Dedication

I would like to dedicate this work to the future Business Teacher Students and to my Mamsi, Ate Dolly for their financial support and understanding through the duration of my studies.

Acknowledgement

This portfolio would not have been possible without the support of many people First of all, I would like to give praise and glory to our almighty God for giving me the strength and wisdom to do this manual. Second, I would like to extend my gratitude to Dr. Carina Ortiz-Luis for allowing us to conduct our practice teaching despite of all the odds and mess regarding MOA etc.. Special thanks to my cooperating teacher Mrs. Ellena Factora for the patience, guidance and for supporting me during my practice teaching and lastly, to my Mamsi for her financial support and understanding

A Teachers Prayer

Lord, let me be just what they need. If they need someone to trust, let me be trustworthy. If they need sympathy, let me sympathize. If they need love, (and they do need love), let me love, in full measure. Let me not anger easily, Lord but let me be just. Permit my justice to be tempered in your mercy. When I stand before them, Lord, let me look strong and good and honest and loving. And let me be as strong and good and honest and loving as I look to them. Help me to counsel the anxious, crack the covering of the shy, temper the rambunctious with a gentle attitude. Permit me to teach only the truth. Help me to inspire them so that learning will not cease at the classroom door. Let the lessons they learn make their lives fruitful and happy. And, Lord, let me bring them to You. Teach them through me to love You. Finally, permit me to learn the lessons they teach.

A Student's Prayer

Creator of all things, true source of Light and Wisdom, lofty source of all Being, graciously let a ray of Your Brilliance penetrate into the darkness of my understanding and take from me the double darkness in which I have been born, sin and ignorance. Give me a sharp sense of understanding, a retentive memory, and the ability to grasp things correctly and fundamentally. Grant me the talent of being exact in my explanations and the ability to express myself with thoroughness and charm. Point out the beginning, direct the progress, help in the completion. Through Christ our Lord. St. Thomas Aquinas

Introduction
A student teacher (also called pupil-teacher) is college or graduate student who is teaching under the supervision of a certified teacher in order to qualify for a degree in education. This term is also often used interchangeably with "Pre-Service Teacher." It is a much broader term to include those students that are studying the required coursework in pedagogy, as well as their specialty, but have not entered the supervised teaching portion of their training. In many institutions "Pre-Service Teacher" is the official and preferred title for all education students. Pupil teacher also used to refer to a senior pupil who acted as a teacher of younger children, which in the 19th and early 20th centuries was a common step on the road to becoming a professional teacher for intelligent boys and girls of poor background. The primary role of the teacher intern is to successfully carry out the internship assignment. The teaching internship may be viewed as a critical stage of transition from the status of college student to the status of classroom teacher. The internship is a privilege and therefore carries with it certain responsibilities, among which are: 1. Place school duties and responsibilities ahead of personal wishes and outside activities. The teaching internship is a full-time responsibility. 2. Become informed about students and classes you will teach. 3. Conform to the school's rules, policies, and local standards of behavior. 4. Conduct yourself in a mature, responsible and professional manner and maintain an appropriate personal appearance. 5. Show courtesy and respect for students, faculty, staff, parents, and members of the community. Respect the judgment of the school supervisor.

6. Avoid partiality and favoritism toward students. 7. Place the needs of the students first. 8. Adjust to, rather than try to change, the situation in the classroom or school. 9. Plan lessons on a weekly and daily basis and submit the plans to your school supervisor for review and recommendations prior to actual instruction. (A sample lesson plan format is in the appendix.) Your plans should be kept in a notebook or folder and made available to your university supervisor during each visit. 10. Be fully prepared for each class session. This will require considerable planning and development of materials outside regular school hours. 11. Participate in all of the activities expected of your school supervisor, including faculty meetings, team planning, professional decision-making, open houses, parent-teacher conferences, school activities, and non-instructional duties (before, during, and after school). 12. Be on time all the time. Never be absent from your assignment without good reason. If you do become ill, call your school supervisor and university supervisor as early as possible, but no later than 7:00 a.m. 13. Cooperate at all times with teachers, other staff members, and administrators. 14. Become thoroughly familiar with the Teacher Intern Assessment Instrument and expectations for your major. Consult the Reference Guide in this handbook for explanations and rubrics for the items on the assessment instrument 15. Complete self-evaluations and discuss them with your school and university supervisor. Forms are provided for this purpose (see self-evaluation checklists). Videotaping provides another means of self-assessment. 16. Accept feedback and suggestions that will aid your personal and professional growth.

17. Demonstrate effective management of self. Don't lose your patience or self control. 18. Maintain confidentiality and avoid unfavorable criticism of the school, the school supervisor, other teachers, the students, administration and the community. 19. Submit weekly teacher intern reports to your university supervisor. Notify your supervisor if there are any changes. 20. Strive for personal and professional growth through continued study and effort. Become actively involved in activities directed at the improvement of teaching and learning, e.g., instructional team meetings, staff development workshops, and seminars. 21. Become acquainted with professional organizations and resources available through information technologies. Journals, publications of professional organizations, and the internet provide up-to-date information on teaching strategies and resources.

PUP
Goals, Philosophy, mission and vision

Goals Reflective of the great emphasis being given by the country's leadership aimed at providing appropriate attention to the alleviation of the plight of the poor, the development of the citizens, and of the national economy to become globally competitive, the University shall commit its academic resources and manpower to achieve its goals through: 1. Provision of undergraduate and graduate education which meet international standards of quality and excellence; 2. Generation and transmission of knowledge in the broad range of disciplines relevant and responsive to the dynamically changing domestic and international environment; 3. Provision of more equitable access to higher education opportunities to deserving and qualified Filipinos; and 4. Optimization, through efficiency and effectiveness, of social, institutional, and individual returns and benefits derived from the utilization of higher education resources.

Philosophy As a state university, the Polytechnic University of the Philippines believes that: Education is an instrument for the development of the citizenry and for the enhancement of nation building;  

Meaningful growth and transformation of the country are best achieved in an atmosphere of brotherhood, peace, freedom, justice and a nationalist-oriented education imbued with the spirit of humanist internationalism.

