Saudi Electricity Company

Distribution Planning Standard
DPS








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Distribution Planning Standard
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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page #

TABLE OF CONTENTS 01

1 DISTRIBUTION PLANNING CRITERIA 05

1.1 Introduction 05

1.2 Definitions 05

1.3 General Principles 14

1.4 Frequency 15

1.5 Harmonics 15

1.6 Phase Unbalance 15

1.7 Power Factor 16

1.8 Voltage Fluctuation 16

1.9 Standard Distribution Voltage 16

1.10 Voltage Drop 17

1.11 Voltage Regulation 19

1.12 Standard Loading Conditions 20





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2 Medium Voltage Planning Criteria 21

2.1 Introduction 21

2.2 Design of M. V. Network 22

2.2.1 Contingency plan Criteria 22

2.2.2 Grid Station Criteria 28

2.2.3 Feeders Configuration 28

2.2.4 Feeders Loading 31

2.2.5 Normal Open Point 31

2.3 Supply to rural Area 33

2.4 Supply to Bulk Customer 33

2.4.1 Estimation of the load 34

2.4.2 Voltage Drop Calculation 35

2.5 Mode of supply 36

2.5.1 Bulk LV customers: 36

2.5.2 Bulk MV customers: 36







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3 LOW VOLTAGE PLANNING CRITERIA. 37

3.1 Introduction 37

3.2 Customer Classification 37

3.3 Estimation of Customer Load 38

3.4 Load Estimation Procedures 38

3.5 Low Voltage Network Design 42

3.5.1 Underground Network Configuration 42

3.5.2 Overhead Line Network Configuration 44

3.6 Calculation Of Voltage Drop (V.D.) 45

3.7 Distribution Substation 47

3.7.1 Distribution Substation Type 47

3.7.2 Loading of Distribution Substations 48

3.7.3 Sites of Distribution Substation 48

3.7.4 Distribution Cabinet 50

3.8 Low Voltage Cables/Conductors 50

3.9 Reinforcement Of Low Voltage Network 51

3.10 New Plot Plan 51



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4 IMPROVEMENT OF THE NETWORK PERFORMANCE 52

4.1 Introduction 52

4.2 Short Circuit Performance 52

4.3 Voltage Regulator Placement 54

4.4 Capacitor Placement 61

4.5 Motor Starting – Voltage Dip 70

4.6 Auto – Reclosers 76

4.7 Loss Evaluation 80


APPENDIX A

APPENDIX B

APPENDIX C

APPENDIX D









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1 DISTRIBUTION PLANNING CRITERIA


1.1 Introduction

The objective of Power Distribution System is to deliver the Electrical power
to Customers in safe, reliable and most economical way. This means that a
Customer receives a supply of Electrical power required by him at the time
and place at which he can use it. Several parameters of an Electricity supply
such as frequency, continuity of supply, voltage level, etc. should be within
allowable limits to ensure that the Customer obtains satisfactory performance
for his electrical equipment while ensuring that the demands of the
Customers continue to be met, the capital and operating costs of doing so
should be reduced minimum as possible.

The “Distribution Planning Criteria” has been written to serve as a guideline
to the Planning Engineers in the Saudi Electricity Company for the Planning
of Distribution Network.


1.2 Definitions


1.2.1 Ambient Temperature:

The surrounding temperature (in the absence of the equipment) of the
immediate environment in which equipment is installed. This temperature
normally varies. A derived constant value is taken for the purposes of
designing or rating equipment.

1.2.2 Bulk Supply Point:

An in feed point from higher to a lower voltage level on the transmission
system.




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1.2.3 Customer:

Any entity that purchases electrical power from a power utility, where each
kwh meter represents customer.

1.2.4 Customer Interface:

The point at which a customer's load is connected to the SEC's power
system. This shall normally be taken as the load side of the customer
metering installation. The SEC shall normally be responsible for operating
and maintaining all equipment on the supply of this interface. The
customer shall be responsible for all equipment on the load side of this
interface.

1.2.5 Continuity:

A measure of the availability of Power Supply, to a Customer over a period
of time. This is generally measured, as the length of time supply is un-
available in a year.

1.2.6 Coincidence Factor:

The ratio of the maximum total demand of a group of customers to the sum
of the maximum power demand of individual customers comprising the
group both taken at the same point of supply for the same time, it is
reciprocal of diversity factor.

1.2.7 Connected Load:

The sum of the nameplate ratings of all present and future electrical
equipment installed by a customer. Connected load is measured in Volt-
Amperes (VA).

1.2.8 Demand Load:

It is the maximum load drawn from the power system by a customer at the
customer’s interface (either estimated or measured)


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1.2.9 Distribution System:

The aggregate of electrical equipment and facilities used to transfer
electrical power to the Customer. Distribution Systems typically operate at
voltages in the medium and low voltage ranges.

1.2.10 Effectively Earthed System:

A Power System in which the Neutral is connected to Earth either directly
or through a Neutral Resistor.

1.2.11 Even Harmonics:

Harmonic quantities, at even multiples of the fundamental Frequency.

1.2.12 Extra High Voltage (EHV):

A class of maximum system voltages greater than 242 kV, but less than
1000 kV.

1.2.13 Fault Outage:

A loss of supply to a Customer due to some un-planned event in the
Power System.

1.2.14 Flicker:

Periodic fluctuations in voltage, at fluctuation frequencies below the
fundamental frequency. These are generally expressed as percentage
variations, relative to the fundamental voltage.

1.2.15 Frequency:

The rate of oscillation of the AC supply. This is generally expressed as a
frequency range, in terms of a nominal frequency in Hz (cycles per
second), with plus and minus percentage limits.




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1.2.16 Fundamental Frequency:

The operating or system frequency of the Power System. Parameters
whose frequency is the same as the fundamental frequency are referred to
as fundamental parameters.

1.2.17 Harmonic Distortion:

The measure of a harmonic impressed on some fundamental quantity
which usually refers to voltage. This is generally expressed as the ratio of
the magnitude of the relevant harmonic, to the fundamental value.

1.2.18 Harmonics:

Parameters which vary at integer multiples of the nominal frequency of the
Power System. The magnitudes of these quantities are generally
expressed as percentage values of the fundamental parameter.


1.2.19 Highest Voltage:

The highest effective value of voltage, which occurs under normal
operating conditions at any time and at any point on the System. The term
does not include transient voltages due to fault or switching.

1.2.20 High Voltage (HV):

A class of nominal system voltages of 100 kV or greater, but equal to or
less than 230 kV.

1.2.21 Lateral Feeder:

A branch circuit off a primary feeder used to distribute Power from the
primary feeder.

1.2.22 Load (Customer):

The aggregate of all electrical equipment by which a Customer draws
electrical power from the power system.

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1.2.23 Loss Load Factor:

The ratio between average and peak losses on an element of the power
system.

1.2.24 Low Voltage (LV):

A class of nominal system voltages of 1000 Volts or less.

1.2.25 Medium Voltage (MV):

A class of nominal system voltages greater than 1000 Volts but less than
100 kV.

1.2.26 Negative Sequence Voltage:

A set of symmetrical phase voltages (of equal magnitude and 120º phase
angle) having the opposite phase sequence to that of the source. The
term negative sequence may also be applied, in the same sense, to AC
currents, impedances, etc.

1.2.27 Network:

The aggregate of Cable and or overhead line and associated equipment,
used to transport electrical power between Substations or between
Substations and Customer loads.

1.2.28 Nominal Voltage:

The voltage value, by which a system is designated and to which certain
operating characteristics of the system are related.


1.2.29 Odd Harmonics:

Harmonic quantities, at odd multiples of the fundamental frequency.



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1.2.30 Outage:

Any loss of supply to a Customer.

1.2.31 Parameter:

A quantity of value describing some aspect of the electrical system or the
process of power supply. Typical parameters are voltage, frequency, short
circuit levels, continuity, etc.

1.2.32 Phase Un-Balance:

A measure of asymmetry between phase parameters in terms of
magnitude, phase angle or both. This is generally expressed as a ratio of
negative and or zero sequence values to the positive sequence value.

1.2.33 Positive Sequence Voltage:

A set of symmetrical phase voltages (of equal magnitude and 120º phase
angle) having the same phase sequence as the source. The term positive
sequence may also be applied, in the same sense, to AC currents,
impedances, etc.

1.2.34 Power:

The rate (in kilowatts) of generating, transferring or using energy.

1.2.35 Power (Active):

The product of R.M.S value of the voltage and R.M.S value of the in-phase
component of the current. It is usually given in (K.W).

1.2.36 Power (Apparent):

The product of R.M.S value of the voltage and R.M.S value of the current.
It is usually given in (K.V.A).




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1.2.37 Power Factor:

The ratio of active power to apparent power.

1.2.38 Power System:

The aggregate of all electrical equipment used to supply electrical power to
a Customer, up to the Customer interface.

1.2.39 Power Utility:

Any entity that generates and supplies electrical power for sale to
Customers.

1.2.40 Primary Feeder:

A medium voltage circuit used to distribute Power from a Substation.

1.2.41 Rural:

A rural area shall be interpreted as any location outside an urban area.

1.2.42 Secondary Feeder:

A LV circuit used to distribute Power from a Distribution Substation.

1.2.43 Service Line:

The portion of a Utility Power System, nearest the Customer, dedicated to
supplying power to an individual Customer.

1.2.44 Service Voltage:

The voltage value at the Customer's interface, declared by the Power
Utility. This is generally expressed as a voltage range, in terms of a
nominal voltage with plus and minus percentage variations.




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1.2.45 Substation:

The aggregate of electrical equipment and facilities, by which electrical
power is transformed in bulk from one voltage to another.

1.2.46 System Voltage:

A value of voltage used within the Utilities Power System. It is generally
expressed as a nominal voltage with an upper limit only. This upper limit
defines the rated voltage for equipment.

1.2.47 Total Harmonic Distortion:

Total Harmonic Distortion is the aggregate of the harmonic distortions at all
harmonic frequencies. This is expressed as the root mean square value of
harmonic distortions, at all harmonic frequencies.

1.2.48 Transmission System:

The aggregate of electrical equipment and facilities used to transfer
electrical power, in bulk, between sources (generation) and the Distribution
System. Transmission Systems typically operate at voltages in the high
voltage range.

1.2.49 Urban:

For Power supply purposes an urban area shall be interpreted as any
town or city.

1.2.50 Utilization Voltage:

The voltage value at the terminals of utilization equipment, for example,
domestic appliances. It is generally expressed as a voltage range, in
terms of a nominal voltage with plus and minus percentage variations.

1.2.51 Voltage:

The root mean square (rms) value of power frequency voltage, on a three-
phase alternating current electrical system. This is measured between
phases, unless otherwise indicated.


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1.2.52 Voltage Dip:

Individual variations in voltage, typically caused by network switching,
motor starting, etc. These are generally expressed as percentage
variations, relative to the fundamental voltage.

1.2.53 Voltage Drop:

The difference in voltage between one point in a power system and
another, typically between the supply substation bus and the extremities of
a network. This is generally expressed as a percentage of the nominal
voltage.

1.2.54 Voltage Limits:

The voltage values, which define the extremities of a voltage range. These
are generally expressed as plus and minus percentage variations from the
nominal value.

1.2.55 Voltage Range:

The span of voltage values, within which a voltage may vary, under normal
operating conditions. Transient voltages due to fault or switching
conditions are excluded.

1.2.56 Voluntary Outage:

A planned loss of supply to a Customer, with prior knowledge of the
Customer.

1.2.57 Zero Sequence Voltage:

A set of phase voltages of equal magnitude and zero phase angle, relative
to each other. The 3-phase values are thus in phase with each other. The
term zero sequence may also be applied, in the same sense, to AC
currents, impedances, etc.




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1.3 General Principles

The distribution planning criteria is mainly based on the following general
principles:

1.3.1 All equipment will operate within normal ratings and the system voltages
will be within the permissible limits when the system is operating anywhere
from the minimum load to the forecasted maximum peak load.

1.3.2 Planning is based on normal and emergency equipment ratings.
Emergency ratings are those, which can safely exist for a specified
number of hours.

1.3.3 Environment parameters will be as per the following:

( a ) Standard Service Conditions:

All standard materials and equipment shall be designed and
constructed of satisfactory operation under the appropriate set of
Service Conditions listed hereunder. Where local conditions differ
from these standard conditions standard material ratings shall be
modified. Where it is not possible to use standard materials, other
materials of higher rating may be used.
Note that These standard Service Conditions, while representative
of the major load regions, will be exceeded at some locations
within the Kingdom. It is therefore necessary for the user to
confirm whether local conditions exceed standard conditions and
to take appropriate action. Special surveys to define
environmental and soil conditions should be carried out prior to
major engineering works.

( b ) Standard Equipment Rating Conditions:

Standard ratings for materials and equipment shall be based on
the following Service Conditions. Where local conditions differ
from these standard conditions, standard material ratings shall be
modified, using the Tables in section 1.12. Where it is not
possible to use standard materials, other materials of higher rating
may be used.


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1.4 Frequency

1.4.1 Standard Frequency:
The standard system frequency shall have a nominal value of 60 Hz.

1.4.2 Operating Range:
The maximum permissible frequency operating range shall be between
59.8 Hz and 60.2Hz .The preferred operating range should be between
59.9 Hz and 60.1 Hz.

1.5 Harmonics

The level of harmonics in the power system shall not exceed the values,
listed in Table-1.1, on a continuous basis.

Table –1.1
Maximum Continuous Harmonic Levels
Individual Harmonic Voltage
Distortion (%) Nominal Voltage
Total Harmonic
Voltage Distortion %
Odd Even
4.0 for N <14
127-380 V 5.0
1.5 for N >14
2.0
13.8 KV 4.0 3.0 1.75
33 KV 3.0 2.0 1.0

Note:
N is the harmonic order, or multiple of the fundamental frequency.
Voltage distortion is expressed as a percentage of the fundamental
voltage.
The indicated values refer to maximum continuous levels.

1.6 Phase Unbalance

Under normal system conditions the three phase voltages shall be balanced
at MV, and higher voltages in the system, such that the negative phase
sequence voltage does not exceed 2% of the positive phase sequence
voltage.

Customers with a dedicated transformer or those supplied at 13.8 kV or a

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higher voltage shall balance their loads, such that the load phase unbalance
at the customer interface meets the above criterion. All other customers shall
balance their loads over the three phases to the greatest degree possible.
The SEC shall then balance these loads, within the power system, to meet
the above criterion.

1.7 Power Factor

Each customer shall maintain a power factor of 0.85 lagging or higher at the
interface. No customer shall present a leading power factor to the SEC
system.

1.8 Voltage Fluctuation

1.8.1 Voltage Dips:

For non-repetitive voltage variation, or voltage dips, such as those
associated with motor-starting, welding equipment or power system
switching, the voltage variation shall not exceed 7% of the fundamental
nominal voltage under normal circumstances. Such variations shall not
occur more frequently than 3 times per day.

1.8.2 Application:

No Customer shall connect equipment to the power system, which causes
voltage fluctuation at the Customer interface in excess of these
requirements. The SEC shall ensure that the power supply, at each
Customer's interface, conforms to these requirements.

1.9 Standard Distribution Voltage

The voltages listed in Table – 1.2 shall be used as standard service voltages
at the interface with power customers. The service voltage shall be
maintained within the range defined by the indicated lowest and highest
values, under steady state and normal system conditions and over the full
loading range of the system.

Where two voltages are listed e.g., 220/127 V the lower value refers to the
phase to neutral voltage. All other values are phase-to-phase voltages.
Table – 1.2

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Standard Service Voltage
Nominal Voltage Lowest Voltage Highest Voltage
220/127 V 209/120 V 231/134 V
380/220 V 360/209 V 400/231 V
*11 kV 10.45 kV 11.55 kV
13.8 kV 13.1 kV 14.5 kV
33 kV 31.4 kV 34.7 kV
*34.5 kV 32.78 kV 36.23 kV
Percentage Limits - 5.0% + 5.0%
* Existing voltage, but non-standard voltage.

1.10 Voltage Drop

1.10.1 Voltage Drop Allocation:

( a ) LV Customers:
The Utility voltage drop allocations listed in Table-1.3 shall be
used as guideline voltage drops over the power system
components supplying a low voltage customer. The additional
voltage drop in the customer's wiring shall not exceed the value
indicated.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Table- 1.3
Voltage Drop Allocations
Voltage Drop % Power System Component
Utility:
Primary System (33 kV or 13.8 kV):
1.0 - Substation Voltage Regulator Bandwidth
1.5 - Primary Feeders
2.5 - Distribution Transformer
Secondary System (127-380 Volts):
3.5 - Secondary Feeder
1.5 - Service Feeder
10.0 Total Service Drop

2.5 Customer Wiring
(To furthest point of utilization)

12.5 Total Utilization Drop


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Notes:

The indicated primary feeder voltage drops apply, where no voltage
regulation/control measures are applied to the network, down-stream of the
Substation. Where such voltage regulation measures are applied, the primary
feeder voltage drops may be increased. The service and utilization voltage
standards shall be observed, however, in all cases for both high and low
network-loading conditions.

Where the voltage drop allocated to a system component is not fully utilized,
the spare allocation may be availed of to increase the allocation for other
system components. The service and utilization voltage standards shall be
observed, however, in all cases, for both high and low network-loading
conditions.

Distribution Transformers have a built-in voltage boost of 5% by virtue of the
transformation ratio. Note that this does not extend the voltage drop to the
service point beyond 10% however.

( b ) MV Customers:

The voltage drop over the power system components supplying a
medium voltage (33 kV or 13.8 kV) Customer shall be such that
the service voltage standards are observed, in all cases, for both
high and low network loading conditions. The SEC shall endeavor
to maintain the service voltage spread below the 5% maximum
value, permitted by the standards.

The Customer may avail of any voltage drop not utilized by the
SEC to increase his internal voltage drop above the 2.5%
permitted by the standards. The voltage drop over the
Customer’s power system, however, shall be such that the
utilization voltage standards are observed, in all cases, for both
high and low system loading conditions.





1.10.2 Standard Utilization Voltage:

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Table-1.4
Standard Utilization Voltages

Highest Voltage Lowest Voltage Nominal Voltage
231/134 Volts 203/117 Volts 220/127 Volts
400/231 Volts 352/203 Volts 380/220 Volts
11.55 kV 10.18 kV *11 kV
14.5 kV 12.8 kV 13.8 kV
34.7 kV 30.5 kV 33 kV
36.23 kV 31.91 kV *34.5 kV
+ 5.0% - 7.5% Percentage Limits
* Existing voltage, but non-standard voltage.

Notes:
Refer to details of voltage drop allocations. Where two voltages are
listed, the lower value refers to the phase to neutral voltage. All other
values are phase-to-phase voltages. Existing locations where other
voltages are currently in use shall be clearly defined. For such other
voltages, the utilization voltage shall be maintained within the indicated
percentage limits. Refer to details of voltages under exceptional
conditions, in the event of an outage.

1.11 Voltage Regulation

1.11.1 Substation

Automatic voltage regulation shall be applied in main substations (grid
stations), such that the voltage is regulated on all distribution feeders
leaving the substation. The bandwidth of the regulator must be considered
when assigning voltage drops.

1.11.2 Network:

Additional voltage regulation/control may be applied to networks
downstream from the substations, to compensate for voltage drop in
excess of the levels indicated in section 1.10. This will in fact be
necessary, in many instances, especially for rural networks. Advantage
may be taken of the following means of voltage regulation.

1.11.3 Automatic Regulation:

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Voltage regulators, or switched capacitor banks, may be installed along
the primary feeders, to automatically regulate the voltage. The full 10%
voltage spread, less the percentage bandwidth of the regulator, may then
be the applied down-steam of the point of regulation.

1.12 Standard Loading Conditions

SEC has standardized the equipment that are used in the distribution system
and their ratings have been established according to the prevailing
conditions. Two different operating conditions are considered for equipment
rating namely normal and emergency.

1.12.1 Equipment Loading:

Guideline load ratings for the standard sizes of power system equipment
under standard conditions are indicated hereunder. Tables of correction
factors for deviations from these standard conditions are also provided.

These ratings are presented as guidelines only and are based on the
indicated assumptions. Variations from standard conditions and the
general suitability of the ratings method shall be checked before using the
ratings. Special surveys to define environmental and operating conditions
should be carried out prior to major engineering works. These load ratings
are based solely on the thermal rating of the equipment.

1.12.2 Cables: Standard Cable Rating Conditions
Refer to Appendix A.













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2 MEDIUM VOLTAGE PLANNING CRITERIA

2.1 Introduction

Medium Voltage (MV) covers 33KV and 13.8KV networks as standard
medium voltages as well as 34.5 kV & 11 kV (69 kV is not included) for
Saudi Electricity Company (SEC). The main purpose of this part is to give
some guidance for engineers to perform their planning work for medium
voltage level network.

The distribution network plans should be prepared based on the following
strategies:

• Optimum utilization of equipment (capital resources).
• Improvement of system reliability.
• Economical and systematic expansion in accordance with system growth.

Network plans shall be developed such that the equipment utilization at
different levels is improved every year indicating a move towards optimization.

The standardization of the network and elimination of system deficiencies and
weaknesses as a consequence is deemed to improve the system reliability.

The timely addition of facilities with the economical evaluation for the best
alternatives is the basic requirement of a good network plan. Nevertheless,
the planning engineer should be provided with a guideline to evaluate the plan
before it is implemented to ensure that the objectives are achieved. Once the
plans are prepared, these should be reviewed to assess the quality (reliability,
economy, etc).








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2.2 Design of M. V. Network

In order to make a design of M. V. network the following should be taken into
consideration:

ƒ Contingency plan criteria
ƒ Grid station criteria
ƒ Feeders configuration criteria
ƒ Feeders loading criteria
ƒ Normal open point location
ƒ Voltage drop criteria
ƒ Short circuit level

2.2.1 Contingency Plan Criteria

( a ) Purpose

This section has been developed to assist distribution-planning
engineers in evaluating the performance of the proposed network
under various defined contingency conditions. It also includes
recommendations for the remedial action to be taken by
appropriate agencies to overcome the situation to bring the
distribution network within the established contingency criteria.

( b ) Scope

This section enlists the contingency conditions that should be
considered during development of 5-year network plans and
identifies possible solutions to resolve the problems arising in
different situations. It also identifies the responsibilities of
involved divisions/departments within SEC for the development of
contingency plans under various contingency conditions and
provides general guidelines for multiple contingency planning by
operating areas.



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( c ) Criteria

Distribution network plans shall be developed to meet the first
level contingency conditions and not for multiple contingencies as
per distribution planning criteria. Abnormal (though rarely)
multiple contingencies may arise in the network resulting in loss of
supply to customers.

( d ) Contingencies to be Considered in Distribution Network
Planning

The following first level contingencies shall be considered in the
development of a 5-year network plan:

1 - Failure of any one of the power transformers in any
substation having single, double or multiple power
transformers.

2 - Failure of any one of the bus sections in any substation
having single, double or multiple bus sections, which
normally involves interruption to all the loads associated with
the bus section. But the first contingency criteria require that
the power supply shall be restored within reasonable time
through available standby/alternate supply

3 - Failure of any one-feeder segment in any feeder network
configuration.

( e ) Contingencies Not Covered in Distribution Network Planning

The following contingencies shall not be covered in the
development of 5-year network plan:

1 - Contingency at Distribution Transformer.

2 - Contingency at low voltage system.

3 - Multiple contingencies at any level.



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( f ) Probable Solution For Contingency Planning

1 - Grid Station Overloading

In case the grid station is expected to operate beyond the
firm capacity, the following may be considered as probable
solutions:

i Network Resectionalization

Resectionalization of the distribution network should be
proposed to eliminate the expected overloading if load
transfer capability is available in the system at distribution
level. The interties between different grid stations
facilitate load transfer from one grid station to the other
neighboring grid stations by shifting the normal open point
in the loop. The first step of the contingency plan shall be
the identification of the interties and the available relief
through each intertie depending upon the overload on the
grid station and the spare capacity available in the
neighboring grid stations. Factors such as auto change
over switches; operational inconvenience, important loads
and geographical location restrict or limit the load transfer
through an intertie and therefore are required to be
thoroughly examined. Accordingly, proposals shall be
made to suitably shift the normal open points to efficiently
utilize the system spare capacity to relieve an overloaded
facility.

ii Activate Thermal Protection

Activate the trip circuit for the grid station power
transformer thermal relays image relays. Normally the
over current relays of the power transformers are
coordinated with the fault currents and require higher
settings to avoid undesirable tripping due to transients.
There is no protection against overloading for the
remaining power transformers in service in case one of
the grid station transformers trips on internal faults. As an
interim arrangement during the contingency period the
transformer thermal relays i.e. oil temperature and

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winding temperature shall be used for transformer
tripping. The overload relay settings of the transformer
control breakers shall also be reduced to minimum
allowable level to minimize the risk of overloading. The
contingency plan should identify the grid stations, which
are required to be protected from overloading for
coordination with the concerned agencies to implement
the scheme.

iii Advance Installation of Planned Facilities

Planned distribution facilities may be advanced by one or
two years if the overload is expected to be alleviated
significantly by their implementation. Little modification if
any may be required to enable the facility to be efficiently
utilized during the interim period of contingency plan and
to be readily available before its planned use. The
advancement of expenditure may avoid non-recoverable
expenditure in installing alternatively other facilities on
temporary basis. But the earlier implementation depends
on budget provision and certainty of development plan.

iv Installation of Facilities on Temporary Basis

Installation of temporary facilities is sometimes
indispensable to maintain reliability of supply. The
facilities shall be planned such that they involve minimum
non-recoverable expenditure. Short lengths of lines, oil
switches and new feeders to interconnect existing
overloaded feeders and grid stations with the available
source of relief shall be planned to overcome the
situation.

v Installation of Mobile Station/Transformer

Installation of a mobile station/transformer may be
required in areas where:

• The overloading is so heavy that it cannot be relieved
through the available interties.

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• The neighboring grid stations are also overloaded.

• The overloaded grid station is located in an isolated
area and there is no facility available in the
neighborhood for load transfer.

vi Manning of Grid Station or Frequent Inspection During
Peak Load Period

One of the alternatives though expensive is manning of
the grid station or planning frequent inspection during
peak load period. In case the overloading of a grid station
is significant and it is not possible to reduce by any of the
probable solutions mentioned above it may be loaded as
per the requirement within the installed transformer
capacity and watched for the abnormalities to arrange
immediate load relief by load shedding. Such situations
will normally be very rare.

2 - Feeder Overloading criteria

In case the planned reinforcement of the feeder is not
expected to be completed as scheduled and the associated
distribution network is expected to be overloaded in a
particular year during the plan period the following solutions
may be considered in the contingency plan:

i Same as 1.iii.

ii Same as 1.iv.

iii Use of Mobile Generators

Mobile generators shall be used to provide emergency
supply to the customers, which are normally fed by radial
feeders. The arrangement may also be workable in case
of loop feeder, which exceeds the emergency loading
capacity. The feeder shall be sectionalized and supplied
by mobile generator to avoid overloading during first
contingency.

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( g ) General Guidelines for second / Multiple Contingency Planning

The second/multiple contingency conditions are created in the
system when more than one transmission line, power transformer,
bus section of a Bulk Supply Point or grid station or primary feeder
fail, the impact being in accordance with the capacity lost. SEC
does not plan the system at any level to meet such contingencies,
which involve huge capital investment. Such contingencies are
however very rare and if materialize may result in interruption of
supply. Nevertheless SEC is obliged to utilize the system
redundancy wherever available to provide alternate supply to the
customers. Therefore it is desirable to develop contingency plans
for each such contingency to enable the concerned agencies to
systematically utilize the available facilities and minimize
interruption to the customers. These plans should be developed
on the following lines:

1 - Identify important loads, which require restoration of supply
on priority.

2 - Establish operational steps required to restore supply to the
VIP customers utilizing the available alternate source of
supply and existing interties.

3 - Determine the loads, which can be restored with rotating
blackout.

4 - Identify the feeders which cannot be partially/fully restored
until repairs are completed.

5 - Identify the loads which shall be partially/fully restored
through the customer installed emergency/standby supply.

6 - Identify the loads which should be partially/fully restored
through the installation of SEC mobile generators.

7 - Propose additional distribution requirement if any, with the
8 - Justification.

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9 - Estimate load in MW/MVA (reflected to peak) that will
remain without supply until repairs are completed.

10 - Estimate approximate number of customers that will be left
without power if the outage occurs during peak load period.

2.2.2 Grid Station Criteria

The grid station is the interface point between transmission level and
distribution level. In planning stage the planning engineer should consider
the following:

( a ) The grid station load should not exceed the firm capacity of the
station based on N-1 criteria.

( b ) The location of the new grid station should consider with center of
new load.

( c ) The capacity of the new grid station should be appropriate for the
forecasted load.

( d ) The time required to build the grid station.

( e ) The number of out going feeders required.

Based on regulation of power supply, SEC will supply power to customers
with load requirement greater than 8 MVA if it is technically feasible (Grid
Station load permits, spare breaker is available, voltage drop is within
allowed limits), otherwise SEC has the right to ask for G/S’s location as per
SEC standard specially for new plot plans (scheme).

2.2.3 Feeders Configuration Criteria

In general, the best configuration is the single loop but due to the customer
location and feeder loading other configuration take place. The length of
the feeders controlled by load, voltage drop and operating circumstances.
As indication to the planning engineers, feeders on MV should not exceed
7.5 Km for 13.8 kV in length up to the normal open point. For distribution
network planning, one of the following criteria for feeder configuration shall
be followed:

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( a ) Radial

Radial feed is the most economical type of supply but offers
minimum reliability (circuit-out conditions). Refer to Figure #
2.1(Appendix B). Radial feeder shall be utilized to supply power to
remote area customer(s) (Villages, farms and bulk customers out
side the planned area domain phase-I). In the case of bulk
customers, SEC shall provide radial supply only irrespective of
demand. Loop supply shall be provided only if the bulk customer
pays for the additional expenditure required for the alternate
source.

( b ) Single Loop

Single loop system shall be considered as the most-preferred
SEC feeder configuration.

Single loop is consists of two radial feeders. Such radial feeders
shall be looped between two neighboring grid stations if possible.
Alternately, they may be looped between different buses of the
same grid station.

Wherever practical and economical, loop supply should be
provided with diversified sources. The network shall be operated
radially and the total load of loop shall not exceed the normal
rating of the conductor/cable. This type of feeder arrangement
offers an acceptable degree of reliability but at a higher initial cost.

Refer to Figure # 2.2 (Appendix B).

( c ) Tee Loop

When the combined feeder load in a single loop exceeds normal
rating of the cable depending on the size and construction of the
line, the following tee loop arrangement shall be considered:

1 - OPTION 1: Three feeders sharing approx. equal load
connected together.

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This option is a preferred SEC distribution feeder configuration.
It allows loading up to one and half times the feeder’s normal
load (provided all feeders are of same size). Each feeder is
capable of extending standby supply to the remaining two
feeders in case of emergency in this arrangement. If the loop
load exceeds circuit capacity, the addition of a new feeder to
form two separate single loop shall be considered. This three-
feeder arrangement offers an acceptable degree of reliability
(but less than single loop) at less initial cost than the single
loop arrangement.

2 - OPTION 2:

Two feeders each loaded to full capacity and one feeder as
express circuit to provide back up to either of the two feeders
in case of emergency.

This option is a non-preferred SEC distribution network
configuration but does allow loading two feeders to full load
(provided all feeders are of same size). This type of
arrangement shall be considered a temporary or interim
arrangement. Efforts shall be made to bring the system to a
single loop or tee loop/Option I arrangement as soon as
practical. Option II feeder arrangement offers less supply
reliability than the type in Option I but it is less expensive than
the open loop arrangement. Refer to attached Figure # 2.3
(Appendix B).

( d ) Multiple Feeder Loop

Multiple feeder loops are in operation in many places in the SEC.
It is not desirable (for complex operation and maintenance) to
connect more than three feeders in an open loop arrangement.
Additionally, efficient utilization of spare feeder capacity may not
be possible in the case of multiple feeder loops. Efforts must be
made to minimize this type of feeder arrangement and if used,
timely resources must be allocated to convert them to single loop
or tee loop arrangements by adding new grid station. Refer to
Figure # 2.4 (Appendix B).

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( e ) Radial Branches Of Main Circuits

Small isolated loads (especially in rural areas) shall be served
radially by branch-off of main feeders. Sub-loop within an open
loop may be built in urban area in exceptional cases to efficiently
utilizing the system spare capacity. Refer to Figure # 2.5
(Appendix B).

2.2.4 Feeders Loading Criteria

2.2.4.1 Radial Feeder Configuration:

For radial feeder, the feeder configuration is same as section 3.72.

2.2.4.2 Single and Tee Looped Feeders:

The loading of feeders should be according the configuration as follow:

Feeder Configuration Loading
Single looped feeders 50 %
Tee looped Feeders 65%

However, the normal load rating of the standard medium voltage
cable/conductor refer to Appendix A.

2.2.5 Normal Open Point

The concerned planning engineer based on the following factors shall
decide normal open points in the distribution network:

( a ) Distribution of load on each section.

( b ) Distribution of load on the grid station.

( c ) Continuity performance.

( d ) VIP customers.

( e ) Voltage drop.

( f ) District boundaries.

( g ) Auto-change over switches.

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( h ) Easy accessibility.

( i ) Equipment operational flexibility.

( j ) Optimal energy loss.

All temporary shifting will be by operating people due their operational
requirements.

The most desirable design condition for a normally open point in any loop
is to have equal loading on the individual circuits of the loop and to have
each circuit supplied from separate grid stations (to achieve maximum load
transfer capability between grid stations). As an alternative to supply from
separate grid stations, the circuits may be looped onto different bus
sections at the same grid station (with this arrangement, station capability
will not be achieved).

The normally open point shall be located to facilitate easy accessibility and
fast restoration of supply in case of emergency. Location of important
customers on the loop shall be considered when determining the normal
open points as a closely located normal open point to an important
customer may enable quicker restoration of power through the available
stand-by source. Since load density and distance from the supply source
determines the voltage drop, the normally open point shall be selected
such that in normal operating conditions, all feeders in the loop should
maintain satisfactory voltage. District boundaries sometimes determine
feeder normally open points due to operational jurisdiction. Such
influencing factors shall be acceptable if other conditions do not dictate
otherwise.

Because of variations in seasonal peak loads on grid stations, it may be
necessary to specify one normally open point for a specific loop during grid
station summer peak loads and a different normally-open point on the
same loop during winter peak periods. Such action should be considered
by operation people in cases where a grid station’s load must be reduced
so as not to exceed the substation firm capacity. It is an acceptable
means of deferring capital expenditures for premature grid station
reinforcement or construction of a grid station in a newly developed area.


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The most ideal location for the normally open point will be a compromise
among all the above-mentioned factors. There is no firm rule for fixing a
normally open point. Good engineering judgment and area information
usually will determine the best location leading to efficient system
operation. If the normal open point changed because of over loading then
the planning engineer should be informed.

2.2.6 Voltage Drop Criteria
Refer to section 2.4.2

2.2.7 Short Circuit level
Refer to section 4

2.3 Supply to Rural Area

Supply to Rural Area the following should be considered:

• SEC should utilize the highest MV available in the area to supply rural area
• The system in rural area should be radial and O/H.
• The voltage drop should be in the permissible range.
• In calculating the load of the area , 5 KVA per customer can be used.
• Recloser and sectionalizer should be used wherever required on branches
and fuse cutouts / air break switch can be used for branches with load less
than 1 MVA and 1 km length
2.4 Supply to Bulk Customer

Each customer requires more than 1 MVA load should be considered as a
bulk customer. Those customers should be supplied on MV. However, those
customers can be supplied on LV if the existing rules and regulation of
customer service allow.

Bulk customer should provide a declared load data to be considered by SEC.

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For bulk customer on LV, they should provide load requirement and SEC will
verify the load and calculate the demand accordingly and identify the
diversity factor and substations requirement.

2.4.1 Estimation of the load

Bulk customer submit connected load details to SEC. Planning engineer
will consider the submitted load detail and verify according to SEC rules of
calculating demand load.

These customer can be supplied either:

( a ) On medium voltage with an agreed MV switching room at the
boundary of the project
Or
( b ) On low voltage customers according to the existing service rules with
number of substation with attached metering rooms at agreed
location on the boundary of the project on roadside not less than 6
meters wide. These meters will be connected to the system through
normal substation connection.

To calculate the demand load of the customer the planning engineer
should use the following formula:

Demand Load = connected load X Demand Factor
Where the demand factor is according the following Table 2.1

Table – 2.1
(Demand Factor)

Class of
customer
Demand
Factor
Type of construction
Residential
Customer
0.5 Villas, Houses, Palaces, Istrahat
0.6
Shops, Workshops, Stores, Offices, Petrol
pumps, Supermarkets, Malls, Motels,
Furnished flats.
0.8
Government buildings Hospitals, Schools,
Clubs
Commercial
Customer
0.9 Mosque, Gold shops, Hajj Load, Street Lights
Industrial
Customer
0.9 Industries, Factories
Agriculture
Customer
0.9
Big Farms, Livestock and Dairy Farms,
Production Farms, Greenhouses

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2.4.2 Voltage Drop Calculation

For a particular supply voltage, the voltage drop from the supply point to
the customer interface depends on various factors such as customer
demand, length and size of cable and power factor. A commonly used
formula for voltage drop is provided below:

2
10
) (
. %
KV
L SIN X COS R KVA
D V
×
× × + ×
=
φ φ


Where:

KVA = Three phase load in kVA.
R = Resistance of conductor in ohms per kilometer
X = Inductive resistance of conductor in ohms per kilometer
Kv = Three phase supply voltage in kilovolts at sending end
L = Length of cable in kilometers
Ф = Angle of supply

This formula can be modified to

K
L KVA
D V
×
= . %


Where K is a constant shown in table 2.2 at power factor 0.85

Table 2.2

Cable / Conductor Size
Voltage K
3 X 185 mm² CU 33 KV 63020
3 X 300 mm² CU 13.8 KV 14712
3 X 185 mm² CU 13.8 KV 11020
3 X 300 mm² AL 13.8 KV 11282
170 mm² ACSR 33 KV 26535
170 mm² ACSR 13.8 KV 4730

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2.5 Mode of Supply

For supplying bulk customer, the mode of supply depends on the nature of
customer's load where SEC can feed those customers as follows:

2.5.1 Bulk LV Customers:

Design of MV network (feeders) to bulk customer will be based on
calculated demand load and should be connected to the nearest MV
network if capacity is available without laying new feeders. These
customers can be grouped into two categories:

Bulk customer with multi meter should be designed based on the demand
load as shown in Figure # 2.6 (Appendix B) including the number of
transformers required. The space size of the substation room should be
based on customer-contracted load.

Bulk LV customer with main meter should be designed based on the
contracted load according to the number of transformers as shown in
Figure # 2.7 (Appendix B).

2.5.2 Bulk MV Customers:

Design of MV customers should be according the contracted load for
customers less than 4 MVA. For customers greater than 4 MVA can be
studied to be supplied from existing MV ring network if capacity allows, or
new single loop should be created and the design should be according to
the contracted load. Figure # 2.8 (Appendix B).

Bulk customers outside the designated area to be developed by
municipality of the city will be supplied on MV radial in case the source is
available under all technical conditions. Backup supply can be provided on
customer cost.

Bulk customer within the first zone of the city will be supplied with a
backup if the system is looped in the area




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3 LOW VOLTAGE PLANNING CRITERIA

3.1 Introduction

This section deals with the estimation of the customer load, electrical design
and layout of LV supply network to new load developments, to deliver the
supply of electricity at the standard service voltage under all normal operating
load and voltage conditions, and to maintain the defined standards.

The objective of this section is to determine the connected and demand load
of residential, commercial, agricultural and industrial customers, and to
calculate diversity factor for a group of customers fed from the same source.
Also to find the maximum allowable distance from the substation to customer
to maintain the maximum allowable voltage drop ( ±5% ) as table 3.1 .

Table 3.1
(Standard Service Voltage)

Nominal Voltage Lowest Voltage Highest Voltage
220/127 V 209/120 231/134
380/220 V 361/209 400/231
Percentage Limits - 5% + 5%

3.2 Customer Classification

( a ) Residential customer: Dwelling for private use, e.g. houses, villas,
palaces, Istrahat, etc.

( b ) Commercial customer/ Governmental customer: This includes
shopping centers, hotels, government buildings, hospitals,
schools, mosques, etc.

( c ) Industrial customer: This includes all industries inside designated
industrial areas or having Industrial License.

( d ) Agricultural customer: This includes Big Farms, Livestock and
Dairy Farms, Production Farms, Greenhouses

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3.3 Estimation of Customer Load

To estimate the customer load, the following factors are to be considered:

ƒ Connected load: It is the load of the customer calculated according to
the covered area of the building as per the Ministry of Industry and
Electricity (MOIE) guideline .

ƒ If the covered area of the building is not available/applicable, it can
be defined as the sum of all of the name plate rating of all present
and future electrical equipment installed before applying any diversity
factor.

ƒ Contracted load : It is the capacity of power supply equivalent to the
circuit breaker rating in amperes provided to the customer.

ƒ Maximum Demand Load (MDL): This is the actual maximum
demand of the customer usually occurring during the peak loading
period. It must be calculated from the connected load in accordance
with the approved demand factors.

ƒ Demand factor: It is the ratio of the maximum demand load (MDL) of
the system to the total connected load of the system.

ƒ Diversity factor (D.F) : It is the ratio of the sum of the individual
maximum demands of customers to the maximum demand of the
system.

3.4 Load Estimation Procedures

This is the procedures (steps) to calculate the connected and demand load of
the residential and commercial customers. As regard, the industrial,
agricultural, and governmental customers connected load shall be calculated
as per declared load.

( a ) Calculate the total connected load (KVA) according to the covered
area (sq. meter) from the Ministry (MOIE) guidelines for customer
load estimation.

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( b ) Calculate the individual maximum demand load as follows:

Max. Demand Load (MDL) = demand factor x connected load

Where the demand factor is shown in Table 3.2

Table 3.2
(Demand Factors)

Customer
Classification
Demand
Factor
Type of construction
Residential Customer 0.5 Villas, Houses, Palaces, Istrahat
0.6
Shops,Workshops,Stores, Offices,
Petrol pumps, Supermarkets, Malls,
Motels, Furnished flats.
0.8
Government buildings Hospitals,
Schools, Clubs
Commercial
Customer
0.9
Mosque, Gold shops, Hajj Load,
Sreet Lights
Industrial Customer 0.9 Industries, Factories

Agricultural
Customer

0.9
Big Farms, Livestock and Dairy
Farms, Production Farms,
Greenhouses

( c ) Calculate the diversity factor from the following equation:

|
.
|

\
|
+
=
N
0.33
0.67
1.25
D.F



C. F. = 1
D. F.
N is always greater than 1 and N is the customer(KWH meter)
refer to table 3.3


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Table 3.3
Diversity & Coincident Factors

NO. OF
CUSTOMER
S
DIVERSITY
FACTOR
COINCIDEN
T FACTOR
NO. OF
CUSTOMER
S
DIVERSITY
FACTOR
COINCIDEN
T FACTOR
1 1.000 1.000 24 1.695 0.590
2 1.384 0.723 25 1.698 0.589
3 1.453 0.688 26 1.701 0.588
4 1.497 0.668 27 1.704 0.587
5 1.529 0.654 28 1.707 0.586
6 1.553 0.644 29 1.709 0.585
7 1.573 0.636 30 1.712 0.584
8 1.589 0.629 31 1.714 0.583
9 1.603 0.624 32 1.716 0.583
10 1.614 0.619 33 1.718 0.582
11 1.624 0.616 34 1.720 0.581
12 1.633 0.612 35 1.722 0.581
13 1.641 0.609 36 1.724 0.580
14 1.649 0.607 37 1.726 0.579
15 1.655 0.604 38 1.728 0.579
16 1.661 0.602 39 1.729 0.578
17 1.667 0.600 40 1.731 0.578
18 1.672 0.598 41 1.732 0.577
19 1.676 0.597 42 1.734 0.577
20 1.681 0.595 43 1.735 0.576
21 1.685 0.594 44 1.737 0.576
22 1.688 0.592 45 1.738 0.575








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( d ) Calculate the demand load of the group of customer fed from the
same source

Customers with the same load (KVA)
Demand load = Sum of the MDL of the customers / D.F (of all customers)
or multiply by coincidence factor.

Customers with different load (KVA)

Demand load = MDL of the largest customer + [Sum of the MDL of the
remaining customer / D.F (of remaining customers)]

Example : Calculate the demand load of the following customers
(Residential customers, 220 V) and the cable size to feed them.

Demand load = MDL of the largest customer on the cabinet + [Sum of the
MDL of the remaining customers on the same cabinet / D.F (of remaining
customers)]

Customer A 4 No. of KWH meters …… 100 m2 each
Customer B 4 No. of KWH meters ……. 325 m2 each
Customer C 1 No. of KWH meter ……… 450 m2

from covered area Table - the connected load for 100 m2 = 16 kva
for 325 m2 = 50 kva and for 450 m2 = 66 kva

Max. Demand load = demand factor x connected load
=0. 5x16 = 8 kva (customer A 4 No. of KWH meters)
= 0.5x50 = 25 kva (customer B 4 No. of KWH meters)
= 0.5x66 = 33 kva (customer C 1 No. of KWH meter)

Diversity factor from Table 3.3 for 8 customers is 1.589

Demand load = MDL largest +[(MDL1+MDL2+…)/D.F]
= 33 + [(4x8 +4x25)/1.589] =116.07 kva


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3.5 Low Voltage Network Design:

The low voltage network also called secondary network, it can be either
underground or overhead . The low voltage networks are connected at one
end only and have no facility of back-feeding. The design of LV network has
to satisfy following conditions namely:

ƒ Current carrying capacity
ƒ Voltage at customer terminal must be within ± 5% of declared voltage
supply.

ƒ Low cost
ƒ Minimum losses
3.5.1 Underground Network Configuration

At present, different method of customer low voltage connections are in
practice, i.e. Looping system,Tee joint, Direct connection,etc… which are
detailed below , whereas direct connection and connect through
Distribution Cabinet are SEC Standards and to be followed.

For the LV, Maximum allowable length from substation to customer is 250
meter for 220V and 420 meter for 380 V to maintain the maximum
allowable voltage drop (5%).

( a ) Direct Connection: This type of connection is shown in figure 3.1 (a).

( b ) Connection through Distribution Cabinet: This type of connection is
shown in figure 3.1 (b). For this condition, cable 300 mm2 AL/XLPE
is used from substation to distribution cabinet (D/C), and cables 185
mm2 AL/XLPE, 70 mm2 AL/XLPE are used from D/C to the
customer.



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( c ) Existing Low Voltage Under Ground Network

1 - Looping System : The looping system is a connection from
customer to another customer through distribution box, this
kind of connection used to minimize the cost of LV Network
and mainly used on the not planned area.

2 - Tee Joints : Tee joint is used to connect a customer to main
secondary feeder. Tee joints are available for cables up to
500 mm² Aluminum or 300 mm² Aluminum. Eight service
connections up to 95 mm² Aluminum cable may be made,
but voltage drop considerations normally limit the number of
service connections

i Service cable length should in no case exceed 25 meters.

ii These are not be laid across streets 30 meters and
above.









Figure # 3.1 (a)








Distribution Substation
Main LV Cable
LV Meter
Distribution Substation
Main LV Cable
LV Meter
Distribution Cabinet
Service LV Cable

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Figure # 3.1 (b)

3.5.2 Overhead Line Network Configuration

For overhead low voltage network

( a ) Quadruplex conductor 3(1x120 mm2 XLPE insulated Aluminum
Conductor) + 1x120 mm2 ACSR/AW messenger is used for the main
line.

( b ) 3(1x50 mm2 XLPE insulated Aluminum Conductor) + 1x50 mm2
ACSR/AW messenger is used for service drops as connection to the
customers. The voltage drop calculation for the variation of the load
against variation of the length is provided.






Figure # 3.2
Existing Low Voltage Network

For design of low voltage overhead distributors the following should be
considered :

1 - SEC standard specification for Overhead Lines calls for new
lines to be earth type construction using steel poles. The
lines could be double or single circuit.

2 - The preferred design is overhead quadruplex conductor.
3x120 mm2 XLPE + 1x120 mm2 ACSR
QUADRUFLEX CABLE
3x120 mm2 XLPE + 1x120 mm2 ACSR
QUADRUFLEX CABLE
Pole Mounted
Transformer
LV Distribution
Board
Customer
Customer
3x50 mm2 XLPE + 1x50 mm2
ACSR QUADRUFLEX CABLE

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3 - Service lengths should in no case exceed 50 meters



3.6 Calculation Of Voltage Drop (V.D.)

For a particular supply voltage, the voltage drop from the supply point to the
customer interface depends on various factors such as customer demand,
length and size of feeder and power factor. A commonly used formula for
voltage drop is provided at section 2. That formula modified to:

K
L KVA
D V
×
= . %


Where L is length of the cable in meter and K is a constant shown in Table
below:


Above Voltage Drop calculation are based on 3 phase balance system.

Following are the other factors effecting the Voltage Drop (V.D):

( a ) The representation of the 3 phase, phase-phase and phase-neutral
loads will be a single phase system derived from the assumption that
the load is balanced. It is known that the above is an over
simplification and that site measurements show that one or two
phases are more heavily loaded. This real situation shows that a
correction factor is required. This is known as the unequal loading in
the phase.

K
Cable / Conductor Size
Voltage 220 V
Voltage 380
V
4x300 MM2 Al 3322 9912
4x185 MM2 Al 2313 6902
4x70 MM2 Al 1001 2988
4x50 MM2 Al 710 2118
Quadruplex Cable 3(1x120) +1x120 MM2 1192 3556
Quadruplex Cable 3(1x50) +1x50 MM2 710 2118

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( b ) In the SEC system, loads are mainly phase-phase with a smaller
superimposed phase-neutral load distributed over the 3 phases. The
phase-neutral loads give rise to the unequal loading in the phase.


( c ) Neutral current produces a voltage drop which has to be added to
the phase conductor voltage drop. The value of this neutral current
which will flow is different throughout the length of the conductor due
to the vectorial addition. A correction factor is required to allow for
neutral current voltage drop.

( d ) The reactive impedance of the cable produces a voltage drop which
is dependent on the power factor of the loads. Power factor of 0.85
has been built into the calculation above.

( e ) The resistance value of aluminum varies with temperature. In a
distributor supplying a number of customers the current is not a
constant value throughout the conductor and the temperature of the
cable core will change along the length of the conductor.

( f ) The rating of the cables used is very dependent upon the cyclic
nature of the load. For the period when high loads are expected on
the cable a daily load factor of less than one has been observed.
Load factors lower than 0.84 allow considerable increase in the
amps/phase which the cable can safely carry. However there is a
change over point where the voltage drop along the distributor is
reached before the thermal limit is reached and there is no benefit
from an increase in the permitted amps which a cable can carry
beyond those quoted

( g ) Loads are assumed to be either applied as point or end loads or can
be assumed to be evenly distributed and therefore acting as end load
applied at the mid-point of the distributor length. Loads per villa are
calculated in accordance with the tabulation based on Municipality
Building Permit . The tabulation has been correlated to the Ministry of
Industry and Electricity Rules.

( h ) The currents flowing in each branch of the distributor required to be
diversified in accordance with the Diversity Factors for Systems
which have been derived from system measurements and

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observations




3.7 Distribution Substation

This paragraph sets out standards for determining the Size, Loading,
Dimension and Location of Distribution Substation in SEC. The purpose is to
provide sufficient distribution and low voltage network capacity to enable
permanent connection to all customer’s demand loads at foreseen future.

3.7.1 Distribution Substation Type

( a ) Package Unit

The package unit substation is the preferred type and commonly
used substation in SEC because of its convenience to install
and occupy lesser spaces. This consists of Ring Main Unit,
distribution transformer and Low Voltage Distribution Board
combined in a single unit. Characteristics of the available package
unit substation are as follow:

P. U. Rating
( KVA )
Number of Secondary
Feeder Outlets
Voltage Ratio
500 6/8 13.8/.23/.4 KV
1000 8/12 13.8/.23/.4 KV
1500 8/16 13.8/.23/.4 KV

( b ) Room Substations :

Separate Transformers and Low Voltage Distribution Boards also are
available as well as 13.8 KV Ring Main Unit The use of Ring Main
Unit at all substations enables network operators to isolate any
section of cable without loss of supply to any substation. Ring Main
Unit shall be non-extensible or extensible comprising of two load
break switches and one load break switch equipped with fuse , built in
the same unit or coupled together. This unit is floor mounted suitable
for outdoor usage and maybe oil-immersed or SF6. Ring Main Units
are equipped with earth fault indicator. These are to be used in indoor
substations. As indoor substations usually serves large spot loads,
the combinations of transformers and Low Voltage Distribution Board

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may differ from those of package unit substations, but the ratings are
similar.


