1

BUSINESS RESEARCH METHOD


PROJECT REPORT
ON
'IDENTIFY MARKET POTENTIAL FOR MARS FOREIGN
CHOCOLATES IN INDIA¨




SUBMITTED BY

GROUP-5
ASIM KUMAR VERMA - 2010056
FAHAD KHAN - 2010071
GAUTAM BANSAL - 2010075
JAI SHANKAR - 2010083
KISHAN KUMAR - 2010096
NIDHI GUPTA - 2010260
PRATEEK CHATURVEDI - 2010295






INSTITUTE OF MANGEMENT TECHNOLOGY. NAGPUR

2
Introduction
Mars. Incorporated is a worldwide manuIacturer oI conIectionery, pet Iood and other
Iood products with US$30 billion in annual sales in 2008, and is ranked as the 5th largest
privately-held company in the United States by Forbes. Headquartered in McLean,
unincorporated FairIax County, Virginia, USA the company is entirely owned by the
Mars Iamily. Mars operates in six business segments in the U.S.: Chocolate
(Hackettstown, New Jersey), Petcare (Franklin, Tennessee), Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company
(Chicago, Illinois), Food (Los Angeles, CaliIornia), Drinks (West Chester, Pennsylvania),
and Symbioscience (Rockville, Maryland). Seeing huge potential oI the Indian Chocolate
Industry the company is planning to enter into the Ioreign chocolates market in a big way.
It has its presence in India in the Iorm oI candy bars and conIectionary. Many Indian
enioy the Ioreign chocolates oIIered by Mars through imports.





3
Imported chocolates are gaining popularity in India especially Irom the mature and
aIIluent population despite high prices. An annual growth oI 15 percent has been noticed
in the demand Ior imported chocolates in India with the market size Ior the overseas
brands estimated to be about Rs35 crore. Business in the unorganized sector is estimated
to be valued at halI the business achieved through organized channels.

The obiective oI this study is to explore the market potential oI Mars Ioreign chocolates
in India. A proportional study oI the consumers and non-consumers oI Ioreign chocolates
was conducted to understand the buying behavior oI potential customers. Demographic
and psychographic analysis was conducted to segment the market and identiIy the target
market. Brand wise analysis was conducted, supplemented through secondary research,
to understand the competitive scenario and suggest preliminary positioning strategies to
Mars. The data collected was analyzed to suggest a Ieasible marketing mix.

The Iindings indicate that a larger percentage oI the people buying Ioreign chocolates
Irom India belong to the middle income group as compared to the broader segment oI the
more aIIluent consumers oI Ioreign chocolates who are buying even Irom abroad. This
indicates that this middle income group segment is currently experiencing a lack oI
opportunity to buy Ioreign chocolates Irom abroad but has a latent desire to consume
Ioreign chocolates. Hence this is a very lucrative market segment since Ioreign
chocolates Irom a leading brand like Mars will be well received by this group.

75° oI the non-consumers are open to the idea oI buying Ioreign chocolates in the Iuture.
This is also a potential market. A very promising segment that is willing to buy Ioreign
chocolates is the aIIluent, young proIessionals with the spending power.

The most popular chocolate categories consumed are milk, Iruit and nut, waIer, dark and
truIIle chocolates. Taste and brand are the most important attributes that a consumer
looks at while buying chocolates. Pricing is something that Mars needs to be very careIul
about as the consumer is value conscious. Also, peculiar about the Indian market is that it
is a land oI Iestivals, especially, during the long giIting season Irom Dussehra to New
4
Year; Assorted/ GiIting packs oI Ioreign chocolates are becoming increasingly popular.
This is a big opportunity Ior Mars and it get cash on this consumer mind set shiIt Irom
mithai to the contemporary giIts like chocolates. Maior consumer dissatisIaction in this
segment is arising Irom date oI expiry, damaged chocolates, lack oI both depth and width
in the range available, lack oI innovative packaging, and all such problems can be
addressed by Mars very eIIectively due to already existing distribution muscle in India
and chocolate expertise.

Based on the analysis, it is observed that the market is Ieasible Ior Mars to launch Ioreign
chocolates Irom a preliminary research perspective.

A second stage research must be carried out to understand the Marketing mix oI the top
competition brands that Mars has to take cues Irom. Also, a detailed study oI the
consumer decision making process maybe carried out to supplement the above. All this
will eventually help Mars take its decision on positioning its Ioreign chocolates as mass
or niche products.






















5
Problem Definition

a. Background to the problem/ Rationale Ior the proiect
While Mars was unaIIected by the price wars that plagued the FMCG industry two years
ago, thanks to its urban consumer Iocus, it still Iaced a challenging environment. In
chocolates, the revenues have surged, led by volume growth. Volumes have been robust,
thanks to the launch oI products at the Rs 5 price point. This makes it harder Ior the
company to aIIect price hikes, without aIIecting volume growth.
In this backdrop, Mars has had to tread cautiously in raising product price hikes. Input
costs, on the other hand, have been soaring. Prices oI green coIIee and milk solids, which
account Ior most oI its raw material costs, have been on a Iirm uptrend over the past year.
It is expected that gradually custom duties Ior imported chocolates will come down
overall. Probably in the next three to Iour years, they will be around 20 per cent, and in
seven years they may be nil. So, it is very critical that Mars becomes as competitive as
possible, oIIering international quality chocolates and become the best in terms oI cost
structure and margins. Foreign chocolates, especially as giIt packs give opportunities Ior
higher margins. This will help us not only in gearing up to Iace competition, but also in
becoming a source Ior supplies. II, over a period oI time, the business climate improves,
then it will be good Irom the point oI view oI consumers, domestic producers and
importers. India has a long Iestive season Irom dussehra to New Year, special Iestivals
etc. which can help Mars capitalize by selling Ioreign chocolates as giIt packs.

In the backdrop oI this environment, this proiect aims to identiIy the market potential,
consumer behavior, appropriate marketing strategies etc. with respect to Mars Ioreign
chocolates in India.

b. Statement oI the problem
Management Problem:
Should Mars start importing its Ioreign chocolates and sell them in India.

6
Marketing Research Problem:
Is there a market potential Ior Mars Ioreign chocolates?

Components:
What can be crudely said about the Market Potential?
Who are our Current and Potential buyers?
What is the Consumer Buying Behavior?
What is the Competitive Scenario?
What would be the right marketing strategy Ior selling Ioreign chocolates? What are the
consumer`s wish list vis-a-vis Ioreign chocolates?

c. Approach to the problem

1. What can be crudely said about the Market Potential?

4 Proportional analysis oI Consumers and Potential consumers and examining their
consumption Irequencies, patterns etc. Analysis oI Secondary data

2. Who are our Current and Potential buyers?

4 Through Demographic and Psychographic analysis oI these buyers.

3. What is the Consumer Buying Behavior?

4 Attitude Interests Opinion Analysis (AIO)
4 7Os
Who constitutes the market? Occupants
What does the Market buy? Objects
Why does the Market Buy? Objectives
Who Participates in the Buying? Organizations
How does the Market Buy? Operations
When does the Market Buy? Occasions
Where does the Market buy? Outlets

4. What is the Competitive Scenario?

4 Brand-wise Analysis through Multi Dimensional Scaling and Secondary
Data Analysis

5. What would be the right marketing strategy Ior selling Ioreign chocolates? What are
the consumer`s wish list vis-a-vis Ioreign chocolates?

4 Marketing Mix
7
Product related: Desired Ieatures: preI size, packaging etc
Price related: Brand wise price brand study
Place/Distribution related
Promotion related: Media habits to ascertain media mix and media
vehicles









































8
Research Design

a) Type of research design: the research design that we have made is a conclusive
research. The inIormation needs were clearly deIined and the sample that we have
taken is large. Moreover we need more quantitative analysis Ior Iinding out the
basic obiectives oI sales potential. These Iindings will be Iurther used by Mars in
their decision making whether to come with their Ioreign chocolates in India and
which type oI chocolates. The research is descriptive as we are trying to Iind the
market segments and their characteristics, their demographic inIormation, etc.
Iurther it`s a single cross-sectional design as we have taken each sample once
Irom the target population, which is the person who buys or consumes chocolates.

b) Information Needs: Irom the problem statement we recognize the inIormation
that would be required to carry out analysis and the decision. The obiective is to
Iind the sales potential Ior Mars Ioreign chocolates in India. The inIormation that
we are seeking is as Iollows:
O Tentative market share oI various Indian chocolate brands and Ioreign chocolate
brands.
O Consumer Buying Behavior where we are looking at three main aspects, which
are
4 Triggers Ior purchase
4 Frequency oI purchase/consumption
4 AIO statements oI the consumers and purchasers oI chocolates.
4 7 O`s
O Marketing Mix
4 Product: the Ieatures that a customer is looking at in a chocolate, example
preIerence, size, packaging, assortment, etc
4 Price: we are collecting the inIormation oI the kind oI price the customer
is most comIortable with and what is his likely price brand Ior Ioreign
chocolates.
9
4 Place/Distribution: where does the customer purchase the chocolates
mostly and do they inIluence his selection oI chocolate.
4 Promotion: Media habits to ascertain media mix and media vehicles
ThereIore, this inIormation with the above will enable us to segment the target market

O Brand-wise Analysis: Competition Scenario, as to how the other brands are
perIorming in the chocolate market.
O What is it that the consumer is looking at when he/ she is buying a chocolate

c) Data collection from secondary sources: the data collected Irom secondary
sources covered the overall Chocolate Market in India, the Foreign Chocolate
Market in India and data on Mars Chocolates. IndiaStat.com was a maior resource
provider. Since data on Foreign Chocolates was not readily available we used
newspaper articles to get a better understanding.

d) "uestionnaire development and pretesting

Questionnaire development:
The questionnaire was developed based on the secondary data analysis done as above.
AIter deIining the obiectives oI the study the questionnaire was developed to meet all
inIormation needs required to conduct analysis and reach conclusions. The questionnaire
was developed in two sets: Consumers and Non-Consumers. Most oI the questions were
structured though a Iew unstructured questions were provided to understand get
qualitative insights.

Pretesting:
A sample oI 5 consumers and 10 non-consumers were taken Ior this study to identiIy the
Ilaws in the questionnaire. Here the questionnaire administration was aided and in depth
discussion with the respondent was conducted. The sample population composed oI IMI
students.

