Self Study Report     

   

To The American Culinary Federation  Foundation Accrediting Commission   8/1/2008 
  

School Contact Number: 159079 

Culinary Arts Program  Department of Business Technology  The University of Montana   College of Technology 
 

Transmittal Sheet ACF Foundation Accrediting Commission SELF STUDY
NAME OF INSTITUTION: ADDRESS: PROGRAM NAMES: The University of Montana College of Technology 909 South Avenue West, Missoula, MT 59801 1. Culinary Arts Certificate of Applied Science 2. Food Service Management Associate of Applied Science Degree Thomas L. Campbell, CEC 406-243-7831 thomas.campbell@umontana.edu September 1974 January 2009 Total 17 Full time 16 Part time 1

PROGRAM COORDINATOR/CONTACT: DATE OF FIRST PROGRAM OFFERING: DATE OF ACFF ACCREDITATION EXPIRATION: CURRENT NUMBER OF STUDENTS:
At the time of writing, fall entry enrollment had not been finalized. These numbers represent 2nd year students.

INSTITUTION’S DEFINITION OF FULL TIME:

INSTITUTION’S DEFINITION OF PART TIME:

An undergraduate student must register for a minimum of 12 credit hours a semester to be classified as a full-time student; however, in most baccalaureate programs a student must earn at least 15 credits per semester to graduate in a four year period. One and two year programs usually require between 15 and 19 credits per semester. An undergraduate student with fewer than the minimum of 12 credits a semester is classified as a part-time student.

NUMBER OF FULL -TIME FACULTY: NUMBER OF PART-TIME FACULTY: LENGTH OF PROGRAMS: CLASSROOM CONTACT HOURS: LAB CONTACT HOURS: REQUIRED HOURS OF ON-THE-JOB TRAINING (Externship, Co-op, Apprenticeship, etc.) TOTAL CONTACT HOURS REQUIRED OF PROGRAM: TOTAL GRADUATES FOR THE PAST TWO YEARS: DATE: SUBMITTED BY: (Include title)

Certificate of Applied Science Program: 2 semesters A.A.S. Degree Program: 4 semesters Certificate of Applied Science Program: 325 A.A.S. Degree Program: 580 Certificate Program: 470 A.A.S. Degree Program: 995 Spring Semester of 2006 a required internship course was initiated. This course required 180 hours of onthe-job-training. Certificate of Applied Science Program: 795 A.A.S. Degree Program: 1,575 23 August 2008 Thomas L. Campbell, CEC, Program Director

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Foreword
We welcome the ACF accreditation team to our campus. Along with our self-study report, we are sending you a folder containing maps of our campuses, maps of Missoula and surrounds, brochures of local attractions, and a list of contacts and telephone numbers. We are completely at your service during the week of your visit and hope we can assist in making your visit as productive as it can be. So please contact us on any matter. We have used this self study to support and move forward continued improvements. We hope that you, in addition to performing your inspection duties, will share with us your experiences, educational philosophies, and offer suggestions. We welcome any advice aimed at further improvement of our programs. To facilitate your review of this report, we have employed shading to set apart questions and stated requirements of the ACF Accrediting Commission from our responses and unsolicited comments, which are not shaded. Exhibits too bulky to include in the report will be available at a designated location at the College of Technology. Those exhibits are deserving of discussion in the report are referenced from the report text. A list of all exhibits is included as Appendix 1. The University of Montana and The College of Technology have not been denied or lost accreditation by any accrediting agency. No action is pending, or action been taken, by court or administrative body.

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Contents
Section 1 — Program Eligibility, Standard 1……………………………………………….……. 1 Section 2 — Mission and Goals, Standard 2……………………………………………….…….. 2 Section 3 — Organization and Administration, Standard 3……………………………………... .5 Section 4 — Faculty and Staff, Standard 4 ....................................................................................18 Section 5 — Curriculum, Standard 5 .............................................................................................27 Section 6 — Facilities, Standard 6.................................................................................................41 Section 7 — Student Services, Standard 7 ....................................................................................49 Section 8 — Program Assessment .................................................................................................65 Section 9 — Summary ...................................................................................................................70 Appendix 1 — List of Exhibits ......................................................................................................75 Appendix 2 — Maps .......................................................................................................................... Appendix 3 — Program Application for ACF Accreditation ............................................................

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American Culinary Federation Foundation Accrediting Commission

Standards
July 2006

AMERICAN CULINARY FEDERATION FOUNDATION ACCREDITING COMMISSION Standards 1.0 PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA
1.1 The program must be offered at an institution which is legally authorized under applicable state law to provide postsecondary education and which is institutionally accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education or approved by a comparable government agency. Apprenticeship programs are also eligible. They must be registered with the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship Training, or its state designee. 1.2 The program’s application for accreditation must be authorized by the institutional chief executive or designee. 1.3 The program must be post-secondary and so authorized under applicable state law or comparable governmental unit. 1.4 • • • • The coordinator must have credentials that include: A minimum of (1) industry certification at the administrative/management level Five years industry experience at a management level A minimum of a BA or BS degree in an appropriate discipline or an equivalent combination with the above degree A Master’s degree is preferred. These credentials should be accomplished within a twoyear period.

Existing program coordinator may have 3 years to meet requirements. 1.5 The program must have been in continuous existence for a minimum of two years and must have graduated students within a three year period in order for the Commission to judge its educational success. 1.6 The program must exhibit evidence of meeting the required competencies as specified in the ACFF “Required Knowledge and Competencies.” 1.7 The program shall be ongoing, include a minimum of 1,000 contact hours, and result in a certificate, diploma, or degree.

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2.0 PROGRAM MISSION AND GOALS
2.1.1 The objective of a program is the development of the students' competence to practice effectively in an entry-level position as a cook, pastry cook, or foodservice management trainee (and ensure the ability to advance within the hospitality industry and for lifelong enhancement of learning and opportunities). 2.2 The mission and goals of the program are consistent with the philosophy of the institution as well as industry standards. 2.3 The stated area of specialization is compatible with the resources available to the program, especially the kitchen/laboratory facilities and faculty expertise.

3.0 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION
3.1 There are clearly defined administrative channels for the program, which allow it to operate effectively. 3.1.1 There is an organizational chart showing the relationship of the program to other programs within the institution. 3.1.2 3.1.3 There is an organizational chart showing the structure of the program. There are written job descriptions for the program coordinator, faculty and support staff.

3.2 The program coordinator is responsible for ongoing assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation critical to an effective educational program. 3.2.1 The program coordinator shall monitor compliance with the ACFF Accrediting Commission standards. 3.2.2 The program coordinator should have limited teaching/laboratory coordination responsibilities in addition to program administration. 3.3 The program shall have an advisory committee (Board of Directors, Apprenticeship committee, Steering Committee) whose meetings are scheduled on a regular basis with a minimum of two meetings each year to advise the program and make recommendations as needed. Written agendas and minutes which include attendance are available to document this activity. 3.3.1 The members of the Advisory Committee include a variety of representatives from the hospitality industry (institutional food service, restaurants, clubs, hotels, allied food service businesses or education) and must include current students and/or recent graduates of the program.

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3.3.2 On a continuing basis an Advisory committee assists the program coordinator in assuring that the program responds to the needs of industry, and continues to meet the standards of the ACFF Accrediting Commission. 3.4 There is evidence of continuing financial support commensurate with the resources of the institution and appropriate to the needs of the program. 3.5 The program mission, goals, competencies stated in behavioral terms, course outlines, including evaluation strategies, class schedules, and descriptions and schedules of supervised kitchen/laboratory or work experience shall be on file, open to review, reviewed annually by the advisory board. The review should be reflected in the minutes

4.0 FACULTY AND STAFF
4.1 The faculty of the program is academically and professionally qualified.

4.1.1 The faculty has professional preparation relevant to their areas of responsibility, and have demonstrated and documented professional participation in those areas. 4.1.2 At least 50 percent of the full-time equivalent faculty in the technical phase of the program have credentials equivalent to any ACF certification at chef level. 4.2 The personnel policies for faculty and equivalent members of the program are the same as those in effect for other faculty members in the institution with regard to appointment, academic rank, tenure, salary, promotion, and recognition of professional competencies. 4.2.1 A person is not denied a faculty position, tenure, or advancement because of race, religion, color, gender, age, national origin, or disability.

4.3 The faculty is adequate in number to implement the program of instruction and related activities effectively and to support the achievement of educational outcomes 4.3.1 The program needs to have a standard number of full-time equivalent faculty based on the institutional requirements of student/faculty ratio and that faculty would have advanced degrees.) 4.3.2 The minimum ratio of full-time equivalent faculty to enrolled students shall be appropriate to the number of training stations available. 4.4 There is evidence of participation and attendance at regularly scheduled faculty meetings. Minutes of these meetings are available for review. 4.5 Faculty must participate on an annual basis in and document continuing professional development which includes technical and instructional skills. 4.5.1 The program faculty must show evidence of professional growth on an annual basis in the technical areas for which they have teaching responsibilities.

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4.5.2 The program faculty must show evidence of professional growth on an annual basis in the area of instructional skills. 4.6 Resource people from various disciplines, community agencies, or other organizations may be used as guest lecturers, consultants, and discussion leaders. However, they may not substitute for adequate faculty staffing in a program. 4.7 Support services and personnel are provided to meet the needs of the program and to facilitate the work of the faculty.

5.0 CURRICULUM
5.1 The curriculum implements the program mission, goals and objectives.

5.1.1 Units of instruction follow written outlines and syllabi which clearly state measurable objectives, student activities, learning resources, time allotment, grading criteria, and student evaluation methods. 5.1.2 Throughout the curriculum, opportunities are provided to strengthen the student’s competence in communications, critical thinking, problem solving, leadership and human relation skills. 5.1.3 Guest speakers and field trips are utilized to provide additional program enrichment. Documentation of guest speakers and field trips must be documented and available for commission review. 5.2 There is a rationale for the organization of the curriculum and for the allocation of credit.

5.2.1 Course requirements are organized and sequenced so that knowledge and skills are developed progressively throughout the program. 5.2.2 The allocation of credit for lecture and laboratory hours is consistent with a recognized standard. 5.3 The program curriculum must include at least the required objectives as specified in the REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES, and the number of hours allotted to each objective must be adequate for student competence. 5.3.1 Competency areas in nutrition, sanitation, and human relations/management must each include a minimum of 30 hours of student effort in a combination of theoretical and applied learning instruction, with a minimum of 15 hours directed by an instructor. 5.4 The curriculum meets graduation requirements for the postsecondary institution offering the program. 5.4.1 The satisfaction of certificate, diploma, or degree requirements is reasonably documented and conforms to commonly accepted educational standards for the particular certificate, diploma, or degree involved.

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5.5 There are well defined, verifiable, and consistent outcome measurement strategies utilized in the grading procedures in both lecture and lab courses. 5.5.1 Students are kept informed of their performance and progress in both lecture and lab classes. 5.6 The curriculum provides for correlation of theoretical and practical learning experiences.

5.7 The kitchen/laboratory experiences shall reflect high standards of professional sanitation practices. 5.7.1 Employees and students are trained in the correct handling and use of hazardous materials, substances, or wastes. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are available in each of the laboratories and are updated on a regular basis. 5.7.2 Students are trained in the proper use of laboratory equipment with documentation/evidence of this training available for review. (Equipment Safety Check Sheet) 5.8 If part of the curriculum requires a lab/kitchen experience in which a student is supervised by other than program faculty, there should be a training agreement and plan as well as evidence that the supervisor is qualified according to Standard 4.1.1 5.9 The program and curriculum are sufficiently flexible to provide for individual differences among students. 5.10 The curriculum provides for a variety of instructional techniques and strategies, with emphasis on student involvement in the teaching/learning process. 5.11 The curriculum requires a variety of instructional media be used.

5.12 In the case of an externship, internship, co-op, or apprenticeship training program, the relationship between the postsecondary institution and an outside food service establishment should include a written agreement which meets the objectives of the total program. Materials on file should include documented and signed training agreements, employer evaluation(s) of students, instructor evaluation(s) of students, and students’ evaluations of work stations, with evidence to support the qualifications of the supervising chef.

6.0 FACILITIES
6.1 6.1.1 6.1.2 The facilities and equipment of the institution are adequate for the needs of the program Classroom space is available to support the program objectives. Office space is provided for the program coordinator, faculty members and staff.

6.1.3 The program coordinator and other faculty who are closely involved with student counseling and advisement have access to offices that provide privacy.

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6.1.4 All kitchen/laboratory experiences are in facilities that meet federal, state, and local codes and have sufficient and experienced personnel and adequate equipment. 6.2 There shall be a resource center with adequate and accessible materials which supports the objectives of the program. 6.3 The kitchen/laboratory facilities reflect safe and sanitary conditions.

7.0 STUDENT SERVICES
7.1 Recruitment and matriculation practices are nondiscriminatory with respect to race, religion, color, gender, age, national origin, or disability. 7.2 Criteria and procedures for the selection of students for the program are stated and on file at all times. 7.2.1 All programmatic pre-admissions tests and evaluations, if used, are appropriate to the training offered; adequately measure the aptitude of prospective students to successfully complete the program; and are administered fairly. 7.3 The program shall have a written policy on transfer of credits. The program shall have a written policy on advanced standing, if offered. 7.4 There is an established and documented method for improving retention of students in the program. 7.5 The program’s mission, goals, tuition and fees, requirements for entrance, and continuation in the program, and descriptions of course and kitchen/lab experiences are accurate, and are publicly available. 7.5.1 Announcements, advertising, and student recruitment practices accurately reflect the program offered and the current institutional and programmatic accreditation status. 7.5.2 Additional costs of the program, beyond the basic fees of the institution, are clearly stated (e.g., liability insurance, facility use fees, transportation). 7.5.3 Policies and procedures for student withdrawal and refunds on tuition to which the student is entitled are published and made known to all applicants. 7.6 Students and graduates have access to files maintained by the program relating to their performance. 7.7 There is a published grievance procedure that students may use to address concerns and needs. 7.8 Services for placement, professional counseling, and guidance are available for students. 7.9 Scholarship/Industry information is available to students.

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8.0 PROGRAM ASSESSMENT
8.1 The program is involved in an ongoing process of assessing its effectiveness.

8.2 There is a process for collecting programmatic assessment data from a variety of sources. 8.2.1 There is a documented and ongoing system for assessing faculty performance.

8.2.2 There is a documented and ongoing system for assessing validity of curriculum by students, faculty and advisory committees. 8.2.3 There is a documented and ongoing system for assessing and documenting graduate placements, student retention, and educational achievements for students, in verifiable and consistent ways, including employer surveys, graduate follow-up surveys, and job placement rates which indicate a majority of graduates are placed in their field of study following graduation. 8.3 There is a process by which the collected data is assessed by all constituents involved in the program. 8.4 The assessed data findings are used in program planning involving all constituents.

8.5 The plans developed, based on the assessment of data, are implemented for programmatic change.

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Section 1

Program Eligibility — Standard 1
REQUIRED COMMENTS 1. Provide a copy of Program Application for ACF Accreditation as part of this self study. This document is included as Exhibit A and also as Appendix 3 to this report. 2. Describe the institution, including accreditation and licensure status. If a recognized agency has denied accreditation or pre-accreditation status to the institution or place the program on public probationary status, or has revoked the accreditation or pre-accreditation status of the institution or program, provide an account of such action (s). The University of Montana College of Technology is a college within The University of Montana and part of the Montana University System. The University is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (Exhibit A). Culinary Arts is a program within the Department of Business Technology at the College of Technology and is accredited by the American Culinary Federation.

REQUIRED EXHIBITS List of 10 recent graduates and their places of employment. address, and phone numbers for graduates and employers. Include name, Exhibit C

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Mission of the Associate of Applied Science Degree: The Food Service Management Program culminates in an Associate of Applied Science Degree designed to continue principles taught in the Certificate of Applied Science Program.Section 2 Mission and Goals — Standard 2 REQUIRED COMMENTS 1. What are the mission and goals of the program(s)? Mission of the Certificate of Applied Science Program: The two-semester Culinary Arts Certificate of Applied Science Program provides an introduction to the field of culinary arts. practical training. The Certificate of Applied Science Program parallels with and forms a seamless transition into the Food Service Management Associate of Applied Science Degree. 2 . b. and basic culinary principles. and to ensure graduates’ eligibility for certification as an ACF “Certified Culinarian” by maintaining program accreditation from the American Culinary Federation. The program goals are to incorporate comprehensive hands-on learning experiences complemented by supportive courses and to prepare students for a wide range of career opportunities in this field. (2) demonstrate computer literacy. (4) maintain sanitary conditions in the kitchen. The mission of the program is to combine theory. The goals are to expand the spectrum of learning to include more in-depth professional studies. (3) demonstrate their knowledge of culinary history. The mission of the program is to prepare students for entry-level positions in the expanding and challenging food service industry. to enhance employment options. and experience to prepare students for entry-level and management positions in the diverse and dynamic hospitality industry. c. a. Specific program goals of the Certificate Program: Students will: (1) express themselves through written communication. kitchen organization.

breakfast menus. and applicable sauce derivatives. cakes. and ices.Section 2 — Mission and Goals — Standard 2 (5) have a working knowledge of mathematical computations involved in a food service establishment. d. (8) perform front-of-the-house duties. (5) supervise work load and coordinate station responsibilities. analyze. (12) prepare eclectic entrees incorporating all cooking principles for service to the public. foundation stocks and broths. and (14) prepare basic bread varieties and desserts. (13) utilize purchasing procedures to procure foodstuffs. and write menus. kitchen supplies. desserts. 3 . dressings. and equipment. and unique specialties. salads. (10) prepare fast-food selections. (7) demonstrate conceptual aspects of physical layout of food service establishments. (11) prepare hot and cold soups. students will: (1) plan. Specific program goals of the Associate of Applied Science Degree: In addition to the 14 goals listed for the Certificate of Applied Science program. charcuterie items. (6) describe and serve alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. (4) prepare bread varieties. confections. (3) control food and labor costs. (7) organize and prioritize tasks. (2) control portion costs. (6) interact effectively within a team-oriented group. all the mother sauces. and garde manger items. (9) prepare appetizers.

Where are these goals and objectives of the program made evident to the students? To ensure students understand the mission and goals of the culinary program. and program policies.lib. Following are synopses of the mission statements of the College of Technology and the Business Technology Department: (1) The mission of the College of Technology is to provide academically sound.edu/ and in culinary faculty offices where the goals and objectives may be found.edu/programs/business/culinary. catalog-type course descriptions. The Handbook is given to all Culinary Arts students and program faculty members and is available to interested members of the public during orientation.) (2) The mission of the Business Technology Department is to collaborate with local and regional business and industry to prepare graduates to compete in and contribute to a dynamic global society. How do the mission and goals of the program(s) fit with the institution of which it is a part? The University of Montana Missoula provided the basis for developing program mission and goals. and departmental leadership. faculty suggestions. 4. the standards and competencies required for ACF accreditation are emphasized. Finally. Such reviews are influenced by Chef Campbell’s professional experience. The professional and technical mission of the College of Technology (UM COT) and the Business Technology Department were also incorporated. 3. student comments.Section 2 — Mission and Goals — Standard 2 and (8) apply strict dietary standards in the preparation of nutritional dishes. and economic development needs.) b. They are also found in the University of Montana’s Catalogue and website. www.umt.umt. a. How are the goals and objectives kept current with industry’s requirements? Include in your answer the frequency and methods of their review. Chef Thomas Campbell has made a sustained evaluation of the program requirements including mission and goals. Since joining the faculty five years ago as Culinary Arts Program Director. (See Exhibit AF. community. advisory committee input. He has continued this same level of scrutiny and performs formal review of mission statements and program goals on an annual basis. program goals and objectives. 2. a Culinary Arts Student Handbook (Exhibit AA) was created. socially responsible.htm 4 . This Self-Study Report is available to students in the Mansfield Library at the UM College of Technology www. (See Exhibit AH. current and accessible certificate and associate degree programs in response to individual. which includes complete program description.cte.

Section 2 — Mission and Goals — Standard 2 REQUIRED EXHIBITS. Sample of the review methods used. Exhibit D Exhibit I 5 .

Together with the Program Director. The University of Montana catalog (Exhibit E) contains descriptions of the Culinary Arts Certificate of Applied Science program and the Food Service Management Associate of Applied Science Degree program. The catalog is available to the public in paper copy from Student Services or online at the University’s web site: http://www. Program and course changes were submitted by Vicki Micheletto to ASCRC (Academic Standards and Curriculum Review Committee) and ultimately approved by Faculty Senate Fall Semester 2004.umt.edu/homepage/catalog/default. Dean’s Office. To address these issues and to provide a cohesive effort. Provide the program(s) description as listed in documents available to the public. the Dean of the College of Technology (UM COT) identified Vicki Micheletto as Department Chair of Business Technology with direction to include Culinary Arts as a program within the Business Technology Department. When his health forced him to resign. The chair chosen through the search held the position for only one year before accepting a similar position in another state. For a period of time the Culinary Arts Program was still providing an adequate education but the leadership role left inconsistencies. REQUIRED COMMENTS 1. (See organizational chart Exhibit G1 in this section.) With this change Culinary Program faculty report to the Business Technology Department Chair which has resulted in tighter administrative control and provided strengths discussed in more detail in later paragraphs. In 2006 Vicki Micheletto retired as Business Technology Chair and was succeeded by Brian Larson. Provost’s Office and the President of the University. 5 . In 2004 The ACF awarded a five-year accreditation to the College of Technology’s Culinary Arts Program. The individual who had held the position for several years retired and was replaced by a person with a love of culinary arts and an interest towards the prosperity of the Culinary Arts Program. Brian has continued the work started in 2003. Ross Lodahl served as interim chair while a search was conducted.Section 3 Organization and Administration — Standard 3 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE AND REORGANIZATION From 1998-2003 the Culinary Arts Department had several department chairs.asp. Today the Culinary Arts Program enjoys tremendous administrative support and encouragement from the Department Chair.

culinary faculty members. admission. While on the culinary faculty of the Art Institute of Seattle. course credits were adjusted. courses were added or deleted. policies.2009 Chef Campbell is an active member of the American Culinary Federation (ACF). Accordingly. resulting in revision and improvement of the program. policies. admission. Describe his/her role in assessing. Program changes were approved by ASCRC and Faculty Senate.Section 3 — Organization and Administration — Standard 3 During the reorganization process Tom Campbell and Vicki Micheletto reviewed and revised the culinary arts certificate option and the food service management degree option. is Program Director of Culinary Arts which includes both certificate and degree options. contributed to policy studies. policies. 3. Chair of the Business Technology Department. he reports to Brian Larson. There are no other programs. Campbell also is a representative of the ACFFAC by volunteering as an Accreditation Site Evaluator in the northwest region. president of the local chapter of the ACF. and curriculum. and curricula. 2. He has thirty-six years of experience in the hospitality industry including eleven years in the culinary education field. List other hospitality or food service programs in the institution. and helped coach the student culinary team. As a result of the reorganization. a Culinary Arts Student Handbook (Exhibit AA) was created. Since 2006 he has participated in six site visits in both secondary and post secondary culinary education. These efforts resulted in the Culinary Arts Conspectus (Exhibit AJ) which is still being refined. and a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America. planning. certified as an Executive Chef by the ACF. he developed programs of instruction. program improvements. Thomas Campbell. and interested members of the public. and course descriptions were updated. and procedures. Larson have researched culinary programs across the country and reviewed ACF standards in this curriculum review process. Business Technology Department Assessment. and curriculum requirements were revised. evaluating and implementing changes to the program. Describe this person’s qualifications. The Business Technology Department conducts ongoing assessment of its programs in concert with its several program directors. CEC. Both Chef Campbell and Mr. To whom does this person report on such matters as finance. Following is a recap of his ACF involvement: 6 . goals. It includes information from the conspectus and selections from Exhibit AF plus catalog-type course descriptions. On matters such as finance. The last assessment is documented in Exhibit AF. Tom Campbell is responsible for writing the ACFFAC Self-Study Report and Annual Reports. This handbook is given to Culinary Arts students. and this self-study. program mission. Describe the administrative responsibilities and teaching responsibilities of the program coordinator. He compiled the last Self-Study and the Culinary Arts Program was granted a five-year accreditation from 2004 .

he managed budgets. Attendee of the CAFÉ Chef Educator Conference h. 4 credits 7 . Within the normal constraints of budgets. 8 week course • Mediterranean Cuisine (CUL 195T). He is the Student Advisor for Culinary Arts and maintains a full teaching load. In the summer of 2007 he developed and taught: • Introduction to the Food Service Industry (CUL 151T) a five-credit. and institutional policies. In 2007 he hosted the first ever ACF sanctioned practical examinations and competitions in the State of Montana k. 3 credits • Dining Room Procedures (CUL 156T). a 1 credit/no credit course offered through the Outreach Program • Tips for Teachers (CUL 195T). Recipient of the ACF Western Region Meritorious Achievement Award for 2008 While serving as a corporate executive chef at a Seattle-area hotel and as owner of his own restaurant and culinary consulting business. In the Fall Semester of 2007 he taught: • Introduction to the Food Service Industry (CUL 151T). The following is a list of his recent teaching duties: 1. evaluating and implementing changes to the culinary program. 3 credits • Internship (FSM 290T). Coach and sponsor of Carol Chandler as she won the 2007 National Student Culinarian of the Year competition f. Attendee of annual ACF Western Region and National Conferences g. July 1. 5 credits • Meats & Vegetables (CUL 161T). 2003 and currently has full-time administrative duties including accreditation activities involving departmental reorganization. and program and course revision. resources. A member of the Missoula County Public Schools Advisory Board. Chef Campbell is responsible for assessing. 3 credits • Garde Manger (CUL 157T). planning. Department of Career and Technical Education i.Section 3 — Organization and Administration — Standard 3 a. Coach and manager of the College of Technology’s Jr. personnel. a 2 credit/no credit course offered through the Outreach Program 2. Culinary Team since 2003 e. Works as an ACFAC accreditation site-visit examiner for secondary and post secondary culinary programs j. budgetary planning. local chapter of the ACF b. Presiding President of the Montana Chefs Association.   Chef Campbell joined the College of Technology’s team five years ago. Head Judge for the Montana Agriculture sponsored Chef’s Collaborative cooking competition c. Head Judge for UM Dining Services NACUFS culinary challenge competition d. Voted Montana’s Chef of the Year for 2007 by the Montana Chefs Association l. and other resources.

7. and Lynn Stocking. Advisory committee members represent local hospitals. Currently Chef Campbell is rewriting and teaching eight separate courses. 9. Chef Campbell is also occasionally called upon for specialized demonstrations and instruction as well as covering for faculty members when they are not present. frequency of meetings. Additionally. The University of Montana Student Dining Services (UDS). hotels. He developed a required formal Internship for Culinary (FSM 290T). This adheres to ACF guidelines mandating that two meetings per year 8 . caterers. and members of the Montana Chefs Association chapter of the ACF.) The advisory committee held a lengthy meeting in November 2007. 4 credits 5. restaurants. food service purveyors. In the Spring Semester of 2008 he taught: • Nutritional Cooking (FSM 280T). Business Technology Department Chair. however. 2 credits • Internship (FSM 290T). He is authorized as a proctor for administering the NRAEF ServeSafe examination and recently renewed his status. 2 credits • Capstone (FSM 271). no formal meeting was held.Section 3 — Organization and Administration — Standard 3 3. He introduced this course in the Spring Semester of 2006.  4. culinary faculty. Describe the advisory committee(s) for the program (s) and indicate: a. (See Exhibit I for a list of members and minutes of meetings. 4. institutional food service operations. bakers. 4 credits • Patisserie (FSM 275). 3 credits each: • Meats & Vegetables (CUL 161T) • Dining Room Procedures (CUL 156T) • Garde Manger (CUL 157T) 6. 8. a minimum of two updates and meeting follow-ups were communicated via e-mail to advisory committee members during the remainder of the school year. This advisory committee represents a variety of hospitality professionals to reflect ever-changing industry standards and trends. providing guidance and support. Chef Campbell has recruited twelve advisory committee members. alumni. He taught this course in the Spring Semester of 2006. In the Spring Semester of 2008 he team-taught three classes. 4 credits • Food Service Management Computer Applications (FSM 205). resorts. Associate Dean. He is also the sole advisor for the Culinary Program. He rewrote the Beverage Management and Menus Design (FSM 170T) course to reflect a capstone experience and linked it with the Food Service Computer Applications (FSM 205) and Patisserie (FSM 275) classes. with Brian Larson.

Students entering Fall Semester 2004 will participate in the internship during Spring Semester 2006 (see Exhibit AB). and provide a link between culinary students and prospective food service employers. The advisory committee members supported the inclusion of an internship experience. establish internships. placement. review curricula. have been exceptionally responsive in providing guidance.acfmontanachefs. provides a link between current industry trends and culinary education. Since Chef Campbell is the President of the ACF Montana Chefs Association (MCA) www. examples of major suggestions and results. functions and responsibilities. and The Program Director utilizes the advisory committee to provide feedback regarding graduates working in the field. The reasoning included the importance of students’ experiencing their craft in actual work situations. Committee members from UDS (University Dining Services). Director Mark LoParco and Executive Chef Thomas Siegel. are currently exploring sustainable cuisine and the prospect of inclusion in COT’s program under the wing of UDS’s “Farm-to-College” plan. c. The MCA is also very supportive of culinary education and awards two full-semester scholarships to deserving UM COT culinary students. update technological advancements and industry trends. resources. a nationally recognized institution. Committee members within the health-related industries discussed the growing demand for graduates to possess more nutritionally sound experience. This. Advisory members are surveyed and encouraged to interact and provide constructive criticism to program director and faculty at any time during the school year. (Copies of MCA meeting agendas and scholarship criteria may be viewed in Exhibit I.) b.org their monthly meetings always carry an aspect of culinary education and continuing education. Chef Campbell replaced the nursing program’s nutrition course with CUL 280T Nutritional Cooking which gives a more hands-on approach and is more pertinent to the food service industry.Section 3 — Organization and Administration — Standard 3 be held. CEC. coupled with the fact that most members of the MCA are also members of the UM COT Culinary Program’s Advisory Committee. An internship also provides a liaison between students and industry. Advisory committee feedback confirmed the change made in the 2005 curriculum to require a 4 credit internship course. To answer this concern. and an exchange of ideas specifically relating to the positive evolution of the Culinary Arts program. 9 .

or general operating fund. dinners. (Index Code MCT107) are public monies which support the following elements of the program: Faculty Salaries Laundry Office Supplies Repair and Maintenance Payroll Benefits General Expenses Laboratory Equipment Printing Food Communications b. Categories for this account index are: UM Administrative Assessment Food Supplies Telephone Catering Other General Expenses Sales Employee Salaries And Benefits General Repairs And Maintenance d. It provides income to supplement the Culinary Arts Students in areas of culinary competitions. Income for this fund is generated solely from fund raising event. Course Fees (Index Code MCT006) are funds collected from students to cover the following: Course Supplies Laboratory Consumables UM Administrative Assessment These course fees are submitted for approval by the Board of Regents before included in student costs. etc. The Culinary Arts Program does not aim to make a profit and this account is kept as close as possible to a break-even budget restriction. Culinary Student Assistance Fund (Index Code MCT094) is an account designed to augment special activities. etc. State Fund. Describe in detail funding for the program(s). There are five types of funding for the Culinary Arts program: a.Section 3 — Organization and Administration — Standard 3 5. Categories for this account index are: Culinary Capstone Catering Culinary Competitions Exotic Food Supplies UM Administrative Field Trips Special Equipment Other General Expenses 10 . It provides income to supplement the Culinary Arts program operation and offers students competency building experiences. field trips. culinary team sales. specialized equipment. Student Snack Bar and Dining Room (Index Code MCT017) is an account designed very much as an independent business. dining room tips. c.

(i. Currently and historically. and 15 percent supports catered functions (see Exhibit AI). low-cost meals for UM COT students. faculty. the Student Snack Bar and Dining Room run very efficiently. It provides income to supplement the Culinary Arts program operation and the Outreach program. government/private industry grants) at what point will the program be self-sufficient? There is no outside funding. Communication within Culinary Arts is efficient due to the small 11 . Will this program be able to continue after outside funding expires? No outside funding is provided. c. restaurant. The goal of the business is to budget menu prices to reflect a 50 percent food cost and to operate at a break-even point. 6. It provides a competency-based and realistic learning environment for culinary students. Strengths. It offers non-traditional students noncredit and continuing education experiences. The Student Snack Bar and Dining Room functions as a non-profit entity providing high-quality. If the program operates any income producing business (catering cafeteria. Outreach Culinary Courses (Index Code MCTI35) is an account designed to operate under “cost recovery” parameters. a la minute student learning experience. What are the major strengths and weaknesses of your program as it relates to this section in comparison to the ACF Accrediting Commission Standards? a. Approximately 85 percent of food expenditures provide an environment for an a la carte. Culinary faculty strives to keep catered events within the competencybased mandates and to follow the instructional time frame. and the general public. staff.Section 3 — Organization and Administration — Standard 3 Assessment e. (1) Communication. vending) describe how those funds relate to the program’s operations and provides for capital expenditures. b. If you receive any outside funding.e. Categories for this account index are: Food Uniforms Instructor Salaries Supplies Tools UM Administrative Assessment Linen Printed Materials Other General Expenses a.

anywhere via Microsoft Outlook and common e-mail access. Facilities personnel also administer a preventative maintenance program. and (f) inviting faculty and culinary students to join in cutting-edge developments such as composting. (b) The Facilities Department supports a clean and sanitary environment. (c) allowing access to surplus equipment and supplies. (2) UM Student Dining Services. the COT’s culinary program maintains strong ties with the award-winning University of Montana Student Dining Services. This multi-million dollar department supports our programs by (a) enabling quality culinary employment for many of our students within an ACF certification-based organization. sustainable cuisine. (See Exhibit AG. 12 . This enables superior communication and makes available a variety of resources. (e) encouraging dining services chefs and administrators to participate in advisory committee meetings. and culinary workshops. All COT faculty and staff can communicate anytime. (b) The University of Montana Health and Occupational Safety Department provides periodic sanitation and safety inspections and advises faculty and students as to proper procedures. As a program within the University of Montana.Section 3 — Organization and Administration — Standard 3 number of personnel. (c) Public Safety polices the campus and is available to students and faculty in matters which require law enforcement. Internet and e-mail access allow communication both internally and externally. (b) providing an internship establishment in the past as well as the future. (d) embracing our program within the powerful purchasing structure of The University of Montana system.) (3) UM Collaboration. recycling. Our partnership with the University of Montana system provides benefits to the COT Culinary Arts program by sustaining an infrastructure of professional support in the following areas: (a) The competent and well-staffed Facilities Department keeps the kitchen laboratory equipment operating properly and safely. Culinary staff and faculty share the same office space.

Brian Larson. b. While the Program Director exercises day-to-day management of his resources. He participates in interviews and discusses adjunct faculty course evaluations with the department chair. (b) (c) (d) A challenge does exist when accommodating faculty use of personal or sick leave. Chef Campbell is subject to this evaluation process. resulting in a cohesive organization. This structure is sound and allows for a systematic flow of ideas. he does have input into the process. While he does not formally evaluate other tenured or tenure-track culinary faculty. The faculty contract provides five personal leave days each academic year. reports directly to the Associate Dean and Dean of the COT.Section 3 — Organization and Administration — Standard 3 (d) The University of Montana Recycling Department aids in promoting an ecologically sound environment while exposing students to recycling trends and educates them in these types of systems. (1) Personnel Management. Program directors work cooperatively with the department chair under the auspices of the faculty collective bargaining agreement to address faculty concerns. In turn. The daily operation of Business Technology Department programs is the responsibility of various program directors. (See the organizational charts at the end of this section or Exhibit G1). A challenge in a University setting is for program directors to assist faculty and staff in developing and realizing their career goals. Tom Campbell does supervise the cashier position and has the responsibility and authority to conduct personnel evaluations. This involves motivating them toward further education. including Chef Campbell. who report directly to the department chair. (4) Organization. policy requires he/she gain formal approval from the Chair of the Business Technology Department and 13 . The interface between the COT and the University system is from Dean Barry Good to The University of Montana Provost’s and President’s offices. Adjunct faculty are hired as temporary employees and evaluated on a semester by semester basis and Chef Campbell does have direct input into this process. If a Culinary Arts instructor wishes to use a personal leave day. he does have limited authority in some areas: (a) Faculty evaluation is conducted for all tenured or tenure-track culinary faculty by a process set in place by the faculty and administered by the Faculty Evaluation Committee. It also involves making them aware of shortcomings which may hinder their professional advancement. the Business Technology Department Chair. and extra-classroom activities. The system is measured and thorough. professional development. Weaknesses. Decisions to retain adjunct faculty are made on a semester basis.

It creates a similar demand on the Program Director to cover kitchen/station courses. Given that Chef Campbell is the president of the ACF local chapter and University of Montana Dining Services is the chapter’s major supporter. c. Use of personal leave creates the need for Tom Campbell or other instructors to cover kitchen/station experiences. Preparation of the five budgetary indexes is not currently part of the Program Director’s responsibility. Sick leave is rarely anticipated and does present an immediate challenge in covering kitchen/station experiences. has made efforts to balance budgetary indexes at the end of the fiscal year a challenge. This particular technology will be especially helpful to maintain a dialogue with advisory committee members. Chef Campbell will continue working on a regular basis to strengthen the relationship between The University of Montana Dining Services and the Culinary Arts program. (b) 7. Notification of a sick-leave absence is communicated by the faculty to both the department chair and Tom Campbell.Section 3 — Organization and Administration — Standard 3 the College of Technology Dean. Chef Campbell will continue to participate in professional development activities which will in turn lead to continual program improvement. b. Program Director. This. While the Program Director exercises day-to-day management of his resources. (2) Budgetary Control. This will establish an even stronger connection among culinary faculty. which puts a strain on their teaching schedule. d. A plan for substitute faculty should be in place to accommodate personal leave and absences. Rarely does the signature procedure precede the date of absence because it is cumbersome to route the request form in time for the department chair to grant the request. He will use “e-meetings” to promote communication and to keep appropriate people aware of issues which affect them. in turn. he does have limited authority in some areas: (a) The energy crisis has manifested itself within the Culinary program and has made anticipation of costs erratic. Without the opportunity to forecast trends in costs as well as projections of enrollment leads to a deficiency in purchasing and planning. The advisory committee meetings will be held each semester. How do you plan to use the results of this section of the Self Study to maximize the strengths of the program and to minimize any identified weaknesses? a. staff. Chef Campbell will continue communication both externally and internally. 14 . and members will continue to be encouraged to participate and interact with program faculty in program evaluation. it is natural and necessary there be a close relationship between these two entities. and administration.

2. and to educate them concerning the importance of culinary program needs. ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS Organizational charts for Culinary Arts (Exhibit G) are reproduced in the following pages. Exhibit G Exhibit H Exhibit I Exhibit J 15 . REQUIRED EXHIBITS 1. A conscious effort will be made to praise personnel from these areas for their contributions.Section 3 — Organization and Administration — Standard 3 e. while good support is now being provided by various UM service departments such as Dining Services. audited or un-audited. Financial statement for the program for the last fiscal year . and 4. Roster of advisory committee members and their job titles and minutes for past year. 3. Organizational charts for the administrative structure of the institution and the program.this can be the department budget. better relationships can and should be formed. to communicate clearly specific requirements. Facility Services and other Educational Departments. Job descriptions for program (s)related staff and faculty. Chef Campbell feels that.

Section 3 — Organization and Administration — Standard 3 University of Montana College of Technology Applied Arts and Sciences Business Technology Applied Computing and Electronics Health Professions Industrial Technology Culinary Arts 16 .

Section 3 — Organization and Administration — Standard 3 Program Director Thomas Campbell Related General Education Courses Work Study Student (part time) Advisory Committee Administrative Associate Cashier Dana Veike Culinary Faculty (Adjunct) Laura Swanson Culinary Faculty (full time) Culinary Faculty (Adjunct) Aimee Ault Culinary Faculty (Adjunct) Andrea Paskert 17 .

The following diagram shows the faculty and staff positions that were filled when this Self Study Began: Program Director Thomas Campbell Related General Education Courses Work Study Student (part time) Advisory Committee Administrative Associate Cashier (full time) Dana Veike Culinary Faculty (Adjunct) Laura Swanson Culinary Faculty (full time) Culinary Faculty (Adjunct) Aimee Ault Culinary Faculty (Adjunct) Andrea Paskert .Faculty and Staff — Standard 4 1.

Chef Swanson is a member of the Montana chapter of the ACF. Nutritional Cooking. She also team-teaches with Chef Campbell Capstone. She is an adjunct faculty member employed since 2007. Because of her aptitude. she holds a certification at Certified Culinarian and is actively engaged in a continuing education program whereby she will earn her Certified Chef de Cuisine status. In spring semester 2004 he developed and taught the new Nutritional Cooking course. Her enthusiasm for teaching and learning is infectious with the students with whom she enjoys a great relationship. Currently Chef Campbell. teaches program courses. CEC Chef Campbell’s background includes over twenty-five years of service in the culinary industry. and Dining Room Procedures.88 and was on the Dean’s List. restaurants. With the Art Institute. Since assuming this position in July 2003. participation in the ACF Montana Chefs Association. Chef Campbell was a full-time instructor for the eight-week Baking and Pastry course offered during Summer Session 2004. Introduction to the Food Service Industry. proprietorship of a restaurant. and grade point. he taught up to 75 percent of the courses offered and developed new courses for inclusion in their curriculum. Relate their backgrounds to the courses for which they are responsible. Chef Swanson earned her AOS degree with an overall GPA of 3. she was awarded the MCA Culinary Scholarship for 2006. Thomas Campbell. ServSafe Sanitation and Safety. Currently. She currently teaches three stations: Garde Manger (which includes charcuterie). Discuss faculty background strengths including any professional certifications held. work ethic. Baking and Pastry. He also provided support for the administration of the culinary program by writing syllabi and developing codes for sanitation and personal hygiene. and Outreach summer courses. including his present position as director of The College of Technology’s (UM COT) Culinary Arts program. as well as six years with the Art Institute of Seattle as a chef instructor. Laura Swanson Chef Swanson is a graduate from the UM COT Culinary Arts program and holds and AOS degree in Food Service Management. such as the Taste of Seattle annual benefit functions and culinary student competition team activities. Chef Campbell currently has eleven years experience in the culinary education field. b. a. She previously taught Meats and Vegetables and is a very capable front-of-the-house faculty member. including work in hotels. he has redesigned and instructed the Introduction to Food Service and Introduction to Food Service Sanitation courses. and catering and consulting business. Such courses were Northwest Food and Wine and International Cuisine.REQUIRED COMMENTS 1. in addition to his director responsibilities. . He coordinated many extracurricular activities involving students.

Swanson brings a diverse knowledge of real-life experiences to her teaching by being an Emergency Medical Technician. Introduction to the Food Service Industry. She is involved with revising the course with Chef Campbell integrating it into the Capstone Experience classes. and grade point. c.80 and was on the Dean’s List. Aimee also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and has won awards for her creative non-fiction and poetry. and Food Service Management Computer Applications. Chef Ault also is a participant in ACF sanctioned food competitions and won a silver medal in category K-1 in 2006.7 and is on the Dean’s List. She holds a GPA of 3. Ault brings a diverse knowledge of real-life experiences to her teaching by working fulltime in professional high-volume production. Because of her business experience and contacts with industry professionals. She is a full-time adjunct faculty member employed since 2007. and Sanitation and Safety. she holds a certification at Certified Culinarian and is actively engaged in a continuing education program whereby she will earn her Certified Chef de Cuisine status. Aimee Ault Chef Ault is a graduate from the UM COT Culinary Arts program and holds and AOS degree in Food Service Management. She currently teaches three stations: Nutritional Cooking. She received William Wright Hart’s III Award for Outstanding Humanities and Arts Student. work ethic. Her enthusiasm for teaching and learning is infectious with the students with whom she enjoys a great relationship. In the fall she is slated to teach Purchasing and Cost Controls. Capstone. Andrea Paskert Chef Paskert’s specialty is Baking and Pastry and currently is and part-time adjunct instructor for Patisserie FSM 275. Because of her business experience and contacts with industry professionals. . She was Editor-in-Chief of The Pacific Review literary magazine. she was awarded the MCA Culinary Scholarship for 2006. catering and fine dining food service establishments. 2007. Chef Ault earned her AOS degree with an overall GPA of 3. she is a great resource for student placement opportunities. She also teaches the summer Outreach Baking and Pastry class CUL 195T. she is a great resource for student placement opportunities. participation in the ACF Montana Chefs Association. She understands customer wants and needs and is able to translate these to students facing front-of-the-house challenges. and Excavation Laborer. Chef Paskert is a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education in New York with a specialization in Baking and Pastry. d. Emergency Dispatcher. She is also enrolled in The University of Montana and a candidate for a Bachelors of Science degree majoring in Communication Studies and Culinary Arts. Currently. Chef Ault is a member of the Montana chapter of the ACF. Because of her aptitude.

NY. Gluten-Free Desserts. Italian Baking. Candies. Vegan Bakery. Healthy Desserts.Chef Paskert continuously updates her knowledge with continuing education courses in Cake Decoration. She teaches part-time for the Dickinson Lifelong Learning Center: All About Chocolate. received a “Masters in chocolate” certification from The New School of Culinary Arts. Asian Desserts. Desserts for Entertaining. . Muffin Mania. Tantalizing Truffles. Pulled Sugar. Her accomplishments include developing a pastry menu for the Velvet Lounge in Brooklyn. Chef Paskert brings an industry related perspective by being the Owner of Creative Confections and Baker for Bear Claw Bakery. etc. is a member of the Retail Bakers Association. NY. Breads. Sorbet. Breakfast Delights.

whether it be personal or academic. Indicate whether faculty contractual obligations or requirements are different from any other faculty within the institution. in order to supervise participating students. He has provided opportunities for students to participate with demonstrations on the local NBC network affiliate—KECI “Chefs of Montana” television program (Exhibit Z). where advisors meet individually and collectively with students and parents to inform them of the culinary industry and issues associated with admission to the Culinary Arts program. The Program Director was instrumental in recommending the annual award of two-full tuition scholarships ($1500) UM COT students by this association. Because Culinary Arts hosts catered events and provides food service to the general population of students. the workday includes engagements where culinary staff members must be present at evening events. Currently. The Program Director is the person to address problems students encounter. or twenty-five hours per week. Describe faculty workload. There are differences between his position and other COT program directors given the nature of the hospitality industry. Most full-time faculty provides hands-on instruction five hours per day. including counseling. before seeking the resources of other departments.2. Periodically. throughout the year. He also encourages students to participate in charity auction events. The Program Director is the contact for all culinary student advising and shares the counseling duties with the retention coordinator. faculty. and public budgetary demands are more complicated than other programs. Chef Campbell works with five separate budget configurations including one representing the profit-or-loss business of the student cafeteria. Contractual obligations for the Program Director are different from those of other culinary faculty because he holds a supervisory/faculty position. (Typically a part-time faculty member is in class three hours per week. The Program Director has the ultimate responsibility to define whether or not these events fit within the curricula and are beneficial to the education of culinary students. Students are invited to join and participate in the Montana Chef’s Association (the local chapter of the ACF). Within this realm. Advising sessions are held periodically throughout the academic school year—twice a semester and three times during the summer. Faculty workload is limited to two categories: full-time tenure or adjunct faculty and parttime adjunct faculty. such as catering for UM COT and community functions. and to be involved with cooking segments on the local affiliate of National Public Radio.) Extracurricular activities for full-time faculty include the coordination of catering events that take place at the UM COT. Introductions to culinary program options include open houses and advising sessions. staff. and extracurricular activities involving students. he has taken strides towards introducing the students to other educational environments such as cooking demonstrations for area high school culinary classes. Part-time faculty provides instruction as dictated by the number of credit hours of the course they teach. He is assisted by the Business Technology 18 . teaching.

Stocks. and how action plans are developed. Distinguish between professional development that focuses on technical skills versus instructional skills. Currently. The Culinary Program is governed by two standards for faculty professional development: (1) Culinary Arts is subject to The University of Montana and College of Technology Unit Standards (see Exhibit V). Assessment of professional development is required by these standards in order for faculty to be granted normal raises. Include a description of teaching assistants and their roles. the student-to-teacher ratio in lecture is 18:1. The size of the kitchen laboratory allows for no more than eighteen to twenty students to participate in an effective and safe educational environment. 4. Be specific. Describe faculty/student ratios in both lecture and lab classes. This portfolio must be submitted annually for review. 3. release time conditions. Each member of the culinary faculty is responsible for responding to these standards by actively pursuing an upgrade in certification level commensurate with the level of expertise demanded by the ACF Accreditation Commission. the UM COT Culinary Program employs no teaching assistants. This arrangement allows each chef instructor opportunity to oversee and direct student production efficiently and effectively. (2) The ACF Accrediting Commission demands culinary faculty to conform to ACF certification standards in order to achieve and retain program accreditation. The other chef instructor simultaneously teaches three courses: CUL 156T Dining Room Procedures. Typically. Include the budget allocation. Describe the program for professional development of faculty. Faculty-to-student ratios in the laboratory situation currently are maintained in range of approximately 8:1 to 10:1. and CUL 158T Short Order Cookery. CUL 157T Pantry and Garde Manger. Standards include on-going professional and educational development. hands-on instruction is divided into two groups. The purpose of attending these conferences is to update certification credentials by taking written tests and practical examinations. Each individual faculty member is expected to document his/her fulfillment of requirements and to maintain a professional portfolio using the Faculty Evaluation Committee format. tenure. a. and CUL 165T Baking and Pastry. b. Faculty professional development includes attending ACF-sponsored events such as the Western Regional and National Conferences. 19 . In culinary courses the same numbers of students who participate in the laboratory are present in a lecture class. The number of students may vary in other program lecture and laboratory courses. One chef instructor simultaneously teaches three courses: CUL 161T Meats and Vegetables.Section 4 — Faculty and Staff — Standard 4 Administrative Assistant and the College’s business operation personnel for all budgetary matters. CUL 160T Soups. merit raises. and Sauces. and promotion. Because of this.

and feedback at these meetings. These individuals also participate in the preparation of documents for curriculum changes.Section 4 — Faculty and Staff — Standard 4 Personal certification also includes attending culinary workshops to improve upon techniques such as wine tasting. d. suggestions. They provide support for all clerical functions including word processing. Describe how adjuncts. 6. participate in program meeting and they are kept informed in the weekly faculty-staff meeting as well as by e-mail.. processing of review forms. Application Clinic. participate in culinary workshops. Chef Campbell attended relevant seminars such as “Fund Raising for Your Chapter. f. and take part-time culinary positions to learn new trends. As president of the local ACF chapter. The Business Technology Department has one full-time administrative assistant and two student work-study personnel. participate in planning. are evaluated. program planning and priority setting. staff members. the knowledge bowl competition and the chef-of-the year cooking competition. and the Program Director. staff. and cuisines. for class scheduling. ideas. The Program Director conducts faculty meetings and keeps the minutes. Each faculty member is expected to keep a record of anything that affects the Culinary Arts program and to present his/her concerns.” He also attended the chapter’s "Educators’ Workshops” and “Certification. and marketing techniques. c. Faculty are encouraged to volunteer for special events. Describe faculty meetings and other situations where the faculty actively participate in policy formation. meeting place and set up). part-time faculty. etc. copying. 20 . (Part-time faculty are held to the same evaluation guidelines as full-time faculty. pastry techniques. Culinary Arts faculty meetings are held every Tuesday afternoon during the fall and spring semesters. These meetings are important in maintaining open communication between faculty. etc. teaching assistants. techniques.) 7. and administration. audio/visual aids.g. and coordination of self-study inspection visits (e. 5. ice carving competition. part-time faculty are kept informed. such as at the American Academy of Chefs dinner during the Regional Conference. They have equal voice in matters involving the Culinary Arts program. Describe the secretarial and support services available to the program. Other focuses on culinary instructional skills include the junior hot food competition. An open invitation is extended to the Business Technology Department Chair as well as to the Associate Dean and Dean of the UM COT. Participants are full-time faculty. Also involved with certification and professional development is networking with industry professionals.” e.

Strengths (1) The Culinary Arts program is blessed with devoted faculty members with many years’ service to the culinary and food service industry. Additionally. Every instructor is committed to ensuring quality educational experiences for students. (5) The support provided by the department administrative assistant is available and critical to the efficient operation of the Culinary Arts Program. counseling. How do you plan to use the results of this section of the Self Study to maximize the strengths of the program and to minimize any identified weaknesses? a. (4) The Program Director. 21 . part-time faculty to provide expert instruction to augment culinary studies. faculty/student ratios.Section 4 — Faculty and Staff — Standard 4 8. What are the major strengths and weaknesses of your program as it relates to this section in comparison to the ACF Accrediting Commission Standards? a. Our biggest weakness is faculty terminal degrees and industry experience. regular departmental communication and meetings occur. being the president of the local chapter of the ACF. As justification for proper adherence to ACF Accreditation Standards the study gives a information and data that can be used and referred to as the program continues to evolve. (3) Faculty and Staff meetings are kept at an informal level and are held each week to promote involvement of personnel in all educational and procedural decisions. b. and extracurricular activities are reasonable and designed to ensure that quality time is spent with students. b. teaching. (2) Faculty workload. The program is fortunate to be able to rely on highly qualified. The faculty strengths identified in this study will continue to be used to bolster program quality and be called upon to enhance regularity of the program as identified in the report. 9. An ongoing plan is in place to rectify these deficiencies. Weaknesses (1) The emphasis on professional development must continue in order to ensure the quality of the program steadily increases. brings special opportunity to the student Culinarian by providing an important link between education and the culinary professions.

Teaching schedule in effect for time of the on-site visit. d. Faculty meeting minutes from the last year. Personnel data sheets/IPD’s or Personal development plans for all full and parttime faculty (use Faculty Professional Development Report forms provided by the Commission.Section 4 — Faculty and Staff — Standard 4 c. Exhibit K Exhibit F Exhibit L Exhibit F 22 . Preparation of the study has created a communication analysis which will be used to assist faculty to work together and better serve the needs of students. This study has forced concentration on administrative procedures and use of the talents of support staff. REQUIRED EXHIBITS 1. 3. Copies of all current instructors’ certificates or licenses. 2. do not include resumes). 5.

27 . 6. as well as specialized cooking courses geared to the gourmet-enthusiast public. The goal was to develop more course-specific culinary subjects. Introducing summer courses by aligning with the Outreach Program thus allowing the Program Director to use the facility to offer professional continuing education courses. Design and Analysis and replacing it FSM 271 Capstone.  and  Internship – FSM 290T to create a virtual food and beverage service establishment. 2. 4. Introducing a required. 7. 5.   8. four-credit Internship – FSM 290T. 9.  This  allowed theories in FSM 271 to become project applications in the computer lab. Patisserie – FSM 275. Revising the more advanced FSM 275Patisserie course to serve as an extension to the Capstone experience course.Section 5 Curriculum — Standard 5 PROGRAM CHANGES During 2006 and 2007. Changes included: 1. Sanitation and safety. is now offered as a two credit course and culminates in the award of the NRAEF ServeSafe certificate. Chef Campbell and Brian Larson. Replacing Food Production–Math 114T with Introduction to Algebra – MAT 100D in order to satisfy General Education credit requirements for graduation. Expanding the credits for Short order Cookery CUL 158T in order to represent the actual hours spent in lab. Deleting FSM 271 Menu Layout. Deleting Food Service Management Accounting – FSM 266T and expanding the course          content and credits of Purchasing Procedures and Cost Controls – FSM 270. CUL 175T (formerly taught within Introduction to the Food Service Industry). Expanding CUL 151T Introduction to the Food Service Industry to encompass a two hour lecture and three hour lab session. The plan was to shift course content to coordinate and integrate with Food  Service     Management Computer Applications – FSM 205. 3. rewrote the Culinary Arts curricula. Chair of the Business Technology Department.

which was revised on March 11. Complete descriptions of the certificate and degree program are given in The University of Montana 2007-2008 catalog (Exhibit E) and the Culinary Arts Conspectus (Exhibit AJ). 3. and Sauces Meats and Vegetables Baking and Pastry Purchasing Procedures and Cost Controls Capstone Patisserie Internship √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ 28 . Stocks. which allows entry into food service management positions. 2. Following are course requirements for the two programs.Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAMS 1. Required Knowledge and Competencies (Exhibit M) gives contact-hour allocations by course and for laboratory and classroom activities. See Exhibit E for course descriptions. Course Contact Hours Worksheet (Exhibit AC) also contains this information. and Sauces Meats and Vegetables Baking and Pastry Nutritional Cooking Intermediate Algebra Organizational Psychology Technical Writing Psychology of Management and Supervision Food Service Management Computer Applications Dining Room Procedures Pantry and Garde Manger Short Order Cookery Soups. The following two paragraphs define culinary programs in brief so as to present a basis for subsequent discussions. The one-year Culinary Arts Certificate of Applied Science Program is designed for entry level into the food service industry. The two-year Food Service Management Associate of Applied Science Degree Program consists of all courses required in the Certificate of applied Science Program plus a second year of management-oriented courses. Required By Course Course Name Certificate Degree Number Program Program COM 150S CRT 100 CUL 151T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 180T MAT 100D PSY 110S WTS 115 BUS 243T CRT 205T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 270T FSM 271T FSM 275T FSM 290T Interpersonal Communication Computer Literacy Introduction to Food Service Industry Dining Room Procedures Pantry and Garde Manger Short Order Cookery Soups. Stocks. 2008.

Educational Policies: Chef Campbell’s experiences as a student at the Culinary Institute of America and as a member of the culinary faculty of the Art Institute of Seattle led him to place value in well-documented courses. informally or formally. The University of Montana. Therefore. and grading criteria. all Culinary Arts course offerings include the following written instruments. communicated to students via syllabi. definition of special projects. 29 . to be given to each student: a. Daily Assignment Sheet: Must contain reading assignments. He/she is required to answer. College of Technology Culinary Arts Program requires that faculty members have day-to-day reminders of lesson content and detailed plans for achieving course objectives. Lesson plans will be followed by substitute faculty.Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 DOCUMENTATION OF COURSES 1. as well as course overviews. Course Syllabus: Must contain the following elements: (1) Course description (2) Course objectives (3) Course overview (4) Grading procedures and scale (5) Required textbooks and other resources (6) Special assignments or projects (7) Reference to the student dress code (8) Faculty office hours (9) Competency checklist for students where applicable b. 2. for execution of the plan and its satisfaction of course objectives. Lesson Plans: Each faculty member submits a written daily lesson plan to the Program Director before Lesson 1 is administered for his/her assigned course. as a matter of policy.

supervision and coordination of station responsibilities. All courses require students to learn and demonstrate communication skills through oral presentations and written projects utilizing computer skills. teamwork. field trip. Objectives concerning mathematics are met by classroom exercises. faculty continuously review traditional course offerings. Summarize the manner in which the curriculum: a. and conceptualizing restaurant design. and an historical and philosophical viewpoint. special projects. Many program objectives include communication skills which are absolutely essential in the food service industry. foundations of the principles described in the ACF Code are introduced. Courses also require the use of communication skills in planning. and laboratory work. (See Exhibit O) b. apply relevant experiences. and writing menus. In addition. solicit the wisdom of local food service professionals.Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 REQUIRED COMMENTS 1. mise en place lists. integrates the code of ethics of a national professional association in the program. Students must demonstrate achievement of objectives relating to culinary skills throughout the food preparation courses where all the principles listed above come to bear. From this course forward these standards are reinforced and put into practice in every course whether it is in the classroom. Students are required to apply culinary and business mathematical principles to nearly every course. fulfills the stated objectives of the program. and presentation sequences. analyzing. production schedules. In developing programs of instruction. All food preparation courses demand portion controlled costed recipes and requisitions that affect purchasing and inventory systems throughout the programs. Students are required to utilize communication skills by organizing and prioritizing tasks through recipe development. Starting at the beginning of the curriculum with CUL 151T Introduction to the Food Service Industry. 30 . or laboratory. they must demonstrate a sound foundation of basic culinary principles involving sanitation standards. and inject modern methods and equipment into a dynamic curricula plan. The Culinary Arts programs at the College of Technology (UM COT) rely on the Culinarian’s Code of the ACF (Exhibit AN) as the basis for philosophical inspiration towards professionalism and attitude to be instilled in each student. workplace. These requirements are embedded in the goals stated in Section 2. The Food Service and Hospitality Industry requires employees and managers to have skills which reflect modern industry and business.

and ability to interact with individuals from varying backgrounds. guest chef appearances. c. namely Intermediate Algebra (MAT 100D). There are courses that special emphasis is given to these areas. With regard to developing competence in communication. An internship program was added to the curriculum to place students directly in the community with culinary professionals. Many courses rely on field trips to businesses to emphasize and augment the curriculum. Students demonstrate problem solving and leadership competencies in nearly every course of study. Organizational Psychology (PSY 110S). mise en place lists. and Capstone (FSM 271). One example is the baking and pastry course that features a project where the students tour a local bakery and interview the manager or owner. The Student Handbook (Exhibit AA). apply their experiences. 2. leadership. cooking demonstrations. and writing menus. and inject modern methods and equipment into a dynamic curricula plan. The Program Director encourages students to participate in the community with auction events. television cooking shows (Exhibit Z).Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 The standards of the ACF Culinarian’s Code are reflected in the Standard Personal Hygiene and Dress Code (Exhibit AM). 31 . problem solving. faculty continuously look at traditional course offerings. production schedules. Students are required to utilize communication skills by organizing and prioritizing tasks through recipe development. and leadership: The Food Service and Hospitality Industry requires employees and managers to have skills that reflect modern industry and business. and presentation sequences. catered events. These principles are addressed in orientation presentations and open house functions. Describe how the curriculum develops competence in communication. solicit the wisdom of local food service professionals. The Culinary program also requires the use of communication skills in planning. Psychology of Management and Supervision (BUS 243T). adherence to which is required for student participation in every culinary class. and conceptualizing restaurant design. problem solving. In developing the programs of instruction. Many program objectives involve communication skills which are absolutely essential in the food service industry. These requirements are reflected in the goals which are stated in Section 2. and culinary workshops. analyzing. which every student is given at his/her entry into the programs. supervision and coordination of station responsibilities. provides opportunities for students to become familiar with the profession of culinary arts and the relationship of culinary arts to other professions. competitions. All courses require students to learn and demonstrate communication skills through oral presentations and written projects utilizing computer skills. details these codes.

geographical. This multi-million dollar department supports the Culinary Program by: (1) enabling quality culinary employment for many students within its ACF certificationbased organization. and age group.) b. (2) providing an internship establishment in the past as well as the future. it should be noted that they come from a wide spectrum of the population representing nearly every religious. sustainable cuisine. the basic principles of cooking and even some of the language used everyday in the curriculum is gleaned from classical French cookery and the studies of Escoffier. Previously mentioned in Section 3 is the relationship the UM COT culinary programs have with The University of Montana Dining Services. Describe the program’s use of community resources. The nature of culinary arts is steeped in the idea of regional cuisine from this country and around the globe. Students are taught to embrace this philosophy in every course. Indeed.Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 In terms of the students’ ability to interact with individuals from varying backgrounds. and culinary workshops. (1) FSM 270 Purchasing Procedures and Cost Control and CUL 151T Introduction to the Food Service Industry – Chef Ault attended the Food Services of America’s food show 32 . (3) allowing access to surplus equipment and supplies. including field trips and guest speakers. and (6) inviting faculty and students to join in cutting-edge developments such as composting. ethnic. (See Exhibit AG. Many courses augment classroom activities through field trips. The COT and the Culinary program prohibit students from discriminating in these regards and strive towards the enhancement of differences to bring about new perspectives and learning situations. Be specific. The University of Montana and the City of Missoula is an environment where students from varying backgrounds feel comfortable. 3. (4) embracing the program within the powerful purchasing structure of the University of Montana system. It is impossible to ignore the joy of ethnic and social diversity that is fundamental to and drives the culinarian. recycling. Examples of these are and may be viewed in entirety in Exhibit AI. a. (5) encouraging Dining Services chefs and administrators to participate in the advisory committee.

CEC and a local restaurateur. From this the student proceeds with the proper understanding of the “big picture. (See Exhibit AI). microbreweries. and restaurants. Students were required to write a synopsis of the trip. present to the class the business plan for his new restaurant. (2) CUL 265T Baking Processes and Procedure – Chef Campbell and Chef Swanson assign a student project requiring a visit to a local bakery.Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 in Spokane every fall since 2004. The COT Culinary Programs meet all the “Required Knowledge and Competencies” set forth by the ACF Accreditation Commission. 33 . Are there any areas of the “Required Knowledge and Competencies” which are not completely met by your program? If yes. This course also invites a certified pastry chef for demonstrations and quest speakers. describe. 4. The visit includes a tour and interview with the manager or owner. What is the rationale for the organization and sequencing of courses in the program (s)? The program provides the necessary foundation with introductory courses supplemented with support courses.” No student may enter food station experience courses unless he/she successfully completes CUL 151T Introduction to Food Service Industry with a C grade or better: Once students have a foundation. the curriculum is designed so courses build upon one another forming stepping stones to each next level. 5. Students present their findings in a written report. They also were fortunate to have Bob Zimmerino. (3) FSM 271 Capstone—have featured many field trips and guest speaker engagements. During spring semester 2008 the class visited local wineries.

b. a. The requirements include communications (written or verbal) computation and human relations.Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 6. Stocks. What are the specific requirements for graduation from the program? These are listed below: Course Number COM 150S CRT 101 CUL 151T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 180T MAT 100D PSY 110S WTS 115 BUS 243T CRT 205T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 270 FSM 271 FSM 275 FSM 290T Course Name Required By Certificate Associate of Applied Program Science √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ Interpersonal Communication Introduction to Computers Introduction to Food Service Industry Dining Room Procedures Pantry and Garde Manger Short Order Cookery Soups. and Sauces Meats and Vegetables Baking and Pastry Nutritional Cooking Intermediate Algebra Organizational Psychology Technical Writing Food Service Management AAS Degree Program Psychology of Management and Supervision Food Service Management Computer Applications Dining Room Procedures Pantry and Garde Manger Short Order Cookery Soups. What are the general requirements for the certificate or degree from the institution offering the program? Each program of the UM COT must be compliant with requirements set forth by Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities and Montana Board of Regents. Design and Analysis Patisserie Internship 34 . Stocks. and Sauces Meats and Vegetables Baking and Pastry Purchasing Procedures and Cost Controls Menu Layout. Graduation Requirements.

Costed recipes f. Some of the methods of instruction which correlate theory and actual practice include: a. guest speakers. Preliminary requisitioning of product e.Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 c. The foundation of culinary principles is formed prior to the student receiving hands-on training in the kitchen lab. what is the rationale? The COT Culinary Program meets the Montana Board of Regents and The University of Montana requirements. Pricing of menus k. Describe how your courses correlate theory and actual practice in the lab. This preparation may be in conjunction with daily course objectives. If program credit or hour requirements exceed those required by the state or institutional accrediting body. Presentation and service sequences Once the student has studied and had the opportunity to discuss the learning outcomes with faculty. 35 . Audio/Visual resources including PowerPoint presentations. Demonstrations by faculty. d. Plating diagrams j. he/she is expected to come to class prepared to proceed with experiments and production in the kitchen laboratory. Production schedules i. Mise en place sheets g. Lectures b. etc. 7. Station diagrams h. video library. and on field trips (Exhibit AI) c.

The student was advised by the faculty and the Program Director on many occasions as to means for improvement. b. The following example better illustrates the problem and how the program remains flexible and adaptable to these differences. These workshops are free and available on a drop-in basis. These deficiencies were underscored by the fact that he posed potential safety threats to himself as well as to those around. The Retention Coordinator distributes these data to administration. The Program Director evaluates these data to identify trends in retention and provide information for program assessment. At this point the Programs Director. Dr. Efforts are made to identify “at risk” students and to advise them toward appropriate assistance. “7 Hours to Academic Success. chaired by Dr. Gallagher.Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 8. How does the program provide flexibility to adapt to individual differences among students (e. Changes in the registration process were implemented to require students to meet with program advisors prior to registration. Where necessary. Faculty and student support programs work closely with students who face challenges and assist them in skill.g.)? a. Faculty professional development activities now include annual advising training sessions. supported by the faculty. The COT Continuous Enrollment Committee. Meeting diverse needs is a very important part of the COT and the Culinary Program. Also. the Registrar’s Office gathers data regarding student withdrawal. Upon admission. etc. these assessment results are used to advise students regarding placement in mathematics and writing courses. The student support center offers personalized assistance to all students in all programs and courses as needed.” each semester. Early in the Food Preparation Kitchen Laboratory courses it became evident that one student was seriously challenged in a number of areas. addressed these issues with the Retention Coordinator and steps were taken to provide the student with resources that enabled success.. c. The culinary field offers some students unexpected challenges. and follow-up tutoring or individual assistance is available. The series is designed to help students be successful in their academic efforts. peer tutoring. Workshops are held at varying times to enable students to work around their class schedules. and staff personnel. remedial instruction. Gallagher offers a study skills workshop series. Group discussion is involved. He responded inconsistently and issues regarding fairness to the other students arose. d. One of the efforts is the assessment of incoming student competency levels in the areas of mathematics and writing. career refocuses or goal redefinition is explored. e. was formed about nine years ago to address retention issues and facilitates efforts to improve retention. The COT has made a concerted effort to improve academic advising. 36 . This includes areas such as teamwork and stress management. honors programs. faculty. knowledge and application development.

The Program sends up warning flags to students and faculty early enough in the semester for them to meet personally to discuss his/her difficulties. c. d. (2) An informal attitude prevails throughout the program with first names being the usual form of address. Because instructors and students sometimes interact socially or in off-campus activities. Faculty Demonstrations – Faculty demonstrations are given as planned classroom or laboratory activities or as impromptu demonstrations in the kitchen. Discuss instructional techniques and/or strategies used in the program. the instructor will gather his or her students informally to discuss what is to be done and how and why the activities relate to the course objectives. students often voluntarily refer to a faculty member in the style ‘Chef Smith’ or more simply ‘Chef’. counseling and psychological services. (See Exhibit AN). e. and undergraduate advising.” Therefore. financial aid. work. In recognition of the professional stature that is usually ascribed to by culinary graduates. classroom lectures are kept short and to the point. 9. b. Several areas of difficulty may be addressed with links to tutoring. Lectures – The program philosophy includes the maxim “Students learn best by doing. before a laboratory session. 37 . Informal Preparation Seminars – Often. the mutual respect indicated above is expected. The Provost’s Office has initiated an Early Alert Program to identify 100-200 level students who may be deficient in their grades. a. it is not unusual that lasting friendships are formed. Student/Student Relationships – Students are expected to treat each other with respect and professionalism albeit in an informal environment. (See Exhibit S). Toward that end. they often offer personal advice and critique in one-on-one sessions. Personal Counseling Sessions – The faculty is genuinely interested in the long-term successes of the students. In these situations. f.Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 f. math tutoring. Faculty/Student Relationships (1) The Culinary Arts Faculty seeks to create a professional environment where students have the opportunity to learn. This is a teaching technique on Conflict resolution used by faculty with respect to the ACF Culinarian’s Code. Sometimes the satisfaction of program objectives requires a student to assume the role of head chef in the kitchen. As each student nears graduation. faculty may offer job placement assistance. and perform as aspiring professionals. Students are encouraged to ask questions freely and to interact with faculty and the class as equals.

i. Student Projects – Student projects are assigned by the instructional staff and are usually designed to demonstrate competence in selected areas and to exercise students’ computational and computer expertise. there remains more subjectivity in grading than in a classroom. Quizzes 38 . While complete adaptation to these demands may take years. the Culinary Arts faculty is able to help students engage in part-time work in local food service industries for externship opportunities. Project c. (2) Through constant community interaction. Student Demonstrations – Student demonstrations are essential for ensuring that required skills and attitudes are acquired by the students. where possible.Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 g. When it becomes evident that a student is in trouble academically. Preparation and timely delivery of kitchen products creates an extremely busy and stressful atmosphere. Attendance/Participation b. Students are kept informed of their progress as often as they would like. These competencies are governed by rubrics and. multiple proctors take part in evaluation resulting in an objective consensus. h. Examples of evaluation methods are found in Exhibits M. The following format is the norm: a. How well these demonstrations are conducted determines part of their grades. as well as employment possibilities after graduation. Discuss grading procedures in both lab and lecture courses. 10. Each faculty member has the freedom to grade his/her students. Students are also encouraged to keep their “own grade sheet” and retain copies of competency check-lists. faculty and the program Director confer in private with that student. a more rigorous tool is utilized where competencies are assessed as a direct input to grading and point accumulation. In order to reduce subjectivity in lab courses. All culinary faculty are encouraged to develop and use objective testing instruments. N. A typical format for grading is exemplified in Exhibit AE. as well as. Grade sheets are updated on a daily basis and faculty are more than willing to share their progress. Include a description of how students are kept informed of their progress. With the laboratory situation in the food production courses. focusing on the entire kitchen staff acting as a well-organized team. the laboratory aspires to providing students with real-world learning and development opportunity experience. and O. their oral and written communication skills. Student Work (1) A majority of the student’s laboratory activities are geared to simulate an actual restaurant kitchen environment.

Video assignments i. These include a daily sanitation and safety report compiled by the Student Sanitation Steward. b. Examples of these inspection reports are in Exhibits R. It involves completing a cleaning checklist that he/she administers to the rest of the students. Include a description of the program’s use of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and its compliance to state and federal regulations. earthquake. Practical Exam e. Discuss how high standards of professional practice are taught. MSDS information is updated regularly. Extra Credit 11. which is designed to monitor the safe and sanitary flow of the preparation of food. Measures are in place to identify potential problems and hazards before they happen. (See Exhibits R and Y. The inspection report and cleaning checklist are then filed with the Program Director. Final Written Exam f. Along with this. and updates are posted in the kitchen laboratory for emergency purposes. Once the report is complete. and continues to upgrade. Students are required to pass the course CUL 175T Introduction to Food Service Sanitation and Safety.Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 d. kept in the Sanitation Steward Log book. Daily assignment h. emphasized and evaluated in the kitchen laboratories in regard to sanitation and safety. who is ultimately responsible for his/her laboratory space. examples of notebook criteria are in the syllabi for each course g.) 39 . and at the individual station areas in the kitchen. The following is a recapitulation: a. Notebook. An in-depth description of how high standards of professional practices regarding sanitation and safety are taught may be referenced in section 6-3. and the NRAEI ServSafe examination prior to admission into the kitchen laboratory. faculty also put in place procedures for addressing crisis situations such as fire. Y. The program continues to aspire to high standards of professional practice through all facets of the program Examples of how this is administered are offered in Exhibits R and Y. The Culinary Program also has instituted. Safety and sanitation are concerns of everyone associated with the program. c. it is acknowledged by the Chef Instructor. or foodborne illness outbreaks. Faculty and staff are required to have taken and passed the same type of course and the same examination. robbery. their HAACP system.

The Library at the COT maintains a well-stocked section devoted to culinary arts and was recently awarded over 500 volumes of cookbooks and a complete set of Gourmet magazines donated by alumni of The University of Montana. With such a large variety of resources available. and the student is given a blank form to be filled out and acknowledged by the librarian when completed. 13. The Program Director recently introduced a video checklist (Exhibit AO) which requires students to view videos pertaining to specific subjects of study. The Wine Spectator. and Gourmet.Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 d. overhead projectors. on-the-job training. and each classroom has the capability of supporting PowerPoint presentations. Describe how audio-visuals and other resources are used to support the teaching program. The Culinary Arts program encourages students to aspire to industry-related employment and requires. as well as chemical purveyance. instructors are free to design classroom presentations around those they deem to be most effective. which is responsible for overseeing safety and sanitation throughout all of their facilities. podiums. (If applicable) Describe how career related employment and/or experience (e. This on-the-job training is to help identify positions related to each student’s career goals. The culinary program also has access to over 100 instructional videos and the Program Director recently up-graded it to house the complete Culinary Institute of America’s video series. A percentage of the overall grade is awarded upon completion. Classrooms are equipped with various educational implements such as dry/erase boards. It is common for faculty and students to utilize the library resources to augment course materials. and television monitors. The library also subscribes to several culinary periodicals including. With the assistance of faculty. Bon Appétit. To augment the Health and Occupational Safety Department. a formal internship. Consequently. VCRs. Culinary Arts facilities are routinely inspected and held accountable to maintain strict standards of excellence in this regard. the Culinary Arts Program retains the ECOLAB Company for certified pest control maintenance. The National Culinary Review. 12. Internet. In addition. The University of Montana Mansfield Library has an annual budget of $2. cooperative training) provide the opportunity to practice at the professional level and how the experience is monitored so as to provide a valuable part of the curriculum. Faculty and students routinely use these educational resources in their classroom activities. Food Arts. in the newly reorganized curriculum. Assigned videos are placed on reserve with the library. The experience 40 . The University of Montana maintains the Health and Occupational Safety Department.500 to be used for culinary learning resources. the Program Director is now performing a review of all of these new resources with the intention of integrating relevant ones into courses as they prove to be useful.g. fellowships. externships.

