Oracle Applications Architecture, Release 11i

Student Guide

Course Code Edition Month Part Number

14433GC10 1.0 July 2000 M0-11890

Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved. This documentation contains proprietary information of Oracle Corporation. It is provided under a license agreement containing restrictions on use and disclosure and is also protected by copyright law. Reverse engineering of the software is prohibited. If this documentation is delivered to a U.S. Government Agency of the Department of Defense, then it is delivered with Restricted Rights and the following legend is applicable: Restricted Rights Legend Use, duplication or disclosure by the Government is subject to restrictions for commercial computer software and shall be deemed to be Restricted Rights software under Federal law, as set forth in subparagraph (c)(1)(ii) of DFARS 252.227-7013, Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software (October 1988). This material or any portion of it may not be copied in any form or by any means without the express prior written permission of the Education Products group of Oracle Corporation. Any other copying is a violation of copyright law and may result in civil and/or criminal penalties. If this documentation is delivered to a U.S. Government Agency not within the Department of Defense, then it is delivered with “Restricted Rights,” as defined in FAR 52.227-14, Rights in Data-General, including Alternate III (June 1987). The information in this document is subject to change without notice. If you find any problems in the documentation, please report them in writing to Worldwide Education Services, Oracle Corporation, 500 Oracle Parkway, Box SB-6, Redwood Shores, CA 94065. Oracle Corporation does not warrant that this document is error-free. Oracle and all references to Oracle Products are trademarks or registered trademarks of Oracle Corporation. All other products or company names are used for identification purposes only, and may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Author Richard Sears, Yun Shaw Technical Contributors and Reviewers Dawn Austin, Mary Beights, Steve Coleman, Ivo Dujmovic, Rick Lotero, Jeff Lunn, Kent Noble, Bill Sawyer, Sean Tuck

Table of Contents
Oracle Applications Overview..............................................................................................1-1 Oracle Applications Overview.............................................................................................1-2 Objectives ............................................................................................................................1-3 Lesson Overview .................................................................................................................1-4 Oracle Applications .............................................................................................................1-5 Oracle Applications and the Technology Stack ...................................................................1-6 Oracle8i and Oracle Tools Release/Version Requirements .................................................1-7 Oracle Applications Product Families .................................................................................1-8 Standard Product Abbreviations ..........................................................................................1-9 Product Dependencies..........................................................................................................1-10 Vision Demo Database ........................................................................................................1-11 Lesson Summary .................................................................................................................1-12 Practice ................................................................................................................................1-13 The Applications Technology Layer ....................................................................................2-1 The Applications Technology Layer ...................................................................................2-2 Objectives ............................................................................................................................2-3 Lesson Overview .................................................................................................................2-4 Applications Technology Layer...........................................................................................2-5 Applications Technology Layer Members...........................................................................2-6 Applications Technology Layer Members..........................................................................2-7 Oracle Application Object Library ......................................................................................2-8 AOL End User Features.......................................................................................................2-9 AOL Developer Features .....................................................................................................2-10 AOL Features for Administrators ........................................................................................2-11 Application Object Library Security....................................................................................2-12 Lesson Summary .................................................................................................................2-13 Practice ................................................................................................................................2-14 Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications ..............................................3-1 Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications..................................................3-2 Objectives ............................................................................................................................3-3 Lesson Overview .................................................................................................................3-4 Internet Computing Architecture .........................................................................................3-5 Desktop Tier ........................................................................................................................3-6 Forms Client Applet ............................................................................................................3-7 JInitiator...............................................................................................................................3-8 Application Tier...................................................................................................................3-9 Web Server ..........................................................................................................................3-10 Forms Server........................................................................................................................3-11 Load Balancing Among Forms Servers ...............................................................................3-12 Self-Service Web Applications............................................................................................3-13 PL/SQL Access with Self-Service Web Applications .........................................................3-14 Java Servlet Access with Self-Service Applications............................................................3-15 Concurrent Processing Server..............................................................................................3-16 Accessing Concurrent Processing Output............................................................................3-17 Reports Server .....................................................................................................................3-18 Administration Server..........................................................................................................3-19 Database Tier.......................................................................................................................3-20 Lesson Summary .................................................................................................................3-21 Practice ................................................................................................................................3-22 Oracle Applications Database Structure .............................................................................4-1
Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

Oracle Applications Architecture, Release 11i Table of Contents i

.........................................................................................................................................................................................4-22 Oracle Applications File System........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................5-12 Forms Directory..........................................................................................................................................................................................4-13 Oracle8i Features Used by Oracle Applications 11i .............................................................................................................................................................................................................5-20 Mesg Directory ..........5-23 Reports Directory.............................................5-15 Include Directory ........... All rights reserved......5-22 PL/SQL and Resource Directories..........................5-30 Copying Java Files: Product Files....................................................5-31 Copying Java Files: apps............................zip ............ 2000...........5-16 Java Directory....5-35 File Types .......................................................................................................................................................................5-24 Sql Directory...........................Oracle Applications Database Structure .................................................5-27 Admin Directory............................5-25 AD Directory ...............5-13 Help Directory ........................................................................................................................................................................4-16 Index-Organized Tables.......................................5-2 Objectives ...................................................................................................5-34 Oracle Enterprise Manager Directory..............................................................................................................................................4-11 Multiple Sets of Books Architecture.....................................................................................................................................5-33 Oracle Applications Database Files Directory...................................4-21 Practice .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................5-7 Oracle Applications Product Directories ........................................................................................................................................................................4-7 Oracle Applications Product Schemas..............................................................................................................................................................................5-6 APPL_TOP Directory.............................................................................................................................................................................................4-10 Multiple Organization Architecture Views.................................................5-1 Oracle Applications File System ...........................................................................................................4-20 Lesson Summary .......5-10 Admin Directory.................................................................................................. Oracle Applications Architecture..........5-3 Lesson Overview .....5-8 Distributing Files Across Multiple Disks ..................................................5-21 Patch Directory ................ Release 11i Table of Contents ii ................................................................................................................................4-17 Partitioned Tables ...........................................................................................................................................4-19 Invoker’s Rights.............................................................5-29 Common Components Directory .......................4-2 Objectives ...........................4-18 Materialized Views.......4-14 Advanced Queuing ..........................................................................................................................................5-11 Bin Directory ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................4-8 Additional Schemas .............................................................4-9 Schemas Used During Signon ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................5-9 Product Directories .4-12 Multiple Reporting Currencies ....................................................................................................4-3 Lesson Overview ................................................5-28 Admin Directory Text Files......5-14 HTML Directory.............................................................................................................................................................................4-6 APPS Schema ...................................................................5-18 Log and Out Directories ..............................................................................................................................................................................5-17 Lib Directory ..............................................................................5-5 Oracle Applications File System ................................................................5-26 AU Directory ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................4-15 Temporary Tables............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................5-36 Copyright © Oracle Corporation...............................................................5-19 Media Directory....4-4 Oracle Applications Database Objects................................................................4-5 Schemas ..................................................................................................5-32 Technology Stack Directory .......

................................................................................6-1 Applications Environment Files ......................7-7 Installing Multiple Languages .....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................7-6 File Character Set .......Glossary ..........................env File ..........................7-15 Practice ...............................6-16 Practice ...........5-39 Applications Environment Files ..............7-10 Localizations...........................................................6-17 Languages and Localizations..............................................................................................6-4 Oracle Applications Environment File ...........................................................7-2 Objectives ........ Oracle Applications Architecture.......................................................................................................................................................7-9 Additional Language Subdirectories.....................env File.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................6-12 The adovars...................................................8-2 Copyright © Oracle Corporation..................................... 2000......................... Release 11i Table of Contents iii ..................................................................................................6-14 User Defaults File .......................................6-2 Objectives .........7-3 Lesson Overview .........................................................................................................................7-12 Localization Directories......................................................................7-14 Lesson Summary ......................................................................................................6-5 The fndenv........................................................Glossary ........................................................................................................................................................................txt File.....................................................................................7-4 Languages and Localizations.............................6-3 Lesson Overview .....................................................................Lesson Summary ..............................................................................................................7-13 Localization Database Objects......................................................................................................8-1 Appendix A ........................6-11 The devenv............................7-5 Oracle Applications Alternate Languages .............................................6-13 The adconfig...................................................................... All rights reserved.....................................................................................................................................................................................................7-8 Translated Language Items...........................................env File............................................................................6-15 Lesson Summary .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................5-38 Practice ...........................7-1 Languages and Localizations.............7-11 Localization Applications .............................................................................................7-16 Appendix A ................................

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Preface Profile Before You Begin This Course Before you begin this course. 2000. Online demonstrations and written practice sessions reinforce the concepts and skills introduced. Release 11i Table of Contents v . you should have the following qualifications: • Knowledge of ERP software systems and the Internet recommended Prerequisites • There are no prerequisites for this course How This Course Is Organized Oracle Applications Architecture is an instructor-led course featuring lecture and hands-on exercises. Oracle Applications Architecture. All rights reserved. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.

Release 11i Table of Contents vi . All rights reserved. Oracle Applications Architecture.me files Oracle Applications User’s Group (OAUG) articles Oracle Magazine Part Number A82932-01 A69411-01 A69409-01 A83525-01 Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000.Related Publications Oracle Publications Title Oracle Applications Concepts Upgrading Oracle Applications Installing Oracle Applications Maintaining Oracle Applications Additional Publications • • • • • System release bulletins Installation and user’s guides read.

check boxes. table names Example The algorithm inserts the new key. where user_id is the name of the user. Open the Master Schedule window. Lesson 3. schemas. user input. usernames Graphics labels (unless the term is a proper noun) Emphasized words and phrases. triggers. 300). Select the Can’t Delete Card check box. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.” Uppercase Use the SELECT command to view information stored in the LAST_NAME column of the EMP table. passwords. filenames. 2000. see Oracle7 Server SQL Language Reference Manual.com User input: Enter 300 Username: Log on as scott Customer address (but Oracle Payables) Courier new. functions. directory names. “Working with Objects. All rights reserved. Assign a When-Validate-Item trigger to the ORD block. Oracle Applications Architecture.oracle.Typographic Conventions Typographic Conventions in Text Convention Bold italic Caps and lowercase Element Glossary term (if there is a glossary) Buttons. lesson and chapter titles in crossreferences SQL column names. Pathname: Open c:\my_docs\projects URL: Go to http://www.ora file.set (‘I”. commands. case sensitive (default is lowercase) Initial cap Italic Quotation marks Do not save changes to the database. Release 11i Table of Contents vii . Enter user_id@us. pathnames.oracle. titles of books and courses. Click the Executable button. This subject is covered in Unit II. windows Code output. Directory: bin (DOS).com. Code output: debug. Password: User tiger as your password. variables Interface elements with long names that have only initial caps. $FMHOME (UNIX) Filename: Locate the init. Select “Include a reusable module component” and click Finish. For further information. URLs.

select Invoice > Entry > Invoice Batches Summary. (M) From the menu. functions Typographic Conventions in Navigation Paths This course uses simplified navigation paths. DROP USER scott IDENTIFIED BY tiger. to direct you through Oracle Applications. (B) Click the Approve button. OG_ACTIVATE_LAYER (OG_GET_LAYER (‘prod_pie_layer’)) Lowercase italic Uppercase Syntax variables CREATE ROLE role SQL commands and SELECT userid FROM emp. (N) Invoice > Entry > Invoice Batches Summary (M) Query > Find (B) Approve This simplified path translates to the following: 1. All rights reserved. table names Passwords PL/SQL objects Example When-Validate-Item SELECT last_name FROM s_emp. [F]. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Press and release keys one at a time: [Alternate].Convention Arrow Brackets Commas Plus signs Element Menu paths Key names Key sequences Key combinations Example Select File—> Save. such as the following example. Oracle Applications Architecture. Release 11i Table of Contents viii . (N) From the Navigator window. 2000. 3. select Query > Find. 2. Press [Enter]. [D] Press and hold these keys simultaneously: [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[Del] Typographic Conventions in Code Convention Caps and lowercase Lowercase Element Oracle Forms triggers Column names.

Notations : (N) = Navigator (M) = Menu (T) = Tab (I) = Icon (H) = Hyperlink (B) = Button Typographical Conventions in Help System Paths This course uses a “navigation path” convention to represent actions you perform to find pertinent information in the Oracle Applications Help System. Review the Enter Journals topic that appears in the document frame of the help system window. expand the General Ledger entry. 3. Under the General Ledger entry. expand Journals. for example— (Help) General Ledger > Journals > Enter Journals —represents the following sequence of actions: 1. Release 11i Table of Contents ix . All rights reserved. Oracle Applications Architecture. 2. 4. The following help navigation path. 2000. In the navigation frame of the help system window. select Enter Journals. Under Journals. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.

Release 11i Table of Contents x . All rights reserved.Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Oracle Applications Architecture. 2000.

Page 1 . Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 .Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 2000.

2000. For a Unix environment assume that it is $APPL_TOP and for NT %APPL_TOP%.Page 2 .Oracle Applications Overview Oracle Applications Overview Oracle Applications Overview Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Profile How This Course Is Organized Oracle Applications Architecture is an instructor-led course featuring lecture and written practice sessions. 2000. Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 . Many environment variables such as APPL_TOP are stated as such. When appropriate. All rights reserved. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. This course takes a platform-generic approach. NT or UNIX specific information is presented. All right s reserved.

Page 3 . • Describe the Vision demo database. you should be able to: • List the components of Oracle Applications. • Describe the Oracle Applications product families. Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 . and other technology stack tools Oracle8i. and other technology stack tools The Vision demo database The Vision demo database Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. and other technology stack tools. Oracle8i. Oracle8i.Objectives Objectives Objectives • • • • • • • • • • The components of Oracle Applications The components of Oracle Applications Oracle Applications product families Oracle Applications product families Product dependencies Product dependencies The relationship between Oracle Applications. • Explain the relationship between Oracle Applications. The relationship between Oracle Applications. 2000. 2000. At the end of this lesson. All rights reserved. • Explain product dependencies. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All right s reserved.

All rights reserved. All right s reserved. A brief introduction of the Vision demo database is also provided. This lesson is important because it provides an introduction to the different programs and modules that comprise Oracle Applications Release 11i. 2000. Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 .Lesson Overview Lesson Overview Lesson Overview • • • • • • • • • • • • Database components Database components File system components File system components Product families Product families Product dependencies Product dependencies Oracle Applications and other technology stack Oracle Applications and other technology stack products products Vision demo database Vision demo database Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.Page 4 . It also explains the various product families and how dependencies exist between them. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. It describes the components that are stored and processed in the Oracle Applications database as well as the components stored in the Oracle Applications file system.

2000. Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 . All rights reserved. Oracle Applications is a suite of integrated software applications that provides a complete solution to the business needs of Oracle customers. All right s reserved. such as – PL/SQL stored procedures and triggers for performing database processing – views.Oracle Applications Oracle Applications Oracle Applications Suite of business applications Applications Technology Financials HRMS CRM Supply Chain Manufacturing Stored in a Database and File System Business Data Product Files Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. such as – tables which are used to store customer data – indexes and sequences • code objects.Page 5 . grants. 2000. non-interactive update of data • programs and SQL scripts for maintaining the system • Java that performs certain UI and business functions An Oracle8i database containing • data objects. Each application provides services and processing in a particular business area such as inventory or accounts receivable. synonyms and functions Copyright © Oracle Corporation. An Oracle Applications installation physically consists of A file system containing • forms that allow interactive entry and updating of data • reports that allow formatted documentation and display of data • concurrent programs that provide high-volume.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation. The Oracle Applications Technology layer lies between the Oracle tools and the Oracle Applications product specific modules. It provides features common to all Oracle Applications products. Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 . The customer data gathered. 2000. Oracle Applications Release 11i works in conjunction with the Oracle8i Server and associated Oracle tools products. All right s reserved.Oracle Applications and the Technology Stack Oracle Applications and the Technology Oracle Applications and the Technology Stack Stack Oracle Applications CRM Financials HRMS Manufacturing Applications Technology Technology Stack Forms Server Reports Server Web Server Oracle8i Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000. All rights reserved.Page 6 . stored and processed by Oracle Applications is stored in tables in an Oracle8i database. distributed processing capability. The Oracle tools products provide the multi-tier. Details on the Applications Technology layer will be covered in a subsequent lesson.

Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 .1.welcome Copyright © Oracle Corporation.6 Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Always refer to the Certify site to verify that the combination of platform and components that you plan to use are properly certified by Oracle Applications: http://wwsreg.us. 2000. All rights reserved.oracle. All right s reserved.Oracle8i and Oracle Tools Release/Version Requirements Oracle8i and Oracle Tools Oracle8i and Oracle Tools Release/Version Requirements Release/Version Requirements Product Oracle8i (Enterprise) Oracle Enterprise Manager Oracle Developer Server Oracle WebDB Oracle WebDB Listener 8.Page 7 .5 Version 8.com:8001/certifyv3/owa/certify.8 2.6 6. 2000.0. This slide lists the version requirements for the Oracle 8i server and the components of the Technology Stack.1.2 2.

