2010-2011 Catalog

Contact the College at 732-224-2345 or online at www.brookdalecc.edu

Lincroft Main Campus 765 Newman Springs Road, Lincroft 732-224-2345 Eastern Monmouth Higher Education Center at Neptune 60 Neptune Boulevard, Neptune 732-869-2180 Northern Monmouth Higher Education Center at Hazlet One Crown Plaza, Hazlet 732-739-6010 Long Branch Higher Education Center Broadway & Third Avenue, Long Branch 732-229-8440 Wall Higher Education Center and the NJ Coastal Communiversity Monmouth Boulevard, Wall 732-280-7090 Western Monmouth Branch Campus at Freehold 3680 Route 9 South, Freehold 732-780-0020

A Message From Brookdale’s President
Welcome to Brookdale! You join close to 100,000 friends and neighbors taking advantage of the resources and offerings of the County College of Monmouth. As one of the largest higher education institutions in New Jersey, Brookdale takes great pride in continuously challenging the future – with you in mind. Did you know that Brookdale is consistently listed as one of the top 50 community colleges in the United States? That we are the number one Associate Degree granting college in New Jersey? A nationally recognized leader in technology, Brookdale has invested over $25 million in its technology infrastructure systems and direct student technology access services. The $100 million campus facility master plan has enabled new Counseling, Admission and Registration Centers, a stateof-the-art Bankier Library as well as a Student Life Center complete with college and convenience stores, meeting spaces and dedicated space for student use. The expanded Automotive Technologies building opened in Spring 2010 and an expanded Arena and new Fitness Lab is expected to be completed in 2011. One of every four Brookdale students is enrolled in a class at one of our Higher Education Centers. All of our Centers have been equipped with the latest in technology, expansive student success centers and convenient parking. Extensive renovations have taken place at the Long Branch Higher Education Center and over $10 million dollars in renovations have been completed at the Western Monmouth Branch Campus. At the Wall Higher Education Center, home of the New Jersey Coastal Communiversity, we provide a broad array of Baccalaureate and graduate programs - including over 40 degrees available from Georgian Court University - to record-setting numbers of residents of Monmouth County. You, our Monmouth County neighbors, are the reason that Brookdale was founded. You are the reason we continue to grow and challenge the future. Thanks for joining us!

Peter F. Burnham, Ph.D.

........... 29 Campus Sexual Assault Victim’s Bill of Rights .......Table of Contents Introducing Brookdale Brookdale Vision..... 21 Academic Amnesty .......................................... 35 The Holocaust.. 30 Textbook Information ............ 33 Academic Programs ... 13 Tuition and Fees ............................... 35 Fitness Center.15.................................................................... 35 Small Business Development Center ............. 18 Adding/Dropping Courses.................. 11 Dual Enrollment Program ....................... 37 Sandy Hook ...................... 31 The Office of Student Life and Activities ........................................ 26 ROTC .......................................... 35 Outreach........... 18 Credits ...................................................................... 34 ESL Testing ... 35 Child Care ... 10 High School College Enrollment ....................................................................................... 25 Loss of Student Eligibility for Federal Aid ..... 16 Admission to Electric Utility Tech Program ................................ 17...................................................................................................................................... 21 Outstanding Student ................. 18 Course Cancellation Policy .... 35 Radio Station... 10 Right to Access Government Records of Brookdale Community College ............................... 34 Disability Services Office........................................ 13 Student Grievance Process .......... 17 Non-Degree Students............................ 21 Dean’s List Criteria................................................................ 13 I...................................... 32 Articulation ................ 18 Credit by Examination (CLEP and Dantes) 18 Once the Term Begins ...... 14 Basic Skills .. 23 Transcripts ................................................................................. 12 Institution Wide Assessment . 28 Insurance and Immunization ............. 30 Counselors................ 36 Honor Societies ......................................................................................... 25 The Educational Opportunity Fund (EOF) .... 19 Academic Information On-line ..................................................................... 14 Pre-Registration Testing ............................................................... 31 College Nurse .......................... 20 Grade Changes ...................................................... 25 Return of Title IV Funds .. 17 Counseling ........... 12 Honors at Brookdale ......................... 23 Degree Audit ........................ 11 Tech Prep Program.. 31 Center for Experiential Learning and Career Services.......................................... 28 Solomon Amendment & FERPA.... 33 International Students Services.... 31 Sports Camps .......................................................................................................................15............... 30 Dining Services ........................................................................................ 26 Tuition Installment Plan.......................... 30 Registering for Courses ........................... 36 Clubs and Organizations .................. 12 College Life ........................................................................................................................... 18 Open Registration ......................... 32 Academic Affairs ........ 34 Persons with Disabilities ........................................... 27 Brookdale Admission Process The Admission Process ... 34 Special Parking Privileges .................. 33 Services to Special Interest Groups.................... 18 Student Records ...9 Brookdale Philosophy ........... 30 Admission to Health Science Programs ........ Cards .......................................... 19 The Grading System Grading System .............. 17 Pre-Registration Testing/Matriculation ......................... 34 Online Courses – Distance Education .............................................................. 10 Degrees and Certificates .......................... 12 Outreach................. 32 Job Placement Assistance .. 35 Available to Students and Members of the Public ............... 18 Attendance ............ 28 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) ...........D.............................................................. 15 Licensure Requirements for Health Science Graduates ....................... 30 Athletics.......... 21 Grade Appeal Process.... 32 Testing Center and Services . 32 Internships/Cooperative Education/ Externships ....... 30 Office of the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs .... 32 Service Learning ............................. Business and Community Development........................ 19 Grades .................................................... 19 WEBADVISOR for Students .................... 27 Resolution of Complaints Regarding Discrimination ........................................................... 19 Student E-mail .................. 37 .................................... 12 Accreditation......................... 34 Learning Communities ............... 26 Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC) . 29 Brookdale Services Services to Students ................. 13 E-mail and On-line Resources ......... 21 Distinguished Scholar Award....................... 34 Non-Native Speakers of English ..................... 21 College Regulation for Academic Standing ...................... 28 Medical Emergency Procedure ........................................................................................................................... 14 Transfer Students.................................................................................................................... Genocide and Human Rights Center ............. 36 Weather Emergency ........................ 11 Company On-Site Course Offerings .. 29 Visiting Student Status.... 30 The Bankier Library ................... 17......................... 14 Degree Students ................ Values .. 36 Regional Locations...................................................... 34 Emergency Evacuation Procedures............. 33 Study Abroad Programs ................................................... 15 Counseling................................9 About Brookdale ... 13 Residency Definitions....................... 35 Center for Business Services.................................................................... 26 Veterans/Military Affairs ............................................... 22 Health Science Programs ........................ 26 Brookdale Community College Foundation .............................................. 18 Refunds ......... Responsibilities and Rules .............. 23 Paying for College Financial Aid Sources ... 36 Alumni Association .............. 20 Grade Change Timing............................................................ 26 Tuition Waivers..................... 26 Active Duty Military .......... 10 Higher Education Opportunity Act ........ 32 High School Programs.................................................. 30 Computing Facilities ... 32 Work Study .............................................. 32 Student Help ................. 32 Adult Basic Education ............... 33 International Events ............... Business and Community Development ............................................ 19 Student Responsibilities and Procedures Rights...................................... 28 Safety and Security...... 33 International Education Center .. Mission........ 24 Filing for Financial Aid.......................................................................... 31 School Insurance ............................................................ 18 Priority Registration ............... 23 Graduation Requirements .. 30 The Scroll and Pen Book Store .....................................................................................

............. 91 Electronic Computer Technician Option ............... ..................... 74 Computer Science Program A.......S........ 78 Culinary Arts Program A. 106 Corrections Option ....... 123 Philosophy Option... Criminal Justice Program A............ 56 Academic Credit Certificate Listings .................................. 45 Business Degrees .............A.... Social Sciences Program A........... Political Science Option .....A........................A....... 70 Business Management Option .....A......A. 37 College Police ................. 83 Digital Animation and 3D Design A.. 38 Smoking Policy ............... .S.......... 38 Lost and Found .................................... Radiologic Technology Program A. 47 Information Technology Degrees .......A............... 38 Bulletin Boards ........... 53 Core Competencies ............. 129 Social Sciences Program A.......... 50 Associate in Arts (A..... 67 Biology Option ... Accounting Program A.S........S..............S............ 107 Interior Design Program A............. 37 Activity Fees .. 66 Toyota Technical Educational Network (T-TEN) .. 41 The Student Grade Appeal Process ... 65 General Motors Automotive Service Educational Program Option ...........A........................................... 131 Humanities Program A...... 96 Social Sciences Program A. Traffic & Miscellaneous Info ..S....... Early Childhood Education Option.....S.....A.........S........S...................S......A... Audio Production Option ...S....... Chemistry Option .......... 51 Associate in Fine Arts (A....................A.................. .................. 116 Humanities Program A.............. 115 Mathematics/Science Program A................... .. 122 Paralegal Studies Program A... Medical Laboratory Technology A..... Environmental and Earth Sciences Option.......... 100 Humanities Program A............S.............................. Public Administration Option ...........A.... 53 General Education Courses By Category.............. 44 Career Programs ......................A.......... 114 Mathematics Option....................................................) Transfer Programs ........... Marketing Program A.A..................) Transfer Programs ........ 117 Music Option ... 63 Communication Media A.S........ 138 ... 52 Academic Credit Certificate .................................. 43 Dual Degree Program ......... 58 Business Administration Program A...........A.................... 111 Humanities Program A...A.......... Electronics Engineering Technology Option .......................................................... 60 Social Sciences Program A......... 125 Social Sciences Program A.F..A........... 99 Digital Animation and 3D Design A........................ 87 Elementary....... Sustainable Energy A...........A........ 38 Academic Programs Accounting Option ......A..... ...........A.........S.... Degree .............A................ 128 Humanities Program A................................. 44 Dual Admissions Programs .. ............. 77 Corrections Option . 75 Creative Writing Option ............. ....A.... 71 Business Program A.......... 57 Fashion Merchandising Program A......................... Music Technology A...S...........................................S........S...............................S................S.... ........................S.........S..A...... 103 Social Sciences Program A..S...........................................A.................................................. Student Behavior in a Learning Centered Environment Student Conduct Code ..........S..A........ ......................S..............................A...................... Computer Aided Drafting and Design Technology Program A....................A......................) Transfer Programs . 38 “Happenings” ..A... 133 Science Option ......... ........ ...............................................A............. 43 NJ Transfer ......S... 88 Electric Utility Technology Program A.. 118 Humanities Program A........ 98 Game Programming Option ................ 37 Brookdale’s Parking System.....S....A............................A........ Human Services A........A....... Liberal Education Option .S................ Graphic Design Program A.. Physics Option .............A. 132 Respiratory Therapy Program A................. Media Studies Option ........................A...........A. 84 Early Childhood Education Program A.... 48 Nursing Degrees ...S.......... 59 Anthropology Option .......... 136 Social Sciences Program A......................................... 95 Mathematics/Science Program A..........................A.....A........ 44 Brookdale-Rutgers Partnership ... 89 Substation Option.... – Generalist ......S.. 94 Humanities Program A.. 61 Art Option .......................................... 43 Transfer Agreements ....... Public Relations Option............................A.................A................... 49 Programs of Study General Education ........ 119 Network Information Technology A...........................A.....A...... 37 Traffic Laws at Brookdale .......A. . Photography Option ............ 81 Diagnostic Medical Sonography A... 46 Education Degrees ... 46 Public Safety Degrees . 102 History Option .........................................A......S....... 97 Fine Arts Program A. 108 International Studies Option ........A.. 127 Mathematics/Science Program A....................... 90 Electronics Technology Program A.....A... 44 New Jersey Coastal Communiversity Introduction .. Programming Option .........S.. 62 Humanities Program A... 76 Humanities Program A..........A............. 37 Public Transportation .A............................. Journalism Option ........ 52 Associate in Applied Science (A.... 120 Nursing Program A. 64 Automotive Technology Option ....... 79 Dental Hygiene Program A....................... 47 Liberal Arts Degrees ............ Speech Communications Option .. 92 Engineering Program A......S Overhead Lines ... Architecture Program A.) Transfer Programs ..S............... .................... Ethnic Studies Option ...........S.......... 134 Mathematics/Science Program A...................S........ Psychology Option . 101 Health Information Technology A.. 109 Social Sciences Program A..... ........ ...........A............ Middle School and Secondary Education Option.. 105 Addiction Studies Option .........A......S.........A..... 112 Humanities Program A.. 85 Education Program A.................. 93 English Option ................ .................A............................. 38 Academic Integrity Code ....... 130 Social Sciences Program A............... Languages Option ............ 64 Automotive Engineering Technician Option ........................ ..................... Business Administration Program A... .. 126 Humanities Program A....Parking... 110 Humanities Program A............... Automotive Technology Program A...........S........................... 38 Alcoholic Beverages.............. .....F...... Graphic Design Option............................... 72 Mathematics/Science Program A....A....................... 42 Transfer Opportunities Transfer Programs .....................A........................... ........A.........A..... 69 Mathematics/Science Program A.............. ........................ ..........S.....S............ 51 Associate in Science (A.....A................................ 135 Sociology Option...... Studio Art Option . ....... 73 Computer Science Program A.. 52 Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement .. 38 Drugs.......A....................... 137 Humanities Program A......A..S.....

...................................... 148 Studio Arts ....... 179 Human Development ..............................................................A............................................................. 145 American Sign Language ......................................... 165 Education . 155 Communication Media ...........A........ 195 Philosophy .......................................... 142 Computer Science Program A.... 180 Human Geography ............. 205 Sustainable Energy ................................................. 205 Spanish ....................................................................... 169 English as a Second Language ............................ 209 Deans ........................................................................................ 176 Health Science . Web Site Development Option ............................Technical Studies Program A............ 151 Business ................................................................................................................................................................ 163 Digital Animation and 3D Design ............................................................................................................................................. 194 Office Administration............................................................................ Business Management Option .... 152 CAD . 124 Pastry Arts ........ 149 Biology .......... 225 Index ............ 204 Sociology ................................... 68 Automotive Engine Remanufacturing Specialist............................................. 206 Theater ...................................................... 181 Humanities ............ 166 Electronics Technology .......................... 177 History ........................................ 199 Radio ...........................A...................................................................... 207 Women’s Studies . 158 Culinary Arts ................................................... 183 Journalism .......................... 68 Automotive Transmissions Systems Specialist ................................................................ 164 Digital Media . 199 Psychology................................. 147 Art ................... 167 Energy (Sustainable Energy) .......... 92 Accounting ...............................................A.... Steering.... 164 Early Childhood Education ........................................... 154 Chinese ................. 223 Public Transportation ..... 223 Directions to Brookdale’s Regional Locations ............ Faculty and Advisory Boards College Officers........................... 181 Information Literacy .............. 184 Medical Laboratory Technology .....................................................Computer-Aided Drafting and Design – CADD ................................... 148 Automotive Technology .. 184 Marketing............................................................. 113 Paralegal ..................................... 206 Utility Technology ................................................................ 140 Humanities Program A...................S.......................... 164 Economics .............................. 73 Floral Design.... 216 Foundation Board of Trustees Brookdale Advisory Boards .......... 161 Diagnostic Medical Sonography ..................................... 146 Architecture ... 141 Communication Media Program A...................... 80 Dental Assisting .... 175 Graphic Design ...... 104 Landscape Design ............. 104 Medical Coding ............... 179 Horticulture .................... 189 Music Technology ...................................... 225 New Jersey Coastal Communiversity................. 223 Brookdale Community College Board of Trustees ....................... 164 Drafting and Design ........................................................... 174 French ............. 201 Radiologic Technology ...... 159 Dance ...................................... 82 Early Childhood Education .... 168 English............................... 191 Nursing ................................... 223 Directions to the Lincroft Campus .............................................................. Video Production Option .................................................................... 197 Photography .............................................................S.......................... 161 Dental Hygiene ... 80 CISCO CCNA Certification.................... 102 Social Services ...................................................................................... 223 President’s Cabinet Members........................ 181 Italian ....................................................................................................................................... 147 Computer Arts ...................................................................................................................................... 153 Chemistry... 183 Language ............................................................ 203 Russian................................. 59 Computer LAN/WAN Technician Certificate/CCNA .... 145 Allied Dental Education.......... 144 Accounting............ 68 Advanced Automotive Technician .................................................. 188 Music Performance ............................................................. 208 Brookdale Administration............................ 146 Anthropology............................... 175 German................. 181 Interdisciplinary Studies ........................... 105 Other Certifications Culinary Arts Letter of Recognition ................ 177 Honors Seminar .....S....................................................... 139 Theater Option ........ 147 Art History.................................................................. 187 Music ..................................................................................... 209 Administrators..... 173 Fitness and Recreation ........................... 176 Health Information Technology .............................. 146 Arabic ...........................................A.......................................................................... Academic Credit Certificates A+ Computer Repair Technician Certificate ......................................................................... 166 Electric Utility Technology ............... 184 Mathematics ...................... 223 Discrimination Complaint Procedure .................... 202 Reading ............. 209 Brookdale Faculty ..................................................................... 68 Computer-Aided Drafting and Design ............................................................................ 104 Liberal Studies Transfer. 212 Brookdale Community College ............... 197 Physics .......................................................... 194 Paralegal Studies .................................. 168 Engineering . 183 Japanese ............... 155 Cinematography .. 86 Horticulture .. 80 Webmaster Administration ................................................................................... 205 Speech ...... 203 Respiratory Therapy ................................ 142 Academic Credit Certificates of Achievement Automotive Brakes...... 190 Networking............................. Women’s Studies Option...................................................................................................... 155 Computer Science .............................. 224 Western Monmouth Branch Campus in Freehold ............ 226 ........................ 143 Humanities Program A.................... Suspension and Alignment Specialist ........................... 68 Automotive Engine Performance Specialist ... 172 Fashion Merchandising ............................................. 217 General Information Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders ............................................................... 171 Environmental Science.. 67 Automotive Electrical Power Systems Specialist ......................... 198 Political Science ..................................................... 204 Social Sciences .................. 206 Television . 156 Criminal Justice........................ 121 Course Descriptions Academic Skills Workshop .............................................................................. 181 Interior Design ................................... 121 Culinary Arts ..................................

.

Important Note The statements. • Commitment to Collegial Governance Brookdale Community College values the transparent decision-making. We see that developing career skills and developing individual human potential are equally valuable. Values Vision Brookdale. services and experiences. Values These Values guide the Brookdale community in the fulfillment of our Mission. innovative and creative environment representative of a successful multicultural and globally interdependent society. strengths. cultural and professional programs and offerings to enable. which enhances every aspect of human existence. provisions. diversity. which could include the possible elimination of programs. fees procedure or statements. and experiences through open access to a wide variety of diverse programs. which exist among people and between individuals and their environment. We believe all education is a life-long activity.Introducing Brookdale 9 Introducing Brookdale Vision. encourages. clients. The College is dedicated to using the community as a laboratory for learning. and weaknesses in each person. strategic planning. College staff and administration work closely with local organizations and agencies when applicable. and honesty. Brookdale Philosophy Brookdale Community College values most. lifelong learning. and community development. economic development and the common good of society. . the individual learner. Each makes its contribution to the fullness of life. • Academic Freedom Brookdale Community College values the principles of academic freedom and freedom of speech for all members of the College community. Mission Brookdale Community College provides a comprehensive array of quality. they are enthusiastic. economic development. We further value the experience of learning and count it among the most satisfying of human activities. courses. or maintains. Failure to read and comply with College guidelines. empower and inspire community members to achieve their aspirations to the best of their abilities. • Students and Student Success Brookdale Community College values our students and their academic and personal success. Therefore. requirements and regulations will not exempt the student from responsibility. policies and fees listed in this catalog are not to be regarded as binding between the student and Brookdale Community College. skills. cultural enrichment. Brookdale Community College plays a transformative role in our community. access to post-associate learning. innovative and responsive to students and the institutional needs and interests of our community. lifelong learning. tuitions. • One Brookdale Brookdale Community College values the philosophy of One Brookdale. The College has the right to change at any time any of the provisions or programs. • Our Employees Brookdale Community College values our employees and their commitment to providing excellent service. employees. appropriate and comparable level of teaching and service excellence throughout the entire College. • Our Role in Our Community Brookdale Community College values our unique role in our community and commits to working with students. We respect the right of each individual to strive. collaboration and collegiality fostered by College Governance which demonstrates an environment of mutual respect. • Diversity and Global Perspectives Brookdale Community College values the diversity among the members of our community and chooses to build an inclusive. engaging in continuous self-assessment to sustain excellence and demonstrate accountability. to struggle to succeed — the right to be unique. openness. The College respects the differences in needs. affordable educational choices leading to transfer and career opportunities. certificates and associate degrees. across all locations. and our community to achieve common goals in education. learning from our past as we expand and respond to challenges inherent in our future. Brookdale Community College commits itself to the task of creating an atmosphere. we urge students to accept their responsibility for improving society. Mission. which fosters individual and societal growth and achievement. schedules. future-oriented institution committed to student success and development in a socially diverse environment. Brookdale is an open-access. We recognize the interrelatedness of all learning and the benefit gained by freedom of thought and expression. each being of equal weight and importance. creating and communicating a dynamic synergy of intent and action focused on student success. • Integrity and Accountability Brookdale Community College values fairness. • Our Legacy Brookdale Community College values our legacy and history. as may be warranted. • Excellence in Teaching and Support Services Brookdale Community College values teaching and service excellence and prepares learners with a broad range of knowledge. One Brookdale represents a collective commitment by all employees to demonstrate a consistent. is a dynamic community college system committed to student success. stewardship. The development of individual potential is inevitable related to what society permits. providing educational. alumni and the greater community. Effective education promotes awareness of the intricate relationships. their learning and achievement are the hallmarks of our mission. Each student is held responsible for the knowledge of the information contained in the catalog. the County College of Monmouth. and sustainability.

S. or (2) by filing an action in the Superior Court. Northern Monmouth. along with the general studies required of freshmen and sophomores in four-year schools.A. grading standards.nj. in programs designed for transfer to four-year colleges. Failure of the Custodian of Government Records to respond within seven business days after receiving a request is deemed a denial. Many students are here because they love to learn.). which is available in the President’s office.A.10 Introducing Brookdale About Brookdale The College was founded in 1967 and is sponsored by the citizens of Monmouth County through the Board of Chosen Freeholders.S. The requester is entitled to be advised in advance of the estimated amount of fees and charges to be imposed by the College for the reproduction costs and other special services requested. bills. seq. not in use and not in storage or archived. Monmouth County Courthouse. in which case the Custodian of Government Records shall not be required to respond until the requester reappears before the Custodian seeking a response to the original request. either in education or in employment practices. Immediate access will be provided as soon as reasonably possible following receipt of the request if the record is not being used and is not in archive storage. There are two traditional 15-week terms that begin in September and January.) degree programs are designed for transfer to four-year colleges. including collective negotiations agreements. evening. . fax 609-292-9073 or by e-mail: Mpfeiffer@dca. 47:1A-1 et. Requests for government records may be made anonymously. and public employee salary and overtime information. Degree and transfer to a New Jersey Public Institution receive the benefits of transfer registration. People of all ages come to the College to meet education goals as varied as the people themselves. access will be granted or denied to all other government records provided record is currently available. The Higher Education Opportunity Act The Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) requires the College to disclose and report on numerous items. These degrees give students grounding in their major fields of study. notification for students with disabilities and reference to additional support and labs. Additional terms may be added based on community need.edu/pages/3602. available to anyone 18 years of age or older.) If a student does not have a high school diploma or an equivalency diploma. NJ. course content.A. Classes are scheduled through the day. The Act safeguards from disclosure proprietary and private records and information. contracts. In the laboratories. or part time. Brookdale is open all year and operates on a term-based system. or other means of contacting the requester.asp. (the “Act”) requires that the College grant members of the public access to government records as defined in the Act. The program is offered at the Western Monmouth Branch Campus. Requesters must fill out a form specific to their request. Classes tend to meet once or twice a week. Teaching and counseling faculty members schedule office hours to answer student questions. Requests for records should be made to the Executive Assistant to the President. A program is provided for persons who wish to earn equivalency diplomas without attending the College.S. an 11-week term is offered during each traditional term and a 2-week Winterim term is offered during winter break. The courses they select enrich their personal lives.A. Upon payment of the applicable fee.A.) and Associate in Fine Arts (A. the College does not discriminate against anyone on any basis. 609-292-4584. the Eastern Monmouth and Long Branch Higher Education Centers and is geared toward the New Jersey High School Equivalency Examination. Many of these are included throughout this catalog. An appointed Board of Trustees sets policy. They all are accessible from most areas by public transportation. individual employment contracts. Courses are offered not only on the Lincroft campus. lab assistants perform similar functions for students needing help in performing projects or experiments. In keeping with the College’s dedication to open and innovative education. he or she may still enroll at Brookdale as long as the student is 18 or older. Degrees And Certificates The Associate in Arts (A. The Long Branch.). The President’s office is located on the second floor of the Brookdale Administrative Center. See page 43 for the rules and requirements.J.us. Right of Appeal A person who is denied access to government records by the Custodian. Associate in The Associate in Arts (A. course requirements. to go over tests. NJ Division of Local Government Services by telephone. Notice of Right to Access Government Records of Brookdale Community College The New Jersey Public Access to Government Records Act N. Wall Higher Education Centers and the Western Monmouth Branch Campus offer a wide range of courses as well as courses offered at the Sandy Hook Environmental Field Station. learning at Brookdale is oriented toward success. brookdalecc. Eastern Monmouth. Associate in Science (A. depending on the length of the academic term and the course content. anyone who is a high school graduate or holder of an equivalency diploma. to meet the demands of working people as well as traditional full-time students. vouchers. address or telephone number. unless the requester has elected not to provide a name. Learning assistants are available for tutoring. Each course syllabus has learning outcomes. Freehold. Many are enrolled full time (12 credits or more). Persons already working attend Brookdale to upgrade skills and enhance chances for promotion or to explore new areas to facilitate career change. 6-week and 10-week terms run during summer. state. at the option of the requester. Students who graduate with an A. online and on weekends. Students wishing to gain equivalency diplomas may do so by completing a sequence of 30 Brookdale credits and passing a test. Not later than seven (7) business days after receiving the records request. Brookdale is an open admission college. In addition. and assist students in completing class work.F. Others are pursuing programs designed to prepare them for employment upon graduation. (A limited number of programs have specific admission criteria. may institute a proceeding challenging the Custodian’s decision by (1) filing a complaint with the Government Records Council. but also at various locations throughout the county. There is no typical Brookdale student. the College is required to make government records available within the following time periods: Immediate access will be provided to budgets. Equal opportunity for all is a College mandate. or A. fixes tuition and fees and continually monitors education programs. Information pertaining to Student Consumer Information is available from the Brookdale home page at www.

Applicants may not enroll in selective admission programs. . In fulfilling this duty. Dual Enrollment Program High school juniors and seniors may take advantage of Brookdale’s Dual Enrollment Program.S. in the spring of their senior year. Applicants are required to submit a student privacy waiver in order for the academic and conduct information to be shared between the College and the high school. G. The Office of Transfer Resources and Articulation will be responsible for instituting and administering the Dual Enrollment Program at individual high schools. F. E. Applicants will complete the standard Brookdale application process and pay the appropriate fees in the spring of their senior year. In the case of home schooled students.A. C. Applicants must meet minimum proficiency requirements on the placement tests or SATs. Appeals for exceptions should be made in writing to the Executive Vice President for Educational Services or designee. B. These credits will be held in escrow until the student completes 12 additional college level credits with a grade of “C” or better. G.S. basic skills or support courses. F. the student must maintain a minimum term GPA of 2. aligning and approving Tech Prep courses as equivalent to Brookdale courses. The additional credits must be earned within two years of high school graduation. High School College Enrollment High school students may take advantage of Brookdale’s “College Fast Start” program. G. The appropriate college department chair. The following criteria will apply: A. Students receive education and training in the skills needed for employment. All courses offered in the Dual Enrollment Program must be approved and monitored by the appropriate college department chair. The Office of Transfer Resources and Articulation will be responsible for instituting and administering the Tech Prep Program at individual high schools. E. Enrollment will be subject to the guidelines of the Brookdale Community College prerequisite and co-requisite system. previously approved by Brookdale. certificate programs are available. B. the A. Dual Enrollment students will be designated as non-degree students. Appeals for exceptions to any criteria above should be made in writing to the Executive Vice President for Educational Services or designee. D. Tech Prep Program High School juniors and seniors enrolled in select high school courses may take advantage of Brookdale’s “Technology Preparation” program. Applicants must be recommended and approved by their high school teacher/ counselor and have earned a grade of “C” or better in the appropriate course or course sequence. Selected Brookdale credit courses will be open to high school and home schooled students. The following criteria will apply: A. While some credits may transfer to four-year institutions. plus the general studies designed to turn out well-rounded employees.Introducing Brookdale 11 The Associate in Applied Science (A. The appropriate college department chair. B. syllabus. D. To continue in the program.0 at the College. C. H. All academic standards regarding the course content. and certify students as competent in a particular employment area. In order to receive credit for a Brookdale approved Tech Prep course. E. written approval of a parent/legal guardian will suffice. programs are not designed for transfer. the Office of Recruitment Services will inform all Monmouth County superintendents. Applicants may not enroll in selective admission programs. the student must maintain a minimum term GPA of 2. H. Credit for the course(s) will be assigned and appear as “TPC” on the Brookdale transcript. Appeals for exceptions should be made in writing to the Executive Vice President for Educational Services or designee. in conjunction with the Office of Transfer Resources and Articulation. To continue in the program.A. These contain fewer credits than the degree programs. Permission from a parent/legal guardian is also required. basic skills or support courses. Applicants to and students in the program must be recommended by and have written approval from their High School Guidance Counselor and parent/legal guardian. Applicants must meet minimum proficiency requirements on the placement tests or SATs. principals and counselors with high school responsibilities of the provisions in the policy and regulation on Fast Start. Fast Start students will be designated as non-degree students until they meet the college’s admission requirements for a degree student. in conjunction with the Office of Transfer Resources and Articulation. The Dual Enrollment Program is open to high school juniors and seniors who attend a high school with a signed Dual Enrollment agreement with Brookdale Community College. F. C. and faculty credentials will apply. as determined by the appropriate Brookdale academic department. will be responsible for evaluating off site teaching locations to ensure that the proper equipment and technologies required for the course are available.0 at the College. In some study areas.) degree programs are career-related. The Admission and Records Office in coordination with the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs will be responsible for the enrollment of Fast Start students in these course offerings. will be responsible for evaluating. D. Selected Brookdale credit courses will be open to high school juniors and seniors at a Brookdale campus or Higher Education Center or at their high school. The following criteria will apply: A. Applicants will be allowed to enroll in no more than two college level courses during any term under the guidelines of the Brookdale Community College prerequisite and co-requisite system. at the high school. Applicants must be recommended and approved by their High School Guidance Counselor. Applicants will be allowed to enroll in no more than two (2) Brookdale courses during any term. Applicants must be at least 15 years of age or older and have completed the equivalent of 9th grade. the students may be required to pass a challenge test and/or portfolio review. The Tech Prep Program is open to high school juniors and seniors who attend a high school with a signed Tech Prep Agreement with Brookdale Community College.

Looking for a career change or job training? Explore new possibilities! Brookdale’s short-term career training programs include healthcare.coarc. 61 Broadway. Recommendations are forwarded to the President for consideration.com). retention. Instructional emphases to include case studies can be customized to reflect corporate objectives and learning experiences with on-the-job tasks. Monmouth County’s official county college. (212) 363-5555. The courses are identical to those presented on campus and are taught by Brookdale instructors. For more information. build bridges. visit www. Brookdale adheres to the Principles of Good Practice in Institutional Advertising. Chicago. 3624 Market Street. Starting dates and class times are flexible. the accrediting agency for all colleges in the mid-Atlantic region. NJ 07101. we offer something for everyone. Division of Consumer Affairs. Every effort is made to meet the needs of employers. Chicago. . A copy of the Principles is available in the office of the Executive Vice President for Educational Services. Institution Wide Assessment Information on institution wide assessment results such as graduation. • The responsibility for learning is shared by the faculty and the student. lists up-to-date information on all activities including many intercollegiate and intramural athletic programs. Brookdale’s Center for Creative Retirement offers exciting learning experiences with offerings in art. Students may also serve as members of College Governance. (312) 988-5522. certification and licensing pass rates. computer training and the alternate route to teacher certification. Accreditation Brookdale. NY 10006-2701. “community” is at the core of our mission. Continually searching for innovative and creative ways to meet the constantly changing needs of Monmouth County residents. Board of Nursing. open doors. Business and Community Development work with employers who request college courses to be presented to their employees at their place of business. edu/bcd or call 732-224-2315. Newark. business/industry career training certificate programs. VA 22071. find hope and educate themselves for the future. extension 153 and by the State of New Jersey. Concerns regarding any Health Science Program may be forwarded to the appropriate agency listed above. Outreach. as well as entertaining trips to regional destinations. Executive Director. (817) 283-2835. Brookdale’s Camps-OnCampus program offers summer camps for children and teen workshops. • The College Student Learning Outcomes Plan makes wise use of faculty and staff time. Happenings.12 Introducing Brookdale Company On-site Credit Course Offerings (COCCO) The Center for Business Services through Outreach. IL 60606. is certified by the State of New Jersey and the United States Department of Education to grant associate degrees to students who complete formal programs of study. The Stall (student newspaper) and Collage (student literary magazine) are two publications produced by the student body. 6th floor. Secretary of Education and the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation. • Assessment processes involve all faculty and responsibility is shared by all faculty teaching in the department/discipline. Herndon. Some training is free of charge. and student learning outcomes are available through the office of the Dean of Academic Affairs or the Office of Planning Assessment and Research. Learning is lifelong! From art and photography to youth programs. Suite 900. administrators. During the summer. 20 North Wacker Drive. Philadelphia. Department of Law and Public Safety. Texas 76021-4244. programming board and finance board. Bedford. Continuing education programs in healthcare and teaching can help improve on-the-job performance and promotion potential. Brookdale programs have accreditation or recognition from specific organizations and agencies when applicable. nurture an interest and meet new people. the Student Life and Activities newsletter. (973) 504-6403. PA 19104 (215) 6625606. 1248 Harwood Road. history and current events. green jobs and construction management. The Center for Business Services offers workforce development training programs designed to boost productivity and profitability. Business and Community Development At Brookdale Community College. New York. funded by the New Jersey Department of Labor. Outcomes assessment principles and practices are in compliance with accreditation requirements as articulated by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. S. The Nursing program is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. and is a member of the Servicemembers’ Opportunity College Consortium. Student Recruitment and Representation of Accredited Status as defined by the Commission on Higher Education. In addition.brookdalecc. which enable students to enjoy a well-rounded education. This is a body comprised of faculty. (312) 704-5300. The Paralegal Studies Program is approved by the American Bar Association. and an extensive array of socially – and intellectually – stimulating programs. staff and students which discusses issues affecting College life and academic policies and regulations. Brookdale Community College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. The Respiratory Therapy program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (www. all in one). IL 60611. Students can become involved in planning and shaping programs and services at Brookdale through the Student Life Board (Brookdale’s version of student government. 13505 Dulles Technology Drive. The Radiologic Technology program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. 124 Halsey Street. Students receive full college credit for course completion. literature. 541 North Fairbanks Court. Standing Committee on Legal Assistants. Explore issues. The GM-ASEP and Toyota T-Ten options of the Automotive Technology program are certified by the National Automotive Technicians Foundation (NATEF). we help people savor life. The Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U. The College’s assessment guiding principles are: • Faculty are the content experts. College Life The Office of Student Life and Activities administers many clubs and organizations geared to student interests.

Cards Each Brookdale student must have a BCC I. students must validate their I. whether planning to attend for a single course or full time. Consult the Master Schedule. Honors courses are designed to provide students with in-depth study of the subject matter in an environment which encourages student-to-student interaction and development of general research skills. Radiologic Technology.edu> and click on “Quicklinks”  “Honors at Brookdale.edu/ pages/257. See the Master Schedule. including the application process.Introducing Brookdale 13 • Assessment is directly and inseparably linked to teaching and learning.D. Special tuition rates may be in effect for persons 65 years of age and older. maximum $1. a meeting will be scheduled to discuss the issues in more detail and the Director of Student Affairs and Support Services will render a decision. Tuition rates for Out-of-State/Out-of-Country. are higher than the rates/maximums for out-of-county residents.asp.D. refer to our website. call 732-224-2500. Medical Laboratory Technology. A Brookdale Student I. Prospective international students should contact the International Education Center for additional admission requirements. Specific concerns related to faculty members must first be discussed with the professor involved to try and reach an amicable solution.” Brookdale Admission Process The Admission Process All new students. $262 per credit. fees and benefits available. with any appropriate supporting documentation.asp>. Applicants should contact the Admission Office for details. Information on Accreditation by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education and individual program accreditation is available from the Brookdale website and can be accessed at www.44 per credit Student Grievance Process Students who have questions or concerns about any issue at Brookdale Community College are encouraged to resolve those issues through appropriate channels. maximum $3.asp. Tuition Monmouth County Residents – The tuition rate as well as a maximum amount per term. card whether full. Fees – Application $25 (non-refundable). • Assessment of student learning is a means to faculty growth and development. Veterans and their families are also encouraged to visit Veterans Affairs in the Admissions Office for a consultation or visit the Brookdale website www. <www. • Results are used to improve student learning. The application must be filled out completely. The Dean of Academic Affairs serves as an arbiter. General concerns about a wide range of issues should be directed to the Student Affairs and Support Services Office. Diagnostic Medical Sonography. For a complete description of Honors at Brookdale. get student discounts on tickets. On the first day of each term. Consult the Master Schedule. Or go to <www. • Assessment results will be communicated to the campus community. . Students appealing a grade in a class must follow a detailed and prescribed process. must submit an application form.777. to the Admission Office.brookdalecc. students have the right to file a formal appeal with the office of the Dean of Academic Affairs. Dental Hygiene. staff and students. Students who complete the program receive honors designation on their diplomas and transcripts.edu/pages/394. • Assessment focuses on learning outcomes that are clearly articulated and linked institutionally.D.asp for additional information on tuition. Without one. (Special tuition rates may be in effect for persons 65 years and older.50 per term for Monmouth County residents. a student cannot borrow a book from the Library. It is published in each current Master Schedule. Tuition for on-line course sections is charged at $118.50 per credit.930 per term for outof-state residents. Nursing. purchase tickets. Late Registration $25 (begins with first day of the semester).edu/pages/ 278. cards at the Warner Student Life Center Information Desk or at the Western Monmouth Branch Campus or any of the Higher Education Center’s student services area.brookdalecc. is set by the Brookdale Board of Trustees. Concerns should be identified. seminar-style classes for high-achieving students. The paperwork for this process is available in the office of the Dean of Academic Affairs and on the Academic Affairs web site at http://www.50 per credit. Applicants may automatically enter any Brookdale program with the exception of Culinary.) Honors at Brookdale Brookdale’s Honors program offers challenging. • Sufficient resources are devoted to meaningful assessment activities. card is obtained in the lower level of the Warner Student Life Center in the I.D. programmatically and to courses. use recreation facilities. Respiratory Therapy.D. Questions. While the initial steps are informal. Students must bring an official copy of their schedule and a valid form of photo identification to obtain a Brookdale student identification card. students must meet with the department chairperson followed by the Academic Division Dean if necessary. Applicants should indicate their intention to be a full-time or part-time student. as well as maximums per term. Tuition And Fees Tuition – $118.brookdalecc.550 per term for other New Jersey residents. gain free entry to student events. If that is not satisfactory. and course offerings. ASEP and T-TEN which involve an additional process.edu/pages/807. $237 per credit.or part-time. I. Brookdale has transfer agreements which enable graduates of the Honors program to enter Honors programs at Monmouth University and Georgian Court University as juniors. and use the computer labs or the Testing Center. If necessary. room (WSLC 109). maximum $3. Fees to be added to tuition include a $28. Armed Forces personnel and their dependents stationed in Monmouth County are eligible for the same rates as regular Monmouth County residents. including a non-refundable application fee. in writing. Official Transcript $3. The final step in this process is a hearing before a representative committee including faculty.brookdalecc.brookdalecc.

However. bearing in mind that this program selection may be changed at any time. upon completion of the waiver form. The tuition rate as well as the maximum amount per term is double that for Monmouth County residents. or a college diploma. Transcripts will not be evaluated until the student has successfully completed one semester at Brookdale. • Photo Driver’s License • Current Lease or Deed • Voter Registration Card • Utility Bill. Bank Statement or Postmarked Correspondence reading. Out-of-County Resident – A resident of a county other than Monmouth. These 24 credits must include English composition and a mathematics course higher than introductory or elementary Algebra. 2) Students have taken the Accuplacer test at another college. Students will be given the name of a particular counseling area after the test. Out-of-Country Resident – A person in the United States for purposes other than that of establishing permanent residence. This test is designed to assure that students are ready to perform college-level work. In some instances. students must apply in person in the Admission Office. All fees are non-refundable. Waivers of testing are available to students under the following provisions: Full Test Waiver (Students will not have to take the test): 1) Students who have completed at least 24 college level credits with a grade of “C” or better from an accredited college. Students with equivalency diplomas should submit either a copy of the diploma or the actual scores received. Out-of-State Resident – A person who has not lived in New Jersey for at least one year prior to the first day of instruction. Students who waive testing will be given counselor names in the Admission Office. Transcripts must be official and students wishing to have previous credits evaluated toward Brookdale degrees are responsible for having transcripts sent to the Admission Office and informing their counselors that they would like their transcripts evaluated. Out-of country residents are assessed at the same rate as out-of-state residents. The tuition rate as well as the maximum amount per term is double that for out-of-county residents. Below is the list of documents required for proof of residency: Any two of the following valid documents (dated within one year) Degree Students Degree students are enrolled in programs of study leading to degrees or certificates. or because the community college does not offer the program you wish to pursue.60 per term. Partial Test Waiver (Students only need part of the test): 1) Students who have taken the SAT test ON OR AFTER SEPTEMBER 1. In addition to the Brookdale application. 3) Students have at least a four-year degree from an accredited college. writing and mathematics. Records must be provided before a student may register for any subsequent term. 2007 and have scored as follows: a) Critical Reading score of 540 or higher will waive both Writing and Reading tests. Non-native speakers of English and persons age 65 and older may also be eligible for a test waiver. The admission process cannot continue until a major field or interest area has been declared.14 Introducing Brookdale • Brookdale Admission Process general services fee. Transfer Students Degree students transferring to Brookdale after gaining credits elsewhere are required to submit official transcripts of credits from their other colleges or post-secondary schools. 2) Students have credits from another college that do not meet the full guidelines of the Full Test Waiver category above. For more information go to http://www. Pre-Registration Testing All new students must take a Basic Skills Placement Test which includes measurement of . a system by which you pay in-county tuition rates. trade and technical school and Armed Forces classes are accepted for Brookdale credit. degree students are listed as “provisional. (Students without high school or equivalency diplomas will be referred to Brookdale’s 30-credit high school equivalency program.0) or above may be accepted toward Brookdale degrees. Students MAY qualify for a partial waiver. but will be notified during the term if records are not received. Residency Definitions Monmouth County Resident – A person with a permanent Monmouth County address who has lived in New Jersey for at least one year prior to the first day of instruction. Change in Residence – Students must request a change in residency and provide all residency documents before the end of the refund (add/ drop) period to receive in-county tuition for a semester or term.” Provisional students may register for courses. Degree students must select a major field.asp. Those wishing to waive on the basis of previous credits must provide an unofficial or official transcript. you may be eligible for full or partial “charge back”. with non-immigrant status as designated under immigration regulations. b) Quantitative score of 530 or higher will waive both Computation and Algebra tests. if they are applicable to the chosen program. Non-remedial credits with grades of “C” (2. Students whose scores indicate the need to enhance skills in the areas of Reading. Those unsure about a major field of study should indicate a general interest area. A form to request high school records is available from the Admission Office. Individuals who wish to apply for a student visa to attend Brookdale Community College should contact the International Education Center for additional information.brookdalecc. To receive a waiver of testing. Students with documented disabilities who would like to request appropriate accommodations should contact the Disability Services Office prior to testing. Armed Forces personnel and their dependents stationed in the county are considered Monmouth County residents. who has lived in New Jersey for at least one year prior to the first day of instruction. if you attend Brookdale because your county does not have a community college. Students registering for 16 credits or more pay no additional tuition or general service fees.) Until all records have been received. Contact Brookdale’s Admissions Office or the Admissions Office of your local community college. It is the student’s responsibility to make an appointment with a counselor to have the Basic Skills Test results interpreted and to select appropriate courses for the initial term. degree students must submit a record of high school graduation or attendance and immunization documentation. as are the application and immunization forms.edu/ pages/1742. An individual assessment must be made. Tuition billing will be adjusted for the student’s next semester or term if residency documents are submitted after the refund period. maximum of $426.

Students who do not complete a basic skills course are required to re-register for the course in the next term. and at the Higher Education Centers and Branch Campus by appointment. All first-time entering full-time and part-time matriculated students. a person must: 1. The objectives of Basic Skills at Brookdale Community College are to: • Assess and identify students’ academic needs. Diagnostic Medical Sonography and Medical Laboratory Technology programs or pass the equivalent College courses. the counselor will generate a program plan form or a course registration form. Degree students should make an appointment with their counselor before registering for any subsequent term. Complete the following program prerequisites (with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2. Students with gaps in their academic backgrounds or who. reading and mathematics and related support services. Students needing such work must take and satisfactorily complete the developmental courses. 4. Non-matriculating students registering for their 12th credit. Take the Basic Skills Placement Test and complete any courses required as a result of scores. Students with fewer than 24 credits of college-level courses must take the Reading Accuplacer test. Basic Skills Courses in basic skills reading. The College will provide Accuplacer placement testing to identify and assess students’ academic needs. The program consists of testing. and should do so at the Office of Registration on the first available date. The Registrar will notify students who fail any course(s) including basic skills courses indicating that they must contact their Counselor regarding future course enrollment. After three (3) years have passed. (In a 2 or 3 course sequence. located on the lower level of the CAR building on a walk-in basis. • Establish requirements for enrollment in and completion of necessary basic skills courses. placement. Introduction to Inorganic. Pass a standardized Health Science entrance exam.) Students identified as requiring developmental coursework will be placed in those courses as follows: • Basic Skills Reading: within the first 12 credits • Basic Skills Writing: within the first 12 credits • Basic Skills Mathematics (Algebra and/ or Pre-algebra): within the first 12 credits unless the counselor determines that developmental reading and writing should be completed first. NOTE: While Counselors make recommendations and in many cases must formally approve classes. Students are then prepared to register. Have passing grades in high school Biology and Chemistry for the Nursing. The exception to this is the Writing test which must be taken in the Writing Center in LAH118. will find the developmental courses are designed to bring basic skills up to the necessary level for optimum college performance. with the passage of time. Complete the following general education courses with a minimum of “C” or higher . Microbiology (BIOL 213). English Composition: Writing Process (ENGL 121) and Introduction to Psychology II (PSYC 106). Organic and Biological Chemistry (CHEM 136). in that case.) 2. students must pass all required basic skills courses. Students whose scores indicate no need for developmental work may not enroll in them. students are responsible and accountable for final course selection and registration. In order to fulfill Basic Skills requirements. Transfer students who have not passed a college-level writing course or a college-level math course beyond elementary algebra (only the appropriate Accuplacer subject tests are required). BIOL 112). Respiratory Therapy. 5. students must take the next course in the sequence. See page 30 for a complete description of the Counseling Division and Student Development Services.75) for the Dental Hygiene program prior to admission: Anatomy and Physiology I and II (BIOL 111. Radiologic Technology.) Basic Skills Placement Test scores are good for three (3) years. Students may not register for any course for which they have not met Basic Skills prerequisites or co-requisites. Complete the Brookdale application and the specific program application forms. (A deadline date is added to the referral form as determined by the counselor. After discussion with the student. writing and mathematics are provided to help prepare students to succeed in college and to ensure the integrity of college-level courses. 6. although credits do not count towards graduation. Students identified as needing development in the skills necessary to succeed in college-level courses are required to take and pass Basic Skills courses as outlined below. Non-matriculating students below the 12th credit who wish to register for basic skills courses or a course with basic skills pre/ co-requisites. Students are entitled to one retest per subject area. 3. 3. The following students are required to be tested for placement: 1. A referral from a counselor is required before a retest can be administered. A retest in a given subject area must be taken prior to the end of the add/drop period in the first semester of the required basic skills course in that subject. Retests are given in the Testing Center. counseling. students must either retest or see a Counselor to be placed in courses based on current skills.Brookdale Admission Process 15 Language Arts and/or Pre-algebra or Elementary Algebra will be placed in the appropriate courses. Admission to Health Science Programs To be eligible for admission to Health Science programs. 7. • Address these needs through counseling and basic skills coursework in writing. Students at the end of the ESL sequence. courses and support services. Counseling All degree (matriculated) students must make an appointment to see a student development specialist (counselor) to work with over the course of their educational career at Brookdale. 2. 5. It is the responsibility of the student development specialist (counselor) to assist degree students in selecting courses that meet particular goals. 4. have grown rusty in one or more of these areas. (See Partial Test Waiver on page 15 of this Catalog. Please call 732-224-2941 for Writing Center hours and information. Basic skills courses are offered below the 100 level for institutional credit and will not be counted as credits toward graduation. in the first semester following completion of required developmental reading. Have a high school diploma or the equivalent.

Complete a nurse’s aide course for the Nursing program. Has your license ever been revoked or suspended in any state? If yes. which requires a valid social security number. 7. 10. or pleaded guilty to. Have you served in the Armed Forces of the United States? Licensure Requirements for Health Science Graduates Graduates of the Nursing program who wish to apply for a license to practice professional nursing must answer the following questions on the licensing application: 1. Have you ever been convicted of any offense of any federal or state law other than a motor vehicle traffic violation(s)? If yes. Has your license to practice dental hygiene now or ever been subject to disciplinary action in any state? 3. Brookdale maintains contracts with affiliated facilities which stipulate participation by students whose health and scholastic progress assure a safe level of clinical performance. Have you ever been summoned. Public Speaking (SPCH 115). Law and Jurisprudence Exam: Date taken_____________. Complete the following program prerequisites prior to the start of the Medical Laboratory Technology course work in September annually: Anatomy and Physiology I and II (BIOL 111. Attend an information session. Introduction to Psychology II (PSYC 106). Principles of Sociology (SOCI 101). offered in cooperation with the University of Medicine and Dentistry. Recommendation of secretary of state board issuing license(s) must be completed by every state in which you hold a license. and Humanities elective. However. Have you ever served in the Armed Forces of the United States? If yes. taken into custody. Are you licensed in any other state? 2. indicted or convicted for the violation of any law or regulation within the last ten years? (Major traffic offenses such as parking or speeding violations need not be listed.) 5. 9. Have you ever been permitted to surrender or otherwise relinquish your nursing license to avoid injury. Have you taken any state or regional board examination and failed? 2. in their sole discretion. convicted. give date(s) of conviction and type(s) of offense. BIOL 112). 12. addresses and dates of dentists where you have been engaged in the practice of dental hygiene. English Composition: Writing and Research (ENGL 122) or Public Speaking (SPCH 115). 11. investigation or action by any state licensing board or federal agency? 4. that student will be dropped from the program. These checks are conducted by an external vendor and the information is sent to the College and to clinical agencies. who apply for a license to practice dental hygiene must answer the following questions on the licensing application: 1. and other positions in health. Is there any action pending against you by any state licensing board? 4. Clinical agencies mandate criminal history background checks for all individuals engaged in patient care and all students must undergo criminal history background checks. Graduates of the Radiologic Technology program who apply for a license to practice radiologic technology must answer the following questions on the licensing application: 1. 6. or a pre-application to determine eligibility? Graduates of the Dental Hygiene program. List all names. must be completed prior to admission to the allied health program and during NURS 160 (forms provided by the Health Sciences Division). a student may be dismissed from the program. what type of military discharge did you receive? . Introduction to Inorganic. etc. Organic and Biological Chemistry (CHEM 136). Persons with relevant previous college credits may have their transcripts evaluated for program credit. has the court sentence(s) been completed? 2. Have you previously submitted an application for ARRT examination in radiography. If a student is denied clinical placement by any clinical agency due to criminal history information. Have you ever been arrested. Has any action ever been taken against your nursing license by any state licensing board or federal agency? 2. or in a foreign country? (Parking or speeding violations need not be listed. Have you ever been summoned. The number of students admitted depends on the availability of faculty and clinical facilities. Statistics (MATH 131).) If yes. education. 3. the violation of any law or ordinance or the commission of any felony or misdemeanor in this or any other state. Microbiology (BIOL 213). Applicants are accepted on a first-come. Is there any action pending against your nursing license by any state licensing board or federal agency? 3. convicted or tried for or charged with or pleaded guilty to the violation of law or ordinance or the commission of any felony or misdemeanor (excluding traffic violations) in this or another state or foreign country? 4. indicted. or charged with. taken into custody. a special eligibility application. Agency personnel will evaluate the information they receive and. or tried for. Complete Medical Terminology (HESC 105) for the Radiologic Technology program. nuclear medicine or radiation therapy.16 Brookdale Admission Process prior to the start of dental course work in January annually: English Composition: Writing and Research (ENGL 122). Graduates of the Respiratory Therapy program who apply for a license to practice professional respiratory care must answer the following questions on the licensing application: 1. motor vehicle offenses such as driving while impaired or intoxicated must be disclosed.) 8. If yes. 8. explain on a separate sheet of paper. but motor vehicle offenses such as driving while intoxicated or impaired must be disclosed. and Algebraic Modeling (MATH 145). Should these criteria not be met at any point. firstserved basis until the classes are filled. Participation in Clinical Laboratory is also contingent on a satisfactory medical examination report from a physician or nurse practitioner. A criminal history background check. arrested. explain in an accompanying letter along with a certified copy of court record. indicted. Complete Medical Terminology (HESC 105) and Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL 111) prior to the start of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography Program. English Composition: Writing Process (ENGL 121). (Include period in Armed Services. make the final determination as to each student’s ability to continue to engage in patient care in their agency.

The instructor may remove an unsuitable student from the program. Non-degree students should consult this catalog to determine if the courses they wish to take require the Basic Skills Placement Test. These students may take up to 11 Brookdale credits without declaring a major. Non-Degree Students Non-degree students are those not enrolled in programs of study leading to degrees or certificates. Counseling Meeting with a counselor (Student Development Specialist) is not required for non-degree students. Pre-Registration Testing/ Matriculation A non-degree student who has completed 11 credits at Brookdale will be required to take a Basic Skills Placement Test and declare a major. During this time. All climbing and safety equipment will be provided. Electrical Circuits for Power Distribution I and II. students need to take a total of 64 credit hours. Eligibility screening will be conducted prior to the start of the fall semester. where safe work practices and procedures in the electrical environment are continually stressed. Students will be compensated. an evening orientation session will be held at Brookdale Community College which will provide background information on the program and introduce students to the skills necessary for this program. Based on results. before being allowed to register for the 12th credit. Reading. The program will prepare students for employment as a line worker or substation electrician. Before testing.A. However. Career and Technical Courses Computer Aided Circuit Analysis. welleducated and experienced line workers and substation electricians. Jersey Central Power & Light (JCP&L) has partnered with Brookdale Community College to train the next generation of top-quality. Step 3 – Technical Evaluation & Skills Orientation Prospective students will participate in a skills orientation which will includes activities to test strength. Step 6 – Classes Begin With successful completion of steps 1 through 5. which begins in September. and they may register. All training and education will be offered weekdays. students will earn First Aid and CPR Certifications. Field Experience Following the second semester. instructors will determine if each prospective student possesses the basic skills and abilities required for electric power utility work. Computer Literacy. or to meet waiver requirements. English Composition: Writing and Research. enrollment is limited and preregistration is required. prospective students should complete a Brookdale application and make an appointment with a Brookdale counselor. For information on this program call (732) 224-2791 or (732) 212-4154. Laboratory Work All the essential hands-on skills necessary for a line worker or substation electrician will be taught in the laboratory.Brookdale Admission Process 17 Admission to the Electric Utility Technology Program A. a mandatory 80-hour Basic Wood Pole Climbing course will be conducted at a JCP&L site where students will learn to climb poles. and Math. Class size is limited. Step 5 – Basic Climbing To prepare for the fall semester. Transformers and Controls. Although non-degree students are not required to meet with a student development specialist (counselor). Nondegree students must file the Brookdale application. . students can earn a two-year Accredited Associate of Applied Science Degree with a focus on Electric Utility Technology.S. Switchgears. this service is available and highly recommended. and Community First Aid and Professional CPR. Economics and Algebraic Modeling. Classroom-based courses will be held at Brookdale Community College. completed consecutively over the 21-month (four semester) period. and laboratory courses are held at a JCP&L facility. Electrical System Design and the National Electric Code. Through this program. Non-degree students may convert to matriculated status at any time. Step 4 – Background check Prospective students must successfully pass a background check. technical training and hands-on field experience to become a line worker or substation electrician. students have the necessary education. Preemployment screening is required. endurance and the ability to work in high places. Interpersonal Communications. and classroom coursework will take place at Brookdale the remaining 2 1/2 days a week at our Western Monmouth Higher Education Center in Freehold. Field experience will begin in June and end in August. Selection Process Step 1 – Program Orientation In the spring and/or fall. Course Delivery Students will conduct their laboratory training at a JCP&L facility 2 1/2 days a week. Because of the handson involvement. Certain courses require pre-registration testing. Step 2 – Brookdale Application and Placement Testing Prior to registration. students will be required to participate in a paid ten-week (40 hr/week) evaluated field experience. counseling is available. or a candidate may withdraw on his or her own. As part of the program. students may be required to enroll in summer courses to prepare for the fall semester. Overhead Lines. selected students will begin the 21-month degree program in the fall semester. Course Curriculum General Education courses English Composition: Writing Process. A non-degree student who drops a course or is dropped from a course because of the lack of appropriate prerequisites will not receive a refund. Brookdale requires placement testing in English. Substation students will be oriented to the skill and practices of the profession. Students will also become familiar with basic overhead line equipment. Degree Specifications To earn this degree. See page 30 for a complete description of Counseling and Student Development services. non-degree students wishing to consult counselors should inquire at the Admissions Office to learn the counselor’s name and location. In just two years. World Civilization I. FirstEnergy Lab and Field Experience. Electric Skills and Techniques. Non-degree students should consult catalog course descriptions and the Master Schedule carefully. Electrical Transmission and Distribution. as well as a Class “A” Commercial Driver’s License (CDL).

consist of a variety of general education and subject examinations. students must pay in full. Students must drop courses OFFICIALLY during the refund period to receive a refund. students may be able to add and/or drop classes online. Priority Registration After the initial semester of study. Furthermore. Failure to meet all financial obligations results in the withholding of grades and transcripts and ineligibility to register for subsequent terms. Once The Term Begins… Attendance Policy Individual instructors determine the attendance policy for their courses. Students are responsible for knowing these dates. Students in deleted courses will be notified by email and the College will also try to contact students by telephone. See the Master Schedule for exact dates for refund periods. Refunds Students may withdraw from courses without financial penalty at any time BEFORE the first day of a term. a full refund will automatically be mailed. Students who do Credits Brookdale Community College operates on a semester credit hour basis. edu and select Testing Center for cut off scores and course equivalences.000 colleges and universities throughout the country. enter Webadvisor for Students. or receive a refund by mail if they opt for courses with fewer credits. Brookdale’s refund policy states that a student may receive 100% refund of tuition and fees up until the day before the first day of the term. Students may register at that time and date. Students must pay all financial obligations. given exclusively on computers. Failure to comply could result in dismissal from classes. THE REFUND MUST BE REQUESTED DURING THE TERM IN WHICH THE STUDENT’S ILLNESS OCCURS. a check will be mailed. Clinical. Discover Card or Visa. Open Registration New students may register on or after the first day of open registration listed in the Master Schedule. check. or charge on Mastercard. 80% refund of tuition only. Students registering for the Fall or Spring Terms may elect to pay (or charge) in full. not withdraw from classes for which they have not completed required course work may be dropped at any time with no refund. no fees during the second week of the term and no refund after the second week of the term. may receive a full refund of tuition and fees. The CLEP and DSST tests. students will be informed by email or by telephone. by cash. Stop by the Office of Testing Services or consult with a counselor for additional information. If for any reason students have to change their schedule. upon registration. money order. Students are urged to take advantage of priority passes since courses fill up quickly and lines become lengthy later in the registration period. Please check the website at http://www. Students can replace the canceled course through the appropriate Division Office. in the military. Students who do not officially drop a course during the refund period are responsible for all fees and tuition payments. Students wishing to do so must file an Add/Drop Form in person in the Registration Office. For the Summer Terms. Students may choose any Adding/Dropping Courses Be advised that students are responsible for ensuring that all pre and co-requisite requirements are met. The Master Schedule defines the time lines within which a drop/withdrawal may be completed and lists the refund eligibility dates. Students who withdraw to enter the Armed Forces of the United States may be granted a full tuition and fee refund. an Add/Drop form must be completed in the Registration and Records Office. Classes may be cancelled at the discretion of the Executive Vice President for Educational Services. Students who register for classes before grades are finalized must drop any classes if they do not successfully pass the pre or co-requisite subject. A full tuition refund will be granted prior to the first day of the term. Credit by Examination (CLEP and Dantes) Testing Services offers CLEP and DSST assessments. Students must also comply with all state and federal regulations. and if passed. Students who withdraw from all classes because of serious illness. Provisional students will not receive a priority registration pass. On the priority pass is a time and a date. attested to in writing by a physician. if students stop attending a course(s) during a term. Based on certain eligibility requirements. and enclose a copy of the enlistment papers.brookdalecc. CLEP and DSST credits are accepted at over 2. All requests for medical refunds should be sent to the Registration Office. on the job. or through other learning experiences. Students with credits from other institutions or who have relevant field experience may be required to provide transcripts or to meet with Brookdale faculty to determine eligibility to take particular courses. All fees are non-refundable. In addition. one credit hour is assigned for each 750 minutes of lecture time. go to Webadvisor (through Brookdale’s home page). a check will be mailed within four to six weeks. field observation. To determine eligibility. through independent study. Course Cancellation Policy When students register for courses and the paid course is canceled or the time is changed. Creditby-examination testing may allow students to bypass subjects in which they already have college-level knowledge. Instructors will distribute their attendance policy in the syllabi or instructor addendum. The initial days of each registration period are reserved for returning students to ensure their registration for courses required to complete programs. With the time and money saved. If a student does not wish to select another course. students must OFFICIALLY withdraw from the course(s). and read question #25 “Can I register online?” If a student adds a course(s) the student must pay any additional tuition and fees. . They must write to the Registrar to request the refund. one or a combination of tests. click on the link FAQ. or defer payment up to a date listed in the Master Schedule. no fees during the first week of the term. refund amounts are reduced and are granted for tuition only. students will receive credit at Brookdale. which are credit-by-examination programs for students who have gained knowledge elsewhere — in school. Generally. students can take courses that are more interesting and challenging. If a student drops a course(s) and is eligible for a refund. Laboratory experience during a semester generally consists of 1500 minutes of work per credit hour. As of the first day of the term. 60% refund of tuition only. It is the responsibility of the student to know and adhere to the attendance policy specified for each class. Courses that the College drops from the schedule are not the student’s responsibility. Attendance may affect a student’s eligibility for financial aid and veterans’ benefits. Students may elect to choose other courses and pay additional tuition and fees if the credit total is larger. students will receive priority registration passes through email. or thereafter.18 Brookdale Admission Process Registering For Courses The registration dates for each term are listed in the Brookdale Master Schedule.

should go to Webadvisor from the Brookdale Home page and click on “What’s My Password” and follow the instructions. Student Development Records – Maintained by individual counselors. referrals. brookdalecc. Then click on Log In. results of diagnostic and psychological testing batteries. The office is open from 8:30 AM to 7 PM. advanced standing evaluations. and from 9 AM to noon on Saturdays (See Master Schedule for summer hours). a student believes that a factual inaccuracy is contained within the records. The hearing will be conducted and decided within a reasonable period of time (in no case to exceed 45 days) following the request for a hearing. brookdalecc. These include: record of course completions. from 8:30 AM to 5 PM on Fridays. Students are responsible for checking their grades. students are required to change their passwords. related correspondence. To review the process: Go to www. Students can access their grades through their Webadvisor account. To access this information go to www. Student E-Mail All students are assigned a Brookdale e-mail address upon admission to the college. As part of this procedure students may request copies of information contained in their educational records. these include: high school and college transcripts. For students who do not know their user name and/or password click on “Student E-Mail and on the “welcome” page click the link showing how to look up user name and password. change of data. Financial Aid Records – The Financial Aid Office is located in the CAR building (park in lot #5). E-Mail and On-line Resources Technology has dramatically altered the way students access and process data.brookdalecc. These include: certification applications. For the Winterim Term the maximum credit load is 4 credits. Academic Information On-line Students can access academic information through Webadvisor. Monday through Thursday. promissory notes. contact the Information Technology Help Desk in the Bankier Library at 732-224-2632.Brookdale Admission Process 19 internships and other experiences have additional time requirements depending on the program. It is important to understand the options that are available and how to use these various tools. See page 24 for details. etc. The minimum fee for reproducing copies is one dollar ($1). If a student believes there is an error on their transcript. . password. Upon initial log in.edu and click on “Student E-Mail. All current and new students are assigned a password. click on “Students enter here. Health Records – Health Services. That department will attempt to settle the dispute regarding records content through informal meetings and discussions with the student and a member of the appropriate department. It is vital for students to regularly check their Brookdale e-mail weekly. If. Students will be directed to a screen identifying personal e-mail address and password. graduation notices and registration announcements. Official transcripts are only available from the Admission. Grades will be posted one week after the last day of the semester. Students receive critical information such as grade. Upon receiving the form. an attempt will be made to schedule an appointment for a review of the records within seven days. etc. Access to the records listed in this section will be given to College personnel with a legitimate educational interest in the records as determined by the College. submit a written request to the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs requesting a hearing to arbitrate the dispute. Records and Registration office. referrals. Copy the e-mail address and password. related correspondence. Enter the student User ID and Password. program plans. Students. If such informal means do not result in a student obtaining satisfaction. a copy of which is available for your inspection at the Records Office. students should contact the office maintaining the record in question concerning the inaccuracy. etc. who have questions or difficulty accessing online services.edu” and password. Students are now ready to begin using their Brookdale email. Cumulative maximum for non-degree students is 11 credits. Scroll to the bottom and click on “Proceed to the new E-Mail Server” and enter the student e-mail username (everything up to “@mail. An unofficial transcript with a student’s complete academic history is available in the student’s Webadvisor account under the Academic Profile section.” Enter student’s name which is everything before “@mail. and Summer II Terms) for matriculated students (Degree) is 16 credits. and a written decision will be rendered. first floor. Spring. All students receive a letter explaining how to use Brookdale email and are provided a student login and Webadvisor for Students The User ID is the seven-digit Student ID number. Students can contact the Information Technology Help Desk in the Bankier Library or call them at 732-224-2632 with difficulties accessing the student e-mail account. admission application. The maximum amount of credits students can take during the Long Terms (Fall. This is the only way to access your grades unless you request a hard copy from the Registrar. Warner Student Life Center. our online system. Students wishing exceptions should meet with their counselor. Student Records The College maintains the following records on individual students: Academic and Veteran Records – The Records Office is located in the CAR building (park in lot #5). who don’t know their password. Students who wish to inspect and review their educational records may do so by obtaining and completing a “Request to Review Educational Records” form at the Records Office. course substitutions. Enter the seven-digit Student ID number (found on student registration materials).edu”) and password to begin using the Brookdale assigned e-mail account. Students. high school transcripts. Information will be released to other agencies and individuals in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. graduation evaluations. course substitutions. for Summer I and Summer III terms the maximum for all students is seven (7) credits. following the inspection. Grades Student’s academic grades are only available online. Record of Disciplinary Action – Office of Student Life and Activities. Main Academic Central (MAC 112). related correspondence.edu and click on “Webadvisor” from the home page. course registrations.” If students know their username and password.brookdalecc. they should contact their instructor immediately. See the information below titled “What can I do in Webadvisor” for more details. In addition Faculty may communicate with students through email.

Counselor Approved Courses – When the Student Development Specialist (Counselor) approves courses in the system.00 2. without academic penalty until fourfifths of the course or semester has been completed (i. GPA. Students should know that if they click the “Reset Password” option from the menu.asp or call the Information Technology Help Desk in the Bankier Library at 732-224-2632. C+ = What Can I Do In Webadvisor? 1. add and/or drop classes online. A grade of Pass is earned if the student completes the course at the “Satisfactory” (C) level or above.= B+ = B BC P D F W = = = = = = = • The incomplete contract is completed by the faculty member and must be signed by both the faculty member and the student. current program. No login is required.e. Audit A student who wishes to attend a class but does not want to receive credit or a grade may register for the class and request permission to audit it.00 2.. go to Webadvisor for Students.00 1. both grades will appear on the transcript but only the higher grade will be included in the GPA calculation.67 2.33 3. This option may not be used for a course in the student’s major. 2. If a decision to change the grade is made. To determine eligibility. • For the purpose of calculating academic standing. Financial Profile –Students can check financial aid status. students can view any outstanding restrictions on their account (if applicable). Incomplete An Incomplete (INC) may be assigned at the discretion of the course faculty for students who have extraordinary circumstances of documented hardship or emergency. list of completed courses and current class schedule. Students may not change from credit to audit or from audit to credit after the end of the Add/Drop period. and read question #25 “Can I register online?” (Students are responsible for printing verification of all Web Advisor transactions after completing registration. Withdrawal Students are allowed to withdraw from a course. The following process should be followed: • The student contacts the faculty member with the appropriate documentation. A maximum of two courses (maximum eight credits) taken on a Pass/No Credit basis may be used toward the degree.00 Audit.67 3. students can check progress toward degree requirements. Registration – Based on certain eligibility requirements.” showing available and closed seats. All tuition and applicable fees are charged for the course.brookdalecc. click on the link FAQ. • Students will be notified by e-mail to check their grades and to speak to their counselor about the impact of the incomplete. AUD = A student’s grade point average for a term is computed by multiplying credits times grade points and dividing the total by the number of credits attempted. The Grading System The grading system at Brookdale is as follows: A = 4. assigned Counselor and registration status (determines eligibility to register online). students may be able to register. •• When a student completes the work satisfactorily. Search for Classes – Students can search through Brookdale’s database of credit courses. In addition. Academic Profile – Students can look up grades. Students will be notified by e-mail. to find the class(es) they want in the term they’ll be attending. (Degree Audit) 3. Repetition If a course is repeated. edu/pages/352. • All course work should be completed by the twenty-first (21st) day after the end of the current semester or term. Changing Grades If a student thinks a grade received was not a true representation of efforts. Pass / No Credit Option for Above Zero-Level Courses A student may take a course at the 100 level or higher on a Pass/No Credit basis. . current academic standing.20 Brookdale Admission Process Students can change their password at any time using the “Change Password” option on the Webadvisor Student Menu. • If work is not completed satisfactorily. the Registrar will change the INC to an F.00 0. Consult the Master Schedule for specific dates.00 3. 4. Results are displayed in “real time. then the faculty member will submit a change of grade form. For help on how to log in to the student email account see the student email website at http://www. exclusive of official College closings.33 2. These are students who have been actively participating throughout the term and have completed a significant portion of the course in a satisfactory manner but approach the end of the term without completing all assignments. add/ drop activities. All students have a Brookdale Community College student Gmail email address. up to the end of the third week of the Fall or Spring Terms or 20% of any shorter term. then the student should consult with the faculty member. Students must officially withdraw by completing an add/drop form in the Registration Office or they will not be dropped from the class. Financial Aid students should contact the Financial Aid Office prior to withdrawing since it may affect current and/or future aid. A grade of “No Credit” is recorded if the student fails the course or completes the course at the “Marginal” (D) level. students can view the list of approved courses in Webadvisor for Students. make a payment and check account summary. In addition. no grade points assigned Withdrawal A.) 5. A student may change from Pass/No Credit to the A-F grade option or from the A-F grade option to Pass/No Credit. Check student on-line information from the Brookdale home page a few weeks later to make sure the new grade is properly recorded on the student transcript. a new system generated password will be sent to the student email address selected from the drop down choices. the INC will be treated as an F. the faculty member will submit a change of grade. the twelfth week of a fifteen week course).

Information regarding this process may be found on page 42 after the Academic Integrity portion of the Student Conduct Code and Academic Integrity Code. The student will be required to meet with their counselor and plan the next semester with Satisfactory Academic Standing as a goal. A student must have a CGPA of 2.5.6 22-31 1.0 will also receive a warning.0 Semester Grade Point Average (SGPA) for degree credits attempted. The student must have completed 12 college-level credits or more in any long term. 2) The student has at least 32 degree credits successfully completed and in the second semester of probation.0 will receive a warning. Academic Standing Table Degree Credits Attempted* Minimum CGPA 1-11 -12-21 1. . the Academic Probation period ends. If. the student does not achieve Satisfactory Academic Standing.The student must be a matriculated student. 2. must pass 50% of those courses each semester he or she is enrolled in Basic Skills courses. Warning Notices – A student who has attempted 1-11 degree credits and whose CGPA is less than a 2. *Successful completion includes grades of D or higher. with 100% completion rate. grade-point average. Developmental courses do not count toward the Dean’s List. within one year of the original grade assignment. at the end of the first semester of Academic Probation. whereas non-degree credits refers to credits at the 0-level. Grade Appeal Process There is a student grade appeal process that provides an avenue to discuss and resolve problems that may arise with educational progress.0 *Degree credits attempted includes credits for all courses (at the 100-level or above) from which the student has not officially withdrawn and all transfer credits accepted by Brookdale. as defined in the Basic Skills regulation. at the end of the first semester of Academic Probation. The student will be restricted to a maximum of 14 credits or four (4) courses.75 32-51 1. the student still does not achieve Satisfactory Academic Standing. a student enrolled in Basic Skills courses. College Regulation for Academic Standing The objective of the College Regulation for Academic Standing is to establish standards for determining whether a student is in satisfactory academic standing and to establish a process for monitoring student academic standing. the student must complete 12 credits over the course of one year (July through June). C. 3. All grade changes exceeding the one year time limit require the Academic Division Dean’s and Executive Vice President for Educational Services written approval. B. degree credits refers to credits for courses at the 100level or above.7 or higher cumulative grade point average at graduation. A student who has attempted more than 11 degree credits and is in Satisfactory Academic Standing but whose CGPA is less than a 2. OR if the student enrolls for less than 12 college-level credits in both long terms. Criteria to be considered for this award include personal achievement and activities while pursuing a degree. and the counselor’s signature is required for registration. Outstanding Student The Outstanding Student Award applies to graduates from Associate degree programs who have exhibited outstanding academic and personal growth at Brookdale.9 >51 2. Regulation Statement (NOTE: For purposes of this regulation. If at the end of the second semester of Academic Probation.The Grading System 21 Grade Changes – Time Limit Grade changes should be made as soon as an error is detected or an appeal is granted. Academic Suspension – A student who has been on Academic Probation and has not achieved Satisfactory Academic Standing by the end of the probation period will be suspended from the College for at least one full semester (Fall or Spring). along with a 95% cumulative course completion rate.) A. The suspended student will not be permitted to attend any intervening Winterim or Summer terms.3 Semester Grade Point Average (SGPA) for degree credits attempted. D. The students will be notified that they may be in jeopardy of losing Satisfactory Academic Standing and must choose future courses carefully in order to maintain Satisfactory Academic Standing. successfully completes* 100% of credits attempted and earns at least a 2. If. Students are responsible for accessing their grades through their Webadvisor accounts. Distinguished Scholar Award The Distinguished Scholar Award applies only to graduates from Associate Degree programs that have a 3. Further questions concerning the Grade Appeal Process should be directed to the Academic Affairs Office. The student must have achieved a grade point average of 3. Each division will select a student to receive this award at graduation. (Only credits earned at Brookdale are computed in the CGPA. the student continues for another semester on Academic Probation. and active participation in the learning process. All grade changes must be submitted in person. Once the Academic Suspension period has expired. successfully completes* 100% of credits attempted and earns at least a 2. Dean’s List Criteria Full-Time and Part-Time Students Following is the criteria for eligibility for the Dean’s List effective Academic Year 2007: 1. the student achieves Satisfactory Academic Standing. the student may continue for a third semester of Academic Probation if they fall into one of the following categories: 1) The student has fewer than 32 degree credits successfully completed and in the second semester of probation.0 to be eligible for graduation. Satisfactory Academic Standing – A student is considered to be in Satisfactory Academic Standing if the following two criteria are met: 1) The student must meet the minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) as outlined in the Academic Standing Table below. to the Registrar’s Office by the instructor or a representative from the appropriate Division Office.) 2) Once more than 11 credits (either degree or non-degree) have been attempted (not including official withdrawals). with 100% completion rate. Academic Probation – A student who is not in Satisfactory Academic Standing will be placed on Academic Probation.

The GPA for all course work taken during this time must be at least a 2. If the student does not return for three (3) or more years. Academic Dismissal – A student who has returned after Academic Suspension must meet the conditions outlined in F. Students must meet with a counselor before applying for Academic Amnesty to ensure the guidelines are met. All appropriate documentation must be included. i. the student may apply for Academic Amnesty (College Regulation 5. F’s or W’s. Reinstatement after Suspension or Dismissal. The student must explain in full the basis for the appeal. G. All courses below Credit or C level during the student’s previous attendance will be included when Academic Amnesty is declared. the student must make an appointment to meet with the Director.e. F.. Student Affairs and Support Services explaining in full the basis for the appeal. Warning. any extenuating circumstances. Dismissal or their cumulative G. If the counselor supports the appeal: the student must write a letter to the Director. based on extraordinary circumstances. the extenuating circumstances.0 Semester Grade Point Average (SGPA) for degree credits attempted. Students who do not achieve Satisfactory Academic Standing in the semester following reinstatement will remain under Conditional Reinstatement until they have attempted 14 additional degree credits and if they fall into one of the following categories: 1) The student has fewer than 32 degree credits successfully completed and in the semester of reinstatement successfully completes* 100% of the credits attempted and earns at least a 2. The Appeal for Reinstatement will be judged by an Academic Review Committee composed of: • Dean of Academic Affairs (or designee) • Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs (or designee) • Director of Student Development Services (or designee) • Director of Student Affairs and Support Services (or designee) • Registrar (or designee) • Two Academic Division Deans • Two Faculty The Academic Review Committee must have 60% of its members present to act on an appeal. *Successful completion includes grades of D or higher. . Academic Amnesty Academic Amnesty allows students to restore their academic standing at the College by eliminating the previous academic credit from the current Grade Point Average (GPA). and in the semester of reinstatement successfully completes* 100% of the credits attempted and earns at least a 2. The decision of the Academic Review Committee is final. Students granted Academic Amnesty must maintain regular contact with their counselor to monitor academic progress..3 Semester Grade Point Average (SGPA) for degree credits attempted. The student who successfully appeals the suspension may return to the College on Conditional Reinstatement. The student must have successfully completed at least 12 credits. The student’s current academic standing is unsatisfactory. and to secure approval. The Director must receive this letter. The counselor’s signature is required for registration. Appeal of Academic Suspension – A student placed on academic suspension may appeal the suspension. The Dean of Academic Affairs will grant final approval. through the following process: The student must meet with a counselor within seven (7) days of notification of suspension and discuss the reason for the appeal. If these conditions are not met.A. Reinstatement after Suspension or Dismissal. The counselor supports or denies the appeal. Academic Amnesty Applied will appear on transcripts to indicate the separation of past coursework from the current.0014R). The student needs additional courses to complete program requirements. with the exceptions noted below. The Director will make a determination on the appeal. no D’s.0. Once the minimum period for Academic Dismissal is over. Suspension. 2) The student has at least 32 degree credits successfully completed. The committee will notify the student in writing of its decision at least one week prior to the start of the semester for which the student wishes to register.P. Students who attended Brookdale Community College in the past and attained very poor academic records may apply at the Registrar’s Office under the following conditions: The student has had three years elapse since the end of the last term attended and the return to credit enrollment at the College. All previous coursework will continue to appear on the student’s transcript.22 The Grading System the student may return to the College under the conditions specified in F. and a plan for academic success. one semester to achieve Satisfactory Academic Standing. Academic Amnesty can be granted one time only. The Academic Review Committee may grant an Appeal for Reinstatement by majority vote. however the excluded coursework will not be included in the calculations for the cumulative GPA. is below 2.e. along with a letter of support from the counselor. Reinstatement After Suspension or Dismissal – A student who is reinstated after Academic Suspension or Academic Dismissal will be required to meet with a counselor and plan the next semester with Satisfactory Academic Standing as a goal.0. Student Affairs and Support Services. within ten (10) days following notification of suspension. Appeal for Reinstatement – A student in Academic Dismissal may appeal for reinstatement in writing to the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs. The Director’s office will notify the student of the results within seven (7) days of the meeting. and a plan for academic success. Reinstatement after Suspension or Dismissal. The decision of the Director is final. i. Within ten (10) days following notification of suspension. The results will be forwarded to the counselor and the Registration Office. the student is placed on Academic Dismissal for a minimum period of one full year. The appeal letter must be received at least thirty (30) days prior to the start of the next long semester. E. Upon reinstatement. before applying for Academic Amnesty. Probation. the student may submit a written request for reinstatement to the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs. The student is governed by the conditions outlined in F. the student will be placed on Conditional Reinstatement and will have. Academic Amnesty does not affect or alter the student’s records for financial aid eligibility. H.

Records and Registration Office. A Candidacy for Graduation Request Form must be filed with a Counselor by students who wish to receive an Associate Degree or Certificate from Brookdale Community College. they should apply to the Dean for a Brookdale degree and be ready to show that the contract’s terms were met. and students may earn their final 15 credits at another institution. click Webadvisor. Students writing to request an official transcript. Commencement exercises are held in May each year. This online degree audit evaluation is provided as a tool to help students keep track of their progress towards graduation and is best used in consultation with their Student Development Specialist (Counselor) to insure that the information is accurate. Registration and Records. Should a program change during NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to check with their Student Development Specialist (Counselor). etc. students must complete the Transcript Request Form available in the Admissions. Counselors work with students in selecting courses geared toward graduation and toward meeting the student’s academic. Transcripts Official transcripts of grades are available through the Office of Admissions. In order to obtain official transcripts. Students who wish to graduate from Brookdale should be aware that. or consult the appropriate BCC catalog. These requirements include the general education component specified for each type of degree (see page 53) plus the career studies that may be listed as set requirements or may involve choices. The Candidacy for Graduation Request Form should be filed at the beginning of the term in which the student plans to complete requirements for graduation. payable to Brookdale Community College. Written requests must include the student’s social security number or Brookdale Student ID number. The student develops a contract. to transfer credits back to Brookdale. When students meet the contract’s terms. E-mail and fax requests are not accepted. The courses necessary for award of Brookdale certificates are also clearly listed in the catalog. Registration and Records. No more than 50% of the credits towards a degree can be accepted from another college or from CLEP and other equivalency testing programs toward Brookdale graduation. and detailed information as to where the transcript is to be sent (full address including Zip Code is required) along with a fee of $3 per transcript. students must be aware of the requirements for graduation for their particular program. The Degree Audit Evaluation is NOT an official transcript or document. and if applicable. candidates for graduation will be charged a fee (amount to be set each year) to cover graduation expenses. are tracking the transfer requirements of the institution that they plan to attend. working with the counselor and the Dean. Exceptions to all these rules may be made for persons attending Brookdale as members of the Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC). For certificates. The graduation requirements in force during a degree student’s first term are those by which the courses will be selected and evaluated for graduation. This form must be submitted to their counselor by the deadlines listed below: Summer II & III Term – July 1 Fall Term – October 15 Winterim – December 7 Spring & Summer I – February 15 Each year. the final 15 credits toward a degree or certificate must be taken at Brookdale. such as cap and gown. Graduation Requirements From the beginning of a college career at Brookdale. Transcript requests must be made by the student and will not be accepted on behalf of the student from other individuals. Notification to candidates is sent in March and diplomas are mailed within 12 weeks after certification. a student’s tenure at Brookdale.The Grading System 23 Health Science Programs In order to ensure patient safety. To check Degree Audit-go to www. Degree Audit Students who began their major at Brookdale Community College in Summer III 1999 or after can review an online degree audit evaluation of their progress in satisfying the requirements of their current academic program (major) or of an academic program they would like to consider. click Log In and select Degree Audit-Progress toward my degree. In addition. Students who withdraw for a year and are later re-admitted or change programs must follow graduation requirements in effect in the re-entry term. in most cases. The contract will be filed with the student’s records. to verify that the active program and catalog year are correct and that the courses the student takes are fulfilling the graduation requirements for that program. diploma or certificate must attain a cumulative grade point average of 2. If requesting transcripts in–person. Candidates for an Associate Degree or Certificate are expected to conform to the graduation requirements which are in effect during the term in which they originally matriculated in that program or term readmitted following one year of non-attendance.edu. Academic Division Dean Approval is required for the substitution. students must apply in person using the Transcript Request Form available in the Office of Admissions. In certain cases. Students may also obtain a transcript with a written mailed request. In rare circumstances. A candidate for a degree. student signature.0 (C) or higher. a course substitution may be made for a program requirement. personal and career goals. All of these are listed in the individual program descriptions that are listed alphabetically beginning on page 57. at the Branch Campus or Higher Education Centers. one half of the total credits must be earned at Brookdale. may send a letter or complete and mail the online Transcript Request Form. the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs may waive this requirement. additional separate grading policies (Academic Progress Policies) exist for all Health Science programs.brookdalecc. Payments can be made in the form of a check or money order. at the Branch Campus or Higher Education Centers and pay the fee as noted above. diploma. These policies and other policies governing these programs can be found in the Health Science Student Handbooks. half of a program’s career studies credits must be earned at Brookdale. the student may still graduate by meeting the requirements in force during the first term of that program. Cash should not be sent through the mail. .

BROOKDALE COMMUNITY COLLEGE FOUNDATION VETERANS TUITION CREDIT PROGRAM Scholarships vary based on enrollment. PUBLIC TUITION BENEFIT PROGRAM *FEDERAL WORK STUDY (F. Availability depends on funding in each individual office. Veterans eligible for VA Educational benefits who served between 12/31/60 and 5/7/75. no repayment. . Up to cost of education. New Jersey residents demonstrating highest academic achievement based on high school transcripts and SAT scores. A small number of scholarships are awarded based on academic or athletic achievement and other special criteria. An academic Competitiveness grant will provide up to $750 for the first year of undergraduate study and up to $1.S. of continuous full-time enrollment. An additional $2. legal resident of NJ at time of induction or discharge or for a period of not less than one year prior to application exclusive of time spent on active duty.F.O. Amount depends on financial need and available funds. who have completed a rigorous high school course of study and achieved the required scores on a college placement test to determine college readiness. Repayment begins 6 months after last date of half time enrollment. Student must be registered at least half-time. All accepted or enrolled degree students registered for six or more credits who demonstrate financial need. Repayment begins 60 days after first disbursement. as determined by the Secretary of Education. students must be taking at least 12 college-level credits and be matriculated in a degree program. Must take Stafford Loan first. The NJ STARS scholarship covers the cost of tuition and fees (not including Health Insurance) for classes completed AFTER other Federal and State grants are applied. Scholarship) may be awarded to students who graduated in the top 15% of their high school class. N. NJ residents demonstrating high academic achievement based on high school transcripts and SAT scores. All accepted or enrolled degree students registered for six or more credits. First year students must have graduated from high school after January 1. Repayment begins 60 days after first disbursement. Students in their final NJ STARS term (preparing to graduate) may take less than 12 credits. NEW JERSEY STARS * Designates federally funded programs.) Actual cost of tuition at Brookdale.E.) BLOUSTEIN SCHOLAR Grants vary based on New Jersey eligibility index. Interest is not subsidized. STUDENT HELP *FEDERAL DIRECT STAFFORD LOAN (Subsidized and Unsubsidized) NEW JERSEY CLASS LOAN Student’s parents or relatives with a current work history and a good credit rating may borrow for student.300 for the second year of undergraduate study.500 for a first-year student. Additional grants awarded to PELL recipients. Grant amounts vary based on financial need evaluation of applicant by the College. GARDEN STATE SCHOLAR $930 per year throughout undergraduate program.8. interest when loan is disbursed. Students are selected by their high school guidance counselors. Students earn an appropriate hourly rate and are paid bi-monthly. In addition. $200 per year half time. Interest is not subsidized. 2005 and successfully completed a rigorous high school program.000 unsubsidized loan is available. Available Grants vary with cost of education. $400 per year full time. Maximum of $3. All accepted students who are registered at least half-time.J. Federal Government pays interest on subsidized loans for students with financial need. Dependents of emergency service personnel killed in line of duty. financial need is not required. Students must be attending college for the first time and attending the community college in the county in which they reside. for up to 18 credits and may be received for up to 5 terms. Students may earn money while working either on or off campus.O. All accepted or enrolled degree students who demonstrate financial need. Variable interest rate . Parents of dependent students enrolled at least half-time.W.500 after first year of study is completed.G) ACADEMIC COMPETITIVENESS GRANT Eligibility Requirements All accepted or enrolled degree students who demonstrate financial need. who are NJ residents. Students must attend in a minimum of 6 credits and be eligible for a Federal Pell Grant.S. including Summer terms. $930 per year throughout undergraduate program. Students are selected by their high school guidance counselors. State residents-Accepted full-time students of exceptional financial and academic need. all others are state funded NJ STARS (Student Tuition Assistance Rewards Actual cost of tuition at Brookdale. TUITION AID GRANT EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY FUND (E. Varies based on specific employment. no repayment. no repayment. Maximum of $4.5% maximum. Second year students must also have maintained a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3. 2006 and second year students graduated after January 1.0 NJ residents enrolled full-time who demonstrate financial need and do not have an Associate or BA. For unsubsidized loans.24 Paying for College Financial Aid Sources Aid Source *FEDERAL PELL GRANT *FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANT (F. *FEDERAL PLUS Up to cost of education. Students earn an appropriate hourly rate and are paid bi-monthly.