Sample of lab evaluations. Weaknesses – The Program Director believes the program curriculum is strong and satisfies the requirements of Standard 5. 14. Sample of all required documents used in the supervised work experience portion of the curriculum (if applicable). faculty and the Program Director have revised and developed course documentation to reinforce assessment tools. 4. Guidelines set forth by the ACF have been instrumental towards this evolution and have transformed the program. How do you plan to use the results of this section of the Self Study to maximize the strengths of the program and to minimize any identified weaknesses? Course documentation as described herein. and the general public. AB Exhibit O Exhibit Y 41 . Sample of completed Equipment Safety Check Sheet Exhibit M Exhibit N. Strengths – Since the last Self Study. This is a clear step to better program management. This is a time-consuming effort requiring commitment of resources and standardization of documents. it is considered a significant step for program improvement. 15. Completed ACFFAC “Required Knowledge and Competencies” with referenced course syllabi attached. and increases occupational awareness and professionalism. faculty. prepares them for initial employment. REQUIRED EXHIBITS 1. The curriculum has evolved into one based on current industry trends and advancements in culinary educational practices. However.Section 5 — Curriculum — Standard 5 increases students’ skills. 2. and will make achievement of course objectives more verifiable. Students work a minimum of 180 hours during the Internship semester at an approved site and attend scheduled one-hour seminars. and 3. What are the major strengths and weaknesses of your program as it relates to this section in comparison to the ACF Accrediting Commission Standards? a. will make courses more visible to students. b.

reach-in compartment. and one ten-quart mixer. 41 . portable steam table. a disposal unit and pre-rinse area.Section 6 Facilities — Standard 6 REQUIRED COMMENTS 1. Describe how the facilities support the educational needs of the program. chemically sanitized. two twenty-quart mixers. a newer combi-oven (convection/steamer). two-stack convection ovens. three-door. and one portable heat lamp for the fry line. Station refrigeration includes two salad-prep Garde Manger sandwich stations (one located in the short-order area and the other located on the hot line for meats and vegetables). as well as a three-compartment sink with automatic dispensing of pot-washing detergent and sanitation solution. There are four. three-compartment deck oven. In addition. commercial mixers available at stations throughout the kitchen. reach-in units. The kitchen laboratory includes four commercial mixers. three heat lamps over the pass bar. complete with attachments and a recently purchased sausage stuffer. These are located in the storeroom area. single-compartment ware-washing machine. Hot-holding equipment includes a four-section. A two-quart ice cream freezer was recently purchased. there are eight Kitchen Aide four-quart. The kitchen also has its own free-standing Manitowoc ice-cube machine. one for dairy) and a walk-in freezer. Refrigeration equipment includes two walk-in refrigerators (one for produce. Exhibit P contains lists of major and minor equipment used in the Culinary Arts programs at the College of Technology (COT). and two. two flattops. some of the equipment has required effective corrective maintenance and preventative maintenance. and a larger. two broilers. and it continues to operate flawlessly. one forty-quart mixer. Because of the longevity of programs. two griddles. Augmentation of refrigeration includes two up-right. and gas-fired smoker for Garde Manger. Your description should include: a. equipment. The kitchen laboratory boasts three different banks of star burners and ovens with two deep-fat fryers. The ware-washing area includes a Hobart. fully functional Robot Coupes. one salamander. Equipment is adequate for the present curriculum and supports most of the required cooking essentials. a free-standing freezer.

assorted pastry tips. podiums. cake decorating turn-tables. with space being made available as required by the curriculum. as well as bain-maries. bread loaf pans. classroom space. as well as one hand-washing sink. pans. Also available for special functions such as the Capstone Dinner is a great array of facilities and equipment housed in the University Dining Services operation on the Mountain Campus. bowl scrapers. institutional serving spoons. Internet. pint units. tongs. quart units. VCR’s. springform pans. Storage implements include assorted full hotel pans. Cutting boards are all National Sanitation Federation approved and color-coded for prevention of cross-contamination. 42 . The kitchen laboratory is equipped with three commercial hood systems featuring fireretarding systems as mandated by federal and regional fire and safety regulations. etc. Additional items include pastry equipment such as pastry bags. cups. and six pans. as well as stainless steel counter space available as student preparation areas. b. Administrative Building. The kitchen laboratory also owns two institutional sized pasta machines with attachments. tart pans. There are two produce sinks.Section 6 — Facilities — Standard 6 The kitchen laboratory maintains a large assortment of small wares such as saucepots. etc. These are identified on the floor plans with the prefix AD. The kitchen also has a buffalo chopper for use in Charcuterie.) Classroom space for non-laboratory culinary program use is more than adequate. meat forks. bench scrapers. braziers. pancake turners. and television monitors. spatulas. Classrooms are well equipped with seating and desks. overhead projectors. (AD 14. and cast-iron skillets. dockers. There are several workbenches including five wooden baking prep tables. as well as graduated scoops and ladles. etc. and have appropriate ventilation and egress access as required by state fire and building regulations. as well as a number of various sized cutters. half-gallon units. baguette pans. tartlet pans. stockpots. egg pans. AD 06. Classroom areas are equipped with various educational implements such as dry/erase boards. third pans. sauteuses. stainless steel mixing bowls. There is a multitude of measuring devices for volume such as onegallon units.⎯all readily available for students to utilize. Classrooms are assigned at the beginning of each semester. etc. and two fully appointed locker rooms (one for men and one for women). lexans. sautoirs. and have the ability to include PowerPoint presentations in each classroom. muffin tins. off-set spatulas. half hotel pans. Exhibit Q contains floor plans for physical facilities. hamburger bun pans.

15. Stocks. and another six-star burner stove. with oven underneath. 43 . This area also features a storage shelf for sheet pans. Beyond the storeroom is an area for storage of kitchen equipment. one sixstar burner stove. as well as an area for the housing of Robot Coupes and small kitchen machines. A second computer is available to assist students with recipes. baking pans. and is adjacent to a gas-fired grill—a flat-top unit with oven underneath—and a two-basket. baking pans. c. as well as a walk-in freezer. It features a six-star burner. small wares such as pots and pans. with oven underneath. signage. ordering. menus. and produce and dairy walk-ins. one combination oven-steamer unit. The storeroom is equipped with scales for weighing incoming product and is utilized during inventory activities. and features one flat-top with oven underneath. Adjacent to it is a commercial refrigeration unit for storage. two electric proof boxes. two convention ovens. and spice racks.Section 6 — Facilities — Standard 6 The library and computer laboratories AD 12. (4) Soups. The Meats and Vegetables instruction area of the kitchen also has access to hot and cold-holding capabilities with a steam table and a cooler unit for mise en place. Kitchen laboratory space (see Exhibit Q) facilitates the instruction of up to twenty students giving each student proper access to all of the equipment necessary to perform laboratory exercises. (5) Meats and Vegetables Area – On the opposite side of the kitchen is a work area and laboratory space for the meats and vegetable station. and Sauce Preparation Area – This area is on the opposite side of the Oven and Bake Shop Area. It also houses a specific storage area for equipment. 14. compilation of notes and basic instruction in computer use. lab space. and storeroom control functions. a larger forty-quart bread mixer. 16. (3) Garde Manger/Charcuterie Area – Located adjacent to produce sinks and a commercial reach-in refrigerator. etc. Laboratory space for food preparation is divided mainly into six separate areas: (1) Storeroom Area – Houses all dry goods. as well as. deep-fat fryer. It also has access to a twocompartment produce sink for cooling of stocks. It contains one computer for inventory of product. (2) Bake Shop Area – Has three separate prep areas and make-up tables which contain a bank of Hobart mixers. etc. a bank of deck ovens. as well as a three-compartment reach-in for storage just off of the kitchen. and 17 provide students with access to computers which are available to aid in student projects.

and study tables on all floors provides quiet study locations. e-journal packages. and Gourmet. salads. The UM COT is a college within The University of Montana and is served by the Mansfield Library system. The Library at the COT maintains a well-stocked section (the largest collection in Montana) devoted to culinary arts and was recently awarded with over 500 volumes of cookbooks and a complete set of Gourmet magazines donated by alumni of the University of Montana. These collections are supplemented by an active interlibrary loan service through which the resources of other libraries are made available to students and faculty. This system houses several libraries throughout The University of Montana higher education institutions located statewide. Food Arts. Over 100 public workstations throughout the library system are wired for fast and stable Internet connectivity in support of electronic information resources. and an electric griddle. access to over 5. and other items prepared by the Garde Manger station. coffee machines. The library also subscribes to several culinary periodicals including: The National Culinary Review. group study rooms. d. In addition. Dillon. Library services include in-depth research and reference assistance.000 print and electronic journals. microwave ovens. and full-service computing and copying facilities. The Wine Spectator. and staff. Collections exceed 1. (See Exhibit AO. a deep fat fryer. soda dispenser. University of Montana Helena. These services include traditional library collections and electronic access to a network of research databases. gas-fired broiler. It also maintains a small snack bar. and coolers for holding condiments. Montana Tech.Section 6 — Facilities — Standard 6 (6) Short Order Cookery Area – This area maintains two reach-in salad prep areas. Here is where baked goods are sold. Bon Appetit. hot water.500 to be used for culinary library learning resources. and customers have access to toaster units.3 million bound volumes. the State of Montana awards an annual grant of $2. Butte. Sites include: The University of Montana in Missoula. pre-made sandwiches. depository collection.) 44 . student body. and a web-based library catalog. The University main campus houses a state-of-the-art Student Learning Center as well as study carrels. electronic journal subscriptions. heating lamps. Throughout this system is an integrated link of teaching and research information to provide the student with an array of information resources and services. resources (including the library). The culinary program also has access to over 100 instructional videos and the Programs Director recently upgraded it to house the complete Culinary Institute of America’s video series. concession area for service to the general public. faculty. beverages. The Carson Library of the University of Montana Western. pass bar area. and archives for special collections. and The University of Montana College of Technology.

45 . and staff of the COT. f. Associate Dean. Print capability is accessed via one laser printer located in the culinary offices and at various locations throughout the College of Technology campus. bulletin board. administrators. It has vending machines available and is used to cater events put on by the COT Culinary Arts program. stationary. and support from the Welding Technology program which is building a portable grill and smoker for the Culinary Arts programs. The Program Director has a separate office space with the ability to conduct consultations in private. and Administrative Officer of UM COT. since it is so close to the kitchen laboratory. and filing cabinets. it provides easy communication between faculty and staff and affords students easy access to faculty. a meeting room. bookshelves. Each of these office spaces is equipped with a personal computer linked to The University of Montana system as well as complete Internet access. Two eating facilities are served by the program: a general cafeteria and the Hunter Dining Room. some catered events. other. It is separate from all other departments and programs and ensures an element of quietude. it is convenient to share resources to benefit the curriculum in each particular area. Examples include: catered events provided by Culinary Arts. Also. computer access and instruction by the Business Technology department. It can comfortably seat up to 200 people and is also used as a study area for students. Culinary Arts personnel have access to the Administrative Offices which provide resources such as a copying machine. The dining room can seat up to 45 people and is used for luncheons. First. fax machine. faculty. it fosters an informal compatibility between faculty members. and uniforms. cafeteria/dining room. Beyond the dining room is an open facility⎯the central foyer area of the administration building⎯which is used daily for meal periods serving the general public. faculty offices. It is also a meeting place for lecture prior to the kitchen and front-of-the house lab experiences. Although the office area is small. Since the COT maintains programs in various trades. Culinary faculty offices are located just adjacent to the kitchen laboratory and storeroom in a mobile trailer unit and feature five office areas each complete with a desk. student population. The culinary faculty offices currently contain storage areas for linens.Section 6 — Facilities — Standard 6 e. access to the Dean. g. there are some benefits to this arrangement. as well as. mail room and mail boxes.

and students are charged as well. the Culinary Arts Program retains the ECOLAB Company for certified pest control maintenance as well as chemical purveyance. It is imperative that everyone be on the lookout for unsafe situations involving the maintenance of equipment. It involves completing a cleaning checklist that he/she administers to the rest of the students. The College of Technology Maintenance Department. These individuals have a responsibility for identifying. 46 . the Culinary Programs facilities are routinely inspected and held accountable to maintain strict standards of excellence in this regard. and the Department Chair to confer on assessment. Consequently. Describe how the facilities are maintained in a safe and sanitary manner. As described in the previous paragraph. 3. Along with this. measures are in place to identify potential problems and hazards before they happen. cost outlines and processes to release moneys for repair or replacement of equipment. This involves investigation of probable causes. Currently. current procedures require the Culinary Arts Director. the Maintenance Engineer. Describe procedures for maintenance and replacement of equipment. The inspection report and cleaning checklist is then filed with the Program Director. These include a daily sanitation and safety report compiled by the Student Sanitation Steward. Once the report is complete. (See Exhibits R and Y. safety and sanitation are concerns of everyone associated with the culinary programs. but all Culinary Arts faculty. oversee maintenance of the equipment within the facilities and gives special consideration to the equipment in the kitchen laboratory because of the nature of the equipment. who is ultimately responsible for laboratory space. problem solving. robbery. a department of The University of Montana Facilities Department. we have also put in place procedures for addressing crisis situations such as fire.Section 6 — Facilities — Standard 6 2. MSDS information is updated regularly and access is posted in the kitchen laboratory for emergency purposes. earthquake. staff. Faculty and staff are required to taken and pass the same type of course and the same examination. which is designed to monitor the safe and sanitary flow of the preparation of food. or food-borne illness outbreaks.) The University of Montana maintains the Health and Occupational Safety Department which is responsible for over-seeing safety and sanitation throughout all of their facilities. and evaluation. Students are required to pass the course CUL 151T Introduction to Food Service Industry and the NRAEI ServSafe examination prior to admission into the kitchen laboratory. Not only is the Maintenance Department responsible for preventative measures. it is acknowledged by the Chef Instructor. To augment the Health and Occupational Safety Department. The Culinary Program also has instituted and continues to upgrade their HAACP system. When maintenance is needed. reporting and rectifying kitchen sanitation and safety standards.

What are the major strengths and weaknesses of your program(s) as it/they relates to this section in comparison to the ACF Accrediting Commission Standards? a. b. 47 . Custodial. Faculty plan to engage in consistent application of expectations and monitoring of results in order to adhere to current industry standards regarding overseeing sanitation and safety. and students for suitable actions to be taken in critical situations. How do you plan to use the results of this section of the Self Study to maximize the strengths of the program and to minimize any identified weaknesses. Strengths (1) The University of Montana-Missoula provides access to Maintenance. culinary resource materials will be expanded and shall remain unparalleled in number and quality by any other library in Montana and neighboring states. including: a. and with proper emphasis.Section 6 — Facilities — Standard 6 4. Over time. Faculty intend to continue to utilize the excellent learning resources provided by the Library. and Health and Occupational Safety Departments. (3) Adequacy of classrooms and office space provides a positive learning environment for the program. The major focus is prevention of problems. to continue to give these the highest priority. as well as. (4) The resolve for everyone to take an active role in sanitation and safety is a tremendous benefit towards delaying any potential problems as well as preparing faculty. (2) Access to the University’s expansive library system is a wonderful resource opportunity for students and faculty. This relieves program faculty of several areas of concern and provides high-quality support. b. Regarding sanitation and safety. The age of the facility and equipment are problems and efforts are being made to relocate to a new campus with a complete state-of-the art culinary facility. The study has helped the College access its ongoing quality improvement strategies. Weaknesses While there are always improvements to be made. staff. 5. the Program Director believes the facilities are adequate to fulfill the current mission and goals.

title page of insurance certificate. faculty will establish relationships with industry which may identify grants or contributions to the Culinary instructional programs. Evidence that the physical facility meets fire and safety standards (copy of certificate (s) of insurance showing all coverage carried by the school/institution e. REQUIRED EXHIBITS 1. Such investigation will include possible procurement of surplus equipment from The University Student Dining Services and a tour of the storage facility in Helena that warehouses all used equipment from all state-run facilities. Certain equipment has been added recently such as a sausage stuffer. 2. ice cream freezer. Diagram/floor plan of kitchen and/or lab facilities.Section 6 — Facilities — Standard 6 c. Hobart mixing bowls. Principally through advisory committee interaction.g. digital scales. Exhibit P Exhibit Q Exhibit R Exhibit P Exhibit P 48 . Copy of Equipment Safety Check Sheet 5. List of major equipment used in the program. 4. The faculty intend to continue emphasizing preventative maintenance of the equipment while investigating possibilities of updating it. and other lesser items. Procurement of more modern equipment is a slow process given the enormous cost burden associated with kitchenwares. Most recent sanitation inspection. and 3. terrine molds. tamis. pasta rolling machine.

Section 7

Student Services — Standard 7
REQUIRED COMMENTS 1. State the criteria and policies established for admission to the program. All applicants to The University of Montana College of Technology (COT) must have a high school diploma or equivalent. To apply, applicants submit a completed application form along with a $30 application fee to the Admissions Office. The Culinary Arts Programs are filled on a first-come, first-served basis, and program enrollment is open resulting in 30 – 40 new students each fall. Before registering, each potential student is required to submit a copy of his/her high school diploma or GED certificate, health inoculation forms, and standardized test scores. Students’ are placed in appropriate writing and mathematics courses based on required standardized scores from ACT, SAT, COMPASS or on-line math placement assessments. If an applicant’s scores do not meet the required cut score for writing and mathematics the applicant will be required to complete developmental course work. Pre-registration advising for each student is available during Orientation sessions five times per year. 2. What is the program’s policy on accepting transfer credits? Applicable transfer credits are accepted from accredited higher education institutions. Transfer courses are evaluated on an individual basis and must be approved by University of Montana articulation evaluation agreements, the appropriate department chair, as well as, the Associate Dean of the COT. If transfer requests include culinary or food service management courses, the Business Technology Chair consults with the Culinary Arts Programs Director before transfer credit is allowed. Further, the Department Chair may require students to submit syllabi and course descriptions to enable him to make realistic decisions for course transfer requests. 3. Does your program give advanced standing or credit by exam? If so, based on what criteria? Students may attempt to challenge or test out of some courses at the COT. Individual arrangements must be made with the faculty, and approval must be granted by the appropriate department chair. Students must pass an examination with a satisfactory score as determined by the department to receive credit for the course. Culinary Arts courses with CUL and FSM

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Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7 rubrics are rarely eligible for credit by exam because of their experiential nature. Exceptions to this would be made only on an individual basis and only if it were possible to assess fully the student’s ability in a particular course. The University of Montana recognizes there are wide individual differences in the academic preparation and backgrounds of students because of the variety of learning opportunities afforded by books, television, travel, and work experience. In an effort to give credit for learning that takes place outside of the university classroom The University of Montana grants credit for some of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests. Credit for specific examinations is granted subject to approval of the appropriate academic department at The University. University policy for awarding credit on the basis of CLEP is as follows: a. Students must be enrolled in or applying to the undergraduate degree status. b. Grades of Pass will be recorded for all credits granted. c. There is no limit to the number of credits that may be awarded. d. Credits may be used toward general education requirements. Appropriate designations will be made by Admissions and New Student Services. e. The applicability of credits granted toward major requirements will be determined by the student’s academic department. 4. Discuss the attrition and retention of students for the last five years or since the inception of the program, whichever is less. The University of Montana College of Technology has instituted an Early Assistance Request program which is coordinated by the Retention Coordinator. The purpose of this effort is active intervention, particularly early in the semester, to resolve student problems which are interfering with their academic performance. The referral process is initiated by faculty and includes students’ participation. Referrals are made to the Retention Coordinator. If a student doesn’t follow up by contacting the Retention Coordinator, she will contact the student with a letter inviting him/her in for an appointment. At that point it is the student’s choice to utilize the assistance and resources offered. This referral is treated as confidential information to respect students’ rights to privacy. The advisor is notified that a student has or has not followed up with the referral. Retention data from Perkins Annual Reports is analyzed by Dr. Gallagher, Retention Coordinator. First-time enrolled students are tracked by cohort groups to determine the graduation rate within three years. The lowest graduation rate—16 percent—was for the 2000-2001 cohort group. Each subsequent cohort group has maintained a graduation rate

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Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7 average of 46 percent. The most recent data was compiled at the end of AY05 and reflects a graduation rate of 42.87 percent for Food Service Management AAS degree students. The UM COT recognizes the need to define what length of time should be considered when calculating attrition rates and who, of those who have left the program, should no longer be counted in the cohort group. To that end, a three-year graduation rate for a two-year degree program is utilized for retention statistical analysis. a. What are the trends? The practice at the UM COT is to track “persistence rates” as opposed to “attrition rates.” The persistence rate for the Food Service Management program is somewhat higher than the persistence rate for the general student population. For AY05 the overall persistence rate was 40.73 percent compared to the Food Service Management rate of 50.75 percent. (See Exhibit S.) b. What methods are utilized to increase retention? The UM COT Continuous Enrollment Committee, chaired by Dr. Gallagher was formed approximately four years ago to address retention issues, and facilitate efforts to improve retention. One of the efforts is the assessment of incoming student competency levels in the areas of mathematics and writing. Upon admission, these assessment results are used to advise students regarding placement in mathematics and writing courses. Also, the Registrar’s Office gathers data regarding student withdrawal. These data are distributed to administration, faculty, and staff personnel by the Retention Coordinator. The Program Director evaluates this data and uses them for planning and revision of the curriculum. Dr. Gallagher offers a study skills workshop series, “7 Hours to Academic Success,” each semester. The series is designed to help students be successful in their academic efforts. Workshops are held at varying times to enable students to work around their class schedules. These workshops are free and available on a drop-in basis. Group discussion is involved, and follow-up tutoring or individual assistance is available. The UM COT has made a concerted effort to improve academic advising. Faculty professional development activities now include annual advising training sessions. Changes in the registration process were implemented to require students to meet with program advisors prior to registration. Students who seek academic reinstatement to the Culinary Arts program meet with the Retention Coordinator and Program Director as part of the reinstatement process. Additionally, students who have lost financial aid are required to work with the Retention Coordinator to develop a plan for academic success as a condition for financial aid reinstatement. Students in either or both of these situations must meet weekly with the

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Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7 Retention Coordinator to monitor progress and troubleshoot potential difficulties which could impede student success. Orientation activities have always included meetings between the Program Director, culinary faculty, and new students. However, in the past two years, more time has been allotted for these meetings, and the Program Director provides information regarding the hospitality industry, career opportunities, and skills necessary for success in Culinary Arts. Students have an opportunity to ask questions and achieve realistic ideas about this career path and the course of study involved. Additionally, the Program Director monitors incoming student COMPASS scores and other placement tools and conducts one-on-one advising sessions with them. The faculty and administration believe this assists students in choosing appropriate courses to ensure a successful college experience. 5. Include all publications having to do with the program, including catalogs, brochures, advertisements, etc. The University of Montana catalog, brochures, and other publications are included in the Exhibits. (See Appendix 1 – List of Exhibits.) 6. Describe the procedures of the program regarding student grievances. Student grievances for all university students are handled according to the faculty contract, excerpts of which are as follows: 21.000 STUDENT COMPLAINT PROCEDURE: 21.100 PURPOSE The purpose of this section is to promote the just, prompt, and efficient resolution of student complaints concerning academic judgment by members of the bargaining unit based upon the criteria in 21.300. Student complaints about employment relations or other campus activities or policies extending beyond the immediate teaching/learning context are subject to other University policies and procedures including but not limited to conduct constituting a violation of the University Conflict of Interest and Scientific Misconduct policies. Student complaints alleging unlawful discrimination not intrinsically related to the academic process should be filed with the University EEO/AA Officer. Any complaint about academic judgment that accompanies alleged non-academic misconduct by a member of the bargaining unit may be addressed under the procedures of this action. This complaint procedure is intended to be used when specific actions of a faculty member had a specific adverse effect on the academic performance or academic record of a student. Complaints regarding the general quality of a faculty member's teaching are to be addressed through the faculty evaluation process. The parties shall make every effort to resolve problems that might ultimately become grounds for a complaint whenever possible prior to resorting to this procedure. NOTE: All time sequences in this section will exclude weekends and holidays

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Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7

21.200 RESORTING TO OTHER PROCEDURES If the student complainant(s) seeks resolution of a complaint in any non-University forum, whether administrative or judicial, the parties to a complaint under this section shall have no obligation to proceed further under the provisions of this section. It is understood, however, that the procedure under this section is the only appropriate University procedure for a student to dispute a decision solely involving academic assessment by a faculty member based upon the criteria listed in Section 21.300. 21.300 DEFINITION OF COMPLAINT The term "complaint" shall mean a claim or allegation by a student who is a real party in interest against members of the bargaining unit that: 1. The faculty member(s) significantly failed to carry out their responsibilities as defined in this contract; 2. And/or the faculty member(s) failed to maintain a responsible, professional relationship with the complainant(s), using the teaching/learning context as a means to extract inappropriate personal advantage or in any other way using professional authority for other than appropriate purposes. 21.400 STUDENT RESOLUTION OFFICER The president of ASUM shall appoint a Student Resolution Officer and an alternate or designee to act in case the Student Resolution Officer fails to act. The Student Resolution Officer or designee may represent any student and/or group of students who have a complaint. At the beginning of each new school year, the President of the University, or his/ her designee, shall schedule a meeting between the ASUM President, the Student Resolution Officer, and the UFA Student Complaint Officer. The purpose of the meeting is to review the student complaint procedures (including the time lines) pertaining to the student complaint procedure, as well as the responsibilities of all parties. 21.410 STUDENT COMPLAINT COMMITTEES There will be two (2) Student Complaint Committees. One committee will hear student complaints involving undergraduate student(s) and the other committee will hear complaints involving graduate student(s). The Chair of Faculty Senate shall appoint four (4) members of the bargaining unit who will serve on both the Undergraduate and the Graduate Student Complaint Committees. At least two (2) of the four (4) faculty members of the Graduate Student Complaint Committee shall have substantial experience teaching at the graduate level and in directing theses and dissertations. The Provost or the Provost’s designee shall serve as chair of the two committees and the President of ASUM shall appoint two (2) graduate students to serve on the graduate Student Complaint Committee and two (2) students, undergraduate or graduate, to serve on the Undergraduate Student Complaint Committee. Each, the University President and the Faculty Senate Chair, will also appoint two (2) alternates to serve on the appropriate committees with the same qualifications as other members. Under no circumstances shall any of the seven (7) members of the Graduate or Undergraduate Student Complaint Committees hearing the complaint be from the same unit or administrative office as the parties to the complaint. Both parties to the complaint may exercise one peremptory challenge of a committee member to hear the complaint. (See also 20.000 Sec. 3, c).

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Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7

21.500 FORMAL COMPLAINT PROCEDURE Step 1: Within thirty (30) days after the act or omission which caused the complaint, or following the date that the student knew or reasonably should have known of such an act or omission, the student shall bring the matter to the Student Resolution Officer or designee. The student shall within ten days confer with the person(s) against whom the complaint exists and the student or the Student Resolution Officer must identify this meeting as a Step 1 meeting to the person against whom the complaint exists. Additionally, if, during the course of a discussion with a student who complains about or objects to any feature of the faculty member’s academic performance, a faculty member concludes that the student is not satisfied with the explanation offered, the faculty member may identify such a discussion as a Step 1 meeting and so inform the student. Both parties to the complaint should make an effort to resolve the complaint during this meeting. Either party to the complaint may bring a witness to this meeting. Additionally, the Student Resolution Officer (or designee), and/or UFA representative (or designee) may serve as an advocate for their respective parties. Step 2: If the student feels the matter is unresolved after the Step 1 meeting, and the Student Resolution Officer or designee agrees to proceed with the complaint, the Student Resolution Officer or designee shall within fifty (50) days of the act or omission, schedule a non-binding mediation session which shall be held in some neutral place for the purpose of resolving the matter in lieu of filing a formal complaint and requesting a Step 3 hearing. Such mediation sessions shall be facilitated by volunteer School of Law students or Department of Communication Studies students who have successfully completed the mediation phase of their training and have agreed to mediate such disputes for ASUM, supervised by the appropriate faculty member in Law or Communication Studies. This Step 2 mediation session should involve only the student and respondent faculty member. A determined effort will be made to resolve the complaint in the Step 2 mediation session. If the requested mediation session cannot be arranged within ten (10) working days of the receipt of the request, the complainant(s) may proceed to Step 3. This deadline may be postponed by mutual consent of the parties. If either party has compelling reasons why they feel a Step 2 mediation session should not be held, they may request that the Provost schedule a Step 3 hearing. The Provost will review the request for a Step 3 hearing. Step 3: If the Step 2 mediation session could not be scheduled within ten (10) working days after the receipt of the request, the Student Resolution Officer may, within sixty-five (65) days of the occurrence of the act or omission, submit a formal written complaint, as specified in Section 21.510, to the Provost requesting a hearing before the appropriate Student Complaint Committee. If a Step 2 mediation session occurred and the student(s) and the Student Resolution Officer or designee believe the matter is unresolved, the Student Resolution Officer may, within five (5) working days, submit a formal written complaint, as specified in Section 21.510, to the Provost requesting a hearing before the appropriate Student Complaint Committee. In either of the above cases, the Provost will, upon receipt of the formal written complaint, send a copy to the UFA Student Complaint Officer. Should the Student Resolution Officer choose not to move to Step 3, the student may elect to file for a Step 3 hearing subject to the same filing requirements and deadlines. The student filing the complaint must include the reason(s) the Student Resolution Officer would not proceed

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Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7 with the complaint. Within fifteen (15) working days of filing a request for a Step 3 meeting, the Student Complaint Committee shall hold a hearing for all parties to a complaint, pursuant to procedures to be developed by the Committee in consultation with the University Legal Counsel, ASUM, the Student Resolution Officer, and the UFA Student Complaint Officer. The purpose of the hearing shall be to determine findings of fact and recommend either dismissal of the complaint, a warning letter, formal reprimand, and/or a specific remedy limited to curing the act or omission for which the complaint was filed. Nothing from the Step 2 mediation session may be used in the Step 3 hearing. During the 58 course of its deliberation, the Committee shall confer with the parties to the complaint and may confer with other individuals at its discretion. The Committee shall make its decision by majority vote. The decision of the Committee, and minority report, if any, shall be forwarded to the University President who may or may not accept the Committee's or the minority's report. The University President shall, within five (5) working days of receipt of the recommendations, either approve them or remand them to the Committee together with his/her objections and a suggested alternative resolution. The Committee shall, within five (5) working days of receipt of the President's suggested alternative resolution, either accept it or forward its own suggestion to the University President. The President may accept or reject the Committee's suggestion. Implementation of a specific remedy rests with the University President, whose decision shall be the final campus disposition of the complaint. The President shall provide the Committee with a rationale for the final disposition, should it differ from that suggested by the Committee. Upon issuance of the final decision, the President shall send copies to all parties involved. 21.510 COMPLAINT FORM The following complaint form shall be completed by the student as a request for a Step 2 meeting. If the complaint proceeds to a Step 3 level, the Student Resolution Officer shall complete the form as a request for a Step 3 hearing, summarizing the results of the Step 2 under number 5 (below, “Summary and Explanation of the Complaint”), and identifying and addressing any changes to the information provided on the Step 2 complaint form. 1. Name of student complainant(s): 2. Date(s) complaint occurred: 3. Name(s) of bargaining unit member(s) or administrator(s) involved in complaint: 4. Sections of contract on which complaint is based: 5. Summary and explanation of complaint: 6. Potential Witnesses: 7. Documents (identify here and attach): 8. Remedy Request: Dated this _____ day of ______________, 20__. Signature of Complainant 21.520 EXPEDITED PROCEDURE A student may elect to use this expedited procedure only to dispute a final course grade for spring semester, dismissal from an academic program, or decision preventing graduation. The Formal Complaint Procedure, described in Section 21.510, shall be modified as follows: The student may proceed without the Student Resolution Officer at Step 2 if the Student Resolution Officer or alternate or designee fails to contact the student complainant within three (3) days, excluding weekends and holidays, of the student's contacting the ASUM Student Resolution Office. If the student does not receive a response from the Student Resolution Officer within three (3) days of his/her initial contact, the student shall make a request for 55

Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7 use of the expedited procedure in writing, hand-delivered to the ASUM Offices. The Student Resolution Officer shall immediately upon receipt of the request contact the complaining student and arrange the Step 2 mediation session as soon as possible. A request for a Step 2 meeting shall be labeled prominently as a request for Step 2 under this expedited procedure. The request for an expedited Step 2 mediation session shall be granted by the supervisor within seven (7) days. If the student complainant finds that the immediate supervisor of the faculty member complained against is not available within seven (7) days, or has failed to respond within seven (7) days, the student may make the request for an expedited Step 2 mediation session to any supervisor of the faculty member that is available. If the supervisor receiving a request for an expedited Step 2 mediation session finds that the faculty member complained against is not available, or fails to respond, the supervisor shall designate another faculty member to represent the absent faculty member in the Step 2 mediation session. If the matter is unresolved after the Step 2 mediation session, the Student Resolution Officer or student complainant may submit immediately a request to the President of the University to convene the Student Complaint Committee to conduct a hearing and recommend a decision to the President. The Student Complaint Committee shall decide the case within five (5) days after convening, and send its finding of fact and recommendation to the President for the final decision. The President may accept or reject the committee's decision. Implementation of a specific remedy rests with the University President whose decision shall be the final campus disposition of the complaint. The President shall provide the committee with a rationale for the final disposition, should it differ from that recommended by the committee. 21.600 TIME LIMITS Time limits stipulated in this procedure shall exclude all scheduled breaks, holidays, and summer break, and may be extended by mutual written agreement between the parties to the complaint. Resolution of the complaint may extend into summer break by mutual written agreement between the parties to the complaint or in the case of an expedited procedure as put forth in 21.520. Failure to comply with the time limits by the student in the absence of such written agreement shall be deemed acceptance by the student of the decision of the administrator or faculty member at the previous step. If a faculty member or administrator fails to comply with time limits stipulated in this procedure, the student or Student Resolution Officer may proceed immediately to the next step. 21.700 RECORDS The final decision of the President shall be filed in the affected faculty member(s) or University administrator(s) personnel file(s) for a period of three (3) years following the date of issuance. 21.750 APPLICATION OF PRESIDENT’S DECISION No Presidential decision shall be implemented before the party adversely affected by the decision has had the opportunity to exercise any rights to appeal or grieve the decision pursuant to applicable Board of Regents policies or the Collective Bargaining Agreement.

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Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7 21.800 REPRISAL No reprisal of any kind will be made by either party against any student, any witness, any UFA representative, the Student Resolution Officer, or any other participant in the complaint procedure by reason of such participation. This does not, of course, limit the faculty member(s) or University administrator(s) right to legal redress. 21.900 COMPLAINT DISSOLUTION The decision made to dissolve a complaint at any step shall not modify or subvert this agreement or the intent of this agreement. 7. Describe the counseling and services available to students. a. Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) CAPS is the primary mental health care provider for students. CAPS assists students by addressing their personal counseling and psychotherapy needs for the purpose of helping them gain the most from their time on campus. CAPS provides brief therapy, a model that attempts to identify and address those problems and needs that can reasonably be considered within the time constraints of a semester or less. When a student's mental health care needs are beyond the scope of their services, they assist with referrals to community-based providers for specialized or longerterm care. CAPS staff consists of four psychologists and four counselors who work closely with graduate student assistants, and offer the services of a consulting psychiatrist on a referralonly basis. In most instances, medical management of psychological distress involves the combined resources of the CHC Medical Clinic and CAPS. Confidentiality is strictly maintained in accordance with ethical standards and the legal requirements of the state of Montana. Services provided by CAPS include: (1) Individual Counseling and Psychotherapy; (2) Topical Group Therapy; (3) Crisis Walk-in Service; (4) Limited Psychological Assessments; (5) Psychiatric Consultation; (6) After hours urgent care (provided by Curry Health Center Staff); (7) Consultation with concerned others; (8) Referrals to community-based colleagues;

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Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7 (9) Brief Inpatient Respite Care: (10) Student Blue Cross/Shield Plan referrals; (11) Bereavement counseling always available; (12) Medication management in cooperation with the CHC Medical Clinic Staff; and (13) Networked with Self Over Substances to provide substance abuse counseling. b. Career Services The University of Montana Career Services Center has offices at the COT’s East Campus and on the UM Mountain Campus. Career counselors are available to help students develop the job search skills they need to find work upon completing a COT program. Career counselors work with prospective students who want assistance choosing a COT program and a career path. As needed, special career interest surveys can be used to help students identify interests and talents and then determine which programs would be most appropriate. Counselors can also help with decisions about program change or options for continuing education. In addition to decision-making, services include assistance with writing resumes, developing interviewing skills, and job search skills. The Career Services Center can also offer information about the local, state and national job markets, as well as supply specific job leads via a web-based listing service. The Career Services Office on campus has a staff of counselors to assist with all aspects of the career process. The following career services are available to COT students: (1) Ask-a-Career Counselor – Students can pose career questions to a counselor via email. (2) Ask-an-Alum Mentor Program – Students can talk to a UM alumnus who can offer advice about career-related issues. (3) Big Sky Career Fair – Students can talk to employers about full-time, part-time, internship and volunteer opportunities. (4) Career Assessments – These help students decide on careers and majors. (5) Career Handbook – Resumes, cover letters, interviewing, and job search. (6) Career Planning – Employment resources are available from the Program Director. A data base is maintained and students have access to employers throughout the immediate area.

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Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7 (7) Career Planning Checklists – These are available to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (8) Career Resource Handouts – Download and print informational handouts on resumes, cover letters, interviewing, job search, etc. (9) Career Resource Library – Students can review these resource materials at Career Services. (10) Considering College – These guides help students plan a career, and select and pay for college. (11) Employer Directories – These help students look for specific employers. (12) Graduate Survey – Information on UM graduates. (13) Griz e-Recruiting – Free to UM students: resumes on-line, on-campus interviewing, and job vacancy listings. (14) Internet Job Search Resources – Jobs, career fairs, newspapers, geographic and occupational information. (15) Mock Interviews – Students can practice interviewing skills. (16) On-Campus Interview Schedule Calendar – See who is recruiting on-campus. (17) On-line Job Vacancy Listings – Look at current job postings listed with UM Career Services. (18) Student Employment Job Board – Check on-campus, off-campus, and volunteer opportunities. (19) Walk-in Counseling: – Provided for those quick questions. (20) What Can I Do With A Major In... – Career options for different majors at UM (21) Workshops—resume writing, interviewing, job search, using the internet, working abroad. c. ASUM Student Government All full-time students pay a student government fee and are eligible to vote in Associated Students of The University of Montana (ASUM) elections. Students may run for senate or executive offices and participate on ASUM committees. Students paying the

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Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7 ASUM fee are also offered use of campus legal services, reduced tickets for select ASUMsponsored concerts and short-term loans. d. Childcare and Family Resources The ASUM offers all fee-paying students access to its Childcare and Family Resource programs which provide family and group childcare homes, two Children's Learning Centers, a Summer Fun Center, and School's Out Fun Camp. Enrollment in these programs is limited and is offered on a first-come, first-served basis. e. Disability Services The University of Montana guarantees students with disabilities equal access to all programs. Disability Services promotes an accessible learning environment and provides services to students with disabilities. The office also advocates responsibility for an accessible and hospitable learning environment through the removal of informational, physical, and attitudinal barriers. f. Housing and Food Services The University of Montana College of Technology students have the option to reside in one of the University's residence halls. He/she may continue residence hall living until he/she earns 30 semester credits. Any student who moves into the residence halls at the beginning of the semester is required to reside in the residence halls for the entire semester. However, students must be enrolled for at least seven credits to be eligible to live in a residence hall. Students with spouses or children are eligible to live in University Villages apartments. Housing is awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. Students are therefore encouraged to apply early. g. Campus Recreation and Athletics Students may pay an optional fee to use UM recreational facilities, including weight rooms, gyms, racquetball courts, and swimming pools. Students who pay the fee are eligible to rent sports equipment, participate in intramural sports, and receive discounts on recreation classes. Students may pay an optional athletic fee to receive tickets and discounts to campus athletic events. h. Services for Nontraditional Students The Phoenix Group is a special campus organization that assists nontraditional students in their transition to college life. Phoenix Group provides a variety of support services for students and a common meeting ground for adult learners. Along with issuing a quarterly newsletter and organizing social activities for nontraditional students, Phoenix also maintains an emergency short-term loan fund for qualified applicants. i. Student Health Services

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Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7 Student Health Services provides medical and dental services, counseling, health education, and sexual assault recovery services to all students paying the health service fee. This fee is mandatory for students taking more than six credits per semester. For an additional fee, Student Health Services also offers major, medical health insurance through Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Montana. j. Summer and Night Programs The Center for Continuing Education and Summer Programs serves students in ways that may not be possible through the structure of regular daytime programs and courses. Both credit and noncredit courses are offered. Mini-courses, customized workshops, contract courses, and special business programs are among the opportunities provided. Because they are funded completely by student fees, courses must meet minimum enrollments. k. Placement For UM students, Career Services and Internship Services have partnered to provide Griz eRecruiting—a comprehensive career services software program designed to assist students with career preparation and job/internship searches. Career Connections is free to students upon registration. All students are provided with registration materials at orientation and again during their internship experience, if they are not registered. It allows them to submit resumes electronically into a database used by UM Career Services and Internship Services to match candidates with employers´ needs. Students are able to view and sign-up for on-campus interviews, as well as view, and apply for jobs posted with Career Services and internships posted with Internship Services. For UM employers, Career Services and Internship Services have partnered to provide Griz eRecruiting, a free, comprehensive career services software program designed to assist employers with staffing/recruiting/internship needs. Employers can search and view resumes of qualified UM students, schedule on-campus interviews, monitor sign-ups. Employers can post current vacancies on-line with UM's Griz eRecruiting. Employment opportunities are available to students through Job Fairs, held regularly on the UM Mountain Campus. Students and faculty are notified of upcoming Job Fairs to help students plan their job searches. Students’ and employers’ reactions to Griz eRecruiting have been extremely positive. Students have access to available positions from a computer lab or from home. Many students have commented they feel more jobs are being listed as employers become familiar with the free services provided to them. The Career Services office at the College continues to handle job placement requests from employers, but employers are encouraged to list their positions on-line. Positions are still posted at Career Services, and program directors are notified of positions.

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will receive an award of $1. Montana Cattlewomen. d. and www.fastweb. Interested students are encouraged to list The University of Montana as their first college choice and submit a Freshman Scholarship application. a.000 a year to finalists who have indicated UM as their first choice for attending college. Earl’s Distributing. The local ACF chapter provides two $1500 scholarships each academic year. Describe any scholarship programs available to students in this program(s). All University of Montana students are eligible for the following scholarship programs: (1) The National Merit Scholarship The University of Montana. Written descriptions of potential jobs/employment prospects are posted on a job bulletin board located in the kitchen lab. which should provide further networking opportunities. there is a distinct departure seen now in the way students are approaching the job search. Awards under this program may be held in addition to the Presidential Leadership Scholarship. however. and advisory board members have proven to be excellent contacts for student and graduate employment. c.collegenet.Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7 Traditionally.org. local ACF chapter members. The Program Director is president-elect of the local ACF chapter. who enroll at UM.com. It is apparent they are relying more on on-line services. Additionally. the Program Director maintains a file of employment contacts that is available to students. 62 . Financial Aid staff encourage students to utilize the following websites for scholarship opportunities and guidance: www. such as Griz eRecruiting. Semi-finalists. which are awarded to second-year Food Service Management students. 8. Students obtain applications through the Financial Aid Office. and making personal contacts to obtain employment. networking. and Food Services of America provide scholarships exclusively to Food Service Management students. Program Directors have played a key role in placement for students.com. b. Business people. he handles many employment requests in the form of e-mail and personal communication from employers.000 a year. Missoula participates in the National Merit Scholarship Program and offers awards of $2. The Financial Aid office posts information on scholarships available to COT students.finaid. While he encourages employers to use Griz eRecruiting. Recent follow-up indicates that many graduates supplement their education by working in the industry and are staying on in similar positions after graduation. www. Employers regularly contact the Culinary Arts Program Director with requests for employees.

000 spread over a four year course of study. (6) Students may depend on the University of Montana to provide other necessary support services too many to mention: Child care.200. and in many cases. advising. housing. etc. (5) Career Services does much work with students to link them with suitable employment. (1) The Admissions Department provides assistance by way of placement. Scholarships. f. The Horatio Alger Montana Scholarship Program provides financial assistance to eligible high school seniors in the State of Montana who aspire to pursue higher education at the University of Montana. 9. What are the major strengths and weaknesses of your program as it relates to this section in comparison to the ACF Accrediting Commission Standards? a. Recipients must meet all eligibility requirements and demonstrate critical financial need. e. 63 . The scholarships are for one year. orientation. plus be planning to attend one of the University of Montana's campuses. based on academic merit. etc. General Scholarships General Scholarships are for currently-enrolled UM students.Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7 (2) The Horatio Alger Montana Scholarship Program Funded through the generosity of the Dennis and Phyllis Washington Foundation and the University of Montana. Strengths The University of Montana-Missoula provides access to an array of student services and departments that deliver support in many areas. former UM students and transfer students with 12 or more college credits. (4) Counseling and Psychological Services provide mental health care for students. available in the Financial Aid Office or on-line. (2) A Retention Coordinator is utilized to monitor and give guidance to students in academic probation or facing social and economic woes. The awards are worth up to $1. Freshman Scholarships The Freshman Scholarship program consolidates UM's many endowed scholarships into one application. Disabilities. financial need. Housing and Food. (3) The Office of the Provost maintains a system that handles student complaints in a just and legal manner. This scholarship awards 100 recipients $5.

discussion has centered on requiring incoming culinary students to have a physical exam and tuberculosis test prior to admission. on-line recruitment services available through the University. and Associate Dean is the advisability of special standards for students entering Culinary Arts. Copies of all current advertising and promotional materials used by the school including radio. by state mandate. Weaknesses One area identified for improvement by the Program Director. scripts. 10. Since the COT must. REQUIRED EXHIBITS 1. 2. yellow pages. Further. there is a strong desire to uphold stringent health standards in the program. How do you plan to use the results of this section of the Self Study to maximize the strengths of the program and to minimize any identified weaknesses? When reviewing the services available. admit all students with a high school diploma or GED. Department Chair.Section 7 — Student Services — Standard 7 b. and a hard copy of the school’s web page. flyers. The inclusion of an internship experience and resulting career workshops will address this issue and help bridge the span from educational institution to industry employment for students. Exhibit S Exhibit T 64 . the Program Director recognizes the need to promote the use of Griz e-Recruiting opportunities. Any admission requirements must be clearly stated in the catalog and advertising brochures—no changes are anticipated for Fall 2008 entry students but are likely for Fall 2009 entries. While there is reluctance to deny admission to students. television. newsprint. Retention statistics for the last two years. surveys. video tapes. the Program Director plans to assist and encourage employers to utilize the free.

curriculum. The FEC is responsible for using the Unit Standards to review the IPRs of College of Technology (UM COT) faculty and make a written. faculty. sample forms and results for assessment of: a. (See Exhibit V. Methods for assessment are far-reaching and encompass the following information gathering tools (Exhibit D): (1) Embedded testing 65 . This is necessary in order to offer courses designed to meet the ever-changing hospitality and culinary industries. (2) Faculty must submit IPRs to the Department Chair for review and recommendation. College of Technology (UM COT) Unit Standards for Teaching Assessment of Faculty. Assessment is based on the criteria contained in the UM COT Unit Standards for Teaching. They are then sent to the Faculty Evaluation Committee (FEC) by October 15. (6) The Provost reviews the recommendation and awards salary determinations based upon the current faculty collective bargaining agreement and approved unit standards. b. The curricula of the culinary programs are in constant scrutiny. scholarship. Faculty are evaluated via the University of Montana. and professional and public service. justified recommendation.Section 8 Program Assessment — Standard 8 REQUIRED COMMENTS 1. (5) The UM COT Dean forwards the recommendation to the Provost. (4) The UM COT Dean prepares his or her recommendation of the faculty member based on the IPR and Department Chair and FEC recommendation. Describe the system used and provide dates. (3) The FEC recommendation is forwarded to the UM COT Dean by November 15.) The process is as follows: (1) Each faculty member must compile and maintain an IPR (Individual Performance Record) documenting teaching. professional growth.

and the Program Director strives to understand the educational needs of students and identify which curriculum. and results are reviewed by the department chair. (2) advisory committee surveys. textbooks are evaluated for effectiveness. Information is gathered to determine how well programs prepare graduates to perform in the culinary field by: (1) placement statistics. learning processes. and course content are acquired in this way. Ideas for texts. (5) professional organizational involvement (local ACF chapter). and (7) external accreditation approval. course offerings. This allows for changing or 66 . program directors review course evaluations for adjunct faculty.Section 8 — Program Assessment — Standard 8 (2) Student papers and projects (3) Capstone projects (4) Nationally-normed tests (5) Internships (6) Retention activities (7) Student feedback c. In addition. (3) graduate feedback. Course evaluations are proctored. (6) employer feedback. Courses taught within the Business Technology Department are reviewed each semester. Input from the advisory committee and program faculty is requested and considered on a regular basis. Using information garnered from a variety of sources helps the Program Director change program requirements and resequence course offerings for more flexibility or better prerequisite flow. The Culinary Arts Program Director and Department Chair research course offerings of similar programs in other educational institutions. This method was employed fall semester 2003 when significant changes were being made to the program. and teaching methods are most effective. Summaries with verbatim comments are prepared by the administrative assistant and forwarded to program directors and faculty. Additionally. program effectiveness.

The Internship Director and program director work together to establish internship sites and conduct exit and mid-semester interviews with internship supervisors. The internship experience program requirement since 2004 has been a great success and adds a new dimension to program review. Maintaining accreditation and writing a self-study help the Program Director and Department Chair focus on areas in which the program excels and areas which may need improvement. the Provost’s Office.) 2. Program and course updates are accomplished by following specific procedures as required by The University of Montana. Additionally. The goal was to streamline transition from the one-year. Additionally. The Culinary Program looks forward to the Fall 2008 ACF Site Team visit to further evaluate and strengthen Institutional accreditation by Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges necessitates comprehensive program review. Culinary Arts Certificate Program into the two-year AAS degree Food Service Management Program. 67 . 2. Feedback from both students and internship supervisors helps the program director determine whether students have acquired appropriate skills and knowledge. b. Currently Chef Campbell and Brian Larson. What changes were effected as a result? 1. more baking and pastry experiences were added with the more advanced Patisserie (FSM 275) course. Department Chair. Chef Campbell and Vicki Micheletto rewrote the Culinary Arts curricula. Missoula Faculty Academic Standards and Curriculum Review Committee (ASCRC). and feedback from that evaluation was used to improve the program. and the Board of Regents. (See Exhibit V. Program directors and Department Chair worked collaboratively to create this document during spring semester 2004.Section 8 — Program Assessment — Standard 8 affirming individual course structures or teaching methods. review assessment data and determine the path of change in curricula and personnel. What were the results of the most recent overall evaluation of the program? In fall semester 2003. A part of this process recently involved preparation of a departmental assessment document. Accreditation guidelines provide a valuable tool for reviewing the food service program. This course was re-structured to align with Food Service Management Capstone (FSM 271). Programs Evaluation: a. Each Program Director was required to review his/her program conspectus from the last NASC site visit and document program assessment measures. This is a particularly valuable in assessing the program to ensure the principles and procedures being taught are current and adaptable to the food service environment. Τhe summer Baking and Pastry course was realigned within the Food Service Stations experience (CUL 165T). the Fall 2004 ACF Site Team provided an external evaluation of the program.

Culinary Tips for Teachers (CUL 195T). Internship (FSM 290T) was introduced requiring 180 hours of industry experience. 7. Please refer to Exhibit U. 8. 4. which was taught under direction of the Health Professions Department. 9. c. allowing more of an urgency-based industry experience. The Food Service Management Computers Applications course (CRT 205T) was scheduled together in the same semester with the Menu Layout. Please refer to Exhibit U. Please refer to Exhibit V. Breakfast Cookery and Lunch Cookery. Design. job placement surveys. producing more of a refreshing learning experience. numerous courses have been developed and taught thus allowing the Program Director to use the facility to offer professional continuing education courses. Pantry and Garde Manger (CUL 157T) was divided into two segments. 3. and Analysis course (FSM 271). Introduction to Baking and Pastry (CUL 195T). imbedded within. Introduction to the Food Service Industry (CUL 151T) was separated from Food Service Sanitation (CUL 175T). Preparatory Food Service Training (CUL 195T). b. Please refer to Exhibit U. sample forms. 10. Eventually FSM 271 was eliminated and CRT 205 was re-structured to align with Food Service Management Capstone (FSM 271). allowing for a more diversified learning experience. as well as specialized cooking courses geared to the gourmet-enthusiast public. was transformed into Nutritional Cooking (FSM 280T) and now provides laboratory nutritional cooking derived from nutritional theory. d. student evaluations of courses and faculty. Mediterranean Cuisine (CUL 195T). Storeroom Procedures (CUL162T) was realigned with Dining Room Procedures (CUL 156T). and results from the most recent: a. thus providing more hands-on experiences and culminating in the award of the NRAEF ServeSafe certificate. This is an effort to put into effect theories learned in FSM 271 by providing project applications in the computer laboratory. Garde Manger and Charcuterie. 68 .Section 8 — Program Assessment — Standard 8 3. employer surveys. graduate surveys. Short Order Cookery (CUL 158T) was divided into two segments. Provide dates. Nutrition (formerly FSM 280T). Through the Outreach Department. 5. 6.

students. The outcome of the review committee will be a recommendation for program direction and curriculum change. How do you plan to use the results of this section of the Self Study to maximize the strengths of the program(s) and to minimize any identified weaknesses? The assessment methods for the Culinary Program are more than adequate to deliver the information necessary to enact positive. local ACF members. REQUIRED EXHIBITS 1. placement statistics. state reviews. advisory committee members. Exhibit U Exhibit U 69 .. etc. 5.g. Persons on the review committee will include faculty. The review of the surveys will then be discussed in committee each year prior to formal review of proposed course changes. graduates. student evaluations. parents. and 2. up-to-date changes. and administrators.Section 8 — Program Assessment — Standard 8 4. What are the major strengths and weaknesses of your program(s) as it relates to this section in comparison to the ACFEI Accrediting Commission Standards? Program assessment is ongoing and is recognized as essential toward providing an unbiased viewpoint as to its success. The Program Director has developed a plan to streamline the gathering of survey data into a file for review. Blank forms are only a portion of this exhibit. The process that is currently in place is very effective and meets the standards set forth by the Commission. Summary of recent assessment date and surveys: e. graduate follow-up studies. employers. Placement statistics for the last two years. employer surveys.

as ties with the ACF grow. daily lesson plans. custodial services. security. Summarize the major strengths and weaknesses of your program(s) in comparison to the ACF Accrediting Commission Standards identified through this Self-Study. various elements of support. and standardized administrative control within the UM COT. and new developments in culinary arts. a. (Section 3) (3) Collaboration with the University of Montana provides excellent support in the areas of maintenance. and recycling. Strengths (1) Communication is efficient due to the small number of personnel and superior communication systems utilized throughout the University system. (Section 3) (5) Emphasis is now being given to development of more extensive course documentation such as course syllabi. and daily assignment sheets. health and safety. (Sections 3 and 6) (4) The new organizational structure allows for a systematic flow of ideas. (Section 6) (7) A definite strength of the Culinary Arts program is Chef Campbell’s presidency with the local ACF chapter. equipment and supplies donations. purchasing structure. This opens doors for students.Section 9 Summary REQUIRED COMMENTS 1. (Section 3) (2) The University of Montana Student Dining Services is actively involved in student employment. 70 . (Section 5) (6) The Culinary Arts program enjoys the extensive collection of library resources. advisory committee participation. both locally and nationally.

Section 9 — Summary b. and assessment. oversaw all aspects of the Self Study and the development of the self-study report. and other appropriate resources within his authority to ensure all Culinary Arts faculty comply with ACF and UM COT standards regarding continuing education. (Section 3) (2) All faculty must meet ACF standards. Weaknesses (1) Adding additional links to the organizational structure requires time to implement changes of any magnitude. Program Director. Describe the process by which this Self-Study was prepared. (Section 7) f. (2) Consultation 71 . (Section 3) b. (Section 4) (3) Admission standards for the program need to be created. which will be provided to all students. Self Study preparation and review: a. while exploring possibilities for replacing old equipment as cost effectively as possible. (Section 5) d. professional development. Culinary faculty will continue development of the Culinary Arts Student Handbook. Culinary faculty and staff will continue emphasizing sanitation. (Section 7) 2. The Program Director will supply motivational guidance. The Business Technology Department Chair and the Culinary Arts Programs Director will develop standards for student admission to the Culinary Arts program. How do you plan to use the results of the Self-Study to maximize the strengths of the program(s) and to minimize any identified weaknesses? a. (Section 6) e. (Section 7) 3. The Business Department Chair and the Culinary Arts Programs Director will continue to work together to maximize the positive aspects of the organizational structure. (1) Overall Supervision – Chef Campbell. safety. The Program Director intends to apply pressure on all culinary faculty to develop more extensive and effective written course documentation and to review the results of their efforts. time incentives. and maintenance. (Section 4) c. certification.

David Campbell provided overall advice to Chef Campbell concerning the purposes and positive results to be experienced in a self study. Air Force Academy. processes involved. Chef Campbell took information from Appendix 1 and developed Exhibit AL. Similarly.Section 9 — Summary David Campbell of ROY G BIV Educational Consultants volunteered his time to assist in this effort. student notes. it became obvious that standardization of writing style and format was essential. which lists major milestones (first draft. Without it. Extensive time was spent collecting information for the exhibits and arranging them for submission and display.S. Therefore. and audiovisual materials for at least fifteen college-level courses. Exhibit Worksheet. it was saved until last. Chef Campbell was able to analyze data and evaluate the two Culinary Arts program options with a fresh. laboratory manuals. spell check. second draft. Exhibit AK. Included in Exhibit AK is a paragraph titled Countdown to Finishing. Report Guidelines was developed as a document management tool. font styles would have been mixed. Since Standard 5 (Section 5 of the report) required the most effort and time to accumulate exhibit data. Coming directly from a commercially oriented culinary educational program allowed him to compare programs with an eye to improving his UM COT offerings. and spell checking of certain sections might have been overlooked. paragraph formatting would not have been consistent. (2) Method of evaluation It was decided early-on that answering ACF’s template questions could not be done adequately until exhibit materials were accumulated. and construction of a self-study. It was also recognized that some management principles were necessary to make certain that nothing was overlooked as bits and pieces came together from different sources.) As the early sections of the report grew. text materials. In order to keep track of daily progress on the exhibits. unbiased attitude. Actual writing of the report was done by Chef Campbell starting with Section 1 and progressing section-by-section toward Section 9 (initially skipping over the three sections mentioned above. and etc. final version. Standard 4 (Section 4) was postponed until data was received from faculty and staff members.) 72 . David Campbell spent a large portion of his fifteen-year career in education studying educational philosophy and developing curricula. He was heavily involved in curriculum studies and textbook evaluations at the U. instructor notes. Therefore. Chef Campbell made a formal list of exhibits (Appendix 1) that increased from the 23 exhibits required by the ACF to 41. He has developed syllabi.

4. Who reviewed the Self-Study once it was completed prior to submission to the ACF Accrediting Commission? Chef Campbell reviewed the report several times in order to ensure its accuracy and completeness. and information were also contributed by advisory committee members. The site inspectors make use of an ACFFAC evaluation check-list to guide in the evaluation process. recommendations. Brian Larson. c. Associate Dean Lynn Stocking. Chef Campbell compiled the 2009 ACFFAC self-study report for the College of Technology’s Culinary Program and used his evaluators experience to review the Culinary Arts program and its facilities. Chef Campbell applied this guide to evaluate his own culinary program. The final draft of the self-study was reviewed and edited by Barry Good. Who compiled the document and identified strengths and weaknesses? Chef Campbell completed the strengths and weaknesses section with assistance from Brian Larson and Lynn Stocking. His evaluators experience with the visiting team includes secondary and post secondary institutions in both participatory and leadership roles. and Arlene Walker-Andrews. Administrative support was provided by Nina Broshar. As president of the ACF Montana Chefs Association and Director of an ACF accredited culinary program. guidance and information were submitted by Department Chair Brian Larson. Who was involved in reviewing the program(s) in preparation for this Self-Study? Chef Campbell prepared himself for the self-study by talking with Candice Childers of the ACF Accrediting Committee and David Campbell of ROY G BIV Educational Consultants. Throughout the self-study process. Suggestions. culinary faculty. Chef Campbell reviewed the programs and gathered exhibits.Section 9 — Summary Recognition of these milestones was extremely important as the self-study was completed. b. Lynn Stocking. Associate Provost. Chef Campbell has participated in five self-study reports as an ACFFAC qualified accreditation site team evaluator. Dean Barry Good. What does accreditation by the Accrediting Commission of ACF mean to your program(s)? 73 . and students. He was the primary reviewer for ensuring program accuracy and completeness of the report. Before starting. staff. d.

The process of collecting exhibits and responding to ACF’s challenging questions is a valuable program evaluation process. address challenges. and give freely of their resources to help other members. Although periodic self-study is arduous. and the public. potential employers. Without high program standards for graduates. Before the self study. strive for excellence in the culinary profession. Accreditation standards ensure continued work to provide a quality educational product. The Culinary Arts program is accredited by an organization made up of professionals who extol education and certification. and develop needed improvements. the work that culminated in this report was an enriching professional endeavor. In short. jobs would go to graduates from other institutions. and administration to realistically assess the program. but the study brought an appreciation for the details that contribute to such philosophy. faculty. it was easy for Chef Campbell to philosophize broadly about educational convictions. As a member institution of the ACF. 74 .Section 9 — Summary ACF accreditation provides program credibility to graduates. it forces program director.

ExAI-1 INTRODUCTION TO FOODS CUL 151T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 INTRODUCTION TO FOOD SERVICE SANITATION CUL175T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING FSM 266T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 DINING ROOM PROCEDURES CUL 156T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 PANTRY AND GARDE MANGER CUL 157T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 SHORT ORDER COOKERY CUL 158T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 SOUPS. AND SAUCES CUL 160T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts . STOCKS.

ExAI-1 MEATS AND VEGETABLES CUL 161T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 STOREROOM PROCEDURES CUL 162T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT FSM 170T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 PURCHASING PROCEDURES FSM 270 The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 MENU LAYOUT. AND ANALYSIS FSM 271 The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts . DESIGN.

ExAI-1 NUTRITIONAL COOKING FSM 280T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 BAKING PROCESSSES AND PROCEDURES CUL 265T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 BAKING AND PASTRY CUL 165T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 PSYCHOLOGY OF MANAGEMENT AND SUPERVISION BUS 234T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 FOOD PRODUCTION MATH MAT 114T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 CATERING FUNCTION SHEETS 2008 The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExAI-1 FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT COMPUTER APPLICATIONS FSM 205 The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN INTRODUCTION TO FOODS CUL 151T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN INTRODUCTION TO FOOD SERVICE SANITATION CUL175T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION COM 150S The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN DINING ROOM PROCEDURES CUL 156T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN PANTRY AND GARDE MANGER CUL 157T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN SHORT ORDER COOKERY CUL 158T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN SOUPS. AND SAUCES CUL 160T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts . STOCKS.

ExN MEATS AND VEGETABLES CUL 161T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN HOLIDAY MENUS CHEF CAMPBELL .

ExN .

ExN CULINARY TIPS FOR TEACHERS CUL 195T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN CAPSTONE FSM 271 The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN PURCHASING AND COST CONTROL FSM 270 The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

DESIGN. AND ANALYSIS FSM 271 The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .ExN MENU LAYOUT.

ExN NUTRITIONAL COOKING FSM 280T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN PATISSERIE FSM 275T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN BAKING AND PASTRY CUL 165T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN PSYCHOLOGY OF MANAGEMENT AND SUPERVISION BUS 234T The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA MAT 100 The University of Montana College of Technology .

ExN Culinary Arts CATERING FUNCTION SHEETS 2008 The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT COMPUTER APPLICATIONS FSM 205 The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExN .

2004 University of Montana Dining Services College of Technology Mission Statement Catering Functions Culinary Arts Conspectus Report Guidelines Exhibit Worksheet Standard Hygiene and Dress Code ACF Culinarian’s Code Library Resources Required By Standard 1 Programs Director Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 7 Standard 4 Standard 3 Standard 3 Standard 3 Standard 3 Standard 4 Standard 4 Standard 5 Standard 5 Standard 5 Standard 6 Standard 6 Standard 6 Standard 7 Standard 7 Standard 8 Standard 8 Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director Standard 5 Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director Programs Director 75 . April 14. one for each course Consultation Dialogues (ROY G BIV and others) Safety Inspections Media Outlet Activities Culinary Arts Student Handbook Culinary Arts Internship Course Contact Hours Worksheet Display of Student Projects Laboratory Resource Materials.Appendix 1 LIST OF EXHIBITS Exhibit A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z AA AB AC AD AE AF AG AH AI AJ AK AL AM AN AO Description or Title Program Application for ACF Accreditation Faculty Professional Development (Attachment B) List of 10 recent graduates & their places of employment Sample of the review methods used (Review & Assessment) University of Montana Catalog Faculty Data Sheets (Document F) Organizational Charts Faculty and Staff Job Descriptions Advisory Committee Members and Minutes Program’s FY2004 and FY2005 Budgets Faculty Meeting Minutes for 2003-2004 Teaching schedule in effect for the time of the on-site visit Completed “Required Knowledge and Competencies” Course Syllabi Sample of Laboratory Evaluations List of Major Equipment Floor Plans of Facilities Most recent sanitation inspection Retention statistics for the last two years Program Advertisement Brochures Placement statistics for the last two years Summary of recent assessment data and surveys Daily Assignment Sheets. Grade Sheets Business Technology Department Assessment.

Appendix 2    College of Technology  Culinary Arts Contact List  7‐1‐08          University of Montana. College of Technology:    COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 1  .

Appendix 2    College of Technology  Culinary Arts Contact List  7‐1‐08              COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 2  .

Appendix 2    College of Technology  Culinary Arts Contact List  7‐1‐08          Culinary Arts:          COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 3  .

Appendix 2    College of Technology  Culinary Arts Contact List  7‐1‐08          Current Students:          COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 4  .

Appendix 2    College of Technology  Culinary Arts Contact List  7‐1‐08          Advisory Committee:    COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 5  .

Appendix 2    College of Technology  Culinary Arts Contact List  7‐1‐08                  COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 6  .

Appendix 2    College of Technology  Culinary Arts Contact List  7‐1‐08          Recent Graduates:            COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 7  .

Appendix 2    College of Technology  Culinary Arts Contact List  7‐1‐08          Suppliers and Service Personnel:               COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 8  .

Appendix 2    College of Technology  Culinary Arts Contact List  7‐1‐08          Employers:                    COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 9  .

Appendix 2    College of Technology  Culinary Arts Contact List  7‐1‐08          Culinary Educators:          COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 10  .

Appendix 2    College of Technology  Culinary Arts Contact List  7‐1‐08          Supporters of Culinary Arts:      COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 11  .

AUGUSTINE. The initial fee of $200.Attention: Accreditation Program Coordinator. .00 is to be included with this document.Appendix 3 ACF ACCREDITING COMMISSION 180 Center Place Way ST. FL 32095 (904) 824-4468 APPLICATION FOR INITIAL GRANT OF ACCREDITATION Please complete the application form and submit with all supporting documentation to the National Office . An on-site visit must be scheduled within one year of the application in order to ensure the relevancy of the materials submitted.

AUGUSTINE. MT 59801 TELEPHONE #: 406-243-7831 FAX #: 406-243-7899 SCHOOL IS INSTITUTIONALLY ACCREDITED BY: The University of Montana: Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges The School of Business Administration: The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business The Food Service Management Program: The American Culinary Federation Educational Institute Accrediting Commission NAME OF PROGRAM COORDINATOR: Thomas Campbell. CEC EMAIL ADDRESS: thomas. FLORIDA 32086 (904) 824-4468 APPLICATION FOR GRANT OF ACCREDITATION The application form and all supporting documents are to be submitted to the ACF National Office attention: Accreditation Program Coordinator.campbell@umontana.Appendix 3 AMERICAN CULINARY FEDERATION ACCREDITING COMMISSION 10 SAN BARTOLA DRIVE ST.00 is to be included with this document. West Missoula. 1 Adjunct Instructor TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: Food Service Management – AAS Degree: Semesters: 4 Credits: 66 Contact Hours: 1. The initial application fee of $200.575 .edu NAME OF PROGRAM (S) APPLYING FOR ACCREDITATION: Culinary Arts – Certificate Program The Food Service Management – Degree Program CERTIFICATE OR DEGREE: Associate of Applied Science YEARS ESTABLISHED: 32 #STUDENTS FULL TIME: 16 #STUDENTS PART TIME: 1 #OF TECHNICAL FACULTY: 3 Chef Instructors. Public comment information will be in writing addressed to the Chair of the Commission. The program and institution names of programs meeting the eligibility criteria will be publicly published for comments from individuals who possess information concerning the program’s qualifications for accreditation. PLEASE COMPLETE THE QUESTIONS BELOW: NAME OF SCHOOL SPONSORING PROGRAM: The University of Montana College of Technology ADDRESS: 909 South Ave.

AND APPLICABLE STATE APPROVAL FOR THE INSTITUTION AND/OR PROGRAM TO PROVIDE POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION. • See attached catalog and brochures NUMBER OF GRADUATES (FOR EACH PROGRAM YOU WISH APPROVED).0 graduates Spring 2007 .Food Service Management and Culinary Arts Certificate . • • • • Fall 2006 .Food Service Management and Culinary Arts Certificate – 0 graduates Spring 2008 . ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS.Food Service Management and Culinary Arts Certificate – 15 graduates Fall 2007 . INCLUDING WHETHER THEY RECEIVED A CERTIFICATE OR DEGREE.Appendix 3 THE FOLLOWING IS A CHECKLIST OF ITEMS THAT MUST BE INCLUDED WITH THIS APPLICATION: A CATALOG AND ANY OTHER BROCHURES DESCRIBING YOUR PROGRAM’S CONTENT. (THIS IS NOT A CATALOG DESCRIPTION) • See attached document THIS APPLICATION IS SUBMITTED BY ________________________________________________ COORDINATOR THIS APPLICATION IS APPROVED BY: _________________________________________________ SUPERVISOR/TITLE . FOR THE PAST 2 YEARS. INCLUDING PERCENTAGE THEY REPRESENT OF TOTAL PROGRAM ENROLLMENT.Food Service Management and Culinary Arts Certificate – 6 graduates A LIST OF ANY PROGRAMS WHICH HAVE STUDENTS ENROLLED NOT AT THE POSTSECONDARY LEVEL. ETC. N/A VERIFICATION OF CURRENT INSTITUTIONAL ACCREDITATION.

00 CRN 40098 50 25 $1.464.00 $700.00 ‐$2.500.250.814.00 $148.58 $11.00 $30.500.00 $726.800 $870.Culinary Programs ACTV 7 Mediter canceled Salaries      # hrs      rate      Payment      Benefits  Food Supplies ‐ laund + handouts Outreach PR 70 60.00 $154.00 $30.00 $180.004.00 12 6 currently reg.33 $295 $3.00 Tom Campbell $2.540.00 $1.81 $3. $500.00 Andrea Paskert Mark Johaness 7/28 ‐ 8/1 M ‐ F 8 ‐ 2 5 sessions 30 OPI 2 8 $2.00 $350 $4.540.00 ‐$506.00 Dates Credits 6/6 ‐ 7/25 Fri 8 ‐ 1 7 sessions 35 not 7/3 2 OPI no insur per PN 6/2 ‐ 7/14 Mon 8 ‐ 1 7 sessions 35 2 Notes Need to add to this years cost 52.00 14 $262.04 from 07 Cul cost A:  total food costs $440 5/4/2010 .00 $30.900.50 $295 $3.030.00 $1.00 $154.00 $200.00 $1. $234.232.00 Intro to  Baking & Patr Summer 08 Baking & Pastr Tips for Teachers TOTAL CRN 40099 60 25 $1.00 $400.00 $750.00 12 only 4 final reg.00 TOTAL # of students Cost/student Charge INCOME ESTIMATE NET Instructor $6.250.00 $456.668.486.00 $6.00 38 $328.00 $1.260.00 $150.980.00 $4.00 Andrea Paskert $3.620.00 $200.00 set payroll e to KT 7/1 for Andrea $12.00 $90.890.

88 Account Nu 62107 62251 62252 62253 62254 62259 62264 62275 62278 62279 62288 62289 62291 62292 62903 Account Name Laundry Meat Dairy Produce Bakery Kitchen Supplies Grocery Poultry Beverages Red Meat Canned Goods Stables Seafood Pork Freight‐in Date Vendor .76 $15.46 $8.Culinar Break do Date June 12 08 Vendor Petty Cash/Campbell June 13 08 Food Services/actv7 June 13 08 Missoula Textile $44.44 $4.57 $44.86 $24.95 $199.88 Account Nu 62107 62251 62252 62253 62254 62259 62264 62275 62278 62279 62288 62289 62291 62292 62903 Account Name Laundry Meat Dairy Produce Bakery Kitchen Supplies Grocery Poultry Beverages Red Meat Canned Goods Stables Seafood Pork Freight‐in Total $74.98 $119.

00 $0.00 $0.00 .Total $0.

00 $0.88 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 .00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.76 $15.95 $268.00 $119.00 $0.00 $0.00 $74.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.86 $0.98 $0.00 $0.89 Total Cost Total $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.ry Expenses  Summer o8 own by Date And  Account July 2008 Total $44.46 $8.00 $4.

$0.00 Total Cost .

.

.

.Attention: Accreditation Program Coordinator. An on-site visit must be scheduled within one year of the application in order to ensure the relevancy of the materials submitted. The initial fee of $200. AUGUSTINE. FL 32095 (904) 824-4468 APPLICATION FOR INITIAL GRANT OF ACCREDITATION Please complete the application form and submit with all supporting documentation to the National Office .00 is to be included with this document.ExA.doc ACF ACCREDITING COMMISSION 180 Center Place Way ST.

ExA. West Missoula. The initial application fee of $200. 1 Adjunct Instructor TOTAL CONTACT HOURS: Food Service Management – AAS Degree: Semesters: 4 Credits: 66 Contact Hours: 1. Public comment information will be in writing addressed to the Chair of the Commission.campbell@umontana. FLORIDA 32086 (904) 824-4468 APPLICATION FOR GRANT OF ACCREDITATION The application form and all supporting documents are to be submitted to the ACF National Office attention: Accreditation Program Coordinator. MT 59801 TELEPHONE #: 406-243-7831 FAX #: 406-243-7899 SCHOOL IS INSTITUTIONALLY ACCREDITED BY: The University of Montana: Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges The School of Business Administration: The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business The Food Service Management Program: The American Culinary Federation Educational Institute Accrediting Commission NAME OF PROGRAM COORDINATOR: Thomas Campbell. CEC EMAIL ADDRESS: thomas. PLEASE COMPLETE THE QUESTIONS BELOW: NAME OF SCHOOL SPONSORING PROGRAM: The University of Montana College of Technology ADDRESS: 909 South Ave. The program and institution names of programs meeting the eligibility criteria will be publicly published for comments from individuals who possess information concerning the program’s qualifications for accreditation.doc AMERICAN CULINARY FEDERATION ACCREDITING COMMISSION 10 SAN BARTOLA DRIVE ST.00 is to be included with this document.edu NAME OF PROGRAM (S) APPLYING FOR ACCREDITATION: Culinary Arts – Certificate Program The Food Service Management – Degree Program CERTIFICATE OR DEGREE: Associate of Applied Science YEARS ESTABLISHED: 32 #STUDENTS FULL TIME: 16 #STUDENTS PART TIME: 1 #OF TECHNICAL FACULTY: 3 Chef Instructors. AUGUSTINE.575 .

