Solutions to the exercises from T.M.

Apostol,
Calculus, vol. 1 assigned to doctoral students in
years 2002-2003
andrea battinelli
dipartimento di scienze matematiche e informatiche “R.Magari”
dell’università di Siena
via del Capitano 15 - 53100 Siena
tel: +39-0577-233769/02 fax: /01/30
e-mail: battinelli @unisi.it
web: http//www.batman vai li
December 12, 2005
2
Contents
I Volume 1 1
1 Chapter 1 3
2 Chapter 2 5
3 Chapter 3 7
4 Chapter 4 9
5 Chapter 5 11
6 Chapter 6 13
7 Chapter 7 15
8 Chapter 8 17
9 Chapter 9 19
10 Chapter 10 21
11 Chapter 11 23
12 Vector algebra 25
12.1 Historical introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
12.2 The vector space of n-tuples of real numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
12.3 Geometric interpretation for n ≤ 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
12.4 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
12.4.1 n. 1 (p. 450) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
12.4.2 n. 2 (p. 450) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
12.4.3 n. 3 (p. 450) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
12.4.4 n. 4 (p. 450) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
12.4.5 n. 5 (p. 450) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
12.4.6 n. 6 (p. 451) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
4 CONTENTS
12.4.7 n. 7 (p. 451) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
12.4.8 n. 8 (p. 451) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
12.4.9 n. 9 (p. 451) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
12.4.10 n. 10 (p. 451) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
12.4.11 n. 11 (p. 451) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
12.4.12 n. 12 (p. 451) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
12.5 The dot product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
12.6 Length or norm of a vector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
12.7 Orthogonality of vectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
12.8 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
12.8.1 n. 1 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
12.8.2 n. 2 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
12.8.3 n. 3 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
12.8.4 n. 5 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
12.8.5 n. 6 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
12.8.6 n. 7 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
12.8.7 n. 10 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
12.8.8 n. 13 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
12.8.9 n. 14 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
12.8.10 n. 15 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
12.8.11 n. 16 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
12.8.12 n. 17 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
12.8.13 n. 19 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
12.8.14 n. 20 (p. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
12.8.15 n. 21 (p. 457) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
12.8.16 n. 22 (p. 457) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
12.8.17 n. 24 (p. 457) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
12.8.18 n. 25 (p. 457) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
12.9 Projections. Angle between vectors in n-space . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
12.10 The unit coordinate vectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
12.11 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
12.11.1 n. 1 (p. 460) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
12.11.2 n. 2 (p. 460) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
12.11.3 n. 3 (p. 460) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
12.11.4 n. 5 (p. 460) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
12.11.5 n. 6 (p. 460) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
12.11.6 n. 8 (p. 460) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
12.11.7 n. 10 (p. 461) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
12.11.8 n. 11 (p. 461) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
12.11.9 n. 13 (p. 461) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
12.11.10 n. 17 (p. 461) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
12.12 The linear span of a finite set of vectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
CONTENTS 5
12.13 Linear independence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
12.14 Bases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
12.15 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
12.15.1 n. 1 (p. 467) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
12.15.2 n. 3 (p. 467) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
12.15.3 n. 5 (p. 467) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
12.15.4 n. 6 (p. 467) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
12.15.5 n. 7 (p. 467) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
12.15.6 n. 8 (p. 467) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
12.15.7 n. 10 (p. 467) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
12.15.8 n. 12 (p. 467) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
12.15.9 n. 13 (p. 467) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
12.15.10 n. 14 (p. 468) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
12.15.11 n. 15 (p. 468) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
12.15.12 n. 17 (p. 468) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
12.15.13 n. 18 (p. 468) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
12.15.14 n. 19 (p. 468) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
12.15.15 n. 20 (p. 468) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
12.16 The vector space V
n
(C) of n-tuples of complex numbers . . . . . . . 59
12.17 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
13 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 61
13.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
13.2 Lines in n-space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
13.3 Some simple properties of straight lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
13.4 Lines and vector-valued functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
13.5 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
13.5.1 n. 1 (p. 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
13.5.2 n. 2 (p. 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
13.5.3 n. 3 (p. 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
13.5.4 n. 4 (p. 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
13.5.5 n. 5 (p. 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
13.5.6 n. 6 (p. 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
13.5.7 n. 7 (p. 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
13.5.8 n. 8 (p. 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
13.5.9 n. 9 (p. 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
13.5.10 n. 10 (p. 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
13.5.11 n. 11 (p. 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
13.5.12 n. 12 (p. 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
13.6 Planes in euclidean n-spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
13.7 Planes and vector-valued functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
13.8 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
6 CONTENTS
13.8.1 n. 2 (p. 482) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
13.8.2 n. 3 (p. 482) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
13.8.3 n. 4 (p. 482) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
13.8.4 n. 5 (p. 482) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
13.8.5 n. 6 (p. 482) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
13.8.6 n. 7 (p. 482) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
13.8.7 n. 8 (p. 482) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
13.8.8 n. 9 (p. 482) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
13.8.9 n. 10 (p. 483) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
13.8.10 n. 11 (p. 483) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
13.8.11 n. 12 (p. 483) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
13.8.12 n. 13 (p. 483) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
13.8.13 n. 14 (p. 483) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
13.9 The cross product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
13.10 The cross product expressed as a determinant . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
13.11 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
13.11.1 n. 1 (p. 487) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
13.11.2 n. 2 (p. 487) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
13.11.3 n. 3 (p. 487) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
13.11.4 n. 4 (p. 487) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
13.11.5 n. 5 (p. 487) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
13.11.6 n. 6 (p. 487) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
13.11.7 n. 7 (p. 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
13.11.8 n. 8 (p. 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
13.11.9 n. 9 (p. 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
13.11.10 n. 10 (p. 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
13.11.11 n. 11 (p. 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
13.11.12 n. 12 (p. 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
13.11.13 n. 13 (p. 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
13.11.14 n. 14 (p. 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
13.11.15 n. 15 (p. 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
13.12 The scalar triple product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
13.13 Cramer’s rule for solving systems of three linear equations . . . . . . 85
13.14 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
13.15 Normal vectors to planes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
13.16 Linear cartesian equations for planes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
13.17 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
13.17.1 n. 1 (p. 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
13.17.2 n. 2 (p. 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
13.17.3 n. 3 (p. 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
13.17.4 n. 4 (p. 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
13.17.5 n. 5 (p. 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
CONTENTS 7
13.17.6 n. 6 (p. 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
13.17.7 n. 8 (p. 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
13.17.8 n. 9 (p. 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
13.17.9 n. 10 (p. 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
13.17.10 n. 11 (p. 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
13.17.11 n. 13 (p. 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
13.17.12 n. 14 (p. 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
13.17.13 n. 15 (p. 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
13.17.14 n. 17 (p. 497) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
13.17.15 n. 20 (p. 497) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
13.18 The conic sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
13.19 Eccentricity of conic sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
13.20 Polar equations for conic sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
13.21 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
13.22 Conic sections symmetric about the origin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
13.23 Cartesian equations for the conic sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
13.24 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
13.25 Miscellaneous exercises on conic sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
14 Calculus of vector-valued functions 93
15 Linear spaces 95
15.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
15.2 The definition of a linear space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
15.3 Examples of linear spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
15.4 Elementary consequences of the axioms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
15.5 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
15.5.1 n. 1 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
15.5.2 n. 2 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
15.5.3 n. 3 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
15.5.4 n. 4 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
15.5.5 n. 5 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
15.5.6 n. 6 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
15.5.7 n. 7 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
15.5.8 n. 11 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
15.5.9 n. 13 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
15.5.10 n. 14 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
15.5.11 n. 16 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
15.5.12 n. 17 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
15.5.13 n. 18 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
15.5.14 n. 19 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
15.5.15 n. 22 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
8 CONTENTS
15.5.16 n. 23 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
15.5.17 n. 24 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
15.5.18 n. 25 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
15.5.19 n. 26 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
15.5.20 n. 27 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
15.5.21 n. 28 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
15.6 Subspaces of a linear space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
15.7 Dependent and independent sets in a linear space . . . . . . . . . . . 103
15.8 Bases and dimension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
15.9 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
15.9.1 n. 1 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
15.9.2 n. 2 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
15.9.3 n. 3 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
15.9.4 n. 4 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
15.9.5 n. 5 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
15.9.6 n. 6 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
15.9.7 n. 7 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
15.9.8 n. 8 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
15.9.9 n. 9 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
15.9.10 n. 10 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
15.9.11 n. 11 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
15.9.12 n. 12 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
15.9.13 n. 13 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
15.9.14 n. 14 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
15.9.15 n. 15 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
15.9.16 n. 16 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
15.9.17 n. 22 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
15.9.18 n. 23 (p. 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
15.10 Inner products. Euclidean spaces. Norms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
15.11 Orthogonality in a euclidean space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
15.12 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
15.12.1 n. 9 (p. 567) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
15.12.2 n. 11 (p. 567) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
15.13 Construction of orthogonal sets. The Gram-Schmidt process . . . . . 115
15.14 Orthogonal complements. projections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
15.15 Best approximation of elements in a euclidean space by elements in a
finite-dimensional subspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
15.16 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
15.16.1 n. 1 (p. 576) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
15.16.2 n. 2 (p. 576) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
15.16.3 n. 3 (p. 576) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
15.16.4 n. 4 (p. 576) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
CONTENTS 9
16 Linear transformations and matrices 121
16.1 Linear transformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
16.2 Null space and range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
16.3 Nullity and rank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
16.4 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
16.4.1 n. 1 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
16.4.2 n. 2 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
16.4.3 n. 3 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
16.4.4 n. 4 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
16.4.5 n. 5 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
16.4.6 n. 6 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
16.4.7 n. 7 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
16.4.8 n. 8 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
16.4.9 n. 9 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
16.4.10 n. 10 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
16.4.11 n. 16 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
16.4.12 n. 17 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
16.4.13 n. 23 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
16.4.14 n. 25 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
16.4.15 n. 27 (p. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
16.5 Algebraic operations on linear transformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
16.6 Inverses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
16.7 One-to-one linear transformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
16.8 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
16.8.1 n. 15 (p. 589) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
16.8.2 n. 16 (p. 589) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
16.8.3 n. 17 (p. 589) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
16.8.4 n. 27 (p. 590) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
16.9 Linear transformations with prescribed values . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
16.10 Matrix representations of linear transformations . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
16.11 Construction of a matrix representation in diagonal form . . . . . . . 129
16.12 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
16.12.1 n. 3 (p. 596) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
16.12.2 n. 4 (p. 596) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
16.12.3 n. 5 (p. 596) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
16.12.4 n. 7 (p. 597) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
16.12.5 n. 8 (p. 597) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
16.12.6 n. 16 (p. 597) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
10 CONTENTS
Part I
Volume 1
1
Chapter 1
CHAPTER 1
4 Chapter 1
Chapter 2
CHAPTER 2
6 Chapter 2
Chapter 3
CHAPTER 3
8 Chapter 3
Chapter 4
CHAPTER 4
10 Chapter 4
Chapter 5
CHAPTER 5
12 Chapter 5
Chapter 6
CHAPTER 6
14 Chapter 6
Chapter 7
CHAPTER 7
16 Chapter 7
Chapter 8
CHAPTER 8
18 Chapter 8
Chapter 9
CHAPTER 9
20 Chapter 9
Chapter 10
CHAPTER 10
22 Chapter 10
Chapter 11
CHAPTER 11
24 Chapter 11
Chapter 12
VECTOR ALGEBRA
12.1 Historical introduction
12.2 The vector space of n-tuples of real numbers
12.3 Geometric interpretation for n ≤ 3
12.4 Exercises
12.4.1 n. 1 (p. 450)
(a) a +b = (5, 0, 9).
(b) a −b = (−3, 6, 3).
(c) a +b −c = (3, −1, 4).
(d) 7a −2b −3c = (−7, 24, 21).
(e) 2a +b −3c = (0, 0, 0).
12.4.2 n. 2 (p. 450)
The seven points to be drawn are the following:
µ
7
3
, 2

,
µ
5
2
,
5
2

,
µ
11
4
,
13
4

, (3, 4) , (4, 7) , (1, −2) , (0, −5)
The purpose of the exercise is achieved by drawing, as required, a single picture,
containing all the points (included the starting points A and B, I would say).
26 Vector algebra
It can be intuitively seen that, by letting t vary in all R, the straight line through
point A with direction given by the vector b ≡
−→
OB is obtained.
12.4.3 n. 3 (p. 450)
The seven points this time are the following:
µ
5
3
,
10
3

,
µ
2,
7
2

,
µ
5
2
,
15
4

, (3, 4) , (5, 5) , (−1, 2) , (−3, 1)
-3
-2
-1
0
1
2
3
4
5

-3 -2 -1 1 2 3 4 5
It can be intuitively seen that, by letting t vary in all R, the straight line through B
with direction given by the vector a ≡
−→
OA is obtained.
Exercises 27
12.4.4 n. 4 (p. 450)
(a) The seven points to be drawn are the following:
µ
3
2
, 2

,
µ
5
4
,
5
2

,
µ
4
3
,
7
3

, (3, −1) , (4, −3) ,
µ
1
2
, 4

, (0, 5)
The whole purpose of this part of the exercise is achieved by drawing a single picture,
containing all the points (included the starting points A and B, I would say). This
is made clear, it seems to me, by the question immediately following.
-4
-2
0
2
4

-4 -2 2 4
(b) It is hard not to notice that all points belong to the same straight line; indeed,
as it is going to be clear after the second lecture, all the combinations are affine.
(c) If the value of x is fixed at 0 and y varies in [0, 1], the segment OB is obtained;
the same construction with the value of x fixed at 1 yields the segment AD, where
−→
OD =
−→
OA+
−→
OB, and hence D is the vertex of the parallelogram with three vertices
at O, A, and B. Similarly, when x =
1
2
the segment obtained joins the midpoints of
the two sides OA and BD; and it is enough to repeat the construction a few more
times to convince oneself that the set
©
xa +yb : (x, y) ∈ [0, 1]
2
ª
is matched by the set of all points of the parallelogram OADB. The picture below
is made with the value of x fixed at 0,
1
4
,
1
2
,
3
4
, 1,
5
4
,
3
2
, and 2.
28 Vector algebra
0
1
2
3
4

0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3
(d) All the segments in the above construction are substituted by straight lines, and
the resulting set is the (infinite) stripe bounded by the lines containing the sides OB
and AD, of equation 3x −y = 0 and 3x −y = 5 respectively.
(e) The whole plane.
12.4.5 n. 5 (p. 450)
x
µ
2
1

+y
µ
1
3

=
µ
c
1
c
2

I 2x +y = c
1
II x + 3y = c
2
3I −II 5x = 3c
1
−c
2
2II −I 5y = 2c
2
−c
1
µ
c
1
c
2

=
3c
1
−c
2
5
µ
2
1

+
2c
2
−c
1
5
µ
1
3

12.4.6 n. 6 (p. 451)
(a)
d = x

¸
1
1
1
¸

+y

¸
0
1
1
¸

+z

¸
1
1
0
¸

=

¸
x +z
x +y +z
x +y
¸

(b)
I x +z = 0
II x +y +z = 0
III x +y = 0
I x = −z
(↑) ,→II y = 0
(↑) ,→III x = 0
(↑) ,→I z = 0
(c)
I x +z = 1
II x +y +z = 2
III x +y = 3
II −I y = 1
II −III z = −1
(↑) ,→I x = 2
Exercises 29
12.4.7 n. 7 (p. 451)
(a)
d = x

¸
1
1
1
¸

+y

¸
0
1
1
¸

+z

¸
2
1
1
¸

=

¸
x + 2z
x +y +z
x +y +z
¸

(b)
I x + 2z = 0
II x +y +z = 0
III x +y +z = 0
I x = −2z
(↑) ,→II y = z
z ←1 (−2, 1, 1)
(c)
I x + 2z = 1
II x +y +z = 2
III x +y +z = 3
III −II 0 = 1
12.4.8 n. 8 (p. 451)
(a)
d = x

¸
¸
¸
1
1
1
0
¸

+y

¸
¸
¸
0
1
1
1
¸

+z

¸
¸
¸
1
1
0
0
¸

=

¸
¸
¸
x +z
x +y +z
x +y
y
¸

(b)
I x +z = 0
II x +y +z = 0
III x +y = 0
IV y = 0
IV y = 0
IV ,→III x = 0
(↑) ,→I z = 0
II (check) 0 = 0
(c)
I x +z = 1
II x +y +z = 5
III x +y = 3
IV y = 4
IV y = 4
IV ,→III x = −1
(↑) ,→I z = 2
II (check) −1 + 4 + 2 = 5
(d)
I x +z = 1
II x +y +z = 2
III x +y = 3
IV y = 4
II −I −IV 0 = −3
30 Vector algebra
12.4.9 n. 9 (p. 451)
Let the two vectors u and v be both parallel to the vector w. According to the
definition at page 450 (just before the beginning of § 12.4), this means that there are
two real nonzero numbers α and β such that u = αw and v = βw. Then
u = αw = α
µ
v
β

=
α
β
v
that is, u is parallel to v.
12.4.10 n. 10 (p. 451)
Assumptions:
I c = a +b
II ∃k ∈ R ∼ {0} , a = kd
Claim:
(∃h ∈ R ∼ {0} , c = hd) ⇔(∃l ∈ R ∼ {0} , b = ld)
I present two possible lines of reasoning (among others, probably). If you look
carefully, they differ only in the phrasing.
1.
∃h ∈ R ∼ {0} , c = hd

I
∃h ∈ R ∼ {0} , a +b = hd

II
∃h ∈ R ∼ {0} , ∃k ∈ R ∼ {0} , kd +b = hd
⇔ ∃h ∈ R ∼ {0} , ∃k ∈ R ∼ {0} , b = (h −k) d
(b 6= 0) h 6= k

l≡h−k
∃l ∈ R ∼ {0} , b = ld
2. (⇒) Since (by I) we have b = c −a, if c is parallel to d, then (by II) b is the
difference of two vectors which are both parallel to d; it follows that b, which
is nonnull, is parallel to d too.
(⇐) Since (by I) we have c = a + b, if b is parallel to d, then (by II) c is
the sum of two vectors which are both parallel to d; it follows that c, which is
nonnull, is parallel to d too.
12.4.11 n. 11 (p. 451)
(b) Here is an illustration of the first distributive law
(α +β) v = αv +βv
Exercises 31
with v = (2, 1), α = 2, β = 3. The vectors v, αv, βv, αv + βv are displayed by
means of representative oriented segments from left to right, in black, red, blue, and
red-blue colour, respectively. The oriented segment representing vector (α +β) v is
above, in violet. The dotted lines are there just to make it clearer that the two
oriented segments representing αv + βv and (α +β) v are congruent, that is, the
vectors αv +βv and (α +β) v are the same.
0
2
4
6
8

2 4 6 8 10 12 14

tails are marked with a cross, heads with a diamond
An illustration of the second distributive law
α(u +v) = αu +αv
is provided by means of the vectors u = (1, 3), v = (2, 1), and the scalar α = 2. The
vectors u and αu are represented by means of blue oriented segments; the vectors
v and αv by means of red ones; u + v and α(u +v) by green ones; αu + αv is in
violet. The original vectors u, v, u + v are on the left; the “rescaled” vectors αu,
αv, α(u +v) on the right. Again, the black dotted lines are there just to emphasize
congruence.
32 Vector algebra
0
2
4
6
8

-4 -2 2 4 6 8

tails are marked with a cross, heads with a diamond
12.4.12 n. 12 (p. 451)
The statement to be proved is better understood if written in homogeneous form,
with all vectors represented by oriented segments:
−→
OA+
1
2
−→
AC =
1
2
−→
OB (12.1)
Since A and C are opposed vertices, the same holds for O and B; this means that
the oriented segment OB covers precisely one diagonal of the parallelogram OABC,
and AC precisely covers the other (in the rightward-downwards orientation), hence
what needs to be proved is the following:
−→
OA+
1
2
³
−→
OC −
−→
OA
´
=
1
2
³
−→
OA+
−→
OC
´
which is now seen to be an immediate consequence of the distributive properties.
In the picture below,
−→
OA is in red,
−→
OC in blue,
−→
OB =
−→
OA +
−→
OC in green, and
−→
AC =
−→
OC −
−→
OA in violet.
The dot product 33
The geometrical theorem expressed by equation (12.1) is the following:
Theorem 1 The two diagonals of every parallelogram intersect at a point which di-
vides them in two segments of equal length. In other words, the intersection point of
the two diagonals is the midpoint of both.
Indeed, the lefthand side of (12.1) is the vector represented by the oriented
segment OM, where M is the midpoint of diagonal AC (violet), whereas the righthand
side is the vector represented by the oriented segment ON, where N is the midpoint
of diagonal AB (green). More explicitly, the movement from O to M is described
as achieved by the composition of a first movement from O to A with a second
movement from A towards C, which stops halfway (red plus half the violet); whereas
the movement from A to N is described as a single movement from A toward B,
stopping halfway (half the green). Since (12.1) asserts that
−−→
OM =
−→
ON, equality
between M and N follows, and hence a proof of (12.1) is a proof of the theorem
12.5 The dot product
12.6 Length or norm of a vector
12.7 Orthogonality of vectors
12.8 Exercises
12.8.1 n. 1 (p. 456)
(a) ha, bi = −6
(b) hb, ci = 2
(c) ha, ci = 6
(d) ha, b +ci = 0
(e) ha −b, ci = 4
12.8.2 n. 2 (p. 456)
(a) ha, bi c =(2 · 2 + 4 · 6 + (−7) · 3) (3, 4, −5) = 7 (3, 4, −5) = (21, 28, −35)
(b) ha, b +ci = 2 · (2 + 3) + 4 · (6 + 4) + (−7) (3 −5) = 64
34 Vector algebra
(c) ha +b, ci = (2 + 2) · 3 + (4 + 6) · 4 + (−7 + 3) · (−5) = 72
(d) ahb, ci = (2, 4, −7) (2 · 3 + 6 · 4 + 3 · (−5)) = (2, 4, −7) 15 = (30, 60, −105)
(e)
a
hb,ci
=
(2,4,−7)
15
=
¡
2
15
,
4
15
, −
7
15
¢
12.8.3 n. 3 (p. 456)
The statement is false. Indeed,
ha, bi = ha, ci ⇔ha, b −ci = 0 ⇔a ⊥ b −c
and the difference b −c may well be orthogonal to a without being the null vector.
The simplest example that I can conceive is in R
2
:
a = (1, 0) b = (1, 1) c = (1, 2)
See also exercise 1, question (d).
12.8.4 n. 5 (p. 456)
The required vector, of coordinates (x, y, z) must satisfy the two conditions
h(2, 1, −1) , (x, y, z)i = 0
h(1, −1, 2) , (x, y, z)i = 0
that is,
I 2x +y −z = 0
II x −y + 2z = 0
I +II 3x +z = 0
2I +II 5x +y = 0
Thus the set of all such vectors can be represented in parametric form as follows:
{(α, −5α, −3α)}
α∈R
12.8.5 n. 6 (p. 456)
hc, bi = 0
c = xa +yb
¾
⇒ hxa +yb, bi = 0
⇔ xha, bi +y hb, bi = 0
⇔ 7x + 14y = 0
Let (x, y) ≡ (−2, 1). Then c = (1, 5, −4) 6= 0 and h(1, 5, −4) , (3, 1, 2)i = 0.
Exercises 35
12.8.6 n. 7 (p. 456)
1 (solution with explicit mention of coordinates) From the last condition, for
some α to be determined,
c = (α, 2α, −2α)
Substituting in the first condition,
d = a −c = (2 −α, −1 −2α, 2 + 2α)
Thus the second condition becomes
1 · (2 −α) + 2 · (−1 −2α) −2 (2 + 2α) = 0
that is,
−4 −9α = 0 α = −
4
9
and hence
c =
1
9
(−4, −8, 8)
d =
1
9
(22, −1, 10)
2 (same solution, with no mention of coordinates) From the last condition, for
some α to be determined,
c = αb
Substituting in the first condition,
d = a −c = a −αb
Thus the second condition becomes
hb, a −αbi = 0
that is,
hb, ai −αhb, bi = 0 α =
hb, ai
hb, bi
=
2 · 1 + (−1) · 2 + 2 · (−2)
1
2
+ 2
2
+ (−2)
2
= −
4
9
and hence
c =
1
9
(−4, −8, 8)
d =
1
9
(22, −1, 10)
36 Vector algebra
12.8.7 n. 10 (p. 456)
(a) b = (1, −1) or b = (−1, 1).
(b) b = (−1, −1) or b = (1, 1).
(c) b = (−3, −2) or b = (3, 2).
(d) b = (b, −a) or b = (−b, a).
12.8.8 n. 13 (p. 456)
If b is the required vector, the following conditions must be satisfied
ha, bi = 0 kbk = kak
If a = 0, then kak = 0 and hence b = 0 as well. If a 6= 0, let the coordinates of a be
given by the couple (α, β), and the coordinates of b by the couple (x, y). The above
conditions take the form
αx +βy = 0 x
2
+y
2
= α
2

2
Either α or β must be different from 0. Suppose α is nonzero (the situation is
completely analogous if β 6= 0 is assumed). Then the first equations gives
x = −
β
α
y (12.2)
and substitution in the second equation yields
µ
β
2
α
2
+ 1

y
2
= α
2

2
that is,
y
2
=
α
2

2
α
2

2
α
2
= α
2
and hence
y = ±α
Substituting back in (12.2) gives
x = ∓β
Thus there are only two solutions to the problem, namely, b = (−β, α) and b =
(β, −α) In particular,
(a) b = (−2, 1) or b = (2, −1).
(b) b = (2, −1) or b = (−2, 1).
(c) b = (−2, −1) or b = (2, 1).
(d) b = (−1, 2) or b = (1, −2)
Exercises 37
12.8.9 n. 14 (p. 456)
1 (right angle in C; solution with explicit mention of coordinates) Let (x, y, z)
be the coordinates of C. If the right angle is in C, the two vectors
−→
CA and
−→
CB must
be orthogonal. Thus
h[(2, −1, 1) −(x, y, z)] , [(3, −4, −4) −(x, y, z)]i = 0
that is,
h(2, −1, 1) , (3, −4, −4)i + h(x, y, z) , (x, y, z)i −h(2, −1, 1) + (3, −4, −4) , (x, y, z)i = 0
or
x
2
+y
2
+z
2
−5x + 5y + 3z + 6 = 0
The above equation, when rewritten in a more perspicuous way by “completion of
the squares”
µ
x −
5
2

2
+
µ
y +
5
2

2
+
µ
x +
3
2

2
=
25
4
is seen to define the sphere of center P =
¡
5
2
, −
5
2
, −
3
2
¢
and radius
5
2
.
2 (right angle in C; same solution, with no mention of coordinates) Let
a ≡
−→
OA b ≡
−→
OB x ≡
−→
OC
(stressing that the point C, hence the vector
−→
OC, is unknown). Then, orthogonality
of the two vectors
−→
CA = a −x
−→
CB = b −x
is required; that is,
ha −x, b −xi = 0
or
ha, bi −ha +b, xi + hx, xi = 0
Equivalently,
kxk
2
−2
¿
a +b
2
, x
À
+
°
°
°
°
a +b
2
°
°
°
°
2
=
°
°
°
°
a +b
2
°
°
°
°
2
−ha, bi
°
°
°
°
x −
a +b
2
°
°
°
°
2
=
°
°
°
°
a −b
2
°
°
°
°
2
38 Vector algebra
The last characterization of the solution to our problem shows that the solution set is
the locus of all points having fixed distance (
°
°
a−b
2
°
°
) from the midpoint of the segment
AB. Indeed, if π is any plane containing AB, and C is any point of the circle of π
having AB as diameter, it is known by elementary geometry that the triangle ACB
is rectangle in C.
3 (right angle in B; solution with explicit mention of coordinates) With
this approach, the vectors required to be orthogonal are
−→
BA and
−→
BC. Since
−→
BA =
(−1, 3, 5) and
−→
BC = (x −1, y + 4, z + 4), the following must hold
0 =
D
−→
BA,
−→
BC
E
= 1 −x + 3y + 12 + 5z + 20
that is,
x −3y −5z = 33
The solution set is the plane π through B and orthogonal to (1, −3, −5).
4 (right angle in B; same solution, with no mention of coordinates) Pro-
ceeding as in the previous point, with the notation of point 2, the condition to be
required is
0 = ha −b, x −bi
that is,
ha −b, xi = ha −b, bi
Thus the solution plane π is seen to be through B and orthogonal to the segment
connecting point B to point A.
Exercises 39
5 (right angle in B) It should be clear at this stage that the solution set in this
case is the plane π
0
through A and orthogonal to AB, of equation
hb −a, xi = hb −a, ai
It is also clear that π and π
0
are parallel.
12.8.10 n. 15 (p. 456)
I c
1
−c
2
+ 2c
3
= 0
II 2c
1
+c
2
−c
3
= 0
I +II 3c
1
+c
3
= 0
I + 2II 5c
1
+c
2
= 0
c = (−1, 5, 3)
12.8.11 n. 16 (p. 456)
p = (3α, 4α)
q = (4β, −3β)
I 3α + 4β = 1
II 4α −3β = 2
4II + 3I 25α = 11
4I −3II 25β = −2
(α, β) =
1
25
(11, −2)
p =
1
25
(33, 44) q =
1
25
(−8, 6)
12.8.12 n. 17 (p. 456)
The question is identical to the one already answered in exercise 7 of this section.
Recalling solution 2 to that exercise, we have that p ≡
−→
OP must be equal to αb =
α
−→
OB, with
α =
ha, bi
hb, bi
=
10
4
Thus
p =
µ
5
2
,
5
2
,
5
2
,
5
2

q =
µ

3
2
, −
1
2
,
1
2
,
3
2

40 Vector algebra
12.8.13 n. 19 (p. 456)
It has been quickly seen in class that
ka +bk
2
= kak
2
+ kbk
2
+ 2 ha, bi
substituting −b to b, I obtain
ka −bk
2
= kak
2
+ kbk
2
−2 ha, bi
By subtraction,
ka +bk
2
−ka −bk
2
= 4 ha, bi
as required. You should notice that the above identity has been already used at the
end of point 2 in the solution to exercise 14 of the present section.
Concerning the geometrical interpretation of the special case of the above
identity
ka +bk
2
= ka −bk
2
if and only if ha, bi = 0
it is enough to notice that orthogonality of a and b is equivalent to the property
for the parallelogram OACB (in the given order around the perimeter, that is, with
vertex C opposed to the vertex in the origin O) to be a rectangle; and that in such
a rectangle ka +bk and ka −bk measure the lengths of the two diagonals.
12.8.14 n. 20 (p. 456)
ka +bk
2
+ ka −bk
2
= ha +b, a +bi + ha −b, a −bi
= ha, ai + 2 ha, bi + hb, bi + ha, ai −2 ha, bi + hb, bi
= 2 kak
2
+ 2 kbk
2
The geometric theorem expressed by the above identity can be stated as follows:
Theorem 2 In every parallelogram, the sum of the squares of the four sides equals
the sum of the squares of the diagonals.
12.8.15 n. 21 (p. 457)
Exercises 41
Let A, B, C, and D be the four vertices of the quadrilateral, starting from left
in clockwise order, and let M and N be the midpoint of the diagonals
−→
AC and
−→
DB.
In order to simplify the notation, let
u ≡
−→
AB, v ≡
−→
BC, w ≡
−→
CD, z ≡
−→
DA = −(u +v +w)
Then
c ≡
−→
AC = u +v d ≡
−→
DB = u +z = −(v +w)
−−→
MN =
−→
AN −
−−→
AM = u −
1
2
d −
1
2
c
2
−−→
MN = 2u+(v +w) −(u +v) = w +u
4
°
°
°
−−→
MN
°
°
°
2
= kwk
2
+ kuk
2
+ 2 hw, ui
kzk
2
= kuk
2
+ kvk
2
+ kwk
2
+ 2 hu, vi + 2 hu, wi + 2 hv, wi
kck
2
= kuk
2
+ kvk
2
+ 2 hu, vi
kdk
2
= kvk
2
+ kwk
2
+ 2 hv, wi
We are now in the position to prove the theorem.
¡
kuk
2
+ kvk
2
+ kwk
2
+ kzk
2
¢

¡
kck
2
+ kdk
2
¢
= kzk
2
−kvk
2
−2 hu, vi −2 hv, wi
= kuk
2
+ kwk
2
+ 2 hu, wi
= 4
°
°
°
−−→
MN
°
°
°
2
12.8.16 n. 22 (p. 457)
Orthogonality of xa +yb and 4ya −9xb amounts to
0 = hxa +yb, 4ya −9xbi
= −9 ha, bi x
2
+ 4 ha, bi y
2
+
¡
4 kak
2
−9 kbk
2
¢
xy
Since the above must hold for every couple (x, y), choosing x = 0 and y = 1 gives
ha, bi = 0; thus the condition becomes
¡
4 kak
2
−9 kbk
2
¢
xy = 0
and choosing now x = y = 1 gives
4 kak
2
= 9 kbk
2
Since kak is known to be equal to 6, it follows that kbk is equal to 4.
42 Vector algebra
Finally, since a and b have been shown to be orthogonal,
k2a + 3bk
2
= k2ak
2
+ k3bk
2
+ 2 h2a, 3bi
= 2
2
· 6
2
+ 3
2
· 4
2
+ 2 · 2 · 3 · 0
= 2
5
· 3
2
and hence
k2a + 3bk = 12

2
12.8.17 n. 24 (p. 457)
This is once again the question raised in exercises 7 and 17, in the general context of
the linear space R
n
(where n ∈ N is arbitrary). Since the coordinate-free version of
the solution procedure is completely independent from the number of coordinates of
the vectors involved, the full answer to the problem has already been seen to be
c =
hb, ai
ha, ai
a
d = b −
hb, ai
ha, ai
a
12.8.18 n. 25 (p. 457)
(a) For every x ∈ R,
ka +xbk
2
= kak
2
+x
2
kbk
2
+ 2xha, bi
= kak
2
+x
2
kbk
2
if a ⊥ b
≥ kak
2
if a ⊥ b
(b) Since the norm of any vector is nonnegative, the following biconditional is true:
(∀x ∈ R, ka +xbk ≥ kak) ⇔
¡
∀x ∈ R, ka +xbk
2
≥ kak
2
¢
Moreover, by pure computation, the following biconditional is true:
∀x ∈ R, ka +xbk
2
−kak
2
≥ 0 ⇔∀x ∈ R, x
2
kbk
2
+ 2xha, bi ≥ 0
If ha, bi is positive, the trinomial x
2
kbk
2
+ 2xha, bi is negative for all x in the open
interval
³

2ha,bi
kbk
2
, 0
´
; if it is negative, the trinomial is negative in the open interval
³
0, −
2ha,bi
kbk
2
´
. It follows that the trinomial can be nonnegative for every x ∈ R only
if ha, bi is zero, that is, only if it reduces to the second degree term x
2
kbk
2
. In
conclusion, I have proved that the conditional
(∀x ∈ R, ka +xbk ≥ kak) ⇒ha, bi = 0
is true.
Projections. Angle between vectors in n-space 43
12.9 Projections. Angle between vectors in n-space
12.10 The unit coordinate vectors
12.11 Exercises
12.11.1 n. 1 (p. 460)
ha, bi = 11 kbk
2
= 9
The projection of a along b is
11
9
b =
µ
11
9
,
22
9
,
22
9

12.11.2 n. 2 (p. 460)
ha, bi = 10 kbk
2
= 4
The projection of a along b is
10
4
b =
µ
5
2
,
5
2
,
5
2
,
5
2

12.11.3 n. 3 (p. 460)
(a)
cos
c
ai =
ha, ii
kak kik
=
6
7
cos
c
aj =
ha, ji
kak kjk
=
3
7
cos
c
ai =
ha, ki
kak kkk
= −
2
7
(b) There are just two vectors as required, the unit direction vector u of a, and its
opposite:
u =
a
kak
=
µ
6
7
,
3
7
, −
2
7


a
kak
=
µ

6
7
, −
3
7
,
2
7

44 Vector algebra
12.11.4 n. 5 (p. 460)
Let
A ≡ (2, −1, 1) B ≡ (1, −3, −5) C ≡ (3, −4, −4)
p ≡
−→
BC = (2, −1, 1) q ≡
−→
CA = (−1, 3, 5) r ≡
−→
AB = (−1, −2, −6)
Then
cos
b
A =
h−q, ri
k−qk krk
=
35

35

41
=

35

41
41
cos
b
B =
hp, −ri
kpk k−rk
=
6

6

41
=

6

41
41
cos
b
C =
h−p, qi
k−pk kqk
=
0

6

35
= 0
There is some funny occurrence in this exercise, which makes a wrong solution
apparently correct (or almost correct), if one looks only at numerical results. The
angles in A, B, C, as implicitly argued above, are more precisely described as B
b
AC,
C
b
BA, A
b
CB; that is, as the three angles of triangle ABC. If some confusion is made
between points and vectors, and/or angles, one may be led into operate directly with
the coordinates of points A, B, C in place of the coordinates of vectors
−→
BC,
−→
AC,
−→
AB,
respectively. This amounts to work, as a matter of fact, with the vectors
−→
OA,
−→
OB,
−→
OC, therefore computing
D
−→
OB,
−→
OC
E
°
°
°
−→
OB
°
°
°
°
°
°
−→
OC
°
°
°
= cos B
b
OC an angle of triangle OBC
D
−→
OC,
−→
OA
E
°
°
°
−→
OC
°
°
°
°
°
°
−→
OA
°
°
°
= cos C
b
OA an angle of triangle OCA
D
−→
OA,
−→
OB
E
°
°
°
−→
OA
°
°
°
°
°
°
−→
OB
°
°
°
= cos A
b
OB an angle of triangle OAB
instead of cos B
b
AC, cos C
b
BA, cos A
b
CB, respectively. Up to this point, there is
nothing funny in doing that; it’s only a mistake, and a fairly bad one, being of
conceptual type. The funny thing is in the numerical data of the exercise: it so
happens that
1. points A, B, C are coplanar with the origin O; more than that,
2.
−→
OA =
−→
BC and
−→
OB =
−→
AC; more than that,
Exercises 45
3. A
b
OB is a right angle.
Point 1 already singles out a somewhat special situation, but point 2 makes
OACB a parallelogram, and point 3 makes it even a rectangle.
−→
OA red,
−→
OB blue,
−→
OC green, AB violet
It turns out, therefore, that
°
°
°
−→
OA
°
°
° =
°
°
°
−→
BC
°
°
° = kpk
°
°
°
−→
OB
°
°
° =
°
°
°
−→
AC
°
°
° = k−qk = kqk
°
°
°
−→
OC
°
°
° =
°
°
°
−→
AB
°
°
° = krk
C
b
OA = C
b
BA B
b
OC = B
b
AC A
b
OB = A
b
CB
and such a special circumstance leads a wrong solution to yield the right numbers.
12.11.5 n. 6 (p. 460)
Since
ka +c ±bk
2
= ka +ck
2
+ kbk
2
± 2 ha +c, bi
from
ka +c +bk = ka +c −bk
it is possible to deduce
ha +c, bi = 0
This is certainly true, as a particular case, if c = −a, which immediately implies
c ac = π
c
bc = π −
c
ab =
7
8
π
46 Vector algebra
Moreover, even if a +c = 0 is not assumed, the same conclusion holds. Indeed, from
hc, bi = −ha, bi
and
kck = kak
it is easy to check that
cos
c
bc =
hb, ci
kbk kck
= −
ha, ci
kbk kak
= −cos
c
ab
and hence that
c
bc = π ±c ac =
7
8
π,
9
8
π (the second value being superfluous).
12.11.6 n. 8 (p. 460)
We have
kak =

n kb
n
k =
r
n(n + 1) (2n + 1)
6
ha, b
n
i =
n(n + 1)
2
cos
[
ab
n
=
n(n+1)
2

n
q
n(n+1)(2n+1)
6
=
v
u
u
t
n
2
(n+1)
2
4
n
2
(n+1)(2n+1)
6
=
r
3
2
n + 1
2n + 1
lim
n→+∞
cos
[
ab
n
=

3
2
lim
n→+∞
[
ab
n
=
π
3
12.11.7 n. 10 (p. 461)
(a)
ha, bi = cos ϑsin ϑ −cos ϑsin ϑ = 0
kak
2
= kbk
2
= cos
2
ϑ + sin
2
ϑ = 1
(b) The system
µ
cos ϑ sin ϑ
−sin ϑ cos ϑ
¶µ
x
y

=
µ
x
y

that is,
µ
cos ϑ −1 sin ϑ
−sin ϑ cos ϑ −1
¶µ
x
y

=
µ
0
0

has the trivial solution as its unique solution if
¯
¯
¯
¯
cos ϑ −1 sin ϑ
−sin ϑ cos ϑ −1
¯
¯
¯
¯
6= 0
Exercises 47
The computation gives
1 + cos
2
ϑ + sin
2
ϑ −2 cos ϑ 6= 0
2 (1 −cos ϑ) 6= 0
cos ϑ 6= 1
ϑ / ∈ {2kπ}
k∈Z
Thus if
ϑ ∈ {(−2kπ, (2k + 1) π)}
k∈Z
the only vector satisfying the required condition is (0, 0). On the other hand, if
ϑ ∈ {2kπ}
k∈Z
the coefficient matrix of the above system is the identity matrix, and every vector in
R
2
satisfies the required condition.
12.11.8 n. 11 (p. 461)
Let OABC be a rhombus, which I have taken (without loss of generality) with one
vertex in the origin O and with vertex B opposed to O. Let
a ≡
−→
OA (red) b ≡
−→
OB (green) c ≡
−→
OC (blue)
Since OABC is a parallelogram, the oriented segments AB (blue, dashed) and OB
are congruent, and the same is true for CB (red, dashed) and OA. Thus
−→
AB = b
−→
CB = a
From elementary geometry (see exercise 12 of section 4) the intersection point M of
the two diagonals OB (green) and AC (violet) is the midpoint of both.
The assumption that OABC is a rhombus is expressed by the equality
kak = kck ((rhombus))
48 Vector algebra
The statement to be proved is orthogonality between the diagonals
D
−→
OB,
−→
AC
E
= 0
that is,
ha +c, c −ai = 0
or
kck
2
−kak
2
+ ha, ci −hc, ai = 0
and hence (by commutativity)
kck
2
= kak
2
The last equality is an obvious consequence of ((rhombus)). As a matter of fact, since
norms are nonnegative real numbers, the converse is true, too. Thus a parallelogram
has orthogonal diagonals if and only if it is a rhombus.
12.11.9 n. 13 (p. 461)
The equality to be proved is straightforward. The “law of cosines” is often called
Theorem 3 (Carnot) In every triangle, the square of each side is the sum of the
squares of the other two sides, minus their double product multiplied by the cosine of
the angle they form.
The equality in exam can be readily interpreted according to the theorem’s
statement, since in every parallelogram ABCD with a =
−→
AB and b =
−→
AC the
diagonal vector
−→
CB is equal to a − b, so that the triangle ABC has side vectors a,
b, and a −b. The theorem specializes to Pythagoras’ theorem when a ⊥ b.
12.11.10 n. 17 (p. 461)
(a) That the function
R
n
→R, a 7→
X
i∈n
|a
i
|
is positive can be seen by the same arguments used for the ordinary norm; nonnega-
tivity is obvious, and strict positivity still relies on the fact that a sum of concordant
numbers can only be zero if all the addends are zero. Homogeneity is clear, too:
∀a ∈ R
n
, ∀α ∈ R,
kαak =
X
i∈n
|αa
i
| =
X
i∈n
|α| |a
i
| = |α|
X
i∈n
|a
i
| = |α| kak
Exercises 49
Finally, the triangle inequality is much simpler to prove for the present norm (some-
times referred to as “the taxi-cab norm”) than for the euclidean norm:
∀a ∈ R
n
, ∀b ∈ R
n
,
ka +bk =
X
i∈n
|a
i
+b
i
| ≤
X
i∈n
|a
i
| + |b
i
| =
X
i∈n
|a
i
| +
X
i∈n
|b
i
|
= kak + kbk
(b) The subset of R
2
to be described is
S ≡
©
(x, y) ∈ R
2
: |x| + |y| = 1
ª
= S
++
∪ S
−+
∪ S
−−
∪ S
+−
where
S
++