Loss of Student Eligibility for Federal Aid due to Drug Conviction The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 include a new student eligibility provision. *This subsection was added by section 483(f) of the Higher Education Amendments of 1998 (H. 8:30 AM-7 PM Monday through Thursday and 8:30 AM-4:00 PM Friday. between 9 AM and 4:30 PM. of any offense involving the possession or sale of a controlled substance during a period of enrollment in which federal student aid was received.fafsa.edu/staff/ finaid. the conviction is reversed. There are four criteria in the BCC Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy: 1. The federal recalculation formula calculates how much Title IV program assistance is earned for attendance up through the 60% point of the term. The sale of a controlled substance: Ineligibility period is: First offense Second offense 2 years Indefinite 2. the student must be a citizen of the United States or an eligible non-citizen as defined by INS. The chart on page 24 contains general aid guidelines.. it’s easy and it’s fast! Brookdale participates in several programs of tuition assistance for degree students who can demonstrate financial need. under federal or state law. For more information see the Financial Aid website at http://ux. the student must maintain satisfactory academic progress toward a degree or certificate and must complete their educational program within 150% of the published length of their educational program. The student may regain eligibility early . These are available in the Financial Aid office. All financial aid recipients are required by Federal regulations to meet standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress established by Brookdale Community College. Rehabilitation – A student whose eligibility has been suspended under paragraph (1) may resume eligibility before the end of the ineligibility period determined under such paragraph if – a. loan. the student satisfactorily completes a drug rehabilitation program that – i. 2. Students should file this form on-line at least 45 days before classes begin to allow time for processing. or work assistance under this title during the period beginning on the date of such conviction and ending after the interval specified in the following table: If convicted of an offense involving: The possession of a controlled substance: Ineligibility period is First offense Second offense Third offense 1 year 2 years Indefinite Return of Title IV Funds The Higher Education Amendment of 1998 stipulates that a recalculation of a financial aid award must be completed for any Title IV recipient who totally withdraws from Brookdale Community College.edu for more specific information related to financial aid programs. The maximum number of remedial credits attempted for which a student may receive financial aid. Federal aid can be grants. state and college awards. Please visit the Financial Aid website at http:// financialaid@brookdalecc. scholarships and employment. In general – A student who has been convicted of any offense under any Federal or State law involving the possession or sale of a controlled substance shall not be eligible to receive any grant. set aside. It provides that a student is ineligible for federal student aid if convicted. student loans.C. The period of ineligibility begins on the date of conviction and lasts until the end of a statutorily specified period. tax return for verification purposes). Among these are grants.edu. and/or college work study. More information regarding this process is available in the Financial Aid Office. All programs are subject to change because of fund availability and federal and state regulation modifications. It is each student’s responsibility to understand the specific requirements in each criterion.e. complies with such criteria as the Secretary shall prescribe in regulations for purposes of this paragraph. application process and cost of attendance. 1. Higher Education Act of 1965. To receive financial aid. 3. The maximum length of time for which a student may receive financial aid.Paying for College 25 Paying for College Brookdale encourages all students to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). call the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-433-3243. Section 484®*. To be eligible for any of these. For any other questions call the Financial Aid Office at 732-224-2361. Financial aid applications must be submitted YEARLY. loans. Information on these may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office or on the Brookdale website at www.brookdalecc. This policy applies to all students receiving assistance from any financial aid program (including loans) administered by the Financial Aid Office at Brookdale Community College and includes the entire academic record.brookdalecc.802(6)). detailing the suspension of eligibility for drugrelated offenses and rehabilitation. follows.S. The number of credit hours a student must earn in relation to credits attempted. It’s free. call 1-800-792-8670 toll-free. Anyone applying for financial aid should file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) on-line at www. Other state scholarships or special interest scholarships may be available to Brookdale students. For information about any of the New Jersey Financial Aid Programs. and ii. or otherwise rendered nugatory.R. You will be contacted if additional documents are needed (i. Definitions – In this subsection. or b. For information about any of the Federal Financial Aid Programs. includes two unannounced drug tests. 4. This policy is monitored once per year for all students and at the end of each term for students on probation or appeal. 6). by completing a drug rehabilitation program or if the conviction is overturned. ® Suspension of Eligibility for Drug-Related Offenses. the term "controlled substance" has the meaning given the term in section 102(6) of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U. Please speak to a Financial Aid Administrator if you have any questions.gov which is used to determine eligibility for all federal. The cumulative grade point average a student must earn in relation to credits attempted.

Information and referral of other veterans’ benefits is available. all military members and their dependents are eligible for the SOCAD and SOCNAV programs.050 E.html. Veterans/Military Affairs Veterans The Office of the Registrar assists all veterans and eligible dependents to make full use of their V. For more information on the Army ROTC call 732-932-7313.O. student leadership. They must wait until the first day of any semester in order to register and have their tuition waived. Bequests and charitable trusts are also ways that donors can leave a legacy of support. ext. to veterans may be investigated through this Office. a State funded college access and student support initiative. up to 45 credits. ext. and educational and curriculum enrichment programs. personal counseling. Please call 732-224-2095 for assistance and information. as well as school year activities including academic advisement. Educational Entitlement under the Montgomery GI Bill are also serviced by this Office. Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC) Brookdale Community College is a member of the Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC) sponsored by the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges and the education agencies of the Department of Defense. Also. and career development and transfer services. Members of the New Jersey Army National Guard and Military Reserve units eligible for V. each a barrier that is successfully overcome as a result of their resourcefulness and self-determination.com/edu/Rutgers. 10 or go to armyrotc. Tuition waivers (tuition charges are waived. State grant to help them manage their college costs and special funding for a variety of educational and career related activities. The mission of the Foundation is to raise money for student scholarship programs. A number of scholarships are available each year for both full and parttime students at the College. As a SOC College. each year students are provided a $1. The program is called Servicemembers Opportunity College Associate Degree (SOCAD) in the Army and Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOCNAV) in the Navy. Service members enrolled in SOCAD/SOCNAV programs can rest assured that credits equivalent to course requirements at Brookdale earned at other institutions will be accepted toward a Brookdale degree. community and professional leaderships.26 Paying for College The Educational Opportunity Fund (EOF) Program Students participating in the EOF program.rutgers. call 732-224-2510. goal-oriented and committed to seeking a college degree/certificate as they pursue their educational and career-related goals. sponsored by the SOC Consortium. Verification of Monmouth County residence should be available when seeking admission. and the “Securing the Vision” Library Endowment Campaign are tax-exempt under section 501c(3) of the Internal Revenue Service Code. no payment is made to the College) are provided for the unemployed student with a waiver from state employment services. All SOC Consortium Special At Brookdale The Brookdale Community College Foundation The Brookdale Community College Foundation is a private.F. are highly motivated. The program at Brookdale is open to all Armed Forces personnel stationed or residing in Monmouth County. In addition. the Army ROTC and/or the Air Force ROTC to provide two and three year scholarships for qualified students. Waivers are valid for the Academic Year.A. firefighters and first aid volunteers obtain waivers from their municipalities. firefighters and first aid volunteers may not pre-register. institutions offer program planning and have personnel ready to assist the service member in completing degree requirements.asp for additional information on tuition. For more information on Brookdale’s E. and lastly. Information about Brookdale’s SOCAD/SOCNAV is handled through the Outreach. For more information on the Air Force ROTC call 732-932-7706. designed to allow service members to earn degrees even though an enrolled member relocates away from the home institution. 20 or go to web. edu/rotc485/index. Any other concerns particular . Veterans and their families are also encouraged to visit Veterans Affairs in the Admissions Office for a consultation or visit the Brookdale website www. learning support. Brookdale is also a member of a national collegiate program. Gifts to the Foundation’s Annual Access and Opportunity Scholarship. tax-exempt organization. non-profit. Bill and VEAP programs. Through these programs the service members and their dependents may enroll at Brookdale for a planned program and receive optimum credit for technical training and experience. admission opportunities. Our student’s college success is supported by their participation in a comprehensive set of support services sponsored by our program – a college preparatory summer program for new first-time fall entry college students. The unemployed student. corporate.I. For further information the Financial Aid Office. and their dependents. Educational Entitlements. based on financial eligibility. as is information on the New Jersey Veterans’ Tuition Credit program for eligible veterans. achievement recognition. building and capital expansion projects. fees and benefits available. All active duty military stationed in Monmouth County and their family members are considered county residents for tuition purposes. Foundation Trustees are elected to three-year terms and represent Monmouth County’s business.A. ROTC Brookdale maintains an agreement with Rutgers University. Tuition Waivers There are also three other opportunities to “pay” for tuition. Students needing financial assistance from the Foundation should apply through the College Financial Aid Office.O.edu/pages/257. All upon admission are judged as having some past or present indicator of under-preparedness for college study.brookdalecc. family dependents of victims of 9/11. Business and Community Development unit of Brookdale and by Base education offices. which runs July 1st through June 30th.F. Active Duty Military The Office of the Registrar also provides services to active duty military and their dependents. Brookdale commits to meeting the educational needs of Armed Forces personnel and their dependents. under the Montgomery G. as well as financial need.

state or federal law.3000R. 4. Of primary importance is the maintaining of a current address with the Office of the Registrar. • Use of physical force or the threat to do so. Discrimination Right: Students have the right to an academic environment that is free from all forms of discrimination. • Obstruction of the lawful movement of another. go to www. Confidentiality Right: Students have the right to confidential and appropriate use of academic and personal information. • Engaging in reckless conduct. Grievances Right: Students have the right to a process for addressing grievances. the counselors. 8. Responsibility: Students may not jeopardize the health. color. Student Rights. for seeking clarification of standards at the beginning of the term. attendance policy. Students are responsible for compliance with Brookdale Community College policies and regulations regarding health and safety. Responsibility: Students are responsible for conducting themselves respectfully in an academic environment that accepts the diversity of all people regardless of their perceived or real differences in race. Students who move or change their permanent address must go to the Registrar’s Office and file a change of address form. • Possession of alcoholic beverages or illegal narcotics or drugs. age. Academic Freedom Right: Students have the right to develop. Student Rights and Responsibilities Students shall enjoy all the rights and privileges guaranteed to every citizen by the Constitution of the United States and by the State of New Jersey. The standards of conduct are explained in College Regulation 6. In addition. including the Catalog. pagers. religion. headphones. Disruptions may include entering class or other academic settings late. Responsibility: Students are responsible for understanding the circumstances under which information can be released. 9. The full regulation may be found on page 37 of this catalog. nation of origin. inappropriate talking or noise. leaving and returning unnecessarily. 5. • Any violation of Brookdale policy. • Any violation of local. or the Diversity Management Office.Paying for College 27 Tuition Installment Plan Students enrolling for credit courses in any term may participate in a tuition installment plan. and consequences for failing to meet the standards. laptops or other devices. Responsibility: Students are responsible for identifying and following the appropriate procedures for pursuing a grievance. which is available in the Office of the Executive Vice President of Educational Services. Payment schedules will differ depending on the term. and improper use of cell phones. • Gambling. • Persistent loud noise. Student Conduct Code. students are responsible for understanding and complying with information in all Brookdale student publications. regulation or procedure. The following are some of the acts which are prohibited: • Cheating. or the Office of Student Life and Activities. due dates. • Possession of guns or dangerous weapons. to the Registrar’s Office. A Student Grade Appeal Process may be found on page 41. plus any official publication intended for student use. • Use of language or actions intended to incite physical force. safety and well-being of others. Responsibility: Students may not interfere with the learning process of others by disrupting the academic environment. the Student Handbook. sex. 6. gender identity or disability status. Drugs and Alcohol Right: Students have the right to an academic environment that is free from the unlawful use of drugs and alcohol. sexual orientation. you have certain responsibilities. 3.afford. and express ideas with the expectation that their in-class performance will be evaluated solely on an academic basis. Persons who change their names for any reason must report this change. Program Information and Graduation Requirements Right: Students have the right to accurate and complete information regarding program and graduation requirements. Students with disabilities requiring accommodations are responsible for identifying themselves and requesting accommodations through the Disability Services Office. explore. Responsibility: Students are responsible for adhering to the standards of academic performance contained in the syllabus and . Responsibility: Students are responsible for respecting the viewpoints and opinions of others in an academic environment. Responsibilities and Procedures The Brookdale Student As a member of the College community. Disruptions Right: Students have the right to an academic environment that is free of unnecessary disruption. providing substantiating documents. • Impersonating a College employee. Brookdale will not be responsible for correspondence not received through student failure to provide a current address. Health and Safety Right: Students have the right to an academic environment that is healthy and reasonably free of hazards to safety and security. These requirements should be identified in the course syllabus distributed at the beginning of the semester and include the evaluation system. 2. Students must be in good financial standing to participate and there is an initial $50 nonrefundable fee at the time of application. 7. Students may request an identification number other than a Social Security number at the Admission Office. Responsibility: Students are responsible for compliance with Brookdale’s policies and regulations regarding the unlawful use of illegal drugs or alcohol at all Brookdale facilities and sponsored events.com or call 1-800-722-4867. For additional information. In addition students will have the following Rights and Responsibilities: 1. Brookdale’s faculty and staff exercise authority of the College in enforcing standards for student behavior. information in each Master Schedule. Course Information Right: Students have the right to know the academic requirements for each course in which they are enrolled.

4) The right to file a complaint with the U. • EMT/Paramedic Unit or ambulance will be dispatched if deemed appropriate. DC 20202-4605 Solomon Amendment and FERPA Brookdale Community College complies with the Solomon Amendment which provides certain information to military recruiters. Student Records Right: Students have the right to know the type of information that is maintained in their student records and have the right to view those records and petition for change. They are: 1) The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the College receives a request for access: Students should submit to the Registrar written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. Information released to military recruiters (unless a requested privacy hold for the term has been received) may include: name. Recovery Solutions and the NJ Division of Revenue SOIL Unit. seven days per week. clearly identify the part of the record they want changed. except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent: One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the College in an administrative. class roster and photographs. delete. in writing. Safety and Security The Brookdale Police Department was created to protect the personal rights and physical safety of students and staff. Upon request. and for the protection of College property. and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. All the resources are available at the Brookdale website (www. brookdalecc. academic or research. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. or collection agent). Violators are subject to summonses through the Middletown Municipal Court. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U. affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. If EMT/ Paramedic or ambulance service and/or hospital service is required the individual receiving these services will be responsible for all fees associated with this emergency. Students who wish to have Directory Information withheld must notify the Registrar. supervisory. The complaint must be filed with the Diversity Management Officer who will conduct an impartial investigation. Individuals. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue SW Washington. or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. If this is not possible. field of study. Responsibilities and Procedures Responsibility: Students are responsible for reviewing program material and developing graduation plans based on program and graduation requirements. The complaint should contain a written statement of the alleged violation. a person may file a formal complaint of alleged discrimination. the College currently contracts with Joseph Morgano Esq. . The College reserves the right to release. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). e-mail address. whenever possible. auditor. They should write the College official responsible for the record.S. telephone number. Officers are on duty 24 hours per day. Be certain to observe all traffic and parking rules. the College will adhere to the following procedures: • Brookdale Police Department will be notified immediately. Responsibility: Students are responsible for adhering to the rules and regulations governing access to student records as defined in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) and any college policies defining and regulating access to student records. degrees and awards and most recent educational institution attended. Family Educational Rights And Privacy Act Of 1974 (FERPA) This Act provides for the confidentiality of student records. Resolution Of Complaints Regarding Discrimination Any individual who feels she/he has been discriminated against may file a complaint of alleged discrimination. dates of attendance. If the College decides not to amend the record as requested by the student. Directory Information at the discretion of appropriate officials. should attempt an informal resolution of an alleged complaint. weight and height of athletic team members. If the records are not maintained by the Registrar. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing. Allied Account Services. The Registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. In emergencies. 10. such as a disciplinary or grievance committee. within seven days of the first day of instruction for each term and request that such information not be released without consent. that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. Directory Information may include a student’s name. Medical Emergency Procedures In the event of a medical emergency on the Lincroft Campus.. 3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records. The speed limit on campus roads is 25 mph and 15 mph in parking lots. the College may disclose educational records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. phone number. or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and Health Services staff).edu). dial 911 or 2222 from any campus phone. For collection purposes. address. or change collection agencies as needed.S. 2) The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading: Students may ask the College to amend the record they believe is inaccurate or misleading. class schedule. Yellow emergency phones are strategically placed throughout the campus. along with a recommended resolution. •• College Nurse will be notified if available. participation in activities. age and degree program. or a student serving on an official committee.28 Paying for College • Student Rights. a person serving on the Board of Trustees. address. the College will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. A variety of resources are available to help students understand and pursue their rights and responsibilities. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. The College reserves the right to add. the Center Security Officer will contact the appropriate local Police/ Fire Department and/or First Aid. Financial Recoveries. a person or company with whom the College has contracted (such as an attorney. If there is a medical emergency at one of the Higher Education Centers. Any correspondence dealing with the complaint will NOT become part of any permanent record and will only be kept on file in the Diversity Management Office. or not to release.

the right to be treated with dignity. securing.asp#vaccines_available. Federal regulations under the Higher Education Authority Act require proof of immunization prior to admission. Visit the Student Health Center website for information on immunizations available at http://www. Campus Judicial Rights: • To be afforded the same access to legal assistance as the accused. • To receive full and prompt cooperation and assistance of campus personnel in notifying the proper authorities. it has established a “Bill of Rights” to articulate requirements for policies. •• To have any allegations of sexual assault treated seriously. It is very important to meet with the student’s home institution advisor and review the Brookdale course descriptions.edu/ pages/180.brookdalecc. • To be free from any suggestion that victims are responsible for the commission of crimes against them. • To be afforded the same opportunity to have others present during any campus disciplinary proceeding that is allowed the accused. Its rules must be conceived for the purpose of furthering and protecting the rights of all members of the university community in achieving these ends. The State of New Jersey recognizes that the impact of violence on its victims and the surrounding community can be severe and long lasting.Student Rights. Campus Sexual Assault Victim’s Bill Of Rights A college or university in a free society must be devoted to the pursuit of truth and knowledge through reason and open communication among its members. brookdalecc. The immunization form is available at http://www. respect for the individual and human dignity are of paramount importance. report crimes as lesser offenses than the victim perceives the crime to be. mumps. refrain from reporting crimes. It is the visiting student’s responsibility to verify that the course(s) taken at Brookdale will transfer to the home institution. Visiting Students are not required to take the Basic Skills Placement Test or to meet with a Brookdale Counselor – unless the student is registering for developmental “zero-level” courses. counseling. In creating a community free from violence. Human Dignity Rights: • To be free from any suggestion that victims must report the crimes to be assured of any other right guaranteed under this policy. call the College’s Enrollment Hotline at 732-224-2345. including a medical examination when it is necessary to preserve evidence of the assault. human immunodeficiency virus. and that the student has the prerequisites necessary to succeed in the course(s). Responsibilities and Procedures 29 Insurance and Immunization All full-time students are required by state law to possess health insurance that includes hospitalization. This will ensure that what is taken at Brookdale meets requirements and transfers back to the home institution. Thus. and rubella. Insurance waiver forms and immunization documentation forms are available in the Registrar’s Office. Failure to provide required documentation may prevent students from attending more than one term. Bill of Rights The following Rights shall be accorded to victims of sexual assault that occur: • On the campus of any public or independent institution of higher education in the State of New Jersey. Visiting Student Status A “visiting student” is anyone who is matriculated and in good standing at a college or university other than Brookdale Community College. and • Where the victim or alleged perpetrator is a student at that institution. mental health and student services for victims of sexual assault whether or not the crime is formally reported to campus or civil authorities. For more information. and/or pregnancy or any rights that may be provided by law to compel and disclose the results of testing of sexual assault suspects for communicable diseases. Legal Rights: • To have any allegation of sexual assault investigated and adjudicated by the appropriate criminal and civil authorities of the jurisdiction in which the sexual assault is reported. Statutory Mandates: • Each campus must guarantee that this Bill of Rights is implemented. . • To have access to campus counseling under the same terms and conditions as apply to other students in their institution seeking such counseling. prompt. refrain from reporting crimes to avoid unwanted personal publicity. A fee may be assessed upon registration to ensure compliance. Campus Intervention Rights: • To require campus personnel to take reasonable and necessary actions to prevent further unwanted contact of victims by their alleged assailants. Visiting students do not need to submit a letter from their home institution giving them permission to take courses at Brookdale. Full-time degree students may be required to furnish proof of immunization of measles. It is the obligation of the individual campus governing board to examine resources dedicated to services required and to make appropriate requests to increase or reallocate resources where necessary to ensure implementation. • To be informed of and assisted in exercising: any rights to confidential or anonymous testing for sexually transmitted diseases. • To receive full. procedures and services designed to insure that the colleges and universities in New Jersey create and maintain communities that support human dignity. Rights to Resources On and Off Campus: • To be notified of existing campus and community based medical. • To be notified of the outcome of the sexual assault disciplinary proceeding against the accused. Academic communities acknowledge the necessity of being intellectually stimulating where the diversity of ideas is valued. and/or • When the victim is a student involved in an off-campus sexual assault. • To be notified of the options for and provided assistance in changing academic and living situations if such changes are reasonably available. and maintaining evidence.edu/PDFFiles/Student%20Health/ immunization-form-2-09. and victim-sensitive cooperation of campus personnel with regard to obtaining. sexual assault and nonconsensual sexual contact.pdf. •• To be free from any pressure from campus personnel to: report crimes if the victim does not wish to do so. Applicable state and federal laws and institutional rules and regulations governing interpersonal behavior limit the boundaries of personal freedom.

As is required by the Higher Education Authority Act. CDs. and address personal counseling needs which might affect their academic progress. Although counseling services are available on an as-needed basis. Textbook Information Information regarding course textbooks and supplemental materials is available on the Scroll and Pen Book Store website at www. Responsibilities and Procedures • Brookdale Services • Each campus shall make every reasonable effort to ensure that every student at that institution receives a copy of this document. Computer Resources. the College Store holds a book buy-back where students may receive up to 50% of the purchase price for used texts. publisher and copyright date will be available At the end of each major term and other special times. open labs are available in the Reading and Writing Center in Larrison Hall. additional access time with lab assistants who are available to answer technical questions. Our resources can be accessed remotely through a full-service web site. The hours of operation for the Jersey Blues Dining Room and Larrison Hall are Monday-Thursday. If the ISBN is not available.edu/library The Bankier Library provides a variety of study and research environments. For textbook information call 732-224-2382. and Computing Facilities Computers for student use are located throughout the Lincroft campus. clarify career goals. The librarians and learning assistants at the Help Desk are there to assist students with their research needs. 7:30 AM to 7:00 PM and 7:30 AM to 2:00 PM on Fridays. early on the Counselor will interpret the Basic Skills Placement Test and help students select courses that reflect their initial academic and career interests. If you need more information. lunches. Counselors can help students build their academic degree programs. is the student store for textbooks. reference books. The document is viewable on the web address below. • Nothing in this act or in any “Campus Assault Victim’s Bill of Rights” developed in accordance with the provisions of this act. candy and beverages. The Scroll and Pen Book Store is open Monday and Tuesday 8:00 AM to 7:00 PM. and a whole lot more. course-required material. Hours are extended during the first two weeks of each term including the first two Saturdays to accommodate evening students. brookdalecc. Student's Brookdale ID has their library barcode on the back of the card.brookdalecc. at the Branch Campus and Higher Education Student Centers. known at Brookdale as Student Development Specialists. In addition. The Scroll and Pen Book Store offers a wide variety of supplies. Working both individually and in groups. and dinners are available in the Warner Student Life Center throughout the year. Light dining is also available in Larrison Hall. The Dean serves as the student advocate and the official liaison between students and the College administration. The Information Commons is the largest open computer lab on campus. access the databases from off-campus. http://www. tailor Brookdale course work toward specific transfer purposes. shall be construed to preclude or in any way restrict any public or independent institution of higher education in the State from reporting any suspected crime or offense to the appropriate law enforcement authorities. help students make clear decisions related to their educational goals and overall development. the unauthorized distribution of copyrighted material. software. While many of these facilities are limited to students enrolled in the supported classes. 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM and 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM on Friday during the Fall and Spring Terms. Dining Services The College operates its own Dining Services for student and staff enjoyment.com. the Math Lab in the MAS building and the Information Commons in the Bankier Library. Brookdale annually publishes a Safety and Security Report. A Counselor can also be the student’s primary liaison with the teaching faculty. Hours between terms are Monday through Friday 8:00am to 5:00pm. track your interlibrary loan and reserve group study rooms. Counselors (Student Development Specialists) NOTE: While Counselors make recommendations and in many cases must formally approve classes. Students should familiarize themselves with the College policy and regulations concerning appropriate computer use. centrally located in the Warner Student Life Center near parking lots 6 and 7. please call 732-224-2502 or visit the website at www. helping them assess career interests and clarify transfer goals becomes more important. Wednesday and Thursday. There are “open labs” that allow students . gift items. For example. students are responsible and accountable for final course selection and registration.brookdalecc. Please refer to College Policy #2. Students will find the International Standard Book Number (ISBN) as well as the retail price. edu/PDFFiles/Brookdale%20Police%20-%20 Safety/Campus-Safety. Wireless access is available with student email login name and password. art and photography supplies. paperbacks.pdf. The Scroll and Pen Book Store The Scroll and Pen Book Store. Home-cooked breakfasts. For more information call 732-224-2595.com. renew books online. As students make progress. clothing and backpacks and an assortment of snacks.edu. A crime log is also available in the Wilbur Ray Police Department located in parking lot 8.brookdalecc. assorted vending machines are located throughout the campus for students and staff. including unauthorized peer-to-peer file sharing. It is required in order to borrow books and media materials. Individual carrels and group study rooms are networked with data ports and electrical outlets for portable computers. Office of the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs The Office of the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs is the official unit of the College concerned with providing services to the student population and directing other College units designed to enhance the quality of student education and social life. To order textbooks online go to the web site at www. the book author. During the summer terms the hours are 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM Monday through Thursday and 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM on Friday.bkstr.9000R. In particular. Brookdale Services Services To Students The Bankier Library http://www.30 Student Rights. Professionally trained Counselors.brookdalecc. title.9000 and College Regulation #2. Library hours are posted on the web site or students may call 732-224-2706. The need for personal counseling may arise at any time.bkstr. Doing so may subject the user to civil and/or criminal liabilities.edu. emphasis may be placed on certain counseling services at different points in the student’s educational career.

lifetime learning begins at Brookdale. cultural programs. and logistical skills. and finance board all in one. This program includes films. The Student Life Board (SLB) is Brookdale’s version of student government. mental health counseling and health screenings. make referrals. Spring Baseball Golf (coed) Softball Men’s Tennis Men’s and Women’s Lacrosse Summer Sports Camps For young athletes. The members of SLB and the staff of Student Life and Activities combine their talents to plan and implement a total activities program. International Education Center. At the beginning of each semester. Educational Opportunity Fund (EOF) and Experiential Learning/Career Services. The organization is made up of student members interested in bringing exciting.njcaa. "Happenings". keeps the Brookdale community abreast of campus activities. Intramural Coordinator at 732223-2376. Student Health Services and can be reached at gevans@brookdalecc. This service. Part-time students who wish to purchase Student Accident and Sickness Insurance may obtain the registration form in Student Life and Activities or at the Registration Office. Warner Student Life Center room SLC 101. Intramural and recreational programs are open to all registered students. Programs sponsored by the Board include films.N. The department emphasizes that the “student” come first in “student-athlete” therefore all participants of Brookdale athletics must be deemed eligible by the standards set forth by the NJCAA. quality programs to Brookdale. Gwen Evans. Robert Quinones is the Director of Student Life and Activities and can be reached via email at rquinones@brookdalecc. All rules and regulations for participation can be found at www. edu or by calling 732-224-2390. Athletics Brookdale Community College enhances the academic college experience with a wide array of extracurricular activities. programming board. If students would like to participate in the selection and production process. The Office of Student Life and Activities The Office of Student Life and Activities provides services and programs to assist Brookdale students to become more broadly educated and to develop improved interpersonal relationships. and performing and creative arts experiences. The student members of the Board are afforded excellent experiences to learn about group processes. Student Life and Activities and Recruitment Services. Associate Athletic Director at 732-224-2379. is distributed throughout the campus. Brookdale’s intercollegiate program is nationally recognized. dances. Financial Aid. College-wide activities. The Jersey Blues’ teams compete in the Garden State Athletic Conference (GSAC) and in the Region XIX of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). Hepatitis A. The College Nurse The College Nurse is available from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Monday through Friday in the Student Health Center. Referrals. Call 732-224-1867 to request a brochure or to be placed on the mailing list if brochures are not yet available. lectures. The Office of Student Life and Activities is located in the Donald D. Hepatitis B. R. intercollegiate athletics. comedy performances. To ensure integration of student development and support services. exchanging program and School Insurance Every full-time student is required to purchase school insurance or show proof of insurance coverage at the time of registration. the Counseling Division is part of the Student Development Services Group which includes the Office of Disability Services. concerts. which outlines the events for the entire term. is the College Nurse/ Program Manager. or the Brookdale Health Services Hotline at 732-224-2176. Student Life accomplishes this through student services such as the Student Life Board. bus trips. In-service education and special projects are offered as well. while on campus. the Admission and Registration office as well as. every week. Under the larger umbrella for the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs Division. numerous vaccines. recreation and intramurals. and clubs and organizations. The Student Life Board also promotes good relations with surrounding colleges. or the Office of Student Life and Activities at 732-224-2390. management. or trigger crisis-intervention procedures. The Jersey Blues Summer Sports Camps are open to boys and girls between the ages of 5-18. Information regarding these programs is included in the “Happenings” or can be obtained by contacting Bo Scannepieco. located on the first floor of the Main Academic Complex (MAC 112). College Health Services.. contact the Student Life Board at 732-224-2647. pap smears. and social events.org or by contacting either Frank Lawrence. are also offered by the Student Health Center. an information flier. Athletics. lectures. Athletic Director at 732-224-2044 or Shannon Holt. For further information call 732-224-2106. and while participating in College-sponsored activities. A 24-hour policy is required. health services. the Student Activities Calendar.C. See the Events Calendar on the college website and the Student Health Center home page for details. The following sports will be available beginning in June: Soccer Basketball Baseball Softball Golf Lacrosse Field Hockey Running Camp Tennis Cheerleading Sports Readiness Sports Fun Summer Leagues for Soccer Summer Leagues for Basketball Roller/Street Hockey Camp organizational ideas as well as cooperating on programs. Please register early as these popular camps fill up quickly. . this group also works closely with the department of Student Affairs and Support Services. Offices for both the Student Life Board and Student Life and Activities are located in the Student Life Center in SLC 101. concerts. Backed by passionate coaches and administrators. theater trips. leadership methods. provided by the ASBCC. Recreation and Intramurals provides a diverse range of programs to encourage physical well being as a lifetime endeavor for full and part-time students alike. payable at registration for uninsured full-time student.edu. covers the student traveling to and from campus (not exceeding one hour each way).Brookdale Services 31 counselors may provide short-term services. Also. The Department of Athletics. Gardasil. The athletic department sponsors the following sports for the 2010-2011 academic year: Fall Men’s and Women’s Cross Country Men’s and Women’s Soccer Women’s Tennis Winter Cheerleading Men’s and Women’s Basketball Brochures are available by mid-February.

or continue their education. or volunteering in a community service project as an integrated component of their course work. The high school applicants must be recommended and approved by their high school guidance counselor and have the consent of a parent/legal guardian. develop agreements that coordinate curricula and ensure maximum transferability of general education and transfer program career courses.edu/pages/279. Services include resume writing. These courses integrate first semester college course work into the high school course. For further information. The office also administers the Dean’s List. cheating in class.asp.edu and select Testing Center or call 732-224-2584 for information. Job Search Assistance The services are available to all Brookdale students and alumni. Call 732-224-2015 for information.32 Brookdale Services The Center for Experiential Learning and Career Services The Experiential Learning and Career Services Department offers programs designed to complement the student’s academic study with “hands-on” experiences in the real world and services to help them attain their career goals. call 732-224-2574. employer evaluation and an evaluation meeting with an Experiential Learning Representative. articulation and dual-admission agreements as well as a number of transfer links to other colleges. Service-Learning puts education into action. For these positions. as well as the Office of the Dean and the Academic Affairs Web Page at www. Internships/Cooperative Education/ Externships Students interested in participating in either Internship/Externship (credit) or Cooperative Education (non-credit) must meet program eligibility.edu/ pages/163. financial aid eligibility is not a criterion. through our Testing Center. The Dual Enrollment program at Brookdale Community College allows qualified high school juniors and seniors to enroll in college courses and simultaneously earn credit toward a high school diploma and a postsecondary degree. and a service project appropriate to the course of study. Forms for both the Grade Appeal and Academic Integrity Code are available in each Division Office. Service-Learning Service-Learning combines academic study and community service. Both the credit and non-credit work experiences require the completion of learning objectives. The goal of the Dual Enrollment program is to give qualified high school students the opportunity to experience college courses and prepare for the academic rigor of college. Approval for the project is required from the instructor. and for the academic class schedule. student learning outcomes assessment. Basic Skills and Adult Basic Education (ABE) at the College’s regional sites and the Teaching and Learning Center report to Academic Affairs. Student Help Students who are in good academic standing and are currently enrolled for a minimum of six credits may be able to find on-campus work opportunities through Student Help Programs. Students choosing this option are required to provide between 20-50 hours of volunteer community service hours in activities related to their course work. Contact the office at 732-224-2792 or visit MAC 105.brookdalecc. Check the Brookdale website www. Students will be able to review New Jersey Transfer Law. as they move into either permanent employment. leading out from self into the world.e. Programs and Services include: • Internships (credit) • Externships (credit) •• Cooperative Education (non-credit) • Service Learning (community service volunteer) • Field Experiences • Work Study • Student Help •• Alumni Services • Career Development Workshops • Job Search Assistance The benefits of Experiential Learning are clear. (2) have completed the number of course credits in their major required by the department and (3) have the approval of an instructor and Experiential Learning Representative. Articulation and Transfer Agreements. providing a unique opportunity for students to learn through active participation in organized service experiences in the community. Service-Learning course options are offered as an alternative to more traditional classroom assignments. etc.brookdalecc. and enrolling in a four-year college. The Dual Enrollment program is open to qualified high school juniors and seniors who attend a high school with a signed Dual Enrollment Agreement with Brookdale Community College. Work Study Students who qualify under financial aid for the Work Study Program work with Experiential Learning and Career Services staff who match the students’ skills with appropriate campus/off campus jobs. job readiness preparation and employer information. time constraints. enhancing their learning through participation. All Experiential Learning activities are recorded on the student’s transcript. a student must maintain a minimum GPA of 2. faculty and administrators to . High School Programs The Technology Preparation program is a collaboration between Brookdale Community College and high schools throughout Monmouth County. Additional information can be found on the Transfer Resources/Articulation webpage at http://www. Testing Services and Center The Office of Testing Services and the Testing Center offer many services to both students and members of the surrounding community. Academic Affairs The Office of the Dean of Academic Affairs provides institutional support for development and improvement of academic programs and courses. Through written agreements. students develop valuable skills for the future. Participants are better prepared for career decision making. All students must be: (1) matriculated. Academic Testing Services.asp. Student Grade Appeals and Academic Integrity cases (i.). Participants have a greater “edge” in securing a job. Applicants must meet minimum proficiency requirements on ACCUPLACER or SATs. students are able to earn free college credits during their senior year in high school. Whether placed with an employer in a work experience related to their major. interviewing skills. Dual Enrollment and Tech Prep Programs are also coordinated through this Office. Testing Services For Brookdale Students • All new degree students entering the College may be required to take the Accuplacer Articulation Brookdale maintains transfer agreements with upper level institutions through the Transfer Resources/Articulation Office. brookdalecc.. This office works with deans. High School. plagiarism. Experiential Learning staff meets with students to determine area of interest.0 at the College. The Testing Center is located in the lower level of the CAR building. To remain in the program. Students enroll in selected high school courses designed by High School and College faculty.

Activities include films. adult basic education which focuses on improving reading. International Studies Option. Passing these tests may allow a student to bypass these subjects in which college-level knowledge has already been gained. • Students must present a valid permission slip.asp or call the Testing Center staff at 732-224-2584. English as a Second Language (ESL). PowerPoint and Access. • The Testing Center also administers the Miller Analogies Test (MAT). For additional information on the Center’s programs and activities. Students do not have to speak a foreign language to study abroad and there are programs for almost all academic programs. new immigrant assistance. • Time constraints. • All other test takers must present a valid government issued photo ID (i.edu/ pages/166. students can take more interesting and challenging courses. Most events are free and open to students. Testing Center Hours The Testing Center is open Monday through Saturday. Testing Services for the Community • CLEP and DSST credit-by-examination programs for students who have gained knowledge elsewhere – in school.e. The English Literacy Civics and Citizenship course has been added to the program. In addition. LSAT. writing. and credits from these exams are accepted at over 2. ESL: 732-625-7048) for further information. have completed at least one term of college studies and have a minimum GPA of 2. • Brookdale’s Lincroft campus now offers GED Testing.5.S. • Candidates for entry into one of Brookdale’s Allied Health Programs must take an admissions test. Locks are supplied by the Testing Center Staff. the Center promotes internationalization of the campus through its varied programs and services. visit the website at http://international. Students will be referred to the Office of Testing Services and will take the tests at their convenience. online. pre-arrival services. Contact the Long Branch (732-229-8440). Students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Full or partial waivers may be granted for a variety of circumstances (See Page 14). Education Centers or the Western Monmouth Branch Campus (GED: 732-625-7047. • The Testing Center strictly adheres to the Academic Standards of the College and will report all violations.edu or stop by MAC 114 on the Lincroft Campus. the student will be sent an invitation for admission testing. must present their Brookdale student ID to take a Brookdale course test. brookdalecc. Among the services: GED classes offered to improve the skills necessary to pass the GED test which will lead to a New Jersey State high school diploma.edu. Programs range from two-weeks up to a term or a year. Praxis. staff and community. including visiting students. Students should arrive no later than two hours before closing for all academic course testing and three hours for all other testing. Africa. It is possible to earn 30 credits at Brookdale through CLEP and DSST. call 732-224-2799. television. Oceania and South America. Testing Center Policies • Brookdale students. Central America. through independent study. Europe. The Center handles international admissions. • All personal items including turned off cell phones must be placed in lockers. or through other life experiences. orientation and on-going immigration and cultural advising. When students are eligible for entry into the program. driver’s license. lectures. With time and money saved. Brookdale is a member of the Consortium of College Testing Centers. Interested students should consult the “Programs of Study” section of this catalog for more information about the Social Science Program. including closing times of the Testing Center will be strictly followed. Counselors will use the results of this placement test to assist students in choosing first semester classes. The Center also offers short-term study abroad programs led by Brookdale faculty members. See the website for more information. Testing for alternate delivery courses (videotape. International Student Services – The Center provides support services for approximately 140 international students representing 45 countries. Occasionally. Study in another Country! – Brookdale’s International Center offers over 40 study abroad programs year round in Asia. and the international festival. Students should make an appointment with their counselor to discuss the results and interpretation. email the International Center at international@ brookdalecc.. excursions. language use and mathematics. Adult Basic Education Anyone wishing to return to education should investigate the program offered by the Office of Adult Basic Education at the College’s Higher Education Centers. Financial Aid can be applied to study abroad programs. or hybrid courses) is also done in the Testing Center. county ID. job skills training for displaced homemakers and consumer education. The credits students earn in these programs can be transferred back to the U. and mathematics.). faculty. • The Testing Center is contracted with Certiport to deliver Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) assessment testing for the following Microsoft Office applications: Word. Please visit the website at www. • Distance Education students from other institutions may take exams at Brookdale’s Testing Center. All test results are held in the strictest confidence. Academic Programs – Brookdale offers an Associate degree with an emphasis in International Studies. etc. in the military. Questions. For hours of service visit the Testing Center web site at www. Students must be 18 years old.000 colleges and universities throughout the country.brookdalecc. • Brookdale students may be referred to the Testing Center for course testing by an instructor for a variety of reasons. including retests and make up exams. exams may be scheduled in the Testing Center because of unscheduled class cancellations.Brookdale Services 33 Basic Skills Placement Test which includes a measurement of reading. The International Education Center The International Education Center provides support services to Brookdale students interested in studying abroad and to international students attending the College.asp for preparation and registration information. Eastern Monmouth (Neptune) (732-229-8440) or Northern Monmouth (Hazlet) (732-787-0019) Higher .brookdalecc. Staff will assist students preparing to become a citizen of the United States of America.edu/pages/889. Excel. The results and an interpretation will be forwarded to the counselor. International Events – The Center sponsors or co-sponsors international and intercultural events primarily on the Lincroft campus. and various actuarial and health tests. Degree. • Students may wish to take advantage of career assessment services available and should see their counselor to discuss the assessment services. passport.

with all intended to restructure the student’s time. or designated assembly areas in buildings that are not so equipped. and the driver or passenger must be disabled. Contact . between students and their teachers. No Temporary Permits will be issued beyond these limitations. Because of the special needs of students with disabilities. adapted lavatories. then receive ESL Placement Test results and get the Level Recommendation form. Then. Disability Services Office The Disability Services Office ensures compliance with federal and state laws. and for informing police and fire personnel of the presences of disabled persons in the designated area. Contact the International Education Center for more information. These are the requirements of the New Jersey Division of Motor Vehicle and Traffic Laws which cover Brookdale’s parking lots (Motor Vehicle Statutes 39:4-204. If students have a permanent physical disability and need to use the handicapped spaces. schedule an appointment with the assigned Student Development Specialist. (Use parking lot 5. A variety of approaches are used to build learning communities. credit and learning experiences to build community among students. admission to a program requires the meeting of prerequisites for all students. Evacuation will be done by fire or police personnel as part of their emergency procedures. Students in Learning Communities enroll in more than one class with the same group of students. counselors have been assigned to work specifically with them. Relationships with faculty and classmates are enriched by connecting content and assignments between courses. ramps from parking areas to the walkways. and among faculty members and disciplines. or be subjected to discrimination by the College or its personnel. 39:4-206 & 39:4-207) the ESL Coordinator at 732-224-2656 for further information. To get started at Brookdale students must: apply to the College. that no qualified student with a disability be excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of services. Upon admission to the College. students must bring the permission slip with them. however. provide documentation of their disability and request appropriate services. Results will be ready 24-48 hours later. electric power doors. Non-Native Speakers of English The College offers a seven-level English as a Second Language Program for non-native speakers of English who need to improve their English language skills in order to successfully study college-level coursework. The Police Department can issue an additional six-month Temporary Parking Permit if warranted by a doctor’s certification. go home and relax. elevators in the academic complex. and the Learning Disabilities Specialist work in conjunction to coordinate meeting the needs of students with disabilities. TTY equipment is available in the Disability Services Office. please contact the New Jersey Division of Motor Vehicles in order to obtain the approved decal or license plate.asp#motor_ vehicles_. The Police Department will issue Temporary Handicapped Parking Permits (Placards) for a six-month period only on receipt of a doctor’s certification that the applicant is temporarily disabled. 3. persons with ambulatory disabilities who are unable to negotiate a stairwell will be brought to an area of rescue assistance in buildings so equipped. Normally. Emergency Evacuation Procedures During general emergencies. non-native speakers are administered a test of their English as a Second Language. and enroll a common cohort of students. register for classes in the Office of the Registrar and make arrangements for payment.edu/pages/229. Fill out the Admission Application a) Go to the CAR Building. Additional information about facilities and services available to prospective and enrolled students with disabilities can be found on the Disability Services webpage at http://www. The International Students Organization promotes the cultures and customs of various nationalities through various activities and helps non-native students take their places in Brookdale Student Life. Students should call 732-224-2489 to make an appointment for an Oral Proficiency Test. Students with disabilities must identify themselves.00 fee. d) Ask for a permission slip to take the ESL Placement Test. programs or activities of Brookdale Community College. take the Accuplacer basic skills test. brookdalecc. If necessary. Learning Communities In higher education Learning Communities are classes that are linked or clustered during an academic term. Admission to Brookdale is automatic. 4. Anyone found using a handicapped permit issued to another person is subject to a summons and forfeiture of the handicapped permit. The first point of contact should be with the Director of Disability Services. who can be reached by calling 732224-2730 or 732. when it is necessary to evacuate a building. 2. and blue light emergency phones are located in various locations across the campus and down the Campus Gateway path to parking lot 1. Be sure to save your receipt. The Disability Services Office. students are then placed in the appropriate level of the ESL Program based on their test results. c) Fill out the application and pay the $25. How to take the ESL Placement Test: 1. There are designated parking spaces. b) Ask for an admission application. Accommodations are approved and coordinated on a case-by-case basis. a) Go to the lower level of the CAR building. often around an interdisciplinary theme. Special Parking Privileges All motor vehicles parked in handicapped parking spaces must display a valid permit. Take the Oral Proficiency Test.) b) Take the ESL Placement Test in the Testing Center.34 Brookdale Services Services To SpecialInterest Groups Persons with Disabilities Brookdale Community College offers individualized accommodations and/or services to persons with disabilities. the senior Brookdale employee in the area will be responsible for ensuring that the disabled person gets to the area. The office is located in the Main Academic Complex on the first floor in MAC 111. the counselors. make an appointment with the Director of Disability Services where appropriate documentation of the disability is provided. ESL Placement Test and Oral Proficiency Test: All ESL students must take the ESL Placement Test and the Oral Proficiency Test. These areas will normally be shown on diagrams near the exits of all classrooms.842-4211 (TTY). Learning Communities improve students’ success and help ease the transition to college.

For more information or to receive a printed copy of course catalogs. engineering. plateloaded and selectorized machines for circuit training. workshops. transportation issues. Verifying the identity of students in Brookdale courses and programs is a significant. following a calendar with prescribed due dates to encourage interaction with the material. Experts in a variety of fields are available to provide consulting services and technical assistance in the areas of communication. English. The student is forced to use these credentials to access the course management system and reset their password to one which is entirely confidential and only known by the student. fitness programming . Business and Community Development This continuing education division of Brookdale Community College offers short-term career training and professional development programs.brookdalecc. Certified staff provide curriculum and learning activities that are developmentally appropriate. degree in Business Administration. Comprehensive continuing education course catalogs are published three times a year. For more information on SBDC’s programs and services call 732-842-8685. government.m. Online courses offer the flexibility needed by many students while providing an equivalent learning experience to traditional face-to-face courses. workshops or customized activities uniquely designed for each organization’s objectives. staff and the community. see the Programs of Study section of the catalog. seminars. Look for sections coded DE in the master schedule and on Webadvisor.m. or students may choose a schedule with a combination of online courses and face-to-face courses. History. year round. Membership information is available at the information desk. Classes can be held on company site. free weight. training and retraining.Brookdale Services 35 Online Courses – Distance Education Online courses are designed for active learners with excellent reading. genocide and Available to Students and Members of the Public Child Care on Campus The Children’s Learning Center (CLC). the New Jersey Economic Development Authority and the Rutgers Graduate School of Management to provide counseling on matters relating to small business – from start-up to expansion. The Children’s Learning Center is a Learning Lab for the Education and Nursing students on campus. degree. or a variety of other locations throughout the county. currently ANGEL. problem solving. The new facility was completed Summer 2010 and is adjacent to the Collins Arena. Data transmission of login information is secured using standard encryption technology. Genocide & Human Rights Center (HGHRC) The office is dedicated to providing resources for education on the Holocaust. multifaceted and ongoing process. Courses are offered over the Internet for access anytime. English Psychology and Social Sciences A. edu/pages/200. Liberal Education.asp to determine if online courses are right for them. The Center is open five days a week from 7 a.edu/bcd. industry. Students may choose to take courses online because of work schedules. and development needs of local business. military commitments. Many online courses require attendance at an initial orientation meeting. childcare. Care is provided to children from 3 months to 5 years of age. History. There is no drop-in care offered. and non-profit groups. This unique set of login credentials consists of data which the student is likely to know and which others are unlikely to know. student information and records requests.A. Small Business Development Center The Small Business Development Center (SBDC) provides workshops and one-on-one counseling to the business community of Monmouth and Ocean Counties. Courses are not self-paced. to 6 p. or call 732-224-2562. For specific program requirements for the Business Administration. staff and the community on a for fee basis. management. which is then re-set every semester. In addition. Students can earn an A. systems and procedures. professional. computers. writing and time management skills. Detailed information can also be found on the website. The Center also accepts vouchers and Financial Aid Transfers. Liberal Education. The Center links resources of the United States Small Business Administration. and provides cardio. Programs can be credit or non-credit courses. lifelong learning experiences. please call 732-224-2306 prior to the start of each semester. and a wide range of other areas. Identity verification begins when a student applies for admission to the institution and continues through graduation. please call 732-2242315 Monday through Friday from 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM. Online courses provide the adult learner with educational flexibility and life-long learning opportunities. Students interested in the online degree should consult with a Student Development Specialist and may take the courses indicated. Procedures related to student identity verification include but are not limited to: web registration. at Brookdale. The Holocaust. anywhere students have access to a computer. team building. Outreach.brookdalecc. and the course management system login and security functions wherein the appropriate College administrator(s) creates a unique username and password for each individual student every semester. is a licensed quality Child Care Center that offers care to students. The CLC offers the opportunity for those students to use the Center to complete their required field work during the semester as assigned and approved by their professors. and fellow students. and some courses require proctored testing. Fitness Center The Brookdale Fitness Center is open 7 days a week for students. www. Center for Business Services The Center serves the education. conferences and summer camps to the community.A. May and August. with the instructor. The staff also encourages those students who are interested in working with children to stop by and see the Center. Call the Teaching and Learning Center at 732-224-2089 for more information. culture. organizational development. located on Brookdale’s Main Campus in front of parking lot #4. transfer or withdrawal from study. or time or mobility constraints. in December. Community members can also sign up on the website to receive email updates on professional development and lifelong learning programs. Children enrolled in the Learning Center must be registered for the entire semester. is provided in the Group Exercise Room. Psychology and Social Sciences online. All content and interaction for online courses occurs through a learning Management System. Students can take advantage of a self-test on the Online Course webpage www. For more information or a tour of the Center. Tuition is based on a monthly rate and Brookdale students receive a discounted fee.

NJ 101. Contact the Legal Studies Department. Candidates for membership in LEX must have completed at least 40 credits (60 credit program) and have achieved a GPA of 3. WBJB-FM is proud to be a long-time sponsor of many local festivals including Riverfest. As part of that program there are clubs and organizations to supplement a student’s classroom experiences as well as special interest groups. state. Issues of Substance.7 or above. HGHREC serves the community through its comprehensive and creative educational programs and resources including an extensive library.5 (101. is not only concerned with academic achievement. former students and friends of the College. Students can “opt in” to the Emergency Text Alert system to receive text . and jazz plus the award-winning feature. Being a member provides opportunities for leadership. enroll as a full-time student for at least one semester. This society recognizes annually exceptional scholastic achievement based on GPA. WHTG (106. WOBM (92. foster. Lambda Nu Lambda Nu is the national honor society for radiologic and imaging sciences. leadership and personal relationships among alumni and students of the College. and the WBJB-FM Annual Guitar Show. Only the top 1% of students in Brookdale’s Business Administration program are eligible. Lambda Epsilon Chi Lambda Epsilon Chi (LEX) is a nationally known academic honor society for paralegal students.5 FM). Alpha Pi Theta. including in-house productions exploring blues. during and after undergraduate years. Meetings of the Association are open to the public. summer festival information. The Chapter office is located in the Clubs and Organizations Room in the Student Life Center. Each group is supervised by a Student Life Administrator and a BCC faculty or staff advisor who is appointed annually by the Office of Student Life and Activities. There are no evening classes when the day classes are canceled on the Lincroft Campus. programs and much more. WCBS (880 AM). 90. weather. Service.3 FM). Public Service Announcements. Psi Beta Psi Beta is the National Honor Society in Psychology for two year colleges. (732) 2242846 for more information. room SLC 109. special lectures. announcements will be made over radio stations WBJB (90. and local conferences.0 on a 4. 1973. completed at least one college psychology course. it’s the place to find out what’s happening. students must be admitted to the Radiologic Technology program. anti-Semitism and all forms of prejudice in our society.5 FM).3 FM).5 or higher in 2/3 of legal specialty courses. New Jersey Seafood Festival. School closings are also announced via phone mail broadcast and on the Brookdale website. as the College is not notified of them. jmorgovosky@brookdalecc. develop and provide scholarships for Brookdale students and alumni. Students should call the local Board of Education to determine these closings. (732) 224-2150 or Professor Joel Morgovsky. For more information contact the Business Department at 732-224-2894.5 The NIGHT is a student’information station: the home for local news. 732-224-2337 for more information. The staff works to eliminate racism. Alumni Association The Alumni Association was established as an independent corporation on August 15. completed 12 college credits (applicable towards a degree). participation in regional. Call (732) 224-2427 for more information. Also. Teacher's Resource Center and Speakers’ Bureau. and is matriculated into a major. New Jersey Collegiate Business Administration Association Honors Society The New Jersey Collegiate Business Administration Association Honors Society is a statewide organization which is sponsored by two-and four-year colleges with business programs. and Fellowship through club-sponsored activities and programs including regional and national workshops and conferences. Membership enables student participation in the activities program at the College. The Night is a training ground for broadcasting students at Brookdale Community College.edu. community events.36 Brookdale Services human rights. Brookdale closings. Primary Advisor. With Community Bulletin Boards. WINS (1010 AM). but also encourages the four Phi Theta Kappa hallmarks of Scholarship. Brookdale Psi Beta members are distinguished by special mention in the program and the opportunity to wear identifying cords or stoles. The Association is governed by an elected Board of Directors which consists of seven officers and twenty-one trustees. and networking opportunities with other legal professionals. Membership is open to all graduates. under the guidance of an experienced. and demonstrate commitment to the profession of Radiologic Technology through professional organizations. evening classes held in a public school are suspended when an emergency causes that school to close during the day. the society offers students national scholarship opportunities. WBJB-FM supports local artists both in its music mix (like The NIGHT Local Spotlight) and festival sponsorships. Radio Station WBJB-FM— 90. A student is invited to join if the cumulative GPA is 3. and promote ideas. if the student has completed 12 college credits. Sponsored by the American Association for Paralegal Education (AAfPE). Comcast’s Jazz in the Park series. and have received a grade of “B” or higher in every completed psychology course.0 scale in professional courses. maintain a GPA of 3.2 GPA. For further information contact the Alumni Association Office at 732224-2705. Contact Dr. Leadership. bluegrass. dwiseman@brookdalecc. and more. Upon graduation. To qualify as a member. Weather Emergency (Emergency Closings) In the event of emergency college closings. participation in research projects.edu. Honor Societies Phi Theta Kappa Phi Theta Kappa is a national honor society/ service organization that recognizes academic achievement among two-year college students.5 The NIGHT is the sole source for Adult Album Alternative in the MonmouthOcean market. WJLK (94. It was founded in 1981 to recognize the scholastic achievements of students in Psychology. The stated purpose of the Association is to advance the cause of education. attendance at regional conferences. 90. Clubs and Organizations All students enrolled at Brookdale Community College are automatically members of the Associated Students of Brookdale Community College.5 The NIGHT is a full-service local public radio station and NPR® member station linked to the community in many ways. and Brookdale Notes running throughout the day. The Brookdale Chapter was established in 2002 and was recognized as the 2005 Wadsworth Publishers Outstanding Psi Beta Chapter. A recorded message on closing can also be obtained by calling 732-842-1900. TV News 12 NJ and WCBS (Channel 2). For further information call the HGHREC at 732-224-2074. The College reserves the right to schedule additional class sessions should some be canceled. David Wiseman.7 FM). Psi Beta is open to students from any majors who have: at least a 3. the Brookdale PTK chapter. as are all activities and programs sponsored by the Association. professional staff.

There are also many opportunities for students outside the classroom through service learning. There is always adequate parking in lot #1 on the north side of campus with access to the campus Gateway Path. Sandy Hook is a barrier beach peninsula with 1. and Marine Chemistry (CHEM) at the field station. and parallel to. or by use of one of the 15 emergency phones situated in the parking lots and 12 emergency phones situated in the school elevators. Throughout the year Brookdale offers courses in Geology. Traffic and Miscellaneous Information The College Police The College Police Department was created by the Board of Trustees in accordance with NJSA 18A: 6-4. The field station occupies Building 53 of the Hook’s historic Fort Hancock section. All traffic and parking summonses issued by the College Police are governed by Title 39 of the Revised Statutes of New Jersey and are returnable in Middletown Municipal Court. Public Transportation to and from Brookdale Public transportation to and from Brookdale Community College in Lincroft is available. 2352. federal laws. etc. To best serve students throughout the County. Schedules and more information about these services are available at the Student Life and Activities Information Desk. Students are advised to allow ample time for the trip to school especially during the first few weeks of the term. handicapped parking). Classes are taught using hands-on classroom and outdoor laboratory exercises in which students collect and analyze data using current technology and environmental testing equipment. and for protection of College property. The Wall Higher Education Center and Communiversity is located on Monmouth Blvd. the phone number is 732-842-1950. The Northern Monmouth Higher Education Center is located at 1 Crown Plaza in Hazlet. or which present a safety or traffic hazard may be towed and/or ticketed at the owner’s or operator’s expense. New Jersey statutes. and a daytime shuttle bus from the Eastern Monmouth Higher Education Center in Neptune). New Jersey Bay Keeper. For further information. Environmental Studies. Parking in a handicapped zone is a minimum $250 fine and a mandatory court appearance. The Western Monmouth Branch Campus is located at the junction of Route 33 and Route 9 in Freehold Township. 1/4 mile east of the junction of Route 35 and Union Avenue. call 732-869-2180. and ordinances of Middletown Township. blocking loading zones or fire hydrants. in Wall Township. For information call 732 872-0380. In addition. Brookdale believes its community is all of Monmouth County and views the entire County as its campus. there are officers on duty 24 hours per day. State. For further information. For further information. American Littoral Society (ALS). call 732-280-7090. Parking. There are several New Jersey Transit bus routes in the area and a Brookdale shuttle bus (an evening shuttle bus from the Red Bank train station. The Centers and Branch Campus offer a wide range of daytime and evening credit and continuing education courses as well as full-service Student Success Centers to apply to the college. across from the Neptune High School. The Long Branch Higher Education Center is located at the corner of Broadway and Third Avenue in Long Branch. Parking summons are $54 and most moving violations start at $85. They are also subject to the same training requirements mandated by the New Jersey Police Training Commission. are parked on any grass area. in America and close to many educational and environmental groups such as: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). They can be reached by dialing extension Sandy Hook Brookdale Community College is unique among New Jersey community colleges in having a marine and environmental science field station located in the Gateway National Recreation Area on Sandy Hook. Go to the Brookdale homepage and scroll down under “News and Events” and click Opt-In Text Message: Emergency. Coastal Geology and Oceanography (ENVR). Clean Ocean Action (COA).665 acres of coastal habitat located at the northern tip of the Jersey Shore. Students may park in any lot (except the visitor’s lot adjacent to lot #5). in the Warner Student Life Center. There are also a number of reserved spaces in each parking lot for persons with disabilities. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) James J. call 732-780-0020. The field station has partnerships with County. For further information. It is just west of the oldest lighthouse . the same as municipal police officers. special projects and paid internships. Brookdale operates one main campus in the Lincroft section of Middletown. call 732739-6010. Marine Biology (BIOL). enter the information as requested to receive important alerts. When dialing from off campus. 2222. or 911 on College phones.5 to protect the personal rights and physical safety of students and staff of the College.e. the police are responsible for enforcing College regulations.. a Branch Campus in Western Monmouth and four Higher Education Centers at the locations listed on this page. the white lines (providing it is not parked in violation of a posted sign. Vehicles which are parked or standing as to obstruct or impede a normal flow of traffic. seven days a week. Brookdale also offers courses through the New Jersey Marine Science Consortium to 23 affiliated colleges and universities throughout New Jersey. For further information. In the event a summons is received. College police officers possess full New Jersey police powers 24 hours per day. The Eastern Monmouth Higher Education Center is located just north of the junction of Neptune Avenue and Route 33. Further information concerning handicapped parking permits can be found under the title “Services to Special Interest Groups” on page 34 of this catalog.727 general parking spaces at the Lincroft Campus. Regional Locations A major function of Brookdale is to serve the needs of its community. please read it carefully and follow the instructions. and New Jersey Audubon Society which are all located in a campus-like community at Fort Hancock. Brookdale’s Parking System There are 3. Courses taught at Sandy Hook satisfy the science requirements for completion of an Associate’s degree at Brookdale. The speed limit in parking lot lanes is fifteen (15) miles per hour. and Federal Agencies that provide students these opportunities and help them find jobs. meet with a counselor and register for courses all at one convenient location. If you need to contact the police. Traffic Laws at Brookdale A vehicle is considered legally parked in a parking lot only when it is parked between. Howard Laboratory. Marine Academy of Science and Technology (MAST).Brookdale Services 37 messages in case of emergency closings. The speed limit on all roadways on the Lincroft Campus is twenty-five (25) miles per hour. i. New Jersey Marine Science Consortium (NJMSC). call 732-229-8440.

or being under the influence of any kind of drug classified as a controlled dangerous substance or prescription legend drug is prohibited. club meetings. Look for The Stall.2. the College will not request special consideration for that individual because of his/her status as a student. video tape presentations. which carries severe penalties. Drugs In accordance with Brookdale Community College Regulation 2. Written notification of the time. except when available at a recognized and approved College function. informally and expeditiously before resorting to formalized procedures or the use of outside agencies. The following statements comprising the Student Conduct Code are adopted for the purpose of providing a precise set of expectations and at the same time offering the assurance that all students will be accorded fair and objective treatment when violations occur. Lost & Found If you’ve lost something. coffee houses. N-B. These requirements are: 1. The student newspaper is also a great vehicle for news. 1. The opportunity to have a hearing or to waive the right to a hearing and accepting the penalties imposed. rule or regulation. Loss of Eligibility for Federal Aid due to Drug Conviction. and or the property of the College are judged to be jeopardized by the action of an individual student or group of students.3. extension 2352. Persons who have not attained the legal drinking age will not be served alcoholic beverages. and ads. rules and regulations. Smoking Policy Brookdale Community College is a smoke-free institution! Smoking is not permitted anywhere on campus except in the gazebos conveniently located across campus. 7. Allocations of the fee are controlled by the Student Life Board. Discussions about making the entire campus smoke-free are underway as of this publication and are subject to change beginning Fall 2010. the College ensures that the rudimentary requirements of due process in academic disciplinary matters will be implemented. but are a violation of Statutory Law. place and date of the hearing at least three working days in advance. which carries severe penalties. use.38 Brookdale Services Activity Fee Twenty-two percent of the per credit “General Services Fee” is given to the ASBCC to subsidize student bus. State of New Jersey. as well as to student organizations sponsoring approved off-campus functions. 2. check it out with the College Police. Process and Disciplinary Procedures It has been recognized that due process in higher education disciplinary matters does not parallel the requirements of due process in a court of law. Copies are available throughout the campus as well as in the Student Activities Office and the Information Desk. which interferes with the philosophical platform of the College.1000R. throughout the campus as well. These standards of conduct will apply to students engaging in activities on the campus. Violations The following offenses could be determined to be minor or major offenses at the discretion of the hearing officer. theater.100R. Student conduct. It should be noted that drug offenses not only are a violation of College Regulations. The Happenings is distributed every Tuesday when classes are in session. 2. . The opportunity to have a discussion to clarify evidence and/or view of an incident before an initial determination is made by a hearing officer. or visit the station in front of the Brookdale Print Shop in parking lot #8. Responsibilities 1. is not acceptable. It should be noted that alcoholic beverages are not only prohibited by College Regulation but by the Statutory Law. Happenings This weekly information flyer keeps Brookdale students aware of activities. 2. The College shall attempt to handle disciplinary matters privately. and ski trips. or nation. notices. Convictions could lead to a loss of Financial Aid as stated in the Higher Education Opportunity Act. does not imply Brookdale’s endorsement. Alcoholic Beverages In accordance with Brookdale Community College Regulation 2. or at any of the Brookdale College off-campus centers. However. clubs and organizations. They may support causes by orderly means which do not disrupt the regular and essential operations of the College. An individual who enrolls at the College can rightfully expect that the faculty and administration will exercise the authority of the College to regulate student conduct whenever the educational process. all alcoholic beverages are prohibited on campus. 5. Written notification of findings and sanctions or penalties imposed based on a preponderance of evidence presented verbally or in writing. State of New Jersey. Disregard for the property and rights of others including the right to be free from verbal Student Behavior in a Learning Centered Environment Student Conduct Code For the purpose of this code. 4. the health and welfare of the student body as a whole. the College will cooperate fully. N–B. state. and more. Bulletin Boards All items must be approved by the Office of Student Life and Activities or they will be removed. The opportunity to present evidence and witnesses. Written notification of an appeal process. 6. and other important events. Students and student organizations may examine and discuss questions of interest to them and may express opinions publicly and privately. films. When a student is convicted of a violation of one or more of the laws in the community. Written notification of charges and possible penalties within a reasonable time period. 3. with law enforcement agencies and with other agencies in any appropriate program for the rehabilitation of the student. a student is defined as one who is currently enrolled as a registered credit student at the College. possession. It is the responsibility of all students of the College to adhere to the letter and spirit of this statement and duly enacted College policies. the student newspaper. However. Students shall not violate or attempt to violate any duly promulgated and approved College policy. selling. 2. See page 25. 3. Purpose and Scope of the Student Conduct Code 1. Standards of Conduct 1. Approval of any item for posting.

Restitution: The obligation to replace or pay for property damaged to compensate for losses incurred or to provide a campus service as a result of a violation. Written Reprimand: Written warning placed in student’s file for having engaged in misconduct. 11. except in those areas of the College premises or Collegerelated premises where the President or his/ her designee has authorized the serving of legal beverages. Failure to meet any college-related financial obligations. 3. 19. Setting a fire on the campus or campusrelated premises without proper authority. 2. sedatives. Verbal Reprimand: Verbal admonition against further violations. central nervous systems stimulants. substances. or facility on College premises or College-related premises by means of activating a fire alarm or in any other manner. subject to prescribed regulations. structure. Summary (Temporary) Suspension: Exclusion for all or specified classes and other College-related activities until due process can be completed. 25. annoyance. 5. Engagement in any abusive or demeaning conduct or obscene gestures directed toward another individual or group of individuals which has the effect of creating a hostile environment or impedes the right or privileges of other members of the College Community. Engaging in any form of gambling while on College premises or at functions sponsored by the College. Illegal manufacture. Conditional Probation: Temporary loss of College rights and privileges until specified conditions are met.: cell phones. and/or possession of stolen books. Furnishing false information to a College employee with intent to deceive. and/or doctor’s releases. research. fire or other emergency in any building. pagers. 2. Community Service: Assigned community service work to fit a particular violation. such as letters of apology. 14. possession or use of any scheduled drug. and/or similar drugs and/or chemicals. sale. 3. 10. administration. 15. discipline procedures or other College authorized event. 6. Obstructing or restraining the passage of any person at an exit or entrance to the College campus or property. Disorderly conduct. Falsification. Failure to present student identification to a College employee in response to a request. public or private property. the President and/or Board of Trustees. embezzlement. Executive Vice President. 26. 7. Theft. noise and improper use of personal communication devices (e. or assembly to riot. 20. malicious destruction. palm pilots. rules and/or regulations promulgated by an official College office. College Police property. Any other violation of existing local. or other emergency or safety equipment. Disruptions of teaching and learning include tardiness. Interference with performance of duties of any College employee. Unauthorized use. May be used by the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs in the event of a threat of safety to the student or College community or if a student refuses to respond to a summons to appear before the Associate Director of Student Life and Activities or his/her designee. possession. or misuse of College. 21. 27. Obstruction or disruption of teaching. Failure to abide by. 12. The intentional making of a false report of a bomb. including library materials and all computers. 28. 4.g. Malfeasance in or misuse of elective or appointive office in a student organization which is injurious to the welfare of the College. larceny. Violation of any published policies. or alteration of fire fighting equipment. Unauthorized use or possession on the campus of firearms. alteration or withholding information related to academic records/ documents. 9. Inappropriate use of any combustible or chemical or flammable substance which may present a fire hazard. or violation of. Fine: Monetary sum imposed as a penalty for an offense. 8. headphones. fraud. inciting to riot. etc. and laptops). 24. Vandalism. Any student. or preventing or attempting to prevent by force or violence or by threats thereof. state or federal law. Unauthorized occupation. Enforcement 1. 10. the entrance or exit of any person to or from said property or campus without the authorization of the administration of the College. safety devices. 17. hallucinogens. 18. unauthorized entry or unauthorized use of any College facility or College-related facilities or premises. tranquilizers. learning. Participating in hazing. Failure of a student to respond to written communication in connection with an alleged violation of the Student Conduct Code. ammunition. or the temporary taking of the property of another or possession of stolen goods without permission. Possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages in any form on College premises or College-related premises. Initial Action. 5. offensive language or behavior. 6. fireworks. marijuana. May also contain conditions to be met in order to be removed from probation. explosives. Physical abuse or threats thereof against any person or persons. 13. barbiturates. Theft. 8. including rioting. 7.Brookdale Services • Student Behavior in a Learning Centered Environment 39 abuse or harassment. or other dangerous weapons. faculty or staff member may file a complaint. any sanction imposed by the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs. or materials. damage. . defacing. 4. 16. Sanctions The following sanctions may be applied either singularly or in any combination as appropriate to the circumstances of each case: 1. 22. Suspension: Exclusion from all or specified classes and other College-related activities for a specified period of time. Misrepresentation of oneself or of an organization to be an agent of the College. or other conduct which threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person or persons. Disciplinary Probation: Loss of participation in College-related activities for a specified period of time. 23. Expulsion: Permanent dismissal from classes and college-related activities. or danger to property or person and/or persons on College premises. threat. Any student or group of students violating the Student Conduct Code by committing a prohibited act or acts as aforesaid will be referred to the Director of Student Life and Activities for disciplinary measures in accordance with the provisions hereof. sale. such as narcotics. Educational Services. 9.

Any student may be summarily suspended by the Director of Student Life and Activities for a period not to exceed ten (10) College working days during which the Student Conduct Committee will convene. i. d. will conduct a hearing consistent with the principles of due process. notify the student of the incident and advise the student of the charges against him/her. when possible. Any student may appeal a minor offense as stated in I of the Appeals Section. The Student Conduct Committee will proceed at such meeting to hear the charges against said student. Outcomes and offenses may be publicized in the campus newspaper without alluding to names of individuals involved. In the event the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs affirms the decision of the Student Conduct Committee. will review the proceeding in the matter and either (a) affirm the decision of the Student Conduct Committee. In the event of any appeal of the Student Conduct Committee decision. Any student. Suspension is carried out only on the basis of the recommendation of the Student Conduct Committee and with the approval of the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs. A taped record will be made of Student Conduct Committee Hearings. Minor offenses. The Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs will convene such committee. and will preside over the hearing. acting as a non-voting member of the Student Conduct Committee will arrange with the student the time and place of a meeting of the Student Conduct Committee. hear the student’s comments about the incident. 4. numbers one (1) through seven (7) of this code. c. and in general. Major Offenses. 2. Other Brookdale students. not to constitute acts which would result in suspension or expulsion of the student(s) the Director of Student Life and Activities may determine disciplinary actions as stated in Sanctions. to hear witnesses against and for the student. g. The Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs will appoint an appeal committee consisting of three students and two representatives of the College faculty/ staff. the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs will advise the student in writing within three working days of the decision. staff and students. and to select the counsel of his/ her own choosing. the student’s right to cross examine witnesses against him/her. after hearing the matter. the Director of Student Life and Activities may suspend a student or continue any previous suspension until the disposition of the appeal. 3. A student suspended from the College forfeits all rights and privileges of a student. (2) Altering decision of Student Conduct Committee. A Student Conduct Committee will be appointed to hear all cases. the Student Conduct Committee will make recommendation to the Director of Student Life and Activities based on the preponderance of evidence presented in the hearing verbally and/or in writing. In the event the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs on any appeal filed with him/her will determine to convene an appeal committee. One Student Conduct Committee will hear offenses by more than one (1) student in the same case all at once. or (3) Rendering a new decision. e. The Student Conduct Committee will be convened as soon as possible in proximity to time of incident. and the term is specified to the student. which could result in suspension or expulsion. faculty and staff are not invited to Student Conduct Committee hearings and may only attend through invitation by the Director of Student Life and Activities. In such cases. This committee will be composed of three (3) students and two (2) representatives of the College staff from a designated group of faculty. which said notice will advise the student of the charges against him/her. The Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs upon the filing of such appeal. or (b) make alterations to the decision of the Student Conduct Committee. faculty or staff member may appeal a decision of the Director of Student Life and Activities or Student Conduct Committee by notice in writing filed with the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs within five working days after notice of the Student Conduct Committee decision. make a determination about the case and notify the student in a reasonable amount of time of that determination and notify the student of the appeal procedures when necessary. the Director of Student Life and Activities or his/her designee. The Director of Student Life and Activities at the meeting of said committee will present all charges against the student. including all college-related or college sponsored functions. the Director of Student Life and Activities will not recommend disciplinary action except upon the following procedures: a. The appeal committee. The Director of Student Affairs and Support Services will assume the role of the Director of Student Life and Activities as stated within this code if there exists a specific conflict of interest in any pending case. d. give notice to the student appellant of the time and place of the meeting of said committee to hear the appeal. The Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs will advise the student in writing within one working day of the decision of the appeal committee. Suspension is applied for a given period of time. Upon the conclusion of such hearing and after deliberation. 3.40 Student Behavior in a Learning Centered Environment 2. c. as deemed by Director of Student Life and Activities. may take action: (1) Affirming the decision of the Student Conduct Committee. The Director of Student Life and Activities will notify the student within 24 hours of the determination made. In the case of all minor offenses. Appeals 1. In any case in which the violation is of such a nature that in the opinion of the Director of Student Life and Activities suspension or expulsion from the College could be imposed. h. The Director of Student Life and Activities will investigate the incident. All suspension actions will be noted in the student’s record. the student’s right to produce witnesses on his/ her behalf. Counsel will be allowed to advise the student or students charged. Suspension Suspension of a student will be invoked when more serious violations of the disciplinary code occur or when the conditions of disciplinary probation are disregarded. or (c) convene an appeal committee. b. but not to speak at the hearing. Expulsion Expulsion will be invoked where extreme violations of the disciplinary code occur or when suspensions have been issued to a . A training program for potential Student Conduct Committee members will be held in September each Fall Term. b. f. the following procedure will prevail: a.

A designated faculty/ staff member will assume the role of Dean of Academic Affairs if there exists a specific conflict of interest for the Dean of Academic Affairs in a pending case. within two weeks. 4. buys. 8. Student Obligations/Academic Violations Without limiting the application of the code. Depends on the aid of others in a manner expressly prohibited by the instructor in the research. The outcome will be documented on the violation form. 7. performance. or publication of work to be submitted for academic credit or evaluation. 10. All records of violations of the academic integrity code will be maintained by the Office of the Dean of Academic Affairs and will be destroyed upon the student’s graduation or three years from the date of the Committee’s recommendation whichever comes first. When an alleged violation of the academic integrity code occurs. Any other Brookdale students. Acts as a substitute for another person in any academic evaluation process. Process and Discipline Procedures The College ensures every individual has the right to a fair and equal process in academic disciplinary matters. or employs devices not authorized by the instructor during an academic evaluation. Nothing in these regulations will be deemed to limit the final authority of the President of the College in all matters relating to violations of the Student Conduct Code and the imposition of discipline. 2. Possesses. The student will be sent a copy of the form and the Academic Integrity Code. If the committee finds that a violation of the academic code did occur. 3. 11. If generated by staff. and to bring counsel of his/her own choosing. (5) Written Reprimand: written warning placed in student’s file within Academic Affairs Office for having engaged in misconduct. If generated by faculty. who will act as a tie-breaking member. (6) Other as determined by faculty or department policy. These requirements are: 1. form is then sent to course faculty. and the Dean of Academic Affairs. the Dean of Academic Affairs will make a determination as to the merit of the appeal and will convene the Academic Integrity Committee if necessary. 2. sells. writing. The faculty has the authority to impose the following sanctions: (1) No credit for assignments. 5. Refers to materials or sources. Counsel will be allowed to advise the student or students charged. The following statements are adopted for the purpose of providing a set of expectations and at the same time offering the assurance that all students will be accorded fair and objective treatment when violations occur. 12. 9. a. the outcome determined by the faculty will be upheld. b. 6. 3. (3) Retest and or assign work to be done over again. or uses a copy of any material intended to be used as an instrument of academic evaluation from . obtains. Multiple Violations 1. Attempts to influence or change one’s academic evaluation or record inappropriately. make a determination about the incident and notify the student as soon as possible but not later than two weeks of that determination.Student Behavior in a Learning Centered Environment 41 student and may result in the severance of a student from the College with the approval of the Dean of Enrollment Development and Student Affairs. to question all witnesses. Written notification of the time. the faculty member will: investigate the incident. Receives or gives assistance during an academic examination from or to another person in a manner not authorized by the instructor. performance. Practices any form of deceit in an academic evaluation proceeding. A copy of the form will also be sent to the Dean of Academic Affairs. no sanctions will be imposed.) 2. the student and faculty will be informed in writing of the Committee’s determination of academic code violation. faculty. another person in a manner not authorized by the instructor. a student may be found to have violated this obligation if he/she: 1. (Students should consult course syllabus and/or specified written handbook. Presents for evaluation the ideas. the student and the faculty/staff member have the right to produce witnesses on his/her behalf. Knowingly permits one’s work to be submitted by another person without the instructor’s authorization. or publication of work to be submitted for academic credit or evaluation. writing. a violation report is generated by staff or faculty observing the incident. The student will have two weeks from the date of being notified of the violation to decide whether to appeal the alleged violations or waive the right to an appeal and accept the sanctions imposed. 13. or words of another person or persons. Utilizes a substitute in any academic evaluation procedure. The student will be notified Academic Integrity Code Purpose and scope of the Academic Integrity Code 1. If the committee finds in favor of the appeal. At the meeting of the Academic Integrity Appeal. but not speak at the hearing. Student is notified by staff that form will be written and sent to faculty. giving students the opportunity to discuss the alleged violation with the course faculty and advise the student of the charges against him/her. The student will notify the faculty and Dean of Academic Affairs of her/his decision to appeal in writing. representations. If the student chooses to appeal. This committee will be composed of two students. knowing such aid is expressly prohibited by the instructor in the research. Submits the work of another person in a manner that represents the work as one’s own. (2) No credit for tests. Provides aid to another person. two faculty members. the Dean of Academic Affairs will convene the Academic Integrity Committee. Within two weeks after the hearing. (4) Failing grade in course. and staff may attend only through invitation by the Dean of Academic Affairs. creation. creation. Discusses in any manner the content of an academic examination with another person in a manner not authorized by the instructor. This code will apply to students engaging in academic activities of any kind or interfering with academic activities of any kind associated with Brookdale Community College. Presidential Power Any suspension or any expulsion imposed will be at all times subject to the approval of the President of the College. 4. When more than one documented violation has occurred by the same student. without customary and proper acknowledgment of sources. place and date of the hearing will be sent to all concerned parties.

4. dated and signed by the course faculty member. The faculty member must complete the following steps within two weeks: 1. Presidential Power: Any suspension or any expulsion or denial or revocation of degree imposed will be at all times subject to the approval of the President of the College. or expulsion. The Student Grade Appeal Form must be completed. Step 2: If the issue is not resolved at Step 1. Documentation of the hearing and recommendations will be maintained by the Office of the Dean of Academic Affairs and will be destroyed upon the student’s graduation or three years from the date of the Committee’s recommendation whichever comes first. 2. Upon the conclusion of this hearing and after deliberation. proceed to the next step. The student must attend the scheduled meeting and discuss the issue of the grade appeal with the department chairperson. edu/pages/394. the student must contact the department chairperson* to arrange a meeting. All employees involved in the Academic Appeal Process will keep a confidential record of their part of the process or a copy of the Appeal Form. Within two (2) weeks after the hearing. within two weeks of completing Step 3. Review the recommendation. dated and signed by the Academic Division Dean. their counselor. The records will be destroyed upon the student’s graduation from Brookdale or three (3) years from the date of the Committee’s recommendation. except in the event of a tie. f.* (4) Denial or revocation of degree. 3. Additional possible sanctions are: (1) Temporary loss of specified College rights and privileges until conditions are met. Records of appeals will be confidential and will be maintained by the Office of the Dean of Academic Affairs. Step 4: If the issue is not resolved at Step 3. the date of the meeting and will receive a copy of the academic integrity code.brookdalecc. the Dean will convene the Academic Appeals Committee. The Dean will notify the student within one week. Nothing in this regulation will be deemed to limit the final authority of the President of the College in all matters relating to violations of the Student Academic Integrity Code and the imposition of discipline therefore. within two weeks of completing Step 1. the student must obtain a Student Grade Appeal Form from http://www. within two weeks of completing Step 2. whichever comes first. In cases where the Academic Integrity Committee finds in favor of the student. (2) Suspension may be applied for a given period of time and the term is specified to the student. the student must send a copy of the Student Grade Appeal Form to the Office of the Dean of Academic Affairs and schedule a meeting. The Student Grade Appeal Form must be completed. Student Grade Appeal Process The Student Grade Appeal Process provides the student with an opportunity to appeal a final course grade. in writing. 2. Any other individuals who wish to participate must receive prior approval from the Dean. Submit grade change if necessary. a. no sanctions will be imposed. the Academic Integrity Committee will make a recommendation to the Dean of Academic Affairs based on the preponderance of evidence presented in the hearing verbally or in writing. If warranted. The Academic Appeal Committee will be made up of two (2) faculty members. this process provides an unbiased forum to discuss and dispute the final course grade. the Dean will review the appeal to determine if the student has appropriate grounds for appeal based on the statements in the syllabus and other instructor documents. proceed to the next step. Academic Appeals Committee: The Academic Appeal Committee is convened by the Dean of Academic Affairs after Step 4 when the grade is still in dispute and the Dean determines that the student has grounds for an appeal.42 Student Behavior in a Learning Centered Environment of the charges. e. or any division office. The Student Grade Appeal Process includes the following steps: Step 1: The student must meet with the course faculty member and discuss the issue of the grade appeal. Notify the Dean of Academic Affairs of final decision. . step 4. If not. the participants will be informed. who will be a non-voting member. whether by way of probation. The student will have the same rights to present their case as in Process and Discipline Procedures. and any employee involved in Steps 1-3 may be asked to comment before the Committee. Make the final decision if the recommendation is to change the grade. dated and signed by the department chairperson. two (2) students and the Dean (or designee). which is a recommending body. of the Committee’s recommendation. Step 3: If the issue is not resolved at Step 2. suspension. the Dean makes the determination that the grade stands. After meeting with the student and discussion with faculty. The Academic Division Dean will conduct an investigation of the situation. The student will be notified in writing of the Dean’s decision. The faculty member and student involved in the appeal will have an opportunity to be heard before the Appeals Committee. The Dean of Academic Affairs has the responsibility to present all charges against the student. to convene a hearing. Records may not be used in any detrimental way against the student or faculty member. expulsion.asp. b. If there is no resolution and the student intends to pursue the appeal. denial or revocation will be at all times subject to the approval of the President of the College. c. The Dean of Academic Affairs will notify the student in writing within one week of the Committee’s decision.* (3) Expulsion: results in the severance of a student from the College. The student must attend the scheduled meeting and discuss the issue of the grade appeal. *If the faculty member is also the department chair. THE GRADE APPEAL PROCESS MUST BE STARTED BEFORE THE END OF THE NEXT LONG (FIFTEEN WEEK) TERM. No adverse action will be taken against a student who chooses to utilize this process. *If the faculty member is also the Academic Division Dean. The Student Grade Appeal Form must be completed. The student must initiate the process and be prepared to present supporting documentation. d. Although the instructor of the course is the only individual who can change the final grade. All suspension actions will be noted in the student’s record.* *Any suspension. the student must contact the Academic Division Dean* to schedule a meeting. The faculty member may be invited to this meeting if the department chairperson deems it appropriate.

brookdalecc. .A.edu Your chosen school(s) catalog/website l FACTS: l The law applies to AA and AS (transfer) degree programs. teaching programs. you may not get credit for all of your courses. The College of New Jersey. Kean University and the NJ Coastal Communiversity institutions. articulation and dual admissions agreements as well as a number of transfer links to other colleges. Metropolitan College of New York (MCNY). the Lampitt Bill. Its many features allow you to learn which community college courses transfer to participating NJ four-year institutions and how they satisfy baccalaureate degree requirements for specific majors. New Jersey City University. the College has developed Transfer Agreements for one or more programs with the following out-of-state four year institutions: Drexel University. These degrees give students grounding in their major fields of study. NJ The College of New Jersey-Ewing. College of Saint Elizabeth. Pennsylvania College of Technology and Savannah State University. Drew University.) and Associate in Fine Arts (A.org. Monmouth University. NJ l l YOUR RESPONSIBILITIES: l l l PLANNING AND SUPPORT RESOURCES l l l l Transfer Programs The Associate in Arts (A. Students who plan to transfer should work closely with their counselors and should identify a major and potential transfer institution as early as possible. Felician College. Choose your transfer school(s) as soon as you possibly can. etc. along with the general studies required of freshman and sophomores in four-year schools. Some majors at the four-year college will take more than an additional two years to complete because program requirements are more than 120-128 credits (Architecture and Engineering are some examples). NJ Thomas Edison State College-Trenton. Additional information can be found on the Transfer Resources/Articulation webpage at http://transfer. Laboratory Institute of Merchandising. NJ Transfer NJ Transfer is a website that provides information on transfer of community college courses to four-year institutions within the state. Your Brookdale Counselor -. Check your transfer school(s) program requirements (prerequi sites and course level. New Jersey State Colleges and Universities Kean University-Union.). Georgian Court University.A. Ramapo College.brookdalecc. Monmouth University. DeVry University.njtransfer. in September 2007 regarding transfer from New Jersey community colleges to New Jersey four-year public colleges.) degree programs are designed for transfer to four-year colleges. l l Major to major transfer will work best under this law. NJ Ramapo College of New Jersey-Mahwah. Many Brookdale graduates transfer to four-year colleges to obtain baccalaureate degrees. Montclair State University. The law does not guarantee that you will be accepted. Centenary College. New Jersey Institute of Technology. NJ Montclair State University-Montclair. Rowan University. transfer admission to a public four-year college is still competitive. NJ William Paterson University of New Jersey-Wayne.org Brookdale’s website at www. The New School.njtransfer.F. NJ Rowan University-Glassboro. If you change your mind about what you want to study after you transfer. The State University of New Jersey-New Brunswick. Seton Hall University. NJ University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey-Newark.Call Counseling Areas: Business 732-224-2555 Humanities 732-224-2505 Science 732-224-2586 Social Science 732-224-2338 The NJ Transfer Website at www. Choose your transfer major carefully. but there are rules and regulations. Bloomfield College. The following four-year institutions in New Jersey are participating members of the NJ Transfer system: Berkeley College. NJ New Jersey City University-Jersey City.S. Transfer Agreements In addition to NJ Transfer. It is valid only for NJ public institutions. and William Paterson University. Rutgers University. engineering are some examples) Follow General Education requirements listed in this catalog carefully. Caldwell College. The website address for NJ Transfer is located at: http://www. and evolved from the Rutgers University transfer pilot program (ARTSYS). not to AFA (transfer) or AAS (career) programs. Rider University. Richard Stockton College. Some majors require you to complete specific courses and have higher grade point averages required to be eligible (Business. For specific information on transferability of courses and programs. The initiative was developed jointly by the New Jersey Commission on Higher Education and the New Jersey Presidents’ Council. with the largest number being accepted by Rutgers.). NJ Rutgers.Programs of Study 43 TRANSFER OPPORTUNITIES New Jersey Transfer Law New Jersey passed a law. Thomas Edison State College. Kean University. Fairleigh Dickinson University. The law provides for transfer of up to 60-64 credits for AA and AS degree graduates. Saint Peter’s College. NJ New Jersey Public Research Universities New Jersey Institute of Technology-Newark. See your counselor for information on using the NJ Transfer System.edu. see your counselor. Associate in Science (A. Students will be able to review New Jersey Transfer Law. NJ The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey-Pomona.

