we evolve to 4-part harmony, and adding the definitive IImi7 chord in front of the V7 of each key center. This makes the progression more sophisticated, as the scale degree resolutions are less obvious. This also makes it more difficult to hear, as we move from key center to key center.

2. The IImi7 chords added on this progression are based on page 32 (V7 - I). It features a leading line that ascends up the scale of the key signature. The IIm7 prepares the altered tone, and uses a scale degree pivot that does not move by half-step. Instead it moves DO to RE, and then RE pivots and becomes DO of the new key.

1'1
, " --"::L
,.j
._} ?l! .. ~i #~~~ • IJ:"H~
~~
< iii iii
• •
f ·

--'::I- .~
1 - 2 -6 3 -d. 4 ~u EXAMPLE

Cma7

C

Emi7

Ema7 C7

fma7

KEY OF 'C'

A7 Oma7

f#mi7 B7

D

f

Ami7

G

D7

Gma7

I\_
,
_...t
.
) ._} #H~ ~t ~ .::::..... ~'4~ "u
&. ~1iI
) •
( •


-6 ~ 6u -d ~
5 7 8 Bmi7 E7

Ama7

A

C#mi7 F#7

Cma7

Bma7 G7

11 #

12

13

Ama7 F7

Bbma7

Bb Dmi7

G7

Cma7

C

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

Page 40 DICK GROVE· JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1 I

I I I

, EXERCISE #18

I

I TRACK#8

EXER. l8a: EXER. l8b:

637 652

1. Exercise #18 transposes the Example on page 39 into the key of 'F'. Using the 7 - 3 voicing I throughout, voicelead the leading tones, using the solfeg 'cues' to prompt you as to the 'top note' leading scale degrees.

KEY OF IF'

Fma7

F

Ami7 D7 Gma7

G

Bmi7 E7

1\
,
,
.... '-<J . •
~ .::::__
e-
iii 03 'iJiHI" iii 03 'iiri':,'

f ~.
·
./ h
~ 2

3

4

1\
,

) ~
iii iii m 03 'iiri':" m II am
}

f ·
·
.z 5

6

7

8

Emi7 A7

Dma7

D

F#mi7 B7

Ema7 C7

Fma7

I\_
I

~
~ i~ri.r,' iii m Dl 'AWlt., iii iii iii m

( ·
·
9

10

11

12

13

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 41

EXER.19a: 665

EXERCISE #19 TRACK #9

EXER.19b: 680

1. Exercise #19 transposes the example on page 39 into the key of 'G'. Again, try to 'hear ahead' as you are playing. Concentrate on listening to the bass part on the track. Your eyes see the chords, your ear hears the leading tones, and also the reinforcement from the bass and drums.

KEY OF 'G'

Gma7 G

Bmi7 E7

Ama7

A

C#mi7 F#7

II ~ I
,
.
) ~ U"
iii D! 'iJij':n iii D! 'iJM':"
)
f ·
·
2

3

4

Bma7 G7

Cma7

C

Emi7

A7

Dma7

D

, ~
/If
~
) iii iii iii D! '9+':" iii iii D!

I •

5

6

7

8

F#mi7 B7

Ema7

E

G#mi7 C#7

F#ma7 D7

Gma7

II ~
l .~ I/l_

~
'iiM·I., iii iii D! 'ii!1.r·, iii iii iii iii


I ·
9

10

11

12

13

EXER.20b: 707

I I I I

Page 42

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1

EXER.20a: 693

EXERCISE #20 TRACK #9

1. Now Exercise #20 transposes the example on page 39 into the key of 'Bb'. Listen to the feel

of the strong and weak measures as you play. The rhythm section is defining the 'time' in I their way, just as the leading tones are defining the active/resting chords, and the pivot tones.

Ebma7

Eb Gm;7

(7

Fma7

F

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

KEY OF 'Rh'

Bbma7

Bb

Dmi7

G7 Cma7

c

Emi7 A7

f\ I
,
I
) ~ ~ -,J 4-
II 113 iiift.:" II 113 'jiM':"
)
f •

1- U

Dma7 Bb7

2

3

4

f\ I
,

tJ
II II m 113 'iJ'i':,' II II 113

I ·

./ " 5

6

7

8

Ami7 D7

Gma7

G

Bmi7 E7

Ama7 F7

Bbma7

fI I
I lih

~
'iift-:.) II II 113 ',ift.:.J II II II m

·
I •
v 9

10

11

12

13

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 43

EXERCISE #2tL TRACK #9

EXER. 21 b: 734

I EXER.21a: 720

1. In Exercise #21 you are to transpose the progression into the key of 'Ab'. This is our first track in the key of four flats. Although you may be familiar with chord and scale spelling in this key, the physical aspect of playing, relative to this key may be more difficult at first.

KEY OF lAb'

Abma7 Ab

Bbma7

Dmi7 G7

Bb

Cmi7 F7

" I I I
I \J [.I h_ r..
f-"
~ -e- I
< iii Ii! 'SM':·' iii Ii! ',iMII.i

( ·
,. [j, h_ q 2

3

4

Cma7

Ab7

Ebma7 Eb

Dbma7

Db Fmi7 Bb7

" I I
~

) t.l
iii iii iii Ii! ',IM':') iii iii Ii!
)

I ·
, ,. [J h 5

6

7

8

Gmi7 C7

Cma7 Eb7 Abma7

Fma7

F

Ami7 D7

-" J I
I

) t.l 'iiM':" iii iii Ii! 'Sh':" iii iii iii iii
}

I ~.
·
v 9

10

12

13

11

Page44

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1 I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

EXER.22a: 745

EXERCISE #22 TRACK #10>·

EXER.22b: 762

KEY OF -c

Gmi7

Fmi7

Bb7

1. This series of exercises again uses the definitive IImi7 chord in front of the V7 of each key center. This makes the progression more sophisticated, as the scale degree resolutions are less obvious. This also makes it more difficult to hear, as we move from key center to key center.