Oracle Receivables and Oracle General Ledger are three of the many members of the Financials product family. 2000. All rights reserved. Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 . All right s reserved. Some of the product families are shown on the slide.Oracle Applications Product Families Oracle Applications Product Families Oracle Applications Product Families Applications Technology Manufacturing/ Distribution Financials Process Manufacturing Public Sector Human Resources Management Customer Relationship Management Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.Page 8 . Each product family contains many applications. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. The applications that make up Oracle Applications are grouped into product families. The Release 11i Upgrading Oracle Applications manual provides a list of all the product members for each product family. For example Oracle Payables. 2000.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000.Standard Product Abbreviations Standard Product Abbreviations Standard Product Abbreviations ID 0 101 222 Short name FND GL AR Full Name Application Object Library Oracle General Ledger Oracle Receivables 401 INV Oracle Inventory Copyright  Oracle Corporation. Refer to the Upgrading Oracle Applications manual for a complete list of product identifiers.Page 9 . These identifiers are used internally throughout Oracle Applications and are commonly used when referring to Oracle Applications products. 2000. Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 . All rights reserved Each application has multiple identifiers. Some example identifiers are shown on the slide. All rights reserved.

called dependent or shared products. The products that make up Oracle Applications are tightly integrated. Note: Products can be used independently and they can also be integrated with other third party software. and General Ledger. you use the License Manager to license the products you wish to use. Some products depend on components from other products. This includes any localization files. All right s reserved.Page 10 . • INV (Oracle Inventory) depends on the Application Object Library and General Ledger. for full functionality. Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 . 2000. The slide shows a simplified example of product dependencies. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. After you have installed Oracle Applications.Product Dependencies Product Dependencies Product Dependencies GL FND INV AR Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000. • GL (Oracle General Ledger) depends on the Application Object Library (FND). both the database objects for all Oracle Applications products and all product files are installed by the Rapid Install utility. All rights reserved. • AR (Oracle Receivables) depends on the Application Object Library. To simplify licensing and maintenance. Inventory.

2000. Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 .Page 11 . You can use the Vision Demo as a testing and training environment. You can also use it to learn about new products to help decide whether you want to expand the number of Oracle Applications products you have licensed. All rights reserved.Vision Demo Database Vision Demo Database Vision Demo Database Vision Database Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. The Vision demonstration database provides a sample set of transaction data for a fictitious company that uses most Oracle Applications Release 11i products. it can be both upgraded and maintained using regular Oracle Applications utilities. The Vision Demo simulates a real production installation configuration. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. The Vision database uses its own database instance and cannot be combined with any other Oracle Applications installation. 2000. The Vision Demo runs with Oracle8i Enterprise Edition and can be installed with Rapid Install. All right s reserved. As such.

product families. The Vision database simulates a real production The Vision database simulates a real production installation configuration with full functionality of installation configuration with full functionality of most Release 11i products. Applications components are stored in both an Applications components are stored in both an Oracle8i database and the applications file system Oracle8i database and the applications file system The applications modules are grouped into The applications modules are grouped into product families. dependencies exist between many modules. 2000. business applications.Lesson Summary Lesson Summary Lesson Summary • • • • • • • • • • Oracle Applications is a suite of integrated Oracle Applications is a suite of integrated business applications.Page 12 . Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 . All rights reserved. 2000. All right s reserved. Product family modules are tightly integrated and Product family modules are tightly integrated and dependencies exist between many modules. most Release 11i products. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.

Oracle Receivables. What is the product abbreviation for the Application Object What is the product abbreviation for the Application Object Library? Library? What is the purpose of the Vision demo database that is What is the purpose of the Vision demo database that is supplied with Oracle Applications? supplied with Oracle Applications? Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. grants and synonyms 2 Name two types of Oracle Application components stored in the file system. Tables. what are the other components of the technology stack required by Oracle components of the technology stack required by Oracle Applications. Name two types of Oracle Application components stored in Name two types of Oracle Application components stored in the file system. reports. Oracle WebDB Listener 5 What is the product abbreviation for the Application Object Library? FND Copyright © Oracle Corporation. what are the other Other than the Oracle 8i server. triggers. Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 . the file system. sequences. Name two types of database objects used a collection of files. Forms. Name two types of database objects used by Oracle Applications. For the Financials product family. of its products. Oracle WebDB. and General Ledger are members. Oracle Payables.Practice Practice Practice 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 Oracle Applications stores its components in a database and Oracle Applications stores its components in a database and a collection of files.Page 13 . what are the other components of the technology stack required by Oracle Applications. Name two types of database objects used by Oracle Applications. Other than the Oracle 8i server. concurrent programs 3 Name one Oracle Applications product family along with some of its products. 4 Other than the Oracle 8i server. Practice Solutions 1 Oracle Applications stores its components in a database and a collection of files. All right s reserved. Oracle Enterprise Manager. See the Upgrading Oracle Applications manual for a complete listing of product families and their member products. 2000. All rights reserved. views. Oracle Developer Server. 2000. Applications. indexes. PL/SQL stored procedures. by Oracle Applications. Name one Oracle Applications product family along with some Name one Oracle Applications product family along with some of its products.

Page 14 . It can be used for product demonstrations as well as training. Oracle Applications Overview Chapter 1 . All rights reserved. 2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.6 What is the purpose of the Vision demo database that is supplied with Oracle Applications? The Vision database simulates a real production installation configuration.

Page 1 . All rights reserved. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 . 2000.The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 Copyright © Oracle Corporation.

2000. All rights reserved. All right s reserved.The Applications Technology Layer The Applications Technology Layer The Applications Technology Layer Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.Page 2 . Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 .

All right s reserved. All rights reserved. developers. The Applications Technology layer provides standardized functionality. and security across all Oracle Applications modules. developers. developers. • Describe the Application Object Library. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. you should be able to: • List the products that comprise the Application Technology layer. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 . • List the Application Object Library features provided to end users. 2000.Page 3 .Objectives Objectives Objectives • • • • • • • • Products that comprise the Applications Products that comprise the Applications Technology layer Technology layer The functions provided by each member The functions provided by each member The Application Object Library The Application Object Library Application Object Library features provided to Application Object Library features provided to end users. • Briefly describe the functions provided by each member of this layer. 2000. and administrators. and administrators Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. This lesson describes the Applications Technology layer. At the end of this lesson. capabilities. and administrators end users.

2000. 2000.Page 4 . The Applications Technology layer provides common.Lesson Overview Lesson Overview Lesson Overview Oracle Applications CRM Financials HRMS Manufacturing Applications Technology Layer Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. The Application Object Library is a fundamental part of the Applications Technology layer. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 . Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. basic functionality across all Oracle Applications product families. All right s reserved.

2000. The products include: • Application Object Library • Applications DBA • Applications Utilities • Common Modules • Workflow • Alert • Implementation Wizard Copyright © Oracle Corporation. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 . All rights reserved.Applications Technology Layer Applications Technology Layer Applications Technology Layer Oracle Applications CRM Financials HRMS Manufacturing Application Object Library Application Utilities Common Modules Applications DBA Implementation Wizard Alert Workflow Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. the Applications Technology layer is a collection of products whose functionality is applicable to all Oracle Applications modules.Page 5 . All right s reserved. 2000. Within Oracle Applications.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Oracle Common Modules The Common Modules is an active data dictionary that enables you to define application components for the web. 2000. Oracle Applications DBA The Applications DBA product provides a set of tools that help in the administration of the Oracle Applications file system and database. It is heavily used to develop inquiry applications for the web without programming. The applications Java files are stored in this common area as well. upgrading.Page 6 . Other Oracle products use the code in these directories instead of in each product’s PL/SQL subdirectory. 2000. It provides tools for installing. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 .Applications Technology Layer Members Applications Technology Layer Applications Technology Layer Members Members • • • • • • Oracle Applications DBA Oracle Applications DBA Oracle Applications Utilities Oracle Applications Utilities Oracle Common Modules Oracle Common Modules Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. All right s reserved. Oracle Applications Utilities The Applications Utilities products are used in maintenance of the Oracle Applications’ environment and include shared product libraries used by all Oracle Applications products. maintaining. and generate many of the application's characteristics at runtime. and patching the applications environment. All rights reserved. It is also used to store translated labels for all the attributes on a transaction page. The installation process copies PL/SQL code from each application’s PL/SQL directory into this common area.

and delivering electronic notifications. 2000.Page 7 . Oracle Workflow Builder lets you graphically define the rules of your process which are expressed as automated activities using PL/SQL. 2000. defining rules. All right s reserved. Oracle Workflow Oracle Workflow allows for communication of data between applications and accomplishes three important business requirements: routing information. Oracle Alert Oracle Alert allows you to electronically mail system notifications to users when an exception or event has occurred.Applications Technology Layer Members Applications Technology Layer Applications Technology Layer Members Members • • • • • • Oracle Workflow Oracle Workflow Oracle Alert Oracle Alert Oracle Application Implementation Wizard Oracle Application Implementation Wizard Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 . Some applications are delivered with predefined alerts which allow you to notify users about specified database exceptions as they occur and perform routine tasks automatically according to a schedule that you define. Application Implementation Wizard Oracle Application Implementation Wizard guides your implementation of Oracle Applications products by tracking the implementation tasks needed for the products licensed. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. This allows easy administration and monitoring of the implementation process. Electronic notifications can be delivered via email to any Oracle Applications or Internet user. All rights reserved.

The Application Object Library also provides capabilities for developers to extend the operation of Oracle Applications by creating custom programs that interact with the base modules. The Application Object Library is a collection of programs and database tables that provide common functionality across all applications. for instance.Oracle Application Object Library Oracle Application Object Library Oracle Application Object Library Receivables General Ledger Fixed Assets Inventory Application Object Library Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.Page 8 . All rights reserved. 2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. Using the Application Object Library ensures that the processing of flexfields or the procedure for report submission . All right s reserved. The Application Object Library is a primary component of the Applications Technology layer. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 . does not vary from one application to another.

The procedure to submit a batch report using SRS is the same regardless of the application that owns the report. The Application Object Library supports the integration of Oracle Applications by providing standardized functionality and capabilities across all applications so that the look and feel do not vary by application. One example is the Accounting Flexfield. 2000. Another example of such standardization is the Standard Report Submission (SRS) facility. 2000. All right s reserved. The Applications Online Help is also standardized across all applications.Page 9 .AOL End User Features AOL End User Features AOL End User Features • • • • • • • • • • Standard user interface Standard user interface Key flexfields and descriptive flexfields Key flexfields and descriptive flexfields Shared flexfield value sets Shared flexfield value sets Standard Report Submission Standard Report Submission Applications Online Help Applications Online Help Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Flexfields allow the entry of certain important information to be standardized across all applications. All rights reserved. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 . which is used by both financial applications and manufacturing applications.

Flexfields used on custom forms can take advantage of existing flexfield capabilities such as value sets. Application Object Library provides many features for developers creating custom programs that interface with Oracle Applications. Custom reports can be integrated into Standard Report Submission so that they can be submitted and monitored using the same procedures as other Oracle Applications reports. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 .Page 10 . All right s reserved. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Detailed information on custom developers’ features can be found in the Oracle Applications Developers’ Guide. 2000.AOL Developer Features AOL Developer Features AOL Developer • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • PL/SQL libraries PL/SQL libraries CUSTOM library CUSTOM library GUI standards GUI standards Coding standards Coding standards Message dictionary Message dictionary Standard Report Submission Standard Report Submission Flexfield development Flexfield development APIs APIs Function security Function security Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000. The same coding and GUI standards used by Oracle Applications developers are available to custom developers. All rights reserved.

and reports they need to do their jobs. All rights reserved. responsibility. taking full advantage of multitasking and parallel processing. and user levels. and reports a user can access. 2000. and within an application. • Audit user activity: Monitor what users are doing and when they do it.AOL Features for Administrators AOL Features for Administrators AOL Features for Administrators • • • • • • • • • • Manage and control security Manage and control security Set up new users Set up new users Audit user activity Audit user activity Set user and system profiles Set user and system profiles Manage concurrent processing Manage concurrent processing Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. functions. • Manage concurrent processing: Concurrent Processing is an Oracle Applications facility that lets long-running. and give them access to only those forms. A system administrator can monitor and control concurrent processing using a few simple forms. • Set up new users: Register new Oracle Applications users. which forms. All right s reserved. data-intensive tasks run simultaneously with online operations. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. • Set user and system profiles: A user or system profile is a set of changeable options that affects the way Oracle Applications looks and behaves. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 . Choose who to audit and what type of data to audit. functions. The Application Object Library provides many features to make administration of the Oracle Applications easier. 2000.Page 11 . A system administrator can set profile values at the site. The applications system administrator can • Manage and control security: Decide which users have access to each application. application.

2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. functions and other responsibilities. When you install Oracle Applications. Since the SYSADMIN signon is automatically assigned to the System Administration responsibility. Set of Books Menu Reports Programs The Application Object Library controls access to the data in Oracle Applications.Page 12 . 2000.Application Object Library Security Application Object Library Security Application Security Responsibility Operating Unit Forms Navigation User Signon Report Group Database Objects Data Group Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. All right s reserved. Security is provided through user signons and responsibilities. For example the Purchasing User navigation menu does not include all the forms that are available to the Purchasing Super User navigation menu. Each user must have a signon and password to gain access to Oracle Applications. operating units. Responsibilities can allow access to a specific application. you can use SYSADMIN to create new user signons and assign them to responsibilities. A responsibility is a level of authority in Oracle Applications that lets application users access only those functions and data appropriate to their roles in the organization. Several default responsibilities are also created. a standard application user called SYSADMIN is created for you. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 . set of books and a restricted list of windows. Note that the forms available from the navigation menus vary by responsibility. All rights reserved. You can also create any custom responsibilities you need.

Alert. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 . 2000.Page 13 . All rights reserved. services and functionality to all applications.. and the Applications Utilities. Application Object Library provides a common Application Object Library provides a common interface to all applications.Lesson Summary Lesson Summary Lesson Summary • • • • The Application Technology Layer provides The Application Technology Layer provides services and functionality to all applications. Application Object Library features allow Application Object Library features allow developers to customize and extend functionality. The Application Object Library. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. layer for Oracle Applications. Applications DBA Applications Utilities. components of the Applications Technology layer. Alert. The Application Object Library. Application Object Library supplies the security Application Object Library supplies the security layer for Oracle Applications. • • • • • • Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Workflow. and the Implementation Wizard are all important Implementation Wizard are all important components of the Applications Technology layer. developers to customize and extend functionality. 2000. Workflow. All right s reserved. interface to all applications. Applications DBA .

–Applications DBA –Applications Utilities –Workflow –Alert –Implementation Wizard 3 List two AOL features for end users. Practice Solutions 1 What is the importance of the Application Technology Layer? The Applications Technology Layer provides common.Page 14 . All right s reserved. 2000. Name two AOL features used by administrators. List two AOL features for end users. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 . Name two AOL features used by administrators. List two AOL features for end users. All rights reserved. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Name two other products. 2000. 2 The Application Object Library is one product of the Application Technology Layer. Name two other products.Practice Practice Practice 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 What is the importance of the Application Technology Layer? What is the importance of the Application Technology Layer? The Application Object Library is one product of the The Application Object Library is one product of the Application Technology Layer. Name two other products. –Standard user interface –Key flexfields and descriptive flexfields –Shared flexfield value sets –Standard Report Submission Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Application Technology Layer. Name two AOL features used by developers. Name two AOL features used by developers. basic functionality across all Oracle Applications product families.

– Manage and control security – Set up new users – Audit user activity – Set user and system profiles – Manage concurrent processing Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 .4 5 Name two AOL features used by developers. – PL/SQL libraries – GUI standards – Coding standards – Message dictionary – Standard Report Submission – Flexfield development – APIs – Function security Name two AOL features used by administrators.Page 15 . All rights reserved.

The Applications Technology Layer Chapter 2 .Page 16 . 2000. All rights reserved.Copyright © Oracle Corporation.

2000.Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . All rights reserved.Page 1 .

Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Internet Computing Architecture and Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Oracle Applications Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. All rights reserved. 2000. 2000. All right s reserved. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 .Page 2 .

• Describe the components of the desktop tier. • Explain the purposes for the different servers used by Oracle Applications Release 11i. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. This lesson describes the multi-level architecture implemented with Release 11i of Oracle Applications. • Describe the components of the application tier.Page 3 . Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . All rights reserved. 2000. It also explains the interaction of Oracle Applications with other Oracle products. All right s reserved.Objectives Objectives Objectives • • • • • • • • • • • • The benefits of Internet Computing architecture The benefits of Internet Computing architecture Oracle Applications and the Internet Computing Oracle Applications and the Internet Computing architecture architecture The desktop tier The desktop tier The application tier The application tier The database tier The database tier The servers used by Oracle Applications Release The servers used by Oracle Applications Release 11i 11i Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000. At the end of this lesson. you should be able to: • Explain the benefits of the Internet Computing (IC) architecture. • Describe the components of the database tier. • Explain how Oracle Applications uses the Internet Computing architecture.

