COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 1.


( )
3
2
3 m x t t = − −

( )
2
2 3 3 m/s
dx
v t t
dt
= = − −


( )
2
2 6 3 m/s
dv
a t
dt
= = − −

(a) Time at a = 0.

( )
0 0
0 2 3 3 10 3 t t = − − = −

0
10
3
t =

0
3.33 s t = W
(b) Corresponding position and velocity.

2 3
10 10
3 11.074 m
3 3
x
⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
=
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠
− − =

11.07 m x = W


( ) ( )
2
10 10
2 3 3 6.333 m/s
3 3
v
⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠
= − − = 6.33 m/s v = W




COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 2.


( )
2
3
2 m x t t = − −


( )
2
3 2 2 m/s
dx
v t t
dt
= = − −


2
6 2 m/s
dv
a t
dt
= = −

(a) Time at a = 0.

0
0 6 2 0 t = − =


0
1
3
t =

0
0.333 s t = W

(b) Corresponding position and velocity.

3 2
1 1
2 2.741 m
3 3
x
⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
= − − = −
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠

2.74 m x = − W


2
1 1
3 2 2 3.666 m/s
3 3
v
⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
= − − =
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠

3.67 m/s v = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 3.


Position:

4 3
5 4 3 2 ft x t t t = − + −

Velocity:

3 2
20 12 3 ft/s
dx
v t t
dt
= = − +

Acceleration:

2 2
60 24 ft/s
dv
a t t
dt
= = −

When

2 s, t =


( )( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
4 3
5 2 4 2 3 2 2 x = − − − 52 ft x = W

( )( ) ( )( )
3 2
20 2 12 2 3 v = − + 115 ft/s v = W

( )( ) ( )( )
2
60 2 24 2 a = −
2
192 ft/s a = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 4.


Position:

4 3 2
6 8 14 10 16 in. x t t t t = + − − +

Velocity:

3 2
24 24 28 10 in./s
dx
v t t t
dt
= = + − −

Acceleration:

2 2
72 48 28 in./s
dv
a t t
dt
= = + −

When

3 s, t =


( )( ) ( )( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
4 3 2
6 3 8 3 14 3 10 3 16 x = + − − + 562 in. x = !

( )( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
3 2
24 3 24 3 28 3 10 v = + − − 770 in./s v = !

( )( ) ( )( )
2
72 3 48 3 28 a = + −
2
764 in./s a = !


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 5.


Position:

500sin mm x kt =

Velocity:

500 cos mm/s
dx
v k kt
dt
= =

Acceleration:

2 2
500 sin mm/s
dv
a k kt
dt
= = −

When

0.05 s, and 10 rad/s t k = =


( )( ) 10 0.05 0.5 rad kt = =


( ) 500sin 0.5 x = 240 mm x = !

( )( ) ( ) 500 10 cos 0.5 v = 4390 mm/s v = !

( )( ) ( )
2
500 10 sin 0.5 a = −
3 2
24.0 10 mm/s a = − × !
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 6.


Position:

( )
2
1 2
50sin mm x k t k t = −

Where

2
1 2
1 rad/s and 0.5 rad/s k k = =

Let

2 2
1 2
0.5 rad k t k t t t θ = − = −

( )
2
2
2
1 rad/s and 1 rad/s
d d
t
dt dt
θ θ
= − = −

Position:

50sin mm x θ =

Velocity:

50cos mm/s
dx d
v
dt dt
θ
θ = =

Acceleration:

dv
a
dt
=


2
2
2
2
50cos 50sin mm/s
d d
a
dt dt
θ θ
θ θ
⎛ ⎞
= −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠

When 0, v =

either cos 0 θ =

or

1 0 1 s
d
t t
dt
θ
= − = =

Over 0 2 s, values of cos are: t θ ≤ ≤

( ) s t 0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0
( ) rad θ 0 0.375 0.5 0.375 0
cosθ 1.0 0.931 0.878 0.981 1.0
No solutions cos 0 in this range. θ =
For 1 s, t =

( )( )
2
1 0.5 1 0.5 rad θ = − =


( ) 50sin 0.5 x = 24.0 mm x = W

( )( ) ( )( ) 50cos 0.5 1 50sin 0.5 0 a = − −
2
43.9 mm/s a = − W
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 7.


Given:

3 2
6 9 5 x t t t = − + +

Differentiate twice.

2
3 12 9
dx
v t t
dt
= = − +


6 12
dv
a t
dt
= = −

(a) When velocity is zero.
0 v =

( )( )
2
3 12 9 3 1 3 0 t t t t − + = − − =


1 s and 3 s t t = = W

(b) Position at t = 5 s.

( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
3 2
5
5 6 5 + 9 5 + 5 x = −

5
25 ft x = W

Acceleration at t = 5 s.

( )( )
5
6 5 12 a = −

2
5
18 ft/s a = W

Position at t = 0.

0
5 ft x =

Over 0 ≤ t < 1 s x is increasing.
Over 1 s < t < 3 s x is decreasing.
Over 3 s < t ≤ 5 s x is increasing.
Position at t = 1 s.

( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
3 2
1
1 6 1 9 1 5 9 ft x = − + + =

Position at t = 3 s.

( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
3 2
3
3 6 3 9 3 5 5 ft x = − + + =

Distance traveled.

At t = 1 s
1 1 0
9 5 4 ft d x x = − = − =
At t = 3 s
3 1 3 1
4 5 9 8 ft d d x x = + − = + − =

At t = 5 s
5 3 5 3
8 25 5 28 ft d d x x = + − = + − =


5
28 ft d = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 8.


( )
3
2
2 ft x t t = − −

( )
2
2 3 2 ft/s
dx
v t t
dt
= = − −

(a) Positions at v = 0.

( )
2
2
2 3 2 3 14 12 0 t t t t − − = − + − =


2
14 (14) (4)( 3)( 12)
(2)( 3)
t
− ± − − −
=



1 2
1.1315 s and 3.535 s t t = =


1
At 1.1315 s, t =

1
1.935 ft x =

1
1.935 ft x = W


2
At 3.535 s, t =

2
8.879 ft x =

2
8.879 ft x = W

(b) Total distance traveled.

0
At 0, t t = =

0
8 ft x =


4
At 4 s, t t = =

4
8 ft x =

Distances traveled.

1
0 to : t

1
1.935 8 6.065 ft d = − =


1 2
to : t t

2
8.879 1.935 6.944 ft d = − =


2 4
to : t t

3
8 8.879 0.879 ft d = − =

Adding,

1 2 3
d d d d = + +

13.89 ft d = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 9.


0.2
3
t
a e

=

0 0
v t
dv a dt =
∫ ∫


0.2 0.2
0
0
3
0 3
0.2
t
t
t t
v e dt e
− −
− = =




( ) ( )
0.2 0.2
15 1 15 1
t t
v e e
− −
= − − = −

At t = 0.5 s,
( )
0.1
15 1 v e

= −

1.427 ft/s v = W

0 0
x t
dx v dt =
∫ ∫


( )
0.2 0.2
0
0
1
0 15 1 15
0.2
t
t
t t
x e dt t e
− −
⎛ ⎞
− = − = +
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠



( )
0.2
15 5 5
t
x t e

= + −

At 0.5 s, t =

( )
0.1
15 0.5 5 5 x e

= + − 0.363 ft x = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 10.


Given:

2
0 0
5.4sin ft/s , 1.8 ft/s, 0, 3 rad/s a kt v x k = − = = =


0
0 0
0
5.4
5.4 sin cos
t
t t
v v adt kt dt kt
k
− = = − =
∫ ∫


( )
5.4
1.8 cos 1 1.8cos 1.8
3
v kt kt − = − = −

Velocity:

1.8cos ft/s v kt =


0
0 0
0
1.8
1.8 cos sin
t
t t
x x v dt kt dt kt
k
− = = =
∫ ∫


( )
1.8
0 sin 0 0.6sin
3
x kt kt − = − =

Position:

0.6sin ft x kt =

When 0.5 s, t =

( )( ) 3 0.5 1.5 rad kt = =


1.8cos1.5 0.1273 ft/s v = = 0.1273 ft/s v = W

0.6sin1.5 0.5985 ft x = = 0.598 ft x = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 11.


Given:

2
3.24sin 4.32cos ft/s , 3 rad/s a kt kt k = − − =


0 0
0.48 ft, 1.08 ft/s x v = =


( ) ( )
0
0 0 0
0 0
3.24 sin 4.32 cos
3.24 4.32
1.08 cos sin
3.24 4.32
cos 1 sin 0
3 3
1.08cos 1.08 1.44sin
t t t
t t
v v a dt kt dt kt dt
v kt kt
k k
kt kt
kt kt
− = = − −
− = −
= − − −
= − −
∫ ∫ ∫

Velocity:

1.08cos 1.44sin ft/s v kt kt = −


( ) ( )
0
0 0 0
0 0
1.08 cos 1.44 sin
1.08 1.44
0.48 sin cos
1.08 1.44
sin 0 cos 1
3 3
0.36sin 0.48cos 0.48
t t t
t t
x x v dt kt dt kt dt
x kt kt
k k
kt kt
kt kt
− = = −
− = +
= − + −
= + −
∫ ∫ ∫

Position:

0.36sin 0.48cos ft x kt kt = +

When
0.5 s, t =

( )( ) 3 0.5 1.5 rad kt = =


1.08cos1.5 1.44sin1.5 1.360 ft/s v = − = − 1.360 ft/s v = − !

0.36sin1.5 0.48cos1.5 0.393 ft x = + = 0.393 ft x = !
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 12.


Given:

2
mm/s where is a constant. a kt k =

At 0, t =

400 mm/s; at 1 s, 370 mm/s, 500 mm v t v x = = = =


2
400 0 0
1
2
v t t
dv a dt kt dt kt = = =
∫ ∫ ∫

2 2
1 1
400 or 400
2 2
v kt v kt − = = +

At 1 s, t =

( )
2
3
1
400 1 370, 60 mm/s
2
v k k = + = = −
Thus

2
400 30 mm/s v t = −

At

7 s, t =

( )( )
2
7
400 30 7 v = −
7
1070 mm/s v = − W
2 2 2
When 0, 400 30 0. Then 13.333 s , 3.651 s v t t t = − = = =

For 0 3.651 s, t ≤ ≤

0 and is increasing. v x >

For 3.651 s, t >

0 and is decreasing. v x <


( )
2
500 1 1
400 30
x t t
dx v dt t dt = = −
∫ ∫ ∫

( )
3 3
1
500 400 10 400 10 390
t
x t t t t − = − = − −

Position:

3
400 10 110 mm x t t = − +

At
0, t =

0
110 mm x x = =

At
3.651 s, t =

( )( ) ( )( )
3
max
400 3.651 10 3.651 110 1083.7 mm x x = = − + =

At

7 s, t =

( )( ) ( )( )
3
7
400 7 10 7 110 x x = = − +
7
520 mm x = − W
Distances traveled:

Over
0 3.651 s, t ≤ ≤

1 max 0
973.7 mm d x x = − =

Over
3.651 7 s, t ≤ ≤

2 max 7
1603.7 mm d x x = − =

Total distance traveled:

1 2
2577.4 mm d d d = + =

2580 mm d = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 13.


Determine velocity.
0.15 2 2
0.15
v t t
dv adt dt

= =
∫ ∫ ∫

( ) ( )( ) 0.15 0.15 0.15 2 v t − − = −


0.15 0.45 m/s v t = −

At

5 s, t =

( )( )
5
0.15 5 0.45 v = −
5
0.300 m/s v = W
When 0, v =

0.15 0.45 0 3.00 s t t − = =

For 0 3.00 s, t ≤ ≤

0, is decreasing. v x ≤

For 3.00 5 s, t ≤ ≤

0, is increasing. v x ≥

Determine position.

( )
10 0 0
0.15 0.45
x t t
dx v dt t dt

= = −
∫ ∫ ∫


( )
( )
2 2
0
10 0.075 0.45 0.075 0.45
t
x t t t t − − = − = −


2
0.075 0.45 10 m x t t = − −

At 5 s, t =

( )( ) ( )( )
2
5
0.075 5 0.45 5 10 10.375 m x = − − = −


5
10.38 m x = − W

At
0, t =

0
10 m (given) x = −

At
3.00 s, t =

( )( ) ( )( )
2
3 min
0.075 3.00 0.45 3.00 10 10.675 mm x x = = − − = −

Distances traveled:

Over 0 3.00 s, t ≤ ≤
1 0 min
0.675 m d x x = − =
Over
3.00 s 5 s, t < <

2 5 min
0.300 m d x x = − =
Total distance traveled:
1 2
0.975 m d d d = + =

0.975 m d = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 14.


Given:

2
9 3 a t = −
Separate variables and integrate.
( )
2
0 0
9 3 9
v t
dv a dt t dt = = − =
∫ ∫ ∫


3
0 9 v t t − = −
( )
2
9 v t t = −
(a) When v is zero.
2
(9 ) 0 t t − =

0 and 3 s (2 roots) t t = =

3 s t = W

(b) Position and velocity at 4 s. t =
( )
3
5 0 0
9
x t t
dx v dt t t dt = = −
∫ ∫ ∫


2 4
9 1
5
2 4
x t t − = −


2 4
9 1
5
2 4
x t t = + −


At 4 s, t =

( ) ( )
2 4
4
9 1
5 4 4
2 4
x
⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
= + −
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠

4
13 m x = W


( )
( )
2
4
4 9 4 v = −

4
28 m/s v = − W

(c) Distance traveled.
Over 0 3 s, t < < v is positive, so x is increasing.
Over 3 s 4 s, t < ≤ v is negative, so x is decreasing.

At 3 s, t =

( ) ( )
2 4
3
9 1
5 3 3 25.25 m
2 4
x
⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
= + − =
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠


At 3 s t =

3 3 0
25.25 5 20.25 m d x x = − = − =

At 4 s t =
4 3 4 3
20.25 13 25.25 32.5 m d d x x = + − = + − =
4
32.5 m d = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 15.


Given:

2
dv
a kt
dt
= =

Separate variables dv = kt
2
dt
Integrate using v = –10 m/s when t = 0 and v = 10 m/s when t = 2 s.

10 2
2
10 0
dv kt dt

=
∫ ∫


10
3
10
0
1
3
t
v kt

=

[ ] ( )
3 1
(10) ( 10) 2 0
3
k
⎡ ⎤
− − = −
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦

(a) Solving for k,
( )( ) 3 20
8
k =

4
7.5 m/s k = W

(b) Equations of motion.
Using upper limit of v at t,

( )
3 3
10
0
1 1
10 7.5
3 3
t
v
v kt v t

⎛ ⎞
= + =
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠


3
10 2.5 m/s v t = − + W

Then,
3
10 2.5
dx
v t
dt
= = − +

Separate variables and integrate using x = 0 when t = 2 s.

( )
3
10 2.5 dx t dt = − +


( )
3
0 2
10 2.5
x t
dx t dt = − +
∫ ∫


4
2
0 10 0.625
t
x t t
⎡ ⎤
− = − +
⎣ ⎦


( )( ) ( )( )
4
4
10 0.0625 10 2 0.625 2 t t
⎡ ⎤
⎡ ⎤
= − + − − +
⎢ ⎥ ⎣ ⎦
⎣ ⎦


[ ]
4
10 0.625 10 t t = − + − −


4
10 10 0.625 m x t t = − + W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 16.


Note that is a given function of . a x

( ) 40 160 160 0.25 a x x = − = −

( ) Note that is maximum when 0, or 0.25 m a v a x = =


( ) Use 160 0.25 with the limits v dv adx x dx = = −


max
0.3 m/s when 0.4 m and when 0.25 m v x v v x = = = =


( )
max
0.25
0.3 0.4
160 0.25
v
v dv x dx = −
∫ ∫


( ) ( )
0.25
2 2
2 2
max
0.4
0.25 0.15 0.3
160 160 0 1.8
2 2 2 2
x v
⎡ ⎤
− −
⎢ ⎥ − = − = − − =
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦


2 2 2
max
3.69 m /s v =

max
1.921 m/s v = W

( ) Note that is maximum or minimum when 0. b x v =


( ) Use 160 0.25 with the limits v dv adx x = = −

0.3 m/s when 0.4 m, and 0 when
m
v x v x x = = = =


( )
0
0.3 0.4
160 0.25
m
x
v dv x dx = −
∫ ∫


( ) ( )
( ) ( )( )
2 2
2 2
0.4
0.3 0.25
0 160 80 0.25 80 0.15
2 2
m
x
m
x
x

− = − = − − + −

( )
2
0.25 0.02306 0.25 0.1519 m
m m
x x − = − = ±


0.0981 m and 0.402 m
m
x = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 17.


is a function of : a x

( )
2
100 0.25 m/s a x = −

( ) Use 100 0.25 with limits v dv a dx x dx = = − 0 when 0.2 m v x = =

( )
0 0.2
100 0.25
v x
v dv x dx = −
∫ ∫


( )( )
2
2
0.2
1 1
0 100 0.25
2 2
x
v x − = − −


( )
2
50 0.25 0.125 x = − − +

So
( ) ( )
2 2
2
0.25 100 0.25 or 0.5 1 400 0.25 v x v x = − − = ± − −

Use

( )
2
or
0.5 1 400 0.25
dx dx
dx v dt dt
v
x
= = =
± − −

Integrate:

( )
0 0.2
2
0.5 1 400 0.25
t x dx
dt
x
= ±
− −
∫ ∫

Let ( ) 20 0.25 ; when 0.2 = 1 and 20 u x x u du dx = − = = −

So

1 1
1
2
1
1 1
sin sin
10 10 2
10 1
u
u du
t u u
u
π
− −
 
= = = −
 
 


m m m

Solve for . u

1
sin 10
2
u t
π

= m


( ) sin 10 cos 10 cos10
2
u t t t
π  
= = ± =
 
 
m


( ) cos 10 20 0.25 u t x = = −
continued

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.



Solve for and . x v

1
0.25 cos10
20
x t = −


1
sin10
2
v t =

Evaluate at 0.2 s. t =


( )( ) ( )
1
0.25 cos 10 0.2
20
x = − 0.271 m x = W
( )( ) ( )
1
sin 10 0.2
2
v = 0.455 m/s v = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 18.


Note that is a given function of a x

Use

( ) ( )
2 3
600 1 600 600 v dv adx x kx dx x kx dx = = + = +

Using the limits

7.5 ft/s when 0, v x = =

and

15 ft/s when 0.45 ft, v x = =


( )
15 0.45
3
7.5 0
600 600 v dv x kx dx = +
∫ ∫


15
0.45
2
2 4
0
7.5
600 600
2 2 4
v
x kx
⎡ ⎤
⎡ ⎤
= +
⎢ ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦
⎣ ⎦


( ) ( )
( )( ) ( ) ( )
2 2
2 4
15 7.5
300 0.45 150 0.45
2 2
k − = +


84.375 60.75 6.1509k = +

Solving for , k

2
3.84 ft k

= W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 19.


Note that is a given function of . a x

Use

( )
3
800 3200 v dv adx x x dx = = +

Using the limit 10 ft/s when 0, v x = =


( )
3
10 0
800 3200
v x
v dv x x dx = +
∫ ∫


( )
2
2
2 4
10
400 800
2 2
v
x x − = +


2 4 2 2
1600 800 100 Let v x x u x = + + =

Then

( )( )
2 2
1 2
1600 800 100 1600 , v u u u u u u = + + = − −

1 2
where and are the roots of u u

2
1600 800 100 0 u u + + =

Solving the quadratic equation,

( ) ( )( )( )
( )( )
2
1,2
800 800 4 1600 100
800 0
0.25 0
2 1600 3200
u
− ± −
− ±
= = = − ±


2
1 2
0.25 ft u u = = −

So

( )
( )
2
2
2 2 2 2 2
1600 0.25 1600 0.5 ft /s v u x = + = +

Taking square roots,

( )
2 2
40 0.5 ft/s v x = ± +
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

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Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Use

( )
2 2
or
40 0.5
dx dx
dx v dt dt
v
x
= = = ±
+

2 2
40 Use limit 0 when 0
0.5
dx
dt x t
x
= ± = =
+


1
2 2 0 0
1
40 tan
0.5 0.5 0.5
t x dx x
dt
x

= ± = ±
+
∫ ∫


( ) ( )
1 1
40 2.0tan 2 or tan 2 20 t x x t
− −
= ± = ±


( ) ( ) 2 tan 20 or 0.5tan 20 x t x t = ± = ±


( ) ( ) ( )
2 2
0.5 sec 20 20 10 sec 20
dx
v t t
dt
 
= = ± = ±
 

At 0, 10 ft/s, which agrees with the given data if the minus sign is rejected. t v = = ±

Thus,

( ) ( )
2
10 sec 20 ft/s, and 0.5tan 20 ft v t x t = =

At
0.05 s, t =

20 1.0 rad t =


( )
2
2
10
10sec 1.0
cos 1.0
v = = 34.3 ft/s v = W

( ) 0.5tan 1.0 x = 0.779 ft x = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 20.


Note that is a given function of . a x

2
7
12 28 12 m/s
3
a x x
| |
= − = −
|
\ .

7
Use 12 with the limits
3
v dv adx x dx
| |
= = −
|
\ .
8 m/s when 0. v x = =

2
2
8 0
8 0
7 12 7
12
3 2 2 3
x v
v x v
v dv x dx x
| |
| | | |
= − = −
|
| |
|
\ . \ .
\ .
∫ ∫


2 2
2 2
8 12 7 7
2 2 2 3 3
v
x

| | | |
− = − −
| |
\ . \ .



2 2 2
2 2
7 7 7 4
8 12 12
3 3 3 3
v x x

| | | | | |
= + − − = − −
| | |
\ . \ . \ .



2
7 4
12
3 3
v x
| |
= ± − −
|
\ .

Reject minus sign to get 8 m/s at 0. v x = =

(a) Maximum value of . x
max
0 when v x x = =

2 2
7 4 7 1
12 0 or
3 3 3 9
x x
| | | |
− − = − =
| |
\ . \ .


max max
7 1 8 2
2 m and m 2 m
3 3 3 3
x x x − = ± = = =

Now observe that the particle starts at 0 with 0 and reaches 2 m. At 2 m, 0 and x v x x v = > = = =

2
0, so that becomes negative and decreases. Thus, 2 m is never reached.
3
a v x x < =


max
2 m x = !
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


(b) Velocity when total distance traveled is 3 m.
The particle will have traveled total distance 3 m d = when
max max
d x x x − = − or 3 2 2 x − = −
or 1 m. x =

Using

2
7 4
12
3 3
v x
| |
= − − −
|
\ .
, which applies when x is decreasing, we get

2
7 4
12 1 20
3 3
v
| |
= − − − = −
|
\ .
4.47 m/s v = − !


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 21.


Note that is a function of . a x

( )
1
x
a k e

= −

( )
Use 1 with the limits 9 m/s when 3 m, and 0 when 0.
x
v dv adx k e dx v x v x

= = − = = − = =


( )
0 0
9 3
1
x
v dv k e dx


= −
∫ ∫


( )
0
2
0
3
9
2
x
v
k x e


⎛ ⎞
= +
⎜ ⎟
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠

( )
2
3
9
0 0 1 3 16.0855
2
k e k
⎡ ⎤
− = + − − − = −
⎣ ⎦

(a) 2.5178 k =
2
2.52 m/s k = W

( ) ( )
Use 1 2.5178 1 with the limit 0 when 0.
x x
v dv adx k e dx e dx v x
− −
= = − = − = =

( )
0 0
2.5178 1
v x
x
v dv e dx

= −
∫ ∫


( ) ( )
2
0
2.5178 2.5178 1
2
x
x x
v
x e x e
− −
= + = + −


( ) ( )
1/2
2
5.0356 1 2.2440 1
x x
v x e v x e
− −
= + − = ± + −

(b) Letting

2 m, x = −

( )
1/ 2
2
2.2440 2 1 4.70 m/s v e = ± − + − = ±


Since begins at 2 m and ends at 0, 0. x x x v = − = >

Reject the minus sign.

4.70 m/s v = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 22.


0.00057
6.8
x
dv
a v e
dx

= =


0.00057
0 0
6.8
v x
x
v dv e dx

=
∫ ∫

2
0.00057
0
6.8
0
2 0.00057
x
x
v
e

− =



( )
0.00057
11930 1
x
e

= −

When 30 m/s. v =

( )
( )
2
0.00057
30
11930 1
2
x
e

= −

0.00057
1 0.03772
x
e

− =
0.00057
0.96228
x
e

=

0.00057 ln(0.96228) 0.03845 x − = = −

67.5 m x = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 23.

Given:
0.4
dv
a v v
dx
= = −

or
0.4
dv
dx
= −

Separate variables and integrate using 75 mm/s when 0. v x = =

75 0
0.4 75 0.4
v x
dv v x = − − = −
∫ ∫

(a) Distance traveled when 0 v =
0 75 0.4x − = − 187.5 mm x = W

(b) Time to reduce velocity to 1% of initial value.

(0.01)(75) 0.75 v = =


0.75
2.5ln
75
t = −

11.51 s t = W



COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 24.

Given:
dv
a v kv
dx
= = −
2

Separate variables and integrate using 9 m/s when 0. v x = =

9 0
v x dv
k dx
v
= −
∫ ∫

ln
9
v
kx = −

Calculate using 7 m/s when 13 m. k v x = =


( )( )
3 1
7
ln 13 19.332 10 m
9
k k
− −
= − = ×

Solve for . x

1
ln 51.728 ln
9 9
v v
x
k
= − = −

(a) Distance when 3 m/s. v =

3
51.728 ln
9
x
⎛ ⎞
= −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
56.8 m x = W
(b) Distance when 0. v =

( ) 51.728 ln 0 x = −

x = ∞ W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 25.


0 0
, 0, 25 ft/s v dv adx k vdx x v = = − = =


1/2
1
dx v dv
k
= −


0 0
0
3/2
1 2
3
v
x v
x v
v
dx vdv v
k k
= − = −
∫ ∫

( )
( )
3/2
3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2
0 0
2 2 2
or 25 125
3 3 3
x x v v x v v
k k k
⎡ ⎤
⎡ ⎤
− = − = − = −
⎢ ⎥ ⎣ ⎦
⎣ ⎦

Noting that 6 ft when 12 ft/s, x v = =

3/2 3
2 55.62
6 125 12 or 9.27 ft/s
3
k
k k
⎡ ⎤
= − = =
⎣ ⎦

Then,

( )( )
( )
3/2 3/2
2
125 0.071916 125
3 9.27
x v v
⎡ ⎤
= − = −
⎣ ⎦


3/2
125 13.905 v x = −

( ) When a
8 ft, x =

( )( ) ( )
3/2
3/2
125 13.905 8 13.759 ft/s v = − =


5.74 ft/s v = W

( ) b

dv adt k vdt = = −

1/ 2
1 dv
dt
k v
= −


( )
0
1/2 1/2 1/2
0
1 2
2
v
v
t v v v
k k
⎡ ⎤
= − ⋅ = −
⎣ ⎦


At rest,

0 v =

( )( )
1/2
1/2
0
2 25 2
9.27
v
t
k
= = 1.079 s t = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 26.


2
0.8 49 a v = +

2

0.8 49
v dv v dv
v dv adx dx
a
v
= = =
+

Integrating using 0 when 0, x v = =


2
0 0
2
0
1 1
49
0.8 0.8
49
v
x v v dv
dx v
v
= = +
+
∫ ∫

( )
2
1.25 49 7 x v = + −
(1)
( ) When a

24 ft/s, v =

( )
2
1.25 24 49 7 x = + − 22.5 ft x = W
(b) Solving equation (1) for
2
, v

2
49 7 0.8 v x + = +
( )
2
2
7 0.8 49 v x = + −
When 40 ft, x =

( )( )
2
2 2 2
7 0.8 40 49 1472 ft /s v ⎡ ⎤ = + − =
⎣ ⎦

38.4 ft/s v = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 27.


2 2
2 , and 0 when 0
dv
a k k v v t
dt
= = − − = =


1
2 2
2 sin
dv v
k dt d
k
k v

⎡ ⎤
⎛ ⎞
− = =
⎜ ⎟ ⎢ ⎥
⎝ ⎠
⎣ ⎦ −


1
0
0
2 sin
v
t v
k dt
k

⎡ ⎤
⎛ ⎞
− =
⎜ ⎟ ⎢ ⎥
⎝ ⎠
⎣ ⎦



1
sin 2
v
kt
k

⎛ ⎞
= −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠


( ) ( ) sin 2 sin 2 v k kt k kt = − = −
( ) sin 2 dx v dt k kt dt = = −
Integrating, using 1.5 ft at 0, and 1.2 ft at 0.2 s, x t x t = = = =

( )
1.2 0.2
1.5 0
sin 2 dx k kt dt ⎡ ⎤ = −
⎣ ⎦
∫ ∫


( )
1.2
1.5
0
1
cos 2
2
t
x kt =

( ) ( )
1 1
1.2 1.5 cos 2 0.2
2 2
k ⎡ ⎤ − = −
⎣ ⎦

( ) cos 0.4 0.4 k =


( )
1
0.4 cos 0.4 1.1593 rad k

= =


1.1593
0.4
k = 2.90 ft/s k = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 28.

Acceleration is a given function of velocity.
(a) Position when 0.6 ft/s. v = −

2
From , we get
2 1
v dv v dv
v dv adx dx
a
v
= = =
− −

Integrating, using 1.5 ft x = when 0. v =
2
1.5 0 1.5
2
0
1
or 1
2
2 1
v
x x v v dv
dx x v
v
⎛ ⎞
= = −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
− −
∫ ∫

( )
2 2
1 1
1.5 1 1 or 1 1
2 2
x v x v − = − − = − +
(1)

When

0.6 ft/s, v = −

( )
2 1
1 0.6 1
2
x = − − + 1.400 ft x = W
(b) Position when 0.3 s. t =

2
From we get
2 1
dv dv
dv adt dt
a
v
= = =
− −

Integrating, using 0 t = when 0. v =
( )
1
0 0 0
2
0
1
, or sin
2
2 1
v
t t v dv
dt t v
v

= = −
− −
∫ ∫


1 1
1 1
0 sin 0 sin
2 2
t v t v
− −
− = − − = −


Solving for , v

( ) ( ) sin 2 sin 2 v t t = − = −


When

0.3 s, t =

2 0.6 rad t =


sin0.6 0.5646 ft/s v = − = −


Using equation (1),

( )
2 1
1 0.5646 1
2
x = − − +

1.413 ft x = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 29.

x as a function of v.

0.00057
1
154
x
v
e

= −


2
0.00057
1
154
x
v
e

⎛ ⎞
= −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠


2
0.00057 ln 1
154
v
x
⎡ ⎤
⎛ ⎞
− = − ⎢ ⎥
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦


2
1754.4 ln 1
154
v
x
⎡ ⎤
⎛ ⎞
= − − ⎢ ⎥
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦
(1)
a as a function of x.

( )
2 0.00057
23716 1 v e

= −


( )( )
2
0.0005
11858 0.00057
2
x
dv d v
a v e
dx dx

⎛ ⎞
= = = ⎜ ⎟
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠


2
0.00057
6.75906 6.75906 1
154
x
v
a e

⎡ ⎤
⎛ ⎞
= = − ⎢ ⎥
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦
(2)
(a) v = 20 m/s.
From (1), x = 29.843 x = 29.8 m e
From (2), a = 6.64506 a = 6.65 m/s
2
e
(b) v = 40 m/s.
From (1), x = 122.54 x = 122.5 m e
From (2), a = 6.30306 a = 6.30 m/s
2
e


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 30.


( )
0.3
Given: 7.5 1 0.04 with units km and km/h v x = −

(a) Distance at 1 hr. t =
0.3
Using , we get
7.5(1 0.04 )
dx dx
dx v dt dt
v x
= = =


Integrating, using 0 t = when 0, x =
( )
( ) ( )( )
{ }
0.7
0
0.3 0 0
0
1 1 1
or [ ] 1 0.04
7.5 7.5 0.7 0.04
1 0.04
x
t x
t
dx
dt t x

= = ⋅ −

∫ ∫


( )
{ }
0.7
4.7619 1 1 0.04 t x = − −

(1)


Solving for , x

( )
{ }
1/0.7
25 1 1 0.210 x t = − −


When

1 h, t =

( )( )
{ }
1/0.7
25 1 1 0.210 1 x ⎡ ⎤ = − −
⎣ ⎦
7.15 km x = W
(b) Acceleration when 0. t =

0.7 0.7
(7.5)(0.3)( 0.04)(1 0.04 ) 0.0900(1 0.04 )
dv
x x
dx
− −
= − − = − −

When 0 t = and 0, x =
1
7.5 km/h, 0.0900 h
dv
v
dx

= −

2
(7.5)( 0.0900) 0.675 km/h
dv
a v
dx
= = − = −


2
2
(0.675)(1000)
m/s
(3600)
= −

6 2
52.1 10 m/s a

= − × W

(c) Time to run 6 km.
Using 6 km x = in equation (1),

( )( )
{ }
0.7
4.7619 1 1 0.04 6 0.8323 h t ⎡ ⎤ = − − =
⎣ ⎦

49.9 min t = W




COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 31.


The acceleration is given by

2
2
dv gR
v a
dr r
= = −

Then,
2
2
gR dr
v dv
r
= −

Integrating, using the conditions
esc
0 at , and v r v v = = ∞ = at r R =

esc
0
2
2 v R
dr
v dv gR
r

= −
∫ ∫


esc
0
2 2
1 1
2
v
R
v gR
r

⎛ ⎞
=
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠


2 2
esc
1 1
0 0
2
v gR
R
⎛ ⎞
− = −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠


esc
2 v gR =

6 2
Now, 3960 mi 20.909 10 ft and 32.2 ft/s . R g = = × =

Then,

( )( )
( )
6
esc
2 32.2 20.909 10 v = ×
3
esc
36.7 10 ft/s v = × W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 32.


The acceleration is given by

6
2
20.9 10
32.2
1
y
a
×

=
⎡ ⎤
⎛ ⎞
+
⎜ ⎟
⎢ ⎥
⎝ ⎠
⎣ ⎦

6
2
20.9 10
32.2
1
y
dy
vdv ady
×

= =
⎡ ⎤
⎛ ⎞
+
⎜ ⎟
⎢ ⎥
⎝ ⎠
⎣ ⎦

2
0 max
Integrate, using the conditions at 0 and 0 at . Also, use 32.2 ft/s and v v y v y y g = = = = =

6
20.9 10 ft. R = ×

( )
( )
0
0
2
2 2 0 0
1
v
y
R
dy dy
v dv g gR
R y
∞ ∞
= − = −
+
+
∫ ∫ ∫

max
0
0
2 2
0
1 1
2
y
v
v gR
R y
⎛ ⎞
=
⎜ ⎟
+
⎝ ⎠


( )
2 2 2 max
0 0 max max
max max
1 1 1
0 2
2
gRy
v gR v R y gRy
R y R R y
⎡ ⎤
− = − = − + =
⎢ ⎥
+ +
⎣ ⎦

max
Solving for , y

2
0
max
2
0
2
Rv
y
gR v
=


Using the given numerical data,

( )( )
( )
6 2 6 2
0 0
max
9 2
6 2
0
0
20.9 10 20.9 10
1.34596 10
2 32.2 20.9 10
v v
y
v
v
× ×
= =
× −
× −

0
( ) 2400 ft/s, a v =

( )
( )
( )
( )
2
6
max
2
9
20.9 10 2400
1.34596 10 2400
y
×
=
× −

3
max
89.8 10 ft y = × W
0
( ) 4000 ft/s, b v =

( )
( )
( )
( )
2
6
max
2
9
20.9 10 4000
1.34596 10 4000
y
×
=
× −

3
max
251 10 ft y = × W
0
( ) 40000 ft/s, c v =

( )
( )
( )
( )
2
6
max
2
9
20.9 10 40000
negative
1.34596 10 40000
y
×
= =
× −

Negative value indicates that
0
v is greater than the escape velocity.

max
y = ∞ W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 33.


( ) ( ) Given: sin
n
a v v t ω ϕ ′ = +


At 0, t =

0
0
sin or sin
v
v v v
v
ϕ ϕ ′ = = =

(1)
Let x be maximum at
1
t t = when 0. v =
Then, ( ) ( )
1 1
sin 0 and cos 1
n n
t t ω ϕ ω ϕ + = + = ± (2)

Using

or
dx
v dx v dt
dt
= =


Integrating,

( ) cos
n
n
v
x C t ω ϕ
ω

= − +


At 0, t =

0 0
cos or cos
n n
v v
x x C C x ϕ ϕ
ω ω
′ ′
= = − = +


Then,

( )
0
cos cos
n
n n
v v
x x t ϕ ω ϕ
ω ω
′ ′
= + − +
(3)

max 0 1
cos using cos 1
n
n
v v
x x t ϕ ω ϕ
ω ω
′ ′
= + + + = −


Solving for cos , ϕ

( )
max 0
cos 1
n
x x
v
ω
ϕ

= −



max 0
With 2 , x x =

0
cos 1
n
x
v
ω
ϕ = −

(4)

Using

2 2
2 2 0 0
sin cos 1, or 1 1
n
v x
v v
ω
ϕ ϕ
| | | |
+ = + − =
| |
′ ′
\ . \ .


Solving for gives v′

( )
2 2 2
0 0
0
(5)
2
n
n
v x
v
x
ω
ω
+
′ = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


( ) Acceleration: b

( ) cos
n n
dv
a v t
dt
ω ω ϕ ′ = = +


2
Let be maximum at when 0. v t t a = =

Then, ( )
2
cos 0
n
t ω ϕ + =
From equation (3), the corresponding value of x is
( )
0
0 0 0
2 2 2 2
0 0 0
0 0
2
0 0
cos 1 2
3 1
2
2 2 2
n
n n n
n
n n n
v v x v
x x x x
v
v x v
x x
x x
ω
ϕ
ω ω ω
ω
ω ω ω
′ ′ ′
| |
= + = + − = −
|

\ .
+
= − = −


( )
0
0
2
0
3

2
n
v
x
x
ω




W



COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 34.


0
( ) 1 sin
dx t
a v v
dt T
π ⎡ ⎤
= = −
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦


0
Integrating, using 0 when 0, x x t = = =

0
0 0 0
1 sin
x t t t
dx v dt v dt
T
π ⎡ ⎤
= = −
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦
∫ ∫ ∫


0
0
0
0
cos
t
x v T t
x v t
T
π
π
⎡ ⎤
= +
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦


0 0
0
cos
v T t v T
x v t
T
π
π π
= + − (1)

When

3 , t T =

( )
0 0
0 0
2
3 cos 3 3
v T v T
x v T v T
T
π
π π
⎛ ⎞
= + − = −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠


0
2.36 x v T = W

0
cos
dv v t
a
dt T T
π π
= = −

When

3 , t T =

0
cos3
v
a
T
π
π = −
0
v
a
T
π
= W
( ) Using equation (1) with , b t T =


0 0
1 0 0
2
cos 1
v T v T
x v T v T π
π π π
⎛ ⎞
= + − = −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠

Average velocity is

1 0
ave 0
2
1
x x x
v v
t T π
Δ − ⎛ ⎞
= = = −
⎜ ⎟
Δ
⎝ ⎠

ave 0
0.363 v v = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 35.


10 km/h 2.7778 m/s = 100 km/h 27.7778 m/s =
(a) Acceleration during start test.

dv
a
dt
=
8.2 27.7778
0 2.7778
adt v dt =
∫ ∫

8.2 27.7778 2.7778 a = −
2
3.05 m/s a = W
(b) Deceleration during braking.

dv
a v
dx
= =

44 0
0 27.7778
a dx v dv = =
∫ ∫

( )
( )
0
44
2
0
27.7778
1
2
a x v =
( )
2 1
44 27.7778
2
a = −

2
8.77 m/s a = − deceleration
2
8.77 m/s a = − = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 36.

10 km/h 2.7778 m/s = 100 km/h 27.7778 m/s =
(a) Distance traveled during start test.

dv
a
dt
=

0
0
t v
v
a dt dv =
∫ ∫


0
at v v = −

0
v v
a
t

=


2
27.7778 2.7778
3.04878 m/s
8.2
a

= =


0
2.7778 3.04878 v v at t = + = +


)
8.2
0 0
2.7778 3.04878
t
x v dv t dt = = +
∫ ∫


( )( ) ( )( )
2
2.7778 8.2 1.52439 8.2 = +

125.3 m x = W

(b) Elapsed time for braking test.

dv
a v
dx
=

0
0
x v
v
adx v dv =
∫ ∫


2 2
0
2 2
v v
ax = −


( )
( )( )
( )
2 2 2
0
1 1
0 27.7778
2 2 44
a v v
x
= − = −


2
8.7682 m/s = −


dv
a
dt
=

0
0
t v
v
a dt dv =
∫ ∫


0
at v v = −


0
0 27.7778
8.7682
v v
t
a
− −
= =


3.17 s t = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 37.


Constant acceleration.

0 0
0, 0
A A
v v x x = = = =


0
v v at at = + =
(1)

2 2
0 0
1 1
2 2
x x v t at at = + + =
(2)
At point , B 2700 ft and 30 s
B
x x t = = =
(a) Solving (2) for a,
( )( )
( )
2 2
2 2700 2
30
x
a
t
= =
2
6 ft/s a = W
(b) Then, ( )( ) 6 30
B
v at = = 180 ft/s
B
v = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 38.


Constant acceleration.

0
0 x =


0
v v at = +
(1)

2
0 0
1
2
x x v t at = + +
(2)
Solving (1) for a,
0
v v
a
t

=
(3)
Then,

( ) ( )
2 0
0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1
2 2 2
v v
x x v t t x v v t v v t
t

= + + = + + = +
At 6 s, t =

0 6
1
and 540 ft
2
v v x = =


( )
0 0 0 0
0
1 1 540
540 6 4.5 or 120 ft/s
2 2 4.5
1
60 ft/s
2
v v v v
v v
⎛ ⎞
= + = = =
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
= =

Then, from (3),
2 2
60 120 60
ft/s 10 ft/s
6 6
a

= = − = −
Substituting into (1) and (2), 120 10 v t = −

( )
2
1
0 120 10
2
x t t = + −

At stopping, 0 or 120 10 0 12 s
s s
v t t = − = =

( )( ) ( )( )
2 1
0 120 12 10 12 720 ft
2
x = + − =

( ) Additional time for stopping 12 s 6 s a = − 6 s t Δ = W
( ) Additional distance for stopping 720 ft 540 ft b = − 180 ft d Δ = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 39.


2
0 0
1
( ) During the acceleration phase
2
a x x v t at = + +

0 0
Using 0, and 0, and solving for gives x v a = =

2
2x
a
t
=


Noting that 130 m when 25 s, x t = =


( )( )
( )
2
2 130
25
a = 0.416 m/s a = W
(b) Final velocity is reached at 25 s. t =

( )( )
0
0 0.416 25
f
v v at = + = + 10.40 m/s
f
v = W
(c) The remaining distance for the constant speed phase is
400 130 270 m x Δ = − =


For constant velocity,

270
25.96 s
10.40
x
t
v
Δ
Δ = = =


Total time for run:

25 25.96 t = + 51.0 s t = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 40.


Constant acceleration. Choose 0 t = at end of powered flight.
Then,

2
1
27.5 m 9.81 m/s y a g = = − = −
(a) When y reaches the ground, 0 and 16 s.
f
y t = =

2 2
1 1 1 1
1 1
2 2
f
y y v t at y v t gt = + + = + −


( )( )
2
2
1 1
1
2 2
1
0 27.5 9.81 16
76.76 m/s
16
f
y y gt
v
t
− + − +
= = =


1
76.8 m/s v = W

(b) When the rocket reaches its maximum altitude
max
, y
0 v =

( ) ( )
2 2 2
1 1 1 1
2 2 v v a y y v g y y = + − = − −


2 2
1
1
2
v v
y y
g

= −


( )
( )( )
2
max
0 76.76
27.5
2 9.81
y

= −
max
328 m y = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 41.


Place origin at 0.
Motion of auto. ( ) ( )
2
0 0
0, 0, 0.75 m/s
A A A
x v a = = =

( ) ( ) ( )
2 2
0 0
1 1
0 0 0.75
2 2
A A A A
x x v t a t t
⎛ ⎞
= + + = + +
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠


2
0.375 m
A
x t =

Motion of bus.
( ) ( )
0 0
?, 6 m/s, 0
B B B
x v a = = − =


( ) ( ) ( )
0 0 0
6 m
B B B B
x x v t x t = − = −

At 20 , 0.
B
t s x = =
( ) ( )( )
0
0 6 20
B
x = − ( )
0
120 m
B
x =
Hence, 120 6
B
x t = −
When the vehicles pass each other, .
B A
x x =

2
120 6 0.375 t t − =

2
0.375 6 120 0 t t + − =

( )( )( )
( )( )
2
6 (6) 4 0.375 120
2 0.375
t
− ± − −
=

6 14.697
11.596 s and 27.6 s
0.75
t
− ±
= = −

Reject the negative root. 11.60 s t = W
Corresponding values of x
A
and x
B
.
( )( )
2
0.375 11.596 50.4 m
A
x = =
( )( ) 120 6 11.596 50.4 m
B
x = − = 50.4 m x = W



COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 42.

Place the origin at A when t = 0.
Motion of A: ( ) ( )
2
0 0
0, 15 km/h = 4.1667 m/s, 0.6 m/s
A A A
x v a = = =
( )
0
4.1667 0.6
A A A
v v a t t = + = +
( ) ( )
2 2
0 0
1
4.1667 0.3
2
A A A A
x x v t a t t t = + + = +
Motion of B: ( ) ( )
2
0 0
25 m, 23 km/h = 6.3889 m/s, 0.4 m/s
B B B
x v a = = = −

( )
0
6.3889 0.4
B B B
v v a t t = + = −


( ) ( )
2 2
0 0
1
25 6.3889 0.2
2
B B B B
x x v t a t t t = + + = + −

(a) When and where A overtakes B.
A B
x x =


2 2
4.1667 0.3 25 6.3889 0.2 t t t t + = + −


2
0.5 2.2222 25 0 t t − − =


( )( )( )
( )( )
2
2.2222 2.2222 4 0.5 25
2 0.5
t
± − −
=


2.2222 7.4120 9.6343 s and 5.19 s t = ± = −

Reject the negative root. .
9.63 s t = W


( )( ) ( )( )
2
4.1667 9.6343 0.3 9.6343 68.0 m
A
x = + =


( )( ) ( )( )
2
25 6.3889 9.6343 0.2 9.6343 68.0 m
B
x = + − =

moves 68.0 m A W

moves 43.0 m B W

(b) Corresponding speeds.

( )( ) 4.1667 0.6 9.6343 9.947 m/s
A
v = + =

35.8 km/h
A
v = W


( )( ) 6.3889 0.4 9.6343 2.535 m/s
B
v = − =

9.13 km/h
B
v = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 43.

Constant acceleration ( )
1 2
and a a for horses 1 and 2.

Let 0 x =

and 0 t = when the horses are at point A.

Then,

2
0
1
2
x v t at = +
Solving for , a
( )
0
2
2 x v t
a
t

=
Using 1200 ft x =

and the initial velocities and elapsed times for each horse,
( )( )
( )
2 1 1
1
2 2
1
2 1200 20.4 61.5
0.028872 ft/s
61.5
x v t
a
t
⎡ ⎤ −

⎣ ⎦
= = = −


( )( )
( )
2 2 2
2
2 2
2
2 1200 21 62.0
0.053070 ft/s
62.0
x v t
a
t
⎡ ⎤ −

⎣ ⎦
= = = −

1 2
Calculating , x x − ( ) ( )
2
1 2 1 2 1 2
1
2
x x v v t a a t − = − + −

( ) ( ) ( )
2
1 2
2
1
20.4 21 0.028872 0.053070
2
0.6 0.012099
x x t t
t t
⎡ ⎤ − = − + − − −
⎣ ⎦
= − +

At point B,
2
1 2
0 0.6 0.012099 0
B B
x x t t − = − + =
(a)
0.6
49.59 s
0.012099
B
t = =

Calculating
B
x using data for either horse,
Horse 1: ( )( ) ( )( )
2 1
20.4 49.59 0.028872 49.59
2
B
x = + − 976 ft
B
x = W
Horse 2: ( )( ) ( )( )
2 1
21 49.59 0.05307 49.59 976 ft
2
B
x = + − =
When horse 1 crosses the finish line at 61.5 s, t =

(b) ( )( ) ( )( )
2
1 2
0.6 61.5 0.012099 61.5 x x − = − + 8.86 ft x Δ = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 44.

Choose x positive upward. Constant acceleration a g = −

Rocket launch data:
Rocket : A

0
0, , 0 x v v t = = =


Rocket : B

0
0, , 4 s
B
x v v t t = = = =

Velocities:

Rocket : A

0 A
v v gt = −


Rocket : B ( )
0 B B
v v g t t = − −

Positions:
2
0
1
Rocket :
2
A
A x v t gt = −
( ) ( )
2
0
1
Rocket : ,
2
B B B B
B x v t t g t t t t = − − − ≥

For simultaneous explosions at

240 ft when ,
A B E
x x t t = = =

( ) ( )
2
2 2 2
0 0 0 0
1 1 1 1
2 2 2 2
E E E B E B E B E E B B
v t gt v t t g t t v t v t gt gt t gt − = − − − = − − + −

0
Solving for , v
0
2
B
E
gt
v gt = − (1)
Then, when ,
E
t t =
2
1
,
2 2
B
A E E E
gt
x gt t gt
 
= − −
 
 
or
2
2
0
A
E B E
x
t t t
g
− − =
Solving for ,
E
t
( )( )
( )
( )
( )( )( )( )
2 2
4 1 2 240 2
32.2
4 1
4 4
6.35 s
2 2
A
x
B B
g
E
t t
t
± +
± +
= = =


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.



(a) From equation (1), ( )( )
( )( )
0
32.2 4
32.2 6.348
2
v = −
0
140.0 ft/s v =

W


At time ,
E
t

0 A E
v v gt = − ( )
0 B E B
v v g t t = − −
(b)
( )( ) 32.2 4
B A B
v v gt − = =

/
128.8 ft/s
B A
v =

W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 45.

(a) Acceleration of A.
( ) ( )
0 0
, 168 km/h 46.67 m/s
A A A A
v v a t v = + = =

At 8 s, t = 228 km/h 63.33 m/s
A
v = =

( )
0
63.33 46.67
8
A A
A
v v
a
t


= =
2
2.08 m/s
A
a = W
(b) ( ) ( )
2
0 0
1
2
A A A A
x x v t a t = + +

( ) ( )
2
0 0
1
2
B B B B
x x v t a t = + +


( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
2
0 0 0 0
1
2
A B A B A B A B
x x x x v v t a a t
⎡ ⎤
− = − + − + −
⎣ ⎦
When 0, t = ( ) ( )
0 0
38 m
A B
x x − = and ( ) ( )
0 0
0
B A
v v − =
When 8 s, t = 0
A B
x x − =

Hence,

( )( )
2 1
0 38 8 , or 1.1875
2
A B A B
a a a a = + − − = −


1.1875 2.08 1.1875
B A
a a = + = +

2
3.27 m/s
B
a = W




COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 46.

(a) Acceleration of A.
( ) ( ) ( )
2
0 0 0
1
and
2
A A A A A A A
v v a t x x v t a t = + = + =


Using

( ) ( )
0 0
0 and 0 gives
A A
v x = =


2
1
and
2
A A A A
v a t x a t = =

When cars pass at
1
, 90 m
A
t t x = =

( )( )
2
1 1
2 90 2 180
and
A
A A
A A A
x
t v a t
a a a
= = = =

For 0 5 s, t ≤ ≤ ( )
0
96 km/h 26.667 m/s
B B
v v = = − = −
For 5 s, t > ( ) ( ) ( )
0
1
5 26.667 5
6
B B B A
v v a t a t = + − = − + −
When vehicles pass,
A B
v v = −


( )
1 1
1
26.667 5
6
A A
a t a t = − −


1 1
7 5 160
26.667 or 7 5
6 6
A A
A
a t a t
a
− = − =

Using
1
180 7 180 160
gives 5
A A A
t
a a a
= − =
Let
1
,
A
u
a
=
2
7 180 5 160 u u − =

or

2
160 7 180 5 0 u u − + =

continued
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Solving the quadratic equation,
( )( ) ( )( )( )
( )( )
7 180 49 180 4 160 5
93.915 74.967
2 160 320
0.0592125 and 0.52776
u
± −
±
= =
=

2
1
285.2 m/s and 3.590 m/s
A
a
u
= =

The corresponding values for
1
t are
1 1
180 180
0.794 s, and 7.08 s
285.2 3.590
t t = = = =

Reject 0.794 s since it is less than 5 s.
Thus,
2
3.59 m/s
A
a = W

(b) Time of passing.
1
7.08 s t t = = W
(c) Distance d.
( ) ( )
0 0
0 5 s, 26.667
B B B
t x x v t d t ≤ ≤ = − = −


At 5 s, t =

( )( ) 22.667 5 133.33
B
x d d = − = −


For 5 s, t >

( ) ( ) ( )
2
0
1
133.33 5 5
2
B B B
x d v t a t = − + − + −

( ) ( )
2 1 3.59
133.33 26.667 5 5
2 6
B
x d t t
 
= − − − + −
 
 


1
When 7.08 s, t t = =

90
B A
x x = =

( )( )
( )( )
( )( )
2
3.59 2.08
90 133.33 26.667 2.08
2 6
d = − − +


90 133.33 55.47 1.29 d = + + − 278 m d = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 47.


For 0, t >

( ) ( ) ( )
2 2 2
0 0
1 1
0 0 6.5 or 3.25
2 2
A A A A A
x x v t a t t x t = + + = + + =

For 2 s, t >

( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )( )
2 2
0 0
1 1
2 2 0 0 11.7 2
2 2
B B B B
x x v t a t t = + − + − = + + −

or

( )
2
2
5.85 2 5.85 23.4 23.4
B
x t t t = − = − +

For ,
A B
x x =

2 2
3.25 5.85 23.4 23.4, t t t = − +

or

2
2.60 23.4 23.4 0 t t − + =

Solving the quadratic equation, 1.1459 and 7.8541 s t t = =
Reject the smaller value since it is less than 5 s.
( ) a

7.85 s t = W


( )( )
2
3.25 7.8541
A B
x x = = 200 ft x = W
( ) b

( ) ( )( )
0
0 6.5 7.8541
A A A
v v a t = + = + 51.1 ft/s
A
v = W

( ) ( ) ( )( )
0
2 0 11.7 7.8541 2
B B B
v v a t = + − = + −

68.5 ft/s
B
v = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 48.

Let x be the position relative to point P.
Then,

( ) ( )
0 0
0 and 0.62 mi 3273.6 ft
A B
x x = = =

Also,

( ) ( )
0 0
68 mi/h 99.73 ft/s and 39 mi/h 57.2 ft/s
A B
v v = = = − = −

(a) Uniform accelerations.
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
0 0 2
2 0 0
2
1
or
2
A A A
A A A A A
x x v t
x x v t a t a
t
⎡ ⎤
− −
⎣ ⎦
= + + =


( )( )
( )
2
2
2 3273.6 0 99.73 40
0.895 ft/s
40
A
a
⎡ ⎤ − −
⎣ ⎦
= = −

2
0.895 ft/s
A
a =

W

( ) ( )
( ) ( )
0 0 2
2 0 0
2
1
or
2
B B B
B B B B B
x x v t
x x v a t a
t
⎡ ⎤
− −
⎣ ⎦
= + + =


( )( )
( )
2
2
2 0 3273.6 57.2 42
0.988 ft/s
42
B
a
⎡ ⎤ − − −
⎣ ⎦
= = −
2
0.988 ft/s
B
a =

W

(b) When vehicles pass each other .
A B
x x =

( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
2 2
0 0 0 0
1 1
2 2
A A A B B B
x v t a t x v t a t + + = + +

( ) ( )
2 2
1 1
0 99.73 0.895 3273.6 57.2 0.988
2 2
t t t t + + − = − + −


2
0.0465 156.93 3273.6 0 t t − − + =

Solving the quadratic equation, 20.7 s t = and 3390 s −
Reject the negative value. Then, 20.7 s t = W
(c) Speed of B.
( ) ( )( )
0
57.2 0.988 20.7 77.7 ft/s
B B B
v v a t = + = − + − = −

77.7 ft/s
B
v = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 49.

Let x be positive downward for all blocks and for point D.
1 m/s
A
v =

Constraint of cable supporting A: ( ) constant
A A B
x x x + − =

( )( ) 2 0 or 2 2 1 2 m/s
A B B A
v v v v − = = = =

Constraint of cable supporting B: 2 constant
B C
x x + =
( )( ) 2 0 or 2 2 2 4 m/s
C B C B
v v v v + = = − = − = −

(a)

4 m/s
C
= v

W

(b)

/
2 1
B A B A
v v v = − = −

/
1 m/s
B A
= v

W

(c)

constant, 0
D C D C
x x v v + = + =

4 m/s
D C
v v = − =


/
4 1
D A D A
v v v = − = −

/
3 m/s
D A
= v

W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 50.

Let x be positive downward for all blocks.
Constraint of cable supporting A: ( ) constant
A A B
x x x + − =
2 0 or 2 and 2
A B B A B A
v v v v a a − = = =

Constraint of cable supporting B: 2 constant
B C
x x + =
2 0, or 2 , and 2 4
B C C B C B A
v v v v a a a + = = − = − = −

Since
C
v and
C
a are down,
A
v and
A
a are up, i.e. negative.
( ) ( )
2
2
0 0
2
A A A A A
v v a x x
⎡ ⎤
− = −
⎣ ⎦
( )
( )
( )
( )( )
2 2 2
2 0
0
0.2 0
( ) 0.04 m/s
2 0.5
2
A A
A
A A
v v
a a
x x
− −
= = = −
⎡ ⎤ −

⎣ ⎦

2
0.04 m/s
A
a =

W


4
C A
a a = −

2
0.16 m/s
C
a =

W

( )( )
2
( ) 2 2 0.04 0.08 m/s
B A
b a a = = − = −


( )( ) 0.08 2 0.16 m/s
B B
v a t Δ = = − = −

0.16 m/s
B
v Δ =

W


( )( )
2
2
1 1
0.08 2 0.16 m
2 2
B B
x a t Δ = = − = −

0.16 m
B
x Δ =

W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 51.

Let x
A
, x
B
, x
C
, and x
D
be the displacements of blocks A, B, C, and D relative to the upper supports, increasing
downward.
Constraint of cable AB: constant
A B
x x + =
0
A B
v v + =
B A
v v = −
Constraint of cable BED: 2 constant
B D
x x + =

1 1
2 0 or
2 2
B D D B A
v v v v v + = = − =
Constraint of cable BCD: ( ) ( ) constant
C B C D
x x x x − + − =

1
2 0 or 2 0
2
C B D C A A
v v v v v v − − = + − =
(a) Velocity of block A.

1
2 (2)(4)
2
A C
v v = − = − 8 ft/s
A
v = − 8 ft/s
A
v = W
(b) Velocity of block D.

1
4 ft/s
2
D A
v v = = − 4 ft/s
D
v = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 52.