©
(x, y) ∈ R
2
+
: x +y = 1
ª
(red)
S
−+
≡ {(x, y) ∈ R

×R
+
: −x +y = 1} (green)
S
−−

©
(x, y) ∈ R
2

: −x −y = 1
ª
(violet)
S
+−
≡ {(x, y) ∈ R
+
×R

: x −y = 1} (blue)
Once the lines whose equations appear in the definitions of the four sets above are
drawn, it is apparent that S is a square, with sides parallel to the quadrant bisectrices
-2
-1
0
1
2

-2 -1 1 2
(c) The function
f : R
n
→R, a 7→
X
i∈n
|a
i
|
is nonnegative, but not positive (e.g., for n = 2, f (x, −x) = 0 ∀x ∈ R). It is
homogeneous:
∀a ∈ R
n
, ∀α ∈ R,
kαak =
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
X
i∈n
αa
i
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
=
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
α
X
i∈n
a
i
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
= |α|
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
X
i∈n
a
i
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
= |α| kak
50 Vector algebra
Finally, f is subadditive, too (this is another way of saying that the triangle inequality
holds). Indeed,
∀a ∈ R
n
, ∀b ∈ R
n
,
ka +bk =
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
X
i∈n
(a
i
+b
i
)
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
=
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
X
i∈n
a
i
+
X
i∈n
b
i
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯

¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
X
i∈n
a
i
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
+
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
X
i∈n
b
i
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
= kak + kbk
12.12 The linear span of a finite set of vectors
12.13 Linear independence
12.14 Bases
12.15 Exercises
12.15.1 n. 1 (p. 467)
x(i −j) +y (i +j) = (x +y, y −x)
(a) x +y = 1 and y −x = 0 yield (x, y) =
¡
1
2
,
1
2
¢
.
(b) x +y = 0 and y −x = 1 yield (x, y) =
¡

1
2
,
1
2
¢
.
(c) x +y = 3 and y −x = −5 yield (x, y) = (4, −1).
(d) x +y = 7 and y −x = 5 yield (x, y) = (1, 6).
12.15.2 n. 3 (p. 467)
I 2x +y = 2
II −x + 2y = −11
III x −y = 7
I +III 3x = 9
II +III y = −4
III (check) 3 + 4 = 7
The solution is (x, y) = (3, −4).
Exercises 51
12.15.3 n. 5 (p. 467)
(a) If there exists some α ∈ R ∼ {0} such that

a = αb, then the linear combination
1a−αb is nontrivial and it generates the null vector; a and b are linearly dependent.
(b) The argument is best formulated by counterposition, by proving that if a and b
are linearly dependent, then they are parallel. Let a and b nontrivially generate the
null vector: αa + βb = 0 (according to the definition, at least one between α and β
is nonzero; but in the present case they are both nonzero, since a and b have been
assumed both different from the null vector; indeed, αa + βb = 0 with α = 0 and
β 6= 0 implies b = 0, and αa + βb = 0 with β = 0 and α 6= 0 implies a = 0). Thus
αa = −βb, and hence a = −
β
α
b (or b = −
α
β
a, if you prefer).
12.15.4 n. 6 (p. 467)
Linear independency of the vectors (a, b) and (c, d) has been seen in the lectures
(proof of Steinitz’ theorem, part 1) to be equivalent to non existence of nontrivial
solutions to the system
ax +cy = 0
bx +dy = 0
The system is linear and homogeneous, and has unknowns and equations in equal
number (hence part 2 of the proof of Steinitz’ theorem does not apply). I argue by
the principle of counterposition. If a nontrivial solution (x, y) exists, both (a, c) and
(b, d) must be proportional to (y, −x) (see exercise 10, section 8), and hence to each
other. Then, from (a, c) = h(b, d) it is immediate to derive ad−bc = 0. The converse
is immediate, too
12.15.5 n. 7 (p. 467)
By the previous exercise, it is enough to require
(1 +t)
2
−(1 −t)
2
6= 0
4t 6= 0
t 6= 0
12.15.6 n. 8 (p. 467)
(a) The linear combination
1i + 1j + 1k + (−1) (i +j +k)
is nontrivial and spans the null vector.
(b) Since, for every (α, β, γ) ∈ R
3
,
αi +βj +γk = (α, β, γ)

Even if parallelism is defined more broadly − see the footnote in exercise 9 of section 4 − α
cannot be zero in the present case, because both a and b have been assumed different from the null
vector.
52 Vector algebra
it is clear that
∀(α, β, γ) ∈ R
3
, (αi +βj +γk = 0) ⇒α = β = γ = 0
so that the triple (i, j, k) is linearly independent.
(c) Similarly, for every (α, β, γ) ∈ R
3
,
αi +βj +γ (i +j +k) = (α +γ, β +γ, γ)
and hence from
αi +βj +γ (i +j +k) = 0
it follows
α +γ = 0 β +γ = 0 γ = 0
that is,
α = β = γ = 0
showing that the triple (i, j, i +j +k) is linearly independent.
(d) The last argument can be repeated almost verbatim for triples (i, i +j +k, k)
and (i +j +k, j, k), taking into account that
αi +β (i +j +k) +γk = (α +β, β, β + γ)
α(i +j +k) +βj +γk = (α, α +β, α +γ)
12.15.7 n. 10 (p. 467)
(a) Again from the proof of Steinitz’ theorem, part 1, consider the system
I x +y +z = 0
II y +z = 0
III 3z = 0
It is immediate to derive that its unique solution is the trivial one, and hence that
the given triple is linearly independent.
(b) We need to consider the following two systems:
I x +y +z = 0
II y +z = 1
III 3z = 0
I x +y +z = 0
II y +z = 0
III 3z = 1
It is again immediate that the unique solutions to the systems are (−1, 1, 0) and
¡
0, −
1
3
,
1
3
¢
respectively.
Exercises 53
(c) The system to study is the following:
I x +y +z = 2
II y +z = −3
III 3z = 5
III z =
5
3
(↑) ,→II y = −
14
3
(↑) ,→I x = 5
(d) For an arbitrary triple (a, b, c), the system
I x +y +z = a
II y +z = b
III 3z = c
has the (unique) solution
¡
a −b, b −
c
3
,
c
3
¢
. Thus the given triple spans R
3
, and it is
linearly independent (as seen at a).
12.15.8 n. 12 (p. 467)
(a) Let xa +yb +zc = 0, that is,
x +z = 0
x +y +z = 0
x +y = 0
y = 0
then y, x, and z are in turn seen to be equal to 0, from the fourth, third, and first
equation in that order. Thus (a, b, c) is a linearly independent triple.
(b) Any nontrivial linear combination d of the given vectors makes (a, b, c, d) a
linearly dependent quadruple. For example, d ≡ a +b +c = (2, 3, 2, 1)
(c) Let e ≡ (−1, −1, 1, 3), and suppose xa +yb +zc +te = 0, that is,
x +z −t = 0
x +y +z −t = 0
x +y +t = 0
y + 3t = 0
Then, subtracting the first equation from the second, gives y = 0, and hence t, x,
and z are in turn seen to be equal to 0, from the fourth, third, and first equation in
that order. Thus (a, b, c, e) is linearly independent.
(d) The coordinates of x with respect to {a, b, c, e}, which has just been seen to be
a basis of R
4
, are given as the solution (s, t, u, v) to the following system:
s +u −v = 1
s +t +u −v = 2
s +t +v = 3
t + 3v = 4
54 Vector algebra
It is more direct and orderly to work just with the table formed by the system
(extended) matrix
¡
A x
¢
, and to perform elementary row operations and column
exchanges.

¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
s t u v x
1 0 1 −1 1
1 1 1 −1 2
1 1 0 1 3
0 1 0 3 4
¸

a
1
↔a
3
,
2
a
0

2
a
0

1
a
0

¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
u t s v x
1 0 1 −1 1
0 1 0 0 1
0 1 1 1 3
0 1 0 3 4
¸

a
2
↔a
3
,
2
a
0

3
a
0

¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
u s t v x
1 1 0 −1 1
0 1 1 1 3
0 0 1 0 1
0 0 1 3 4
¸

4
a
0

4
a
0

3
a
0

¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
u s t v x
1 1 0 −1 1
0 1 1 1 3
0 0 1 0 1
0 0 0 3 3
¸

Thus the system has been given the following form:
u +s −v = 1
s +t +v = 3
t = 1
3v = 3
which is easily solved from the bottom to the top: (s, t, u, v) = (1, 1, 1, 1).
Exercises 55
12.15.9 n. 13 (p. 467)
(a)
α
¡√
3, 1, 0
¢

¡
1,

3, 1
¢

¡
0, 1,

3
¢
= (0, 0, 0)

I

3α +β = 0
II α +

3β +γ = 0
III β +

3γ = 0

I

3α +β = 0

3II −III −I 2β = 0
III β +

3γ = 0
⇔ (α, β, γ) = (0, 0, 0)
and the three given vectors are linearly independent.
(b)
α
¡√
2, 1, 0
¢

¡
1,

2, 1
¢

¡
0, 1,

2
¢
= (0, 0, 0)

I

2α +β = 0
II α +

2β +γ = 0
III β +

2γ = 0
This time the sum of equations I and III (multiplied by

2) is the same as twice
equation II, and a linear dependence in the equation system suggests that it may
well have nontrivial solutions. Indeed,
¡√
2, −2,

2
¢
is such a solution. Thus the
three given triple of vectors is linearly dependent.
(c)
α(t, 1, 0) +β (1, t, 1) +γ (0, 1, t) = (0, 0, 0)

I tα +β = 0
II α +tβ +γ = 0
III β +tγ = 0
It is clear that t = 0 makes the triple linearly dependent (the first and third vector
coincide in this case). Let us suppose, then, t 6= 0. From I and III, as already
noticed, I deduce that α = γ. Equations II and III then become
tβ + 2γ = 0
β +tγ = 0
a 2 by 2 homogeneous system with determinant of coefficient matrix equal to t
2
−2.
Such a system has nontrivial solutions for t ∈
©√
2, −

2
ª
. In conclusion, the given
triple is linearly dependent for t ∈
©
0,

2, −

2
ª
.
56 Vector algebra
12.15.10 n. 14 (p. 468)
Call as usual u, v, w, and z the four vectors given in each case, in the order.
(a) It is clear that v = u + w, so that v can be dropped. Moreover, every linear
combination of u and w has the form (x, y, x, y), and cannot be equal to z. Thus
(u, w, z) is a maximal linearly independent triple.
(b) Notice that
1
2
(u +z) = e
(1)
1
2
(u −v) = e
(2)
1
2
(v −w) = e
(3)
1
2
(w−z) = e
(4)
Since (u, v, w, z) spans the four canonical vectors, it is a basis of R
4
. Thus (u, v, w, z)
is maximal linearly independent.
(c) Similarly,
u −v = e
(1)
v −w = e
(2)
w−z = e
(3)
z = e
(4)
and (u, v, w, z) is maximal linearly independent.
12.15.11 n. 15 (p. 468)
(a) Since the triple (a, b, c) is linearly independent,
α(a +b) +β (b +c) +γ (a +c) = 0
⇔ (α +γ) a + (α +β) b + (β +γ) c = 0

I α +γ = 0
II α +β = 0
III β +γ = 0

I +II −III 2α = 0
−I +II +III 2β = 0
I −II +III 2γ = 0
and the triple (a +b, b +c, a +c) is linearly independent, too
(b) On the contrary, choosing as nontrivial coefficient triple (α, β, γ) ≡ (1, −1, 1),
(a −b) −(b +c) + (a +c) = 0
it is seen that the triple (a −b, b +c, a +c) is linearly dependent.
12.15.12 n. 17 (p. 468)
Let a ≡ (0, 1, 1) and b ≡ (1, 1, 1); I look for two possible alternative choices of a
vector c ≡ (x, y, z) such that the triple (a, b, c) is linearly independent. Since
αa +βb +γc = (β +γx, α +β +γy, α +β +γz)
Exercises 57
my choice of x, y, and z must be such to make the following conditional statement
true for each (α, β, γ) ∈ R
3
:
I β +γx = 0
II α +β +γy = 0
III α +β +γz = 0

α = 0
β = 0
γ = 0
Subtracting equation III from equation II, I obtain
γ (y −z) = 0
Thus any choice of c with y 6= z makes γ = 0 a consequence of II-III; in such a case,
I yields β = 0 (independently of the value assigned to x), and then either II or III
yields α = 0. Conversely, if y = z, equations II and III are the same, and system
I-III has infinitely many nontrivial solutions
α = −γy −β
β = −γx
γ free
provided either x or y (hence z) is different from zero.
As an example, possible choices for c are (0, 0, 1), (0, 1, 0), (1, 0, 1), (1, 1, 0).
12.15.13 n. 18 (p. 468)
The first example of basis containing the two given vectors is in point (c) of exercise
14 in this section, since the vectors u and v there coincide with the present ones.
Keeping the same notation, a second example is (u, v, w +z, w−z).
12.15.14 n. 19 (p. 468)
(a) It is enough to prove that each element of T belongs to lin S, since each element
of lin T is a linear combination in T, and S, as any subspace of a vector space, is
closed with respect to formation of linear combinations. Let u, v, and w be the three
elements of S (in the given order), and let a and b be the two elements of T (still in
the given order); it is then readily checked that
a = u −w b = 2w
(b) The converse inclusion holds as well. Indeed,
v = a −b w =
1
2
b u = v +w = a −
1
2
b
Thus
lin S = lin T
58 Vector algebra
Similarly, if c and d are the two elements of U,
c = u +v d = u + 2v
which proves that lin U ⊆ lin S. Inverting the above formulas,
u = 2c −d v = d −c
It remains to be established whether or not w is an element of lin U. Notice that
αc +βd = (α +β, 2α + 3β, 3α + 5β)
It follows that w is an element of lin U if and only if there exists (α, β) ∈ R
2
such
that

I α +β = 1
II 2α + 3β = 0
III 3α + 5β = −1
The above system has the unique solution (3, −2), which proves that lin S ⊆ linU.
In conclusion,
linS = linT = lin U
12.15.15 n. 20 (p. 468)
(a) The claim has already been proved in the last exercise, since from A ⊆ B I can
infer A ⊆ lin B, and hence lin A ⊆ lin B.
(b) By the last result, from A ∩ B ⊆ A and A ∩ B ⊆ B I infer
lin A∩ B ⊆ lin A linA ∩ B ⊆ lin B
which yields
lin A∩ B ⊆ lin A∩ linB
(c) It is enough to define
A ≡ {a, b} B ≡ {a +b}
where the couple (a, b) is linearly independent. Indeed,
B ⊆ lin A
and hence, by part (a) of last exercise,
lin B ⊆ lin lin A = lin A
lin A∩ lin B = lin B
On the other hand,
A∩ B = ∅ lin A∩ B = {0}
The vector space V
n
(C) of n-tuples of complex numbers 59
12.16 The vector space V
n
(C) of n-tuples of complex numbers
12.17 Exercises
60 Vector algebra
Chapter 13
APPLICATIONS OF VECTOR ALGEBRA TO ANALYTIC
GEOMETRY
13.1 Introduction
13.2 Lines in n-space
13.3 Some simple properties of straight lines
13.4 Lines and vector-valued functions
13.5 Exercises
13.5.1 n. 1 (p. 477)
A direction vector for the line L is
−→
PQ = (4, 0), showing that L is horizontal. Thus
a point belongs to L if and only if its second coordinate is equal to 1. Among the
given points, (b), (d), and (e) belong to L.
13.5.2 n. 2 (p. 477)
A direction vector for the line L is v ≡
1
2
−→
PQ = (−2, 1). The parametric equations
for L are
x = 2 −2t
y = −1 +t
If t = 1 I get point (a) (the origin). Points (b), (d) and (e) have the second coordinate
equal to 1, which requires t = 2. This gives x = −2, showing that of the three points
only (e) belongs to L. Finally, point (c) does not belong to L, because y = 2 requires
t = 3, which yields x = −4 6= 1.
62 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
13.5.3 n. 3 (p. 477)
The parametric equations for L are
x = −3 +h
y = 1 −2h
z = 1 + 3h
The following points belong to L:
(c) (h = 1) (d) (h = −1) (e) (h = 5)
13.5.4 n. 4 (p. 477)
The parametric equations for L are
x = −3 + 4k
y = 1 +k
z = 1 + 6h
The following points belong to L:
(b) (h = −1) (e)
µ
h =
1
2

(f)
µ
h =
1
3

A direction vector for the line L is
−→
PQ = (4, 0), showing that L is horizontal.
Thus a point belongs to L if and only if its second coordinate is equal to 1. Among
the given points, (b), (d), and (e) belong to L.
13.5.5 n. 5 (p. 477)
I solve each case in a different a way.
(a)
−→
PQ = (2, 0, −2)
−→
QR = (−1, −2, 2)
The two vectors are not parallel, hence the three points do not belong to the same
line.
(b) Testing affine dependence,
I 2h + 2k + 3l = 0
II −2h + 3k +l = 0
III −6h + 4k +l = 0
I −2II +III 2l = 0
I +II 5k + 4l = 0
2I −III 10h + 5l = 0
the only combination which is equal to the null vector is the trivial one. The three
points do not belong to the same line.
Exercises 63
(c) The line through P and R has equations
x = 2 + 3k
y = 1 −2k
z = 1
Trying to solve for k with the coordinates of Q, I get k = −
4
3
from the first equation
and k = −1 from the second; Q does not belong to L(P, R).
13.5.6 n. 6 (p. 477)
The question is easy, but it must be answered by following some orderly path, in
order to achieve some economy of thought and of computations (there are
¡
8
2
¢
= 28
different oriented segments joining two of the eight given points. First, all the eight
points have their third coordinate equal to 1, and hence they belong to the plane
π of equation z = 1. We can concentrate only on the first two coordinates, and,
as a matter of fact, we can have a very good hint on the situation by drawing a
twodimensional picture, to be considered as a picture of the π
-15
-10
-5
0
5
10
15

-15 -10 -5 5 10 15

Since the first two components of
−→
AB are (4, −2), I check that among the
twodimensional projections of the oriented segments connecting A with points D to
H
p
xy
−→
AD = (−4, 2) p
xy
−→
AE = (−1, 1) p
xy
−→
AF = (−6, 3)
p
xy
−→
AG = (−15, 8) p
xy
−→
AH = (12, −7)
64 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
only the first and third are parallel to p
xy
−→
AB. Thus all elements of the set P
1

{A, B, C, D, F} belong to the same (black) line L
ABC
, and hence no two of them can
both belong to a different line. Therefore, it only remains to be checked whether or
not the lines through the couples of points (E, G) (red), (G, H) (blue), (H, E) (green)
coincide, and whether or not any elements of P
1
belong to them. Direction vectors
for these three lines are
1
2
p
xy
−→
EG = (−7, 4)
1
3
p
xy
−→
GH = (9, −5) p
xy
−−→
HE = (−13, 7)
and as normal vectors for them I may take
n
EG
≡ (4, 7) n
GH
≡ (5, 9) n
HE
≡ (7, 13)
By requiring point E to belong to the first and last, and point H to the second, I end
up with their equations as follows
L
EG
: 4x + 7y = 11 L
GH
: 5x + 9y = 16 L
HE
: 7x + 13y = 20
All these three lines are definitely not parallel to L
ABC
, hence they intersect it exactly
at one point. It is seen by direct inspection that, within the set P
1
, C belongs to
L
EG
, F belongs to L
GH
, and neither A nor B, nor D belong to L
HE
.
Thus there are three (maximal) sets of at least three collinear points, namely
P
1
≡ {A, B, C, D, F} P
2
≡ {C, E, G} P
3
≡ {F, G, H}
13.5.7 n. 7 (p. 477)
The coordinates of the intersection point are determined by the following equation
system
I 1 +h = 2 + 3k
II 1 + 2h = 1 + 8k
III 1 + 3h = 13k
Subtracting the third equation from the sum of the first two, I get k = 1; substituting
this value in any of the three equations, I get h = 4. The three equations are
consistent, and the two lines intersect at the point of coordinates (5, 9, 13).
13.5.8 n. 8 (p. 477)
(a) The coordinates of the intersection point of L(P; a) and L(Q; b) are determined
by the vector equation
P +ha = Q+kb (13.1)
which gives
P −Q = kb −ha
that is,
−→
PQ ∈ span {a, b}
Exercises 65
13.5.9 n. 9 (p. 477)
X (t) = (1 +t, 2 −2t, 3 + 2t)
(a)
d (t) ≡ kQ−X (t)k
2
= (2 −t)
2
+ (1 + 2t)
2
+ (−2 −2t)
2
= 9t
2
+ 8t + 9
(b) The graph of the function t 7→ d (t) ≡ 9t
2
+ 8t + 9 is a parabola with the
point (t
0
, d (t
0
)) =
¡

4
9
,
65
9
¢
as vertex. The minimum squared distance is
65
9
, and the
minimum distance is

65
3
.
(c)
X (t
0
) =
µ
5
9
,
26
9
,
19
9

Q−X (t
0
) =
µ
22
9
,
1
9
, −
10
9

hQ−X (t
0
) , Ai =
22 −2 + 20
9
= 0
that is, the point on L of minimum distance from Q is the orthogonal projection of
Q on L.
13.5.10 n. 10 (p. 477)
(a) Let A ≡ (α, β, γ), P ≡ (λ, µ, ν) and Q ≡ (%, σ, τ). The points of the line L
through P with direction vector
−→
OA are represented in parametric form (the generic
point of L is denoted X (t)). Then
X (t) ≡ P +At = (λ +αt, µ +βt, ν +γt)
f (t) ≡ kQ−X (t)k
2
= kQ−P −Atk
2
= kQk
2
+ kPk
2
+ kAk
2
t −2 hQ, Pi + 2 hP −Q, Ai t
= at
2
+bt +c
where
a ≡ kAk
2
= α
2

2

2
b
2
≡ hP −Q, Ai = α(λ −%) +β (µ −σ) +γ (ν −τ)
c ≡ kQk
2
+ kPk
2
−2 hQ, Pi = kP −Qk
2
= (λ −%)
2
+ (µ −σ)
2
+ (ν −τ)
2
The above quadratic polynomial has a second degree term with a positive coefficient;
its graph is a parabola with vertical axis and vertex in the point of coordinates
µ

b
2a
, −

4a

=
Ã
hQ−P, Ai
kAk
2
,
kAk
2
kP −Qk
2
−hP −Q, Ai
2
kAk
2
!
66 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
Thus the minimum value of this polynomial is achieved at
t
0

hQ−P, Ai
kAk
2
=
α(% −λ) +β (σ −β) +γ (τ −ν)
α
2

2

2
and it is equal to
kAk
2
kP −Qk
2
−kAk
2
kP −Qk
2
cos
2
ϑ
kAk
2
= kP −Qk
2
sin
2
ϑ
where
ϑ ≡
\
−→
OA,
−→
QP
is the angle formed by direction vector of the line and the vector carrying the point
Q not on L to the point P on L.
(b)
Q−X (t
0
) = Q−(P +At
0
) = (Q−P) −
hQ−P, Ai
kAk
2
A
hQ−X (t
0
) , Ai = hQ−P, Ai −
hQ−P, Ai
kAk
2
hA, Ai = 0
13.5.11 n. 11 (p. 477)
The vector equation for the coordinates of an intersection point of L(P; a) and
L(Q; a) is
P +ha = Q+ka (13.2)
It gives
P −Q = (h −k) a
and there are two cases: either
−→
PQ / ∈ span {a}
and equation (13.2) has no solution (the two lines are parallel), or
−→
PQ ∈ span {a}
that is,
∃c ∈ R, Q−P = ca
and equation (13.2) is satisfied by all couples (h, k) such that k −h = c (the two lines
intersect in infinitely many points, i.e., they coincide). The two expressions P + ha
and Q + ka are seen to provide alternative parametrizations of the same line. For
each given point of L, the transformation h 7→k (h) ≡ h +c identifies the parameter
change which allows to shift from the first parametrization to the second.
Planes in euclidean n-spaces 67
13.5.12 n. 12 (p. 477)
13.6 Planes in euclidean n-spaces
13.7 Planes and vector-valued functions
13.8 Exercises
13.8.1 n. 2 (p. 482)
We have:
−→
PQ = (2, 2, 3)
−→
PR = (2, −2, −1)
so that the parametric equations of the plane are
x = 1 + 2s + 2t (13.3)
y = 1 + 2s −2t
z = −1 + 3s −t
(a) Equating (x, y, z) to
¡
2, 2,
1
2
¢
in (13.3) we get
2s + 2t = 1
2s −2t = 1
3s −t =
3
2
yielding s =
1
2
and t = 0, so that the point with coordinates
¡
2, 2,
1
2
¢
belongs to the
plane.
(b) Similarly, equating (x, y, z) to
¡
4, 0,
3
2
¢
in (13.3) we get
2s + 2t = 3
2s −2t = −1
3s −t =
1
2
yielding s =
1
2
and t = 1, so that the point with coordinates
¡
4, 0,
3
2
¢
belongs to the
plane.
(c) Again, proceeding in the same way with the triple (−3, 1, −1), we get
2s + 2t = −4
2s −2t = 0
3s −t = −2
68 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
yielding s = t = −1, so that the point with coordinates (−3, 1, −1) belongs to the
plane.
(d) The point of coordinates (3, 1, 5) does not belong to the plane, because the system
2s + 2t = 2
2s −2t = 0
3s −t = 4
is inconsistent (from the first two equations we get s = t = 1, contradicting the third
equation).
(e) Finally, the point of coordinates (0, 0, 2) does not belong to the plane, because
the system
2s + 2t = −1
2s −2t = −1
3s −t = 1
is inconsistent (the first two equations yield s = −
1
2
and t = 0, contradicting the
third equation).
13.8.2 n. 3 (p. 482)
(a)
x = 1 +t
y = 2 +s +t
z = 1 + 4t
(b)
u = (1, 2, 1) −(0, 1, 0) = (1, 1, 1)
v = (1, 1, 4) −(0, 1, 0) = (1, 0, 4)
x = s +t
y = 1 +s
z = s + 4t
Exercises 69
13.8.3 n. 4 (p. 482)
(a) Solving for s and t with the coordinates of the first point, I get
I s −2t + 1 = 0
II s + 4t + 2 = 0
III 2s +t = 0
I +II −III t + 3 = 0
2III −I −II 2s −3 = 0
check on I
3
2
−6 + 1 6= 0
and (0, 0, 0) does not belong to the plane M. The second point is directly seen to
belong to M from the parametric equations
(1, 2, 0) +s (1, 1, 2) +t (−2, 4, 1) (13.4)
Finally, with the third point I get
I s −2t + 1 = 2
II s + 4t + 2 = −3
III 2s +t = −3
I +II −III t + 3 = 2
2III −I −II 2s −3 = −5
check on I −1 + 2 + 1 = 2
check on II −1 −4 + 2 = −3
check on III −2 −1 = −3
and (2, −3, −3) belongs to M.
(b) The answer has already been given by writing equation (13.4):
P ≡ (1, 2, 0) a = (1, 1, 2) b = (−2, 4, 1)
13.8.4 n. 5 (p. 482)
This exercise is a replica of material already presented in class and inserted in the
notes.
(a) If p +q +r = 1, then
pP + qQ +rR = P −(1 −p) P +qQ+rR
= P + (q +r) P +qQ +rR
= P +q (Q−P) +r (R −P)
and the coordinates of pP + qQ + rR satisfy the parametric equations of the plane
M through P, Q, and R..
(b) If S is a point of M, there exist real numbers q and r such that
S = P +q (Q−P) +r (R −P)
Then, defining p ≡ 1 −(q +r),
S = (1 −q −r) P +qQ+rR
= pP +qQ +rR
70 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
13.8.5 n. 6 (p. 482)
I use three different methods for the three cases.
(a) The parametric equations for the first plane π
1
are
I x = 2 + 3h −k
II y = 3 + 2h −2k
III z = 1 +h −3k
Eliminating the parameter h (I −II −III) I get
4k = x −y −z + 2
Eliminating the parameter k (I +II −III) I get
4h = x +y −z −4
Substituting in III (or, better, in 4 · III),
4z = 4 +x +y −z −4 −3x + 3y + 3z −6
I obtain a cartesian equation for π
1
x −2y +z + 3 = 0
(b) I consider the four coefficients (a, b, c, d) of the cartesian equation of π
2
as un-
known, and I require that the three given points belong to π
2
; I obtain the system
2a + 3b +c +d = 0
−2a −b −3c +d = 0
4a + 3b −c +d = 0
which I solve by elimination

2 3 1 1
−2 −1 −3 1
4 3 −1 1
¸
¸
µ
2
a
0

1
2
(
2
a
0
+
1
a
0
)
3
a
0

3
a
0
−2
1
a
0

2 3 1 1
0 1 −1 1
0 −3 −3 −1
¸
¸
¡
3
a
0

1
2
(
3
a
0
+ 3
1
a
0
)
¢

2 3 1 1
0 1 −1 1
0 0 −3 1
¸
¸
Exercises 71
From the last equation (which reads −3c +d = 0) I assign values 1 and 3 to c and d,
respectively; from the second (which reads b −c +d = 0) I get b = −2, and from the
first (which is unchanged) I get a = 1. The cartesian equation of π
2
is
x −2y +z + 3 = 0
(notice that π
1
and π
2
coincide)
(c) This method requires the vector product (called cross product by Apostol ), which
is presented in the subsequent section; however, I have thought it better to show its
application here already. The plane π
3
and the given plane being parallel, they have
the same normal direction. Such a normal is
n =(2, 0, −2) × (1, 1, 1) = (2, −4, 2)
Thus π
3
coincides with π
2
, since it has the same normal and has a common point
with it. At any rate (just to show how the method applies in general), a cartesian
equation for π
3
is
x −2y +z +d = 0
and the coefficient d is determined by the requirement that π
3
contains (2, 3, 1)
2 −6 + 1 +d = 0
yielding
x −2y +z + 3 = 0
13.8.6 n. 7 (p. 482)
(a) Only the first two points belong to the given plane.
(b) I assign the values −1 and 1 to y and z in the cartesian equation of the plane M,
in order to obtain the third coordinate of a point of M, and I obtain P = (1, −1, 1) (I
may have as well taken one of the first two points of part a). Any two vectors which
are orthogonal to the normal n = (3, −5, 1) and form a linearly independent couple
can be chosen as direction vectors for M. Thus I assign values arbitrarily to d
2
and
d
3
in the orthogonality condition
3d
1
−5d
2
+d
3
= 0
say, (0, 3) and (3, 0), and I get
d
I
= (−1, 0, 3) d
II
= (5, 3, 0)
The parametric equations for M are
x = 1 −s + 5t
y = −1 + 3t
z = 1 + 3s
72 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
13.8.7 n. 8 (p. 482)
The question is formulated in a slightly insidious way (perhaps Tom did it on pur-
pose...), because the parametric equations of the two planes M and M
0
are written
using the same names for the two parameters. This may easily lead to an incorrect
attempt two solve the problem by setting up a system of three equations in the two
unknown s and t, which is likely to have no solutions, thereby suggesting the wrong
answer that M and M
0
are parallel. On the contrary, the equation system for the
coordinates of points in M ∩ M
0
has four unknowns:
I 1 + 2s −t = 2 +h + 3k
II 1 −s = 3 + 2h + 2k
III 1 + 3s + 2t = 1 + 3h +k
(13.5)
I take all the variables on the lefthand side, and the constant terms on the righthand
one, and I proceed by elimination:
s t h k | const.
2 −1 −1 −3 | 1
−1 0 −2 −2 | 2
3 2 −3 −1 | 0

¸
1
r
0

1
r
0
+ 2
2
r
0
3
r
0

3
r
0
+ 3
2
r
0
1
r
0

2
r
0
¸

s t h k | const.
−1 0 −2 −2 | 2
0 −1 −5 −7 | 5
0 2 −9 −7 | 6
µ
3
r
0

3
r
0
+ 2
2
r
0
1
r
0

2
r
0

s t h k | const.
−1 0 −2 −2 | 2
0 −1 −5 −7 | 5
0 0 −19 −21 | 16
A handy solution to the last equation (which reads −19h − 21k = 16) is obtained
by assigning values 8 and −8 to h and k, respectively. This is already enough to
get the first point from the parametric equation of M
0
, which is apparent (though
incomplete) from the righthand side of (13.5). Thus Q = (−14, 3, 17). However, just
to check on the computations, I proceed to finish up the elimination, which leads
to t = 11 from the second row, and to s = −2 from the first. Substituting in the
lefthand side of (13.5), which is a trace of the parametric equations of M, I do get
indeed (−14, 3, 17). Another handy solution to the equation corresponding to the last
row of the final elimination table is (h, k) =
¡

2
5
, −
2
5
¢
. This gives R =
¡
2
5
,
7
5
, −
3
5
¢
,
and the check by means of (s, t) =
¡

2
5
, −
1
5
¢
is all right.
13.8.8 n. 9 (p. 482)
(a) A normal vector for M is
n = (1, 2, 3) × (3, 2, 1) = (−4, 8, −4)
Exercises 73
whereas the coefficient vector in the equation of M
0
is (1, −2, 1). Since the latter is
parallel to the former, and the coordinates of the point P ∈ M do not satisfy the
equation of M
0
, the two planes are parallel.
(b) A cartesian equation for M is
x −2y +z +d = 0
From substitution of the coordinates of P, the coefficient d is seen to be equal to 3.
The coordinates of the points of the intersection line L ≡ M∩M
00
satisfy the system
½
x −2y +z + 3 = 0
x + 2y +z = 0
By sum and subtraction, the line L can be represented by the simpler system
½
2x + 2z = −3
4y = 3
as the intersection of two different planes π and π
0
, with π parallel to the y-axis, and
π
0
parallel to the xz-plane. Coordinate of points on L are now easy to produce, e.g.,
Q =
¡

3
2
,
3
4
, 0
¢
and R =
¡
0,
3
4
, −
3
2
¢
13.8.9 n. 10 (p. 483)
The parametric equations for the line L are
x = 1 + 2r
y = 1 −r
z = 1 + 3r
and the parametric equations for the plane M are
x = 1 + 2s
y = 1 +s +t
z = −2 + 3s +t
The coordinates of a point of intersection between L and M must satisfy the system
of equations
2r −2s = 0
r +s +t = 0
3r −3s −t = −3
The first equation yields r = s, from which the third and second equation give t = 3,
r = s = −
3
2
. Thus L ∩ M consists of a single point, namely, the point of coordinates
¡
−2,
5
2
. −
7
2
¢
.
74 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
13.8.10 n. 11 (p. 483)
The parametric equations for L are
x = 1 + 2t
y = 1 −t
z = 1 + 3t
and a direction vector for L is v =(2, −1, 3)
(a) L is parallel to the given plane (which I am going to denote π
a
) if v is a linear
combination of (2, 1, 3) and
¡
3
4
, 1, 1
¢
. Thus I consider the system
2x +
3
4
y = 2
x +y = −1
3x +y = 3
where subtraction of the second equation from the third gives 2x = 4, hence x = 2;
this yields y = −3 in the last two equations, contradicting the first.
Alternatively, computing the determinant of the matrix having v, a, b as
columns
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
2 2
3
4
−1 1 1
3 3 1
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
=
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
4 0 −
5
4
−1 1 1
6 0 −2
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
=
¯
¯
¯
¯
4 −
5
4
6 −2
¯
¯
¯
¯
= −
1
2
shows that {v, a, b} is a linearly independent set.
With either reasoning, it is seen that L is not parallel to π
a
.
(b) By computing two independent directions for the plane π
b
, e.g.,
−→
PQ = (3, 5, 2) −
(1, 1, −2) and
−→
PR = (2, 4, −1) − (1, 1, −2), I am reduced to the previous case. The
system to be studied now is
2x +y = 2
4x + 3y = −1
4x +y = 3
and the three equations are again inconsistent, because subtraction of the third equa-
tion from the second gives y = −2, whereas subtraction of the first from the third
yields x =
1
2
, these two values contradicting all equations. L is not parallel to π
b
.
(c) Since a normal vector to π
c
has for components the coefficients of the unknowns
in the equation of π
c
, it suffices to check orthogonality between v and (1, 2, 3):
h(2, −1, 3) , (1, 2, 3)i = 9 6= 0
L is not parallel to π
c
.
Exercises 75
13.8.11 n. 12 (p. 483)
Let R be any point of the given plane π, other than P or Q. A point S then belongs
to M if and only if there exists real numbers q and r such that
S = P +q (Q−P) +r (R −P) (13.6)
If S belongs to the line through P and Q, there exists a real number p such that
S = P +p (Q−P)
Then, by defining
q ≡ p r ≡ 0
it is immediately seen that condition (13.6) is satisfied.
13.8.12 n. 13 (p. 483)
Since every point of L belongs to M, M contains the points having coordinates equal
to (1, 2, 3), (1, 2, 3) +t (1, 1, 1) for each t ∈ R, and (2, 3, 5). Choosing, e.g., t = 1, the
parametric equations for M are
x = 1 +r +s
y = 2 +r +s
z = 3 +r + 2s
It is possible to eliminate the two parameters at once, by subtracting the first equaiton
from the second, obtaining
x −y + 1 = 0
13.8.13 n. 14 (p. 483)
Let d be a direction vector for the line L, and let Q ≡ (x
Q
, y
Q
, z
Q
) be a point of L.
A plane containing L and the point P ≡ (x
P
, y
P
, z
P
) is the plane π through Q with
direction vectors d and
−→
QP
x = x
Q
+hd
1
+k (x
P
−x
Q
)
y = y
Q
+hd
2
+k (y
P
−y
Q
)
z = z
Q
+hd
3
+k (z
P
−z
Q
)
L belongs to π because the parametric equation of π reduces to that of L when k is
assigned value 0, and P belongs to π because the coordinates of P are obtained from
the parametric equation of π when h is assigned value 0 and k is assigned value 1.
Since any two distinct points on L and P determine a unique plane, π is the only
plane containing L and P.
76 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
13.9 The cross product
13.10 The cross product expressed as a determinant
13.11 Exercises
13.11.1 n. 1 (p. 487)
(a) A×B = −2i + 3j −k.
(b) B ×C = 4i −5j + 3k.
(c) C ×A = 4i −4j + 2k.
(d) A× (C ×A) = 8i + 10j + 4k.
(e) (A×B) ×C = 8i + 3j −7k.
(f) A× (B ×C) = 10i + 11j + 5k.
(g) (A×C) ×B = −2i −8j −12k.
(h) (A+B) × (A−C) = 2i −2j.
(i) (A×B) × (A×C) = −2i + 4k.
13.11.2 n. 2 (p. 487)
(a)
A×B
kA×Bk
= −
4

26
i +
3

26
j +
1

26
k or −
A×B
kA×Bk
=
4

26
i −
3

26
j −
1

26
k.
(b)
A×B
kA×Bk
= −
41

2054
i −
18

2054
j +
7

2054
k or −
A×B
kA×Bk
=
41

2054
i +
18

2054
j −
7

2054
k.
(c)
A×B
kA×Bk
= −
1

6
i −
2

6
j −
1

6
k or −
A×B
kA×Bk
=
1

6
i +
2

6
j +
1

6
k.
13.11.3 n. 3 (p. 487)
(a)
−→
AB ×
−→
AC = (2, −2, −3) × (3, 2, −2) = (10, −5, 10)
area ABC =
1
2
°
°
°
−→
AB ×
−→
AC
°
°
° =
15
2
(b)
−→
AB ×
−→
AC = (3, −6, 3) × (3, −1, 0) = (3, 9, 15)
area ABC =
1
2
°
°
°
−→
AB ×
−→
AC
°
°
° =
3

35
2
Exercises 77
(c)
−→
AB ×
−→
AC = (0, 1, 1) × (1, 0, 1) = (1, 1, −1)
area ABC =
1
2
°
°
°
−→
AB ×
−→
AC
°
°
° =

3
2
13.11.4 n. 4 (p. 487)
−→
CA×
−→
AB = (−i + 2j −3k) × (2j +k) = 8i −j −2k
13.11.5 n. 5 (p. 487)
Let a ≡ (l, m, n) and b ≡ (p, q, r) for the sake of notational simplicity. Then
ka ×bk
2
= (mr −nq)
2
+ (np −lr)
2
+ (lq −mp)
2
= m
2
r
2
+n
2
q
2
−2mnrq +n
2
p
2
+l
2
r
2
−2lnpr +l
2
q
2
+m
2
p
2
−2lmpq
kak
2
kbk
2
=
¡
l
2
+m
2
+n
2
¢ ¡
p
2
+q
2
+r
2
¢
= l
2
p
2
+l
2
q
2
+l
2
r
2
+m
2
p
2
+m
2
q
2
+m
2
r
2
+n
2
p
2
+n
2
q
2
+n
2
r
2
(ka ×bk = kak kbk) ⇔
¡
ka ×bk
2
= kak
2
kbk
2
¢
⇔ (lp +mq +nr)
2
= 0
⇔ ha, bi = 0
13.11.6 n. 6 (p. 487)
(a)
ha, b +ci = ha, b ×ai = 0
because b ×a is orthogonal to a.
(b)
hb, ci = hb, (b ×a) −bi = hb, (b ×a)i + hb, −bi = −kbk
2
because b ×a is orthogonal to b. Thus
hb, ci < 0 cos
c
bc = −
kbk
kck
< 0
c
bc ∈
i
π
2
, π
i
. Moreover,
c
bc = −π is impossible, because
kck
2
= kb ×ak
2
+ kbk
2
−2 kb ×ak kbk cos
\
(b ×a) b
= kb ×ak
2
+ kbk
2
> kbk
2
since (a, b) is linearly independent and kb ×ak > 0.
(c) By the formula above, kck
2
= 2
2
+ 1
2
, and kck =

5.
78 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
13.11.7 n. 7 (p. 488)
(a) Since kak = kbk = 1 and ha, bi = 0, by Lagrange’s identity (theorem 13.12.f)
ka ×bk
2
= kak
2
kbk
2
−ha, bi
2
= 1
so that a × b is a unit vector as well. The three vectors a, b, a × b are mutually
orthogonal either by assumption or by the properties of the vector product (theorem
13.12.d-e).
(b) By Lagrange’s identity again,
kck
2
= ka ×bk
2
kak
2
−ha ×b, ai
2
= 1
(c) And again,
k(a ×b) ×bk
2
= ka ×bk
2
kbk
2
−ha ×b, bi
2
= 1
k(a ×b) ×ak
2
= kck
2
= 1
Since the direction which is orthogonal to (a ×b) and to b is spanned by a, (a ×b)×b
is either equal to a or to −a. Similarly, (a ×b) × a is either equal to b or to −b.
Both the righthand rule and the lefthand rule yield now
(a ×b) ×a = b (a ×b) ×b = −a
(d)
(a ×b) ×a =

¸
(a
3
b
1
−a
1
b
3
) a
3
−(a
1
b
2
−a
2
b
1
) a
2
(a
1
b
2
−a
2
b
1
) a
1
−(a
2
b
3
−a
3
b
2
) a
3
(a
2
b
3
−a
3
b
2
) a
2
−(a
3
b
1
−a
1
b
3
) a
1
¸

=

¸
(a
2
2
+a
2
3
) b
1
−a
1
(a
3
b
3
+a
2
b
2
)
(a
2
1
+a
2
3
) b
2
−a
2
(a
1
b
1
+a
3
b
3
)
(a
2
1
+a
2
2
) b
3
−a
3
(a
1
b
1
+a
2
b
2
)
¸

Since a and b are orthogonal,
(a ×b) ×a =

¸
(a
2
2
+a
2
3
) b
1
+a
1
(a
1
b
1
)
(a
2
1
+a
2
3
) b
2
+a
2
(a
2
b
2
)
(a
2
1
+a
2
2
) b
3
+a
3
(a
3
b
3
)
¸