Vision
Towards a Total University

Mission
The mission of PUP in the 21st Century is to provide the highest quality of comprehensive and global education and community services accessible to all students, Filipinos and foreigners alike. It shall offer high quality undergraduate and graduate programs that are responsive to the changing needs of the students to enable them to lead productive and meaningful lives. PUP commits itself to: 1. Democratize access to educational opportunities;

2. Promote science and technology consciousness and develop relevant expertise and competence among all members of the academe, stressing their importance in building a truly independent and sovereign Philippines;

3. Emphasize the unrestrained and unremitting search for truth and its defense, as well as the advancement of moral and spiritual values;

4. Promote awareness of our beneficial and relevant cultural heritage;

5. Develop in the students and faculty the values of self-discipline, love of country and social consciousness and the need to defend human rights;

6. Provide its students and faculty with a liberal arts-based education essential to a broader understanding and appreciation of life and to the total development of the individual;

7. Make the students and faculty aware of technological, social as well as political and economic problems and encourage them to contribute to the realization of nationalist industrialization and economic development of the country;

8. Use and propagate the national language and other Philippine languages and develop proficiency in English and other foreign languages required by the students¶ fields of specialization;

9. Promote intellectual leadership and sustain a humane and technologically advanced academic community where people of diverse ideologies work and learn together to attain academic, research and service excellence in a continually changing world; and

10. Build a learning community in touch with the main currents of political, economic and cultural life throughout the world; a community enriched by the presence of a significant number of international students; and a community supported by new technologies that facilitate active participation in the creation and use of information and knowledge on a global scale.

PUP MAPS

HISTORY OF PUP

The history of PUP may well parallel the nation's growth and development. As it met the needs of a fledgling Philippine civil service under American rule forged from anvil of Spanish colonialism, so will it serve the rising expectations of the people in the 21st century...desirous now of reclaiming their rightful place in the community of independent nations. As it has withstood the test of time, so will it continue to pace contemporary Philippine history.

1904-1951 Take a journey to the University's humble beginnings as it started being a Business School.

1952-1971 This period covers the time where the Business School became a College whose main thrust is in Commerce.

1972-1985 The Institution's transformation from a College into a University happened during these period.

1986-1990 This period brought about a dramatic change in the University firming its commitment to the role of education as an equalizing factor.

1991-1999 To keep pace with changing conditions; the University underwent continuous change in this period.

2000-present A transition point as the University heads for the future, grasps new and emerging technologies, and prepares itself to become globally competitive.

LAGRO HIGH SCHOOL: PHILOSOPY, VISION AND MISSION

PHILOSOPHY: The development of the young into an intelligent, morally upright, responsible and productive member of the society is the main focus of education. For this reason, Lagro High School believes that every Filipino high school age youth must be given the right to quality instruction in a compassionate and caring environment. VISION: Lagro High School is an educational institution that produces academically competent, morally upright and vocationally prepared citizens of the society. MISSION: To ensure the maximum intellectual, social, emotional and physical growth of the child and strengthen moral foundations through relevant and adequate learning experiences in a nurturing and caring school environment.

LAGRO HIGH SCHOOL HYMN by: Rebecca F. Jimeno

We are yours our dearest Alma Mater We love we praise we honor your forever Lagro High School dear Alma Mater The crowning glory of our dreams We offer you our treasures rare Our hearts and minds for your to rear With bright hopes for greater knowledge And fervent prayers for our success We delve deep into your wisdom We seek our Lord¶s ennobling grace When our dreams burst into glory And we rise radiant but humble To you dearest Alma Mater Goes our tribute of love and praise We are yours our dearest Alma Mater We love we praise we honor you forever Lagro High School dear Alma Mater You set our hearts and minds aglow For your honor we praise our best We are yours through all the years

HISTORY OF LAGRO HIGH SCHOOL

In the early seventies, the growing number of people in the GSIS La Mesa Homeowners Association (GLAMEHA) triggered the need for a high school in Lagro Subdivision. The officers of GLAMEHA requested fervently for an establishment of a high school next to Lagro Elementary School. With the aid of the city government and the education bureau, Novaliches High School with Mr. Florencio Dumlao as principal started accepting students. This high school annex started on June 13, 1974 with 87 students and a facility, which were humbly two housing units in Block 59 and chairs the students provided themselves.On August 26 of the same year, Lagro Annex was transferred to the Lagro Elementary School compound and occupied the sawali-walled makeshift building. The high school was then headed by Mr. Crispulo A. Pilar with Mr. Narciso M. Caingat, Mrs. Nilfa C. Caingat and Mrs. Greta Manlapig as pioneer teachers. Two years after, the enrolment rose to 249 from the former 87 with three sections in first year, two in second year, and one in third year. They were all managed to stay in just four classrooms guided by nine teachers. The first graduation from this high school happened two years after with an increased enrolment of 461 with Mrs. Josefa Q. Maglipon, head of the Home Economics Department in Novaliches High School, who replaced Mr. Pilar(who left for the United States). The School Year 1977-1978 reached 774 with 15 sections occupying seven classrooms. With this problem on accommodation, Mr. Florencio Dumlao appealed to the national government for a Lagro Annex Building. Through the unrelenting efforts of the department head-in-charge and with the PTA lobbying behind, the 1.3 hectare present school site, and building became a reality.At the opening of classes on June 11, 1978, 923 students flocked the newly constructed building which