2. The IImi7 chords added on this progression are based on page 36 (V7 - I). It features a leading line that descends down the scale of the key signature. The pivots are shown in reverse print, and you will find, easier to 'hear' than the previous series of exercises, beginning with Exercise 17.

3. The 'line' starts on TI of the key signature, and descends one octave.

EXAMPLE

Cma7

Ebma7

C7 Fma7

2

Ebmi7

Ab7

Dbma7

Dmi7 G7

'\
~
. s-.
t.! u.~ • V CJ ~ ~ ~~ ..
• ~~I:r.H'.:..
5 6 7
l ·

L
174' .. 174 P-d· -,; -d 1\
IJ
I
~v
) t.! 9i~ i I ,Di .::: ~:iiI ~ b'iiJ
~
) 11
12
I •
·

~. -J ~ 0 b~· ~ J~ p-e
Co Cma7

Cmi7

Bbma7

Eb7

ntinued

Bbmi7

F7

I I I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE· JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 45

I Exercise #22, Continued

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

Abma7

Dmi7 G7

Cma7

I
,

._j f~ ~ ~ ~ !': nit! II
u ...... \ _,u
13 • 15 16
f .
.
.
I ~ - - I EXER.23a: 775

EXER.23b: 791

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

Page46

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1 I

EXERCISE #23 TRACK #1 0'

1. You are now to play the sequence shown on pages 44 and 45 in the key of 'F'.

2. Remember to sing the top note, in solfeg, descending chromatically from TI in bar 1, to bar 15.

KEY OF 'F'

Fma7

Cmi7

F7 Bbma7

Bbmi7 Eb7

"
.
I I<, h .,..
~ I I
II '41Mtj II '41Mtj
~
1 2 3 4
( ·
• _!'"' Abma7

Abmi7

Db7

Gbma7

Gmi7 C7

1\
,

) tJ II '3'Mti II 131!~~t
} 5 6 7 8
( •

v Fma7

Fmi7

Bb7

Ebma7

Ebmi7 Ab7

fl.
) ~ II 14IMt;t II I4IWfd
)
9 10 11 12
( •

Continued

I I I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 47

I Exercise #23, Continued

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

Dbma7

Gmi7

C7

Fma7

I't
, " ·

~ II '3iN·n,

13 14 15 16

I • ·
· Page48

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1 I
I
I

I

e, I
ould
I
I
I
I

I
I

I
I

I
I
I

I
I


ontinued
I EXER.24a:

Side B - 002

EXERCISE #24 TRACK #11

1. Transpose the sequence shown on pages 44 and 45 into the key of 'G'.

2. For added eartraining, you can also play an exercise like this, and try to sing the 2nd voic in solfeg, with the scale tones that pivot into each new momentary key center. This one w start: MI - FA/DO: TI - TE/DO, etc.

Gma7

Bbma7

5

Gma7

9

EXER.24b: 38

c

KEY Of 'G'

Dmi7 G7

Cmi7

F7

Cma7

WitJ¥i

2

4

3

Bbmi7 Eb7

Abma7

Ami7 D7

'4"1"

6

'3'H"

7

8

Gmi7

C7

Fma7

Fmi7 Bb7

'i't1"

'atria

12

11

10

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE m JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 49

Exercise #24, Continued

Ebma7

Ami7

D7

Gma7

fI ~
I

~ II iiitJ.r"

13 14 15 16
f •

Page 50 DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1 I

I I I I I I

EXER. 25a: EXER. 25b:

65 98

1. Transpose this same sequence into 'Eb'.

2. For added eartraining, you can also play an exercise like this, and try to sing the 2nd voice,

in solfeg, with the scale tones that pivot into each new momentary key center. This one would start: MI - FA/DO: TI - TE/DO, etc.

Continued

I I I I I I I I I I I I

KEY OF 'Eb'

Ebma7

Bbmi7 Eb7 Abma7

Abmi7 Db7

1\ I
, .
~ r-
~ III I '31ini II 'Mb"

) 1 2 3 I 4

I • .

I I Gbma7

Gbmi7 Cb7

Fbma7

Fmi7 Bb7

11 J
,

) ~ II 'MH¥i II 'itt~fj

)
5 6 7 8
( •

I': t1 Ebma7

Ebmi7

Ab7

Dbma7

Dbmi7 Gb7

1\ I
, 11 b

) ~ II MiHfj II 'i'Wl;l

) 9 10 11 12
( ·
·

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 51

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

Exercise #25, Continued

Cbma7

Fmi7

Bb7

Ebma7

, I
, f~
·

) .J II iiitJ1I"

)
13 14 15 16
, •
• ·
/' · LESSON 1 I
I
I

EXER.26b I
:
152 I
Page52

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

EXER.26a: 122

1. Transpose this same sequence into 'Db'.

2. For added eartraining, you can also play an exercise like this, and try to sing the 2nd voice,

in solfeg, with the scale tones that pivot into each new momentary key center. This one would start: MI - FA/DO: TI - TE/DO, etc.