INCLUDING PERCENTAGE THEY REPRESENT OF TOTAL PROGRAM ENROLLMENT.doc THE FOLLOWING IS A CHECKLIST OF ITEMS THAT MUST BE INCLUDED WITH THIS APPLICATION: A CATALOG AND ANY OTHER BROCHURES DESCRIBING YOUR PROGRAM’S CONTENT. • • • • Fall 2006 .Food Service Management and Culinary Arts Certificate – 15 graduates Fall 2007 .Food Service Management and Culinary Arts Certificate – 0 graduates Spring 2008 . N/A VERIFICATION OF CURRENT INSTITUTIONAL ACCREDITATION. AND APPLICABLE STATE APPROVAL FOR THE INSTITUTION AND/OR PROGRAM TO PROVIDE POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION.Food Service Management and Culinary Arts Certificate . FOR THE PAST 2 YEARS. INCLUDING WHETHER THEY RECEIVED A CERTIFICATE OR DEGREE. ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. • See attached catalog and brochures NUMBER OF GRADUATES (FOR EACH PROGRAM YOU WISH APPROVED).ExA.Food Service Management and Culinary Arts Certificate – 6 graduates A LIST OF ANY PROGRAMS WHICH HAVE STUDENTS ENROLLED NOT AT THE POSTSECONDARY LEVEL.0 graduates Spring 2007 . ETC. (THIS IS NOT A CATALOG DESCRIPTION) • See attached document THIS APPLICATION IS SUBMITTED BY ________________________________________________ COORDINATOR THIS APPLICATION IS APPROVED BY: _________________________________________________ SUPERVISOR/TITLE .

  COURSE SYLLABUS   1 | P a g e                                                  Date revised: Spring 2008 FSM 290T Internship  .m.m.  This experience increases students’ skills.edu        243‐7831   CREDITS: 4     PREREQUISITES:  Enrolled in final semester of program.    HOURS: 7a.campbell@umontana. prepares them for initial  employment.–3 p.  Students  work a minimum of 180 hours at an approved site and attend scheduled one‐hour  seminars.  OFFICE:  Culinary Offices.          thomas.  COURSE DESCRIPTION: On‐the‐job training in position related to each student’s  career goal. or recommendation of Culinary Program Director. and increases occupational awareness and professionalism. minimum of “C” in all  CUL and FSM courses. or by appointment.ExAB        Culinary Arts  THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY              BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT   FACULTY: Chef Thomas Campbell. director.

ExAB    STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES:       Upon completion of this course.  4.  No hours will be recorded until this is done.  See  attached document for requirements.   See attached document  for requirements. Complete 180 hours of supervised work at an approved internship site. Attend scheduled seminars for special topics. Be responsible to schedule for.  2. group discussions. within the first two weeks of employment.  See attached  document for requirements. Submit Midterm Evaluation at 90 hours (student responsibility) – Copy. including  Program Director approval.  7. the student will be able to:    Employ classroom skills in a 180 hour business environment. prepare and execute Final Practical Exam.  3.    STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES:  Percentage of Point Allocation per Course Requirement                                                                               Internship Position  Program Objectives  Green Cards            10%  10%  10%  10%  20%  10%  30%    Midterm Evaluation  180 Hours Supervised Work  Seminars        Portfolio Binder  2 | P a g e     . Submit completed and signed program objectives identified in “Learning Agreement  Goals for management Internship”. guest speakers and  oral presentations.  COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  1. plan. Complete green time cards (two sides) and turn in weekly to Internship Director.  8.  Develop occupational preparedness and professionalism through completion of  employment credentials and attendance of seminars. Final Evaluation by Supervisor (Internship Director responsibility) – Copy available for  intern.  Gain experience for initial employment.  9.  5. preparation.  10.   Incomplete cards will not be accepted. Secure an internship position and submit completed “Learning Agreement”. Be responsible to schedule for and participate in the planning.  6. Prepare a portfolio organized in a bendable/foldable binder. and  execution of the Portfolio Review Banquet at the end of the semester.

 grade will be calculated using the  following grading scale:  90 – 100  = A  80 – 89    = B  70 – 79   = C  60 – 69    = D  Below 60 = F    FINAL NOTE:  1. Ideally. An incomplete grade.  A midterm evaluation will be done at completion of 90  hours. circumstances. Previous work experience cannot be accepted toward internship course.  4.  If students are absent for any reason.  The midterm evaluation is the responsibility of the student to obtain and request  employment supervisor to complete.  Each missed class will result in a 5‐point deduction from final points  accumulated. attendance  at required scheduled seminars. “I”.  5.  At completion of 180  hours of work with appropriate documentation and final evaluation by supervisor. the required number of hours should be spread over the entire semester so that  the student is able to experience the depth of a variety of tasks. will be assigned until all requirements have been met. and completed portfolio. All Internship positions must have prior approval from Program Director to assure  qualifications. announcements of tests.ExAB               Final Practical Exam    Pass or fail  Any missing projects and seminars will decrease the student overall grade.  Students who read text assignments prior to class will be equipped  3 | P a g e     . and  solutions that likely will not occur in a condensed time‐frame. Student must ensure that internship work schedule responsibilities not interfere with the  Portfolio Review Banquet.  Students who miss  a seminar may make‐up that topic.  3. and assignments.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production.  2.  An  incomplete grade will count as an “F” according to Financial Aid guidelines.      ATTENDANCE POLICY:    Attendance will be taken.  they will be accountable for any information disseminated and be held responsible for class  notes.      PARTICIPATION:    Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry.  The original copy of the midterm evaluation must be  turned into the Internship Director when 180 hours of work is complete.  This is necessary as  students contribute to the learning environment and become active learners by attending  class and participating.

. teamwork.  The  Conduct Code is located at http://www.  Assignments for makeup tests will be  made only if faculty is notified by voice mail. A score of  zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed test.    CELL PHONE POLICY:    Cell phones must be turned off prior to class. Wayne.  The code is available for  review online at http://www. John Wiley & Sons.    TESTS:    Tests will be given during the semester as announced. 6th edition.edu/SA/VPSA/index. assignments must be submitted by stated due dates. Professional Cooking.    All students must practice academic honesty.cfm/page/1321. e‐mail.  No late assignments will be accepted after week 13.  Participation points will be granted  or denied depending on how the student exhibits enthusiasm.umt. or personally prior to the test.  organization. interest. and preparedness.    All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code.    ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:    Students are required to adhere to standards of academic integrity.  Academic misconduct is subject to an  academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the University.  Late assignments  will be lowered by 50 percent.ExAB    to participate and will obtain the most from this course.  Students should review  The University of Montana Conduct Code regarding their rights and responsibilities.umt.    REQUIRED TEXT:     Gissen.    UNIFORM POLICY:    Students will be required to be in full Culinary Uniform to be accepted into class.    DUE DATES:    To receive full credit.    ISBN 0‐471‐43625‐9      4 | P a g e     . Inc.edu/studentaffairs/.

d. with references. if any. numbered pages.  • Student will include an analysis explaining actions the student could have taken to improve  the internship experience. the  introduction should nicely transition to the body of the report detailing how the objectives  were met.  • This report should be formatted appropriately in educational report format as follows:   Attractive margins.      5 | P a g e     . compiling a portfolio allows you to put together your best work to submit to  employers. awards. b. and include potential actions by the student that could have improved the  experience.  This paper should be an example of the student’s  best work that represents research (if necessary) and writing capabilities to a potential  employer.  volunteer work. e. f. extracurricular activities.  • Overall.  punctuation. etc…  • The report should be approximately 1‐2 pages in length. double‐spaced.  The conclusion should summarize the importance and significance of the  objectives to the internship experience. menus. and  objectives defined on learning agreement. the student will directly and specifically reflect how objectives as defined and  agreed upon by employer and student in “Learning Agreement Goals” were met during the  internship.  i. Submitted in a three‐ring binder  Cover page  Table of contents  Transcript  Resume – final version  Cover letter – final version  One example of a project/assignment from a course in your program area taken at the College of  Technology or a project/assignment from you internship which best represents your capabilities  to a potential employer. etc. and spelling.  h. but not met. conferences. listed on  separate page. citations used for direct quotes borrowed from another  source in the report (internship supervisor said…). it is common for employers to ask for samples of  your work. Professional paper describing accomplishments/goals and objectives met by the student during  the internship experience. Web site to look up…). Pertinent food photographs. copies of  your certificates.ExAB    YOUR PERSONAL PORTFOLIO     When interviewing for Hospitality Industry Jobs. g. if any. if used.  In addition to using the portfolio for your final  internship project. certificates. letters of recommendation.  • Student will address objectives met that were not defined on learning agreement. c. and autobiography and more. thank you letters.     Portfolio Binder Requirements:  a.  They may request items such as written reports. and references given for any resources  used in the report (used www. correct grammar. photographs of your work. the report should include an introduction to define student objectives.  • In this report.

  The order of courses will depend on the menu service style. or take on a station as part of  the interview process.  Additionally.  Courses will consist of an appetizer.  They may clean.   Students who do not pass may not graduate.   Three portions are for judges and one is for photographs. dessert. set up. soup. serve. it is not advised to keep  books opened on the station throughout the allotted cooking time. etc.  Note: it is okay  to refer to cookbooks or manuals during the testing time.ExAB    FINAL PRACTICAL EXAM (BLACK BOX)    This portion of your internship will prove quite challenging. a complete menu. their score will be deducted by half a point.  Also.  The menu must have a consistent.  When the basket is presented to the student. half an  hour to present their menu to the judges and half an hour to clean up their stations.  The parameters for the Final Practical are as follows:  PREPARE A FIVE COURSE MENU FOR FOUR GUESTS FROM MYSTERY INGREDIENTS TO BE  SUPPLIED BY THE CHEF  Menu:  Each student will be given a basket consisting of seven to eleven items that must be used in  at least one course of the menu.   The courses presented must be an appetizer. cohesive theme demonstrating proper basic cooking  techniques. they will be given half an hour to write a menu  which will need to be displayed on the station for the floor judge to refer to.  Each student will have four hours of cooking time to prepare the menu.  Each student will be randomly assigned an apprentice to help during their testing time.  However.   Remember.  A growing number of employers  require a prospective employee to prepare a meal. soup.  The  student will be tested on how well they manage the apprentice’s time and responsibility.  Judging  will start at the moment of set‐up and will remain until the station is completely cleaned. each  student will be given half an hour to set‐up their stations and prepare their menu.  For every minute the student is late after the  presentation window has ended.  Each student will have four hours to produce four portions of each course. each student will have access to the rest of the kitchen  for ingredients that can be used in their menu. the apprentice cannot demonstrate  any cooking or fabrication skill that can be judged during the exam. entrée. salad.  The completion of this internship and the entire program hinges on a passing  score for this exam.  The apprentice may work only as a helper. salad.  They may not prepare anything that affects demonstrated cooking  techniques or knife skills. help with  presentation.   The first course must be presented during the designated presentation time and each course  must follow at appropriate time intervals.  Meaning. entrée and dessert. sanitize.  Students who fail must pay appropriate course fees to retake the exam. the apprentice is there to assist.    Examination:  The examinant is responsible to schedule the time for the examination period.  You will be expected to execute a  practical exam designed to evaluate your cooking expertise.  Participants are responsible for setting the evaluation table according to the standards of  6 | P a g e     .

 skills.  The judging will follow the ACF Category F/1: Hot Food Student Competition criteria. including the coordinator.  ½ hour after the four hour preparation time is the service/presentation window.  • Dessert ten minutes after the entrée (00:30)  Immediately after service the student should clean their station thoroughly and store left‐ over product appropriately.  • Entrée ten minutes after the salad (00:20).  65% of the score will be the service/tasting evaluation accordingly:  • Serving methods and presentation.  • Timing of service and follow up.  • Soup delivered five minutes later (00:05)  • Salad ‐ depending on service style ‐ five minutes after the soup (00:10).  No advance preparation or cooking is allowed.  • Menu and ingredient compatibility.       Judging:  The examinant is responsible for inviting the judges for the examination.  There will be three judges assigned as taste evaluators.  • Cooking techniques.  35% of the score will be the kitchen/floor evaluation covering the following:  • Mise en place and organization.  Courses should be delivered in proper sequence observing the following time frame:  • Appetizer on the table at the end of the four hours (00:00).  There will be one judge assigned as the coordinator.  • Apprentice coordination and task delegation.  • Effective utilization of all ingredients.   ½ hour before the test commences is available for station set up and menu preparation.  • Portion size and nutritional balance.  Judging continues through this phase!    Judges will critique immediately after clean up and the practical score will be delivered at  this time.ExAB    table service.  • Flavor  • Texture  • Doneness  The final score tally will reflect the combined evaluation of the floor and tasting segments and  translate into ACF Point Conversions and Awards as follows:             7 | P a g e     .  There will be one judge assigned to evaluate the student performance in the kitchen.  • Sanitation and cleaning procedures.  Judges must be  qualified chefs or restaurateurs agreed to by the program director. and fundamentals.  • Craftsmanship and professionalism.

 but is not limited to:  • Lack of mise en place.0 – 100  80.  • Inappropriate or unsafe food handling practices.99  0 – 27.  • Lack of cooking integrity.9  70.0 – 89.0 – 40.0  32.  • Violation of the standard uniform code for the College of Technology’s Culinary Arts  Program.  • Inappropriate conduct or unethical behavior.0 – 35.0 – 79.9  28.   Noncompliance may include.  • Tardiness.0 – 31.ExAB    Percentage  90. or disorganization.  ACF Point Conversion  36.9  Under 70%    Students may lose points or be disqualified for excessive lack of compliance.9  ACF Award Guidelines  Gold  Silver  Bronze  Did not pass    8 | P a g e     .  • Late submission of required materials.

meets deadlines. MT 59801-7910 Phone: 406/243-7874 Fax: 406/243-7899 Email: cheryl. M. accepts criticism. public Self-Management: Professional appearance. Internship Director 909 South Avenue West Missoula. 2010 . courteous/friendly Relationships: Works effectively with coworkers.E.edu Mr/Ms STUDENT (Printed Name) DATE CONTACTED SEMESTER AND YEAR ORGANIZATION NAME Mr/Ms WORK SUPERVISOR/SITE CONTACT (Printed Name) PHONE EMAIL INTERNSHIP MIDTERM EVALUATION Good Dependability: punctual.. supervisors. understands company expectations. willing to learn Strengths: Areas of Improvement: White – Internship Director Gold – Student Pink – Employer Revised: May 4.ExAB-2 Midterm Evaluation by Internship Supervisor The University of Montana-Missoula College of Technology Cheryl Galipeau.galipeau@umontana. applies classroom knowledge to job. seeks guidance when necessary Learning: Demonstrates skills needed for assigned tasks. consistent quality Fair Poor Comments Attitude: Shows initiative. manages time and resources.

errors. ___________________ 5. _________________ 6. __________________ 3. ___________________ 4.ExAB-3 The University of Montana College of Technology Internship – Weekly Time Card ________________________________ Week Ending ________________________________ Employed By ________________________________ Supervised By ________________________________ Student Work Phone Number: ______________ Please list all main duties and responsibilities relating to your job: 1. or challenging situations you experienced during the week. __________________ 2. ______________________________________________________________________ How do you get along with fellow workers? ____________ Supervisor? __________ Did you receive any special compliments relating to your work this week? ___________ ______________________________________________________________________ Date ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ Checked In __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ Total Hours Checked Out ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ Total Hours Worked __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ Supervisor Signature ________________________________ . _________________ Did you learn anything new on the job this week? ______________________________ Do you need special or additional training in any specific area to help you on your job? ______________________________________________________________________ What seems to be the most difficult task? ____________________________________ List any difficulties.

physical or mental disabilities. regulations. 2010 . M. marital status. White: College of Technology. The employer reserves the right to dismiss the student for just cause. and policies of the employing site. color. or national origin. MT 59801-7910 Phone: 406/243-7874 Fax: 406/243-7899 Email: cheryl.E. without regard to race. College of Technology and has the minimum qualifications as required by the program to work in an Internship training situation.PROGRAM DIRECTOR (Approval Signature) Phone Email STUDENT: The student is enrolled in a program at the University of Montana-Missoula. sex.ExAB-4 Learning Agreement The University of Montana-Missoula College of Technology Cheryl Galipeau. religion. The student will adhere to all rules. # Date Mailing Address City State Zip Phone Email Expected Date of Graduation: Major/Program: Class: FR SOPH UMCT Advisor: JR SR GRAD GPA: INTERNSHIP/EMPLOYER INFORMATION Organization Name Organization Web Address Mailing Address City State Zip Mr/Ms WORK SUPERVISOR (Printed Name) Phone Email Semester(s) of Placement: Sp Su Fa 20_____ Employment Dates: from Work Schedule: ____hours/week Compensation: $_______/hr wk mo other : Intern's Title: ___/___/___ to ___/___/___ Volunteer Student goal statements with learning objectives MUST BE ATTACHED! ACADEMIC/FACULTY INFORMATION UMCT . Internship Director Gold: Student Pink: Employer Revised May 4. The student should indicate any particular needs/requests related to scheduling or performance of this Internship: ________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ SIGNATURES STUDENT (Signature) Date Date WORK SUPERVISOR (Signature) The University of Montana is committed to Equal Opportunity in education. employment. and participation in university activities and programs. including admissions..S. political ideas. age.edu STUDENT INFORMATION Mr/Ms STUDENT (Printed Name) S. Internship Director 909 South Avenue West Missoula. A meeting will be arranged to evaluate attached Learning Objectives at the end of the internship experience. EMPLOYER: The employer agrees to try to structure work experiences commensurate with goals during agreed upon time period.galipeau@umontana.

Internship Director Gold: Student _____________________________________________ Supervisor – printed name Date _____________________________________________ Supervisor .signature Date Pink: Employer Revised May 4. Work with front of the house staff to demonstrate customer relations and sales. 2010 . MT 59801-7910 Phone: 406/243-7874 Fax: 406/243-7899 Email: cheryl.Learning Agreement Goals For Food Service Management Internship The University of Montana-Missoula College of Technology Cheryl Galipeau. at 243-7831 or E-mail thomas. including objectives to meet goal: Student goal #2. Internship Director 909 South Avenue West Missoula. Demonstrate basic safety and sanitation procedures. Demonstrate basic baking and pastry skills. Participate in inventory audits and receiving procedures.umt.edu. including objectives to meet goal: ______________________________________ Student – printed name ______________________________________ Student – signature Date White: College of Technology. Director of Culinary Program. For further information.galipeau@umontana.edu FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES Tasks performed by Culinary Interns in the internship experience vary depending on the setting. M. Student goal #1. Demonstrate basic food service computer applications. • • • • • • • • • Demonstrate basic math skills for food production. please contact Tom Campbell.. The objectives listed below serve as guidelines for intern and supervisor in designing a successful work experience applicable to the internship site. Maintain professional demeanor and positive interaction with co-workers and supervisors.campbell@mso. Work with kitchen staff on both hot line and garde-manger. including objectives to meet goal: Student goal #3.E. Work with management in a supervision capacity.

College of Technology is committed to Equal Opportunity in education. political ideas. employment. What are the intern's strengths? In what areas could the intern improve. How has the intern met the objectives identified in the Learning Agreement? 3. M.edu SEMESTER AND YEAR ORGANIZATION NAME Mr/Ms WORK SUPERVISOR (Printed Name) PHONE EMAIL * 5 = Outstanding 4 = Good 3 = Average 2 = Marginal 1 = Unsatisfactory DEPENDABILITY 5 5 5 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 Attends regularly and is punctual Completes projects by specified deadlines Consistently produces quality work 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 SELF-MANAGEMENT Maintains professional manner and appearance Manages time and resources effectively Seeks further guidance when appropriate Sets realistic goals ATTITUDE 5 5 5 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 Demonstrates initiative Accepts and makes constructive use of criticism Is courteous and friendly LEARNING 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 Demonstrates skills needed for assigned tasks Applies classroom knowledge to the job Understands company norms/expectations Is flexible and willing to learn RELATIONSHIPS 5 5 5 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 Works effectively with supervisor Works effectively with co-workers Works effectively with the public/customers *Student letter grade will reflect average of above scores OVERALL PERFORMANCE 5 4 3 2 1 Please rate the intern's overall performance 1. White: College of Technology. Would you like to request an intern for next semester? Will this intern continue next semester? Please add other comments regarding the intern's performance and/or service from the College of Technology Internship Program. if any? 2. religion. MT 59801-7910 Mr/Ms STUDENT (Printed Name) Phone: 406/243-7874 Fax: 406/243-7899 Email: cheryl. WORK SUPERVISOR (Signature) Date The University of Montana-Missoula. Internship Director Gold: Student Pink: Employer Yellow: Program Director Revised May 4.. physical or mental disabilities. sex. age. without regard to race. color. Internship Director 909 South Avenue West Missoula. marital status.Final Evaluation by Supervisor The University of Montana-Missoula College of Technology Cheryl Galipeau.E. or national origin.galipeau@umontana. including admissions. and participation in university activities and programs. 2010 .

Semesters: 2 . ability. citizenship. and skills. . and skills.Contact Hours: 1575 Credit Distribution: Credits in Discipline: Technical courses that deliver occupation specific knowledge. .Culinary Arts Certificate .Food Service Management Credits in Related Instruction: Courses having certain pragmatic content relating to fundamental skills such as written and oral communication skills and the development of such skills as critical thinking. creative thinking.Contact Hours: 795 Food Service Management – AAS Degree: .Culinary Arts Certificate . ability.Food Service Management 6 18 14 18 18 45 .ExAC. cultural understanding and a sense of individual responsibility and integrity.doc Course Contact Hours Worksheet Program Length: Culinary Arts Certificate: .Credits: 63 .Credits: 32 .Food Service Management Credits in Support Areas: Technical courses containing skills or knowledge directly related to successful performance or understanding of occupation specific knowledge.Culinary Arts Certificate .Semesters: 4 . . problem solving.

and Sauces CUL 161T Meats and Vegetables CUL 165T Baking and Pastry Total Autumn 3 3 2 5 3 Spring 3 3 16 10 16 Second Year BUS 243T Psychology of Management and Supervision CRT 205T Food Service Management Computer Applications FSM 270 Purchasing Procedures and Cost Controls FSM 271 Capstone FSM 275 Patisserie FSM 290T Internship Food Station Experience from following courses: CUL 156T Dining Room Procedures CUL 157T Pantry and Garde Manger CUL 158T Short Order Cookery CUL 160T Soups. Stocks.ExAC. Stocks.doc Program Scope and Sequence: Autumn Entry Only: First Year COM 115 Technical Writing COM 150S Interpersonal Communication CRT 100 Introduction to Computers CUL 151T Introduction to Food Service Industry FSM 180T Nutritional Cooking MAT 100 Intermediate Algebra PSY 110S Organizational Psychology Food Station Experience from following courses: CUL 156T Dining Room Procedures CUL 157T Pantry and Garde Manger CUL 158T Short Order Cookery CUL 160T Soups. and Sauces CUL 161T Meats and Vegetables CUL 165T Baking and Pastry Total Autumn Spring 4 2 5 - 4 2 4 10 15 16 .

Due day 10. . Administration team will be judged on every aspect of how the kitchen is operating from sanitation. Evaluation: • • • • • • The test is to be administered on day 11 immediately following the written final. MEP. Each team is to submit a typed packet containing a cover menu.ExAE-2. proper cooking techniques. The total points for the test is 20. prep sheet. utilization. Please bear in mind that each day of production is in a sense. professionalism. proper plating techniques and sanitation principles. pressure situation intended to stimulate the mind and soul. and recipes. or window of opportunity. Students will need to demonstrate organization. etc. organization.doc COT School of Culinary Arts Health and Nutritional Cooking Practical Grading Criteria Object: To provide the student with a realistic. Each team will present within a designated time. Each team is to submit menu ideas and order sheet for chef approval on day 7. practice for the practical…Use the opportunity.

Salads were kept cold before service.ExAE-3. Rice out on stove for 30 minutes after service. Gloves were used for dessert and pork presentation. No gloves for Prosciutto and strawberry production. Good flow of work during service. The team communicated well initially and continued throughout production and service. Good organization. There was some indecision within the first five minutes concerning presentation. it seemed a little late for that. Shawn. Plenty of tasting. Good delegation and communication. Team cleaned as they went. Good teamwork. Carrie. Team members seem relaxed and focused. Garbage cans too close to work areas.doc Final Nutritional Cooking Practical Evaluations Spring 08 Team 1: Jacquie. Pesto in rorbocoupe for 15+ minutes. Thermometers X 4. Frequent changing of rubber gloves by all team members. Useable trim and waste containers were not used. Excellent teamwork overall. Proper sautéing technique. . Good use of timers and schedules. Team members used gloves initially. Containers were labeled and covered properly. Asparagus was rinsed in the same sink that the pork was thawed in. Dairy products were out for 20+ minutes. One participant had no socks. Zach Start 1:30 Service 3:30 Completion 4:10 Kitchen Score: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • All team members washed hands and sanitized equipment at start of production. Consistent hand washing by all team members. Asparagus and Prosciutto out in production area for 15+ minutes. Team started to wander during clean up. Sanitation solution shouldn’t be on work surface.

Nuts around edge not necessary. Salad: • • • • • • • • • Chill the plate. Not highly creative. . Messy sauce. cool. Plate was cool. Sauce nice freshness and minty coolness. Good balance. Sense of food on plate. Seemed to not fit into overall menu flow. Too much salad for the size of the plate. Too large portion. Good odd numbers. One brown asparagus. Couldn’t tell if the walnuts were toasted. Couldn’t see if you were following you intentions. Seeds in grapes.doc Final Nutritional Cooking Practical Evaluations Spring 08 Tasting and Presentation Score: Asparagus: • • • • • • • • • • Dirty rim on plate. Pretty. Nice presentation. Proper cooking techniques and doneness. Need more components. A bit heavy on the chicory…tended to be overly bitter. Enjoyable. crunchiness. Take more time to accentuate. totally edible. Loved aldente’ asparagus. Not juicy. Deseed grapes. colorful. Presentation dark. No menu. Nice freshness and spring time appeal. Asparagus needed a light marinade. herbs. Use a liner. salty. Taste bitter because of the greens choice. No roll. Dressing nice and light to accentuate the flavor of the greens. Presentation lost in the largeness of the plate. Peach Nectar: • • Refreshing but uninspired.ExAE-3. Nice dressing coverage on the greens.

Pesto perhaps wrong sauce choice. Good accentuation of strawberry flavor. Pork prepared well. Too much food on the plate. Least favorite dish. Slice the berries or use fewer of them. Too much filling. Beans were sautéed. Sun-dried tomatoes needed flavor. Use olives. Smells delicious. Too busy pattern on plate rim. Needs a crunch. Good balance with flavors…complimentary. Less cheese. Nice cooking technique on the pork. Too much food especially the protein portion. Perhaps a tuille. Dessert: • • • • • • Plate not chilled. dark. Nice vegetable and pork fabrication. perhaps incorporate kalamata olives. Citrus? Good entrée well prepared but room to grow. kalamatas. Nothing new or fresh. Presentation should be different.ExAE-3. Change the size to smaller. . or plate too full. Nice compote. cookie. or cake. Could use some saltiness. Haricots slightly charred. and shriveled. Pork very tender and juicy.doc Final Nutritional Cooking Practical Evaluations Spring 08 Entrée: • • • • • • • • Nice aroma and proper temperature of plate and food was hot. Needs texture component. Soak the berries in Balsamic longer.

Some confusion on delegation of tasks. no pads under – dangerous. Heidi. Dairy. MEP seems scattered and unorganized. Sadie Start 1:45 Service 4:00 Completion 4:30 Kitchen Score: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Only one team member sanitized the work station.ExAE-3. to tasting spoon. Chicken scraps left on line 1+ hour. Three team members had thermometers. Cluttered work spaces. One member in tennis shoes. No members had neckerchiefs. No delegation of cleaning duties. and equipment before production. Improper storage techniques.doc Final Nutritional Cooking Practical Evaluations Spring 08 Team 2: Devin. One member handled raw chicken. Hair hanging out of two team member’s hats. Sarah. Only one sanitation bucket and it was on the work surface. Raw chicken was pounded next to raw vegetables. work area very cluttered. Raw chicken was left on the work station next to fruit. Done with production 45 minutes before service. All team members washed hands initially. and assisted in other production with the same pair of gloves on. Produce left out during entire time. Poor organization during plating. Team left dirty utensils and pots on star burners. Good tasting. Need better communication and delegation. cutting board. Didn’t clean table after pounding chicken. prepped salad. Bare hand to prepped salad to sugar scoop. Just before service. washed dishes. • • • • • • • • • • . Team members just wandering. Cutting boards sliding around. no delegation. One member didn’t change her gloves for 45+ minutes. Poor timing and flow of work and food. Excessive butter in potatoes? One team member cleaned and sanitized work station but didn’t change gloves. One team member took her straw out of here drink with gloved hands…stuck the straw in another drink…put the straw back in her drink glass…ate prepped salad with the same hand…handled raw chicken…pan coating spray…handled service-ready plates. raw eggs left out on prep table 10+ minutes. No useable trim and waste containers. Drinks on the production table.

doc Final Nutritional Cooking Practical Evaluations Spring 08 • • • Plates went out late causing another team to present late. Tasting over food that was plated and waiting for service.ExAE-3. Same plates were out for 5+ minutes. .

Were the nuts toasted? The dressing needs to coat all of the greens. Did not have baby carrot as menu stated. Think outside the box! Raspberries too buried. Serve with a straw. great balance with the softness of Bibb lettuce. Use an edible container for the dip. not merely drizzled over. Stick dirty on the end. Complementary balance with the textures and acidity of the raspberries. Could have been more artfully arranged. Salad: • • • • • • • • Plate too small and not chilled.doc Final Nutritional Cooking Practical Evaluations Spring 08 Tasting and Presentation Score: Beverage: • • • • What is the drink? Nice and cool. Walnuts not toasted? Salad presentation interesting…mine looked like a rose. core them. Peel peppers. Salad need more complexity overall.ExAE-3. Nice dressing. What’s the sweetness? Stick tricky and makes for a clean break. Did you taste it with every vegetable? Think outside the box. Some of the greens were bruised. Dressing compliments the vegetables well. they were your color! . Not enough ice. Poor knife skills. Skewer very difficult to eat. Nice flavor on the dressing. Too small plate…needs a leaf liner. Dip lacked flavor. Walnuts are winter item…not consistent with springtime dish. Use more components. Appetizer: • • • • • • • • • Whole cherry tomatoes…fabricate them. Uninspired presentation and dish. Not very exploratory.

white and purple pearl onions. More color variations.ExAE-3. Nice demonstration of cooking techniques. Lost the summertime grill feel. Flavor was balanced and appropriate. Needs height! Couldn’t discern lemon in the potatoes. Think outside the box! Tuille a bit too crumbly. No roll. Everything was peachy! Good texture component and technique on the tuille and sorbet. Tighten the presentation. Protein not centered. Peach slices uninspired. Nice flavor. Lacked height. Plate was luke warm. Needs a sauce. Finger-type cuts of chicken leaves the presentation a too-handled effect. Could you have kabobed (two kabobs) over the potatoes? Could have included tomatoes. . How much sugar was used? Flavor seemed to have no less than a regular sorbet or tuille recipe. Dessert: • • • • • Nice balance with textures and temperatures. Did you stay within guidelines in terms of salt and fat? Flavor seemed to depend on these factors rather than utilizing cooking techniques and herbs and spices to deliver. Nice aroma.doc Final Nutritional Cooking Practical Evaluations Spring 08 Entrée: • • • • • • • • • • Feature protein at the 6:00 position. Love the vinegar-mustard sauce. it was too spread out.

Loss of quality and temperature through time. Need to change gloves regularly. Service late. Peeling shrimp with bare hands then touching and eating cooked asparagus then back to shrimp. Unprofessional. Wasted food. Need to use rubber gloves. Peter. again. Need better communication and delegation. Colander left in meat sink after team members were gone. Not much communication initially. Work stations very cluttered. Lettuce in meat sink. Labor intensive presentation.doc Final Nutritional Cooking Practical Evaluations Spring 08 Team 3: Amanda. Proper thawing procedure on shrimp. No gloves for shrimp production. Only one sanitation bucket for four members. Bringing hot food across the kitchen for plating. Apparent confusion in delegation and recipes. One team member with unkempt uniform. Bill Start 2:00 Service 4:18 Completion 4:55 Kitchen Score: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • All team members washed hands initially. Lack of delegation. Produce cleaned in meat sink. Chilled salad plates. Only two pads under cutting boards. Only one member cleaning as they go. Cristin. again. Beard? Neckerchiefs X 3. . loss of quality. Some members cleaning regularly during down time. Good sanitation of equipment and work stations. but confused about what to do with it afterwards. shrimp shells in with useable trim.ExAE-3. Proper cooking technique of shrimp. Produce out on prep table 40+ minutes. No communication. Prepping produce where pork was fabricated. Don’t try to make food do something it can’t do. no production schedule. Consistent hand washing by entire team.

Core the tomatoes and how does a half tomato translate into confetti? Texture too thick and grainy. Don’t freeze the salad with the plate. Flat and one dimensional. Two doilies. Perhaps could have been the dessert or a component in a dessert. I don’t believe this is a good recipe. How about a spoon? Appetizer. Larger. Liked presentation. Should not have such a heavy texture. Liked the double-plate presentation.soup: • • • • • • Nice color. Chilled bowl good. Maybe bake the parmesan and have it stick out. Salad: • • • • • • • • • Upside-down doily. Sloppy! No one pulled the plate covers. A bit heavy for the meal. Nice balance of acid and oil in vinaigrette. Most creative tasting salad. Needs a crispy component. more distinct artichokes. Tomato confetti would have made a huge flavor difference. Why confine salad in a little bowl? Frozen greens. Slice onions thinner. Nice chilled plate.ExAE-3. How does mango fit in with Mediterranean theme? Felt heavy and would overcome any meal. Nice flavor balance with vinaigrette. Too much garlic. . Huge portion.doc Final Nutritional Cooking Practical Evaluations Spring 08 Tasting and Presentation Score: Beverage: • • • • Why the strawberry in a mango drink? Nice smoothness and texture. A lot of cheese…is it within guidelines? Not all greens coated with a dressing.

Wrong plate and dirty. Couscous – too dry. Asparagus had good flavor.ExAE-3. Wasabi for the shrimp sauce would have been fun. Balsamic clashes with the shrimp flavor. Rim messy.doc Final Nutritional Cooking Practical Evaluations Spring 08 Entrée: • • • • • • • • • • • Feature protein at 6:00. Plate nice and warm. Overcooked asparagus. Less sauce. Trim the woody end of asparagus. Textures were too soft. Too large. Couscous no flavor. . Use odd numbers on the shrimp. Nice flavor on shrimp. Arrived with a nice aroma. Dessert: • • • Nice surprise with the warm and cold components. Too much sauce. Most people wouldn’t eat this much cheese even if they thought it was healthy. Gremolata – Mediterranean Menu lacked continuity. Good grill techniques but there were too many grilled items on the plate. Overcooked shrimp. No roll. Needs a concassee or salsa. Dish needs a coulis or a salsa.

5 pt. 2 pt.Meats & Vegetables Competencies Student Name _____________________________ Each of the following preparations must be demonstrated to the Chef Instructor for credit. Cooking Technique Sauté Braise Pan Fry Deep Fry Roast Poele Grill En Papillote Steam Shallow Poach Submerge Poach Stir Fry 1 pt. 4 pt. Please have instructor initial each competency check point. 3 pt. Total Points .

Please have instructor initial each competency check point. Cooking Technique Composed Salads Entrée Salads Special Salads Cold Appetizers Hors d’ oeuvres Canapes Amuse Bouche Plated Desserts Ice Cream Gelato Sorbet Pudding Custards Mousses Total Points 1 pt. 2 pt. 3 pt. 5 pt. . 4 pt.Pantry Garde Manger Competencies Student Name _____________________________ Each of the following preparations must be demonstrated to the Chef Instructor for credit.

Program Director. professional development. Program Director. Chair. DEPARTMENTAL GOALS: • • • Attract and retain skilled faculty who teach from professional experiences as well as theoretical bases. interpersonal. Paralegal Studies MISSION STATEMENT: The mission of the Business Technology Department of The University of Montana—Missoula College of Technology is to collaborate with local and regional business and industry to prepare graduates to compete in and contribute to a dynamic global society. Computer Technology Cheryl Galipeau. Program Director. Foster community and university service. quantitative and analytical processes. professionalism. Administrative Assisting Lisa Swallow. Deliver curricula which integrate experiential technical education with ethical awareness. with input from: Tom Campbell. Medical Office Technology Sue Olson. and scholarly endeavors. verbal. and written communication. Program Director.doc THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY Business Technology Department Assessment April 14. • . Internship Director Carol Hinricher. Utilize diverse instructional methodologies which reflect current and emerging business practices. Program Director. Management Tom Stanton.ExAF. 2004 Written by Vicki Micheletto. Program Director. EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: • • Provide market-driven programs which actively engage students in the learning process. Program Director. Empower students to adapt to an ever-changing world and embrace lifelong learning. Accounting Technology Brian Larson. Culinary Arts Tom Gallagher. and teambuilding.

culinary competitions. MCP. Some programs require or encourage standardized testing developed by professional organizations. . Presentations help students develop communication skills. A+. Students prepare a learning agreement prior to seeking employment. tests. Group projects encourage analytical thinking and necessitate teamwork in an effort to simulate a “real world” environment. resumes and cover letters. escoffier dinners. and comprehensive final exams to assess course outcomes. advanced simulation projects. comprehensive accounting/tax simulations. juried reviews of business plans. and NRA. Students in all AAS degree programs are required to complete internships ranging from 90-180 hours.Business Technology Department Spring 2004 Assessment Document 2 ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY: The department strives to provide student-centered learning by employing the following methods of assessment: Embedded testing. Faculty utilize quizzes. and other documentation of students’ accomplishments. Program Directors use all internship feedback for program review and change. retail window displays. These portfolios include sample projects. simulated litigations. skills. The Internship Director shares internship evaluations and employer feedback with Program Directors. evaluations. Internships. Internships afford students external evaluations by internship supervisors. Written papers and research projects are included in the curriculum to enhance students’ research and writing abilities. Capstone projects. A variety of testing methods are included to accommodate differences in student learning styles. ACF. students prepare portfolios to assist in after-graduation job searches. Retention data is maintained by the college and provided to Program Directors to track students entering specific Business Technology Programs. Additionally. The goals set out in the agreement are reviewed by Internship Director and employers and become part of the evaluation process. Student papers and projects. and concepts gained in specialty courses. Nationally-normed tests. and computer troubleshooting and repair. such as CCNA. Retention activities. Program Directors encourage the use of advanced projects designed to integrate the knowledge. Examples of capstone projects include legal authority briefs. Faculty participate in an “early warning” program to identify students who may be having difficulty in particular areas.

SUMMARY: The Department Chair. The Culinary Arts Program (ACF) and the Paralegal Studies Program (ABA) are reviewed by external organizations. exit interviews. emerging technology. Every semester internship students recap their experiences in presentations for Program Directors and peers. Advisory Boards offer input on course content. Every program maintains an active advisory board to ensure community feedback regarding programs. . and course evaluations. The Business Technology Department is committed to and views assessment as an ongoing process. External accreditation and approval. and interact with listservs. job level diversifications. Organizational involvement. Student feedback is solicited through midprogram surveys. one-on-one consultations. subscribe to professional journals. The Business Technology Department has institutional membership in AAfPE. leading to invaluable liaisons with other professionals. Many boards provide professional organization liaisons and assist with adjunct faculty recruitment. The rigorous processes often benefit all programs as faculty become aware of national requirements and adapt courses to meet standards set by such organizations. If external accreditation/approval processes are involved. Advisory Boards meet with site teams. Such review provides valuable feedback from professionals and educators trained to evaluate courses and programs. educational resources. and ACF. all of which bring them in contact with professionals in their respective fields. Department Chair. Placement is a critical indicator of program effectiveness and viability. new/innovative program offerings. and project reviews. Program Directors. Faculty attend conferences. advising sessions. the results of which are shared with all Business Technology Department faculty. job and internship opportunities. While Career Services maintains an employment website and conducts graduate follow up. and continuing education activities. topical elements. Student feedback. pay scales and job demands. efficacy of programs. job market analysis. Individuals participate in a variety of professional organizations. workshops. professional development activities. Program Directors.Business Technology Department Spring 2004 Assessment Document 3 Placement and graduate/employer feedback. Advisory Boards. and Business Technology Department faculty recognize the need to maintain viable programs to ensure compliance with departmental and institutional missions. guest speakers. CompTia. and Internship Director remain active participants in placement. Ascertaining the requirements for positions in the community validates program content or indicates need for change. trends in industry. Additional surveys are completed within the department for programs with external approval or accreditation. a tool whereby results are analyzed to evaluate course and program offerings. Career Services conducts yearly graduate and employer surveys.

4. As a result of community and student feedback. . In response the nursing program’s nutrition course was deleted from culinary arts curriculum and replaced with a nutritional cooking course. 9. Graduates surveys reflect a low number of Network Management students completing the CCNA exam despite having purchased vouchers. as a direct result of job openings and advisory board feedback. consequently. the Administrative Assisting program changed its name to Administrative Management and proposed a combination of two options into an Administrative Management AAS degree. Accounting Technology recently added an Accounting Capstone course as a result of student and internship supervisor feedback indicating a need for students to complete an integrated financial. 6.Business Technology Department Spring 2004 Assessment Document 4 ASSESSMENT OUTCOMES: 1. the Business Technology Department chair drew on the connection between the hospitality industry and other program offerings within the Business Technology Department to make culinary arts part of Business Technology. 8. 10. tax. 7. In response to student feedback and national research. As a result of graduate follow up and advisory board input. 3. and budgeting simulation project. Course evaluations indicated computer technology curriculum was not adequate to prepare students for the operating system portion of the A+ exam. Medical Office Technology changed its name to Medical Information Technology to reflect community input and current trends in the medical industry and. Community and advisory board input resulted in the development of a Customer Relations certificate program which will be offered beginning Fall 2004. To respond to culinary graduate follow up indicating a need for more departmental guidance and support. 5. The Paralegal Studies program added additional document preparation and torts coverage in the civil litigation course as a direct result of course evaluations and exit interviews with internship students. the department added a web design and development course to provide graduates with skills to promote existing or new businesses via the web. CRT210 Advanced Operating Systems was added to the curriculum. 2. proposed a new Health Information Coding Program option. The Culinary Arts advisory board indicated a growing demand for culinary arts graduates to possess more nutritionally sound experience. the Management Program increased experiential learning through creation of a student-run bookstore board and utilization of the bookstore as a student lab. In response a Professional Certification course will be submitted for approval Fall 2004 to provide additional instruction and examination review. 11.

Exhibit AH College of Technology Mission Statement The College of Technology at a Glance The University of Montana--Missoula College of Technology provides the best occupational education in 34 different areas ranging from health care. College of Technology faculty and staff encourage the fullest development of each student's potential so all students can contribute creatively to society. as well as the business. This challenge is met by providing a technically skilled workforce. computer. Most programs begin in the fall with some offering additional spring entries. electronics. A branch of the Mansfield library. Mission Statement The mission of the College of Technology is to provide lifelong occupational learning opportunities. Upon graduation. and the Academic Support Center. students receive a certificate of completion for twoand three-semester programs and an Associate of Applied Science degree for four-semester programs. and abilities. culinary arts. regional. bookstore. career services. College Campuses Facilities are divided among three separate campuses. The East Campus at 909 South Avenue West houses the Admissions and Registrar's offices. and industry. and local communities. and culinary arts to computers. and computer center are also located at the East Campus. Missoula. . and health programs. by developing programs responsive to industry needs. administrative departments. Student dignity is enhanced by fostering respect for individual differences. dining room. business. all within one of Montana's most beautiful communities. statewide. and by listening and responding to the community workforce as well as to other educational institutions. The College is committed to developing the vocational skills and background needed to give students ongoing occupational competence and to developing this competence by emphasizing hands-on experience. talents. financial aid. The College of Technology is committed to an ongoing relationship with national.

recreational facilities. The Legal Assisting program is approved by the American Bar Association. career services branch office and the student health service are located on The University of Montana Mountain Campus. Mansfield Library.Exhibit AH The West Campus at 3639 South Avenue West houses electronics and industrial programs. College of . The Medical Laboratory Technology program is working toward national accreditation by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences. Curriculum is approved by the Montana Board of Regents of Higher Education. Accreditation The University of Montana College of Technology is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges. The Food Service Management program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation's Educational Institute Accrediting Commission. The Surgical Technology and Respiratory Care programs are accredited by their respective review committees of the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs. The University Center. The Practical Nursing program is approved by the Montana Board of Nursing.

and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.umt.edu Back . The University of Montana has a Cultural Diversity Council that examines issues of cultural diversity at the school and encourages the enrollment and retention of students from many cultures. and faculty.Exhibit AH Technology programs are further approved by the United States Office of Education. Cultural Diversity The University of Montana and the College of Technology value multiculturalism and appreciate the benefits of a diverse student body. Programs are also approved for veterans. College of Technology Admissions Office Phone In Montana E-mail: 406-243-7882 800-542-6882 BZygmond@mso. staff. Students are represented in the important work of this council. the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

 This program combines theory. Accreditation by the American Culinary Federation ensures graduates  eligibility for certification as an ACF “Certified Culinarian.Exhibit AH The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts  Mission and Goals  Mission of the Certificate Program:  The Culinary Arts Certificate Program is two semesters in duration and provides  an introduction to the field of culinary arts.  Mission of the Applied Science Degree:  The Food Service Management Program culminates in an Associate of Applied  Science Degree. practical training. This program  incorporates comprehensive hands‐on learning experiences complemented by  supportive courses designed to prepare students for a wide range of career  opportunities in this field.”  . The degree program is designed to continue  principles taught in the certificate program. The spectrum of learning is expanded  to include more in‐depth professional studies thereby enhancing employment  options. and experience  to prepare students for entry‐level and management positions in the diverse and  dynamic hospitality industry. The Certificate Program parallels with and forms a  seamless integration into the Food Service Management Applied Science Degree. Students prepare for an entry‐level  position in the expanding and challenging food service industry.

 kitchen organization.  (13)  utilize purchasing procedures to procure foodstuffs. breakfast menus. kitchen supplies.  (10)  prepare café food selections. and garde manger  items.  (7)  organize and prioritize tasks. foundation stocks and broths. and applicable sauce derivatives.  (2)  demonstrate computer literacy.  (11)  prepare hot and cold soups.  (3)  have a broad understanding of culinary history. and unique specialties. dressings.  (4)  understand and maintain sanitary conditions in the kitchen. charcuterie items. all the mother  sauces. and  basic culinary principles. salads. and  (14)  prepare basic bread varieties and desserts. and  equipment.  (8)  perform front‐of‐the‐house duties.  (12)  prepare eclectic entrees incorporating all cooking principles for service to the  public.  (9)  prepare appetizers.  (6)  interact effectively within a team‐oriented group.Exhibit AH   Goals of the Certificate Program:  Students will:  (1)  express themselves through written communication.  .  (5)  have a working knowledge of all mathematical computations involved in a  food service establishment.

    .  (4)  prepare bread varieties. desserts.  (3)  control food and labor costs.Exhibit AH    Goals of the Applied Science Degree:  Students will.  (7)  demonstrate conceptual aspects of physical layout of food service  establishments. and ices. in addition to the 14 goals listed for the Certificate program. analyze. and  (8)  apply strict dietary standards in the preparation of nutritional dishes. confections.  (1)  plan. and write menus.  (5)  supervise work load and coordinate station responsibilities. cakes.  (2)  control portion costs.  (6)  serve and describe alcoholic and non‐alcoholic beverages.

 2004: COT Students participated in the second annual  Suenos de Chocolate charity event hosted for and by the Missoula International  School.  Littig required a written report from the students about what new products are  available and how they might be used in professional kitchens. 2003: The COT Culinary Program traveled to Spokane  Washington to attend the Food Services of America’s food show. administrators.  During the event the COT Student  Culinary Team participated in individual market basket competitions sponsored by  the Inland Washington Chef’s de Cuisine Chapter of the ACF.1. and persons of interest to further enrich their  educational experience. 2004: The COT Culinary Program traveled to Spokane Washington to  attend the Food Services of America’s food show.  These events also serve to bring them into contact with many  professionals.    The College of Technology’s Culinary Program has in the past and will endeavor in the future  to provide guest speakers and field trips to broaden the scope and enhance the curriculum.    • Monday. 2004. November 13. May 12.  Chef Instructor. COT students participate in catering events  and culinary competitions that give them the opportunity to prepare menus outside the  normal curriculum.    • Saturday.    • Monday.  In addition.3 relates specifically to insure that guest speakers and field trips are utilized to  provide additional program enrichment. March 30. October 15.    The University of Montana  College of Technology  Culinary Arts     Guest Speakers and Field Trips      The Culinary Program utilizes many guest speakers and also provides sufficient opportunities  for students to travel on field trips. 2004: COT Culinary Students travel to Hamilton Montana to the  Stock Farm Country Club and participate in the Montana Chef’s de Cuisine Chapter  of the ACF annual Chef of the Year banquet.      Culinary Competitions:    • Wednesday. faculty.    1|Page .    • October 26. 2003: COT Students participated in a demonstration on  tableside desserts for the cooking program at Hellgate High School.  The event was  hosted by the University of Montana Dining Services.    • Thursday.Standard 5. 2004: COT Students participated in a practice competition  sponsored by the Montana Chef’s de Cuisine chapter of the ACF.    • Friday. November 7. November 6.  COT Students entered the first annual Missoula  International School charity auction event featuring chocolate creations.

  • • • • • • • •           2|Page . Charlotte Haugen.    • Aimee Ault competed in Seattle at the AIS Competition and won a  silver medal.  Students competed in Seattle (June ‘05). Wayne Weidow.     • Carol Chandler won the National Student Culinarian of     the Year Competition in Orlando Florida at the   ACF National Convention! (July 2007).    • Carol Chandler competed for the Student Culinarian of the Year in  Coeur d’Alene at the ACF Western Regional Conference (April ‘07) and won  thereby becoming eligible to compete for the national title. 2004:  The COT Student Culinary Team competed in the hot food section  of the ACF sponsored event hosted by the Inland Washington Chef’s de Cuisine  chapter of the ACF.  (October ‘06).  Kristen Clute  and Misty Monson won a bronze and silver medal.    A five­student team competed at the ACF Western Regional Conference in Hawaii  (February ‘06) and earned a bronze medal.•   • Starting October 27.    Kristen Clute earned a Bronze medal in Spokane at Inland NW Culinary  Competition (March ‘08).     Five students competed in Spokane at the FSA food show.  March 2.  (April ‘06).      Craig Goroski and Blaize Huntley won a fist place medal and Kidron  Cobb and Charles Cain won a second place medal at the annual  University of Montana Campus Culinary Challenge (April ‘08). and Carol Chandler earned two bronze.  Carol Chandler and Debbie McLane won a  silver and bronze medal in the one­hour hot food category.  Sonia  Slatt.  one silver and one gold medal. 2004: COT Student Culinary Team practice commenced at the  Stock Farm Club on a weekly basis.  (October ‘07).      Four students competed in Spokane at the FSA food show hot food event.  Carol Chandler earned a silver medal in the Chefs Collaborative cooking  competition (September ‘06).  (June ‘08).  Craig Goroski won a Silver medal in Salt Lake City at the Beehive State Culinary  Competition.  Chef/coach Toby McCracken will host these  events and oversee practice.

 CEPC gave a four­hour. hands­on demonstration to the Purchasing Procedures and Cost  Controls class (FSM 270) on how to use their on­line or ordering system.  Guest Speakers and Hands­on Demonstrations:    • Wednesday. hands­on pastry demonstration  on cake decoration to the Baking and Pastry Class (CUL 165T)    • October 19.    Students  participated as apprentices and volunteers for the three­day event.  April 2007: Students participated in ACF Montana Chef of the Year Dinner.  • • April 2004: Students participated in ACF Montana Chef of the Year Dinner.  April 2005: Students participated in ACF Montana Chef of the Year Dinner. 2004:  Jack Witch.   Students were asked to write a paper outlining their experiences. 2004: Numerous field trips to various food and beverage  institutions in the Missoula area conducted by Ruth Williams as part of the  instruction for her Beverage Management (FSM 170T) and Menu Layout and  Design (FSM 217) classes.    • July 9. George Gobel. Owner of Hunter Bay Coffee  Roasters. 2004:  Valerie Harris. sales associate from Sysco Food Services gave a  three­hour. October 15.  June 2008: Students participated in ACF Montana Chef of the Year Dinner.    • Spring semester. 2004:  COT Program hosted Glenn Junkert.    • October 21.  April 2006: Students participated in ACF Montana Chef of the Year Dinner.  April  2007:  The  Culinary  Arts  Program  hosted  the  first  ever  ACF  sanctioned  practical  examinations  and  competitions  in  the  State  of  Montana.    • Every Tuesday and Thursday. 2003:  Restaurateur Barry Roose of the Lake House Café in Polson gave  a presentation on what it takes to open a new establishment. our Food Services of America  representative spends thirty minutes with students to aid them in the weekly  ordering process. 2003:  College of Technology Culinary (COT) Students  traveled to Spokane Washington for the Food Service of America annual food show.      • • • •   3|Page .  He delivered a one­hour presentation and a coffee “cupping” (tasting)  for the second year students.    • October 14.

Field Trips and Guest Speaker Schedule       Person/Place  Date  Contact    Amaltheia Dairy  2­15­05  388­0569  Sue & Mel Brown    Mission Mountain  2­22­05  676­0676  Market  Jennifer Forbis  Homestead Organics  2­15­05  363­6627  Farm  Laura Garber & Paul  Madeen  Sysco of Montana  3­30­05  247­1355  Leroy Coles  StockFarm Club  4­13­05  375­0053  Chef Toby McCracken  Lauren Phinney  2­1­05 –  721­2063  KECI­13  5­1­05  Montana Today Chefs  of Montana  Valerie Harris  9­1­05 –  1­800­ Sysco  5­1­06  755­3676  Black Cat Bakery  Pastry Chef Jack Witch  George Goble  Food Services of  America  Black Rock Club  Chef Dan Bower  Mark Minor  Ecolab  Chris Blueher    Ecolab  Glenn Junkert  Hunter Bay Coffee  Mark Johannes    6­15­05  542­9043  Course  Nutritional  Cooking  FSM 280T  Nutritional  Cooking  FSM 280T   Nutritional  Cooking  FSM 280T  Food Stations  Food Stations  Culinary  Program  Food Service  Management  Accounting  FSM 270  Summer  Baking Course  to be  Developed  Food Stations  Food Stations  Subject  Natural Goat Cheese  Sustainable Cuisine  Organic Farm  New Market Products  Practical Testing and  Certification  Television Cooking  Demonstrations by  Students and Staff  Inventory Systems and  On­line ordering      Cake Decoration  Demonstration  Weekly Hands­on  Ordering  Garde Manger and  Charcuterie  Demonstration  Pest Control Lecture  Ware Washing Machine  Demonstration  Espresso and Cupping  Demonstration  Bread Bakers Guild  Chocolate Demo  4|Page 1­1­05 –  5­1­06  3­10­05  1­800­ 372­4747  208­676­ 8999  1­800­ 325­1671  406­529­ 1879  (406) 531­ 0922  406­454­ 1469  7­12­05  9­8­05  and on­ going  10­5­05  and on­ going  4­15­08  Intro to Foods  Food Stations  and Intro  Food Stations  Patisserie  .

 Dean of the College of Technology 4­28­04  • Review Day. Dean of the College of Technology 11­7­03  • Faculty/Staff Social. Dean of the College of Technology 12­19­03  • Community Mgmt. Luncheon. Dean of the College of Technology 11­13­03  • Montana Chef’s Assn. Admissions 11­6­03  • Ruth’s Retirement 5­6­04  • Valley Christian Luncheon 9­27­04  • Advisory Board Luncheon for Beverly 4­26­05  • Chamber of Commerce Luncheon 2­10­05  • Chamber of Commerce Reception 2­10­05  • Montana Chefs Association Meeting 2­14­05  • Montana Educators Association Dinner 10­18­05  • Faculty Staff Social 11­04­05  • Missoula Work Force 4­18­05  • Paul’s Luncheon 5­11­05  • Rotary Club Breakfast 11­09­05  • Escoffier Dinner 4­23­05  • Open House 4­13­05  • Valley Christian Luncheon 9­27­05  • American Bar Association 10­15­07  • Charlo High School 2­15­07  • Missoula Workforce 4­25­07  • Outreach 10­26­08    5|Page . Dean of the College of Technology 10­22­04  • Financial Luncheon 11­2­03  • Jim Lizotte Dinner 3­25­04  • Joan Beebe Dinner 10­03­04  • Judy’s Retirement 5­9­04  • Karen Hill Luncheon 10­15­03  • Open House 4­13­04  • Polson High Luncheon 2­20­03  • Realtors Assn.Catered Events:    • Breakfast and cooking demonstration for Missoula Rotary Club 11­5­04  • Reception for US Senator Baucus 10­29­04  • ACF Evaluation Team Breakfast 10­13­04  • ACF Evaluation Team Reception 10­11­04  • Advisory Board Luncheon 9­29­04  • Advisory Board Luncheon 10­22­03  • Ala Carte Luncheon. Dean of the College of Technology 9­24­03  • Debbie Fillmore Luncheon 5­7­04  • Escoffier Dinner 4­23­04  • Faculty/Staff Social. Luncheon 10­11­04  • Christmas Pot Luck. Luncheon 12­15­03  • Continental Breakfast. Dean of the College of Technology 12­9­03  • Big Brothers and Sisters 4­16­04  • Chamber of Commerce. Luncheon 4­18­04  • Montana Chef’s Assn.

’05.’07. Ignatius High School 10­26­07  Charlo Public Schools 2­23­07  ACT 2­5­08  Sentinel High School 3­1­08  American Bar Association  3­7­08  Butte High School 3­15­08  Dean’s Office 3­19­08  Capital High School 4­16­08  Computer Tech Advisory Meeting 4­16­08  Billings Clinic 4­18­08  Annual Capstone Dinners ‘04.’06.• • • • • • • • • • • • • •   Rotary Club 11­4­07  Job Service 11­28­07  MT.’08  6|Page . Dental Association 2­3­07  St.

ExAJ‐1     

 
 

   Culinary Arts   

 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY                          BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT 
Thomas Campbell, CEC   

Program  Conspectus   Date revised: Spring 2008   

BUSINES TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT  CULINARY ARTS PROGRAM    CULINARY ARTS CERTIFICATE  FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT  Award:  1. Culinary Arts Certificate  2. Associate of Applied Science Degree    Program/Option Mission:  The Culinary Arts Certificate program is two semesters and provides an introduction to the field of  Culinary Arts.  Students prepare for an entry‐level position in the expanding and challenging food service  industry.  This program incorporates comprehensive hands‐on learning experiences complemented by  supportive courses designed to prepare students for a wide range of career opportunities in this field.   The Certificate program parallels with and forms a seamless integration into the Food Service  Management Degree.   The Food Service Management program culminates in an Associate of Applied Science Degree.  This  program combines theory, practical training, and industry experience to prepare students for entry‐level  and management positions in the diverse and dynamic hospitality industry.  The degree program is  designed to continue principles taught in the certificate program.  The spectrum of learning is expanded  to include more in‐depth professional studies thereby enhancing employment options.  Accreditation by  the American Culinary Federation ensures graduates eligibility for certification as an ACF “Certified  Culinarian.”   

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Program Objectives:    Students who earn the CULINARY ARTS CERTIFICATE will be able to:  Express themselves through written communication.  Demonstrate computer literacy.  Have a broad understanding of culinary history, kitchen organization, and basic culinary  principles.  Understand and maintain sanitary conditions in the kitchen.  Have a working knowledge of all mathematical computations involved in a food service  establishment.  Interact effectively within a team oriented group.  Organize and prioritize tasks.  Perform front of the house duties.  Prepare appetizers, salads, dressings, charcuterie items, and garde manger items.  Prepare fast food selections, breakfast menus, and unique specialties.  Prepare hot and cold soups, foundation stocks and broths, all the mother sauces, and applicable  sauce derivatives.  Prepare eclectic entrees incorporating all cooking principles for service to the public  Utilize Purchasing procedures to procure foodstuffs, kitchen supplies, and equipment.   Prepare basic bread varieties and desserts.       

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Graduates of the FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT ‐ AAS Degree program will be able to:  Express themselves through written communication.  Demonstrate computer literacy.  Have a broad understanding of culinary history, kitchen organization, and basic culinary  principles.  Understand and maintain sanitary conditions in the kitchen.  Have a working knowledge of all mathematical computations involved in a food service  establishment.  Interact effectively within a team oriented group.  Organize and prioritize tasks.  Perform front of the house duties.  Prepare appetizers, salads, dressings, charcuterie items, and guard manger items.  Prepare fast food selections, breakfast menus, and unique specialties.  Prepare hot and cold soups, foundation stocks and broths, all the mother sauces, and applicable  sauce derivatives.  Prepare eclectic entrees incorporating all cooking principles for service to the public  Utilize Purchasing procedures to procure foodstuffs, kitchen supplies, and equipment.  Supervise and coordinate food preparation.  Plan, analyze, and write menus.  Control portion costs.  Control food and labor costs.  Prepare bread varieties, desserts, confections, cakes, and ices.  Supervise work load and coordinate station responsibilities.  Serve and describe alcoholic and non‐alcoholic beverages.  Write menus.  Demonstrate conceptual aspects of physical layout of food service establishments.  Apply strict dietary standards to prepare nutritional dishes.      4 | P a g e    

Recommended High School Courses:  • • • • • • •   Admission Requirements and Prerequisite Skills:  To be admitted to the College of Technology students must have a high school diploma or its  equivalent.  Admission to College programs is on a first come‐first served basis.  Some courses  have prerequisite achievement level requirements as determined by placement testing.  Please  reference academic achievement level prerequisites for those courses.    Program Length:  Culinary Arts Certificate:  Semesters:  Credits:   2  32  Mathematics and Algebra  Culinary Principles  Business Accounting  Computer Principles  English Composition  French  Spanish 

Contact Hours:  795    Food Service Management – AAS Degree:  Semesters:  Credits:   4  63 

Contact Hours:  1575     

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Credit Distribution:    Credits in Discipline:   Technical courses that deliver occupation specific knowledge, ability, and skills.  • •   Credits in Related Instruction:  Courses having certain pragmatic content relating to fundamental skills such as written and oral  communication skills and the development of such skills as critical thinking, creative thinking, problem  solving, citizenship, cultural understanding and a sense of individual responsibility and integrity.  • •   Credits in Support Areas:  Technical courses containing skills or knowledge directly related to successful performance or  understanding of occupation specific knowledge, ability, and skills.    • •   Culinary Arts Certificate   Food Service Management    14  18  Culinary Arts Certificate   Food Service Management  14  18  Culinary Arts Certificate   Food Service Management  20  47 

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Program Scope and Sequence:  Autumn Entry Only:  First Year  COM 115 Technical Writing  COM 150S Interpersonal Communication  CRT 100  Introduction to Computers   CUL 151T Introduction to Food Service Industry  FSM 180T Nutritional Cooking  MAT 100 Intermediate Algebra  PSY 110S Organizational Psychology   Food Station Experience from following courses:  CUL 156T Dining Room Procedures  CUL 157T Pantry and Garde Manger  CUL 158T Short Order Cookery   CUL 160T Soups, Stocks, and Sauces  CUL 161T Meats and Vegetables  CUL 165T Baking and Pastry  Total       Second Year  BUS 243T Psychology of Management and Supervision   CRT 205T Food Service Management Computer Applications   FSM 270 Purchasing and Cost Controls  Autumn  Spring    ‐  5  4  2  ‐  Autumn  3  3  2  5  ‐  3  ‐                  ‐  16  Spring  ‐    ‐  ‐  3  ‐  3              10  16 

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FSM 271 Capstone  FSM 275 Patisserie  FSM 290T Internship  Food Station Experience from following courses:  CUL 156T Dining Room Procedures  CUL 157T Pantry and Garde Manger  CUL 158T Short Order Cookery   CUL 160T Soups, Stocks, and Sauces  CUL 161T Meats and Vegetables  CUL 165T Baking and Pastry  Total      Student Performance Assessment Methods and Grading Procedures: 

‐  ‐  ‐                  10  15 

4  2  4              ‐  16 

Student’s progress is monitored and periodically assessed in a variety of ways to ensure  completion of course requirements.  Students will be required to demonstrate daily production  assignments requiring pre‐planning of methodology and recipes.  Students will be evaluated on  teamwork, professionalism, mise en place, quality of finished product, sanitation and  organizational skills.  All assignments, projects and tests will be assigned point values.  Total  points earned will be divided by points possible, and a letter grade will be assigned based on the  following:                                          Grade Scale  A  B  C  D 

Evaluation Criteria:  Tests    Projects  

20 percent  20 percent  60 percent     

90 – 100  80 – 89   70 – 79    60 – 69  

Daily Production           

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Attendance Policy:  Attendance will be taken.  Students may miss two class sessions during the semester with no  negative impact on grade.  Each missed class thereafter will result in a 5 – point deduction from  final points accumulated.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production.  If students are absent for  any reason, they will be accountable for any information disseminated and be held responsible  for class notes, announcements of tests, and assignments.    Participation:  Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry.  This is necessary as students  contribute to the learning environment and become active learners by attending class and  participation.  Students who read text assignments prior to class will be equipped to participate  and will obtain the most from this course.    Due Dates:  To receive full credit, assignments must be submitted by stated due dates.  Late assignments will  be lowered by 50% of point value.  No late assignments will be accepted after week 13.    Tests:  Tests will be given during the semester as announced.  Assignments for makeup tests will be  made only if faculty is notified by voice mail, e‐mail, or personally prior to the test.  A score of  zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed test.    Specialized Culinary Assessment Methods:  Learning competency checklist to be completed prior to exit of courses.  Examples include  evaluation of industry trends, calculate food, beverage and cost percentages, demonstrate  proper selection of equipment and utensils for specific applications, prepare a variety of hot  soufflés, perform mock interviews, demonstrate time management skills, demonstrate American,  English, and Russian service, prepare mousses and gelatins, calculate energy needs based upon  basal metabolic rate and exercise expenditure.    Practical examinations where students demonstrate hands on physical course requirements such  as knife skills, sauces, culinary cooking fundamentals, sanitation, organization, timeliness, taste,  temperature, doneness, texture, nutritional balance, etc.   

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Projects reflecting course concepts such as designing menus, facility planning, nutritional menu  development demonstrating strict dietary guidelines, food cost sheets, purchasing specification  sheets, inventory spreadsheets, and food requisitions.    Final Practical Exam (BLACK BOX):   Students will be expected to execute a practical exam designed to evaluate their cooking expertise.   A growing number of employers require a prospective employee to prepare a meal, a complete  menu, or take on a station as part of the interview process.  The completion of the internship and the  entire program hinges on a passing score for this exam.  Students who fail must pay appropriate  course fees to retake the exam.  Students who do not pass may not graduate.  The parameters for  the Final Practical are as follows:  • • • • • • •   Personal Portfolio:    When interviewing for Hospitality Industry Jobs, it is common for employers to ask for samples of  student work.  They may request items such as written reports, photographs, copies of certificates,  and autobiography and more.  The portfolio is the final internship project which allows students to  put together their best work to submit to employers.  Portfolio Binder Requirements:  • • • • • • Submitted in a three‐ring binder  Cover page  Table of contents  Transcript  Resume – final version  Cover letter – final version  Prepare a five course menu for three guests  Total time in which to produce is four hours  Students may not bring any pre‐made products  Examinee may utilize one apprentice to perform menial tasks  Examinee must requisition product and cost menus to reflect a 33% food cost budget  Students must set up white table cloth dining table for judges  Students will be judged by ACF practical examination guidelines 

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One example of a project/assignment from a course in the student’s program area taken at the  College of Technology or a project/assignment from the internship which best represents student  capabilities to a potential employer.  Pertinent food photographs, menus, certificates, letters of recommendation, thank you letters,  volunteer work, extra‐curricular activities, awards, conferences, etc.  Professional paper describing accomplishments/goals and objectives met by the student during  the internship experience.  In this report, the student will directly and specifically reflect how objectives as defined and  agreed upon by employer and student in “Learning Agreement Goals” were met during the  internship.  Student will address objectives met that were not defined on learning agreement, and objectives  defined on learning agreement, but not met, if any.  Students will include an analysis explaining actions the student could have taken to improve the  internship experience, if any.  This report should be formatted appropriately in educational report format as follows:   Attractive margins, double‐spaced, citations used for direct quotes borrowed from another  source in the report (internship supervisor said…), references given for any resources used in the  report (used www. Web site to look up…), numbered pages, correct grammar, punctuation, and  spelling, etc…  The report should be approximately 1‐2 pages in length, with references, if used, listed on  separate page.  Overall, the report should include an introduction to define student objectives, the introduction  should nicely transition to the body of the report detailing how the objectives were met, and  include potential actions by the student that could have improved the experience.  The  conclusion should summarize the importance and significance of the objectives to the internship  experience.  This paper should be an example of the student’s best work that represents research  (if necessary) and writing capabilities to a potential employer. 

• • •

• • •

• •

  Capstone Dinner:  Students will be required to participate in a capstone formal dinner showcasing their  accomplishments.       

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    Assessment of Program Effectiveness:  Program effectiveness is determined via an established procedure utilizing quantitative and  qualitative inputs and an analysis effort with results used in a continuous  programming/curriculum development process.    Assessment of Data Input Methods:  • • • • •   Feedback from Outside Constituencies:  • • • •   Evaluation of Teaching:  Effective teaching methods, lesson organization, communication ability, maintenance of a  positive learning environment, and fair, adequate evaluation of student learning are among the  major criteria for faculty evaluation.  Tenured faculty are evaluated biennially, non‐tenured  faculty, annually via a combination of classroom observation, self, student, peer, and  administrative written instruments.      Survey/Guest comment forms  Graduate survey  Advisory committee  Program accreditation or approval from The American Culinary Federation Educational Institute  Accrediting Commission  Feedback from current students  Exit interview/survey of graduating students  Survey of Advisory Committee members  Students' course evaluation forms  Focus groups 

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ExAO-1

Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana

2008

Unsuppressed COT records in call number range 641-642.9, with location codes tdgen, tdvid, tdem, or tdref and item types tb, tmmidvd, tmmivt, tmemcdr, or tbref, as of 7/15/08. Title "A" is for appetizers [videorecording] / Anchor Food Products. [Beverage & food service] [videorecording] / The Culinary Institute of America ; a Culinary Learning Resources production ; producer, Philip Miller ; video/audio director, Skip Thela. [Dessert to check handling] [videorecording] / The Culinary Institute of America ; a Culinary Learning Resources production ; producer, Philip Miller ; video/audio director, Skip Thela. 100 great pasta recipes / [project manager/editor, Shelli McConnell ; writer/researcher, Carol Prager]. 100 ways to be pasta : perfect pasta recipes from Gangivecchio / Wanda and Giovanna Tornabene with Carolynn Carren~o. 100% pleasure : from appetizers to desserts, the low-fat cookbook for people who love to eat / by Nancy Baggett and Ruth Glick. 101 all-time favorite cranberry recipes. 125 best cheesecake recipes / George Geary. 125 best cupcake recipes / Julie Hasson. 175 essential slow cooker classics / Judith Finlayson. 1984 Culinary Olympics cookbook : U.S. Team recipes from the 16th International Culinary Competition Geary, George. Hasson, Julie. Finlayson, Judith. Metz, Ferdinand E., Tornabene, Wanda. Baggett, Nancy, 1943Author Call Number 641.8 AIS 642.6 BEV 642.6 DES 641.822 ONE 641.822 TOR 641.5638 BAG 641.5 ONE 641.8653 GEA 641.8 HAS 641.5884 FIN 641.572 MET 1984 641.59 TYS Lansky, Vicki. 641.3 LAN

(Internationale Kochkunst Ausstellung, Frankfurt, West Germany) / Ferdinand E. Metz and the United States 19411991 symposium on global cuisine [videorecording] / produced by the Tyson Foods, Inc. 200 fabulous, frugal uses for baking soda / from Vicki Lansky.

1 of 123

Emily. Carol. Kristi M. 500 low-fat and fat-free appetizers. About professional baking DVD series [videorecording] / produced for Thomson/Delmar Learning by Terra Associates . writer. by Ivie Priestnall-Holden. 75 fix-fast recipes. About professional baking : student workbook / Gail Sokol. 365 great cakes and pies / Carol Prager. director. Patrick. Absolutely tofu [videorecording] / a B-rave Studio production .71 ABO Henderson. Gail. Gail.815 SOK CD 641. [photography by Andrew Elton]. Tom Cammisa . Prager. Katharine.65655 ABS Lemery.5 BUR 641. director. Luchetti. Johanna.555 S497 Priestnall-Holden. Acceptance and cost factors in soup bases versus conventional stock. Sokol. 750 dishes from overseas.5638 FIV 641. 1957641. Blakemore. and hors d'oeuvres / Sarah Schlesinger.5784 FIV 641. Patrick Henderson. Ozzie Alfonso . About professional baking / Gail Sokol. 641.22 H4966 641. 5 o'clock grill / [editor. Amy Stevenson. 2008 300 best comfort food recipes / by Johanna Burkhard.692 BLA 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Burkhard. Rosemary. Sokol. Gail.813 L552a 2 of 123 . 1995 641. Janet Ilona. 4-star desserts / by Emily Luchetti . 50 ways with chicken / Rosemary Wadey . design by Michael Mabry.5 P949s 1945 641.8 PRA 641.815 SOK Workbook 641. Dellie Rex. snacks. 50 ways with fish / Katharine Blakemore. producer.665 WAD Wadey. 1936641. styling by Sara Slavin .86 LUC 641. About wine / J. 641. Ivie.815 SOK 641. Sokol. Kate Farrell. Fuller]. About professional baking / Gail Sokol. photography by Michael Lamotte . J.

Meyer .57 GIS Puck. 1943Wong. writer/producers. Martin.6374 ADV Gisslen. Ukers. by Laurens van der Post and the editors of Time-Life Books. Van der Post. 1946. photographs by Alan Richardson.5 F455a 641. African kitchen : a day in the life of a safari chef / by Josie Stow and Jan Baldwin.3411 MAR Against the grain : 150 good carb Mediterranean recipes / Diane Kochilas. Josie. foreword by Calvin Trillin. Fisher. Alan. Advanced professional cooking / Wayne Gisslen. African cooking. 1945Medrich.596 STO 641. Philip Miller. 1873-641. Philip Miller. 641. Baggett. Wayne. 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. Ukers. Alice A. All about coffee.822 ALL 641.596 V239a Stow. produced & directed by Lee Kraft. by William H.5635 KOC 641. with illustrations by Sir John Tenniel.5 FIS 641. photography by Danna Martel. Martin. 641. Alice in Wonderland cookbook : a culinary diversion / John Fisher . Alan Wong's new wave luau : recipes from Honolulu's award-winning chef / Alan Wong with John Harrisson . William H. Alice Medrich's cookies and brownies. Wolfgang. 1915All manner of food. Field. Nancy. All about pasta [videorecording] / with Giuliano Bugialli .877 U34a 641.86 BAG 641. Drawings by Shelly Sacks. All-American dessert book / Nancy Baggett . Alice. Laurens. 1971. Diane.8654 MED 641. John. director. Photographed by Brian Seed and Richard Jeffery. Joanne A. (William Harrison).578 A442 3 of 123 .641. All about apples / Alice A. All-time favorite barbecue recipes / Better homes and gardens. 1943Baggett.5 PUC 2008 Advanced chocolate decoration techniques with Ewald Notter [videorecording] / produced by the Food & Beverage Institute . Michael.8654 BAG 641. All-American cookie book / Nancy Baggett. Nancy. Kochilas.59969 WON 641. Adventures in the kitchen / Wolfgang Puck .

Illinois. Peggy L.5 D431a 641. Jim.572 AME Dodge. with Elaine Ratner . Dale. Photographed by Richard Meek. 1947American Academy of Chefs cookbook : recipes from American Academy of Chefs members / the American Academy of Chefs . Indiana. Amateur de cuisine / Jean-Philippe Derenne. Walter. New York. Chalmers. 1926Brown. Shenton . writers. American bistro / Irena Chalmers and friends. by Jonathon Norton Leonard and the editors of Time-Life Books. by Dale Brown and the editors of Time-Life Books. Feibleman and the editors of Time-Life Books. 641..ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Ramette.5973 CHA 641. [et al. Studio photography by Richard Meek. Ron Blau. Dale.5 AME 641. Eugene. Michigan. photographs by Michael Lamotte. Jonathan Norton. Suppl. Irena. by Jose´ Wilson and the editors of Time-Life Books. Photographed by Richard Jeffery [and others] American cooking: the great West. 1903-1975. Feibleman. 2008 All-time favorite fish recipes / [authors. by Mark Kauffman. by Jonathan Norton Leonard and the editors of Time-Life Books. Leonard. produced and directed by Ron Blau . New Jersey. 641.5974 W749a 641. Dun Gifford. K.5975 W231a 1973 641. American cooking. Wilson.692 R172a Derenne. Photographed by Constantine Manos and American cooking: the Eastern heartland.. 1903-1975. American cooking: Creole and Acadian.] and the editors of Time-Life Books. American cooking: New England. Jose´. Photographed by Mark Kauffman. Jean-Philippe.592 AME Weaver.5973 WEA 641. by Peter S. American cooking: the Northwest. America cooks Mediterranean style [videorecording] / a production of Oldways Preservation & Exchange Trust . Jonathan Norton. 641. and Ted Streshinsky.5978 L581a 1972 641. Peggy Ramette. Peter S. 4 of 123 . Richard Meek.5 B877a 641. 641. Dick Sternberg]. Photography by Mark Kauffman. America eats : forms of edible folk art / William Woys Weaver.5974 L581a 641..815 LOU 641. illustrations by Susan Mattmann. 1930Leonard.59763 F297a 641. assisted by Restaurants & Institutions editorial staff. William Woys. American baking heritage / Patricia Lousada.59795 B877a Brown.86 DOD 641. American baker : exquisite desserts from the pastry chef of the Stanford Court / by Jim Dodge. Pennsylvania. 1954Lousada. Ohio. by James P. studio photos. American cooking: the melting pot. by Dale Brown and the editors of Time-Life Books. foreword by Maida Heatter . American cooking : Southern style / by Eugene Walter and the editors of Time-Life Books . Photographed by Anthony Blake and Richard Jeffery. with supplementary chapters on the cooking of eastern Canada. Patricia.