Mathematics/Science Program.S.A.F.A.A.A. Business Administration Program New Jersey City University B. Through DDP. Social Science Program.S. Fine Arts Program. Biology. A. Biochemistry. *English. and Elementary Education with English are offered through the Communiversity at the Wall Higher Education Center with discounted tuition.S. Humanities Program. Brookdale Community College and Georgian Court University Dual Admissions Degree Programs Brookdale Community College A. the A.S. Social Work (B. Education Program Early Childhood Education Option A.F. See your Counselor for further information on transfer opportunities for specific career programs. Nursing.A.S.S. Business Administration.A. Applied Arts & Sciences with two concentrations chosen from among 21 business or liberal arts/science disciplines Honors Program (with 3. Modern Languages and Music Options A. Graduates of Associate in Applied Science Programs (A. or B. Rutgers offers a select group of first-year applicants the option of beginning their Rutgers career by enrolling at a New Jersey community college. Graduates of Brookdale’s A. please contact the Rutgers Manager of Academic Programs at 732-625-7012 or visit http:// wmhec. Physics. Both of these programs are designed to complement the education provided in AAS career programs.W.S.S.S. Hospitality and Recreation Management *B. Dual Admissions Programs Brookdale participates in Dual Admissions Programs with Georgian Court University and New Jersey City University. National Security Studies A. English. Biology.A.A. Chemistry. B. History B. Art.A. Liberal Studies. Mathematics. Middle School and Secondary Education Option A. (See NJ Transfer). Business Administration Program Georgian Court University B.S. To be considered for this program.A. Physics A. Upon completion of an Associate in Arts or an Associate in Science degree at Brookdale. *Psychology. Degree Programs (24 programs) B.44 Programs of Study Dual Degree Program The Dual Degree Program (DDP) is an agreement between Rutgers University and the 19 New Jersey community colleges. or enroll in either of the Dual Admissions Programs any time prior to their last semester at Brookdale.S. Marketing B. Elementary.5 GPA minimum) **Honors Program *Psychology.A. Mathematics. Rutgers currently offers degree programs in Criminal Justice. Students can be simultaneously admitted to Brookdale and Georgian Court University or Brookdale and New Jersey City University. (depending on major): Allied Health Technologies. Accounting B. For more information.A. Spanish Career Programs The Associate in Applied Science (A.) can transfer to baccalaureate degree programs designed to build upon the education provided by career programs. plus the general studies designed to turn out well-rounded employees. Articulation agreements with four-year institutions for specific programs may also be available.A.S. Business Administration.S. Sociology Concentration A. Optional Subject Specialization K-8 Endorsement is available for Elementary [K-5] Education).A. Clinical Laboratory Sciences. Studio Art Option A. Business Administration. Education Program Elementary. Brookdale maintains a partnership at Western Monmouth with Rutgers University for the Liberal Studies Program and holds a Dual Admission Agreement with Georgian Court University which includes the Bachelor of Arts in Applied Arts and Sciences Degree.S.edu.A. **Graduates of the Brookdale Honors Program can transfer as juniors into the Honors Program at Georgian Court University Brookdale Community College and New Jersey City University Dual Admissions Degree Programs Brookdale Community College A.S. The Brookdale Rutgers Partnership Brookdale graduates may complete a Rutgers University Baccalaureate Degree at the Western Monmouth Branch Campus at Freehold. Tourism. Labor Studies and Employment Relations. Sociology B. History.) degree programs are career-related. History B.).S. Students receive education and training in the skills needed for employment. Business Administration. Dual Degree Program students should work closely with their counselors to determine course selection and program requirements. Political Science and Psychology.S. Management B. Humanities. or B. Elementary Education with Psychology.A.S. Chemistry. with Liberal Arts Major (choose from among 13 majors) and Teacher Certification (Elementary [K-5] Education with Special Education Endorsement or Subject Specific [Secondary 9-12] education with Special Education Endorsement. Finance B. Accounting Option A. Criminal Justice B. Criminal Justice Program .rutgers.S. Natural Sciences.A.A. Elementary Education. Administration B. While some credits may transfer to four-year institutions. The program ensures qualified students admission to the specified Georgian Court University or New Jersey City University Bachelor’s Degree programs as outlined in the tables below. programs may continue studies toward a B. History and Psychology Options. Art. Business Administration. New Jersey high school students should complete a Rutgers application by the December 1 priority application date. Art B.A. English. Additional programs are planned for the future. Liberal Education. Criminal Justice Program A.A.A.A.0 has been achieved in a Recommended Transfer Program. Education Program. Music.A. Fire Science B. See your counselor or call 732-224-2570 for more information. in Liberal Studies. Criminal Justice B. Middle School and Secondary Education Option A. programs are not designed for transfer. and Science Option B.S. Early Childhood Education. DDP participants will be admitted to at least one college of Rutgers University provided a cumulative grade-point average of 3.A.

The partner colleges offer the third and fourth year of the Bachelor’s degree. The State University of New Jersey.org or visit www. Associate Degrees Business Pathway Business Administration AA Bachelor’s Degrees and Certificates Accounting BS Finance BS Marketing BS Management BS Criminal Justice BS National Security BS Fire Science BS Criminal Justice BA Dual Elementary Education/ Special Ed BA Elementary Education BA Early Childhood Education BA Master’s Degrees and Graduate Certificates Business Administration MBA Accounting MS Public Safety Pathway Criminal Justice AS National Security Studies MS Education Pathway Education AA Administration and Leadership (Principal/School Administrator Certificate) MA Education (Teacher Certification) MA Modified Alternate Route P-3 Education: Autism Spectrum Disorders MA or Certificate Education Technology (MA) Associate School Library Media Specialist Certification School Library Media Specialist MA Nursing MS Graduate School Nurse Certificate Information Systems MS Professional/Technical Communications MS Engineering Management MS Information Technology & Engineering Certificates Health Sciences Pathway Information Technology Pathway Nursing AAS Fast Track Nursing BS Nursing BS School Nurse Certificate Information Systems BA Information Technology BS Computer Science AS Liberal Arts Pathway AAS (any) AAS (any) Humanities AA (Liberal Ed Option) Social Science AA Humanities AA (English Option) Social Sciences AA (Political Science Option) Social Sciences AA (Psychology Option) Liberal Studies BA Labor & Employment Relations BS Labor Studies & Employment Relations BA Labor Studies & Employment Relations BA English BA Political Science BA Psychology BA Liberal Studies MA . The Bachelor’s degree is granted by the partner college. led by Brookdale Community College. The Communiversity has something for everyone. Whether you are studying for your Associate degree. Degree Pathways at the Communiversity A Degree Pathway is the most direct sequence of programs Communiversity students can follow to progress from Associate through Graduate-level degrees. Call (732)280-7090 ext. which then transfers to specific Bachelor’s degrees offered at the Communiversity.Programs of Study 45 New Jersey Coastal Communiversity Earn Your Bachelor’s or Master’s Degree through the Communiversity at Brookdale Community College The Communiversity is a six-member partnership of New Jersey colleges and universities. or returning to school after many years away. 3.njcommuniversity.and second-year courses required to earn an Associate degree. Other degree pathways may be possible. e-mail info@njcommuniversity. the Communiversity has something for you. mostly provided at Brookdale’s Wall Twp. Montclair State University. and Rutgers. New Jersey Institute of Technology. Over 30 degree options are brought right here to Monmouth County by Georgian Court University. students are encouraged to speak with their counselor. a recent graduate. location. How does a Communiversity Bachelor’s degree work? Brookdale offers the first. Communiversity 101 Information Session or meet with a Communiversity advisor. New Jersey City University.org for more information. To get started students should attend an Open House.

BUSINESS ADMINISTrATIoN – FINANCE BS The finance specialization prepares students for managerial positions in finance. foreign currency specialists. delegating assignments. BUSINESS ADMINISTrATIoN MBA BUSINESS ADMINISTrATIoN– MANAGEMENT BS The management specialization combines fundamental management concepts and techniques with advanced applications in the functional and analytical areas of management. and operations. The curriculum is composed of courses recognized as pertinent for the comprehensive development of today’s firefighter. The curriculum prepares students to assume marketing responsibilities for products . price. assets and liabilities are managed. and law enforcements areas. and BUSINESS ADMINISTrATIoN – MArkETING BS The marketing program builds competencies in effective communications. offered by New Jersey City University. and international business. making decisions. NATIoNAL SECUrITY STUDIES BS The National Security Program is designed for individuals interested in the field of federal. offered by New Jersey City University. It provides the background for advanced study in accounting. entrepreneurship.A. and security management. Saturday Program This AACSB-accredited program was specifically designed for the busy professional so students graduate in approx. n Information Assurance/Cyber Security: Develop the ability to analyze and apply principles of information assurance/cyber security. student-centered program is designed specifically to maximize student-learning. instruments and domestic and international markets. The degree program is designed for individuals who are either involved in the fields of criminal justice. and evaluation of product. as well as gain an understanding of strategies for financial planning and control. offered by New Jersey City University. offered by New Jersey City University. Master’s Degrees ACCoUNTING MS (on-Line) This online program is designed for business students with undergraduate degrees in accounting or other business fields. management information systems. and education – and to assume supervisory responsibilities in a functional unit. The National Security Studies Department is a National Center of Academic Excellence recognized by the Department of Homeland Security and National Security Agency. government. two years through Saturday classes. however.B. CrIMINAL JUSTICE BS The Criminal Justice BS combines professional studies in the fields of criminal justice with studies in security. or a law degree. students may opt to take additional undergraduate courses or combine the undergraduate program with the Master of Science in Accounting. The program provides students with a rich understanding of crime and criminal justice in the United States and abroad.46 Programs of Study BUSINESS DEGREES Bachelor’s Degrees BUSINESS ADMINISTrATIoN –ACCoUNTING BS The accounting program prepares students to pursue careers in public or private accounting and includes the broader business competencies required to succeed in other functional areas of organizations. Bachelor’s Degrees and Certificates CrIMINAL JUSTICE BA The program in Criminal Justice is a comprehensive interdisciplinary program that blends a strong liberal arts education experience with pre-professional instruction in the field of criminal justice. Up to 21 credits may be waived for advanced standing candidates. students will need 150 hours of college credits. BUSINESS ADMINISTrATIoN – MANAGEMENT BS The management major provides training in analyzing problems. and career advancement. procedures. stock brokerage account executives and investment advisors. and coordinating. or those who seek careers in these fields. as well as the tools needed by top management to lead an organization. training and supervising employees. This ACBSP-accredited program provides excellent preparation for the CPA exam. place. The curriculum also prepares students to sit for the Certified Public. Toward that end. This is the only criminal justice program in New Jersey that has undergone a satisfactory Program Review by the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. The State University of New Jersey are qualified for graduate study or for employment as practitioners in a variety of legal. portfolio managers. The management major provides the skills needed to secure an entry-level position. n Corporate Security: Develop your ability to analyze and synthesize organizational continuity. and also provides the broad entrepreneurial knowledge that is required to start a business. Program length for Bachelor’s in Accounting graduates: 33 credits. trust managers. program. offered by rutgers. emergency response and risk management policy and procedures. offered by New Jersey City University. design of market research. health services. offered by rutgers. budgeting. bank managers. policy-making. Master’s Degrees PUBLIC SAFETY DEGREES NATIoNAL SECUrITY STUDIES MS This master’s program prepares students at the graduate level and allows students to specialize in three distinct areas: n National Security: Develop the ability to analyze the global complexities and implications of National Security policy. Students are prepared to pursue management opportunities in different types of organizations – including business. and the role of financial institutions. offered by Montclair State University. cyber security. offered by New Jersey City University. and promotion. Graduates of the program are well-informed citizens on the subject of crime and justice. state and local law enforcement. The management area encompasses operations. Students specializing in finance will gain insights into how funds are raised and invested. analysis of consumer behavior. These include credit managers. FIrE SCIENCE BS The Fire Science Program is the only university-based bachelor’s degree program in the State of New Jersey. offered by New Jersey City University. juvenile justice and security. This progressive. offered by New Jersey City University. and offers the only degree of its kind in the state of New Jersey. commodity analysts. other business graduates: 46 credits. The State University of New Jersey. offered by New Jersey City University. an M. professional success. and services in different types of organizations. To meet the educational requirements for CPA licensure in New Jersey. strategy.

Early Childhood candidates must dual major in an Arts & Sciences area. offered by Georgian Court University. Students pursue a dual major in education PLUS Psychology (K-5 or K-8) or English (K-8). You will focus on the improvement of the learning process and instruction through the evaluation. offered by New Jersey City University. For the Associate SLMS Certification. This program is non-degree and non-matriculated. and you will leave with projects that are applicable to your particular educational setting.Programs of Study 47 EDUCATION DEGREES Bachelor’s Degrees Degrees leading to NJ Teacher Certification are offered on the Early Childhood and Elementary levels.systems topics. Students not interested in the MA degree may complete all five courses in Autism Spectrum Disorders to receive a Georgian Court University certificate in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Courses will be held at the Communiversity and online. Courses are projectbased. are applicable to your particular educational setting. EDUCATIoNAL TECHNoLoGY. It consists of five courses in Autism Spectrum Disorders and 21 additional graduate credits culminating in the MA degree. Students must choose a dual major in History. mathematics and supporting interdisciplinary studies. primarily teachers employed in Abbot districts in the State of New Jersey. with or without Special Education Endorsement. the sciences. INFORMATION TEChNOLOGY DEGREES Bachelor’s Degrees INForMATIoN SYSTEMS BA (oN-LINE) This program provides a solid foundation in the principles and applications of computing and information systems with considerable emphasis on information. Graduates will be ready to contribute to the development and evolution of technology infrastructures in organizations. organization. offered by New Jersey City University. MA – This degree is designed to meet the needs of classroom teachers who want to apply technology to the learning process and/or for individuals wishing to develop leadership skills as site-based technology coordinators. selection. MA This MA program is for teachers aspiring to become educational administrators. The P-3 program targets employed teachers in pre-kindergarten through third grade classrooms. and may qualify for additional endorsements by taking additional elective courses. The program is designed for beginners with little or no background in computing as well as for experienced computer users. SCHooL LIBrArY MEDIA SPECIALIST. graduates are able to apply for a letter of eligibility with advanced standing as a principal or those with three years of teaching experience may apply for a NJ supervisor certificate. leading to specialty concentrations offering the breadth . offered by New Jersey City University. DUAL ELEMENTArY/SPECIAL EDUCATIoN (k-5 or k-8) BA This BA provides the broad academic. EDUCATIoN: AUTISM SPECTrUM DISorDErS MA This 36-credit MA program is for certified teachers who wish to pursue an advanced degree in education and focus on autism and pervasive developmental disorders. Courses for this degree may be completed entirely on line or by mixing on line and in-person classes at the Communiversity. offered by Georgian Court University ELEMENTArY EDUCATIoN BA wITH k-8 CErTIFICATIoN IN HISTorY This Bachelor’s degree program prepares students for a career as a public or private school teacher in Kindergarten through grade 8. Teachers must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited four-year college or university. offered by Montclair State University. EArLY CHILDHooD EDUCATIoN (P-3) MAr The Modified Alternate Route Program provides the courses necessary for a teacher to apply for P-3 licensure through the NJDOE. social service agencies. Graduates may work in school districts. You will learn the new role of information. and practical experience that enables students to be effective teachers for inclusive K-5 or K-8 classrooms serving a diverse student population. The program is intended to develop a broad range of technological expertise while at the same time focusing clearly on the new way that technology is changing how students and educators create and understand knowledge. offered by Georgian Court University. Courses are project-based. These programs provide growth opportunities for you to acquire a broad cultural and intellectual background. The program emphasizes leadership in an inclusive school community to provide enriched educational experiences for a diverse K-12 student population. EArLY CHILDHooD EDUCATIoN (P-3) BA The Early Childhood Education BA is designed to deepen the understanding and perfect the skills of teacher candidates planning to work with children from birth through eight years of age in a variety child development and school settings. MA & ASSoCIATE SCHooL LIBrArY MEDIA SPECIALIST CErTIFICATIoN These programs are designed to offer you the opportunity to acquire the skills and competencies that will enable you to develop and coordinate school library media services. not as isolated facts but as building blocks to develop cognitive skills. Through core courses that provide fundamental knowledge and hands-on practice in information technology functions. system development. EDUCATIoN wITH TEACHEr CErTIFICATIoN. child care organizations or in behavioral healthcare settings. with the following offered through Communiversity: History. offered by New Jersey Institute of Technology. and you will leave with projects that INForMATIoN TECHNoLoGY BS (oN-LINE) The BS-IT Program prepares students to integrate. offered by Georgian Court University. and applications. The program consists of 7 courses which totals 18 credits. and utilization of print and non-print resources and the technology related to their use. Students earn both elementary certification and teacher of students with disabilities endorsement. offered by New Jersey City University. The program emphasizes the inclusive nature of schools and provides the students with opportunities to work with a diverse K-8 student population. DUAL ELEM/ SPECIAL ED. Upon completion of the program. cultural. the courses of study can be completed in five semesters. deploy and manage computing and telecommunication resources and services. Master’s Degrees and Certificates ADMINISTrATIoN & LEADErSHIP (PrINCIPAL/SCHooL ADMINISTrATor CErTIFICATE). design. MA This MA program is designed for individuals seeking both preliminary teacher certification and a Master’s degree in education. thus earning both elementary certification and teacher of students with disabilities endorsement.

personality. The degree enables students to acquire an understanding of information technologies and to approach communication PoLITICAL SCIENCE BA The Department of Political Science at Rutgers University-Camden offers a wide range of courses that students have found useful in preparation for careers in law. as well as for . the State University of New Jersey. philosophy. writers. ProFESSIoNAL & TECHNICAL CoMMUNICATIoNS MS (oN-LINE) This on-line program prepares students for careers in the rapidly growing field of technical communication. evening. group dynamics. offered by rutgers. The State University of New Jersey. perception. and the international system. PSYCHoLoGY BA This psychology program features the Mental Health and Human Services Option and is recommended for students pursuing employment in related mental health or human services settings. Courses are equally valuable for careeroriented majors and for students interested in developing a well-rounded liberal arts background. and public affairs. The psychology major provides students with a broad background for understanding behavior through exposure to theories and scientific research across a range of these subdisciplines. five upper-level period courses. religion. LIBErAL STUDIES BA This degree incorporates a wide range of disciplines to develop students into life-long learners. IT CErTIFICATES (oN-LINE) These certificates are designed for professionals with completed Bachelor’s degrees who wish to continue their education by earning a 12-credit graduate certificate in Information Technology and Engineering. The State University of New Jersey. offered by the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Graduates will be prepared for graduate study or for diverse career paths including lawyers. The program graduates are capable of entering any number of job markets or continuing their education in an array of graduate degrees. The State University of New Jersey. government service. projectoriented enterprise. Psychologists study the structure and function of the nervous system. the arts. INForMATIoN SYSTEMS MS (oN-LINE) This on-line program emphasizes the planning. It is a 30 credit hour (9 classes plus a capstone project) M. issues with problem-solving skills. and complex phenomena such as development. editors. investigation. program offering a broad range of courses in literature. Master’s Degrees LIBErAL STUDIES MA The Master of Arts in Liberal Studies is a unique degree program within the Rutgers Camden School of Arts and Sciences. offered by rutgers. history. offered by Georgian Court University. Courses towards this degree are held at the Western Monmouth Branch Campus in Freehold. It is also recommended for students interested in pursuing graduate study in fields such as counseling and clinical psychology. It is intended to provide students with the kind of intellectual stimulation that comes from working with a highly qualified faculty of expert scholars in a variety of disciplines. the social sciences. employers. offered by the New Jersey Institute of Technology.48 Programs of Study and depth of NJIT’s technology core. The State University of New Jersey. and six credits of capstone courses providing an overview of all literature written in English. individual behavior. offered by Georgian Court University. and cognition. it provides broad-based knowledge and skills to succeed as organizational managers and project managers. offered by the New Jersey Institute of Technology. and what workers. Courses towards this degree are held at the Western Monmouth Branch Campus in Freehold. offered by rutgers. basic processes such as sensation. biological sciences. Students thus acquire the preparation necessary to pursue graduate training in clinical or research psychology or to enhance the pursuit of related professions such as education. development. and the arts. LABor STUDIES AND EMPLoYMENT rELATIoNS BA The Labor Studies and Employment Relations BA provides students with an understanding of the nature of work. foreign countries. social work. The program focuses on interdisciplinary course work and research in order to provide students with an advanced background in both the theoretical and practical aspects of managing technical/engineering projects. offered by rutgers. physical sciences. Further. PSYCHoLoGY BA Psychology is the multidimensional scientific study of behavior and thought processes. offered by rutgers. Bachelor’s Degrees ENGLISH BA This English program includes a foundational research course. LIBERAL ARTS DEGREES Master’s Degrees and Certificates ENGINEErING MANAGEMENT MS (oN-LINE) This on-line program develops engineers and other technically trained individuals for leadership roles in a technologically based. application and evaluation of information systems. this interdisciplinary program is designed for students to develop a marketable expertise in an IT area of their choosing. educators. offered by rutgers. and society has done and can do in the future to address those problems. weekend. offered by New Jersey Institute of Technology. and abnormal behavior. Daytime classes are also available. It is designed for students who are interested in the application of information systems to business. technology specialists. LABor AND EMPLoYMENT rELATIoNS BS The School of Management and Labor Relations (SMLR) announces a new degree completion program focused on issues in the workplace. or criminal justice.A.  Virtual Tools/Professional Comm  Information Systems Design  Information Systems Implementation  Internet Applications Development  Practice of Technical Communications  Project Management  Telecommunication Networking All Graduate Certificate Programs may be applied directly to NJIT Master’s degrees. managers. design. offered by the New Jersey Institute of Technology. and/or off-campus courses. The program provides students the opportunity for cross-disciplinary studies in a small classroom setting. medicine. The BS is designed so that students with associate’s degrees or equivalent credits can complete a bachelor’s degree through a flexible combination of online. and librarians. The department curriculum is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of politics and government in the United States. The State University of New Jersey. the problems of working people. social sciences. humanities and engineering. graduate studies in political science and public policy. journalists. and with fellow students from diverse backgrounds.

Programs of Study

49

NURSING DEGREES

SCHooL NUrSE GrADUATE CErTIFICATE
In response to the growing demand for certified school nurses, the Health Science Department offers a graduate program in school nurse certification that leads to state certification. Completion of this program, approved by the New Jersey State Department of Education meets the requirements for the standard Educational Services Certificate Endorsement as a Certified School Nurse. This endorsement authorizes the holder to perform nursing services and to teach in areas related to health in public schools in grades pre-K to 12. Applicants must hold a current NJ Registered Nurse license and a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university. offered by New Jersey City University.

Bachelor’s Degrees and Certificates
FASTTrACk BSN
The FastTrack BSN program is an innovative educational opportunity for bachelor’s degree graduates to transition into the nursing role in only 12 months. Interested individuals with bachelor’s degrees who have completed the required prerequisite courses are invited to apply to the program. Once admitted, students will take the courses that qualify them to take the licensing examination to become a registered nurse (RN). offered by New Jersey City University.

NUrSING BS
This degree is for registered nurses with either AAS degrees or hospital school diploma to increase their career potential while attending classes part time. Classes are offered on line or in the evenings at the Western Monmouth Branch Campus. Courses requiring laboratory facilities are offered at the Brookdale campus in Lincroft. offered by rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

SCHooL NUrSE CErTIFICATE
This certificate program is designed for professional registered nurses who wish to be certified in school nursing in the State of NJ. Certification is offered as a post-baccalaureate program for registered nurses with a BA, BS or BSN and/or as a minor for registered nurses pursuing a baccalaureate degree. offered by rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

Master’s Degrees and Certificates
NUrSING MS
This program is for RN’s with a Bachelor’s degree in Nursing and prepares students to be advanced-practice nurses, such as nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists. The curriculum includes core coursework and seven specialty clinical concentration options. All core coursework is offered on line. Specialty courses in the clinical concentration are offered in Newark or on line. offered by rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

50

Programs of Study

General Education
General education is “instruction that presents forms of expression, fields of knowledge, and methods of inquiry fundamental to intellectual growth and to a mature understanding of the world and the human condition, as distinguished from ‘specialized education’, which prepares individuals for particular occupations or specific professional responsibilities” (N.J.A.C. 9A: 1-1.2). All programs leading to an associate degree at Brookdale will include a distribution of courses in the general education portion of the curricula from the following major knowledge areas:
l l l l l l l l l

Technological Competency or Information Literacy (IT) History (HI) Cultural and Global Awareness (CG) Ethical Dimension (E)

Students should choose their general education courses based upon the degree sought and their transfer plans. Student Development Specialists (Counselors) work with students to design a plan of study and approve the plan in the name of the College. General Education courses are marked with a (l) in the course description section of the catalog. A list of General Education courses by category is on pages 53-56. General education requirements for each degree program are summarized in the table below:

Communications (C) Humanities (HU) Social Sciences (SS) Mathematics (M) Sciences (SC)

General Education Knowledge Areas
1 Communications (C)

Associate in Arts (A.A.)
9 credits [2 composition and 1 speech course] 9 credits 6 credits 3-8 4-8 (2) 0-4 (3) 12 credits (4) 6 credits 3 credits (5)

Associate in Science (A.S.)
6 credits [2 composition courses]

Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) or Fine Arts (A.F.A.)
6 credits [1 composition (writing) course; 2nd course may be composition or speech] 3 credits

Academic Credit Certificate
3 credits [1 composition course]

2 Humanities (HU) 3 Social Sciences (SS) 4 Mathematics (M)

Sciences (SC) Technological Competency or Information Literacy (IT) (3) 5 History (HI) 6 Cultural and Global Awareness (CG) (5 ) 7 Ethical Dimension (E)
(2)

3 credits(1) 3 credits(1) 3-8 4-8 (2) 0-4 (3)

3 credits

(1)

3 credits 9 credits (4) 3 credits

3 credits are 3 credits are recommended recommended At least one course in the student’s program of study must contain an ethical dimension. This course, which can come from any of the above knowledge areas or career course, should contain a component that helps the student recognize, analyze and assess ethical issues and situations.
Courses from any category

Additional Credits
REQUIRED GENERAL EDUCATION CREDITS (6)
(1) (2)

6 credits

Courses from any category

8 credits

45

30

20

6

Students must take 3 credits in Humanities and 3 credits in Social Sciences, plus an additional 3 credits in either category for a total of 9 credits. A laboratory science course is required for A.A. and A.S. degree students. (3) Technological Competency or Information Literacy can be satisfied in accordance with the Programs of Study requirements on pp. 51-52. Students should consult a Counselor. (4) Students must complete a minimum of 12 credits for the AA degree and 9 credits for the AS degree to fulfill the requirements for the Mathematics (M), Sciences (SC) and Technological Competency or Information Literacy (IT) knowledge areas. (5) Students meeting this requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area will need to take three credits from any General Education knowledge area to satisfy the 45 credit requirement for the A.A. degree. (6) Students may exceed required number of General Education credits depending on course selection for Mathematics (M), Sciences (SC) and Technological Competency or Information Literacy (IT) or Humanities. A description of the General Education courses that meet the requirements of each General Education category are described in the following Programs of Study section for each degree program.

Programs of Study

51

Programs of Study
Associate in Arts (A.A.)
The Associate in Arts programs serve students who plan to transfer to four-year colleges. These institutions require a broad range of general education courses for freshman and sophomores, and concentrate on major-related courses in the junior and senior years. This degree includes no fewer than 45 general education credits from the following knowledge areas. 1. Communications (C) - 9 credits to include two Composition (writing) courses and one Speech course. 2. Humanities (HU) - 9 credits in any broad-based courses in the history of or appreciation of Art, Music, and Theater; Literature; Foreign Language; Philosophy; Religious Studies; or additional broad-based history course in Western, non-Western, American, or World (Civilization) History. 3. Social Sciences (SS) – 6 credits selected from introductory courses in Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Political Science, Psychology or Sociology. 4. Mathematics (M), Sciences (SC), and Technological or Information Literacy Competency (IT) – 12 credits including 3-8 credits in Mathematics at a level that minimally requires a prerequisite of basic algebra; 4-8 credits in science in general biology, chemistry, physics, or environmental sciences, at least one of which must have a laboratory component; 0-4 credits in a rigorous introduction to computer science or a computer applications course or by taking comparable coursework that emphasizes common computer skills and/or helps students access, analyze, and communicate information using appropriate technologies. A student may be waived from the Technological/ Information Literacy competency requirement by passing a proficiency exam or by taking comparable coursework within other portions of his or her studies. Such courses will be designated in the catalog by a (t). 5. History (HI) – 6 credits selected from broad-based courses in Western, non-Western, American or World (Civilization) History. 6. Cultural and Global Awareness (CG) (Diversity): - 3 credits One course is required from those courses designated with a (CG). This designation is for any course that significantly helps students analyze the implications of the commonalities and differences among culturally diverse people. Students may meet this requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area or other program requirements. Note: Students who fulfill this requirement by taking a course from another knowledge area will need to take three credits from any General Education knowledge area to satisfy the 45-credit requirement for this degree. 7. Ethical Dimension (E): At least one course in the student’s program of study must contain an ethical dimension,

a course which contains a component that helps the student to recognize, analyze and assess ethical issues and situations. Students may meet this requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area or other program requirements.

Associate in Science (A.S.)

The Associate in Science (A.S.) programs serve students who plan to transfer to four-year colleges for science-related majors. These institutions require a broad range of general education courses for freshman and sophomores, and concentrate on major-related courses in the junior and senior years. This degree includes no fewer than 30 general education credits distributed among: 1. Communications (C) - 6 credits to include two Composition courses, may include an additional course in Speech. 2. Humanities (HU) - 3 credits in any broad-based course in Art, Music, Theater, Literature, Foreign Language, Philosophy, Religious Studies or additional broad-based history course in Western, non-Western, American, or World (Civilization) History. 3. Social Sciences (SS) - 3 credits selected from introductory courses in Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Political Science, Psychology or Sociology. 4. Mathematics (M), Sciences (SC), and Technological or Information Literacy Competency (IT) – 9 credits including 3-8 credits in Mathematics at a level that minimally requires a prerequisite of basic algebra; 4-8 credits in science in general biology, chemistry, physics, or environmental sciences, at least one of which must have a laboratory component; 0-4 credits in a rigorous introduction to computer science or a computer applications course or by taking comparable coursework that emphasizes common computer skills and/or helps students access, analyze, and communicate information using appropriate technologies. A student may be waived from the Technological/ Information Literacy competency requirement by passing a proficiency exam or by taking comparable coursework within other portions of his or her studies. Such courses will be designated in the catalog by a (t). 5. Three (3) additional credits in Social Science or Humanities knowledge areas as described above. 6. The Additional 6 credits can be chosen from any of the categories but cannot exceed the number of credits listed in the A.A. program credit distribution requirements. 7. Cultural and Global Awareness (CG) (Diversity): One course is recommended from those courses designated with a (CG). This designation is for any course that significantly helps students analyze the implications of the commonalities and differences among culturally diverse people.

52

Programs of Study

8. Ethical Dimension (E): At least one course in the student’s program of study must contain an ethical dimension, a course which contains a component that helps the student to recognize, analyze and assess ethical issues and situations. Students may meet this requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area or other program requirements.

Academic Credit Certificate
Academic Credit Certificates consist of 30 to 36 credits, including 6 credits of general education. Any offering of clustered courses consisting of less than 30 credits is entitled Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement. Academic Credit Certificates include no fewer than 6 general education credits distributed among:

Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) or Associate in Fine Arts (A.F.A.)
The Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) programs prepare students to enter employment as well-rounded, skilled workers. The Associate in Fine Arts (A.F.A.) is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college to pursue a Bachelor in Fine Arts Degree. It provides an exposure to the general education courses required by four-year Bachelor of Fine Arts Programs. The A.A.S. or A.F.A. Degrees will include no fewer than 20 General Education credits distributed among: 1. Communications (C) - 6 credits to include one Composition (writing) course; the second course may be taken in either Composition or Speech. 2. Humanities (HU) or Social Science (SS) – 3 credits from either of the knowledge areas as defined in the A.A. section. 3. Mathematics (M), Sciences (SC), and Technological or Information Literacy Competency (IT) – 3 credits as defined in the A.A. and A.S. requirements. 4. Cultural and Global Awareness (CG) (Diversity): One course is recommended from those courses designated with a (CG). This designation is for any course that significantly helps students analyze the implications of the commonalities and differences among culturally diverse people. 5. Ethical Dimension (E): At least one course in the student’s program of study must contain an ethical dimension, a course which contains a component that helps the student to recognize, analyze and assess ethical issues and situations. Students may meet this requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area or other program requirements. 6. General education courses for these degrees should support career preparation. 7. The additional 8 credits can be chosen from any of the categories but cannot exceed the number of credits listed in the A.S. program credit distribution requirements.

1. Communication (C) – 3 credits in Composition (writing). 2. Three (3) credits from any General Education category. 3. General education coursework in excess of the required 6 credits should follow the A.A.S. degree.

Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement
An offering of clustered courses consisting of less than 30 credits is an Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement.
Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement programs require no general education courses beyond those which support career education.

CG) Women’s History Survey: Experiences.CG) History of Modern Asia HIST 227 (HI. Contributions and Debates HIST 135 (HI) American Civilization I HIST 136 (HI) American Civilization II HIST 137 (HI) Recent American History HIST 145 (HI.CG) World Civilization II HIST 107(HI.CG) Modern Latin American History HIST 225 (HI.Programs of Study 53 General Education Courses By Category l Symbol used to identify General Education courses in course description section of catalog Course Code Course Title COMMUNICATIONS (C) ENGL 121 English Composition: The Writing Process ENGL 122 (E) English Composition: Writing and Research SPCH 115 (E) Public Speaking HUMANITIES (HU) ARAB 101 Elementary Arabic I ARAB 102 Elementary Arabic II ARTH 105 Art Appreciation ARTH 106 History of Art: Ancient Through Medieval ARTH 107 History of Art: Renaissance Through Contemporary CHNS 101 Elementary Chinese I CHNS 102 Elementary Chinese II CINE 105 Film Appreciation: Motion Picture/Art ENGL 155 The Short Story ENGL 156 Introduction to Poetry ENGL 158 Introduction to Literature ENGL 231 British Literature I: Beginnings to 18th Century ENGL 232 British Literature II: Romantic Era to The Modern Age ENGL 235 (CG) World Literature I ENGL 236 (CG) World Literature II ENGL 245 American Literature I ENGL 246 American Literature II ENGL 275 Shakespeare’s Plays FRCH 101 Elementary French I FRCH 102 Elementary French II FRCH 203 Intermediate French I FRCH 204 Intermediate French II FRCH 206 French Conversation and Composition I FRCH 207 French Conversation and Composition II GRMN 101 Elementary German I GRMN 102 Elementary German II GRMN 203 Intermediate German I GRMN 204 Intermediate German II HIST 105(HI.CG) Contemporary World History HIST 108 (HI) Modern European History HIST 125 (HI.CG) World Civilization I HIST 106(HI.CG) African Civilization HIST 217 (HI.CG) African-American History II HIST 215 (HI.CG) Middle Eastern History HUMN 125 The Creative Process ITAL 101 Elementary Italian I ITAL 102 Elementary Italian II ITAL 203 Intermediate Italian I ITAL 204 Intermediate Italian II JPNS 101 Elementary Japanese I JPNS 102 Elementary Japanese II JPNS 203 Intermediate Japanese I JPNS 204 Intermediate Japanese II Credits 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 .CG) African-American History I HIST 146 (HI.

54 Programs of Study Course Code MUSI 115 MUSI 116 (CG) PHIL 105 (E) PHIL 115 (E) PHIL 225 (CG) PHIL 226 PHIL 227 (E) PHTY 105 RUSS 101 RUSS 102 SPAN 101 SPAN 102 SPAN 203 SPAN 204 SPAN 207 SPAN 215 THTR 105 THTR 135 Course Title Music Appreciation History of Jazz Practical Reasoning Introduction to Philosophy Comparative Religion Logic Introduction to Ethics The History and Aesthetics of Photography Elementary Russian I Elementary Russian II Elementary Spanish I Elementary Spanish II Intermediate Spanish I Intermediate Spanish II Spanish Conversation and Composition Contemporary Latin American Literature Theater Appreciation Musical Theater Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 SOCIAL SCIENCES (SS) ANTH 105 (CG) Cultural Anthropology ANTH 116 Introduction to Physical Anthropolgy ECON 105 Macro Economics ECON 106 Micro Economics ECON 107 Economics HGEO 105 (CG) Human Geography POLI 101 Introduction to Political Science POLI 105 American National Government POLI 115 State. and Local Government PSYC 105 Introduction to Psychology I PSYC 106 Introduction to Psychology II PSYC 206 Human Growth and Development I PSYC 207 Human Growth and Development II PSYC 208 Life Span Development SOCI 101 Principles of Sociology SOCI 202 Analysis of Social Problems MATHEMATICS MATH 131 MATH 136 MATH 137 MATH 145 MATH 146 MATH 151 MATH 152 MATH 153 MATH 156 MATH 171 MATH 172 MATH 176 MATH 273 MATH 274 MATH 285 (M) Statistics Mathematics for the Liberal Arts Finite Mathematics Algebraic Modeling Advanced Topics in Mathematics for the Liberal Arts Intermediate Algebra College Algebra & Trigonometry Pre-Calculus Mathematics Mathematics for Management and the Social Sciences Calculus I Calculus II Calculus with Business Applications Calculus III Elementary Differential Equations Linear Algebra SCIENCES (SC) BIOL 101 General Biology I (Lab Science) BIOL 102 General Biology II (Lab Science) BIOL 105 Life Sciences (Lab Science) BIOL 107 Human Biology BIOL 111 Anatomy and Physiology I (Lab Science) BIOL 112 Anatomy and Physiology II (Lab Science) BIOL 125 Introduction to Plants (Lab Science) BIOL 126 Exploring Biology: Cycles of Life BIOL 213 Microbiology (Lab Science) . County.

Contributions and Debates American Civilization I American Civilization II Recent American History African-American History I African-American History II African Civilization Modern Latin American History History of Modern Asia Middle Eastern History GLOBAL AWARENESS (CG) Cultural Anthropology Cultures of the World Writing from the Female Experience African-American Literature Woman As Author World Literature I World Literature II Human Geography World Civilization I World Civilization II Contemporary World History Women’s History Survey: Experiences.HU) HIST 146 (CG.HU) African Civilization .HU) African-American History I HIST 146 (HI.HU) HIST 107(HI.HU) HIST 215 (CG.HU) HIST 107(CG.Programs of Study 55 Course Code CHEM 100 CHEM 101 CHEM 102 CHEM 116 CHEM 136 ENVR 101 ENVR 102 ENVR 105 ENVR 107 ENVR 111 ENVR 127 PHYS 106 PHYS 108 PHYS 111 PHYS 112 PHYS 121 PHYS 122 PHYS 223 Course Title Principles of Chemistry (Lab Science) General Chemistry I (Lab Science) General Chemistry II (Lab Science) Chemistry In Life (Lab Science) Introduction to Inorganic.HU) HIST 106(HI.HU) HIST 227 (CG.HU) HIST 217 (CG.HU) HIST 125(HI.HU) CULTURAL AND ANTH 105 (SS) ANTH 106 ENGL 128 ENGL 150 ENGL 175 ENGL 235 (HU) ENGL 236 (HU) HGEO 105 (SS) HIST 105(HI.HU) HIST 225 (CG.HU) World Civilization I World Civilization II Contemporary World History Modern European History Women’s History Survey: Experiences. Organic and Biological Chemistry (Lab Science) Physical Geology (Lab Science) Historical Geology (Lab Science) Environmental Studies Environmental Science (Lab Science) Oceanography (Lab Science) Meteorology (Lab Science) Astronomy Physics in Life (Lab Science) General Physics I (Non-Calculus) (Lab Science) General Physics II (Non-Calculus) (Lab Science) General Physics I (Lab Science) General Physics II (Lab Science) General Physics III (Lab Science) Credits 4 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 TECHNOLOGICAL OR INFORMATION LITERACY COMPETENCY (IT) COMP 126 Computer Logic and Design COMP 129 (E) Information Technology INFL 105 Information Literacy in a Connected World HISTORY (HI) HIST 105(CG.HU) HIST 135 (HU) HIST 136 (HU) HIST 137 (HU) HIST 145 (CG.HU) African-American History II HIST 155 Native American Studies HIST 215(HI. Contributions & Debates HIST 126 Dimensions of the Holocaust HIST 145(HI.HU) HIST 106(CG.HU) HIST 108 (HU) HIST 125(CG.

identify solutions. Personal Development The student will use the biological. a worker. Community and Workplace The student will demonstrate cultural sensitivity within the context of the contemporary. ETHICAL DIMENSION (E) COMP 129 (IT) Information Technology ENGL 122 (C) English Composition: Writing and Research PHIL 105 (HU) Practical Reasoning PHIL 115 (HU) Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 227 (HU) Introduction to Ethics SPCH 115 (C) Public Speaking Core Competencies Core competencies represent the essential elements of complete and relevant education at Brookdale Community College. global community. verbal or written methods of communication to articulate a response to the arts and/or humanities. time and stress management skills. Technological Literacy The student will use computer systems and other appropriate forms of technology to achieve professional. They are the skills and abilities that graduates of all associate degree programs should acquire. educational. critically and creatively to analyze information. organize and evaluate information from a variety of sources.HU) HIST 235 HUMN 129 HUMN 230 MUSI 116 (HU) PHIL 225 (HU) PSYC 217 SOCI 105 SOCI 216 Course Title Modern Latin American History History of Modern Asia History of Modern Russia Middle Eastern History Immigration & Ethnicity in American History Issues in Women’s Studies Women and Science History of Jazz Comparative Religion Social Psychology Intercultural Communication: The Person and The Process Sociology in Minorities Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Additional General Education courses. Mathematical/Scientific Reasoning The student will use mathematical and/or scientific skills and methods to organize information and develop and test conjectures. and personal objectives. The student will demonstrate personal. make logical decisions and solve problems. See Brookdale’s web site www. diverse. . Information Literacy The Student will identify a need for information and collect. The student will demonstrate ethical conduct and effective teamwork. Critical Thinking The student will think clearly. Communication The student will communicate information and ideas clearly and effectively in the written and spoken form.HU) HIST 225 (HI. For information on the Lampitt Bill and transfer of General Education courses to four-year New Jersey institutions. not available at printing. see New Jersey Transfer Law on page 43.brookdalecc. The student will synthesize. Creative Expression The student will use visual.56 Programs of Study Course Code HIST 217(HI. Historical/Societal Analysis The student will identify and analyze historical and/or societal issues as they impact current and future trends. psychological and social dimensions of health and wellness to improve and maintain physical and emotional well-being. analyze. may be added to this list. and a life-long learner. The general education distribution requirements support acquisition of the core competencies by all graduates. document and present information.HU) HIST 226 HIST 227 (HI. They are the abilities necessary to be effective as a person. The student will also analyze and solve problems and interpret the results within the context of practical applications. and will demonstrate effective listening and reading skills. a citizen.edu for additional General Education course listings.

.... ... .. 30 . Ethnic Studies Option .... . ... Programming Option . .....A.. .64 Automotive Engineering Technician Option ..S. . . ..........116 Humanities Program A......... ...... . ........S.. ... .. .........115 Mathematics/Science Program A.S Overhead Lines ....... .... ..... 30 ..5 ..A.... . Business Management Option ... .. .....A.95 Mathematics/Science Program A......... ...F........ ..... 67 Automotive Electrical Power Systems Specialist . . 34-36 .. 136 Social Sciences Program A. Early Childhood Education Option... .... .... Political Science Option ....... ... ... .. .. ....... .............. ....... ......... ......A. 24 .. . . ... ... .. .. .78 Culinary Arts Program A.. . ....... ..S.............108 International Studies Option ..60 Social Sciences Program A. Environmental and Earth Sciences Option ........ ...... . 73 Floral Design ........... .... Accounting Program A... . 104 Landscape Design . ...... ...140 Humanities Program A....... ....S...A......A..... ... Steering.... .......... ...... .. .. ...... ........A.A. ... 20 . Suspension and Alignment Specialist .75 Creative Writing Option .. 68 Automotive Engine Performance Specialist .A... 68 Automotive Engine Remanufacturing Specialist .. 124 Pastry Arts ................ .. .......... .............. .. .....S. .. Psychology Option .... .......S.............118 Humanities Program A.134 Mathematics/Science Program A.. .. Criminal Justice Program A.... ..A.25 ... .. .S.... ....... .. ...A.. .... ....106 Corrections Option .. Languages Option.. . ..S.. .... ............A. . 30 .S... Chemistry Option .....A...A..... ........ Speech Communications Option ................. Electronics Engineering Technology Option ....... . .. . ... ..A............S.... – Generalist . Certificate Total Credits Page A+ Computer Repair Technician Certificate..... 80 Dental Assisting..76 Humanities Program A. Public Administration Option ..A.. ....... .........130 Social Sciences Program A. ...... ....... ... .. .. ......A..... . ....84 Early Childhood Education Program A. ... .. .. .. ........125 Social Sciences Program A..94 Humanities Program A..... ....A. . ..... ...72 Mathematics/Science Program A.............. ... . 27 ...A.64 Automotive Technology Option .......S...............S...... ..... ... ....... .A....... .142 Computer Science Program A.................. .... . ..A.102 History Option . ...... .. ..... .S.. 68 Advanced Automotive Technician .. .. ..... 31 ...... .... ...112 Humanities Program A.S.... Video Production Option . . ..A......S..S...... .. .... . .. . ... . 20 .... ... 104 Medical Coding ......A.. .... ...126 Humanities Program A........ Marketing Program A.61 Art Option .... ... .....S. Women’s Studies Option ... . . ........S. ...A. .... Degree ..... ....... Fashion Merchandising Program A.. . ..A... .......... .............. ....A.... ............... ..137 Humanities Program A.. . Academic Credit Certificates Certificates of proficiency.... .. .... .... .... . Automotive Technology Program A. ... .... Public Relations Option ... ....... ... 80 CISCO CCNA Certification . .119 Network Information Technology A.... .............. ..... ....S... .A.S.. are available....... 30 .... .A... .... 59 Computer LAN/WAN Technician Certificate/CCNA .... Medical Laboratory Technology A. 30.... ..............A.... ... ..... ....132 Respiratory Therapy Program A.. .. ... .. ........ .... ... ..... ....A. . .. ..71 Business Program A... 16 .S..S. 104 Liberal Studies Transfer . ... .Programs of Study 57 Academic Programs Accounting Option . .. . ........ ... Middle School and Secondary Education Option ..135 Sociology Option .... . .........A. 6 . . Media Studies Option . .... 23 ... . .59 Anthropology Option ...A.. ....... 17 ...... .....S..114 Mathematics Option ..A. 142 Academic Credit Certificates of Achievement Automotive Brakes...... 12 .. . ...... 33 . ..S.A...... ........70 Business Management Option .. ..... .... .... . .......S...... .... .........133 Science Option .S.... .. ...... . ........... .A.... . 82 Early Childhood Education . .. ... Studio Art Option . ... ............ ...87 Elementary. ..... .A... ...62 Humanities Program A. ..... .A.120 Nursing Program A. .... ........... ... ....S..... . ....... ..... ..... .. .... .. .79 Dental Hygiene Program A......69 Mathematics/Science Program A.... .. 30 .. .. Architecture Program A........ ..A..... .. ...... .. .....A. . ...... .A.....A....101 Health Information Technology A.. .. . ..... 92 Accounting ...... 121 ..58 Business Administration Program A... ......111 Humanities Program A.... ..S....A.....96 Social Sciences Program A...S......65 General Motors Automotive Service Educational Program Option .... ......... ......A.. Graphic Design Option...88 Electric Utility Technology Program A..... ..... ... 105 Other Certifications Culinary Arts Letter of Recognition . ..S. ...A... ..S......A... Social Sciences Program A.. . . .........A..83 Digital Animation and 3D Design A.................... .... ......A. ........ ... ...... .......A...A.... ........ .S. .. .. ...73 Computer Science Program A.S...........143 Humanities Program A. designed to credentialize competency in particular skills areas.....129 Social Sciences Program A................... ........... Photography Option .A............... ...... .... ..............S.......... ........67 Biology Option .. ... .........97 Fine Arts Program A.... 33.. 31 ..A. . ..S. Computer Aided Drafting and Design Technology Program A...... ................... ..... .... .... .........123 Philosophy Option .... ........ .... ...... ............ ....... Business Administration Program A. .. . .. 102 Social Services ....... .. ......... ............ Sustainable Energy A......74 Computer Science Program A.S.......... .....91 Electronic Computer Technician Option .. 19 .... . Human Services A.... .S...... .. ..... Journalism Option... 113 Paralegal ...... .128 Humanities Program A.....109 Social Sciences Program A.....S.. ....... 12 ... ..... Physics Option ....S.S.... .... . . 86 Horticulture ..... . .. ... .... .....A. . .. . Web Site Development Option . .........100 Humanities Program A. ... . .117 Music Option .131 Humanities Program A.. ..66 Toyota Technical Educational Network (T-TEN) .... ...A..... . ............. .. .. ..... ...A.A..... 121 Culinary Arts ....... ...5 ............ ...... ....... .......... .... ..... ... . .. . ...... ... ..... 15 .......... 68 Computer-Aided Drafting and Design ....127 Mathematics/Science Program A. .....A.... ............ ..89 Substation Option .85 Education Program A. ........ The credits earned in these certificates are applicable to the related degree programs... ............98 Game Programming Option.... . . 80 Webmaster Administration .....A. .. They are listed after the degree programs or options to which they refer... ...... ... Liberal Education Option ... . . ...............107 Interior Design Program A. ................. Graphic Design Program A.....77 Corrections Option .......... ..139 Theater Option .....90 Electronics Technology Program A........... .. ....93 English Option . ...92 Engineering Program A....... .. Audio Production Option . .81 Diagnostic Medical Sonography A.......A.122 Paralegal Studies Program A. .... ........ Music Technology A........103 Social Sciences Program A...63 Communication Media A.... .. . . . .........A..110 Humanities Program A. Radiologic Technology Program A... .. . ..138 Technical Studies Program A. ... ......... ... ....99 Digital Animation and 3D Design A.... . ......... ....... ............ .. 68 Automotive Transmissions Systems Specialist ... ..... . ............105 Addiction Studies Option ........ . .141 Communication Media Program A. .

and Calculus Public Speaking Credits 3 3 6-8 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. or individual needs. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Business Administration Program A. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Students should consult with their counselor. This option couples accounting and business management courses with the general education studies required to transfer to four-year colleges. banking and commerce or they may go into business for themselves. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Analyze economic events of a business entity f Communicate economic events in the form of a general purpose financial statement including: — income statement — retained earnings statement — balance sheet — cash flow statement f Demonstrate ethical/professional responsibility in the analysis and disclosure of an entity’s economic event BAChELOR’S ThROUGh BROOkDALE This is a preferred Associate degree for students planning to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting at Brookdale’s New Jersey Coastal Communiversity. Refer to page 23 for details. Statistics. career objectives. such as Algebra. students should talk to their Student Development Specialist or call the Communiversity at 732-280-2090. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. The following general education courses are recommended for students choosing this program.edu Elective 3 **This course may not transfer to a four-year college.A. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. Degree This program is for students planning to transfer to four-year colleges to earn Bachelor’s degrees with accounting or financial concentrations and to sit for the Certified Public Accountant examination.brookdalecc. For program details.58 Programs of Study Accounting Option Business Administration Program A. For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. Bachelors of Accounting may work in finance. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ACCT 101 ECON 105 ENGL 121 Mathematics (2) Technological Competency or Information Literacy (2) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term ACCT 203* SPCH 115 Humanities Science (with Lab) (2) History Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3-4 15-17 3 3 3 4 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term ACCT 102 ECON 106 ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (2) Humanities Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term ACCT 204** Humanities Cultural & Global Awareness (1) History Elective 3 3 3 3 3 15 *Offered Fall Term in evenings **Offered Spring Term in evenings (1) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Career Studies – 12 credits as follows: ACCT 101 Principles of Accounting I ACCT 102 Principles of Accounting II **ACCT 203 Intermediate Accounting I (Offered Fall term only) **ACCT 204 Intermediate Accounting II (Offered Spring term only) 3 3 3 3 NOTE: Four-year colleges accredited by the American Collegiate Schools of Business may require demonstration of proficiency for selected 200-level courses.A. (2) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. . Code ECON 105 ECON 106 MATH SPCH 115 Course Macro Economics Micro Economics Mathematics. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Degree Accounting Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. when eligible. and preferred math sequence. transfer information.

Programs of Study 59 Accounting Program A. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. An internship with an existing employer or with a Brookdale-arranged employer can be used for 1-to-3 elective credits.S. Students wishing to continue toward bachelor’s degrees should choose the Accounting Option of the Business Administration Program – A. Code ENGL 121 PHIL 227 SPCH 115 Course English Composition: The Writing Process Introduction to Ethics Public Speaking Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 30 Career Studies — 21 credits as follows: ACCT 101 Principles of Accounting I ACCT 102 Principles of Accounting II ACCT 105 Introduction to Quickbooks ACCT 112** Managerial Accounting ACCT 115* Federal Income Tax ACCT 203* Intermediate Accounting I ACCT 204** Intermediate Accounting II *Offered Fall Term **Offered Spring Term 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Analyze economic events of a business entity f Communicate the economic events in the form of general purpose financial statements including: — income statements — retained earnings statements — balance sheets — cash flow statements f Demonstrate ethical/professional responsibility in the analysis and disclosure of business events Career Studies — 12 credits from among the following: ACCT 299 Accounting Internship 3 BUSI 105 Introduction to Business 3 BUSI 165 Computer Applications in Business 3 BUSI 221 Business Law I 3 BUSI 222 Business Law II 3 OADM 141 Excel for Windows 4 ECON 106 Micro Economics 3 ECON 225 Business Statistics 3 Electives 7 A grade of “C” or higher is required for career courses Career Studies – 18 credits as follows: ACCT 101 Principles of Accounting I ACCT 102 Principles of Accounting II ACCT 105 Introduction to QuickBooks ACCT 112** Managerial Accounting ACCT 115* Federal Income Tax ENGL 127 Business Writing Electives Total Credits Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence Accounting Program A.A. or individual needs. though many of the courses will prove to be transferable. The student gains understanding of accounting methods and basic accounting theory. and junior accountant. Accounting and business courses form the core of the program. The following general education courses are recommended for students choosing this program.A.S. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Analyze economic events of a business entity f Communicate the economic events in the form of general purpose financial statements including: — income statements — retained earnings statements — balance sheets — cash flow statements Requirements General Education — 9 credits The following General Education courses are recommended for students choosing this Certificate. Code SPCH 115 ECON 105 ENGL 121 ENGL 122 Course Public Speaking Macro Economics English Composition: The Writing Process English Composition: Writing and Research Credits 3 3 3 3 Accounting Academic Credit Certificate The Certificate in Accounting is career-oriented in nature. Refer to page 23 for details. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ACCT 101 Career Studies ENGL 121 General Education(1) Credits 3 3 3 6 15 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term ACCT 115* ACCT 203* Career Studies ECON 105 Elective Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term ACCT 102 ACCT 105 Career Studies ENGL 122 OR SPCH 115 Mathematics or Science or Technological/Info Literacy SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term ACCT 112** ACCT 204** Career Studies General Education Elective Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 3 3 2-3 4 15-16 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.A. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall start date. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. Degree This career program provides the student with the business concepts and procedures used in compiling data and financial records. accounting clerk. This program is not designed for transfer to a four-year school. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Students will be awarded a Certificate of Proficiency in Accounting with particular emphasis on computer applications. *Offered Fall Term in evenings **Offered Spring Term in evenings . Job titles for graduates include account analyst. Degree. 3 3 3 3 3 15 (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural and Global Awareness knowledge area. career objectives. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.

(2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Degree This option prepares students for a Bachelor’s degree in Anthropology. healthcare. career objectives. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution.Anthropology Elective *Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Social Sciences Program A. or individual needs.60 Programs of Study Anthropology Option Social Sciences Program A. Upon completion of the program. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. . Career Studies – 3 credits as follows: Code ANTH 105 Course Cultural Anthropology Credits 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Students will be able to work effectively with diverse ethnic populations in many different disciplines such as education.at least one course must be a 200 level course: ANTH 106 Cultures of the World ANTH 115** Introduction to Archaeology ANTH 116* Introduction to Physical Anthropology ANTH 205 Culture and Personality ANTH 216 Fieldwork in Archaeology ANTH 295 Special Project . This program provides the framework for a scientific and comprehensive study of human behavior and society and introduces students to the major subfields of anthropology and the various associated specializations.A.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. students will be able to make informed choices regarding their careers and academic areas of specialization. Refer to page 23 for details. Degree Anthropology Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.brookdalecc. Career Studies – 9 credits from among the following . This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Distinguish between career options in terms of anthropological subfields and how cultures are studied through fieldwork Develop the necessary skills to critically think the important role culture has in defining the human experience and how an awareness of cultural universals can decrease cross-cultural misunderstandings Recognize the role globalization and cultural diffusion have on culture change Requirements General Education– 45 credits as described on page 50. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. Course Code Credits SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term Career Studies 3 ENGL 121 3 Humanities (language) 3-4 Mathematics (1) 3-4 Mathematics/Science/Technological 3-4 Competency or Information Literacy (1) 15-18 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Communications Science (with lab) (1) History Humanities 3 3 4 3 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1) Social Sciences History Credits 3 3 3-4 3 3 15-16 f f SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Humanities Social Sciences Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Elective 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. and business and community development.A. human and social services.

Refer to page 23 for details. (Students should consult their Counselor and the Architecture faculty prior to the selection of these courses. Requirements General Education – 30 credits as described on page 50. . (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural and Global Awareness knowledge area.S.Programs of Study 61 Architecture Program A. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.S.brookdalecc. career objectives. The program’s goal is to develop creative and analytical skills in both of these areas. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and *prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Degree This degree program is for students wishing to transfer to Bachelor of Architecture schools at accredited colleges or universities. or individual needs.) It’s recommended that students select 30 General Education credits from among the following: Code ENGL 121 ENGL 122 SPCH 115 ARTH 107 MATH 152 MATH 153 PHYS 111 PHYS 121 PHYS 112 PHYS 122 Course Credits English Composition: 3 The Writing Process English Composition: 3 Writing and Research Public Speaking 3 History of Art: Renaissance 3 Through Contemporary College Algebra and 4 Trigonometry Pre-Calculus Mathematics 4 General Physics I (non-calculus) 4 or General Physics I 4 General Physics II(non-calculus) 4 or General Physics II 4 Social Sciences 3 Social Sciences or Humanitites 3 Career Studies — 38 credits as follows: ARCH 121 People and Their Environment ARCH 131 Introduction to Design I ARCH 132 Introduction to Design II ARCH 151 Architectural Construction I ARCH 152 Architectural Construction II ARCH 245 History of Architecture: Pre-History to Gothic ARCH 246 History of Architecture: Renaissance to Mid-19th Century ARCH 247 History of Architecture: Industrial Revolution to Modernism ARCH 261 Architectural Studio I ARCH 262 Architectural Studio II Suggested Electives (beyond degree requirements): MATH 171 Calculus I MATH 172 Calculus II ARTS 111 Drawing I CADD 211 Intermediate Computer Aided Drafting DIGM 116 Production & Storyboarding Photoshop 3 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 5 5 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Analyze how the history of architecture influences current design f Discuss what non-design factors influence building design f Explain the technical requirements of building and construction f Demonstrate the ability to organize a building program into building space from functional and aesthetic perspectives f Develop three-dimensional utilization abilities through abstract design exercises f Demonstrate architectural presentation techniques in both manual and digital formats 4 4 3 3 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Completion of a five-year curriculum is a requirement for licensing as a professional architect. The program provides the equivalent number and type of courses generally required in the first two years of study within a five-year curriculum. Credits required for degree: 68 Suggested Sequence – Architecture Program A. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.edu *MATH 151 may be required if prerequisites for MATH 152 are not satisfied. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ARCH 121 ARCH 131 ARCH 151 ENGL 121 MATH 152* SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term ARCH 246 ARCH 261 SPCH 115 or Social Sciences Physics Credits 3 5 3 3 4 18 3 5 3 4 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term ARCH 132 ARCH 152 ARCH 245 ENGL 122 MATH 153 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term ARCH 247 ARCH 262 Physics Social Sciences or Humanities (1) ARTH 107 Credits 5 3 3 3 4 18 3 5 4 3 3 18 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. An architectural education embodies the study of both art and engineering disciplines. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution.

See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. Degree Art Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Refer to page 23 for details.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. illustrating. jewelry. art education. Career Studies – 9 credits as follows: Code ARTS 111 ARTS 121 ARTH 106 Course Drawing I 2-D Design History of Art: Ancient through Medieval or History of Art: Renaissance through Contemporary Credits 3 3 3 ARTS 161 Jewelry I ARTS 162 Jewelry II ARTS 213 Figure Drawing ARTS 231 Painting I ARTS 232 Painting II ARTS 233 Acrylic Painting ARTS 235*** Watercolor Elective 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 ARTH 107 3 Note: Both ARTH 106 and ARTH 107 may be required for transfer.brookdalecc. Suggested Sequence – humanities Program A.A. Degree This option prepares the student for transfer to a four-year college or professional art school to major in the visual arts. ceramics design and manufacture. or individual needs. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ARTS 111 ARTS 121 Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (1) ENGL 121 Mathematics (1) Credits 3 3 3-4 3 3-4 15-17 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term ARTH 106 or ARTH 107 or Career Studies ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1) Humanities Social Sciences Credits 3 3 3-4 3 3 15-16 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Humanities Science (with lab) (1) History SPCH 115 3 3 4 3 3 16 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Social Sciences Humanities Cultural & Global Awareness(2) History Electives 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. art therapy. Consult your counselor.A. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. . (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. and commercial art. *Offered spring only ** Offered fall only ***Offered summer only Graduates of this program will be able to: f Explain significant events in the history of art f Discuss the different techniques basic to the processes of artmaking f Develop an aesthetic sense in relation to the arts and culture Career Studies – 3 credits from among the following: (6 credits if ARTH 106 or ARTH 107 are used to fulfill General Education requirements) ARTC 141 ARTC 142 ARTS 112 ARTS 122 ARTS 123* ARTS 151 ARTS 152 ARTS 156** Digital Paint I Digital Paint II Drawing II Color Theory 3-D Design Ceramics I Ceramics II Sculpture I 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Graduates of this option may choose to find art-related work and receive on-the-job training.62 Programs of Study Art Option humanities Program A. career objectives. It provides the core courses necessary for Bachelor’s degree programs in art.

Degree This career option provides students with the skills necessary to take entrylevel positions in the field of audio recording. Hands-on experience with an emphasis on digital technology will prepare students for positions in the audio recording industry. theories. social effects. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date.Programs of Study 63 Audio Production Option Communication Media Program A. and multimedia production. * Offered spring only . career objectives. Program. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term COMM 101 TELV 115 TELV 121 ENGL 121 Humanities SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term COMM 216* RDIO 101 Career Studies Social Sciences Elective (1) Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 3 3 3 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies COMM 102 COMM 115 Communications Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies General Education (1) Elective Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 6 6 4 16 One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Students who wish to continue at the four-year level should consider one of the options of the Humanities A. Students can apply skills learned to music. terminology and aesthetics of communication f Create projects that adhere to a variety of aesthetic principles Career Studies – 12 credits from among the following: CINE 105 Film Appreciation: The Motion 3 Picture as an Art Form COMM 295 Special Project – 1-6 Communication Media COMM 299 Communication Media 1-6 Internship MUSI 101 Fundamentals of Music 3 MUSI 115 Music Appreciation 3 MUSI 123** Music Technology 3 TELV 122 Digital Video Production 3 Electives *Offered spring only ** Offered fall only 7 Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Communication Media Program A.S. Refer to page 23 for details.A.A. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate expertise in field production techniques and editing f Apply and synthesize basic concepts about the history. television. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.S. Degree Audio Production Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. This option is not designed for transfer to a four-year college. or individual needs. Career Studies – 21 credits as follows: Code COMM 101 COMM 102 COMM 115 COMM 216* RDIO 101 TELV 115 TELV 121 Course Communication Communication Media Audio in Media Advanced Digital Audio/ Musical Recording Introduction to Radio TV: Aesthetics and Analysis Television Production Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.A.

4 Suspension and Alignment Automotive Brake Systems 4 Automotive Electricity/ 4 Electronics I Automatic and Manual 4 Transmission Overhaul Engine Performance II 4 Automotive Engines I 4 Automotive Electricity/ 3 Electronics II Automotive Heating and 4 Air Conditioning Automotive Capstone Seminar* 1 OR Automotive Internship 3 with Permission of Department Chair Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.S. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. service manager. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. Refer to page 23 for details. this option is not designed for transfer to a four-year school. Emphasis in class and laboratory is placed on real-world. Degree Automotive Technology Option This program is designed to meet the continual demand for trained automotive technicians. the student is fully qualified to work in an auto service center/dealership as an auto technician. The student participates in hands-on experiences in testing. Upon graduation.S. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Degree Automotive Technology Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.S. and repairing automobiles. Chair 4 3 3 3 2 1 3 16-18 15-16 (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. and service writer.A. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate proficiency in the diagnosis of an automobile malfunction f Demonstrate competency in the repair and service of an automobile f Demonstrate proficiency in the repair of advanced automotive electronic and computer systems f Communicate effectively with members of the automotive team * AUTO 298 to be taken in last semester of program Credits required for degree: 64-66 Suggested Sequence – Automotive Technology Program A.A. and may lead to positions such as service advisor. career objectives. or individual needs.64 Programs of Study Automotive Technology Program A. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. . but many courses may prove to be transferable.A. As an A. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term AUTO 101 AUTO 131 AUTO 141 ENGL 121 Credits 4 4 4 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term AUTO 111 AUTO 123 AUTO 132 Communications General Education (1) Credits 4 4 4 3 3 18 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term AUTO 222 AUTO 226 AUTO 243 Mathematics or Science or Technological/Info Literacy 4 4 4 3-4 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term AUTO 213 AUTO 241 Humanities Social Sciences General Education AUTO 298 OR AUTO 299 with permission of Dept. diagnosing. Career Studies — 44-46 credits as follows: Code AUTO 101 AUTO 111 AUTO 123 AUTO 131 AUTO 132 AUTO 141 AUTO 213 AUTO 222 AUTO 226 AUTO 241 AUTO 243 AUTO 298 AUTO 299 Course Credits Automotive Fundamentals 4 Automotive Drivelines and 4 Transmissions Engine Performance I 4 Automotive Steering. handson experience. degree. parts counter person.

* AUTO 241 to be taken in last semester of program Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate proficiency in the diagnosis of an automobile malfunction f Demonstrate competency in the repair and service of an automobile f Demonstrate proficiency in the repair of advanced automotive electronic and computer systems f Solve automotive engineering problems utilizing mathematical skills Credits required for degree: 63 Suggested Sequence – Automotive Technology Program A.Programs of Study 65 Automotive Technology Program A. Career Studies – 43 credits as follows: Code AUTO 101 AUTO 111 AUTO 123 AUTO 131 AUTO 132 AUTO 141 AUTO 222 AUTO 226 MATH 151 MATH 152 AUTO 241* Course Credits Automotive Fundamentals 4 Automotive Drivelines and 4 Transmissions Engine Performance I 4 Automotive Steering. Degree Automotive Engineering Technician Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. although many courses may prove to be transferable.A. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.S. Degree Automotive Engineering Technician Option The thrust of this option is toward employment in engineering laboratories and service industries. 4 Suspension and Alignment Automotive Brake Systems 4 Automotive Electricity/ 4 Electronics I Engine Performance II 4 Automotive Engines I 4 Intermediate Algebra 4 College Algebra & Trigonometry 4 Automotive Electricity/ Electronics II 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. or individual needs. . degree. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution.A. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. As an A. this option is not designed for transfer into a four-year institution. Job titles include lab technician and automotive engineering assistant. career objectives. This option places greater emphasis on the scientific and mathematical concepts of the automobile design. Refer to page 23 for details.S.A. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term AUTO 101 AUTO 131 AUTO 141 ENGL 121 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term AUTO 222 AUTO 226 MATH 152 PHYS 111 Credits 4 4 4 3 15 4 4 4 4 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term AUTO 111 AUTO 123 AUTO 132 MATH 151 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term AUTO 241 PHYS 112 Humanities or Social Science Communications General Education (1) Credits 4 4 4 4 16 3 4 3 3 3 16 (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50.S.

A. Suspension. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term AUTO 106 AUTO 111 AUTO 141 Math or Science or Technological/Info Literacy SUMMER AUTO 299 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term AUTO 222 AUTO 226 AUTO 299 General Education Social Sciences (1) Credits 4 4 4 3-4 15-16 3 4 4 3 3 3 17 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term AUTO 123 AUTO 135 AUTO 299 General Education (1) ENGL 121 Credits 4 4 3 3 3 17 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term AUTO 213 AUTO 241 AUTO 299 Communications Humanities 4 3 3 3 3 16 One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Career Studies – 47 credits as follows: Code AUTO 106/GM AUTO 111/GM AUTO 123/GM AUTO 135/GM AUTO 141/GM AUTO 213/GM AUTO 222/GM AUTO 226/GM AUTO 241/GM AUTO 299/GM Course Credits Basic Automotive Systems/ 4 Air Conditioning Automotive Drivelines 4 and Transmissions Engine Performance I 4 Steering. and then work in a GM dealership for the remaining portion of the semester.A. The twoyear program will require the student to attend classes at Brookdale for a portion of each semester. . The GM-ASEP program is certified by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). please contact the Automotive Technology Department. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate proficiency in the diagnosis of a General Motors automobile malfunction f Demonstrate competency in the repair and service of the General Motors product f Communicate effectively with customers and members of the automotive team f Demonstrate professional accountability Credits required for degree: 67 Suggested Sequence – Automotive Technology Program A. 4 Alignment and Brakes Automotive Electricity/ 4 Electronics I Automatic and Manual 4 Transmission Overhaul Engine Performance II 4 Automotive Engines I 4 Automotive Electricity/ 3 Electronics II Dealership Internship 12 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Degree General Motors Automotive Service Educational Program The GM-ASEP is a special program developed by Brookdale’s Automotive Department in conjunction with General Motors Corporation to upgrade the competency and professional level of the incoming dealership technician. For further information. ASEP Coordinator. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Refer to page 23 for details. This is a rigorous training program which requires certain testing and prerequisites prior to acceptance. or individual needs.66 Programs of Study Automotive Technology Program A. Requirements General Education– 20 credits as described on page 50. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution.S. career objectives.S. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Degree General Motors Automotive Service Educational Program The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.

Automotive Brakes.S. Persons completing these are awarded Certificates of Achievement in the particular area of study. is a two-year automotive technology program that has been developed by Brookdale.A. SUMMER AUTO 299 (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. Suspension and Alignment Automotive Brake Systems Automotive Electricity/ Electronics I Automatic and Manual Transmission Overhaul Engine Performance II Automotive Electricity/ Electronics II Automotive Engines I Automotive Heating and Air Conditioning Dealership Internship Credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 6 Automotive Academic Credit Certificates of Achievement These short training programs are designed to train students in a particular area of automotive specialization. T-TEN.) Degree in Automotive Technology.Programs of Study 67 Automotive Technology Program A. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term AUTO 101 AUTO 131 AUTO 132 ENGL 121 Credits 4 4 4 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term AUTO 111 AUTO 141 Communications Social Sciences Humanities Credits 4 4 3 3 3 17 3 4 4 4 3-4 15-16 3 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term AUTO 222 AUTO 226 AUTO 241 General Education(1) 4 4 3 4-5 15-16 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate proficiency in the diagnosis of an automobile malfunction f Demonstrate competency in the repair and service of the Toyota/Lexus product f Communicate effectively with customers and members of the automotive team f Demonstrate professional accountability SUMMER AUTO 299 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term AUTO 123 AUTO 213 AUTO 243 Math or Science or Technological/Info Literacy Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.. the student will receive an Associate in Applied Science (A.A. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. For further information. Upon successful completion of the program. Refer to page 23 for details. Suspension and Alignment Specialist Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement Requirements Career Studies — 16 credits as follows: Code Course Credits AUTO 101 Automotive Fundamentals 4 AUTO 131 Automotive Steering. Degree Toyota Technical Educational Network (T-TEN) The Toyota Technical Educational Network.S.A.S. The program is a two-year program with part of the training taking place at Brookdale and at a sponsoring Toyota dealership. in conjunction with Toyota Motor Sales. Suspension and Alignment 4 AUTO 132 Automotive Brake Systems 4 AUTO 295 Special Project – Automotive Technology 4 Credits required for degree: 69 Suggested Sequence – Automotive Technology Program A. . The Toyota T-TEN program is certified by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). Steering. Degree Toyota Technical Education Network (T-TEN) The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Career Studies — 49 credits as follows: Code AUTO 101 AUTO 111 AUTO 123 AUTO 131 AUTO 132 AUTO 141 AUTO 213 AUTO 222 AUTO 241 AUTO 226 AUTO 243 AUTO 299 Course Automotive Fundamentals Automotive Drivelines and Transmissions Engine Performance I Automotive Steering. to upgrade the competency and professional level of the incoming dealership technician. contact the Automotive Technology Department or the T-TEN coordinator. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Credits earned may later be applied toward the Automotive degree program. or individual needs. career objectives. Inc.

Career Studies — 19 credits as follows: Code Course Credits AUTO 213 Automatic and Manual Transmission Overhaul 4 AUTO 226 Automotive Engines I 4 AUTO 241 Automotive Electricity/ 3 Electronics II AUTO 243 Automotive Heating and 4 Air Conditioning AUTO 295 Special Project – 4 Automotive Technology and Standards Automotive Transmission Systems Specialist Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement Requirements Career Studies — 20 credits as follows: Code Course Credits AUTO 101 Automotive Fundamentals 4 AUTO 111 Automotive Drivelines and 4 Transmissions AUTO 141 Automotive Electricity/ 4 Electronics I AUTO 213 Automatic and Manual 4 Transmission Overhaul AUTO 295 Special Project–Automotive 4 Technology Automotive Engine Performance Specialist Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement Requirements Career Studies — 24 credits as follows: Code Course Credits AUTO 101 Automotive Fundamentals 4 AUTO 123 Engine Performance I 4 AUTO 141 Automotive Electricity/ 4 Electronics I AUTO 222 Engine Performance II 4 AUTO 226 Automotive Engines I 4 AUTO 295 Special Project – 4 Automotive Technology . Advanced Automotive Technician Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement Requirements Successful completion of basic automotive technician certificate plus courses listed below.68 Programs of Study Automotive Electrical/ Power Systems Specialist Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement Requirements Career Studies — 23 credits as follows: Code Course Credits AUTO 101 Automotive Fundamentals 4 AUTO 123 Engine Performance I 4 AUTO 141 Automotive Electricity/ 4 Electronics I AUTO 241 Automotive Electricity/ 3 Electronics II AUTO 243 Automatic Heating and 4 Air Conditioning AUTO 295 Special Project – 4 Automotive Technology Automotive Engine Remanufacturing Specialist Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement Requirements Career Studies — 20 credits as follows: Code Course Credits AUTO 101 Automotive Fundamentals 4 AUTO 123 Engine Performance I 4 AUTO 226 Automotive Engines I 4 AUTO 227 Automotive Engines II 4 AUTO 295 Special Project – 4 Automotive Technology Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Refer to page 23 for details.

BIOL 207. offered in Fall semester only. information analysis.brookdalecc.Programs of Study 69 Biology Option Mathematics/ Science Program A. Requirements General Education – 30 credits as described on page 50. offered in Summer only. veterinary.S. dental or graduate schools or take positions as biologists.S. and problem solving f Interpret basic biological concepts f Use appropriate technology Career Studies – 8 credits from among the following: BIOL 205* Invertebrate Zoology 4 (Fall Term only) BIOL 206** Vertebrate Zoology 4 (Spring Term only) BIOL 207*** Marine Biology 4 (Summer Term only) BIOL 213 Microbiology 4 BIOL 215 Cell and Molecular Biology 4 Electives † All career studies courses must be passed with a grade of “C” or higher.edu One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. A minimum of 9 credits are required from the Mathematics. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term BIOL 101 CHEM 101 ENGL 121 Social Sciences SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term *Career Studies CHEM 203 Humanities or Social Sciences Mathematics/Science/(2) Technological or Information Literacy Credits 4 5 3 3 15 4 5 3 3-4 15-16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term BIOL 102 CHEM 102 ENGL 122 Humanities SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term *Career Studies CHEM 204 General Education (1) Elective Credits 4 5 3 3 15 4 5 3 4 16 *Take one of the following Career Studies courses: BIOL 205. † Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. laboratory technicians and researchers. *Offered Fall term only ** Offered Spring term only ***Offered Summer term only 4 Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Mathematics/Science Program A. Degree Biology Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Science or Technological or Information Literacy knowledge areas. offered in Spring semester only. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. BIOL 213 BIOL 215 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. BIOL 206. Degree Students wishing to transfer to biology or pre-medical studies should choose this option which combines biology and related scientific studies with liberal arts requirements. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. career objectives. Bachelor’s degree graduates enter medical. Career Studies – 18 credits as follows: Course General Biology I General Biology II Organic Chemistry I Organic Chemistry II Credits 4 4 5 5 Code BIOL 101 BIOL 102 CHEM 203 CHEM 204 † Graduates of this program will be able to: f Employ the scientific method of inquiry to gather and use information for the express purposes of critical thinking. (2) (1) . Refer to page 23 for details. or individual needs.

operations management. It contains a broad range of business-related courses plus the general education studies required for transfer to most four-year schools. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. Refer to page 23 for details. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. transfer information. For more information call 732-224-2089.A. analyze and present business situations f Demonstrate common computer/ technology skills to process and present information f Demonstrate a proficiency in basic algebra and quantitative reasoning BAChELOR’S ThROUGh BROOkDALE This is a preferred Associate degree for students planning to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Finance. and subsequent completion of a fouryear degree. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. marketing. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term BUSI 105 ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (2) History SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies SPCH 115 Humanities History ECON 105 or Social Science Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 3 3 3 3 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies Mathematics or Science (2) ENGL 122 Humanities ECON 105 or Social Science SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Cultural & Global Awareness (1) Science (with lab) (2) Mathematics/Science/ (2) Technological or Info Literacy Elective Credits 3 3-4 3 3 3 15-16 3 3 4 3-4 3 17 (1) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.brookdalecc. but not both Career Studies — 9 credits from among the following: ACCT 101 Principles of Accounting I 3 ACCT 102 Principles of Accounting II 3 OR ACCT 112 Managerial Accounting 3 BUSI 165 Computer Applications 3 in Business BUSI 205 Principles of Management 3 BUSI 221 Business Law I 3 ECON 106 Microeconomics 3 ECON 225 Business Statistics 3 MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing 3 Elective 3 This degree program may also be completed online.Student could complete either BUSI 165 or COMP 129. (2) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. Management. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution.A. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Apply business facts. sales. Degree This program is for students wishing to transfer to four-year colleges which offer Bachelor’s degrees in business or business education. Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. and preferred career studies courses. . students should talk to their Student Development Specialist or call the Communiversity at 732-280-2090. or individual needs.ECON 106 may be used for either general education social science credits or for career studies. Marketing or Labor Studies at Brookdale’s New Jersey Coastal Communiversity.Some career courses may not automatically transfer to a four-year college . and other business-related activities with opportunities for promotion to management positions. career objectives. personnel management. terminology and concepts f Research.70 Programs of Study Business Administration Program A. Upon graduation from this program. Students may choose to take some or all of their courses online. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. students will be prepared to begin careers in financial management. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. NOTE: Four-year colleges accredited by the American Collegiate Schools of Business may require demonstration of proficiency for selected 200-level courses. Students who wish to become business education teachers upon completion of a four-year degree should also begin in this program.edu Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Business Administration Program A. For program details. but should not complete both . government. For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. The following general education course is recommended for students choosing this program: Code ECON 105 Course Macro Economics Credits 3 Career Studies – 3 credits as follows: Code BUSI 105 Course Introduction to Business Credits 3 Notes: Students should check with their counselor on the following: .

The following general education courses are recommended for students choosing this program. technological. In addition.Programs of Study 71 Business Management Option Business Program A.A. program. career objectives.S. Code ECON 105 ECON 106 ENGL 121 SPCH 115 Course Macro Economics Micro Economics English Composition: Writing Process Public Speaking Credits 3 3 3 3 Career Studies — 6 credits from among the following: BUSI 221 BUSI 295 BUSI 299 MRKT 101 MRKT 105 Electives (1) Business Law I Special Project–Management Business Internship Introduction to Marketing Advertising 3 3 3 3 3 4 Recommended as first BUSI course Career Studies — 30 credits as follows: BUSI 105(1) Introduction to Business 3 3 BUSI 116** Money Management and Personal Finance (Offered Spring term in odd years) BUSI 165 Computer Applications in Business BUSI 205 BUSI 231* Principles of Management Human Resource Management BUSI 206** Supervisory Management BUSI 241** Small Business Management BUSI 251* Global Business BUSI 298** Management Analysis-Capstone Course ACCT 101 Principles of Accounting I *Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Apply business terminology and concepts f Analyze business situations and develop effective plans for achievement of goals f Utilize appropriate technology to solve business-related problems f Make decisions that reflect an understanding of how political-legal. competitive. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Business Program A. . may enhance promotion opportunities in any phase of business or government employment. The option is not designed for transfer to a four-year college. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Persons wishing to transfer should select the Business Administration A.A. Refer to page 23 for details. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term BUSI 105 BUSI 165 ENGL 121 General Education (1) Career Studies Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term ACCT 101 BUSI 205 Career Studies Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy BUSI 116** SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term BUSI 206** BUSI 298** ECON 106 General Education BUSI 241** Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 3 3 3 3 3 15-16 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term BUSI 231* BUSI 251* SPCH 115 ECON 105 Elective 3 3 3 3 3-4 15 *Offered Fall Term only **Offered Spring Term only (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date.A. although many courses will transfer. or individual needs.S. Degree This career program is designed for students who desire entry-level employment in business and government careers. this degree. Degree Business Management Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. economic and social issues influence business f Communicate an understanding of business principles in written and oral form f Demonstrate effective team/interpersonal skills Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. combined with work experience.

Requirements General Education – 30 credits as described on page 50 including the following: Code Course Credits MATH 171 Calculus I 4 PHYS 121 General Physics I 4 Since these courses are prerequisites for the Career Studies courses MATH 172 and PHYS 122. they are recommended as the MATH and SCIENCE general education courses. *Career Studies – 28 credits as follows: CHEM 101 General Chemistry I CHEM 102 General Chemistry II CHEM 203 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 204 Organic Chemistry II MATH 172 Calculus II PHYS 122 General Physics II *All career studies courses must be passed with a grade of “C” or higher. chemical engineers. Electives 4 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.S.72 Programs of Study Chemistry Option Mathematics/ Science Program A.edu One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Degree Chemistry Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Bachelor’s degree graduates may become chemists. (2) (1) . career objectives. Science or Technological or Information Literacy knowledge areas. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term CHEM 101 MATH 171* ENGL 121 Humanities SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term CHEM 203 PHYS 121 Humanities or Social Sciences Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy (2) Credits 5 4 3 3 15 5 4 3 4 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term CHEM 102 MATH 172 ENGL 122 Social Sciences SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term CHEM 204 PHYS 122 General Education (1) Electives Credits 5 4 3 3 15 5 4 3 4 16 *MATH 151. mathematical techniques and critical thinking skills to solve chemical problems f Utilize instruments/computers to gather and analyze data and present findings Credits required for degree: 62 Suggested Sequence – Mathematics/Science Program A. MATH 152 and/or MATH 153 may be required if prerequisites for MATH 171 are not satisfied. For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. laboratory technicians and pharmacists. 5 5 5 5 4 4 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Explain basic chemical concepts and theories f Apply chemical concepts. or individual needs.S Degree Students who wish to pursue four-year degrees in chemistry or medicine or to enter pharmacy degree programs should choose this option which combines chemistry and related science courses with liberal arts requirements. A minimum of 9 credits are required from the Mathematics. Refer to page 23 for details. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution.brookdalecc. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and *prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date.

drawing aids. It is tailored to met entry-level requirements in the Computer-Aided Drafting and Design field. Requirements Career Studies – 25 credits as follows: Code Course Credits DRFT 106 Fundamentals of Basic Drafting 3 CADD 121 Engineering Graphics with CADD 4 CADD 211 Intermediate Computer-Aided Drafting 3 CADD 212 Computer-Aided Architectural Drafting and Design 4 CADD 214 3-D Modeling 4 CADD 220 CAD for Rendering & Animation 4 Approved Technical electives 3 . Degree In this technological society.S.A. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term CADD 121 DRFT 106 ELEC 103 ENGL 121 MATH 151 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term ARCH 151 CADD 212 HIST 105 PHYS 111 Credits 4 3 4 3 4 18 3 4 3 4 14 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term CADD 211 COMP 129 Technical Elective ENGL 122 MATH 152 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term CADD 214 Technical Elective Technical Elective ECON 107 Credits 3 3 3-4 3 4 16-17 4 3-4 3-4 3 13-15 Computer-Aided Drafting and Design Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement This short program is designed to train the students in the area of Computer-Aided Drafting and Design. The graduates will be fully prepared to take positions as CADD operators. Refer to page 23 for details. if auxiliary or section views are needed. Code ECON 107 ENGL 121 ENGL 122 HIST 105 MATH 151 PHYS 111 Course Credits Economics 3 English Composition: 3 The Writing Process English Composition: 3 Writing and Research World Civilization I 3 Intermediate Algebra 4 General Physics I (non-calculus) 4 Technical Electives – 9-12 credits from any of following: Architectural ARCH 152 Architectural Construction II 3 CADD 220 CAD for Rendering and 4 Animation CADD 225 3D Architectural CAD 4 Computer Art CADD 220 CAD for Rendering and Animation ARTC 141 Digital Paint I ARTC 142 Digital Paint II Computer Repair/Networking COMP 145 Introduction to UNIX ELEC 243 Mini/Microcomputer Interfacing ELEC 244 Computer Peripherals. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Data Communications and Networking Electronic ELEC 111 ELEC 112* PHYS 112 4 3 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Utilize AutoCAD’s mode settings. and how to dimension and plot each drawing f Produce professional quality twodimensional and three-dimensional drawings using the AutoCAD software Career Studies — 32 credits as follows: ARCH 151 Architectural Construction I CADD 121 Engineering Graphics with CADD CADD 211 Intermediate ComputerAided Drafting CADD 212 Computer-Aided Architectural Drafting and Design CADD 214 3-D Modeling with CAD COMP 129 Information Technology DRFT 106 Fundamentals of Basic Drafting ELEC 103 Electrical Skills and Techniques MATH 152 College Algebra & Trigonometry 3 4 3 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 4 4 Electrical Circuits I Electrical Circuits II General Physics I (non-calculus) 4 4 4 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Students have the opportunity to prepare themselves in either basic or specialized ComputerAided Drafting and Design areas. career objectives. input (pointing) device and output (hardcopy) devices (plotter & printer) f Prepare and plot a complete set of working drawings. the demand for trained CADD (ComputerAided Drafting and Design) personnel continues to grow.Programs of Study 73 ComputerAided Drafting and Design Technology Program A. drafters and design technicians. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. degree program. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. prototype drawings and shortcuts f Operate the CAD work-station components including the microcomputer. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50.A. STUDENTS WHO HAVE NO PREVIOUS DRAFTING EXPERIENCE MUST TAKE DRFT 106 UPON ENTRY INTO THE PROGRAM. The following courses are recommended for students choosing this program. The credits earned may later be applied toward an A.S. deciding which views to include.A. or individual needs. Website Design COMP 140 Designing/Developing Websites COMP 166 Web Design Using HTML Approved Technical Elective *Offered Fall term only 3 3 3-4 Credits required for degree: 61-64 Suggested Sequence – Computer-Aided Drafting and Design Technology Program A.S. toolbars.

NET COMP 225 Operating Systems Technology COMP 226 Systems Analysis and Design COMP 228 Data Structures COMP 269 Database Concepts COMP 271 Programming II COMP 296 Advanced Software Project Technical Electives – 9 credits from among the following: COMP 140 Designing/Developing Web Sites COMP 145 Introduction to UNIX COMP 166 Web Design Using HTML COMP 299 Computer Science Internship Elective Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Career Studies – 30 credits as follows: COMP 126 Computer Logic and Design COMP 135 Computer Architect – Assembly Language COMP 171 Programming I COMP 185 Programming in Visual Basic. career objectives. although the student will find that many of the courses which provide a foundation in computer science may transfer. SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term COMP 185 COMP 225 COMP 226 COMP 269 Humanities (1) 3 3 3 3 3 15 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term COMP 228 COMP 296 General Education(1) Technical Electives 3 3 6 3 15 One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. .S.S. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. or individual needs. design. Refer to page 23 for details.A. test.A. testing and debugging. coding. Courses are designed to offer hands-on experience to prepare the student for an entry level computer programming position. This degree is not designed to transfer. 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Computer Science Program A. Degree Programming Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. and stacks Design and use classes and objects Create programs which use Graphical User Interfaces Explain functions of operating systems and computer architecture Understand how to store and access data using a database Plan and design a computer information system Requirements General Education – 20 credits of general education as described on page 50.S.74 Programs of Study Computer Science Program A. lists.A. Graduates of this program will be able to: f f f f f f f f f Analyze problems Create effective algorithms Code. and document programs using basic control structures Create programs using data structures such as arrays. Degree Programming Option Students wishing to gain knowledge of computer programming and design should choose this program. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Focus is on problem analysis. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term COMP 126 COMP 171 ENGL 121 Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy Technical Electives Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term COMP 135 COMP 271 Communications Social Sciences Technical Electives Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 See page 142 for the Web Site Development Option – Computer Science A. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. debug.

debug. lists. test and document programs using basic control structures Create programs using data structures such as arrays.edu *MATH 152 and/or MATH 153 may be required if prerequisites for MATH 171 are not satisfied. and stacks Design and use classes and objects Explain functions of operating systems and computer architecture Understand how to store and access data using a database Plan and design a computer information system Career Studies – 35 credits as follows: COMP 126 COMP 135 COMP 171 COMP 225 COMP 226 COMP 228 COMP 269 COMP 271 COMP 296 MATH 172 MATH 273 Computer Logic and Design Computer Architect – Assembly Language Programming I Operating Systems Technology Systems Analysis and Design Data Structures Database Concepts Programming II Advanced Software Project Calculus II Calculus III 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Requirements General Education – 30 credits of general education as described on page 50. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Handson computer courses are combined with general and mathematics courses to provide the student with the essential coursework needed to succeed beyond the Associate degree.S. students should talk to their Student Development Specialist or call the Communiversity at 732-280-2090. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Students who need to satisfy basic math requirements or who are counseled to take courses prior to Calculus will need to take additional credits. Code ENGL 121 ENGL 122 MATH 171 PHYS 121 PHYS 122 Course English Composition The Writing Process English Composition Writing and Research Calculus I General Physics I General Physics II Credits 3 3 4 4 4 NOTE: This program assumes that the student is prepared to take Calculus I as a first semester college level math course. For program details and transfer information. Refer to page 23 for details. Also note that Calculus I is a prerequisite for Calculus II.Programs of Study 75 Computer Science Program A. Degree This program is designed for students who would like to transfer to a four-year program in Computer Science or related areas. or individual needs.brookdalecc. such as Management Information Systems or Software Engineering. (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.S. career objectives. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term COMP 126 COMP 171 MATH 171* ENGL 121 Social Sciences SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term COMP 225 COMP 226 COMP 269 MATH 273 PHYS 121 Credits 3 3 4 3 3 16 3 3 3 4 4 17 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term COMP 135 COMP 271 MATH 172 ENGL 122 Social Sciences or Humanities SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term COMP 228 COMP 296 PHYS 122 General Education(1) Humanities Credits 3 3 4 3 3 16 3 3 4 3 3 16 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. The following general education courses are recommended for students choosing this program. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Credits required for degree: 65 BAChELOR’S ThROUGh BROOkDALE This is a preferred Associate degree for students planning to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Information Technology or Information Systems at Brookdale’s New Jersey Coastal Communiversity. Suggested Sequence – Computer Science Program A. . This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and *prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Graduates of this program will be able to: f f f f f f f f Analyze problems Create effective algorithms Code.