Let x
A
, x
B
, x
C
, x
D
, and x
E
be the displacements of blocks A, B, C, and D and cable point E relative to the upper
supports, increasing downward.
Constraint of cable AB: constant
A B
x x + =
0
A B
v v + =
B A
v v = −
0
A B
a a + =
B A
a a = −
Constraint of cable BED: 2 constant
B D
x x + =
1 1
2 0
2 2
B D D B A
v v v v v + = = − =
1 1
2 0
2 2
B D D A A
a a a a a + = = − =
Constraint of cable BCD: ( ) ( ) constant
C B C D
x x x x − + − =
2 0 2 0
C B D C A
v v v v v − − = + =
1
2 0 2 0
2
C B D C A
a a a a a − − = + =

1
4
C A
a a = −
Since block C moves downward, v
C
and a
C
are positive.
Then, v
A
and a
A
are negative, i.e. upward.
Also, v
D
and a
D
are negative.
Relative motion:
/
1
2
A D A D A
v v v v = − =
/
1
2
A D A D A
a a a a = − =
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

(a) Acceleration of block C.
/ 2
/
2
(2)(8)
2 3.2 ft/s
5
A D
A A D
v
a a
t
= = = =

2
3.2 ft/s
A
a = −

2
1
0.8 ft/s
4
C A
a a = − =
2
0.8 ft/s
C
a = W
Constraint of cable portion BE: constant
B E
x x + =
0
B E
v v + = 0
B E
a a + =
(b) Acceleration of point E.
2
3.2 ft/s
E B A
a a a = − = = −
2
3.2 ft/s
E
a = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 53.

Let x be position relative to the right supports, increasing to the left.
Constraint of entire cable: ( ) 2 constant
A B B A
x x x x + + − =
2 0 2
B A A B
v v v v + = = −
Constraint of point C of cable: 2 constant
A C
x x + =
2 0 2
A C C A
v v v v + = = −
(a) Velocity of collar A.
( )( ) 2 2 300 600 mm/s
A B
v v = − = − = − 600 mm/s
A
v = W
(b) Velocity of point C of cable.
( )( ) 2 2 600 1200 mm/s
C A
v v = − = − − = 1200 mm/s
C
v = W
(c) Velocity of point C relative to collar B.

/
1200 300 900 mm/s
C B C B
v v v = − = − =
/
900 mm/s
C B
v = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 54.

Let x be position relative to the right supports, increasing to the left.
Constraint of entire cable: ( ) 2 constant,
A B B A
x x x x + + − =
1 1
2 0, or , and
2 2
B A B A B A
v v v v a a + = = − = −
(a) Accelerations of A and B.
/ /
1 2

2 3
B A B A A A A B A
v v v v v v v = − = − − = −
( )
2
610 406.67 mm/s
3
A
v = − = −
( )
( )
2 0
A
0
406.67 0
, or 50.8 mm/s
8
A A
A A A
v v
v v a t a
t

− −
− = = = = −


2
50.8 mm/s
A
a = W
( )
1 1
50.8
2 2
B A
a a = − = − −
2
25.4 mm/s
B
a = W
(b) Velocity and change in position of B after 6 s.
( ) ( )( )
0
0 25.4 6
B B B
v v a t = + = + 152.5 mm/s
B
v = W
( ) ( ) ( )( )
2
2
0 0
1 1
25.4 6
2 2
B B B B
x x v t a t − = + = 458 mm
B
x Δ =

W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 55.

Let x be position relative to left anchor. At the right anchor, . x d =
Constraint of cable: ( ) ( ) 2 constant
B B A A
x x x d x + − + − =

2 2
2 3 0 or and
3 3
B A A B A B
v v v v a a − = = =
Constraint of point D of cable: ( ) constant
A D
d x d x − + − =
0 or and
A D D A D A
v v v v a a + = = − = −
(a) Accelerations of A and B.
( ) ( ) ( )
0 0
2
6 in./s 6 4 in./s
3
B A
v v = = =
( ) ( )
2
2
0 0
2
A A A A A
v v a x x
⎡ ⎤
− = −
⎣ ⎦


( )
( )
( ) ( )
( )( )
2 2 2 2
2 0
0
2.4 4
0.512 in./s
2 10
2
A A
A
A A
v v
a
x x
− −
= = = −
⎡ ⎤

⎣ ⎦

2
0.512 in./s
A
a = W
( )
2
3 3
0.512 0.768 in./s
2 2
B A
a a = = = −
2
0.768 in./s
B
a = W
(b) Acceleration of point D. ( ) 0.512
D A
a a = − = − −
2
0.512 in./s
D
a =

W
(c) Velocity of block B after 4 s.
( ) ( )( )
0
6 0.768 4
B B B
v v a t = + = + − 2.93 in./s
B
v = W
Change in position of block B.
( ) ( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
2
2
0 0
1 1
6 4 0.768 4
2 2
B B B B
x x v t a t − = + = + − 17.86 in.
B
x Δ =

W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 56.

Let x be position relative to left anchor. At right anchor . x d =
Constraint of entire cable: ( ) ( ) 2 constant
B B A A
x x x d x + − + − = 2 3 0
B A
v v − =
(a) Velocity of A: ( )
2 2
12
3 3
A B
v v = = 8.00 in./s
A
v =

W
Constraint of point C of cable: constant
B B C
x x x + − = 2 0
B C
v v − =
(b) Velocity of C: ( ) 2 2 12
C B
v v = = 24 in./s
C
v =

W
Constraint of point D of cable: constant
A C
d x d x − + − = 0,
A D
v v + =
(c) Velocity of D: 8.00 in./s
D A
v v = − = − 8.00 in./s
D
v =

W
(d) Relative velocity.
/
24 8
C A C A
v v v = − = −
/
16.00 in./s
C A
v =

W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 57.

Let x be position relative to the anchor, positive to the right.
Constraint of cable: ( ) ( ) 3 constant
B C B C A
x x x x x − + − + − =
4 2 3 0 4 2 3 0
C B A C B A
v v v a a a − − = − − = (1, 2)
When 0, t = ( )
0
50 mm/s and 100 mm/s
B a
v v = − =
(a) ( ) ( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
0 0
1 1
2 3 2 50 3 100
4 4
C B A
v v v
⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ = + = − +
⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦
( )
0
50 mm/s
C
v =

W
Constraint of point D: ( ) ( ) ( ) constant
D A C A C B B
x x x x x x x − + − + − − =
2 2 2 0
D C A B
v v v v + − − =
(b) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
0 0 0
2 2 2 2 100 + 2 50 2 50
D A B C
v v v v = + − = − − ( )
0
0
D
v =

W
( ) ( )
2
0 0
1
2
C C C C
x x v t a t − = +
(c)
( ) ( ) ( )( )
( )
0 0 2
2 2
2 2 40 50 2
30 mm/s
2
C C C
C
x x v t
a
t
⎡ ⎤
− − ⎡ ⎤ −
⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦
= = = −

2
30 mm/s
C
a = W
Solving (2) for a
A

( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
2
1 1
4 2 4 30 2 0 40 mm/s
3 3
A C B
a a a ⎡ ⎤ = − = − − = −
⎣ ⎦


2
40 mm/s
A
a = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 58.

Let x be position relative to the anchor, positive to the right.
Constraint of cable: ( ) ( ) 3 constant
B C B C A
x x x x x − + − + − =
4 2 3 0 and 4 2 3 0
C B A C B A
v v v a a a − − = − − =
(a) Accelerations of B and C.
At 2 s, t = 420 mm/s and 30 mm/s
A B
v v = = −
( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
1 1
2 3 2 30 3 420 300 mm/s
4 4
C B A
v v v ⎡ ⎤ = + = − + =
⎣ ⎦

( )
0
0
C
v =
( )
0
C C C
v v a t = +
( )
0
300 0
2
C C
C
v v
a
t


= =
2
150 mm/s
C
a =

W
( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
2
1 1
4 3 4 150 3 270 105 mm/s
2 2
B C A
a a a ⎡ ⎤ = − = − = −
⎣ ⎦


2
105 mm/s
B
a =

W
(b) Initial velocities of A and B.
( )
0
A A A
v v a t = − ( ) ( )( )
0
420 270 2 120 mm/s
A A A
v v a t = − = − = −
( )
0
120 mm/s
A
v =

W
( )
0
B B B
v v a t = − ( ) ( )( )
0
30 105 2
B B B
v v a t = − = − − − ( )
0
180 mm/s
B
v =

W
Constraint of point E: ( ) ( ) 2 constant
C A E A
x x x x − + − =
3 2 0
E A C
v v v − + =
(c) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
0 0 0
3 2 3 120 2 0 360 mm/s
E A C
v v v = − = − − = −
( )
0
360 mm/s
E
v = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 59.

Define positions as positive downward from a fixed level.
Constraint of cable. ( ) ( ) ( ) 2 constant
B A C A C B
x x x x x x − + − + − =
3 2 constant
C B A
x x x − − =
3 2 0
C B A
v v v − − =
3 2 0
C B A
a a a − − =
Motion of block C.
( ) ( )
2
0 0
0, 3.6 in./s , 18 in./s, 0
A A B B B
v a v v a = = − = = =
( ) ( ) ( )
0 0 0
1
2 6 in./s
3
C B A
v v v

= + =


( ) ( )( )
2
1 1
2 0 2 3.6 2.4 in./s
3 3
C B A
a a a = + = + − = −


( )
0
6 1.2
C C C
v v a t t = + = −
( ) ( )
2 2
0 0
1
6 0.6
2
C C C C
x x v t a t t t − = + = −
(a) Time at v
C
= 0.
0 6 2.4t = − 2.5 s t = W

(b) Corresponding position of block C.
( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
2
0
1
6 2.5 2.4 2.5
2
C C
x x
| |
− = + −
|
\ .
( )
0
7.5 in.
C C
x x − =

W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 60.

Define positions as positive downward from a fixed level.
Constraint of cable: ( ) ( ) ( ) 2 constant
B A C A C B
x x x x x x − + − + − =
3 2 constant
C B A
x x x − − =
3 2 0
C B A
v v v − − =
3 2 0
C B A
a a a − − =
Motion of block C.
( )
0
0,
A
v =
2
2.5 in./s ,
A
a t = − ( )
0
0,
B
v =
2
15 in./s
B
a =
( ) ( ) ( )
0 0 0
1
2 0
3
C B A
v v v
⎡ ⎤
= + =
⎣ ⎦

( )
2
1 1
2 (15 5 ) in./s
3 3
C B A
a a a t = + = −
( )
0 0
t
C C C
v v a dt = +



( )
2
1
0 15 2.5 in./s
3
t t = + −
( )
( )
2 3
0
1
7.5 0.83333 in.
3
C C
x x t t − = −
( ) Time at 0
C
a v =

( )
2
1
0 15 2.5 0
3
t t + − = 0 and 6 s t t = = 6 s t = W
(b) Corresponding position of block C.
( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
2 3
0
1
0 7.5 6 0.83333 6
3
C C
x x
⎡ ⎤
− = + −
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦

( )
0
30 in.
C C
x x − = W



COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 61.

Let x be position relative to the support taken positive if downward.
Constraint of cable connecting blocks A, B, and C:
2 2 constant, 2 2 0
A B C A B C
x x x v v v + + = + + =
2 2 0
A B C
a a a + + = (1)
Constraint of cable supporting block D:
( ) ( ) constant, 2 0
D A D B D A B
x x x x v v v − + − = − − =
2 0
D B A
a a a − − = (2)
Given:
/
120 or 120
C B C B C B
a a a a a = − = − = − (3)
Given:
/
220 or 220
D A D A D A
a a a a a = − = = + (4)
Substituting (3) and (4) into (1) and (2),
( ) 2 2 120 0 or 2 3 120
A B B A B
a a a a a + + − = + = (5)
( ) 2 220 0 or 440
A A B A B
a a a a a + − − = − = − (6)
Solving (5) and (6) simultaneously,
2 2
240 mm/s and 200 mm/s
A B
a a = − =
From (3) and (4),
2 2
80 mm/s and 20 mm/s
C D
a a = = −
(a) Velocity of C after 6 s.
( ) ( )( )
0
0 80 6
C C C
v v a t = + = + 480 mm/s
C
v = W
(b) Change in position of D after 10 s.
( ) ( ) ( )( )
2
2
0 0
1 1
0 20 10 1000 mm
2 2
D D D D
x x v t a t − = + = + − = −
1.000 m
D
x Δ = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 62.

Let x be position relative to the support taken positive if downward.
Constraint of cable connecting blocks A, B, and C:
2 2 constant,
A B C
x x x + + = 2 2 0,
A B C
v v v + + = 2 2 0
A B C
a a a + + =
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
0 0 0 0 0 0
0, ,
A B C A B C
v v v x x x = = = = =
( ) ( )
/ /
0 0
0, 0
B A B A
x v = =
( ) ( ) ( )
2 2
/ / / / /
0 0
2
B A B A P A B A B A
v v a x x
⎡ ⎤
− = −
⎣ ⎦
( )
2
/ /
0 2 0
B A B A B A
v a x x − = − −

( ) ( )
2
2
/ 2
/
40
10 mm/s
2 2 160 80
B A
B A
B A
v
a
x x
= = =
− −


( ) ( )
2 2
/ / / / /
0 0
1 1
0 0
2 2
B A B A B A B A B A
x x v t a t a t = + + = + +
( ) ( )
/ 2
/ /
2 2 2 160 80
, or 4 s
10
B A B A
B A B A
x x x
t t
a a
− −
= = = =
( ) ( )
2
0 0
1
2
A A A A
x x v t a t − = +
(a)
( ) ( )
( )
( )
0 0
2 2
2
2 80 0
4
A A A
A
x x v t
a
t
⎡ ⎤
− −

⎣ ⎦
= =
2
10 mm/s
A
a = W

/
10 10
B A B A
a a a = + = +
2
20 mm/s
B
a = W
( ) ( )( ) ( )( ) 2 2 2 20 2 10 60 mm/s
C B A
a a a ⎡ ⎤ = − + = − + = −
⎣ ⎦

( )
( )
0
0
300 0
5 s
60
C C
C C C
C
v v
v v a t t
a

− −
= + = = =


Constraint of cable supporting block D:
( ) ( ) constant, 2 0
D A D B D A B
x x x x v v v − + − = − − =
( ) ( )
1 1
2 0, 10 20 15 mm/s
2 2
D A B D A B
a a a a a a − − = = + = + =
(b) ( ) ( ) ( )( )
2
2
0 0
1 1
0 15 5
2 2
D D D D
x x v t a t − = + = + 187.5 mm
D
x Δ = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 63.
























curve a t −
1 2
12 m/s, 8 m/s A A = − =

(a) curve v t −

6
4 m/s v = −
( )
0 6 1
4 12 v v A = − = − − − 8 m/s =

10
4 m/s v = −
(b)
14 10 2
4 8 v v A = + = − +
14
4 m/s v = W
3 4
16 m, 4 m A A = = −

5 6
16 m, 4 m A A = − = −

7
4 m A =
(a) curve x t −

0
0 x =
4 0 3
16 m x x A = + =
6 4 4
12 m x x A = + =

10 6 5
4 m x x A = + = −

12 10 6
8 m x x A = + = −
(b)
14 12 7
x x A = +
14
4 m x = − W
Distance traveled:
0 4 s, t ≤ ≤
1
16 0 16 m d = − =
4 s 12 s, t ≤ ≤
2
8 16 24 m d = − − =
12 s 14 s, t ≤ ≤ ( )
3
4 8 4 m d = − − − =
Total distance traveled: 16 24 4 d = + + 44 m d = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 64.

















(a) Construction of the curves.
curve a t −
1 2
12 m/s, 8 m/s A A = − =
curve v t −

0
8 m/s v =
( )
6 0 1
8 12 4 m/s v v A = + = + − = −

10 6
4 m/s v v = = −

14 10 2
4 8 4 m/s v v A = + = − + =

3 4
16 m, 4 m A A = = −

5 6
16 m, 4 m A A = − = −

7
4 m A =
curve x t −

0
0 x =

4 0 3
16 m x x A = + =

6 4 4
12 m x x A = + =

10 6 5
4 m x x A = + = −

12 10 6
8 m x x A = + = −

14 12 7
4 m x x A = + = −
(b) Time for 8 m. x >
From the x t − diagram, this is time interval
1 2
to . t t
Over 0 6 s, t < < 8 2
dx
v t
dt
= = −
continued
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.



Integrating, using limits 0 x = when 0 t = and 8 m x = when
1
t t =
8
2 2
1 1
0
0
8 or 8 8
t
x t t t t
 
= − = −
 

or
2
1 1
8 8 0 t t − + =
Solving the quadratic equation,
( ) ( )( )( )
( )( )
2
1
8 8 4 1 8
4 2.828 1.172 s and 6.828 s
2 1
t
± −
= = ± =
The larger root is out of range, thus
1
1.172 s t =
Over 6 10, t < < ( ) 12 4 6 36 4 x t t = − − = −
Setting 8, x =
2 2
8 36 4 or 7 s t t = − =
Required time interval: ( )
2 1
5.83 s t t − = W
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 65.

















The a–t curve is just the slope of the v–t curve.
0 10 s, t < < 0 a = W
10 s < 18 s, t <
2
18 6
1.5 ft/s
18 10
a

= =

W
18 s < 30 s, t <

2
18 18
3 ft/s
30 18
a
− −
= = −

W

30 s < 40 s t < 0 a = W
Points on the x–t curve may be calculated using areas of the v–t
curve.

1
(10)(6) 60 ft A = =

2
1
(6 18)(18 10) 96 ft
2
A = + − =

3
1
(18)(24 18) 54 ft
2
A = − =

4
1
( 18)(30 24) 54 ft
2
A = − − = −

5
( 18)(40 30) 180 ft A = − − = −
0
48 ft x = − W
0 1 0 1
12 ft x x A = + = W
8 1 10 2
108 ft x x A = + = W
24 18 3
162 ft x x A = + = W
30 24 4
108 ft x x A = + = W
40 30 5
72 ft x x A = + = − W
continued
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.



(a) Maximum value of x.
Maximum value of x occurs
When 0, v = i.e. 24 s. t =

max
162 ft x = W
(b) Time s when 108 ft. x =
From the x–t curve,
18 s and 30 s t t = = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 66.












Data from problem 11.65:
0
48 ft x = −
The a–t curve is just the slope of the v–t curve.
0 10 s, t < < 0 a = !
10 s < 18 s, t <
2
18 6
1.5 ft/s
18 10
a

= =

!
18 s < 30 s, t <

2
18 18
3 ft/s
30 18
a
− −
= = −

!

30 s < 40 s, t < 0 a = !
Points on the x–t curve may be calculated using areas of the v–t
curve.
!

1
(10)(6) 60 ft A = =
2
1
(6 18)(18 10) 96 ft
2
A = + − =
3
1
(18)(24 18) 54 ft
2
A = − =
4
1
( 18)(30 24) 54 ft
2
A = − − = −
5
( 18)(40 30) 180 ft A = − − = −
0
48 ft x = − !
0 0 1 1
12 ft x x A = + = !
10 18 2
108 ft x x A = + = !
24
x =
18 3
x A + = 162 ft !
30
x =
24 4
x A + = 108 ft !
40 30 5
72 ft x x A = + = − !
continued
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.



(a) Total distance traveled during 0 30 s t ≤ ≤ .
For 0 24 s t ≤ ≤
1 24 0
210 ft d x x = − =
For 24 s 30 s t ≤ ≤
2 30 24
54 ft d x x = − =
Total distance.
1 2
d d d = + 264 ft d = !
(b) Values of t for which 0. x =
In the range 0 10 s t ≤ ≤

0 0
48 6 x x v t t = + = − +
Set 0. x =
1
48 6 0 t − + =
1
8 s t = !
In the range 30 s 40 s, t < <
30 30
( 30) x x v t = + −
108 ( 18)( 30) t = + − −
648 18t = −
Set 0. x =
2
648 18 0 t − =
2
36 s t = !


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 67.

Sketch v t − curve as shown. Label areas
1 2
, , A A and
3
A

( )( )
1
3 20 60 in. A = =

1 1
2 in./s v at t Δ = =
( )
2
2 1 1
1
in.
2
A v t t = Δ =
( )( ) ( )
3 1 1 1
20 2 20 in. A v t t t = Δ − = −
Distance traveled: 12 ft 144 in. x Δ = =
( )
2
1 1 1
total area, 144 60 2 20 x t t t Δ = = + + −
or
2
1 1
40 84 0 t t − + =
( )( )( )
( )( )
2
1
40 40 4 1 84
2.224 s and 37.8 s
2 1
t
± −
= =
Reject the larger root.
1
2.224 s t =

1
2 4.45 in./s v t Δ = =

max
3 3 4.45 v v = + Δ = +
max
7.45 in./s v = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 68.










Let x be the altitude. Then v is negative for decent and a is positive
for deceleration.
Sketch the v t − and x t − curves using times
1 2
, t t and
3
t as
shown.
Use constant slopes in the v t − curve for the constant
acceleration stages.
Areas of v t − curve:
( )
1 1 1
1
180 44 112 ft
2
A t t = − + = −


2 2
44 A t = −

( )
3 3 3
1
44 22
2
A t t = − = −

Changes in position:
1
1800 1900 100 ft x Δ = − = −

2
100 1800 1700 ft x Δ = − = −

3
0 100 100 ft x Δ = − = −
Using
i i
x A Δ = gives
1
100
0.893 s
112
t

= =



2
1700
38.64 s
44
t

= =



3
100
4.55 s
22
t

= =


(a) Total time:
1 2 3
44.1 s t t t + + = W
(b) Initial acceleration.
( ) ( ) 44 180
0.893
v
a
t
− − − Δ
= =
Δ


2
152.3 ft/s a = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 69.

Sketch the v t − curve

Data:
0
64 km/h 17.778 m/s v = =
3
2
4.8 km 4.8 10 m x = = ×
1
32 km/hr 8.889 m/s v = =

3 3
1
4.8 10 800 4.0 10 m x = × − = ×

2
450 s t =
(a) Time
1
t to travel first 4 km.
( ) ( )
3
1 1 0 1 1 1
1 1
4.0 10 17.778 8.889
2 2
x A v v t t = × = = + = +
1
300 s t = W
(b) Velocity
2
. v
( )( ) ( )( )
2 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 2
1 1
800 450 300
2 2
x x A v v t t v v − = = = + − = + −

2 1
10.667 m v v + =

2
10.667 8.889 v = −
2
1.778 m/s v = W
(c) Final deceleration.

2 2 1
12
2 1
1.778 8.889
0.0474 m/s
450 300
v v
a
t t
− −
= = = −
− −

2
12
0.0474 m/s a = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 70.


10 20
10 min 20 s 0.1722 h
60 3600
= + =
Sketch the v t − curve

60
25
35
a
b
c
t
a
t
a
t
a
=
=
=


( )( ) ( )
1 1 1
1 1 1 1
60 60 25 60 1800 312.5
2 2
a b
A t t t t
a a
= − − = − −
But
1
5 mi A =

1
1
60 2112.5 5 t
a
− = (1)
( )
2 1 1
1
35 0.1722 35 6.0278 35 612.5
c
A t t t
a
= − − = − −
But
2
8 5 3 mi A = − =

1
1
35 612.5 3.0278 t
a
+ = (2)
1
1
Solving equations (1) and (2) for and , t
a

3
1
85.45 10 h 5.13 min t

= × =
6 2
1
60.23 10 h /mi
a

= ×

( )
( )
( )
3
3 2
2
16.616 10 5280
16.616 10 mi/h
3600
a
×
= × =
2
6.77 ft/s a = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 71.

Sketch the curve as shown a t −

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,

0 1
20 ft/s, 6 ft/s v v = = −
( )
1 1
2 1
6
1
40 6 17
2
A t
1
A t t
= −
= − − = −


1 0 1
v v A A
2
= + +

1 1
6 20 6 17 t t = − −
(a)
1
0.6087 s t =
1
0.609 s t = W

2
1.4 s t =

2 1
0.7913 s t t − =
( )( )
1 3
6 1.4 8.4 ft/s A A + = − = −
( )( )
2
17 0.6087 10.348 ft/s A = − = −

2 0 1 3 2
20 8.4 10.348 v v A A A = + + + = − −
2
1.252 ft/s v = W
(b) ( )
2 0 0 2 1 3 13 2 2
by moment-area method x x v t A A x A x = + + + +
( )
0 2 1 3 2 2 2 1
1 1
0
2 3
v t A A t A t t
⎛ ⎞ ⎛
= + + + + −
⎜ ⎟ ⎜
⎝ ⎠ ⎝




( )( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
1 0.6087
0 20 1.4 8.4 1.4 10.348 1.4
2 3
⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
= + − − −
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠
2
9.73 ft x = W
)


Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 72.

Note that
1 5280
mile 660 ft
8 8
= =
Sketch v t − curve for first 660 ft.
Runner A:
1 2
4 s, 25 4 21 s t t = = − =
( )( ) ( )
1
max max
1
4 2
2
A A
A v v = =
( )
2
max
21
A
A v =

1 2
5280 ft
= 660 ft
8
A A x + = ∆ =
( ) ( )
max max
23 660 or 28.696 ft/s
A A
v v = =
Runner B:
1 2
5 s, 25.2 5 20.2 s t t = = − =
( )( ) ( )
1
max max
1
5 2.5
2
B B
A v v = =
( )
2
max
20.2
B
A v =
1 2
660 ft A A x + = ∆ =
( ) ( )
max max
22.7 660 or 29.075 ft/s
B B
v v = =
Sketch v t − curve for second 660 ft.
3 3
0.3 v a t t ∆ = =
2
3 max 3 3 3 max 3
1
660 or 0.15 660 0
2
A v t vt t v t = − ∆ = − + =
( ) ( )( )( )
( )( )
( )
2
2 max max
3 max max
4 0.15 660
3.3333 396
2 0.15
v v
t v v
± −
 
= = ± −
 
 

Runner A: ( )
max
28.696,
A
v = ( )
3
164.57 s and 26.736 s
A
t =
Reject the larger root. Then total time (a) 25 26.736 51.736 s
A
t = + =
51.7 s
A
t = W

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Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
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Runner B: ( )
max
29.075,
B
v = ( )
3
167.58 s and 26.257 s
B
t =
Reject the larger root. Then total time 25.2 26.257 51.457 s
B
t = + =
51.5 s
B
t = W
Velocity of A at 51.457 s: t =
( )( )
1
28.696 0.3 51.457 25 20.759 ft/s v = − − =
Velocity of A at 51.736 s: t =
( )( )
2
28.696 0.3 51.736 25 20.675 ft/s v = − − =
Over 51.457 s 51.736 s, runner covers a distance t A x ≤ ≤ ∆
(b) ( ) ( )( )
ave
1
20.759 20.675 51.736 51.457
2
x v t ∆ = ∆ = + − 5.78 ft x ∆ = W
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
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© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 73.

Sketch the v t − curves.

At 12 min 720 s, t = =
( )( )
truck
bus
bus
19.44 720 14000 m
14000 1200 15200 m
area under curve
x
x
x v t
= =
= + =
= −

( )( ) ( )( )
1 1
1
120 27.78 720 27.78 15200
2
t t − + − =
1
225.8 s t =
(a) When
bus truck
, x x = areas under the v t − curves are equal.
( )( ) ( )
1 2 1 2
1
27.78 120 27.78 19.44
2
t t t t − + − =
With
1
225.8 s, t =
2
576 s t = W
( )( )
truck
19.44 576 11200 m x = =
truck
11.20 km x = W
(b)
0
bus
1
27.78 0
120 225.8 120
v v
a
t
− −
= =
− −

2
bus
0.262 m/s a = W






COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 74.















( )
0
32 km/h 8.889 m/s
24 km/h 6.667 m/s
A
B
v
v
= =
= =

Sketch the v t − curves.
( )( )
( )( ) ( )
( )
( )
1
2 /
/
1 2
0
1
0
6.667 45 300 m
1 1
2.222 45 45
2 2
50 22.5
A B
A B
A A
B B
A
A v
v
x x A A
x x A
= =
= +
= +
= + +
= +


( ) / / 2
0
B A B A
x x A = −

( ) b

/
0 60 50 22.5
A B
v = − −

/
0.444 m/s
A B
v = W


/
6.667 0.444 7.111 m/s
A B A B
v v v = + = + =
(a)
( )
0
7.111 8.889
45
A A
A
v v
a
t


= =
2
0.0395 m/s
A
a = − W





COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 75.









( )
( )
0
0
22 mi/h 32.267 ft/s
13 mi/h 19.067 ft/s
A
B
v
v
= =
= =

Sketch the v t − curves.
Slope of v t − curve for car A.
( )( )
2
1
1
2
13.2
0.14 ft/s
13.2
94.29 s
0.14
1
13.2 94.29 622.3 m
2
a
t
t
A
= − = −
= =
= =


( )
( )
1
0
1 2
0
B B
A A
x x A
x x A A
= +
= + +

( ) ( )
/ 2 2
0 0
, or 0
B A B A B A
x x x x x A d A = − = − − = −

2
d A = 622 m d = W



COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 76.








Construct the a t − curves for the elevator and the ball.
Limit on
1
A is 24 ft/s. Using
1
4 A t =

2 2
4 24 6 s t t = =
Motion of elevator.
For
1
0 6 s, t ≤ ≤ ( ) ( )
0 0
0 0
E E
x v = =
Moment of
1
A about
1
: t t =
2 1
1 1
4 2
2
t
t t =
( ) ( )
2 2
1 1 1
0 0
2 2
E E E
x x v t t t = + + =
Motion of ball. At 2, t = ( ) ( )
0 0
40 ft 64 ft/s
B B
x v = =
For
1
2 s, t > ( )
2 1
32.2 2 ft/s A t = − −
Moment of
2
A about
2
: t t = ( ) ( )
2
1
1 1
2
32.2 2 16.1 2
2
t
t t
− ⎛ ⎞
− − = − −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠

( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( )
2
1 1
0 0
2
1 1
2 16.1 2
40 64 2 16.1 2
B B B
x x v t t
t t
= + − − −
= + − − −

When ball hits elevator,
B E
x x =
( ) ( )
2
2
1 1 1
2
1 1
40 64 2 16.1 2 2 or
18.1 128.4 152.4 0
t t t
t t
+ − − − =
− + =

Solving the quadratic equation,
1
1.507 s and 5.59 s t =
The smaller root is out of range, hence
1
5.59 s t = W
Since this is less than 6 s, the solution is within range.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 77.

Let x be the position of the front end of the car relative to the front end of the truck.
Let
dx
v
dt
= and
dv
a
dt
= .
The motion of the car relative to the truck occurs in 3 phases, lasting t
1
, t
2
, and t
3
seconds, respectively.
Phase 1, acceleration.
2
1
2 m/s a =
Phase 2, constant speed.
2
90 km/h 54 km/h v = −
36 km/h = 10 m/s =
Phase 3, deceleration.
2
3
8 m/s a = −
Time of phase 1.
2
1
1
0 10 0
5 s
2
v
t
a
− −
= = =
Time of phase 3.
2
3
2
0 0 10
1.25 s
8
v
t
a
− −
= = =
Sketch the a t − curve.
Areas:
1 1 2
10 m/s A t v = =

3 3
10 m/s A t v = = −
Initial and final positions.

0
30 16 46 m x = − − = −
30 5 35 m
f
x = + =
Initial velocity.
0
0 v =

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
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Final time.
1 2 3 f
t t t t = + +

0 0 f f i i
x x v t At = + +



1 1
1
2
f
t t t = −

2
5 1.25 2.5 t = + + −

2
3.75 t = +

2 3
1
0.625 s
2
t t = =
( )( ) ( )( )
2
35 46 0 10 3.75 10 0.625 t = − + + + + −

2
49.75
4.975 s
10
t = =

1 2 3
11.225 s
f
t t t t = + + =
Total time. 11.23 s
f
t = W

1 2
9.975 s t t + =



COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 78.

Let x be the position of the front end of the car relative to the front end of the truck.
Let
dx
v
dt
= and
dv
a
dt
= .
The motion of the car relative to the truck occurs in two phases, lasting t
1
and t
2
seconds,
respectively.
Phase 1, acceleration.
2
1
2 m/s a =
Phase 2, deceleration.
2
2
8 m/s a = −
Sketch the a–t curve.
Areas:
1 1
2 A t =

2 2
8 A t = −
Initial and final positions

0
30 16 46 m x = − − = −
30 5 35 m
f
x = + =
Initial and final velocities.

0
0
f
v v = =

0 1 2 f
v v A A = + +

1 2
0 0 2 8 t t = + −

1 2
4 t t =

0 0 f f i i
x x v t At = + +



1 2 1 2
1
3
2
t t t t = + =

2 2
1
2
t t =

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Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
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© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.



( )( ) ( )
2 2 2 2
1
35 46 0 2 4 3 8
2
t t t t
 
= − + + + −
 
 


2
2
81 20 t =

2
2.0125 s t =

1
8.05 s t =

1 2
10.0625 s.
f
t t t = + =
Maximum relative velocity.
( )( )
1 1
2 8.05 16.10 m/s
m
v a t = = =
60.0 km/h
m
v =
Maximum velocity relative to ground.

max
54 60.0
T
v v v = + = +

max
112.0 km/h v = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 79.
















Sketch acceleration curve.
Let

jerk
da
j
dt
= =

Then,

( )
max
a j t = Δ


( ) ( )
( )
1 max max
2
1
2
2
A a t a t
j t
= Δ = Δ
= Δ

0 1 2
1 2
2 1
0 0
f
v v A A
A A
A A
= + −
= + −
=

( ) ( )( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
( )( )
0 1 2
3 3 3
3 3
4 3
0 3 2
0.36
0.4932
2 2 1.5
x v t A t A t
j t j t j t
x
t
j
Δ = Δ + Δ − Δ
= + Δ − Δ = Δ
Δ
Δ = = =

(a) Shortest time: ( )( ) 4 4 0.4932 1.973 s t Δ = = W
(b) Maximum velocity: ( )
2
max 0 1
0 v v A j t = + = + Δ
( )( )
2
1.5 0.4932 0.365 m/s = = W
Average velocity:
ave
0.36
0.1825 m/s
4 1.973
x
v
t
Δ
= = =
Δ
W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 80.


Sketch the a t − curve.

From the jerk limit, ( )
1 max
j t a Δ = or ( )
max
1
1.25
5 s.
0.25
a
t
j
Δ = = =
( )( )
1
1
5 1.25 3.125 m/s
2
A = =
( )( )
max 1 2
2 max 1
2
2
max
32 km/hr 8.889 m/s 2
2 8.889 2 3.125 2.639 m/s
2.639
2.111 s
1.25
v A A
A v A
A
t
a
= = = +
= − = − =
Δ = = =

Total distance is 5 km 5000 m. = Use moment-area formula.

( ) ( )
( )
0 0 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2
max 1 2
1 1
2 2
2 2
0 0 2
f f f
f
x x v t A A t t t A A t t
v t t t
⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
= + + + − Δ − Δ − + Δ + Δ
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠
= + + − Δ − Δ

(a) ( )( )
1 2
max
5000
2 2 5 2.111 10 2.111 562.5 575 s
8.889
f
f
x
t t t
v
= Δ + Δ + = + + = + + =
9.58 min
f
t = W
(b)
ave
5000
8.70 m/s
575
f
f
x
v
t
= = =
ave
31.3 km/h v = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 81.


Indicate areas
1 2
and A A on the a t − curve.

( )
1
1
0.6 0.1 m/s
2 3
T
A T = =


( )
2
1 2
0.6 0.2 m/s
2 3
T
A T = =

By moment-area formula,

( )
( )( )
0 1 2
2 2 2 2
2 2
7 4
9 9
7 8 15 1
40 0
90 90 90 6
40 6 240 s
x v t A T A T
T T T T
T
⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
= + +
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠
= + + = =
= =

(a)
15.49 s T = W

max 0 1 2
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 v v A A T T T = + + = + + =

(b)
max
4.65 m/s v = W

Indicate area
3 4
and A A on the a t − curve.
( )
( )
1 3
4
1
0.1 0.6 0.05
2 6
1
0.45 0.0375
2 6
T
A T A T
T
A T
= = =
= =

(c)
0 1 3 4
0.1875 v v A A A T = + + + = 2.90 m/s v = W
By moment-area formula,
( ) ( ) ( )
0 1 3 4
2
2 2 1
2 2 9 3 6 3 6
5
0 0.1 0.05 0.0375 0.035417
18 9 18
T T T T T
x v A A A
T T T
T T T T
⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
= + − + ⋅ + ⋅
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠
⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
= + + + =
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠

( )( )
2
0.035417 15.49 = 8.50 m x = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 82.





Divide the area of the a t − curve into the four areas
1 2 3 4
, , and . A A A A
( )( )
( )( )
( )( )
( )( )
1
2
3
4
2
3 0.2 0.4 m/s
3
5 0.2 1 m/s
1
5 2.5 0.1 0.375 m/s
2
1
2.5 0.1 0.125 m/s
2
A
A
A
A
= =
= =
= + =
= =

(a)
0
Velocities: 0 v =


0.2 0 1 2
v v A A = + +

0.2
1.400 m/s v = W


0.3 0.2 3
v v A = +

0.3
1.775 m/s v = W


0.4 0.3 4
v v A = +

0.4
1.900 m/s v = W

Sketch the v t − curve and divide its area into
5 6 7
, , and A A A as
shown.
0.3 0.4 0.4
0.3 or 0.3
x t t
dx x vdt x vdt = − = = −
∫ ∫ ∫

At 0.3 s, t = ( )( )
0.3 5
0.3 1.775 0.1 x A = − −
(b) With ( )( )
5
2
0.125 0.1 0.00833 m
3
A = =
0.3
0.1142 m x = W
At 0.2 s, t = ( )
0.2 5 6 7
0.3 x A A A = − + −
With ( )( )
5 6
2
0.5 0.2 0.06667 m
3
A A + = =
and

( )( )
7
1.400 0.2 0.28 m A = =

0.2
0.3 0.06667 0.28 x = − −
0.2
0.0467m x = − W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 83.


Approximate the a t − curve by a series of rectangles of height ,
i
a each with its centroid at .
i
t t = When equal
widths of 0.25 s t Δ = are used, the values of and
i i
t a are those shown in the first two columns of the table
below.

















At 2 s, t = ( )
2
0 0
0
i
v v adt v a t = + ≈ + Σ Δ


( )( )
0 i
v a t ≈ + Σ Δ
(a) ( )( )
0
0 7.650 0.25 v ≈ −
0
1.913 ft/s v = W
Using moment-area formula,

( ) ( )( )
( ) ( )( )
2
0 0 0 0
0
0 0
2
2
i i i i
i i
x x v t a t t dt x v t a t t
x v t a t t
= + + − ≈ + + Σ − Δ
≈ + + Σ − Δ


(b) ( )( ) ( )( ) 0 1.913 2 11.955 0.25 ≈ + − 0.836 ft x = W
i
t
i
a 2
i
t − ( ) 2
i i
a t −
( ) s

( )
2
ft/s

( ) s

( ) ft/s

0.125 3.215 − 1.875 6.028 −
0.375 1.915 − 1.625 3.112 −
0.625 1.125 − 1.375 1.547 −
0.875 0.675 − 1.125 0.759 −
1.125 0.390 − 0.875 0.341 −
1.375 0.205 − 0.625 0.128 −
1.625 0.095 − 0.375 0.036 −
1.875 0.030 − 0.125 0.004 −
Σ

( )
2
7.650 ft/s −

( ) 11.955 ft/s −

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 84.


Approximate the a t − curve by a series of rectangles of height ,
i
a each with its centroid at .
i
t t = When equal
widths of 2 s t Δ = are used, the values of and
i i
t a are those shown in the first two columns of table below.





















(a) At 8 s, t = ( )
8
8 0
0
0
i
v v adt a t = + ≈ + Σ Δ


( )( )
i
a t = Σ Δ
Since 8 s, t = only the first four values in the second column are summed:
2
17.58 13.41 10.14 7.74 48.87 ft/s
i
a Σ = + + + =
( )( )
8
48.87 2 v =
8
97.7 ft/s v = W
(b) At 20 s, t = ( ) ( )( )
20
20
0
20 0 20
o i
x v t a t dt a t t = + − = + Σ − Δ


( )( ) 990.1 2 =
20
1980 ft x = W
i
t
i
a 20
i
t − ( ) 20
i i
a t −
( ) s

( )
2
ft/s

( ) s

( ) ft/s

1
17.58 19 334.0
3 13.41 17 228.0
5 10.14 15 152.1
7 7.74 13 100.6
9 6.18
11
68.0
11
5.13 9 46.2
13 4.26 7 29.8
15 3.69 5 18.5
17 3.30 3 9.9
19 3.00
1
3.0
Σ ( ) 990.1 ft/s

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 85.


The given curve is approximated by a series of uniformly accelerated motions.

For uniformly accelerated motion,
( )
2 2
2 2 2 1
2 1 2 1
2 or
2
v v
v v a x x x
a

− = − Δ =
( )
2 1 2 1
v v a t t − = − or
2 1
v v
t
a

Δ =
For the regions shown above,











(a) ( ) 3.19 s t t = Σ Δ = W
(b) Assuming
0
0, x = ( )
0
62.6 m x x x = + Σ Δ = W
Region

( )
1
m/s v

( )
2
m/s v

( )
2
m/s a

( ) m x Δ

( ) s t Δ

1
32 30 3 − 20.67 0.667
2
30 25 8 − 17.19 0.625
3 25 20 11.5 − 9.78 0.435
4
20 10 13 − 11.54 0.769
5 10 0 14.5 − 3.45 0.690
Σ


62.63 3.186

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 86.


Use
dv
a v
dx
= noting that
dv
dx
= slope of the given curve.
Slope is calculated by drawing a tangent line at the required point, and using two points on this line to
determine and . x v Δ Δ Then, .
dv v
dx x
Δ
=
Δ

(a) When 0.25, x =
1.4 m/s v = from the curve
1m/s and 0.25m from the tangent line v x Δ = Δ =
( )( )
1
1
4 s 1.4 4
2.5
dv
a
dx

= = =
2
5.6 m/s a = W
(b) When 2.0 m/s, v = 0.5m x = from the curve.
1 m/s and 0.6m from the tangent line. v x Δ = Δ =
( )( )
1
1
1.667s , 2 1.667
0.6
dv
a
dx

= = =
2
3.33 m/s a = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 87.



The a t − curve for uniformly accelerated motion is shown. The area of the rectangle is
. A at =
Its centroid lies at

1
.
2
t t =

By moment-area formula,
( ) ( )
0 0 0 0
1
2
x x v A t t x v t at t
⎛ ⎞
= + + − = + +
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠


2
0 0
1
2
x v t at = + +

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
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Chapter 11, Solution 88.



From the curve, a t −

( )( )
1
2 6 12 m/s A = − = −

( )( )
2
2 2 4 m/s A = =

Over 6 s 10 s, t < <

4 m/s v = −

0 1 0 0
, or 4 12, or 8 m/s v v A v v = + − = − =

By moment-area formula,
12 0 0
moment of shaded area about 12s x x v t t = + + =
( )( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
12
0 8 12 12 12 3 4 12 11 x = + + − − + −
12
8 m x = − W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 89.






(a) 0.2s. T =
( )( )
1
2
24 0.2 3.2 ft/s
3
A = − = −


( )( )
2 1
1
24 0.2
24 4.8
A t
t
= − −
= − +


0
1
0 90 3.2 24 4.8
f
v v A
t
= + Σ
= − − +


1
3.8167 s t =


2
86.80 ft/s A = −


1
3.6167 s t T − =

By moment-area formula,

1 0 0 1
moment of area x x v t = + +

( )( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
1
3 3.6167
0 90 3.8167 3.2 0.2 3.6167 86.80
8 2
x
⎡⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
= + + − + + −
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟ ⎢
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠



1
174.7 ft x = W
(b) 0.8 s. T =
( )( )
( )( )
1
2 1 1
0 1 1
2
24 0.8 12.8 ft/s,
3
24 0.8 24 19.2
or 0 90 12.8 24 19.2, 4.0167 s
f
A
A t t
v v A t t
= − = −
= − − = − +
= + Σ = − − + =

1 2
3.2167s 77.2 ft/s t T A − = = −
By moment-area formula,
( )( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
1
3 3.2167
0 90 4.0167 12.8 0.8 3.2167 77.2
8 2
x
⎡ ⎤ ⎛ ⎞
= + + − + + −
⎜ ⎟
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦ ⎝ ⎠


1
192.3 ft x = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 90.






Data from Prob. 65

0 0
48 ft, 6 ft/s x v = − =
The a – t curve is just the slope of the v – t curve.
0 10 s, t < < 0 a = !
10 s < < 18 s, t
18 6
1.5 ft/s
18 10
a

= =

!
18 s 30 s, t < <
18 18
3 ft/s
30 18
a
− −
= = −

!
30 s < < 40 s t 0 a = !

0 0 i i
x x v t At = + +


(a) Position when t = 20 s.
( )( )
1
18 10 1.5 12 ft/s A = − =

1
20 14 6s t = − =
( )( )
2
2 3 6 ft/s A = − = −

2
20 19 1 s t = − =
( )( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
20
48 6 20 12 6 6 1 x = − + + + −

20
138 ft x = !
(b) Maximum value of position coordinate.
x is maximum where 0. v =
From velocity diagram, 24 s
m
t =
( )( )
1
18 10 1.5 12 ft/s A = − =
( )
1
24 14 10 s t = − =
( )( )
2
24 18 3 18 ft/s A = − − = −
( )
2
24 21 3 s t = − =
( )( ) ( )( ) ( )( ) 48 6 24 12 10 18 3
m
x = − + + + −
162 ft
m
x = !



COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 91.

( )
2
1 = + x t ( )
2
4 1

= + y t
( ) 2 1 = = + &
x
v x t ( )
3
8 1

= = − + &
y
v y t
2 = = &
x x
a v ( )
4
24 1

= = + &
y y
a v t
Solve for (t + 1)
2
from expression for x. (t + 1)
2
= x
Substitute into expression for y.
4
y
x
=
Then, 4 xy =
This is the equation of a rectangular hyperbola.
(a) t = 0. 2 m/s, 8 m/s
x y
v v = = −
( ) ( )
2 2
2 8 8.25 m/s v = + − =

1
8
tan 76.0
2
θ

  −
= = − °
 
 

8.25 m/s = v 76.0 ° W
( ) ( )
2 2
2 2
2
1
2 m/s , 24 m/s
2 24 24.1 m/s
24
tan 85.2
2
x y
a a
a
θ

= =
= + =
 
= = °
 
 


2
24.1 m/s = a 85.2°W
(b)
1
s.
2
t = 3 m/s,
x
v = 2.37 m/s = −
y
v
( )
2
2
3 (2.37) 3.82 m/s v = + =

1
2.37
tan 38.3
3
θ

−  
= = − °
 
 

3.82 m/s = v 38.3 ° W
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
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2 m/s,
x
a =
2
4.74 m/s
y
a =

2 2 2
2 4.74 5.15 m/s a = + =

1
4.74
tan 67.2
2
θ

 
= = °
 
 


2
5.15 m/s = a 67.2°W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 92.


Let
( )
2 3 2
9 18 9 18 u t t t t t t = − + = − +
Then,
2
2
2
3 18 18, and 6 18
du d u
t t t
dt dt
= − + = −
6 0.8 m x u = − 4 0.6 m y u = − +
0.8
dx du
dt dt
= − 0.6
dy du
dx dt
= +
0.6
0.75 constant
0.8
= = − = − =
dy
dt
dx
dt
dy
dx

Since
dy
dx
does not change, the path is straight.
(a) At 2 s, t =
2
2
6, and 6. = − = −
du d u
dt dt

( )( ) ( )( ) 0.8 6 4.8 m/s, 0.6 6 3.6 m/s = = − − = = = − = −
x y
dx dy
v v
dt dt

( )( ) ( )( )
2
2 2
2
0.8 6 4.8 m/s , 0.6 6 3.6 m/s = = − − = = − = −
x y
d x
a a
dt

6.0 m/s = v

36.9 , °
2
6.0 m/s = a

36.9 ° W
(b) At 3 s, t =
2
2
9, and 0
du d u
dt dt
= − =
( )( ) ( )( ) 0.8 9 7.2 m/s, 0.6 9 5.4 m/s
x y
v v = − − = = − = −
0, 0
x y
a a = =
9.0 m/s = v
36.9 , ° 0 = a W
(c) At 4 s, t =
2
2
6, and 6
du d u
dt dt
= − =
( )( ) ( )( ) 0.8 6 4.8 m/s, 0.6 6 3.6 m/s = − − = = − = −
x y
v v
( )( ) ( )( )
2 2
0.8 6 4.8 m/s , 0.6 6 3.6 m/s
x y
a a = − = − = =
6.0 m/s = v

36.9 , °
2
6.0 m/s = a 36.9° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 93.


Substitute the given expressions for x and y into the given equation of the ellipse, and note that the equation is
satisfied.
( )
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
2
2 2 2
2 2
2 2 2
2 2
16cos 16cos 4
9sin
4 3
4 2 cos 3 2 cos
4cos 4cos 1 3sin 4 4cos cos
1
2 cos 2 cos
t t
x y t
t t
t t t t t
t t
π π
π
π π
π π π π π
π π
− +
+ = +
− −
− + + − +
= = =
− −

Calculate x& and y& by differentiation.
( )
( )( )
( ) ( )
( )
( )
( )
( )
( )
2 2
2 2
4cos 2 sin 4 sin 6 sin
2 cos
2 cos 2 cos
3sin sin 3 2cos 1 3 cos
2 cos
2 cos 2 cos
t t t t
x
t
t t
t t t t
y
t
t t
π π π π π π π
π
π π
π π π π π π π
π
π π
− − −
= − =

− −

= − =

− −
&
&

(a) When 0 s, t = 0 and 3 , x y π = = & & 9.42 m/s = v W
(b) When
1
s,
3
t =
( )
( )
3
2
2
1
2
6
4
3, 0
3
2
x y
π
π

= = − − =

& & 7.26 m/s = v

W
(c) When 1 s, t =
( )
( )
2
3 3
0 and ,
3
x y
π
π

= = = − & & 3.14 m/s = v W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 94.

Sketch the path of the particle, i.e. plot of y versus x.
Using 6 sin , and 6 3cos x t t y t = − = − obtain the values in the table below. Plot as shown.












(a) Differentiate with respect to t to obtain velocity components.
( ) ( )
( )
2 2
2 2 2 2
2
6 3cos and 3sin
6 3cos 9sin 45 36cos m/s
36sin 0 0, , and 2 in the range 0 2 .
x y
x y
dx dy
v t v t
dt dx
v v v t t t
d v
t t t
dt
π π π
= = − = =
= + = − + = −
= = = ≤ ≤

When 0 or 2 , t π =
2
cos 1, and is minimum. t v =
When , t π =
2
cos 1, and is maximum. t v = −

( )
( )
2
2
min
45 36 9 m/s , v = − =
min
3 m/s v = W
( ) t s ( ) x m ( ) y m
0 0 3
2
π

6.42

6

π 18.85 9
3
2
π

31.27

6

2π 37.70 3

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( )
( )
2
max
45 36 81 m/s , v = + =
max
9 m/s v = W
(b) 0, 0, 3 m, 3 m/s, 0
x y
t x y v v = = = = =
0 t = W
( ) 3 m = r j W
tan 0
y
x
v
v
θ = = 0 θ = W

2 s, 12 m, = 3 m, 3 m/s, 0
x y
t x y v v π π = = = =
2 s t π = W
( ) ( ) 12 m + 3 m π = r i j W
tan
y
x
v
v
θ = 0 θ = W
s, 6 m, = 9 m, 9 m/s, 0
x y
t x y v v π π = = = =
s t π = W
( ) ( ) 6 m + 9 m π = r i j W
tan
y
x
v
v
θ = 0 θ = ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 95.


Given: ( ) ( ) cos sin sin cos A t t t A t t t = + + − r i j
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
sin sin cos cos cos sin
cos sin
cos sin sin cos
d
A t t t t A t t t t
dt
A t t A t t
d
A t t t A t t t
dt
= = − + + + − +
= +
= = − + +
r
v i j
i j
v
a i j

(a) When r and a are perpendicular, 0 ⋅ = r a
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) cos sin sin cos cos sin sin cos 0 A t t t t t t A t t t t t t ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ + + − ⋅ − + + =
⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦
i j i j
( )( ) ( )( )
2
cos sin cos sin sin cos sin cos 0 A t t t t t t t t t t t t ⎡ ⎤ + − + − + =
⎣ ⎦

( ) ( )
2 2 2 2 2 2
cos sin sin cos 0 t t t t t t − + − =

2
1 0 t − = 1 s t = W
(b) When r and a are parallel, 0 × = r a
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) cos sin sin cos cos sin sin cos 0 A t t t t t t A t t t t t t ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ + + − × − + + =
⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦
i j i j
( )( ) ( )( )
2
cos sin sin cos sin cos cos sin 0 A t t t t t t t t t t t t ⎡ ⎤ + + − − − =
⎣ ⎦
k
( ) ( )
2 2 2 2 2 2
sin cos sin cos sin cos sin cos cos sin sin cos 0 t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t + + + − − − + =
2 0 t = 0 t = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 96.


Given:
( )
/2
1
30 1 20 cos 2
1
t
e t
t
π
π

⎡ ⎤
= − +
⎢ ⎥
+
⎣ ⎦
r i j
Differentiating to obtain v and a,
( )
/2 /2
2
1
30 20 cos 2 2 sin 2
2
1
t t
d
e t e t
dt
t
π π
π
π π π
− −
⎛ ⎞
= = + − −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ +
r
v j

( )
/2
2
30 1
20 cos 2 2sin 2
2
1
t
e t t
t
π
π π π

⎡ ⎤ ⎛ ⎞
= − +
⎜ ⎟ ⎢ ⎥
⎝ ⎠ + ⎣ ⎦
i j
( )
( )
/2 /2
3
2 1
30 20 cos 2 2sin 2 sin 2 4 cos 2
2 2
1
t t
d
e t t e t t
dt
t
π π
π
π π π π π π π
− −
⎡ ⎤ ⎛ ⎞
= = − − − + + − +
⎜ ⎟ ⎢ ⎥
⎝ ⎠ + ⎣ ⎦
v
a i j

( )
( )
2 /2
3
60
10 4sin 2 7.5cos 2
1
t
e t t
t
π
π π π


= − −
+
i j
(a) At 0, t = ( )
1
30 1 20 1
1
⎛ ⎞
= − +
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
r i j 20 in. = r

W
( )
1 1
30 20 1 0
1 2
π
⎡ ⎤ ⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
= − +
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟ ⎢ ⎥
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠
⎣ ⎦
v i j 43.4 in. /s = v

46.3 ° W
( )( )
2
60
10 1 0 7.5
1
π = − − − a i j
2
743 in. /s = a

85.4 ° W
(b) At 1.5 s, t =
0.25
1
30 1 20 cos3
2.5
e
π
π

⎛ ⎞
= − +
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
r i j
( ) ( ) 18 in. 1.8956 in. = + − i j 18.10 in. = r

6.0 ° W

( )
0.75
2
30 1
20 cos3 0
2
2.5
e
π
π π

⎛ ⎞
= − +
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
v i j
( ) ( ) 4.80 in./s 2.9778 in./s = + i j 5.65 in./s = v 31.8 ° W

( )
( )
2 0.75
3
60
10 0 7.5cos3
2.5
e
π
π π

= − + − a i j

( ) ( )
2 2
3.84 in./s 70.1582 in./s = − + i j
2
70.3 in./s = a

86.9 ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 97.


Given: ( ) ( ) cos sin
n n
Rt t ct Rt t ω ω = + + r i j k
Differentiating to obtain v and a.
( ) ( ) cos sin sin cos
n n n n n n
d
R t t t c R t t t
dt
ω ω ω ω ω ω = = − + + +
r
v i j k
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
2 2
2 2
sin sin cos cos cos sin
2 sin cos 2 cos sin
n n n n n n n n n n n n
n n n n n n n n
d
R t t t t R t t t t
dt
R t t t t t t
ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω
= = − − − + + −
⎡ ⎤
= − − + −
⎣ ⎦
v
a i k
i k

Magnitudes of v and a.
( ) ( ) ( )
2 2 2 2
2 2
2
2 2 2 2 2 2
2 2 2 2 2
cos sin sin cos
cos 2 sin cos sin
sin 2 sin cos cos
x y z
n n n n n n
n n n n n n
n n n n n n
v v v v
R t t t c R t t t
R t t t t t t c
R t t t t t t
ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω ω ω
= + +
⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ = − + + +
⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦
⎡ ⎤
= − + +
⎣ ⎦
⎡ ⎤
+ + +
⎣ ⎦


( )
2 2 2 2
1
n
R t c ω = + +
( )
2 2 2 2
1
n
v R t c ω = + + W
( ) ( )
2 2 2 2
2 2
2 2 2
2 2 2 3 4 2 2 2 2
3 4 2 2
2 sin cos 2 cos sin
4 sin 4 sin cos cos 4 cos
4 sin cos sin
x y z
n n n n n n n n
n n n n n n n n n
n n n n n
a a a a
R t t t t t t
R t t t t t t t
t t t t t
ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω ω
= + +
⎡ ⎤
= − − + −
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦

= + + +


− +



( )
2 2 4 2
4
n n
R t ω ω = +
2 2
4
n n
a R t ω ω = + W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 98.

Given: ( )
( )
( )
2
cos 1 sin from which At t A t Bt t = + + + r i j k
2
cos , 1, sin x At t y A t z Bt t = = + =
2
2
cos sin 1
x z y
t t t
At Bt A
| |
= = = −
|
\ .

2 2 2 2
2 2 2
cos sin 1 1 or
x z x y
t t t
At At A B
| | | | | | | |
+ = ⇒ + = = +
| | | |
\ . \ . \ . \ .

Then,
2 2 2
1
y x z
A A B
| | | | | |
− = +
| | |
\ . \ . \ .

2 2 2
1
y x z
A A B
| | | | | |
− − =
| | |
\ . \ . \ .
!
For 3 and 1, A B = = ( )
( )
( )
2
3 cos 3 1 sin t t t t t = + + + r i j k
Differentiating to obtain v and a.
( ) ( )
( )
( )
( )
3
2
2
2
3 cos sin 3 sin cos
1
1
3 2sin cos 3 2cos sin
1
d t
t t t t t t
dt
t
d
t t t t t t
dt
t
= = − + + +
+
= = − − + + −
+
r
v i j k
v
a i j k

(a) At 0, t = ( ) ( ) ( ) 3 1 0 0 0 = − + + v i j k 3 ft/s v = !
And ( ) ( ) ( ) 3 0 3 1 2 0 = − + + − a i j h
Then, ( ) ( )
2 2
2
3 2 13 a = + =
2
3.61 ft/s a = !
(b) If and are perpendicular, 0 ⋅ = r v r v
( ) ( )
( )
( )( )
2
2
3
3 cos 3 cos sin 3 1 sin sin cos 0
1
t
t t t t t t t t t t t
t
| |
− + + + + = |

|
+
\ .

or
( )
( )
( )
2 2 2 2
9 cos 9 sin cos 9 sin sin cos 0 t t t t t t t t t t t − + + + =
continued
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


With 0, t ≠
2 2
9cos 8 sin cos 9 sin 0 t t t t t − + + =

2
10 8 sin cos 8cos 0 t t t t − + =
or 7 2cos2 2 sin 2 0 t t t + − =
The smallest root is 2 7.631 s t = 3.82 s t = !
The next root is 4.38 s t =

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 99.