( c ) Pole Mounted Transformers:

The standard distribution substation for overhead system is a pole-
mounted transformer with secondary LV Distribution Cabinet. These
are commonly used in rural areas where loads are located
scatteredly.

Sizes & Characteristics of the available Transformer units are as
follows.

Under Ground Over Head
Size
L.V
Feeder
Size L.V Feeder
Voltage Ratio
300 4 50 2
33/.23, 33/.4 KV or
13.8/.23, 13.8/.4 KV
500 8 100 4
33/.23, 33/.4 KV or
13.8/.23, 13.8/.4 KV
1000 12 200 4
33/.23, 33/.4 KV or
13.8/.23, 13.8/.4 KV
1500 16 300 4
13.8/.23, 13.8/.4 KV


3.7.2 Loading of Distribution Substations:

The Maximum Load (MDL) of the Distribution Transformers must not
exceed more than 100% of its nameplate rating. When the actual load
reach the 80% rating of the transformer, reinforcement of the network shall
be planned.

3.7.3 Sites of Distribution Substation

( a ) For area electrification SEC will negotiate with the developer and/or
the local Municipality for the land and locations required for
substations as follows:


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1 - The preferred substation will be the package type and will be
installed in all cases except where extensible HV switch gear
is required.


2 - The preferred locations are on Municipality land, e.g., open
spaces, schools, mosques, car parks, etc.

( b ) Conditions of provision of a transformer room for customer with
loads exceeding 400 amperes

1 - If the customer applies for supplying one or more buildings
constructed on one or more adjacent plot, a transformer room
shall be provided if the building(s) loads exceed 400 Amperes
– 3 Phase, even if each single building has separate permit. If
the buildings are constructed in relatively different periods of
time – not less than 2 years from power connection to the
previous building loads of each individual building shall be
calculated separately.

2 - If the customer applies for a supply increase as he has
elevated, extended or added an appendix to his premise, he
will be treated in this case according to the total of old and
new loads, if more than 400 Amperes – 3 Phase then he shall
provide a room even if the changes made have separate
permits.

3 - If there are adjacent premises in one block belonging to one
owner but each has its own permit and land certificate, then
their loads will be added together when considering the total
load.

4 - Where a customer requires power over 400 amps, he will be
required to provide a transformer room. Where such a
customer can be supplied at LV from a nearby substation,
the room he provides need not be equipped until the network
capacity requires it at some future date. LVDB will be
installed in S/S room to secure it.

5 - Where two adjoining customer both require to provide a

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substation room, they may be permitted to share one room at
discretion of the both customers.

6 - Where a customer provides the transformer room , he will be
asked to build this room in accordance with one of the SEC
standard substation civil drawings, where the customer has
not built the room, he must agree in writing to do so before a
scheme for his supply will be prepared and approved.

7 - If the customer has been built and standard SEC substation
room can not be accommodated, it is still possible that the
equipment can be installed in the space available . A layout
drawing will be prepared for this substation as per SEC safety
standards.

3.7.4 Distribution Cabinet

Following point shall be considered in utilizing distribution cabinets.

( a ) Shall be installed between two plots to avoid future relocation.
( b ) Shall be installed at the load centre to minimize service cable length.
( c ) In low customer load areas, the outgoing of the cabinet can feed the
second cabinet to provide provision for more customers connection.
( d ) The outgoing terminal of distribution cabinet can be utilized for direct
connection to the customer, if feeder capacity permits.

3.8 Low Voltage Cables/Conductors

Following shall be considered for selecting cable size

( a ) Size shall be selected based on demand load.

( b ) Rating of cable/conductor is shown in the table # 3.4

Table 3.4
Size of Cable Current Rating per phase
4x70 mm2 Al. 135 Amps.
4x185 mm2 Al. 230 Amps.
4x300 mm2 Al. 310 Amps.
Size of Overhead Conductor mm2 Current Rating per phase
120 mm2 Al. Quad. 270 Amps
50 mm2 Al. Quad. 185 Amps.


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Convert the demand load unit from KVA to Amperes to determine the
size of the cable , for 220 V multiply by 2.6243 and for 380 V multiply by
1.5193.


3.9 Reinforcement of Low Voltage Network:

Low Voltage underground network should also need reinforcement especially
when a cable reached its maximum level. A scheme for this problem should
be made. This scheme shall be prepared when it is reported that actual load
on Low Voltage cable had reached a level which cause blowing of protection
fuse. This will normally be occurring during peak load periods and would
need quick and simple solution.

3.10 New Plot Plan

The planning engineer should study the plan and details given by
municipality regarding utilization of plots. Following procedure shall be
adopted for the electrification of plans.

( a ) Estimation of the plots load as per class of plot, percentage of
construction and number of floors.

( b ) Number of Substation required will be based on demand load where
following points will be considered.

1 - In no case cable length shall increase more than 250
meters.

2 - No crossing of 36 meters road shall be allowed.

3 - Voltage drop shall in standard limit (±5 %).

4 - Transformer loading shall not exceed 80 %.

5 - The medium voltage cable shall be without hindrance and
on clear routes (i.e asphalted or leveled roads).




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4 IMPROVEMENT OF THE NETWORK PERFORMANCE

4.1 Introduction

This section will cover the short circuit performance, voltage regulator
placement, capacitor placement, motor starting – voltage dip, auto reclosers
and losses evaluation.

4.2 Short Circuit Performance

4.2.1 Introduction
This document is intended to provide guidance to the distribution planning
engineer in determining the performance of the equipments particularly
those installed along the distribution network for the expected short circuit
during the plan period. It enables him to identify which of these equipments
can and cannot withstand the short circuit level of the feeders this
investigation is carried out during the preparation of the five-year
distribution network plan and it includes both the existing as well as the
future facilities. This will then ensure that all existing equipments as well as
those that are going to be installed within the planned period will be able to
withstand probable abnormal conditions on the circuit.

4.2.2 Methodology

During the preparation of the five-year distribution network plan, the
planning engineer examines the short circuit levels on the secondary bus
bars for all the grid stations covered in the plan. Based on this information,
the Operating Areas will identify the equipments installed on the feeders
that do not meet the short circuit capability and inform Planning Division for
further evaluation. There are soft wares currently in use for short circuit
studies. The Planning Engineer will make sure that the short circuit rating
of the equipments including those that are going to be installed in the
particular feeder will not be exceeded SEC standard.


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4.2.3 Criteria

The underlying factors provide the conditions and criteria under which
equipment performance study is undertaken.

( a ) Short circuit calculation will be based on SEC standard.

( b ) Short circuit duration is one second.

( c ) The fault level at the customer interface does not exceed the values
indicated in Table 4.1.

( d ) Fault calculations shall be based on the highest voltages at each
system level.

( e ) MVA levels are calculated for the highest system voltage at each
level.

( f ) The distribution feeders radiate from only one grid station. There is no
other source of power feeding into the distribution circuits.

Table 4.1
(Short Circuit Level)

Short Circuit Level (1 Second) System Voltage - Nominal
kA MVA
33 kV 25 1560
13.8 kV 20 527
380 V Consumer Interface Load
< 500 KVA 20 14
> 500 KVA 30 21
220 V Consumer Interface Load
< 152 KVA 21 8.4
> 152 KVA 45 18

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4.3 Voltage Regulator Placement

4.3.1 Introduction

This procedure has been prepared to assist planning engineers in solving
overhead network voltage problems in the SEC system by utilization of line
voltage regulators. Of particular concern in applying line voltage regulators
is that the voltage during both peak and light load periods complies with
the voltage criteria.

Voltage regulator installed on a distribution system will cause a voltage
rise at the point of application. The voltage rise at the voltage regulator will
vary depending upon line current and the output voltage settings. The
voltage rise past the voltage regulator location will be the same as the
voltage regulator location.

Line voltage regulators will improve voltage regulation by providing a
constant source of voltage at the point of application. When installed on a
primary feeder, the voltage increase at the voltage regulator location will
vary both for light-load and high-load feeder voltage profiles. The voltage
at light-load must be calculated to ensure that customers are not over-
voltaged, especially when capacitor banks are located on the same feeder.

Several benefits of voltage regulators can be listed:

( a ) Better voltage regulation provides more uniform voltage levels. This
should be more satisfactory to customers.

( b ) Deferral of investment by better utilization of existing SEC network.
Hence, investments in new feeders or additional grid substation
capacity can often be cancelled or delayed.

( c ) Properly located line voltage regulators often provide a small
reduction in energy and demand losses and release line and
substation capacity due to a small reduction in line currents. This
depends upon the situation, system parameters and voltage profile.


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( d ) The planning staff is responsible for locating the regulators in
concordance with the current load forecast and planned feeder
configurations.




4.3.2 Criteria:

( a ) Standard Distribution Voltages and Ranges:

The following voltages and their associated ranges are the
proposed voltages by SEC that will be standard throughout the
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia:

Nominal Voltage Lowest Voltage Highest Voltage
Standby
Minimum
220/127 V 209/120 V 231/134 V 203/117 V
380/220 V 360/209 V 400/231 V 351/203 V
*11 kV 10.45 kV 11.55 kV 10.175 kV
13.8 kV 13.1 kV 14.5 kV 12.8 kV
33 kV 31.4 kV 34.7 kV 30.525 kV
*34.5 kV 32.78 kV 36.23 kV 31.9 kV
Percentage
Limits
- 5.0% + 5.0% -7.5%

(*) Non-standard but exist in SEC.

A further 2.5% voltage drop is expected within the customer’s
wiring to give a normal utilization voltage drop of –10% for which
the customer’s equipment must be selected and designed for.

( b ) Voltage regulation:


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The high voltage distribution network regulation in urban and rural
areas should not exceed 1.5% for normal load conditions and 4%
for contingency or emergency conditions. In any case, the



secondary voltages are to be maintained according to the above
section on Standard Distribution Voltages and Ranges.

4.3.3 Recommended three-phase line voltage regulators:

( a ) The individual single-phase voltage regulator units and the associated
mounting racks are purchased separately for field assembly and
mounting on poles. The line voltage regulators are connected in a
grounded-wye configuration on 4-wire system and delta configuration
on 3-wire system.

( b ) For details on the latest specifications on the individual voltage
regulator units and field construction of the line voltage regulators,
material specification engineer should be contacted.

( c ) Any operational problems, such as over voltages, or special
compensation setting requirements with voltage regulator band
installations should be reported to DED for assistance.

4.3.4 Overview of voltage regulators placement technique:

( a ) Appropriate placement of a line voltage regulator is required to
achieve the desired results of improving the feeder voltage profile and
voltage regulation. The following general method is used whether the
calculations are being performed by a computer programs or
manually.

( b ) The overall requirement for placing line voltage regulators is the
understanding of voltage regulation on a feeder. This includes such
items as how the grid station bus regulation is done, how distribution
transformers no-load tap settings affect the voltage regulation and so
forth, beyond those basic principles.

4.3.5 Data Requirements:

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( a ) Feeder and grid station transformer loading during a period of one
year. This is the peak demand and the lowest demand (such as 0400



hours during the fall or spring) and the load power factor is not known,
assume 90% lagging power factor where the majority of load is
residential load, 85% where majority is industrial load.

( b ) The grid station bus voltage during peak and low demand There
may be cases where the transformer load drop compensation is being
used or the voltage setting are significantly different.

( c ) Distribution primary circuit configuration including conductor sizes,
circuit distances, conductor impedances and load nodes.

( d ) Voltages and voltage regulation criteria to be followed.

( e ) Economic placement of voltage regulator shall be attempted if
possible

4.3.6 Analysis Technique:

The following technique are the general method that should be followed
when analyzing voltage regulator locations:

( a ) The voltage drop during high and light load conditions without line
voltage regulators installed is determined.

( b ) Allowing for future growth, the amount of voltage rise necessary to
move the peak demand voltage to meet the criteria. This will usually
be to a fixed reference voltage at the location where the regulator is to
be installed.

( c ) The voltage rise due to voltage regulators bank installation is
substracted from the voltage drops calculated in (a) for the nodes
downstream of the regulator bank. This is done for both high and light
load conditions to ensure that no customer along the feeder will be
either over or undervoltaged per the criteria. If capacitors are also
applied, then the effect of voltage rise of the capacitors must be

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included.






4.3.7 Calculation technique.

( a ) Computer method technique:

The preferred method of planning the installation of line voltage
regulators is to utilize one of the commercial computer programs
that will calculate line voltages and demand / energy loses with
and without line voltage regulators on the feeder. Generally, the
data is the same as what is required for a single-line equivalent
power flow with load profile and economic data added.

( b ) Manual Calculation Technique:

1 - Determine the feeder node voltages in percent during the
feeder’s peak demand, usually occurring during the summer.
This may be done either by direct measurement of the
voltage or by performing a feeder voltage drop calculation.

2 - Determine the amount of voltage rise in percent that is
needed to bring the voltage into the voltage ranges specified.
This will usually be to a fixed reference voltage at the location
where the regulator is to be installed.

3 - Substract the voltage regulators voltage rise from the original
voltage drop of the nodes downstream of the voltage
regulator for peak and light load periods. If capacitors are
also on the feeder, add in the voltage rise due to the
capacitors

4 - Check against the established voltage criteria. If not within
the voltage criteria, repeat step (2) and (3).

( c ) Example of the Manual Technique:

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Assume the following overhead circuit:






170mm2 ACSR A 170mm2ACSR B 170mm2ACSR C
5MVA 3.5MVA 1.5MVA

G\S
5 km 2 km 3km

Step 1:

A voltage drop analysis is performed using the voltage drop
calculation guidelines:
Voltage drop from Grid Station to Node A:

5000x5
4730
= 5.3 %

Voltage drop form Node A to Node B:

3500x2
4730
= 1.5 %

Voltage drop from Node B to C:

1500x3
4730
= 1 %

The voltage drops from the G/S to the nodes is the sum of the
segment voltage drops:

VD from G/S to Node A: 5.3%
VD from G/S to Node B: 5.3+1.5 = 6.8 %
VD from G/S to Node C: 5.3+1.5+1 = 7.8%


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The light load peak demand is estimated to be 50% of the peak
demand and is used to calculate the light load voltage drops:

VD from G/S to Node A: 0.5*5.3 = 2.7 %


VD from G/S to Node B: 0.5 x 6.8 = 3.4 %
VD from G/S to Node C: 0.5 x 7.8 = 3.9 %

If the grid station bus is set to maintain a constant voltage out of
14200 volts (102.9%), then peak load voltages at the primary of
the customer’s substation will be:
Peak Load Light Load

Voltages at G/S : 102.9% 102.9%

Voltages at Node A: 102.9% - 5.3 % = 97.6 % 100.2%

Voltages at Node B: 102.9% - 6.8 % = 96.1 % 99.45%

Voltages at Node C: 102.9% - 7.8 % = 95.1 % 98.95%

Step 2:

For residential customers, the voltage needs to be maintained in
the range of ±5% of the nominal 209-231 with a 3.0% allowance
for transformer voltage drop and 5% for secondary service voltage
drop.

For ideal case and without raising Tap changer of the distribution
Transformer the minimum voltage of consumer must be
209 volt (-5%) e.g = 95 %.

The equivalent voltage primary must be =95+3+5=103%.

To cover the voltage in transformer & secondary/service
drop then the voltage must be 103+1.5+1=105.5%
to cover V.D in segment AB, BC but we can not raise voltage
more than 5%.


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If the VR is to be located just prior to node A then the regulator
voltage must be established at 105% to meet all feeder
equipments on A 220 volt nominal system.




Step 3:

A check must be done to verify that all the voltages are within the
prescribed regions:

Peak Load Light Load
G/S Bus 102.9% 102.9%
Node A 105% 105%
Node B 103.5% 104.25%
Node C 102.5% 103.75%

Step 4:

All the voltages are within the standard voltage criteria, therefore,
there are no any further adjustments required.


4.4 Capacitor Placement

4.4.1 Introduction

This procedure has been prepared to assist planning engineers in solving
overhead network voltage problems in the SEC system by utilization of
fixed capacitor banks. Of particular concern in applying fixed capacitor
banks is that the voltage during both peak and light load periods complies
with the voltage criteria. Whereas, during periods of light load customers
should not be over voltaged.

Shunt capacitors installed on a distribution system will cause a voltage rise
from the capacitor bank location back to the source. Capacitors draw a
leading power-factor current and this leading current flowing through the
series reactance of the circuit causes a voltage rise equal to the circuit
reactance time’s capacitor current (see the formula in the later sections).

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The voltage rise is independent of load conditions and is greatest at the
capacitor location, decreasing in the direction of the source to the constant
source voltage, the voltage rise past the capacitor location will be the
same as at the capacitor location.



Fixed capacitor banks will not appreciably improve voltage regulation, but
will provide a constant increase in the voltage level. When installed on a
primary feeder, the voltage increase at the capacitor location is the same
for both light-load and high-load feeder voltage profiles. The voltage at
light-load must be calculated to ensure that customers are not
overvoltaged. The fixed capacitor banks may require that the fuse cutouts
be opened in the fall and closed again in the spring to ensure that
customers will not be over voltaged during the lightly loaded winter period.

Other benefits of properly located capacitor banks is the reduction in
energy and demand losses and release in line and substation capacity.


4.4.2 Recommended Three-Phase Fixed Capacitor Banks:

Individual single-phase capacitor units and the associated mounting rack
are purchased separately for field assembly and mounting on Poles. The
capacitor banks are connected in an ungrounded wye configuration.

Any operational problems, such as over voltages or harmonic interference,
with capacitor bank installations should be reported to DED for assistance.
Form experience, it is not expected that the ungrounded-wye connection
will cause any telephone interference problems, as there is no path for 3rd
and higher order zero sequence harmonic currents to flow without neutral
grounding.


4.4.3 Switched Capacitor Banks:

Switched capacitor banks consist of the following components:

( a ) Three or six capacitor cans,


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( b ) Three single-phase switches,

( c ) One single-phase power transformer (typically 1 kVA) or other
source for switch power supply and controller voltage,



( d ) Single-phase fuse cutouts to protect the switches and capacitors
and disconnect the bank for maintenance.

( e ) One mounting rack to mount the above equipment.

( f ) One controller to sense and switch based upon system or
environmental conditions.

Other controllers are available and can be considered. However, to use
these controllers adequate lead time will be required to obtain the required
approvals.

Alternative controllers to the voltage controller are as follows:

1 - Time Switched Controllers.

2 - High/Low Temperature Switched Controllers

3 - Current Switched Controllers

4 - VAR Switched Controllers

5 - Combinations of the above controllers

The advantages to the environmental controllers (time and temperature)
are their simplicity in installation and control settings.
Typically, fewer Manhours will be required to properly set and monitor
these controllers.

The advantages to the system controllers (voltage, current
and VAR) are that they can more accurately sense the variables that are
to be controlled. The major disadvantage is that more manhours are
required to properly set and monitor these controllers.

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In addition to controlling HV distribution network voltages, switched
capacitor banks are useful for increasing system capacities (both HV
distribution and transmission) and lowering losses.



4.4.4 Overview of Capacitor Placement Technique:

Accurate placement of capacitor banks is required to achieve the desired
results of improving a feeder’s voltage profile and voltage regulation. To
this end, following method is used whether the calculations are being
performed by one of the computer programs or manually.

The overall requirement for placing capacitor banks is the understanding of
voltage regulation on a feeder. This includes such items as how the grid
station bus regulation is done, how distribution transformer no-load tap
settings affect the voltage regulation and so forth. Beyond those basic
principles, the following procedure is required:

( a ) Data Requirements:

1 - Feeder and grid station transformer loading during a period
of one year. This is the peak demand and the lowest
demand (such as 0400 hours during the fall or spring) and
the load power factor. If the light load values are not
known,assume about 25% of the peak demand. If the power
factor is not known,assume 90% lagging power factor where
the majority of load is residential load, 85% for commercial
load, or 80% for industrial load.

2 - The 13.8 kV grid station bus voltage during peak and low
demand. Usually this is about 14.1 kV, however, there may
be cases where the transformer load drop compensation is
being used or the voltage setting are significantly different.

3 - Distribution primary circuit configuration including conductor
sizes, circuit lengths, conductor impedances, and load
nodes.


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4 - If economic placement of capacitors is required, then the
economic parameters are required.





( b ) Analysis Technique:

The following techniques are the general method that should be
followed when analyzing capacitor locations:

1 - The voltage drop during high and light load conditions
without capacitor banks installed is determined.

2 - Allowing for future growth, the amount of voltage rise
necessary to increase the peak demand voltage to meet the
criteria.

3 - The conductor length is determined satisfying the voltage
rise requirement for the givencapacitor bank rating.

4 - The voltage rise due to capacitor bank installation is
subtracted from the voltage drops calculated in (1) above.


This is done for both high and light load conditions to ensure that
no customer along the feeder will be either over or under-
voltaged according to the voltage criteria.


4.4.5 Calculation Technique.

( a ) Computer Method technique:

The preferred method of planning the installation of capacitor banks
is to utilize one of the commercial computers based programs that
will optimally locate the capacitor banks on the feeder and ensure
that al voltage constraints are complied with. The majority of
computer programs of these type will adequately solve the capacitor

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placement problem and at the same time will assist in placement of
voltage regulators. Generally, the data is the same as what is
required for a single-line equivalent power flow with load profile and
economic data added.



The major advantages of using the capacitor placement programs is
that all voltage constraints will be checked and when automatically
located the capacitor banks are located to minimize system losses..

( b ) Manual Calculation Formula:

Manual Formula Using Per Unit Values:

If the line impedance data is available in per unit quantities, then the
percent voltage rise due to the application of a shunt capacitor,
neglecting line resistance is:

(CkVA).(x).(d)
Voltage Rise (percent) =
(10).(Base MVA)

Where: CkVA = Three-phase capacitor bank kVAR rating
x = Reactance in per unit / kilometer
d = length of line in kilometers

Base MVA =Three-phase value used to calculate line per unit
reactance

Manual Formula Using Ohmic Values:

The equation of percent voltage rise due to the application of a shunt
capacitor, neglecting line resistance is:

(CkVA).(x).(d)
Voltage Rise (percent) =
(10).(kV)2

Where: CkVA = Three-phase capacitor bank kVAR rating
x = Reactance in per conductor in ohms / kilometer
d = length of line in kilometers

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kV = Phase-to-phase voltage in kV






( c ) Manual Calculation Technique:

1 - Determine the voltage in percent during the
feeder peak demand, usually occurring during
the summer. This may be done either by direct
measurement of the voltage or by performing a feeder
voltage drop calculation.

2 - Determine the amount of voltage rise in percent
that is needed to bring the voltage into the voltage
ranges specified.

3 - Calculate using the voltage rise formula for a given
capacitor rating (ckVA) and distance (d)
from the grid station. If the voltage rise is not
as desired, repeat using a different distance
or a different capacitor rating (if different sizes
are available).

4 - Add the capacitor voltage rise to the peak
and light load period voltages and check
against the established voltage criteria.
If not within the voltage criteria, repeat steps
1, 2 and3.

5 - If the light load constraints cannot be achieved
for the required voltage rise, then issue instructions
that the fuse cutouts are to be opened in the
fall and closed again in the spring. Verification
of the summer light load profile is required in
this case (summer light load is usually 50% of
the peak demand).


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( d ) Example of the Manual Technique:

Assume the following overhead circuit: where the voltage profile as
example shown at section 4.3.7 (13.8 kV)


G/S 5MVA 3.5MVA 1.5MVA


5 km 2 km 3 km
A B C

Peak 102.9% 97.6% 96.1% 95.1%

Light 102.9% 100.2% 99.45% 98.95%


The calculation done based on PF=0.85 (we assume actual power
factor) or we can measure voltage on the L.T bus of distribution
transformer during no load of transformer in summer peak and tap
changer were set to set zero change in voltage.
Our condition is PF=0.85 & VD as the above

The MVAR flow in segment as below


A B C
2.6 MVAR 1.8 MVAR 0.8 MVAR


5Km 2Km 3km


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1.8 MVAR





If we install capacitor bank 1800 KVAR to compensate KVAR in
segment AB then the MVA will change as:

A B C
4.3 MVA 2.97 MVA 1.5 MVA


5Km 2 Km 3 Km


Note: After installing 1800 KVAR (2x900) at node B, MVA in segment
G/S-A reduced from 5.0 MVA to 4.3 MVA and MVA in segment A-B
reduced from 3.5 MVA to 2.97 MVA with the same active load.

VD at peak load
VD from G/S to node A= (4300*5) /4730=4.5% (instead of 5.3%)
VD from node A to node B=(2970*2)/4730=1.25% (instead of 1.5%)
VD from point B to point C= as before no change
VD at point C =6.75% (instead of 7.8%)

During light load ,if we keep 1800 KVAR capacitor the power factor
become lead so that we keep only 900 KVAR and remove 900
KVAR to improve PF but still lag

A B C
2.16 MVA 1.487 MVA 0.75 MVA

5Km 2 km 3km

VD from G/S to point A=(2160*5)/4730=2.28% instead of 2.7%
VD from point A to point B=(1487*2)/4730=0.62 instead of 0.75
VD from point B to point C =(750*3)/4730=0.5 as before


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G/S A B C
Voltage during peak
load
102.9% 98.4% 97.15% 96.15%
Light load (900 KVAR) 102.9% 100.6% 100% 99.5%


Note :

1 - The design of capacitor must meet light load to avoid over
voltage.

2 - During voltage drop occur we use first capacitor method
then voltage regulator.


4.5 Motor Starting – Voltage Dip

4.5.1 Introduction

This section calculates the voltage dip due to induction motor starting and
provides guidelines for establishing corrective measures. Special cases of
synchronous motor starting, motors starting on generation buses, or large
motors operated parallel on a bus should be referred to DED for review.

4.5.2 Criteria:

The SEC Electricity Utilities Standards sets the maximum permissible voltage
dip and voltage fluctuations that a customer can cause on the network base
on the Utilities Standards .

Voltage dip is the relative variation in voltage, usually caused by motor
starting, that is expressed as a percentage variation from the fundamental
voltage. For motor starts that are limited to 2 to 3 times daily, then the
maximum allowable voltage dip can be 7%.

In general, SEC is concerned that the voltage dip does not exceed the above
criteria at the interface point between SEC and the customer. The customer’s
system can possibly have voltage dips that exceed the standard, however,
this is generally of no concern to SEC.


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The same voltage dip curves can be applied to reciprocating or pulsing type
loads. This is done by calculating voltage drop corresponding to the peak
and the law load points of each cycle.




4.5.3 Corrective measures:

When the calculated voltage dip exceeds the criteria, then the customer and
SEC must coordinate to determine the appropriate corrective measures to
solve the excessive voltage dip problem. SEC cannot approve the design
until the calculated voltage dip is within the criteria and the customer cannot
be connected until the motor start issue is resolved. Any special voltage dip
arrangements with the customer should be noted on the customer
agreement.

After customers are connected, when excessive voltage dips are suspected,
such as through customer complaints, the appropriate voltage recording
meters can be used to determine if the voltage dip exceeds prescribed
standards and / or the customer service agreement.

Corrective measures generally follow to basic routes:

( a ) Reduce the magnitude of starting current seen by the distribution
network from the motor start:

1 - Use auto – transformer motor starter (50, 65 or 80% taps);

2 - Use delta – wye motor starter.

3 - Use reactor motor starter.

4 - Install a motor with less starting current.

5 - Switch shunt capacitors on during the starting phase.
(Obtain approval from DED before agreeing with customer
on this type of starter.).



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( b ) Reduce the driving point impedance at the interface point:

1 - Decrease the length of the line if possible

i Relocate the interface point if possible

ii Use a source nearer to the facility if possible

iii Relocate the facility closer to the source if possible

2 - Use larger conductor (this is usually marginal).

3 - Decrease the impedance of the source transformer.


4.5.4 Overall Methodology:

Voltage dip due to induction motor starting is calculated quickly and
accurately by use of the impedance ratio technique. Two different
methods implementing this technique are furnished for use by the
Operating Areas;

( a ) A computer method (preferred) and a manual method.
The preferred computer method utilizes the actual
impedances to more accurately calculate the motor starting
voltage dip.

( b ) The manual method determines the voltage dip as a ratio of the
impedance magnitudes from the system source to the interface
point to the total impedance magnitudes from the system source
through the motor.

These methods ignore the negligible effect of other loads. The study of the

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effect of other loads requires the use of a power flow program. The use of
such a program will take a day whereas this guideline’s methods give a
fairly accurate answer in less than 30 minutes.




4.5.5 Manual Method of Calculation:

The alternative method is to manually calculate the voltage drop. This
method will not be as accurate as the computer program method but will
provide satisfactory results for the majority of cases. If results using the
manual method are border line, then the computer method should be used
to provide a more accurate answer. This may prevent unnecessary
expenses from being incurred either by SEC or the customer.

( a ) Data Required:

The following data must be collected prior to calculating the voltage
dip caused by induction motor starting:

1 - Starting kVA of motor. If customer cannot provide, assume
the worst case value of 6 times the horse-power or kVA
rating. See the attachments for a table of inrush current
values for the NEMA Code letter marked on the motor
nameplate.
Data Source: Customer

2 - Type of motor starter and voltage applied to motor during
starting (across-the-line, 1.0 voltage; auto-transformer,
usually 0.80, 0.65 or 0.50 voltage; solid state, customer
supplied data; etc.). if customer does not provide any
information, assume across-the-line start with 1.0 voltage.

A delta-wye starter is the same as an auto-transformer starter
with the tap set at a voltage equal to the reciprocal of the
square root of three (0.577).
Data source: Customers

3 - Number of Starts per day. Remember that large motors, are

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usually started at the maximum of only once or twice per day.

4 - Determine SEC short circuit value for three-phase fault at
interface point.




( b ) Calculation Method:

The approximate voltage drop in percent of the initial voltage is as
follows:


100 x Adjusted Motor Starting kVA
VD = System Short Circuit kVA + Adjusted Motor Starting
kVA

Where: Adjusted Motor Starting kVA

= (Auto–transformer Tap)² x Motor Starting kVA x system Short Circuit kVA
= (Line-Line kV) x Short Circuit Amps x 1.73


( c ) Example:

The following information has been collected from the customer
for a 2200 Hp, 60 Hz, 4160/2400 volt induction motor:

ƒ Motor Starting kVA: NEMA Code F (inrush current of
approximately 5.4 times full load current).

ƒ Type of Motor Start: Auto–transformer on 65% tap.

ƒ Number of starts per day: This pump is used for pumping
water and the customer stated that it will only be started a
maximum of once per day.



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( d ) Calculations

Adjusted Motor Starting
= (0.65)2 x (5.4 x 2,200 Hp x 1 kVA/hp)
= 5,019 kVA
system Short Circuit kVA
= (13.8 kV) x 1,726 Amps x 3
= 41,255 kVA
Voltage Dip Calculation:


100 x 5,019 kVA
VD (%) =
41,255 kVA + 5,019 kVA
= 10.8%

( e ) Conclusion

If the interface point is at grid station bus bar, then the voltage dip is
7% which is not acceptable. Alternately, if the SEC Customer
interface is defined as the MV bus of the grid station, then the
voltage dip is 4.0 percent (from computer program). This is within the
standard. In this real case, the interface had to be defined at the
substation bus and the line was dedicated to meet the voltage dip
criteria.










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4.6 Auto – Reclosers

4.6.1 Introduction:

This section is intended to develop criteria for installing auto-recloser on
overhead feeders as a means to achieve improvements in the existing
customer services. However, Improving customer services both in urban
and the rural areas is one of the important company goals, which is
effected by following.

( a ) Feeders Length is very long.

( b ) In many cases the “Frequency” and the “Average Outage Duration”
of Faults is higher than the EC Standards.

( c ) The “Reasons” for most of the fault Outages were described as
“Temporary” in nature.

4.6.2 EC Supply Standards

SEC has set a number of supply standards for the urban and the rural
customers. SEC companies in the Kingdom have to make all possible
efforts to achieve these standards.

( a ) Continuity Standard

This standard is described in terms ”Average Loss of Supply
Duration per Customer (ALSD)”.

The maximum permissible value of annual “ALSD” should not
exceed the following limits:

Type of ALSD Due to ALSD Due to

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Customer “Faults” “Voluntary Outages”
Urban 40 Minutes 40 Minutes
Rural 120 Minutes 120 Minutes



( b ) Standard Outage Frequency:

This standard is described in term of annual “Average Number of
Interruptions per Customer (ANIC)”.
The maximum permissible value of annual “ANIC” should not exceed
the following limits:

Type of Customer ANIC
Urban 3.40
Rural 7.65


4.6.3 Purpose and Scope:

The main purpose of this study is to achieve SEC Supply Standards on
SEC Primary Distribution System. Currently the scope is limited to improve
the “Numbers” and “Average Duration of Faults” on individual overhead
feeders.

Improvement of Supply Standards on Overhead Distribution Feeders
would ultimately result in improving the supply standards on a system
basis.

The main objective would be to bring the overall “Numbers” and “Average
Duration” of faults on all overhead feeders within a reasonable limit.


4.6.4 Use of Auto-Reclosers:

To improve supply standards on overhead distribution feeders, installation
of auto-reclosing (Both at the source and on the Line) has been

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considered as one of the most effective and practical solution. A number of
utilities have been using this equipment and have achieved good results
over the years.





Installation of auto-reclosing would improve supply standards on the
overhead distribution feeders by:


( a ) Reducing the outage duration.

( b ) Auto – clearing of outages caused by temporary/ transient faults. It
will save O&M staff from unnecessary patrolling.

( c ) Isolating faulty sections from the healthy sections in case of
permanent fault. It will reduce post-fault line patrolling effort by O&M
staff.

( d ) Providing facility for sectionalization of the line.


4.6.5 Selection Criteria:

Not all overhead feeders would necessarily require auto-reclosers.
Installation of an “Auto-Reclosing Facility” at the source grid station of all
feeders is recommended. Installation of auto reclosers on the line would
depend upon whether or not the feeder is exceeding a certain pre-set
value of the supply standard and the overall length of the feeder.

The Criteria: Overhead feeder meeting the following two conditions, should
be selected for the installation of a line recloser.

( a ) Primary condition (Supply Standards): During any year the Total
Number of Faults (permanent / transient) exceed four (12). Or During
any year the Average Outage duration recorded, exceeds two (2)
hours.


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( b ) Secondary Condition (Feeder Length): The overall length of feeder is
more than thirty kilometers for 13.8 km & 60 km for 33 km.

Note** number of installation must be taken in consindration.




4.6.6 Procedure to determine the numbers and location of line reclosers
required

Step 1: Select the overhead feeders meeting one of the above conditions
(Refer Section # 4.6.5).

Step 2: Obtain an up-dated single-line diagram of the selected feeder
indicating length of each section in kms.

Step 3: Determine the distance of each point from the source including the
distance of the farthest point from the source.

Step 4: Determine “Number” and the “Location” of each recloser as
explained in Table A (Appendix D)

4.6.7 How to determine the size of the line recloser required:

Size of the auto-recloser installed at the substation should match with
feeders total existing and future peak demand.

Continuous current rating of a line-recloser installed along the line will
depend upon the existing and future peak demand on feeder at the point of
its application.

The interrupting rating of a Line Recloser must be equal to or greater than
the “maximum fault current” expected at the point of its application.







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4.7 Loss Evaluation

4.7.1 Introduction

This guideline has been developed to assist distribution planning and
design engineers in evaluating distribution network’s demand and energy
losses, including, possible improvements to minimize a distribution
network’s real power and energy losses.

Demand and energy losses are inherent in any network and are a direct
revenue loss to the company as generation, transmission and distribution
capacity and fuel are to be used to support losses. Real power losses are
an indicator of the system efficiency and by minimizing losses, within
economic constraints, the distribution network efficiency is improved.
Consequently, just as voltage drop and ampacity are currently evaluated
while reviewing alternatives, losses must be evaluated.

Losses in the power system are classified as real or reactive power losses.
The reactive losses are caused by current flowing through the inductive or
capacitive components. The real losses are caused by current flowing in
resistive components and is the subject of this guideline. Reactive losses
will usually increase the line currents causing higher real power losses.
However, their evaluation is not reasonably possible without use of a
power flow computer program.

The cost of the losses depends on their location in the system, one kW of
loss in the distribution network will cost more money than if this loss occurs
in the transmission or generation system. The explanation is that this
amount of loss in the distribution network will have less magnitude if it is
reflected to the transmission or generation side due to the coincidence
factors. Also theoretically distribution capacity must be added to support
the additional demand caused by network losses. Because of these

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concepts, the evaluation of the losses in the distribution network is very
significant in addition to other economic reasons.






The cost of supplying the losses can be divided into two parts. The first
part is the energy component which is the cost of generating or producing
one kWH of energy (includes fuel and maintenance). The second part is
the demand component which is the amount of money required annually to
supply one kW of demand. These costs are usually at the highest
incremental system costs. All these factors are included in the average
cost of energy supplied. Therefore, the average cost of energy supplied
will be used to determine the cost of the annual losses.

4.7.2 Factors Affecting Distribution Losses

The following factors affecting distribution losses should be reviewed for
each individual study to find which factors may be appropriate:

( a ) The network configuration and the subsequent feeder loadings
directly impact the feeder losses.

( b ) The increase of network losses are proportional to the square of load
growth.

( c ) The proper selection of the conductor size usually limits the line
losses on phase conductors.

( d ) Poor power factor also affects power losses in the system.

( e ) Capacitor bank locations will have a large effect on losses.

( f ) The daily and seasonal switching method of capacitors will affect the
losses.

( g ) Unbalanced loads also add line losses on ground wire and ground.


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( h ) The core losses of distribution transformer are sensitive to the
magnitude of system voltage.

( i ) The quality of a transformer also affects the core losses.




4.7.3 Methodology

Calculate the losses at peak demand (LPD) by one of the following
techniques:

1 - Manually calculate the losses, or

2 - Use a distribution power flow program that calculates
demand losses while doing a voltage analysis. A power flow
will give a more complete demand loss calculation by
including such items as the effect of reactive power losses.

Calculate the annual cost of the losses.

( b ) Load factor (LF):

Load factor is the ratio of the average load over a designated
period of time (kWH divided by number of hours) to the peak load
occurring in that period. Since load factor has no unites, both the
average load and the peak load must be in the same units.
Practically, the load factor must always be in th range between
zero and one.

As load factor is a function of a time period, its value will be
different when calculated for a day, month or year. As the time
period is extended, the load factor will be less. For example, the
load factor of SEC when calculated over a summer period will be
higher than a load factor over an entire year period.





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( c ) Loss Factor (LsF)

The loss factor is the ratio of the average power loss to the peak
load power loss, during a specified period of time. The loss factor
does not necessarily indicate the thermal loading of a piece of
apparatus. It merely indicates the degree to which the load loss
within the apparatus during peak load is maintained throughout
the period in which the loss is being considered.

Loss factor cannot be generally expressed in terms of load factor
without calculating the losses for each level of system demand.
However, the following empirical formula is often used to describe
the relationship between the load factor and the loss factor:

LsF = 0.08 LF + 0.92 LF²

Where: LsF = Loss Factor

LF = Load Factor


4.7.4 Losses at Peak Demand Calculation:

( a ) For distribution circuits, single or three-phase, with load in amperes:

LPD = N x I² R x d x 10
-3
kW

Where: N - Number of phases.
I - Peak demand in amps.
R - Conductor resistance in ohms/km.
d - Distance in km.


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( b ) For three-phase distribution circuits with load in kVA:

KVA²
LPD =
KV²
X R x d x 10
-3
kW

Where: kVA - Peak demand in kVA.
kV - Voltage in kV.
R - Conductor resistance in ohms/km.
d - Distance in km.


( c ) To manually calculate the LPD for a distribution feeder, the following
general procedure is followed. The manual calculation method uses
the same general method for voltage drop calculations:

1 - Group the loads into logical load nodes.

2 - Find the cumulative load for each line segment between load
nodes.

3 - Calculate the LPD for each line segment by using one of the
above formulas for calculating LPD for given load.

4 - Calculate the LPD for the feeder by totaling the losses for all
the line segments.

5 - Multiply by the loss cost factor to get the cost of losses.


( d ) For any other component, determine the kW demand loss by an
appropriate technique.


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4.7.5 Cost of Losses Calculation:

Cost of Losses = Losses at Peak Demand x Loss Cost Factor
= LPD x LCF SR/Year

Loss Cost Factor (LCF) Calculation

Normally, the Loss Cost Factor will not be calculated for each loss
evaluation. LCF should only be calculated or updated when its parameters
change.

Load Factor (LF)

Loss Factor (LsF)


Hours/ Hijra Year (H)



Loss Cost Factor (LCF)
= (average load/max load) = 0.46 (See note)

= 0.08 LF + 0.92 LF² = 0.23


= 24 x 354 = 8496 Hours / year
(8760 Hour for Gregorian)


= H x LsF x CES
= 8496 x 0.23 x 0.0949
= 186 SR/kW/year
where CES : Cost of Energy Supply


Note: the load factor was determined by reviewing the load history of the
Operating Areas. If a more accurate load factor and / or loss factor values
are available, they may be used and the LCF modified accordingly.




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4.7.6 Examples

( a ) Example One - Feeder Losses

Example of the Manual Technique:


Determine the cost of losses of this 3-phase 13.8 kV feeder.

300 mm2 Al 300 mm2 Al 300 mm2 AL
A B
C
2635KVA 1435 KVA 485KVA

distance (km): 12 7 : 10
:

Losses factor=0.23 CES =0.0949

Voltage 13.8 13.8 13.8
I(current) 2635/1.73*13.8=
110.2A
1435/1.73*13.
8=60A
485/1.73*13.8
=20.3A
R per Km 0.13 0.13 0.13
LPD=3I²R=3LI²R
(per Km)
56.9 9.8 1.6
Segment losses =10871 SR/year 1873 SR/year 306 SR/year







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( b ) Example Two – Incremental Losses for New Load:

Determine the cost of losses attributable to a new load of 300 kVA at
node B in Example One above.

Note:

A common error is to consider the cost of losses of the additional
load alone from the source to its location (i.e. 19 km). The correct
method is determine the cost of losses with this additional load as a
new exercise, and then subtract that from the line without that
additional load (i.e. Example One’s results).


300mm2 Al A 300mm2 Al B 300mm2 Al C

# #
Distance (km): 12 : 7 : 10 :
: : :

Node Load (kVA) : 1200 1250 485
Segment Load (kVA): 2935 1735 485
Voltage (kv) : 13.8 13.8 13.8
R (Ohms/km) : .13 .13 .13
LPD (km) : 70.8 14.4 1.6
Segment Loss Cost : SR13,537 SR2,753
SR306

Total Annual Cost of Losses = SR 16,615
Less: Loss w/o New Load = SR 13,050 (from Example One)
Incremental cost increase = SR 3,565


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Page 88 of 90


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This represents the additional annual cost of HV feeder losses
created by adding 300 kVA at node B.






( c ) Example three – Distribution Transformer Losses

An excellent example of using loss evaluation is
determination of distribution transformer losses. Transformer
losses are expressed by two different values; cor loss
and copper loss. Core loss is a constant load where as
copper loss is proportional to the square of load.
Copper loss is the same as described in this guideline.

Note:

This example is presented to illustrate the use of energy loss
calculations for situations where the LCF must be modified. This
example should not be used for the official SEC bid evaluations as
not all the conditions are equal.

Consequently, transformer loss evaluations could use the following
factors:

Core Loss Copper Loss
Load Factor (LF) 1.0 0.46
Loss Factor (LsF) 1.0 0.26


The annual losses can then be calculated as follows:

Cost of Core Loss = H x LsF x CES x Core Loss in kW
= 8496 x 1.0 x .1008 x Core Loss
= 856 SR/kW x Core Loss in kW


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Cost of Copper Loss = H x LsF x CES x Copper Loss in kW
= 8496 x 0.26 x .1008 x Copper Loss
= 223 SR/kW x Copper Loss in kW




The present values are then calculated using a Net Discount Rate of
3.0% and a period of 25 years.

Annual Present Worth
Core Loss SR 856 SR 14,913 per kW of loss
Copper Loss SR 223 SR 3,877 per kW of Loss



















APPENDIX A

Standard Cable Rating Conditions


Cable ratings are based on the following standard conditions:

• Ambient Temperature Direct Buried/ Underground Ducted, at depths not
less than 1 m
: 35 °C.
• Soil Thermal Resistivity, at depths not less than 1 m : 2.0 °C.m/w
• Maximum Continuous Conductor Operating Temperature (XLPE) : 90 °C
• Maximum Short Circuit Conductor Temperature – 5 second Maximum
Duration (XLPE)
: 250 °C
• Loss Load Factor – Daily (Equivalent Load Factor = 0.88) : 0.8
• Burial Depth : 1.0 m
• Circuit Spacing (center to center) : 0.30 m






























Normal Load Ratings
Table 1.5
Direct – Buried Cable Ratings
CABLE SIZE Amps MVA
33 KV
1 X 630 mm² CU 570 33
1 X 500 mm² CU 500 29
3 X 240 mm² CU 350 20
3 X 185 mm² CU 290 17
3 X 120 mm² CU 240 14
13.8 KV
1 X 630 mm² CU 570 14
3 X 300 mm² CU 390 9
3 X 185 mm² CU 290 7
3 X 120 mm² CU 240 6
3 X 50 mm² CU 150 4
3 X 300 mm² AL 300 7
3 X 70 mm² AL 140 3
1 X 50 mm² CU 150 4
CABLE SIZE Amps KVA
380V 220V
LV
1 X 630 mm² CU 525 346 200
3 X 185 + 95 mm² CU 300 197 114
3.5 X 120 mm² CU 280 184 107
3.5 X 70 mm² CU 170 112 65
3.5X 35 mm² CU 120 79 46
3.5 X 16 mm² CU 75 49 29
4 X 500 mm² AL 400 263 152
4 X 300 mm² AL 310 204 118
4 X 185 mm² AL 230 151 88
4 X 120 mm² AL 200 131 76
4 X 95 mm² AL 160 105 61
4 X 70 mm² AL 135 89 51
4 X ٥0 mm² AL 105 69 40

Note: These ratings are based on calculations derived from IEC 287 (1982) : “ Calculation of the
Continuous Current Rating of Cables”. They are based on the standard rating conditions indicated in
section 1.12.2.1 and on the cable characteristics indicated in section 1.12.2.3 These results are based on
data for typical cable types. For more precise data refer to the specific cable supplier. Correction
factors for deviation from these conditions are indicated in table 1.6 1.7 and 1.8.
Where two or more circuits are installed in proximity, the load rating of all affected cables is reduced.
The ratings in table 1.5 are based on equally loaded circuits at a spacing of 0.3 m.


Table 1.6
Burial Depth Correction Factors

Burial Depth – m Correction Factor
0.8 1.02
1.0 1.00
1.5 0.96
2.0 0.92
2.5 0.90
3.0 0.87
4.0 0.84
5.0 0.82
Note:Burial depth refers to the distance from the center of the cable installation to the final grade
(surface) level.

Table 1.7
Soil Thermal Resistivity Correction Factors

Soil Thermal Resistivity - °C.m/w Correction Factor
1.2 1.14
1.5 1.08
2.0 1.00
2.5 0.92
3.0 0.86

Note:

The value of soil thermal Resistivity chosen shall make full allowance for dry-out of the soil adjacent to
the cables, due to heat emission from the cables. All soil within the 50°C. isotherm surrounding the
cables should be assumed to be dry. The soil at the ground surface should also be assumed to be dry.
Thus the value of soil thermal Resistivity chosen shall be higher than the background value derived
from site measurements.


Table 1.8
Ground Temperature Correction Factors

Ground Temperature - °C Correction Factor
30 1.04
35 1.00
40 0.95




Cable Characteristics
Table 1.9
Cable Characteristics
CABLE
SIZE
RDC 20 °C
Ohms / km
RAC 20 °C
Ohms / km
X1 (60HZ)
Ohms / km
33 KV
1 X 630 mm² CU
0.0283 0.0427 0.1280
1 X 500 mm² CU
0.0301 0.0597 0.1300
3 X 240 mm² CU
0.0754 0.0987 0.1310
3 X 185 mm² CU
0.0991 0.1290 0.1160
3 X 120 mm² CU
0.1530 0.1960 0.1240
13.8 KV
1 X 630 mm² CU
0.0283 0.0434 0.1160
3 X 300 mm² CU
0.0601 0.0808 0.1080
3 X 185 mm² CU
0.0991 0.1290 0.1160
3 X 120 mm² CU
0.1530 0.1960 0.1240
3 X 50 mm² CU
0.3870 0.4940 0.1440
3 X 300 mm² AL
0.1000 0.1300 0.1080
3 X 70 mm² AL
0.4430 0.5680 0.1360
1 X 50 mm² CU
0.3914 0.5023 0.1280
LV
1 X 630 mm² CU
0.0283 0.0434 0.1120
3 X 185 + 95 mm² CU
0.0991 0.1290 0.1040
3.5 X 120 mm² CU
0.1530 0.1960 0.1100
3.5 X 70 mm² CU
0.2680 0.3420 0.1200
3.5X 35 mm² CU
0.5290 0.6680 0.1320
3.5 X 16 mm² CU
1.1500 1.4700 0.1500
4 X 500 mm² AL
0.0605 0.0820 0.0800
4 X 300 mm² AL
0.1000 0.1300 0.1000
4 X 185 mm² AL
0.1640 0.2110 0.1050
4 X ١٢٠mm² AL
0.2530 0.3250 0.1100
4 X 95 mm² AL
0.4100 0.4110 0.1150
4 X 70 mm² AL
0.4430 0.5680 0.1200
4 X ٥0 mm² AL
0.6410 0.8220 0.1260

Note:

Impedance values are ohms per km per phase for each cable type. Multiply by square root of 3 to derive
equivalent line values. Indicated values are positive / negative sequence impedance values.
The DC resistance values are based on IEC 228: conductors of Insulated Cables. The AC resistance values
take account of skin effect and are based on data for typical cable types. For more precise data refer to the
specific cable supplier.
The reactance values are based on a trefoil conductor configuration for single core cables. They are based on
data for typical cable types. For more precise data refer to the specific cable supplier.


Overhead Lines: Standard Line Rating Conditions



Overhead Lines ratings are based on the following standard conditions:

Ambient Temperature

: 50 °C.
Minimum Wind Velocity

: 0.6 m/sec.
Altitude ( above sea level)

: 1000 m
Maximum Continuous Conductor Operating Temperature

: 80 °C
Emissivity (for Cu. And Al.)

: 0.5
Absorptive (of solar heat)

: 0.5































Normal Load Ratings

Table 6
Overhead Line Ratings

Conductor Size Amps MVA
33 KV
240 mm² ACSR 450 25.7
170 mm² ACSR 361 20.7
70 mm² ACSR 207 11.8
300 mm² AAAC 482 27.6
180 mm² AAAC 351 20.1
120 mm² AAAC 272 15.5
120 mm² CU 362 20.7
70 mm² CU 254 14.5
13.8 KV
240 mm² ACSR 450 10.8
170 mm² ACSR 361 8.6
70 mm² ACSR 207 4.9
300 mm² AAAC 482 11.5
180 mm² AAAC 351 8.4
120 mm² AAAC 272 6.5
120 mm² CU 362 8.7
70 mm² CU 254 6.1
L.V. 380 V 220 V
120 mm² AAAC 285 188 109
4 X 120 mm² AL, Quadruplex 290 190 110
4 X 50mm² AL, Quadruplex 125 33 19
70 mm² CU 254 167 97

Note:

These ratings are based on calculations derived from ANSI/IEEE Std. 738-1986 : IEEE Standard for
Calculation of Bare Overhead Conductor Temperature and Ampacity Under Steady-State Conditions. They
are based on the standard rating conditions indicated in section 1.12.3.1 and the conductor characteristics
indicated in section 1.12.3.3 Correction factors for deviations from these conditions are indicated in Tables
1.11,1.12, 1.13 and 1.14











Table 7
Ambient Temperature Correction Factors
Ambient Air Temperature - °C. Correction Factor
45 1.10
50 1.00
55 0.88

Table 8
Altitude Correction Factors
Altitude – m Correction Factor
0 1.05
1000 1.00
2000 0.95
3000 0.90

Table 9
Wind Velocity Correction Factors
Wind Velocity – m/sec. Correction Factor
Natural Convection 0.60
0.6 1.00
1.0 1.15
2.0 1.38
5.0 1.80

Table 10
Conductor Temperature Correction Factors
Conductor Temperature - °C Correction Factor
75 0.88
80 1.00
85 1.10
90 1.19
120 1.60

Note:

Conductors shall be operated at temperatures in excess of the standard maximum operating temperature
of 80 °C. only where:
The line has been designed such that all clearances are observed at the higher conductor temperature:
and
The suppliers confirm that the conductor and all accessories are capable of operation without sustaining
damage at the higher conductor temperature.
Any period of operation at higher conductor temperatures shall be limited to within the supplier’s
recommendation.