10
The Iollowing problems were seen and hence corrected:
1. DeIinition oI consumers and non-consumers was unclear
The two qualiIying questions developed thereaIter were
1. Do you consume chocolates?
2. Do you consume Ioreign chocolates on a regular basis?
I only have Ioreign chocolates
I mostly consume Ioreign chocolates (Out oI every 10 chocolates that I
consume, 7 or more are Ioreign chocolates)
I have equal level oI consumption Ior Foreign and Indian chocolates
(Out oI every 10 chocolates that I consume, 4 to 6 are Ioreign chocolates)
I rarely consume Ioreign chocolates (Out oI every 10 chocolates that I
consume 3 or less are Ioreign chocolates)
I don`t consume Ioreign chocolates at all
Here, Iirst chocolate consumers were Iiltered out and then in the second question
consumers were deIined by Iirst and second option and non-consumers be last 3 options.

3. The demographic data questions that were positioned in the beginning oI the
questionnaire were repositioned at the end to increase comIort levels and
concentration oI the respondent.
4. Question based on Psychographics was introduced.
5. In consumer questionnaire q16 was changed Irom visual bar rating to a tabular
rating.
6. In consumer questionnaire, Q9 was introduced Ior a Iurther reIined analysis oI the
sample population and in non-consumer questionnaire Q8 was introduced.
7. The questionnaire was made more user Iriendly by introducing boxes Ior ticking
and the overall visual eIIect oI the questionnaires was worked upon.
8. Wording oI certain questions was changed to make them easier to understand.




11
e) Sampling techniques

Overall a sample size oI 200 was chosen which would be quite a representative sample
considering the target segment Mars is already looking at.

Overall Proportional Sampling: The Mars India Marketing Department was contacted to
understand the ratio oI consumers to non-consumers oI Ioreign chocolates in the current
scenario. Based on this a ration oI 4:1(non consumers: consumers) was taken to split the
sample population oI 200 into 160 non consumers and 40 consumers.

Simple Random Sampling: Within each category oI consumers and non-consumers
simple random sampling was conducted to select respondents.

f) Fieldwork
The Pre-testing was done in the IMI Campus, through aided questionnaire Iilling and
discussions.

Understanding that the target consumer is most likely the urban, educated consumer, we
conducted Convenient Sampling at MBA colleges, at urban markets like Priyas,
Connaught Place, outside corporate houses, and through Mall intercepts in Gurgaon. The
group was split into two sub groups with 2-3 members each and intercepts were
conducted at the entrances, in the open spaces, and near chocolate shops and vendors.

Motivation needs oI the respondent were IulIilled by distributing chocolates as an
incentive to Iill the questionnaire.






12
Data Analysis. Observations and Results

nalvsis of Secondarv data

Chocolate Market in India

The chocolates market is estimated at around 33,000 tonnes valued at approximately Rs
8.0 bn. The counter market is estimated at about nearly Rs 2.5 to 3.5 bn and the rest is
made up oI chocolate bars. Chocolates make up less than a Iourth oI the sweet-tooth
products including sugar-boiled conIectionery, mints and chewing gums. Sugar
conIectionery is by Iar the largest segment. To push sales, chocolate maiors have
been targeting adult audiences. Chocolates are being presented as snack Iood Ior the new
target audiences. Another strategy sought was the introduction oI smaller editions.
Although the players resorted to very aggressive promotional drives, the overall
penetration levels in 1999 and 2000 did not register any signiIicant increase. Perhaps, the
increases by 5° to 15° in selling prices due to increase in cocoa prices caused the
stagnation.

AIter the worm controversy in October 2003, there was a meltdown in chocolate sales.
Cadbury India appears to be on a recovery path.

Statistics: Chocolate Market


Demand : Past & Future
Year th MT
2000-01 22.1
2001-02 24
2002-03 30
2003-04 32.7
2004-05 35.5
2005-06 38.4
2006-07 41.3
2007-08 44.2
Market Segmentation
Segment Share (°)
2 to 8 years old 16
8 to 25 years old 53
25 to 54 years old 22
Over 55 years old 7
North 35
East 12
West 33
South 20

13
























eading Plavers
While Cadbury leads in both the segments oI the chocolates market, Nestle is the other
maior player. Amul
and Campco
(producing Ior Amul)
have,
however, managed to
corner signiIicant
shares oI the market.
Cadbury has actually
become the generic
name Ior chocolates in India. Cadbury with its Dairy Milk, Five Star, Milk Treat,
Eclairs, Golden, is ruling the roost. It proposed to introduce a host oI its global oIIerings
like Flake, Timeout, Wispa, Caramel, Fuse and Cherry Ripe into the Indian market.
Cadbury dominates the chocolate segment with a share oI around 70°. In chocolate-
Segment Share (°)
Molded Chocolates 50
Count line bars 33
Sugar panned 13
Choco panned 4
Market Growth Rates
1990-91 - 1996-97 6.9°
1996-97 - 2001-02 8.9°
2001-02 - 2006-07 11.5°
2004-05 - 2009-10 7.2°

2009-10 - 2014-15 6.0°
Sensitivity CoeIIicient 7.8°
Yr. 2006
Cadbury's
68%
NestIe
22%
AmuI
8%
Others
2%
Product Variation
14
based drinks, it claims nearly 50° oI the market. Cadbury India's market share in cocoa-
based products is 35°, with Dairy Milk brand alone accounting Ior 29°. Perk and Five
Star account Ior another 20°. Cadbury derives 76° oI its revenues Irom chocolates and
other conIectionery sales.

oreign Chocolate Market

Imported chocolates are gaining popularity in India especially Irom the mature and
aIIluent population despite high prices. Indians do not preIer dark bitter chocolates but
these have Iound Iavor with expats and Ioreigners. Five-star kitchens are also demanding
chocolates oI the cooking variety like Lindt Couverture and Belgian Calibaut as
chocolate mousse and souIIles are becoming popular.

An annual growth oI 15 percent has been noticed in the demand Ior imported chocolates
in India with the market size Ior the overseas brands estimated to be about Rs35 crore.
Business in the unorganized sector is estimated to be valued at halI the business achieved
through organized channels.

Many Ioreign chocolates brands are Ilood Indian metropolitan cities with the
commencement oI the Iestive season. They are Swiss brands Ferraro Rocher, Fox's and
Lindt and Australian brands
Walter Heindl and Macadamia.
Sales oI oIIicially imported
chocolates are high during the
Iestive season despite their high
prices. MB International Private
Limited is an exclusive
distributor Ior Walter Heindl and
Macadamia and expects to
realise a turnover oI Rs1.5 crore Irom Walter Heindl brand chocolates during Oct-Jan
2001.
15

Indian chocolate companies Cadbury India and Mars India have observed that their net
proIits were not aIIected by Ioreign chocolate brands. The latest Exim policy has
provided means Ior Ioreign brands like Hershey, Lindt and Quality Macintosh to enter the
country and Cadbury is Iaced with the task oI maintaining its marketing share.

Indian shops are now selling more and more imported Iood products. Droste oI Holland
has introduced 22 varieties oI chocolates in various pack sizes. Lindt oI Switzerland is
oIIering nearly 45 varieties oI chocolates throughout the country. Customers in the
country now have a wide range oI quality products to choose Irom. Due to the high
import duty oI there is a growing grey market in these products.

Nestle India Ltd (NIL) had imported two brands, Quality Street and AIter Eight, into
India in 1997. As oI now, the 40 percent import duty on the imported chocolates is
making it uncompetitive. Cadbury's Overtures, a premium priced brand has not
penetrated the market in volumes sale.


nalvsis of Primarv Data

B1. Market Potential Analysis


Mars when planning to come with its Ioreign chocolates in India should have a Iair idea
oI the market potential or the possible sales volume that can be achieved in the market.
For the above obiective we have tried to calculate the market potential Ior Mars. Lets
look at the cross tab below:





16


For Consumers:
We have taken a conservative aspect, iI a respondent is consuming more than 1 chocolate
per week then we have taken 2 chocolates per week. For special occasions we have
considered about 4 chocolates in a year.

The respondents who buy 2-3 and 4-5 units bought we have taken mean value and Ior giIt
packs we have taken 5 chocolate units.
Using the above assumptions we have multiplied the Irequency with number oI units
bought on a yearly basis and added Ior all the respondents interested in buying Ioreign
chocolates.

Using these assumptions, market potential comes out to be 6718 chocolates per 50
consumers, which can be an upper limit Ior Mars.

41ten u c4nsume ch4c4Iates - 14reign ch4c4Iates
* h4 many ch4cIates u buy at a g4
Cr4sstabuIati4n
3 6 9
33.3% 66.7% 100.0%
1 4 2 4 11
9.1% 36.4% 18.2% 36.4% 100.0%
2 1 3
66.7% 33.3% 100.0%
3 3 3 9
33.3% 33.3% 33.3% 100.0%
8 2 6 16
50.0% 12.5% 37.5% 100.0%
12 14 2 20 48
25.0% 29.2% 4.2% 41.7% 100.0%
Count
% within often u
consume chocolates
- foreign chocolates
Count
% within often u
consume chocolates
- foreign chocolates
Count
% within often u
consume chocolates
- foreign chocolates
Count
% within often u
consume chocolates
- foreign chocolates
Count
% within often u
consume chocolates
- foreign chocolates
Count
% within often u
consume chocolates
- foreign chocolates
More than once a week
Once a week
Once a fortnight
Once a month
Special Occasion
often u consume
chocolates - foreign
chocolates
Total
Single 2-3 4-5 Gift/Assorted
how many choclates u buy at a go
Total
17
Therefore if we see broadly Mars has a market potential of 6718 chocolates yearly
per 50 consumers

This shows that Mars has a huge market potential for its foreign chocolates


Limitations:
O The consumers may use the Mars Ioreign chocolates as a substitute and not really
switch Irom their Iavorite brand.
O Respondents may not be interested in Mars brand at all. The study is iust a broad
Iigure on an optimistic note.