All right s reserved. It is. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.7 NCA releases.Page 4 .0. All rights reserved. Application Database Browser Client Applet Data Server Browser The multi-tier architecture implemented in Release 11i of Oracle Applications is similar to the architecture of Release 10.7 NCA and Release 11.Lesson Overview Lesson Overview Lesson Overview Desktop Web Server Forms Server Concurrent Processing Server Reports Server Admin Server Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. quite different from the client-server architecture used in pre-10. This lesson is important because an understanding of the different tiers and components of Oracle Applications Release 11i that reside on each tier is fundamental to fully understanding how Oracle Applications operates. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . 2000. 2000. however.

Application Database Browser Client Applet Data Server Browser The Internet Computing architecture provides Oracle Applications with a framework for multi-tier. Although many physical machines may be used in a configuration. All rights reserved.Page 5 . Internet computing architecture shifts software administration from the desktop onto the middle tier. and the database tier. thus lowering administration costs. 2000.Internet Computing Architecture Internet Computing Architecture Internet Computing Architecture Desktop Web Server Forms Server Concurrent Processing Server Reports Server Admin Server Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. distributed computing. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . which resides in the data center with the database server. or tiers. In the multi-tier computing model various functions of the Oracle Applications architecture are distributed among multiple levels. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. scalability is derived from processing capabilities on three separate levels: the desktop client tier. All right s reserved. 2000. the application tier.

All rights reserved. Browser Client Applet Data Server Browser The client interface is provided through a Java applet using a Java-enabled web browser. Web Browser/JInitiator The Forms Client Applet must run within a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) on the desktop. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . which works in conjunction with the web browser. The client can download the applet on demand and the applet is cached locally for future use. For Oracle Applications the JVM is supplied by the JInitiator program. pop-up lists. multiple coordinated windows. All right s reserved.Page 6 . The applet sends user requests to the forms server and handles such responses as screen updates. It can display any Oracle Applications screen and supports field-level validation.Desktop Tier Desktop Tier Desktop Tier Desktop Web Server Forms Server Concurrent Processing Server Reports Server Admin Server Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000. 2000. Forms Client Applet The Forms Client Applet is a component of Oracle’s Developer application development tool. and data entry aids like lists of values. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. and cursor movement.

Afterwards it remains in the browser’s local disk cache. 2000.Forms Client Applet Forms Client Applet Forms Client Applet Desktop Client Applet JAR files Java Enabled Browser with JInitiator Admin Server Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 .Page 7 . All rights reserved. ready for future sessions until an updated version is released. The required and commonly used JAR files are downloaded from the Web Server once at the beginning of the client’s first session. All right s reserved. Web Server Forms Server Concurrent Processing Server Reports Server JAR files JAR files The Forms client applet is a general-purpose applet that supports all Oracle Applications products including those with customizations and extensions. Other less commonly used JAR files are downloaded as needed. 2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. JAR files are digitally signed and should not be opened or expanded on-site. All updates are installed on the application tier and downloaded to the client automatically through the use of JInitiator. The Forms client is packaged as Java ARchive (JAR) files that contain all the Java classes typically required to run Oracle Applications forms.

JInitiator JInitiator JInitiator Desktop Client Applet JAR files Java Enabled Browser with JInitiator Admin Server Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Once installed. JInitiator allows Oracle Applications to run under the most current Java code set and is the preferred method of accessing Oracle Applications. When an end-user enters the desired Oracle Applications signon URL within the web browser. Oracle JInitiator will run the Forms client applet and start an Oracle Applications session. 2000. 2000. the browser will download the necessary installation executable to the desktop client. Web Server Forms Server Concurrent Processing Server Reports Server JAR files JAR files JInitiator is Oracle's Java Virtual Machine (JVM) that is implemented on the desktop client as a plug-in (Netscape Communicator) or ActiveX component (Microsoft Internet Explorer). All rights reserved. All right s reserved.Page 8 . Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . Copyright © Oracle Corporation. the browser will execute Oracle JInitiator. If Oracle JInitiator has not been previously installed.

2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. There are five servers that comprise the application tier: The Web Server • The Forms Server • The Concurrent Processing Server • The Reports Server • The Admin Server This tier provides the communication between the desktop tier and the database tier. All rights reserved. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . Browser Client Applet Data Server Browser The Application Tier is the location of servers that provide the business logic and code processing.Application Tier Application Tier Application Tier Application Web Server Forms Server Concurrent Processing Server Reports Server Admin Server Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. The application tier also supports load balancing among multiple forms servers to provide optimal scalability and processing.Page 9 . All right s reserved. 2000. This tier is sometimes referred to as the middle tier.

All rights reserved. the listener passes the request on to the cgi-bin load balancer. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . The Web Server processes the requests it receives over the network from the desktop clients. All right s reserved.Web Server Web Server Web Server Listener Web Server 2 cgi-bin Load Balancer Data Server 1 Browser HTTP Listener 3 4 Forms Server 5 Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 1 The HTTP listener accepts incoming HTTP requests (URLs) from desktop clients (browsers). 5 From this point on. 3 The cgi-bin load balancer determines the least loaded form server name and passes the information back to the desktop client by means of an HTML page it has created. The Web Server consists of an HTTP listener and the cgi-bin load balancer. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.g. 4 The desktop client can then connect directly to the forms server by the name it has been provided. PL/SQL or Java. for example. by returning a simple HTML web page. all communication is between the client desktop and the Forms Server with the Forms Server handling the communication with the Oracle8i database.Page 10 . 2000. 2000. If possible. 2 If the page referenced by the URL needs some kind of advanced processing. e. the HTTP listener services the request itself.

Forms Server Forms Server Forms Server Listener Web Server Data Server cgi-bin Load Balancer HTTP Listener Browser Forms Server Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.Page 11 . The forms server communicates with the desktop client in one of three ways: a standard HTTP network connection • a secure HTTPS network connection • a TCP/IP connection It communicates with the Oracle8i Server using Net8. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All right s reserved. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . Data is cached on the forms server and provided to the client as needed. All rights reserved. such as when scrolling through multiple order lines. The Forms Server hosts the Oracle Applications forms and the forms runtime engine. 2000. 2000. The Forms server is a Developer Server component that mediates the communication between the desktop client and the Oracle8i server. displaying client screens and causing changes in the database records based on user actions.

In a loadbalancing configuration. 2000.Load Balancing Among Forms Servers Load Balancing Among Forms Servers Load Balancing Among Forms Servers Listener Web Server 2 cgi-bin Load Balancer Data Server 1 Browser HTTP Listener 4 Forms Server 1 3 6 5 Forms Server 2 Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. a single point of coordination takes place with the cgi-bin load balancer. When a client issues a request to download the Forms client applet and thus initiate a forms session. the cgi-bin load balancer determines the name of the leastloaded host for the applet to connect to and returns it to the client in an HTML page. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . All right s reserved. Automatic load balancing among multiple forms servers can be provided. All rights reserved. The cgi-bin load balancer is a Perl script that determines the least loaded forms server. The client can now access the least loaded forms server directly and conduct transactions with the data server.Page 12 .

The Oracle Self-Service Web Applications are unique in that they do not use Oracle Forms for the interface. Logic is controlled through stored procedures that execute through either the PL/SQL Cartridge or Java servlets.Self-Service Web Applications Self-Service Web Applications Self-Service Web Applications HTTP Listener (WebDB) Browser Servlet Engine PL/SQL Cartridge Data Server Business Data Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. The PL/SQL Cartridge is executed by Web DB 2. while the Java servlets are executed by the Apache JServ module. 2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All right s reserved. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . The Self-Service Applications are designed in pure HTML and JavaScript and operate by direct connection to an HTTP listener running Oracle WebDB.5 and its PL/SQL Gateway.Page 13 . 2000. All rights reserved.5 and Apache communicate with the database using JDBC (Java Data Base Connectivity). WebDB 2.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2 The PL/SQL cartridge runs a stored procedure. All rights reserved. a Self-Service Application module uses the following access path: 1 The user clicks the hyperlink of a function from a browser.PL/SQL Access with Self-Service Web Applications PL/SQL Access with Self-Service Web PL/SQL Access with Self-Service Web Applications Applications Client Client Browser Web Server Web Server Listener Data Server Data Server Stored Procedures PL/SQL Cartridge Web Applications Dictionary Data Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. When using PL/SQL cartridge access. 2000. 3 These procedures query data from the applications tables and information from the Web Applications Dictionary to construct the resulting HTML page. All right s reserved. This request references the PL/SQL cartridge. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . 2000. 4 The resulting page is passed back through the Web Server to the browser. The browser makes a URL request to a Web listener.Page 14 .

2000. All rights reserved. 3 The server page obtains the data from the applications table and uses information from the Web Applications Dictionary to construct the HTML page. 2000.Page 15 . Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . 4 The resulting page is passed back to the browser.Java Servlet Access with Self-Service Applications Java Servlet Access with Self-Service Java Servlet Access with Self-Service Applications Applications Client Client Browser Web Server Web Server Listener Data Server Data Server Web Applications Dictionary Servlet Engine JSP Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All right s reserved. Data When using a Java Server Page. the Self-Service module uses the following access path: 1 The user makes a URL request from the browser 2 The listener contacts the Servlet engine where it is running a Java Server Page.

Most interaction with Oracle Applications data is done through Oracle Applications forms. This inserts a row into a database table specifying the program to be run. and operate in the background while users continue to work on other tasks. that periodically need to be run. however. All rights reserved. they can be configured to run on a separate machine called the concurrent processing server. Processes that run on the concurrent processing server are called concurrent programs. You submit a request to run concurrent programs through Oracle Applications forms. 2000. The concurrent manager then runs the program generating log and output files on the concurrent processing server. There are also reporting programs and data updating programs.Concurrent Processing Server Concurrent Processing Server Concurrent Processing Server Web Server Forms Server Concurrent Processing Server Data Server Browser Browser Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. so to ensure that they do not interfere with interactive operations.Page 16 . Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . 2000. A monitoring process reads the table and assigns the request to one of several concurrent managers running on one or more concurrent processing servers. All right s reserved. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. These programs may contain a very large number of computations.

The Concurrent Processing Server communicates with the Data Server using Net8. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . 2000. The Forms Server passes the report back to the user’s browser a page at time. The results of a concurrent report are passed back to the Web Review Agent. The Web Review Agent passes a file containing the entire report to the Forms Server. You can use system settings to control the size of the files and pages passed through the system.Accessing Concurrent Processing Output Accessing Concurrent Processing Output Accessing Concurrent Processing Output HTTP Report Browser Page Forms Server Report File Data Server Web Review Agent Browser Concurrent Processing Server Net8 Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. All right s reserved.Page 17 . 2000. All rights reserved.

All rights reserved. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 .Reports Server Reports Server Reports Server Web Server Forms Server Concurrent Processing Server Reports Server Admin Server Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000. Browser Data Server Browser The Reports Server resides on the middle tier with the Concurrent Processing Server. However. This server is automatically installed on the same node as the Concurrent Processing Server.Page 18 . 2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. and its reports are contained in the same directory with regular concurrent processing reports. The Reports Server is used to produce reports for business intelligence products. All right s reserved. reports generated by the Reports Server are monitored and administered separately from concurrent reports.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation. You use the AutoPatch program. Maintaining the Applications data Some features such as multi-lingual support and Multiple Reporting Currencies require regular maintenance to ensure updates are propagated to the additional schemas used by these features. 2000. All rights reserved.Administration Server Administration Server Administration Server Oracle Applications Database Oracle Applications File System Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. The administration server is the machine from which you maintain the data in your Oracle Applications database. to update software on the database and the application tier servers. adpatch. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . You carry out the following operations from this server: Installing and upgrading the database This process is conducted only when you are installing a new release. AutoPatch may also be used to apply cumulative patches to perform product upgrades. Applying database updates Most bug fixes consist of new files and scripts that update database objects. 2000. The AD Administration program (adadmin) allows you to do this and other file system and database maintenance tasks.Page 19 . or are upgrading to a new minor or major release. You use the Rapid Install to install Oracle Applications and AutoUpgrade for upgrades. All right s reserved.

Browser Client Applet Data Server Browser The database tier holds all the data stored and maintained by the Oracle Applications system. In Release 11i the database also includes the Oracle Applications help files. By definition the data server does not communicate directly with the desktop clients. but rather with the servers on the application tier that mediate these communications.Page 20 . More specifically. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . All right s reserved. indexes. the database tier contains Oracle8i Server files and an Oracle Applications database instance that physically stores the tables.Database Tier Database Tier Database Tier Database Web Server Forms Server Concurrent Processing Server Reports Server Admin Server Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. All rights reserved. 2000. It also contains some processing code that is stored in the database to optimize performance. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. and other database objects for your installation.

improves network efficiency. tier Internet Computing architecture. 2000. improves network desktop administration. 2000.Lesson Summary Lesson Summary Lesson Summary • • • • Oracle Applications Release 11i utilizes the multiOracle Applications Release 11i utilizes the multitier Internet Computing architecture. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. The applications tier is comprised of five servers.Page 21 . All right s reserved. and provides easy scalability to handle increased demand. and provides easy scalability to handle efficiency. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . the application tier. All rights reserved. the application tier. A multi-tier architecture allows processing to be distributed across multiple servers. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. The client applet is run using a Java-enabled web browser. Isolating the client software from the application code itself allows for easier maintenance. The Internet Computing architecture is comprised The Internet Computing architecture is comprised of the desktop client tier. The Internet Computing architecture reduces The Internet Computing architecture reduces desktop administration. the database tier. The applications tier is comprised of five servers. and the database tier. increased demand. Client access is provided in the form of a Java client applet. Load balancing allows clients to utilize the least Load balancing allows clients to utilize the least loaded forms servers. loaded forms servers. • • • • • • This lesson covered the multi-tier architecture used in Oracle Applications Release 11i. and of the desktop client tier.

All right s reserved. JInitiator allows Oracle Applications to run under the most current Java code set and is the preferred method of accessing Oracle Applications. All rights reserved. 3 List the elements that reside on the application tier. List the elements that reside on the application tier.Practice Practice Practice 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 What is the basic architecture of Internet Computing? What is the basic architecture of Internet Computing? What is JInitiator? What is JInitiator? List the elements that reside on the application tier. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . Practice Solutions 1 What is the basic architecture of Internet Computing? The Internet Computing architecture provides Oracle Applications with a framework for multi-tier. and the database tier. 2000. 2 What is JInitiator? JInitiator is Oracle's Java Virtual Machine (JVM) that is implemented on the desktop client. The Web Server. 2000. Processing capabilities exist on three separate levels: the desktop client tier. What is the purpose for the Administration server? What is the purpose for the Administration server? What is the purpose of the Forms server? What is the purpose of the Forms server? Briefly explain the process of load balancing. the Reports Server. distributed computing. the Forms Server(s).Page 22 . Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 4 What is the purpose of the Administration server? The Oracle Applications Administration server is used to: – Install and upgrade the database – Apply database patches – Maintain applications data Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Briefly explain the process of load balancing. the application tier. and the Administration Server. the Concurrent Processing Server.

–The Forms server mediates the communication between the client and the Oracle8i database. The client can now access the least loaded forms server directly and conduct transactions with the data server. The cgi-bin load balancer determines the least loaded forms server. the cgi-bin load balancer determines the name of the leastloaded host for the applet to connect to and returns it to the client in an HTML page. Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . Briefly explain the process of load balancing. Load balancing allows the middle-tier processing to be spread over multiple Forms servers. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. In a load-balancing configuration.Page 23 .5 6 What is the purpose of the Forms server? –The Forms server hosts the Forms Server engine. All rights reserved. a single point of coordination takes place with the cgi-bin load balancer. When a client issues a request to download the Forms client applet and thus initiate a forms session. 2000.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Page 24 . Internet Computing Architecture and Oracle Applications Chapter 3 . 2000. All rights reserved.

All rights reserved.Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . 2000.Page 1 .

Oracle Applications Database Structure

Oracle Applications Database Structure Oracle Applications Database Structure

Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right s reserved.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 - Page 2

Objectives

Objectives Objectives • • • • • • • • • • • •
Oracle Applications database objects Oracle Applications database objects Use of schemas within Oracle Applications Use of schemas within Oracle Applications Multiple Organization Architecture Multiple Organization Architecture Multiple Sets of Books Architecture Multiple Sets of Books Architecture Multiple Reporting Currencies Multiple Reporting Currencies Advanced features of Oracle8i used by Oracle Advanced features of Oracle8i used by Oracle Applications Applications

Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right s reserved.

This lesson describes the components of an Oracle Applications installation that are stored in the Oracle8i database. It also discusses the schemas used to provide access to these objects. At the end of this lesson, you should be able to: • Give examples of Oracle Applications database objects. • Explain the use of schemas within Oracle Applications. • Explain how Multiple Organization Architecture is implemented. • Explain how Multiple Sets of Books Architecture is implemented. • Explain how Multiple Reporting Currencies are implemented. • Describe Oracle 8i features used by Oracle Applications.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 - Page 3

Lesson Overview

Lesson Overview Lesson Overview

Oracle8i Database

Oracle Applications File System

Business data

Processing Programs

Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right s reserved.