(a) At the landing point, tan30 y x = − °
Horizontal motion: ( )
0 0
0
x
x x v t v t = + =
Vertical motion:
( )
2 2
0
0
1 1
2 2
y
y y v t gt gt = + − = −
from which
2 0
2 2 tan 30 2 tan 30 y x v t
t
g g g
° °
= − = =
Rejecting the 0 t = solution gives
( )( )
0
2 25 tan30 2 tan30
9.81
v
t
g
° °
= = 2.94 s t = W
(b) Landing distance:
( )( )
0
25 2.94
cos30 cos30 cos30
x v t
d = = =
° ° °
84.9 m d = W
(c) Vertical distance: tan30 h x y = ° +
or
2
0
1
tan30
2
h v t gt = ° −
Differentiating and setting equal to zero,
0
tan30
tan30 0 or
o
dh v
v gt t
dt g
°
= ° − = =
Then,
( ) ( )
2
0 0 0
max
tan 30 tan 30 1 tan 30
2
v v v
h g
g g
° ° ⎛ ⎞ °
= −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠


( ) ( )
( )( )
2 2
2 2
0
25 tan30 tan 30
2 2 9.81
v
g
° °
= =
max
10.62 m h = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 100.


Horizontal motion: ( )
0 0
0
0
, or
x
x
x x v t v t t
v
= + = =
Vertical motion:
( )
2
2 2
0 0 0
2
0
0
1 1
or
2 2 2
y
gx
y y v t gt y gt y y
v
= + − = − = −
At ground level, 0, y = so that
2
0
2
0
2
gx
y
v
=
At 50 m, x =
( )( )
( )( )
2
0
2
9.81 50
13.625 m
2 30
y = =

0
13 0.625 m h y = − =
At 53 m, x =
( )( )
( )( )
2
0
2
9.81 53
15.31 m
2 30
y = =

0
13 2.31 m h y = − =
Range to avoid: 0.625 m 2.31 m h < < W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 101.


Horizontal motion.
0 0 x
v v x v t = =
Vertical motion.
2
1
2
y h gt = −
Eliminate t.
2
2
0 0
2
x gx
t y h
v v
= = −
Solve for v
0
.
( )
2
0
2
=

gx
v
h y

Data: h = 3 ft, g = 32.2 ft/s
2
(a) To strike corner C. 15 ft, 0 x d y = = =
( )( )
( )( )
2
0
32.2 15
2 3 0
=

v
0
34.7 ft/s v = W
To strike point B. 15 ft, 1 ft x y = =
( )( )
( )( )
2
0
32.2 15
2 3 1
=

v
0
42.6 ft/s v =
To strike point D. 15 1 14 ft, 0 x y = − = =
( )( )
( )( )
2
0
32.2 14
2 3 0
=

v
0
32.4 ft/s v =
(b) Range to strike corner BCD.
0
32.4 ft/s < 42.6 ft/s v < W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 102.


Place origin of coordinates at point A.
Horizontal motion: ( )
0
90 mi/h 132 ft/s = =
x
v
( )
0
0
0 132 ft = + = +
x
x x v t t
At point B where 6.5 s,
B
t =
( )( ) 132 6.5 858 ft = =
B
x
(a) Distance AB.
From geometry
858
cos 10
d =
°
871 ft d = W
Vertical motion:
( )
2
0
0
1
2
= + −
y
y y v t gt
At point B
( )( )
2 1
tan 10 0 32.2 6.5
2
− ° = + −
B
x h
(b) Initial height. 529 ft h = W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 103.


Data:
2
0
25 ft/s, 90 55 35 , 32.2 ft/s v g α = = ° − ° = ° =
Horizontal motion. ( )
0
cos = x v t α
Vertical motion. ( )
2
0
1
sin
2
= + − y h v t gt α
Eliminate t.
0
cos
x
t
v α
=

2 2
0
tan
2 cos
gx
y h x
v
α
α
2
= + −
Solve for h.
2
2 2
0
tan
2 cos
gx
h y x
v
α
α
= − +
To hit point B. 20 ft, 0 x y = =

( )( )
( )( )
2
2
32.2 20
0 20 tan35 1.352 ft
2 25cos35
= − ° + =
°
h
To hit point C. 24 ft, 0 x y = =

( )( )
( )( )
2
2
32.2 24
0 24 tan35 5.31 ft
2 25cos35
= − ° + =
°
h
Range of values of h. 1.352 ft < 5.31 ft h < W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 104.


Place the origin at A. Let β be the direction of the discharge velocity measured counterclockwise from the
x-axis
Horizontal motion. ( ) ( )
0 0
0
cos cos = =
x
v v x v t β β
Solve for t.
0
cos
x
t
v β
=
Vertical motion.
( )
0
0
sin =
y
v v β
( )
2
0
1
sin
2
= − y v t gt β

2
2 2
0
tan
2 cos
gx
x
v
β
β
= −
Geometry. At points B and C tan y x α =
Hence,
2
2 2
0
tan tan
2 cos
gx
x x
v
α β
β
= −
Solve for x. ( )
2 2
0
2 cos
tan tan = −
v
x
g
β
β α
To water point B.
0
90 90 40 50 β φ = °− = °− ° = °

( )( )
( )
2
2
2 24 cos 50
tan50 tan10 15.01 ft
32.2
°
= ° − ° =
B
x
15.01 ft
B
d = W
To water point C.
0
90 90 40 130 = ° + = ° + ° = ° β φ

( )( )
( )
2
2
2 24 cos 130
tan130 tan10 20.2 ft
32.2
°
= ° − ° = −
C
x
20.2 ft
C C
d x = − = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 105.


0 0 0
13 m/s, 33 , 0, 0.6 m v x y α = = ° = =
Vertical motion:
0
sin
y
v v gt α = −
( )
2
0 0
1
sin
2
y y v t gt α = + −
At maximum height,
0
sin
0 or
y
v
v t
g
α
= =
(a)
13sin33
0.7217 s
9.81
t
°
= =
( )( ) ( )( )
2
max
1
0.6 13sin33 0.7217 9.81 0.7217
2
y = + ° −
max
3.16 m y = W
1.8 m 3.16 m 3.7 m < < yes W
Horizontal motion: ( )
0
0 0
0
cos or
cos
x x
x x v t t
v
α
α

= + =
At 15.2 m, x =
15.2 0
1.3941 s
13cos33
t

= =
°

(b) Corresponding value of : y ( )( ) ( )( )
2 1
0.6 13sin33 1.3941 9.81 1.3941
2
y = + ° −
0.937 m y = W



COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 106.


Horizontal motion: ( )
( )
0
0
0
0
or
x
x
x x
x x v t t
v

= + =
( )
0
0
40cos 4 39.903 m/s, 0
x
v x = ° = =
At 12.2 m, x =
12.2 0
0.3057 s
39.903
t

= =
Vertical motion:
( )
2
0
1
2
y
y h v t gt = + −
( )
2
0
40sin 4 2.790 m/s and 9.81 m/s
y
v g = − ° = − =
(a) At the net, 1.066 m and 0.3057 s y t = =
( ) ( )( ) ( )( )
2
2
0
1 1
1.066 2.790 0.3057 9.81 0.3057
2 2
y
h y v t gt = − + = − − +
2.38 m h = W
(b) At 0, y =
( )
2
0
1
0
2
y
gt v t h − − =
( ) ( )
2
1
9.81 2.790 2.377 0
2
t t − − − =

( ) ( )( )( )
2
2.790 2.790 4 4.905 2.377
0.4676 s
9.81
t
− + − −
= =
At 0.4952 s, t = ( )( ) 39.903 0.4676 18.66 m x = =
Then, 12.2 d x = − 6.46 m d = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 107.


The horizontal and vertical components of velocity and position are
0
0
0
2
0
cos 45
sin 45
cos 45
1
sin 45
2
x
y
v v
v v gt
x v t
y v t gt
= °
= ° −
= °
= ° −

At landing on belt,
0
tan 45 tan 20
cos 45
y
x
v
gt
v v
= ° − = °
°

( )
0 0
tan 45 tan 20 cos 45 0.44974
v v
t
g g
= ° − ° ° =
2
0 0
0
2
0
1
sin 45 0.44974 0.44974
2
0.21688
v v
y v g
g g
v
y
g
⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
= ° −
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠
=

( )( )( )
2 2 2
0
4.6108 4.6108 32.2 3 445.4 ft /s v gy = = =
(a)
0
21.1 ft/s v = W
( )( ) 0.44974 21.1
0.2948 s
32.2
t = =
(b) ( )( ) 21.1cos 45 0.2948 x = ° 4.40 ft x = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 108.

The horizontal and vertical motions are

( )
( )
0 0
2 2
0
cos or
cos
1 1
sin tan
2 2
x
x v t v
t
y v t gt x gt
α
α
α α
= =
= − = −
(1)
or
( )
2
2 tan x y
t
g
α −
= (2)
At the landing point C: 0,
c
y =
0
2 sin v
t
g
α
=
And ( )
2
0
0
2 sin cos
cos
c
v
x v t
g
α α
α = = (3)
(a) 31 α = °
To clear tree A: 90 ft, 36 ft
A A
x y = =
From (2),
( )
2 2
2 90tan31 36
1.12282 s , 1.0596 s
32.2
A A
t t
° −
= = =
From (1), ( )
0
90
99.088 ft/s
1.0596cos31
A
v = =
°

To clear tree B: 300 ft, 42 ft
B B
x y = =
From (2), ( )
( ) 2
2
2 300tan31 42
8.5875 s , 2.9304 s
32.2
B B
t t
° −
= = =
From (1), ( )
0
300
119.43 ft/s
2.9304cos31
B
v = =
°

The larger value governs,
0
119.43 ft/s v =
0
119.4 ft/s v = W
From (3),
( )( )
2
2 119.43 sin31 cos31
391.13 ft
32.2
c
x
° °
= =
330
c
d x = − 61.1 ft d = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


(b) 27 α = °
By a similar calculation, ( )
0
0.78247 s, 129.09 ft/s,
A
A
t v = =
( )
0
2.6240 s, 128.31 ft/s
B
B
t v = =

0
129.09 ft/s v =
0
129.1 ft/s v = W

418.69 ft
c
x = 88.7 ft d = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 109.


Using 40 α = ° the horizontal and vertical motions are
( ) ( )
2
0 0 0
1
cos , and sin ,
2
x v t y y v t gt α α = = + −
or
2
0
0
1
, and tan
cos 2
x
t y y x gt
v
α
α
= = + −
From which
( )
0 2
2 tan y x y
t
g
α + −
=
Using
0
0.6 m, 4.2 m, and 1.1 m
B B
y x y = = =

( )
2 2
2 0.6 4.2tan 40 1.1
0.6166 s
9.81
0.7852 s
B
B
t
t
+ ° −
= =
=

From the horizontal motion,

( )
0
4.2
cos 0.7852cos 40
x
v
t α
= =
°

0
6.98 m/s v = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 110.


Horizontal motion: ( )
0
0
cos or
cos
x
x v t t
v
α
α
= =
Vertical motion:
2
0 0
1
sin
2
y y v t gt α = + −

( )
2
0
0 2
1
tan
2
2 tan
y y x gt
y x y
t
g
α
α
= + −
+ −
=

(a) When 228 mm 0.228 m, d = =
5 0.228 4.772 m x = − =

( )
2 2
2 2 4.772tan30 3.048
0.3480 s
9.81
0.590 s
t
t
+ ° −
= =
=


0
4.772
0.590cos30
v =
°

0
9.34 m/s v = W
(b) When 430 mm 0.430 m, d = =
5 0.430 4.57 m x = − =

( )
2 2
2 2 4.57tan30 3.048
0.3243 s
9.81
0.569 s
t
t
+ ° −
= =
=


0
4.57
0.569cos30
v =
°

0
9.27 m/s v = W
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 111.


Place the origin at A with x-axis horizontal to the right and y-axis vertically upward.
Horizontal motion. ( )
0 0
sin sin
x
v v x v t β β = =
At point B, ( )
0
cos sin
B B
x R v t β β = =
Solve for t
B
.

0
tan
B
R
t
v β
=
Vertical motion.
0
cos
y
v v β =
( )
2
0
1
cos
2
y v t gt β = −
At point B,
2
2 2
0
cos
sin
tan 2 tan
B
R gR
y R
v
β
β
β β
= − = −
Simplifying,
2
2 2
0
cos
sin
tan sin 2 tan
R gR
R
v
β
β
β β β
⎛ ⎞
+ = =
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠

Solve for v
0
.
2
0
2
sin
2tan
gR
v
β
β
=

2
cos
2sin
gR β
β
=

0
cos
2sin
gR
v β
β
= W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 112.

Horizontal motion:
0
cos
x
v v α =
0
cos x v t α =
Vertical motion:
0
sin
y
v v gt α = −
( )
2
0 0
1
sin
2
y y v t gt α = + −
Eliminate t.
0
cos
x
t
v α
=

2
0
2 2
0
tan
2 cos
gx
y y x
v
α
α
= + − (1)
Data:
2
2.1 m, 50 m, 10 , 9.81 m/s y x g α = = = ° =
(a) Range of values of v
0
.
Solve equation (1) for v
0


2
2 2
0
0
2 cos
tan
gx
v
y x y
α
α
=
+ −


( )
( )( )
( )( )
2
2
0
2
0
9.81 50
2 tan 2 2.1 50tan10 cos 10
gx
v
y x y y α
= =
+ − + ° − °
12643.8
10.9163 y
=


For y = 0.5 m,
0
34.840 m/s v =
For y = 1.5 m,
0
36.649 m/s v =
Range for v
0
.
0
34.8 m/s 36.6 m/s v ≤ ≤ W
(b) Maximum height. 0
y
v =

0
sin 0 v gt α − =
0
sin
m
v
t
g
α
=

continued
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


( )
2
0 0
0 0
sin 1 sin
sin
2
m
v v
y y v g
g g
α α
α
 
= + −
 
 


( )( )
2 2 2
2 0
0 0
sin sin 10
2.1
2 2 9.81
v
y v
g
α °
= + = +
For v
0
= 34.840 m/s, 3.9655 m
m
y =
For v
0
= 36.649 m/s 4.1643 m
m
y =
Range for y
m
. 3.97 m 4.16 m
m
y ≤ ≤ W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 113.

Given:
0
86 m/s, 0, 0, 104 m, 0
A A B B
v x y x y = = = = =
Horizontal motion: ( )
0
0
sin or
sin
x
x v t t
v
α
α
= = (1)
Vertical motion:
0
cos
y
v v gt α = −
( )
( )
( )
2
0 2
0
2
2
0
0
cos 1
cos
2 sin
2 sin
v x gx
y v t gt
v
v
α
α
α
α
= − = −
At point B,
( )
2
0
2 2
0 0
cos
0
sin 2 sin
B B
B
v x gx
y
v v
α
α α
= = −
(a)
2
0
2sin cos sin 2
B
gx
v
α α α = =

( )( )
( )
2
9.81 104
sin 2 0.13794 2 7.93
86
α α = = = °
3.96 α = ° !
At maximum height,
0
cos 0
y
v v gt α = − =
0
cos 86cos3.96
8.746 s
9.81
v
t
g
α °
= = =
(b) Then, ( )( ) ( )( )
2
max
1
86cos3.96 8.746 9.81 8.746
2
y = ° −
max
375 m y = !
(c) From equation (1),
( )( )
0
104
sin 86 sin3.96
B
B
x
t
v α
= =
°
17.51 s
B
t = !
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
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© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 114.


Horizontal motion: ( )
0
0
cos or
cos
x
x v t t
v
α
α
= =
Vertical motion: ( )
2
0
1
sin
2
y v t gt α = −

2
2 2
0
tan
2 cos
gx
x
v
α
α
= −

( )
2
2
2
0
tan 1 tan
2
gx
x
v
α α = − +
2 2
2 0 0
2
2 2
tan tan 1 0
v v y
gx gx
α α
⎛ ⎞
− + + =
⎜ ⎟
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠

Data:
0
170 km/h 47.222 m/s, 4.8 m v x = = = at point C,
1.22 m y = at point C.
( )( )
( )( )
( )( )
2
2
0
2
0
2
2 47.222 2
94.712
9.81 4.8
94.712 1.22 2
24.073
4.8
v
gx
v y
gx
= =
= =

(a)
2
tan 94.712 25.073 0 α α − + =
tan 0.26547 and 94.45 α =
14.869 or 89.4 α = ° ° 14.9 α = ° W
(b)
( )
0
4.8
cos 47.222 cos14.869
x
t
v α
= =
°
0.1052 s t = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 115.


Horizontal motion: ( )
0
0
cos or
cos
x
x v t t
v
α
α
= =
Vertical motion: ( )
0 0
sin y y v t α = +

2
0
2 2
0
tan
2 cos
gx
y x
v
α
α
= + −

( )
2
2
0
2
0
tan 1 tan
2
gx
y x
v
α α = + − +
from which
( )
2 2
0 0 2 0
2
2 2
tan tan 1 0
v y y v
gx gx
α α
⎡ ⎤

− − + = ⎢ ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦

Data:
0 0
40 mi/h 58.667 ft/s, 2.0 ft, 2.2 ft, 50 ft v y y x = = = = =

( )( )
( )( )
( ) ( )( )
2
2
0
2
0 0
2
2 58.667 2
4.2755
32.2 50
2 4.2755 2.2 2.0
0.01710
50
v
gx
v y y
gx
= =
− −
= =


2
tan 4.2755tan 1.01710 0 α α − + =
(a) Solving the quadratic equation, tan 4.0226 and 0.25285 α =
76.04 and 14.19 α = ° ° 14.19 α = ° W
(b)
( )
0
2
0
0
sin
tan tan
cos
cos
y
x
v
v gt gx
v v
v
α
θ α
α
α

= − = − = − +

( )( )
( )
2
32.2 50
0.25285 0.24483
58.667cos14.19
= − + =
°
13.76 θ = ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 116.


Vertical motion: with 0
y y
a g v = − = at point B.
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
2 2
2
0 0
0 0
2 or 2
y y y B
v v a y y v g y y − = − = −
( ) ( )( )( ) ( )
2
2 2
0 0
2 32.2 3.6 231.84 ft /s or 15.226 ft/s
y y
v v = = =
( )
( )
0
0
or 0.47287 s
y
y y B
v
v v gt t
g
= − = = =
( )
0
0
15.226
sin 0.43504
35
25.79
y
v
v
α
α
= = =
= °

Horizontal motion: ( )
0
cos x v t α =
(a) ( )( ) 35cos 25.79 0.47287
B
x = 14.90 ft
B
x = W
(b) From above, 25.8 α = ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 117.

Horizontal motion: ( )
0
0
cos or
cos
x
x v t t
v
α
α
= =
Vertical motion: ( )
( )
2
2
0 0 0
2
0
1 1
sin tan
2 2
cos
gx
y y v t gt y x
v
α α
α
= + − = + −

( )
2
2
0
2
0
tan 1 tan
2
gx
y y x
v
α α = + − +
Let tan u x α = so that
( )
2 2
0
2
0
2
g
y y u x u
v
= + − +
Solving for
2
: x ( )
2
2 2 0
0
2

v
x u y y u
g
= + − −
The maximum value of
2
x is required:
( )
2
0.
d x
du
=
( )
2
2 2
0 0
2
2 0 or
d x
v v
u u
du g g
= − = =
Data:
0 0
36 ft/s, 3.6 ft, 18 ft
B
v y y = = =
( )
2
36
40.2484 ft
32.2
u = =
( )
( )( )
( ) ( )
2
2 2
2
max max
2 36
40.2484 3.6 18 40.2484 460.78 ft 21.466 ft
32.2
x x = + − − = =
(a) Maximum distance:
max
13.5 d x = − 7.97 ft d = W
continued
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


(b) Angle . α
max
max max
tan 40.2484
tan 1.875
21.466
x u
x x
α
α = = = =
61.93 α = ° 61.9 α = ° W
Check the edge.
( )
2
0
2
0
tan
2 cos
gx
y y x
v
α
α
= + +
( )( )
( )( )
[ ]
2
2
32.2 13.5
3.6 13.5 1.875
2 36cos61.93
y = + −
°
18.69 ft y = W
Since 18 ft, y > the stream clears the edge.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 118.

Let 90 β α = ° −
Horizontal motion: ( )
0
0
cos or
cos
x
x v t t
v
β
β
= =
Vertical motion: ( )
2 2 2 2
0 0
1 1
sin tan sec /
2 2
y v t gt x gx v β β β = − = −
At point B,
2 2 2
0
1
tan30 tan sec /
2
B B B B
y x x gx v β β = ° = −
Solving for ,
B
x ( )
( )
2 2
2 2 0 0
2 2
tan tan30 cos sin cos tan30 cos
B
v v
x
g g
β β β β β = − ° = − °
Differentiating with respect to β and setting equal to zero,
( )
( )
2
2 2 0
2
0
2
cos sin 2tan30 cos sin
2
cos 2 tan30 sin 2 0
B
dx v
d g
v
g
β β β β
β
β β
= − + °
= + ° =

tan 2 cot 30 3 or 2 60 and 120 β β = − ° =− = − ° °
30 and 60 . β = − ° ° Use 60 . β = °
Maximum values of and .
B
x d
( ) ( )
2 2
2 0 0
max
2
tan60 tan30 cos 60 0.57735
B
v v
x
g g
= ° − ° =
(a)
( ) ( )
2
2
0 max
max
120 2 2
cos30 3 3 32.2
B
x
v
d
g
= = =
°

max
298 ft d = W
(b) 90 90 60 α β = ° − = ° − ° 30 α = ° W
continued
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


At the point of maximum height, the projectile path is parallel to the surface so that

0
0
sin
tan30 or tan30
cos
y
x
v
v gt
v v
β
β

= ° = °
or ( )
0 0
cos
tan tan30 0.57735
v v
t
g g
β
β = − ° =

( )
( )
2
0 0
0
2
2
0
1
sin 0.57735 0.57735
2
120 1 1
149.068 ft
3 3 32.2
v v
y v g
g g
v
g
β
   
= −
   
   
= = =


( )
( )( )
2
0 0
0
2
cos 0.57735 0.288675
0.288675 120
129.097 ft
32.2
v v
x v
g g
β
 
= =
 
 
= =

(c)
max
tan30 149.068 129.097tan30 h y x = − ° = − °
max
74.5 ft h = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 119.








Sketch the velocity vector diagram showing v
B
= v
A
+ v
B/A
.
Law of cosines.

2 2 2
/
2 cos
B A A B A B
v v v v v γ = + −

2 2 2
/
cos
2
A B B A
A B
v v v
v v
γ
+ −
=

( ) ( ) ( )
( )( )( )
2 2 2
700 500 1125
0.7509
2 700 500
+ −
= = −
138.7 γ = ° 90 48.7 γ − ° = °
48.7° west of southW

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 120.


Let i and j be unit vectors in directions east and north respectively.
Velocity of plane relative to air.
( )( )
/
120 km/h cos 20 sin 20
P A
= ° + ° v i j
Velocity of plane.
( )( ) 110 km/h cos30 sin30
P
= ° + ° v i j
But
/ P A P A
= + v v v
Velocity of air.
/ A P P A
= − v v v

( ) ( ) 110cos30 120cos 20 110sin30 120sin 20
A
v = ° − ° + ° − ° i j
( ) ( ) 17.50 km/h 13.96 km/h = − + i j
( ) ( )
2 2
17.50 13.96 22.4 km/h
A
v = + =

17.50
tan
13.96
θ = 51.4 θ = °
22.4 km/h at 51.4 west of north
A
= ° v W




COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 121.










( )
/
/
B A B A
B A B A
B A
= +
= −
= + −
v v v
v v v
v v

Sketch vector addition on a diagram as shown.
Law of cosines:
( ) ( ) ( )( )( )
( )
2 2 2
/
2 2
2
/
2 cos120
30 25 2 30 25 cos120
2275 mi/h
47.697 mi/h
B A B A B A
B A
v v v v v
v
= + − °
= + − °
=
=

Law of sines:
/
sin sin120
A B A
v v
α °
=
25sin120
sin 0.45392
47.697
27.0 , 30 57.0
α
α α
°
= =
= ° + ° = °


/
47.7 mi/h
B A
= v 57.0 ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 122.














First solve geometry triangle ABC.
Law of sines:
sin sin120
1.5 2.4
β °
=
1.5
sin sin120 0.54127
2.4
β = ° =
32.77 β = °
Law of angles: 120 180 α β + + ° = °
60 27.23 α β = ° − = °
Now
/ B A B A
= + v v v
Sketch the vector addition triangle.
90 62.77 α °− = °
60 90 180 θ α + ° + ° − = °
180 60 62.77 57.23 θ = ° − ° − ° = °
Law of sines:
/
sin 60 sin
B A A
v v
θ °
=
(a)
/
sin60 4.5sin 60
4.63 ft/s
sin sin57.23
A
B A
v
v
θ
° °
= = =
°


/
4.63 ft/s
B A
= v 62.77° W
Law of sines:
( ) sin 90 sin
B A
v v
α θ ° −
=
(b)
( ) sin 90 4.5sin 62.77
4.759 ft/s
sin sin57.23
A
B
v
v
α
θ
° − °
= = =
°

4.76 ft/s
B
= v 60 ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 123.















/ B A B A
= + v v v
Sketch the vector addition as shown in the velocity diagram.
By law of cosines:
( ) ( ) ( )
( )
2 2 2
/
2 2
2
3
/
2 cos155
80 60 2 80 60 cos155
18.7005 10 km/h
136.7 km/h
B A A B A B
B A
v v v v v
v
= + − °
= + − °
= ×
=

Law of sines:
/
sin sin155
B B A
v v
α °
=
60sin155
sin 0.18543
136.7
α
°
= =
10.69 α = °
(a)
/
136.7 km/h
B A
= v 10.69 ° W
Determine positions relative to the crossing.
3
80 4 km
60
A A
t = = = r v
( )
0
10
60
60
B B B
t
⎛ ⎞
= + =
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
r r v
3
60
60
⎛ ⎞
+
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
7 km = 25°

/ B A B A
= + r r r Sketch the vector addition as shown.
By law of cosines:

2 2 2
/
2 cos 25
B A A B A B
r r r r r = + − °
( ) ( ) ( )
2 2 2
4 7 2 4 7 cos 25 14.25 km = + − ° =
(b)
/ B A
d r = 3.77 km d = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 124.







Begin with
/ /
and
C A C A C B C B
= + = + v v v v v v
Subtracting
/ / / / /
0
A C A B C B A B C A C B
= + − − = + − v v v v v v v
or
( ) / / / / / / B A A B C A C B C B C A
= − = + − = − + v v v v v v
Sketch the vector addition as shown. By law of cosines:
( ) ( ) ( )( )( )
( )
2 2 2
/ / / / /
2 2
2
3
/
2 cos65
470 520 2 470 520 cos65
284.72 10 km/h
533.6 km/h
B A C A B A C A B A
B A
v v v v v
v
= + − °
= + − °
= ×
=

Law of sines:
/ /
sin sin65
C B B A
v v
α °
=
520sin 65
sin 0.88322
533.6
62.03 , 75 12.97
α
α α
°
= =
= ° ° − = °

(a)
/
534 km/h
B A
= v 12.97 ° W
( ) / /
or
C A C A A C C A
= + = + − v v v v v v
Sketch the vector addition as shown.
Law of cosines: ( )
2 2 2
/ /
2 cos 180 15
A C C A C C A
v v v v v = + − ° − °
( ) ( ) ( )( )( ) ( )
2 2 2
2 3
48 470 2 48 470 cos165 266.79 10 km/h
A
v = + − ° = ×
516.5 km/h
A
v =

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Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
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Law of sines:
/
sin sin165
C A A
v v
β °
=
or
470sin165
sin 0.23551
516.5
β
°
= =
13.62 90 13.62 76.4 β = ° ° − ° = °
(b) 517 km/h
A
= v 76.4 ° W
(c) ( )
/ /
15
520
60
C B C B
t
 
= =
 
 
r v
/
130 km
C B
= r 40 ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 125.

























Let d be the distance between the left and right supports.
Constraint of entire cable: ( ) ( ) 2 constant
B B A A
x x x d x + − + − =
2 3 0 and 2 3 0
B A B A
v v a a − = − =
( )
2 2
2 2
1 0.667 ft/s or 0.667 ft/s
3 3
A B A
a a a = = = =
Constraint of point C: ( )
/
2 constant
A C A
d x y − + =
/ /
2 0 and 2 0
A C A A C A
v v a a − + = − + =
(a) ( )
2
/
2 2 0.667 1.333 ft/s
C A A
a a = = =

2
/
1.333 ft/s
C A
= a W
Velocity vectors after 2s: ( )( ) 0.667 2 1.333 ft/s
A
= = v
( )( )
/
1.333 2 2.666 ft/s
C A
= = v
/

C A C A
= + v v v
Sketch the vector addition.
( )
2
2 2 2 2 2
/
(1.333) (2.666) 8.8889 ft/s
C A C A
v v v = + = + =
2.981 ft/s
C
v =
/
2.666
tan 2, 63.4
1.333
C A
A
v
v
θ θ = = = = °
(b) 2.98 ft/s
C
= v 63.4 ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 126.









Vector
/
8 in./s
P A
= v α 30 90 120 α θ θ = ° + + ° = ° +
Vector 4.8 in./s
A
= v 30°

/ P A P A
= + v v v
(a) 30 , 150 θ α = ° = °
Method 1: Sketch the vector addition.
By law of cosines:
( ) ( ) ( )( )( )
2 2 2
/ /
2 2
2 cos60
4.8 8 2 4.8 8 cos 60
6.97 in./s
P A P A A P A
P
v v v v v
v
= + − °
= + − °
=

By law of sines:
sin sin60 4.8sin60
or sin 0.59604
6.97
A P
v v
β
β
° °
= = =
36.6 , 30 66.6 , β β = ° + ° = ° 6.97 in./s
P
= v 66.6 ° W
(b) 135 , 120 135 255 θ α = ° = ° + ° = °
Method 2: Use unit vectors i and j.
Vector
/
8cos 8sin 2.0706 7.7274
P A
α α = + = − − v i j i j
Vector 4.8cos 30 4.8sin 30 4.1569 2.4
A
= ° + ° = + v i j i j

/
2.0863 5.3274
P A P A
= + = − v v v i j
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
2 2 2 2
2.0863 5.3274 5.72 in./s
P P P
x y
v v v = + = + =
( )
( )
5.3274
tan 2.5535 or 68.6
2.0863
P
y
P
x
v
v
ϕ ϕ

= = = = − °
5.72 in./s
P
= v 68.6 ° W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 127.







Draw vector diagram showing
B A B/A
= + a a a
Law of cosines.
( )( )( )
2 2 2
80 120 2 80 120 cos 20
B
a = + − °
2 2
2758 mm /s =
2
52.516 mm/s
B
a =
Law of sines.
sin sin 20
80 52.516
ϕ °
=
sin 0 5210 31 4 ϕ ϕ = . = . °

(a) Acceleration of block B.
2
52.5 mm/s
B
= a 31.4°W
(b) Velocity of block B when t = 3 s.
( )( ) 52.516 3 157.5 mm/s
B B
v a t = = =
157.5 mm/s
B
= v 31.4 ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 128.


Horizontal motion of the ball: ( ) ( )
ball
0 0
,
x x x
v v x v t = =
Vertical motion of the ball:
( )
0
y y
v v gt = −
( ) ( ) ( )
2 2
2
0 0
1
, 2
2
B y y y
y v t gt v v gy = − − = −
At maximum height,
max
0 and
y
v y y = =
( ) ( )( )( )
( )
2
2 2
max
0
2 2 9.81 8 156.96 m /s
12.528 m/s
y
y
v gy
v
= = =
=

At time of catch, ( )
2
1
0 12.528 9.81
2
y t = = −
or
catch
2.554 s and 12.528 m/s = =
y
t v
Motion of the deck: ( ) ( )
2
deck
0 0
1
,
2
x x D x D
v v a t x v t a t = + = +
Motion of the ball relative to the deck:
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
/
0 0
2 2
/
0 0
/ /
0
1 1
2 2
,
B D x x D D
x
B D x x D D
B D y B D B
y
v v v a t a t
x v t v t a t a t
v v gt y y
⎡ ⎤
= − + = −
⎣ ⎦
⎡ ⎤
= − + = −
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦
= − =

(a) At time of catch, ( )( )
2
/
1
0.3 2.554
2
D B
d x = = − − 0.979 m d = W
(b)
( ) ( )( )
/
0.3 2.554 0.766 m/s or 0.766 m/s
B D
x
v = − − = +

( )
/
12.528 m/s
B D
y
v =

/
12.55 m/s
B D
= v 86.5° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 129.

Vertical motion of sand. a = 32.2 ft/s
2
,

v
0
= 0, y
0
= 0
At impact with conveyor belt B, 5 ft
B
y = −

2
1
2
y gt = −

( )( ) 2 5 2
0.55728 s
32.2
y
t
g
− − −
= = =
Downward velocity component at impact.
( )( ) 32.2 0.55728 17.9444 ft/s
y
v gt = = =
Horizontal motion of sand. v
x
= 6 ft/s
Velocity vector of sand at impact.
( ) ( )
2 2
17.9444 6 18.9209 ft/s
S
v = + =
tan 71.512 ϕ ϕ
17.9444
= = °
6

18.9209 ft/s
S
= v 71.512°
Velocity of conveyor belt B. 8 ft/s =
B
v 15°
Draw vector diagram showing

/
.
S B S B
= − v v v
71.512 15 86.512 = ° + ° = ° ϕ
Law of cosines.

2 2 2
/
2 cos = + −
S B S B S B
v v v v v ϕ
( )( )( )
2 2
18.9209 8 2 18.9209 8 cos86.512 = + − °
403.358 =

/
20.0894 ft/s =
S B
v

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.



Law of sines.
/
sin sin
=
S S B
v v
α ϕ

/
sin 18.9209 sin86.512
sin 0.9401
20.0894
S
S B
v
v
ϕ
α
°
= = =
70.1 15 85.1 = ° + ° = ° α α
Velocity of sand relative to conveyor belt B.

/
20.1 ft/s
S B
= v 85.1° W


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Chapter 11, Solution 130.


Motion of the suitcase relative to the truck.
Acceleration.
0
=
∫ ∫
a
x v
x v
a dx v dv

2 2
0 0
1 1
2 2
− = − ax ax v v

( )
( )
( )( )
2
2 2
2 0
0
15 0
11.25 ft/s
2 2 10 0
v v
a
x x
− −
= = =
− −

Time.
0
0
=
∫ ∫
t v
v
a dt dv

0
= − at v v

0
15 0
1.3333 s
11.25
− −
= = =
v v
t
a

Velocity at 1.2 s.
0
= + v v at
( )( ) 0 11.25 1.2 13.5 ft/s = + =
As a vector. 13.5 ft/s
S/T
= v 20°
Motion of truck. 6 in. 0.5 ft =
Acceleration.
2
0 0
1
2
= + + x x v t at
( )
2 1
0.5 0 0 1.3333
2
a = + +

( )( )
( )
2
2
2 0.5
0.5625 ft/s
1.3333
a = =
Velocity at 1.2 s.
0
v v at = +
( )( ) 0 0.5625 1.2 0.675 ft/s v = + =
As a vector. 0.675 ft/s
T
= v

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System



Velocity of suitcase at 1.2 s.
/ S T S
= + v v v
T

Law of cosines.
( ) ( ) ( )( )
2 2
2
13.5 0.675 2 13.5 cos 20
S
v = + −
Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
°
165.579 =
12.87 ft/s
S
v =
Law of sines.
0.675
sin sin 20
S
v
α
=
°

0.675 sin 20
sin 0.01794
12.87
α
°
= =
1.0 20 1.0 21.0 α β = ° = ° + ° = °
12.87 ft/s
S
= v 21.0 ° W



Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 130.

Motion of the suitcase relative to the truck.
Acceleration.
0
=
∫ ∫
a
x v
x v
a dx v dv

2 2
0 0
1 1
2 2
− = − ax ax v v

( )
( )
( )( )
2
2 2
2 0
0
15 0
11.25 ft/s
2 2 10 0
v v
a
x x
− −
= = =
− −

Time.
0
0
=
∫ ∫
t v
v
a dt dv

0
= − at v v

0
15 0
1.3333 s
11.25
− −
= = =
v v
t
a

Velocity at 1.2 s.
0
= + v v at
( )( ) 0 11.25 1.2 13.5 ft/s = + =
As a vector. 13.5 ft/s
S/T
= v 20°
Motion of truck. 6 in. 0.5 ft =
Acceleration.
2
0 0
1
2
= + + x x v t at
( )
2 1
0.5 0 0 1.3333
2
a = + +

( )( )
( )
2
2
2 0.5
0.5625 ft/s
1.3333
a = =
Velocity at 1.2 s.
0
v v at = +
( )( ) 0 0.5625 1.2 0.675 ft/s v = + =
As a vector. 0.675 ft/s
T
= v

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Velocity of suitcase at 1.2 s.
/ S T S T
= + v v v

Law of cosines.
( ) ( ) ( )( )
2 2
2
13.5 0.675 2 13.5 cos 20
S
v = + − °
165.579 =
12.87 ft/s
S
v =
Law of sines.
0.675
sin sin 20
S
v
α
=
°

0.675 sin 20
sin 0.01794
12.87
α
°
= =
1.0 20 1.0 21.0 α β = ° = ° + ° = °
12.87 ft/s
S
= v 21.0 ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 132.


Let the x-axis be directed east, and the y-axis be directed north.
Airspeed:
/
480 km/h
AW
= v ( )( ) 30 480 km/h cos30 sin30 ° = ° + ° i j
Plane relative to ship: ( )( )
/
416 km/h cos33 sin33 km/h
A B
= ° + ° v i j
Ship: 20 km/h
B
= v 20 = − j
(a) Velocity of airplane.
( )
/
20 416 cos33 sin33
A B A B
= + = − + ° + ° v v v j i j
( ) ( ) 348.89 km/h 206.57 km/h = + i j 405 km/h
A
= v 30.6 ° W
(b) Wind velocity.

/ / W A W A A AW
= + = − v v v v v
( ) 348.89 206.57 480 cos30 sin30 = + − ° + ° i j i j
( ) ( ) 66.80 km/h 33.43 km/h = − − i j 74.7 km/h
W
= v 26.6 ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 133.


Let the x-axis be directed east, and the y-axis be directed north.
From data obtained as the boat travels north, the wind velocity is
( ) ( ) /
1
1
3
W B W B
= + = v v v
( ) /
1
W B
v +
( ) ( )
/
1
50 3 sin50 cos50
W B
v ° = + ° − ° j i j
From data obtained as the boat travels east, it is
( ) ( ) /
2
2
12
W B W B
= + = v v v
( )
/ W B
v +
( ) ( )
/
2
50 12 cos50 sin50
W B
v ° = + − ° − ° i i j
Subtracting,
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
/ /
1 2
0 3 sin50 cos50 12 cos50 sin50
W B W B
v v = + ° − ° − − − ° − ° j i j i i j
x-components: ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) / /
1 2
sin 50 cos 50 12
W B W B
v v ° + ° = (1)
y-components: ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
/ /
1 2
cos 50 sin 50 3
W B W B
v v − ° + ° = − (2)
Solving (1) and (2),
( ) ( ) / /
1 2
11.121 mi/h, 5.415 mi/h
W B w B
v v = =
Then, ( ) ( ) ( ) 3 11.121 sin50 cos50 8.519 mi/h 4.148 mi/h
W
= + ° − ° = − v j i j i j
or ( ) ( ) ( ) 12 5.415 cos50 sin50 8.519 mi/h 4.148 mi/h
W
= + − ° − ° = − v i i j i j
9.48 mi/h
W
= v 26.0 ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 134.


Let unit vector i point east and unit vector j point north.
First observation.
Velocity of ship: ( )
1
6 mi/h = v i
Velocity of wind relative to ship:
( )
/1 /1 W W
v = v j
Velocity of wind:
( )
1 /1 /1
6
W W W
v = + = + v v v i j (1)
Second observation.
Velocity of ship: ( )
2
4 mi/h = v i
Velocity of wind relative to ship:
( )
/2 /2
2 2
2 2
W W
⎛ ⎞
= +
⎜ ⎟
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
v v i j (2)
Velocity of wind:
2 /2 /2 /2
2 2
4
2 2
W W W W
v v
⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞
= + = + +
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠
v v v i j
Equate expressions (1) and (2) for v
W.
i components:
/2
2
6
2
W
v =
Substitute into (2).
( ) ( ) ( ) 6 4 6 6 mi/h 10 mi/h
W
= + + = + v i j i j
2 2
6 10 11.66 mi/h
W
v = + =
10
tan , 59.0
6
ϕ ϕ = = ° ( ) 11.66 mi/h
W
= v 59.0 ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 135.


(a) 16 km 16, 000 m, 160 km/h 44.444 m/s r v = = = =

( )
2
2
44.444
16, 000
v
a
r
= =
2
0.1235 m/s a = W
(b) ( )
64 160
96 km 96, 000 m, 160 96 16 112 km/h 31.111 m/s
176 16
r v

= = = − − = =



( )
2
2
31.111
96, 000
v
a
r
= =
2
0.01008 m/s a = W
(c) 176 km 176, 000 m, 64 km/h 17.788 m/s r v = = = =

( )
2
2
17.778
176, 000
v
a
r
= =
2
0.001796 m/s a = W



COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 136.

Velocities:

/
1 m/s
A B A B
= − = v v v


Accelerations:


2
/
0.25 m/s
A B A B
= − = a a a

(a)
( )
( )
2 2
2
2
2
2
/
100
1
96
1
0.25
100 96
A A
A
A
A B
B
B
A A
A B
v v
a
v v
a
v v
a
ρ
ρ
= =

= =

= − =


2
50 625 0
A A
v v − + =
25
A
v = ± 25 m/s
A
v = !
(b) 25 1 24
B
v = − = 24 m/s
B
v = !
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 137.



2
2
max
, 0,
n t n
v
a a v a ρ
ρ
= = =
( )( ) ( )( )( )
2 2 2
max
25 3 25 3 9.81 735.35 m /s v g = = =

max
27.125 m/s v =
max
97.6 km/h v = !
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 138.


( ) ( )
( ) ( )
( )
( )
( )( )
2 2
2
,
0.66
0.09706
6.8
0.09706 0.09706 60 5.8235 mm
c c
c c
n n
A A
A A
c A c B c
n n
A B
c
n
B A
A
c
n
B
B A
v v
a a
v a a
a
a
ρ ρ
ρ ρ
ρ
ρ
ρ ρ
   
= =
   
   
= =
   
 
 
= = =
 
 
= = =

2 11.65 mm
B B
d ρ = = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 139.


Initial speed.
0
72 km/h 20 m/s v = =
Tangential acceleration.
2
1.25 m/s
t
a = −
(a) Total acceleration at 0. t =

( )
2
2
2 0
20
1.14286 m/s
350
n
v
a
ρ
= = =
( ) ( )
2 2
2 2
1.25 1.14286
t n
a a a = + = − +
2
1.694 m/s a = !
(b) Total acceleration at 4 s. t =
( )( )
0
20 1.25 4 15 m/s
t
v v a t = + = + − =

( )
2
2
2
15
0.6426 m/s
350
n
v
a
ρ
= = =
( ) ( )
2 2
2 2
1.25 0.6426
t n
a a a = + = − +
2
1.406 m/s a = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 140.


Length of run. 130 meters L D π π = = (1)
Radius of circle.
1
65m
2
D ρ = =
Tangential acceleration of starting portion of run.
( )( )
1
4 4 m/s
m t t t
v a t a a = = = (2)
( )( )
2
2
1 1
1 1
4 8 m
2 2
t t t
s a t a a = = = (3)
Constant speed portion of run.
m
v v =
( )
1 1 m
s s v t t = + − (4)
Substituting (1), (2) and (3) into (4)
( ) 130 8 4 54 4
t t
a a π = + −
Solving for .
t
a
2
130
1.9635 m/s
8 200
t
a
π
= =
+

From (2) ( )( ) 4 1.9635 7.854 m/s
m
v = =
Normal acceleration during constant speed portion of run.

( )
2
2
2
7.854
0.9490 m/s
65
m
n
v
a
ρ
= = =
Maximum total acceleration.
( ) ( )
2 2
2 2
1.9635 0.9490
t n
a a a = + = +
2
2.18 m/s a = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 141.


For uniformly decelerated motion:
0 t
v v a t = +
At 9 s, t = ( )
2
0 150 9 , or 16.667 ft/s
t t
a a = − = −
Total acceleration:
2 2 2
t n
a a a = +
( ) ( )
1/2
1/2
2 2
2 2 2
130 16.667 128.93 ft/s
n t
a a a


= − = − − =



Normal acceleration:
2
1 5
, where diameter ft
2 12
n
v
a ρ
ρ
= = =
( )
2 2 2
5
128.93 53.72 ft /s , 7.329 ft/s
12
n
v a v ρ
| |
= = = =
|
\ .

Time:
0
7.329 150
16.667
t
v v
t
a
− −
= =

8.56 s t = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 142.


Speeds:
0 1
0 65 mi/h 95.33 ft/s v v = = =
Distance: ( ) 450 300 1006.86 ft
2
s
π
= + =
Tangential component of acceleration:
2 2
1 0
2
t
v v a s = +
( )
( )( )
2
2 2
2 1 0
95.33 0
4.5133 ft/s
2 2 1006.86
t
v v
a
s
+ −
= = =
At point B,
2 2
0
2
B t B
v v a s = + where ( ) 450 706.86 ft
2
B
s
π
= =
( )( )( )
2 2 2
0 2 4.5133 706.86 6380.5 ft /s
B
v = + =
(a) 79.88 ft/s
B
v = 54.5 mi/h
B
v = !
At 15 s, t = ( )( )
0
0 4.5133 15 67.70 ft/s
t
v v a t = + = + =
Since ,
B
v v < the car is still on the curve. 450 ft ρ =
Normal component of acceleration:
( )
2
2
2
67.70
10.185 ft/s
450
n
v
a
ρ
= = =
(b) Magnitude of total acceleration: ( ) ( )
2 2
2 2
4.5133 10.185
t n
a a a = + = +
2
11.14 ft/s a = !
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 143.












(a) 420 km/h
A
= v , 520 km/h
B
= v 60°
/ B A B A
= + v v v or ( )
/ B A B A B A
= − = + − v v v v v
Sketch the vector addition as shown.
( ) ( ) ( )( )( )
2 2 2
/
2 2
2 cos 60
420 520 2 420 520 cos 60
B A A B A B
v v v v v = + − °
= + − °

or
/
477.9 km/h
B A
v =
sin sin60
520 477.9
α °
= or 70.4 α = °

/
478 km/h
B A
= v 70.4 ° !
(b)
2
6 m/s
A
a = ( )
2
2 m/s
B
t
a = 60°
520 km/h 144.44 m/s
B
v = =
( )
( )
2
2
2
144.44
104.32 m/s
200
B
B
n
v
ρ
= = = a 30°
( ) ( )
/ B A B A B B A
t n
= − = + − a a a a a a

[
2 = ] [ 60 104.32 ° + ] [ 30 6 ° − ]
( ) ( ) 2 cos 60 sin 60 104.32 cos30 sin30 6 = − ° + ° + − ° − ° − i j i j i

( ) ( )
2 2
97.34 m/s 50.43 m/s = − − i j

2
/
109.6 m/s
B A
a = 27.4 ° !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 144.


(a) 180 km/h 50 m/s
A
= = v 30 , 162 km/h 45 m/s
B
° = = v 45°
( ) ( )
/
45 cos 45 sin 45 50 cos120 sin120
B A B A
= − = ° − ° − ° + ° v v v i j i j
56.82 75.12 94.2 m/s = − = i j 52.9°

/
339 km/h
B A
v = 52.9 ° !
(b) ( )
2
8 m/s
A
t
= a ( )
2
60 , 3 m/s
B
t
° = a 45°
( )
( )
2
2
2
50
6.25 m/s
400
A
A
n
A
v
ρ
= = = a 30°
( )
( )
2
2
2
45
6.75 m/s
300
B
B
n
B
v
ρ
= = = a 45°
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
/ B A B A B B A A
t n t n
= − = + − − a a a a a a a
( ) ( ) 3 cos 45 sin 45 6.75 cos 45 sin 45 = ° − ° + ° + ° i j i j
( ) ( ) 8 cos60 sin60 6.25 cos30 sin30 − ° − ° − − ° − ° i j i j

( ) ( )
2 2
8.31 m/s 12.07 m/s = + i j
or
2
/
15.18 m/s
B A
= a 56.8° !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 145.




(a) As water leaves nozzle.
8 m/s v =
2
sin55 9.81 sin55 8.04 m/s
n
a g = ° = ° =

2
n
v
a
ρ
=

( )
2
2
8
8.04
n
v
a
ρ = = 7.96 m ρ = !
(b) At maximum height of stream.
( )
0
8 sin55 6.55 m/s
x
v v = = ° =

2
9.81 m/s
n
a g = =

2
n
v
a
ρ
=

( )
2
2
6.55
9.81
n
v
a
ρ = = 4.38 m ρ = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 146.


Horizontal motion.
0 0
cos cos
x
v v x v t α α = =
Vertical motion.
0
sin
y
v v gt α = −

2
0 0
1
sin
2
y y v t gt α = + −
Eliminate t.
2
0
2 2
0
tan
2 cos
gx
y y x
v
α
α
= + − (1)
Solving (1) for
0
v and applying result at point B
( )
( )( )
( )( )
( )
2
2
0
2
2
0
9.81 6
2 tan cos
2 1.5 6 tan3 0.97 cos 3
gx
v
y x y α α
= =
+ −
+ ° − °

(a) Magnitude of initial velocity.
0
14.48 m/s = v !
(b) Minimum radius of curvature of trajectory.

2 2 2
cos
n
n
v v v
a g
a g
ρ
ρ θ
= = = = (2)
where θ is the slope angle of the trajectory.
The minimum value of ρ occurs at the highest point of the trajectory where cos 1 = θ
and
0
cos = =
x
v v v α
Then

( )
2
2 2 2
0
min
14.48 cos 3 cos
9.81
°
= =
v
g
α
ρ

min
21.3 m = ρ !
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 147.






(a) At point A,
0
120 ft/s 120 ft/s v v = = = v 60°

A
g = a
2
32.2 ft/s =
( )
2
sin30
A
A
n
A
v
a g
ρ
= ° =

( )
2
2
120
sin30 32.2sin30
A
A
v
g
ρ = =
° °
894 ft
A
ρ = !
(b) At the point where velocity is parallel to incline,

0
sin30 120 sin30 60 ft/s
x
v v = ° = ° =
tan30 60tan30 34.64 ft/s
y x
v v = ° = ° =
( ) ( )
2 2
60 34.64 69.282 ft/s v = + =

2
sin 60
B
n
B
v
a g
ρ
= ° =

( )
2
2
69.282
sin60 32.2sin 60
B
B
v
g
ρ = =
° °
172.1 ft
B
ρ = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 148.


Compute x- and y-components of velocity and acceleration.

( )
2
2cos 1 3 sin
, ,
2 cos
2 cos
t t
x x
t
t
π π π
π
π
− −
= =


&

( )
( )
( )
2
2 3
6 sin sin 3 cos
2 cos 2 cos
t t t
x
t t
π π π π π π
π π

= +
− −
&&

( )
( )
2
1.5 2cos 1 1.5sin
, ,
2 cos
2 cos
t t
y y
t
t
π π π
π
π

= =


&
( )
( )( )
( )
2
2 3
3 2cos 1 sin 3 sin
2 cos 2 cos
t t t
y
t t
π π π π π π
π π
− −
= −
− −
&&
(a) 0, t =
2
1, 0, 0, 1.5 , 3 , x y x y x π π = = = = = − & & &&
1.5 , v y π = = &&
2
3 ,
n
a x π = − = &&
( )
2
2
2
1.5
3
n
v
a
π
ρ
π
= = 0.75 ft ρ = !
(b)
1
,
3
t =
2
3 2 2
0, , , 0, ,
2 3 3
x y x y y
π π
= = = − = = − & & &&

2
,
3
v x
π
= − = − &
2
2
,
3
n
a y
π
= − = &&
2 2
2
4 3
3.2
n
v
a
π
ρ
π
= = 1.155 ft ρ = !
(c) 1, t =
2
1, 0, 0, , ,
2 3
x y x y x
π π
= − = = = − = & & &&
,
2
v y
π
= − = &
2
,
3
n
a x
π
= = &&
2 2
2
3
4
n
v
a
π
ρ
π
= = ⋅ 0.75 ft ρ = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 149.


Given:
( )
3
2
4
m
6
t
x t

= +
( )
2
3
1
m
6 4
t t
y

= −
Differentiating twice

( )
( )( )
2
2
2 2 6 m/s
2
x
v x

= = + = &

( )
2
4
2 m/s
2
t
x t

= + &
( )
2
1
m/s
2 2
t t
y

= − &

2
4 2 2 m/s x t t = − + = − &&
2
1
m/s
2
y t = − &&
At 2 s. t =

( ) ( )
2
2 1
1.5 m/s
2 2
y
v y = = − = &
2 2 0
x
a x = = − = &&

2
1
2 1.5 m/s
2
y
a y = = − = &&
(a) Acceleration.
( )
2
1.5 m/s = a j !
(b) Radius of curvature of path.

1.5
tan
6
y
x
v
v
θ = =
14.036 θ = °

2 2 2 2 2
6 1.5
x y
v v v = + = +

2 2
38.25 m /s =
cos 1.5 cos14.036
n
a a θ = = °

2
1.45522 m/s =

2
n
v
a
ρ
=

2
38.25
1.45522
n
v
a
ρ = = 26.3 m ρ = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 150.







x A
v v =
At point B ( )
B A
x
v v =
( )
cos cos
B
A x
B
v
v
v
θ θ
= =
cos
A
B
v
v
θ =
cos cos
n B
a a g θ θ = =

A
B
v
g
v
=

2 2
B B B
B
n A
v v v
a gv
ρ = =
3
B
B
A
v
gv
ρ = !




COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 151.



Let θ be the slope angle of the trajectory at an arbitrary point C.
Then, ( )
2 2
cos , or
cos
C C
C C
n
C
v v
a g
g
θ ρ
ρ θ
= = =
But, the horizontal component of velocity is constant, ( ) ( )
C A
x x
v v =
where ( ) ( )
0
cos cos
A C C
x x
v v v v α θ = =
Then,
0
cos cos
C
v v α θ =
or
0
cos
cos
C
v v
α
θ
=
so that
2
2 2
0
0
3
1 cos cos
cos cos cos
C
v
v
g g
α α
ρ
θ θ θ
 
= =
 
 

(a) Since
0
, , v α and g are constants,
C
ρ is a minimum at point B where cosθ is a maximum or 0. θ =
Then,
2 2
0
min
cos
Q.E.D.
B
v
g
α
ρ ρ = = !
(b)
2 2
0
3
1 cos
cos
C
v
g
α
ρ
θ
 
=
 
 
 

or
min
3
Q.E.D.
cos
C
ρ
ρ
θ
= !


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 152.


Let θ be the slope angle of the trajectory at an arbitrary point C.
Then, ( )
2 2
cos or
cos
C C
C C
n
C
v v
a g
g
θ ρ
ρ θ
= = =

But the horizontal component of velocity is constant, ( ) ( )
C A
x x
v v =
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
0 0
cos
A C
x x x
v v x v t v t α = = =
0
or (1)
cos
x
t
v α
=
where ( ) ( )
0 0
cos and cos
A C
x x
v v v v α θ = =
Then,
0
cos cos
C
v v α θ =
so that
3
0
cos
C
C
v
gv
ρ
α
= (2)
The vertical motion is uniformly accelerated
( ) ( )
0 0
0
sin
cos
C
y y
gx
v v gt v
v
α
α
= − = − (3)
( ) ( ) ( )
2
2 2 2
2
0 0 0 0
0
2 2
2
0
2 4 2
0 0
But cos sin
cos
2 tan
1
cos
C
x y
x
v v v v v g
v
gx g x
v
v v
α α
α
α
α
 
= + = + −
 
 
 
= − +
 
 
 

or
3/2
2 2
3 3
0
2 4 2
0 0
2 tan
1
cos
C
gx g x
v v
v v
α
α
 
= − +
 
 
 
(4)
Finally, substituting (4) into (2) gives


3/2
2 2 2
0
2 4 2
0 0
2 tan
1
cos cos
v gx g x
g v v
α
ρ
α α
 
= − +
 
 
 
!

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 153.


Given: ( ) ( ) cos sin
n n
Rt t ct Rt t ω ω = + + r j k i
Differentiating to obtain v and a,
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
2 2
2 2
cos sin sin cos
sin sin cos cos cos sin
2 sin cos 2 cos sin
n n n n n n
n n n n n n n n n n n n
n n n n n n n n
d
R t t t c R t t t
dt
d
R t t t t R t t t t
dt
R t t t t t t
ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω
= = − + + +
= = − − − + + −
 
= − − + −
 
r
v i j k
v
a i k
i k

Magnitudes of v and a.
( ) ( ) ( )
( )
2 2 2 2
2 2
2
2 2 2 2 2 2
2 2 2 2 2
2 2 2 2
cos sin sin cos
cos 2 sin cos sin
sin 2 sin cos cos
1
x y z
n n n n n n
n n n n n n
n n n n n n
n
v v v v
R t t t c R t t t
R t t t t t t c
R t t t t t t
R t c
ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω
= + +
    = − + + +
   
 
= − + +
 
 
+ + +
 
= + +
( )
( ) ( )
2 2 2 2
2 2 2 2
2 2
2 2 2
2 2 2 3 4 2 2
2 2 3 4 2 2
2
or 1
2 sin cos 2 cos sin
4 sin 4 sin cos cos
4 cos 4 sin cos sin
4
n
x y z
n n n n n n n n
n n n n n n n
n n n n n n n
v R t c
a a a a
R t t t t t t
R t t t t t t
t t t t t t
R
ω
ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω ω ω ω
= + +
= + +
 
= − − + −
 
 

= + +


+ − +

=
( )
2 4 2 2 2
or 4
n n n n
t a R t ω ω ω ω + = +

Tangential component of acceleration:
( )
2 2
1/2
2 2 2 2
1
t
n
dv R n t
a
dt
R t c
ω
ω
= =
 
+ +
 

At
2 2 2
0, , 2 , 0
n t
t v R c a R a ω = = + = =
Normal component of acceleration:
2 2
2
n t n
a a a Rω = − =
2
But
n
v
a
ρ
=

or
2
n
v
a
ρ =

2 2
2
n
R c
R
ρ
ω
+
= !


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 154.


