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A Photometric Stereo Approach to Face Recognition

A Photometric Stereo Approach to Face Recognition

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Published by bigglesuk486
A Photometric Stereo Approach to Face Recognition

Roger Woodman
[ www.brl.ac.uk/~rwoodman ]

A dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of the West of England, Bristol for the Degree of Master of Science

Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Mathematical Sciences

November 2007

Abstract
Face recognition has received much interest in the last decade, as the need for reliable personal identification security has become ever more critical. At present fo
A Photometric Stereo Approach to Face Recognition

Roger Woodman
[ www.brl.ac.uk/~rwoodman ]

A dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of the West of England, Bristol for the Degree of Master of Science

Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Mathematical Sciences

November 2007

Abstract
Face recognition has received much interest in the last decade, as the need for reliable personal identification security has become ever more critical. At present fo

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Published by: bigglesuk486 on Mar 27, 2011
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07/11/2012

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The final normalisation experiment is to scale the size of the face to a
dimension that all other faces can be compared with, while maintaining the
aspect ratio. To accomplish this, first the maximum face dimensions in pixels
must be determined. In this way normalisation of scale will only require
enlarging the face image, thus there will be no possibility of lost information
by reducing the size. As the captures image dimension is 640 x 480 pixels, all
face images must be of this size or less. Therefore, each face image will be
scaled to 640 x 480 pixels, while maintaining aspect ratios.

An algorithm has been designed and implemented that manipulates the
positioning of the feature locations. By extending the feature locations, the
relative positions of the eyes and nose can be transformed to fit the
boundaries of the image. As the overall size of the face is unknown, the

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outermost feature locations are used to define the face width and height. The
following pseudo code describes the first step of the scaling algorithm. This
step involves calculating the scale value that will be used to enlarge all the face
features.

As this code demonstrates, first the scale size is calculated for the width which
is then compared with the scale size for the height. The largest scale is used,
as this will allow the features to be enlarged to the full dimensions of the
image, while keeping the aspect ratio. Following the calculation of the scale
value, all the face feature locations are moved relative to eye1 x and y = 0.
This shift allows for the face features to be enlarged by the scale value, while
remaining within the dimensions of the image. The pseudo code which
follows demonstrates how the features are enlarged by multiplying the x and y
locations with the scale value.

The complete face scaling algorithm is provided in appendix F. The algorithm
has been implemented in the research software and the results of face scaling,
for the face database, are presented in the following section.

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