was a two-story 18-room structure standing proudly with Mrs. Maglipon as head of the school. She was replaced with Mr. Silverio Reinoso. Mr. Reinoso had to continue with the challenge to manage 19 sections of students with just 32 teachers. It was the significant day of September 1, 1978 that Lagro High School was inaugurated by Mrs. Commemoracion M. Concepcion, the former schools division superintendent. Thus, it has become its foundation day. Hand in hand with the influx of residents in Lagro Subdivision is the continuous increase of student population. And to accommodate this increasing population, a six-room building on the southern site of the campus was constructed. The school then also improved with the completion of concrete fences surrounding the campus, construction of the stage and the new steel flagpole, all to house and educate the community. Mr. Reinoso was replaced by Mrs. Virginia H. Cerrudo on September of 1981. Mrs. Cerrudo was replaced with Ms. Felicidad C. Gutierrez in 1987 bringing another building funded by the city government. The same year created the Lagro High School-Payatas Annex with 257 students. This annex was assigned to Mrs. Sheridan Evangelista, who was then the Social Studies Department Head of the Main School. Promoted as Principal IV, Ms. Gutierres was transferred to E. Rodriguez Jr. High School. Mr. William S. Barcena took her place as the principal of Lagro High School on June 1991. Three years after, Mr. Barcena was replaced by Mrs. Cristina C. Monis, the General Education Supervisor I-English, as Officer-In-Charge on January 8, 1993. Mr. Gil T. Magbanua replaced Mrs. Monis on June 13, 1993 To accommodate the continuous increasing enrollees, the three-story building funded by the Quezon City Government was constructed. The third Annex in Fairview was finally opened with Mrs. Justina A. Farolan as the Teacher-In-Charge. Dr. Consolacion C. Montano replaced Dr. Gil Magbanua later on with more improvements. Mrs.

Sheridan Evangelista made her comeback as the principal of Lagro High School in 1998 with improved facilities and technology advancements for the school. The dawn of more improvements was realized when Dr. Fernando C. Javier became the principal in April 2003. The construction of the new building previously applied by Mrs. Sheridan Evangelista was built and inaugurated by the successor, Dr. Javier. The SB Building and the full renovation of the formerly called Social Hall was transformed into a multi-purpose conference room conveniently equipped with multimedia projectors and modern sound technology now being utilized for events, seminars, workshops by the whole division. The construction of the new gate, renovations of all facilities and the covered court; Lagro High School now boasts of not only its talents but it¶s conducive learning ambience sure to provide every learner more motivation to pursue his dreams. Lagro High School reaped achievements in the district, division, regional and national competition under Dr. Javier. The Bureau of Alternative Learning System was established and soon after the Open High School. The Special Education Program was established accepting deaf and blind students. The Guidance Program was also enhanced and improved with the administration of Dr. Javier. International competitions, speech and debate contests sponsored by the government and private companies, Palarong Pambansa, National Schools Press Conference and the creation of the Special Program in the Arts which annually showcases talents in its culminating activities. Today, as we speak, Lagro High School does not only have a growing number of enrollees but also consistently develops as a community that consists of highly competitive and productive members.

Organizational Chart

MAPS

LESSON PLAN

Student Teacher: Teresa C. Recto Cooperating Teacher: Ms. Ellen L. Factora I. Objectives:

Subject: T.L.E I Culinary Arts Time: 7:50 A.M ± 8:50

At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to: 1. analyze the benefits of mangoes 2. demonstrate fermentation method of preserving fruits using green mango 3. appreciate the value of learning how to preserve mangoes II. Content: A. B. C. D. III. Chapter: Fruit Preservation Lesson: Drunken Mango Instructional Materials: Realia Reference: T. L. E III. Workbook by M. Celzo, et, al PP. 132-133

Procedure: A. Set induction and preparatory activities 1. Opening prayer, greetings, ocular inspection of the classroom surroundings, checking of attendance 2. Review: Methods and Process of fruit Preservation 3. Motivation: Story telling about the legend of drunken mango 4. Unlocking the Difficulties: ³Pick a Pick´ Direction: The students will pick a mango that will match with each definition 4.1 Fermentation ± Conversion of carbohydrates to alcohols and carbon dioxide or organic acids using yeasts 4.2 Osmosis ± The process of water moving from an area of higher concentration to a lesser concentration 4.3 Dissolve -To make a solution of, as by mixing with a liquid; pass into solution: to dissolve salt in water

4.4 Sterilization - The process of treating something to kill microorganisms B. Presentation of the Lesson Learning task The benefits of green mangoB. C. Different tools, D. used in ingredients E. drunken mango F. Procedures on how to G. prepare drunken mango H. Instructional procedure Brain storming Buzz session Evaluation Oral response Oral response

Demonstration

Rubrics Checklist

C. Closing Activities 1. Generalization: Accurate measurement of ingredients and following the procedure correctly ensure successful finished product 2. Valuing: Industry, patience and joy in working with others D. Remedial Measures: 1. Corrective ± Reteaching 2. Reinforcement ± Compilation of different methods of preserving root crop 3. Enrichment ± Interview an expert food technologist IV. Evaluation: Rubrics for Drunken mango

Score

Description Very Satisfactory

Criteria Mangoes are well-packed, syrup is clear, bottle sterilized and product is exhausted Well packed, syrup clear, bottle sterilized Not well packed, syrup not clear

95 85
Satisfactory

75
Good

V.

Assignment: Jelly Making Word study: 1. Pectin 2. Acid 3. Enzymes Guide Question: 1. What is the characteristic of jelly? 2. Why is pectin important in jelly making? Reference: T. L. E workbook by M. Celzo pp. 133-134

Code of Ethics for Student Teachers
A. Preamble ± A student-centered perspective Mandate: A joint subcommittee consisting of members from two standing committees of the Faculty of Education (Faculty of Education Ethical Review Board and Student Standing) was created to develop a Code of Ethics for Student Teachers and to examine the ways in which this Code will be communicated to students, faculty members and educational partners.

Goals and rationale: The interests of the two Standing Committees of the Faculty of Education in promoting appropriate ethical and professional conduct have led us to develop the following Code of Ethics for Student Teachers. This code seeks to respond to, and address the following needs: The Code addresses the interdependent duties, rights and responsibilities of student teachers, faculty members and educational partners.
y

y

By addressing common issues and needs, the Code seeks to articulate and make explicit ethical principles that transcend disciplinary boundaries. These principles reflect the fundamental values that are expressed in the duties, rights and responsibilities of all involved in Teacher Education.

y

The Code requires a reasonable flexibility in the implementation of common principles. It is designed to help those involved in Teacher Education, as a matter of sound ethical reasoning, to understand and respect the contexts in which they work and accommodate the needs of others.

y

The Code seeks to encourage continued reflection and thoughtful response to ethical issues. It does not seek definitive answers to all ethical questions or situations. Rather, it seeks to outline the guiding principles to ethical conduct and to identify major issues which are essential to the development and implementation of this Code.