Since a is a unit vector,
(a ×b) ×a =

¸
b
1
b
2
b
3
¸

The proof that (a ×b) ×b = −a is identical.
Exercises 79
13.11.8 n. 8 (p. 488)
(a) From a ×b = 0, either there exists some h ∈ R such that a = hb, or there exists
some k ∈ R such that b = ka. Then either ha, bi = hkbk
2
or ha, bi = k kak
2
, that
is, either hkbk = 0 or k kak = 0. In the first case, either h = 0 (which means a = 0),
or kbk = 0 (which is equivalent to b = 0). In the second case, either k = 0 (which
means b = 0), or kak = 0 (which is equivalent to a = 0). Geometrically, suppose
that a 6= 0. Then both the projection
ha,bi
kak
2
a of b along a and the projecting vector
(of length
kb×ak
kak
) are null, which can only happen if b = 0.
(b) From the previous point, the hypotheses a 6= 0, a×(b −c) = 0, and ha, b −ci =
0 imply that b −c = 0.
13.11.9 n. 9 (p. 488)
(a) Let ϑ ≡
c
ab, and observe that a and c are orthogonal. Froma×b = kak kbk |sin ϑ|,
in order to satisfy the condition
a ×b = c
the vector b must be orthogonal to c, and its norm must depend on ϑ according to
the relation
kbk =
kck
kak |sin ϑ|
(13.7)
Thus
kck
kak
≤ kbk < +∞. In particular, b can be taken orthogonal to a as well, in
which case it has to be equal to
a×c
kak
2
or to
c×a
kak
2
. Thus two solutions to the problem
are
±
µ
7
9
, −
8
9
, −
11
9

(b) Let (p, q, r) be the coordinates of b; the conditions a ×b = c and ha, bi = 1 are:
I −2q −r = 3
II 2p −2r = 4
III p + 2q = −1
IV 2p −q + 2r = 1
Standard manipulations yield
2II + 2IV +III 9p = 9
(↑) ,→II 2 −2r = 4
(↑) ,→I −2q + 1 = 3
check on IV 2 + 1 −2 = 1
check on III 1 −2 = 1
that is, the unique solution is
b =(1, −1, −1)
The solution to this exercise given by Apostol at page 645 is wrong.
80 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
13.11.10 n. 10 (p. 488)
Replacing b with c in the first result of exercise7,
(a ×c) ×a = c
Therefore, by skew-simmetry of the vector product, it is seen that the c × a is a
solution to the equation
a ×x = c (13.8)
However, c ×a is orthogonal to a, and hence it does not meet the additional require-
ment
ha, xi = 1 (13.9)
We are bound to look for other solutions to (13.8). If x and z both solve (13.8),
a × (x −z) = a ×x −a ×z = c −c = 0
which implies that x − z is parallel to a. Thus the set of all solutions to equation
(13.8) is
©
x ∈ R
3
: ∃α ∈ R, x = a ×c +αa
ª
From condition (13.9),
ha, a ×c +αai = 1
that is,
α = −
1
kak
2
Thus the unique solution to the problem is
b ≡ a ×c−
a
kak
2
13.11.11 n. 11 (p. 488)
(a) Let
u ≡
−→
AB = (−2, 1, 0)
v ≡
−→
BC = (3, −2, 1)
w ≡
−→
CA = (−1, 1, −1)
Each side of the triangle ABC can be one of the two diagonals of the parallelogram
to be determined.
Exercises 81
If one of the diagonals is BC, the other is AD, where
−→
AD =
−→
AB +
−→
AC = u −w. In
this case
D = A+u −w = “B +C −A” = (0, 0, 2)
If one of the diagonals is CA, the other is BE, where
−→
BE =
−→
BC +
−→
BA = v −u. In
this case
E = B +v −u = “A+C −B” = (4, −2, 2)
If one of the diagonals is AB, the other is CF, where
−→
CF =
−→
CA +
−→
CB = −v + w.
In this case
F = A−v +w = “A +B −C” = (−2, 2, 0)
(b)
u ×w =
µ¯
¯
¯
¯
1 0
1 −1
¯
¯
¯
¯
, −
¯
¯
¯
¯
−2 0
−1 −1
¯
¯
¯
¯
,
¯
¯
¯
¯
−2 1
−1 1
¯
¯
¯
¯

= (−1, −2, −1)
ku ×wk =

6 = area (ABC) =

6
2
82 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
13.11.12 n. 12 (p. 488)
b +c = 2 (a ×b) −2b
ha, b +ci = −2 ha, bi = −4
cos
c
ab =
ha, bi
kak kbk
=
1
2
ka ×bk
2
= kak
2
kbk
2
sin
2
c
ab = 12
kck
2
= 4 ka ×bk
2
−12 ha ×b, bi + 9 kbk
2
= 192
kck = 8

3
hb, ci = 2 hb, a ×bi −3 kbk
2
= 48
cos
c
bc =
hb, ci
kbk kck
=

3
2
13.11.13 n. 13 (p. 488)
(a) It is true that, if the couple (a, b) is linearly independent, then the triple
(a +b, a −b, a ×b)
is linearly independent, too. Indeed, in the first place a and b are nonnull, since every
n-tuple having the null vector among its components is linearly dependent. Secondly,
(a ×b) is nonnull, too, because (a, b) is linearly independent. Third, (a ×b) is
orthogonal to both a + b and a −b (as well as to any vector in lin {a, b}), because
it is orthogonal to a and b; in particular, (a ×b) / ∈ lin {a.b}, since the only vector
which is orthogonal to itself is the null vector. Fourth, suppose that
x(a +b) +y (a −b) +z (a ×b) = 0 (13.10)
Then z cannot be different from zero, since otherwise
(a ×b) = −
x
z
(a +b) −
y
z
(a −b)
= −
x +y
z
a +
y −x
z
b
would belong to lin{a, b}. Thus z = 0, and (13.10) becomes
x(a +b) +y (a −b) = 0
which is equivalent to
(x +y) a+(x −y) b = 0
By linear independence of (a, b),
x +y = 0 and x −y = 0
Exercises 83
and hence x = y = 0.
(b) It is true that, if the couple (a, b) is linearly independent, then the triple
(a +b, a +a ×b, b +a ×b)
is linearly independent, too. Indeed, let (x, y, z) be such that
x (a +b) +y (a +a ×b) +z (b +a ×b) = 0
which is equivalent to
(x +y) a + (x +z) b + (y +z) a ×b = 0
Since, arguing as in the fourth part of the previous point, y + z must be null, and
this in turn implies that both x +y and x +z are also null. The system
x + y = 0
x +z = 0
y +z = 0
has the trivial solution as the only solution.
(c) It is true that, if the couple (a, b) is linearly independent, then the triple
(a, b, (a + b) × (a −b))
is linearly independent, too. Indeed,
(a +b) × (a −b) = a ×a −a ×b +b ×a −b ×b
= −2a ×b
and the triple
(a, b, a ×b)
is linearly independent when the couple (a, b) is so.
13.11.14 n. 14 (p. 488)
(a) The cross product
−→
AB ×
−→
AC equals the null vector if and only if the couple
³
−→
AB,
−→
AC
´
is linearly dependent. In such a case, if
−→
AC is null, then A and C coin-
cide and it is clear that the line through them and B contains all the three points.
Otherwise, if
−→
AC is nonnull, then in the nontrivial null combination
x
−→
AB +y
−→
AC = 0
x must be nonnull, yielding
−→
AB = −
y
x
−→
AC
84 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
that is,
B = A−
y
x
−→
AC
which means that B belongs to the line through A and C.
(b) By the previous point, the set
n
P :
−→
AP ×
−→
BP = 0
o
is the set of all points P such that A, B, and P belong to the same line, that is, the
set of all points P belonging to the line through A and B.
13.11.15 n. 15 (p. 488)
(a) From the assumption (p ×b) +p = a,
hb, p ×bi + hb, pi = hb, ai
hb, pi = 0
that is, p is orthogonal to b. This gives
kp ×bk = kpk kbk = kpk (13.11)
and hence
1 = kak
2
= kp ×bk
2
+ kpk
2
= 2 kpk
2
that is, kpk =

2
2
.
(b) Since p, b, and p×b are pairwise orthogonal, (p, b, p ×b) is linearly independent,
and {p, b, p ×b} is a basis of R
3
.
(c) Since p is orthogonal both to p×b (definition of vector product) and to b (point
a), there exists some h ∈ R such that
(p ×b) ×b = hp
Thus, taking into account (13.11),
|h| kpk = kp ×bk kbk
¯
¯
¯sin
π
2
¯
¯
¯ = kpk
and h ∈ {1, −1}. Since the triples (p, b, p ×b) and (p ×b, p, b) define the same
orientation, and (p ×b, b, p) defines the opposite one, h = −1.
(d) Still from the assumption (p ×b) +p = a,
hp, p ×bi + hp, pi = hp, ai
hp, ai = kpk
2
=
1
2
p × (p ×b) +p ×p = p ×a
kp ×ak = kpk
2
kbk =
1
2
The scalar triple product 85
Thus
p =
1
2
a +
1
2
q (13.12)
where q = 2p−a is a vector in the plane π generated by p and a, which is orthogonal
to a. Since a normal vector to π is b, there exists some k ∈ R such that
q = k (b ×a)
Now
kqk
2
= 4 kpk
2
+ kak
2
−4 kpk kak cos c pa
= 2 + 1 −4

2
2

2
2
= 1
kqk = 1 |k| = 1
If on the plane orthogonal to b the mapping u 7→b×u rotates counterclockwise, the
vectors a = p + b × p, b × p, and b × a form angles of
π
4
,
π
2
, and

4
, respectively,
with p. On the other hand, the decomposition of p obtained in (13.12) requires that
the angle formed with p by q is −
π
4
, so that q is discordant with b × a. It follows
that k = −1. I have finally obtained
p =
1
2
a −
1
2
(b ×a)
13.12 The scalar triple product
13.13 Cramer’s rule for solving systems of three linear equations
13.14 Exercises
13.15 Normal vectors to planes
13.16 Linear cartesian equations for planes
86 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
13.17 Exercises
13.17.1 n. 1 (p. 496)
(a) Out of the inifnitely many vectors satisfying the requirement, a distinguished one
is
n ≡ (2i + 3j −4k) × (j +k) = 7i −2j + 2k
(b)
hn, (x, y, z)i = 0 or 7x −2y + 2z = 0
(c)
hn, (x, y, z)i = hn, (1, 2, 3)i or 7x −2y + 2z = 9
13.17.2 n. 2 (p. 496)
(a)
n
knk
=
µ
1
3
,
2
3
, −
2
3

(b) The three intersection points are:
X-axis : (−7, 0, 0) Y -axis :
µ
0, −
7
2
, 0

Z-axis :
µ
0, 0,
7
2

.
(c) The distance from the origin is
7
3
.
(d) Intersecting with π the line through the origin which is directed by the normal
to π

x = h
y = 2h
z = −2h
x + 2y −2z + 7 = 0
yields
h + 4h + 4h + 7 = 0
h = −
7
9
(x, y, z) =
µ

7
9
, −
14
9
,
14
9

Exercises 87
13.17.3 n. 3 (p. 496)
A cartesian equation for the plane which passes through the point P ≡ (1, 2, −3) and
is parallel to the plane of equation
3x −y + 2z = 4
is
3 (x −1) −(y −2) + 2 (z + 3) = 0
or
3x −y + 2z + 5 = 0
The distance between the two planes is
|4 −(−5)|

9 + 1 + 4
=
9

14
14
13.17.4 n. 4 (p. 496)
π
1
: x + 2y −2z = 5
π
2
: 3x −6y + 3z = 2
π
3
: 2x +y + 2z = −1
π
4
: x −2y +z = 7
(a) π
2
and π
4
are parallel because n
2
= 3n
4
; π
1
and π
3
are orthogonal because
hn
1
, n
3
i = 0.
(b) The straight line through the origin having direction vector n
4
has equations
x = t
y = −2t
z = t
and intersects π
2
and π
4
at points C and D, respectively, which can be determined
by the equations
3t
C
−6 (−2t
C
) + 3t
C
= 2
t
D
−2 (−2t
D
) +t
D
= 7
Thus t
C
=
1
9
, t
D
=
7
6
,
−→
CD =
¡
7
6

1
9
¢
n
4
, and
°
°
°
−→
CD
°
°
° =
19
18
kn
4
k =
19
18

6
Alternatively, rewriting the equation of π
4
with normal vector n
2
3x −6y + 3z = 21
dist (π, π
0
) =
|d
2
−d
4
|
kn
2
k
=
19

54
88 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
13.17.5 n. 5 (p. 496)
(a) A normal vector for the plane π through the points P ≡ (1, 1, −1), Q ≡ (3, 3, 2),
R ≡ (3, −1, −2) is
n ≡
−→
PQ×
−→
QR = (2, 2, 3) × (0, −4, −4) = (4, 8, −8)
(b) A cartesian equation for π is
x + 2y −2z = 5
(c) The distance of π from the origin is
5
3
.
13.17.6 n. 6 (p. 496)
Proceeding as in points (a) and (b) of the previous exercise, a normal vector for the
plane through the points P ≡ (1, 2, 3), Q ≡ (2, 3, 4), R ≡ (−1, 7, −2) is
n ≡
−→
PQ×
−→
RQ = (1, 1, 1) × (3, −4, 6) = (10, −3, −7)
and a cartesian equation for it is
10x −3y −7z + 17 = 0
13.17.7 n. 8 (p. 496)
A normal vector to the plane is given by any direction vector for the given line
n ≡ (2, 4, 12) −(1, 2, 3) = (1, 2, 9)
A cartesian equation for the plane is
(x −2) + 2 (y −3) + 9 (z + 7) = 0
or
x + 2y + 9z = 55
13.17.8 n. 9 (p. 496)
A direction vector for the line is just the normal vector of the plane. Thus the
parametric equations are
x = 2 + 4h y = 1 −3h z = −3 +h
Exercises 89
13.17.9 n. 10 (p. 496)
(a) The position of the point at time t can be written as follows:
x = 1 −t y = 2 −3t z = −1 + 2t
which are just the parametric equations of a line.
(b) The direction vector of the line L is
d = (−1, −3, 2)
(c) The hitting instant is determined by substituting the coordinates of the moving
point into the equation of the given plane π
2 (1 −t) + 3 (2 −3t) + 2 (−1 + 2t) + 1 = 0
−7t + 7 = 0
yielding t = 1. Hence the hitting point is (0, −1, 1).
(d) At time t = 3, the moving point has coordinates (−2, −7, 5). Substituting,
2 · (−2) + 3 · (−7) + 2 · 5 +d = 0
d = 15
A cartesian equation for the plane π
0
which is parallel to π and contains (−2, −7, 5)
is
2x + 3y + 2z + 15 = 0
(e) At time t = 2, the moving point has coordinates (−1, −4, 3). A normal vector for
the plane π
00
which is orthogonal to L and contains (−1, −4, 3) is −d. Thus
−1 · −1 −3 · −4 + 2 · 3 +d = 0
d = −19
A cartesian equation for π
00
is
(x + 1) + 3 (y + 4) −2 (z −3) = 0
or
x + 3y −2z + 19 = 0
90 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
13.17.10 n. 11 (p. 496)
From
c
ni =
π
3
c
nj =
π
4
c
nk =
π
3
we get
n
knk
=
1
2
³
1,

2, 1
´
A cartesian equation for the plane in consideration is
(x −1) +

2 (y −1) + (z −1) = 0
or
x +

2y +z = 2 +

2
13.17.11 n. 13 (p. 496)
First I find a vector of arbitrary norm which satisfies the given conditions:
l + 2m−3n = 0
l −m+ 5n = 0
Assigning value 1 to n, the other values are easily obtained: (l, m) =
¡

7
3
,
8
3
¢
. Then
the required vector is
³

7

122
,
8

122
,
3

122
´
13.17.12 n. 14 (p. 496)
A normal vector for the plane π which is parallel to both vectors i +j and j +k is
n ≡ (i +j) × (j +k) = i −j +k
Since the intercept of π with the X-axis is (2, 0, 0), a cartesian equation for π is
x −y +z = 2
13.17.13 n. 15 (p. 496)
I work directly on the coefficient matrix for the equation system:
3 1 1 | 5
3 1 5 | 7
1 −1 3 | 3
With obvious manipulations
0 4 −8 | −4
0 0 4 | 2
1 −1 3 | 3
I obtain a unique solution (x, y, z) =
¡
3
2
, 0,
1
2
¢
.
The conic sections 91
13.17.14 n. 17 (p. 497)
If the line ` under consideration is parallel to the two given planes, which have as
normal vectors n
1
≡ (1, 2, 3) and n
2
≡ (2, 3, 4), a direction vector for ` is
d ≡ (2, 3, 4) × (1, 2, 3) = (1, −2, 1)
Since ` goes through the point P ≡ (1, 2, 3), parametric eqautions for ` are the
following:
x = 1 +t y = 2 −2t z = 3 +t
13.17.15 n. 20 (p. 497)
A cartesian equation for the plane under consideration is
2x −y + 2z +d = 0
The condition of equal distance from the point P ≡ (3, 2, −1) yields
|6 −2 −2 +d|
3
=
|6 −2 −2 + 4|
3
that is,
|2 +d| = 6
The two solutions of the above equation are d
1
= 4 (corresponding to the plane
already given) and d
2
= −8. Thus the required equation is
2x −y + 2z = 8
13.18 The conic sections
13.19 Eccentricity of conic sections
13.20 Polar equations for conic sections
13.21 Exercises
92 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry
13.22 Conic sections symmetric about the origin
13.23 Cartesian equations for the conic sections
13.24 Exercises
13.25 Miscellaneous exercises on conic sections
Chapter 14
CALCULUS OF VECTOR-VALUED FUNCTIONS
94 Calculus of vector-valued functions
Chapter 15
LINEAR SPACES
15.1 Introduction
15.2 The definition of a linear space
15.3 Examples of linear spaces
15.4 Elementary consequences of the axioms
15.5 Exercises
15.5.1 n. 1 (p. 555)
The set of all real rational functions is a real linear space. Indeed, let P, Q, R, and
S be any four real polynomials, and let
f : x 7→
P (x)
Q(x)
g : x 7→
R(x)
S (x)
Then for every two real numbers α and β
αf +βg : x 7→
αP (x) S (x) +βQ(x) R(x)
Q(x) S (x)
is a well defined real rational function. This shows that the set in question is closed
with respect to the two linear space operations of function sum and function multipli-
cation by a scalar. From this the other two existence axioms (of the zero element and
of negatives) also follow as particular cases, for (α, β) = (0, 0) and for (α, β) = (0, −1)
respectively. Of course it can also be seen directly that the identically null function
x 7→ 0 is a rational function, as the quotient of the constant polynomials P : x 7→ 0
96 Linear spaces
and Q : x 7→1. The remaining linear space axioms are immediately seen to hold, tak-
ing into account the general properties of the operations of function sum and function
multiplication by a scalar
15.5.2 n. 2 (p. 555)
The set of all real rational functions having numerator of degree not exceeding the
degree of the denominator is a real linear space. Indeed, taking into account exercise
1, and using the same notation, it only needs to be proved that if deg P ≤ deg Q and
deg R ≤ deg S, then
deg [αPS +βQR] ≤ deg QS
This is clear, since for every two real numbers α and β
deg [αPS +βQR] ≤ max {deg PS, deg QR}
deg PS = deg P deg S ≤ deg Qdeg S
deg QR = deg Qdeg R ≤ deg Qdeg S
so that the closure axioms hold. It may be also noticed that the degree of both
polynomials P and Q occurring in the representation of the identically null function
as a rational function is zero.
15.5.3 n. 3 (p. 555)
The set of all real valued functions which are defined on a fixed domain containing 0
and 1, and which have the same value at 0 and 1, is a real linear space. Indeed, for
every two real numbers α and β,
(αf +βg) (0) = αf (0) +βg (0) = αf (1) +βg (1) = (αf +βg) (1)
so that the closure axioms hold. Again, the two existence axioms follow as particular
cases; and it is anyway clear that the identically null function x 7→0 achieves the same
value at 0 and 1. Similarly, that the other linear space axioms hold is a straightforward
consequence of the general properties of the operations of function sum and function
multiplication by a scalar.
15.5.4 n. 4 (p. 555)
The set of all real valued functions which are defined on a fixed domain containing
0 and 1, and which achieve at 0 the double value they achieve at 1 is a real linear
space. Indeed, for every two real numbers α and β,
(αf +βg) (0) = αf (0) +βg (0) = α2f (1) +β2g (1) = 2 (αf +βg) (1)
so that the closure axioms hold. A final remark concerning the other axioms, of a
type which has become usual at this point, allows to conclude.
Exercises 97
15.5.5 n. 5 (p. 555)
The set of all real valued functions which are defined on a fixed domain containing
0 and 1, and which have value at 1 which exceeds the value at 0 by 1, is not a real
linear space. Indeed, let α and β be any two real numbers such that α+β 6= 1. Then
(αf +βg) (1) = αf (1) +βg (1) = α[1 +f (0)] +β [1 +g (0)]
= α +β +αf (0) +βg (0) = α +β + (αf +βg) (0)
6= 1 + (αf +βg) (0)
and the two closure axioms fail to hold (the above shows, however, that the set in
question is an affine subspace of the real linear space). The other failing axioms are:
existence of the zero element (the identically null function has the same value at 0
and at 1), and existence of negatives
f (1) = 1 +f (0) ⇒(−f) (1) = −1 + (−f) (0) 6= 1 + (−f) (0)
15.5.6 n. 6 (p. 555)
The set of all real valued step functions which are defined on [0, 1] is a real linear
space. Indeed, let f and g be any two such functions, so that for some nonnegative
integers m and n, some increasing (m+ 1)-tuple (σ
r
)
r∈{0}∪m
of elements of [0, 1] with
σ
0
= 0 and σ
m
= 1, some increasing (n + 1)-tuple (τ
s
)
s∈{0}∪n
of elements of [0, 1]
with τ
0
= 0 and τ
m
= 1, some (m+ 1)-tuple (γ
r
)
r∈{0}∪m
of real numbers, and some
n-tuple (δ
s
)
s∈{0}∪n
of real numbers

,
f ≡ γ
0
χ
{0}
+
X
r∈m
γ
r
χ
Ir
g ≡ δ
0
χ
{0}
+
X
s∈n
δ
s
χ
Js
where for each subset C of [0, 1], χ
C
is the characteristic function of C
χ
C
≡ x 7→
¿
1 if x ∈ C
0 if x / ∈ C
and (I
r
)
r∈m
, (J
s
)
s∈n
are the partitions of (0, 1] associated to (σ
r
)
r∈{0}∪m
, (τ
s
)
s∈{0}∪n
I
r
≡ (σ
r−1
, σ
r
] (r ∈ m)
J
s
≡ (τ
s−1
, τ
s
] (s ∈ n)
Then, for any two real numbers α and β,
αf + βg = (αγ
0
+βδ
0
) χ
{0}
+
X
(r,s)∈m×n
(αγ
r
+βδ
s
) χ
K
rs

I am using here the following slight abuse of notation for degenerate intervals: (σ, σ] ≡ {σ};
This is necessary in order to allow for “point steps”.
98 Linear spaces
where (K
rs
)
(r,s)∈m×n
is the “meet” partition of (I
r
)
r∈m
and (J
s
)
s∈n
K
rs
≡ I
r
∩ J
s
( (r, s) ∈ m×n)
which shows that αf +βg is a step function too, with no more

than m+n steps on
[0, 1].
Thus the closure axioms hold, and a final, usual remark concenrning the other
linear space axioms applies. It may also be noticed independently that the identically
null function [0, 1] 7→R, x 7→0 is indeed a step function, with just one step (m = 1,
γ
0
= γ
1
= 0), and that the opposite of a step function is a step function too, with
the same number of steps.
15.5.7 n. 7 (p. 555)
The set of all real valued functions which are defined on R and convergent to 0 at
+∞ is a real linear space. Indeed, by classical theorems in the theory of limits, for
every two such functions f and g, and for any two real numbers α and β,
lim
x→+∞
(αf +βg) (x) = α lim
x→+∞
f (x) + β lim
x→+∞
g (x)
= 0
so that the closure axioms hold. Final remark concerning the other linear space
axioms. It may be noticed independently that the identically null function [0, 1] 7→
R, x 7→0 indeed converges to 0 at +∞(and, for that matter, at any x
0
∈ R∪{−∞}).
15.5.8 n. 11 (p. 555)
The set of all real valued and increasing functions of a real variable is not a real linear
space. The first closure axiom holds, because the sum of two increasing functions is an
increasing function too. The second closure axiom does not hold, however, because
the function αf is decreasing if f is increasing and α is a negative real number.
The axiom of existence of the zero element holds or fails, depending on whether
monotonicity is meant in the weak or in the strict sense, since the identically null
function is weakly increasing (and, for that matter, weakly decreasing too, as every
constant function) but not strictly increasing. Thus, in the former case, the set of all
real valued and (weakly) increasing functions of a real variable is a convex cone. The
axiom of existence of negatives fails, too. All the other linear space axioms hold, as
in the previous examples.
15.5.9 n. 13 (p. 555)
The set of all real valued functions which are defined and integrable on [0, 1], with
the integral over [0, 1] equal to zero, is a real linear space. Indeed, for any two such
functions f and g, and any two real numbers α and β,
Z
1
0
(αf +βg) (x) dx = α
Z
1
0
f (x) dx +β
Z
1
0
g (x) dx = 0

Some potential steps may “collapse” if, for some (r, s) ∈ m×n, σ
r−1
= τ
s−1
and ασ
r
+βτ
s
=
ασ
r−1
+βτ
s−1
.
Exercises 99
15.5.10 n. 14 (p. 555)
The set of all real valued functions which are defined and integrable on [0, 1], with
nonnegative integral over [0, 1], is a convex cone, but not a linear space. For any two
such functions f and g, and any two nonnegative real numbers α and β,
Z
1
0
(αf +βg) (x) dx = α
Z
1
0
f (x) dx +β
Z
1
0
g (x) dx ≥ 0
It is clear that if α < 0 and
R
1
0
(αf) (x) dx > 0, then
R
1
0
(αf) (x) dx < 0, so that
axioms 2 and 6 fail to hold.
15.5.11 n. 16 (p. 555)
First solution. The set of all real Taylor polynomials of degree less than or equal to
n (including the zero polynomial) is a real linear space, since it coincides with the set
of all real polynomials of degree less than or equal to n, which is already known to be
a real linear space. The discussion of the above statement is a bit complicated by the
fact that nothing is said concerning the point where our Taylor polynomials are to be
centered. If the center is taken to be 0, the issue is really easy: every polynomial is
the Taylor polynomial centered at 0 of itself (considered, as it is, as a real function of
a real variable). This is immediate, if one thinks at the motivation for the definition
of Taylor polynomials: best n-degree polynomial approximation of a given function.
At any rate, if one takes the standard formula as a definition
Taylor
n
(f) at 0 ≡ x 7→
n
X
j=0
f
(j)
(0)
j!
x
j
here are the computations. Let
P : x 7→
n
X
i=0
p
i
x
n−i
Then
P
0
: x 7→
P
n−1
i=0
(n −i) p
i
x
n−1−i
P
0
(0) = p
n−1
P
00
: x 7→
P
n−2
i=0
(n −i) (n −(i + 1)) p
i
x
n−2−i
P
00
(0) = 2p
n−2
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
P
(j)
: x 7→
P
n−j
i=0
(n−i)!
(n−i−j)!
p
i
x
n−j−i
P
(j)
(0) = j!p
n−j
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
P
(n−1)
: x 7→n!p
0
x + (n −1)!p
1
P
(n−1)
(0) = (n −1)!p
1
P
(n)
: x 7→n!p
0
P
(n)
(0) = n!p
0
100 Linear spaces
and hence
n
X
j=0
P
(j)
(0)
j!
x
j
=
n
X
j=0
j!p
n−j
j!
x
j
=
n
X
i=0
p
i
x
n−i
= P (x)
On the other hand, if the Taylor polynomials are meant to be centered at some x
0
6= 0
Taylor
n
(f) at x
0
≡ x 7→
n
X
j=0
f
(j)
(x
0
)
j!
(x −x
0
)
j
it must be shown by more lengthy arguments that for each polynomial P the following
holds:
n
X
j=0
P
(j)
(x
0
)
j!
(x −x
0
)
j
=
n
X
i=0
p
i
x
n−i
Second solution. The set of all real Taylor polynomials (centered at x
0
∈ R)
of degree less than or equal to n (including the zero polynomial) is a real linear space.
Indeed, let P and Q be any two such polynomials; that is, let f and g be two real
functions of a real variable which are m and n times differentiable in x
0
, and let
P ≡Taylor
m
(f) at x
0
, Q ≡Taylor
n
(g) at x
0
, that is,
P : x 7→
m
X
i=0
f
(i)
(x
0
)
i!
(x −x
0
)
i
Q : x 7→
n
X
j=0
g
(j)
(x
0
)
j!
(x −x
0
)
j
Suppose first that m = n. Then for any two real numbers α andβ
αP +βQ =
m
X
k=0
½
α
·
f
(k)
(x
0
)
k!
¸

·
g
(k)
(x
0
)
k!
¸¾
(x −x
0
)
k
=
m
X
k=0
(αf +βg)
(k)
(x
0
)
k!
(x −x
0
)
k
= Taylor
m
(αf +βg) at x
0
Second, suppose (without loss of generality) that m > n. In this case, however,
αP +βQ =
n
X
k=0
αf
(k)
(x
0
) +βg
(k)
(x
0
)
k!
(x −x
0
)
k
+
m
X
k=n+1
αf
(k)
(x
0
)
k!
(x −x
0
)
k
a polynomial which can be legitimately considered the Taylor polynomial of degree
n at x
0
of the function αf + βg only if all the derivatives of g of order from n + 1
to m are null at x
0
. This is certainly true if g itself a polynomial of degree n. In
fact, this is true only in such a case, as it can be seen by repeated integration. It is
hence necessary, in addition, to state and prove the result asserting that each Taylor
polynomial of any degree and centered at any x
0
∈ R can be seen as the Taylor
polynomial of itself.
Exercises 101
15.5.12 n. 17 (p. 555)
The set S of all solutions of a linear second-order homogeneous differential equation
∀x ∈ (a, b) , y
00
(x) +P (x) y
0
(x) +Q(x) y (x) = 0
where P and Q are given everywhere continuous real functions of a real variable,
and (a, b) is some open interval to be determined together with the solution, is a real
linear space. First of all, it must be noticed that S is nonempty, and that its elements
are indeed real functions which are everywhere defined (that is, with (a, b) = R), due
to the main existence and solution continuation theorems in the theory of differential
equations. Second, the operator
L : D
2
→R
R
, y 7→y
00
+Py
0
+Qy
where R
R
is the set of all the real functions of a real variable, and D
2
is the subset
of R
R
of all the functions having a second derivative which is everywhere defined, is
linear:
∀y ∈ D
2
, ∀z ∈ D
2
, ∀α ∈ R, ∀β ∈ R,
L(αy +βz) = (αy +βz)
00
+P (αy +βz)
0
+Q(αy +βz)
= α(y
00
+Py
0
+Qy) +β (z
00
+Pz
0
+Qz)
= αL(y) +βL(z)
Third, D
2
is a real linear space, since
∀y ∈ D
2
, ∀z ∈ D
2
, ∀α ∈ R, ∀β ∈ R,
αy +βz ∈ D
2
by standard theorems on the derivative of a linear combination of differentiable
functions, and the usual remark concerning the other linear space axioms. Finally,
S =ker L is a linear subspace of D
2
, by the following standard argument:
L(y) = 0 ∧ L(z) = 0 ⇒L(αy +βz) = αL(y) +βL(z) = 0
and the usual remark.
15.5.13 n. 18 (p. 555)
The set of all bounded real sequences is a real linear space. Indeed, for every two real
sequences x ≡ (x
n
)
n∈N
and y ≡ (y
n
)
n∈N
and every two real numbers α and β, if x
and y are bounded, so that for some positive numbers ε and η and for every n ∈ N
the following holds:
|x
n
| < ε |y
n
| < η
then the sequence αx +βy is also bounded, since for every n ∈ N
|αx
n
+βy
n
| ≤ |α| |x
n
| + |β| |y
n
| < |α| ε + |β| η
Thus the closure axioms hold, and the usual remark concerning the other linear space
axioms applies.
102 Linear spaces
15.5.14 n. 19 (p. 555)
The set of all convergent real sequences is a real linear space. Indeed, for every two
real sequences x ≡ (x
n
)
n∈N
and y ≡ (y
n
)
n∈N
and every two real numbers α and β, if
x and y are convergent to x and y respectively, then the sequence αx+βy converges
to αx +βy. Thus the closure axioms hold. Usual remark concerning the other linear
space axioms.
15.5.15 n. 22 (p. 555)
The set U of all elements of R
3
with their third component equal to 0 is a real linear
space. Indeed, by linear combination the third component remains equal to 0; U is
the kernel of the linear function R
3
→R, (x, y, z) 7→z.
15.5.16 n. 23 (p. 555)
The set W of all elements of R
3
with their second or third component equal to 0 is
not a linear subspace of R
3
. For example, (0, 1, 0) and (0, 0, 1) are in the set, but
their sum (0, 1, 1) is not. The second closure axiom and the existence of negatives
axiom fail too. The other axioms hold. W is not even an affine subspace, nor it is
convex; however, it is a cone.
15.5.17 n. 24 (p. 555)
The set π of all elements of R
3
with their second component which is equal to the
third multiplied by 5 is a real linear space, being the kernel of the linear function
R
3
→R, (x, y, z) 7→5x −y.
15.5.18 n. 25 (p. 555)
The set ` of all elements (x, y, z) of R
3
such that 3x + 4y = 1 and z = 0 (the line
through the point P ≡ (−1, 1, 0) with direction vector v ≡ (4, −3, 0)) is an affine
subspace of R
3
, hence a convex set, but not a linear subspace of R
3
, hence not a
linear space itself. Indeed, for any two triples (x, y, z) and (u, v, w) of R
3
, and any
two real numbers α and β
3x + 4y = 1
z = 0
3u + 4v = 1
w = 0


½
3 (αx +βu) + 4 (αy +βv) = α +β
z + w = 0
Thus both closure axioms fail for `. Both existence axioms also fail, since neither
the null triple, nor the opposite of any triple in `, belong to `. The associative and
distributive laws have a defective status too, since they make sense in ` only under
quite restrictive assumptions on the elements of R
3
or the real numbers appearing in
them.
15.5.19 n. 26 (p. 555)
The set r of all elements (x, y, z) of R
3
which are scalar multiples of (1, 2, 3) (the line
through the origin having (1, 2, 3) as direction vector) is a real linear space. For any
Subspaces of a linear space 103
two elements (h, 2h, 3h) and (k, 2k, 3k) of r, and for any two real numbers α and β,
the linear combination
α(h, 2h, 3h) +β (k, 2k, 3k) = (αh +βk) (1, 2, 3)
belongs to r. r is the kernel of the linear function R
3
→R
2
, (x, y, z) 7→(2x −y, 3x −z).
15.5.20 n. 27 (p. 555)
The set of solutions of the linear homogenous system of equations
A(x, y, z)
0
= 0
is the kernel of the linear function R
3
→ R, (x, y, z) 7→ A(x, y, z)
0
and hence a real
linear space.
15.5.21 n. 28 (p. 555)
The subset of R
n
of all the linear combinations of two given vectors a and b is a
vector subspace of R
n
, namely span {a, b}. It is immediate to check that every linear
combination of linear combinations of a and b is again a linear combination of a and
b.
15.6 Subspaces of a linear space
15.7 Dependent and independent sets in a linear space
15.8 Bases and dimension
15.9 Exercises
15.9.1 n. 1 (p. 560)
The set S
1
of all elements of R
3
with their first coordinate equal to 0 is a linear
subspace of R
3
(see exercise 5.22 above). S
1
is the coordinate Y Z-plane, its dimension
is 2. A standard basis for it is {(0, 1, 0) , (0, 0, 1)}. It is clear that the two vectors are
linearly independent, and that for every real numbers y and z
(0, y, z) = y (0, 1, 0) +z (0, 0, 1)
104 Linear spaces
15.9.2 n. 2 (p. 560)
The set S
2
of all elements of R
3
with the first and second coordinate summing up to
0 is a linear subspace of R
3
(S
2
is the plane containing the Z-axis and the bisectrix of
the even-numbered quadrants of the XY -plane). A basis for it is {(1, −1, 0) , (0, 0, 1)};
its dimension is 2. It is clear that the two vectors are linearly independent, and that
for every three real numbers x, y and z such that x +y = 0
(x, y, z) = x(1, −1, 0) +z (0, 0, 1)
15.9.3 n. 3 (p. 560)
The set S
3
of all elements of R
3
with the coordinates summing up to 0 is a linear
subspace of R
3
(S
3
is the plane through the origin and normal vector n ≡ (1, 1, 1)).
A basis for it is {(1, −1, 0) , (0, −1, 1)}; its dimension is 2. It is clear that the two
vectors are linearly independent, and that for every three real numbers x, y and z
such that x +y +z = 0
(x, y, z) = x(1, −1, 0) +z (0, −1, 1)
15.9.4 n. 4 (p. 560)
The set S
4
of all elements of R
3
with the first two coordinates equal is a linear subspace
of R
3
(S
4
is the plane containing the Z-axis and the bisectrix of the odd-numbered
quadrants of the XY -plane). A basis for it is {(1, 1, 0) , (0, 0, 1)}; its dimension is 2.
It is clear that the two vectors are linearly independent, and that for every three real
numbers x, y and z such that x = y
(x, y, z) = x(1, 1, 0) +z (0, 0, 1)
15.9.5 n. 5 (p. 560)
The set S
5
of all elements of R
3
with all the coordinates equal is a linear subspace of
R
3
(S
5
is the line through the origin and direction vector d ≡ (1, 1, 1)). A basis for it
is {d}; its dimension is 1.
15.9.6 n. 6 (p. 560)
The set S
6
of all elements of R
3
with the first coordinate equal either to the second
or to the third is not a linear subspace of R
3
(S
6
is the union of the plane S
4
of
exercise 4 and the plane containing the Y -axis and the bisectrix of the odd-numbered
quadrants of the XZ-plane). For example, (1, 1, 0) and (1, 0, 1) both belong to S
6
,
but their sum (2, 1, 1) does not.
15.9.7 n. 7 (p. 560)
The set S
7
of all elements of R
3
with the first and second coordinates having identical
square is not a linear subspace of R
3
(S
7
is the union of the two planes containing
the Z-axis and one of the bisectrices of the odd and even-numbered quadrants of the
XY -plane). For example, (1, −1, 0) and (1, 1, 0) both belong to S
7
, but their sum
Exercises 105
(2, 0, 0) or their semisum (1, 0, 0) do not. S
7
is not an affine subspace of R
3
, and it
is not even convex. However, S
7
is a cone, and it is even closed with respect to the
external product (multiplication by arbitrary real numbers).
15.9.8 n. 8 (p. 560)
The set S
8
of all elements of R
3
with the first and second coordinates summing up to
1 is not a linear subspace of R
3
(S
8
is the vertical plane containing the line through
the points P ≡ (1, 0, 0) and Q ≡ (0, 1, 0)) For example, for every α 6= 1, α(1, 0, 0) ,
and α(0, 1, 0) do not belong to S
8
. S
8
is an affine subspace of R
3
, since
∀(x, y, z) ∈ R
3
, ∀(u, v, w) ∈ R
3
, ∀α ∈ R
(x +y = 1) ∧ (u +v = 1) ⇒[(1 −α) x +αu] + [(1 −α) y +αv] = 1
15.9.9 n. 9 (p. 560)
See exercise 26, p.555.
15.9.10 n. 10 (p. 560)
The set S
10
of all elements (x, y, z) of R
3
such that
x +y +z = 0
x −y −z = 0
is a line containing the origin, a subspace of R
3
of dimension 1. A base for it is
{(0, 1, −1)}. If (x, y, z) is any element of S
10
, then
(x, y, z) = y (0, 1, −1)
15.9.11 n. 11 (p. 560)
The set S
11
of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n, and taking value 0 at 0 is a
linear subspace of the set of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n, and hence a
linear space. If P is any polynomial of degree not exceeding n,
P : t 7→p
0
+
X
h∈n
p
h
t
h
(15.1)
then P belongs to S
11
if and only if p
0
= 0. It is clear that any linear combination of
polynomials in S
11
takes value 0 at 0. A basis for S
11
is
B ≡
©
t 7→t
h
ª
h∈n
Indeed, by the general principle of polynomial identity (which is more or less explicitly
proved in example 6, p.558), a linear combination of B is the null polynomial, if and
only if all its coefficients are null. Moreover, every polynomial belonging to S
11
is a
linear combination of B. It follows that dimS
11
= n.
106 Linear spaces
15.9.12 n. 12 (p. 560)
The set S
12
of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n, with first derivative taking
value 0 at 0, is a linear subspace of the set of all polynomials of degree not exceeding
n. Indeed, for any two suach polynomials P and Q, and any two real numbers α and
β,
(αP +βQ)
0
(0) = αP
0
(0) +βQ
0
(0) = α · 0 +β · 0 = 0
A polynomial P as in (15.1) belongs to S
12
if and only if p
1
= 0. A basis for S is
B ≡
n
¡
t 7→t
h+1
¢
h∈n−1
, (t 7→1)
o
That B is a basis can be seen as in the previous exercise. Thus dimS
12
= n.
15.9.13 n. 13 (p. 560)
The set S
13
of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n, with second derivative
taking value 0 at 0, is a linear subspace of the set of all polynomials of degree not
exceeding n. This is proved exactly as in the previous exercise (just replace
0
with
00
).
A polynomial P as in (15.1) belongs to S
13
if and only if p
2
= 0. A basis for S is
B ≡
n
¡
t 7→t
h+2
¢
h∈n−2
, (t 7→1) , (t 7→t)
o
That B is a basis can be seen as in the exercise 11. Thus dimS
13
= n.
15.9.14 n. 14 (p. 560)
The set S
14
of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n, with first derivative taking
value at 0 which is the opposite of the polynomial value at 0, is a linear subspace of
the set of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n. A polynomial P as in (15.1)
belongs to S
14
if and only if p
0
+ p
1
= 0. If P and Q are any two polynomials in S,
and α and β are any two real numbers,
(αP +βQ) (0) + (αP +βQ)
0
(1) = αP (0) +βQ(0) +αP
0
(0) +βQ
0
(0)
= α[P (0) +P
0
(0)] +β [Q(0) +Q
0
(0)]
= α · 0 +β · 0
A basis for S
14
is
B ≡
n
t 7→1 −t,
¡
t 7→t
h+1
¢
h∈n−1
o
Indeed, if α is the n-tuple of coefficients of a linear combination R of B, then
R : t 7→α
1
−α
1
t +
X
h∈n−1
α
h+1
t
h+1
Exercises 107
By the general principle of polynomial identity, the n-tuple α of coefficients of any
linear combination of B spanning the null vector must satisfy the conditions
α
1
= 0
α
h+1
= 0 (h ∈ n −1)
that is, the combination must be the trivial one. If P is any polynomial such that
p
0
+p
1
= 0, P belongs to span B, since by the position
α
1
= p
0
= −p
1
α
h+1
= p
h+1
(h ∈ n −1)
the linear combination of B with α as n-tuple of coefficients is equal to P. It follows
that B is a basis of S
14
, and hence that dimS = n.
15.9.15 n. 15 (p. 560)
The set S
15
of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n, and taking the same value
at 0 and at 1 is a linear subspace of the set of all polynomials of degree not exceeding
n, and hence a linear space. This can be seen exactly as in exercise 3, p.555. A
polynomial P belongs to S
15
if and only if
p
0
= p
0
+
X
h∈n
p
h
that is, if and only if
X
h∈n
p
h
= 0
A basis for S
15
is
B ≡
n
(t 7→1) ,
¡
t 7→(1 −t) t
h
¢
h∈n−1
o
and the dimension of S
15
is n.
15.9.16 n. 16 (p. 560)
The set S
16
of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n, and taking the same value
at 0 and at 2 is a linear subspace of the set of all polynomials of degree not exceeding
n, and hence a linear space. This can be seen exactly as in exercise 3, p.555. A
polynomial P belongs to S
16
if and only if
p
0
= p
0
+
X
h∈n
2
h
p
h
that is, if and only if
X
h∈n
2
h
p
h
= 0
108 Linear spaces
A basis for S
16
is
B ≡
n
(t 7→1) ,
¡
t 7→(2 −t) t
h
¢
h∈n−1
o
and the dimension of S
16
is n.
15.9.17 n. 22 (p. 560)
(b) It has alredy been shown in the notes that
lin S ≡
\
W subspace of V
S⊆W
W
=
(
v : ∃n ∈ N, ∃u ≡ (u
i
)
i∈n
∈ V
n
, ∃a ≡ (α
i
)
i∈n
∈ F
n
, v =
X
i∈n
α
i
u
i
)
hence if T is a subspace, and it contains S, then T contains lin S.
(c) If S = lin S, then of course S is a subspace of V because lin S is so. Conversely, if
S is a subspace of V , then S is one among the subspaces appearing in the definition
of lin S, and hence lin S ⊆ S; since S ⊆ lin S always, it follows that S = linS.
(e) If S and T are subspaces of V , then by point c above lin S = S and lin T = T,
and hence
S ∩ T = lin S ∩ lin T
Since the intersection of any family of subspaces is a subspace, S ∩ T is a subspace
of V .
(g) Let V ≡ R
2
, S ≡ {(1, 0) , (0, 1)}, T ≡ {(1, 0) , (1, 1)}. Then
S ∩ T = {(1, 0)}
L(S) = L(T) = R
2
L(S ∩ T) = {(x, y) : y = 0}
15.9.18 n. 23 (p. 560)
(a) Let
f : R →R, x 7→1
g : R →R, x 7→e
ax
h : R →R, x 7→e
bx
0 : R →R, x 7→0
and let (u, v, w) ∈ R
3
be such that
uf +vg +wh = 0
Exercises 109
In particular, for x = 0, x = 1, and x = 2, we have
u +v +w = 0
u +e
a
v +e
b
w = 0 (15.2)
u +e
2a
v +e
2b
w = 0
The determinant of the coefficient matrix of the above system is
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
1 1 1
1 e
a
e
b
1 e
2a
e
2b
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
=
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
1 1 1
0 e
a
−1 e
b
−1
0 e
2a
−1 e
2b
−1
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
= (e
a
−1)
¡
e
b
−1
¢ £
e
b
+ 1 −(e
a
+ 1)
¤
= (e
a
−1)
¡
e
b
−1
¢ ¡
e
b
−e
a
¢
Since by assumption a 6= b, at most one of the two numbers can be equal to zero. If
none of them is null, system (15.2) has only the trivial solution, the triple (f, g, h)
is linearly independent, and dimlin {f, g, h} = 3. If a = 0, then g = f; similarly, if
b = 0, then h = f. Thus if either a or b is null then (f, g, h) is linearly dependent (it
suffices to take (u, v, w) ≡ (1, −1, 0) or (u, v, w) ≡ (1, 0, −1), respectively).
It is convenient to state and prove the following (very) simple
Lemma 4 Let X be a set containing at least two distinct elements, and let f : X →R
be a nonnull constant function. For any function g : X → R, the couple (f, g) is
linearly dependent if and only if g is constant, too.
Proof. If g is constant, let Imf ≡ {y
f
} and Img ≡ {y
g
}. Then the function
y
g
f −y
f
g is the null function. Conversely, if (f, g) is linearly dependent, let (u, v) ∈
R
2
∼ (0, 0) be such that uf +vg is the null function. Thus
∀x ∈ X, uy
f
+vg (x) = 0
Since f is nonnull, y
f
6= 0. This yields
v = 0 ⇒u = 0
and hence v 6= 0. Then
∀x ∈ X, g (x) = −
u
v
y
f
and g is constant, too.
It immediately follows from the above lemma (and from the assumption a 6= b)
that if either a = 0 or b = 0, then dimlin {f, g, h} = 2.
(b) The two functions
f : x 7→e
ax
g : x 7→xe
ax
110 Linear spaces
are linearly independent, since
[∀x ∈ R, αe
x
+βxe
ax
= 0] ⇔ [∀x ∈ R, (α +βx) e
ax
= 0]
⇔ [∀x ∈ R, (α +βx) = 0]
⇔ α = β = 0
Notice that the argument holds even in the case a = 0, Thus dimlin {f, g} = 2.
(c) Arguing as in point a, let (u, v, w) ∈ R
3
be such that
uf +vg +wh = 0
where
f : x 7→1 g : x 7→e
ax
h : x 7→xe
ax
In particular, for x = 0, x = 1, and x = −1, we have
u +v +w = 0
u +e
a
v +e
a
w = 0 (15.3)
u +e
−a
v −e
−a
w = 0
a homogeneous system of equations whose coefficient matrix has determinant
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
1 1 1
1 e
a
e
a
1 e
−a
−e
−a
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
=
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
1 1 1
0 e
a
−1 e
a
−1
0 e
−a
−1 −e
−a
−1
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
¯
= −(e
a
−1)
¡
e
−a
+ 1 +e
−a
−1
¢
= 2e
−a
(1 −e
a
)
Thus if a 6= 0 the above determinant is different from zero, yielding (u, v, w) =
(0, 0, 0). The triple (f, g, h) is linearly independent, and dimlin {f, g, h} = 3. On the
other hand, if a = 0 then f = g and h = Id
R
, so that dimlin {f, g, h} = 2.
(f) The two functions
f : x 7→sinx g : x 7→cos x
are linearly independent. Indeed, for every two real numbers α and β which are not
both null,
∀x ∈ R, αsinx +β cos x = 0
m
∀x ∈ R,
α

