P. 1
Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi-VOL021

Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi-VOL021

|Views: 452|Likes:
Published by tij15
This are the volumes form the revised - erroneous - version of the CWMG as published on the CD-Rom "Mahatma Gandhi - Interactive Multimedia - Electronic Book" in 1999. Page and volume nos. are not identical with the original print version of the 1960's-1990's. The content of this CWMG version is to be credited as "The Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi (Electronic Book), New Delhi, Publications Division Government of India, 1999, 98 volumes"
vol 021- July 1, 1920 - November 14, 1920
This are the volumes form the revised - erroneous - version of the CWMG as published on the CD-Rom "Mahatma Gandhi - Interactive Multimedia - Electronic Book" in 1999. Page and volume nos. are not identical with the original print version of the 1960's-1990's. The content of this CWMG version is to be credited as "The Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi (Electronic Book), New Delhi, Publications Division Government of India, 1999, 98 volumes"
vol 021- July 1, 1920 - November 14, 1920

More info:

Published by: tij15 on Mar 23, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/13/2011

pdf

[August 1, 1920]2

SIR,

It is not without a pang that I return the Kaiser-i-Hind gold

medal, granted3

to me by your predecessor4

for my humanitarian
work in South Africa, the Zulu War medal granted in South Africa for
my war services as officer in charge of the Indian Volunteers Service
Corps in 1906 and the Boer War medal for my services as Assistant
Superintendent of the Indian Volunteer Stretcher-Bearer Corps during
the Boer War of 1899. I venture to return these medals in pursuance
of the scheme of non-co-operation, inaugurated today in connection
with the khilafat movement. Valuable as these honours have been to
me, I cannot wear them with an easy conscience so long as my
Mussulman countrymen have to labour under a wrong done to their
religious sentiments. Events, which have happened during the past
month, have confirmed me in the opinion that the Imperial
Government have acted in the khilafat matter in an unscrupulous,
immoral and unjust manner and have been moving from wrong to
wrong in order to defend their immorality. I can retain neither respect
nor affection for such a Government. The attitude of the Imperial
and Your Excellency’s Governments on the Punjab question has
given me an additional sense for grave dissatisfaction. I had the
honour as Your Excellency is aware as one of the Congress

1

This also appeared in Young India, 4-8-1920, under the caption

“Renunciation of Medals”.

2

From the reference to inauguration of non-co-operation in connection with

the khilafat movement on this date

3

In 1915.

4

Lord Hardinge

106

THE COLLECTED WORKS OF MAHATMA GANDHI

Commissioners to investigate the cause of disorder in the Punjab
during April of 1919 and
it is my deliberate conviction that Sir Michael O’Dwyer was
totally unfit to hold the office of Lieutenant-Governor of the Punjab
and that his policy was primarily responsible for infuriating the mob
at Amritsar. No doubt the mob excesses were unpardonable. Incen-
diarism, the murder of the five innocent Englishmen and the cowardly
assault on Miss Sherwood1

were most deplorable and uncalled for but
the punitive measures taken by General Dyer, Col. Frank Johnson,
Col. O’Brien, Mr. Bosworth Smith, Rai Shri Ram Sud, Mr. Malik
Khan and other officers were out of all proportion to the crime of the
people and amounted to a wanton cruelty and inhumanity, almost
unparallelled in modern times.
Yours Excellency’s light-hearted treatment of the official crime,
your exoneration of Sir Michael O’Dwyer, Mr. Montagu’s dispatch
and above all the shameful ignorance of the Punjab events and the
callous disregard of the feelings of the Indians betrayed by the House
of Lords, have filled me with the gravest misgivings regarding the
future of the Empire, have estranged me completely from the present
Government and have disabled me from tendering as I have hitherto
whole-heartedly tendered my loyal co-operation. In my humble
opinion, the ordinary method of agitating by way of petitions,
deputation and the like, is no remedy for moving to repentence a
Government, so hopelessly indifferent to the welfare of its charge as
the Government of India has proved to be.
In European countries, the condonation of such grievous
wrongs as the khilafat and the punjab would have resulted in a bloody
revolution by the people. They would have resisted at all cost the
national emasculation such as the said wrongs imply. But one half of
India is too weak to offer a violent resistance and the other half is
unwilling to do so. I have therefore ventured to suggest a remedy of
non-co-operation, which enables those who wish to dissociate
themselves from the Government and which, if it is unattended by
violence and undertaken in an ordered manner must compel it to
retrace its steps and undo the wrongs committed. But whilst I pursue
the policy of non-co-operation in so far as I can carry the people

1

An English woman who served in the Mission School, Amritsar. She
was brutally attacked on April 10, 1919, while cycling and was rescued by an
Indian

VOL. 21 : 1 JULY, 1920 - 21 NOVEMBER, 1920

107

with me, I shall not lose hope that you will yet see your way to do
justice. I therefore respectfully ask Your Exellency to summon a
conference of recognized leaders of the people and in consultation
with them find a way that would placate the Mussulman and do
reparation to the unhappy Punjab.

I remain,

Sir,

Your faithful servant,

M. K. GANDHI

NOTE

I understand that P.S.V.1

will send us the K.I.H. medal for storage. No other

action is needed.

JOHN WOOD2

N.A.I. : Foreign : Political : File No. 100 : 1921

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->