Context of an ethics framework for student teachers The principles and norms guiding ethical conduct are developed within an ever-evolving complex societal context, elements of which include the need for reflective action and ethical principles. Education is premised on a fundamental moral commitment to advance and construct knowledge and to ensure human understanding and respect for individual and collective well being and integrity. The moral imperative of respect translates into the following ethical principles that assume a student-centred perspective as articulated in the Quebec Curriculum Reform and Competencies outlined for Teacher Education.

B. Academic freedom and responsibilities Teachers enjoy, and should continue to enjoy important freedoms and privileges. However, with freedoms come responsibilities and ethical challenges. This Code of Ethics is in keeping with the philosophy and spirit of the New Directions that are embedded in the document Teacher Training: Orientations, Professional Competencies (Ministère de l¶Éducation 2001) and the reflective practice literature.

The role of the teacher and the contexts of teaching have changed. Thus, new resources (knowledge, skills, attitudes) are required to practice the profession and meet the challenges of teaching and learning in whatever contexts student teachers may find themselves and to engage in professional development individually and with others.

C. Ethics and law ³Teaching is governed by a legal and regulatory framework´ (MEQ p. 120). The law affects and regulates the standards and norms of teaching behaviors in a variety of ways such as respecting privacy, confidentiality, intellectual property, competence. Human rights legislation prohibits discrimination and recognizes equal treatment as fundamental to human dignity and well being. Teachers should respect the spirit of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms particularly the sections dealing with life, liberty and the security of the person as well as those involving equality and discrimination and the Education Act that sets out the obligations and rights of teachers.

D. Guiding ethical principles

Ethical student teachers should respect the following guiding ethical principles: 1. Respect for human dignity
o

Speaks and acts towards all students with respect and dignity; and deals judiciously with them at all times, always mindful of their individual rights and personal sensibilities.

o

Respects the dignity and responsibilities of cooperating teachers, peers, principals, parents and other professionals or para-professionals within the school, school board and community.

2. Respect for vulnerable persons
o

Respects and recognizes ethical obligations towards vulnerable persons. This principle recognizes that students are in a vulnerable position and that student teachers are in a privileged relationship with students and their families and will always refrain from exploiting that relationship in any form or manner.

3. Respect for confidentiality and privacy
o

Respects the confidential nature of all information related to students and their families and will share such information in an appropriate manner only with those directly concerned with their welfare.

o

Respects the confidential nature of all information related to all school personnel and will share such information in an appropriate manner.

4. Respect for justice
o

Respects and recognizes the right of individuals to be treated with fairness and equity and the importance of avoiding conflicts of interest.

5. Respect for safety of students
o

Respects the right of individuals to expect that student teachers will engage in practices that aim to ensure the physical, psychological and emotional safety of students.

6. Respect for existing ethical codes and professional standards
o

o

Respects the authority, roles and responsibilities of the cooperating teacher and agrees to adhere to the responsibilities and obligations for teachers as outlined in the Education Act, Faculty and University handbooks as well as all local agreements by host school boards and schools.

7. Balancing harm and benefits
o

Acknowledges that any potentially harmful practices (eg. Science Labs and Physical Education Activities) must be balanced with anticipated benefits and conducted in a prudent informed manner.

Writing committee members for the code of ethics Associate Deans Mary Maguire, Christopher Milligan, Professors Spencer Boudreau, Elizabeth Wood, Jon Bradley, Ron Morris, Myrna Hynes, Greg Reid Approved by Faculty Council Academic Policy Committee Faculty of Education Ethics Review Board Student Standing Committee

Eligibility to Student Teach: In order to be eligible to student teach, teacher candidates must have: 90% of content area coursework completed with grades of C or better and no incomplete grades outstanding.
y y y

y

All prerequisite education coursework completed with grades of C or better. 2.75 GPA on all college coursework. Passing score on the State level content exam (as of January 2002). There is no waiver of this policy AND documentation of a passing score must be received by the Educator Licensing Program by August 1 for fall placements or by December 20 for spring placements.

Policies Regarding Student Teaching Placements Placement is done by Educator Licensing Program only; students are not to negotiate their own placement with teachers or school personnel.
y

y

Students do not student teach in a school they previously attended nor in a school where close relatives are employed or attending. Exceptions to this are made only by the Director of Student Teaching and/or the Director of Educator Licensing.

y

Candidates are encouraged to participate in interviews and observations prior to final placement. Both the student and the cooperating teacher should feel comfortable about the placement.

y

Following the interview/observation, both parties should provide feedback to the Educator Licensing Program. Once both parties agree to the placement, a Student

Teacher Placement Confirmation/Agreement is signed by the cooperating teacher, the school administrator, and the candidate.
y y

The student teaching application will be sent to one school at one time for consideration. The application will not be removed from the school unless the school has determined a placement is not possible or it is determined, following an interview, that the philosophical match between the student teacher and teacher are not acceptable for a successful placement.

y

Candidates are expected to complete their student teaching semester as defined by the dates on the Student Teacher Placement Confirmation/Agreement. In order to receive credit for a full semester of student teaching, the candidate must complete the student teaching semester as defined by the dates of the signed contract. Early completion requests will not be honored except for extenuating circumstances as determined by the Field Placement Coordinator and the Director of Teacher Licensure.

y

During the prescribed student teaching semester, candidates are not allowed to receive payment for work within the usual work day. Students may not receive substitute teaching pay while receiving university credit for student teaching. [You cannot be both a student and a teacher within the same endorsement area at the same time.] Student teachers do not assume extracurricular coaching responsibilities for salary during normal classroom teaching hours.