B2. Consumer decision making Process

7Os Analysis
1.Who participates in the buying? Organizations
Consumer Media Habits:
18

These are the three main media vehicles to create awareness about Ioreign chocolates
presently. Where in two oI them are most eIIective which are word oI mouth and the in
store display.




h4 did u c4me t4 kn4 - WOM
14 28.0 29.2 29.2
34 68.0 70.8 100.0
48 96.0 100.0
2 4.0
50 100.0
No
Yes
Total
Valid
9 Missing
Total
Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
h4 did u c4me t4 kn4 - magazines
37 74.0 77.1 77.1
11 22.0 22.9 100.0
48 96.0 100.0
2 4.0
50 100.0
No
Yes
Total
Valid
9 Missing
Total
Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
h4 did u c4me t4 kn4 - in-st4re
15 30.0 31.9 31.9
32 64.0 68.1 100.0
47 94.0 100.0
3 6.0
50 100.0
No
Yes
Total
Valid
9 Missing
Total
Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
19
The cross tab shows that the Iemales rely more on WOM but when they are working
somewhere whereas house wives do not rely much on WOM, probably because they are
not constantly interacting with their peer group.

Occupati4n
* h4 did u c4me t4 kn4 - WOM
* Gender
Cr4sstabuIati4n
7 11 18
38.9% 61.1% 100.0%
1 3 4
25.0% 75.0% 100.0%
2 2
100.0% 100.0%
8 16 24
33.3% 66.7% 100.0%
2 12 14
14.3% 85.7% 100.0%
1 1
100.0% 100.0%
2 3 5
40.0% 60.0% 100.0%
2 1 3
66.7% 33.3% 100.0%
6 17 23
26.1% 73.9% 100.0%
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Student
Service
Professional
Occupation
Total
Student
Service
Professional
Housewife
Occupation
Total
Gender
Male
Female
No Yes
how did u come to
know - WOM
Total
M4nthIy h4useh4Id Inc4me
* h4 did u c4me t4 kn4 - in-st4re
Cr4sstabuIati4n
1 2 3
33.3% 66.7% 100.0%
6 10 16
37.5% 62.5% 100.0%
8 19 27
29.6% 70.4% 100.0%
15 31 46
32.6% 67.4% 100.0%
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Under 20,000
20,000-50,000
50,000and above
Monthly household
Ìncome
Total
No Yes
how did u come to
know - in-store
Total
20
We know that a large number oI consumers are Irom the segment with monthly
household income greater than 20K. ThereIore the in store display is very important Ior
Ioreign chocolates and they should be attractive so that the people get attracted to
purchase them. Since the advertising Ior Ioreign chocolates has been close to nil thereIore
the awareness through this channel is low but iI advertising is done on television then it
can create awareness Iast as compared to WOM which is an important channel here but is
slower. Also advertising in magazines can be a good medium.

M4nthIy h4useh4Id Inc4me
* h4 did u c4me t4 kn4 - in-st4re
* Iike t4 try ne pr4ducts
Cr4sstabuIati4n
1 1
100.0% 100.0%
1 1
100.0% 100.0%
3 8 11
27.3% 72.7% 100.0%
4 9 13
30.8% 69.2% 100.0%
4 6 10
40.0% 60.0% 100.0%
3 9 12
25.0% 75.0% 100.0%
7 15 22
31.8% 68.2% 100.0%
2 2
100.0% 100.0%
1 2 3
33.3% 66.7% 100.0%
2 2 4
50.0% 50.0% 100.0%
3 6 9
33.3% 66.7% 100.0%
1 1
100.0% 100.0%
1 1
100.0% 100.0%
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Under 20,000
20,000-50,000
50,000and above
Monthly household
Ìncome
Total
20,000-50,000
50,000and above
Monthly household
Ìncome
Total
Under 20,000
20,000-50,000
50,000and above
Monthly household
Ìncome
Total
20,000-50,000 Monthly household
Ìncome
Total
like to try new products
Completely Agree
Agree
Neutral
Disagree
No Yes
how did u come to
know - in-store
Total
21
2. How does the market buy? Operations

Consumer: the Irequency and quantity oI purchase Ior them is



Age
* 41ten u c4nsume ch4c4Iates
Cr4sstabuIati4n
18 9 8 1 4 40
45.0% 22.5% 20.0% 2.5% 10.0% 100.0%
1 3 2 1 1 8
12.5% 37.5% 25.0% 12.5% 12.5% 100.0%
1 1
100.0% 100.0%
19 12 11 2 5 49
38.8% 24.5% 22.4% 4.1% 10.2% 100.0%
Count
% within Age
Count
% within Age
Count
% within Age
Count
% within Age
21-35yrs
36-50yrs
51 and above
Age
Total
More than
once a week Once a week
Once a
fortnight Once a month
Special
Occasion
often u consume chocolates
Total
Occupati4n
* 41ten u c4nsume ch4c4Iates
Cr4sstabuIati4n
16 7 7 3 33
48.5% 21.2% 21.2% 9.1% 100.0%
3 1 1 5
60.0% 20.0% 20.0% 100.0%
3 1 1 1 1 7
42.9% 14.3% 14.3% 14.3% 14.3% 100.0%
2 1 3
66.7% 33.3% 100.0%
1 1
100.0% 100.0%
19 12 11 2 5 49
38.8% 24.5% 22.4% 4.1% 10.2% 100.0%
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Student
Service
Professional
Housewife
Other
Occupation
Total
More than
once a week Once a week
Once a
fortnight Once a month
Special
Occasion
often u consume chocolates
Total
22

The Irequency oI consumption is the highest amongst the younger age group which is 21-
35 years and amongst the students and proIessionals. Similarly the higher income groups
the higher is the Irequency oI consumption oI Ioreign chocolates. Since the prices oI
Ioreign chocolates are higher thereIore with increasing incomes the Irequency oI
consumption is going up.

With rising disposable incomes the number oI units bought at a go; go up. But the
number oI giIt/ assorted packs remains same across various occupations.
The Irequency oI consumption and quantity bought at a go Ior Consumers is:
M4nthIy h4useh4Id Inc4me
* 41ten u c4nsume ch4c4Iates
Cr4sstabuIati4n
1 2 3
33.3% 66.7% 100.0%
7 4 2 1 2 16
43.8% 25.0% 12.5% 6.3% 12.5% 100.0%
12 7 9 1 1 30
40.0% 23.3% 30.0% 3.3% 3.3% 100.0%
19 12 11 2 5 49
38.8% 24.5% 22.4% 4.1% 10.2% 100.0%
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Under 20,000
20,000-50,000
50,000and above
Monthly household
Ìncome
Total
More than
once a week Once a week
Once a
fortnight Once a month
Special
Occasion
often u consume chocolates
Total
Occupati4n
* h4 many ch4cIates u buy at a g4
Cr4sstabuIati4n
7 9 1 15 32
21.9% 28.1% 3.1% 46.9% 100.0%
2 1 2 5
40.0% 20.0% 40.0% 100.0%
2 5 7
28.6% 71.4% 100.0%
3 3
100.0% 100.0%
11 14 2 20 47
23.4% 29.8% 4.3% 42.6% 100.0%
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Count
% within Occupation
Student
Service
Professional
Housewife
Occupation
Total
Single 2-3 4-5 Gift/Assorted
how many choclates u buy at a go
Total
23
Here we notice that the total quantity oI consumption is more compared to the non
consumers. The consumers who have Ioreign chocolates more than once a week buy
about 2-3 units mostly Iollowed by giIting packs or assorted packs. But the consumers
who have Iewer chocolates also buy lower quantity a trend similar to that oI non
consumers. But a contrasting trend is that most oI the consumers buy giIt/ assorted packs
maybe to giIt or even enioy more variety through a package. The ones who have
chocolates on special occasions usually buy assorted chocolates to get the most Irom a
package.
The preferences of attributes for consumers are:
Attribute Score Attribute Score
Assortment
5.48
Packaging
6.08
Availability
5.28
Price
4.46
Brand
3.98
SoItness/ Texture
4.34
Pack Size
5.72
Taste
2.12
The score is out oI 8. Here also the most important attribute is taste Iollowed by brand,
soItness and price.

41ten u c4nsume ch4c4Iates
* h4 many ch4cIates u buy at a g4
Cr4sstabuIati4n
1 11 8 20
5.0% 55.0% 40.0% 100.0%
3 1 2 4 10
30.0% 10.0% 20.0% 40.0% 100.0%
6 1 4 11
54.5% 9.1% 36.4% 100.0%
1 1 2
50.0% 50.0% 100.0%
1 1 3 5
20.0% 20.0% 60.0% 100.0%
12 14 2 20 48
25.0% 29.2% 4.2% 41.7% 100.0%
Count
% within often u
consume chocolates
Count
% within often u
consume chocolates
Count
% within often u
consume chocolates
Count
% within often u
consume chocolates
Count
% within often u
consume chocolates
Count
% within often u
consume chocolates
More than once a week
Once a week
Once a fortnight
Once a month
Special Occasion
often u
consume
chocolates
Total
Single 2-3 4-5 Gift/Assorted
how many choclates u buy at a go
Total
24
. When does the market buy? Occasion

The consumers buy Ioreign chocolates Ior below reasons:
Reason Percentage Reason Percentage
SelI Consumption
93.75°
GiIting
79.17°
Festivals
18.75°
Baking Food Ingredient
6.25°
In lieu oI sweets/ desserts
10.42°
Anytime snack
20.83°
Special Occasion
37.50°

Here also the Ioreign chocolates are primarily bought Ior selI consumption Iollowed by
giIting, special occasion and anytime snack.
The respondents who agree to the statement that 'Ioreign chocolates make good giIts¨
14reign ch4c4Iates make g44d gi1ts
* Pup4se 41 buying - gi1ting
Cr4sstabuIati4n
1 13 14
7.1% 92.9% 100.0%
5 20 25
20.0% 80.0% 100.0%
2 2
100.0% 100.0%
1 2 3
33.3% 66.7% 100.0%
1 1 2
50.0% 50.0% 100.0%
10 36 46
21.7% 78.3% 100.0%
Count
% within foreign
chocolates
make good gifts
Count
% within foreign
chocolates
make good gifts
Count
% within foreign
chocolates
make good gifts
Count
% within foreign
chocolates
make good gifts
Count
% within foreign
chocolates
make good gifts
Count
% within foreign
chocolates
make good gifts
Completely Agree
Agree
Neutral
Disagree
Completely Disagree
foreign
chocolates
make good
gifts
Total
No Yes
Pupose of buying -
gifting
Total
25
buy Ioreign chocolates a lot Ior giIting. InIact, even the consumers who disagree buy a
lot oI Ioreign chocolates Ior giIting.

ThereIore, the main occasions Ior buying the Ioreign and Indian chocolates are Ior
giIting, during Iestivals as giIts and on special occasion else both Indian and Ioreign
chocolates are mainly used Ior selI consumption.