Degree Creative Writing Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. . Refer to page 23 for details.12 credits as follows: Career Studies – 6-9 credits from the following: Code ENGL 221 ENGL 223 ENGL 224 ENGL 227 Course Creative Writing Poetry Writing Workshop Fiction Writing Workshop Creative Non-Fiction Workshop Credits 3 3 3 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. It will also prepare students for positions in writing and publishing such as writer. proofreader. and public relations as well as a creativity worker such as author. f Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – humanities Program A. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term Career Studies Mathematics / Science / Technological Competency or Information Literacy (1) ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (1) Credits 3 3-4 3 3 3-4 15-17 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies SPCH 115 Humanities Science (with lab) (1) History 3 3 3 4 3 16 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Humanities Social Sciences Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Electives 3 3 3 3 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1 ) History Social Sciences Credits 3 3 3-4 3 3 15-16 f f For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. career objectives. but general English majors may be interested as well. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics.brookdalecc. editor. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. MFA or PhD in Creative Writing will benefit the most from this Option. Degree This option provides the writing skills and general studies to establish a foundation in creative writing across genres with some depth in specific genres and will prepare students for transfer to writing programs at the four year college level for further study.A. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. editorial staff positions in creative fields such as publishing. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. Career Studies – 3-6 credits from the following: ENGL 128* ENGL 155 ENGL 156 ENGL 158 ENGL 168 ENGL 228** ENGL 265* Elective **Offered Spring term only *Offered Fall term only Writing from the Female Experience The Short Story Introduction to Poetry Introduction to Literature Contemporary Plays Screenwriting Basics Workshop Children’s Literature 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Explicate a literary text and deconstruct the use of craft elements specific to certain genres of writing Develop and show a portfolio of original creative work as well as scholarship on contemporary literature Exhibit basic facility in at least two genres of creative writing Demonstrate familiarity with the protocals of publication both print and online. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50.76 Programs of Study Creative Writing Option humanities Program A.A. Students interested in pursuing a BFA. advertising. Career Studies . or individual needs.

See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Students can go on to earn a B. County and Local Government Principles of Sociology Public Speaking Credits 3 3 3 3 CRJU 295 CRJU 299 ENVR 126 Special Project–Criminal Justice Criminal Justice Internship Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 1-3 3 3 Electives *Offered Fall term only *Offered Spring term only 9 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Identify occupational opportunities in the three sub-systems of the criminal justice system f Analyze the constitutional rights and court decisions most important to the criminal justice system f Analyze the structure of the New Jersey and the United States court systems f Critique the important decision points in the criminal justice process f Construct their own personal views on controversial issues raised about the American justice system f Examine the issues of professional responsibility and ethical standards in the criminal justice system Career Studies – 21 credits from among the following: CRJU 101 Introduction to the Criminal 3 Justice System CRJU 125 Police Role in the Community 3 CRJU 126 Introduction to Public 3 Administration CRJU 127 Introduction to Corrections 3 CRJU 131* Introduction to Private Security 3 CRJU 151 Introduction to Criminology 3 CRJU 202 Criminal Investigation 3 CRJU 204 Forensic Investigation 3 CRJU 205 Community Corrections 3 CRJU 225 Police Organization and 3 Administration CRJU 226 Criminal Law 3 CRJU 229 Criminal Due Process 3 CRJU 235** Loss Prevention 3 CRJU 236 Counter Terrorism 3 CRJU 245 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.S.S. For program details and transfer information. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term CRJU 101 Career Studies ENGL 121 Social Sciences* Mathematics (2) Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy (2) General Education (1) Credits 6 3 3-4 3 15-16 BAChELOR’S ThROUGh BROOkDALE This is a preferred Associate degree for students planning to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice. Requirements General Education – 30 credits as described on page 50. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. corrections and security.edu SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Humanities Science (with Lab) (2) Elective 6 3 4 3 16 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Humanities or Social Sciences* General Education Elective 3 3 3 6 15 *POLI 105 or POLI 115 strongly recommended. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Refer to page 23 for details.brookdalecc. students should talk to their Student Development Specialist or call the Communiversity at 732-280-2090. or individual needs. The Writing Process State. Degree or take courses in an effort to find employment. National Security Studies or Fire Science at Brookdale’s New Jersey Coastal Communiversity. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Career opportunities exist in law enforcement. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Criminal Justice Program A. Coursework also seeks to provide particular career-oriented skills. Degree The Criminal Justice program is both a transfer and a career program.A. For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. court administration. The study of criminal justice provides an opportunity to learn about issues and problems in society’s response to crime. The following courses are recommended for students in this program. career objectives. Sciences or Technological or Information Literacy categories.Programs of Study 77 Criminal Justice Program A. Code ENGL 121 POLI 115 SOCI 101 SPCH 115 Course English Composition. (2) A minimum of 9 credits are required from the Mathematics. .

trends and dilemmas confronting Community Corrections Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Criminal Justice Program A.S. The Corrections Option is designed to provide alternative curricula for students who are interested in a career in law enforcement. career objectives. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term CRJU 101 CRJU 127 ENGL 121 Social Sciences Mathematics (2) Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies CRJU 245 Science (with lab) (2) Humanities (1) (2) Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies CRJU 205 ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy(2) General Education(1) SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Humanities or Social Sciences General Education Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 9 3 3 15 6 3 4 3 16 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. Because transfer requirements vary.78 Programs of Study Criminal Justice Program A. Degree Corrections Option The Corrections Option is aimed at providing students with the skills and knowledge to enter a career in institutional or community-based corrections. . Sciences or Technological or Information Literacy categories. or individual needs. The tremendous growth of prisons and the prison population has resulted in career opportunities in corrections for criminal justice majors.S. Career Studies — 18 credits. Refer to page 23 for details. Career opportunities in community-based corrections provide an opportunity to incorporate psychological and sociological course work in the criminal justice program. Degree Corrections Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.edu One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Requirements General Education – 30 credits as described on page 50.Based Programs f Analyze the various intermediate sanctions as sentencing options between Probation and Incarceration f Critique the mission of Community Corrections and its purpose as a vital diversion to the American Criminal Justice and Corrections System f Construct solutions and/or make predictions involving the major issues. A minimum of 9 credits are required from the Mathematics. 3 3 3 3 Career Studies — Social Science — Select 12 credits from the following list of courses: PSYC 111 Introduction to Human Services 3 PSYC 215 Counseling Techniques 3 PSYC 216 Abnormal Psychology 3 PSYC 235 Group Dynamics 3 SOCI 105 Intercultural Communications 3 SOCI 202 Analysis of Social Problems 3 SOCI 216* Sociology in Minorities 3 *Offered Fall term only Graduates of this program will be able to: f Distinguish between occupational opportunities in Community-Based Correctional Programs f Compare and contrast the differences between Probation and Parole f Demonstrate a strong knowledge base and practical experience in delivery of services to clients in Community. students should identify transfer schools as early as possible and work closely with counselors to insure selecting appropriate courses for smooth transfer. A similar expansion of communitybased corrections has occurred to stem the prison building boom and reduce the cost of institutional corrections.brookdalecc. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. It is strongly recommended that students select two of the following three courses to satisfy the Social Sciences requirement of general education. Code PSYC 105 PSYC 106 SOCI 101 Course Credits Introduction to Psychology I 3 Introduction to Psychology II 3 Principles of Sociology 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. 12 credits as follows: CRJU 101 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System CRJU 127 Introduction to Corrections CRJU 205 Community Corrections CRJU 245 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice Select another 6 credits from the remaining Criminal Justice curricula.

Refer to page 23 for details. allowing the student the weekend to pursue job opportunities in the field. Students must successfully pass the SERV-SAFE sanitation examination to receive the degree.5 CULA 107 Culinary Math 1. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term CULA 271 CULA 272 CULA 275 Humanities General Education 3 3 3 3 5 17 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term CULA 126 CULA 127 CULA 131 CULA 141 CULA 151 Communications Credits 3 3 3 2 3 3 17 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate a working knowledge of the science of food and of the history of the culinary profession f Apply computation skills pertinent to the culinary industry f Demonstrate advanced cooking and baking techniques f Demonstrate both customer service and management techniques f Apply the standards of sanitation and safety that have been attained upon successful completion of the National Restaurant Association’s Serv-Safe Certification . This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Culinary Courses will run in threeweek blocks each semester. career courses and hands-on professional food preparation. or individual needs. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. hospitals. food catering services.A. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. Degree This program is for the highly motivated career-oriented person who desires to work in a restaurant or other food service establishment as a professional chef.A. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term CULA 105 CULA 107 CULA 111 CULA 112 CULA 115 CULA 133 ENGL 121 Summer Semester CULA 299 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term CULA 241 CULA 251 CULA 266 CULA 267 COMP 129 Social Sciences Credits 1.S. Code COMP 129 ENGL 121 Course Information Technology English Composition: The Writing Process Credits 3 3 CULA 266 CULA 267 CULA 271 CULA 272 CULA 275 CULA 299 Meat and Seafood Science American Regional Cuisine Advanced Classical Cuisine Advanced Dining Room III/ Spirits International Regional Cuisine Culinary Arts Externship 3 3 3 3 3 3 The following general education courses are recommended: SOCI 105 Intercultural Communication 3 SPCH 115 Public Speaking 3 Career Studies — 50.5 3 3 1. Classes are conducted Monday through Thursday.5 credits as follows: CULA 105 Introduction to Culinary Arts 1. Credits required for degree: 70.5 CULA 126 Brunch/Buffet Production 3 CULA 127 Ala Carte Lunch 3 CULA 131 Nutrition in the Culinary Arts 3 CULA 133 Storeroom and Purchasing 2 Operations CULA 141 Dining Room I 2 CULA 151 Baking Skills I 3 CULA 241 Dining Room II/Wines 3 CULA 251 Patisserie 3 A grade of “C” or better in all career courses is required to graduate with a A. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. in Culinary Arts. Students have been successfully placed in local restaurants and hotels as well as in Atlantic City and in exciting externships at Disney World and other locations internationally.A. Prospective students must take the College Placement Test prior to entering the program.5 1.Programs of Study 79 Culinary Arts Program A. colleges. and business establishment facilities. quality training program combines general education studies.5 CULA 111 Basic Food Skills I 3 CULA 112 Basic Food Skills II 3 CULA 115 Sanitation and Safety 1. Potential employment opportunities exist in food preparation and supervisory positions in restaurants. and institutional food services in schools.S. A-mid program assessment will be administered at the end of the students’ first year preceding CULA 299. Challenging externship experiences will be custom-matched to the student’s individual career goals. nursing homes.5 Suggested Sequence – Culinary Arts Program A.S. career objectives. This fast-track.5 2 3 15. The following general education courses are required for students choosing this program. Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.

5 credits as follows: Code CULA 105 CULA 107 CULA 111 CULA 112 CULA 115 CULA 126 CULA 127 CULA 131 CULA 133 CULA 151 CULA 266 Course Introduction to Culinary Arts Culinary Math Basic Food Skills I Basic Food Skills II Sanitation and Safety Brunch/Buffet Production Ala Carte Lunch Nutrition in the Culinary Arts Storeroom and Purchasing Operations Baking Skills I Meat and Seafood Science Credits 1. The student must successfully pass the SERV-SAFE sanitation examination to receive this letter.A.5 credits as follows: Code CULA 115 Course Sanitation and Safety Credits 1.S.5 Pastry Arts Academic Credit Certificate This option is designed for the culinary student who wants to pursue a career in pastry arts.S. Students must take 23 career credits as follows and six general education credits.5 3 3 3 2 3 3 33. plus 1 elective credit. Most credits earned may be applied to the A. cakes. A grade of “C” or better in all career courses is required to receive the Pastry Arts Academic Credit Certificate.5 CULA 151 Baking Skills I 3 CULA 251 Patisserie 3 CULA 252 Advanced Baking 3 CULA 253 Advanced Patisserie 3 CULA 255 Advanced Pastry Arts 3 CULA 256 Confectionery and Showpieces 3 Electives Total Credits 2 30. confections. A grade of “C” or better in all career courses is required to receive the Culinary Arts Academic Credit Certificate. This program consists of a select 23 credits that would benefit the individual who wants to develop their pastry skills into more advanced and elaborate patisserie.5 credits selected from the Culinary Arts A.S. Upon completion. Requirements Career Studies – 1. degree to meet specific individual requirements. The student must meet with the Culinary Arts director for approval of course selections. The student must pass the SERV-SAFE sanitation examination to receive the certificate. and decorating. Refer to page 23 for details.5 3 3 Career Studies — 10. Total Credits 12 Graduates of this certificate program will be able to: f Demonstrate a working knowledge of the history of the culinary profession f Apply computation skills pertinent to the culinary industry f Demonstrate advanced baking techniques f Apply the standards of sanitation and safety that have been attained upon successful completion of the National Restaurant Association’s Serv-Safe Certification Requirements General Education – 6 credits ENGL 121 English Composition: The Writing Process Any other General Education course 3 3 Career Studies – 22. Most credits are transferable to the A.A. Graduates of this certificate program will be able to: f Demonstrate a working knowledge of the science of food and of the history of the culinary profession f Apply computation skills pertinent to the culinary industry f Demonstrate basic cooking and baking techniques f Apply the standards of sanitation and safety that have been attained upon successful completion of the National Restaurant Association’s Serv-Safe Certification Requirements General Education – 6 credits ENGL 121 English Composition The Writing Process Any other General Education course Career Studies — 27.5 1. The student must successfully pass the SERV-SAFE sanitation examination to receive the certificate. degree in Culinary Arts.80 Programs of Study Culinary Arts Academic Credit Certificate This condensed program of study provides the student with skills needed to perform a variety of basic food preparation activities required by the entry-level food service job. Culinary Arts – Letter of Recognition This intense option is for the student who needs to take only a few selective courses to meet job requirements.A.5 credits as follows: Code Course Credits CULA 105 Introduction to Culinary Arts 1. students are awarded a Certificate of Proficiency. degree.5 3 3 1. .5 CULA 115 Sanitation and Safety 1.5 CULA 107 Culinary Math 1.5 Total Credits Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.

page 15 in this Catalog. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Career Studies – 52 credits as follows: ADEC 110 ADEC 111 ADEC 112 Introduction to the Dental Profession Dental Head and Neck Anatomy Dental Materials 4 3 3 ADEC 113 ADEC 114 ADEC 115 ADEC 116 ADEC 117 DENH 120 DENH 121 DENH 122 DENH 123 DENH 124 DENH 231 DENH 232 DENH 233 DENH 234 DENH 235 DENH 236 DENH 242 DENH 243 DENH 244 DENH 245 DENH 246 Medical Emergencies in the Dental Office Dental Health Education Dental Radiology Dental Specialties I Practice Management Introduction to Clinical Dental Hygiene Clinical Dental Hygiene I Clinical Services I Oral Histology and Embryology Nutrition Clinical Dental Hygiene II Clinical Services II Periodontology I Dental Health Education/ Community Dental Health Oral Pathology Pharmacology and Oral Medicine Clinical Services III Periodontology II Dental Specialties II Pain and Anxiety Control Capstone Seminar Graduates of this program will be able to f Exhibit competency as clinicians through demonstrated performance on the North East Regional Board Dental Hygiene Examination and the National Board Examination and feedback from Employer Surveys f Assume responsibility for health promotion and disease prevention for individuals and communities through participation in multiple off-campus dental health education community projects f Obtain RDH license issued by the State Board of Dentistry of New Jersey f Perform multiple. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.S. This degree will take longer than two years to complete. Degree An Associate in Applied Science Degree in Dental Hygiene and a Certificate in Dental Assisting are offered in cooperation with the School of Health Related Professions at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ). The following prerequisites must be taken prior to admission: Course Code Credits Course Code BIOL 111 4 MATH 145 BIOL 112 4 PSYC 106 BIOL 213 4 SOCI 101 CHEM 136 4 SPCH 115 ENGL 121 3 ENGL 122 3 Total Credits SEMESTER 1 ADEC 110 ADEC 111 ADEC 112 ADEC 113 DENH 120 SEMESTER 3 ADEC 116 DENH 124 DENH 231 DENH 232 DENH 233 DENH 234 DENH 235 DENH 236 4 3 3 1 4 15 1 2 2 3 2 2 2 1 15 SEMESTER 2 ADEC 114 ADEC 115 DENH 121 DENH 122 DENH 123 SEMESTER 4 ADEC 117 DENH 242 DENH 243 DENH 244 DENH 245 DENH 246 Credits 4 3 3 3 35 1 3 3 3 2 12 1 3 2 1 1 2 10 .A. All prospective students must apply to Brookdale for admission to these programs which have limited enrollment and an entrance examination. In both cases the diploma or certificate is awarded jointly by the two Colleges. Some general education courses must be taken prior to starting clinical courses. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. 30 of 35 General Education credits must be taken at Brookdale. Requirements General Education – 35 credits as follows: Code BIOL 111 BIOL 112 BIOL 213 CHEM 136 Course Credits Anatomy and Physiology I 4 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 Microbiology 4 Introduction to Inorganic. 4 Organic and Biological Chemistry ENGL 121 English Composition: 3 The Writing Process ENGL 122 English Composition: 3 Writing and Research PSYC 106 Introduction to Psychology II 3 SOCI 101 Principles of Sociology 3 SPCH 115 Public Speaking 3 MATH 145 Algebraic Modeling 4 A grade of “C” or higher is required in all General Education courses. expanded dental auxiliary functions as defined in the New Jersey State Dental Practice Act under the auspices of Dental Specialties II and Clinical Services I.A. See Admission to Health Science Programs. Students must satisfy specific requirements in order to be admitted to this program. All dentistry courses are taken at UMDNJ’s Scotch Plains campus. II and III f Demonstrate professional development through membership in the Student American Dental Hygienists’ Association and participation in related activities f Display professional demeanor at all times as evidenced by professional development grades achieved in all dental courses f Prepare individuals for employment as dental hygienists according to established studies by the American Dental Hygiene Association Commission on Dental Accreditation and the American Dental Hygiene Association f Determine student satisfaction with educational programming by assessment of course evaluations and alumni surveys f Assess patient satisfaction with treatment service provided by students through data collection from the patient satisfaction survey f Demonstrate competency in dental hygiene as stated in the Dental Hygiene Standard of Care and American Dental Educators Association Competencies Credits required for degree: 87 Suggested Sequence – Dental hygiene Program A. career objectives. See below. More information about both of these programs can be obtained by calling the Office of Admissions at (732) 224-2330. or individual needs.Programs of Study 81 1 1 3 1 1 4 3 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 1 3 2 1 1 2 Dental hygiene Program A.S.

Total Credits . Refer to page 23 for details.82 Programs of Study Dental Assisting Academic Credit Certificate Graduates of this certificate program will be able to: f Exhibit competency as clinicians through demonstrated performance on the Certified Dental Assistants Examination (CDA) administered by the Dental Assisting National Board and feedback from Employer Surveys f Assume responsibility for health promotion and disease prevention for individuals and communities through participation in multiple dental health education projects f Perform multiple. f Prepare individuals for employment as dental assistants f Determine student satisfaction with educational programming Requirements General Education – All 10 of the following General Education credits must be completed at Brookdale in order to be considered for admission to the Dental Assisting Program: Code Course Credits BIOL 111 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 ENGL 121 English Composition: 3 The Writing Process PSYC 106 Introduction to Psychology II 3 Career Studies – 23 credits as follows: Code Course Credits ADEC 110 ADEC 111 ADEC 112 ADEC 113 ADEC 114 ADEC 115 ADEC 116 ADEC 117 DENA 110 DENA 111 DENA 112 Introduction to the Dental Profession Dental Head and Neck Anatomy Dental Materials Medical Emergencies in the Dental Office Dental Health Education Dental Radiology Dental Specialties I Practice Management Dental Science Clinical Assisting Internship 4 3 3 1 1 3 1 1 2 3 1 33 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. advanced level dental auxiliary functions as defined in the New Jersey State Dental Practice Act under the auspices of Clinical Assisting and Internship f Obtain the Registered Dental Assistant credential issued by the State Board of Dentistry of New Jersey f Demonstrate professional development through membership in the American Dental Assistants’ Association and participation in related activities f Display professionalism in the delivery of comprehensive dental health care through achievement of satisfactory grades in the section of the evaluation form for Clinical Assisting and Internship.

implement and evaluate sonographic imaging procedures f Use critical thinking as a framework for decision making in an effort to deliver quality patient care f Exhibit therapeutic communication skills and collaborate effectively with patients. or individual needs.A. identify normal and abnormal human anomalies and pathologies. They directly aid in the diagnosis of disease for medical treatment.Programs of Study 83 Diagnostic Medical Sonography A. gather patient medical histories and correlate to imaging findings. General Education – 20 credits as follows Code BIOL 111 BIOL 112 ENGL 121 ENGL 122 PSYC 106 Course Anatomy & Physiology I Anatomy & Physiology II English Composition: Writing Process English Composition: Writing & Research Introduction to Psychology II Humanities Credits 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 2 2 4 2 4 4 4 4 3 3 Requirements Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Course Code HESC 105 SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term BIOL 112 ENGL 121 DMSO 121 DMSO 122 DMSO 123 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term PSYC 106 HITC 124 DMSO 221 DMSO 222 Credits 3 Course Code BIOL 111 Total Credits SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term ENGL 122 DMSO 131 DMSO 132 DMSO 133 DMSO 134 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Humanities (1) Elective DMSO 231 DMSO 232 Credits 4 7 3 2 4 2 4 15 3 3 4 3 13 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate competency in the cognitive. and take measurements. Graduates will also have the ability to safely operate sonographic imaging equipment. transmitted. calculate values. As a member of the health care team. analyze. Career Studies – 43 credits as follows: HESC 105 Medical Terminology HITC 124 Pathophysiology DMSO 121 Introduction to Patient Care DMSO 122 Abdominal Sonography I DMSO 123 Ultrasound Physics & Instrumentation I DMSO 131 Cross-Sectional Anatomy DMSO 132 Abdominal Sonography II DMSO 133 Ultrasound Physics & Instrumentation II DMSO 134 Obstetric & Gynecological Sonography I DMSO 221 High Resolution Imaging DMSO 222 OB-GYN Sonography II DMSO 231 Vascular Imaging & Echocardiography DMSO 232 Professional Issues in Ultrasonography Electives Credits required for degree: 66 Suggested Sequence – Diagnostic Medical Sonography A. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.S. career objectives. biologic sciences and humanities in their practice f Continue personal and professional growth 4 3 3 5 2 17 3 3 4 4 14 (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Refer to page 23 for details. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. . and members of the health care team f Teach patients and families pertinent information regarding their sonographic procedures f Incorporate legal and ethical concepts in the implementation of imaging procedures f Apply principles from social science.S. degree will have developed patient care and diagnostic medical sonographic procedure skills in order to assist in the diagnosis of pathologies. high frequency sound waves into areas of the patient’s body in order to collect reflected echoes and forms an image that may be videotaped. Prerequisites . The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. They will be able to use specialized equipment to direct non-ionizing. Students graduating with the Diagnostic Medical Sonography A. and analyze the results in preliminary reports for the physicians.A. psychomotor and affective domains of professional sonographic practice f Asses.S. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. or photographed for interpretation and diagnosis by a physician. they will work directly with physicians and be able to communicate with physicians and other health care professionals to clarify diagnoses or to obtain additional information for diagnostic purposes.A.The following courses must be taken prior to admission.

This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Requirements General Education – 20 credits of general education as described on page 50 including the following required General Education course: COMP 126 Computer Logic and Design 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.S. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. editing and output to tape.S.A. Degree Students graduating with the Digital Animation and 3D Design AAS degree will have developed skills in modeling. Career Studies – 42 credits as follows: ARTS 111 Drawing I ARTS 213 Figure Drawing DIGM 115 Digital Editing: After Effects DIGM 116 Production & Storyboarding: Photoshop DIGM 121 Maya I: 3D Modeling DIGM 122 Maya II: Fundamentals DIGM 125 Digital Editing: Combustion DIGM 126 Digital Modeling: ZBrush DIGM 221 Maya III: Rendering DIGM 222 Maya IV: Advanced Modeling and Character Rigging DIGM 225 Digital Design and Production DGMD 101 Introduction to Digital Media TELV 122 Digital Video Production Elective 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 3 3 3 Credits required for degree: 65 Suggested Sequence – Digital Animation and 3D Design A. editing. Students will complete courses that provide them with technical skills and aesthetic proficiency.84 Programs of Study Digital Animation and 3D Design Program A. props and backgrounds f Create materials for characters and scenes f Animate characters f Create lighting for animations f Render moving pictures f Sequence rendered frames with compositing. rendering and storyboarding. career objectives. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. They will have gained command of the basic technical skills required in today’s highly competitive animation industry. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term DGMD 101 DIGM 115 DIGM 116 DIGM 121 ARTS 111 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term DIGM 122 DIGM 126 ARTS 213 ENGL 121 General Education(1) Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term DIGM 221 DIGM 125 TELV 122 Humanities COMP 126 Communications 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term DIGM 222 DIGM 225 Social Sciences Elective General Education 3 6 3 3 2-3 17-18 (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. . or individual needs.A. This program is designed to prepare students for entry level positions in digital animation. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Create geometry for characters. Refer to page 23 for details. Program The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.

or individual needs. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. and EDUC) courses. EDEC and EDUC course that measures performances based on current Child Development Associate (CDA) credential competencies or National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) standards. techniques and preschool education theory with various general studies. safe learning environments Advance physical and intellectual competence among typical and atypical learners Support social and emotional development and provide positive guidance among early learners Establish positive partnerships with families Ensure a well run classroom environment responsive to participant needs Demonstrate an understanding of the essential components of teaching and learning processes Recognize the importance of technology in early learning environments SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies General Education(1) Elective 9 3 3 15 9 3 3-4 15-16 f (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.S.A. Refer to page 23 for details.A. hands-on experience. Health and Safety 3 in Early Childhood Programs Career Studies – 6 credits from among the following: ENGL 265* Children’s Literature: 3 An Introduction PSYC 206 Human Growth and 3 Development I SOCI 105 Intercultural Communication 3 Electives *Offered Fall term only 10 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. The program combines practical. elementary school aide or social service assistant. Graduates of this program will be able to: f f Identify. Code ENGL 121 SPCH 115 Course English Composition: Writing Process Public Speaking Social Sciences Credits 3 3 3 EDUA 205 EDUA 206 EDUA 299 EDUC 216 EDUC 217 EDUC 225 Creative Arts in Early 3 Childhood Programs Math and Science in Early 3 Childhood Programs Early Childhood Assistant 1-5 Internships Classroom Techniques 3 Introduction to the Exceptional 3 Child Literacy Development and 3 Instruction Career Studies – 24–26 credits from among the following: EDEC 105 Foundations of Early 3 Childhood Education EDUA 106 Language Arts in Early 3 Childhood Programs EDUA 131 Social Studies in Early 3 Childhood Programs EDUA 135 Music in Early Childhood 3 Education EDUA 145 Nutrition. Degree In this program. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term EDEC 105 Career Studies ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies General Education Elective Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies Communications Social Sciences Elective Credits 6 3 3 3 15 — Language arts — Mathematics and science — Creative arts — Music — Social studies. learning and assessment processes through developmentally appropriate delivery methods in: Credits required for degree: 60-62 Suggested Sequence – Early Childhood Education Program A. safety and nutrition f f f f f f Maintain healthy. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. students learn the skills necessary to assist teaching personnel in public or private early childhood centers and day care centers. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. career objectives. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. This program is not designed for transfer to a four-year college. students can apply to the State of New Jersey (Professional Impact New Jersey. The following general education courses are recommended for students choosing this program. advocating growth for early childhood education) for Certification as Group Teacher. .A. career explorations and civics — Health. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. By taking 15 credits of Early Childhood (EDUA. students qualify for such positions as day care or preschool aide. Students wishing to become teachers should choose the appropriate Education A. Upon graduation. analyze and evaluate the variety of early childhood program delivery options Demonstrate understanding and applications of early childhood teaching. although many graduates make such transitions. option for transfer programs. EDEC. Students will create a competency statement within each EDUA.S.Programs of Study 85 Early Childhood Education Program A.

safety and nutrition f f Ensure a well run classroom environment responsive to participant needs Demonstrate an understanding of the essential components of teaching and learning processes Requirements General Education . (two-year) degree.6 credits: Code Course Credits Required: ENGL 121 English Composition 3 Writing Process Recommended: SOCI 105 Intercultural Communication 3 Career Studies – 28-30 credits as follows: EDEC 105 Foundations of Early 3 Childhood Education EDUA 106 Language Arts in Early 3 Childhood Programs EDUA 131 Social Studies in Early 3 Childhood Programs EDUA 135 Music in Early Childhood 3 Education EDUA 145 Nutrition. career explorations and civics — Health.A. Health and Safety 3 in Early Childhood Programs EDUA 205 Creative Arts in Early 3 Childhood Programs EDUA 206 Math and Science in Early 3 Childhood Programs EDUA 299 Early Childhood-Assistant 1-3 Internship EDUC 216 Classroom Techniques 3 ENGL 265* Children’s Literature: 3 An Introduction Total Credits *Offered Fall term only 34-36 . Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate understanding and applications of early childhood teaching. Refer to page 23 for details.S.86 Programs of Study Early Childhood Education Academic Credit Certificate The Early Childhood Education Academic Credit Certificate is designed for students who want to take more work in early childhood education than is required for the group teacher endorsement but who do not wish to complete the additional work required for an A. learning and assessment processes through developmentally appropriate delivery methods in: — Language arts — Mathematics and sciences — Creative arts — Music — Social studies.

Degree Early Childhood Education Option This option prepares students for transfer to four-year institutions to pursue preschool through third grade P-3 teaching certification. many courses prove relevant to the needs of parents and professionals from other fields. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Education Program A. play based instruction. Code ENGL 122 Course English Composition: Writing and Research Any Language course Credits 3 3-6 3-4 4 Career Studies – 6 credits from among the following: HGEO 105 Human Geography 3 PHIL Philosophy Course 3 PSYC 218 Educational Psychology 3 SOCI 105 Intercultural Communication: 3 The Person and the Process Electives *EDEC 199 . Early Childhood Education Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.A. A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. analyze and evaluate the roles and characteristics of the successful classroom teacher including: — skill in classroom management — sensitivity to diversity and special needs of young children — use of appropriate teaching and learning strategies in play-based and academicbased settings — promotion of integrated literacy — mastery of subject matter — knowledge of child growth and development as applied to a variety of theoretical and philosophical perspectives — appreciation of ongoing professional development f Demonstrate an understanding of the essential components of teaching and learning processes as they are articulated in diverse early childhood educational settings f Think critically to analyze and evaluate cultural. emergent literacies. 3 Humanities Mathematics Science (with lab) Career Studies – 3 credits as follows: EDEC 105 Foundations of Early Childhood Education *EDEC 199 Field Experience 3 0 Career Studies – 3 credits from among the following: EDUC 216 Classroom Techniques 3 EDUC 217 Introduction to the 3 Exceptional Child EDUC 225 Literacy Development and 3 Instruction BAChELOR’S ThROUGh BROOkDALE This is a preferred Associate degree for students planning to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Brookdale’s New Jersey Coastal Communiversity. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Recognize. For program details and transfer information. societal and historical influences that affect early childhood education today. teaching the exceptional child. or individual needs. The following general education courses are recommended for students choosing this program. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.brookdalecc.Programs of Study 87 Education Program A. with a grade of B or better are required to complete 60 hours of observation in an approved academic setting to ensure transferability of EDEC 105 to a four-year institution. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. and professional opportunities in early childhood education. Refer to page 23 for details. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. diversity in early childhood education. students should talk to their Student Development Specialist or call the Communiversity at 732-280-2090. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term EDEC 105 ENGL 121 PSYC 105 Humanities Mathematics (2) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (2) SPCH 115 Science (with lab) (2) History Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 3-4 3 4 3 16-17 (1) (2) Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term EDEC 199 Career Studies ENGL 122 PSYC 206 Humanities Mathematics or Science(2) SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Cultural and Global Awareness(1) Humanities History Career Studies Electives Credits 0 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. Students in this option take courses in education with required field experiences. Students explore early childhood professional opportunities in business and industry. In addition. Students are introduced to: the variety of early childhood education programs and constructs. coupled with general education studies required for successful transfer. inclusion education.A.Students who have completed EDEC 105 Foundations of Early Childhood Education. The courses offered in this option need to be taken in consultation with a College counselor.edu One course is required from the Cultural and Global Awareness knowledge area. . Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. Students may meet the requirements while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. NOTE: It is strongly recommended that no more than six Education credits be taken in the first two years for transfer. career objectives.

inclusion education. For program details and transfer information. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term EDUC 105 ENGL 121 PSYC 105 Humanities Mathematics (2) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (2) SPCH 115 Science (with Lab) (2) History (1) (2) Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 0-4 3 4 3 15-17 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term EDUC 199 Career Studies ENGL 122 PSYC 206 Humanities Mathematics or Science (2) SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Cultural and Global Awareness(1) Humanities History Career Studies Elective Credits 0 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 3 3 3 3 15 One course is required from the Cultural and Global Awareness knowledge area. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Recognize. Humanities Mathematics Science (with lab) Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Middle School or Secondary Education teaching certifications. NOTE: It is strongly recommended that no more than six Education credits be taken in the first two years for transfer. Middle School and Secondary Education Option This option prepares students for transfer to four-year institutions to pursue Elementary. Refer to page 23 for details. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. . Degree Elementary.edu Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Education Program A.A. Students explore professional opportunities in business and industry. Code ENGL 122 Course English Composition: Writing and Research Any Language course Credits 3 3-6 3-4 4 *EDUC 199 . The courses offered in this option need to be taken in consultation with a College counselor. career objectives. literacies: emergent and content areas. In addition. The following general education courses are recommended for students choosing this program. students should talk to their Student Development Specialist or call the Communiversity at 732-280-2090. Middle School and Secondary Education Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution.Students who have completed EDUC 105 Introduction to Education. analyze and evaluate the roles and characteristics of the successful classroom teacher including: — skill in classroom management — sensitivity to diversity and special needs of students — use of appropriate learning strategies — promotion of literacy across the curriculum — mastery of subject matter — knowledge of child growth and development — appreciation of the importance of ongoing professional development f Demonstrate an understanding of the essential components of teaching and learning processes in academic settings as they are articulated by current trends and practices in diverse educational settings f Think critically to analyze and evaluate societal. Students may meet the requirements while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. organization and structure of schools systems.brookdalecc. Students are introduced to: foundations of education.88 Programs of Study Education Program A. Degree Elementary. Career Studies – 3 credits as follows: EDUC 105 Introduction to Education *EDUC 199 Field Experience 3 0 Career Studies – 3 credits from among the following: EDUC 216 Classroom Techniques 3 EDUC 217 Introduction to the 3 Exceptional Child EDUC 225 Literacy Development and Instruction 3 Career Studies – 6 credits from among the following: HGEO 105 Human Geography 3 PHIL Philosophy Course 3 PSYC 218 Educational Psychology 3 SOCI 105 Intercultural Communication: 3 The Person and the Process Elective 3 BAChELOR’S ThROUGh BROOkDALE This is a preferred Associate degree for students planning to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education at Brookdale’s New Jersey Coastal Communiversity. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. effective teaching techniques. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. or individual needs. A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. teaching the exceptional child. Students in this option take courses in education theory and practice and field observations coupled with the general studies required for successful transfer. and technology integration in teaching and learning. cultural and historical influences that affect education For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. many courses prove relevant to the needs of parents and professionals from other fields.A. with a grade of B or better are required to complete 60 hours of observation in an approved academic setting to ensure transferability of EDUC 105 to a 4-year institution.

currents. Refer to page 23 for details. 3 4 4 4 3 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.Programs of Study 89 Electric Utility Technology Program A. The following general education courses are required for students choosing this program. Thevenin’s Theorem. Code ENGL 121 ENGL 122 SPCH 130* HIST 105 COMP 129 ECON 107 MATH 145 Course Credits English Composition: 3 Writing Process English Composition 3 Writing and Research Interpersonal Communications 3 World Civilization I 3 Information Technology 3 Economics 3 Algebraic Modeling 4 Technical Studies – 18 credits UTIL 101 UTIL 102 UTIL 201 UTIL 202 UTIL 299 Overhead Lines Technology I Overhead Lines Technology II Overhead Lines Technology III Overhead Lines Technology IV Internship in Electric Utility 4 4 4 4 2 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Measure and verify calculated values for standard analog laboratory instruments such as the oscilloscope.S Degree Overhead Lines The Associate in Applied Science degree program in Electric Utility Technology is offered in partnership with FirstEnergy Corp. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ENGL 121 ELEC 101 COMP 129 ELEC 103 UTIL 101 Credits 3 3 3 4 4 17 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term MATH 145 ELEC 131 ENGL 122 UTIL 102 Credits 4 4 3 4 15 SUMMER SEMESTER UTIL 299 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term HIST 105 ELEC 132 ELEC 201 UTIL 201 2 3 4 3 4 14 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term ECON 107 SPCH 130 ELEC 202 UTIL 202 3 3 3 4 13 . The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. audio generator and frequency counter Analyze and measure circuit currents. This is not a General Education course.A. DVM. This program prepares students for employment opportunities in the electric utility technology industry with a specific focus on line worker training. See page 17 of the catalog. Transformers and Controls *This course satisfies a General Education requirement for this specific program. VOM. and Norton’s Theorem Calculate impedance. The coursework in this program is designed to provide students the opportunity to develop both the academic skills and technical skills needed for employment in this field.S. Mesh Analysis. operate and maintain standard utility industry transmission and distribution equipment. Students must satisfy specific requirements in order to be admitted to this program. f f f f f Credits required for degree: 61 Suggested Sequence – Electric Utility Technology Program A. Nodal Analysis. and phase angles for AC circuits Perform work on secondary voltage circuits Apply proper cable pulling/bus work techniques Safely install. voltages. Requirements General Education – 22 credits as described on page 50.A. as well as safely climb transmission support towers and H-Structures Career Studies – 21 credits ELEC 101 Computer Aided Circuit Analysis ELEC 103 Electrical Skills and Techniques ELEC 131 Electrical Circuits for Power Distribution I ELEC 132 Electrical Circuits for Power Distribution II ELEC 201 Electrical Transmission and Distribution ELEC 202 Switchgears. resistance and voltages using Kirchhoff’s laws. See page 17 of the catalog. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Students must satisfy specific requirements in order to be admitted to this program.

DVM. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Technical Studies – 18 credits UTIL 111 UTIL 112 UTIL 211 UTIL 212 UTIL 299 Substation Technology I Substation Technology II Substation Technology III Substation Technology IV Internship in Electric Utility 4 4 4 4 2 Career Studies – 21 credits ELEC 101 ELEC 103 ELEC 131 ELEC 132 ELEC 201 ELEC 202 Computer Aided Circuit Analysis Electrical Skills and Techniques Electrical Circuits for Power Distribution I Electrical Circuits for Power Distribution II Electrical Transmission and Distribution Switchgears. *This course satisfies a General Education requirement for this specific program.S. audio generator and frequency counter Analyze and measure circuit currents. Mesh Analysis. Thevenin’s Theorem and Norton’s Theorem Calculate impedance. See page 17 of the catalog. f f f f f Credits required for degree: 61 Suggested Sequence – Electric Utility Technology Program A. regulators/reclosers. fuses. This program prepares students for employment opportunities in the electric utility industry with a specific focus on electrical substation and switchyards.A. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ENGL 121 ELEC 101 COMP 129 ELEC 103 UTIL 111 Credits 3 3 3 4 4 17 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term MATH 145 ELEC 131 ENGL 122 UTIL 112 Credits 4 4 3 4 15 SUMMER SEMESTER UTIL 299 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term HIST 105 ELEC 132 ELEC 201 UTIL 211 2 3 4 3 4 14 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term ECON 107 SPCH 130 ELEC 202 UTIL 212 3 3 3 4 13 .S Degree Substation Option The Associate in Applied Science degree program in Electric Utility Technology is offered in partnership with FirstEnergy Corp. See page 17 of the catalog. currents. The coursework in this program is designed to provide students the opportunity to develop both the academic skills and technical skills needed for employment in this field. Substation Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.A. transformers. VOM. This is not a Brookdale General Education course. and phase angles for AC circuits Perform high-level maintenance in electrical substation and switchyards Apply proper cable/pulling bus work techniques Safety install and use batteries. The following general education courses are required for students choosing this program. voltages. Nodal Analysis. Transformers and Controls 3 4 4 4 3 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Measure and verify calculated values for standard analog laboratory instruments such as the oscilloscope. resistance and voltages using Kirchhoff’s laws. circuit breakers and capacitors Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Students must satisfy specific requirements in order to be admitted to this program. Students must satisfy specific requirements in order to be admitted to this program. Code ENGL 121 ENGL 122 SPCH 130* HIST 105 COMP 129 ECON 107 MATH 145 Course Credits English Composition: 3 Writing Process English Composition 3 Writing and Research Interpersonal Communications 3 World Civilization I 3 Information Technology 3 Economics 3 Algebraic Modeling 4 Electric Utility Technology Program A.90 Programs of Study Requirements General Education – 22 credits as described on page 50. Refer to page 23 for details.

I. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution.A. The following general education courses are recommended for students choosing this program. career objectives. Credits required for degree: 61 Suggested Sequence – Electronics Technology Program A.S. Code ENGL 121 ENGL 122 HIST 105 MATH 151 MATH 152 PHIL 105 Course English Composition: The Writing Process English Composition: Writing and Research World Civilization I Intermediate Algebra College Algebra and Trigonometry Practical Reasoning Credits 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 1 MATH 153 MATH 171 Pre-Calculus Mathematics Calculus I Note: Students Transferring to NJIT should take PHYS 111 and PHYS 112. graphic. This program is part of a joint admissions agreement program with N.J. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. or individual needs. and written form Career Studies – 41 credits as follows: COMP 135 Computer Architecture Using Assembly Language COMP 137 Programming for Engineers ECON 107 Economics ELEC 101 Computer Aided Circuit Analysis ELEC 103 Electrical Skills and Techniques ELEC 111 Electrical Circuits I ELEC 112* Electrical Circuits II ELEC 225** Fundamentals of Analog Electronic Devices ELEC 241* Introduction to Digital Circuits ELEC 298 Electronics Capstone Seminar Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.S. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and *prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. *Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only Graduates of this program will be able to: f Perform engineering analysis and problem solving f Develop an engineering design to meet given specifications f Work effectively in diverse teams and provide leadership to teams and organizations f Communicate effectively in oral.J. Degree Electronics Engineering Technology Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Students should work with the transfer institution.Programs of Study 91 4 4 Electronics Technology Program A.I. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ELEC 101 ELEC 103 HIST 105 ENGL 121 MATH 151 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term ELEC 112* PHIL 105 ELEC 241* MATH 153 Credits 3 4 3 3 4 17 4 3 4 4 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term ELEC 111 MATH 152 ENGL 122 ECON 107 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term COMP 135 COMP 137 MATH 171 ELEC 225 ELEC 298 Credits 4 4 3 3 14 3 3 4 4 1 15 *Offered Fall term only . or for immediate employment in the electronics industry. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. and the Electronics Technology faculty to insure correct course choices. Degree Electronics Engineering Technology Option This option is designed for transfer to colleges or universities offering a Bachelor of Science in Technology or a Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology degree.T. Refer to page 23 for details. Students completing this program may work toward a Baccalaureate degree or may continue in the Baccalaureate Degree Program at N.T.A. their counselors.

Data Communications and Networking COMP 129 Information Technology COMP 137 Programming for Engineers Total Credits 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 31 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Build. categories and principles of motherboards. terminology and security Demonstrate knowledge of operating systems including installation.92 Programs of Study Electronics Technology Program A. computer programming. Degree Electronic/Computer Technician Option Computers and electronics have found their way into businesses and homes throughout the world. upgrading. operation. printer concepts and printer components Demonstrate knowledge of basic network concepts. optimization. configure. graphic. expansion slots and memory in desktop computer systems Demonstrate knowledge and skills to identify. problem solving and design. and written form *Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only Credits required for degree: 65 Suggested Sequence – Electronics Technology Program A. security and preventive maintenance Demonstrate the ability to diagnose and troubleshoot common problems and system malfunction as well as perform preventive maintenance. . or individual needs. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. and microcomputers to the building. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. testing. students can sit for A+ certification. and maintenance of electrical/ electronic(s) systems f Apply scientific concepts to electrical/ electronic(s) circuits in a rigorous mathematical environment at or above the level of algebra and trigonometry f Work effectively in diverse teams and provide leadership to teams and organizations f Communicate effectively in oral. career objectives.A. test. operate and maintain electrical systems f Apply circuit analysis. as well as knowledge of basic types of printers.A.S. The proliferation of computer systems has created a demand for highly qualified individuals to install and maintain computer systems. configuration. The student learns how peripherals and computers communicate with each other. peripherals. install. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ELEC 101 ELEC 103 HIST 105 MATH 151 ENGL 121 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term ELEC 112* NETW 106 ELEC 241* MATH 153 *Offered Fall term only Credits 3 4 3 4 3 17 4 3 4 4 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term ELEC 111 MATH 152 PHYS 108 ECON 107 ENGL 122 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term COMP 135 COMP 137 ELEC 243 ELEC 225 ELEC 298 Credits 4 4 4 3 3 18 3 3 4 4 1 15 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. f f f Career Studies – 45 credits as follows: ELEC 101 ELEC 103 ELEC 111 ELEC 112* ELEC 225** ELEC 241* ELEC 243 ELEC 298 MATH 152 MATH 153 COMP 135 COMP 137 NETW 106 Computer Aided Circuit Analysis Electrical Skills and Techniques Electrical Circuits I Electrical Circuits II Fundamentals of Analog Electronic Devices Introduction to Digital Circuits Mini/Microcomputer Interfacing Electronics Capstone Seminar College Algebra & Trigonometry Pre-Calculus Mathematics Computer Architecture Using Assembly Language Programming for Engineers Introduction to Networking TCP/IP 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 3 3 3 f Requirements General Education – 6 credits required: Required: ENGL 121 English Composition: The Writing Process Recommended: SPCH 115 Public Speaking Career Studies — 25 credits as follows: ELEC 101 Computer Aided Circuit Analysis ELEC 103 Electrical Skills and Techniques ELEC 241* Introduction to Digital Circuits ELEC 243 Mini/Microcomputer Interfacing ELEC 244 Computer Peripherals. The following general education courses are recommended for students choosing this program. Refer to page 23 for details. processors. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. This option provides the student with the skills required to troubleshoot and repair a wide variety of computer systems and digital electronic equipment. Graduates of this certificate program will be able to: f Demonstrate knowledge of classifications. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50.S. Electronic/Computer Technician Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. power supplies. and networks. and upgrade desktop computer modules and peripherals.. Code ENGL 121 ENGL 122 HIST 105 ECON 107 MATH 151 PHYS 108 Course English Composition: The Writing Process English Composition: Writing and Research World Civilization I Economics Intermediate Algebra Physics in Life Credits 3 3 3 3 4 4 A+ Computer Repair Technician Academic Credit Certificate At the conclusion. analog and digital electronics.

DVDs. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.T.engineeringk12. digital cameras.org/students/What_Is_Engineering/default.edu website http://www. The following general education courses are recommended for the program: Code ENGL 121 ENGL 122 ECON 107 MATH 171 CHEM 101 HIST 105 PHYS 121 Course Credits English Composition: 3 The Writing Process English Composition: 3 Writing and Research Economics 3 Calculus I 4 General Chemistry I 5 World Civilization I 3 General Physics I 4 Humanities 3 Humanities or Social Sciences 3 Technical Electives – 6–14 credits Career Studies – 39 credits as follows: CADD 121 CHEM 102 COMP 137 ENGI 101* ENGI 102** ENGI 105(1) MATH 172 MATH 273 MATH 274 PHYS 122 PHYS 223 Engineering Graphics with CAD General Chemistry II Programming for Engineers Engineering Mechanics I Engineering Mechanics II Introduction to Engineering Calculus II Calculus III Elementary Differential Equations General Physics II General Physics III 4 5 3 3 3 1 4 4 4 4 4 (choose one set of courses) CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CHEM 203 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 204 Organic Chemistry II CIVIL ENGINEERING ENGI 205** Strength of Materials ENGI 206*** Material Properties and Processes ENGI 261*** Surveying I ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ENGI 241* Properties of EE I (Circuits) ENGI 242** Properties of EE II (Electronics) ENGI 251* Digital I ENGI 252** Properties of EE III (Circuits) MECHANICAL ENGINEERING ENGI 205** Strength of Materials ENGI 206*** Material Properties and Processes ENGI 216*** Kinematics and Dynamics of Machinery INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING ENGI 205** Strength of Materials ENGI 206*** Material Properties and Processes *Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only ***Offered Summer II term (1) 5 5 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Students are required to take ENGI 105 in the first term and declare a major area of study toward the end of this course. Engineers are problem solvers who search for quicker. better.I.php . For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer.I.brookdalecc.T. Whether it’s cell phones.J. The program leads to an Associate in Science degree in Engineering and transfers to most engineering schools.S. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Brookdale has a Joint Admission Agreement with N. There are five major areas of study: • • • • • Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Electrical Engineering Industrial Engineering Mechanical Engineering Requirements General Education – 30 credits as described on page 50.T. “Engineering offers more career options than any other discipline. Credits required for degree: 75-83 Suggested Sequence – Engineering Program A.S. MATH 152 and/or MATH 153 may be required if MATH requirements are not met. or individual needs. career objectives. from within the microscopic structures of the human cell to the top of the tallest skyscrapers.J.J.Programs of Study 93 Engineering Program A. engineers are behind almost all of today’s exciting technology. The following prerequisites must be taken prior to admission: Course Code Credits Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term ENGI 105 1 CADD 121 CHEM 101 5 CHEM 102 ENGL 121 3 ENGL 122 MATH 171 4 MATH 172 Humanities 3 PHYS 122 PHYS 121 4 20 SUMMER II SEMESTER Technical Elective 0-4 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term COMP 137 ENGI 101 MATH 273 HIST 105 Technical Elective Technical Elective 3 3 4 3 3-5 0-4 16-22 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term ENGI 102 ECON 107 MATH 274 PHYS 223 Social Sciences or Humanities Technical Elective Technical Elective Credits 4 5 3 4 4 20 Graduates of this program will be able to: f f f f f Perform engineering analysis and problem solving Develop an engineering design to meet given specifications Describe the social and cultural context of the engineering and technology fields Work well in diverse teams and organizations Communicate effectively in oral. graphic and written form Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Students completing this program may work toward a Baccalaureate degree or may continue in the Baccalaureate Degree Program at N. This program is part of a joint admissions agreement program with N. Students should consult a counselor. and an Articulation Agreement with Rutgers University. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites** and presumes a Fall Term start date. Students should work with a counselor to satisfy requirements for major career areas. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. It is and will continue to be the profession upon which the United States depends for its growth and ability to compete in world markets. the Engineering program parallels the first two years of the four-year engineering curriculum of most engineering schools throughout the country. It’s a profession that can take you from the depths of the ocean to the far reaches of outer space. Degree Engineering is a profession that integrates science and mathematics with design and laboratory study.”1 At Brookdale Community College. or facial recognition devices that can pick out a terrorist in a crowded football stadium. and less expensive ways to use the forces and materials of nature to meet today’s challenges. 1ASEE 3 3 4 4 3 3-5 0-4 20-26 MATH 151. Refer to page 23 for details.I.

Students may choose to take some or all of their courses online.94 Programs of Study English Option humanities Program A. For program details and transfer information. students should talk to their Student Development Specialist or call the Communiversity at 732280-2090. Students in this option take writing and courses concerned with specific areas of literature. Career Studies – 12 credits from among the following: Code ENGL 127 ENGL 128 ENGL 150 ENGL 155 ENGL 156 ENGL 158 ENGL 168 ENGL 175 ENGL 221 ENGL 225 ENGL 231 ENGL 232 ENGL 235 ENGL 236 ENGL 245 ENGL 246 ENGL 265** ENGL 266 ENGL 275 ENGL 295 Elective Course Credits Business Writing 3 Writing from the Female Experience 3 African-American Literature 3 The Short Story 3 Introduction to Poetry 3 Introduction to Literature 3 Contemporary Plays 3 Woman as Author 3 Creative Writing 3 Technical Writing 3 British Literature I 3 British Literature II 3 World Literature I 3 World Literature II 3 American Literature I 3 American Literature II 3 Children’s Literature: 3 An Introduction Young Adult Literature: 3 Books and the Adolescent Shakespeare’s Plays 3 Special Project – English 1-6 3 This degree program may also be completed online.edu A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics.A. among which may be teaching. or individual needs. *Offered Spring term only **Offered Fall term only Graduates of this program will be able to: f Identify and understand the characteristics of literary forms and genres f Utilize a college vocabulary to identify and interpret stylistic and technical features of literary texts f Think and write critically about various types of literary texts and support an analysis with specific textual evidence f Think and write critically about literary texts within a cultural or historical framework Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Fouryear English graduates enter widely diverse professions.A. Degree English Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. coupled with liberal arts studies.brookdalecc. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. For more information call 732-224-2089. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term Career Studies Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (1) ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (1) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies SPCH 115 Humanities Science (with lab) (1) History Credits 3 3-4 3 3 3 15-17 3 3 3 4 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1) History Social Sciences Credits 3 3 3-4 3 3 15-16 BAChELOR’S ThROUGh BROOkDALE This is a preferred Associate degree for students planning to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in English at Brookdale’s New Jersey Coastal Communiversity. SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Humanities Cultural & Global Awareness(2) Social Sciences Elective 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. career objectives. copywriting. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – humanities Program A. editing and publishing. Refer to page 23 for details. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. (1) . This sequence is based on completion of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Degree This option is designed for transfer to a four-year college with a major in writing and/or literature. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area.

environmental scientists. marine biologists or natural resource managers. (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural and Global Awareness knowledge area. students must be guided by the transfer institution’s requirements and work closely with their counselor in order to select courses wisely.S. f f f Credits required for degree: 60-64 Suggested Sequence – Mathematics/Science Program A. and physical science knowledge to comprehend environmental issues on a local. earth. To maximize transfer credits. career objectives. and global scale Investigate the role that humans play in influencing the natural world Analyze the social and economic aspects of current environmental issues Employ the scientific method of inquiry to develop critical thinking skills and qualitative and quantitative analytical proficiency Requirements General Education – 30 credits as described on page 50. or individual needs.Programs of Study 95 4 4 3) 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Environmental and Earth Sciences Option Mathematics/ Science Program A.S.edu *Offered Fall term only. it is recommended as the Science (SC) general education course. natural resource studies. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. . An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Degree This option is designed for students who are transferring to a four-year college majoring in environmental sciences. The following general education courses are recommended: Code BIOL 101* COMP 129 MATH 151 or MATH 152 Course General Biology Information Technology Intermediate Algebra Credits 4 3 4 ENVR 101 ENVR 102** ENVR 106** ENVR 111 ENVR 121 ENVR 126 College Algebra & 4 Trigonometry *Since this course is a prerequisite for career studies courses BIOL 102 and BIOL 208. Degree Environmental and Earth Sciences Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Refer to page 23 for details. marine sciences or geology.brookdalecc. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Utilize biological. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ENVR 107 BIOL 101 ENGL 121 COMP 129 Humanities SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term BIOL 208* ENGL 122 MATH 151 or MATH 152 Career Studies Social Sciences or Humanities Credits 4 4 3 3 3 17 4 3 4 3-4 3 17-18 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term BIOL 102 MATH 131 Career Studies Social Sciences Credits 4 4 3-4 3 14-15 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term POLI 228 General Education (1) Career Studies 3 4 5-7 12-14 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Career Studies – 19 credits as follows: BIOL 102 General Biology II BIOL 208* Ecology and Field Biology ENVR 107 Environmental Science MATH 131 Statistics POLI 228 Environmental Politics and Policy Career Studies – 11-15 credits from among the following BIOL 205* Invertebrate Zoology BIOL 206** Vertebrate Zoology BIOL 207*** Marine Biology CHEM 101 General Chemistry I CHEM 102 General Chemistry II CHEM 117*** Introduction to Marine Chemistry 4 4 4 4 3 Physical Geology Historical Geology Environmental Geology Oceanography Physical Geography Introduction to Geographical Information Systems ENVR 127 Meteorology ENVR 205*** Introduction to Coastal Geology ENVR 212** Coastal Zone Management MATH 153 Precalculus MATH 171 Calculus I MATH 172 Calculus II PHYS 111 General Physics I (non-calculus) PHYS 112 General Physics II (non-calculus) PHYS 121 General Physics I PHYS 122 General Physics II *Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only ***Offered Summer only 4 4 4 5 5 4 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. ecology. regional. Bachelor’s degree graduates may become researchers.

Degree Ethnic Studies Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. literary. history. history and social scientific research. art and literature. The coursework provides students with the opportunity to explore various issues in the study of ethnic diversity. cultural and social perspectives regarding race and ethnicity in a global setting Analyze the conditions of different racial/ ethnic groups in U. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Social Sciences Program A. culture. The option is designed to provide an understanding of the numerous relationships between various ethnic groups throughout the world. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.A. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Career Studies – 9 credits as follows: Code SOCI 101 SOCI 105 SOCI 216* Course Principles of Sociology Intercultural Communication Sociology of Minorities Credits 3 3 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. social scientific. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. sociology. society Examine the current topics and research within the interdisciplinary field of ethnic/ diversity studies Research and connect to transfer programs that can lead to careers in ethnic/diversity studies.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. psychology.S. or individual needs. career objectives. The students within this program will explore various peoples’ values and ideologies through the study of philosophy. and ethnicity. Students will be exposed to structures that exist within societies that shape people’s experiences regarding race. Refer to page 23 for details. literature.96 Programs of Study Ethnic Studies Option Social Sciences Program A. *Offered Fall term only .brookdalecc. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. political science. Degree This option combines aspects of preexisting disciplines in the social sciences and humanities (sociology. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. Course Code Credits SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ENGL 121 3 Humanities 3 Mathematics (1) 3-4 SOCI 101 3 Mathematics/Science/Technological 3-4 Competency or Information Literacy (1) 15-17 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term (1) Science (with lab) 4 Career Studies 3 SPCH 115 3 History SOCI 216* 3 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term ENGL 122 Humanities Social Science SOCI 105 Mathematics or Science(1) SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Social Sciences Humanities History Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Elective Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 3 3 3 3 15 f f f For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer.A. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. English) in order to prepare students to transfer to a four-year college in any diversity or ethnic studies-based program. Requirements General Education– 45 credits as described on page 50. Career Studies – 3 credits from among the following: ANTH 106 Cultures of the World ENGL 150 African-American Literature HIST 126 Dimensions of the Holocaust HIST 155 Native American Studies HIST 215 African Civilization HIST 217* Modern Latin American History HIST 225** History of Modern Asia HIST 227** Middle Eastern History HIST 235 Immigration & Ethnicity in American History PHIL 225 Comparative Religion 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Elective *Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f f Communicate skills and content effectively in written and verbal form Discuss diverse historical. history.

or individual needs.S. The following general education courses are recommended for students choosing this program. or buying career in the wholesale or retail fashion industry should select this program which combines fashion studies with business and general education courses. which apply to the fashion industry f Demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationships between the consumer and the primary. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Career Studies – 30 credits as follows: MRKT 105 MRKT 111 FASH 121 FASH 122 FASH 205 FASH 212 FASH 213 FASH 223 FASH 224 FASH 225 Advertising Fundamentals of Retailing Fashion Merchandising Textile Science Merchandise Planning and Control Visual Merchandising and Display Buying Fashion Coordination Case Studies & Executive Development in Fashion Merchandising Survey of Historic Costume 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate a working knowledge of the fashion industry from concept to consumer f Apply computation skills pertinent to the fashion and retailing industries f Apply appropriate visual merchandising and advertising techniques f Demonstrate both customer service and management techniques.A. career objectives. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Degree Students who wish to prepare for a sales. secondary. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Fashion Merchandising Program A. students may either begin their careers or may choose to transfer to Bachelor degree programs in colleges which offer Fashion Merchandising degrees. After graduation. management.Programs of Study 97 Fashion Merchandising Program A. .A. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term FASH 121 MRKT 111 ENGL 121 Social Sciences Elective SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term FASH 212 FASH 213 FASH 225 Humanities Career Studies (1) Credits 3 3 3 3 4 16 3 3 3 3 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term FASH 122 MRKT 105 FASH 205 SPCH 115 Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term FASH 223 FASH 224 Career Studies General Education(1) Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 3 3 6 15 One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.S. Code ARTH 106 ARTH 107 ENGL 121 SPCH 115 Course History of Art: Ancient Through Medieval OR History of Art: Renaissance Through Contemporary English Composition: The Writing Process Public Speaking Credits 3 3 3 3 Career Studies – 6 credits from among the following: COMP 129 BUSI 105 BUSI 206 ECON 105 ECON 106 MRKT 101 MRKT 145 FASH 295 FASH 299 Electives Information Technology Introduction to Business Supervisory Management Macro Economics Micro Economics Introduction to Marketing Salesmanship Special Project–Fashion Fashion Merchandising Internship 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1-3 3 4 Students planning to transfer should see their counselors regarding general education requirements. retailing and auxiliary segments of the fashion industry Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Graduates of this program have been accepted with full credit to the upper division of four-year colleges which offer fashion-related Bachelor degrees. Refer to page 23 for details.

Career Studies – 21 credits from among the following: ARTC 141 Digital Paint I 3 ARTC 142 Digital Paint II 3 ARTS 112 Drawing II 3 ARTS 151 Ceramics I 3 ARTS 152 Ceramics II 3 ARTS 156 Sculpture I 3 ARTS 161 Jewelry I 3 ARTS 162 Jewelry II 3 ARTS 213 Figure Drawing I 3 ARTS 231 Painting I 3 ARTS 232 Painting II 3 ARTS 235 Watercolor 3 ARTS 295 Special Project – Art 1-6 ARTS 299 Art Internship 1-3 PHTY 111 Photography I 3 transfer. or individual needs. Because certain requirements may vary in some B. Painting.F. Refer to page 23 for details. Degree Studio Art Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Fine Arts Program A. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ARTS 111 ARTS 121 ENGL 121 Social Sciences General Education(1) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term ARTH 107 ARTS 295 Career Studies Humanities Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 1 9 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term ARTH 106 ARTS 122 ARTS 123 ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies General Education Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 12 3 15 (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.98 Programs of Study Fine Arts Program A. .A. This option provides the courses necessary at the Associate degree level to transfer to a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio Art or Visual Art with a concentration in Drawing.F. career objectives. The Studio Art Option is designed for students seeking to transfer to a four-year college or professional art school.A. programs. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Jewelry. Ceramics. Career Studies – 19 credits as follows: Code ARTH 106 Course Credits History of Art: 3 Ancient through Medieval ARTH 107 History of Art: 3 Renaissance through Contemporary ARTS 111 Drawing I 3 ARTS 121 2-D Design 3 ARTS 122 Color Theory 3 ARTS 123 3-D Design 3 *ARTS 295 Special Project – Art 1 *One credit special project to be used for portfolio development.A. or Sculpture. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate a proficiency in basic design elements f Discuss the history of the visual arts f Demonstrate a proficiency in the use of basic crafts and visual arts Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. and work closely with counselors to insure selecting appropriate courses for smooth Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Degree Studio Art Option The Associate of Fine Arts Degree in Studio Art provides a well-rounded education with the adequate range of liberal studies required by fouryear Bachelor of Fine Arts programs.F. students should identify transfer schools as early as possible.

The emphasis is on developing the skills required to design. .A. This includes fundamental programming concepts as well as those demanded to develop interactive games.S. Refer to page 23 for details. Career Studies – 36 credits as follows: COMP 132 Structured Programming Using C++ COMP 175 Game Design and Development COMP 226 Systems Analysis and Design COMP 233 Object Oriented Programming Using C++ COMP 275 Game Programming COMP 276 Game Level Design DIGM 115 Digital Editing: After Effects DIGM 116 Production & Storyboarding: Photoshop DIGM 121 Maya I: 3D Modeling DIGM 122 Maya II: Fundamentals DIGM 225 Digital Design and Production Technical Electives – 3 credits from among the following: COMP 145 COMP 166 DIGM 221 Elective Introduction to UNIX Web Design Using HTML Maya III Rendering 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Conceptualize an original game f Create game documents f Develop and test C++ code f Use an Application Programming Interface to create 3D Programs f Modify a game using an existing game engine 3 3 3 1 Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Digital Animation and 3D Design A. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term COMP 126 COMP 175 COMP 132 DIGM 121 ENGL 121 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term DIGM 115 DIGM 122 COMP 233 COMP 275 Communications Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term COMP 226 DIGM 116 COMP 276 Humanities or Social Science Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Elective DIGM 225 General Education (1) Technical Electives 1 6 5 3 15 (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.Programs of Study 99 Game Programming Option Digital Animation and 3D Design Program A.A. Requirements General Education – 20 credits of general education as described on page 50 including the following required general education course: COMP 126 Computer Logic and Design 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Degree This option is designed for students who are interested in the programming segment of game development.S. or individual needs. code and test programs which will ultimately become the backbone of an electronic game. Game Programming Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. career objectives. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.

A. The option prepares students to transfer to four-year programs which allow them to enter design fields such corporate design. or individual needs.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. Refer to page 23 for details. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term GRPH 101 Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (1) ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (1) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term GRPH 204 SPCH 115 Humanities Science (with lab) (1) History Credits 3 3-4 3 3 3-4 15-17 3 3 3 4 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term GRPH 102 ENGL 122 History Mathematics or Science (1) Social Sciences Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term GRPH 216 Humanities Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Social Sciences Elective 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. Career Studies – 12 credits as follows: Code GRPH 101 GRPH 102 GRPH 204 GRPH 216 Elective Course Typography I Typography II Graphic Design Production Graphic Design Techniques Credits 3 3 3 3 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.brookdalecc.100 Programs of Study Graphic Design Option humanities Program A.A. corporate identity and others Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. illustration. . graphic design. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. career objectives. Degree Students who wish to transfer with majors in graphic design should select this option which combines general education and basic production courses. Degree Graphic Design Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Apply the meaning of corporate identity f Apply the principles of good illustration f Demonstrate graphic design f Apply typography Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – humanities Program A. typography.

Positions may be available in advertising – print and non-print – and in various visual communication fields.A. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. print production.Programs of Study 101 Graphic Design Program A. Program. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Employment areas may include: design production. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Discuss the history of typography f Utilize various software programs f Apply pre-press techniques f Demonstrate digital design techniques Career Studies – 15 credits from among the following: ARTH 107 History of Art: Renaissance through Contemporary 3 ARTC 147 Desktop Publishing I 3 GRPH 295 Special Project – 1-6 Graphic Design GRPH 299 Graphic Design 1-6 Internship MRKT 105 Advertising 3 PHTY 111 Photography I 3 Electives 4 Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Graphic Design Program A. illustration. . career objectives. or individual needs.A. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term Career Studies ENGL 121 Humanities Credits 9 3 3 15 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Social Sciences General Education (1) 9 3 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies Communications Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies General Education Electives Credits 9 3 3-4 15-16 9 3 4 16 (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.A. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. This program is not designed for transfer to a four-year college. Students who wish to complete Bachelors’ degrees should choose the Graphic Design Option of the Humanities A. Refer to page 23 for details. Degree This program is for students who wish to gain employment in the field of graphic art and design.S.S. display. Career Studies – 21 credits as follows: Code ARTS 111 ARTS 121 GRPH 101 GRPH 102 GRPH 115 GRPH 204 GRPH 216 Course Drawing I 2-D Design Typography I Typography II Illustration Graphic Design Production Graphic Design Techniques Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. and photography. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. digital design.

provide documentation for use in legal actions or provide data for use in research studies. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. or individual needs. Credits from this program will transfer into the Health Information Technology AAS Program. Degree Students graduating with the Health Information Technology A. As members of the health care team. and members of the health care team.A. maintaining and evaluating health records. monitor. analyze. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Collect.A. Graduates will have the ability to code patients’ medical information for insurance purposes and use computer programs to tabulate and analyze data to improve patient care. f Credits required for degree: 64 Suggested Sequence – health Information Technology A.S Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. It allows students who do not wish to pursue a degree at this time the opportunity to gain basic skills and knowledge in the area of medical coding. they will be able to communicate with physicians and other health care professionals to clarify diagnoses or to Requirements General Education – 20 credits as follows: Code ENGL 121 ENGL 122 ENGL 235 PSYC 106 BIOL 111 BIOL 112 Course Credits English Composition: 3 Writing Process English Composition: 3 Writing & Research World Literature I 3 Introduction to Psychology II 3 Anatomy & Physiology I 4 Anatomy & Physiology II 4 Medical Coding Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement This program prepares individuals for employment as entry level coders in various health care settings. ensure that all forms are completed and properly identified and signed. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term HITC 121 OADM 116 HESC 105 BIOL 111 ENGL 121 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term HITC 221 HITC 222 HITC 223 PSYC 106 ENGL 235 Credits 3 4 3 4 3 17 4 3 3 3 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term HITC 122 HITC 123 HITC 124 BIOL 112 ENGL 122 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term HITC 224 HITC 225 HITC 226 Elective Credits 4 3 3 4 3 17 4 3 4 3 14 f f f Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.A. degree will have developed skills in organizing. . Graduates will have the ability to interact with health care professionals and managed care representatives about medical coding issues. They will be able to assemble health information. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.102 Programs of Study health Information Technology Program A. Refer to page 23 for details.S. Practice in a legal and ethical manner exhibiting personal accountability for all actions Synthesize knowledge from health information technology and other disciplines to promote optimal information system function. and ensure that all necessary information is in the computer. Students who have completed this program and have attained work experience may wish to pursue the Certified Coding Specialist (CCS) examination and credentials through the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).S. career objectives. maintain. Graduates of this certificate program will be able to: f Demonstrate competence as a health care coder in entry-level employment in various types of health care settings f Communicate with health care professionals and managed care companies Requirements Code Course HESC 105 Medical Terminology HITC 121 Introduction to Health Information Technology HITC 221 Coding and Classification Systems I HITC 222 Health Information Documentation HITC 224 Coding and Classification Systems II Total Credits Credits 3 3 4 3 4 17 Career Studies – 41 credits as follows: HESC 105 HITC 121 HITC 122 HITC 123 HITC 124 HITC 221 HITC 222 HITC 223 HITC 224 HITC 225 HITC 226 OADM 116 Elective Medical Terminology Introduction to Health Information Technology Health Information in Alternative Systems Health Information and the Law Pathophysiology Coding and Classification Systems I Health Information Documentation Health Information Reporting Coding and Classification Systems II Health Information Management Clinical Practicum Microsoft Office 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 4 4 3 obtain additional information. retrieve and report health care data in accordance with quality assurance principles Use critical thinking as a framework for decision making in information system issues in a variety of settings Communicate and collaborate effectively with clients.

An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. journalism. Career Studies – 12 credits from among the following.A. Code HIST 105 HIST 106 HIST 107 HIST 116 HIST 125 Course Credits World Civilization I 3 World Civilization II 3 Contemporary World History 3 Vietnam: Historical Perspectives 3 Women’s History Survey: 3 Experiences. For more information call 732-224-2089. law. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date.A. Degree history degree for transfer to a fouryear college history program. career objectives. Careers more typically pursued by history majors include business. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. expands awareness of other cultures. develops imagination and helps connect the past to contemporary concerns. as well as teaching. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate and summarize knowledge of historical content f Communicate skills and content effectively in written and verbal forms f Explain the impact of historical developments on their lives and the diverse world around them This option prepares students for a Requirements General Education– 45 credits as described on page 50.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. . diplomacy. publishing. library and museum work. social work. or HIST 135/HIST 136. *Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Social Sciences Program A. Degree history Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.brookdalecc. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. and allows students the opportunity to explore this subject for the following reasons: intellectual curiosity. Contributions and Debates HIST 135 American Civilization I 3 HIST 136 American Civilization II 3 HIST 137 Recent American History 3 HIST 138 The 1960s: Pop Music 3 and the Counterculture HIST 145* African American History I 3 HIST 146** African American History II 3 HIST 155 Native American Studies 3 HIST 202 History of New Jersey 3 HIST 205 History of World War II 3 HIST 215 African Civilization 3 HIST 217* Modern Latin American History 3 HIST 225** History of Modern Asia 3 HIST 226 History of Modern Russia 3 HIST 227** Middle Eastern History 3 HIST 237 American Civil War 3 Elective 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.Programs of Study 103 history Option Social Sciences Program A. Refer to page 23 for details. This degree program may also be completed online. or individual needs. Students may choose to take some or all of their courses online. The selected courses must include at least one sequence of HIST 105/HIST 106. government service. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term HIST 105 or HIST 135 ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (1) Mathematics/ Science/Technological (1) Competency or Information Literacy SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Communications Science (with lab) (1) Humanities History Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3-4 15-17 3 3 4 3 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term HIST 106 or HIST 136 ENGL 122 History Social Sciences Mathematics or Science (1) SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Humanities Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Social Sciences Elective Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer.

will need additional science and math courses to meet specific transfer college entry requirements. Requirements General Education – 6 credits as follows: Code ENGL 121 Course English Composition The Writing Process Humanities/Social Science Credits 3 3 Floral Design Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement Completion of the following courses will enable one to pursue a career as a floral designer and work toward operating or owning a small business selling cut flowers and floral arrangements for various occasions. potentiallyprofitable areas. Requirements: Career Studies – 6 credits as follows: Code Course HORT 151 Floral Design I HORT 152 Floral Design II HORT 153 Floral Design III BUSI 241 Small Business Management Recommended: HORT 299 Horticulture Internship *Career Studies – 8 credits as follows: BIOL 125 HORT 125 HORT 126 Introduction to Plants AND Landscape Plant Materials I OR Landscape Plant Materials II 4 4 4 *Career Studies — 16 credits from among the following: BUSI 241 Small Business Management (Fall Only) HORT 115 Soil Science HORT 125 Landscape Plant Materials I HORT 135 Grounds Maintenance HORT 146** Great Gardens HORT 151 Floral Design I HORT 152 Floral Design II HORT 153 Floral Design III HORT 185 Landscape Design HORT 186 Landscape Construction HORT 225 Turf Management HORT 235 Plant Diseases and Pests HORT 245 Plant Propagation HORT 295 Special Project–Ornamental Horticulture HORT 299 Horticulture Internship *All career courses taken for the Horticulture Certificate Program must have a grade of “C” or higher **Students can take HORT 146 in the summer as a substitute for any of the courses in the suggested sequence. Brookdale offers a variety of useful and stimulating courses. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. need better trained employees or simply want to pursue horticulture as a lifelong hobby. Students planning to transfer to two. 3 4 4 3 2 1 1 1 4 3 3 3 4 1-6 1-6 Credits 1 1 1 3 2-3 Landscape Design Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement Completion of the following courses will enable one to pursue a career as a landscape designer and work toward operating or owning a small business that installs attractive functional landscapes. or individual needs.or four-year degree programs work closely with their counselors and instructors to select appropriate courses and insure a smooth transition process. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Refer to page 23 for details. Note: Students may substitute BUSI 241 for one of the career courses in the suggested sequence if they wish to operate a small business. People of all ages and backgrounds take courses to gain or augment horticultural skills. desire to expand into new. HORT 152 and HORT 153 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term HORT 115 and/or HORT 225 and/or HORT 186 Humanities or Social Sciences HORT 299* Credits 4 4 3 7-8 3 3 3 3 2-3 6-15 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. for example. Whether you are planning to begin your own small business. . See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.104 Programs of Study horticulture Academic Credit Certificate The Horticulture Certificate prepares students to pursue this interesting and dynamic field as a profession or to enhance knowledge for personal pleasure. The 30-credit certificate combines specialized career courses with related general education studies. Students interested in a four-year horticulture degree. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term BIOL 125 HORT 126 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term HORT 235 or HORT 245 HORT 135 ENGL 121 HORT 299* Credits 4 4 8 3 4 3 3 2-3 9-13 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term HORT 125 HORT 185 or HORT 151. Requirements: Career Studies – 15 credits as follows: Code Course HORT 125 Landscape Plant Materials I HORT 126 Landscape Plant Materials II HORT 185 Landscape Design HORT 186 Landscape Construction Recommended: HORT 299 Horticulture Internship Credits 4 4 4 3 2-3 Graduates of this certificate program will be able to: f f Obtain or improve horticulture business-related job skills Acquire useful information and techniques to become a more knowledgeable and successful gardener Credits required for certificate: 30 Suggested Sequence – horticulture Academic Credit Certificate The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. career objectives. *Internships are recommended but not required either Fall or Spring of the 2nd year.

Those earning a certificate will develop skills that will enable them to be competent and effective entry level social service workers.S. Graduates take positions as mental health workers. Career Studies – 33 credits as follows: Code PSYC 105 PSYC 106 PSYC 111 PSYC 208 PSYC 209 Course Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 7 Social Services Academic Credit Certificate of Achievement The Social Services Certificate is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in social services. Degree Generalist Human Services is a creative. career objectives. or individual needs. and professional settings with an understanding of cultural/ethnic diversity. Refer to page 23 for details. and limitations **Offered Spring term only Career Studies – 15 credits as follows: PSYC 215 Counseling Techniques PSYC 295 Special Project – Psychology SOCI 295 Special Project – Sociology Total Credits 3 6 6 27 Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – human Services Program A. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. mental health. Requirements General Education – 12 credits as follows: Code Course Credits ENGL 121 PSYC 105 SOCI 101 SPCH 115 English Composition The Writing Process Introduction to Psychology I Principles of Sociology Public Speaking 3 3 3 3 Introduction to Psychology I Introduction to Psychology II Introduction to Human Services Life Span Development Theories of Personality OR PSYC 245 Introduction to Quantitative Methods PSYC 212** Community Agencies and Human Services Systems PSYC 215 Counseling Techniques PSYC 216 Abnormal Psychology PSYC 235 Group Dynamics PSYC 285 Human Services Practicum CRJU 126 Introduction to Public Administration OR CRJU 127 Introduction to Corrections Electives Graduates of this program will be able to: f Serve Human Services clients or carry out other supportive human service agency functions f Explain the historical and philosophical foundation of Human Services f Identify human systems.A.S.Programs of Study 105 human Services Program A. values. discuss their interaction. and attitudes in personal. and evaluate outcomes f Apply human service ethics. In addition to time spent in the classroom. drug and alcohol workers. personalities. social service agencies. (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. many graduates may make smooth transitions to Bachelor’s programs by working with their counselors and the members of the Human Services team. . innovative field for persons who work with. and give support to. reaction patterns. other human beings. community organizers and personnel counselors. services. or developmental disabilities will be given the opportunity to convert their training into academic credit and complete an academic certificate with additional course work. While this program is not designed for transfer. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. educational. social service interviewers. students spend 285 hours in hospitals. and recognize the conditions that promote or limit optimal human functioning f Analyze service problems. Students learn through a combination of classroom work and on-site performances. mental health centers. substance-abuse counseling sites and other facilities. Department of Human Services (DHS) employees who complete recognized DHS training modules in one of the areas of: child protective services. psychiatric technicians. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term PSYC 105 PSYC 111 ENGL 121 SPCH 115 SOCI 101 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term General Education(1) PSYC 216 PSYC 235 Mathematics or Science or Technological or Information Literacy CRJU 126 or CRJU 127 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term PSYC 106 PSYC 212 PSYC 215 Humanities PSYC 208 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term PSYC 209 or PSYC 245 PSYC 285 General Education Elective Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 3 3 7 16 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. or interventions. interpersonal styles. f Evaluate their own values. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. spending time in human services facilities. select appropriate strategies.A.

values. social service interviewers. community organizers and personnel counselors.state. Students taking the courses listed below can apply to have their credits count toward the academic portion of the CADC credential with the department of consumer affairs. Students may apply with the NJ Board of Consumer Affairs to have their BCC credits count for the totality of the CADC coursework requirements. Career Studies – 39 credits as follows: Code PSYC 106 PSYC 111 PSYC 125* PSYC 127** Course Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Introduction to Psychology II Introduction to Human Services Intro to Addiction Studies Evaluation and Diagnosis of the Addicted Client PSYC 208 Life Span Development PSYC 212** Community Agencies and Human Services Systems PSYC 215 Counseling Techniques PSYC 216 Abnormal Psychology PSYC 221* Individual Counseling for the Addicted Client PSYC 222** Social. psychiatric technicians. nor does Brookdale award the CADC credential itself. interpersonal styles. In addition to time spent in the classroom. other human beings who are experiencing problems with addiction. and give support to.nj. reaction patterns. Graduates take positions as mental health workers.us/lps/ca/medical/ alcdrug. Requirements General Education– 20 credits as described on page 50. and recognize the conditions that promote or limit optimal human functioning f Analyze service problems.A. students spend 285 hours in hospitals. and professional settings with an understanding of cultural/ethnic diversity. or interventions. personalities. discuss their interaction. Brookdale does not provide supervised Praxis hours for a CADC. The courses are in sequence to provide a comprehensive approach to addiction studies. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term PSYC 105 PSYC 111 PSYC 125 ENGL 121 Humanities SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term General Education (1) PSYC 216 Mathematics or Science or Technological/Info Literacy PSYC 221 PSYC 235 (1) Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 4-5 3 3-4 3 3 16-18 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term PSYC 212 PSYC 106 PSYC 127 PSYC 215 ENGL 122 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term PSYC 222 PSYC 285 SOCI 105 PSYC 208 Electives Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 3 3 3 3 15 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. drug and alcohol workers. and attitudes in personal. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. innovative field for persons who work with. mental health centers. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Cultural and Familial Aspects of Addiction PSYC 235 Group Dynamics PSYC 285 Human Services Practicum SOCI 105 Intercultural Communication Electives *Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only Students who complete the suggested course sequence for the addictions option A.S. For more information go to the following web page: http://www. many graduates may make smooth transitions to Bachelor’s programs by working with their counselors and the members of the Human Services team. substance-abuse counseling sites and other facilities. social service agencies. services.htm > or call 973-504-6369 SOCI 105 PSYC 105 PSYC 106 PSYC 111 PSYC 125 PSYC 127 PSYC 208 PSYC 212 PSYC 215 PSYC 216 PSYC 221 PSYC 222 PSYC 235 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Serve Human Services clients or carry out other supportive human service agency functions f Explain the historical and philosophical foundation of Human Services f Identify human systems. educational.A.A. While this program is not designed for transfer. or individual needs. Refer to page 23 for details. f Evaluate their own values. and limitations f Apply interventions with individual clients and therapeutic groups as it relates to drug and alcohol addictions Credits required for degree: 62 Suggested Sequence – human Services Program A.106 Programs of Study human Services Program A. CADC division. Degree Addiction Studies Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Students may be able to earn college credits and certification credits simultaneously. career objectives. will have fulfilled the academic competencies of the CADC credential awarded by the state of New Jersey.S. select appropriate strategies. One course is recommended from the Cultural and Global Awareness knowledge area.S Degree Addiction Studies Option Human Services is a creative. . his sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. and evaluate outcomes f Apply human service ethics.

A. Requirements General Education– 20 credits as described on page 50. Successful completion of this option requires that students learn to efficiently and effectively work within the corrections system. Career Studies – 30 credits as follows: Code PSYC 106 PSYC 111 PSYC 212** PSYC 215 PSYC 216 PSYC 235 PSYC 285 CRJU 101 CRJU 127 CRJU 205 Course Credits Introduction to Psychology II 3 Introduction to Human Services 3 Community Agencies and Human 3 Services Systems Counseling Techniques 3 Abnormal Psychology 3 Group Dynamics 3 Human Services Practicum 3 Introduction to the Criminal 3 Justice System Introduction to Corrections 3 Community Corrections 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. While this option is not designed for transfer. Refer to page 23 for details.e. or interventions. Evaluate their own values. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. and professional settings with an understanding of cultural/ethnic diversity.S Degree Corrections Option This option is designed to provide students in the Human Services field with basic skills for helping and empowering individuals who are experiencing problems related to the law and corrections. reaction patterns. so that they attain the knowledge. Students are required to learn the fundamental principles and skills of human service work to foster personal empowerment and improve offenders’ social skills. values. career objectives. and make appropriate referrals to services available in the community. assist with the development of client goals and plans. and attitudes in personal. and limitations Apply interventions with individual clients and therapeutic groups as it relates to corrections Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 3-4 3 3 3 15-16 f f Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term General Education PSYC 106 CRJU 127 PSYC 215 SPCH 115 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies PSYC 212 PSYC 285 Humanities Electives Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 3 3 3 4 16 f f One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. and recognize the conditions that promote or limit optimal human functioning Analyze service problems. Students will learn how to assess individual needs. personalities. skills. volunteer work.A. Students are required to complete 225 hours of field work while successfully completing their courses. many of our students make smooth transitions to four-year colleges and universities. internships). This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Cultural. attitudes and values of a human services generalist. and Familial Aspects of Addiction SOCI 101 Principles of Sociology SOCI 105 Intercultural Communications SOCI 202 Analysis of Social Problems Electives 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – human Services Program A. . Students are required to take the basic. educational. core courses in human services. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. self-sufficient. law abiding citizens. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term PSYC 105 PSYC 111 CRJU 101 ENGL 121 General Education (1) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Mathematics or Science or Technological or Information Literacy PSYC 216 CRJU 205 PSYC 235 (1) Graduates of this program will be able to: f f f Serve Human Services clients or carry out other supportive human service agency functions Explain the historical and philosophical foundation of Human Services Identify human systems.S. or individual needs.. select appropriate strategies. Particular emphasis is placed on preparing clients for successful reintegration into society as a functional. Degree Corrections Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. discuss their interaction. *Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only Career Studies – 6 credits from the following: CRJU 245 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice PSYC 125* Introduction to Addiction Studies PSYC 127** Evaluation and Diagnosis of the Addicted Client PSYC 221* Individual Counseling for the Addicted Client PSYC 222** Social. Their education will come from class work and on-site experiences (i. interpersonal styles. services.Programs of Study 107 human Services Program A. and evaluate outcomes Apply human service ethics.

Successful completion of the NCIDQ exam is required for interior design certification in the State of New Jersey. The following General Education courses are strongly recommended.A.S.A.108 Programs of Study Interior Design Program A. and interiors Apply elements and principles of design Create interior design drawings using both manual and computer-aided drafting techniques and documents necessary for the completion of a design project Demonstrate the appropriate application of codes. trade information and business practices. lighting and building systems. This program may take longer than two years to complete. and standards that pertain to interior environments Demonstrate appropriate selection of interior finishes and furnishings based on performance criteria and applicable codes and standards Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. Code ENGL 121 ENGL 122 ANTH 106 ARTH 107 ENVR 105 PHIL 227 SPCH 115 Course English Composition: The Writing Process English Composition: Writing and Research Cultures of the World History of Art: Renaissance through Contemporary Environmental Studies Introduction to Ethics Public Speaking Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 INTD 155 INTD 161 INTD 162 INTD 245 INTD 251 INTD 253 INTD 254 INTD 256 INTD 257 INTD 258 Illustrative Sketching for Interior Environments History of Furniture and Interiors I History of Furniture and Interiors II Codes and Standards for Interiors CAD for Interior Design I Interior Design Studio I Interior Design Studio II Lighting and Building Systems Textiles and Materials for Interior Design Trade Information and Business Practices 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Career Studies – 48 credits as follows: ARCH 151 Architectural Construction I ARTH 201 History of Western Architecture INTD 150 Design Elements for Interior Environments INTD 152 Drafting and Graphic Presentation for Interior Design I INTD 153 Drafting and Graphic Presentation for Interior Design II INTD 154 Introduction to Interior Design 3 3 3 3 3 3 Career Studies – Choose 3-4 credits from among the following: ARCH 121 People & Their Environment 3 ARTS 122 Color Theory 3 INTD 252 CAD for Interior Design II 3 INTD 225 3-D Architectural CAD 4 INTD 299 Internship 1-3 PLEASE NOTE: Students wishing to sit for the NCIDQ exam will need a total of 60 credits in career studies in addition to their work experience. Career studies courses will provide training in the following categories: manual and computer-aided drafting skills. These policies can be found on the Interior Design web site. historical developments in the built environment. Separate policies exist for the Interior Design program. regulations. including grading. jobfocused education in order to prepare students for entry-level positions in Interior Design. Credits required for degree: 71-72 Suggested Sequence – Interior Design Program A. furniture. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. career objectives. Refer to page 23 for details. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. or individual needs.S. universal design concepts. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Degree This program provides intensive. codes. . Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term INTD 150 ENGL 121 INTD 152 INTD 161 ENVR 105 SUMMER ARTH 201 ENGL 122 PHIL 227 SPCH 115 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term ANTH 106 ARCH 151 INTD 253 INTD 257 INTD 245 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 3 3 3 12 3 3 3 3 3 15 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term ARTH 107 INTD 254 INTD 256 INTD 258 Career Studies 3 3 3 3 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term INTD 154 INTD 153 INTD 155 INTD 162 INTD 251 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 f f Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Graduates of this program will be able to: f f f Understand the historical development of architecture. space planning. A grade of “C” or better is required in all Career Studies courses. twoand three-dimensional visualization skills.