Conductor Characteristics

Table 11
Overhead Conductor Characteristics

Conductor Size
R
DC
20 °C
Ohms/km
R
AC
20 °C
Ohms/km
X
L
(60HZ)
Ohms/km
33 KV
240 mm² ACSR 0.120 0.150 0.388
170 mm² ACSR 0.169 0.210 0.404
70 mm² ACSR 0.426 0.529 0.436
300 mm² AAAC 0.109 0.133 0.388
180 mm² AAAC 0.183 0.223 0.409
120 mm² AAAC 0.277 0.337 0.428
120 mm² CU 0.153 0.190 0.425
70 mm² CU 0.273 0.338 0.447
13.8 KV
240 mm² ACSR 0.120 0.150 0.374
170 mm² ACSR 0.169 0.210 0.391
70 mm² ACSR 0.426 0.529 0.422
300 mm² AAAC 0.109 0.133 0.374
180 mm² AAAC 0.183 0.223 0.395
120 mm² AAAC 0.277 0.337 0.415
120 mm² CU 0.153 0.190 0.412
70 mm² CU 0.273 0.338 0.433
LV
120 mm² AAAC 0.246 0.306 0.356
4 X 120 mm² AL, Quadruplex 0.277 0.337 0.415
4 X 50mm² AL, Quadruplex 0.523 0.674 0.622
70 mm² CU 0.273 0.338 0.378

Note:
Impedance values are ohms per km per phase for each conductor type. Multiply by square root of 3 to
derive equivalent line values. Indicated values are positive / negative sequence impedance values.
The AC resistance values take account of skin .
The reactance values only include line inductance effects. Capacitance effects are ignored for these voltage
levels. The inductance values are based on a geometric mean conductor spacing as follows:
33 KV 1.5 m
13.8 KV 1.25 m
L.V. 0.6 m
The geometric mean conductor spacing is the cube root of the product of the three phases inter – conductor
spacing.

























APPENDIX B
































Grid Station
M.V Feeder M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
Figure No. 2.1
Distribution Feeder Configuration - Radial Supply
Figure No. 2.2
Distribution Feeder Configuration - Loop Supply
Grid Station
M.V Feeder M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
Grid Station
M.V Feeder M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
N.O.P
































Figure No. 2.3A
Distribution Feeder Configuration – T - Loop Supply
Grid Station
M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
Grid Station
M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
Grid Station
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
N.O.P
N.O.P
































Figure No. 2.3B
Distribution Feeder Configuration – T - Loop Supply
M.V Feeder
Grid Station
M.V Feeder M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
Grid Station
M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
Grid Station
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
































Figure No. 2.4
Distribution Feeder Configuration – Multiple Feeder Loop Supply
Grid Station
M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
Grid Station
M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
Grid Station
M.V Feeder M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
Grid Station
M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation


M.V Feeder
M.V Feeder





























M.V Feeder
Grid Station
M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
Grid Station
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
Distribution Substation
Figure No. 2.5
Distribution Feeder Configuration – Radial Branch Supply


M.V Feeder






























Grid Station
Distribution Substation
Main LV Cable
LV Meters
Figure No. 2.6
MV Customer Supplied at LV with multi- meter
Distribution Transformer
To Customer SEC


M.V Feeder






























Grid Station
Distribution Substation
Figure No. 2.7
MV Customer Supplied at LV with Main Meter
Distribution Transformer
To Customer SEC


M.V Feeder






























Grid Station
M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
HV Meter
R.M.U
M.V Feeder
To Customer
Figure No. 2.8A
MV Customer Supplied at MV with Main Meter


M.V Feeder
M.V Feeder






























Grid Station
M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
Grid Station
M.V Feeder
Distribution Substation
To Customer SEC
Figure No. 2.8B
MV Customer Supplied at MV with Main Meter
APPENDIX C
CABLE SIZE = 300 MM2 AL/XLPE
PF= .85 K= 3323
10 30 50 70 90 110 130 150 170 190 210 230 250 270 290
AMP KVA
20.0 8.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7
40.0 16.0 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4
60.0 24.0 0.1 0.2 0.4 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6
80.0 32.0 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8
100.0 40.0 0.1 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.3 3.5
120.0 48.0 0.1 0.4 0.7 1.0 1.3 1.6 1.9 2.2 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.2
140.0 56.0 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.5 1.9 2.2 2.5 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.9 4.2 4.6 4.9
160.0 64.0 0.2 0.6 1.0 1.3 1.7 2.1 2.5 2.9 3.3 3.7 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.2 5.6
180.0 72.0 0.2 0.7 1.1 1.5 2.0 2.4 2.8 3.3 3.7 4.1 4.6 5.0 5.4 5.9 6.3
200.0 80.0 0.2 0.7 1.2 1.7 2.2 2.6 3.1 3.6 4.1 4.6 5.1 5.5 6.0 6.5 7.0
220.0 88.0 0.3 0.8 1.3 1.9 2.4 2.9 3.4 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.6 6.1 6.6 7.2 7.7
240.0 96.0 0.3 0.9 1.4 2.0 2.6 3.2 3.8 4.3 4.9 5.5 6.1 6.6 7.2 7.8 8.4
260.0 104.0 0.3 0.9 1.6 2.2 2.8 3.4 4.1 4.7 5.3 5.9 6.6 7.2 7.8 8.5 9.1
280.0 112.0 0.3 1.0 1.7 2.4 3.0 3.7 4.4 5.1 5.7 6.4 7.1 7.8 8.4 9.1 9.8
300.0 120.0 0.4 1.1 1.8 2.5 3.3 4.0 4.7 5.4 6.1 6.9 7.6 8.3 9.0 9.8 10.5
320.0 128.0 0.4 1.2 1.9 2.7 3.5 4.2 5.0 5.8 6.5 7.3 8.1 8.9 9.6 10.4 11.2
340.0 136.0 0.4 1.2 2.0 2.9 3.7 4.5 5.3 6.1 7.0 7.8 8.6 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.9
360.0 144.0 0.4 1.3 2.2 3.0 3.9 4.8 5.6 6.5 7.4 8.2 9.1 10.0 10.8 11.7 12.6
380.0 152.0 0.5 1.4 2.3 3.2 4.1 5.0 5.9 6.9 7.8 8.7 9.6 10.5 11.4 12.4 13.3
400.0 160.0 0.5 1.4 2.4 3.4 4.3 5.3 6.3 7.2 8.2 9.2 10.1 11.1 12.0 13.0 14.0
420.0 168.0 0.5 1.5 2.5 3.5 4.6 5.6 6.6 7.6 8.6 9.6 10.6 11.6 12.6 13.7 14.7
TABLE 1
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOLTAGE =220 V
DISTANCE (M)
LOAD
VOL_DROP_220V.xls/lv_220V/2
CABLE SIZE = 185 MM2 AL/XLPE
PF= .85 K= 2313
10 30 50 70 90 110 130 150 170 190 210 230 250 270 290
AMP KVA
20.0 8.0 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.9 0.9 1.0
40.0 16.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.3 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.9 2.0
60.0 24.0 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8
80.0 32.0 0.1 0.4 0.7 1.0 1.2 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.6 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.7 4.0
100.0 40.0 0.2 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.6 1.9 2.2 2.6 2.9 3.3 3.6 4.0 4.3 4.7 5.0
120.0 48.0 0.2 0.6 1.0 1.5 1.9 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 3.9 4.4 4.8 5.2 5.6 6.0
140.0 56.0 0.2 0.7 1.2 1.7 2.2 2.7 3.1 3.6 4.1 4.6 5.1 5.6 6.1 6.5 7.0
160.0 64.0 0.3 0.8 1.4 1.9 2.5 3.0 3.6 4.2 4.7 5.3 5.8 6.4 6.9 7.5 8.0
180.0 72.0 0.3 0.9 1.6 2.2 2.8 3.4 4.0 4.7 5.3 5.9 6.5 7.2 7.8 8.4 9.0
200.0 80.0 0.3 1.0 1.7 2.4 3.1 3.8 4.5 5.2 5.9 6.6 7.3 8.0 8.6 9.3 10.0
220.0 88.0 0.4 1.1 1.9 2.7 3.4 4.2 4.9 5.7 6.5 7.2 8.0 8.8 9.5 10.3 11.0
240.0 96.0 0.4 1.2 2.1 2.9 3.7 4.6 5.4 6.2 7.1 7.9 8.7 9.5 10.4 11.2 12.0
260.0 104.0 0.4 1.3 2.2 3.1 4.0 4.9 5.8 6.7 7.6 8.5 9.4 10.3 11.2 12.1 13.0
280.0 112.0 0.5 1.5 2.4 3.4 4.4 5.3 6.3 7.3 8.2 9.2 10.2 11.1 12.1 13.1 14.0
300.0 120.0 0.5 1.6 2.6 3.6 4.7 5.7 6.7 7.8 8.8 9.9 10.9 11.9 13.0 14.0 15.0
320.0 128.0 0.6 1.7 2.8 3.9 5.0 6.1 7.2 8.3 9.4 10.5 11.6 12.7 13.8 14.9 16.1
340.0 136.0 0.6 1.8 2.9 4.1 5.3 6.5 7.6 8.8 10.0 11.2 12.4 13.5 14.7 15.9 17.1
360.0 144.0 0.6 1.9 3.1 4.4 5.6 6.8 8.1 9.3 10.6 11.8 13.1 14.3 15.6 16.8 18.1
380.0 152.0 0.7 2.0 3.3 4.6 5.9 7.2 8.5 9.9 11.2 12.5 13.8 15.1 16.4 17.7 19.1
400.0 160.0 0.7 2.1 3.5 4.8 6.2 7.6 9.0 10.4 11.8 13.1 14.5 15.9 17.3 18.7 20.1
420.0 168.0 0.7 2.2 3.6 5.1 6.5 8.0 9.4 10.9 12.4 13.8 15.3 16.7 18.2 19.6 21.1
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOLTAGE =220 V
DISTANCE (M)
TABLE 2
LOAD
VOL_DROP_220V.xls/lv_220V/3
CABLE SIZE = 120 MM2 AL/XLPE
PF= .85 K= 1636
10 30 50 70 90 110 130 150 170 190 210 230 250 270 290
AMP KVA
20.0 8.0 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4
40.0 16.0 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.1 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8
60.0 24.0 0.1 0.4 0.7 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.1
80.0 32.0 0.2 0.6 1.0 1.4 1.8 2.2 2.5 2.9 3.3 3.7 4.1 4.5 4.9 5.3 5.7
100.0 40.0 0.2 0.7 1.2 1.7 2.2 2.7 3.2 3.7 4.2 4.6 5.1 5.6 6.1 6.6 7.1
120.0 48.0 0.3 0.9 1.5 2.1 2.6 3.2 3.8 4.4 5.0 5.6 6.2 6.7 7.3 7.9 8.5
140.0 56.0 0.3 1.0 1.7 2.4 3.1 3.8 4.5 5.1 5.8 6.5 7.2 7.9 8.6 9.2 9.9
160.0 64.0 0.4 1.2 2.0 2.7 3.5 4.3 5.1 5.9 6.7 7.4 8.2 9.0 9.8 10.6 11.3
180.0 72.0 0.4 1.3 2.2 3.1 4.0 4.8 5.7 6.6 7.5 8.4 9.2 10.1 11.0 11.9 12.8
200.0 80.0 0.5 1.5 2.4 3.4 4.4 5.4 6.4 7.3 8.3 9.3 10.3 11.2 12.2 13.2 14.2
220.0 88.0 0.5 1.6 2.7 3.8 4.8 5.9 7.0 8.1 9.1 10.2 11.3 12.4 13.5 14.5 15.6
240.0 96.0 0.6 1.8 2.9 4.1 5.3 6.5 7.6 8.8 10.0 11.2 12.3 13.5 14.7 15.8 17.0
260.0 104.0 0.6 1.9 3.2 4.5 5.7 7.0 8.3 9.5 10.8 12.1 13.4 14.6 15.9 17.2 18.4
280.0 112.0 0.7 2.1 3.4 4.8 6.2 7.5 8.9 10.3 11.6 13.0 14.4 15.7 17.1 18.5 19.9
300.0 120.0 0.7 2.2 3.7 5.1 6.6 8.1 9.5 11.0 12.5 13.9 15.4 16.9 18.3 19.8 21.3
320.0 128.0 0.8 2.3 3.9 5.5 7.0 8.6 10.2 11.7 13.3 14.9 16.4 18.0 19.6 21.1 22.7
340.0 136.0 0.8 2.5 4.2 5.8 7.5 9.1 10.8 12.5 14.1 15.8 17.5 19.1 20.8 22.5 24.1
360.0 144.0 0.9 2.6 4.4 6.2 7.9 9.7 11.4 13.2 15.0 16.7 18.5 20.2 22.0 23.8 25.5
380.0 152.0 0.9 2.8 4.6 6.5 8.4 10.2 12.1 13.9 15.8 17.7 19.5 21.4 23.2 25.1 26.9
400.0 160.0 1.0 2.9 4.9 6.8 8.8 10.8 12.7 14.7 16.6 18.6 20.5 22.5 24.5 26.4 28.4
420.0 168.0 1.0 3.1 5.1 7.2 9.2 11.3 13.4 15.4 17.5 19.5 21.6 23.6 25.7 27.7 29.8
VOLTAGE =220 V
DISTANCE (M)
TABLE 3
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
LOAD
VOL_DROP_220V.xls/lv_220V/4
CABLE SIZE = 70 MM2 AL/XLPE
PF= .85 K= 1001
10 25 40 55 70 85 100 115 130 145 160 175 190 205 220
AMP KVA
10.0 4.0 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9
20.0 8.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.8
30.0 12.0 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4
40.0 16.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.9 1.1 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.3 2.6 2.8 3.0 3.3 3.5
50.0 20.0 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.3 2.6 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.8 4.1 4.4
60.0 24.0 0.2 0.6 1.0 1.3 1.7 2.0 2.4 2.8 3.1 3.5 3.8 4.2 4.6 4.9 5.3
70.0 28.0 0.3 0.7 1.1 1.5 2.0 2.4 2.8 3.2 3.6 4.1 4.5 4.9 5.3 5.7 6.2
80.0 32.0 0.3 0.8 1.3 1.8 2.2 2.7 3.2 3.7 4.2 4.6 5.1 5.6 6.1 6.6 7.0
90.0 36.0 0.4 0.9 1.4 2.0 2.5 3.1 3.6 4.1 4.7 5.2 5.8 6.3 6.8 7.4 7.9
100.0 40.0 0.4 1.0 1.6 2.2 2.8 3.4 4.0 4.6 5.2 5.8 6.4 7.0 7.6 8.2 8.8
110.0 44.0 0.4 1.1 1.8 2.4 3.1 3.7 4.4 5.1 5.7 6.4 7.0 7.7 8.4 9.0 9.7
120.0 48.0 0.5 1.2 1.9 2.6 3.4 4.1 4.8 5.5 6.2 7.0 7.7 8.4 9.1 9.8 10.6
130.0 52.0 0.5 1.3 2.1 2.9 3.6 4.4 5.2 6.0 6.8 7.5 8.3 9.1 9.9 10.7 11.4
140.0 56.0 0.6 1.4 2.2 3.1 3.9 4.8 5.6 6.4 7.3 8.1 9.0 9.8 10.6 11.5 12.3
150.0 60.0 0.6 1.5 2.4 3.3 4.2 5.1 6.0 6.9 7.8 8.7 9.6 10.5 11.4 12.3 13.2
160.0 64.0 0.6 1.6 2.6 3.5 4.5 5.4 6.4 7.4 8.3 9.3 10.2 11.2 12.2 13.1 14.1
170.0 68.0 0.7 1.7 2.7 3.7 4.8 5.8 6.8 7.8 8.8 9.9 10.9 11.9 12.9 13.9 14.9
180.0 72.0 0.7 1.8 2.9 4.0 5.0 6.1 7.2 8.3 9.4 10.4 11.5 12.6 13.7 14.7 15.8
190.0 76.0 0.8 1.9 3.0 4.2 5.3 6.5 7.6 8.7 9.9 11.0 12.2 13.3 14.4 15.6 16.7
200.0 80.0 0.8 2.0 3.2 4.4 5.6 6.8 8.0 9.2 10.4 11.6 12.8 14.0 15.2 16.4 17.6
210.0 84.0 0.8 2.1 3.4 4.6 5.9 7.1 8.4 9.7 10.9 12.2 13.4 14.7 15.9 17.2 18.5
DISTANCE (M)
TABLE 4
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOLTAGE =220 V
LOAD
VOL_DROP_220V.xls/lv_220V/5
CABLE SIZE = 50 MM2 AL/XLPE
PF= .85 K= 710
10 25 40 55 70 85 100 115 130 145 160 175 190 205 220
AMP KVA
10.0 4.0 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.2
20.0 8.0 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.1 2.3 2.5
30.0 12.0 0.2 0.4 0.7 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6
40.0 16.0 0.2 0.6 0.9 1.2 1.6 1.9 2.3 2.6 2.9 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.3 4.6 5.0
50.0 20.0 0.3 0.7 1.1 1.5 2.0 2.4 2.8 3.2 3.7 4.1 4.5 4.9 5.4 5.8 6.2
60.0 24.0 0.3 0.8 1.4 1.9 2.4 2.9 3.4 3.9 4.4 4.9 5.4 5.9 6.4 6.9 7.4
70.0 28.0 0.4 1.0 1.6 2.2 2.8 3.4 3.9 4.5 5.1 5.7 6.3 6.9 7.5 8.1 8.7
80.0 32.0 0.5 1.1 1.8 2.5 3.2 3.8 4.5 5.2 5.9 6.5 7.2 7.9 8.6 9.2 9.9
90.0 36.0 0.5 1.3 2.0 2.8 3.6 4.3 5.1 5.8 6.6 7.4 8.1 8.9 9.6 10.4 11.2
100.0 40.0 0.6 1.4 2.3 3.1 3.9 4.8 5.6 6.5 7.3 8.2 9.0 9.9 10.7 11.6 12.4
110.0 44.0 0.6 1.5 2.5 3.4 4.3 5.3 6.2 7.1 8.1 9.0 9.9 10.8 11.8 12.7 13.6
120.0 48.0 0.7 1.7 2.7 3.7 4.7 5.7 6.8 7.8 8.8 9.8 10.8 11.8 12.8 13.9 14.9
130.0 52.0 0.7 1.8 2.9 4.0 5.1 6.2 7.3 8.4 9.5 10.6 11.7 12.8 13.9 15.0 16.1
140.0 56.0 0.8 2.0 3.2 4.3 5.5 6.7 7.9 9.1 10.3 11.4 12.6 13.8 15.0 16.2 17.4
150.0 60.0 0.8 2.1 3.4 4.6 5.9 7.2 8.5 9.7 11.0 12.3 13.5 14.8 16.1 17.3 18.6
160.0 64.0 0.9 2.3 3.6 5.0 6.3 7.7 9.0 10.4 11.7 13.1 14.4 15.8 17.1 18.5 19.8
170.0 68.0 1.0 2.4 3.8 5.3 6.7 8.1 9.6 11.0 12.5 13.9 15.3 16.8 18.2 19.6 21.1
180.0 72.0 1.0 2.5 4.1 5.6 7.1 8.6 10.1 11.7 13.2 14.7 16.2 17.8 19.3 20.8 22.3
190.0 76.0 1.1 2.7 4.3 5.9 7.5 9.1 10.7 12.3 13.9 15.5 17.1 18.7 20.3 21.9 23.6
200.0 80.0 1.1 2.8 4.5 6.2 7.9 9.6 11.3 13.0 14.7 16.3 18.0 19.7 21.4 23.1 24.8
210.0 84.0 1.2 3.0 4.7 6.5 8.3 10.1 11.8 13.6 15.4 17.2 18.9 20.7 22.5 24.3 26.0
TABLE 5
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOLTAGE =220 V
DISTANCE (M)
LOAD
VOL_DROP_220V.xls/lv_220V/6
CABLE SIZE = QUADRUPLEX 120 MM2 XLPE
PF= .85 K= 1781
10 25 40 55 70 85 100 115 130 145 160 175 190 205 220
AMP KVA
10.0 4.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5
20.0 8.0 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.9 0.9 1.0
30.0 12.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
40.0 16.0 0.1 0.2 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.6 1.7 1.8 2.0
50.0 20.0 0.1 0.3 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.1 2.3 2.5
60.0 24.0 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 3.0
70.0 28.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.2 3.5
80.0 32.0 0.2 0.4 0.7 1.0 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.3 2.6 2.9 3.1 3.4 3.7 4.0
90.0 36.0 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.3 2.6 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.8 4.1 4.4
100.0 40.0 0.2 0.6 0.9 1.2 1.6 1.9 2.2 2.6 2.9 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.3 4.6 4.9
110.0 44.0 0.2 0.6 1.0 1.4 1.7 2.1 2.5 2.8 3.2 3.6 4.0 4.3 4.7 5.1 5.4
120.0 48.0 0.3 0.7 1.1 1.5 1.9 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.7 5.1 5.5 5.9
130.0 52.0 0.3 0.7 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.5 2.9 3.4 3.8 4.2 4.7 5.1 5.5 6.0 6.4
140.0 56.0 0.3 0.8 1.3 1.7 2.2 2.7 3.1 3.6 4.1 4.6 5.0 5.5 6.0 6.4 6.9
150.0 60.0 0.3 0.8 1.3 1.9 2.4 2.9 3.4 3.9 4.4 4.9 5.4 5.9 6.4 6.9 7.4
160.0 64.0 0.4 0.9 1.4 2.0 2.5 3.1 3.6 4.1 4.7 5.2 5.8 6.3 6.8 7.4 7.9
170.0 68.0 0.4 1.0 1.5 2.1 2.7 3.2 3.8 4.4 5.0 5.5 6.1 6.7 7.3 7.8 8.4
180.0 72.0 0.4 1.0 1.6 2.2 2.8 3.4 4.0 4.7 5.3 5.9 6.5 7.1 7.7 8.3 8.9
190.0 76.0 0.4 1.1 1.7 2.3 3.0 3.6 4.3 4.9 5.5 6.2 6.8 7.5 8.1 8.7 9.4
200.0 80.0 0.4 1.1 1.8 2.5 3.1 3.8 4.5 5.2 5.8 6.5 7.2 7.9 8.5 9.2 9.9
210.0 84.0 0.5 1.2 1.9 2.6 3.3 4.0 4.7 5.4 6.1 6.8 7.5 8.3 9.0 9.7 10.4
TABLE 6
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOLTAGE =220 V
DISTANCE (M)
LOAD
VOL_DROP_220V.xls/lv_220V/7
CABLE SIZE = QUADRUPLEX 50 MM2 XLPE
PF= .85 K= 760
10 25 40 55 70 85 100 115 130 145 160 175 190 205 220
AMP KVA
10.0 4.0 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2
20.0 8.0 0.1 0.3 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.3
30.0 12.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6
40.0 16.0 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.1 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.3 4.6
50.0 20.0 0.3 0.7 1.1 1.4 1.8 2.2 2.6 3.0 3.4 3.8 4.2 4.6 5.0 5.4 5.8
60.0 24.0 0.3 0.8 1.3 1.7 2.2 2.7 3.2 3.6 4.1 4.6 5.1 5.5 6.0 6.5 6.9
70.0 28.0 0.4 0.9 1.5 2.0 2.6 3.1 3.7 4.2 4.8 5.3 5.9 6.4 7.0 7.6 8.1
80.0 32.0 0.4 1.1 1.7 2.3 2.9 3.6 4.2 4.8 5.5 6.1 6.7 7.4 8.0 8.6 9.3
90.0 36.0 0.5 1.2 1.9 2.6 3.3 4.0 4.7 5.4 6.2 6.9 7.6 8.3 9.0 9.7 10.4
100.0 40.0 0.5 1.3 2.1 2.9 3.7 4.5 5.3 6.1 6.8 7.6 8.4 9.2 10.0 10.8 11.6
110.0 44.0 0.6 1.4 2.3 3.2 4.1 4.9 5.8 6.7 7.5 8.4 9.3 10.1 11.0 11.9 12.7
120.0 48.0 0.6 1.6 2.5 3.5 4.4 5.4 6.3 7.3 8.2 9.2 10.1 11.1 12.0 13.0 13.9
130.0 52.0 0.7 1.7 2.7 3.8 4.8 5.8 6.8 7.9 8.9 9.9 10.9 12.0 13.0 14.0 15.1
140.0 56.0 0.7 1.8 2.9 4.1 5.2 6.3 7.4 8.5 9.6 10.7 11.8 12.9 14.0 15.1 16.2
150.0 60.0 0.8 2.0 3.2 4.3 5.5 6.7 7.9 9.1 10.3 11.5 12.6 13.8 15.0 16.2 17.4
160.0 64.0 0.8 2.1 3.4 4.6 5.9 7.2 8.4 9.7 10.9 12.2 13.5 14.7 16.0 17.3 18.5
170.0 68.0 0.9 2.2 3.6 4.9 6.3 7.6 8.9 10.3 11.6 13.0 14.3 15.7 17.0 18.3 19.7
180.0 72.0 0.9 2.4 3.8 5.2 6.6 8.1 9.5 10.9 12.3 13.7 15.2 16.6 18.0 19.4 20.8
190.0 76.0 1.0 2.5 4.0 5.5 7.0 8.5 10.0 11.5 13.0 14.5 16.0 17.5 19.0 20.5 22.0
200.0 80.0 1.1 2.6 4.2 5.8 7.4 8.9 10.5 12.1 13.7 15.3 16.8 18.4 20.0 21.6 23.2
210.0 84.0 1.1 2.8 4.4 6.1 7.7 9.4 11.1 12.7 14.4 16.0 17.7 19.3 21.0 22.7 24.3
DISTANCE (M)
LOAD
TABLE 7
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOLTAGE =220 V
VOL_DROP_220V.xls/lv_220V/8
TABLE 8
CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C 300 mm
2
P.F 0.85
CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER 185 mm
2
VOLTAGE 220 V
RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP. 310
RATED CURRENT FOR 185 mm2 IN AMP. 230
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150
10 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 3.2 3.6 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.2 5.6 6.0 6.4
20 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 3.2 3.6 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.2 5.6 6.0 6.4 6.8
30 1.5 1.9 2.3 2.7 3.2 3.6 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.2 5.6 6.0 6.4 6.8 7.2
40 1.9 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.2 5.6 6.0 6.4 6.8 7.2 7.6
50 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.7 5.0 5.4 5.8 6.2 6.6 7.0 7.4 7.8
60 2.7 3.1 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.7 5.2 5.6 6.0 6.4 6.8 7.2 7.7 8.1 8.5
70 3.0 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.7 5.1 5.5 6.0 6.4 6.8 7.2 7.6 8.1 8.5 8.9
80 3.4 3.8 4.3 4.7 5.1 5.5 5.9 6.4 6.8 7.2 7.6 8.1 8.5 8.9 9.3
90 3.8 4.2 4.6 5.1 5.5 5.9 6.3 6.8 7.2 7.6 8.0 8.5 8.9 9.3 9.7
100 4.2 4.6 5.0 5.5 5.9 6.3 6.7 7.2 7.6 8.0 8.5 8.9 9.3 9.7 10.2
110 4.5 5.0 5.4 5.8 6.3 6.7 7.1 7.6 8.0 8.4 8.9 9.3 9.7 10.2 10.6
120 4.9 5.4 5.8 6.2 6.7 7.1 7.5 8.0 8.4 8.8 9.3 9.7 10.1 10.6 11.0
130 5.3 5.7 6.2 6.6 7.1 7.5 7.9 8.4 8.8 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.6 11.0 11.4
140 5.7 6.1 6.6 7.0 7.4 7.9 8.3 8.8 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.5 11.0 11.4 11.9
150 6.0 6.5 6.9 7.4 7.8 8.3 8.7 9.2 9.6 10.1 10.5 11.0 11.4 11.8 12.3
160 6.4 6.9 7.3 7.8 8.2 8.7 9.1 9.6 10.0 10.5 10.9 11.4 11.8 12.3 12.7
170 6.8 7.3 7.7 8.2 8.6 9.1 9.5 10.0 10.4 10.9 11.3 11.8 12.2 12.7 13.1
180 7.2 7.6 8.1 8.5 9.0 9.5 9.9 10.4 10.8 11.3 11.7 12.2 12.7 13.1 13.6
190 7.6 8.0 8.5 8.9 9.4 9.9 10.3 10.8 11.2 11.7 12.2 12.6 13.1 13.5 14.0
200 7.9 8.4 8.9 9.3 9.8 10.3 10.7 11.2 11.6 12.1 12.6 13.0 13.5 14.0 14.4
210 8.3 8.8 5.5 9.7 10.2 10.6 11.1 11.6 12.1 12.5 13.0 13.5 13.9 14.4 14.9
220 8.7 9.2 9.6 10.1 10.6 11.0 11.5 12.0 12.5 12.9 13.4 13.9 14.4 14.8 15.3
230 9.1 9.5 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.4 11.9 12.4 12.9 13.3 13.8 14.3 14.8 15.3 15.7
240 9.4 9.9 10.4 10.9 11.4 11.8 12.3 12.8 13.3 13.8 14.2 14.7 15.2 15.7 16.2
250 9.8 10.3 10.8 11.3 11.8 12.2 12.7 13.2 13.7 14.2 14.7 15.1 15.6 16.1 16.6
260 10.2 10.7 11.2 11.7 12.1 12.6 13.1 13.6 14.1 14.6 15.1 15.6 16.0 16.5 17.0
270 10.6 11.1 11.6 12.0 12.5 13.0 13.5 14.0 14.5 15.0 15.5 16.0 16.5 17.0 17.5
280
10.9 11.4 11.9 12.4 12.9 13.4 13.9 14.4 14.9 15.4 15.9 16.4 16.9 17.4 17.9
VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK
CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 185 MM^2)
C
A
B
L
E

F
R
O
M

S
/
S

T
O

D
I
S
T
R
I
B
U
T
I
O
N

C
A
B
I
N
E
T


3
0
0

M
M
^
2
TABLE 9
CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C 300 mm
2
P.F 0.85
CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER 120 mm
2
VOLTAGE 220 V
RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP. 310
RATED CURRENT FOR 120 mm2 IN AMP. 204
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150
10 0.9 1.4 1.9 2.4 2.9 3.4 3.9 4.4 4.9 5.4 5.9 6.4 6.9 7.4 7.9
20 1.3 1.8 2.3 2.8 3.3 3.8 4.3 4.8 5.3 5.8 6.3 6.8 7.3 7.8 8.3
30 1.6 2.1 2.7 3.2 3.7 4.2 4.7 5.2 5.7 6.2 6.7 7.2 7.8 8.3 8.8
40 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.1 4.6 5.1 5.6 6.1 6.6 7.1 7.7 8.2 8.7 9.2
50 2.4 2.9 3.4 3.9 4.4 4.9 5.4 5.9 6.4 6.9 7.4 7.9 8.4 8.9 9.4
60 2.8 3.3 3.8 4.3 4.9 5.4 5.9 6.4 6.9 7.5 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.5 10.1
70 3.1 3.7 4.2 4.7 5.2 5.8 6.3 6.8 7.3 7.9 8.4 8.9 9.5 10.0 10.5
80 3.5 4.0 4.6 5.1 5.6 6.2 6.7 7.2 7.8 8.3 8.8 9.3 9.9 10.4 10.9
90 3.9 4.4 5.0 5.5 6.0 6.6 7.1 7.6 8.2 8.7 9.2 9.8 10.3 10.8 11.4
100 4.3 4.8 5.3 5.9 6.4 7.0 7.5 8.0 8.6 9.1 9.7 10.2 10.7 11.3 11.8
110 4.6 5.2 5.7 6.3 6.8 7.4 7.9 8.4 9.0 9.5 10.1 10.6 11.2 11.7 12.2
120 5.0 5.6 6.1 6.7 7.2 7.8 8.3 8.9 9.4 9.9 10.5 11.0 11.6 12.1 12.7
130 5.4 6.0 6.5 7.1 7.6 8.2 8.7 9.3 9.8 10.4 10.9 11.5 12.0 12.6 13.1
140 5.8 6.3 6.9 7.4 8.0 8.6 9.1 9.7 10.2 10.8 11.3 11.9 12.4 13.0 13.6
150 6.2 6.7 7.3 7.8 8.4 9.0 9.5 10.1 10.6 11.2 11.8 12.3 12.9 13.4 14.0
160 6.5 7.1 7.7 8.2 8.8 9.4 9.9 10.5 11.1 11.6 12.2 12.7 13.3 13.9 14.4
170 6.9 7.5 8.1 8.6 9.2 9.8 10.3 10.9 11.5 12.0 12.6 13.2 13.7 14.3 14.9
180 7.3 7.9 8.4 9.0 9.6 10.2 10.7 11.3 11.9 12.5 13.0 13.6 14.2 14.7 15.3
190 7.7 8.2 8.8 9.4 10.0 10.6 11.1 11.7 12.3 12.9 13.5 14.0 14.6 15.2 15.8
200 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.8 10.4 11.0 11.5 12.1 12.7 13.3 13.9 14.5 15.0 15.6 16.2
210 8.4 9.0 5.9 10.2 10.8 11.4 12.0 12.5 13.1 13.7 14.3 14.9 15.5 16.1 16.7
220 8.8 9.4 10.0 10.6 11.2 11.8 12.4 13.0 13.5 14.1 14.7 15.3 15.9 16.5 17.1
230 9.2 9.8 10.4 11.0 11.6 12.2 12.8 13.4 14.0 14.6 15.2 15.8 16.3 16.9 17.5
240 9.6 10.2 10.8 11.4 12.0 12.6 13.2 13.8 14.4 15.0 15.6 16.2 16.8 17.4 18.0
250 9.9 10.5 11.2 11.8 12.4 13.0 13.6 14.2 14.8 15.4 16.0 16.6 17.2 17.8 18.4
260 10.3 10.9 11.5 12.2 12.8 13.4 14.0 14.6 15.2 15.8 16.4 17.0 17.7 18.3 18.9
270 10.7 11.3 11.9 12.5 13.2 13.8 14.4 15.0 15.6 16.2 16.9 17.5 18.1 18.7 19.3
280
11.1 11.7 12.3 12.9 13.6 14.2 14.8 15.4 16.1 16.7 17.3 17.9 18.5 19.2 19.8
VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK
CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 120 MM^2)
C
A
B
L
E

F
R
O
M

S
/
S

T
O

D
I
S
T
R
I
B
U
T
I
O
N

C
A
B
I
N
E
T


3
0
0

M
M
^
2
TABLE 10
CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C 300 mm
2
P.F 0.85
CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER 70 mm
2
VOLTAGE 220 V
RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP. 310
RATED CURRENT FOR 50 mm2 IN AMP. 135
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150
10 0.9 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.1 3.6 4.2 4.7 5.3 5.8 6.4 6.9 7.4 8.0 8.5
20 1.3 1.8 2.4 2.9 3.5 4.0 4.6 5.1 5.7 6.2 6.8 7.3 7.9 8.4 9.0
30 1.7 2.2 2.8 3.3 3.9 4.4 5.0 5.5 6.1 6.6 7.2 7.7 8.3 8.8 9.4
40 2.0 2.6 3.2 3.7 4.3 4.8 5.4 5.9 6.5 7.1 7.6 8.2 8.7 9.3 9.8
50 2.4 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.6 5.1 5.6 6.2 6.7 7.3 7.8 8.3 8.9 9.4 10.0
60 2.8 3.4 3.9 4.5 5.1 5.6 6.2 6.8 7.3 7.9 8.4 9.0 9.6 10.1 10.7
70 3.2 3.8 4.3 4.9 5.5 6.0 6.6 7.2 7.7 8.3 8.9 9.4 10.0 10.6 11.1
80 3.6 4.1 4.7 5.3 5.9 6.4 7.0 7.6 8.1 8.7 9.3 9.9 10.4 11.0 11.6
90 3.9 4.5 5.1 5.7 6.2 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.6 9.1 9.7 10.3 10.9 11.4 12.0
100 4.3 4.9 5.5 6.1 6.6 7.2 7.8 8.4 9.0 9.6 10.1 10.7 11.3 11.9 12.5
110 4.7 5.3 5.9 6.5 7.0 7.6 8.2 8.8 9.4 10.0 10.6 11.1 11.7 12.3 12.9
120 5.1 5.7 6.3 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.8 10.4 11.0 11.6 12.2 12.8 13.3
130 5.4 6.0 6.6 7.2 7.8 8.4 9.0 9.6 10.2 10.8 11.4 12.0 12.6 13.2 13.8
140 5.8 6.4 7.0 7.6 8.2 8.8 9.4 10.0 10.6 11.2 11.8 12.4 13.0 13.6 14.2
150 6.2 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.8 10.4 11.0 11.7 12.3 12.9 13.5 14.1 14.7
160 6.6 7.2 7.8 8.4 9.0 9.6 10.2 10.9 11.5 12.1 12.7 13.3 13.9 14.5 15.1
170 7.0 7.6 8.2 8.8 9.4 10.0 10.7 11.3 11.9 12.5 13.1 13.7 14.3 15.0 15.6
180 7.3 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.8 10.4 11.1 11.7 12.3 12.9 13.5 14.2 14.8 15.4 16.0
190 7.7 8.3 9.0 9.6 10.2 10.8 11.5 12.1 12.7 13.3 14.0 14.6 15.2 15.8 16.5
200 8.1 8.7 9.4 10.0 10.6 11.2 11.9 12.5 13.1 13.8 14.4 15.0 15.7 16.3 16.9
210 8.5 9.1 6.0 10.4 11.0 11.6 12.3 12.9 13.6 14.2 14.8 15.5 16.1 16.7 17.4
220 8.9 9.5 10.1 10.8 11.4 12.1 12.7 13.3 14.0 14.6 15.3 15.9 16.5 17.2 17.8
230 9.2 9.9 10.5 11.2 11.8 12.5 13.1 13.7 14.4 15.0 15.7 16.3 17.0 17.6 18.3
240 9.6 10.3 10.9 11.6 12.2 12.9 13.5 14.2 14.8 15.5 16.1 16.8 17.4 18.1 18.7
250 10.0 10.6 11.3 12.0 12.6 13.3 13.9 14.6 15.2 15.9 16.5 17.2 17.9 18.5 19.2
260 10.4 11.0 11.7 12.4 13.0 13.7 14.3 15.0 15.7 16.3 17.0 17.6 18.3 19.0 19.6
270 10.7 11.4 12.1 12.7 13.4 14.1 14.7 15.4 16.1 16.7 17.4 18.1 18.8 19.4 20.1
280
11.1 11.8 12.5 13.1 13.8 14.5 15.2 15.8 16.5 17.2 17.9 18.5 19.2 19.9 20.5
VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK
CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 70 MM^2)
C
A
B
L
E

F
R
O
M

S
/
S

T
O

D
I
S
T
R
I
B
U
T
I
O
N

C
A
B
I
N
E
T


3
0
0

M
M
^
2
TABLE 11
CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C 300 mm
2
P.F 0.85
CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER 50 mm
2
VOLTAGE 220 V
RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP. 310
RATED CURRENT FOR 50 mm2 IN AMP. 125
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150
10 1.1 1.8 2.5 3.2 3.9 4.6 5.3 6.1 6.8 7.5 8.2 8.9 9.6 10.3 11.0
20 1.5 2.2 2.9 3.6 4.3 5.0 5.8 6.5 7.2 7.9 8.6 9.3 10.0 10.8 11.5
30 1.8 2.6 3.3 4.0 4.7 5.4 6.2 6.9 7.6 8.3 9.0 9.8 10.5 11.2 11.9
40 2.2 2.9 3.7 4.4 5.1 5.8 6.6 7.3 8.0 8.8 9.5 10.2 10.9 11.7 12.4
50 2.6 3.3 4.0 4.7 5.4 6.1 6.8 7.5 8.2 8.9 9.6 10.3 11.0 11.7 12.4
60 3.0 3.7 4.5 5.2 5.9 6.7 7.4 8.1 8.9 9.6 10.3 11.1 11.8 12.6 13.3
70 3.4 4.1 4.8 5.6 6.3 7.1 7.8 8.6 9.3 10.0 10.8 11.5 12.3 13.0 13.8
80 3.7 4.5 5.2 6.0 6.7 7.5 8.2 9.0 9.7 10.5 11.2 12.0 12.7 13.5 14.2
90 4.1 4.9 5.6 6.4 7.1 7.9 8.6 9.4 10.1 10.9 11.7 12.4 13.2 13.9 14.7
100 4.5 5.3 6.0 6.8 7.5 8.3 9.1 9.8 10.6 11.3 12.1 12.9 13.6 14.4 15.1
110 4.9 5.6 6.4 7.2 7.9 8.7 9.5 10.2 11.0 11.8 12.5 13.3 14.1 14.8 15.6
120 5.3 6.0 6.8 7.6 8.3 9.1 9.9 10.7 11.4 12.2 13.0 13.7 14.5 15.3 16.1
130 5.6 6.4 7.2 8.0 8.7 9.5 10.3 11.1 11.9 12.6 13.4 14.2 15.0 15.7 16.5
140 6.0 6.8 7.6 8.4 9.1 9.9 10.7 11.5 12.3 13.1 13.9 14.6 15.4 16.2 17.0
150 6.4 7.2 8.0 8.8 9.6 10.3 11.1 11.9 12.7 13.5 14.3 15.1 15.9 16.7 17.5
160 6.8 7.6 8.4 9.2 10.0 10.8 11.5 12.3 13.1 13.9 14.7 15.5 16.3 17.1 17.9
170 7.1 8.0 8.8 9.6 10.4 11.2 12.0 12.8 13.6 14.4 15.2 16.0 16.8 17.6 18.4
180 7.5 8.3 9.1 10.0 10.8 11.6 12.4 13.2 14.0 14.8 15.6 16.4 17.2 18.1 18.9
190 7.9 8.7 9.5 10.4 11.2 12.0 12.8 13.6 14.4 15.3 16.1 16.9 17.7 18.5 19.3
200 8.3 9.1 9.9 10.8 11.6 12.4 13.2 14.0 14.9 15.7 16.5 17.3 18.2 19.0 19.8
210 8.7 9.5 6.6 11.2 12.0 12.8 13.6 14.5 15.3 16.1 17.0 17.8 18.6 19.4 20.3
220 9.0 9.9 10.7 11.6 12.4 13.2 14.1 14.9 15.7 16.6 17.4 18.2 19.1 19.9 20.8
230 9.4 10.3 11.1 12.0 12.8 13.6 14.5 15.3 16.2 17.0 17.9 18.7 19.5 20.4 21.2
240 9.8 10.7 11.5 12.4 13.2 14.1 14.9 15.8 16.6 17.5 18.3 19.2 20.0 20.9 21.7
250 10.2 11.0 11.9 12.8 13.6 14.5 15.3 16.2 17.0 17.9 18.8 19.6 20.5 21.3 22.2
260 10.6 11.4 12.3 13.2 14.0 14.9 15.8 16.6 17.5 18.3 19.2 20.1 20.9 21.8 22.7
270 11.0 11.8 12.7 13.6 14.4 15.3 16.2 17.0 17.9 18.8 19.7 20.5 21.4 22.3 23.1
280
11.3 12.2 13.1 14.0 14.8 15.7 16.6 17.5 18.4 19.2 20.1 21.0 21.9 22.8 23.6
VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK
CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 50 MM^2)
C
A
B
L
E

F
R
O
M

S
/
S

T
O

D
I
S
T
R
I
B
U
T
I
O
N

C
A
B
I
N
E
T


3
0
0

M
M
^
2
TABLE 12
CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C QUADRUPLEX 120 mm2 P.F 0.85
CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER QUADRUPLEX 50 mm2 VOLTAGE 220 V
RATED CURRENT FOR QUAD 120 mm2 IN AMP 270
RATED CURRENT FOR QUAD 50 mm2 IN AMP. 185
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150
10 1.6 2.6 3.6 4.6 5.5 6.5 7.5 8.5 9.5 10.5 11.5 12.4 13.4 14.4 15.4
20 2.2 3.2 4.2 5.2 6.2 7.2 8.2 9.2 10.2 11.2 12.2 13.2 14.2 15.2 16.2
30 2.8 3.8 4.9 5.9 6.9 7.9 8.9 9.9 10.9 11.9 12.9 14.0 15.0 16.0 17.0
40 3.4 4.5 5.5 6.5 7.5 8.6 9.6 10.6 11.6 12.7 13.7 14.7 15.7 16.8 17.8
50 4.1 5.1 6.0 6.9 7.9 8.9 9.9 10.8 11.8 12.8 13.8 14.7 15.7 16.7 17.6
60 4.7 5.7 6.8 7.8 8.9 9.9 11.0 12.0 13.1 14.1 15.2 16.2 17.3 18.3 19.4
70 5.3 6.4 7.4 8.5 9.6 10.6 11.7 12.7 13.8 14.9 15.9 17.0 18.1 19.1 20.2
80 5.9 7.0 8.1 9.2 10.2 11.3 12.4 13.5 14.5 15.6 16.7 17.8 18.8 19.9 21.0
90 6.5 7.6 8.7 9.8 10.9 12.0 13.1 14.2 15.3 16.4 17.5 18.5 19.6 20.7 21.8
100 7.2 8.3 9.4 10.5 11.6 12.7 13.8 14.9 16.0 17.1 18.2 19.3 20.4 21.5 22.6
110 7.8 8.9 10.0 11.1 12.3 13.4 14.5 15.6 16.7 17.9 19.0 20.1 21.2 22.3 23.5
120 8.4 9.5 10.7 11.8 12.9 14.1 15.2 16.3 17.5 18.6 19.7 20.9 22.0 23.1 24.3
130 9.0 10.2 11.3 12.5 13.6 14.8 15.9 17.1 18.2 19.4 20.5 21.7 22.8 24.0 25.1
140 9.7 10.8 12.0 13.1 14.3 15.5 16.6 17.8 19.0 20.1 21.3 22.5 23.6 24.8 25.9
150 10.3 11.5 12.6 13.8 15.0 16.2 17.4 18.5 19.7 20.9 22.1 23.3 24.4 25.6 26.8
160 10.9 12.1 13.3 14.5 15.7 16.9 18.1 19.3 20.5 21.7 22.9 24.0 25.2 26.4 27.6
170 11.5 12.7 13.9 15.2 16.4 17.6 18.8 20.0 21.2 22.4 23.6 24.8 26.1 27.3 28.5
180 12.1 13.4 14.6 15.8 17.1 18.3 19.5 20.7 22.0 23.2 24.4 25.7 26.9 28.1 29.3
190 12.8 14.0 15.3 16.5 17.7 19.0 20.2 21.5 22.7 24.0 25.2 26.5 27.7 29.0 30.2
200 13.4 14.7 15.9 17.2 18.4 19.7 21.0 22.2 23.5 24.8 26.0 27.3 28.5 29.8 31.1
210 14.0 15.3 10.5 17.9 19.1 20.4 21.7 23.0 24.3 25.5 26.8 28.1 29.4 30.7 31.9
220 14.6 15.9 17.2 18.5 19.8 21.1 22.4 23.7 25.0 26.3 27.6 28.9 30.2 31.5 32.8
230 15.3 16.6 17.9 19.2 20.5 21.8 23.2 24.5 25.8 27.1 28.4 29.7 31.1 32.4 33.7
240 15.9 17.2 18.6 19.9 21.2 22.6 23.9 25.2 26.6 27.9 29.2 30.6 31.9 33.2 34.6
250 16.5 17.9 19.2 20.6 21.9 23.3 24.6 26.0 27.3 28.7 30.1 31.4 32.8 34.1 35.5
260 17.1 18.5 19.9 21.3 22.6 24.0 25.4 26.8 28.1 29.5 30.9 32.3 33.6 35.0 36.4
270 17.8 19.2 20.6 22.0 23.3 24.7 26.1 27.5 28.9 30.3 31.7 33.1 34.5 35.9 37.3
280
18.4 19.8 21.2 22.6 24.1 25.5 26.9 28.3 29.7 31.1 32.5 34.0 35.4 36.8 38.2
VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK
CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( QUADRUPLEX 50 MM^2)
C
A
B
L
E