. Where does the market buy? Outlets

Source Percentage Source Percentage
Retail Shops, India
60.00°
Bakeries/ coIIee shops, India
24.00°
Duty Iree shops
22.00°
During Foreign Trips
32.00°
Friends and relatives abroad
36.00°
GiIts
64.00°
Never buy get as giIts only
4.00°
Others
2.00°
We see that the respondents get the chocolates mainly as giIts Iollowed by buying Irom
retail shops, Iriends and relatives abroad and during Ioreign trips.

M4nthIy h4useh4Id Inc4me
* here d4 u get 14reign ch4cIates - buy 1r4m retaiI sh4ps
Cr4sstabuIati4n
3 3
100.0% 100.0%
5 11 16
31.3% 68.8% 100.0%
12 18 30
40.0% 60.0% 100.0%
20 29 49
40.8% 59.2% 100.0%
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Under 20,000
20,000-50,000
50,000and above
Monthly household
Ìncome
Total
No Yes
where do u get foreign
choclates - buy from
retail shops
Total
26

GiIting oI Ioreign chocolates is more prevalent amongst the higher income groups with a
monthly household income above 20K. The income group Irom 20K to 50K preIers to
buy Ioreign chocolates Irom the retail stores in India. The households with income more
than 50K preIer to buy Ioreign chocolates during their trip abroad.

5.Who constitutes the market?

This was analyzed by looking at the consumers. The respondents among the consumers,
the respondents who are either already buying Irom India are open to the idea oI buying
M4nthIy h4useh4Id Inc4me
* here d4 u get 14reign ch4cIates - get as gi1ts
Cr4sstabuIati4n
2 1 3
66.7% 33.3% 100.0%
9 7 16
56.3% 43.8% 100.0%
7 23 30
23.3% 76.7% 100.0%
18 31 49
36.7% 63.3% 100.0%
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Under 20,000
20,000-50,000
50,000and above
Monthly household
Ìncome
Total
No Yes
where do u get foreign
choclates - get as gifts
Total
M4nthIy h4useh4Id Inc4me
* here d4 u get 14reign ch4cIates - buy during 14reign trips
Cr4sstabuIati4n
3 3
100.0% 100.0%
14 2 16
87.5% 12.5% 100.0%
16 14 30
53.3% 46.7% 100.0%
33 16 49
67.3% 32.7% 100.0%
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Count
% within Monthly
household Ìncome
Under 20,000
20,000-50,000
50,000and above
Monthly household
Ìncome
Total
No Yes
where do u get foreign
choclates - buy during
foreign trips
Total
27
in the Iuture are the potential consumers. Analyzing their demographics gives us the
potential market segment and the consumer demographic proIile.Also analyzed are the
consumers who are not going to buy Ioreign chocolates Irom India. The reasons Ior the
same have been analyzed later in the qualitative analysis.

nalvzing the consumer of foreign chocolates:

O Demographic analysis of the consumers of foreign chocolates:

Age
Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

Valid 21-35yrs 40 80.0 81.6 81.6
36-50yrs 8 16.0 16.3 98.0
51 and above 1 2.0 2.0 100.0
Total 49 98.0 100.0
Missing 9 1 2.0
Total 50 100.0


Gender
Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

Valid Male 26 52.0 5.1 53.1
Female 23 46.0 6.9 100.0
Total 49 98.0 100.0
Missing 9 1 2.0
Total 50 100.0


Monthly household Income
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent
Valid Under 20,000 3 6.0 6.1 6.1
20,000-50,000 16 32.0 32.7 38.8
50,000and above 30 60.0 61.2 100.0
28
Total 49 98.0 100.0
Missing 9 1 2.0
Total 50 100.0

Education
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent
Valid Less than
graduation
3 6.0 6.1 6.1
Graduate 29 58.0 59.2 65.3
Postgraduat
e and above
17 34.0 .7 100.0
Total 49 98.0 100.0
Missing 9 1 2.0
Total 50 100.0


Occupation
Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent
Valid Student 33 66.0 67. 67.3
Service 5 10.0 10.2 77.6
ProIessional 7 14.0 14.3 91.8
HousewiIe 3 6.0 6.1 98.0
Other 1 2.0 2.0 100.0
Total 49 98.0 100.0
Missing 9 1 2.0
Total 50 100.0

Based on the above tables, the proIile oI a typical consumer oI Ioreign chocolates in India
is as Iollows:
The consumer is a man/ woman aged between 21-35 years. She/he has household
monthly income in excess oI Rs.50,000. The person is at least a graduate or above. One
limitation oI the questionnaire is that the number oI students interviewed is
29
disproportionately high. Hence Irom this particular sample it appears that most oI the
consumers oI Ioreign chocolates are students which may be misleading.

O Demographic analysis of the consumers of foreign chocolates who are already
buying foreign chocolates from India:

People buying foreign chocolates from retail shops in India

Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

Valid No 20 40.0 40.0 40.0
Yes 30 60.0 60.0 100.0
Total 50 100.0 100.0

People buying foreign chocolates from bakeries in India

Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

Valid No 38 76.0 76.0 76.0
Yes 12 24.0 24.0 100.0
Total 50 100.0 100.0

35 out oI 50 (70º) of the consumers of foreign chocolates are buying foreign
chocolates from India (either retail shops or bakeries). 30° are not currently buying
Irom India. This shows that a market Ior Ioreign chocolates exists in India as well.
Age
Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

Valid 21-5yrs 28 80.0 82. 82.4
36-50yrs 6 17.1 17.6 100.0
Total 34 97.1 100.0
Missing 9 1 2.9
Total 35 100.0



Gender
Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

30
Valid Male 19 54.3 55.9 55.9
Female 15 42.9 44.1 100.0
Total 34 97.1 100.0
Missing 9 1 2.9
Total 35 100.0


Monthly household Income
Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

Valid 20,000-
50,000
14 40.0 41.2 41.2
50.000and
above
20 57.1 58.8 100.0
Total 34 97.1 100.0
Missing 9 1 2.9
Total 35 100.0

Education
Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

Valid Less than
graduation
2 5.7 5.9 5.9
Graduate 22 62.9 6.7 70.6
Postgraduat
e and above
10 28.6 29.4 100.0
Total 34 97.1 100.0
Missing 9 1 2.9
Total 35 100.0

Occupation
Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

Valid Student 22 62.9 6.7 64.7
Service 3 8.6 8.8 73.5
ProIessional 7 20.0 20.6 94.1
HousewiIe 2 5.7 5.9 100.0
31
Total 34 97.1 100.0
Missing 9 1 2.9
Total 35 100.0

A consumer who is already buying Ioreign chocolates Irom India, is aged between 21-
35years belonging to the middle and upper income groups (Rs.20,000 and above). A
larger percentage oI the people buying Ioreign chocolates Irom India belong to the
middle income group as compared to the broader segment oI consumers oI Ioreign
chocolates. This indicates a lack oI opportunity to buy Irom abroad but a desire to
consume Ioreign chocolates. Hence this is a very lucrative market segment since Ioreign
chocolates Irom a leading brand like Mars will be well received by this group.

O Analysis of the consumers who are not currently buying from India but are
willing to buy from India in the future:
This suIIers Irom non response error. 60° oI the consumers who do not buy Ioreign
chocolates Irom India haven`t answered this question indicating that either they are
unsure about whether they want to buy Irom India or an error in the Iraming oI the
question. Hence this has not been considered while analyzing the market potential.

nalvzing the non-consumer of foreign chocolates:

O Demographic analysis of the non-consumers of foreign chocolates:
Age
Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

Valid ·20 yrs 10 6.7 6.7 6.7
21-5 yrs 115 76.7 76.7 8.
36-50 17 11.3 11.3 94.7
51 and
above
8 5.3 5.3 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0


32
Gender
Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

Valid Male 75 50.0 50.0 50.0
Iemale 75 50.0 50.0 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0


Monthly household Income
Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

Valid ·20000 7 4.7 4.7 4.7
20001 -
50000
56 7. 7.6 2.
50001 and
above
77 51. 51.7 9.0
NA 9 6.0 6.0 100.0
Total 149 99.3 100.0
Missing 9 1 .7
Total 150 100.0

Education
Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

Valid ·graduation 9 6.0 6.0 6.0
graduate 82 5.7 5.7 60.7
Postgraduat
e & above
59 39.3 39.3 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0


Occupation
Frequency Percent Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent

Valid Student 87 58.0 58.0 58.0
Service 12 8.0 8.0 66.0
Professional 2 16.0 16.0 82.0
Businessman 10 6.7 6.7 88.7
33
Housewife 16 10.7 10.7 99.3
Other 1 .7 .7 100.0
Total 150 100.0 100.0

A typical non consumer oI Ioreign chocolates is aged between 21-35years. Nearly halI
the respondent base had monthly household income less than Rs.50,000. This shows that
this segment might be relatively less aIIluent and more price conscious. Hence in order to
attract this segment it is essential to look at the pricing policies. The non consumer has
most likely done her/his graduation. ProIessionals and housewives are also an important
segment among the non-consumers besides the students.

5. What does the market buy?
The consumers have been analyzed to Iind out which type oI chocolates do they buy and
the brands that they preIer. This also gives us an insight into which is the most popular
type oI chocolate amongst the consumers. This is later supplemented by what they look
Ior in a chocolate in terms oI the importance oI various attributes.


nalvzing the consumers of foreign chocolates:

Type of Chocolate Frequency
Milk chocolate 2
Truffle (with smooth center) 19
Dark chocolate 25
Fruit and nut 2
Exotic Ilavours e.g.Mint 14
Wafer 20
Caramel 16
Liquor 14
Others 3
No PreIerence/ Any 0

The most popular chocolate categories are milk, Iruit and nut, waIer, dark and truIIle. The
Irequency oI consumption has been analysed below Ior the people who consume these
chocolates.

Milk Chocolate by Recoded frequency of consumption of Milk chocolate
34
Recoded Irequency oI
consumptionMilk chocolate


Total
Heavy Medium Light
Milk Chocolate



No Count 1 1 12 14
° within type
oI chocolate -
Milk
Chocolate
7.1° 7.1° 85.7° 100.0°
Yes Count 15 6 21
° within type
oI chocolate -
Milk
Chocolate
71.º 28.6° 100.0°
Total Count 16 1 18 35
° within type
oI chocolate -
Milk
Chocolate
45.7° 2.9° 51.4° 100.0°

Maiority oI the consumers oI milk chocolates are heavy users, consuming the particular
chocolate at least once a week or more.