*Students with no prior language study are required to take two consecutive semesters of a modern language (6-8 credits). journalism. economic. international business. It is recommended that students choosing this program select general education courses that focus on global perspectives and international studies. cultural and social perspectives in a global setting Credits required for degree: 60-62 Suggested Sequence – Social Sciences Program A.A.A. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. It is highly recommended that students work with a Student Development Specialist to select their General Education courses. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. should choose this option. Refer to page 23 for details. See your Student Development Specialist (counselor) to verify transferability. artistic. but not both. or individual needs. teaching. foreign service. ***Recommended for students pursuing an international major in business. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. and global mediation and conflict resolution. Students who wish to pursue a major in international studies at a four-year school are advised that intermediate proficiency in a language is often required. For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. international relations. and communicate diverse historical. Study in another country through the International Center is highly recommended. synthesize. Degree International Studies Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.edu One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. 12 credits for students who have met the language* requirement: ANTH 106** Cultures of the World ANTH 205 Culture and Personality ENVR 105** Environmental Studies or ENVR 107** Environmental Science HGEO 105** Human Geography HIST 107** Contemporary World History HIST 217** Modern Latin American History (offered Fall only) HIST 225** History of Modern Asia (offered Spring only) HIST 227** Middle Eastern History (offered Spring only) POLI 109 POLI 227 Current Global Topics Comparative Politics Electives — 3 credits BUSI 251*** Global Business Study Abroad Students are strongly encouraged to study in another country while earning credits towards their degree. 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate language proficiency at the upper elementary level including an appraisal of the relationship between the language and other elements of the culture investigated f Analyze specific discipline content from a global perspective. Career Studies – 12-14 credits as follows: At least one course must be a 200 level course. . Students who can demonstrate proficiency at the upper elementary level (Completion of Level 2) can satisfy this requirement by appropriate documentation and counselor evaluation in conjunction with the Language Department. intercultural counseling. students should check the transfer requirements of their transfer institution. Students electing to take language courses beyond the required credits may apply them to General Education and/or Elective Requirements. However. The Brookdale Community College International Center will assist in placing students in a study-abroad program. career objectives.Programs of Study 109 3 3 3 International Studies Option Social Sciences Program A. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term SOCI 105 (1) Modern Language Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (2) ENGL 121 Social Sciences SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies SPCH 115 Humanities Mathematics or Science(2) History (1) Credits 3 3-4 3-4 3 3 15-17 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Modern Language ENGL 122 Humanities Social Sciences Mathematics(2) SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Science (with lab)(2) History Humanities Elective Credits 3-4 3 3 3 3-4 15-17 3 4 3 3 3 16 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. ** These General Education courses may be used to satisfy General Education requirements or career. Career Studies – 6-8 credits from among the following: *Languages 6-8 (Two-Semester Sequence) Career Studies – 6 credits for students who are completing the 6-8 credit language requirement. distinguishing and evaluating various perspectives within the discipline and the wider world f Express and demonstrate cultural competence in a diverse global environment preferably through a study abroad experience or an intercultural community service experience f Interpret. Degree Students wishing to transfer to four-year colleges to prepare for careers in global history and area studies. Emphasis is placed on courses that have a strong international focus. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. See your counselor for advice.brookdalecc. (2) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. It is recommended that students investigate the study-abroad option early in their course selection.

This sequence is based on completion of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. researcher.A.brookdalecc.110 Programs of Study Journalism Option humanities Program A. to write impact-driven. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. such as spot news. fair and unbiased journalism and use critical thinking skills to determine when these standards are being violated f Gather news and evaluate the credibility of news sources f Perform basic interviewing techniques f Follow a journalistic writing style. Degree This option provides the writing skills and general studies necessary for transfer to a four-year college to prepare for various positions in writing and publishing. such as AP. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. Skills learned in journalism are helpful for careers in advertising. Degree Journalism Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Refer to page 23 for details. law. Career Studies – 6 credits as follows: Code JOUR 101 JOUR 102 Course Introduction to Journalism Journalism II Credits 3 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. or individual needs. and reviews f Analyze and synthesize notes and other sources to create unbiased news reports and well-argued critiques and editorials Career Studies – 6 credits from among the following: COMM 101 Communication 3 COMM 102 Communication Media 3 COMM 115 Audio in Media 3 COMM 226 Digital Reporting 3 ENGL 127 Business Writing 3 ENGL 225 Technical Writing 3 HUMN 215 Propaganda and 3 Critical Thinking JOUR 295 Special Project – Journalism 1-6 JOUR 299 Journalism Internship 1-6 RDIO 101 Introduction to Radio 3 TELV 121 Television Production 3 Elective 3 Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – humanities Program A. editor.A.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. career objectives. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Stay current on the ever-growing journalism industry and the convergence of various media types f Explain how a story grows or changes depending upon the medium reporting the news f Demonstrate an understanding of what constitutes good. public relations and business. such as reporter. special-interest writer. book reviewer. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. features. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. concise and precise stories in a variety of formats. . editorials. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term JOUR 101 Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (1) ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (1) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Humanities Science (with lab) (1) SPCH 115 History Credits 3 3-4 3 3 3-4 15-17 3 3 4 3 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term JOUR 102 ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1) History Social Sciences Credits 3 3 3-4 3 3 15-16 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Humanities Social Sciences Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Electives 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer.

Russian or Spanish for transfer to a liberal arts program in foreign languages. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. Degree This option prepares students of Arabic. A double major on the four-year level that combines language with any of these fields can be advantageous. customs and current events of the countries where the language is spoken f Interact with native speakers of the language *Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. government. Career Studies – 12 credits from among the following. Languages are assets to many careers. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50.A. German.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. Italian. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. including at least one 200-level course: Code ARAB 101* ARAB 102** CHNS 101* CHNS 102** FRCH 101 FRCH 102 FRCH 203* FRCH 204** FRCH 206 Course Elementary Arabic I Elementary Arabic II Elementary Chinese I Elementary Chinese II Elementary French I Elementary French II Intermediate French I Intermediate French II French Conversation & Composition I FRCH 207 French Conversation & Composition II GRMN 101* Elementary German I GRMN 102** Elementary German II GRMN 203* Intermediate German I GRMN 204** Intermediate German II ITAL 101 Elementary Italian I ITAL 102 Elementary Italian II ITAL 203 Intermediate Italian I ITAL 204** Intermediate Italian II Credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 JPNS 101 JPNS 102 JPNS 203 JPNS 204 LANG 295 RUSS 101* RUSS 102** SPAN 101 SPAN 102 SPAN 203 SPAN 204 SPAN 207 SPAN 215 SPAN 216 Elective Elementary Japanese I Elementary Japanese II Intermediate Japanese I Intermediate Japanese II Special Project – Modern Language Elementary Russian I Elementary Russian II Elementary Spanish I Elementary Spanish II Intermediate Spanish I Intermediate Spanish II Spanish Conversation & Composition Contemporary Latin American Literature Spanish for Native and Near-Native Speakers Graduates of this program will be able to: f Speak. health professions. read and write in the language at the intermediate level f Discuss and evaluate the culture. career objectives. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – humanities Program A. social services and education. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term Career Studies Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (1) ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (1) Credits 3-4 3-4 3 3 3-4 15-18 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies SPCH 115 Humanities Science (with lab) (1) History 3-4 3 3 4 3 16-17 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Social Sciences Humanities Electives 3-4 3 3 3 3 15-16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1) History Social Sciences Credits 3-4 3 3-4 3 3 15-17 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. among which are foreign service. interpreting. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.brookdalecc.A. Refer to page 23 for details. international business. Degree Languages Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.Programs of Study 111 4 4 3 3 1-6 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 Languages Option humanities Program A. law enforcement. . Japanese. French. or individual needs. Chinese.

Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. Credits required for degree: 60 BAChELOR’S ThROUGh BROOkDALE This is a preferred Associate degree for students planning to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Liberal and Labor Studies at Brookdale’s New Jersey Coastal Communiversity. Degree This option is designed for the student who is planning to transfer to a fouryear institution and for the student who desires two years of collegiate liberal education. Journalism. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Degree Liberal Education Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Communications Media. Dance. Refer to page 23 for details. For more information call 732-224-2089. Music. . Speech and Theater. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. career objectives. There is considerable freedom in course selection. Languages. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Research and write college level reports and papers f Create original works that adhere to a variety of aesthetic principles f Demonstrate an appreciation for the arts and humanities f Apply fundamental concepts about the theories. Students may choose to take some or all of their courses online.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. Suggested Sequence – humanities Program A. For program details and transfer information.A. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term Career Studies Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (1) ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (1) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Communications Humanities Science (with lab) (1) History Credits 3 0-4 3 3 3-4 14-17 3 3 3 4 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1) History Social Sciences Credits 3 3 3-4 3 3 15-16 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Humanities Social Sciences Electives 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. English. Graphic Design. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50.A. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution.112 Programs of Study Liberal Education Option humanities Program A.brookdalecc. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. This sequence is based on completion of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Elective 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Career Studies – 12 credits from selected courses in Art. Aptitude and interest testing is available from a counselor to help the student make a career choice. social effects and terminology of communication This degree program may also be completed online. students should talk to their Student Development Specialist or call the Communiversity at 732-280-2090. or individual needs.

in-state or out-of-state. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution.brookdalecc. The Writing Process ENGL 122 English Composition. or individual needs. See your Student Development Specialist for additional information. public or private. Your Student Development Specialist (Counselor) will help you select the best courses for the college you wish to transfer to.edu General Education . See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. career objectives. Students who have earned 30 transferable credits at Brookdale may apply to most four year institutions and be evaluated solely on their college record. 3 3 6 3 0 12** 30 0 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.org provides information on which courses will meet general education requirements at participating New Jersey colleges and universities. The NJ Transfer website at www. Students whose SAT scores and/or high school records did not meet freshman entrance requirements have a second opportunity to be admitted to competitive colleges based on their college performance only. Students selecting this certificate should be aware that completing an Associates degree in a transfer program may increase the transferability of coursework and opportunities for scholarships. Refer to page 23 for details. Students should consult a counselor. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics or Science or Technological or Information Literacy(1) General Education(2) General Education Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term ENGL 122 Social Sciences Humanities or Social Sciences General Education General Eduction Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 (1) (2) College level Mathematics course is recommended. Graduates of this certificate program will be able to: f Research and write college level reports and papers f Use social science theories and concepts to analyze human behavior and social and political institutions and to act as responsible citizens f Analyze works in the humanities For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. Writing & Research 6 3 9 9 6 8 3** 8 4 Humanities (HU) Social Sciences (SS) Mathematics (M) Sciences (SC) Technological or Information Literacy Competency (IT) History (HI) *Cultural and Global Awareness (CG) Ethical Dimension (E) Additional Credits from any category not to exceed Category Maximums Total Credits *It is recommended that students complete a Cultural and Global Awareness (CG) course.njtransfer. Course is recommended from the Cultural and Global Awareness knowledge area. Students who complete this Certificate Program may declare a major and continue to earn an Associates degree in a transfer program.Programs of Study 113 Liberal Studies Transfer Academic Credit Certificate The Liberal Studies Transfer Academic Credit Certificate is designed for students who plan to transfer to another school after only a short time at Brookdale Community College.30 Credits as follows General Education Knowledge Areas Transfer Certificate GE Knowledge Area Requirements Maximum Number of Credits for GE Knowledge Area Communications (C) credits ENGL 121 English Composition. This Certificate provides a general education foundation with general education course choices that will transfer to meet the general education requirements of most colleges and universities. This program outlines a one-year program of study designed to enable students to tailor their program to meet the admissions requirements of any four year institution. . Suggested Sequence – Liberal Studies Transfer Academic Credit Certificate The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in one year. **It is recommended that students take a college level Mathematics course.

Students should work with counselors to satisfy requirements for major career areas. merchandise distribution. are recommended for students choosing this program. career objectives. Refer to page 23 for details. many courses prove to be transferable. or individual needs. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. The following general education courses. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term MRKT 101 ENGL 121 Social Science General Education (1) Elective SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term MRKT 105 Career Studies Mathematics or Science or Technological or Information Literacy Elective Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 6 3-4 3 15-16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term MRKT 111 BUSI 105 SPCH 115 Humanities BUSI 165 or COMP 129 or OADM 116 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term *MRKT 202 MRKT 145 Career Studies General Education Elective Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 3 3-4 3 3 15-16 *Courses offered only during the Spring term (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. . Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50.A. analyze both layout and display strategies f Design presentation applying accepted sales strategies f Differentiate and analyze marketing strategies. and regulatory confines f Evaluate the merchandising practices of differing retail establishments. appraising the success or failure of such strategies. advertising and management training should choose this program. Degree Students who wish to pursue a career in a marketing-related field such as sales. and articulate conclusion Career Studies – 21-22 credits as follows: BUSI 105 Introduction to Business COMP 129 Information Technology OR BUSI 165 Computer Applications in Business OR OADM 116 Microsoft Office MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing MRKT 105 Advertising MRKT 111 Fundamentals of Retailing MRKT 145 Salesmanship *MRKT 202 Marketing in Contemporary Society *Courses offered only during the Spring term 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 Career Studies – 9-10 credits from among the following: BUSI 205 Principles of Management BUSI 221 Business Law I COMP 105 Introduction to the Internet ECON 105 Macro Economics ECON 106 Micro Economics ECON 225 Business Statistics FASH 121 Fashion Merchandising FASH 213 Buying FASH 224 Case Studies and Executive Development in Fashion Merchandising Electives 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 9-10 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. while not required. While this program is not specifically designed for transfer. Code ENGL 121 SPCH 115 Course English Composition: The Writing Process Public Speaking Credits 3 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Analyze marketing mix variables and environments f Recognize problems and design research projects aimed at solution f Develop promotional strategy within its social. research analyst. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date.A.S. ethical. retail buying. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Marketing Program A.S. purchasing.114 Programs of Study Marketing Program A.

subject to counselor approval. It is strongly advised that students taking MATH 274 have had Physics. students may substitute the BIOL 101/102 sequence or the CHEM 101/102 sequence. economist. Degree Students wishing. statistician. or a course may be selected from Career Studies above: COMP 137 COMP 132 Programming for Engineers OR Structured Programming Using C++ OR Programming I 4 4 3 3 3 **Career Studies – 20 or 22 credits as follows: MATH 171 Calculus I 4 MATH 172 Calculus II 4 MATH 273 Calculus III 4 *PHYS 121 General Physics I 4 *PHYS 122 General Physics II 4 *The above Physics sequence is highly recommended. MATH 152 and/or MATH 153 may be required if prerequisites for MATH 171 are not satisfied. or individual needs.edu A minimum of 9 credits are required from the Mathematics. and interpret results in the context of the problems f Use mathematical software to apply concepts and solve problems Requirements General Education – 30 credits as described on page 50. explain methods to solve the problems. (1) For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. students may substitute the BIOL 101/102 sequence or the CHEM 101/102 sequence. COMP 171 3 **All career studies courses must be passed with a grade of “C” or higher. career objectives. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Mathematics/Science Program A. stock or financial analyst. The following general education courses are recommended for students choosing this program.S. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term MATH 171* ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (1) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term MATH 273 PHYS 122 Humanities or Social Science Social Sciences Elective Credits 4 3 3 4 14 4 4 3 3 3 17 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term MATH 172 **PHYS 121 ENGL 122 Science (with lab) (1) SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term ***Career Studies Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy (1) General Education(2) Elective Credits 4 4 3 4 15 3-4 3-4 4 4 14-16 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. ***Take one of the following courses: MATH 274 (offered in Spring and Summer 2 terms). upon acquisition of a Bachelor’s degree. One of the following courses is highly recommended.Programs of Study 115 Mathematics Option Mathematics/ Science Program A. Refer to page 23 for details. subject to counselor approval. Code ENGL 121 ENGL 122 MATH 131 Course English Composition: The Writing Process English Composition: Writing and Research Statistics Credits 3 3 4 **Career Studies – 3 or 4 credits from among the following: MATH 226 Discrete Mathematics MATH 274 Elementary Differential Equations MATH 285 Linear Algebra Electives – 4 to 7 credits. *MATH 151. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and *prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. . MATH 226 (offered only in the Summer 2 term) or MATH 285 (offered only in Summer 2 term). Degree Mathematics Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. to enter such positions as mathematician. Sciences or Technological or Information Literacy categories. **The Physics sequence is highly recommended. (2) One course is recommended from the Cultural and Global Awareness knowledge area. However. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Define and explain basic concepts and theories of differential and integral calculus f Identify strategies for solving application problems using derivatives and integrals. and correctly solve these problems f Apply the appropriate mathematical skills to find derivatives and integrals f Communicate about mathematics problems. or researcher should choose this transfer option which combines mathematics with liberal studies. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. However.S.brookdalecc.

Degree Students who wish to transfer to four-year Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. Four-year graduates may enter such positions as television producer/director. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. . or individual needs. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. VIDEO PRODUCTION TELV 121 Television Production TELV 122 Digital Video Production 3 3 Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – humanities Program A.A. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Apply basic concepts about the history. social effects. media specialist and communication researcher/analyst. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.brookdalecc.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. Degree Media Studies Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. corporate communications specialist. theories. Mass media theory and production courses are coupled with liberal arts. Career Studies – 6 credits as follows: Code COMM 101 COMM 102 Course Communication Communication Media s Credits 3 3 AUDIO RECORDING COMM 115 Audio in Media COMM 216* Advanced Digital Recording/ Musical Recording RADIO RDIO 101 COMM 226 Elective 3 3 Introduction to Radio Digital Reporting 3 3 3 communications degree programs should choose this option. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.A.116 Programs of Study Media Studies Option humanities Program A. career objectives. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Refer to page 23 for details. terminology and aesthetics of communication f Apply concepts to the analysis of media content f Investigate and synthesize information on topics and questions related to course concepts f Demonstrate basic knowledge of related video and audio recording and editing equipment Career Studies – 6 credits from the following: Code THEORY CINE 105 TELV 115 JOUR 101 RDIO 101 Course Film Appreciation: Motion Picture/Art TV: Aesthetics and Analysis Introduction to Journalism Introduction to Radio Credits 3 3 3 3 *Offered Spring term only Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Course Code Credits SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term COMM 101 3 Mathematics/Science/Technological 3-4 Competency or Information Literacy (1) ENGL 121 3 Humanities 3 (1) Mathematics 3-4 15-17 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Humanities Science (with lab) (1) SPCH 115 History 3 3 4 3 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term COMM 102 ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1) History Social Sciences Credits 3 3 3-4 3 3 15-16 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Humanities Social Sciences Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Elective 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer.

The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.S. and humanities into the practice of a medical laboratory technician f Practice within the limits of a nationally certified medical laboratory technician SUMMER TERM BIOL 213 4 Semester 3. diagnose. implement and evaluate laboratory tests and results. They will learn to perform laboratory techniques and methodologies and how to apply them to patient specimens and clinical needs. All MDLT courses will be taken at Meridian Health. Suite 1600. Students will work with a variety of specimens including blood. Chicago. 33 West Monroe Street. physicians and in community based medical laboratories. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. and other body fluids and tissues. Graduates are employed by hospitals. urine.Programs of Study 117 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 Medical Laboratory Technology A. Clinical experiences are required of all students. biological sciences. analyzing information and solutions and solving problems f Practice effective communication skills with clients. Credits required for degree: 72 Suggested Sequence – Medical Laboratory Technology Program A. analyze. 60603. (312) 541-4999. 4 and 5 for this program are offered in one academic year from September 1 through July 30. Education and Research Hemostasis Career Studies – 48 credits as follows: BIOL 213 Microbiology CHEM 136 Introduction to Inorganic. Upon completion of the program the student will be eligible to sit for the national certification exam administered by the American Society of Clinical Pathology (ASCP). Specific admission criteria for the program are outlined in the college catalog. Medical laboratory scientists are critical members of the health care team. See Admission to Health Sciences Programs page 15 in the catalog. and treat disease. Organic and Biological Chemistry MDLT 151 Clinical Microbiology I MDLT 152 Clinical Hematology I and Phlebotomy 4 4 3 4 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.A. and members of the health care team f Demonstrate legal and ethical accountability for professional practice f Incorporate principles from social sciences. Degree This program prepares students for entry level positions as medical laboratory technicians. research labs. Requirements General Education – 24 credits as follows: Code BIOL 111 BIOL 112 ENGL 121 ENGL 122 SPCH 115 PSYC 106 MATH 131 Course Credits Anatomy & Physiology I 4 Anatomy & Physiology II 4 English Composition: 3 Writing Process English Composition: 3 Writing & Research OR Public Speaking 3 Introduction to Psychology II 3 Statistics 4 Humanities 3 MDLT 153 MDLT 154 MDLT 251 MDLT 252 MDLT 253 MDLT 254 MDLT 261 MDLT 262 MDLT 263 MDLT 264 MDLT 265 Clinical Chemistry I Immunohematology I Clinical Microbiology II and Immunology Clinical Hematology II Clinical Chemistry II and Urine Immunohematology II Clinical Microbiology III Clinical Hematology III Clinical Chemistry III Clinical Management. Refer to page 23 for details. career objectives. SEMESTER 3 MDLT 151 MDLT 152 MDLT 153 MDLT 154 SEMESTER 5 MDLT 261 MDLT 262 MDLT 263 MDLT 264 MDLT 265 (1) 3 4 3 3 13 3 3 3 2 2 13 SEMESTER 4 MDLT 251 MDLT 252 MDLT 253 MDLT 254 4 3 4 3 14 One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. or individual needs.A. pharmaceutical companies. These policies can be found in the Medical Laboratory Technology Handbook. Students will demonstrate knowledge of how to interpret the tests and procedures to provide information that will help detect. Separate polices exist for the Medical Laboratory Technology program. incorporating measures of quality assurance f Utilize critical thinking as a framework for decision making.S. including grading. Course Code SEMESTER 1 Fall term BIOL 111 CHEM 136 PSYC 106 ENGL 121 Credits 4 4 3 3 14 Course Code SEMESTER 2 Spring term BIOL 112 MATH 131 Humanities (1) ENGL 122 or SPCH 115 Credits 4 4 3 3 14 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Assess. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Illinois. . Students must satisfy specific requirements in order to be admitted to this program.

Refer to page 23 for details.A. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date.A.6 to 9 credits as follows: Code MUSI 101 Course Fundamentals of Music OR MUSI 102 Comprehensive Musicianship I (based on placement test) MUSI 103** Ear Training MUPF 101 Group Piano I or successful completion of placement test Credits 3 PIANO MUPF 102 MUPF 103 MUPF 201 MUPF 202 MUPF 203 VOICE MUPF 111 MUPF 112 MUPF 211 MUPF 212 Group Piano II Group Piano III Group Piano IV Group Piano V Group Piano VI 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Voice I Voice II Voice III Voice IV 3 3 3 3 Career Studies – 3 to 6 credits from among the following: Code Course Credits GENERAL MUSIC MUSI 102 Comprehensive Musicianship I 3 MUSI 115 Music Appreciation 3 MUSI 116 History of Jazz 3 MUSI 121** Song Writing 3 MUSI 122 Commercial Composition II 3 MUSI 123* Music Technology I 3 MUSI 201 Comprehensive Musicianship II 3 MUSI 221** Music Technology II 3 GUITAR/INSTRUMENTAL MUPF 121 Jazz Ensemble I MUPF 122 Jazz Ensemble II MUPF 131 Group Guitar I MUPF 132 Group Guitar II Elective **Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only 3 3 3 3 3 Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – humanities Program A. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate technical and artistic technique in their major instrument f Perform in student recitals and in other Brookdale events such as classroom demonstrations.brookdalecc. Course Code Credits SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term Career Studies 3 Mathematics/Science/Technological 3-4 Competency or Information Literacy (1) ENGL 121 3 Humanities 3 (1) Mathematics 3-4 15-17 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Humanities Science (with lab) (1) SPCH 115 History 3 3 4 3 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1) History Social Sciences Credits 3 3 3-4 3 3 15-16 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. . See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. music club lectures and events off campus f Demonstrate the artistic development and technical skills required of a complete creative artist Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Career Studies – 12 credits: Career Studies . Degree Music Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Degree Students in this option should take music and music theory courses. career objectives.118 Programs of Study Music Option humanities Program A. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. or individual needs. coupled with the liberal arts studies necessary for transfer to a four-year college.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Humanities Social Sciences Elective 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer.

Course Code MUSI 101 Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term MUTC 101 MUTC 111 ENGL 121 General Education Elective Credits 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 0-3 12-15 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term MUTC 201 MUTC 211 MUTC 105 Humanities or Social Science Elective 3 3 3 3 0-4 12-16 Course Code MUPF 101 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term MUTC 102 MUTC 112 ENGL 122 or SPCH 115 Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy Elective SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term MUTC 202 MUTC 212 MUTC 205 General Education(1) Credits 3 Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 3 3 3 5-6 14-15 (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. or individual needs. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Students with the requisite music skills will have an opportunity to take a placement test. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Music Technology A. Students with the requisite music skills will have an opportunity to take placement tests. The following general education course is recommended for students choosing this program: Code Course Humanities: MUSI 115 Theater Appreciation OR THTR 135 Musical Theater Credits 3 3 *Students with no prior music study are required to take MUSI 101 and MUPF 101.A. and technological perspectives required to create and perform music f Apply the fundamentals of music theory and principles f Utilize industry-standard equipment and applications for the production of music and multimedia Career Studies – 30-36 credits as follows: MUSI 101* Fundamentals of Music 3 MUPF 101* Group Piano I 3 MUTC 101 Pro Tools® I 3 MUTC 102 Pro Tools® II 3 MUTC 201 Pro Tools® III 3 MUTC 202 Pro Tools® IV 3 MUTC 111 Finale® I 3 MUTC 112 Finale® II 3 MUTC 211 Finale® III 3 MUTC 212 Finale® IV 3 MUTC 105 Introduction to NOTION Music®3 MUTC 205 Advanced NOTION Music® 3 Elective: Recommended: MUSI 103 Ear Training 4-10 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Finale® and NOTION Music®. Graduates of this program will have the skills and expertise necessary to obtain employment in music preparation. recording.S. . Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. The curriculum provides a complete education in the software used in the digital music industry such as ProTools®.S. Degree This innovative program in Music Technology provides students with the skills and expertise necessary to enter the field of computer-generated music. Prerequisites: Students with no prior music study are required to take the following prerequisite courses before taking MUTC 101. Refer to page 23 for details.A. career objectives. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. orchestration. MUTC 105 or MUTC 111. Digidesign®.Programs of Study 119 Music Technology A. Students who are not required to take MUSI 101 and MUPF 101 are required to take elective credits to complete the 60-credit degree requirement. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Examine the theoretical. historical. The following sequence is an example of how this degree may be completed in two years. performance and the video-gaming industry.

120

Programs of Study

Network Information Technology A.A.S.
The network information technology program prepares students as LAN and WAN network administrators. Successful completion of the program provides students with the essential skills of networking (TCP/IP, Routing, Switching, Wireless, Security, and PC Repair and Maintenance). Students will design, install, configure, maintain, optimize, and troubleshoot networks using a variety of network operating systems (Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X), vendor tools (Microsoft©, Cisco©, Juniper Networks© and Foundry©) and hardware platforms and protocols. Upon completion of the program, students are prepared for numerous computer related certification exams.

Requirements General Education – 20 Credits as described on page 50. Career Studies – 41 credits as follows: NETW 106 NETW 107 NETW 110 NETW 111 NETW 125 NETW 151 NETW 152 NETW 190 NETW 191 Introduction to Networking Introduction to Security Introduction to UNIX Network Administration UNIX Network Administration II Introduction to Wireless Router Internetworking/CCNA Virtual LANs and WANs/CCNA MCTS Guide to Windows Vista MCSE Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server Juniper Network Routers Mini/Microcomputer Interfacing 3 3 3 4 3 6 6 3 3

Degree Audit
Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Refer to page 23 for details.

NETW 253 ELEC 243

3 4

Graduates of this program will be able to: f Install, configure, and troubleshoot network operating systems f Configure, maintain, troubleshoot, & secure routers, switches, and other networking hardware f Evaluate current and emerging technologies and assess their applicability to address the users’ needs f Solve problems individually and in a team environment f Communicate effectively with clients, users and peers both verbally and in writing f Understand the impact of technology on individuals, organizations and society, including ethical, legal, security and global policy issues.

Credits required for degree: 61 Suggested Sequence – Network Information Technology A.A.S.
The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution, career objectives, or individual needs. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.
Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term NETW 106 NETW 107 NETW 190 ENGL 121 Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term NETW 110 NETW 151 Humanities General Education (1) Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 6 3 3 15 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term NETW 111 NETW 152 NETW 253 General Education Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term NETW 125 NETW 191 ELEC 243 Communications Social Sciences Credits 3 3 4 3 3 16

4 6 3 3 16

NOTE: Students may find it advisable to take some of the General Education courses during the summer. After the Spring term of the first year, students may be ready to begin taking the Microsoft MCSE Certification Exams. After the Spring term of the second year, students may be ready to take the A+ and Network+ certification exams.
(1)

One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.

Programs of Study

121

Computer LAN/WAN Technician Academic Credit Certificate/CCNA
Combines A+ with Networking. At the conclusion, students could sit for the following certifications: • A+ • Network+ • CCNA
Graduates of this certificate program will be able to: f

CISCO CCNA Certification
This option is designed for those who wish to learn how to design, install, and configure LANs, Virtual LANs, and WANs. After successful completion of this Certification Option, the student will have learned all the material, and configured Cisco routers and switches in preparation for taking the CCNA Certification exam. The student will also have learned most of the material necessary to take the Network+ exam.
• CCNA Requirements NETW 151 Router Internetworking/CCNA NETW 152 Virtual LANs and WANs/CCNA Total Credits

Degree Audit
Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Refer to page 23 for details.

f

f

f

f

f

f

Demonstrate the fundamental concepts of computer networking and converged networks such as voice, wireless and videos as well as the function of network devices and the limitation of the network media and apply the principles to the design of basic networks Propose a network topology and an addressing scheme for a given network design scenario Demonstrate the ability to assemble and test network cables and use them appropriately to interconnect networking devices Perform router configurations, IOS management, distant vector and link state routing protocol configuration as well as ACL configuration and assignments Demonstrate knowledge of VLSM, Ethernet switch configurations, IOS management, VLAN, STP (Spanning Tree protocol) and RSTP (Rapid Spanning Tree protocol) Understand the protocols used to connect remote sites over a wide area network, as well as selecting the appropriate technologies for WAN interconnections based on available resources and information Propose private addressing implementations using Network Address Translation or equivalent solutions such as Port Address Translation

6 6 12

Requirements General Education – 6 credits required. Code Course Credits Required: ENGL 121 English Composition: 3 The Writing Process Recommended: SPCH 115 Public Speaking 3 Career Studies — 24 credits as follows: ELEC 103 Electrical Skills and Techniques NETW 151 Router Internetworking/CCNA NETW 152 Virtual LANs and WANs/CCNA ELEC 243 Mini/Microcomputer Interfacing ELEC 244 Peripheral and Data Communications Total Credits

4 6 6 4 4

30

122

Programs of Study

Nursing Program A.A.S. Degree
This program prepares the student for entry-level nursing positions in hospitals or comparable facilities. Clinical learning experiences are required for all courses. Upon completion of the program, students are eligible to sit for the National Council Licensing Exam for Registered Nursing. Successful completion of this examination results in licensure as a Registered Nurse (RN). This program is accredited by the State Board of Nursing, Department of Law & Public Safety Division of Consumer Affairs, 124 Halsey Street, Sixth Floor, Newark, New Jersey 07101, (973) 504-6403, and by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, 61 Broadway, New York, New York 10006-2701, (212) 363-5555, extension 153. Specific admission criteria for the program are outlined on page 15 of this catalog. Separate policies exist for the Nursing Program, including grading. These policies can be found in the Nursing Student Handbook.

Requirements General Education – 26 credits as follows Code BIOL 111 BIOL 112 ENGL 121 ENGL 122 Course Credits Anatomy and Physiology I 4 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 English Composition 3 The Writing Process English Composition 3 Writing and Research OR Public Speaking 3 Introduction to Psychology II 3 Life Span Development 3 Humanities 3 Principles of Sociology 3 OR Cultural Anthropology 3 4 3 7 8 2 2 8 6 3 3

Advanced Placement in Nursing
There is a process in place for advanced placement for practical nurses who hold a current New Jersey license. The Health Science Administrator may be contacted for more information.

SPCH 115 PSYC 106 PSYC 208 SOCI 101 ANTH 105

Bachelor’s Through Brookdale Students may pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Nursing at Brookdale’s New Jersey Coastal Communiversity. For program details and transfer information, students should talk to their Student Development Specialist or call the Communiversity at 732-280-2090.

Career Studies – 43 credits as follows: BIOL 213 Microbiology NURS 160 Introduction to Human Needs NURS 161 Nursing and Human Needs I NURS 162 Nursing and Human Needs II NURS 163 Nursing and Human Needs in the Community NURS 165 (E) Issues in Nursing NURS 261 Nursing and Human Needs III NURS 262 Nursing and Human Needs IV NURS 263 Managing and Coordinating Nursing Care Electives

Graduates of this program will be able to: f Practice holistic patient centered nursing care using human needs as a framework f Use critical thinking and self-reflection to guide clinical decision making in the implementation of the nursing process f Communicate and collaborate effectively with clients, groups, and members of the health care team incorporating the use of current technology f Coordinate and manage care for diverse individuals and groups in various care environments f Demonstrate a commitment to the profession of nursing and demonstrate legal and ethical accountability for safe professional practice f Synthesize knowledge from nursing and other disciplines to promote health through evidence-based practice

Credits required for degree: 72 Suggested Sequence – Nursing A.A.S. Program Degree
The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution, career objectives, or individual needs. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Students must satisfy specific requirements in order to be admitted to this program. See Admission to Health Science Programs, page 15 in this catalog.
Course Code SEMESTER 1 NURS 160 BIOL 111 PSYC 106 ENGL 121 NURS 165 SEMESTER 3 NURS 162 NURS 163 BIOL 213 SEMESTER 5 NURS 262 NURS 263 Elective Credits 3 4 3 3 2 15 8 2 4 14 6 3 3 12 Course Code SEMESTER 2 NURS 161 BIOL 112 PSYC 208 SOCI 101 or ANTH 105 Credits 7 4 3 3 17 SEMESTER 4 NURS 261 ENGL 122 or SPCH 115 Humanities 8 3 3 14

Degree Audit
Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Refer to page 23 for details.

This degree may take longer than two years to complete. BIOL 111 may be taken either before admission to the Nursing program or concurrently with NURS 160. BIOL 111 must be completed before progression into NURS 161. The other general education courses may be taken before starting clinical courses or with the nursing courses.

Programs of Study

123

Paralegal Studies Program A.A.S. Degree
The Paralegal Studies Program is approved by the American Bar Association, Standing Committee on Legal Assistants, 541 North Fairbanks Court, Chicago, IL 60611, (312) 988-5522, and is also an institutional member of the American Association for Paralegal Education (AAfPE), and maintains a chapter of the Lambda Epsilon Chi (LEX) Honor Society. The purpose of this program is to train paralegals/legal assistants. It is not intended to be a program for training lawyers or legal administrators. A paralegal/legal assistant may not engage in the practice of law by accepting cases, giving legal advice, appearing in court, setting fees, etc. Engaging in the unauthorized practice of law is a criminal offense in the State of New Jersey. The New Jersey State Bar Association defines a paralegal/ legal assistant as “an individual qualified through education, training or work experience who is retained by a lawyer, law office, governmental agency or other entity to perform, under the direction and supervision of a lawyer, specifically delegated substantive legal work, which for the most part requires sufficient knowledge of legal concepts and which, absent the paralegal or legal assistant, would be performed by a lawyer.” The Code of Ethics and Professional Responsibility of the National Association of Legal Assistants, Inc., in its Preamble, provides that it is the responsibility of every paralegal/legal assistant to adhere strictly to the accepted standards of legal ethics and to live by general principles of proper conduct. The performance of duties of the paralegal/legal assistant is governed by specific canons of ethics in order that justice will be served and the goals of the profession attained. This program, while not designed for transfer, may transfer in part or in its entirety to four-year schools.

Graduates of this program will be able to: f Draft legal documents f Exhibit technology skills f Perform computerized legal research f Utilize legal software programs f Utilize word processing to draft legal documents f Demonstrate ethical/professional responsibility
Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. MUSI courses and COMP 129 may not be used to satisfy the 20-credit general education requirement. Career Studies – 16 credits as follows: Code PLGL 105 Course Credits 3 4 3 3 3

Career Studies —12 credits from among the following: PLGL 125* Real Property Transactions 3 PLGL 135* Family Law 3 PLGL 215** Criminal Procedure 3 PLGL 225 Wills, Estates and Probate 3 PLGL 226* Corporate Law Procedure 3 PLGL 227** Introduction to Bankruptcy 1 PLGL 228** Introduction to Workers’ 1 Compensation PLGL 237** Elder Law 3 PLGL 245** Introduction to Social 1 Security Disability PLGL 299 Paralegal Internship 3 Career Studies – 9 credits from courses remaining above, or from the following: BUSI 221 Business Law I BUSI 222** Business Law II PLGL 126* Constitutional Law PLGL 206** Torts PLGL 207 Moot Court PLGL 235*** Entertainment Law I PLGL 295 Special Project – Paralegal Studies Elective *Offered Fall Term only **Offered Spring Term only ***Offered Summer Term only

Introduction to Law and Litigation PLGL 106 Legal Research and Writing PLGL 145 Professional Standards in Ethics for Legal Assistants PLGL 205** Litigation Assistance Procedures PLGL 210 Computer Applications in Law

3 3 3 3 4 3 1-4 3

Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Paralegal Studies Program A.A.S. Degree
The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution, career objectives, or individual needs. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.
Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term PLGL 105 Career Studies ENGL 121 Social Science PLGL 145 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term PLGL 210 Career Studies Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy General Education(1) Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 6 3-4 3 15-16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies PLGL 106 SPCH 115 Humanities Credits 6 4 3 3 16

SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term PLGL 205** Career Studies General Education Elective

Degree Audit
Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Refer to page 23 for details.

3 6 3 3 15

**Offered Spring Term only (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.

or government office by offering the necessary paralegal courses to achieve competency in this profession.6 credits as follows: Course English Composition Writing Process Any other General Education Course that follows the A.] Code ENGL 121 Credits 3 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Draft legal documents in selected areas of law f Exhibit technology skills f Perform computerized and manual legal research f Utilize legal software programs f Utilize word processing to draft legal documents f Demonstrate ethical and professional responsibility Career Courses – 25 credits as follows: PLGL 105 Introduction to Law and Litigation for Paralegals PLGL 106 Legal Research and Writing PLGL 125* Real Property Transactions PLGL 135* Family Law PLGL 145 Professional Standards in Ethics for Legal Assistants PLGL 210 Computer Applications in Law PLGL 205** Litigation Assistance Procedures PLGL 225 Wills.A. . Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term PLGL 105 PLGL 125* PLGL 106 PLGL 135* ENGL 121 *Offered Fall Term Only **Offered Spring Term Only Credits 3 3 4 3 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term PLGL 145 PLGL 205** PLGL 210 PLGL 225 General Education Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Refer to page 23 for details. degree [MUSI courses and COMP 129 may not be used to satisfy the General Education requirement.124 Programs of Study Paralegal Studies Academic Credit Certificate This accelerated program is designed for students who possess a bachelor’s or associate’s degree and want to complete the requirements necessary to perform as a paralegal in a law office. corporate environment. Requirements General Education.S. Estates and Probate *Offered Fall Term Only **Offered Spring Term Only 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits required for Certificate: 31 Suggested Sequence – Paralegal Studies Academic Credit Certificate The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in one year. with a Fall Term start date.

career objectives. ethical. Technical Writing and Publishing. such as life and death. or individual needs.A.brookdalecc. Nursing.A. Refer to page 23 for details. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Bioethics. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Degree Philosophy Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. epistemological. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Education. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term PHIL 115 ENGL 121 Mathematics (1) Social Sciences Elective SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies SPCH 115 Humanities Science (with lab) (1) History Credits 3 3 3-4 3 3 15-16 3 3 3 4 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies ENGL 122 Humanities Social Sciences Mathematics or Science (1) SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Cultural & Global Awareness(2) History Humanities Mathematics/ Sciences/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (1) Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-17 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. and/or religious synthesis in the formulation of their own opinions f Present ideas clearly in written form about difficult issues. Religious Ministry. Degree This option prepares students for transfer to a four-year college Philosophy Program in preparation for academic professions such as teaching or scholarly research/ writing. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Government. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas.Programs of Study 125 Philosophy Option Social Sciences Program A. Business. Career Studies – 12 credits as follows: Code Course Credits PHIL 115 Introduction to Philosophy 3 PHIL 225 PHIL 226 PHIL 227 Elective Comparative Religion Logic Introduction to Ethics 3 3 3 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Skills developed in this program are highly valued in many types of employment such as Law. Employee Relations. using deductive and inductive logic and other critical thinking techniques f Develop a metaphysical.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. . truth and reality Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Social Sciences Program A. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Assess critically arguments found in public discourse. Requirements General Education– 45 credits as described on page 50.

126 Programs of Study Photography Option humanities Program A. career objectives. Refer to page 23 for details. commercial or medical photographers.A. Degree Photography Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term PHTY 105 PHTY 111 ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (1) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies History Science (with lab) (1) SPCH 115 Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (1) Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 3 4 3 3-4 16-17 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term PHTY 120 ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1) Humanities Social Sciences SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term History Social Sciences Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Humanities Elective Credits 3 3 3-4 3 3 15-16 3 3 3 3 3 15 (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics.) PHTY 212 Photography II 3 PHTY 216 Portfolio Development 3 PHTY 225 Digital Photography II 3 PHTY 235 Large Format Photography 3 PHTY 295 Special Project–Photography 1-6 Elective *It is recommended that students take PHTY 105 to fulfill a General Education requirement in the Humanities knowledge area. Career Studies – 12 credits: Career Studies – 9 credits as follows: Code PHTY 105* PHTY 111 PHTY 120 Course The History and Aesthetics of Photography Photography I Digital Photography I Credits 3 3 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. and metaphoric potential of the photographic medium f Explain the history and impact of photography on society and the arts f Distinguish between photographers of historic and artistic significance f Demonstrate the ability to utilize the photographic medium as a means of communication and personal expression Career Studies – 3 credits from among the following: (6 credits if PHTY 105 is used to fulfill a General Education requirement. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. photo-journalists. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area.A. For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer.brookdalecc. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate a mastery of basic and intermediate photographic principles and techniques f Evaluate photographic images based on technical and artistic quality f Think critically about the documentary. Degree This option should be selected by the student who wishes to transfer with a major in photography. photo lab technicians. aesthetic. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. or individual needs. Theoretical and applied photography courses coupled with liberal arts prepare the student to transfer and prepare for employment as photographic artists. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Students choosing this option will need to take six credits from career studies as noted above.edu (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. . See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. 3 Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – humanities Program A. photo-illustrators.

This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Mathematics/Science Program A.S. Electives *All career studies courses must be passed with a grade of “C” or higher. Degree This transfer option is designed for the student who wishes to attain a Bachelor’s degree in physics and become a physicist. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term MATH 171* Mathematics (2) ENGL 121 Social Sciences General Education (1) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term MATH 273 PHYS 122 Science (with lab) (2) Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy (2) Credits 4 3-4 3 3 3 16-17 4 4 4 3-4 14-16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term MATH 172 PHYS 121 ENGL 122 Humanities Credits 4 4 3 3 14 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term PHYS 223 Social Sciences or Humanities General Education Electives 4 3 3 6 16 *MATH 151. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. or individual needs. . *Career Studies – 24 credits as follows: Code MATH 171 MATH 172 MATH 273 PHYS 121 PHYS 122 PHYS 223 Course Calculus I Calculus II Calculus III General Physics I General Physics II General Physics III Credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.edu (1) (2) One course is recommended from the Cultural and Global Awareness knowledge area. Refer to page 23 for details. It combines study of physics and related sciences with liberal arts courses necessary for transfer. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Communicate the basic concepts of experimental and theoretical physics f Apply the scientific method. MATH 152 and/or MATH 153 may be required if prerequisites for MATH 171 are not satisfied. or researcher. fundamental principles of physics and mathematical techniques to solve problems f Use instruments/computers to gather and analyze data and present findings Requirements General Education – 30 credits as described on page 50. A minimum of 9 credits are required from the Mathematics.Programs of Study 127 Physics Option Mathematic/Science Program A.S. engineer. Degree Physics Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. career objectives.brookdalecc. Sciences or Technological or Information Literacy categories. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution.

For program details and transfer information. Refer to page 23 for details. political consulting. or individual needs.128 Programs of Study Political Science Option Social Sciences Program A. Students may meet this requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. County and Local 3 Government International Relations 3 Comparative Politics 3 Environmental Politics and 3 Policy Political Science Internship 3 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. law enforcement or law. a student may enter such occupations as Federal. Degree Political Science Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Career Studies – 12 credits from among the following: Code POLI 101 POLI 105 POLI 109 POLI 115 POLI 225 POLI 227 POLI 228 POLI 299 Elective Course Credits Introduction to Political Science 3 American National Government 3 Current Global Topics 3 State.brookdalecc. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. county or local government service. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term Career Studies ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (1) Mathematics/ Science/Technological (1) Competency or Information Literacy SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies SPCH 115 Science (with lab) (1) Humanities History Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3-4 15-17 3 3 4 3 3 16 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Social Sciences Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Humanities Elective Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies ENGL 122 History Social Sciences Mathematics or Science (1) Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. the Bill of Rights. the teaching of civics and history courses.A.edu A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. Upon the receipt of either an Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree. and the UN Charter on Human Rights f Illustrate in written and oral form the diversity of global political life and the impact of such diversity on their personal lives Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Social Sciences Program A. career objectives. interest group staffs. Degree This option combines political science and other liberal arts courses required for transfer to a four-year college political science program. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. journalism. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. BAChELOR’S ThROUGh BROOkDALE This is a preferred Associate degree for students planning to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science at Brookdale’s New Jersey Coastal Communiversity. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Communicate skills and content effectively in written and verbal forms f Complete written assignments demonstrating skills of political analysis f Explain political science methodology f Compare and contrast political ideologies and theories of governance f Describe the workings of a democratic civil society f Summarize the content of important political documents such as the Declaration of Independence. One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.A. international business or government service. the US Constitution. State. political parties. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. students should talk to their Student Development Specialist or call the Communiversity at 732-280-7090. (2) (1) .

Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term PSYC 105 ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (1) Mathematics (1) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term PSYC 245 Communications Science (with Lab) (1) History Humanities Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3-4 15-17 3 3 4 3 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career PSYC 208 ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1) Social Sciences Credits 3-4 3 3 3-4 3 15-17 f f f BAChELOR’S ThROUGh BROOkDALE This is a preferred Associate degree for students planning to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology at Brookdale’s New Jersey Coastal Communiversity. Students will apply relevant research to analyze and evaluate psychological perspectives and concepts. or individual needs.A. Students may meet this requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. students should talk to their Student Development Specialist or call the Communiversity at 732-280-2090. f Credits required for degree: 60-61 Suggested Sequence – Social Sciences Program A. Refer to page 23 for details. (1) . Graduates of this program will be able to: f f Examine the essential elements of the history of Psychology Compare and contrast the concepts of the various contemporary perspectives within the field Appraise the scientific study and measurement of psychology and its concepts Evaluate the basic physical. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50.edu SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Humanities Social Science Cultural & Global Awareness(2) History Elective 3 3 3 3 3 15 A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics.A. The coursework is designed to foster an appreciation and understanding of (1) the scientific study. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. based upon current research. cognitive. Career Studies – 9 credits as follows: Code PSYC 105 PSYC 208 PSYC 245 Course Introduction to Psychology I Life Span Human Development Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Science Credits 3 3 3 This degree program may also be completed online. For more information call 732-224-2089. For program details and transfer information. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. career objectives. and emotional aspects of development through the lifespan Discuss the basic structure and physiology of the nervous and endocrine systems Express informed personal views. and (3) perspectives and concepts (both historical and contemporary) of behaviors and mental processes fundamental to psychology.Programs of Study 129 Psychology Option Social Sciences Program A. Degree This option prepares students to transfer to a baccalaureate psychology program. For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. regarding controversial topics in the field Career Studies – 3-4 credits from the following: PSYC 106 Introduction to 3 Psychology II PSYC 107 Personality and Adjustment 3 PSYC 205 Industrial/Organizational 3 Psychology PSYC 206 Human Growth and 3 Development I PSYC 207 Human Growth and 3 Development II PSYC 209 Theories of Personality 3 PSYC 216 Abnormal Psychology 3 PSYC 217 Social Psychology 3 PSYC 218 Educational Psychology 3 PSYC 219 Positive Psychology 3 PSYC 246 Quantitative Methods Lab 1 Elective 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Program graduates will learn fundamental knowledge concerning psychological processes and research methods for investigating basic and applied problems in psychology.brookdalecc. (2) measurement. social. Students may choose to take some or all of their courses online. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Degree Psychology Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.

The following courses are recommended for students in this program: Code POLI 115 PSYC 105 SOCI 101 SPCH 115 Course State. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. County and Local Government Introduction to Psychology I Principles of Sociology Public Speaking Credits 3 3 3 3 Career Studies – 3 credits as follows: CRJU 126 Introduction to Public Administration 3 Career Studies — 9 credits from among the following: BUSI 205 Principles of Management 3 CRJU 101 Introduction to the Criminal 3 Justice System CRJU 151 Introduction to Criminology 3 CRJU 225 Police Organization and 3 Administration ECON 105 Macro Economics 3 POLI 105 American National Government 3 POLI 115 State and Local Government 3 POLI 295 Special Project – 1-3 Political Science PSYC 205 Industrial/Organizational 3 Psychology PSYC 212** Community Agencies and 3 Human Services Systems SOCI 101 Principles of Sociology 3 SOCI 202 Analysis of Social Problems 3 SOCI 295 Special Project–Sociology 1-6 Elective **Offered Spring term only 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Communicate the skills and content effectively in written and verbal forms f Describe the structure and functions of State. (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics.A. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. students enter such fields as urban planning.edu . political science and management courses with liberal arts studies for students who wish to transfer to a four-year college with majors in public service.130 Programs of Study Public Administration Option Social Sciences Program A. career objectives. Degree Public Administration Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Degree This option combines government. County. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. or individual needs. federal service. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. labor relations. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term Career Studies* ENGL 121 Humanities Social Sciences Mathematics (1) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Communications Science (with lab) (1) History Humanities Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 3 4 3 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term CRJU 126 ENGL 122 Humanities Social Sciences Mathematics or Science(1) SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies History Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Mathematics/Science/Technological (1) Competency or Information Literacy Elective Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Upon receipt of bachelor’s degrees.A. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas.brookdalecc. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. economics. Refer to page 23 for details. For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. and Local Government f Compare and contrast different perspectives of social systems and their application to everyday work and community experiences f Display knowledge of social science research methodology f Appraise different perspectives of individual and group decision-making processes and how these processes affect the workplace and community relations f Apply principles of public administration and management Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Social Sciences Program A. government or pre-law. *CRJU 101 strongly recommended.

brookdalecc. public relations specialist. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – humanities Program A.Programs of Study 131 Public Relations Option humanities Program A. Course Code Credits SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term COMM 101 3 Mathematics/Science/Technological 3-4 Competency or Information Literacy (1) ENGL 121 3 Humanities 3 (1) Mathematics 3-4 15-17 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term COMM 106 Humanities Science (with lab) (1) SPCH 115 History 3 3 4 3 3 16 Total Credits for Degree Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term COMM 102 ENGL 122 History Mathematics or Science (1) Social Sciences Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term JOUR 101 Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Humanities Social Sciences Elective 3 3 3 3 3 15 60 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. tools. Degree Designed for transfer. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. advertising worker. lobbyist. Refer to page 23 for details. . Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. or individual needs. Career Studies – 12 credits as follows: Code COMM 101 COMM 102 COMM 106 JOUR 101 Elective Course Credits Communication 3 Communication Media 3 Introduction to Public Relations 3 Introduction to Journalism 3 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. career objectives. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. and techniques of public relations f Investigate the characteristics of the practitioner. history.A. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Evaluate their potential success in public relations through a broad examination of the topic f Demonstrate understanding of the definition. function. Bachelor’s degree graduates may take such positions as communications specialist. and job opportunities f Practice the necessary skills and meet practicing professionals Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. community relations specialist. this option combines communication/mass media courses with liberal arts requirements. Degree Public Relations Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. organizational structures.A.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. speech writer and media advisor. copywriter for news and media releases.

diagnostic imaging centers and physician’s offices. and evaluate imaging procedures f Teach diverse patients and families pertinent information regarding their imaging procedures f Perform image quality control activities f Incorporate ethical and legal considerations in the implementation of imaging procedures f Exhibit effective communication skills f Practice as a member of the interdisciplinary healthcare team f Continue professional growth f Apply principles from the social sciences. or individual needs. including grading. . Separate policies exist for the Radiologic Technology Program. The program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology.132 Programs of Study Radiologic Technology Program A. Although not required to be taken prior to beginning the program. After successful completion of this examination and application to the Board of Radiologic Technology Examiners. clinics. Degree This program prepares students for entry-level positions in diagnostic imaging. Suite 900. Chicago. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. This degree may take longer than two years to complete. These policies can be found in the Radiologic Technology Student Handbook. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. implement. See Admissions to Health Sciences Programs.S. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Students must satisfy specific requirements in order to be admitted to this program. the graduate is also eligible for state licensure. (312) 7045300. general education courses may be taken before starting clinical courses or during the summer terms. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Clinical experiences are required of all students. Requirements General Education – 20 credits as follows: Code BIOL 111 BIOL 112 ENGL 121 ENGL 122 SPCH 115 PSYC 106 Course Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II English Composition: The Writing Process English Composition: Writing and Research or Public Speaking Humanities Introduction to Psychology II Credits 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 Career Studies – 51 credits as follows: HESC 105 Medical Terminology RADT 150 Introduction to Radiologic Technology RADT 151 Radiographic Exposures I RADT 152 Radiographic Procedures I RADT 153 Introduction to Patient Care RADT 155 Principles of Radiobiology RADT 156 Equipment Operation I RADT 157 Radiographic Procedures II RADT 158 Clinical Practicum I RADT 250 Equipment Operation II RADT 251 Advanced Medical Imaging Modalities RADT 252 Advanced Imaging Procedures RADT 255 Radiographic Pathology RADT 256 Issues in Health Care RADT 257 Radiographic Procedures III RADT 258 Clinical Practicum II 3 2 3 6 3 2 2 6 2 2 3 6 2 2 6 1 Credits required for degree: 71 Suggested Sequence – Radiologic Technology Program A. Upon completion of the Radiologic Technology Program. career objectives. (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.A. 20 North Wacker Drive. Students work with patients. analyze. and humanities to their practice f Practice within the limits and scope of a licensed radiologic technologist 2 2 6 4 3 17 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Refer to page 23 for details. Graduates are employed by hospitals. Illinois 60606. performing a full range of diagnostic radiographic procedures. students will be eligible to sit for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists examination in Radiography. biologic sciences. page 15 in the catalog The following degree requirement must be taken prior to admission: Course Code Credits Course Code HESC 105 – Medical Terminology 3 SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term RADT 150 RADT 151 RADT 152 RADT 153 BIOL 111 SUMMER TERM RADT 158 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term RADT 250 RADT 251 RADT 252 PSYC 106 ENGL 122 or SPCH 115 SUMMER TERM RADT 258 2 3 6 3 4 18 2 2 3 6 3 3 17 1 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term RADT 255 RADT 256 RADT 257 Humanities (1) 2 2 6 3 13 SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term RADT 155 RADT 156 RADT 157 BIOL 112 ENGL 121 Credits Graduates of this program will be able to: f Assess.A. Specific admission criteria for the program are outlined on page 15 of this catalog.S.

Clinical learning experiences are required of all students. rehabilitation. doctors. Career Studies – 41 credits as follows: BIOL 213 Microbiology RESP 161 Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology RESP 162 Fundamental Skills in Respiratory Therapy RESP 163 Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology RESP 164 Patient Assessment and Diagnostics RESP 261 Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care RESP 262 Adult Critical Care RESP 263 Subacute Respiratory Care RESP 264 Respiratory Care Practice RESP 265 Issues and Trends in Health Care Elective 4 3 6 4 5 2 7 2 6 2 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Upon completion of the program students are eligible to sit for the National Board of Respiratory Care (NBRC) Examination.com). analyze. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Refer to page 23 for details. Degree This program prepares students for entry-level positions in respiratory care. The above sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. After successful completion of this examination and application to the Respiratory Care Board. management and control of problems and abnormalities associated with the cardiopulmonary system. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Once licensed. or individual needs. . the graduate is also eligible for state licensure as a Certified Respiratory Therapist. biologic sciences and humanities into their practice f Continue personal and professional growth f Practice as a member of the interdisciplinary healthcare team f Practice within the limits and scope of a licensed respiratory therapist This degree may take longer than two years to complete. life support and other specialized methods of treatment. and nurses to provide diagnostic testing.S. graduates are eligible to take the Advanced Practitioner Examinations to become a Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT). Graduates work closely with patients.Programs of Study 133 Respiratory Therapy Program A.coarc. career objectives. Applicants for Advanced Placement must have met all criteria for Allied Health admission and have completed all program requirements in order to be eligible for graduation. implement and evaluate respiratory care f Incorporate ethical/legal considerations into the respiratory action plan f Exhibit therapeutic communication skills f Apply basic principles of management in the care of groups of patients f Incorporate principles from the social sciences.S. Students must satisfy specific requirements in order to be admitted to this program. Credits required for degree: 67 Suggested Sequence – Respiratory Therapy Program A. Bedford. Separate policies exist for the Respiratory program including grading. page 15 in this catalog. (1) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. general education courses may be taken before starting clinical courses or during the summer terms.A. 1248 Harwood Road. Specific admission criteria for the program are outlined on page 15 of this catalog. education. The process and criteria for Advanced Placement are available by request from the Allied Health Office. monitoring. Requirements General Education – 23 credits as follows: Code BIOL 111 BIOL 112 COMP 129 ENGL 121 Course Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II Information Technology English Composition: Writing Process Communications Humanities Social Sciences Credits 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 Advanced Placement in Respiratory Therapy Certified Respiratory Therapists and persons with previous experience in Respiratory Therapy may be eligible for Advanced Placement. Although not required to be taken prior to beginning the program. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. See Admission to Health Science Programs. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term RESP 161 RESP 162 BIOL 111 COMP 129 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term RESP 261 RESP 262 BIOL 213 Humanities (1) Social Sciences Credits 3 6 4 3 16 2 7 4 3 3 19 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term RESP 163 RESP 164 BIOL 112 ENGL 121 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term RESP 263 RESP 264 RESP 265 Communications Elective Credits 4 5 4 3 16 2 6 2 3 3 16 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Assess. therapeutics. Students work with patients in the treatment. Texas 76021-4244 (817)2832835. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.A. These policies can be found in the Respiratory Therapy Student Handbook. This program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (www.

An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Employ the scientific method of inquiry to gather and use information for the express purposes of critical thinking. information analysis and problem solving f Identify and interpret basic scientific concepts f Use appropriate technology BIOL 101 BIOL 102 BIOL 111 BIOL 112 BIOL 205* BIOL 206** BIOL 207*** BIOL 213 BIOL 215 General Biology I General Biology II Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II Invertebrate Zoology Vertebrate Zoology Marine Biology Microbiology Cell and Molecular Biology 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 CHEM 101 General Chemistry I CHEM 102 General Chemistry II CHEM 117*** Introduction to Marine Chemistry CHEM 136 Introduction to Inorganic. (The Math/Science Division may approve another sequence based on the requirements of the transfer institution. Science Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.S. Degree. . *Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only ***Offered Summer term only 5 5 4 4 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Credits required for degree: 62-66 Suggested Sequence – Mathematics/Science Program A.brookdalecc. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term Career Studies **MATH 152 ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (2) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term *Career Studies Science (with lab) (2) Humanities or Social Sciences Credits 4 4 3 3 3-4 17-18 8-10 4 3 15-17 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies MATH 153 ENGL 122 Social Sciences General Education (1) SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term *Career Studies Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy (2) General Education Credits 4-5 4 3 3 3 17-18 8-10 3-4 3 14-17 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. or individual needs. This option may fulfill the needs of students planning to major in Marine Science. ENVR 101/102. MATH 171/172. career objectives. To maximize transfer credits. PHYS 121/122.S. Career Studies – 8 credits as follows: Code Course Credits MATH 152 College Algebra and 4 Trigonometry MATH 153 Pre-Calculus Mathematics 4 † † Career Studies — 24–26 credits from among the following. Organic and Biological Chemistry CHEM 203 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 204 Organic Chemistry II CHEM 235 Fundamentals of Organic and Biological Chemistry CHEM 236 Biochemistry ENVR 101 Physical Geology ENVR 102** Historical Geology ENVR 205*** Introduction to Coastal Geology MATH 171 Calculus I MATH 172 Calculus II ENVR 111 Oceanography ENVR 212** Coastal Zone Management PHYS 111 General Physics I (non-calculus) PHYS 112 General Physics II (non-calculus)** PHYS 121 General Physics I PHYS 122 General Physics II PHYS 223 General Physics III † All career studies courses must be passed with a grade of “C” or higher. (1) (2) One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. or Environmental Science at a four-year college. Sciences or Technological or Information Literacy categories.) It is suggested that the student complete both courses in any two-semester sequence begun. students must be guided by the transfer institution’s requirements and work closely with their counselor in order to select courses wisely. For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. BIOL 101 BIOL 215 CHEM 235 MATH 171 BIOL 102 CHEM 101 CHEM 236 MATH 172 BIOL 111 CHEM 102 ENVR 101 PHYS 111 BIOL 112 CHEM 117 ENVR 102 PHYS 112 BIOL 205 CHEM 136 ENVR 205 PHYS 121 BIOL 206 CHEM 203 ENVR 111 PHYS 122 BIOL 207 CHEM 204 ENVR 212 PHYS 223 BIOL 213 **MATH 151 may be required if prerequisites to MATH 152 are not satisfied. BIOL 111/112. CHEM 101/102. Degree Students wishing a concentration in science combined with liberal studies needed for transfer to four-year colleges or special professional institutions may choose this option. PHYS 111/112. the selected courses must include at least one two-semester sequence of courses as indicated above. Geology.134 Programs of Study Science Option Mathematics/ Science Program A. The flexibility offered by this option allows for differences in entrance and transferability requirements of these schools. The selected courses must include at least one two-semester sequence of courses chosen from BIOL 101/102. Refer to page 23 for details.edu *Take one of the following courses. Requirements General Education – 30 credits as described on page 50. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. A minimum of 9 credits are required from the Mathematics. Consult with your counselor or Math/Science Division Chairperson. Overall.

career objectives. history. This program also provides personal enrichment in the social sciences.brookdalecc. . Elective – 3 credits BAChELOR’S ThROUGh BROOkDALE This is a preferred Associate degree for students planning to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Liberal and Labor Studies at Brookdale’s New Jersey Coastal Communiversity. philosophy. SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Humanities Social Sciences Cultural & Global Awareness(2) Elective 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. with at least 6 credits in one of the following concentrations: anthropology. Career Studies – 12 credits from among the Social Sciences. law. philosophy. political science. or the ministry. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. psychology or sociology.Programs of Study 135 Social Sciences Program A.A. For more information call 732224-2089. consulting. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. interdisciplinary studies. Refer to page 23 for details. For program details and transfer information. political science. The Social Sciences A.A. Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Social Sciences Program A. economics. teaching. economics. Degree The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. sociology. degree program will prepare students for transfer to degree programs leading to careers in the mental health professions. students should talk to their Student Development Specialist or call the Communiversity at 732-280-2090.A.A. Students planning to major in the following areas should enroll in this program and choose from the following concentrations: anthropology. Students may choose to take some or all of their courses online. interdisciplinary studies. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy(1) ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (1) Career Studies SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Communications Humanities History Science (with lab) (1) Credits 3-4 3 3 3-4 3 15-17 3 3 3 3 4 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1) History Social Sciences Career Studies Credits 3 3-4 3 3 3 15-16 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. degree program is designed for students seeking a broad general education or transfer to a fouryear institution. or individual needs. history. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. psychology. Degree The Social Sciences A. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate how culture and personal experience impacts individuals in everyday life f Analyze and interpret philosophical and theoretical perspectives found in a variety of Social Science schools of thought f Investigate and evaluate the research methods used in various Social Science disciplines f Synthesize and communicate the applications of Social Science concepts in a global setting f Distinguish between the many career paths and transfer options available to Social Science students This degree program may also be completed online.

Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. and major social institutions.A. . community and non-profit organizations. This option prepares students for transfer in order to complete a Bachelor’s degree in sociology.brookdalecc. social inequality. Upon completion of the sociology option. students will be able to identify a potential career path and/or specialization within the field of social science. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. or individual needs. career objectives. The curriculum will introduce students to the various subdisciplines in sociology and related fields. This will provide students with opportunities in areas that include but are not limited to social and human services. and social problems.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. Refer to page 23 for details. students who complete the program will be introduced to the study of social inequality. social structures. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Career Studies: 9 credits from among the following courses: Code Course Credits SOCI 105 Intercultural Communication 3 SOCI 202 Analysis of Social Problems 3 SOCI 215 Sociology of Marriage 3 and the Family SOCI 216* Sociology of Minorities 3 SOCI 226 Drugs and Society 3 SOCI 235 Sociology of Sport 3 CRJU 151 Introduction to Criminology 3 Elective *Offered Fall term only 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Communicate major sociological concepts verbally and in writing f Identify and define the social features of human beings and the ways in which they interact and change f Demonstrate and summarize knowledge regarding the components of social structure as well as the major agents of socialization f Compare and contrast the different subdisciplines and theoretical perspectives in the study of sociology and social inequality Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Social Sciences Program A. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.A. business. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. Degree Sociology Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. This program provides a framework for the scientific study of individual social interaction. Finally. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term SOCI 101 ENGL 121 Humanities History Mathematics (1) Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies ENGL 122 Humanities History Mathematics or Science (1) Credits 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Science (with lab) (1) Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy(1) SPCH 115 Social Sciences 3 4 3-4 3 3 16-17 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Humanities Social Sciences Cultural & Global Awareness(2) Elective 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. and education. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. government offices.136 Programs of Study Sociology Option Social Sciences Program A. Career Studies: 12 credits as follows: Code SOCI 101 Course Principles of Sociology Credits 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor.

advertising. public relations and broadcast journalism.brookdalecc. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.A. 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. demonstrate effective conflict resolution skills in both small group and interpersonal settings Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – humanities Program A. sales. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. . Degree This Option is for students who wish to transfer to a four-year college with a major in Speech Communication or Communication. Career Studies: 3 credits required: Code Course Credits SPCH 130 Interpersonal Communication 3 Career Studies – 9 credits from among the following: SPCH 125 Oral Interpretation 3 SPCH 126 Small Group Discussion 3 SPCH 127 Voice and Diction 3 SPCH 215* Argumentation and Debate 3 SPCH 225 Advanced Public Speaking 3 SPCH 226 Speech Practicum 1-3 SPCH 295 Special Project – Speech 1-3 SOCI 105 Intercultural Communication 3 Elective *Offered Spring term in odd years. The combination of theoretical and applied oral communication courses within liberal arts studies allow students to transfer to four-year colleges and universities as Speech. Speech Communication or Communication majors. create and use visual aids. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term SPCH 115 ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (1) Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (1) SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Career Studies History Humanities Social Sciences Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3-4 15-17 3 3 3 3 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term SPCH 130 History ENGL 122 Science (with lab) (1) Social Sciences SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Cultural & Global Awareness (2) Humanities Mathematics or Science (1) Elective Credits 3 3 3 4 3 16 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. Career Options open to four-year Speech Communication majors include teaching. and/or create mediated messages f Utilize personal development skills by meeting course deadlines.A. or individual needs.Programs of Study 137 Speech Communication Option humanities Program A. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. organizing and evaluating information to create effective oral messages f Utilize appropriate technology to communicate with others. analyzing. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. corporate training. Degree Speech Communication Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. Students taking this option are urged to participate in Brookdale’s competitive speech team. Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate rhetorical competence by effectively delivering oral presentations in a variety of contexts f Utilize critical thinking to create and evaluate oral messages f Demonstrate information literacy by collecting. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. Refer to page 23 for details. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. meeting attendance requirements and managing communication apprehension f Utilize effective oral communication skills with culturally diverse and/or multiple audiences f Practice oral communication skills to work effectively within teams to complete tasks. career objectives.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics.

138

Programs of Study

Sustainable Energy A.A.S. Degree
This program is designed to prepare graduates for careers in energy services. Scientific, engineering, and business principles are integrated for workplace application in the emerging green industries. Graduates can function in a variety of employment opportunities including construction, marketing, and energy services. This program, while not designed for transfer, may transfer in part or in its entirety to four-year schools.

Requirements General Education – 24 credits as described below: Code ENGL 121 SPCH 115 ENGL 122 ECON 105 MATH 151 CHEM 116 PHYS 108 HIST 107 Course English Composition: Writing Process Public Speaking OR English Composition: Writing and Research Macro Economics Intermediate Algebra Chemistry in Life Physics in Life Contemporary World History Credits 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 3

Degree Audit
Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Refer to page 23 for details.

Graduates of this program will be able to: f Analyze the sustainability of current energy resources f Discuss the environmental impact of energy consumption f Conduct energy audits f Incorporate basic business principles into energy management f Demonstrate knowledge of basic electrical skills f Utilize wind and biomass knowledge to manage energy issues f Communicate in a manner that reflects an understanding of the sustainable energy field f Use the scientific method to develop critical thinking skills and quantitative analytical proficiency

Career Studies - 37 credits Code Course Credits BUSI 105 Introduction to Business 3 BUSI 205 Principles of Management 3 ELEC 103 Electrical Skills and Techniques 4 ELEC 111 Electrical Circuits 4 ENEG 125 Introduction to Sustainable Energy 3 ENEG 126 Principles of Energy Management 3 ENEG 225 Wind and Wave Technology 3 ENEG 226 Photovoltaic and Biofuel Technology 4 ENVR 107 Environmental Science 4 ENVR 121 Physical Geography 3 POLI 228 Environmental Politics and Policy 3

Credits required for degree: 61 Suggested Sequence – Sustainable Energy A.A.S.
The following sequence is an example of how this degree may be completed in two years. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution, career objectives, or individual needs. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.
Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ENGL 121 MATH 151 ENVR 107 ENVR 121 ENEG 125 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term ECON 105 PHYS 108 ELEC 111 ENEG 225 Credits 3 4 4 3 3 17 3 4 4 3 14 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term SPCH 115 or ENGL 122 BUSI 105 CHEM 116 ELEC 103 ENEG 126 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term HIST 107 POLI 228 BUSI 205 ENEG 226 Credits 3 3 4 4 3 17 3 3 3 4 13

Programs of Study

139

Technical Studies Program A.A.S. Degree
Business Management Option
This career program is designed for students with prior work experience and apprenticeship training to earn an Associate’s degree and pursue a business career related to their technical expertise. Students may be granted up to 25 college credits from training programs approved by the American Council on Education. Students complete course work that provides management training for employment opportunities in business or in establishing their own business.

Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. Technical Core – A maximum of 25 credits (if student does not have 25 technical credits, the remaining credits can be elective credits approved by assigned counselor or can be completed through the apprenticeship program while also taking Brookdale courses) from the following: Apprenticeship Training Military Training Trade/Proprietary Education 25 Career Studies — 18 credits as follows: BUSI 105 Introduction to Business BUSI 165 Computer Applications in Business BUSI 205 Principles of Management BUSI 206** Supervisory Management BUSI 231* Human Resource Management BUSI 241** Small Business Management Total Credits for Degree *Offered Fall term only **Offered Spring term only 3 3 3 3 3 3 63

Degree Audit
Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Refer to page 23 for details.

Graduates of this program will be able to: f Analyze business situations and develop effective plans for achievement of goals f Utilize appropriate technology to solve business-related problems f Make decisions that reflect an understanding of how political-legal, competitive, technological, economic and social issues influence business f Communicate an understanding of business principles in written and oral form f Demonstrate effective team/interpersonal skills

Credits required for degree: 63 Suggested Sequence – Technical Studies A.A.S. Degree Business Management Option
The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution, career objectives, or individual needs. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.
Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term ENGL 121 General Education (1) BUSI 105 Technical Core Credits 3 3 3 6 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Communications BUSI 165 Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy Technical Core SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term BUSI 206** BUSI 241** General Education Technical Core Credits 3 3 3-4 7 16-17 3 3 2-3 6 14-15

SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Humanities BUSI 205 BUSI 231* Social Sciences Technical Core *Offered Fall Term only **Offered Spring Term only
(1)

3 3 3 3 6 18

One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.

140

Programs of Study

Theater Option
humanities A.A.
Students who wish to specialize in acting or musical theater should select this option. Upon successful completion of the option, students will be prepared for the rigors of a Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, or his/her immediate entry into the market place. This option provides students an opportunity to select a career path in either acting or musical theater. The student will focus on and receive the fundamental and advanced acting skills or voice skills along with the practical training necessary for success in improvisation, basic and advanced character development, movement and auditioning techniques. The skills students develop in this option will prove valuable in career fields such as sales, government, public relations and broadcasting.

Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. The following general education courses are recommended for students choosing this program: HUMANITIES: THTR 135 Musical Theater 3 OR THTR 105 Theater Appreciation 3 Career Studies – 12 credits as described below: THTR 111 Acting I THTR 112 Acting II Career Studies – 6 credits from among the following: Students seeking to specialize in Musical Theater should select the following: MUPF 111 Voice I MUPF 112 Voice II Students seeking to specialize in Acting should select the following: THTR 213 Acting III THTR 222 Acting IV Elective Recommended: DANC 111 Introduction to Dance I (for Musical Theater students) THTR 121 Basic Directing (for Acting students)

Degree Audit
Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Refer to page 23 for details.

3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Graduates of this program will be able to: f f Examine the history, traditions, and literary richness of theater Research and organize the text to clearly, critically and creatively make logical decisions and choices on character development Evaluate information from a variety of sources for efficient and effective creative expression Communicate effectively through oral, physical, and aesthetic interpretation and interaction with the text, cast and audience Apply basic principles of stage performance, design, and technical skills Apply advanced principles of stage performance, design, and technical skills (Acting Specialization) Produce an optimal vocal quality and sound for any number of musical styles, interpretations or techniques (Musical Theater Specialization)

f

Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – humanities A.A. Theater Option
The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution, career objectives, or individual needs. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.
Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term THTR 111 ENGL 121 Humanities Mathematics (1) Social Sciences Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term THTR 112 ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1) SPCH 115 THTR 105 or THTR 135 Credits 3 3 3-4 3 3 15-16

f

f f

f

SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term MUPF 111 or THTR 213 Science (with lab) (1) Humanities History Mathematics/Science/Technological Competency or Information Literacy (1)

3 3 4 3 3-4 16-17

SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term MUPF 111 or THTR 213 History Social Sciences Cultural & Global Awareness(2) Elective

3 3 3 3 3 15

For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer.brookdalecc.edu

(1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics, Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area.

Programs of Study

141

Video Production Option
Communication Media Program A.A.S. Degree
This option prepares students for entrylevel positions in the video industry. Hands-on experience, with an emphasis on digital technology, provides the skills necessary to plan programming and assist production as a camera operator, audio recordist, technical director, or general crew member. Students who wish to continue at the four-year level should consider one of the options of the Humanities A.A. Program.

Requirements General Education – 20 credits as described on page 50. Career Studies – 21 credits as follows: Code COMM 101 COMM 102 COMM 115 TELV 115 TELV 121 TELV 122 TELV 224 Course Communication Communication Media Audio in Media TV: Aesthetics and Analysis Television Production Digital Video Production Video Editing and Post Production Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Degree Audit
Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. Refer to page 23 for details.

Graduates of this program will be able to: f Demonstrate proficiency with television studio equipment, digital audio and digital video technology f Create projects that adhere to a variety of aesthetic principles f Apply concepts about the history and nature of television production

Career Studies – 15 credits from among the following: CINE 105 Film Appreciation: The Motion 3 Picture as an Art Form COMM 216* Advanced Digital Audio/ 3 Musical Recording DGMD 101 Introduction to Digital Media 3 DIGM 115 Digital Editing: 3 After Effects DIGM 116 Production & Storyboarding: 3 Photoshop TELV 295 Special Projects–Television 1-6 TELV 299 Television Internship 1-6 Electives *Offered Spring term only 4

Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Communication Media A.A.S. Program Degree Video Production Option
The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution, career objectives, or individual needs. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.
Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term COMM 101 TELV 115 TELV 121 ENGL 121 Humanities SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term COMM 115 TELV 224 or Career Studies Career Studies Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy
(1)

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 3 6 3-4 15-16

Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term COMM 102 TELV 122 Communication Social Sciences General Education (1) SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term TELV 224 Career Studies General Education Elective

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 6 3 4 16

One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area.

Refer to page 23 for details. XML and web site developCOMP 126 Computer Logic and Design 3 ment tools COMP 145 Introduction to UNIX 3 f Enhance web sites through scripting and programming COMP 166 Web Design Using HTML 3 COMP 171 COMP 185 COMP 226 COMP 267 COMP 268 COMP 269 COMP 296 Programming I Programming in Visual Basic. the student will be prepared to enter the web developer field. implementing and maintaining web sites should choose this certificate program. f Plan and develop interactive web sites f Enable access to databases Career Studies – 30 credits as follows: f Efficiently use HTML.S. XML and web site development tools Enhance web sites through scripting and programming Analyze and design systems Webmaster Administration Academic Credit Certificate Students wishing to gain a technical proficiency and expertise in planning. Upon completion of the certificate coursework students will be prepared to enter the webmaster administration field.able to: tion as described on page 50. test.S. concepts and technical skills. development.142 Programs of Study Web Site Development Option Computer Science Program A. Course Code SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term COMP 126 COMP 145 COMP 166 ENGL 121 Humanities Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term COMP 171 COMP 269 Communications Mathematics or Science or Technological or Info Literacy Technical Electives SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term COMP 296 Technical Electives General Education (1) Credits 3 3 3 3-4 3 15-16 3 6 6 15 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. career objectives. implementation and maintenance of web sites should choose this option. debug. Degree Web Site Development Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years. or individual needs. design. This degree is not designed to transfer. developing. Degree Students wishing to gain a technical proficiency and expertise in planning.NET Systems Analysis and Design Client Side Using JavaScript Server Side Scripting Database Concepts Advanced Software Project 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 the 3 3 3 3 3 1 Requirements General Education – 6 credits: Code Course Required: ENGL 121 English Composition: The Writing Process Recommended: COMP 129 Information Technology Career Studies – 21 credits as follows: COMP 126 Computer Logic and Design COMP 145 Introduction to UNIX COMP 166 WEB Design Using HTML COMP 171 Programming I COMP 267 Client Side Using JavaScript COMP 268 Server Side Scripting COMP 269 Database Concepts Technical Electives . Total Certificate Credits 30 Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – Computer Science Program A. Students will learn the necessary languages. although the student will find that many of the courses which provide for a foundation in computer science may transfer. Upon completion.3 credits from among following: BUSI 171 E-Business Technologies COMP 140 Designing/Developing WEB Sites COMP 265 Spreadsheets Using EXCEL NETW 115 E-Commerce System Design Credits 3 Technical Electives – 9 credits from among following: BUSI 171 E-Business Technologies COMP 140 Designing/Developing Web Sites COMP 265 Spreadsheets Using EXCEL COMP 299 Computer Science Internship NETW 115 E-Commerce System Design Electives 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 the 3 3 3 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f f f f f f f f f Analyze problems Create effective algorithms Code. SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term COMP 185 COMP 226 COMP 267 COMP 268 Social Sciences (1) 3 3 3 3 3 15 One course is recommended from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. and document programs using basic control structures Create programs which use Graphical User Interfaces Plan and develop interactive web sites Enable access to databases Efficiently use HTML. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. . An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution.A. See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress.A. tools. Requirements Graduates of this certificate program will be General Education – 20 credits of general educa.

See your counselor for other options and to monitor your progress. Sciences or Technological Competency or Information Literacy knowledge areas.Programs of Study 143 Women’s Studies Option humanities Program A.brookdalecc. An individual’s program may vary depending on transfer institution. concerns and experiences across disciplines and in a global context.A. artistic. multicultural. research. scientific. Psychology or Sociology. perspectives. race. and social perspectives of women f Describe and express awareness of the conditions of women through written and verbal communication in classroom and community settings f Examine issues. Students may meet the requirement while simultaneously fulfilling the General Education requirement for another knowledge area. (2) One course is required from the Cultural & Global Awareness knowledge area. sexuality. This sequence is based on satisfaction of all Basic Skills requirements and prerequisites and presumes a Fall Term start date. and science will also be examined. ability and age f Describe how the word “feminism” has been used and misused from historical to contemporary times Credits required for degree: 60 Suggested Sequence – humanities Program A. Career Studies – 3 credits Code HUMN 129 Course Issues in Women’s Studies Credits 3 Degree Audit Your progress toward your degree is available through WebAdvisor. academic field of Women’s Studies f Discuss the intersection of identities such as gender. History. social work. literary. Course Code Credits SEMESTER 1 – Fall Term HUMN 129 3 Mathematics/Science/Technological 3-4 Competency or Information Literacy (1) ENGL 121 3 Humanities 3 (1) Mathematics 3-4 15-17 SEMESTER 3 – Fall Term Career Studies Humanities Science (with lab) (1) SPCH 115 History 3 3 4 3 3 16 Course Code SEMESTER 2 – Spring Term Career Studies ENGL 122 Mathematics or Science (1) History Social Sciences Credits 3 3 3-4 3 3 15-16 SEMESTER 4 – Spring Term Career Studies Social Sciences Cultural & Global Awareness(2) Humanities Elective 3 3 3 3 3 15 For-additional information on transfer visit the Transfer Resources website at http://transfer. . economic. career objectives. counseling. Knowledge of Women’s Studies is an asset for students choosing careers in teaching. Contributions and Debates HUMN 230** Women and Science Elective **Offered Spring term only *Offered Fall term only 3 3 3 3 3 Graduates of this program will be able to: f Discuss and appreciate diverse historical. literature. Career Studies – 9 credits from among the following: ENGL 128* Writing from the Female Experience ENGL 175 Woman as Author HIST 125 Women’s History Survey: Experiences. and other areas. Students choosing this option may transfer to a four-year college where Women’s Studies is offered as a major or minor or paired with another discipline such as Literature.A. Refer to page 23 for details. Women’s roles in – and contributions to – history. methodologies and research in the interdisciplinary. cultural. or individual needs. class. culture.edu (1) A minimum of 12 credits are required from the Mathematics. Requirements General Education – 45 credits as described on page 50. human services. Degree This option is designed for students interested in women’s issues. Degree Women’s Studies Option The following sequence is an example of how this degree can be completed in two years.

college vocabulary. if applicable. This class introduces students to reading and study techniques needed for survival in college courses. The number in parenthesis following the course credits indicates the number of lecture hours. setting priorities. studio. Technological Competency or Information Literacy (IT). The course code is followed by the course title. Students who do not withdraw from classes for which they have not completed required course work may be dropped at any time. here. strategies taught in class are applied to other college courses. (Prerequisite: ACAD 084) ACAD-086 Academic Skills Workshop III (Cr4) (3:2) This is a course for students with learning disabilities. Social Sciences (SS). Lecture. Corequisites are courses that must be taken with the course. Students will be introduced to college support systems and will be assisted in their program planning. All general education courses in this section will be marked with a (l) dot before the course code. Cultural and Global Awareness (CG) and Ethical Dimension (E). Sciences (SC). Students meet with a professional tutor for a scheduled hour each week. College survival skills will be introduced. e. Students will be introduced to other departments on campus. time management. Individual tutoring is part of the course. Students who register for classes before grades are finalized must drop any class in which they have not successfully passed the prerequisite or corequisite subject. students will attend a scheduled lab hour each week to review and complete reading assignments due the following class. (Prerequisite: ACAD 084) . In addition to three hours of class. Developmental courses will not be counted to meet degree requirements. Developmental courses will not be counted to meet degree requirements. Technological or Information Literacy Competency The courses listed below.144 Course Descriptions Course Descriptions Course descriptions are listed alphabetically by subject. students will attend a scheduled lab hour each week to review and complete reading assignments due the following class. which will prepare students for the transition to college. These credits may not transfer to four-year institutions. for a 15 week semester. This class focuses on language. This class helps students develop strategies to manage content-area course work. Course credits are identified following the course title. See your Counselor for transferability information and how these courses apply to your degree. ACAD-084 Academic Skills Workshop I (Cr4) (3:2) ACAD 084 is the first in a series of four-credit courses for students enrolling in a Learning Disabilities course at Brookdale. Some courses are offered only in specific terms. these credits may be used as either career studies or elective credits. lab. In addition. Courses preceded with (l) are General Education courses. designated with a (t). Humanities (HU). Developmental courses will not be counted to meet degree requirements. Read a listing as follows: General Education Knowledge Areas College policies on general education require a distribution of courses across the following knowledge areas – Communications (C). History (HI). Mathematics (M). are identified at the end of the descriptive information. here. ACAD-085 Academic Skills Workshop II (Cr4) (3:2) This course is for students with learning disabilities. These courses are not General Education courses and do not count toward General Education requirements.. if required for a course. The letter or letters in parenthesis following the course code identify the general education knowledge area. strategies taught in class are applied to other college courses. here. Course prerequisites and corequisites. Students meet with a trained professional tutor for a scheduled hour each week. reading and writing. taking responsibility for academic tasks and active studying. Academic Skills Workshops ACAD-081 Transition to College (Cr3) (3:0) ACAD 081 is a support course for students with learning disabilities offered only in the summer. may satisfy the Technological or Information Literacy Competency (IT) BUSI 165 BUSI 171 COMP 116 COMP 128 DGMD 101 NETW 107 NETW 125 NETW 151 NETW 152 OADM 116 PLGL 210 Prerequisites and Corequisites: Prerequisites are courses that must be passed prior to taking the course. communication skills. and lab. In addition to three hours of class. Students meet with a trained professional tutor for a scheduled hour each week. students will attend a scheduled lab hour each week to review and complete reading assignments due the following class. Individual tutoring is part of the course. and clinical hours will be longer in shorter terms. Depending on degree program. See degree program outlines for specific distributions. Individual tutoring is part of the course.g. strategies taught in class are applied to other college courses. studio. Students are responsible for ensuring that all prerequisite and corequisite requirements are met. This information is listed at the end of the course description. spelling. or clinical hours. vocabulary and thinking skills in addition to expanding communication skills.