y

Student teachers are expected to conform to the Code of Ethics of the Education Profession. Student teachers are also expected to conform to the professional codes and standards of the host school.

y

The institutional costs for field placements, including long-distance phone calls and postage, and travel costs of the Colorado State supervisor are covered by a special course fee attached to student teaching. By current state policy, there is no ³catchment´ area designated to the School of Education, Colorado State University. By state policy, this no longer exists with all other Colorado teacher education programs. There are, however, three placement options (see below) for Colorado State University teacher candidates that should be considered by the candidate regarding fees for student teaching

2011

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"HAPPY SMILES FOR HEALTHY KIDS" PROJECT 69TH COMMEMORATION OF THE ARAW NG KAGITINGAN AND PHILIPPINE VETERANS WEEK ENTREPRENEURSHIP TRAINING FOR YEARS III AND IV TECHVOC EDUCATION TEACHERS IMPLEMENTING THE STVEP IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DEPED COMPUTERIZATION PROGRAM BATCH 11 (803 MOBILE TEACHERS) SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION (SPED) TEACHERS HANDLING CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER ENJOINING ALL DEPED OFFICIALS, EMPLOYEES, TEACHERS AND STUDENTS TO ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE IN THE OBSERVANCE OF THE EARTH HOUR 60+ 2011 55TH NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF CHIEFS AND ASSISTANT CHIEFS OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION IMPLEMENTATION AND ORIENTATION OF BATCH 8 (FY 2009) OF THE DEPED COMPUTERIZATION PROGRAM FOR TECHNICAL VOCATIONAL SECONDARY SCHOOLS PAGDIRIWANG NG ARAW NI FRANCISCO "BALAGTAS" BALTAZAR 2011 DISSEMINATION OF ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER NO. 6, S. 2011 (Organizing the Inter-Agency Energy Contingency Committee (IECC) PLACEMENT OF 2011 DOST-SEI SCHOLAR-GRADUATES IN PUBLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS 2011 SEARCH FOR THE MOST OUTSTANDING SPECIAL

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EDUCATION (SPED) TEACHERS AND SPED CENTERS No. 65 s.2011 CAPABILITY BUILDING FOR SPED TEACHERS, ADMINISTRATORS AND SUPERVISORS UNDER THE HUMAN RESOURCE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT RESULTS OF THE 2010 NATIONAL QUALIFYING EXAMINATION FOR PRINCIPALS DEVELOPMENT OF COMPETENCY JOB PROFILES FOR DEPED NON-TEACHING PERSONNEL NATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE ON ASSESSMENT AND TRAINING OF TRAINERS (TOT) FOR THE MASS TRAINING OF SECOND YEAR TEACHERS ON THE 2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM (SEC) DISSEMINATION OF MEMORANDUM CIRCULAR NO. 11-A RECONSTITUTING THE NATIONAL AND REGIONAL SEARCH COMMITTEES FOR THE THIRD LEVEL POSITIONS 10TH CONFERENCE FOR THE PHILIPPINE SCHOOLS OVERSEAS CREATION OF A TASK FORCE ON NATIONAL GREENING PROG

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http://www.deped.gov.ph/deped.asp?i=O

DepED Order

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ADDENDUM TO DEPED ORDER NO. 119, S. 2010 (Designation of Undersecretary Rizalino D. Rivera as the Focal Person for Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) Program and Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) Initiatives) IMPLEMENTATION OF SCHOOL-BASED PAYROLL PREPARATION REVISED GUIDELINES ON THE NAMING AND RENAMING OF SCHOOLS

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CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES FOR SCHOOL YEAR 2011-2012 PRESCRIBING THE NATIONAL UNIFORMS FOR DEPED TEACHERS AND NON-TEACHING PERSONNEL FOR SCHOOL YEARS 2011-2012 AND 2012-2013 GUIDELINES ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE APPROVED PROJECT PROPOSALS OF THE ENHANCHEDWORK (E-WORK) MODEL SCHOOLS AT THE ELEMENTARY LEVEL GUIDELINES ON THE ALLOCATION OF NEW TECHNICALVOCATIONAL TEACHER ITEMS FOR THE 282 SECONDARY SCHOOLS IMPLEMENTING THE STRENGTHENED TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM (STVEP) CHANGES IN DEPED ORDER NO. 88, S. 2010 (2010 Revised Manual of Regulations for Private Schools in Basic Education) KINDERGARTEN SUMMER PROGRAM (KSP): A STRATEGY TO REACH MORE CHILDREN AMENDMENT TO DEPED ORDER NO. 58, S. 2009 (Designating a Focal Office to Handle Concerns and Activities Relative to Parents-Teachers Associations (PTAs) and its

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Federations) No. 21 s.2011 No. 20 s.2011 POLICY GUIDELINES ON THE USE OF SAVINGS FROM THE SCHOOL BUILDING PROGRAM (SBP) GRANTING OF VACATION SERVICE CREDITS TO TEACHERS IMPLEMENTING DROPOUT REDUCTION PROGRAM (DORP) AND OPEN HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM (OHSP) GUIDELINES ON THE CONDUCT OF MOTHER TONGUEBASED MULTILINGUAL EDUCATION TRAINING GUIDELINES ON THE UTILIZATION OF THE ENGINEERING AND ADMINISTRATIVE OVERHEAD (EAO) FUNDS FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CY 2011 BASIC EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES FUND (BEFF) GUIDELINES ON THE UTILIZATION OF DOWNLOADED TRAINING FUNDS FOR THE 282 PUBLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS IMPLEMENTING THE STRENGTHENED TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM (STVEP) CHANGE IN DEPED ORDER NO.118, S. 2010 (Adoption of the New BESRA Implementation Arrangement) GUIDELINES ON THE UTILIZATION OF THE CY 2011 FINANCIAL SUBSIDY TO S & T ORIENTED HIGH SCHOOLS AMENDMENT TO DEPED ORDER NO. 4, S. 2011 (Graduation Rites) GUIDELINES ON THE ALLOCATION OF NEW SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER I ITEMS AMENDMENTS TO THE 2010 REVISED MANUAL OF REGULATIONS FOR PRIVATE SCHOOLS IN BASIC