Truffle Chocolate by Recoded frequency of consumption of Truffle chocolate
Heavy Medium Light
TruIIle



No Count 3 3 5 11
° within
type oI
chocolate -
truIIle
27.3° 27.3° 45.5° 100.0°
Yes Count 12 3 3 18
° within
type oI
chocolate -
truIIle
66.7º 16.7° 16.7° 100.0°
Total Count 15 6 8 29
° within
type oI
chocolate -
truIIle
51.7° 20.7° 27.6° 100.0°

Maiority (66.7°) oI the consumers oI truIIle are heavy users, consuming the particular
chocolate at least once a week or more.
35
Fruit and Nut by Recoded frequency of consumption of fruit and nut chocolate
Heavy Medium Light
Fruit and nut No Count 2 1 7 10
° within
type oI
chocolate -
Iruit and nut
20.0° 10.0° 70.0° 100.0°
Yes Count 10 5 6 21
° within
type oI
chocolate -
Iruit and nut
7.6º 23.8° 28.6° 100.0°
Total Count 12 6 13 31
° within
type oI
chocolate -
Iruit and nut
38.7° 19.4° 41.9° 100.0°

Less than 50° oI the consumers oI Iruit and nut are heavy consumers. So even though
this category oI chocolates is popular with most people liking it, it is not consumed that
Irequently. This could partly be attributed to the generally higher prices oI this category
oI chocolates.




Dark Chocolate by Recoded frequency of consumption of Dark Chocolate
Heavy Medium Light
Dark
chocolate
No Count 1 1 7 9
° within
dark
chocolate
11.1° 11.1° 77.8° 100.0°
Yes Count 12 4 9 25
° within
dark
chocolate
8.0º 16.0° 36.0° 100.0°
Total Count 13 5 16 34
° within
dark
chocolate
38.2° 14.7° 47.1° 100.0°
Again Ior this category less than 50° oI the consumers are heavy consumers. So even
though this category oI chocolates is popular with most people liking it, it is not
36
consumed that Irequently. This could partly be attributed to the generally higher prices
and also lesser availability oI this category oI chocolates.

Wafer Chocolate by Recoded frequency of consumption of Wafer Chocolate
Heavy Medium Light
WaIer No Count 4 4 8 16
° within
waIer
25.0° 25.0° 50.0° 100.0°
Yes Count 11 3 3 17
° within
waIer
6.7º 17.6° 17.6° 100.0°
Total Count 15 7 11 33
° within
waIer
45.5° 21.2° 33.3° 100.0°

A substantial (64.7°) proportion oI the consumers oI waIer chocolates are heavy
consumers. This can be attributed to greater variety, availability and lower price points.
The analysis oI the chocolate category consumed the most and the Irequency oI
consumption Ior the chosen categories, reveals a drawback oI the questionnaire where the
consumer has not iust given the chocolates that he consumes the most but actually the
chocolates he likes/ preIers the most. This is a limitation oI the questionnaire which is
leading to slight discrepancies witnessed in case oI dark chocolates and Iruit and nut

Type of chocolate Frequency (out of 50)
Toblerone 8
Mars 6
Hersheys 2
Snickers 27
Bounty 14
Lindt 18
AIter 8 20
M & M 15
Ferro Roche 0
Others 6

The brands that are consumed the most are Toblerone, Mars, Hersheys and Ferro Roche.
These brands have the easiest recall and greatest visibility. The reasons as to why these
brands are bought have been analyzed in the subsequent part.

37
6. Why does the market buy?
This takes a look at the reasons Ior chocolate purchase Ior both consumers. This has been
analyzed by looking at the ranks that have been given by the various consumers to the
various attributes.

nalvzing the consumers:

Taste 1.8
Brand .77
SoItness / texture 4.15
Price 4.27
Availability 5.13
Assortment 5.33
Packsize 5.58
Packaging 5.96

Taste and brand emerged to be the most important attributes among the consumers. But
taste has received a substantially higher rating in case oI consumers reIlecting a greater
importance attached to taste in this segment oI consumers oI Ioreign chocolates.

For the consumers oI Ioreign chocolates the perIormance oI the most popular brands on
the various attributes were studied: Ferro Roche, Toblerone, Mars
Toblerone
toblerone - assortment 2.56
toblerone availability 1.95
toblerone - brand 1.52
toblerone packsize 1.93
toblerone packaging 1.93
toblerone price 2.21
toblerone soItness 2.07
toblerone - taste 1.62
Mars
mars - assortment 2.7
mars availability 2.19
mars brand 1.93
mars packsize 2.14
mars packaging 2.38
mars price 2.4
mars - softness 1.76
38
mars - taste 1.62
Ferro
Roche
Ferro roche assortment 2.36
ferro roche - availability 1.98
Ierro roche brand 1.74
Ierro roche packsize 1.98
Ferro roche - packaging 1.6
Ierro roche price 2.67
ferro roche - softness 1.7
ferro roche - taste 1.7

Toblerone has scored the maximum on brand and taste and perIormed the worse on
assortment. Hence the reasons Ior popularity amongst the customer who looks Ior a good
brand and great taste and ranks assortment as the least important attribute. The same is
true Ior Mars. While the above is true Ior Ferro Roche as well, it perIorms really well on
another attribute which is the packaging. Ferro Roche is popular Ior its sleek packaging
Ior giIting and which the customers appreciate and adds to its brand value


C. Attitude Interests Opinion Analysis (AIO)

The analysis has been done in 2 ways :
n the whole respondents group
First the AIO analysis is done on whole oI respondents group. The Psychographic
statements, given in Q. No 19 oI consumers Questionnaire and, is taken into
consideration Ior this analysis. First, a Iactor analysis is run on these segments to reduce
the data and to Iind out 2-3 dominant Iactors which sum up the psychographic statements.
AIter that Iactor scores are saved in respective data sheets and a cluster analysis is done
to segment the respondents. AIter that cluster wise demographic analysis is done to
identiIy the clusters and the respondent proIiles in respective clusters.

All Consumers of Foreign Chocolates
Four Iactors emerge out aIter running the Iactor analysis. These Iour Iactors explain 65°
39
oI the total variance. The rotated component matrix oI the Iactor analysis is as shown
The Iour Iactors are:
1. Chocolates are waste oI money
2. Like to try new products
3. Foreign Products have good quality
4. Foreign chocolates are good giIts
The cluster analysis shows that there are only two dominant clusters which are emerging.
Running a 2-cluster solution on these Iactor scores gives us Iollowing clusters:

inaI CIuster Centers
-1.08705 .12640
-1.00687 .11708
-1.42894 .16616
.62819 -.07304
REGR factor score
1 for analysis 1
REGR factor score
2 for analysis 1
REGR factor score
3 for analysis 1
REGR factor score
4 for analysis 1
1 2
Cluster
#4tated C4mp4nent Matrix
a
.242 .575 -3.49E-02 -5.26E-02
-.540 7.023E-02 .636 2.044E-02
.856 .233 8.724E-02 -3.45E-02
.806 -.174 -9.17E-02 -4.98E-02
-3.40E-02 2.499E-02 .113 .853
.310 .378 -.551 .354
-2.05E-02 .597 -4.25E-02 .234
.578 .135 3.236E-02 -.608
.278 7.256E-03 .818 .213
-.229 .720 4.135E-02 -.264
prefer eating on festive
occasions
like buying foreign brands
buying chocolates is
waste
foreign chocolates are
expensive
foreign chocolates make
good gifts
indian are better in taste
consume chocolates
oncaasionally
Ì buy only indian
chocolates
foreign choclates have
high quality standards
like to try new products
1 2 3 4
Component
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.
Rotation Method: Varimax with Kaiser Normalization.
Rotation converged in 8 iterations.
a.
40



Cluster 1
The dominant Iactor which is in this cluster is Iactor 4 and this cluster has only 5
members. That means this cluster believes in that Ioreign chocolates are good giIts and
but they themselves will not buy them. They will still preIer buying Indian chocolates.
The demographic analyses oI this cluster show us that all oI the respondents lie within
21-35 yrs age group. Maiority (4 out oI 5) are males and students who are graduate and
having a MHI oI Rs 50,000 and above. Thus this iustiIies Ior their belieI that Ioreign
chocolates make good giIts.



Cluster 2
This cluster has 43 members and the dominant Iactors which emerge out in this cluster
are Iactors 1, 2 and 3. That means they believe in trying out new products and think they
are oI good quality but on the other hand think that Ioreign chocolates are expensive and
buying them is a waste oI money. The demographic analyses oI this cluster show that
maiority oI them are students in the age group oI 21-35 yrs and there is mix oI both males
and Iemales. But here in this case maiority oI them lies in 20,000 50,000 MHI category
which explains there ambitions oI liking Ioreign products abut still believing that Ioreign
chocolates are expensive and waste oI money. Perhaps they want to spend there money
on some other products.

D. "ualitative Data Analysis

The questionnaire that was designed contained the Iollowing open-ended question :
re vou open to buving foreign chocolates in the future?
Number 41 Cases in each CIuster
5.000
43.000
48.000
2.000
1
2
Cluster
Valid
Missing
41
If Yes . Whv?
If Ao.Whv?

The main obiective behind this obiective was to Iind out what the consumers wishlist is
and what would actually trigger his purchase. The quantitative data is indicative oI the
purchase and non-purchase scenario. However, on analyzing the responses, the Iollowing
picture emerged.

(a) If Yes, whv.....



Some respondents Iilled in this question with their comments. Based on these comments,
the above pie-chart was drawn.

O The Iour predominant Iactors that are reasons Ior consumers being open to the
purchase oI Ioreign chocolates are:
4 Taste: Foreign chocolates taste better than Indian chocolates
4 Variety: Foreign chocolates have a greater variety oI Ilavours than Indian
chocolates
4 AIIordability: Expectation oI Ioreign chocolates being more aIIordable
Why 4uId y4u be 4pen t4 buying 4reign
Ch4c4Iates
Availability
10%
taste
43%
Variety
16%
Experimenting
9%
Affordable
11%
Texture
1%
Gifting
1%
Perception
2%
Quality
7%
42
4 Availability: Expectation oI better availability.