3. This key has more black keys than previous exercises. Be conscious of the scale degree leading and you will find that these more involved keys will not be so difficult.

KEY OF 'Db'

Dbma7

Abmi7 Db7 Gbma7

F#mi7 B7

'MhO

4

II

'@!1M II

2

3

Ema7

Emi7 A7

Ebmi7Ab7

Dma7

II

II

'&itit'

6

5

7

8

Dbma7

Dbmi7 Gb7

Bmi7 E7

Cbma7

II

II

"'m

10

I'ril

12

11

9

I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I

Continued

I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 53

I I I I I I I

-I I I I I I I I I I I

Exercise #26, Continued

Ama7

Ebmi7 Ab7

Dbma7

I\. I I
I
~l.f v
t.l II '3'N·m

13 14 15 16
f .:lI.o
°
Page54

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1

I I I I

EXER.27a:

Cassette: 175

1. Exercise #27 features the 'jazz blues progression' discussed in Chapter 9 of the 'See It' course. I In the more basic blues context, all chord forms are dominant, which supports the 'modified'

major scale, or 'Blues scale'.

2. You can see, when playing the example below, that the definitive tones (Srds and b7ths) of the I dominant chords, all lead by half-step, except for the turnaround measures 15 and 16.

3. This 7 - 3 setting therefore, lets your ear 'hear ahead' in a very natural way. We can hear the I

'Blues' without pivoting, with all tones relative to the key signature.

4. Play 3 x's.

I

I

C7

EXERCISE #27

.' TRACK #12

EXER.27b:

Cassette: 212

BLUES IN IC'
F7 C7
2 6;)m 3 u. 4 I I I I I I I I I I

C7

• •

&
F7 C7 B7 Bb7 A7
II 8 ~. 6

07 G7 C7 A7 Ab7 G7

·
·

#& 10 ~ Ii. ~
9 6~ 11


·

U LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page SS

EXER.28a:

Cassette: 237

EXERCISE #28 TRACK #12

EXER.28b:

Cassette: 266

1. Exercise #28 now transposes the 'Blues' into 'F'.

2. Sing the top note definitive tones (3rds and b7ths) of the dominant chords, all leading by halfstep, except for the turnaround measures 15 and 16.

3. Play 3 x's.

BLUES IN IF'

fJ.
,

) ~ II II II
)
1 2 3 4
( •

U F7

Bb7

F7

F7

Bb7

Bb7

F7

E7 Eb7

07

II

5

6

II iii iii

7

iii

8

G7

C7

F7

07

Db7

C7

fJ.
,
1m. "
) ~ m! iii II ED II II
) 9 10 11 12
I ·
·
Page56

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

EXER.29a:

Cassette: 289

10 Exercise #28 now transposes the 'Blues' into 'G'.

1. Sing the top note definitive tones (3rds and b7ths) of the dominant chords, all leading by halfstep, except for the turnaround measures 15 and 16.

3. Play 3 x's.

G7

C7

II

5

A7

m3

9

EXERCISE #29 TRACK #13

EXER.29b:

Cassette: 31 6

BLUES IN 'G'

C7

G7

G7

4

II

II

2

3

C7

G7

E7

F#7 F7

111111 II

7 8

6

D7

Eb7

D7

G7

E7

II

11

10

12

LESSON 1 I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE ~ JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 57

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

EXER.30a:

Cassette: 337

EXERCIS_E #30 TRACK #13

EXER.30b:

Cassette: 364

1. Our last exercise in this series will transpose the 'Blues' into 'Bb'.

2. Sing the top note definitive tones (3rds and b7ths) of the dominant chords, all leading by halfstep, except for the turnaround measures 15 and 16.

3. Play 3 x's.

BLUES IN 'Bb'

Bb7

Eb7

Bb7

Bb7

1\ I
, ,.

) ~ II 1m II
) 1 2 3 4
t •
,. ... Eb7

Eb7

Bb7 A7 Ab7

G7

1\ I
l
t II IImm
m
5 6 7 8

I ·
C7

F7

Bb7

G7

C7

F7

1\ I
I
(Lr"I. v
~ lJ3 iii iii II &I II
<
9 10 11 12

I ·
L _h Page58

DICK GROVE ~ JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1 I

EXER. 31:

Cassette: 384

EXERCISE #31 . TRACK#14

I I I I I I

1. This series of exercises works with the IImi7 - V7 -lma7 combinations detailed in the textbook on pages 6 - 9.

2. You are to play the 7 - 3 voicing setting, while you sing the definitive line shown on the music.

You are given a 'lead sheet' single stave. As you move from one combination to the next, voicelead as smoothly as possible.

3. You are determining your voicings from the chord symbols, and singing the definitive note melody shown. Each two-measure combination repeats once! The entire exercise is played once.

4. The point of the exercise is to gain familiarity with any possible combination of active and resting definitive "mi7 - Y7 - Ima7 chords.

KEY OF IC'

I I

I

Dmi7 G7 Cma7 Cma7 Dmi7 G7
I~i, J j J J 1 J J. :111: J l 1 J j J J :11
2 3 4 Dmi7 G7 Dmi7 G7 Cma7 G7 Cma7 G7

I ~II) J J J 16 J J J J :III) J J J I) J J ~

:11

I I I I I I

G7 Cma7 G7 Cma7 Cma7 Dmi7 Cma7 Dmi7

I ~II) J J J I) J J J :111) J J J I) J J J

:11

G7

I~II: j J

G7 Cma7 Cma7
I J J :111: ] J I J ] :11
14 15 16
Dmi7
1 J J :11
18 I I I

13

Dmi7

I ~II: J J

17

I I

I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE ~ JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 59

EXERCISE #32 TRACK #14

EXER.32: I

Cassette: 41 0

1. This is the same as the previous example, using the IImi7 - V7 -lma7 combinations detailed in the textbook on pages 6 - 9, played in the key of 'F', without the definitive tones written in.