α
2

2
sinx +
β

α
2

2
cos x = 0
m
∀x ∈ R, sin (γ +x) = 0
Inner products. Euclidean spaces. Norms 111
where
γ ≡ signβ arccos
α
p
α
2

2
since the sin function is not identically null, the last condition cannot hold. Thus
dimlin{x 7→sin x, x 7→cos x} = 2.
(h) From the trigonometric addition formulas
∀x ∈ R cos 2x = cos
2
x −sin
2
x = 1 −2 sin
2
x
Let then
f : x 7→1 g : x 7→cos x g : x 7→sin
2
x
The triple (f, g, h) is linearly dependent, since
f −g + 2h = 0
By the lemma discussed at point a, dimlin {f, g, h} = 2.
15.10 Inner products. Euclidean spaces. Norms
15.11 Orthogonality in a euclidean space
112 Linear spaces
15.12 Exercises
15.12.1 n. 9 (p. 567)
hu
1
, u
2
i =
Z
1
−1
t dt =
t
2
2
¯
¯
¯
¯
1
−1
=
1
2

1
2
= 0
hu
2
, u
3
i =
Z
1
−1
t +t
2
dt = 0 +
t
3
3
¯
¯
¯
¯
1
−1
=
1
3

µ

1
3

=
2
3
hu
3
, u
1
i =
Z
1
−1
1 +t dt = t|
1
−1
+ 0 = 1 −(−1) = 2
ku
1
k
2
=
Z
1
−1
1 dt = 2 ku
1
k =

2
ku
2
k
2
=
Z
1
−1
t
2
dt =
2
3
ku
2
k =
r
2
3
ku
3
k
2
=
Z
1
−1
1 + 2t +t
2
dt = 2 +
2
3
ku
3
k =
r
8
3
cos [ u
2
u
3
=
2
3
q
2
3
q
8
3
=
1
2
cos [ u
1
u
3
=
2

2
q
8
3
=

3
2
[ u
2
u
3
=
π
3
[ u
1
u
3
=
π
6
15.12.2 n. 11 (p. 567)
(a) Let for each n ∈ N
I
n

Z
+∞
0
e
−t
t
n
dt
Then
I
0
=
Z
+∞
0
e
−t
dt = lim
x→+∞
Z
x
0
e
−t
dt
= lim
x→+∞
−e
−t
¯
¯
x
0
= lim
x→+∞
−e
−x
+ 1
= 1
Exercises 113
and, for each n ∈ N,
I
n+1
=
Z
+∞
0
e
−t
t
n+1
dt = lim
x→+∞
Z
x
0
e
−t
t
n+1
dt
= lim
x→+∞
½
−e
−t
t
n+1
¯
¯
x
0
+ (n + 1)
Z
x
0
e
−t
t
n
dt
¾
= lim
x→+∞
©
−e
−x
x
n+1
−0
ª
+ (n + 1) lim
x→+∞
½Z
x
0
e
−t
t
n
dt
¾
= 0 + (n + 1)
Z
+∞
0
e
−t
t
n
dt
= (n + 1) I
n
The integral involved in the definition of I
n
is always convergent, since for each n ∈ N
lim
x→+∞
e
−x
x
n
= 0
It follows that
∀n ∈ N, I
n
= n!
Let now
f : t 7→α
0
+
X
i∈m
α
i
t
i
g : t 7→β
0
+
X
i∈n
β
j
t
j
be two real polynomials, of degree m and n respectively. Then the product fg is a
real polynomial of degree m+n, containing for each k ∈ m+n a monomial of degree
k of the form α
i
t
i
β
j
t
j
= α
i
β
j
t
i+j
whenever i +j = k. Thus
fg = α
0
β
0
+
X
k∈m+n

¸
¸
¸
X
i∈m, j∈n
i+j=k
α
i
β
j
¸

t
k
114 Linear spaces
and the scalar product of f and g is results in the sum of m + n + 1 converging
integrals
hf, gi =
Z
+∞
0
e
−t

α
0
β
0
+
X
k∈m+n

¸
¸
¸
X
i∈m, j∈n
i+j=k
α
i
β
j
¸

t
k
¸
¸
¸
¸
dt
= α
0
β
0
Z
+∞
0
e
−t
dt +
X
k∈m+n

¸
¸
¸
X
i∈m, j∈n
i+j=k
α
i
β
j
¸

Z
+∞
0
e
−t
t
k
dt
= α
0
β
0
I
0
+
X
k∈m+n

¸
¸
¸
X
i∈m, j∈n
i+j=k
α
i
β
j
¸

I
k
= α
0
β
0
+
X
k∈m+n

¸
¸
¸
X
i∈m, j∈n
i+j=k
α
i
β
j
¸

k!
(b) If for each n ∈ N
x
n
: t 7→t
n
then for each m ∈ N and each n ∈ N
hx
m
, x
n
i =
Z
+∞
0
e
−t
t
m
t
n
dt
= I
m+n
= (m+n)!
(c) If
f : t 7→(t + 1)
2
g : t 7→t
2
+ 1
then
fg : t 7→t
4
+ 2t
3
+ 2t
2
+ 2t + 1
hf, gi =
Z
+∞
0
e
−t
¡
t
4
+ 2t
3
+ 2t
2
+ 2t + 1
¢
dt
= I
4
+ 2I
3
+ 2I
2
+ 2I
1
+I
0
= 4! + 2 · 3! + 2 · 2! + 2 · 1! + 1
= 43
Construction of orthogonal sets. The Gram-Schmidt process 115
(d) If
f : t 7→t + 1 g : t 7→αt +β
then
fg : t 7→αt
2
+ (α +β) t +β
hf, gi = αI
2
+ (α +β) I
1
+βI
0
= 3α + 2β
and
hf, gi = 0 ⇔(α, β) = (2γ, −3γ) (γ ∈ R)
that is, the set of all polynomials of degree less than or equal to 1 which are orthogonal
to f is
P
1
∩ perp {f} = {g
γ
: t 7→2γt −3γ}
γ∈R
15.13 Construction of orthogonal sets. The Gram-Schmidt process
15.14 Orthogonal complements. projections
15.15 Best approximation of elements in a euclidean space by elements
in a finite-dimensional subspace
15.16 Exercises
15.16.1 n. 1 (p. 576)
(a) By direct inspection of the coordinates of the three given vectors. it is seen that
they all belong to the plane π of equation x−z = 0. Since no two of them are parallel,
lin {x
1
, x
2
, x
3
} = π and dimlin{x
1
, x
2
, x
3
} = 2. A unit vector in π is given by
v ≡
1
3
(2, 1, 2)
Every vector belonging to the line π ∩ perp {v} must have the form
(x, −4x, x)
116 Linear spaces
with norm 3

2 |x|. Thus a second unit vector which together with v spans π, and
which is orthogonal to v, is
w ≡

2
6
(1, −4, 1)
The required orthonormal basis for lin {x
1
, x
2
, x
3
} is {v, w}.
(b) The answer is identical to the one just given for case a.
15.16.2 n. 2 (p. 576)
(a) First solution. It is easily checked that
x
2
/ ∈ lin {x
1
}
x
3
/ ∈ lin {x
1
, x
2
}
0 = x
1
−x
2
+x
3
−x
4
Thus dimW ≡ dimlin {x
1
, x
2
, x
3
, x
4
} = 3, and three vectors are required for any
basis of W. The following vectors form an orthonormal one:
y
1

x
1
kx
1
k
=

2
2
(1, 1, 0, 0)
y
2

x
2
−hx
2
, y
1
i y
1
kx
2
−hx
2
, y
1
i y
1
k
=
(0, 1, 1, 0) −

2
2

2
2
(1, 1, 0, 0)
°
°
°(0, 1, 1, 0) −

2
2

2
2
(1, 1, 0, 0)
°
°
°
=
¡

1
2
,
1
2
, 1, 0
¢
q
1
4
+
1
4
+ 1
=

6
6
(−1, 1, 2, 0)
y
3

x
3
−hx
3
, y
1
i y
1
−−hx
3
, y
2
i y
2
kx
3
−hx
3
, y
1
i y
1
−−hx
3
, y
2
i y
2
k
=
(0, 0, 1, 1) −0 −2

6
6

6
6
(−1, 1, 2, 0)
°
°
°(0, 0, 1, 1) −0 −2

6
6

6
6
(−1, 1, 2, 0)
°
°
°
=
¡
1
3
, −
1
3
,
1
3
, 1
¢
q
1
9
+
1
9
+
1
9
+ 1
=

3
6
(1, −1, 1, 3)
Second solution. More easily, it suffices to realize that
lin {x
1
, x
2
, x
3
, x
4
} = H
(1,−1,1,−1),0

©
(x, y, z, t) ∈ R
4
: x −y +z −t = 0
ª
is the hyperplane of R
4
through the origin, with (1, −1, 1, −1) as normal vector, to
directly exhibit two mutually orthogonal unit vectors in lin {x
1
, x
2
, x
3
, x
4
}
u ≡

2
2
(1, 1, 0, 0) v ≡

2
2
(0, 0, 1, 1)
Exercises 117
It remains to find a unit vector in H
(1,−1,1,−1),0
∩perp{u, v}. The following equations
characterize H
(1,−1,1,−1),0
∩ perp{u, v}:
x −y +z −t = 0
x +y = 0
z +t = 0
yielding (by addition) 2 (x +z) = 0, and hence
w ≡
1
2
(1, −1, −1, 1) or w ≡ −
1
2
(1, −1, −1, 1)
Thus an orthonormal basis for lin {x
1
, x
2
, x
3
, x
4
} is {u, v, w}.
(b) It is easily checked that
x
2
/ ∈ lin {x
1
}
0 = 2x
1
−x
2
−x
3
Thus dimW ≡ dimlin {x
1
, x
2
, x
3
} = 2, and two vectors are required for any basis of
W. The following vectors form an orthonormal one:
y
1

x
1
kx
1
k
=

3
3
(1, 1, 0, 1)
y
2

x
2
−hx
2
, y
1
i y
1
kx
2
−hx
2
, y
1
i y
1
k
=
(1, 0, 2, 1) −2

3
3

3
3
(1, 1, 0, 1)
°
°
°(0, 1, 1, 0) −2

3
3

3
3
(1, 1, 0, 1)
°
°
°
=
¡
1
3
, −
2
3
, 2,
1
3
¢
q
1
9
+
4
9
+ 4 +
1
9
=

42
42
(1, −2, 6, 1)
15.16.3 n. 3 (p. 576)
hy
0
, y
0
i =
Z
π
0
1

π
1

π
dt = π
1
π
= 1
hy
n
, y
n
i =
Z
π
0
r
2
π
cos nt
r
2
π
cos nt dt =
2
π
Z
π
0
cos
2
nt dt
Let
I
n

Z
π
0
cos
2
ntdt =
Z
π
0
cos nt cos nt dt
integrating by parts
I
n
= cos nt
sinnt
n
¯
¯
¯
¯
π
0

Z
π
0
−nsin nt
sin nt
n
dt
=
Z
π
0
sin
2
nt dt =
Z
π
0
1 −cos
2
nt dt
= π −I
n
118 Linear spaces
Thus
I
n
=
π
2
hy
n
, y
n
i = 1
and every function y
n
has norm equal to one.
To check mutual orthogonality, let us compute
hy
0
, y
n
i =
Z
π
0
1

π
cos nt dt =
1

π
sin nt
n
¯
¯
¯
¯
π
0
= 0
hy
m
, y
n
i =
Z
π
0
cos mt cos nt dt
= cos mt
sinnt
n
¯
¯
¯
¯
π
0

Z
π
0
−msin mt
sin nt
n
dt
=
m
n
Z
π
0
sin mt sinnt dt
=
m
n
sin mt
µ

cos nt
n
¶¯
¯
¯
¯
π
0

m
n
Z
π
0
mcos mt
µ

cos nt
n

dt
=
³
m
n
´
2
hy
m
, y
n
i
Since m and n are distinct positive integers,
¡
m
n
¢
2
is different from 1, and the equation
hy
m
, y
n
i =
³
m
n
´
2
hy
m
, y
n
i
can hold only if hy
m
, y
n
i = 0.
That the set {y
n
}
+∞
n=0
generates the same space generated by the set {x
n
}
+∞
n=0
is trivial, since, for each n, y
n
is a multiple of x
n
.
15.16.4 n. 4 (p. 576)
We have
hy
0
, y
0
i =
Z
1
0
1dt = 1
hy
1
, y
1
i =
Z
1
0
3
¡
4t
2
−4t + 1
¢
dt = 3
Ã
4
3
t
3
−2t
2
+t
¯
¯
¯
¯
1
0
!
= 1
hy
2
, y
2
i =
Z
1
0
5
¡
36t
4
−72t
3
+ 48t
2
−12t + 1
¢
dt
= 5
Ã
36
5
t
5
−18t
4
+ 16t
3
−6t
2
+t
¯
¯
¯
¯
1
0
!
= 1
Exercises 119
which proves that the three given functions are unit vectors with respect to the given
inner product.
Moreover,
hy
0
, y
1
i =
Z
1
0

3 (2t −1) dt =

3
³
t
2
−t
¯
¯
1
0
´
= 0
hy
0
, y
2
i =
Z
1
0

5
¡
6t
2
−6t + 1
¢
dt =

5
³
2t
3
−3t
2
+t
¯
¯
1
0
´
= 0
hy
1
, y
2
i =
Z
1
0

15
¡
12t
3
−18t
2
+ 8t −1
¢
dt
=

15
³
3t
4
−6t
3
+ 4t
2
−t
¯
¯
1
0
´
= 0
which proves that the three given functions are mutually orthogonal. Thus {y
1
, y
2
, y
3
}
is an orthonormal set, and hence linearly independent.
Finally,
x
0
= y
0
x
1
=
1
2
y
0
+

3
2
y
1
x
2
=
Ã
1 −

5
30
!
y
1
+

3
3
y
1
+

5
30
y
2
which proves that
lin {y
1
, y
2
, y
3
} = lin {x
1
, x
2
, x
3
}
120 Linear spaces
Chapter 16
LINEAR TRANSFORMATIONS AND MATRICES
16.1 Linear transformations
16.2 Null space and range
16.3 Nullity and rank
16.4 Exercises
16.4.1 n. 1 (p. 582)
T is linear, since for every (x, y) ∈ R
2
, for every (u, v) ∈ R
2
, for every α ∈ R, for
every β ∈ R,
T [α(x, y) +β (u, v)] = T [(αx +βu, αy +βv)]
= (αy +βv, αx +βu)
= α(y, x) +β (v, u)
= αT [(x, y)] +βT [(u, v)]
The null space of T is the trivial subspace {(0, 0)}, the range of T is R
2
, and hence
rank T = 2 nullity T = 0
T is the orthogonal symmetry with respect to the bisectrix r of the first and third
quadrant, since, for every (x, y) ∈ R
2
, T (x, y) − (x, y) is orthogonal to r, and the
midpoint of [(x, y) , T (x, y)], which is (x +y, x +y), lies on r.
122 Linear transformations and matrices
16.4.2 n. 2 (p. 582)
T is linear, since for every (x, y) ∈ R
2
, for every (u, v) ∈ R
2
, for every α ∈ R, and for
every β ∈ R,
T [α(x, y) +β (u, v)] = T [(αx +βu, αy +βv)]
= (αy +βv, αx +βu)
= α(y, x) +β (v, u)
= αT [(x, y)] +βT [(u, v)]
The null space of T is the trivial subspace {(0, 0)}, the range of T is R
2
, and hence
rank T = 2 nullity T = 0
T is the orthogonal symmetry with respect to the X-axis.
16.4.3 n. 3 (p. 582)
T is linear , since for every (x, y) ∈ R
2
, for every (u, v) ∈ R
2
, for every α ∈ R, and
for every β ∈ R,
T [α(x, y) +β (u, v)] = T [(αx +βu, αy +βv)]
= (αx +βu, 0)
= α(x, 0) +β (u, 0)
= αT [(x, y)] +βT [(u, v)]
The null space of T is the Y -axis, the range of T is the X-axis, and hence
rank T = 1 nullity T = 1
T is the orthogonal projection on the X-axis.
16.4.4 n. 4 (p. 582)
T is linear, since for every (x, y) ∈ R
2
, for every (u, v) ∈ R
2
, for every α ∈ R, and for
every β ∈ R,
T [α(x, y) +β (u, v)] = T [(αx +βu, αy +βv)]
= (αx +βu, αx +βu)
= α(x, x) +β (u, u)
= αT [(x, y)] +βT [(u, v)]
The null space of T is the Y -axis, the range of T is the bisectrix of the I and III
quadrant, and hence
rank T = nullity T = 1
Exercises 123
16.4.5 n. 5 (p. 582)
T is not a linear function, since, e.g., for x and u both different from 0,
T (x +u, 0) =
¡
x
2
+ 2xy +u
2
, 0
¢
T (x, 0) +T (u, 0) =
¡
x
2
+u
2
, 0
¢
16.4.6 n. 6 (p. 582)
T is not linear; indeed, for every (x, y) ∈ R
2
, for every (u, v) ∈ R
2
, for every α ∈ R,
for every β ∈ R,
T [α(x, y) +β (u, v)] = T [(αx +βu, αy +βv)]
=
¡
e
αx+βu
, e
αy+βv
¢
=
h
(e
x
)
α
· (e
u
)
β
, (e
y
)
α
· (e
v
)
β
i
αT [(x, y)] +βT [(u, v)] = α(e
x
, e
y
) +β (e
u
, e
v
)
= (αe
x
+βe
u
, αe
y
+βe
v
)
so that, e.g., when x = y = 0 and u = v = α = β = 1,
T [(0, 0) + (1, 1)] = (e, e)
T [(0, 0)] +T [(1, 1)] = (1 +e, 1 +e)
16.4.7 n. 7 (p. 582)
T is not an affine function, but it is not linear. Indeed, for every (x, y) ∈ R
2
, for
every (u, v) ∈ R
2
, for every α ∈ R, and for every β ∈ R,
T [α(x, y) +β (u, v)] = T [(αx +βu, αy +βv)]
= (αx +βu, 1)
αT [(x, y)] +βT [(u, v)] = α(x, 1) +β (u, 1)
= (αx +βu, α +β)
16.4.8 n. 8 (p. 582)
T is affine, but not linear; indeed, for every (x, y) ∈ R
2
, for every (u, v) ∈ R
2
, for
every α ∈ R, and for every β ∈ R,
T [α(x, y) +β (u, v)] = T [(αx +βu, αy +βv)]
= (αx +βu + 1, αy +βv + 1)
αT [(x, y)] +βT [(u, v)] = α(x + 1, y + 1) +β (u + 1, v + 1)
= (αx +βu +α +β, αy +βv +α +β)
124 Linear transformations and matrices
16.4.9 n. 9 (p. 582)
T is linear, since for every (x, y) ∈ R
2
, for every (u, v) ∈ R
2
, for every α ∈ R, and for
every β ∈ R,
T [α(x, y) +β (u, v)] = T [(αx +βu, αy +βv)]
= (αx +βu −αy −βv, αx +βu +αy +βv)
= α(x −y, x +y) +β (u −v, u +v)
= αT [(x, y)] +βT [(u, v)]
The null space of T is the trivial subspace {(0, 0)}, the range of T is R
2
, and hence
rank T = 2 nullity T = 0
The matrix representing T is
A ≡
·
1 −1
1 1
¸
=

2
"

2
2


2
2 √
2
2

2
2
#
=
· √
2 0
0

2
¸ ·
cos
π
4
−sin
π
4
sin
π
4
cos
π
4
¸
Thus T is the composition of a counterclockwise rotation by an angle of
π
4
with a
homothety of modulus

2.
16.4.10 n. 10 (p. 582)
T is linear, since for every (x, y) ∈ R
2
, for every (u, v) ∈ R
2
, for every α ∈ R, and for
every β ∈ R,
T [α(x, y) +β (u, v)] = T [(αx +βu, αy +βv)]
= (2 (αx +βu) −(αy +βv) , (αx +βu) + (αy +βv))
= α(2x −y, x +y) +β (2u −v, u +v)
= αT [(x, y)] +βT [(u, v)]
The null space of T is the trivial subspace {(0, 0)}, the range of T is R
2
, and hence
rank T = 2 nullity T = 0
The matrix representing T is
A ≡
·
2 −1
1 1
¸
the characteristic polynomial of A is
λ
2
−3λ + 3
Exercises 125
and the eigenvalues of A are
λ
1

3 +

3i
2
λ
2

3 −

3i
2
An eigenvector associated to λ
1
is
z ≡
µ
2
1 −

3i

The matrix representing T with respect to the basis
{Imz, Re z} =
½µ
0


3

,
µ
2
1
¶¾
is
B ≡
"
3
2


3
2 √
3
2
3
2
#
=

3
"

3
2

1
2
1
2

3
2
#
=
· √
3 0
0

3
¸ ·
cos
π
6
−sin
π
6
sin
π
6
cos
π
6
¸
Thus T is the composition of a counterclockwise rotation by an angle of
π
6
with a
homothety of modulus

3.
16.4.11 n. 16 (p. 582)
T is linear, since for every (x, y, z) ∈ R
3
, for every (u, v, w) ∈ R
3
, for every α ∈ R,
for every β ∈ R,
T [α(x, y, z) +β (u, v, w)] = T [(αx +βu, αy + βv, αz +βw)]
= (αz +βw, αy +βv, αx +βu)
= α(z, y, x) +β (w, v, u)
= αT [(x, y, z)] +βT [(u, v, w)]
The null space of T is the trivial subspace {(0, 0, 0)}, the range of T is R
3
, and hence
rank T = 3 nark T = 0
16.4.12 n. 17 (p. 582)
T is linear (as every projection on a coordinate hyperplane), since for every (x, y, z) ∈
R
3
, for every (u, v, w) ∈ R
3
, for every α ∈ R, for every β ∈ R,
T [α(x, y, z) +β (u, v, w)] = T [(αx +βu, αy + βv, αz +βw)]
= (αx +βu, αy +βv, 0)
= α(x, y, 0) +β (u, v, 0)
= αT [(x, y, z)] +βT [(u, v, w)]
The null space of T is the Z-axis, the range of T is the XY -plane, and hence
rank T = 2 nark T = 1
126 Linear transformations and matrices
16.4.13 n. 23 (p. 582)
T is linear, since for every (x, y, z) ∈ R
3
, for every (u, v, w) ∈ R
3
, for every α ∈ R,
for every β ∈ R,
T [α(x, y, z) +β (u, v, w)] = T [(αx +βu, αy +βv, αz +βw)]
= (αx +βu +αz +βw, 0, αx +βu +αy +βv)
= [α(x +z) , 0, α(x +y)] + [β (u +w) , 0, β (u +v)]
= α(x, y, z) +β (u, v, w)
= αT [(x, y, z)] +βT [(u, v, w)]
The null space of T is the axis of central symmetry of the (+, −, −)-orthant and of
the (−, +, +)-orthant, of parametric equations
x = t y = −t z = −t
the range of T is the XZ-plane, and hence
rank T = 2 nark T = 1
16.4.14 n. 25 (p. 582)
Let D
1
(−1, 1) or, more shortly, D
1
be the linear space of all real functions of a real
variable which are defined and everywhere differentiable on (−1, 1). If
T : D
1
→R
(−1,1)
, f 7→(x 7→xf
0
(x))
then T is a linear operator. Indeed,
T (f +g) =
¡
x 7→x[f +g]
0
(x)
¢
= (x 7→x[f
0
(x) +g
0
(x)])
= (x 7→xf
0
(x) +xg
0
(x))
= (x 7→xf
0
(x)) + (x 7→+xg
0
(x))
= T (f) +T (g)
Moreover,
ker T = {f ∈ D
1
: ∀x ∈ (−1, 1) , xf
0
(x) = 0}
= {f ∈ D
1
: ∀x ∈ (−1, 0) ∪ (0, 1) , f
0
(x) = 0}
By an important though sometimes overlooked theorem in calculus, every function f
which is differentiable in (−1, 0) ∪ (0, 1) and continuous in 0, is differentiable in 0 as
well, provided lim
x→0
f
0
(x) exists and is finite, in which case
f
0
(0) = lim
x→0
f
0
(x)
Exercises 127
Thus
ker T = {f ∈ D
1
: f
0
= 0}
(here 0 is the identically null function defined on (−1, 1)). If f belongs to ker T, by
the classical theorem due to Lagrange,
∀x ∈ (−1, 1) , ∃ϑ
x
∈ (0, x)
f (x) = f (0) +xf
0

x
)
and hence f is constant on (−1, 1). It follows that a basis of ker T is given by the
constant function (x 7→1), and nullity T = 1. Since T (D
1
) contains, e.g., all the
restrictions to (−1, 1) of the polynomials with vanishing zero-degree monomial, and
it is already known that the linear space of all polynomials has an infinite basis, the
dimension of T (D
1
) is infinite.
16.4.15 n. 27 (p. 582)
Let D
2
be the linear space of all real functions of a real variable which are defined
and everywhere differentiable on R. If
L : D
2
→R
R
, y 7→y
00
+Py
0
+Q
where P and Q are real functions of a real variable which are continuous on R, it has
been shown in the solution to exercise 17, p.555, that L is a linear operator. Thus
ker L is the set of all solutions to the linear differential equation of the second order
∀x ∈ R, y
00
(x) +P (x) y
0
(x) +Q(x) y (x) = 0 (16.1)
By the uniqueness theorem for Cauchy’s problems in the theory of differential equa-
tions, for each (y
0
, y
0
0
) ∈ R
2
there exists a unique solution to equation (16.1) such
that y (0) = y
0
and y
0
(0) = y
0
0
. Hence the function
ϕ : ker L →R
2
, y 7→
µ
y (0)
y
0
(0)

is injective and surjective. Moreover, let u be the solution to equation (16.1) such
that (u (0) , u
0
(0)) = (1, 0), and let v be the solution to equation (16.1) such that
(v (0) , v
0
(0)) = (0, 1). Then for each (y
0
, y
0
0
) ∈ R
2
, since ker L is a linear subspace of
D
2
, the function
y : x 7→y
0
u(x) +y
0
0
v (x)
is a solution to equation (16.1), and by direct inspection it is seen that y (0) = y
0
and
y
0
(0) = y
0
0
. In other words, ϕ
−1
((y
0
, y
0
0
)), and
ker L = span {u, v}
Finally, u and v are linearly independent; indeed, since u(0) = 1 and v (0) = 0,
αu(x) + βv (x) = 0 for each x ∈ R can only hold (by evaluating at x = 0) if α = 0;
in such a case, from βv (x) = 0 for each x ∈ R and v
0
(0) = 1 it is easily deduced that
β = 0 as well. Thus nullity L = 2.
128 Linear transformations and matrices
16.5 Algebraic operations on linear transformations
16.6 Inverses
16.7 One-to-one linear transformations
16.8 Exercises
16.8.1 n. 15 (p. 589)
T is injective (or one to one), since
T (x, y, z) = T (x
0
, y
0
, z
0
) ⇔

x = x
0
2y = 2y
0
3z = 3z
0
⇔(x, y, z) = (x
0
, y
0
, z
0
)
T
−1
(u, v, w) =
³
u,
v
2
,
w
3
´
16.8.2 n. 16 (p. 589)
T is injective, since
T (x, y, z) = T (x
0
, y
0
, z
0
) ⇔

x = x
0
y = y
0
x +y +z = x
0
+y
0
+z
0
⇔(x, y, z) = (x
0
, y
0
, z
0
)
T
−1
(u, v, w) = (u, v, w −u −v)
16.8.3 n. 17 (p. 589)
T is injective, since
T (x, y, z) = T (x
0
, y
0
, z
0
) ⇔

x + 1 = x
0
+ 1
y + 1 = y
0
+ 1
z −1 = z
0
−1
⇔(x, y, z) = (x
0
, y
0
, z
0
)
T
−1
(u, v, w) = (u −1, v −1, w + 1)
Linear transformations with prescribed values 129
16.8.4 n. 27 (p. 590)
Let
p = x 7→p
0
+p
1
x +p
2
x
2
+ · · · +p
n−1
x
n−1
+p
n
x
n
DT (p) = D[T (p)] = D
·
x 7→
Z
x
0
p(t) dt
¸
= x 7→p(x)
the last equality being a consequence of the fundamental theorem of integral calculus.
TD(p) = T [D(p)] = T
£
x 7→p
1
+ 2p
2
x + · · · (n −1) p
n−1
x
n−2
+np
n
x
n−1
¤
= x 7→
Z
x
0
p
1
+ 2p
2
t + · · · (n −1) p
n−1
t
n−2
+np
n
t
n−1
dt
= x 7→ p
1
t +p
2
t
2
+ · · · p
n−1
t
n−1
+p
n
t
n
¯
¯
x
0
= x 7→p
1
x +p
2
x
2
+ · · · p
n−1
x
n−1
+p
n
x
n
= p −p
0
Thus TD acts as the identity map only on the subspace W of V containing all
polynomials having the zero degree monomial (p
0
) equal to zero. ImTD is equal to
W, and ker TD is the set of all constant polynomials, i.e., zero-degree polynomials.
16.9 Linear transformations with prescribed values
16.10 Matrix representations of linear transformations
16.11 Construction of a matrix representation in diagonal form
16.12 Exercises
16.12.1 n. 3 (p. 596)
(a) Since T (i) = i +j and T (j) = 2i −j,
T (3i −4j) = 3T (i) −4T (j) = 3 (i +j) −4 (2i −j)
= −5i + 7j
T
2
(3i −4j) = T (−5i + 7j) = −5T (i) + 7T (j)
= −5 (i +j) + 7 (2i −j) = 9i −12j
130 Linear transformations and matrices
(b) The matrix of T with respect to the basis {i, j} is
A ≡
£
T (i) T (j)
¤
=
·
1 2
1 −1
¸
and the matrix of T
2
with respect to the same basis is
A
2

·
3 0
0 3
¸
(c) First solution (matrix for T). If e
1
= i −j and e
2
= 3i +j, the matrix
P ≡
£
e
1
e
2
¤
=
·
1 3
−1 1
¸
transforms the (canonical) coordinates (1, 0) and (0, 1) of e
1
and e
2
with respect to
the basis {e
1
, e
2
} into their coordinates (1, −1) and (3, 1) with respect to the basis
{i, j}; hence P is the matrix of coordinate change from basis {e
1
, e
2
} to basis {i, j},
and P
−1
is the matrix of coordinate change from basis {i, j} to basis {e
1
, e
2
}. The
operation of the matrix B representing T with respect to the basis {e
1
, e
2
} can be
described as the combined effect of the following three actions: 1) coordinate change
from coordinates w.r. to basis {e
1
, e
2
} into coordinates w.r. to the basis {i, j} (that
is, multiplication by matrix P); 2) transformation according to T as expressed by
the matrix representing T w.r. to the basis {i, j} (that is, multiplication by A); 3)
coordinate change from coordinates w.r. to the basis {i, j} into coordinates w.r. to
basis {e
1
, e
2
} (that is, multiplication by P
−1
). Thus
B = P
−1
AP =
1
4
·
1 −3
1 1
¸ ·
1 2
1 −1
¸ ·
1 3
−1 1
¸
=
1
4
·
−2 5
2 1
¸ ·
1 3
−1 1
¸
=
1
4
·
−7 −1
1 7
¸
Second solution (matrix for T). The matrix B representing T with respect to the
basis {e
1
, e
2
} is
B ≡
£
T (e
1
) T (e
2
)
¤
provided T (e
1
) and T (e
2
) are meant as coordinate vectors (α, β) and (γ, δ) with
respect to the basis {e
1
, e
2
}. Since, on the other hand, with respect to the basis {i, j}
we have
T (e
1
) = T (i −j) = T (i) −T (j) = (i +j) −(2i −j)
= −i + 2j
T (e
2
) = T (3i +j) = 3T (i) +T (j) = 3 (i +j) + (2i −j)
= 5i + 2j
Exercises 131
it suffices to find the {e
1
, e
2
}-coordinates (α, β) and (γ, δ) which correspond to the
{i, j}-coordinates (−1, 2) and (5, 2). Thus we want to solve the two equation systems
(in the unknowns (α, β) and (γ, δ), respectively)
αe
1
+βe
2
= −i + 2j
γe
1
+δe
2
= 5i + 2j
that is,
½
α + 3β = −1
−α +β = 2
½
γ + 3δ = 5
−γ +δ = 2
The (unique) solutions are (α, β) =
1
4
(−7, 1) and (γ, δ) =
1
4
(−1, 7), so that
B =
1
7
·
−7 −1
1 7
¸
Continuation (matrix for T
2
). Since T
2
is represented by a scalar diagonal matrix
with respect to the initially given basis, it is represented by the same matrix with
respect to every basis (indeed, since scalar diagonal matrices commute with every
matrix of the same order, P
−1
DP = D for every scalar diagonal matrix D).
16.12.2 n. 4 (p. 596)
T : (x, y) (reflection w.r. to the Y -axis) 7→ (−x, y)
(length doubling) 7→ (−2x, 2y)
Thus T may be represented by the matrix
A
T

µ
−2 0
0 2

and hence T
2
by the matrix
A
2
T

µ
4 0
0 4

16.12.3 n. 5 (p. 596)
a)
T (i + 2j + 3k) = T (k) +T (j +k) +T (i +j +k)
= (2i + 3j + 5k) +i + (j −k)
= 3i + 4j + 4k
132 Linear transformations and matrices
The three image vectors T (k), T (j +k), T (i +j +k) form a linearly independent
triple. Indeed, the linear combination
xT (k) +yT (j +k) +zT (i +j +k) = x(2i + 3j + 5k) +yi +z (j −k)
= (2x +y) i + (3x +z) j + (5x −z) k
spans the null vector if and only if
2x +y = 0
3x +z = 0
5x −z = 0
which yields (II + III) x = 0, and hence (by substitution in I and II) y = z = 0.
Thus the range space of T is R
3
, and rank T is 3. It follows that the null space of T
is the trivial subspace {(0, 0, 0)}, and nark T is 0.
b) The matrix of T with respect to the basis {i, j, k} is obtained by aligning as
columns the coordinates w.r. to {i, j, k} of the image vectors T (i), T (j), T (k). The
last one is given in the problem statement, but the first two need to be computed.
T (j) = T (j +k −k) = T (j +k) −T (k)
= −i −3j −5k
T (i) = T (i +j +k −j −k) = T (i +j +k) −T (j +k)
= −i +j −k
A
T

¸
−1 −1 2
1 −3 3
−1 −5 3
¸

16.12.4 n. 7 (p. 597)
(a)
T (4i −j + k) = 4T (i) −T (j) +T (k) = (0, −2)
Since {T (j) , T (k)} is a linearly independent set,
ker T = {0} rank T = 2
(b)
A
T
=
µ
0 1 1
0 1 −1

Exercises 133
(c)
Let C = (w
1
, w
2
)
T (i) = 0w
1
+ 0w
2
T (j) = 1w
1
+ 0w
2
T (k) = −
1
2
w
1
+
3
2
w
2
(A
T
)
C
=
µ
0 1 −
1
2
0 0
3
2

(d)
Let B ≡ {j, k, i} and C = {w
1
, w
2
} = {(1, 1) , (1, −1)}. Then
(A
T
)
B,C
=
µ
1 0 0
0 1 0

16.12.5 n. 8 (p. 597)
(a) I shall distinguish the canonical unit vectors of R
2
and R
3
by marking the former
with an underbar. Since T (i) = i +k and T
¡
j
¢
= −i +k,
T
¡
2i −3j
¢
= 2T (i) −3T
¡
j
¢
= 2 (i +k) −3 (i −k)
= −i + 5k
For any two real numbers x and y,
T
¡
xi +yj
¢
= xT (i) +yT
¡
j
¢
= x(i +k) +y (i −k)
= (x + y) i + (x −y) k
It follows that
ImT = lin {i, k}
rank T = 2
nullity T = 2 −2 = 0
(b) The matrix of T with respect to the bases
©
i, j
ª
and {i, j, k} is
A ≡
£
T (i) T
¡
j
¢ ¤
=

1 1
0 0
1 −1
¸
¸
(c) First solution. If w
1
= i +j and w
2
= i + 2j, the matrix
P ≡
£
w
1
w
2
¤
=
·
1 1
1 2
¸
134 Linear transformations and matrices
transforms the (canonical) coordinates (1, 0) and (0, 1) of w
1
and w
2
with respect to
the basis {w
1
, w
2
} into their coordinates (1, 1) and (1, 2) with respect to the basis
©
i, j
ª
; hence P is the matrix of coordinate change from basis {w
1
, w
2
} to basis
©
i, j
ª
,
and P
−1
is the matrix of coordinate change from basis
©
i, j
ª
to basis {w
1
, w
2
}. The
operation of the matrix B of T with respect to the bases {w
1
, w
2
} and {i, j, k} can be
described as the combined effect of the following two actions: 1) coordinate change
from coordinates w.r. to basis {w
1
, w
2
} into coordinates w.r. to the basis
©
i, j
ª
(that
is, multiplication by matrix P); 2) transformation according to T as expressed by the
matrix representing T w.r. to the bases
©
i, j
ª
and {i, j, k} (that is, multiplication by
A). Thus
B = AP =

1 1
0 0
1 −1
¸
¸
·
1 1
1 2
¸
=

2 3
0 0
0 −1
¸
¸
Second solution (matrix for T). The matrix B representing T with respect to the
bases {w
1
, w
2
} and {i, j, k} is
B ≡
£
T (w
1
) T (w
2
)
¤
where
T (w
1
) = T
¡
i +j
¢
= T (i) +T
¡
j
¢
= (i +k) + (i −k)
= i
T (w
2
) = T
¡
i + 2j
¢
= T (i) + 2T
¡
j
¢
= (i +k) + 2 (i −k)
= 3i −k
Thus
B =

1 3
0 0
0 −1
¸
¸
(c) The matrix C representing T w.r. to bases {u
1
, u
2
} and {v
1
, v
2
, v
3
} is diagonal,
that is,
C =

γ
11
0
0 γ
22
0 0
¸
¸
if and only if the following holds
T (u
1
) = γ
11
v
1
T (u
2
) = γ
22
v
2
Exercises 135
There are indeed very many ways to achieve that. In the present situation the simplest
way seems to me to be given by defining
u
1
≡ i v
1
≡ T (u
1
) = i +k
u
2
≡ j v
2
≡ T (u
2
) = i −k
v
3
≡any vector such that {v
1
, v
2
, v
3
} is lin. independent
thereby obtaining
C =

1 0
0 1
0 0
¸
¸
16.12.6 n. 16 (p. 597)
We have
D(sin) = cos D
2
(sin) = D(cos) = −sin
D(cos) = −sin D
2
(cos) = D(−sin) = −cos
D(id · sin) = sin +id · cos D
2
(id· sin) = D(sin +id · cos) = 2 cos −id · sin
D(id · cos) = cos −id· sin D
2
(id· cos) = D(cos −id · sin) = −2 sin −id · cos
and hence the matrix representing the differentiation operator D and its square D
2
acting on lin {sin, cos, id · sin, id · cos} with respect to the basis {sin, cos, id · sin, id · cos}
is
A =

0 −1 1 0
1 0 0 1
0 0 0 −1
0 0 1 0
¸
¸
¸
¸
A
2
=

−1 0 0 −2
0 −1 2 0
0 0 −1 0
0 0 0 −1
¸
¸
¸
¸

2

Contents
I Volume 1 1
3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 26 27 28 28

1 Chapter 1 2 Chapter 2 3 Chapter 3 4 Chapter 4 5 Chapter 5 6 Chapter 6 7 Chapter 7 8 Chapter 8 9 Chapter 9 10 Chapter 10 11 Chapter 11 12 Vector algebra 12.1 Historical introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.2 The vector space of n-tuples of real numbers 12.3 Geometric interpretation for n ≤ 3 . . . . . 12.4 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.4.1 n. 1 (p. 450) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.4.2 n. 2 (p. 450) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.4.3 n. 3 (p. 450) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.4.4 n. 4 (p. 450) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.4.5 n. 5 (p. 450) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.4.6 n. 6 (p. 451) . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 (p. . .8. 12. . . . . 12. .10 n. . . . . 12. . 460) . . . . . . . 457) . . . .8.10 n. . 8 (p. . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 The unit coordinate vectors . . . 456) .18 n. . . . . . . .8 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. 451) . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . 8 (p. .12 n. 2 (p. . . . . . . . .11. . . . . 12. . . . . . 456) .16 n. .4. . . .4 CONTENTS 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11. .11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . .8. .8. . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . 456) . . 6 (p. .11. .4. . . . . . . . . .2 n. 456) . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . .5 n.15 n. 12. . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . 456) . . . . . . 456) .8. . . . 451) .11. . 451) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 n. 460) . . . 456) . . . . . . . 12. . . .8.7 n. . . . . . . . 12. . . . .8. . .13 n. 7 (p. . 7 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 n. . . . . . . . .8 Exercises . . . . . .8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 (p. 13 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 (p. . 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . 21 (p. 12. . . . 456) . . 460) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456) . .11 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . .17 n. . . . . . . . . . . . .8.7 n. . . 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . .4. 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 (p. 451) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. . . . . .10 n. . . . . .5 n. . .12 n. . . . . . . . . . . .9 n. . . . .5 The dot product . 12. . . 12. . . . . . . . 25 (p. . . 12. . 12 (p. . . . . . . 12. . 460) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.8. . . . . . . . . . 457) . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 n. 461) . 22 (p. . . . . . . . . 5 (p. . . .3 n. . . . . 1 (p. . . . . .8 n. . 12. . . . . .14 n. . . . . . 12. 461) . . . . . . . . 11 (p. . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . 5 (p. . . . . . . . Angle between vectors in n-space 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . 12. . 12. .7 n. . . . . .6 n. . . . . . . . 14 (p. . .8.11 Exercises . . . 12. . . . . . . 24 (p. 451) . . . . . . .9 Projections. . . .8 n.6 n. .12 The linear span of a finite set of vectors . . .9 n. . . . .7 Orthogonality of vectors . 457) . . . . . . 11 (p. . . . . 17 (p. 13 (p. . . . . . . . 457) .8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Length or norm of a vector . . . . .4 n. . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . 29 29 30 30 30 32 33 33 33 33 33 33 34 34 34 35 36 36 37 39 39 39 40 40 40 41 42 42 43 43 43 43 43 43 44 45 46 46 47 48 48 50 .1 n. .11. . . . . . 15 (p. . . . . . . . . . .8. . . 12. . . . . . 460) . . 10 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . 461) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461) . . . . . 9 (p. . . . . . . .11. . .4. . . 10 (p. . . . . . . .3 n. . .11. . . . .8. 2 (p. . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . 12. 460) . . . . . . . 456) . . . . .8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11. . . . 12. . . . . . 16 (p. 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. 451) . . . . . 3 (p. . . . . . . . . . .11. . . . . . . . 1 (p. . . 12. 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . .9 n. . . . . . . . . .11 n. 3 (p. . . . .