F
R
O
M

S
/
S

T
O

D
I
S
T
R
I
B
U
T
I
O
N

C
A
B
I
N
E
T


Q
U
A
D
R
U
P
L
E
X

1
2
0

M
M
^
2
CABLE SIZE =300 MM2 AL/XLPE
PF= .85 K= 9913
10 40 70 100 130 160 190 220 250 280 310 340 370 400 430
AMP KVA
20.0 13.8 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6
40.0 27.6 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2
60.0 41.5 0.0 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6
80.0 55.3 0.1 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.7 1.9 2.1 2.2 2.4
100.0 69.1 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.7 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 3.0
120.0 82.9 0.1 0.3 0.6 0.8 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.3 2.6 2.8 3.1 3.3 3.6
140.0 96.7 0.1 0.4 0.7 1.0 1.3 1.6 1.9 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.2
160.0 110.6 0.1 0.4 0.8 1.1 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.5 3.8 4.1 4.5 4.8
180.0 124.4 0.1 0.5 0.9 1.3 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 3.1 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.6 5.0 5.4
200.0 138.2 0.1 0.6 1.0 1.4 1.8 2.2 2.6 3.1 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.7 5.2 5.6 6.0
220.0 152.0 0.2 0.6 1.1 1.5 2.0 2.5 2.9 3.4 3.8 4.3 4.8 5.2 5.7 6.1 6.6
240.0 165.9 0.2 0.7 1.2 1.7 2.2 2.7 3.2 3.7 4.2 4.7 5.2 5.7 6.2 6.7 7.2
260.0 179.7 0.2 0.7 1.3 1.8 2.4 2.9 3.4 4.0 4.5 5.1 5.6 6.2 6.7 7.3 7.8
280.0 193.5 0.2 0.8 1.4 2.0 2.5 3.1 3.7 4.3 4.9 5.5 6.1 6.6 7.2 7.8 8.4
300.0 207.3 0.2 0.8 1.5 2.1 2.7 3.3 4.0 4.6 5.2 5.9 6.5 7.1 7.7 8.4 9.0
320.0 221.1 0.2 0.9 1.6 2.2 2.9 3.6 4.2 4.9 5.6 6.2 6.9 7.6 8.3 8.9 9.6
340.0 235.0 0.2 0.9 1.7 2.4 3.1 3.8 4.5 5.2 5.9 6.6 7.3 8.1 8.8 9.5 10.2
360.0 248.8 0.3 1.0 1.8 2.5 3.3 4.0 4.8 5.5 6.3 7.0 7.8 8.5 9.3 10.0 10.8
380.0 262.6 0.3 1.1 1.9 2.6 3.4 4.2 5.0 5.8 6.6 7.4 8.2 9.0 9.8 10.6 11.4
400.0 276.4 0.3 1.1 2.0 2.8 3.6 4.5 5.3 6.1 7.0 7.8 8.6 9.5 10.3 11.2 12.0
420.0 290.2 0.3 1.2 2.0 2.9 3.8 4.7 5.6 6.4 7.3 8.2 9.1 10.0 10.8 11.7 12.6
TABLE 1
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOLTAGE =380 V
DISTANCE (M)
LOAD
VOL_DROP_380V.xls/LV_380V/1
CABLE SIZE =185 MM2 AL/XLPE
PF= .85 K= 6902
10 40 70 100 130 160 190 220 250 280 310 340 370 400 430
AMP KVA
20.0 13.8 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.9
40.0 27.6 0.0 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7
60.0 41.5 0.1 0.2 0.4 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9
80.0 55.3 0.1 0.3 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.2 3.4
100.0 69.1 0.1 0.4 0.7 1.0 1.3 1.6 1.9 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.3
120.0 82.9 0.1 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.6 1.9 2.3 2.6 3.0 3.4 3.7 4.1 4.4 4.8 5.2
140.0 96.7 0.1 0.6 1.0 1.4 1.8 2.2 2.7 3.1 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.8 5.2 5.6 6.0
160.0 110.6 0.2 0.6 1.1 1.6 2.1 2.6 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.4 5.9 6.4 6.9
180.0 124.4 0.2 0.7 1.3 1.8 2.3 2.9 3.4 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.6 6.1 6.7 7.2 7.7
200.0 138.2 0.2 0.8 1.4 2.0 2.6 3.2 3.8 4.4 5.0 5.6 6.2 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.6
220.0 152.0 0.2 0.9 1.5 2.2 2.9 3.5 4.2 4.8 5.5 6.2 6.8 7.5 8.2 8.8 9.5
240.0 165.9 0.2 1.0 1.7 2.4 3.1 3.8 4.6 5.3 6.0 6.7 7.4 8.2 8.9 9.6 10.3
260.0 179.7 0.3 1.0 1.8 2.6 3.4 4.2 4.9 5.7 6.5 7.3 8.1 8.9 9.6 10.4 11.2
280.0 193.5 0.3 1.1 2.0 2.8 3.6 4.5 5.3 6.2 7.0 7.8 8.7 9.5 10.4 11.2 12.1
300.0 207.3 0.3 1.2 2.1 3.0 3.9 4.8 5.7 6.6 7.5 8.4 9.3 10.2 11.1 12.0 12.9
320.0 221.1 0.3 1.3 2.2 3.2 4.2 5.1 6.1 7.0 8.0 9.0 9.9 10.9 11.9 12.8 13.8
340.0 235.0 0.3 1.4 2.4 3.4 4.4 5.4 6.5 7.5 8.5 9.5 10.6 11.6 12.6 13.6 14.6
360.0 248.8 0.4 1.4 2.5 3.6 4.7 5.8 6.8 7.9 9.0 10.1 11.2 12.3 13.3 14.4 15.5
380.0 262.6 0.4 1.5 2.7 3.8 4.9 6.1 7.2 8.4 9.5 10.7 11.8 12.9 14.1 15.2 16.4
400.0 276.4 0.4 1.6 2.8 4.0 5.2 6.4 7.6 8.8 10.0 11.2 12.4 13.6 14.8 16.0 17.2
420.0 290.2 0.4 1.7 2.9 4.2 5.5 6.7 8.0 9.3 10.5 11.8 13.0 14.3 15.6 16.8 18.1
VOLTAGE =380 V
TABLE2
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
LOAD
DISTANCE (M)
VOL_DROP_380V.xls/LV_380V/2
CABLE SIZE =120 MM2 AL/XLPE
PF= .85 K= 4881
10 40 70 100 130 160 190 220 250 280 310 340 370 400 430
AMP KVA
10.0 6.9 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6
20.0 13.8 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.2
30.0 20.7 0.0 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3
40.0 27.6 0.1 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.4
50.0 34.6 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 3.0
60.0 41.5 0.1 0.3 0.6 0.8 1.1 1.4 1.6 1.9 2.1 2.4 2.6 2.9 3.1 3.4 3.7
70.0 48.4 0.1 0.4 0.7 1.0 1.3 1.6 1.9 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.3
80.0 55.3 0.1 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.5 1.8 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.2 3.5 3.9 4.2 4.5 4.9
90.0 62.2 0.1 0.5 0.9 1.3 1.7 2.0 2.4 2.8 3.2 3.6 4.0 4.3 4.7 5.1 5.5
100.0 69.1 0.1 0.6 1.0 1.4 1.8 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.2 5.7 6.1
110.0 76.0 0.2 0.6 1.1 1.6 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.4 3.9 4.4 4.8 5.3 5.8 6.2 6.7
120.0 82.9 0.2 0.7 1.2 1.7 2.2 2.7 3.2 3.7 4.2 4.8 5.3 5.8 6.3 6.8 7.3
130.0 89.8 0.2 0.7 1.3 1.8 2.4 2.9 3.5 4.0 4.6 5.2 5.7 6.3 6.8 7.4 7.9
140.0 96.7 0.2 0.8 1.4 2.0 2.6 3.2 3.8 4.4 5.0 5.6 6.1 6.7 7.3 7.9 8.5
150.0 103.7 0.2 0.8 1.5 2.1 2.8 3.4 4.0 4.7 5.3 5.9 6.6 7.2 7.9 8.5 9.1
160.0 110.6 0.2 0.9 1.6 2.3 2.9 3.6 4.3 5.0 5.7 6.3 7.0 7.7 8.4 9.1 9.7
170.0 117.5 0.2 1.0 1.7 2.4 3.1 3.9 4.6 5.3 6.0 6.7 7.5 8.2 8.9 9.6 10.3
180.0 124.4 0.3 1.0 1.8 2.5 3.3 4.1 4.8 5.6 6.4 7.1 7.9 8.7 9.4 10.2 11.0
190.0 131.3 0.3 1.1 1.9 2.7 3.5 4.3 5.1 5.9 6.7 7.5 8.3 9.1 10.0 10.8 11.6
200.0 138.2 0.3 1.1 2.0 2.8 3.7 4.5 5.4 6.2 7.1 7.9 8.8 9.6 10.5 11.3 12.2
210.0 145.1 0.3 1.2 2.1 3.0 3.9 4.8 5.6 6.5 7.4 8.3 9.2 10.1 11.0 11.9 12.8
TABLE 3
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOLTAGE =380 V
LOAD
DISTANCE (M)
VOL_DROP_380V.xls/LV_380V/3
CABLE SIZE = 70 MM2 AL/XLPE
PF= .85 K= 2988
10 30 50 70 90 110 130 150 170 190 210 230 250 270 290
AMP KVA
10.0 6.9 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7
20.0 13.8 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.3
30.0 20.7 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5
40.0 27.6 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.5 2.7
50.0 34.6 0.1 0.3 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.3 1.5 1.7 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.7 2.9 3.1 3.4
60.0 41.5 0.1 0.4 0.7 1.0 1.2 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.6 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.7 4.0
70.0 48.4 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.8 3.1 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.4 4.7
80.0 55.3 0.2 0.6 0.9 1.3 1.7 2.0 2.4 2.8 3.1 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.6 5.0 5.4
90.0 62.2 0.2 0.6 1.0 1.5 1.9 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.2 5.6 6.0
100.0 69.1 0.2 0.7 1.2 1.6 2.1 2.5 3.0 3.5 3.9 4.4 4.9 5.3 5.8 6.2 6.7
110.0 76.0 0.3 0.8 1.3 1.8 2.3 2.8 3.3 3.8 4.3 4.8 5.3 5.9 6.4 6.9 7.4
120.0 82.9 0.3 0.8 1.4 1.9 2.5 3.1 3.6 4.2 4.7 5.3 5.8 6.4 6.9 7.5 8.0
130.0 89.8 0.3 0.9 1.5 2.1 2.7 3.3 3.9 4.5 5.1 5.7 6.3 6.9 7.5 8.1 8.7
140.0 96.7 0.3 1.0 1.6 2.3 2.9 3.6 4.2 4.9 5.5 6.2 6.8 7.4 8.1 8.7 9.4
150.0 103.7 0.3 1.0 1.7 2.4 3.1 3.8 4.5 5.2 5.9 6.6 7.3 8.0 8.7 9.4 10.1
160.0 110.6 0.4 1.1 1.9 2.6 3.3 4.1 4.8 5.6 6.3 7.0 7.8 8.5 9.3 10.0 10.7
170.0 117.5 0.4 1.2 2.0 2.8 3.5 4.3 5.1 5.9 6.7 7.5 8.3 9.0 9.8 10.6 11.4
180.0 124.4 0.4 1.2 2.1 2.9 3.7 4.6 5.4 6.2 7.1 7.9 8.7 9.6 10.4 11.2 12.1
190.0 131.3 0.4 1.3 2.2 3.1 4.0 4.8 5.7 6.6 7.5 8.3 9.2 10.1 11.0 11.9 12.7
200.0 138.2 0.5 1.4 2.3 3.2 4.2 5.1 6.0 6.9 7.9 8.8 9.7 10.6 11.6 12.5 13.4
210.0 145.1 0.5 1.5 2.4 3.4 4.4 5.3 6.3 7.3 8.3 9.2 10.2 11.2 12.1 13.1 14.1
DISTANCE (M)
VOLTAGE =380 V
TABLE 4
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
LOAD
VOL_DROP_380V.xls/LV_380V/4
CABLE SIZE = 50 MM2 AL/XLPE
PF= .85 K= 2118
10 30 50 70 90 110 130 150 170 190 210 230 250 270 290
AMP KVA
10.0 6.9 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 0.9
20.0 13.8 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.8 1.9
30.0 20.7 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7
40.0 27.6 0.1 0.4 0.7 0.9 1.2 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.2 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.5 3.8
50.0 34.6 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.8 3.1 3.4 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.7
60.0 41.5 0.2 0.6 1.0 1.4 1.8 2.2 2.5 2.9 3.3 3.7 4.1 4.5 4.9 5.3 5.7
70.0 48.4 0.2 0.7 1.1 1.6 2.1 2.5 3.0 3.4 3.9 4.3 4.8 5.3 5.7 6.2 6.6
80.0 55.3 0.3 0.8 1.3 1.8 2.3 2.9 3.4 3.9 4.4 5.0 5.5 6.0 6.5 7.0 7.6
90.0 62.2 0.3 0.9 1.5 2.1 2.6 3.2 3.8 4.4 5.0 5.6 6.2 6.8 7.3 7.9 8.5
100.0 69.1 0.3 1.0 1.6 2.3 2.9 3.6 4.2 4.9 5.5 6.2 6.9 7.5 8.2 8.8 9.5
110.0 76.0 0.4 1.1 1.8 2.5 3.2 3.9 4.7 5.4 6.1 6.8 7.5 8.3 9.0 9.7 10.4
120.0 82.9 0.4 1.2 2.0 2.7 3.5 4.3 5.1 5.9 6.7 7.4 8.2 9.0 9.8 10.6 11.4
130.0 89.8 0.4 1.3 2.1 3.0 3.8 4.7 5.5 6.4 7.2 8.1 8.9 9.8 10.6 11.5 12.3
140.0 96.7 0.5 1.4 2.3 3.2 4.1 5.0 5.9 6.9 7.8 8.7 9.6 10.5 11.4 12.3 13.2
150.0 103.7 0.5 1.5 2.4 3.4 4.4 5.4 6.4 7.3 8.3 9.3 10.3 11.3 12.2 13.2 14.2
160.0 110.6 0.5 1.6 2.6 3.7 4.7 5.7 6.8 7.8 8.9 9.9 11.0 12.0 13.1 14.1 15.1
170.0 117.5 0.6 1.7 2.8 3.9 5.0 6.1 7.2 8.3 9.4 10.5 11.6 12.8 13.9 15.0 16.1
180.0 124.4 0.6 1.8 2.9 4.1 5.3 6.5 7.6 8.8 10.0 11.2 12.3 13.5 14.7 15.9 17.0
190.0 131.3 0.6 1.9 3.1 4.3 5.6 6.8 8.1 9.3 10.5 11.8 13.0 14.3 15.5 16.7 18.0
200.0 138.2 0.7 2.0 3.3 4.6 5.9 7.2 8.5 9.8 11.1 12.4 13.7 15.0 16.3 17.6 18.9
210.0 145.1 0.7 2.1 3.4 4.8 6.2 7.5 8.9 10.3 11.6 13.0 14.4 15.8 17.1 18.5 19.9
TABLE 5
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOLTAGE =380 V
DISTANCE (M)
LOAD
VOL_DROP_380V.xls/LV_380V/5
CABLE SIZE = QUADRUPLEX 120 MM2 XLPE
PF= .85 K= 5314
10 30 50 70 90 110 130 150 170 190 210 230 250 270 290
AMP KVA
10.0 6.9 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4
20.0 13.8 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8
30.0 20.7 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3
40.0 27.6 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5
50.0 34.6 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.8 1.9
60.0 41.5 0.1 0.2 0.4 0.5 0.7 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.3 1.5 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.1 2.3
70.0 48.4 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.5 2.6
80.0 55.3 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 3.0
90.0 62.2 0.1 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.2 3.4
100.0 69.1 0.1 0.4 0.7 0.9 1.2 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.2 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.5 3.8
110.0 76.0 0.1 0.4 0.7 1.0 1.3 1.6 1.9 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.1
120.0 82.9 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.3 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.5
130.0 89.8 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.5 1.9 2.2 2.5 2.9 3.2 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.6 4.9
140.0 96.7 0.2 0.5 0.9 1.3 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.7 3.1 3.5 3.8 4.2 4.6 4.9 5.3
150.0 103.7 0.2 0.6 1.0 1.4 1.8 2.1 2.5 2.9 3.3 3.7 4.1 4.5 4.9 5.3 5.7
160.0 110.6 0.2 0.6 1.0 1.5 1.9 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.2 5.6 6.0
170.0 117.5 0.2 0.7 1.1 1.5 2.0 2.4 2.9 3.3 3.8 4.2 4.6 5.1 5.5 6.0 6.4
180.0 124.4 0.2 0.7 1.2 1.6 2.1 2.6 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.4 4.9 5.4 5.9 6.3 6.8
190.0 131.3 0.2 0.7 1.2 1.7 2.2 2.7 3.2 3.7 4.2 4.7 5.2 5.7 6.2 6.7 7.2
200.0 138.2 0.3 0.8 1.3 1.8 2.3 2.9 3.4 3.9 4.4 4.9 5.5 6.0 6.5 7.0 7.5
210.0 145.1 0.3 0.8 1.4 1.9 2.5 3.0 3.6 4.1 4.6 5.2 5.7 6.3 6.8 7.4 7.9
VOLTAGE =380 V
DISTANCE (M)
LOAD
TABLE 6
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOL_DROP_380V.xls/LV_380V/6
CABLE SIZE = QUADRUPLEX 50 MM2 XLPE
PF= .85 K= 2266
10 30 50 70 90 110 130 150 170 190 210 230 250 270 290
AMP KVA
10.0 6.9 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9
20.0 13.8 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.8
30.0 20.7 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6
40.0 27.6 0.1 0.4 0.6 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.3 2.6 2.8 3.0 3.3 3.5
50.0 34.6 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.3 2.6 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.8 4.1 4.4
60.0 41.5 0.2 0.5 0.9 1.3 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.7 3.1 3.5 3.8 4.2 4.6 4.9 5.3
70.0 48.4 0.2 0.6 1.1 1.5 1.9 2.3 2.8 3.2 3.6 4.1 4.5 4.9 5.3 5.8 6.2
80.0 55.3 0.2 0.7 1.2 1.7 2.2 2.7 3.2 3.7 4.1 4.6 5.1 5.6 6.1 6.6 7.1
90.0 62.2 0.3 0.8 1.4 1.9 2.5 3.0 3.6 4.1 4.7 5.2 5.8 6.3 6.9 7.4 8.0
100.0 69.1 0.3 0.9 1.5 2.1 2.7 3.4 4.0 4.6 5.2 5.8 6.4 7.0 7.6 8.2 8.8
110.0 76.0 0.3 1.0 1.7 2.3 3.0 3.7 4.4 5.0 5.7 6.4 7.0 7.7 8.4 9.1 9.7
120.0 82.9 0.4 1.1 1.8 2.6 3.3 4.0 4.8 5.5 6.2 7.0 7.7 8.4 9.1 9.9 10.6
130.0 89.8 0.4 1.2 2.0 2.8 3.6 4.4 5.2 5.9 6.7 7.5 8.3 9.1 9.9 10.7 11.5
140.0 96.7 0.4 1.3 2.1 3.0 3.8 4.7 5.6 6.4 7.3 8.1 9.0 9.8 10.7 11.5 12.4
150.0 103.7 0.5 1.4 2.3 3.2 4.1 5.0 5.9 6.9 7.8 8.7 9.6 10.5 11.4 12.4 13.3
160.0 110.6 0.5 1.5 2.4 3.4 4.4 5.4 6.3 7.3 8.3 9.3 10.2 11.2 12.2 13.2 14.2
170.0 117.5 0.5 1.6 2.6 3.6 4.7 5.7 6.7 7.8 8.8 9.9 10.9 11.9 13.0 14.0 15.0
180.0 124.4 0.5 1.6 2.7 3.8 4.9 6.0 7.1 8.2 9.3 10.4 11.5 12.6 13.7 14.8 15.9
190.0 131.3 0.6 1.7 2.9 4.1 5.2 6.4 7.5 8.7 9.9 11.0 12.2 13.3 14.5 15.6 16.8
200.0 138.2 0.6 1.8 3.0 4.3 5.5 6.7 7.9 9.1 10.4 11.6 12.8 14.0 15.2 16.5 17.7
210.0 145.1 0.6 1.9 3.2 4.5 5.8 7.0 8.3 9.6 10.9 12.2 13.4 14.7 16.0 17.3 18.6
LOAD
TABLE 7
VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOLTAGE =380 V
DISTANCE (M)
VOL_DROP_380V.xls/LV_380V/7
TABLE 8
CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C 300 mm
2
P.F 0.85
CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER 185 mm
2
VOLTAGE 380 V
RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP. 310
RATED CURRENT FOR 185 mm2 IN AMP. 230
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150
10 0.4 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.2 3.5 3.7
20 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.2 3.5 3.7 3.9
30 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.3 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.2 3.4 3.7 3.9 4.1
40 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.3 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.2 3.4 3.7 3.9 4.1 4.4
50 1.3 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.2 3.4 3.6 3.8 4.1 4.3 4.5
60 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.2 3.4 3.7 3.9 4.1 4.4 4.6 4.8
70 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.2 3.4 3.6 3.9 4.1 4.4 4.6 4.8 5.1
80 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.7 2.9 3.2 3.4 3.6 3.9 4.1 4.4 4.6 4.8 5.1 5.3
90 2.2 2.4 2.7 2.9 3.1 3.4 3.6 3.9 4.1 4.3 4.6 4.8 5.1 5.3 5.5
100 2.4 2.6 2.9 3.1 3.4 3.6 3.8 4.1 4.3 4.6 4.8 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.8
110 2.6 2.9 3.1 3.3 3.6 3.8 4.1 4.3 4.6 4.8 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.8 6.0
120 2.8 3.1 3.3 3.6 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.7 6.0 6.2
130 3.1 3.3 3.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.0 5.2 5.5 5.7 6.0 6.2 6.5
140 3.3 3.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.7 5.0 5.2 5.5 5.7 6.0 6.2 6.5 6.7
150 3.5 3.7 4.0 4.2 4.5 4.7 5.0 5.2 5.5 5.7 5.9 6.2 6.4 6.7 6.9
160 3.7 4.0 4.2 4.4 4.7 4.9 5.2 5.4 5.7 5.9 6.2 6.4 6.7 6.9 7.2
170 3.9 4.2 4.4 4.7 4.9 5.2 5.4 5.7 5.9 6.2 6.4 6.7 6.9 7.1 7.4
180 4.1 4.4 4.6 4.9 5.1 5.4 5.6 5.9 6.1 6.4 6.6 6.9 7.1 7.4 7.6
190 4.4 4.6 4.9 5.1 5.4 5.6 5.9 6.1 6.4 6.6 6.9 7.1 7.4 7.6 7.9
200 4.6 4.8 5.1 5.3 5.6 5.8 6.1 6.3 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.3 7.6 7.8 8.1
210 4.8 5.0 3.1 5.5 5.8 6.1 6.3 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.3 7.6 7.8 8.1 8.3
220 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.8 6.0 6.3 6.5 6.8 7.0 7.3 7.5 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6
230 5.2 5.5 5.7 6.0 6.2 6.5 6.8 7.0 7.3 7.5 7.8 8.0 8.3 8.5 8.8
240 5.4 5.7 6.0 6.2 6.5 6.7 7.0 7.2 7.5 7.7 8.0 8.3 8.5 8.8 9.0
250 5.7 5.9 6.2 6.4 6.7 6.9 7.2 7.5 7.7 8.0 8.2 8.5 8.7 9.0 9.3
260 5.9 6.1 6.4 6.7 6.9 7.2 7.4 7.7 7.9 8.2 8.5 8.7 9.0 9.2 9.5
270 6.1 6.4 6.6 6.9 7.1 7.4 7.7 7.9 8.2 8.4 8.7 9.0 9.2 9.5 9.7
280
6.3 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.6 7.9 8.1 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.2 9.4 9.7 10.0
VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK
CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 185 MM^2)
C
A
B
L
E

F
R
O
M

S
/
S

T
O

D
I
S
T
R
I
B
U
T
I
O
N

C
A
B
I
N
E
T


3
0
0

M
M
^
2
TABLE 9
CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C 300 mm
2
P.F 0.85
CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER 120 mm
2
VOLTAGE 380 V
RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP. 310
RATED CURRENT FOR 120 mm2 IN AMP. 204
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150
10 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.3 4.6
20 0.7 1.0 1.3 1.6 1.9 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.5 4.8
30 0.9 1.2 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.5 4.7 5.0
40 1.2 1.5 1.7 2.0 2.3 2.6 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.7 5.0 5.3
50 1.4 1.7 1.9 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.3 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4
60 1.6 1.9 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.2 5.4 5.7
70 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0
80 2.0 2.3 2.6 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.7 5.0 5.3 5.6 5.9 6.2
90 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.2 5.6 5.9 6.2 6.5
100 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.2 5.5 5.8 6.1 6.4 6.7
110 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0 6.3 6.6 6.9
120 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.7 5.0 5.3 5.6 5.9 6.2 6.6 6.9 7.2
130 3.1 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.3 4.6 5.0 5.3 5.6 5.9 6.2 6.5 6.8 7.1 7.4
140 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.2 5.5 5.8 6.1 6.4 6.7 7.0 7.3 7.6
150 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0 6.3 6.6 6.9 7.3 7.6 7.9
160 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.7 5.0 5.3 5.6 5.9 6.2 6.6 6.9 7.2 7.5 7.8 8.1
170 4.0 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.2 5.5 5.9 6.2 6.5 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.7 8.0 8.3
180 4.2 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.5 5.8 6.1 6.4 6.7 7.0 7.3 7.6 8.0 8.3 8.6
190 4.4 4.7 5.0 5.4 5.7 6.0 6.3 6.6 6.9 7.2 7.6 7.9 8.2 8.5 8.8
200 4.6 5.0 5.3 5.6 5.9 6.2 6.5 6.8 7.2 7.5 7.8 8.1 8.4 8.7 9.1
210 4.9 5.2 3.3 5.8 6.1 6.4 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.7 8.0 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.3
220 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0 6.3 6.7 7.0 7.3 7.6 7.9 8.3 8.6 8.9 9.2 9.5
230 5.3 5.6 5.9 6.3 6.6 6.9 7.2 7.5 7.8 8.2 8.5 8.8 9.1 9.4 9.8
240 5.5 5.8 6.2 6.5 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 8.1 8.4 8.7 9.0 9.4 9.7 10.0
250 5.7 6.0 6.4 6.7 7.0 7.3 7.7 8.0 8.3 8.6 9.0 9.3 9.6 9.9 10.2
260 5.9 6.3 6.6 6.9 7.2 7.6 7.9 8.2 8.5 8.9 9.2 9.5 9.8 10.2 10.5
270 6.2 6.5 6.8 7.1 7.5 7.8 8.1 8.4 8.8 9.1 9.4 9.7 10.1 10.4 10.7
280
6.4 6.7 7.0 7.4 7.7 8.0 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.3 9.7 10.0 10.3 10.6 11.0
VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK
CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 120 MM^2)
C
A
B
L
E

F
R
O
M

S
/
S

T
O

D
I
S
T
R
I
B
U
T
I
O
N

C
A
B
I
N
E
T


3
0
0

M
M
^
2
TABLE 10
CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C 300 mm
2
P.F 0.85
CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER 70 mm
2
VOLTAGE 380 V
RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP. 310
RATED CURRENT FOR 50 mm2 IN AMP. 135
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150
10 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.0 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.3 4.6 4.9
20 0.7 1.1 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.3 2.6 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.5 4.8 5.2
30 1.0 1.3 1.6 1.9 2.2 2.5 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.8 5.1 5.4
40 1.2 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.4 4.7 5.0 5.3 5.6
50 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.3 2.6 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.5 5.8
60 1.6 1.9 2.3 2.6 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.9 4.2 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.5 5.8 6.1
70 1.8 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.4 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.7 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0 6.3
80 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.7 4.0 4.3 4.6 5.0 5.3 5.6 5.9 6.3 6.6
90 2.3 2.6 2.9 3.2 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.5 4.9 5.2 5.5 5.8 6.2 6.5 6.8
100 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.5 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.1 6.4 6.7 7.1
110 2.7 3.0 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.3 4.7 5.0 5.3 5.7 6.0 6.3 6.6 7.0 7.3
120 2.9 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.6 4.9 5.2 5.6 5.9 6.2 6.5 6.9 7.2 7.5
130 3.1 3.5 3.8 4.1 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.5 5.8 6.1 6.4 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8
140 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.4 4.7 5.0 5.4 5.7 6.0 6.3 6.7 7.0 7.3 7.7 8.0
150 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.6 4.9 5.2 5.6 5.9 6.2 6.6 6.9 7.2 7.6 7.9 8.2
160 3.8 4.1 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.5 5.8 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.1 7.5 7.8 8.1 8.5
170 4.0 4.3 4.7 5.0 5.4 5.7 6.0 6.4 6.7 7.0 7.4 7.7 8.0 8.4 8.7
180 4.2 4.6 4.9 5.2 5.6 5.9 6.3 6.6 6.9 7.3 7.6 7.9 8.3 8.6 9.0
190 4.4 4.8 5.1 5.5 5.8 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.2 7.5 7.8 8.2 8.5 8.9 9.2
200 4.7 5.0 5.3 5.7 6.0 6.4 6.7 7.1 7.4 7.7 8.1 8.4 8.8 9.1 9.4
210 4.9 5.2 3.4 5.9 6.3 6.6 6.9 7.3 7.6 8.0 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.3 9.7
220 5.1 5.4 5.8 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.2 7.5 7.9 8.2 8.5 8.9 9.2 9.6 9.9
230 5.3 5.7 6.0 6.4 6.7 7.0 7.4 7.7 8.1 8.4 8.8 9.1 9.5 9.8 10.2
240 5.5 5.9 6.2 6.6 6.9 7.3 7.6 8.0 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.4 9.7 10.1 10.4
250 5.8 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.1 7.5 7.8 8.2 8.5 8.9 9.2 9.6 9.9 10.3 10.6
260 6.0 6.3 6.7 7.0 7.4 7.7 8.1 8.4 8.8 9.1 9.5 9.8 10.2 10.5 10.9
270 6.2 6.5 6.9 7.2 7.6 7.9 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.4 9.7 10.1 10.4 10.8 11.1
280
6.4 6.8 7.1 7.5 7.8 8.2 8.5 8.9 9.2 9.6 9.9 10.3 10.7 11.0 11.4
VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK
CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 70 MM^2)
C
A
B
L
E

F
R
O
M

S
/
S

T
O

D
I
S
T
R
I
B
U
T
I
O
N

C
A
B
I
N
E
T


3
0
0

M
M
^
2
TABLE 11
CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C 300 mm
2
P.F 0.85
CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER 50 mm
2
VOLTAGE 380 V
RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP. 310
RATED CURRENT FOR 50 mm2 IN AMP. 125
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150
10 0.6 1.0 1.4 1.9 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.7 5.1 5.5 6.0 6.4
20 0.8 1.3 1.7 2.1 2.5 2.9 3.3 3.7 4.1 4.5 5.0 5.4 5.8 6.2 6.6
30 1.1 1.5 1.9 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.2 5.6 6.0 6.4 6.8
40 1.3 1.7 2.1 2.5 2.9 3.4 3.8 4.2 4.6 5.0 5.4 5.8 6.3 6.7 7.1
50 1.5 1.9 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.8 5.2 5.6 6.0 6.4 6.8 7.2
60 1.7 2.1 2.6 3.0 3.4 3.8 4.2 4.6 5.1 5.5 5.9 6.3 6.7 7.2 7.6
70 1.9 2.4 2.8 3.2 3.6 4.0 4.5 4.9 5.3 5.7 6.1 6.6 7.0 7.4 7.8
80 2.2 2.6 3.0 3.4 3.8 4.3 4.7 5.1 5.5 6.0 6.4 6.8 7.2 7.6 8.1
90 2.4 2.8 3.2 3.6 4.1 4.5 4.9 5.3 5.8 6.2 6.6 7.0 7.5 7.9 8.3
100 2.6 3.0 3.4 3.9 4.3 4.7 5.1 5.6 6.0 6.4 6.8 7.3 7.7 8.1 8.6
110 2.8 3.2 3.7 4.1 4.5 4.9 5.4 5.8 6.2 6.7 7.1 7.5 7.9 8.4 8.8
120 3.0 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.7 5.2 5.6 6.0 6.5 6.9 7.3 7.8 8.2 8.6 9.0
130 3.2 3.7 4.1 4.5 5.0 5.4 5.8 6.3 6.7 7.1 7.6 8.0 8.4 8.9 9.3
140 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.8 5.2 5.6 6.1 6.5 6.9 7.4 7.8 8.2 8.7 9.1 9.5
150 3.7 4.1 4.5 5.0 5.4 5.9 6.3 6.7 7.2 7.6 8.0 8.5 8.9 9.3 9.8
160 3.9 4.3 4.8 5.2 5.6 6.1 6.5 7.0 7.4 7.8 8.3 8.7 9.1 9.6 10.0
170 4.1 4.6 5.0 5.4 5.9 6.3 6.8 7.2 7.6 8.1 8.5 8.9 9.4 9.8 10.3
180 4.3 4.8 5.2 5.7 6.1 6.5 7.0 7.4 7.9 8.3 8.7 9.2 9.6 10.1 10.5
190 4.5 5.0 5.4 5.9 6.3 6.8 7.2 7.7 8.1 8.5 9.0 9.4 9.9 10.3 10.8
200 4.8 5.2 5.7 6.1 6.5 7.0 7.4 7.9 8.3 8.8 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.6 11.0
210 5.0 5.4 3.7 6.3 6.8 7.2 7.7 8.1 8.6 9.0 9.5 9.9 10.4 10.8 11.3
220 5.2 5.7 6.1 6.6 7.0 7.5 7.9 8.4 8.8 9.3 9.7 10.1 10.6 11.0 11.5
230 5.4 5.9 6.3 6.8 7.2 7.7 8.1 8.6 9.0 9.5 9.9 10.4 10.8 11.3 11.7
240 5.6 6.1 6.5 7.0 7.5 7.9 8.4 8.8 9.3 9.7 10.2 10.6 11.1 11.5 12.0
250 5.9 6.3 6.8 7.2 7.7 8.1 8.6 9.0 9.5 10.0 10.4 10.9 11.3 11.8 12.2
260 6.1 6.5 7.0 7.5 7.9 8.4 8.8 9.3 9.7 10.2 10.7 11.1 11.6 12.0 12.5
270 6.3 6.8 7.2 7.7 8.1 8.6 9.1 9.5 10.0 10.4 10.9 11.4 11.8 12.3 12.7
280
6.5 7.0 7.4 7.9 8.4 8.8 9.3 9.7 10.2 10.7 11.1 11.6 12.1 12.5 13.0
VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK
CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 50 MM^2)
C
A
B
L
E

F
R
O
M

S
/
S

T
O

D
I
S
T
R
I
B
U
T
I
O
N

C
A
B
I
N
E
T


3
0
0

M
M
^
2
TABLE 12
CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C QUADRUPLEX 120 mm2 P.F 0.85
CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER QUADRUPLEX 50 mm2 VOLTAGE 380 V
RATED CURRENT FOR QUAD 120 mm2 IN AMP 270
RATED CURRENT FOR QUAD 50 mm2 IN AMP. 185
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150
10 0.9 1.5 2.1 2.6 3.2 3.8 4.3 4.9 5.5 6.0 6.6 7.2 7.7 8.3 8.9
20 1.3 1.8 2.4 3.0 3.6 4.1 4.7 5.3 5.9 6.4 7.0 7.6 8.1 8.7 9.3
30 1.6 2.2 2.8 3.4 3.9 4.5 5.1 5.7 6.2 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.5 9.1 9.7
40 2.0 2.6 3.1 3.7 4.3 4.9 5.5 6.0 6.6 7.2 7.8 8.4 8.9 9.5 10.1
50 2.3 2.9 3.4 4.0 4.6 5.1 5.7 6.3 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.5 9.1 9.7 10.2
60 2.7 3.3 3.9 4.5 5.1 5.6 6.2 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.8 10.3 10.9
70 3.1 3.6 4.2 4.8 5.4 6.0 6.6 7.2 7.8 8.4 9.0 9.6 10.2 10.8 11.4
80 3.4 4.0 4.6 5.2 5.8 6.4 7.0 7.6 8.2 8.8 9.4 10.0 10.6 11.2 11.8
90 3.8 4.4 5.0 5.6 6.2 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.8 10.4 11.0 11.6 12.2
100 4.1 4.7 5.3 5.9 6.5 7.1 7.8 8.4 9.0 9.6 10.2 10.8 11.4 12.0 12.6
110 4.5 5.1 5.7 6.3 6.9 7.5 8.1 8.7 9.4 10.0 10.6 11.2 11.8 12.4 13.0
120 4.8 5.4 6.1 6.7 7.3 7.9 8.5 9.1 9.7 10.4 11.0 11.6 12.2 12.8 13.4
130 5.2 5.8 6.4 7.0 7.7 8.3 8.9 9.5 10.1 10.8 11.4 12.0 12.6 13.2 13.9
140 5.5 6.2 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.7 9.3 9.9 10.5 11.2 11.8 12.4 13.0 13.7 14.3
150 5.9 6.5 7.2 7.8 8.4 9.0 9.7 10.3 10.9 11.6 12.2 12.8 13.4 14.1 14.7
160 6.3 6.9 7.5 8.2 8.8 9.4 10.1 10.7 11.3 12.0 12.6 13.2 13.9 14.5 15.1
170 6.6 7.2 7.9 8.5 9.2 9.8 10.4 11.1 11.7 12.4 13.0 13.6 14.3 14.9 15.5
180 7.0 7.6 8.2 8.9 9.5 10.2 10.8 11.5 12.1 12.7 13.4 14.0 14.7 15.3 16.0
190 7.3 8.0 8.6 9.3 9.9 10.6 11.2 11.9 12.5 13.1 13.8 14.4 15.1 15.7 16.4
200 7.7 8.3 9.0 9.6 10.3 10.9 11.6 12.2 12.9 13.5 14.2 14.9 15.5 16.2 16.8
210 8.0 8.7 5.8 10.0 10.7 11.3 12.0 12.6 13.3 14.0 14.6 15.3 15.9 16.6 17.2
220 8.4 9.1 9.7 10.4 11.0 11.7 12.4 13.0 13.7 14.4 15.0 15.7 16.3 17.0 17.7
230 8.7 9.4 10.1 10.7 11.4 12.1 12.8 13.4 14.1 14.8 15.4 16.1 16.8 17.4 18.1
240 9.1 9.8 10.4 11.1 11.8 12.5 13.1 13.8 14.5 15.2 15.8 16.5 17.2 17.8 18.5
250 9.5 10.1 10.8 11.5 12.2 12.8 13.5 14.2 14.9 15.6 16.2 16.9 17.6 18.3 18.9
260 9.8 10.5 11.2 11.9 12.5 13.2 13.9 14.6 15.3 16.0 16.6 17.3 18.0 18.7 19.4
270 10.2 10.9 11.5 12.2 12.9 13.6 14.3 15.0 15.7 16.4 17.1 17.7 18.4 19.1 19.8
280
10.5 11.2 11.9 12.6 13.3 14.0 14.7 15.4 16.1 16.8 17.5 18.2 18.9 19.5 20.2
VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK
CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( QUADRUPLEX 50 MM^2)
C
A
B
L
E

F
R
O
M

S
/
S

T
O

D
I
S
T
R
I
B
U
T
I
O
N

C
A
B
I
N
E
T


Q
U
A
D
R
U
P
L
E
X

1
2
0

M
M
^
2



















APPENDIX D

TABLE : 1
NUMBER & LOCATION OF LINE RECLOSERS
REQUIRED

EM# FEEDER’S TOTAL
DISTANCE IN KMS
NUMBER OF LINE
RECLOSERS REQUIRED
INSTALL LINE RECLOSERS
AT A DISTANCE OF ABOUT
1 >30 kms and up to 60 kms 1
“half-way” between the source &
the farthest point on the line
2 >60 kms and up to 90 kms 2
“1/3
rd
.” & “2/3
rd
.” respectively
from the source point.
3 >90 kms and up to 120 kms 3
“1/4
th
.” , “1/21f” & “3/4
th

respectively from the source point.

NOTES:
1) It is assumed that the plan to install auto-reclosing facility at ht source point on
all overhead feeders would be completed as scheduled.
2) Overhead feeders = <30 kms would not require any line recloser, as the auto-
reclosing facility installed at the source point on such feeders would be
enough.
3) The above procedure is intended as a general guideline, while a good
engineering judgment would be required to “pin-point” the actual location
with in an identified section in the field.





DPS - 06
Distribution Planning Standards
Multi Source Two Voltage Or One Voltage Supplies,
Including More Than One MVA

(April 2004)

Page 3 of 6

Saudi Electricity Company




TABLE OF CONTENTS



1 Introduction

2 Justification

2.1 Two Voltage Supplies

2.2 Multi Source Supplies

3 Minimum Requirements

3.1 Multi Source Two Voltage LV Supplies

3.2 Multi Source One Voltage LV Supplies

3.3 Multi Source MV Supplies

ATTACHMENT

• Undertaking From Customers (1 sheet)












DPS - 06
Distribution Planning Standards
Multi Source Two Voltage Or One Voltage Supplies,
Including More Than One MVA

(April 2004)

Page 4 of 6

Saudi Electricity Company

1. INTRODUCTION

• This Standard shall be considered as guidelines for the minimum requirements in case of
supplying the customers with Multi source two voltage or one voltage supplies at single point
including more than one MVA for making them safe and reliable. Two-point supply shall continue
to be as per Customer Services Manual.
• With the approval of LV connections up to 16 MVA, customer is given supplies from multi
sources (more than one transformer) at single LV voltage. However, there is demand for taking
supplies at two LV voltages.
• Supplies from multi sources are given at LV by more than one transformer or at 11kV or 13.8 kV
or 33 kV or 34.5kV thru more than one feeder.
• Connection charges for such supplies shall continue to be as per Customer Services Manual.

2. JUSTIFICATION

2.1 Two Voltage Supplies

Such supplies are allowed as per NEC and already exist in KSA with commercial customers like
hospitals, municipality, printing press, etc.

2.2 Multi Source Supplies

For such supplies, if customer connects these sources internally thru his network, fault on any SEC
feeder outside customer premises will be fed from all sources. However, this fault will be cleared
safely as given below:
• Customer breaker (LV or MV) will isolate fault
• SEC breaker connected to faulty feeder will trip.
Customer breaker (LV or MV) will also clear internal faults. Therefore, present over current
protection in customer breakers without any additional protection such as reverse power relay is
considered sufficient for handling faults under such paralleling of feeders.

3. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

3.1 Multi Source Two Voltage LV Supplies

3.1.1 One MVA and Above

Such supplies from more than one LV/MV transformer can be extended under the
following conditions:

a) LV supply voltages shall be at any two voltages: 220/127V, 380/220V, 480/277V
(480/277V is applicable only for areas where 480/277V already exists).





DPS - 06
Distribution Planning Standards
Multi Source Two Voltage Or One Voltage Supplies,
Including More Than One MVA

(April 2004)

Page 5 of 6

Saudi Electricity Company

b) Primary voltage of transformers shall be any one of the following:

11kV, 13.8kV, 33kV, 34.5kV (11kV or 34.5kV is applicable only for areas where
11kV or 34.5kV already exists).

c) Substations

• Dedicated transformers/package units/unit substations in insets or rooms along
with switchgear as applicable shall be used.

• Separate insets or rooms shall be used for each secondary voltage of
transformer/package unit/unit substation.

d) Metering

Customers metering shall be based on Customer Services Manual.

e) Undertaking from Customers

Customer shall sign an undertaking for his responsibility for the following (see
attached undertaking):

• Separate conduits shall be used for cables/wiring of each voltage supplies.
• Sockets/outlets shall be installed only for one voltage.
• Changeover switches shall be used for all standby supplies.
• SEC transformers shall not be run in parallel.
• Customers shall provide at NOC/Application stage as well as at the time of
commissioning a certificate along with wiring drawings from an independent
engineering consultant stating that all wiring in the building is verified/checked
and found ok for all above points.
• During emergency, SEC shall provide back - up supply for one supply voltage
(220 or 380 or 480V), whichever is dominant in that location subject to the
availability of redundant power at that location.
• Customers shall be fully responsible for all consequences resulting in from such
paralleling of transformers and using such dual voltage supplies.

3.1.2 Below one MVA

Two voltage supplies below one MVA shall not be extended:

• These customers are small and do not have sufficient know-how for handling
such supplies safely, as they involve two or more services.
• They require special equipment such as dual voltage transformers.




DPS - 06
Distribution Planning Standards
Multi Source Two Voltage Or One Voltage Supplies,
Including More Than One MVA

(April 2004)

Page 6 of 6

Saudi Electricity Company
3.2 Multi Source Single Voltage LV Supplies

3.2.1. One MVA and Above

Single Voltage LV supplies from multi sources (more than one LV/MV transformer) can be
extended as per current SEC Standards and customer shall sign an undertaking for his
responsibility for the following (see attached undertaking):

• Separate conduits for feeding independent circuits shall be used for cables/wiring of
each source supplies.
• Changeover switches shall be used for all standby supplies.
• SEC transformers shall not be run in parallel.
• Customers shall provide at NOC/Application stage as well as at the time of
commissioning a certificate along with wiring drawings from an independent
engineering consultant stating that all wiring in the building is verified/checked and
found ok for all above points.
• Customers shall be fully responsible for all consequences resulting in from such
paralleling of transformers.

3.2.2. Below one MVA

Single voltage supplies below one MVA from two or more transformers shall not be
extended as these customers are small and do not have sufficient know-how for handling
such supplies safely as they involve two or more services.

3.3 Multi Source MV Supplies

MV supplies can be extended from multi sources by using more than one feeder from
different bus bars or substations or grid stations as per current SEC Standards and
customer shall sign an undertaking for his responsibility for the following (see attached
undertaking):

• Customer shall not run SEC MV feeders in parallel thru his LV or MV network.
• Customer shall get SEC approval for interlocks/protection for his MV switchgear
required at interface point.
• Customers shall be fully responsible for all consequences resulting in from such
paralleling of SEC MV feeders.



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Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard

‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬
DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 1 of 90

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page #

TABLE OF CONTENTS

01 05 05 05 14 15 15 15 16 16 16 17 19 20

1
1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 1.10 1.11 1.12

DISTRIBUTION PLANNING CRITERIA
Introduction Definitions General Principles Frequency Harmonics Phase Unbalance Power Factor Voltage Fluctuation Standard Distribution Voltage Voltage Drop Voltage Regulation Standard Loading Conditions

ssm

1 2.2.4.2.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 2 of 90 2 2.5 Contingency plan Criteria Grid Station Criteria Feeders Configuration Feeders Loading Normal Open Point 21 21 22 22 28 28 31 31 33 33 34 35 36 36 36 2.2 Medium Voltage Planning Criteria Introduction Design of M.3 2.3 2.1 2.1 2.1 2. Network 2.5.5.2.2 Bulk LV customers: Bulk MV customers: ssm .2 2.4 2.2.2.2 Estimation of the load Voltage Drop Calculation 2. V.4 Supply to rural Area Supply to Bulk Customer 2.4.5 Mode of supply 2.

D.7.6 3.) Distribution Substation 3.10 Low Voltage Cables/Conductors Reinforcement Of Low Voltage Network New Plot Plan ssm .7.3 3.4 3.4 Distribution Substation Type Loading of Distribution Substations Sites of Distribution Substation Distribution Cabinet 3.7 Calculation Of Voltage Drop (V.3 3.9 3.5.5.2 Underground Network Configuration Overhead Line Network Configuration 37 37 37 38 38 42 42 44 45 47 47 48 48 50 50 51 51 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.8 3. Introduction Customer Classification Estimation of Customer Load Load Estimation Procedures Low Voltage Network Design 3.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 3 of 90 3 3.7.1 3.7.1 3.5 LOW VOLTAGE PLANNING CRITERIA.

3 4.7 IMPROVEMENT OF THE NETWORK PERFORMANCE Introduction Short Circuit Performance Voltage Regulator Placement Capacitor Placement Motor Starting – Voltage Dip Auto – Reclosers Loss Evaluation 52 52 52 54 61 70 76 80 APPENDIX APPENDIX APPENDIX APPENDIX A B C D ssm .4 4.2 4.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 4 of 90 4 4.5 4.6 4.1 4.

Several parameters of an Electricity supply such as frequency.1 Definitions Ambient Temperature: The surrounding temperature (in the absence of the equipment) of the immediate environment in which equipment is installed.2. This means that a Customer receives a supply of Electrical power required by him at the time and place at which he can use it. The “Distribution Planning Criteria” has been written to serve as a guideline to the Planning Engineers in the Saudi Electricity Company for the Planning of Distribution Network.2.2 Bulk Supply Point: An in feed point from higher to a lower voltage level on the transmission system.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 5 of 90 1 1. the capital and operating costs of doing so should be reduced minimum as possible. 1. 1. should be within allowable limits to ensure that the Customer obtains satisfactory performance for his electrical equipment while ensuring that the demands of the Customers continue to be met. voltage level. ssm . etc. continuity of supply. A derived constant value is taken for the purposes of designing or rating equipment.1 DISTRIBUTION PLANNING CRITERIA Introduction The objective of Power Distribution System is to deliver the Electrical power to Customers in safe. reliable and most economical way. This temperature normally varies.2 1.

as the length of time supply is unavailable in a year.3 Customer: Any entity that purchases electrical power from a power utility. 1. 1. 1. 1. 1.8 Demand Load: It is the maximum load drawn from the power system by a customer at the customer’s interface (either estimated or measured) ssm .2.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 6 of 90 1. to a Customer over a period of time.4 Customer Interface: The point at which a customer's load is connected to the SEC's power system. where each kwh meter represents customer.2. The customer shall be responsible for all equipment on the load side of this interface. This shall normally be taken as the load side of the customer metering installation. The SEC shall normally be responsible for operating and maintaining all equipment on the supply of this interface. This is generally measured.2. Connected load is measured in VoltAmperes (VA).2.6 Coincidence Factor: The ratio of the maximum total demand of a group of customers to the sum of the maximum power demand of individual customers comprising the group both taken at the same point of supply for the same time.5 Continuity: A measure of the availability of Power Supply.7 Connected Load: The sum of the nameplate ratings of all present and future electrical equipment installed by a customer.2. it is reciprocal of diversity factor.2.

1. Distribution Systems typically operate at voltages in the medium and low voltage ranges.2. with plus and minus percentage limits.2. ssm . 1. This is generally expressed as a frequency range.10 Effectively Earthed System: A Power System in which the Neutral is connected to Earth either directly or through a Neutral Resistor. at fluctuation frequencies below the fundamental frequency. in terms of a nominal frequency in Hz (cycles per second).11 Even Harmonics: Harmonic quantities. relative to the fundamental voltage.12 Extra High Voltage (EHV): A class of maximum system voltages greater than 242 kV.9 Distribution System: The aggregate of electrical equipment and facilities used to transfer electrical power to the Customer. 1. 1.2.2. 1. These are generally expressed as percentage variations. but less than 1000 kV.2.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 7 of 90 1. at even multiples of the fundamental Frequency.2. 1.15 Frequency: The rate of oscillation of the AC supply.2.13 Fault Outage: A loss of supply to a Customer due to some un-planned event in the Power System.14 Flicker: Periodic fluctuations in voltage.

21 Lateral Feeder: A branch circuit off a primary feeder used to distribute Power from the primary feeder.19 Highest Voltage: The highest effective value of voltage.17 Harmonic Distortion: The measure of a harmonic impressed on some fundamental quantity which usually refers to voltage. The magnitudes of these quantities are generally expressed as percentage values of the fundamental parameter.16 Fundamental Frequency: The operating or system frequency of the Power System. ssm .2. which occurs under normal operating conditions at any time and at any point on the System. 1.20 High Voltage (HV): A class of nominal system voltages of 100 kV or greater. The term does not include transient voltages due to fault or switching. 1. 1. This is generally expressed as the ratio of the magnitude of the relevant harmonic.2.2.2.22 Load (Customer): The aggregate of all electrical equipment by which a Customer draws electrical power from the power system.18 Harmonics: Parameters which vary at integer multiples of the nominal frequency of the Power System.2. but equal to or less than 230 kV.2. 1.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 8 of 90 1.2. 1. to the fundamental value. 1. Parameters whose frequency is the same as the fundamental frequency are referred to as fundamental parameters.

27 Network: The aggregate of Cable and or overhead line and associated equipment.2.25 Medium Voltage (MV): A class of nominal system voltages greater than 1000 Volts but less than 100 kV.24 Low Voltage (LV): A class of nominal system voltages of 1000 Volts or less. 1.29 Odd Harmonics: Harmonic quantities.2. ssm .28 Nominal Voltage: The voltage value.2.2. 1. at odd multiples of the fundamental frequency. 1. used to transport electrical power between Substations or between Substations and Customer loads. to AC currents.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 9 of 90 1. etc.2.2. by which a system is designated and to which certain operating characteristics of the system are related. 1. in the same sense.2. 1. The term negative sequence may also be applied. impedances.23 Loss Load Factor: The ratio between average and peak losses on an element of the power system.26 Negative Sequence Voltage: A set of symmetrical phase voltages (of equal magnitude and 120º phase angle) having the opposite phase sequence to that of the source. 1.

34 Power: The rate (in kilowatts) of generating.2. 1. It is usually given in (K. ssm .S value of the current.2. continuity.M. etc.S value of the in-phase component of the current.S value of the voltage and R. 1. short circuit levels.W).2.V. frequency.M.S value of the voltage and R.2. 1.2.35 Power (Active): The product of R. in the same sense. transferring or using energy. It is usually given in (K. Typical parameters are voltage. to AC currents.M. The term positive sequence may also be applied.31 Parameter: ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 10 of 90 A quantity of value describing some aspect of the electrical system or the process of power supply. 1.30 Outage: Any loss of supply to a Customer.36 Power (Apparent): The product of R.2. 1.A).2.M.32 Phase Un-Balance: A measure of asymmetry between phase parameters in terms of magnitude. etc. This is generally expressed as a ratio of negative and or zero sequence values to the positive sequence value. impedances. phase angle or both.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard 1.33 Positive Sequence Voltage: A set of symmetrical phase voltages (of equal magnitude and 120º phase angle) having the same phase sequence as the source. 1.

39 Power Utility: Any entity that generates and supplies electrical power for sale to Customers.2. 1.2. 1.44 Service Voltage: The voltage value at the Customer's interface.2.41 Rural: A rural area shall be interpreted as any location outside an urban area.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard 1. up to the Customer interface. ssm .43 Service Line: The portion of a Utility Power System. 1. nearest the Customer.2.2.2. in terms of a nominal voltage with plus and minus percentage variations. dedicated to supplying power to an individual Customer.42 Secondary Feeder: A LV circuit used to distribute Power from a Distribution Substation. 1.37 Power Factor: ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 11 of 90 The ratio of active power to apparent power.38 Power System: The aggregate of all electrical equipment used to supply electrical power to a Customer.40 Primary Feeder: A medium voltage circuit used to distribute Power from a Substation. declared by the Power Utility.2. This is generally expressed as a voltage range.2. 1. 1. 1.

ssm . It is generally expressed as a nominal voltage with an upper limit only. domestic appliances.47 Total Harmonic Distortion: Total Harmonic Distortion is the aggregate of the harmonic distortions at all harmonic frequencies.2. in bulk.2. 1.2. at all harmonic frequencies. Transmission Systems typically operate at voltages in the high voltage range.46 System Voltage: A value of voltage used within the Utilities Power System. 1. This is expressed as the root mean square value of harmonic distortions. in terms of a nominal voltage with plus and minus percentage variations.50 Utilization Voltage: The voltage value at the terminals of utilization equipment.2.48 Transmission System: The aggregate of electrical equipment and facilities used to transfer electrical power. for example.2. 1. between sources (generation) and the Distribution System. 1.45 Substation: ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 12 of 90 The aggregate of electrical equipment and facilities. by which electrical power is transformed in bulk from one voltage to another.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard 1. This is measured between phases. It is generally expressed as a voltage range.49 Urban: For Power supply purposes an urban area shall be interpreted as any town or city.51 Voltage: The root mean square (rms) value of power frequency voltage. unless otherwise indicated.2.2. This upper limit defines the rated voltage for equipment. 1. on a threephase alternating current electrical system. 1.

52 Voltage Dip: ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 13 of 90 Individual variations in voltage.53 Voltage Drop: The difference in voltage between one point in a power system and another.57 Zero Sequence Voltage: A set of phase voltages of equal magnitude and zero phase angle. relative to each other.2. The 3-phase values are thus in phase with each other. 1. 1. etc. This is generally expressed as a percentage of the nominal voltage.56 Voluntary Outage: A planned loss of supply to a Customer. which define the extremities of a voltage range. etc.2. The term zero sequence may also be applied. typically caused by network switching. motor starting.2.2.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard 1. 1. with prior knowledge of the Customer.2. 1.55 Voltage Range: The span of voltage values. 1. to AC currents. Transient voltages due to fault or switching conditions are excluded. within which a voltage may vary. in the same sense. These are generally expressed as percentage variations. ssm .2. typically between the supply substation bus and the extremities of a network. under normal operating conditions.54 Voltage Limits: The voltage values. impedances. relative to the fundamental voltage. These are generally expressed as plus and minus percentage variations from the nominal value.