2. You are to play the 7 - 3 voicing setting, while you sing the definitive line. At this point, you are not reading the definitive tones, although you have blank line with which to write them in if necessary. It is preferred that you only look at the chord symbol, and from that, sing the line and play the voicings.

3. You are determining your voicings and singing the definitive scale degrees from the chord symbols. Remember - Each two-measure combination repeats once! The entire exercise is played once.

KEY OF IF'

Gmi7 C7 Fma7 Fma7 Gmi7 C7
I~~ i :111: :11

1 2 3 4
Gmi7 C7 Gmi7 C7 Fma7 C7 fma7 C7
I~ ~ II: :111: :11

5 6 7 8
C7 Fma7 C7 Fma7 Fma7 Gmi7 Fma7 Gmi7
I f ~ II: 9 :1 I I: :11

10 11 12
If ~ II: C7 C7 Fma7 Fma7
:111: :11

13 14 15 16
Gmi7 Gmi7
If ~ II: :11

17 18 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

Page 60

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1 I

EXER.33: I Cassette: 433

1. This is the same as the previous example, using the IImi7 - V7 - Ima7 combinations detailed in the textbook on pages 6 - 9.

2. You are to play the 7 - 3 voicing setting, while you sing the definitive line. At this point, you are not reading the definitive tones, although you have blank line with which to write them in if necessary. It is preferred that you only look at the chord symbol, and from that, sing the line and play the voicings.

3. You are determining your voicings and singing the definitive scale degrees from the chord symbols. Remember - Each two-measure combination repeats once! The entire exercise is played once.

KEY OF 'G'

Ami7 D7 Gma7 Gma7 Ami7 07
I~~ 1 :111: :11

1 2 3 4
, Ami7 D7 Ami7 07 Gma7 07 Gma7 D7
I~ # II: :111 : :11

6 7 8
I ~ j 11:9 D7 Gma7 D7 Gma7 Gma7 Ami7 Gma7 Ami7
:111: :11

10 11 12
I~ # II: D7 07 Gma7 Gma7
:111: :11

13 14 15 16
I ~ ti II: Ami7 Ami7
:11

17 18 •

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 61

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

EXER.34:

Cassette: 456

1. Now you are to play the 7 - 3 voicing setting (shown in the Example 7, pages 6 - 9), while you sing the definitive line in the key of 'Bb'.

2. You are determining your voicings and singing the definitive scale degrees from the chord symbols. Remember - Each two-measure combination repeats once!

KEY OF 'Bb'

Cmi7 F7 Bbma7 Bbma7 Cmi7 F7
I ~ ~I> t :111: :'1

1 2 3 4
I ~ ~I, II: Cmi7 F7 Cmi7 F7 Bbma7 F7 Bbma7 F7
:111: :11

5 6 7 8
I ~ ~Il It F7 Bbma7 F7 Bbma7 Bbma7 Cmi7 Bbma7 Cmi7
:111: :11

10 11 12
I ~ ~llll: F7 F7 Bbma7 Bbma7
:111: :11

13 14 15 16
I ~ ~llll: Cmi7 Cmi7
:11

17 18 Ebma7

Ebma7

Fmi7 Bb7

LESSON 1 I
I
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DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

EXER.35:

Cassette: 481

1. Continue this series of exercises, this time in the key of 'Eb'

2. Remember - Each two-measure combination repeats once! The entire exercise is played once.

KEY OF 'Eb'

Bb7

Ebma7

:11 I
4
Bb7 Ebma7 Bb7 I
:11
I
8
Fmi7 Ebma7 Fmi7
:11 I
12
Ebma7 I
:11 I
16
I
I
I 2

3

Fmi7 Bb7 Fmi7 Bb7 Ebma7

I ~ ~I'I, II: :111:

5 6 7

Bb7 Ebma7 Bb7 Ebma7 Ebma7

I ~ ~I'I, II: :111:

9 10 11

13

14

15

Fmi7

Fmi7

17

18

I I I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 63

I I

EXER.36:

Cassette: 502

EXERCISE #36 TRACK #16

I I

1. This series of exercises work with the plural substitutes of each major scale. The 2-bar segments of the exercise are typical progressions that combine definitive IImi7 - V7 - Ima7 chords with the "lmi7, IVma7 and Vlmi7 plural substitutes.

2. As you practice Exercise #37 with the play-along tracks, sing the leading tones written in treble clef as you play the 7 - 3 over root setting of chord voicings.

3. Each two-measure combination repeats once! The entire exercise is played once.

II I

KEY OF -c

I

I I

Emi7 Ami7 Dmi7 G7 Cma7

I ~ i J j j J I J J J Jill: J

Dmi7 Emi7

j J J I J J

:11

I I

1 2 3

Fma7 G7 Cma7 Fma7 Emi7

I ~ lid j J F I F J :111: j J j J I J J j J :11

5 6 7 8

4

Dmi7

Cma7

I I

I I

13 14 15 J 16

~ Cma7 Emi7 Fma7

I ==::11: j ::t J J I J J :11

17'" 18

J

:11

I

Page 64

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1 I

EXER.37:

Cassette: 524

EXERCISE #37 TRACK#16

I I

I I

1. This exercises works with the plural substitutes in the key of IF'. Each two-bar segment repeats once.The entire exercise is played once. In this version, the scale degree definitive tones (3rds and 7ths), are not written out for you.