With 3 and 1, A B = = the position vector is
( )
( )
( )
2
3 cos 3 1 sin r t t t t t = + + + i j k
Differentiating to obtain v and a,
( ) ( )
( )
( )
2
2
2
2
3
3 cos sin sin cos
1
1
1
3 sin sin cos 3
1
cos cos sin
3 2sin
d t
t t t t t t
dt
t
t
t t
t
d
t t t t
dt t
t t t t
t t
| |
|
= = − + + +
|
+
\ .

| |
|
+ −
|
+
\ .
= = − − − +
+



+ + −
= − +
r
v i j k
v
a i j
k
( )
( )
( )
3/2
2
3
cos 2cos sin
1
t t t t
t
+ + −
+
i j k

Magnitude of
2
. v
( ) ( )
2
2 2
2 2 2 2
2
9
9 cos sin sin cos
1
x y z
t
v v v v t t t t t t
t
= + + = − + + +
+

Differentiating,
( )( )
( )
( )( )
2
2
18
2 18 cos sin 2sin cos
1
2 sin cos 2cos sin
dv t
v t t t t t t
dt
t
t t t t t t
= − − − +
+
+ + −

2
When 0, 3 2 , 9, 2 0
dv
t v v
dt
= = + = = a j k

2 2 2
3 2 13 a = + =

Tangential acceleration:
0
t
dv
a
dt
= =

Normal acceleration:
2 2 2
13 or 13
n t n
a a a a = − = =
But

2 2
9
or
13
n
n
v v
a
a
ρ
ρ
= = =

2.50 ft ρ = !


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 155.


For the sun,
2
274 m/s , g =
and
( )
9 9
1 1
1.39 10 0.695 10 m
2 2
R D
 
= = × = ×
 
 

Given that
2
2
n
gR
a
r
= and that for a circular orbit
2
n
v
a
r
=
Eliminating
n
a and solving for r,
2
2
gR
r
v
=
For the planet Earth,
6 3
107 10 m/h 29.72 10 m/s v = × = ×
( )
( )
( )
2
9
9
2
274 0.695 10
Then, 149.8 10 m
29.72
r
×
= = ×

149.8 Gm r = !



COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 156.


For the sun,

2
274 m/s g =
and
( )
9 9
1 1
1.39 10 0.695 10 m
2 2
R D
 
= = × = ×
 
 

Given that
2
2
n
gR
a
r
= and that for a circular orbit:
2
n
v
a
r
=

Eliminating
n
a and solving for r,
2
2
gR
r
v
=
For the planet Saturn,
6 3
34.7 10 m/h 9.639 10 m/s v = × = ×
Then,
( )
( )
( )
2
9
12
2
274 0.695 10
1.425 10 m
9.639
r
×
= = × 1425 Gm r = !


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 157.


From Problems 11.155 and 11.156,
2
2
n
gR
a
r
=
For a circular orbit,
2
n
v
a
r
=
Eliminating
n
a and solving for v,
g
v R
r
=

For Venus,
2
29.20 ft/s g =

6
3761mi 19.858 10 ft. R = = ×
6
3761 100 3861mi 20.386 10 ft r = + = = ×
Then,
6 3
6
29.20
19.858 10 23.766 10 ft/s
20.386 10
v = × = ×
×

16200 mi/h v = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 158.


From Problems 11.155 and 11.156,
2
2
n
gR
a
r
=
For a circular orbit,
2
n
v
a
r
=
Eliminating
n
a and solving for v,
g
v R
r
=

For Mars,
2
12.24 ft/s g =

6
2070 mi 10.930 10 ft R = = ×
3
2070 100 2170 mi 11.458 10 ft r = + = = ×
Then,
6 3
6
12.24
10.930 10 11.297 10 ft/s
11.458 10
v = × = ×
×

7700 mi/h v = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 159.


From Problems 11.155 and 11.156,
2
2
n
gR
a
r
=
For a circular orbit,
2
n
v
a
r
=
Eliminating
n
a and solving for v,
g
v R
r
=

For Jupiter,
2
75.35 ft/s g =

6
44432 mi 234.60 10 ft R = = ×
6
44432 100 44532 mi 235.13 10 ft r = + = = ×
( )
6 3
6
75.35
Then, 234.60 10 132.8 10 ft/s
235.13 10
v = × = ×
×

90600 mi/h v = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 160.


Radius of Earth ( )( )
6
3960 mi 5280 ft/mi 20.908 10 ft R = = ×
Radius of orbit ( )( )
6
3960 10900 5280 78.4608 10 ft r = + = ×
Normal acceleration
2
2
n
gR
a
r
= and
2
n
v
a
r
=
Thus,
2 2
2
v gR
r r
= or
2
2
gR
v
r
=

( )
( )
2
6
2 6 2 2
6
32.2 20.908 10
179.40 10 ft /s
78.4608 10
v
×
= = ×
×


3
13.3941 10 ft/s v = ×
Time T for one orbit. 2 vT r π =

( )
6
3
3
2 78.4608 10
2
= 36.806 10 s
13.3941 10
r
T
v
π
π
×
= = ×
×

10.22 h T = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 161.


Normal acceleration.
2
2
n
gR
a
r
= and
2 2
n
v v
a
r ρ
= =
Solve for v
2
.
2
2
n
gR
v ra
r
= =
Data:
2
9.81 m/s , g =
6
6370 km = 6.370 10 m R = ×

3 6
384 10 km = 384 10 m r = × ×

( )
( )
2
6
2 6 2 2
6
9.81 6.370 10
1.0366 10 m /s
384 10
v
×
= = ×
×

= 1.018 m/s v 3670 km/h v = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 162.

From Problems 155 through 156,
2
2
n
gR
a
r
=
For a circular orbit,
2
n
v
a
r
=
Eliminating
n
a and solving for v,
g
v R
r
=

For one orbit the distance traveled is 2 ; r π hence, the time is
2 r
t
v
π
=
or
3 2
1 2
2 r
t
Rg
π
=
For satellites A and B,
3 2 3 2
1 2 1 2
2 2
and
A B
A B
r r
t t
Rg Rg
π π
= =
Let number of orbits of . n B = For the next alignment,
( )
3 2
3 2
1
1 or
1
1
B B
A B
A A
B
A
n t r
n t nt
n t r
r
n r
  +
+ = = =
 
 
 
= −
 
 

Data:
3
6370 km 6.370 10 m R = = ×
3
6370 190 6560 km 6.560 10 m
A
r = + = = ×
3
6370 320 6690 km 6.690 10 m
B
r = + = = ×
Then,
3/2
3
3
1 6.690 10
1 0.02987 or 33.475
6.560 10
n
n
 
×
= − = =
 
 
×
 

continued
COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Time for orbit of satellite B is
( )
( )
( )
3 2
6
3
1 2
6
2 6.690 10
5.449 10 s 1.5137 h
6.370 10 9.81
B
t
π ×
= = × =
×

Time for next alignment is
( )( ) 33.475 1.5137
B
nt = 50.7 h
B
nt = !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 163.


Differentiate the expressions for r and θ with respect to time.
2 3
2
0.8
0.8 0.8
0.8 0.8
1 2 6 8
2 12 24
12 48
0.5 sin3
0.4 sin3 1.5 cos3
0.32 sin3 1.2 cos3
t
t t
t t
r t t t
r t t
r t
e t
e t e t
e t e t
θ π
θ π π π
θ π π π

− −
− −
= + − +
= − +
= − +
=
= − +
= −
&
&&
&
&&


0.8 2 0.8
1.2 cos3 4.5 sin3
t t
e t e t π π π π
− −
− −
At 0.5 s, t =
2
1.5 ft, 2.00 ft/s, 12 ft/s , r r r = = = & &&
0.8
2
0.67032, sin 3 1, cos 3 0
0.33516 rad, 0.26812 rad/s, 29.56 rad/s
t
e t t π π
θ θ θ

= = − =
= − = =
& &&

(a) Velocity of the collar.

r
r r
θ
θ = + v e e
&
& ( ) ( ) 2.00 ft/s 0.402 ft/s
r θ
= + v e e !
2 ft/s, 0.402 ft/s
r
v v
θ
= = !
(b) Acceleration of the collar.
( ) ( )
2
2
r r r
r r r r a a
θ θ θ
θ θ θ = − + + = + a e e e e
& && &
&& &


( )( )
2
12 1.5 0.26812
r
a = −

2
11.89 ft/s
r
a = !


( )( ) ( )( )( ) 1.5 29.56 2 2 0.26812 a
θ
= +

2
45.41 ft/s a
θ
= !


( ) ( )
2 2
11.89 ft/s 45.41 ft/s
r θ
= + a e e !

(c) Acceleration of the collar relative to the rod.

( )
2
12 ft/s
r r
r = e e && !


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 164.


Differentiate the expressions for r and θ with respect to time.
( ) ( )
2
2 3
10 10 20
mm, mm/s, mm/s
6
6 6
r r r
t
t t
= = − =
+
+ +
& &&

2
4
sin rad, 4cos rad/s 4 sin rad/s t t t θ π θ π θ π π
π
= = =
& &&

At 1s, t =
2
10 10 20
mm; mm/s, mm/s
7 49 343
r r r = = − = & &&
0, 4 rad/s, 0 θ θ θ = = − =
& &&

(a) Velocity of the collar.
0.204 mm/s, 5.71 mm/s
r
v r v r
θ
θ = = = = −
&
&
( ) ( ) 0.204 mm/s 5.71 mm/s
B r θ
= − v e e !
(b) Acceleration of the collar.
( )
( ) ( ) ( )
2
2 2
2
20 10
4 22.8 mm/s
343 7
10 10
2 0 2 4 1.633 mm/s
7 49
r
a r r
a r r
θ
θ
θ θ
 
= − = − − = −
 
 
   
= + = + − − =
   
   
&
&&
&& &
&


( ) ( )
2 2
22.8 mm/s 1.633 mm/s
B r θ
= − + a e e !

(c) Acceleration of the collar relative to the rod.

/
20
343
B OA r r
r = = a e e &&
( )
2
/
0.0583 mm/s
B OA r
= a e !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 165.


Given ( ) 2 cos /2 r B At B = /2 At B θ =
Differentiating twice
( ) sin /2 r A At B = − & /2 A B θ =
&


( )
( )
2
/2 cos /2 r A B At B = − && 0 θ =
&&

Components and magnitude of velocity.
( ) sin /2 sin
r
v r A At B A θ = = − = − &
( ) ( ) 2 cos /2 /2 cos v r B At B A B A
θ
θ θ   = = =
 
&

(a)
2 2 2 2 2 2
sin cos
r
v v v A A A
θ
θ θ = + = + = v A = !
Components and magnitude of acceleration.
( )
( ) ( ) [ ]
2
2 2
/2 cos /2 2 cos /2 /2
r
a r r A B At B At B A B θ   = − = − +
 
&
&&

( )
2
/ cos A B θ = −
( ) ( ) 2 0 (2) sin /2 /2 a r r A At B A B
θ
θ θ   = + = + −
 
&& &
&

2
/ sin A B θ = −

( ) ( )
2 2 4 2 2 4 2 2
/ cos / sin
r
a a a A B A B
θ
θ θ = + = +
=
2
/ A B
2
/ a A B = !
From the figure a is perpendicular to v
Thus,
2
/
n
a a A B = =

2
n
v
a
ρ
=
2
n
v
a
ρ =
(b)
( )
2
2
/
A
B
A B
ρ = = B ρ = !
Since ρ is constant, the path is a circle of radius B.



COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 166.


Differentiate the expressions for r andθ with respect to time.
( )
2
2 cos ,
sin ,
cos
,
,
0
r b t
r b t
r b t
t
π
π π
π π
θ π
θ π
θ
= +
= −
= −
=
=
=
&
&&
&
&&

(a) At 2 s, t = sin 0, cos 1 t t π π = =
2
3 , 0, , 2 rad, rad/s r b r r b π θ π θ π = = = − = =
&
& &&
0 , 3 ,
r
v r v r b
θ
θ π = = = =
&
& 3 b
θ
π = v e W
( )
2 2 2 2
3 4
r
a r r b b b θ π π π = − = − − = −
&
&&
2 0, a r r
θ
θ θ = + =
&& &
&
2
4
r
b π = − a e W
(b) Values of θ for which v is maximum.

( )
( )
( )
2
2 2 2 2 2 2
2 2 2 2
2 2
sin
2 cos
sin 2 cos
sin 4 4cos cos
5 4cos
r
r
v r b t
v r b t
v v v b t t
b t t t
b t
θ
θ
π π
θ π π
π π π
π π π π
π π
= = −
= = − +
⎡ ⎤
= + = + +
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦
⎡ ⎤
= + + +
⎣ ⎦
= +
&
&

2
v is maximum when cos 1 or 0, 2 , 4 , 6 , etc t t π π π π π = =
But

, hence t θ π =

2 , 0, 1, 2, N N θ π = = KW


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 167.


Differentiate the expressions for r andθ with respect to time.

( )
1 2
2 2 2 2
6 1 4 , 6 1 4 24 1 4 r t t r t t t

= + = + + + &
( ) ( )
1 2 3 2
2 3 2
72 1 4 96 1 4 , r t t t t
− −
= + − + &&

( )
1
2
arctan 2 2 1 4 , t t θ θ

= = +
&

( )
2
2
16 1 4 t t θ

= − +
&&

(a) At 0, t = 0, 6 ft/s, 0 r r r = = = & &&
0, 2 rad/s, 0 θ θ θ = = =
& &&

6 ft/s, 0,
r
v r v r
θ
θ = = = =
&
& ( ) 6 ft/s
r
= v e W

2
0,
r
a r rθ = − =
&
&&
2
2 24 ft/s , a r r
θ
θ θ = + =
&& &
&
( )
2
24 ft/s
θ
= a e W
(b) At 0.5 s, t =
2
3 2 ft, 9 2 ft/s, 15 2 ft/s r r r = = = & &&

2
rad, 1rad/s, 2 rad/s
4
π
θ θ θ = = = −
& &&

12.73 ft/s, 4.243 ft/s
r
v r v r
θ
θ = = = =
&
&
( ) ( ) 12.73 ft/s 4.24 ft/s
r θ
= + v e e W
( )
2
2 2
15 2 3 2 1 16.97 ft/s
r
a r rθ = − = − =
&
&&
( ) ( )
( )
( )
2
2 3 2 2 2 9 2 1 16.97 ft/s a r r
θ
θ θ = + = − + =
&& &
&
( ) ( )
2 2
16.97ft/s 16.97ft/s
r θ
= + a e e W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 168.


Change to rectangular coordinates. cos and sin
x y
r r
θ θ = =
Equation of the path:
3 3 3
sin cos
r
r
y x
y x
r r
θ θ
= = =
− −


from which 3 or 3. y x y x − = = +

Also,
2
3 3 1
tan 1 1
y x
x x x t
θ
+
= = = + = +
from which
2 2
3 and 3 1 x t y t = = +
Differentiating, 6 , 6
x y
v x t v y t = = = = & &
6, 6
x y
a x a y = = = = && &&
(a) Magnitudes:
2 2
x y
v v v = + 6 2 ft/s v t = W

2 2
x y
a a a = +
2
6 2 ft/s a = W
(b) 3 y x = + is the equation of a straight line.
Hence, ρ = ∞ W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 169.















Sketch the directions of the vectors v and .
θ
e
cos v v
θ θ
θ = ⋅ = − v e
But v r
θ
θ =
&

Hence, cos r v θ θ = −
&

But from geometry,
cos
b
r
θ
=
2
cos or
cos cos
b b
v v
θ θ
θ
θ θ
= − = −
& &

Speed is the absolute value of v.

2
cos
b
v
θ
θ
=
&
W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 170.














From geometry,
cos
b
r
θ
=
Differentiating with respect to time,
2
sin
cos
b
r
θθ
θ
=
&
&
Transverse component of acceleration

2
2
2 sin
2
cos cos
b b
a r r
θ
θ θθ
θ θ
θ θ
= + = +
&& &
&& &
& (1)

Sketch the directions of the vectors a and .
θ
e
cos a a
θ θ
θ = ⋅ = − a e (2)
Matching from (1) and (2) and solving for a,
( )
2
2 3
2
2
2 sin
cos cos
2tan
cos
b b
a
b
θ θθ
θ θ
θ θθ
θ
= − −
= − +
&& &
&& &

Since magnitude of a is sought,
2
2
| | 2tan
cos
b
a θ θθ
θ
= +
&& &
W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 171.












Sketch the geometry.
( ) 180 180 θ β α + ° − + = °
α β θ = −
( ) sin 180 sin
r d
β α
=
° −

sin
sin
d
r
β
α
=
Sketch the velocity vectors.
( ) cos 90 v v
θ θ
α = ⋅ = ° − v e
sin v α =
But
sin
or sin ,
sin
d
v r v
θ
β
θ α θ
α
= =
& &

or
2
sin
sin
d
v
β
θ
α
=
&

( )
2
sin
sin
d
v
β
θ
β θ
=

&
W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 172.










Looking at d and β as polar coordinates with 0, d =
&

2 2
, 0
2 0,
d
d
v d d v d
a d d a d d d
β
β
β ω
β β β ω
= = = =
= + = = − = −
& &
& && && & &

Geometry analysis: 3 r d = for angles shown.
(a) Velocity analysis:




Sketch the directions of v, and .
r θ
e e

cos120
r r
v r dω = = ⋅ = ° v e &


1
2
r dω = − & W


cos30 v r d
θ θ
θ ω = = ⋅ = ° v e
&


3
2
cos30
3
d
d
r d
ω
ω
θ
°
= =
&

1
2
θ ω =
&
W

(b) Acceleration analysis:




Sketch the directions of a, and .
r θ
e e

2
3
cos150
2
r r
a a a dω = ⋅ = ° = − e


2 2
3
2
r r d θ ω − = −
&
&&


2
2 2 2
3 3 1
3
2 2 2
r d r d d ω θ ω ω
⎛ ⎞
= − + = − +
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
&
&&


2
3
4
r dω = − && W


2 2
1
cos120
2
2
a d d
a r r
θ θ
θ
ω ω
θ θ
= ⋅ = ° = −
= +
a e
&& &
&


( ) ( )
2
1 1 1 1 1
2 2
2 2 2 3
a r d d
r d
θ
θ θ ω ω ω
⎡ ⎤ ⎛ ⎞⎛ ⎞
= − = − − −
⎜ ⎟⎜ ⎟ ⎢ ⎥
⎝ ⎠⎝ ⎠
⎣ ⎦
&& &
&

0 θ =
&&
W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 173.


Rate of change of . θ
3
48.0 47.0 1.0 17.453 10 rad θ

Δ = ° − ° = ° = ×
0.5 s t Δ =

3
3
17.453 10
34.907 10 rad/s
0.5 t
θ
θ


Δ ×
≈ = = ×
Δ
&

Let r be a polar coordinate with origin at A.

3
4 km 4 10 m b = = ×

3
3
4 10
5.921 10 m
cos cos 47.5
b
r
θ
×
= = = ×
°


( )( )
3 3
5.921 10 34.907 10 206.68 m/s v r
θ
θ

= = × × =
&

From geometry,
206.68
cos cos 47.5
v
v
θ
θ
= =
°

306 m/s v = W
Alternate solution. tan x b θ =

2
2
sec
cos
b
v x b
θ
θθ
θ
= = =
&
&
&

( )( )
3 3
2
4 10 34.907 10
306 m/s
cos 47.5
v

× ×
= =
°




COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 174.


Changes in values over the interval
13600 12600 1000 ft r Δ = − =

3
28.3 31.2 2.9 5.0615 10 rad θ

Δ = ° − ° = − ° = − ×
2 t s Δ =
Rates of change.
1000
500 ft/s
2
r
r
t
Δ
= = =
Δ
&

3
3
5.0615 10
2.5307 10 rad/s
2 t
θ
θ


Δ − ×
= = = − ×
Δ
&

Mean values.
12600 13600
13100 ft
2
r
+
= =

31.2 28.3
29.75
2
θ
° + °
= = °
Velocity components.
500 ft/s
r
v r = = &
( )
( )
3
13100 2.5307 10 331.53 ft/s v r
θ
θ

= = − × = −
&

( ) ( )
2 2
2 2
500 331.53 600 ft/s
r
v v v
θ
= + = + − =
409 mi/h v = W
cos sin
x r
v v v
θ
θ θ = −
( ) 500cos 29.75 331.53 sin 29.75 598.61 ft/s = ° − − ° =
sin cos
y r
v v v
θ
θ θ = +
( ) ( )
500sin 29.75 331.53 cos 29.75 39.73 ft/s = ° + − ° = −
39.73
tan 0.06636
598.61
y
x
v
v
α

= = = 3.80 α = ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 175.



2 2
1/2 1/2
, r be r be
θ θ
θθ = =
&
&

( )
( )
2 2
2
1/2 1/2
2
2 2 2 1/2 2 2
,
1
r
r
v r be v r be
v v v be
θ θ
θ
θ
θ
θθ θ θ
θ θ
= = = =
= + = +
& & &
&
&


( )
2 1/2
1 2 2
1 v be
θ
θ θ = +
&
W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 176.



2 3
2
,
b b
r r θ
θ θ
= = −
&
&

3 2
2
,
r
b b
v r v r
θ
θ θ θ
θ θ
= = − = =
& & &
&

( )
2 3 2
2 2 2 2 2 2 2
6 4 6
4
4
r
b b b
v v v
θ
θ θ θ θ
θ θ θ
= + = + = +
& & &


( )
1 2
2
3
4
b
v θ θ
θ
= +
&
W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 177.


( )
( ) ( )
2 2 2
2 2
2 2 2
2
1/2 1/2 1/2 2
2 2
2 1/2 2 2 1/2
1/2 1/2 2 1/2 2
, ,
2 2 2
r
r be r be r be
a r r be be
a r r be be be
θ θ θ
θ θ
θ θ θ
θ
θθ θθ θ θθ
θ θθ θ θθ θ θθ θθ
θ θ θ θθ θ θθ
⎡ ⎤
= = = + +
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦
⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤
= − = + + − = +
⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦
⎡ ⎤
= + = + = +
⎣ ⎦
& & & &&
& &&
& & & && & & &&
&&
&& & && & && &
&

But and 0 θ ω θ = =
& &&

( )
( )
( )
( )
2 2
2
2
1/2 1/2 2
2
2 2 2 1/2 4 2 4
and 2
4
r
r
a be a be
a a a be
θ θ
θ
θ
θ
θω θω
θ θ ω
= =
= + = +


( )
2 1/2
1/2 2 2
4 a be
θ
θ θ ω = + W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 178.



2
2 3 3 4
2 2 6
, ,
b b b b
r r r θ θ θ
θ θ θ θ
= = − = − +
& && &
& &&
( )
2 2 2 2 2 2
3 4 2 4
2 6
2 6
r
b b b b
a r rθ θ θ θ θθ θ θ θ
θ θ θ θ
= − = − + − = − + −
& & & & && & &
&&
( )
( )
2 2
2 3 3
2
2 2 4
b b b
a r r
θ
θ θ θ θ θθ θ
θ θ θ
⎛ ⎞
= + = = − = −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
&& & && & && &
&
But and 0 θ ω θ = =
& &&


( )
2 2 2
4 3
4
6 and
r
b b
a a
θ
θ ω ω
θ θ
= − = −

( )
2 2
2 2 2 2 4 2 2
8 6
16
36 12
r
b b
a a a
θ
θ θ ω ω
θ θ
= + = − + +

( )
2
2 4 2
8
36 4
b
θ θ ω
θ
= + +
( )
1 2
2 4 2
4
36 4
b
a θ θ ω
θ
= + + W



COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 179.







Sketch the geometry.
Law of cosines:
2 2 2
2 cos r d h dh ϕ = + −
Differentiating with respect to time and noting that d and h are constant,

2 2 sin rr dh ϕϕ = & &

sin dh
r
r
ϕ
ϕ = & &
Law of sines:
sin sin
r d
ϕ θ
=
so that sin Q.E.D r h θϕ = & & W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 180.


Given: , ,
1 1
A Ct
R Bt z
t t
θ = = =
+ +

Differentiating with respect to time,
( )
( )
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
2 2 2
3 3
1
, ,
1 1 1
2 2
, 0,
1 1
C t Ct A C
R B z
t t t
A C
R z
t t
θ
θ
+ −
= − = = =
+ + +
= = = −
+ +
& &
&
&& &&
&

(a) 0. t = , 0, 0 R A z θ = = =
, ,
2 , 0, 2
R A B z C
R A z C
θ
θ
= − = =
= = = −
&& &
&
&& &&
&&

, ,
R z
v R A v R AB v z C
θ
θ = = − = = = =
& &
&

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
R z
v v v v A A B C
θ
= + + = + +
2 2 2 2
v A A B C = + + W
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 4
2 4 4
R R
a R R A AB a A A B A B θ = − = − = − +
& &&

2 0 2 a R R AB
θ
θ θ = + = −
&& & &

2 2
4 a A B
θ
=
2
z
a z c = = − &&
2 2
4
z
a C =

2 2 2 2 2 2 4 2
4 4
R z
a a a a A A B C
θ
= + + = + +
2 2 4 2
4 4 a A A B C = + + W
(b) . t = ∞ 0, , , 0, , 0, R z C R B z θ θ = = ∞ = = = =
& &
&
0, 0, 0 R z θ = = =
&& &&
&&
0, 0, 0,
r z
v R v R v z
θ
θ = = = = = =
& &
& 0 v = W
2 2
0, 0, 0,
r z
a R R a R R a z
θ
θ θ θ = − = = − = = =
& && & &&
&&
0 a = W




COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 181.


In cylindrical coordinates.
2
, 2 ,
4
At
R A t z θ π = = =
Differentiating with respect to time,
0, 2 ,
2
0, 0,
2
At
R z
At
R z
θ π
θ
= = =
= = =
& &
&
&& &&
&&

Velocity vector: 0, 2 ,
2
r z
At
v R v R A v z
θ
θ π = = = = = =
& &
&

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
1
0 4
4
R z
v v v v A A t
θ
π = + + = + +

2 2
1
16
2
v A t π = + W
Acceleration vector:
2 2
0 4
r
a R R A θ π = − = −
& &&

2 0, /2
z
a R R a z A
θ
θ θ = + = = =
&& & &
&&

2 2 2 2 4 2 2
1
16 0
4
R z
a a a a A A
θ
π = + + = + +

4
1
64 1
2
a A π = + W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 182.

From problem 11.97, the position vector is ( ) ( ) cos sin .
n n
Rt t ct Rt t ω ω = + + r i j k
Differentiating to obtain v and a,
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
2 2
cos sin sin cos
sin sin cos cos cos sin
n n n n n n
n n n n n n n n n n n n
d
R t t t c R t t t
dt
d
R t t t t R t t t t
dt
ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω
= = − + + +
= = − − − + + −
r
v i j k
v
a i k


( ) ( )
2 2
2 sin cos 2 cos sin
n n n n n n n n
R t t t t t t ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω
 
= − − + −
 
i k

( ) ( ) ( )
x y z y z z y z x x z x y y x
x y z
v v v v a v a v a v a v a v a
a a a
× = = − + − + −
i j k
v a i j k

( ) ( )( )
( )
( )
( )
2 2 2
2 2
2
2 cos sin sin cos 2 sin cos
cos sin 2 cos sin
2 sin cos
n n n n n n n n n n n
n n n n n n n
n n n n
cR t t t R t t t t t t
R t t t t t t
cR t t t
ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω ω ω ω
ω ω ω ω
  
= − + + − −
  

− − −

 
+ − − −
 
i
j
k

( ) ( ) ( )
2 2 2
2cos sin 2 2sin cos
n n n n n n n n n n
cR t t t R t cR t t t ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω ω = − − + + + i j k
( ) ( )
1/2
2
2 2 2 2 2 4 2 2 2
| | 4 2
n n n n
c R R t ω ω τ ω ω
 
× = + + +
 
 
v a
The binormal unit vector
b
e is given by
| |
b
×
=
×
v a
e
v a

Let α be the angle between the y-axis and the binormal.
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
2
1 2
2 2 2 2 2 4 2 2 2
2
cos
| |
4 2
n n
b
n n n n
R t
v a
c R t R t
ω ω
α
ω ω ω ω
+ × ⋅
= ⋅ = =
×
 
+ + +
 
v a j
e j
( ) ( )
1 2
2 2 2 2 2
Let 2 , 4 ,
n n n n
A R t B cR t ω ω ω ω = + = +

2 2
C A B = + so that cos as
A
C
α =

shown in the sketch. The angle that the osculating plane makes with the
y-axis is the angle . β

( )
( )
2 2
1 2
2 2
2
tan
4
n
n
R t
A
B
c t
ω
β
ω
+
= =
+

( )
( )
2 2
1
1 2
2 2
2
tan
4
n
n
R t
c t
ω
β
ω

+
=
+
!

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 183.

For 3 and 1, A B = = ( )
( )
( )
2
3 cos 3 1 sin t t t t t = + + + r i j k
Differentiating to obtain v and a.
( ) ( )
( )
( )
( )
2
3/2
2
3 cos sin 3 sin cos
1
1
3 2sin cos 3 2cot sin
1
d t
t t t t t t
dt
t
d
t t t t t t
dt
t
= = − + + +
+
= = − − + + −
+
r
v i j k
v
a i j k

(a) At 0, t = ( ) ( ) ( ) 3 1 0 0 0 3 = − + + = v i j k i
( ) 3(0) 3(1) 2 0 3 2 = − + + − = + a i j k j k
3 0 0 6 9
0 3 2
× = = − +
i j k
v a j k
2 2
| | 6 9 10.817 × = + = v a
0.55470 0.83205
| |
b
×
= = − +
×
v a
e j k
v a


2
cos 0, cos 0.55470, cos 0.83205
x y
θ θ θ = = − =

z
90 , 123.7 , 33.7
x y
θ θ θ = ° = ° = ° !
(b) At s,
2
t
π
= 4.71239 2.53069 v = − + + i j k
6 0.46464 1.5708 = − + − a i j k
4.71239 2.53069 1
6 0.46464 1.5708
4.43985 13.4022 12.9946
× = −

= − − +
i j k
v a
i j k

continued

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

( ) ( ) ( )
1/2
2 2 2
| | 4.43985 13.4022 12.9946 19.1883
 
× = + + =
 
 
v a
0.23138 0.69846 0.67721
| |
b
×
= = − − +
×
v a
e i j k
v a

cos 0.23138, cos 0.69846, cos 0.67721
x y z
θ θ θ = − = − =
103.4 , 134.3 , 47.4
x y z
θ θ θ = ° = ° = ° !

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 184.


Given:

2 2
0 9 9
ft/s , 36 ft, 144 ft, 27 ft/s a kt x x v = = = =

2 3
0
0 0
1
3
t t
v v adt kt dt kt − = = =
∫ ∫

Velocity:

3
0
1
3
v v kt = +

4
0 0
0
1
12
t
x x v dt v t kt − = = +


Position:

4 4
0 0 0
1 1
36
12 12
x x v t kt v t kt = + + = + +

When
9 s, t =

144 ft and 27 ft/s x v = =

( ) ( )
4
0
1
36 9 9 144
12
v k + + =

or

0
9 546.75 108 v k + =

(1)


( )
3
0
1
9 27
3
v k + =


0
243 27 v k + =
(2)
Solving equations (1) and (2) simultaneously yields:
4
0
7 ft/s and 0.082305 f t/s v k = =

Then,

4
36 7 0.00686 ft x t t = + + W


3
7 0.0274 ft/s v t = + W


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 185.

(a) Determination of k.

From

( )
,
0.6 1
dv dv
dv adt dt
a kv
= = =


Integrating, using the condition 0 v = when 0, t =

( )
( ) ( )
0 0 0
0
1 1
or ln 1 ln 1
0.6 1 0.6 0.6
v t t v dv
dt t kv t kv
kv k k
= = − − = − −


∫ ∫
(1)

Using 20 s when 6 mm/s, t v = = ( )
1
20 ln 1 6
0.6
k
k
= − −


Solving by trial,

0.1328 s/m k = W

(b) Position when 7.5 m/s. v =

From , v dv a dx =

( ) 0.6 1
v dv v dv
dx
a kv
= =


Integrating, using the condition 6 m x = when 0, v =
( )
6 0
0.6 1
x v v dv
dx
kv
=

∫ ∫


( )
0
0
1 1 1 1
6 1 ln 1
0.6 1 0.6
v
v
x dv v kv
k kv k k
| |

− = − + = − − −
|



\ .



( )
1 1
6 ln 1
0.6
x v kv
k k

= − + −




COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Using 7.5 m/s v = and the determined value of k:

( )( )
( )( ) ( )
1 1
6 7.5 ln 1 0.1328 7.5
0.6 0.1328 0.1328
x

= − + −


434 m x = W
(c) Maximum velocity occurs when a = 0.
max
1 1
0.1328
v
k
= =
max
7.53 m/s v = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 186.


Constant acceleration.

0
25 mi/h 36.667 ft/s v = =


65 mi/h 95.333 ft/s
f
v = =


0
0 and 0.1 mi 528 ft
f
x x = = =

( )
2 2
0 0
2
f f
v v a x x = + −

(a) Acceleration.
( )
( )
2 2
2 2
0 2
0
95.333 36.667
7.3333 ft/s
2 528 0 2
f
f
v v
a
x x


= = =
− −


2
7.33 ft/s a = W

(b) Time to reach 65 mph.
0 f f
v v at = +


0
95.333 36.667
7.3333
f
f
v v
t
a


= = 8.00 s
f
t = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 187.


Let x be position relative to the fixed supports, taken positive if downward.
Constraint of cable on left: 2 3 constant
A B
x x + =
2 2
2 3 0, or , and
3 3
A B B A B A
v v v v a a + = = − = −
Constraint of cable on right: 2 constant
B C
x x + =
1 1 1
2 0, or , and
2 3 3
B C C B A C A
v v v v v a a + = = − = =
Block C moves downward; hence, block A also moves downward.
(a) Accelerations.
( )
( )
2 0
0
456 0
or 38.0 mm/s
12
A A
A A A A
v v
v v a T a
t


= + = = =

2
38.0 mm/s
A
= a W
( )
2
2 2
38.0 25.3 mm/s
3 3
B A
a a
⎛ ⎞
= − = − = −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠

2
25.3 mm/s
B
= a W
( )
2
1 1
38.0 12.67 mm/s
3 3
C A
a a
⎛ ⎞
= = =
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠

2
12.67 mm/s
C
= a W
(b) Velocity and change in position of B after 8 s.
( ) ( )( )
0
0 25.3 8 203 mm/s
B B B
v v a t = + = + − = −
203 mm/s
B
= v W
( ) ( ) ( )( )
2
2
0 0
1 1
0 25.3 8 811 mm
2 2
B B B B
x x v t a t − = + = + − = −
811 mm
B
x Δ = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 188.

(a) Construction of the curves.
Construct the a t − curve. slope of curve a v t = −
0 10 s: t < < 10 s, t ∆ = 0 v ∆ = 0
v
a
t

= =


10 s 26 s: t < < 16 s, t ∆ = 80 m/s v ∆ = −
2
5 m/s
v
a
t

= = −


26 s 41 s: t < < 15 s, t ∆ = 0 v ∆ = 0
v
a
t

= =


41 s 46 s: t < < 5 s, t ∆ = 15 m/s v ∆ =
2
3 m/s
v
a
t

= =


46 s 50 s: t < < 4 s, t ∆ = 0 v ∆ = 0
v
a
t

= =



Construct the curve. x t − area of curve. x v t ∆ = −
x is maximum or minimum where 0. v =
For 10 s 26 s, t ≤ ≤ ( ) 60 5 10 v t = − −
0 v = when 60 5 50 0 or 22 s t t − + = =
Also
0
540 m x = −
0 to 10 s ( )( ) 10 60 600 m x ∆ = =
10
540 600 60 m x = − + =
10 s to 22 s ( )( )
1
12 60 360 m
2
x ∆ = =
22
60 360 420 m x = + =
22 s to 26 s ( )( )
1
4 20 40 m
2
x ∆ = − = −
26
420 40 380 m x = − =


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


26 s to 41 s ( )( ) 15 20 300 m x ∆ = − = −
41
380 300 80 m x = − =
41 s to 46 s ( )
20 5
5 62.5 m
2
x
− −  
∆ = = −
 
 

46
80 62.5 17.5 m x = − =
46 s to 50 s ( )( ) 4 5 20 m x ∆ = − = −
50
17.5 20 2.5 m x = − = −

(b) Total distance traveled.
( )
1 22 0
0 22 s, 420 540 960 m t d x x ≤ ≤ = − = − − =

2 50 22
22 s 50 s, 2.5 420 422.5 t d x x ≤ ≤ = − = − − =
Total:
1 2
1382.5 m d d d = + = 1383 m d = W
(c) Times when 0. x =
For 0 10 s, t ≤ ≤ 540 60 m x t = − +
At 0, x = 540 60 0 t − + = 9 s t = W
For 46 s 50, t ≤ ≤ ( ) 17.5 5 46 m x t = − −
At 0, x = ( ) 17.5 5 46 0 46 3.5 t t − − = − = 49.5 s t = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 189.

















( ) ( )
0 0
100 km/h 27.778 m/s 25 km/h 6.944 m/s
A B
v v = = = =

Sketch acceleration curve for car B over 0 5 s. t < <
Using moment-area formula at 5 s. t =
( ) ( ) ( )( )( )
( )( )
0
2
5 2.5
70 6.944 5 12.5
2.822 m/s
B B o B
B
B
x x v t a
a
a
− = +
= +
=

Determine when reaches 100 km/h. B

( ) ( )
2
0
27.778 6.944 2.822
7.38 s
B B
f
B
B
v v A
t
t
= +
= +
=

( )( )
2
2.822 7.38 20.83 m/s A = =
Then, ( ) ( )
2
0 0
2
B
B B B B
t
x x v t A = + + by moment-area formula
and ( ) ( )
0 0
A A A B
x x v t = +
Subtracting, ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
2
0 0 0 0
2
B
B A B A B A B
t
x x x x v v t A
⎡ ⎤
− = − + − +
⎣ ⎦

Then, ( )( ) ( )
7.38
120 6.944 27.778 7.38 20.83
2
B A
x x
⎛ ⎞
− = + − +
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠


/
Car is ahead of car . 43.1 m
B A
B A x = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 190.


(a) Vertical motion:
0
1.5 m, y =
( )
0
0
y
v =

( )
( )
0 2
0
0
2
1
or
2
y
y y
y y v t gt t
g

= + − =
At point B,
( )
0
2
or
B
y h
y h t
g

= =
When 788 mm 0.788 m, h = =
( )( ) 2 1.5 0.788
0.3810 s
9.81
B
t

= =
When 1068 mm 1.068 m, h = =
( )( ) 2 1.5 1.068
0.2968 s
9.81
B
t

= =
Horizontal motion: ( )
0 0
0
0, ,
x
x v v = =
0 0
or
B
B
x x
x v t v
t t
= = =
With 12.2 m,
B
x =
0
12.2
we get 32.02 m/s
0.3810
v = =

0
12.2
and 41.11 m/s
0.2968
v = =

0
32.02 m/s 41.11 m/s v ≤ ≤ or
0
115.3 km/h 148.0 km/h v ≤ ≤ W
(b) Vertical motion:
( )
0
y y
v v gt gt = − = −
Horizontal motion:
0 x
v v =

( )
( )
0
tan
y
B B
x
B
v
dy gt
dx v v
α = − = − =
For 0.788 m, h =
( )( ) 9.81 0.3810
tan 0.11673,
32.02
α = = 6.66 α = ° W
For 1.068 m, h =
( )( ) 9.81 0.2968
tan 0.07082,
41.11
α = = 4.05 α = ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 191.


The horizontal and vertical components of velocity are
0
0
sin15
cos15
x
y
v v
v v gt
= °
= ° −

At point B,
0
0
sin15
tan12
cos15
x
y
v v
v v gt
°
= = − °
° −

or
0 0
sin15 cos15 tan12 tan12 v v gt ° + ° ° = °
0
0.46413 tan12 v gt = °
0
2.1836
v
t
g
=
Vertical motion:
( )
2
0 0
2
2
2
0 0
2
0
1
cos15
2
1
2.1836cos15 2.1836
2
0.27486
y y v t gt
v v
g
g g
v
g
− = ° −
⎛ ⎞
= ° −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
= −

( ) ( )( )
2
0 0
2 2
8
3.638 3.638 32.2 0
12
78.10 ft / s
v g y y
⎛ ⎞
= − − = − − −
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
=


0
8.84 ft /s v = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 192.












First determine the velocity
C
v of the coal at the point where the coal
impacts on the belt.
Horizontal motion: ( ) ( )
0
1.8cos50
C C
x x
v v
⎡ ⎤
= = − °
⎣ ⎦

1.1570 m/s = −
Vertical motion: ( ) ( ) ( )
2
2
0
0
2
C C
y y
v v g y y
⎡ ⎤
= − −
⎣ ⎦


( ) ( )( )( )
( )
2
2 2
1.8sin50 2 9.81 1.5
31.331 m / s
5.5974 m/s
C
y
v
= ° − −
=
= −

( ) ( )
2 2
2 2 2
5.5974
tan 4.8379, 78.32
1.1570
32.669 m /s
C C C
x y
v v v
β β

= = = °

= + =

5.7156 m/s, 5.7156 m/s
C C
v = = v 78.32°
or ( ) ( ) 1.1570 m/s 5.5974 m/s
C
= − + − v i j
Velocity of the belt: ( ) cos10 sin10
B B
v = − ° + ° v i j
Relative velocity: ( )
/ C B C B C B
= − = + − v v v v v
(a)
/ C B
v is vertical.
( ) /
0
C B
x
v =
( ) ( )
/
1.1570 cos10 0, 1.175 m/s
C B B B
x
v v v = − − − ° = =
1.175 m/s
B
= v 10 ° W
(b)
/ C B
v is minimum. Sketch the vector addition as shown.
2 2 2
/
2 cos 88.32
B C B C B C
v v v v v = + − °
Set the derivative with respect to
B
v equal to zero.
2 2 cos88.32 0
B C
v v − ° =
cos88.32 0.1676 m/s
B C
v v = ° = 0.1676 m/s
B
= v 10 ° W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.


Chapter 11, Solution 193.


Given: ( ) ( )
2
0
0, 0.8 in./s
A
A A
t
dv
v a
dt
= = =
Then, ( ) ( )
0
0.8
A A A
t
v v a t t = + =
(a) 0, t = ( )
2
0, 0
A
A A
n
v
v a
ρ
= = =
( )
A A
t
a a =
2
0.800 in./s
A
a = W
(b) 2 s, t = ( )( ) 0 0.8 2 1.6 in./s
A
v = + =
( )
( )
2
2
2
1.6
0.731 in./s
3.5
A
A
n
v
a
ρ
= = =
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
1/2 1/2
2 2 2 2
0.8 0.731
A A A
t n
a a a
⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤
= + = +
⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦

2
1.084 in./s
A
a = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 194.








(a) At point A.
A
a g =
2
9.81m/s =
Sketch tangential and normal components of acceleration at A.
( ) cos50
A
n
a g = °

( )
( )
2
2
2
9.81cos50
A
A
A
n
v
a
ρ = =
°
0.634 m
A
ρ = W
(b) At point B, 1 meter below point A.
Horizontal motion: ( ) ( ) 2cos50 1.286 m/s
B A
x x
v v = = ° =
Vertical motion: ( ) ( ) ( )
2 2
2
B A y B A
y y
v v a y y = + −

( ) ( )( )( )
2
2 2
2cos 40 2 9.81 1
21.97 m /s
= ° + − −
=

( ) 4.687 m/s
B
y
v =
( )
( )
4.687
tan , or 74.6
1.286
B
y
B
x
v
v
θ θ = = = °

cos74.6
B
a g = °

( )
( ) ( )
2 2
2
cos74.6
B B
x y
B
B
B
n
v v
v
a g
ρ
+
= =
°


( )
2
1.286 21.97
9.81cos74.6
+
=
°
9.07 m
B
ρ = W

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr.,
Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell
© 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Chapter 11, Solution 195.


Differentiate the expressions for r and θ with respect to time.
( )
2
6 4 2 ft, 12 ft/s, 12 ft/s
t t t
r e r e r e
− − −
= − = = − & &&
( ) ( )
2 2 2 2
2 2 4 rad, 2 2 8 rad/s 32 rad/s
t t t
t e e e θ θ θ
− − −
= + = − =
& &&

(a) At 0 s, t =
2
12 ft, 12 ft/s, 12 ft/s r r r = = = − & &&

2
8 rad, 12 rad/s, 32 rad/s θ θ θ = = − =
& &&

12 ft/s, 144 ft/s
r
v r v r
θ
θ = = = = −
&
&
( ) ( ) 12 ft/s 144 ft/s
r θ
= − v e e W
( )( )
( )( ) ( )( )( )
2
2 2
2
12 12 12 1740 ft/s
2 12 32 2 12 12 96 ft/s
r
a r r
a r r
θ
θ
θ θ
= − = − − = −
= + = + − =
&
&&
&& &
&


( ) ( )
2 2
1740 ft/s 96 ft/s
r θ
= − + a e e W
(b) At t , ∞


t
e
− 2
0 and
t
e

0
24 ft, 0, 0 r r r ≈ ≈ ≈ & &&
4 rad, 4 rad/s, 0 t θ θ θ ≈ ≈ ≈
& &&

0, 96 rad/s
r
v r v r
θ
θ = ≈ = ≈
&
&
( ) 96 ft/s
θ
= v e W
( )( )
2
2 2
24 4 384 ft/s , 0
r
a r r a
θ
θ ≈ − = − = − ≈
&
&&


( )
2
384 ft/s
r
= − a e W

The particle is moving on a circular path of radius of 24 ft and with a speed of 96 ft/s. The acceleration is the
normal acceleration
( )
2
2 2
96
/ 384 ft/s
24
v r = = directed toward the center of the circle.


COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 2.
x = t3 − (t − 2) m
2

v= a= (a) Time at a = 0.

dx = 3t 2 − 2 ( t − 2 ) m/s dt dv = 6t − 2 m/s 2 dt

0 = 6t0 − 2 = 0 t0 = 1 3

t0 = 0.333 s

(b)

Corresponding position and velocity.
⎛1⎞ ⎛1 ⎞ x = ⎜ ⎟ − ⎜ − 2 ⎟ = − 2.741 m ⎝3⎠ ⎝3 ⎠
3 2

x = − 2.74 m

⎛1⎞ ⎛1 ⎞ v = 3 ⎜ ⎟ − 2 ⎜ − 2 ⎟ = 3.666 m/s ⎝3⎠ ⎝3 ⎠

2

v = 3.67 m/s

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 3.
Position:
Velocity: x = 5t 4 − 4t 3 + 3t − 2 ft v= a= dx = 20t 3 − 12t 2 + 3 ft/s dt dv = 60t 2 − 24t ft/s 2 dt

Acceleration:
When t = 2 s,

x = ( 5 )( 2 ) − ( 4 )( 2 ) − ( 3)( 2 ) − 2 v = ( 20 )( 2 ) − (12 )( 2 ) + 3 a = ( 60 )( 2 ) − ( 24 )( 2 )
2 3 2

4

3

x = 52 ft v = 115 ft/s a = 192 ft/s 2

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 4.
Position:
Velocity: x = 6t 4 + 8t 3 − 14t 2 − 10t + 16 in.

v=
a=

dx = 24t 3 + 24t 2 − 28t − 10 in./s dt
dv = 72t 2 + 48t − 28 in./s 2 dt

Acceleration:
When t = 3 s,

x = ( 6 )( 3) + ( 8 )( 3) − (14 )( 3) − (10 )( 3) + 16 v = ( 24 )( 3) + ( 24 )( 3) − ( 28 )( 3) − 10 a = ( 72 )( 3) + ( 48 )( 3) − 28
2 3 2

4

3

2

x = 562 in. ! v = 770 in./s ! a = 764 in./s 2 !

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.5 ) 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. 8/e.5 ) a = − ( 500 )(10 ) sin ( 0. Position: Velocity: x = 500sin kt mm v= a= and k = 10 rad/s kt = (10 )( 0. David Mazurek. Jr.05 ) = 0. Elliot R. Russell Johnston.0 × 103 mm/s 2 ! v = ( 500 )(10 ) cos ( 0. Solution 5.5 rad x = 500sin ( 0. William E. Phillip J. . Eisenberg.05 s. Beer. Ferdinand P. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. E.. x = 240 mm ! v = 4390 mm/s ! a = − 24.5 ) dx = 500k cos kt mm/s dt dv = − 500k 2 sin kt mm /s 2 dt Acceleration: When t = 0. Clausen.

Clausen.931 No solutions cosθ = 0 in this range.878 1.9 mm/s 2 a = 50cos ( 0.5 0. .5 0.. E. Beer.5 )(1) = 0. 8/e.0 0.5 rad/s 2 ( ) θ = k1t − k2t 2 = t − 0. Ferdinand P.5 )( −1) − 50sin ( 0.0 θ ( rad ) cosθ 0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Position: Where Let x = 50sin k1t − k2t 2 mm k1 = 1 rad/s dθ = (1 − t ) rad/s dt x = 50sin θ mm v= and k2 = 0. Jr. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. For t = 1 s.0 0. values of cosθ are: t (s) 0 0 1.5 ) x = 24.0 0 1. θ = 1 − ( 0.0 mm a = − 43.5 )( 0 ) 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.981 2. Elliot R.5 1. David Mazurek.5t 2 rad and d 2θ = −1 rad/s 2 dt 2 Position: Velocity: Acceleration: dx dθ = 50cosθ mm/s dt dt dv a= dt a = 50cosθ d 2θ ⎛ dθ ⎞ 2 − 50sin θ ⎜ ⎟ mm/s dt ⎠ dt 2 ⎝ either cosθ = 0 t =1s 2 When v = 0.375 0.375 0. Russell Johnston. or dθ =1− t = 0 dt Over 0 ≤ t ≤ 2 s. Phillip J.5 rad x = 50sin ( 0. Eisenberg. William E. Solution 6.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Jr. x is decreasing. At t = 1 s At t = 3 s At t = 5 s d1 = x1 − x0 = 9 − 5 = 4 ft d3 = d1 + x3 − x1 = 4 + 5 − 9 = 8 ft d5 = d3 + x5 − x3 = 8 + 25 − 5 = 28 ft d5 = 28 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. x is increasing. E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. David Mazurek. Clausen. x5 = ( 5 ) − ( 6 )( 5 ) + ( 9 )( 5 ) + 5 3 2 x5 = 25 ft a5 = 18 ft/s 2 Acceleration at t = 5 s. Russell Johnston. Ferdinand P. Elliot R. x = t 3 − 6t 2 + 9t + 5 v= a= (a) When velocity is zero. Given: Differentiate twice. x0 = 5 ft Over 0 ≤ t < 1 s Over 1 s < t < 3 s Over 3 s < t ≤ 5 s Position at t = 1 s. Eisenberg. Beer. Position at t = 3 s. 8/e. Phillip J. Solution 7. x3 = ( 3) − ( 6 )( 3) + ( 9 )( 3) + 5 = 5 ft 3 2 Distance traveled. .. dx = 3t 2 − 12t + 9 dt dv = 6t − 12 dt v=0 3t 2 − 12t + 9 = 3 ( t − 1)( t − 3) = 0 t = 1 s and t = 3 s (b) Position at t = 5 s. William E. a5 = ( 6 )( 5 ) − 12 Position at t = 0. x1 = (1) − ( 6 )(1) + ( 9 )(1) + 5 = 9 ft 3 2 x is increasing.

At t = t4 = 4 s.879 ft x1 = 1. Elliot R. d1 = 1.935 ft x2 = 8.879 − 1. (b) Total distance traveled. Clausen. x = t 2 − ( t − 2 ) ft 3 v= (a) Positions at v = 0. Solution 8. .879 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.1315 s. 0 to t1: t1 to t2: t2 to t4: Adding.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. 8/e. Russell Johnston. At t = t0 = 0.89 ft x0 = 8 ft x4 = 8 ft x1 = 1.935 = 6. Jr. At t2 = 3. David Mazurek..535 s At t1 = 1.879 = 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Eisenberg.535 s.935 − 8 = 6. Ferdinand P. Distances traveled. E.879 ft d = d1 + d 2 + d3 d = 13.935 ft x2 = 8.944 ft d3 = 8 − 8. Phillip J.1315 s and t2 = 3.065 ft d 2 = 8. dx 2 = 2t − 3 ( t − 2 ) ft/s dt 2t − 3 ( t − 2 ) = − 3t 2 + 14t − 12 = 0 2 t= −14 ± (14) 2 − (4)(− 3)(−12) (2)(− 3) t1 = 1. Beer. William E.

( ) x = 15 0. Phillip J. E.2t ) 1 − 0. ( ) ( ) v = 1.1 ( ) t ∫ 0 dx = ∫ 0 v dt x − 0 = 15∫ 1 − e t 0 x t ( − 0..2t ⎞ ⎛ dt = 15 ⎜ t + e ⎟ 0. Eisenberg.2t dt 0 v t 3 = e− 0.363 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.5 s.5 + 5e− 0. Elliot R.2t At t = 0.2t − 1 = 15 1 − e− 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Solution 9.2t − 0. Ferdinand P.5 s.2 t 0 v = −15 e− 0. William E. David Mazurek.1 − 5 ( ) x = 0. a = 3e− 0. Jr.2 ⎝ ⎠0 x = 15 t + 5e− 0. 8/e. Beer. Russell Johnston.427 ft/s v = 15 1 − e− 0.2t − 5 At t = 0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Clausen. .2t ∫ 0 dv = ∫ 0 a dt v −0=∫ t 3e− 0.

Elliot R. Jr.4 ( cos kt − 1) = 1.1273 ft/s x = 0.8cos1. Russell Johnston. E.8 ∫ 0 cos kt dt = x−0= t t 1.8 3 v = 1.8 ( sin kt − 0 ) = 0.4 cos kt k t k = 3 rad/s v − v0 = ∫ 0 a dt = − 5.6sin kt ft kt = ( 3)( 0.8 ft/s.6sin1. x = 0. Clausen.8 = Velocity: 0 5. William E. x0 = 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Given: a = − 5. Phillip J.8cos kt ft/s x − x0 = ∫ 0 v dt = 1.8cos kt − 1.5 = 0. Solution 10. Eisenberg.8 sin kt k t 0 1. t t v0 = 1.5985 ft v = 0.1273 ft/s x = 0..6sin kt 3 Position: When t = 0.5 rad v = 1. 8/e. .COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Ferdinand P.4 ∫ 0 sin kt dt = v − 1.5 = 0.598 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.4sin kt ft/s 2 .5 ) = 1. David Mazurek. Beer. 5.5 s.

44sin kt Velocity: v = 1.44sin1. William E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.08cos1. . Eisenberg.48cos1.48 Position: When t = 0.5 + 0. Given: a = − 3. Russell Johnston. Clausen.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.08 = = 3.5 = 0.36sin kt + 0.24sin kt − 4.32 sin kt k t 0 3.08 ft/s t t v − v0 = ∫ 0 a dt = − 3. 8/e.5 s.36sin1.48 ft.32 ( cos kt − 1) − ( sin kt − 0 ) 3 3 = 1.08 − 1. Beer.08cos kt − 1.360 ft/s ! x = 0.32 cos kt ft/s 2 . David Mazurek.32 ∫ 0 cos kt dt v − 1.5 − 1. E.48cos kt ft kt = ( 3)( 0. Ferdinand P. x = 0.48cos kt − 0.08 1.44 ∫ 0 sin kt dt x − 0.08 sin kt k t 0 t t t + 1.08 ∫ 0 cos kt dt − 1.44 cos kt k t 0 1.24 4. Solution 11.393 ft v = −1.44sin kt ft/s x − x0 = ∫ 0 v dt = 1.24 ∫ 0 sin kt dt − 4.24 cos kt k t 0 − 4.5 ) = 1.360 ft/s x = 0.48 = = 1.5 = −1. Jr. Phillip J.44 ( sin kt − 0 ) + ( cos kt − 1) 3 3 = 0.393 ft ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. t k = 3 rad/s v0 = 1.. x0 = 0.5 rad v = 1. Elliot R.36sin kt + 0.08cos kt − 1.

David Mazurek. At t = 3. x is decreasing. For 0 ≤ t ≤ 3. v>0 v<0 t = 3. where k is a constant. Distances traveled: Over 0 ≤ t ≤ 3.651 s.7 mm x = x7 = ( 400 )( 7 ) − (10 )( 7 ) + 110 3 3 At t = 7 s. Beer.651) − (10 )( 3. v = 400 mm/s.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Total distance traveled: Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. a = kt mm/s 2 at t = 1 s. Russell Johnston.651 s.651 s. Elliot R. Thus v = 400 + 1 2 k (1) = 370. x7 = − 520 mm d1 = xmax − x0 = 973. Solution 12.4 mm d = 2580 mm Over 3.7 mm d 2 = xmax − x7 = 1603. Ferdinand P. 2 k = − 60 mm/s3 v = 400 − 30t 2 mm/s v7 = 400 − ( 30 )( 7 ) 2 At t = 7 s. x = 400t − 10t 3 + 110 mm x = x0 = 110 mm x = xmax = ( 400 )( 3. 400 − 30t 2 = 0. Jr.. .651 s.333 s2 . E.7 mm d = d1 + d 2 = 2577. When v = 0.651) + 110 = 1083. Given: At t = 0. Clausen. Phillip J. William E. Eisenberg. For t > 3. x t t 2 ∫ 500 dx = ∫ 1 v dt = ∫ 1 ( 400 − 30t ) dt x − 500 = 400t − 10t 3 ( ) t 1 = 400t − 10t 3 − 390 Position: At t = 0. 8/e. x = 500 mm v = 370 mm/s.651 ≤ t ≤ 7 s. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. v7 = −1070 mm/s Then t 2 = 13. 1 v t t 2 ∫ 400 dv = ∫ 0 a dt = ∫ 0 kt dt = 2 kt v − 400 = 1 2 kt 2 or v = 400 + 1 2 kt 2 At t = 1 s.651 s and and x is increasing.

45t ( ) t 0 = 0.075 t 2 − 0.. For 3.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.00 s.00 ) − 10 = −10.15t − 0. 8/e.15t − ( 0.15 )( 2 ) v = 0. Solution 13.00 s.15t − 0. Determine velocity.45t − 10 m At t = 5 s. Phillip J.075t 2 − 0. Determine position.15 )( 5 ) − 0. . Russell Johnston.45 )( 3.300 m d = d1 + d 2 = 0. v5 = ( 0.45 m/s At t = 5 s. Over 3.375 m 2 x5 = −10.45t x = 0. When v = 0.45 = 0 v ≤ 0. Ferdinand P.975 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.15 dv = ∫ 2 a dt = ∫ 2 0. x5 = ( 0. x is increasing. For 0 ≤ t ≤ 3.00 ≤ t ≤ 5 s.38 m At t = 0. t = 3.675 mm 2 At t = 3. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Eisenberg. Beer.00 ) − ( 0. Total distance traveled: d1 = x0 − xmin = 0.075 )( 3. David Mazurek.45) dt x − ( −10 ) = 0.675 m d 2 = x5 − xmin = 0. Distances traveled: Over 0 ≤ t ≤ 3.300 m/s x is decreasing.15 dt v − ( −0.45 )( 5 ) − 10 = −10.075 )( 5 ) − ( 0.00 s. v t t ∫ − 0. Elliot R.00 s v5 = 0.15t − 0. William E.975 m d = 0. Clausen. E.00 s < t < 5 s. x t t ∫ −10 dx = ∫ 0 v dt = ∫ 0 ( 0.45 0. x0 = −10 m (given) x3 = xmin = ( 0.075t 2 − 0. Jr.15 ) = 0. v ≥ 0.