Within its multi-tier architecture, Oracle Applications stores its business data in Oracle8i database tables. Additional database objects such as indexes and views are also used when processing these tables. Code modules in the form of stored procedures are contained in the database. Help files are stored in the database in Release 11i. This lesson discusses: • The database objects used by Oracle Applications • Oracle Applications’ use of schemas to control access

Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 - Page 4

Oracle Applications uses an Oracle8i database to store its database objects. and sequences. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . each application module has its own set of database objects. indexes. These objects store both business data as well as some of the code modules.Oracle Applications Database Objects Oracle Applications Database Objects Oracle Applications Database Objects Data Objects Tables Views Code Objects Triggers Packages Indexes Synonyms Sequences Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Data objects are used for storing and accessing business data. All rights reserved. In general. Code objects are used to process the data. synonyms and views. 2000. These objects include tables. These objects can be broadly defined into two categories. Code objects are stored in the database and used for optimizing application processing. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All right s reserved. Code objects include triggers. 2000. packages.Page 5 .

Schemas

Schemas Schemas
APPS
Views Tables

INV

Triggers Synonyms Indexes Packages Sequences

Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right s reserved.

A schema is a named collection of database objects. The schema is the “owner” of its objects and controls access to the objects. A schema can allow another schema to use its objects by granting the second schema access. With Oracle Applications the concept of a database schema is directly tied to the concept of a database user. That is, a schema in an Oracle database has a one-to-one relationship with a database user. The database user and the schema have the same name. The example above shows the database user and the schema on the left as APPS and on the right as INV (inventory). Note that the database objects are divided between the product schemas and the APPS schema. The product schemas contain only their own tables, sequences, and indexes. All other objects (triggers, views, packages) reside in the APPS schema.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 - Page 6

APPS Schema

APPS Schema APPS Schema
APPS Schema
Views INV Schema

Triggers GL Schema Synonyms Packages

Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right s reserved.

Oracle Applications is tightly integrated. A procedure in one schema may access data in a second schema and call a function in a third. To accomplish this, the procedure needs access to all three schemas. However, maintaining the access rights to all three is time-consuming and error prone. Using the APPS schema solves this problem. Each product’s schema grants full privileges to the APPS schema. The APPS schema has synonyms to all base product tables and sequences.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 - Page 7

Oracle Applications Product Schemas

Oracle Applications Product Schemas Oracle Applications Product Schemas
GL Schema GL_PERIODS AR Schema AR_DISPUTE_HISTORY

GL_JE_LINES

AR_BATCHES_ALL

Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right s reserved.

In general, for each product there is a corresponding schema that stores that product’s data objects. The default Oracle schema name and password for a product are usually the same as the product’s short name. For example Oracle General Ledger objects are in the schema GL • Oracle Receivables objects are in the schema AR

Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 - Page 8

2000. All rights reserved. AD. etc.) are combined under the HR schema. (APPS_ refers to the name of your Oracle Applications database).Page 9 .Additional Schemas Additional Schemas Additional Schemas HR APPLSYSPUB APPLSYS PAY APPS AOL PER AD Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. etc. PAY. For example. The data objects for some products are combined within a single schema. 2000. APPLSYSPUB. All right s reserved. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . Copyright © Oracle Corporation. There is an additional schema.) are combined under the APPLSYS schema. tables for the Application Technology Layer products (AOL. The APPS_MRC schema is used if you install the Multiple Reporting Currencies option. tables for the Human Resources products (PER. that is used only during the signon process which does not actually own any database objects.

All rights reserved. Once your signon and password have been verified. When you sign on to Oracle Applications. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Page 10 . All right s reserved. APPLSYSPUB is owned by the Application Object Library and it’s function is to validate the user name and password that you enter. 2000. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . you can select a responsibility. You are then connected to the APPS schema. 2000.Schemas Used During Signon Schemas Used During Signon Schemas Used During Signon APPLSYSPUB APPS GL Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. you can use forms from the APPS schema to access data in a product schema. Once connected to the APPS schema. you are connecting to the APPLSYSPUB schema.

All rights reserved.Multiple Organization Architecture Views Multiple Organization Architecture Views Multiple Organization Architecture Views SO_Headers_All Table Eastern Region View Western Region View Org_Id Column Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. operating units or inventory organizations. Accounting Flexfield. Organizations that share the same functional currency. You can support multiple organizations running any Oracle Applications product with a single installation. These different organizations can reflect different sets of books. These view definitions use the values in the Org_Id column to guarantee that only the information appropriate for that organization is returned to the user.Page 11 . This Multiple Organization Architecture is a virtual partitioning solution which secures information by operating unit using views within the APPS schema. different business groups. all forms and reports display information for that organization only. and calendar can post to the same set of books. legal entities. you first choose an organization either implicitly by choosing a responsibility or explicitly in a Choose Organization window. When you run any Oracle Applications product. All right s reserved. 2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . After you have chosen a particular organization. 2000.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Page 12 . All MSOBA installations must be converted to Multi-Org before upgrading to Release 12. Prior to Release 10.Multiple Sets of Books Architecture Multiple Sets of Books Architecture Multiple Books Architecture APPS INV1 APPLSYS GL INV2 AR1 AR2 AP1 AP2 APPS2 Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. This graphic illustrates a multiple product installation group architecture for two sets of books. require only a single installation. 2000. Multi-Org makes multiple installations of product schemas unnecessary. like the GL schema. two INV schemas. in order to partition the product’s data by ‘set of books’. The APPLSYS schema. All rights reserved.6. two AR schemas and two AP schemas. MSOBA's physical partitioning solution has been replaced by Multi-Org's virtual partitioning. Multiple copies of the subledger products such as Oracle Receivables were installed. All right s reserved. 2000. There are two APPS schemas. each in a different ORACLE schema (for instance AR1 and AR2). Although new installations of Oracle Applications cannot use MSOBA. simplifying upgrades and patching. partitioning was implemented through what is known as Multiple Sets of Books architecture (MSOBA). Release 11i will continue to support existing Multiple Sets of Books architecture installations and in fact will allow additional product installation groups to be added. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 .

You do this by defining one or more reporting sets of books in addition to your primary set of books.Multiple Reporting Currencies Multiple Reporting Currencies Multiple Reporting Currencies Primary Set of Books Currency: USD Reporting Set of Books Currency: BEF Primary Responsibility STANDARD Data Group Reporting Responsibility MRC Data Group APPS Schema APPS_MRC Schema Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Payables. Projects. MRC is supported for the following products: General Ledger. and Receivables. 2000. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . Cash Management. The Multiple Reporting Currencies (MRC) feature allows you to report and maintain accounting records at the transaction level in more than one functional currency. Purchasing. Global Accounting Engine. Assets. All rights reserved. All right s reserved. The data for the reporting set of books is stored in its own schema having its own tables and views.Page 13 . Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Cost Management. In your reporting sets of books. you maintain records in a functional currency other than your primary functional currency. 2000.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 2000. 2000. see the Oracle 8i documentation. For detailed information regarding these features. All right s reserved. The Oracle 8i features listed above are briefly described on subsequent slides.Page 14 . Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 .Oracle8i Features Used by Oracle Applications 11i Oracle8i Features Used by Oracle Oracle8i Features Used by Oracle Applications 11i Applications 11i • • • • • • • • • • • • Advanced Queuing (Workflow) Advanced Queuing (Workflow) Temporary tables Temporary tables Index-organized tables Index-organized tables Partitioned tables (Concurrent Manager) Partitioned tables (Concurrent Manager) Materialized views Materialized views Invoker’s Rights Invoker’s Rights Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.

This allows you to store messages into queues for deferred retrieval and processing by the Oracle server. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Page 15 . All right s reserved. 2000. Oracle Advanced Queuing (Oracle AQ) integrates a message queuing system with the Oracle database. 2000.Advanced Queuing Advanced Queuing Advanced Advanced Queuing Invoker’s Rights Temporary Tables Materialized Views Index-organized Tables Partitioned Tables Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Advanced Queuing also allows Workflow to operate outside of the database and across servers. All rights reserved. Benefits of Advanced Queuing Oracle Workflow utilizes Advanced Queuing to provide multi-protocol/platform support for implementation in heterogeneous environments. This allows Workflow to enable cross application integration throughout an organization while maintaining reliable and scalable performance. This enables users to create Application or Master Workflows that control and manage the flow of data and decisions across different servers and applications. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 .

All rights reserved. and the data discarded at the end of the session or transaction. A temporary table is a table with session-specific or transaction-specific data. It is empty when the session or transaction begins. Benefits of Temporary Tables In past applications releases. this creating and dropping of tables is no longer necessary.Temporary Tables Temporary Tables Temporary Tables Advanced Queuing Invoker’s Rights Temporary Tables Materialized Views Index-organized Tables Partitioned Tables Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. a new table was created to store this intermediate data and the table dropped when the transaction was complete. 2000. All right s reserved. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . thus improving performance of upgrades and other data transactions. 2000. With temporary tables. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Page 16 . Temporary tables are useful for saving intermediate results that can be joined back into another table.

2000. All rights reserved. index-organized tables provide faster keybased access to table data for queries that involve exact match or range search or both. result in updating the index. 2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . or deleting rows. Benefits of Index-Organized Tables Because data rows are stored in the index.Page 17 . Changes to the table data.Index-Organized Tables Index-Organized Tables Index-Organized Advanced Queuing Invoker’s Rights Temporary Tables Materialized Views Index-organized Tables Partitioned Tables Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. The storage requirements are reduced because key columns are not duplicated as they are in an ordinary table and its index. updating rows. All right s reserved. An index-organized table differs from an ordinary table in that the data for the table is held in its associated index. such as adding new rows.

2000. 2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Benefits of Partitioned Tables Each partition can be managed individually. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . or even subpartitions. thus providing a structure that can be better tuned for availability and performance.Page 18 . more manageable pieces called partitions. All rights reserved. Partitioned tables are customizable to the specific needs of individual customers. Partitioned tables allow your data to be broken down into smaller.Partitioned Tables Partitioned Tables Partitioned Tables Advanced Queuing Invoker’s Rights Temporary Tables Materialized Views Index-organized Tables Partitioned Tables Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. and can operate independently of the other partitions. All right s reserved.

Benefits of Materialized Views Cost-based optimization can make use of materialized views to improve query performance by automatically recognizing when a materialized view can and should be used to satisfy a request. They are suitable in various computing environments such as data warehousing. All rights reserved.Page 19 . Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . materialized views are used to replicate data at distributed sites and synchronize updates done at several sites with conflict resolution methods. All right s reserved. replicate. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. and distributed or mobile computing. The optimizer transparently rewrites the request to use the materialized view.Materialized Views Materialized Views Materialized Views Advanced Queuing Invoker’s Rights Temporary Tables Materialized Views Index-organized Tables Partitioned Tables Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Queries are then directed to the materialized view and not to the underlying detail tables or views. The materialized views as replicas provide local access to data which otherwise would have to be accessed from remote sites. 2000. and distribute data. precompute. 2000. Materialized views are schema objects that can be used to summarize. decision support. In distributed environments.

. 2000.. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . 2000. maintenance of Multiple Reporting Currencies (MRC) and Multiple Set of Books Architecture (MSOBA) is much quicker. APPS_MRC. Roles are enabled unless the invoker-rights procedure was called directly or indirectly by a definer-rights procedure. APPS2. introduced in this release. The invoker-rights model. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.. Benefits of Invoker’s Rights Invoker’s Rights eliminates the need to duplicate packages in other APPS schemas (e.Invoker’s Rights Invoker’s Rights Invoker’s Rights Advanced Queuing Invoker’s Rights Temporary Tables Materialized Views Index-organized Tables Partitioned Tables Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Therefore. All rights reserved. APPS3. and less expensive.Page 20 . Prior releases used a definer-rights model wherein programs execute with the privileges of the creating user.g.). allows programs to be executed with the privileges of the calling user. All right s reserved. less complicated. An invoker-rights procedure executes with all of the invoker's privileges.

store and process business data. All right s reserved. Each product has its own schema that contains its Each product has its own schema that contains its tables and indexes . used for processing.Lesson Summary Lesson Summary Lesson Summary • • • • • • • • • • Oracle Applications uses an Oracle8i database to Oracle Applications uses an Oracle8i database to store and process business data. 2000.Page 21 . 2000. advanced features of Oracle8i. Oracle Applications Release 11i uses many of the Oracle Applications Release 11i uses many of the advanced features of Oracle8i. Schemas are groups of database objects and are Schemas are groups of database objects and are used to control access to those objects. All rights reserved. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . used to control access to those objects. tables and indexes The APPS schema has access to all the product The APPS schema has access to all the product schemas and also contains the database objects schemas and also contains the database objects used for processing. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.

packages.Page 22 . 3 What is the difference between the APPS schema and the APPLSYS schema? The APPLSYS schema owns the Application Object Library (AOL) database objects. Name them and There are two categories of database objects. This simplifies the access requirements needed to allow product dependency processing. Practice Solutions 1 There are two categories of database objects. 2 Define “schema. an example of each. synonyms and views. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . Name them and an example of each. 4 What benefit does using the APPS schema provide? All product schemas grant access to APPS. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Name them and an example of each. indexes. The values stored in a column called the Organization_ID Column are used to distinguish between views. features. name two. and sequences. The APPS schema is a general purpose schema with access to all product schema objects. 2000. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Define “schema.” Define “schema. name two.” What is the difference between the APPS schema and the What is the difference between the APPS schema and the APPLSYS schema? APPLSYS schema? What benefit does using the APPS schema provide? What benefit does using the APPS schema provide? How does Oracle Applications use views to implement MultiHow does Oracle Applications use views to implement MultiOrg processing? Org processing? What are the benefits of MRC? What are the benefits of MRC? Oracle Applications Release 11i utilizes several Oracle 8i Oracle Applications Release 11i utilizes several Oracle 8i features. 5 How does Oracle Applications use views to implement MultiOrg processing? Each different organization uses a different view to access and display the information appropriate to its organization. All right s reserved. Code objects are used to process the data and include triggers. Data objects are used for storing and accessing business data and include tables. All rights reserved.Practice Practice Practice 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 7 7 There are two categories of database objects.” A named collection of database objects. 2000.

6 7 What are the benefits of MRC? The Multiple Reporting Currencies (MRC) feature allows you to report and maintain accounting records at the transaction level in more than one functional currency. Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . name two. All rights reserved. Oracle Applications Release 11i utilizes several Oracle 8i features.Page 23 . –Advanced Queuing –Temporary tables –Index-organized tables –Partitioned tables –Materialized views –Invoker’s Rights Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000.Page 24 . Oracle Applications Database Structure Chapter 4 . All rights reserved.

Page 1 . Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . All rights reserved. 2000.Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 Copyright © Oracle Corporation.

All right s reserved.Page 2 . All rights reserved.Oracle Applications File System Oracle Applications File System Oracle Applications File System Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. 2000.

At the end of this lesson. This lesson describes the file system used to store the files belonging to Oracle Applications. the technology stack components. 2000. • Describe the contents of a typical product directory.Page 3 . and the Oracle Applications database. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All right s reserved. • Describe the contents of the $APPL_TOP/au directory • Describe the contents of the $APPL_TOP/admin directory. • Describe the contents of the $APPL_TOP/ad directory. 2000. All rights reserved.Objectives Objectives Objectives • • • • • • • • • • The APPL_TOP directory The APPL_TOP directory A typical product directory A typical product directory The APPL_TOP/ad directory The APPL_TOP/ad directory The APPL_TOP/au directory The APPL_TOP/au directory The APPL_TOP/admin directory The APPL_TOP/admin directory Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . you should be able to: • Explain the importance of the APPL_TOP directory.

All rights reserved. 2000. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . • • • • • • Describe the contents of the Common Components directory Describe the contents of the Technology Stack directory Describe the contents of the Oracle Database Files directory Explain the purpose for the Oracle Enterprise Manager directory Locate Java and HTML files used by Oracle Applications Define some of the types of files in the file system Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Page 4 . 2000. All right s reserved.Objectives Objectives Objectives • • • • • • • • • • • • The Common Components directory The Common Components directory The Technology Stack directory The Technology Stack directory The Oracle Database Files directory The Oracle Database Files directory The Oracle Enterprise Manager directory The Oracle Enterprise Manager directory Java and HTML files used by Oracle Applications Java and HTML files used by Oracle Applications File types in the file system File types in the file system Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.

2000. This lesson provides you with an understanding of the Oracle Applications Environment file systems.Page 5 . This lesson is important because Oracle Applications 11i Environment uses components from many other Oracle products. 2000. All rights reserved. All right s reserved. It stores these product files within several different file systems. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Lesson Overview Lesson Overview Lesson Overview < env name>APPL < env name >ORA < env name >COMN OEMAgent < env name >DATA (to Product (to Log/Out (to Oracle8i and Tools Files) (to Oracle Database) (to Oracle Manager Agent) Directories) and Java Files) Applications Enterprise Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.

where db name is the name of the database).Page 6 . 2000. regardless of their license status. • Additional directories for administration and maintenance Copyright © Oracle Corporation. licensed or not.Oracle Applications File System Oracle Applications File System Oracle Applications File System <env name>APPL/115 < db name>.5.env name>. 2000.0 Administrative Files Product Files Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. The Oracle Applications file system contains: The Oracle applications environment file (default name is <db name>.env admin au fnd 11.0 inv 11. • A directory for each of the products. (Note: This is a major change in Release 11i.5. The Oracle Applications file system contains the product files for Oracle Applications itself. All right s reserved. are installed into the database AND the file system.) Product directories use the standard product abbreviations. that have been installed under the <env name>APPL/115.0 11.env.0 11. All products. or APPL_TOP directory. All rights reserved.5. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 .5.