3 ssm . Where local conditions differ from these standard conditions standard material ratings shall be modified. Where it is not possible to use standard materials.3. will be exceeded at some locations within the Kingdom.1 All equipment will operate within normal ratings and the system voltages will be within the permissible limits when the system is operating anywhere from the minimum load to the forecasted maximum peak load. Where it is not possible to use standard materials. standard material ratings shall be modified. while representative of the major load regions. (b) Standard Equipment Rating Conditions: Standard ratings for materials and equipment shall be based on the following Service Conditions. Emergency ratings are those. 1. Where local conditions differ from these standard conditions. Special surveys to define environmental and soil conditions should be carried out prior to major engineering works. It is therefore necessary for the user to confirm whether local conditions exceed standard conditions and to take appropriate action.3 General Principles ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 14 of 90 The distribution planning criteria is mainly based on the following general principles: 1. other materials of higher rating may be used. Environment parameters will be as per the following: (a) Standard Service Conditions: All standard materials and equipment shall be designed and constructed of satisfactory operation under the appropriate set of Service Conditions listed hereunder.12.3.2 1. Note that These standard Service Conditions.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard 1. other materials of higher rating may be used. using the Tables in section 1. Planning is based on normal and emergency equipment ratings. which can safely exist for a specified number of hours.3.

6 Phase Unbalance Under normal system conditions the three phase voltages shall be balanced at MV. such that the negative phase sequence voltage does not exceed 2% of the positive phase sequence voltage.0 2.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard 1.0 3.0 for N <14 127-380 V 5. Operating Range: The maximum permissible frequency operating range shall be between 59.2 Frequency ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 15 of 90 Standard Frequency: The standard system frequency shall have a nominal value of 60 Hz. or multiple of the fundamental frequency. Harmonics The level of harmonics in the power system shall not exceed the values.4. Voltage distortion is expressed as a percentage of the fundamental voltage.4 1.The preferred operating range should be between 59.9 Hz and 60.4.8 KV 4. Table –1.8 kV or a ssm .5 for N >14 13.1 Maximum Continuous Harmonic Levels Individual Harmonic Voltage Total Harmonic Nominal Voltage Voltage Distortion % Distortion (%) Odd Even 4. Customers with a dedicated transformer or those supplied at 13.0 1.1.75 33 KV 3.0 Note: N is the harmonic order. 1. The indicated values refer to maximum continuous levels. on a continuous basis. and higher voltages in the system.1 Hz.0 1.1 1.8 Hz and 60. listed in Table-1.0 1.0 2.2Hz .5 1.

Where two voltages are listed e.2 shall be used as standard service voltages at the interface with power customers.8. within the power system. or voltage dips.8. under steady state and normal system conditions and over the full loading range of the system. conforms to these requirements.9 Standard Distribution Voltage The voltages listed in Table – 1.85 lagging or higher at the interface. 1.1 Voltage Fluctuation Voltage Dips: For non-repetitive voltage variation. welding equipment or power system switching. No customer shall present a leading power factor to the SEC system. 1. All other customers shall balance their loads over the three phases to the greatest degree possible. Such variations shall not occur more frequently than 3 times per day. 220/127 V the lower value refers to the phase to neutral voltage.7 Power Factor Each customer shall maintain a power factor of 0. The SEC shall then balance these loads. which causes voltage fluctuation at the Customer interface in excess of these requirements. 1. the voltage variation shall not exceed 7% of the fundamental nominal voltage under normal circumstances.2 Application: No Customer shall connect equipment to the power system.8 1. such as those associated with motor-starting.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 16 of 90 higher voltage shall balance their loads. 1. The service voltage shall be maintained within the range defined by the indicated lowest and highest values.2 ssm . such that the load phase unbalance at the customer interface meets the above criterion. All other values are phase-to-phase voltages. at each Customer's interface. The SEC shall ensure that the power supply. Table – 1.g.. to meet the above criterion.

45 kV 13.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 17 of 90 Standard Service Voltage Nominal Voltage Lowest Voltage 220/127 V 209/120 V 380/220 V 360/209 V *11 kV 10. but non-standard voltage.0 2. The additional voltage drop in the customer's wiring shall not exceed the value indicated.1 Voltage Drop Voltage Drop Allocation: (a) Highest Voltage 231/134 V 400/231 V 11.0% * Existing voltage. 1.5 2.5 ssm .55 kV 14.5 12.Primary Feeders .10.5 kV 34.0 1.1 kV 33 kV 31.5.3 shall be used as guideline voltage drops over the power system components supplying a low voltage customer.4 kV *34.Substation Voltage Regulator Bandwidth .8 kV 13.5 3.Distribution Transformer Secondary System (127-380 Volts): .8 kV): .7 kV 36. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table.Secondary Feeder .5 10.0% LV Customers: The Utility voltage drop allocations listed in Table-1.5 1.23 kV + 5.5 kV 32.10 1.78 kV Percentage Limits .1.3 Voltage Drop Allocations Power System Component Utility: Primary System (33 kV or 13.Service Feeder Total Service Drop Customer Wiring (To furthest point of utilization) Total Utilization Drop Voltage Drop % 1.

for both high and low network loading conditions. shall be such that the utilization voltage standards are observed. in all cases. however. in all cases. The SEC shall endeavor to maintain the service voltage spread below the 5% maximum value.2 ssm Standard Utilization Voltage: . Where such voltage regulation measures are applied. permitted by the standards. however. (b) MV Customers: The voltage drop over the power system components supplying a medium voltage (33 kV or 13. however.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard Notes: ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 18 of 90 The indicated primary feeder voltage drops apply. The voltage drop over the Customer’s power system. down-stream of the Substation. The service and utilization voltage standards shall be observed. in all cases. 1. Distribution Transformers have a built-in voltage boost of 5% by virtue of the transformation ratio. The Customer may avail of any voltage drop not utilized by the SEC to increase his internal voltage drop above the 2. the primary feeder voltage drops may be increased. for both high and low system loading conditions. for both high and low network-loading conditions.10. Note that this does not extend the voltage drop to the service point beyond 10% however. in all cases for both high and low network-loading conditions. where no voltage regulation/control measures are applied to the network.5% permitted by the standards. Where the voltage drop allocated to a system component is not fully utilized. the spare allocation may be availed of to increase the allocation for other system components. The service and utilization voltage standards shall be observed.8 kV) Customer shall be such that the service voltage standards are observed.

the utilization voltage shall be maintained within the indicated percentage limits.55 kV 14. Existing locations where other voltages are currently in use shall be clearly defined.11.11.10.3 ssm Automatic Regulation: . in many instances. in the event of an outage.5 kV *34.4 Standard Utilization Voltages Nominal Voltage Lowest Voltage 220/127 Volts 203/117 Volts 380/220 Volts 352/203 Volts *11 kV 10.7 kV 36.2 Network: Additional voltage regulation/control may be applied to networks downstream from the substations. Where two voltages are listed. Highest Voltage 231/134 Volts 400/231 Volts 11. but non-standard voltage.8 kV 12.18 kV 13. the lower value refers to the phase to neutral voltage. 1.7. This will in fact be necessary. Refer to details of voltages under exceptional conditions. All other values are phase-to-phase voltages. 1.23 kV + 5.5 kV 31.11.1 Voltage Regulation Substation Automatic voltage regulation shall be applied in main substations (grid stations). The bandwidth of the regulator must be considered when assigning voltage drops.8 kV 33 kV 30.91 kV Percentage Limits . For such other voltages. 1. to compensate for voltage drop in excess of the levels indicated in section 1. especially for rural networks.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 19 of 90 Table-1. such that the voltage is regulated on all distribution feeders leaving the substation.0% Notes: Refer to details of voltage drop allocations.5% * Existing voltage. Advantage may be taken of the following means of voltage regulation.5 kV 34.11 1.

These load ratings are based solely on the thermal rating of the equipment. or switched capacitor banks.2 Cables: Standard Cable Rating Conditions Refer to Appendix A. may then be the applied down-steam of the point of regulation. Two different operating conditions are considered for equipment rating namely normal and emergency. 1.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 20 of 90 Voltage regulators.12. These ratings are presented as guidelines only and are based on the indicated assumptions. to automatically regulate the voltage. Tables of correction factors for deviations from these standard conditions are also provided. 1. ssm . less the percentage bandwidth of the regulator.12 Standard Loading Conditions SEC has standardized the equipment that are used in the distribution system and their ratings have been established according to the prevailing conditions. The full 10% voltage spread. Special surveys to define environmental and operating conditions should be carried out prior to major engineering works.1 Equipment Loading: Guideline load ratings for the standard sizes of power system equipment under standard conditions are indicated hereunder.12. Variations from standard conditions and the general suitability of the ratings method shall be checked before using the ratings. may be installed along the primary feeders. 1.

8KV networks as standard medium voltages as well as 34. The main purpose of this part is to give some guidance for engineers to perform their planning work for medium voltage level network.1 MEDIUM VOLTAGE PLANNING CRITERIA Introduction Medium Voltage (MV) covers 33KV and 13. etc).5 kV & 11 kV (69 kV is not included) for Saudi Electricity Company (SEC). these should be reviewed to assess the quality (reliability. Network plans shall be developed such that the equipment utilization at different levels is improved every year indicating a move towards optimization. Nevertheless. the planning engineer should be provided with a guideline to evaluate the plan before it is implemented to ensure that the objectives are achieved. Once the plans are prepared. The timely addition of facilities with the economical evaluation for the best alternatives is the basic requirement of a good network plan. The standardization of the network and elimination of system deficiencies and weaknesses as a consequence is deemed to improve the system reliability.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 21 of 90 2 2. economy. The distribution network plans should be prepared based on the following strategies: • Optimum utilization of equipment (capital resources). • Improvement of system reliability. ssm . • Economical and systematic expansion in accordance with system growth.

2 Design of M.2. V.1 Contingency Plan Criteria (a) Purpose This section has been developed to assist distribution-planning engineers in evaluating the performance of the proposed network under various defined contingency conditions. network the following should be taken into consideration: Contingency plan criteria Grid station criteria Feeders configuration criteria Feeders loading criteria Normal open point location Voltage drop criteria Short circuit level 2.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard 2. It also identifies the responsibilities of involved divisions/departments within SEC for the development of contingency plans under various contingency conditions and provides general guidelines for multiple contingency planning by operating areas. V. It also includes recommendations for the remedial action to be taken by appropriate agencies to overcome the situation to bring the distribution network within the established contingency criteria. ssm . Network ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 22 of 90 In order to make a design of M. (b) Scope This section enlists the contingency conditions that should be considered during development of 5-year network plans and identifies possible solutions to resolve the problems arising in different situations.

(d) Contingencies to be Considered in Distribution Network Planning The following first level contingencies shall be considered in the development of a 5-year network plan: 1Failure of any one of the power transformers in any substation having single. double or multiple power transformers. Multiple contingencies at any level. ssm . Contingency at low voltage system. Abnormal (though rarely) multiple contingencies may arise in the network resulting in loss of supply to customers. 2- 3(e) Contingencies Not Covered in Distribution Network Planning The following contingencies shall not be covered in the development of 5-year network plan: 123Contingency at Distribution Transformer.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard (c) Criteria ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 23 of 90 Distribution network plans shall be developed to meet the first level contingency conditions and not for multiple contingencies as per distribution planning criteria. which normally involves interruption to all the loads associated with the bus section. But the first contingency criteria require that the power supply shall be restored within reasonable time through available standby/alternate supply Failure of any one-feeder segment in any feeder network configuration. double or multiple bus sections. Failure of any one of the bus sections in any substation having single.

Normally the over current relays of the power transformers are coordinated with the fault currents and require higher settings to avoid undesirable tripping due to transients. There is no protection against overloading for the remaining power transformers in service in case one of the grid station transformers trips on internal faults. proposals shall be made to suitably shift the normal open points to efficiently utilize the system spare capacity to relieve an overloaded facility.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard (f) ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 24 of 90 Probable Solution For Contingency Planning 1Grid Station Overloading In case the grid station is expected to operate beyond the firm capacity. operational inconvenience. the following may be considered as probable solutions: i Network Resectionalization Resectionalization of the distribution network should be proposed to eliminate the expected overloading if load transfer capability is available in the system at distribution level. The first step of the contingency plan shall be the identification of the interties and the available relief through each intertie depending upon the overload on the grid station and the spare capacity available in the neighboring grid stations. The interties between different grid stations facilitate load transfer from one grid station to the other neighboring grid stations by shifting the normal open point in the loop. ii Activate Thermal Protection Activate the trip circuit for the grid station power transformer thermal relays image relays. As an interim arrangement during the contingency period the transformer thermal relays i. oil temperature and ssm .e. Factors such as auto change over switches. important loads and geographical location restrict or limit the load transfer through an intertie and therefore are required to be thoroughly examined. Accordingly.

Little modification if any may be required to enable the facility to be efficiently utilized during the interim period of contingency plan and to be readily available before its planned use. ssm . oil switches and new feeders to interconnect existing overloaded feeders and grid stations with the available source of relief shall be planned to overcome the situation. The contingency plan should identify the grid stations. But the earlier implementation depends on budget provision and certainty of development plan. which are required to be protected from overloading for coordination with the concerned agencies to implement the scheme. The advancement of expenditure may avoid non-recoverable expenditure in installing alternatively other facilities on temporary basis. Short lengths of lines.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 25 of 90 winding temperature shall be used for transformer tripping. v Installation of Mobile Station/Transformer Installation of a mobile station/transformer may be required in areas where: • The overloading is so heavy that it cannot be relieved through the available interties. iv Installation of Facilities on Temporary Basis Installation of temporary facilities is sometimes indispensable to maintain reliability of supply. iii Advance Installation of Planned Facilities Planned distribution facilities may be advanced by one or two years if the overload is expected to be alleviated significantly by their implementation. The overload relay settings of the transformer control breakers shall also be reduced to minimum allowable level to minimize the risk of overloading. The facilities shall be planned such that they involve minimum non-recoverable expenditure.

The feeder shall be sectionalized and supplied by mobile generator to avoid overloading during first contingency.iv. Such situations will normally be very rare. 2Feeder Overloading criteria In case the planned reinforcement of the feeder is not expected to be completed as scheduled and the associated distribution network is expected to be overloaded in a particular year during the plan period the following solutions may be considered in the contingency plan: i Same as 1. iii Use of Mobile Generators Mobile generators shall be used to provide emergency supply to the customers.iii. ii Same as 1. which exceeds the emergency loading capacity. In case the overloading of a grid station is significant and it is not possible to reduce by any of the probable solutions mentioned above it may be loaded as per the requirement within the installed transformer capacity and watched for the abnormalities to arrange immediate load relief by load shedding. ssm .Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 26 of 90 • The neighboring grid stations are also overloaded. vi Manning of Grid Station or Frequent Inspection During Peak Load Period One of the alternatives though expensive is manning of the grid station or planning frequent inspection during peak load period. which are normally fed by radial feeders. • The overloaded grid station is located in an isolated area and there is no facility available in the neighborhood for load transfer. The arrangement may also be workable in case of loop feeder.

power transformer. 4 .Determine the loads.Identify the feeders which cannot be partially/fully restored until repairs are completed. 5 . Such contingencies are however very rare and if materialize may result in interruption of supply.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 27 of 90 (g) General Guidelines for second / Multiple Contingency Planning The second/multiple contingency conditions are created in the system when more than one transmission line.Establish operational steps required to restore supply to the VIP customers utilizing the available alternate source of supply and existing interties. which require restoration of supply on priority. Nevertheless SEC is obliged to utilize the system redundancy wherever available to provide alternate supply to the customers.Identify the loads which shall be partially/fully restored through the customer installed emergency/standby supply. which involve huge capital investment. bus section of a Bulk Supply Point or grid station or primary feeder fail. 2 . 7 . ssm . These plans should be developed on the following lines: 1 . with the 8 .Propose additional distribution requirement if any.Identify important loads. Therefore it is desirable to develop contingency plans for each such contingency to enable the concerned agencies to systematically utilize the available facilities and minimize interruption to the customers. 6 . SEC does not plan the system at any level to meet such contingencies. 3 . the impact being in accordance with the capacity lost.Identify the loads which should be partially/fully restored through the installation of SEC mobile generators. which can be restored with rotating blackout.Justification.

Estimate load in MW/MVA (reflected to peak) that will remain without supply until repairs are completed. ( b ) The location of the new grid station should consider with center of new load. feeders on MV should not exceed 7. 10 .8 kV in length up to the normal open point. one of the following criteria for feeder configuration shall be followed: ssm . The length of the feeders controlled by load. ( e ) The number of out going feeders required.5 Km for 13. voltage drop and operating circumstances. For distribution network planning.2.3 Feeders Configuration Criteria In general. In planning stage the planning engineer should consider the following: ( a ) The grid station load should not exceed the firm capacity of the station based on N-1 criteria. voltage drop is within allowed limits). Based on regulation of power supply.2 Grid Station Criteria The grid station is the interface point between transmission level and distribution level. 2. spare breaker is available. SEC will supply power to customers with load requirement greater than 8 MVA if it is technically feasible (Grid Station load permits.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 28 of 90 9 . ( d ) The time required to build the grid station. As indication to the planning engineers. otherwise SEC has the right to ask for G/S’s location as per SEC standard specially for new plot plans (scheme).Estimate approximate number of customers that will be left without power if the outage occurs during peak load period. 2. the best configuration is the single loop but due to the customer location and feeder loading other configuration take place. ( c ) The capacity of the new grid station should be appropriate for the forecasted load.2.

The network shall be operated radially and the total load of loop shall not exceed the normal rating of the conductor/cable.2 (Appendix B). Wherever practical and economical. Refer to Figure # 2. Such radial feeders shall be looped between two neighboring grid stations if possible. Loop supply shall be provided only if the bulk customer pays for the additional expenditure required for the alternate source. farms and bulk customers out side the planned area domain phase-I). Single loop is consists of two radial feeders. equal load connected together. In the case of bulk customers. they may be looped between different buses of the same grid station. (b) Single Loop Single loop system shall be considered as the most-preferred SEC feeder configuration.1(Appendix B). (c) Tee Loop When the combined feeder load in a single loop exceeds normal rating of the cable depending on the size and construction of the line. SEC shall provide radial supply only irrespective of demand.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 29 of 90 (a) Radial Radial feed is the most economical type of supply but offers minimum reliability (circuit-out conditions). Radial feeder shall be utilized to supply power to remote area customer(s) (Villages. loop supply should be provided with diversified sources. the following tee loop arrangement shall be considered: 1 . This type of feeder arrangement offers an acceptable degree of reliability but at a higher initial cost. Alternately. ssm .OPTION 1: Three feeders sharing approx. Refer to Figure # 2.

It allows loading up to one and half times the feeder’s normal load (provided all feeders are of same size).3 (Appendix B). 2 . This type of arrangement shall be considered a temporary or interim arrangement. the addition of a new feeder to form two separate single loop shall be considered.4 (Appendix B).Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 30 of 90 This option is a preferred SEC distribution feeder configuration. Each feeder is capable of extending standby supply to the remaining two feeders in case of emergency in this arrangement. efficient utilization of spare feeder capacity may not be possible in the case of multiple feeder loops. Additionally. Refer to Figure # 2. timely resources must be allocated to convert them to single loop or tee loop arrangements by adding new grid station. Refer to attached Figure # 2. If the loop load exceeds circuit capacity. Option II feeder arrangement offers less supply reliability than the type in Option I but it is less expensive than the open loop arrangement. This threefeeder arrangement offers an acceptable degree of reliability (but less than single loop) at less initial cost than the single loop arrangement. Efforts must be made to minimize this type of feeder arrangement and if used. This option is a non-preferred SEC distribution network configuration but does allow loading two feeders to full load (provided all feeders are of same size).OPTION 2: Two feeders each loaded to full capacity and one feeder as express circuit to provide back up to either of the two feeders in case of emergency. (d) Multiple Feeder Loop Multiple feeder loops are in operation in many places in the SEC. ssm . It is not desirable (for complex operation and maintenance) to connect more than three feeders in an open loop arrangement. Efforts shall be made to bring the system to a single loop or tee loop/Option I arrangement as soon as practical.

5 Normal Open Point The concerned planning engineer based on the following factors shall decide normal open points in the distribution network: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) Distribution of load on each section.4. 2.2.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 31 of 90 (e) Radial Branches Of Main Circuits Small isolated loads (especially in rural areas) shall be served radially by branch-off of main feeders.2 Single and Tee Looped Feeders: The loading of feeders should be according the configuration as follow: Feeder Configuration Single looped feeders Tee looped Feeders Loading 50 % 65% However. Continuity performance. Sub-loop within an open loop may be built in urban area in exceptional cases to efficiently utilizing the system spare capacity.2. Voltage drop.1 Radial Feeder Configuration: For radial feeder.5 (Appendix B).72. 2. Distribution of load on the grid station. VIP customers. the feeder configuration is same as section 3. Auto-change over switches. ssm . Refer to Figure # 2. the normal load rating of the standard medium voltage cable/conductor refer to Appendix A.2.4.2. 2.4 Feeders Loading Criteria 2. District boundaries.

The normally open point shall be located to facilitate easy accessibility and fast restoration of supply in case of emergency. station capability will not be achieved). the normally open point shall be selected such that in normal operating conditions. all feeders in the loop should maintain satisfactory voltage. Location of important customers on the loop shall be considered when determining the normal open points as a closely located normal open point to an important customer may enable quicker restoration of power through the available stand-by source.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard (h) (i) (j) Easy accessibility. the circuits may be looped onto different bus sections at the same grid station (with this arrangement. it may be necessary to specify one normally open point for a specific loop during grid station summer peak loads and a different normally-open point on the same loop during winter peak periods. Such influencing factors shall be acceptable if other conditions do not dictate otherwise. Because of variations in seasonal peak loads on grid stations. District boundaries sometimes determine feeder normally open points due to operational jurisdiction. The most desirable design condition for a normally open point in any loop is to have equal loading on the individual circuits of the loop and to have each circuit supplied from separate grid stations (to achieve maximum load transfer capability between grid stations). Optimal energy loss. All temporary shifting will be by operating people due their operational requirements. It is an acceptable means of deferring capital expenditures for premature grid station reinforcement or construction of a grid station in a newly developed area. ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 32 of 90 Equipment operational flexibility. As an alternative to supply from separate grid stations. Such action should be considered by operation people in cases where a grid station’s load must be reduced so as not to exceed the substation firm capacity. Since load density and distance from the supply source determines the voltage drop. ssm .

those customers can be supplied on LV if the existing rules and regulation of customer service allow. ssm . There is no firm rule for fixing a normally open point.7 2. 5 KVA per customer can be used.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 33 of 90 The most ideal location for the normally open point will be a compromise among all the above-mentioned factors. • The voltage drop should be in the permissible range.4 Supply to Bulk Customer Each customer requires more than 1 MVA load should be considered as a bulk customer. 2. • Recloser and sectionalizer should be used wherever required on branches and fuse cutouts / air break switch can be used for branches with load less than 1 MVA and 1 km length 2.4. Bulk customer should provide a declared load data to be considered by SEC.2.3 Voltage Drop Criteria Refer to section 2. • In calculating the load of the area .2.2 Short Circuit level Refer to section 4 Supply to Rural Area Supply to Rural Area the following should be considered: • SEC should utilize the highest MV available in the area to supply rural area • The system in rural area should be radial and O/H. Good engineering judgment and area information usually will determine the best location leading to efficient system operation. Those customers should be supplied on MV. However.6 2. If the normal open point changed because of over loading then the planning engineer should be informed.

Gold shops. To calculate the demand load of the customer the planning engineer should use the following formula: Demand Load = connected load X Demand Factor Where the demand factor is according the following Table 2. Factories Big Farms. Greenhouses 0. Schools. Istrahat Customer Shops.9 Industrial Customer Agriculture Customer ssm Mosque.8 Customer Clubs 0. they should provide load requirement and SEC will verify the load and calculate the demand accordingly and identify the diversity factor and substations requirement.5 Villas. Workshops. Furnished flats. Supermarkets.6 pumps.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 34 of 90 For bulk customer on LV. Stores.1 Estimation of the load Bulk customer submit connected load details to SEC. 2. Commercial Government buildings Hospitals. Motels.9 . Production Farms.9 0.4. Malls.1 (Demand Factor) Class of Demand Type of construction customer Factor Residential 0. These meters will be connected to the system through normal substation connection. Livestock and Dairy Farms. Planning engineer will consider the submitted load detail and verify according to SEC rules of calculating demand load. Houses. 0. These customer can be supplied either: ( a ) On medium voltage with an agreed MV switching room at the boundary of the project Or ( b ) On low voltage customers according to the existing service rules with number of substation with attached metering rooms at agreed location on the boundary of the project on roadside not less than 6 meters wide. Palaces. Street Lights Industries.1 Table – 2. Offices. Petrol 0. Hajj Load.

4.85 Table 2.8 KV 33 KV 13.2 Voltage Drop Calculation For a particular supply voltage.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 35 of 90 2.8 KV 13.2 Cable / Conductor Size 3 X 185 mm² CU 3 X 300 mm² CU 3 X 185 mm² CU 3 X 300 mm² AL 170 mm² ACSR 170 mm² ACSR Voltage 33 KV 13.D = Where: KVA R X Kv L Ф KVA( R × COSφ + X × SINφ ) × L 10 × KV 2 = Three phase load in kVA.D = KVA × L K Where K is a constant shown in table 2. A commonly used formula for voltage drop is provided below: %V . = Resistance of conductor in ohms per kilometer = Inductive resistance of conductor in ohms per kilometer = Three phase supply voltage in kilovolts at sending end = Length of cable in kilometers = Angle of supply This formula can be modified to %V .8 KV K 63020 14712 11020 11282 26535 4730 ssm .2 at power factor 0. length and size of cable and power factor.8 KV 13. the voltage drop from the supply point to the customer interface depends on various factors such as customer demand.

2.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 36 of 90 2. Bulk LV customer with main meter should be designed based on the contracted load according to the number of transformers as shown in Figure # 2. Bulk customers outside the designated area to be developed by municipality of the city will be supplied on MV radial in case the source is available under all technical conditions. Figure # 2. For customers greater than 4 MVA can be studied to be supplied from existing MV ring network if capacity allows.5 Mode of Supply For supplying bulk customer. The space size of the substation room should be based on customer-contracted load. These customers can be grouped into two categories: Bulk customer with multi meter should be designed based on the demand load as shown in Figure # 2. Backup supply can be provided on customer cost. the mode of supply depends on the nature of customer's load where SEC can feed those customers as follows: 2.8 (Appendix B).7 (Appendix B). or new single loop should be created and the design should be according to the contracted load. Bulk customer within the first zone of the city will be supplied with a backup if the system is looped in the area ssm .5.6 (Appendix B) including the number of transformers required.5.2 Bulk MV Customers: Design of MV customers should be according the contracted load for customers less than 4 MVA.1 Bulk LV Customers: Design of MV network (feeders) to bulk customer will be based on calculated demand load and should be connected to the nearest MV network if capacity is available without laying new feeders.

electrical design and layout of LV supply network to new load developments. and to calculate diversity factor for a group of customers fed from the same source. Also to find the maximum allowable distance from the substation to customer to maintain the maximum allowable voltage drop ( ±5% ) as table 3. villas. ( c ) Industrial customer: This includes all industries inside designated industrial areas or having Industrial License.g. ( d ) Agricultural customer: This includes Big Farms.1 . Table 3. mosques.1 LOW VOLTAGE PLANNING CRITERIA Introduction This section deals with the estimation of the customer load. Greenhouses ssm . The objective of this section is to determine the connected and demand load of residential. palaces. Istrahat. government buildings. e.1 (Standard Service Voltage) Nominal Voltage 220/127 V 380/220 V Percentage Limits Lowest Voltage 209/120 361/209 . hospitals. commercial. to deliver the supply of electricity at the standard service voltage under all normal operating load and voltage conditions. agricultural and industrial customers. and to maintain the defined standards.5% Highest Voltage 231/134 400/231 + 5% 3. schools. ( b ) Commercial customer/ Governmental customer: This includes shopping centers. hotels. Production Farms. houses. etc.2 Customer Classification ( a ) Residential customer: Dwelling for private use. etc.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 37 of 90 3 3. Livestock and Dairy Farms.

Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 38 of 90 3. It must be calculated from the connected load in accordance with the approved demand factors. If the covered area of the building is not available/applicable. ( a ) Calculate the total connected load (KVA) according to the covered area (sq.F) : It is the ratio of the sum of the individual maximum demands of customers to the maximum demand of the system. meter) from the Ministry (MOIE) guidelines for customer load estimation. As regard. ssm . the industrial. 3. Contracted load : It is the capacity of power supply equivalent to the circuit breaker rating in amperes provided to the customer. and governmental customers connected load shall be calculated as per declared load. Diversity factor (D.4 Load Estimation Procedures This is the procedures (steps) to calculate the connected and demand load of the residential and commercial customers. it can be defined as the sum of all of the name plate rating of all present and future electrical equipment installed before applying any diversity factor.3 Estimation of Customer Load To estimate the customer load. Demand factor: It is the ratio of the maximum demand load (MDL) of the system to the total connected load of the system. the following factors are to be considered: Connected load: It is the load of the customer calculated according to the covered area of the building as per the Ministry of Industry and Electricity (MOIE) guideline . Maximum Demand Load (MDL): This is the actual maximum demand of the customer usually occurring during the peak loading period. agricultural.

Factories Big Farms. Supermarkets. Clubs Mosque.2 (Demand Factors) Customer Classification Residential Customer Demand Factor 0. Gold shops. Motels.3 C. Malls.Workshops.9 Type of construction Villas. Demand Load (MDL) = demand factor x connected load Where the demand factor is shown in Table 3.8 0. F. N is always greater than 1 and N is the customer(KWH meter) refer to table 3.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 39 of 90 ( b ) Calculate the individual maximum demand load as follows: Max. Furnished flats. Production Farms.6 Commercial Customer 0. Hajj Load. Offices.9 Industrial Customer Agricultural Customer (c) 0.9 0.2 Table 3. Government buildings Hospitals.F = 1.25 0. Istrahat Shops. = ssm . Houses. Greenhouses Calculate the diversity factor from the following equation: D.Stores. Schools. Sreet Lights Industries.67 +  0.5 0. Palaces. Livestock and Dairy Farms.33     N     1 D. Petrol pumps. F.

655 1.619 0.714 1.577 0.688 0.688 1.712 1.609 0.718 1. OF DIVERSITY COINCIDEN DIVERSITY COINCIDEN CUSTOMER CUSTOMER FACTOR T FACTOR FACTOR T FACTOR S S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 1.723 0.497 1.586 0.577 0.738 0.576 0.624 1.704 1.581 0.649 1.731 1.707 1.597 0.629 0.654 0.734 1.724 1.573 1.716 1.641 1.602 0.585 0.588 0.685 1.729 1.726 1.589 0.681 1.614 1.612 0.667 1.579 0.636 0.583 0.598 0.575 ssm .580 0.616 0.589 1.668 0.583 0.578 0.735 1.000 0.590 0.698 1.644 0.607 0.553 1.728 1.701 1.624 0.633 1.384 1.595 0.579 0.587 0.604 0.581 0.582 0.672 1.000 1.603 1.722 1.732 1.584 0.594 0.600 0.737 1. OF NO.720 1.3 Diversity & Coincident Factors NO.578 0.592 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 1.676 1.576 0.695 1.453 1.661 1.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 40 of 90 Table 3.529 1.709 1.

Demand load = MDL of the largest customer on the cabinet + [Sum of the MDL of the remaining customers on the same cabinet / D.589 Demand load = MDL largest +[(MDL1+MDL2+…)/D. Customer C 1 No. 5x16 = 8 kva (customer A 4 No. Customers with different load (KVA) Demand load = MDL of the largest customer + [Sum of the MDL of the remaining customer / D. of KWH meters) = 0.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 41 of 90 ( d ) Calculate the demand load of the group of customer fed from the same source Customers with the same load (KVA) Demand load = Sum of the MDL of the customers / D. of KWH meters) = 0.F (of all customers) or multiply by coincidence factor. Demand load = demand factor x connected load =0. of KWH meters …… Customer B 4 No. 220 V) and the cable size to feed them.the connected load for 100 m2 = 16 kva for 325 m2 = 50 kva and for 450 m2 = 66 kva Max.F] = 33 + [(4x8 +4x25)/1.F (of remaining customers)] Customer A 4 No.5x66 = 33 kva (customer C 1 No.5x50 = 25 kva (customer B 4 No.F (of remaining customers)] Example : Calculate the demand load of the following customers (Residential customers. of KWH meters ……. of KWH meter ……… 100 m2 each 325 m2 each 450 m2 from covered area Table .589] =116.3 for 8 customers is 1. of KWH meter) Diversity factor from Table 3.07 kva ssm .

etc… which are detailed below . Direct connection. 70 mm2 AL/XLPE are used from D/C to the customer. Low cost Minimum losses 3. and cables 185 mm2 AL/XLPE. i.5 Low Voltage Network Design: The low voltage network also called secondary network. whereas direct connection and connect through Distribution Cabinet are SEC Standards and to be followed. ssm . different method of customer low voltage connections are in practice. The low voltage networks are connected at one end only and have no facility of back-feeding.e. ( b ) Connection through Distribution Cabinet: This type of connection is shown in figure 3. For the LV. cable 300 mm2 AL/XLPE is used from substation to distribution cabinet (D/C).Tee joint.5.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 42 of 90 3. Maximum allowable length from substation to customer is 250 meter for 220V and 420 meter for 380 V to maintain the maximum allowable voltage drop (5%).1 (b). Looping system.1 Underground Network Configuration At present.1 (a). ( a ) Direct Connection: This type of connection is shown in figure 3. For this condition. The design of LV network has to satisfy following conditions namely: Current carrying capacity Voltage at customer terminal must be within ± 5% of declared voltage supply. it can be either underground or overhead .

ii These are not be laid across streets 30 meters and above. Eight service connections up to 95 mm² Aluminum cable may be made. Tee joints are available for cables up to 500 mm² Aluminum or 300 mm² Aluminum.1 (a) Main LV Cable Distribution Substation Service LV Cable LV Meter Distribution Cabinet ssm . this kind of connection used to minimize the cost of LV Network and mainly used on the not planned area. but voltage drop considerations normally limit the number of service connections i Service cable length should in no case exceed 25 meters.Looping System : The looping system is a connection from customer to another customer through distribution box.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 43 of 90 ( c ) Existing Low Voltage Under Ground Network 1 .Tee Joints : Tee joint is used to connect a customer to main secondary feeder. 2 . Main LV Cable Distribution Substation LV Meter Figure # 3.

1 (b) 3. The preferred design is overhead quadruplex conductor. ( b ) 3(1x50 mm2 XLPE insulated Aluminum Conductor) + 1x50 mm2 ACSR/AW messenger is used for service drops as connection to the customers. 2- ssm .2 ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 44 of 90 Overhead Line Network Configuration For overhead low voltage network ( a ) Quadruplex conductor 3(1x120 mm2 XLPE insulated Aluminum Conductor) + 1x120 mm2 ACSR/AW messenger is used for the main line. The voltage drop calculation for the variation of the load against variation of the length is provided.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard Figure # 3.5.2 Existing Low Voltage Network For design of low voltage overhead distributors the following should be considered : 1SEC standard specification for Overhead Lines calls for new lines to be earth type construction using steel poles. The lines could be double or single circuit. 3x120 mm2 XLPE + 1x120 mm2 ACSR QUADRUFLEX CABLE 3x120 mm2 XLPE + 1x120 mm2 ACSR QUADRUFLEX CABLE 3x50 mm2 XLPE + 1x50 mm2 ACSR QUADRUFLEX CABLE Pole Mounted Transformer LV Distribution Board Customer Customer Figure # 3.

This is known as the unequal loading in the phase. It is known that the above is an over simplification and that site measurements show that one or two phases are more heavily loaded. That formula modified to: %V .D): ( a ) The representation of the 3 phase.D = KVA × L K Where L is length of the cable in meter and K is a constant shown in Table below: K Cable / Conductor Size 4x300 MM2 Al 4x185 MM2 Al 4x70 MM2 Al 4x50 MM2 Al Quadruplex Cable 3(1x120) +1x120 MM2 Quadruplex Cable 3(1x50) +1x50 MM2 Voltage 220 V 3322 2313 1001 710 1192 710 Voltage 380 V 9912 6902 2988 2118 3556 2118 Above Voltage Drop calculation are based on 3 phase balance system. length and size of feeder and power factor. A commonly used formula for voltage drop is provided at section 2. Following are the other factors effecting the Voltage Drop (V.D. the voltage drop from the supply point to the customer interface depends on various factors such as customer demand.) For a particular supply voltage. This real situation shows that a correction factor is required.6 Calculation Of Voltage Drop (V. phase-phase and phase-neutral loads will be a single phase system derived from the assumption that the load is balanced.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard 3- ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 45 of 90 Service lengths should in no case exceed 50 meters 3. ssm .

( e ) The resistance value of aluminum varies with temperature. ( c ) Neutral current produces a voltage drop which has to be added to the phase conductor voltage drop. ( h ) The currents flowing in each branch of the distributor required to be diversified in accordance with the Diversity Factors for Systems which have been derived from system measurements and ssm . loads are mainly phase-phase with a smaller superimposed phase-neutral load distributed over the 3 phases. Loads per villa are calculated in accordance with the tabulation based on Municipality Building Permit . Load factors lower than 0. In a distributor supplying a number of customers the current is not a constant value throughout the conductor and the temperature of the cable core will change along the length of the conductor. ( d ) The reactive impedance of the cable produces a voltage drop which is dependent on the power factor of the loads. A correction factor is required to allow for neutral current voltage drop. The value of this neutral current which will flow is different throughout the length of the conductor due to the vectorial addition.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 46 of 90 ( b ) In the SEC system. For the period when high loads are expected on the cable a daily load factor of less than one has been observed. The phase-neutral loads give rise to the unequal loading in the phase. The tabulation has been correlated to the Ministry of Industry and Electricity Rules. However there is a change over point where the voltage drop along the distributor is reached before the thermal limit is reached and there is no benefit from an increase in the permitted amps which a cable can carry beyond those quoted ( g ) Loads are assumed to be either applied as point or end loads or can be assumed to be evenly distributed and therefore acting as end load applied at the mid-point of the distributor length. (f) The rating of the cables used is very dependent upon the cyclic nature of the load. Power factor of 0.85 has been built into the calculation above.84 allow considerable increase in the amps/phase which the cable can safely carry.

Rating ( KVA ) 500 1000 1500 ( b ) Room Substations : Separate Transformers and Low Voltage Distribution Boards also are available as well as 13. The purpose is to provide sufficient distribution and low voltage network capacity to enable permanent connection to all customer’s demand loads at foreseen future. Ring Main Unit shall be non-extensible or extensible comprising of two load break switches and one load break switch equipped with fuse . 3.7. U. As indoor substations usually serves large spot loads.8/. Characteristics of the available package unit substation are as follow: P. Loading.4 KV 13. These are to be used in indoor substations.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard observations ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 47 of 90 3.23/.4 KV ssm .7 Distribution Substation This paragraph sets out standards for determining the Size.8/. built in the same unit or coupled together. the combinations of transformers and Low Voltage Distribution Board Number of Secondary Feeder Outlets 6/8 8/12 8/16 Voltage Ratio 13. distribution transformer and Low Voltage Distribution Board combined in a single unit. Dimension and Location of Distribution Substation in SEC.23/.23/. This unit is floor mounted suitable for outdoor usage and maybe oil-immersed or SF6.1 Distribution Substation Type (a) Package Unit The package unit substation is the preferred type and commonly used substation in SEC because of its convenience to install and occupy lesser spaces. Ring Main Units are equipped with earth fault indicator. This consists of Ring Main Unit.8 KV Ring Main Unit The use of Ring Main Unit at all substations enables network operators to isolate any section of cable without loss of supply to any substation.4 KV 13.8/.

3 Sites of Distribution Substation ( a ) For area electrification SEC will negotiate with the developer and/or the local Municipality for the land and locations required for substations as follows: ssm .4 KV or 13.8/. When the actual load reach the 80% rating of the transformer.7. Sizes & Characteristics of the available Transformer units are as follows. These are commonly used in rural areas where loads are located scatteredly.4 KV 13.23.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 48 of 90 may differ from those of package unit substations. but the ratings are similar.2 L.8/. ( c ) Pole Mounted Transformers: The standard distribution substation for overhead system is a polemounted transformer with secondary LV Distribution Cabinet.8/.23.8/.23. 3.23.4 KV Loading of Distribution Substations: The Maximum Load (MDL) of the Distribution Transformers must not exceed more than 100% of its nameplate rating.4 KV 33/.23. 33/.4 KV or 13. 33/.4 KV or 13.8/.7.23.23. 13.V Feeder 2 4 4 4 33/. reinforcement of the network shall be planned.8/. 13. Under Ground Size 300 500 1000 1500 3. 13.4 KV 33/.V Feeder 4 8 12 16 Over Head Voltage Ratio Size 50 100 200 300 L. 13. 33/.8/.8/.

mosques.Where two adjoining customer both require to provide a ssm . etc. even if each single building has separate permit. open spaces. ( b ) Conditions of provision of a transformer room for customer with loads exceeding 400 amperes 1 . a transformer room shall be provided if the building(s) loads exceed 400 Amperes – 3 Phase. the room he provides need not be equipped until the network capacity requires it at some future date. 5 . if more than 400 Amperes – 3 Phase then he shall provide a room even if the changes made have separate permits.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 49 of 90 1 . 3 . 2 .If the customer applies for supplying one or more buildings constructed on one or more adjacent plot..The preferred substation will be the package type and will be installed in all cases except where extensible HV switch gear is required.The preferred locations are on Municipality land.If the customer applies for a supply increase as he has elevated. Where such a customer can be supplied at LV from a nearby substation.Where a customer requires power over 400 amps. extended or added an appendix to his premise. 4 .g. LVDB will be installed in S/S room to secure it. car parks.If there are adjacent premises in one block belonging to one owner but each has its own permit and land certificate. schools. 2 . he will be treated in this case according to the total of old and new loads. e. he will be required to provide a transformer room. then their loads will be added together when considering the total load. If the buildings are constructed in relatively different periods of time – not less than 2 years from power connection to the previous building loads of each individual building shall be calculated separately.

( d ) The outgoing terminal of distribution cabinet can be utilized for direct connection to the customer.Where a customer provides the transformer room . he must agree in writing to do so before a scheme for his supply will be prepared and approved. ( c ) In low customer load areas. ssm . he will be asked to build this room in accordance with one of the SEC standard substation civil drawings. 50 mm2 Al. A layout drawing will be prepared for this substation as per SEC safety standards. 4x185 mm2 Al. 3. ( b ) Shall be installed at the load centre to minimize service cable length. 230 Amps. ( a ) Shall be installed between two plots to avoid future relocation. 7 . the outgoing of the cabinet can feed the second cabinet to provide provision for more customers connection.8 Low Voltage Cables/Conductors Following shall be considered for selecting cable size (a) (b) Size shall be selected based on demand load.7.4 Size of Cable 4x70 mm2 Al. 3. Quad.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 50 of 90 substation room. Quad. 4x300 mm2 Al. Current Rating per phase 270 Amps 185 Amps.If the customer has been built and standard SEC substation room can not be accommodated. Rating of cable/conductor is shown in the table # 3. where the customer has not built the room. they may be permitted to share one room at discretion of the both customers. if feeder capacity permits. Current Rating per phase 135 Amps.4 Distribution Cabinet Following point shall be considered in utilizing distribution cabinets. 6 .4 Table 3. it is still possible that the equipment can be installed in the space available . Size of Overhead Conductor mm2 120 mm2 Al. 310 Amps.

5 . ( b ) Number of Substation required will be based on demand load where following points will be considered. ( a ) Estimation of the plots load as per class of plot. Voltage drop shall in standard limit (±5 %).6243 and for 380 V multiply by 1. ssm . This scheme shall be prepared when it is reported that actual load on Low Voltage cable had reached a level which cause blowing of protection fuse.10 New Plot Plan The planning engineer should study the plan and details given by municipality regarding utilization of plots.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 51 of 90 Convert the demand load unit from KVA to Amperes to determine the size of the cable . for 220 V multiply by 2. Following procedure shall be adopted for the electrification of plans. 3.9 Reinforcement of Low Voltage Network: Low Voltage underground network should also need reinforcement especially when a cable reached its maximum level. percentage of construction and number of floors. 3.The medium voltage cable shall be without hindrance and on clear routes (i. Transformer loading shall not exceed 80 %. 1234In no case cable length shall increase more than 250 meters. A scheme for this problem should be made.e asphalted or leveled roads). This will normally be occurring during peak load periods and would need quick and simple solution. No crossing of 36 meters road shall be allowed.5193.

This will then ensure that all existing equipments as well as those that are going to be installed within the planned period will be able to withstand probable abnormal conditions on the circuit.1 Short Circuit Performance Introduction This document is intended to provide guidance to the distribution planning engineer in determining the performance of the equipments particularly those installed along the distribution network for the expected short circuit during the plan period. 4. 4. voltage regulator placement. The Planning Engineer will make sure that the short circuit rating of the equipments including those that are going to be installed in the particular feeder will not be exceeded SEC standard. It enables him to identify which of these equipments can and cannot withstand the short circuit level of the feeders this investigation is carried out during the preparation of the five-year distribution network plan and it includes both the existing as well as the future facilities.2 ssm . motor starting – voltage dip. Methodology During the preparation of the five-year distribution network plan.2 4.2.1 IMPROVEMENT OF THE NETWORK PERFORMANCE Introduction This section will cover the short circuit performance.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 52 of 90 4 4. There are soft wares currently in use for short circuit studies. the planning engineer examines the short circuit levels on the secondary bus bars for all the grid stations covered in the plan. Based on this information. capacitor placement.2. auto reclosers and losses evaluation. the Operating Areas will identify the equipments installed on the feeders that do not meet the short circuit capability and inform Planning Division for further evaluation.

1.2. ( a ) Short circuit calculation will be based on SEC standard. There is no other source of power feeding into the distribution circuits. ( f ) The distribution feeders radiate from only one grid station.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 53 of 90 4. Table 4. ( c ) The fault level at the customer interface does not exceed the values indicated in Table 4.Nominal 33 kV 13. ( b ) Short circuit duration is one second.1 (Short Circuit Level) System Voltage .3 Criteria The underlying factors provide the conditions and criteria under which equipment performance study is undertaken. ( d ) Fault calculations shall be based on the highest voltages at each system level.4 18 ssm . ( e ) MVA levels are calculated for the highest system voltage at each level.8 kV 380 V Consumer Interface Load < 500 KVA > 500 KVA 220 V Consumer Interface Load < 152 KVA > 152 KVA Short Circuit Level (1 Second) kA MVA 25 1560 20 527 20 30 21 45 14 21 8.

ssm . When installed on a primary feeder.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 54 of 90 4. ( b ) Deferral of investment by better utilization of existing SEC network.3 4. The voltage at light-load must be calculated to ensure that customers are not overvoltaged. investments in new feeders or additional grid substation capacity can often be cancelled or delayed.1 Voltage Regulator Placement Introduction This procedure has been prepared to assist planning engineers in solving overhead network voltage problems in the SEC system by utilization of line voltage regulators. The voltage rise at the voltage regulator will vary depending upon line current and the output voltage settings. especially when capacitor banks are located on the same feeder. ( c ) Properly located line voltage regulators often provide a small reduction in energy and demand losses and release line and substation capacity due to a small reduction in line currents. Line voltage regulators will improve voltage regulation by providing a constant source of voltage at the point of application. the voltage increase at the voltage regulator location will vary both for light-load and high-load feeder voltage profiles. Several benefits of voltage regulators can be listed: ( a ) Better voltage regulation provides more uniform voltage levels. This depends upon the situation. Hence. Voltage regulator installed on a distribution system will cause a voltage rise at the point of application. system parameters and voltage profile. This should be more satisfactory to customers.3. Of particular concern in applying line voltage regulators is that the voltage during both peak and light load periods complies with the voltage criteria. The voltage rise past the voltage regulator location will be the same as the voltage regulator location.

8 kV 33 kV *34.8 kV 30.45 kV 13. 4.5% (*) Non-standard but exist in SEC.175 kV 12.525 kV 31.78 kV .55 kV 14.0% Standby Minimum 203/117 V 351/203 V 10. (b) Voltage regulation: ssm .5 kV 34.23 kV + 5.5 kV Percentage Limits Lowest Voltage 209/120 V 360/209 V 10.1 kV 31. A further 2.3.4 kV 32.7 kV 36.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 55 of 90 ( d ) The planning staff is responsible for locating the regulators in concordance with the current load forecast and planned feeder configurations.5.2 Criteria: (a) Standard Distribution Voltages and Ranges: The following voltages and their associated ranges are the proposed voltages by SEC that will be standard throughout the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: Nominal Voltage 220/127 V 380/220 V *11 kV 13.5% voltage drop is expected within the customer’s wiring to give a normal utilization voltage drop of –10% for which the customer’s equipment must be selected and designed for.9 kV -7.0% Highest Voltage 231/134 V 400/231 V 11.

This includes such items as how the grid station bus regulation is done.3 Recommended three-phase line voltage regulators: ( a ) The individual single-phase voltage regulator units and the associated mounting racks are purchased separately for field assembly and mounting on poles. The following general method is used whether the calculations are being performed by a computer programs or manually. such as over voltages. ( b ) The overall requirement for placing line voltage regulators is the understanding of voltage regulation on a feeder. material specification engineer should be contacted. ( b ) For details on the latest specifications on the individual voltage regulator units and field construction of the line voltage regulators. 4. the secondary voltages are to be maintained according to the above section on Standard Distribution Voltages and Ranges. how distribution transformers no-load tap settings affect the voltage regulation and so forth. or special compensation setting requirements with voltage regulator band installations should be reported to DED for assistance. The line voltage regulators are connected in a grounded-wye configuration on 4-wire system and delta configuration on 3-wire system.4 Overview of voltage regulators placement technique: ( a ) Appropriate placement of a line voltage regulator is required to achieve the desired results of improving the feeder voltage profile and voltage regulation. In any case.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 56 of 90 The high voltage distribution network regulation in urban and rural areas should not exceed 1. ( c ) Any operational problems.3.3. 4.3. beyond those basic principles. 4.5% for normal load conditions and 4% for contingency or emergency conditions.5 ssm Data Requirements: .

( b ) Allowing for future growth. ( c ) The voltage rise due to voltage regulators bank installation is substracted from the voltage drops calculated in (a) for the nodes downstream of the regulator bank.3. If capacitors are also applied. This will usually be to a fixed reference voltage at the location where the regulator is to be installed. ( c ) Distribution primary circuit configuration including conductor sizes. This is the peak demand and the lowest demand (such as 0400 hours during the fall or spring) and the load power factor is not known. circuit distances.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 57 of 90 ( a ) Feeder and grid station transformer loading during a period of one year. 85% where majority is industrial load.6 Analysis Technique: The following technique are the general method that should be followed when analyzing voltage regulator locations: ( a ) The voltage drop during high and light load conditions without line voltage regulators installed is determined. the amount of voltage rise necessary to move the peak demand voltage to meet the criteria. then the effect of voltage rise of the capacitors must be ssm . This is done for both high and light load conditions to ensure that no customer along the feeder will be either over or undervoltaged per the criteria. ( e ) Economic placement of voltage regulator shall be attempted if possible 4. ( d ) Voltages and voltage regulation criteria to be followed. assume 90% lagging power factor where the majority of load is residential load. ( b ) The grid station bus voltage during peak and low demand There may be cases where the transformer load drop compensation is being used or the voltage setting are significantly different. conductor impedances and load nodes.

Determine the amount of voltage rise in percent that is needed to bring the voltage into the voltage ranges specified.Determine the feeder node voltages in percent during the feeder’s peak demand.Substract the voltage regulators voltage rise from the original voltage drop of the nodes downstream of the voltage regulator for peak and light load periods.3.7 Calculation technique. This will usually be to a fixed reference voltage at the location where the regulator is to be installed.Check against the established voltage criteria. repeat step (2) and (3). 2 . If capacitors are also on the feeder.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard included. (b) Manual Calculation Technique: 1 . the data is the same as what is required for a single-line equivalent power flow with load profile and economic data added. Generally. usually occurring during the summer. (a) Computer method technique: The preferred method of planning the installation of line voltage regulators is to utilize one of the commercial computer programs that will calculate line voltages and demand / energy loses with and without line voltage regulators on the feeder. (c) Example of the Manual Technique: ssm . 3 . ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 58 of 90 4. This may be done either by direct measurement of the voltage or by performing a feeder voltage drop calculation. add in the voltage rise due to the capacitors 4 . If not within the voltage criteria.

5 = 6.8% ssm .8 % VD from G/S to Node C: 5.3+1.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 59 of 90 Assume the following overhead circuit: 170mm2 ACSR A 170mm2ACSR B 170mm2ACSR C 5MVA G\S 5 km Step 1: 3.5MVA 3km A voltage drop analysis is performed using the voltage drop calculation guidelines: Voltage drop from Grid Station to Node A: 5000x5 = 5.5 % 4730 Voltage drop from Node B to C: 1500x3 = 1% 4730 The voltage drops from the G/S to the nodes is the sum of the segment voltage drops: VD from G/S to Node A: 5.3+1.3 % 4730 Voltage drop form Node A to Node B: 3500x2 = 1.3% VD from G/S to Node B: 5.5+1 = 7.5MVA 2 km 1.