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EDUCATION No. 10 s.2011 IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DEPED PROVIDENT RESOLUTION NO. 09, S. 2006 (Resolution Authorizing the Regional Board of Trustees to Grant Calamity Loans to Teaching and non-Teaching Staff in Areas/Provinces Declared Under the State of Calamity) REVISED FLOWCHART ON THE ALLOCATION AND DEPLOYMENT OF NEW TEACHER ITEMS POLICIES AND GUIDELINES ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GOVERNMENT ASSISTANCE TO STUDENTS AND TEACHERS IN PUBLIC EDUCATION (GASTPE) EFFECTIVE SY 2011-2012 CHANGE IN DEPED ORDER NO. 4, 2011 (2011 Graduation Rites) SUPERVISION OF CERTAIN DEPED OFFICES AND BODIES IN THE CENTRAL OFFICE GUIDELINES ON THE UTILIZATION OF THE ADDITIONAL SUBSIDY FOR THE REGIONAL SCIENCE HIGH SCHOOLS FOR CY 2011 2011 GRADUATION RITES GUIDELINES FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CY 2011 REGULAR SCHOOL BUILDING PROGRAM (RSBP) DECLARING JANUARY 29, 2011 AS EARLY REGISTRATION DAY FOR SCHOOL YEAR 2011-2012 TO ACHIEVE THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL (MDG) IN EDUCATION GUIDELINES FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 2011 BASIC EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES FUNDS

No. 9 s.2011

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No. 4 s.2011 No. 3 s.2011

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http://www.deped.gov.ph/deped.asp?i=O

November 30, 2010 briefer by the Department of Budget and Management and by the Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Office Education²from basic to higher education²remains a priority of the Aquino administration. It understands the concerns of teachers, students, and their parents, and has proposed the 2011 Reform Budget precisely to ensure that the education sector will receive the funds they need. The bottom line: 1. The proposed budget for the whole education sector actually increased by P31 billion. The proposed budget for basic education in particular increased by 18.5%, the highest increase in a decade. 2. The 2011 Budget proposes a larger amount for State Universities and Colleges ( SUCs) than what they actually received for 2010.

The first bar in toto represents the 2010 appropriated budget for SUCs, including the Congressional Insertions subjected to a conditional veto by former President Arroyo -- and were never released. The second bar represents the proposed SUC budget for 2011. The graph illustrates that the proposed 2011 budget is P2.373 billion higher than that of the 2010 proposed budget, which was the only amount not subject to the former President¶s conditional veto.

A graph illustrating the difference between the overall education budget for 2010 (left) and 2011 (right). Q&A Was the Education Budget cut? The education budget was actually increased from 15.6% (P240.59 billion) of the National Budget to 16.5% (P271.67 billion). Was the budget for State Universities and Colleges (SUC) cut? The proposed SUC budget for 2011 is P23.407 billion, or 11.3% of the total National Budget: higher than the P21.034 billion proposed in 2010. The increase is allotted for Personal Services (PS) to support the requirements of the Salary Standardization Law. The P23.845 billion 2010 appropriation for SUCs in the 2010 General Appropriations Act was not the actual budget released for 2010. At the least, P2.8 billion worth of congressional insertions was subjected to a conditional veto by former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, and was never released. The actual SUC budget released for 2010 only amounted to the 2010 proposed budget of P21.034 billion.

Why do people say the budget was cut? As stated, the nominal figures for 2010 include congressional insertions which made the 2010 figures seem higher, but which were never disbursed as per the conditional veto of former President Arroyo. Another reason may have been the relatively larger basic education funding increase to P207.3 billion, 18.5% of the 2011 budget²the highest increase in a decade. This move was made to aid the sector of basic education, which the administration deems most in need of public assistance [see charts below]. Furthermore, it is in accordance with Section 2, Article XIV of the 1987 Constitution, which encourages the Government to focus on basic education. What is a Conditional Veto? It is defined as a veto in which the President objects to parts of a Bill and proposes amendments and conditions to make it acceptable. The insertions could only have been released if the 14th Congress enacted new revenue measures. This condition was not met. What does this mean for SUCs? SUCs may earn extra income through different ventures, including partnerships with the private sector, and utilizing resources, such as land, that are available to them. The institutions are free to manage and allocate these resources as they see fit to augment their budget. As stated in Higher Education Modernization Act of 1997 (Republic Act 8292), SUCs are authorized to retain and utilize their own income. At the end of 2009, SUCs had a total amount of P19.1 billion in cash balances. These institutions, as proposed, should use their cash balances to fund academic programs. This is in line with the President¶s objective to make SUCs more self-reliant. What does this mean for teachers in SUCs? The salaries and benefits of teachers are fully covered. What does this mean for students in SUCs? The general concern is that this might lead to tuition hikes in SUCs. The 2011 budget was proposed as such to prevent unnecessary tuition fee increases. The whole amount allotted to SUCs will be released unconditionally. Students should nonetheless encourage the administrations of their respective schools to come up with creative ways to maximize income from their existing resources to develop their respective universities or colleges.