For both an installation and upgrade of Oracle Applications.env file define important directories within the Oracle Applications file structure. Many of the parameters located in the <db name>. This variable is used in subsequent directory definitions. The top level directory path is defined in an environment variable APPL_TOP.env file during the installation.env file is a very important file containing parameters defining the Oracle Applications environment.APPL_TOP Directory APPL_TOP Directory APPL_TOP Directory <env name>APPL/115 < db name >.5. and is also used as a term to refer to a particular Oracle Applications file system.0 APPL_TOP= < env name>APPL/115 <env Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Technical note: The <db name>.env >. Rapid Install creates the <db name>. These and other parameters are discussed during this lesson.Page 7 . All rights reserved. Rapid Install creates the new APPL_TOP. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. or top Applications directory and defaults the APPL_TOP directory value to <db name>APPL. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 .5.0 11.5.5.0 11. Additional parameters point to product top directories. the APPL_TOP directory is identified in the environment parameter APPL_TOP.0 inv 11. 2000. All right s reserved. Typically. For example. 2000.env admin au fnd 11.

Page 8 .0 FND_TOP =APPL_TOP/fnd/11. the slide shows three product directories.5.env >. 2000.env admin au fnd 11. All rights reserved.0 INV_TOP=APPL_TOP/inv/11. The product subdirectory name is defined in an environment variable <PROD>_TOP. 2000.5.5. Keep in mind that multiple releases and product versions cannot exist in a single APPL_TOP directory. Since products can exist at different version levels.0 11.env file: AU_TOP=APPL_TOP/au/11. where < PROD> is the product short name. Each product has its own subdirectory. the version is typically reflected in the subdirectory name. All right s reserved. For example.5. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 .0 11. The paths to these directories would be defined in the following declarations in the <db name>.5.Oracle Applications Product Directories Oracle Applications Product Directories Oracle Applications Product Directories <env name>APPL/115 < db name >.0 Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.0 inv 11.5.5.0 Copyright © Oracle Corporation.

you can choose to put products’ files on disks other than the main disk. Also note the lack of a period for Java compatibility in the example APPL_TOP value.. All right s reserved.env $APPL_TOP = /d01/appl/115 /d01/appl/115 $GL_TOP = /d01/appl/115/ gl/11. OFA helps users avoid problems by optimizing Oracle’s relationship with its host operating system.env file. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. OFA is a set of file naming and placement guidelines for Oracle software and databases. au. Technical note 1: The ad. define the full path to the directory in the <PROD>_TOP parameter in the <db name>.5 /d02/appl/115/oe/11. and admin directories must reside on the same disk containing the directory identified by the APPL_TOP parameter. where x. You can distribute product directories across several disks if space is a problem. All files may not fit on a single disk. Oracle Applications files require a significant amount of space.n is a number (use zeros to pad fixed length numbers). If a product’s directory is not located on the same disk.. The slide shows examples of this naming convention.5 $OE_TOP = /d02/appl/115/ oe/11.. One OFA rule is to name mount points using the format /x.xn.5 /d01/appl/115/gl/11.x is a character string and n. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 .5 115 Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. All rights reserved. Technical note 2: Use Optimal Flexible Architecture (OFA) compliant mount point designations. Rapid Install’s multi-node install provides this option.n.. 2000.env name>.Page 9 .5 gl ap 11. See the Oracle8i Administrator's Guide for detailed information on Optimal Flexible Architecture.Distributing Files Across Multiple Disks Distributing Files Across Multiple Disks Distributing Multiple /d01/appl/115 /d01/appl/115 /d02/appl /115 /d02/appl/115 < db name>. 2000. fnd. When you install Oracle Applications.

All right s reserved. 2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. The product directory contains many subdirectories that group the different files for that product. These subdirectories are explained on the following pages.Product Directories Product Directories Product Directories <PROD>_TOP admin bin help html java lib media mesg log out patch plsql resource sql forms include reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . there may be differences based upon configuration. however. 2000.Page 10 . All rights reserved. A typical product directory will have the subdirectories shown.

specifies dependencies between GL and other products so that upgrade jobs between products are processed in the correct order. The admin subdirectory contains files used by AutoUpgrade to upgrade products to the current release. All right s reserved. lists the GL files needed to run the application.drv. glfile. The upgrade process is divided into several phases. gldep. Phase driver files specify processing by phase.Admin Directory Admin Directory Admin Directory <PROD>_TOP admin bin help html java lib media mesg log out patch plsql resource sql forms driver import include odf sql reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.drv. All rights reserved.drv creates sequences for the General Ledger (GL) product during the sequence phase. import: the import files used to upgrade seed data.Page 11 . Example files: glseq.drv). odf: the object description files used to create tables and other database objects. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. 2000. sql: the SQL scripts and PL/SQL scripts used to upgrade data. The admin subdirectory has several subdirectories of its own: driver: the upgrade driver files (.

Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . The concurrent programs. All rights reserved. other C language programs and shell scripts for each product are stored in its respective bin directory.Bin Directory Bin Directory Bin Directory < PROD >_TOP admin bin help html java lib media mesg log out patch plsql resource sql forms include reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Some of the programs you will find here include: f60webmx: the applications form processor (in FND_TOP/bin) FNDLIBR: the concurrent manager (in FND_TOP/bin) startmgr: a Unix shell script to start the concurrent manager (in FND_TOP/bin) fdfcmp: the flexfield compiler (in FND_TOP/bin) FNDMDGEN: a message file generator (in FND_TOP/bin) adadmin: the AD Administration utility (in AD_TOP/bin) adpatch: the AutoPatch utility (in AD_TOP/bin) Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. All right s reserved. 2000. Of particular importance to Oracle Applications are the FND_TOP/bin and AD_TOP/bin directories.Page 12 .

Copyright © Oracle Corporation.fmx runtime files. The installation utility generates form files by converting the .fmb source file to .Page 13 . /US for American English forms.fmb files) or generated runtime files (. All right s reserved.. The source files are stored in AU_TOP/forms so generation of runtime files can be done more easily. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . e. All rights reserved. /F for French forms. Using forms in other languages is covered in the lesson on Languages and Localizations.g. 2000. 2000. This subdirectory is named according to the language. The forms directory contains Oracle Forms files.fmx files).Forms Directory Forms Directory Forms Directory < PROD >_TOP admin bin help html java lib media mesg log out patch plsql resource sql forms US include reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Oracle Forms may be portable source files (. A subdirectory exists for the language(s) installed. /D for German forms.

Under the help directory.Help Directory Help Directory Help Directory < PROD >_TOP admin bin help US html java lib media mesg log out patch plsql resource sql forms include reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Page 14 . These files are imported into the database during an install or an upgrade to optimize the performance of online help. 2000. All right s reserved. The help directory contains the online help source files. All rights reserved. 2000. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . there is a language directory to store the help files for each language in which your are running Oracle Applications.

These files are used primarily by products that have a Self-Service interface. HTML files are kept in subdirectories by language. All right s reserved. 2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. The Javascripts (. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . and Java Server Page files used by various products. 2000.js) and Java Server Page (. Javascripts.Page 15 .HTML Directory HTML Directory HTML Directory < PROD >_TOP admin bin help html java lib media mesg log out patch plsql resource sql forms include reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.jsp) files are kept in the main directory. The html subdirectory contains HTML. All rights reserved.

All rights reserved.h) files. 2000. All right s reserved. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . Note that not all products have an include directory. 2000.Include Directory Include Directory Include Directory < PROD >_TOP admin bin help html java lib media mesg log out patch plsql resource sql forms include reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. The include directory contains header (. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Page 16 . These files may be required by the files contained in the lib directory for the relinking process.

there will be one or more Java ARchive (JAR) files under the jar directory. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . There will also be a product specific .Java Directory Java Directory Java Directory < PROD >_TOP admin bin help html include java make lib media log mesg out patch plsql resource sql forms reports jar *. This directory is used to initially store Java files.dep file under the make directory that specifies the dependencies between this product and other products using Java. This is done to optimize processing. All rights reserved. the files are copied to the directories identified in the JAVA_TOP environment variable (these directories are defined in the environment file you create during the installation process). 2000. All right s reserved. During the installation or the upgrade.Page 17 . For each product that uses Java. 2000.jar Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.

o (object module for the GLCCON program) • other . the $GL_TOP/lib directory contains: • glpmai.mk the makefile for all gl programs Copyright © Oracle Corporation. The lib subdirectory contains files pertinent to the process of relinking Applications programs: object files: (.a the gl library file • gl.o files). you may need to relink Applications programs. 2000. All rights reserved. for example if you upgrade the Oracle8i server. one for each C program to relink.o files • libgl. All right s reserved.o files with the . At some time.Page 18 .a file to create the newly linked C programs.o (object module for the GLPPOS program) • glcmai. 2000. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . For example. a library file: (. a makefile: (.a file) the compiled C code common to that product’s programs.mk file) specifying how to relink the .Lib Directory Lib Directory Lib Directory < PROD >_TOP admin bin help html java lib media mesg log out patch plsql resource sql forms include reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.

When the concurrent managers run Oracle Applications reports or data update programs. All right s reserved.Log and Out Directories Log and Out Directories Log and Out Directories < PROD >_TOP admin bin help html java lib media mesg log out patch plsql resource sql forms include reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.env. which is the default or 2) a common log and output subdirectory. The default locations for these two files are <PROD>_TOP/log and <PROD>_TOP/out. The log directory holds concurrent log files from each concurrent request as well as the concurrent manager log files. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . but you can change the default directory and the default file names by changing the APPLLOG and APPLOUT environment variables in the <db name>. 2000. The out directory holds the concurrent report output files. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.env file. 2000. All rights reserved. There are two methods for storing log and output files: 1) in each product’s log and out directories. You can consolidate all product log and out files into one directory by defining the APPLCSF environment variable in the <db name>. they write output files as well as diagnostic log files and temporary files. to directories defined during the installation process.Page 19 . This parameter identifies a directory to hold all log and output files.

The Applications Forms client applets display text and graphics in the form of . All right s reserved. The media directory contains all product specific . 2000.gif files. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 .Page 20 .Media Directory Media Directory Media Directory < PROD >_TOP admin bin help html java lib media mesg log out patch plsql resource sql forms include reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.gif files. All rights reserved.

msg US. Applications concurrent programs also print messages in their log and output files. Each product’s mesg directory contains one or more files for the language-specific messages that the product uses: • . Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . Applications forms display messages at the bottom of the screen and in pop-up boxes. • an equivalent German message file will be titled D. These messages can be translated into different languages and are stored in message files separate from the forms and programs. 2000. All rights reserved.Mesg Directory Mesg Directory Mesg Directory < PROD >_TOP admin bin help html java lib media out mesg US.msb files contain the binary messages used at runtime.msg patch plsql resource sql log forms include reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.msb file. All right s reserved.msb.Page 21 . • a standard American English install will contain a US. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000.

2000. Phase driver files specify processing by phase. All rights reserved.pls) scripts used to update the database. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. • sql: contains sql (.Page 22 . Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 .drv).Patch Directory Patch Directory Patch Directory < PROD >_TOP admin bin help html java lib media mesg log out plsql resource reports sql patch 115 forms include driver sql odf import Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. All right s reserved.sql) and PL/SQL (. 2000. Any updates to Oracle Applications data or data model use a directory named patch to store the patch files. • import: contains lct and slt files to update the seed data.odf) to update the data model. • odf: contains object description files (. Patch files are grouped by release within the following subdirectories: • driver: contains the driver files (.

Page 23 . • The files in the resource subdirectory (. These directories are used for unloading PL/SQL libraries used by Applications reports and forms.pll and . Copyright © Oracle Corporation.plx files) are used by Oracle Forms. 2000. they are moved to equivalent subdirectories under the AU_TOP directory. Note that not all products have PL/SQL libraries. After these files are unloaded. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . All rights reserved. All right s reserved.pll files) are used by Oracle Reports. • The files in the plsql subdirectory (. 2000.PL/SQL and Resource Directories PL/SQL and Resource Directories PL/SQL and Resource Directories < PROD >_TOP admin bin help html java lib media mesg log out patch plsql resource sql forms include reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.

2000. 2000. This directory contains the report files for this product.Reports Directory Reports Directory Reports Directory < PROD >_TOP admin bin help html java lib media mesg log out patch plsql resource sql forms include reports US Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.rex files) and then back to binary format. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. The AD Administration utility can regenerate these reports by converting them to their source format (. This is usually recommended so the PL/SQL is optimally compiled for the platform. All right s reserved.Page 24 . For each report there is a portable binary .rdf file. Reports for non-English languages are stored in their own language-specific directory under the reports directory.

All rights reserved. There are many SQL*Plus scripts used by Oracle Applications for concurrent processing.Sql Directory Sql Directory Sql Directory < PROD >_TOP admin bin help html java lib media mesg log out patch plsql resource sql forms include reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.Page 25 . Copyright © Oracle Corporation. These scripts are stored as . These scripts typically produce reports or perform concurrent processing. 2000. 2000. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . All right s reserved.sql files in this subdirectory.

env name>. AutoPatch (adpatch) and the AD Administration (adadmin) utility. The Applications DBA is a set of tools for installing.0 admin bin lib Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. AD stands for Applications DBA. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.AD Directory AD Directory AD Directory < env name >APPL/115 < db name>. The ad directory contains utilities such as AutoUpgrade. and lib directories.Page 26 . and administering the Oracle Applications environment.5.env admin au ad 11. upgrading. All right s reserved. See 5-10. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . and 5-17 for the contents of the admin. bin. 5-11. 2000. All rights reserved. 2000.

env admin au 11. The AU_TOP directory contains product files that are consolidated in a single location for optimal processing. All right s reserved.5. 2000. These are also stored in the products’ forms subdirectories.env name>. • A copy of all Java files used by JInitiator when regenerating the desktop client jar files. • PL/SQL libraries used by Oracle Forms. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. These are also stored in the products’ plsql subdirectories.AU Directory AU Directory AU Directory < env name >APPL/115 < db name>. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . All rights reserved. AU stands for Application Utilities. The public copy of all Java files are stored in JAVA_TOP.0 ad admin forms plsql resource java reports Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.Page 27 . These files include: PL/SQL libraries used by Oracle Reports. These are also stored in the products’ resource subdirectories. 2000. • Oracle Forms source files.

and restart files in the log. adrelink preupg log restart < db name>. All right s reserved. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. out and restart files in the <db name> subdirectory.txt adsetenv applprod.txt . out and restart directories directly under the APPL_TOP/admin directory.Admin Directory Admin Directory Admin Directory admin adovars.Page 28 .env) • scripts run during the upgrade • text files read by AutoUpgrade • a preupg directory containing product-specific pre-upgrade scripts • log and out directories for upgrade log and output files • a restart directory where AD programs create restart files Most AD programs put their log.txt applora. These include: • a custom environment file defining certain file locations (adovars. applprod. adovars. cannot access the <db name> value and therefore store their log. adconfig .env name>. out. applora. 2000.env out log out restart Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. patch and administration utilities obtain this value and store their log. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . Some programs when run from the command line. 2000.env adconfig. out and restart files in a separate <db name> subdirectory. All rights reserved. The APPL_TOP/admin directory contains files and scripts used by the AutoUpgrade utility during the upgrade process. The value for <db name> comes from the TWO_TASK or ORACLE_SID parameters. The upgrade.

Admin Directory Text Files Admin Directory Text Files Admin Directory Text Files admin adconfig. applcust .env name>. 2000. All right s reserved.txt: territory description for Localizations Copyright © Oracle Corporation.txt: environmental configuration variable values • adlinkbk. Some of the files include: • adconfig. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . applprod.txt applcust. applterr .Page 29 .txt: files adrelink should backup rather than delete • applcust.txt adlinkbk.txt applprod. There are many text files stored under the admin directory. adlinkbk.txt: minimum or required settings for database initialization parameters • applprod.txt: products available in this release • applterr. 2000. All rights reserved. applora.env log out restart Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. adconfig . These files are used by many different utilities.txt: registered customizations • applora.txt applora.txt applterr.txt adrelink preupg log out restart < db name>.

All right s reserved.zip Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Release 11i supports the placement of the java directory (JAVA_TOP) and the HTML directory (OAH_TOP) anywhere in your file system.zip *. The <env name>COMMON directory contains directories and files that are used across products or are used in conjunction with other third-party products.zip icx html log html admin* util oracle apps mrp jar gl jar fnd jar Apache JRE118 US WebTools (unzipped into) *contains Rapid Install scripts fndewt. 2000.jar fndewt.jar fndswing .jar icxcabo. <env name> denotes the name of the applications environment. This directory also contains the consolidated log and output directories used by concurrent processing.Common Components Directory Common Components Directory Common Components < env name>COMMON xml jdbc java out apps. The environment name is defined by the system administrator during the initial run of an AD utility. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.zip icxcabo. Unlike previous releases.Page 30 . Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . 2000. All rights reserved.jar fndswing.