. . . . . . 10 (p. . . . . . . . . . . .5. 12. . . . . . .7 Planes and vector-valued functions . . . . . 12. . 12. 477) . . . . . 467) . 3 (p. 7 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . 12 (p. .5 n. .4 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 The vector space Vn (C) of n-tuples 12. . . . .3 n. . . . . . . 19 (p. . . . .5. 3 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . 11 (p. . . . . . 13. . . . . 10 (p. . .8 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 50 50 50 50 51 51 51 51 52 53 55 56 56 56 57 57 58 59 59 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 62 62 62 63 64 64 65 65 66 67 67 67 67 13 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 13. . 477) . . .13 Linear independence . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . 18 (p. . 467) . . .2 Lines in n-space . . . . . . . . .15. . . . . . . . . . . . 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 n. . . . . . . 12. . . . . . 12. 13. . . . . 477) . 20 (p. 13. 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 (p. .15. . . . .15. . . . . . . 1 (p.15. . . 13. . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Exercises . . . . . 8 (p. . . . . . .3 n.15 n. . . . . 12.5. 13. . . . . . . . . 468) . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 (p. . . . . . . . . . of complex numbers . . . . .4 n.15. . 13. . . . .14 n. . . . . .15. . . . . . . . . . . 12 (p. . . . . . . . . 13. . . . 467) . . . . . . . 468) . .15 Exercises . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . .5 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 n. 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. 13. . . 5 (p. . 4 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . .15. . . . . . . . . 467) . . . . . . . .14 Bases . . . . .7 n. . . . . . . . . . . .11 n. . .10 n. . . . . .10 n. . 12. . . . . . 13 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Some simple properties of straight lines . . . . 477) . 9 (p. . 13. . . 12. . 1 (p. . . 8 (p. . . . 5 (p. . 467) . . . . . . . . . . . 13. .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Exercises . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . 477) . . . . . . . . . . 7 (p. . . 2 (p. . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . 12.11 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15. 13. . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . .15. . .2 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 n. . . .4 Lines and vector-valued functions . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 477) . . . . . . . .7 n. .5. .12 n. . .5. . . . . 477) . . . . . . . . .1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . 467) . . . . . 13. . . . . .2 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . . . .1 n. 477) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 477) . . . 13.15. . 477) . . . . . . . . . .9 n.15. . . . . .15. . . 468) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 (p. . . . . . . .5 Exercises . . . . . . .6 n. . . . . . . 468) . 467) . . . . . . .5. . 468) . . . . . . . . .6 n. . .5. . . . . . . 477) . . . . 6 (p. .15. . . .6 Planes in euclidean n-spaces . . . . . . .15. . . . . . . . . . . . 467) .15. . . . . . . . . .8 n. .1 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CONTENTS 5 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . 15 (p. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . 3 (p. . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . 12 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 n. . . 488) . . . . 67 68 69 69 70 71 72 72 73 74 75 75 75 76 76 76 76 76 76 77 77 77 78 79 79 80 80 82 82 83 84 85 85 85 85 85 86 86 86 87 87 88 . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . 6 (p. . . . 482) . . . . 13. . . . 3 (p. . . 8 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 n. . .8. . . 14 (p. . . 483) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 487) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482) . . 1 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . .8. . . . . . . . . 4 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . 496) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . .13 n. . . . . . . 496) . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . .17. . . . . . 487) . . 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 n. . . . . . . . 5 (p. . .11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. 5 (p. 483) . . . . . . 488) . . . . 483) . .11. . . . . . . 496) . .1 n. . . . .11. . . . . . . . . 482) . . . . . . . .3 n. .6 n. . . . . . 13.9 n. . .11. . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . .11 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11. . . . . . 13. . . . .8. . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . 11 (p. . . . . . . . .11. . . . . . . . . . 5 (p. . . . . . 13. . . . .17. . . 482) . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . .3 n. . . . . 13. 13. . . 13 (p. . . .11. . . 482) . .11. . .11 n. . . . . . . . . 2 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482) . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . 13. . . . . . .8 n. . . . . . . . . . . 488) . . . . . . 483) . . . . . . . . .11. . . . . . . . . . . .3 n. . . 483) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. . 13.2 n. 13.17. . .8. . . . 4 (p.15 Normal vectors to planes . . . . . . . . . . .10 The cross product expressed as a determinant . . . 487) . 12 (p. . . 14 (p. . . 13.12 The scalar triple product . 13. . . 13. . . . . . . . . . .8. . . 13. . . . 482) . 13. . . . . 487) . . .17. . . . 15 (p. . .2 n. . 13. 2 (p. . . . . 10 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . equations . . . . . . 487) . . . . 6 (p. . . 13. . .4 n. 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 (p. . . . . . . . . .1 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482) . . . 496) . . .11. .8. . . . . .14 n. . 10 (p. . . . . . .15 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 n. . . . . .8. 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 n. . . .16 Linear cartesian equations for planes . . . .4 n. . . . . . . . . .8. . . . . . . . 4 (p. . . . . . 488) . . 13. . . . . . . . . 9 (p. . . . . . . . .8. . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . .11. . . . .11. . . . . .11 n. . . . . . . .8. . . .10 n. . . . . 13. . . . . 13. . .8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 n. . . . . . . . 496) . . . . .5 n.14 Exercises . .17. . . . 13. . . .9 The cross product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 (p. 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 (p. .12 n. . . . . 1 (p. . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . .11. . . .8 n. . . . . . .11. .8. . . . . 488) . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Cramer’s rule for solving systems of three linear 13. . . 13. 11 (p.17 Exercises . . . 13. . 13. . . . . . . . . . 9 (p. . . . 7 (p. .7 n. . 13. . . . . . 487) . . . 3 (p.4 n. . 13. . . . . .1 n. . . .9 n. . . . . . . . . . . .6 n.6 CONTENTS 13. . . 8 (p. . .

. 15. . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . 13 (p. . . . . . . . .17.10 n. . 13. . 20 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 (p. . . . . 15. . . . . . 15 (p. . 11 (p. . . . . . . . . .5. . 555) . . . . . . . .18 The conic sections . .1 n. . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . 14 Calculus of vector-valued functions 15 Linear spaces 15. .2 The definition of a linear space . . . .9 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 (p. . . . . . 16 (p. . . .15 n. . 18 (p. .5. . .15 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 n.5. 13. 13 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 n. . . . . 22 (p. . . . . .25 Miscellaneous exercises on conic sections . . .5. . .5. . .3 Examples of linear spaces . . . . . .17. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 n. . . . . . 17 (p. . . . . .17. . .10 n. . . . . . . . . . . .14 n. . . . . . . . . . .12 n. . 15. .17. . . . . . . . . . 13. 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . .8 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 n. . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . .21 Exercises . . 555) . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . .CONTENTS 7 13. . . . . . . 5 (p. . . 496) . . . . . . . . . 555) . 555) . . . . . . .5. . . . .17. 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 (p. . . . 555) . . . . . . . 496) . . . .12 n. . . . . . . . .5. . . . . .5. . . .5.14 n.4 n. . . 555) . .13 n. 15. . . . . . . . . . 19 (p. . . . . . . . . . . 555) .1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . .11 n. . . . . . . . . . . 555) . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 (p. . . . 496) . . . . . . . . .17. . . . . 14 (p. . 13. . . . 9 (p. . . . 15. . . 13. . . . . . 15. . . . . . 555) . . 555) . . . . . .20 Polar equations for conic sections . 496) .5.17. . . . . .22 Conic sections symmetric about the origin 13. . . . . 497) .5 Exercises . . . . . . 17 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497) . . . . 6 (p. . 2 (p. 8 (p. . . . . . . . 13. . 1 (p. . 15. . . . . .17. . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . .19 Eccentricity of conic sections . . . . . . . 555) . . . . . . . . . . . 496) .11 n.5 n. . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496) . . . . 15.8 n. . . . . .17. . . . . . 496) . 13. . . . . . . 15. . . . . . 11 (p. . . . . . . . . . . .3 n. . . . . .4 Elementary consequences of the axioms 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496) . . .9 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . 15. . . . . . 88 88 88 89 90 90 90 90 91 91 91 91 91 91 92 92 92 92 93 95 95 95 95 95 95 95 96 96 96 97 97 98 98 98 99 99 101 101 102 102 . . . . . . . . . . .23 Cartesian equations for the conic sections 13. . . . 555) . . . . . 15.5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17. . . . 13. .6 n. . . . . . . . 555) . . . . . . . . 13. . . . .24 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555) . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . 6 (p. . . 15. . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . 102 102 102 102 103 103 103 103 103 103 103 104 104 104 104 104 104 105 105 105 105 106 106 106 107 107 108 108 111 111 112 112 112 115 115 115 115 115 116 117 118 . . . . 15. . .4 n. . . . . . . . 10 (p. . . . . . . . . .15 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576) . . . . . .9. . .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . 555) . . 8 (p.9. . . . . 28 (p. . . . 576) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 (p. . . . . . . 560) . . . . . . . . 27 (p. . . .16 n. . . . .7 Dependent and independent sets in a linear space . . . 12 (p. . .20 n. . . . . . 560) . . . . . . . . . . .14 n. . . . 15. . . . 555) .9. . . . Euclidean spaces. . . . . . .17 n. . .16 n. . . . 15. . . . . . . .16. . . . . 14 (p. 555) . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . .2 n. . . . . 560) . . . . . . 4 (p. . . . . . . . . .16. . . . 15. . . . . . . . 2 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 (p. . . . . . .5. . .16. . 560) . 15. .17 n.8 Bases and dimension . . . . . 560) . . 560) . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 n. 11 (p. 560) . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 CONTENTS 15. . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 n. . . . . .5 n. .16 Exercises . . . . .10 n. . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12. 11 (p. . . . . projections . .11 n. .5. . . . . . . . . . . .10 Inner products. . . . .6 Subspaces of a linear space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555) .2 n. 15. . . . . . 15.9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . 576) . . . . . 26 (p. Norms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. .16. . . . . 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . 15. .9 Exercises . . . . . . . . 15.1 n. . .14 Orthogonal complements.9. . . . . .19 n. . . . . . . . 15. . .9. . . . . . 9 (p. . . . . . . . . 5 (p. . 3 (p. . . . . . . . . . 1 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. .9. . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560) . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . .9 n. 567) . 560) . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. 4 (p. . . . . . . 555) . . .8 n. . . . . . . . .21 n. . . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . 2 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 (p. .13 Construction of orthogonal sets. . . . .5. . . . .11 Orthogonality in a euclidean space . . . . . . 560) . . 15. . . . . . . . . . 13 (p. . . 23 (p. . 9 (p. . 560) . . . . . . . .5. . . .18 n. . . . . . . .1 n. . 560) . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 (p. .3 n. . . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . 567) . . . . . . . 3 (p. . 15. . . . . . .4 n. . . The Gram-Schmidt process . . . . . . . 6 (p.15 Best approximation of elements in a euclidean space by elements in a finite-dimensional subspace . . .7 n. . .6 n. .12 Exercises . . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560) . . . 560) . . . . . . . 15. . . . . . . . . . . 15. . . 15. . . 576) . . . . . . . . . 1 (p. 15. . 25 (p. . 15. . . 15. . . 15. . . . 555) . . . .9. . . . . 15.13 n. . 15. . . . . . 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . 560) . . .12 n.9. . . . . .5. . . 15. 15.3 n. . .2 n. . . 15. . . . . 560) . . . . . . . . . . . . .12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 (p.

. . . . . . . . 16. . .3 n. . . . . . 3 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . .12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 (p. . . 596) . . . . . . . . . . . 16. . . . . . . . . . . 7 (p. . 16. . 597) . . .12 n. 121 121 121 121 121 121 122 122 122 123 123 123 123 124 124 125 125 126 126 127 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 129 129 129 129 129 129 131 131 132 133 135 . . . 6 (p. . . . 16.4. . . . . . . . . . . . .12. . . . . . . . . . 16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CONTENTS 9 16 Linear transformations and matrices 16. . . . . . . . . . . .4.4. . . . . . 582) . 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 (p. . . 596) . 8 (p. . . . 16. . . 10 (p. . . 27 (p. . 589) . .13 n. . . .1 Linear transformations . . . . . . . .12. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 (p.12. 16. . . . . . . 582) . . . . .2 n. . . . . . . . 17 (p. 16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . .2 n. . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 n. . . . . 589) . . 16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 (p. . . . 16. 16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 590) . . . . . . . . . .1 n. . . . . . . . . 16. 17 (p. . . . . . . 16 (p. . .14 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 (p. . . . 16. .9 Linear transformations with prescribed values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 (p. . . . .11 n. . .2 Null space and range . . . . 16. . . . 582) . . . . . .8. 597) . . . . . . . . . .10 n. . . . . . . .7 n. . . . .4. . . . . . . .7 One-to-one linear transformations .8 Exercises . . 16. . . . . . . 16. . . 5 (p. . . . . . . . . . . .4 n. 16.11 Construction of a matrix representation in diagonal 16. . . 16. . . . . .5 n. . . . . 582) . 597) . . . . . . . . . .5 n. . . . . . . . . 16. . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 n. . 16. . .6 n. . . 9 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . 582) . . . . . . . . . . 16. . . . . . . . . 16. 2 (p. . . . . . .8 n. . . 16. . . . . . . . . 582) . . . . . . . 16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . 16. . . . . . 27 (p. . . . . . . 582) . . . . . .15 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 596) . . 16. .9 n. . . . . . . . . . . .4 Exercises . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . form . . . .6 Inverses . 582) . . . . . 582) . . . . . .8. . . . 589) . . . . . . . . . . . .3 n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4. . . . . . 16 (p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 582) . . . .12. . . . . .4. . . . . .10 Matrix representations of linear transformations . . . . . .4. . . 4 (p.5 Algebraic operations on linear transformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16. . . . . . .3 Nullity and rank . . . . . 582) . . . . . 16. . . 582) . 4 (p. . .4. . 16. . . . . . . . . . . 5 (p. . .12 Exercises . . . 16. . . . 16. . . . . . . . . . . .4. . 8 (p. . . . . . .1 n. 3 (p. . . . . . . . . . .8. . . . . . . . . .4 n. . . 16. . . . . . . . . . .4. .8. . . 582) . . . . 16. .3 n. .12. . . . . . . . . 16. . . . . . . .4 n. 582) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10 CONTENTS .

Part I Volume 1 1 .

.

Chapter 1 CHAPTER 1 .

4 Chapter 1 .

Chapter 2 CHAPTER 2 .

6 Chapter 2 .

Chapter 3 CHAPTER 3 .

8 Chapter 3 .

Chapter 4 CHAPTER 4 .

10 Chapter 4 .

Chapter 5 CHAPTER 5 .

12 Chapter 5 .

Chapter 6 CHAPTER 6 .

14 Chapter 6 .

Chapter 7 CHAPTER 7 .

16 Chapter 7 .

Chapter 8 CHAPTER 8 .

18 Chapter 8 .

Chapter 9 CHAPTER 9 .

20 Chapter 9 .

Chapter 10 CHAPTER 10 .

22 Chapter 10 .

Chapter 11 CHAPTER 11 .

24 Chapter 11 .

(0. 3). (1. −5) 3 2 2 4 4 The seven points to be drawn are the following: The purpose of the exercise is achieved by drawing. 450) µ ¶ µ ¶ µ ¶ 7 5 5 11 13 . 0. 7) . 21). 24. 1 (p. 4).2 n. . 0. 9).1 n. as required. 2 (p. . . 450) (a) a + b = (5. (c) a + b − c = (3. a single picture.2 .Chapter 12 VECTOR ALGEBRA 12.4 Exercises 12.1 Historical introduction 12. . 4) .2 The vector space of n-tuples of real numbers 12. −2) . I would say). . (d) 7a − 2b − 3c = (−7. (3.4. −1.4. 6. containing all the points (included the starting points A and B. (4. 12. (e) 2a + b − 3c = (0. (b) a − b = (−3.3 Geometric interpretation for n ≤ 3 12. 0).

the straight line through B − → with direction given by the vector a ≡ OA is obtained.4. . (−1. 5) . (5.26 Vector algebra It can be intuitively seen that. by letting t vary in all R. 12. 2) . . by letting t vary in all R. (3.3 n. 1) 3 3 2 2 4 5 4 3 2 1 -3 -2 -1 0 -1 -2 -3 1 2 3 4 5 It can be intuitively seen that. . the straight line through − → point A with direction given by the vector b ≡ OB is obtained. 4) . 2. 450) The seven points this time are the following: µ ¶ µ ¶ µ ¶ 5 10 7 5 15 . 3 (p. . (−3. .

. as it is going to be clear after the second lecture. 3 . the segment OB is obtained. 3 . it seems to me.Exercises 27 12. y) ∈ [0. I would say). Similarly. The picture below is made with the value of x fixed at 0. (3. −3) . where −→ − → − → OD = OA + OB. containing all the points (included the starting points A and B. 4 2 -4 -2 0 -2 -4 2 4 (b) It is hard not to notice that all points belong to the same straight line. 5 . 450) (a) The seven points to be drawn are the following: µ ¶ µ ¶ µ ¶ µ ¶ 3 5 5 4 7 1 . 1 . 1. . . (4. and it is enough to repeat the construction a few more times to convince oneself that the set © ª xa + yb : (x. (c) If the value of x is fixed at 0 and y varies in [0. 5) 2 4 2 3 3 2 The whole purpose of this part of the exercise is achieved by drawing a single picture.2 . 1 . and hence D is the vertex of the parallelogram with three vertices at O. by the question immediately following. 4 . −1) . . indeed. 4 2 4 4 2 . 1].4 n. all the combinations are affine. the same construction with the value of x fixed at 1 yields the segment AD. A. (0. This is made clear. 4 (p. and B.4. 1]2 is matched by the set of all points of the parallelogram OADB. and 2. when x = 1 the segment obtained joins the midpoints of 2 the two sides OA and BD. .

→ III (↑) . 5 (p. 12.→ I x = 2 I (↑) .5 2 2.→ II (↑) . of equation 3x − y = 0 and 3x − y = 5 respectively.5 n.6 (a) n.4. and the resulting set is the (infinite) stripe bounded by the lines containing the sides OB and AD. 450) µ ¶ µ ¶ µ ¶ 2 1 c1 +y = x 1 3 c2 I 2x + y = c1 II x + 3y = c2 µ 12.4.→ I x = −z y=0 x=0 z=0  c1 c2 ¶ 3c1 − c2 = 5 µ 3I − II 5x = 3c1 − c2 2II − I 5y = 2c2 − c1 2 1 ¶ 2c2 − c1 + 5 µ 1 3 ¶ (b) .5 1 1. 451)        1 0 1 x+z d = x 1  + y 1  + z  1  =  x + y + z  1 1 0 x+y I x+z =0 II x + y + z = 0 III x+y =0 (c) I x+z =1 II x + y + z = 2 III x+y =3 II − I y=1 II − III z = −1 (↑) . 6 (p.28 Vector algebra 4 3 2 1 0 0. (e) The whole plane.5 3 (d) All the segments in the above construction are substituted by straight lines.

451)        1 0 2 x + 2z d = x 1  + y 1  + z  1  =  x + y + z  1 1 1 x+y+z I x + 2z = 0 II x + y + z = 0 III x + y + z = 0 I x = −2z (↑) .→ I II (check) y=0 x=0 z=0 0=0      (b) II − I − IV 0 = −3 . 451)   1 0  1   1 d = x  + y  1   1 0 1 I II III IV (c) I II III IV (d) I II III IV x+z =1 x+y+z =2 x+y =3 y=4 x+z =1 x+y+z =5 x+y =3 y=4 IV IV . 1) III − II 0 = 1  (b) (c) I x + 2z = 1 II x + y + z = 2 III x + y + z = 3 12. 1.8 (a) n.4.→ I II (check) y=4 x = −1 z=2 −1 + 4 + 2 = 5 x+z =0 x+y+z =0 x+y =0 y=0     1 x+z   1   x+y+z +z =   0   x+y 0 y IV IV .7 (a) n.→ III (↑) .→ III (↑) . 7 (p.→ II y = z z ← 1 (−2.Exercises 29 12.4. 8 (p.

a = kd Claim: (∃h ∈ R ∼ {0} .4). is parallel to d too. which is nonnull.11 n.30 Vector algebra 12. is parallel to d too. 1. 11 (p. (⇒) Since (by I) we have b = c − a. if c is parallel to d. probably). this means that there are two real nonzero numbers α and β such that u = αw and v = βw. c = hd) ⇔ (∃l ∈ R ∼ {0} .4. 12. c = hd ∃h ∈ R ∼ {0} . they differ only in the phrasing. b = ld ∃h ∈ R ∼ {0} . b = ld) I present two possible lines of reasoning (among others.9 n. ∃k ∈ R ∼ {0} . 9 (p. If you look carefully. 451) Assumptions: I c=a+b II ∃k ∈ R ∼ {0} . then (by II) c is the sum of two vectors which are both parallel to d. then (by II) b is the difference of two vectors which are both parallel to d.10 n. it follows that c. kd + b = hd ∃h ∈ R ∼ {0} . it follows that b. Then µ ¶ v α u = αw = α = v β β that is. 10 (p. 451) Let the two vectors u and v be both parallel to the vector w. ⇔ I II ⇔ (b 6= 0) ⇔ l≡h−k ⇔ ∃h ∈ R ∼ {0} . b = (h − k) d h 6= k ∃l ∈ R ∼ {0} . a + b = hd 2. if b is parallel to d.4. u is parallel to v. According to the definition at page 450 (just before the beginning of § 12.4. 12. (⇐) Since (by I) we have c = a + b. which is nonnull. ∃k ∈ R ∼ {0} . 451) (b) Here is an illustration of the first distributive law (α + β) v = αv + βv .

Exercises

31

with v = (2, 1), α = 2, β = 3. The vectors v, αv, βv, αv + βv are displayed by means of representative oriented segments from left to right, in black, red, blue, and red-blue colour, respectively. The oriented segment representing vector (α + β) v is above, in violet. The dotted lines are there just to make it clearer that the two oriented segments representing αv + βv and (α + β) v are congruent, that is, the vectors αv + βv and (α + β) v are the same.

8 6 4 2

0

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4

6

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12

14

tails are marked with a cross, heads with a diamond

An illustration of the second distributive law

α (u + v) = αu + αv

is provided by means of the vectors u = (1, 3), v = (2, 1), and the scalar α = 2. The vectors u and αu are represented by means of blue oriented segments; the vectors v and αv by means of red ones; u + v and α (u + v) by green ones; αu + αv is in violet. The original vectors u, v, u + v are on the left; the “rescaled” vectors αu, αv, α (u + v) on the right. Again, the black dotted lines are there just to emphasize congruence.

32

Vector algebra

8 6 4 2

-4

-2

0

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8

tails are marked with a cross, heads with a diamond 12.4.12 n. 12 (p. 451) The statement to be proved is better understood if written in homogeneous form, with all vectors represented by oriented segments: − → 1− → 1− → OA + AC = OB (12.1) 2 2 Since A and C are opposed vertices, the same holds for O and B; this means that the oriented segment OB covers precisely one diagonal of the parallelogram OABC, and AC precisely covers the other (in the rightward-downwards orientation), hence what needs to be proved is the following: ³ ´ 1³ ´ → − → − → − → − → 1 − OA + OC − OA = OA + OC 2 2 which is now seen to be an immediate consequence of the distributive properties. − → − → − → − → − → In the picture below, OA is in red, OC in blue, OB = OA + OC in green, and − → − → − → AC = OC − OA in violet.

The dot product

33

The geometrical theorem expressed by equation (12.1) is the following: Theorem 1 The two diagonals of every parallelogram intersect at a point which divides them in two segments of equal length. In other words, the intersection point of the two diagonals is the midpoint of both. Indeed, the lefthand side of (12.1) is the vector represented by the oriented segment OM , where M is the midpoint of diagonal AC (violet), whereas the righthand side is the vector represented by the oriented segment ON , where N is the midpoint of diagonal AB (green). More explicitly, the movement from O to M is described as achieved by the composition of a first movement from O to A with a second movement from A towards C, which stops halfway (red plus half the violet); whereas the movement from A to N is described as a single movement from A toward B, −→ − −→ stopping halfway (half the green). Since (12.1) asserts that OM = ON , equality between M and N follows, and hence a proof of (12.1) is a proof of the theorem 12.5 The dot product

12.6

Length or norm of a vector

12.7

Orthogonality of vectors

12.8

Exercises

12.8.1 n. 1 (p. 456) (a) ha, bi = −6 (b) hb, ci = 2 (c) ha, ci = 6 (d) ha, b + ci = 0 (e) ha − b, ci = 4 12.8.2 n. 2 (p. 456) (a) ha, bi c = (2 · 2 + 4 · 6 + (−7) · 3) (3, 4, −5) = 7 (3, 4, −5) = (21, 28, −35) (b) ha, b + ci = 2 · (2 + 3) + 4 · (6 + 4) + (−7) (3 − 5) = 64

5. 2)i = 0.8. − 15 15 15 ¢ 12. z)i = 0 h(1. bi = 0 ⇔ 7x + 14y = 0 Let (x.4 n. question (d). 2) . (x. −4) 6= 0 and h(1. y. Then c = (1. −3α)}α∈R 12. 456) The statement is false. (x. 1. bi + y hb. −1.8. y) ≡ (−2.8. 4 . −105) (e) a hb. 1). 1. −5α. I 2x + y − z = 0 II x − y + 2z = 0 I + II 3x + z = 0 2I + II 5x + y = 0 b = (1. 456) hc. ci = (2. 60. ci ⇔ ha. 2) Thus the set of all such vectors can be represented in parametric form as follows: {(α.4.34 Vector algebra (c) ha + b. 12. b − ci = 0 ⇔ a ⊥ b − c and the difference b − c may well be orthogonal to a without being the null vector. bi = ha. 1) c = (1. Indeed. z)i = 0 that is. −1) . of coordinates (x.−7) 15 = ¡2 7 . 0) See also exercise 1. (3. 5 (p. The simplest example that I can conceive is in R2 : a = (1. ha. 4. −4) . y. 3 (p. 6 (p.5 n. bi = 0 c = xa + yb ¾ ⇒ hxa + yb. −7) (2 · 3 + 6 · 4 + 3 · (−5)) = (2. bi = 0 ⇔ x ha.3 n. y. z) must satisfy the two conditions h(2. 4. 456) The required vector. ci = (2 + 2) · 3 + (4 + 6) · 4 + (−7 + 3) · (−5) = 72 (d) ahb. −7) 15 = (30.ci = (2. 5. .

8) 9 1 d = (22. −2α) Substituting in the first condition.6 n. a − αbi = 0 that is. d = a − c = (2 − α. for some α to be determined. 8) 9 1 d = (22. 7 (p. ai − α hb. bi = 0 and hence 1 (−4.Exercises 35 12. −1. d = a − c = a − αb Thus the second condition becomes hb. hb. 10) 9 c = α= hb. 10) 9 c = 2 (same solution. c = αb Substituting in the first condition. −1. for some α to be determined. −8. bi 9 1 α=− 4 9 . −8. 456) 1 (solution with explicit mention of coordinates) From the last condition.8. −4 − 9α = 0 and hence 1 (−4. c = (α. with no mention of coordinates) From the last condition. 2α. 2 + 2α) Thus the second condition becomes 1 · (2 − α) + 2 · (−1 − 2α) − 2 (2 + 2α) = 0 that is. ai 2 · 1 + (−1) · 2 + 2 · (−2) 4 = =− 2 + 22 + (−2)2 hb. −1 − 2α.

7 n.36 Vector algebra 12. 456) (a) b = (1. then kak = 0 and hence b = 0 as well. Then the first equations gives (12. (b) b = (−1. 2). Suppose α is nonzero (the situation is completely analogous if β 6= 0 is assumed). −a) or b = (−b. 1). (a) b = (−2.2) β x=− y α and substitution in the second equation yields ¶ µ 2 β + 1 y 2 = α2 + β 2 α2 that is. b = (−β. If a 6= 0. namely. 13 (p. a). 1).8. −2) or b = (3. y). −1) or b = (2. (c) b = (−2. −1) or b = (1. let the coordinates of a be given by the couple (α. 2) or b = (1. 12.8 n. −1) or b = (−1. (c) b = (−3. 1). −α) In particular.2) gives x = ∓β 2 α2 + β 2 α2 +β 2 α2 = α2 Thus there are only two solutions to the problem. −1). 456) If b is the required vector. −2) .8. bi = 0 kbk = kak If a = 0. y = and hence y = ±α Substituting back in (12. −1) or b = (−2. The above conditions take the form αx + βy = 0 x2 + y 2 = α2 + β 2 Either α or β must be different from 0. (b) b = (2. the following conditions must be satisfied ha. 1) or b = (2. and the coordinates of b by the couple (x. 1). (d) b = (−1. (d) b = (b. 10 (p. α) and b = (β. β).

b − xi = 0 or ha. xi = 0 Equivalently. y. is unknown). z)i − h(2. −4) − (x. z) . when rewritten in a more perspicuous way by “completion of the squares” µ ¶2 µ ¶2 µ ¶2 5 3 25 5 x− + y+ + x+ = 2 2 2 4 ¡ ¢ is seen to define the sphere of center P = 5 . 1) − (x. z) − → − → be the coordinates of C. −4. xi + hx. y. If the right angle is in C. (x.8. solution with explicit mention of coordinates) Let (x. −4. the two vectors CA and CB must be orthogonal. h(2.x + ° ° ° 2 ° 2 2 ° °2 ° °2 ° ° ° ° °x − a + b ° = ° a − b ° ° ° 2 ° 2 ° . z)]i = 0 that is. bi − ha + b. same solution. −4) . (3. z)] . orthogonality of the two vectors − → CA = a − x is required. y. − 3 and radius 5 . − 5 . bi . −4)i + h(x. y. with no mention of coordinates) Let − → − → − → a ≡ OA b ≡ OB x ≡ OC − → (stressing that the point C. kxk − 2 2 − → CB = b − x ¿ ° ° °2 À ° ° a + b °2 ° ° a+b ° ° = ° a + b ° − ha. 1) . y. z)i = 0 or x2 + y 2 + z 2 − 5x + 5y + 3z + 6 = 0 The above equation. 456) 1 (right angle in C. [(3. 14 (p. that is. hence the vector OC. −1. −4. y. 1) + (3.9 n. Thus h[(2. ha − x. Then. (x. 2 2 2 2 2 (right angle in C. −1. −1.Exercises 37 12.

the following must hold D E − − → → 0 = BA. bi Thus the solution plane π is seen to be through B and orthogonal to the segment connecting point B to point A. x − 3y − 5z = 33 The solution set is the plane π through B and orthogonal to (1. with the notation of point 2.38 Vector algebra The last characterization of the solution to our problem shows that the solution set is ° ° the locus of all points having fixed distance (° a−b °) from the midpoint of the segment 2 AB. x − bi that is. xi = ha − b. 4 (right angle in B. the condition to be required is 0 = ha − b. BC = 1 − x + 3y + 12 + 5z + 20 that is. 5) and BC = (x − 1. z + 4). ha − b. . the vectors required to be orthogonal are BA and BC. 3. with no mention of coordinates) Proceeding as in the previous point. 3 (right angle in B. −3. Indeed. same solution. solution with explicit mention of coordinates) With − → − → − → this approach. if π is any plane containing AB. −5). y + 4. it is known by elementary geometry that the triangle ACB is rectangle in C. Since BA = − → (−1. and C is any point of the circle of π having AB as diameter.

8. . we have that p ≡ OP must be equal to αb = − → αOB. −2) 25 (α. −3β) 4II + 3I 25α = 11 4I − 3II 25β = −2 1 (33. 2 2 2 2 µ ha. 17 (p. of equation hb − a. . bi 4 .8. 2 2 2 2 µ ¶ 3 1 1 3 q = − .12 n. bi 10 = hb. β) = p= 12. with α= Thus ¶ 5 5 5 5 p = . xi = hb − a. .8.10 n.11 n. 456) I c1 − c2 + 2c3 = 0 II 2c1 + c2 − c3 = 0 I + II 3c1 + c3 = 0 I + 2II 5c1 + c2 = 0 c = (−1. 16 (p. 4α) q = (4β. 3) 12. 5. 12. 44) 25 I 3α + 4β = 1 II 4α − 3β = 2 1 (11. ai It is also clear that π and π 0 are parallel.− . 456) p = (3α. 6) 25 The question is identical to the one already answered in exercise 7 of this section. − → Recalling solution 2 to that exercise. 15 (p. 456) q= 1 (−8.Exercises 39 5 (right angle in B) It should be clear at this stage that the solution set in this case is the plane π 0 through A and orthogonal to AB.

bi + ha. bi substituting −b to b. 12. 20 (p. 456) ka + bk2 + ka − bk2 = ha + b. with vertex C opposed to the vertex in the origin O) to be a rectangle.13 n.40 Vector algebra 12.8. 456) It has been quickly seen in class that ka + bk2 = kak2 + kbk2 + 2 ha. bi + hb. that is. bi = 0 ka − bk2 = kak2 + kbk2 − 2 ha. and that in such a rectangle ka + bk and ka − bk measure the lengths of the two diagonals. ai + 2 ha. bi = 2 kak2 + 2 kbk2 The geometric theorem expressed by the above identity can be stated as follows: Theorem 2 In every parallelogram. bi + hb. 457) .8. ai − 2 ha.8. the sum of the squares of the four sides equals the sum of the squares of the diagonals. You should notice that the above identity has been already used at the end of point 2 in the solution to exercise 14 of the present section. a − bi = ha. ka + bk2 − ka − bk2 = 4 ha. bi as required. 21 (p. I obtain By subtraction. a + bi + ha − b. bi it is enough to notice that orthogonality of a and b is equivalent to the property for the parallelogram OACB (in the given order around the perimeter. Concerning the geometrical interpretation of the special case of the above identity ka + bk2 = ka − bk2 if and only if ha.15 n. 19 (p. 12.14 n.

8. bi y 2 + 4 kak2 − 9 kbk2 xy . and let M and N be the midpoint of the diagonals AC and DB. wi + 2 hv. 457) Orthogonality of xa + yb and 4ya − 9xb amounts to Since the above must hold for every couple (x. wi We are now in the position to prove the theorem. bi = 0. 22 (p. ui − → v ≡ BC. wi kck2 = kuk2 + kvk2 + 2 hu. vi + 2 hu. thus the condition becomes ¡ ¢ 4 kak2 − 9 kbk2 xy = 0 and choosing now x = y = 1 gives 4 kak2 = 9 kbk2 Since kak is known to be equal to 6. choosing x = 0 and y = 1 gives ha. y).16 n. it follows that kbk is equal to 4. Then c −→ − MN −→ − 2MN ° ° − °− →°2 4 °M N ° − → −→ ≡ AC = u + v d ≡ DB = u + z = − (v + w) 1 1 −→ −→ − = AN − AM = u − d − c 2 2 = 2u+ (v + w) − (u + v) = w + u = kwk2 + kuk2 + 2 hw. starting from left − → −→ in clockwise order. B. bi x2 + 4 ha. wi ° ° − °− →°2 = 4 °MN ° 12. C. 0 = hxa + yb.Exercises 41 Let A. vi − 2 hv. −→ w ≡ CD. and D be the four vertices of the quadrilateral. let − → u ≡ AB. −→ z ≡ DA = − (u + v + w) kzk2 = kuk2 + kvk2 + kwk2 + 2 hu. vi kdk2 = kvk2 + kwk2 + 2 hv. ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡ kuk2 + kvk2 + kwk2 + kzk2 − kck2 + kdk2 = kzk2 − kvk2 − 2 hu. 4ya − 9xbi ¡ ¢ = −9 ha. wi = kuk2 + kwk2 + 2 hu. In order to simplify the notation.

0 . Since the coordinate-free version of the solution procedure is completely independent from the number of coordinates of the vectors involved. 24 (p. in the general context of the linear space Rn (where n ∈ N is arbitrary). 3bi = 22 · 62 + 32 · 42 + 2 · 2 · 3 · 0 = 25 · 32 and hence √ k2a + 3bk = 12 2 12. It follows that the trinomial can be nonnegative for every x ∈ R only if ha.42 Vector algebra Finally.18 n. if it is negative. bi ³ positive. bi is negative for all x in the open is interval − 2ha. I have proved that the conditional (∀x ∈ R. bi = kak2 + x2 kbk2 if a ⊥ b 2 ≥ kak if a ⊥ b (b) Since the norm of any vector is nonnegative. bi ≥ 0 Moreover. 457) This is once again the question raised in exercises 7 and 17. ka + xbk2 ≥ kak2 ∀x ∈ R. only if it reduces to the second degree term x2 kbk2 . ka + xbk2 = kak2 + x2 kbk2 + 2x ha. ka + xbk2 − kak2 ≥ 0 ⇔ ∀x ∈ R. ai d = b− a ha. by pure computation.17 n. ka + xbk ≥ kak) ⇒ ha. bi is zero. is true.bi 0. In conclusion. ka + xbk ≥ kak) ⇔ ∀x ∈ R.8. the full answer to the problem has already been seen to be hb. bi = 0 . ai hb.´the trinomial x2 kbk2 + 2x ha.bi . 457) (a) For every x ∈ R. ai a ha. the trinomial is negative in the open interval 2 ³ ´ kbk 2ha. the following biconditional is true: If ha. ai c = 12. x2 kbk2 + 2x ha. the following biconditional is true: ¡ ¢ (∀x ∈ R. since a and b have been shown to be orthogonal.8. − kbk2 . that is. k2a + 3bk2 = k2ak2 + k3bk2 + 2 h2a. 25 (p.

460) ha. ii = kak kik 7 ha. Angle between vectors in n-space 43 12.− kak 7 7 7 µ ¶ a 6 3 2 − = − .9 Projections. 3 (p.2 n.11. .3 (a) n.− . .11 12. . Angle between vectors in n-space 12. 460) ha. 2 2 2 2 ¶ kbk2 = 4 µ (b) There are just two vectors as required. and its opposite: µ ¶ a 6 3 2 u = = .Projections.11. 9 9 9 ¶ The projection of a along b is 11 b= 9 12. . bi = 10 The projection of a along b is 10 b= 4 12.11. 2 (p. ji 3 c cos a j = = kak kjk 7 ha.10 The unit coordinate vectors 12. ki 2 c cos a i = =− kak kkk 7 c cos a i = . the unit direction vector u of a. 460) µ 5 5 5 5 .1 Exercises n. 1 (p. bi = 11 kbk2 = 9 11 22 22 . kak 7 7 7 6 ha.

460) A ≡ (2.11. more than that. b b C BA. The funny thing is in the numerical data of the exercise: it so happens that 1. that is. −1. − − → → respectively. cos C BA. as implicitly argued above. C in place of the coordinates of vectors BC. AB. −2. and/or angles.44 Vector algebra 12. ri 35 35 41 b cos A = =√ √ = k−qk krk 41 35 41 √ √ hp. The b angles in A. − → OC. C. B. therefore computing D E − − → → OB. OA b ° °° ° an angle of triangle OCA → → °− ° °− ° = cos C OA °OC ° °OA° D E − − → → OA. This amounts to work. OB b ° °° ° an angle of triangle OAB → → °− ° °− ° = cos AOB °OA° °OB ° b b b instead of cos B AC. cos ACB. 1) Then B ≡ (1. −ri 6 6 41 b cos B = =√ √ = kpk k−rk 41 6 41 0 h−p. −4. qi b cos C = = √ √ =0 k−pk kqk 6 35 . AC. OC b ° °° ° an angle of triangle OBC → → °− ° °− ° = cos B OC OB ° °OC ° ° D E − − → → OC. there is nothing funny in doing that. points A. C are coplanar with the origin O. are more precisely described as B AC. 5) C ≡ (3. ACB. OA = BC and OB = AC. being of conceptual type. 3. if one looks only at numerical results. 5 (p. − → − → − → − → 2. as the three angles of triangle ABC.4 Let n. −6) There is some funny occurrence in this exercise. which makes a wrong solution apparently correct (or almost correct). B. more than that. −5) − → q ≡ CA = (−1. OB. one may be led into operate directly with − − − → → → the coordinates of points A. Up to this point. with the vectors OA. −4) − → r ≡ AB = (−1. it’s only a mistake. 1) − → p ≡ BC = (2. If some confusion is made between points and vectors. respectively. and a fairly bad one. B. as a matter of fact. −1. −3. √ √ h−q.