Developmental courses will not be counted to meet degree requirements. morphology and function of teeth. and READ 092. Discussions will be included to emphasize the importance of anatomical concepts. with the extent and quality of the project and report to be previously agreed upon by the instructor and student. DENA and DENH) courses are taken at UMDNJ. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ACCT 102) NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term in the evening. noncurrent liabilities and shareholders equity. The Medical Emergency section of this course will prepare the student for a specific role in the management of medical emergencies. The student will become familiar with the opinions of the Accounting Principles Board of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and the statements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board. By using QuickBooks the students will analyze and record a business entity’s transactions in a computerized environment rather than using a manual system. (Prerequisites: 15 credits of Accounting course work and instructor approval) ACCT-299 Accounting Internship (Cr3) Students will work in a job related to their program. ACCT-203 Intermediate Accounting I (Cr3) (3:0) The student will be able to apply generally accepted accounting principles to the preparation of general purpose financial statements with particular emphasis on current assets and current liabilities. ACCT 101 is recommended. but not required) l General Education Course . This is a college support course and will not be counted to meet the requirements for a degree. track and calculate finances that simplifies financial tasks. Long-term assets and liabilities. ACCT-204 Intermediate Accounting II (Cr3) (3:0) The student will be able to apply generally accepted accounting principles to the preparation of general purpose financial statements with particular emphasis on non-current assets. a study of the nomenclature. Students meet with a professional tutor for a scheduled hour each week. (Prerequisite: ACAD 084) ACAD-089 Academic Skills Workshop IV (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed for upper-level students who need only individual tutoring and monitoring by the learning disabilities specialist. A written report will be submitted. ADEC-110 Introduction to the Dental Profession (Cr4) This course is designed to introduce the student to the profession of dentistry and allied dental education. ADEC-113 Medical Emergency in the Dental Office (Cr1) The Medical History and Evaluation section of this course is designed specifically to help obtain and record accurately the patient’s past and present physical condition and medication history to modify the dental hygiene treatment plan accordingly. worksheet and financial statements. (Prerequisites: MATH 012. MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation. The student will become familiar with the opinions of the Accounting Principles Board of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and the statements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board. Demonstrations and lecture sessions are designed to emphasize the clinical appearance of the anatomical features of the teeth and point out the relationship of the teeth to adjacent teeth. This course also describes the structure and function of the gross structures of the head and neck. opposing teeth. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. cost control. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ACCT 203) ACCT-295 Special Project-Accounting (Cr1-3) Students will work independently on an accounting project not suitable to one of the other Accounting courses. Expanded functions as listed in New Jersey Dental Auxiliary’s Act are included whenever applicable to reinforce the importance of understanding the utilization of dental materials. here. (Prerequisite: ACCT 101) ACCT-115 Federal Income Tax (Cr3) (3:0) A study of income tax laws as they apply to individuals.Course Descriptions 145 ACAD-088 Academic Skills Workshop V: Word Processing (Cr4) (3:2) This course introduces students to computer techniques needed for survival in college courses. strategies taught in class are applied to other college courses. It introduces partnership and corporate accounting. ADEC-112 Dental Materials (Cr3) This course is to introduce and reinforce theory. (Prerequisite: ACAD 084 or appropriate ACAD courses plus written permission from the Learning Disabilities Specialist). Current topics relevant to the practice of dentistry and concepts of general and speciality practice are addressed. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term in the evening. (Prerequisite: ACCT 101) ACCT-105 Introduction to QuickBooks (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to introduce students to a widely used software program used to record. Current assets and liabilities are emphasized. Individual tutoring is part of the course. Emphasis is placed on tax laws as they apply to income and deductions and the ability to prepare an accurate Federal Income Tax Return. Information and manipulation will be taught to a preclinical laboratory proficiency level and will be explored further in the Dental Specialties course. structure. (Prerequisites: 30 credits to include ACCT 101 and ACCT 102 and permission of instructor and Career Services Representative) Allied Dental Education Dental education (ADEC. preparation of trial balance. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Dental Assisting or Dental Hygiene program) ADEC-111 Dental Head and Neck Anatomy (Cr3) This course is a study of the basic structure of the oral cavity. participate in programs on campus and complete an internship workbook based on work experience gained. cash flow and analysis of financial statements are emphasized. In addition. surrounding tissues and approximating tissues. Accounting ACCT-101 Principles of Accounting I (Cr3) (3:0) An introduction to basic concepts and principles of recording and posting financial information. ACCT-112 Managerial Accounting (Cr3) (3:0) A study of financial information as presented for internal management purposes. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) ACCT-102 Principles of Accounting II (Cr3) (3:0) This course is a continuation of ACCT 101. performance evaluation and techniques for analyzing information for planning and decision making. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. (Prerequisite: Computer experience desirable. with a focus on cost determination. students will attend a scheduled lab hour each week. techniques and application in the handling of dental materials.

including native North America. workbook questions and a quality assurance project. as well as industrial societies. recording procedures and field photography. Note: This course is offered only in the Fall term. development.146 Course Descriptions Students will be able to recognize emergency situations and take appropriate steps in treating them with a team approach. and humans as primates as they study the place of humans in nature. role playing and discussions. issues of identity. northern Asia. l ANTH-116 (SS) Introduction to Physical Anthropology (Cr3) (3:0) Students will develop an understanding of evolution. diversity and cross-cultural requirements. American Sign Language AMSL-101 American Sign Language I (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of American Sign Language with particular attention to the grammar of the language and the culture of American deaf persons. In addition. Students will participate in exercises to develop skills which are significant to this visually-based language. In this course. Students will receive instruction in a broad range of archaeological activities. The course takes the student through a process regarding the development. as well as approaches toward the reconstruction of ancient cultural systems. l ANTH-106 (CG) Cultures of the World (Cr3) (3:0) This course investigates the common and distinctive features of culture in each of several broad zones around the world. This course will create a solid foundation of basic conversational skills and a command of the essentials and grammatical principles of the language. through readings. except by instructor approval. (Prerequisite: ADEC-110) ADEC-115 Dental Radiology (Cr3) Dental Radiology is a didactic/laboratory course presenting the principles of radiology and its clinical application. This course utilizes a lecture series with audio-visual aids. The course is a prerequisite to Dental Specialties II. where the student will function and perform expanded duties to laboratory proficiency. discussion. The course is intended for students who are interested in the various cultures of the world. ANTH-295 Special Project-Anthropology (Cr1-6) Anthropology l ANTH-105 (SS) (CG) Cultural Anthropology (Cr3) (3:0) The student will investigate the concepts of culture and apply them to different cultures of the world. native South America. research design. The format will include lectures. behavioral patterns and the environment in which the patient lives. processing. geological environment. we will investigate. demonstrations. Lecture topics include x-ray production. and a field trip. Grammatical patterns and syntax will be introduced with the aim that students read and write what they have learned to say and understand. Guest lectures may also be included. Topics will include field excavation techniques. satisfies the general education. intraand extra-oral techniques. infection control and hazardous waste disposal. southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. increased fluency in the language structure and regional and stylistic variations as well as advanced work in deaf culture. l General Education Course . The student will determine the universal aspects of each culture concept and investigate the development and consequences of culture’s evolution from simple to complex. and sex/gender roles will be discussed as they apply to small scale. ANTH-115 Introduction to Archaeology (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed as an Introduction to Archaeological method and theory. helps students recognize and appreciate the nature and impact of cultural diversity in their communities and work environments. ANTH-205 Culture and Personality (Cr3) (3:0) Culture and personality is a subdiscipline of anthropology that deals with the relationship between the culture of a particular society and the personality of its members. utilization of radiographic interpretation and radiation biology and safety. quality assurance. analyzing the patients’ lifestyles. Students who take the laboratory component will also complete a portfolio with a self-evaluation paper. AMSL-102 American Sign Language II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will build upon skills acquired in the first semester course. It provides a descriptive overview with emphasis on the variety of human experiences and achievements. classification Arabic l ARAB-101 (HU) Elementary Arabic I (Cr4) (4:0) This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge or very limited knowledge of the Arabic language. (Prerequisite: AMSL 101) and analysis of artifacts. folklore and literature. the ways in which culture and personality have impacted the course of historical events and culture change. (Prerequisite: ADEC 110) ADEC-116 Dental Specialties I (Cr1) This course will allow students to incorporate principles and manipulate properties of dental materials. (This course is not opened to native Arabic speakers or to students with more than two years of Arabic in high school. They will consider how physical anthropology can be applied to studies of forensics and medical anthropology. (Prerequisites: ADEC 110 and ADEC 112) ADEC-117 Practice Management (Cr1) The goal of this course in Practice Management is to provide the Dental Hygiene and Dental Assisting students with background information required to manage the business office of a dental practice effectively.) Note: This course is offered only in the Fall term. (Prerequisite: ADEC-110) ADEC-114 Dental Health Education (Cr1) This course is designed to prepare the dental auxiliary student to provide patient education to individuals and groups. Emphasis will be placed on vocabulary development. Strong emphasis will be placed on acquiring conversational and comprehension skills. focusing on the patient as a whole person. including excavation techniques. This course consists of both lecture and laboratory sessions. using practical and interesting situational materials that will stress both language and culture. implementation and evaluation of dental health education programs in a number of settings. values. ANTH-216 Fieldwork in Archaeology (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed as an introduction to archaeological field methods. Laboratory experiences include manikin simulation as well as assigned patients. This course will offer field training through the excavation of a selected historic site in Monmouth County. The expanded duties are outlined in the New Jersey Dental Auxiliary Practice Act. Note: This course is offered only in the Spring term.

The use of different reprographic techniques and applications will also be explored. (Prerequisites: READ 092. and constructs a systematic introduction to these fields. political. both natural and man-made. economic and cultural factors which have helped to shape the development of modern architecture relative to modern history and culture. standards and test methods and forces of deterioration. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in ARCH 131 AND ARCH 132) ARCH-245 History of Architecture: Pre-Historic to Gothic (Cr3) (3:0) This course is a survey of social. Traditional drafting. The lecture hour explores in depth aspects of architectural design. materials research. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ARCH 261) ARCH-295 Special Project . ARCH-132 Introduction to Design II (Cr5) (1:8) This course continues the design fundamentals introduced in ARCH 131.) . Issues related to sensitivity to context and graphic analysis of existing architecture are also explored. The course will study materials and methods of masonry. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in ARCH 121 and ARCH 131) ARCH-151 Architectural Construction I (Cr3) (3:0) This course is an introduction to the construction process and its relationship to architecture and interior design. abstract design theories and concepts and communication skills. Some previous drawing experience is useful. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ARAB 101 or instructor approval) NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. Emphasis will be placed on criteria for selection of materials and systems. The student will acquire the skills necessary to create photorealistic images. (Prerequisites: READ 092. compatibility of materials and drawings as a communication tool in architecture and interior design. Emphasis is on process. technological. Commercial building planning and basic environmental systems will also be explored. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ARCH 151 or permission of instructor) ARCH-225 3D Architectural CAD (Cr4) (4:0) The student will be presented with a comprehensive course in 3D Architecture. Students will create buildings in 3D using a dedicated 3D architectural package. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading and ENGL 121) ARCH-247 History of Architecture: Industrial Revolution to Modernism (Cr3) (3:0) The student will study the history of modern architecture from its precursors in the late 19th century through the “Late Modernist” movements after World War II. social. Media will include pen and ink. The course draws upon many areas of design. (Prerequisites: READ 092. environment and social order. The assignments will focus on typical interior design and architectural applications. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in ARCH 131 and ARCH 132) ARCH-262 Architectural Studio II (Cr5) (1:8) This studio course continues to build upon the design concepts introduced in ARCH 261. films and case studies. Emphasis on American. Supplementing the faculty lectures will be guest lectures and field trips. The emphasis is on seeing and comprehending the world around us.based systems are being phased out in favor of 3D modelbased solutions. ARCH-131 Introduction to Design I (Cr5) (1:8) This course is an introduction to basic principles and elements of design with emphasis on design methodology. the nature of technology. functional and aesthetic concerns of Western Architecture from its earliest beginnings to the late Gothic period. ART Computer Arts ARTC-141 Digital Paint I (Cr3) (3:0) This course will provide students with an understanding of the theory and operation of computers as artist’s tools. Detailed analysis and the design development of a complex program will be studied. Integrated and object-oriented 3D CAD is becoming the mainstream design and documentation tool for architectural practices. ARCH-152 Architectural Construction II (Cr3) (3:0) A continuation of ARCH 151 that relates construction to architectural design. political. identifying and discussing the forces of change at work in the environment and clarifying the role of the environmental designer. regional and European architecture. The student will be able to consider the technological. animations and construction documents. The study of materials and methods of construction is concerned primarily with wood.Course Descriptions 147 l ARAB-102 (HU) Elementary Arabic II (Cr4) (4:0) Students will build upon skills acquired in the first semester course and will be able to express themselves in a variety of more complex situations in Arabic. interior design and industrial design. They will use paint software to create images. concrete and steel construction. color pencil. The lecture hour explores. technological. in depth. (No previous computer experience is required. functional and aesthetic concerns of Western Architecture from the Renaissance through the mid-19th century. Students will need to dedicate additional time to working in the computer studio in order to complete assignments. structure l General Education Course and mechanical system issues. case studies and site visits. as they relate to studio work. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading and ENGL 121) ARCH-246 History of Architecture: Renaissance Through the 19th Century (Cr3) (3:0) This course is a survey of social. Course material will be presented through lectures. (Prerequisites: Any CADD course or computer literacy) ARCH-235 Media and Communication: Portfolio Development (Cr4) (1:6) The student will be introduced to various media relative to the development of a professional level design portfolio. Architecture ARCH-121 People and Their Environment (Cr3) (3:0) This introduction to design presents an overview of the relationship between people and their environment. subject to the approval of the Architecture Program Coordinator. field trips. marker. heavy timber and masonry construction and is presented through lectures. exercises. This will include an investigation of factors such as building codes.Architecture (Cr1-5) Students interested in pursuing a particular aspect of Architecture which extends beyond the scope of our existing courses may develop a proposal. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading and ENGL 121) ARCH-261 Architectural Studio I (Cr5) (1:8) The studio builds upon the abstract concepts introduced in ARCH 131 and ARCH 132 toward three dimensional structures of singular functions. particularly architectural. pencil and films.

light/shade. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) l ARTH-106 (HU) History of Art: Ancient Through Medieval (Cr3) (3:0) The student will survey the history of painting. or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading and ENGL121) l ARTH-107 (HU) History of Art: Renaissance Through Contemporary (Cr3) (3:0) The student will survey the history of painting. (Prerequisites: READ 092. color problems are explored through paint. Students will need to dedicate additional time to working in the Digital Paint Studio in order to complete assignments. (Prerequisite: ARTC 147) ARTC-251 Internet Animation I (Cr3) (3:0) Students will be introduced to vector based animation software for the internet. Field trips may be required. Students will work with software to design web pages that illustrate a proficiency with the navigational demands of web sites. collage. shape. ARTS-112 Drawing II (Cr3) (2:2) Students will deal with advanced drawing concepts in relation to materials and composition. Students will develop an understanding of color phenomena relating to the twodimensional plane and its application to the visual arts. (Prerequisite: ARTC 142) ARTC-247 Desktop Publishing II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will build upon the skills developed in the ARTC 147 course. brush and ink.148 Course Descriptions ARTC-142 Digital Paint II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will build upon the skills developed in Digital Paint I to create computer art images. Students will create frame by frame animations as well as animations with motion tweening. Projects done in a variety of media will express an understanding of these elements. Single and multiple timelines will be created. (Prerequisite: ENGL 121) Studio Arts ARTS-109 Introduction to Art Therapy Art History l ARTH-105 (HU) Art Appreciation (Cr3) (3:0) Students will discuss the nature of aesthetics in general and art in particular. both traditional and contemporary. Field trips may be l General Education Course . They will incorporate a variety of behaviors and animations into their work. space. (Prerequisite: ARTS 111) ARTS-121 2-D Design (Cr3) (2:2) Students will be able to control and organize various design elements: line. Color scanners will be used to digitize images. An overview of the theoretical foundations and history of art therapy is presented. (Prerequisite: ARTC 155) Egypt through the twentieth century. Students will produce a variety of documents that combine graphics and text and import them into page layout software. (Prerequisites: READ 092. collage and paper. ARTS-122 Color Theory (Cr3) (2:2) The student will be introduced to basic color relationships and the interaction of color. Students will need to spend additional time in the lab in order to complete assignments. (Students are not required.(Prerequisites: READ 092. The course includes: value systems. Students will need to spend additional time in the lab in order to complete assignments. texture and space. Students will create web sites that use the concepts taught in this course. unity. (Prerequisite: ARTC 155) ARTC-255 Designing for the Internet II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will build upon the skills developed in ARTC 248 to create web pages using professional web site development software. ARTC-155 Designing for the Internet I (Cr3) (3:0) This course will introduce students to web layout and design for the internet. Students explore various approaches to drawing. Field trips may be required. Field trips may be required. Note: ARTS 109 is offered only in the Spring term. (Prerequisite: ARTC 141 or permission of instructor) ARTC-147 Desktop Publishing I (Cr3) (3:0) Students will be introduced to graphic illustration software for Desktop Publishing. Media explored will include color pencil. pen. sculpture and architecture from the Renaissance to the Contemporary with emphasis on stylistic analysis and the relationship of art to its cultural and historical context. color. An integral part of the course is site management where the student learns to place their work on a server and update the site. proportion and composition. ARTS-111 Drawing I (Cr3) (2:2) Students will gain a working knowledge of basic principles and techniques of drawing in a studio setting. In a studio setting. Scanners and high resolution laser printers will be utilized. This course is the second in a series that stresses the art elements essential to page layout and design. value. READ 095. The student will create and modify vector objects. sculpture and architecture from the Ancient through Medieval period with emphasis on stylistic analysis and the relationship of art to its cultural and historical center. In a studio setting. perspective. The student will design color images to import into page layout software. ARTS-123 3-D Design (Cr3) (2:2) The student will be introduced to the basic concepts of three-dimensional design. Students will need to spend additional time in the lab in order to complete assignments. Interactivity with frame actions and buttons will be studied. with emphasis on development of style. Students will need to spend additional time in the lab in order to complete assignments. color. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading and ENGL 121) ARTH-201 History of Western Architecture (Cr3) (3:0) This course is a broad-based survey of the history of Western architecture from its beginnings in Mesopotamia and (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to answer the questions “What is art therapy?” and “How does it work?”. students will examine three-dimensional relationships and explore methods of shaping and structuring space. technology and the relationship of society to the built environment. and will be able to identify and analyze the works of selected artists from historical periods. They will demonstrate an understanding of such essential principles as form. Students will be encouraged to develop a portfolio of images. Field trips may be required. This course will offer students an opportunity to complete assignments utilizing page layout software. The application of art therapy in various settings and populations will be explored experimentally and didactically. but are encouraged to take ARTH 106 prior to ARTH 107). Field trips may be required. lecture and critique. The course will involve project construction. Field trips may be required. Students will work with a variety of techniques that enhance the overall look of the web site. balance and emphasis.

Course Descriptions

149

required. Note: This course is offered only in the Spring term. (Prerequisite: ARTS-121 or ARCH-131) ARTS-151 Ceramics I (Cr3) (2:2) Students will work with basic hand-building techniques, executing at least two pieces of pottery in each of the basic processes. Students will also have the opportunity to learn the use of the potter’s wheel, and will be introduced to various embellishing, glazing and firing methods to finish the pottery. ARTS-152 Ceramics II (Cr3) (2:2) The student will work primarily on the potter’s wheel, will explore advanced handbuilding techniques and will experiment with glaze formulation. The student will be able to embellish, glaze and fire all the work. (Prerequisite: ARTS 151) ARTS-156 Sculpture I (Cr3) (2:2) The student will be introduced to the basic concepts of sculpture. In a studio setting, the relationship between form, space and concept will be explored through a series of exercises designed to expand the student’s understanding of the materials and processes utilized in sculpture. ARTS-161 Jewelry I (Cr3) (2:2) Students will be introduced to the basic metalworking techniques, and the use of specialized tools and equipment employed in jewelry making. Emphasis will be on designing and creating finished pieces of fabricated and cast jewelry. Students will be acquiring their own metal, stones and other materials needed for the projects. Extra assisted studio time will be made available to work outside of class. ARTS-162 Jewelry II (Cr3) (2:2) This course is a continuation of Jewelry I. Students will work with advanced techniques in casting and fabrication and will be introduced to etching, enameling and anodizing. Emphasis will be on experimentation with materials and techniques, and on designing and creating original, finished pieces of jewelry. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ARTS 161) ARTS-213 Figure Drawing (Cr3) (2:2) In this studio course working from the live model, the student will be able to translate basic structural relationships, both skeletal and muscular, through the drawing medium. Various materials will be used. (Prerequisite: ARTS 111 or permission of instructor)

ARTS-214 Figure Drawing II (Cr3) (2:2) Figure Drawing II is designed as an advanced studio drawing course working with the human figure. The student will work on developing new drawing strategies in dealing with the figure as well as experimenting with different art media. Personal approach and style will also be a consideration of the course. (Prerequisites: ARTS 213) ARTS-231 Painting I (Cr3) (2:2) This course is the introduction to the fundamentals of studio practices and painting approaches used in oils. Emphasis will be placed on personal expression as well as on an understanding of various historical and contemporary modes. Emphasis will also be placed on the development of the palette, color mixing and on compositions from still life. Studio sessions and critiques are on an individual basis. (Prerequisite: ARTS 111 or permission of instructor) ARTS-232 Painting II (Cr3) (2:2) In addition to working from the still-life, students will solve pictorial problems such as abstract handling of color relationships and spatial structures. Further personal exploration of the media and class critiques with slides and films are part of the students’ experience. (Prerequisite: ARTS 231 or permission of instructor) ARTS-233 Acrylic Painting (Cr3) (2:2) This is an acrylic painting course designed for the more experienced student in which certain problems of form and approach to subject are investigated. Experimental techniques with media, size, format and construction will be stressed. Weekly critique sessions are part of the course. (Prerequisite: ARTS 231 or permission of instructor) ARTS-235 Watercolor (Cr3) (2:2) The student will be introduced to the techniques and processes of watercolor: washes, texture applications, brush manipulations and stretched paper. Emphasis will be placed on materials and composition. Field trips may be required. Note: This course is offered only in the Summer. (Prerequisite: ARTS 111 or permission of instructor) ARTS-295 Special Project – Art (Cr1-6) Students may choose to specialize or investigate some area in greater depth by selecting 1-6 credits in this individual learning course for the major.

ARTS-299 Art Internship (Cr1-3) This work/study program provides students with an opportunity to obtain direct and practical art experience. Students will work in areas related to their program, such as: Interior Design, Studio, Gallery and Museum Apprenticeship, Art Instruction, Applied and Commercial Arts. (Prerequisite: Students in Art Option or Creative Arts Certificate Program must have completed 30 credits in Art and have permission of the instructor and Career Services Representative. Students in Interior Design Option must have completed 30 credits, including 15 credits in Interior Design and Art, and have permission of the instructor and Career Services Representative)

Automotive Technology
AUTO-100 Basic Automotive Maintenance (Cr4) (3:3) This course is designed for the “do-it-yourself mechanic”. Various systems of the automobile are studied with special emphasis placed on general maintenance and service. Practical work performed as part of this course is designed to teach the student proper technique and procedures that he/she can perform at home to help maintain an automobile properly. Most of this information is consumer oriented and is highly useful whether performing your own maintenance or not. AUTO-101 Automotive Fundamentals (Cr4) (3:3) This is the first course in a series for Automotive majors. The primary focus is on the theory, operation and servicing of various systems of the modern automobile. Special emphasis will be placed on examining engine, ignition and fuel system fundamentals. Shop policies and procedures, career opportunities, consumer information and industry standards will be discussed to better prepare the student for future employment in the automotive service industry. AUTO-106 Basic Automotive Systems/ Air Conditioning (Cr4) (3:3) This is specifically designed for General Motors ASEP students. It covers the servicing of automotive systems as they pertain to GM vehicles. It includes air conditioning systems. AUTO-111 Automotive Drivelines and Transmissions (Cr4) (3:3) This course investigates the different kinds of drive systems used in today’s automobiles and

l General Education Course

150

Course Descriptions

requires the student to learn how to service and overhaul various components of those systems. Included are clutches, manual and automatic transmissions, drive shafts and half-shafts, differentials, rear axles, front-wheel drive and four-wheel drive. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in AUTO 101) AUTO-123 Engine Performance I (Cr4) (3:3) This course is designed to give students the background training required to service automotive computer systems. Special emphasis will be placed on computer controlled fuel systems and the use of scan tools and diagnostic modes to solve drivability problems. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in AUTO 101 and AUTO 141) AUTO-131 Automotive Steering, Suspension and Alignment (Cr4) (3:3) This course is designed to give students knowledge and practical experience in servicing the various steering and suspension systems. Students will perform various steering and suspension repairs, as well as apply their understanding of alignment factors by performing complete two and four-wheel alignments. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in AUTO 101) AUTO-132 Automotive Brake Systems (Cr4) (3:3) This course emphasizes the design, operation, diagnosis and repair procedures associated with modern automotive brake systems. Beginning with overhaul of standard drum and disc brake systems, the course of study will include machining processes, hydraulic system design and repair, power brakes and anti-lock brake systems. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in AUTO 101) AUTO-135 Steering, Suspension, Alignment and Brakes (Cr4) (3:3) This is a specialized course for General Motors Automotive Service Education Program students. The course covers the theory, inspection, maintenance and overhaul of General Motors brake, steering and suspension systems. As part of the learning experience, students will perform four-wheel computerized alignments and diagnose and repair GM anti-lock brake systems. AUTO-141 Automotive Electricity/ Electronics I (Cr4) (3:3) Basic electricity and how it applies to the automobile is the primary focus of this course. Students are required to test and overhaul components l General Education Course

of the starting, charging, body and chassis electrical systems. System design and basic electronics are discussed in order to provide a better understanding of the role of electronics and computers in today’s cars. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in AUTO 101) AUTO-213 Automatic and Manual Transmission Overhaul (Cr4) (3:3) Building on knowledge gained in AUTO 111, this course is designed to give the student practical experience in the overhaul of automatic transmissions and transaxles. To further enhance the student’s understanding of this discipline, special instruction on torque converters, torque converter clutches and electronic transmission operation is also included in this course of study. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in AUTO 111) AUTO-222 Engine Performance II (Cr4) (3:3) This course is designed to examine automotive emissions and methods used to control them, with special emphasis placed on computer control of both emissions and ignition systems, and how these areas affect engine performance. Practical use of scan tools, self-diagnostic modes and engine analyzers will be covered to better prepare the student to solve related drivability problems. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in AUTO 123; and AUTO 141) AUTO-226 Automotive Engines I (Cr4) (3:3) This course will familiarize students with engine overhaul procedures. Proper diagnosis, disassembly, inspection and measuring, machining operations and reassembly will be topics studied. Lab work will include complete disassembly and reassembly of an automotive engine; emphasis will be placed on machining of cylinder heads and valves. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in AUTO 123 and AUTO 141) AUTO-227 Automotive Engines II (Cr4) (3:3) This course is designed for the student interested in further training on automotive engine overhaul. Emphasis will be on complete engine disassembly, inspection and reassembly of a short block. Special attention will be paid to machining of cylinders, connecting rods, main bearings, crankshafts and cylinder heads. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in AUTO 226)

AUTO-241 Automotive Electricity/ Electronics II (Cr3) (3:0) Beginning with a review of fundamentals, this course proceeds into capacitance, magnetism, semiconductors, amplifiers, integrated circuits and microprocessors as they relate to the modern automobile. Practical application of the above information will be stressed as part of the diagnostic and trouble-shooting procedures. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in AUTO 123 and AUTO 141) AUTO-243 Automotive Heating and Air Conditioning; (Cr4) (3:3) This course is designed to cover the automotive heating, cooling and refrigeration systems. Emphasis will be placed on refrigeration system operation, service and diagnosis, as well as diagnosis and repair of cooling systems and other power accessories commonly found on modern automobiles. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in AUTO 141) AUTO-295 Special Project — Automotive Technology (Cr1-6) Students may choose to specialize or investigate some area in greater depth by selecting 1-6 credits in this individual learning course for the Automotive Technology major. An interview with the appropriate Auto Tech instructor is required prior to registration. AUTO-298 Automotive Capstone Seminar (Cr1) (1:0) This course is designed to be the capstone course for the automotive program in which students will review and demonstrate all curriculum content areas previously learned in their automotive area of study. Through guided lessons and assignments, students will prepare for the end-of-program proficiency test where they will demonstrate mastery of their skills and abilities necessary for the complete automotive area of study. The course will also aid students preparing to take their ASE examinations. This course is the final automotive course in the series and should only be taken in the fourth or final semester. (Prerequisites: All required Automotive 100level courses; Prerequisites or Corequisites: AUTO 213, AUTO 222, AUTO 226, AUTO 241, AUTO 243) AUTO-299 Automotive Internship (Cr1-6) This course is designed for the Automotive Technology major who wishes to earn credit while working in the field. The course requirements will be discussed with an automotive instructor and Career Services Representative prior to a student’s participation.

Course Descriptions

151

Biology
l BIOL-101 (SC) General Biology I (Cr4) (3:3) This course is designed for science majors and for those students in other majors with a laboratory science requirement. Through laboratory exercises and classroom experiences the student will demonstrate the ability to identify and interpret basic biological concepts. These concepts include the chemical basis of life, metabolism, reproduction and development, genetic continuity and heredity as they pertain to the cellular through organismic levels of organization in living organisms. (Prerequisites: HS Biology or a grade of “C” or higher in BIOL 105, HS Chemistry or a grade of “C” or higher in CHEM 100 or CHEM 136, and a grade of “C” or higher in MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading, and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skill requirement in writing) l BIOL-102 (SC) General Biology II (Cr4) (3:3) Through laboratory exercises and classroom experiences the student will demonstrate the ability to identify and interpret basic biological concepts related to the evolution, behavior, unity and diversity and ecology of living organisms. This course, together with BIOL 101, serves as an initial sequence for further studies in the biological sciences. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in BIOL 101) l BIOL-105 (SC) Life Sciences (Cr4) (3:2) This course is intended to meet a laboratory science requirement for the non-science major. Through laboratory exercises and classroom experiences the student will demonstrate an appreciation of life phenomena and the diversity of living organisms. Topics include basic metabolic functions that create and sustain life, reproduction, growth, development, behavior and adaptation of selected life forms and the interactions among living organisms. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 012, MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading, and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) l BIOL-107 (SC) Human Biology (Cr3) (3:0) This is a survey course for nonl General Education Course

science majors. Upon completion of this course, the student will demonstrate a basic understanding of how the human body functions in healthy and diseased states. Included in the course is a broad overview of human anatomy, physiology and organization. Class lecture and discussion emphasize current topics related to human health and wellness. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 012, MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading, and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) l BIOL-111 (SC) Anatomy and Physiology I (Cr4) (3:2) This course is designed to satisfy the requirements of health sciences programs, the needs of the pre-professional student and those who desire a deeper understanding of the human body. Through classroom and laboratory experiences, the student will be able to identify and describe the anatomy, and demonstrate an understanding of the physiology of the human body at the molecular, cellular, tissue and organ system levels. Covered in this course are the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and digestive systems of the human body. (Prerequisites: HS Biology or a grade of “C” or higher in BIOL 105, HS Chemistry or a grade of “C” or higher in CHEM 100 or CHEM 136, and a grade of “C” or higher in MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading, and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skill requirement in writing) l BIOL-112 (SC) Anatomy and Physiology II (Cr4) (3:2) As the second course in the Anatomy and Physiology sequence, this course is designed to satisfy the requirements of health sciences programs, the needs of the pre-professional student and those who desire a deeper understanding of the human body. Through classroom and laboratory experiences, the student will be able to identify and describe the anatomy, and demonstrate an understanding of the physiology of the human body at the molecular, cellular, tissue and organ system levels. Covered in this course are the cardiovascular, immune, lymphatic, urinary, respiratory, endocrine and reproductive systems of the human

body. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in BIOL 111) l BIOL-125 (SC) Introduction to Plants (Cr4) (3:2) This course is intended to meet a laboratory science requirement for the non-science major, and is a required course in the Horticulture Certificate Program. The student will become familiar with the structure and function of plant roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds. An understanding of plant diversity develops through the study of plant evolution and classification. A variety of interesting plants native to various parts of the world will be observed and discussed with emphasis on their structure, growth requirements, propagation and ecological role in the natural landscape. Laboratory activities include greenhouse projects and several field trips. (Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or higher in MATH 012, MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading, and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) l BIOL 126 (SC) Exploring Biology: Cycles of Life (Cr3) (3:0) Exploring Biology: Cycles of Life is a study of basic scientific principles and biological concepts for the non-science major. Topics include: scientific method, chemistry of life, cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, diversity of life and ecology. Topics are covered at an introductory level to provide students an overview of biological science and its relevance in the world. (Prerequisites: MATH 012 or MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation, READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading, and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) BIOL-205 Invertebrate Zoology (Cr4) (3:3) This course is designed for science majors. Through classroom and laboratory experiences, the student will demonstrate an understanding of taxonomy, morphology, structure, function and evolution of the various invertebrate phyla of animals. Laboratory experiences will include field collection, identification, taxonomy and description of fundamental anatomical traits found within representative phyla. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall

152

Course Descriptions

term. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in BIOL 102) BIOL-206 Vertebrate Zoology (Cr4) (3:3) This course is designed for the science major, pre-professional or advanced health science student. Through classroom and laboratory experiences, the student will demonstrate an understanding of the probable origins of, and be able to identify in detail, the anatomical characteristics of organisms of the phylum Chordata. Starting with the primitive Amphioxus and progressing to the complex mammals, the student will demonstrate an understanding of the ontogenic and phylogenic relationships of the three chordate subphyla and seven vertebrate classes. Laboratory experiences include detailed dissection of representative organisms. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in BIOL 102 or BIOL 112) BIOL-207 Marine Biology (Cr4) (3:3) This course is designed for the student majoring in biology, marine studies or ecology. Through classroom and laboratory experiences, the student will be able to identify the environmental parameters of marine habitats and their effect on the distribution of marine flora and fauna. Students will collect and identify numerous representatives of local marine forms, both in the laboratory and field settings. The student will also demonstrate proficiency in the utilization of various types of equipment used to complete such tasks, and demonstrate knowledge of the anatomy, physiology and behavior of marine organisms. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Summer term. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in BIOL 102 or ENVR 111) BIOL-208 Ecology and Field Biology (Cr4) (3:3) This course is designed for science majors and for students enrolled in the Environmental and Earth Sciences Option. Through laboratory exercises and classroom experiences, the student will investigate and demonstrate an understanding of the processes regulating the distribution and abundance of living organisms. Topics include interactions among organisms and their environment, population ecology, community ecology, and the energy flow and trophic structure of ecosystems. Lecture, laboratory experiences and field trips are designed to introduce qualitative and quantitative methods for the measurement of factors and populations l General Education Course

in field situations, procedures for recording and analyzing data, and coverage of current topics and trends in ecology. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall Term. (Prerequisites: BIOL 102, MATH 131; Prerequisites or Corequisites: MATH 151 or MATH 152 or appropriate score on the CLM placement test) l BIOL-213 (SC) Microbiology (Cr4) (3:3) The biology of pathogenic microorganisms will be stressed, emphasizing their microscopic and molecular aspects. Students will describe, in detail, the relationship existing between the hostparasite complex during the diseased state. They will also become acquainted with those characteristics which endow certain microbes with a pathogenic nature. Students will be able to list and characterize various pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoan parasites. Isolation and identification techniques in microbiology will be mastered by the student in the laboratory. The role of chemotherapy, immunology and serology used to combat pathogens will be examined thoroughly. Finally, the homeostatic defense mechanisms of the body, especially those against invading micro-organisms, will be discussed in great detail. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in BIOL 102 or BIOL 112) BIOL-215 Cell and Molecular Biology (Cr4) (3:3) This course is designed to provide biology majors with a broad, integrated understanding of contemporary cell and molecular biology, biochemistry and biotechnology. Lecture topics will include: structure and function of biological macromolecules; subcellular aspects of biological organization; gene organization, expression and regulation; recombinant DNA technology, genetic engineering and gene therapy; cell signaling; and cellular aspects of motility, development and cancer. Experimental laboratory exercises will focus on modern, fundamental techniques of molecular biology. Techniques will include: electron microscopy; bacterial culturing; isolation, cloning and sequencing of DNA; plasmid manipulation; gel electrophoresis of nucleic acids; restriction enzyme mapping; methods for analyzing gene expression; computer modeling of protein structure; and DNA database analysis on the Internet. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in BIOL 102, CHEM 102 and CHEM 235 or CHEM 203)

BIOL-295 Special Project-Biology (Cr1-4) Students interested in pursuing a particular aspect of biology which extends beyond the scope of existing biology courses may develop a proposal, subject to the approval of a biology department faculty member. BIOL-299 Biology Internship (Cr16) Students will work in an internship job related to biology and complete internship learning objectives under faculty supervision. Approval of instructor, Department Chairperson and Division Chairperson. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in BIOL 102 or BIOL 112)

Business
BUSI-105 Introduction to Business (Cr3) (3:0) In this survey course, the student will receive an overview of functional areas of business and learn the basic concepts of the business world. Some topics covered include management, managing human resources, labor relations, ethics and social responsibility, accounting, money and banking, securities and investments, marketing, and globalization. Upon completion of this course, students will understand the various forms of business ownership and the free enterprise system and how it contrasts with other systems. This course will assist the student in making career choices and will serve as an entry level foundation course. (Prerequisite: READ 092 or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) BUSI-116 Money Management and Personal Finance (Cr3) (3:0) The student will design and utilize a personal budget, create and evaluate a savings, investment, insurance and retirement program. The student will be able to use credit judiciously and make rational decisions in utilizing his purchasing power. In addition, the student will be able to identify the basic elements of will and estate planning. The student will have the opportunity to utilize current, userfriendly computer software and instructorcreated exercises to apply the above concepts to their personal financial situation. Field trips may be required. NOTE: This course is offered in the evening during the Spring term in odd years. (Prerequisite: MATH 012, MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement n computation)

as well as learn how to conduct research on the Internet and communicate via email. agency. Students will utilize basic computer software and internet to manage their course projects. (Prerequisite: BUSI 105 or permission of instructor) BUSI-241 Small Business Management (Cr3) (3:0) Students will learn major considerations faced by an individual planning to start and run a small business venture in New Jersey. participate in programs on campus and complete an internship workbook based on the work experience gained. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. BUSI-222 Business Law II (Cr3) (3:0) The student will identify. The student will also learn programs such as graphic presentations. news. and loan analysis. (Prerequisites: 6 credits of career studies and permission of instructor and Career Services Representative) CADD-ComputerAided Drafting and Design CADD-121 Engineering Graphics with CAD (Cr4) (3:3) This course will provide the student with a complete engineering graphics curriculum utilizing freehand sketching. accounting. leading and controlling that is involved in any type of organization. small business accounting/bookkeeping/taxes. forms of ownership. (Prerequisite: BUSI 165 or instructor approval) BUSI-205 Principles of Management (Cr3) (3:0) The student will develop an insight into the basic concepts. The student will obtain specific knowledge of how to manage the planning. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. BUSI-231 Human Resource Management (Cr3) (3:0) Students will recognize the basic terminology of Human Resource Management. search information services (including. Students will identify the major elements of a Human Resource manual. It is recommended that you take BUSI 205 before BUSI 206. and income tax preparation. etc. financial and cultural environments in which international business operates. training. franchising. The student will also survey the economic. define and describe contracts. and READ 092. manual/board drafting and Computer-Aided Drafting. employee health and safety and diversity management. Students will learn how the internet affects our economy. This expanded knowledge of management will be applied in classroom case studies and practical exercises involving analysis and development of workable solutions to supervisory problems. (Prerequisite: BUSI 105 and/or permission of instructor) BUSI-298 Management Analysis – Capstone Seminar (Cr3) (3:0) Students will analyze the development of long-term strategic goals and their implementation in the form of Strategic. They will practice communication skills necessary to perform Human Resource Management functions. financing and investing tools. performance appraisal. This course will focus on the internet as a business and investment tool. sources of capital. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. and Operational plans. partnerships. ethics and social responsibility. orthographic projection. human resource management. use the WWW to view online banking. They will identify the functional areas of HRM including job analysis. principles and techniques as a foundation for acquiring an expanded knowledge of how to manage and supervise resources. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in BUSI 105. concepts. Students will apply internet search techniques to develop a working knowledge of the internet and learn how the WWW applies to business operations and management. MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) BUSI-171 (t) E-Business Technologies (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed for the student with prior computer knowledge and internet skills. federal requirements and state regulations and business law as it relates to small business. commercial paper and bankruptcy. but not limited to. The student will learn about global e-commerce and how it relates to lowering geographic barriers. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. travel. BUSI 205. (Prerequisite: BUSI 105 or permission of instructor) BUSI-295 Special Project — Management (Cr1-3) Students may choose to specialize or investigate some area in greater depth by selecting 1-3 credits in this individual learning course for the major. employment. BUSI 231. wills. security devices. corporations. Tactical. . NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term.Course Descriptions 153 BUSI-165 (t) Computer Applications in Business (Cr3) (3:0) This is an introductory level course for students with basic computer knowledge and provides a “hands-on” laboratory experience. define and describe sales. the student will study the nature. business development and competitive shopping.). personal and real property. money and banking. mechanics and functional management aspects of international business. (Prerequisite: MATH 012. selection. spreadsheets. bailment. and BUSI 251. choosing a location. The student will develop a working knowledge of the computer and work with a variety of software programs such as word processing. the student will have an understanding of the principles of good management. financial planning. This course will cover the nature of self-employment. marketing. business ownership. (Prerequisite: BUSI 105 or permission of instructor) l General Education Course BUSI-206 Supervisory Management (Cr3) (3:0) The student will use management theories. recruitment. functions and techniques of administrative management. dimensioning and tolerancing. orientation. database construction. NOTE: This course is offered in the Spring term only. Upon completion of the course. sectional and auxiliary views. labor relations. Students will utilize their course knowledge in economics.) BUSI-299 Business Internship (Cr3) The student will work in a job related to his or her program. perform a job analysis and construct a job description and job specification. government data. Students will demonstrate the use of these computer software applications and programs to interpret and analyze diverse economic and financial situations in their personal and professional lives. (Prerequisite: BUSI 105 or permission of instructor) BUSI-221 Business Law I (Cr3) (3:0) The student will identify. organizing. Students will draw their own conclusions and defend them in order to have an opportunity to apply what they have learned in their study of Business Administration. The topics will include graphic size and shape development. (Prerequisite: BUSI 105 or permission of instructor) BUSI-251 Global Business (Cr3) (3:0) In this introductory course. global business and computer applications in business by examining actual case studies from the business world. record keeping. benefits. management. use web sites for career planning.

CHEM-203 Organic Chemistry I (Cr5) (4:3) Students will apply many concepts from general chemistry to a study of organic chemistry.(Prerequisite: MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra) l CHEM-101 (SC) General Chemistry I (Cr5) (4:3) The student will investigate the fundamental concepts of chemistry from a theoretical approach and participate in a laboratory program that demonstrates this theory. organic and biological chemistry which will be applied to allied health and biological fields. within AutoCAD. The assignments will focus on typical interior design and architectural applications. (Prerequisite: CADD 211 or CADD 212. Traditional drafting-based systems are being phased out in favor of 3D modelbased solutions. The student will become familiar with advanced operations and procedures. aldehyde. quantitative relationships between elements. field and laboratory work all focus on analyzing the normal cycles that occur in the marine environment throughout the year and how environmental pollution effects these cycles. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CHEM 102) CHEM-204 Organic Chemistry II (Cr5) (4:3) A continuation of CHEM 203. states of matter. carbon chemistry and transition metal and organic chemistry using a problem solving approach to bring about understanding. alcohols. Integrated and object-oriented 3D CAD is becoming the mainstream design and documentation tool for architectural practices. The student will acquire the skills necessary to create photorealistic images and animations. the student will investigate the areas of kinetics. The student will also learn to incorporate AutoLISP routines into AutoCAD. periodic behavior. thus gaining access to time-saving commands and procedures otherwise unavailable. acids and bases.154 Course Descriptions fasteners and the preparation of a set of working drawings. aiding in production of engineering drawings in a timely. (Prerequisites: HS Chemistry or a grade of “C” or higher in CHEM 100 or equivalent. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in DRFT 106 or permission of department) CADD-211 Intermediate Computer Aided Drafting (Cr3) (3:0) Students will learn to efficiently use a computer-aided drafting system to create orthographic drawings of complex parts. and health issues such as nutrition and world hunger. synthesize and explain reaction mechanisms for hydrocarbons and halogenated hydrocarbons. The program is designed for students who have had no previous chemistry course. design and architectural applications. students will extend their studies into topics including aromatic hydrocarbons. (Prerequisite: MATH-151 and a grade of “C” or higher in CHEM-101) . isolation and identification of organic compounds using modern laboratory instrument techniques. modify and display 3-D drawings. The focus of the assignments will be multidisciplinary. This course assumes that students understand the concepts of engineering graphics. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CADD 211) CADD-220 Computer-Aided Rendering & Animation for Engineers. framing plans. nuclear reactions. efficient and accurate manner. Drawings will include floor plans. carboxylic acid. or permission of instructor) CADD-225 3D Architectural CAD (Cr4) (3:2) The student will be presented with a comprehensive course in 3D l General Education Course Architecture. thermochemistry. the study of energy sources including nuclear power. The accompanying lab involves the study of common items found in everyday life. Organic and Biological Chemistry (Cr4) (3:3) The student will consider selected concepts from inorganic. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Summer. interpret spectra for. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CADD 211) CADD-214 3-D Modeling with CAD (Cr4) (3:3) The student will utilize multiple viewports. animations and construction documents. equilibrium. electrochemistry. The student will acquire the skills necessary to create photorealistic images. (Prerequisite: MATH 012 or MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation) CHEM-117 Introduction to Marine Chemistry (Cr4) (3:3) Lecture. work in either model or paper space. Labs will emphasize preparation. acid rain and recycling. compound formation. Topics include environmental issues such as air pollution. chemical bonding. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CHEM 203) Chemistry l CHEM-100 (SC) Principles of Chemistry (Cr4) (3:3) The student will be able to identify and interpret the basic concepts of inorganic chemistry including electronic structure of atoms. gases. to create. compounds and equations. The course is for students who have never had chemistry and who wish to continue into CHEM 101. The stereo-chemistry of compounds and reactions will be studied. Architects & Designers (Cr4) (3:3) The student will be presented with a comprehensive course in 3 D rendering and animation using CAD. predict products. elevations. Skills will be developed in a laboratory program which enhances topics under consideration. The course content is designed for the science major who wishes to transfer to a four-year institution. They will be able to name. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CADD 121 or ARCH 151 and/or previous equivalent industrial experience) CADD-212 Computer-Aided Architectural Drafting and Design (Cr4) (3:3) This course will provide the student with the skills and knowledge necessary to utilize a Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) system in the preparation of architectural drawings. models and renderings. (Prerequisite: CHEM 100 or high school chemistry) l CHEM-136 (SC) Introduction to Inorganic. Students will create buildings in 3D using a dedicated 3D architectural package. site plans and building and wall sections. and a grade of “C” or higher in MATH 151) l CHEM-102 (SC) General Chemistry II (Cr5) (4:3) A continuation of CHEM 101. Students will be introduced to using a computer-aided drafting system to produce floor plan drawings and basic three-dimensional components. acids and bases. solids and liquids and properties of solutions. ethers and epoxides. amines. ketone and carbanion chemistry. The subjects covered include atomic structure. Laboratory work will focus on learning techniques that will then be applied to analyzing the actual conditions present in our local marine waters. including typical engineering. (Prerequisites: Any CADD course or computer literacy) CADD-295 Special Project — ComputerAided Drafting And Design (Cr2-6) CADD-299 Internship in Computer-Aided Drafting And Design (Cr2-6) l CHEM-116 (SC) Chemistry in Life (Cr4) (3:3) This chemistry course for non-science majors will focus on the role chemistry plays in maintaining and improving our quality of life. draw.

dynamic. Students will be required to satisfactorily demonstrate communication skills: reading. (Prerequisite: HS Chemistry or a grade of “C” or higher in CHEM 100 or equivalent) CHEM-236 Biochemistry (Cr5) (4:3) Upon completion of this course the student will be able to recognize and draw the structure and state the nature of the biochemicals important to life (carbohydrates. digestion and metabolism. (Prerequisites: ENGL 121. students will be able to create audio productions with both technical and aesthetic quality in both analog and digital formats. Students must have completed previous course work in the subject area and must meet with an appropriate instructor before registration. COMM 101. writing. (Approval of instructor and Career Services Representative is required) Communication Media COMM-101 Communication. models and history of communication. television and the internet. Students will investigate the characteristics of the practitioner. (Prerequisites: RDIO 101 and/or JOUR 101) COMM-295 Special Project Communication Media (Cr1-6) Students will design a project of advanced study. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. They will work with an experienced practitioner who will guide and supervise their progress. (Prerequisite: CHEM 136 or CHEM 235 or CHEM 203 or equivalent) CHEM-295 Special Project — Chemistry (Cr1-4) CHEM-299 Chemistry Internship (Cr1-6) credits Students will work in an internship related to chemistry and complete internship learning objectives under faculty supervision. Provocative. l General Education Course . Students will learn contemporary audio recording and editing techniques through in-class demonstrations and hands-on lab exercises on a digital audio multitrack workstation. predict products and write reaction mechanisms for organic compounds. and they will practice the necessary basic skills and meet practicing professionals. Laboratory skills will be developed. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. the definition. Students will study the nature of sound and the structure of acoustic sound perception. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CHNS 101 or instructor approval) Cinematography l CINE-105 (HU) Film Appreciation: Motion Picture/Art (Cr3) (3:0) The student will view a wide range of short and feature length films and be able to identify the major film theories. Grammatical patterns and syntax will be introduced with the aim that students read and write Pinyin Chinese. In addition. COMM-299 Communication Media Internship (Cr1-6) Students will practice skills in the use of communication media in a real world experience. COMM-106 Introduction to Public Relations (Cr3) (3:0) Students will evaluate their potential success in the Chinese l CHNS-101 (HU) Elementary Chinese I (Cr4) (4:0) This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge or very limited knowledge of the Chinese language. COMM 102) COMM-115 Audio in Media (Cr3) (3:0) Students will develop proficiency in making audio recordings of various types and in varying acoustic environments.Course Descriptions 155 CHEM-235 Fundamentals of Organic and Biological Chemistry (Cr5) (4:3) Students will be able to name. (Prerequisites: ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) COMM-102 Communication Media (Cr3) (3:0) Students will examine the historical. lipids and proteins). describe in detail the metabolic pathways that generate them and release energy from them. Organic concepts will be extended to carbohydrates. titrimetry. the organizational structures and the variety of job opportunities. interdisciplinary learning materials and teaching techniques are used to help students find coherence in their education and counter the trends of specialization and self-preoccupation. interspecies and extraterrestrial communication. and will include applications of polarimetry. (Prerequisite: COMM 115 with a minimum grade of “C”) COMM-226 Digital Reporting (Cr3) (3:0) Students will examine the evolution of journalism and learn how to write news stories for a variety of media outlets such as radio. field of public relations through a broad examination of the topic including the definition. Approval of instructor and Academic Division Dean required. personal. relevant field of communication. lipids and protein structure. Students will be required to recall and understand course concepts about essential communication skills. using practical and interesting situational materials that will stress both language and culture. (This course is not open to native Chinese speakers or to students with more than two years of Chinese in high school. COMM-216 Advanced Digital Audio/ Musical Recording (Cr3) (3:0) This course explores music recording and editing techniques in a digital environment. economic. and mediated. enhancing textbook coverage. verbal and nonverbal coding systems. speaking and listening. the basic techniques of filmmaking and the basic characteristics of the film medium as art and entertainment. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. function. chromatography and ultraviolet and visible spectrosopy. and physiological contexts. (Cr3) (3:0) Communication will encourage students to become curious and skeptical observers of the broad. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. This course may be repeated for credit. The student will also be able to describe and draw the structure of the gene molecules (RNA & DNA) and describe their metabolism and their role in protein synthesis. technological. with emphasis on understanding life processes. The course will emphasize the convergence of conventional mass media with new forms of information services and provide knowledge. The course will emphasize journalistic standards as well as clear and concise writing for the media. history. draw. (Prerequisite: CHEM 100) l CHNS-102 (HU) Elementary Chinese II (Cr4) (4:0) Students will build upon skills acquired in the first semester course and will be able to express themselves in a variety of more complex situations in Chinese. tools and techniques. except by instructor approval). the cultural. Emphasis will be on acquiring conversational and comprehension skills. Basic concepts will be reinforced with appropriate laboratory experiences. organizational and social aspects of communication mediated by technology. skills and perspectives to help prepare students to thrive as consumers and employees in the rapidly changing information society. Appropriate technology will be used to provide students with hands on experience.

documentation techniques. Students will be able to contrast and compare UNIX with LINUX. the interface between hardware and software. storytelling. play mechanics. (Prerequisite or Corequiste: COMP 126) COMP-185 Programming in Visual Basic. operations and expressions..NET. They will acquire a working knowledge of the fundamental tools of computer programming needed for further progress: problem organization and analysis. frames. this course enables the students to write code that provides a good. designing solutions and writing programs in Visual Basic programming language on a microcomputer. computer programming logic and coding. Specifically. (Cr1) (1:0) The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the component of the Internet known as the World Wide Web (Web/WWW). control structures. the student will be able to write structured program code typical of generalized application problems. coding diagnosis and testing. with some of the search engines. COMP-171 Programming I (Cr3) (3:0) The student will be able to analyze a variety of problems. and integrating Office documents into Web sites. Students will learn the basics of XML including creating XML documents and binding data. This course emphasizes common computer/technology skills and helps students access. Both Windows and Web based ASP applications are covered. tables. Programs will be developed using the popular INTEL based architecture. Topics explored are examining Web publication and security issues. (Prerequisite: MATH 151) COMP-140 Designing/Developing Web Sites (Cr3) (3:0) This course will teach students how to build Web sites. control structures. addressing modes. Designed for students with previous high-level programming language experience. object structures and input/output handling. Students will obtain first-hand experience in computer programming by analyzing problems. Students will learn how to perform customer interaction with forms and special controls. pointers. as well as basic system administration. (Prerequisites: COMP 126 or approval of Instructor/Department Chair) COMP-137 Programming for Engineers (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed for engineering students with no previous highlevel programming language experience. balance. The focus is on the development process and the documentation required to successfully implement a game. (Prerequisites: MATH 021 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra) COMP-128(t) BASIC Programming (Cr1) (1:0) The student will be able to analyze.NET for the integration of databases. Students will be able to debug and edit their program code using compiler diagnostics. l COMP-129 (IT) (E) information Technology (Cr3) (3:0) This course is a rigorous introduction to computer science and computer applications. and apply them to create solutions to problems in the fields of business or mathematics/ science. application software and Web design concepts. develop. The student will also learn the essentials of communicating with other users on the Web. analyze and assess ethical issues and situations in computer science. i. tables. The topics include computer architecture and data representations. (Corequisite: COMP 126) COMP-135 Computer Architecture Using Assembly Language (Cr3) (3:0) Students will acquire the fundamentals of computer architecture from a programmer’s perspective by learning assembly language. interface design. (Corequisite: COMP 126) COMP-175 Game Design and Development (Cr3) (3:0) This course teaches the student the fundamental concepts needed to design and develop a game. memory organization. as well as ADO. Students will become familiar with the UNIX file system structure. and debugging are covered. The fundamentals of software development. test. operating systems. arrays. frames. Students will learn networking in UNIX. They will be able to use a fairly extensive set of Visual Basic instructions and commands. COMP-166 WEB Design Using HTML (Cr3) (3:0) Students will learn the most important topics of HTML including creating multimedia Web pages with hypertext links. classes. and differentiation between genres are also covered. (Prerequisite: READ 095 is recommended) COMP-132 Structured Programming Using C++ (Cr3) (3:0) The student will be able to analyze a variety of real-world problems. This course contains a component that helps the l General Education Course student to recognize. Microsoft FrontPage.e. Topics to be studied include lists. The focus of the course is on the hands-on usage of various resources available through the Web. Rules. write. The students will learn how to analyze scientific problems and code solutions to these problems using the ANSI/ISO Standard C++ language. develop algorithms to solve those problems and code solutions using JAVA. team management. NET (Cr3) (3:0) This course will teach the student how to program in Microsoft Visual Basic. image mapping and animation. editors and shell programming. Programming topics will include data types. style sheets. COMP-145 Introduction to UNIX (Cr3) (3:0) Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of the UNIX operating system. including the creation of a game treatment and game spec. forms and cascading style sheets. Assignments give students hands-on experience to design. intuitive model of the computing environment. (Prerequisite: MATH 021 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra) l COMP-126 (IT) Computer Logic and Design (Cr3) (3:0) This course provides the student with an introduction to computer systems. code and execute solutions for a variety of problems using the BASIC programming language. The student will use practical problems to learn the capabilities of building object oriented applications in a graphical environment. The student will become familiar with using a Web Browser and. process and present information. Students will design and develop wireless web pages using XHTML and WML. debug and edit their program code using an integrated development environment. functions. develop algorithms to solve those problems and code solutions using the ANSI/ISO C++ language. exception handling and interrupts. arrays. which includes logic. methods. (Prerequisite: COMP 171) COMP-225 Operating Systems Technology (Cr3) (3:0) Students will acquire an understanding of the role that an operating . Current Web-based software tools are used in the course. commands and tools. as a means to finding information on the Web. the instruction cycle. Concepts covered will be data representation. testing.156 Course Descriptions Computer Science COMP-105 Introduction to the Internet. COMP-116 (t) Introduction to Digital Programming (Cr3) (3:0) This course is for students who have not had any prior computer programming courses.

implementation and support. Topics include windows programming. (Prerequisites: COMP 126 and COMP 132) COMP-245 Internet Programming Using JAVA (Cr4) (4:0) This course will provide the student with the ability to develop applications that will reside on the Internet. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: COMP 233) COMP-276 Game Level Design (Cr3) (3:0) This course will enable a student to use an existing game engine to modify an original game. (Prerequisite: COMP 226 and (COMP 271 or COMP 267)) COMP-299 Computer Science Internship (Cr3) This course will allow the student to gain practical work experience by participating in a computer science career-related position with an approved company or institution. methods and procedures required to develop a computerized information system. program structures and user interfaces of the system. sound. describe and perform various tasks associated with a computer system development particularly in systems. COMP-266 Database Using Access (Cr3) (3:0) This course will teach students basic and advanced topics of Microsoft Access. lighting. (Prerequisite: 12 credits in computer science courses and matriculation as a Computer Science major. Topics and techniques covered include design features from objects. (Prerequisites: COMP 166 or HTML and COMP 171 or an approved procedural language) COMP-268 Server Side Scripting. generic operations and their efficiency will be examined. (Prerequisite: COMP 135) COMP-226 Systems Analysis and Design (Cr3) (3:0) Students will acquire working knowledge of the principles. and the standard template library. design and implementation of an information system. debug and edit their program code using an integrated development environment. graphs. Topics will include process management. polymorphism. The course will include projects that the student will use to demonstrate the integration of the course material into a practical Internet application. creating data tables. The student will construct Internet documents through the JAVA language. (Prerequisite: COMP 126) COMP-228 Data Structures (Cr3) (3:0) This course will introduce students to the use of various data structures found in Computer Science. the use of dynamic memory. A relational database management system and drawing software are used in a laboratory environment to teach the practical application of the theories covered. code and execute JavaScript applications in a lab environment. implementation. write. as well as accessing files and databases from web pages. device management. coding functions. The student will have hands-on experience and assignments on major operating systems. including programming and running macros. (Prerequisites: COMP 166 or HTML and COMP 269 or relational database experience) COMP-269 Database Concepts (Cr3) (3:0) This course is intended to teach the student how to analyze data and effectively design databases to store such data. COMP-267 Client Side using JavaScript (Cr3) (3:0) The student will gain a working knowledge of the Web-based scripting language JavaScript. and tables. and input. operator overloading. texture mapping. classes and objects as encapsulation tools. publishing Excel data on the World Wide Web and using Visual Basic Code. (Prerequisites: COMP 126 and COMP 171) COMP-275 Game Programming (Cr3) (3:0) This course introduces the student to programming concepts unique to the development of games. publishing objects on the World Wide Web and using Visual Basic Code. Emphasis is on the skill set necessary to create a game world from a conceptual design. file structures. advanced queries and custom forms. management analysis and design. Students develop detail descriptions of the data stores. (Prerequisite: COMP 233) l General Education Course COMP-265 Spreadsheets Using Excel (Cr3) (3:0) The course will teach the students all the topics of Microsoft Excel. performance evaluation and networking.Course Descriptions 157 system has in the computing environment. The data structures to be studied include arrays. inheritance and hierarchies among classes. Implementation and administration are covered through basic and advanced SQL. For these structures. virtual functions supporting polymorphism. (Prerequisite: COMP 275) COMP-295 Special Project — Computer Science (Cr1-6) (Prerequisites: COMP 126 and programming language) COMP-296 Advanced Software Project (Cr3) (3:0) This course is a capstone course for students enrolled in the Computer Science program. working with sessions and cookies. as well as specific applications for these operations. lists. exception handling. Assignments give students hands-on experience to design. design. Projects give students hands-on experience to perform the analysis. Relational database design. The student will develop the skills necessary to understand and implement the logical construction of JAVA software. This includes using serverside software to develop dynamic and robust web pages. including developing worksheets. integrating Excel with other programs. utilities. integrating Access with other programs. Students conduct analysis and research resulting in the architecture. queues. producing new levels and characters. planning. design features for objects. inheritance and hierarchies among classes. creating charts. Students will learn how to create and use design documents and diagrams as well as implement them using the game engine. trees. They will be able to identify. permission of instructor and Career Services Representative) . and administration are covered. coding and testing of software created. (Prerequisites: COMP 135 and COMP 271) COMP-233 Object Oriented Programming Using C++ (Cr3) (3:0) This course will introduce students to the concepts and techniques of object oriented programming using the ANSI/ISO Standard C++ language. exception handling and GUI/ event driven programming. The course will examine the syntax and semantics of the JAVA language used to build Internet applications. This course provides the structure to allow students to design. programming and running macros. (Prerequisite: COMP 126 or equivalent experience) COMP-271 Programming II (Cr3) (3:0) This course continues the development of problem solving. test. stacks. logical thinking and object oriented programming techniques using JAVA. Recursive processes will be introduced as well as searching and sorting techniques. Topics to be studied include classes and objects as encapsulation tools. Design concepts include entity relationship modeling and normalization. (Cr3) (3:0) The student will gain a working knowledge of PHP to develop web applications. The emphasis is on creating programs with 3D effects.

process it and bring it into a Forensic Laboratory. the five schools of criminological theory will be reviewed. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CRJU 101) CRJU-204 Forensic Investigation (Cr3) (3:0) Forensic Investigation constructs a bridge between basic criminal investigation and forensic science. In addition. county and municipal level. and several different crime problems in America will be discussed. Counterterrorism strategies and the responses to the terrorist threat in the United States will be a major focus of the course. (Prerequisite: CRJU 101) CRJU-225 Police Organization and Administration (Cr3) (3:0) Students will be able to identify and compare the organizational models. (Prerequisite: CRJU 101) CRJU-245 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice (Cr3) (3:0) The course will examine the social and behavioral causes of delinquency. interviews and interrogations. Students will complete the course with a fundamental understanding of the impact of due process issues on the operation of the American Criminal Justice System. Students need to be made aware of changes in the relationship between local and federal responses to national threats. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CRJU 101) CRJU-236 Counter Terrorism (Cr3) (3:0) The course begins by examining the political and historical roots of international terrorism. Students will be expected to: identify and describe four separate theories of delinquency. l General Education Course CRJU-202 Criminal Investigation (Cr3) (3:0) The course will explore the responsibilities of the criminal investigator during the criminal investigation process. employee theft and security law will be discussed. the historical background. authority structures and major functions of law enforcement on a federal. concerns of retail security. Students will compare fundamental legal concepts to The New Jersey Criminal Code. will be able to describe the threats to private and public agencies and design a security survey. NOTE: This course is offered in the Fall term only. forfeiture. This is the only course in the program which studies the criminal rather than society’s response to crime. In addition. injury and terrorist threat. This course is a prerequisite for all 200 level courses in the Criminal Justice program. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CRJU 101) CRJU-235 Loss Prevention (Cr3) (3:0) Loss prevention seeks to reduce the risk of loss from theft. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CRJU 101) CRJU-229 Criminal Due Process (Cr3) (3:0) Due process is the essence of justice in the American Criminal Justice System. CRJU-151 Introduction to Criminology (Cr3) (3:0) Students will be introduced to the study of crime and criminal behavior. This course is a follow up to CRJU 101. amplify it. is reviewed and discussed. Newer community-based alternatives such as bootcamps. day reporting.158 Course Descriptions Criminal Justice CRJU-101 Introduction to Criminal Justice System (Cr3) (3:0) The social and institutional response to crime is discussed topically in this interdisciplinary survey of the American Criminal Justice System. Three different methods of measuring crime will be described. The structure and dynamics of international and domestic terrorist groups will be described. the role of the crime laboratory. along with institutional rehabilitation and community-based corrections. distinguish the practices and procedures of the adult justice system from the juvenile justice system and . Scientific methods will be explained and evidence examination techniques will be explored. CRJU-125 Police Role in Community (Cr3) (3:0) The student will use various methods to analyze the police role in the United States. Students will learn practical applications of physical security. intensive supervision and technology-based supervisions will also be examined in the course. Students will compare various divisions of government and administration and how administrators manage their particular functions on a federal. Individuals working as loss prevention professionals are concerned with the assets of private companies and public agencies. training and personnel administration. new security techniques and devices. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CRJU 101) CRJU-226 Criminal Law (Cr3) (3:0) Students will be able to define and explain the basic elements of a crime. Topics will include traditional community-based alternatives to prison such as probation and parole. Historical trends in constitutional law will be reviewed. The creation of the Office of Homeland Security and the US Patriots Act has altered the role of the federal government in the country’s response to internal dangers. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CRJU 101) CRJU-205 Community Corrections (Cr3) (3:0) Students will review the various non-custodial alternatives to the correctional system. state. CRJU-127 Introduction to Corrections (Cr3) (3:0) The student will gain an understanding of historical and contemporary correctional practices. The initial crime scene investigation. Students. physical evidence. CRJU-126 Introduction to Public Administration (Cr3) (3:0) Students will analyze the various approaches to public administration. state. They will be able to define the major administrative problems involved in assigning responsibility and delegating authority in the areas of recruitment. 2001 has changed the perception of the dangers faced by the country. after taking the course. legal rights and procedural problems of the juvenile justice system will be reviewed. promotion. the insanity defense and the death penalty. shrinkage. Enhanced intelligence. county and municipal level. crime scene reconstruction and specific investigative techniques relating to specific crimes will be discussed and evaluated. Students are required to formulate views on controversial issues and concerns such as plea bargaining. The course will take forensic evidence. September 11. as well as the organization of agencies to more effectively respond to the terrorist threat will be an important part of the course. They will be able to apply these basic elements to crimes against person and property. collect it. conducted in the past twenty years. Important cases will be read and analyzed. new career opportunities have been created that need to be understood by current students. Theoretical concepts of the criminal sanction will be discussed. CRJU-131 Introduction to Private Security (Cr3) (3:0) The growth and expansion of career opportunities in the private security industry will be reviewed. Students will be introduced to the significant constitutional cases which define due process of law in the justice system. Finally. the exclusionary rule. Research and experimentation on police. Innovations in policing from Team Policing to Community Policing are also described and analyzed.

Emphasis will be placed on rice. New Jersey Department of Corrections and other agencies. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH-012 or MATH-015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation) CULA-111 Basic Food Skills I (Cr3) (2:3) The students will gain knowledge of the principles of food preparation through classroom instruction and laboratory experiences. (Prerequisites: CULA 115 and a grade of “C” or higher in CULA 111. CULA 112 and CULA 115) CULA-126 Brunch/Buffet Production (Cr3) (2:3) The students will get hands-on experience in the production of breakfast items. READ 092 or READ 095 Culinary Arts CULA-105 Introduction to Culinary Arts (Cr1. vegetarianism and current diet trends will be presented.Course Descriptions 159 explain recent reforms and innovations in delinquency prevention. The student will perform recipe conversions. CULA 112 and CULA 115) CULA-131 Nutrition in the Culinary Arts (Cr3) (2:3) This course covers the basic principles of nutrition as they apply to the culinary arts profession.5) (1. food allergies. hot and cold hor d’oeuvres. and terms and concepts. absorption. phone quotes and contracts. The preparation experience will include: egg cookery (including omelet preparation). dairy and cheese.5) (1. Commissioned police officers may serve an internship with the County Prosecutor’s Office. the county jail. decimals and other computations will be performed utilizing industry-based problems. percentages. Students earn the SERV-SAFE Certificate. probation. and READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) CULA-115 Sanitation & Safety (Cr1. Students will prepare stocks. quick breads. (Prerequisites: CULA 111. Cultural diversity will be recognized and discussed as a key component to the success of any food service operation. storage and service. fruit and nuts. fractions. (Prerequisite: 30 credits to include 12 credits of Criminal Justice courses. CULA 112. freshness and the quality factors of maturity and ripeness. HACCP and protecting food during preparation. appetizers. Multiplication. proteins and fats) and the minor nutrients (vitamins. Presentation of these items on a plate and buffet line will be emphasized. (Prerequisites: READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in Reading. packaging. soups and sauces as the foundation for cooking competencies needed in more advanced food preparation courses. recipe costing. Corequisite: CULA 105) CULA-133 Storeroom/Purchasing Operations (Cr2) (1:2) The student will learn about the storeroom operations of purchasing. permission of the instructor and Career Services Representative and a grade of “C” or higher in CRJU 101) and equipment. (Prerequisites: CULA 111. The student will also be involved with the developing of stock and inventory control. Through lecture. galantines. ratios.5:0) Math fundamentals. taste. requisitioning and record keeping. digestion. They will learn about different ordering methods: bidding.5:0) The course explores the history of the food service industry and the development of the professional chef. pasta. seasonality and availability. punishment and treatment. Faculty permission required for registration. Limited to students who need 1-3 credits to graduate. minerals and water) are discussed.5) (1. texture and other selection points. and extension computations. terrines and salads (Garde Manger). pest control. Presentation of these items on a plate and buffet line will be emphasized. Emphasis will be placed on knife skills. An extensive unit on safety will be included. They will develop preparation and timing skills. salads and salad dressings. appropriate culinary uses. Lecture and lab application will be utilized. legumes. CULA 111. They will develop preparation and timing skills. receiving. Students will learn to apply healthy cooking techniques into today’s restaurant menu. will be intensively reviewed. division. CULA 115) CULA-127 Ala Carte Lunch (Cr3) (2:3) The student will apply the skills learned in basic food preparation skills classes to the preparation of lunch foods from the following categories: sandwiches. vegetables. cereals. cereals. common diseases related to nutrition. CULA-125 Breakfast Cookery (Cr2) (1:2) The students will get hands-on experience in the production of breakfast items. measuring. breakfast meats. The personal and educational resources needed to become a professional chef will be discussed. sanitation and safety. The course covers microbiology and foodborne illnesses. demonstration and hands-on experience in the lab the students will learn product identification. The student will be able to develop appropriate ingredient substitutions and healthy cooking techniques. CULA-107 Culinary Math (Cr1. SERV-SAFE certification is required to work in the production kitchen and continue in the Culinary Arts program. transportation and metabolism of the major nutrients (carbohydrates. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CRJU 101) CRJU-299 Criminal Justice Internship (Cr3) Students will work 175 hours for a local justice agency. Students will prepare cold kitchen items such as canapés. weights and measures. (Prerequisite: CULA 107. breakfast meats. The preparation experience will include: egg cookery (including omelet preparation). the Food Guide Pyramid. dairy and cheese.5:0) Students will obtain an understanding of standards for sanitation that are applicable to all aspects of food service and food industry operations. hot lunches and vegetarian dishes. The student will have to show proficiency in knife skills. Topics including: food labeling. MATH-012 or MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation. sanitizing equipment and facilities. storage. (Prerequisites: MATH 012 or MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in CRJU 101) CRJU-295 Special Project — Criminal Justice (Cr1-3) Students will complete a research project. Internships are available with several local police departments. pasta and starch. and MATH-012 or MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation and a grade of “C” or higher in CULA 115) CULA-112 Basic Food Skills II (Cr3) (2:3) The students will build upon the information learned in Basic Food Preparation Skills I and increase their knowledge of food preparation through classroom instruction and laboratory experiences. Students will become familiar with the library and how to do research and enhance their study skills. and mise en place while working in the kitchen. This course is a foundation course for cooking competencies needed in more advanced food preparation courses. CULA 115. quick breads. CULA 112. (Prerequisites: CULA 111. menu pricing. identification of tools l General Education Course . as they relate to the food industry. pates. The function.

(Prerequisites: CULA 151. food preparation techniques. puff pastry and filo dough products. CULA 266 and CULA 267. cakes and cookies and pate a choux. CULA 252. CULA 127 and CULA 133) CULA-267 American Regional Cuisine (Cr3) (1:6) This course is designed to provide the student with respect for cultural diversity in foods. CULA 252. (Prerequisites: CULA 126. CULA 251. breads and rolls. food preparation techniques. demonstration and hands-on application preparation techniques. soufflés. ingredients. French and Italian pastries. handling and butchering techniques for finfish. Midwest. calculating the guest check. Food. and whole grain baking. Upper South. Great Lakes. (Prerequisites: CULA 126 and CULA 127). menu patterns and culture of American regions will be emphasized. pies. He/She will learn to identify quality of wine by interpreting the label. . filling the orders. flatbreads and starters. theories and techniques learned in all of the food preparation classes to an actual setting. Proper handling of these items will be stressed. mousses. CULA 255). The student will learn through lecture. CULA-266 Meat and Seafood Science (Cr3) (2:3) The student will learn through lecture. handling the cash transaction and farewell to the guest. The student will also learn about the major wine growing regions of the world and the different wines that each produces. (Prerequisites: CULA 115 and a grade of “C” or higher in CULA 151) CULA-252 Advanced Baking Skills (Cr3) (1:6) This course is designed to meet the needs of the student who is pursuing pastry arts as a possible career goal. Areas of study will be selected as to their culinary popularity and influence on world cuisine. pork and poultry. (Prerequisite: CULA 141) CULA-251 Patisserie (Cr3) (1:6) This course is designed to expand on the principles and techniques learned in Baking Skills. (Prerequisites: CULA 107. Hawaii and Alaska. techniques and principles. taking food and beverage orders. and menu patterns of international cuisine will be learned and applied. souffles. CULA 251. decorative breads.160 Course Descriptions or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skllls requirement in reading) CULA-141 Dining Room I (Cr2) (1:2) This course is designed as an overview of service. This is the culmination of all the food preparation courses and signifies that the student is now prepared to work in the field. cakes. pulled and blown sugar. The student will perform sensory evaluation of the finished product. The students will prepare selected international recipes from the following areas: Great Britain. discuss how the cuisines of other cultures have been encultured into American cuisines and apply their knowledge of international cuisines into recipe development. Middle Atlantic. lamb. CULA-271 Advanced Classical Cuisine (Cr3) (1:6) The student will apply all of the food preparation skills. and MATH 012 or MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation) CULA-151 Baking Skills I (Cr3) (1:4) This course is designed to give the student the ability to demonstrate an understanding of baking. flans. CULA 253) CULA-256 Confectionary and Showpieces (Cr3) (1:6) During this course the student will become proficient at tempering chocolate. tools and equipment. The student will learn through lecture. tarts. The students will prepare selected recipes from the following areas: New England. terminology. Petit fours. South and Central America. puddings. (Prerequisites: CULA 141 and CULA 241) CULA-275 International Regional Cuisine (Cr3) (2:3) Students will acquire both the knowledge and understanding of cuisines around the world. The student will also learn identification. galettes and meringues. There will also be classroom discussion of distilled spirits. Europe. (Prerequisites: CULA 126. international breads. Corequisite: CULA 272) CULA-272 Advanced Dining Room III/ Spirits (Cr3) (1:4) This course is the culmination of all of the students’ efforts in the previous dining room courses. CULA 251. CULA 115 and CULA 131) CULA-241 Dining Room II/Wines (Cr3) (2:3) The student will further develop his/ her service skills by serving dinner in the dining room. Students will also be introduced to frozen desserts. Each country/regions covered will describe food customs. including: Artisan breads. serving dessert. This course includes the preparation of both French and Italian foods. discussion and hands-on production. students will apply skills from all Pastry Arts classes in the preparation of a dessert buffet. Mountain States. (Charcuterie). greeting and seating guests. The student will perform yield test analysis as a part of the learning experience. The student will be responsible for setting up the dining room mise en place. demonstration and hands-on application of fish cookery principles and techniques. The students will develop professional server skills and be able to efficiently serve a meal. Pacific Northwest. (Prerequisites: CULA 115 and CULA 151) l General Education Course CULA-253 Advanced Patisserie (Cr3) (1:6) The student will gain knowledge of the principles of advanced Patisserie by working with materials and products at an advanced level. The student will prepare a variety of baked goods including: quick breads. Demonstration on filled chocolates. Africa. Southwest. centerpieces and advanced techniques are also included for student practice. formulations. fruit cakes. Techniques of brining. shellfish and a variety of fish. The student will prepare puff paste and choux paste products. The student will also prepare strudel. The students will gain hands-on experience in serving in the dining room. Students will study international countries and regions. Wedding cakes. The student will understand how meat is graded. cheese cake and frozen desserts. Students will learn the basis for diverse food preferences around the globe. (Prerequisites: CULA 151. common ingredients and culinary specialties from that area. tools and equipment. There will be lecture. (Prerequisites: READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading. CULA 252) CULA-255 Advanced Pastry Arts (Cr3) (1:6) In this course. (Prerequisites: CULA 151. CULA 253. inspected and aged and will be able to identify the bone and muscle structure of beef. petit fours and cookies. Asia. custards. special needs baking. strudels. Food. tools and equipment. The student will be held to high professional standards of performance. demonstration and hands-on experiences how to butcher meat to portion control cuts. The student will begin to develop skills in cake decorating and finishing. curing and smoking will be discussed. CULA 127. a variety of yeast doughs. Decorative icings and Regional Specialties are covered. The student will prepare and plate the restaurant menu to patrons. working with Pastillage. Emphasis will be placed on sanitation and safety in the dining room. Students will gain knowledge of and respect for cultural diversity in foods. Deep South.

266. hypersensitivity and airbrasive. adjunctive instrumentation. Lyrical jazz techniques and choreographic skills will be developed. Waltz. 126. DENA-110 Dental Science (Cr2) This course will provide continued study in the disciplines of oral embryology and oral histology. Choreographic skills will be further explored. Attendance at professional dance performances will be required and students will be required to perform in a recital at the end of each semester. (Prerequisites: ADEC 110 and ADEC 111) DENA-111 Clinical Assisting (Cr3) This course will incorporate the pre-clinical principles and techniques learning in the Spring Semester. treatment planning. A combination of lecture and movement will be included in each class session that will provide personal growth and proper body alignment. inventory control. Emphasis will be placed on the recognition and identification of normal oral tissues and anomalies. it will introduce the Dental Assisting student to the dental sciences of oral pathology and pharmacology. office management. comprehend and utilize the technical and choreographic skills of the ballroom dancing discipline. rise and fall. (Prerequisites: Completion of 30 credits. rise and fall. The student will be able to perform modern jazz/ contemporary dance techniques. A combination of lecture and movement will be included in each class session that will provide personal growth and proper body alignment. Merengue. No prior dance experience required. comprehend and utilize the technical and choreographic skills of the modern dance discipline. Dental Hygiene Dental education (ADEC. (Prerequisite: Admission to the Dental Hygiene program) DENH-121 Clinical and Dental Hygiene I (Cr3) The student will demonstrate advanced techniques to the dental hygiene appointment. DANC-122 Modern Dance II (Cr3) (2:2) A continuation of the fundamentals of Modern Dance. Merengue. including Fox Trot. strength. Students will learn to develop the body as a moving instrument through physical conditioning. l General Education Course . DENH-120 Introduction to Clinical Dental Hygiene (Cr4) An introduction to the basic knowledge.) CULA-295 Special Project . skills and judgment necessary for prevention of disease of the teeth and surrounding tissue. DENA-112 Internship (Cr1) This course will incorporate the pre-clinical principles and techniques addressed in Introduction to the Dental Professions and Dental Specialties I. (Prerequisites: DANC 151) DANC-295 Special Project — Dance. identify. placement and turnout. Tango. Swing. No formal training is necessary. systemic disorders and related oral sequelae and the most commonly used/prescribed pharmaceuticals in dentistry. Central and Eastern Europe. Partners are not necessary but will be assigned. 115. flexibility. (Prerequisite: DANC 111 or instructor approval) DANC-141 Contemporary Jazz I (Cr3) (2:2) This is a fundamental course in contemporary jazz technique. (Prerequisite: DANC 141) DANC-151 Ballroom Dance I (Cr3) (2:2) In this fundamental course. seminars. Waltz. Turkey. Students will learn to lead and follow. Case studies will also be examined with respect to treatment Dance DANC-111 Introduction to Dance I (Cr3) (2:2) This is a fundamental course in dance. India and the Middle East. DENA and DENH) courses are taken at UMDNJ. Expanded functions allowed by the State of New Jersey will be practiced in the New Jersey Dental School during the clinical rotation assignments. students will be able to perform. DANC-121 Modern Dance I (Cr3) (2:2) In this fundamental course. Students will be introduced to the world of dance and will be instructed in Latin and Smooth dances. Chairside assisting also will be performed with the dental students and their patients. selfinstructional audio-visual presentations and reading assignments. comprehend and utilize the technical and choreographic skills of the ballroom dancing discipline. The student will receive a formal evaluation verbally and in writing from their immediate supervisor. Students will continue to explore the world of dance and will be provided advanced instruction in Latin and Smooth dances. fluoride. Southeast Asia. and approval of instructor and Career Services Representative) DANC-142 Contemporary Jazz II (Cr3) (2:2) This course is designed for students who wish to continue and further explore the techniques of modern jazz.” development of flexibility.Course Descriptions 161 Greece. extension. Students will learn to lead and follow. Cha Cha and Salsa. balance and foot work. “Fall and Recovery. Learning methods include lectures. Chairside assisting. laboratory assignments. Tango. turns.Culinary Arts (Cr1-3) (Prerequisite: 20 credits in the major and permission of instructor) CULA-299 Externship — Culinary Arts (Cr3) Students will be placed in approved sites for 350-400 hours of related work experience. Cha Cha and Salsa. Additionally. They will be able to execute basic dance steps and movement with better understanding of the physical body. as well as more complicated and intricate dance patterns. proper alignment and exploration of movement qualities. Rhumba. 151. identify. using the body as an interpretive and artistic instrument. 127. balance and foot work. To include oral physiotherapy. identify. including Fox Trot. Swing. Attendance at professional dance performances will be required and students will be provided the opportunity to perform in a recital at the end of each semester. Partners are not necessary. Laboratory and clinical experiences provide the opportunity for practical application of the principles of comprehensive dental hygiene treatment. No formal dance training is necessary. (Cr1-3) Students may choose to specialize or investigate some area in greater depth by selecting one to three credits in this individual learning course for the major. students will be able to further perform. 112. Rhumba. radiographs and expanded functions allowed by the State of New Jersey for dental assistants will be performed during the clinical rotation assignments in private practice. DANC-131 Ballet (Cr3) (2:2) This is a fundamental course in classical ballet in which students will learn traditional techniques emphasizing body coordination. The student will complete an externship experience logbook pertaining to the work experience. (Prerequisites or corequisites: CULA 111. students will be able to perform. balance. DANC-152 Ballroom Dance II (Cr3) (2:2) Building upon the skills mastered in DANC 151. 20 of which must be from career courses.

A detailed study of the development of the deciduous and permanent dentition is presented along with the common developmental disturbances and anomalies that sometimes occur during the complex pattern of growth and development. In addition. Correlation of the relationship of the histopathologic changes of the supporting structures of the teeth are integrated through the use of case based clinical situation. We will delve further into clinical manifestations of perio disease and its treatment using case histories. Included in this course is information relative to the care and treatment of the pedodontic. (Prerequisites: DENH 120. etiology and treatment of periodontal disease are discussed in depth using slides. tobacco cessation and latex sensitivity. ADEC 111 and ADEC 110) DENH-122 Clinical Services I (Cr3) The student will perform the basic procedures relative to the traditional dental hygiene appointment. treatment planning. dental indices and reliability and validity of research methods. (Prerequisites: ADEC 115. It examines dental public health. ADEC 112 and ADEC 116) DENH-245 Pain and Anxiety Control (Cr1) The course is designed to introduce the student to the principles of local anesthesia in dentistry. the etiology. pharmacologic effects and their usual incitations and contraindications. Students will correlate their patients’ care through a case presentation and article reviews will enhance current events on the perio scene. DENH 123 and ADEC 114) DENH-233 Periodontology I (Cr2) This lecture course is designed to explore basic concepts of the anatomy and pathology of the periodontium. BIOL 213. videos and CD-ROM. (Prerequisites: ADEC 111. The learning method will be through clinical experience and weekly seminars. Case presentations will also be discussed and analyzed. adult and child preventive counseling. sharpening. treatment. treatment planning. and become clinically proficient in all expanded duties listed in the New Jersey Dental Auxiliary Practice Act. DENH 121. Lectures. This includes both systemic and oral conditions. DENH 123 and ADEC 114) DENH-243 Periodontology II (Cr2) This lecture course is a continuation of Periodontology I. discussion and case studies will be used to enhance learning. growth and development of the face and oral cavity will be studied to reinforce lecture topics. to include oral physiotherapy.162 Course Descriptions planning. Pathology is the study of abnormalities in morphology and function and may include any deviation from normal. ADEC 111 and ADEC 110) DENH-123 Oral Histology and Embryology (Cr2) The course provides the dental hygiene student with a conceptual framework for understanding the growth and development of oral structures as well as an overview of the perinatal events that begin their growth. DENH 123 and DENH 124) DENH-236 Pharmacology and Oral Medicine (Cr1) This course will introduce the dental hygiene student to pharmacology as it relates to the practice of dentistry including adverse drug reactions. Learning methods include seminar and clinical experience. geriatric and special needs patients. with emphasis placed on those lesions most frequently encountered. behavior modification strategies. Classification. (Prerequisites: ADEC 114 and ADEC 110) DENH-235 Oral Pathology (Cr2) As a member of the oral health team it is important for the dental hygienist to recognize pathological conditions in patients so that appropriate precautions and/or treatment may be rendered. student presentation and interviews. The majority of the course is devoted to oral pathology. (Prerequisites: BIOL 213. (Prerequisites: BIOL 112 and ADEC 113) DENH-242 Clinical Services III (Cr3) The students will demonstrate advanced techniques relative to the dental hygiene appointment. (Prerequisites: ADEC 115. DENH 122. The knowledge obtained from this course will provide a basis for further study in oral pathology and periodontology. Learning methods include seminar and clinical experience. dissemination of dental health information and tools of public health including epidemiology. pregnant. delivering and evaluation of community dental health programs. which will explore other conditions of the oral cavity. The pharmacology of various local anesthetics and vasoconstrictors will be reviewed. (Prerequisite: DENH 233) DENH-244 Dental Specialties II (Cr1) This course is designed to build upon the knowledge and skills developed in Dental Specialties I. behavior modification strategies. legal and ethical issues of patient records. differential diagnosis. Microscopic structures of the oral tissues. (Prerequisite: ADEC 111) DENH-124 Nutrition (Cr2) The purpose of this course is to provide the dental hygiene student with the knowledge to understand and skill to apply the principle of nutrition and diet evaluation and counseling relative to oral health in the dental setting. Case presentations will also be discussed and analyzed. Since abnormalities begin at the cellular level. Anatomy of the head and neck will be stressed throughout the course with an in-depth review of the trigeminal nerve and neurophysiology. (Prerequisite: DENH 121) DENH-232 Clinical Services II (Cr3) The student will demonstrate advanced l General Education Course techniques relative to the dental hygiene appointment. Guest lectures may also present the current information on clinical and adjunctive home care aids available. telephone skills. Students will rotate throughout clinic where they will function as New Jersey expanded duties dental hygienist/dental assistants. DENH 122. Emphasis will be placed on clinical application of these principles. this course also begins with cellular alterations and response. The seminar will support and supplement clinical education with topics relating to treatment planning. adult and child preventive counseling. followup and prognosis are presented. dental hygiene students will attend the New Jersey Dental School Pain Control course to obtain the necessary didactic knowledge in the application of pain control techniques. biostatistics. pathogenesis. DENH-231 Clinical and Dental Hygiene II (Cr2) This course is designed to help further educate the dental hygiene student in various aspects of clinical practice. For each lesion discussed. the role of the dental auxiliary in planning. clinical and microscopic signs and symptoms. ADEC 115 and DENH 123) DENH-234 Dental Health Education II/ Community Dental Health (Cr2) This course is a participation and study of the principles of delivering health care to the public. DENH 121. adolescent. adductive instrumentations. behavior modification strategies and adult pedo preventive counseling. DENH 120. time management of the appointment book and clinic. (Prerequisites: ADEC 110. Limited discussion will be devoted to general pathology as it relates to oral lesions and manifestations. Discussion of systemic toxicity and local complications will alert the student to . (Prerequisites: DENH 120. to include oral physiotherapy.

refraction. Students will perform obstetrical and gynecologic scanning procedures under the direct supervision of certified technologists. DMSO 221 and DMSO 222. theory and practice of the physical and psychological methods of quality patient care such as therapeutic communication. DMSO 122 and DMSO 123. cranium. (Prerequisites: DMSO 121. (Prerequisites: DMSO 121. including breast. (Prerequisites: DMSO 121. drug and contrast administration. Students will perform small parts scanning procedures under the direct supervision of certified technologists. certification. Corequisites: DMSO 131. Corequisites: DMSO 131. testicular. (Prerequisites: HITC 124. DMSO 132. transducers. thorax. professional liability and risk. tissue interaction. ophthalmic and musculoskeletal scanning. wave l General Education Course . and emergency patient care. DMSO 133 and DMSO 134. DMSO 122 and DMSO 123. bio-effects. thyroids. abdomen. echocardiographic pattern recognition. as well as scanning protocols for the ultrasound examination of the abdomen and associated organs. and computers in sonography. pathology. pelvis. imaging and display techniques that relate to high-frequency sound production. Topics that are covered include modes of operation. ethical decision making. (Prerequisites: DMSO 131. resonance. and oblique planes of the circulatory system. Corequisites: DMSO 122 and DMSO 123. transverse. pathophysiology of the circulatory system and scanning techniques of human vasculature including Doppler techniques used to diagnose peripheral vascular and cerebral vascular disease. acoustic power. focusing on advanced obstetrics and gynecology procedures and female sonographic procedures and pathologies. Corequisites: HITC 124 and DMSO 221) DMSO-231 Vascular Imaging & Echocardiography (Cr4) (2:6) This course presents current vascular imaging theory. Co-requisites: DMSO 132. image artifacts. Corequisites: DMSO 131. utilizing specialized equipment and high megahertz frequencies. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 112) DMSO-122 Abdominal Sonography I (Cr5) (2:10) This course presents basic concepts and terminology. (Prerequisites: DMSO 121. neurosonography. The students will demonstrate their ability to perform ultrasonographic procedures with indirect supervision and will present final diagnostic case studies and a portfolio. Students will perform vascular scanning procedures under the direct supervision of certified technologists. fluid dynamics. physiology. DMSO 132. reflection. and acoustical physics. (Prerequisites: HITC 124. gynecological anomalies and normal and abnormal first trimester pregnancy. Students will perform abdominal scanning procedures under the direct supervision of certified technologists. coronal. and palpation and auscultation of the heart. Corequisites: HITC 124 and DMSO 222) DMSO-222 Obstetric & Gynecological Sonography II (Cr4) (2:6) This course presents current theory and scanning techniques for medical sonographers. Corequisite: DMSO 232) DMSO-232 Professional Issues in Ultrasonography (Cr3) (2:4) This course is a capstone course. DMSO 122 and DMSO 123. (Prerequisite: ADEC 116) DENH-246 Capstone Seminar (Cr2) The Capstone Seminar is at the conclusion of a student’s program of study and caps prior course work. and quality assurance procedures. body mechanics. Students will analyze correlations of anatomy with clinical sonographic imaging techniques. reproductive system. DMSO 133 and DMSO 134) DMSO-132 Abdominal Sonography II (Cr4) (2:6) This course presents advanced concepts and terminology. the Doppler effect. Professional issue topics that are examined include licensure. prostate. The course also examines the ethical and legal aspects of clinical medicine. as well as scanning protocols for the ultrasound examination of the abdomen and abdominal structures with an emphasis on specialty organ procedures including both normal and pathological states. Corequisites: DMSO 121 and DMSO 123. (Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and HESC 105. light and sound. aseptic and sterile techniques. This course also introduces cardiovascular principles including ultrasound scanning techniques of the heart focusing on anatomy. DMSO 132 and DMSO 134) DMSO-134 Obstetric & Gynecological Sonography I (Cr4) (2:6) This course presents current theory and scanning techniques focused on obstetrics and gynecology procedures and pathologies including pathophysiology of the female reproductive system. (Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and HESC 105: Co-requisites: DMSO 121 and DMSO 122. Local anesthetic techniques will be discussed and a rational approach to selection of anesthetic and injection techniques for each patient will be presented. DMSO 221 and DMSO 222. DMSO 122 and DMSO 123. DMSO 133 and DMSO 134) DMSO-133 Ultrasound Physics & Instrumentation II (Cr2) (2:0) This course presents advanced instrumentation topics to including hemodynamics. Corequisite: DMSO 231) Diagnostic Medical Sonography DMSO-121 Introduction to Patient Care (Cr3) (2:2) This introductory course provides a basic foundation for the practice of diagnostic medical sonography including related terminology. including heat energy. DMSO 133 and DMSO 134. bioeffects. safety. (Prerequisites: DMSO 131. retroperitoneum and fetal cross-sectional anatomy. Doppler techniques. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 112) DMSO-131 Cross-Sectional Anatomy (Cr2) (2:0) This introductory course covers the human anatomy from the cross-sectional perspective in longitudinal.Course Descriptions 163 emergencies that can develop in the dental treatment area. Topics that are covered include both normal and pathological states. Students will perform abdominal scanning procedures under the direct supervision of certified technologists. DMSO 132 and DMSO 133) DMSO-221 High Resolution Imaging (Cr4) (2:6) This course presents current theory and scanning techniques of anatomy classified as small parts. (Prerequisite: Approval of Program Director) theory. The course is an opportunity for students to synthesize what they have learned in the Dental Hygiene major by applying research methods and oral pathological conditions into a case study for publication and presentation. The identification of normal and abnormal sonographic patterns for the evaluation of the gravid uterus and fetus are emphasized for recognition of pathologies. (Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and HESC 105. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 112) DMSO-123 Ultrasound Physics & Instrumentation I (Cr2) (2:0) This course provides the student with the relevant fundamental physical principles of basic instrumentation used in diagnostic ultrasound.