9% 102.9% 100.8 = 3.D in segment AB.5+1=105.8 % = 96.9% .45% 98.9% .9 % If the grid station bus is set to maintain a constant voltage out of 14200 volts (102.4 % VD from G/S to Node C: 0.9%).3 = 2.2% 99.1 % Step 2: For residential customers.5 x 7. then peak load voltages at the primary of the customer’s substation will be: Peak Load Light Load Voltages at G/S : 102.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 60 of 90 The light load peak demand is estimated to be 50% of the peak demand and is used to calculate the light load voltage drops: VD from G/S to Node A: 0.0% allowance for transformer voltage drop and 5% for secondary service voltage drop.6.95% Voltages at Node A: 102. ssm .5 x 6.3 % = 97.8 % = 95.5.5*5. BC but we can not raise voltage more than 5%.9% .7. For ideal case and without raising Tap changer of the distribution Transformer the minimum voltage of consumer must be 209 volt (-5%) e.8 = 3.g = 95 %. the voltage needs to be maintained in the range of ±5% of the nominal 209-231 with a 3.6 % Voltages at Node B: 102. To cover the voltage in transformer & secondary/service drop then the voltage must be 103+1.5% to cover V. The equivalent voltage primary must be =95+3+5=103%.1 % Voltages at Node C: 102.7 % VD from G/S to Node B: 0.

Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 61 of 90 If the VR is to be located just prior to node A then the regulator voltage must be established at 105% to meet all feeder equipments on A 220 volt nominal system. Capacitors draw a leading power-factor current and this leading current flowing through the series reactance of the circuit causes a voltage rise equal to the circuit reactance time’s capacitor current (see the formula in the later sections).9% 105% 103. Of particular concern in applying fixed capacitor banks is that the voltage during both peak and light load periods complies with the voltage criteria. Whereas.75% .5% 102. there are no any further adjustments required. Step 3: A check must be done to verify that all the voltages are within the prescribed regions: G/S Bus Node A Node B Node C Step 4: All the voltages are within the standard voltage criteria.5% Light Load 102.25% 103.4 4.4. during periods of light load customers should not be over voltaged. ssm Peak Load 102.9% 105% 104. 4.1 Capacitor Placement Introduction This procedure has been prepared to assist planning engineers in solving overhead network voltage problems in the SEC system by utilization of fixed capacitor banks. Shunt capacitors installed on a distribution system will cause a voltage rise from the capacitor bank location back to the source. therefore.

3 Switched Capacitor Banks: Switched capacitor banks consist of the following components: ( a ) Three or six capacitor cans.4.4. Any operational problems. the voltage increase at the capacitor location is the same for both light-load and high-load feeder voltage profiles. decreasing in the direction of the source to the constant source voltage. Other benefits of properly located capacitor banks is the reduction in energy and demand losses and release in line and substation capacity. ssm . the voltage rise past the capacitor location will be the same as at the capacitor location.2 Recommended Three-Phase Fixed Capacitor Banks: Individual single-phase capacitor units and the associated mounting rack are purchased separately for field assembly and mounting on Poles. 4. The fixed capacitor banks may require that the fuse cutouts be opened in the fall and closed again in the spring to ensure that customers will not be over voltaged during the lightly loaded winter period. but will provide a constant increase in the voltage level. it is not expected that the ungrounded-wye connection will cause any telephone interference problems.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 62 of 90 The voltage rise is independent of load conditions and is greatest at the capacitor location. such as over voltages or harmonic interference. Form experience. The capacitor banks are connected in an ungrounded wye configuration. as there is no path for 3rd and higher order zero sequence harmonic currents to flow without neutral grounding. Fixed capacitor banks will not appreciably improve voltage regulation. When installed on a primary feeder. The voltage at light-load must be calculated to ensure that customers are not overvoltaged. 4. with capacitor bank installations should be reported to DED for assistance.

However. ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 63 of 90 ( c ) One single-phase power transformer (typically 1 kVA) or other source for switch power supply and controller voltage. ssm . One controller to sense and switch based upon system or environmental conditions.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ( b ) Three single-phase switches. The major disadvantage is that more manhours are required to properly set and monitor these controllers. One mounting rack to mount the above equipment. Typically. fewer Manhours will be required to properly set and monitor these controllers. The advantages to the system controllers (voltage. current and VAR) are that they can more accurately sense the variables that are to be controlled. Other controllers are available and can be considered. Alternative controllers to the voltage controller are as follows: 12345Time Switched Controllers. High/Low Temperature Switched Controllers Current Switched Controllers VAR Switched Controllers Combinations of the above controllers The advantages to the environmental controllers (time and temperature) are their simplicity in installation and control settings. (d) (e) (f) Single-phase fuse cutouts to protect the switches and capacitors and disconnect the bank for maintenance. to use these controllers adequate lead time will be required to obtain the required approvals.

The overall requirement for placing capacitor banks is the understanding of voltage regulation on a feeder.8 kV grid station bus voltage during peak and low demand.assume about 25% of the peak demand.4. the following procedure is required: (a) Data Requirements: 1Feeder and grid station transformer loading during a period of one year. 4. If the power factor is not known. The 13.4 Overview of Capacitor Placement Technique: Accurate placement of capacitor banks is required to achieve the desired results of improving a feeder’s voltage profile and voltage regulation. Distribution primary circuit configuration including conductor sizes.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 64 of 90 In addition to controlling HV distribution network voltages. 2- 3- ssm . This is the peak demand and the lowest demand (such as 0400 hours during the fall or spring) and the load power factor.assume 90% lagging power factor where the majority of load is residential load. This includes such items as how the grid station bus regulation is done. If the light load values are not known. Usually this is about 14. conductor impedances. however. there may be cases where the transformer load drop compensation is being used or the voltage setting are significantly different. To this end. circuit lengths. and load nodes. or 80% for industrial load. switched capacitor banks are useful for increasing system capacities (both HV distribution and transmission) and lowering losses.1 kV. Beyond those basic principles. how distribution transformer no-load tap settings affect the voltage regulation and so forth. 85% for commercial load. following method is used whether the calculations are being performed by one of the computer programs or manually.

5 Calculation Technique. 34- This is done for both high and light load conditions to ensure that no customer along the feeder will be either over or undervoltaged according to the voltage criteria. the amount of voltage rise necessary to increase the peak demand voltage to meet the criteria. The voltage rise due to capacitor bank installation is subtracted from the voltage drops calculated in (1) above. The conductor length is determined satisfying the voltage rise requirement for the givencapacitor bank rating. (a) Computer Method technique: The preferred method of planning the installation of capacitor banks is to utilize one of the commercial computers based programs that will optimally locate the capacitor banks on the feeder and ensure that al voltage constraints are complied with. The majority of computer programs of these type will adequately solve the capacitor ssm . Allowing for future growth. (b) Analysis Technique: The following techniques are the general method that should be followed when analyzing capacitor locations: 12The voltage drop during high and light load conditions without capacitor banks installed is determined. then the economic parameters are required.4. 4.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard 4- ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 65 of 90 If economic placement of capacitors is required.

the data is the same as what is required for a single-line equivalent power flow with load profile and economic data added. then the percent voltage rise due to the application of a shunt capacitor.(x).Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 66 of 90 placement problem and at the same time will assist in placement of voltage regulators.(d) (10).(kV)2 Three-phase capacitor bank kVAR rating Reactance in per conductor in ohms / kilometer length of line in kilometers . neglecting line resistance is: Voltage Rise (percent) = Where: CkVA = x = d = ssm (CkVA). The major advantages of using the capacitor placement programs is that all voltage constraints will be checked and when automatically located the capacitor banks are located to minimize system losses.(x). (b) Manual Calculation Formula: Manual Formula Using Per Unit Values: If the line impedance data is available in per unit quantities.(d) (10). neglecting line resistance is: Voltage Rise (percent) = Where: CkVA x d (CkVA)..(Base MVA) = Three-phase capacitor bank kVAR rating = Reactance in per unit / kilometer = length of line in kilometers Base MVA =Three-phase value used to calculate line per unit reactance Manual Formula Using Ohmic Values: The equation of percent voltage rise due to the application of a shunt capacitor. Generally.

repeat using a different distance or a different capacitor rating (if different sizes are available).Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard kV = ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 67 of 90 Phase-to-phase voltage in kV (c) Manual Calculation Technique: 1Determine the voltage in percent during the feeder peak demand. then issue instructions that the fuse cutouts are to be opened in the fall and closed again in the spring. Determine the amount of voltage rise in percent that is needed to bring the voltage into the voltage ranges specified. repeat steps 1. Add the capacitor voltage rise to the peak and light load period voltages and check against the established voltage criteria. This may be done either by direct measurement of the voltage or by performing a feeder voltage drop calculation. If the voltage rise is not as desired. If not within the voltage criteria. If the light load constraints cannot be achieved for the required voltage rise. 2- 3- 4- 5- ssm . Calculate using the voltage rise formula for a given capacitor rating (ckVA) and distance (d) from the grid station. usually occurring during the summer. Verification of the summer light load profile is required in this case (summer light load is usually 50% of the peak demand). 2 and3.

85 & VD as the above The MVAR flow in segment as below A 2.85 (we assume actual power factor) or we can measure voltage on the L.6 MVAR 5Km 1.1% 99.45% 97.5MVA 2 km B 96.9% 102.T bus of distribution transformer during no load of transformer in summer peak and tap changer were set to set zero change in voltage.95% Peak Light 102.7 (13.6% 100.1% 98. Our condition is PF=0.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 68 of 90 (d) Example of the Manual Technique: Assume the following overhead circuit: where the voltage profile as example shown at section 4.8 MVAR 3km C ssm .8 MVAR 2Km B 0.5MVA 3 km C 95.9% The calculation done based on PF=0.8 kV) G/S 5MVA 5 km A 3.2% 1.3.

Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 69 of 90 1.5 MVA to 2.5 MVA 3 Km C Note: After installing 1800 KVAR (2x900) at node B. VD at peak load VD from G/S to node A= (4300*5) /4730=4.75 MVA 3km C VD from G/S to point A=(2160*5)/4730=2.if we keep 1800 KVAR capacitor the power factor become lead so that we keep only 900 KVAR and remove 900 KVAR to improve PF but still lag A 2.3 MVA 5Km 2.75 VD from point B to point C =(750*3)/4730=0.5 as before ssm .28% instead of 2.0 MVA to 4.97 MVA with the same active load.3%) VD from node A to node B=(2970*2)/4730=1.75% (instead of 7.25% (instead of 1.97 MVA 2 Km B 1.5% (instead of 5.62 instead of 0.8 MVAR If we install capacitor bank 1800 KVAR to compensate KVAR in segment AB then the MVA will change as: A 4.487 MVA 2 km B 0.7% VD from point A to point B=(1487*2)/4730=0.3 MVA and MVA in segment A-B reduced from 3.16 MVA 5Km 1.8%) During light load . MVA in segment G/S-A reduced from 5.5%) VD from point B to point C= as before no change VD at point C =6.

2 Criteria: The SEC Electricity Utilities Standards sets the maximum permissible voltage dip and voltage fluctuations that a customer can cause on the network base on the Utilities Standards .Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard Voltage during peak load Light load (900 KVAR) Note : G/S 102. 4. Voltage dip is the relative variation in voltage.15% 100% C 96.4% 100. motors starting on generation buses. In general. Special cases of synchronous motor starting.6% B 97.5. 4.9% ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 70 of 90 A 98. however.5% 1 . that is expressed as a percentage variation from the fundamental voltage.9% 102. this is generally of no concern to SEC.During voltage drop occur we use first capacitor method then voltage regulator. 2 . For motor starts that are limited to 2 to 3 times daily. The customer’s system can possibly have voltage dips that exceed the standard. SEC is concerned that the voltage dip does not exceed the above criteria at the interface point between SEC and the customer. ssm .15% 99. or large motors operated parallel on a bus should be referred to DED for review.The design of capacitor must meet light load to avoid over voltage. usually caused by motor starting.5 4.1 Motor Starting – Voltage Dip Introduction This section calculates the voltage dip due to induction motor starting and provides guidelines for establishing corrective measures. then the maximum allowable voltage dip can be 7%.5.

Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 71 of 90 The same voltage dip curves can be applied to reciprocating or pulsing type loads. SEC cannot approve the design until the calculated voltage dip is within the criteria and the customer cannot be connected until the motor start issue is resolved. then the customer and SEC must coordinate to determine the appropriate corrective measures to solve the excessive voltage dip problem. Install a motor with less starting current. Use delta – wye motor starter. when excessive voltage dips are suspected. Corrective measures generally follow to basic routes: (a) Reduce the magnitude of starting current seen by the distribution network from the motor start: 12345Use auto – transformer motor starter (50. (Obtain approval from DED before agreeing with customer on this type of starter. After customers are connected. Any special voltage dip arrangements with the customer should be noted on the customer agreement.). such as through customer complaints. the appropriate voltage recording meters can be used to determine if the voltage dip exceeds prescribed standards and / or the customer service agreement.5. 65 or 80% taps). 4. Switch shunt capacitors on during the starting phase. Use reactor motor starter.3 Corrective measures: When the calculated voltage dip exceeds the criteria. This is done by calculating voltage drop corresponding to the peak and the law load points of each cycle. ssm .

(b) These methods ignore the negligible effect of other loads. The manual method determines the voltage dip as a ratio of the impedance magnitudes from the system source to the interface point to the total impedance magnitudes from the system source through the motor.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 72 of 90 (b) Reduce the driving point impedance at the interface point: 1Decrease the length of the line if possible i Relocate the interface point if possible ii Use a source nearer to the facility if possible iii Relocate the facility closer to the source if possible 23Use larger conductor (this is usually marginal).5. The study of the ssm . 4.4 Overall Methodology: Voltage dip due to induction motor starting is calculated quickly and accurately by use of the impedance ratio technique. The preferred computer method utilizes the actual impedances to more accurately calculate the motor starting voltage dip. Two different methods implementing this technique are furnished for use by the Operating Areas. (a) A computer method (preferred) and a manual method. Decrease the impedance of the source transformer.

0. assume across-the-line start with 1.577). usually 0. solid state. if customer does not provide any information. (a) Data Required: The following data must be collected prior to calculating the voltage dip caused by induction motor starting: 1 .80.Type of motor starter and voltage applied to motor during starting (across-the-line. etc. are ssm . auto-transformer. The use of such a program will take a day whereas this guideline’s methods give a fairly accurate answer in less than 30 minutes.50 voltage.). See the attachments for a table of inrush current values for the NEMA Code letter marked on the motor nameplate. Remember that large motors.Starting kVA of motor.0 voltage. Data Source: Customer 2 . If customer cannot provide. customer supplied data.65 or 0. then the computer method should be used to provide a more accurate answer.5 Manual Method of Calculation: The alternative method is to manually calculate the voltage drop.0 voltage. This method will not be as accurate as the computer program method but will provide satisfactory results for the majority of cases. If results using the manual method are border line.5. A delta-wye starter is the same as an auto-transformer starter with the tap set at a voltage equal to the reciprocal of the square root of three (0. Data source: Customers 3 . This may prevent unnecessary expenses from being incurred either by SEC or the customer.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 73 of 90 effect of other loads requires the use of a power flow program. 1.Number of Starts per day. assume the worst case value of 6 times the horse-power or kVA rating. 4.

Type of Motor Start: Auto–transformer on 65% tap.73 (c) Example: The following information has been collected from the customer for a 2200 Hp. (b) Calculation Method: The approximate voltage drop in percent of the initial voltage is as follows: 100 x Adjusted Motor Starting kVA System Short Circuit kVA + Adjusted Motor Starting kVA VD = Where: Adjusted Motor Starting kVA = (Auto–transformer Tap)² x Motor Starting kVA x system Short Circuit kVA = (Line-Line kV) x Short Circuit Amps x 1. Number of starts per day: This pump is used for pumping water and the customer stated that it will only be started a maximum of once per day.4 times full load current).Determine SEC short circuit value for three-phase fault at interface point. ssm . 4160/2400 volt induction motor: Motor Starting kVA: NEMA Code F (inrush current of approximately 5.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 74 of 90 usually started at the maximum of only once or twice per day. 60 Hz. 4 .

726 Amps x 3 = 41. if the SEC Customer interface is defined as the MV bus of the grid station. then the voltage dip is 7% which is not acceptable. ssm .4 x 2. This is within the standard.65)2 x (5. the interface had to be defined at the substation bus and the line was dedicated to meet the voltage dip criteria.019 kVA VD (%) = (e) Conclusion = 10.0 percent (from computer program). Alternately.255 kVA + 5.8 kV) x 1.255 kVA Voltage Dip Calculation: 100 x 5.019 kVA system Short Circuit kVA = (13. then the voltage dip is 4. In this real case.200 Hp x 1 kVA/hp) = 5.8% If the interface point is at grid station bus bar.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 75 of 90 (d) Calculations Adjusted Motor Starting = (0.019 kVA 41.

SEC companies in the Kingdom have to make all possible efforts to achieve these standards.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 76 of 90 4.1 Auto – Reclosers Introduction: This section is intended to develop criteria for installing auto-recloser on overhead feeders as a means to achieve improvements in the existing customer services. 4. The maximum permissible value of annual “ALSD” should not exceed the following limits: Type of ALSD Due to ALSD Due to ssm .6 4. ( a ) Continuity Standard This standard is described in terms ”Average Loss of Supply Duration per Customer (ALSD)”. ( b ) In many cases the “Frequency” and the “Average Outage Duration” of Faults is higher than the EC Standards. which is effected by following. However. ( c ) The “Reasons” for most of the fault Outages were described as “Temporary” in nature.6. ( a ) Feeders Length is very long. Improving customer services both in urban and the rural areas is one of the important company goals.6.2 EC Supply Standards SEC has set a number of supply standards for the urban and the rural customers.

Currently the scope is limited to improve the “Numbers” and “Average Duration of Faults” on individual overhead feeders.40 7.3 Purpose and Scope: The main purpose of this study is to achieve SEC Supply Standards on SEC Primary Distribution System.6. The maximum permissible value of annual “ANIC” should not exceed the following limits: Type of Customer Urban Rural ANIC 3. 4. The main objective would be to bring the overall “Numbers” and “Average Duration” of faults on all overhead feeders within a reasonable limit. installation of auto-reclosing (Both at the source and on the Line) has been ssm .4 Use of Auto-Reclosers: To improve supply standards on overhead distribution feeders.6. Improvement of Supply Standards on Overhead Distribution Feeders would ultimately result in improving the supply standards on a system basis.65 4.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard Customer Urban Rural “Faults” ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 77 of 90 “Voluntary Outages” 40 Minutes 120 Minutes 40 Minutes 120 Minutes ( b ) Standard Outage Frequency: This standard is described in term of annual “Average Number of Interruptions per Customer (ANIC)”.

A number of utilities have been using this equipment and have achieved good results over the years.5 Selection Criteria: Not all overhead feeders would necessarily require auto-reclosers. The Criteria: Overhead feeder meeting the following two conditions. Or During any year the Average Outage duration recorded. should be selected for the installation of a line recloser.6. ( c ) Isolating faulty sections from the healthy sections in case of permanent fault. ( d ) Providing facility for sectionalization of the line. ( b ) Auto – clearing of outages caused by temporary/ transient faults. ( a ) Primary condition (Supply Standards): During any year the Total Number of Faults (permanent / transient) exceed four (12). Installation of auto-reclosing would improve supply standards on the overhead distribution feeders by: ( a ) Reducing the outage duration. 4. ssm . It will reduce post-fault line patrolling effort by O&M staff. Installation of auto reclosers on the line would depend upon whether or not the feeder is exceeding a certain pre-set value of the supply standard and the overall length of the feeder. It will save O&M staff from unnecessary patrolling. Installation of an “Auto-Reclosing Facility” at the source grid station of all feeders is recommended.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 78 of 90 considered as one of the most effective and practical solution. exceeds two (2) hours.

Step 4: Determine “Number” and the “Location” of each recloser as explained in Table A (Appendix D) 4.5). The interrupting rating of a Line Recloser must be equal to or greater than the “maximum fault current” expected at the point of its application.7 How to determine the size of the line recloser required: Size of the auto-recloser installed at the substation should match with feeders total existing and future peak demand.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 79 of 90 ( b ) Secondary Condition (Feeder Length): The overall length of feeder is more than thirty kilometers for 13.6. Step 2: Obtain an up-dated single-line diagram of the selected feeder indicating length of each section in kms.8 km & 60 km for 33 km. 4. Continuous current rating of a line-recloser installed along the line will depend upon the existing and future peak demand on feeder at the point of its application.6.6 Procedure to determine the numbers and location of line reclosers required Step 1: Select the overhead feeders meeting one of the above conditions (Refer Section # 4.6. Note** number of installation must be taken in consindration. ssm . Step 3: Determine the distance of each point from the source including the distance of the farthest point from the source.

Demand and energy losses are inherent in any network and are a direct revenue loss to the company as generation. Losses in the power system are classified as real or reactive power losses. Also theoretically distribution capacity must be added to support the additional demand caused by network losses. However. Because of these ssm . The cost of the losses depends on their location in the system. Reactive losses will usually increase the line currents causing higher real power losses. Consequently. Real power losses are an indicator of the system efficiency and by minimizing losses. including. transmission and distribution capacity and fuel are to be used to support losses. The explanation is that this amount of loss in the distribution network will have less magnitude if it is reflected to the transmission or generation side due to the coincidence factors. The real losses are caused by current flowing in resistive components and is the subject of this guideline.7 4. possible improvements to minimize a distribution network’s real power and energy losses.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 80 of 90 4. within economic constraints. The reactive losses are caused by current flowing through the inductive or capacitive components. their evaluation is not reasonably possible without use of a power flow computer program. losses must be evaluated. just as voltage drop and ampacity are currently evaluated while reviewing alternatives.1 Loss Evaluation Introduction This guideline has been developed to assist distribution planning and design engineers in evaluating distribution network’s demand and energy losses. one kW of loss in the distribution network will cost more money than if this loss occurs in the transmission or generation system.7. the distribution network efficiency is improved.

( c ) The proper selection of the conductor size usually limits the line losses on phase conductors. the evaluation of the losses in the distribution network is very significant in addition to other economic reasons.7. the average cost of energy supplied will be used to determine the cost of the annual losses. The second part is the demand component which is the amount of money required annually to supply one kW of demand. ( e ) Capacitor bank locations will have a large effect on losses.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 81 of 90 concepts. ( d ) Poor power factor also affects power losses in the system. ssm . Therefore. 4. ( b ) The increase of network losses are proportional to the square of load growth. (f) The daily and seasonal switching method of capacitors will affect the losses.2 Factors Affecting Distribution Losses The following factors affecting distribution losses should be reviewed for each individual study to find which factors may be appropriate: ( a ) The network configuration and the subsequent feeder loadings directly impact the feeder losses. The cost of supplying the losses can be divided into two parts. These costs are usually at the highest incremental system costs. All these factors are included in the average cost of energy supplied. ( g ) Unbalanced loads also add line losses on ground wire and ground. The first part is the energy component which is the cost of generating or producing one kWH of energy (includes fuel and maintenance).

Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 82 of 90 ( h ) The core losses of distribution transformer are sensitive to the magnitude of system voltage. the load factor of SEC when calculated over a summer period will be higher than a load factor over an entire year period. its value will be different when calculated for a day. (b) Load factor (LF): Load factor is the ratio of the average load over a designated period of time (kWH divided by number of hours) to the peak load occurring in that period.7. month or year. For example. As load factor is a function of a time period. (i) The quality of a transformer also affects the core losses. or 2 . 4.Use a distribution power flow program that calculates demand losses while doing a voltage analysis. the load factor must always be in th range between zero and one. Since load factor has no unites. A power flow will give a more complete demand loss calculation by including such items as the effect of reactive power losses. both the average load and the peak load must be in the same units. As the time period is extended. Practically. Calculate the annual cost of the losses.3 Methodology Calculate the losses at peak demand (LPD) by one of the following techniques: 1Manually calculate the losses. the load factor will be less. ssm .

08 LF + 0. with load in amperes: LPD = N x I² R x d x 10-3 kW Where: N I R d Number of phases. ssm . Conductor resistance in ohms/km. Peak demand in amps.92 LF² Where: LsF = Loss Factor LF = Load Factor 4. the following empirical formula is often used to describe the relationship between the load factor and the loss factor: LsF = 0. The loss factor does not necessarily indicate the thermal loading of a piece of apparatus.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 83 of 90 (c) Loss Factor (LsF) The loss factor is the ratio of the average power loss to the peak load power loss. It merely indicates the degree to which the load loss within the apparatus during peak load is maintained throughout the period in which the loss is being considered. However. during a specified period of time. Loss factor cannot be generally expressed in terms of load factor without calculating the losses for each level of system demand. Distance in km.7. single or three-phase.4 Losses at Peak Demand Calculation: ( a ) For distribution circuits.

the following general procedure is followed. ( c ) To manually calculate the LPD for a distribution feeder. ssm .Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 84 of 90 ( b ) For three-phase distribution circuits with load in kVA: LPD = KVA² KV² X R x d x 10-3 kW Where: kVA kV R d . The manual calculation method uses the same general method for voltage drop calculations: 1 .Find the cumulative load for each line segment between load nodes.Peak demand in kVA. . ( d ) For any other component. 3 .Calculate the LPD for the feeder by totaling the losses for all the line segments.Distance in km. 2 .Voltage in kV. .Group the loads into logical load nodes.Multiply by the loss cost factor to get the cost of losses.Calculate the LPD for each line segment by using one of the above formulas for calculating LPD for given load. determine the kW demand loss by an appropriate technique.Conductor resistance in ohms/km. 5 . 4 . .

0949 = 186 SR/kW/year where CES : Cost of Energy Supply Note: the load factor was determined by reviewing the load history of the Operating Areas.7. the Loss Cost Factor will not be calculated for each loss evaluation.23 x 0.23 = 24 x 354 = 8496 Hours / year (8760 Hour for Gregorian) Loss Cost Factor (LCF) = H x LsF x CES = 8496 x 0.5 Cost of Losses Calculation: Cost of Losses = Losses at Peak Demand x Loss Cost Factor = LPD x LCF SR/Year Loss Cost Factor (LCF) Calculation Normally. If a more accurate load factor and / or loss factor values are available. ssm . LCF should only be calculated or updated when its parameters change. Load Factor (LF) Loss Factor (LsF) Hours/ Hijra Year (H) = (average load/max load) = 0. they may be used and the LCF modified accordingly.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 85 of 90 4.46 (See note) = 0.92 LF² = 0.08 LF + 0.

8 2635/1.23 Voltage I(current) R per Km LPD=3I²R=3LI²R (per Km) Segment losses 1435 KVA 7 CES =0.8 13.8 1.Feeder Losses Example of the Manual Technique: Determine the cost of losses of this 3-phase 13.9 9.73*13.8 110. 485/1.2A 8=60A =20.73*13.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 86 of 90 4.6 =10871 SR/year 1873 SR/year 306 SR/year ssm .73*13.8= 1435/1.13 56.7.3A 0.13 0.8 13.6 Examples (a) Example One .0949 : 300 mm2 Al 300 mm2 AL B 485KVA 10 13.8 kV feeder. 300 mm2 Al A C 2635KVA distance (km): 12 : Losses factor=0.13 0.

615 Less: Loss w/o New Load = SR 13.13 1.753 Node Load (kVA) : 1200 Segment Load (kVA): 2935 Voltage (kv) : 13.4 B 300mm2 Al C 10 : : 485 485 13.050 (from Example One) Incremental cost increase = SR 3.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 87 of 90 ( b ) Example Two – Incremental Losses for New Load: Determine the cost of losses attributable to a new load of 300 kVA at node B in Example One above.13 14. and then subtract that from the line without that additional load (i.6 SR2.13 LPD (km) : 70.8 Segment Loss Cost : SR13. The correct method is determine the cost of losses with this additional load as a new exercise.537 SR306 Total Annual Cost of Losses = SR 16. 19 km).8 .e.8 R (Ohms/km) : . 300mm2 Al ## Distance (km): 12 : : A 300mm2 Al 7 : : 1250 1735 13.565 ssm .8 .e. Note: A common error is to consider the cost of losses of the additional load alone from the source to its location (i. Example One’s results).

Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 88 of 90 This represents the additional annual cost of HV feeder losses created by adding 300 kVA at node B. Core loss is a constant load where as copper loss is proportional to the square of load.26 The annual losses can then be calculated as follows: Cost of Core Loss = H x LsF x CES x Core Loss in kW = 8496 x 1.0 1. transformer loss evaluations could use the following factors: Core Loss Load Factor (LF) Loss Factor (LsF) 1. Note: This example is presented to illustrate the use of energy loss calculations for situations where the LCF must be modified. Consequently.0 x . This example should not be used for the official SEC bid evaluations as not all the conditions are equal. Copper loss is the same as described in this guideline. ( c ) Example three – Distribution Transformer Losses An excellent example of using loss evaluation is determination of distribution transformer losses.0 Copper Loss 0. cor loss and copper loss. Transformer losses are expressed by two different values.46 0.1008 x Core Loss = 856 SR/kW x Core Loss in kW ssm .

913 per kW of loss SR 3.1008 x Copper Loss = 223 SR/kW x Copper Loss in kW The present values are then calculated using a Net Discount Rate of 3.877 per kW of Loss ssm . Core Loss Copper Loss Annual SR 856 SR 223 Present Worth SR 14.26 x .0% and a period of 25 years.Saudi Electricity Company Distribution Planning Standard ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS ( March 2004 ) Page 89 of 90 Cost of Copper Loss = H x LsF x CES x Copper Loss in kW = 8496 x 0.

APPENDIX A .

8 : 1. at depths not less than 1 m Soil Thermal Resistivity. at depths not less than 1 m Maximum Continuous Conductor Operating Temperature (XLPE) Maximum Short Circuit Conductor Temperature – 5 second Maximum Duration (XLPE) Loss Load Factor – Daily (Equivalent Load Factor = 0.m/w : 90 °C : 250 °C : 0. : 2.30 m .0 °C.88) Burial Depth Circuit Spacing (center to center) : 35 °C.0 m : 0.Standard Cable Rating Conditions Cable ratings are based on the following standard conditions: • • • • • • • Ambient Temperature Direct Buried/ Underground Ducted.

8.6 1. the load rating of all affected cables is reduced.12.5 X 16 mm² CU 4 X 500 mm² AL 4 X 300 mm² AL 4 X 185 mm² AL 4 X 120 mm² AL 4 X 95 mm² AL 4 X 70 mm² AL 4 X ٥0 mm² AL Amps 380V 525 300 280 170 120 75 400 310 230 200 160 135 105 346 197 184 112 79 49 263 204 151 131 105 89 69 KVA 220V 200 114 107 65 46 29 152 118 88 76 61 51 40 Note: These ratings are based on calculations derived from IEC 287 (1982) : “ Calculation of the Continuous Current Rating of Cables”. They are based on the standard rating conditions indicated in section 1.5 X 120 mm² CU 3.1 and on the cable characteristics indicated in section 1.2. Correction factors for deviation from these conditions are indicated in table 1.12.3 m. The ratings in table 1.Normal Load Ratings Table 1.5X 35 mm² CU 3.5 X 70 mm² CU 3.7 and 1.5 Direct – Buried Cable Ratings CABLE SIZE 33 KV 1 X 630 mm² CU 1 X 500 mm² CU 3 X 240 mm² CU 3 X 185 mm² CU 3 X 120 mm² CU 570 500 350 290 240 570 390 290 240 150 300 140 150 33 29 20 17 14 14 9 7 6 4 7 3 4 Amps MVA 13. .8 KV 1 X 630 mm² CU 3 X 300 mm² CU 3 X 185 mm² CU 3 X 120 mm² CU 3 X 50 mm² CU 3 X 300 mm² AL 3 X 70 mm² AL 1 X 50 mm² CU CABLE SIZE LV 1 X 630 mm² CU 3 X 185 + 95 mm² CU 3. Where two or more circuits are installed in proximity. For more precise data refer to the specific cable supplier.2.3 These results are based on data for typical cable types.5 are based on equally loaded circuits at a spacing of 0.

Table 1.92 0.0 2.8 1.2 1. The soil at the ground surface should also be assumed to be dry. All soil within the 50°C.0 Note: The value of soil thermal Resistivity chosen shall make full allowance for dry-out of the soil adjacent to the cables.92 0.00 0.84 0.00 0. Thus the value of soil thermal Resistivity chosen shall be higher than the background value derived from site measurements.5 3.0 2.87 0.08 1.04 1.5 3.86 Table 1.96 0.14 1.7 Soil Thermal Resistivity Correction Factors Soil Thermal Resistivity . due to heat emission from the cables.0 4.02 1.00 0.0 Correction Factor 1.0 5.82 Note:Burial depth refers to the distance from the center of the cable installation to the final grade (surface) level. isotherm surrounding the cables should be assumed to be dry.m/w 1.0 1.°C.90 0. Correction Factor 1.°C 30 35 40 Correction Factor 1.8 Ground Temperature Correction Factors Ground Temperature .5 2.95 . Table 1.5 2.6 Burial Depth Correction Factors Burial Depth – m 0.

5680 0.5680 0.4700 0.1000 0.1160 0. For more precise data refer to the specific cable supplier.1280 0.0283 0.0754 0.3420 0.4430 0.3914 0.0434 0. For more precise data refer to the specific cable supplier.1160 0. Indicated values are positive / negative sequence impedance values.5 X 70 mm² CU 3.1150 0.1310 0.6410 0.1300 0.1300 0.1530 0.1530 0.1290 0.1240 0.1200 0.2530 0.5 X 120 mm² CU 3. .1100 0.1280 0.1290 0.5 X 16 mm² CU 4 X 500 mm² AL 4 X 300 mm² AL 4 X 185 mm² AL 4 X ١٢٠mm² AL 4 X 95 mm² AL 4 X 70 mm² AL 4 X ٥0 mm² AL Note: Impedance values are ohms per km per phase for each cable type.3870 0.0820 0.1440 0.5X 35 mm² CU 3.6680 1.0597 0.0987 0.0991 0.1360 0.8 KV 1 X 630 mm² CU 3 X 300 mm² CU 3 X 185 mm² CU 3 X 120 mm² CU 3 X 50 mm² CU 3 X 300 mm² AL 3 X 70 mm² AL 1 X 50 mm² CU LV 1 X 630 mm² CU 3 X 185 + 95 mm² CU 3.0601 0. They are based on data for typical cable types.8220 X1 (60HZ) Ohms / km 0.0991 0.4940 0.1960 0.1500 0.0800 0.1000 0.5023 0.3250 0.1040 0.1200 0. The reactance values are based on a trefoil conductor configuration for single core cables.1960 0.0283 0.2680 0.1050 0.0283 0.1000 0.1290 0.Cable Characteristics Table 1. The AC resistance values take account of skin effect and are based on data for typical cable types.1320 0. Multiply by square root of 3 to derive equivalent line values.0605 0.1080 0.5290 1.0434 0.4110 0.4100 0.1530 0.1960 0.1080 0.4430 0.0808 0.0427 0.1500 0.1240 0. The DC resistance values are based on IEC 228: conductors of Insulated Cables.1640 0.1300 0.0991 0.1120 0.1260 CABLE SIZE 33 KV 1 X 630 mm² CU 1 X 500 mm² CU 3 X 240 mm² CU 3 X 185 mm² CU 3 X 120 mm² CU 13.1100 0.9 Cable Characteristics RDC 20 °C RAC 20 °C Ohms / km Ohms / km 0.1160 0.2110 0.0301 0.

5 0.) Absorptive (of solar heat) : : : : : : 50 °C. 0.5 .Overhead Lines: Standard Line Rating Conditions Overhead Lines ratings are based on the following standard conditions: Ambient Temperature Minimum Wind Velocity Altitude ( above sea level) Maximum Continuous Conductor Operating Temperature Emissivity (for Cu. 1000 m 80 °C 0.6 m/sec. And Al.

9 11. 738-1986 : IEEE Standard for Calculation of Bare Overhead Conductor Temperature and Ampacity Under Steady-State Conditions.12.1 15. They are based on the standard rating conditions indicated in section 1.1 and the conductor characteristics indicated in section 1.7 20.Normal Load Ratings Table 6 Overhead Line Ratings Conductor Size 33 KV 240 mm² ACSR 170 mm² ACSR 70 mm² ACSR 300 mm² AAAC 180 mm² AAAC 120 mm² AAAC 120 mm² CU 70 mm² CU 450 361 207 482 351 272 362 254 450 361 207 482 351 272 362 254 25.1.6 20.5 8.V.8 8.3. Quadruplex 70 mm² CU Note: 285 290 125 254 380 V 188 190 33 167 220 V 109 110 19 97 These ratings are based on calculations derived from ANSI/IEEE Std.1 Amps MVA 13.3.11.3 Correction factors for deviations from these conditions are indicated in Tables 1.5 10.6 4. 1.5 20.5 8.14 . 120 mm² AAAC 4 X 120 mm² AL.12. Quadruplex 4 X 50mm² AL.7 6.13 and 1.4 6.8 KV 240 mm² ACSR 170 mm² ACSR 70 mm² ACSR 300 mm² AAAC 180 mm² AAAC 120 mm² AAAC 120 mm² CU 70 mm² CU L.7 11.8 27.7 14.12.

88 80 1.10 50 1.38 5.80 Table 10 Conductor Temperature Correction Factors Conductor Temperature .00 0.°C.88 Table 8 Altitude Correction Factors Altitude – m 0 1000 2000 3000 Correction Factor 1.05 1. Any period of operation at higher conductor temperatures shall be limited to within the supplier’s recommendation. Conductor Characteristics .60 0. Correction Factor 45 1.00 85 1.00 1.19 120 1.10 90 1.°C Correction Factor 75 0.Table 7 Ambient Temperature Correction Factors Ambient Air Temperature .0 1.15 2.95 0.0 1.6 1.00 55 0.60 Note: Conductors shall be operated at temperatures in excess of the standard maximum operating temperature of 80 °C.90 Table 9 Wind Velocity Correction Factors Wind Velocity – m/sec. Correction Factor Natural Convection 0. only where: The line has been designed such that all clearances are observed at the higher conductor temperature: and The suppliers confirm that the conductor and all accessories are capable of operation without sustaining damage at the higher conductor temperature.0 1.

395 0.Table 11 Overhead Conductor Characteristics Conductor Size 33 KV 240 mm² ACSR 170 mm² ACSR 70 mm² ACSR 300 mm² AAAC 180 mm² AAAC 120 mm² AAAC 120 mm² CU 70 mm² CU 0.337 0. Quadruplex 70 mm² CU Note: Impedance values are ohms per km per phase for each conductor type.153 0.273 0.391 0.183 0.169 0.277 0.436 0.277 0.153 0.622 0.8 KV 240 mm² ACSR 170 mm² ACSR 70 mm² ACSR 300 mm² AAAC 180 mm² AAAC 120 mm² AAAC 120 mm² CU 70 mm² CU LV 120 mm² AAAC 4 X 120 mm² AL.190 0.388 0.120 0.378 RDC 20 °C Ohms/km RAC 20 °C Ohms/km XL (60HZ) Ohms/km 13.150 0.223 0.337 0.388 0.422 0.415 0.409 0.109 0. Indicated values are positive / negative sequence impedance values.273 0.169 0.523 0.V.190 0.374 0.223 0. The inductance values are based on a geometric mean conductor spacing as follows: 33 KV 1.447 0.415 0. Multiply by square root of 3 to derive equivalent line values.277 0.133 0.133 0.356 0. . The AC resistance values take account of skin .337 0.210 0.426 0.150 0.306 0.529 0.5 m 13. Capacitance effects are ignored for these voltage levels.109 0.273 0.338 0. Quadruplex 4 X 50mm² AL.404 0.428 0.674 0.25 m L.426 0.183 0.8 KV 1.338 0.529 0.120 0. The reactance values only include line inductance effects.433 0.6 m The geometric mean conductor spacing is the cube root of the product of the three phases inter – conductor spacing.374 0. 0.338 0.246 0.425 0.210 0.412 0.

APPENDIX B .

O. 2.P M. 2.1 Distribution Feeder Configuration .Radial Supply N.Grid Station M.V Feeder Distribution Substation Grid Station Grid Station M.V Feeder Distribution Substation M.V Feeder Distribution Substation M.V Feeder Distribution Substation M.V Feeder Distribution Substation Figure No.2 Distribution Feeder Configuration .V Feeder Distribution Substation Figure No.Loop Supply .

P M.O.V Feeder Distribution Substation Distribution Substation Grid Station Grid Station N.N.P M.3A Distribution Feeder Configuration – T .O.Loop Supply .V Feeder Distribution Substation Distribution Substation Grid Station Figure No. 2.

Loop Supply .V Feeder Substation Distribution Grid Station Figure No. 2.Grid Station M.V Feeder Distribution Substation Grid Station Distribution Substation M.V Feeder Distribution Substation M.V Feeder Distribution Substation M.3B Distribution Feeder Configuration – T .

V Feeder Distribution Substation Distribution Substation Grid Station M. 2.V Feeder Distribution Substation M.V Feeder Distribution Substation Distribution Substation Figure No.V Feeder Distribution Substation Distribution Substation Distribution Substation Grid Station M.Grid Station M.V Feeder Distribution Substation Distribution Substation Grid Station M.4 Distribution Feeder Configuration – Multiple Feeder Loop Supply .

2.V Feeder Distribution Substation M.V Feeder Distribution Substation M.V Feeder Distribution Substation Distribution Substation M.Grid Station M.V Feeder Substation Distribution Grid Station Distribution Substation Distribution Substation Figure No.5 Distribution Feeder Configuration – Radial Branch Supply .

SEC

To Customer

M.V Feeder Grid Station

Distribution Substation

Main LV Cable Distribution Transformer LV Meters

Figure No. 2.6 MV Customer Supplied at LV with multi- meter

SEC

To Customer

M.V Feeder Grid Station

Distribution Substation Distribution Transformer

Figure No. 2.7 MV Customer Supplied at LV with Main Meter

M.V Feeder Grid Station

Distribution Substation

M.V Feeder

R.M.U

To Customer

HV Meter

M.V Feeder

Figure No. 2.8A MV Customer Supplied at MV with Main Meter

8B MV Customer Supplied at MV with Main Meter .V Feeder Figure No. 2.V Feeder Grid Station Distribution Substation M.SEC To Customer M.V Feeder Grid Station Distribution Substation M.V Feeder M.

APPENDIX C .

0 5.0 16.6 3.9 2.0 144.0 32.9 3.3 3.6 230 0.5 3.3 0.7 3.0 10.0 0.1 11.2 7.7 8.9 6.2 3.5 70 0.4 2.0 128.0 120.0 40.1 0.3 0.0 48.0 88.0 420.6 9.5 0.8 0.6 7.2 2.1 1.4 0.8 10.8 0.1 6.6 DISTANCE (M) 130 150 170 0.3 8.9 1.0 4.8 3.1 6.3 3.6 0.3 4.1 1.0 200.2 0.6 1.2 7.2 2.7 1.3 1.0 80.3 3.3 6.2 8.2 8.5 4.2 0.2 1.0 9.xls/lv_220V/2 .1 6.0 2.3 0.5 2.3 3.4 0.4 1.5 4.0 56.3 0.3 1.3 0.2 7.8 2.2 0.0 3.3 1.6 1.5 9.0 5.0 1.4 2.9 7.9 2.9 5.7 2.6 190 0.9 0.3 7.2 2.1 4.0 136.4 6.2 0.1 0.1 7.8 10.3 1.4 3.2 10.1 9.4 9.0 168.6 6.2 2.6 1.3 4.0 380.4 3.0 7.4 0.8 3.4 0.2 2.3 1.7 9.6 1.0 320.7 0.1 1.4 0.4 0.0 3.8 6.9 2.3 14.4 2.7 1.8 4.8 1.0 0.1 3.3 2.3 3.9 3.9 4.2 0.2 5.3 0.9 7.2 0.8 8.1 0.6 0.6 0.1 0.8 2.6 4.0 4.4 5.3 0.5 2.3 1.8 3.1 0.0 2.9 5.2 3.2 3.0 80.5 0.2 1.4 3.1 4.2 4.6 5.5 3.0 13.9 4.0 5.4 1.2 4.0 2.0 220.0 10 0.0 112.6 210 0.0 4.9 3.4 2.0 140.3 1.0 152.3 1.6 250 0.5 2.7 1.3 5.0 1.6 2.1 10.2 1.0 2.0 160.9 1.4 5.1 0.2 0.8 1.1 6.8 8.6 10.4 0.0 280.1 9.0 5.9 0.5 2.0 0.7 0.7 5.2 1.7 0.1 0.0 360.5 1.6 7.7 VOL_DROP_220V.5 1.0 340.4 2.9 3.6 5.5 5.85 K= 3323 LOAD AMP KVA 20.0 6.0 260.2 0.6 1.8 8.6 5.4 0.4 2.7 0.0 96.0 64.0 120.1 0.5 2.9 9.2 0.TABLE 1 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH VOLTAGE =220 V CABLE SIZE = 300 MM2 AL/XLPE PF= .0 72.0 40.0 14.4 1.8 5.4 3.6 8.5 90 0.7 3.0 100.0 7.0 240.1 8.6 0.5 4.8 8.4 10.0 400.1 4.4 1.7 2.4 1.6 270 0.7 4.1 2.2 4.8 3.2 7.5 6.0 104.4 0.2 0.5 1.6 2.2 9.6 0.8 11.7 4.0 2.0 3.9 6.7 290 0.4 7.1 5.5 50 0.7 5.8 1.5 2.2 11.0 24.6 2.2 1.6 110 0.1 0.5 6.4 6.3 5.0 1.6 4.6 5.8 5.9 2.6 6.4 0.5 7.4 13.1 11.5 0.0 160.1 9.5 0.7 6.0 300.9 6.7 12.1 5.4 11.0 12.9 4.6 7.0 8.0 180.4 9.4 4.3 5.2 2.5 4.5 7.3 2.5 0.3 0.6 2.5 30 0.4 12.3 0.7 0.9 12.0 60.5 0.7 4.7 1.5 11.3 7.1 4.6 13.8 8.1 1.0 3.6 10.5 11.4 0.3 1.

4 17.9 2.9 7.3 9.0 4.2 1.2 0.1 21.0 64.5 0.8 8.7 0.1 7.8 7.6 0.7 0.4 2.5 4.0 14.0 24.1 0.9 15.3 5.0 168.5 0.0 0.9 2.4 7.6 3.3 1.7 0.2 6.9 4.7 1.3 7.7 6.8 5.6 4.8 12.0 4.6 5.2 0.6 1.9 5.1 0.1 14.0 120.1 11.2 12.2 4.5 0.4 2.6 8.9 3.2 270 0.1 6.7 4.2 7.5 15.9 8.5 4.7 13.4 10.5 7.2 0.8 9.7 0.0 136.6 0.4 1.9 16.0 8.0 144.9 6.0 152.0 220.9 1.5 9.4 0.3 11.8 9.7 3.0 1.4 190 0.0 5.0 7.4 11.3 5.5 1.7 30 0.4 5.2 2.4 4.2 1.0 160.1 20.5 2.0 380.7 250 0.6 9.9 2.7 5.6 3.6 6.8 14.5 1.3 0.2 1.8 1.6 5.0 340.0 10.2 8.1 3.8 3.1 2.0 16.8 2.8 6.9 6.6 1.0 10 0.0 13.2 5.5 3.7 3.0 280.3 0.6 2.9 4.2 11.5 1.2 1.9 3.1 8.0 128.6 8.0 4.4 13.9 0.6 4.6 12.1 13.0 104.3 5.0 9.85 K= 2313 LOAD AMP KVA 20.3 3.7 18.9 10.8 8.9 1.0 0.4 0.8 9.2 2.0 8.0 420.9 3.8 6.8 17.2 2.1 13.1 15.3 15.6 70 0.0 32.9 0.4 9.0 260.1 90 0.0 1.6 0.5 7.0 80.1 VOL_DROP_220V.9 1.6 4.0 40.7 4.8 14.8 5.9 0.6 1.0 400.0 13.6 11.4 2.6 4.5 11.5 8.0 DISTANCE (M) 130 150 170 0.0 3.1 4.2 50 0.2 0.2 0.3 10.1 0.2 10.4 1.8 1.9 2.0 300.2 6.7 5.1 2.2 0.7 0.6 2.xls/lv_220V/3 .0 40.5 2.1 3.3 0.7 7.6 16.9 1.0 1.0 60.0 12.6 8.0 96.8 0.0 320.1 6.0 8.7 1.0 16.1 5.4 0.8 210 0.0 120.6 0.6 7.2 4.7 7.9 5.3 5.2 1.4 3.5 2.5 13.7 19.5 4.6 0.9 12.2 7.3 2.5 9.7 3.4 4.1 19.3 8.4 10.0 5.0 2.1 2.9 6.1 18.3 0.7 6.0 72.5 7.7 1.9 2.0 360.0 48.3 230 0.3 18.8 0.0 100.4 5.4 2.0 15.3 1.4 3.TABLE 2 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH VOLTAGE =220 V CABLE SIZE = 185 MM2 AL/XLPE PF= .7 9.3 5.7 1.5 0.7 5.5 1.2 4.0 160.0 10.0 140.0 56.5 10.9 3.6 3.8 12.0 88.4 10.1 3.1 13.3 0.6 3.0 11.2 11.0 80.3 8.1 3.5 110 0.1 0.4 0.3 0.0 2.2 0.0 180.6 0.0 240.7 3.1 13.2 1.0 9.0 6.6 4.5 6.4 0.7 1.7 5.3 3.8 4.2 9.3 6.5 10.1 1.6 6.0 112.6 290 1.3 11.2 6.2 2.0 200.0 14.8 4.1 4.9 10.6 1.1 17.5 0.3 0.7 15.9 11.4 0.5 14.2 12.4 3.1 3.7 2.2 7.8 2.0 0.5 0.0 8.2 8.4 0.9 16.

7 2.8 14.1 0.5 19.1 8.9 9.1 0.8 21.4 2.9 9.0 80.9 13.7 4.0 220.3 6.5 10.4 4.85 K= 1636 LOAD AMP KVA 20.7 0.3 22.9 14.9 6.1 70 0.2 0.6 19.0 340.2 7.0 19.6 7.7 12.7 15.0 1.3 1.8 5.9 0.3 8.3 11.9 5.0 4.5 0.0 104.1 3.2 24.5 13.0 280.7 3.3 11.7 7.5 26.1 5.5 2.8 11.0 140.6 6.1 0.9 4.7 3.9 18.2 2.4 14.8 4.2 13.0 100.2 10.5 1.9 1.9 2.0 152.6 12.8 11.0 32.9 6.4 3.8 22.4 1.5 7.1 8.5 14.2 1.4 4.9 17.2 2.6 9.0 1.5 25.0 11.3 2.1 6.6 4.4 5.5 8.3 12.2 2.1 15.0 23.4 13.4 16.2 0.3 19.6 20.0 64.2 3.2 4.1 2.4 1.5 0.1 2.9 4.4 2.0 7.4 8.5 14.7 3.3 2.5 19.0 112.0 15.4 0.0 120.9 15.2 12.1 22.0 13.6 0.3 13.8 25.0 4.6 250 1.TABLE 3 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH VOLTAGE =220 V CABLE SIZE = 120 MM2 AL/XLPE PF= .0 48.0 72.5 5.5 6.5 23.7 290 1.5 190 0.7 17.0 144.9 11.9 28.1 5.1 5.2 6.5 8.9 3.1 9.4 15.6 17.0 16.0 18.0 128.9 1.8 2.4 17.9 9.0 2.4 19.7 2.3 8.8 5.xls/lv_220V/4 .0 420.8 5.0 40.8 11.5 5.4 1.8 4.1 0.7 7.4 22.4 7.2 6.5 7.5 23.8 4.4 2.4 12.7 1.8 VOL_DROP_220V.1 4.8 7.7 4.2 1.7 0.6 3.4 9.6 7.8 9.1 8.0 96.5 9.9 6.9 1.0 10.2 0.6 8.1 12.8 1.5 10.4 0.1 5.8 17.0 200.9 0.1 5.8 2.0 88.2 3.5 1.0 56.5 3.4 0.2 18.8 1.2 14.3 0.0 320.4 3.6 2.4 0.6 0.6 6.5 210 1.5 0.0 40.1 7.2 10.1 26.3 10.2 2.0 10 0.6 0.5 0.5 15.4 0.7 13.2 3.7 0.1 3.0 8.1 5.6 11.3 DISTANCE (M) 130 150 170 0.8 0.5 4.2 8.7 15.2 5.7 1.3 12.9 0.2 110 0.8 16.0 400.3 4.1 10.2 10.7 6.7 18.0 120.0 0.0 2.1 13.0 10.8 4.0 160.0 160.5 2.4 0.4 2.5 4.9 21.1 18.1 25.3 0.8 6.4 8.7 10.0 1.7 270 1.7 3.2 12.6 2.0 7.3 5.7 0.5 18.3 8.1 50 0.1 11.9 14.0 7.0 168.6 1.6 15.3 0.6 9.3 1.3 0.0 24.5 5.2 9.7 3.7 7.4 29.2 11.3 4.3 0.2 15.0 260.9 3.0 12.2 10.0 180.1 20.0 300.2 21.2 90 0.6 1.5 20.7 6.0 240.2 13.6 230 1.0 80.5 1.1 2.8 16.2 2.5 21.5 7.8 0.6 5.7 16.7 0.0 360.0 380.0 5.9 3.2 0.0 60.1 0.6 1.3 14.6 7.7 24.3 9.7 2.8 6.9 8.4 27.6 17.8 9.8 1.0 136.4 5.8 11.5 13.0 30 0.