25 − 5 = 20. Over 0 < t < 3 s.5 m d 4 = 32.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.5 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. At t = 3 s At t = 4 s v is positive. t (9 − t 2 ) = 0 t = 0 and t = 3 s (2 roots) (b) Position and velocity at t = 4 s. Elliot R. Jr. William E. Given: Separate variables and integrate.25 m d 4 = d3 + x4 − x3 = 20. ⎛9⎞ 2 ⎛1⎞ 4 x3 = 5 + ⎜ ⎟ ( 3) − ⎜ ⎟ ( 3) = 25. Beer. Ferdinand P. Eisenberg. David Mazurek. Clausen. 8/e. E. ⎛9⎞ 2 ⎛1⎞ 4 x4 = 5 + ⎜ ⎟ ( 4 ) − ⎜ ⎟ ( 4 ) ⎝2⎠ ⎝4⎠ v4 = ( 4 ) 9 − 42 x4 = 13 m v4 = − 28 m/s ( ) (c) Distance traveled. .25 m ⎝2⎠ ⎝4⎠ d3 = x3 − x0 = 25. Solution 14. Russell Johnston. v t 2 ∫ 0 dv = ∫ a dt = ∫ 0 ( 9 − 3t ) dt = 9 a = 9 − 3t 2 v − 0 = 9 t − t3 (a) When v is zero. v = t 9 − t2 ( ) t =3s x t t 3 ∫ 5 dx = ∫ 0 v dt = ∫ 0 ( 9t − t ) dt x−5= 9 2 1 4 t − t 2 4 9 2 1 4 t − t 2 4 x=5+ At t = 4 s. At t = 3 s. v is negative.25 + 13 − 25. so x is decreasing.25 = 32. Over 3 s < t ≤ 4 s. so x is increasing.. Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

. dx = v = −10 + 2. Eisenberg.625 t 4 − [ −10] x = 10 − 10t + 0.5 t 3 dt dx = −10 + 2.5 t 3 dt t 2 t 2 ( ) ) x − 0 = ⎡ −10 t + 0. William E. Equations of motion.5 ) t 3 ⎝3⎠ v = −10 + 2. ( ∫ x dx 0 = ∫ −10 + 2. Russell Johnston. Elliot R. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Clausen. Given: Separate variables Integrate using dv = kt2 dt v = –10 m/s when t = 0 and v = 10 m/s when t = 2 s.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Ferdinand P. David Mazurek. . Beer.625t 4 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. E.625 )( 2 ) ⎤ ⎢ ⎥ ⎣ ⎣ ⎦ 4⎤ = −10 t + 0.0625 t ⎦ − ⎡( −10 )( 2 ) + ( 0. Solution 15.5 t 3 m/s Then. v v −10 1 = kt 3 3 t 0 ⎛1⎞ v + 10 = ⎜ ⎟ ( 7. 8/e. Phillip J.5 t 3 dt Separate variables and integrate using x = 0 when t = 2 s.5 m/s 4 Using upper limit of v at t. a= dv = kt 2 dt 10 2 2 ∫ −10 dv = ∫ 0 kt dt v 10 − 10 = 1 3 kt 3 1 t 0 [(10) − (−10)] = 3 k ⎡( 2 )3 − 0⎤ ⎢ ⎥ ⎣ ⎦ (a) (b) Solving for k.625 t 4 ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ 4 = ⎡ −10 t + 0. Jr. k= ( 3)( 20 ) 8 k = 7.

Use v dv = a dx = 160 ( 0.25 m vmax 0.3 m/s when x = 0.25 − x )2 = −160 2 xm = − 80 ( 0. William E. or x = 0.25 − x ) with the limits v = 0.25 − x ) (a) Note that v is maximum when a = 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.0981 m and 0.15)2 ⎤ = 1.921 m/s (b) Note that x is maximum or minimum when v = 0. 0 and v = 0 when x = xm ∫ 0. Eisenberg.32 − = −160 2 2 2 2 0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.25 ∫ 0. Phillip J.4 m and v = vmax when x = 0. . Jr.3 v dv = ∫ 0. Elliot R.25 − x ) vmax 0.15 ) 0. Beer.4 ⎡ ( − 0.25 − x ) dx 2 ( 0.25 − x ) dx with the limits v = 0. Note that a is a given function of x.25 − xm ) + ( 80 )( − 0. Russell Johnston.8 ⎥ = −160 ⎢0 − 2 ⎢ ⎥ ⎣ ⎦ 2 vmax = 3.1519 m xm = 0.25 − xm = ± 0.4 160 ( 0.25 − xm )2 = 0. 8/e.25 0. David Mazurek. a = 40 − 160 x = 160 ( 0.25 m Use v dv = a dx = 160 ( 0..69 m 2 /s 2 vmax = 1. Solution 16. E.3 m/s when x = 0.25 − x ) dx xm ( 0.3 v dv = ∫ 0.3)2 0− 2 ( 0.402 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.4 2 2 ( 0.4 160 ( 0. Clausen.4 m. Ferdinand P.02306 0.

25 − x ) 2 or dt = dx dx dx = 2 v ± 0. Elliot R.25 − x ) 2 Integrate: 0.25 − x ) Let u = 20 ( 0.2 u = 1 u 1 and du = − 20dx u 1 1  −1 π = m sin −1 u = m t = m∫  sin u −  2 10 10  2 10 1 − u 1 du sin −1 u = Solve for u. Clausen.125 2 So v 2 = 0. π 2 m 10t π  u = sin  m 10t  = cos ( ± 10t ) = cos10t 2  u = cos 10t = 20 ( 0.5 1 − 400 ( 0. .5 1 − 400 ( 0.2100 ( 0.25 − x ) dx v x 1 2 1 2 v − 0 = − (100 )( 0.2 m ∫ 0 v dv = ∫ 0. Beer.25 − x ) dx with limits v = 0 when x = 0. Jr.5 1 − 400 ( 0.25 − x ) . William E. David Mazurek. Solution 17. Phillip J.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. So when x = 0. 8/e.25 − x ) continued Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.25 − 100 ( 0.25 − x ) m/s 2 Use v dv = a dx = 100 ( 0.25 − x ) 2 2 0.25 − x ) + 0.. Russell Johnston. a is a function of x: a = 100 ( 0. Eisenberg.2 x = − 50 ( 0.25 − x ) Use dx = v dt t x ∫ 0 dt = ± ∫ 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. E.2 2 or v = ± 0. Ferdinand P.

Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. William E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Solve for x and v. Eisenberg..271 m v = 0.455 m/s x = 0. Russell Johnston. E. Clausen. Phillip J.2 ) ) 20 x = 0. Jr. Ferdinand P. 1 cos10t 20 1 sin10t 2 1 cos ( (10 )( 0. 8/e.25 − v= 1 sin ( (10 )( 0. Elliot R. x = 0. Beer.2 ) ) 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.2 s. .25 − v= Evaluate at t = 0. David Mazurek.

3 ( ) ( ) ∫ 7. when x = 0. Russell Johnston. Eisenberg. Phillip J. Jr. William E.5 ⎡ 600 2 600 4 ⎤ =⎢ x + kx ⎥ 4 ⎣ 2 ⎦ 2 (15)2 2 − ( 7. k = 3.5 v dv = ∫ 0 ⎡ v2 ⎤ ⎢ ⎥ ⎣2⎦ 15 15 0. David Mazurek.45 ) 4 84.5)2 2 = ( 300 )( 0.45 ) + (150 ) k ( 0.375 = 60. .45 ( 600x + 600kx ) dx 0.1509k Solving for k . Note that a is a given function of x Use Using the limits and v dv = a dx = 600 x 1 + kx 2 dx = 600 x + 600kx3 dx v = 7. E.75 + 6.5 ft/s v = 15 ft/s when x = 0. Beer. 8/e. Solution 18.84 ft −2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Clausen. Elliot R. Ferdinand P..45 ft. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.45 0 7.

William E. Beer. v 2 = 1600 ( u + 0.25 ft 2 So Taking square roots.25 ± 0 3200 u1 = u2 = − 0. Elliot R. Clausen. Solution 19. v x 3 ∫10 v dv = ∫ 0 ( 800 x + 3200 x ) dx v 2 (10 ) − = 400 x 2 + 800 x 4 2 2 2 v 2 = 1600 x 4 + 800 x 2 + 100 Then where u1 and u2 are the roots of Solving the quadratic equation. Note that a is a given function of x.52 ft/s ( ) Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Jr. Eisenberg.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Use v dv = a dx = 800 x + 3200 x3 dx ( ) Using the limit v = 10 ft/s when x = 0. Ferdinand P. . 1600u 2 + 800u + 100 = 0 u1.. David Mazurek. Russell Johnston.52 2 ( ) 2 ft 2 /s 2 v = ± 40 x 2 + 0.25 ) = 1600 x 2 + 0. E. Let u = x 2 v 2 = 1600u 2 + 800u + 100 = 1600 ( u − u1 )( u − u2 ) . 8/e. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.2 = − 800 ± (800 )2 − ( 4 )(1600 )(100 ) ( 2 )(1600 ) = − 800 ± 0 = − 0. Phillip J.

.05 s.3 ft/s x = 0. Ferdinand P.5 0. which agrees with the given data if the minus sign is rejected. 20t = 1. At t = 0. 8/e.5 tan ( 20t ) dx = ± 0.5 tan (1.0 rad v = 10sec2 (1. Elliot R. Beer.5 x + 0. .0 v = 34.52 ( ) t=0 40dt = ± t dx x + 0. Jr.5 sec2 ( 20t )  ( 20 ) = ± 10 sec2 ( 20t )   dt At t = 0.0 ) = x = 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.779 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.0 tan −1 ( 2 x ) 2 x = ± tan ( 20t ) v= or or tan −1 ( 2 x ) = ± 20t x = ± 0. William E. Eisenberg. E. v = 10 sec 2 ( 20t ) ft/s.5 2 40t = ± 2.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Use dx = v dt or dt = dx dx =± 2 v 40 x + 0. David Mazurek. Phillip J. Russell Johnston. Thus.52 2 Use limit x=0 when 40∫ 0 dt = ± ∫ 0 x dx 1 x =± tan −1 2 0.5 tan ( 20t ) ft 10 cos 2 1. v = ± 10 ft/s.0 ) and x = 0. Clausen.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 20.
Note that a is a given function of x.
7  a = 12 x − 28 = 12  x −  m/s 2 3 

7  Use v dv = a dx = 12  x −  dx with the limits v = 8 m/s when x = 0. 3 

v v dv 8

7 = 12∫ −  dx 3 

x x 0

 v2     2  

v

8

12  7 = x −  2 3

2

x

0

2 2 v 2 82 12  7 7  − =  x −  −    2 2 2  3 3    2 2 2  7 7 4 7   v = 8 + 12  x −  −    = 12  x −  − 3 3 3 3      2 2

7 4  v = ± 12  x −  − 3 3  Reject minus sign to get v = 8 m/s at x = 0.

2

(a) Maximum value of x.

v = 0 when x = xmax

7 4  12  x −  − = 0 3 3 
x− 7 1 =± 3 3

2

or

7 1  x − 3 = 9  
and xmax = 8 2 m=2 m 3 3

2

xmax = 2 m

Now observe that the particle starts at x = 0 with v > 0 and reaches x = 2 m. At x = 2 m, v = 0 and 2 a < 0, so that v becomes negative and x decreases. Thus, x = 2 m is never reached. 3 xmax = 2 m !

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

(b) Velocity when total distance traveled is 3 m.

The particle will have traveled total distance d = 3 m when d − xmax = xmax − x or 3 − 2 = 2 − x or x = 1 m.
7 4  Using v = − 12  x −  − , which applies when x is decreasing, we get 3 3  7 4  v = − 12 1 −  − = − 20 3 3 
2 2

v = − 4.47 m/s !

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 21.
Note that a is a function of x.
a = k 1 − e− x

(

)

Use v dv = a dx = k 1 − e− x dx with the limits v = 9 m/s when x = −3 m, and v = 0 when x = 0.
0 0 −x ∫ 9 v dv = ∫ − 3 k (1 − e ) dx

(

)

⎛ v2 ⎞ ⎜ ⎟ ⎜ 2⎟ ⎝ ⎠

0

= k x + e− x
9

(

)

0

−3

0− (a)

92 = k ⎡0 + 1 − ( − 3) − e3 ⎤ = −16.0855k ⎣ ⎦ 2 k = 2.5178 k = 2.52 m/s 2

Use v dv = a dx = k 1 − e− x dx = 2.5178 1 − e− x dx with the limit v = 0 when x = 0.

(

)

(

)

∫ 0 v dv = ∫ 0 2.5178 (1 − e
v x

−x

) dx
x
0

v2 = 2.5178 x + e− x 2

(

)

= 2.5178 x + e− x − 1

(

) )
1/2

v 2 = 5.0356 x + e− x − 1 (b) Letting x = −2 m,

(

) )
1/ 2

v = ± 2.2440 x + e− x − 1

(

v = ± 2.2440 − 2 + e2 − 1 Since x begins at x = − 2 m and ends at x = 0, v > 0. Reject the minus sign.

(

= ± 4.70 m/s

v = 4.70 m/s

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 22.
a=v
v

dv = 6.8 e−0.00057 x dx
x −0.00057 x

∫ 0 v dv = ∫ 0 6.8 e

dx
x 0

v2 6.8 e−0.00057 x −0= 2 − 0.00057

= 11930 1 − e−0.00057 x

(

)

When v = 30 m/s.

( 30 )2
2

= 11930 1 − e−0.00057 x

(

)

1 − e−0.00057 x = 0.03772 e−0.00057 x = 0.96228 − 0.00057 x = ln (0.96228) = − 0.03845 x = 67.5 m

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

4 dx Separate variables and integrate using v = 75 mm/s when x = 0. William E. Jr.75 t = − 2.51 s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. . Phillip J.4x v x v − 75 = − 0.5ln 0. David Mazurek. Beer. Eisenberg.4v dx dv = − 0.01)(75) = 0. Ferdinand P. E. v = (0. 8/e.75 75 t = 11.4∫ 0 (a) Distance traveled when v = 0 0 − 75 = − 0. Given: or a=v dv = − 0. ∫ 75 dv = − 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.5 mm (b) Time to reduce velocity to 1% of initial value.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.4 x x = 187. Elliot R. Solution 23. Russell Johnston. Clausen..

(a) Distance when v = 3 m/s. Elliot R.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Given: a =v dv = − kv2 dx Separate variables and integrate using v = 9 m/s when x = 0.332 × 10−3 m −1 1 v v ln = − 51. Solution 24.728 ln 9 9 k ⎛3⎞ x = − 51. William E. Phillip J. x = − 51..728 ln ( 0 ) x=∞ Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. . Jr. David Mazurek.728 ln ⎜ ⎟ ⎝9⎠ x = 56. 8/e. v x ∫ 9 v = − k ∫ 0 dx dv ln Calculate k using v = 7 m/s when x = 13 m. Beer. ln Solve for x. 7 = − ( k )(13) 9 x=− v = − kx 9 k = 19. Clausen. Eisenberg.8 m (b) Distance when v = 0. Ferdinand P. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. E. Russell Johnston.

Ferdinand P.74 ft/s (b) dv = a dt = − k vdt dt = − t =− 1 dv k v1/ 2 v 1 2 1/2 ⋅ 2 ⎡v1/2 ⎤ = v0 − v1/2 ⎣ ⎦ v0 k k 1/2 ( ) t = 1. v0 = 25 ft/s 1 2 v v0 x − x0 = 2 3/2 v0 − v3/2 3k ( ) or x= 2 ⎡ 2 ⎡ 3/2 3/2 ⎤ 3/2 ⎤ ⎢( 25) − v ⎥ = 3k ⎣125 − v ⎦ ⎣ ⎦ 3k Noting that x = 6 ft when v = 12 ft/s..27 ) ⎣ v3/2 = 125 − 13.905 )( 8 ) = 13. . Phillip J. v = 0 ( 2 )( 25) 2v1/2 t = 0 = 9.759 ( ft/s ) v = 5.079 s At rest. Jr. 6= Then. 1 dx = − v1/2dv k x v 3/2 ∫ x0 dx = − k ∫ v0 vdv = − 3k v x0 = 0. Russell Johnston.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Beer. v dv = a dx = −k vdx. E. Elliot R. Solution 25. 2 ⎡ 55.27 k Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.071916 125 − v3/2 ⎦ ( 3)( 9.62 125 − 123/2 ⎤ = ⎦ 3k ⎣ k or k = 9. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Clausen. 8/e.27 ft/s3 x= 2 ⎡125 − v3/2 ⎤ = 0. Eisenberg. William E.905 x ( ) 3/2 (a) When x = 8 ft. David Mazurek. v3/2 = 125 − (13.

25 (a) When v = 24 ft/s. Russell Johnston. ∫ x dx 0 1 v v dv 1 = = v 2 + 49 ∫0 2 0.8 v 2 + 49 v dv = a dx dx = v dv v dv = a 0. Jr.4 ft/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. ( v 2 + 49 − 7 ) ) x = 22. Solution 26.8 x ) − 49 2 When x = 40 ft. E.25 (b) Solving equation (1) for v 2 . 8/e.5 ft (1) ( 242 + 49 − 7 v 2 + 49 = 7 + 0. x = 1. a = 0. Eisenberg. David Mazurek.8 )( 40 ) ⎤ − 49 = 1472 ft 2 /s 2 ⎣ ⎦ 2 v = 38. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.8 v + 49 v 0 x = 1. Phillip J.8 v 2 + 49 Integrating using x = 0 when v = 0.8 0. Elliot R.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Clausen. Ferdinand P..8x v 2 = ( 7 + 0. William E. v 2 = ⎡7 + ( 0. . Beer.

5 1 = cos ( 2kt ) 2 t 1.2 − 1. Elliot R.1593 rad k = 1. E.5 ft at t = 0. Solution 27. Beer. and x = 1. a= dv = −2k k 2 − v 2 .2 ft at t = 0. Ferdinand P. 1. Russell Johnston. Clausen.2 s. using x = 1. Eisenberg.4 k = 2.2 ∫ 1.4k = cos −1 ( 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.90 ft/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics..1593 0. dt dv k −v 2 2 and v = 0 when t = 0 −2k dt = ⎡ ⎛ v ⎞⎤ = d ⎢sin −1 ⎜ ⎟ ⎥ ⎝ k ⎠⎦ ⎣ v − 2k ∫ t dt 0 ⎡ ⎛ v ⎞⎤ = ⎢sin −1 ⎜ ⎟ ⎥ ⎝ k ⎠⎦ ⎣ 0 ⎛v⎞ sin −1 ⎜ ⎟ = −2kt ⎝k⎠ v = k sin ( −2kt ) = −k sin ( 2kt ) dx = v dt = −k sin ( 2kt ) dt Integrating.2 0.2 1.5 = 0 1 1 cos ⎡( 2 ) k ( 0.4k ) = 0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. .5 dx = − ∫ 0 ⎡ k sin ( 2kt )⎤ dt ⎣ ⎦ x 1. Jr. 8/e.4 0.2 ) ⎤ − ⎣ ⎦ 2 2 cos ( 0. Phillip J.4 ) = 1. David Mazurek. William E.

1 t = − sin −1 v 2 v = sin ( − 2t ) = − sin ( 2t ) 2t = 0.6 ft/s.5646 ) + 1 2 Using equation (1). Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies..5646 ft/s 1 2 x= 1 − ( − 0. Eisenberg. From dv = a dt we get dt = 1 2 ( 1− v − 1 ) or x= x= 1 1 − v2 + 1 2 1 2 1 − ( − 0. David Mazurek. 8/e. Jr.6 = − 0. Russell Johnston.3 s. we get dx = v dv v dv = a −2 1 − v 2 Integrating. or t t 0 =− 1 sin −1 v 2 ( ) v 0 1 t − 0 = − sin −1 v − 0 2 Solving for v. . Solution 28. Elliot R. Beer.400 ft (1) dv dv = a −2 1 − v 2 Integrating. x = 1. Phillip J. ∫ x dx 1.5 = When v = − 0.6 ft/s.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.3 s. ∫ t dt 0 = ∫0 v dv −2 1 − v 2 . When t = 0. (a) Position when v = − 0. Ferdinand P.5 = ∫0 v v dv −2 1 − v 2 2 or x ⎛1 ⎞ x 1.6 ) + 1 2 x = 1. William E. Clausen. (b) Position when t = 0. E. using x = 1.5 ft when v = 0.5 = ⎜ 1 − v2 ⎟ ⎝2 ⎠ v 0 x − 1. Acceleration is a given function of velocity. using t = 0 when v = 0.6 rad v = − sin 0. From v dv = a dx.413 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.

x = 122.00057 x 154 ⎛ v ⎞ e −0. . (b) v = 40 m/s.4 ln ⎢1 − ⎜ ⎟ ⎥ ⎢ ⎝ 154 ⎠ ⎥ ⎣ ⎦ a as a function of x. Elliot R. David Mazurek.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.00057 x = 1 − ⎜ ⎟ ⎝ 154 ⎠ ⎡ ⎛ v ⎞2 ⎤ − 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.75906 e −0.00057 x = ln ⎢1 − ⎜ ⎟ ⎥ ⎢ ⎝ 154 ⎠ ⎥ ⎣ ⎦ ⎡ ⎛ v ⎞2 ⎤ x = −1754. v = 1 − e−0. Phillip J. From (2).. v 2 = 23716 1 − e−0.75906 ⎢1 − ⎜ ⎟ ⎥ ⎢ ⎝ 154 ⎠ ⎥ ⎣ ⎦ (a) v = 20 m/s.00057 x = 6. 8/e. x as a function of v.30 m/s2 x = 29.00057 a=v (1) 2 ( ) dv d ⎛ v2⎞ −0. Beer.65 m/s2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. From (1). Russell Johnston. Ferdinand P.54 a = 6. From (1).8 m a = 6. E. Clausen.5 m a = 6. Jr. William E. Solution 29.00057 ) e dx dx ⎜ 2 ⎟ ⎝ ⎠ (2) ⎡ ⎛ v ⎞2 ⎤ a = 6. From (2).843 a = 6. Eisenberg.0005 x = ⎜ ⎟ = (11858 )( 0.64506 x = 29.30306 x = 122.

04 x ) 0.7 = − 0.210t ) { 1/0.7 } x = 7.04 )( 6 ) ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ { 0. we get dt = dx dx = v 7. x = 25 1 − (1 − 0.0900(1 − 0. using t = 0 when x = 0. E.5) ( 0.5 (1 − 0. Using dx = v dt .04x0.3)(− 0.04 x ) { 0.675)(1000) m/s 2 (3600)2 a = − 52.04 x)0.7619 1 − (1 − 0.5)(−0. Using x = 6 km in equation (1).5 km/h. a=v dv − 0. William E.15 km dv = (7. Ferdinand P.7619 1 − ⎡1 − ( 0.3 ( 7.. v = 7. Russell Johnston.04 x) − 0. David Mazurek.7 dx When t = 0 and x = 0. Eisenberg. .5)(0. Given: v = 7.5(1 − 0. 8/e.210 )(1) ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ { 1/0. Jr. (b) Acceleration when t = 0. Phillip J.7 } (1) Solving for x.04 x)−0. t = 4.0900) = − 0. t x ⋅ or [t ]t0 = {1 − 0.7 )( 0.04 ) 1 dx 1 −1 x t = 4.04)(1 − 0. x = 25 1 − ⎡1 − ( 0.0900 h −1 dx dv = (7.3 Integrating.7 } = 0. Solution 30.5 ∫ 0 0.7 } When t = 1 h.8323 h t = 49. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.675 km/h 2 dx (0. Clausen.1 × 10−6 m/s 2 =− (c) Time to run 6 km.9 min Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.04 ) (1 − 0.7} 0 ∫ 0 dt = 7.3 with units km and km/h (a) Distance at t = 1 hr. Beer. Elliot R.

. E. Then.2 ) ( 20. Russell Johnston. David Mazurek. Solution 31. Ferdinand P. vesc = ( 2 )( 32. Beer. Clausen. Elliot R. Phillip J. R = 3960 mi = 20. William E. and v = vesc at r = R 0 2 ∞ ∫ vesc v dv = − gR ∫ R r 2 dr 1 2 v 2 0 vesc ⎛1⎞ = gR 2 ⎜ ⎟ ⎝r⎠ ∞ R 0− 1 2 1⎞ ⎛ vesc = gR 2 ⎜ 0 − ⎟ 2 R⎠ ⎝ vesc = 2 gR Now.7 × 103 ft/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. v dv = − Integrating. . Jr. using the conditions v = 0 at r = ∞. The acceleration is given by v dv gR 2 =a=− 2 dr r gR 2dr r2 Then. Eisenberg.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.909 × 106 ft and g = 32. 8/e. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.2 ft/s2 .909 × 106 ) vesc = 36.

use g = 32. Elliot R. Ferdinand P.2 ⎡ ⎛ y ⎞⎤ ⎢1 + ⎜ 20. 8/e. using the conditions v = v0 at y = 0 and v = 0 at y = ymax .9 × 106 v0 2 1.9 × 10 ) ( 40000) = (1.2 ft/s 2 and R = 20.2 ) ( 20. ymax ( 20.8 × 103 ft 6 2 9 2 ymax = 251 × 103 ft 6 2 9 2 = negative Negative value indicates that v0 is greater than the escape velocity.9 × 106 v0 = 2 20. Eisenberg. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.9 × 106 ⎟ ⎥ ⎠⎦ ⎣ ⎝ 2 Integrate. . Using the given numerical data.34596 × 10 ) − ( 4000) ( 20. Phillip J. ymax = 2 Rv0 2 2 gR − v0 ymax = 2 ( 2 )( 32. Beer.9 × 106 ⎟ ⎥ ⎠⎦ ⎣ ⎝ 2 vdv = ady = − 32.34596 × 109 − v0 (a) v0 = 2400 ft/s. David Mazurek. The acceleration is given by a = − 32.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Jr. ymax = ∞ Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. ymax (b) v0 = 4000 ft/s.9 × 10 ) ( 4000) = (1. ymax (c) v0 = 40000 ft/s. dy dy 1 2 v 2 0 v0 ∫ 0 v v0 dv = − g ∫ ∞ 0 (1 + ) y R 2 = ∞ − gR 2 0 ∫ ( R + y )2 1 ⎞ = gR ⎜ ⎟ ⎝R + y⎠ 2⎛ ymax 0 0− ⎡ gRymax 1 2 1 1⎤ − ⎥=− v0 = gR 2 ⎢ R + ymax 2 ⎣ R + ymax R ⎦ 2 v0 ( R + ymax ) = 2 gRymax Solving for ymax . Clausen.9 × 106 ft.9 × 10 ) ( 2400 ) = (1.. Solution 32.34596 × 10 ) − ( 2400) ( 20. William E.9 × 106 ) − v0 6 2 2 20. Russell Johnston.34596 × 10 ) − ( 40000 ) 9 2 ymax = 89. Also. E.2dy ⎡ ⎛ y ⎞⎤ ⎢1 + ⎜ 20.

8/e. x = x0 = C − v′ ωn or ωn Then. x = x0 + ωn v′ cos ϕ − ωn v′ cos (ω nt + ϕ ) using cos ω nt1 + ϕ = −1 (3) xmax = x0 + ωn cos ϕ + ω Solving for cos ϕ . Jr. Clausen. x=C − v′ ωn cos (ω nt + ϕ ) v′ cos ϕ v′ C = x0 + v′ cos ϕ At t = 0. (a) Given: v = v′ sin (ω nt + ϕ ) At t = 0. Beer. Ferdinand P. Using sin (ω nt1 + ϕ ) = 0 and or cos (ω nt1 + ϕ ) = ± 1 (2) dx =v dt dx = v dt Integrating. With xmax = 2 x0 . Using cos ϕ = cos ϕ = ( xmax − x0 ) ω n v′ x0ω n −1 v′ −1 (4)  v0   x0ω n   v′  +  v′ − 1 = 1     2 2 sin 2 ϕ + cos 2ϕ = 1.. . Eisenberg. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. or Solving for v′ gives v′ = (v 2 0 2 2 + x0ω n ) 2 x0ω n (5) Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. William E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Russell Johnston. Elliot R. Solution 33. E. David Mazurek. Then. Phillip J. v = v0 = v′ sin ϕ or sin ϕ = v0 v′ (1) Let x be maximum at t = t1 when v = 0.

Clausen. William E. Jr. Ferdinand P. 8/e. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Then. David Mazurek. Phillip J. . Russell Johnston.. the corresponding value of x is x = x0 + v′ ωn cos ϕ = x0 + v′  x0ω n v′   ′ − 1 = 2 x0 − ωn  v ωn  = 2 x0 − 2 2 2 2 3 1 v0 v0 + x0ω n = x0 − 2 2 x0ω n ( 2x0ω n )ω n 2  3 − x0  ( )  v0 x0ω n 2 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System (b) Acceleration: a= dv = v′ω n cos (ω nt + ϕ ) dt Let v be maximum at t = t2 when a = 0. Elliot R. Beer. E. Eisenberg. cos (ω nt2 + ϕ ) = 0 From equation (3).

πv πt dv = − 0 cos dt T T π v0 T cos 3π a= a=− π v0 T x1 = v0T + Average velocity is vave = v0T π cos π − v0T 2⎞ ⎛ = v0T ⎜1 − ⎟ π π⎠ ⎝ Δx x1 − x0 ⎛ 2⎞ = = ⎜1 − ⎟ v0 T Δt π⎠ ⎝ vave = 0. (b) Using equation (1) with t = T . Russell Johnston. Beer. Phillip J. Elliot R. (a ) πt ⎤ dx ⎡ = v = v0 ⎢1 − sin ⎥ dt T ⎦ ⎣ Integrating. David Mazurek. Jr. πt ⎤ x t t ⎡ ∫ 0 dx = ∫ 0 v dt = ∫ 0 v0 ⎢1 − sin T ⎥ dt ⎣ ⎦ x x 0 vT πt ⎤ ⎡ = ⎢v0t + 0 cos ⎥ T ⎦ π ⎣ t 0 x = v0t + v0T π cos πt T − v0T π (1) When t = 3T . using x = x0 = 0 when t = 0. Ferdinand P. William E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. E. x = 3v0T + v0T vT ⎛ 2⎞ cos ( 3π ) − 0 = ⎜ 3 − ⎟ v0T T π π⎠ ⎝ x = 2.36v0T a= When t = 3T . . Clausen. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Eisenberg. 8/e.363v0 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.. Solution 34.

Beer.77 m/s 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Clausen. 8/e. a= dv dt 8.7778 m/s (a) Acceleration during start test.2 27. Ferdinand P. Elliot R. Jr. E. David Mazurek.7778 44 a = − 1 ( 27.05 m/s 2 44 0 ∫ 0 a dx = ∫ 27. a=v dv = dx a = 3. Eisenberg.2 a = 27.7778 v dv = a ( x) 44 0 1 = v2 2 ( ) 0 27. William E.7778)2 2 deceleration = − a = 8..7778 − 2.7778 (b) Deceleration during braking.7778 ∫ 0 a dt = ∫ 2. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Phillip J. Russell Johnston.77 m/s 2 a = − 8.7778 v dt 100 km/h = 27. Solution 35. 10 km/h = 2.7778 m/s 8. .

2 ) + (1. Elliot R.04878 t x = ∫ 0 v dv = ∫ 0 2. Phillip J. 10 km/h = 2. 8/e.2 ) 2 t 8. Eisenberg. Jr.52439 )( 8.3 m (b) Elapsed time for braking test. Russell Johnston.7778 )( 8.2 x = 125.7778 = − 8. a= dv dt 100 km/h = 27. Clausen.7778 m/s (a) Distance traveled during start test.04878 m/s 2 8.7778 = 3.7682 m/s 2 a= dv dt ∫ 0 a dt = ∫ v0 dv t v at = v − v0 t= v − v0 0 − 27..COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Solution 36. E.7778 + 3.7778 m/s ∫ 0 a dt = ∫ v0 dv a= v − v0 t t v at = v − v0 a= 27.77782 2x ( 2 )( 44 ) ( ) ( ) = − 8. David Mazurek. Beer. William E. .04878 t ) dt = ( 2.7778 + 3. a=v dv dx ∫ 0 a dx = ∫ v0 v dv x v ax = a= v 2 v0 2 − 2 2 1 2 1 2 v − v0 = 0 − 27. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.7682 a t = 3.7778 − 2.17 s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.2 v = v0 + at = 2. Ferdinand P.

Elliot R. William E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Phillip J. 8/e. David Mazurek. v0 = v A = 0. Beer. 1 2 1 2 at = at 2 2 and t = 30 s a = 6 ft/s 2 vB = 180 ft/s x0 = x A = 0 (1) (2) x = xB = 2700 ft a= 2 x ( 2 )( 2700 ) = t2 ( 30 )2 (b) Then. Eisenberg. Constant acceleration. (a) Solving (2) for a. Solution 37. Jr. Clausen. Russell Johnston. . v = v0 + at = at x = x0 + v0t + At point B.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Ferdinand P.. E. vB = at = ( 6 )( 30 ) Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.

from (3). .5v0 2⎝ 2 ⎠ 1 v0 = 60 ft/s 2 a= 60 − 120 60 =− ft/s 2 = − 10 ft/s 2 6 6 v = 120 − 10t x = 0 + 120t − 1 (10 ) t 2 2 At stopping. Solution 38. William E. Phillip J. Eisenberg. Clausen.. Beer. x0 = 0 v = v0 + at x = x0 + v0t + a= x = x0 + v0t + v= 540 = v= Then. Ferdinand P. Substituting into (1) and (2). (3) Then. 1 v − v0 2 1 1 t = x0 + ( v0 + v ) t = ( v0 + v ) t 2 t 2 2 x6 = 540 ft or v0 = 540 = 120 ft/s 4. 1 v0 2 v − v0 t 1 2 at 2 (1) (2) Solving (1) for a. Elliot R. Jr. and 1⎛ 1 ⎞ ⎜ v0 + v0 ⎟ ( 6 ) = 4.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Constant acceleration. v = 0 or 120 − 10ts = 0 ts = 12 s 1 (10 )(12 )2 = 720 ft 2 Δt = 6 s Δd = 180 ft x = 0 + (120 )(12 ) − (a) Additional time for stopping = 12 s − 6 s (b) Additional distance for stopping = 720 ft − 540 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. 8/e. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Russell Johnston. E. David Mazurek.5 At t = 6 s.

Jr. David Mazurek.96 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Elliot R.40 t = 51. Beer.40 m/s t = 25 + 25. Ferdinand P.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. (a) During the acceleration phase x = x0 + v0t + 1 2 at 2 Using x0 = 0. 8/e. v f = v0 + at = 0 + ( 0. Solution 39. Eisenberg. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.416 )( 25 ) (c) The remaining distance for the constant speed phase is Δx = 400 − 130 = 270 m For constant velocity. E. William E.96 s v 10.416 m/s (b) Final velocity is reached at t = 25 s. . and v0 = 0.0 s v f = 10. Total time for run: Δt = Δx 270 = = 25. Clausen. a= ( 2 )(130 ) ( 25)2 a = 0. Russell Johnston.. and solving for a gives a= 2x t2 Noting that x = 130 m when t = 25 s. Phillip J.

Choose t = 0 at end of powered flight. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. y1 = 27.81) 2 ymax = 328 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.81)(16 )2 16 = 76. Beer. 8/e.81 m/s 2 t = 16 s. y f = 0 y f = y1 + v1t + y f − y1 + t v1 = gt 2 = 0 − 27. Then. Eisenberg. David Mazurek. v=0 2 2 v 2 = v1 + 2a ( y − y1 ) = v1 − 2 g ( y − y1 ) y = y1 − 2 v 2 − v1 2g ymax = 27.. Solution 40. Clausen.8 m/s (b) When the rocket reaches its maximum altitude ymax . 1 2 1 at = y1 + v1t − gt 2 2 2 1 2 (a) When y reaches the ground.76 ) ( 2 )( 9.5 + 1 2 ( 9.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. William E.5 m and a = − g = − 9. Russell Johnston. Jr.5 − 0 − ( 76.76 m/s v1 = 76. Elliot R. Ferdinand P. Phillip J. . E. Constant acceleration.

120 − 6t = 0.375t 2 m Motion of bus.375 t 2 0.75 and − 27. 8/e. x A = ( 0. a A = 0. ( vA )0 = 0. Motion of auto. ( vB )0 = − 6 m/s. aB = 0 xB = ( xB )0 − ( vB )0 t = ( xB )0 − 6t m At t = 20 s. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies..375 t 2 + 6 t − 120 = 0 t= t= Reject the negative root.75 ) t 2 2 ⎝2⎠ ( xB )0 = ?.4 m 2 − 6 ± (6) 2 − ( 4 )( 0.75 m/s 2 x A = ( x A )0 + ( v A )0 t + x A = 0.375 )(11.4 m x = 50. Corresponding values of xA and xB.596 ) = 50. xB = x A.596 s 0.4 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. William E. xB = 0. David Mazurek. ( x A )0 = 0. Eisenberg. Place origin at 0. xB = 120 − 6 t ( xB )0 = 120 m When the vehicles pass each other. E. Elliot R.375) − 6 ± 14.596 ) = 50.697 = 11. Jr. Solution 41.6 s t = 11.375 )( −120 ) ( 2 )( 0. Russell Johnston. Clausen. 0 = ( xB )0 − ( 6 )( 20 ) Hence. 1 ⎛1⎞ a At 2 = 0 + 0 + ⎜ ⎟ ( 0. Ferdinand P. Beer.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Phillip J.60 s xB = 120 − ( 6 )(11. .

Phillip J.3889 m/s.63 s A moves 68.1667 m/s. Russell Johnston.6343) + ( 0.4 )( 9.13 km/h Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.4 m/s 2 Motion of B: ( xB )0 = 25 m. t = 9.6343) − ( 0.3t 2 2 = 23 km/h = 6.8 km/h vB = 9. a A = 0.3889 − ( 0.4t xB = ( xB )0 + ( vB )0 t + (a) When and where A overtakes B.6343) = 9.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Jr.22222 − ( 4 )( 0.1667 + ( 0. ( v A )0 = 15 km/h = 4.19 s Reject the negative root. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.2222t − 25 = 0 t= 2. Clausen. Elliot R.3889t − 0.1667 + 0.3889 − 0. Eisenberg. 8/e.1667 t + 0. Place the origin at A when t = 0.2222 ± 2. aB = − 0. David Mazurek.3889 t − 0. William E.6343 s and − 5.4120 = 9.1667 )( 9.2 t 2 2 x A = xB 4.6343) = 68.3 t 2 = 25 + 6.2 )( 9.2 t 2 0.2222 ± 7.6343) = 68.5) t = 2.0 m B moves 43. Beer. .3889 )( 9. v A = 4.947 m/s vB = 6.5 )( − 25 ) ( 2 )( 0. x A = ( 4.5t 2 − 2. Motion of A: ( x A )0 = 0.6 m/s 2 v A = ( v A )0 + a At = 4. 1 aBt 2 = 25 + 6. ( vB )0 vB = ( vB )0 + aBt = 6.0 m xB = 25 + ( 6.6t x A = ( x A )0 + ( v A )0 t + 1 a At 2 = 4.6343) = 2. Ferdinand P. E.1667 t + 0..0 m 2 2 .6 )( 9. Solution 42.3)( 9.0 m (b) Corresponding speeds.535 m/s v A = 35.

012099 t 2 At point B. Russell Johnston. Constant acceleration ( a1 and a2 ) for horses 1 and 2.6t + 0. William E.053070 ft/s 2 = ⎣ 2 2 t2 ( 62.6 = 49. a1 = x − v1t1 2 ⎡1200 − ( 20. (a) x1 − x2 = 0 tB = 2 − 0.0 ) a2 = Calculating x1 − x2 .028872 ) − ( − 0. . (b) x1 − x2 = − ( 0.5) x − v2t2 2 ⎡1200 − ( 21)( 62. Horse 1: Horse 2: xB = ( 20. Jr.59 ) + xB = 976 ft xB = ( 21)( 49.5 ) ⎤ ⎦ = − 0. Phillip J.4 )( 49. David Mazurek. Solution 43. E. Let x = 0 and t = 0 when the horses are at point A. 2 ( x − v0t ) t2 Using x = 1200 ft and the initial velocities and elapsed times for each horse.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.86 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.59 ) + When horse 1 crosses the finish line at t = 61. x = v0t + a= 1 2 at 2 Solving for a.6 )( 61. Then.4 − 21) t + = − 0.053070 ) ⎤ t 2 ⎦ 2⎣ x1 − x2 = ( 20. Clausen.4 )( 61..012099 1 ( − 0. x1 − x2 = ( v1 − v2 ) t + 1 ( a1 − a2 ) t 2 2 1 ⎡( − 0.6tB + 0.5 ) Δx = 8. Ferdinand P.012099 )( 61.028872 ft/s 2 = ⎣ 2 2 t1 ( 61. Eisenberg.59 )2 2 1 ( −0.0 ) ⎤ ⎦ = − 0.5 ) + ( 0. Beer.59 s 0.028872 )( 49. Elliot R.5 s.59 )2 = 976 ft 2 2 Calculating xB using data for either horse. 8/e.05307 )( 49.012099 t B = 0 0.

Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Clausen. v0t E − Solving for v0 .35 s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. 2 t ≥ tB Rocket B: xB = v0 ( t − t B ) − For simultaneous explosions at x A = xB = 240 ft when t = t E .2 2 = 6.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Choose x positive upward. Ferdinand P. . Then. 8/e. Beer. David Mazurek. tE = 2 ( ) = 4± ( 4 )2 + ( 4)(1)( 2)( 240) 32. Russell Johnston. 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 2 gt E = v0 ( t E − t B ) − g ( t E − t B ) = v0t E − v0t B − gt E + gt E t B − gt B 2 2 2 2 v0 = gt E − gt B 2 or 2 t E − t Bt E − (1) 2xA =0 g gt  1 2  x A =  gt E − B  t E − gt E . E. Jr. 2  2  2 t B ± t B + ( 4 )(1) 2 xA g Solving for t E . Solution 44. Rocket launch data: Constant acceleration a = − g Rocket A: x = 0. Eisenberg. v = v0 . Elliot R. Phillip J. v = v0 . William E. when t = t E . t = t B = 4 s Rocket B: Velocities: Rocket A: v A = v0 − gt Rocket B: vB = v0 − g ( t − t B ) Positions: Rocket A: x A = v0t − 1 2 gt 2 1 2 g ( t − tB ) .. t = 0 x = 0.

At time t E . 8/e. Beer. Clausen. v0 = ( 32. Eisenberg.2 )( 4 ) Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Ferdinand P. Elliot R.2 )( 4 ) 2 v0 = 140..COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System (a) From equation (1). Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.8 ft/s (b) vB − v A = gt B = ( 32. Russell Johnston. William E.0 ft/s vB = v0 − g ( t E − t B ) vB/ A = 128.2 )( 6. David Mazurek. E. Phillip J. Jr. .348 ) − v A = v0 − gt E ( 32.

Beer.08 m/s 2 (b) x A = ( x A )0 + ( v A )0 t + 1 aBt 2 2 1 x A − x B = ( x A ) 0 − ( x B ) 0 + ⎡ ( v A ) 0 − ( vB ) 0 ⎤ t + ( a A − a B ) t 2 ⎣ ⎦ 2 When t = 0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. 8/e. Elliot R.67 8 1 a At 2 2 xB = ( x B ) 0 + ( vB ) 0 t + a A = 2. David Mazurek. ( v A )0 = 168 km/h = 46. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.1875 = 2.27 m/s 2 x A − xB = 0 1 ( a A − aB )(8)2 .67 m/s v A = 228 km/h = 63. 2 or aB = a A + 1. Solution 45. E. William E. Jr.1875 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. (a) Acceleration of A.33 m/s At t = 8 s.1875 aB = 3. Clausen.08 + 1. When t = 8 s. aA = v A − ( v A )0 t = 63.. Russell Johnston. Hence. . v A = ( v A )0 + a At .33 − 46. Eisenberg. ( x A )0 − ( xB )0 = 38 m 0 = 38 + and ( vB ) 0 − ( v A ) 0 = 0 a A − aB = − 1. Phillip J. Ferdinand P.

667 m/s vB = ( vB )0 + aB ( t − 5 ) = − 26. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. aA t1 = 180 7 180 160 gives −5= aA aA aA 7 180u − 5 = 160u 2 Let u = or 160u 2 − 7 180u + 5 = 0 continued Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.. Phillip J.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Beer. x A = 90 m 2 t1 = 2 x A ( 2 )( 90 ) 180 = = aA aA aA and v A = a At1 For 0 ≤ t ≤ 5 s. Elliot R. William E. 8/e.667 6 6 1 a A ( t1 − 5 ) 6 or 7t1 − 5 = 160 aA 1 aA ( t − 5) 6 When vehicles pass. Solution 46. vB = ( vB )0 = − 96 km/h = − 26. v A = ( v A )0 + a At and and and x A = ( x A )0 + ( v A )0 t = 1 a At 2 2 Using ( v A )0 = 0 v A = a At ( xA )0 = 0 gives xA = 1 a At 2 2 When cars pass at t = t1. E. David Mazurek. Eisenberg. For t > 5 s. . Using 1 . Russell Johnston. Clausen. (a) Acceleration of A. Ferdinand P. Jr.667 − 7 5 a At1 − a A = 26.667 + v A = − vB a At1 = 26.

285. Phillip J. Elliot R.667 )( 5 ) = d − 133. u = 7 180 ± ( 49 )(180 ) − ( 4 )(160 )( 5) ( 2 )(160 ) and 0. Ferdinand P. Beer. (c) Distance d.667t xB = d − ( 22.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Solving the quadratic equation.590 Reject 0.. At t = 5 s. E. Jr. Clausen. . David Mazurek. a A = 3.794 s.667 ( t − 5 ) + 1 2 aB ( t − 5 ) 2 1  3.29 d = 278 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.33 − ( 26.59 m/s 2 t = t1 = 7.590 m/s The corresponding values for t1 are t1 = 180 = 0.08 s xB = ( xB )0 − ( vB )0 t = d − 26.08 ) + ( 2 )( 6 ) 2 d = 90 + 133. Thus.33 − 26.0592125 aA = 3.794 s since it is less than 5 s.52776 and 1 = 285. William E.08 s 3. Russell Johnston.08) − 133.33 + 55.33 + ( vB )0 ( t − 5 ) + xB = d − 133.2 m/s u2 = 93. Eisenberg. 90 = d xB = x A = 90 ( 3.667 )( 2.08 s.33 xB = d − 133.915 ± 74. 8/e.59 )( 2.2 and t1 = 180 = 7.967 320 = 0.59  2  6  (t − 5) 2  When t = t1 = 7. (b) Time of passing. 0 ≤ t ≤ 5 s. For t > 5 s. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.47 − 1.

Solution 47. William E.8541) vB = ( vB )0 + aB ( t − 2 ) = 0 + (11.5 )( 7. Jr.4t + 23. E.7 )( t − 2 ) 2 2 or For x A = xB .5 ) t 2 2 2 or x A = 3. .8541 − 2 ) Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Russell Johnston.. Elliot R.25 )( 7.7 )( 7. xB = 5. For t > 0. x A = ( x A )0 + ( v A )0 t + 1 1 a At 2 = 0 + 0 + ( 6.85t 2 − 23.4 3.60t 2 − 23. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. t = 1.1459 and t = 7.1 ft/s vB = 68.4 = 0 or Solving the quadratic equation. Phillip J. Ferdinand P.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.85t 2 − 23.4t + 23.25t 2 = 5. David Mazurek.8541 s Reject the smaller value since it is less than 5 s. (a ) x A = xB = ( 3. 8/e.4. Eisenberg. Beer.25t 2 For t > 2 s.85 ( t − 2 ) = 5. 2.4t + 23.8541) 2 t = 7. xB = ( x B ) 0 + ( v B ) 0 ( t − 2 ) + 2 1 1 2 2 aB ( t − 2 ) = 0 + 0 + (11.85 s x = 200 ft v A = 51.5 ft/s (b) v A = ( v A )0 + a At = 0 + ( 6. Clausen.

2t + ( − 0.. Clausen.895 ft/s 2 a A = 0. William E.7 ft/s vB = 77. Phillip J.7 s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.988 ft/s 2 (b) When vehicles pass each other x A = xB .2 + ( − 0. Beer.988 )( 20.93t + 3273. ( x A )0 = 0 and ( xB )0 = 0. Ferdinand P.6 ft and ( vA )0 = 68 mi/h = 99.0465t 2 − 156.62 mi = 3273. Reject the negative value.73)( 40 ) ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ ( 40 ) = − 0. David Mazurek.895) t 2 = 3273.6 = 0 Solving the quadratic equation. 1 a At 2 2 2 or aA = 2 ⎡3273. E.2 ft/s 2 ⎡ x A − ( x A ) 0 − ( v A )0 t ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ t2 (a) Uniform accelerations. vB = ( vB )0 + aBt = − 57. Jr.988 ft/s 2 aB = 0. ( x A )0 + ( v A )0 t + 0 + 99. (c) Speed of B. Eisenberg.7 s and − 3390 s t = 20.988) t 2 2 2 −0. Then.73t + 1 1 a At 2 = ( xB )0 + ( vB )0 t + aBt 2 2 2 1 1 ( − 0.895 ft/s 2 xB = ( x B ) 0 + ( v B ) 0 + aB = 1 aBt 2 2 2 or aB = 2 ⎡ x B − ( x B ) 0 − ( vB ) 0 t ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ t2 2 ⎡0 − 3273.7 ft/s t = 20.6 − 0 − ( 99.6 − ( − 57. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Russell Johnston. Solution 48.2 )( 42 ) ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ ( 42 ) = − 0. Let x be the position relative to point P. Then. Elliot R. Also. .73 ft/s x A = ( x A )0 + ( v A )0 t + aA = ( vB )0 = − 39 mi/h = − 57.7 ) = − 77.6 − 57. 8/e.

v A = 1 m/s Constraint of cable supporting A: x A + ( x A − xB ) = constant 2v A − vB = 0 or vB = 2v A = ( 2 )(1) = 2 m/s Constraint of cable supporting B: 2 xB + xC = constant vC + 2vB = 0 (a) (b) (c) vB/ A = vB − v A = 2 − 1 xD + xC = constant. Phillip J. Russell Johnston. Solution 49.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Clausen. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Elliot R. E. . Eisenberg. Ferdinand P. vD + vC = 0 vD = − vC = 4 m/s vD/ A = vD − v A = 4 − 1 or vC = − 2vB = − ( 2 )( 2 ) = − 4 m/s vC = 4 m/s v B/ A = 1 m/s v D/ A = 3 m/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. 8/e. William E. Jr. David Mazurek.. Beer. Let x be positive downward for all blocks and for point D.

16 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.. Solution 50.08 )( 2 ) = − 0.16 m/s ΔxB = 1 1 2 aBt 2 = ( −0.16 m 2 2 ΔvB = 0. v A and a A are up. Beer. or vC = − 2vB . i. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Constraint of cable supporting A: x A + ( x A − xB ) = constant 2v A − vB = 0 or vB = 2v A and aB = 2a A Constraint of cable supporting B: 2 xB + xC = constant 2vB + vC = 0. Jr.2 )2 − 0 = − 0. 8/e.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. William E. Elliot R.08 )( 2 ) = − 0.e. Let x be positive downward for all blocks.16 m/s ΔxB = 0.08 m/s 2 ΔvB = aBt = ( − 0. negative. Russell Johnston. Phillip J.04 m/s 2 aC = 0. Clausen. Eisenberg. 2 2 v A − ( v A )0 = 2a A ⎡ x A − ( x A )0 ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ 2 v A − ( v A )0 2 (a ) a A = 2 ⎡ x A − ( x A )0 ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ = ( 0.5) aC = − 4a A a A = 0.16 m/s 2 (b) aB = 2a A = ( 2 )( − 0. and aC = − 2aB = − 4a A Since vC and aC are down.04 m/s2 ( 2 )( − 0. David Mazurek. E.04 ) = − 0. Ferdinand P. .

Jr. 1 v A = − 2vC = − (2)(4) 2 (b) Velocity of block D. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. vD = 1 v A = − 4 ft/s 2 vD = 4 ft/s v A = − 8 ft/s v A = 8 ft/s x A + xB = constant vB = − v A xB + 2 xD = constant or 1 1 vD = − v B = v A 2 2 ( xC − xB ) + ( xC − xD ) = constant or 2vC + v A − 1 vA = 0 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Constraint of cable AB: v A + vB = 0 Constraint of cable BED: vB + 2vD = 0 Constraint of cable BCD: 2vC − vB − vD = 0 (a) Velocity of block A. Elliot R. C.. . Clausen. William E. 8/e. Eisenberg. and D relative to the upper supports. xC. Phillip J. xB. Beer. David Mazurek. increasing downward.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Russell Johnston. E. Let xA. and xD be the displacements of blocks A. B. Solution 51. Ferdinand P.

Beer. upward. xD. Jr. Elliot R. Then. vC and aC are positive. vA and aA are negative. C. E. Solution 52. Ferdinand P. xC. . Relative motion: v A/D = v A − vD = a A/D = a A − aD = 1 vA 2 1 aA 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Russell Johnston. Let xA. Clausen. vD and aD are negative. increasing downward. Constraint of cable AB: v A + vB = 0 a A + aB = 0 x A + xB = constant vB = − v A aB = − a A xB + 2 xD = constant Constraint of cable BED: vB + 2vD = 0 a B + 2aD = 0 1 1 v D = − vB = v A 2 2 1 1 aD = − a A = a A 2 2 ( xC − xB ) + ( xC − xD ) = constant Constraint of cable BCD: 2vC − vB − vD = 0 2aC − aB − aD = 0 2vC + v A = 0 2aC + 1 aA = 0 2 1 aC = − a A 4 Since block C moves downward. xB. B. 8/e..e. Eisenberg. David Mazurek. and D and cable point E relative to the upper supports. William E. Also. Phillip J.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. and xE be the displacements of blocks A. i. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Jr. Phillip J. 8/e. E. David Mazurek.2 ft/s 2 1 aC = − a A = 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.. Elliot R. Eisenberg. Russell Johnston.2 ft/s 2 5 aC = 0. a A = 2a A/D = 2v A/D t = (2)(8) = 3.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System (a) Acceleration of block C.8 ft/s 2 a A = − 3. aE = − aB = a A = − 3.2 ft/s 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Beer. William E. Ferdinand P.8 ft/s 2 4 Constraint of cable portion BE: vB + vE = 0 xB + xE = constant aB + aE = 0 (b) Acceleration of point E. Clausen.2 ft/s 2 aE = 3. .

David Mazurek.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. increasing to the left. Eisenberg. v A = − 2vB = − ( 2 )( 300 ) = − 600 mm/s (b) Velocity of point C of cable. . Solution 53. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 8/e. Jr. Clausen. E. vC/B = vC − vB = 1200 − 300 = 900 mm/s vC/B = 900 mm/s vC = 1200 mm/s v A = 600 mm/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Russell Johnston. Phillip J. Let x be position relative to the right supports. William E. vC = − 2v A = − ( 2 )( −600 ) = 1200 mm/s (c) Velocity of point C relative to collar B. Beer. Constraint of entire cable: 2 x A + xB + ( xB − x A ) = constant 2vB + v A = 0 Constraint of point C of cable: v A = − 2vB 2 x A + xC = constant 2v A + vC = 0 vC = − 2v A (a) Velocity of collar A.. Elliot R. Ferdinand P.

67 mm/s 3 aA = v A − ( v A )0 t = − 406.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.4 )( 6 ) 2 2 vB = 152. Jr. David Mazurek. E. Russell Johnston. Ferdinand P. Clausen. 1 vB = − v A . Let x be position relative to the right supports. William E.8 ) 2 2 aB = 25.8 mm/s2 8 a A = 50. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. or 2 v A = − v B/A 3 or 2 x A + xB + ( xB − x A ) = constant. Eisenberg. Beer.5 mm/s ΔxB = 458 mm Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.4 )( 6 ) xB − ( xB )0 = ( vB )0t + 1 1 2 aBt 2 = ( 25.8 mm/s 2 1 1 aB = − a A = − ( −50. increasing to the left.4 mm/s 2 (b) Velocity and change in position of B after 6 s. Phillip J. 2 and 1 aB = − a A 2 2 ( 610 ) = − 406. (a) Accelerations of A and B.67 − 0 = − 50. vB = ( vB )0 + aBt = 0 + ( 25. . Elliot R.. 8/e. 1 vB/A = vB − v A = − v A − v A 2 vA = − v A − ( v A )0 = a At . Solution 54. Constraint of entire cable: 2vB + v A = 0.

At the right anchor.512 ) = − 0./s 2 a A = 0. Clausen.768 )( 4 ) (c) Velocity of block B after 4 s. . Elliot R./s Change in position of block B. Solution 55./s 2 aB = 0. Ferdinand P.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. x = d . Beer. xB − ( xB ) 0 = ( vB ) 0 t + 1 1 2 aBt 2 = ( 6 )( 4 ) + ( − 0.512 ) vB = ( vB )0 + aBt = 6 + ( − 0. Eisenberg./s 2 aD = 0.512 in. David Mazurek. vB = 2. E.86 in.512 in. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Jr. William E. Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.768 in. or or xB + ( xB − x A ) + 2 ( d − x A ) = constant vA = 2 vB 3 and aA = 2 aB 3 (d vD = − v A 2 3 − x A + d − xD ) = constant and aD = − a A ( vB )0 = 6 in.768 )( 4 ) 2 2 ΔxB = 17. 8/e. Constraint of cable: 2vB − 3v A = 0 Constraint of point D of cable: v A + vD = 0 (a) Accelerations of A and B. 2 ⎡ x A − ( x A )0 ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ = ( 2.4 )2 − ( 4 )2 ( 2 )(10 ) = − 0. Phillip J./s 2 2 2 aD = − a A = − ( − 0.768 in./s 2 2 v A − ( v A ) 0 = 2a A ⎡ x A − ( x A ) 0 ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ 2 v A − ( v A )0 2 aA = aB = (b) Acceleration of point D..93 in. Let x be position relative to left anchor. Russell Johnston.512 in./s ( vA )0 = ( 6 ) = 4 in./s 2 3 3 a A = ( 0.

00 in. Ferdinand P.. Constraint of entire cable: (a) Velocity of A: xB + ( xB − x A ) + 2 ( d − x A ) = constant vA = 2 2 vB = (12 ) 3 3 xB + xB − xC = constant vC = 2vB = 2 (12 ) d − x A + d − xC = constant vD = − v A = − 8. Beer.00 in. At right anchor x = d .00 in./s 2vB − vC = 0 vC = 24 in.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. vD = 8. Solution 56. Jr. Elliot R./s Constraint of point C of cable: (b) Velocity of C: Constraint of point D of cable: (c) Velocity of D: (d) Relative velocity. Eisenberg./s vC/ A = 16. David Mazurek./s 2vB − 3v A = 0 v A = 8.00 in. Let x be position relative to left anchor. Phillip J. Russell Johnston./s vC/ A = vC − v A = 24 − 8 v A + vD = 0. . Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. E. 8/e. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Clausen. William E.