0 java ar make arjar. dep jar *.0 java make gljar. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . Copyright © Oracle Corporation. gljar. 2000.Copying Java Files: Product Files Copying Java Files: Product Files Copying Java Files: Product Files < env name>APPL/115 < env name>COMMON java gl 11.jar oracle apps gl jar jar Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000.jar ar 11. Java files are installed into Oracle Applications product directories and then copied to directories under the Common Components directory to facilitate processing. Oracle Applications Release 11i makes extensive use of Java. Many Oracle Applications products use Java on the front end for forms and on the back end for data processing. arjar . All right s reserved.5.dep jar *.5.Page 31 . All rights reserved.

zip Copying Java Files: apps. Individual Java class files are never present on the file system.zip but. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 .0 java apps. The public copy is the one utilized in a web server environment. All rights reserved.zip jdbc xml oracle apps fa jar gl jar Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.zip is located in AU_TOP/java and a public copy is stored under JAVA_TOP. Apps.zip Copying Java Files: apps.zip directly. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.5. 2000.Copying Java Files: apps. for security reasons. All right s reserved. cannot access the APPL_TOP apps.zip is a patchable archive of all Java class files required by Oracle Applications.zip apps. 2000. Apps. as the web server can see the JAVA_TOP stored apps.Page 32 .zip < env name>APPL/115 < env name>COMMON java au 11.

5) (WebDB reports60 graphics60 Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. This slide shows which technology stack components are located in each directory. 2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.1Web (WebDB 2.1 8. All rights reserved.0 forms60 java bin lib bin lib (Oracle8i) 8. there are multiple ORACLE_HOME directories under the Technology Stack directory.2 Listener) bin lib 2.Technology Stack Directory Technology Stack Directory Technology Stack Directory <env name>ORA 8. 2000. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 .Page 33 . All right s reserved. To take advantage of the technology stack components’ latest features.

The Rapid Install utility installs all the system.dbf files that comprise the Oracle Applications database itself. Oracle Applications Release 11i uses an Oracle8i data server. and index files across four disks. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . The <env name>DATA file system contains the . Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. You can specify mount points and directory names during the installation. All right s reserved.Page 34 . 2000. data. All rights reserved.Oracle Applications Database Files Directory Oracle Applications Database Files Oracle Applications Database Files Directory Directory Disk 1 cntrl01 log01a log02a rbs01 Disk 2 cntrl02 log01b log02b system01 ctxd01 Disk 3 cntrl03 product data Disk 4 temp01 product index Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.

you will need to install Oracle Enterprise Manager on each machine as well. In Release 11i. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. All rights reserved.Page 35 .1 ORACLE_HOME) ORACLE_HOME) *only one install per machine Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. If you choose to perform a multi-node install using Rapid Install to spread your Oracle Applications environment across multiple machines.Oracle Enterprise Manager Directory Oracle Enterprise Manager Directory Oracle Enterprise Manager Directory OEMAgent Oracle Enterprise Manager Agent* (8. Oracle Applications uses the Oracle Enterprise Manager and Oracle Applications Management Pack to perform many system administration and monitoring tasks. All right s reserved. 2000. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 . The product files for Oracle Enterprise Manager are installed under the OEMAgent file system.

h . All rights reserved. The Oracle Applications file system contains a variety of files.fmb .dat . 2000. This list describes some of the types of files you will find in the file system: Extension .c .dmp . All right s reserved.exp . Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 .log Description Library files that contain compiled C code C source files DataMerge control file DataMerge Import/Export parameter file Import/Export data export file Driver files Environment files in UNIX DataMerge data export file Binary forms files Executable forms files Compiled forms files C header files Java Archive files C files that are linked into libraries Log files Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Page 36 .a . 2000.File Types File Types File Types • • • • • • • • • • • • DataMerge files DataMerge files Forms files Forms files Java ARchive files Java ARchive files Log files Log files PL/SQL files PL/SQL files Reports files Reports files Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.lc .frm .jar .ctl .drv .env .fmx .

sql Description Pro*C files that are linked into libraries Binary message files Readable (text) message files Object files used to relink Applications Object Description Files Similar to .msb .out .Page 37 .rdf .Extension .lpc .pll .pdf .lpc except these contain a main() function Output files Acrobat files or report output PL/SQL package bodies PL/SQL shared libraries PL/SQL package specifications Oracle Reports files (non-executable) Log files from a concurrent request Oracle Reports executables SQL*Plus scripts Copyright © Oracle Corporation.plb .odf .lc except these contain a main() function Similar to .opc .pls .rex . 2000. All rights reserved. Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 .req .msg .oc .o .

Lesson Summary

Lesson Summary Lesson Summary • • • • • •
Oracle Applications uses a file system to store its Oracle Applications uses a file system to store its programs. programs. Each product has its own directory structure to Each product has its own directory structure to store its programs. store its programs. Additional subdirectories store utilities and Additional subdirectories store utilities and common programs and libraries. common programs and libraries.

Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right s reserved.

• • • • • • • • • •

The APPL_TOP is the top level file system directory. Each product subdirectories have the same structure. AD_TOP contains tools for installing, upgrading and administering the Applications environment. AU_TOP contains consolidated product files for optimal processing. The Common Components directory contains directories and files that are used across products or are used in conjunction with other third-party products. Apps.zip is a patchable archive of all Java class files required by Oracle Applications. The Technology Stack directories contain components of the technology stack. The Oracle Database Files directories contain the .dbf files that comprise the Oracle Applications database itself. The Oracle Enterprise Manager directories contain the product files for the Oracle Enterprise Manager. The Oracle Applications file system contains a variety of file types.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 - Page 38

Practice

Practice Practice
1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 8
What is the purpose of the APPL_TOP directory? What is the purpose of the APPL_TOP directory? What is the difference between the APPL_TOP directory and, What is the difference between the APPL_TOP directory and, for example, the GL_TOP directory? for example, the GL_TOP directory? One important file in the APPL_TOP directory is the <db One important file in the APPL_TOP directory is the <db name>.env file. What is its purpose? name>.env file. What is its purpose? What is the difference between APPL_TOP/admin and What is the difference between APPL_TOP/admin and APPL_TOP/GL_TOP/admin? APPL_TOP/GL_TOP/admin? Java files exist in three locations. Name two. Java files exist in three locations. Name two. What is located in the AD directory? What is located in the AD directory? Name two of the text files located in the APPL_TOP/admin Name two of the text files located in the APPL_TOP/admin directory. What is each file used for? directory. What is each file used for? What is apps.zip? What is apps.zip?

Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right s reserved.

Practice Solutions 1 What is the purpose of the APPL_TOP directory? APPL_TOP identifies the top level directory for the Applications installation. Using the APPL_TOP variable simplifies the definition of product directories. 2 What is the difference between the APPL_TOP directory and, for example, the GL_TOP directory? APPL_TOP is the top-level applications directory. Only General Ledger product files are stored under GL_TOP. GL_TOP itself is stored under APPL_TOP. 3 One important file in the APPL_TOP directory is the <db _name>.env file. What is its purpose? This file defines the application environment. 4 What is the difference between APPL_TOP/admin and GL_TOP/admin? The GL_TOP/admin directory contains the product specific files necessary to upgrade GL. The APPL_TOP/admin directory contains files used by the upgrade utility (AutoUpgrade). 5 Java files exist in three locations. Name two. They are stored in the product subdirectory /java, in the JAVA_TOP directory, and in the AU_TOP/java directory.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 - Page 39

6 7

8

What is located in the AD directory? Administrative and maintenance utilities Name two of the text files located in the APPL_TOP/admin directory. What is each file used for? – adconfig.txt: environmental configuration variable values – adlinkbk.txt: files adrelink should backup rather than delete – applcust.txt: registered customizations – applora.txt: minimum or required settings for database initialization parameters – applprod.txt: products available in this release – applterr.txt: territory description for localizations What is apps.zip? Apps.zip is a patchable archive of all Java class files required by Oracle Applications.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

Oracle Applications File System Chapter 5 - Page 40

Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 .Page 1 . 2000. All rights reserved.Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 Copyright © Oracle Corporation.

Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 . All rights reserved.Page 2 . All right ss reserved. 2000. All right reserved. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000. 2000.Applications Environment Files Applications Environment Files Applications Environment Files Applications Environment Files Applications Environment Files Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.

All right ss reserved.env file The devenv. • Explain the purpose for the adovars. you should be able to: • Define the Oracle Applications environment files.env files. 2000. • Explain the purpose for the adconfig.env file The adovars. Oracle Applications uses the information stored in several files to define your operating environment.txt file The adconfig.txt file The adconfig.env file The adconfig.txt and the user defaults files. All rights reserved.Page 3 .env file The adovars.env file The devenv. • Explain the purpose for the fndenv.txt file The fndenv.env file. 2000.env file The devenv. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 . Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.txt file The adconfig. At the end of this lesson.env file The fndenv.env file The adovars.env file The fndenv.env and the devenv.env file The fndenv.env file The devenv. All right reserved. This lesson describes the environment files you use to define and customize the processing of Oracle Applications.env file The user defaults file The user defaults file The user defaults file The user defaults file Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.Objectives Objectives Objectives Objectives Objectives •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• The Oracle Applications environment file The Oracle Applications environment file The Oracle Applications environment file The Oracle Applications environment file The adovars.

This lesson is important because it explains the Oracle Applications environment files.env FND_TOP/fndenv.env FND_TOP/devenv.env APPL_TOP/admin/adconfig. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 .txt APPL_TOP/admin/adconfig.env APPL_TOP/<db name>.env FND_TOP/fndenv.env APPL_TOP/admin/adovars.Page 4 . 2000.env APPL_TOP/<db name>. There are several files you define to control the setup and processing of your Oracle Applications environment. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.env user defaults file user defaults file user defaults file user defaults file Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.Lesson Overview Lesson Overview Lesson Overview Lesson Overview Lesson Overview •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• APPL_TOP/<db name>.env FND_TOP/devenv. 2000. the information contained in them. and the ramifications of the processing options.env FND_TOP/devenv.env APPL_TOP/admin/adovars. All rights reserved.txt APPL_TOP/admin/adconfig.env FND_TOP/devenv.txt APPL_TOP/admin/adconfig. 2000. All right reserved.env APPL_TOP/admin/adovars.env APPL_TOP/<db name>.env APPL_TOP/admin/adovars. All right ss reserved.env FND_TOP/fndenv.txt FND_TOP/fndenv.

env. Some of the variables can be changed during the install process. name> APPLLOG= APPLLOG= APPL_TOP= APPL_TOP= NLS_LANG= NLS_LANG= FND_TOP= FND_TOP= Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. where <db name> is the name of your ORACLE_SID or TWO_TASK. the default file name is <db name>. All right ss reserved. When you install or upgrade Oracle Applications. All rights reserved.env name>. On Unix.Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File < db name>. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.env < dbname>. • On Windows NT.. 2000. The file name depends on the platform on which you are running. All right reserved. 2000. The Oracle Applications environment file is a script that sets the environment for running Oracle Applications. Rapid Install creates this script in your APPL_TOP directory. the file name information is stored in the Windows Registry. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Page 5 . 2000. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 .

<db name>.env >. The value should match the value in APPL_TOP/admin/adpltfrm.Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File < db name > .txt. The default is APPLSYSPUB/PUB. 2000. APPLFENV is the name of this environment file.env. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. APPL_TOP is the top level directory for this Oracle Applications installation. PLATFORM is the execution platform. > APPLFENV= APPLFENV= PLATFORM= PLATFORM= FNDNAM= FNDNAM= APPL_TOP= APPL_TOP= GWYUID= GWYUID= Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. The default is APPS. change this parameter.env < db name>.Page 6 .. All right reserved. GWYUID is the public ORACLE username and password that grants access to the Oracle Applications initial signon form. All rights reserved. 2000. If you rename the environment file. 2000. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 . All right ss reserved. FNDNAM is the name of the Oracle schema to which the System Administration responsibility connects. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.

Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 . 2000. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. APPLFULL lists the short names of all applications modules that have been installed. 2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.. 2000. FND_TOP is the path to the Application Object Library directory. <PROD>_TOP is the path to a product’s top directory. All right reserved.Page 7 . All rights reserved.env >. > APPLFULL= APPLFULL= AU_TOP= AU_TOP= APPLSHAR= APPLSHAR= FND_TOP= FND_TOP= <PROD>_TOP= <PROD>_TOP= Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. APPLSHAR is the short names of shared products needed for relinking. It is used for relinking programs.env < db name>. There is one for each product.Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File < db name > . AU_TOP is the path to the Application Utilities directory. All right ss reserved.

Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.3: maximum of 8 characters to the left of the dot and 3 to the right. If this parameter is set to “REQID”. APPLCSF identifies the top level directory for Concurrent Manager log and output files if they are consolidated into a single directory across all products.. the concurrent manager will use file names that meet DOS naming requirements. if the path is $APPL_TOP/admin. > PATH= PATH= APPLDCP= APPLDCP= APPCPNAM= APPCPNAM= APPLCSF= APPLCSF= APPLLOG= APPLLOG= APPLOUT= APPLOUT= Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. APPCPNAM indicates whether the format of the Concurrent Manager log and output files follow DOS file name conventions (8. APPLLOG the subdirectory for Concurrent Manager log files. All right ss reserved. 2000. The default is “out”. 2000. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 .env < db name>. Distributed concurrent processing distributes processing load across multiple concurrent processors. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. APPLOUT the subdirectory for Concurrent Manager output files.Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File < db name > .g. The default is “log”. primarily FND_TOP and AD_TOP. e. (e. alogfile.log). The options are “OFF” or “ON”. 2000. APPLDCP specifies whether distributed concurrent processing is being used.env >. all log and output files will be placed in a subdirectory under this defined directory).Page 8 . All right reserved. PATH sets the directory search path.g. All rights reserved.

All rights reserved. The default is “usr/tmp”. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000.\ Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 . The default is "DD-MON-RR".. APPLPTMP identifies the directory for temporary PL/SQL output files..env >. APPLTMP identifies the directory for Oracle Applications temporary files. 2000. The possible directory options must be listed in the init. NLS_DATE_FORMAT is the National Language Support date format specified. All right ss reserved. NLS_LANG is the language. NLS_NUMERIC_CHARACTERS is the National Language Support numeric separators specified.WE8ISO8859P1". territory and character set installed in the database. All right reserved.ora parameter "utl_file_dir". The default is "AMERICAN_AMERICA. 2000.env < db name>.Page 9 .Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File < db name > .". The default is ". > APPLTMP= APPLTMP= APPLPTMP= APPLPTMP= NLS_LANG= NLS_LANG= NLS_DATE_FORMAT= NLS_DATE_FORMAT= NLS_NUMERIC_CHARACTER= NLS_NUMERIC_CHARACTER= Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.

REPORTS60_TMP is the directory for temporary files used by Oracle Reports.Page 10 . Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000. 2000. > REPORT60_TMP= REPORT60_TMP= REPORTS60_PATH= REPORTS60_PATH= Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All right ss reserved.env < db name>..Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File Oracle Applications Environment File < db name > .env >. REPORTS60_PATH specifies the path to the Oracle Reports PL/SQL programs. All right reserved. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 . All rights reserved. 2000.

The fndenv.env file sets additional environment variables used by Oracle Applications Application Object Library. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Applications. Default values should be correct for all sites. Applications. All right reserved. 2000. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. Default values should be correct for all sites. All right ss reserved.env File The fndenv. the default values should be applicable for all customers. Default values should be correct for all sites.env File The fndenv.env File The fndenv.env File •• •• •• •• Specifies additional variables used by Oracle Specifies additional variables used by Oracle Specifies additional variables used by Oracle Specifies additional variables used by Oracle Applications. This file should not be modified. The fndenv. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 . 2000.env File The fndenv. All rights reserved. Default values should be correct for all sites. Applications.Page 11 .

This script is automatically called by fndenv. 2000. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000.Page 12 . Copyright © Oracle Corporation.env file.env so that you can compile and link custom Oracle Forms and Reports user exits and concurrent programs with Oracle Applications. Applications.env File •• •• Used to identify and describe third-party and Used to identify and describe third-party and Used to identify and describe third-party and Used to identify and describe third-party and custom applications linked with Oracle custom applications linked with Oracle custom applications linked with Oracle custom applications linked with Oracle Applications.env File The devenv.env File The devenv.env File The devenv. The devenv.The devenv. 2000. See the Oracle Applications Developers Guide for detailed information on customizing the devenv.env File The devenv.env file sets variables that let you link third-party software and your own custom-developed applications with Oracle Applications. All right reserved. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 . All rights reserved. Applications. All right ss reserved. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Applications.