Zanger. Edward G.59 ZAN 641. low-cholesterol cookbook : an essential guide for those concerned about their cholesterol level / editors. Americas hospitality industry [videorecording] Ours is a special world! / [American Hotel and Motel Association and the National Restaurant Association].5973 ZAN 641. Meredith.662 A512 641. America's Rising Star Chefs. American Culinary Federation's guide to culinary certification : the mark of professionalism / American Culinary Federation .563 M4788a 641. Mark.5973 FOR 642.52 MAY 2008 American country cheese : cooking with America's specialty and farmstead cheeses / Laura Chenel and Linda Siegfried . Zanger. 1946Grundy. Michael Baskette. American metric beef cookbook : 101 favorite beef recipes : metric and U. photographs by Dana Gallagher.5638 GRU 641.5079 LEO 641. Pitkin. American place : celebrating the flavors of America / Larry Forgione . American country inn and bed & breakfast cookbook / Kitty and Lucian Maynard .5973 Jo 641. Inc. a production of Santa Fe Ventures. foreword by Evan Jones . With chapters by Cleveland Amory [and others] Historical foods consultant: Helen Duprey Bullock. Evan. American folklife cookbook / Joan Nathan. Kitty.5 AME 641. Leonard. American heritage cookbook and illustrated history of American eating & drinking. American Culinary Federation's guide to culinary competitions : cooking to win! / American Culinary Federation . Forgione. editor. illustrated by Victor Ichioka. McCarty. Maynard.52 MAY 1995 641. David Ruggerio [videorecording] / PDR Film & Video . in association with American Program Service .5023 BAS 641. Nathan. 1996. American Heart Association low-fat. Jones. 1955Baskette. American country inn and bed & breakfast cookbook / Kitty and Lucian Maynard . Scott Grundy. Recipes editor: Helen American history cookbook / Mark H. American ethnic cookbook for students / by Mark H.673 CHE 641.5 A5122a American food : the gastronomic story / Evan Jones. measures. Zanger. Pitkin. editor. Larry. producer/director. 641. Joan. American macrobiotic cuisine / Meredith McCarty.S. Julia M.54 AME 5 of 123 . Edward G.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Chenel. Mark.5973 NAT 641. Kitty. 1955Maynard. Jim Lautz. Brad Barnes. Leonard. Zanger. Julia M. Scott M. Laura. Mary Winston. 1915641. 102. 641. Michael.

Antipasti : the little dishes of Italy / Julia Della Croce . America's Rising Star Chefs. Jane. John Burgoyne . illustrations. Roy F. executive producers. Cook's illustrated [videorecording] : [the complete 5th season . Carl Tremblay. Inc. Antioxidant save-your-life cookbook : 150 nutritious high-fiber. Animal. 6 of 123 . producer.692 AME 641.5 AME 641. original drawings by Richard A.4 641. Kingsolver. low-fat recipes to protect yourself against the damaging effects of free radicals / Jane Kinderlehrer and Daniel A. Guste.5 AME v. photography by Carl Tremblay .8 PIL 641. Fitch. Bouterin. Antoine's Restaurant. Herb Sevush. with Steven L. Ann. illustrations by John Burgoyne. America's test kitchen. Della Croce.53 AME 641. Another Blue Strawbery : more brilliant cooking without recipes / James Haller .5 AME 2008 America's Rising Star Chefs. Appetizers & garnishes [videorecording] : cut garnishes / demonstrator. producer. producer. executive producer.812 DEL 641. Antoine Bouterin's desserts from Le Pe´rigord / Antoine Bouterin with Ruth Gardner. Haller. in association with American Program Service . Season 4 [videorecording] : [home of Cook's illustrated magazine]. Jim Lautz . [illustrations by Bob Marstall]. a production of Santa Fe Ventures. Antoine. James. Huang SuHuei. miracle : a year of food life / Barbara Kingsolver.5 HAL 641. photography by Joyce Oudkerk Pool . Ann Pillsbury's baking book. Season 7 [videorecording] / a production of A La Carte Communications . Jr. America's test kitchen.5 AME v. 104. America's test kitchen live! / by the editors of Cook's illustrated . Michael Cardua [videorecording] / PDR Film & Video . director. Noel Riley. America's test kitchen cookbook / by the editors of Cook's illustrated . Hopp and Camille Kingsolver . 106. home of Cook's illustrated magazine] / a production of A La Carte Communications . in association with American Program Service .5 GUS 641. Houser. cookbook : a collection of the original recipes from New Orleans' oldest and most famous restaurant / by Roy F. Jim Lautz .5 641.0973 K554a 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. vegetable.563 K51a 641. Guste. George Morrone [videorecording] / PDR Film & Video . Pillsbury. Shiao Fa Tsai . food styling by Amy Nathan. Julia. Barbara. Kinderlehrer. Kinderlehrer. Geoffrey America's test kitchen. van Ackere. American Public Television . since 1840.86 BOU 641. Geoffrey Drummond. photography Daniel J. Inc.5 AME 641.595 CHI Appetite for life : the biography of Julia Child / Noel Riley Fitch. a production of Santa Fe Ventures.5 C536Zf 641. 641. director. Nat Katzman . director.

Mitchell. Haedrich. Henckels Knives. Robb. Tim Ward. 642. Gonza´lez. Elaine. Walsh. Are you really going to eat that? : reflections of a culinary thrill seeker / Robb Walsh. J. photography by Frankie Frankeny. 641. Bellouet. Ken. producer/director. Shiao Fa Tsai . Harvey.5979 COR 641 WAL 641. Susan E. Arranging food beautifully : tray and steam table art / Susan E.8 ROS 2008 Appetizers & garnishes [videorecording] : sculptured garnishes / demonstrator. Apple pie perfect : 100 delicious and decidedly different recipes for America's favorite pie / Ken Haedrich. J. Albert.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641.5 YEL 641.6 GON 641. Wutsch. Apple garnishing with full-color photos and step-by-step instructions / Harvey Rosen. Art a la carte. Albert. G.8652 HAE Bellouet. Perruchon.812 APP Rosen.8652 BEL 641.6 ART 641. First courses and wine [videorecording] / WTTW/Chicago .J.8 Ly 641.691 WUT 642. Huang Su-Huei.5 ARO Mitchell. Bellouet. Romaine Chatard. Art of chocolate : techniques & recipes for simply spectacular desserts & confections / by Elaine Gonza´lez . Philip Miller. J.-J. Champion. Joanne A. 641. 1954641. G. Apprenez l'art de la glace et des sorbets / E.A.-M. Emmanuel. 642. Aprovecho : a Mexican-American border cookbook / Teresa Cordero-Cordell & Robert Cordell. Art of barbecuing and grilling game/ by Albert Wutsch. Ryon.691 WUT 7 of 123 . Perruchon . Teresa. producers. Meyer. translated by Diane Holuigue. Cordero-Cordell. Art of cooking omelettes [by] Madame Romaine de Lyon.862 RYO 641.595 CHI 641. Art of carving [videorecording] / produced by Presentation Councel in association with Simpson's in the Strand & J. Aromatic & flavoring combinations [videorecording] / produced by The Food & Beverage Institute . Apprenex l'art de la viennoiserie et Festival de Tartes = Learn the art of viennoiserie and Festival of Tarts / G. producer. (Ge´rard Joe¨l) Ryon.M.8 MIT Yellowstone Art Center Associates. Wutsch. G. Paris. Appetizers. Art of cooking venison / by Albert Wutsch. Kevin O'Malley.

by Joon Lee.G.49 ART Toulouse-Lautrec. Cherkasky.641. 1864-1901.59 KAI 641. Dortu and Ph. Art of French cooking : sumptuous recipes and menus from the heart of the incomparable French cuisine : 3760 recipes and instructions for masterpiece cookery created by the great chefs of France . Johnson. 2008 Art of cooking with certified Angus beef : a collection of recipes by distinguished chefs. Jan. drawings by Kelly Luscombe. Ursula. Art of New York deli cooking [videorecording] / Videocraft Classics . 641. Translated by Margery Weiner. Arno Schmidt . table manners and tableware / Suzanne von Drachenfels . Henri de.59 A784a. Art of food presentation [videorecording] / Meridian Education Corporation . 1956. with Abe Lebewohl.5944 TOU 641.G. Jennifer Joyce.4 BER 641. Suzanne.59747 SCH Schwartz . James Gerard Smith. photography by Holly Stewart.59 ART Berry.. Art of waiting tables [videorecording] / Produced by Robert Kanner.59519 M876a 641. producer/director.815 HEN 641. photographer. Inja.7 V946a 642.8654 JOH 641. Art of preserving / Jan Berry .662 ART 642. photographs by Chris Callis. Von Drachenfels. 1935Morris. Beth.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. Jann. Art of Korean cooking. Harriett. (Arthur R. Reid. Art of quick breads : simple everyday baking / by Beth Hensperger . Gary Penn and William Reid.6 PRO Art of the hamburger. written by Robert Kanner. Culinary notes and annotation by Barbara Kafka. Introd. Kaiser. 641. Lisa. 641.) 2004 8 of 123 . by M.81 NAM 641. Arthur 641. Art of cuisine [by] Henri Toulouse-Lautrec [and] Maurice Joyant.8 CHE Arthur Schwartz's New York City food : an opinionated history and more than 100 legendary recipes / Arthur Schwartz. produced and directed by Lee Kraft.8 ART 641. translated by Art of garnishing / Inja Nam.Ef Nam. directed by W. photography by Joyce Oudkerk Pool . Hensperger.. Art of rosette cooking / by Ursula Kaiser. 1928- Artful pie : unforgettable recipes for creative cooks / by Lisa Cherkasky and Rene´e Comet. Illus. Huisman. styling by Amy Nathan. Art of the table : a complete guide to table setting. photography by Rodney Weidland. Art of the cookie : over 75 irresistible recipes / by Jann Johnson .

Andoh.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Malouf. Simonds. translated by Laurence Escoffier . Wendy. photographs by Ben Fink. and illustrated by Jan Adkins. Nina. the best recipes / Maggie Glezer . Takayuki. At your service : a hands-on guide to the professional dining room / The Culinary Institute of America . Glezer. 641. illustrated by Linda Bennett. introduction by Julia Child. Elizabeth. preface by Pierre P. photography by Melanie Acevedo.331 ADK 9 of 123 . memories of my life / by Auguste Escoffier . designed. Artist's table : a cookbook by master chefs inspired by paintings in the National Gallery of Art / edited and compiled by Carol Eron.5784 LIL 641. Vicki. Sweetser. John W. John W. foreword by Ferdinand E. Margaret. Jan.5994 SIM 641.5 B126 1995 Cross.5952 KOS 641.5 AME 641. Avon international cookbook : winning recipes from Avon representatives around the world. 641. Metz . the bakers.5952 A552a Fischer.814 SWE 641. Auguste Escoffier. Asian grilling / Vicki Liley. Fischer. Artistry & innovation [videorecording] / American Culinary Federation.815 GLE 641.8 SIM 641. Greg. Artisan baking across America: the breads. (Auguste).5 FIS Escoffier. Simpson. wrap. 1846-1935.5956 M258A 641.5092 ESC 641.5 ART Liley. Adkins. Maureen. and relish / Nina Simonds . Authentic recipes from Japan / recipes by Takayuki Kosaki and Walter Wagner. A.59 A961 641. Asian wraps : deliciously easy hand-held bundles to stuff. Back label recipes and more! Backpacker's cookbook / by Margaret Cross & Jean Fiske . Australian cuisine / Maureen Simpson. 641. Escoffier . At home with Japanese cooking / by Elizabeth Andoh. Bakers : a simple book about the pleasures of making bread / written. Kosaki. 641. Maggie.578 C951b 641. 2008 Artichoke to za'atar : modern Middle Eastern food / Greg Malouf and Lucy Malouf. 642. Asian sauces & marinades / Wendy Sweetser.

Jim. 1870Baking powder. writers/producers. [et al. barbe-cookery section edited by Virginia Rich. Flo Braker . produced by Jennifer Johns.815 AME 641. [ill.5 Sz 641. Sheldon. Mimi Turner]. producer/writer Philip Baking boot camp : five days of basic training at the Culinary Institute of America / The Culinary Institute of America and Darra Goldstein. leavening agent. Darra.71 VAN 641.86 DOD 641. Greg. photography by Joyce Oudkerk Pool. Miller. edited by Rick Rodgers.. 1953- photography by Tom Tracy.71 LAM 641.815 HEN General Mills. Sanderson. Goldstein.6 A8 641. 641. Bakeshop [videorecording] : Vanilla sauce and pastry cream / [produced with the Culinary Institute of America. Baking handbook for the food service program. Barbe-construction section edited by George A. Joseph. photography by Richard Jung. produced by the Food & Beverage Institute .. James K. Bakeshop [videorecording] : Laminating dough / [produced with the Culinary Institute of America.815 BAK Amendola. Baking with Jim Dodge / Jim Dodge and Elaine Ratner . illustrations by Lauren Jarrett . Bakeshop [videorecording] : the basic steps of baking bread / produced with the Culinary Institute of America Baking and Pastry Department . inc.. 1939Atkinson.815 BAKE 641. Szathmary. producer/writer Philip E. Barbecue book. 641. Baking and Pastry Department] . photographs by Chris Shorten.578 S958s George.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. a healthful. produced by the Food & Beverage Institute . Miller.815 PAT 641. Baking and Pastry Department] . convenient. 641.] . 10 of 123 . Atkinson. Thomas 641. Joanne A. Beth. producer/writer Philip E.62 JOH 641. Patent. Bakeshop [videorecording] : Meringue / [produced with the Culinary Institute of America. Bakery restaurant cookbook / Louis Szathmary . 1954Balsamico! : a balsamic vinegar cookbook / text & recipes by Pamela Sheldon Johns . Louis. Food Service Division.76 MCN 641. Pamela Barry Design . Baking in America : traditional and contemporary favorites from the past 200 years / Greg Patent.815 G6244b Hensperger.815 Ba 641.71 MER 2008 Baker's Dozen cookbook : become a better baker with 135 foolproof recipes and tried-and-true techniques / the Baker's Dozen. Baking bread : old and new traditions / by Beth Hensperger . illustrated by Norman Gordon. Bakers' manual for quantity baking and pastry making. by Thomas G. Bar & grill cookbook : exciting new recipes from San Francisco's bar & grill restaurants / James McNair . McNair. introduction by Marion Cunningham . Dodge. produced by the Food & Beverage Institute . Baking and Pastry Department] . produced by the Food & Beverage Institute .

illustrations by Pearl Beach. Beer : tap into the art and science of brewing / Charles Bamforth .5882 M592b 642 BAS Hazen. Janet.6565 GRE 641. 2008 Barbecue inferno : cooking with chile peppers on the grill / Dave DeWitt and Nancy Gerlach.873 B199b Basket of berries : recipes and paintings from a fruit garden / Val Archer. Archer. Steven. Gerald.5784 RAI 641.5946 HIR 641. Judith.. 641. Beard. 641. Beard on bread. foreword by William Woys Weaver. James. Val. 19031985. Beard. illustrations by Margaret Chodos-Irvine.5 BAS Methven.662 T583b 641. Basque kitchen : tempting food from the Pyrenees / Gerald Hirigoyen with Cameron Hirigoyen . Steven. James. producer.815 B368b 641. Philip Miller.822 B368b 641. Raichlen. Beef & veal / by the editors of Time-Life Books. Raichlen. peas and every edible bean on the planet! / by Aliza Green .5784 RAI 641. Choate. Drawings by Karl Stuecklen. 641. Dave. Basic table service skills [videorecording] / produced by the Learning Resources Center of the Culinary Institute of America . Beard on pasta / by James Beard.5784 DEW 641. Bean cookbook : a celebration of the delicious legume from Hoppin' John to simple cassoulet / Judith Choate . foreword by Dave Thomas. Basil / Janet Hazen . Basket of apples : recipes and paintings from a country orchard / Val Archer.6565 CHO 641. Barbecue! bible / by Steven Raichlen . Basic microwaving / by Barbara Methven. Green. principal photography by Peter Johansky . Barbara. Basic kitchen preparations [videorecording] / produced by The Food & Beverage Institute. Hirigoyen. Charles W. Archer. 1952- 11 of 123 . Bamforth. photographs by Chris Shorten. food styling by Dyne Benner. Barbecue! sauces.641 ARC 641. Val. Aliza. rubs and marinades / Steven Raichlen. by James Beard.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana DeWitt.657 HAZ 641. 19031985.647 ARC 641. Bean bible : a legumaniac's guide to lentils. Time-Life Books.

647 KRA 641. with an appreciation of the Shakers by Walter Muir Whitehill. 641. : cookbook / by Darlene Glantz Skees . Belgo cookbook / Denis Blais and Andre´ Plisnier.] 641. photographs by John Dominis. Berries / by Sharon Kramis .5945 BUG 641.5 SKE 641. Sandra. Gluck. photographs by Eric Jacobson . Jr. Darlene Glantz.62 T654b 2008 Beer cookbook. Cartier. Best of Shaker cooking. too! : cookbook : town & country cuisine for people on-the-go! / by Darlene Glantz Skees .5 SKE Skees. Beverly. Kramis. Kinard . Denis.814 ADL 641. .5 MIL 641. Best of Shaker cooking / edited by Amy Bess Williams Miller and Persis Wellington Fuller .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Tolson.647 BER 641. Best of Bugialli / by Giuliano Bugialli . Best little marinades cookbook / by Karen Adler. with an appreciation of the Shakers by Walter Muir Whitehill.5973 M647b 12 of 123 . Berkley. Blais. Best of coffee : a cookbook / Sandra Gluck . [Romulo A.692 C327b 641. Giuliano. Best of friends. Bernard Clayton's new complete book of breads / Bernard Clayton. Best of friends. food photography by Ellen Silverman. Skees. Berries : a cookbook / [Robert Berkley . Edited by Amy Bess Williams Miller and Persis Wellington Fuller. etc. Illustrated by Norman Pomerantz. Cartier. design by Lesley Ehlers. Karen. Best little BBQ sauces cookbook / by Karen Adler. working drawings by Donnie Cameron.6373 GLU Best fish ever : the indispensable guide for all anglers and non-anglers who love eating fish / John O. Adler. Bugialli. by Berneita Tolson and Edith McCaig.7 ADL 641. Clayton.5 BES 641. Berneita.815 CLA 2003 641. photography by Kathryn Kleinman. Miller. Best of ice cream : a cookbook / Beverly Cox & Malvina C. Sharon. illustrated by Terry Melvin. 641. illustrated by Mimi Grant.59493 BLA 641. John O. Bernard. Cox.862 COX 641. Best of Gourmet [2005] : a year of celebrations / from the editors of Gourmet . Adler. Amy Bess Williams. Robert. 1945Miller. Amy Bess Williams. food photography by Elizabeth Watt. Yanes. Darlene Glantz. photographer]. 641. Karen.

Alicia.665 B565 641. Beth. 1953Woodruff. Better homes and gardens encyclopedia of cooking.86 B565 Halpin. Best-loved cookies.563 W893b 641. cornbreads. 641.815 STA 641. Cartier. illustrations by John Burgoyne . Stacey. and more / Beth Hensperger.5946 SAA 2008 Best of Spain : a cookbook / recipes and text by Alicia Saacs . Best quick breads : 150 recipes for muffins. 13 of 123 . coffeecakes. Cartier.5 Bet Best of waffles & pancakes : a cookbook / Jane Stacey . Best of the best from the Big Sky cookbook : selected recipes from the favorite cookbooks of Montana and Wyoming / edited by Gwen McKee and Barbara Moseley . Mai.34 Be 641. Better homes and gardens all-time favorite fruit recipes / [editors. Best of Sunset low-fat cook book / by the editors of Sunset Books. Best-ever chocolate desserts : Rick Rodgers. Better homes and gardens chicken and turkey cook book.691 C327b 641. food photography by Steven Mark Needham. shortcakes.8654 B561 641.6374 ROD 641. Best-kept secrets of healthy cooking / Sandra Woodruff. Bonnie Lasater]. scones. Saacs. Better food for public places : a guide for improving institutional food / by Anne Moyer.813 BES 641. Pham. Joanne Johnson.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. illustrated by Tupper England.5 M938b 641. Better cooking library dessert cook book. John O. Best of Vietnamese & Thai cooking : favorite recipes from Lemon Grass Restaurant and Cafes / Mai Pham.59786 BES 641. Rodgers.59597 P534b 641. Rick.815 HEN 641. food photography by Elizabeth Watt. Sandra L. 642. photography by Carl Tremblay. Best venison ever : the indispensable guide for big-game hunters who love eating wild food / John O. Best recipe : soups & stews / by the editors of Cook's illustrated . Hensperger. Jane. gingerbreads.5638 B5615 641. Anne Moyer.

Better homes and gardens new cook book. Thompson. photographs by Tom Eckerle and Tom Murphy . Groff. Betty. Bill.5884 CRO 641. (Albert J. Biltmore Estate specialities of the house / [editor. Big sky cooking / Meredith Brokaw and Ellen Wright . Crocker.8 THO 641. turkey.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 2008 Better homes and gardens favorite ways with chicken.5978 BRO 641. A.5979 CRO 641.5 B565 641. Betty Groff's Country goodness cookbook / by Betty Groff .5973 C938c 641. J.5 BET 1962 641. duck.822 CRO 641. and gamebirds.59748 GRO 641. Betty Crocker's Southwest cooking. Neal. Vaughn Sheekman. Biscuits. Crocker.5 BIL 641.ill.) Brokaw. by Lauren Jarrett. and sweet potato pie / by Bill Neal. Cathy A.71 NEA 14 of 123 . Crocker. Betty. Better homes and gardens gifts from your kitchen. Baime. Meredith. Better homes and gardens fondue and tabletop cooking. Crocker. [foreword by Tom Brokaw]. Betty Crocker More slow cooker recipes : all-new recipes easier than ever. Betty. every recipe perfected for you in our test kitchen. 641. Betty.8 B565 641.5973 B565 641. spoonbread.255 BAI 641.J. Big shots : the men behind the booze / A.665 B5652 641. Betty. Baime. Better homes and gardens menu cook book. Betty Crocker's pasta cookbook.3 BET 641. Sylvia Birthday cake book / by Sylvia Thompson . Better homes and gardens heritage cook book. Betty Crocker's casual country cooking. illustrations by Brooke Scudder. Wesler].

L. Bobby. Gerard Smith. William. illustrated by Akiko Aoyagi. 1941. Blender bible / Andrew Chase & Nicole Young. Chase.5 CHA 641. and wine bars of Paris : everyday recipes from the real Paris / Daniel Young .812 SCH 641.5 WEN 641.852 WIL Book of miso : savory. Hellon.5944 YOU 641. John. Zgola. C. brasseries. 641. Tsai. Grimsdale. Wenzel.814 GRI Rosengarten. photographs by Alan Richardson . Book of spices.5973 FLA 641. illustrated by Akiko Aoyagi.56 Z632b 641. Blue Elephant cookbook : Royal Thai cuisine / text by John Hellon . photography by Per Ericson.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Palomino. high-protein seasoning / William Shurtleff & Akiko Aoyagi . photographs by Daniel Young.5784 F592b 641. Bistros. Blue Ginger : East meets West cooking with Ming Tsai / by Ming Tsai and Arthur Boehm . G. Ming. Sr. 641.595 TSA 641.5638 BON Blueprints for restaurant success / by George L. Rafael. foreword by Ken Horn. Book of marmalade : its antecedents. Schmidt. Book of hors d'oeuvres and canapes / Arno Schmidt and Inja Nam . Daniel. 1937Wilson. and its role in the world today.6 SHU Book of sauces / Gordon Grimsdale . Gilbert Bordillon.59593 HEL 641. (George 2008 Bistro Latino : home cooking fired up with the flavors of Latin America / Rafael Palomino with Julia Moskin. photographs by Tom Eckerle + design by Stark Design. 641. Anne Wilson. together with a collection of recipes for marmalades & marmalade cookery / C. Flay. photographs by Tony Le Duc. Andrew. Shurtleff. Flay. 1963. Arno. photographs by Ben Fink. its history. Jitka M.6383 ROS Shurtleff.6 SHU 2001 15 of 123 . 1941. Anne. Book of tempeh / William Shurtleff & Akiko Aoyagi . Leonard). Bon Appe´tit deliciously light. William. Bon appetit! : the joy of dining in long-term care / Jitka Zgola. Bobby. Frederic.598 PAL Young. 642. 1902Bobby Flay's bold American food : more than 200 revolutionary recipes / by Bobby Flay with Joan Schwartz . Bobby Flay's Mesa Grill cookbook : explosive flavors from the southwestern kitchen / by Bobby Flay with Stephanie Banyas and Sally Jackson . 641. 1964Wenzel.641. Gordon. photography by J.641.

Nancy. lunch & dinner. Leader. writer/producer. Hamilton.815 LEA 641. Sylvia G. with Lisa Weiss.815 RAM 641. Ogden. Daniel.5973 OGD 641.815 BRE Reinhart. Hensperger. Fannie Merritt.815 HEN 16 of 123 . 641. Bradley. Beth. Bashline. photography by Victor Budnik . photography by Ron Manville. Judith Blahnik.5 F233b 1924 641. Braise : a journey though international cuisine / Daniel Boulud and Melissa Clark. Daniel. and other wild things / Sylvia G. Hensperger. Boulangerie : the craft and culture of baking in France / Paul Rambali . Bread baker's apprentice : mastering the art of extraordinary bread / by Peter Reinhart . written & produced by Jack R.69 B2999b 641. Boulud. 641.815 REI 641.815 HEN 641. Bread Alone : bold fresh loaves from your own hands / Daniel Leader.73 BRA Idone. Beth. 641. designed by Thomas Ingalls. Bradley Ogden's breakfast.5981 IDO 641. Oakes. Boulevard : the cookbook / Nancy Oakes and Pamela Mazzola. Christopher. Peter. Bread bible : Beth Hensperger's 300 favorite recipes. recorded & directed by ARC Video Productions.815 HEN 641. produced by Bruce Franchini.5981 HAM 641. Paul. Bounty of the earth cookbook : how to cook fish. Brazil : a culinary journey / Cherie Hamilton. Rambali. Joanne A.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Farmer. with recipes and photographs by Maria Rudman. game. Bread baking essentials [videorecording] / Pastry Chef Central . Bashline. Cherie Y.5097 OAK 641. Bread for breakfast / by Beth Hensperger . 641. Meyer. photography by Leigh Beisch. Brazil : a cook's tour / Christopher Idone. 2008 Boston cooking-school cook book.77 BOU 641. Bread and baker [videorecording] : from the source / produced by the Culinary Institute of America [and] the Bread Bakers Guild of America .815 BRE Hensperger. Marshall . Braising and stewing [videorecording] / National Productions Division of KQED . Beth. Bread / by Beth Hensperger . 1857-1915.

Chet Holden. George Leonard. Breakfast all day : 150 recipes for everybody's favorite meal / by Edon Waycott. Brewing battles : a history of American beer / Amy Mittelman. 642. Dalsass. Joanne A. Buffets : a guide for professionals / Georges C.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. and prepare cold buffets / Andreas Miessmer. Mittelman.2309 M6851B 641. Philip Miller. Bugialli on pasta / by Giuliano Bugialli . Giuliano.86 DAL 641.52 CUN 2008 Breads / by the editors of Time-Life Books. Butterscotch lover's cookbook : & mail-order treats source guide / by Diana Dalsass. written and presented by Burt Wolf. Butte's heritage cookbook / edited by Jean McGrath. Bernard.3009 BUR 641. produced and edited by Philip E. organize. Bruce Aidells' complete sausage book : recipes from America's premium sausage maker / Bruce Aidells & Denis Kelly. Laurent.873 SHA 641. Miessmer. Ken 641.52 WAY 641. Breakfast book / Marion Cunningham . Herter. photographs by John Dominis. 641.4 STL Bugialli. Jr. illustrated by Donnie Cameron. 641.815 B828 Clayton. Jr.79 MIE St.66 AID 641. Amy. Aidells.5 H573b 1963 641.and his thirst / by Ken Shales. Laurent. Edon. Meyer. illustrations by Glenn Wolff . Herter. Buffet : a handbook for professionals. Andreas. 1911-1994. Waycott.814 BRO 641. Bull cook and authentic historical recipes and practices / by George Leonard Herter and Berthe E. Marion.59 B988 17 of 123 . Shales. Miller. Brittle and more [videorecording] / Culinary Institute of America . Bruce. St. underwritten by ConAgra Foods . Cunningham. Georges C. Brown sauces [videorecording] / produced by the Food & Beverage Institute . Burt Wolf [videorecording] : what we eat / Acorn Associates . writer/producers.815 CLA 641..822 BUG 641. Brewing better beers : a practical guide to the craft which will satisfy every would be home brewer . Diana.853 BRI 641. how to plan. Breads of France and how to bake them in your own kitchen / by Bernard Clayton.

Fisher . by Cleve Carney. Cleve. Rose Levy.86 BRA 641. pork. 641. California fresh cookbook / the Junior League of Oakland-East Bay .S. George.8653 CAK 641.8653 BER 641. Russell Museum cookbook. Cake decorating [videorecording] : Easy as 1-2-3 / Wilton Enterprises. Teresa Moore . Camouflage cuisine : wild game & seafood cookery of the South / compiled by Dorcas Brown. Cake tour of the U. Cafe´ des artistes cookbook / by George Lang . 641.303 BUY 641. and wild game for dutch ovens. and grills / Rick Black. writer.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641.56383 THE Beranbaum.5 LAN 2008 Buying guide for fresh fruits. Cabin cookin' : the very best recipes for beef. John Phillip. 641. Theriot.M. food photography by Allan Rosenberg . edited by Maria D.8653 C139 641. Jeremiah. 641. Tower.F. scenic photography by Leo Meier. Joanne G. Cajun low-carb / Jude W. 1924Theriot. McCraine. Joanne G. C. photographs by Vincent Lee .5092 TOW 641.8653 CAK 641. by Kathy G. : favorite recipes from every corner of this cake-loving country. Cakes / by the editors of Time-Life Books. Mary Major Williams . Cakes and pastries. California the beautiful cookbook : authentic recipes from California / recipes by John Phillip Carroll . art by Beth Van Hoesen.59794 CAR 641.5 CAL Carroll. foreword by M. text by Virginia Rainey . skillets. Jude W. Fullan. herbs and nuts. McCraine. design and illus. Fullan]. seafood. 18 of 123 . Cakes / [editor. Brachman.5 BLA 641.6 C289c 641.K.5 C111 Black. Carney. Lang. Guarnaschelli . poultry.8653 FUL 641. Kathy G.A. foreword by Brendan Gill . foreword by Maida Heatter. Rick. Harley. vegetables.691 C185 California dish : what I saw (and cooked) at the American culinary revolution / Jeremiah Tower. photographs by Mick Hales. Wayne Cakes and cowpokes : new desserts from the old Southwest / Wayne Harley Brachman. Cake bible / Rose Levy Beranbaum .

1970Ferrari.578 O944c Weihofen. chocolates. Carole.5631 C752c 2000 641. Horace. Candy cookbook : recipes for spectacular truffles. Campground cookery : great recipes for any outdoor activity / Brenda Kulibert. Campagna table : bring the style and cooking of the Italian countryside into your own home / Mark Strausman. Pat. Candy and chocolate [videorecording] / KQED.42 FER 641. Canteen cup cookery : a cookbook to enhance MREs / by Galen Geer. McMorris. Campsite to kitchen : tastes & traditions from America's great outdoors / the Outdoor Writers Association of America. Strausman. Doran.853 BLO 641. Canning & preserving / Linda Ferrari. brittles. illustrations by Dan Hubig.578 K96c 1995 Association of America. Linda. Geer. . Candida Albicans yeast-free cookbook : how good nutrition can help fight the epidemic of yeast-related diseases / Pat Connolly and the associates of the Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation .853 CAN Bloom. 641. 641. 641.563 WEI 641.86 PEN 19 of 123 . Donna L.578 M4789c 641. toffees. Pence. 641.578 G298c 641.5979 PEN 641. Cancer survival cookbook : 200 quick & easy recipes with helpful eating hints / Donna L. Caprial cooks for friends / Caprial Pence . Connolly. Candy! : a sweet selection of fun and easy recipes / Laura Dover Doran. Galen.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Kephart. Camp cooking / Bill and Jo McMorris . Caprial's desserts / Caprial Pence and Melissa Carey. 641.5945 STR 641. Caprial. San Francisco . Capital classics : recipes from the Junior League of Washington. Weihofen with Christina Marino. Caprial. and more / by Carole Bloom . 18621931. [illustrations by Ron Butler].853 DOR 641. Brenda. Bill.5 CAP Pence. Kulibert. Laura Dover. Mark. food styling by Heather Bowen. photographs by Evan Sklar.575 K38c 2008 Camp cookery / by Horace Kephart. foreword by Candy / by the editors of Time-Life Books. Outdoor Writers 641. produced by Bruce Franchini. photography by Paul Yonchek .853 C219 641.

Carrots to caviar / by Stephan & Lavonne. Edward E. Patteson. Chuck Williams . foreword by James Beard ..4 SAN 641. Cather's kitchens : foodways in literature and life / by Roger L. Ceil Dyer's Wok cookery. Heller. Pence. Livingston . Phyllis Pellman. Carbohydrate addict's cookbook : 250 all-new low-carb recipes that will cut your cravings and keep you slim Heller. 1948Kasouris. produced by Bruce Franchini. A. recipes.641.8653 Ce 641. 1943Sanders.5945 FIE 641. Central Market in Lancaster. Richard F. Caprial. Carol. and Linda K. Dyer. Roger L.59797 CEL 641. Celebrating Italy / Carol Field. [illustrations by Richard Harrington]. Richard Eskite. sausage and pate [videorecording] / KQED. Charles Patteson's Kentucky cooking / Charles Patteson with Craig Emerson . Celebrate! Celebrating 100 years of Jell-O.813 PEN 2008 Caprial's soups & sandwiches / by Caprial Pence and Mark Dowers. illustrations by Shirley Felts. Field. 641. Heller and Rachel F. 1932. (Richard Ferdinand). for life / Richard F. Nick Fluge. Lane. Good.77 D996w 641. Georgeanne Brennan . Charcuterie. Pennsylvania / Phyllis Pellman Good and Louise Stoltzfus. introduction by James M. Welsch . Georgeanne.5973 WEL 641. Rosowski.5638 H477c 641. Central Market cookbook : favorite recipes from the standholders of the nation's oldest farmer's market. Catering solutions : for the culinary student. foodservice operator. Larry Lewis. photography.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. San Francisco . 641.864 CEL 641. Celebrate 100 : the Washington State Centennial cookbook. Ceil. Stephan.578 BRE 642. foreword by Susan J.5 GOO 641.77 L7881c Brennan. Carnegie Institute .66 CHA 641. Charles. and caterer / Ed Sanders. Carnegie treasures cookbook / Women's Committee Museum of Art.D. Casual outdoor dining / general editor. Welsch.5 KAS Livingston.59769 PAT 20 of 123 . Walton and John R. Cast-iron cooking : from johnnycakes to blackened redfish / A. D.5 CAR 641.

Arno.57 SCH 641.59763 PRU 641.564 RAM 641. directed by John Birkin. Decorative and instructive drawings by Ed Nuckolls. written by Peter Tilbury . and sizes / Arno Schmidt. American Culinary Federation. Chef! [videorecording] / BBC Films . and sizes / Arno Schmidt. Don.5 CHE 642 CHE 642 CHE Chef Paul Prudhomme's pure magic / photographs by Paul Rico. photography by Tom Jimison. Charlie Trotter cooks at home / by Charlie Trotter . 1937Schmidt. Ramsay.57 SCH 1996 641. NBC News Today with Bryant Gumbel .673 R129c 641. directed by John Birkin. Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana tastes : exciting flavors from the state that cooks. yields. foreword by Crete Dahl. Prudhomme.5 TRO 641. Hospitality Television presents .59763 PRU 641. a production of WYESTV . Prudhomme. Prudhomme. 1940Jenkins. Charles. Paul. photography by Paul Elledge. Paul. Gordon. Terri Landry . Chef Paul Prudhomme's fiery foods [videorecording] / producer/director.) Chef for all seasons / Gordon Ramsay . Chef Prudhomme's fork in the road [videorecording] /producer/director. (Steven W.57 B835c 21 of 123 . 2008 Charles Virion's French country cookbook. 641.5 CHE Cheese primer / Steven Jenkins. produced by Charles Hanson .5944 V818c 641. Cheese at foodservice [videorecording] / sponored by Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board . introduction by Charlie Trotter. Chef's guide to quantity cookery. 641. Cheese making at home: the complete illustrated guide.373 CHE Radke. Terri Landry . Greater New Orleans Educational Television Foundation. Trotter. with Roz Denny . Paul. Schmidt. Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana kitchen / Paul Prudhomme . Steven 641. John Henry. Chef's book of formulas. 1937Breland. photographs by Georgia Glynn Smith . Arno. produced by Charles Hanson . Charlie. Greater New Orleans Educational Television Foundation. Chef! [videorecording] / written by Peter Tilbury . Chef's book of formulas.373 JEN 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Virion. a production of WYESTV .657 PRU 641. 641. yields.

Illus. Chef's special [videorecording] / a co-production of WGBH and Learning Corporation of America .665 MCN 641.5 WAT Shere. 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. Laura. Alice. Rod Rees. writer. illustrations by Wayne Thiebaud. Chez nous : home cooking from the south of France / Lydie Marshall. 1935Waters. Waters. Linda Siegfried.592 CHE Haeringer. Alice. 641. director. Chesapeake cookbook / Susan Belsinger and Carolyn Dille . Lindsey Remolif. Szathmary. 641. Chicken / by James McNair . illustrations by David Lance Goines. 641. Chevys and Rio Bravo fresh mex cookbook Chez Franc¸ois cookbook : the cuisine of Franc¸ois R. photography by Patricia Brabant. Alice.5 CHE Belsinger.65 WAT 641. Jacques E. Chemistry of cooking [videorecording] / Classroom Video presents .5 Le Grant. Chez Panisse vegetables / by Alice Waters and the cooks of Chez Panisse .64 WAT 641. Chez Panisse desserts / by Lindsey Remolif Shere . producer. pizza & calzone / by Alice Waters. Louis. Waters. Lydie.8 WAT 641. Haeringer. Patricia Curtan & Martine Labro. Rozas. by Carolyn Amundson. Chez Panisse pasta. Haeringer / Jacques E. Chenel.5944 MAR Waters. Foreword by Jean Hewitt. 641. writer/producer. McNair.6 G7 641. By James Grant. James. Marshall. illustrations by Patricia Curtan.673 CHE 641. Chicken breasts : 116 new and classic recipes for the fairest part of the fowl / by Diane Rozas. David Espar. Alice. Chez Panisse fruit / by Alice Waters and the cooks of Chez Panisse in collaboration with Alan Tangren and Fritz Streiff . in collaboration with David Tanis and Fritz Streiff . Che`vre! : the goat cheese cookbook / Laura Chenel.5975 BEL 641.665 ROZ 22 of 123 . photograph by Michael Skott. James K. Chemistry of breadmaking. illustrations by Patricia Curtan. 1859641. Diane. preface by Alice Waters . Susan.86 SHE 641.5 HAE 2008 Chef's secret cook book.5 Sz 642. Chez Panisse Cafe´ cookbook / Alice Waters and the cooks at Chez Panisse .

Nick. Chen Chang-Yen. Karl. 641. [et al. photos. photographs by Alexandra Chocolate / Linda Collister . Chantal. Cantonese / Margaret Leeming. photographs by Michael Lamotte . Gloria C.5638 MED 641.. 641. with over 600 illustrations / Christian Teubner .5622 R588t. Petzke. Martinez. Chinese imperial cuisines and eating secrets / translated by Zhang Tingquan = [Kung t`ing ts`an yin yu yang sheng / Shang Kuan-feng]. Meyer.6374 CHO Chocolate : from simple cookies to extravagant showstoppers / Nick Malgieri . Chicken for dinner / general editor. author. illustrations by Liz Wright. Alice. Chinese kitchen : recipes. Margaret. Jane. photography by Patrice de Villiers.6374 COL 641. translator. Chili madness : a passionate cookbook / by Jane Butel . ingredients.. by Jerry Darvin. photo styling by Sara Slavin. Translated and adapted by Charlotte Turgeon. Children's gastronomique. 1912Butel. Chocolate : a sweet indulgence / photographs. Lo. photography.823 BUT 641. a guide to gourmet cooking for infants and young people.Es Chili nation : the ultimate chili cookbook with recipes from every state in the nation / Jane and MIchael Stern. Richard Eskite. recipes.592951 LEE 641. Joanne A.5951 LO 641. 641. Malgieri. collaborator. Shu-hui. Chuck Williams .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. art direction. Chicken foot soup and other recipes from the Pine Barrens / edited by Arlene Martin Ridgway. by Christine Ripault. Philip Miller . and memories from America's leading authority on Chinese cooking / Eileen Yin-Fei Lo . Linda. producer/director.3374 COA 641. Huang. Chocolate and the art of low-fat desserts / Alice Medrich .3374 PET 641. recipes. Karl Petzke . Chinese cooking. Turgeon. Chocolate Bible : the definitive sourcebook.812 HUA 641. Heidi Haughy.Et 641. Collister.5 CHI Cusick. Sara Slavin . Chocolate : the food of the gods / Chantal Coady .5951 K9651. Jane. calligraphy by San Yan Wong . Sandra Cook. history. photographs by Tom Eckerle. styling. Leeming. food styling. Eileen Yin-Fei. Heidi Haughy Cusick . Culinary Institute of America . producer/writer.665 CHI 641. Charlotte Snyder. Chinese appetizers and garnishes / Huang Su-Huei. techniques. Stern. Coady.]. 23 of 123 .6374 MAL 641. Medrich. text.823 STE 641. Carolyn Miller .665 CUS 2008 Chicken fabrication by the professional chef [videorecording] / produced by the Learning Resources Center.

Idone. Meyer . 641. Joanne A. Huber. Philip Miller. Cinnamon / by Lou Seibert Pappas . Christopher Idone's glorious American food / photographs by Tom Eckerle . 641. 1947Branch. Lou Seibert. Orabona.3 MOR 641. photographs by Frankie Frankeny. Chocolate mousse and other fabulous chocolate creations / by Betty Malisow Potter.7 H348c Christmas candy book / by Lou Seibert Pappas . William Woys.5 DIR 641. Chop suey. Christopher Idone's salad days. illustrations by Michael Hofmann. Chopsticks! : an owner's manual / Hashi-San . Kathy.83 IDO 641. 1948- 642.568 BRA 641.3374 BER 641.6374 HUB 641. Chocolate decadence : a truly sinful pleasure / Veronica Di Rosa.] Compiled by the Chinese cooking companions. writer/producers.6374 POT 2008 Chocolate cakes : decadent and delicious / Kathy Farrell-Kingsley. Chocolate truffles / by Carrie Huber. Christopher. Philippe. Rena Coyle . 641. food assistant. photography by Jerry Weaver. Chocolate. director. wine consultant. Penelope Wisner. 641. an illustrated history / Marcia and Frederic Morton. Pappas.6383 PAP 24 of 123 .568 WEA 641. Chocolate designs / : Philippe Bertrand & Philippe Marand . Susan.853 PAP Christmas cook : three centuries of American Yuletide sweets / William Woys Weaver . a la carte : selected 62 recipes [sic.5973 IDO 641. Veronica. Idone. Waxman].6 CHO Bertrand. Morton. illustrations by Vivienne Flesher. Christmas from the heart of the home / by Susan Branch. Betty Malisow. Janice Feuer.592 CHO Hashi-San. 641. Potter.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Farrell-Kingsley.568 CHR 641. Carrie. translated from the French by Jeanne-Marie Vazelle. Christmas memories with recipes / [conceived and edited by Maron L. Marcia. Lou Seibert. 641. Pappas. Christopher.8 FAR Di Rosa. Chocolate decoration techniques with Ewald Notter [videorecording] / produced by the Food & Beverage Institute . Philip Miller.

Classic American cooking.595 OWE 641.692 C597c 641. produced & directed by Lee Kraft. Eileen.5944 WIL 641.EL 641.EL 641.86 C614 Lauvand. Chuck Williams . Sri. Photographed by Mark Kauffman. Volume 2 [videorecording] / with Ruth Adams Bronz . by Craig Claiborne. recipes. Classic and contemporary recipes of Yves Thurie`s. produced & directed by Lee Kraft. produced & directed by Lee Kraft. Yves. drawings by George Koizumi. Classic Italian cook book : the art of Italian cooking and the Italian art of eating / Marcella Hazan . Janet Fletcher . Volume 1 [videorecording] / with Ruth Adams Bronz . Willan. Civil War cook book : typical of the times but timely for today / by Myrtle Ellison Smith. Josephine.865 THU.865 THU. Classic French cooking. Classic American cooking.865 THU.EL 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Bacon. Pierre Franey. Claiborne. Myrtle Ellison.657 NOR 641. Yves. Yves. Janet Kessel. Richard Eskite.5973 CLA2 641.822 FLE 25 of 123 . and the editors of Time-Life Books. 641. Classic herb cookbook / Jill Norman. Classic and contemporary recipes of Yves Thuries. Classic French cooking / by Anne Willan . Norman. Craig. illustrated by Susan Alcantarilla. Classic and contemporary recipes of Yves Thurie`s. Clarke.5945 HAZ Fletcher.5973 CLA1 641. Smith. Classic Asian cookbook / Sri Owen. Jill. Anne.6435 BAC 2008 Citrus cookbook / Josephine Bacon . Restarurant pastries and desserts / translated by Rhona Poritzky Lauvand. 641. Classic desserts / by the editors of Time-Life Books. Owen. Classic pasta at home / general editor. illustrations by Nancy Simonds. French pastry / translated by Rhona Poritzky Lauvand. Classic freshwater fish cooking / by Eileen Clarke. 641.5944 C585c 641. Marcella. Thurie`s. photography. Hazan. Classic French cooking [videorecording] / with Anne Willan .50973 S655c 641. Modern French pastry / translated by Rhona Poritzky Thuries. Thurie`s. 1942-641.59 CLA 641.

5979 ATK 642. 642. Miles.6374 MED 641. Antigone. Hadda. co-executive producers.8 HAD 641. Andrea Campbell . Clean food. James K. Cocktail party cookbook and guide / by the Faculty Women's Club of the Indiana University School of Medicine . Cocktail servers' performance of emotional labor : antecedents and negation of emotional dissonance / by Elizabeth J. Coffee cakes / Ceri Hadda. Leland. Indiana University. photographs by Patricia Brabant. Ellmer. Ellyne Lonergan . Medrich. illustrated by Druscilla Defalque.5945 ELL Classical cooking the modern way / by Eugen Pauli . [English translation by Pauli.5636 CLA 2008 Classic vegetarian : appetizing dishes for every occasion.41 I39c 642.5 Pa 641. 1983.822 DAL 641. Alice. Cocktails di^natoires et amuse-bouche = cocktail pieces and "amuse-bouche"/ translation. Coffee basics : a quick and easy guide / Kevin Knox. Julie Sheldon Huffaker. Ayla Esen.. Elizabeth J.302 CLE 641. Rebecca Reid. foreword by Mark Miller. edited by Barbara Mealey . Eugen. Close-up on cakes : easy recipes for every occasion / edited by Suzie Smith. Ceri. Simran Sethi. 1929. Cleaning and preparing gamefish : step-by-step instructions from water to table / Monte Burch. Atkinson.5929435 ALG 641. Burch. Classico pasta sauce cookbook : [start with Classico and create tempting home cooked meals] / Antigone Dallas. Cocolat : extraordinary chocolate desserts / Alice Medrich . School of Medicine. 1926Peter C. writer. edited by Marjorie S. Hazel Henderson. Cocina! : a hands-on guide to the techniques of Southwestern cooking / Leland Atkinson . Bruno H.692 B9473c 641. Algar. photography by Renee Comet .6 M6433c 641. McNair. director. Knox. Kevin.3373 KNO 641. photography by Tom Tracy.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641.812 COC 641. organic agriculture [videorecording] / Ethical Markets Media . Monte. Dallas.641. Classical and contemporary Italian cooking for professionals / Bruno H. Cold pasta / James McNair . March and Monroe S. Arkwright . Miles. Levine].822 MCN 26 of 123 . Classical Turkish cooking : traditional Turkish food for the American kitchen / Ayla Algar. Ellmer.8 CLO 641.

London. Complete book of outdoor cookery. Rinzler. Norma Macmillan]. with over 170 delicious and authentic recipes / Shehzad Husain and Rafi Fernandez.59 DEL 641. 1753.. Jr. Edited by Anne London and Bertha Kahn Bishov. Complete book of gingerbread / Valerie Barrett.5 CHA 2008 Cold-weather cooking / by Sarah Leah Chase . sweet and savory / Bernard Clayton. Shehzad. from homestyle dinners to satisfying breakfasts and fun midnight treats / Ira Freehof with Pia Catton. and condiments : from garden to kitchen to medicine chest / Carol Ann Rinzler.R. editors: Helen Southall. Compleat housewife. Brown. Ruth. illustrated by Suzanne T. Columbia Restaurant Spanish cookbook / Adela Hernandez Gonzmart and Ferdie Pacheco. Adela Hernandez. by Tom Stoerrle.5954 H968c 641. 641. Clayton.3374 COM Barrett. 641. Lucy. Accomplish'd gentlewoman's companion . Carol Ann.695 R2887c 1999 641.5092 REI 641.5945 GON 641. Reichl. Gonzmart. Comidas de New Mexico / by Lucy Delgado. 641. E. Smith. Valerie.578 B8631c 641. Comfort Diner cookbook : a world of classic diner delights. Reaske. Bernard. . Reaske . Ugelow [and others. Complete book of breads. Complete book of Indian cooking : the ultimate Indian cookery collection. Husain. Associate editors: Ethel I.8 CLA 27 of 123 . Comfort me with apples : more adventures at the table / Ruth Reichl..357 RIN 641. illustrations by Gretchen Schields. Smith. Beard. Robert I. Crocker. Freehof. in accordance with the Jewish dietary laws. Complete American-Jewish cookbook.. 1909. by Helen Evans Brown and James A. Complete book of chocolate / [cookery editor: Janet Smith .8654 BAR 641. Christopher Russell. 641. Sarah Leah.5942 S646c 1968 641. cook. by E.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Chase.1971 641. Complete book of pastry. or. Complete book of baking / Pillsbury. Bernard.815 CLA 641. Delgado.567 G664c Gordon.71 COM Clayton. Helen Evans. Complete book of herbs. Compleat crab and lobster book / Christopher R. Ira.. spices.5973 FRE 641. ill.

Complete idiot's guide to vegan living / by Beverely Lynn Bennett and Ray Sammartano.563 COM Clayton. and cooking / by Sara Perry .69 L786c Livingston. Complete guide to game care & cookery / by Sam & Nancy Fadala.5944 ESC. 1939641. Complete fish & game cookbook / A. Susann. Julie Rodwell. Lawrence. Complete vegan cookbook : over 200 tantalizing recipes.6373 PER 641. plus plenty of kitchen wisdom for beginners and experienced cooks / Susann Geiskopf-Hadler and Mindy Toomay. A. Adamson. Livingston. Cracknell and R. photography by Ann Stratton. Complete idiot's guide to cooking-. Beverly Lynn. 1963Passmore.5092 BIL 641. Ellie. Bishop.1996 Fadala. translated by H. Kaufmann.5946 PAS 641.812 KOH Perry. Bernard. D. Complete book of year-round small-batch preserving : over 300 delicious recipes / Ellie Topp & Margaret Howard.4 LAW 1992 Cohen. Geiskopf-Hadler. illustrations by Stephanie Fleischer Osser. Eve. Elizabeth Wolf. 641. Jacki. contributing editor. Bilderback. Complete cocktails & finger food / Elizabeth Wolf-Cohen & Oona van den Berg. Complete caterer : a practical guide to the craft and business of catering / Elizabeth Lawrence.5636 BEN 641. Tod.563 A2211c 641. brewing. photography by Edward Gowans. Jr. delicious vegetarian cuisine made with living foods includes over 350 recipes from the world's top raw food chefs / Lori Baird. 642. Complete Spanish cookbook / Jacki Passmore. Complete book of soups and stews / Bernard Clayton.D. Complete coffee book : a gourmet guide to buying.813 CLA 641. Complete Italian vegetarian cookbook : 350 essential recipes for inspired everyday eating / Jack Bishop . Topp. 641.J. editor.Ec 641. Complete idiot's guide to success as a chef / by Leslie Bilderback.5636 GEI 28 of 123 . Elizabeth (Elizabeth K.5 DIM 641.5636 BIS 641. Escoffier . (Auguste). Leslie. Bennett.) 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. 1950641. Jack. Dimmick.. 1846-1935. Sara. A.4 TOP 2008 Complete book of raw food : healthy. 1932. Complete guide to the art of modern cookery : the first translation into English in its entirety of Le guide culinaire / A.for guys / by Tod Dimmick.691 F144c Escoffier. Complete idiot's guide to gluten-free eating / by Eve Adamson and Tricia Thompson. .L. Sam.

McKibbin.5631 K173c 641.5978 MCF 29 of 123 . Anderson . 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Marshall. Steven Kolpan. Consomme´ [videorecording] / produced by Culinary Learning Resources Production .79 COM 641. by Jean and Frank McKibbin. illustrations by Kate Gridley.1 GOD 641.69 C7734 McFall. contributors. Illus.3 WIN 641. Barbara A. Contemporary encyclopedia of herbs & spices : seasonings for the global kitchen / Tony Hill.5 M158c 1972 641.) 2008 Complete vegetarian cookbook / Anne Marshall. Elizabeth. Sharon. Amanda. prepared.7 CON Winter. Malgieri. 1989 supplement / by Nutrition Monitoring Division .8654 HOF 641.6 HIL 641.86 COO 641. Hesser. Ruth. 1966Godsmark. Dorothy J. 641. Mayle. Composition of foods : raw. Cookin' with Will Rogers / by Sharon and Gene McFall.].5636 MAR 641.. 1930Hill. Anne (Anne E.1 COM Kaplan. wine & beverage costs / by Elizabeth Godsmark. Dickey . directed by Lee Kraft. Confessions of a French baker : breadmaking secrets.65 HES 641. Comprehensive diabetic cookbook / by Dorothy J. Consumer's dictionary of food additives. with a foreword by Robert Kaye. photographs by Tom Eckerle. Tony. Miller. Cookies by Bess / [Bess Hoffman]. and recipes by Jean McKibbin. Lynn E. Cookies. Controlling liquor. writer/producers Philip E..815 MAY 641. 641. Cookies unlimited / Nick Malgieri . Paul Mareth. and recipes / Peter Mayle and Gerard Auzet. producers. cakes and pies [videorecording] / Videocraft Classics . Cookbook of foods from Bible days.8654 MAL 641. Kaplan . Cook and the gardener : a year of recipes and writings from the French countryside / Amanda Hesser . coordinator. [et al. Bess. Hoffman. a Culinary Learning Resources production. Philip Miller . processed. Jean. Nick. tips. 641. Composed salads [videorecording] / produced by the Food & Beverage Institute . Peter. Cookin' wild : the Bob Hirsch family recipes for wild game and fish.

Jones . Ice cream and frozen desserts [videorecording] / KQED.59729 IDO 641. Cooking in colour : 700 recipes for every occasion / edited by Norma MacMillan and Wendy James .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Barber. by Edith and Sam Brown. Edith.5636 B877c 641. produced by Bruce Franchini.5 SCH 641. San Francisco . Miriam L. Cooking for your hunter / by Miriam L. 1997. Cooking for all seasons / by Jimmy Schmidt . Chiappetta Productions . 641. 1905Cooking of China. Carl Tremblay.5 COO 641. Cooking from quilt country : hearty recipes from Amish and Mennonite kitchens . Dun Gifford . Cooking for the house that love built. Philip Miller. Cooking at home with the Culinary Institute of America. Emily. 1920Schmidt. van Ackere. Richard W. Loomis. illustrations: John Burgoyne .50978 J78c 641. 641. 2008 Cooking and recipes from Rome to the Renaissance [by] Richard Barber. Norma. Cooking method series [videorecording] / The Culinary Institute of America . Brown.563 COO 641. Jerry Chiappetta. Cooking creatively with natural foods. Marcia. Cooking Caribe / Christopher Idone with Helen McEachrane. 641. Cooking at home with America's test kitchen / by the editors of Cook's Illustrated . consultant. Photographed by Michael Rougier.566 ADA 641. Susan Herrmann. organic produce at its seasonal best / foreword by Nell Newman .5 COO Adams. 641. photography: Daniel J.5 COO 641. Gill Edden. producer. introductions by Sibella Kraus & K. MacMillan.5 Co 641. producer/director.5944 LOO 641. by Emily Hahn and the editors of Time-Life Books.5 COO Jones. Cooking fresh from the Bay Area : the Bay Area's best recipes for eating local. Jimmy. Cooking at home on rue Tatin / Susan Herrmann Loomis. compiled & Cooking freshwater fish [videorecording] / Wild Harvest Videos . Cooking at the Academy. illustrated by Angela Jones. 641.862 ICE Idone. photographs by Alexandra Avakian / by Marcia Adams.5951 H148c 30 of 123 . illustrations by Robert Schefman.5 COOK Hahn. Christopher.509 B234c 641.

31 of 123 .59729 W855c 641. Suppl.5943 W386c 641.5973 COO 641. Adrian. Dmitri Kessel and Brian Seed.5943 H429c 641. M. F. Jerry Chiappetta. Peter S. by Peter S. Bouterin.. 1923Root. Cooking of India.49 COO 641. F. by Linda Wolfe and the editors of Time-Life Books. 1903- 2008 Cooking of Germany. Cooking of the British Isles. Cooking plain : a treasury of century-old family recipes. Photographed by Richard Meek.59773 L759c 641.5941 B154c Bailey. and with sections on preserving foods and on household hints. Wechsberg. 1928Wolfe. Adrian. Photographed by Feibleman.5944 F535c Frances Kennedy). photographed by Anthony Blake. [videorecording] program 2. Dale. Santha. Cooking of the Caribbean Islands.5952 S819c Steinberg. by Santha Rama Rau and the editors of Time-Life books. Photographed by Eliot Elisofon.5948 B877c 641. 1907Linsenmeyer. by Dale Brown and the editors of Time-Life Books. Waverley Lewis. Chiappetta Productions . (Mary 641.5946 F297c 641. Brown. by Waverley Root and the editors of Time-Life Books. 641. 641. with a selection of natural foods and wild game cookery. 1927. 1930Cooking of the Americas [videorecording] program I : how it all began an Educational Outreach program from the American Culinary Federation Educational Institute. Rama Rau. by Joseph Wechsberg and the editors of Time-Life Books. 1975 641. Fisher and the editors Time-Life Books. 641. from the Illinois Country / Helen Cooking Provence : four generations of traditions and recipes / Antoine Bouterin and Joan Schwartz. Rafael.Suppl. by Adrian Bailey and the editors of Time-Life Books. Fisher. Nika Crane and Henry Groskinsky. Feibleman and the editors of Time-Life Books. Joseph. Cooking of the British Isles / by Adrian Bailey and the editors of Time-Life Books .5941 B154c Suppl. Photographed by Anthony Blake. Cooking of Spain and Portugal.59449 BOU 641. K. by Rafael Steinberg and the editors of Time-Life Books. Cooking of the Americas. a taste of Louisiana : begin with the roux / Horizons 2000. by Nika Standen Hazelton and the editors of Time-Life Books. Photographed by Fred Lyon.5945 R783c 641. Photographed by Ralph Hazelton.5954 R165c 641. Photographed by Eliot Elisofon. Cooking of Vienna's empire. Cooking of Italy. Cooking of Japan. Helen Walker. Photographed by Fred Lyon. Antoine. producer. by M. Linda.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Standen. K. Photographed by Richard Meek. Cooking of provincial France. Cooking saltwater fish [videorecording] / Wild Harvest Videos . 1928Bailey. Photographed by Mark Kauffman.6 COO Cooking of Scandinavia.

Cooking with flowers. Cooking with herbs / by Emelie Tolley and Chris Mead. Lorraine. drawings by Alice Golden. Cook's book : techniques and tips from the world's master chefs / editor-in-chief. Marden and Suzanne I. Jerry Chiappetta. producer. Charlene S.563 Ba 641 COO 641. photographs by Louis B. [editors. Patricia C.5 CHI 641. Anderson.6 COO 2008 Cooking seafood [videorecording] / Wild Harvest Videos . Chiappetta Productions .658 CZA 32 of 123 . producer. Jill Norman .631 MAR Tolley.691 C9897c Fears. 1948Cooking wild from Idaho : a collection of wild game and sausage recipes / by Eldon R...657 TOL 641. Zack. Cooking up world history : multicultural recipes and resources / Patricia C.58 AND 2006 641. Julia. Wayne Fears . Eldon R. Cooking with gourmet grains [by Charlene S. Chris. Illustrated by Donald Hendricks.6 H2416c Martinsen. National Live Stock and Meat Board on behalf of the Beef Board . 1938. Barchers. Cooking with master chefs / Julia Child. Written by Zack Hanle. produced by Goldsholl: Design and Film .657 CLA 641. Beatrice A.641. 1966Bagg. illustrated by David Wright. Cutlip. Jack. Gregory Jameson. 641. Caroline Reed. Cooking with herbs and spices / Craig Claiborne . Cooking with sunshine : the complete guide to solar cuisine with 150 easy sun-cooked recipes / Lorraine Anderson and Rick Palkovic.58 OAJ 2005 Hanle. Emelie. Lucy Heaver. Cooking today's beef [videorecording] / developed by the Education Dept. Cooking with convection / Beatrice Ojakangas. Frank Ritter]. 641. Wayne. Martinsen. Cook's book of mushrooms : with 100 recipes for common and uncommon varieties / Jack Czarnecki . Bagg . Czarnecki. Claiborne. 1918641. Craig.66 COO Ojakangas. Cooking the wild harvest / by J. Cooking with the diabetic chef / Chris Smith.691 F2884c 641. Child. Elma W. 1952Smith. 641. director Larry Marden. 641. foreword by A. Wallach. J.56314 S644c 641. wherein an age-old art is revived. Cooking without a grain of salt / by Elma W. Cutlip.59007 M322c 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641.

Yockelson.568 CRA Claiborne. Rogers. Miller. illustrated by Bill Rivard. Anne. Cowboy in the kitchen : recipes from Reata and Texas west of the Pecos / Grady Spears and Robb Walsh .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Willan.5 COO 641. photography by Michael Grand. Shirley. illustrations by Wendy Wheeler. Country cakes : a homestyle treasury / Lisa Yockelson . 33 of 123 . 1931. Santa Fe.5 COR Fifield. food photography by Dick Patrick .8 YOC 641. Ludovic.8652 YOC 641. Verne. Spears. 641. Bartlett. Jonathan. Crave. Crabtree & Evelyn cookbook : a book of light meals and small feasts / [edited by Elizabeth Kent] .695 F933c 641. Coyote Cafe : foods from the great southwest : recipes from Coyote Cafe. 1949Coyote's pantry : southwest seasonings and at home flavoring techniques / Mark Miller and Mark Kiffin . New Mexico / by Mark Corriher. Cook's magazine cookbook / edited by Michael and Judith Hill. 641.5978 CAR 641. 1949Froncillo. cooking. photographs by Christopher Baker. Mark Charles.5631 C585g 641. definitive guide to cooking and food / Jonathan Bartlett. illustrations by Wendy Wheeler. Mara Reid.641. location photography by James Evans. Lisa. illustrations by Robin Wimbiscus.5 LEF 641. Country pies : a seasonal sampler / Lisa Yockelson . Cook's dictionary and culinary reference : a comprehensive.5979 MIL 641. with Miller. cracking / Andrea Froncillo & Jennifer Jeffrey.641. Carlson. Co-op cookbook : delicious and healthy meals in less than half an hour / Rosemary Fifield . Creative garnishing : beautiful ways to enhance meals / Mara Reid Rogers .81 ROG Charles Miller. Lefebvre. 641. illustrations by Janet Simon. Crab : buying.555 FIF Yockelson.5 WIL 2008 Cook's book of quick fixes & kitchen tips : how to turn adversity into opportunity / Anne Willan . recipes from Santa Fe's famous Coyote Cafe. Corriher. 1945.6382 MIL 641.03 BAR 641. John Harrisson .5978 SPE 641. Cookwise : the hows and whys of successful cooking / Shirley O. Mark Charles. Andrea. Cowboy cookbook / written by Verne Carlson . Lisa. Grady. the feast of the five senses / Ludovic Lefebvre with Martin Booe. Rosemary. Craig Claiborne's Gourmet diet / Craig Claiborne with Pierre Franey. Craig.

Joyce R8936C 2008 Creole / Babette de Rozie`res. Mireille Scharfenberg.59729 PAR 641. LaFray.5945 HYM 641.59763 Rozie`res.59495 MIL 641. Culinaria Italy : pasta. Cuba Cocina! : the tantalizing world of Cuban cooking--yesterday.5975 RAW 641. editor-in-chief . today. Foreword by Craig Claiborne. Esersky. with drawings by Robert Camp. Culinaria France / edited by Andre´ Domine´ . Diana. Marjorie Kinnan. Clarissa. Culinaria Spain / Marion Trutter. editor.5944 C351c 641. passion / Claudia Piras. Castignac. Hyman. Huguette. photography. Marianthi. Johnston. Christine Westphal. 1896-1953. Rawlings. editor .5943 SCH 641.5945 CUL 641.5944 JOH 641. Michael Ditter. Cuisine of the sun : classic recipes from Nice and Provence / by Mireille Johnston. Horst. Cuisine occitane. Rosemary.5944 CUL 641. Drawings by Sidonie Coryn.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. Cross Creek cookery / by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings . Kennedy. Parkinson. Cucina veneziana : the food & cooking of Venice / Gino Santin . Culinaria : European specialties / Joachim Ro¨mer. Ruprecht Stempell.5972 KEN 641. Gino. photography. Joyce. Anthony Blake. Santin. Cuisines of Germany : regional specialities and traditional home cooking / Horst Scharfenberg. Cuisines of Mexico. 641. Culinaria Greece / Marianthi Milona . photography . Goldstein. photography by Werner Stapelfeldt.594 CUL Cucina Ebraica : flavors of the Italian Jewish kitchen / Joyce Goldstein. and tomorrow / Joyce LaFray . Culinaria : the Caribbean : a culinary discovery / written by Rosemary Parkinson.5975 LAF 641. illustrations by Ann Field. Cucina siciliana : authentic recipes and culinary secrets from Sicily / Clarissa Hyman . 641. Gu¨nter Beer. Gu¨nter Beer. Milona. photographs. photographs by Gu¨nter Beer.5676 GOL 641.594531 S235c 641. chief editors . Babette de.300946 CUL 34 of 123 . photography by Peter Cassidy. pesto.

Frankfurt.5 P5581d 35 of 123 . Lund).8 DES 641.5954 BRE 641. Death by chocolate cookies / Marcel Desaulniers .. L.507 P4859 Culinary schools. KQED. Team recipes from the 15th International Culinary Competition (International Kochkunst Ausstellung. 19582006. Marcel. Daily Soup cookbook / Leslie Kaul .8 DES 641. P.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Dornenburg. 1913641. Bruce Franchini . Metz and the United States Culinary schools. Egan. [et al. photography by Michael Grand. Death by chocolate cakes : an astonishing array of chocolate enchantment / Marcel Desaulniers . Desaulniers. Decadent desserts / by Anne Egan. West Germany) / Ferdinand E. Brennan. Andrew. Vicki. Fearing. Curries & bugles : a memoir & cookbook of the British Raj / Jennifer Brennan.6 EGA 641. Phillips.865 DANI 641.]... the dainties and delicacies of different nations obtained from the animal kingdom / by Simmonds. 1941- 2008 Culinary artistry / Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page .5975 W932d 641. Damnyankee in a Southern kitchen. Curries / Vicki Liley. Dean Fearing's southwest cuisine : blending Asia and the Americas / Dean Fearing .5973 DOR 641. Leslie. 1814-1897. by Helen Worth. Allen. Liley.5979 FEA 641.S. Metz. editing by Judith Choate. 2008 Curiosities of food. director. (Peter Peter Lund Simmonds . Deer & fixings / by John and Denise Phillips. Danish & breakfast sweets [videorecording] / producer. Linda Brandt . Helen Levison.6384 LIL 641. 641. Kaul. Ferdinand E. with an introduction by Alan Davidson. recipes with Brett Bailey and Kelly Bailey . photography by Duane Winfield. Darina. photographs by James Bergin and Jessica Zane.59115 ALL 641. Worth. Desaulniers. Marcel. Culinary Olympics cookbook : U. Anne.507 P4859 2007 641. Jennifer.813 K21d 641. : or. a revival feast.3 SIM 641.572 MET 1980 641. Darina Allen's Ballymaloe Cooking School cookbook / with photographs by Ray Main. Dean. John.

641. Igoe.56314 H1122d 641. Finlayson.641 STA 641. photography by Michael Grand . Fant & Howard M. Judith.86 DES Dessert sensations / Faye Levy . Ang.86 BAR 641. Delectable apple / Kathleen Desmond Stang . Wolk. Diabetes fit food : over 200 recipes from the world's greatest chefs / Ellen Haas and the editorial team of FoodFit. photographs by Hartmut Kiefer. produced by Bruce Franchini. Michael. Dictionary of Italian cuisine / Maureen B. photographs by Gus Francisco. recipes with Joh Pierre Peavey.86 SIL 641. Robert S. Eng Tie. Nancy.5 FIN 2008 Deer Camp Dan's cookbook / compiled by Andrea Van Steenhouse. Desserts by Pierre Herme´ / written by Dorie Greenspan . Kathleen Desmond.3 FAN 36 of 123 . Jan.86 DES 641. photography by Greg Elms. Marcel.7 WOL 641. Herme´.578 D312 Stang. Barrett. Levy.563 VAS 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. illustrations by Lynne Riding. Delicious & dependable slow cooker recipes / Judith Finlayson. 641.86 LEV 641. Desserts [videorecording] / KQED . Isaacs.5981 A5811d 642. Haas. Blackburn. Vassallo. Desserts to die for / Marcel Desaulniers . illustrations by Maureen Jensen . Igoe. Purser. foreword by George L. decorative paintings by Deborah Healy .86 HER 641.1 Ig 641.563 PUR 641. Diabetes everyday cookbook : health for life / Jody Vassallo. Ellen.com . Desaulniers. Fant. Faye. Desserts from an herb garden / Sharon Kebschull Barrett. Designing for the table : decorative and functional products / Michael Wolk. Silverton. Dictionary of food ingredients / Robert S. with Susanna Holt. Jody. Desserts / by Nancy Silverton in collaboration with Heidi Yorkshire . Maureen B. Delightful Brazilian cooking / by Eng Tie Ang. [for Danny Baize]. Sharon Kebschull. Detox cookbook : cleansing for food lovers / Jan Purser & Kathy Snowball . technique drawings by Wendy Wray. Pierre. Jean Marie Martini . 1951641.

Frances Moore. by Yoshiya Fukuda. Takahashi. Dry it.5973 BEI 641. Kuwako. 641.5 EAS 1992 Diner desserts / by Tish Boyle . Tish. Madge. Michael.59 DOJ 641. photography by Scott Dorrance. Don't lick the chopsticks. East meets West. Ducasse flavors of France / Alain Ducasse .631 D779 MacManiman.5951 D688 641. Lappe´. Dining customs around the world : with occasional recipes / by Alice Bonzi Mothershead .59 MOT 641.595 FEN 642. Embree De Persiis Vona.44 Ma 641. the creative. Diet for a small planet / Frances Moore Lappe´ . Dried beans & grains / by the editors of Time-Life Books. with Linda Dannenberg . East meets Southwest : innovative cuisine from Santacafe´ / Michael Fennelly . 641. illustrations by Marika Hahn. table setting / table design and food by Kuwako Takahashi .563 LAP 1982 641. Brooke. Easy cooking with brand names. Alain. Beilenson. photography by Charles Greer. with illustrations by Mothershead. Ducasse. Don't try this at home : culinary catastrophes from the world's greatest chefs / edited by Kimberly Witherspoon and Andrew Friedman. Dining with William Shakespeare / Madge Lorwin. Dojny. 641. photography by Hugo Steccati. Anstice. Boyle.6 TAK 641. 37 of 123 . with more than 140 delicious.589 EAR Fennelly. Bonzi. you'll like it! a book about food dehydration.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Carroll. Earthcooks / [introduction by Ree Schonlau]. harmonious Ma family Chinese cookbook [by] Nancy Chih Ma [and others] Photos. with an introduction by James Bibo . nutritious recipes / Anstice Carroll. 641. by Gen MacManiman. and Gianna De Persiis Vona . Early American cooking : recipes from America's historic sites / compiled and edited by Evelyn L.86 BOY 641. Evelyn L.5 DON 641. Beilenson. Gen. photographs by Clark Irey.5942 L878d 641. Dishing up Maine : 165 recipes that capture authentic down east flavors / Brooke Dojny . Alice Marilena Perrone. Lorwin. photographs by Pierre Hussenot.5944 DUC 641.303 CAR 2008 Dictionary of wholesome foods : a passionate A-to-Z guide to the earth's healthy offerings.

1949641.563 GIO 641.5952 E141 1998 Lee. know the market foods & embark on a tasting adventure / Giobbi. S. B. Edible art : forty-eight garnishes for the professional / David Paul Larousse. Cecilia Hae-Jin.578 K92e 641 Ro 641. Easy recipes for wild game and fish / by Ferne Holmes. B. Edward. Ferne.696 GOR 641. Easy ways to delicious meals. Cathy Wilkinson. Easy recipes for the traveling cook / by Ferne Holmes.69 H7491e 641. Ferne. Eat! enjoy! : the 101 best Jewish recipes in America / Honey and Larry Zisman.5 E11 1995 641. Eat right. know the market foods and embark on a tasting adventure / Peterson. 1903- 38 of 123 . Eating in America : a history / Waverley Root & Richard de Rochemont. Eating up the Santa Fe Trail / Sam'l P. 1928Holmes. Eat smart in India : how to decipher the menu. Gordon. Sam. David Paul.5 E13 641. Root. 1950Kreissman.595 LEE 641.5 LAR 641. Eating Korean : From barbecue to kimchi. Joan (Joan author.) Zisman. Honey. & illustrated by Carrie Arnold.5954 PET 641. Edible flowers : from garden to palate / Cathy Wilkinson Barash. recipes from my home / Cecilia Hae-Jin Lee. Eating hearty in the wilderness with absolutely no clean up : a backpacker's guide to good food and "leave no trace camping!" / by Bern Kreissman. Eat-a-bug cookbook / David George Gordon. Medaris. illustrator. 1926Larousse. Waverley Lewis. eat well--the Italian way / Edward Giobbi and Richard Wolff.575 H7491e 641. Peterson. Eating in Japan : illustrated = Inshoku hen.6 B2259e Joan Peterson and Indu Menon illustrated by Susan Chwae.) Eat smart in Turkey : how to decipher the menu. 1928- 641.V. Joan (Joan Holmes.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 2008 Easy meals for busy days.5676 ZIS 641. Bern. 1949Barash.59561 PET 641. Arnold . (David George). David G. Joan Peterson .5978 A758e 641. Arnold.

director. Elinor Fettiplace's receipt book : Elizabethan country house cooking / Hilary Spurling.675 EGG Sokol. photographer. 39 of 123 . Edible mushroom : a gourmet cook's guide / Margaret Leibenstein . editor . 641. Joseph F. 2008 Edible herb garden / Rosalind Creasy. Elements of taste / Gray Kunz and Peter Kaminsky . Gail. Byrne. illustrations. Leibenstein. Elementary baking [by] William J. Barbara M. Patrick Henderson. Elegant low-calorie cooking / Mary Harrison Carroll. Michael. Embassy fare : a guide to international cooking in the nation's capital / Susan O. Rosalind. Part 1.5942 SPU 641. Preparing & handling .013 KUN 641. Dellie Rex. Ruhlman. Linda Brandt . Part 2. Effective food handling techniques. Margaret.3 NAT pt. photographs by Andre´ Baranowski .59 EMB Elements of food production and baking. Storing [videorecording] / Educational Foundation of National Restaurant Association. Kunz. Effective food handling techniques.2 641.5635 C319e 641. Holding & serving .815 SOK CD2 641. calligraphy . William J. Elements of cooking : translating the chef's craft for every kitchen / Michael Ruhlman. 1963641. foreword by Bryan Miller. Part 3.79 GAR CD Carroll.3 NAT pt.5 R933e 641.57 Va 641. Sultan. Mueller. Introduction to principles.657 C9122e 641. Hilary. Mary Harrison. Michael Lamotte. Effective food handling techniques.22 HEN CD Electronic classroom manager CD-ROM to accompany About wine / J. J. writer . Spurling. illustrations by Monika Bittman. Henderson. Egg cookery [videorecording] / producer. Sultan.3 NAT pt.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Creasy. Robert.1 641. Cleaning & sanitizing [videorecording] / Educational Foundation of National Restaurant Association. purchasing [videorecording] / Educational Foundation of National Restaurant Association. Bruce Franchini . Electronic classroom manager CD-ROM to accompany Modern garde manger / Robert Garlough and Angus Campbell. Garlough. Hal Straus. 1954.658 LEI 641. Vastano. Patrick. Receiving . Electronic classroom manager CD-ROM to accompany About professional baking / Gail Sokol.641. KQED.815 Su 641.3 641. 641. Gray.