Inferences
O It is evident that the consumer would go ahead and buy the Ioreign chocolates
because oI the taste Iactor primarily.
O Another Iactor that lures them is the variety that Ioreign chocolates have.
O Following this is the availability and aIIordability Iactors, which are supported
by10° and 11° oI the respondents.

Demographics:
O Income: With regard to the Iour predominant Iactors , we see that all the
respondents Iall within the income group oI 20000 to 50000 and 50,000 and
above. There seems to be no diIIerence in the income groups oI respondents
supporting a speciIic Iactor.


O ender : With regards to gender, the data shows that women are more
demanding than men on almost all parameters!!

Inc4me Gr4ups
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
A
v
a
i
l
a
b
i
li
t
y
t
a
s
t
e
V
a
r
i
e
t
y
E
x
p
e
r
i
m
e
n
t
i
n
g
A
f
f
o
r
d
a
b
l
e
Q
u
a
l
i
t
y
T
e
x
t
u
r
e
P
e
r
c
e
p
t
i
o
n
G
i
f
t
i
n
g
Ìnc -a
Ìnc-b
Ìnc-c
Ìnc-d
43

O Occupation : The dominating group is deIinitely the Student' group on all
parameters.


(b) If AO, whv.
The next part oI the question was on why the respondents would not be open to buying
Ioreign chocolates..
The Iollowing Iactors were the primary reasons Ior non-purchase by the respondents.

Gender
0
5
10
15
20
25
A
v
a
i
l
a
b
i
li
t
y
t
a
s
t
e
V
a
r
i
e
t
y
E
x
p
e
r
i
m
e
n
t
i
n
g
A
f
f
o
r
d
a
b
l
e
Q
u
a
l
i
t
y
T
e
x
t
u
r
e
P
e
r
c
e
p
t
i
o
n
G
i
f
t
i
n
g
Male
Female
Occupati4n
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
A
v
a
i
l
a
b
i
li
t
y
t
a
s
t
e
V
a
r
i
e
t
y
E
x
p
e
r
i
m
e
n
t
i
n
g
A
f
f
o
r
d
a
b
l
e
Q
u
a
l
i
t
y
T
e
x
t
u
r
e
P
e
r
c
e
p
t
i
o
n
G
i
f
t
i
n
g
Housewife
Businessman
Service
Professional
Student
44

Inferences:
O pensive : The respondents Ieel that these chocolates will continue to be
expensive
O Satisfied with Indian Chocolates : The respondents Ieel that there is no reason
to buy Ioreign chocolates since Indian chocolates are good enough.
O %aste is poor : The respondents are oI the opinion that Indian chocolates taste a
lot better than the Ioreign ones.

Demographics :
ender : Here, too it is seen that it is the women who are more apprehensive about
buying Ioreign chocolates.

Occupation :
Total
Expensive
46%
Satisfied with
Ìndian
Chocolates
32%
Low personal
Consumption
4%
Taste is poor
18%
Gender
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Expensive Satisfied with
Ìndian
Chocolates
Low personal
Consumption
Taste is poor
Male
Female
45

It is evident that students are a dominating group here as well and this has obvious
relevance as well known to common perception , especially when it comes to chocolates
being expensive. Students also seem to be the ones who are rather touchy about the taste
Iactor as well.

What They Said.
O oreign Chocolates are softer and tastier than Indian ones
O More oreign flavours must be introduced
O #educe the price
O ring chocolate candies here.
O oreign chocolates in stores are inferior in taste than those bought from
abroad
O I believe thev (foreign chocolates) are better in qualitv and will get cheaper
O Must keep a check on prices, must be available and must be in svnc with
Indian taste
O I'm not sure which chocolate is a foreign one.there should be better
promotion
O Current prices don't justifv the value desired

Occupati4n
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Expensive Satisfied with
Ìndian
Chocolates
Low personal
Consumption
Taste is poor
Housewife
Businessman
Service
Professional
Student
46
Would vou buv foreign chocolates from India if a major foreign chocolate brand
started selling them in the countrv
If not, whv?
This is what they said..
O oreign chocolates should be as easilv available in India as Dairv milk
is
O indt is too epensive.%he chocolates must be in smaller sizes
O Price is the onlv issue , barring which the popularitv of these chocolates
would be high
O %he major consideration is that sometimes the packaging date of foreign
chocolates is old.

Some key points brought out by the consumers oI Ioreign chocolates are :
- They believe that Ioreign chocolates aren`t as expensive when they
are paid Ior in Dollars!
- Also, they are skeptical about ease oI availability, variety, pricing and
above all , whether the taste would be comparable with the chocolates
available abroad.

47
%he Wishlist

From the above analysis it is evident that a bulk oI consumers are open to the idea oI
buying Ioreign chocolate.

~What deIinitely seems to have won them over is the taste factor. This is a key Iactor
and will probably even determine their decision oI re-purchase.

~These consumers are looking Ior variety and different flavours. This is going to be
quite a lure Ior them.

~But, then again, price tends to be a restraining Iactor. For some there is an expectation
oI lower prices, while Ior some others there is a perception that the high prices are a
deterrent to purchase.

~Another perception that must be looked into is that oI availability.

~ Promotion is very important. People are unaware oI which brands are authetic Foreign
chocolates and they Ieel that adequate promotion would dispel their Iears.

~ There must be a clear communication to the prospective consumers that the chocolates
are authentic and genuine.

~ The respondents attribute a lot oI importance to quality and believe that Ioreign
chocolates are deIinitely superior on that Iront. This expectation must be met
consistently.





48
Limitations and caveats

O Consumers haven`t answered q10, which questions them on whether they are
going to buy Ioreign chocolates Irom India in the Iuture. There is substantial non
response error as 15 people should have answered this question but only 6 people
have given a response (40°).
O A limitation oI the questionnaire is that the number oI students interviewed is
disproportionately high. Hence Irom this particular sample it appears that most oI
the consumers oI Ioreign chocolates are students which may be misleading.
O The analysis oI the chocolate category consumed the most and the Irequency oI
consumption Ior the chosen categories, reveals a drawback oI the questionnaire
where the consumer has not iust given the chocolates that he consumes the most
but actually the chocolates he likes/ preIers the most. This is a limitation oI the
questionnaire which is leading to slight discrepancies witnessed in case oI dark
chocolates and Iruit and nut
O The questionnaire has not given us data to understand whether the non-
consumers who are ready to buy Ioreign chocolates , will actually cut-down their
consumption oI Indian brands and start consuming Ioreign brands or whether their
consumption oI Indian chocolates will remain unaIIected while they increase their
total consumption by adding on Ioreign chocolates.
O The questionnaire hasn`t been able to Iind out how the consumer oI Ioreign
chocolates perceives Indian brands vis-a-vis Ioreign brands. There are a Iew
qualitative statements to support this, but more quantitative analysis is required.
O The questionnaire has predominantly nominal data, thereby limiting the scope oI
analysis.
O Also, the consumers oI chocolates haven`t been asked to rank their preIerred
brands.The only indicators are the ranks allotted to the brands on various
attributes.
O Finally, we haven`t asked the consumers to explicitly discuss their ideal brand.
The only way we have garnered some inIormation is Irom the qualitative and
quantitative analysis drawn above.
49
Conclusions and Recommendations

WHO IS MARS`S POTENTIAL AND PROSPECTIVE CONSUMER ?

A larger percentage oI the people buying Ioreign chocolates Irom India belong to the
middle income group as compared to the broader segment oI consumers oI Ioreign
chocolates. This indicates a lack oI opportunity to buy Irom abroad but a desire to
consume Ioreign chocolates. Hence this is a very lucrative market segment since Ioreign
chocolates Irom a leading brand like Mars will be well received by this group.

A very promising segment that is willing to buy Ioreign chocolates is the aIIluent, young
proIessionals with the spending power.
What %hev ike!
The most popular chocolate categories are milk, Iruit and nut, waIer, dark and truIIle
chocolates

Preffered Attributes

Taste and brand emerged to be the most important attributes among the consumers as.
But taste has received a substantially higher rating in case oI consumers reIlecting a
greater importance attached to taste in this segment oI consumers oI Ioreign chocolates.

A cluster analysis done shows the emergence oI two clusters which are very lucrative
Ior Mars. In terms oI demographics there is no signiIicant diIIerence since maiority oI
the respondents are students. However, what emerges very clearly is that:
the age group oI the target group is between 20 to 35 years
With monthly household incomes oI Rs. 50,000 plus Ior the consumers.

50
It is very essential Ior Mars to keep in mind PRICE as a Iactor as this has emerged not
only in the mean scores calculated but also in the qualitative data analysis.
% M#%IA MIX
By looking at the position oI the Ioreign brands being consumed in India currently,
Mars will need to take cues Irom the top brands as rated by the consumers on various
parameters.

O Price and Product
In terms oI product attributes such as soItness, taste, assortment and packsize,
Toblerone wins hands down.

O Availability
Here, too Mars must look into its own distribution oI Toblerlone, because despite
being a Ioreign brand it seems to score well in this aspect.

O Packaging And Branding
The Iorerunner here is the bright- gold -paper wrapped Ferrero Rocher chocolate.

O Most common Reasons for Purchase
The three key reasons Ior purchase are :
- SelI consumption
- GiIting
- Special occassions

ThereIore, Mars must Iocus on these areas when deciding SKU size and positioning,
considering the Iact that it will have an advantage over the current Ioreign brands.
Currently, it should be noted that only 2 brands have giIt packs- Cadburys` and
Ferrero Rocher

51
O Preferred Pack Type
Respondents preIer Ioreign chocolates Ior the purpose oI giIting. However, it is also
to be noted that they preIer assorted packs. This is also validated by the qualitative
data analysis as well wherein consumers are looking Ior variety and believe it is a
parameter where Ioreign chocolates score over Indian chocolates. ThereIore, Mars
must come out with a wide product line ranging Irom single units Ior an any-time
snack, to assortment packs Ior special/giIting occasions.

O Media Habits & Communication
Across segments, the dominant media options that have emerged are :
- Television
- Magazines ( to some extent)
No Ioreign brands have advertised in India as oI now. Whereas, when it comes to
Indian chocolates we see that the awareness is created mainly by TV commercials.
What also gets the consumer thinking is word- oI- mouth promotion and in-store
displays.
At this iuncture it is important Ior Mars to avail the beneIits oI being one oI the Iirst
mover. Being an FMCG product, the main media oI communication would be TV
Iollowed by print and radio. Mars will have to develop integrated marketing
communication plan.