2. As you practice Exercise #38 with the play-along tracks, sing the leading tones written in treble clef as you play the 7 - 3 over root setting of chord voicings.

I I

KEY OF 'F'

I I

Ami7 Dmi7 Gmi7 C7 Fma7 Gmi7 Ami7
I'~ ! :111: :11

2 3 4
Bbma7 C7 Fma7 Bbma7 Ami7 Gmi7 Fma7
I' ~ II: :111: :11

5 6 7 8
I~ ~ II: Fma7 Dmi7 Gmi7 C7 Fma7 Gmi7 Ami7 Bbma7
:111: :11

9 10 11 12
I~ ~ II: Ami7 Gmi7 Fma7 Fma7 Dmi7
:111: :11

13 14 15 16
Fma7 Ami7 Bbma7
I~~II: :11

17 18 I

I I

I I I I II I I

rl

I I

I I I I

I

I

I I I

~I I I I

I I I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE e JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 65

EXERCISE #38 TRACK #16

EXER.38:

Cassette: 544

1. This exercises works with the plural substitutes in the key of 'G'. Each two-bar segment repeats once. The entire exercise is played once. Like Exercise #38, the scale degree definitive tones (3rds and 7ths), are not written out for you.

2. As you practice Exercise #39 with the play-along tracks, sing the leading tones written in treble clef as you play the 7 - 3 over root setting of chord voicings.

KEY OF 'G'

I,j Bmi7 Emi7 Ami7 07 Gma7 Ami7 Bmi7
a :111: :11

2 3 4
Cma7 D7 Gma7 Cma7 Bmi7 Ami7 Gma7
I' j II: :111: :11

5 6 7 8
I,jll: Gma7 Emi7 Ami7 07 Gma7 Ami7 Bmi7 Cma7
:111: :11

9 10 11 12
, j 8mi7 Ami7 Gma7 Gma7 Emi7
:111: :11
I II:
13 14 15 16
I' j II: Gma7 Bmi7 Cma7
:11

17 18 Page 66

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1

l~ I I I I I I I I II II

I I I I I I I I

EXER.39: I

Cassette: 564

EXERCISE #39 ·TRACK4fl7!

1. This exercises works with the plural substitutes in the key of 'Bb'. Each two-bar segment repeats once. The entire exercise is played once.

2. As you practice Exercise #40 with the play-along tracks, sing the leading tones written in treble clef as you play the 7 - 3 over root setting of chord voicings.

KEY OF 'Rb'

Dmi7 Gmi7 Cmi7 F7 Bbma7 Cmi7 Dmi7
I~ ~11 1 :111: :11

1 2 3 4
Ebma7 F7 Bbma7 Ebma7 Dmi7 Cmi7 Bbma7
I ~ lib II: :111: :11

5 6 7 8
I ~ ~lllt Bbma7 Gmi7 Cmi7 F7 Bbma7 Cmi7 Dmi7 Ebma7
:111: :11

10 11 12
I ~ ~b II: Dmi7 Cmi7 Bbma7 Bbma7 Gmi7
:111: :11

13 14 15 16
I ~ ~b II: Bbma7 Dmi7 Ebma7
:11


17 18 •

LESSON 1

Page 67

I

I I

I

I II

I

I

I I

I I I

I

I I

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

THE HOME STRETCH!

The last exercises for this lesson concentrate on modulating from key center to key center. As the text mentioned, it is possible for a scale tone to pivot and then function as any other scale degree. This means that if you are in the key center of 'C', it is possible to modulate to eleven other major keys.

The 'sound' of each of these modulations can be learned, and our goal is to experience what each of these 'sound like' by the end of the course. In each lesson we will practice two of the possible modulations. The following exercises, from this point in this lesson, will focus on the first two of these eleven modulations.

These exercises summarize many of the points made in Lesson 1, and offer you a way to recap the concepts and ideas that have been introduced and practiced, up to this point.

The exercises present the substance of what you are to play, and in a sense, Exercises #40 and #42 give you the answers (the voicings are all written out for you, and the definitive scale degree line is also written out).

Exercises #41 and 43 then present the same series of key centers, but on Iy give you the chord symbols, and you are supposed to play the voicings and sing the line as you play. What you will find, as you practice the written version, is that the exercises are all sequenced, meaning that the 'pattern' of the key change is the same each time.

Your ear will now recognize this, and the sound will become very comfortable. That is exactly what the goal of the lesson is about. If it seems too easy (after you have practiced), it is supposed to be easy. Why it seems that way is because the 'patterns' that make up jazz and standards are based on reoccuring relationships of scale degree tones (active and resting), and they become like a melodic (horizontal) and harmonic (vertical) type of melody. Once your ear learns how they sound like, it becomes as easy as singing the melody to a tune!

Page 68

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1 I

EXERS. 40 & 41:

Cassette: 584

EXERCISE #40-41 TRACK#19 '

I I I I I I I I

1. Following the explanation on page 17 of the textbook, you are now to sing the definitive scale degree tones (see treble def), as you play the 7 - 3-over-root setting (see bass clef). The notes with 'stems up' are to be played in the right hand, while the notes with 'stems down' are the roots, to be played in the left hand.