Bellissino]. Ranhofer. Epicurean. Cotton. 642 RAN 1971 Escoffier. Janie. Charles A. Bellissino. Gaillard. editor in chief..5972 KEN 641. photographs by Brian Smale. Sadlack. Emeril. A. Escoffier. Emeril. Henrietta F. Enlightened gourmet : the first cookbook complete with recipes and their food values / edited by Ann C. 1954Bellissino. Philip. Enjoying microwave cooking : discovering delicious recipes.814 EMU 641.814 BEL 1995 641. Quinn. Willis . Lagasse. including table and wine service .814 BEL 641. Harben. (Albert Jules). photographs by Tom Eckerle. designed by Albert Squillace. 1922- 641. Meyer.5 ENL 641. Jo Anne J. McClane . Encyclopedia of sauces for your food / [Charles A. McClane. J. (Auguste).555 GOL 642 H255e 1952 Entertaining at home [by] Philip & Katharine Harben. writer/producers. Kennedy.. Emulsion sauces [videorecording] / produced by the Food & Beverage Institute. Essential eating : a cookbook : discover how to eat. 641. 1846-1935. J.59763 LAG 641.5392 MCC 641.588 S126e 641. Smith. not diet / Janie Quinn.5944 ESC Escoffier. Joanne A. Beringer. Frances F. and a selection of interesting bills of fare of Delmonico's from 1862 to 1894. Encyclopedia of fish cookery / by A. 641. Escoffier cook book.3 ENC 641.5976 LAG 2008 Emeril's Delmonico : a restaurant with a past / Emeril Lagasse. Essential cuisines of Mexico / Diana Kennedy. a complete treatise of analytical and practical studies on the culinary art. Rozanne. photography by Arie deZanger . a guide to the fine art of cookery. by A. Entertaining 1-2-3 : more than 300 recipes for food and drink using only three ingredients / Rozanne Gold . Bellissino]. Emeril's new New Orleans cooking / Emeril Lagasse and Jessie Tirsch . Philip Miller. (Auguste). A. Escoffier. Charles A. Escoffier cook book : a guide to the fine art of cookery / by A. Encyclopedia of food and drink in America / Andrew F. Charles. Diana.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Lagasse. A. Gold. 1846-1935.59 E74e 641. Encyclopedia of sauces for your pasta : the greatest collection of pasta sauces ever in one book! / [Charles A.563 QUI 40 of 123 . art editor. 641. Janet L.

. 1916Family favorites from country kitchens. 641. Dean. a collection of outstanding recipes from the best cooks in the country . Photography Family table service.. Anne. and Helen Roe. Elisabeth. 2008 Essential Italian cookbook : 50 classic recipes.5973 S683f. Leona Myrick. Dolamore. [et al. Terence. illustrated by Seth Rozin. Dean Ornish : 150 easy. Cinnamon.64 JAN to your diabetic meal plan / by Marilyn A.5636 O73e 641.d Hansen. Essentials of good table service. Janericco. prepared products. Pamela A. Fischer.646 DOL 642.. 642 N698f Family acceptability of processed mashed potatoes. Durocher and Raymond J. Sokolov. selected and tested by the food editors of Farm journal. presentation & creation / by Terence Janericco .5945 THO 641. Joseph F. 41 of 123 . Jean-Marc Fullsack.56314 S972e 1986 642 EXC 641. Manning. Everyday cooking with Dr. high-flavor recipes / by Dean Ornish.5 EXC 641. [illustrations by Madeleine David].6521 H249f 641. Exotic fruit and vegetable handbook / Oona van den Berg. Phillip Miller . Exceeding expectations [videorecording] : service tips and techniques to keep your customers coming back / producer/director. Essential olive oil companion / Anne Dolamore . all nutritious. Oona van den Fabulous fat-free cooking : more than 225 dishes--all delicious. Marilyn A. Ethnic cuisine : how to create the authentic flavors of 30 international cuisines / by Elisabeth Rozin . [color photographs by James Scherer . Swanson. Ornish. Fading feast : a compendium of disappearing American regional foods / by Raymond Sokolov. Heather. Edited by Elise W. Lynn. writers. all with less than 1 gram of fat! / by Lynn Fischer.] Exclusively rhubarb cookbook. Everything about exchange values for foods : how to add-. Fabulous fruit desserts : their preparation.mixed dishes. more variety-- 641.64 B4936e 641.6 Es Durocher. Goodman. low-fat. 641.. Essentials of tableside cookery / Joseph F. Raymond A. line drawings by Anne Vadeboncoeur]. Rozin. Kathryn Bele. Swanson.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Thomas. Phillip Miller .5 F198 Niles.5638 FIS 641. with step-by-step photographs / edited by Heather Thomas. Berg.6 Du 641. Jr.59 ROZ 641. 642. with Janet Fletcher.

Favorite brand name pie collection. Darlene Glantz. Bray . healthy fare in 20 minutes or less / the editors of Prevention health books.86 FAV 641. Eiji Kori .8654 BEI Skees. Festive occasions : cookbook for people on-the-go! / by Darlene Glantz Skees . illustrations by Judith Dufour Love. Huntley. food arrangement. [et al. Feast of fishes / by Elizabeth H. 1948. Feast of Santa Fe : cooking of the American Southwest / Huntley Dent . Fast. illustrations by James Henry. illustrated by Jodi Jensen & Ann Bishop. Tsuchiya. 1938. Yoshio. Beilenson ..5 Un 641. Reid. Festive breads of Christmas / Norma Jost Voth .5 Fa 2008 Famous friends of the wolf cookbook : benefiting wolf recovery in the West / Nancy Reid & Sheila Liermann.3674 LAM Jue. KQED.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. by Tom Funk. Beilenson. and Austrian tradition / Sarah Kelly Iaia. Favorite American recipes. a collection of classics from around the country. Illus. 641. 1912641.641. Favorite brand-name recipe cookbook / by the editors of Consumer guide. 641. Norma Jost. Sarah Kelly.] . German.59 D321f Iaia. director. Far East cafe: the best of casual Asian cooking / by Joyce Jue. Joyce. Feasts for all seasons. illustrations by Susan Gaber. Nancy.59 REI 641.865 IAI Voth.555 FAS 641.5952 T8825f 641. 1943. Evelyn L. Linda Brandt . photography by Patricia Brabant. Festive baking : holiday classics in the Swiss. Bruce Franchini .8 VOT 641.. Roy Andries. Fancy cookies [videorecording] / producer. Feast for the eyes : the Japanese art of food arrangement / Yoshio Tsuchiya . photography. fun & delicious : tasty. Festive chocolate & cookies / compiled by Evelyn L.8654 FAN Lambert. 1947641. Juliet Winters Carpenter.5 SKE 42 of 123 . Masaru Yamamoto . Fantasy chocolate desserts / by Robert Lambert .641.595 JUE 641. translation.5979 DEN De Groot.641. Robert. 641. illustrated by Ellen Jane Price.692 FEA Dent.

J. Miller. Sophie. photographer.853 FIL 641. Laurens. Bruce Beauchamp].692 PET 641.59 FIN 641. Madolyn Wilson. Linda Brandt . KQED. Kokko.692 FIS 641. English. Figs table : more than 100 recipes for pizzas. Grigson. Filled chocolates [videorecording] / Culinary Institute of America . writer . 1650-1900 / Louise Conway Belden.6 B427f 2008 Festive salads [videorecording] / producer. Cyril J. 641. Somerville. Finely tuned foods / presented by the Symphony League of Kansas City. Fish / Sophie Grigson and William Black . Lonnie.83 FES Belden. Buzz Gorder . table decoration and desserts in America. Fish / by the editors of Time-Life Books. Margo. editors . Festive tradition. Lynn. Bruce Franchini . photographs by Carl Tremblay. Fish & shellfish / Lonnie Gandara. with over 150 tried and tested recipes / C. Firefighter's cookbook / [edited by] John Sineno . pastas. Fish & shellfish / James Peterson. First steps in winemaking : a complete month-by-month guide to winemaking (including the production of cider. and Rosemary Carey. perry and mead) in your own home. Annie.5 FIN 641. illustrations by Robert Paul Scudellari. Final touch : decorative garnishes / Margo Kokko . Peterson.692 F532 641. Todd. 641.596 V239f Berry.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641.872 BER 641. Gandara. Fischer. First catch your eland / Laurens van der Post.5636 SOM 641.J. director. Fields of Greens : new vegetarian recipes from the celebrated Greens Restaurant / Annie Somerville.514 Ko 641. Jill Fox. Fine art of dining : with recipes from world-famous chefs and kitchens / illustrated by Graham Rust . Virgil Brown. [illustrator. Fischer/Brown low cholesterol gourmet / by Lynn Fischer & W. Anne Coolman. with photographs by Georgia Glynn Smith. photographer. compiled and edited by Fiona Gore Langton. Louise Conway. salads.5945 ENG 641. 641. 642.5638 FIS 641. Berry. James. Jackson Vereen.5 FIR Van der Post. produced and edited by Philip E. and desserts / Todd English and Sally Sampson . J.692 GRI 43 of 123 .

Rozin. Decorative and instructive drawings by Ed Nuckolls. Alford. Christine Messer Hausch . photography by Joyce Oudkerk Pool. producer. cooked. and eaten / Rob DeBorde. Joan.22 FLO 641. editorial director. Gottlieb. bought. herbs. 641.815 FIE 641. fruit / Offerico Maoz. producers. Flight catering / edited by Peter Jones.59 N274f 641. . Loretta Slepikas.5945 DEM 641. Claudia Spinner. dairy. Flatbreads and flavors : a baker's atlas / Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid. Florida bounty : a celebration of Florida cuisine and culture / Eric R. Fish and shellfish : top recipes / by great chefs . exeuctive producer and director. Floyd uncorked [videorecording] / Nick Patten Productions. Bruno Hausch . Focaccia : simple breads from the Italian oven / Carol Field . Fish fabrication by the professional chef [videorecording] / produced by The Learning Resources Center .22 FOO 44 of 123 . Niall Fraser . Ltd.5 JAC 641. color photography by Dennis M. Fish on a first-name basis : how fish is caught. Meyer. Flavor of Jerusalem / Joan Nathan and Judy Stacey Goldman. 641. Nathan. The Culinary Institute of America .692 B624f 641. presented by Keith Floyd with Jonathan Pedley . translation from the German. Lou Seibert.59 ROZ 1973 642.692 FISH DeBorde. Jacobs. 1926Jacobs. Joanne A. 1972641. Maoz.6 DEB 641. Florentines : a Tuscan feast / Lorenza de' Medici . director. Jeffrey.672 MAO 2008 Fish : the complete guide to buying and cooking / Mark Bittman . Pappas. Nick Patten.815 ALF 641. illustrations by Giovanna Garzoni. 641. Focus on a chef [videorecording] / Cambridge Career Products . Food & wine magazine's wine guide. cleaned.. Mark.4 FLI 2004 De' Medici Stucchi. Lorenza.572 FOC 641. Flavor-principle cookbook.692 FIS 641. Rob. photography and design. Carol. Field.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Bittman. Offerico. Elisabeth. Eric R. Philip Miller.81 P2183F 641. Flavored butters : nuts. Fondue / Lou Seibert Pappas. Jacobs & Sandra M.

641. and the editors of Life. Jack D. Haggerty. Edward. illustrations by Jeffrey Fisher. Food and beverage controls / Jack D. Pisegna. Food and United States.57028 S434f 641.5944 BRE 641. Science and Education Administration. Marvin 641. by William H. 641. with a new introduction by the author. Sebrell. photographs by Dick Busher . Ninemeier.59795 PIS and Ronald J.3 Se 641. Food and nutrition. Lucinda. 642.. 1943Sebrell. Food Nutrition Service. U.S. McWilliams. Food and flavors of Haute Provence / by Georgeanne Brenna . Litrides. Kathryn Sucher. 1857-1915. Carol A. Margaret. Scriven. Food and culture in America : a nutrition handbook / Pamela Goyan Kittler.3 F6868 Benarde. Thorner. Food equipment facts : a handbook for the food service industry / Carl Scriven & James Stevens. and Consumer and Food Economics Institute. James J.5631 F233f 641. Lesley.5068 NIN 1998 Axler. Food additives dictionary / by Melvin A. 45 of 123 . a complete guide to hot and cold soft drinks. with a new introduction by the author. Food and cookery for the sick and convalescent / by Fannie Merritt Farmer. Pamela Goyan. Chamberlain. Kittler. Georgeanne. (William Henry). landscape photographs by Pat O'Hara. Axler. Melvin A. Food around the world : a cultural perspective / Margaret McWilliams.5947 CHA 1953641. Food and beverage service / Bruce H. by Marvin Edward Thorner 641. Food and cooking of Eastern Europe / Lesley Chamberlain . David. Jr. Lesley.5947 CHA 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641.47 Be 2008 Food : the history of taste / edited by Paul Freedman. and Nutrition Service. foreword by Patricia Wells . 1901-1992. Food and cooking of Russia / Lesley Chamberlain . Food beverage service handbook. Chamberlain. Food allergy cookbook / Lucinda Bruce-Gardyne. Bruce H. H.0973 KIT Brennan.5 Fo 641. Carl.5 Th 642.6 AXL Farmer. Ninemeier. Herzberg. Fannie Merritt. Benarde. Food for all seasons : savory recipes from the Pacific Northwest / by David Pisegna . Food buying guide for school food service / prepared by Nutrition and Technical Services Division. W.56318 B8868f 642. Bruce-Gardyne.3 MCW 2007 642.

1871. Reece. Food in world history / Jeffrey M. Food presentation [videorecording] written and directed by Joe Brown .5944 RIO 641.641.5 Re 641. Pilcher. Sue Reeves. Richard L. Gibbs. Lynch.58 K56f 641. Food of Thailand : authentic recipes from the Golden Kingdom / recipes by Sven Krauss. Rio. food-stylist/writer..57 MOL 2001 (Winifred Stuart). a laboratory guide and note-book for high school classes in domestic science . Food of Paris : authentic recipes from Parisian bistros and restaurants / by Marie-Noe¨l Rio . Barry L. Winifred S. by Beth Warner Josserand . Susan.59 LIN 641. 641. Kong Foong. Food is culture / Massimo Montanari . 1949Gunderson.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Molt. Niles. Louise. Mary. 46 of 123 . Food of Asia / Kong Foong Ling. Food preparation: study course. Josserand. consulting editor. Ling. and Vira Sanguanwong .5 FOO food photography by Heinz von Holzen . Food journal of Lewis & Clark : recipes for an expedition / Mary Gunderson.56 G4 Pilcher.5 N698f 641. Food preparation.. translated from the Italian by Albert Sonnenfeld.5 J8 641. Food of Bali : authentic recipes from the island of the gods / recipes by Heinz von Holzen & Lother Arsana . Sven. editing by Krauss. introduction by William Warren .. Food on campus : a recipe for action : a step-by-step guide to improving your college food service / by Susan Kinsella and the staff of the Action Center.. Beth Warner Mull. introduction and editing by Wendy Hutton . Dennler. Food for the invalid and the convalescent. 2008 Food for fifty / Mary Molt. Jeffrey M.5952 FOO 641. produced in association Holzen.. translation by Vincent Vichit-Vadakan. Laurent Ganguillet.59593 KRA 642. introduction by Kathleen Morikawa . food photography by Heinz von Holzen . Food preparation recipes. Massimo. Kinsella. 641.3 PIL 641. edited by Wendy Kosaki. Food marketing / Barry L. photography by Jean-Franc¸ois Hamon . by Winifred Stuart Gibbs .. Kathryn Bele. Reece . styling by Sophie Jacquesson .5978 G9755f 642. Takayuki. 1965Montanari.57 D411f 641.3 MON 641. photography by Luca Invernizzi Tettoni . Heinz von.595986 H7623f 641. Mary. Food of Japan : authentic recipes from the land of the rising sun / recipes by Takayuki Kosaki & Walter Wagner . Marie-Noe¨l..

arrangement. Food service in institutions.5028 J55f 1980 642. Anna Food service equipment / Anna Katherine Jernigan. Katherine.5028 JER 642. Lynne Nannen Ross. Food service for artichokes [videorecording] California Artichoke Advisory Board. Strianese. Strianese and Sunbreak Productions. written. and Le Velle Wood .6532 FOO 642. 642. and use [by] Anna Katherine Jernigan [and] Lynne Nannen Jernigan. Anthony J. Jernigan.5 Sm 641.5028 J55f 2008 Food processor video cookbook with Jane Freiman [videorecording] / Videocraft Classics presents .5 W516f 1945 642.589 FOO 641.5 W516f 1977 642. consulting editor. Anna Food service equipment / Anna Katherine Jernigan. Katherine. West. Charley.. and directed by Wendy Boersema. Food service industry video series [videorecording] / Anthony J. Food service equipment: selection. [by] Bessie Brooks West [and] LeVelle Wood. William O'Daniel.. Food service manual for health care institutions.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. [et al. Food service [computer file] : disc 2..5 Ch 47 of 123 .]. Smith.5 SHO 642. Food services / William O. West. Food service in institutions. by Bessie Brooks West .503 K157f 641.. Lynch. Helen. Anna Ross. 1938Kamp.59 A512h Association. Food science technology [videorecording] / produced and distributed by Meridian Education Corporation . Bessie Brooks. American Hospital Katherine. Food safety [videorecording] / Learning Seed.5 W516f 1955 642. Food service in institutions / Bessie Brooks West .. Lynne Nannen Ross. 641. produced by Jerry Pierce and Kristina Reibel King.5 STR 642. Jernigan.1 FOO 641. 1972 Smith. produced. Bessie Brooks. David. Cooking for beginners / Shopware .. produced & directed by Lee Kraft.3 FOO 641. Richard L. Food snob's dictionary : an essential lexicon of gastronomical knowledge : food snob n: reference term for the sort of food obsessive for whom the actual joy of eating and cooking is but a side dish to the Food study manual / Helen Charley.

6 L985f Foods of the foreign-born in relation to health. Julie Wilkinson. Food-n-fun craft : clever and unusual ways to prepare food for clubs.. Katie Letcher. with a foreword by Michael M. Doan and Gladys McElroy. 1908Eshbach. Martha Rose. church groups.59 K87f 642. Kotschevar. Foodservice for the extended care facility [by] Lendall H. illustrated by Oscar Ochoa. parties. 1914Lyle. Foods of Long Island / by Peggy Katalinich .5945 FOO Katalinich. jr.3 SHU Doan. Davis. Helen. Supplement. Charles E.5072 C478f Shulman.59297 FRA 641.4 CHA 641. Sam Etheridge. Wood .1 Kotschevar. etc.5945 CAS 1982 641.5973 KAT 641. Foodlover's atlas of the world / Martha Rose Shulman.3 Fo 641. 641. Foods of the Southwest Indian nations : traditional & contemporary Native American recipes / Lois Ellen Frank . Foods and wines of Spain / by Penelope Casas . 48 of 123 ... by Bertha M. editor.59 F686 no. 641. Foods of Italy [videorecording] = la cucina Italiana / Interactive Educational Media. photographs by J. Wood.5 E75f 1976 641. Walter Whitewater. Casas. 2008 Food study manual. Connie Weaver. Foods of the world. 1938642. McWilliams.81 D631f 642 FOO Charley. Lois Ellen. Foodphotos [computer file] : [digital photography of foods and culinary elements]. Foods : a scientific approach / Helen Charley. Margaret. Foods from around the world. Penelope.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Charley. 641. Helen. Lendal Henry. Eshbach.59 W85 641. Eleanor Lloyd. 641. Foraging gourmet / Katie Letcher Lyle. Foods : experimental perspectives / Margaret McWilliams. culinary advisors. Bertha M. Michael Dombroski. 1914641. Frank. Peggy. Foodservice management / Chares E. / by Eleanor L.3 MCW 1993 641.

Ron.5944 WIL 2008 Foundations of food preparation / Gladys C. Marie. Peckham. Ruhm. Fresh & fast : inspired cooking for every season and every day / Marie Simmons . Willan. the Scotto sisters . Gilles Pudlowski. E. Drawings and photos. photography by Alan Richardson.56 B496Z 641. Fresh & saltwater fish [videorecording] / producer. French chef with Julia Child. text. France. Linda Brandt . 641.5944 SCO 642.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Peckham. Simmons. by Herb Caen. photographs by Deborah Jones. Russell Fortier or David Griffiths. Freeland-Graves. Peckham. 641.5944 OLN 641.. Leo Meier. Freedom from allergy cookbook / Ron Greenberg. by Paul Child.5631 G798f Greenberg.5944 WIL 641.5944 C536f 641. produced and directed by Russell Morash. Franz.5 SIM 641. Gladys C. 641 PEC 641 Pe 641. Frankly speaking: Trader Vic's own story. Jeanne H. Thomas. by Trader Vic. French chef cookbook.. Peter Johnson. Scotto. French Culinary Institute's salute to healthy cooking : from America's foremost French chefs / by Alain Sailhac .] . Anne. mit u¨ber 1000 Rexepten / mit 48 Farbtafeln von Ernest Richter. Olney. David B. Bruce Franchini . Julia. Franz Ruhm Kochbuch . Anne.2000 Child. French Laundry cookbook / Thomas Keller with Susie Heller and Michael Ruhlman .5944 FRE 641. photography. French regional cooking / Anne Willan.5944 FREN 641. 641. the beautiful cookbook : authentic recipes from the regions of France / recipes.692 FRE 49 of 123 . Atwood. food photography by Maria Robledo. French menu cookbook : a revised and updated edition of culinary classic / by Richard Olney . with illustrations by Judith Eldridge. French chef with Julia Child [videorecording] / produced by Russell Morash or Ruth Lockwood . Willan. Richard. Foundations of food preparation [by] Gladys C. Pierre Hussenot. director. 2 [videorecording] / WGBH-TV Boston .5 KEL 1999 641.59436 R933f 641. [et al. Gladys C. Introd.5944 FRE Keller. KQED. France gastronomique / by Anne Willan. Peckham. Angela Nori. directed by Russell Morash. 1949. (Elisabeth) Trader Vic. das Standardwerk der Wiener und o¨sterreichischen Ku¨cke von heute.

641. From the galleys of Nantucket. research Smith. Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.59 S651fg 641. photographs by Kathryn Kleinman . Simpson. Smith . Frugal Gourmet on our immigrant ancestors : recipes you should have gotten from your grandmother / Jeff Smith. Terrin Haley..552 S651f 641. cooking and preservation of frozen foods . Frugal gourmet with Jeff Smith. Fruit / by Amy Nathan . Jean Irwin. Frugal Gourmet / Jeff Smith . and Rome / Jeff Smith . illustrations by Gary Jacobsen. illustrations by Chris Cart. From Nonnie's Italian kitchen : the recipes of Mary Baldini Leonardi / compiled and edited by Elmerina Leonardi Parkman. Tim Ward. illustrations by Gary Jacobsen.5944 FRU 641. Frugal Gourmet / Jeff Smith .5945 FRU 641. Chris Cart.64 NAT Africa / Habeeb Salloum and James Peters . Smith. Frugal Gourmet with Jeff Smith. The Italian kitchen [videorecording] / WTTW. Jeff. illustrator . Greece. Jeff. Jean Irwin. Tim Ward. Jeff. culinary consultant . 1896Simpson. Salloum. 1896Smith. From a lighthouse window : recipes and recollections from the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum. producer/director. 641.59468 FRU Nathan.5 FRO 1982 641. director.5 S613f 1962 641.5944 ESQ 641. Smith. by Jean I. Jeff. photographs by Neal Cassidy. Tim Ward. research assistant . Norma Leonardi Leone. Chicago . Habeeb. The Spanish kitchen [videorecording] / WTTW/Chicago .552 SMI 641. The French kitchen [videorecording] / WTTW . Craig Wollam. Taylor with the technical assistance and cooperation of the Frozen Food Frozen food cookbook and guide to home freezing. culinary assistant . director. a complete guide to the preparation. 2008 From a French country kitchen : the culinary tradition of La Madeleine French Bakery & Cafe´ / Monique Esquerre´ and Patrick Esquerre´. Frugal gourmet cooks three ancient cuisines : China. Mary Baldini.59 S651f 641.5 S613f 1948 641. styling by Amy Nathan . producer/director. D. Frozen food cook book.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Esquerre´-Anciaux. Michaels. St. Craig Wollam. Frugal Gourmet with Jeff Smith.5945 LEO 641.5973 CHE Leonardi. 50 of 123 . drawings by Lynn Peterfreund . Simpson and Demetria M. Terrin Haley. producer. From the lands of figs and olives : over 300 delicious and unusual recipes from the Middle East and North 641. Jean I.5956 S169f 641. Maryland. text by Jo Mancuso. The Chinese kitchen [videorecording] / WTTW/Chicago . Frugal Gourmet with Jeff Smith. producer. by Simpson.. Tim Ward.5951 FRU 641. Amy. Monique.C.

641. Garlic : garlic recipes by leading chefs from around the world / [chefs. edited with an introduction by Lesley Chamberlain. Montana State University. garlic capital of the world / [the Gilroy Garlic Festival]. Ware. John. Garrulous gourmet. Ruth. William Wallace. Garden-fresh vegetable cookbook / Andrea Chesman. Frying [videorecording] / National Productions Division of KQED .5945 M338c. [et al. Willard.77 FRY Taya. 1881641.5944 I72g 1943641. Eric V. Garnishing / Francis Talyn Lynch. Yoshitada. Filippo Tommaso. 641.Eb 641. 641.6526 GAR Reichl. Garde manger : the art and craft of the cold kitchen / the Culinary Institute of America.. Foreword by Fred Allen.86 YOC 641.578 J684G 641. 1876-1944. 641. McVety. Copage .. Copage. Futurist cookbook / Marinetti . Fucha ryo¯ri / Taya Yoshitada.]] .81 SCO 51 of 123 . Marinetti. Lisa. photographed by Andy Cameron. illustrations by Cheryl Carrington. Bradley J.5 LYN 641. Fruits of the harvest : recipes to celebrate Kwanzaa and other holidays / Eric V. 2008 Fruit desserts / Lisa Yockelson.568 COP 641.6526 GAR Lynch. Andrea. McVety. Drawings by Vern Craig.5952 T236f 642 MCV 641. Garlic lovers' cookbook : from Gilroy. Sugai Eisuke. Fundamentals of menu planning / Paul J. Garnishing [videorecording] : how to play with your food / Department of Health and Human Development. 1915Johnson.65 CHE 641. Francis Talyn. Paul J.5 REI 641. Garlic and sapphires : the secret life of a critic in disguise / Ruth Reichl.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Yockelson. Claudio Aprile . translated by Suzanne Brill .79 GAR 2004 Chesman.69 W693g 1958 641. produced by Bruce Franchini. Gameday gourmet : more than 80 all-American tailgate recipes / Pableaux Johnson. Irwin. Pableaux. Game is good eating.

director. Choate. a complete guide to mastering authentic German cooking. producer. sorbetti & granite / text & recipes by Pamela Sheldon Johns . Marco Pierre White. Henrietta.59 GAT Cohen. Giuliano. Global eating [videorecording] : learning from other cultures / writer. pasture.5784 SLO 641. 1953Sheraton.6543 SHE 642.59 GLO 641. producer/director. Giuliano Bugialli's Foods of Italy / photographs by John Dominis. Jane Green. 2008 Gas grill cookbook / [Shelli McConnel. editor]. with menus.862 JOH 641.013 GAS 641. Green.8 CHO 641. Judith. Kingi. Dolnack. Global grill / Kathleen Sloan.5 YOC 641. Gefilte variations : 200 inspired recreations of classics from the Jewish kitchen. Yves Thurie`s. special photography by Jess Koppel . Marcella. and sea / Henrietta Green . Michael Lienau.691 D6657g 641.3374 G425 641. Ernie Geefay. George. 641. Gift giver's cookbook / Judith Choate. orchard.563 GRE Glorious gifts from your kitchen / Lisa Yockelson. Kathleen. Sloan-McIntosh. Getting the most from your deer / by George Dolnack. Gelato! : Italian ice creams. stories. Gathering place [videorecording] : informal international menus that bring family and friends back to the table / with Graham Kerr . produced by Jennifer Barry Design .76 G246 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. [illustrations. Yockelson. Getting down to business : restaurant business / Marcella Kingi.5 ET 641. Johns. Jeff Schrank . German cookbook. Glasgow on a plate / edited by Ferrier Richardson .5676 COH 641. Americanized text by Miriam Rubin .59411 GLA 641.5945 BUG 641. Ghirardelli cookbook : recipes and history from America's premier chocolate maker / photography by Leigh Beisch. Jayne. photographs by Alan Donaldson. photography by Joyce Oudkerk-Pool. Pamela Sheldon. Global Net Productions . Glorious harvest : robust recipes from the dairy. Lynne Robinson]. Gastronomia international : Karl Wannemacher. Lisa. 52 of 123 . Mimi. Bugialli. and traditions for the holidays and year-round / Jayne Cohen.

All American greats [videorecording] / a production of Means St. Breakfast eats 2 [videorecording] / a production of Means St. 641. Be Square Productions.5 U57g 641. Good eats with Alton Brown. Roosevelt. Good eats with Alton Brown. Productions.5 GOO 641. Good eats with Alton Brown. Miriam.302 Su 2008 Gluten (the economical meat substitute) / by Deanna Smith Sudweeks. 1941641. Good eats with Alton Brown. Productions.5 UNG 641. Productions. Good cooking. 1893-1982. Good eats with Alton Brown.5 GOO 641. Good cheap food. Roben.53 Y657g Ungerer. Miriam. Good day for soup / by Jeannette Ferrary and Louise Fiszer. Good eats with Alton Brown. Family favorites [videorecording] / a production of Means St.568 GOO 641. 1905.692 GOO 641. Italian eats [videorecording] / a production of Means St. Productions. Good eats with Alton Brown. Productions. Productions . Good cheap food. Good eats with Alton Brown. Productions.5 R781g 641.52 GOO 641. Ungerer. Illus. Holiday treats [videorecording] / a production of Means St. Gogo no ocha : maneku toki no kondate to tsukurikata 150-shu / [chosha Yoshioka Kiyoko].641.813 F378g 641.563 R989g Yoshioka. by Dominique Strandquest.52 GOO 641. Juicy meats [videorecording] / a production of Means St.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Sudweeks. Productions. Gluten-free kitchen : over 135 delicious recipes for people with gluten intolerance or wheat allergy / Roben Ryberg. Hooked & cooked [videorecording] / a production of Means St. Illus. 641.36 GOO 53 of 123 .36 GOO 641. Kiyoko. Deanna Smith.5945 GOO 641. Nicholas. Good eats with Alton Brown. Juicy meats 3 [videorecording] / a production of Means St. Breakfast eats [videorecording] / a production of Means St. Productions. Jeannette. Ferrary. Ryberg. by Dominique Strandquest.

Oliver. Good old food : a taste from the past / Irena Chalmers and friends. Good food compendium : an indispensable guide to sensible nutrition and eating pleasures for those who care about fine fare and wholesome living / Jo Giese Brown .83 GOO 641. Poultry pleasers [videorecording] / a production of Means St.86 GOO 641. Livingston.641. Good egg : more than 200 fresh approaches from soup to dessert / Marie Simmons. 641.5 OLI 641. a few vegetables. Productions. glop & glue stew : favorite foods from 165 outdoor experts / Yvonne Prater and Ruth Dyar Mendenhall .675 SIM 641. Productions. 1923Good Housekeeping Institute (New York. Prater. Irena. Marie. Marsh. Good Housekeeping cook book. Livingston. Good vittles : one man's meat.65 GOO Simmons. ed. Ocean edibles [videorecording] / a production of Means St.302 Br 641. Good eats with Alton Brown. Super sweets [videorecording] / a production of Means St. Productions.. 1932641. Good eats with Alton Brown. More juicy meats [videorecording] / a production of Means St. Productions.5 CHA 2008 Good eats with Alton Brown. Be Square Productions.665 GOO 641. Jo Giese. 1932. Good eats with Alton Brown.5 L786g Gorp. D. Tossed around [videorecording] / a production of Means St. Super sweets 3 [videorecording] / a production of Means St. Productions. A. Good eats with Alton Brown.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. by Dorothy B.36 GOO 641. Veggie eats [videorecording] / with Alton Brown . Say cheese [videorecording] / a production of Means St. Super sweets 2 [videorecording] / a production of Means St. Yvonne. Good eats with Alton Brown. Good eats with Alton Brown. Margo. Brown.86 GOO 641. illustrated by Dave Falcon. cartoons by Dale Martin. Productions.578 P912g 54 of 123 . Good eats with Alton Brown. and a drink or two / A.865 GOO 641.D. Good food cookbook / Margo Oliver. Chalmers.5 GOO 641.692 GOO 641. Productions. Productions.673 GOO 641. Good eats.

5946 GOY 641. recipes and preparation of food for photography by Zanne E. Robert.514 WEM 641. Hubert Sieben.514 TRO 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Osborne. Gourmet to go : a guide to opening and operating a specialty food store / Robert Wemischner.5975 EDG 641. ill.5 GOU 1979 641.691 SCO 641. Gourmet potluck : show-stopping recipes for the buffet table / Beth Hensperger . illustrations by Francesca Pelizzoli. Gourmet cookbook / [compiled and edited by Gourmet. Sondra.5944 GOU 641. Scott. Wemischner. with wine suggestions by Gerald Asher .57 HEN 641.. Evie. photography by Scott Peterson. Joan Wilcox. Gourmet's sweets / from the editors of Gourmet .59931 K41g 55 of 123 .. 1885Gotlieb. Gourmet game recipes and anecdotes from around the world / Philippa Scott . Philippa. Gourmet's France / photos. Charlie. by Mario Micossi. Trotter. Beth. 641. Gourmet's Canada / Sondra Gotlieb. Zakroff .86 GOU 641. canoeists. Yanes. photography by Tim Turner .] . 2008 Gourmet camping : a menu cookbook and travel guide for campers. Karen Karp. Gracious plenty : recipes and recollections from the American South / John T. Illustrated by Georgette de Lattre.5 GOU 641. by Ronny Jaques . John T. inc.59727 GOY 641. Goya cook's tour of Spain. cyclists.5 RIG 641.5971 G684g 641. by the Galloping Gourmet. photographs styled by Nancy Righter. and skiers / by Joan Wilcox Osborne. Photography.5944 DIA 641. Louis. Gourmet's menu cookbook. Graham. Kerr. Graham Kerr cookbook. Diat. foreword by Emeril Lagasse.578 O816g 641. [et al. photographs by Romulo A. Hensperger. Gourmet's menus for contemporary living / text by Evie Righter .] Gourmet cooking for dummies / by Charlie Trotter with Judi Carle and Sari Zernich . a collection of epicurean menus and recipes. Edge for the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi. Edge. Goya Caribbean cook's book. Gourmet's basic French cookbook. techniques of French cuisine.

86 KHA Giedt.86 GRE 641. Frances Towner. photographs by Ellen Silverman.86 GIE 56 of 123 . Grand finales : the art of the plated dessert / [compiled by] Tish Boyle and Timothy Moriarty. Marton.815 SHU Walter. Khalsa. Marton. 641. Great American bake sale book / Alison Boteler. Bill. photography by John Uher. Grand prix culinaire / Gerold Berger.631 GRA 641.563 K412g 641. Grand finales : a modernist view of plated desserts / [compiled by] Tish Boyle and Timothy Moriarty . Grand Central Oyster Bar & Restaurant seafood cookbook / introd. and beans / Kevin Graham . art direction by Leslie Smolan. photographs by Michael Boys.71 BOT 641. Great desserts : from the editors of Food & wine magazine / edited and written by Mardee Haidin Regan . 641. illustrated by Richard Sommers. Baba S. Grains.56314 M387g 641. 641. Great desserts of the American West : sweet endings and treats from the West Coast to the Lone Star State / Frances Towner Giedt.5 Gra 641. 641. Graham. the British Isles & North America / Martha Rose Shulman .86 GRA 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Kerr. Great chicken cookbook for people with diabetes / Beryl M. Boteler. photography by Irvin Blitz . introduction by Michael Schneider . Alison Molinare. by Jerome Brody . 641. Great breads : home-baked favorites from Europe. Martha Rose.86 GRA Berger. Gerold.8653 WAL 641. Kevin. Khalsa and Andrea Opalenik.823 BRI Great American chili book / Bill Bridges. Great cakes / Carole Walter. Shulman.59 Be 641. rice. Grand diplo^me cooking course. Beryl M. Great desserts from the great chefs / by Baba S. Graham.69 GRA 641. Anne. Carole. Great cooks and their recipes : from Taillevent to Escoffier / Anne Willan . Bridges.59 WIL 641. photography by Steven Mark Needham. Willan. 2008 Graham Kerr's Simply Splenda cookbook / with Suzanne Butler.

49 KUT 1984 Ojakangas. design by Thomas Ingalls . illustrations by Lynn Wohlers. photographs by Kristen Brochmann.71 GLA 641. Great women chefs : marvelous meals & innovative recipes from the stars of American cuisine / Julie Stillman .641. Great vegetables from the great chefs / Baba S. Reinersmann]. with sketches by Christine Engla Eber. Edited by Michael Sonino. Great salsa book / Mark Miller with Mark Kiffin and John Harrisson . 641. Beatrice A.5636 MAD 641. with recipes / Norman Van Aken with John Harrisson . Jennifer Trainer. photography by Valerie Santagto. 2008 Great exotic fruit book : a handbook of tropical and subtropical fruits. 1951Davis.65 KHA 642.646 VAN 641.5784 MCC 57 of 123 . Mark Charles. Julie. Greek cook book / by Sophia . with sketches by Christine Engla Eber. Stillman. 642. Great sausage recipes and meat curing / by Rytek Kutas . Khalsa . Great Scandinavian baking book / by Beatrice Ojakangas .71 OJA Khalsa. Baba S. 1888.F. Grill book / text by Kelly McCune . La grande cucina internazionale. photographic design by Al J.59495 GEO 641. Marianne. Madison.5 G786 Thompson. translated and adapted by Helen Georges. Rytek. Great sausage recipes and meat curing / by Rytek Kutas . Kutas. Greens cook book : extraordinary vegetarian cuisine from the celebrated restaurant / by Deborah Madison with Edward Espe Brown. Georges. produced by David Barich. Luigi. Great Italian cooking. Rytek. Norman. Helen.49 KUT 641. photographs by Lou Manna . Deborah.Handelslehrerin. [translated by Elisabeth R. photography by Lois Ellen Frank.7 MUL 641.4 STI 641.76 DAV 641. Greyston Bakery cookbook / by Helen Glassman and Susan Postal .K.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Van Aken. Michael Grand. McCune.6384 THO Carnacina. Glassman. 641. Hillary. 1949Kutas. Miller. introduction by Alice Waters. Helen. Fisher. Kelly. 641. Dipl.8 MIL 641. principal photographer. Reagan. introduction by M. illustrated by Rudy Luoma. Great napkin folding & table setting / Marianne Mu¨ller & Ola Mikolasek with Hans Tapper . Great hot sauce book / by Jennifer Trainer Thompson . Great grilling : easy & elegant entertaining all year round / Hillary Davis .5945 CAR Mu¨ller. Great home cooking in America : heirloom recipes treasured for generations / edited by the food editors of Farm journal . 641.

3 TAC 641. Mrs. by E. by Jim Keller.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. Missouri recipes. ill. Grosses illustrirtes Kochbuch fu¨r einfachen Tisch und die feine Ku¨ch. producer. Philip E.57 K13g 1946 Hepinstall. Reaney Kelly.59764 GUI 641. 641.76 GRI 641... J. produced by Richard and Judith Logan.7 Gi 641. Guide to cooking fish & game. 641. edited by Andria Kuzeff. R. . und verm. Mrs. photography by Bob Parvin . a collection of articles from publications of the National Association of College and University Food Services.853 HAN 58 of 123 . Henriette.692 ELV 641. Gusto estetico / Fabio Tacchella. Gonzalez-Hastings.5 Ha Elverson.5973 AND 641. Capps. Kaiser. Group feeding. 641. Andrews. Virginia T. Gulf coast cooking : seafood from the Florida Keys to the Yucata´n Peninsula / by Virginia Elverson . Guide to Tex-Mex cooking [videorecording] : with Jane Butel / Videocraft Classics presents . Lewis R. Fabio. Illus. Cy. Habana Cafe´ cookbook / Josefa Gonzalez-Hastings .69 L779g 641.5943 L828g 1882 641. food photography by David Crossley and Bill Pogue. James. produced & directed by Lee Kraft.59519 HEP Littlebee. 641. American Home Handbook of food preparation.5 GUI 642. Hammond-Harwood House cook book / Mrs.5 GON 641. Ginders . Inc.508 G946 641. Clifford Allen. Economics Association..586 GRI 2008 Grill management [videorecording] / a presentation of Prentice-Hall Media. Nagel. produced by Bruce Franchini. mit vielen Recepten nach eigener Erfahrung von Theodor Bechtel. Guide to foodservice management. Andrews. by Clifford Allen Kaiser Growing up in a Korean kitchen : a cookbook / Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall. with an essay by John Graves . Lo¨ffler. Miller. [Frances Cloyd. Lewis R. Hand formed chocolates [videorecording] / Culinary Institute of America . Grilling [videorecording] / National Productions Division of KQED . Tacchella. compiled by Werner O. 1901Ginders. Hi Soo Shin. Josefa. Umgearb. Guide to cooking schools. editor] Guide to napkin folding / James R.

5 BRA 641.. Gill. Healing gourmet. Healthy Italian cooking / Emanuela Stucchi .563 JON 641. photographs by Gus Filgate . Healthy cooking for people who don't have time to cook / by Jeanne Jones. Pat L. Cooksmith. Adams.3372 SAF 641. Healthy choices. Harrods book of chocolates & other edible gifts / by Gill Edden. Bruce Moody. herbal. Cooksmith. Lund.36 RAN 642. Mexican [videorecording] / with Marietta Pagani . Tribole. black. with a fraction of the fat / by Evelyn Tribole.5638 TRI 641. Inc. Handbook of meat product technology / M. Healthy choices. Evelyn. Kathy McManus. 641. 641. producer/director. Boland. by Mary A. Boland. Healthy choices. it's a way of life / JoAnna M. Handling food safely [videorecording] : basic rules of personal hygiene / produced for Vocational Media Associates by Richard and Judith Logan. Jeanne.65 STU 641.5972 HEA Jones. Michael D. 641. and others who care for the sick . Healthy Exchanges cookbook : it's not a diet. 1954Safi. Inc. for the use of nurses in training-schools. producer/director. in association with American Production Services .5944 HEA 641.56311 HEA Crocker.563 LUN 641. Susan. producer/director. Emanuela. in association with American Production Services . photographs by Dorothy Handelman. 59 of 123 .5 HAN Edden.56 P3 641.853 EDD 2008 Handbook of invalid cooking. 641.5977 ADA Heart of the home : notes from a vineyard kitchen / by Susan Branch..657 CRO 641. Bruce Moody. Healthy homestyle cooking : 200 of your favorite family recipes.5945 HEA 641. Heartland : the best of the old and the new from Midwest kitchens / Marcia Adams . Italian [videorecording] / with Marietta Pagani . eat to lower cholesterol / the editors of Healing gourmet with Victoria Rand. Branch. 1959Stucchi. nurses in private practice. foreword by Lorenza De'Medici. Cooksmith. in association with American Production Services . fruit / Tammy Safi. Bruce Moody.D. JoAnna M. Lund. Healthy teas : green. Marcia. 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Pequignot. 1852Ranken. Tammy. Mary A. Healing herbs cookbook / Pat Crocker. French [videorecording] / with Marietta Pagani . Ranken. and Bev Shaffer. Inc.

and apprentice to a Dante-quoting butcher in Tuscany / Bill Buford. Symons. Herbal pantry / Emelie Tolley and Chris Mead.5944 SCO 641.5973 BER 641.509 S988h Ward. High-calcium. 641. 641.. Bill. Elizabeth. Hering's dictionary of classical and modern cookery : and practical reference manual for the hotel. illustrations by John Burgoyne .6383 HER 641. Hibachi cookery in the American manner : Japanese-American cookbook / by George E. botanical watercolors of herbs by Louise Smith . George E. Herbs and spices [videorecording] / prepared and presented by Alice Vernon.].641.641. photographs by Marcia Luce. restaurant and catering trade. Mary.5 He 641. Lois Sinaiko. line cook. John. 2008 Heat : an amateur's adventures as kitchen slave. and Miche`le Carles] . Hering.59455 BUF 641.5952 E58h 641. Corbitt. low-calorie cookbook / Betty Marks. 1945. 641. Here in America's test kitchen / by the editors of Cook's illustrated . Betty.657 TRA Vernon. Holidays : 21 menus for elegant entertaining from Thanksgiving to Twelfth Night / John Hadamuscin . Berruet. photography by Keller + Keller . [photos by Cary Hazlegrove]. Richard.657 TOL Traunfeld.6 WAR 642. Here's to Nantucket : recipes for the good life and great food / Jean-Charles Berruet and Jack Warner .4 HAD 641. Chong. 1940Hadamuscin. Michael. Alice R.5 COR 641. Helen Corbitt's cookbook / by Helen Corbitt . text by Annie Hubert-Bare. Hodgson Mill oat bran cookbook and guide to reducing blood cholesterol / [Mary Ward]. Jerry.568 WEB 60 of 123 . illustrations by Elayne Sears . Herbfarm cookbook / Jerry Traunfeld . Marianne Comolli. Tolley. Holidays of the world cookbook for students / by Lois Sinaiko Webb. Webb.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Buford. Engler.5 HER 641. (Elisabeth) Engler. [et al. E. Emelie.5951 CHO 641. color photographs by Jonelle Weaver. Scotto. Helen. History of cooks and cooking / Michael Symons. Jean-Charles. Heritage of French cooking / recipes by the Scotto sisters [Elisabeth Scotto. Marks. with decorations by Joe Allen Hong. 1959.5632 M346h Heritage of Chinese cooking / Elizabeth Chong.. pasta maker.

Commission on Hospitality industry : the world of food service / Joseph A. Petersen for members of the State Historical Society of Iowa.81 H945h Larousse. Hors d'oeuvres buffet [videorecording] / a production of WTTW/Chicago . of an 1866 almanac.5 Vi 641.641. 641. Housekeepers almanac. Susan Mahnke. Bonnie Stewart. October 19-21. Hot station [videorecording] / Meridian Education Corporation. 641. 642.. producer/director. by William J. illustrations by Ann Schuler Santo.. 1949Duffy.6 W756h 1954 641. Gillian. sweet : a culinary journey through Southeast Asia / Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid . by Wilton.5952 K79h Wilton. Philip Gay. Joseph A.. location photographs by Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid. 641.812 H817 Hunter. Elizabeth. 641. Authors: McKinley Wilton & Norman Wilton. producer. David Paul. Home sausage making : how-to techniques for making and enjoying 100 sausages at home / Susan Mahnke Peery & Charles G. Hot.5 HOT Alford. Tim Ward. Minneapolis. Hors d'oeuvre bible / David Paul Larousse. slightly enl. Minnesota. sour. collected by Elizabeth Hunter. Reprinted with an introd. 1981 / Advisory Board on Military Personnel Supplies. 641. for the year 1866.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Mickelson. Hors d'œuvre around the world.812 HOR 642. Hors d'oeuvres / Gillian Duffy .5059 H842 61 of 123 . Hors d'oeuvre / by the editors of Time-Life Books.641. Produced and edited by Don Fitzgerald.812 DUF 641.76 HOT 641.5973 MIC 2008 Hollyhocks & radishes : Mrs. Hospital patient feeding systems : proceedings of a symposium held at Radisson South Hotel. 1898. Reavis. 1928. Hot off the grill [videorecording] : the ultimate guide to year-round grilling / WGBH Educational Foundation . Sadako. Home on the range.812 LAR 641. studio photographs by Richard Jung . 641. a facsimile reproduction. salty. Jeffrey.5971 HOM Peery. director. Homemaker's pictorial encyclopedia of modern cake decorating . Home style Japanese cooking in pictures/ by Sadako Kohno. McKinley. Laurie Donnelly .5 H828 Villella. Chard's almanac cookbook / Bonnie Stewart Mickelson .66 PEE 2003 Kohno. photography by Melanie Acevedo.50959 ALF 641. Villella.

How to pronounce French. Jean C. and George E. 1945..5092 HOW Ulm. foreword by Lois Jovanovic. Diana. Evelyn Gertrude. . written by Nadia How to cook his goose (and other wild games) [by] Karen Green and Betty Black. Egerton-Thomas. illustrated by Chris Winn.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Mackay. and Italian wine names / Diana Bellucci. Milton.86 W1197h 642. Stoner . Warren.4 EGE 641. editor. Halliday. 1919- Stevens.8 ROS 641. Stevens and Rosemary B. How to feed friends and influence people : the Carnegie Deli : a giant sandwich. a little deli. Gertrude (Lucy Gertrude).563 S844h Rosen. Wade . Bellucci.5 B368h 1970 641. Robert A. Parker. Karen. Rosen. Inc. Christopher. How to feed your hyperactive child / Laura J. James. a huge success / Milton Parker and Allyn Freeman.44 De 641.641. How to run a catering business from home / Christopher Egerton-Thomas. with a helpful supplement on budget 641.5 H188h 1946 62 of 123 . How to be the perfect waiter or waitress [videorecording] : and earn great tips! / Los Angeles Professional Servers. With illus. How to dry foods / by Deanna DeLong. Hows and whys of cooking.2 BEL 642. 641. Housekeeping in old Virginia : containing contributions from two hundred and fifty of Virginia's noted housewives. How to store your garden produce : the key to self-sufficiency / Piers Warren . illustrations by Anthony F.452 WAR 2003 641.5 PAR wines and spirits. How much to buy : a foodservice purchasing workbook / Robert A. Laura J. 1903641.without the sugar / Jean C. German. Gertrude Mackay. Deanna. L. 641. by William Green. Harvey.31 ULM 641. How to garnish : illustrated step-by-step instructions / Harvey Rosen . Christian Mills . Holtgrefe. How sweet it is-. 642. Piers.69 G796h 641. How to eat better for less money / [by] James Beard and Sam Aaron . b.6 M1 2008 Housekeeper's apple book : over two hundred ways of preparing the apple / by L. produced by Nadia Semczuk. directed by Gerald Massimei . Robert J. 1944DeLong.59755 H8425 641. Wade. Ulm.6 HOW Green. distinguished for their skill in the culinary art and other branches of domestic economy / edited How I learned to cook : culinary educations from the world's greatest chefs / edited by Kimberly Witherspoon and Peter Meehan. 1985. Beard.

pictures by Richard Cuffari. Willan.5952 ILO Ice carving / by Hideo Hasegawa . In good taste : a contemporary approach to cooking / Victor Gielisse. Mable. Kathryn G. Victor. 1924-642. produced by Wadel and Associates . 1962Amendola.5 C366i 641. what pioneer America ate and why / Lila Perl . Romi Adachi . Hall . edited by Jackie Athey... Nozomu. 641. by Evelyn G. forzen yogurts. Caton. Perl. dining car. and Isabel T. executive producer. Gielisse. Jay. Joseph. sherbets. 642. Illustrated herbal / Wilfrid Blunt. I love sushi [videorecording] : sushi for everyone/ Triangle Production Services .71 GAL 641. I can manage : a practical approach to school foodservice management / Jay Caton & Mary Nix.8 Ha Ice carving made easy / Joseph Amendola. a ready reference to catering methods. 641. tea room. Kimbrough.63 BLU 641. Galli. Ideas for refreshment rooms. cafeteria. I'm just here for the food : food + heat = cooking / Alton Brown. Igirisu wa oishii / Hayashi Naozomu. Hayashi. directors.7 IMP 641. club. Mary E. Andrew J. Gielisse. school. 1922. Ray Manard.5 GIE 63 of 123 .5978 P451h 642. photography by Sara Taylor.5 H188h 2008 Hows and whys of cooking. Hunter's stew and hangtown fry. sorbets. Franco. Hideo. Reiko Ishihara. Ice cream & frozen yogurt cookbook : enjoy homemade ice creams. covering a wide range of pratice. Sandra Raphael. Evelyn Gertrude. English language translation by Norman Braslow . producer. Chef-San . restaurants. Blunt. Hasegawa. 19011987. industrial plant. coffee shop. Anne. Wilfrid.3521 IDA 642.5 BRO 642.8 HOF 641. Brown.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Halliday. Noble. Lila.5 H8i 641.8 AME 1994 Hoffman. Impressive 1 minute napkins [videorecording] / by Chef Ted . Halliday . Mike Wadel.641. lunch room. In & out of the kitchen in fifteen minutes or less / Anne Willan . Alton.59592 H4136i 641. soda fountain.555 WIL 641. producer/director. Il Fornaio baking book : sweet and savory recipes from the Italian kitchen / by Franco Galli. Idaho [videorecording] : home of the world famous potato. and more / Mable and Gar Hoffman.

In the kitchen with love. Inside America's test kitchen / by the editors of Cook's Illustrated . Indian cook book / recipes by Cecelia Corcoran. Inquisitve cook / Anne Gardiner and Sue Wilson.5638 D141i 641. Rosie.555 L285i 641. 1881-1958.86 CHA 641.657 ING 641. with Nancy Verde Barr .57 S637i3 641.59786 C793i 641. In pursuit of flavor / by Edna Lewis with Mary Goodbody . poaching & smoking. photographs by Gus Filgate. Regan. Corcoran. Lillian. 1945Gardiner. hospitals and other institutions.5636 PIC 641. Institution recipes for use in schools. photography Carl Tremblay. Inspired vegetarian / Louise Pickford . Anne. with the Exploratorium. Smedley. Daniel Van Ackere. Loren. colleges.5975 LEW 641. illustrations. Louise. Motoyama. Inn at Little Washington : a consuming passion / Patrick O'Connell . Langseth-Christensen.5 OCO 641. Sophia. Lauren. Instant epicure cookbook.5945 LOR 641. Cecelia. Edna. photographs by Tim Turner. 641. illustrated by Louisa Jones Waller. photographs by Micheal McLaughlin.5973 CHI 2008 In Julia's kitchen with master chefs / Julia Child .7 ING Inshoku jiten / Motoyama Tekishu¯ cho. In the kitchen with Rosie : Oprah's favorite recipes / by Rosie Daley. Julia. Instant gratification : no-hassle desserts in just about no time / Lauren Chattman. In the sweet kitchen : the definitive baker's companion / Regan Daley. Lewis. 1934Daley. by Emma Smedley. Daley.5952 M9199i 1966 641.5 INS Pickford. Ingredients & flavor dynamics : cooking with spices & herbs.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Child. Ingredients & flavor dynamics : saute´ing. Chattman.815 DAL 641. Patrick. O'Connell. steaming. Emma.5 G221i 641. 641. John Burgoyne . 641. 64 of 123 . Tekishu¯.

1931- 2008 Institutional cakes: premix versus the conventional. produced by the Learning Resources Center .8 BAG 641.595 G8161i CD 641. Illustrated by Sandy Heckinger. 1908Instructor's guide for the teaching of professional cooking / prepared for The Culinary Institute of America by Culinary Institute of LeRoi A. 1920. 1943Baggett.865 LOD 642. Robert. Janice Murfitt . and outline domestic and production recipes / compiled by Charles G. photographs by Martin Jacobs. menu terms. additives. Anderson. International chocolate cookbook / Nancy Baggett .5 In 641. Douglas. International dictionary of food & cooking : ingredients. catering terms. International foods [electronic resource] 3 Asia & Russia / by Michelle Greenwald. Eleanor 641. Auriel.5 INT 641. Kenneth. 1921Greenwald. Nicholas. International school of sugarcraft / principal teacher. Michelle. producer. teacher. Angus Campbell. International hangover book. Joseph. International dictionary of food & nutrition / Kenneth N. techniques.596 G8161i CD 641.Manual Baggett. Michelle. Gottlieb. Institutional evaluation of processed mashed potatoes. Fredericha. equipment.865 M116i 641.81 B789i McArthur.874 D733i 641. Sokol. Anderson. 1943641. Nancy. Lodge. International foods [electronic resource] 2 Africa & the Middle East / by Michelle Greenwald. America. Introduction to table side cooking [videorecording] / the Culinary Institute of America presents . food science. 641. Greenwald. Garlough.8653 H461i Boyd. Miller.79 GAR Institutional premarket testing of chiffon pie mixes. Sinclair. LaVilla. Philip E.641. photography by Graham Tann.03 AND 641. Folsom. Gail. Nicholas Lodge .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Hefner.6374 BAG 641. Instructor's manual to accompany About professional baking / Gail Sokol. photographs by Dennis M.815 SOK Manual 641. Patricia Larue. International cookie cookbook / Nancy Baggett . Anderson and Lois E. Instructor's manual to accompany Modern garde manger / Robert Garlough.6 INT 65 of 123 .22 HEN Manual 641. Instructor's manual to accompany About wine / prepared by Joseph LaVilla. Ruth Ann. 1954. Nancy.

Rue. a laboratory manual of food preparation and evaluation [by] Mary L.568 SCA 641.v 641. Italian farmhouse cookbook / by Susan Herrmann Loomis . Field. Tolley.5945 BET 641.5954 J23i. 641. 1933Merchant. 641. illustrations by Anne Smith.5945 MED 641. with an introduction by Moira Hodgson . Italian wines 2006 : a guide to the world of Italian wine for experts and wine lovers. Tony.5 JUD 642.5945 MER 641. Pat Mitchamore.5 Mo 2008 Introductory foods. Carol.5945 FIE 641. Michele. Lorenza. Jack Daniel's the spirit of Tennessee cookbook / Lynne Tolley. Italian cooking in the grand tradition / Jo Bettoja and Anna Maria Cornetto . Scicolone. photography by Carl Tremblay and Daniel Van Ackere . Italian holiday cooking : a collection of 150 treasured recipes / Michele Scicolone. Jo.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Morr.5945 ITA 641. Italian baker / by Carol Field. with wine notes by Angelo Bettoja. Irmiter. photographs by Derrick Santini.625 TOL 66 of 123 . Bettoja. Madhur. Jaffrey. De' Medici Stucchi. Italian cusine : the new essential references to the riches of the Italian table / Tony May.5945 LOO 641. Italy in small bites / Carol Field. Susan Herrmann.4 ITS 641.220945 VIN 2006 641.71 FIE 641. Lynne. Ismail. Ismail Merchant's Florence : filming and feasting in Tuscany / Ismail Merchant . It's a long way to guacamole : the Tex-Mex cookbook / by Rue Judd and Ann Worley . 1937Loomis. Itadakimasu / prepared by the Women's Group of the Tokyo American Club. Italy the beautiful cookbook : authentic recipes from the regions of Italy / recipes compiled by Lorenza de'Medici .5 I881 641. Italian classics : the best recipe / by the editors of Cook's illustrated . text by Patrizia Passigli.5945 MAY 641. written & directed by Vince Clews & Associates. drawings by Marti Patchell. Inc. illustrations by John Burgoyne. May. 1926Judd. Invitation to Indian cooking. Mary L. 1950Field. Carol. Morr and Theodore F. It's your wedding reception [videorecording] / produced.

Jacques Pe´pin's simple and healthy cooking / written and illustrated by Jacques Pe´pin. McNair. by Earl Thollander.692 MCN 641. McNair.52 MCN 641. James McNair's Rice cookbook / photography by Patricia Brabant. McNair.5945 MCN 641. James McNair's beans & grains / recipes by James McNair and Andrew Moore .822 MCN 641. Bruce Franchini. James K. James McNair's corn cookbook / photography by Patricia Brabant. photographs and styling by James McNair. McNair. James K. With illus. James K. James McNair cooks Italian / photography and styling by James McNair. McNair.8653 MCN 641. James McNair's beef cookbook / photography by Patricia Brabant. director. photography and styling by James McNair. McNair. James McNair's cold cuisine / photograph by Patricia Brabant. 641. McNair. James K.5973 BEA 2008 Jacques Pe´pin's cooking techniques [videorecording] / produced by KQED . James K.662 MCN 641.6318 MCN 67 of 123 . James K.5638 PEP 641. James K.673 MCN 641. James McNair's pie cookbook / photography by Patricia Brabant. James McNair's pasta cookbook / photography by Patricia Brabant. McNair. James McNair's cheese cookbook / photography by Patricia Brabant. James McNair's cakes / recipes by James McNair and Andrew Moore .6567 MCN 641. McNair.5 JAC Pe´pin. mousses & puddings / photography by James McNair. McNair. Beard. McNair. James McNair's breakfast / photography by Patricia Brabant.631 MCN 641.864 MCN 641. James K. McNair. James K. James McNair's fish cookbook / photography and styling by James McNair. James. Jacques. McNair. James K. James Beard's American cookery. James K. 19031985. 641. James K. James McNair's custards.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. James K.79 MCN 641.8652 MCN 641.

5952 K82j 2008 James McNair's salads / photography by Jim Hildreth and James McNair. illustrations by Ray Skibinski. Frankel.5676 FRA 641.563 B439j 641. by Prof. photographs by Ben Fink. James K. JoAnne Pepper. Grigson. Jones. and well-being / John Belleme & Jan Belleme. Grigson. . Jane. James K. writer. Jeanne Jones' homestyle cooking made healthy : 200 classicAmerican favorites : low in fat with all the original flavor! / Jeanne Jones. Jewish cooking in America [videorecording] / a national production of Maryland Public Television. McNair. 641.83 MCN 641. 641. Jewish cooking for all seasons : fresh. Jackie Frazin. Buddy Saper.5979 WIL 641. Laura.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana McNair. Hiroko. Frappe` . Brody.5638 JON 641. Jim.5952 S556j 641. glossary to the American edition by Judith Hill .692 MCN 641. Brody . Jane Grigson's British cookery. flavorful kosher recipes for holidays and every day / Laura Frankel . James McNair's salmon cookbook / photography by Patricia Brabant. Jewish mothers video cookbook [videorecording] : Volume 1 / EMA Productions . and Joan Nathan .824 MCN 641. Jeanne. Kaneko.5 BRO 641. Tezuka. James K. John. Konishi.865 FOB 68 of 123 . Janos. 641.64 GRI 641. Frank Pecora. Kaneko Tezuka.5676 JEW Fobel. producers. McNair. Jane Brody's good food gourmet : recipes and menus for delicious and healthful entertaining / by Jane E. Kiyoko. Jim Fobel's old-fashioned baking book : recipes from an American childhood. Jane E. produced and directed by Charles Pinskey. Inc. Japanese foods that heal : using traditional ingredients to promote health. Wilder. photographs by Geoffrey Clifford. Jane.5941 GRI 641. Jr. introduction to the Bison Books edition by Sara Dickerman. Jane Grigson's fruit book / illustrated by Yvonne Skargon .5952 T356j 641. Belleme. longevity.5676 JEW 641. Japanese kitchen : 250 recipes in a traditional spirit / Hiroko Shimbo . Japanese cooking for health and fitness / Kiyoko Konishi. Japanese food. Janos : recipes & tales from a Southwest restaurant / Janos Wilder . director/cameraman. Shimbo. Bob Simons . illustrations by Rodica Prato. James McNair's vegetarian pizza / photography and styling by James McNair.

Dana. Jan. Julia Child! [videorecording] : America's favorite chef / [produced by WGBH/Boston in association with Thirteen/WNET New York American Masters] . Junior cook. Joy of soy : 75 delicious ways to enjoy nature's miracle food / Dana Jacobi. Joy of cooking Christmas cookies / by Irma S. Rombauer. Bignami.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Brown. Marion Rombauer Becker and Ethan Becker. 69 of 123 . by Tom Funk. Carrie. Clancy. Joy of grilling / Joe Famularo. illustrated by Laura Hartman Maestro. Linda.5944 JUL Child. Williams. Rombauer. Joy of cooking / by Irma S. 641.42 ZIE 641.5973 BRO 641. Just pheasant / by Louis & Annette Bignami.65655 J16j 641. 1877-1962. John H. Julie Dannenbaum's Creative Cooking School. Geise. 641.64 CAS 641.5973 ROM 1997 641. Caroline D. 1960641. Tobe's health giving life saving "no-cook" book. Rombauer. John. Joy of pickling : 200 flavor-packed recipes for all kinds of produce from garden or market / Linda Ziedrich.568 CLA 641. with David Nussbaum. 1945Castorina.5 W722j 641.691 B593j John Clancy's Christmas cookbook.5784 FAM 641. Judie.22 JOH Tobe. Famularo. Julie. 1955- 2008 Jimtown Store cookbook : recipes and more from Sonoma County's favorite country store / Carrie Brown and John Werner. John Cleese's wine for the confused [videorecording] / produced and directed by David Kennard . Ziedrich.5 D188j 641. Rombauer. Illus. Marion Rombauer Becker. Irma von Starkloff. Judie Geise's new Northwest kitchen.5 GEI 641. Juices : nature's cure-all for health and vitality / Jan Castorina & Dimitra Stars.8 ROM 641. Irma von Starkloff. John H. Julia.5 T628h 641. and Ethan Becker . 1877-1962. Louis V.5 C536j 641. Joseph J. Dannenbaum. produced and written by Marilyn Mellowes. written by John Cleese & David Kennard. Julia's kitchen wisdom : essential techniques and recipes from a lifetime of cooking / by Julia Child. with Michael McLaughlin. Jacobi.

Keo's Thai cuisine / Keo Sananikone. Kathy. a delicious account of the author's years as a grand ho^tel cook. Casey. Kitchen confidential : adventures in the culinary underbelly / Anthony Bourdain. wine notes by Brian Cronin.56 F854Z 70 of 123 . photography by Tim Turner . Keep it simple : easy techniques for great home cooking / from the editors of Bon Appe´tit. Nicolas. foreword by Alex Brennan-Martin. QTV Productions. Bourdain. Anthony. Deuel. Southern Alaska / by Kathy Casey .59593 KEO 1999 641. Keeping nice people nice [videorecording] / with Michael Hurst.6384 M855k 641. Evans.4 Ax 641. Washington. and preparation / William K.657 GIL 642. Kitchen management for institutions : economies in purchasing. Kitchen math [videorecording] : measuring / script writer. 1954Keo Sananikone.5 De 641.5 T583k 641.5 TRO 641. Kitchen confidential : adventures in the culinary underbelly / Anthony Bourdain. Kathy Casey's Northwest table : Oregon. by Bruce H. Axler. Kitchen. Randy. Rogers. portioning. 641. Ann Olson .5 BOU 641. scenic photographs by Mike Hipple and Joel W. food photographs by E. Takashi. by the editors of Time-Life Books.5 EVA 642. Gilbertie. culinary text and recipes by Frances Towner Giedt. Haedrich. Kitchen guide. Ken.5 KIT 641. Ken Haedrich's Country baking : simple home baking with wholesome grains and the pick of the harvest. Morieda. Bruce H. photographs by Joseph Kugielsky . Time-Life Books. Bourdain.6 KEE 641. with photographs by Jay Stevens . Trotter. Sal. Anthony. Kitchen sanitation and food hygiene. British Columbia. Axler.59795 CAS 641. Kitchen herbs : the art and enjoyment of growing herbs and cooking with them / Sal Gilbertie . Kitchen table at Brennan's of Houston / by Randy Evans . 1975Freeling. William K.5092 BOU 2007 641. Deuel. Jane Armstrong . Kitchen sessions with Charlie Trotter / recipes by Charlie Trotter .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 2008 Kare¯raisu to Nihonjin / Morieda Takashi. Charlie. video production.71 HAE 641.5 KEE 642. Woodcuts by Gail Garraty.

Prosper.59519 K843 641. Legendary cuisine of Persia / Margaret Shaida.. .H.5028 KNI 641. director. sharpening. producer.59515 WAN 71 of 123 . writer/producer. Margaret. Meyer. Khamtane. Lee.663 L218 Gilbert . 1910-1994.503 LAR 641. Jenifer Harvey Lang. Lee Bailey's southern food & plantation houses : favorite Natchez recipes / by Lee Bailey and the Pilgrimage Garden Club . Lessons in excellence from Charlie Trotter / by Paul Clarke. [text translated from the French by Nina Froud and 1864-1948. Last course : the desserts of Gramercy Tavern / Claudia Fleming with Melissa Clark . photographs by Tom Eckerle. photography by Dana Gallagher. Lemongrass and sweet basil : traditional Thai cuisine / by Khamtane Signavong .595 SIG Clarke. photographs by Langdon Clay . J.J. Claudia. produced by Kennedy Nelson Shultz. 1967-641.503 LAR 1988 641. Kurt Kennedy. Latin American cooking.5028 KNIF 641. Lamb / by the editors of Time-Life Books. Leonard.5092 CLA Wangmo. by Jonathan Norton Leonard and the editors of Time-Life Books. Bode. W. Lee. wine & cookery / Introductions by A. sanitation and safety / Culinary Institute of America . the Commander's Palace. Inc. Jonathan Norton. Lee Bailey's New Orleans : good food and glorious houses / by Lee Bailey with Ella Brennan . Tsering. Paul. Korean food guide in English / Han?guk Kukche Kyoryu Chaedan pyo?n = edited by the Korea Foundation. Signavong. Montagne´. Fleming. and the Palace Cafe´ . foreword by Tom Colicchio . B's. producers. 1903-1975. illustrations by Palden Choedak Oshoe . Lhasa Moon Tibetan cookbook / by Tsering Wangmo and Zara Houshmand .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 2008 Knife care [videorecording] : selection. Larousse gastronomique : the new American edition of the world's greatest culinary encyclopedia / edited by Montagne´. photography by Ken Martin and Alison Plummer. M.6 FLE 641. 641.5955 SHA 641. recipes from 1864-1948. Leto. edited by Charlotte Turgeon and Nina Froud . David Powell . Jack). Bailey. Knife skills [videorecording] : vegetable cuts / produced by the Food & Beverage Institute . Mr. Escoffier and Ph. (Mario Larder chef : food preparation and presentation / M. recipe testing and Bailey.5 LET 2006 641. preface by Danny Meyer .. Larousse gastronomique : the encyclopedia of food. Meyer. Joanne A. Leto. 641. Knife techniques [videorecording] : the cutting edge .].598 L581L 641.65 KNI 641. [et al. 641. Shaida.K.5975 BAI 641. Prosper. Philip Miller and Joanne A. Photographed by Milton Greene.59763 BAI 641.

Lu¨chow's German festival cookbook / Gene and Fran Schoor . Rose Lee. recipes. Local flavors : cooking and eating from America's farmers' markets / Deborah Madison . Squier.5 Lo 641. 641 ESQ 641. Louis. Jr. . Jon N. Lost arts : a celebration of culinary traditions / Lynn Alley.563 LOW Stacey. Laura. 641.5636 STA 641. illustrated by Ed Nuckolls. Gene. Squier. Living in the raw : recipes for a healthy lifestyle / Rose Lee Calabro. Like water for chocolate : a novel in monthly installments. romances.5636 MCC 641. Lundberg in consultation with Eric Saucy. Low-fat vegetarian cooking : innovative vegetarian recipes for the adventurous cook / Jenny Stacey. and consumer tips / by Betty Wedman-St. Taylor. Living off the land / Thomas K.5638 SCH 641. Louis. Squier . 641. Jenny. Ojakangas. Wedman-St.5638 W393L 641.6 S773L 641. the most delicious way to eat healthy food / Sarah Schlesinger & Barbara Earnest. translated by Carol Christensen and Thomas Christensen.5 G566L 2008 Librarian's cook book. Madison. and home remedies / Laura Esquivel . Alley. Thomas K. Living gluten-free : meal plans. Liselotte F.86 OJA Esquivel.874 LIQ Leonard. Low-cholesterol olive oil cookbook : more than 200 recipes. Deborah.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Glozer. Lynn.5973 MAD 641. Logic of cooking--programmed : the principles of cooking explained in simple language and by a programmed presentation / Donald E. Donald E. Calabro.563 L581L 641. Betty.5943 S372L 72 of 123 . Leonard and Elaine A. Beatrice A. edited by Frances Squier & Isaac Laudenslager.5636 CAL 641. Lowfat & fast! [videorecording] : real food for busy people / producer. Schlesinger. Lundberg. illustrations by Patrick McFarlin. Linda. 641. Sarah. photographs by Laurie Smith . Allan Lemley. illustrated by Thomas K. Linda McCartney on tour : over 200 meat-free dishes from around the world / Linda McCartney. with recipes. Liquid assets [videorecording] : the beverage trade's role in restaurant profitability. Light desserts / Beatrice Ojakangas. Live longer now cookbook : for joyful health & long life / by Jon N. Schoor. 1950McCartney.6382 ALL 2000 641. 641.

1933Jaffrey. Heatter.. Madhur Jaffrey's world vegetarian. Magic spices : 200 healthy recipes featuring 30 common spices / Donna L.86 HEA 1974 641. Heatter. Heatter. Heatter. Maida Heatter's book of great American desserts / drawings by Toni Evins. Drawings by Toni Evins. Magic beans : 150 delicious recipes featuring nature's low-fat. 641. Maida Heatter's New book of great desserts / drawings by Toni Evins. Heatter. Maida. Maida..6383 WEI 641. Maida Heatter's best dessert book ever / drawings by Toni Evins. Eulalia C. location photographs by Karen Marshall.5 MAC Kulla. Maida Hatter's brand-new book of great cookies / illustrations by the author.53 Bl 641. Lucinda Scala. by Joseph Wechsberg .563 K971m 1993 641. Weihofen. Ma Cuisine Cooking School cookbook / Linda Lloyd .86 HEA 641. Macrobiotic way : the complete macrobiotic diet & exercise book / Michio Kushi with Stephen Blauer . Patti Bazel.. introd. Maida Heatter's book of great desserts. Maida. Maida Heatter's Book of great chocolate desserts / drawings by Toni Evins. Weihofen. Kushi.5972 QUI 641. Ma gastronomie / Fernand Point .8654 HEA 641. Luncheon and supper dishes. 2008 Lucinda's authentic Jamaican kitchen / Lucinda Scala Quinn .86 HEA 641. Blair. Maida.5954 JAF 641.5636 JAF 641. special drawings by Andre Dunoyer de Segonzac. nutrient-rich. Maida. photographs by Quentin Bacon . translated and adapted by Frank Kulla and Patricia Shannon Kulla . Heatter. disease-fighting powerhouse / Patti Bazel Geil. Madhur. Maida. Maida. 641. Michio.86 HEA 73 of 123 . Frank. Jaffrey. Geil.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Quinn.86 HEA 641. foreword by John Denver. Madhur. Madhur Jaffrey's flavors of India. Heatter. Maida Heatter's Book of great cookies / drawings by Toni Evins.].6565 GEI 641.5944 KUL 641. [et a. editor. Jule Wilkinson. Donna L.6374 HEA 641.