O Triggers For Purchase and the consumers` Wishlist
~What deIinitely seems to have won the consumers over is the taste factor. This is
a key Iactor and will probably even determine their decision oI re-purchase.

~These consumers are looking Ior variety and different flavours. This is going to
be quite a lure Ior them.

52
~But, then again, price tends to be a restraining Iactor. For some there is an
expectation oI lower prices, while Ior some others there is a perception that the high
prices are a deterrent to purchase.

~Another perception that must be looked into is that oI diIIiculty oI availability.

~ Promotion is very important. People are unaware oI which brands are authetic
Foreign chocolates and they Ieel that adequate promotion would dispel their Iears.

~ There must be a clear communication to the prospective consumers that the
chocolates are authentic and genuine.

~ The respondents attribute a lot oI importance to quality and believe that Ioreign
chocolates are deIinitely superior on that Iront. This expectation must be met
consistently.

WHAT WE FEEL..

Based on all the above analysis and recommendations, we are oI the opinion that the
market is Ieasible Ior Mars to launch Ioreign chocolates Irom a preliminary research
perspective.
A second stage research must be carried to out to understand the Marketing mix oI
the top competition brands that Mars has to take cues Irom.
Also, a detailed study oI the consumer decision making process maybe carried out to
supplement the above.

All this will eventually help Mars take its decision on positioning its Ioreign
chocolates as mass or niche products.



53
Bibliography

www.mars.com
IndiaStat.com
Foreign Chocolates Flood Shop Shelves, Business Line. Oct 16, 2001; pg 1
Foreign Chocolates, Juices Crowd Indian Shelves, Business Line. Jul 7, 2001; pg 6
Chocolate Imports, A Sweet Tale, Economic Times. Dec 5, 2002; pg 1
Chocolate Imports Will Make No Dent On Players, Financial Express. Oct 10, 1997; pg 7
Cadbury India, Beverage & Food World. Feb 28, 2006; pg 91
Chocolate Market Gears Up For A Sweet Time, Impact. Mar 6, 2005; pg 7
A Chocolate A Day, Pitch. Dec 15, 2004; pg 60
Sweet Success, USP Age. Nov 30, 2004; pg 44
Cadbury Dairy Milk: Real Taste OI Meetha, Brand Reporter. Aug 15, 2004; pg 30
Hershey To Set Up Own Subsidiary, Economic Times. May 13, 1995; pg 13
What's sweet and what isn't , Business Line, July 22, 2001
Nestle India: Pare exposures Business Line, Aug 15, 2004
















54

Exhibits
a. CONSUMER "UESTIONNAIRE

"ualifying "uestion

1. Do you consume chocolates?

2. Do you consume Ioreign chocolates on a regular basis?
I only have Ioreign chocolates
I mostly consume Ioreign chocolates (Out oI every 10 chocolates that I consume, 7 or more
are Ioreign chocolates)
I have equal level oI consumption Ior Foreign and Indian chocolates
(Out oI every 10 chocolates that I consume, 4 to 6 are Ioreign chocolates)
I rarely consume Ioreign chocolates (Out oI every 10 chocolates that I consume 3 or less are
Ioreign chocolates)
I don`t consume Ioreign chocolates at all

"uestions:

1. Do you purchase packaged snack Iood Irom the market? Yes / No

2. Which are the packaged snack Iood items that you purchase regularly (at least once a month)
(Tick one or more)
Biscuits/ Cakes Namkeens/ Salted Snacks Chips/ WaIers
Cold Drinks/Juices Ice Creams Sugar ConIectionary
Chocolates Others

3. Which oI the Iollowing packaged snack Iood items are you most likely to purchase impulsively?
(Tick one or more)
Biscuits/ Cakes Namkeens/ Salted Snacks Chips/ WaIers
Cold Drinks/Juices Ice Creams Sugar ConIectionary
Chocolates Others

4. How oIten do you consume chocolates?
More than once a week Once a week Once in a Iortnight
Once a month Only on special occasions

5. What type oI chocolates do you consume the most?(Tick one or more)
Milk chocolate TruIIle (with smooth center) Dark chocolate
Fruit and nut Exotic Ilavours e.g.Mint WaIer
Caramel Liquor Others
No preIerence/ Any

6. Frequency oI consumption:
Type oI Chocolate More than once a
week
Once a week Once a Fortnight Once a Month Only on special
occasions
Milk chocolate
Dark chocolate
TruIIle (with smooth
center)

Caramel
Fruit and nut
WaIer
55
Exotic Ilavours
e.g.Mint

Liquor
No PreIerence/ Any
Others

7. How oIten do you consume Ioreign chocolates? (Tick only one)
More than once a week Once a week Once in a Iortnight
Once a month Only on special occasions

8. From where do you get Ioreign chocolates Ior consumption? (Tick which ever is applicable)
Buy Irom retail shops in India
Buy Irom Bakeries/ CoIIee shops in India (including the ones in hotels)
Buy Irom Duty Free shops at International airports
Buy during Ioreign trips
Ask Iriends/ relatives going abroad to buy chocolates Ior you (pay them)
Get as giIts Irom people, company etc.
Never buy and only get as giIts
Others

9. (For people who chose don`t buy option in Q.No.8 only)

II you don`t buy Ioreign chocolates (Answer this question and then move to Question 14)
a. Why don`t you buy Ioreign chocolates?
Don`t like it that much to spend money on it
I preIer Indian chocolates
Availability is very poor in the country
There isn`t a marked diIIerence in the quality and taste oI Ioreign and Indian
chocolates
They are too expensive

b. II you stop getting Ioreign chocolates as giIts
Would stop eating Ioreign chocolates (Move to Question 15)
Would ask people going abroad to get me Ioreign chocolates (pay them)
Would start buying Ioreign chocolates either Irom India or abroad

10. For people who buy Ioreign chocolates but have never bought them Irom India,
a. Would you buy Ioreign chocolates Irom India iI a maior Ioreign chocolate brand started
selling them in the country? Yes/ No
b. II No, Why

11. II you buy Ioreign chocolates, how many Ioreign chocolates do you buy at a go?

Single unit 2-3 4-5 GiIt pack and Assorted packs

12. For what purpose do you buy Ioreign chocolates?(Tick one or more)

SelI consumption
GiIting
Festivals
Baking Ioods ingredient
In Lieu oI sweets/ desserts
Anytime Snack
Special Occasions

56


13. How did you come to know about the Ioreign chocolates you buy? (Tick one or more)

Newspapers Television Commercials Magazines
Billboards Word oI mouth In-store
Others

14. Rank the importance oI the Iollowing attributes in order oI preIerence while buying Ioreign
chocolates (1-Most important, 8- Least important)
Attribute Rank
Assortment
Availability
Brand
Pack size
Packaging
Price
SoItness/ Texture
Taste

15. Which oI the Iollowing brands oI Ioreign chocolates do you consume?(Tick one or more)
Toblerone Mars Hersheys
Snickers Bounty Lindt
AIter 8 M & M Ferro Roche
No brand preIerence Others

16. Rate each oI the Iollowing brands Ior eIIectiveness on each criteria
(1-Very Good, 2-Good, 3-Neutral, 4-Poor, 5-Very Poor)


Assortment Availability Brand Pack size Packaging Price
SoItness/
Texture Taste
Toblerone
Mars
Hersheys
Snickers
Ferro Roche
Bounty
Lindt
AIter 8
M & M
Others



17. Any suggestions/ comments.
.....................................................................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................................................................

18. Please rate the Iollowing on a scale oI 1 to 5
1 ÷ Completely Agree, 2 ÷ Agree, 3 ÷ Neutral, 4 ÷ Disagree, 5 ÷ Completely Disagree

a. I preIer eating/giIting Indian sweets on Iestive occasions
b. I like buying Ioreign brands over Indian Brands
c. Buying chocolates is a waste oI money
d. Foreign chocolates are unnecessarily expensive
e. Foreign chocolates make good giIts
57
I. Indian chocolates are better in taste than Ioreign chocolates
g. I consume chocolates only occasionally since they are Iattening
h. Since I was in born in India, I should buy only Indian Chocolates
i. I believe that Ioreign brands have very high quality standards
i. I like to try new products