In addition. and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) l ECON-106 (SS) Micro Economics. layering. students will learn the AfterEffects program filters and presets for use in animation. (Prerequisites: DIGM 221 or permission of instructor) discussions about current and future concepts in the digital audio-visual domain. and practices of digital imaging for animation. The project will be presented for critique and evaluation at each of the developmental stages. The student will become familiar with the basics of mechanical drawings and basic drafting procedure. and . (Prerequisite: DIGM 121) l General Education Course DIGM-126 Digital Modeling: ZBrush (Cr3) (3:0) Students will use ZBrush’s high-level controls and applications for 3D modeling and texturing. They will be able to explain the effects of monetary and fiscal policy and the impact of foreign trade on the phenomenon of economic growth. MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra) Economics l ECON-105 (SS) Macro Economics (Cr3) (3:0) Students will understand how a market economy operates using the fundamental principles of supply and demand. (Prerequisites: MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation. and deformers. (Prerequisites: MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation. Expressions will be used to animate particles. polygon construction and subdivisional surfaces. and print media in both a non-linear and hypermedia environment. principles. Students will use Photoshop software and storyboarding software to complete their projects. income and utility. The primary 3D modeling and rendering software used in this course will be Maya which is a commercial standard for 3D modeling. They will be able to relate the significance of unemployment. DIGM-121 Maya I: 3D Modeling (Cr3) (3:0) This course introduces students to fundamental concepts. Students will establish a digital lighting design methodology. game development and 3D Design. Students will use visual storytelling concepts to produce storyboards and an animatic. This course includes the fundamentals of the ZBrush interface. and composition. A fundamental understanding of a Windows OS.164 Course Descriptions Digital Animation and 3D Design DIGM-115 Digital Editing: After Effects (Cr3) (3:0) Students will use the AfterEffects software to explore the concepts of digital editing for time-based media. and basic computer knowledge is helpful. The character setup and rigging techniques will include kinematics and inverse kinematics. Students will learn about audio. DIGM-122 Maya II: Fundamentals (Cr3) (3:0) This course is a series of project-based lessons designed to guide students through the process of creating and generating an animation. introductions to software and concepts utilized in digital AV production and graphic design. Students are given instruction in 3D modeling techniques including: production of geometric and organic surfaces and forms using NURBS. READ 092 or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading. displacement. They will analyze cost under various market structures. (Prerequisite: DIGM 221) DIGM-225 Digital Design and Production (Cr6) (6:0) This course is a design and production project for Digital Media Arts students enrolled in Digital Animation & 3D Design and the Game Programming Option. Some additional lab time is expected in this course. (Cr3) (3:0) Students will understand principles of supply and demand including sensitivity analysis to price. Both the output and input markets will be examined. READ 092 or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading. including keyframing. camera. Drafting and Design DRFT-106 Fundamentals of Basic Drafting (Cr3) (3:0) This course is intended for the student who has not had any previous experience with drafting. In this course. Zspheres modeling. Students will use Combustion nonlinear interface and extensive tool sets. and ends with post-production processing. continues with storyboarding. texture map. students will learn the basics of digital editing. and will work with AfterEffects’ native 3D space to create primitive objects and move cameras through scenes. The student will document each stage of the project’s development. This courses teaches students how to model. to create scenes in 2D and 3D environments. ZBrush’s Subdivisional surface modeler will be used for model creation and manipulation. Students will produce a high-quality original game or animation product. (Prerequisite: DIGM 121 and ARTS 111) DIGM-221 Maya III: Rendering (Cr3) (3:0) Students will light 3D scenes. and color manipulation. Students will demonstrate an understanding of composition through lighting. Students will construct a Full Body IK control rigging and skin for the model. animate. Students will manipulate digital images for animation and design applications. the 3D edit mode. and rendering within ZBrush. principles. add visual effects and render using Maya software (Prerequisite: DIGM 121) DIGM-125 Digital Editing: Combustion (Cr3) (3:0) Students will learn to use a node-based digital video interface to create composites for motion graphics and visual effects. DIGM-116 Production & Storyboarding: Photoshop (Cr3) (3:0) This course introduces students to fundamental concepts. and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) l ECON-107 (SS) Economics (Cr3) (3:0) This intensive course for non-business students combines macro and micro Digital Media DGMD-101 (t) Introduction to Digital Media (Cr3) (3:0) Digital Media Technology is designed to familiarize the student with the expanding world of new digital media formats. in addition to operators and expressions. set up shading networks and render 3D images with alpha channels for compositing. The student will learn to use the basic tools of drafting in the preparation of engineering drawings. video. texturing techniques. (Prerequisite: DIGM 122) DIGM-222 Maya IV: Advanced Modeling & Character Rigging (Cr3) (3:0) Students will build a standard bipedal skeleton with properly aligned rotation axes character rig. The project begins with the creation of the original concept. inflation and other indicators to our nation’s economy. (Prerequisite: MATH 021. The course will include the basics of digital media formats and codecs. and practices of 3D digital modeling.

Course Descriptions 165 economics theory. Developmentally appropriate assessment processes and observation tools will be studied and applied in field based early childhood settings. social. Observation sites must be licensed and meet with department approval. hypothesis testing. (Prerequisite: MATH 021. ECON 107 is a condensed combination of ECON 105 and ECON 106. consumption. They will also know the basic methods. Also. An understanding of the nature of early childhood education services and programs for young children with special needs will be demonstrated.) EDUA-106 Language Arts in Early Childhood Programs (Cr3) (3:0) Students will identify the materials and methods used in language arts experiences in early childhood programs. EDUA-145 Nutrition. EDUA-205 Creative Arts in Early Childhood Programs (Cr3) (3:0) Students will know the developmental levels of creativity in early childhood settings. investment. Emphasis is placed on developing the skill of writing lyrics to familiar tunes and building a set repertoire of songs to complement a year-long early childhood curriculum. Discrete and continuous probability. emotional and cognitive development of young children. Students will develop competency statements of the interrelationship of health. 30 hours are to be completed in an early learning environment. Fieldwork is required in this course. (Prerequisite: EDEC 105 with a grade of “B” or better. Attendance at a mandatory orientation and seminar session. An emphasis on theoretical perspectives specifically related to early childhood development. Students will also understand the basic theoretical principles of production possibilities. cost and price. techniques and materials used in creative arts in early childhood settings. Appropriate handmade musical instruments and props are produced. confidence intervals. They will also develop and demonstrate materials for teaching social studies in early childhood programs. regression. across all educational disciplines. Students will demonstrate a two-week lesson plan to teach some aspect of health and nutrition in early childhood settings. This course is required for the option of an AA degree in Education as a replacement of EDUC 105 for students interested in a career in early childhood education (Prerequisites: READ 091/READ 092 sequence or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) EDEC-199 Education Field Experience (Cr0) Students who have completed EDEC 105 as a part of the Education AA Early Childhood Education Option with a grade of B or better are required to complete 60 hours field experience. Health and Safety in Early Childhood Programs (Cr3) (3:0) Students in this course will study the proper practices used in early childhood programs for diet. EDUA-206 Math and Science in Early Childhood Programs (Cr3) (3:0) Students will know the basic math and science skills to be taught to early childhood students and will demonstrate some of these in class. Songs. national income accounts. 30 hours to be completed in a K-3 setting. planning and assessment. props and instruments are combined to enhance and produce musical dramatic play activities. Therefore. Field observations are required to meet transferability of EDEC 105 to fouryear institutions and certification options. listening. Fieldwork is required in this course. They will also demonstrate basic methods of teaching. EDUA-135 Music in Early Childhood Programs (Cr3) (3:0) Students will define the goals of an early childhood music program and explore the ways to utilize music in the classroom. Students must meet with the instructor prior to registering and develop a written proposal on the project to be undertaken. They will also know the methods. Fieldwork is required in this course. techniques and materials used in teaching early childhood math and science. guidelines. and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) ECON-225 Business Statistics (Cr3) (3:0) Students will summarize statistical data. demonstrate basic arts and crafts and music skills suitable for early childhood students in class. and historical movements that guide teaching and learning in early childhood education settings will be identified as they impact the physical. speaking. is demonstrated. equilibrium analysis and application to decision-making in the firm. since ECON 107 is not a comprehensive combination of ECON 105 and ECON 106. READ 092 or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading. Field experience is required in this course. performance standards. both graphically and as measures of center and dispersion. pre-writing and pre-reading skills and know the developmental language characteristics of students in early childhood programs. MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra) ECON-295 Special Project — Economics (Cr1-3) Students will work independently on a project that is mutually agreed upon with the instructor. EDUA-131 Social Studies in Early Childhood Programs (Cr3) (3:0) Students will know what social studies skills and attitudes should be developed in early childhood programs through the study of units in basic social studies subjects. (Prerequisites: MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation. EDUA-299 Early Childhood Assistant Internship (Cr1-5) The student will participate in a field experience for nine to eighteen hours per week of on-the-job Early Childhood Education EDEC-105 Foundations of Early Childhood Education (Cr3) (3:0) Students will identify the emergent processes of early childhood development as they apply to learning and teaching in early childhood education programs. safety and nutrition for young children focusing on current practices. distributions. It is designed to acquaint students with the nature of the market system and the major issues and problems affecting our economy. monetary and fiscal policies and problems of employment and price levels. Musical application. safety and health maintenance. Fieldwork is required for this course. Emphasis is placed on current critical issues related to health. (Prerequisites: ECON 105 and ECON 106) developmentally appropriate delivery models and practices. Fieldwork is required in this course. time series analysis and index numbers are also covered. Field work is required in this course. it cannot be used in place of the two. Students will understand the basic theoretical principles of demand theory. safety and nutrition. a student will not receive credit for ECON 107 in addition to ECON 105 and ECON 106. nutrition. sampling techniques. multicultural experiences and the methods and materials for teaching social studies in early childhood settings. l General Education Course .

Upon completion of the course. frequency counter and others to measure and verify calculated values. Units include retardation. components and analysis. lecture. parallel. Students interested in teaching early childhood education or general elementary education are recommended to take EDUC 217 or EDUC 225 as a follow-up. The student will observe special education programs presently functioning in Monmouth County. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in ELEC 103) ELEC-132 Electrical Circuits for Power Distribution II (Cr4) (3:2) This course is specifically designed for students in the Electric Utility Technology Program. or a minimum of 6 credits in Early Childhood courses if they wish placement in preschool classes. learning disability. READ 091/092 or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading. (Prerequisites: Five from among EDUA 106. and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing). field trips. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in ELEC 103 and ELEC 131) ELEC-133 Electrical System Design and the National Electric Code (Cr3) (3:0) This course introduces students to the National Electric Code as it applies primarily to the design of large commercial and industrial installations. word recognition. Introduction to Education. and bridge circuits. including dry and wet type distribution transformers. voltages. This course is of interest to parents of special needs children as well as those interested in a career in education. and circuit analysis. Field trips to appropriate sites comprise the laboratory requirement. the student will . Additionally. and Norton’s Theorem. will be explained and illustrated. the student will be able to analyze complex AC circuits comprised of resistors. etc. phonics. (Prerequisites: EDUC 105 or EDEC 105. Mesh Analysis. Nodal Analysis. the student will apply the basic laws of meter circuits and various circuit analysis techniques including Kirchoff’s laws. It shows basic switchgear construction. EDUC 216 or EDUC 217 for students who wish placement in special education classes. Techniques such as discussion. as well as the complex skills required to develop comprehension in all content areas. demonstrations. single-phase and threephase transformer connections. students will have developed a foundation in the scientifically research based instructional methods and activities that drive current pedagogical practices. Students interested in teaching secondary education or special education are recommended to take EDUC 217 as a follow-up to this course. and instrument transformers is explained. vocabulary and fluency. Students’ presentations will be videotaped. EDUC-225 Literacy Development and Instruction (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to give students a foundation in the theory and practices of literacy development as they pertain to the processes by which children learn to read and write. Students will be able to recognize the relationships between phonemic awareness. S/he will be able to use standard laboratory test equipment such as the oscilloscope. EDUA 206. The EDUC field work lab (EDUC 199) and a grade of B or better are required for successfully transferring this course to most four-year institutions for education majors. with a grade of at least B. Thevenin’s Theorem. EDUC 105. grounding. Introduction to Education.) EDUC-216 Classroom Techniques (Cr3) (3:0) The student will be able to identify and apply various teaching methods used in presentation of materials. capacitors. giftedness. are required to complete 60 hours of observation in an approved academic setting to ensure transferability of EDUC 105 to a four-year institution. power transformers. (Prerequisites: EDUC 105.166 Course Descriptions experience. EDUA 205. Note that this course may not be accepted as an education course by New Jersey state colleges. The basic theory of transformers and connection schemes of common types of transformers. with a grade of B or better. and use the j operator (complex algebra) to calculate impedance.) disorders. currents. series-parallel.. Attendance at a mandatory orientation session. conductor size calculations. permission of instructor and Career Services Representative. (Prerequisites: Completion of EDUC 105. EDUC 216 or EDUC 217 for students who wish placement in special education classes. At the conclusion of this course. EDUC 105. The methods covered will have wide applicability to all levels and subjects. Transformers and Controls (Cr3) (2:2) This course covers low and high voltage circuit breakers and switchgear primarily from 4kV to 15kV. EDUC-217 Introduction to the Exceptional Child (Cr3) (3:0) The student will identify the characteristics of special children and will develop programs to meet the needs of these children. At the conclusion of this course. lighting design. EDUC-295 Special Project — Education (Cr1-6) The student will work independently on a project mutually agreed upon with the instructor. permission of instructor and Career Services Representative) be able to analyze and measure series. EDUC 216 and EDUC 217. how circuit breakers function and general maintenance of such equipment. computer instruction. audio generator. EDUC-299 Education Internship (Cr1-6) The student will participate in a fifteen week field experience in a county school or agency designed to provide nine to eighteen hours per week of on-the-job experience for education students. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ELEC 131) ELEC-202 Switchgears. VOM. and phase angles. Students will perform power factor calculation and corrections. role playing. EDUC-199 Education Field Experience (Cr0) Students who have completed EDUC 105. physical handicaps and emotional l General Education Course Electric Utility Technology ELEC-131 Electrical Circuits for Power Distribution I (Cr4) (3:2) This course is specifically designed for students in the Electric Utility Technology Program. games. Control Education EDUC-105 Introduction to Education (Cr3) (3:0) The student will identify and define current issues in education and describe various philosophical viewpoints in education. circuit overcurrent protection selection. DMM. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in ELEC 103 and ELEC 131) ELEC-201 Electrical Transmission and Distribution I (Cr3) (2:2) This course encompasses power transmission and distribution systems. and inductors. or a minimum of 9 credits in Early Childhood courses if they wish placement in preschool classes. Students will also explore the interrelatedness in the development of reading and writing skills and impact of diverse learners and multicultural issues on the curriculum.

time delays. Laboratory experiments along with course projects are designed to support the theory and provide practical skills that students need to design. The student will use the computer to draw various electronic circuits. construct and analyze analog circuits. flip-flops. The student will learn to install operating systems such as DOS and Windows. ELEC-103 Electrical Skills and Techniques (Cr4) (3:3) Students will be able to operate standard analog laboratory instruments including the VOM. DMM. the student will be able to analyze complex AC circuits comprised of resistors. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in ELEC 131) See Utility Technology for UTIL courses. and Transient Analysis to simulate circuit operation under both normal and extreme operating conditions. and timers. The student will become familiar with the microprocessor instruction set and will write programs consisting of loops. The applications will include amplifiers. The students will be able to install all the software and hardware needed to create a LAN. In addition.Electronics Technology (Cr1-4) A written proposal by the student detailing an independent course of study and project. The student will be able to use Ohm’s law to solve series.2. AC. Microsoft Word. In the hardware portion of the course. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ELEC 103) ELEC-242 Introduction to Microprocessors – Architecture and Assembly Language (Cr4) (3:2) This course is an introduction to the basic principles of microprocessor architecture and assembly language programming. different transistor biasing methods and operational amplifiers. The student will be able to use the scientific calculator utilizing the majority of the scientific functions on the calculator. capacitors. She/he will be able to use standard laboratory test equipment such as the oscilloscope. an Electronic Circuit Analysis Program with schematic capture. including number systems. is required for entry into this course. ELEC-295 Special Project . the student will become proficient in microprocessor and the three- bus architecture. Through guided lessons and assignments. parallel and series-parallel DC circuits. They will learn all the basic commands and peer to peer networking and networking essentials. (Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of the first year of courses and approval of an Electronics Technology Faculty Advisor) ELEC-298 Electronics Capstone Seminar (Cr1) (0:2) This course is designed to be the capstone course for the Electronics Technology program in which students will review and demonstrate all curriculum content areas previously learned in their Electronics Technology area of study. The student will be able to analyze and design simple logic circuits using tools such as Boolean algebra and Karnaugh Mapping and will be able to draw logic diagrams using both the traditional logic symbols and the ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 symbols with dependency notation. op-amps. and use the j operator (complex algebra) to calculate impedance. students will be able to design simple meter circuits and determine the correct type of electrical instrument for a particular application. (Prerequisites or Corequisites: ELEC 103 and MATH 151) ELEC-112 Electrical Circuits II (Cr4) (3:3) At the conclusion of this course. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ELEC 111) ELEC-241 Introduction to Digital Circuits (Cr4) (3:2) This course is an introduction to the basic principles of digital electronics. parallel and series-parallel DC circuits. sockets and standard components. the student will write a summary report detailing the projects completed. They will be able to solder PC board connections for IC chips. (Prerequisites: ELEC 112. MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra) ELEC-111 Electrical Circuits I (Cr4) (3:3) Students will use basic electrical quantities and analyze series. The student will gain the practical skills necessary to work with digital circuits through problem solving and hands-on laboratory experience with logic gates. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. In the software portion of the course the student will become proficient in writing assembly language programs using a microcomputer and an assembler. In addition. and approval of enrollment by an Electronics Technology faculty member. oscilloscope. logic gates. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 022.Course Descriptions 167 ladder and wiring diagrams. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. and perform DC. with input and output control devices are presented. indexing and subroutines. ELEC-244 Computer Peripherals. They will be able to employ Kirchhoff’s Laws and the various network theorems to simplify and systematically attack complex DC circuit problems. repair and upgrade a personal computer. and is designed on the Intel family of microprocessors. MATH 153 and ENGL 122) . Wire-wrap techniques will also be utilized. ELEC 225. NOVELL netware and Microsoft NT are used as operating systems. Electronics Technology ELEC-101 Computer Aided Circuit Analysis (Cr3) (3:0) This course will introduce the student to the hardware and software of an Advanced Personal Computer Workstation. shift registers. It will introduce students to the commonly used protocols and their configuration. Windows. E-mail. troubleshoot. students will complete a series of electronics application projects. VOM. and l General Education Course inductors. frequency counter. voltages and phase angles. and others to measure and verify calculated values. audio generator and frequency counter. etc. currents. NOTE: This course is offered in the Fall term only. audio generator. This course is divided into two sections. and the use of PSpice 9. oscillators. rectifiers. (Prerequisite: ELEC 111 and MATH 151) ELEC-225 Fundamentals of Analog Electronic Devices (Cr4) (3:2) This course introduces the students to the active devices used in electronics circuits and their theory of operation. groups and printers. Data Communications and Networking (Cr4) (3:2) This course is an introduction to computer and local area networking. hardware and software. counters. encoders. After installation they will be able to configure the LAN for users. Students will be able to quantitatively identify the fundamentals of computers. adders. logic and arithmetic subsystems and integrated circuits. This course is the final Electronics Technology course and should only be taken in the fourth or final semester. Students will collect data and display the data using proper graphing techniques on appropriate graph paper. (Corequisite: COMP 137) ELEC-243 Mini/Microcomputer Interfacing (Cr4) (3:2) This is a hands-on course which will provide the knowledge and skills needed to test. ELEC 241. It covers the characteristics and applications of semiconductor diodes.

NOTE: ENGI 206 is offered only in the Summer II term. ENEG-225 Wind and Wave Technology (Cr3) (3:0) This course addresses wind and wave as energy resources. rotation of rigid body. bending and torsional members. The purpose of this course is to expose the student to the various branches of engineering. Field trips may be part of this course. In addition. (Prerequisites: ENEG 125 and MATH 151) or higher in MATH 171 and ENGI 101) ENGI-206 Material. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGI 101) ENGI-216 Kinematics and Dynamics of Machinery (Cr3) (3:0) The design approach is applied to machines such as cam and follower. the cost of wind and wave energy. plane motion of particles and rigid bodies. The different types of commercial conversion processes will also be discussed. Various computer demonstrations and student projects will be performed to introduce the student to typical engineering uses of computers and software. fatigue of metals. moments of inertia. Upon successful completion of this course. energy auditing and project development will be covered. The student will learn the elementary concepts of electronic device physics. Properties and Processes (Cr3) (3:0) Students will be introduced to the basic principles underlying the behavior of materials. solution of intermediate beams by double integration. yield-point. This course will provide the scientific foundation for an understanding of the relations between material properties. NOTE: ENGI 216 is offered only in the Summer II term. Concepts will be developed and applied which allow for correlation between performance and aspects of structure. In addition. bipolar transistors and field effect transistors. including ideas relating to atomic and larger size defects. transistor circuit biasing. semiconductors and composites). moments of inertia. Topics covered include wind power rate. the student will earn one credit. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 171 and PHYS 121) ENGI-102 Engineering Mechanics II (Cr3) (3:0) Subject includes kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. principal stresses and theories of failure. ENGI-205 Strength of Materials (Cr3) (3:0) Subject includes properties of structural materials. NOTE: ENGI 241 is offered only in the Fall term. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGI 101 and MATH 172) ENGI-105 Introduction to Engineering (Cr1) (1:0) This course is an introduction to the Engineering Curriculum. This course may lead to professional relationships which could result in permanent employment before or after graduation. network theorems and poly-phase circuits. friction. deflection of axial. resultants. and the use of wind and wave as a source of electricity. analytical and digital computer methods are used. impulse. the course provides a foundation in wind and wave turbine technology. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 172 and PHYS 122) ENGI-242 Principles of EE II (Electronics) (Cr4) (4:0) This course introduces the student to electronic circuits and devices. solar energy. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGI 241) Engineering ENGI-101 Engineering Mechanics I (Cr3) (3:0) Subject includes classification of systems of forces. trusses. (Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and Career Services Representative) include field trips. from the atomic through the macroscopic level. the careers that are available. stresses at a point on different planes. the educational requirements. Laboratory work emphasizes basic measurement techniques. riveted and welded joints. frames. polymers. loop and node analysis. Topics such as energy purchasing. turbine conversion efficiency. NOTE: ENGI 242 is offered only in the Spring term. design of axial members. proportional limit. (Prerequisites: MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra and READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) ENEG-126 Principles of Energy Management (Cr3) (3:0) This course addresses the concepts of energy management. stress and strain relationship. tidal effects. ceramics. impact and energy loads. geared transmissions. relative motion. particularly junction diodes. geometrical and analytical conditions for equilibrium of force systems. ultimate strength. NOTE: ENGI 102 is offered only in the Spring term. global capacity. amplifiers and transistor models. Graphic. speed changers. parabolic and catenary cables.168 Course Descriptions ELEC-299 Internship in Electronics (Cr4) This is a four-month cooperative education work experience which provides students with industrial reinforcement of their academic programs through direct exposure to industrial situations and work assignments. risk management. structure and performance for the classes of engineering solids (metals. Laboratory experiences will l General Education Course . momentum and impact. (Prerequisite: ENEG 125 and MATH 151) ENEG-226 Photovoltaic and Biofuel Technology (Cr4) (3:2) This course introduces the student to the primary source of bioenergy including agricultural platforms and solar sources. various forms of sustainable energy will be discussed including hydroelectric power. modulus of elasticity. principles of work and energy. wind and wave energy. and the tools of the engineer. The student will design and analyze transistor amplifiers with the assistance of various computer-aided circuit analysis software packages. combined stresses. and biomass energy. NOTE: ENGI 101 is offered only in the Fall term. The student will verify circuit theory as well as laboratory measurements with computer-aided circuit analysis such as PSpice and other software packages. design of compression members and columns. design of bending and torsional members. centers of gravity. working stress. In addition. The students should have an interest in understanding the challenges of engineering as a profession. The course consists of one hour per week of lecture. Students will have the opportunity to conduct a simulated energy audit. NOTE: ENGI 205 is offered only in the Spring term. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” Energy – (Sustainable Energy) ENEG-125 Introduction to Sustainable Energy (Cr3) (3:0) This course will introduce the student to the history of energy resources. planetary gear systems and linkages for generating specific type of motion. stress concentration. the course provides a foundation in biomass and solar technology. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGI 102) ENGI-241 Principles of EE I (Circuits) (Cr4) (3:2) This course introduces the student to the basic concepts of DC and AC circuit analysis.

Bode diagrams. route location and earthwork computation. counters. including number systems. ENGL-094 Writing Skills Center (Cr2) (2:0) This course is designed for students who need additional work in grammar or the writing process after having taken a Basic Skills Course (ENGL 093 or ENGL 095) or ESL 225. ENGL 097 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) l ENGL-122 (C) (E) English Composition: Writing and Research (Cr3) (3:0) This course teaches techniques and strategies for conducting research and for writing effectively on a range of subjects. logic and arithmetic subsystems. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 095. students explore the writing process. poetry. computerintegrated setting. etc. The goal of this course is to help students discover the validity of their own thoughts and experiences and to use writing as a tool for self expression and communication. encoders. Students may not enroll in another writing course simultaneously with ENGL 095. Through a writers’ workshop approach. In addition to class. NOTE: ENGI 252 is offered only in the Spring term. NOTE: ENGI 261 is offered only in the Summer II term. formal and informal papers and a research report. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in PHYS 122 and MATH 172) ENGI-252 Principles of EE III (Circuits) (Cr3) (3:0) This course introduces the student to three-phase circuits. Readings include excerpts from diaries. The student will use computer-aided circuit analysis software packages in the analysis and design of circuits. adders. 91-194 logic symbols with dependency notation. transformers. After a diagnostic writing and orientation session. exposes students to literary contributions of prominent/influential twentieth-century Black writers. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 121 or instructor approval) l ENGL-128 (CG) Writing From the Female Experience (Cr3) (3:0) This women’s writing workshop focuses on topics relevant to the female experience. journals. triangulation. respond to a variety of texts and learn to communicate their ideas effectively and confidently in writing. S-domain circuit analysis. students are placed with a Writing Center instructor. Increased enjoyment. Related reasoning and support for papers necessitates inquiry into social ethics and moral situations. through eclectic samplings of narratives. clarity and conciseness in informative and persuasive business writing. level. and MATH 171) may not enroll in another writing course simultaneously with ENGL 093. ethical reasoning. Students will select one longer autobiography for in-depth analysis and research. study and appreciation of texts and authors explored emerge from critical analysis of literary selections. Students will develop their individual writing processes as they write and revise letters. At the conclusion of this course. short stories. flip-flops. errors in measurements. (Prerequisites: CADD 121. (Prerequisite: ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) l ENGL-150 (CG) African-American Literature (Cr3) (3:0) This introductory African-American Literature survey course. ENGL-097 Seminar in College Writing Strategies (Cr3) (3:0) This is a basic writing course for students who have made significant progress in ENGL 095 but who need further development in the strategies and skills that are necessary for successful college writing. This is a developmental course and will not be counted toward degree requirements. geodetic corrections and subdivision design. This is a developmental course and will not be counted toward degree requirements.Course Descriptions 169 ENGI-251 Digital I (Cr3) (3:0) This course is an introduction to the basic principles of digital electronics. Students also learn and demonstrate proper documentation style. resonance Laplace Transform theorems. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 121) ENGL-127 Business Writing (Cr3) (3:0) This course introduces students to the principles of effective business writing. Written work required includes weekly journal writing. and social morals. students are required to work in the Writing Center each week. (Prerequisite: Approval of writing or Language instructor) ENGL-095 Fundamentals of Writing (Cr4) (3:2) This basic writing course is designed to teach students to write clear. resumes and reports. Students learn to write and revise convincing papers using critical thinking skills and information they find to support an assertion or position. classroom discussions and written journal and research projects. A grade of “P” is given when the student achieves course contract objectives. Through their own writing and study of women’s autobiographical works. plays and novels. Students are recommended by a writing or language instructor. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGI 241. (Prerequisites: ENGL 095 and instructor approval) l ENGL-121 (C) English Composition: The Writing Process (Cr3) (3:0) English 121 is an introductory writing course where students compose and revise narrative and expository essays and prepare for the study of literature by using writing to analyze texts. shift registers. data reduction. Students learn to analyze and process this information using foundational principles of logic. participants will explore the uniqueness and universality inherent in their own and other women’s lives. memos. Students l General Education Course . The student will be able to analyze and design simple logic circuits using tools such as Boolean Algebra and Karnaugh Mapping and will be able to draw logic diagrams using both the traditional logic symbols and IEEE/IEC Std. This is a developmental course and will not be counted toward degree requirements. Placement in this course is determined by counselor or instructor recommendation. (Prerequisite: ENGL 121) English ENGL-093 Discovery Through Writing (Cr3) (3:0) This course is intended for students who have special needs in writing and learning. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 274) ENGI-261 Surveying (Cr4) (3:2) Subject includes field measurements with transit. and integrated circuits She/he will gain the practical skills necessary to work with digital circuits through problem solving and handson laboratory experience with logic gates. well-organized and mechanically acceptable prose. topographical surveys. Emphasis is placed on appropriate organization. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. Fourier Transforms and applications. the student will be able to quantitatively identify the fundamentals of computers. Objectives for this course are based on the student’s ENGL 095 portfolio and achieved in a small group. letters and essays. Fourier Series. tape. Successful completion of ENGL 095 satisfies students’ basic skills requirement in writing. NOTE: ENGI 251 is offered only in the Fall term. This is a development course in basic skills and will not be counted towards degree requirements. logic gates.

ENGL-168 Contemporary Plays (Cr3) (3:0) The student will demonstrate a knowledge of some of the major plays of our literature after the Second World War and analyze them in terms of dramatic content and theatrical devices. By the end of this course. write and revise fiction and nonfiction. Creative Writing. (Cr3) (3:0) Students will read and discuss major works of early British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the first half of the 18th century. peer texts. students will work toward creating a portfolio of work with significant attention to revision and focus on preparation for publication. l ENGL-175 (CG) Woman As Author (Cr3) (3:0) Students will learn about the contribution of women to the world of literature. Students will work toward creating a portfolio of work with significant attention to revision and focus on preparation for publication. They will understand and identify recurrent themes and images in women’s writing. dialogue. Clear. scene and dialogue. Students will also learn the elements of plot. character. with particular attention to their historical. summarizing and classifying information. Students will read contemporary screenplays and analyze them for technique. Assignments will include determining audience needs. and composing letters and reports for various purposes. Creative Writing. Shakespeare. By the end of the course. l ENGL-158 (HU) Introduction to Literature (Cr3) (3:0) This course is a fundamental overview of literature for those who love to read and for those who have previously been intimidated by literature courses. describing objects and explaining processes. It teaches terminology of the four major genres of literature. forms and poetic craft elements through analysis of existing texts. and a survey of literary theoretical perspectives and their critical applications. and other creative non-fiction writing products and develop a portfolio by the end of the semester. short story and the novel) and the literary movements that have shaped these genres from the Classicism of Aristotle to the Anti-realism of MTV. etc. (Prerequisite: ENGL 221 or permission of instructor) ENGL-225 Technical Writing (Cr3) (3:0) Students will learn to communicate factual information objectively for the practical use of a reader. description. memoirs. research. including short stories. The relevance of these short stories for the modern reader will be examined. and innovative poetry. Students will articulate their understanding of poetic texts. social. Emphasis will be on how to read a poem for maximum enjoyment and understanding. and character and plot development. authorial voice. approaches to the elements and conventions of genre. description. students will have written a first draft speculative (spec) script. but in this advanced course concentrate on the specific techniques of effective fiction writing. l ENGL-232 (HU) British Literature II: Romantic Era to The Modern Age (Cr3) (3:0) Students will read and discuss major . Milton. ENGL-206 Approaches to Literary Studies (Cr3) (3:0) Approaches to Literary Studies is a foundational course that prepares the student in the English Option for transition to upper level study as an English Major. a deeper understanding of the purpose and process of revision. Students will learn the three act dramatic structure of set-up. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 121 or extensive experience in a specific technology and permission of instructor) ENGL-227 Creative Non-Fiction Workshop (Cr3) (3:0) Students will receive an overview of the art and craft of the personal essay and memoir with focus on how to transform personal narrative into literary form and the understanding of how to employ literary fictive techniques such as voice. Students will develop the skills and practice necessary to perform l General Education Course informed analyses in reading. students should also be ready to enter a creative writing degree program at a transfer institution. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. l ENGL-156 (HU) Introduction to Poetry (Cr3) (3:0) The student will read and discuss poetry from earliest times to modern times. Students will read creative non-fiction essays and critique them with an eye toward developing the skills to employ the techniques used by the authors read and annotated. workshop. Help will be available for writers who have not yet broken into print and for those who want to prepare manuscripts for publication. poetry. conflict. and writing expected of an undergraduate in the discipline of English. ENGL-223 Poetry Writing Workshop (Cr3) (3:0) Students will continue to build on the knowledge of craft and style of creative writing garnered from the prerequisite mixed genre class. and treatment. relationship to their own lives and reflection of various cultures. form. Readings will include representative works from Chaucer. (poetry. and many others. and resolution. craft elements. character biographies. In addition. action. including a plot outline. rate of disclosure. pacing. for writing papers for literature courses.170 Course Descriptions l ENGL-155 (HU) The Short Story (Cr3) (3:0) Students will read and discuss short stories drawn from the literature of many cultures and countries. (Prerequisite or corequisite: ENGL 122) ENGL-221 Creative Writing (Cr3) (3:0) The student will plan. point of view. traditional. students should also be ready to enter a creative writing degree program at a transfer institution. ENGL 228 Screenwriting Basics Workshop (Cr3) (3:0) Students will receive an overview of the art and craft of screenwriting with a focus on how to compose for visual media. The course introduces the student to the principles of literary study and performance by engaging and considering the major debates and issues in the discipline. This course stresses easy techniques for effectively answering essay questions. and political contexts. By the end of the course. Students will write. precise and economical writing is emphasized. (Prerequisite: ENGL 221 or permission of instructor) ENGL-224 Fiction Writing Workshop (Cr3) (3:0) Students will continue to build on the knowledge of craft and style of Creative Writing garnered from the prerequisite mixed genre class. and revise personal essays. and in their own works. The student will see films and live productions which make the play come to life. and for more efficient studying. but in this advanced course concentrate on the specific techniques of effective contemporary. Students will apply their understanding by analyzing the selections read during the semester. students will learn and utilize proper screenplay format as defined by industry standards. Technical Writing is writing from a “technical point of view” and is not limited to writing about “technical” subjects. articles and novels. They will analyze the stories for the theme. (Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or instructor approval) l ENGL-231 (HU) British Literature I: Beginnings to 18th Century. With a greater emphasis on the concision and fluency of prose. and page to screen effectiveness. drama.

periods. in the ESL computer lab and/or attending ESL . (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ESL 021 or as a result of a placement test) ESL-031 Advanced English As a Second Language I (Cr3) (3:0) Students will demonstrate mastery of vocabulary and structural patterns that are used by educated native speakers of English. and films and videotapes will be screened in class or in the library. and to discuss and evaluate American culture. exposes students to a wide variety of cultures. l ENGL-235 (HU) (CG) World Literature I (Cr3) (3:0) The student will read and respond to masterpieces of world literature from earliest times to the 18th Century. Grammatical patterns and syntax will be introduced with the aim that students read and write what they have learned to say and understand. religions. India. China. and spend two-six hours per week (depending on the number of credits being attempted) with a tutor. exposes students to a wide variety of cultures. Course content/competencies will be determined by the individually diagnosed needs of the student in question. short stories and essays of world literature from the 18th Century to the present. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) l ENGL-236 (HU) (CG) World Literature II (Cr3) (3:0) The student will read and respond to selected plays. Students will also complete assignments at home. Victorian. Students will also be required to know the basic facts about Shakespeare’s life and theater craft and will be able to identify and discuss the basic elements of comedy. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ESL 012 or as a result of a placement test) ESL-022 Intermediate English As a Second Language II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will demonstrate the ability to speak. The course will examine a broad and diverse range of poetry. The role of literature in the education of the imagination will be explored. Major writers l General Education Course will be studied in an effort to determine their stature and influence on American literature. history and romance plays. designated grammar points and/or expository writing. NOTE: This course is offered in the Fall term only. tracing the rise and development of key styles. tragedy. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ESL 022 or as a result of a placement test) English as a Second Language ESL-010 ESL Skills Workshop (Cr1-6) (1-6:0) This course is designed for ESL students who receive a “D” or an “F” in ESL 011. Students will apply principles of criticism in written and oral discussion. This is a developmental course and will not be counted toward degree requirements. (Prerequisite: ENGL 095. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ESL 011 or as a result of a placement test) ESL-021 Intermediate English As a Second Language I (Cr3) (3:0) Students will improve their speaking. READ 092. Emerson and others. the Americas and Europe. (Cr3) (3:0) Students in this course will be required to see and discuss at least five Shakespeare plays. novels. histories and regions. These may include: oral fluency.Course Descriptions 171 works of British literature from the Romantic. Ben Franklin. This is a developmental course and will not be counted toward degree requirements. histories and regions. This broad based exploration of the ancient world. Japan. reading and writing skills. Nathaniel Hawthorne. Principles of criticism will be applied to literature and artistic elements in children’s books. l ENGL-275 (HU) Shakespeare’s Plays. Those regions include works from Africa. Several theater trips will be available. customs and current events. This is a developmental course and will not be counted toward degree requirements. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) l ENGL-245 (HU) American Literature I (Cr3) (3:0) This survey of Early American literature from the Puritans to Walt Whitman covers such writers as Ann Bradstreet. Jonathan Edwards. READ 092. demonstrating the ability to report on various aspects of American life and culture. The works’ relevance for contemporary readers will be examined. Central Asia. ENGL-295 Special Project — English (Cr1-6) conversation groups. China. Japan. 021 or 031. themes. This is a developmental course and will not be counted toward degree requirements. Strong emphasis will be in both language and culture. as seen through its literary art. They will participate in group problem-solving discussions in English and develop free writing skills. the Americas and Europe. Those regions include works from Africa. ENGL 097 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing. (Prerequisite: ENGL 095. l ENGL-246 (HU) American Literature II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will read works reflecting America’s literary growth and evolution in the 20th century. and literary essays. ENGL 097 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing. The works’ relevance for contemporary readers will be examined. prose. as well as on how American literature reflects American culture. India. and movements in British literature over the last 200 or so years. drama. The student will set up an individualized program with the instructor. the Middle East. the Middle East. Students will be able to complete an in-depth review of a Shakespeare production by the end of the semester as well as to complete a term paper on some aspect of Shakespeare’s works. Central Asia. as seen through its literary art. This broad based exploration of the modern world. Emphasis is placed on literary movements like Transcendentalism. (Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) ESL-011 Elementary English As a Second Language (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed for students with limited knowledge of the English language. ENGL-265 Children’s Literature (Cr3) (3:0) The student will read and respond to a variety of works in children’s literature. using more complex English language patterns. Edgar Allan Poe. listening. ESL-012 Elementary English As a Second Language II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will build upon skills acquired in the first semester course and will be able to express themselves in a variety of more complex situations in English. ENGL-266 Young Adult Literature: Books and the Adolescent (Cr3) (3:0) The student will explore the domain of young adult literature by reading a sampling from various genres published for readers ages twelve and up. read and write English. They will also interact with native speakers of the language. This is a developmental course and will not be counted toward degree requirements. and Modern periods. Students will demonstrate improvement in designated skill areas which have been diagnosed as sub-standard for the course in which he or she did not earn a grade of at least “C”.

with a minimum of errors in syntax and language usage. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” of higher in ESL 032 or as a result of a placement test) geological history of the earth. students will learn how early paleontologists discovered dinosaurs through fossils and study these wonderful animals’ ways of life: their feeding strategies. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 022 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra. landforms. and economic aspects of the environment as they relate to environmental sustainability. especially theories of their mysterious extinction. The information and skills taught are intended to help students understand and adapt to American culture and to cultural differences affecting their communication with speakers of American English. The relationships and interactions among these oceanic components and processes will be analyzed. focusing on the geological evolution of the North American continent. Laboratory and field experiences will include the use of computer simulations. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ESL 031 or as a result of a placement test) ESL-035 American Culture for ESL (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed for students of English as a Second Language who are presently at the Advanced (ESL 031-032-225) level. This is a developmental course and will not be counted toward degree requirements. how the physical environment impacts on our health. The dinosaurs’ origins and evolution will be discussed. (Prerequisite: ENVR 101) l ENVR-105 (SC) Environmental Studies (Cr3) (3:0) The student will be able to describe and discuss the earth and its deteriorating environment. and READ 092 or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) ENVR-106 Environmental Geology (Cr3) (3:0) This course will examine cultural attitudes toward the environment. and how to make decisions for global change including proper land management. They will make oral presentations and write on topics of interest. and READ 092 or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) l ENVR-107 (SC) Environmental Science (Cr4) (3:3) This introductory laboratory science course integrates the biological. and the enactment of environmental policies. scientific data collection and interpretation.172 Course Descriptions ESL-032 Advanced English As a Second Language II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will use increasingly complex vocabulary and grammatical patterns. The course draws on the foundations of ecology to understand how human population growth and resulting technology affect individual species. waves. erosion and deposition and the evolution of plants and animals. employ the scientific method of inquiry as a tool to analyze realworld environmental data to quantify human impacts leading to potential solutions to environmental problems. Gateway National Recreation Area. (Prerequisite: MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra) ENVR-115 Dinosaurs (Cr3) (3:0) In this course. (Prerequisites: MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the Environmental Science l ENVR-101 (SC) Physical Geology (Cr4) (3:3) Students will discuss the nature of the materials that make up the earth: rocks and minerals. and laboratory analyses. There are sections covering weather. examination of in-situ coastal processes. pollution. biodiversity. natural resource conservation. Students will discover how unexpectedly diverse dinosaurs were. how to predict and avoid natural hazards such as earthquakes. and READ 092 or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) l ENVR 111 (SC) Oceanography (Cr4) (3:3) This introductory laboratory science course focuses on the fundamental principles of ocean science including the geography and geology of ocean basins. (Prerequisites or Corequisites: MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra. chemical. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. man’s interdependence with the physical and social environment and the responsibility to this system. transport and distort these materials and the way in which they become involved in the development of the landscape. the chemistry of seawater. (Prerequisites: MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra. reading and writing. There will be two required field trips during class time to Pennsylvania and northern New Jersey to collect fossils and observe geological phenomena. and READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) ENVR-121 Physical Geography. vegetation and the effects of all these things on human evolution and society. and coastal processes. (Prerequisite: ESL 012 or permission of instructor) ESL-225 Advanced English Composition for Non-Native Speakers (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed for students who have attained near-native proficiency in oral skills. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. (Cr3) (3:0) The student will discuss physical environmental factors and their influences on human activity. The course includes an optional field trip on a weekend day to the American Museum of Natural History’s world renowned Dinosaur Halls in New York City. basic ecological relationships. Topics will include plate tectonics. This is a developmental course and will not be counted toward degree requirements. and ecosystem health. and biological composition of the world’s oceans. They will discuss their distribution and origin. but whose writing skills need to be developed further before they embark upon college-wide courses which require writing. and the processes and forces that alter. how to deal with landbased disposal of waste materials. computer simulations. how to find and exploit energy and natural resources from within the earth. American culture and cross-cultural communication are the vehicles used for improving students’ English proficiency in speaking. landslides and coastal flooding. MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra) l ENVR-102 (SC) Historical Geology (Cr4) (3:3) This course will explore the l General Education Course . through field experiences. the oceans. problems with our water resources. the physical dynamics of currents. volcanoes. The laboratory component of the course will. chemical analyses of seawater and the collection of marine organisms. political. their unique behavior and the environment in which they lived. and tides. All classroom and lab activities are scheduled at Brookdale’s Sandy Hook Laboratory. (Prerequisites or Corequisites: MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 021. soil.

Approval of instructor and Dean required. this course will focus on computer mapping exercises. open-to-buy. FASH 205 and MRKT 111) FASH-223 Fashion Coordination (Cr3) (3:0) Students will analyze sources of fashion information and present findings as fashion shows. (Prerequisite: ENVR 111 or ENVR 101 or permission of instructor) ENVR-212 Coastal Zone Management (Cr4) (3:3) Students will demonstrate knowledge of shore area terrestrial and marine environments. (Prerequisite: MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation) FASH-212 Visual Merchandising and Display (Cr3) (3:0) Students will apply the principles and methods of displaying. This course offers techniques for monitoring pollutants. analyze. through practical applications. Students are required to participate in field trip exercises and will need a camera (film or digital) and access to a computer. Through comprehensive projects. business. treatment plants and field study sites. appearance and performance. The student will be introduced to the field of GIS and how GIS relates to the real world. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Summer II term. Knowledge of Word or COMP 129 or permission of instructor) l ENVR-127 (SC) Meteorology (Cr4) (3:3) This introductory laboratory science course focuses on the physical and chemical processes that affect Earth’s weather and climate by examining the composition and structure of the atmosphere and the sources of energy and moisture driving atmospheric processes. bulletins and fashion reporting. After learning mapping basics. sources of buying information and the responsibilities of buyers in different types of retail firms. (Prerequisite: READ 092. and the retail method of inventory. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in FASH 121. Management aspects will be integrated throughout as well as field and mapping techniques. Students will delve into all aspects of production of apparel and accessories from fiber to finished garment. materials and lighting in creating effective displays. Students will learn the properties of a wide variety of textile fabrics and dyeing and finishing techniques. practices. barrier beaches. health. Although there is no separate lab time scheduled. including retail pricing. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” of higher in FASH 121 and MRKT 111) FASH-213 Buying (Cr3) (3:0) Students will study the principles of selection. and mathematical procedures involved in profitable merchandising. (Prerequisites: ENVR 105. equipment. MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra. stored. and interpret real world meteorological data utilizing the scientific method of inquiry. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in FASH 121. The causes of climatic events and the impacts of human activities on weather and climate will also be explored in the context of severe weather events. barrier islands and estuarine beaches. They will study functions of fashion coordination in merchandising and the areas of fashion newspapers and magazines. geography and criminal justice. and READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading. the way in which it develops and the environmental influences on the movement of fashion. (Prerequisite: READ 092. identify resources (their use/misuse) and study conservative alternatives to the above areas. and real-time computer weather graphics and simulations that enable students to measure. so it will meet in a computer lab. promoting. test laboratories. ENVR 111 or related science course and approval of instructor and Career Services Representative) READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) FASH-205 Merchandise Planning & Control (Cr3) (3:0) Students will study the essential concepts. workbook exercises. the student will learn how data is gathered. students will demonstrate and present methods of displaying merchandise and develop a basic understanding of the use of showcases. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. The class and labs will study the various components of the New Jersey coast: headlands. six-month merchandising plans. and READ 092 or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills test in reading) ENVR-205 Introduction to Coastal Geology (Cr4) (3:3) This course will explore the geologic processes that have formed and l General Education Course continue to change the coastlines of New Jersey. The course uses the interdisciplinary involvement of all other sciences and non-sciences related to the study of the shore environment. They will analyze and critique displays of fellow students as well as displays created by professionals for area retailers. The student will use basic merchandising arithmetic in planning purchases and in merchandising goods. edited. . and merchandising fashion apparel and accessories. FASH 122 and MRKT 111) FASH-224 Case Studies and Executive Development In Fashion Merchandising (Cr3) (3:0) The student will develop Fashion Merchandising FASH-121 Fashion Merchandising (Cr3) (3:0) The student will explore the nature of fashion. They will learn the fundamental tools of the trade. spits. global warming and stratospheric ozone depletion. They will analyze fashion trends and consumer motivation and their effect on retail merchandising. (Prerequisites or Corequisites: MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) FASH-122 Textile Science (Cr3) (3:0) Students will study textile materials with emphasis on factors which affect the hand. Since GIS is now important in almost every aspect of our technologically oriented world we will examine important applications of GIS in various fields of study including environmental studies. mapped and analyzed using GIS.Course Descriptions 173 College’s basic skills requirement in algebra) and READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) ENVR-126 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (Cr3) (3:0) Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a non-lab science course aimed at both science and non-science majors. The laboratory component includes experiments. (Prerequisites: ENVR 111 or ENVR 105) ENVR-295 Special Project — Environmental Sciences (Cr1-4) ENVR-299 Environmental Science Internship (Cr1-6) Students will work in an internship related to environmental studies and complete internship learning objectives under faculty supervision. on-site visits to industries. fashion clinics. (Prerequisites: MATH 021.

the backhand and the serve. a complete physical exam including electrocardiogram at rest. Students 35 and over who use the Fitness Lab must have medical clearance as follows within three months prior to testing: age 35-39. FITN-162 Yoga II (Cr1) (0:2) Students will deepen their understanding of Hatha Yoga and actively maintain achieved physical health and mental wellness. FITN-152 Intermediate Karate (Cr2) (1:2) Students will develop further control in the execution of basic techniques through free sparring. The student will also learn the history and philosophy of karate and tournament rules. and economic context. (Prerequisites: FASH 121) FASH-295 Special Project – Fashion (Cr1-3) Students may choose to specialize or investigate some area in greater depth by selecting 1-3 credits in this individual learning course for the major. The Health and Skill Components of Fitness. FITN-157 T’ai Chi (Cr1) (0:2) The student will learn and demonstrate an understanding of basic skills of Chinese T’ai Chi. FITN-121 Golf I (Cr1) (0:2) The student will demonstrate the rules. and learn one kata (prearranged form). complete physical including electrocardiogram at rest. Students will undergo diagnostic testing at the beginning of the semester. sales promotion. FITN-161 Yoga I (Cr1) (0:2) Students will learn and demonstrate an understanding of Hatha yoga thereby enhancing physical health and mental wellness. through illustrated lectures. Fitness workouts in a fitness center are a required component of the course. posture and swing. grip. the graceful dance of warriors. The course will cover such topics as: The Risk Factors & Heart Disease. i. and own-brand exclusivity. personnel. They will also be able to identify and execute intermediate karate-as-selfdefense techniques. Participants using exercise equipment in the Fitness Center must follow the medical guidelines that are in place. 40 and over. Cost of tests are at the student’s expense. complete physical including stress electrocardiogram. FASH 225 and MRKT 111. The student will also develop basic skills in supervision and leadership. cultural. qualify of life and longevity. (Prerequisite: FITN 151 or instructor’s approval) FITN-155 Self Defense (Cr1) (0:2) The student will learn and practice simple but effective techniques and strategies of selfdefense. kicks and punches. increase muscle strength and tone. including blocking. and increase selfconfidence and overall energy. Other topics deal with concepts on nutrition and weight management. release toxins by stimulating the lymphatic system.174 Course Descriptions techniques in problem-solving on a middle management level. good nutrition and their relationship to health. (Prerequisites: 30 credits to include 15 credits of career studies. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in FASH 121. including the rules and etiquette of the game. punching. alcoholism and drug abuse as they apply to various ages and settings. permission of instructor and Career Services Representative) FITN-106 Fitness Workouts (Cr1) (0:2) The student will be able to identify basic exercises and relate them to their individual needs. FITN-120 Exercise Science & Sports Conditioning (Cr2) (2:0) This course will enable the student to describe common sports injuries and explain basic principles of sports rehabilitation. Students 35 and over who use the Fitness Lab must have medical clearance as follows within three months prior to testing: 35-39. address. exercise the spine. FASH 122. The costume of each period will be viewed within its historical. FITN-107 Personal Fitness (Cr2) (2:0) This course will provide the student with basic information regarding the benefits of physical activity. selling. Basic Nutrition and Weight Control. Behavioral risk factors leading up to the premature onset of cardiovascular disease with a focus on behavior modification will also be discussed. current health and disease problems. including blocks. Corerequisite: FASH 223) FASH-225 Historic Costume (Cr3) (3:0) Students will analyze historic costume of the Western World.. l General Education Course . Guest speakers and visual media will demonstrate a variety of methods of individual self-defense. The student will gain experience in decision-making through the case study method in areas of buying. age 40 and over. By performing beginner and intermediate yoga postures students will develop flexibility and balance. FITN-141 Tennis I (Cr1) (0:2) For beginners or non-tennis players. (FITN 105 and FITN 106 cannot be taken at the same time). FITN-158 Kickboxing (Cr1) (0:2) This course will provide students with proper basic kicking and punching techniques to prevent injuries. The students will undergo a fitness evaluation and a prescribed personalized exercise program designed to improve the overall level of fitness. A personal exercise program will be developed for each student. balance and muscle tone. Exercise and Weight Management (Cr3) (2:2) The student will be able to identify and apply the principles of health such as preventing heart disease. (Prerequisites: 6 credits in Fashion Merchandising Program and permission of instructor) FASH-299 Fashion Merchandising Internship (Cr3) Students will work in a job related to their program. Aerobic & Anaerobic Exercise. vendor/ store relations.e. Emphasis will be on meditation and graceful movements which are designed to develop flexibility. The components of physical fitness will be defined in relation to individual goals and sports performance. Other topics include behavioral and psychological concerns pertinent to the athlete. FITN-151 Karate Self Defense (Cr2) (1:2) The student will demonstrate the basic skills and techniques of empty-handed self-defense. Students will use various techniques to improve cardiovascular fitness and muscle tone. This course details physical conditioning and training for the athlete as well as nutrition that facilitates sport performance. The students Fitness and Recreation FITN-105 Personal Fitness (Cr2) (1:2) The course has two components: an exercise component and a classroom component. knowledge and basic skills of golf. general health and environmental considerations and acclimatization in athletics. students will demonstrate the fundamentals of tennis. They will also be able to demonstrate the basic skills of the forehand. a complete physical exam including stress electrocardiogram. stance. FASH 213. from antiquity to the 21st Century. participate in programs on campus and complete an internship workbook based on the work experience gained. Costs of tests are at the student’s expense. FITN-117 Health. kicking and free sparring.

Emphasis will be on improving conversational skills. strength. listening. reading and writing skills. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in FRCH 101 or instructor approval) l FRCH-203 (HU) Intermediate French I (Cr3) (3:0) Students will improve their speaking. demonstrating the ability to report on various aspects of life/culture in Frenchspeaking countries. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in FRCH 204 or permission of instructor) l FRCH-207 (HU) French Conversation and Composition II (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed for students who have completed four semesters or more of college French and/or already possess the ability to interact with native speakers and read and write the language. One-half of the course is related to cardiovascular risk factors. NOTE: FRCH 204 is offered only in the Spring term. NOTE: FRCH 203 is offered only in the Fall term. Strong emphasis will be placed on acquiring conversational and comprehension skills.R. FITN-235 Scuba I (Cr2) (0:4) The student will master the fundamental skills. (This course is not open to native French speakers or to students with more than two years of French in high school. The course teaches the skills a first responder needs to act as a crucial link in the emergency medical services (EMS) system. Students 40 and over. fins. a full wet suit and any certification fees. boots and gloves. There is a minimal charge for certifications. l General Education Course screening and evaluating clients for safe participation in an individual exercise program. discussions will bring increasingly complex grammar and vocabulary into active use. wet suit hood. An American Red Cross Certification in C. designing and implementing exercise prescriptions for a diverse population and successful goal attainment plus functional anatomy and exercise physiology. (Corequisites: Any 100 level biology course or equivalent.Certified Personal Trainer certification. and First Aid is required and must be obtained for certification. Students 35-39 must have a complete physical including an electrocardiogram at rest. of the German language. discussions will bring increasingly complex grammar and vocabulary into active use. FITN-245 Personal Training (Cr3) (3:0) This lecture course prepares students to work as personal trainers. balance. The course includes selfhelp and home care if medical assistance is not available or is delayed. Grammatical patterns and syntax will be introduced with the aim that students read and write what they have learned to say and understand. using practical and interesting situational materials that will stress both language and culture.. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in FRCH 102 or permission of instructor) l FRCH-204 (HU) Intermediate French II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will be able to speak. FITN-295 Special Project — Physical Education (Cr1:3) FITN-299 Internship in Fitness and Recreation (Cr3) The student will participate in a field experience in a local recreation department. Students will also be educated through lecture on various weight training topics. Emphasis will be on improving conversational skills. National Certification by the Red Cross or the YMCA is optional at additional cost. read and write French and to discuss and evaluate French culture. Students 35 and over must have medical clearance. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in FRCH 203 or permission of instructor) l FRCH-206 (HU) French Conversation and Composition I (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed for students who have completed four semesters or more of college French and/or already possess the ability to interact with native speakers and read and write the language. reduce pain and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until more advanced medical help can arrive. or permission of the instructor and Fitness Coordinator) FITN-278 Red Cross Emergency Response (Cr3) (3:0) The purpose of the American Red Cross Emergency Response course is to provide the first responder with the knowledge and skills necessary in an emergency to help sustain life. The student may opt to become nationally certified with a professional association of diving instruction. Successful completion of this course prepares the student to take the National Council on Strength and Fitness (NCSF) board certification exam to receive the NCSF .P. a complete physical including a stress electrocardiogram. The course work focuses on the qualifications and responsibilities of a personal trainer. The course content and activities will prepare participants to make appropriate decisions about the care to provide in an emergency. designed to provide nine to 18 hours per week of on-the-job experience. heart failure and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.P.e. techniques and practices of skin and scuba diving. except by instructor approval) German l GRMN-101 (HU) Elementary German I (Cr4) (4:0) This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge. or very limited knowledge. Strong emphasis will be . using more complex language patterns.Course Descriptions 175 will perform intermediate and advanced yoga postures and further develop flexibility.R. Topics include nutrition and weight management. Professional C. They will also demonstrate the ability to use French with native speakers of the language. This will require the rental of some other equipment. The course requires the initial purchasing of mask. i. FITN-177 Community First Aid and Professional CPR (Cr2) (2:0) The student will learn to give immediate care to a person who has been injured or has suddenly been taken ill. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in FRCH 206 or permission of instructor) French l FRCH-101 (HU) Elementary French I (Cr4) (4:0) This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge or very limited knowledge of the French language. FITN-233 Lifeguard Training (Cr1) (0:2) Students will identify and apply the basic skills necessary to take care of themselves in water emergencies and to aid or rescue anyone in danger of drowning. Costs of the tests are at the students’ expense. and First Aid may be issued upon successful completion of this course. Programs will include use of the Fitness Lab. (Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and Career Services Representative) l FRCH-102 (HU) Elementary French II (Cr4) (4:0) Students will build upon skills acquired in the first semester course and will be able to express themselves in a variety of more complex situations in French. customs and current events. snorkel. (Prerequisite: FITN 161 or approval from the instructor) FITN-167 Weight Training (Cr1) (0:2) Students will use both free-weight and resistance training machines to develop strength and muscular endurance. self confidence and overall energy.

and interactive/online applications. In addition. content. Graphic Design GRPH-101 Typography I (Cr3) (2:2) Students will learn skills that will enable them to specify typography. Alternative sites include long term care. The roles of various health care providers and governmental agencies are covered as well as health care legislation. HITC-222 Health Information Documentation (Cr3) (3:0) This course introduces the student to computer applications in health information services. GRPH 204. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in GRMN 203 or permission of instructor) campaigns. color. NOTE: GRMN 204 is offered only in the Spring term. These layouts will be based on concept thinking. students will explore the infinite variety of methods. promotion and merchandising of products. HITC-221 Coding & Classification Systems I (Cr4) (3:2) In this course the student will study the principles of coding and classification systems with an emphasis on ICD-9-CM. regulatory and accreditation standards will be discussed. read and write German and to discuss and evaluate German culture. advertising l General Education Course . (This course is not open to native German speakers or to students with more than two years of German in high school. listening. Students must have completed previous course work in the subject area and must meet with an appropriate instructor before registering. l GRMN-102 (HU) Elementary German II (Cr4) (4:0) Students will build upon skills acquired in the first semester course and will be able to express themselves in a variety of more complex situations in German. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in GRMN 102 or permission of instructor) l GRMN-204 (HU) Intermediate German II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will be able to speak. There is an emphasis on clinical manifestations and treatment. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in GRPH 101. format. In addition. GRPH-204 Graphic Design Production (Cr3) (2:2) Students will develop the skills of the mechanical artist who prepares final camera-ready art for the printer. customs and current events. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in GRPH 101) GRPH-115 Illustration (Cr3) (2:2) Students will explore both traditional and non-traditional techniques that will expand their ability to adapt their styles to various illustration assignments. including print. rehabilitation services and cancer programs. There is an emphasis on the function of the medical record department in relation to risk management. Design assignments are directed toward a variety of output media. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in GRPH 101. The electronic record and future directions in information systems will also be discussed. GRPH 102 and ARTS 111) GRPH-216 Graphic Design Techniques (Cr3) (2:2) In this advanced course. paste-up skills. etc. the relationship between an accurate and comprehensive medical record and reimbursement is discussed. Software used will be QuarkXpress and Adobe Illustrator. reading and writing skills. materials and equipment available to solve visual design problems. demonstrating the ability to report on various aspects of life and culture in Germanspeaking countries. Additional lab time is expected in this course. They will also demonstrate the ability to use German with native speakers of the language. HITC-123 Health Information and the Law (Cr3) (3:0) This course focuses on the legal and ethical aspects of health information technology in the United States. GRPH 216) GRPH-299 Graphic Design Internship (Cr1-6) Students will practice skills in graphic design and photography in a realworld experience. HITC-124 Pathophysiology (Cr3) (3:0) This course covers the structural and functional changes associated with various disease conditions. In addition. etc. produce professional lettering and render typography for visual layouts. the computer software Adobe Illustrator and QuarkXpress will be used to set type and arrange images for more comprehensive projects. This course does not offer the pass/no credit grade or extra credit. GRPH 102 and GRPH 204) GRPH-295 Special Project – Graphic Design (Cr1-6) Students will design a project of advanced study. This course may be repeated for credit. abstracting and retrieval will be emphasized. plus a variety of design software will be addressed. (Prerequisites: GRPH 101. Previous experience with computers is beneficial. GRPH 102. the computer will be used for pre-press production processing. l GRMN-203 (HU) Intermediate German I (Cr3) (3:0) Students will improve their speaking. Emphasis will be placed on craftsmanship and originality. the student is introduced to the use and function of the health record in non-acute care settings. Emphasis will be placed on the use of and application of coding and classification systems in the health care environment. students will begin to create and design visual layouts using traditional techniques. They will learn inking. using more complex language patterns. Data entry. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in GRMN 101 or permission of instructor) NOTE: GRMN 102 is offered only in the Spring term.176 Course Descriptions placed on acquiring conversational and comprehension skills. psychiatric settings. It addresses the function of the medical record department and the role of the medical record technician. Grammatical patterns and syntax will be introduced with the aim that students read and write what they have learned to say and understand. analysis and use of medical records. display. color separations. GRPH-102 Typography II (Cr3) (2:2) Utilizing the skills acquired in GRPH 101. In addition. Computer imaging. NOTE: GRMN 203 is offered only in the Fall term. except by instructor approval) NOTE: GRMN 101 is offered only in the Fall term. In addition the student will understand how disease affects the body as a whole. Health Information Technology HITC-121 Introduction to Health Information Technology (Cr3) (3:0) This course introduces the student to the health care delivery system and the development. (Prerequisite: ARTS 111) GRPH-120 Introduction to Digital Media Design (Cr3) (2:2) This course is designed to comprehensively cover computer design issues. HITC-122 Health Information in Alternative Systems (Cr4) (3:3) In this course. using practical and interesting situational materials that will stress both language and culture. vector graphics. from concept to final presentation. They will work with an experienced practitioner who will guide and supervise their progress. This information will be utilized in the communication of ideas.

l HIST-107 (HI) (HU) (CG) Contemporary World History (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to provide students with the framework of the contemporary world which will be discussed by examining key historical developments since 1945. Emphasis will be placed on the institutions. Middle Eastern and Latin American societies and the impact of imperialism of those cultures. as exemplified by the traditional cultures of Africa. HITC 122. Marx. Class sessions will include games. HESC-155 Here’s to Your Health (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to help students define their lifestyles. Two field trips will be taken to the Vietnam Era Educational Center and Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial in New Jersey. China. l HIST-108 (HI) (HU) Modern European History (Cr3) (3:0) Students will review the development of industrialism. Resources. HITC-225 Health Information Management (Cr3) (3:0) This course addresses basic principles of supervision and management in the health information setting. inventors and political leaders will be evaluated in the light of their influences on mankind’s thoughts and actions in the past and present. HITC 124. the role of ideology and the emergence of modern culture in its scientific. Students will acquire an understanding of the causes of stress. Latin America and the Middle East. Emphasis will be placed on practical information that will enable students to make judgments about their food intake and gain awareness of the critical role of nutrition in health care. stress management techniques. The careers of major religious figures. HESC-145 Crisis Intervention (Cr3) (3:0) Students will explore life situations that pose a threat or potential threat to an individual’s coping abilities. in-depth study of a relevant topic. values and interrelationships among people across the globe. l HIST-106 (HI) (HU) (CG) World Civilization II (Cr3) (3:0) The course will examine the major developments in human history from 1500 to the present. It includes topics such as sources and use of health data and computations commonly used by health care facilities. They will examine the events surrounding the two World Wars and the Cold War. Students are offered an opportunity to examine all the factors influencing one’s health including nutritional awareness. India. the impact of these conflicts on Vietnam and America. role playing and group exercises. emphasis will be placed on understanding the historical readings and contemporary issues such as international conflict. industrial and imperialist movements. HITC 123. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the significance of Greek and Latin prefixes. (Prerequisites: HITC 121. Students are assigned to various types of health care facilities to gain experience with a variety of health information practices. the Americas and Europe. the twentieth-century wars involving the French and Americans that took place there. including the Cold War and the fall of communism. nutritional awareness and exercise programs. philosophers. Japan. History l HIST-105 (HI) (HU) (CG) World Civilization I (Cr3) (3:0) The course will provide a general understanding of the chief characteristics of human history up to 1500. The student will have the opportunity to apply information and skills learned in the classroom to procedures performed in a health information management department. The instructor will serve as a mentor and consultant in guiding the student through the study plan. as well as the independence movements and revolutions in Asia. their reactions to. HESC-115 Nutrition and Health (Cr3) (3:0) Students are introduced to the basic concepts of nutrition. scientists. and finally independence from Western dominance in the 20th century will also be explored. the student will develop a written independent study plan for pursuing and completing an individual. interaction with. Emphasis will also be placed on the history of Asian. nationalism. procedures. HITC-224 Coding & Classification Systems II (Cr4) (3:2) In this course the student will study the principles of coding and classification systems with an emphasis on the Health Care Financing Administration’s Common Procedural Coding System (HCPCS) and Current Procedural Coding (CPT). Corequisites: HITC 224 and HITC 225) HESC-125 Stress and Everyday Living (Cr3) (3:0) An understanding of how stress affects everyday life will be discussed using examples from literature. Health Science HESC-105 Medical Terminology (Cr3) (3:0) Through a study of medical language. stress management and exercise programs. HESC-SP Special Project: Dental Hygiene Program (Cr12-15) Europe’s self-transformation into a modern society as seen in its intellectual. suffixes and verbal roots as they pertain to the human body. the Middle East. planning. and the world wars. and the achievements and contributions of individual civilizations to human history. African.Course Descriptions 177 HITC-223 Health Information Reporting (Cr3) (3:0) This course addresses medical statistics and quality improvement. liberalism and socialism as background for understanding the 20th century as an age of total war. consultation and the role of the health information technician in the health care team will be discussed. HITC-226 Clinical Practicum (Cr4) (0:12) This supervised practicum introduces students to a health information setting. technological. the student will be able to build a practical. make decisions about that lifestyle and improve those areas that will bring them to a state of optimal health. working medical vocabulary. and their legacy in the contemporary world. Relying on a variety of historical readings and current accounts. HIST-115 Great Persons in History (Cr1) (1:0) The student will examine the contributions of the most important people in history. chemistry and physiology are used as a basis for the exploration of the role of nutrition in health. It will focus on the elements involved in l General Education Course . Confucius. HITC 222 and HITC 223. Hitler. HESC-295 Special Project — Health Sciences (Cr1-6) In conjunction with the faculty. In addition quality indicators and the principles of performance improvement are covered. HITC 221. Darwin and others. The course is designed to give students the tools necessary for achieving and maintaining an optimal healthy lifestyle. economic and artistic dimensions. Central Asia. HIST-116 Vietnam: Historical Perspectives (Cr3) (3:0) In this course students will examine the culture and history of the Vietnamese people. human and natural resources and global cultural and economic trends. They will discuss and practice specific strategies that have proven useful in crisis situations. Africa. the environment. history and the group members. such as Jesus. Concepts from biology.

tourism and motion pictures. the colonial period. e. This approach will also give students a greater sense of place as New Jersey residents and will provide Education majors with a pedagogical foundation for teaching the subject. Women’s history. issues. (Prerequisites: READ or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading. emphasizing the period between the wars of independence and characterizing the Latin American role in the world today. the Leni Lenape. l HIST-136 (HI) (HU) American Civilization II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will demonstrate an understanding of personalities. architecture and African American history in all topics. The course will include a class trip to a historical site. students will study the Atlantic Slave Trade. The student will study women’s changing roles through history.g. and outcomes of a watershed in human history – The Holocaust. lives and contribution of women to American history. The course will offer a survey of major events. events and problems in American history from the Civil War (1865) until World War II (1941). NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. legislation and critical environmental factors shaping the African-American experience in Colonial America from the 1600’s to the Civil War. events. acts of resistance. Comparative themes. Race issues and relations. Women’s Suffrage. An understanding of this cataclysmic event will also necessitate knowing the leading personalities of the conflict and their goals and motivations. l HIST-155 (CG) Native American Studies (Cr3) (3:0) This course will identify and survey native peoples of the Americas from before European contact to the present. Therefore. civil rights and the resistance to the Vietnam War. Problems and solutions women have faced in the past will be discussed with an emphasis on understanding the participation of women in America. historical and socio-cultural factors that have shaped and continue to shape the course of human affairs in Africa. The student will investigate the causes. events and personalities in American history which have influenced the origins and growth of the Republic from the colonial period until the Civil War (1861). In addition. After surveying how slavery became institutionalized in Colonial America. political. In reviewing African origins. Contributions and Debates (Cr3) (3:0) A survey of the experiences. and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) HIST-205 History of World War II (Cr3) (3:0) The student will study the military. Students will have an opportunity to explore various aspects of Native American cultures. (Prerequisites: ENGL 121 and READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) l HIST-135 (HI) (HU) American Civilization I (Cr3) (3:0) Students will identify and discuss problems. varied accomplishments and cultural experiences unique to African-Americans from the Civil War and Reconstruction Era to contemporary times. sociocultural and environmental forces which have shaped the African-American culture and its communities in the United States. HIST-202 History of New Jersey (Cr3) (3:0) This survey of New Jersey history will cover the development of New Jersey from the Native American inhabitants. l HIST-126 (CG) Dimensions of the Holocaust (Cr3) (3:0) The student will investigate the origins. The emphasis will be on how music shaped and reflected the values of young people. the relationship of the continent with the African Diaspora and the place of Africa in world civilization will be discussed and evaluated. Slavery and the Civil War. HIST-138 The 1960’S: Pop Music and the Counterculture (Cr3) (3:0) Students will evaluate the history of the 1960’s through l General Education Course an examination of the rock and folk music of the turbulent decade. l HIST-215 (HI) (HU) (CG) African Civilization (Cr3) (3:0) The student will describe the environmental. as well as the diversity of women’s experience on a racial. issues and problems concerning them will be discussed. Industrialization. are employed and amplified by local history. European colonization. social and economic history of World War II. Hitler’s rise to power and the racial objectives in his Nazi program led to the systematic murder of millions of innocent victims. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. the Great Depression. ethnic and class basis. History will be viewed from many perspectives. The focus will be on leaders such as Bob Dylan. The student must attend at least two programs given by the Center for Holocaust Education. Slavery. Presentations by Native Americans will be included. l HIST-217 (HI) (HU) (CG) Modern Latin American History (Cr3) (3:0) The student will understand and discuss peoples cultures of Latin America. the Jacksonian Era. such as European Colonization. expressed in movements such as the counterculture. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. The Armenian and Cambodian genocides.178 Course Descriptions l HIST-125 (HI) (HU) (CG) Women’s History Survey: Experiences. In a search for meaning and conscience in this cataclysmic event. Immigration. the Industrial Revolution. the American Revolution. the resulting African Diaspora and the contrasting perspectives on Africa and Africans during the Slave Trade period. the Rolling Stones and the Doors. etc. as well as the rise of Victorian Leisure. genocidal actions in Rwanda. There will be an emphasis on understanding the participation of Native Americans in a world of diverse cultures. the themes of United States history. the American Revolution. Bosnia. its participants. stressing both America’s role and worldwide implications. etc. the Beatles. l HIST-145 (HI) (HU) (CG) African-American History I (Cr3) (3:0) Students will examine the cultural and historical themes of the African experience which dominated and influenced the evolving African-American culture during slavery. World War II. There will be special emphasis on Ecological history. events and outcomes of World War II. the student will encounter additional material covering other genocides and genocidal events. l HIST-146 (HI) (HU) (CG) African-American History II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will examine the complex historical. Labor Union Movements. The student will analyze the inter-relationship and consequences of foreign and domestic events. legislation and issues defining the struggles. The course will use New Jersey history as a means of understanding the major themes of United States history. students will focus on events. l HIST-225 (HI) (HU) (CG) History of Modern Asia (Cr3) (3:0) The course is an introduction to Asian civilizations from . to uncover and restore women’s achievements and experiences. l HIST-137 (HI) (HU) Recent American History (Cr3) (3:0) The student will recognize and assess the major forces that have shaped the course of American domestic and foreign policies since World War II (1945).

Panama and Kuwait. in epoch l General Education Course making alliances in NATO and elsewhere. but not limited to. Groups of plants to be discussed include shade trees. In the modern period a central feature of world civilization has been the interaction between Asia and the rest of the world. Military leaders. Seminars provide in-depth study of a topic from a number of perspectives and provide students the opportunity to bring their own experience and potential to an environment which is conducive to intellectual growth and personal enrichment. Emphasis will be placed on the Russia Revolutions. (Prerequisite: High school chemistry or instructor approval) HORT-125 Landscape Plant Materials I (Cr4) (3:2) The student will demonstrate the ability to identify selected non-hardy plant materials. (Prerequisites: Usually a GPA of 3. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. This course is an appropriate prerequisite for the Landscape Design course. maintenance and propagation for use as ornamentals in landscaping. but also faculty or counselor recommendation) HONR-291 Honors Seminar (Cr3) (3:0) Honors Seminars are interdisciplinary courses connected to. The major groups covered are the tropicals. Honors at Brookdale. the persistence of ArabIsraeli crisis and Arab rivalries. but not limited to. including ethnic life in the United States today.5. Honors at Brookdale. shrubs and groundcovers.5. the cultures of India and Southeast Asia may also be included. . The course will emphasize those interactions. strategies and battle campaigns will also be discussed. These seminars are led by professors from two or more disciplines who bring their special expertise to bear on a special topic. as well in diplomatic maneuvering in the Middle East. the rise and expansion of Islam. Seminars provide in-depth study of a topic from a number of perspectives and provide students the opportunity to bring their own experience and potential to an environment which is conducive to intellectual growth and personal enrichment. HORT-146 Great Gardens (Cr2) (2:1) The students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of garden design and the Honors Seminar HONR-290 Honors Seminar (Cr3) (3:0) Honors Seminars are interdisciplinary courses connected to. the conflict between modernity and tradition. The emphasis is on studentstudent and student-faculty interaction and the development of general research skills. HIST-237 American Civil War (Cr3) (3:0) The student will survey all aspects of America’s most tragic conflict: political. The accelerated events since 1950 have involved the United States in hot wars in Korea. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term.Course Descriptions 179 the 18th century to the present. conflicts such as those in Korea and Vietnam. HIST-295 Special Project — History (Cr1-3) The student will work independently on a project mutually agreed upon with the instructor. Granada. climactic conditions. events in the Middle East have commanded more attention throughout the world. The student will relate good soil management practices to favorable plant growth and development. during and after arrival in this country. time and living organisms. with emphasis on those materials used as ornamentals in and around residential and commercial buildings. social and religious. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. evergreens. Those who enroll will develop appropriate landscape maintenance programs from estimating to implementation. diplomatic. This practical course will enable the student to save money or increase profits while doing a professional job. topography. students will discuss the political. Though the focus will be on China. small trees. The effects of the end of the Cold War will also be considered. Students will evaluate lawn and landscape planting needs. but also faculty or counselor recommendation) Horticulture HORT-115 Soil Science (Cr4) (4:0) The student will demonstrate an understanding of the physical and chemical properties of soils including the influence of parent material. Special emphasis will be placed on such themes as pre Islamic civilization. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term in the even years. maintenance and propagation. social. l HIST-235 (CG) Immigration & Ethnicity in American History (Cr3) (3:0) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the historical experiences of immigrants before. (Approval of instructor and Career Services Representative is required) (Prerequisites: Usually a GPA of 3. describe their habits of growth. revolution and independence throughout Asia and political developments after World War II. highlighting the era of imperialism. The topics of the seminars will change each semester. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. The student will understand the historical evolution of the volatile Middle East from ancient times to the crisis-ridden present. Selection and maintenance of equipment will also be reviewed. Great Power conflicts in the region and the worldwide impact of oil. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term in the even years. perennials and annuals commonly used in this area. (Prerequisite: BIOL 125 or instructor approval) HORT-126 Landscape Plant Materials II (Cr4) (3:2) The student will identify selected hardy plant materials and describe their habits of growth. Japan and Korea. The student will investigate a selection of those events for opportunities to gain new insights and information to perform historical research. increases property values and makes a favorable impression. and corresponding social and cultural change. Latin America and Africa. HORT-135 Grounds Maintenance (Cr3) (3:0) A well-maintained residential or commercial property is pleasing to the eye. psychological. more significant change has taken place in the United States international affairs than in all of its previous history. HIST-236 Twentieth Century American Diplomatic History Since 1900 (Cr3) (3:0) Since World War II. economic and intellectual events in Russia since 1800. economic. l HIST-227 (HI) (HU) (CG) Middle Eastern History (Cr3) (3:0) Increasingly. Vietnam. l HIST-226 (CG) History of Modern Russia (Cr3) (3:0) After a survey of earlier Russian history. the growth of Arab nationalism. HIST-299 Internship in History (Cr3) The student will select from a variety of internships of a historical nature that are located within the community. The emphasis is on studentstudent and student-faculty interaction and the development of general research skills. tactics. the features of modern Soviet society and the dissolution of the Soviet Union. These seminars are led by professors from two or more disciplines who bring their special expertise to bear on a special topic. The topics of the seminars will change each semester.

HUDV-108 Achievement Motivation (Cr1) (1:0) Students will study achievement patterns and behaviors and apply this understanding to their own lives. values and motivations. There will be some free discussion involved. This course should be taken in the student’s first semester at Brookdale. Students will also be able to use all of these exploration tools to assist them in their career decision making process and to create a career portfolio. (Prerequisite: BIOL 125) HORT-295 Special Project — Ornamental Horticulture (Cr1-6) HORT-299 Ornamental Horticulture Internship (Cr1-6) Students will obtain on-the-job experience and demonstrate the mastery of horticulture skills through placement with an established business in Monmouth County for four to eight weeks. The student will be able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of their life goals based on the Kuder online assessment tool and self-reflection. pricing. This hands-on. presentations and videos will emphasize the history of gardens and the cultural influences on plant selection and design. l General Education Course HORT-225 Turf Management (Cr3) (3:0) The student will be able to identify economically important turf grass species and varieties and apply cultural practices including fertilizations. including the following techniques: seeds. This five-week. HORT-152 Floral Design II (Cr1) (1:0) Students will sharpen their design skills by focusing on wedding pieces. class exercises. The student will also demonstrate a knowledge of plant structure and physiology relating to propagation. (Prerequisite: HUDV 116 is recommended. HUDV-117 Career Exploration Seminar (Cr1) (1:0) Students will apply the Kuder online career assessment tool to make career decisions. but most sessions are structured experiences. proper care and handling of flowers. They will explore their personal goals and . (Students will pay their own admission to the gardens. (Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and Career Services Representative) values through individual projects. Field trips to local and regional private and public gardens will provide the student with actual examples of the textbook descriptions. signs of diseases and pest infestations. and select the appropriate method of control and prevention. cuttings. and group interaction. Students will also study bed preparation. selling and servicing the customer. planting techniques. ordering flowers. private and public gardens. participants will develop a more positive self concept and gain experience in setting personal goals that are both realistic and rewarding. Integrated pest management techniques will focus attention on alternatives to pesticide use. Participants will prepare for the Core and Category 3A and 3B pesticide licensing exams or receive pesticide applicator recertification credits upon satisfactory course completion. site evaluation methods and job estimating techniques. how to analyze a site. pricing of flowers and the construction of basic designs according to industry standards. A prior knowledge of woody plant material is required. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. walls. HORT-151 Floral Design I (Cr1) (1:0) Students will learn skills needed to create floral designs consistent with business standards. The student will identify potential obstacles to the decision making process. (Prerequisite: BIOL 125) HORT-245 Plant Propagation (Cr4) (3:2) The student will select appropriate methods for the propagation of woody and non-woody plants and will demonstrate their effective use. They will learn how to utilize online and text reference materials to research career information.180 Course Descriptions use of plant materials in regional. Students will also be able to identify obstacles toward selecting a major and gaining employment in these careers and learn tools to overcome these obstacles. The need to achieve will also be studied in light of other needs of the personality. recreational and athletic uses. ordering. layerings. water features and landscape lighting. decks. HUDV-116 Career Development and Self Assessment Seminar (Cr1) (1:0) Students will apply the process and utilization of materials including Kuder online assessment tool. Also there will be an emphasis on achievement goal setting and time management skills. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term in the even years. NJ Department of Labor website and other related data in making career decisions. (Prerequisite: HORT 151) HORT-185 Landscape Design (Cr4) (3:2) The student will learn the theory and principles of landscape design. five-week course will include selling. HUDV-109 Human Development Seminar (Cr3) (3:0) By exploring personal strengths. construction of pieces. construct site-use plans and create attractive solutions to common landscape problems. delivery timing and other issues important to a major part of most floral design businesses. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term in the odd years. construction and set-up techniques. walkways. grafting and budding. Class discussions. tools and equipment needed. They will learn to locate and understand the various Holland Codes and create mini case studies. Students will learn basic drawing techniques on the board and computer. outcomes and reasonable long-term and short-term career goals. hands-on introductory course will focus on the history of floral design. This course is highly recommended for all first-time. during which they are evaluated by both the employer/supervisor and the program coordinator. full-time students in any program that requires less than 66 total credits. Residential design will be stressed. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. They will identify career choices that match their passions. material selection and installation of patios. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term in the odd years. five-week course will also include pricing methods. HORT-235 Plant Diseases and Pests (Cr3) (3:0) The student will identify common plant pests and diseases. pest control. This hands-on. funeral director constraints. (Prerequisite: HORT 126 or permission of instructor) HORT-186 Landscape Construction (Cr3) (3:0) An introduction to the design.) NOTE: This course is offered only in the Summer I term. The student will set expectations. but not required) Human Development HUDV-107 College Success Seminar (Cr1) (1:0) Students learn to identify and practice a variety of skills and behaviors that can foster success in college and work. mowing and irrigation for the purpose of developing and maintaining turf for aesthetic. (Prerequisite: HORT 151 or permission of instructor) HORT-153 Floral Design III (Cr1) (1:0) Students will sharpen their design skills by focusing on funeral designs.

Course materials include case studies and autobiographical narratives. (Prerequisites: HUDV 116 and HUDV 117 are recommended. religion. Please see your counselor for verification. l HUMN-129 (CG) Issues in Women’s Studies (Cr3) (3:0) This course provides an exploration of the field of women’s studies and includes an analysis of women’s lives through readings in a wide range of topics from the new scholarship on gender. This course will also help students investigate bibliographic and full-text databases and . social customs. The social construction of gender and race will be examined along with a feminist critique of science. how it is organized and how it is assessed. television. or prior knowledge of. and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) Interdisciplinary Studies IDST-235 Human Sexuality: Physical and Developmental Aspects (Cr3) (3:0) Knowledge of one’s body is a right and responsibility. The history of women in science and the experiences of contemporary women scientists will be included along with the impact of science and technology on women’s lives. The curriculum will define information and the role that information plays in the educational process. responsive and creative audience for all the arts. theater and the visual arts. or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) l HUMN-230 (CG) Women and Science (Cr3) (3:0) This course provides an interdisciplinary examination of women’s relationship to the natural sciences. as well as theory and sociological analysis. consumer concerns. film. The student will assess the appropriateness of the information found and how it meets the needs of the task. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. social and vocational affairs. Students will be requested to write response papers as well as to read from a variety of texts. two-dimensional relationships will be explored through a variety of media. IDST-236 Human Sexuality: Social and Psychological Aspects (Cr3) (3:0) Sexual behavior is strongly influenced by and. language. legal aspects of sexual behavior. Guest speakers will contribute a variety of perspectives from different areas of women’s experiences. Through readings. students will react critically to propaganda techniques employed in such fields as politics. mathematics and technology. education. IDST-295 Special Project— Interdisciplinary Studies (Cr1-6) Humanities l HUMN-125 (HU) The Creative Process (Cr3) (3:0) This Humanities interdisciplinary course introduces a variety of creative processes to equip the student to become a more informed. The course is equally useful to all students because the amount of experience with. Artists from the College and community will come to class and discuss their work in process. newspapers. (Prerequisite: Completion of READ 091 and READ 092 sequence or READ 095. radio. (Prerequisite: ENGL 121) HUMN-299 Humanities Internship (Cr3) This internship is designed for Humanities majors who wish to earn credit while working in a career field related to their major or career goal. economic and political development. controlled by social and psychological considerations. analyze and counteract the psychological. The computer will be used as a learning and research tool in this course. HUMN-215 Propaganda and Critical Thinking (Cr3) (3:0) Students will learn to recognize. The student will demonstrate effective job interview skills. the arts makes little difference in the student’s ability to complete the requirements of learning from the course. The student will demonstrate knowledge of various aspects of employment law. Research writing will also be included. economics. students will visit studios and workshops. and show students how to search and retrieve information in electronic formats. in part. the physiology of sex and reproduction and the development of the person as a sexual being. Auditing of this course is not permitted. magazines. Two and one half hours of additional lab time required. Also. Students will examine areas of gender identity. Emphasis will be on students developing an understanding of the design process and demonstrating their ability to design and create compositions based on these fundamental principles. (Prerequisite: Completion of at least one semester of college level course work and prior approval of instructor and Career Services Representative) 181 Human Geography l HGEO-105 (SS) (CG) Human Geography (Cr3) (3:0) Students will study the physical global environment focusing on the interaction of resources and cultural variables such as population patterns. Please note that this course may not transfer. sexual relationships and social/psychological theories of sexual development. In a studio setting. Internship requirements will be discussed with the appropriate Humanities instructor prior to a student’s participation. Field trips may be required. discussion and projects. attend rehearsals and meet practicing artists from the College and community. but not required) components of propaganda in a variety of media including books. Information Literacy l INFL-105 (IT) Information Literacy in a Connected World (Cr3) (3:0) This course will help students develop the skills needed to become information literate. (Prerequisites: READ 095 or completion of READ 091 & READ 092 sequence or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading. Students may use this experience to apply their classroom skills and theories to real work situations in the Humanities area.Course Descriptions HUDV -118 Career Planning and Attainment Seminar (Cr1) (1:0) Students will apply the job search process and demonstrate job search strategies. Students will be able to understand diversity in the work place. cross cultural patterns of sexuality. social and language l General Education Course Interior Design INTD-150 Design Elements for Interior Environments (Cr3) (1:4) The purpose of this course is to provide students with the working knowledge of design characteristics and the elements and principles of design as it relates to the interior environment. films. discover what information is included in electronic databases. Students will study sex anatomy. Students will use written materials and verbal communication to convey their experiences and expectations in pursuit of career goals. along with exploring the different types and formats of sources of information.