11. as a particular case. 6 (p. and point 3 makes it even a rectangle.5 n. but point 2 makes OACB a parallelogram. AB violet It turns out. OC green. which immediately implies c ac = π 7 c c bc = π − ab = π 8 b b AOB = ACB . therefore. if c = −a. b 3.Exercises 45 Point 1 already singles out a somewhat special situation. OB blue. AOB is a right angle. 12. bi = 0 This is certainly true. that ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° → → → → °− ° °− ° °− ° °− ° °OA° = °BC ° = kpk °OB ° = °AC ° = k−qk = kqk b b C OA = C BA b b B OC = B AC ° ° ° ° → → °− ° °− ° °OC ° = °AB ° = krk and such a special circumstance leads a wrong solution to yield the right numbers. 460) Since ka + c ± bk2 = ka + ck2 + kbk2 ± 2 ha + c. − → − → − → OA red. bi from ka + c + bk = ka + c − bk it is possible to deduce ha + c.

9 π (the second value being superfluous). Indeed. 8 (p. the same conclusion holds.6 n. 10 (p. bi and kck = kak it is easy to check that c cos bc = hb.7 (a) n. 461) ha. from hc. 460) We have r √ n (n + 1) n (n + 1) (2n + 1) n kbn k = ha. even if a + c = 0 is not assumed.11. bn i = kak = 6 2 v u n2 (n+1)2 r n(n+1) u 3 n+1 4 cos [ = √ q 2 a bn = t n2 (n+1)(2n+1) = 2 2n + 1 n n(n+1)(2n+1) 6 6 √ 3 π lim [ = lim cos [ = a bn a bn n→+∞ n→+∞ 2 3 12. ci c =− = − cos ab kbk kck kbk kak c c 8 8 and hence that bc = π ± ac = 7 π. µ cos ϑ − 1 sin ϑ − sin ϑ cos ϑ − 1 ¶µ x y ¶ = µ 0 0 ¶ cos ϑ sin ϑ − sin ϑ cos ϑ ¶µ x y ¶ = µ x y ¶ has the trivial solution as its unique solution if ¯ ¯ cos ϑ − 1 sin ϑ ¯ ¯ − sin ϑ cos ϑ − 1 ¯ ¯ ¯ 6= 0 ¯ .46 Vector algebra Moreover. bi = cos ϑ sin ϑ − cos ϑ sin ϑ = 0 kak2 = kbk2 = cos2 ϑ + sin2 ϑ = 1 (b) The system µ that is. 12.11. ci ha. bi = − ha.

and the same is true for CB (red. which I have taken (without loss of generality) with one vertex in the origin O and with vertex B opposed to O. and every vector in R2 satisfies the required condition. 461) Let OABC be a rhombus. 11 (p. The assumption that OABC is a rhombus is expressed by the equality kak = kck ((rhombus)) . 0). 12. On the other hand. (2k + 1) π)}k∈Z the only vector satisfying the required condition is (0.11. Let − → − → − → a ≡ OA (red) b ≡ OB (green) c ≡ OC (blue) Since OABC is a parallelogram. if ϑ ∈ {2kπ}k∈Z the coefficient matrix of the above system is the identity matrix. dashed) and OB are congruent.8 n. Thus − → AB = b − → CB = a 6= 6= 6= ∈ / 0 0 1 {2kπ}k∈Z From elementary geometry (see exercise 12 of section 4) the intersection point M of the two diagonals OB (green) and AC (violet) is the midpoint of both. dashed) and OA.Exercises 47 The computation gives 1 + cos2 ϑ + sin2 ϑ − 2 cos ϑ 2 (1 − cos ϑ) cos ϑ ϑ Thus if ϑ ∈ {(−2kπ. the oriented segments AB (blue.

b. so that the triangle ABC has side vectors a. 12. since norms are nonnegative real numbers.9 n. 13 (p. The statement to be proved is orthogonality between the diagonals D E − − → → OB.10 n.48 Vector algebra that is. Thus a parallelogram has orthogonal diagonals if and only if it is a rhombus. 12. too: ∀a ∈ Rn . nonnegativity is obvious. and a − b. since in every parallelogram ABCD with a = AB and b = AC the − → diagonal vector CB is equal to a − b. Homogeneity is clear. and strict positivity still relies on the fact that a sum of concordant numbers can only be zero if all the addends are zero. ai = 0 and hence (by commutativity) kck2 = kak2 The last equality is an obvious consequence of ((rhombus)). AC = 0 ha + c. ∀α ∈ R. 461) (a) That the function X Rn → R. X X X kαak = |αai | = |α| |ai | = |α| |ai | = |α| kak i∈n i∈n i∈n .11. c − ai = 0 or kck2 − kak2 + ha. a 7→ |ai | i∈n is positive can be seen by the same arguments used for the ordinary norm. minus their double product multiplied by the cosine of the angle they form. the square of each side is the sum of the squares of the other two sides. As a matter of fact.11. the converse is true. The theorem specializes to Pythagoras’ theorem when a ⊥ b. The equality in exam can be readily interpreted according to the theorem’s − → − → statement. too. 461) The equality to be proved is straightforward. ci − hc. 17 (p. The “law of cosines” is often called Theorem 3 (Carnot) In every triangle.

for n = 2. with sides parallel to the quadrant bisectrices 2 1 -2 -1 0 -1 1 2 -2 (c) The function f : Rn → R. y) ∈ R2 : x + y = 1 + ≡ {(x. but not positive (e. ∀α ∈ R. a 7→ X i∈n |ai | is nonnegative.. y) ∈ R+ × R− : x − y = 1} (red) (green) (violet) (blue) Once the lines whose equations appear in the definitions of the four sets above are drawn. X X X X ka + bk = |ai + bi | ≤ |ai | + |bi | = |ai | + |bi | i∈n i∈n i∈n i∈n = kak + kbk (b) The subset of R2 to be described is © ª S ≡ (x.Exercises 49 Finally. ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯X ¯ ¯ X ¯ ¯X ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ kαak = ¯ αai ¯ = ¯α ai ¯ = |α| ¯ ai ¯ = |α| kak ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ i∈n i∈n i∈n . ∀b ∈ Rn . y) ∈ R− × R+ : −x + ª = 1} y © 2 ≡ (x. f (x. the triangle inequality is much simpler to prove for the present norm (sometimes referred to as “the taxi-cab norm”) than for the euclidean norm: ∀a ∈ Rn . −x) = 0 ∀x ∈ R). it is apparent that S is a square. It is homogeneous: ∀a ∈ Rn . y) ∈ R− : −x − y = 1 ≡ {(x.g. y) ∈ R2 : |x| + |y| = 1 = S++ ∪ S−+ ∪ S−− ∪ S+− where S++ S−+ S−− S+− © ª ≡ (x.

2 2 (c) x + y = 3 and y − x = −5 yield (x. ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯X ¯ ¯X X ¯ ¯X ¯ ¯X ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ka + bk = ¯ (ai + bi )¯ = ¯ ai + bi ¯ ≤ ¯ ai ¯ + ¯ bi ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ i∈n i∈n i∈n i∈n i∈n = kak + kbk 12. f is subadditive. y) = − 1 . y) = (3. y − x) ¢ ¡ (b) x + y = 0 and y − x = 1 yield (x. 6). 467) x (i − j) + y (i + j) = (x + y.50 Vector algebra Finally. y) = (1. −4). 467) I 2x + y = 2 II −x + 2y = −11 III x − y = 7 The solution is (x. −1). y) = (4. too (this is another way of saying that the triangle inequality holds). 12.2 n. I + III 3x = 9 y = −4 II + III III (check) 3 + 4 = 7 . 1 (p. 1 .15 12.15.14 Bases 12. Indeed.13 Linear independence 12. ∀a ∈ Rn . (a) x + y = 1 and y − x = 0 yield (x. 2 2 (d) x + y = 7 and y − x = 5 yield (x.1 Exercises n.12 The linear span of a finite set of vectors 12. 3 (p.1 . y) = ¡1 ¢ .15. ∀b ∈ Rn .

Exercises 51 12. d) has been seen in the lectures (proof of Steinitz’ theorem.6 n. c) and (b. it is enough to require (1 + t)2 − (1 − t)2 6= 0 4t 6= 0 t 6= 0 12. γ) Even if parallelism is defined more broadly − see the footnote in exercise 9 of section 4 − α cannot be zero in the present case. from (a. ∗ . 5 (p. section 8). αa + βb = 0 with α = 0 and β 6= 0 implies b = 0.15. d) must be proportional to (y. y) exists. both (a. αi + βj + γk = (α. then the linear combination 1a − αb is nontrivial and it generates the null vector. but in the present case they are both nonzero. β. Thus β αa = −βb. and hence a = − α b (or b = − α a. β.5 n.3 n. part 1) to be equivalent to non existence of nontrivial solutions to the system ax + cy = 0 bx + dy = 0 The system is linear and homogeneous. 7 (p. 6 (p. −x) (see exercise 10. 8 (p. γ) ∈ R3 . a and b are linearly dependent. if you prefer). 467) By the previous exercise. (b) Since. d) it is immediate to derive ad − bc = 0. 467) Linear independency of the vectors (a. I argue by the principle of counterposition. because both a and b have been assumed different from the null vector.15. and αa + βb = 0 with β = 0 and α 6= 0 implies a = 0). then they are parallel.15. Then. 467) (a) The linear combination 1i + 1j + 1k + (−1) (i + j + k) is nontrivial and spans the null vector. and hence to each other. Let a and b nontrivially generate the null vector: αa + βb = 0 (according to the definition. b) and (c. for every (α. 467) (a) If there exists some α ∈ R ∼ {0} such that∗ a = αb. β 12. since a and b have been assumed both different from the null vector. The converse is immediate. by proving that if a and b are linearly dependent.4 n. and has unknowns and equations in equal number (hence part 2 of the proof of Steinitz’ theorem does not apply). (b) The argument is best formulated by counterposition. indeed. If a nontrivial solution (x.15. at least one between α and β is nonzero. c) = h (b. too 12.

β. k) is linearly independent. consider the system I x+y+z =0 II y + z = 0 III 3z = 0 It is immediate to derive that its unique solution is the trivial one. β + γ) α (i + j + k) + βj + γk = (α. (αi + βj + γk = 0) ⇒ α = β = γ = 0 so that the triple (i. (b) We need to consider the following two systems: I x+y+z =0 II y + z = 1 III 3z = 0 I x+y+z =0 II y + z = 0 III 3z = 1 It is again immediate that the unique solutions to the systems are (−1. j. for every (α. α=β=γ=0 showing that the triple (i. β. k) and (i + j + k. (c) Similarly. α + β.7 n. 1. αi + βj + γ (i + j + k) = (α + γ. β. k). part 1. α + γ) 12. j. i + j + k. 0) and ¢ ¡ 0. 10 (p. γ) and hence from αi + βj + γ (i + j + k) = 0 it follows α+γ =0 β+γ =0 γ =0 that is.52 Vector algebra it is clear that ∀ (α.15. − 1 . γ) ∈ R3 . j. taking into account that αi + β (i + j + k) + γk = (α + β. β + γ. 467) (a) Again from the proof of Steinitz’ theorem. (d) The last argument can be repeated almost verbatim for triples (i. i + j + k) is linearly independent. 3 3 . 1 respectively. γ) ∈ R3 . and hence that the given triple is linearly independent.

c. are given as the solution (s. c). d ≡ a + b + c = (2.→ I x = 5 (d) For an arbitrary triple (a. which has just been seen to be a basis of R4 . 12. x. subtracting the first equation from the second. c. and it is linearly independent (as seen at a). from the fourth. b − 3 . gives y = 0. u. and first equation in that order. −1. 3 . b. x+z−t x+y+z−t x+y+t y + 3t = = = = 0 0 0 0 Then. b. and first equation in that order. v) to the following system: s+u−v s+t+u−v s+t+v t + 3v = = = = 1 2 3 4 .Exercises 53 (c) The system to study is the following: I x+y+z =2 II y + z = −3 III 3z = 5 III z=5 3 (↑) . the system I x+y+z = a II y + z = b III 3z = c ¢ ¡ c c has the (unique) solution a − b. x+z x+y+z x+y y = = = = 0 0 0 0 then y. and hence t. For example.8 n. e}. x. b. and z are in turn seen to be equal to 0.→ II y = − 14 3 (↑) . c) is a linearly independent triple. d) a linearly dependent quadruple. from the fourth. and z are in turn seen to be equal to 0. Thus the given triple spans R3 . 1) (c) Let e ≡ (−1. b. 3). 2. c. t.15. (d) The coordinates of x with respect to {a. (b) Any nontrivial linear combination d of the given vectors makes (a. third. and suppose xa + yb + zc + te = 0. 1. 12 (p. 3. third. e) is linearly independent. b. that is. Thus (a. Thus (a. that is. 467) (a) Let xa + yb + zc = 0.

v) = (1. u.   s t u v x      1 0 1 −1 1     1 1 1 −1 2     1 1 0 1 3  0 1 0 3 4 a1 ↔ a3 . 2 a0 ↔ 3 a0 x 0 4a ← 4 a0 − 3 a0 Thus the system has been given the following form: = = = = 1 3 1 3 which is easily solved from the bottom to the top: (s. 2 a0 ← 2 a0 − 1 a0     1 0 1 −1   0 1 0 0   0 1 1 1 0 1 0 3     1 1 0 −1   0 1 1 1   0 0 1 0 0 0 1 3     1 1 0 −1   0 1 1 1   0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 u+s−v s+t+v t 3v u s t v u s t v u t s v x   1   1   3  4   1   3   1  4 x   1   3   1  3    a2 ↔ a3 . t. and to perform elementary row operations and column exchanges. . 1). 1.54 Vector algebra It is more direct and orderly to work just with the table formed by the system ¡ ¢ (extended) matrix A x . 1.

√ ª ©√ Such a system has nontrivial solutions for t ∈ 2. 1) + γ (0. 0. I deduce that α = γ. 3. γ) = (0. 0 + β 1. 1. 0) + β (1. 13 (p. 0) √ I 2α√ β = 0 + ⇔ II α + √2β + γ = 0 III β + 2γ = 0 √ This time the sum of equations I and III (multiplied by 2) is the same as twice equation II. 0. From I and III. − 2 . 2. 1. 1 + γ 0. 2. t. 1. 0) I tα + β = 0 ⇔ II α + tβ + γ = 0 III β + tγ = 0 It is clear that t = 0 makes the triple linearly dependent (the first and third vector coincide in this case).9 (a) n. Indeed. 0. 0. as already noticed. Let us suppose. −2.Exercises 55 12. 1 + γ 0. (b) √ ¢ ¡√ ¢ ¡ √ ¢ ¡ α 2. and a linear dependence in the equation system suggests that it may √ ¢ ¡√ well have nontrivial solutions. 1. Thus the three given triple of vectors is linearly dependent. the given √ ª © √ triple is linearly dependent for t ∈ 0. 1. 3 = (0. 0) and the three given vectors are linearly independent. t) = (0. Equations II and III then become tβ + 2γ = 0 β + tγ = 0 a 2 by 2 homogeneous system with determinant of coefficient matrix equal to t2 − 2. (c) α (t.15. β. In conclusion. 2 is such a solution. . 1. then. 467) √ ¢ ¡√ ¢ ¡ √ ¢ ¡ α 3. − 2 . t 6= 0. 2. 0 + β 1. 2 = (0. 0) √ 3α√ β = 0 + I ⇔ II α + √3β + γ = 0 III β + 3γ = 0 √ I 3α + β = 0 √ ⇔ 3II − III − I 2β = 0 √ III β + 3γ = 0 ⇔ (α.

Thus (u.15. 12. w. α + β + γz) . b. α (a + b) + β (b + c) + γ (a + c) = 0 ⇔ (α + γ) a + (α + β) b + (β + γ) c = 0 I α+γ =0 α+β =0 ⇔ II III β + γ = 0 I + II − III 2α = 0 ⇔ −I + II + III 2β = 0 I − II + III 2γ = 0 and the triple (a + b. v. α + β + γy. a + c) is linearly dependent. z) is maximal linearly independent. b + c. (b) Notice that 1 (u + z) = e(1) 2 1 (v − w) = e(3) 2 1 (u − v) = e(2) 2 1 (w − z) = e(4) 2 Since (u. (a − b) − (b + c) + (a + c) = 0 it is seen that the triple (a − b. 15 (p. x. z) is maximal linearly independent. a + c) is linearly independent.10 n. b + c. 1) and b ≡ (1. 468) Let a ≡ (0.12 n. 14 (p. v. Thus (u. Since αa + βb + γc = (β + γx. 1. choosing as nontrivial coefficient triple (α. I look for two possible alternative choices of a vector c ≡ (x. b. c) is linearly independent. every linear combination of u and w has the form (x. w. (c) Similarly. v. so that v can be dropped. y. and cannot be equal to z. 12. y). c) is linearly independent. β. 1). 468) (a) Since the triple (a. z) such that the triple (a.11 n. 468) Call as usual u. 1. w.15. 17 (p. it is a basis of R4 . too (b) On the contrary. z) is a maximal linearly independent triple. w. z) spans the four canonical vectors. in the order.56 Vector algebra 12. (a) It is clear that v = u + w. and z the four vectors given in each case. 1). u − v = e(1) w − z = e(3) v − w = e(2) z = e(4) and (u. γ) ≡ (1. y.15. Moreover. −1. v. w.

(1. y. 12. in such a case. and w be the three elements of S (in the given order). (1. I yields β = 0 (independently of the value assigned to x). 0). and let a and b be the two elements of T (still in the given order). w + z. if y = z. is closed with respect to formation of linear combinations. As an example. since the vectors u and v there coincide with the present ones. since each element of lin T is a linear combination in T . and system I-III has infinitely many nontrivial solutions α β γ = −γy − β = −γx free provided either x or y (hence z) is different from zero.Exercises 57 Subtracting equation III from equation II. equations II and III are the same. v. 468) The first example of basis containing the two given vectors is in point (c) of exercise 14 in this section. Let u. and S. 1).14 n. possible choices for c are (0. (0. as any subspace of a vector space. Keeping the same notation. 19 (p. and then either II or III yields α = 0. 18 (p. and z must be such to make the following conditional statement true for each (α. 1. Indeed. a second example is (u. w − z).15. 1).15. 1. 0). β. Conversely. it is then readily checked that a=u−w b = 2w (b) The converse inclusion holds as well. γ) ∈ R3 :   I β + γx = 0   α=0 II α + β + γy = 0 β=0 ⇒   III α + β + γz = 0 γ=0 Thus any choice of c with y 6= z makes γ = 0 a consequence of II-III. 0.13 n. I obtain γ (y − z) = 0 my choice of x. 12. 0. v. v =a−b Thus lin S = lin T 1 w= b 2 1 u=v+w = a− b 2 . 468) (a) It is enough to prove that each element of T belongs to lin S.

by part (a) of last exercise. and hence lin A ⊆ lin B.15 n. 468) (a) The claim has already been proved in the last exercise. Indeed. from A ∩ B ⊆ A and A ∩ B ⊆ B I infer lin A ∩ B ⊆ lin A which yields lin A ∩ B ⊆ lin A ∩ lin B (c) It is enough to define A ≡ {a. β) ∈ R2 such that  α+β =1  I II 2α + 3β = 0  III 3α + 5β = −1 The above system has the unique solution (3. if c and d are the two elements of U . Notice that αc + βd = (α + β. B ⊆ lin A and hence. (b) By the last result.58 Vector algebra Similarly. lin B ⊆ lin lin A = lin A lin A ∩ lin B = lin B On the other hand. u = 2c − d v =d−c It remains to be established whether or not w is an element of lin U . which proves that lin S ⊆ lin U . 3α + 5β) It follows that w is an element of lin U if and only if there exists (α. A∩B =∅ lin A ∩ B = {0} . Inverting the above formulas. c=u+v d = u + 2v which proves that lin U ⊆ lin S. b) is linearly independent. b} B ≡ {a + b} lin A ∩ B ⊆ lin B where the couple (a. since from A ⊆ B I can infer A ⊆ lin B. −2). 20 (p. In conclusion. lin S = lin T = lin U 12. 2α + 3β.15.

17 Exercises .16 The vector space Vn (C) of n-tuples of complex numbers 12.The vector space Vn (C) of n-tuples of complex numbers 59 12.

60 Vector algebra .

which yields x = −4 6= 1. showing that L is horizontal. 477) − → A direction vector for the line L is v ≡ 1 P Q = (−2.1 n.4 Lines and vector-valued functions 13.2 n.3 Some simple properties of straight lines 13. showing that of the three points only (e) belongs to L. Finally. point (c) does not belong to L. 2 (p. 0). 1).2 Lines in n-space 13.5. (d) and (e) have the second coordinate equal to 1.Chapter 13 APPLICATIONS OF VECTOR ALGEBRA TO ANALYTIC GEOMETRY 13.1 Introduction 13. 1 (p. .5 Exercises 13. because y = 2 requires t = 3.5. and (e) belong to L. Points (b). (b). This gives x = −2. 13. The parametric equations 2 for L are x = 2 − 2t y = −1 + t If t = 1 I get point (a) (the origin). 477) − → A direction vector for the line L is P Q = (4. Thus a point belongs to L if and only if its second coordinate is equal to 1. (d). which requires t = 2. Among the given points.

3 n.5. (d). Thus a point belongs to L if and only if its second coordinate is equal to 1.62 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 13. 13. Among the given points. −2. 4 (p. hence the three points do not belong to the same line. 0). (b).5. −2) − → QR = (−1.5 n. and (e) belong to L. 2) The two vectors are not parallel.5. I 2h + 2k + 3l = 0 II −2h + 3k + l = 0 III −6h + 4k + l = 0 I − 2II + III 2l = 0 I + II 5k + 4l = 0 2I − III 10h + 5l = 0 the only combination which is equal to the null vector is the trivial one. showing that L is horizontal. (a) − → P Q = (2. 0.4 n. . 5 (p. (b) Testing affine dependence. 3 (p. The three points do not belong to the same line. 477) I solve each case in a different a way. 477) The parametric equations for L are x = −3 + h y = 1 − 2h z = 1 + 3h The following points belong to L: (c) (h = 1) (d) (h = −1) (e) (h = 5) 13. 477) The parametric equations for L are x = −3 + 4k y = 1+k z = 1 + 6h The following points belong to L: (b) (h = −1) (e) µ 1 h= 2 ¶ (f ) µ 1 h= 3 ¶ − → A direction vector for the line L is P Q = (4.

6 n. we can have a very good hint on the situation by drawing a twodimensional picture. 3) − → −→ pxy AG = (−15. I get k = − 4 from the first equation 3 and k = −1 from the second. R). I check that among the twodimensional projections of the oriented segments connecting A with points D to H − → − → − → pxy AD = (−4. 2) pxy AE = (−1. −7) . 1) pxy AF = (−6. We can concentrate only on the first two coordinates. 477) The question is easy. as a matter of fact. in order to achieve some economy of thought and of computations (there are 8 = 28 2 different oriented segments joining two of the eight given points. 13. to be considered as a picture of the π 15 10 5 -15 -10 -5 0 -5 -10 -15 5 10 15 − → Since the first two components of AB are (4. Q does not belong to L (P. but it must be answered by following some orderly ¡ ¢ path. 8) pxy AH = (12. −2).5. 6 (p.Exercises 63 (c) The line through P and R has equations x = 2 + 3k y = 1 − 2k z = 1 Trying to solve for k with the coordinates of Q. and. First. all the eight points have their third coordinate equal to 1. and hence they belong to the plane π of equation z = 1.

F belongs to LGH .1) . nor D belong to LHE . C belongs to LEG .5.64 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry − → only the first and third are parallel to pxy AB. 7 (p. 477) The coordinates of the intersection point are determined by the following equation system I 1 + h = 2 + 3k II 1 + 2h = 1 + 8k III 1 + 3h = 13k Subtracting the third equation from the sum of the first two. I get k = 1. b) are determined by the vector equation P + ha = Q + kb which gives P − Q = kb − ha that is. namely P 1 ≡ {A. 9) nHE ≡ (7. H} 13. Therefore. 477) (a) The coordinates of the intersection point of L (P . 13. 8 (p. 7) nGH ≡ (5. B. F } belong to the same (black) line LABC . and neither A nor B. and whether or not any elements of P 1 belong to them. (H. H) (blue). and the two lines intersect at the point of coordinates (5. − → P Q ∈ span {a. G} P 3 ≡ {F. and point H to the second. within the set P 1 . hence they intersect it exactly at one point. b} (13. 9. G.5. −5) 2 3 and as normal vectors for them I may take nEG ≡ (4. it only remains to be checked whether or not the lines through the couples of points (E. I end up with their equations as follows LEG : 4x + 7y = 11 LGH : 5x + 9y = 16 LHE : 7x + 13y = 20 All these three lines are definitely not parallel to LABC . The three equations are consistent. Direction vectors for these three lines are 1 −→ 1 − → −→ − pxy HE = (−13. F } P 2 ≡ {C. G) (red). C. B. 7) pxy EG = (−7. (G. Thus there are three (maximal) sets of at least three collinear points. E. C. 13). and hence no two of them can both belong to a different line. 13) By requiring point E to belong to the first and last. substituting this value in any of the three equations. 4) pxy GH = (9. a) and L (Q.7 n. E) (green) coincide. It is seen by direct inspection that. Thus all elements of the set P 1 ≡ {A.8 n. D. D. I get h = 4.

The minimum squared distance is 65 . γ). 9 (p. τ ). 65 as vertex. β. Ai kAk kP − Qk − hP − Q. Then X (t) ≡ P + At = (λ + αt. 477) X (t) = (1 + t. P i + 2 hP − Q. d (t0 )) = −√. 2 − 2t. Ai = 22 − 2 + 20 =0 9 that is. and the 9 9 9 65 minimum distance is 3 . 2a 4a kAk2 kAk2 . ν) and Q ≡ (%. 3 + 2t) (a) d (t) ≡ kQ − X (t)k2 = (2 − t)2 + (1 + 2t)2 + (−2 − 2t)2 = 9t2 + 8t + 9 (b) The graph of ¡ the function t 7→ d (t) ≡ 9t2 + 8t + 9 is a parabola with the ¢ 4 point (t0 .9 n. Ai − .10 n. . µ + βt. . σ. 10 (p. 13.5. its graph is a parabola with vertical axis and vertex in the point of coordinates ! µ ¶ Ã 2 2 2 b ∆ hQ − P.− = . ν + γt) f (t) ≡ kQ − X (t)k2 = kQ − P − Atk2 = kQk2 + kP k2 + kAk2 t − 2 hQ. µ.Exercises 65 13. Ai t = at2 + bt + c where a ≡ kAk2 = α2 + β 2 + γ 2 b ≡ hP − Q. Ai = α (λ − %) + β (µ − σ) + γ (ν − τ ) 2 c ≡ kQk2 + kP k2 − 2 hQ. Q − X (t0 ) = . P i = kP − Qk2 = (λ − %)2 + (µ − σ)2 + (ν − τ )2 The above quadratic polynomial has a second degree term with a positive coefficient. The points of the line L − → through P with direction vector OA are represented in parametric form (the generic point of L is denoted X (t)). the point on L of minimum distance from Q is the orthogonal projection of Q on L. (c) ¶ ¶ µ µ 5 26 19 22 1 10 X (t0 ) = . 477) (a) Let A ≡ (α.− 9 9 9 9 9 9 hQ − X (t0 ) .5. P ≡ (λ.

Ai = 0 kAk2 13. (13. Ai hA. the transformation h 7→ k (h) ≡ h + c identifies the parameter change which allows to shift from the first parametrization to the second. QP is the angle formed by direction vector of the line and the vector carrying the point Q not on L to the point P on L.. Ai − hQ − P. (b) Q − X (t0 ) = Q − (P + At0 ) = (Q − P ) − hQ − X (t0 ) . Q − P = ca and equation (13.2) is satisfied by all couples (h.e. they coincide). i. a) and L (Q.5. or − → P Q ∈ span {a} that is.2) . Ai = hQ − P. 11 (p.11 n. ∃c ∈ R. The two expressions P + ha and Q + ka are seen to provide alternative parametrizations of the same line.66 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry Thus the minimum value of this polynomial is achieved at t0 ≡ and it is equal to kAk2 kP − Qk2 − kAk2 kP − Qk2 cos2 ϑ = kP − Qk2 sin2 ϑ 2 kAk −\ → − → ϑ ≡ OA. k) such that k − h = c (the two lines intersect in infinitely many points.2) has no solution (the two lines are parallel). a) is P + ha = Q + ka It gives P − Q = (h − k) a and there are two cases: either − → P Q ∈ span {a} / and equation (13. Ai α (% − λ) + β (σ − β) + γ (τ − ν) = 2 α2 + β 2 + γ 2 kAk where hQ − P. 477) The vector equation for the coordinates of an intersection point of L (P . Ai A kAk2 hQ − P. For each given point of L.

1 belongs to the 2 2 plane. 2 (p.3) ¡ ¢ (a) Equating (x. 3 in (13. equating (x.8 Exercises 13.8. −1). 1.5.12 n. z) to 4. 482) We have: − → P Q = (2. y. 2.3) we get 2 2s + 2t = 3 2s − 2t = −1 1 3s − t = 2 2s + 2t = 1 2s − 2t = 1 3 3s − t = 2 ¡ ¢ yielding s = 1 and t = 1. 3) − → P R = (2. 2. −2. so that the point with coordinates 4. proceeding in the same way with the triple (−3. ¡ ¢ (b) Similarly. 2. 1 in (13. so that the point with coordinates 2. 12 (p. (c) Again. 0.6 Planes in euclidean n-spaces 13.7 Planes and vector-valued functions 13.1 n. 477) 13.3) we get 2 ¡ ¢ yielding s = 1 and t = 0.Planes in euclidean n-spaces 67 13. 0. y. z) to 2. −1) so that the parametric equations of the plane are x = 1 + 2s + 2t y = 1 + 2s − 2t z = −1 + 3s − t (13. we get 2s + 2t = −4 2s − 2t = 0 3s − t = −2 . 3 belongs to the 2 2 plane.

68 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry yielding s = t = −1. 13. 1. 1. 1. because the system 2s + 2t = −1 2s − 2t = −1 3s − t = 1 is inconsistent (the first two equations yield s = − 1 and t = 0. (e) Finally. 1. −1) belongs to the plane. 0) = (1. 5) does not belong to the plane. 1. 1.8. 2) does not belong to the plane. 0. 3 (p. 2. because the system 2s + 2t = 2 2s − 2t = 0 3s − t = 4 is inconsistent (from the first two equations we get s = t = 1.2 (a) n. contradicting the 2 third equation). (d) The point of coordinates (3. 482) x = 1+t y = 2+s+t z = 1 + 4t (b) u = (1. 1) v = (1. 1) − (0. contradicting the third equation). the point of coordinates (0. 4) − (0. 4) x = s+t y = 1+s z = s + 4t . so that the point with coordinates (−3. 0) = (1. 0.

then pP + qQ + rR = P − (1 − p) P + qQ + rR = P + (q + r) P + qQ + rR = P + q (Q − P ) + r (R − P ) and the coordinates of pP + qQ + rR satisfy the parametric equations of the plane M through P . 2) + t (−2.. 1. 2. 2.4 n. 0) + s (1. 4. 4. 5 (p.4) and (2.4): P ≡ (1. (a) If p + q + r = 1. 0) does not belong to the plane M . Q. 482) This exercise is a replica of material already presented in class and inserted in the notes.Exercises 69 13. with the third point I get I s − 2t + 1 = 2 II s + 4t + 2 = −3 III 2s + t = −3 I + II − III 2III − I − II check on I check on II check on III t+3=2 2s − 3 = −5 −1 + 2 + 1 = 2 −1 − 4 + 2 = −3 −2 − 1 = −3 (13. 0) a = (1. −3. and R. −3) belongs to M .8. (b) The answer has already been given by writing equation (13.3 n. 0. (b) If S is a point of M. there exist real numbers q and r such that S = P + q (Q − P ) + r (R − P ) Then. 482) (a) Solving for s and t with the coordinates of the first point. 1.8. defining p ≡ 1 − (q + r). 1) 13. 4 (p. 2) b = (−2. The second point is directly seen to belong to M from the parametric equations (1. S = (1 − q − r) P + qQ + rR = pP + qQ + rR . I get I s − 2t + 1 = 0 II s + 4t + 2 = 0 III 2s + t = 0 I + II − III t + 3 = 0 2III − I − II 2s − 3 = 0 3 check on I − 6 + 1 6= 0 2 and (0. 1) Finally.

c.5 n. d) of the cartesian equation of π 2 as unknown. better. in 4 · III). 6 (p. b.70 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 13. and I require that the three given points belong to π 2 . 4z = 4 + x + y − z − 4 − 3x + 3y + 3z − 6 I obtain a cartesian equation for π 1 x − 2y + z + 3 = 0 (b) I consider the four coefficients (a. 482) I use three different methods for the three cases. (a) The parametric equations for the first plane π 1 are I x = 2 + 3h − k II y = 3 + 2h − 2k III z = 1 + h − 3k Eliminating the parameter h (I − II − III) I get 4k = x − y − z + 2 Eliminating the parameter k (I + II − III) I get 4h = x + y − z − 4 Substituting in III (or. I obtain the system 2a + 3b + c + d = 0 −2a − b − 3c + d = 0 4a + 3b − c + d = 0 which I solve by elimination  µ 0 1 2 0  2 3 1 1  −2 −1 −3 1  4 3 −1 1 2a ← ( 2a + 1a ) 0 0 3a ← 3a − 2 1a 0 0 0 ¶   2 3 1 1  0 1 −1 1  0 −3 −3 −1   2 3 1 1  0 1 −1 1  0 0 −3 1 ¡ 3a ← 1 ( 3 a0 + 3 1 a0 ) 2 ¢ .8.

0. they have the same normal direction. −5. from the second (which reads b − c + d = 0) I get b = −2. 2) Thus π 3 coincides with π2 . 1) = (2. −1. however. Any two vectors which are orthogonal to the normal n = (3. 0). and from the first (which is unchanged) I get a = 1. I have thought it better to show its application here already.Exercises 71 From the last equation (which reads −3c + d = 0) I assign values 1 and 3 to c and d. The cartesian equation of π 2 is x − 2y + z + 3 = 0 (notice that π 1 and π 2 coincide) (c) This method requires the vector product (called cross product by Apostol ). 1. respectively. and I obtain P = (1. 7 (p. −4. 482) (a) Only the first two points belong to the given plane. 0. which is presented in the subsequent section. Such a normal is n = (2. At any rate (just to show how the method applies in general). 0) .8. Thus I assign values arbitrarily to d2 and d3 in the orthogonality condition 3d1 − 5d2 + d3 = 0 say. 3. 1) (I may have as well taken one of the first two points of part a). 3) The parametric equations for M are x = 1 − s + 5t y = −1 + 3t z = 1 + 3s dII = (5. 3. (b) I assign the values −1 and 1 to y and z in the cartesian equation of the plane M . (0. The plane π3 and the given plane being parallel. a cartesian equation for π 3 is x − 2y + z + d = 0 and the coefficient d is determined by the requirement that π 3 contains (2. in order to obtain the third coordinate of a point of M . since it has the same normal and has a common point with it. 3) and (3. and I get dI = (−1.6 n. −2) × (1. 1) and form a linearly independent couple can be chosen as direction vectors for M . 1) 2−6+1+d =0 yielding x − 2y + z + 3 = 0 13.

This may easily lead to an incorrect attempt two solve the problem by setting up a system of three equations in the two unknown s and t. This is already enough to get the first point from the parametric equation of M 0 . 482) (a) A normal vector for M is n = (1. 8 (p. 9 (p. respectively. t) = − 5 . which is apparent (though incomplete) from the righthand side of (13.5).).5) I take all the variables on the lefthand side. −4) . just to check on the computations. Thus Q = (−14. 2. I do get indeed (−14.7 n.8. − 2 . 3.. On the contrary. Another handy solution to¡the equation corresponding¡ the last to ¢ ¢ row of the final elimination table is (h. which leads to t = 11 from the second row.8 n. and the constant terms on the righthand one. 17). k) = − 2 . thereby suggesting the wrong answer that M and M 0 are parallel. 5 5 5 5 5 ¡ 2 1¢ and the check by means of (s.8.. 2. 17). the equation system for the coordinates of points in M ∩ M 0 has four unknowns: I 1 + 2s − t = 2 + h + 3k II 1 − s = 3 + 2h + 2k III 1 + 3s + 2t = 1 + 3h + k (13. | 2 | 5 | 16 µ 0 0 0 3r ← 3r + 2 2r 0 0 1r ↔ 2r ¶ A handy solution to the last equation (which reads −19h − 21k = 16) is obtained by assigning values 8 and −8 to h and k. which is a trace of the parametric equations of M . and I proceed by elimination: s t h k 2 −1 −1 −3 −1 0 −2 −2 3 2 −3 −1  ← 1 r0 + 2 2 r0  3 r0 ← 3 r0 + 3 2 r0  0 0 1r ↔ 2r  1r 0 | const. because the parametric equations of the two planes M and M 0 are written using the same names for the two parameters. 3) × (3.72 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 13. 3. 8. 7 . This gives R = 2 .5). 1) = (−4. −1 0 −2 −2 | 2 0 −1 −5 −7 | 5 0 2 −9 −7 | 6 s t h k −1 0 −2 −2 0 −1 −5 −7 0 0 −19 −21 | const. − 5 is all right. However. 13. I proceed to finish up the elimination. Substituting in the lefthand side of (13. 482) The question is formulated in a slightly insidious way (perhaps Tom did it on purpose. which is likely to have no solutions. − 3 . and to s = −2 from the first. | 1 | 2 | 0 s t h k | const.

4 .g. 483) The parametric equations for the line L are x = 1 + 2r y = 1−r z = 1 + 3r and the parametric equations for the plane M are x = 1 + 2s y = 1+s+t z = −2 + 3s + t The coordinates of a point of intersection between L and M must satisfy the system of equations 2r − 2s = 0 r+s+t = 0 3r − 3s − t = −3 The first equation yields r = s. − 3 4 2 13. 10 (p. the coefficient d is seen to be equal to 3. e. 0 and R = 0. . 1). namely. The coordinates of the points of the intersection line L ≡ M ∩ M 00 satisfy the system ½ x − 2y + z + 3 = 0 x + 2y + z = 0 By sum and subtraction. Coordinate of points on L are now easy to produce. Since the latter is parallel to the former. and the coordinates of the point P ∈ M do not satisfy the equation of M 0 . 3 .Exercises 73 whereas the coefficient vector in the equation of M 0 is (1. ¡ ¡ 3 3 the ¢ Q = − 2 .9 n. the line L can be represented by the simpler system ½ 2x + 2z = −3 4y = 3 as the intersection of two different planes π and π 0 . 2 . with π parallel to the y-axis. 3 r . − 2 . the two planes are parallel. −2. the point of coordinates −2. 2 ¡ = s5= −7 ¢ Thus L ∩ M consists of a single point. (b) A cartesian equation for M is x − 2y + z + d = 0 From substitution of the coordinates of P ..8. from which the third and second equation give t = 3. and π 0 parallel to ¢ xz-plane.

1. this yields y = −3 in the last two equations. Alternatively. 4. −2). −1) − (1. Thus I consider the system 4 3 2x + y = 2 4 x + y = −1 3x + y = 3 shows that {v. 5. a. (1. L is not parallel to π b . −1. The system to be studied now is 2x + y = 2 4x + 3y = −1 4x + y = 3 where subtraction of the second equation from the third gives 2x = 4. 1. −2) and P R = (2. e. b as columns ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 2 2 3 ¯ ¯ 4 0 −5 ¯ ¯ 5 ¯ 4 ¯ 4 ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ −1 1 1 ¯ = ¯ −1 1 1 ¯ = ¯ 4 − 4 ¯ = − 1 ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 6 −2 ¯ 2 ¯ 3 3 1 ¯ ¯ 6 0 −2 ¯ and the three equations are again inconsistent. −1. 2) − − → (1. it suffices to check orthogonality between v and (1. 3) .10 n.. hence x = 2. 2. 483) The parametric equations for L are x = 1 + 2t y = 1−t z = 1 + 3t and a direction vector for L is v = (2. 1. it is seen that L is not parallel to πa . 1. 11 (p. computing the determinant of the matrix having v. 3) and 3 .g. contradicting the first. 2 (c) Since a normal vector to π c has for components the coefficients of the unknowns in the equation of π c . these two values contradicting all equations. b} is a linearly independent set. P Q = (3. because subtraction of the third equation from the second gives y = −2.74 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 13.8. − → (b) By computing two independent directions for the plane π b . a. 3) (a) L is parallel to the given plane (which I am going to denote π a ) if v is a linear ¡ ¢ combination of (2. 3): h(2. I am reduced to the previous case. With either reasoning. 1 . . 3)i = 9 6= 0 L is not parallel to π c . 2. whereas subtraction of the first from the third yields x = 1 .

.g. 2. A plane containing L and the point P ≡ (xP . by defining q≡p r≡0 it is immediately seen that condition (13. 483) Let R be any point of the given plane π. (1.Exercises 75 13. yP . yQ . 13. 483) Let d be a direction vector for the line L. 1. 14 (p. π is the only plane containing L and P . obtaining x−y+1 =0 13. 2. other than P or Q. Since any two distinct points on L and P determine a unique plane. there exists a real number p such that S = P + p (Q − P ) Then. the parametric equations for M are x = 1+r+s y = 2+r+s z = 3 + r + 2s It is possible to eliminate the two parameters at once.6) If S belongs to the line through P and Q.8. and let Q ≡ (xQ . 3). zQ ) be a point of L. t = 1. and (2. M contains the points having coordinates equal to (1. by subtracting the first equaiton from the second. e. A point S then belongs to M if and only if there exists real numbers q and r such that S = P + q (Q − P ) + r (R − P ) (13.11 n. 5). . 483) Since every point of L belongs to M .8. zP ) is the plane π through Q with − → direction vectors d and QP x = xQ + hd1 + k (xP − xQ ) y = yQ + hd2 + k (yP − yQ ) z = zQ + hd3 + k (zP − zQ ) L belongs to π because the parametric equation of π reduces to that of L when k is assigned value 0. Choosing. 13 (p. 1) for each t ∈ R.12 n. 3. and P belongs to π because the coordinates of P are obtained from the parametric equation of π when h is assigned value 0 and k is assigned value 1.13 n. 12 (p. 3) + t (1.6) is satisfied.8.