2. In this exercise we are modulating by pivoting MI to function as FA of the new key center.

The solfeg in reverse print shows you the pivots.

1\
,

._j .. -,J -,J #~ - +!,uo
d~ (\ ~7 ~~ ~#~ '!
~4 -& Vi
:/ "IT I

I ·

r - - ~I -
-& U 1\
I

._j " p-,J ~ - u • ~ #:J • ~-&
~" II J9I II
~I u4
~ I u~-& ')
( • ~ , ,0
I· '[)_
L
_., t"
- I' ~u 'I Dmi7

G7

IF Cmi7

F7

5

f

Bbmi7

Eb7

II

Cma7

II

C#mi7

F#7

Bma7

2

If

I

I

I I I I I I I I I

4

Bbma7 Bmi7

E7

Ama7

6 7

r

8

Abma7 Ami7

D7

Gma7

10

F

12

Continued on next page

11

I LESSON 1
I
I
I
I
I
I DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 69

II I I I I I I I I I I

Abmi7

Gbma7

Gmi7

C7

Fma7

Db7

1\
, ~
7 ......
~ I I rID -- I
~~~ ~ ~&~JI ~ II
< ~~';' . .u
:II &'1_>
- - - - ), -
·

I I r T --u- 17

18

19

20

F#mi7 B7

Bb7

Ebma7

Ema7

Fmi7

~ I I I I
,

) ~lDd - ~. II Dt~d -v- • II
#d ~
~#~ '!r &
- :II
I c"t..
·
L =z:
21 ~I I u- I I tJ&
22 23 24 Emi7

Ebmi7

Dbma7

Ab7

A7

Dma7

1\
I If

) ~ . ~. TT II ID~ p. # II
llj ~~ ~ ..
~#~ ~ --- n
&<
_--,..
·
rri
I u- P> I PU- 26

27 r

28

Page 70

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1 I

I I I I I I

I EXER.42:

Cassette: 588

1. Following the explanation on page 17 of the textbook, you are now to sing the definitive scale degree tones, as you play the 7 - 3-over-root setting

2. In this exercise we are modulating by pivoting MI, by commontone, to change its function and function as the FA of the new key center. The solfeg in reverse print shows you the pivots. Of course, this is the same as Exercise #40-41, but without the notes written in for you.

Dmi7 G7

Cma7

C#mi7 F#7

Bma7

I, I I I

_~-,.. T.._

·

II

2

Cmi7 F7

Bbma7

Bmi7

E7

Ama7

1\
II-
I
~ II II II II
<
l • I
• I
II

I I I I I

5

6

7

8

Bbmi7 1\

I~

Eb7

Abma7

Ami7 D7

Gma7

9

10

11

12

Continued on next page

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE· JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 71

Abmi7 Db7

Gbma7

Gmi7 C7

Fma7

1\
I

~
)
( ·
,._"-1: 17

18

19

20

F#mi7 B7

Ema7

Fmi7 Bb7

Ebma7

1\
,

~
I •

21

22

23

24

Emi7 A7

Dma7

Ebmi7 Ab7

Dbma7

1\
I

) ~
}
I ·
,.
- 25

26

27

28

Page72

DICK GROVE· JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1 I

EXER. "'I''''-''PI'I' Cassette: 600

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

1 0 Following the explanation on pages 18 and 9 of the textbook, you are now to sing the definitive scale degree tones (see treble clef), as you play the 7 - 3-over-root setting (see bass clef). The notes with 'stems up' are to be played in the right hand, while the notes with 'stems down' are the roots, to be played in the left hand.

20 In this exercise we are modulating by altered MI to become ME, then pivoting ME to function as FA of the new key center. The solfeg in reverse print shows you the pivots.

Dmi7

G7

Cma7 Cmi7

F7

Bbma7

li

r

2

3

i

4

Bbmi7

Eb7

Abma7

G#mi7 C#7

F#ma7

5

Ema7

Emi7

A7

Dma7

r

12

Continued on next paze

I I I I I I I I I I I I I

'II I

I I I I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE· JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 73

EXERCISE #43-44 CONTINUED

Gmi7

Fmi7

Bb7

Ebma7

C7

Fma7

I J
I .~

~ I - I - •
~~ 11'1 ~ .0. II ~~J 11'1 ~ II
e- I', ;~ e- i
- s-: - I :n;,
&v ;<"i
I •
~. "t
'v-p
r I u 1 I pe- 17

19

20

18

Ebmi7

Ab7

Dbma7

C#mi7 F#7

Bma7

1\
I ~

) ~ p. .. - j!_ #~ - *u
~~~. ~ .0. II .. II
~ f~ '~d J ~#~
; e- ';,.,
· ~ -.,' -.c:>
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21 ~. I 22PU- - ~I
23 24 r

#r

Ami7

Gma7

Bmi7

E7

D7

Ama7

fI
l

} ~ " ~ #~ " ~e- .. =± - .. u-
II ... #~ II
) J~,4 ,~ f'j~
,J
11 ~e- ij -6 5' rI> <
I •
· ~ .,
_]-'
25 I I '-' r

f

27

26

28

Continued on next ::22':=

I I I

Page74

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1

I

I I I I

EXER.