6 2.4 0.4 6.4 2.8 7.1 8.4 4.3 6.0 4.7 4.0 100.1 1.3 1.5 0.0 140.2 5.2 4.2 7.4 3.1 5.7 8.3 3.1 6.9 0.1 0.6 13.1 14.8 3.9 14.0 90.2 14.9 10.2 6.0 120.0 2.0 0.6 12.5 1.3 1.9 5.4 0.8 1.6 1.5 12.1 3.0 210.0 28.5 VOL_DROP_220V.6 1.2 1.85 K= 1001 LOAD AMP KVA 10.0 50.4 6.3 0.8 0.3 14.8 6.3 2.1 4.3 7.9 4.1 5.3 1.4 1.9 13.2 0.4 0.4 11.8 8.4 0.3 8.0 20.7 14.2 2.9 15.3 9.5 4.8 6.4 3.3 0.3 7.0 190.6 1.0 52.7 1.0 160.5 1.7 0.4 0.7 0.6 6.6 5.1 0.0 10 0.7 0.6 0.7 0.0 16.3 4.4 2.0 8.7 1.7 9.5 0.5 0.4 175 0.7 4.9 7.9 85 0.8 9.7 190 0.6 3.3 0.0 8.2 0.0 170.9 11.1 4.6 4.2 3.1 5.1 0.5 5.2 0.6 5.0 11.9 145 0.8 10.1 13.1 9.4 12.3 5.2 4.4 2.8 4.9 10.4 7.2 12.5 8.5 2.8 4.6 70 0.6 5.5 4.6 0.6 6.5 4.6 3.6 11.9 205 0.2 0.0 80.0 2.0 80.0 84.0 60.0 30.5 0.2 0.8 7.2 10.0 1.8 5.4 9.8 0.7 17.3 0.6 0.6 8.0 130.2 7.0 6.9 2.2 5.8 9.2 12.0 110.2 3.1 3.8 1.1 1.5 6.6 10.9 5.1 6.6 4.6 2.8 3.0 36.8 7.4 0.0 7.7 10.3 2.4 7.0 9.9 12.2 1.7 3.1 9.1 2.9 1.2 9.3 2.8 5.0 6.6 11.6 3.6 2.2 1.7 8.0 4.0 3.9 1.7 2.8 0.4 9.7 9.0 68.7 6.xls/lv_220V/5 .5 1.8 2.2 5.4 0.8 16.2 3.0 3.0 32.0 7.2 4.0 40.1 4.4 12.4 15.7 11.4 4.8 8.0 44.0 1.3 8.4 1.9 3.6 0.3 0.0 2.6 7.2 220 0.9 1.3 2.8 0.8 5.6 0.0 12.0 150.4 1.4 5.9 2.0 4.6 0.6 0.3 0.2 2.2 0.2 3.4 1.0 7.1 3.0 9.0 2.8 1.0 14.4 3.8 10.7 2.4 10.9 10.4 0.1 3.2 15.8 2.2 2.6 8.8 25 0.4 3.0 60.8 0.4 8.0 40.TABLE 4 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH VOLTAGE =220 V CABLE SIZE = 70 MM2 AL/XLPE PF= .2 1.3 0.7 4.5 11.3 2.0 24.2 160 0.3 9.1 2.0 56.1 DISTANCE (M) 100 115 130 0.8 3.0 20.5 4.6 1.7 15.5 0.0 0.2 0.0 48.8 6.0 180.6 18.4 3.0 2.3 13.7 6.0 200.7 5.1 1.5 6.2 4.5 0.5 3.4 2.8 7.9 8.0 7.4 7.5 12.0 72.6 16.4 55 0.8 13.2 11.4 5.1 0.1 4.7 2.3 6.1 40 0.9 3.4 17.2 9.0 5.3 13.0 76.6 5.8 1.0 64.0 70.7 0.4 4.8 3.2 2.8 1.9 3.1 1.1 1.4 9.

9 6.1 2.6 0.9 15.7 4.0 2.6 3.8 5.2 10.1 DISTANCE (M) 100 115 130 0.3 0.7 1.7 0.0 40 0.4 3.7 7.6 1.7 12.8 21.6 5.0 1.6 4.0 80.3 2.3 4.2 1.8 8.4 6.8 9.7 9.0 28.4 0.4 9.5 7.xls/lv_220V/6 .6 10.5 4.3 5.0 36.1 0.3 0.8 3.5 10.0 24.85 K= 710 LOAD AMP KVA 10.7 20.0 170.0 11.0 16.0 70.9 6.0 120.3 23.3 0.1 1.0 56.6 12.3 0.3 7.9 6.1 8.9 9.4 7.7 2.9 1.8 3.3 0.7 55 0.7 15.6 9.9 4.1 5.5 3.8 1.6 20.8 0.9 2.7 12.4 0.5 1.4 3.2 19.1 9.6 0.1 24.9 8.9 10.3 4.8 6.9 3.1 1.8 7.1 1.6 3.0 210.0 16.8 14.2 1.2 8.9 1.5 5.8 13.3 2.3 4.7 4.0 1.5 0.1 3.2 3.7 0.0 6.5 5.0 50.3 4.8 3.7 15.4 13.6 19.2 17.1 8.1 9.1 9.8 12.6 3.0 4.9 10.7 19.6 0.3 21.8 15.7 13.2 0.5 9.5 7.1 18.4 5.3 8.4 2.6 24.2 2.3 4.8 2.1 0.9 16.0 13.0 60.7 7.6 1.8 16.3 1.2 0.2 1.3 17.4 3.0 9.0 84.0 2.5 14.0 5.9 14.0 64.3 0.7 12.2 6.0 130.0 32.4 8.3 5.4 11.5 2.8 10.2 2.7 0.5 2.8 21.2 13.6 4.5 0.9 8.6 5.2 5.9 175 1.1 0.7 10.5 1.4 11.7 5.4 145 0.5 70 0.2 12.4 22.6 10.1 1.4 3.0 20.0 44.2 2.1 0.6 9.5 2.3 13.2 7.0 0.8 0.6 7.2 3.4 1.6 5.8 12.6 14.1 4.6 10.0 76.3 11.0 10 0.5 0.9 8.0 1.0 2.2 17.6 5.6 0.9 7.5 5.3 13.8 4.3 85 0.1 17.4 3.0 52.5 0.0 9.3 2.8 13.8 11.9 11.0 20.4 18.0 0.1 5.9 23.1 17.1 9.2 25 0.2 3.0 140.1 18.9 6.8 0.1 10.0 48.8 0.7 0.2 9.8 17.0 11.0 160.1 7.4 3.4 6.0 150.3 220 1.5 16.8 1.3 5.6 0.6 0.3 2.5 13.9 14.3 7.0 200.3 16.3 20.0 40.6 6.7 2.0 100.0 8.TABLE 5 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH VOLTAGE =220 V CABLE SIZE = 50 MM2 AL/XLPE PF= .0 18.0 12.9 15.9 4.9 2.1 13.0 2.7 6.6 11.1 5.2 6.8 2.4 12.8 26.9 5.6 13.8 11.7 1.5 8.2 7.0 110.1 7.2 160 0.4 2.4 2.3 6.8 6.8 4.7 190 1.1 4.0 60.4 15.6 2.5 4.9 4.5 19.1 0.0 VOL_DROP_220V.1 2.5 205 1.4 0.1 1.2 6.8 3.4 8.9 8.8 0.0 90.6 1.0 30.5 5.5 1.0 68.9 3.3 2.0 16.0 80.5 7.9 3.9 5.1 22.4 2.2 0.9 4.0 4.0 180.9 1.7 11.4 1.3 18.0 72.0 40.7 8.8 18.5 0.7 11.0 9.3 11.7 6.0 190.

5 1.5 2.0 72.9 2.5 0.4 3.7 4.6 2.2 1.3 4.9 1.3 0.3 1.4 4.1 5.3 85 0.1 3.8 0.1 0.9 4.3 190 0.2 1.2 1.3 0.0 160.0 40.7 2.1 3.0 70.0 1.2 1.0 3.1 4.2 0.5 175 0.0 76.2 0.9 8.0 20.0 180.2 7.8 0.4 0.2 4.4 0.4 0.9 3.9 0.7 0.2 5.0 2.0 100.0 190.0 5.9 6.0 4.6 2.9 5.5 0.0 84.6 3.6 1.1 1.6 0.1 0.8 6.9 3.1 2.1 1.9 2.1 5.7 8.1 0.0 68.1 3.3 0.0 5.7 2.5 5.4 6.0 24.3 2.0 2.2 2.7 0.5 6.3 0.8 3.5 4.0 2.1 0.4 VOL_DROP_220V.0 150.8 1.0 10 0.7 2.3 0.0 0.8 7.7 0.4 0.4 0.7 4.2 2.8 2.5 5.0 130.1 3.5 7.0 DISTANCE (M) 100 115 130 0.9 6.0 30.4 6.6 1.1 3.7 9.7 0.4 5.3 1.3 1.0 205 0.1 1.xls/lv_220V/7 .0 4.2 2.5 1.9 5.1 4.2 0.1 145 0.2 2.8 3.5 2.6 2.6 3.85 K= 1781 LOAD AMP KVA 10.1 0.1 5.0 28.2 0.0 80.5 5.3 4.7 0.6 3.1 4.3 1.5 2.2 2.5 9.3 2.7 1.2 1.0 64.9 6.0 1.4 9.4 0.2 0.3 1.8 4.8 4.0 110.0 40.7 5.5 3.7 5.0 32.6 70 0.6 0.4 1.8 4.6 3.9 1.1 1.0 200.9 10.5 1.1 7.8 2.0 44.8 6.5 1.9 55 0.8 3.9 2.0 90.0 120.0 48.1 1.0 8.0 50.4 0.3 0.3 2.0 1.3 7.4 3.2 0.7 7.1 0.9 3.0 210.2 3.8 4.1 8.1 0.3 0.0 52.3 1.4 0.3 5.0 1.8 1.0 4.2 9.1 0.2 1.9 4.5 25 0.1 1.9 8.4 0.2 1.0 1.6 2.3 1.1 2.7 0.5 2.7 1.1 0.8 160 0.4 7.0 2.7 0.0 80.3 2.5 6.8 0.4 3.6 0.9 1.1 1.9 3.7 5.6 0.5 3.3 2.4 0.2 0.0 2.8 3.2 0.3 0.0 60.0 1.5 2.4 7.1 1.4 0.3 0.4 2.7 2.4 5.7 1.2 6.4 3.9 1.6 5.4 1.7 1.1 2.8 2.2 0.4 0.1 6.0 0.6 0.5 6.8 0.6 3.0 0.2 5.9 0.1 1.1 0.9 7.0 3.1 0.4 4.0 60.3 6.6 1.4 4.4 1.4 8.4 0.9 7.4 0.8 7.7 220 0.1 2.8 8.6 2.6 1.3 2.0 4.0 20.0 2.5 4.1 0.8 2.8 2.4 0.5 3.2 40 0.3 3.2 3.5 0.5 1.0 36.9 4.0 6.3 4.4 2.9 9.6 4.3 8.9 5.2 0.2 3.2 1.5 0.9 3.TABLE 6 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH VOLTAGE =220 V CABLE SIZE = QUADRUPLEX 120 MM2 XLPE PF= .0 16.3 0.5 6.7 5.0 2.0 6.0 140.2 0.8 0.3 4.5 0.0 170.0 3.6 1.2 3.6 0.2 0.3 0.6 4.0 12.0 56.9 1.4 6.4 1.

1 25 0.85 K= 760 LOAD AMP KVA 10.0 160.5 0.1 5.9 5.6 1.4 0.0 76.0 40.3 2.9 9.4 7.0 30.5 8.6 10.0 84.9 8.6 5.8 0.4 1.2 10.xls/lv_220V/8 .7 220 1.4 8.7 11.4 3.0 2.9 3.0 23.0 12.7 1.4 7.4 3.8 6.6 0.4 2.8 22.8 5.0 8.8 1.6 0.8 11.7 10.3 19.4 0.7 2.0 13.1 11.0 44.6 2.0 2.8 40 0.1 1.9 3.6 13.0 64.4 5.0 7.3 0.8 5.5 1.7 0.2 16.5 7.0 100.4 0.2 2.0 8.6 3.0 12.0 190.2 1.4 8.1 0.3 13.2 9.9 15.7 4.6 5.4 9.9 7.5 10.1 2.1 12.4 7.7 1.0 18.0 15.4 145 0.6 4.0 4.6 0.2 24.7 0.8 5.0 17.3 6.6 4.0 11.2 0.7 10.0 20.0 2.9 5.0 56.6 12.0 14.4 55 0.0 28.0 4.0 60.6 2.4 3.7 175 0.2 13.5 0.0 9.3 6.5 18.6 4.5 2.5 1.0 60.0 40.3 1.6 12.3 6.8 1.2 0.4 9.1 12.2 6.9 10.7 4.9 11.4 0.5 0.2 7.0 160 0.0 0.7 16.5 8.3 5.7 7.1 16.9 1.6 5.1 0.4 DISTANCE (M) 100 115 130 0.6 17.0 70.3 2.5 3.1 1.0 200.2 1.5 11.5 5.5 4.5 19.6 3.3 10.9 0.5 12.8 0.5 1.0 52.5 4.7 15.2 5.8 7.0 205 1.5 15.5 6.2 3.4 6.2 5.1 0.0 10.3 10.2 3.7 7.0 20.1 6.0 210.7 14.8 6.6 22.9 13.6 0.0 4.1 9.9 3.9 11.9 0.6 1.6 8.2 17.2 2.7 85 0.7 1.0 72.8 4.7 13.9 1.4 18.1 4.5 14.8 1.7 0.3 0.0 80.2 3.8 12.2 1.5 0.4 0.9 1.5 5.7 0.9 11.4 4.8 17.8 0.9 8.0 150.4 0.5 4.0 120.4 20.0 10 0.3 VOL_DROP_220V.3 0.3 4.3 16.2 2.4 6.8 4.8 4.1 10.4 3.3 15.6 8.4 0.0 110.9 13.7 3.6 8.1 8.9 9.0 20.3 2.6 4.2 1.2 0.3 0.8 14.5 9.0 90.9 2.0 7.7 4.0 19.1 70 0.7 14.1 3.7 3.1 2.1 2.4 1.9 6.3 3.0 50.6 8.0 12.4 4.3 18.3 1.4 11.0 16.2 0.2 17.4 4.3 10.4 3.1 1.1 6.2 4.2 2.0 180.0 16.7 0.1 9.0 16.1 0.8 7.1 2.2 4.3 190 1.8 2.9 9.7 2.8 6.2 5.1 0.2 0.5 12.7 20.0 48.6 7.2 8.4 19.0 21.1 16.0 5.0 6.7 5.0 80.1 3.3 5.0 24.3 2.1 1.1 4.0 15.3 0.8 0.0 13.3 10.0 3.0 170.7 7.TABLE 7 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH VOLTAGE =220 V CABLE SIZE = QUADRUPLEX 50 MM2 XLPE PF= .0 32.3 6.9 8.8 2.7 0.0 36.8 2.3 9.5 6.6 9.6 2.9 6.5 2.1 4.0 14.3 2.5 21.0 68.0 13.0 10.0 130.8 6.0 1.3 7.2 4.0 140.

3 12.2 10.9 11.8 15.7 11.8 7.2 8.2 7.2 5.0 11.1 10.0 4.1 5.6 10.9 5.7 9.9 6.6 13.2 6.4 30 1.7 6.6 8.0 6.8 10.9 13.9 15.2 1.8 1.9 15.9 2.6 8.5 5.7 3.4 11.9 8.3 8.8 11.F VOLTAGE 0.2 4.7 5.7 11.5 8.4 13.8 5.9 6.8 4.9 130 5.4 8.7 16.4 2.2 7.5 9.5 10.4 13.8 5.1 7.0 14.7 10.9 6.4 8.1 9.0 16.6 8.3 15.1 3.5 8.7 8.9 7.9 5.8 6.3 6.5 3.9 9.6 17.2 12.3 9.0 6.9 16.9 4.8 7.1 10.7 16.6 4.3 6.2 16.2 6.3 10.5 5.2 11.5 16.4 15.8 7.8 12.3 9.3 7.8 11.2 13.1 5.8 7.8 7.0 10.0 13.4 11. RATED CURRENT FOR 185 mm2 IN AMP.8 10.4 14.4 10.2 9.6 11.8 3.4 10.1 11.5 12.4 4.8 8.2 9.7 3.0 6.3 9.6 10.1 12.2 6.0 7.0 6.7 11.5 7.1 15.8 11.9 5.0 8.4 150 6.2 4.4 8.8 13.7 6.5 16.5 6.0 13.8 9.4 4.3 9.9 13.3 2.TABLE 8 VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP.6 9.6 4.2 9.8 8.3 6.4 11.8 4.5 14.3 10.7 12.3 8.6 12.9 14.7 5.6 6.4 6.6 2.7 7.7 6.2 15.8 15.0 6.0 11.0 3.3 4.4 4.5 4.7 10.8 12.9 10.4 3.2 7.6 7.5 3.2 14.9 8.1 13.5 13.9 11.0 8.5 4.7 12.6 2.4 6.4 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 10 0.5 5.8 3.2 5.3 4.4 6.1 3.3 4.4 11.6 14.6 14.1 14.3 11.1 13.0 9.1 3.9 10.2 1.9 20 1.0 12.1 8.2 8.2 7.2 12.1 5.7 8.7 13.4 10.7 10.4 14. 300 mm2 2 185 mm P.2 5.7 9.2 5.4 4.6 6.3 10.3 7.4 5.1 7.6 8.4 12.5 6.9 CABLE FROM S/S TO DISTRIBUTION CABINET 300 MM^2 .1 12.0 4.7 7.1 13.8 14.6 6.9 4.6 12.4 5.8 7.7 12.0 11.3 8.1 8.6 8.9 13.1 12.3 11.9 9.7 10.8 9.1 13.0 2.8 7.4 14.7 10.5 3.0 17.3 11.0 17.1 10.8 14.9 9.6 16.8 8.5 12.3 15.9 7.7 3.7 9.6 11.9 12.1 11.4 2.4 8.9 9.1 7.2 3.6 11.2 14.0 6.3 2.8 7.0 10.0 9.9 9.2 8.0 12.5 1.3 12.5 9.0 8.1 8.3 6.5 5.5 13.7 13.2 10.0 14.0 5.2 11.9 10.8 9.6 13.6 7.6 11.7 7.2 7.6 5.5 11.1 6.0 12.4 5.0 2.9 8.5 15.0 5.1 7.8 8.7 15.5 8.6 7.6 1.4 14.7 13.2 3.7 13.4 8.4 7.0 8.5 10.4 6.5 9.0 3.6 4.7 5.4 6.6 4.9 4.3 13.6 3.2 2.6 6.7 14.0 8.1 9.3 2.8 12.2 7.5 7.6 10.2 12.2 11.4 11.2 10.3 12.0 7.4 12.6 15.5 9.6 11.1 9.5 17.85 220 V 310 230 CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 185 MM^2) 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 2.4 6.3 5.2 3.0 4.1 5.7 10.9 140 6.6 11.8 6.0 4.5 8.5 14.4 9.1 11.9 11.4 7.8 6.9 10.0 5.6 6.2 4.5 8.6 5.9 2.5 13.0 11.4 6.3 10.1 10.4 9.3 13.0 10.1 16.5 10.0 11.0 15.4 3.9 14.5 8.6 12.6 9.5 17.3 4.6 10.0 7.2 7.2 10.7 5.8 9.4 8.8 5.7 3.0 14.3 9.8 12.2 9.9 12.8 5.5 11.

5 10.8 15.9 7.8 10.9 7.7 15.9 16.0 5.4 12.5 14.0 13.5 13.9 7.7 10.4 11.6 10.2 16.8 7.7 11.4 6.6 12.7 17.4 15.8 10.2 13.2 11.9 9.1 9.8 5.9 4.6 11.2 4.9 8.8 2.1 4.2 11.4 8.3 130 6.5 8.7 19.7 8.3 6.4 9.9 6.7 8.5 13.0 9.6 7.7 30 1.8 4.2 8.9 17.3 5.4 14.2 15.6 9.1 3.7 12.8 12.0 9.8 14.6 8.2 9.9 11.9 4.3 6.4 16.7 17.3 4.7 5.4 5.8 16.8 13.0 4.2 11.4 1.2 17.4 15.5 4.8 CABLE FROM S/S TO DISTRIBUTION CABINET 300 MM^2 .9 19.3 9.4 13.6 6.3 6.6 5.2 9.9 4.4 7.8 9.3 12.7 8.0 12.4 18.0 9.3 8.6 6.8 7.6 11.9 17.3 8.6 12.2 7.7 9.8 11.9 10.3 16.3 7.6 15.9 10.3 17.7 3.5 18.6 16.0 8.5 6.2 15.1 11.4 5.9 5.9 12.6 9.6 6.7 7.0 6.6 14.4 2.5 4.3 7.9 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 10 0.4 12.1 12.1 6.1 17.4 6.0 10.1 20 1.4 14.0 5.5 3.9 13.6 5.9 8.6 12.85 220 V 310 204 CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 120 MM^2) 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 2.0 8.8 12.3 2.8 13.6 9.8 6.6 6.6 15.6 11.2 10.9 8.8 3.4 4.0 16.TABLE 9 VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP.2 9.3 14.2 16.3 5.5 10.2 5.8 11.3 8.9 11.4 10.0 12.6 13.6 13.4 17.0 6.7 5.2 9.7 10.1 7.4 3.5 10.5 11.7 7.9 10.5 140 7. RATED CURRENT FOR 120 mm2 IN AMP.5 12.5 12.1 14.8 8.0 13.2 6.3 11.9 14.3 11.7 8.9 9.5 10.6 5.0 13.2 13.9 14.3 11.2 6.0 12.4 9.0 10.2 8.6 14.3 10. 300 mm2 2 120 mm P.9 10.3 10.5 11.2 14.1 9.2 10.8 8.6 9.8 16.3 7.1 18.9 2.9 15.1 13.0 15.7 18.9 1.5 6.3 19.1 7.6 7.0 2.2 12.4 11.3 11.2 8.8 11.0 10.2 3.5 10.3 4.2 14.2 3.9 13.5 6.8 11.1 13.7 14.9 3.9 6.9 7.8 6.1 6.8 10.8 5.5 13.9 13.2 15.2 6.4 9.4 13.7 13.5 15.0 9.1 10.8 9.2 8.4 12.2 10.2 5.5 2.2 4.7 3.6 2.0 18.1 7.0 9.9 10.2 150 7.4 16.2 12.2 5.8 17.8 12.0 9.5 9.4 4.4 5.8 9.4 9.9 4.6 9.4 13.F VOLTAGE 0.9 11.5 8.1 5.1 12.8 18.6 13.7 4.4 8.2 11.8 9.2 10.7 11.9 5.8 9.6 16.2 9.9 7.9 6.4 10.4 10.8 8.0 3.6 12.3 11.8 11.4 7.0 8.4 7.9 7.0 12.3 10.0 13.8 15.1 2.3 13.8 8.7 7.5 12.3 14.3 8.0 7.0 8.7 11.3 5.3 7.5 10.7 4.0 14.7 9.8 14.8 10.7 12.3 3.7 14.9 8.3 3.1 16.4 10.4 8.3 8.1 16.3 15.5 7.2 7.5 14.4 10.2 14.3 13.0 14.9 5.2 6.1 7.9 11.4 17.6 15.9 6.1 5.2 5.4 7.5 11.8 3.4 9.0 15.2 11.0 11.8 12.9 5.8 3.4 2.2 12.2 8.1 10.4 5.4 14.8 6.5 7.0 7.6 8.9 12.3 1.6 9.1 11.3 6.4 2.9 10.7 15.4 3.0 15.7 6.0 11.4 4.0 12.4 9.0 14.1 8.2 12.9 3.6 16.8 8.7 7.6 14.5 16.7 13.3 18.8 5.8 4.7 6.1 10.4 8.3 4.

6 20.3 7.0 17.9 11.9 13.1 12.6 7.5 17.4 5.8 14.3 4.1 14.6 8.0 11.7 12.0 17.2 12.4 2.6 5.7 15.0 19.4 18.0 2.9 9.1 20 1.2 15.4 9.3 4.8 12.1 13.4 19.3 8.2 2.4 12.3 8.2 10.8 7.F VOLTAGE 0.5 4.7 7.5 14.1 6.0 5.5 8.5 14.2 9.5 16.1 12.2 7.6 10.3 12.5 12. RATED CURRENT FOR 50 mm2 IN AMP.2 9.7 6.3 5.6 10.3 11.8 2.3 16.2 7.1 16.1 10.0 8. 300 mm2 2 70 mm P.9 6.9 11.7 16.3 14.3 3.9 13.1 10.6 11.0 7.5 7.7 12.3 6.9 5.4 7.0 8.7 5.3 11.7 6.2 9.0 4.2 17.0 16.0 8.9 17.6 3.9 150 8.8 8.2 11.5 16.4 11.9 4.5 CABLE FROM S/S TO DISTRIBUTION CABINET 300 MM^2 .0 14.3 5.0 15.4 10.1 13.9 11.5 19.0 8.1 5.2 6.3 7.8 10.6 8.0 9.0 7.8 3.1 13.3 18.8 16.0 9.5 4.8 15.6 11.1 6.6 10.0 7.6 11.6 11.2 4.6 14.1 14.7 12.7 5.0 10.8 9.4 10.1 5.2 8.4 8.7 19.3 6.4 8.0 10.8 15.4 15.1 11.0 10.2 7.2 6.8 11.5 10.0 6.2 6.2 6.8 10.5 7.2 14.3 13.4 11.6 10.7 11.TABLE 10 VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP.2 17.7 9.2 14.4 5.8 6.6 7.2 11.4 13.0 10.2 3.4 11.4 6.2 6.2 14.1 5.6 10.85 220 V 310 135 CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 70 MM^2) 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 2.6 18.4 7.7 15.6 11.7 17.8 10.1 8.9 14.7 13.6 12.2 13.5 5.5 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 10 0.4 6.1 5.5 130 7.0 3.9 11.5 10.8 10.9 16.1 3.5 5.9 18.3 4.8 8.9 3.7 6.9 9.9 6.3 9.2 12.6 8.6 10.3 12.7 9.6 3.0 10.7 14.3 14.9 18.3 3.4 8.8 9.6 12.3 15.4 2.0 11.3 14.0 7.6 7.1 20.3 12.8 3.4 6.0 13.9 5.8 19.2 140 8.5 9.2 7.2 10.4 9.8 6.4 9.6 9.4 9.7 13.7 8.3 15.0 9.7 5.0 10.5 15.7 13.7 12.8 7.2 8.9 8.9 13.9 4.0 11.9 6.2 9.5 6.5 13.1 16.8 11.1 12.6 9.8 7.4 15.2 19.0 11.9 2.0 4.2 7.1 15.0 12.1 10.4 10.7 8.5 9.6 6.9 12.5 13.9 1.7 10.7 11.1 7.4 9.4 3.3 7.8 9.5 13.6 4.7 9.4 16.3 12.4 15.2 10.6 13.0 10.8 12.8 13.1 13.6 7.3 4.5 6.3 10.0 15.0 7.6 5.4 14.6 13.4 10.8 18.6 8.7 13.8 7.8 30 2.3 18.9 10.0 12.7 4.8 16.3 8.1 5.9 8.4 12.0 4.8 11.6 9.7 3.8 8.0 9.5 17.8 7.8 12.9 12.0 11.7 6.0 9.0 2.0 15.2 8.5 12.5 13.4 7.8 14.9 5.6 14.6 16.3 1.9 12.0 13.2 9.0 14.4 10.3 11.8 8.4 11.7 17.9 8.3 17.5 15.5 3.6 7.6 8.4 5.7 16.8 4.9 4.9 14.6 7.1 4.4 17.6 9.8 9.5 3.6 12.5 12.8 14.1 13.2 15.2 15.0 10.2 11.5 1.1 18.0 8.7 2.0 6.3 9.3 5.6 15.4 11.8 15.4 8.1 16.7 14.1 6.7 16.9 13.5 17.1 8.4 11.1 11.4 5.2 12.3 8.3 11.2 4.1 9.0 10.8 5.1 12.6 10.6 6.2 3.9 9.4 10.1 9.3 13.4 17.6 12.7 11.7 8.6 15.

3 21.8 16.9 5.6 10.2 16.7 5.3 10.5 15.1 9.0 10.7 7.3 15.0 19.2 12.1 4.3 5.1 5.1 23.0 17.2 12.0 11.6 10.5 18.3 19.8 16.6 14.0 14.6 10.4 15.0 15.8 10.3 8.5 4.9 11.2 7.0 8.1 9.8 7.8 9.4 15.3 16.5 18.2 11.4 18.8 19.6 13.3 16.0 11.3 13.0 17.8 14.5 12.3 16.4 6.9 10.6 3.8 15.8 13.4 6.9 7.5 12.0 13.8 11.7 9.9 3.1 11.2 21.3 9.5 13.9 10.8 7.0 14.1 19.2 14.8 7.1 4.8 150 11.0 20.1 1.9 10.8 21.1 7.0 3.6 8.3 6.8 12.2 10.6 10.5 6.7 7.0 11.8 7.3 16.3 10.2 14.3 5.0 4.9 15.8 8.2 8.4 20.4 21.4 12.3 11.6 14.3 13.1 16.9 18.4 7.3 13.0 12.6 12.5 20.3 19.3 5.6 13.4 6.0 9.4 15.1 18.8 2.9 15.4 9.9 6.1 14.3 12.1 13.5 17.7 16.8 17.6 6.9 8.9 9.3 8.8 11.2 17.3 11.4 6.6 12.1 17.3 5.2 10.5 10.1 130 9.9 18.8 11.5 14.3 3. RATED CURRENT FOR 50 mm2 IN AMP.3 11.9 14.2 6.8 13.1 8.0 4.5 8.0 12.8 13.8 15.6 13.9 14.6 8.2 12.1 7.5 9.4 8.9 12.9 15.2 17.6 7.8 2.5 8.0 11.2 14.7 13.1 13.4 9.2 12.6 9.2 13.5 2.0 14.4 13.3 9.6 4.6 10.9 7.6 17.5 7.2 30 2.0 10.6 18.7 12.4 14.0 9.7 4.2 11.6 9.4 11.8 11.2 14.9 19.7 12.0 8.7 12.4 19.6 17.3 12.5 10.9 14.2 5.7 23.0 8.6 11.7 9.8 12.1 17.9 18.4 15.0 6.7 11.8 13.7 9.8 15.1 15.7 11.5 7.6 16.0 11.6 14.5 9.6 CABLE FROM S/S TO DISTRIBUTION CABINET 300 MM^2 .5 8.6 6.7 20.9 12.9 140 10.3 16.9 21.1 14.8 9.1 9.2 8.2 20.2 3.8 7.2 18.4 12.1 16.2 2.7 18.9 8.3 20.4 14.6 14.8 10.7 15.1 9.0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 10 1.9 5.6 17.7 13.3 3.6 8.0 6. 300 mm2 2 50 mm P.4 3.1 14.7 13.5 4.0 9.8 12.7 15.6 14.9 3.8 5.8 11.3 9.5 11.2 14.5 19.5 20.3 19.5 4.5 13.4 10.1 10.3 8.6 8.0 17.TABLE 11 VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP.1 11.7 5.8 20.3 12.3 10.3 7.5 18.6 2.0 10.4 10.9 11.6 8.6 11.2 9.9 20.3 20 1.4 13.1 7.8 19.0 17.9 18.0 12.6 9.9 9.2 7.2 4.0 14.4 6.7 16.2 8.5 15.2 7.6 12.7 9.9 8.6 14.4 13.2 22.9 8.3 16.8 4.5 17.4 6.9 6.1 6.3 11.4 11.8 9.3 7.2 5.8 13.6 6.6 17.5 14.7 11.5 17.0 5.0 12.1 6.2 12.2 17.5 1.4 11.6 19.1 12.7 10.F VOLTAGE 0.2 13.3 22.1 9.4 13.9 10.7 17.3 4.0 6.6 16.3 15.1 9.4 5.7 8.8 22.2 14.9 12.5 10.9 16.5 9.6 5.6 10.0 10.8 11.8 7.2 17.4 8.5 15.7 22.8 6.5 8.9 4.0 6.85 220 V 310 125 CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 50 MM^2) 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 3.9 15.5 10.7 11.7 16.2 12.0 10.8 6.5 11.0 17.9 3.1 13.1 5.1 21.7 16.6 14.2 16.1 11.2 2.9 12.2 7.4 13.0 13.7 4.5 11.4 18.7 4.0 8.2 20.4 19.0 6.7 11.6 6.9 21.5 15.

3 23.5 24.8 28.3 10.6 12.9 17.2 17.6 9.1 25.5 11.0 25.1 5.1 25.0 17.5 23.2 9.2 6.0 23.4 32.4 13.7 12.9 12.3 20.7 34.2 16.4 17.5 9.1 4.9 22.8 19.1 18.2 4.5 10.5 7.1 18.9 11.1 34.8 18.7 15.7 17.6 11.4 17.0 23.2 17.2 16.0 13.3 15.2 3.5 10.2 24.3 12.1 22.4 14.7 31.5 19.4 26.8 8.4 8.2 22.3 7.0 20.0 25.8 12.6 4.3 22.6 5.5 11.7 5.85 220 V 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 10 1.2 10.9 10.7 26.0 9.5 21.8 22.9 9.0 17.1 18.2 34.5 26.2 31.2 10.0 13.4 16.1 17.8 33.4 14.5 15.9 36.1 27.4 10.4 29.3 24.4 23.8 17.5 14.2 17.5 34.9 8.4 20 2.5 15.6 26.7 21.5 27.6 16.7 15.6 20.7 21.6 26.5 12.8 15.2 21.8 30.3 28.9 14.0 24.TABLE 12 VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C QUADRUPLEX 120 mm2 CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER QUADRUPLEX 50 mm2 RATED CURRENT FOR QUAD 120 mm2 IN AMP 270 RATED CURRENT FOR QUAD 50 mm2 IN AMP.5 19.2 18.9 6.1 29.2 24.8 26.9 16.8 10.7 19.1 32.6 8.6 19.6 12.5 15.0 24.7 30.8 8.8 4.1 23.3 19.5 36.2 20.9 8.2 5.8 11.9 18.2 16.7 10.1 35.2 22.5 21.4 7.5 19.2 19.9 17.2 26.1 8.0 5.6 22.9 21.3 24.2 11.1 9.0 20.2 2.9 5.8 21.0 6.7 22.9 19.2 14.2 26.5 8.6 15.0 29.2 18.2 11.3 14.5 17.5 24.2 15.7 13.0 22.7 31.4 4.1 19.7 6.9 9.2 19.9 19.4 13.7 25.6 3.7 15.5 5.8 16.8 7.9 25.8 CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( QUADRUPLEX 50 MM^2) 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 3.6 24.8 23.8 18.7 15.2 21.4 27.7 20.1 15.0 11.9 32.6 24.0 7.9 30.8 11.4 20.3 25.3 25.8 8.7 9.9 19.8 14.0 11.6 14.8 3.3 19.5 6.3 16.7 22.6 21.1 12.0 15.8 20.8 14.0 27.4 14.4 CABLE FROM S/S TO DISTRIBUTION CABINET QUADRUPLEX 120 MM^2 140 14.9 19.1 14.1 29.7 13.6 23.1 24.9 9.7 33.6 16.9 11.2 23.9 20.2 17.2 20.0 12.5 17.7 26.7 14.1 14.2 7.2 16.3 27.0 26.3 13.2 10.8 27.9 15.8 15.3 28.8 12.9 23.9 26.1 31.5 13.8 13.2 19.2 7.2 30.7 18.1 21.5 20.3 30.7 6.5 22.4 18.3 22.4 9.6 17.8 12.5 19.5 9.8 26.9 11.6 23.3 38.8 25.8 150 15.6 13.5 6.4 33.4 13.0 18.9 15.0 35.8 13.6 31.6 11.3 16.4 23.4 25.5 30.4 19.9 29.9 24.6 19.9 18.0 21.4 21.7 17.6 24.4 17.1 12. 185 P.5 7.6 18.0 13.7 13.1 12.8 28.1 14.5 26.0 27.3 24.6 28.6 2.3 8.9 16.2 8.3 17.9 22.1 29.8 27.1 20.1 14.4 20.5 21.9 10.0 20.2 13.9 14.3 33.6 9.4 37.0 16.5 28.3 15.7 31.5 8.9 12.9 32.7 6.9 7.3 29.2 10.3 12.5 29.9 9.2 17.5 18.6 19.6 35.2 .0 16.7 20.9 16.6 12.1 18.6 27.7 11.9 7.1 21.5 18.3 20.3 31.7 24.6 15.5 32.9 15.1 31.7 16.0 21.3 28.5 21.0 14.7 23.1 19.8 17.9 17.5 7.9 6.6 17.2 22.0 14.3 5.1 28.5 16.3 15.0 25.7 13.8 19.9 28.5 10.1 15.F VOLTAGE 0.8 14.0 35.5 12.9 21.6 28.6 10.4 4.2 13.5 17.2 12.9 30.5 25.5 12.4 10.6 10.5 22.4 15.7 22.

3 4.8 10.0 165.8 5.xls/LV_380V/1 .1 0.9 5.7 4.6 4.2 4.5 4.1 3.3 3.5 1.3 7.9 260.8 0.0 179.6 1.1 0.0 1.3 1.5 5.8 1.1 8.2 2.6 6.3 0.7 0.1 0.3 1.4 0.0 3.0 248.6 10.6 1.9 2.1 3.3 3.8 160 0.4 0.2 0.7 5.2 2.1 2.5 2.6 0.0 6.1 6.6 1.7 7.9 4.7 280.5 1.1 1.9 1.8 0.5 5.4 2.5 2.7 0.8 5.2 6.5 10.0 276.0 41.0 55.6 5.0 152.1 5.9 3.2 0.0 1.2 2.2 8.3 10.8 3.7 0.4 1.0 221.3 0.1 1.0 124.4 6.9 4.9 6.0 360.2 4.4 3.2 220.9 130 0.1 1.7 0.9 3.2 3.2 4.2 10.4 0.5 0.9 7.3 1.3 4.5 1.6 0.8 2.3 0.6 2.6 1.6 VOL_DROP_380V.4 2.2 0.4 0.1 6.3 1.8 40.8 3.4 200.0 69.3 40 0.8 2.1 0.0 0.6 1.5 2.0 7.8 0.4 2.TABLE 1 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH VOLTAGE =380 V CABLE SIZE =300 MM2 AL/XLPE PF= .6 400.7 1.6 0.2 0.1 0.0 7.6 2.6 4.4 3.6 7.6 7.2 5.7 430 0.8 2.4 9.4 0.2 5.1 0.1 3.5 0.0 290.3 5.2 5.3 4.0 10.6 3.3 0.4 420.5 2.6 2.2 6.2 0.8 8.2 6.1 2.6 0.1 4.1 0.6 1.7 6.2 10 0.1 340.3 0.8 4.3 1.6 5.2 310 0.2 2.5 0.3 0.0 5.4 3.0 370 0.6 60.6 3.7 8.3 0.2 0.0 4.0 9.2 5.1 3.9 1.7 7.0 207.7 2.9 5.1 6.9 1.6 6.9 3.4 12.7 2.2 0.9 1.3 6.6 2.3 320.8 1.1 1.6 8.0 96.0 235.0 9.0 2.3 100.1 0.6 3.1 0.3 0.1 3.8 8.0 4.7 DISTANCE (M) 190 220 250 0.5 1.4 1.3 1.0 262.6 0.3 4.5 3.3 7.3 3.1 2.5 2.5 9.5 4.2 11.4 1.5 300.0 240.3 0.3 2.4 1.1 7.5 6.2 0.9 6.2 7.8 11.9 140.3 280 0.2 1.1 2.0 138.1 3.6 0.2 0.9 0.0 100 0.7 0.8 2.9 9.4 3.6 2.6 9.8 3.8 4.0 110.1 0.1 2.7 160.6 180.4 2.2 7.4 0.8 9.1 120.8 8.8 6.0 2.5 80.5 1.0 2.9 0.7 6.1 0.8 8.3 9.4 2.2 5.7 3.7 0.1 0.6 11.0 1.5 1.0 5.0 13.85 K= 9913 LOAD AMP KVA 20.0 2.9 4.4 8.0 27.8 5.5 0.2 0.8 400 0.6 4.3 1.1 1.2 1.9 2.6 3.2 0.4 1.8 380.5 3.8 0.5 5.0 4.2 70 0.5 3.3 3.2 0.9 2.4 1.1 340 0.9 0.8 2.8 3.2 4.8 4.0 0.7 2.0 12.7 2.0 193.3 0.1 1.7 1.1 0.4 7.6 7.0 3.0 0.0 82.1 1.4 0.0 0.5 10.6 7.3 8.0 2.2 0.5 4.4 0.2 2.2 0.2 0.7 5.7 4.

5 4.7 8.5 4.4 4.1 0.6 11.0 110.1 0.5 7.3 5.7 1.7 7.2 0.1 VOL_DROP_380V.8 7.8 9.2 5.2 1.7 9.85 K= 6902 LOAD AMP KVA 20.5 6.2 2.2 6.8 4.2 130 0.2 10 0.6 0.1 0.8 15.6 1.7 3.3 1.6 0.3 9.2 3.8 14.9 7.2 2.2 2.1 5.4 6.8 430 0.8 5.4 0.4 1.9 13.9 3.2 3.8 1.0 138.1 14.9 4.9 0.7 11.3 1.4 9.9 2.0 207.5 6.7 1.9 5.9 2.1 0.2 4.8 13.9 1.4 0.5 5.8 4.4 4.8 380.6 3.6 15.9 100 0.4 3.0 4.1 0.4 3.6 14.7 6.4 0.0 1.5 10.6 10.2 18.8 0.4 1.3 7.3 11.0 96.6 2.4 0.2 0.7 2.0 0.5 10.9 4.0 2.8 0.6 0.3 5.4 8.3 2.4 13.8 3.2 10.6 6.0 8.0 276.0 5.2 7.2 5.0 82.7 0.8 5.5 280 0.0 41.1 3.6 0.0 193.6 1.3 0.4 2.0 262.9 6.0 5.4 40 0.2 0.4 5.5 5.4 5.7 2.6 6.3 0.4 2.6 4.5 7.4 8.3 0.4 4.xls/LV_380V/2 .5 8.6 2.1 2.1 1.0 9.7 0.9 8.5 3.5 16.0 3.1 0.TABLE2 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH VOLTAGE =380 V CABLE SIZE =185 MM2 AL/XLPE PF= .4 3.2 0.8 4.5 1.2 11.6 12.0 1.8 1.5 300.3 0.0 3.9 3.9 260.9 9.4 7.2 6.8 6.5 2.5 1.0 152.7 70 0.7 4.2 4.6 13.8 3.6 3.2 2.6 2.4 0.0 360.4 3.5 3.2 0.5 8.1 1.8 7.4 6.6 400 0.4 200.0 1.6 7.2 11.3 14.0 8.0 124.2 0.4 0.8 40.6 10.0 0.7 7.0 69.2 1.8 2.7 4.6 1.1 120.2 2.4 4.0 1.0 7.0 340 0.8 9.3 1.9 3.0 290.1 3.2 0.6 14.0 221.8 2.4 0.3 100.6 400.7 3.4 8.5 4.2 12.6 60.6 1.5 1.1 340.7 160.9 10.5 10.0 13.2 4.0 9.8 2.6 9.0 0.4 420.2 0.5 1.0 16.9 9.3 1.5 0.9 12.6 2.0 4.0 1.6 0.1 0.8 5.7 6.0 248.3 0.3 0.3 5.4 0.7 0.4 15.8 8.2 0.7 DISTANCE (M) 190 220 250 0.0 2.1 6.0 4.5 3.5 9.8 7.6 3.4 1.0 235.1 6.1 8.1 2.1 12.1 4.4 1.4 17.8 310 0.9 1.3 1.4 11.1 11.2 16.0 3.5 0.1 10.8 12.0 3.0 6.0 240.7 4.5 160 0.3 0.7 1.0 10.2 8.7 280.2 0.2 4.5 10.3 0.5 80.0 0.8 1.3 5.6 8.4 0.9 11.0 5.2 8.2 12.0 12.0 55.8 3.3 320.1 3.5 0.4 1.8 2.8 5.2 6.1 0.6 2.2 220.8 3.0 27.3 1.3 0.8 2.3 2.5 2.0 4.6 1.6 1.6 180.0 179.4 11.9 5.5 1.3 0.1 6.0 2.9 13.0 7.6 6.0 165.3 370 0.2 8.2 6.0 6.3 12.9 140.

TABLE 3 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOLTAGE =380 V CABLE SIZE =120 MM2 AL/XLPE PF= .85 K= 4881 LOAD AMP KVA 10.0 6.9 20.0 13.8 30.0 20.7 40.0 27.6 50.0 34.6 60.0 41.5 70.0 48.4 80.0 55.3 90.0 62.2 100.0 69.1 110.0 76.0 120.0 82.9 130.0 89.8 140.0 96.7 150.0 103.7 160.0 110.6 170.0 117.5 180.0 124.4 190.0 131.3 200.0 138.2 210.0 145.1 10 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 40 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.2 70 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.0 2.1 100 0.1 0.3 0.1 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.4 1.6 1.7 1.8 2.0 2.1 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.7 2.8 3.0 130 0.2 0.4 0.1 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 2.9 3.1 3.3 3.5 3.7 3.9 160 0.2 0.5 0.1 0.9 1.1 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.3 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.2 3.4 3.6 3.9 4.1 4.3 4.5 4.8 DISTANCE (M) 190 220 250 0.3 0.5 0.1 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.9 2.2 2.4 2.7 3.0 3.2 3.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.6 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.6 0.3 0.6 0.2 1.2 1.6 1.9 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.4 4.7 5.0 5.3 5.6 5.9 6.2 6.5 0.4 0.7 0.2 1.4 1.8 2.1 2.5 2.8 3.2 3.5 3.9 4.2 4.6 5.0 5.3 5.7 6.0 6.4 6.7 7.1 7.4 280 0.4 0.8 0.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 3.2 3.6 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.2 5.6 5.9 6.3 6.7 7.1 7.5 7.9 8.3 310 0.4 0.9 0.2 1.8 2.2 2.6 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.3 5.7 6.1 6.6 7.0 7.5 7.9 8.3 8.8 9.2 340 0.5 1.0 0.2 1.9 2.4 2.9 3.4 3.9 4.3 4.8 5.3 5.8 6.3 6.7 7.2 7.7 8.2 8.7 9.1 9.6 10.1 370 0.5 1.0 0.3 2.1 2.6 3.1 3.7 4.2 4.7 5.2 5.8 6.3 6.8 7.3 7.9 8.4 8.9 9.4 10.0 10.5 11.0 400 0.6 1.1 0.3 2.3 2.8 3.4 4.0 4.5 5.1 5.7 6.2 6.8 7.4 7.9 8.5 9.1 9.6 10.2 10.8 11.3 11.9 430 0.6 1.2 0.3 2.4 3.0 3.7 4.3 4.9 5.5 6.1 6.7 7.3 7.9 8.5 9.1 9.7 10.3 11.0 11.6 12.2 12.8

VOL_DROP_380V.xls/LV_380V/3

TABLE 4 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOLTAGE =380 V CABLE SIZE = 70 MM2 AL/XLPE PF= .85 K= 2988 LOAD AMP KVA 10.0 6.9 20.0 13.8 30.0 20.7 40.0 27.6 50.0 34.6 60.0 41.5 70.0 48.4 80.0 55.3 90.0 62.2 100.0 69.1 110.0 76.0 120.0 82.9 130.0 89.8 140.0 96.7 150.0 103.7 160.0 110.6 170.0 117.5 180.0 124.4 190.0 131.3 200.0 138.2 210.0 145.1 10 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 30 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 50 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 70 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.6 1.8 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.4 2.6 2.8 2.9 3.1 3.2 3.4 90 0.2 0.4 0.1 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.1 3.3 3.5 3.7 4.0 4.2 4.4 110 0.3 0.5 0.2 1.0 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.3 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.3 3.6 3.8 4.1 4.3 4.6 4.8 5.1 5.3 DISTANCE (M) 130 150 170 0.3 0.6 0.2 1.2 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0 6.3 0.3 0.7 0.2 1.4 1.7 2.1 2.4 2.8 3.1 3.5 3.8 4.2 4.5 4.9 5.2 5.6 5.9 6.2 6.6 6.9 7.3 0.4 0.8 0.3 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 3.1 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.7 5.1 5.5 5.9 6.3 6.7 7.1 7.5 7.9 8.3 190 0.4 0.9 0.3 1.8 2.2 2.6 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.3 5.7 6.2 6.6 7.0 7.5 7.9 8.3 8.8 9.2 210 0.5 1.0 0.3 1.9 2.4 2.9 3.4 3.9 4.4 4.9 5.3 5.8 6.3 6.8 7.3 7.8 8.3 8.7 9.2 9.7 10.2 230 0.5 1.1 0.4 2.1 2.7 3.2 3.7 4.3 4.8 5.3 5.9 6.4 6.9 7.4 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.6 10.1 10.6 11.2 250 0.6 1.2 0.4 2.3 2.9 3.5 4.0 4.6 5.2 5.8 6.4 6.9 7.5 8.1 8.7 9.3 9.8 10.4 11.0 11.6 12.1 270 0.6 1.2 0.4 2.5 3.1 3.7 4.4 5.0 5.6 6.2 6.9 7.5 8.1 8.7 9.4 10.0 10.6 11.2 11.9 12.5 13.1 290 0.7 1.3 0.5 2.7 3.4 4.0 4.7 5.4 6.0 6.7 7.4 8.0 8.7 9.4 10.1 10.7 11.4 12.1 12.7 13.4 14.1

VOL_DROP_380V.xls/LV_380V/4

TABLE 5 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH
VOLTAGE =380 V CABLE SIZE = 50 MM2 AL/XLPE PF= .85 K= 2118 LOAD AMP KVA 10.0 6.9 20.0 13.8 30.0 20.7 40.0 27.6 50.0 34.6 60.0 41.5 70.0 48.4 80.0 55.3 90.0 62.2 100.0 69.1 110.0 76.0 120.0 82.9 130.0 89.8 140.0 96.7 150.0 103.7 160.0 110.6 170.0 117.5 180.0 124.4 190.0 131.3 200.0 138.2 210.0 145.1 10 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 30 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.0 2.1 50 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.1 2.3 2.4 2.6 2.8 2.9 3.1 3.3 3.4 70 0.2 0.5 0.2 0.9 1.1 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.3 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.2 3.4 3.7 3.9 4.1 4.3 4.6 4.8 90 0.3 0.6 0.2 1.2 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.3 2.6 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.7 5.0 5.3 5.6 5.9 6.2 110 0.4 0.7 0.2 1.4 1.8 2.2 2.5 2.9 3.2 3.6 3.9 4.3 4.7 5.0 5.4 5.7 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.2 7.5 DISTANCE (M) 130 150 170 0.4 0.8 0.3 1.7 2.1 2.5 3.0 3.4 3.8 4.2 4.7 5.1 5.5 5.9 6.4 6.8 7.2 7.6 8.1 8.5 8.9 0.5 1.0 0.3 2.0 2.4 2.9 3.4 3.9 4.4 4.9 5.4 5.9 6.4 6.9 7.3 7.8 8.3 8.8 9.3 9.8 10.3 0.6 1.1 0.4 2.2 2.8 3.3 3.9 4.4 5.0 5.5 6.1 6.7 7.2 7.8 8.3 8.9 9.4 10.0 10.5 11.1 11.6 190 0.6 1.2 0.4 2.5 3.1 3.7 4.3 5.0 5.6 6.2 6.8 7.4 8.1 8.7 9.3 9.9 10.5 11.2 11.8 12.4 13.0 210 0.7 1.4 0.5 2.7 3.4 4.1 4.8 5.5 6.2 6.9 7.5 8.2 8.9 9.6 10.3 11.0 11.6 12.3 13.0 13.7 14.4 230 0.8 1.5 0.5 3.0 3.8 4.5 5.3 6.0 6.8 7.5 8.3 9.0 9.8 10.5 11.3 12.0 12.8 13.5 14.3 15.0 15.8 250 0.8 1.6 0.6 3.3 4.1 4.9 5.7 6.5 7.3 8.2 9.0 9.8 10.6 11.4 12.2 13.1 13.9 14.7 15.5 16.3 17.1 270 0.9 1.8 0.6 3.5 4.4 5.3 6.2 7.0 7.9 8.8 9.7 10.6 11.5 12.3 13.2 14.1 15.0 15.9 16.7 17.6 18.5 290 0.9 1.9 0.7 3.8 4.7 5.7 6.6 7.6 8.5 9.5 10.4 11.4 12.3 13.2 14.2 15.1 16.1 17.0 18.0 18.9 19.9

VOL_DROP_380V.xls/LV_380V/5

9 90 0.4 0.5 110 0.2 0.2 0.4 190.3 2.1 2.9 3.0 120.6 0.7 160.3 250 0.9 5.7 2.0 0.5 2.1 1.3 3.9 20.9 3.1 1.9 2.5 4.9 3.3 0.5 0.2 1.4 6.0 0.5 0.0 1.0 1.2 5.9 4.0 2.0 27.0 6.2 1.0 2.8 7.9 3.2 0.7 3.7 0.0 6.2 4.3 0.4 4.4 4.7 0.1 10 0.7 0.5 5.0 2.2 0.5 1.0 6.9 4.8 5.5 4.5 5.2 4.3 2.4 0.4 3.2 0.1 1.5 1.0 117.2 0.2 0.5 1.3 1.8 2.3 6.1 4.2 0.7 3.5 2.4 0.3 30 0.6 0.1 0.8 2.0 103.0 110.1 1.0 13.7 2.0 2.2 2.3 3.6 0.TABLE 6 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH VOLTAGE =380 V CABLE SIZE = QUADRUPLEX 120 MM2 XLPE PF= .6 2.7 3.2 210.2 3.8 0.1 1.6 1.7 0.2 0.2 1.2 1.2 1.4 1.6 4.6 6.3 0.0 0.2 2.3 3.6 3.1 0.8 270 0.9 2.3 0.4 0.0 3.0 138.2 0.5 3.9 1.1 0.4 2.2 7.2 2.5 3.0 1.4 2.6 0.6 2.0 96.3 3.8 4.1 0.2 3.1 0.8 30.0 1.3 3.0 145.7 1.4 1.1 3.1 0.2 0.9 5.0 2.0 1.6 3.3 2.1 0.9 4.2 0.6 1.3 1.7 40.5 1.8 1.3 0.2 210 0.7 0.3 200.9 5.2 1.0 2.3 1.4 2.2 6.4 5.2 1.0 2.7 0.9 6.xls/LV_380V/6 .2 1.0 131.3 1.0 41.0 4.8 1.7 0.3 0.0 69.1 2.2 3.7 2.1 0.1 0.0 1.1 2.6 0.2 4.5 0.9 3.7 1.85 K= 5314 LOAD AMP KVA 10.9 2.6 190 0.2 4.5 70.0 1.4 0.2 0.0 3.7 4.2 2.4 1.1 0.1 2.8 4.2 0.6 0.1 0.5 1.0 55.7 150.2 5.7 2.7 0.1 0.2 1.8 0.6 60.2 1.9 1.4 70 0.0 3.4 4.7 0.1 1.7 6.1 110.7 230 0.5 0.7 3.6 1.8 3.5 2.6 2.2 0.5 2.1 0.5 3.1 0.7 7.9 1.8 1.4 3.6 3.6 0.4 290 0.4 0.9 VOL_DROP_380V.0 6.5 0.7 6.0 20.4 80.1 0.3 1.8 2.0 124.8 0.1 5.1 2.6 3.3 0.6 50.8 2.5 0.3 2.2 4.6 4.9 2.2 1.5 7.0 62.8 0.9 5.5 0.7 0.4 0.9 2.3 0.8 0.3 1.4 0.5 0.5 0.3 5.5 6.3 5.5 0.1 0.7 2.4 2.1 0.8 0.8 4.0 48.0 82.9 4.9 1.5 1.6 1.4 1.2 0.3 1.6 170.9 1.0 DISTANCE (M) 130 150 170 0.6 0.1 0.0 89.8 1.4 1.5 1.2 0.9 5.0 0.1 0.9 130.1 0.6 4.4 1.0 76.0 3.1 3.5 180.1 4.5 1.7 1.2 0.5 2.0 3.7 4.7 0.2 1.4 0.6 1.0 34.1 0.2 0.2 2.8 50 0.8 140.5 3.3 0.4 1.2 1.0 7.0 4.3 0.2 100.3 2.3 90.