This allows for critical analysis and improvement of the design before more technical drawings are completed. Students will research flammability requirements based on building type and occupancy classification. Students will become aware of the purpose of building codes. (Prerequisites: INTD 152 and INTD 251) INTD-253 Interior Design Studio I (Cr3) (1:4) The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to contract design. the student will explore stylistic developments. Students will be introduced to the mechanical and aesthetic tools of the designer. ornamentation. Through a series of slides. INTD 155 and INTD 251) (Prerequisite or Corequisite: INTD 245) INTD-254 Interior Design Studio II (Cr3) (1:4) The purpose of this course is to expose students to advanced concepts and problems in the planning of interior environments. field trips and hands-on projects. the student will learn techniques for drawing interior spaces. Field trips required. (Prerequisites: ENGL 095 and READ 095 or READ 092 or passing scores in English and reading on Basic Skills Test) INTD-162 History of Furniture & Interiors II (Cr3) (3:0) The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the historical development of furniture and interiors. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in INTD 152) INTD-154 Introduction to Interior Design (Cr3) (1:4) This course introduces students to the diversified field of interior design. furnishings and to create presentation materials for the purpose of conveying design concepts. Students will need to dedicate additional time to work in the lab to complete assignments. ornamentation. INTD-161 History of Furniture and Interiors I (Cr3) (3:0) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the historical development of furniture and interiors. Through a series of videos. lectures. The focus of semester projects will be on building interior architecture. Field trip is required. INTD 154. Field trips may be required. Students will be introduced to primary software functions to produce drawings and will use a plotter to produce finished drawings. This course can be taken in conjunction with INTD 154. Students will create a set of drawings and plans necessary for the installation of an Interior Design project. and relevant terminology. codes and specifications. universal design. Two and one half hours lab time required. Students will research plumbing and electrical requirements for both residential and public spaces. The student will expand the aesthetic and technical skills developed in INTD 152. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in INTD 152. INTD 153. Students will create buildings in 3-D using a dedicated 3-D architectural package. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in INTD 152) INTD-252 CAD for Interior Design II (Cr3) (3:0) The purpose of this course is to expand on the CAD skills developed in INTD 251. students will gain an overall view of various aspects of the profession and a basic understanding of the role of the designer. Two and one half hours additional lab time required. process of code adoption. (Prerequisites: Any CADD course or computer literacy) INTD-245 Codes and Standards for Interiors (Cr3) (3:0) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to codes and standards that must be observed in the process of planning interior environments. This mixed media course will emphasize both freehand drawing and drafting skills. two and one half hours lab time is required. They also serve as a basis for all future working and presentation drawings. INTD 154. The student will acquire the skills necessary to create photorealistic images. the student will be able to identify major furniture styles and place them within their historical and cultural context. motifs and function of furniture forms from the Renaissance through the Twentieth Century. (Prerequisite or Corequisite INTD 152) INTD 155 Illustrative Sketching for Interior Environments (Cr3) (1:4) The purpose of this course is to help the student develop sketching skills. code agencies. motifs and function of furniture forms from ancient Egypt through the Renaissance. Students will further expand their abilities to develop effective space plans. Through hands on projects students will research codes and standards requirements and will review plans and drawings for compliance. rendering techniques and variations on the creation of presentation materials. Field trips may be required. the student will explore stylistic developments. As a result of this exploration. These sketches provide the designer with a means of rapid visualization of the intended design concept. Students will use codes and standards publications to identify occupancy classification and type. INTD-153 Drafting & Graphic Presentation for Interior Design II (Cr3) (1:4) The purpose of this class is to introduce the student to advanced drawing and presentation techniques utilized by the professional designer. Emphasis will be placed on space planning. Students will have a series of exercises to complete (and compile for their portfolio) in order to develop competency with their materials. as well as a means of effectively communicating ideas to others. and will develop a project that will demonstrate how a job would be presented to a client. lectures. As a result of this exploration. Students will employ skills developed in Drafting and Graphic Presentation for Interior Design I. Field trips may be required. occupancy load and egress requirements. to specify appropriate interior finishes.182 Course Descriptions INTD-152 Drafting and Graphic Presentation for Interior Design I (Cr3) (1:4) Students will be introduced to basic tools of drafting and graphic presentation. Students will become familiar with ADA and accessibility guidelines. The student will use the internet for product research. INTD 153. The assignments will focus on typical interior design and architectural applications. Emphasis will be placed on code compliance and l General Education Course . Specifically. which are useful to the designer as a tool in design development. Students will then apply their skills to their semester project. INTD-251 CAD for Interior Design (Cr3) (1:4) This course provides students with an opportunity to utilize the personal computer to design interior spaces. Aspects of three dimensional drawing and computer rendering will be explored using AutoCAD 2000 and 3-D Studio Viz software. slides. animations and construction documents. field trips and hands-on projects. Traditional drafting-based systems are being phased out in favor of 3-D modelbased solutions. INTD 155 and INTD 251. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in INTD 161) INTD-225 3-D Architectural CAD (Cr4) (3:2) The student will be presented with a comprehensive course in 3-D Architecture. students will be able to identify major furniture styles and place them within their historical and cultural context. furnishings and finishes. Integrated and object-oriented 3-D CAD is becoming the mainstream design and documentation tool for architectural practices. Field trips required. Through class lecture and discussion. Field trips may be required.

Students will develop their resume. printing.Course Descriptions 183 universal design concepts. They will also demonstrate the ability to use Japanese with native speakers of the language. Also. The student will develop an understanding of light measurement and control. reading. They will be able to use Italian with native speakers of the language. or very limited . The student will become aware of various building systems including HVAC. to analyze audience needs. Field trips may be required. Additional lab time required. Students will become aware of the type of business formations. customs and current events. plumbing and sprinklers. reading and writing skills. INTD 256 and INTD 257) INTD-299 Internship – Interior Design (Cr1-3) Italian l ITAL-101 (HU) Elementary Italian I (Cr4) (4:0) This course is designed for students with no previous or very limited knowledge of the Italian language. Students will use the two basic Japanese alphabets and some Kanji (Chinese characters) as well as grammatical patterns. read and write Italian. Field trips may be required. using more complex language patterns. expose the student to diverse job opportunities. The course is presented using both the Hiragama and Katakana versions of Japanese. The student will gain knowledge of fiber sources. except by instructor approval) l JPNS-102 (HU) Elementary Japanese II (Cr4) (4:0) Students will build upon skills acquired in the first semester course and will be able to express themselves in a variety of more complex situations in Japanese. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in INTD 251 and INTD 253) INTD-256 Lighting and Building Systems for Interiors (Cr3) (1:4) The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the technical and aesthetic aspects of lighting and its use as a visual design element in interior spaces. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in INTD 152. Students will use the two basic Japanese alphabets and some Kanji (Chinese characters) as well as grammatical patterns. demonstrating the ability to report on various aspects of life and culture in Italy. Field trips may be required. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. to write concisely and clearly and to background themselves quickly. listening. using practical and interesting situational materials that will stress both language and culture. listening. finishing processes and will be able to identify and classify textiles used by their yarns and weaves. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ITAL 203 or permission of instructor) knowledge of the Japanese language. portfolio and various l General Education Course marketing tools. Additionally. Lighting problems will be explored and solved through the application of formulas and lighting calculations. Students also gain an understanding of what makes news. Additional lab time is required. and writing skills in Japanese. The student will become familiar with lighting and electrical symbols and utilize them in the creation of reflected ceiling plans. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ITAL 102 or permission of instructor) l ITAL-204 (HU) Intermediate Italian II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will demonstrate the ability to speak. and INTD 251) INTD-257 Textiles & Materials for Interior Design (Cr3) (3:0) The purpose of this course is to introduce and familiarize the student with textiles and the textile industry as it relates specifically to Interior Design. The course emphasizes clarity and conciseness in writing and examines those techniques in successful writing for both fiction and nonfiction. reading and writing skills in Japanese. documents utilized during the course of a design project. Strong emphasis will be placed on acquiring conversational and comprehension skills. such as sustainability or green design and present their research to the class. Students will also research a current topic. listening. and to discuss and evaluate Japanese culture and customs using increasingly complex language patterns. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in INTD 153) INTD-258 Trade Information and Business Practices (Cr3) (3:0) The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the business practices of the design industry. (This course is not open to native Italian speakers or students with more than two years of Italian in high school. to develop a sense of importance. except by instructor approval) l ITAL-102 (HU) Elementary Italian II (Cr4) (4:0) Students will build upon skills acquired in the first semester course and will be able to express themselves in a variety of more complex situations in Italian. demonstrating the ability to discuss various aspects of life and culture in Japan. Students will learn the “language” of textiles as used by the design industry and will understand the transformation raw fibers undergo before reaching the end user. creation of yarn and various methods of fabric construction. (Prerequisite: ENGL 095 or satisfactory Japanese l JPNS-101 (HU) Elementary Japanese I (Cr4) (4:0) This course is designed for students with no previous. (This course is not open to native Japanese speakers or to students with more than two years of Japanese in high school. using practical and interesting situational materials that will stress both language and culture. using more complex language patterns. Prerequisite or Corequisite: INTD 254. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in INTD 251 and INTD 253. students will develop an understanding of dyeing. Field trips may be required. Strong emphasis will be placed on acquiring conversational and comprehension skills. Grammatical patterns and syntax will be stressed with the aim that students read and write what they have learned to say and understand. INTD 154. who decides what becomes news and how media decide what to publish or broadcast. students will discuss and evaluate Italian culture. Students are required to create and render historical and contemporary textile projects. (Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or higher in JPNS 203) Journalism JOUR-101 Introduction to Journalism (Cr3) (3:0) Students learn to develop and evaluate sources of information. methods of determining fees and basic project management practices. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in ITAL 101 or permission of instructor) l ITAL-203 (HU) Intermediate Italian I (Cr3) (3:0) Students will improve their speaking. (Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or higher in JPNS 102) l JPNS-204 (HU) Intermediate Japanese II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will continue to improve their speaking. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in JPNS 101) l JPNS-203 (HU) Intermediate Japanese I (Cr3) (3:0) Students will improve their speaking. and reinforce their preparedness for entry into the work force.

or on a magazine staff or for book publishing firms. merchandising practices and policies. advertising and the marketing system. NOTE: Students taking MATH 011 may not enroll simultaneously in any other math course. (Prerequisite: JOUR 101. distribution. and solving simple algebraic equations.) MATH-012 Prealgebra. practical geometry. as assistants in public relations offices of either private firms or public institutions. Students work independently outside of class as well as in the computer lab on various journalism exercises that will teach them to write clearly and concisely. Upon completion of this course. including consumer behavior. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) MRKT-105 Advertising (Cr3) (3:0) The course will encompass those areas relevant to modern advertising. marketing and the social environment. The student will apply marketing principles and techniques to the area of consumer behavior and evaluate their relevance to overall marketing patterns. (Cr3) (3:0) This course helps refine the American English of non-native speakers. (Prerequisite: READ 092. LANG-295 Special Project — Modern Language (Cr1-6) (Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) Marketing MRKT-101 Introduction to Marketing (Cr3) (3:0) The student will master the fundamentals of marketing and marketing theory. Topics covered will include media selection. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. (Prerequisite: READ 092. Part II (Cr4) (4:0) This course is the second half of the content of MATH 015 (the first half is covered by MATH 011). develop their ability to interview and learn the standard sources of news. retail advertising. the student will be able to develop selling strategies through case studies and field experiences. (Prerequisite: Ability to speak some English) LANG-101 American Pronunciation and Articulation for the Non-Native Speaker. Some class time may be spent in the Math Lab. Also. promotion and pricing. Other topics include organizing and reading data in tables and graphs. social and economic impacts of advertising. It is an in-depth program that teaches students to understand and use the correct patterns of stress and intonation. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) MRKT-202 Marketing in Contemporary Societies (Cr3) (3:0) The student will examine the societal implications of modern marketing practice by reading and evaluating a series of essays by prominent authors.e. The MATH 011-012 sequence prepares students for elementary algebra. In MATH 011. This course covers . LANG-102 Conversation Strategies for Non-Native Speakers of English (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to give practice in idiomatic American English conversation by focusing on everyday situations (i. This is a development course and will not be counted toward degree requirements. evaluating algebraic expressions. which were covered in MATH 011. absolute value. (Prerequisites: READ 095 and MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading. meeting new people. permission of instructor and Career Services Representative) course is teaching the student the difference between the formal language learned in the classroom and the informal language used by Americans in real life.. and fractions are reinforced through application problems. product strategies and development. phrases and sentences. A hidden dimension of this l General Education Course Mathematics MATH-011 Prealgebra. MATH 012 begins with a brief review of integers and fractions. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MRKT 101) MRKT-295 Special Project-Marketing (Cr1-3) Students may choose to specialize or investigate some area in greater depth by selecting 1-3 credits in this individual learning course for the major. research. (Prerequisite: 30 credits to include 15 credits of career studies. (Prerequisite: None. layout. problems and successes as a consumer. and MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement n computation) MRKT-145 Salesmanship (Cr3) (3:0) The student will practice the basic principles and theories of accepted selling practices. layout and display as well as other basic retail management responsibilities. copywriting and advertising campaign strategies. operations with whole numbers. (Prerequisite: JOUR 101) JOUR-295 Special Project – Journalism (Cr1-6) JOUR-299 Journalism Internship (Cr1-6) Students may practice journalistic/ writing skills in a real-world situation. they will participate in programs on campus and complete an internship workbook based on the work experience gained. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) MRKT-111 Fundamentals of Retailing (Cr3) (3:0) This course will involve the student in the study of basic retail operations and store management. placement is based on scores on the College Placement Test. in the news departments of broadcast or television stations. solving problems) that students will be likely to encounter as they adjust to life in the United States.184 Course Descriptions completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) JOUR-102 Journalism II (Cr3) (3:0) Students deepen their knowledge of reference materials. They may work part time as reporters or editorial assistants for daily or weekly newspapers. formulas. The students will study theories relevant to marketing and the business environment. This is a developmental course in the basic skills and will not be counted towards degree requirements. location and site analysis. (Prerequisite: 6 credits in the Marketing Program or permission of the instructor) MRKT-299 Marketing Internship (Cr3) Students will work in a job related to their program. integers. The focus is on correct identification and production of Standard American English consonant and vowel sounds in words. permission of instructor and Career Services Representative) Language LANG-075 Intensive Basic Pronunciation for Non-Native Speakers of English (Cr3) (3:0) This is an introductory course designed for non-native English speakers who wish to improve their speech clarity. The MATH 011-012 sequence prepares students for elementary algebra. Part I (Cr4) (4:0) This course is the first half of the content of MATH 015 (the second half is covered by MATH 012). (Prerequisite: READ 092.

quadratic. exponential. or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra) l MATH-145 (M) Algebraic Modeling (Cr4) (4:0) This course is an intermediate algebra course in which examples are drawn from real life and skills are learned in the context of these applications. and algebraic. Numerical. solving linear equations. exponential. NOTE: Students taking MATH 021 may not enroll simultaneously in any other math course. percents. NOTE: MATH 146 is offered only in the Spring and Summer II terms. practical geometry. The course is intended for students who need to take Intermediate Algebra. verbal. factoring. Topics include functions and their properties and associated algebraic skills and modeling using linear. complex numbers. inequalities and formulas. verbal. and applications of functions: linear. inequalities. Applications are included throughout the course. In addition. consumer mathematics. matrices solving linear programming problems graphically and with the simplex method. networks. national. fractions. (Prerequisite: MATH 021) MATH-025 Elementary Algebra (Cr4) (4:0) This course is a review of elementary algebra and requires previous experience in algebra. scheduling. polynomial. quadratic. (Prerequisite: MATH 011) MATH-015 Prealgebra (Cr4) (4:0) This course prepares students for elementary algebra. logarithmic.) MATH-022 Algebra Skills (Cr4) (4:0) This course provides students who have completed MATH 021 with the necessary skills and concepts to continue the study of algebra in MATH 151. quadratic. quadratic. (Prerequisite: MATH 021 or MATH 025. This is a developmental course in the basic skills and will not be counted towards degree requirements. placement is based on scores on the College Placement Test. proportions. absolute value. and some topics in geometry. verbal and algebraic. and radical expressions. This course begins with a review of MATH 021 and continues l General Education Course with polynomial and exponential expressions. Topics include equations. including graphical representations of data and measures of central tendency. The course concludes with Chi Square tests and linear correlation and regression. This is a developmental course and will not be counted towards degree requirements. (Prerequisite: MATH 021 or MATH 025. evaluating algebraic expressions.Course Descriptions 185 decimals and real numbers. position and variation. Mathematical models will be used to solve problems in business and the social and behavioral sciences. rational. graphing and writing linear functions. quadratic equations. (Prerequisite: MATH 015 or MATH 012. or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation) l MATH-131 (M) Statistics (Cr4) (4:0) This course begins with descriptive statistics. linear inequalities. and symbolic tools and techniques are used to apply algebra to real-world situations. counting techniques and probability theory. (Prerequisites: MATH 021 or MATH 022 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra) l MATH-146 (M) Advanced Topics in Mathematics for the Liberal Arts (Cr4) (4:0) This is a survey course with topics chosen from the mathematics of voting. and graphing linear and quadratic equations. exponential. A graphing calculator is required – the specific model is determined by the department. The topics in MATH 025 include linear. This is a developmental course in the basic skills and will not be counted towards degree requirements. Some class time may be spent in the Math Lab. Problem solving is stressed throughout the course. graphing in the coordinate plane. A graphing calculator is required – the specific model is determined by the department. ratio and proportion. Operations with whole numbers. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives. graphing in the rectangular coordinate system. fair division. This is a developmental course in the Basic Skills and will not be counted towards degree requirements. and simplifying polynomial and radical expressions. (Prerequisites: None. A graphing calculator is required – the specific model is determined by the department. (Prerequisites: MATH 015 or MATH 012 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation. rational and radical equations. polynomial. geometry. numerical. logarithmic. measurement. and solving simple algebraic equations. linear systems. Computer software will be used in class to gain a greater understanding of underlying concepts. (Prerequisite: MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra) l MATH-136 (M) Mathematics for the Liberal Arts (Cr3) (3:0) This is a mathematics survey course that covers sets. Problem solving is stressed throughout the course. sets. linear systems in two and three variables. NOTE: Students taking MATH 012 may not enroll simultaneously in any other math course. graphical. making input/output tables. and graph theory. NOTE: Students taking MATH 015 may not enroll simultaneously in any other math course. cubic and radical equations. measurement conversion between American and metric units. factoring. rational and radical expressions and equations. MATH 151. decimals. linear. The course may be used as a prerequisite for MATH 146 and MATH 156 but NOT MATH 152 or MATH 153. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 145 or MATH 151) l MATH-151 (M) Intermediate Algebra (Cr4) (4:0) This course prepares students for courses that require algebraic skills beyond those taught in Elementary Algebra. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives. percent. logic and two topics chosen from probability. apportionment. formulas. The course continues with the Central Limit Theorem and its use in the development of estimation through confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. This is a developmental course and will not be counted towards degree requirements. including graphical. rational and radical functions. rational and radical.) MATH-021 Introductory Algebra (Cr4) (4:0) This course is an introduction to the concepts and methods of algebra. including graphical. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives. Basic probability concepts lead to the study of the binomial and normal probability distributions. solving quadratic. symmetry. . and fractal geometry. numeration systems. or satisfactory completion of the college’s basic skills requirement in algebra) l MATH-137 (M) Finite Mathematics (Cr3) (3:0) This course contains topics chosen from linear functions. ratios and rates. Topics include creating and translating algebraic expressions. NOTE: Students taking MATH 025 may not enroll simultaneously in any other math course. and algebraic. Computer software will be used in class to gain a greater understanding of underlying concepts through graphs and specialized programs. the Traveling Salesman Problem. solving linear systems. numerical. Other topics include organizing data in tables and graphs. numerical. Euler circuits. including graphical. and integers are reinforced through application problems.

and solve optimization problems using those functions. discrete probability. exponential and logarithmic functions will be studied. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives. verbal. inverse trigonometric. including the Fundamental Theorems. preceded by MATH 152. techniques of integration with emphasis on substitution and integration by parts. completes the study of elementary calculus. a review of right triangle trigonometry. arc length. l General Education Course Functions and their graphs are studied. exponential. including graphical. and algebraic. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 171) l MATH-176 (M) Calculus With Business Applications (Cr4) (4:0) This course covers differential and integral calculus with applications in business. economics. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives. and average value. trigonometric functions through the unit circle. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives. and algebraic. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives. verbal. Algebraic. inverse trigonometric. motion of a body. power series. graphs and trees. including graphical. identities as tools for rewriting trigonometric expressions. is not necessary. number theory. infinite sequences and series. Topics include classical methods of solving firstand higher-order differential equations. including graphical. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives. numerical. vectors and vector-valued functions. numerical. a continuation of MATH 172. Topics include polar equations. numerical. A graphing calculator is required – the specific model is determined by the department. Computer software will be used extensively in class to gain a greater understanding of concepts as well as to consider non-routine problems. Topics include functions and function notation. logistic. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives. quadratic functions. matrix algebra. the derivative and its applications. while recommended. and algebraic. derivatives and their applications. constructing mathematical models. Applications are drawn from the field of computer science. and the life sciences. prepares students for the study of calculus. A graphing calculator is required. The topics require students to exhibit critical thinking skills as they analyze a variety of problems. Topics include sets. Computer software will be used extensively in class to gain a greater understanding of concepts as well as to consider non-routine problems. and algebraic. including linear. (Prerequisite: MATH 022 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra) l MATH-152 (M) College Algebra & Trigonometry (Cr4) (4:0) This course. A graphing calculator is required. verbal.186 Course Descriptions the course provides a basic introduction to right triangle trigonometry. and Taylor series. followed by MATH 153. MATH-226 Discrete Mathematics (Cr4) (4:0) This course is intended for students of mathematics or computer science. and algebraic through the use of computer software in class. verbal. including graphical. spring-mass systems and electric circuits. Applications will be considered throughout the course. and systems of differential equations. NOTE: . Topics also include systems of linear equations. and polynomial functions. and integrals. A prior programming course. including graphical. transformations of functions. verbal. numerical. NOTE: MATH 226 is offered only in the Summer II term. rate of change and linear functions. numerical. the integral and its applications and exponential and logarithmic functions. mathematical models for phenomena such as growth and decay. Computer software will be used extensively in class to gain a greater understanding of concepts as well as to consider non-routine problems. and logarithmic functions. including graphical. Topics include functions and their graphs. functions. All topics include applications in the management. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 151 or equivalent) l MATH-153 (M) Pre-Calculus Mathematics (Cr4) (4:0) This course. some basic identities. power functions. and hyberbolas. methods of proof. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives. linear programming (graphical solution and simplex method) and the mathematics of finance. l MATH-171 (M) Calculus I (Cr4) (4:0) This is a first semester scientific calculus course and the topics include limits. chemical reactions. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives. Topics include applications of the definite integral. ellipses. and sinusoidal models. exponential. numerical. the specific model is determined by the department. numerical. relations and Boolean functions. trigonometric. Computer software will be used extensively in class to gain a greater understanding of concepts as well as to consider non-routine problems. Calculus I. rational. and logarithmic. such as area. Parametric equations are introduced and used to define circles. numerical. including graphical. the double and half-angle identities. and algebraic. The course examines the theoretical and applied mathematical foundations for the discipline of computer science. solving equations. including graphical. continuity. Calculus II. Students use their calculators and their understanding of the behavior of functions to perform regression analysis on data sets. verbal and algebraic. approximate integration and error formulas. logic. graphing trigonometric functions. life and social sciences. applications leading to sinusoidal graphs. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 172) l MATH-273 (M) Calculus III (Cr4) (4:0) This course. partial derivatives and multiple integrals. qualitative and numerical aspects of differential equations. prepares students for the study of calculus. verbal. quadratic. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 172) l MATH-274 (M) Elementary Differential Equations (Cr4) (4:0) This is an introductory course in concepts and applications of differential equations. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 145 or MATH 151) This course is recommended for Business majors. volume. counting techniques. surfaces in space and functions of several variables. and algebraic. verbal. Computer software will be used in class to gain a greater understanding of underlying concepts. the specific model is determined by the department. Types of functions studied include rational. and topics from vector analysis. Mathematical reasoning and proofs will be stressed. including polynomial. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 156) This course is recommended for Business majors. exponential. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 152 or equivalent) l MATH-156 (M) Mathematics for Management and the Social Sciences (Cr3) (3:0) This course prepares students for a college level business calculus course. create functions from a problem situation. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 153 or equivalent) l MATH-172 (M) Calculus II (Cr4) (4:0) This course is a continuation of MATH 171.

and instrumentation. Topics may be in a variety of areas. The student will also become proficient in routine antigen and antibody testing. MATH 131. eigenvalues and eigenvectors. implementing quality assurance measures. including fractal geometry. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 172) MDLT-152 Clinical Hematology I and Phlebotomy (Cr4) (3:5) In this course. MDLT 154) MDLT-153 Clinical Chemistry I (Cr3) (2:5) This course introduces the student to the various automated functions utilized in the Chemistry laboratory. The student will participate in laboratory procedures that diagnose and differentiate various types of anemia. MATH 131. including the identification and proper treatment of specimens and principles of isolation. and polynomial interpolation are included throughout the course. (Prerequisite: MDLT 151. and post-analytical concerns of laboratory testing will be observed. Students will use case studies to apply principles of Microbiology to various organ Medical Laboratory Technology MDLT-151 Clinical Microbiology I (Cr3) (2:5) This course introduces basic principles in the isolation and identification of clinically significant organisms. including issues related to hemolytic disease of the newborn. and infection control. BIOL 213. MATH 131. In addition. blood gases and acid base equilibrium. pathophysiology. Pre-analytical. abstract algebra and others. erythropoiesis. statistics and probability theory. verbal. They will develop skills for effective communication including following departmental regulations. Corequisites: MDLT 152. MDLT 154) l General Education Course . This course will include the study of carbohydrates and the Krebs’ cycle as it relates to the laboratory testing of Type I and Type II diabetes as well as the implications of diabetes on various organ systems. Problems are approached from a variety of perspectives. biosynthesis of heme. The student will examine and become proficient in compatibility testing. MDLT 153. Topics include solutions of systems of linear equation using matrices and determinants. and maintaining patient confidentiality. The student will investigate laboratory principles involving safety measures. The student will become proficient in pre-analytical variables such as collection and handling of specimens and the selection of differential and selective media. to include the collection. MDLT 253. CHEM 136. and treatment of erythrocytic disorders. leukocyte evaluation. Corequisites: MDLT 251. The student will acquire an understanding of the immune system. Corequisites: MDLT 151. the basic immunologic techniques used in the immunology laboratory. numerical. MDLT 154) MDLT-154 Immunohematology (Cr3) (2:5) In this course. (Prerequisites: BIOL 112. the complement system. MDLT 254) MDLT-254 Immunohematology II (Cr3) (2:5) In this course. and algebraic through the use of computer software in class. The laboratory experience provides the student with an understanding of the scope of Transfusion Medicine. the student will become familiar with the hematology lab and apply principles of laboratory safety. including graphical. storage. including venapuncture. MDLT 252. and thrombopoiesis will be discussed. MDLT 152. This course will teach the student to identify specific common organisms with a focus on susceptibility testing. MDLT 152. CHEM 136. immunoglobulin. CHEM 136. MDLT 254) MDLT-253 Clinical Chemistry II and Urinalysis (Cr4) (3:5) This course focuses on the study of amino acids and proteins with an emphasis on interpreting electrophoretograms observed in various pathological states. BIOL 213. reagents. and laboratory testing. electrolytes. processing. The student will correlate data with physiologic and pathologic processes when studying liver functions. MDLT 252. CHEM 136. as well as blood typing. diagnostic laboratory testing. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 172) MATH-295 Special Project — Mathematics (Cr1-3) MATH 295 is a course designed for students who wish to study an advanced topic in mathematics not included in one of our currently offered courses. MDLT 253. Topics such as hematopoiesis. The student will study clinically significant human pathogens. (Prerequisites: BIOL 112. including Markov chains. and the problem of diagonalizing a square matrix. leukopoiesis. Corequisites: MDLT 151. MDLT 254) MDLT-252 Clinical Hematology II (Cr3) (2:5) In this course the student will identify the etiology. the student will continue to investigate all aspects of the transfusion of blood components. (Prerequisites: BIOL 112. and acquired immunodeficiency states. and clinical laboratory diagnostic tests used in infectious and autoimmune diseases. Corequisites: MDLT 151.Course Descriptions 187 MATH 274 is offered only in the Spring and Summer II terms. Applications. NOTE: MATH 285 is offered only in the Summer II term. and statistical procedures. Corequisites: MDLT 251. linear transformation. the student is introduced to the human blood groups. MATH 131. red cell metabolism and catabolism. MDLT 253) MDLT-261 Clinical Microbiology III (Cr3) (2:5) This course covers clinically significant fungi and parasites important to man. (Prerequisites: BIOL 112. with emphasis on their isolation. The student will perform common hematological procedures. MDLT 153. BIOL 213. urinalysis and body fluid collection techniques for testing and analysis will be covered. (Prerequisite: MDLT 154. identification. BIOL 213. MDLT 153) MDLT-251 Clinical Microbiology II and Immunology (Cr4) (3:5) This course is a continuation of Clinical Microbiology I and will explore analytical methods and strategies used to identify clinically significant organisms. distribution and transfusion of blood components. vector spaces. Corequisites: MDLT 252. In this course the student will also learn about the diagnosis and treatment of immunologic diseases. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 273) l MATH-285 (M) Linear Algebra (Cr3) (3:0) This is an introductory course in concepts and applications of linear algebra. This series of lectures addresses the clinical and serological nature of antigens and antibodies as they relate to the transfusion of blood and blood components. analytical. whole blood analyzers. the least squares fit problem. (Prerequisite: MDLT 153. anti-microbials. (Prerequisite: MDLT 152. viral infections. Before registering for the course the student must obtain a faculty advisor who will develop and submit a detailed program of study for the student. problem resolution and decision making in critical situations. Topics include an overview of bone marrow and the diagnosis of a variety of anemias and iron metabolism disorders. Corequisites: MDLT 251.

as well as compose melodies in each. BIOL 213. Corequisites: MDLT 261. rhythm. soft tissue. and qualitative diseases of platelets and vasculature. emphasizing its matrix and cellular components. and diminished. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUSI 101. (Corequisites: MDLT 261. (Prerequisite: MDLT 251. This course will teach the student to perform laboratory procedures associated with the diagnosis and differentiation of leukocyte disorders. gastrointestinal tract infections. (Prerequisite: MDLT 153. MDLT 265)) MDLT-265 Hemostasis (Cr2) (1:5) This course covers normal hemostasis and coagulation. The student will identify the key morphologic features and cytochemical reactivity of cells. Attendance at an on-campus concert will be required. The student will learn to play and notate all intervals. hemorrhagic coagulation disorders. Attendance at three concerts is mandatory. and triads. CHEM 136. and national organizations associated with clinical laboratory practice. lyric content and form will be examined. folk songs. and will also be exposed to electronic music literature. MDLT 264) three distinct ethnic groups: the Western European tradition. Students must be able to read music and have a general music background to take this course. blues. with a focus on infections of the bloodstream. federal regulations. The student will investigate the effects of growth and disease on bone metabolism. MUSI-102 Comprehensive Musicianship I (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed for music students who already possess basic reading skills in music and can attempt the study of minor. Attendance at an on-campus concert will be required. and neoplasms. instructional cassettes. The study of lipids will emphasize the various fractions. learning domains. Historical and sociological factors will also be considered. Corequisites: MDLT 261. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. sound filmstrips. and critical thinking skills will be explored. making the material understandable to non-musicians. noting their cardiovascular and storage implications. Elements such as melody. MDLT 263. information technology affecting the laboratory. in that it combines the musical traditions of l General Education Course . Students will be able to compose for large ensembles as well as film and radio projects. (Prerequisites: BIOL 112. including the most current WHO and FAB classifications. (Prerequisite: MUSI 101 or permission of the instructor) Music MUSI-101 Fundamentals of Music (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed for beginner music students or those wishing to review music notation. (Prerequisite: Basic fluency in music fundamentals: reading treble and bass clefs. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. MDLT 264. and myelodysplastic syndromes. myeloproliferative disorders. MDLT 263. rhythms.188 Course Descriptions systems. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUSI 121) MUSI-123 Music Technology I (Cr3) (3:0) The student will experience a hands-on use of digital synthesizers in a compositional environment. and wounds. genital tract infections. skin. modified taxonomy of cognitive domain. The student will learn to understand and enjoy more fully the classics of music literature. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. chord and melodies. l MUSI-116 (HU) (CG) History of Jazz (Cr3) (3:0) The legacy of Jazz is uniquely indigenous to the American experience. (Prerequisite: MDLT 152. urinary tract infections. Computer sequencing techniques will be stressed. The student will be able to define basic electronic music principles. MDLT 262. MUSI-121 Song Writing (Cr3) (3:0) Song Writing is a course in which students will write songs. selected listenings. augmented. The History of Jazz will concentrate on Jazz music from its origins to present day developments. Corequisites: MDLT 261. Concert attendance will be a requirement. MDLT 262. and film viewings. principles and theories of clinical management. African music and the newly emerging American tradition of the late 19th century. major. MDLT 265) MDLT-264 Clinical Management. Students will operate and understand various MIDI-equipped electronic synthesizers. MDLT 263. and Research (Cr2) (2:0) This course will introduce the student to management issues in health care. four basic triads and their inversions. intervals. formation and resorption. Corequisites: MDLT 262. the student will perform tests for the laboratory evaluation of hemostasis and monitoring anticoagulant therapy. The activity and role of various clinically significant enzymes are studied in detail. MDLT 262. MDLT 263. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUSI 101) MUSI-103 Ear Training (Cr3) (3:0) The student will learn to identify and notate intervals. The musical style traits of different periods will be discussed from a non-technical point of view. thrombosis evaluation and testing. major scales and key signatures. Attendance at an on-campus concert will be required. basic rhythmic notation and concepts. MDLT 264. Education. MDLT 264. harmony. The objectives will be accomplished through class discussion. minor. In addition. or a grade of “C” or higher in MUSI-101. and molecular genetics. MATH 131.) MUSI-122 Commercial Composition II (Cr3) (3:0) The student will continue the techniques and skills learned in MUSI 121. TV and radio broadcasts as well as attendance at operas. required concerts. concerts and recitals. art songs. all periods of popular music and instrumental songs will all be considered. and the purpose and use of behavioral objectives. including health care reform. modal and exotic scales. The student will learn to read simple music. MDLT 265) MDLT-263 Clinical Chemistry III (Cr3) (2:5) This course focuses on the study of bone. identify the fundamentals of musical acoustics and define the fundamental rules of music theory. In the clinical laboratory. This will be accomplished by examining stylistic characteristics and then writing songs in different genres. The student will focus on clinical education topics that will include characteristics of a clinical instructor. operettas. lower and upper respiratory tract. principles of personnel and financial management. Basic research techniques will be identified and employed by the student to conduct a literature search of a specific topic. cytogenetics. Broadway. or equivalent skills on pretest or audition) l MUSI-115 (HU) Music Appreciation (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed for music listeners with experiences that will include classroom-teacher guided sessions. MDLT 265) MDLT-262 Clinical Hematology III (Cr3) (2:5) This course covers morphologic and distributive leukocyte disorders. coagulation instrumentation and manual testing methods.

Attendance at an on-campus concert will be required. students will learn the correct way to produce a healthy. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) Students will be able to play and transpose easy pieces in minor keys. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) Students will study the art and science of singing in Voice I. safe vocal sound by means of bel canto techniques intended to strengthen breathing support. harmonic. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUSI 123) MUSI-295 Special Project — Music (Cr1-6) Students may choose to specialize or investigate some area in greater depth by selecting 1-6 credits in this individual learning course for the major. The instrumentation of the group will be that of a traditional swing band and repertoire of all style periods and major arrangers will be covered. Jazz Ensemble I. minor. Interpretation. NOTE: This course is offered in the Spring term only. and pentatonic scales and modes. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUSI 102) MUSI-221 Music Technology II (Cr3) (3:0) This course is an extension of Music Technology I. These goals will be accomplished through required listening. In the second part of the class. within the context of the entire ensemble. MUPF-125 Basics of Jazz Improvisation (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). support. whereby the student will become familiar with the operation of the digital electronic synthesizer and will be able to explain its uses thoroughly. as a prerequisite in order to gain the necessary level of performance experience required for this course). Specific areas of discussion will include reading music. including those found in today’s popular music. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. projection. MUPF-122 Jazz Studio Ensemble II (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). effective Spring 2011 (2:2) Building upon the skills learned in MUPF 111. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) This course is designed to introduce the student to the basics of jazz improvisation (namely. Specific areas of discussion will include understanding and reading rhythms. learning to improvise using major. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUPF 111) MUPF-121 Jazz Studio Ensemble I (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). projection. Attendance at two jazz concerts will be required. transposing them to all major keys. polish and perform pieces of early intermediate level at the piano. (Prerequisite: MUSI 102 or approval of instructor. basic fluency of music fundamentals. phrasing. and performance based on the student’s background and experience. They will play elementary chord progressions and pieces in all the major and minor keys. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUPF 102 or instructor approval) MUPF-111 Voice I (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). They will identify parallel and relative majors and minors. the students will be exposed to performing in various jazz styles. vocal sound by means of bel canto techniques intended to discover. will be studied as a part of the performances. Hard disk recording techniques will also be introduced. or the approval of the instructor. (Prerequisite: MUSI 101. Attendance at an on-campus concert will be required. They will play major and minor scales and arpeggios with the appropriate l General Education Course . Students without previous ensemble experience should consider or may be asked to enroll in MUPF 121. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) Students will analyze. fingerboard basics. and some common seventh chords in root position and inversion. They will improve their sight reading and improvising skills. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) In this instrumental ensemble.) MUPF-131 Group Guitar I (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0).. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUPF 101 or instructor approval) MUPF-103 Group Piano III (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). style. students will work on assigned pieces of music and present their work to the class. The class will be divided into two sections: in the first section. They will play all the major and minor scales in tetrachords. and rhythmic interpretation of Big Band performance clichés will be stressed. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) This course is designed as a continuation of MUPF 131. Ensemble performance skills such as section playing. will also be covered. They will identify and play the four forms of the triad and their inversions. develop and strengthen breath. (Prerequisite: Music Performance MUPF-101 Group Piano I (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). safe. Attendance at one Brookdale concert is required. Advanced computer sequencing techniques and MIDI applications will be discussed in a compositional environment. and theoretical functions of the musical process of improvising). the students will work on assigned pieces of music and present their work to the class. The class will be divided into the same two sections: in the first section. Improvisation techniques. traditional fingerings. Attendance at an on-campus concert will be required. strumming and picking technique. They will play simple chord structures. Figured bass will be discussed. etc. with added emphasis on individual study. with additional work on performance proficiency. etc. and an introduction to chords and scales. MUPF-102 Group Piano II (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). as well as understanding harmony in a variety of musical styles. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) Jazz Studio Ensemble II is a hands-on musical performance course with emphasis placed on the repertoire of the Big Band. Popular applications. a discussion of music theory as it applies to jazz performance. Students will be able to construct four-part chorale harmonization’s. students will learn the correct way to produce a healthy. range and flexibility. A personal instrument is required with the exception of pianists and vocalists. group intonation and dynamics. They will perform elementary fivefinger studies and two-hand piano pieces. MUPF-132 Group Guitar II (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). phrasing. Personal instrument required. and basic concepts in harmonic analysis will also be discussed. students will continue to study both the art and the science of singing. Attendance at one Brookdale concert is required. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) This course is designed for students with little or no guitar experience and will focus on the basic skills needed to play the guitar. in other words. will be studied as a part of the performances. MUPF-112 Voice II (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). the rhythmic. range and flexibility. Skills learned in this course will allow the student to perform music in a variety of styles.. Students will do final projects arranging composing or performing songs. Students will be instructed in soloing techniques and they will be encouraged to individually solo within the context of the ensemble.Course Descriptions 189 MUSI-201 Comprehensive Musicianship II (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed for the music student with a strong working knowledge of music theory. this course is designed to continue to build a solid vocal technique. style. In the second part of the class. Students will develop a technique of harmonization with triads. Interpretation. and fluency on an instrument. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) Students will learn to read music at the piano.

and learning to improvise using major scales. score set-up. beginning with installation. They will improve their sight reading and improvising skills. note entry methods. email. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) Students will build upon the skills established in MUPF 111 and MUPF 112. style. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUPF 202 or instructor approval) MUPF-211 Voice III (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUTC 101) MUTC-105 Introduction to NOTION Music® (Cr3) (3:0) This course will give the student an introduction to the “virtual orchestra” software. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUPF 201 or instructor approval) MUPF-203 Group Piano VI (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). Musical works of the impressionistic style will be emphasized. phrasing. Performances will be taped and viewed in the class for constructive criticism. (Prerequisites: MUSI 101 and MUPF 101 or Placement tests. safe vocal sounds by means of the most advanced and challenging bel canto techniques intended to further strengthen breathing. simple entry and an introduction to sequencer techniques. In the second part of the class. students will develop advanced vocal techniques to further refine healthy. email. Interpretation.xml import/ export. the student will work with video/gaming tools to provide basic musical enhancement for projects in other media. students will be assigned advanced standard repertory pieces of music and present their work to the class. analysis of lyrics. and perform pieces of early intermediate level at the piano. jazz chord forms. this course will guide the student through advanced tools and techniques for score realization. The course will guide the student through software/ MIDI installation. modes. including MIDI entry. analysis of lyrics and compositional techniques will be studied. polish. l General Education Course projection. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUPF 112) MUPF-212 Voice IV (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). (Prerequisites: MUSI 101 and MUPF 101 or placement tests. Musical works of the 20th century will be emphasized. (Prerequisites: MUSI 101 and MUPF 101 or placement tests.xml and *. NOTION Music®. guide tones. MIDI entry and playback including both “in” and “out”. Plug-Ins. Studies continue with the melodic and harmonic analysis of jazz guitar solos by historically renowned jazz guitarists. (Prerequisite: MUPF 131 or MUPF 132 or at least one year of guitar experience) MUPF-201 Group Piano IV (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). The material focuses on Finale® software and covers additional basic functions. Specific areas of discussion will include understanding and reading rhythms. *. performance requirements outside of Brookdale. internet) MUTC-102 ProTools® II (Cr3) (3:0) Building upon the skills mastered in Pro Tools® I. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUPF 211) string quartet. email. *. and other tools necessary to create a small-to-medium sized score for wind ensemble. furthering technical and musical skills begun in the first four terms of group piano and pursuing their own interests. students will be assigned advanced standard repertory pieces of music and present their work to the class. The material focuses on Finale® software and covers beginner-level functions and feature enhancements. note entry methods including real-time entry and enhanced playback. internet) MUTC-112 Finale® II (Cr3) (3:0) Building upon the skills mastered in Finale® I. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUTC 102) MUTC-202 ProTools® IV (Cr3) (3:0) Building upon the skills mastered in Pro Tool® I. Basic computer skills: working with files. students will develop advanced vocal techniques to further refine healthy. MIDI connections. In the first section of the course. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUTC 111) MUTC-201 ProTools® III (Cr3) (3:0) Building upon the skills mastered in Pro Tools® I and II. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) Students will continue to advance. They will identify and play the four forms of the triad and their inversions. this course covers the additional beginners’ principles needed to create a musical project on Finale®. Additional requirements will include study of Latin diction. Attendance at one concert with piano music is required. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) Students will analyze. The course will guide the student through the additional beginners’ skills of multi-part score set-up with instrumentations. The student will master the beginner level tools and techniques. and chord melody playing. range. Using cross platform techniques with other software. The student will be able to successfully orchestrate and perform a multi-part selection of music. this course will guide the student through advanced beginner-level tools and techniques for score creation. projection. and feature enhancements. and work on the presentation of a cabaret show. The course will guide the student through the basic skills and tools of installation. support. initial setup and score creation. simple editing tools and basic playback.way file creation. The student will learn advanced note entry with and without MIDI support. brass quintet and . In the first section. and flexibility.190 Course Descriptions A grade of “C” or higher in MUPF 131 or at least one year of guitar experience and instructor approval) MUPF-138 Jazz Guitar (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUPF 103 or instructor approval) MUPF-202 Group Piano V (Cr3) Fall 2010 (3:0). professional Music Technology MUTC-101 ProTools® I (Cr3) (3:0) This course covers the basic principles required to create a Pro Tools® project. range and flexibility. safe vocal sounds by means of the most advanced and challenging bel canto techniques intended to further strengthen breathing support. furthering technical and musical skills begun in the first five terms of group piano and pursuing their own interests. Basic computer skills: working with files. The class will continue to be divided into two sections. Performances will be taped and viewed in the class for constructive criticism. They will play major and minor scales and arpeggios with the appropriate traditional fingerings. style. MUPF 112 and MUPF 211. this course will guide the student through professional tools and techniques for live performance. phrasing. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) Students will build upon the skills established in MUPF 111. and compositional techniques will be studied. note entry. editing techniques. articulation tools specific to the four orchestral families. II and III. internet) MUTC-111 Finale® I (Cr3) (3:0) This course covers the basic principles needed to create a musical project on Finale®. Basic computer skills: working with files. In the second part of the class. Interpretation. orchestration tools and playback/recording. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) Students will continue to advance. effective Spring 2011 (2:2) This course will focus on the basic skills needed to play jazz music on the guitar.

Course Descriptions 191 video/gaming/film scoring and cross-platform functions. Using cross-platform techniques. This course consists of four hours of lecture and additional lab time as necessary per week. II. The course will guide the student through professional skills of a full orchestral score. (Prerequisite: NETW 110). At the end of the course the student will have the skills required to administer a UNIX server. as well as on network monitoring and debugging. The student will be introduced to notation articulations specific to each instrument family for enhanced playback. “standards. Additionally. email threats and countermeasures. the student will have the skills required to administer a UNIX system including user management. The student will be able to successfully orchestrate and perform a multi-part selection of music. orchestration tools and playback/recording. Security topologies are discussed as well as technologies used and principles involved in creating secure computer networking environments such as providing secure communications channels. Instruction will include demonstration and hands-on experience of networking and TCP/IP concepts. the Network Information System. including a full symphonic orchestra.xml and *. network connectivity principles and concepts of network design and management. this course covers the advanced principles needed to create a musical project on Finale®. Plug-Ins. and case studies. students will earn three credits. and the Network File System. It focuses on an introduction to TCP/IP networking under UNIX. The material focuses on Finale® software l General Education Course and covers advanced functions. Plug-Ins.” transmission and media. playback including both “in” and “out. configuring and using the Domain Name Service. circuits and LANS. playback including both “in” and “out. The material focuses on Finale® software and covers advanced functions. Students will learn the basic principles of TCP/IP networking. MIDI-to-Sequencer techniques. Hands-on and case project assignments will reinforce each of the concepts. Upon successful completion of this course. The . firewalls. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUTC 201) MUTC-205 Advanced NOTION Music® (Cr3) (3:0) Building upon the skills mastered in NOTION Music® I. jazz combo and other ensembles. *. as well as the basics of network security. It is useful for students who wish to understand networking concepts with TCP/IP or make decisions about implementing a TCP/IP network. types of attacks. class work. network infrastructure. architectures. current use and future directions of telephony. The course will focus on the specific techniques required for realistic live performances. This course consists of three hours of lecture and additional independent lab time as necessary per week. Topics covered include: authentication. this course completes the professional and advanced skills needed to create and perform a musical project on Finale®. this course will give the student an advanced mastery of the “virtual orchestra” software NOTION Music®. NETW-115 E-Commerce System Design (Cr3) (3:0) The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the technologies and design concepts relevant to electronic commerce. remote access. security and performance requirements. NETW-110 Introduction to UNIX Network Administration (Cr3) (3:0) This course will provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of the administrative aspects of the UNIX operating system. MIDI and voice entry. and the reconfiguration and handling peripheral devices. Broadway pit scores and rock band score set-up with VST instrumentations including percussion. NETW-107(t) Introduction to Security (Cr3) (3:0) This course provides a fundamental understanding of network security principles and implementation through lecture. and file and print services. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUTC 211) Networking NETW-105 Fundamentals of Telecomm (Cr3) (3:0) The purpose of this course is to provide students with a working knowledge of voice telecommunications (telephony). this course provides students with an overview of the facilities and services provided by the TCP/ IP protocol suite and others. The emphasis is on E-Commerce applications. and computer forensics. and physical security concepts.” note entry methods including real-time entry and enhanced playback. secure internetworking devices. backup procedures. voice and data telecommunication. sendmail. and III.) NETW-111 UNIX Network Administration II (Cr4) (4:0) This course will provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of the administrative aspects of the UNIX operating system. electronic cash systems and user security. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUTC 112) MUTC-212 Finale® IV (Cr3) (3:0) Building upon the skills mastered in Finale® I. cyber-crime. MIDI-to-Sequencer techniques and feature enhancements. (Prerequisite: Familiarity with a computer operating system would be very helpful. installing and configuring a Web and Internet Server. the student will master the skills needed to perform their pieces in a live performance.” note entry methods including real-time entry and enhanced playback. disaster recovery. The student will begin and complete a professional-level project in one field and present the project for professional review and critique. protocols. The course concentrates on the Windows Operating System with TCP/IP implementation. security policies. file management. The laboratory component of the course will require the student to install and configure an Intel computer with UNIX.way file creation and other feature enhancements. Students will learn the history. Other topics include the history and development of the industry and regulation and deregulation. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MUTC 105 and MUTC 111) MUTC-211 Finale® III (Cr3) (3:0) Building upon the skills mastered in Finale® I and II. Through lectures. and hands-on projects students will gain an understanding of voice networks and network components. MIDI and voice entry. including advanced instrumentation articulation/editing techniques. (Prerequisites: MATH 012 or MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation. The student will be introduced to notation articulations specific to each instrument family for enhanced playback. rock band. The course will guide the student through advanced skills of a full orchestral score set-up with VST instrumentations. The course also covers E-Commerce transaction models such as the electronic exchange of technical data. Web applications. intrusion detection systems. and network medium and the daily tasks involved with managing and troubleshooting these technologies. privacy. case studies. and finally. hands-on activities. At the conclusion of this course. ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) NETW-106 Introduction to Networking TCP/IP (Cr3) (3:0) The objective of this course is to provide students with a practical understanding of networking and the skills required to set up and use TCP/IP networks. malicious code.

LANs. and in particular 802. configure and maintain Microsoft Windows 7 as a client operating system. WANs. IP routing and certificate services. It will present cell phone technology. instruction and training are provided in the proper care. configuration and maintenance. (Prerequisite: NETW 191) NETW-193 MCSE– Planning and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Network Server (Cr3) (3:0) In this course.11a. In addition. monitor and troubleshoot network security. WANs. engineering or networking. monitor and troubleshoot remote access. A task analysis of current industry standards and occupational analysis was used to develop the content standards. protocols and services. monitor and troubleshoot basic security. but is not limited to. the student will learn to implement and administer a Microsoft Windows 2008 network infrastructure. In addition.192 Course Descriptions student will understand systems design and operational considerations for an E-Commerce system. Local Area Networks (LANs) and Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) design. the student will earn three credits. and troubleshoot change and configuration management. Students learn to install. networking. configure and troubleshoot the desktop environment. and 3 G and examine WAP and SMS. manage and troubleshoot hardware devices and drivers. Configuring. and Administering Microsoft Windows 2008 Server MCSE exam. DHCP. configure and troubleshoot Active Directory. (Prerequisite: NETW 192) NETW-194 MCSE – Planning. At the conclusion of this course. manage and troubleshoot access to resources. the student will learn to design a Microsoft Windows 2008 directory services infrastructure. The student will learn to install. the student will learn to install and configure Microsoft Windows 2008 Server. configure.5. Implementing. security or network infrastructure. and be ready to take the Implementing and Administering a Microsoft Windows 2008 Directory Services Infrastructure MCSE exam. or CCNA Semester 1 and 2 at another CNAP institution) NETW-190 MCTS Guide to Microsoft Windows 7 (Cr3) (3:0) This is an introductory course designed for people who are getting started in computer networking as well as experienced network administrators who are new to Windows Vista. At the conclusion of this course. and implement. Managing. Point-to-Point Protocols (PPP) and Frame Relay design. configure and troubleshoot system storage. At the conclusion of this course. Fiber Distributed Data Interface. and troubleshoot network address translation. 802. OSI models. monitor. switches. and case studies. network protocols. Instruction introduces and extends the student’s knowledge and practical experience with routers. routers. including 2. This course is useful for students who are majoring in computer science. and design a directory service architecture and . Integrated Services Data Networks (ISDN). monitor and optimize system performance. Particular emphasis is given to the use of decision-making and problem-solving techniques in applying science. manage. tools and equipment and all local. monitor and troubleshoot DNS for Active Directory. the student will learn and have practical experience with Wide Area Networks (WANs). Token Ring. and install. The student will study and design networks using Ethernet. Students will learn how to implement. Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX) routing and Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP). and understand the difference between radio and infrared. ISDN. (Prerequisite: NETW 190) NETW-192 MCSE – Implementing. reliability and availability. network terminology and protocols. implement. install. safety. hands-on activities. monitor and troubleshoot DNS. manage and troubleshoot network protocols and services: disaster recovery and troubleshooting. and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Network Infrastructure (Cr3) (3:0) In this course. cabling. configuration and maintenance. The student will learn to install. manage. Novell networks. router programming. install. the student will earn three credits. the student will learn to implement and administer a Microsoft Windows 2008 Directory Services Infrastructure. manage. It will provide a foundation for other hardware. NETW-191 MCSE – Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Environment (Cr3) (3:0) In this course. and be ready to take the Microsoft Windows 7 MCSE exam. manage. and troubleshoot active directory security solutions. and 802. and be ready to take the Implementing and Administering a Microsoft Windows 2008 Network Infrastructure MCSE exam. WINS. Students will be able to describe the advantages and disadvantages of wireless communication in general. monitor. implement. the student will earn three credits. Students develop practical experience in skills related to configuring LANs.11b. The student will analyze business and technical requirements.11g -configuration and security problems. and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Active Directory Infrastructure (Cr3) (3:0) In this course. l General Education Course NETW-152 (t) Virtual LANs and WANs/ CCNA (Cr6) (6:0) This is the second of a two semester sequence designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology that will empower them to enter employment and/or further education and training in the computer networking field. manage. mathematics. configure. the student will earn three credits. IP addressing and network standards. Students will learn how to implement. configure. building and environmental codes and regulations. monitor and optimize system performance and reliability. from cell phones to wireless local area networks to broadband wide area network links to satellite. state and federal safety. The course will cover WLANs. TCP/IP Addressing Protocol and dynamic routing. manage. At the conclusion of this course. configure. 2. it will examine fixed broadband wireless and satellite communications. NETW-125 (t) Introduction to Wireless (Cr3) (3:0) Through lecture. monitor. and configure. this course introduces wireless networking over a range of applications. Instruction includes. maintenance and use of networking software. Finally. software or networking courses that deal with E-Commerce applications. star topology. communication and social studies concepts to solve networking problems. and implement. cabling tools. configuring WANs. and optimize the components of Active Directory. configure. optimizing. network standards. (Prerequisites: ENGL 095 or passing score on Basic Skills Test) NETW-151 (t) Router Internetworking/ CCNA (Cr6) (6:0) This is the first of a two semester sequence designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology that will empower them to enter employment and/or further education and training in the computer networking field. PPP and Frame Relay protocols and network troubleshooting. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in NETW 151. manage and troubleshoot network connections. and be ready to take the Installing.

Given a specification containing multiple routed and routing protocols. including Windows. This course is useful for a variety of networking disciplines and will provide a foundation for courses dealing with security of network infrastructure. disk structures. the student will be able to select and configure a scalable IP address solution (including route summarization) for a branch office environment. Upon completion of this course. given a list of specifications. Given a set of WAN topologies and specifications. design a network infrastructure. STP. CCNP 3 introduces students to the deployment of state-ofthe-art campus LANs. the investigator’s office. configuration. design a basic security solution. as well as to maximize bandwidth utilization over the remote links. The emphasis is on understanding computer investigations. and develop a management and implementation strategy for networking. and challenges relevant to properly conducting a computer forensics investigation. troubleshooting methodologies and tools. digital evidence controls. the student will learn to design a Microsoft Windows 2008 network infrastructure. Successful completion of the CCNA certification exam will also be accepted as a prerequisite for this course) NETW-252 Network Troubleshooting/ CCNP (Cr4) (3:2) This course. Other topics covered include boot processes. and telecommuters. This course focuses on documenting and baselining a network. and reporting investigation results. At the conclusion of this course. Network . given a network specification. and the computer fraud and abuse act. is the third of four courses leading to the Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) designation. and configure access lists. The course also covers working with various operating systems. Within a given WAN topology. CCNP 4 teaches students how to troubleshoot network problems. CCNP 4: Network Troubleshooting. and implements quality of service capabilities to ensure that mission critical applications receive the required bandwidth within a given topology. Additionally. and use Cisco product features to troubleshoot device protocols and technologies. Students will develop skills with VLANs. and Layer 1 to 7 troubleshooting. campus LAN security and transparent LAN services. The student will understand wireless systems design and operational considerations from a security point of view. is the last of four courses leading to the Cisco Certified Professional (CCNP) certification. Cisco AVVID. and be ready to take the Implementing and Administering a Microsoft Windows 2008 Directory Services Infrastructure MCSE exam. This course requires three hours of lecture and additional independent lab as necessary per week. The student will learn how to build. At the conclusion of this course. IP routing protocols. The emphasis is on auditing tools. CCNP 3: Multilayer Switching. the student will earn 4 credits. being an expert witness. types of attack. the student will learn to design security for a Microsoft Windows 2008 network. (Prerequisite: NETW 194) NETW-196 MCSE – Designing a Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Active Directory and Network Infrastructure (Cr3) (3:0) In this course. authentication. the student will be able to identify the appropriate Cisco products for a given set of WAN technology requirements. wireless LAN security solutions and policy. data acquisition. This course requires 3 hours of lecture and additional independent lab time as necessary per week. (The Prerequisite for this course is a grade of “C” or higher in NETW 152 or a CCNA) NETW-235 Applied Wireless Security (Cr3) (3:0) The objective of this course is to provide a hands-on understanding of the technologies and challenges relevant to deploying (set-up. At the conclusion of this course. advanced. Macintosh. They also learn how to control access to the central site. the student assembles and configures Cisco equipment to establish appropriate WAN connections. including permanent or dialup access between a central site. and processing of crime and incident scenes. Upon completion of this course. multilayer-switched LANs. l General Education Course the student will implement solutions in a laboratory environment. laboratory and tools. branch office. (Prerequisite for this course is a grade of “C” or higher in NETW 152 or CCNA) NETW-225 Remote Access/CCNP (Cr4) (3:2) This course is designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in building Cisco Remote Access Networks. the student will earn three credits. QoS issues. while minimizing the amount of overhead traffic on each connection. The student will analyze business and technical requirements. a security solution for access between networks. DOS. the student will design and implement applicable access control measures to allow desired access into the network. The course focuses on the selection and implementation of the appropriate Cisco IOS services to build reliable. redundancy. technologies. The student will learn how to use and configure Cisco routers connected in local-area networks (LANs) and wide-area networks (WANs) typically found at medium to large network sites. (Prerequisite: NETW 195) NETW-215 Advanced Routing/CCNP (Cr4) (3:2) This course is designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience on advanced routing. encryption. network forensics. The course also covers legislation. He/she will select and implement the technologies necessary to redistribute between and to support multiple. At the conclusion of this course. scalable. design for WAN and Internet connectivity. given a network specification. the course maps to the objectives of the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS) certification.Course Descriptions 193 service location. the student will earn three credits. and Linux. enables protocols and technologies that allow traffic flow between multiple sites. inter-VLAN routing. configure and troubleshoot a remote access network to interconnect central sites to branch offices and home offices. VTP. (Prerequisite: NETW 193) NETW-195 MCSE – Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Network (Cr3) (3:0) In this course. the student will earn three credits. and installation) and securing wireless LANs. configure and test edge router connectivity (either single or multihomed connection) into BGP network. (Prerequisite: COMP 129 or instructor approval) NETW-251 Multilayer Switching/CCNP (Cr4) (3:2) This course. This course is useful for a variety of networking disciplines and will provide a foundation for courses dealing with security of network infrastructure. and be ready to take the Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows 2008 Network MCSE exam. and security for communication channels. and be ready to take the Designing a Microsoft Windows 2008 Network Infrastructure MCSE exam. recovering image files. The student will analyze business and technical requirements. (Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in NETW 107 and NETW 125 or instructor approval) NETW-236 Computer Forensics and Investigation (Cr3) (3:0) This course provides a hands-on understanding of the methods. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in NETW 152.

Emphasis will be placed on problemsolving. methods of achievement and plan for evaluation. use basic communication interventions and engage in strategies that will promote success in the program. social.194 Course Descriptions configuration examples will demonstrate management and troubleshooting techniques. ethical. PSYC 106 and NURS 160. NETW 225. (Prerequisites: NURS 161. professional and wellness topics will be integrated throughout the course. health assessment and the elements of reasoning used in critical thinking. geriatric and oncology clients. historical and research perspectives. oxygenation. (Prerequisites: NURS 162 and BIOL 213) NURS-262 Nursing and Human Needs IV (Cr6) (4:6) In Nursing 262. A range of topics is explored from philosophical. save. The student will create. economic. tissue perfusion and metabolism. operational analysis. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 111 and PSYC 106) NURS-161 Nursing and Human Needs (Cr7) (4:9) This Nursing Course focuses on the Human Needs Framework. beliefs and insights. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in NETW 215. (Prerequisites: Typing skills required. The influence of the family. cultural diversity and financial concerns on the delivery of community-based care is explored. (Prerequisite: NURS 262) NURS-295 Special Project . A critical thinking approach that incorporates the elements of reasoning and universal intellectual standards. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 213) NURS-163 Nursing and Human Needs in the Community (Cr2) (2:0) This course examines human needs in the community. and NETW 251. Problem-solving checklists and worksheets help the student organize and document troubleshooting steps. Windows skills essential) OADM-141 EXCEL for Windows (Cr4) (3:2) The student will develop the basic information processing skills and techniques required to use EXCEL for Windows software effectively for personal and business use. Significant time will be allocated for hands-on experience. and troubleshooting of Juniper Network routers. theoretical. communication techniques and teaching/learning interventions to care for adult. Health. tabulations and reports using the computer. familiarity with the command-line interface of a routing platform or UNIX system is helpful. static. (Prerequisite: NURS 161) NURS-165 (E) Issues in Nursing (Cr2) (2:0) This course introduces students to current issues in nursing and health care. Integration of files and multi-tasking activities in a networked environment will be emphasized. edit and print worksheets. Student will be introduced to Juniper Networks M-series and J-series Enterprise Routing platforms. the Multilink Point-to-Point Protocol (MLPPP) and Network Address Translation (NAT). Prerequisite or Corequisite: NETW 152 or instructor approval) medications. While not required. the Human Needs framework. NURS-261 Nursing and Human Needs III (Cr8) (4:12) In Nursing III. The nursing process will be introduced.) NETW-253 . the student will type straight copy at a minimum of 35 words per minute for five minutes. memos. Upon completion of the course. the varied roles and practice settings of the community-based nurse and the basic principles of epidemiology are discussed. OADM-105 Introduction to Computer Keyboarding (Cr1) (1:0) The student will develop basic techniques and skills required to use the alphanumeric keyboard of a computer efficiently. and OSPF routing. (Prerequisites: BIOL 111. BIOL 112 and PSYC 208. NOTE: This course is offered online only. achieving a minimum speed of 15 words a minute. health assessment and the elements of reasoning used in critical thinking. students use the Human Needs Framework to care for clients with alterations in nutrition. charts and databases in a multi-user network environment. Students will learn to calculate l General Education Course . At the conclusion of this course. The class also provides an overview of common services such as the Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP). understandings. students use the Human Needs Framework to integrate nursing management concepts and principles in planning the care of groups of clients in the acute care setting. The instructor will serve as a preceptor and consultant in guiding the student through the theoretical and laboratory components of the study plan. the student will earn 4 credits. (Prerequisite: Admission to the Nursing Program. (Prerequisite: NURS 261) NURS-263 Managing and Coordinating Nursing Care (Cr3)(1:6) In Managing and Coordinating Nursing Care. OADM-116 (t) Microsoft Office (Cr4)(4:0) The student will learn the basic terminology and operations of programs in the Microsoft Office software suite. configuration. Prerequisite is a basic understanding of the TCP/IP protocols. NURS-160 Introduction to Human Needs (Cr3) (2:3) The first course in the Nursing Program introduces the student to the practice of professional nursing. (Prerequisite: NETW 151 or instructor approval. absorption. (Prerequisite: Computer and keyboarding skills essential) Nursing NURS-106 Introduction to Associate Degree Nursing (Cr3) (3:0) This prenursing course introduces the student to the realm of Associate Degree nursing. The needs of the childbearing and child caring family and issues of human sexuality are also addressed. The student uses caring interventions.the student uses the Human Needs Framework to care for individuals undergoing surgery and for those with alterations in mobility. elimination. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 112 and PSYC 208) NURS-162 Nursing and Human Needs II (Cr8) (4:12) In Nursing 162.Juniper Network Routers (Cr3) (3:0) This course focuses on installation. as well as therapeutic communication skills and basic physical assessment techniques. focuses the student on generating new thoughts. The student and the instructor will complete a contract which will include a set of objectives. Office Administration OADM-101 Computer Keyboarding (Cr3) (3:0) The student will master the alphanumeric keyboard and will key basic letters. Real-world configuration and operational monitoring case studies are provided fro general router configuration and for RIP. sensation and perception. the student uses the Human Needs Framework to care for individuals with alterations in mental health. In addition. Medical terminology will also be integrated. Students will configure routers using the J-Web graphical user interface (GUI) and the JUNOS software command-line interface (CLI).Nursing (Cr1-6) The student will prepare an individualized plan of study in behavioral terms. critical thinking and application – those concepts essential to the role of the Associate Degree Nurse.

ethical and professional responsibilities. presentation and advocacy skills. The course will provide a working knowledge of and an understanding of legal research materials. and tasks essential to the role of the paralegal in assisting the attorney and the client in the civil litigation process. civil litigation support work. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. query and maintain an Access database with the use of tables. liens. Course curriculum includes units on the New Jersey Rules of Professional Conduct. tools and methods. forms and reports. giving legal advice. in various types of legal settings. It also provides an introduction to ethical and professional responsibilities. This course is designed to give an overview of the law. legal briefs and legal memoranda. setting fees. This course is designed to give an overview of the law. and annulment proceedings. (Prerequisite: PLGL 105 or instructor’s approval) PLGL-206 Torts (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to give an overview of Tort law in the traditional areas of Intentional. and 6) other Paralegal Studies PLGL-105 Introduction to Law and Litigation (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to give an overview of the law. mortgage financing. domestic violence and adoption. participate in programs on campus. absent the paralegal or legal assistant.S. absent the supervision of a lawyer. and they will have a knowledge of the ethical ramifications of their conduct and work as a legal assistant. (Prerequisites or Corequisites: ENGL 121 and PLGL 105) PLGL-125 Real Property Transactions (Cr3) (3:0) This course is an introduction to Real Estate Law. and they will be able to prepare all forms and pleadings necessary for divorce. edit. and complete an internship workbook based on the work experience gained. contracts. property settlement agreements. perform the necessary research and communicate their findings in the proper written format. The students will be able to define and differentiate between the various grounds for divorce and annulment. Students will learn how the laws governing family situations are applied. Constitution and Constitutional Law. child custody. Engaging in the unauthorized practice of law is a crime in the State of New Jersey. CD ROM products and Internet resources. rules of procedure. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. (Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and Career Services Representative) inception of the real estate transaction to its closing. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. the ABA Model Code. (Prerequisite: Basic computer experience) OADM-299 Business Technology System Internship (Cr1-3) The student will work in a job related to his/her program. orders to show cause. The preparation will consist of researching the legal questions either individually or in two member teams and preparing an appellate brief. financing. which for the most part requires sufficient knowledge of legal concepts and which. It is not intended to be a course which teaches individuals to litigate their own cases or assist others in litigation. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. alimony. with the eventual winning team meeting in the competition finals. under the direction and supervision of a lawyer. and will learn to research and write case briefs. (Prerequisite: PLGL 105 or instructor’s approval) PLGL-207 Moot Court (Cr4) (4:0) The Court Competition will be a combination of in-class study and an independent study. child support. The Moot Trial will be conducted as if it were a real appellate trial with judges. etc. which is essential to the role of the paralegal in understanding the law and in assisting the attorney in many legal matters. would be performed by a lawyer. the NALA Code of Ethics. 3) word processing. principles of land ownership. court systems and rules of legal procedure. PLGL-106 Legal Research and Writing (Cr4) (4:0) This course is an introduction to legal research and writing. 4) electronic filing of litigation documents. (Prerequisite: PLGL 106 or approval of instructor) PLGL-210 (t) Computer Applications in Law (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to familiarize paralegals with the various use of computers and technology in a law office. ethical and professional responsibilities and tasks essential to the role of the paralegal in assisting the attorney in the family law litigation process. rules of procedure. appearing in court. with emphasis on the role of the paralegal and the lawyer. the student will have achieved a survey of basic real estate law concepts to provide a fundamental understanding of real estate law that is necessary to proceed with real estate practice as a paralegal. and commonly employed defenses. Topics of study include property rights. 2) software applications in document preparation. It also covers ethical and professional responsibilities and tasks essential to the roles of the participants in the legal process. and tasks essential to the role of the paralegal in assisting the attorney in the civil litigation process arising out of a cause of action in Tort. which will be 75% of the grade. The students will be developing research skills and through their participation in the trial. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: PLGL 105) PLGL-145 Professional Standards in Ethics for Legal Assistants (Cr3) (3:0) Students will learn professional responsibilities. 5) email. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: PLGL 105) PLGL-126 Constitutional Law (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to give an overview of the U. and will be able to draft real estate documents from the l General Education Course . Negligent and Strict Liability Torts. This includes: 1) computerized legal and factual research using online for fee services (Westlaw and/or Lexis). The content of the course covers dissolution. settlement concepts and other property concepts. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. The course will provide the student with the knowledge and skills needed to create basic legal research strategies. Students will learn to develop research and writing strategies. PLGL-135 Family Law (Cr3) (3:0) The purpose of the Family Law Course is to give legal assistants an understanding of domestic relations law. A paralegal/legal assistant may not engage in the practice of law by accepting cases. file management and law office management. The student will research a factual situation and prepare for an appellate trial. recording. conveyance. (Prerequisite or Corequisite: PLGL 105) PLGL-205 Litigation Assistance Procedures (Cr3) (3:0) The purpose of this course is to train paralegals/ legal assistants to perform.Course Descriptions 195 OADM-185 Microsoft Access Database (Cr3) (3:0) The student will learn the fundamental concepts and procedures needed to create. sale. The research teams will then compete against each other in a moot court competition (25% of grade). Upon completion of the course. etc. deeds.

and complete federal estate. It looks at the role of the artist. A paralegal/ legal assistant may not engage in the practice of law by accepting cases. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. criminal litigation support work. under the direction and supervision of a lawyer. rules of procedure. ethical and professional responsibilities. A paralegal/legal assistant may not engage in the practice of law by accepting cases.S. It is not intended to be a course which teaches individuals to litigate their own workers’ compensation cases. This course is designed to give an overview of the law. rules of procedure. gift tax and state inheritance tax returns. ethical and professional responsibilities. under the direction and supervision of a lawyer. and the client in the formation. scanners. estates and probate process. setting fees. appearing in court. This course is designed to give an overview of the law. absent the paralegal or legal assistant. would be performed by a lawyer. which for the most part requires sufficient knowledge of legal concepts and which. limited partnerships. limited liability companies (LLC’s). “Elder Law” support work.” NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. rules of procedure. NOTE: This course is offered in the Summer term. It is not designed to prepare paralegals to act as “Representatives” of claimants pursuant to Title 42. (Prerequisite: PLGL 105 and PLGL 225 or instructor approval) PLGL-245 Introduction to Social Security Disability (Cr1) (1:0) The purpose of this course is to train paralegals/legal assistants to perform. and tasks essential to the role of the paralegal in assisting the attorney. The course is designed to give an overview of the law. etc. or assist others in such litigation. “C” Corporations and “S” Corporations. Section 406(a)(1) of the U. and living wills following applicable laws and procedures. rules of procedure. bankruptcy support work. It is not intended l General Education Course to be a course which teaches individuals to prepare and file their own bankruptcy petitions or assist others in filing such petitions. ethical and professional responsibilities. which for the most part requires sufficient knowledge of legal concepts and which. This course is designed to give an overview of the law. etc. and tasks essential to the role of the paralegal in assisting the attorney in bankruptcy matters. (Prerequisite: PLGL 105 or instructor’s approval). attorney and others involved in this area. It is not intended to be a course which teaches individuals to prepare and file their own Social Security Disability claims or appeals. setting fees. appearing in court. absent the paralegal or legal assistant. Social Security Disability claims and appeals support work. (Prerequisite: PLGL-105 or instructor’s approval) . absent the paralegal or legal assistant. which. rules of procedure. Engaging in the unauthorized practice of law is a criminal offense in the State of New Jersey. giving legal advice. and tasks essential to the role of the paralegal in assisting the attorney in the Social Security Disability claim and appeals process. (Prerequisite: PLGL 105 or instructor’s approval) PLGL-227 Introduction to Bankruptcy (Cr1) (1:0) The purpose of this course is to train paralegals/legal assistants to perform. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. It is not designed to prepare paralegals to act as Bankruptcy Trustees. would be performed by a lawyer. (Prerequisite: PLGL 105 or instructor’s approval) PLGL-225 Wills. This course is designed to give an overview of the law. ethical and professional responsibilities and tasks essential to the role of the paralegal in assisting the attorney in the wills. which for the most part requires sufficient knowledge of legal concepts and which. appearing in court. setting fees. absent the paralegal or legal assistant.196 Course Descriptions law office technology such as fax machines. under the direction and supervision of a lawyer. Engaging in the unauthorized practice of law is a criminal offense in the State of New Jersey. workers’ compensation litigation support work. and tasks essential to the role of the paralegal in assisting the attorney in the workers’ compensation litigation process. manager. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. appearing in court. (Prerequisite: PLGL 105 or instructor’s approval) PLGL-228 Introduction to Workers’ Compensation (Cr1) (1:0) The purpose of this course is to train paralegals/legal assistants to perform. ethical and professional responsibilities. would be performed by a lawyer. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term . etc. giving legal advice. etc. PLGL-237 Elder Law (Cr3) (3:0) The purpose of this course is to train paralegals/ legal assistants to perform. ethical and professional responsibilities. (Prerequisite: PLGL 105 or instructor’s approval) PLGL-226 Corporate Law Procedure (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to give an overview of the law. limited liability partnerships (LLP’s). giving legal advice. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Fall term. etc. general partnerships. under the direction and supervision of a lawyer. rules of procedure. Students will be able to draft wills. It is not intended to be a course which teaches individuals to plan or handle their own affairs involving “Elder Law” issues. giving legal advice. or to assist others in filing such claims or appeals. and tasks essential to the role of the paralegal in assisting the attorney and the client in the criminal litigation process. and tasks essential to the role of the paralegal in assisting the attorney in matters relating to what has become known as “Elder Law. setting fees. A paralegal/legal assistant may not engage in the practice of law by accepting cases. PLGL-235 Entertainment Law I (Cr3) (3:0) This course deals with entertainment law with particular attention devoted to the music and recording industry and contract law. A paralegal/ legal assistant may not engage in the practice of law by accepting cases. Code. under the direction and supervision of a lawyer. ethical and professional responsibilities. (Prerequisites: PLGL 105 and PLGL 106) PLGL-215 Criminal Procedure (Cr3) (3:0) The purpose of this course is to train paralegals/legal assistants to perform. operation and dissolution of the following types of business entities: sole proprietorships. Engaging in the unauthorized practice of law is a criminal offense in the State of New Jersey. Estates and Probate (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to give an overview of the law. They will be able to set up various trusts and follow procedures for obtaining life insurance benefits. absent the paralegal or legal assistant. It is not designed to teach document preparation in the absence of a supervising lawyer. which for the most part requires sufficient knowledge of legal concepts and which. or to assist others in planning or handling their affairs in these matters. would be performed by a lawyer. would be performed by a lawyer. Engaging in the unauthorized practice of law is a criminal offense in the State of New Jersey.

(Prerequisites: 30 credits to include 16 credits of the required career studies courses: PLGL 105. A single lens digital reflex camera is necessary. imaging software. Christianity and Islam. film processing and printing. (Prerequisites: PHTY 105. PHTY 111 and PHTY 112) PHTY-225 Digital Photography II (Cr3) (2:2) Students will continue to improve and refine their digital image making technique while exploring the creative possibilities of current electronic image making. Previous experience with photography and the computer is beneficial but not required. This is not a darkroom course. Students will evaluate claims. Minimum four to six hours of additional lab time each week will be necessary to complete the goals of the course. negative printing and hand coloring to solve thought-provoking photographic problems. MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation) l PHIL-227 (HU) (E) Introduction to Ethics (Cr3) (3:0) Students will become familiar with many approaches to deciding what is “right” and “wrong” in human behavior.g.Course Descriptions 197 PLGL-295 Special Project – Paralegal Studies (Cr1-4) Students will work independently on legal problems not suitable to one of the other Paralegal Studies courses. Students must provide a Digital SLR camera. Taoism. Environmental Ethics. business. meaning and purpose. PHTY-212 Photography II (Cr3) (2:2) Students will continue to improve on basic black and white photographic skills while learning some new photographic techniques. abortion. Among the religions to be studied are the Eastern religions of Hinduism. while exploring the possibilities of black and white photography as a medium of visual communication and personal expression. (Certain sections of the course will be designated to focus on questions within one particular area. medical practice. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) l PHIL-226 (HU) Logic (Cr3) (3:0) Students will learn to develop methods of correct reasoning and ways of avoiding formal and informal fallacies. Additional expenses for textbook.. Business Ethics. the student will develop an understanding of the evolution of photography and how photography can be a medium of documentation. including the nature of self. and research. sexual behavior. with the extent and quality of the project and report to be previously agreed upon by the instructor and the student. including view camera Philosophy l PHIL-105 (HU) (E) Practical Reasoning (Cr3) (3:0) The focus of this course is the development of students analytic skills. Through lectures. Emphasis will be given to clarifying students’ own thinking on these issues through reading. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of words. (Prerequisite: MATH 012. (Prerequisites: 15 credits of Paralegal course work including PLGL 106) PLGL-299 Paralegal Internship (Cr3) Students will serve for a specified number of hours in actual paralegal employment and submit an internship log of the experience. students will explore the possibilities of this medium for visual communication and personal expression. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) PHIL-295 Special Project — Philosophy. solarization. etc. The number of credits will be determined by the nature of the subject matter. See the Master Schedule for designated topics). e.g. A grade of “C” or higher is required in each career study course. (Prerequisite: READ 092. PHTY-111 Photography I (Cr3) (2:2) Students develop a basic understanding of the camera. Approval of Program Director and Career Services Representative) l PHIL-225 (HU) (CG) Comparative Religion (Cr3) (3:0) Students will explore the ideas. (Prerequisite: PHTY 120) PHTY-235 Large Format Photography (Cr3) (2:2) The student will develop studio and field skills. the nature of the universe. Nursing Ethics. e. statements and arguments using traditional logic. (Prerequisite: READ 092. knowledge and truth. storage media. (Prerequisite: READ 092. The course will explore the use of the digital camera. group discussions. multiple exposure. death and afterlife. storage mediums and printing paper will be incurred. viewing them comparatively in the search for common truths and principles. Additional lab time of four to six hours per week is required. reflection and discussion. PLGL 106. morality. (Prerequisite: Any philosophy course or permission of the instructor. (Prerequisite: PHTY 111) PHTY-216 Portfolio Development (Cr3) (2:2) The student will continue the evolution of a personal approach to photography through individual assignments leading to the development of a portfolio. A written report will be submitted. (Cr1-6) (Prerequisite: PHIL 115 or instructor’s approval) and personal expression. identify examples of pseudo-reasoning and use inductive generalizations. assumptions and values of the religions of the world. communication . each intended to provide a framework for moral decision-making. PLGL 145. Emphasis will be on image content and creative use of the medium. Students must provide a manually operated 35 mm camera. While establishing technical skills. The second part of the course involves discussion of many controversial issues such as the taking of human life. distinguish arguments from explanations.) l General Education Course Photography l PHTY-105 (HU) The History and Aesthetics of Photography (Cr3) (3:0) This course is an introductory survey of the history and aesthetics of photography from the early years of investigation to the present. The course begins with a look at several ethical theories. and the Western religions of Judaism. Topics will change each semester and students can re-register for the course whenever a new topic is discussed. Problem-solving will be the primary mode of learning. PLGL 205 and PLGL 210. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) l PHIL-115 (HU) (E) Introduction to Philosophy (Cr3) (3:0) Students investigate key issues in philosophy. PHTY-120 Digital Photography I (Cr3) (2:2) Students will develop a basic understanding of the digital camera and current electronic imaging technology.. Confucianism and Buddhism. (Prerequisite: READ 092. and printing techniques. freedom and determinism. media presentations. the existence of God. museum/gallery visits. READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) PHIL-215 Topics in Philosophy (Cr1-3) (1-3:0) A more in-depth analysis of a specific philosophical topic will be undertaken in this course.

political parties. The goal of this course is a general understanding of the physical principles in everyday life with emphasis of how physicists approach the problem of describing nature in terms of experimental tests of physical theories. student presentations and video offerings. and human rights. and sound. and modern physics. dynamics. sovereignty. POLI-225 International Relations (Cr3) (3:0) In this course students will be exposed to various theories of international relations. planets. examine the role of international law. investigate the causes of war. l POLI-115 (SS) State. The student will apply these skills to the solution of problems involving basic concepts of vectors. France. work and energy. atomic nature of matter and elementary nuclear and particle physics. County. electricity and magnetism. student presentations and video offerings. education. moons. law enforcement. races. l POLI-105 (SS) American National Government (Cr3) (3:0) Students in . county and local governments within the United States--though particular attention is given to these themes as they apply in New Jersey. the sun. rotational mechanics. the nation. kinematics. molecular and thermal properties of matter. energy. and minor bodies of our solar system. Countries to be analyzed include the United Kingdom. wave motion. welfare. POLI-227 Comparative Politics (Cr3) (3:0) In this course students will be exposed to various theories of comparative politics. environment. static’s. sound and light waves. There are no college-level pre-requisites. exposure and development controls and basic lighting. READ 092 or READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading. and power. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 152) l PHYS-112 (SC) General Physics II (NonCalculus) (Cr4) (3:2) The student will apply the skills developed in PHYS 111 to the solution of problems involving basic concepts of electrostatics. and examine the political. They will solve problems related to harmonic motion. the atomic structure of matter. and less developed nations. they must have successfully completed all previous coursework in the subject area. health. magnetism. India. light. magnetic induction. mechanical. Students will read from a wide variety of sources as they learn more about these topics and their potential impacts on the international community. environment. health. energy. civil liberties. heat and thermodynamics. static’s. Topics include the economy. elementary quantum theory. learn about concepts like the state. magnetism. and the processes by which it formed. Course activities include use of teacher and guest lectures. education. current and former communist regimes. Russia. civil rights. (Prerequisites: PHTY 111 and PHTY 112. Iran and South Africa. and wave motion and sound. NOTE: This course is offered only in the Spring term. momentum. and Local Government (Cr3) (3:0) The student will study the structure and philosophy of state. AC circuits. (Prerequisite: MATH 021 or MATH 025 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in algebra. small group discussion. welfare. momentum. special relativity. globalization of the economy. foreign policy and political parties. Germany. Course activities include the use of teacher and guest lectures. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in PHYS 122) American National Government study the structure and philosophy of the United States government. small group discussion. terrorism. Aesthetic concerns and the development of personal style will be stressed. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in PHYS 111) l PHYS-121 (SC) General Physics I (Cr4) (3:2) The student will employ calculus in the development of the basic concepts of vectors. international organizations and diplomacy in world politics. work and energy. The topics to be examined include armed conflicts between and within countries. ideology. Topics covered include the historical foundations of astronomy. and explore such issues as arms. European Union. learn about comparative research methods. and ENGL 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in writing) l PHYS-111 (SC) General Physics I (NonCalculus) (Cr4) (3:2) The student will develop skills in laboratory and problemsolving techniques as they relate to the physical sciences and modern technology. DC circuits. POLI-109 Current Global Topics (Cr3) (3:0) This course introduces students to a diverse range of international topics that the community of nation-states is currently facing. student presentations and video offerings. Mexico. and must meet with the appropriate instructor for approval before registering. weapons of mass destruction. law. Course activities include the use of teacher and guest lectures. ethnic strife. DC electricity. the nation-state. China. dynamics. rotational mechanics. and world population growth. disarmament. kinematics. the nation-state. economic and governance systems of countries from around the world including: industrialized democracies. civil rights and civil liberties. light and optics. magnetic induction. including themes of national economy. thermodynamics. l General Education Course Political Science l POLI-101 (SS) Introduction to Political Science (Cr3) (3:0) As an introductory course in Political Science. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in PHYS 121 and MATH 172 or permission of the Engineering Department) l PHYS-223 (SC) General Physics III (Cr4) (3:2) Students will relate classical and relativistic mechanics in the investigation of contemporary physics. Physics l PHYS-106 (SC) Astronomy (Cr3) (3:0) This introductory astronomy course is for college students who are curious about the universe. small group discussion. Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHTY 105) PHTY-295 Special Project — Photography (Cr1-6) Students must present a proposal for a project of advanced study. and modern physics. (Prerequisites: MATH 015 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in computation.198 Course Descriptions techniques. natural resource utilization. interest groups and political parties. the tools and techniques used by modern astronomers. students examine basic concepts of democracy and dictatorship. (Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or higher in MATH 171 or permission of the Engineering Department) l PHYS-122 (SC) General Physics II (Cr4) (3:2) The student will employ calculus in the development of the basic concepts of electrostatics. and READ 095 or satisfactory completion of the College’s basic skills requirement in reading) l PHYS-108 (SC) Physics in Life (Cr4) (3:2) This is a general education lab science course for non-science majors. Also. molecular and thermal properties of matter. The course surveys motion and Newton’s laws.

The Family Development Credential is a professional training and credentialing program for family workers. health. environment. Students are introduced to the roles of Human Service Professional (HSP) in a variety of helping systems where they assist a wide array of clients in need. The topic may deal with the political dimension of such themes as economy. and strength-based assessment in learning how to interact with families in a productive manner. Students are expected to learn how to effectively communicate with families for the purpose of helping them access their adaptive potentials in dealing with day-today stressors and other life problems. introductory course in addiction studies. and community so as to show the challenges to teaching effective problem solving skills and wellness. energy. Students will be required to participate in class field trips and begin the first phase of their independent fieldwork which will require 20 hours of field experience outside of lecture. their family system. To earn the credential. or the connections and interactions between environmental concerns and the political process. Students will be exposed to a number of environmental problems and the political and legislative responses government has taken to address those problems. PSYC-127 Evaluation and Diagnosis of the Addicted Client (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental skills needed for evaluating clients who may or may not have substance abuse as a primary referral issue. Students will explore first-hand the role of exercise in improving cardiovascular functioning. This course will focus primarily on environmental politics and policy in the USA. An introduction to the primary method of treatment used by HSP is applied to the individual client. The general thrust of the credential and this course is the development of skills needed to ascertain and nurture the strengths of families. The course is primarily oriented toward helping students understand the fundamentals of addictive behavior and mental process. the student should reach a decision as to whether or not to work in the field upon graduation from college. After gaining a first-hand experience as to how that agency operates and the various duties involved in working within that agency. Students will gain the ability to examine these subjects from a critical as well as diverse point of view. emotion. Note: This course is offered only in the Spring term. motivation. Note: This course is offered only in the Fall term. PSYC-111 Introduction to Human Services (Cr3) (3:0) This course provides new students with an introduction to the historical perspective of the human services movement. especially as regards (a) the biomedical forces integral to chemical dependency (b) drug and alcohol education and awareness (c) the recovery process (d) personal wellness (e) professional consultation and (f) medical issues related to chemical abuse. They will complete exercises covering the relevant areas: social and interpersonal behavior. and trends in addiction as they relate to proper assessment and documentation for individuals suffering from addictions (especially addictions to drugs. The ultimate goal is to teach students how to foster the autonomy and well-being of families. This class emphasizes the value of diversity. and reliable methods for coping with stress. POLI-295 Special Project — Political Science (Cr1-3) Students will pursue and complete one individualized. (Prerequisite: Approval of instructor) POLI-299 Political Science Internship (Cr3) The student will serve as an intern/ observer with a municipal. county or state agency. Human Services models are extensively covered in conjunction with other closely associated helping models. concepts. Service-learning is an option. personality theories and the psychotherapies. Students will also learn how to monitor blood pressure and develop the understanding of the relationship between stress and hypertension. psychological disorders. Students will gain the ability to analyze a variety of l General Education Course . education or human services. l PSYC-106 (SS) Introduction to Psychology II (Cr3) (3:0) Students will demonstrate an understanding of Psychology as an applied science. To earn the credential. PSYC-107 Personality and Adjustment (Cr3) (3:0) This course is designed to help students increase their self-knowledge through in-depth studies of three theoretical views of man. scientific method.Course Descriptions 199 POLI-228 Environmental Politics and Policy (Cr3) (3:0) This course will introduce students to the field of environmental politics and policy. (Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and Career Services Representative) theoretical perspectives from critical and diverse points of view while applying them to problems of daily living. They will complete exercises covering fundamental areas of the discipline: history of psychology. PSYC-125 Introduction to Addiction Studies (Cr3) (3:0) This course is a general. students must successfully complete both Family Development courses and work with a portfolio advisor to document their ability to practice the skills they learned in class. The general thrust of the credential and this course is the development of skills needed to ascertain and nurture the strengths of families. cultural and individual differences are systematically explored. Service-learning is an option. self-care. Speakers will visit the classroom to discuss Marriage/Divorce. the roles of gender. Addiction and Death/Dying as part of an examination of crisis which typically occur in adulthood and later years. (Prerequisite: PSYC 125) PSYC-131 Empowerment Skills Worker I (Cr3) (3:0) This class is the first of two classes required for students to earn a Family Development Credential in New Jersey. Emphasis is also placed on how HSPs work within different social and helping networks while learning the importance of their professional and ethical obligations set out by the National Organization of Human Services. Students will explore the basic issues. sensation and perception. alcohol and/or gambling). communications skills. such as HIV and AIDS. IQ and personality testing. students must successfully complete both Family Development courses and work with a portfolio advisor to document their ability to practice the skills they learned in class. i