Making great sausage at home : 30 savory links from around the world plus dozens of delicious sausage dishes / Chris Kobler. and more! / Tekulsky.5945 HAZ 641. mochas. Fearing. Chris.877 TEK 2008 Making great candy : a sweet selection of fun and easy recipes / Laura Dover Doran. and students of the Mansfield Library. green teas. Marinades.641. Giovanna.877 TEK 641. and glazes / by Jim Tarantino.7 TAR 2006 641. illustrations by Clair Moritz-Magnesio. Mathew.5973 FEA 641.5945 LAF 641. Jim. Mama D's old-fashioned Italian cooking / Giovanna D'Agostino. Mark Charles. Batali. staff. rubs. Steingarten.59786 MAN 641. Marcella cucina / Marcella Hazan . Mario Batali simple Italian food : recipes from my two villages / photographs by Mark Ferri.66 KOB 641. Making your own gourmet coffee drinks . iced teas. Chiang. 1954Making your own gourmet tea drinks : black teas. Dean. cures. cappuccinos. Jeffrey. scented teas. espressos.853 DOR 641. Mark Kiffin. Manna: foods of the frontier. and more! / Mathew Tekulsky. Hazan. Hazan. Mark Miller's Indian market cookbook / Mark Miller. and Suzy Dayton with John Harrisson. Cecilia Sun Yun. Drawings by Heidi Palmer. by Mathew Tekulsky . Man who ate everything / Jeffrey Steingarten. Marcella's Italian kitchen/ by Marcella Hazan. 19491954D'Agostino. lattes. as told to Allan Carr. 1970Kobler. 1914. 1946Tekulsky.5951 C532m Harris. Mansion on Turtle Creek cookbook / by Dean Fearing . with Pam Manela.013 S8226m 2006 641. LaFemina.5945 HAZ 641. Marcella. Man & his meatballs : the hilarious but true story of a self-taught chef and restaurateur. Mathew. 641. Laura Dover. Mario. Marcella. brines. Mandarin way / by Cecilia Sun Yun Chiang . Gertrude.5979 MIL 74 of 123 . with 75 recipes / John LaFemina. design by Joel Avirom.5945 DAG 641. Miller. Mansfield Library cooks : a sharing of recipes from the faculty.5945 BAT 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Doran. photography by Alison Harris. Tarantino. John.5973 H314m 641. edited by Dotty Griffith. herb teas. 641.

Joyce. (Albert Jules). McClane's fish buyer's guide / A. Meals that heal : over 175 simple everyday recipes that help prevent and treat disease / Anne Egan and Regina Ragone. Fussell.5882 MAS 641. Mayo Clinic Williams-Sonoma cookbook : simple solutions for eating well / recipe writer. Julia McWilliams Child / Betty Fussell : with a preface by the author. David Powell. Inc. 1892McLean. producer. Dixon. 1892Meal timing [videorecording] : juggling ten balls at once / produced by Kennedy Nelson Shultz. 641. design by Drenttel Doyle Partners. John Phillip. Meal management manual. Fisher. 642. photographs by David Wakely . Martin. McLean.5973 FUS 641. .5 CAR 641. 1948Emmerling. Faye. J. Chris Shorten. Masters of American cookery : M.59449 LON 641. food photography by Maren Caruso .J. director.02 H591m Kinder.F. Mary Emmerling's American country cooking : recipes and menus from family and friends across America / photographs by Michael Skott .5631 EGA Meal planning and table service for the American home without servants. Thomas. Rubash.5941 MAR 641. Meal planning and service. Kinder. A. Frances Marie. Meal management. Martin Yan's Asian favorites : from Hong Kong. 2008 Markets of Provence : a culinary tour of southern France / text by Dixon Long . location photography by Stephanie Jan. Mastering microwave cookery [videorecording] / Videocraft Classics . McClane. produced and directed by Lee Kraft. Master dictionary of food and wine / Joyce Rubash. 641. Taiwan. Carroll. photographer. Meal management.5 MEA Egan.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Long. recipes by Ruthanne Long . Raymond Craig Claiborne. Martha Washington's Booke of cookery / transcribed by Karen Hess with historical notes and copious annotations. Anne. by Frances M.5973 EMM 641. Faye. Beth Bailey. Beth Bailey. Mary Ellisor. James Andrew Beard.K. Hettler and Isabelle R.3003 RUB 641. John Phillip Carroll . Kurt Kennedy . Betty Harper. McClane. 1922Yan.595 YAN 641.692 MCC Hettler. and Thailand / Martin Yan . foreword by Patricia Wells. 75 of 123 . 642 K51m 642 K51m 1968 642 M163m 1964 642 M163m 1955 641.

David. Marissa. Mediterranean cooking / Paula Wolfert. Albert. 641. F.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 2008 Mealtime manual for people with disabilities and the aging / compiled by Judith Lannefeld Klinger. Meat evaluation handbook. lamb.5 K65m 1978 Fisher. Meat Purveyors. Mediterranean diet : newly revised and updated / Marissa Cloutier and Eve Adamson. Meat cook book. and other meats / by David Barich and Thomas Ingalls . Meat on the grill : new recipes for beef. pork.31 Me 641. with the Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine. Measure of her powers : an M.31 Me 641. Meat buyers guide / by National Association of Meat Purveyors. 641.36 LEV 1970 641.36 M4848 CD 641. lamb.092 FIS 641. Ltd. Meat cut ID [electronic resource] / CEV Multimedia. Meat buyer's guide : beef.502 MEA 641.6 B565m 641.59 WOL 641. veal. Meat in the foodservice industry. photography by Dennis Bettencourt . Barich. Meat handbook.F. Measure up in the kitchen [videorecording] / Learning Seed.36 MEA 641. (Mary Frances Kennedy). Cloutier. Levie.K. New York University Medical Center and Campbell Soup Company . National Association of Meat buyers guide / by the National Association of Meat Purveyors.5784 BAR 641. Paula.6 M484 641.36 MEA 2007 641.563 JEN 2004 641.36 NAT 641. K. Meat evaluation handbook. M. Wolfert. food styling by Robert Burns.31 MEA 76 of 123 . pork. and poultry / North American Meat Processors Association. Meat evaluation handbook. with an introduction by Ruth Reichl. Fisher reader / edited by Dominique Gioia .

641. Melting pot : ethnic cuisine in Texas. 641. 77 of 123 .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Jenkins. Mediterranean kitchen / Joyce Goldstein .S.5 S559m 1957 642 SEA 1991 642.5 M5338 1985 Showalter. combining the best features of Mediterranean and Asian diets and lifestyles / Ric Watson and Trudy Thelander. 641. Food and Nutrition Service.657 BRE 641. Georgeanne. and longevity. Mediterranean vegetarian cooking : innovative vegetarian recipes for the adventurous cook / edited by Janet Swarbrick. Mennonite community cookbook : favorite family recipes / by Mary Emma Showalter .595 WAT 642 Ka 641. Mari´a Jose´. United States. 641. Seaberg. Department of Agriculture. Mediterranean herb cookbook : fresh and savory recipes from the Mediterranean garden / Georgeanne Brennan .563 JEN 2008 Mediterranean diet cookbook : a delicious alternative for lifelong health / Nancy Harmon Jenkins. 1943Goldstein. Kremezi. Meeting challenges in food service : a guide for solving present and future problems / William L. Kahrl. Mary Emma. photographs by Grey Crawford. 641. 641.5635 SHU 641.5636 MED Watson.5975 MEL 1983 Dahl. Memories with food at Gipsy House / Felicity & Roald Dahl . Ric. drawings by Rachel Goldstein . U. Felicity. Martha Rose. William L. Mediterranean flavors : recipes from the countries of the sun / Mari´a Jose´ Sevilla . Mediterranean grains and greens : a book of savory.591822 WOL Brennan. photographs by Sevilla. Joyce Esersky. MediterrAsian way : a cookbook and guide to health. 1913Seaberg. Nancy 641. Menu planning guide for school food service / prepared by Nutrition and Technical Services Division. sun-drenched recipes / Paula Wolfert. weight loss. Kahrl.6382 KRE 641. Mediterranean pantry : creating and using condiments and seasonings / Aglaia Kremezi . Memphis cookbook. wine recommendations by Evan Goldstein. Harmon. 641. drawings by Naomi Nissley. Aglaia.594 DAH 641. photographs by Jan Baldwin. Paula. Menu design : merchandising and marketing / Albin G.5 Me Martin Brigdale. Mediterranean light : delicious recipes from the world's healthiest cuisine / Martha Rose Shulman.5636 GOL Shulman.591822 SEV Wolfert. Food and Nutrition Service. illustrated by Christopher Wormell. Albin G.

Hubert E. Dorothy H. Given. Van Kleek. Adelma Grenier.. Meta Given's Modern encyclopedia of cooking .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Visick. Meta. Microwave cookbook / by Dorothy H. [photographers.852 FER 641.5972 QUI 641. 1930642. Michael Jensen.. Drawings by Kathleen Bourke. Paula J. Jack E. Colleen. A modern cook book. complete in every detail. how to eat and drink in style without fear of faux pas / Colleen Rush. Microwave baking & desserts / by Barbara Methven and Sylvia Ogren . Microwave guide & cookbook. 1888Quintana. photographed by Ignacio Urquiza. Methven. Meta. brings the latest developments in home economics into your kitchen for a simpler.5 Mi Mes confitures : the jams and jellies of Christine Ferber / Christine Ferber . Ferber. [photography.. Hubert E. Mere mortal's guide to fine dining : from salad forks to sommeliers.503 G539m 641. Sadlack. Sadlack . with Carol Haralson . most succulent wild meat and fish meals you've ever eaten / Paula J. Pybus. James Marvy]. Christine. Microwave game & fish cookbook : quick. juiciest. Meat Board. Del Giudice. Janet L. Menu pricing and strategy / Jack Miller. Rush. Phillips. Merry Christmas herbal. Visick. translated by Virginia R. 641. brings the latest developments in home economics into your kitchen for a simpler.5 GIV 641. Visick & Peter E. Steven Smith].588 P995m 1977 641.5 V831m 642. 641. Visick & Peter E. better and richer life. convenient recipes for concocting the tastiest.36 MER 641.588 S126m 78 of 123 . Mexico's feasts of life / Patricia Quintana .5 Vi 642. Barbara. Simmons.69 D3527m 641. Van Kleek.86 M592m 641. MenuPro deluxe [computer file] / SoftCafe..5 RUS 2008 Menu planning: a blueprint for better profits [by] Hubert E. Pybus. Merchandising beef loins / National Live Stock and Meat Board. recipes & time guides / by Janet L. Del Giudice. Miller. better and richer life. Microwave meals made easy : menus.568 S592m 641.5 Mi 642 MEN National Live Stock and 641. complete in every detail. A modern cook book. Patricia. Menu planning: a blueprint for better profits [by] Hubert E. Meta Given's Modern encyclopedia of cooking . 1888Given..

Moore.595692 MID 641.5956 N632m Suppl.5 M678 79 of 123 .5882 M592mi 641. Lebanon [videorecording] / a production of WTTW/Chicago . Michael Jensen. Buck Holzemer. Jack Mithun]. Barbara. 1787Miss Leslie's secrets : what every bride should know : the classic household guide / by Eliza Leslie. [photographers. Miniature book of chocolate / compiled by Jane Donovan . Buck Holzemer. Ruth Adams. Leslie. 2008 Microwaving convenience foods / by Barbara Methven . Harry G. Barbara.5882 M592m 641. Barbara. 641.5 BIT 641. Michael Jensen. Microwaving on a diet / by Barbara Methven. 641. Microwaving fruits & vegetables / by Barbara Methven and Sara Jean Thoms . 1951. Middle Eastern & African cuisines. Michael Jensen. Barbara.66 M592m 641.. [photographers. Ken Greer]. Methven. [et. Minnie Worthen. Methven. Microwaving meats / by Barbara Methven .5973 MIN Kaplan.5973 BRO 641. 641. Hoover.641. Bronz. Microwaving meals in 30 minutes / by Barbara Methven .563 M592m 641. Marjorie A.. Michael Jensen.al. Eliza. Photographed by David Lees and Richard Jeffery. Nickles and the editors of Time-Life Books. Mark.657 M948h 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Methven. Miss Ruby's American cooking : from border to border & coast to coast : the best recipes from America's regional kitchens / Ruth Adams Bronz . producer/ director. Mixology [videorecording] : making great cocktails.64 M592m 641. recipes by Carole Handslip . Barbara.874 MIX Bittman. by Harry G. 641. Misawa Officers' Wives Club. Willard B. [photographers. with ill. Misawa gourmet / compiled by Education Services Office.5973 KAP Muenscher..5 LES 641. Anne R. Tim Ward. University of Maryland staff. by Elfriede Abbe. [photographers.6 MIN 641. Ken Greer]. Methven. Middle Eastern cooking. illustrations by Beth Krommes. Minnie Muenscher's Herb cookbook / by Minnie Worthen Muenscher . Steven Smith.] Minimalist cooks at home : recipes that give you more flavor from fewer ingredients in less time / Mark Bittman. Methven. Minnesota ethnic food book / Anne R. 1858. Nickles. Minnesota [4-H] recipes : favorite recipes of 4-H families and friends. Kaplan. Ken Greer].

Momo. Hamm. photographs by Noel Barnhurst. Vena V. by McKinley Wilton & Norman Wilton. Anderson. Fourth Marquis of Bute. Greg. Garlough.5944 JOY 641. McKinley. Marquess of. photographs by Richard Clark .5979 SED 641. 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana MacGregor. John.641. 2008 Modelling / Elaine MacGregor.8653 MAC 641. Modern cake decorating. Robert. 1898. Helena. Kahrl. Moosewood Restaurant cooks for a crowd : recipes with a vegetarian emphasis for 24 or more / the Moosewood Collective.5964 BUT 641. 641. photos by Carol Rublein. Money-in-the-bank cook book. illustrated by Janet L. Momo cookbook : a gastronomic journey through North Africa / Mourad Mazouz. pulled sugar and candy making.59786 MON 641. Anderson . foreword by Jo¨el Robuchon . Richard. Bute. Patent.5 Ka Modern garde manger : a global perspective / Robert Garlough. Monet's table : the cooking journals of Claude Monet / text by Claire Joyes . Wong. Claire. Elaine. Seabring.5636 MOO 641.5 GRA 641. photographs styled by Cheryl Brantner.5 PAT 80 of 123 . Sedlar. Modern food service planning / William L. Mom's makin's / by Vena V.5973 DAV 641.5951 WON Wilton. Montana table : recipes from Chico Hot Springs Resort / by Seabring Davis . John. Moorish recipes / John. More Big Sky cooking / by Greg Patent. Anderson. William L. Joyes.6 W756m Kahrl. photographs by Jean-Bernard Naudin . 1954Mazouz.5 H224m 641. Montana cookbook. 1917Graetz. 642. Montana celebrity cookbook / compiled by Susie Beaulaurier Graetz for the benefit of Intermountain Children's Home. Montana.79 GAR Modern Southwest cuisine / John Sedlar with Norman Kolpas .5961 MAZ 641.5 A551m 641.641. Davis. [translation by Josephine Bacon]. Angus Campbell. Susie Beaulaurier. Marie Roberson. Modern Asian flavors : a taste of Shanghai / Richard Wong . 1954.

Lois Sinaiko.658 BRO 641. 641. Albright. Barrett. a guide for Roons lore / by John Ratzloff . Mussel cookbook / Sarah Hurlburt . Morning glories : breakfast.5945 L314M 641. 19021983. Smith. Kennedy.5972 KEN 641. More diabetic meals in 30 minutes--or less! / Robyn Webb.694 H965m 641. Slezak. Jose´. My stomach goes traveling / Walter Slezak . 2008 More classic Italian cooking / by Marcella Hazan . delicious. Ratzloff. Mushroom cookbook : recipes for white & exotic varieties / Mimi Brodeur.5945 HAZ 641. Yukiko.59752 KIT Webb. Mimi. More recipes for fifty. recipes by Jerry Petermeier. Webb. Margaret S.56314 W367m 1999 641. drawings by Franziska Bilek. by Marisabina Russo. More Japanese garnishes / Yukiko and Bob Haydock. My Italian garden / Viana La Place .. Sarah.59 WEB 641.657 BAR Kitching. Frances. recipes . Marcella. with photographs by the author. Barbara.658 R238r 641. Multicultural cookbook of life-cycle celebrations / by Lois Sinaiko Webb. Sa´nchez H. and light fare from an herb garden / Sharon Kebschull Barrett. Robyn. Mrs. Kitching's Smith Island cookbook / Frances Kitching and Susan Stiles Dowell.8 H415m 641. drawings by Edith Allard. Viana. Walter. 1925La Place. ill. Haydock. Fox and John Bear. Hurlburt.52 FOX 641. 1947Fox.59 S632m 81 of 123 .5984 SAN 641. More muffins : 72 recipes for moist. 1918. Morning food from Cafe Beaujolais / Margaret S. fresh-baked muffins / Barbara Albright and Leslie Weiner. My Mexico : a culinary odyssey with more than 500 recipes / by Diana Kennedy . Brodeur. Sharon Kebschull. John.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Hazan. by Frances Lowe Smith.815 ALB 641.5 SMI 641.641. Frances Lowe. My mother's Bolivian kitchen : recipes and recollections / Jose´ Sa´nchez-H. Morel mushroom : information. 641. illustrations by Cindy Salans Rosenheim. brunch. Diana.

Frank.5974 SIM 641. . foreword by 641. 1943Freitus. Allegra.691 N153 Ross.2 ALL 642. Sarah Leah. Nantucket recipes from the Fog Island Cafe / Mark Dawson and Anne Blake Dawson. Anna Koska. Mark. John Sedlar. Inc.5 DAW 641. Napkin folding in New Orleans [videorecording] / produced by Christopher H.7 J764n 642. completely illustrated by Salli Haberman. Lois Ellen. Native American cooking : foods of the Southwest Indian nations / Lois Ellen Frank with Cynthia J. 1914.5636 BLA 641. photographs by Tom Eckerle. 82 of 123 . Larry.7 NAP 641. Napa Valley : the ultimate winery guide / by Antonia Allegra .568 CHA 641.59764 ROS Hawkins.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. 1945Chase. photographs by Jeffrey Allen. written by Susan Coe Heitsch. Schmidt.5974 HAW Simon. Dawson.59 FRA 641. director. the perfect accent videorecording / produced by Phelps Gianni Collection in cooperation with Departures. Frank .5974 CLA 641. recipes translated and tested by Tina Ujlaki and Charles Pierce. Bridget. Georges. Nalty . by Randy Hill . Antonia. photographs by Richard Gillette .641.568 SIM 641. Nantucket and other New England cooking / Nancy & Arthur Hawkins & Mary Allen Havemeyer . photography by Cary Hazlegrove. Haran]. illustrations. 1945641. Enter-Trainment of Louisiana. Simon. Natural world cookbook : complete gourmet meals from wild edibles / Joe Freitus . illustrations by Judith Shahn. designed by Dean Peters. Nanny's Texas table : Texas country cooking at the Houghton ranch / Larry Ross.6 F866n 641. Melissa. edited and designed by Pamela B. Clark. Natural cuisine of Georges Blanc / photography by Christopher Baker . culinary advisor. Nalty. Nancy. Blanc. Joe. 642. Napkin folds : beautifully styled napkins for every occasion / [Bridget Jones and Madeleine Brehaut] . with drawings by George Buctel & Arthur Hawkins. [cover photo. Susan. Nantucket open-house cookbook / by Sarah Leah Chase . Michelle. .7 NAPK Jones. Nantucket table / Susan Simon . New almond cookery / by Michelle Schmidt. Napkins. Rene Michel . Susan. Nantucket holiday table / Susan Simon . Nantucket restaurants cookbook : menus and recipes from the faraway isle / Melissa Clark and Samara Farber Mormar . Kevin H. 1949- 2008 NAHC wild game cookbook / edited by Bill Miller et al.6455 SCH Robert Mondavi.

New short course in wine / Lynn Hoffman. Rose. [food photography. Mollie. (Lynn F. Greg.K.5973 COL 1978 641.5973 PRO 641. Scott. Carolyn. Mollie.5636 NEW Hoffman. Dosti. and Louisiana French recipes past and present / by Rima Collin & Richard Collin.) 641. Cajun. 641. New southwestern cooking / by Carolyn Dille & Susan Belsinger .5 BEA 641. Katzen. New Orleans cookbook : Creole.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Pappas. Richard Jung].5978 PAT 641. and hand-lettering by Mollie Katzen . Egan. Ortiz. James.5636 KAT 641. Fisher. editor. New enchanted broccoli forest / recipes.57 NEW 1996 Procter & Gamble New recipes for good eating.F.5979 DIL 83 of 123 . New fish & seafood cookbook : exciting classic and contemporary recipes / consultant editor. 1950- 2008 New American chefs and their recipes / Lou Seibert Pappas .5972 ORT 1998 641.692 NEW Patent. Linda Fraser. Katzen. Maria Luisa. preface by M. 641. 641. New frontiers in Western cooking / by Greg Patent. New Moosewood cookbook / by Mollie Katzen. New California cuisine : great recipes from the Los Angeles times / compiled and edited by Rose Dosti. L. New professional chef / the Culinary Institute of America . drawings. New James Beard / drawings by Karl Stuecklen. Anne. Rima. with photographs of Italy by Samuel Chamberlain and drawings by Melvin Klapholz. Mary Deirdre Donovan. F. New complete book of pasta : an Italian cookbook / by Maria Luisa Scott and Jack Denton Scott .5973 DOS 641. 1950Collin.5636 KAT 2000 641.22 HOF Dille. 1939Beard. New classics cookbook : family favorites made healthy for today's lifestyle / by Anne Egan. New complete book of Mexican cooking / Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz.822 SCO 641. Elisabeth Lambert. 641. 19031985. with forewords by Paul Bocuse and Ferdinand Metz . illustrations by Kathleen Gray Farthing.50973 PAP 641. Company.5638 EGA 641. New recipes from Moosewood Restaurant / the Moosewood Collective. Lou Seibert.

Hegeman. Nobuyuki. Niman Ranch cookbook : from farm to table with America's finest meat / Bill Niman and Janet Fletcher . New York times menu cook book / by Craig Claiborne . foreword by Mark Bittman . Craig. Presilla. edited by Jules Bond. Molly. 641. Nihon ryo¯ri no subete / shi do¯. No need to knead : handmade Italian breads in 90 minutes / written & illustrated by Suzanne Dunaway. stratas. Yvonne Young. Nice 'n' easy family cookbook. Dunaway. New York cookbook / by Molly O'Neill . Linda.5 ONE 641. Howard F. Lyman. illustrations by Ellen K. No more bull! : the mad cowboy targets America's worst enemy.5636 LYM 641. photographs by Diane Farris. Taylor. Nicole. Lyman with Glen Merzer and Joanna Samarow-Merzer . Nick Malgieri's perfect pastry. Routhier. New vegetarian classics : entre´es / by Mary F. with a foreword by Caldwell-Esselstyn.813 T192n 641. Mary F. puffs.815 DUN 641. New-fangled.6374 PRE 641. food photography by Scott Peterson. Taylor .5952 S463n 641. Claiborne.865 MAL 641. New York Botanical Garden cookbook / [compiled] by Sharen Benenson . Niman. 1940Matsuhisa. Nick. photography by Howard Earl Simmons. Nicole Routhier's fruit cookbook : 400 sweet & savory fruit-filled recipes : soups to desserts / illustrations by Carolyn Vibbert.5 N588 v. New York times bread and soup cookbook. Seki. Suzanne.5973 CLA 641. 641. Ishihara Meitaro¯. and bread souffle´s / Linda Hegeman & Barbara Hayford .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Presilla.64 ROU 641. 641. our diet / Howard F. Walsh. henshu¯ ken hakko¯nin. Seki Misako . drawings by Bill Goldsmith. Linda.36 NIM 641.5 NEW O'Neill.692 MAT 84 of 123 . translation by Laura Holland.1 Malgieri. location photography by Laurie Smith.82 TAY 2008 New taste of chocolate : a cultural and natural history of cacao with recipes / by Maricel E. Rosensweig. 641. Maricel E. old-fashioned bread puddings : sixty recipes for delectable sweet and savory puddings. Tarr.5636 ROS 641. Bill. New vegetarian cuisine : 250 low-fat recipes for superior health / by Linda Rosensweig and the food editors of Prevention magazine. Nobu : the cookbook / Nobuyuki Matsuhisa . photographs by Fumihiko Watanabe . Misako.864 HEG 641.

Nutrition almanac / Nutrition Search. Donna Orr. David. Norte : the cuisine of northern Mexico / James W. Dinaburg.4 W75 641. Winterburn. Fowler. Northern Italian cookbook / by Teresa Gilardi Candler. Peyton. foreword by Marion Cunningham. 641.1 Nu 641.5972 P519n 641. Inc. Normal and abusive fat temperatures in home cooking. 85 of 123 . Nutrition Search. 641. Gazzaniga . John D. Hella Viola Anneli. Garrido.59795 ING 641. James W. Noteworthy. NOLS cookery / edited by Sukey Richard. Nutrition survival kit : a natural foods recipe and reference guide / Kathy Dinaburg and D'Ann Ausherman Akel. foreword by Dr. photographs. a collection of recipes from the Ravinia Festival / [editor: Joan Freehling] Nourish / Holly Davis . Michael B. Mallos. Nuevo Tex-Mex : festive new recipes from just north of the border / David Garrido and Robb Walsh . Peyton.578 N797 1991 Pranttila.. Claude.596 MAL Candler. Holly. Gazzaniga and Maureen A. 641. lowest-sodium international cookbook / Donald A.5944 GUE 641. Schuyler. Sue.5 NOT Davis. Kathy.592 GAR 641. Teresa Gilardi. Kirschmann. 1928Guermont. Nuevo cubano cooking / Sue Mullin. No-salt.578 N797 641. Gazzaniga. inc. foreword by Stephan Pyles . Donald A.77 P899n 2008 NOLS backcountry cooking : creative menu planning for short trips / edited by Claudia Pearson and Joanne Kuntz.563 D583n Northwest bounty / text by Schuyler Ingle and recipes by Sharon Kramis . North African cooking / Tess Mallos.59 DAV 642. by Florence Hull Winterburn and others. director. Ingle. Geoff Lung. Novel ways of entertaining. photographs by Manny Rodriguez. Tess.. Florence (Hull) Mrs.5975 MUL 641. and Claudia Lindholm. 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641.59451 C218n 641. Norman table : the traditional cooking of Normandy / Claude Guermont with Paul Frumkin.563 G291n 641. 1858Mullin.

Patrick Gavin. Nuts : sweet and savory recipes from Diamond of California / Tina Salter with Steve Siegleman . Olives dessert table : spectacular restaurant desserts you can make at home / Todd English. photography by Dan Cox. food photography by Holly Stewart . Small.86 ENG Chamberlain. 1956 641.853 WIL 641. 1915Salter. Olive oil : a gourmet guide / Olivier Baussan and Jacques Chibois . Nancy. Illus. Knickerbocker.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Gebhardt. drawings by Hilary Knight. Baggett.815 OLD Baussan. by Reisie Lonette. Bill.5 OFF 641. Gebhardt and Ruth H. Omnivore [videorecording] / produced by Productions Coscient .645 SAL 641. 1945Rosenblum. foreword by Maggie Blyth Klein.1 US 641.. Official mixer's manual. Old-fashioned home baking. Oat bran baking book : 85 delicious. low-cholesterol recipes / Nancy Baggett and Ruth Glick.3 OMN 86 of 123 .4 HAN Williams. Oh truffles by Au chocolat : perfect recipes for every choclate lover's fantasy / by Pam Williams and Rita Morin. Nutritive value of foods / prepared by Science and Education Administration.6463 KNI 641. photography by Carl Tremblay. Paige Retus.3463 BAU 641. 641. photographs by Jean-Charles Vaillant assisted by Vale´rie Lhomme. Chamberlain . location photography by Robert Holmes. Olivier. Todd. 641. Adams.1 NUT 641.6 BAG 2008 Nutritive value of foods / authors. [editor. Tina. Catherine F.69 S6351o Hansen.3 ROS English. Mort. Jane Middleton]. Dan. 641. Olive oil : from tree to table / by Peggy Knickerbocker . 641. Pam (Pamela Sue) 641. Off duty : the world's greatest chefs cook at home / photographs by James Merrell . written by Marie-No¨elle Delatte. low-fat. Olives : the life and lore of a noble fruit / Mort Rosenblum. Matthews. Peggy. 1943641. photographs by Laurie Smith . Susan E.6754 CHA 641. Omelette book / Narcissa G. the standard guide for professional & amateur bartenders throughout the world. director Guylaine Laframboise .874 D858o Duffy. Off-premise catering management / Bill Hansen. Official Outdoor Wisconsin cookbook / Dan Small and Nancy Frank . Narcissa G. and Sally Sampson . 642. Susan E.

Jonathan. Williams. Oz Clarke's new essential wine book : an indispensable guide to the wines of the world. drawings by Stacey Winters Quattrone. with Steven Labensky .6318 ROD Kinsley.84 B216s. assistant editor. Open Hand cookbook : great chefs cook for friends / compiled and edited by Robert C. Sarah R. Jennifer. 1950Kett. James R.5637 KET 641.694 WIL 641. Original Thai cookbook / Jennifer Brennan . Robson and Joseph D. Tracy.22 OXF 2006 641. M.22 CLA 2005 87 of 123 . Hause . Brennan.632 ROB 641. 641. photographs by Richard Embery . with Steven Labensky . White. Ingram. color photographs by Lisa Blevins . Introd. Oysters : a connoisseur's guide & cookbook / recipes by Lonnie Williams . and suggested recipes by Louis Szathma´ry. Hause.58 KIN 641. Out of the earth : a heritage farm coast cookbook / by Kerry Downey Romaniello . photographs by Richard Embery . Organic gourmet : feast of fields / written and compiled by Tracy Kett. Labensky. Labensky. (Herbert M.69 O944 641. Alan M. Clarke. photographs by Frankie Frankeny One hundred recipes for the chafing dish [by] H. 642. Schneider .Ew Chmelynski. White. Oz. Carol Ann Caprione. Rick. Roberts. [illustrations by the author].59593 BRE 641. 641.5 LAB 1999 Rodgers. On rice : 60 fast and easy toppings that make the meal / by Rick Rodgers . Asta. Romaniello. Outdoor tables and tales : recipes & food memories from America's top outdoor writers / [Robert Hitt Neill.M. illustrations by Deborah Zemke. editor]. Lonnie.5 LAB 2003 641. On cooking : techniques from expert chefs / Sarah R. Sarah R. Alan M. Kinsley.5973 ROM 641. drawings by Stacey Winters Quattrone and William E. text by Karen Warner .5 OPE Bang. Kerry Downey. H.5 C253o 641. Thomas. Oxford companion to wine / edited by Jancis Robinson . Labensky. Julia Harding.) 641. 2008 On cooking : techniques from expert chefs / Sarah R. Opportunities in food services / Carol Ann Caprione.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Labensky. 1953641. food styling by Stevie Bass.84 W585o 1957 641. Origins of fruit & vegetables / Jonathan Roberts. photography and design [by] John K. Oskar Davidsen book of open sandwiches : from traditional Danish recipes and the compositions of Axel Svensson / compiled by James R. Open sandwiches and cold lunches [by] Asta Bang in collaboration with Edith Rode.

Wood. Pacific and Southeast Asian cooking. Carol. Steinberg. 1953. produced by Jennifer Barry Design . Alston. Passion for chocolate / Maurice and Jean-Jacques Bernachon . 641. Italian style / Viana La Place. Maurice. Clarke.641. [videorecording] / Meridian Education Corporation. 1953. Pamela Sheldon. crostini : sandwiches.5 PAN 641.. De' Medici Stucchi. Photographed by Anthony Blake [and others] Pacific grilling : recipes for the fire from Baja California to the Pacific Northwest / Denis Kelly.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641.. 1939641.67358 JOH 641. Margaret. Oz. photographs by Mike Newton. Huang Su-Huei . bruschetta. 1926Gotfryd. wen kao hsieh chu Ch?iu Ch?eng-tzu .5944 WEL 641. 1927. La Place. photographs by Vincent Lee. Viana.3 FIR 2005 88 of 123 . Denis. photography by Steven Rothfeld. fan i Lai Yen-chen . by Rafael Steinberg and the editors of Time-Life Books. translated and adapted for the American kitchen by Rose Levy Beranbaum .64 GOT 641. Lorenza.6374 PAS 641.81 HUA 641. Bernachon. Johns. Firenze. Wells. Parmigiano! : 50 new & classic recipes with parmigiano-reggiano cheese / text and recipes by Pamela Sheldon Johns . chao hsiang Ta-yeh Hsien = Great garnishes / author. 1953Huang. editor]. Paris cookbook / Patricia Wells. Passionate olive : 101 things to do with olive oil / Carol Firenze.] . Rafael. Elizabeth.22 CLA 2008 Oz Clarke's pocket wine guide.84 LAP 641. Passion fruit / Alex Gotfryd. Yen-Jen Lai .64 MED 641. Passion for chocolate / [Kristi M. Panini.5784 K29p Wood. translator.5959 S819p Kelly. Patricia. Pantry station.5973 WOO Painter's kitchen : recipes from the kitchen of Georgia O'Keeffe / by Margaret Wood. [et al. Passion for fruit / Lorenza De'Medici . Pancakes and waffles / Elizabeth Alston.5973 WOO 641. Shu-hui.641.6374 BER 641. Painter's kitchen : recipes from the kitchen of Georgia O'Keeffe / by Margaret Wood. Margaret. Alex.1997 P?an shih ching hsu¨an / tso che Huang Shu-hui .815 ALS 641. Fuller.

Hanneman. photographs by Robert Fre´son. Patent.822 T583p 641. 89 of 123 .59949 WEL 641. Pastry magic / Carol Pastor.822 PAS Della Croce.5892 PAT 641. Wells. Patricia. Patricia. Bruce Franchini . L.5092 DEE 641. photography by Kathryn Kleinman. 1947Peck. J. 641. Lauterbach. Deen. KQED. Patricia Well's trattoria : healthy.822 JOH 641.. Linda Brandt .5 PEC 641. Pa^tisserie de Pierre Herme´ / Pierre Herme´. 2008 Pasta / by the editors of Time-Life Books. Barbara. Pasta buffet [videorecording] / producer. director.Stefan Christiansen. photographs by Reed Davis. Pamela Jennifer Barry Design . text/texte .5945 WEL 641. Nina. Graybill. Pasta! : authentic recipes from the regions of Italy / text and recipes by Pamela Sheldon Johns . Illus. Carol.83 GRA 641. Hazen. Julia.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Time-Life Books. 1953Pastor. photographs/photographies. Patricia Wells' trattoria : simple and robust fare inspired by the small family restaurants of Italy / Patricia Wells. (Leonard John) Herme´. photography by Joyce Oudkerk-Pool. produced by Johns. Paula Peck's art of good cooking.J.5945 WEL 641. Pierre. Janet. by Mel Klapholz. simple. Patricia. Paula H.86 HER 2006 641.865 PAS 641. Paula Deen : it ain't all about the cookin' / Paula Deen with Sherry Suib Cohen. Patisserie / L.865 HAN 1993 641.822 LAU 641. Wells. robust fare inspired by the small family restaurants of Italy / photography by Steven Rothfeld.822 DEL 641. Sheldon. 641. Pasta salad : 50 favorite recipes / by Barbara Lauterbach . Wells. Pasta classica : the art of Italian pasta cooking / Julia della Croce.6413 HAZ Pasta salad book / Nina Graybill and Maxine Rapoport. Patricia Wells at home in Provence : recipes inspired by her farmhouse in France / Patricia Wells . Paula. 1939Hanneman. Greg. Pears / by Janet Hazen . Patently easy food processor cooking / by Greg Patent.

Miller .59 GOR 641.6384 AND Spivey. Steven Perfect picnics for all seasons / Gail Monaghan . Marlena. 641. Nora. Sally. writers. Peppers. Gail.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Chase.59444 CHA Chase. peppers : [jalapen~o. photographs by Mick Hales. William Woys. Diane M. photographs by Eric Jacobson. 641. cracklings. Cammy Bowcier. Meditations on transcendental gastronomy / by Brillat-Savarin . Perfect vegetables / by the editors of Cook's Illustrated . Gordon.578 MON 641.5973 WEA 641.641. photography by Carl Tremblay and Daniel Van Ackere . Carey. and embellished with designs by Andrew Johnson. Jean. Pedaling through Provence cookbook / Sarah Leah Chase . director. illustrations by Cathy Brear. Peppers. Malgieri. 641. photographs by Tom Eckerle. producer.22 PER Monaghan. Persia in Peckham : recipes from Persepolis / Sally Butcher . with illustrations by Carlos Calvet. Nick. Perfect preserves : provisions from the kitchen garden / Nora Carey . 2008 Pedaling through Burgundy cookbook / Sarah Leah Chase .5955 B9836P 641. illustrations by John Burgoyne. illustrated by Linda Montgomery. Physiology of taste. Marijane Lynch . 1923641.5942 D782p 641. or. 1947Andrews. with an introduction by Arthur Machen . Spivey.59449 CHA Weaver. chipotle. Perfect match [videorecording] : wine & food / [produced with the Culinary Institute of America] . Peter. . 1949. Sarah Leah. Driver. Philip E. peppers. and knots of wool cookbook : the global migration of African cuisine / Diane M.815 PER 641.5929 S761p Spieler. poblano.. 1963Brillat-Savarin. photographs by Jerry Orabona. and more. 90 of 123 .6384 SPI 641. produced by the Food & Beverage Institute . Pepys at table : seventeenth century recipes for the modern cook / Christopher Driver and Michelle 641. Christopher P. Peter Gordon's world kitchen / photography by Jean Cazals. Perfect bread [videorecording] : fun with creative shapes / produced in Betsy's Kitchen by Dudkowski-Lynch Associates. Pepper trail : history & recipes from around the world / written and illustrated by Jean Andrews.4 CAR 641.65 PER Butcher. Sarah Leah. Pennsylvania Dutch country cooking / William Woys Weaver . serrano.8653 MAL 641. producer. Inc.013 BRI Berriedale-Johnson. in a riot of color and flavor] / Marlena Spieler. Perfect cakes / Nick Malgieri . 17551826. Mary Cowell. Ed Dudkowski. 641.

865 BER Purdy.5676 CLA 641. Pizza / James McNair . pies. text by Mary Townsend . photography by Patricia Brabant. Jack D. and a raucous year of eating locally / Alisa Smith and J. Alisa.6373 TOW 641. remedies. Rose Levy.815 PUR 641. Pies & pastries / by the editors of Time-Life Books. Ninemeier.824 MCN 641. Chantal. one woman. Goldmann. 7. original recipes by John Phillip Carroll . 3. Pierre. Planning and serving your meals. Planning and control for food and beverage operations / Jack D. Franey. Pie and pastry bible / Rose Levy Beranbaum . 641.000.5068 Ni 642 G619p 1959 641. photographs by Tina Rupp. Mary.563 S6425p 91 of 123 . Pigott. 1939Carroll. cookies.000 feet (and anywhere in between) / Susan G. Stuart. Pierre Franey's cooking in France / by Pierre Franey and Richard Flaste. breads. Pleasures of summer / foreword by Dave Olsen . illustrations by Laura Hartman Maestro .812 PIL 641.000. Pillsbury appetizers : small bites packed with big flavors from America's most trusted kitchens / the Pillsbury Company. Townsend. 5. Pie pie pie : easy homemade favorites / by John Phillip Carroll . MacKinnon. James K.22 PIG 642. and pastries hometested for baking at sea level. Jeanne. Clabrough.8 CAR 641. John Phillip. Susan Gold.5784 MCC Beranbaum. Scargall. food photography by Philip Salaverry. Mary E. photographs by Gentl & Hyers.000.71 P642 641. Pie in the sky : successful baking at high altitudes : 100 cakes.5971 S285p 641.B. Pied Noir cookbook : French Sephardic cuisine from Algeria / Chantal Clabrough. McNair. McCole. memories / collected by Jeanne Scargall. 1960Ninemeier. Pillsbury bake-off cookbook. Planet wine : a grape-by-grape visual guide to the contemporary wine world / Stuart Pigott. 641.865 P624 641. illustrations by Cynthia Fitting.5944 FRA 641. Connie. Plenty : one man. and 10. Smith. 1971- 641. Pioneer potpourri : recipes.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 2008 Picnics in the park : moveable feasts for dining alfresco / by Connie McCole .

Popped culture : a social history of popcorn in America / Andrew F. Phillips.59467 ROB Pot pies : comfort food under cover / Diane Phillips.641. Illustrated by Ernest H. Pattee. Poultry & game / Ian McAndrew. Polenta : 100 innovative recipes. Pocket guide to field dressing. Smith.55677 S642p Time-Life Books. Kleinberg. Ann. Sultan. 641. butchering and cooking deer / by Monte and Joan Burch. Ian. Alida Frances. photographs by David Robertson. 1946.664 T583p Robertson. produced by Bruce Franchini. Ellison. Potatoes : from pancakes to pommes frites. Carol. Ellison.. Nichols. William J. Annie.6 MCA 641. 1943641. Diane. by Virginia H. Pooh cook book. photography by Josef Salis. 641. Pork / by the editors of Time-Life Books. McAndrew. Monte.56 P2 92 of 123 . Portuguese cooking : the authentic and robust cuisine of Portugal : journal and cookbook / text and illustrations by Carol Robertson . from appetizers to desserts / Michele Anna Jordan. Pomegranates / Ann Kleinberg .6464 KLE 641. photographys by John Vaughan .493 MOU 641.6 JOR 641. George J. Virginia H. Brennan.824 PHI Potager : fresh garden cooking in the French style / Georgeanne Brennan . Sultan. Potatoes / [managing editor.73 POA Burch. Michele Anna.6521 NIC 641. Practical baking / William J. Kay Halsey]. 1942. Mountney.6521 POT 641.5 ELL Smith. foreword by Alice Waters.641. Andrew F. Jordan.65 BRE 641. Shepard.71 SUL 1990 641. Georgeanne. 641.691 B9471p 641. Poultry products technology.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. 2008 Poaching and steaming [videorecording] / National Productions Division of KQED . Practical dietetics : with reference to diet in health and disease / by Alida Frances Pattee.

Preserving food without freezing or canning : traditional techniques using salt. Sultan. Koichiro Hata . Freeland-Graves. Labensky . sugar. oil. William J. Labensky. Ingram. Practical ice carving / Joseph F. 1948Tsuji. video/audio director. Jeanne H. 641. Principles of food preparation.5979 PRI Gardon. a laboratory manual / J.7 PRI1 641. Durocher.8 Du 2008 Practical guide to the nutrition labeling laws for the restaurant industry / Donna Shields . Sarah R. Principles and processes of cooking. Prevention's quick and healthy low-fat cooking : featuring all-American food / edited by Jean Rogers. Tape two [videorecording] / produced by Hospitality Television. Tape one [videorecording] / produced by Hospitality Television.6 PRE 641.42 GAR 641. Philip Miller . Donna. Prevention Magazine Health Books.5638 PRE 641. Principles and processes of cooking.4 SHI 642.4 PRE 641. Jr.7 PRI2 93 of 123 . Steven. 641.36 FAB 641. vinegar. and lactic fermentation : the gardeners and farmers of Terre Vivante. a Culinary Learning Resources production . illustrations by William E. food editor. 1933Fabbricante. cold storage.303 L116p 642. photographs by Yoshikatsu Saeki. Joseph F. Practical Japanese cooking : easy and elegant / Shizuo Tsuji. Thomas. Practical meat cutting and merchandising / Thomas Fabbricante. Shizuo.5638 P9445 641. Freeland-Graves. Prentice Hall essentials dictionary of culinary arts / Steven Labensky. Durocher. Preparation to order taking [videorecording] / The Culinary Institute of America . Skip Thela. Prevention's low-fat.5 PRI 641. producer. low-cost cookbook : over 220 delicious recipes plus twenty $2 dinners! / edited by Sharon Sanders. Private collection : recipes from the Junior League of Palo Alto / edited by Bonnie Stewart Mickelson.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Shields. Prevention's the healthy cook : the ultimate illustrated kitchen guide to great low-fat food : featuring 450 homestyle recipes and hundreds of time-saving tips / by the food editors of Prevention Magazine Health Prima diner : recipes from opera stars.. Anne. prepared as a member service by the National Restaurant Association.5952 T882p 641. Ingram. 641 Fr 641.5638 PRE 641. drying. Gaye G. Preserving for all seasons / Anne Gardon. alcohol.

. Mueller. John F.57 PRO Gisslen.57 GIS 94 of 123 . Timothy Ryan. Wilma Inman. Professional caterer series / by Denis Ruffel. Sonnenschmidt [and] Jean Nicolas. Professional chef. 1952641.572 S699p Mueller. Harvey. translated by Anne Sterling. inc. David T.641. Culinary Institute of Edited by LeRoi A. 1946. Gerard Smith . 1935Sonnenschmidt. assisted by Roland Bilheux and Alain Escoffier . Wurtzburger in collaboration with Mac K. editor. Frederic H. Wayne.71 GIS 1994 Ruffel. Professional chef's knife / prepared by the Learning Resources Center of the Culinary Institute of America . galantines. editor . Wayne.57 PRO 2006 641.57 PRO 641.C. Professional chef's techniques of healthy cooking / Mary Deirdre Donovan.G. Professional chef's art of garde manger / Frederic H. Professional cooking / Wayne Gisslen . Professional chef's art of garde manger / Frederic Sonnenschmidt. 1946. with forewords by Craig Claiborne and L. Professional baking / Wayne Gisslen .6 KIN 641. Learning 641.8 RUF 641. book editor.641. Nicolas. art director. timbales. Edited by Janet E. Frederic H. Wayne. Czack of the Culinary Institute of America.79 SON 1988 641.641. Kinsella. Professional chef's art of garde manger / Frederic Sonnenschmidt. and the editors of Institutions magazine. Professional baking / Wayne Gisslen. (Tina G. terrines. photography by J. 1935Sonnenschmidt.589 CUL 641.). Frederic H.79 SON 1993 Professional chef / the Culinary Institute of America. 1935Sonnenschmidt. curing. John F.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. photography by J. with a foreword by Andre´ J. Nicolas.4 Pr Culinary Institute of America.. Jule Wilkinson. illustrations by Steve Jenkins.79 SON 1982 641. and pa^te´s / John Kinsella. book design.. Frederic H. sausages. under the direction of Pierre Michalet . Griswold. Professional chef's book of charcuterie : pates. Sonnenschmidt. John. Jule Wilkinson. Nicolas. 641. Gisslen. Professional chef's catering recipes.66 MUE 642. Cointreau . Jean F. T. America. and other culinary delights / T. Denis.71 GIS 2005 Gisslen. terrines. Sonnenschmidt.. prepared under the guidance of chef-instructor Richard A. Prepared by the Culinary Institute of America. Professional charcuterie : sausage making. Tony Pronoitis. Folsom.5 PRI 2008 Private collections: a culinary treasure. Gerard Smith. 1935641. 1946. Professional chef's art of garde manger [by] Frederic H. G.

Gerard Smith . Punch / by Colleen Mullaney . Burros. David Paul. photography by Gerard Smith. Stefanelli. Cointreau. Colleen. Pure & simple : delicious recipes for additive-free cooking : an elegant & easy cookbook with up-to-date advice on avoiding ingredients that contain chemicals & preservatives / by Marian Burros. Cointreau .59449 SHU Rodnitzky. 1944. Prune gourmet / Donna Rodnitzky. 1946. with a foreword by Andre´ J. Christel Spuhler . Cointreau .6 MEY 641.641.57 GIS 2003 641.874 MUL Stefanelli. photography by J.79 LAR 642.65 PUM Mullaney. Professional cooking / Wayne Gisslen . 1946. 1946. 1966-641.865 FRI 1996 642. Professional cooking / Wayne Gisslen . Bo. photography by Gerard Gisslen. 641. John M.6422 ROD 641.31 St 641. Provenc¸al light / Martha Rose Shulman. under the direction of Pierre Michalet . Wayne. Gerard Smith. 1949641.5 B972p 95 of 123 .641. Professional host / The foodservice editors of CBI. Wayne.641. with a foreword by Andre´ J. Edy Schmid. translated by Rhona Poritzky-Lauvand and James Peterson. Martha Rose. with a foreword by Andre J. Friberg. translated by Heinz Holtmann.8653 HER Shulman. Professional garde manger : a guide to the art of the buffet / David Paul Larousse.865 BIL Larousse. Roland. Professional cooking / Wayne Gisslen . Marian Fox. Donna. Sylvia.57 GIS 2007 Gisslen. JoGail Wenzel. with a foreword by Andre´ . 641. Lesley. Herbert.57 GIS 2003 Smith. Purchasing : selection and procurement for the hospitality industry / John M. photography by J.CD Professional French pastry series / Roland Bilheux and Alain Escoffier .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 2008 Professional cooking / Wayne Gisslen . Gisslen. Professional pastry chef / Bo Friberg.57 GIS 1999 Gisslen. 1940Meyer. photographs by Jack Duetsch. Wayne. Bilheux.641. 641. Ellie Densen. Wayne. Professional touches / Lesley Herbert. 1946. Professional table service / Sylvia Meyer. Pumpkin cookbook / [edited by Nicola Hill].5 PRO 641.

5 CES 641. Quintet of cuisines. 642. 19151971. Quality control for the food industry. Kotschevar. 1908Kotschevar. B. Quick breads [videorecording] / Meridian Education Corporation presents. Pat. Quantity food production. Quick & easy Asian tapas and noodles. Robert H. Richard Donnelly. and management / John B. Kotschevar. Ninemeier. Quality food preparation and display : handbook for culinary competitions / Robert H. 1941Field. Kotschevar. 641. Quality California ripe olives [videorecording] / presented by the California Olive Industry. 1908Kotschevar.665 MUR 641. 96 of 123 .A. Richards. Ronald Kinton.3463 QUA Kramer. Quantity food purchasing / Lendal H.31 Ko 642. Photographed by Sheldon Cotler and Richard Jeffery. Lendal Henry. John Barton.31 KOT 1994 641. and Nola Treat.812095 Q62 641. Victor. 1950Kotschevar. Richard Donnelly. 641. Lendal Henry. Twigg. by Michael and Frances Field and the editors of Time-Life Books.4 KRA Nelson. Rose. by Amihud Kramer and Bernard A. Lenore. Karla.31 KOT 1999 641. Quick chicken / Rose Murray. 1905Ceserani.. 1908Longre´e. Nelson. Charles Levinson.31 KOT 641. Michael. Quantity food purchasing / Lendal H.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Baird. Quantity food purchasing [by] Lendal H. Lendal Henry. 1908Kotschevar.815 QUI Murray. planning. Kotschevar. Questions on practical cookery / Victor Ceserani.5 L856q 641. Amihud.563 BAI 2008 Pyramid cookbook : pleasures of the food guide pyramid / Pat Baird. 1913. 641. Knight.4 NEL 641. by Lenore Richards.57 R5q 641. Jack D. Knight.5 F455q Quantity cookery.57068 KNI 641. Photography in Poland by Eliot Elisofon. Kotschevar. Lendal Henry. Lendal H. menu planning and cookery for large numbers. Quantity food purchasing / Lendal H.641. Quantity food sanitation.

John. 97 of 123 . Real American food : from Yankee red flannel hash and the ultimate Navajo taco to beautiful swimmer crab cakes and general store fudge pie : Jane and Michael Stern's coast-to-coast cookbook / illustrated by Jane Real chili cookbook : America's 100 all-time favorite recipes / Marjie Lambert.5973 STE 641.59495 KYR 641. Herrmann.5636 KEN 642. Recipes and menus for fifty. assisted by Restaurants & Recipe conversion for microwave / by Barbara Methven .647 RAS 641. Recipes for fat free living 3 cookbook : fat free desserts : every recipe under 1 gram of fat per serving / [Jyl Steinback]. Susan Kenney.5 REC Methven.5944 LOO 641. the Culinary Institute of America . Forsman. Jane. photography by Gus Filgate.823 LAM 641.86 S8197r 641.5 SMI 641.5 X F732r 641. Michael Jensen. Raw food. Smith. [photographers. Stern.4 ANN 641. real world : 100 recipes to get the glow / Matthew Kenney and Sarma Melngailis . Reading your table [videorecording] : tipped off / Hospitality Television. Lambert. Philip Miller. 641. Theodore. Kyriakou. Recipes for living in Big Sur. Real Greek food / Theodore Kyriakou and Charles Campion . 1970. 641. prepared by Frances Lowe Smith.5882 M592r 642. with Jen Karetnick. the eater's guide to periodical literature. Jyl.6 REA 641. producer.5 REC Recettes de la saison = a holiday cookbook from the Chefs of la Madeleine & Susan Herrmann Loomis. as used in the School of domestic science of the Boston young women's Christian association.5 REC Annechild. Loomis. the bottom line [videorecording] / produced by the Learning Resources Center. Marjie. Raspberry recipe book. Ken Greer]. Recipe index.597111 R154 641. Barbara. Recipe for a great affair : how to cater your own party-.or anybody else's! / by Annette Annechild and Russell Bennett. Matthew. Frances Lowe. Annette. Steinback. 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 2008 Raincoast kitchen : coastal cuisine with a dash of history / The Museum at Campbell River. Recipe collection from the American Academy of Chefs : top professionals present a treasury of world-class fare for culinarians across the country / the American Academy of Chefs . Recipe costing.

5978 MIL 98 of 123 .622 LUC 641. special photography by Linda Burgess. Recipes from a vegetarian goddess : delectable feasts through the seasons / Karri Allrich. Geraldene. 641.5 REC 1983 Recipes from historic America : cooking & traveling with America's finest hotels / Linda & Steve Bauer. Claiborne. [et al.59729 W855c Suppl. Recipes from a Spanish village / Pepita Aris . Recipes from the regional cooks of Mexico / Diana Kennedy .5636 A441r 641.691 R311 Mihesuah. Tony. Harris. Allrich. Pepita. Jacobs. Bauer.5972 KEN 641.5946 ARI 641. Emily.59 MIH 641. Red Sage : contemporary western cuisine / Mark Miller .C. 1957Miller. Recipes from wine country / Tony de Luca. photography by Rodney Weidland. Pawleys Island. Linda. . S. Linda. Recipes. 641. Recipes from a Greek island / Susie Jacobs . 19051997.5944 C585c Suppl. Recovering our ancestors' gardens : indigenous recipes and guide to diet and fitness / Devon Abbott Mihesuah.. drawings by Sidonie Coryn. special photography by Linda Burgess.657 HOL 2008 Recipes from a French herb garden / Geraldene Holt . Aris. the cooking of China / Emily Hahn. L. Susie. 641. (Devon Abbott). Recipes from Pawley's Island / compiled and published by church women of All Saints Waccamaw Episcopal Church. Recipes. De Luca.F. 641. 641.59495 JAC 641.5973 BAU 641. special photography by Linda Burgess. Wolfe.5946 F297c Suppl. the cooking of Spain and Portugal. Karri. Hahn.]. Freeman . Recipes. Diana.. the cooking of the Caribbean Islands. 641. Kennedy. special photography by Linda Burgess. Mark Charles.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Holt. illustrations by Mrs. Valentina.5945 HAR 641. Recipes from an Italian farmhouse / Valentina Harris .5951 H148c Suppl. 1949641. Recommended precautions for upland bird and waterfowl consumption. 641. Devon A. Craig. Recipes: classic French cooking.

5635 ROS 641. photographs by William Nash. Pierre Troisgros.6318 VIT 641.5 RID 641.G. O'Hara. De' Medici Stucchi.6318 BAR 641. Marcy. Judith. Ribs : a connoisseur's guide to grilling and barbecuing / text by Christopher B. photographs by John Ferro Sims. Ridley. Barrett. Hess. Rise & dine Canada : savory secrets from Canada's bed & breakfast inns / Marcy Claman.52 CLA 1999 641. Ritz-Carlton cook book and guide to home entertaining.66 ROB 641. Jean-Michel Charbonnier. Restaurant favorites : at home / by the editors of Cook's Illustrated . Rice diet solution : the world famous low-sodium. Elisabetta A. Risotto risotti / Judith Barrett. adaptation. introduction. Robert Rose's favorite beef. Vitale. 99 of 123 .5944 NAU 641.5945 HES Regulation of cancer-causing food additives. 641. preface. illustrations by John Burgoyne. english translation and U. Renoir's table : the art of living and dining with one of the world's greatest impressionist painters / by JeanBernard Naudin.S. Franco Benussi . 1963Accounting Office.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Joshi. 641. 1948Ridley.555 ROB Riso : undiscovered rice dishes of Northern Italy / by Gioietta Vitale with Lisa Lawley. General General of the United States.5954 JOS 2008 Regional Indian cooking / Ajoy Joshi and Alison Roberts. illustrations by Constance Arkin Del Nero.664 OHA 641. time for a change? : report to the Congress / by the Comptroller United States. pork & lamb / by the editors of Robert Rose. 641. 1954Itoh. Arkin. Reinhardt. Reinhard Hess and Sabine Sa¨lzer . Ajoy. Joan.5945 MED 641. by Georgette de Lattre. Renaissance of Italian cooking / Lorenza de' Medici . 1926Naudin. Robert Rose's favorite meals in minutes / by the editors of Robert Rose.5 RES 641. front cover photography by Christopher Hirsheimer .47 Re 641.5952 I89r 641. by Helen E. Illus. Risotto : a taste of Milan / Constance Arkin Del Nero and Rosario Del Nero .6318 DEL 641. O'Hara . good-carb. photography by Keller & Keller and Daniel Van Ackere . Lorenza. Rosati. detox diet for quick and lasting weight loss / Kitty Gurkin Rosati and Robert Rosati. Christopher B. Kitty Gurkin. Jacqueline Saulnier . Constance Del Nero. Jean-Bernard. Helen E. Gioietta. Claman. Rice paddy gourmet / by Joan Itoh. Regional Italian cuisine : typical recipes and culinary impressions from all regions / Authors.

. Austin . with John Harrisson .5 A342r 641. and cordials / David Lebovitz . Rodale cookbook. Bob.8 LEB 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana DiSpirito.69 B9156r Rocky Mountain cookbook / by Connie Chesnel .2 MOR 641. Roy. Connie. by Helen and George Papashvily and the editors of Time-Life Books. Russian cooking / translated from the Russian by F. Rocky Mountain berry book / Bob Krumm. Albright. Apicius. 1956. Helen Waite.555 D6127r 641.641. Morgan. 100 of 123 . custards. Roving fisherman's favorite wild game & fish and other old time recipes / Duffie E. Room for dessert : 110 recipes for cakes. Roux brothers on patisserie / Michel & Albert Roux . G. Chesnel.692 YAM 642. Romance of candy.Ef 641. cobblers. Reid. Austin. Nancy. a critical translation of The art of cooking. Krumm.641. photography by Michael Rose´ : a guide to the world's most versatile wine / by Jeff Morgan . 1941Bryant. ice creams. Photographed by Eliot Elisofon and Richard Jeffery.Es 641. by Barbara Flower and Elisabeth Rosenbaum.5947 K96.647 KRU 641. Photography by T. candies. directed by W. Rocco. foreword by Alice Waters .59969 YAM Roy's fish & seafood : recipes from the Pacific Rim / Roy Yamaguchi. Russian cooking. for use in the study and the kitchen. Jeff. pies. Siegel. written by Robert Kanner . Roy. souffles. L. Jeffcoate. 1956. Michel.5947 P213r Suppl.509 A642d. photographs by France Ruffenach. sorbets.8653 JEF 641. Papashvily. seafood and location photography by John De Mello. cookies. photographs by Alexandra Avakian.. Alma H. Lebovitz.865 ROU 641. Roux. by Alma H. 1944- 2008 Rocco's real life recipes : fast flavor for every day / Rocco DiSpirito.6 PRO 641. Bryant.5978 CHE 641. 641. Rush [videorecording] / produced by Gary Penn . fish. Yamaguchi. Gettings and Robert Griffith. Duffie E. tarts. food photography by Scott Peterson. Roman cookery book. Roses in sugar / Chris Jeffcoate & Jackie Kuflik. photographs by Anthony Blake. David. With drawings by Katerina Wilezynski. Roy's feasts from Hawaii / Roy Yamaguchi and John Harrisson.853 A935r 641. text with Ruth Rudner . Yamaguchi. Chris.

Georgeanne. Rustico : regional Italian country cooking / Micol Negrin.692 NOR 641.83 SAL DVD 641. Noel Barnhurst. text with Judith Blahnik . Veronika.83 SAL 641.5974 OLI 101 of 123 . Oliver. Willy Wyssenbach . Negrin. Sandra L. 1852-1933.83 KOO. Hill.83 BRE 641. general editor. 1969 (Sandra Louise). Salads.8 H646s 641. Salad perfection : delicious full-color step-by-step recipes & cooking tips for every occasion / [Belinda Jeffery . Salad perfection : delicious full-color step-by-step recipes & cooking tips for every occasion / [Belinda Jeffery . Oliver. Ellen Argyriou]. Salad dressing 101 : dressing for all occasions / edited by Nathan Hyam.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Visson.5947 VIS 2008 Russian heritage cookbook : a culinary tradition preserved in 360 authentic recipes / Lynn Visson. Salmon : a great food from the sea / Jeff Woodward. Jeff. photographs by Lans Christensen . Lynn. Conason and Ella Metz.83 KOO 641. food editor.G 641.641.814 SAL 641. photographs. food editor. Mu¨ller. Salads / Veronika Mu¨ller. Salads / by the editors of Time-Life Books. Ellen Argyriou].5945 NEG Henderson. Georgeanne Brennan . 1947. photographs by Terje Marthinusen. Woodward. Ruth & Skitch Henderson's seasons in the country : good food for family and friends / foreword by Jacques Pe´pin . Gunter Beer. Chuck Williams . at sea and ashore. by Emil G.5 HEN Brennan.83 MUL 641.83 S159 Koops. Frauke. Koops. by Janet McKenzie Hill. Saltwater foodways : New Englanders and their food. in the nineteenth century / Sandra L. Salmon : international chefs' recipes / editor. Salate aus Europe / Frauke Koops. Emil G. 1943641. Micol 641. Frauke. Salad / recipes and text. Gu¨nter Beer. Salt-free diet cook book. Janet McKenzie. design by Beth Tondreau Design.692 WOO 641. Ruth (Ruth Einseidl) 641. 641. sandwiches and chafing-dish dainties. Salads / Frauke Koops. 641.563 C743s Conason.

James. 641. produced by Bruce Franchini. Christopher. producer/director. Jordan. San Francisco encore : a cookbook / the Junior League of San Francisco .59794 SAN 641. foreword by Alice Waters .65 HIR 641. Sauces : classical and contemporary sauce making / James Peterson. Sauces & seasonings. photographs by Cary Hazelgrove. 102 of 123 .692 JOR 641. Sokolov. Bene´t. producer/director Tim Ward. James. 641.814 SOK 641. San Francisco chronicle cook book. Sauces from wine [videorecording] / WTTW/Chicago . Meat marinades [videorecording] / WTTW/Chicago presents .59794 SAN Hirsheimer. Sausage & jerky handbook : a 25-year collection of tried and proven sausage & jerky recipes / by Eldon R. Cutlip. Sauces & seasonings. Tim Ward. Hideo. San Francisco Ferry Plaza Farmers' Market cookbook : a comprehensive guide to impeccable produce plus 130 seasonal recipes / by Christopher Hirsheimer and Peggy Knickerbocker .66 C9897s 641.814 PET 1998 641.5 B465s 641.5952 DEK 641. Sandwich buffet [videorecording] / WTTW Chicago presents . Judy. illustrations by Earl Thollander. Sandwich book : a complete guide to America's favorite food.814 PET 641. 641. Tim Ward. Saucier's apprentice : a modern guide to classic French sauces for the home / Raymond Sokolov.814 SAU Peterson.5974 CHA 641. 641. Sauces : classical and contemporary sauce making / James Peterson. Cutlip. 2008 Saltwater seasonings : good food from coastal Maine / by Sarah Leah Chase and Jonathan Chase . Peterson.84 GET 641.84 SAN Dekura.77 SAU San Francisco seafood : savory recipes from everybody's favorite seafood city / Michele Anna Jordan. San Francisco Chronicle cookbook / edited by Michael Bauer and Fran Irwin. Sarah Leah. Sashimi / Hideo Dekura.66 SAU 641.from child-pleasers to classics to calzones and other dagwood dreams / Judy Gethers.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Chase. Jane. producer/director. Michele Anna. Sauteing [videorecording] / National Productions Division of KQED . Gethers. Raymond A. Eldon R.

58 G348s 642.815 SCO 641. Norvil Lester.563 R442s 641. Barbara Reuben. 641. Scones.5 641. photography by Deborah Jones and Kathryn Kleinman. Peter. 1950641. Sahni. Deborah. Madison.5 RIN 642. Savoir-cuisiner des femmes d'aujourd'hui. David R. Julie.5944 F329s v. photography by Michael Grimaldi.59786 JOH 641. School lunchroom: time of trial. 641.6383 SAH 641. George. Savory way / by Deborah Madison . Bernard. Science of cooking / Peter Barham. Scandinavian feasts / Beatrice Ojakangas . and John Bentham . and color / Julie Sahni. School food centers. Savory stews / Jacques Burdick. Wheaton. photographs by Ruven Afanador. Save-your-life-diet high-fiber cookbook / David Reuben. Jacques. Savoring spices and herbs : recipe secrets of flavor. Barbara Ketcham. Chuck.5954 KAI 641. muffins & tea cakes : breakfast breads and teatime spreads / edited and introduction by Heidi Haughy Cusick . Beatrice A. Barham.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641.58 B245s 641. Savoring the past : the French kitchen and table from 1300 to 1789 / Barbara Ketcham Wheaton. Johnson. their recipes and their histories / by Chuck Johnson and Blanche Johnson. Maya. les bonnes recettes de Femmes d'aujourd'hui. and Joe McCraren. Melissa Ring. Savoring the spice coast of India : fresh flavors from Kerala / Maya Kaimal . Savor Montana cookbook : Montana's finest restaurants.823 BUR 641.5948 OJA Rinella. Scavenger's guide to haute cuisine / Steven Rinella. Kaimal.5 B251s 641. illustrations by Patricia Curtan.5 MAD Ojakangas. 2008 Saveur cooks authentic American / by the editors of Saveur magazine. 1902Bard. aroma.D. Steven. designed by Ph.5973 SAV Reuben.5944 W558s 641. Sea fare cookbook : donated recipes from the members of the American Fisheries Society and fisheries truths and lore / text and recipes edited by Gary Carmichael. a guide to operating the school lunch program. Zubin Shroff.692 S4381 v. Burdick.1 103 of 123 .

Short & sweet : sophisticated desserts in no time at all / Melanie Barnard . Melanie.5 CAL 641. Kotschevar. Secrets of fat-free baking : over 130 low-fat & fat-free recipes for scrumptious and simple-to-make cakes.815 W8938s 641.692 FRA 641. director. Linda Brandt . Kathy Shandrow. Inc. 641.572 KOT 104 of 123 . for Meridian Education Corporation . Buyers guide. breads. Barbara. Philip Miller .83 SCO 641. Wilber W.86 BAR 641. muffins. Susana.86 SEA Sorosky.694 S545 641. the Culinary Institute of America. photographs by Robert Stein. Sandra L. 641. photography by Leigh Beisch. Shellfish / by the editors of Time-Life Books.392 SEA Caldwell.35 SEL Scott-Goodman. photographs by Ann stratton.34 SEL 641.694 SHE 641. Cecilia. Trilling. Seasons of my heart : a culinary journey through Oaxaca.5951 C5323s 641. KQED.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Franey. Shellfish fabrication by the professional chef [videorecording] / producers.66 SER 641. Seafood leader. Meyer. Selecting and storing vegetables [videorecording] / Meridian Education Corporation. Selecting and storing fruits & vegetables [videorecording] / Lawper Video Productions. Lendal Henry. 641. Seasonal fruit desserts [videorecording] / producer. foreword by Alice Waters . produced by the Learning Resources Center. Serving the sizzle [videorecording]. Pierre. Barnard. script. Sensational salads / by Barbara Scott-Goodman . Searching for the Dixie barbecue : journeys into the southern psyche / Wilber W. plus many other tasty goodies / Sandra Woodruff. Joanne A. brownies. Seventh daughter : my culinary journey from Beijing to San Francisco / Cecilia Chiang with Lisa Weiss .568 SOR 641. pies. Mexico / Susana Trilling. 641. Kotschevar. photographs by Judd Pilossof. cookies. Caldwell.5972 TRI 2008 Seafood cookbook : classic to contemporary / Pierre Franey & Bryan Miller . Short order cooking / Lendal H. Season's greetings / Marlene Sorosky . 641. Woodruff. 1908Chiang. Marlene. Bruce Franchini . illustrations by Lauren Jarrett.

Rosso.6 Ax 641. and chiffon / Elizabeth Alston. Simply salmon / James Peterson. pound. James. Payard. Simone. producer. by John Wallner. Simple French desserts / by Jill O'Connor . Silver Palate good times cookbook / by Julee Rosso & Sheila Lukins with Sarah Leah Chase . Elizabeth. director. 1904sketches done in France by Michel Beck.86 OCO 641.578 K55s 1986 641. Franc¸ois. Frank O. [foreword by Graham Kerr].8 ALS 641. Peterson. with Tim Moriarty and Tish Boyle . 641. illustrated by Sheila Lukins. Illus.692 PET 641. illustrated by Sheila Lukins. Axler. Silver spoon. Simca's cuisine [by] Simone Beck in collaboration with Patricia Simon. 641. Patricia. Julee.59593 S6123 Moosberg. Simply shellfish [videorecording] / International Video Network . 1991. 1946O'Connor. Claudia. Simply cakes : angel. Simple foods for the pack / by Claudia Axcell. Lind. Rosso. Simply sensational desserts : 140 classics for the home baker from New York's famous pa^tisserie and bistro / Franc¸ois Payard. Jill. a production of KQED San Francisco .5 ROB 2008 Showmanship in the dining room. photographs by Philippe Houze. Linda Brandt .5 LIN 641. Alston.5944 WEL 641.5 SIL 641. Julee. Diana Cooke. by Bruce H.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Axler. Mary Beth. Simplified manual for cooks.5 Mo 641. Silver Palate cookbook / by Julee Rosso & Sheila Lukins with Michael McLaughlin .86 PAY 641. Bruce Franchini.5944 BEC 641.5945 CUC 641. Simply in season : a world community cookbook / Mary Beth Lind and Cathleen Hockman-Wert . and Vikki Kinmont.5 ROB 641.694 SIM Silverton Public Library's international rhubarb cookbook : and other little gems. 105 of 123 . Axcell. Bruce H. Simple Thai & Chinese step-by-step. 641. many based on Beck. Simply French : Patricia Wells presents the cuisine of Joe¨l Robuchon / photographs by Steven Rothfeld. Wells. photographs by Richard Eskite.

producer/director Tim Ward.59455 LUO 641. Simply Tuscan : recipes for a well-lived life / Pino Luongo.5973 KIR 641. and (fish) steaks : easy.5 FEU 641. Sinful strawberries : a sweetly decadent mouthful / [illustrated by] Veronica di Rosa .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Glover.692 PEN 641.58 Y126S 641. Katherine S. Slice of delight : the best and most requested pie recipes / Friends of the Havre-Hill County Library . Soffritto : tradition and innovation in Tuscan cooking / Benedetta Vitali. Feuer. salmon. and other finger foods / Jennifer Joyce. Solar cooking for home and camp / Linda Frederick Yaffe. Kirlin and Thomas M. 1948- 641. Slice of Nantucket / Saint Mary--Our Lady of the Isle Church. Pitzer. Goudge. Something warm from the oven : baking memories. Jennifer. making memories / Eileen Goudge. Shapiro. [illustrations by Elayne Sears]. Benedetta.53 T583s 641. Something from the oven : reinventing dinner in 1950s America / Laura Shapiro. Leslie plus side dishes to make a meal / Leslie Glover Pendleton . Snacks & sandwiches / by the editors of Time-Life Books.6475 PIT 2008 Simply shrimp. Janice. Sit-down buffet [videorecording] / WTTW Chicago presents .812 JOY 641.815 GOU 106 of 123 . Beth. photographs by Cary Wolinsky. and healthful ways to enjoy your favorite seafood Pendleton. Laura. Solar cookery book : everything under the sun / Beth and Dan Halacy. Time-Life Books. [text by] Janice Feuer] .8 SIT 641. 641. mezze. salads. Small feasts : soups.59455 VIT 641. sushi. Joyce.8 SMA 641. illustrations by Judith Cheek. Eileen. Sheri Neuens.5 SLI 641. Yaffe.508209 S5296S 641. Luongo. Halacy. & sandwiches / edited by Marilee Matteson. Small bites : tapas.58 H157s 641. Kirlin. editor. antipasta. [art direction by] Rebecca Martinez. Simply strawberries / by Sara Pitzer . Smithsonian folklife cookbook / Katherine S. Pino. Kirlin.5 SLI 641. Linda Frederick. Vitali. delicious. Sara.

815 ROB 641. 1963Larousse. John. 641.5959 SOU Egerton. photographer . Norma. Soup bible / David Paul Larousse. drawings by Francoise Webb. Oser. Sophia Loren's recipes and memories / by Sophia Loren . Roberts. project coSouthern food : at home. Pyles. Marie. low-fat. Ada Lou.5975 RUD 641. Alison Harris. editor . Soy of cooking : easy-to-make vegetarian.813 LAR 641. 1946641. Gunter Beer. and with photographs by Al Clayton. produced by Bruce Franchini. art director and design . photographs.5636 PYL 641. fat-free. Southwestern grill : 220 terrific recipes for big and bold backyard barbecue / Michael McLaughlin .813 HAE 641. Sophia. with a special assist from Ann Bleidt Egerton .5 RUH 2001 641. David Paul. illustrated by Barry Moser. illustrations by Sandra Bruce. Soups for the professional chef / Terence Janericco. Wasserman-Miller. 1934Ruhlman. Soup makes the meal : 150 soul-satisfying recipes for soups. McLaughlin. Ken. Soul of a chef : the journey toward perfection / Michael Ruhlman. Michael Ditter.5784 MCL 641. Loren. Stephan. and antioxidant-rich gourmet recipes / Marie Oser.813 WAS 641. Soups / by the editors of Time-Life Books. Southwestern vegetarian : vegetarian southwestern cuisine the Texas way / by Stephan Pyles with John Harrisson. Peter Feierabend.5945 LOR 641. Marie. illustrations by the Janericco. in history / by John Egerton . desk editor . Martina Schlagenhaufer.813 S724 641. 107 of 123 . Davenport. Sourdough breads and coffee cakes : 104 recipes using homemade starters / by Ada Lou Roberts . Michael. Soups [videorecording] / National Productions Division of KQED . 1954- 2008 Sook's cookbook : memories and traditional receipts from the Deep South / Marie Rudisill .5975 EGE 641. on the road. Michael. and breads / Ken Haedrich. [translation.813 SOU 641.815 DAV 641. salads. Carol Amoruso].65655 OSE author. 1949Haedrich. Southeast Asian specialties : a culinary journey / Rosalind Mowe.813 JAN 641. Terence.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Rudisill. Sourdough cookery / Rita Davenport. Rita. Soups of Italy : cooking over 130 soups the Italian way / Norma Wasserman-Miller .

James. Illustrated by Jo Spier.8644 LAU 641. Ann. photographs by Kirsten Strecker. illustrations by Melanie Marder Parks. Peterson. KQED. KQED. director Bruce Franchini . Spectacular desserts [videorecording] / producer. Mike Wadel. Jule Wilkinson.5946 SPA 641. Splendid spoonful : from custard to cre`me bru^le´e / by Barbara Lauterbach .86 SPE Day. Peddersen.] . Avanelle S. Bruce Franchini . McCormick & Co. Spices of the world cookbook by McCormick / prepared and tested in the kitchens of McCormick. 641.5638 S7618 641.813 PET 641. Special desserts / Ann Amernick . [et al. 641. editor.6383 MCC 641. Special and decorative breads / Roland Bilheaux . producer/director. Splendid soups / James Peterson. Raymond B. Nadia. SPECS : the comprehensive foodservice purchasing and specification manual / Raymond B.815 SPE Amernick. produced by Wadel and associates . director. James. Splenda no calorie sweetner. under the direction of Jean Chazalon and Pierre Michalet . Hassani.5943 HAS 108 of 123 . Spice cookbook. 641. Raymond B. Md. by Avanelle Day and Lillie Stuckey. translated by Rhona Poritzky-Lauvand and James Peterson. (Baltimore.) 641..815 BIL 641. Splendid soups : recipes and master techniques for making the world's best soups / James Peterson. Peterson.5 SPE Peddersen.57 Pe 642.8 AME 641. SPECS : the comprehensive foodservice purchasing and specification manual / Raymond B. Spoonfuls of Germany : culinary delights of the German region in 170 recipes / Nadia Hassani. Special breads [videorecording] / producer. Spectacular 6 minute centerpieces [videorecording] / by Chef Ted . Peddersen .6383 DAY 2008 Spanish foods [videorecording] / presented by Andrew Zimmern.813 P4851s 641. editor. Linda Brandt .. Linda Brandt . Barbara. Peddersen .5 P371s 642.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. Jule Wilkinson.8 SPE 641. Specialties of the house : great recipes from great Chicago restaurants. Lauterbach.