Cassette: 609

1. Following the explanation on pages 17 and 19 of the textbook, you are again asked to sing the definitive scale degree tones, as you play the 7 - 3-over-root setting

2. In this exercise we are modulating by altered MI to become ME, then pivoting ME to function as FA of the new key center. The solfeg in reverse print shows you the pivots. This is the same as Exercise #46, but without the notes written in for you.

3. This track is not slated on the audio. Simply play the previous track as you perform the modulations, without the notes written out.

I I

Dmi7

G7

Cma7

Cmi7

F7

Bbma7

I I

"
t

~ II III II
<

I · I

F#mi7

B7

Ema7

Emi7

A7

Dma7

I I I I I I

Bbmi7

Eb7

Abma7

3

G#mi7 C#7

4

2

F#ma7

1\
(

) ~ &I II &I II
)
f ·

L 5

6

7

8

"
t
~
) ~
&I II &I II
)
f •
·
9

10

11

12

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 75

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

Gmi7 -

C7

Fma7

Fmi7

Bb7

Ebma7

fI
,
'n:"'i_ , ..
} ~ III III III III
}
, •
·
17

18

19

20

Ebmi7

Ab7 Dbma7

C#mi7 F#7

Bma7

fI
I oJ

) III III III III
( ,...
·
21

22

23

24

Bmi7

E7

Ama7

Ami7

D7

Gma7

fI
,"'
) ~ III
III III III
}
( ·

25

26

27

28

Page 76

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

"AND THEN I KNEW"

DICK GROVE TRIO - TRACK 20 - 8-622

Composed by Dick Grove

Bass: Adrian Rosen Drums: Jack lacompte

Swing

© 1983 Dick Grove Publications

I Medium Fast I _

. . IIiI Ami7(b5) .

I ,~~ i b f F r II r

D7(b9)

Gmi9

C9(+11)

/

Fir·

2

3

5

4

Cmi9 F7(b9) fEb Dmi7(b5) G7(b9)
I'~~ /
r· r I bj· J I j j j J J II

()
---

6 7 8 9 Cmi7 F9 Bbma9 Eb9
I'~b J. F I r· J I J r I r· j
10 11 12 13 Abma7 G+7(b9) Cma7 F9
I' ~I> tlJ. j M J
j. r I I I E r ~ F II
~

~!
i
14 15 16 17
.. Ami7(b5) D7(b9) Gmi9 C9(+11)
I'~b r· F I I (j Frr j J j ~
rr· r i




18 19 20 21 Continued on next page I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE ~ JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 77

Cmi9 F7(b9) fEb Omi7(bS) G7(b9)
I;~b ,- ~
.- ~J. e r I'~ ~
r' r I J I I E J II
22 23 24 25 rI Cmi7

Ab9

013 0+7

G9 G7(b9)

-
II I -- -- - I ~1 J I
~ • s-: .-! .u.. ..-I _... --
h loO" ~ ~~ <J ,_ -
" ~ v h_ .,
'\: .J • V~ ,
~ I -I - I T I i I
- 26

27

28

29

C13 C+7

F9

F7(b9)

Omi7(bS) G7(b9)

'-

\.J /.1

C be [ J I

r

30

31

32

33

Cmi7

Ab9

013

0+7

G9 G7(b9)

I r

I·.~ b~JJJ II

34

35

36

37

F7(b9) Bb6
~r J I {j tr - II
()
L ..
40 41
-- C13 C+7

F9

38

39

Page78

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

LESSON 1

Well, you've been working pretty hard! But I hope that you've also had some fun, and that you have a glimpse already, of the important aspects of playing that have been started. On the next page you will find a recommended practice schedule that may help you absorb and cover all the material in this first lesson. If you don't have a sense of how you can best practice all of this material, you may find that this recommended schedule, (or a variation you make of it), can help you a great deal.

There are two aspects to successfully bringing your playing ability to a good level. The first is the desire you have to do it, and the second is having an organized plan of study (which is my responsibility).

As far as the desire goes, there are many levels of desire and intensity with which you pursue your goal. The intensity level is completely up to you. A person can have 'tunnel-vision' about

a course like this, if you have a natural, 'can't wait to do it' attitude - plus the time. But if you work better, within the time you have, going at a slower pace - fine! The point is to have some fun with this information, and feel good about getting a solid foundation - proven by your ability to play with the tracks and by realizing that you are doing it!

What the 'School Without Walls' can offer you is a detailed work/study format that you can individualize to your schedule and level of desire. What you might not realize at this point is that this 'stuff' really works! The key, again, is developing that ear that knows what it is hearing. As you ear gets more and more conditioned, and used correctly, you will experience real 'break-throughs' which will amaze you.

I am only the guide that is giving you priorities of what you should practice first, second, third, etc., and the working environment (videos, play-along tracks, etc.) to make it possible. If you have a book and never open it, nothing changes! Get with playing with the tracks and look forward to it. You could never get musicians to play for and with you, through these learning stages of your development.lt makes sense to take advantage of it. Then if you do have a chance to play I ive, you wi II be prepared to do it.

Take a look at the recommended schedule on the following page.

And remember, you can always call me if you, after seeing this first lesson, feel you need to discuss how this 'fits' with your situation.