HTML files. 2000. Java. All rights reserved. • CLASSPATH: variable lists the directories and zip files to be scanned for Java class files needed at runtime. • OA_JRE_TOP: variable indicates the location where you have installed JRE. All right reserved.env File The adovars. You can manually edit most of the variables in this file. Any additional custom variables should be stored here so you do not have to reapply them if you have to recreate your environment. These include Java class files. • OAH_TOP: variable defines the locations to which AutoUpgrade copies HTML files.env File •• •• •• •• •• •• Sets environment variables for other products like Sets environment variables for other products like Sets environment variables for other products like Sets environment variables for other products like Java.env file Called from <db name>. The adovars. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.env File The adovars.env File The adovars. Called from <db name>. All right ss reserved. The adovars. Java.env file specifies the location of files used by the Web server.env file is self-documenting and provides comments on what each variable does and how it should be configured.The adovars.env File The adovars.env file Stores additional custom variables. • OAD_TOP: variable defines the locations to which AutoUpgrade copies contextsensitive documentation files. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.env file Called from <db name>. 2000. 2000. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 . The adovars. Stores additional custom variables.Page 13 . Java. Stores additional custom variables. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.env file Called from <db name>. and JRE (Java Runtime Environment) files. • LD_LIBRARY_PATH: variable used on some platforms to list the directories to be scanned for dynamic library files needed at runtime.env file contains: • JAVA_TOP: variable indicates the top-level directory where all Java class files will be copied. Stores additional custom variables.

txt File •• •• •• •• •• •• Stores Applications configuration information Stores Applications configuration information Stores Applications configuration information Stores Applications configuration information Created during installation Created during installation Created during installation Created during installation Used when running AD utilities Used when running AD utilities Used when running AD utilities Used when running AD utilities Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Once created.The adconfig. Note: This is not the same as the configuration file created by Rapid Install.txt File The adconfig. The file is named adconfig.txt File The adconfig. this file is used by other applications utilities during processing. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. This information is specified when Oracle Applications is installed and subsequently stored in a configuration file. The adconfig file is created during the creation of the APPL_TOP file system.txt File The adconfig. 2000.Page 14 .txt File The adconfig. All right ss reserved. These utilities need to know certain configuration information to run successfully. AD utility programs are used to perform a variety of database and file management tasks. All right reserved. 2000. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000.txt and is located in the $APPL_TOP/admin directory. All rights reserved. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 .

These questions are standard across many AD utilities. Some of the answers to these questions are saved in a file. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. This file is then accessed at the beginning of an AD utility session to bypass answering the standard questions.User Defaults File User Defaults File User Defaults File User Defaults File User Defaults File •• •• •• •• •• •• Stores answers to AD utility preliminary questions Stores answers to AD utility preliminary questions Stores answers to AD utility preliminary questions Stores answers to AD utility preliminary questions Streamlines utility processing Streamlines utility processing Streamlines utility processing Streamlines utility processing File name is user-defined File name is user-defined File name is user-defined File name is user-defined Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000. AD utilities solicit system information by asking questions at the beginning of a session. 2000. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. This file name is user defined.Page 15 . 2000. All rights reserved. All right reserved. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 . All right ss reserved.

information in several files.Page 16 .env file.env file contain key information for the Oracle Applications environment. information in several files. All right ss reserved.env file contain key information for the adovars.env file.env file. • The User Defaults file stores answers to AD utility preliminary questions. and the The fndenv.env file contains parameters you define that are used during the installation process.env file specifies additional variables used by Oracle Applications. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 . Oracle Applications environment. information in several files. 2000.env file is used to identify and describe third-party and custom applications linked with Oracle Applications • The adovars. environment. This file is named <db name>.env file. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. The Oracle Applications environment file called The Oracle Applications environment file called The Oracle Applications environment file called The Oracle Applications environment file called (<db name> .env) defines the operating (<db name> . and the The fndenv. Oracle Applications environment. The fndenv. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.env) defines the operating (<db name> . the devenv. the devenv. This file also contains the locations of important Java and HTML files used by the Oracle Web Server.env) defines the operating environment.env file contain key information for the adovars.env file. All rights reserved. the devenv. and the The fndenv. Oracle Applications uses several files to define and customize the processing environment: • The Oracle Applications environment contains parameters you specify to define the processing environment.txt file contains configuration information used by AD utilities. • The devenv. 2000.env) defines the operating (<db name> . All right reserved.env file contain key information for the adovars.env file. 2000.env file. where <db name> is the name of the Oracle Applications database instance. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Oracle Applications environment. • The fndenv. environment.env file. the devenv. • The adconfig. environment. and the adovars.Lesson Summary Lesson Summary Lesson Summary Lesson Summary Lesson Summary •• •• •• •• •• •• Oracle Applications stores important environment Oracle Applications stores important environment Oracle Applications stores important environment Oracle Applications stores important environment information in several files.env.

Note there are other parameters not mentioned in the lesson.env file for information on on additional parameters. All right reserved. Explain Name two variables stored in the <db name>. each variable’s purpose.env file? What is the purpose for the adovars. 4 What is the name of the file where you specify information about any third-party or custom applications to use them with Oracle Applications. Practice Solutions 1 Name two variables stored in the <db name>. See pages 6-5 through 6-9 for a discussion of these parameters. See the<db name>.Page 17 .env file? What is the purpose for the adovars. 2000. each variable’s purpose. devenv 5 Which environment file’s default values should not need to be modified? fndenv Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 .env file.env file.env file? The adovars.env file. Explain each variable’s purpose.env file? What is the purpose for the adovars. 2 Which NLS parameter specifies the language selected? NLS_LANG 3 What is the purpose for the adovars.env file? What is the name of the file where you specify information What is the name of the file where you specify information What is the name of the file where you specify information What is the name of the file where you specify information about any third-party or custom applications to use them with about any third-party or custom applications to use them with about any third-party or custom applications to use them with about any third-party or custom applications to use them with Oracle Applications? Oracle Applications? Oracle Applications? Oracle Applications? Which environment file’s default values should not need to be Which environment file’s default values should not need to be Which environment file’s default values should not need to be Which environment file’s default values should not need to be modified? modified? modified? modified? Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.env file. each variable’s purpose. Which NLS parameter specifies the language selected? Which NLS parameter specifies the language selected? Which NLS parameter specifies the language selected? Which NLS parameter specifies the language selected? What is the purpose for the adovars. Explain each variable’s purpose. Explain Name two variables stored in the <db name>.env file. All right ss reserved.Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice 11 1 1 22 2 2 33 3 3 44 4 4 55 5 5 Name two variables stored in the <db name>.env file specifies the location of files used by the Web server. 2000. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000. Explain Name two variables stored in the <db name>.

All rights reserved.Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Page 18 . Applications Environment Files Chapter 6 . 2000.

Page 1 .Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 . 2000. All rights reserved.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 . All rights reserved.Languages and Localizations Languages and Localizations Languages and Localizations Languages and Localizations Languages and Localizations Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000.Page 2 . All right ss reserved. All right reserved.

• Identify the additional subdirectories used for localizations.Objectives Objectives Objectives Objectives Objectives •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• Alternate languages available with Oracle Alternate languages available with Oracle Alternate languages available with Oracle Alternate languages available with Oracle Applications Applications Applications Applications The process of implementing Oracle Applications The process of implementing Oracle Applications The process of implementing Oracle Applications The process of implementing Oracle Applications in one or more non-English languages in one or more non-English languages in one or more non-English languages in one or more non-English languages Translated components needed for alternate Translated components needed for alternate Translated components needed for alternate Translated components needed for alternate language support language support language support language support Additional subdirectories used for localizations Additional subdirectories used for localizations Additional subdirectories used for localizations Additional subdirectories used for localizations Database objects used for localizations Database objects used for localizations Database objects used for localizations Database objects used for localizations Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Latin American. 2000. All right ss reserved. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 . • List the translated components needed for alternate language support. 2000. 2000. • Describe the process of implementing Oracle Applications in one or more nonEnglish languages. This lesson describes using additional languages other than American English. All rights reserved. you should be able to: • List alternate languages available with Oracle Applications. All right reserved. and Asia/Pacific countries. • Identify the database objects used for localizations. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.Page 3 . It also covers using localization modules to support processing in European. At the end of this lesson.

This lesson describes the language and localizations related components of Oracle Applications Release 11i.Page 4 . All right reserved.Lesson Overview Lesson Overview Lesson Overview Lesson Overview Lesson Overview •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• Alternate languages Alternate languages Alternate languages Alternate languages File character sets File character sets File character sets File character sets Translated language items Translated language items Translated language items Translated language items Localizations Localizations Localizations Localizations Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 . It explains how character sets are used to support the various languages and also how language and localizations components are stored within the file system. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. All right ss reserved. 2000. 2000. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000.

These application components are also provided in addition to the base product files. or can be run in multiple languages simultaneously (referred to as Multilingual Support or MLS). Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. reports and other application components that are required for processing in a particular country or region. Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 . All rights reserved. Localizations are additional programs. For Release 11i thirty language versions are available in addition to the base product files. Oracle Applications can be run in languages other than American English (referred to as National Language Support or NLS).Page 5 . forms. 2000. All right ss reserved. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.Languages and Localizations Languages and Localizations Languages and Localizations Languages and Localizations Languages and Localizations Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000. All right reserved.

The list above is a small representation of the languages available for Release 11i. or directory code. All right reserved. Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 . 2000.Oracle Applications Alternate Languages Oracle Applications Alternate Languages Oracle Applications Alternate Languages Oracle Applications Alternate Languages Oracle Applications Alternate Languages Language Language French French German German Italian Italian Swedish Swedish Russian Russian Arabic Arabic Korean Korean Japanese Japanese Directory Code Directory Code F F D D IT IT S S RU RU AR AR KO KO JA JA Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. which is used as a directory heading for the directory where language specific files are placed. 2000.Page 6 . For a comprehensive list of languages supported in Release 11i. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. see the Installing Oracle Applications manual. All rights reserved. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. 2000. All right ss reserved. Each language has a short name.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All right reserved. 2000. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. support for the Unicode UTF8 character set removes the limitation on the number of supported languages that can be run in a single instance. Terminals and printers handle text data by converting these encoded values to characters. Character sets are sets of encoded binary values that represents the letters. numerals.Page 7 . The Unicode character set supports all characters in common use in all of the world’s modern languages. Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 .File Character Set File Character Set File Character Set File Character Set File Character Set US7ASCII US7ASCII WE8ISO8859P1 WE8ISO8859P1 EE8ISO8859P2 EE8ISO8859P2 AR8ISO8859P6 AR8ISO8859P6 JA16EUC JA16EUC ZHT32EUC ZHT32EUC UTF8 UTF8 = = = = = = = = = = US 7-bit ASCII US 7-bit ASCII Western European 8-bit Western European 8-bit Eastern European 8-bit Eastern European 8-bit Arabic 8-bit Arabic 8-bit Japanese 16-bit Japanese 16-bit = Traditional Chinese 32-bit = Traditional Chinese 32-bit = Unicode multi-byte = Unicode multi-byte Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. All right ss reserved. All rights reserved. or of a group of languages that use similar written symbols. 2000. 2000. and punctuation marks of a language. In Release 11i. A character set may also be called a codeset. the WE8ISO8859P1 character set can be used by English and many other languages that use a Latin-based alphabet and Arabic numerals. For example.

Installing Multiple Languages

Installing Multiple Languages Installing Multiple Languages Installing Multiple Languages Installing Multiple Languages

1. Select target languages during install 1. Select target languages during install 2. Rapid Install creates init .ora and the applications 2. Rapid Install createsinit..ora and the applications init. init environment file automatically environment file automatically 3. Rapid Install installs English language files 3. Rapid Install installs English language files 4. Rapid Install enables additional languages 4. Rapid Install enables additional languages 5. Use AutoPatch to install additional languages 5. Use AutoPatch to install additional languages

Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right ss reserved. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right reserved.

During the install, the Rapid Install utility prompts you to select the language(s) in which you wish to run Oracle Applications. Based on the languages you select, the utility appropriately sets parameters in the init.ora and the applications environment files. It also determines an appropriate character set that can support all the languages selected. The Unicode character set, UTF8, can be used to support multilingual processing. Rapid Install installs the English language version automatically. It also marks the other selected languages as available. You then install the actual files containing the translated language items using the AutoPatch utility.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 - Page 8

Translated Language Items

Translated Language Items Translated Language Items Translated Language Items Translated Language Items •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• ••

Messages Messages Messages Messages Menu prompts Menu prompts Menu prompts Menu prompts Seed data Seed data Seed data Seed data Forms (.fmb files) Forms (.fmb files) Forms (.fmb files) Forms (.fmb files) Reports (.rdf files) Reports (.rdf files) Reports (.rdf files) Reports (.rdf files) External documents External documents External documents External documents

Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right ss reserved. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right reserved.

The files installed by AutoPatch contain the Oracle Applications components that have been translated. Translated components include • messages • menu prompts • seed data (for example, list of values entries) • forms (.fmb files) • reports files (.rdf files) • external documents SQL scripts, import files, and driver files used to add language seed data to the database may also be translated.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 - Page 9

Additional Language Subdirectories

Additional Language Subdirectories Additional Language Subdirectories Additional Language Subdirectories Additional Language Subdirectories
$GL_TOP $GL_TOP

admin admin driver import sql driver import sql *.drv *.drv *.drv *.drv D D *.drv *.drv *.drv *.drv *.exp *.sql *.exp *.sql *.exp *.sql *.exp *.sql D D *.exp *.exp *.exp *.exp D D *.sql *.sql *.sql *.sql

forms forms

mesg mesg

reports reports

US.msb GLXDBA.rdf US.msb GLXDBA.rdf US.msb GLXDBA.rdf US.msb GLXDBA.rdf US US D D D.msb D.msb D.msb D.msb GLXSSBNR.fmb GLXSSBNR.fmb GLXSSBNR.fmb GLXSSBNR.fmb GLXSSBNR.fmb GLXSSBNR.fmb GLXSSBNR.fmb GLXSSBNR.fmb GLXDBA.rdf GLXDBA.rdf GLXDBA.rdf GLXDBA.rdf D D

Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right ss reserved. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion, 2000. All right reserved.

Translated forms, reports, message files, and installation scripts are stored in their own language specific directories. These directories are identified by a language short name, or directory code. For example, all forms located under the US directory are in American English while all forms located under the D directory are in German.

Copyright © Oracle Corporation, 2000. All rights reserved.

Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 - Page 10

2000. A localization may require • additional forms • additional reports • additional seed data in the base product tables • additional database tables or other database objects If you require additional country specific functionalities (localizations) after the initial installation or upgrade. For example. Localizations provide additional features for a country or region. they can be licensed through the License Manager. 2000. All rights reserved. Or localizations may be created to meet specific government requirements. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 .Localizations Localizations Localizations Localizations Localizations JG JG JE JE JA JA JL JL Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.Page 11 . All right reserved. Oracle France may extend the payment processing features of Oracle Payables to provide a feature needed for banks in France. 2000. All right ss reserved.

2000. 2000. Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 .Localization Applications Localization Applications Localization Applications Localization Applications Localization Applications Abbreviation Application ID Abbreviation Application ID JA JA JE JE JL JL JG JG 7000 7000 7002 7002 7004 7004 7003 7003 Application Name Application Name Asia / /Pacific Localizations Asia Pacific Localizations European Localizations European Localizations Latin America Localizations Latin America Localizations Regional Localizations Regional Localizations Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. All rights reserved. All right ss reserved. All right reserved. you must license any localizations you need to use. After you have installed Oracle Applications.Page 12 .” • Asia/Pacific Localizations • European Localizations • Latin America Localizations • Regional Localizations For 11i all localizations are installed into both the file system and the database by the Rapid Install utility. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. The localizations for various countries and regions are grouped into four “applications.

All right reserved.5 Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.Page 13 .env dbtrain .env ap dbtrain. These directories have the same structure as the directories used by other base products.5 11. Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 .5 ja ja 11. 2000. All right ss reserved. .5 gl gl 11. Each localization application uses additional directories under the APPL_TOP directory. 2000. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion.5 je je jljl admin admin 11.5 11.5 11. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000.Localization Directories Localization Directories Localization Directories Localization Directories Localization Directories /d1/app1/115 /d1/app1/115 dbtrain.5 11.5 ar ar 11. All rights reserved.5 11. dbtrain ap 11.5 11.5 11.

Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. The JG_ZZ_RULE_SETS table. they are owned by the appropriate base application schema. All right ss reserved. The JG_ENTITY_ASSOC table is owned by the JG application schema. 2000. The data objects such as tables and indexes are generally owned by the localization application schema. All rights reserved. The code objects such as packages are owned by the APPS schema. The JG_ZZ_RULE_SETS_PKG package is owned by the APPS schema as most packages are. is owned by the GL schema. 2000.Page 14 . Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 . The slide shows three objects of the JG localization application. The database objects are stored similarly to objects used by the base applications. All right reserved. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. in some instances. However. Localizations also use database objects to store business data used during localization processing.Localization Database Objects Localization Database Objects Localization Database Objects Localization Database Objects Localization Database Objects APPS APPS JG_ZZ_RULE_SETS_PKG JG_ZZ_RULE_SETS_PKG JG JG GL GL JG_ENTITY_ASSOC JG_ENTITY_ASSOC JG_ZZ_RULE_SETS JG_ZZ_RULE_SETS Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. however. 2000.

can be used to support multilingual processing. 2000. must be licensed. All rights reserved. 2000. All right reserved. Localizations use additional directories and Localizations use additional directories and Localizations use additional directories and Localizations use additional directories and database objects. Each language uses additional directories in the Each language uses additional directories in the Each language uses additional directories in the Each language uses additional directories in the file system to store the translated language items. file system to store the translated language items. Additional language versions use their own directories to store translated language items. Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 . file system to store the translated language items. languages other than American English. alternate character sets must also be installed to support languages. The Unicode character set. languages other than American English. must be licensed. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. 2000. For 11i all localizations are installed into both the file system and the database. processing required by countries or regions. needed localizations All localizations are installed.Lesson Summary Lesson Summary Lesson Summary Lesson Summary Lesson Summary •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• Oracle Applications can be implemented in Oracle Applications can be implemented in Oracle Applications can be implemented in Oracle Applications can be implemented in languages other than American English. In some cases. needed localizations All localizations are installed. Localization modules provide additional Localization modules provide additional Localization modules provide additional Localization modules provide additional processing required by countries or regions. database objects. needed localizations must be licensed. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. database objects. Localizations that are needed must be licensed after installation. processing required by countries or regions. UTF8. languages other than American English.Page 15 . processing required by countries or regions. file system to store the translated language items. database objects. Localizations are modules that provide additional processing required by some countries or regions. Oracle Applications can be run in languages other than American English (referred to as National Language Support or NLS). All right ss reserved. or it can be run in multiple languages simultaneously (referred to as Multilingual Support or MLS). must be licensed. needed localizations All localizations are installed. All localizations are installed.

Describe the process to install multiple languages.g. –Select target languages during install –Rapid Install creates init. List two Oracle Applications components that are translated. All right ss reserved. 2000.ora and the applications environment file automatically –Rapid Install installs English language files –Rapid Install enables additional languages –Use AutoPatch to install additional languages Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Practice Solutions 1 What is the distinction between NLS and MLS? NLS is the installation of Oracle Applications where the base language is not American English. Describe the process to install multiple languages. List two Oracle Applications components that are translated.Practice Practice Practice Practice Practice 11 1 1 22 2 2 33 3 3 44 4 4 What is the distinction between NLS and MLS? What is the distinction between NLS and MLS? What is the distinction between NLS and MLS? What is the distinction between NLS and MLS? Describe the process to install multiple languages. Name three extra for use with a particular country or region. Describe the process to install multiple languages.Page 16 . Name three extra for use with a particular country or region. Localizations provide extra Oracle Applications components Localizations provide extra Oracle Applications components Localizations provide extra Oracle Applications components Localizations provide extra Oracle Applications components for use with a particular country or region. 2000. e. Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 . whereas MLS allows Oracle Applications to have multiple languages simultaneously. List two Oracle Applications components that are translated. 2 Describe the process to install multiple languages. All right reserved. Name three extra components that might be required by aalocalization components that might be required by a localization components that might be required by a localization components that might be required by localization Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. List two Oracle Applications components that are translated. All rights reserved. installation in Japanese only. Copyright  Oracle Corporat ion. Name three extra for use with a particular country or region. 2000.

Name three extra components that might be required by a localization. list of values entries) – forms (. – messages – menu prompts – seed data (for example. 2000.3 4 List two Oracle Applications components that are translated. Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 .Page 17 . – Additional forms – Additional reports – Additional seed data in base tables – Additional database tables or other database objects Copyright © Oracle Corporation.rdf files) – external documents – SQL scripts – import files – driver files Localizations provide extra Oracle Applications components for use with a particular country or region.fmb files) – reports files (. All rights reserved.

2000.Page 18 . Languages and Localizations Chapter 7 . All rights reserved.Copyright © Oracle Corporation.

Appendix A .Glossary Chapter 8 . 2000.Appendix A . All rights reserved.Page 1 .Glossary Chapter 8 Copyright © Oracle Corporation.

width. Also see forms server. numerals.Appendix A . The Oracle Web Server handles most of this logic.Glossary A appletviewer A program residing on a client machine that runs and displays a Java applet or application.Glossary Chapter 8 . business logic. and vertical and horizontal resolution. Applications database server The machine or machines containing Oracle Applications Server code and the Oracle Server holding Oracle Applications data. Contrast GUI. bitmap Definition of a physical bit image on a coordinate plane. For example. character set A set of encoded binary values that represent the letters. It owns the server product files. and other functionality. providing load balancing. Applications Help System The Oracle Applications online help system. The Applications database server holds all data and dataintensive programs and processes all SQL requests from the forms servers and concurrent processing servers. application tier Machines that reside between the client tier and database tier. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. or processing of another computer. and punctuation marks of a language. client A general term for a computer that requires the services. Terminals and printers handle text data by converting these encoded values to characters. C character mode An interface in which users access screen fields and regions through menus or keystrokes. or of a group of languages that use similar written symbols. All rights reserved. data. applmgr The default login used to install and upgrade Oracle Applications on a server.zip a patchable archive of all Java class files required by Oracle Applications B background process A non-interactive process that runs in an operating system environment and performs a task. See client/server architecture. the WE8ISO8859P1 character set can be used by English and many other languages that use a Latinbased alphabet and Arabic numerals. A character set may also be called a codeset. A bitmap has a height. 2000. Appendix A .Page 2 . apps.

customization The process of tailoring an Oracle Applications system to the needs of a specific user community. synonyms. data storage. sequences. concurrent processing facility An Oracle Applications facility that runs time-consuming. concurrency The simultaneous access of the same data by multiple users. non-interactive tasks in the background. concurrent process A task run by a concurrent manager. It is created and maintained automatically. A concurrent process runs simultaneously with interactive functions and other concurrent processes.Page 3 . Each concurrent manager has its own queue of pending requests. database instance A running ORACLE system. concurrent manager A process manager on the Applications database server that coordinates the concurrent processes generated by users’ concurrent requests. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. concurrent queue A list of concurrent requests awaiting completion. parameters. See also concurrent processing facility. such as running a report. and privileges. and stored procedures are all examples of database objects. Appendix A . An entire command can consist of the command name. and qualifiers. D data dictionary A set of tables and views that contains administrative information about users. indexes. database A set of operating system files in which an Oracle Server stores a set of data dictionary tables and user tables. concurrent request A request issued to the concurrent processing facility when you submit a non-interactive task. database object A logical entity created and stored in a database. command An instruction or request for the system to perform a particular action. 2000. Contrast multi-tier architecture. There is always a one-to-one correspondence between an ORACLE instance and a system global area (SGA). concurrent processing server A machine on which concurrent processing facilities are run.Glossary Chapter 8 . views. Tables. All rights reserved.client/server architecture A computing arrangement in which one or several servers perform database processing for applications that are run on clients.

extension The second part of the full file specification used to indicate the type or purpose of the file. in turn. demonstration product group A product group that includes predefined transaction data for Oracle Applications products. the Forms Cartridge Handler reads in the HTML file and substitutes values for items that may differ among users.sql” indicates a SQL script. which sends user requests to the forms server and handles its responses. Forms Server listener A process that continuously runs on a forms server that handles requests to display Oracle Forms form files. All rights reserved. It is used primarily for system testing and user training. cached on the forms server and provided to the client as needed.Page 4 . For example. The results of parsing the HTML file are then sent to the requesting user’s web browser or appletviewer. You enter data by typing information into the form. it can choose the least-loaded forms server to run the Applications forms.Glossary Chapter 8 . A filename is assigned by either the user or the system when the file is created. Data is. F filename The name component of a file specification.DBA A database administrator responsible for the maintenance of the Oracle Server and the database objects of Oracle Applications. regions. desktop client A machine on a user’s desktop that sends requests for data and then displays the results. See also product group. form A logical collection of fields. E environment variable A variable maintained by the UNIX shell that can be referenced by any program running within the shell. For example. See also filename. 2000. the desktop client runs the Oracle Forms client Java applet using a Java-enabled web browser or appletviewer. When a user invokes the initial HTML page from a web browser or appletviewer. JInitiator is another option. Forms Cartridge Handler An Oracle Web Application Server cartridge that parses a dynamic initial HTML file used for launching the Oracle Forms client Java applet. forms server A specific type of application server that hosts the Oracle Forms Server engine. These requests are sent from the Oracle Forms client Java applet running on a desktop client. This server processes end-user requests by sending messages directly back to the client or by making requests for data to the Applications database server. and zones that appears on a single screen. Appendix A . In Release11i. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Oracle Applications forms resemble paper forms used to run a business. the extension “. Environment variables hold values used by many Oracle programs and utilities. See also extension.

JDBC (Java Data Base Connectivity) Java Database Connectivity is a standard SQL database access interface. this parameter specifies the SQL*Net database alias to use when no communications driver is specified upon loading an Oracle tool. releasing. Except for this. Contrast WAN. hypertext A document format that contains links leading to other information or other documents. Appendix A . written in the Java programming language that is downloaded and run by a web browser or appletviewer. LOCAL For Windows platforms.G GUI Graphical User Interface (Also known as a bit-mapped interface). images and sounds) into a single file Java applet A program. HTTPS An encrypted version of HTTP implemented through the Secure Socket Layer. H HTTP hyper-text transfer protocol is a protocol used to access different types of resources on the internet.an environment utilized by Oracle Applications for the purpose of developing. An interface used with personal computers and workstations that allows the user to access fields and regions of the screen with a pointing device.class files. Copyright © Oracle Corporation. data communications network that allows various data processing resources to be connected and shared. J Java Archive (JAR) file A platform-independent file format that allows you to bundle a Java applet and its requisite components (. standard. log in (verb) To perform a sequence of actions that establishes communication with the operating system and sets up default characteristics for the session. providing uniform access to a wide range of relational databases. typically a mouse. L LAN Local Area Network. The encrypted secure connection is created by running an ordinary HTTP connection on top of an encrypted SSL connection. Also see World Wide Web.Page 5 . 2000. Contrast character mode. A limited-distance. typically small in size. patching and maintaining Oracle Applications Java code. high-speed. Java Release Infrastructure (JRI) . It also provides a common base on which higher level tools and interfaces can be built. SSL. HTTPS is like HTTP. All rights reserved.Glossary Chapter 8 . Also called signing on.

Appendix A .Glossary Chapter 8 . ORACLE_SID An environment variable that identifies an ORACLE database. See Universal Installer. O operating system The computer software that performs basic tasks such as allocating memory and allowing computer components to communicate. and is partitioned by the ORG_ID column in tables. Net8 facilitates and manages communication sessions between a client application and a remote database.576 bytes (1024 x 1024). All rights reserved. N Net8 Net8 is the follow-on networking product to SQL*Net version 2. Contrast client/server architecture. not to the Oracle Server executable files.048. Oracle Applications System Administrator The person responsible for administering Oracle Applications security and tailoring system operation. ORACLE An Oracle Server database.Page 6 . The term refers in general to the product executable files and/or the ORACLE databases created through those files. 2000.M Megabyte (MB) A unit of memory or disk space equal to 1. The architecture consists of desktop clients requesting information from application servers (including forms servers) that mediate connections to the Applications database server. node . Often rounded to one million bytes. P Copyright © Oracle Corporation. Multiple Organization Architecture (Multi-Org) A single installation of any Oracle Applications product to support any number of organizations or different sets of books. Oracle Server The database management system sold by Oracle Corporation.Used to describe a physical machine in the Applications environment. multi-tier architecture The underlying architecture of Release 11i. Oracle Applications Release 11i and Oracle 8i uses the Universal Installer. Oracle Installer The program previously used to install most Oracle products. Previously used names include host and machine. The data contained in product schemas is for all organizations. multiple sets of books See set of books. This generally refers to a database and the objects it contains.

generating a form. Human Resources. Product Installation group . A report can be viewed online or sent to a printer. Examples of Product families are Financials.parameter An object of a command. platform Any individual operating system.Page 7 . SGA Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Refers to Multiple set of books architecture. calendar. Forms server. patch driver A file read by AutoPatch that lists the actions required to apply a patch or release update. product group A set of Oracle Applications products that uses a single installation of Oracle Application Object Library tables. S server . You must define at least one set of books for each business location. Q queue A line of items waiting to be processed.Used to describe the components of the Technology Stack: Administration server. PL/SQL A procedural extension of SQL that provides programming constructs such as blocks. some procedures vary. password An identification word associated with a username. a symbol value passed to a command procedure. or running a SQL script. Manufacturing.Represents a group of related products. R report An organized display of Oracle Applications information. The latter procedures are called platform-specific. Examples of actions include copying a file.Glossary Chapter 8 . All rights reserved. A user must supply a password to access an ORACLE database or an Oracle Applications system. Appendix A . The content of a report can range from a summary to a complete listing of values. Although most Oracle Applications procedures are the same across platforms. Product Family . set of books An organization or group of organizations within Oracle Applications that shares a common Accounting Flexfield structure. A parameter can be a file specification. or a word defined by the operating system. Each product group can contain any number of Applications products. prompt Words presented on the terminal screen to assist a user’s data entry. and functional currency. conditionals. 2000. and procedures. and Concurrent Manager (node) server. eb server.

subdirectory A directory that is contained within another directory.” SQL*Loader An Oracle Server tool used to load data from operating system files into Oracle Server database tables. SQL Structured Query Language. SYSTEM. 2000. SYS owns the base data dictionary tables and views. SQL script A file containing SQL statements that can be run through SQL*Plus to perform queries or database administration and installation tasks. qualifiers. or program unit that masks the real name and owner of the object. SmartClient Client Server architecture environment of Release 10SC. The SYSTEM username is the preferred username to use when performing database maintenance. including closing and dismounting a database if one has been mounted and opened. shut down (verb) The process of stopping a running instance to make a database unavailable. short name An abbreviation for an Oracle Applications product (such as gl for Oracle General Ledger) or an Oracle Applications language (such as brapor for Brazilian Portuguese).DUAL table Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Glossary Chapter 8 .Page 8 . SYS schema One of two standard DBA usernames automatically created with each database (the other is SYSTEM). syntax The orderly system by which commands. Standard Request Submission A standard interface in Oracle Applications that lets you run and monitor concurrent requests. view. spawned process A background process initiated by a running program. and simplifies SQL statements for database users.System Global Area. Memory that provides communication between all database users and the ORACLE background processes. and parameters are arranged together to form valid command strings. SYSTEM schema One of two standard usernames automatically created with each database (the other is SYS). system administrator See Oracle Applications system administrator. synonym An alias for a table. Appendix A . An internationally standard language used to access data in a relational database. All rights reserved. sequence. These include programs run by concurrent managers and SQL*Net listeners. provides public access to the object. The acronym is pronounced “sequel.

An example of a URL is http://www.Used to describe the three layers of the Internet Computing Architecture: Database tier. A view can be thought of as a “stored query.oracle. The main ones being the file transfer protocol (FTP) and the internet protocol (IP). TCP is a network protocol that allows a user on any computer to get files from another computer. each of which contains the same kinds of values (columns). or to send files to another computer. tier . Applications tier. Users invoke it to perform tasks outside the scope of the form. IP is a protocol that provides the basic service of getting “data” to their destination temporary tablespace A tablespace used when a SQL statement requires the creation of temporary segments (for example.A necessary table that contains exactly one row. such as “true. and Desktop Client tier. Appendix A .” virtual directory Part of a URL that indicates the location of a document on a web server. U URL Uniform Resource Locator. transaction processing option An Oracle Server option for handling a large volume of transactions with a high amount of concurrency. one tablespace may group all of an application’s database objects. Every username is associated with a password. and consists of one or more units of information (rows). the creation of an index). A table represents entities and relationships.” T table The basic unit of storage in a relational database management system. username A name that grants access to an Oracle Server database schema and defines which database objects the user can manipulate. The web server translates the virtual directory. Copyright © Oracle Corporation.Glossary Chapter 8 . For example.com. to a physical location on the machine’s file system. It is used as a “dummy” table to guarantee a known result. 2000. An address used to uniquely identify a document on the World Wide Web. TCP/IP TCP/IP is a layered set of protocols. entered by the user.Page 9 . V view A custom-tailored presentation of the data in one or more tables. user exit A program related to a form. tablespace A logical portion of an Oracle Server database used to allocate storage for data and to group related logical structures. All rights reserved.

The network may consist of machines on the Internet. Also called simply “the Web.W WAN Wide Area Network. web client A machine on which a user is running a web browser or appletviewer. 2000.” Copyright © Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. Appendix A . See also desktop client. and may be processed by additional programs before being passed to the web listener. web server A program that accepts requests to retrieve and display documents on the World Wide Web.Glossary Chapter 8 . a corporate intranet. web listener The main component of a web server program that runs as a background process. World Wide Web (WWW) A network of machines running web servers that provide access to hypertext documents. web browser A program used to retrieve and display documents on the World Wide Web. A long-distance. Contrast LAN. Netscape Navigator and Microsoft Internet Explorer are the most common web browsers. low-speed (typically 128 Kbps or slower). or a combination of both. The requests are typically sent by a web browser. The term “web server” may be used to denote either this program or the actual machine on which the software is running.Page 10 . data communications network that allows various data processing resources to be connected and shared. accepting incoming requests and returning the requested data or document.

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