Further resource:

KEY ISSUES IN PHILIPPINE EDUCATION
Literacy rate in the Philippines has improved a lot over the last few years- from 72 percent in 1960 to 94 percent in 1990. This is attributed to the increase in both the number of schools built and the level of enrollment in these schools. The number of schools grew rapidly in all three levels - elementary, secondary, and tertiary. From the mid-1960s up to the early 1990, there was an increase of 58 percent in the elementary schools and 362 percent in the tertiary schools. For the same period, enrollment in all three levels also rose by 120 percent. More than 90 percent of the elementary schools and 60 percent of the secondary schools are publicly owned. However, only 28 percent of the tertiary schools are publicly owned. A big percentage of tertiary-level students enroll in and finish commerce and business management courses. Table 1 shows the distribution of courses taken, based on School Year 1990-1991. Note that the difference between the number of enrollees in the commerce and business courses and in the engineering and technology courses may be small - 29.2 percent for commerce and business and 20.3 percent for engineering and technology. However, the gap widens in terms of the number of graduates for the said courses. TABLE 1: TERTIARY ENROLLMENT AND GRADUATION BY FIELD OF STUDY. SY 1990-1991 FIELD OF STUDY Arts and Sciences Teacher Training & Education Engineering & Technology Medical and Health related Programs Commerce/Business Management Agriculture, Forestry, Fishery, and Veterinary Medicine Law Religion / Theology TOTAL ENROLLMENT GRADUATION No. 196,711 242,828 273,408 176,252 392,958 43,458 20,405 1,695 % 14.6 18.0 20.3 13.1 29.2 3.2 1.5 0.1 No. 29,961 34,279 32,402 34,868 79,827 7,390 2,111 209 % 13.6 15.5 14.7 15.8 36.1 3.3 1.0 0.1

1,347,715 100.0 221,047 100.0

On gender distribution, female students have very high representation in all three levels. At the elementary level, male and female students are almost equally represented. But female enrollment exceeds that of the male at the secondary and tertiary levels. Also, boys have higher rates of failures, dropouts, and repetition in both elementary and secondary levels. Aside from the numbers presented above, which are impressive, there is also a need to look closely and resolve the following important issues: 1) quality of education 2) affordability of education 3) goverment budget for education; and 4) education mismatch. 1. Quality - There was a decline in the quality of the Philippine education, especially at the elementary and secondary levels. For example, the results of standard tests conducted among elementary and high school students, as well as in the National College of Entrance Examination for college students, were way below the target mean score. 2. Affordability - There is also a big disparity in educational achievements across social groups. For example, the socioeconomically disadvantaged students have higher dropout rates, especially in the elementary level. And most of the freshmen students at the tertiary level come from relatively well-off families. 3. Budget - The Philippine Constitution has mandated the goverment to allocate the highest proportion of its budget to education. However, the Philippines still has one of the lowest budget allocations to education among the ASEAN countries. 4. Mismatch - There is a large proportion of "mismatch" between training and actual jobs. This is the major problem at the tertiary level and it is also the cause of the existence of a large group of educated unemployed or underemployed. The following are some of the reforms proposed: 1. Upgrade the teachers' salary scale. Teachers have been underpaid; thus there is very little incentive for most of them to take up advanced trainings. 2. Amend the current system of budgeting for education across regions, which is based on participation rates and units costs. This clearly favors the more developed regions. There is a need to provide more allocation to lagging regions to narrow the disparity across regions. 3. Stop the current practice of subsidizing state universities and colleges to enhance access. This may not be the best way to promote equity. An expanded scholarship program, giving more focus and priority to the poor, maybe more equitable. 4. Get all the leaders in business and industry to become actively involved in higher education; this is aimed at addressing the mismatch problem. In addition, carry out a selective admission policy, i.e.,

Doctoral Education Mismatch? According to a recently released survey, sponsored by the Pew Charitable Trusts, there is a mismatch between the goals of doctoral education, the expectations of doctoral students, and the reality of the job market.The training that most doctoral students receive and what they want and need to prepare themselves for the jobs they¶ll eventually take. Regardless, nearly all were satisfied with their decision to attend graduate school. The survey was conducted in the summer of 1999 and included more than 4,000 graduate students at 27 universities. Questions surveyed graduate student preparation, expectations, and career aspirations. What careers do graduate students want?
y y y y y y y y y y

48% University professor 15% Research in private sector 13% Work independently (consultant, writer, etc.) 12% Research in nonprofit or government 10% Research in a university 6% Manager in private sector 6% Start own business 5% Manager in nonprofit or government 5% Non-college teaching 3% college administrator

Are students prepared for academia? Although 2/3 of students reported the desire to work in an academic setting, most felt unprepared to take on the responsibilities of the typical academic or faculty position. For example, 1/3 were unclear about customary practices regarding determining and ordering the authorship of papers, the appropriate use of research funds, when and how to publish papers, and refereeing academic papers fairly. Two-thirds reported feeling unclear about how to avoid conflicts of interest. With regard to teaching, less than 1/3 of respondents felt that their graduate program prepared them to teach lecture courses, create an inclusive classroom climate, advise students, develop a teaching philosophy, and incorporate technology into the classroom. How about nonacademic careers? Another major finding was that students are less able to learn about nonacademic careers and often are not encouraged to do so. Academic is often presented as the only option. Alternatively, some educators argue that career placement is not the responsibility of faculty or a PhD program.

Curriculum Vitae
______________________________________________________________________________

Teresa C. Recto
Personal Data: Date of Birth: August 20, 1984 Age: 25 Place of Birth: Hindang, Leyte Gender: Female Civil Status: Single Educational Background: Tertiary: Polytechnic University Of the Philippines Quezon City Campus 2009 ± Present Secondary: North Fairview High School Auburn St, North Fairview Subd. 2003-2007 Elementary: Congress Elementary School Novaliches, Quezon City 1997-2003

LAGRO HIGH SCHOOL Technology and Livelihood Education Culinary Arts I Learning Component: Technology and Livelihood education Sub-Learning Area: Culinary Arts I I. Objectives: At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to: 1. identify the different kinds of meat and poultry used in preservation

2. analyze the different methods applied in preserving meat and poultry 3. appreciate the value of learning how to preserve meat and poultry

I.

Content:

A. Chapter: Food Preservation B. Topic: Preservation of Meat and Poultry C. Materials: charts, chalkboard D. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education III by: Celzo Unit I pp. 131-132

II.