Star of India : the spicy adventures of curry / Jo Monroe. Raichlen.D.5 STE Veale. Wendy. 641. 641. Strictly steak . 1932.5 MEY 641. the Culinary Institute of America. summer afternoons : a collection of warm-weather recipes / by Barbara Scott-Goodman with Mary Goodbody . 2008 Sportsman's cookbook for the hunter and the fisherman.5638 RAI 641. Steven Raichlen's healthy Latin cooking : 200 sizzling recipes from Mexico.302 MUL 641. Scott-Goodman. by Ted Karry in collaboration with Margaret Key. Sprouts.5638 RAI 641. D. Jule. Stand-up buffet [videorecording] / WTTW Chicago presents . Stocks: [videorecording] : White. Stocks and sauces [videorecording] / National Productions Division of KQED . Step-by-step garnishing / Wendy Veale.5954 MON 641. Luchetti. foreword by Cristina Saralegui . Steven Raichlen's high-flavor. Perla.4 WIL Livingston. producer/director Tim Ward. Steven Kolpan . brown & fish / producer/writer. Alice. Cuba.641.73 TRE 641. Emily. and 641. A. Spring evenings. produced by Culinary Learning Resources . Brigid. introduction by Hannia Campos. Meyers. produced by Bruce Franchini. Jo. Barbara. a passionate guide to the great American feast / by A.86 LUC 641..814 STO 641. photography by Michael Lamotte. Spur of the moment cook / Perla Meyers.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Karry. California . Storage specifics [by] Jule Wilkinson. Steaming / Brigid Treloar.5 SCO 641. foreword by Jeremiah Tower .8 STA Monroe. Mu¨ller. recipes edited by Kay Hillyard.81 VEA 641. Ted. 1957Treloar. Steinbeck House cookbook / compiled and published by the Valley Guild of Salinas. Brazil. how to grow and eat them / Alice Muller and Gene Allen. Steven. food styling by Patty Forrestel. Stars desserts / by Emily Luchetti . Steven. Livingston.662 LIV 109 of 123 . Raichlen.69 K18s 641. illustrations by Tom Christopher. 641. Caribbean. low-fat Italian cooking / photography by Greg Schneider .7 STO beyond / by Steven Raichlen . Wilkinson.

. photography by Louis B. Kotschevar. Summer in New York / photography by Battman. American Culinary Federation. Tartan.57 M849s 641.. 641. Morgan. Grotz. Student's guide to improving the campus food service / written by Joanne Manning Anderson. Ruth Aimee. Soni. Successful hostess.. Bode. Eighth edition / Culinary Institute of America. 641..ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Stubblefield.5 S9588 1996 Barker. Lendal Henry. Susanna. B. Beth. C. 641. Morgan.76 STU 642. 110 of 123 .4 GRO 642 H453s 1950 641. Sugar Reef Caribbean cooking / by Devra Dedeaux. Harriett. with a foreword by Amy Tan .8653 M881s 642. 1919Dedeaux. Sunset recipe annual / by the editors of Sunset magazine and Sunset Books. Successful catering : managing the catering operation for maximum profit / by Sony Bode.. Wallach. Jr. Study guide to accompany The professional chef. from a manuscript written by Lendal H. 1931Manning-Anderson.31 KOT 641. William J. foreword by Raymond Blanc. Supplement to Quantity food purchasing / prepared for the Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Motel Association . and Edna Noble White . Study on ready mixes for chocolate cake.5 M284s 641. Devra. 1924Kotschevar. Supervision and management of quantity food preparation : principles and procedures / William J. Mary Helen Bradley.5951 FOO Study of foods. 1877Morrison.. Supermarket backpacker / by Harriett Barker. Susanna Foo Chinese Cuisine : the fabulous flavors & innovative recipes of North America's finest Chinese cook / Susanna Foo .5 SUM 641. Wardall . Peter. 641. by Ruth A.5 W2 641. Successful cold buffets / Peter Grotz .4 BOD 642.59729 DED 641.57 STU 2006 Wardall.5 AME 2008 Stubb's bar-b-q cookbook : from Stubb's legendary kitchen / with Kate Heyhoe . photography by Alexandra Grablewski. Joanne. Study guide for culinarians. project coordinator. 1908Foo.578 B255s 641.

Clarke.864 B329t 111 of 123 . foreword by Donald Richie. Nobuko. 2008 Susanna Foo fresh inspiration : new approaches to Chinese cuisine / Susanna Foo with Hermie Kranzdorf . Susanna.692 DET 641. 1892641. photographs by Tina Rupp. Mia. Margaret. Bashline. Sushi / Mia Detrick . Swans Down breakthrough baking : classic cakes that cut the calories! Sweet indulgences : desserts for every occasion / Norman Kolpas. Anne Barney. O'Connor. 1941641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Foo. Norman. Jeannette. Sweet onions and sour cherries : a cookbook for market day / Jeannette Ferrary and Louise Fiszer.5952 Y657s 1990 641. South Carolina to Harlem / Sylvia Woods and family with Melissa Clark. Andrioli. [photographs by Bruce Wolf]. Sylvia (Sylvia Pressley) Clarke.5951 FOO 641.58 AND 641.691 B2999s 641. low fat. Jeffrey T. low calorie desserts / by Jill O'Connor . from "Meal planning and table service. Detrick. Bates. sales. Tsuda." by Beth Bailey McLean. McLean. scriptwriter. Sylvia G. photographs by Kathryn Kleinman. and service / Jeffrey T. Sergio. Kolpas.65 FER Welch. Woods. 1955. photography Susan Marie Anderson. Sylvia Bashline's Savory game cookbook / Sylvia G.86 KOL 641. Sweet nothings : over 50 luscious. Melanie Nelson . Tablescapes [videorecording] : setting the table / executive producer. Sushi made easy / by Nobuko Tsuda . Yoshino. Sweet seduction : chocolate truffles / Adrienne Welch .874 CLA 642 M163t 642. Jill. Table and bar : a guide to alcoholic beverages.59 WOO 641. Tableside cookery / Sergio Andrioli and Peter Douglas.7 TAB 641. Adrienne. Talking about puddings.641. Table graces.8653 SWA 641. Sylvia's family soul food cookbook : from Hemingway.5952 T8823s 641. service. Sushi / Masuo Yoshino. Beth Bailey. setting.86 OCO 641. and manners for the American home without servants. Ferrary. Masuo.6374 WEL Bashline.

USA pears / produced by Odyssey Productions .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 642. Taste of Burgundy / Julian & Carey More.5 ROA 641. Taste of Australia : the Bathers Pavilion cookbook / Victoria Alexander & Genevieve Harris with Sharon Dyson . Ferdinand E. and adapted by Charlotte Turgeon. the little dishes of Spain / Penelope Casas . sponsored by the Taste of Haiti / by Mirta Yurnet-Thomas & the Thomas family. Metz. Tapas : the little dishes of Spain / Penelope Casas . 1969Casas. L. Padma. 1950More. hot & sweet : a world of recipes for every day / Padma Lakshmi . Shortridge and James R.597291 LLA 641. team manager .812 CAS 2007 641. additional portrait photography by Charles Thompson. Rodney Weidland.C.59444 M835t 641. 1941Yurnet-Thomas.3413 ATA 641. edited by Nancy Ross Ryan . recipes researched by Jacqueline Saulnier . Victoria. Tapas : a taste of Spain in America / Jose´ Andre´s . writer. Oregon Washington California Pear Bureau. Tapas.812 AND 641. Elizabeth. Donna Matrazzo . Beatriz. photographs by Christopher Hirsheimer. Taste of gold. Penelope. Taste of France / photographs by Robert Freson . photography by Ditte Isager .. Llamas. Taride. decorated by Julian Brazelton. design by James Wageman. Taste of Cuba / Beatriz Llamas . Jose´.8 AME Karmel.5973 T215 112 of 123 . Taste of aloha : a collection of recipes from the Junior League of Honolulu. photographs by Tom Hopkins. Alice Marie.59 ALE 641. executive producer. Taste of American place : a reader on regional and ethnic foods / edited by Barbara G. illustrations by Ximena Maier. art direction and design by Erika Oliveira . 641. Erwin. with Richard Wolffe. Adrian Bailey . team captain . Taming the flame : secrets for hot-and-quick grilling and low-and-slow BBQ / Elizabeth Karmel .5784 KAR 2008 Tallow carving in the culinary profession videorecording / presented by E. Lakshmi. the 1988 U.59 L1929t 641. 641.5944 TAS Metz.] . Alexander. Tangy. 642..546 CAS 641. Casas. photographs by Jim Smith. [et al. Luna and Cohn Video Productions. Penelope.5 TAS 641. tart. photography. tr.E 1952 641. Maggie Andre . Taste for all seasons [videorecording] : perfectly delicious. translated by Claudia Lightfoot . Julian.L.59 M334v. Tante Marie's French kitchen. Timothy Ryan.597294 YUR 2004 641. Mirta. [contributing authors.. culinary team cookbook : the road to the world championship / Ferdinand E. Shortridge. 1889Andre´s.S.

7 TEC 641.5972 QUI 641. photographs by Le´on Perer. Toru Mashiko . from the editors of Washington magazine. Taste of Provence : the food and people of southern France.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641. 1952Quintana. Norman W. directed by Toru Mashiko. Diane Rossen. Tell me. Technology of food preservation.5952 R531t 641. Desrosier. adapted by Josephine Terry. Forbes. written and produced by Edward McCann . Jacques. foreword by Judith Olney .5973 AND 641.59 TEA 641. Janet Alm. Carey. Pe´pin. 1940Pattee. Technique : the fundamental techniques of cooking : an illustrated guide / Jacques Pe´pin . photography by Ignacio Urguiza . Donald. director. Anderson.5973 TAS 641. illustrations by Joy Batchelor. containing state board requirements in dietetics and state board examination questions. Lady. Teacher's dietetic guide. Taste of Kentucky / Janet Alm Anderson. Taste of Japan [videorecording] : a tradition of hospitality / produced by Shin-ei Armz . Taste of Japan : food fact and fable : what the people eat : customs and etiquette / Donald Richie. written by Julian More.5945 TAS Richie.5944 MOR 641. 1924- 2008 Taste of Italy [videorecording] / with Guiliano Bugialli . Alida Frances.5944 FOR 641. with 40 delicious recipes / photographed by Carey More . Tastes of liberty : a celebration of our great ethnic cooking / [Chateau Ste. with wine notes by Anthony Dias Blue. written by Kenmei Kato. Henry Woods. More.5944 B397t 113 of 123 . Orme. Patricia. Beckwith. produced & directed by Lee Kraft. Fred. Techniques of healthy cooking [videorecording] / the Culinary Institute of America presents . Team USA's cooks tour of the Pacific Rim [videorecording]. Desrosier.578 WOR 641. chef: being the French recipe collection of the Lady Muriel Beckwith.59795 BRA 641. by Norman W. Brack. Marilyn Wilkinson.5952 TAS 641.5 Pe 641.56 P2t 641. Taste of summer : inspired recipes for casual entertaining / Diane Rossen Worthington . Learning Resources Center. Leslie. Michelle].4 DES 641. consulting editor . Taste of Provence : classic recipes from the south of France / collected & illustrated by Leslie Forbes. Muriel Gordon-Lennox. Worthington. text by William A. Taste of Mexico / Patricia Quintana . Jr. 641. Tastes of the Pacific Northwest : traditional & innovative recipes from America's newest regional cuisine / by Fred Brack & Tina Bell .

(Matilda Gertrude). Daniel J. Hailman. Textbook of domestic science for high schools. John Burgoyne . and schemes : banquet menu ideas. John R. Time-Life Books. 1953Campbell. D'Avila-La Tourrette. Van Loan. Piccolo. concepts. 2008 Tempting appetizers [videorecording] / producer.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641.22 HAI 641. KQED. products.568 T583t 641.5784 P4519t 641.4 WIG 641. Texas barbecue : a guide to the best pits. Thomas Jefferson on wine / John Hailman. 1942. Victor-Antoine. Matilda G.5 C15 642.5 TIM 641. Wigger.5 PIC 114 of 123 .59 J777t 641. Test kitchen favorites / by the editors at America's test kitchen . by Matilda G.5636 DAV Wigger. Tenth muse : my life in food / Judith Jones. dreams.66 BUR 641. van Ackere. prepared & presented by Alice Vernon. Terrines. illustrations. photography. Time-Life holiday cookbook / adapted from the Foods of the world series by the editors of Time-Life Books. Texas link to sausage making / Larry Burrier. Thyme and the river : recipes from Oregon's Steamboat Inn / by Sharon Van Loan and Patricia Lee with Mark Hoy. Time-Life international cookbook / [compiled by] the editors of Time-Life Books.509795 V259t 641. Linda Brandt . and prize-winning recipes in the Lone Star state / Paris Permenter & John Bigley. Larry. Campbell. pa^te´s & galantines / by the editors of Time-Life Books. and thematic experiences / G. G. This good food : contemporary French vegetarian recipes from a monastery kitchen / Brother Victor-Antoine D'Avila-Latourrette.. Burrier. Themes.5 TIM 641.812 TEM Jones. Timing is everything : the complete timing guide to cooking / Jack Piccolo. Through the kitchen window : women explore the intimate meanings of food and cooking / edited by Arlene Voski Avakian. Sharon. Bruce Franchini . director. Timing and organization [videorecording] / produced by Meridian Education Corporation . Eugene 641.812 T327 641.5 T531 641. Eugene. Jack.641. 641. Carl Tremblay. Paris. Judith. b.5 TES Permenter.

Cleaver. Ochiai Toshi. Top one hundred Italian rice dishes : including over 50 risotto recipes / Diane Seed . photography by Tim Robinson . Joanne A. Tom Douglas' Seattle kitchen / Tom Douglas with Dennis Kelly.86 TRA 641. TriBeCa cookbook : a collection of seasonal menus from New York's most renowed restaurant neighborhood / presented. and edited by Mary Cleaver. Philip Miller. Trailside cookbook : a handbook for hungry campers and hikers / Don and Pam Philpott. styling by Sarah De Nardi.59795 D736s 641. Tofu 1-2-3 / by Maribeth Abrams.578 PHI 642. Diane.65655 P147t 641. Abrams. Tricks of the trade [videorecording] / Blue Diamond Growers. most earth-friendly food / Cindy Burke. Tomato sauce [videorecording] / produced by the Food & Beverage Institute . 1936Seed. Joy Simmen Hamburger.6318 SEE 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Burke. Tossed : 200 fast.4 CLE 641. and Duskie Estes . Cindy.56314 S228t 1989 641. Joyce. Tofu book : the new American cuisine / John Paino & Lisa Messinger. Maribeth. Tom. illustrations by Sarah Hocombe. and fabulous salads / Jane Lawson . safest. Munakata Nobuko.59729 LAF 115 of 123 . and . Takashi. Tropic cooking : the new cuisine from Florida and the islands of the Caribbean / Joyce LaFray Young. fresh. Melanie Nelson . To¯nyo¯byo¯ : shigun tensu¯ho¯ no shokuji / Kagawa Aya [kanshu¯] .34 TRI 641.65655 T644 641.814 TOM 641. Linda Fraser. 1968Lanza. Sano Takashi. Paino. Philpott. writer/producers. Traditional desserts : delicious desserts for every occasion / consultant editor. 1958- 641. Douglas. Tour of ethnic food stores [videorecording] / producer. Tofu cooking / edited by Junko Lampert. LaFray. Jane. Totally dairy-free cooking / Louis Lanza and Laura Morton. Learning Zone Express. Mimi Shanley Taft. Sano. Meyer. Lawson.35 ABR 2008 To buy or not to buy organic : what you need to know to choose the healthiest. Louis. Mary.83 LAW 641. Shelley Lance. compiled.563 BUR 641. 641. Don. John.31 TOU 641. foreword by Ed Levine.563 LAN 641.

Joey. Ultimate cheesecake cookbook / Joey Reynolds.641. Bruce. 1960. 641. Lundberg. granitas. 1960. and Vaughn Perret . Donna. by Donald E. hundreds of ways to use America's favorite spread / Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough. Ultimate bread / Eric Treuille & Ursula Ferrigno . photographs by Wayne Barrett . Christopher B. Eric. Ultimate chocolate cake and 110 other chocolate indulgences / Helge Rubinstein. Asquith. Lundberg and Lendal H. 1960.8 WEI Rodnitzky. 641. breakfast to dessert. Daniel G.71 AME 1992 641.853 WEI Reynolds. Bruce. Kotschevar. photographs by William A. photography by Ian O'Leary.59 TRU 641. 1948Trout Point Lodge cookbook : Creole cuisine from New Orleans to Nova Scotia / Daniel Abel.6374 RUB Weinstein. Helge. and more / Bruce Weinstein.578 W9514t 641.815 TRE Weinstein.641. Cherie.853 ASQ 641.823 OHA 641. Donald E. sorbets. Ultimate juicing : delicious recipes for over 125 of the best fruit and vegetable juice combinations / Donna Pliner Rodnitzky. Amendola. Rubinstein. Abel. and more! / Cherie Calbom. Ultimate peanut butter book : savory and sweet.8653 REY 641. Joseph. Ultimate chili book / Christopher B.875 R694u Weinstein. 641. Charles Leary. Donald Lundberg. Understanding baking / Joseph Amendola. Ultimate ice cream book : over 500 ice creams.641. Nash.6 WEI Calbom. Bruce. Twelve months of monastery soups / Brother Victor-Antoine d'Avila-Latourrette. Victor-Antoine. foreword by John Besh. John. Truffles and other chocolate confections / Pamella Asquith. soft and chewy. shakes. Wright. O'Hara . with Myra Chanin. 641. drinks.59 ABE 641.5 CAL 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 2008 Trout on a stick / by John Wright. O'Hara. frozen desserts. Ultimate smoothie book : 130 delicious recipes for blender drinks.813 D259t 641.5 Lu 116 of 123 . D'Avila-Latourrette. True essentials of a feast : a collection of recipes from the staff of the Library of Congress. Treuille. Understanding cooking. hard and crunchy sweets and treats / by Bruce Weinstein. Pamella Z. Ultimate candy book : more than 700 quick and easy.

Rosensweig. Craig. Vegan with a vengeance : over 150 delicious.5636 ROS 641.662 CLA 641. Vegetarian cooking for everyone / Deborah Madison . Isa Chandra Moskowitz. written and presented by Jancis Robinson. Isa photographs by Geoffery Tischman . Vegetables / James Peterson. Valentina. and Terry Romero. Vegetables / by the editors of Time-Life Books. Vegetables / [managing editor.5944 WIL 641.A. Deborah. Variety meats from the U. drawings by Barbara Fiore .36 IND 641. produced & directed by Lee Kraft.65 V422 641.S. special photography by Jacqui Hurst. Vegetarian & more! : versatile vegetarian recipes with optional meat add-ins / Linda Rosensweig. cheap. by Bill Aller. Cooperative Meat 641. and tools of classic modern cuisine / Anne Willan. Madison. Vegetable lover's video cookbook. Moskowitz. Uniform retail meat identity standards : a program for the retail meat trade / by the Industrywide Cooperative Industrywide Meat Identification Standards Committee. Claiborne. Veal cookery / Craig Claiborne. techniques. photos.22 UND 641.65 PET 641. Vegetable lover's video cookbook. 2008 Understanding wines [videorecording] / Columbia River Entertainment Group . Chandra. James. University of Montana getting wild with wild game cookbook.36 VAR 641.65 VEG 641. Kay Halsey]. Linda.5636 MAD 117 of 123 . Valentina's Italian family feast / Valentina Harris . produced & directed by Lee Kraft. Pierre Franey . ingredients. food styling by Neje Bailey. Volume 2 [videorecording] / with Bert Greene .ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641.65 VEG1 641. Peterson. A purchasing guide.69 UNI Harris. Published by National Live Stock and Meat Board for the United States Meat Export Federation. Volume 1 [videorecording] / with Bert Greene .65 VEG2 641.5945 HAR 641. Vanilla : the Watkins kitchen collection.5 MOS 641. [photographs by Laurie Smith].6382 VAN 641. Willan. Varenne pratique : the complete illustrated cooking course. animal-free recipes that rock / Isa Chandra Moskowitz . Anne.

photo styling by Jody Brennan.5636 CHE Vegetarian grill : 200 recipes for inspired flame-kissed meals / by Andrea Chesman. principal photography by Bill Schwob . Della Croce. food styling by Karen Frerichs. Julia. Pamela Sheldon Johns . Sheryl. Tihany . photography. Didi. 118 of 123 . Victory garden fish and vegetable cookbook / by Marian Morash. Venison sausage cookbook : complete guide from field to table / Harold Webster.691 V4612 641.5636 DEL 641. Andrea.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 2008 Vegetarian feast / Martha Rose Shulman. Nir Adar .65 MOR 641. Viennese pastry cookbook. Video pizza [videorecording] / Stephen J. Florence. Richard Eskite. introduction by Melissa Clark . Marian. 641. illustrated by Kathleen M.65 MOR 641. 641. Chesman. Victory garden cookbook / by Marian Morash . Vegetarian times cooks Mediterranean / from the editors of Vegetarian times . photography by John Vaughan . Venetian taste / created by Adam D. illustrations by Melissa Sweet.631 LON 641. 1943641.865 REI Vegetarian table : Italy / by Julia Della Croce . food artist. Morash. Marian. 641.5636 EMM Vegetarian table : France / by Georgeanne Brennan . Emmons. from Vienna with love.691 W379v 641. London. Vegetarian for all seasons / general editor.5945 FAB 641. Morash. text by Florence Fabricant .5636 VEG Fabricant. Thompson-Kennedy . photography by Deborah Jones. additional photography by James Scherer. Venison : fast and foolproof favorites : recipes from the readers of Sports afield / edited by Henry Sinkus. Ryan. photographs by Mary Ellen Bartley. Martha Rose. Lilly Joss.5636 JOH 641. 1963641.691 V461 Webster.5636 SHU Johns. Versatile grain and the elegant bean : a celebration of the world's most healthful foods / Sheryl and Mel London .82 VID Reich.5944 BRE 641. recipes. Pamela Sheldon. Chuck Williams . Skelly. in collaboration with Jane Doerfer . Georgeanne. photographer. Venison cookery. 1953641. Peter Pioppo. Harold W. recipes by Francesco Antonucci . Vegetarian planet : 350 big-flavor recipes for out-of-this-world food every day / Didi Emmons . 641. Shulman.

Ha. Visual food encyclopedia. Vineyard seasons : more from the heart of the home / by Susan Branch. Waiter and waitress training manual / Sondra J. Waiter & waitress and waitstaff training handbook : a complete guide to the proper steps in service for food & beverage employees / Lora Arduser & Douglas R. Toussaint. 1946- 2008 Vietnamese kitchen : treasured family recipes / Ha Roda. Virginia house-wife / by Mary Randolph . Way we ate : Pacific Northwest cooking. Way to cook / Julia Child . Ortiz. 641.5 BRA Randolph. Brown. 17621828. 641.5 RAN Randolph. Kurt W. 642. candies & confections from all the countries that celebrate Christmas / Mimi Sheraton . 641.E Arduser. Mimi.6 ARD 642. Janice. Washington hostess cookbook / Cissie Coy. Kahl. Dahmer. Dahmer. cookies. Dahmer. Feuer.6 ARD 642. Kahl. Rebecca Martinez.59795 WIL 119 of 123 . Virtuous vanilla : a maidenly memoire of innocence / Janice Feuer. photographs by Brian Leatart and Jim Scherer. 1948Sheraton.815 ORT Branch. Susan. foreword by Marion Cunningham. Arduser. 641. Sondra J. Dahmer and Kurt W. Lora.5 FEU 641. Lora. Walnut cookbook / by Jean-Luc Toussaint .5 DAH 641.5 CHI Williams. Virginia housewife: or methodical cook. Joe. Visions of sugarplums : a cookbook of cakes. Jacqueline B. Mary.6451 TOU 641.3 ENC.5975 COY 641. Coy. Waiter & waitress training : how to develop your staff for maximum service & profit / by Lora Arduser. with historical notes and commentaries by Karen Hess. 1843-1900 / Jacqueline B. Cissie. Waiter and waitress training manual / Sondra J. Williams.5 R194v 641. Julia. Jean-Luc. English edition by Betsy Draine & Michael Hinden.59597 ROD 641. Sondra J. 641. 17621828.568 SHE 1986 641. Mary.5 DAH 1996 642. illustrations by Pat Stewart. Village baker : classic regional breads from Europe and America / Joe Ortiz . Child.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Roda. Veronica Di Rosa.

1902Wenzel. foreword by Greg Patent. Wenzel's menu maker. Whistleberries. Labensky .8 WIL 641. healthful. illustrations by David Watts. Joyce.572 We 641. O'Neill. Wenzel. Edward B. delicious and satisfying recipes for salads / by Jennifer Joyce .692 W6681 120 of 123 . Whole grain breads by hand or machine : 200 delicious. G. Ingram. Steven. Meyer.5973 M167w 641. 641. Beatrice A. Blaine. Gaye G. McManus & Patricia "the Troll" McManus Gass .5978 REY 641.355 JOY 641. with photography by Sian Irvine. Philip Miller.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Labensky. the senses. Weight Watchers annual recipes for success 2002. illustrations by William E. Petusevsky.03 LAB 2001 641.563 PET Ojakangas. stirabout. McManus. Sarah R. Whatchagot stew : a memoir of an Idaho childhood. and decorating the perfect wedding cake / Dede Wilson. recipes tested by Lee Ann Cox . Wild about seafood. White sauces [videorecording] / produced by the Food & Beverage Institute . L. G.572 We 641. (George Leonard).814 WHI 641. (George Leonard). Wenzel's menu-maker. Jennifer. Reynolds. What is a calorie? [videorecording]. & depression cake / Edward B. Ingram.563 W4195 641. Joanne A. and the soul / Molly O'Neill . 2008 Webster's new world dictionary of culinary arts / Steven Labensky. Wedding cakes you can make : designing. baking. 1902Freer. Molly. Whole Foods Market cookbook : a guide to natural foods with 350 recipes / Steve Petusevsky and Whole Foods Market team members . Reynolds. writer/producers.3 WHA 641. simple recipes / Beatrice Ojakangas. illustrations by Du¨rten Kampmann. illustrations by Shannon McManus Bayfield. illustrations by Amy Hill. Well-seasoned appetite : recipes for eating with the seasons. 641. Wilson. Well-dressed salad : contemporary. ichael Kennedy . Dede.59 W419 641. with recipes and commentaries / Patrick F. Steve. West Coast seafood recipes : over 375! easy-to-prepare seafood recipes for two people / Blaine Freer .815 OJA 641.692 F856w 641.5 ONE 641. Weight Watchers new international cookbook / photography by Aaron Rezny. Patrick F. L.

With commentary by Joan Parry Dutton. Beth. Manikowski. Kristine Kidd . Bob. Williams-Sonoma's gifts from the kitchen / general editor. by Townsend Whelen. research. Schreiber. Roger. Wild jams and jellies : delicious recipes using 75 wild edibles / Joe Freitus and Salli Haberman. assisted by Jacqui Hurst .691 V2222w 641. Carol. J. 1932Hamerstrom. Wilton makes it easy to create beautiful gum paste flowers.6 HAM 641. illustrated by Elva Hamerstrom Paulson. Angier. traditional and contemporary recipes initially compiled and adapted by Letha Booth Stewart.691 W6681 641. food photography by Richard Jung.691 W6682 641. 641. Kidd. Anderson.59795 SCH 641. Cory. 121 of 123 . Frances. illustrations by Jan Anderson. Wild rice for all seasons cookbook / by Beth Anderson. 1938Schranck. Wildwood : cooking from the source in the Pacific Northwest / Cory Schreiber . Wild food cookbook / Frances Hamerstrom . Bradford. Wild game cookery : the hunter's home companion / Carol Vance Wary. Vance. Allan Rosenberg.69 M278w 641. Phillips.5973 SCO 641. recipes. Wild fish & game cookbook / recipes. Wild blackberry cobbler and other old fashioned recipes / Katie Stewart & Pamela Michael. location photography by Jerome Hart .578 A588w 641. stories & illustrations by John Manikowski .5 P562w 641. Chuck Williams . 1961Scott. Letha. Freitus.59755 BOO 641. Willard. Kristine. 1907-1998.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 2008 Wild about venison. Introd. Joe. Wild about waterfowl. photography. editor. Willard Scott's all-American cookbook.5 STE 641. Wild food / by Roger Phillips . Claire Appleby .69 S3777w 641.852 FRE 641. Color photos. by Taylor Biggs Booth.8 WIL and the staff of Colonial Williamsburg. photographs by Zeva Oelbaum. John.5 KID 641. Nicky Foy. Katie.6318 AND 641. Wilderness cookery. Wild in the kitchen : fish and wild game recipes / by Bob Schranck. Williamsburg cookbook.

641. Moore. consultant. Jacob. Brian.5636 J82w 641. Julie. Wine and food of Spain / Jan Read. Chinois.86 MOO 642. Marilyn M. 641. Maite Manjo´n. Edward A. Winterthur's culinary collection : a sampler of fine American cooking / compiled by Anne Beckley Coleman.822 WON 641.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana 641.5946 REA 641. Wings of life : vegetarian cookery / by Julie Jordan . Pierre . Wines and vines of Europe / by Howard L. Working chef's cookbook for natural whole foods / Jackson F. CTA/Romagnolis. a Culinary Learning Resources production .84 WIN 641. Thomas . Wolfgang Puck cookbook : recipes from Spago. Blackman. Wine lover cooks Italian : pairing great recipes with the perfect glass of wine / by Brian St.5 WIN 641. [drawings by Joanne Leary] Winning sandwiches for menu makers from the National sandwich idea contest / edited by Kathleen M. restaurants. Dee Munson. Jeanne.6 WIN Blum.5945 PIE 642. and points east and west / Wolfgang Puck. Work analysis and design for hotels. Jackson F. Michael Ashkenazi.22 WIN 641. Blackman. Wolfgang. World cookbook for students / Jeanne Jacob. Wine service [videorecording] / The Culinary Institute of America . Howard L. Kazarian. 641. Wonderful world of pasta [videorecording] / with Margaret & Franco Romagnoli . by Edward A. Wooden spoon dessert book : the best you ever ate / Marilyn Moore.5 Ka 641. MVC. Blum.563 BLA 641. video/audio director. producer/writer. Jordan. photographs by Minh + Wass. Women's Volunteer Committee of the New Orleans Museum of Art presents Artist's Palate cookbook : classic creole & New Orleans recipes. and institutions.5973 WOM 1988 641.59 JAC 122 of 123 . Puck. Skip Thela . Jan. Pierre. Wine fundamentals [videorecording] / produced and directed by Dobri Kiprov . Kazarian.782 BLU 2008 Wine : [videorecording] what every server needs to know / Hospitality Television. St.872 HOS Read. Hugh Johnson. Philip Miller.5 PUC 641.

Makoto.563 COO 641. Zane Grey cookbook / by Barbara and George Reiger. preserve. World's finest chicken : recipes / by Sonia Slyer & Janice Metcalfe . roast. Zuni Cafe cookbook / Judy Rodgers . Tara Cranmer . Margaret Olds.815 WOO 641. 1944Rodgers. recipe photography by Phil Wymant . Weir.5028 M969w 641. Munson] . Munson. photography.5 ROD 123 of 123 . Slyer. 641. Carol. Your organic kitchen : the essential guide to selecting and cooking organic foods / Jesse Ziff Cool . Ed. Gerald Asher . Alice. photography by Lisa Koenig. Teresa. You say tomato : peel.641. an international cookbook. Stan.578 R361z Shiina. and enjoy / Joanne Weir. 1940. from the editors of Prevention Magazine cookbooks. Gentl & Hyers/Edge. World of game cooking / Teresa Marrone. 641. 1926Warren. Carol H.6374 MED 641. general editor. Wood. Yuletide at Winterthur : tastes and visions of the season. chop. Year in chocolate : four seasons of unforgettable desserts / Alice Medrich .691 M361w 641. World's best catfish cookbook / by Stan Warren. wine notes & selections.665 SLY 641. freeze. Zen Nihon kueba wakaru zukan / Shiina Makoto. World sourdoughs from antiquity / Ed Wood. Lowell W. Jesse Ziff. Yukon bear bacon & boot grease recipes. Joanne. Cool. dry. Barbara. Sonia.6 WEI 641. 641. Judy. Michael Lamotte. Wrap & roll / California Culinary Academy.691 Y94 641. Munson.8 WRA Medrich.ExAO-1 Culinary Arts Library The Unversity of Montana Collins. Ruth Philpott.5952 S5559z 641.692 W293w 641. World's greatest kitchen gadgets & gizmos / [editor. photography.5 Co 2008 World of curries. writers. Marrone.568 Y95 Reiger. 641.

INSTRUCTIONAL SKILLS DATE & HOURS & A. CEC Job Title: Director of Culinary Arts Full-time: X Subjects Taught: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Introduction to Foods American Regional Cuisine International Cuisine Northwest Food and Wine Soups Stocks and Sauces Techniques of Healthy Cooking Machine and Tools Sanitation and Safety Cooking Methodology Cost Control Ala Carte Kitchen Portfolio Dining Room Garde Manger Charcuterie Baking Processes and Procedures SPECIFY THE TOPIC or EVENT Part-time: I.ExB-1. School/department in-service workshop Educational Psychology Curriculum Planning and Development Evaluation and Testing Teaching Methodology Sanitation Course 2-12-04/3-1-04 3-9-04/3-23-04 3-30-04/4-15-04 4-20-04/5-08-04 09-3-03/12-13-3 40 hours 40 hours 40 hours 40 hours 30 hours/semester Self-Study Report .Revised June 2004 .doc ATTACHMENT B ACF Accrediting Commission FACULTY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Name of School: The University of Montana College of Technology Name of Faculty Member: Thomas Campbell.

Education conferences/seminars 1-26-04/5-15-04 9-04-02/12-04-02 45 hours/semester 30 hours/semester 9-04-02/12-02-02 3-04-04 30 hours/semester 4 hours 4-03-04 2 hours 9-1-3/12-12-3 30 hours 3-1-97/3-1-3 10 hours per year ACF Western Regional Conference ACF Accreditation and Secondary Accreditation Evaluators Clinic Culinary Educators’ Clinic American Academy of Chefs Dinner C.Revised June 2004 . Culinary Arts Department Boise State University. Faculty retreats for planning and assessment 6-12-3 5-14-04 5-04-04 Self-Study Report . Formal college course work D.doc ATTACHMENT B ACF Accrediting Commission FACULTY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Nutritional Cooking Nutrition for Foodservice and Culinary Professionals Supervision in the Hospitality Industry Western Montana Chefs de Cuisine Educational Scholarship Dinner Host Western Montana Chefs de Cuisine Meeting Serve Safe Sanitation Course (NRA Instructor Certificate) Numerous Continuing Education Courses B. Culinary Arts Department Anaconda Jobs Corps.ExB-1. Culinary Arts Department E. Visits to other institution’s programs 2-25-04/2-29-04 2-26-04 5 days 1 hour 2-25-04 2-27-04 8 hours 4 hours Renton Technical College.

Lynn Stocking Hosted two graduate student film crews to shoot in our kitchen and perform interviews. Teaching exchange program H.Revised June 2004 . Aired on University television Guest spot on NPR’s Pea Green Boat radio program with two students and myself talking about Christmas cookies Created the “Ask the Chef” segment for the UM periodicals Chef’s of Montana cooking show aired on channel 12 Students participated in fund raising auction event featuring a chocolate competition with over 50 entries…I was one of the judges Performed a cooking demonstration and lecture for Hellgate High School’s culinary arts program C. Active membership in professional organizations American Culinary Federation Western Montana Chefs de Cuisine Washington State Chefs Association B. 2003 High school counselors open house for Admissions Department Chamber of Commerce Function for Dean.doc ATTACHMENT B ACF Accrediting Commission FACULTY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT F. Active membership in educational organizations American Culinary Federation Accredited Culinary Program G. Culinary competitions • • Student Individual Class “K” competition held 3-29-04 Judge for Class “K” competition Self-Study Report . Visits to business or industry Reestablished working relationship with Accreditation Board of ACF. TECHNICAL SKILLS A. Participation in technical conferences/workshops D. Other (specify) II.ExB-1. Created an advisory board and met for the first time October 22.

⇒ Work with area high schools • Provide periodic cooking demonstrations for their culinary programs • Act as mentors for senior students interested in a hospitality industry career • Participate in college recruitment programs • Initiate a pipeline between The Culinary Program and academic advisors and guidance counselors ⇒ Continue to provide local charities with culinary auction items for fund raising events ⇒ Investigate and work with local farmers and ranchers to augment inventory items with fresh products. Outside related employment F.doc ATTACHMENT B ACF Accrediting Commission FACULTY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT E. particularly with organic producers ⇒ Work with Montana Job Corp’s Business Education Program to articulate classes and encourage discourse Self-Study Report . This could work into a possible chain reaction for sustainable cuisine practices.ExB-1. • Work within the University system to provide services for departmental functions while at the same time introducing the student to new learning opportunities. Other (specify) ⇒ Develop working relationships and communication with industry • Meet regularly with Advisory Committee members.Revised June 2004 .

Education conferences/seminars C. INSTRUCTIONAL SKILLS DATE & HOURS & TOPIC or EVENT A. Culinary competitions E. Outside related employment F. Faculty retreats for planning and assessment F. Visits to other institution’s programs E. Active membership in professional organizations B. Participation in technical conferences/workshops D.doc ATTACHMENT B ACF Accrediting Commission FACULTY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Name of School: University of Montana. College of Technology Name of Faculty Member: Laura Swanson Job Title: Adjunct Professor Full-time: x Part-time: Subjects Taught: Financial Accounting for Hospitality Industry SPECIFY THE I. Visits to business or industry C. Formal college course work D. Other (specify) Self-Study Report .ExB-2. Other (specify) TECHNICAL SKILLS A. Active membership in educational organizations G. School/department in-service workshop B.Revised July 2008 . Teaching exchange program H.

Other (specify) I.ExB-3. Formal college course work D. Introduction to Computers. Active membership in professional organizations B. TECHNICAL SKILLS A. II. Active membership in educational organizations G. Visits to other institution’s programs E. Education conferences/seminars C. Remaining classes are specific to the medical office curriculum I. Visits to business or industry C. INSTRUCTIONAL SKILLS DATE & HOURS & SPECIFY THE TOPIC or EVENT A. School/department in-service workshop B.Revised June 2004 .doc ATTACHMENT B ACF Accrediting Commission FACULTY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Name of School: University of Montana College of Technology Name of Faculty Member: Aimee Ault Job Title: Adjunct Professor Full-time: Yes Part-time: Subjects Taught: Food Service Computer Applications. Outside related employment F. Faculty retreats for planning and assessment F. Participation in technical conferences/workshops D. Teaching exchange program H. Other (specify) Self-Study Report . Culinary competitions E.

Education conferences/seminars C. Visits to other institution’s programs E.doc ATTACHMENT B ACF Accrediting Commission FACULTY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Name of School: University of Montana. Teaching exchange program H. Active membership in educational organizations G. College of Technology Name of Faculty Member: Andrea Paskert Job Title: Chef Instructor Full-time: Part-time: X Subjects Taught: Pantry & Garde Manger. INSTRUCTIONAL SKILLS A. Short Order Cookery SPECIFY THE DATE & HOURS & TOPIC or EVENT I. Dining Room Procedures. TECHNICAL SKILLS A. Outside related employment F. Faculty retreats for planning and assessment F.ExB-4. Culinary competitions E.Revised July 2008 . Participation in technical conferences/workshops   D. School/department in-service workshop B. Other (specify)       II. Visits to business or industry C. Active membership in professional organizations B. Other (specify)      Self-Study Report . Formal college course work D.

Education conferences/seminars C. Other (specify) 8-28-03 7 ADHD Workshop – II. Lodahl Job Title: Chef Instructor Full-time: X Part-time: Subjects Taught: Soups. Visits to business or industry C. Outside related employment F. School/department in-service workshop Student Retention B.Revised June 2004 . Stocks & Sauces – Meats & Vegetables – Storeroom Procedures – Baking and Pastry SPECIFY THE DATE & HOURS & TOPIC or EVENT I. College of Technology Name of Faculty Member: Ross W. Teaching exchange program H.ExB-5. INSTRUCTIONAL SKILLS A. Other (specify) Culinary Position at Perugia’s Restaurant Self-Study Report . Active membership in professional organizations B.doc ATTACHMENT B ACF Accrediting Commission FACULTY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Name of School: University of Montana. Visits to other institution’s programs E. Faculty retreats for planning and assessment F. Culinary competitions E. Participation in technical conferences/workshops D. Active membership in educational organizations G. TECHNICAL SKILLS A. Formal college course work D.

ExC    List of Graduates and Places of Employment     All numbers start with area code 406  Name  Aimee Ault  Laura Swanson  Carol Chandler  Travis Schlader  Gina (Mae) Ikerd  Dena Crill  Stephanie  Immenschuh  Eric Bayley  Allen Christensen  Wayne Elias  Keith Blankenship  Wayne Weidow  Elizabeth Floch          Creative Confections Employer  College of Technology College of Technology University of Montana Finn & Porter University of Montana University of Montana Self Employed University of Montana Paws Up Resort Scotties Table Home Contact  626‐5455 677‐5023 549‐0157 240‐9409 258‐6129 829‐3917 360‐9084 327‐9399 829‐6424 531‐1397 (208) 983‐1299 961‐4773 543‐9513 Work Contact  243‐7815 243‐7880 243‐2324 542‐4660 243‐2324 243‐2324   829‐3917 244‐5200 549‐2790     523‐1705   1 | P a g e     .

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 go directly to Not Employed at bottom of page)    Full Time _____    Part Time _____ (how many hours per week?) ___________    In‐state _____    Out‐of‐state ____________                 (specify state)  What is your job title? ____________________________________________________    Is your position:  Related _____ or Not related to the program? _____    How long have you been employed in your current position? _____________________                         (record to nearest month)  Are you satisfied with your job?  Yes _____  No _____    What is your salary? ___________  _____ Per hour _____ Per Year    What benefits are you receiving?  Health Ins.   THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY                 Name:  Last_____________________ First___________________ Middle __________    Address:  _______________________City _____________State________ Zip_______    Phone:  __________________ Year Graduated _______ E‐Mail __________________      EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION:      Date Completed: __________________    Are you employed?    Yes ____    No ____ (If no. _____ Sick Leave ______ Vacation   Retirement _______    Are there opportunities for advancement?  Yes _____ No _____                1|Page   CULINARY ARTS PROGRAM GRADUATE SURVEY    .

   May we have your permission to contact you employer about the College  of Technology Culinary Program?   Yes _____ No _____      Signiture:_____________________________________________________________      Thank you for your time.edu    2|Page . CEC      406­243­7831      thomas.campbell@umontana.        Thomas Campbell.    How did you obtain this job?    □ Referred by program director      □ Referred by faculty member      □ Referred by Job Service or government agency  □ Knew the employer        □ Had previously worked for the employer  □ Answered an ad in the newspaper    □ Answered an ad in a trade publication                    □ Listing or referral from Career Services    □ Referred by private employment agency  □ Referred by someone who knew the employer  □ Was not aware of opening  □ Replied to an on‐line job listing  □  Found job through a union listing  □  Other (Specify) ________________________  NOT EMPLOYED (Only ask of those who are not employed)    Are you (check one)                ____ Looking for employment  ____ Self Employed    ____ Enlisted in the military        ____ Continuing your education  ____ Not seeking employment  ____ Other (Specify) _______________      Who is your employer? ___________________________________________________    Contact person for employer follow‐up survey?  _______________________________    Employers address: _____________________________________________________    City ___________________ State____________ Zip ___________    Employer Phone _____________________ E‐Mail _____________________________      The American Culinary Federation requires reports about the ACF­approved  programs.  Please feel free to include additional comments or contact the Program  Director.  Your feedback is important for us to provide a quality  education.

how did you learn of the program? Please check all that apply: ____Montana Chefs Association ____Contacts with other food service professionals ____Graduate applied for position/told you of program ____Culinary Arts Advisory Committee ____The University of Montana catalog or web site ____Other ____________________________ DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES Please check the applicable duties performed by the graduate: ____Inventory ____Payroll ____Line cook ____Dinner cook ____Lunch cook ____Breakfast cook ____Menu development ____Recipe development ____Catering ____Front-of-the house ____Baking ____Pastry ____Performs word processing tasks ____Ordering ____Recycling and sustainable systems ____Management ____Nutritional cooking ____Other____________________________________ Please rate the graduate’s entry-level knowledge and skills according to the following: .000 Over 20.000 15.000 ____ ____ ____ What benefits do you offer? Type of firm: ____Restaurant ____Hotel ____Resort ____Other—please specify: __________________________ Did you contact the College when hiring this graduate: 401K Health Insurance Sick & Annual Leave ____ ____ ____ Life Insurance ____ Dental Insurance ____ None ____ Was the graduate adequately prepared as an entry-level employee? ____ Yes ____ Somewhat ____ No ___Yes ___No If yes.THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY CULINARY ARTS STUDIES GRADUATE EMPLOYER SURVEY Graduate Name:_________________________ GENERAL INFORMATION Status: ____Currently employed Length of employment: _______________ Job title: ___________________________ Status: ____Previously employed Length of employment:________________ Job title: ___________________________ SALARY/BENEFITS What salary does the above graduate earn? Below 15. were you aware of the Culinary Arts Program? ____Yes _____No If yes.000-20.

CULINARY ARTS STUDIES GRADUATE EMPLOYER SURVEY 2 Above Average Knowledge of: Sautéing Braising Poaching Frying Roasting Garde Manger Charcuterie Service techniques Beverage service Catering Baking and pastry Skills: Analytical/critical thinking Inventory and cost control Computer applications Computerized menu and recipe research Sanitation Organization Interpersonal communication Internet research Customer service Kitchen management Dining room management Catering management Bake shop management Spreadsheets Word processing Written communication ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ Average ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ Below Average _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ Not Applicable _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ _________ ________ _________ ________ _________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ In which areas do you feel this program best prepared the graduate? In which areas do you feel additional preparation would be helpful? Do you have suggestions for program/curriculum? Would you hire another graduate? ____Yes ____No Survey completed by: ___________________________________ Supervisor .

List of Employers    .

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 Restaurateur                                          1|Page . Garde Manger. Line Cook. Kitchen Manager. Prep Cook. Grillardin.   Entremittier.   Banquet Chef. Tournant.ExF‐1         American Culinary Federation Foundation  Accrediting Commission  Faculty Professional Development Report  2008  Educational Background:    Air Academy High School       Wenatchee Valley College      Bellevue Community College0     The Culinary Institute of America            09‐70 /06‐74  09‐74 /06‐75  High School Diploma  General Studies      9‐75/06‐76           Humanities  AOS Degree  Culinary Arts      Experience:      Name of Company and Job Title including Dates of employment:          The University of Montana College of Technology  07‐01‐03/Present  Director Culinary Arts            The Art Institute of Seattle School of Culinary Arts  03‐01‐97/03‐01‐03  Chef Instructor                        Belleview Inn          05‐91/09‐97  Corporate Executive Chef                    04‐950/5‐01  Tomas Culinary Consulting and Catering  Chef Owner                        Belleview Inn          05‐86/07‐88  Sous Chef                        Student of the Profession         01‐72/05‐86  Dishwasher. Saucier.

  topic.ExF‐1         American Culinary Federation Foundation  Accrediting Commission  Faculty Professional Development Report  2008  Instructional skills updating for the past year. 4‐19‐21           4‐26‐07      144 hours  8 hours  24 hours    7‐23‐07      36 hours      8‐30‐07/present    04‐04‐07.            Educational Psychology                Curriculum Planning and Development  Supervision in the Hospitality Industry      Evaluation and Testing        Teaching Methodology          Sanitation Course         ServeSafe Instructor/Proctor Renewal    ACF Accreditation and Secondary     Accreditation Evaluators Clinic      Culinary Educators’ Clinic                 Certified Master Chefs Dinner         Manager Western Regional   Student Culinarian of the Year   Competition          Western Regional Conference    Culinary Educators Workshop      Host ACF Sanctioned Competitions    And Practical Exams    National ACF Conference          Manager/Coach    Student Culinary Team        Montana Chefs Association    Educational Scholarship Dinner    Host Montana Chefs Association     Cuisine Meeting    CAFE – Educators Seminar      and Workshop    ACF Accreditation Site Inspection    2|Page                                             02‐12‐06/03‐01‐06      03‐09‐06/03‐23‐06  09‐04‐06/12‐02‐06  03‐30‐06/04‐15‐06  04‐20‐06/05‐08‐08  09‐3‐07/12‐13‐07    07‐31‐08  02‐04‐07      02‐04‐07      07‐27‐07                  40 hours         40 hours     30 hours/semester  40 hours   40 hours     30 hours/semester  30 hours  1 hour    8 hours        4 hours  200 hours        01‐30‐06/7‐24‐07          4‐15‐07. educational conferences/seminars. 11‐06    4 hours    06‐12‐15‐05    24 hours    06      12hours  .  Include date. 4‐13‐08  anticipated 200 hours  84 hours    04‐13‐07.

 Culinary Arts        Flathead Valley Community College. Culinary Arts    Clark County Skills Center. Culinary Arts Department    Inland Northwest Culinary Academy    Schoolcraft College. 04‐06  06‐07‐06/09‐06  10‐23/24‐06  05‐12‐06. 10‐22‐06. Culinary Arts      Art Institute of Seattle.ExF‐1             American Culinary Federation Foundation  Accrediting Commission  Faculty Professional Development Report                          06  07  07  08                        12 hours  12 hours  12 hours  12 hours  24 hours  16 hours  8 hours  1 hour  1 hour each  3 hours  2008                    Chef of the Year Dinner        Spokane Community College Competition              Missoula County Public School      Advisory Board Meetings      Montana Association of Career     And Technical Educators Conference          04‐03‐07  10‐22. 10‐23‐07                      06‐12‐15‐05  04‐12‐05. 4‐12‐08  05‐22‐07              9‐10‐07  10‐5‐07  05‐19/21‐08          3|Page . Culinary Arts              06‐12‐03  05‐14‐04  05‐04‐04  10‐22‐05. 5‐13‐08  10‐18‐07    Visits to other institution’s programs:    Renton Technical College. Culinary Arts Department    Anaconda Jobs Corps. 08‐28‐06. Culinary Arts      Walla Walla Community College. 05‐16‐08  06‐03. 23‐07  4‐16‐08    05‐12‐07    08‐30‐06. Culinary Arts Department            Boise State University. Culinary Arts                Tri Cities Culinary Arts          Sentinel High School    Hellgate High School      Idaho State University.

ExF‐4         American Culinary Federation Foundation  Accrediting Commission  Faculty Professional Development Report  2008  Educational Background:    Kailua High School       Pacific University         The University of Montana            09‐94 /06‐98  High School Diploma      Bachelors Degree  Creative Writing/Literature  AOS Degree  Culinary Arts      Experience:      Name of Company and Job Title including Dates of employment:          The University of Montana College of Technology  01‐25‐08/Present  Chef Instructor            The Ranch Club          11‐28‐07/Present  Line Cook                        Walt Disney World Corporation      09‐07/11‐07  Culinary Cook II                    Ciao Mambo          05‐07/09‐07  Prep and Line Cook                                                         1|Page .

ExF‐4         American Culinary Federation Foundation  Accrediting Commission  Faculty Professional Development Report  2008  Instructional skills updating for the past year. educational conferences/seminars. Culinary Arts            04‐12‐05.              Assisted with ACF Sanctioned Competitions  And Practical Exams      Host Montana Chefs Association     Cuisine Meeting    Chef of the Year Dinner                                4‐26‐07    24 hours    01/2008     4 hours    04‐03‐07.  Include date. 06‐13‐08  48  hours  Visits to other institution’s programs:    Flathead Valley Community College. 05‐16‐08  2|Page .  topic.

5 Full Time: Time:yes Current professional Certification(s) held: Subject (s) currently teaching: • Introduction to Foods • Techniques of Healthy Cooking • Sanitation and Safety • Purchasing and Cost Control • Culinary Capstone Allocation of Time: Administrative: Instruction. College of Technology Instructors Name: Aimee Ault Job Title: Adjunct Faculty Part Date of initial employment:01-25-2008 to present Years in this position:. Include Date: Hours: Topic of Event: Educational conferences/seminars: Topic of Event Date Hours Institutional in service workshops: Topic of Event Date Hours W:\Lisa Thomas\Website Posting\Exhibits\ExF-4a. INC. ACCREDITING COMMISSION Faculty Professional Development Report Submit this report signed and dated for each individual teaching in the program.doc Created on 2/26/2007 8:07:00 AM . Name of School: The University of Montana. Use separate sheet if necessary): Date of Employment Company Position Instructional skills updating for the past year.Lab or Shop: 5hr/weekSupervision of Externships/Internships: Student Advising: Educational Background: Name of Post Secondary Institution(s) with Dates Attended describing completed Degree or Diploma and Major: Name of Institute Dates Attended Completed Degree/Diploma Prior Work Experience related to subjects taught (Starting with most recent.AMERICAN CULINARY FEDERATION FOUNDATION.Classroom: 12 hr/week Instruction.

ACCREDITING COMMISSION Faculty Professional Development Report Visits to other institution’s programs: Technical skills updating for the past year: Include Date: Hours: Topic of Event: Visits to Industry or business: Topic of Event Dates Hours Participation in technical conferences/workshops: Topic of Event Dates Hours Outside related employment: Date of Employment Company Position I certify that the above statements are true. INC. to the best of my knowledge.AMERICAN CULINARY FEDERATION FOUNDATION. Signature of School Official and Title: __________________________ Date: ______________ W:\Lisa Thomas\Website Posting\Exhibits\ExF-4a. Signature of Instructor: ______________________________________ Date: ______________ I have verified the above information and believe the statements to be true.doc Created on 2/26/2007 8:07:00 AM .

encourage diversity. interactive information systems. 3. practice collegiality. economic. To expedite student progress toward degree objectives in order to reduce time to degree (and related costs) and maintain affordability for the widest range of students. Vision We will prepare students for success by creating an environment of ideas and excellence that nurtures intellectual. 2.doc The Montana University System The following Strategic Plan was adopted by the Board of Regents October 19. To identify or seek creative funding alternatives that will expand public and private resources.and post-tenure evaluation of faculty performance and systematic program review that reflect the Regents' priority on student learning. To ensure student readiness for higher education and validate student competencies for graduation. . allocating human. 1. We will protect academic freedom. accessible postsecondary educational opportunities. To foster an environment that attracts and retains high quality faculty and staff. We will hold academic quality to be the prime attribute of our institutions. To make sure that every academically qualified individual has an opportunity to receive the benefits of higher education without financial or social barriers. 4. 1. and be accountable. maintain at/near state-of-the-art condition Montana University System facilities. social. 2001. Goals The following five goals and subordinate objectives will guide the Montana University System in moving toward realization of its vision for the future of higher education in Montana. foster economic prosperity. student living. coordinated. 3. and financial resources appropriate to our educational mission. 1. To make a high quality. 6. and academic achievement. To provide a stimulating. and cultural development. A. To offer academic programs and services focused around approved campus missions and consistent with available resources. B. To develop. Mission The Mission of the Montana University System is to serve students through the delivery of high quality. 5. C. responsive and effective environment for student learning. To deliver higher education services in a manner that is efficient. To assure adequate campus policies to protect academic freedom and promote the free exchange of ideas while requiring pre. collaboration and resource sharing.ExG-1. To improve rates of student retention and degree completion across the Montana University System. To increase student access to Montana University System programs through coordinated statewide delivery and expanded use of technology. 2. economic development and lifelong learning. 2. technology and infrastructure and to coordinate the use of capacities and resources across all MUS institutions. assessment. and highly accessible. and accessible to the people of Montana. responsive. physical. To operate as a unified system of higher education and increase productivity through effective planning. while actively participating in the preservation and advancement of Montana's economy and society. affordable higher education experience available to all qualified citizens who wish to further their education and training. We will encourage scientific development and technology transfer.

state. tribal and local governments. 4. Through its programs and the activities of faculty. by providing unique educational experiences through the integration of the liberal arts. 3. and engaged citizens of local and global communities. To expand community involvement. the University asks its students. To promote the full spectrum of higher education needs and opportunities in two-year. nation and the world. The University of Montana-Missoula Mission The mission of The University of Montana-Missoula is the pursuit of academic excellence as indicated by the quality of curriculum and instruction. To offer programs and services consistent with the changing market and employment needs of the state and nation. employment. and economic development needs of the state and the nation. 1. To improve and expand the communication and outreach of the Montana University System to constituents. student performance. technology transfer. The University delivers education and training on its four campuses and through telecommunications to sites inside and outside of Montana. Vision Statements . region. graduate and professional education. 3. The dedication to education for and throughout life reflects the commitment to service learning and community building on and off the campuses. ethical. communities and policy makers. 2. back to top The University of Montana Mission The University of Montana capitalizes on its unique strengths to create knowledge. To improve the support for and understanding of the Montana University System as a leading contributor to the state's economic success and social and political well being. The University of Montana-Missoula provides basic and applied research. provide an active learning environment for students. 4. our congressional delegation. The University accomplishes this mission. and students. To partner with state government. With public expectations on the rise. E. The University enhances its programs through continuous quality review for improvement and remains fully accountable to the citizenry through annual audits and performance evaluations. To be responsive to market. To increase the coordination of academic resources to improve student progress toward degree. 2. To meet constituents' expectations for accountability through responsible stewardship of resources. four-year. graduate study. cultural outreach. To make the Montana University System more accessible and responsive to businesses. K-12 education. labor and business leaders to preserve and improve the economy of Montana. and staff to do and accomplish even more than they have in the past. faculty. and offer programs and services responsive to the needs of Montanans. and professional training with international and interdisciplinary emphases. Through its graduates. the University also seeks to educate competent and humane professionals and informed. To promote diversity with special attention to Montana's Native American populations. service and outreach initiatives at the campus level. and service benefitting the local community. 1.ExG-1. D. in part.doc 3. staff. and faculty professional accomplishments. 4. government and other constituents. To encourage basic research and technology transfer to contribute to the economic development of the State of Montana.

the School of Journalism is accredited by the American Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications. and 6) Involve and engage the faculty. both the Doctor of Physical Therapy degree and the Master of Science degree in Physical Therapy are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education of the American Physical Therapy Association. Suite 512. also. (312) 664-3575. IL 06010. back to top Accreditation The University of Montana-Missoula is fully accredited by the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges. in addition. state and local governments and universities abroadBand expand the training and technology transfer programs to promote community and economic development. all programs preparing licensed school personnel though the School of Education are approved by the Montana Board of Public Education and fully accredited by the National Council of Accreditation of Teacher Education at the undergraduate and graduate levels. 311 West Superior St. community and tribal colleges. staff. The Department of Art is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). 4) Develop more partnershipsBespecially with local communities. students. Many of the professional schools and departments have the approval of appropriate accrediting organizations. 3) Attain the Carnegie Commission status of Doctoral ResearchBExtensive University (50 or more doctorates in at least 15 fields annually) and increase funded research to $50. The University of Montana-Missoula will: 1) Educate students to become ethical persons of character and values.doc In pursuit of its mission. The University of Montana-Missoula is fully accredited by the American Association for Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care. the Chemistry Department's Bachelor of Science program is approved by the American Chemical Society. the baccalaureate program in social work is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. the respiratory care and surgical technology programs are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs. alumni. the recreation management program is accredited by the Parks. the baccalaureate program is accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education and the entry-level Doctor of Pharmacy program has been granted candidate accreditation status by the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education. drama is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Theater at the undergraduate and graduate levels. the School of Law has approval of both the Association of American Law Schools and the American Bar Association. and Leisure Services Education Council on accreditation sponsored by the National Recreation and Parks Association in cooperation with the American Association for Leisure and Recreation. 5) Develop the capability and infrastructure for use of information technology to increase the efficiency and productivity of the campus and the state.000. the accounting programs have a separate accounting accreditation by the AACSB. program is a candidate for accreditation by the Council on Social Work Education. the School of Pharmacy is a member of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. the graduate program in clinical psychology is accredited by the American Psychological Association. and the M.ExG-1. the pharmacy technology program is accredited by the American Society of Health System Pharmacists. computer science is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Inc. public schools. Fax (312) 664-4652. engaged citizens. (ABET).000 annually by 2006.S. Chicago. the food service management program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation Educational Institute Accrediting Commission. the Department of Music is fully accredited at the undergraduate and graduate levels by the National Association of Schools of Music. . partners. the Legal Assisting program is approved by the American Bar Association. competent professionals.W. and friends of the University in institutional governance. the athletic training option in the Health and Human Performance Department in the School of Education is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs. and staff for an enriched campus culture. and informed members of a global and technological society. Recreations. the practical nursing program is approved by the Montana Board of Nursing. businesses and industries. faculty. (800) 533-3606. all programs of the School of Business Administration are accredited by AACSB InternationalBThe Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. 2) Increase the diversity of the students. the forest resources management program is accredited by the Society of American Foresters.

ExG-1. Dennison. (Interim) Davidson Honors College Philip T. Branch. Center for Continuing Education Betsy Wackernagel Bach.D.D. Ph. Bain. Lloyd Chesnut. Superintendent of Public Instruction Brian Sweitzer. J. President University Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs-Missoula Vice President for Student Affairs Legal Counsel Vice President for Administration and Finance Vice President for Research and Development and Graduate Studies Academic Officers Sharon E.D.D. Teresa S. M. Interim Commissioner of Higher Education Linda McCulloch.B.D.S. Governor Billings Bigfork Polson Havre Bozeman Great Falls Busby ex-officio ex-officio ex-officio Local Executive Board Arlene Breum Sam Roberts Leonard Landa Missoula COL (R) Missoula Missoula Administrators George M. Ed. Registrar School of Journalism School of Forestry Library Services .D. Jerry E. Frank D'Andraia. Ph. Ph.A. Perry Brown. Ph. T.L. Semmens Lila Taylor Carrol Krause. Alexander. Duringer. Brown. Robert A.doc University Officers June 2003 Board of Regents of Higher Education Christian Hur (Student Regent) (Vice Chair) Ed Jasmin (Chair) John Mercer Lynn Morrison-Hamilton Richard Roehm Mark J. Ph. Ph.D.D.D.D. Ph. Ph. Lois Muir. David Aronofsky. M.

A. Ph. D. (Interim) David Strobel.D.D. Ph. Ed.ExG-1.D. J. Edwin Eck II.D. Donald L. Ed.doc E. Conrad W. (Interim) David S. Ph. Larry D.D. Ph. Paul Williamson.D. Fetz. Evans. Forbes. Roberta D. School of Law School of Education College of Arts and Sciences School of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences School of Business Administration School of Fine Arts Provost Associate Provost Mansfield Center Graduate School College of Technology .D. Snyder. Gerald A. R. Ed. Ph. Lois Muir.D. Gianchetta. Shirley Howell. Robson. Ph.D.D.

University of Montana at Missoula College of Technology Applied Arts and Sciences Business Technology Electronics Technology Health Professions Industrial Technology Culinary Arts .

President Provost & Vice President of Academic Affairs Dean College of Technology Associate Dean College of Technology Chair Business Technology Department Program Director Culinary Arts .

Program Director Thomas Campbell Related General Education Courses Work Study Student (part time) Advisory Committee Administrative Support (part time) Cashier (full time) Dana Veike Culinary Faculty (full time) Laura Swanson Culinary Faculty (full time) Robert Wood Culinary Faculty (full time) Aimee Ault Culinary Faculty (part time) Andrea Paskert .

teaches courses in Culinary Arts. Individual will prepare instructional materials. Adhere to Department policy regarding requisitions of necessary supplies and fiscal guidelines for allocated costs per class. assemble lesson plans and design laboratory demonstrations and direct students in a realistic work environment that mirrors industry standards. Maintain a safe and sanitary environment at all times and secures area when class is completed. Assist students in attaining measurable outcomes in each class Regularly inform Department Chair about issues of concern raised by students.ExH-1. ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND FUNCTIONS Culinary Arts Faculty will: • Demonstrate knowledge and skill in all materials covered in classes • Prepare and distribute to registered students course syllabi that meet the College of Technology format standards and include required competencies of American Culinary Federation. • • • • • • • • .doc UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA-MISSOULA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY CULINARY ARTS/FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT POSITION DESCRIPTION CULINARY FACULTY JOB SUMMARY Under the general supervision of the Department Chair. Attend and participate in scheduled faculty and committee meetings Assume responsibility for other duties as designated by the Department Chair. Evaluate laboratory products in accordance with standards set by industry Maintain accurate records of attendance and student performance in accordance with department and university requirements.

Education and skills equal to the level of Certified Chef de Cuisine within one year of employment. faculty and staff Project a positive professional image at all times Understand and utilize a computer for administrative and instructional tasks.ExH-1. . ABILITY TO • • • • • Instruct others and properly demonstrate industry recognized techniques Keep accurate records in accordance with accepted accounting procedures Work cooperatively with students. ServSafe certification required within six months of employment.doc QUALIFICATIONS • Minimum Requirements: Experience and education equal to the standards of the American Culinary Federation as Certified Sous Chef. Teaching experience at the post-secondary level is desirable.

cocoa and juices. 3. Observers and reports pricing changes or errors. 6. collaboration and consistency between College of Technology operations. Reconciles cash drawers at the end of the shift on cashier cash report. . Works as a team member with the College of Technology management. At times may work behind the Grill and deli line preparing food orders for customers. 1. Maintains a positive attitude and loyalty to the College of Technology. Actively contributes to a positive work environment and healthy employee morale by not engaging in or condoning coworkers. cocoa brewer and fountain beverage machines. classified staff and students to encourage cooperation. Sets up various displays. 2. B. 5. communicated in a way that promotes and supports the mission statement long-term goals. 3. coffee. and shortrange objectives of the College of Technology. 1. Cleans and maintains proper sanitation of the cashier stations.doc UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA-MISSOULA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY CULINARY ARTS/FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR: CASHIER A. Performs routine cashier transactions on a computerized cash register system following established methods and procedures using mathematical skills.ExH-2. 4. beverage bar and soup and chili line. Must maintain proper food handling and sanitization measures while performing these duties. Performs the duties of a Food Handler in preparing beverages. chili and is responsible for maintaining proper food safe temperatures for these products. 4. Receives cash and transaction from customers for food and beverages. Re-ups soups. the division of Student Affairs and the University of Montana. Maintain effective working relationships with customers. coordination. Is responsible for maintaining sanitization of coffee brewers. staff and the general public and provides courteous service at all times. subordinates or supervisors to engage in gossip or other non-constructive actions that can adversely effect the department or any individual who is a member of that department. 2. Follows protocol and processes.

management makes decisions which are then carried out by the incumbent.doc 5. cocoa machine. steam tables and soup tureens. working relationships with customers. and will- . Will be asked to return form breaks when customer volume demands. however. Incumbent works within specific. Trains and works with new employees including student/full-time.ExH-2. 2. 5. Performs other duties as assigned. This position requires ServeSafe Certification within one year of hire date. Solves problems and alleviates problems in the immediate work area. microwaves. 3. 1. KNOWLEDGE. skills and abilities are typically acquired through a combination of education and experience equivalent to graduation from high school or equivalent GED an two years in a high volume or institutional food service doing similar duties or/and equivalent combination of education and experience. 2. sometimes hostile and demanding during peak hours is necessary. MANAGEMENT AND SUPERVISION OF OTHERS: Opinions may be offered to supervisors. fountain beverage machine. incumbent will work unsupervised for periods throughout the day. Must be skilled in food handling and preparing various beverages. Is the lead cashier in the Food Court. hot food holding units. calculator. 1. Ability to develop and maintain effective customer service skills. Due to demands of the food service industry. Transactions must be performed quickly and accurately. SUPERVISION RECEIVED: The incumbent reports to the Department Chair. Requisite has the ability to perform basic repetitive mathematical computations. fellow employees and management is required. and retrains returning employees. Additionally. the ability to remain pleasant and courteous in a work environment that can be intense. 4. EQUIPMENT AND MACHINERY OPERATED: Computerized cash register. Performs cashier duties in Food Court and trains subordinate staff as direct by supervisors. coffee brewer. the cashier encounters stressful situations caused by irritated customers. EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE: The above knowledge. At times. SKILLS AND ABILITIES: The incumbent must possess working knowledge of standard cashiering practices and procedures. WORKING CONDITIONS AND PHYSICAL DEMANDS: A. 6.

written instructions and guidelines are provided. Work is reviewed by management on a daily basis and a formal evaluation is provided annually. the statements in this position description are accurate and complete. students.ExH-2. classified and student personnel on a daily basis to receive and exchange information. the statements in this position description are accurate and complete. sanitation and the quality of work as defined by established standards. SCOPE AND EFFECT: The incumbent follows specific College of Technology.doc defined policies and procedures set for by the College of Technology and the University of Montana. staff. Signature: Name: ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW Signature: Name: Date: Title: Date: Title: Date: . management. 7. Management usually assigns tasks by verbal communication. Cashiering demand is created by the number of customers served and training that is provided for staff. The University of Montana and state and federal policy and procedures. However. Signature: Name: (Please Print) IMMEDIATE SUPERVISOR To the best of my knowledge. PERSONAL CONTACTS: The incumbent is in constant contact with customers. Decisions relate to customer service. 8. food. which requires flexibility at the beginning of each semester. Decisions are made throughout the day that directly relate to the success of the operation. faculty. INCUMBENT To the best of my knowledge.

ExH-2.doc Signature: Name: AGENCY DIRECTOR Signature: Name: Date: Title: Date: Title: .

minorities. Master Chef. *Minimum of three years experience in food service management. Salary and benefits based on education and experience per University guidelines and approval by the Board of Regents of Higher Education and the negotiated agreement with The University of Montana College of Technology Faculty Association. *Ability to use computer and related technology tools to communicate within industry and institution.ExH-3. food preparation and management. supply purchasing. menu development. *Technical writing and accreditation report writing skills. . curriculum review and maintenance to meet American Culinary Federation Educational Institute accreditation standards. budget management. nutrition. tenure track position to begin spring semester 2003. Qualifications: *Baccalaureate or higher degree in related area of food service preferred. food production. or email culinsearch@mso. and official copies of academic transcripts and ACF certification to the Dean’s Office. The University of Montana College of Technology is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer and encourages applications from women. sanitation policies and procedures development. This position announcement can be made available in alternative formats upon request. *Experience with ACFEI-accreditation procedures.umt. Missoula. review of applications to begin November 15. Qualified applicants can request veteran’s preference in accordance with state law. vita. MT 59801. 909 South Avenue West. and persons with disabilities.edu. three professional reference contacts. cookery and facilities planning. Conditions of Employment: Full-time. program administration and review.doc Position: Culinary Arts Program Director/Faculty Responsibilities: The program dfirector is responsible for hiring and scheduling faculty for culinary program classes. *Formal education in culinary management. Executive Chef. 2002. Application: Interested candidates should submit a letter of application. or Chef de Cuisine (or qualifying for). Responsibilities of assignment include food and beverage management. Applications accepted until position is filled. cost management. University of Montana College of Technology. Vietnam era veterans. *Possess ACF certification as Culinary Educator. *Teaching experience in the food service areas to include sanitation. *Minimum of six years experience in the food service industry.

or email beverly. writing and accreditation procedures experience for this full time. 909 South Avenue West. certified and experienced candidates should have a minimum of six years professional culinary experience as well as teaching.umt. and certifications should be sent to Dean’s Office. regional. accredited culinary program forward located in the Rocky Mountains. references. For more detail information. access the College of Technology web site www.ExH-3.umt. Review of applications to commence November 15. resume. MT 59801.edu.edu .doc Position Advertising: The University of Montana College of Technology has an opening for a Culinary Arts Program Director/Faculty to lead a successful. Salary is commensurate with experience and education.brooks@mso. tenure track opportunity. 2002. Letter of application.cte. Degreed. Missoula. University of Montana College of Technology. Faculty Openings.

Missoula MT 59808 shintz@co.Lodahl Chef Instructor (406) 243-7816 College of Technology 909 South Ave.missoula.net Mark Foss Director Montana Department of Corrections (406) 829-4032 2340 Mullan Rd.ExI-1.mt. Missoula MT 29801 Blackcat@bigsky.missoula.net Bjelland Lief Owner Le Petit Outre (406) 543-3311 129 South 4th Missoula MT 59803 petit@bigsky.doc COT Culinary Arts Program Advisory Board 2003-2004 Jack Wich (406) 542-6043 Owner Black Cat Bakery 105 Broadway Pl.us George Goble Sales Representative (509) 483-4747 Food Services of America 3520 East Francis Avenue Spokane WA 99217-6590 george_goble@fsafood.mt.us Ross W. West . Missoula MT 59808 mfoss@co.com Susan Hintz (406) 859-4071 Directory of Food Services Missoula County Sheriff’s Department 2340 Mullen Rd.

ExI-1.com Tom Siegel Executive Chef Dining Services (406) 243-6173 University of Montana Lomasson Center 145 /o=The University of Montana/ou=Missoula/cn=Recipients/cn=TSiegel Bob Zimmerino Chef/Owner Red Pies Over Montana (406) 728-6686 424 N.net Carla Roe Dining Services Production Manager President American Culinary Federation Western Montana Chefs de Cuisine Chapter (406) 243-6415 University of Montana Lomasson Center 145 /o=The University of Montana/ou=Missoula/cn=Recipients/cn=CRoe Klaus Schuhbauer Executive Chef Retired Red Lion Hotel (4060 721-9079 krschuhby@aol.com Karen Wood .doc Missoula MT 59801 /O=The University of Montana/OU=Missoula/cn=Recipients/cn=Ross Lodahl Mark LoParco Director Dining Services (406) 243-4716 University of Montana Lomasson Center 145 Ray Risho Chef/Owner Perugia (406) 543-3757 1106 W Broadway Missoula MT 59801 risho@qwest. Higgins Ave Missoula MT 59801 zblue_1@msn.

doc Director of Food Services Nutritionist/Chef Community Medical Center (406) 728-4100 ex 7480 2827 Fort Missoula Rd Missoula.ExI-1. MT 59801 kwood@communitymed.org Zach Rathe 2004 Graduate of COT Culinary Arts Program 1205 Idaho St. MT 54801 (406) 543-0056 . Missoula.

ExI‐1    College of Technology  Culinary Arts Advisory Committee  7‐1‐08              COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 1  .

ExI‐1    College of Technology  Culinary Arts Advisory Committee  7‐1‐08                COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 2  .

The committee voted on the approval of the Mission and Goal statement and all agreed.ExI-10   The University of Montana. and concerns that they might have. Associate Dean Ross Lodahl. Minutes of the meeting will be sent to the site visit chairman for review. 15. changes. Tom informed the committee that the ACF would like all culinary arts program advertisement to have the mission statement attached. CRT 205T Food Service Management Computer Applications and FSM 271T Menu Layout. Tom opened the meeting by informing the committee about the follow-up report that was just completed after the ACF on-site visit and that the meeting was to review it and to ask for comments. Also. student handbook. Mission and Goals Statement was voted on and approved by the committee. 2004       COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY CULINARY ARTS ADVISORY COMMITTEE MINUTES Members Present: Jack Rathe Ray Pisho Tom Siegel Klaus Schuhbauer George Goble Marianne Forrest UMCT Faculty Present: Tom Campbell. syllabus. Faculty Wynne Wakley. and Culinary Arts program advertisements after the approval of the advisory board members. Dean Lynn Stocking. Program Scope and Sequence: The scope and sequence of the Culinary Arts certificate and the Food Service Management Associate Degree were reviewed by the advisory board. Program Director Vicki Micheletto. The Mission and Goals Statement will be put on the web site. Faculty Nina Broshar. Tom informed the committee that “Intro to Food Service Industry” covered COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 1  . Administrative Support Called To Order: The Culinary Arts advisory committee meeting was called to order by Program Director Tom Campbell at 12:30 PM. A suggestion to one of the courses was to update the name of “Menu Layout and Design” to “Waitress Development”. College of Technology Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Minutes   Dec. Design. Chair Paul Williamson. Students create a menu and perform all aspects of a formal dinner. Mission and Goals: Culinary Arts Programs Mission and Goals statement was reviewed by the advisory committee members and Tom Campbell asked for any suggestions or changes. Tom informed the committee of the Escoffier dinner that is put on every FY and that is put together as a virtual restaurant setting and the students prepare and serve dinner to the public which teaches the students leadership and management skills. and Analysis together. Committee members suggested adding the internship and a leadership course to the mission statement. A committee member mentioned that maybe the students needed a course on leadership. it was suggested to merge two of the courses together. It was suggestion to add a “Crises Management” course to the programs also.