(b) B × C = 4i − 5j + 3k. (e) (A × B) × C = 8i + 3j − 7k. 10) ° 1 °− → ° → − ° 15 area ABC = °AB × AC ° = 2 2 − → − → AB × AC = (3. 1 (p. 26 √ 18 j 2054 √ 18 j 2054 + √7 k 2054 A×B or − kA×Bk = 1 √ i 6 √ 41 i 2054 − √ 7 k. (c) C × A = 4i − 4j + 2k.3 (a) n.10 The cross product expressed as a determinant 13. 2054 2 √ j 6 − 1 √ k 6 A×B or − kA×Bk = + 2 √ j 6 + 1 √ k. (d) A × (C × A) = 8i + 10j + 4k. 487) − → − → AB × AC = (2. 2 (p. 487) A×B (a) kA×Bk = − √4 i + √3 j + 26 26 (b) (c) A×B kA×Bk A×B kA×Bk 41 = − √2054 i − 1 = − √6 i − √1 k 26 A×B or − kA×Bk = √4 i 26 − √3 j 26 − + √1 k. 0) = (3. −1.76 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 13. −5. 6 13.11. 13. (i) (A × B) × (A × C) = −2i + 4k. −3) × (3. 3 (p. −2.11. 487) (a) A × B = −2i + 3j − k. 9. 15) √ ° 1 °− → ° → − ° 3 35 area ABC = °AB × AC ° = 2 2 (b) .11 Exercises 13. 3) × (3. −6. (g) (A × C) × B = −2i − 8j − 12k. 2. (h) (A + B) × (A − C) = 2i − 2j.11. (f) A × (B × C) = 10i + 11j + 5k.9 The cross product 13.2 n.1 n. −2) = (10.

ci < 0 kbk c cos bc = − <0 kck i i c ∈ π. (b × a) − bi = hb. 5 (p. ci = hb. (b × a)i + hb. bi = 0 13. n) and b ≡ (p. −1) ° √3 1 °− → ° → − ° area ABC = °AB × AC ° = 2 2 n. b) is linearly independent and kb × ak > 0. bc = −π is impossible. 6 (p. 1. (b) hb. b + ci = ha.π bc 2 c .6 (a) n.Exercises 77 (c) − → − → AB × AC = (0. and kck = 5.5 n. 487) Let a ≡ (l. m. 4 (p. r) for the sake of notational simplicity. 487) ha. Then ka × bk2 = (mr − nq)2 + (np − lr)2 + (lq − mp)2 = m2 r2 + n2 q 2 − 2mnrq + n2 p2 + l2 r2 −2lnpr + l2 q 2 + m2 p2 − 2lmpq ¡2 ¢¡ ¢ kak2 kbk2 = l + m2 + n2 p2 + q2 + r2 = l2 p2 + l2 q 2 + l2 r2 + m2 p2 + m2 q 2 +m2 r2 + n2 p2 + n2 q 2 + n2 r2 ¢ ¡ (ka × bk = kak kbk) ⇔ ka × bk2 = kak2 kbk2 ⇔ (lp + mq + nr)2 = 0 ⇔ ha. kck2 = 22 + 12 . Thus hb. 1. 1) × (1. 1) = (1. 0. Moreover.11. 487) 13.11. .11. b × ai = 0 because b × a is orthogonal to a. −bi = − kbk2 because b × a is orthogonal to b. √ (c) By the formula above.4 − → − → CA × AB = (−i + 2j − 3k) × (2j + k) = 8i − j − 2k 13. q. because \ kck2 = kb × ak2 + kbk2 − 2 kb × ak kbk cos (b × a) b = kb × ak2 + kbk2 > kbk2 since (a.

by Lagrange’s identity (theorem 13. bi2 = 1 so that a × b is a unit vector as well.78 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 13.f) ka × bk2 = kak2 kbk2 − ha.11.7 n. k(a × b) × bk2 = ka × bk2 kbk2 − ha × b. 488) (a) Since kak = kbk = 1 and ha. Both the righthand rule and the lefthand rule yield now (a × b) × a = b (d)  (a3 b1 − a1 b3 ) a3 − (a1 b2 − a2 b1 ) a2 (a × b) × a =  (a1 b2 − a2 b1 ) a1 − (a2 b3 − a3 b2 ) a3  (a2 b3 − a3 b2 ) a2 − (a3 b1 − a1 b3 ) a1  2  (a2 + a2 ) b1 − a1 (a3 b3 + a2 b2 ) 3 =  (a2 + a2 ) b2 − a2 (a1 b1 + a3 b3 )  1 3 (a2 + a2 ) b3 − a3 (a1 b1 + a2 b2 ) 1 2  (a2 + a2 ) b1 + a1 (a1 b1 ) 2 3 (a × b) × a =  (a2 + a2 ) b2 + a2 (a2 b2 )  1 3 (a2 + a2 ) b3 + a3 (a3 b3 ) 1 2  b1 (a × b) × a =  b2  b3    (a × b) × b = −a Since a and b are orthogonal.d-e). (a × b)×b is either equal to a or to −a.12. The proof that (a × b) × b = −a is identical. ai2 = 1 (c) And again. The three vectors a. .12. (b) By Lagrange’s identity again. kck2 = ka × bk2 kak2 − ha × b. Since a is a unit vector. bi = 0. bi2 = 1 k(a × b) × ak2 = kck2 = 1 Since the direction which is orthogonal to (a × b) and to b is spanned by a. b. 7 (p. Similarly. a × b are mutually orthogonal either by assumption or by the properties of the vector product (theorem 13. (a × b) × a is either equal to b or to −b.

and ha. 488) c (a) Let ϑ ≡ ab. either there exists some h ∈ R such that a = hb. −1) The solution to this exercise given by Apostol at page 645 is wrong. suppose that a 6= 0. the conditions a × b = c and ha. in a×c c×a which case it has to be equal to kak2 or to kak2 . 13. bi = h kbk2 or ha. the hypotheses a 6= 0. In the first case.→ I check on IV check on III that is. the unique solution is 9p = 9 2 − 2r = 4 −2q + 1 = 3 2+1−2 =1 1−2 =1 b = (1. either h kbk = 0 or k kak = 0. Then either ha.11. Then both the projection ha. 488) (a) From a × b = 0. 9 (p. or there exists some k ∈ R such that b = ka. either h = 0 (which means a = 0).− 9 9 9 the vector b must be orthogonal to c. r) be the coordinates of b.Exercises 79 13. bi = 1 are: I II III IV −2q − r = 3 2p − 2r = 4 p + 2q = −1 2p − q + 2r = 1 Standard manipulations yield 2II + 2IV + III (↑) . In particular. b can be taken orthogonal to a as well. q. bi = k kak2 . and observe that a and c are orthogonal. b − ci = 0 imply that b − c = 0.→ II (↑) . and its norm must depend on ϑ according to the relation kck kbk = (13. in order to satisfy the condition a×b= c kck Thus kak ≤ kbk < +∞. Thus two solutions to the problem are µ ¶ 7 8 11 ± . which can only happen if b = 0.7) kak |sin ϑ| (b) Let (p.9 n. or kbk = 0 (which is equivalent to b = 0).8 n. either k = 0 (which means b = 0). kak (b) From the previous point. In the second case.bi a of b along a and the projecting vector kak2 (of length kb×ak ) are null.− .11. or kak = 0 (which is equivalent to a = 0). From a×b = kak kbk |sin ϑ|. 8 (p. a × (b − c) = 0. −1. Geometrically. that is. .

by skew-simmetry of the vector product. (a × c) × a = c Therefore. α=− Thus the unique solution to the problem is b ≡ a × c− 13. 488) − → u ≡ AB = (−2. 488) Replacing b with c in the first result of exercise7.9) We are bound to look for other solutions to (13.80 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 13. −1) Each side of the triangle ABC can be one of the two diagonals of the parallelogram to be determined. 1.8) is © ª x ∈ R3 : ∃α ∈ R. 1. it is seen that the c × a is a solution to the equation a×x=c (13. 0) − → v ≡ BC = (3.9). Thus the set of all solutions to equation (13. ha.8).11.10 n. c × a is orthogonal to a. −2. 1) − → w ≡ CA = (−1. x = a × c + αa From condition (13.11 (a) Let n. xi = 1 a × (x − z) = a × x − a × z = c − c = 0 which implies that x − z is parallel to a. 11 (p.11. a kak2 1 kak2 (13. and hence it does not meet the additional requirement ha. If x and z both solve (13. a × c + αai = 1 that is.8) However. 10 (p. .8).

In this case D = A + u − w = “B + C − A” = (0. 0. −2. −2. where BE = BC + BA = v − u. −1) √ 6 area (ABC) = 2 .¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ −1 1 ¯ = (−1.Exercises 81 − → − → − → If one of the diagonals is BC. In this case F = A − v + w = “A + B − C” = (−2. the other is CF . 2) − → − → − → If one of the diagonals is AB. 2. 2) − → − → − → If one of the diagonals is CA. the other is AD. − ¯ −2 0 ¯ ¯ −1 −1 ¯ ¯ ¯¶ ¯ ¯ −2 1 ¯ ¯. where AD = AB + AC = u − w. 0) (b) µ¯ ¯ 1 0 ¯ u×w = ¯ 1 −1 √ 6= ku × wk = ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ . In this case E = B + v − u = “A + C − B” = (4. the other is BE. where CF = CA + CB = −v + w.

since otherwise x y (a × b) = − (a + b) − (a − b) z z x+y y−x a+ b = − z z would belong to lin {a. then the triple (a + b. x+y =0 and x−y =0 (13.13 n. a × b) is linearly independent. Fourth. ci = 2 hb.11. if the couple (a.11. b}. Third. Secondly. b}). suppose that x (a + b) + y (a − b) + z (a × b) = 0 Then z cannot be different from zero. 488) b + c = 2 (a × b) − 2b ha. b). in particular.10) kck2 = 4 ka × bk2 − 12 ha × b. Thus z = 0. because it is orthogonal to a and b. since the only vector / which is orthogonal to itself is the null vector. b + ci = −2 ha. too. and (13.b}. (a × b) ∈ lin {a. 488) (a) It is true that. ci c cos bc = = kbk kck 2 .10) becomes x (a + b) + y (a − b) = 0 which is equivalent to (x + y) a+ (x − y) b = 0 By linear independence of (a. 12 (p. because (a. in the first place a and b are nonnull. b) is linearly independent. too. bi 1 c cos ab = = kak kbk 2 2 2 2 c ka × bk = kak kbk sin2 ab = 12 13. (a × b) is nonnull. (a × b) is orthogonal to both a + b and a − b (as well as to any vector in lin {a. 13 (p. Indeed. a × bi − 3 kbk2 = 48 √ 3 hb. bi + 9 kbk2 = 192 √ kck = 8 3 hb. bi = −4 ha. b) is linearly independent.12 n. since every n-tuple having the null vector among its components is linearly dependent. a − b.82 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 13.

b) is so. In such a case. too. then A and C coincide and it is clear that the line through them and B contains all the three points. (b) It is true that. b. y + z must be null. then the triple (a + b. b) is linearly independent. (a + b) × (a − b)) is linearly independent. Indeed. let (x. and this in turn implies that both x + y and x + z are also null. y. arguing as in the fourth part of the previous point. yielding y− − → → AB = − AC x . The system x+y = 0 x+z = 0 y+z = 0 has the trivial solution as the only solution.Exercises 83 and hence x = y = 0. then the triple (a. if AC is null. (c) It is true that. a + a × b. b) is linearly independent. too. if AC is nonnull. then in the nontrivial null combination − → − → xAB + y AC = 0 x must be nonnull. b + a × b) is linearly independent. if the couple (a. 488) → − → − (a) The cross product AB × AC equals the null vector if and only if the couple ³ ´ − − → → − → AB.14 n. 14 (p. b. (a + b) × (a − b) = a × a − a × b + b × a − b × b = −2a × b and the triple (a. z) be such that x (a + b) + y (a + a × b) + z (b + a × b) = 0 which is equivalent to (x + y) a + (x + z) b + (y + z) a × b = 0 Since.11. − → Otherwise. 13. AC is linearly dependent. Indeed. if the couple (a. a × b) is linearly independent when the couple (a.

p × b} is a basis of R3 . ¯ π¯ ¯ ¯ |h| kpk = kp × bk kbk ¯sin ¯ = kpk 2 and h ∈ {1. p × bi + hb. p is orthogonal to b. b. (c) Since p is orthogonal both to p × b (definition of vector product) and to b (point a).11). and P belong to the same line. h = −1. pi = 0 that is. −1}. taking into account (13. 488) (a) From the assumption (p × b) + p = a. ai = kpk2 = 1 2 1 2 p × (p × b) + p × p = p × a kp × ak = kpk2 kbk = . (b) Since p. b. ai hp. the set n o − → − → P : AP × BP = 0 is the set of all points P such that A. This gives kp × bk = kpk kbk = kpk and hence √ (13. and p×b are pairwise orthogonal. and (p × b. pi = hb. p × bi + hp. hb. pi = hp.84 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry that is. there exists some h ∈ R such that (p × b) × b = hp Thus. b) define the same orientation. (d) Still from the assumption (p × b) + p = a. kpk = 22 . the set of all points P belonging to the line through A and B.11. p) defines the opposite one.15 n. p. (p. 13. y− → B = A − AC x which means that B belongs to the line through A and C.11) 1 = kak2 = kp × bk2 + kpk2 = 2 kpk2 that is. 15 (p. (b) By the previous point. p × b) and (p × b. Since the triples (p. b. hp. that is. B. p × b) is linearly independent. b. b. ai hb. and {p.

the decomposition of p obtained in (13.The scalar triple product 85 Thus 1 1 p= a+ q 2 2 (13. I have finally obtained 1 1 p = a − (b × a) 2 2 13.12) where q = 2p − a is a vector in the plane π generated by p and a.15 Normal vectors to planes 13. It follows 4 that k = −1.13 Cramer’s rule for solving systems of three linear equations 13. π . so that q is discordant with b × a. there exists some k ∈ R such that q = k (b × a) Now c kqk2 = 4 kpk2 + kak2 − 4 kpk kak cos pa √ √ 2 2 = 2+1−4 =1 2 2 kqk = 1 |k| = 1 If on the plane orthogonal to b the mapping u 7→ b × u rotates counterclockwise.14 Exercises 13. the vectors a = p + b × p. respectively.12) requires that the angle formed with p by q is − π . Since a normal vector to π is b.16 Linear cartesian equations for planes .12 The scalar triple product 13. and 3π . On the other hand. b × p. which is orthogonal to a. and b × a form angles of π . 4 2 4 with p.

(x. 3)i 13.17.− . y. 496) µ ¶ µ ¶ 7 0. 2 or 7x − 2y + 2z = 9 or 7x − 2y + 2z = 0 n = knk (b) The three intersection points are: X-axis : (−7. y. 9 9 9 . (1. 2.1 n. 0) Y -axis : µ 1 2 2 . 0. − . 0. 496) (a) Out of the inifnitely many vectors satisfying the requirement. z) = − .17.2 (a) n. . 1 (p. y. 2 (p.− 3 3 3 7 0.86 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 13. z)i = 0 (c) hn. 0 2 ¶ Z-axis : (c) The distance from the origin is 7 . . (x.17 Exercises 13. 3 (d) Intersecting with π the line through the origin which is directed by the normal to π   x=h   y = 2h   z = −2h  x + 2y − 2z + 7 = 0 yields h + 4h + 4h + 7 = 0 7 h = − µ9 ¶ 7 14 14 (x. z)i = hn. a distinguished one is n ≡ (2i + 3j − 4k) × (j + k) = 7i − 2j + 2k (b) hn.

4 (p. and 9 6 ° ° 19 √ °−→° 19 kn4 k = 6 °CD° = 18 18 Alternatively. 496) A cartesian equation for the plane which passes through the point P ≡ (1. rewriting the equation of π 4 with normal vector n2 3x − 6y + 3z = 21 |d2 − d4 | 19 =√ kn2 k 54 dist (π. respectively.Exercises 87 13. π 1 and π3 are orthogonal because hn1 . which can be determined by the equations 3tC − 6 (−2tC ) + 3tC = 2 tD − 2 (−2tD ) + tD = 7 −→ ¡ 7 1 ¢ Thus tC = 1 . 2. 3 (p.3 n.17. tD = 7 . n3 i = 0. 496) π1 π2 π3 π4 : : : : x + 2y − 2z = 5 3x − 6y + 3z = 2 2x + y + 2z = −1 x − 2y + z = 7 (a) π 2 and π 4 are parallel because n2 = 3n4 . π 0 ) = .17. −3) and is parallel to the plane of equation 3x − y + 2z = 4 is 3 (x − 1) − (y − 2) + 2 (z + 3) = 0 or 3x − y + 2z + 5 = 0 The distance between the two planes is √ |4 − (−5)| 9 14 √ = 14 9+1+4 13. (b) The straight line through the origin having direction vector n4 has equations x = t y = −2t z = t and intersects π 2 and π 4 at points C and D.4 n. CD = 6 − 9 n4 .

88 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 13. 3) × (0. R ≡ (3. Q ≡ (3. −1.17. R ≡ (−1. −4) = (4. −8) (b) A cartesian equation for π is x + 2y − 2z = 5 (c) The distance of π from the origin is 5 . 12) − (1. 3). −4.17. 496) (a) A normal vector for the plane π through the points P ≡ (1. 2. −4. 9 (p. 9) A cartesian equation for the plane is (x − 2) + 2 (y − 3) + 9 (z + 7) = 0 or x + 2y + 9z = 55 13. 496) A direction vector for the line is just the normal vector of the plane. −7) and a cartesian equation for it is 10x − 3y − 7z + 17 = 0 13. 1. 2. 2.17.17. 496) Proceeding as in points (a) and (b) of the previous exercise. 2). 3) = (1. 4).5 n. 3. 3 13. 8 (p.6 n. 8. −2) is − → − → n ≡ P Q × QR = (2.8 n. 6 (p.7 n. −3. 1. −1). 496) A normal vector to the plane is given by any direction vector for the given line n ≡ (2. 7. Thus the parametric equations are x = 2 + 4h y = 1 − 3h z = −3 + h . Q ≡ (2. 5 (p. 2. 3. 4. 6) = (10. a normal vector for the plane through the points P ≡ (1. −2) is − → − → n ≡ P Q × RQ = (1. 1) × (3.

2) (c) The hitting instant is determined by substituting the coordinates of the moving point into the equation of the given plane π 2 (1 − t) + 3 (2 − 3t) + 2 (−1 + 2t) + 1 = 0 −7t + 7 = 0 yielding t = 1. 2 · (−2) + 3 · (−7) + 2 · 5 + d = 0 d = 15 A cartesian equation for the plane π 0 which is parallel to π and contains (−2. the moving point has coordinates (−2. Thus −1 · −1 − 3 · −4 + 2 · 3 + d = 0 d = −19 A cartesian equation for π 00 is (x + 1) + 3 (y + 4) − 2 (z − 3) = 0 or x + 3y − 2z + 19 = 0 . A normal vector for the plane π 00 which is orthogonal to L and contains (−1. 5) is 2x + 3y + 2z + 15 = 0 (e) At time t = 2. 496) (a) The position of the point at time t can be written as follows: x= 1−t y = 2 − 3t z = −1 + 2t which are just the parametric equations of a line.Exercises 89 13. 3). 10 (p. the moving point has coordinates (−1. 5). −4. Substituting. −4. −7. 1). −1.9 n. Hence the hitting point is (0. −3. 3) is −d.17. (b) The direction vector of the line L is d = (−1. −7. (d) At time t = 3.

1 knk 2 13.11 n.17. √3 the required vector is − 122 122 122 . 496) A normal vector for the plane π which is parallel to both vectors i + j and j + k is n ≡ (i + j) × (j + k) = i − j + k Since the intercept of π with the X-axis is (2. 0. 14 (p. z) = 3 . the other values ´ easily obtained: (l. 8 . 11 (p.10 From n. a cartesian equation for π is x−y+z = 2 13. 15 (p.90 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 13.17. m) = − 7 .13 n. 496) First I find a vector of arbitrary norm which satisfies the given conditions: l + 2m − 3n = 0 l − m + 5n = 0 13. 496) I work directly on the coefficient matrix for the equation system: 3 1 1 | 5 3 1 5 | 7 1 −1 3 | 3 With obvious manipulations 0 4 −8 | −4 0 0 4 | 2 1 −1 3 | 3 ¡ ¢ I obtain a unique solution (x.17.12 n. 496) c π ni = 3 c π nj = 4 π c nk = 3 we get A cartesian equation for the plane in consideration is √ (x − 1) + 2 (y − 1) + (z − 1) = 0 or x+ √ √ 2y + z = 2 + 2 n 1³ √ ´ = 1. 1 . 2.17. 0). 13 (p. 0. y. 2 2 ¡ ¢ Assigning value 1 to n. Then are 3 3 ³ √7 . √8 .

2. 3. 4) × (1.18 The conic sections 13.The conic sections 91 13. which have as normal vectors n1 ≡ (1.14 n. 2. parametric eqautions for ` are the following: x=1+t y = 2 − 2t z =3+t 13.17. 497) A cartesian equation for the plane under consideration is 2x − y + 2z + d = 0 The condition of equal distance from the point P ≡ (3. 4).21 Exercises .17. 497) If the line ` under consideration is parallel to the two given planes. −2. 2.15 n. a direction vector for ` is d ≡ (2. −1) yields |6 − 2 − 2 + 4| |6 − 2 − 2 + d| = 3 3 that is. 1) Since ` goes through the point P ≡ (1. 3. 17 (p.20 Polar equations for conic sections 13. 2. 3) = (1.19 Eccentricity of conic sections 13. 3). 3) and n2 ≡ (2. |2 + d| = 6 The two solutions of the above equation are d1 = 4 (corresponding to the plane already given) and d2 = −8. 20 (p. Thus the required equation is 2x − y + 2z = 8 13.

92 Applications of vector algebra to analytic geometry 13.24 Exercises 13.25 Miscellaneous exercises on conic sections .23 Cartesian equations for the conic sections 13.22 Conic sections symmetric about the origin 13.

Chapter 14 CALCULUS OF VECTOR-VALUED FUNCTIONS .

94 Calculus of vector-valued functions .

5. Q.4 Elementary consequences of the axioms 15. and S be any four real polynomials.1 Introduction 15.5 Exercises 15. −1) respectively. β) = (0.Chapter 15 LINEAR SPACES 15. β) = (0. From this the other two existence axioms (of the zero element and of negatives) also follow as particular cases. Indeed. as the quotient of the constant polynomials P : x 7→ 0 . 0) and for (α. Of course it can also be seen directly that the identically null function x 7→ 0 is a rational function. 555) The set of all real rational functions is a real linear space. and let f : x 7→ P (x) Q (x) g : x 7→ R (x) S (x) Then for every two real numbers α and β αf + βg : x 7→ αP (x) S (x) + βQ (x) R (x) Q (x) S (x) is a well defined real rational function.2 The definition of a linear space 15. 1 (p. This shows that the set in question is closed with respect to the two linear space operations of function sum and function multiplication by a scalar. R.3 Examples of linear spaces 15. for (α.1 n. let P .

The remaining linear space axioms are immediately seen to hold. 555) The set of all real valued functions which are defined on a fixed domain containing 0 and 1. 15.5. Again.4 n. 2 (p. of a type which has become usual at this point.2 n. Indeed. taking into account exercise 1.5. A final remark concerning the other axioms. Similarly. Indeed. 15. and which have the same value at 0 and 1. the two existence axioms follow as particular cases. allows to conclude.96 Linear spaces and Q : x 7→ 1. (αf + βg) (0) = αf (0) + βg (0) = αf (1) + βg (1) = (αf + βg) (1) so that the closure axioms hold. taking into account the general properties of the operations of function sum and function multiplication by a scalar 15. 555) The set of all real rational functions having numerator of degree not exceeding the degree of the denominator is a real linear space. 4 (p. It may be also noticed that the degree of both polynomials P and Q occurring in the representation of the identically null function as a rational function is zero. it only needs to be proved that if deg P ≤ deg Q and deg R ≤ deg S. is a real linear space.3 n. and which achieve at 0 the double value they achieve at 1 is a real linear space. (αf + βg) (0) = αf (0) + βg (0) = α2f (1) + β2g (1) = 2 (αf + βg) (1) so that the closure axioms hold. 555) The set of all real valued functions which are defined on a fixed domain containing 0 and 1. then deg [αP S + βQR] ≤ deg QS This is clear. for every two real numbers α and β. and using the same notation. for every two real numbers α and β.5. . that the other linear space axioms hold is a straightforward consequence of the general properties of the operations of function sum and function multiplication by a scalar. and it is anyway clear that the identically null function x 7→ 0 achieves the same value at 0 and 1. deg QR} deg P S = deg P deg S ≤ deg Q deg S deg QR = deg Q deg R ≤ deg Q deg S so that the closure axioms hold. since for every two real numbers α and β deg [αP S + βQR] ≤ max {deg P S. 3 (p. Indeed.

(Js )s∈n are the partitions of (0. and some n-tuple (δ s )s∈{0}∪n of real numbers∗ . . some increasing (m + 1)-tuple (σ r )r∈{0}∪m of elements of [0. τ s ] Then. so that for some nonnegative integers m and n. and which have value at 1 which exceeds the value at 0 by 1. 1] with σ 0 = 0 and σ m = 1. σ] ≡ {σ}. however. let f and g be any two such functions.5 n. that the set in question is an affine subspace of the real linear space).5. The other failing axioms are: existence of the zero element (the identically null function has the same value at 0 and at 1). 555) The set of all real valued functions which are defined on a fixed domain containing 0 and 1. σ r ] Js ≡ (τ s−1 . is not a real linear space.5. 6 (p. 555) The set of all real valued step functions which are defined on [0. (τ s )s∈{0}∪n Ir ≡ (σ r−1 . and existence of negatives f (1) = 1 + f (0) ⇒ (−f) (1) = −1 + (−f) (0) 6= 1 + (−f ) (0) 15. 1]. some (m + 1)-tuple (γ r )r∈{0}∪m of real numbers. f ≡ γ 0 χ{0} + X γ r χIr g ≡ δ 0 χ{0} + X s∈n δ s χJs r∈m where for each subset C of [0.s)∈m×n I am using here the following slight abuse of notation for degenerate intervals: (σ. some increasing (n + 1)-tuple (τ s )s∈{0}∪n of elements of [0.6 n. 1] is a real linear space. for any two real numbers α and β. Then (αf + βg) (1) = αf (1) + βg (1) = α [1 + f (0)] + β [1 + g (0)] = α + β + αf (0) + βg (0) = α + β + (αf + βg) (0) 6= 1 + (αf + βg) (0) and the two closure axioms fail to hold (the above shows. This is necessary in order to allow for “point steps”. χC is the characteristic function of C ¿ 1 if x ∈ C χC ≡ x 7→ 0 if x ∈ C / and (Ir )r∈m. αf + βg = (αγ 0 + βδ 0 ) χ{0} + ∗ (r ∈ m) (s ∈ n) X (αγ r + βδ s ) χKrs (r. Indeed. let α and β be any two real numbers such that α + β 6= 1. 5 (p.Exercises 97 15. 1] associated to (σ r )r∈{0}∪m . Indeed. 1] with τ 0 = 0 and τ m = 1.

7 γ 0 = γ 1 = 0). 11 (p. x 7→ 0 indeed converges to 0 at +∞ (and. and a final. The axiom of existence of negatives fails.98 Linear spaces where (Krs )(r. 555) The set of all real valued functions which are defined and integrable on [0. with the integral over [0. It may also be noticed independently that the identically null function [0. 15. 15. is a real linear space. The second closure axiom does not hold. because the sum of two increasing functions is an increasing function too. 555) The set of all real valued functions which are defined on R and convergent to 0 at +∞ is a real linear space. and that the opposite of a step function is a step function too. because the function αf is decreasing if f is increasing and α is a negative real number. x→+∞ lim (αf + βg) (x) = α lim f (x) + β lim g (x) x→+∞ x→+∞ = 0 so that the closure axioms hold. 13 (p. with just one step (m = 1. σr−1 = τ s−1 and ασr + βτ s = ασr−1 + βτ s−1 . The first closure axiom holds. 1]. depending on whether monotonicity is meant in the weak or in the strict sense. 1] equal to zero. Indeed. Z 1 Z 1 Z 1 (αf + βg) (x) dx = α f (x) dx + β g (x) dx = 0 0 0 0 Some potential steps may “collapse” if. for every two such functions f and g. as in the previous examples.s)∈m×n is the “meet” partition of (Ir )r∈m and (Js )s∈n Krs ≡ Ir ∩ Js ( (r. at any x0 ∈ R∪{−∞}). and for any two real numbers α and β. 1] 7→ R. x 7→ 0 is indeed a step function. 555) The set of all real valued and increasing functions of a real variable is not a real linear space. however. 7 (p. 15. the set of all real valued and (weakly) increasing functions of a real variable is a convex cone. in the former case. too. s) ∈ m × n) which shows that αf + βg is a step function too. It may be noticed independently that the identically null function [0.9 n. 1]. since the identically null function is weakly increasing (and. s) ∈ m × n. for that matter. and any two real numbers α and β.5. Indeed. † . All the other linear space axioms hold.5. with no more† than m + n steps on [0. as every constant function) but not strictly increasing. The axiom of existence of the zero element holds or fails. Final remark concerning the other linear space axioms. usual remark concenrning the other linear space axioms applies. weakly decreasing too.7 n. for any two such functions f and g. with the same number of steps. Thus the closure axioms hold.8 n. Thus.5. by classical theorems in the theory of limits. 1] → R. for some (r. for that matter.

. : x 7→ n!p0 x + (n − 1)!p1 : x 7→ n!p0 P 0 (0) = pn−1 P 00 (0) = 2pn−2 . if one takes the standard formula as a definition Taylorn (f ) at 0 ≡ x 7→ here are the computations. P (n−i)! : x 7→ n−j (n−i−j)! pi xn−j−i i=0 . 1]. as a real function of a real variable). . and any two nonnegative real numbers α and β. 16 (p. Let P : x 7→ Then P0 P 00 . . . P (j) . The set of all real Taylor polynomials of degree less than or equal to n (including the zero polynomial) is a real linear space.10 n. At any rate. with nonnegative integral over [0. For any two such functions f and g. If the center is taken to be 0. P (n−1) P (n) P : x 7→ n−1 (n − i) pi xn−1−i Pi=0 : x 7→ n−2 (n − i) (n − (i + 1)) pi xn−2−i i=0 . 555) The set of all real valued functions which are defined and integrable on [0.Exercises 99 15. . Z 1 (αf + βg) (x) dx = α R1 0 0 Z 1 f (x) dx + β 0 Z 1 0 g (x) dx ≥ 0 0 It is clear that if α < 0 and axioms 2 and 6 fail to hold. since it coincides with the set of all real polynomials of degree less than or equal to n. P (n−1) (0) = (n − 1)!p1 P (n) (0) = n!p0 n X i=0 n X f (j) (0) j=0 R1 (αf ) (x) dx < 0. . which is already known to be a real linear space. the issue is really easy: every polynomial is the Taylor polynomial centered at 0 of itself (considered. (αf ) (x) dx > 0. . is a convex cone. if one thinks at the motivation for the definition of Taylor polynomials: best n-degree polynomial approximation of a given function. . This is immediate. . . as it is. so that j! xj pi xn−i . . The discussion of the above statement is a bit complicated by the fact that nothing is said concerning the point where our Taylor polynomials are to be centered. but not a linear space.5. 555) First solution. then 15.11 n. P (j) (0) = j!pn−j . 1]. .5. 14 (p.

100

Linear spaces

and hence
n X P (j) (0) j=0

j!

xj =

On the other hand, if the Taylor polynomials are meant to be centered at some x0 6= 0 Taylorn (f ) at x0 ≡ x 7→
n X f (j) (x0 ) j=0

n X j!pn−j j=0

j!

xj =

n X i=0

pi xn−i = P (x)

j!

(x − x0 )j

it must be shown by more lengthy arguments that for each polynomial P the following holds: n n X P (j) (x0 ) X (x − x0 )j = pi xn−i j! j=0 i=0 Second solution. The set of all real Taylor polynomials (centered at x0 ∈ R) of degree less than or equal to n (including the zero polynomial) is a real linear space. Indeed, let P and Q be any two such polynomials; that is, let f and g be two real functions of a real variable which are m and n times differentiable in x0 , and let P ≡ Taylorm (f ) at x0 , Q ≡ Taylorn (g) at x0 , that is, P : x 7→
m X f (i) (x0 ) i=0

i!

(x − x0 )

i

Q : x 7→

Suppose first that m = n. Then for any two real numbers α and β · (k) ¸¾ m X ½ · f (k) (x0 ) ¸ g (x0 ) +β (x − x0 )k αP + βQ = α k! k!
k=0 m X (αf + βg)(k) (x0 ) = (x − x0 )k k! k=0

n X g (j) (x0 ) j=0

j!

(x − x0 )j

= Taylorm (αf + βg) at x0
n X αf (k) (x0 ) + βg (k) (x0 ) k=0

Second, suppose (without loss of generality) that m > n. In this case, however, αP + βQ = k!
m X αf (k) (x0 ) (x − x0 ) + (x − x0 )k k! k k=n+1

a polynomial which can be legitimately considered the Taylor polynomial of degree n at x0 of the function αf + βg only if all the derivatives of g of order from n + 1 to m are null at x0 . This is certainly true if g itself a polynomial of degree n. In fact, this is true only in such a case, as it can be seen by repeated integration. It is hence necessary, in addition, to state and prove the result asserting that each Taylor polynomial of any degree and centered at any x0 ∈ R can be seen as the Taylor polynomial of itself.

Exercises

101

15.5.12 n. 17 (p. 555) The set S of all solutions of a linear second-order homogeneous differential equation where P and Q are given everywhere continuous real functions of a real variable, and (a, b) is some open interval to be determined together with the solution, is a real linear space. First of all, it must be noticed that S is nonempty, and that its elements are indeed real functions which are everywhere defined (that is, with (a, b) = R), due to the main existence and solution continuation theorems in the theory of differential equations. Second, the operator where RR is the set of all the real functions of a real variable, and D2 is the subset of RR of all the functions having a second derivative which is everywhere defined, is linear: ∀y ∈ D2 , ∀z ∈ D2 , ∀α ∈ R, ∀β ∈ R, L (αy + βz) = (αy + βz)00 + P (αy + βz)0 + Q (αy + βz) = α (y 00 + P y 0 + Qy) + β (z 00 + P z 0 + Qz) = αL (y) + βL (z) Third, D2 is a real linear space, since ∀y ∈ D2 , ∀z ∈ D2 , ∀α ∈ R, ∀β ∈ R, αy + βz ∈ D2 L : D2 → RR , y 7→ y 00 + P y 0 + Qy ∀x ∈ (a, b) , y 00 (x) + P (x) y 0 (x) + Q (x) y (x) = 0

by standard theorems on the derivative of a linear combination of differentiable functions, and the usual remark concerning the other linear space axioms. Finally, S = ker L is a linear subspace of D2 , by the following standard argument: and the usual remark. 15.5.13 n. 18 (p. 555) The set of all bounded real sequences is a real linear space. Indeed, for every two real sequences x ≡ (xn )n∈N and y ≡ (yn )n∈N and every two real numbers α and β, if x and y are bounded, so that for some positive numbers ε and η and for every n ∈ N the following holds: then the sequence αx + βy is also bounded, since for every n ∈ N Thus the closure axioms hold, and the usual remark concerning the other linear space axioms applies. |αxn + βyn | ≤ |α| |xn | + |β| |yn | < |α| ε + |β| η |xn | < ε |yn | < η L (y) = 0 ∧ L (z) = 0 ⇒ L (αy + βz) = αL (y) + βL (z) = 0

102

Linear spaces

15.5.14 n. 19 (p. 555) The set of all convergent real sequences is a real linear space. Indeed, for every two real sequences x ≡ (xn)n∈N and y ≡ (yn )n∈N and every two real numbers α and β, if x and y are convergent to x and y respectively, then the sequence αx + βy converges to αx + βy. Thus the closure axioms hold. Usual remark concerning the other linear space axioms. 15.5.15 n. 22 (p. 555) The set U of all elements of R3 with their third component equal to 0 is a real linear space. Indeed, by linear combination the third component remains equal to 0; U is the kernel of the linear function R3 → R, (x, y, z) 7→ z.

15.5.16 n. 23 (p. 555) The set W of all elements of R3 with their second or third component equal to 0 is not a linear subspace of R3 . For example, (0, 1, 0) and (0, 0, 1) are in the set, but their sum (0, 1, 1) is not. The second closure axiom and the existence of negatives axiom fail too. The other axioms hold. W is not even an affine subspace, nor it is convex; however, it is a cone. 15.5.17 n. 24 (p. 555) The set π of all elements of R3 with their second component which is equal to the third multiplied by 5 is a real linear space, being the kernel of the linear function R3 → R, (x, y, z) 7→ 5x − y.

15.5.18 n. 25 (p. 555) The set ` of all elements (x, y, z) of R3 such that 3x + 4y = 1 and z = 0 (the line through the point P ≡ (−1, 1, 0) with direction vector v ≡ (4, −3, 0)) is an affine subspace of R3 , hence a convex set, but not a linear subspace of R3 , hence not a linear space itself. Indeed, for any two triples (x, y, z) and (u, v, w) of R3 , and any two real numbers α and β  3x + 4y = 1   ½  z=0 3 (αx + βu) + 4 (αy + βv) = α + β ⇒ 3u + 4v = 1  z+w =0   w=0 Thus both closure axioms fail for `. Both existence axioms also fail, since neither the null triple, nor the opposite of any triple in `, belong to `. The associative and distributive laws have a defective status too, since they make sense in ` only under quite restrictive assumptions on the elements of R3 or the real numbers appearing in them.

15.5.19 n. 26 (p. 555) The set r of all elements (x, y, z) of R3 which are scalar multiples of (1, 2, 3) (the line through the origin having (1, 2, 3) as direction vector) is a real linear space. For any

y.7 Dependent and independent sets in a linear space 15. the linear combination α (h. (0.5.20 n. its dimension is 2. 555) The subset of Rn of all the linear combinations of two given vectors a and b is a vector subspace of Rn . 0) + z (0. 560) The set S1 of all elements of R3 with their first coordinate equal to 0 is a linear subspace of R3 (see exercise 5. A standard basis for it is {(0. 1)}. 2h. 1.6 Subspaces of a linear space 15. z)0 and hence a real linear space. S1 is the coordinate Y Z-plane. 1 (p. 3k) of r. 27 (p. 15. and that for every real numbers y and z (0. y.1 Exercises n. 2h. 15. It is immediate to check that every linear combination of linear combinations of a and b is again a linear combination of a and b. z) = y (0. 2k. z) 7→ A (x. 0. 1. y. 3) belongs to r. namely span {a. 2k. 3h) + β (k. 3h) and (k.8 Bases and dimension 15.5. It is clear that the two vectors are linearly independent. (x. (x. y. z) 7→ (2x − y. 2.9 15. 0) . 15. r is the kernel of the linear function R3 → R2 .21 n. y. 555) The set of solutions of the linear homogenous system of equations A (x.9. b}. 28 (p.Subspaces of a linear space 103 two elements (h.22 above). 0. and for any two real numbers α and β. 3k) = (αh + βk) (1. z)0 = 0 is the kernel of the linear function R3 → R. 3x − z). 1) .

z) = x (1. (0.9. −1. A basis for it is {(1. 0) + z (0. −1. 1)). 1)}. 1) 15. 0) and (1. 1) both belong to S6 . 0) . 1) 15. 1. 4 (p. y.6 n. It is clear that the two vectors are linearly independent. 5 (p. its dimension is 2. y. 0) both belong to S7 . 1. and that for every three real numbers x. 0) and (1.9. 1. 0.9.5 n. For example. 0.7 n. −1. 1)). its dimension is 1. 6 (p. z) = x (1. and that for every three real numbers x. 0) + z (0.104 Linear spaces 15. (1. 560) The set S7 of all elements of R3 with the first and second coordinates having identical square is not a linear subspace of R3 (S7 is the union of the two planes containing the Z-axis and one of the bisectrices of the odd and even-numbered quadrants of the XY -plane).9. 15. −1. A basis for it is {(1. 1.9. 7 (p. A basis for it is {(1. 560) The set S4 of all elements of R3 with the first two coordinates equal is a linear subspace of R3 (S4 is the plane containing the Z-axis and the bisectrix of the odd-numbered quadrants of the XY -plane). y and z such that x = y (x. 560) The set S5 of all elements of R3 with all the coordinates equal is a linear subspace of R3 (S5 is the line through the origin and direction vector d ≡ (1. y and z such that x + y + z = 0 (x. (1. 1. but their sum . −1. 560) The set S6 of all elements of R3 with the first coordinate equal either to the second or to the third is not a linear subspace of R3 (S6 is the union of the plane S4 of exercise 4 and the plane containing the Y -axis and the bisectrix of the odd-numbered quadrants of the XZ-plane). 1.4 n. its dimension is 2. its dimension is 2. It is clear that the two vectors are linearly independent. −1. and that for every three real numbers x. but their sum (2. 0. 2 (p. 560) The set S2 of all elements of R3 with the first and second coordinate summing up to 0 is a linear subspace of R3 (S2 is the plane containing the Z-axis and the bisectrix of the even-numbered quadrants of the XY -plane). (0. 1)}. z) = x (1. 0) + z (0. y and z such that x + y = 0 (x.2 n. 1. 1)}. A basis for it is {d}. 3 (p. For example.9. (0. 1) 15. 15. 0) . 1) does not. 0) . 0. It is clear that the two vectors are linearly independent. 560) The set S3 of all elements of R3 with the coordinates summing up to 0 is a linear subspace of R3 (S3 is the plane through the origin and normal vector n ≡ (1. −1.3 n. 0. y.

z) of R3 such that x+y+z = 0 x−y−z = 0 is a line containing the origin. 0)) For example. It follows that dim S11 = n. 10 (p. 9 (p. every polynomial belonging to S11 is a linear combination of B. and hence a linear space.9. y. −1)}. 0) . α (1. w) ∈ R3 . However. S7 is not an affine subspace of R3 . and it is even closed with respect to the external product (multiplication by arbitrary real numbers). y. if and only if all its coefficients are null. . S8 is an affine subspace of R3 . ∀ (u. 8 (p. 0. 0. by the general principle of polynomial identity (which is more or less explicitly proved in example 6. 0) or their semisum (1. a subspace of R3 of dimension 1. z) is any element of S10 . If (x. and taking value 0 at 0 is a linear subspace of the set of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n. since ∀ (x. p. 560) The set S8 of all elements of R3 with the first and second coordinates summing up to 1 is not a linear subspace of R3 (S8 is the vertical plane containing the line through the points P ≡ (1.555. y. 560) The set S10 of all elements (x. 0) do not belong to S8 . v. 0) and Q ≡ (0.9. then (x. If P is any polynomial of degree not exceeding n. z) = y (0. 1. A basis for S11 is ª © B ≡ t 7→ th h∈n Indeed. z) ∈ R3 . 1. ∀α ∈ R (x + y = 1) ∧ (u + v = 1) ⇒ [(1 − α) x + αu] + [(1 − α) y + αv] = 1 15.9. 1. It is clear that any linear combination of polynomials in S11 takes value 0 at 0.11 n.8 n. 560) The set S11 of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n. 15. 15. Moreover. −1) 15. for every α 6= 1. and α (0.558).1) h∈n then P belongs to S11 if and only if p0 = 0. 0. X P : t 7→ p0 + ph th (15. 0) do not. 1.Exercises 105 (2. 11 (p.9 n. S7 is a cone. 0. a linear combination of B is the null polynomial. A base for it is {(0. y. p. and it is not even convex.9. 560) See exercise 26.10 n.

13 n. (t 7→ 1) . and any two real numbers α and β. 560) The set S12 of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n. A polynomial P as in (15. 15. if α is the n-tuple of coefficients of a linear combination R of B. (αP + βQ)0 (0) = αP 0 (0) + βQ0 (0) = α · 0 + β · 0 = 0 A polynomial P as in (15. (t 7→ t) That B is a basis can be seen as in the exercise 11.12 n. is a linear subspace of the set of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n.14 n. 14 (p. (αP + βQ) (0) + (αP + βQ)0 (1) = αP (0) + βQ (0) + αP 0 (0) + βQ0 (0) = α [P (0) + P 0 (0)] + β [Q (0) + Q0 (0)] = α·0+β·0 A basis for S14 is n o ¡ ¢ h+1 B ≡ t 7→ 1 − t. This is proved exactly as in the previous exercise (just replace 0 with 00 ).106 Linear spaces 15. t 7→ t h∈n−1 Indeed.1) belongs to S12 if and only if p1 = 0. 560) The set S13 of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n. then X R : t 7→ α1 − α1 t + αh+1 th+1 h∈n−1 . A basis for S is n¡ o ¢ h+1 B ≡ t 7→ t . Thus dim S12 = n. is a linear subspace of the set of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n. 12 (p. Indeed. 13 (p. with first derivative taking value at 0 which is the opposite of the polynomial value at 0. (t 7→ 1) h∈n−1 That B is a basis can be seen as in the previous exercise.9.9. with second derivative taking value 0 at 0.9. 15.1) belongs to S13 if and only if p2 = 0. A basis for S is n¡ o ¢ B ≡ t 7→ th+2 h∈n−2 . Thus dim S13 = n. 560) The set S14 of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n. for any two suach polynomials P and Q. A polynomial P as in (15. is a linear subspace of the set of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n. and α and β are any two real numbers.1) belongs to S14 if and only if p0 + p1 = 0. If P and Q are any two polynomials in S. with first derivative taking value 0 at 0.