19. Are you open to buying Ioreign chocolates in the Iuture?(Tick)
a. II Yes, why
b. II No, why


20. Age: · 20 yrs 20-35 yrs 35-50 yrs 50 yrs and above

21. Gender: Male Female

22. Monthly Household Income in Rupees
Under 20,000 20,000-50,000 50,000 & Above Not Applicable

23. Education: Less than graduation Graduate Postgraduate &above

24. Occupation (Tick)
Student T Service ProIessional
Businessman HousewiIe Other

%A YOU
















58




%A YOU
b Coding Sheet

Mars Chocolates Coding scheme (Consumers)
"Ao Jariable name Coding Instruction
Svmbol used for
variable name
1 Purchse snack Iood Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 1
2a type oI packaged Iood purchsed regularly - biscuits/cakes Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 2a
2b type oI packaged Iood purchsed regularly - namkeens Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 2b
2c type oI packaged Iood purchsed regularly- chips Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 2c
2d type oI packaged Iood purchsed regularly- cold drinks Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 2d
2e type oI packaged Iood purchsed regularly- ice creams Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 2e
2I
type oI packaged Iood purchsed regularly- sugar
conIectionary Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 2I
2g type oI packaged Iood purchsed regularly- chocolates Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 2g
2h type oI packaged Iood purchsed regularly- others Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 2h
3a
type oI packaged Iood purchsed impulsively -
biscuits/cakes Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 3a
3b type oI packaged Iood purchsed impulsively - namkeens Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 3b
3c type oI packaged Iood purchsed impulsively- chips Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 3c
3d type oI packaged Iood purchsed impulsively- cold drinks Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 3d
3e type oI packaged Iood purchsed impulsively- ice creams Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 3e
3I
type oI packaged Iood purchsed impulsively- sugar
conIectionary Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 3I
3g type oI packaged Iood purchsed impulsively- chocolates Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 3g
3h type oI packaged Iood purchsed Impulsively- others Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 3h
4 oIten u consume chocolates
~once a week ÷ 1,
once a week ÷ 2,
once a Iortnight ÷
3, once a month ÷
4, special occasion
÷ 5 4
5a type oI chocolate - Milk Chocolate Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 5a
5b type oI chocolate - truIIle Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 5b
5c type oI chocolate - dark chocolate Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 5c
5d type oI chocolate - Iruit and nut Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 5d
5e type oI chocolate - exotic Ilavors Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 5e
5I type oI chocolate - waIer Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 5I
5g type oI chocolate - caramel Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 5g
5h type oI chocolate - liquor Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 5h
5i type oI chocolate - others Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 5i
5i type oI chocolate - any / no preI Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 5i
59
6a Irequency oI consumption - milk chocolate
~once a week ÷ 1,
once a week ÷ 2,
once a Iortnight ÷
3, once a month ÷
4, special occasion
÷ 5 6a
6b Irequency oI consumption - dark chocolate
~once a week ÷ 1,
once a week ÷ 2,
once a Iortnight ÷
3, once a month ÷
4, special occasion
÷ 5 6b
6c Irequency oI consumption - truIIle
~once a week ÷ 1,
once a week ÷ 2,
once a Iortnight ÷
3, once a month ÷
4, special occasion
÷ 5 6c
6d Irequency oI consumption - caramel
~once a week ÷ 1,
once a week ÷ 2,
once a Iortnight ÷
3, once a month ÷
4, special occasion
÷ 5 6d
6e Irequency oI consumption - Iruit and nut
~once a week ÷ 1,
once a week ÷ 2,
once a Iortnight ÷
3, once a month ÷
4, special occasion
÷ 5 6e
6I Irequency oI consumption - waIer
~once a week ÷ 1,
once a week ÷ 2,
once a Iortnight ÷
3, once a month ÷
4, special occasion
÷ 5 6I
6g Irequency oI consumption - exotic
~once a week ÷ 1,
once a week ÷ 2,
once a Iortnight ÷
3, once a month ÷
4, special occasion
÷ 5 6g
6h Irequency oI consumption - liquor
~once a week ÷ 1,
once a week ÷ 2,
once a Iortnight ÷
3, once a month ÷
4, special occasion
÷ 5 6h
60
6i Irequency oI consumption - others
~once a week ÷ 1,
once a week ÷ 2,
once a Iortnight ÷
3, once a month ÷
4, special occasion
÷ 5 6i
6i Irequency oI consumption - any / no preI
~once a week ÷ 1,
once a week ÷ 2,
once a Iortnight ÷
3, once a month ÷
4, special occasion
÷ 5 6i
7 oIten u consume chocolates - Ioreign chocolates
~once a week ÷ 1,
once a week ÷ 2,
once a Iortnight ÷
3, once a month ÷
4, special occasion
÷ 5 7
8a where do u get Ioreign choclates - buy Irom retail shops Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 8a
8b where do u get Ioreign choclates - buy Irom bakeries Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 8b
8c where do u get Ioreign choclates - buy Irom duty Iree Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 8c
8d where do u get Ioreign choclates - buy during Ioreign trips Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 8d
8e where do u get Ioreign choclates - ask Iriends to get Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 8e
8I where do u get Ioreign choclates - get as giIts Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 8I
8g
where do u get Ioreign choclates - never buy and only as
giIts Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 8g
8h where do u get Ioreign choclates - others Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 8h
9a why don`t u buy Ioreign choclates
don`t like to spend
money ÷ 1, preIer
indian chocolates ÷
2, poor avaiability
÷ 3, no marked diII
÷ 4, too expensive
÷ 5 9a
9b iI u stop getting chocloates as giIts
stop eating Ioreign
choclates ÷ 1, ask
people abroad to
get ÷ 2, start
buying ÷ 3 9b
10a would u buy Irom india Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 10a
11 how many choclates u buy at a go
single unit ÷ 1, 2-3
÷ 2, 4-5 ÷ 3, giIt
pack ÷ 4 11
12a Pupose oI buying - selI consumption Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 12a
12b Pupose oI buying - giIting Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 12b
12c Pupose oI buying - Iestivals Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 12c
12d Pupose oI buying - baking Ioods ingredient Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 12d
12e Pupose oI buying - in lieu oI sweets Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 12e
12I Pupose oI buying - anytime snack Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 12I
12g Pupose oI buying - special occasions Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 12g
61
13a how did u come to know - newspapers Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 13a
13b how did u come to know - TVC Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 13b
13c how did u come to know - magazines Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 13c
13d how did u come to know - billboards Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 13d
13e how did u come to know - WOM Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 13e
13I how did u come to know - in-store Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 13I
13g how did u come to know - others Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 13g
14a importance oI attribute - assortment Write the Rank 14a
14b importance oI attribute - availability Write the Rank 14b
14c importance oI attribute - brand Write the Rank 14c
14d importance oI attribute - packsize Write the Rank 14d
14e importance oI attribute - packaging Write the Rank 14e
14I importance oI attribute - price Write the Rank 14I
14g importance oI attribute - soItness / texture Write the Rank 14g
14h importance oI attribute - taste Write the Rank 14h
15a which brand do u consume - toblerone Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 15a
15b which brand do u consume - mars Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 15b
15c which brand do u consume - hersheys Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 15c
15d which brand do u consume - snickers Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 15d
15e which brand do u consume - bounty Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 15e
15I which brand do u consume - lindt Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 15I
15g which brand do u consume - aIter 8 Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 15g
15h which brand do u consume - M & M Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 15h
15i which brand do u consume - Ierro roche Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 15i
15i which brand do u consume - No brand PreI Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 15i
15k which brand do u consume - others Yes ÷ 1, No ÷ 0 15k
16a1 toblerone - assortment write the rating 16a1
16a2 toblerone - availability write the rating 16a2
16a3 toblerone - brand write the rating 16a3
16a4 toblerone - packsize write the rating 16a4
16a5 toblerone - packaging write the rating 16a5
16a6 toblerone - price write the rating 16a6
16a7 toblerone - soItness write the rating 16a7
16a8 toblerone - taste write the rating 16a8
16b1 mars - assortment write the rating 16b1
16b2 mars - availability write the rating 16b2
16b3 mars - brand write the rating 16b3
16b4 mars - packsize write the rating 16b4
16b5 mars - packaging write the rating 16b5
16b6 mars - price write the rating 16b6
16b7 mars - soItness write the rating 16b7
16b8 mars - taste write the rating 16b8
16c1 Hersheys - assortment write the rating 16c1
16c2 hersheys - availability write the rating 16c2
16c3 hersheys - brand write the rating 16c3
16c4 hersheys - packsize write the rating 16c4
16c5 hersheys - packaging write the rating 16c5
16c6 hersheys - price write the rating 16c6
62
16c7 hersheys - soItness write the rating 16c7
16c8 hersheys - taste write the rating 16c8
16d1 snickers - assortment write the rating 16d1
16d2 snickers - availability write the rating 16d2
16d3 snickers - brand write the rating 16d3
16d4 snickers - packsize write the rating 16d4
16d5 snickers - packaging write the rating 16d5
16d6 snickers - price write the rating 16d6
16d7 snickers - soItness write the rating 16d7
16d8 snickers - taste write the rating 16d8
16e1 Ierro roche - assortment write the rating 16e1
16e2 Ierro roche - availability write the rating 16e2
16e3 Ierro roche - brand write the rating 16e3
16e4 Ierro roche - packsize write the rating 16e4
16e5 Ierro roche - packaging write the rating 16e5
16e6 Ierro roche - price write the rating 16e6
16e7 Ierro roche - soItness write the rating 16e7
16e8 Ierro roche - taste write the rating 16e8
16I1 Bounty - assortment write the rating 16I1
16I2 Bounty - availability write the rating 16I2
16I3 Bounty - brand write the rating 16I3
16I4 Bounty - packsize write the rating 16I4
16I5 Bounty - packaging write the rating 16I5
16I6 Bounty - price write the rating 16I6
16I7 Bounty - soItness write the rating 16I7
16I8 Bounty - taste write the rating 16I8
16g1 Lindt - assortment write the rating 16g1
16g2 Lindt - availability write the rating 16g2
16g3 Lindt - brand write the rating 16g3
16g4 Lindt - packsize write the rating 16g4
16g5 Lindt - packaging write the rating 16g5
16g6 Lindt - price write the rating 16g6
16g7 Lindt - soItness write the rating 16g7
16g8 Lindt - taste write the rating 16g8
16h1 aIter 8 - assortment write the rating 16h1
16h2 aIter 8 - availability write the rating 16h2
16h3 aIter 8 - brand write the rating 16h3
16h4 aIter 8 - packsize write the rating 16h4
16h5 aIter 8 - packaging write the rating 16h5
16h6 aIter 8 - price write the rating 16h6
16h7 aIter 8 - soItness write the rating 16h7
16h8 aIter 8 - taste write the rating 16h8
16i1 M&M - assortment write the rating 16i1
16i2 M&M - availability write the rating 16i2
16i3 M&M - brand write the rating 16i3
16i4 M&M - packsize write the rating 16i4
16i5 M&M - packaging write the rating 16i5
16i6 M&M - price write the rating 16i6
63
16i7 M&M - soItness write the rating 16i7
16i8 M&M - taste write the rating 16i8
16i1 others - assortment write the rating 16i1
16i2 others - availability write the rating 16i2
16i3 others - brand write the rating 16i3
16i4 others - packsize write the rating 16i4
16i5 others - packaging write the rating 16i5
16i6 others - price write the rating 16i6
16i7 others - soItness write the rating 16i7
16i8 others - taste write the rating 16i8
18a preIer eating on Iestive occasions write the rating 18a
18b like buying Ioreign brands write the rating 18b
18c buying chocolates is waste write the rating 18c
18d Ioreign chocolates are expensive write the rating 18d
18e Ioreign chocolates make good giIts write the rating 18e
18I indian are better in taste write the rating 18I
18g consume chocolates oncaasionally write the rating 18g
18h I buy only indian chocolates write the rating 18h
18i Ioreign choclates have high quality standards write the rating 18i
18i like to try new products write the rating 18i
19 Openness to buying Ioreign chocolates in Iuture Yes÷1,no÷0 19
20 Age
·20 ÷ 1, 20-35 ÷ 2,
35-50 ÷ 3, ~50 ÷ 4 20
21 Gender
male ÷ 1, Iemale ÷
2 21
22 Monthly household Income
·20K ÷ 1, 20K-50k
÷ 2, ~50k ÷ 3, NA
÷ 4 22
23 Education
·Graduate ÷ 1,
Graduate ÷ 2, PG
& Above ÷ 3 23
24 Occupation
Student ÷ 1,
Service ÷ 2,
ProIessional ÷ 3,
Businessman ÷ 4,
HousewiIe ÷ 5,
Other ÷ 6 24



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