DICK GROVE

I I I I I I I I I'

I I

I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I

~I I I I I I I I I I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 79

Our approach to a practice schedule is to divide the month between receiving your lessons, into four weeks. The schedule on the following pages is based on you devoting six practice sessions, of one hour each, per week. Working from these suggestions, you can customize your commitment by changing the six practice sessions and:

a. adjust to four practice sessions

1. four sessions, but 1 1/2 hours each, or four sessions, but 2 hours each

b. adjust to nine practice sessions

1. nine sessions, but 45 minutes each

2. nine sessions but 90 minutes each

If you can commit to the following number of hours a week, you will be able to get:

SIX HOU RS A WEEKS:

24 HOURS A MONTH BETWEEN LESSONS 32 HOURS A MONTH BETWEEN LESSONS 36 HOURS A MONTH BETWEEN LESSONS 48 HOURS A MONTH BETWEEN LESSONS

EIGHT HOURS A WEEK:

NINE HOURS A WEEK:

TWELVE HOURS A WEEK:

Think about it,

there are 168 hours in a week, and 672 hours in a month.

Finding at least 24 hours out of 672 hours should not be difficult if,

first of all,

you really want to get better, and secondly,

you can organize your time - even a little bit!

Page80

DICK GROVE - JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

- PAGE

"it"

. -

STUDY SUBJECT

EXERCISE #'s

WEEK 1
#1 ma7, mi7, 7 #la, 2a, 3a 23 - 25 #1 & 2
#2 Voiceleading Triads: #4a,5a 26 - 27 #3
Review Exercises #1 b,2b,3b 23 - 25 #1 & 2
#3 Triads, Hearing Pivots: #6a, 7a, 8a, 9a 28 - 31 #4,5
Review Exercises #4b, 5b 26 - 27 #3
#4 Triads, Hearing Pivots: #10a to 13a 32 - 35 #6,7
Review Exercises #6b,7b,8b,9b 28 - 31 #4, 5
#5 4-part, Hearing Pivots: #14a, 15a, 16a 36 - 38
505 - 589
Review Exercises #1 Ob,11 b,12b,13b 32 - 35 #6,7
#6 4-part, Hearing Pivots: #17a to21a 39 - 43
605 - 733
WEEK 2 #7

4-part, Pivoting 'FA': #22a, 23a, 24a 44 - 49

Review Exercises #14b,15b,16b 36 - 38

#13 - 15 #8,9,10

LESSON 1

Cassette Footage

SIDEA

1 g 127 150-175 27 - 148

205 -347 176 -196

365 - 489 228 - 363

#8,9,10

384 - 503 #11, 12

SIDE B

762 - B35 524 - 604

#8 4-part, Pivoting 'FA': #25a,26a 50 - 53 #16, 17 65 - 150
Review Exercises #17bto21b 39 - 43 #11, 12 623 - 745
#9 General Review: # Session #1 to 5 23 - 27 #1 - 3 A27 - 196
Review Exercises #22b, 23b, 24b 44 - 49 #13 -15 762 - 863
#10 General Review: Session #6 to 13 28 - 35 #4,7 A228-503
Review Exercises #25b,26b 50 - 53 #16, 17 898 - 73
#11 General Review: #14 to 21 36 - 43 #8, 12 A524-745
#12 Your choice of review, extra practice 23 to 53 #1 to 17 A27 - 873
WEEK 3
#13 7 - 3 voicing on Blues: #27, 28, 29, 30 54 - 57 #18, 21 B175-383
#14 II - V - I Combinations: #31, 32, 33 58 - 60 #22-24 384 - 455
#15 Review Exercises: #27,28,29,30 54 - 57 #18, 21 212 - 383
#16 More II - V - 1 Comb's: #34, 35 61 - 62 #25,26 456 - 501
Review Exercises #31,32,33 58 - 60 #22,24 384 - 455
#17 Plural Sub. Combinations: #36, 37 63 - 64 #27,28 502 - 544
Review Exercises #34, 35 61 - 63 #25,26 456 - 501 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

LESSON 1

DICK GROVE· JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

Page 81

I I I I I I I I I I

il

u I I I I I

STUDY SUBJECT

EXERCISE #IS

PAGE

WEEK 4
#19 Hearing Modulations: #40-41 68·69
Review Exercises: #38-39 65 - 66
#20 Hearing Modulations: #42 70 - 71
Review Exercise: #40 68 - 69
#21 Hearing Modulations: #4344 72 -73
Review Exercise: #41 70 - 71
#22 Hearing Modulations: #44 74·75
Review Exercises #42 72 - 73
#23 General Review #27, 39 54, 66
#24 General Review #40 to 43 68,75 Cassette Footage

SIDE B

#31 584·599
#29, 30 544 - 584
#32 588·599
#31 584 - 599
#33 600 - 621
#32 588 - 599
#34 600·621
#33 600 - 621
#18 - 30 175 - 584
#31 - 34 584 - 621 LESSON 1 I

I

I I I I I I I I I I r I

I I I I I

DATE: SESSION # Exercises Practiced TI ME



i
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i
,
i Page82

DICK GROVE Q JAZZ KEYBOARD 1 WORKBOOK

USE THIS LOG TO COMPLETE YOUR SATISFACTORY PROGRESS REPORT

DATE: SESSION # Exercises Practiced TIME

LESSON TWO ..

Continue your course with the Lesson Two Video lesson by Dick Grove: the Lesson Two Textbook, Work Book and Play .. along cassette.

Lesson Two covers Melodic Phrasing, Comping, Technique, Modulation, Voicings and Keyboard Settings.

Over 70 exercise tracks to work with, plus your video lesson/demonstration with Dick Grove and another performance with the Dick Grove Trio.

5202 Willowhaven Avenue, las Vegas, NV 89120 (702) 435~ 1184

GROVE/RASCH MUSIC EDUCATION SYSTEMS

G

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