Procedure: Preparatory Activities

1. Opening prayer, greetings, checking of attendance

2. Motivation: Picture Puzzle Direction: Every student will be given 1 minute to complete the picture puzzled

3. Unlocking the Difficulties: 2.1 Dehydration - Removal of water from a substance. 2.2 Bacteria - Single-celled organisms (singular bacterium) which lack well-defined nuclear membranes and other specialized functional cell parts, and reproduce by cell division or spores 3.3 Enzymes - Any of numerous proteins or conjugated proteins produced by living organisms and functioning as biochemical catalysts. Presentation of the Lesson: 1. Lecture/Discussion

Learning Task different kinds of meat used in preservation Methods applied in meat preservation Proper handling of food being preserve

Instructional procedure Brain storming

Evaluation Oral response

Discussion Demonstration

Oral response Return demo

C.

Closing Activities: 1. Generalization: Proper preservation of meat is important to prevent economic loss due to spoilage, and to prevent the transmission of food borne illness. 2. Valuing: Industry, patience and happiness of preserving III. Evaluation: Short quiz

Identification: 1. Cuts come from the fleshy part of a meat 2. Meat obtained from carabao 3. These are the animal glands and other internal organs of a meat 4. Temperature is held between 26 to 43 5. A slaughtered animal is called

IV.

Assignment: Preservation of meat and Poultry 1 2 . Different kinds of fish used in preservation Differentiate methods of preserving fish from meat

LAGRO HIGH SCHOOL Technology and Livelihood Education Culinary Arts I Learning Component: Technology and Livelihood education Sub-Learning Area: Culinary Arts I

I.

Objectives: At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to: 1. enumerate the common types of fish used in preservation 2. discuss the method used in preserving fish 3. appreciate the value of learning how to preserve fish

II.

Content:

A. Chapter: Food Preservation

B. Topic: Preservation of Fish C. Materials: charts, chalkboard D. Reference: Technology and Livelihood Education III by: Celzo Unit I pp. 131-132

III.

Procedure: Preparatory Activities

4. Opening prayer, greetings, checking of attendance 5. Motivation: Charade Direction: The students are divided into two groups; each group would form a letter C one end should get the word and pass it to its members through whispering on its ears 6. Unlocking the Difficulties: a. Eviscerating - remove the contents of the stomach b. Sodium chloride - is the salt most responsible for the salinity of the ocean and of the extracellular fluid of many multicellular organisms

Presentation of the Lesson: 1. Lecture/Discussion

Learning Task Enumerate the types of fish used in preservation Discuss the method applied in preserving fish

Instructional procedure Brain storming Discussion

Evaluation Oral response Oral response

C.

Closing Activities: 1. Generalization: Fish begin to deteriorate as soon as they leave the water. To delay spoilage, clean the fish as soon as possible. Thorough cleaning of the body cavity and chilling of the fish will prevent spoilage. 2. Valuing: Industry, patience and happiness of preserving IV. Evaluation: Short quiz 1-4 kinds of fish used in preservation 5-7 methods in applying salt in fish preservation 8-10common methods applied in fish preservation

V.

Assignment: Fruits and vegetables preservation 1. What are the common types of fruits in the Philippines use in preservation? 2. What is pectin? 3. What are the methods used in preserving fruits?

LAGRO HIGH SCHOOL Culinary Arts I (4th periodical Test)
Name: ___________ ___________ Section: __________ ___________ Teacher: Date:

I.

TRUE or FALSE: Write T if the statement is correct otherwise write F if the statement is incorrect

_______1. Pige, kasim and Picnic are cuts commonly preserved as ham _______2. Banana and gabi leaves are good wrappers for fruits and vegetables _______3. Carabeef is the general term for chicken, birds and turkey _______2. Pickle solution is a solution of salt and water _______3. Dried mango can be made through drying method _______4. Millet is a cereal grain which is commonly preserved _______5. Grasses, sawdust and sand are used to cover onions, potatoes to keep them spoilage _______6. Curing is a process of stewing meat (usually whole animals) _______7. Meat usually smoked to create a distinctive color and flavor _______8. Salting method is the process of removing water from the tissue of the meat _______ 9. Syrup is a solution of sugar and water added to fruits as sweetener _______10. Refrigerating is a process of food preservation which removes the atmospheric oxygen _______11. Tunsoy is a kind of fish in the Philippines which is commonly preserved _______12. The juice of some fruits and vegetables can be used to make wine _______13. Heavy syrup contains more sugar and helps prevent disintegration of soft fruit tissue

_______14. Artificial drying involved the used of oven for dying of meat _______15. Century egg is an example of canning method _______16. Goats, lambs and dogs are commonly preserved meat in the Philippines _______17. Pig can be slaughtered at 6-8 months old _______18. Rye is a kind of nut which is commonly preserved _______19. Preservative food additives can be used alone in preserving food _______20. Potting is one of the method in preserving meat

II.

Direction: Match column A with Column B A B a. carcass b. peeling c. pork d. blanching e. hot smoking f. eviscerating g. scaling h. cold smoking i. salay-salay j. cleansing k. cutting l. smoking m. cashew nut n. tough cuts o. rice p. tender cuts q. corn r. burial in the

1. Remove the gills through the flaps of the head 2. Temperature is held between 26 to 43ºC 3. Hold the fish by its tails and move the scaling tool from the tail 4. A kind of fish used in preservation 5. Rinse the fish inside and out in running water 6. Temperature is higher from 71 to 79 ºC 7. A slaughtered animal 8. Removal of the skin of fruits and vegetables 9. A kind of meat used in preservation 10. Process of dipping fruits and vegetables in hot water 11. A kind of meat obtained from carabao 12. The fleshy part and unexercised part of meat 13. A cereal grain with hard kernels 14. Methods of preserving food into the soil 15. These are taken from the internal organs of animals 16. Preservation which involved the conversion of carbohydrates to alcohol 17. The most widely used cereal in the Orient 18. These are located in the lower parts of the animal ground

19. A kind of nuts looks roughly like the letter C 20. This method is done in making tinapa

s. carabeef t.fermentation u. variety cuts

III.

Enumeration: 1-3 give at least 3 Methods in fish preservation 4-6 methods in applying salt in fish preservation 7-10 kinds of fruits commonly used for preservation

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