Beer. Phillip J. Solution 57. Jr. E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Elliot R.. Russell Johnston. Ferdinand P. William E. Eisenberg. (a) vB = − 50 mm/s and 4aC − 2aB − 3a A = 0 (1.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Let x be position relative to the anchor. . 8/e. Clausen. David Mazurek. 2) ( va )0 = 100 mm/s ( vC )0 = 50 mm/s ( vC )0 = 1 1 ⎡ 2vB + 3 ( v A ) ⎤ = ⎡( 2 )( − 50 ) + ( 3)(100 ) ⎤ ⎦ 0⎦ ⎣ 4 4⎣ Constraint of point D: ( xD − xA ) + ( xC − x A ) + ( xC − xB ) − xB = constant vD + 2vC − 2v A − 2vB = 0 (b) ( vD )0 = 2 ( v A )0 + 2vB − 2 ( vC )0 = ( 2 )(100 ) + ( 2 )( − 50 ) − ( 2 )( 50 ) xC − ( xC )0 = ( vC )0 t + 1 aC t 2 2 = ⎡ ⎤ 2 ⎣ 40 − ( 50 )( 2 ) ⎦ ( vD ) 0 = 0 (c) aC = 2 ⎡ xC − ( xC )0 − ( vC )0 t ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ t 2 ( 2) 2 = − 30 mm/s 2 aC = 30 mm/s 2 Solving (2) for aA aA = 1 1 ( 4aC − 2aB ) = ⎡( 4 )( −30 ) − ( 2 )( 0 )⎤ = − 40 mm/s2 ⎦ 3 3⎣ a A = 40 mm/s 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Constraint of cable: − xB + ( xC − xB ) + 3 ( xC − x A ) = constant 4vC − 2vB − 3v A = 0 When t = 0. positive to the right.

v A = ( v A )0 − a At ( vA )0 = v A − a At = 420 − ( 270 )( 2 ) = −120 mm/s ( vA )0 = 120 mm/s ( vB )0 = vB − aBt = − 30 − ( −105)( 2 ) vE − 3v A + 2vC = 0 v B = ( vB ) 0 − a B t Constraint of point E: ( vB )0 = 180 mm/s 2 ( xC − x A ) + ( xE − x A ) = constant (c) ( vE )0 = 3 ( vA )0 − 2 ( vC )0 = ( 3)( −120 ) − ( 2 )( 0 ) = − 360 mm/s ( vE )0 = 360 mm/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Jr. Phillip J. Ferdinand P. William E. Eisenberg. David Mazurek. Clausen.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. positive to the right.. Let x be position relative to the anchor. 8/e. Russell Johnston. Beer. Elliot R. E. At t = 2 s. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. . vC = v A = 420 mm/s and vB = − 30 mm/s and 4aC − 2aB − 3a A = 0 1 1 ( 2vB + 3v A ) = ⎡( 2 )( −30 ) + ( 3)( 420 )⎤ = 300 mm/s ⎦ 4 4⎣ ( vC )0 = 0 vC = ( vC )0 + aC t aB = aC = vC − ( vC )0 t = 300 − 0 2 aC = 150 mm/s 2 1 1 ( 4aC − 3a A ) = ⎡( 4 )(150 ) − ( 3)( 270 )⎤ = −105 mm/s2 ⎦ 2 2⎣ aB = 105 mm/s 2 (b) Initial velocities of A and B. Solution 58. Constraint of cable: − xB + ( xC − xB ) + 3 ( xC − x A ) = constant 4vC − 2vB − 3v A = 0 (a) Accelerations of B and C.

/s 0 0 3 1 1 ( aB + 2aA ) = 0 + ( 2 )( − 3. a A = − 3.4 )( 2. Define positions as positive downward from a fixed level. 2 1 xC − ( xC )0 = ( 6 )( 2. Elliot R.. Jr. Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.4 in. vB = ( vB )0 = 18 in. David Mazurek.6 ) = − 2. Russell Johnston.5 in. ( xB − xA ) + ( xC − x A ) + 2 ( xC − xB ) = constant 3xC − xB − 2 x A = constant 3vC − vB − 2v A = 0 3aC − aB − 2a A = 0 Motion of block C.5 ) 2 xC − ( xC )0 = 7. 0 = 6 − 2./s 2 . Solution 59.6 in.5 ) +   ( −2. Ferdinand P. aB = 0 ( vC )0 = aC = 1 ( vB ) + 2 ( v A )  = 6 in.2t xC − ( xC )0 = ( vC )0 t + 1 aC t 2 = 6t − 0. Phillip J. ( v A )0 = 0. . Beer. William E. Constraint of cable./s./s2  3 3 vC = ( vC )0 + aC t = 6 − 1. E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 8/e.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.4t t = 2.5 s (b) Corresponding position of block C. Clausen.6t 2 2 (a) Time at vC = 0. Eisenberg.

8/e.5t 2 − 0.83333t 3 in. . 1 2 3 xC − ( xC )0 = 0 + ⎡( 7. David Mazurek. Solution 60. 1 ⎡ ( vB ) + 2 ( v A ) ⎤ = 0 0 0⎦ 3⎣ ( vB )0 = 0. aB = 15 in. William E. Eisenberg. E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies./s 2 . Define positions as positive downward from a fixed level.. Clausen.5t in.5t 2 = 0 t = 0 and t = 6 s 3 (b) Corresponding position of block C. a A = − 2. Ferdinand P. Phillip J./s2 3 3 t vC = ( vC )0 + ∫ 0 aC dt =0+ xC − ( xC )0 = (a) Time at vC = 0 1 15t − 2.83333)( 6 ) ⎤ ⎥ ⎣ ⎦ 3⎢ 0+ ( ) t =6s xC − ( xC )0 = 30 in. Beer. Jr. Elliot R. Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. ( vA )0 = 0./s 3 ( ) 1 7. Constraint of cable: ( xB − xA ) + ( xC − x A ) + 2 ( xC − xB ) = constant 3xC − xB − 2 x A = constant 3vC − vB − 2v A = 0 3aC − aB − 2a A = 0 Motion of block C. 3 ( ) 1 15t − 2.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11./s 2 ( vC )0 = aC = 1 1 ( aB + 2a A ) = (15 − 5t ) in.5 )( 6 ) − ( 0. Russell Johnston.5t 2 in.

xD − ( x D ) 0 = ( v D ) 0 t + 2vD − v A − vB = 0 (2) aC = aB − 120 aD = a A + 220 (3) (4) or or Substituting (3) and (4) into (1) and (2). vC = ( vC )0 + aC t = 0 + ( 80 )( 6 ) (b) Change in position of D after 10 s. . and C: 2x A + 2 xB + xC = constant. E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 2v A + 2vB + vC = 0 2a A + 2aB + aC = 0 Constraint of cable supporting block D: (1) ( xD − xA ) + ( xD − xB ) = constant.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Let x be position relative to the support taken positive if downward. Clausen. 2aD − aB − a A = 0 Given: Given: aC/B = aC − aB = −120 aD/ A = aD − a A = 220 2a A + 2aB + ( aB − 120 ) = 0 2 ( a A + 220 ) − a A − aB = 0 Solving (5) and (6) simultaneously. (a) Velocity of C after 6 s. Phillip J. Elliot R. or or 2a A + 3aB = 120 a A − aB = − 440 (5) (6) and and aB = 200 mm/s 2 aD = − 20 mm/s 2 aC = 80 mm/s 2 vC = 480 mm/s 1 1 2 aDt 2 = 0 + ( − 20 )(10 ) = −1000 mm 2 2 ΔxD = 1. Ferdinand P. David Mazurek. Jr.000 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Beer.. a A = − 240 mm/s 2 From (3) and (4). Solution 61. Eisenberg. B. Constraint of cable connecting blocks A. William E. Russell Johnston. 8/e.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. David Mazurek. ( vB/A )0 = 0 ( vB/A ) − ( vB/A )0 = 2aP/A ⎡ xB/A − ( xB/A )0 ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ aB/ A = 2 ( xB − x A ) 2 vB/ A 2 vB/ A − 0 = 2aB/ A ( xB − x A − 0 ) = 402 = 10 mm/s 2 2 (160 − 80 ) xB/ A = xB/ A t2 = ( )0 + ( vB/A )0 t + 1 aB/At 2 = 0 + 0 + 1 aB/At 2 2 2 . Eisenberg. Phillip J. 2 2 ( xA )0 = ( xB )0 = ( xC )0 . 2v A + 2vB + vC = 0. 2aD − a A − aB = 0. Beer. (b) xD − ( x D ) 0 aD = 2vD − v A − vB = 0 1 1 ( a A + aB ) = (10 + 20 ) = 15 mm/s 2 2 1 1 2 = ( vD )0 t + aDt 2 = 0 + (15 )( 5 ) ΔxD = 187. Elliot R. Jr. Let x be position relative to the support taken positive if downward. 2a A + 2aB + aC = 0 ( vA )0 = ( vB )0 = ( vC )0 = 0. E. B. ( xB/A )0 = 0. Ferdinand P.5 mm 2 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. or t= 2 ( xB − x A ) aB/ A = 2 (160 − 80 ) 10 =4s 1 a At 2 2 2 2xB/ A aB/ A x A − ( x A )0 = ( v A )0 t + (a) aA = 2 ⎡ x A − ( x A )0 − ( v A )0 t ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ t 2 = 2 ( 80 − 0 ) ( 4) a A = 10 mm/s 2 aB = 20 mm/s 2 aB = a A + aB/ A = 10 + 10 aC = − ( 2aB + 2a A ) = − ⎡( 2 )( 20 ) + ( 2 )(10 ) ⎤ = − 60 mm/s ⎣ ⎦ vC = ( vC )0 + aC t Constraint of cable supporting block D: t= vC − ( vC )0 aC = − 300 − 0 =5s − 60 ( xD − xA ) + ( xD − xB ) = constant. and C: 2 x A + 2 xB + xC = constant. Constraint of cable connecting blocks A. William E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.. Clausen. Russell Johnston. 8/e. Solution 62. .

Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. William E. Clausen. Eisenberg. Beer. A6 = − 4 m A7 = 4 m x−t curve x0 = 0 x4 = x0 + A3 = 16 m x6 = x4 + A4 = 12 m x10 = x6 + A5 = − 4 m x12 = x10 + A6 = − 8 m v14 = 4 m/s (a) (b) Distance traveled: 0 ≤ t ≤ 4 s. David Mazurek. Elliot R.. A4 = − 4 m A5 = −16 m. . Ferdinand P. x14 = x12 + A7 d1 = 16 − 0 = 16 m x14 = − 4 m 4 s ≤ t ≤ 12 s. a−t curve A1 = −12 m/s. A2 = 8 m/s (a) v−t curve v6 = − 4 m/s v0 = v6 − A1 = − 4 − ( −12 ) = 8 m/s v10 = − 4 m/s (b) v14 = v10 + A2 = − 4 + 8 A3 = 16 m. 12 s ≤ t ≤ 14 s. Jr. Solution 63. Phillip J. Total distance traveled: d 2 = − 8 − 16 = 24 m d3 = − 4 − ( − 8 ) = 4 m d = 16 + 24 + 4 d = 44 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Russell Johnston. 8/e. E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.

A2 = 8 m/s v−t curve v0 = 8 m/s v6 = v0 + A1 = 8 + ( −12 ) = − 4 m/s v10 = v6 = − 4 m/s v14 = v10 + A2 = − 4 + 8 = 4 m/s A3 = 16 m. A6 = − 4 m A7 = 4 m x−t curve x0 = 0 x4 = x0 + A3 = 16 m x6 = x4 + A4 = 12 m x10 = x6 + A5 = − 4 m x12 = x10 + A6 = − 8 m x14 = x12 + A7 = − 4 m (b) Time for x > 8 m. Jr. William E. Beer. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Eisenberg.. dx = v = 8 − 2t dt continued Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. . A4 = − 4 m A5 = −16 m. Solution 64. (a) Construction of the curves. Phillip J. a−t curve A1 = −12 m/s. this is time interval t1 to t2. David Mazurek. From the x−t diagram. 8/e. E. Elliot R. Ferdinand P. Russell Johnston. Clausen. Over 0 < t < 6 s.

t1 = 8± (8)2 − ( 4 )(1)(8) ( 2 )(1) = 4 ± 2.172 s and 6.828 s The larger root is out of range. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.828 = 1.172 s Over 6 < t < 10. Elliot R.83 s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. 8/e. Clausen. thus t1 = 1. using limits x = 0 when t = 0 and x = 8 m when t = t1 x or 8 0 = 8t − t 2    t or 0 2 8 = 8t1 − t1 t12 − 8t1 + 8 = 0 Solving the quadratic equation. Eisenberg.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Integrating.. Phillip J. Russell Johnston. Ferdinand P. Beer. . William E. Jr. Required time interval: x = 12 − 4 ( t − 6 ) = 36 − 4t 8 = 36 − 4t2 or t2 = 7 s ( t2 − t1 ) = 5. E. Setting x = 8. David Mazurek.

Elliot R. 8/e. E. Clausen. Solution 65. Beer.5 ft/s 2 18 − 10 −18 − 18 = − 3 ft/s 2 30 − 18 a=0 Points on the x–t curve may be calculated using areas of the v–t curve. David Mazurek. A1 = (10)(6) = 60 ft A2 = A3 = A4 = 1 (6 + 18)(18 − 10) = 96 ft 2 1 (18)(24 − 18) = 54 ft 2 1 (−18)(30 − 24) = − 54 ft 2 x0 = − 48 ft x10 = x0 + A1 = 12 ft x18 = x10 + A2 = 108 ft x24 = x18 + A3 = 162 ft x30 = x24 + A4 = 108 ft x40 = x30 + A5 = − 72 ft continued A5 = (−18)(40 − 30) = −180 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. William E. The a–t curve is just the slope of the v–t curve. Eisenberg. Jr. Phillip J. 18 s < t < 30 s. Ferdinand P. 0 < t < 10 s. 10 s < t < 18 s.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. . Russell Johnston. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 30 s < t < 40 s a= a= a=0 18 − 6 = 1..

. Maximum value of x occurs When v = 0. 8/e. Elliot R. Clausen. Ferdinand P. t = 18 s and t = 30 s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. From the x–t curve. William E. t = 24 s. Jr. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Eisenberg.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System (a) Maximum value of x. E. xmax = 162 ft (b) Time s when x = 108 ft. . i. Russell Johnston.e. David Mazurek. Beer. Phillip J.

Data from problem 11. 8/e. E.5 ft/s 2 ! 18 − 10 18 s < t < 30 s.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.. Elliot R. Ferdinand P. Solution 66. William E. Eisenberg. Jr. A1 = (10)(6) = 60 ft A2 = A3 = A4 = 1 (6 + 18)(18 − 10) = 96 ft 2 1 (18)(24 − 18) = 54 ft 2 1 (−18)(30 − 24) = − 54 ft 2 A5 = (−18)(40 − 30) = −180 ft x0 = − 48 ft ! x10 = x0 + A1 = 12 ft ! x18 = x10 + A2 = 108 ft ! x24 = x18 + A3 = 162 ft ! x30 = x24 + A4 = 108 ft ! x40 = x30 + A5 = − 72 ft ! continued Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. −18 − 18 = − 3 ft/s 2 ! 30 − 18 a=0! ! Points on the x–t curve may be calculated using areas of the v–t curve. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 30 s < t < 40 s. Phillip J. Clausen. David Mazurek. Russell Johnston. a=0! 18 − 6 = 1.65: 0 < t < 10 s. . 10 s < t < 18 s. a= a= x0 = − 48 ft The a–t curve is just the slope of the v–t curve. Beer.

Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Eisenberg. 8/e. .. In the range Set x = 0. E. Beer. Russell Johnston. x = x30 + v30 (t − 30) = 108 + (−18)(t − 30) = 648 − 18t Set x = 0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System (a) Total distance traveled during 0 ≤ t ≤ 30 s . Jr. Elliot R. Ferdinand P. d1 = x24 − x0 = 210 ft d 2 = x30 − x24 = 54 ft d = d1 + d 2 d = 264 ft ! (b) Values of t for which x = 0. For 0 ≤ t ≤ 24 s For 24 s ≤ t ≤ 30 s Total distance. 0 ≤ t ≤ 10 s x = x0 + v0t = − 48 + 6t − 48 + 6t1 = 0 t1 = 8 s ! In the range 30 s < t < 40 s. William E. David Mazurek. Phillip J. 648 − 18t2 = 0 t2 = 36 s ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Clausen.

Russell Johnston. 2 Δx = total area. Solution 67. Elliot R. Clausen. A2 .224 s and 37. 144 = 60 + t1 + 2t1 ( 20 − t1 ) or t1 = Reject the larger root./s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. William E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Distance traveled: Δx = 12 ft = 144 in. E.45 vmax = 7. David Mazurek./s A2 = 1 ( Δv ) t1 = t12 in. 2 t1 − 40t1 + 84 = 0 40 ± 402 − ( 4 )(1)( 84 ) ( 2 )(1) = 2. Eisenberg. Label areas A1.45 in.. Δv = at1 = 2t1 in.224 s t1 = 2. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 8/e. 2 A3 = ( Δv )( 20 − t1 ) = 2t1 ( 20 − t1 ) in. Jr.8 s Δv = 2t1 = 4. and A3 A1 = ( 3)( 20 ) = 60 in./s vmax = 3 + Δv = 3 + 4. Phillip J. . Sketch v − t curve as shown. Ferdinand P. Beer.45 in.

3 ft/s 2 Changes in position: Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.1 s Δv ( − 44 ) − ( −180 ) = Δt 0. Elliot R.893 s −112 −1700 = 38. Then v is negative for decent and a is positive for deceleration. Clausen. Russell Johnston.64 s − 44 −100 = 4.55 s − 22 t1 + t2 + t3 = 44. Areas of v−t curve: A1 = − 1 (180 + 44 ) t1 = −112t1 ft 2 A2 = − 44t2 A3 = 1 ( − 44 ) t3 = − 22t3 2 Δx1 = 1800 − 1900 = −100 ft Δx2 = 100 − 1800 = −1700 ft Δx3 = 0 − 100 = −100 ft Using Δxi = Ai gives t1 = t2 = t3 = (a) Total time: (b) Initial acceleration. Beer. t2 and t3 as shown.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Eisenberg. Ferdinand P. William E.893 a = 152. David Mazurek. Phillip J. Let x be the altitude. . Jr. Use constant slopes in the v−t curve for the constant acceleration stages.. Solution 68. a= −100 = 0. 8/e. Sketch the v−t and x−t curves using times t1. E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

889 ) t1 2 2 t1 = 300 s (b) Velocity v2.667 − 8.667 m v2 = 10. Beer.0474 m/s 2 t2 − t1 450 − 300 a12 = 0. Elliot R. Russell Johnston.8 × 103 m v1 = 32 km/hr = 8.8 × 103 − 800 = 4. x1 = 4.0 × 103 = A1 = 1 1 ( v0 + v1 ) t1 = (17. William E.889 (c) Final deceleration.889 m/s x1 = 4. Sketch the v−t curve Data: v0 = 64 km/h = 17.0 × 103 m t2 = 450 s (a) Time t1 to travel first 4 km. Solution 69.8 km = 4. Eisenberg.889 = = − 0. E.778 m/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Jr.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.. David Mazurek. . a12 = v2 − v1 1.0474 m/s 2 v2 = 1. Phillip J. Ferdinand P. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.778 + 8.778 m/s x2 = 4. Clausen. 8/e. x2 − x1 = 800 = A2 = 1 1 ( v1 + v2 )( t2 − t1 ) = ( v1 + v2 )( 450 − 300 ) 2 2 v2 + v1 = 10.778 − 8.

10 min 20 s = 10 20 + = 0.5 But A2 = 8 − 5 = 3 mi 35t1 + 612. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.77 ft/s 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.5 1 =5 a 1 a (1) A2 = 35 ( 0. Ferdinand P. Phillip J. a 1 = 3. William E.45 × 10−3 h = 5. Jr. David Mazurek. Clausen. 8/e. Elliot R. Beer. Russell Johnston. Solution 70.1722 − t1 ) − 35tc = 6.. Eisenberg.0278 a (2) t1 = 85.5 Solving equations (1) and (2) for t1 and 1 .616 × 10 ) (5280) 3 ( 3600 ) 2 a = 6.13 min 1 = 60.616 × 103 mi/h 2 = (16.1722 h 60 3600 Sketch the v−t curve ta = tb = tc = 60 a 25 a 35 a A1 = 60t1 − But 1 1 1 1 ( 60 ) ( ta ) − ( 25) tb = 60 t1 − 1800 − 312.0278 − 35t1 − 612. E. .5 2 2 a a A1 = 5 mi 60t1 − 2112.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.23 × 10−6 h 2 /mi a a = 16.

Ferdinand P.348 ) ⎜ 1.4 ) − (10.7913 s t1 = 0.348 ft/s v2 = v0 + A1 + A3 + A2 = 20 − 8. E. David Mazurek. Clausen.609 s (a) A1 + A3 = − ( 6 )(1. William E. Eisenberg. v1 = − 6 ft/s A1 = − 6t1 A2 = − 1 ( 40 − 6 ) t1 = −17t1 2 v1 = v0 + A1 + A2 6 = 20 − 6t1 − 17t1 t1 = 0.4 ft/s A2 = − (17 )( 0. 8/e.4 ) ⎜ ⎟ (1.6087 s t2 = 1. Sketch the a−t curve as shown ) v0 = 20 ft/s. Elliot R.4 − 3 ⎟ ⎝2⎠ ⎝ ⎠ x2 = 9..4 s t2 − t1 = 0. Russell Johnston.73 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.4 ) = − 8.348 v2 = 1. .4 − 10.6087 ⎞ ⎛1⎞ ⎛ = 0 + ( 20 )(1. Solution 71. Beer.4 ) − ( 8.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.252 ft/s (b) x2 = x0 + v0t2 + ( A1 + A3 ) x13 + A2 x2 by moment-area method 1 ⎞ ⎛1 ⎞ ⎛ = 0 + v0t2 + ( A1 + A3 ) ⎜ t2 ⎟ + A2 ⎜ t2 − t1 ⎟ 2 ⎠ 3 ⎠ ⎝ ⎝ 0. Jr. Phillip J.6087 ) = − 10. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

736 s t A = 51.736 = 51.3t3 1 ∆vt3 = 660 2 2 0.7 ( vB )max = 660 or ( vB )max or = 29. t2 = 25 − 4 = 21 s A1 = 1 ( 4 )( v A )max = 2 ( vA )max 2 A2 = 21( v A )max A1 + A2 = ∆x = 5280 ft = 660 ft 8 or 23 ( v A )max = 660 ( vA )max = 28.15)( 660 ) ( 2 )( 0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Solution 72. t2 = 25. Note that 1 5280 mile = = 660 ft 8 8 Sketch v−t curve for first 660 ft.2 ( vB )max A1 + A2 = ∆x = 660 ft 22. William E. 8/e.2 s 1 ( 5)( vB )max = 2. Russell Johnston. Beer. David Mazurek. Eisenberg.696 ft/s Runner B: A1 = t1 = 5 s. E.2 − 5 = 20.3333  vmax ±  26. Then total time t A = 25 + 26. Phillip J.736 s ( vmax )2 − 396    Reject the larger root. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.15t3 − vmaxt3 + 660 = 0 Runner A: ( vmax ) A = 28.7 s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Clausen.57 s and (a)  = 3.5 ( vB )max 2 A2 = 20. A3 = vmaxt3 − t3 = vmax ± ∆v = a t3 = 0.696. ( vmax )2 − ( 4 )( 0. Elliot R.. Ferdinand P. Jr.15) ( t3 ) A = 164.075 ft/s Sketch v−t curve for second 660 ft. . Runner A: t1 = 4 s.

.457 s: v1 = 28.457 s ≤ t ≤ 51.457 s t B = 51.736 s: v2 = 28. William E.736 − 25 ) = 20.736 s. ( t3 ) B = 167.759 + 20. 8/e. Phillip J. Then total time Velocity of A at t = 51. Ferdinand P.675 ft/s Over 51.696 − ( 0.457 − 25 ) = 20.736 − 51. Russell Johnston. David Mazurek.3)( 51.3)( 51. runner A covers a distance ∆x (b) ∆x = vave ( ∆t ) = 1 ( 20.58 s and 26. Jr. Beer.. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.696 − ( 0.2 + 26.075.675)( 51. Eisenberg.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Runner B: ( vmax ) B = 29.457 ) 2 ∆x = 5.257 = 51. Clausen. E.759 ft/s Velocity of A at t = 51.257 s t B = 25. Elliot R.78 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.5 s Reject the larger root.

Ferdinand P. William E. 1 ( 27. E.78 − 0 = t1 − 120 225. xtruck = (19. . Solution 73..44 )( 576 ) = 11200 m (b) abus = v − v0 27.78) = 15200 2 t1 = 225. David Mazurek.8 − 120 t2 = 576 s xtruck = 11. Clausen.78) + ( 720 − t1 )( 27. Russell Johnston.262 m/s 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 8/e. Jr. areas under the v−t curves are equal.44 )( 720 ) = 14000 m xbus = 14000 + 1200 = 15200 m xbus = area under v−t curve 1 ( t1 − 120 )( 27.20 km abus = 0. Beer.78 ( t2 − t1 ) = 19.44t2 2 With t1 = 225. Eisenberg.78)( t1 − 120 ) + 27. Phillip J. At t = 12 min = 720 s. Elliot R.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.8 s (a) When xbus = xtruck . Sketch the v−t curves.8 s. xtruck = (19.

222 )( 45) + vA/B ( 45) 2 2 = 50 + 22. . Solution 74.889 m/s vB = 24 km/h = 6.889 45 a A = − 0. Elliot R. E. Beer.444 = 7.5v A/B v A = vB + v A/B = 6.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.5v A/B x A = ( x A )0 + A1 + A2 xB = ( xB )0 + A1 xB/ A = xB/ A (b) ( )0 − A2 v A/B = 0. Eisenberg.444 m/s 0 = 60 − 50 − 22.667 m/s Sketch the v−t curves.667 )( 45 ) = 300 m A2 = 1 1 ( 2.667 + 0. Clausen. Phillip J.111 m/s (a) aA = v A − ( v A )0 t = 7. A1 = ( 6. Ferdinand P. William E.. ( vA )0 = 32 km/h = 8. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.111 − 8. 8/e.0395 m/s 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Russell Johnston. David Mazurek. Jr.

14 1 A2 = (13.2 )( 94.067 ft/s Sketch the v−t curves. Elliot R. Ferdinand P. Solution 75. d = A2 or 0 = d − A2 d = 622 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. David Mazurek.2 = 94. Phillip J. Beer. E. Jr.267 ft/s ( vB )0 = 13 mi/h = 19. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.29 s 0. a=− t1 = 13.29 ) = 622.14 ft/s 2 t1 13. . Slope of v−t curve for car A.2 = − 0. William E.3 m 2 xB = ( xB )0 + A1 x A = ( x A )0 + A1 + A2 xB/ A = xB − x A = ( xB )0 − ( x A )0 − A2 .COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Russell Johnston. ( vA )0 = 22 mi/h = 32. Eisenberg.. Clausen. 8/e.

t2 = 6 s ( xE )0 = 0 ( vE )0 = 0 4t1 t1 2 = 2t1 2 Moment of A1 about t = t1 : 2 2 xE = ( xE )0 + ( vE )0 t1 + 2t1 = 2t1 Motion of ball.1( t1 − 2 ) = 2t1 2 18. At t = 2. Construct the a−t curves for the elevator and the ball. Ferdinand P. William E.4t1 + 152.507 s and 5. Limit on A1 is 24 ft/s. Jr. Phillip J. Eisenberg.1( t1 − 2 ) ⎝ 2 ⎠ 2 xB = ( xB )0 + ( vB )0 ( t1 − 2 ) − 16. 8/e. hence Since this is less than 6 s. Elliot R. Beer.2 ( t1 − 2 ) ⎜ 1 ⎟ = −16.1t1 − 128.4 = 0 or Solving the quadratic equation. Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. David Mazurek. For t1 > 2 s.1( t1 − 2 ) When ball hits elevator.59 s t1 = 5. E. xB = x E 2 2 2 40 + 64 ( t1 − 2 ) − 16.2 ( t1 − 2 ) ft/s 2 ⎛t − 2⎞ − 32. For 0 ≤ t1 ≤ 6 s. Solution 76. .. Clausen. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. the solution is within range. Moment of A2 about t = t2 : ( xB )0 = 40 ft ( vB )0 = 64 ft/s A2 = − 32. Using A1 = 4t 4t2 = 24 Motion of elevator. Russell Johnston.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.1( t1 − 2 ) = 40 + 64 ( t1 − 2 ) − 16.59 s The smaller root is out of range. t1 = 1.

Phillip J. respectively. and t3 seconds. acceleration. t2. David Mazurek.25 s a2 8 Phase 3. Let v= dx dt and a= dv . Russell Johnston. Beer. E. Time of phase 1.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.. Time of phase 3. x0 = − 30 − 16 = − 46 m x f = 30 + 5 = 35 m Initial velocity. Solution 77. Phase 2. v0 = 0 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Eisenberg. Let x be the position of the front end of the car relative to the front end of the truck. deceleration. lasting t1. Sketch the a−t curve. Phase 1. a1 = 2 m/s 2 v2 = 90 km/h − 54 km/h = 36 km/h = 10 m/s a3 = − 8 m/s 2 t1 = t3 = v2 − 0 10 − 0 = =5s a1 2 0 − v2 0 − 10 = = 1. Areas: A1 = t1v2 = 10 m/s A3 = t3v = −10 m/s Initial and final positions. Elliot R. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Jr. 8/e. constant speed. dt The motion of the car relative to the truck occurs in 3 phases. William E. Clausen. . Ferdinand P.

25 − 2. t f = t1 + t2 + t3 x f = x0 + v0t f + t1 = t f − ∑ Ai ti 1 t1 2 = 5 + t2 + 1. William E.975 s 10 t f = t1 + t2 + t3 = 11.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Final time. Eisenberg. Ferdinand P. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Elliot R. Clausen. David Mazurek. Jr.975 s t f = 11.75 = 4.625 s 2 35 = − 46 + 0 + (10 )( 3.625 ) t2 = 49. Phillip J. E. 8/e..75 + t2 t2 = 1 t3 = 0. Beer. t1 + t2 = 9. .225 s Total time.75 + t2 ) + ( −10 )( 0.5 = 3. Russell Johnston.23 s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.

Phase 1. Areas: Initial and final positions x0 = − 30 − 16 = − 46 m x f = 30 + 5 = 35 m A1 = 2t1 A2 = − 8t2 a1 = 2 m/s 2 a2 = − 8 m/s 2 Initial and final velocities. dt The motion of the car relative to the truck occurs in two phases. E. v0 = v f = 0 v f = v0 + A1 + A2 0 = 0 + 2t1 − 8t2 t1 = 4t2 x f = x0 + v0t f + t1 = t2 + t2 = ∑ Ai ti 1 t1 = 3t2 2 1 t2 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Phase 2. Russell Johnston. . 8/e. Let v= dx dt and a= dv . Ferdinand P. Jr. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. David Mazurek. Sketch the a–t curve.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. lasting t1 and t2 seconds.. Solution 78. acceleration. Let x be the position of the front end of the car relative to the front end of the truck. deceleration. Beer. Eisenberg. Elliot R. respectively. Phillip J. William E. Clausen.

vm = a1 t1 = ( 2 )( 8.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System 1  35 = − 46 + 0 + 2 ( 4t2 )( 3t2 ) + ( −8t2 )  t2  2  2 81 = 20 t2 t2 = 2.10 m/s vm = 60. 8/e.0 km/h ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.05 ) = 16.0 vmax = 112.0625 s. vmax = vT + v = 54 + 60. Clausen. William E. Ferdinand P. Jr. E.0 km/h Maximum velocity relative to ground. Elliot R. Beer. . Russell Johnston. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Phillip J. David Mazurek. Eisenberg..05 s t f = t1 + t2 = 10. Maximum relative velocity.0125 s t1 = 8.

1825 m/s 4Δt 1. Solution 79. Clausen. Jr. Ferdinand P.973 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.5) 0.973 s vmax = v0 + A1 = 0 + j ( Δt ) 2 2 = (1. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.365 m/s Average velocity: vave = 0. Phillip J.4932 ) = 0. Eisenberg.36 Δx = = 0. E. Russell Johnston. Sketch acceleration curve. j = jerk = amax = j ( Δt ) da dt A1 = 1 amax ( 2Δt ) = amax ( Δt ) 2 2 = j ( Δt ) v f = v0 + A1 − A2 0 = 0 + A1 − A2 A2 = A1 Δx = v0 ( 4Δt ) + ( A1 )( 3Δt ) − A2 ( Δt ) = 0 + 3 j ( Δt ) − j ( Δt ) = 2 j ( Δt ) Δt = (a) Shortest time: (b) Maximum velocity: 3 3 3 3 Δx = 2j 3 ( 2 )(1. 8/e. William E.4932 ) = 1. Let Then.5 )( 0. Elliot R.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.4932 4Δt = ( 4 )( 0. Beer.. David Mazurek. .36 = 0.

j 0.25) = 3.639 = = 2.111 s amax 1. Elliot R. Eisenberg.70 m/s 575 vave = 31. David Mazurek.25 1 ( 5)(1. Use moment-area formula.. From the jerk limit. Solution 80.889 m/s = 2 A1 + A2 A2 = vmax − 2 A1 = 8.25 = = 5 s. Sketch the a−t curve. 1 1 ⎛ ⎞ ⎛ ⎞ x f = x0 + v0t f + ( 2 A1 + A2 ) ⎜ t f − Δt1 − Δt2 ⎟ − ( 2 A1 + A2 ) ⎜ Δt1 + Δt2 ⎟ 2 2 ⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠ = 0 + 0 + vmax t f − 2Δt1 − Δt2 ( ) 5000 = 10 + 2. Phillip J. Beer. Russell Johnston.3 km/h Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.639 m/s Δt2 = A2 2.125 m/s 2 vmax = 32 km/hr = 8. . E. Clausen.25 Total distance is 5 km = 5000 m.889 t f = 9.58 min (a) t f = 2Δt1 + Δt2 + xf vmax = ( 2 )( 5 ) + 2.5 = 575 s 8.125 ) = 2. Ferdinand P. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. j ( Δt1 ) = amax A1 = or ( Δt1 ) = amax 1.111 + (b) vave = xf tf = 5000 = 8. 8/e. Jr.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. William E.111 + 562.889 − ( 2 )( 3.

05T 2 6 1 T ( 0.1T A4 = (c) By moment-area formula.0375T 2 6 v = 2.90 m/s v = v0 + A1 + A3 + A4 = 0. E.1T ) ⎜ ⎟ + ( 0. William E. ⎛7 ⎞ ⎛4 ⎞ x = v0t + ( A1 ) ⎜ T ⎟ + A2 ⎜ T ⎟ ⎝9 ⎠ ⎝9 ⎠ 7 2 8 2 15 2 1 2 40 = 0 + T + T = T = T 90 90 90 6 T 2 = ( 40 )( 6 ) = 240 s 2 (a) vmax = v0 + A1 + A2 = 0 + 0.6 ) = 0. A1 = 0.. Solution 81.035417T 18 ⎝ 18 ⎠ ⎝9⎠ = ( 0.1T + 0. Beer.6 ) = 0. Indicate areas A1 and A2 on the a − t curve.1T m/s 2 3 1 2T ( 0. Jr.2T = 0. 8/e. Clausen.3T (b) T = 15.50 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Eisenberg.65 m/s Indicate area A3 and A4 on the a − t curve. x = v0 T ⎛ T 2T ⎞ ⎛2 T ⎞ ⎛1 T ⎞ + A1 ⎜ − ⎟ + A3 ⎜ ⋅ ⎟ + A4 ⎜ ⋅ ⎟ 2 9 ⎠ ⎝2 ⎝3 6⎠ ⎝3 6⎠ A3 = 1 T ( 0. Elliot R. Russell Johnston.45) = 0.0375T ) = 0.49 s vmax = 4. A1 = A2 = 1 T ( 0. Ferdinand P.6 ) = 0.1875T T ⎛ 5T ⎞ ⎛T ⎞ 2 = 0 + ( 0. David Mazurek. Phillip J.2T m/s 2 3 By moment-area formula.05T ) ⎜ ⎟ + ( 0.49 ) 2 x = 8. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. .035417 )(15.

2 = v0 + A1 + A2 v0.125)( 0. 8/e. 0.2 ) = 0.375 m/s 2 1 A4 = ( 2.1142 m and x0.3 + A4 v0. Solution 82.3 − 0.2 ) = 1 m/s A1 = 1 ( 5 + 2.3 = 0.4 At t = 0. E.900 m/s Sketch the v − t curve and divide its area into A5 .4 = 1.06667 m 3 A7 = (1. Russell Johnston.1) 2 ( 0.5 )( 0.2 = 0.1) = 0. Clausen.3 − ( A5 + A6 ) − A7 2 ( 0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.2 s. .775 )( 0.. (b) With At t = 0.3 s.2 ) = 0.2 = 0. A3 and A4.125 m/s 2 A3 = (a) Velocities: v0 = 0 v0.2 ) = 0.4 ∫ x dx = 0.5)( 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.2 = − 0.06667 − 0. With A5 + A6 = A5 = x0.400 m/s v0.28 m x0.775 m/s v0.28 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. 2 ( 3)( 0.3 = v0.1) = 0.2 = 1.3 0. Ferdinand P. Phillip J.3 − A5 − (1. and A7 as shown.3 = 0.2 + A3 v0.4 m/s 3 A2 = ( 5 )( 0.1) = 0.5)( 0.3 = 1.0467 m x0. Divide the area of the a−t curve into the four areas A1.4 = v0.3 − x = ∫ t vdt or x = 0.00833 m 3 x0.400 )( 0. Eisenberg. A6 . David Mazurek. A2 .3 − ∫ t vdt 0. Elliot R. Beer. Jr. William E.

675 −0.650 ft/s v = v0 + 2 ( ) −11.125 0. Eisenberg.125 −1. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.125 2 −7.875 1. When equal widths of Δt = 0.25 s are used. Beer.375 0. E. Ferdinand P.650 )( 0.913 ft/s ≈ x0 + v0t + ( Σai ( 2 − ti ) ) ( Δt ) (b) ≈ 0 + (1.955 ( ft/s ) At t = 2 s.215 −1.625 1.390 1.205 −0.955 )( 0.004 0.125 0. the values of ti and ai are those shown in the first two columns of the table below.341 −0.915 (s) 1.25 ) x = x0 + v0t + ∫ 0 ai ( t − ti ) dt ≈ x0 + v0t + Σai ( 2 − ti ) ( Δt ) 2 v0 = 1. ti ai 2 − ti 2 ai ( 2 − ti ) (s ) 0. Jr. each with its centroid at t = ti .125 −0. Solution 83.030 0.547 −0. Clausen..25 ) x = 0.759 −0.375 1. Russell Johnston. . David Mazurek.913)( 2 ) − (11.875 1. ∫ 0 adt ≈ v0 + Σai ( Δt ) ≈ v0 + ( Σai ) ( Δt ) (a) Using moment-area formula.112 −1.875 Σ −0.836 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Approximate the a−t curve by a series of rectangles of height ai .128 −0.625 0.095 −0.875 1.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.625 ( ft/s ) −6.375 ( ft/s ) −3. William E. Phillip J. 8/e. Elliot R.375 1. 0 ≈ v0 − ( 7.028 −3.625 0.036 −0.

Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.9 3.1( ft/s ) (a) At t = 8 s. Jr.58 + 13. Approximate the a−t curve by a series of rectangles of height ai . Clausen. v8 = v0 + ∫ 0 adt ≈ 0 + Σai ( Δt ) 8 = ( Σai ) ( Δt ) Since t = 8 s.1)( 2 ) x20 = 1980 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.8 18.7 ft/s (b) At t = 20 s.41 (s) 19 17 ( ft/s ) 334. Elliot R. Eisenberg.74 = 48.41 + 10. Phillip J.87 )( 2 ) v8 = 97.2 29. each with its centroid at t = ti ..14 7. 20 − ti 2 ti ai ai ( 20 − ti ) (s ) 1 3 ( ft/s ) 17.69 9 7 5 46. the values of ti and ai are those shown in the first two columns of table below.87 ft/s 2 v8 = ( 48.58 13. Beer. .74 6.13 4.6 68. William E.18 15 13 11 152.26 3. x20 = vot + ∫ 0 a ( 20 − t ) dt = 0 + Σai ( 20 − t )( Δt ) 20 = ( 990.14 + 7.0 5 7 9 11 13 15 10.00 3 1 9.0 990.5 17 19 Σ 3.0 228.0 5. When equal widths of Δt = 2 s are used.30 3. David Mazurek. Ferdinand P. Solution 84. Russell Johnston. 8/e. only the first four values in the second column are summed: Σai = 17.1 100. E.

Region 1 2 3 4 v1 ( m/s ) v2 ( m/s ) a m/s 2 −3 ( ) Δx ( m ) Δt ( s ) 32 30 20. For uniformly accelerated motion.63 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Jr..667 30 25 20 25 20 10 −8 −11. Ferdinand P.67 0.435 0. 8/e. Solution 85. Russell Johnston. E.19 9. 2 2 v2 − v1 = 2a ( x2 − x1 ) or Δx = Δt = 2 2 v2 − v1 2a v2 − v1 = a ( t2 − t1 ) or v2 − v1 a For the regions shown above. .186 t = Σ ( Δt ) = 3. William E. Eisenberg.54 0.690 3.19 s (a) (b) Assuming x0 = 0. Clausen.45 62.769 5 Σ 10 0 −14.625 0.5 −13 17. David Mazurek.5 3. Beer. Phillip J.78 11.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. The given curve is approximated by a series of uniformly accelerated motions. x = x0 + Σ ( Δx ) = 62.6 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Elliot R.

Elliot R. Eisenberg.667s−1.667 ) a = 3.5 m from the curve.. Ferdinand P. David Mazurek.0 m/s. E.25m from the tangent line a = (1. William E.5 (b) When v = 2.25. a = ( 2 )(1. Δv = 1 m/s x = 0.6 m from the tangent line. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.4 m/s Δv = 1m/s from the curve and Δx = 0. Beer. and using two points on this line to dv Δv = .4 )( 4 ) a = 5. Russell Johnston. Use a = v dv dv = slope of the given curve.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. dx Δx (a) When x = 0. . Solution 86. dx 0. and Δx = 0. Jr.6 m/s 2 dv 1 = = 4 s −1 dx 2. determine Δx and Δv. Clausen. Phillip J.33 m/s 2 dv 1 = = 1. 8/e.6 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Then. v = 1. noting that dx dx Slope is calculated by drawing a tangent line at the required point.

Elliot R. William E. 8/e. Phillip J. Its centroid lies at By moment-area formula. E. Beer.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Russell Johnston. . t = 1 t.. Clausen. Jr. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. The a−t curve for uniformly accelerated motion is shown. The area of the rectangle is A = at. Eisenberg. 2 ⎛1 ⎞ x = x0 + v0 + A ( t − t ) = x0 + v0t + ( at ) ⎜ t ⎟ ⎝2 ⎠ = x0 + v0t + 1 2 at 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Ferdinand P. Solution 87. David Mazurek.

Phillip J. or v0 = 8 m/s By moment-area formula. Clausen. From the a−t curve.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Ferdinand P. Jr. v = v0 + A1. A1 = ( −2 )( 6 ) = − 12 m/s A2 = ( 2 )( 2 ) = 4 m/s Over 6 s < t < 10 s. Beer.. Eisenberg. v = − 4 m/s or − 4 = v0 − 12. Solution 88. E. 8/e. x12 = x0 + v0t + moment of shaded area about t = 12s x12 = 0 + ( 8 )(12 ) + ( − 12 )(12 − 3) + ( 4 )(12 − 11) x12 = − 8 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Elliot R. . William E. Russell Johnston. David Mazurek.

2 ) + 3. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Russell Johnston. Phillip J. A2 = − 77.8167 ) + ( − 3. 8/e.2.8 ) ⎢ ( 0. Elliot R.7 ft (b) T = 0.2167s By moment-area formula.2 ) = − 24t1 + 4. 3 A2 = ( − 24 )( t1 − 0.0167 s t1 − T = 3. David Mazurek.6167 s By moment-area formula.2 − 24t1 + 4.2 ) ⎢⎜ ( 0.8 s. Ferdinand P. E.8) = −12. . William E.8167 s A2 = − 86.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.3 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. x1 = x0 + v0t1 + moment of area ⎡⎛ 3 ⎞ ⎛ 3. Jr. Beer. A1 = 2 ( − 24 )( 0.0167 ) + ( −12.2 ft/s t1 = 4. Eisenberg. (a) T = 0.2167 ⎥ + ( −77..2 ) = − 3.8 t1 = 3.8 ) = − 24t1 + 19.80 ) ⎜ ⎟ ⎠ ⎝ 2 ⎠ ⎣⎝ 8 x1 = 174. ⎡3 ⎤ ⎛ 3. A1 = 2 ( − 24 )( 0.8 ) + 3.2 ) ⎜ ⎟ ⎣8 ⎦ ⎝ 2 ⎠ x1 = 192.6167 ⎞ x1 = 0 + ( 90 )( 3.2167 ⎞ x1 = 0 + ( 90 )( 4.2s.2 v f = v0 + ΣA or 0 = 90 − 12.8 ft/s.6167 ⎟ + ( − 86.8 v f = v0 + ΣA 0 = 90 − 3. Solution 89.80 ft/s t1 − T = 3.8 − 24t1 + 19.2 ft/s 3 A2 = ( − 24 )( t1 − 0. Clausen.

Eisenberg. Data from Prob. . A1 = (18 − 10 )(1. 30 s < t < 40 s x = x0 + v0t + ∑ Ai ti a= a=0! 18 − 6 = 1. David Mazurek. 65 x0 = − 48 ft. v0 = 6 ft/s The a – t curve is just the slope of the v – t curve.5 ) = 12 ft/s t1 = 20 − 14 = 6s A2 = ( 2 )( − 3) = − 6 ft/s t2 = 20 − 19 = 1 s x20 = −48 + ( 6 )( 20 ) + (12 )( 6 ) + ( − 6 )(1) x20 = 138 ft ! (b) Maximum value of position coordinate. Russell Johnston. Elliot R. 0 < t < 10 s.5 ) = 12 ft/s t1 = ( 24 − 14 ) = 10 s A2 = ( 24 − 18 )( − 3) = −18 ft/s t2 = ( 24 − 21) = 3 s xm = −48 + ( 6 )( 24 ) + (12 )(10 ) + ( −18 )( 3) xm = 162 ft ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Beer. Ferdinand P. Jr. Clausen. Solution 90. Phillip J. E. 18 s < t < 30 s. From velocity diagram. x is maximum where v = 0. 10 s < t < 18 s.5 ft/s ! 18 − 10 −18 − 18 a= = − 3 ft/s ! 30 − 18 a=0 ! (a) Position when t = 20 s. 8/e. William E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.. tm = 24 s A1 = (18 − 10 )(1.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.

37   = − 38. Phillip J. Beer.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. David Mazurek. . Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 8/e. Ferdinand P. 2 (b) t = vx = 3 m/s. E.2°  2  a = 24.0°  2 v = 8. a= a y = 24 m/s 2 = 24.25 m/s ax = 2 m/s 2 . Jr. Clausen.3°  3  v = 3. William E. v= v y = − 2. Substitute into expression for y. y= 4 x (t + 1)2 = x xy = 4 vx = 2 m/s. Elliot R.1 m/s 2 76. ( 2 ) 2 + ( − 8 )2 θ = tan −1   −8   = − 76. Russell Johnston. Solution 91.82 m/s 38. (a) t = 0.37 m/s = 3..0° ( 2 )2 + ( 24 )2  24  θ = tan −1   = 85. v= v y = − 8 m/s = 8.37)2 θ = tan −1   −2.82 m/s ( 3)2 + (2.3° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. x = ( t + 1) 2 y = 4 ( t + 1) −2 −3 −4 & vx = x = 2 ( t + 1) & a x = vx = 2 & v y = y = − 8 ( t + 1) & a y = v y = 24 ( t + 1) Solve for (t + 1)2 from expression for x. Eisenberg.2° 1 s.25 m/s This is the equation of a rectangular hyperbola. Then.1 m/s 2 85.

Beer. E. .15 m/s 2 67.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System ax = 2 m/s. Clausen. Eisenberg. William E. Phillip J.742 = 5.74 m/s 2 a = 22 + 4. David Mazurek. Jr. Russell Johnston.2°  4. Ferdinand P.74  Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.2°  2  a = 5. a y = 4.15 m/s 2 θ = tan −1   = 67. 8/e.. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Elliot R.

William E. 8/e.6 m/s 2 36.9°.8 dt dt dy = dx dy dt dx dt ( ) Then.6 m/s 2 v = 6. Phillip J.9°. dt ax = d 2x = ( − 0. Let u = t t 2 − 9t + 18 = t 3 − 9t 2 + 18t du d 2u = 3t 2 − 18t + 18.6 )( −9 ) = −5. Eisenberg.9° (b) At t = 3 s. dt and vx = ( −0. ax = ( −0.6 )( − 6 ) = − 3.9°.75 = constant 0. du = −9.6 m/s a y = ( 0. v = 6. E.8)( − 6 ) = 4. Solution 92.8 m/s.8 )( −6 ) = 4.8 m/s 2 .2 m/s. dy du = + 0. the path is straight.6 m/s dt a y = ( 0.. and = − 6.0 m/s 36.8 =− Since (a) dy does not change.9° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. dt dt 2 dx vx = = ( − 0.8u m y = − 4 + 0.8 )( 6 ) = −4. a = 6.0 m/s 2 36. Jr.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. du = −6. Russell Johnston.0 m/s (c) At t = 4 s. Ferdinand P.8 )( −9 ) = 7. Beer.6 )( − 6 ) = − 3.6u m dx du = −0.4 m/s ay = 0 2 vy = dy = ( 0.8 )( − 6 ) = 4. Elliot R.0 m/s 2 36. . a = 0 vx = ( −0. dx At t = 2 s. dt ax = 0.6 )( 6 ) = 3.6 dx dt 0.6 = − 0. and = 6t − 18 dt dt 2 x = 6 − 0. a = 6.0 m/s 36. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.6 )( −6 ) = −3. and d 2u =6 dt 2 v y = ( 0. dt 2 d u =0 dt 2 v y = ( 0. du d 2u = − 6. Clausen. v = 9.8 m/s 2 . David Mazurek.8 m/s.

3 (c) When t = 1 s. & x= & y = ( 4cos π t − 2 )(π sin π t ) = −6π sin π t −4π sin π t − ( 2 − cos π t ) ( 2 − cos π t )2 ( 2 − cos π t )2 3sin π t (π sin π t ) 3π ( 2cos π t − 1) 3π cos π t − = ( 2 − cos π t ) ( 2 − cos π t )2 ( 2 − cos π t )2 & x=0 & x= (a) When t = 0 s. William E. and 3 2 & y = 3π .42 m/s v = 7. v = 3. David Mazurek. Russell Johnston.26 m/s −6π (2 − 1 ) 2 ( ) = − 4π − 2 3 & x=0 and & y = 3π ( −3) ( 3)2 = −π . Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Beer. 1 (b) When t = s.. and note that the equation is satisfied. & 3. Ferdinand P. Substitute the given expressions for x and y into the given equation of the ellipse.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Solution 93.14 m/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. . Phillip J. Elliot R. E. y = 0 v = 9. Clausen. 8/e. Jr. 16 cos 2 π t − 16 cos π t + 4 9sin 2 π t x2 y2 + = + 2 2 4 3 4 ( 2 − cos π t ) 3 ( 2 − cos π t ) = 4 cos 2 π t − 4 cos π t + 1 + 3sin 2 π t ( ) ( 2 − cos π t )2 = 4 − 4 cos π t + cos 2 π t ( 2 − cos π t )2 =1 & & Calculate x and y by differentiation. Eisenberg.

and y = 6 − 3cos t obtain the values in the table below. When t = 0 or 2π . v 2 is maximum. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Phillip J. cos t = 1.27 37. 8/e. Jr. Ferdinand P. dx dy = 6 − 3cos t and = 3sin t vx = vy = dt dx 2 v 2 = vx + v 2 = ( 6 − 3cos t ) + 9sin 2 t = 45 − 36 cos t ( m/s ) y 2 2 d (v ) = 36sin t = 0 dt 2 t = 0. π . When t = π . and and v 2 is minimum.70 6 9 6 3 3 π π 2 2π (a) Differentiate with respect to t to obtain velocity components. Solution 94.85 31. i.42 18. Using x = 6t − sin t .. Eisenberg.e. Plot as shown. . 2 (v ) 2 min = 45 − 36 = 9 ( m/s ) . E. Elliot R. vmin = 3 m/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Russell Johnston. David Mazurek. t ( s) 0 x (m) 0 y (m) 3 π 2 6. Clausen. Beer. Sketch the path of the particle. William E. and 2π in the range 0 ≤ t ≤ 2π . cos t = −1. plot of y versus x.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.

Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Elliot R. William E. vx = 3 m/s. vy = 0 t = 2π s r = (12π m ) i + ( 3 m ) j tan θ = t = π s. v y = 0 t=0 r = (3 m) j tan θ = vy vx =0 θ =0 t = 2π s. vx = 3 m/s. 8/e. y = 3 m. David Mazurek.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System (v ) 2 max = 45 + 36 = 81 ( m/s ) . x = 12π m. Russell Johnston. y = 9 m. Clausen. vy vx vy = 0 t =π s θ =0 vx = 9 m/s. r = ( 6π m ) i + ( 9 m ) j tan θ = vy vx θ = 0° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. x = 6π m. E. vmax = 9 m/s (b) t = 0. Jr. Eisenberg. y = 3 m. Phillip J. Beer. x = 0.. Ferdinand P. .

Ferdinand P. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 8/e. Beer. Eisenberg. William E.. Clausen. Jr. David Mazurek. r ⋅ a = 0 A ⎡( cos t + t sin t ) i + ( sin t − t cos t ) j⎤ ⋅ A ⎡( cos t − t sin t ) i + ( sin t + t cos t ) j⎤ = 0 ⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦ A2 ⎡( cos t + t sin t )( cos t − t sin t ) + ( sin t − t cos t )( sin t + t cos t ) ⎤ = 0 ⎣ ⎦ ( cos (b) 2 t − t 2 sin 2 t + sin 2 t − t 2 cos 2 t = 0 1 − t2 = 0 ) ( ) t = 1s When r and a are parallel.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Elliot R. Solution 95. E. . Given: r = A ( cos t + t sin t ) i + A ( sin t − t cos t ) j v= dr = A ( − sin t + sin t + t cos t ) i + A ( cos t − cos t + t sin t ) j dt = A ( t cos t ) i + A ( t sin t ) j dv = A ( cos t − t sin t ) i + A ( sin t + t cos t ) j dt a= (a) When r and a are perpendicular. Russell Johnston. r × a = 0 A ⎡( cos t + t sin t ) i + ( sin t − t cos t ) j⎤ × A ⎡( cos t − t sin t ) i + ( sin t + t cos t ) j⎤ = 0 ⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦ A2 ⎡( cos t + t sin t )( sin t + t cos t ) − ( sin t − t cos t )( cos t − t sin t ) ⎤ k = 0 ⎣ ⎦ (sin t cos t + t sin 2 t + t cos 2 t + t 2 sin t cos t − sin t cos t − t cos2 t − t sin 2 t + t 2 sin t cos t = 0 2t = 0 ) ( ) t =0 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Phillip J.

5cos 2π t ) j (a) At t = 0. E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.80 in.5) 2 ⎛1 ⎞ i − 20π e −0. Russell Johnston. Phillip J.8956 in./s 2 1 ⎞ ⎛ −0. .) j v= 30 r = 18. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 1⎞ ⎛ r = 30 ⎜1 − ⎟ i + 20 (1) j 1⎠ ⎝ ⎡ ⎛1 ⎛1⎞ ⎞⎤ v = 30 ⎜ ⎟ i − 20π ⎢(1) ⎜ + 0 ⎟ ⎥ j 1⎠ 2 ⎝ ⎠⎦ ⎣ ⎝ r = 20 in. David Mazurek./s ) i + ( 2. v = 43./s 31./s 46.4 in.75π ( 0 − 7./s 2 j ( ( 2. Beer.5 ⎠ ⎝ = (18 in..5) 3 i + 10π 2e−0.10 in.9778 in./s2 86./s 2 i + 70. 6.4° a=− (b) At t = 1.8° a=− 60 = −3. Solution 96.3 in.1582 in. v= 1 ⎤ ⎡ r = 30 ⎢1 − i + 20 e−π t/2 cos 2π t j t + 1⎥ ⎣ ⎦ ( ) dr 1 ⎛ π ⎞ = 30 + 20 ⎜ − e−π t/2 cos 2π t − 2π e−π t/2 sin 2π t ⎟ j 2 dt ⎝ 2 ⎠ ( t + 1) = a= ⎡ ⎛1 ⎞⎤ i − 20π ⎢e−π t/2 ⎜ cos 2π t + 2sin 2π t ⎟ ⎥ j 2 ⎝ ⎠⎦ ⎣ ( t + 1) 30 2 ⎡ π ⎤ dv 2 ⎛1 ⎞ i − 20π ⎢ − e−π t/2 ⎜ cos 2π t + 2sin 2π t ⎟ + e−π t/2 ( −π sin 2π t + 4π cos 2π t ) ⎥ j = −30 3 dt ⎝2 ⎠ ⎣ 2 ⎦ ( t + 1) = −60 ( t + 1) 3 i − 10π 2e −π t/2 ( 4sin 2π t − 7.75π ⎜ cos 3π + 0 ⎟ j ⎝2 ⎠ = ( 4. Clausen.) i + ( −1. Eisenberg.5 ) j 1 a = 743 in.3° 85.5cos 3π ) j ) ( ) a = 70.65 in.25π r = 30 ⎜1 − cos 3π j ⎟ i + 20e 2. William E.5 s.84 in. Ferdinand P.0° ( 2. Given: Differentiating to obtain v and a./s ) j v = 5. 8/e.9° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Elliot R. 60 i − 10π 2 (1)( 0 − 7. Jr.