555. 15. 560) The set S15 of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n. 560) The set S16 of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n.15 n. if and only if X h∈n 2h ph = 0 . It follows that B is a basis of S14 . and taking the same value at 0 and at 2 is a linear subspace of the set of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n. p. the n-tuple α of coefficients of any linear combination of B spanning the null vector must satisfy the conditions α1 = 0 αh+1 = 0 (h ∈ n − 1) that is. 15. 15 (p.9.9. and hence that dim S = n. 16 (p. If P is any polynomial such that p0 + p1 = 0. since by the position α1 = p0 = −p1 αh+1 = ph+1 (h ∈ n − 1) the linear combination of B with α as n-tuple of coefficients is equal to P .16 n. This can be seen exactly as in exercise 3. This can be seen exactly as in exercise 3. A polynomial P belongs to S15 if and only if X p0 = p0 + ph h∈n that is.Exercises 107 By the general principle of polynomial identity. the combination must be the trivial one. t 7→ (1 − t) th h∈n−1 that is. p. A polynomial P belongs to S16 if and only if X p0 = p0 + 2h ph h∈n n o ¡ ¢ B ≡ (t 7→ 1) . and hence a linear space. and hence a linear space. if and only if X h∈n ph = 0 A basis for S15 is and the dimension of S15 is n. and taking the same value at 0 and at 1 is a linear subspace of the set of all polynomials of degree not exceeding n. P belongs to span B.555.

(1. (0. (c) If S = lin S.17 n. 0)} L (S) = L (T ) = R2 L (S ∩ T ) = {(x. it follows that S = lin S. 1)}. (g) Let V ≡ R2 . 560) f g h 0 : : : : R → R. 0) . 560) (b) It has alredy been shown in the notes that \ lin S ≡ W W subspace of V S⊆W = ( v : ∃n ∈ N. then by point c above lin S = S and lin T = T . since S ⊆ lin S always. v. (e) If S and T are subspaces of V . S ≡ {(1. T ≡ {(1. if S is a subspace of V . Then S ∩ T = {(1. and hence lin S ⊆ S. and it contains S. R → R. 0) . t 7→ (2 − t) th h∈n−1 and the dimension of S16 is n. w) ∈ R3 be such that uf + vg + wh = 0 . then of course S is a subspace of V because lin S is so.18 (a) Let n. R → R. S ∩ T is a subspace of V . ∃a ≡ (αi )i∈n ∈ F n . x 7→ 1 x 7→ eax x 7→ ebx x 7→ 0 and let (u.9. then T contains lin S. 1)}.108 Linear spaces A basis for S16 is n o ¡ ¢ B ≡ (t 7→ 1) . v = X i∈n αi ui ) hence if T is a subspace.9. R → R. Conversely. y) : y = 0} 15. and hence S ∩ T = lin S ∩ lin T Since the intersection of any family of subspaces is a subspace. ∃u ≡ (ui )i∈n ∈ V n . 15. then S is one among the subspaces appearing in the definition of lin S. 23 (p. 22 (p.

let (u. 0) be such that uf + vg is the null function. It immediately follows from the above lemma (and from the assumption a 6= b) that if either a = 0 or b = 0. let Im f ≡ {yf } and Im g ≡ {yg }. 0) or (u. we have u+v+w = 0 u + ea v + eb w = 0 u + e2a v + e2b w = 0 The determinant of the ¯ ¯ 1 1 ¯ ¯ 1 ea ¯ ¯ 1 e2a coefficient matrix of the above system is ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 1 ¯ 1 ¯ 1 1 ¯ ¯ ¯ eb ¯ = ¯ 0 ea − 1 eb − 1 ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 0 e2a − 1 e2b − 1 ¯ e2b ¯ ¡ ¢£ ¤ = (ea − 1) eb − 1 eb + 1 − (ea + 1) ¡ ¢¡ ¢ = (ea − 1) eb − 1 eb − ea (15. for x = 0. at most one of the two numbers can be equal to zero. h) is linearly independent. g) is linearly dependent if and only if g is constant. too. This yields v=0⇒u=0 and hence v 6= 0. −1. It is convenient to state and prove the following (very) simple Lemma 4 Let X be a set containing at least two distinct elements. v. h) is linearly dependent (it suffices to take (u.2) has only the trivial solution. h} = 2. h} = 3. if b = 0. then h = f . uyf + vg (x) = 0 Since f is nonnull. −1). similarly. w) ≡ (1. and let f : X → R be a nonnull constant function. 0. Conversely. If a = 0. If none of them is null. if (f. g. too. g. g. For any function g : X → R. Proof. Then the function yg f − yf g is the null function. (b) The two functions f : x 7→ eax g : x 7→ xeax . and dim lin {f. respectively). system (15. the triple (f. g) is linearly dependent. g. the couple (f. then g = f . If g is constant. Thus if either a or b is null then (f.2) Since by assumption a 6= b. then dim lin {f. x = 1. Thus ∀x ∈ X. w) ≡ (1. g (x) = − yf v and g is constant. v. v) ∈ R2 ∼ (0. yf 6= 0. and x = 2.Exercises 109 In particular. Then u ∀x ∈ X.

if a = 0 then f = g and h = IdR . Thus dim lin {f. g.3) are linearly independent. sin (γ + x) = 0 . h) is linearly independent. w) ∈ R3 be such that uf + vg + wh = 0 where f : x 7→ 1 g : x 7→ eax h : x 7→ xeax In particular. so that dim lin {f. √ α 2 sin x + √ β 2 cos x = 0 2 2 α +β α +β m ∀x ∈ R. since [∀x ∈ R. α sin x + β cos x = 0 m ∀x ∈ R. (α + βx) = 0] ⇔ α=β=0 Notice that the argument holds even in the case a = 0. g} = 2. h} = 2. (α + βx) eax = 0] ⇔ [∀x ∈ R. 0. and dim lin {f. let (u. v. On the other hand. for every two real numbers α and β which are not both null. The triple (f. αex + βxeax = 0] ⇔ [∀x ∈ R. 0). and x = −1. ∀x ∈ R. x = 1. Indeed. (f) The two functions f : x 7→ sin x g : x 7→ cos x (15. h} = 3. w) = (0. for x = 0. v. we have u+v+w = 0 u + ea v + ea w = 0 u + e−a v − e−a w = 0 a homogeneous system of equations whose coefficient matrix has determinant ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 1 1 ¯ 1 ¯ 1 ¯ 1 1 ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ a a a a ¯ 1 e e ¯ = ¯ 0 e −1 e −1 ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 1 e−a −e−a ¯ ¯ 0 e−a − 1 −e−a − 1 ¯ ¡ ¢ = − (ea − 1) e−a + 1 + e−a − 1 = 2e−a (1 − ea ) Thus if a 6= 0 the above determinant is different from zero.110 Linear spaces are linearly independent. yielding (u. (c) Arguing as in point a. g. g.

7 (h) From the trigonometric addition formulas ∀x ∈ R cos 2x = cos2 x − sin2 x = 1 − 2 sin2 x Let then f : x 7→ 1 g : x 7→ cos x The triple (f. h) is linearly dependent. Thus dim lin {x 7→ sin x. dim lin {f.10 Inner products. 15. Norms 111 where α α2 + β 2 γ ≡ sign β arccos p since the sin function is not identically null. since g : x 7→ sin2 x f − g + 2h = 0 By the lemma discussed at point a.11 Orthogonality in a euclidean space .Inner products. Euclidean spaces. h} = 2. g. the last condition cannot hold. x → cos x} = 2. Euclidean spaces. g. Norms 15.

12. 9 (p.12. 567) (a) Let for each n ∈ N In ≡ Then Z +∞ −t Z +∞ e−t tn dt 0 I0 = = x→+∞ = 1 e dt = lim e−t dt x→+∞ 0 0 ¯ −t ¯x lim −e 0 = lim − e−x + 1 x→+∞ Z x .2 n.112 Linear spaces 15.12 15.1 Exercises n. 567) hu1 . u3 i = hu3 . u1 i = ku1 k2 = ku2 k2 = ku3 k2 = 1 cos u2 u3 = q q = [ 2 2 8 3 3 ¯1 t2 ¯ 1 1 t dt = ¯ = − = 0 ¯ 2 −1 2 2 −1 ¯1 µ ¶ Z 1 t3 ¯ 2 ¯ = 1 − −1 = 2 t + t dt = 0 + ¯ 3 −1 3 3 3 −1 Z 1 1 + t dt = t|1 + 0 = 1 − (−1) = 2 −1 −1 Z 1 √ 1 dt = 2 ku1 k = 2 −1 r Z 1 2 2 ku2 k = t2 dt = 3 3 −1 r Z 1 2 8 1 + 2t + t2 dt = 2 + ku3 k = 3 3 −1 Z 1 2 3 π u2 u3 = [ 3 √ 2 3 cos u1 u3 = √ q = [ 2 2 8 3 π u1 u3 = [ 6 15. u2 i = hu2 . 11 (p.

Thus   f g = α0 β 0 + k∈m+n X  X   αi β j  tk   i∈m. In+1 = e t dt = lim e−t tn+1 dt x→+∞ 0 0 ½ ¾ Z x ¯ −t n+1 ¯x −t n = lim −e t + (n + 1) e t dt 0 x→+∞ 0 ½Z x ¾ © −x n+1 ª −t n = lim −e x − 0 + (n + 1) lim e t dt x→+∞ x→+∞ 0 Z +∞ = 0 + (n + 1) e−t tn dt 0 Z +∞ −t n+1 Z x = (n + 1) In The integral involved in the definition of In is always convergent.Exercises 113 and. Then the product f g is a real polynomial of degree m + n. of degree m and n respectively. for each n ∈ N. j∈n i+j=k . containing for each k ∈ m + n a monomial of degree k of the form αi ti β j tj = αi β j ti+j whenever i + j = k. since for each n ∈ N lim e−x xn = 0 x→+∞ It follows that ∀n ∈ N. Let now X i∈m In = n! f : t 7→ α 0 + αi ti g : t 7→ β 0 + X i∈n β j tj be two real polynomials.

114 Linear spaces and the scalar product of f and g is results in the sum of m + n + 1 converging integrals     Z +∞ X  X     hf. j∈n i+j=k  +∞ e−t tk dt = α0 β 0 I0 + k∈m+n X  X   αi β j  Ik    i∈m. xn i = Z +∞ e−t tm tn dt 0 = Im+n = (m + n)! (c) If f : t 7→ (t + 1)2 then t 7→ t4 + 2t3 + 2t2 + 2t + 1 Z +∞ ¡ ¢ hf. j∈n i+j=k  (b) If for each n ∈ N xn : t 7→ tn then for each m ∈ N and each n ∈ N hxm . j∈n i+j=k  i∈m. gi = e−t α0 β 0 + αi β j  tk  dt     0 k∈m+n = α0 β 0 Z +∞ 0 Z X  X   e dt + αi β j    −t k∈m+n  i∈m. gi = e−t t4 + 2t3 + 2t2 + 2t + 1 dt fg : 0 g : t 7→ t2 + 1 = I4 + 2I3 + 2I2 + 2I1 + I0 = 4! + 2 · 3! + 2 · 2! + 2 · 1! + 1 = 43 . j∈n i+j=k 0  = α0 β 0 + k∈m+n X  X   αi β j  k!   i∈m.

x) . the set of all polynomials of degree less than or equal to 1 which are orthogonal to f is P1 ∩ perp {f } = {gγ : t 7→ 2γt − 3γ}γ∈R 15.16. x3 } = 2. x2 . The Gram-Schmidt process 15.14 Orthogonal complements. gi = 0 ⇔ (α. 1. it is seen that they all belong to the plane π of equation x−z = 0. The Gram-Schmidt process 115 (d) If f : t 7→ t + 1 then f g : t 7→ αt2 + (α + β) t + β hf.16 Exercises 15. x2 .1 n. Since no two of them are parallel.15 Best approximation of elements in a euclidean space by elements in a finite-dimensional subspace 15. A unit vector in π is given by v≡ 1 (2. projections 15.13 Construction of orthogonal sets. −3γ) (γ ∈ R) g : t 7→ αt + β that is. gi = αI2 + (α + β) I1 + βI0 = 3α + 2β and hf. x3 } = π and dim lin {x1 .Construction of orthogonal sets. 576) (a) By direct inspection of the coordinates of the three given vectors. 1 (p. −4x. 2) 3 Every vector belonging to the line π ∩ perp {v} must have the form (x. β) = (2γ. lin {x1 .

with (1. 2. and which is orthogonal to v. 0.16. x2 } / 0 = x1 − x2 + x3 − x4 Thus dim W ≡ dim lin {x1 . 3) 6 1 + 1 + 1 +1 9 9 9 (0. x3 . 0) − x2 − hx2 . 0)° y3 Second solution. 2. 1 3 = q3 = (1. 1. y2 i y2 = ≡ kx3 − hx3 . y1 i y1 − − hx3 . 1.2 n. Thus a second unit vector which together with v spans π. 0) − ¢ ¡ 1 1 √ − . 1. 0. w}. y1 i y1 − − hx3 . −3. x3 } is {v. y1 i y1 k °(0. x2 . 1. 1. 2. 0. 0) 2 √ 2 v≡ (0. 1. to directly exhibit two mutually orthogonal unit vectors in lin {x1 . The following vectors form an orthonormal one: √ x1 2 = (1. −1. t) ∈ R4 : x − y + z − t = 0 √ 2 u≡ (1. 1) 2 x3 − hx3 . 0) ° ° (1. z. 1. 576) (a) First solution. 1) − 0 − 2 66 66 (−1. x4 } . 1. y1 i y1 ≡ =° ° kx2 − hx2 . 1) 6 The required orthonormal basis for lin {x1 . x4 } = 3.−1. 2 (p. 1. 0. it suffices to realize that © ª lin {x1 . . 1. x2 . −4. 0. More easily. 0) 6 1 + 1 +1 4 4 √ √ 2 2 2 2 √ √ 2 2 2 2 (1. 0 6 = q2 2 = (−1. 1. 0) ° ° √ √ ° ° °(0. 1. −1) as normal vector. x3 . x4 } = H(1.1. 1.−1). 0)° √ √ is the hyperplane of R4 through the origin. −1.116 Linear spaces √ with norm 3 2 |x|. 1. 1) − 0 − 2 66 66 (−1. 0.0 ≡ (x. 0) y1 ≡ kx1 k 2 y2 (0. x2 . x2 . is √ 2 w≡ (1. 1. 0. 15. (b) The answer is identical to the one just given for case a. It is easily checked that x2 ∈ lin {x1 } / x3 ∈ lin {x1 . x3 . y. y2 i y2 k ¡1 1 1 ¢ √ . 3. 1. 1. and three vectors are required for any basis of W .

Exercises

117

It remains to find a unit vector in H(1,−1,1,−1),0 ∩ perp {u, v}. The following equations characterize H(1,−1,1,−1),0 ∩ perp {u, v}: x−y+z−t = 0 x+y = 0 z+t = 0 yielding (by addition) 2 (x + z) = 0, and hence 1 1 (1, −1, −1, 1) or w ≡ − (1, −1, −1, 1) 2 2 Thus an orthonormal basis for lin {x1 , x2 , x3 , x4 } is {u, v, w}. (b) It is easily checked that w≡ x2 ∈ lin {x1 } / 0 = 2x1 − x2 − x3 Thus dim W ≡ dim lin {x1 , x2 , x3 } = 2, and two vectors are required for any basis of W . The following vectors form an orthonormal one: √ x1 3 y1 ≡ = (1, 1, 0, 1) kx1 k 3 y2 (1, 0, 2, 1) − 2 33 33 (1, 1, 0, 1) x2 − hx2 , y1 i y1 ° =° ≡ √ √ ° ° kx2 − hx2 , y1 i y1 k °(0, 1, 1, 0) − 2 33 33 (1, 1, 0, 1)° ¡1 2 ¢ √ , − 3 , 2, 1 42 3 = q3 (1, −2, 6, 1) = 42 1 + 4 +4+ 1 9 9 9 Z
π √ √

15.16.3

n. 3 (p. 576)

Let

1 1 1 √ √ dt = π = 1 π π π 0 r Z πr Z 2 2 2 π hyn , yn i = cos2 nt dt cos nt cos nt dt = π π π 0 0 hy0 , y0 i = In ≡ Z
π

cos ntdt =

2

0

integrating by parts In

Z

π

cos nt cos nt dt
0

¯π Z π sin nt ¯ sin nt ¯ − = cos nt −n sin nt dt ¯ n 0 n 0 Z π Z π 2 = sin nt dt = 1 − cos2 nt dt
0 0

= π − In

118

Linear spaces

Thus π 2 hyn , yn i = 1 In = and every function yn has norm equal to one. To check mutual orthogonality, let us compute ¯π Z π 1 sin nt ¯ 1 ¯ =0 √ cos nt dt = √ hy0 , yn i = π π n ¯0 0 Z π hym , yn i = cos mt cos nt dt 0 ¯ Z π sin nt ¯π sin nt ¯ − = cos mt −m sin mt dt ¯ n 0 n 0 Z m π sin mt sin nt dt = n 0 µ ¶¯π µ ¶ Z π m cos nt ¯ cos nt ¯ −m = sin mt − dt m cos mt − ¯ n n n 0 n 0 ³ m ´2 = hym , yn i n ¡ ¢2 Since m and n are distinct positive integers, m is different from 1, and the equation n ³ m ´2 hym , yn i = hym , yn i n

can hold only if hym , yn i = 0. That the set {yn }+∞ generates the same space generated by the set {xn }+∞ n=0 n=0 is trivial, since, for each n, yn is a multiple of xn . 15.16.4 n. 4 (p. 576) We have Z 1 hy0 , y0 i = 1dt = 1 0 Ã ¯1 ! Z 1 ¯ ¡ 2 ¢ 4 3 hy1 , y1 i = 3 4t − 4t + 1 dt = 3 t − 2t2 + t¯ ¯ 3 0 0 = 1 Z 1 ¡ ¢ hy2 , y2 i = 5 36t4 − 72t3 + 48t2 − 12t + 1 dt 0 Ã ¯1 ! ¯ 36 5 = 5 t − 18t4 + 16t3 − 6t2 + t¯ ¯ 5 0 = 1

Exercises

119

which proves that the three given functions are unit vectors with respect to the given inner product. Moreover, Z 1√ √ ³ ¯1 ´ hy0 , y1 i = 3 (2t − 1) dt = 3 t2 − t¯0 = 0 0 Z 1√ √ ³ ¯1 ´ ¡ ¢ hy0 , y2 i = 5 6t2 − 6t + 1 dt = 5 2t3 − 3t2 + t¯0 = 0 Z0 1 √ ¡ ¢ hy1 , y2 i = 15 12t3 − 18t2 + 8t − 1 dt 0 √ ³ 4 ¯1 ´ 3 2 15 3t − 6t + 4t − t¯0 = 0 = which proves that the three given functions are mutually orthogonal. Thus {y1 , y2 , y3 } is an orthonormal set, and hence linearly independent. Finally, Ã √ √ ! √ √ 1 3 5 3 5 y1 y1 + y1 + y2 x0 = y0 x1 = y0 + x2 = 1 − 2 2 30 3 30 which proves that lin {y1 , y2 , y3 } = lin {x1 , x2 , x3 }

120 Linear spaces .

for every α ∈ R. .4 16. T (x.1 Exercises n. αy + βv)] (αy + βv. v)] The null space of T is the trivial subspace {(0. x) + β (v. which is (x + y. x + y). 0)}.Chapter 16 LINEAR TRANSFORMATIONS AND MATRICES 16. y) ∈ R2 . y) is orthogonal to r. the range of T is R2 . y)] + βT [(u. y) .4. lies on r.3 Nullity and rank 16. αx + βu) α (y. v)] = = = = T [(αx + βu. T [α (x. for every β ∈ R. u) αT [(x. y) − (x. 582) T is linear. since for every (x. T (x. y) ∈ R2 . and hence rank T = 2 nullity T = 0 T is the orthogonal symmetry with respect to the bisectrix r of the first and third quadrant. for every (u. y) + β (u. and the midpoint of [(x. since.1 Linear transformations 16. v) ∈ R2 . y)]. for every (x.2 Null space and range 16. 1 (p.

y)] + βT [(u.4 n. v)] The null space of T is the Y -axis. y) + β (u. 0)}. v)] = = = = T [(αx + βu. v)] = = = = T [(αx + βu. v)] = = = = T [(αx + βu. and hence rank T = 2 nullity T = 0 T is the orthogonal symmetry with respect to the X-axis. u) αT [(x. for every α ∈ R. 16. and hence rank T = 1 nullity T = 1 T is the orthogonal projection on the X-axis. αy + βv)] (αy + βv. for every (u. 0) α (x. y) ∈ R2 . v) ∈ R2 .122 Linear transformations and matrices 16. and for every β ∈ R. 4 (p. T [α (x. and hence rank T = nullity T = 1 . x) + β (u. 582) T is linear .4.2 n. for every α ∈ R. αx + βu) α (y. the range of T is R2 . 0) + β (u. 3 (p. for every (u. 2 (p. y) ∈ R2 . u) αT [(x. for every α ∈ R. and for every β ∈ R. y) + β (u. for every (u. v) ∈ R2 . y)] + βT [(u. v) ∈ R2 . since for every (x. and for every β ∈ R. y) ∈ R2 . since for every (x. y)] + βT [(u. 582) T is linear. αy + βv)] (αx + βu. 582) T is linear. αy + βv)] (αx + βu. the range of T is the bisectrix of the I and III quadrant. 16. v)] The null space of T is the Y -axis.4.4. αx + βu) α (x. x) + β (v. 0) αT [(x. T [α (x. y) + β (u.3 n. v)] The null space of T is the trivial subspace {(0. T [α (x. since for every (x. the range of T is the X-axis.

T [α (x. v + 1) (αx + βu + α + β. e. v)] = = T [(αx + βu. v)] = α (ex . 1) α (x. y) + β (u. v) ∈ R2 .g. y)] + βT [(u. y)] + βT [(u. 0 ¡ ¢ T (x. y) ∈ R2 . 582) T is not linear. indeed. eαy+βv i h = (ex )α · (eu )β . T [(0.5 n. y) ∈ R2 . and for every β ∈ R. 6 (p.Exercises 123 16. ev ) = (αex + βeu . α + β) T is affine. T [α (x. v)] = T [(αx + βu. for every (u.g. y)] + βT [(u. 7 (p. T [α (x. for every α ∈ R. y + 1) + β (u + 1.. for every (x. v) ∈ R2 . e. 1 + e) 16. y) + β (u. 0 T is not a linear function. since. αy + βv + 1) α (x + 1.4. for every β ∈ R. for every α ∈ R. αy + βv + α + β) . but not linear. for every (x. 0) + (1.7 n. v) ∈ R2 . when x = y = 0 and u = v = α = β = 1. v)] = = αT [(x. for every (x. for every (u. y) + β (u. (ey )α · (ev )β αT [(x. 0) = x2 + u2 . 1) (αx + βu. Indeed. 0)] + T [(1. indeed. for x and u both different from 0.. 1) + β (u. v)] = = αT [(x. v)] = = 16. αy + βv)] ¡ ¢ = eαx+βu .4. 582) T is not an affine function. for every (u. y) ∈ R2 . 582) ¢ ¡ T (x + u. 1)] = (1 + e. 582) T [(αx + βu. 0) + T (u. but it is not linear. αy + βv)] (αx + βu. 1)] = (e. for every α ∈ R. e) T [(0. αey + βev ) so that. αy + βv)] (αx + βu + 1. 8 (p.6 n.4. 0) = x2 + 2xy + u2 . 16.4.8 n. 5 (p. ey ) + β (eu . and for every β ∈ R.

16. αy + βv)] (αx + βu − αy − βv. v)] The null space of T is the trivial subspace {(0. x + y) + β (u − v. v)] The null space of T is the trivial subspace {(0. the range of T is R2 . T [α (x.4. y)] + βT [(u. y) + β (u. T [α (x. 582) T is linear.10 n. for every α ∈ R. v) ∈ R2 . u + v) αT [(x. 0)}. v)] = = = = T [(αx + βu. since for every (x. 0)}. for every α ∈ R. αy + βv)] (2 (αx + βu) − (αy + βv) . the range of T is R2 . since for every (x. 9 (p. y) + β (u. u + v) αT [(x. and for every β ∈ R. 10 (p. and hence rank T = 2 The matrix representing T is A≡ the characteristic polynomial of A is λ2 − 3λ + 3 · 2 −1 1 1 ¸ nullity T = 0 . (αx + βu) + (αy + βv)) α (2x − y. and hence rank T = 2 The matrix representing T is A ≡ 1 −1 1 1 ¸· · √ 2 √ 0 cos = sin 0 2 · ¸ √ = 2 " √ √ 2 − 22 2 √ √ 2 2 2 2 π − sin π 4 4 π cos π 4 4 nullity T = 0 # ¸ Thus T is the composition of a counterclockwise rotation by an angle of π with a 4 √ homothety of modulus 2.9 n. for every (u. and for every β ∈ R. 582) T is linear. y) ∈ R2 .4. x + y) + β (2u − v. αx + βu + αy + βv) α (x − y. for every (u. v)] = = = = T [(αx + βu. v) ∈ R2 . y)] + βT [(u. y) ∈ R2 .124 Linear transformations and matrices 16.

11 n. Re z} = . 16. w)] nark T = 1 The null space of T is the Z-axis. αy + βv. z) + β (u. for every (u. 1 − 3 is B ≡ " 3 2 √ 3 2 − Thus T is the composition of a counterclockwise rotation by an angle of π with a 6 √ homothety of modulus 3. αy + βv. z)] + βT [(u. y. z)] + βT [(u. 0) αT [(x. y. v. for every α ∈ R. the range of T is R3 . since for every (x. x) + β (w. 582) T is linear. w) ∈ R3 . v. z) ∈ R3 . y. αz + βw)] (αz + βw. and hence 16. u) αT [(x. 0)}. 0) α (x. v. v. the range of T is the XY -plane. 0) + β (u. since for every (x. y.4. w) ∈ R3 .Exercises 125 and the eigenvalues of A are √ 3 + 3i λ1 ≡ 2 An eigenvector associated to λ1 is µ z≡ √ 3 − 3i λ2 ≡ 2 2 √ 1 − 3i ¶ The matrix representing T with respect to the basis ½µ ¶ µ ¶¾ 0 2 √ {Im z. y. T [α (x. 582) T is linear (as every projection on a coordinate hyperplane). 17 (p. and hence . z) ∈ R3 . w)] = = = = rank T = 3 T [(αx + βu. v. v. w)] = = = = rank T = 2 T [(αx + βu.4. αy + βv. αz + βw)] (αx + βu.12 n. v. for every α ∈ R. 0. for every β ∈ R. y. αx + βu) α (z. T [α (x. v. for every β ∈ R. αy + βv. y. w)] nark T = 0 · √ ¸· 3 √ 0 cos π − sin 6 = sin π cos π 3 0 6 6 √ 3 2 3 2 # √ = 3 " √ 3 2 1 2 −1 √2 3 2 ¸ π 6 # The null space of T is the trivial subspace {(0. y. 16 (p. for every (u. z) + β (u.

0) ∪ (0. w)] = = = = = T [(αx + βu. v. z) ∈ R3 . ker T = {f ∈ D1 : ∀x ∈ (−1. v. provided lim f 0 (x) exists and is finite. α (x + y)] + [β (u + w) . w)] The null space of T is the axis of central symmetry of the (+. and hence rank T = 2 nark T = 1 16. w) ∈ R3 . of parametric equations x=t y = −t z = −t the range of T is the XZ-plane. 0. If T : D1 → R(−1. 1) . 1) and continuous in 0.14 n. 582) Let D1 (−1. in which case x→0 f 0 (0) = lim f 0 (x) x→0 . f 0 (x) = 0} By an important though sometimes overlooked theorem in calculus. for every (u. αx + βu + αy + βv) [α (x + z) . z) + β (u. every function f which is differentiable in (−1. for every β ∈ R. more shortly. αy + βv. y. +)-orthant. +. β (u + v)] α (x. 0) ∪ (0. v.4. z) + β (u. since for every (x. D1 be the linear space of all real functions of a real variable which are defined and everywhere differentiable on (−1. T [α (x. for every α ∈ R. −)-orthant and of the (−. 0.1) .126 Linear transformations and matrices 16. 1) . v. y.4. −. Indeed. ¡ ¢ T (f + g) = x 7→ x [f + g]0 (x) = (x 7→ x [f 0 (x) + g 0 (x)]) = (x 7→ xf 0 (x) + xg 0 (x)) = (x 7→ xf 0 (x)) + (x 7→ +xg 0 (x)) = T (f ) + T (g) Moreover. xf 0 (x) = 0} = {f ∈ D1 : ∀x ∈ (−1. 582) T is linear. w) αT [(x. f 7→ (x 7→ xf 0 (x)) then T is a linear operator. αz + βw)] (αx + βu + αz + βw. 0. y.13 n. y. 1) or. 23 (p. 25 (p. is differentiable in 0 as well. 1). z)] + βT [(u.

1) such that 0 (v (0) . since u (0) = 1 and v (0) = 0. in such a case. e. In other words. Hence the function µ ¶ y (0) 2 ϕ : ker L → R . 16.555. v 0 (0)) = (0. 1) of the polynomials with vanishing zero-degree monomial.4.1). u0 (0)) = (1. If where P and Q are real functions of a real variable which are continuous on R. indeed. 1). Since T (D1 ) contains. y0 ) ∈ R2 . y0 )). y0 ) ∈ R2 there exists a unique solution to equation (16.1) is a solution to equation (16. y 7→ y 00 + P y 0 + Q ∀x ∈ R. u and v are linearly independent. the function 0 y : x 7→ y0 u (x) + y0 v (x) ker T = {f ∈ D1 : f 0 = 0} L : D2 → RR . p. x) f (x) = f (0) + xf 0 (ϑx ) and hence f is constant on (−1. Thus ker L is the set of all solutions to the linear differential equation of the second order By the uniqueness theorem for Cauchy’s problems in the theory of differential equa0 tions.1) such that (u (0) .15 n. If f belongs to ker T . 582) Let D2 be the linear space of all real functions of a real variable which are defined and everywhere differentiable on R. and nullity T = 1. the dimension of T (D1 ) is infinite. and it is already known that the linear space of all polynomials has an infinite basis. all the restrictions to (−1.1) such 0 that y (0) = y0 and y 0 (0) = y0 . ker L = span {u.g. from βv (x) = 0 for each x ∈ R and v 0 (0) = 1 it is easily deduced that β = 0 as well. Thus nullity L = 2. and by direct inspection it is seen that y (0) = y0 and 0 0 y 0 (0) = y0 . by the classical theorem due to Lagrange.Exercises 127 Thus (here 0 is the identically null function defined on (−1. v} . y 00 (x) + P (x) y 0 (x) + Q (x) y (x) = 0 (16. and Finally. ∃ϑx ∈ (0. for each (y0 . 0). 1). 27 (p. and let v be the solution to equation (16.. ϕ−1 ((y0 . ∀x ∈ (−1. let u be the solution to equation (16. 1) . αu (x) + βv (x) = 0 for each x ∈ R can only hold (by evaluating at x = 0) if α = 0. y 7→ y 0 (0) is injective and surjective. It follows that a basis of ker T is given by the constant function (x 7→ 1). it has been shown in the solution to exercise 17. 1)). that L is a linear operator. since ker L is a linear subspace of D2 . Moreover. Then for each (y0 .

v.8. y 0 . v. z ) ⇔ y + 1 = y 0 + 1 ⇔ (x. w + 1) . z 0 )  x + y + z = x0 + y 0 + z 0 0 0 0   T −1 (u. 589) T is injective. y . z) = (x0 . y. w) = (u. y. z) = (x0 .128 Linear transformations and matrices 16. 2 3 16. w) = u. z 0 ) T (x. z 0 )  z − 1 = z0 − 1 T −1 (u.7 One-to-one linear transformations 16. 16 (p. 589) T is injective. y 0 . since x = x0 y = y0 T (x. y. w) = (u − 1.5 Algebraic operations on linear transformations 16.2 n. z ) ⇔  3z = 3z 0 ³ v w´ T −1 (u. y . . 17 (p.8. z) = T (x . v − 1. z) = (x0 . z) = T (x . w − u − v) 16. y.8. z ) ⇔ ⇔ (x.6 Inverses 16. y .1 n. 589) T is injective (or one to one).3 n. v. y. v. y. 15 (p. y 0 . z) = T (x . since   x + 1 = x0 + 1 0 0 0 T (x. since   x = x0 0 0 0 2y = 2y 0 ⇔ (x.8 Exercises 16.

. £ ¤ T D (p) = T [D (p)] = T x 7→ p1 + 2p2 x + · · · (n − 1) pn−1 xn−2 + npn xn−1 Z x = x→ 7 p1 + 2p2 t + · · · (n − 1) pn−1 tn−2 + npn tn−1 dt 0 ¯x = x 7→ p1 t + p2 t2 + · · · pn−1 tn−1 + pn tn ¯0 = x 7→ p1 x + p2 x2 + · · · pn−1 xn−1 + pn xn = p − p0 Thus T D acts as the identity map only on the subspace W of V containing all polynomials having the zero degree monomial (p0 ) equal to zero. zero-degree polynomials.12 Exercises 16. and ker T D is the set of all constant polynomials.Linear transformations with prescribed values 129 16. 16.10 Matrix representations of linear transformations 16. 3 (p. 596) (a) Since T (i) = i + j and T (j) = 2i − j. i. 590) p = x 7→ p0 + p1 x + p2 x2 + · · · + pn−1 xn−1 + pn xn · Z x 0 DT (p) = D [T (p)] = D x 7→ = x 7→ p (x) ¸ p (t) dt the last equality being a consequence of the fundamental theorem of integral calculus. Im T D is equal to W .4 Let n. T (3i − 4j) = = 2 T (3i − 4j) = = 3T (i) − 4T (j) = 3 (i + j) − 4 (2i − j) −5i + 7j T (−5i + 7j) = −5T (i) + 7T (j) −5 (i + j) + 7 (2i − j) = 9i − 12j .8. 27 (p.9 Linear transformations with prescribed values 16.11 Construction of a matrix representation in diagonal form 16.12.1 n.e.

β) and (γ. to the basis {i. Thus · ¸· ¸· ¸ 1 1 −3 1 2 1 3 −1 B = P AP = 1 −1 −1 1 4 1 1 · ¸· ¸ 1 −2 5 1 3 = 2 1 −1 1 4 · ¸ 1 −7 −1 = 1 7 4 Second solution (matrix for T ). the matrix · ¸ £ ¤ 1 3 P ≡ e1 e2 = −1 1 provided T (e1 ) and T (e2 ) are meant as coordinate vectors (α. If e1 = i − j and e2 = 3i + j. e2 } is £ ¤ B ≡ T (e1 ) T (e2 ) (c) First solution (matrix for T ). multiplication by P −1 ). 1) with respect to the basis {i. j} is · ¸ £ ¤ 1 2 A ≡ T (i) T (j) = 1 −1 and the matrix of T 2 with respect to the same basis is · ¸ 3 0 2 A ≡ 0 3 transforms the (canonical) coordinates (1. and P −1 is the matrix of coordinate change from basis {i. e2 }. multiplication by A). 2) transformation according to T as expressed by the matrix representing T w. e2 } to basis {i. e2 } can be described as the combined effect of the following three actions: 1) coordinate change from coordinates w. δ) with respect to the basis {e1 .r.r. to the basis {i. e2 }. multiplication by matrix P ). on the other hand. to basis {e1 . −1) and (3.r.r. j} (that is. j} to basis {e1 . j} into coordinates w.130 Linear transformations and matrices (b) The matrix of T with respect to the basis {i. 0) and (0. e2 } into their coordinates (1. 1) of e1 and e2 with respect to the basis {e1 . j} (that is. to the basis {i. j}. The operation of the matrix B representing T with respect to the basis {e1 . to basis {e1 . j}. hence P is the matrix of coordinate change from basis {e1 . The matrix B representing T with respect to the basis {e1 . j} we have T (e1 ) = = T (e2 ) = = T (i − j) = T (i) − T (j) = (i + j) − (2i − j) −i + 2j T (3i + j) = 3T (i) + T (j) = 3 (i + j) + (2i − j) 5i + 2j . Since. 3) coordinate change from coordinates w. with respect to the basis {i.r. e2 } (that is. e2 } into coordinates w.

δ). δ) which correspond to the {i. to the Y -axis) (length doubling) Thus T may be represented by the matrix µ ¶ −2 0 AT ≡ 0 2 and hence T 2 by the matrix A2 T 16. β) = 1 (−7.r. e2 }-coordinates (α. 7). y) (reflection w. Since T 2 is represented by a scalar diagonal matrix with respect to the initially given basis.12. respectively) αe1 + βe2 = −i + 2j γe1 + δe2 = 5i + 2j that is. δ) = 1 (−1. 1) and (γ.12. Thus we want to solve the two equation systems (in the unknowns (α. 596) ≡ µ 4 0 0 4 ¶ 7→ (−x. j}-coordinates (−1.2 n. 5 (p. 596) T : (x. β) and (γ. 2) and (5. 2y) T (i + 2j + 3k) = T (k) + T (j + k) + T (i + j + k) = (2i + 3j + 5k) + i + (j − k) = 3i + 4j + 4k . since scalar diagonal matrices commute with every matrix of the same order.3 a) n. y) 7→ (−2x. 2). so that 4 4 1 B= 7 −7 −1 1 7 Continuation (matrix for T 2 ). it is represented by the same matrix with respect to every basis (indeed. P −1 DP = D for every scalar diagonal matrix D).Exercises 131 it suffices to find the {e1 . ½ α + 3β = −1 −α + β = 2 · ½ γ + 3δ = 5 −γ + δ = 2 ¸ The (unique) solutions are (α. β) and (γ. 4 (p. 16.

T (j) = = T (i) = = T (j + k − k) = T (j + k) − T (k) −i − 3j − 5k T (i + j + k − j − k) = T (i + j + k) − T (j + k) −i + j − k  −1 −1 2 AT ≡  1 −3 3  −1 −5 3  16. T (i + j + k) form a linearly independent triple. 597) T (4i − j + k) = 4T (i) − T (j) + T (k) = (0. b) The matrix of T with respect to the basis {i. 0.r. but the first two need to be computed. −2) Since {T (j) . Thus the range space of T is R3 .12. the linear combination xT (k) + yT (j + k) + zT (i + j + k) = x (2i + 3j + 5k) + yi + z (j − k) = (2x + y) i + (3x + z) j + (5x − z) k spans the null vector if and only if 2x + y = 0 3x + z = 0 5x − z = 0 which yields (II + III) x = 0. T (j + k). j. k} is obtained by aligning as columns the coordinates w. T (j). ker T = {0} (b) µ 0 1 1 0 1 −1 ¶ rank T = 2 AT = . and nark T is 0. to {i.132 Linear transformations and matrices The three image vectors T (k). The last one is given in the problem statement. T (k)} is a linearly independent set. 7 (p. k} of the image vectors T (i). and hence (by substitution in I and II) y = z = 0. It follows that the null space of T is the trivial subspace {(0. and rank T is 3.4 (a) n. 0)}. T (k). Indeed. j.

1) .12. Since T (i) = i + k and T j = −i + k. 597) (a) I shall distinguish the canonical unit vectors of R2 and R3 by marking the former ¡¢ with an underbar. ¡ ¢ ¡¢ T xi + yj = xT (i) + yT j = x (i + k) + y (i − k) = (x + y) i + (x − y) k It follows that Im T = lin {i. w2 } = {(1. the matrix · ¸ £ ¤ 1 1 P ≡ w1 w2 = 1 2 µ 0 1 −1 2 0 0 3 2 ¶ . If w1 = i + j and w2 = i + 2j.C = 0 1 0 16. (1. Then µ ¶ 1 0 0 (AT )B. k} is   1 1 ¡¢ ¤ £ A ≡ T (i) T j = 0 0  1 −1 (c) First solution.Exercises 133 (c) Let C = (w1 . 8 (p. −1)}. j and {i. ¡ ¢ ¡¢ T 2i − 3j = 2T (i) − 3T j = 2 (i + k) − 3 (i − k) = −i + 5k For any two real numbers x and y. k} rank T = 2 nullity T = 2 − 2 = 0 © ª (b) The matrix of T with respect to the bases i. i} and C = {w1 . k.5 n. j. w2 ) T (i) = 0w1 + 0w2 T (j) = 1w1 + 0w2 1 3 T (k) = − w1 + w2 2 2 (AT )C = (d) Let B ≡ {j.

j and {i. w2 } into coordinates w. Thus   · ¸ 1 1 1 1 B = AP =  0 0  1 2 1 −1   2 3 =  0 0  0 −1 Second solution (matrix for T ). j. j. to bases {u1 . to the bases i. j . that is. 1) of w1 and w2 with respect to the basis {w1 . multiplication by matrix P ). k} (that is.r. © ª and P −1 is the matrix of coordinate change from basis i. 0) and (0. j (that is.r. The matrix B representing T with respect to the bases {w1 . w2 } into their coordinates (1. j. hence P is the matrix of coordinate change from basis {w1 . k} is £ ¤ B ≡ T (w1 ) T (w2 ) T (w1 ) = = T (w2 ) = = Thus ¡ ¡¢ ¢ T i + j = T (i) + T j = (i + k) + (i − k) i ¡ ¡¢ ¢ T i + 2j = T (i) + 2T j = (i + k) + 2 (i − k) 3i − k  1 3 B= 0 0  0 −1  where if and only if the following holds (c) The matrix C representing T w. w2 } and {i. to basis {w1 .r. v3 } is diagonal. k} can be described as the combined effect of the following two actions: 1) coordinate ª © change from coordinates w. u2 } and {v1 . multiplication by A). The operation of the matrix B of T with respect to the bases {w1 . 2) transformation according to T as expressed by the © ª matrix representing T w. 1) and (1. 2) with respect to the©basis © ª ª i. w2 } and {i. v2 . w2 }. w2 } to basis i. j .r.   γ 11 0 C =  0 γ 22  0 0 T (u1 ) = γ 11 v1 T (u2 ) = γ 22 v2 .134 Linear transformations and matrices transforms the (canonical) coordinates (1. j to basis {w1 . to the basis i.

id · sin. id · cos} with respect to the basis {sin. id · cos} is     0 −1 1 0 −1 0 0 −2  1 0 0 1   0 −1 2 0    A2 =  A=  0 0 0 −1   0 0 −1 0  0 0 1 0 0 0 0 −1 . v3 } is lin. cos. 597) We have D (sin) = cos D (cos) = − sin D (id · sin) = sin + id · cos D (id · cos) = cos − id · sin D2 (sin) = D (cos) = − sin D2 (cos) = D (− sin) = − cos D2 (id · sin) = D (sin + id · cos) = 2 cos − id · sin D2 (id · cos) = D (cos − id · sin) = −2 sin − id · cos and hence the matrix representing the differentiation operator D and its square D2 acting on lin {sin.Exercises 135 There are indeed very many ways to achieve that. independent  1 0 C = 0 1  0 0  thereby obtaining 16. cos. v2 .6 n.12. In the present situation the simplest way seems to me to be given by defining u1 ≡ i u2 ≡ j v1 ≡ T (u1 ) = i + k v2 ≡ T (u2 ) = i − k v3 ≡ any vector such that {v1 . 16 (p. id · sin.

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