2 3.2 100.8 15.8 17.5 5.9 1.8 4.6 4.0 1.5 0.2 5.8 4.3 6.0 8.3 4.0 7.0 27.2 70 0.6 6.2 1.9 5.1 9.0 41.8 1.3 0.4 4.0 2.1 7.0 13.0 5.0 4.5 12.3 9.7 1.9 50 0.8 1.0 13.9 10.0 145.7 7.9 2.4 4.6 2.1 2.6 1.3 0.1 4.6 170.3 1.9 11.5 70.3 2.9 190 0.2 12.5 0.1 2.7 5.6 12.0 89.8 4.3 2.0 96.2 210.3 3.8 140.2 0.1 1.3 1.2 10.7 9.9 6.6 0.xls/LV_380V/7 .0 103.5 4.1 0.8 6.5 0.8 110 0.6 0.8 1.9 5.7 14.2 13.3 1.7 11.6 2.1 10 0.0 2.0 110.5 0.0 9.2 0.5 12.1 3.4 2.5 7.4 11.6 50.2 0.6 60.0 DISTANCE (M) 130 150 170 0.5 0.TABLE 7 VOLTAGE DROP CALCULATION FOR THE VARIATION OF THE LOAD AGAINST VARIATION OF THE LENGTH VOLTAGE =380 V CABLE SIZE = QUADRUPLEX 50 MM2 XLPE PF= .4 2.9 2.4 0.3 14.5 11.4 1.4 0.0 3.5 4.0 3.5 5.6 3.8 6.5 0.0 15.2 0.2 0.6 13.2 6.8 8.6 0.7 11.5 12.8 30.2 4.7 7.7 150.4 1.6 11.7 3.2 11.6 3.0 62.4 9.0 11.8 3.3 2.6 7.2 0.8 0.4 0.3 90.0 138.8 0.6 1.6 1.1 8.0 6.2 210 0.1 0.2 2.4 1.5 2.7 2.5 0.8 9.2 0.0 4.3 290 0.4 190.9 1.9 1.4 0.3 0.4 2.1 0.9 7.5 8.3 200.3 6.0 131.9 20.5 1.1 9.3 9.6 3.6 2.8 10.1 2.2 1.7 9.8 3.2 1.4 7.5 15.5 180.4 2.0 120.85 K= 2266 LOAD AMP KVA 10.0 55.3 0.4 3.8 9.0 82.7 10.2 7.1 1.1 4.1 0.7 4.5 0.8 6.4 0.0 6.2 14.6 5.4 230 0.1 4.0 48.5 0.4 8.0 3.8 0.1 1.7 2.6 30 0.2 1.5 2.6 3.0 69.9 3.4 80.9 12.1 4.7 250 0.6 5.4 2.0 20.7 5.9 1.3 1.3 0.2 9.7 0.2 16.6 4.2 15.3 9.7 1.9 6.3 1.5 17.4 5.0 0.2 8.9 10.4 9.8 8.7 0.7 4.9 10.0 0.9 10.8 13.9 130.6 VOL_DROP_380V.7 18.9 5.3 2.3 0.5 4.9 8.8 4.6 3.9 0.1 1.4 5.9 3.4 12.6 8.3 7.1 4.2 5.6 0.7 160.4 7.0 34.3 7.3 0.7 1.1 9.5 90 0.0 7.4 0.6 16.3 8.8 2.4 3.0 3.6 0.9 7.7 4.5 1.3 2.2 5.0 14.2 3.6 3.7 6.7 40.0 5.4 6.6 1.0 117.5 3.0 2.3 14.4 4.4 13.6 10.3 7.3 0.1 0.1 110.0 14.2 0.0 76.5 1.1 5.3 6.0 3.8 3.4 0.8 5.8 2.6 0.7 7.7 6.7 8.2 3.0 270 0.7 8.5 5.0 124.5 1.3 4.7 3.5 0.8 0.6 5.2 3.1 4.1 6.0 7.4 10.9 16.4 6.1 8.6 1.7 1.7 3.6 5.3 0.1 9.4 13.2 5.

4 5.6 30 0.8 4.4 8.5 5.2 3.4 7.3 5.3 4.4 1.1 4.2 4.0 5.5 5.0 6.9 7.8 5.1 7.9 7.7 2.F VOLTAGE 0.6 6.1 8.2 4.5 5.0 9.5 6.85 380 V 310 230 CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 185 MM^2) 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 1.9 4.9 3.8 2.5 9.6 4.8 4.5 8.1 3.6 6.5 3.6 3.5 6.0 5.2 6.4 4.6 5.0 4.7 0.9 3.4 7.3 4.2 6.6 4.1 1.0 4.1 4.0 8.0 2.2 2.1 6.5 3.0 CABLE FROM S/S TO DISTRIBUTION CABINET 300 MM^2 .7 6.5 2.3 4.5 4.3 4.6 4.3 7.9 8.2 8.6 3.7 8.1 3.9 7.7 5.4 0.4 3.7 2.3 2.0 7.7 7.9 8.8 2.9 6.3 8.5 5.9 4.3 7.1 4.8 5.8 2.4 7.1 6.0 4.4 4.6 1.9 4.6 3.9 1.4 6.4 3.0 5.7 2.7 6.8 4.3 3.7 2.1 2.3 2.1 4.5 2.9 7.6 2.4 140 3.2 9.5 3.7 9.7 3.7 6.7 3.6 7.6 1.0 7.2 2.0 2.1 8.4 5.2 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 10 0.6 6.7 4.6 1.2 3.2 5.1 6.4 4.8 8.6 4.4 2.0 3.9 5.2 6.3 1.5 4.8 7.8 2.3 5.0 9.0 5.0 7.2 4.8 8.5 7.0 6.5 7.2 3.6 4.3 3.0 2.1 1.4 3.5 6.7 7.3 9.8 2.0 3.4 1.2 2.9 1.3 8.1 3.2 2.9 4.7 5.8 5.5 4.7 4.0 2.9 4.7 0.4 6.7 3.4 2.0 2.3 5.2 3.2 6.7 3.0 4.8 6.7 10.9 6.8 7.3 20 0.1 5.3 2.0 1.1 4.6 4. 300 mm2 2 185 mm P.9 3.6 7.2 7.5 7.0 7.0 3.1 2.3 3.5 4.8 6.8 6.8 7.0 2.9 6.7 5.0 6.0 6.3 4.6 4.7 6.5 6.2 8.1 7.6 2.5 3.TABLE 8 VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP.5 2.7 5.2 2.7 3.8 2.8 6.1 8.3 6.8 5.8 5.3 4.4 5.3 4.1 8.1 5.3 7.7 4.3 3.3 1.6 8.0 3.7 3.3 1.8 2.7 6.4 4.4 6.5 6.6 6.4 7.0 5.9 4.9 7.3 5.7 6.7 3.8 8.5 5.7 4.1 5.9 5.7 4.2 5.4 8.9 1.5 2.2 3.4 4.6 3.6 1.0 6.2 6.2 8.6 5.1 7.5 2.6 7.9 8.4 6.2 4.4 5.3 5.9 7.9 8.4 3.7 5.9 3.4 7.8 5.2 5.1 5.7 150 3.8 4.7 3.7 8.9 6.7 5.8 2.9 6.6 4.1 4.4 2.1 4.4 7.3 6.2 3.4 6.4 4.2 5.0 6.2 1.5 8.4 6.9 5.0 8.7 5.7 2.8 7.6 3.0 5.4 5.5 7.2 7.9 4.3 2.1 4.5 6.1 5.5 9.2 5.0 6.6 5.0 5. RATED CURRENT FOR 185 mm2 IN AMP.8 3.0 4.4 6.1 7.2 6.8 4.1 5.3 5.4 3.4 4.2 5.6 7.1 3.5 2.6 3.5 2.1 3.3 6.7 8.9 4.1 4.1 3.0 3.5 1.5 5.5 5.7 6.0 4.3 5.8 9.4 3.8 6.6 6.2 6.1 6.1 7.8 130 3.6 2.3 6.0 9.9 3.8 5.4 4.2 7.7 9.9 5.8 5.9 6.3 3.2 7.8 5.2 3.2 9.8 3.1 6.1 1.9 9.6 3.1 6.6 5.7 6.1 7.8 3.2 6.5 5.1 5.1 2.9 3.8 3.5 3.4 1.6 1.4 2.5 5.8 9.7 6.7 7.5 4.9 6.8 6.3 8.9 5.1 1.5 8.9 7.4 3.5 3.

3 8.3 9.0 5.3 6.5 2.9 3.4 3.1 5.3 7.3 140 4.9 9.5 2.7 2.4 5.6 4.0 3.1 10.4 7.9 5.0 6.7 6.8 10.1 6.9 3.0 2.1 7.4 8.8 5.4 5.2 5.8 4.3 5.9 7.3 3.7 4.5 5.7 8.1 9.7 4.2 6.7 5.7 8.7 5.1 4.8 3.6 6.8 4.0 5.0 3.8 5.6 6.6 7.6 6.4 3.5 4.8 7.8 2.6 7.0 5.8 8.4 2.3 1.7 1.8 5.TABLE 9 VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP.7 6.7 7.9 4.0 5.5 9.9 6.9 8.7 3.1 3.4 9.4 5.8 6.3 2.0 6.5 3.2 9. 300 mm2 2 120 mm P.0 7.0 6.9 7.7 10.7 5.3 8.3 8.3 8.5 8.8 3.6 150 4.0 3.1 5.3 4.6 6.2 5.5 1.6 6.0 8.4 7.5 7.4 9.3 2.4 7.4 4.2 6.4 8.9 5.7 3.0 8.6 2.8 5.2 2.5 7.7 7.0 1.7 11.4 6.8 3.2 3.9 7.8 7.0 5.9 4.5 4.5 8.1 4.1 7.9 2.0 CABLE FROM S/S TO DISTRIBUTION CABINET 300 MM^2 .3 6.3 6.1 3.8 3.4 6.4 5.0 4.6 4.2 6.5 6.0 10.2 9.5 7.4 6.0 4.6 5.8 7.8 4.4 5.9 5.6 3.8 9.7 1.1 5.2 7.85 380 V 310 204 CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 120 MM^2) 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 1.2 7.2 4.6 2.3 3.8 8.5 4.1 6.0 5.2 2.9 2.9 4.6 4.2 8.2 2.3 4.5 5.6 1.0 7.0 3.7 6.1 9.6 7.7 5.5 2.1 7.4 6.7 30 1.2 1.2 4.6 9.0 6.7 5.4 4.4 1.2 7.0 7.9 2.1 3.7 5.1 2.1 6.0 8.9 6.3 5.8 3.2 2.5 1.9 1.5 2.1 8.2 5.5 3.6 9.3 4.0 4.3 5.0 9.7 3.7 9.9 1.8 7.5 6.0 9.4 20 0.6 1.6 7.7 9.1 8.9 8.6 3.1 5.3 6.4 1.6 5.3 6.2 4.9 7.6 3.9 10.3 4.8 9.6 4.3 5.6 5.3 4.7 5.2 2.5 6.2 8.8 6.2 8.6 5.8 7.9 6.8 5.4 3.5 7.1 9.5 4.4 4.4 2.6 6.5 4.7 8.1 7.0 4.9 3.7 9.1 2.5 5.1 3.3 7.0 5.9 5.3 7.0 4.5 0.7 8.1 6.4 4.9 4.2 6.0 6.8 10.9 4.8 8.6 3.2 4.5 2.4 7.8 6.1 3.5 5.5 5.3 3.1 4.5 6.1 7.5 2.5 6.1 3.8 4.2 4.4 6.0 6.9 4.8 6.8 3.1 1.7 9.8 2.9 6.2 5.8 5.0 7.8 1.2 5.6 7.6 5.5 3.2 2.6 6.0 2.1 5.3 3.2 5.4 5.0 4.3 5.8 3.9 6.3 4.6 3.8 6.2 3.9 5.3 5.5 2.3 3.2 7.5 10.7 4.8 7.2 10.2 10.7 0.4 10.2 1.6 8.4 5.1 8.6 3.6 5.3 3.1 3.2 6.3 8.0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 10 0.9 6.9 7.3 6.6 5.9 9.2 4.4 8.6 5.9 6.9 8.7 4.7 7.3 7.7 4.2 6.1 5.4 9.0 9.5 4.2 4.8 8.6 6.3 4.3 7.F VOLTAGE 0.7 7.4 3.5 8.9 2.7 8.3 4.0 5.4 5.0 8.5 7.3 9.0 4.4 3.7 6.3 6.7 2.6 4.2 6.2 3.9 6.0 2.3 3.3 6.9 5.7 4.6 4. RATED CURRENT FOR 120 mm2 IN AMP.7 5.5 4.9 7.0 130 4.6 4.7 1.9 6.6 3.8 8.4 2.0 8.1 2.2 7.1 4.7 6.4 3.2 6.

2 8.0 4.6 5.5 1.3 1.7 10.0 8.4 5.3 2.4 3.4 7.2 7.6 6.0 3.5 3.7 3.7 6.3 6.9 4.3 6.0 7.1 11.7 4.2 6.6 9.8 5.6 6.8 3.9 7.2 8.9 5.6 7.0 1.2 6.5 4.8 6.5 8.1 5.9 10.6 6.0 4.4 4.5 9.5 6.1 5.1 4.3 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 10 0.2 10.2 3.6 7.8 10.4 6.9 7.0 2.9 9.7 1.4 1.1 6.4 4.9 8.7 7.2 6.3 3.2 1.5 4.1 7.1 5.1 8.8 8.1 3.2 4.4 10.7 5.4 2.1 10.3 8.0 3.5 4.0 3.9 6.3 3.8 1.9 9.2 10.7 6.3 7.8 7.0 4.7 140 4.0 5.7 7.9 3.5 7.9 6.7 4.8 6.7 6.5 5.3 4.8 5.9 10.8 2.7 4.5 5.6 1.0 6.9 3.5 6.1 3.9 6.1 6.8 2.8 9.0 6.4 8.4 20 0.6 6.0 6.1 130 4.6 3.0 5.9 5.4 5.1 6.7 9.1 8.5 2.2 5.85 380 V 310 135 CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 70 MM^2) 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 1.6 6.9 4.4 6.8 3.5 5.1 7.1 4.2 3.2 5.7 2.0 9.9 2.6 8.7 7.2 6.6 8.7 8.6 2.6 4.6 3.5 5.5 6.6 6.0 3.3 7.3 2.4 5.9 7.5 0.2 7.8 4.6 3.7 5.4 3.0 6.5 3.0 2.4 4.5 6.7 6.4 8.6 3.1 7.5 4.2 4.8 3.5 5.4 2.5 7.0 8.1 4.0 5.8 7.8 6.8 11.5 4.4 5.6 7.4 CABLE FROM S/S TO DISTRIBUTION CABINET 300 MM^2 .5 5.0 6.8 7.4 7.7 6.8 4.8 2.1 6.1 9.9 7.7 6.6 7.7 2.7 8.1 8.4 4.4 3.5 8.5 5.9 10.1 9.2 5.7 5.5 6.3 6.4 5.3 4.1 2.6 1.4 3.5 2.0 7.5 3.9 7.2 4.4 2.5 10.0 4.3 9.4 10.3 6.4 5.9 5.5 4.F VOLTAGE 0.7 9.7 5.0 6.2 4.8 5.3 6.1 2.9 6.2 5.2 2.8 5.7 9.5 5.6 9.7 2.2 7.7 1.1 7.5 2.6 5.9 5.2 9.2 8.2 9.1 6.TABLE 10 VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP.2 1.3 5.4 6.8 2.9 8.8 6.5 3.1 3.3 8.8 4.4 1.9 4.2 5.6 8.4 6.1 7.3 3.5 9.3 8.0 5.0 1.7 3.4 7.7 6.1 6.9 4.9 2.2 2.2 5.1 4.9 4.0 8.7 4.1 5.6 10.5 8.1 1.5 8.0 5.6 3.9 7.8 7.1 5.0 8.9 6.7 8.3 3.2 9. RATED CURRENT FOR 50 mm2 IN AMP.1 2.4 7.2 9.0 4.3 2.5 7.5 7.0 9.3 5.9 5.0 5.8 8.8 8.4 9.0 7.7 5.2 7.9 5.8 9.0 3.8 5.1 5.6 3.9 11.3 7.1 6.4 3.7 4.3 8.1 5.6 2.2 8.4 6.3 6.8 8.2 4.8 30 1.8 6.8 7.3 5.2 5.7 2.1 5.9 8.0 9.7 7.5 1.4 8.9 6.1 2.6 4.5 6.9 4.6 5.8 4.3 10.0 4.4 5.2 1.0 7.5 8.8 4.3 7.1 4.8 6.4 6.6 3.9 3.7 7.8 5.6 4.1 3.3 4.7 9.8 7.1 8.3 2.0 150 4.6 5.8 8.8 9.5 4.2 4.3 4.3 3.3 5.8 6.5 7.3 7.2 3.8 3.4 4.7 7.4 7. 300 mm2 2 70 mm P.4 9.7 5.2 6.7 9.8 5.9 6.9 3.1 3.4 3.6 5.2 4.9 9.7 4.1 7.8 4.6 4.0 6.6 3.5 2.9 5.3 3.0 9.

6 5.3 11.6 10.9 8.6 9.3 4.0 8.9 9.6 7.7 12.4 5.5 6.3 4.9 6.5 11.4 3.7 1.7 5.8 3.3 9.4 8.3 8.4 6.0 7.0 4.8 6. 300 mm2 2 50 mm P.0 10.2 7.9 8.7 7.7 8.0 5.0 9.3 2.5 9.7 7.9 7.9 3.0 12.9 2.2 9.7 10.3 6.7 6.8 9.6 7.1 4.3 6.3 8.4 130 5.8 8.0 9.8 7.6 11.2 4.4 7.0 5.7 3.1 4.6 2.9 5.8 11.7 7.5 5.1 3.9 4.2 8.2 5.7 4.8 4.9 4.7 6.1 5.0 7.7 5.3 6.9 8.8 12.9 4.2 5.3 4.1 4.8 4.0 10. RATED CURRENT FOR 50 mm2 IN AMP.6 7.3 6.4 5.5 2.7 7.1 5.9 6.2 3.0 3.8 11.5 7.9 4.7 8.8 7.3 6.5 4.1 6.4 7.6 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 10 0.0 7.6 6.5 6.5 7.0 7.1 6.9 10.3 9.1 8.1 3.6 7.1 7.7 3.0 6.7 11.0 6.9 8.5 9.7 8.5 3.6 8.8 11.2 7.5 9.9 2.1 8.1 11.5 5.7 5.5 4.8 3.4 7.4 8.7 10.3 7.5 4.9 8.0 3.3 11.4 3.9 7.3 9.5 7.3 12.2 7.3 4.0 5.8 7.3 6.0 5.8 5.0 5.9 5.1 5.9 9.8 10.9 8.1 8.9 5.9 6.6 6.5 5.3 6.8 5.8 7.1 8.6 2.8 6.7 10.5 2.1 8.7 3.0 7.2 5.1 8.0 9.2 5.0 CABLE FROM S/S TO DISTRIBUTION CABINET 300 MM^2 .3 3.4 10.3 8.4 9.8 9.8 8.4 6.1 2.8 9.8 7.0 9.7 10.7 8.2 6.4 6.9 4.8 2.4 8.4 10.2 7.5 7.3 6.4 1.8 4.7 3.2 5.5 1.7 5.9 8.7 3.1 6.3 5.8 9.7 7.5 4.3 4.6 2.4 3.8 7.6 9.1 11.1 9.1 9.3 11.5 6.1 8.3 9.6 8.6 3.8 5.6 7.1 6.0 4.5 7.1 10.0 11.5 10.6 9.TABLE 11 VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER RATED CURRENT FOR 300 mm2 IN AMP.2 3.3 4.2 5.2 5.9 6.8 3.8 5.4 2.1 3.6 9.9 8.8 3.5 3.5 10.6 6.2 7.9 3.5 150 6.5 5.5 9.4 5.2 7.6 9.5 6.3 6.F VOLTAGE 0.0 11.6 4.0 3.2 5.5 10.7 6.2 6.9 6.3 9.3 4.3 4.8 7.6 0.1 1.3 8.4 2.8 5.0 5.1 8.0 10.9 4.5 11.6 4.4 6.4 6.0 1.6 6.4 5.0 6.0 7.2 10.1 6.4 5.7 9.8 9.7 8.4 7.3 1.7 5.4 7.6 5.5 7.7 6.7 3.1 4.4 7.2 3.2 5.1 7.5 1.8 6.6 2.6 6.4 3.2 4.1 4.4 7.3 10.4 8.1 140 6.0 5.4 6.9 6.0 6.1 2.9 11.7 1.0 7.0 12.9 10.9 2.8 12.3 9.6 8.5 20 1.7 13.8 4.1 6.3 2.1 7.2 7.3 5.8 5.1 6.2 10.8 7.6 4.7 3.3 10.6 10.1 4.0 3.5 3.8 7.1 2.6 8.5 4.2 5.1 9.8 6.5 4.5 6.7 5.1 6.4 10.4 5.7 6.6 9.4 5.1 10.2 10.0 3.7 8.3 1.8 8.0 30 1.2 2.6 6.6 8.2 3.3 4.0 9.5 7.5 5.2 12.1 6.2 7.8 1.0 3.6 5.0 6.8 10.2 7.5 3.9 6.3 2.9 7.4 8.4 2.85 380 V 310 125 CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( 50 MM^2) 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 1.5 8.3 3.1 7.2 6.5 12.4 5.9 2.7 11.5 4.0 4.2 7.4 4.4 8.1 2.8 9.7 1.9 5.

TABLE 12

VOLTAGE DROP ALLOCATION (%) FOR LOW VOLTAGE NETWORK
CABLE SIZE FROM S/S TO D/C QUADRUPLEX 120 mm2 CABLE SIZE FROM D/C TO CUSTOMER QUADRUPLEX 50 mm2 RATED CURRENT FOR QUAD 120 mm2 IN AMP 270 RATED CURRENT FOR QUAD 50 mm2 IN AMP. 185 P.F VOLTAGE 0.85 380 V

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280

10 0.9 1.3 1.6 2.0 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.4 3.8 4.1 4.5 4.8 5.2 5.5 5.9 6.3 6.6 7.0 7.3 7.7 8.0 8.4 8.7 9.1 9.5 9.8 10.2 10.5

20 1.5 1.8 2.2 2.6 2.9 3.3 3.6 4.0 4.4 4.7 5.1 5.4 5.8 6.2 6.5 6.9 7.2 7.6 8.0 8.3 8.7 9.1 9.4 9.8 10.1 10.5 10.9 11.2

CABLE FROM DISTRIBUTION CABINET TO CUSTOMER (M) ( QUADRUPLEX 50 MM^2) 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 2.1 2.6 3.2 3.8 4.3 4.9 5.5 6.0 6.6 7.2 7.7 2.4 3.0 3.6 4.1 4.7 5.3 5.9 6.4 7.0 7.6 8.1 2.8 3.4 3.9 4.5 5.1 5.7 6.2 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.5 3.1 3.7 4.3 4.9 5.5 6.0 6.6 7.2 7.8 8.4 8.9 3.4 4.0 4.6 5.1 5.7 6.3 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.5 9.1 3.9 4.5 5.1 5.6 6.2 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.8 4.2 4.8 5.4 6.0 6.6 7.2 7.8 8.4 9.0 9.6 10.2 4.6 5.2 5.8 6.4 7.0 7.6 8.2 8.8 9.4 10.0 10.6 5.0 5.6 6.2 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.8 10.4 11.0 5.3 5.9 6.5 7.1 7.8 8.4 9.0 9.6 10.2 10.8 11.4 5.7 6.3 6.9 7.5 8.1 8.7 9.4 10.0 10.6 11.2 11.8 6.1 6.7 7.3 7.9 8.5 9.1 9.7 10.4 11.0 11.6 12.2 6.4 7.0 7.7 8.3 8.9 9.5 10.1 10.8 11.4 12.0 12.6 6.8 7.4 8.0 8.7 9.3 9.9 10.5 11.2 11.8 12.4 13.0 7.2 7.8 8.4 9.0 9.7 10.3 10.9 11.6 12.2 12.8 13.4 7.5 8.2 8.8 9.4 10.1 10.7 11.3 12.0 12.6 13.2 13.9 7.9 8.5 9.2 9.8 10.4 11.1 11.7 12.4 13.0 13.6 14.3 8.2 8.9 9.5 10.2 10.8 11.5 12.1 12.7 13.4 14.0 14.7 8.6 9.3 9.9 10.6 11.2 11.9 12.5 13.1 13.8 14.4 15.1 9.0 9.6 10.3 10.9 11.6 12.2 12.9 13.5 14.2 14.9 15.5 5.8 10.0 10.7 11.3 12.0 12.6 13.3 14.0 14.6 15.3 15.9 9.7 10.4 11.0 11.7 12.4 13.0 13.7 14.4 15.0 15.7 16.3 10.1 10.7 11.4 12.1 12.8 13.4 14.1 14.8 15.4 16.1 16.8 10.4 11.1 11.8 12.5 13.1 13.8 14.5 15.2 15.8 16.5 17.2 10.8 11.5 12.2 12.8 13.5 14.2 14.9 15.6 16.2 16.9 17.6 11.2 11.9 12.5 13.2 13.9 14.6 15.3 16.0 16.6 17.3 18.0 11.5 12.2 12.9 13.6 14.3 15.0 15.7 16.4 17.1 17.7 18.4 11.9 12.6 13.3 14.0 14.7 15.4 16.1 16.8 17.5 18.2 18.9

CABLE FROM S/S TO DISTRIBUTION CABINET QUADRUPLEX 120 MM^2

140 8.3 8.7 9.1 9.5 9.7 10.3 10.8 11.2 11.6 12.0 12.4 12.8 13.2 13.7 14.1 14.5 14.9 15.3 15.7 16.2 16.6 17.0 17.4 17.8 18.3 18.7 19.1 19.5

150 8.9 9.3 9.7 10.1 10.2 10.9 11.4 11.8 12.2 12.6 13.0 13.4 13.9 14.3 14.7 15.1 15.5 16.0 16.4 16.8 17.2 17.7 18.1 18.5 18.9 19.4 19.8 20.2

APPENDIX D

TABLE : 1 NUMBER & LOCATION OF LINE RECLOSERS REQUIRED
EM# 1 2 3 FEEDER’S TOTAL DISTANCE IN KMS >30 kms and up to 60 kms >60 kms and up to 90 kms >90 kms and up to 120 kms NUMBER OF LINE RECLOSERS REQUIRED 1 2 3 INSTALL LINE RECLOSERS AT A DISTANCE OF ABOUT “half-way” between the source & the farthest point on the line “1/3rd.” & “2/3rd.” respectively from the source point. “1/4th.” , “1/21f” & “3/4th” respectively from the source point.

NOTES: 1) It is assumed that the plan to install auto-reclosing facility at ht source point on all overhead feeders would be completed as scheduled. 2) Overhead feeders = <30 kms would not require any line recloser, as the autoreclosing facility installed at the source point on such feeders would be enough. 3) The above procedure is intended as a general guideline, while a good engineering judgment would be required to “pin-point” the actual location with in an identified section in the field.

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2 3.06 (April 2004) Distribution Planning Standards Multi Source Two Voltage Or One Voltage Supplies.1 2.2 Two Voltage Supplies Multi Source Supplies 3 Minimum Requirements 3.3 Multi Source Two Voltage LV Supplies Multi Source One Voltage LV Supplies Multi Source MV Supplies ATTACHMENT • Undertaking From Customers (1 sheet) Page 3 of 6 .1 3.Saudi Electricity Company ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬـﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS . Including More Than One MVA TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 2 Introduction Justification 2.

present over current protection in customer breakers without any additional protection such as reverse power relay is considered sufficient for handling faults under such paralleling of feeders. Connection charges for such supplies shall continue to be as per Customer Services Manual. Therefore. Including More Than One MVA 1. However. customer is given supplies from multi sources (more than one transformer) at single LV voltage. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS 3. 380/220V. • • • 2. Supplies from multi sources are given at LV by more than one transformer or at 11kV or 13.Saudi Electricity Company ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬـﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS .1. Two-point supply shall continue to be as per Customer Services Manual.1 Multi Source Two Voltage LV Supplies 3.06 (April 2004) Distribution Planning Standards Multi Source Two Voltage Or One Voltage Supplies. Customer breaker (LV or MV) will also clear internal faults. With the approval of LV connections up to 16 MVA.8 kV or 33 kV or 34. INTRODUCTION • This Standard shall be considered as guidelines for the minimum requirements in case of supplying the customers with Multi source two voltage or one voltage supplies at single point including more than one MVA for making them safe and reliable. municipality. there is demand for taking supplies at two LV voltages.2 Multi Source Supplies For such supplies. printing press. 480/277V (480/277V is applicable only for areas where 480/277V already exists). etc. 2.1 Two Voltage Supplies Such supplies are allowed as per NEC and already exist in KSA with commercial customers like hospitals. Page 4 of 6 .1 One MVA and Above Such supplies from more than one LV/MV transformer can be extended under the following conditions: a) LV supply voltages shall be at any two voltages: 220/127V. fault on any SEC feeder outside customer premises will be fed from all sources. if customer connects these sources internally thru his network. 3. JUSTIFICATION 2.5kV thru more than one feeder. However. this fault will be cleared safely as given below: • Customer breaker (LV or MV) will isolate fault • SEC breaker connected to faulty feeder will trip.

Separate insets or rooms shall be used for each secondary voltage of transformer/package unit/unit substation. 34. 13. 33kV. SEC shall provide back .1. e) Undertaking from Customers Customer shall sign an undertaking for his responsibility for the following (see attached undertaking): • • • • • Separate conduits shall be used for cables/wiring of each voltage supplies.2 Below one MVA Two voltage supplies below one MVA shall not be extended: • • These customers are small and do not have sufficient know-how for handling such supplies safely. Changeover switches shall be used for all standby supplies. as they involve two or more services. SEC transformers shall not be run in parallel. c) Substations • • Dedicated transformers/package units/unit substations in insets or rooms along with switchgear as applicable shall be used. Customers shall be fully responsible for all consequences resulting in from such paralleling of transformers and using such dual voltage supplies. During emergency.5kV (11kV or 34. d) Metering Customers metering shall be based on Customer Services Manual. • • 3.up supply for one supply voltage (220 or 380 or 480V).5kV is applicable only for areas where 11kV or 34. whichever is dominant in that location subject to the availability of redundant power at that location. Customers shall provide at NOC/Application stage as well as at the time of commissioning a certificate along with wiring drawings from an independent engineering consultant stating that all wiring in the building is verified/checked and found ok for all above points.Saudi Electricity Company ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬـﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS .8kV.5kV already exists). Sockets/outlets shall be installed only for one voltage. They require special equipment such as dual voltage transformers. Including More Than One MVA b) Primary voltage of transformers shall be any one of the following: 11kV.06 (April 2004) Distribution Planning Standards Multi Source Two Voltage Or One Voltage Supplies. Page 5 of 6 .

06 (April 2004) Distribution Planning Standards Multi Source Two Voltage Or One Voltage Supplies.Saudi Electricity Company ‫ﺍﻟﺸـﺭﻜﺔ ﺍﻟﺴـﻌﻭﺩﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﻜﻬـﺭﺒﺎﺀ‬ DPS . • Customers shall be fully responsible for all consequences resulting in from such paralleling of SEC MV feeders. Including More Than One MVA 3.1. • Customer shall get SEC approval for interlocks/protection for his MV switchgear required at interface point.2.2 Multi Source Single Voltage LV Supplies 3. Customers shall provide at NOC/Application stage as well as at the time of commissioning a certificate along with wiring drawings from an independent engineering consultant stating that all wiring in the building is verified/checked and found ok for all above points. 3.2. SEC transformers shall not be run in parallel. • 3. Customers shall be fully responsible for all consequences resulting in from such paralleling of transformers. Changeover switches shall be used for all standby supplies.2.3 Multi Source MV Supplies MV supplies can be extended from multi sources by using more than one feeder from different bus bars or substations or grid stations as per current SEC Standards and customer shall sign an undertaking for his responsibility for the following (see attached undertaking): • Customer shall not run SEC MV feeders in parallel thru his LV or MV network. One MVA and Above Single Voltage LV supplies from multi sources (more than one LV/MV transformer) can be extended as per current SEC Standards and customer shall sign an undertaking for his responsibility for the following (see attached undertaking): • • • • Separate conduits for feeding independent circuits shall be used for cables/wiring of each source supplies. Below one MVA Single voltage supplies below one MVA from two or more transformers shall not be extended as these customers are small and do not have sufficient know-how for handling such supplies safely as they involve two or more services. Page 6 of 6 .

..‬ ‫ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﻀﺭﻭﺭﺓ ﺍﻟﺘﺄﻜﺩ ﻤﻥ ﻋﺩﻡ ﺭﺒﻁ ﻤﺤﻭﻻﺕ ﺍﻟﺸﺭﻜﺔ ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﺘﻭﺍﺯﻱ ﻤﻥ ﺨﻼل ﺸﺒﻜﺘﻪ ﻭﻴﺘﺤﻤل ﺍﻟﻤﺴﺌﻭﻟﻴﺔ ﺍﻟﻜﺎﻤﻠﺔ ﻟﻠﻨﺘﺎﺌﺞ ﺍﻟﻤﺘﺭﺘﺒﺔ‬ ‫ﻋﻠﻰ ﺫﻟﻙ ﺍﻟﺭﺒﻁ....‬ ‫ﺍﻟﻤﻘـﺮ ﺑﻤﺎ ﻓـﻴﻪ )ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺮﻙ(‬ ‫ﺍﻻﺴـــﻡ:‬ ‫ﺍﻟﺘﻭﻗﻴــﻊ:‬ ‫ﺍﻟﺘﺎﺭﻴــﺦ:‬ ..‫ﺘﻌﻬﺩ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﺍﻟﺫﻱ ﻟﺩﻴﻪ ﺃﺤﻤﺎل ﺃﻜﺜﺭ ﻤﻥ )١( ﻡ.......... ﺒﺎﻟ ﻴﺎﺭ‬ ‫ﺸﻬﺎﺩ ﺍﻟ ﺴﻴ /ﺍﻟ ﻠ‬ ‫ﻴﺔ ﺍﻟ ﺸﺭ .‬ ‫/ ﺴ‬ ‫ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﺍﺴﺘﺨﺩﺍﻡ ﻤﺎﺴﻭﺭﺓ ﻜﺎﺒ‬ ‫ﻋﻠﻰ ﺫﻟﻙ ﺍﻟﺭﺒﻁ.‬ ‫ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﺍﺤﻀﺎﺭ ﻤﺨﻁﻁﺎﺕ ﺍﻟﻤﻔﺎﺘﻴﺢ ﺍﻟﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺌﻴﻪ ﻟﻠﺠﻬﺩ ﺍﻟﻤﺘﻭﺴﻁ ﻤﻭﻀﺤﺎ ﺒﻬﺎ ﻨﻅﺎﻡ ﺍﻻﻗﻔﺎل ﻭﺍﻟﺤﻤﺎﻴﻪ ﻷﺨﺫ ﻤﻭﺍﻓﻘﺔ ﺍﻟﺸﺭﻜﻪ‬ ‫ﹰ‬ ‫ﻴﺘﺤﻤل ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﺍﻟﻤﺴﺌﻭﻟﻴﺔ ﺍﻟﻜﺎﻤﻠﺔ ﻟﻠﻨﺘﺎﺌﺞ ﺍﻟﻤﺘﺭﺘﺒﺔ ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﺭﺒﻁ ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﺘﻭﺍﺯﻱ ﺒﻴﻥ ﻤﻐﺫﻴﺎﺕ ﺍﻟﺠﻬﺩ ﺍﻟﻤﺘﻭﺴﻁ ﻟﻠﺸﺭﻜﺔ.‬ ‫•‬ ‫•‬ ‫•‬ ‫•‬ ‫ﻭﺍ ﺩ:-‬ ‫ﺩﺭ ﻭ ﻬﺩ‬ ‫.‬ ‫•‬ ‫ﻟﻠﻨﻘﺎﻁ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺎﺭ ﺇﻟﻴﻬﺎ ﺃﻋﻼﻩ..‬ ‫ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﺃﻥ ﻴﺭﻜﺏ ﻤﻔﺘﺎﺡ ﺘﺤﻭﻴل ﺘﻠﻘﺎﺌﻲ ﻟﺠﻤﻴﻊ ﻤﺼﺎﺩﺭ ﺍﻟﺘﻐﺫﻴﺔ ﺍﻻﺤﺘﻴﺎﻁﻴﺔ..‬ ‫•‬ ‫•‬ ‫•‬ ‫•‬ ‫ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﻀﺭﻭﺭﺓ ﺍﻟﺘﺄﻜﺩ ﻤﻥ ﻋﺩﻡ ﺭﺒﻁ ﻤﺤﻭﻻﺕ ﺍﻟﺸﺭﻜﺔ ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﺘﻭﺍﺯﻱ ﻤﻥ ﺨﻼل ﺸﺒﻜﺘﻪ ﻭﻴﺘﺤﻤل ﺍﻟﻤﺴﺌﻭﻟﻴﺔ ﺍﻟﻜﺎﻤﻠﺔ ﻟﻠﻨﺘﺎﺌﺞ ﺍﻟﻤﺘﺭﺘﺒﺔ‬ ‫•‬ ‫•‬ ‫•‬ ‫.‬ ‫•‬ ‫ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﺍﺴﺘﺨﺩﺍﻡ ﻤﻘﺎﺒﺱ ﻟﺠﻬﺩ ﻭﺍﺤﺩ ﻓﻘﻁ.‬ ‫ﻴﻘﻭﻡ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﻓﻲ ﻤﺭﺤﻠﺔ ﺸﻬﺎﺩﺓ ﺍﻟﺘﻨﺴﻴﻕ/ﺘﻘﺩﻴﻡ ﺍﻟﻁﻠﺏ ﺒﺘﻘﺩﻴﻡ ﺸﻬﺎﺩﺓ ﻤﻥ ﻤﻜﺘﺏ ﻫﻨﺩﺴﻲ ﻤﻌﺘﻤﺩ ﻤﻊ ﻤﺨﻁﻁ ﻟﻠﺘﻤﺩﻴﺩﺍﺕ ﺍﻟﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺌﻴﺔ ﻭﺍﻥ ﺘﻜﻭﻥ‬ ‫ﻤﻭﺍﻓﻘﺔ ﻟﻠﻨﻘﺎﻁ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺎﺭ ﺇﻟﻴﻬﺎ ﺃﻋﻼﻩ.. ﺭ‬ ‫:-‬ ‫ﺍﻟ‬ ‫ﻬﺩﻴ ﻟﻠ‬ ‫ﺩ ﺎ ﺒ ﺒﻭ ﺸﺭﻭ‬ ‫ﺒﻌ ﺔ ) (..‬ ‫ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﺃﻥ ﻴﺭﻜﺏ ﻤﻔﺘﺎﺡ ﺘﺤﻭﻴل ﺘﻠﻘﺎﺌﻲ ﻟﺠﻤﻴﻊ ﻤﺼﺎﺩﺭ ﺍﻟﺘﻐﺫﻴﺔ ﺍﻻﺤﺘﻴﺎﻁﻴﺔ.‬ ‫ﻓﻲ ﺍﻟﺤﺎﻻﺕ ﺍﻟﻁﺎﺭﺌﺔ ﻭﺇﺫﺍ ﻜﺎﻥ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﻴﻐﺫﻯ ﻋﻠﻰ ﺠﻬﺩﻴﻥ ﺴﻭﻑ ﻴﺘﻡ ﺇﻋﺎﺩﺓ ﺍﻟﺘﻴﺎﺭ ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﺠﻬﺩ ﺍﻟﺴﺎﺌﺩ ﺒﺎﻟﻤﻨﻁﻘﺔ ﻭﺒﺸﺭﻁ ﺘﻭﻓﺭ ﻁﺎﻗﺔ ﻓﺎﺌﻀﺔ‬ ‫•‬ ‫ﻓﻲ ﺍﻟﻤﻭﻗﻊ..‬ ‫ﻓﻲ ﺍﻟﺤﺎﻻﺕ ﺍﻟﺘﻲ ﻴﻐﺫﻯ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﻋﻠﻰ ﺠﻬﺩﻴﻥ ﻴﺘﺤﻤل ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﺍﻟﻤﺴﺌﻭﻟﻴﺔ ﺍﻟﻜﺎﻤﻠﺔ ﻟﻠﻨﺘﺎﺌﺞ ﺍﻟﻤﺘﺭﺘﺒﺔ ﻋﻠﻰ ﺫﻟﻙ. ﺍﻟ ﻴﺔ ﺒ ﻜ ﺭ‬ ‫•‬ ‫•‬ ‫•‬ ‫ﻴﺘﻡ ﺇﻴﺼﺎل ﺍﻟﺘﻴﺎﺭ ﺍﻟﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺌﻲ ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﺠﻬﺩ ﺍﻟﻤﺘﻭﺴﻁ ﺤﺴﺏ ﺍﻟﻤﻭﺍﺼﻔﺎﺕ ﺍﻟﻤﻌﻤﻭل ﺒﻬﺎ ﻭﻭﻓﻕ ﺍﻟﺸﺭﻭﻁ ﺍﻟﺘﺎﻟﻴﺔ:‬ ‫ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﻀﺭﻭﺭﺓ ﺍﻟﺘﺄﻜﺩ ﻤﻥ ﻋﺩﻡ ﺍﻟﺭﺒﻁ ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﺘﻭﺍﺯﻱ ﺒﻴﻥ ﻤﻐﺫﻴﺎﺕ ﺍﻟﺠﻬﺩ ﺍﻟﻤﺘﻭﺴﻁ ﻟﻠﺸﺭﻜﺔ ﻤﻥ ﺨﻼل ﺸﺒﻜﺘﻪ ﺍﻟﺩﺍﺨﻠﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﺠﻬﺩ ﺍﻟﻤﺘﻭﺴﻁ‬ ‫ﺃﻭ ﺍﻟﻤﻨﺨﻔﺽ..‬ ‫ﺩﺭ ﻭ ﻠ‬ ‫ﺴ‬ ‫ﻌﻬﺩ ﺎ ﺍﻟ ﻭ‬ ‫ﺴ ﺍﻟ ﻭ‬ ‫ﺍﻟﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎ‬ ‫ﻴﺘﻡ ﺇﻴﺼﺎل ﺍﻟﺘﻴﺎﺭ ﺍﻟﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺌﻲ ﺒﺄﻜﺜﺭﻤﻥ ﻤﺼﺩﺭ ﻭﻋﻠﻰ ﺠﻬﺩﻴﻥ ﻟﻠﻀﻐﻁ ﺍﻟﻤﻨﺨﻔﺽ ﺤﺴﺏ ﺍﻟﻤﻭﺍﺼﻔﺎﺕ ﺍﻟﻤﻌﻤﻭل ﺒﻬﺎ ﻭﻭﻓﻕ ﺍﻟﺸﺭﻭﻁ ﺍﻟﺘﺎﻟﻴﺔ:‬ ‫ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﺘﻭﻓﻴﺭ ﻏﺭﻑ ﻤﺴﺘﻘﻠﻪ ﻟﻠﻤﺤﻭﻻﺕ ﻟﻜل ﺠﻬﺩ ﺜﺎﻨﻭﻱ ﻁﺒﻘﺎ ﻟﻤﻭﺍﺼﻔﺎﺕ ﺍﻟﺸﺭﻜﻪ......‬ ‫ﻴﻘﻭﻡ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﻓﻲ ﻤﺭﺤﻠﺔ ﺸﻬﺎﺩﺓ ﺍﻟﺘﻨﺴﻴﻕ/ﺘﻘﺩﻴﻡ ﺍﻟﻁﻠﺏ ﺒﺘﻘﺩﻴﻡ ﺸﻬﺎﺩﺓ ﻤﻥ ﻤﻜﺘﺏ ﻫﻨﺩﺴﻲ ﻤﻌﺘﻤﺩ ﻤﻊ ﻤﺨﻁﻁ ﻟﻠﺘﻤﺩﻴﺩﺍﺕ ﺍﻟﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺌﻴﺔ ﻭﺍﻥ ﺘﻜﻭﻥ‬ ‫ﻤﻭﺍﻓﻘﺔ ﻟﻠﻨﻘﺎﻁ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺎﺭ ﺇﻟﻴﻬﺎ ﺃﻋﻼﻩ...‬ ‫ﺍﻟﻤـﻮﻇـﻒ ﺍﻟﻤـﺨـﺘـﺺ‬ ‫ﺍﻻﺴـــﻡ:‬ ‫ﺍﻟﺘﻭﻗﻴــﻊ:‬ ‫ﺍﻟﺘﺎﺭﻴــﺦ:‬ ‫ﻋﻠﻴﻬﺎ ﻗﺒل ﺍﻟﺘﻭﺼﻴل....ﻑ...ﺃ‬ ‫ﻭﻴﻐﺫﻯ ﺒﺄﻜﺜﺭ ﻤﻥ ﻤﺼﺩﺭ ﻭﻋﻠﻰ ﺠﻬﺩﻴﻥ ﺃﻭ ﺠﻬﺩ ﻭﺍﺤﺩ‬ ‫. ﺍﻟ ﻴﺔ ﺒ ﻜ ﺭ‬ ‫ﻴﻘﻭﻡ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﻗﺒل ﺘﺸﻐﻴل ﺍﻟﻌﺩﺍﺩ/ﺍﻟﻌﺩﺍﺩﺍﺕ ﺒﺈﺤﻀﺎﺭ ﺸﻬﺎﺩﺓ ﻤﻥ ﻤﻜﺘﺏ ﻫﻨﺩﺴﻲ ﻤﻌﺘﻤﺩ ﺘﻭﻀﺢ ﺃﻨﻪ ﺘﻡ ﻓﺤﺹ ﺍﻟﺘﻤﺩﻴﺩﺍﺕ ﻟﻠﻤﺒﻨﻰ ﻭﺇﻨﻬﺎ ﻤﻭﺍﻓﻘﺔ‬ ‫ﺩﺭ ﻠ ﺍﻟ ﻬﺩ ﺍﻟ ﻭﺴ :-‬ ‫.‬ ‫ﹰ‬ ‫ﻜﻬﺭ ﺒﺎﺌﻴﺔ ﻤﻨﻔﺼﻠﺔ ﻟﻜل ﺠﻬﺩ.......‬ ‫ﻴﻘﻭﻡ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﻗﺒل ﺘﺸﻐﻴل ﺍﻟﻌﺩﺍﺩ/ﺍﻟﻌﺩﺍﺩﺍﺕ ﺒﺈﺤﻀﺎﺭ ﺸﻬﺎﺩﺓ ﻤﻥ ﻤﻜﺘﺏ ﻫﻨﺩﺴﻲ ﻤﻌﺘﻤﺩ ﺘﻭﻀﺢ ﺃﻨﻪ ﺘﻡ ﻓﺤﺹ ﺍﻟﺘﻤﺩﻴﺩﺍﺕ ﻟﻠﻤﺒﻨﻰ ﻭﺍﻨﻬﺎ ﻤﻭﺍﻓﻘﺔ‬ ‫ﻟﻠﻨﻘﺎﻁ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺎﺭ ﺇﻟﻴﻬﺎ ﺃﻋﻼﻩ. ﺍﻟ ﻴﺔ ﺒ ﻜ ﺭ‬ ‫ﻴﺘﻡ ﺇﻴﺼﺎل ﺍﻟﺘﻴﺎﺭ ﺍﻟﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺌﻲ ﻋﻠﻰ ﺠﻬﺩ ﻤﻨﺨﻔﺽ ﻭﺍﺤﺩ ﻭﺍﻜﺜﺭ ﻤﻥ ﻤﺼﺩﺭ ﺤﺴﺏ ﺍﻟﻤﻭﺍﺼﻔﺎﺕ ﺍﻟﻤﻌﻤﻭل ﺒﻬﺎ ﻭﻭﻓﻕ ﺍﻟﺸﺭﻭﻁ ﺍﻟﺘﺎﻟﻴﺔ:‬ ‫ﻋﻠﻰ ﺍﻟﻤﺸﺘﺭﻙ ﺍﺴﺘﺨﺩﺍﻡ ﻤﺎﺴﻭﺭﺓ ﻜﺎﺒﻼﺕ / ﺃﺴﻼﻙ ﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺌﻴﺔ ﻤﻨﻔﺼﻠﺔ ﻟﻜل ﻤﺼﺩﺭ ﻭﺫﻟﻙ ﻟﺘﻐﺫﻴﺔ ﺩﻭﺍﺌﺭ ﻜﻬﺭﺒﺎﺌﻴﺔ ﻤﺴﺘﻘﻠﺔ.....