Clausen. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Jr. William E. Eisenberg. Solution 97. Elliot R. 8/e. v= a= r = ( Rt cos ω nt ) i + ctj + ( Rt sin ω nt ) k dr = R ( cos ω nt − ω nt sin ω nt ) i + cj + R ( sin ω nt + ω nt cos ω nt ) k dt dv = R −ω n sin ω nt − ω n sin ω nt − ω n 2t cos ω nt i + R ω n cos ω nt + ω n cos ω nt − ω n 2t sin ω nt k dt = R ⎡ −2ω n sin ω nt − ω n 2t cos ω nt i + 2ω n cos ω nt − ω n 2t sin ω nt ⎤ k ⎣ ⎦ ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) Magnitudes of v and a. E. Russell Johnston. Ferdinand P. v 2 = vx 2 + v 2 + v z 2 y = ⎡ R ( cos ω nt − ω nt sin ω nt ) ⎤ + ( c ) + ⎡ R ( sin ω nt + ω nt cos ω nt ) ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦ 2 = R 2 ⎡cos 2 ω nt − 2ω nt sin ω nt cos ω nt + ω n t 2 sin 2 ω nt ⎤ + c 2 ⎣ ⎦ 2 + R 2 ⎡sin 2 ω nt + 2ω nt sin ω nt cos ω nt + ω n t 2 cos 2 ω nt ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ 2 = R2 1 + ωn t 2 + c2 2 2 2 ( ) v= 2 R2 1 + ωn t 2 + c2 ( ) 2 2 a 2 = ax + a 2 + az y ⎡ 2 = R 2 ⎢ −2ω n sin ω nt − ω n t cos ω nt ⎣ ( ) + ( 2ω 2 n cos ω nt 2⎤ 2 − ω n t sin ω nt ⎥ ⎦ ) 2 3 4 2 = R 2 ⎡ 4ω n sin 2 ω nt + 4ω nt sin ω nt cos ω nt + ω n t 2 cos 2 ω nt + 4ω n cos 2 ω nt ⎣ 3 4 − 4ω nt sin ω nt cos ω nt + ω n t 2 sin 2 ω nt ⎤ ⎦ 2 4 = R 2 4ω n + ω n t 2 ( ) 2 a = Rω n 4 + ω n t 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Beer.. Given: Differentiating to obtain v and a. Phillip J. . David Mazurek.

Beer. Elliot R. Jr.61 ft/s 2 ! (b) If r and v are perpendicular.. Solution 98. cos t = x At 2 y = A t 2 + 1. And Then.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Russell Johnston. Phillip J. 8/e. 2 2 2 r = ( 3t cos t ) i + 3 t 2 + 1 j + ( t sin t ) k ( )  y x z  A −  A −  B  = 1!       2 2 Differentiating to obtain v and a. sin t = z Bt 2 z = Bt sin t  y t2 =   − 1  A or x  y t2 =   +    A B 2 2 2 2  x   z  cos 2 t + sin 2 t = 1 ⇒   +   = 1  At   At  Then. r = ( At cos t ) i + A t 2 + 1 j + ( Bt sin t ) k Given: ( ) from which x = At cos t . E. r ⋅ v = 0 ( 3t cos t ) 3 ( cos t − t sin t ) +   or (3 t + 1)  2   + ( t sin t )( sin t + t cos t ) = 0  t2 + 1  3t (9t cos t − 9t 2 2 sin t cos t + ( 9t ) + t sin 2 t + t 2 sin t cos t = 0 continued ) ( ) Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Eisenberg. Clausen. v = 3 (1 − 0 ) i + ( 0 ) j + ( 0 ) k a = −3 ( 0 ) i + 3 (1) j + ( 2 − 0 ) h a 2 = ( 3) + ( 2 ) = 13 2 2 v = 3 ft/s ! a = 3. David Mazurek. dr t v= = 3 ( cos t − t sin t ) i + 3 j + ( sin t + t cos t ) k 2 dt t +1 dv 1 a= = 3 ( −2sin t − t cos t ) i + 3 j + ( 2cos t − t sin t ) k 3 dt t2 + 1 2 ( ) (a) At t = 0. William E. Ferdinand P. For A = 3 and  y x z  A −1 =  A +  B        B = 1. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. .

. . Ferdinand P. Clausen. William E. Eisenberg. E. David Mazurek. Elliot R. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Phillip J.38 s t = 3.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System With t ≠ 0. Beer.82 s ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. 9cos 2 t − 8t sin t cos t + 9 + sin 2 t = 0 10 − 8t sin t cos t + 8cos 2 t = 0 or The smallest root is The next root is 7 + 2cos 2t − 2t sin 2t = 0 2t = 7. 8/e.631 s t = 4. Jr. Russell Johnston.

(a) At the landing point.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Clausen. Solution 99.94 ) x v0t = = cos 30° cos 30° cos 30° 1 2 gt 2 d = 84. .. Ferdinand P. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 8/e. E. Phillip J. dh = v0 tan 30° − gt = 0 dt Then.94 s Rejecting the t = 0 solution gives t = (b) Landing distance: (c) Vertical distance: or d = ( 25)( 2. or t = vo tan 30° g 2 hmax = ( v0 )( v0 tan 30°) tan 30° − 1 g ⎛ v0 tan 30° ⎞ g ⎜ 2 ⎝ 2 g ⎟ ⎠ v 2 tan 2 30° ( 25 ) ( tan 30° ) = 0 = 2g ( 2 )( 9.9 m h = x tan 30° + y h = v0t tan 30° − Differentiating and setting equal to zero. Horizontal motion: Vertical motion: from which y = − x tan 30° x = x0 + ( vx )0 t = v0t y = y0 + v y t2 = − ( )0 t − 1 gt 2 = − 1 gt 2 2 2 2y 2 x tan 30° 2v0t tan 30° = = g g g 2v0 tan 30° ( 2 )( 25 ) tan 30° = g 9. Beer. Russell Johnston.81) 2 hmax = 10. William E. David Mazurek. Elliot R. Eisenberg.81 t = 2.62 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Jr.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 100.

Horizontal motion:

x = x0 + ( vx )0 t = v0t ,

or

t =

x v0 y = y0 − gx 2 2 2v0

Vertical motion:

y = y0 + v y

( )0 t − 1 gt 2 = y0 − 1 gt 2 2 2
so that y0 = gx 2 2 2v0

or

At ground level, y = 0,

At x = 50 m,

y0 =

( 9.81)( 50 )2 ( 2 )( 30 )2

= 13.625 m

h = y0 − 13 = 0.625 m At x = 53 m, y0 =

( 9.81)( 53)2 ( 2 )( 30 )2

= 15.31 m

h = y0 − 13 = 2.31 m Range to avoid: 0.625 m < h < 2.31 m

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 101.

Horizontal motion. Vertical motion. Eliminate t.

vx = v0 y=h− t= x v0
gx 2 2(h − y)

x = v0t 1 2 gt 2 y=h− gx 2 2 2v0

Solve for v0.
Data: h = 3 ft, g = 32.2 ft/s2

v0 =

(a) To strike corner C. v0 =

x = d = 15 ft, y = 0 v0 = 34.7 ft/s x = 15 ft, y = 1 ft v0 = 42.6 ft/s x = 15 − 1 = 14 ft, y = 0 v0 = 32.4 ft/s 32.4 ft/s < v0 < 42.6 ft/s

( 32.2 )(15)2 ( 2 )( 3 − 0 ) ( 32.2 )(15)2 ( 2 )( 3 − 1) ( 32.2 )(14 )2 ( 2 )( 3 − 0 )

To strike point B. v0 =

To strike point D. v0 =

(b) Range to strike corner BCD.

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 102.

Place origin of coordinates at point A. Horizontal motion:

( vx )0 = 90 mi/h = 132 ft/s
x = x0 + ( vx )0 t = 0 + 132t ft

At point B where t B = 6.5 s, xB = (132 )( 6.5 ) = 858 ft (a) Distance AB. From geometry Vertical motion: At point B − xB tan 10° = h + 0 − (b) Initial height. 1 ( 32.2 )( 6.5)2 2 h = 529 ft d = 858 cos 10° d = 871 ft

y = y0 + v y

( )0 t − 1 gt 2 2

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 103.

Data: Horizontal motion. Vertical motion. Eliminate t.

v0 = 25 ft/s, α = 90° − 55° = 35°, g = 32.2 ft/s 2 x = ( v0 cos α ) t y = h + ( v0 sin α ) t − t= x v0 cos α gx 2
2 2v0 cos 2 α

1 2 gt 2

y = h + x tan α − Solve for h. To hit point B.

h = y − x tan α + x = 20 ft, y = 0 h = 0 − 20 tan 35° +

gx 2 2 2v0 cos 2 α

( 32.2 )( 20 )2 ( 2 )( 25cos 35°)2 ( 32.2 )( 24 )2 ( 2 )( 25cos 35°)2

= 1.352 ft

To hit point C.

x = 24 ft, y = 0 h = 0 − 24 tan 35° + = 5.31 ft 1.352 ft < h < 5.31 ft

Range of values of h.

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Solution 104. Clausen. Place the origin at A.01 ft To water point C. David Mazurek. Phillip J.2 ft dC = − xC = 20.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.2 ( tan 50° − tan10°) = 15. . xC β = 90° + φ0 = 90° + 40° = 130° ( 2 )( 24 )2 cos2 130° = 32. Vertical motion.2 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. y = x tan α x tan α = x tan β − x= gx 2 2 2v0 cos 2 β Solve for x. 8/e. William E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. ( vx )0 = v0 cos β t = x v0 cos β x = ( v0 cos β ) t Solve for t.. E.01 ft d B = 15. Beer. Jr.2 ( tan130° − tan10°) = − 20. ( vy )0 = v0 sin β y = ( v0 sin β ) t − = x tan β − 1 2 gt 2 gx 2 2 2v0 cos 2 β Geometry. Eisenberg. Elliot R. Let β be the direction of the discharge velocity measured counterclockwise from the x-axis Horizontal motion. Ferdinand P. At points B and C Hence. To water point B. xB 2 2v0 cos 2 β ( tan β − tan α ) g β = 90° − φ0 = 90° − 40° = 50° ( 2 )( 24 )2 cos2 50° = 32. Russell Johnston.

x0 = 0. Solution 105.7217 s 9. Ferdinand P.. Elliot R.81)( 0. David Mazurek.81)(1. Phillip J.3941)2 2 or At x = 15. vy = 0 t = or t = 1 2 gt 2 v0 sin α g (a) 13sin 33° = 0. (b) Corresponding value of y : y = 0.3941) − y = 0.16 m < 3. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.6 m Vertical motion: v y = v0 sin α − gt y = y0 + ( v0 sin α ) t − At maximum height.2 m. William E. α = 33°. Jr.7 m Horizontal motion: x = x0 + ( v0 cos α ) t t = 15. Beer. E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.6 + (13sin 33° )( 0. Eisenberg. v0 = 13 m/s.7217 )2 2 ymax = 3. Russell Johnston.8 m < 3. 8/e. y0 = 0.2 − 0 = 1. .81 1 ( 9.7217 ) − 1.3941 s 13cos 33° 1 ( 9. Clausen.937 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.6 + (13sin 33° )(1.16 m yes t = x − x0 v0 cos α ymax = 0.

2 − 0 = 0. −2. Vertical motion: t= 12. Clausen.38 m 1 2 gt − v y 2 (b) At y = 0.377 = 0 2 t= At t = 0.377 ) 9. Jr.903 x0 = 0 y = h + vy ( )0 t − 1 gt 2 2 and and g = 9.066 − ( −2.4952 s. Phillip J. Then.790 ) t − 2.2 = 0.790 )( 0.3057 )2 2 2 h = 2.3057 ) + 1 ( 9.3057 s 39. Elliot R.790 + ( 2. At x = 12. E.905)( −2.81)( 0.903)( 0. h = y − vy y = 1. ( )0 t − h = 0 1 ( 9. Eisenberg.81 m/s 2 t = 0.46 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. David Mazurek.4676 s d = 6.790 m/s (a) At the net..2 m. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Ferdinand P. Beer.4676 ) = 18.66 m d = x − 12. 8/e. Horizontal motion: x = x0 + ( vx )0 t or t= x − x0 ( v x )0 ( vx )0 = 40cos 4° = 39. William E.81) t 2 − ( −2.81 x = ( 39. Russell Johnston.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Solution 106.903 m/s.066 m ( )0 t + 1 gt 2 = 1.790 )2 − ( 4 )( 4. .3057 s ( vy )0 = − 40sin 4° = − 2.

44974 0 ⎟ − g ⎜ 0. Solution 107.6108 gy = ( 4.2 x = 4.21688 2 v0 g 2 v0 = 4. The horizontal and vertical components of velocity and position are vx = v0 cos 45° v y = v0 sin 45° − gt x = v0 cos 45°t y = v0 sin 45°t − 1 2 gt 2 At landing on belt.. Beer. 8/e. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.44974 0 ⎟ g⎠ 2 ⎝ g⎠ ⎝ y = 0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. E.1) = 0. Ferdinand P.2948 s 32. Jr. .2948 ) Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.1cos 45° )( 0. Elliot R.6108 )( 32. Phillip J.1 ft/s ( 0. Eisenberg.4 ft 2 /s 2 (a) t= (b) v0 = 21. David Mazurek.40 ft x = ( 21. vy vx = tan 45° − gt = tan 20° v0 cos 45° v0 v = 0. Russell Johnston.44974 0 g g 2 t = ( tan 45° − tan 20° ) cos 45° ⎛ v ⎞ 1 ⎛ v ⎞ y = v0 sin 45° ⎜ 0. William E.2 )( 3) = 445. Clausen.44974 )( 21.

2 ( x tan α − y ) g t= 2v0 sin α g (2) xc = ( v0 cos α ) t = 2 2v0 sin α cos α g (3) α = 31° To clear tree A: From (2). Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. .43 ft/s ( 2 )(119. David Mazurek.12282 s 2 . t A = 1.2 = 1.0596cos 31° xB = 300 ft. Elliot R. 32.5875 s 2 .. y A = 36 ft 2 ( 90 tan 31° − 36 ) 32.088 ft/s 1.2 ( v0 )B = 300 = 119. To clear tree B: From (2). Phillip J.1 ft 2 d = xc − 330 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.4 ft/s v0 = 119.9304 cos 31° v0 = 119. Eisenberg. yB = 42 ft t B = 2.43) sin 31° cos 31° = 391.0596 s ( v0 ) A = 90 = 99. The larger value governs.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. xc = 2 tA = x A = 90 ft. Ferdinand P. William E. The horizontal and vertical motions are x t cos α 1 1 y = ( v0 sin α ) t − gt 2 = x tan α − gt 2 2 2 x = ( v0 cos α ) t or v0 = (1) or At the landing point C: And (a) t2 = yc = 0. From (3). Jr.13 ft 32. From (1). E. Clausen. Beer. From (1).9304 s ( tB )2 = 2 ( 300 tan 31° − 42 ) = 8.2 d = 61. Russell Johnston. 8/e. Solution 108.43 ft/s 2.

Beer.78247 s. Phillip J. t A = 0. Elliot R.69 ft Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. t B = 2. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Ferdinand P. Eisenberg. E.6240 s. ( v0 ) A = 129.. 8/e.1 ft/s d = 88. Clausen.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System (b) α = 27° By a similar calculation. . David Mazurek.09 ft/s xc = 418.7 ft v0 = 129. ( v0 )B = 128.31 ft/s v0 = 129.09 ft/s. Russell Johnston. Jr. William E.

Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 8/e.7852 s From the horizontal motion. or and y = y0 + ( v0 sin α ) t − y = y0 + x tan α − 2 ( y0 + x tan α − y ) g 1 2 gt . Russell Johnston. .2 m. Beer. Jr.6 + 4.2 = t cos α ( 0.1) = 0.6166 s 2 9. xB = 4. Using α = 40° the horizontal and vertical motions are x = ( v0 cos α ) t.6 m. v0 = x 4. Solution 109. Eisenberg. 2 tB = and yB = 1.98 m/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Elliot R..7852cos 40° ) v0 = 6. Ferdinand P. David Mazurek. William E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.2 tan 40° − 1.1 m 2 ( 0. Clausen. E. 2 t= x . Phillip J. v0 cos α and 1 2 gt 2 From which Using t2 = y0 = 0.81 t B = 0.

048 ) = 0. Clausen. x = 5 − 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 8/e. Russell Johnston.3480 s 2 9.048 ) = 0.57 0. Elliot R.81 t = 0. .. E.228 m.34 m/s x = 5 − 0. Jr.772 0.57 m t2 = 2 ( 2 + 4.430 m.569 s v0 = 4. Phillip J. Horizontal motion: x = ( v0 cos α ) t or 1 2 gt 2 t= x v0 cos α Vertical motion: y = y0 + v0 sin α t − y = y0 + x tan α − t2 = g 1 2 gt 2 2 ( y0 + x tan α − y ) (a) When d = 228 mm = 0.772 tan 30° − 3.57 tan 30° − 3.569cos 30° v0 = 9. Ferdinand P.772 m t2 = 2 ( 2 + 4. Eisenberg. Solution 110. 4. William E.430 = 4.27 m/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.81 t = 0.3243 s 2 9. David Mazurek.590 s v0 = (b) When d = 430 mm = 0. Beer.228 = 4.590cos 30° v0 = 9.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.

Horizontal motion. Vertical motion. Elliot R. David Mazurek. Eisenberg. gR sin β 2 tan 2 β gR cos 2 β 2sin β = v0 = cos β gR 2sin β Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. 8/e. William E. Solve for tB. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. ⎛ cos β ⎞ R gR 2 = 2 R ⎜ sin β + ⎟= tan β ⎠ sin β 2v0 tan 2 β ⎝ 2 v0 = Solve for v0. Phillip J. E. Solution 111. . yB = − R sin β = R cos β gR 2 − 2 tan β 2v0 tan 2 β Simplifying.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Ferdinand P. Jr. Place the origin at A with x-axis horizontal to the right and y-axis vertically upward. At point B. vx = v0 sin β x = ( v0 sin β ) t xB = R cos β = ( v0 sin β ) t B tB = R v0 tan β v y = v0 cos β y = ( v0 cos β ) t − 1 2 gt 2 At point B. Clausen. Beer.. Russell Johnston.

840 m/s v0 = 36. Beer. William E. Ferdinand P. Range for v0. α = 10°. David Mazurek.9163 − y For y = 0. x = 50 m.1 + 50 tan10° − y ) cos 2 10° v0 = 34. E. Elliot R.81)( 50 )2 = 12643. g = 9.8 10. v0 sin α − gt = 0 34.8 m/s ≤ v0 ≤ 36. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Solution 112. Eisenberg. Russell Johnston.81 m/s 2 Range of values of v0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. .1 m. Horizontal motion: vx = v0 cos α x = v0t cos α Vertical motion: v y = v0 sin α − gt y = y0 + ( v0 sin α ) t − 1 2 gt 2 Eliminate t. Solve equation (1) for v0 2 2v0 cos 2 α = gx 2 y0 + x tan α − y v0 = gx 2 = 2 ( y0 + x tan α − y ) ( 2 )( 2.5 m. (b) Maximum height. Jr. Clausen.. 8/e. Phillip J.6 m/s vy = 0 tm = v0 sin α g continued Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.649 m/s ( 9. For y = 1.5 m. t= x v0 cos α gx 2 2 2v0 cos 2 α y = y0 + x tan α − (1) Data: (a) y = 2.

Jr. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System v sin α 1  v0 sin α  ym = y0 + ( v0 sin α ) 0 − g  g 2  g  = y0 + 2 sin 2 10° 2 v0 sin 2 α = 2.840 m/s. For v0 = 36.81) 0 2 For v0 = 34.16 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Elliot R. William E.1643 m 3. Ferdinand P.1 + v 2g ( 2 )( 9. 8/e. Eisenberg.649 m/s Range for ym. Russell Johnston. E. David Mazurek. Phillip J.9655 m ym = 4. Beer.. . ym = 3. Clausen.97 m ≤ ym ≤ 4.

ymax = ( 86cos 3. Given: Horizontal motion: Vertical motion: v0 = 86 m/s. David Mazurek.13794 2 (86 ) α = 3. (c) From equation (1). Beer.96° )( 8. x A = 0. t= v y = v0 cos α − gt = 0 v0 cos α 86 cos 3. yB = 0 = ( v0 cosα ) xB v0 sin α − 2 gxB 2 2v0 sin 2 α (a) 2sin α cos α = gxB = sin 2α 2 v0 2α = 7.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.81 1 ( 9.96° ) Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. 8/e.51 s ! (b) Then. xB = 104 m. Clausen. Elliot R. yB = 0 x = ( v0 sin α ) t or t= x v0 sin α (1) v y = v0 cos α − gt y = ( v0 cos α ) t − 1 2 ( v0 cos α ) x gx 2 gt = − 2 v0 sin α 2 v0 sin 2 α ( ) 2 At point B.81)(8.746 )2 2 ymax = 375 m ! t B = 17. Solution 113.93° sin 2α = ( 9. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Phillip J.96° ! At maximum height. . Russell Johnston. Eisenberg. Ferdinand P.746 ) − tB = xB 104 = v0 sin α ( 86 )( sin 3.96° = = 8.81)(104 ) = 0.746 s g 9.. y A = 0. William E. Jr. E.

81)( 4.4° α = 14. Beer.222 ) = = 94.712 gx ( 9.22 ) = = 24. Ferdinand P.22 m at point C. David Mazurek. y = 1. Solution 114. E. Elliot R.45 89.8 = v0 cos α ( 47.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Eisenberg. William E.26547 and or 94.8 m at point C.712 )(1. .8 gx 2 2 (a) tan 2 α − 94.8) 2 2v0 y ( 94. Horizontal motion: x = ( v0 cos α ) t or t= 1 2 gt 2 x v0 cos α Vertical motion: y = ( v0 sin α ) t − = x tan α − gx 2 2 2v0 cos 2 α = x tan α − gx 2 1 + tan 2 α 2 2v0 ( ) tan 2 α − 2 ⎛ 2v0 2v 2 y ⎞ tan α + ⎜1 + 02 ⎟ = 0 ⎜ gx gx ⎟ ⎝ ⎠ Data: v0 = 170 km/h = 47. 8/e.073 4..869° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. 2 2v0 ( 2 )( 47. x = 4.073 = 0 tan α = 0. Clausen.9° t = 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.1052 s x 4.222 ) cos14.712α + 25. Phillip J.222 m/s.869° (b) t= α = 14. Jr. Russell Johnston.

E. Horizontal motion: Vertical motion: x = ( v0 cos α ) t or t= x v0 cos α y = y0 + ( v0 sin α ) t = y0 + x tan α − gx 2 2 2v0 cos 2 α gx 2 1 + tan 2 α 2 2v0 = y0 + x tan α − ( ) from which Data: tan 2 α − 2 ⎡ 2v 2 ( y − y0 ) ⎤ 2v0 tan α − ⎢ 0 + 1⎥ = 0 2 gx gx ⎢ ⎥ ⎣ ⎦ v0 = 40 mi/h = 58. Phillip J.25285 α = 76.2755)( 2.0226 and 0. Solution 115.2755 tan α + 1. William E.0 ft. Russell Johnston. 8/e. Jr.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.76° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.667 ft/s.2755 gx ( 32..19° α = 14. x = 50 ft 2 2v0 ( 2 )( 58. Beer.2 ft.2 )( 50 ) 2 2v0 ( y − y0 ) 2 gx 2 = ( 4. Clausen.19° v0 sin α − gt gx = − tan α + v0 cos α ( v0 cosα )2 = − 0. y = 2.0 ) = 0.01710 50 tan 2 α − 4.2 )( 50 ) = 0.667 ) = = 4.667 cos14. .2 − 2. Eisenberg. David Mazurek. Elliot R.01710 = 0 (a) Solving the quadratic equation.04° (b) tan θ = − vy vx =− and 14. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. tan α = 4. y0 = 2.24483 θ = 13. Ferdinand P.19°)2 ( 32.25285 + ( 58.

84 ft 2/s2 vy = vy ( v y )0 = 15. Vertical motion: v2 − vy y 2 2 ay = − g with or 2 vy = 0 at point B. E. Phillip J.47287 s g ( vy )0 = 15. Jr.90 ft α = 25.79° Horizontal motion: (a) (b) From above.79 )( 0.226 = 0. Eisenberg.43504 35 α = 25. Ferdinand P. Elliot R.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. 8/e.. Clausen.8° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.2)( 3. x = ( v0 cos α ) t xB = ( 35cos 25. ( )0 = 2a ( y − y0 ) ( vy )0 = 2 g ( yB − y0 ) or ( vy )0 = ( 2)( 32. William E. Solution 116. . David Mazurek. Beer. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Russell Johnston.47287 ) xB = 14.226 ft/s ( )0 − gt = sin α = v0 or tB = ( v y )0 = 0.6) = 231.

. 8/e. Elliot R. Horizontal motion: x = ( v0 cos α ) t or t= x v0 cos α Vertical motion: y = y0 + ( v0 sin α ) t − 1 2 1 gx 2 gt = y0 + x tan α − 2 2 ( v0 cos α )2 gx 2 1 + tan 2 α 2 2v0 y = y0 + x tan α − u = x tan α ( ) Let so that y = y0 + u − g x2 + u2 2 2v0 ( ) Solving for x 2 : x2 = 2 2v0 ( u + y0 − y ) − u 2 g The maximum value of x is required: d x2 du v0 = 36 ft/s. Russell Johnston. 2 d x2 du ( ) = 0. E.2484 ft ( xmax )2 = ( 2 )( 36 ) 32.. Phillip J.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Jr. David Mazurek.466 ft d = 7. yB = 18 ft u= ( 36 ) 32.6 ft. − 2u = 0 or u= 2 v0 g 2 ( ) = 2v 2 0 g Data: y0 = 3.5 xmax = 21. Clausen. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. William E. Ferdinand P.97 ft continued (a) Maximum distance: Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.2 2 ( 40. Eisenberg.6 − 18 ) − ( 40.2484 + 3.2 = 40.78 ft 2 d = xmax − 13. Solution 117. Beer.2484 )2 = 460.

Russell Johnston. E.69 ft Since y > 18 ft.5 )(1. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Clausen.9° ( 32.5) y = 3. William E.466 α = 61. y = y0 + x tan α + gx 2 2 ( v0 cos α ) 2 α = 61. the stream clears the edge.2 )(13. Beer. ..875 ) − 2 2 [36 cos 61. Ferdinand P.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System (b) Angle α .875 xmax xmax 21. 8/e. Elliot R. Phillip J. tan α = xmax tan α u 40. David Mazurek. Jr.6 + (13.93°] 2 y = 18.2484 = = = 1.93° Check the edge. Eisenberg.

Let β = 90° − α Horizontal motion: x = ( v0 cos β ) t y = ( v0 sin β ) t − or t= x v0 cos β Vertical motion: At point B. Ferdinand P. Beer. Maximum values of xB and d . Use β = 60°. Solution 118.2 2 d max = 298 ft α = 90° − β = 90° − 60° α = 30° continued Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.. 8/e. E. Elliot R.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Eisenberg. William E. ( xB )max (a) (b) = 2 2v0 v2 ( tan 60° − tan 30°) cos2 60 = 0.57735 0 g g d max = ( xB )max cos 30° = 2 2 v0 2 (120 ) = 3 g 3 32. Russell Johnston. 2 2v0 2v 2 ( tan β − tan 30° ) cos2 β = 0 sin β cos β − tan 30° cos 2 β g g ( ) Differentiating with respect to β and setting equal to zero. . 2 dxB 2v0 = cos 2 β − sin 2 β + 2 tan 30° cos β sin β dβ g ( ) 120° = 2 2v0 ( cos 2β + tan 30° sin 2β ) = 0 g tan 2β = − cot 30° = − 3 or 2β = − 60° and β = − 30° and 60°. Jr. Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Clausen. David Mazurek. xB = 1 2 1 2 gt = x tan β − gx 2 sec 2 β /v0 2 2 1 2 2 gxB sec 2 β /v0 2 yB = xB tan 30° = xB tan β − Solving for xB .

097 tan 30° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.2 2 = 129.2 2  v  v2 x = ( v0 cos β )  0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System At the point of maximum height. Ferdinand P.068 ft 3 g 3 32. Elliot R. Beer..57735 0 g g 2  v  1  v  y = ( v0 sin β )  0. Russell Johnston. E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Jr.288675 0 g g  = ( 0. 8/e. David Mazurek. . the projectile path is parallel to the surface so that vy vx = tan 30° or v0 sin β − gt = tan 30° v0 cos β or t= v0 cos β v ( tan β − tan 30°) = 0.5 ft (c) hmax = y − x tan 30° = 149. William E.097 ft hmax = 74.57735 0  g 2  g  = 2 1 v0 1 (120 ) = = 149.57735 0  = 0. Eisenberg.288675)(120 ) 32.57735 0  − g  0. Phillip J. Clausen.068 − 129.

7509 γ = 138.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Clausen. Phillip J. . Ferdinand P. Law of cosines. Elliot R.7° 48.. David Mazurek.7° west of south Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Jr. William E. Eisenberg. Sketch the velocity vector diagram showing vB = vA + vB/A. Solution 119.7° γ − 90° = 48. E. Beer. 2 2 2 vB/ A = v A + vB − 2v AvB cos γ cos γ = 2 2 2 v A + vB − vB/ A 2v AvB = ( 700 )2 + ( 500 )2 − (1125)2 ( 2 )( 700 )( 500 ) = − 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 8/e. Russell Johnston.

v P = v A + v P/ A v A = v P − v P/ A v A = (110cos 30° − 120cos 20° ) i + (110sin 30° − 120sin 20° ) j = ( − 17. Let i and j be unit vectors in directions east and north respectively. Russell Johnston. . Solution 120.4 km/h tan θ = θ = 51. v P = (110 km/h )( cos 30° i + sin 30° j) But Velocity of air. E. Clausen. William E. Beer. v P/ A = (120 km/h )( cos 20° i + sin 20° j) Velocity of plane. 8/e.50 )2 + (13. Velocity of plane relative to air.4 km/h at 51. Phillip J..96 km/h ) j vA = (17.50 km/h ) i + (13.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Elliot R. Jr.50 13.96 )2 17.96 = 22. David Mazurek. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Eisenberg.4° v A = 22.4° west of north Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Ferdinand P.

697 α = 27. Clausen.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. α + 30° = 57. Elliot R.0° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. v B = v A + v B/ A v B/ A = v B − v A = v B + ( −v A ) Sketch vector addition on a diagram as shown.7 mi/h 57.. Russell Johnston. Beer. 8/e.0°. Eisenberg. Law of cosines: 2 2 2 vB/ A = vB + v A − 2vBv A cos120° = ( 30 ) + ( 25 ) − ( 2 )( 30 )( 25 ) cos120° = 2275 ( mi/h ) 2 2 2 vB/ A = 47.0° v B/ A = 47. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.697 mi/h Law of sines: sin α sin120° = vA vB/ A sin α = 25sin120° = 0.45392 47. Solution 121. E. David Mazurek. Phillip J. . William E. Jr. Ferdinand P.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Solution 122.5sin 62.54127 2. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.5 sin120° = 0. Beer. Law of sines: sin β = sin β sin120° = 1. .5 2. Jr.5sin 60° = = 4. David Mazurek. Elliot R.77° Law of angles: α + β + 120° = 180° α = 60° − β = 27. Eisenberg.63 ft/s 62.77° = = 4.4 1. 90° − α = 62.63 ft/s sin θ sin 57. William E.759 ft/s sin θ sin 57.76 ft/s 60° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Phillip J..77° = 57.77° Law of sines: vB = sin ( 90° − α ) sin θ = vB vA (b) v A sin ( 90° − α ) 4.23° Law of sines: vB/ A = sin 60° sin θ = vB/ A vA (a) v A sin 60° 4.23° v B = 4.77 ° θ + 60° + 90° − α = 180° θ = 180° − 60° − 62. First solve geometry triangle ABC. Russell Johnston. Clausen.23° v B/ A = 4.4 β = 32.23° Now v B = v A + v B/ A Sketch the vector addition triangle. 8/e. Ferdinand P. E.

E.7005 × 103 ( km/h ) vB/ A = 136. 8/e.25 km 2 (b) d = rB/ A d = 3. By law of cosines: 2 2 2 vB/ A = v A + vB − 2v AvB cos155° = 802 + 602 − ( 2 )( 80 )( 60 ) cos155° = 18.7 α = 10. By law of cosines: 2 2 2 rB/ A = rA + rB − 2rArB cos 25° = 42 + 7 2 − ( 2 )( 4 )( 7 ) cos 25° = 14. Clausen. Eisenberg. William E.69° (a) v B/ A = 136. Ferdinand P. Jr. v B = v A + v B/ A Sketch the vector addition as shown in the velocity diagram. Elliot R.77 km Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. David Mazurek.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Russell Johnston..18543 136.7 km/h 2 Law of sines: sin α = sin α sin155° = vB vB/ A 60 sin155° = 0. .7 km/h 10.69° Determine positions relative to the crossing. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. rA = v At = 80 ⎛ 10 ⎞ rB = ( rB )0 + v Bt = 60 ⎜ ⎟ ⎝ 60 ⎠ 3 = 4 km 60 ⎛ 3 ⎞ + 60 ⎜ ⎟ ⎝ 60 ⎠ = 7 km 25° rB = rA + rB/ A Sketch the vector addition as shown. Beer. Solution 123. Phillip J.

.79 × 103 ( km/h ) v A = 516. E. Begin with Subtracting or vC = v A + vC/ A and vC = v B + vC/B 0 = v A + vC/ A − v B − v C/B = v A/B + vC/ A − vC/B v B/ A = − v A/B = vC/ A + − vC/B = − vC/B + vC/ A 2 2 2 vB/ A = vC/ A + vB/ A − 2vC/ AvB/ A cos 65° ( ) Sketch the vector addition as shown.72 × 103 ( km/h ) vB/ A = 533. Phillip J.03°. Law of cosines: 2 2 2 2 2 v A = vC + vC/ A − 2vC vC/ A cos (180° − 15° ) 2 2 v A = ( 48 ) + ( 470 ) − ( 2 )( 48 )( 470 ) cos165° = 266.5 km/h Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Jr. 75° − α = 12. Eisenberg. Elliot R.97° v B/ A = 534 km/h 12. By law of cosines: = ( 470 ) + ( 520 ) − ( 2 )( 470 )( 520 ) cos 65° 2 2 = 284.97° (a) v C = v A + v C/ A or v A = v C + − v C/ A ( ) Sketch the vector addition as shown. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Russell Johnston.88322 533. Beer.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. 8/e.6 α = 62. David Mazurek. Solution 124. Clausen. Ferdinand P.. William E.6 km/h 2 Law of sines: sin α = sin α sin 65° = vC/B vB/ A 520sin 65° = 0.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Law of sines: sin β = sin β sin165° = vC/ A vA 470 sin165° = 0..5 90° − 13. Ferdinand P. 8/e. Phillip J. David Mazurek.62° = 76. Eisenberg. Jr.4°  15  rC/B = vC/Bt = ( 520 )    60  rC/B = 130 km 40° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.62 ° (b) (c) 76. E.23551 516. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Elliot R. Clausen. Russell Johnston. Beer. .4° v A = 517 km/h or β = 13. William E.

E. David Mazurek.667 ) = 1.98 ft/s 63. Beer. Ferdinand P. 2 2 2 vC = v A + vC/ A = (1. 8/e.667 ft/s 2 3 3 Constraint of point C: −2v A + vC/ A = 0 (a) 2 ( d − x A ) + yC/ A = constant and − 2a A + aC/ A = 0 aC/ A = 2a A = 2 ( 0. Clausen. Let d be the distance between the left and right supports. William E. Eisenberg.666)2 = 8.333 ft/s 2 Velocity vectors after 2s: v A = ( 0. Constraint of entire cable: xB + ( xB − x A ) + 2 ( d − x A ) = constant 2vB − 3v A = 0 aA = and 2aB − 3a A = 0 or a A = 0.4° (b) Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Russell Johnston.333 ft/s 2 aC/ A = 1. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.333 ft/s vC/ A = (1.333 θ = 63.. Elliot R. Jr.666 = 2.666 ft/s v C = v A + v C/ A Sketch the vector addition.333) 2 + (2.4° vC = 2.667 )( 2 ) = 1. Solution 125.981 ft/s tan θ = vC/ A vA = 2.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. 1.333)( 2 ) = 2.667 ft/s 2 2 2 aB = (1) = 0. Phillip J.8889 ( ft/s ) 2 vC = 2. .

Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.8 )( 8 ) cos 60° vP = 6.6°.5535 2.6°.0863 ϕ = −68. Eisenberg.6° 68. v P = 6. Ferdinand P.8 cos 30°i + 4.8sin 60° = 0. α = 150° Method 1: Sketch the vector addition./s By law of sines: sin β sin 60° = vA vP or sin β = 4. David Mazurek./s 66. . α = 120° + 135° = 255° Method 2: Use unit vectors i and j.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Phillip J.3274 )2 or = 5.0863)2 + ( 5. Beer.97 in.97 2 2 β = 36./s −5. By law of cosines: 2 2 2 vP = v A + vP/ A − 2v AvP/ A cos 60° = ( 4. E.72 in./s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. William E. Clausen.1569i + 2..6° v P = 5.4 j v P = v A + v P/ A = 2.59604 6. Jr. 8/e. Vector Vector v P/ A = 8 in.7274 j Vector v A = 4.72 in.8 in. Russell Johnston. Vector v P/ A = 8 cos α i + 8 sin α j = −2. Solution 126.3274 j vP = tan ϕ = ( vP ) 2 + ( v P ) 2 x y ( vP ) y ( vP ) x = = ( 2.3274 = 2./s v P = v A + v P/ A (a) θ = 30°.0706i − 7.97 in./s α 30° α = 30° + θ + 90° = 120° + θ v A = 4.8 sin 30° j = 4. β + 30° = 66.0863i − 5.6° (b) θ = 135°.8 ) + ( 8 ) − ( 2 )( 4. Elliot R.

Ferdinand P. (b) Velocity of block B when t = 3 s.4° v B = 157. David Mazurek. Clausen. . Jr.516 )( 3) = 157. Draw vector diagram showing a B = a A + a B/A Law of cosines.5210 ϕ = 31.516 sin ϕ = 0. Beer.5 mm/s 31. William E.4° (a) Acceleration of block B. sin ϕ sin 20° = 80 52.516 mm/s 2 Law of sines. E. Russell Johnston.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.5 mm/s 2 vB = aBt = ( 52.5 mm/s 31. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.. 8/e. a B = 52. 2 aB = 802 + 1202 − ( 2 )( 80 )(120 ) cos 20° = 2758 mm 2 /s 2 aB = 52.4° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Solution 127. Elliot R. Phillip J. Eisenberg.

(b) yB/D = yB 1 ( − 0.81)(8) = 156. Clausen. Russell Johnston. E. William E..81) t 2 2 v y = 12. David Mazurek.55 m/s 86. (a) At time of catch.5° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.766 m/s ( vB/D ) y = 12. Ferdinand P.554 s v x = ( v x )0 + aD t . .528 m/s 1 aD t 2 2 xdeck = ( vx )0 t + Motion of the ball relative to the deck: ( vB/D )x = ( vx )0 − ⎡( vx )0 + aDt ⎤ = −aDt ⎣ ⎦ 1 1 ⎡ ⎤ xB/D = ( vx )0 t − ⎢( vx )0 t + aDt 2 ⎥ = − aDt 2 2 2 ⎣ ⎦ ( vB/D ) y = ( vy )0 − gt. Solution 128.554) = + 0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.96 m2/s2 ( vy )0 = 12.528 m/s or 0. Beer.528 − tcatch = 2. vy = vy yB = v y 2 ( )0 − gt 2 xball = ( vx )0 t ( )0 t − 1 gt 2 . and 1 ( 9. Phillip J.528 m/s At time of catch. 8/e. ( vy ) − ( v y )0 = −2gy 2 vy = 0 and At maximum height. Jr.3)( 2. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 2 y = ymax ( vy ) = 2gymax = ( 2)( 9. Eisenberg. or Motion of the deck: y = 0 = 12.554 )2 2 d = 0. Horizontal motion of the ball: Vertical motion of the ball: v x = ( v x )0 .3)( 2.979 m d = xD/B = − ( vB/D ) x = − ( − 0. Elliot R.766 m/s v B/D = 12.

9444 6 = 18.2 )( 0. 1 y = − gt 2 2 t= −2 y = g − ( 2 )( −5) = 0. Velocity vector of sand at impact. Jr. Phillip J. 2 2 2 vS/B = vS + vB − 2vS vB cos ϕ = 18.55728 s 32.512° v S = 18. a = 32. Clausen.9444 )2 + ( 6 )2 17.512° Law of cosines.92092 + 82 − ( 2 )(18.. Vertical motion of sand. William E.358 vS/B = 20.9444 ft/s Horizontal motion of sand. v y = gt = ( 32.2 Downward velocity component at impact. Elliot R.512° 71. Draw vector diagram showing ϕ = 71.512° = 403.512° + 15° = 86.0894 ft/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Ferdinand P. Eisenberg.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.9209 )(8 ) cos86.2 ft/s2 . David Mazurek. y0 = 0 yB = − 5 ft At impact with conveyor belt B. v B = 8 ft/s 15° v S /B = v S − v B . Russell Johnston. vS = vx = 6 ft/s (17. Beer.9209 ft/s tan ϕ = ϕ = 71. . Solution 129.9209 ft/s Velocity of conveyor belt B. E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.55728 ) = 17. v0 = 0. 8/e.

Russell Johnston. sin α = sin α sin ϕ = vS vS/B vS sin ϕ 18. Elliot R.1° Velocity of sand relative to conveyor belt B. William E. v S/B = 20. Clausen.512° = = 0. David Mazurek.9209 sin 86.1° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Jr.1° α + 15° = 85..COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Law of sines.9401 20. Ferdinand P. Beer.0894 vS /B α = 70.1 ft/s 85. Eisenberg. 8/e. Phillip J. E. . Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

2 ) = 13. vT = 0.5 ft x = x0 + v0t + 0. = 0. Acceleration.25 v = v0 + at Velocity at 1. Ferdinand P. Eisenberg.3333) 2 a= ( 2 )( 0.5 ft/s As a vector. David Mazurek. Jr.25 ft/s 2 v 2 − v0 = 2 ( x − x0 ) ( 2 )(10 − 0 ) Time.3333)2 = 0. Solution 130. Acceleration. 6 in. Motion of the suitcase relative to the truck.5 ft/s 20° Motion of truck. v = v0 + at v = 0 + ( 0.5) (1. E. Clausen.2 s. ∫ 0 a dt = ∫ v0 dv at = v − v0 t v t= v − v0 15 − 0 = = 1.2 s. Beer. .COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.5625 )(1. = 0 + (11..3333 s a 11. Russell Johnston.2 ) = 0.5 = 0 + 0 + 1 2 at 2 1 2 a (1.25 )(1. v S/T = 13. Elliot R. ∫ xa a dx = ∫ v0 v dv ax − ax0 = 1 2 1 2 v − v0 2 2 2 x v a= 2 (15 ) − 0 = 11.675 ft/s As a vector. William E.5625 ft/s 2 Velocity at 1. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Phillip J.675 ft/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. 8/e.

Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 0.5) + ( 0.2 s. William E.579 vS = 12. Jr. Clausen.675) − ( 2 )(13.675 vS = sin α sin 20° sin α = 0. Eisenberg.0° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Beer.0° β = 20° + 1. 2 vS = (13.01794 12.675 sin 20° = 0. E.87 ft/s 21. v S = vT + v S/T Law of cosines.87 α = 1.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Velocity of suitcase at 1. Phillip J.0° v S = 12.0° = 21. Ferdinand P. Elliot R. 8/e.5) cos 20° 2 2 = 165..87 ft/s Law of sines. Russell Johnston. . David Mazurek.

Russell Johnston.25)(1.5 ft/s As a vector.3333) 2 = 0. v = v0 + at v = 0 + ( 0. E. Phillip J. Ferdinand P. Motion of the suitcase relative to the truck.2 s. Elliot R. Acceleration.25 a v = v0 + at Velocity at 1. Solution 130.5 ft/s 20° Motion of truck. .5 ft x = x0 + v0t + 0. vT = 0.5) 2 (1. Clausen. Acceleration.3333 s 11. t v ∫ 0 a dt = ∫ v0 dv at = v − v0 t= v − v0 15 − 0 = = 1. Eisenberg.5 = 0 + 0 + 1 2 at 2 1 2 a (1.675 ft/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. = 0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Jr.25 ft/s2 v 2 − v0 = 2 ( x − x0 ) ( 2 )(10 − 0 ) Time. ∫ xa a dx = ∫ v0 v dv ax − ax0 = 1 2 1 2 v − v0 2 2 2 x v a= 2 (15) − 0 = 11.675 ft/s As a vector. David Mazurek.2 ) = 13. v S/T = 13.2 s. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. 6 in..3333) Velocity at 1. William E. 8/e. Beer. = 0 + (11.5625 ft/s 2 a= ( 2 )( 0.5625 )(1.2 ) = 0.

William E. 8/e. Jr. E.0° v S = 12.2 s.5 ) + ( 0.675 ) − ( 2 )(13. 2 vS = (13.579 vS = 12. Eisenberg. Phillip J. Elliot R.87 α = 1. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Beer.675 vS = sin α sin 20° sin α = 0.0° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.87 ft/s Law of sines. v S = vT + v S/T Law of cosines. Ferdinand P.675 sin 20° = 0.01794 12.5 ) cos 20° 2 2 = 165. Clausen.0° = 21.. . 0. Russell Johnston.0° β = 20° + 1.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Velocity of suitcase at 1. David Mazurek.87 ft/s 21.

43 km/h ) j vW = 74. David Mazurek. William E. Let the x-axis be directed east.89i + 206. Eisenberg.80 km/h ) i − ( 33. Jr.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Airspeed: Plane relative to ship: Ship: (a) Velocity of airplane.57 km/h ) j (b) Wind velocity. E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.89 km/h ) i + ( 206. Elliot R. and the y-axis be directed north..6° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.57 j − 480 ( cos 30°i + sin 30° j) = − ( 66. Russell Johnston.7 km/h 26. Phillip J. Ferdinand P. 8/e. Clausen. v A = v B + v A/B = −20 j + 416 ( cos 33°i + sin 33° j) v A/W = 480 km/h 30° = ( 480 km/h )( cos 30°i + sin 30° j) v A/B = ( 416 km/h )( cos 33°i + sin 33° j) km/h v B = 20 km/h = −20 j = ( 348. Solution 132. Beer.6° = 348. . vW = v A + vW / A = v A − v A/W v A = 405 km/h 30.

or ( )1 (sin 50°i − cos 50°j) − 12i − ( vW /B )2 ( − cos 50°i − sin 50°j) ( sin 50°) ( vW /B )1 + ( cos 50°) ( vW /B )2 ( − cos 50°) ( vW /B )1 + ( sin 50°) ( vW /B )2 = 12 = −3 (1) (2) ( vW /B )1 = 11.519 mi/h ) i − ( 4. Beer. the wind velocity is vW = ( v B )1 + vW /B ( )1 = 3 + vW /B ( )1 ) 50° = 3j + vW /B ( )1 (sin 50°i − cos 50°j) )2 ( − cos 50°i − sin 50°j) From data obtained as the boat travels east. Russell Johnston.121 mi/h.0° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. . Eisenberg.148 mi/h ) j vW = 9. and the y-axis be directed north. David Mazurek. William E. Ferdinand P. it is vW = ( v B )2 + vW /B ( )2 = 12 + vW /B ( 50° = 12i + vW /B ( Subtracting. ( vw/B )2 = 5. Elliot R.148 mi/h ) j vW = 12i + 5. 8/e.415 ( − cos50°i − sin 50° j) = ( 8. Solution 133. Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.415 mi/h vW = 3j + 11. Then. Jr. E. From data obtained as the boat travels north..121( sin 50°i − cos 50° j) = ( 8.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Let the x-axis be directed east. 0 = 3j + vW /B x-components: y-components: Solving (1) and (2).519 mi/h ) i − ( 4.48 mi/h 26. Clausen.

vW = 6i + ( 4 + 6 ) j = ( 6 mi/h ) i + (10 mi/h ) j vW = 62 + 102 = 11. E.66 mi/h tan ϕ = 10 .COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. 6 ϕ = 59. i components: ⎛ 2 ⎞ ⎛ ⎞ 2 vW = v 2 + vW /2 = ⎜ vW /2 ⎟ i + ⎜ 4 + vW /2 ⎟ j ⎜ 2 ⎟ ⎜ ⎟ 2 ⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠ 6= 2 vW /2 2 Substitute into (2).66 mi/h ) 59. Velocity of ship: Velocity of wind relative to ship: Velocity of wind: Second observation. Eisenberg. William E. Velocity of ship: Velocity of wind relative to ship: v 2 = ( 4 mi/h ) i ⎛ 2 2 vW /2 = vW /2 ⎜ ⎜ 2 i+ 2 ⎝ v1 = ( 6 mi/h ) i vW /1 = vW /1 j vW = v1 + vW /1 = 6i + vW /1 j ( ) ( ) (1) ( ) ⎞ j⎟ ⎟ ⎠ (2) Velocity of wind: Equate expressions (1) and (2) for vW. Clausen. Solution 134. Jr.0° vW = (11. . Let unit vector i point east and unit vector j point north. First observation. David Mazurek. Russell Johnston. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Phillip J.0° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Ferdinand P. Elliot R. Beer. 8/e..

Eisenberg. Ferdinand P. .01008 m/s 2 (c) r = 176 km = 176.001796 m/s 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Jr. E.444 m/s 2 ( 44. Phillip J. v = 160 km/h = 44. 000 2 a = 0. Russell Johnston. (a) r = 16 km = 16. 000 a = 0.111) v2 = r 96. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. v = 64 km/h = 17.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. 8/e.111 m/s 176 − 16 2 a= ( 31.000 m. Clausen. David Mazurek. 000 (b) r = 96 km = 96. v = 160 − a = 0.1235 m/s 2 64 − 160 ( 96 − 16 ) = 112 km/h = 31. 000 m. Solution 135. William E.000 m.788 m/s a= (17.. Elliot R.778) v2 = r 176.444 ) v2 a= = r 16. Beer.

Jr. Beer. E.25 m/s 2 (a) aA = aB = a A/B = 2 vA ρA ρB 2 vB = = 2 vA 100 ( vA − 1) 96 2 2 ( v − 1) = 0. Russell Johnston. William E. Elliot R.. Solution 136. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Velocities: v A/B = v A − v B = 1 m/s Accelerations: a A/B = a A − a B = 0. Ferdinand P. Phillip J. . 8/e.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Clausen.25 vA − A 100 96 2 2 v A − 50v A + 625 = 0 v A = ± 25 v A = 25 m/s ! vB = 24 m/s ! (b) vB = 25 − 1 = 24 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. David Mazurek. Eisenberg.

at = 0. Elliot R. Eisenberg. 8/e.6 km/h ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. . Clausen. William E. E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. an = v2 ρ . David Mazurek. Ferdinand P. Solution 137.125 m/s vmax = 97. Russell Johnston.35 m 2 /s 2 vmax = 27. 2 vmax = ρ an 2 vmax = ( 25)( 3g ) = ( 25 )( 3)( 9. Beer. Jr. Phillip J.81) = 735.. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Solution 138. Beer. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.09706 ρ A = ( 0. Eisenberg. . Elliot R. William E. v2 ( ac )  = c .. Phillip J. E. Clausen.8 n  B ρ B = 0. nA  ρA v2 ( ac )  = c nA  ρA 2 vc = ρ A ( ac )n  = ρ B ( ac )n   A  B   ρ B ( ac )n  A 0.66 = = = 0. Russell Johnston. 8/e.09706 ρ A ( ac )  6.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.8235 mm d B = 2 ρ B = 11. Ferdinand P. Jr.65 mm ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. David Mazurek.09706 )( 60 ) = 5.

.25 m/s 2 ρ ( 20 )2 350 = 1. . Clausen.25)2 + (1. v = v0 + at t = 20 + ( −1. Jr. 8/e. an = v0 2 = v0 = 72 km/h = 20 m/s at = −1.14286 m/s 2 2 a = at2 + an = ( −1.25)2 + ( 0. Solution 139.406 m/s 2 ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Ferdinand P. Phillip J. Tangential acceleration. Elliot R. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.14286 )2 a = 1.25 )( 4 ) = 15 m/s an = v2 = ρ (15)2 350 = 0. William E. David Mazurek. Russell Johnston. Beer. (a) Total acceleration at t = 0. Eisenberg.694 m/s 2 ! (b) Total acceleration at t = 4 s.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. E.6426 m/s 2 2 a = at2 + an = ( −1. Initial speed.6426 )2 a = 1.

E.. Phillip J. 8/e. 2 a = at2 + an = (1. Radius of circle. William E. L = π D = 130 π meters (1) ρ= 1 D = 65m 2 Tangential acceleration of starting portion of run. . Solution 140. David Mazurek. From (2) at = 130 π = 1. Length of run. (2) and (3) into (4) 130 π = 8 at + 4 at ( 54 − 4 ) Solving for at .854 )2 = 65 = 0. Beer. vm = at t1 = ( at ) ( 4 ) = 4 at m/s s1 = Constant speed portion of run.9635 ) = 7. Russell Johnston. Jr. an = 2 vm ρ ( 7.9490 m/s 2 Maximum total acceleration. 1 1 2 2 at t1 = ( at ) ( 4 ) = 8 at m 2 2 v = vm s = s1 + vm ( t − t1 ) Substituting (1).854 m/s Normal acceleration during constant speed portion of run. Eisenberg. Ferdinand P.9635)2 + ( 0.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Elliot R. Clausen.9490 )2 a = 2.18 m/s 2 ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.9635 m/s 2 8 + 200 (4) (2) (3) vm = ( 4 )(1. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. E. Ferdinand P.  12  Time: t= v − v0 7. 8/e. Phillip J. Jr. Russell Johnston.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.329 ft/s t = 8. For uniformly decelerated motion: At t = 9 s.93 ft/s 2 an = v2 ρ . or at = −16. David Mazurek. William E.667 )      1/2 = 128.667 v = 7. Elliot R. Eisenberg.329 − 150 = at −16.72 ft 2 /s 2 .667 ft/s 2 2 a 2 = at2 + an Total acceleration: an =  a 2 − at2    Normal acceleration: 1/2 2 2 = (130 ) − ( −16. Solution 141. v = v0 + at t 0 = 150 − at ( 9 ) .56 s ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. . Beer. Clausen.93) = 53. where ρ= 1 5 diameter = ft 2 12  5 v 2 = ρ an =   (128.

70 )2 = 450 = 10. Solution 142.14 ft/s 2 ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Phillip J. Beer. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.185 ft/s 2 (b) Magnitude of total acceleration: 2 a = at2 + an = ( 4.86 ft 2 2 v1 = v0 + 2at s at = 2 2 ( 95.5133 ft/s2 v1 − v0 = 2s ( 2 )(1006.70 ft/s vB = 54.5 ft 2 /s 2 (a) At t = 15 s.33 ft/s π 2 ( 450 ) + 300 = 1006.5133)(15 ) = 67.5 mi/h ! Since v < vB . Eisenberg. 2 2 vB = v0 + 2at sB where sB = π 2 ( 450 ) = 706. .86 ft 2 vB = 0 + ( 2 )( 4.86 ) = 6380.185)2 a = 11. Jr. E.33) + 0 = 4.5133)2 + (10.88 ft/s v = v0 + at t = 0 + ( 4.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.5133)( 706. the car is still on the curve. Ferdinand P. Clausen. 8/e. David Mazurek. Normal component of acceleration: an = v2 ρ = 450 ft ρ ( 67.86 ) 2 At point B. vB = 79. Speeds: Distance: Tangential component of acceleration: v0 = 0 s= v1 = 65 mi/h = 95. William E.. Elliot R. Russell Johnston.

44 m/s ( a B )n = 2 vB ρ = (144.32 m/s 2 30° a B/ A = a B − a A = ( a B )t + ( a B )n − a A = [2 60° ] + [ 104.34 m/s 2 i − 50. Jr. (a) v A = 420 km/h v B = v A + v B/ A or . Ferdinand P. E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Clausen.9 or α = 70. . Phillip J.4° ! (b) a A = 6 m/s 2 ( aB )t = 2 m/s 2 60° vB = 520 km/h = 144. Russell Johnston.4° v B/ A = 478 km/h 70. Solution 143. William E.32 30° ] − [ 6 ] = 2 ( − cos 60°i + sin 60° j) + 104.43 m/s2 j aB/ A = 109. 8/e.32 ( − cos 30°i − sin 30° j) − 6i = − 97. v B = 520 km/h 60° v B/ A = v B − v A = v B + ( − v A ) Sketch the vector addition as shown.6 m/s 2 27. Beer.. Elliot R.4° ! ( ) ( ) Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Eisenberg. 2 2 2 vB/ A = v A + vB − 2v AvB cos 60° = ( 420 ) + ( 520 ) − ( 2 )( 420 )( 520 ) cos 60° 2 2 or vB/ A = 477. David Mazurek.44 )2 200 = 104.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.9 km/h sin α sin 60° = 520 477.

8/e. Jr.75 ( cos 45°i + sin 45° j) − 8 ( cos 60°i − sin 60° j) − 6.25 ( − cos 30°i − sin 30° j) = 8.12 j = 94. William E. Phillip J.31 m/s 2 i + 12.75 m/s 2 45° a B/ A = a B − a A = ( a B )t + ( a B )n − ( a A )t − ( a A )n = 3 ( cos 45°i − sin 45° j) + 6. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.9° ! (b) ( a A )t = 8 m/s 2 2 vA 60°.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. v B = 162 km/h = 45 m/s 45° v B/ A = v B − v A = 45 ( cos 45°i − sin 45° j) − 50 ( cos120°i + sin120° j) = 56.2 m/s 52.25 m/s 2 30° ρB ( 45)2 300 = 6. Elliot R.18 m/s 2 ( ) ( ) 56. .07 m/s 2 j or a B/ A = 15.8° ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Clausen.82i − 75.9° vB/ A = 339 km/h 52. Ferdinand P. E. Beer. David Mazurek. Solution 144.. ( a B )t = 3 m/s 2 45° ( a A )n = ( a B )n = ρA 2 vB ( 50 )2 = 400 = = 6. Eisenberg. Russell Johnston. (a) v A = 180 km/h = 50 m/s 30°.

(a) As water leaves nozzle.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Ferdinand P.. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.55 ) = an 9. Beer. . E.81 sin 55° = 8.81 2 ρ= ρ = 4.04 m/s 2 an = v2 ρ 2 v 2 (8) ρ= = an 8.96 m ! (b) At maximum height of stream. William E.38 m ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Jr. Russell Johnston. Solution 145.04 ρ = 7. Phillip J. Clausen. Elliot R. v = ( vx )0 = 8 sin 55° = 6.55 m/s an = g = 9. David Mazurek.81 m/s 2 an = v2 ρ v 2 ( 6. 8/e. v = 8 m/s an = g sin 55° = 9. Eisenberg.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. E. William E. The minimum value of ρ occurs at the highest point of the trajectory where cos θ = 1 and v = vx = v0 cos α Then 2 v 2 cos 2 α (14.48 m/s ! ( 9.5 + 6 tan 3° − 0. . Minimum radius of curvature of trajectory. gx 2 2 2 v0 cos 2 α Solving (1) for v0 and applying result at point B v0 = gx 2 = 2 ( y0 + x tan α − y ) cos 2 α ( 2 )(1.3 m ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Horizontal motion. Clausen.97 ) ( cos 2 3° ) v0 = 14. Solution 146. an = g = v2 ρ ρ= v2 v2 = an g cosθ (2) where θ is the slope angle of the trajectory.48 ) cos 3° = 0 = 9.. Vertical motion.81 g 2 ρ min ρ min = 21. vx = v0 cos α v y = v0 sin α − gt x = v0 t cos α y = y0 + v0 t sin α − y = y0 + x tan α − 1 2 gt 2 (1) Eliminate t. 8/e. Jr. Elliot R.81)( 6 )2 (a) (b) Magnitude of initial velocity. Russell Johnston. David Mazurek. Phillip J. Beer. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Ferdinand P. Eisenberg.

vx = v0 sin 30° = 120 sin 30° = 60 ft/s v y = vx tan 30° = 60 tan 30° = 34.64 )2 2 vB = 69.2sin 30° ρ A = 894 ft ! At the point where velocity is parallel to incline. Ferdinand P. . Russell Johnston.. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. David Mazurek.282 ) vB ρB = = g sin 60° 32. William E.1 ft ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Solution 147.2sin 60° ρ B = 172. Beer. Phillip J.64 ft/s v= ( 60 )2 + ( 34. 8/e. Jr. v = v0 = 120 ft/s v = 120 ft/s 60° aA = g = 32.282 ft/s an = g sin 60° = ρB 2 2 ( 69. Eisenberg. (a) At point A. Elliot R.2 ft/s 2 2 vA ( a A )n = g sin 30° = ρA = (b) ρA 2 2 (120 ) vA = g sin 30° 32. Clausen.

(a) t = 0. an = && = x π2 3 .5sin π t . Clausen.5π ( 2cos π t − 1) ( 2 − cos π t )2 . x 3 . 2 − 3π ( 2cos π t − 1)(π sin π t ) ( 2 − cos π t )3 & y = 1. 3 ρ= v 2 4π 2 3 = an 3. && = − 3π 2 . ρ= v2 π 2 3 = ⋅ an 4 π2 ρ = 0. && = y − 3π 2 sin π t ( 2 − cos π t ) x = 1. & y=− π 2 .5π ) = an 3π 2 2π .COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. 8/e. Phillip J. E. William E. Beer. 2 − cos π t − 3π 2 cos π t + & x= − 3π sin π t ( 2 − cos π t )2 . Ferdinand P. & x = 0. & x = 0..155 ft ! π2 3 (c) t = 1. 3 ρ = 0. 3 & v=−x=− 2π . Russell Johnston. Solution 148. 2 − cos π t 2 6π sin π t (π sin π t ) ( 2 − cos π t )3 y = & y= 1.and y-components of velocity and acceleration.5π . 3 (b) t= x = 0. && = − y an = − && = y 2π 2 .75 ft ! 2π 2 .75 ft ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. x = −1.5π . v = && = 1. y= & x=− & y = 0. Jr. && = x ( 2 − cos π t ) 1. x= 2cos π t − 1 . Eisenberg. && = x . Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Compute x.2π 2 ρ = 1. & v = −y = π 2 . y 1 . 2 ρ= v 2 (1. 3 y = 0. y = 0. x 2 an = − && = 3π 2 . David Mazurek. Elliot R. .

. Ferdinand P. vy 2 2 ax = && = 2 − 2 = 0 x a y = && = 2 − y ( 2 )2 & =y= − (1) = 1.45522 m/s 2 an = v2 ρ v2 38. Elliot R..COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. 8/e. Phillip J.25 = an 1.5 m/s 2 2 (a) (b) Acceleration. Jr.45522 ρ= ρ = 26.5 m/s 2 j ! ( ) θ = 14. Beer. William E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.3 m ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. David Mazurek. Eisenberg. E. Radius of curvature of path. tan θ = vy vx = 1. Solution 149.036° = 1.5 m/s 1 = 1.25 m 2 /s 2 an = a cosθ = 1. Russell Johnston.036° 2 v 2 = vx + v 2 = 62 + 1. Given: Differentiating twice x= ( t − 4 )3 6 + t2 m y= t 3 ( t − 1) − m 6 4 2 vx ( − 2 )2 & =x= 2 + ( 2 )( 2 ) = 6 m/s t 2 ( t − 1) − m/s 2 2 1 && = t − m/s 2 y 2 & y= & x= ( t − 4 )2 2 + 2t m/s && = t − 4 + 2 = t − 2 m/s 2 x At t = 2 s. Clausen.5 cos14.5 6 a = 1.52 y = 38.

Ferdinand P. . vx = v A At point B ( vB ) x = v A vB = ( vB ) x cosθ = vA cosθ cosθ = vA vB an = aB cosθ = g cosθ =g vA vB ρB = 2 2 vB vB v B = an gv A ρB = 3 vB ! gv A Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. 8/e. Jr.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. E. Elliot R. Clausen. Beer. Eisenberg. Russell Johnston.. William E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Solution 150. David Mazurek. Phillip J.

ρC is a minimum at point B where cos θ is a maximum or θ = 0. or so that (a) 1 ρC = gcosθ  cos α  v 2 cos 2 α v0  = 0 3  gcos θ  cosθ  2 Since v0 . Let θ be the slope angle of the trajectory at an arbitrary point C.. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Eisenberg. α. ! ρC = or 1 cos3 θ 2  v0 cos 2 α      g   ρC = ρ min cos3 θ Q. Then. or ρC = 2 vC gcosθ But. Ferdinand P. (b) ρ min = ρ B = 2 v0 cos 2 α g Q. Solution 151. Elliot R.E. Clausen.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.E. Phillip J. ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. David Mazurek.D. the horizontal component of velocity is constant. William E. Russell Johnston. ( vC ) x = ( v A ) x where ( vA ) x = v0 cosα v0 cos α = vC cosθ vC = cos α v0 cosθ ( vC ) x = vC cosθ Then. ( aC )n = gcosθ = ρC 2 vC . 8/e.D. Jr. Then. E. Beer. . and g are constants.

David Mazurek. Phillip J. William E. Ferdinand P.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Then. Russell Johnston. Beer. Clausen. Eisenberg. E. Elliot R. ( aC )n = g cosθ = ρC 2 vC or ρC = 2 vC gcosθ But the horizontal component of velocity is constant. Solution 152. Jr. substituting (4) into (2) gives 2 v0  2 gx tan α g 2 x2  + 4 ρ= 1 −  2 g cos α  v0 v0 cos 2 α    3/2 ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. 8/e. so that x = ( v0 ) x t = ( v0 cos α ) t and or t= x v0 cos α (1) ( vA ) x = v0 cosα ( vC ) x = v0 cosθ v0 cos α = vC cosθ ρC = 3 vC gv0 cos α (2) The vertical motion is uniformly accelerated ( vC ) y = ( v0 ) y − gt = v0 sin α − But 2 vC gx v0 cos α 2 (3) 2 =( 2 v0 x ) +( 2 v0 y ) = ( v0 cos α )  x  +  v0 sin α − g  v0 cos α   2 gx tan α g 2 x2  2 = v0 1 − + 4  2  v0 v0 cos 2 α    or 3 vC = 3 v0 1  2 gx tan α g 2 x2  − + 4  v0 2 v0 cos 2 α    3/2 (4) Finally. Let θ be the slope angle of the trajectory at an arbitrary point C.. ( vC ) x = ( v A ) x ( vA ) x = ( vC ) x where Then. .

Jr. E. Eisenberg. . at = a = 2 Rω n .. dv R 2ω n 2t = 1/2 dt  2 2 R 1 + ωn t 2 + c2    ( ) at = 0 Normal component of acceleration: But an = v2 an = a 2 − at2 = 2Rω n ρ v2 an or ρ = ρ = R2 + c2 ! 2 Rω n Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Solution 153. Given: r = ( Rt cos ω nt ) i + ctj + ( Rt sin ω nt ) k Differentiating to obtain v and a. David Mazurek. 2 2 v 2 = vx + v 2 + vz y ( ) ( ) =  R ( cos ωnt − ωnt sin ωnt )  + ( c ) +  R ( sin ωnt + ωnt cos ωnt )      2 = R 2 cos 2 ωnt − 2ωnt sin ωnt cos ωnt + ωn t 2 sin 2 ωnt  + c 2   2 + R 2 sin 2 ωnt + 2ωnt sin ωnt cos ωnt + ωn t 2 cos 2 ωnt    2 = R 2 1 + ωn t 2 + c 2 2 2 a 2 = ax + a 2 + az y 2 2 2 ( ) or v= 2 R 2 1 + ωn t 2 + c 2 ( )  2 = R 2  −2ωn sin ωnt − ωn t cos ωnt  ( ) + ( 2ω 2 n cos ωnt 2 2 − ωn t sin ωnt   ) 2 3 4 = R 2  4ωn sin 2 ωnt + 4ωnt sin ωnt cos ωnt + ωn t 2 cos 2 ωnt  2 3 4 + 4ωn cos 2 ωnt − 4ωnt sin ωnt cos ωnt + ωn t 2 sin 2 ωnt   2 4 = R 2 4ωn + ωn t 2 ( ) or 2 a = Rωn 4 + ωn t 2 Tangential component of acceleration: At t = 0. Beer. v2 = R2 + c2 . Ferdinand P. William E. Elliot R. Clausen. 8/e. dr v= = R ( cos ω nt − ω nt sin ω nt ) i + cj + R ( sin ω nt + ω nt cos ω nt ) k dt dv 2 2 a= = R − ω n sin ω nt − ω n sin ω nt − ω n t cos ω nt i + R ω n cos ω nt + ω n cos ω nt − ω n t sin ω nt k dt ( ) ( ) 2 2 = R  − 2ω n sin ω nt − ω n t cos ω nt  i + 2ω n cos ω nt − ω n t sin ω nt k   Magnitudes of v and a.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Phillip J. Russell Johnston. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Jr. 8/e. a = 3j + 2k .COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Clausen. David Mazurek. 2v dv 18t = 18 ( cos t − t sin t )( −2sin t − t cos t ) + dt 1 + t2 + 2 ( sin t + t cos t )( 2cos t − t sin t ) ( ) 2 When t = 0. Eisenberg. With A = 3 and B = 1. Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Russell Johnston.. ( ) v=  3t  dr  j + ( sin t + t cos t ) k = 3 ( cos t − t sin t ) i +   t2 + 1  dt      t  t2 + 1 − t    t2 + 1    dv   j a= = 3 ( − sin t − sin t − t cos t ) i + 3  dt t2 + 1         + ( cos t + cos t − t sin t ) k = −3 ( 2sin t + t cos t ) i + Magnitude of v 2.50 ft ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. William E. Elliot R. Solution 154. . Ferdinand P. E. Beer. v 2 = 9. 2v dv =0 dt a 2 = 32 + 22 = 13 Tangential acceleration: Normal acceleration: But an = v2 at = dv =0 dt or 9 13 an = 13 v2 = an an 2 = a 2 − at 2 = 13 ρ or ρ = ρ = 2. the position vector is r = ( 3t cos t ) i + 3 t 2 + 1 j + ( t sin t ) k Differentiating to obtain v and a. 2 2 v 2 = vx + v 2 + vz = 9 ( cos t − t sin t ) + y 2 3 (t 2 +1 ) 3/2 j + ( 2cos t − t sin t ) k 9t 2 2 + ( sin t + t cos t ) 2 t +1 Differentiating.

Russell Johnston.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. David Mazurek. Beer. For the planet Earth.695 × 109 ) r= ( 29.695 ×109 m 2 2 ( ) Given that an = gR 2 v2 and that for a circular orbit an = r r2 r= gR 2 v2 Eliminating an and solving for r. Phillip J.8 Gm ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.72 )2 2 = 149. William E. ( 274 ) ( 0.8 × 109 m r = 149. Solution 155. Clausen.72 × 103 m/s Then.39 × 109 = 0. Elliot R. E. For the sun. R= 1 1 D =   1. Jr. 8/e.. Ferdinand P. v = 107 × 106 m/h = 29. Eisenberg. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. and g = 274 m/s 2 . .

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 156.

For the sun, and

g = 274 m/s 2 R= 1 1 D =   1.39 × 109 = 0.695 × 109 m 2 2

(

)

Given that an =

gR 2 v2 and that for a circular orbit: an = r r2 r= gR 2 v2

Eliminating an and solving for r, For the planet Saturn,

v = 34.7 × 106 m/h = 9.639 × 103 m/s

Then,

( 274 ) ( 0.695 × 109 ) r= ( 9.639 )2

2

= 1.425 × 1012 m

r = 1425 Gm !

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 157.

From Problems 11.155 and 11.156,

an = an =

gR 2 r2 v2 r g r

For a circular orbit,

Eliminating an and solving for v,
For Venus,

v= R g = 29.20 ft/s 2

R = 3761 mi = 19.858 × 106 ft. r = 3761 + 100 = 3861 mi = 20.386 × 106 ft Then, v = 19.858 × 106 29.20 = 23.766 × 103 ft/s 20.386 × 106 v = 16200 mi/h !

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 158.

From Problems 11.155 and 11.156,

an = an =

gR 2 r2 v2 r g r

For a circular orbit,

Eliminating an and solving for v, For Mars,

v=R g = 12.24 ft/s 2

R = 2070 mi = 10.930 × 106 ft r = 2070 + 100 = 2170 mi = 11.458 × 103 ft Then, v = 10.930 × 106 12.24 = 11.297 × 103 ft/s 11.458 × 106 v = 7700 mi/h !

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 159.

From Problems 11.155 and 11.156,

an = an =

gR 2 r2 v2 r g r

For a circular orbit,

Eliminating an and solving for v, For Jupiter, g = 75.35 ft/s 2

v= R

R = 44432 mi = 234.60 × 106 ft r = 44432 + 100 = 44532 mi = 235.13 × 106 ft Then, v = 234.60 × 106

(

)

75.35 = 132.8 × 103 ft/s 235.13 × 106 v = 90600 mi/h !

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

908 × 106 ft r = ( 3960 + 10900 )( 5280 ) = 78. Elliot R.3941 × 103 ft/s Time T for one orbit. Russell Johnston.4608 × 106 ft an = gR 2 r2 and an = v2 = 2 v2 r gR 2 r Thus. Phillip J.40 × 106 ft 2 /s 2 v = 13. Beer. E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. William E.22 h ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.. .3941 × 103 ( ) T = 10.4608 × 106 = 179. Radius of Earth Radius of orbit Normal acceleration R = ( 3960 mi )( 5280 ft/mi ) = 20.4608 × 10 T = = = 36. Clausen. vT = 2π r 6 2π r 2π 78.2 ) ( 20.908 × 106 ) 78. Jr. David Mazurek. 8/e. Ferdinand P. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Eisenberg. Solution 160. v 2 gR 2 = 2 r r v2 = or ( 32.806 × 103 s v 13.

Beer.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.. R = 6370 km = 6. Russell Johnston. Jr. Ferdinand P. Clausen. E.81 m/s 2 .018 m/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Solve for v2.81) ( 6.370 × 106 m r = 384 × 103 km = 384 × 106 m v2 = ( 9. Data: an = gR 2 r2 gR 2 r and an = v2 ρ = v2 r v 2 = ran = g = 9. Elliot R.370 × 106 ) 384 × 106 2 = 1. . David Mazurek. Solution 161. Normal acceleration.0366 × 106 m 2 /s 2 v = 3670 km/h ! v = 1. William E. 8/e. Eisenberg. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Phillip J.

Eisenberg. For a circular orbit. For the next alignment. the time is or an = an = gR 2 r2 v2 r g r v=R t= 2π r v t= tA = 2π r 3 2 Rg1 2 2π rA3 2 Rg1 2 and For satellites A and B. William E. Ferdinand P. ( n + 1) t A = nt B 1  rB  =  n  rA  32 or −1 n + 1 t B  rB  = =  n t A  rA  32 Data: R = 6370 km = 6. Clausen. From Problems 155 through 156.475 continued Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. David Mazurek.560 × 103    3/2 −1 = 0. hence. For one orbit the distance traveled is 2π r. Beer. . 1  6.690 × 103 m Then. Eliminating an and solving for v.02987 or n = 33.370 × 103 m rA = 6370 + 190 = 6560 km = 6. 8/e.. tB = 2π rB 3 2 Rg1 2 Let n = number of orbits of B. Jr.690 × 103  =  n  6. Solution 162.560 × 103 m rB = 6370 + 320 = 6690 km = 6. Russell Johnston. Phillip J.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. E. Elliot R.

370 × 106 ( 9.449 × 103 s = 1. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Time for orbit of satellite B is tB = 2π 6. David Mazurek. William E. E. Phillip J.7 h ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Beer.5137 h Time for next alignment is nt B = ( 33. Eisenberg. Elliot R.. Clausen.81) ( ) ) 32 12 = 5. Jr. 8/e. Russell Johnston. Ferdinand P. .5137 ) nt B = 50.475 )(1.690 × 106 ( 6.

41 ft/s 2 eθ ! aθ = (1.5e−0.4e−0. vθ = 0. Clausen.2π e−0.8t sin 3π t + 1. 8/e. & && && a = && − rθ 2 er + rθ + 2rθ eθ = ar er + aθ eθ r ar = 12 − (1.402 ft/s ) eθ ! vr = 2 ft/s.56 rad/s2 & v = re r + rθ&eθ v = ( 2.89 ft/s 2 er + 45. (a) Velocity of the collar. Ferdinand P.8t cos 3π t − 4. && = 12 ft/s 2 . E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.8t cos 3π t && θ = 0.5 ft. Differentiate the expressions for r and θ with respect to time.5π 2e−0.67032.56 ) + ( 2 )( 2 )( 0. . cos 3π t = 0 && θ& = 0.5π e−0.8t sin 3π t At t = 0.00 ft/s. &&er = 12 ft/s 2 er ! r ( ) Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. r θ = − 0.5 s.2π e −0.89 ft/s 2 ! aθ = 45.32e−0. Jr. e −0. William E.00 ft/s ) er + ( 0.5 )( 0.26812 ) 2 ( ) ( ) ar = 11.26812 rad/s.8t sin 3π t θ& = − 0.. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. David Mazurek. Eisenberg. Phillip J.33516 rad.8t sin 3π t − 1. Beer. r = 1. sin 3π t = −1.26812 ) ( ) ( ) (c) Acceleration of the collar relative to the rod.8t cos 3π t −1.402 ft/s ! (b) Acceleration of the collar.8t = 0. Solution 163.5 )( 29. r = 1 + 2t − 6t 2 + 8t 3 & r = 2 − 12t + 24t 2 && = −12 + 48t r θ = 0. θ = 29. & r = 2. Elliot R.41 ft/s 2 ! a = 11. Russell Johnston.

Ferdinand P. r= 10 mm. Jr.8 mm/s 2 er + 1. Differentiate the expressions for r and θ with respect to time. a B/OA = &&er = r 20 er 343 a B/OA = 0. (a) Velocity of the collar. William E. David Mazurek. Clausen. 49 20 mm/s 2 343 θ = 0. && = r 20 ( t + 6 )3 mm/s 2 θ = At t = 1 s. Phillip J. t+6 4 & r=− 10 (t + 6) 2 mm/s.633 mm/s 2 eθ ! ( ) ( ) (c) Acceleration of the collar relative to the rod. Beer.0583 mm/s 2 er ! ( ) Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.8 mm/s 2 343  7   10   10  && && aθ = rθ + 2rθ =   ( 0 ) + ( 2 )  −  ( −4 ) = 1. & vr = r = 0. Russell Johnston.204 mm/s. & vθ = rθ = − 5. 8/e.204 mm/s ) er − ( 5.71 mm/s ) eθ ! (b) Acceleration of the collar.. Elliot R. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Eisenberg. 7 θ& = 4cos π t rad/s & r=− && θ = 4π sin π t rad/s 2 && = r && θ =0 10 mm/s. θ& = − 4 rad/s.633 mm/s 2  7   49  a B = − 22. Solution 164. r= 10 mm. E.71 mm/s v B = ( 0. & ar = && − rθ 2 = r 20  10  2 −   ( −4 ) = − 22. π sin π t rad. .

Eisenberg. Beer.. Jr. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Clausen. Russell Johnston. Solution 165. E. Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. William E. & ar = && − rθ 2 = − A2 /2B cos ( At/2 ) + 2 B cos ( At/2 B )  [ A/2 B ] r   ( ) = − A2 /B cosθ && && aθ = rθ + 2rθ = 0 + (2)  − A sin ( At/2 B )  ( A/2B )   ( ) = − A2 /B sin θ 2 2 a = ar + aθ = ( A /B ) cos θ + ( A /B ) sin θ 4 2 2 4 2 2 = A2 /B From the figure a is perpendicular to v Thus. an = v2 a = A2 /B ! an = a = A2 /B ρ ρ= ρ= v2 an A2 2 (b) ( A /B ) =B ρ=B! Since ρ is constant. . Elliot R. Phillip J. the path is a circle of radius B. David Mazurek. Given Differentiating twice r = 2 B cos ( At/2B ) & r = − A sin ( At/2B ) θ = At/2B θ& = A/2 B && θ =0 && = − A2 /2 B cos ( At/2B ) r ( ) Components and magnitude of velocity. & vr = r = − A sin ( At/2B ) = − A sin θ & vθ = rθ = 2 B cos ( At/2B )  ( A/2 B ) = A cosθ   (a) 2 2 v = vr + vθ = A2 sin 2 θ + A2 cos 2 θ = A 2 v=A! Components and magnitude of acceleration. Ferdinand P. 8/e.

Clausen. && θ =0 (a) At t = 2 s. Differentiate the expressions for r and θ with respect to time. θ& = π . & r = − π b sin π t . Elliot R. Ferdinand P. K Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.. Beer. a = − 4π 2be r (b) Values of θ for which v is maximum. E. & vr = r = 0 . . r = 3b. Phillip J. cosπ t = 1 && = − π 2b. r θ = 2π rad. 2π . etc But θ = π t. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. William E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. 2. & r = 0. & ar = && − rθ 2 = − π 2b − ( 3b ) π 2 = − 4π 2b r && && aθ = rθ + 2rθ = 0. θ& = π rad/s v = 3π beθ & vθ = rθ = 3π b. & vr = r = − π b sin π t & v = rθ = − b ( 2 + cos π t ) π θ 2 2 v 2 = vr + vθ 2 = π 2b2 ⎡sin 2 π t + ( 2 + cos π t ) ⎤ ⎢ ⎥ ⎣ ⎦ = π 2b 2 ⎡sin 2 π t + 4 + 4cos π t + cos 2 π t ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ = π 2b 2 ( 5 + 4cos π t ) v 2 is maximum when cos π t = 1 or hence π t = 0. 4π . David Mazurek. && = − π 2b cos π t r θ = π t. sinπ t = 0. Eisenberg. Solution 166. Jr. Russell Johnston. 6π . N = 0. 8/e. r = b ( 2 + cos π t ) . 1. θ = 2Nπ .

& ar = && − rθ 2 = 0. Russell Johnston. Phillip J. Elliot R.97 ft/s 2 ( ) a = 16. Ferdinand P. θ = − 2 rad/s2 & vθ = rθ = 4. William E.5 s.97 ft/s 2 eθ ( ) ( ) Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. r = 9 2 ft/s. && = 0 r && θ =0 θ = 0.73 ft/s. && θ = − 16t 1 + 4t 2 ( ) −2 (a) At t = 0. v = (12. David Mazurek. & vr = r = 6 ft/s. v = ( 6 ft/s ) e r && && aθ = rθ + 2rθ = 24 ft/s 2 .. r θ& = 2 rad/s. Beer. Solution 167.73 ft/s ) er + ( 4. Differentiate the expressions for r and θ with respect to time.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. r = 6t 1 + 4t 2 . 8/e. && = 15 2 ft/s 2 r a = 24 ft/s 2 eθ ( ) (b) At t = 0. . r = 0.97 ft/s 2 r && && aθ = rθ + 2rθ = 3 2 ( −2 ) + ( 2 ) 9 2 (1) = 16. & r = 6 1 + 4t 2 + 24t 2 1 + 4t 2 && = 72t 1 + 4t 2 r ( ) −1 2 ( ) −1 2 − 96t 3 1 + 4t 2 ( ) −3 2 . θ = arctan 2t θ& = 2 1 + 4t 2 ( ) −1 . θ = π 4 rad.24 ft/s ) eθ 2 & ar = && − rθ 2 = 15 2 − 3 2 (1) = 16. && θ& = 1 rad/s. Clausen. E. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. & r = 3 2 ft. & r = 6 ft/s.243 ft/s & vr = r = 12. Jr. Eisenberg.97 ft/s 2 er + 16. & vθ = rθ = 0.

Change to rectangular coordinates. Hence. William E. Jr. Russell Johnston. Phillip J.. Solution 168. y−x=3 tan θ = x = 3t 2 & vx = x = 6t . x (a) Magnitudes: a y = && = 6 y v = 6 2 t ft/s 2 v = vx + v 2 y 2 a = ax + a 2 y a = 6 2 ft/s 2 (b) y = x + 3 is the equation of a straight line. Clausen. . Eisenberg. cosθ = r= x r and sin θ = y r Equation of the path: 3 3 3r = = y x sin θ − cosθ y−x − r r or y = x + 3. y x+3 3 1 = =1+ =1+ 2 x x x t and y = 3t 2 + 1 from which Differentiating. Beer. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. & v y = y = 6t ax = && = 6. E. from which Also. David Mazurek. Ferdinand P. Elliot R. 8/e.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. ρ =∞ Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.

& vθ = rθ & rθ = − v cosθ But from geometry. Russell Johnston. Eisenberg. 8/e. Beer. Clausen. William E. vθ = v ⋅ eθ = − v cosθ But Hence. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. E. v= & bθ 2 cos θ Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Elliot R.. & bθ = − v cosθ cosθ r= b cosθ v=− & bθ 2 cos θ or Speed is the absolute value of v. Solution 169.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. David Mazurek. Jr. Sketch the directions of the vectors v and eθ. Ferdinand P. . Phillip J.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 170.

From geometry, Differentiating with respect to time, Transverse component of acceleration
&& && aθ = rθ + 2rθ =

r=

b cosθ
& r= & b sin θθ 2 cos θ

&& & bθ 2b sin θθ 2 + 2 cosθ cos θ

(1)

Sketch the directions of the vectors a and eθ.

aθ = a ⋅ eθ = − a cosθ
Matching from (1) and (2) and solving for a,
&& & bθ 2b sin θθ 2 − 2 3 cos θ cos θ b && =− θ + 2 tan θθ& 2 2 cos θ

(2)

a=−

(

)

Since magnitude of a is sought,

|a| =

b && θ + 2 tan θθ& 2 cos 2 θ

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 171.

Sketch the geometry.

θ + (180° − β ) + α = 180° α = β −θ
r d = sin (180° − β ) sin α r= Sketch the velocity vectors. vθ = v ⋅ eθ = v cos ( 90° − α ) = v sin α But or
& vθ = rθ

d sin β sin α

or

v sin α =

d sin β & θ, sin α
v= d sin β θ& sin 2 ( β − θ )

v=

d sin β & θ sin 2 α

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 172.
& Looking at d and β as polar coordinates with d = 0, & & v = d β = dω , v =d =0
β
d

&& && aβ = d β + 2d β = 0,

&& & ad = d − d β 2 = − dω 2

Geometry analysis:

r = d 3 for angles shown.

(a)

Velocity analysis:

Sketch the directions of v, er and eθ. & vr = r = v ⋅ er = dω cos120°

1 & r = − dω 2
& vθ = rθ = v ⋅ eθ = dω cos 30°
3 dω cos 30° dω 2 = r d 3 Sketch the directions of a, er and eθ.

θ& =

θ& = ω

1 2

(b)

Acceleration analysis:

ar = a ⋅ er = a cos150° = − 3 & && − rθ 2 = − r dω 2 2 && = − r

3 dω 2 2

3 3 ⎛1 ⎞ & dω 2 + rθ 2 = − dω 2 + d 3 ⎜ ω ⎟ 2 2 ⎝2 ⎠

2

&& = − r

3 dω 2 4

1 aθ = a ⋅ eθ = dω 2 cos120° = − dω 2 2 && + 2rθ & & aθ = rθ && θ =

1 && aθ − 2rθ = r

(

)

1 3d

⎡ 1 ⎛ 1 ⎞⎛ 1 ⎞ ⎤ 2 ⎢ − 2 dω − ( 2 ) ⎜ − 2 dω ⎟⎜ 2 ω ⎟ ⎥ ⎝ ⎠⎝ ⎠⎦ ⎣

&& θ =0

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System

Chapter 11, Solution 173.

Rate of change of θ .

Δθ = 48.0° − 47.0° = 1.0° = 17.453 × 10−3 rad Δt = 0.5 s

θ& ≈
Let r be a polar coordinate with origin at A.
b = 4 km = 4 × 103 m r= b 4 × 103 = = 5.921 × 103 m cosθ cos 47.5°

Δθ 17.453 × 10−3 = = 34.907 × 10−3 rad/s Δt 0.5

& vθ = rθ = 5.921 × 103 34.907 × 10−3 = 206.68 m/s From geometry, v= vθ 206.68 = cosθ cos 47.5° v = 306 m/s Alternate solution. x = b tan θ

(

)(

)

& bθ & & v = x = b sec2θθ = cos 2θ

v=

( 4 × 10 )(34.907 × 10 ) = 306 m/s
3 −3

cos 2 47.5°

Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics, 8/e, Ferdinand P. Beer, E. Russell Johnston, Jr., Elliot R. Eisenberg, William E. Clausen, David Mazurek, Phillip J. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.

61 α = 3. David Mazurek.2° + 28. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.0615 × 10−3 rad Δt = 2s Rates of change.0615 × 10−3 = = − 2.75° 2 θ& = Mean values.75° + ( ( −331. 8/e. William E. Clausen.75° = 598. Eisenberg. E.3° = 29.53)2 = 600 ft/s v = 409 mi/h vx = vr cosθ − vθ sin θ = 500cos 29. Elliot R. r= θ = Velocity components.75° − ( −331. Solution 174.53) sin 29.75° ) = − 39.73 = 0. Russell Johnston.53) cos 29.5307 × 10−3 rad/s Δt 2 12600 + 13600 = 13100 ft 2 31.9° = − 5. Phillip J.61 ft/s v y = vr sin θ + vθ cosθ = 500sin 29.2° = − 2. .3° − 31. Changes in values over the interval Δr = 13600 − 12600 = 1000 ft Δθ = 28.06636 598. Ferdinand P.5307 × 10−3 = − 331. Jr. & r= Δr 1000 = = 500 ft/s Δt 2 Δθ − 5.53 ft/s 2 2 v = vr + vθ = ( ) ( 500 )2 + ( −331.73 ft/s tan α = −v y vx = 39.80° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. & vr = r = 500 ft/s & vθ = rθ = (13100 ) −2.. Beer.

Jr. E. Clausen. 8/e. Solution 175. Elliot R. Beer. Eisenberg. William E. . 2 2 v 2 = vr + vθ = be1/2θ ( 2 2 ) (θ 2 & & vθ = rθ = be1/2θ θ 2 & +1 θ2 v = be1 2θ θ 2 + 1 2 ) ( ) 1/2 θ& Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Russell Johnston. Ferdinand P. r = be1/2θ .COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. 2 2 & & r = be1/2θ θθ 2 & & vr = r = be1/2θ θθ .. David Mazurek. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Phillip J.

. 8/e. E. Jr. Eisenberg. 3 θ3 2b & θ & vr = r = − θ & vθ = rθ = θ2 b & θ 2 2 v 2 = vr + vθ = 4b 2 & 2 b3 & 2 b 2 θ + 4 θ = 6 4 + θ 2 θ& 2 6 θ θ θ ( ) v= b θ 3 (4 + θ ) 2 12 θ& Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Elliot R. Clausen. r= b θ 2 . Phillip J. David Mazurek. Russell Johnston. Beer. Solution 176. & r=− 2b & θ. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Ferdinand P.. William E.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.

Eisenberg. Russell Johnston. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Clausen. Phillip J. 2 2 & & r = be1/2θ θθ . 2 & && = be1/2θ ⎡ θθ r ⎢ ⎣ ( ) 2 & && + θ 2 + θθ ⎤ ⎥ ⎦ 2 & & ar = && − rθ 2 = be1/2θ ⎡ θθ r ⎢ ⎣ ( ) 2 2 & && & & + θ 2 + θθ − θ 2 ⎤ = be1/2θ ⎡ θθ ⎥ ⎢ ⎦ ⎣ ( ) 2 && + θθ ⎤ ⎥ ⎦ 2 2 2 && && & && & && aθ = rθ + 2rθ = be1/2θ θ + 2be1/2θ θθ 2 = be1/2θ ⎡θ + 2θθ 2 ⎤ ⎣ ⎦ But 2 θ& = ω ar = be1/2θ (θω ) 2 and and 2 2 && θ =0 aθ = be1/2θ 2 2 2 a 2 = ar + aθ = be1/2θ ( ) (θ ( 2θω ) 2 4 + 4θ 2 ω 4 ) a = be1/2θ θ θ 2 + 4 2 ( ) 1/2 ω2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Ferdinand P. David Mazurek.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Elliot R. 8/e. Solution 177. E. Beer. .. r = be1/2θ . Jr. William E.

. Phillip J. Jr. Solution 178. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Clausen. William E. Russell Johnston. . David Mazurek. E. Elliot R.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. 8/e. Beer. r= b θ 2 . & r=− θ 2b & θ. Eisenberg. 3 && = − r θ 2b && 6b & 2 θ + 4θ 3 θ & ar = && − rθ 2 = − r θ 2b & 6b & 2 b b && θ + 4 θ − 2 θ& 2 = 4 −2θθ + 6θ& 2 − θ 2θ& 2 3 θ θ θ ( ) b && b && ⎛ 2b ⎞ & && & && aθ = rθ + 2rθ = 2 θ = ( 2 ) ⎜ − 3 ⎟θ 2 = 3 θθ − 4θ 2 θ θ ⎠ θ ⎝ ( ) But ar = b θ& = ω and && θ =0 θ 4 ( 6 − θ )ω 2 2 and aθ = − 2 4b θ3 ω2 ω2 2 2 a 2 = ar + aθ = b2 θ8 2 ( 36 − 12θ + θ 4 ω2 + θ 4 ω2 + ) 16b 2 θ6 = b2 θ8 (36 + 4θ ) a= b θ 4 (36 + 4θ 2 +θ4 ) 12 ω2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Ferdinand P.

David Mazurek. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Law of cosines: r 2 = d 2 + h 2 − 2dh cos ϕ Differentiating with respect to time and noting that d and h are constant. William E. . Jr. Solution 179.E. Beer.D Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Elliot R. 8/e.. Sketch the geometry. Clausen. Ferdinand P. Eisenberg. E. Phillip J. Russell Johnston. & & 2rr = 2dh sin ϕϕ & r= Law of sines: so that dh sin ϕ & ϕ r sin ϕ sin θ = r d & & r = h sin θϕ Q.

& R = 0. Given: Differentiating with respect to time. && θ = 0. . Beer. E. & z= & z=− C ( t + 1) − Ct ( t + 1) 2 = C (1 + t )2 ( t + 1) . & vθ = Rθ = AB. Phillip J. && = 0 z & vz = z = 0. 2 2 2 v 2 = vR + vθ + vz = A2 + A2 B 2 + C 2 v= A2 + A2 B 2 + C 2 & && aR = R − Rθ 2 = 2 A − AB 2 && && aθ = Rθ + 2Rθ = 0 − 2 AB 2 aR = 4 A2 − 4 A2 B 2 + A2 B 4 2 aθ = 4 A2 B 2 az = 4C 2 az = && = − 2c z 2 2 2 a 2 = aR + aθ + az = 4 A2 + A2 B 4 + 4C 2 a = 4 A2 + A2 B 4 + 4C 2 (b) t = ∞. θ = 0. θ = ∞. z = C. & z = 0. && R = 2 A. Solution 180. && θ = B.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. θ& = B. Elliot R. && θ = 0. & && ar = R − Rθ 2 = 0. Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. t +1 θ = Bt . Jr. Ferdinand P. 2C (1 + t )3 z=0 & z=C && = − 2C z & vz = z = C R = A. z a=0 && & aθ = Rθ − Rθ 2 = 0.. Eisenberg. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. & R=− && R= (a) t = 0. & R = − A. && θ = 0. 8/e. David Mazurek. Clausen. && R = 0. & vr = R = 0. v=0 az = && = 0. & vθ = Rθ = 0. z= Ct t +1 ( t + 1) 2A 3 2 . R = 0. & vR = R = − A. θ& = B. A R= A . Russell Johnston. William E.

z= At 2 4 & R = 0. & vθ = Rθ = 2π A. Phillip J.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. & z= At 2 At && = z 2 Velocity vector: & vr = R = 0.. Beer. Clausen. Ferdinand P. && θ = 0. Elliot R. && R = 0. Eisenberg. In cylindrical coordinates. 8/e. . az = && = A/2 z 1 A 16π 2 + t 2 2 2 2 2 a 2 = aR + aθ + az = 16π 4 A2 + 0 + 1 2 A 4 a= 1 A 64π 4 + 1 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. θ = 2π t . David Mazurek. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. E. Differentiating with respect to time. Jr. William E. & vz = z = 1 22 At 4 At 2 2 2 2 v 2 = vR + vθ + vz = 0 + 4π 2 A2 + v= Acceleration vector: & && ar = R − Rθ 2 = 0 − 4π 2 A && & aθ = Rθ + 2 Rθ& = 0. R = A. Russell Johnston. θ& = 2π . Solution 181.

The angle that the osculating plane makes with the y-axis is the angle β. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Beer. William E. Russell Johnston.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. C= A2 + B 2 so that cos α = 2 R 2 + ωn t 2 A tan β = = B c 4 + ω 2t 2 1 2 n ( ( ) ) β = tan −1 2 R 2 + ωn t 2 2 c 4 + ωn t 2 ( ( ) ) 12 ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. the position vector is r = ( Rt cos ω nt ) i + ctj + ( Rt sin ω nt ) k. E.. Jr. Clausen. Eisenberg.97. Differentiating to obtain v and a. dr v= = R ( cos ω nt − ω nt sin ω nt ) i + cj + R ( sin ω nt + ω nt cos ω nt ) k dt dv 2 2 = R − ω n sin ω nt − ω n sin ω nt − ω n t cos ω nt i + R ω n cos ω nt + ω n cos ω nt − ω n t sin ω nt k a= dt ( ) ( ) 2 2 = R  − 2ω n sin ω nt − ω n t cos ω nt i + 2ω n cos ω nt − ω n t sin ω nt k    ( ) ( ) ) i j k v × a = vx v y vz = v y a z − vz a y i + ( vz a x − vx az ) j + v x a y − v y a x k ax a y az ( ( ) 2 2 = cR 2ω n cos ω nt − ω n t sin ω nt  i +  R 2 ( sin ω nt + ω nt cos ω nt ) − 2ω n sin ω nt − ω n t cos ω nt    2 − R 2 ( cos ω nt − ω nt sin ω nt ) 2ω n cos ω nt − ω n t sin ω nt  j  2 +  − cR −2ω n sin ω nt − ω n t cos ω nt  k   2 = cRω n ( 2 cos ω nt − ω nt sin ω nt ) i − R 2ω n 2 + ω n t 2 j + cRω n ( 2sin ω nt + ω nt cos ω nt ) k 2  2 2 2 2 | v × a | = c 2 R 2ω n 4 + ω nτ 2 + R 4ω n 2 + ω n t 2    ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) 1/2 The binormal unit vector eb is given by Let α be the angle between the y-axis and the binormal. . David Mazurek. Solution 182. 2 B = cRω n 4 + ω n t 2 12 ( ) . Ferdinand P. Phillip J. Elliot R. 8/e. From problem 11. cos α = eb ⋅ j = eb = v×a | v×a | ( v × a) ⋅ j = |v×a | c 2 R 2ω 2 4 + ω 2t 2 + R 4ω 2 2 + ω 2t 2  n n n n   ( R 2ω n ( 2 + ω nt ) ) ( ) 12 Let 2 A = R 2ω n 2 + ω n t 2 . ( ) A as C shown in the sketch.

Clausen. v= a= dr t = 3 ( cos t − t sin t ) i + 3 j + ( sin t + t cos t ) k 2 dt t +1 dv 1 = 3 ( − 2sin t − t cos t ) i + 3 dt t2 + 1 ( ) ( ) 3/2 j + ( 2cot t − t sin t ) k (a) At t = 0. Elliot R. Solution 183.46464 j − 1..7°.53069 j + k a = − 6i + 0. David Mazurek. Eisenberg. (b) At t = θ y = 123.55470. θ x = 90°. r = ( 3t cos t ) i + 3 t 2 + 1 j + ( t sin t ) k Differentiating to obtain v and a.9946 k continued Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Phillip J. .83205k | v×a | cosθ 2 = 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. cosθ y = − 0.817 eb = v×a = − 0.4022 j + 12.83205 cosθ x = 0.43985 i − 13. E. θ z = 33.5708 −6 = − 4.71239 2. v = 3 (1 − 0 ) i + ( 0 ) j + ( 0 ) k = 3i a = − 3(0)i + 3(1) j + ( 2 − 0 ) k = 3j + 2k i j k v × a = 3 0 0 = − 6 j + 9k 0 3 2 | v × a | = 62 + 92 = 10. Jr. William E.46464 1.53069 0. Russell Johnston. Beer. For A = 3 and B = 1.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.5708k i j k 1 v × a = − 4.7° ! π 2 s.71239i + 2.55470 j + 0. Ferdinand P. 8/e. v = − 4.

23138.69846. E. . θ z = 47..COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System 2 2 2 | v × a | = ( 4.67721k | v×a | cosθ x = − 0. Beer.9946 )      1/2 = 19. cosθ y = − 0. Phillip J.1883 eb = v×a = − 0.69846 j + 0.43985 ) + (13. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. θ y = 134.4° ! Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Eisenberg. William E. Elliot R. Ferdinand P. cosθ z = 0.23138i − 0.3°.4°.4022 ) + (12. Russell Johnston. 8/e.67721 θ x = 103. Jr. Clausen. David Mazurek.

Phillip J. Beer. 8/e. (2) and k = 0.082305 f t/s 4 x = 36 + 7t + 0. Russell Johnston. t x9 = 144 ft. Jr. David Mazurek. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.. Clausen. t x0 = 36 ft. Solution 184. 1 3 kt 3 v9 = 27 ft/s v − v0 = ∫ 0 a dt = ∫ 0 kt 2 dt = Velocity: t v = v0 + x − x0 = ∫ 0 v dt = v0t + 1 3 kt 3 1 4 kt 12 Position: x = x0 + v0t + x = 144 ft 1 4 1 4 kt = 36 + v0t + kt 12 12 and v = 27 ft/s When t = 9 s. William E.00686t 4 ft v = 7 + 0. Given: a = kt 2 ft/s 2 . 36 + v0 ( 9 ) + 1 4 k ( 9 ) = 144 12 or 9v0 + 546.75k = 108 v0 + 1 3 k ( 9 ) = 27 3 (1) v0 + 243k = 27 Solving equations (1) and (2) simultaneously yields: v0 = 7 ft/s Then. .0274t 3 ft/s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Elliot R. E. Ferdinand P. Eisenberg.

Ferdinand P. t v ∫ 0 dt = ∫ 0 0.6 (1 − kv ) Integrating. Jr. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.6 1 − kv ( ) dv or t t 0 =− v 1 ln (1 − kv )  0 0.6k k = 0. using the condition v = 0 when t = 0. Solution 185.. From v dv = a dx. Phillip J.6k 0. Russell Johnston. 8/e.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Elliot R. William E. dt = dv dv = a 0. Clausen.1328 s/m (b) Position when v = 7. From dv = a dt . Beer.6k 1   v + k ln (1 − kv )    ∫ 6 dx = ∫ 0 0. using the condition x = 6 m when v = 0. 1 v 1  1 x−6= ∫ 0  −1 + 1 − kv  dv = 0. Eisenberg.6k t=− 1 ln (1 − kv ) 0. dx = v dv v dv = a 0. (a) Determination of k. Solving by trial. 20 = − 1 ln (1 − 6k ) 0. .6 (1 − kv ) Integrating.6k (1) Using t = 20 s when v = 6 mm/s.6 1 − kv ( ) 1    −v − k ln (1 − kv )  0 v x v v dv Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.5 m/s.6k   x=6− 1 0. E. David Mazurek.

8/e.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Using v = 7.. William E.1328 x = 434 m vmax = 7. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Beer. Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.1328 )  0.6 )( 0. E.5 m/s and the determined value of k: x=6− 1 1   7.5 + ln (1 − ( 0. Jr. Ferdinand P.1328 (   vmax = 1 1 = k 0. .1328 )( 7. David Mazurek. Elliot R. Russell Johnston. Clausen. Phillip J.5 ) )  0.53 m/s (c) Maximum velocity occurs when a = 0. Eisenberg.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Constant acceleration.1 mi = 528 ft 2 v 2 = v0 + 2a x f − x0 f 2 v 2 − v0 f ( ) (a) Acceleration.33 ft/s 2 (b) Time to reach 65 mph.3332 − 36. David Mazurek.333 − 36.667 7. Eisenberg. Solution 186. William E. E. a= 2 x f − x0 ( ) = 95. v f = v0 + at f tf = v f − v0 a = 95. Ferdinand P. Russell Johnston. 8/e.00 s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Beer.3333 t f = 8.667 ft/s v f = 65 mi/h = 95. Jr.3333 ft/s 2 2 ( 528 − 0 ) a = 7. v0 = 25 mi/h = 36. . Clausen.333 ft/s x0 = 0 and x f = 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Elliot R.. Phillip J.667 2 = 7.

COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.0 ) = 12.3)( 8 ) = − 203 mm/s Velocity and change in position of B after 8 s. 3 and aB = − 2 aA 3 xB + 2 xC = constant 1 1 vB = v A . Russell Johnston. Constraint of cable on left: 2v A + 3vB = 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. E. 2 3 and aC = 1 aA 3 Block C moves downward.0 ) = − 25. 8/e. v A = ( v A )0 + a AT or aA = v A − ( v A )0 t = 456 − 0 = 38. William E. Ferdinand P. Elliot R. . David Mazurek.3)( 8 ) = − 811 mm 2 2 ΔxB = 811 mm Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.3 mm/s 2 3 ⎝3⎠ a B = 25. v B = 203 mm/s xB − ( x B ) 0 = ( v B ) 0 t + 1 1 2 aBt 2 = 0 + ( − 25.. (a) Accelerations. Jr. Let x be position relative to the fixed supports. taken positive if downward. block A also moves downward.67 mm/s 2 1 ⎛1⎞ a A = ⎜ ⎟ ( 38. Phillip J.67 mm/s 2 3 ⎝3⎠ vB = ( vB )0 + aBt = 0 + ( − 25. Eisenberg. or vC = − or vB = − 2 x A + 3xB = constant 2 vA. hence.3 mm/s 2 aC = 12. Constraint of cable on right: vB + 2vC = 0.0 mm/s 2 aB = − aC = (b) 2 ⎛2⎞ a A = − ⎜ ⎟ ( 38. Beer.0 mm/s2 12 a A = 38. Solution 187. Clausen.

Construct the a−t curve. x is maximum or minimum where v = 0. Ferdinand P. . v = 60 − 5 ( t − 10 ) 60 − 5t + 50 = 0 or t = 22 s Also 0 to 10 s 10 s to 22 s 22 s to 26 s x0 = −540 m ∆x = (10 )( 60 ) = 600 m ∆x = ∆x = 1 (12 )( 60 ) = 360 m 2 1 ( 4 )( − 20 ) = − 40 m 2 x10 = − 540 + 600 = 60 m x22 = 60 + 360 = 420 m x26 = 420 − 40 = 380 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Eisenberg. Beer. Solution 188. ∆t = 4 s.. ∆t = 16 s. 0 < t < 10 s: 10 s < t < 26 s: 26 s < t < 41 s: 41 s < t < 46 s: 46 s < t < 50 s: a = slope of v − t curve ∆t = 10 s. (a) Construction of the curves. Russell Johnston. For 10 s ≤ t ≤ 26 s. E. Elliot R. 8/e. Clausen. William E. ∆v = 0 ∆v = − 80 m/s ∆v = 0 ∆v = 15 m/s ∆v = 0 a= a= a= a= a= ∆v =0 ∆t ∆v = − 5 m/s 2 ∆t ∆v =0 ∆t ∆v = 3 m/s 2 ∆t ∆v =0 ∆t Construct the x−t curve. ∆t = 15 s.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. ∆t = 5 s. David Mazurek. Phillip J. v = 0 when ∆x = area of v−t curve. Jr.

Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. At x = 0.5 m x50 = 17. For 0 ≤ t ≤ 10 s. Russell Johnston. d1 = x22 − x0 = 420 − ( − 540 ) = 960 m d 2 = x50 − x22 = − 2.5 m 2   ∆x = ( 4 )( − 5) = − 20 m x46 = 80 − 62.5 s t = 9s At x = 0.5 d = 1383 m Total: (c) Times when x = 0. Clausen. 0 ≤ t ≤ 22 s.5 = 17. Ferdinand P.5 − 20 = − 2. 22 s ≤ t ≤ 50 s.5 − 5 ( t − 46 ) m 17. Beer. Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. For 46 s ≤ t ≤ 50.5 m x = − 540 + 60t m − 540 + 60t = 0 x = 17.. David Mazurek.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System 26 s to 41 s 41 s to 46 s ∆x = (15 )( − 20 ) = − 300 m x41 = 380 − 300 = 80 m  − 20 − 5  ∆x = ( 5 )   = − 62. 8/e. d = d1 + d 2 = 1382.5 − 5 ( t − 46 ) = 0 t − 46 = 3. Phillip J. . Jr.5 m 46 s to 50 s (b) Total distance traveled. Elliot R.5 − 420 = 422. Eisenberg. E.5 t = 49. William E.

E. 8/e.944 − 27.1 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Jr. xB = ( xB )0 + ( vB )0 t B + A2 tB 2 by moment-area formula x A = ( x A ) 0 + ( v A )0 t B t xB − x A = ( xB )0 − ( x A )0 + ⎡( vB )0 − ( v A )0 ⎤ t B + A2 B ⎣ ⎦ 2 Then. and Subtracting.822t B t B = 7. Beer. . ⎛ 7. William E.822 m/s 2 Determine when B reaches 100 km/h.83 m/s Then.. Solution 189.944 )( 5 ) + 12. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.5 ) 70 = ( 6.38 ) = 20. Russell Johnston.38 ) + ( 20.38 ⎞ xB − x A = 120 + ( 6. Elliot R. Ferdinand P.38 s A2 = ( 2. ( vB ) f = ( vB )0 + A2 27.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Clausen. Eisenberg.778 m/s ( vB )0 = 25 km/h = 6.778 = 6. ( vA )0 = 100 km/h = 27.944 m/s Sketch acceleration curve for car B over 0 < t < 5 s.83) ⎜ ⎟ ⎝ 2 ⎠ Car B is ahead of car A.822 )( 7.5aB aB = 2. David Mazurek. Using moment-area formula at t = 5 s.944 + 2.778 )( 7. Phillip J. xB/ A = 43. xB − ( xB )0 = ( vo ) t + ( aB )( 5 )( 2.

Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. v y ( )0 = 0 t= 2 ( y0 − y ) g ( )0 t − 1 gt 2 2 or or At point B. Russell Johnston. 8/e. 41.81)( 0.068 m.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.5 − 1.5 − 0. Elliot R.2968 115.05° ( 9.02 m/s 0.2 = 32. we get and 12.788) 9.02 α = 6. (a) Vertical motion: y = y0 + v y y0 = 1.788 m.2 = 41.81 v0 = v0 = v0 = x xB = t tB With xB = 12. Jr.11 m/s (b) Vertical motion: Horizontal motion: tan α = − or vy = vy vx = v0 vy dy gt B =− = B dx ( vx )B v0 ( )0 − gt = − gt ( ) For h = 0.0 km/h 32. E.3810 12.2968 s ( 2 )(1.788 m.11673.3810 ) = 0. Ferdinand P. x = v0t or ( 2 )(1.068) 9.5 m. tan α = tan α = ( 9.11 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Clausen.11 m/s 0. When h = 1068 mm = 1. Phillip J. Beer. For h = 1.2 m.2968) = 0. David Mazurek. Solution 190.81)( 0. 32. ( vx )0 = v0 .02 m/s ≤ v0 ≤ 41.3 km/h ≤ v0 ≤ 148. Eisenberg. William E.3810 s = 0..07082. . y=h tB = 2 ( y0 − h ) g When h = 788 mm = 0.66° α = 4. Horizontal motion: tB = tB = x0 = 0.81 = 0.068 m.

. 8/e. William E. David Mazurek.638 )( 32. Clausen.27486 2 v0 g ⎛ 8 ⎞ 2 v0 = − 3. Eisenberg.10 ft 2 / s 2 v0 = 8.84 ft /s Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.1836 ) ⎜ 0 ⎟ 2 g ⎝g⎠ 2 = 2. E. Phillip J.638g ( y − y0 ) = − ( 3. Solution 191. .2 ) ⎜ − − 0⎟ 12 ⎝ ⎠ = 78.1836 v0 g Vertical motion: y − y0 = v0 cos15°t − 1 2 gt 2 2 v0 1 2⎛v ⎞ − g ( 2. Russell Johnston. The horizontal and vertical components of velocity are vx = v0 sin15° v y = v0 cos15° − gt At point B. Jr. vx v0 sin15° = = − tan12° v y v0 cos15° − gt or v0 sin15° + v0 cos15° tan12° = gt tan12° 0. Elliot R. Ferdinand P. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.46413v0 = gt tan12° t = 2.1836 cos15° = − 0. Beer.

5974 m/s ) j v B = vB ( − cos10°i + sin10° j) Velocity of the belt: Relative velocity: (a) v C/B = v C − v B = v C + ( − v B ) v C/B is vertical. (b) v B = 1. Eisenberg.32° vC = ( −1.1676 m/s 10° Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.8cos 50° ⎣ ⎦ = −1.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.175 m/s ( vC/B )x = −1. −1.1570 m/s ) i + ( − 5.331 m 2 / s 2 ( vC ) y tan β = = − 5. Horizontal motion: ( vC ) x = ⎡( vC ) x ⎤ 0 = −1. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. David Mazurek. Solution 192. Sketch the vector addition as shown.7156 m/s 78.81)( −1.32° 10° Set the derivative with respect to vB equal to zero. . Russell Johnston.1570 − vB ( − cos10°) = 0. 2vB − 2vC cos88.32° = 0. Clausen.5 ) = 31.175 m/s vC/B is minimum.669 m 2 /s 2 vC = 5. Elliot R. 8/e.1570 m/s Vertical motion: ( vC )2 = ⎡( vC ) y ⎤ y ⎣ ⎦ 2 0 − 2 g ( y − y0 ) 2 = (1. Jr.8sin 50° ) − ( 2 )( 9. Beer. Ferdinand P. E. William E.5974 = 4.5974 m/s − 5.. ( vC/B )x = 0 vB = 1.7156 m/s.8379. First determine the velocity vC of the coal at the point where the coal impacts on the belt.1570 2 2 β = 78.1676 m/s v B = 0. or vC = 5.32° 2 vC = ( vC ) x + ( vC ) y = 32. Phillip J. 2 2 2 vB/C = vB + vC − 2vB vC cos 88.32° = 0 vB = vC cos88.

8/e. Clausen. Elliot R. E..731) ⎤ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦ a A = 1. Solution 193. (a) t = 0./s ( a A )n = 2 vA ρ = (1. a A = 0.6 )2 3./s 2 v A = 0 + ( 0.8 in. ( a A )n = 2 vA ρ =0 a A = ( a A )t (b) t = 2 s./s 2 1/2 1/2 2 2 2 2 a A = ⎡( a A )t + ( a A )n ⎤ = ⎡( 0. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies.731 in. William E.8 t v A = 0.800 in. .6 in. Phillip J.8 )( 2 ) = 1. ( a A )t = dv A = 0. Ferdinand P. ( vA )0 = 0. Eisenberg./s 2 Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics.8 ) + ( 0./s 2 dt v A = ( v A )0 + ( a A )t t = 0. Given: Then. Russell Johnston.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11.5 = 0. Jr. Beer.084 in. David Mazurek.

687 . a A = g = 9.97 m 2 /s 2 2 ( vB ) y = 4.286 or θ = 74.07 m Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. Clausen. . Jr.6° ( v B ) x + ( vB ) y v 2 ρB = B = gcos 74. Beer. 1 meter below point A.6° aB = gcos 74. 8/e. Eisenberg. Phillip J.687 m/s tan θ = ( vB ) y ( vB ) x = 4. Horizontal motion: ( vB ) x = ( v A ) x = 2cos 50° = 1. Ferdinand P. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. E.81cos 50° 2 ρ A = 0. William E.634 m At point B.. Elliot R. ( aA )n ρA = (b) = gcos 50° ( 2) v A2 = ( a A )n 9.6° ρ B = 9. Russell Johnston.286 )2 + 21. David Mazurek. 1. (a) At point A.81 m/s 2 Sketch tangential and normal components of acceleration at A.286 m/s Vertical motion: ( vB ) 2 = ( v A ) 2 + 2 a y ( y B − y A ) y y = ( 2 cos 40° ) + ( 2 )( − 9.81cos 74.97 9.6° ( aB ) n = 2 2 (1.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. Solution 194.81)( −1) = 21.

Elliot R. Ferdinand P. e − 2t && ≈ 0 r 0 θ ≈ 4t rad. Solution 195. r aθ ≈ 0 a = − 384 ft/s 2 er The particle is moving on a circular path of radius of 24 ft and with a speed of 96 ft/s. θ = 8 rad. && θ ≈0 & & vr = r ≈ 0. Phillip J. The acceleration is the normal acceleration v 2 /r = ( ) ( 96 )2 24 = 384 ft/s 2 directed toward the center of the circle. − 2t & r = 12e − t ft/s. θ& ≈ 4 rad/s. Differentiate the expressions for r and θ with respect to time.COSMOS: Complete Online Solutions Manual Organization System Chapter 11. vθ = rθ ≈ 96 rad/s v = ( 96 ft/s ) eθ 2 & ar ≈ && − rθ 2 = − ( 24 )( 4 ) = − 384 ft/s 2 . && = −12e − t ft/s 2 r θ& = 2 2 − 8e− 2t rad/s & r = 12 ft/s. Russell Johnston. && θ = 32 rad/s 2 & vθ = rθ = −144 ft/s v = (12 ft/s ) er − (144 ft/s ) eθ 2 & ar = && − rθ 2 = −12 − (12 )(12 ) = −1740 ft/s 2 r && && aθ = rθ + 2rθ = (12 )( 32 ) + ( 2 )(12 )( −12 ) = 96 ft/s 2 a = − 1740 ft/s 2 er + 96 ft/s 2 eθ (b) At t ∞. && = −12 ft/s 2 r ( ) && θ = 32e− 2t rad/s 2 (a) At t = 0 s. 8/e. Beer. William E. r = 12 ft. E. . r = 6 4 − 2e − t ft.. Jr. ( ) θ = 2 ( 2t + 4e ) rad. 0 and & r ≈ 0. Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics and Dynamics. ( ) ( ) e− t r ≈ 24 ft. Clausen. David Mazurek. Cornwell © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies. Eisenberg. & vr = r = 12 ft/s. θ& = −12 rad/s.

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