ExI-10   The University of Montana. but needed to sign documentation that they received the training. issues were previously in effect. field trips. Noncompliance issues were addressed and reviewed by committee members. Students were taught equipment safety. The course syllabi’s were also put on the table to review. Quest speakers. Forms were made and the documentation was made. It will be a state of the art kitchen with several other degree programs offered. Portfolios of the staff needed to be compiled and sent to the ACF. They did some very unique dishes and followed all the procedures and put out some great food. Follow-Up Report: Tom gave the committee members copies of the follow-up report to review. The ACF received the follow-up report and a decision will be made on whether or not the Culinary Program will be accredited. New Campus: Tom told the committee about the architect plans regarding floor plans for the new campus. this will be offered to freshman entry students to help more students to enter the program and to permit the waiting list to move quicker. 2004       a large area of crises management. Deadline dates were discussed and some dates were noted and updated. Student Handbook: Tom passed a prototype of the student handbook around for the committee to review. The students would have a two semester core credits and then continue on to the degree options from there. Evaluation of students at the individual stations also needed to be documented. The handbook will be given out to all students and prospective students. College of Technology Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Minutes   Dec. Wynne Wakley reported that the students did very well in the competition and out shined many professional in the area. Committee reviewed them and made changes and suggestions. Culinary Arts Program faculty was very pleased and proud of our student’s performance. Introduction to the Food Service Industry – CUL 151T. and other learning tools also needed to be documented. Faculty’s non-compliances were reviewed and note of target dates were given. Tom informed the committee of Safety Training verification sheets that were set up for the students as per request from the ACF site-visit team. Tom asked for corrections or additions to the Follow-up report. but documentation needed to be made. CUL 175T and Nutritional Cooking – FSM 180T. Food Service Sanitation – Special Topics. COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 2  . Tom reported to the advisory committee of deadlines of non-compliances that needed to be completed and of target dates for such issues. Provide “for credit” courses needed by secondary domestic educators. this will attract food service professionals from the area by providing continuing education courses required for updating and maintain certification levels mandated by the ACF. Students were very respectful and on time. The facilities would house approximately 200 students. Summer Courses: After seeking advice from several professionals and “testing the waters” of the Missoula community the Director of Culinary Arts proposes the following three pronged approach for summer courses. Committee agreed that there were none. Several of the non-compliances were addressed. such as Butchery degree and Baking/Pastry degree. Committee was informed of training and certification that was currently being addressed. Culinary Competition: Reports of the culinary competition in Spokane were given to the committee. 15. The committee reviewed and suggested changes or additions to the handbook.

and to open the eyes to non-professionals who want authenticity to cuisine from all over the world. College of Technology Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Minutes   Dec. 2004       and to make available the sanitation course necessary for professionals desiring the NRAEF ServeSafe Certificate. Meeting adjourned at 1:15 p. All members agreed. 15. This will attract food service professionals from the area by providing techniques. theory. Mediterranean Cuisine Series – Special Topics. COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 3  .m. and to provide fun and educational courses for secondary domestic educators. Tom asked the committee members to notify him of any other comments or suggestions they might think of and thanked everyone for coming. Adjourned: Tom asked for a final agreement on the discussing at the meeting today and that they all agreed on the documentation they heard today. CUL 195T. and ingredients to further their knowledge with these cuisines.ExI-10   The University of Montana.

Also. approved. ACF Accreditation Site Visits: Tom informed the committee that he has been busy going to several ACF accreditation site visits as he was nominated to be on the site visit team. Dean of the College of Technology. Faculty and Staff: Tom recognized Nina Broshar. Business Department Called To Order: The College of Technology Culinary Arts advisory committee meeting was called to order November 30th at 1:00 pm by Program Director Tom Campbell. Organization and Administration: Changes in organization and administration since the last advisory meeting are. Chair. Faculty and new addition to the faculty Laura Swanson for their contribution to the Program. Ross Lodahl. Tri Cities Culinary Arts. Laura is a graduate of the Culinary Arts program and is certified Culinary working on her ACF certification. COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 1  . College of Technology  Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Minutes   Nov. and SeaTacOccupational Skills Center. Our current student culinary team consists of 9 students. Such as. Brian Larson. This mission statement has been reviewed by the Provost Office and ACF members. Tom asks the committee to view the organization chart handout for The University of Montana College of Technology and the Culinary Arts Program. Administrative Support. Culinary Program Adjunct Faculty Brian Larson. Idaho State University. winner of the ACF National Student Culinarian of the year. Viewing all the different colleges’ curriculums has opened his eyes on his own Culinary Programs curriculum. minutes were reviewed. and seconded. Culinary Program Faculty Laura Swanson. Clark Country Skills Center. Competitions in Spokane were very successful and we have a super star Carol Chandler. Missions/Goals for the Culinary Program: Tom asked the committee to review the Mission and Goals for the program handout and for them to get back with him on any suggestions they might have for additions or deletions of the mission statement. Chair Business Department and Barry Good. Melinda Dorn who taught the Patisserie courses last semester will be missed and hoping to fill a new adjunct faculty position spring semester. advisory committee members.ExI‐11    The University of Montana. 2007        Members Present: Mark LoParco Tom Siegel Aimee Ault Ray Risho Marianne Forrest Toby McCracken UMCT Faculty Present: Tom Campbell. 30. Introductions were made. This will help on the programs upcoming 5 year ACF accreditation renewal January 2009. Program Director Ross Lodahl. Kelly Brown part-time work study and Dana Vieke have been an accent to the program.

to Foods so that more time may be given to these respective courses. Students have an attendance policy and their grades are significantly affected from missing classes. Tom provided students assessments for the committee to review and asked for them to reply to him with comments by e-mail or phone. proof boxes do not function properly. 30. classroom space. Students are required 180 hours to complete their internship with an evaluation from the employer. Also there are plans to add a Culinary Math course and revise the curriculum in the Food Service Accounting class to be more program specific. Planning for fall semester 20089 is to separate the Sanitation course from Into. convection ovens cannot be adjusted anymore. Dining Room Services. Refrigeration equipment not NSF rated. This summer two courses were taught Mediterranean Cuisine. Standards for admissions to the culinary program should be revised to require students to have a physical exam and tuberculosis test prior to entry. Scholarships available to culinary students include the ACF Montana Chef Association. A dance performance was also added as a final attraction. hot holding inefficient and dangerous. The committee viewed the equipment in the culinary kitchen and discussion was made on how under-maintained the equipment is and the need of replacement. The Capstone course consist of four classes to create their business plans. Requirements need to be stated in the catalogue. menu planning. Program Assessment: Program assessments by the students have been very positive and graduate placement stats are high. Introduction to Food as well as a one week seminar—Tips for Teachers. Student Services: Tom discussed the scholarship up-dates with the committee and distributed scholarship applications. 2007        Curriculum: Summer outreach course have been very popular. not necessarily at the College of Technology. College of Technology  Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Minutes   Nov. equipment and library resources. Approximately 40% drop out of the program due to the lack of really understanding how hard it is and the long hours they end up putting into the program. prep tables need replacing. COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 2  . Internship has been very affective—internship paperwork is somewhat repetitious.ExI‐11    The University of Montana. mixers old and dangerous. costing. Earl’s Distributing. A. Weaknesses of the program are the kitchen equipment. and dining room could use a face-lift. Looking forward to this summer.00 a plate. students are answering with same response on several questions. Discussion was made on the attrition percentage of students in culinary programs all over the state. floor plan and a final dinner at a cost of $75. Montana Cattlewomen. Syllabus and Competency worksheets were reviewed with discussion from the advisory board members. and FSA. Scholarships available to students are numerous and efforts are being made to better inform students.V. which baking and Patisserie will be offered. Facilities Strengths/Weaknesses: Strengths of the program are computer labs.

Broshar Administrative Assistant COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 3  .ExI‐11    The University of Montana. 30. College of Technology  Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Minutes   Nov. 2007        Adjourned: Respectfully submitted. Nina R.

Tom Campbell 5 min The 2005 annual report was accepted by the ACF in February this year. CEC Type of meeting: Note taker: Yearly May 2. Thanks to the Montana Chefs Association for helping.30 AM Thomas Campbell.ExI‐12    The University of Montana. 2006 11. CEC NA Nina Broshar Please read: Please bring: Hand out of last year’s meeting minutes Hand out position description of culinary faculty Hand out program changes Hand out letter from certification chair Hand out of adjenda AGENDA ITEMS Topic Presenter Time allotted General Meeting at COT Recap from last year: Welcome Sign in sheet New members Our last meeting resulted in a grant from the ACF for a 5 year accreditation Thanks to all of you who are instrumental in the success of the program. College of Technology  Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Adgenda   May 2. 2006        COT CULINARY ARTS ADVISORY BOARD MEETING Meeting called by: Facilitator: Timekeeper: Attendees: Thomas Campbell. Competition: Tom and Toby 10 min COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 1  . Thanks to Toby McCracken for helping.

UM President Dennison responded with $10. The next Western Regional Competition will be held in Cour d’alene Idaho early next year. I estimate the College of Technology Culinary Student Assistance Fund to balance at around $12. COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    5 min Page 2  . 2006        Recap of Hawaii and slide show. Chair and Brian Larson will take over.325. COT and UM Dining Services Collaboration on certification testing. HANDOUT Education and Scholarship Tom 10 min Thanks to Jim Gray for his successful chef of the year event: Total receipts for the dinner: $5. Status of Culinary Arts instructor credentials. We needed approximately $24. MCA $3000 Tyson $250. Montana Cancer Specialists gave $500. BIV gave $200.000.000. College of Technology  Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Adgenda   May 2. Pending new requirements for instructors.968. UM Dining Services $2500 Chef Siegel and staff $500 Stock Farm Club dinner $4000 The College of Technology will set up a try out practicum for team selection at a date set by Toby.00 Total expenses: $ 356.000. We are looking for a new dean and associate dean. We are in the process of inspiring students to compete in Seattle in June. Faculty.98 will go into the COT Student Scholarship Fund. Staff and Administration Vicki Micheletto is stepping down as Dept. FVCC is interested in competition. UM Student Affairs gave $1000. ROY G.ExI‐12    The University of Montana.02 Net proceeds: $4.

 2006        This years recipients of $1400 each go to Travis Schlader and Laura Swanson. Introduction of evening classes.ExI‐12    The University of Montana. Sustainability thought for the future. Enrollment for Autumn is full. Curriculum changes. Curriculum Current enrollment is about 32 with 9 graduates and 23 first year students. FVCC will be undergoing a self-study report in order to apply for ACF Acreditation. General Discussion 20 min OTHER INFORMATION Observers: Resources: Special notes: COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 3  . College of Technology  Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Adgenda   May 2. The College of Technology Capstone dinner was held on April 22. HANDOUT New changes for summer semester.

ExI‐12    The University of Montana. College of Technology  Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Adgenda   May 2. 2006        COT Culinary Arts Self Study 2008    Page 4  .

ExI-13 COT CULINARY ARTS ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING AGENDA Meeting called by: Facilitator: Timekeeper: Thomas Campbell.) Organization and Administration.Tri Cities Culinary Arts 10-23/24-06 Tom 5 minutes Tom 10 minutes . Culinary Arts 9-10-07 .SeaTac.Brian Larson. . 1|Page Tom 5 minutes Tom 5 minutes 6-7/8-06 . ACF Accreditation Self-study ACF accreditation site visits.We are due to renew January. Mission and Goals of the Culinary Program.Occupational Skills Center . Culinary Arts 10-5-07 . .(Review copy of Mission and Goals. CEC NA Nina Broshar Attendees: Advisory Committee AGENDA ITEMS Topic Presenter Time allotted Greetings and Last general meeting at the College of Technology Recap. CEC Type of meeting: Note taker: Semi-annual November 30. .Clark County Skills Center. Business Technology Chair. . 2007 1:00 PM Thomas Campbell.Idaho State University.Review of minutes and approval from committee. 09.

The Capstone experience has been a success.) . .Addition of adjunct faculty for spring semester. . etc.Revising the Sanitation course next fall.V. .Revising the Food Service Management Accounting course next fall. chocolate.Classroom space. (Distribute article.Revising the curriculum of the Patisserie class to reflect more practical hearth-style breads.ExI-13 .Computer labs. .) . . Tom Facilities Strengths: .Internship program has been effective.Competitions in Spokane.Carol Chandler up-date. .Barry Good.) Faculty and Staff . Dean of the College of Technology. plated desserts. (Distribute copy of grade sheet. (10:1.Library is integrated into the curriculum.Certification status of faculty.Summer Outreach courses.Courses have been revised to include more competency based rubrics. . .) .A.Library resources.Faculty to staff ratio – 30 students: 3 faculty. . equipment. .Culinary team up-date. 10 minutes 10 minutes Tom 5 minutes 2|Page . .(Review Organizational Charts. . Tom Curriculum .) . (Distribute press release.

This needs to be stated in the catalogue.Computer update in the store room. .Prep tables need replacing.) .Plumbing at the Meat & Veg. (Distribute scholarship application.Need for augmented storage.) 5 minutes General Discussion 3|Page .) . . 5 minutes Tom Program Assessment . .Hot holding inefficient and dangerous.(Refer to student assessment forms. . . and FSA. . . Tom Student Services .Convection ovens cannot be adjusted anymore. .Dining room needs a face-lift.Refrigeration equipment not NSF rated.Stairs.(Refer to graduate placement stats. .Outdated and under-maintained equipment. .Hand sinks need replacing. Earl’s Distributing. .Scholarships available to students are numerous.Standards for admission to the Culinary program should be revised to require students to have a physical exam and tuberculosis test prior to entry.ExI-13 Weaknesses: . .Scholarships available to culinary students include Montana Cattlewomen. .Ware washing area needs to be remodeled.Proof boxes do not function properly. . sink insuffient. .Program assessment is strong.Scholarship up-date.Old and dangerous mixers. .

Business Technology Chair. 09 and are in the beginning stages of the Self Study.(Review copy of Mission and Goals.Review of minutes and approval from committee. We will request a site visit for October.) Organization and Administration. 2008 1:00 PM Thomas Campbell. . ACF Accreditation Self-study ACF accreditation site visits.Walla Walla Community College 5-14-08 . .We are due to renew January.Clark County Skills Center.Brian Larson. 1|Page Tom 5 minutes Tom 10 minutes Tom 5 minutes Tom 5 minutes .ExI-14 COT CULINARY ARTS ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING AGENDA Meeting called by: Facilitator: Timekeeper: Thomas Campbell. CEC Type of meeting: Note taker: Semi-annual June 30.Barry Good. Culinary Arts 10-5-07 . CEC NA Nina Broshar Attendees: Advisory Committee AGENDA EMS Topic Presenter Time allotted Greetings and Last general meeting at the College of Technology Recap. The goal is to have it completed by August so that review and revisions may take place in time to submit it to the ACF by September. . Dean of the College of Technology. . Mission and Goals of the Culinary Program. .

(10:1. (Distribute copy of grade sheet.Revising the Sanitation course next fall.Courses have been revised to include more competency based rubrics. Tom Facilities Strengths: .Addition of adjunct faculty for spring semester.ExI-14 .Computer labs. .Revising the curriculum of the Patisserie class to reflect more practical hearth-style breads.Competitions in Spokane and Salt Lake City.) . (Distribute copy of floor plans and new curriculum. .Library is integrated into the curriculum.The Capstone experience has been a success. Tom Curriculum .Ross’s retirement and hiring of tenure track position this July.V.) Faculty and Staff . (Distribute press release. . . . etc. .) . equipment.Revising the Food Service Management Accounting course next fall.Plans are underway for a new campus and I have been meeting with the architects. .Internship program has been effective.Classroom space. . chocolate.Faculty to staff ratio – 30 students: 3 faculty.) 10 minutes 10 minutes Tom 5 minutes 2|Page .Summer Outreach courses.Certification status of faculty. .) .A.Culinary team up-date. . This year’s theme was Louisiana River Boat with Cajun Cuisine. . plated desserts. .(Review Organizational Charts.

Library resources.(Refer to graduate placement stats.(Refer to student assessment forms.Hand sinks need replacing.Outdated and under-maintained equipment. . Earl’s Distributing.Scholarships available to culinary students include Montana Cattlewomen.) 5 minutes General Discussion 3|Page .Standards for admission to the Culinary program should be revised to require students to have a physical exam and tuberculosis test prior to entry.Program assessment is strong.Computer update in the store room. .Plumbing at the Meat & Veg. . 5 minutes Tom Program Assessment .) . This needs to be stated in the catalogue. . .Scholarships available to students are numerous. .Stairs.) .Dining room needs a face-lift.Need for augmented storage. . Tom Student Services .Old and dangerous mixers. . (Distribute scholarship application.Ware washing area needs to be remodeled. Weaknesses: . . .Proof boxes do not function properly. .Convection ovens cannot be adjusted anymore. . . and FSA.Hot holding inefficient and dangerous. . . .Refrigeration equipment not NSF rated.Scholarship up-date.ExI-14 .Prep tables need replacing. sink insuffient.

Thank you. 7. with your participation. 10. 6. • Continental breakfast for Paul Williamson 20 pp. Received new instructional videos thanks to Steve Adkins for students to use as classroom/lab augmentation. Implemented weekly staff meeting. Established student culinary competition team. 3. Accomplishments in 2005 1. Exposure for the culinary program. if you would. 4.ExI-2. 2006 Dear Advisory Board Member: This mail is to update you on the status of our program this spring semester and. 8. • Hosted two graduate student film crews to shoot in our kitchen and perform interviews. . • High school counselors for Katherine Swan 50 pp.doc College of Technology Culinary Arts Advisory Board Member Survey February 20. • Faculty/Staff Social for Paul Williamson 50 pp. Encourage students to participate in Western Montana Chefs de Cuisine chapter of ACF and attain membership and certification. take the time to briefly answer the questionnaire at the end. Settled into good working relationship with culinary faculty and Vicki. New curriculum changes to be implemented in the Fall of 06 Streamline scope and sequence of curriculum to enable Certificate students a seamless advance into the Food Service Management Program. • Ala Carte Luncheon for Paul Williamson and Lois Muir 10 pp. Students who successfully complete sanitation now receive a certificate from the National Restaurant Association Education Foundation. 9. • Chamber of Commerce for Lynn Stocking 50 pp. • Christmas Pot Luck for Paul Williamson 50 pp. • Cooking Demo for preview day for Kathryn Buchanan 100 pp. 12. 13. Aired on University television. Successfully catered events showcasing Culinary Program. Continuing bi-annual meeting with Advisory Board. Reestablished working relationship with Accreditation Board of ACF. Implemented thank you luncheon for “Department of the Month”. • Advisory board meeting for Tom Campbell 25 pp. gather information necessary to tailor the program towards specific industry needs. First will be a short update and please. Laid groundwork for program stability which has benefited student confidence and accentuated their learning experience. • Continental breakfast for Paul Williamson 20 pp. 5. 2. 11.

Implement a Catering Special Topics class or in house Internship to utilize the facility in the evening and weekends. 10. Change the requirements for Culinary Math. Make contact about a chef radio program with local radio station (Mark Ward AM 1290). • Require a signed affidavit for uniform policy and personal hygiene code. 6. 21. 9. • Created the “Ask the Chef” segment for the UM periodicals. 19. Introduce Hunter Bay coffee. Changed outdated information of website. Revamp menu for snack bar. 17. 20. 12. Continue with Pea Green Boat radio spot. • Performed a cooking demonstration and lecture for Hellgate High School’s culinary arts program. • Students performed on Chef’s of Montana cooking show aired on channel 12. Develop a required formal Internship for Culinary. Introduced guest comment form in dining room. eclectic format and menu. 8. Continue with chef column and expand into other UM periodicals. 13. Introduce freshly baked goods produced by students. 3. 15. Revamp the “Escoffier Dinner” by encouraging a more progressive. Held a pumpkin carving contest amongst culinary students. Continue with Chef’s of Montana TV spot. 7. • Students participated in fund raising auction event featuring a chocolate competition with over 50 entries…I was one of the judges. 2. 18. Participate in cooking demonstrations with Vann’s. 5. Update the acceptance standards. 11.Guest spot on NPR’s Pea Green Boat radio program with two students and myself talking about Christmas cookies. • Implemented for Spring Semester 2005. • Complete a questionnaire to identify the expectations of the program 2 . 4. Link Beverage Management and Menus Design classes with Food Service Computers class. 14. 16. • Two letters of recommendation by employers. • Plans for 2006 1. Removed the mural in the dining room. • Implement a pass or fail ACF practical exam guided by ACF judging criteria. 14. • Require students to participate in a review banquet. 15. Purchased digital scales. Provide graduation uniforms and medals for students. • Student to compile a cumulative portfolio package. • Require a written statement on why the student wants to attend. Obtained music system for dining room. Purchased new Hobart mixing bowls. Purchased a sausage stuffer.

This will reduce the risk of students who enter the program with a communicable disease. • Implement a crisis management plan. 22. • Evaluate options for increasing enrollment. 17. • Provide periodic cooking demonstrations for their culinary programs. • Work within the University system to provide services for departmental functions while at the same time introducing the student to new learning opportunities. • Personal hygiene inspections. • Prepare the new fiscal budget for 2006 focusing on ways to reduce costs without infringing on quality ingredients. particularly with organic producers. • Act as mentors for senior students interested in a hospitality industry career. This could work into a possible chain reaction for sustainable cuisine practices. Investigate and work with local farmers and ranchers to augment inventory items with fresh products. Possibilities include the introduction of evening and weekend courses. • Develop a HACCAP plan. • Initiate a pipeline between The Culinary Program and academic advisors and guidance counselors. • Update culinary course fees to reflect changes within the curriculum and current product costs. Develop working relationships and communication with industry. • Prepare the new fiscal budget for 2006 aiming towards an increase in revenues. • Set forth daily sanitation inspections as a mandatory function of operation. • 3 .Require students to undergo a physical examination prior to acceptance into the program. 21. Work with area high schools. 20. 19. Implement working systems to monitor and control issues. 18. Continue to provide local charities with culinary auction items for fund raising events. Work with Mark Foss and the County Corrections Facility to provide the inmates with the opportunity to earn a Culinary Arts Certificate while incarcerated. Evaluate the budgetary goals and accounting while planning and implementing changes within it. Provide Food Service Management students with the means to achieve Certified Culinarian status upon graduation. 16. • Streamline ordering procedures and cost controls. • Participate in college recruitment programs. and classroom instruction. • Professional attire standards. supplies. • Meet regularly with Advisory Committee members. • Regulate strict cleaning procedures as governed by a daily check list. Summer seminars and workshops offered as continuing education for area professionals and gourmets.

23. • Work with College of Technology and The University of Montana representatives to set up plans for appropriating funds for continuing education grants. letters of recommendations. • Adoption of the Griz Card system at COT. Questionnaire 1. intern report. • Examples could include a center for Internship. menus. certificates and permits. 25. What is the most valuable aspect that you look for when hiring a prospective culinary school graduate? 2. awards. • Work on self study requirements as mandated by the ACF Accrediting Commission Standards. • Maintain regular meetings of the Advisory Committee. • Provide opportunities for students to volunteer for special events. Work with Montana Job Corp’s Business Education Program to articulate classes and encourage discourse. Initiate relations with the University Dining Services to foster avenues promoting common endeavors. 24. • Accrediting Commission to inspect and evaluate the Culinary Program in October. • Partner to utilize contacts and knowledge for sustainable cuisine and composting and implement them at the COT. etc? 3. • Require the successful completion of certification written exam. photos. Do find that culinary school graduates come adequately prepared for the interview process? 4 . Is it important to you that graduated students present a portfolio encompassing learning competencies. diploma. • Provide staff the means to update certification credentials. • Require all staff to attain the status of Proctor for NRAEF ServeSafe Course. recipes. Set forth plans to update and maintain compliance with ACF accreditation. • Possible use of kitchen facilities for off site classes and workshops.

Thank you again. 5 . Do you think that culinary school graduates generally come with the skills necessary to excel in an entry level position? 6. your input is very important.4. This is the space where you can ask me a question or state your thoughts and suggestions. What do you think a formal culinary internship should include? 5.

Tom stated how he would like to keep the program focused towards the best interest of the students involved and the best quality program for their money. She mentioned the new courses that are being added and deleted from the Certificate program. Program Director Vicki Micheletto. faculty and staff had a wonderful meal prepared by the culinary students. which is a 2 semester course. and would like to see developmental courses to help students that might need help with coming into the program. He wants to expand the variety of foods and update the acceptance standards.doc COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY CULINARY ARTS ADVISORY COMMITTEE MINUTES October 22.m. He sees more hands on training particularly in the Introduction to Foods and Baking and Pastry courses and he would like to see the kitchen instructional methods organized and managed under the direction of the students. The members. Solid Foundation for Students: Tom told the committee how he would like to have the faculty and students constantly evaluate the standards of the program and to create and maintain a quality educational experience for the students. physical exams. 2003 Members Present: Ray Risho Ruth Williams Mark LoParco Tom Siegel Bob Zimmerino Susan Hintz Mark Foss UMCT Faculty Present: Tom Campbell. have the students sign a statement accepting uniform and hygiene policies. Culinary Program Relocates: Tom informed the committee that the Culinary Program moved under the umbrella of The Business Technology Department and that changes are being made to the scope and sequence of the curriculum to enable Certificate students a seamless advancement into the Food Service Management Program. She told the committee how all the program changes will be going though the provost office/ASCRC and then through faculty senate for approval. Tom opened the meeting by telling the committee about himself and his goals to lay out a solid foundation for the graduation of qualified hospitality industry professionals.ExI-3. Chair Ross Lodahl Wynne Wakley Nina Wood. He also wants the Food Service Management students to be able to achieve a Certified Culinarian status upon graduation. Business Department Chair reviewed the new scope and sequence for the culinary program. He would like to have a pre-college aptitude standards test. Administrative Support Call to Order: The meeting was called to order by Tom Campbell at 11:45 a. The students will continue their kitchen and dining room experiences (stations) and a baking and pastry . Tom stated the importance of having quality student candidates start the program. and will enable the student an easy integration into the Food Service Management AAS Degree. Scope and Sequence: Vicki Micheletto. and implement a competency checklist before the students sign up for the program.

which is a four credit course and involves working in a culinary environment. logical sequence. Visual Material & Internship Program: Visual material is mandatory to the programs success. Challengeable Course: Susan Hintz asked if any of the Culinary Arts courses are challengeable and would the student have to take a written exam or have real proof of knowledge of the course they were trying to challenge.ExI-3. This will encompass on the job. cover letters. resumes. Students will also be required to do an internship. Faculty will be required to be certified to teach ServeSafe. To finish up the internship a review dinner is required as part of their grade. The ACF Certified Program does prepare students for food service administrator positions. The correction facility has a brand new kitchen and inmates that have 30-90 days to learn culinary skills. Some changes will be made. Video’s will be required as part of kitchen and lab classes. and summer courses to bring in extra revenue. Periphery. certificates. An internship program will be mandatory for students at the end of their sophomore year. Mark Foss from the County Correction Facility is working with the college to provide the inmates with the opportunity to earn a Culinary Arts Certificate while incarcerated. There will be the creation of some evening. weekend. This will get our name out into the community and help place inmates in jobs. State of the art instructional videos have been ordered to supplement hands on training. letters of thank you. The Certificate Program doesn’t prepare the students to become administrators either. There needs to be some revamping of course fees to help cover student’s consumable costs. etc. Mainly the Certificate Program is an advertisement for the students to prepare for the two years Food Service Management AAS Degree. Budget Goals: Tom will be reviewing the budget for fiscal year 2005 on ways to reduce costs without infringing on quality ingredients. At the completion of the Certificate Program the student will have basic skills and knowledge to go out into the work force. Tom answered that none of the culinary courses currently afforded any challenges. ACF Certification: Students will be required to perform inspections and follow sanitation and HACCP procedures as stated by the National Restaurant Association Education Foundation’s certification status. supplies. Health inspectors will visit twice a semester and give the students pointers on what checkpoints they need to be aware of for policy standards. internally in the restaurant before reaching out to the community. This will be a four course practical exam dinner the students will manage and execute for the advisory board and parents of the students. hands on training along with requiring a portfolio complete with menus.doc course will be added along with a Patisserie course. The reason is that the program is structured for students to progress through in the prescribed. . and classroom instruction. Qualification of Certificate and Degree Program: Bob Zimmerino asked the committee what the students are qualified to do at the completion of the Certificate Program and the Food Service Management AAS Degree. general education classes may be challenged given the parameter of the individual departments.

and have students volunteering their work for charity auction events. We are providing local charities with culinary contributions. is a Certified Executive Chef and is pursuing the Certified Chef Educator Level. Closing Remarks: Tom thanked everyone for coming and told the committee that the Culinary Program was the future of the surrounding hospitality industry and he wanted to see that the students have an honorable education. It is important to work within the University system to provide service for departmental functions while introducing students to new learning opportunities. Tom is providing periodic recipes and food columns for The University of Montana newspaper and magazine and is working with Dining Services at the University mountain campus on the adoption of the “Griz” (debit/meal plan) card for the students at the College of Technology campus. Everyone on staff is required to become ACF Certified. dinners for 8 auctions. We are providing catering gigs for The Missoula Chamber of Commerce. Meeting Adjourned: 12:50 P. Tom is planning on writing grants to help with the financial stability of the program. After graduation. .doc Community Involvement: We will develop working relationships and communication with industry and recognize members in the committee by printing their names and businesses in school publications. Work will be done to reach out to local farmers and ranchers to procure native Montana products and initiate sustainable cuisine. Faculty/Staff socials at the College of Technology. We have performed cooking demonstrations at local high schools and have started a line of communication between counselors and the College of Technology’s Culinary Program Director. Contact is being made with local radio and television stations for a weekly 3 minute spot/cooking demos. Tom will stay in contact with the local employers and make sure they are happy with the placement program and what the students are demonstrating in the field.ExI-3.M. Accreditation Program: Work is being done to improve the accreditation standards in preparation for curriculum self study and Accreditation Committee inspection. Tom. and progressive dinners. and stated that the program will need money for the test. the Program Director. Tom would like all staff members to take the test to become certified.

CCE. Chef Owner Tomas Culinary Consulting and Catering Faculty Chef Art Institute of Seattle under Roland Henin CMC and then under John Fisher CEC. I would like to take the opportunity to introduce myself and share with you some of the happenings in our program. I have pored through as much information regarding the past as I can assimilate and have discovered some truly wonderful approaches to better our school. 2003 Hello everyone and thank you for your participation in the Advisory Committee. (Next up Asia) Married and living in the Potomac area The future of our program looks extremely exciting. a small summary of my history: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Born in Augusta GA 1956 Moved throughout the country (Air Force Brat) until graduating high school in 1974 First kitchen job at United States Air Force Academy Officers Club While working as a prep cook and cook attended college in Washington Apprenticed four years under two time culinary gold medal winning Chef Dietmar Jeager Owned and operated restaurant and bar on Washington Coast Numerous kitchen and kitchen manager jobs in Astoria Oregon Sous Chef Bellevue Inn.doc The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts Advisory Board August 21. Northwest Hospitality Inc. I plan to teach introductory level classes and keep myself occupied in the day to day instruction and operation of the kitchen and dining facilities. Hyde Park. South America. Initially. Right now I have a tremendous amount on my plate and policies and procedures for implementation are going to take time and patience. First off. Manhattan NY Executive Chef. Bellevue WA Honor graduate Culinary Institute of America. AAC Extensive travels to Europe. NY Intern Peninsula New York Hotel under Chef Gray Kuntz. Middle East. With your help and advice I hope to be able to reach these goals. Bellevue Inn Corporate Executive Chef.ExI-4. My first priority is to the student. Some of you are quite aware of the recent history here and frankly I think it’s a shame that such a viable culinary program languish. I believe strongly in the hands on approach 1 . There is a seemingly endless list of ideas and objectives to occupy me for years to come.

ExI-4.doc towards assessment. Griz Card Instruction times introduced to accommodate evening or weekend classes Curriculum modified to offer certificate program for the State Department of Corrections Nutritional cooking class American regional cooking International cuisine class Charcuterie Culinary French. competent students to enter the work place with professional attitudes and enthusiasm Ideas that could be instituted in the future (you may already recognize some of them): • • • • • • • • • • • • • Become associated with UM Dining services. nutritious and tasty food Require a graduate portfolio Graduate well equipped. Once I have established an understanding of operations and current systems are honed then its time for future agendas. The following is a list of priorities to ensure a firm foundation for the program: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Maintain compliance under ACF Accreditation Guidelines Develop standards for acceptance of new students Update certification of faculty Reorganize current curriculum in a more congruent manner Provide solid employment for staff and faculty Develop a HACCAP program Update AV and library research materials Organize and implement course competencies Institute student assessment of the faculty Design of student hand book Work with advisory board to asses effectiveness of the program Provide a safe and well equipped kitchen lab and dining room Acquaint and maintain professional relationships with businesses Help provide quality employment for graduates Provide incentives for staff and faculty professional development Institute an internship program Meet and exceed budgetary requirements Provide safe. Spanish Classical cuisine Current cuisine Science of cooking Construct a bake shop and introduce a baking and pastry degree program Institute a food court or rent space to vendors 2 .

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• • • • • • •

Upgrade dining room and focus kitchen skills to be applied there Student culinary team Expansion of culinary program to satellite campuses in Helena and Dillon Computer classes focused on culinary management and nutrition Off site catering centered around emergency situations Courses designed towards casino management Student/faculty exchange programs with other culinary institutions

At the moment my first two priorities are to deliver classroom instruction and update ACF Accreditation standards. Part of the accreditation update is to hold regular, productive Advisory Board meetings and the Chair of the Accreditation Committee suggested that it might be more efficient to hold informal dialogues via E-mail. If that’s alright with all of you, this is how I will proceed. We will have a mutually agreeable more formal meeting at a later date. With this in mind, I simply need your feedback. Please feel free to comment, expand upon and suggest. It doesn’t need to be wordy, just informative. Also, please call or stop by anytime. Again, many thanks. Sincerely, Tom

Thomas Campbell CEC

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ExI-5.doc Advisory Committee Meeting October, 22 2003 Goals for the fiscal year 2004 Lay a solid foundation for graduating qualified culinary professionals. 1. Create and maintain a quality educational experience for the students. • • • • • Encourage students and faculty to constantly elevate present culinary standards. Challenge current instructional menus and recipes by expanding variety and initiate contemporary food preparation techniques. Demand that students and faculty push the envelope. Assessment will be on going and consistent. Students will be required to fulfill competency objectives. Reorganize kitchen instructional measures by forming a Student Administration Team comprised of Sous Chef, Steward, and Sanitour.

2. Evaluate and honor the conviction that decisions for the future of the Culinary Arts Department are made with the best intentions of the student. 3. Limit the student to teacher ratio keeping in mind the amount of personal attention necessary for first rate instruction. 4. Update the acceptance standards. • • • • Require a written statement on why the student wants to attend. Require a signed affidavit for uniform policy and personal hygiene code. Two letters of recommendation by employers. Complete a questionnaire to identify the expectations of the program.

5. Relocate the Culinary Program under the umbrella of The Business Technology Department. • • • Provide resources, support and guidance to Culinary Program. Develop relationships with general education classes to tailor them towards more emphasis on the hospitality industry. Enable the Culinary Program to fit better within the framework of The University of Montana and the College of Technology.

6. Streamline scope and sequence of curriculum to enable Certificate students a seamless advance into the Food Service Management Program. • We have made innovative changes to be effective fall 2004. (Vicki’s Presentation). 1

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7. Require each course to assign library audio-visual tools to augment in class participation and lecture. 8. Provide for more hands on training particularly in the Introduction to Foods and Baking and Pastry courses. • • Focus will be for students to be more fundamentally sound upon graduation. Intent is for graduates to meet and exceed entry level standards demanded by industry.

9. Require completion of an Internship Program. • • • • Implemented for Spring Semester 2005 Student to compile a cumulative portfolio package. Require students to participate in a review banquet. Implement a pass or fail ACF practical exam guided by ACF judging criteria.

10. Provide Food Service Management students with the means to achieve Certified Culinarian status upon graduation.

Strengthen and elevate essential sanitation and safety procedures. 1. Implement working systems to monitor and control issues. • • • • • Personal hygiene inspections. Professional attire standards. Set forth daily sanitation inspections as a mandatory function of operation. Develop a HACCAP plan. Regulate strict cleaning procedures as governed by a daily check list.

2. Require students to undergo a physical examination prior to acceptance into the program. This will reduce the risk of students who enter the program with a communicable disease. 3. Require that faculty be certified to teach ServeSafe. 4. Require that the Sanitation course culminate with NRAEF certificate of completion as mandatory pass or fail assessment. 5. Invite local sanitation inspections twice per semester as a learning tool for students and checkpoints for policy standards.

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Evaluate the budgetary goals and accounting while planning and implementing changes within it. 1. Streamline ordering procedures and cost controls. 2. Update culinary course fees to reflect changes within the curriculum and current product costs. 3. Prepare the new fiscal budget for 2005 focusing on ways to reduce costs without infringing on quality ingredients, supplies, and classroom instruction. 4. Prepare the new fiscal budget for 2005 aiming towards an increase in revenues. 5. Evaluate options for increasing enrollment. • • Possibilities include the introduction of evening and weekend courses. Summer seminars and workshops offered as continuing education for area professionals and gourmets.

6. Work with Mark Foss and the County Corrections Facility to provide the inmates with the opportunity to earn a Culinary Arts Certificate while incarcerated.

Develop working relationships and communication with industry. 1. Meet regularly with Advisory Committee members. 2. Recognize Advisory Committee members for their participation by printing their names and businesses in school publications and news releases. 3. Work within the University system to provide services for departmental functions while at the same time introducing the student to new learning opportunities. 4. Provide periodic recipes and or food columns. • • Included in The University of Montana’s University Relations periodicals. Special emphasis on the Main Hall to Main St. community newsletter distributed monthly to several thousand readers in Missoula, including business owners, donors, high schools, and elected officials in the state.

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5. Initiate relations with the University Dining Services to foster avenues promoting common endeavors. • • • • Examples could include a center for Internship. Possible use of kitchen facilities for off site classes and workshops. Adoption of the Griz Card system at COT. Provide opportunities for students to volunteer for special events.

6. Make contact with local radio and television stations to provide public interest spots. 7. Work with area high schools. • • • • Provide periodic cooking demonstrations for their culinary programs. Act as mentors for senior students interested in a hospitality industry career. Participate in college recruitment programs. Initiate a pipeline between The Culinary Program and academic advisors and guidance counselors.

8. Provide local charities with culinary auction items for fund raising events. 9. Investigate and work with local farmers and ranchers to augment inventory items with fresh products. This could work into a possible chain reaction for sustainable cuisine practices, particularly with organic producers. 10. Provide students with a comprehensive placement program. • • Follow up with employers who host interns. Follow up with employers who hire graduates from the Culinary Program.

11. Invite students and staff to associate and participate with the local chapter of the American Culinary Federation. 12. Work with Montana Job Corp’s Business Education Program to articulate classes and encourage discourse.

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Set forth plans to update and maintain compliance with ACF accreditation. 1. Provide staff the means to update certification credentials. 2. Work with College of Technology and The University of Montana representatives to set up plans for appropriating funds for continuing education grants. 3. Require the successful completion of certification written exam. 4. Require successful completion in mandatory 30-hour courses of Sanitation, Nutrition, and Supervisory Management. 5. Require all staff to attain the status of Proctor for NRAEF ServeSafe Course. 6. Require the completion of a minimum of 120 contact hours in educational development courses. 7. Work on self study requirements as mandated by the ACF Accrediting Commission Standards. 8. Invite Accrediting Commission to inspect and evaluate the Culinary Program. 9. Maintain regular meetings of the Advisory Committee.

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Lay a solid foundation for graduating qualified culinary professionals.
Create and maintain a quality educational experience for the students. Limit the student to teacher ratio keeping in mind the amount of personal attention necessary for first rate instruction. Update the acceptance standards. Relocate the Culinary Program under the umbrella of The Business Technology Department. Streamline scope and sequence of curriculum to enable Certificate students a seamless advance into the Food Service Management Program. Require each course to assign library audio-visual tools to augment in class participation and lecture. Provide for more hands on training particularly in the Introduction to Foods and Baking and Pastry courses. Require completion of an Internship Program. Provide Food Service Management students with the means to achieve Certified Culinarian status upon graduation.

Strengthen and elevate essential sanitation and safety procedures.
Implement working systems to monitor and control issues. Require students to undergo a physical examination prior to acceptance into the program. This will reduce the risk of students who enter the program with a communicable disease. Require that faculty be certified to teach ServeSafe. Require that the Sanitation course culminate with NRAEF certificate of completion as mandatory pass or fail assessment. Invite local sanitation inspections twice per semester as a learning tool for students and checkpoints for policy standards.

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Evaluate and improve the budgetary goals.
Streamline ordering procedures and cost controls. Update culinary course fees to reflect changes within the curriculum and current product costs. Prepare the new fiscal budget for 2005 focusing on ways to reduce costs without infringing on quality ingredients, supplies, and classroom instruction. Prepare the new fiscal budget for 2005 aiming towards an increase in revenues. Evaluate options for increasing enrollment. Work with Mark Foss and the County Corrections Facility to provide the inmates with the opportunity to earn a Culinary Arts Certificate while incarcerated.

1

ExI-6.doc

Develop working relationships and communication with industry.
Meet regularly with Advisory Committee members. Recognize Advisory Committee members for their participation by printing their names and businesses in school publications and news releases. Work within the University system to provide services for departmental functions while at the same time introducing the student to new learning opportunities. Provide periodic recipes and or food columns. Initiate relations with the University Dining Services to foster avenues promoting common endeavors. Make contact with local radio and television stations to provide public interest spots. Work with area high schools. Provide local charities with culinary auction items for fund raising events. Investigate and work with local farmers and ranchers to augment inventory items with fresh products. This could work into a possible chain reaction for sustainable cuisine practices, particularly with organic producers. Provide students with a comprehensive placement program. Invite students and staff to associate and participate with the local chapter of the American Culinary Federation. Work with Montana Job Corp’s Business Education Program to articulate classes and encourage discourse.

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Set forth plans to update and maintain compliance with ACF accreditation.
Provide staff the means to update certification credentials. Work with College of Technology and The University of Montana representatives to set up plans for appropriating funds for continuing education grants. Require the successful completion of certification written exam. Require successful completion in mandatory 30-hour courses of Sanitation, Nutrition, and Supervisory Management. Require all staff to attain the status of Proctor for NRAEF ServeSafe Course. Require the completion of a minimum of 120 contact hours in educational development courses. Work on self study requirements as mandated by the ACF Accrediting Commission Standards. Invite Accrediting Commission to inspect and evaluate the Culinary Program. Maintain regular meetings of the Advisory Committee.

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ExI-7.doc

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CULINARY/FOODSERVICE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA-COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGYMISSOULA

The following are recommendations that address the areas of non-compliance with ACF accreditation standards. Other objectives can be considered for future planning and development of the Culinary Arts/Food service Management Program.

OBJECTIVE 1: Rewrite existing curriculum for the Culinary and Food Service Management Programs to reflect intakes of students each semester. This will insure a steady flow of students in the pipeline. See an enclosure which reflects restructuring of the courses and the sequence. COMMENTS: The new curriculum would eliminate waiting lists and provide a steady stream of students. Longer hours in the lab courses include a lecture component. An internship will insure that the students have contact with industry and provide feedback to the program on the mirroring of industry standards. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● Perhaps you could move Nutrition 295 to semester III and make it required. I also believe that adding an internship is a criteria component and a great idea. Nearly all the programs I am aware of include an internship program. Will you be screening applicants for entry into the program? ● I agree fully. ● the internship program sounds like a fantastic idea. In the last 12 years I hired 7 grads from vo-tech. I was disappointed in their lack of ability to apply practiced knowledge. I think the internship program will address the issue. I also found them to be severely lacking in sanitation procedures. I hope the new course structure includes the servsafe certification program. Glad to see the curriculum re-written. ● The Culinary field needs have grown: 1. A 2 year waiting list is too long; even 1 year is. 2. A lecture about the lesson’s goals before heading to the hands-on practice will fulfill daily goals with proper instructional techniques. 3. Students applying skills to a real environmental situation is vital. ● The steady flow of students will result in more continuity and consistency of the delivery of the instructors, as they will be covering material repeatedly with new groups. I’ve confirmed this idea with instructors at the Culinary Institute of America. They regularly rotate through various syllabuses to maintain the ability to be proficient in all disciplines. OBJECTIVE 2: Design and develop greater specificity in cooking lab assignments in the student operated restaurant. Prior to Spring Semester 2002, students were permitted to research recipes in the library and prepare the items. This has been changed to provide students with tested recipes used by the current Dept. Chair for the past 20 years. The instructors were allowed

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to utilize their own recipes if they desired and were furnished with a comprehensive recipe book which they could use as a guide. The objective is to standardize the menu with a cycle so that foods could be ordered on a timely basis and costing could be standardized. This has been effectively implemented and should continue. The students, under the direction of the instructors should cost out each recipe for fiscal responsibility for the storeroom department. COMMENTS: The paramount challenge for Chef/Instructors is to make meaningful all lab assignments and the objective assessment of learning outcomes. The outcomes are to a great extent subjective and are related to the professional competence of the chef/instructors. Professional credibility and technical skill are extremely critical to the success of any skill based program. Students should be required to rotate from station to station and practice basic skills within the station. Lesson plans should be specifically state educational objectives and measurable outcomes. Master check-off sheets will be developed to assist each student in completing assigned tasks. Much like a pre-flight check list in aviation, the forms will permit the details of each task to be fulfilled and not rely on memory alone. The system is advantageous to those students who have not had extensive industry experience or served in supervisory positions. A student work book with a standard format making it easier for the students to use them will be implemented to provide students with skills and outcomes for each station they rotate into. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● This objective cuts to the heart of the program. Produce competent Food Service Professionals. The most repeated criticism that I hear form graduates and local restaurants is that they don’t feel the students who graduate have sufficient base level knowledge and skills. This obviously impacts the perception of the program and the confidence of the graduate. You’re “on target” here. ● This way students know what’s expected of them. It makes it easier to comply. Also in later employment students will know what is required of every chef! I agree. ● Again- totally agree. Following, cost accounting standardized recipes is a skill they will need before using their own recipes. It would also eliminate wasted time running to several stores to find items. How does one increase the professional competence of instructors? Lesson plans stating objectives and outcomes would be as valuable to experienced students as well as inexperienced because the likely do tasks routinely without realizing why or in what steps. Would help them learn appropriate ways to teach their own staff someday. ● If students fail assignments and objective outcomes, then the system failed the student. A work book of assignments and outcomes is a learning tool for both the student and the instructor. ● The key word is “specificity”. The previous methodology of menu/recipe selection renders little value. The Dining room and snack bar menu should be a showcase-learning venue. I recommend that the menu determination and commensurate recipe selections be incorporated into the syllabus of one of the classes with STRONG guidance and parameters laid down by the director. It should be an optimum learning experience reflected by measurable outcomes. I strongly recommend that it reflect the seasonality of various heritage cuisines. Check-off sheets for student assigned tasks should include the student demonstrating the technique back to the instructor. The student workbook should be supplemented by a personal diary that the student carries on them at all times to make special notations such as for specific techniques that may not

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be covered in text. I do this when I go to the CIA. The diary includes notes on other students, teaching styles and mentoring of the instructor. OBJECTIVE 3: Formation and Utilization of a Culinary Advisory Board. An advisory board meeting has not been held since 1999. The board will assist in reviewing proposed curriculum changes, menu development, student placement and fund raising for providing new equipment or changes to the kitchen area. The board members are listed in enclosure. COMMENTS: An advisory handbook will be written to include history, accomplishments and responsibilities of Advisory Board members and short and long term goals of the Culinary Department. Each Advisory Committee person will be asked to serve as a member to a new incoming student for their first semester. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● This is a very important component of the programs long term success. There is a lot of support in the community for you, your efforts and this program. There is wisdom in the saying that “it takes a village….” So use the resources that are interested and willing to help. ● That not only would give a student more emphasis on his or her choice of profession but also would have a person to fall back on for advice. ● The mentor idea is an excellent one. I look forward to the opportunity. ● Sign me on! ● Consider a longer mentoring period. Some chefs are hard to get to know. It seems like it may take a semester to become acclimated to each other. OBJECTIVE 4: Design a Student Handbook to provide students with Mission Statement of the Department, rules and requirements that are specific to the Culinary Program, addresses and phone numbers of pertinent sources of information for supplies and uniforms and names and phone numbers of advisory members and faculty members. COMMENTS: The handbook for the Culinary Arts Department will be proactive in assisting the students to succeed by providing them with the applicable human and material resources. Entry level students will have a written guide which may include a section on Frequently Asked Questions of incoming students in Culinary Arts. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● This is a very good idea and will assist in teaching students the value of networking. It will set a student up to succeed! ● This is an absolute must! E.A. check Johnson and Wales or Culinary School in Portland and of course ACF Culinary School Hide- Park NY. ● I can’t believe this wasn’t standard! Excellent idea. ● Having a handbook for students to read and use appears helpful. ● Stricter disciplinary policy needs to be adopted with clear lines of protocol. It could be articulated here and during orientation. OBJECTIVE 5: Develop a 3 year plan of action for the program listing objectives and assigned responsibilities for each faculty member. It could include a personal action plan to be incorporated into the Department Action Plan. Input from students, advisory committee

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members and representatives from the main campus would be elicited. Instructors should have a personal plan to address certification, continuing education and career goals. COMMENTS: This three year plan based upon one year increments will provide instructors with short, medium and long term goals that can be integrated within the Action Plan of the Department. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● Individual certification should be required as a term of employment. In fact, I believe that it is required for the program to be certified. I would also recommend that at least one instructor should be certified to teach ServeSafe. Requiring that faculty stay current with food industry concerns is also important. ● Agree! ● To grow, to increase the flow of students, to develop professionally – these long-term goals are an absolute necessity. I would like to see some courses geared towards healthcare and some exploration of career possibilities. ● And of course to the advantage of COT and the students ultimately. ● Model the MAPS program. OBJECTIVE 6: Design a standard survey for all in-coming students. COMMENTS: This survey would over time identify changes in attitudes and expectations that would provide input for future changes in the program. This could provide indicators as to changing student population and societal shifts and emphasis. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● This is a very good idea. I would suggest that a survey be sent to students who have graduated as a means to evaluate program success and shortfalls. Outcome assessment is very important. ● A pro active stand on COT’s instructors and personnel, can only help the students. ● Good idea. May also help identify a student’s strong and weak area thus helping the instructor be more effective. ● There are many areas of indicators to consider: local student? Out of state student? Financial status? Race? (optional) Religion? (optional) Marital status? Age? Previous experience? Part-time employment required-survival needs? ● Surprised this is not already being done. On the “front end” this will help the instructor prepare for the diversity of their audience—the student. OBJECTIVE 7: Partner with other departments to interface subject material to provide specific competencies. COMMENTS: Computer course is a good example. Using the standardized recipes in actual operation, students can determine nutritional content, costs and methods of preparation that would assist in evaluation of products prepared in the dining areas. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● This is also very important. Significant resources are available and can be made available through partnering. Human and equipment resources can and should be accessed.

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● Definitely needed is a computer course on recipes: portion size, quantity needs, food cost, menu selling price (%), receiving and issuing and physical inventory. Many establishments expect, even wait staff, to use computer systems. Also partnering with county health department for food safety, prevent spoilage and servesafe course is smart. ● Computer, keyboarding – even some bookkeeping. Working for sysco I found that many chefs – managers do not have a clue how to do the necessary bookkeeping or use various incentive programs. ● This is not only an emerging phenomenon in the restaurant business, but will soon be a standard requirement for restaurants to know the nutritional content of menu Items. ● Acquire a Computerized Menu Management System. It need not be expensive. Many systems such as Nutra Coster are available for a few hundred dollars. Possibilities exist to derive some benefits from Dining Services C-Bord system, at least to preview the capabilities of a larger system. OBJECTIVE 8: Initiate a Baking and Pastry Program that would be accredited by the RBA. COMMENTS: There is a demand for qualified Bakers and Pastry Chefs. This program could be run at night and increase student enrollments. There are several good bakeries in Missoula that would participate in an internship program at the conclusion of the course or would be partners in a work-study program. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● Industry wide there is a shortage of competent bakers. This program will fill a niche that will result in jobs for the graduates. Accreditation will be important and add a credibility level to validate graduate credentials. ● That would be another feather in COT’s hat, and a good idea. ● This would be excellent! ● Having a 12 week. B and P program is necessary. This is definitely an important area of skills for a chef. ● Emphasize the Work-Study aspect. OBJECTIVE 9: Include the use of the GRIZ CARD in the dining area. Create a Frequent Diners Card. COMMENTS: This will encourage usage of the facilities as a source of additional income. The student run restaurant is not being utilized to its’ full potential. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● UDS can help with this objective. ● YES!!! ● Another avenue: Senior meal dining. Because Missoula doesn’t have a senior feeding center, a program is developed for senior diners to be issued tickets and eat at various establishments. Once a month the establishment turns in the tickets for payment. ● Besides the students will know and work in a real restaurant requirement and also the stress that come with it. ● Not my area of expertise to comment on. OBJECTIVE 10: Redesign the dining room to convert to a Food Court Concept.

5

● A student’s success is very important! ● My knowledge is that the advertised program does not match the school’s delivery. instead of a dysfunctional operation. I attended both the “Wild Game Show” and the Culinary Skills Workshop and was extremely impressed by the professionalism displayed by the staff and the quality of foods produced and the educational outcomes derived by all the participants. Culinary Skills Seminars.” COMMENTS: Dining Services posses a significant source of expertise with Director Mark LoParco. ● A Food Court Concept (6:30 – 3:30) would increase sales.ExI-7. COMMENTS: Work towards insuring that concept appears in print and in practice in classes throughout the program. Assisting or Volunteering in work assignments. Our instructors can participate in the skill seminars and compete in events to further develop their competencies. The students ate the COT were 6 . Completion of all daily assignments. materials and tools). Being in class on time (with proper attire. ● Much better than having ‘teacher’s pets’. ● Great idea to give students that practical experience and a variety that has been lacking. 5. Executive Chef. ACF accreditation provides a method to quantify success. Martin Albrect and Food Production Manager. Maintain a “C” GPA. if needed. OBJECTIVE 12: Interact and partner with Dinning Services on the Main Campus for Internships. ● Design food court for easy “change-out” of concepts and incorporate that planning process into a management class in Layout and Design. It would make the kitchen a functional operation. 4. ● This is a very good idea and long in coming. The program at the Mountain Campus is an NACUF award winning facility (National Association of College and University Food Services). ● A measure list should include: 1. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● Again. workshops and special events such as the “Wild Game Show. John Memoli. 3. Reward students who have excelled in practical applications in the dining room stations and in the internship. Salad Bar Station and Mongolian BBQ wok station. Tom Siegal. Smoothie and expanded Espresso Bar and Grill Station. 2. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● Absolutely critical to both student and program success.doc COMMENTS: This would provide for greater skill development by incorporating a Pizza Station. Perhaps that ‘reward’ can be designed in such a way that it could be used to assist the student in gaining employment upon graduation. UDS can help with this. OBJECTIVE 11: Define “Student Success” and how to measure it. No lates or absents in class. customer/student satisfaction also increase customers from Sentinel High School and Retirement Home. Example is the attendance of food shows and competitions. Catering Chef.

projects with appropriate rubric. ● We have one super and award winning program on Main Campus. The competencies obtained were first rate. ● And don’t forget the French Cuisine vocabulary used in international cuisines all over the world. I dislike them because it generally boils down to a popularity contest or a contest to see whose parents have enough money to support the student while he/she “schmoozes”. ● To recognize one’s outstanding achievements is a great award. the UM hosts lots of other shows and training that could benefit students from COT at various skill levels. quizzes. COMMENTS: The criteria will be based on achievement. ● Partaking in Culinary Seminars/Workshops is a great learning environment. ● Though I am not generally a supporter of these kinds of awards. ● Good OBJECTIVE 14: Establish as a Culinary Program goal that each instructor will produce a Master Course Book for each class that they teach. but for the instructors. just my opinion. Throughout the year. why not expand on it at the COT. COMMENTS: This Master Course Book will include Lesson Plans. outside employment in the hospitality industry and personal commitment. good idea.ExI-7. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● This makes sense. The more participants the better for us. Could also be helpful for the occasional student who needs a little extra help. test. participation in community and college events. GPA. I’m sure it’s a necessary thing. ● The quality of the experience may enhance the opportunity for the student to become employed full time especially at Dining Services. ● That alone would be the equivalents of the Griz winning the championship. not only for the students. 7 . It makes sense that the same requirement be made for instructors at COT. list of reserve desk items and additional resources such as videos and audio tapes. Presently. OBJECTIVE 13: Develop a President’s Award for distinguished Culinary Arts students. final exams. or to defend the COT from a student who may object to a grade. UDS supports this and would like to talk about funding a scholarship.doc encouraged to participate in the wild game mis en place and they did a wonderful job. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● UDS is excited about further developing this objective. ● Teachers at public schools are required to do this as are UM professors. ● NaCufs and the Wild Game Show are big events and widely supported by vendors. Each class should have a vocabulary sheet of 75 words or terms specific to that class. we fund through the UM foundation two scholarships for UDS employees. assignments. Should be part of the curriculum. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● Fund a scholarship.

student to student or student to instructor. The facility could be utilized for morning. I make my children do this exercise on New Years day every year and I keep the letter until the following year when they open. Plus. evaluate and write a new one. COMMENTS: This will enable the program to identify and address individual achievement and competencies. read.M. When I worked in gerontology I attended a workshop where I had to write my own eulogy. Every first rate Culinary Arts Program possesses a lab for individual skill development. ● Use Lab for cooking shows “Creative Cooking with the U” OBJECTIVE 17: Become more pro active in recruitment of students from the local food service programs at area high schools. ● Are you talking about offering evening classes to non-students? Could be a great idea for chefs or cooks in establishments to polish their skills or learn new ones. This will serve as an annual student survey to build a meaningful data base.doc ● Agree!! And there should be application of the Culinary words daily in class. I am surprised the glossary of vocabulary list doesn’t already exist. OBJECTIVE 16: Build out of a Culinary laboratory with stations to accommodate 24 students for both cooking and baking programs.ExI-7. PROVIDE IT WITH A PHONETIC KEY. but a very important component to the program. the student can explain the meaning of a word/term to a customer. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● A major capital project. At the Culinary Institute of America. OBJECTIVE 15: Each graduating student in the degree and certificate program will write a letter to themselves (address to be valid in three years). labs start at 6:00A. ● Incorporate guest chef demonstrations and lectures. ● Besides continuing education classes will bring in extra revenues for needed programs and repairs. afternoon and evening classes. COMMENTS: Students will write their career goals. ● Find a way to get alumni to return and interact. ● A one year of written career goals and expectations will cause student to form more determination. job description and expectations. What a difficult task! And how important it is. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● Should be an interesting process. when ordering an entrée. and are in use until midnight for evening and continuing education classes.to identify what one wants to accomplish in life. ● Utilizing the facilities for educational classes is a good idea. ● This is a great idea. This letter and a questionnaire asking how the program has helped them will include recommendations and observations on whether they fulfilled their expectations. ● In order to keep track of ALL students it should be a yearly evaluation of students and faculty. It’s a great exercise. 8 .

job opportunities. It is quite effective. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● Again. ● A Specialty Course(s) definitely should be added. The new programs could lead to A. ADVISORY BOARD COMMENTS: ● This is another great idea. Would also be nice to recruit from local restaurants too. We know that up to 75% of all restaurants will fail and thus we fail unless we can help them and train them an impossible task for what we do! ● A hospitality/Tourism program would broaden students’ skills. This could be included in objectives 14 or 16. 9 . Students enrolled in Recreation Management can take courses at the COT in food preparation. a Casino Management Program. wild game preparation. a Hotel Management Program and a course in Mobile Food Operations for emergency response for fires and other emergencies where food service may be required. ● I would love to see this! You know – dealing with managers and chefs that know what they are doing maybe my current job so much easier. ● professional career day instigation or involvement seems a way to approach this. a very good job idea. menu planning. ● I’m sure there are Funds from the government available to institute these classes. ● And the job fair.ExI-7. I used to do this for my last employer. ● Partner with the Helena Department of Public Instruction and Family Consumer Science office.A.doc COMMENTS: Allowing high school seniors in food programs to “shadow” student chefs at the COT and having instructors provide demonstrations at the school for students at the school locations will provide greater exposure of the Culinary Program. We have almost all of the components to do this and do it well. degrees and develop into Baccalaureate degrees in Arts and Sciences. OBJECTIVE 18: Establish a Tourism Management Program.S. Timing will be important as it seems that there will be a lot on your plate. ● I would suggest to go one step further and have students go to grade schools and make budding culinarians aware of our local ACF sanctioned COT of Missoula. Should also include different kinds of job opportunities in the field so students understand the program is more than ‘just cooking’. Specialty courses in ethnic cooking. The earlier we start with children the better. COMMENTS: Partnering with the main campus can provide all students with a greater range and variety of skills. wild game preparation and baking could also be added to the existing curriculum.held every year for students to go and hear from area businesses.

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The University of Montana, College of Technology  Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Minutes  

May 2, 2006    

 
 

Members Present:

Mark LoParco George Goble

Ray Risho Tom Siegel

UMCT Faculty Present:

Tom Campbell, Program Director Vicki Micheletto, Chair Brian Larson, Management Program Director Lynn Stocking, Associate Dean Harry Sheski, Interim Dean Nina Broshar, Administrative Support

Called To Order: The College of Technology Culinary Arts advisory committee meeting was called to order May 2, 2006 at 11:30 pm by Program Director Tom Campbell. Minutes were reviewed, approved and seconded. Follow-up Report: Tom discussed the follow-up report that was reviewed at the last meeting and reported that the culinary program received a 5 year accreditation. He thanked the committee for all their help to make this possible. Also, Tom reported that the ACF has asked him to be a team member on an accreditation site visit, which is in Seattle this June. Competition Hawaii: Tom showed a video of the Junior Culinary competition that took place at the Western Regional Convention in Hawaii. The competition was a two part-two day test. Our team received a bronze medal in the competition. The program is now putting out feelers for the new culinary team and for individual competitions on June 5th, 6th, and 7th in Seattle. Tom would like the new team to compete at least a couple of times early in the year, so when the next regional comes up they will have the experience needed. The next regional competition will be in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho next April. The regional has been a great boost for the program, which has received a lot of advertisement and media. The ACF Montana Chefs Association was very thankful for the representation that our culinary team gave to Montana. The competition cost approximately $25,000; the students raised approximately $10,000 themselves and learned immensely from the experience. Flathead community college has asked Tom to assist them with their accreditation. While he gets to know the faculty there Tom hopes to get involved with there competitions and other Culinary teams in Montana. This will be a great opportunity for our students to be able to compete closer to home and not have the expense they had going to Hawaii. There is a culinary student assistance fund account that was created for fund raisers to help students go to competitions. After the capstone dinners there is approximately $12,000 in that account which will help students with their expense. This fund is also to help students purchase knife sets or something they might need for their training. Students have worked hard to help raise money for these expenses.

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The University of Montana, College of Technology  Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Minutes  

May 2, 2006    

 
 

Mark LoParco suggested that the culinary program have a separate fund just for the competitions. He said that the program will need triple the amount of money they have now to participate in competitions. Administration Changes: Paul Williams is no longer with us, Harry Sheski will be leaving at the end of the semester, and Vicki Micheletto will be stepping down as department chair. Brian Larson will be taking on that position. Certification Testing: Chef Tom Siegel and Tom Campbell have been collaborating on putting together a testing center. The testing center will use COT and UM dining services facilities for certification testing if approved and will look for outside judges to proctor the examinations. Three qualified judges will have to be brought in and the school will pay their expenses for the testing center, dates will be set up for those interested. This will also help our own faculty stay certified. If our building is testing approved the COT will be qualified to hest competitions. Building Plans: Harry brought up that it would be a good idea to stay involved with the new building plans. To make sure that the culinary area is incorporated into the building plans for what would be needed to have the COT an accreditation site for a testing center and to have room for competition here at the College. Mark LoParco asked if COT was planning to keep the same model for their retail operation or do they plan to expand. He would like to be involved in the building planning as far as Culinary/Food Service area. Would be beneficial to decide if the culinary program will provide food service for both west and east campuses or if they need to have dining services from the mountain campus participate in those services. Future Program Options: Tom mentioned some future possibilities for extended options for the Culinary Arts program, such as Food Service Mgmt, Baking/Patisserie, Butchery/Slaughter House Mgmt, and Casino Mgmt. He asked the committee if they had any other suggestions. There were no further comments. Enrollment/Adjunct Hire: Current enrollment is about 32 with 9 graduates and 23 first year students. Enrollment for autumn semester is full at this time. Also, there will be a full time adjunct position for fall 2006 in the culinary program. This will be advertised soon if anyone knows of someone that might be interested. Tom had the committee review a proposal for what the new position credentials should be and the certifications that are required. State Grant: Tom informed the committee that the Culinary Arts program received a state funded grant which will provide full scholarships to train and prepare students for the workforce. This will be an application process with a minimum of 4 students and maximum of 10. This course will tailor to a prep cook positions and will be 8 weeks from 7:30 am to 12:30 pm (80 hour course) if the student continues in the culinary program they will receive 5 credits for the course.

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The University of Montana, College of Technology  Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Minutes  

May 2, 2006    

 
 

Adjourned: 1:20 pm Respectfully submitted, Nina R. Broshar Administrative Assistant

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ExI-9
 

The University of Montana, College of Technology Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Minutes  

Sept. 29, 2004
 

 
 

Members Present:

Bob Zimmerino Geo Mark LoParco George Goble Greg Marianne Forrest

Jack Christine Littig Klaus Schuhbauer Mary Ann Tom Siegel

UMCT Faculty Present:

Tom Campbell, Program Director Vicki Micheletto, Chair Lynn Stocking, Associate Dean Ross Lodahl, Faculty Wynne Wakley, Faculty Nina Broshar, Administrative Support

Call to Order: The meeting was called to order by Tom Campbell at 11:40 a.m. The members, faculty, and staff had a wonderful meal prepared for them by the culinary students. Tom opened the meeting by having the committee introduce themselves. He told the committee that the program was strong and that there was a lot of enthusiasm in the program. Tom had several books laid out on the table and told the committee that he needed impute on new courses for the program and to take a look at the text for ideas. Books Donated to the Library: Five hundred books related to culinary were donated from an alumni of The University of Montana to the COT Mansfield library and an updated video collection. We currently have over one thousand text for the program in the library. ACF Standards: The self-study has been finished and sent to the accreditation committee. Everyone is welcome to look it over along with the exhibits, impute welcome. Anything you want to know about the program is in these volumes. The ACF on-site visit will be October 1214th, they will come to do an on site evaluation of the program to help the program update their standards and make the program stronger. A reception will be the 12th at 5 p.m. and everyone is invited to attend and meet with them they will visit with students, faculty, administration, and the advisory board members. When the committee leaves they will leave a report of the things we need to improve. We will have to meet these recommendations in a specific time. When we meet these specifications we can receive a certification for 3, 5 or 7 years. One thing we need to work on is certifying our staff. Tom told the committee that they needed to meet once each semester as part of the accreditation requirements. Also the program will need to have updates sent to the committee by e-mail at least once a month. Curriculum Updates: Tom had the committee look over the course requirements for the Culinary Arts program and he emphasized how the Culinary Arts certificate merged directly into the Food Service Management. A couple of courses have been added to the program FSM 180T Nutritional Cooking and FSM 290T Internship. Nutritional Cooking has been very well received
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The University of Montana, College of Technology Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Minutes  

Sept. 29, 2004
 

 
 

by the students, the first couple of days of the week are lectures were they go over a menu and the last day they cook the dishes and invite anyone they can find for a taste test. The Internship course has not yet taken place, last year at the first meeting it was identified that it would be nice to add to the curriculum. The reason this has not taken place yet is because it was just introduced in this years catalog and will be introduced the end of the two year Food Service Management option. So be prepared to see students in the community Spring 2006 looking for internships positions. Requirements for the internship are defined in the course syllabus. This was our last summer for the summer baking course. It will know be part of the food station courses, which now six courses are going at once. We will be deleting the storeroom course to add three segments of baking and pastry. One beginning baking, two intermediate baking, and the third semester we will introduce the pastier course. It will be a one day extensive course where they will learn more involved plated deserts. ACF says we need to have a storeroom course, right know we are heavy with accounting, so we will combine storeroom inventory with accounting principles. Sanitation was two courses, a five credit and 4 credit course. The first day the students attend classes they start in the kitchen with knife handling and kitchen techniques. Students will utilize sanitation in various courses. Culinary Arts Program Exposure: Introduce new courses to the local community, which need to be centered with some PR. We want to let the community know that we are here. We have upgraded the dining room; we have removed the mural and will be doing some advertisement. Bagels on Broadway will be a new addition to our snack bar area. Equipment Purchase: We purchased an ice cream machine, so know we have our own ice cream and also a sausage stuffing machine. We have progressed a lot and are trying to upgrade our equipment for the students. Updating Exception Standards: Mandating a physical examination for each student to determine weather they have any communicable disease. Also a survey will be sent to each student enrolled in the program and asked for a short essay on why they wish to attend the Culinary Arts program at the College of Technology. These are some of the things we can cover without to much legality to filter out some of the students that are not really serious about attending the program. This will make way for the students that are really interested in attending the program. Program Improvements: Students all now have new uniforms with the college logo and their names on them. Course fees have not been evaluated for three years, so some changes will need to be made in the budget plan for next FY. The advisory board and ACF chapter are strong. Tom announced that he was the new President for the American Culinary Federation chapter. Tom would like to see a web page done for the ACF chapter and link it to our web page here at the college.
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The University of Montana, College of Technology Culinary Arts Advisory Meeting Minutes  

Sept. 29, 2004
 

 
 

The Culinary program has currently been doing area high school training seminars. The University of Montana meal plan will know be offered to the students here at the College of Technology. They can use their griz card to scan the University meal plans. Professional Development: Tom Siegle of the University of Montana dining services has set up a program at the University where there’s a building block for professional development. This gives incentives for his staff to progress in an orderly fashion and have it count for something. The ladder is almost a mirror of the ACF certification. The closest place to have practical exams is Seattle, Washington or Provo, Utah. We would like to set up a testing center in dining services at the University or here at the COT. Grants Investigation: We are looking at a new facility in the next five years and will be putting in a state of the arts kitchen. We need to look at where the money is coming from for the new equipment for this kitchen. So, we need to look at grants to help fund this or donations from local businesses. Summer Courses: Short courses of cooking and baking, one week courses offered for the community and professional chefs. We offer at this time three thirty hour certificates, nutrition, sanitation and management. Tom asks the committee to give ideas on what courses are going to be marketable for the community. Closing Remarks: Tom thanked everyone for coming and for their feedback. Meeting Adjourned: 1:00 P.M.

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Teaching Schedule 

                 Fall 2008 
Tom Campbell

   

   

MONDAY 

   

TUESDAY 

  WEDNESDAY 

  THURSDAY 

 

FRIDAY 

7:00‐1:00 

CUL 156T/157T/158T  Dining Room Procedures  Pantry & Garde‐Manger  Short Order Cookery   

Kitchen 

    1:00‐2:00    Introduction to the Food Service Industry CUL 151 T                                FSM 290T  Internship   

    2:10‐3:00    3:10‐4:00      4:00‐5:00    4:00‐5:00 

     

     

     

       

       

CUL 196T Classical Cuisine  

 

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Teaching Schedule 

                 Fall 2008 
Laura Swanson

   

   

MONDAY 

   

TUESDAY 

  WEDNESDAY 

  THURSDAY 

 

FRIDAY 

7:00‐1:00 

CUL 160T/161T/165T  Soups, stocks, and Sauces  Meats and Vegetables  Baking and Pastry   

Kitchen 
    1:00‐2:00        CUL 151 T  Introduction to  the Food  Service Industry  ‐ Lecture          CUL 151 T  Introduction to  the Food  Service  Industry ‐ Lab       

    2:10‐3:00   

 

 

  3:10‐4:00      4:00‐5:00    4:00‐5:00 

 

 

           

       

       

       

       

 

ExL‐3 

                    

Teaching Schedule 

                 Fall 2008 
Aimee Ault

   

   

MONDAY 

   

TUESDAY 

  WEDNESDAY 

  THURSDAY 

 

FRIDAY 

7:00‐1:00 

 

  1:00‐2:00   

CUL 175T Food  Service  Sanitation             

CUL 151T  Introduction to  the Food  Service  Industry ‐  Lecture 

2:10‐3:00 

  CUL 151T  Introduction to  the Food  Service  Industry ‐ Lab         

  CUL 151T  Introduction to  the Food  Service Industry  ‐ Lab 

 

3:10‐4:00 

FSM 270  Purchasing and  Cost Controls 

FSM 270  Purchasing and  Cost Controls 

     

4:10‐5:00 

 

 

 

 

 

ExL‐4 

                    

Teaching Schedule 

                 Fall 2008 
Robert Wood

   

   

MONDAY 

   

TUESDAY 

  WEDNESDAY 

  THURSDAY 

 

FRIDAY 

7:00‐1:00 

CUL 156T/157T/158T  Dining Room Procedures  Pantry & Garde‐Manger  Short Order Cookery   

Kitchen 

  1:00‐2:00    2:10‐3:00    3:10‐4:00      4:00‐5:00    4:00‐5:00 

                   

CUL 151 T  Introduction to  CUL 151 T  the Food  Introduction to  Service Industry  the Food  ‐ Lecture  Service  Industry ‐ Lab                       

   

       

FSM 270  Purchasing and  Cost Controls 

       

   

   

ExAL ExlistChecklist.doc LIST OF EXHIBITS AND WORKSHEET RED TEXT INDICATES PENDING TASKS Exhibit/Section Description or Title Transmittal ☻ Explanation of first and second year enrollment Sheet Full-time student is quote from catalogue Foreword Verify that COT and UM has not been denied or lost accreditation by any accrediting agency. Dr. Walker-Andrews is investigating the verification of this statement. Contents Update Page Numbers – need to wait until final revisions are made Page numbers were lined up Section 1 ☻ Written and filed – sill need to pay Application Fee of $200 (ExA and Appendix 3) Section 2 ☻ 1-c-(3), (4) revised 4 revised Section 3 ☻ Historical perspective ¶ 1 revised 3-h revised 3-9 revised. Comment: I didn’t know how to verify my teaching hours other than to say I’m here 7-3 five days per week. Sometimes weekends and evenings and undocumented hours advising. For this reason I left the hourly aspect out of this paragraph. 5-a revised 5-e revised. Comment: If we were to make the snack bar a “real” business, the food cost would have to reflect a structure for profit. We constantly come in at or below budget in sales would suggest a breakeven policy. 5-c Comment: A la minute is a cooking term meaning “in the minute” or right now! 6-1-c-d Comment: Ross would leave early, ask for days off, leave for appointments, etc. rather frequently. These incidents occurred at least 7 or 8 times per semester. This put the burden on every culinary faculty to take his place. No other faculty posed this problem. 6-1-d revised 6-2-b Comment: I have not participated in the budget process since Required By Standard 1 Program’s Director Program’s Director Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Completed 8-7-08 Completed 8-7-08 Completed 8-8-08 Tasks to Complete Completed 8-7-08

ExAL ExlistChecklist.doc LIST OF EXHIBITS AND WORKSHEET 2005. 7-a revised 7-e revised 7-e Comment: I’m referring to Dining Services, Facility Services, other Educational Departments, etc. on the Mt. Campus. ☻ still need ExF from Laura 1-b deleted 1-c revised 1-d revised 1-e revised 1-e Comment: One of the Program’s weaknesses is faculty not holding adequate degrees. ACF will be looking to see what education is being done and what the plan is for the future. Therefore, I included Andrea’s current degree pursuits. 2-¶-2. 3-¶-1. Comment: I’m not sure of the question but station experience classes meet from 8 – 1. An instructor teaches three courses simultaneously, rotating from station to station, during this time period. 3-¶-2 revised 4-a-1 Comment: I am using the current Unit Standards to describe faculty development in this paragraph. I don’t think ACF will be concerned if they are approved or not rather what is the process. Can you explain further? 5 Comment: Sometimes the faculty meeting falls through the cracks as issues pop up. We do keep in constant communication and I document the events as best I can. For fall a renewed commitment to these meetings will take place and I’ll send out notification. 8-b revised 9-b revised ☻ Documentation of Courses ¶ revised to reflect policy 1-a-¶-4 revised to state exhibit of verification 2-¶-3 included dialogue on problem solving and leadership 3-a-b List of restaurants, hotels, and other community resources for

Section 4

Standard 4

Completed 8-8-08

Section 5

Standard 5

Completed 8-8-08

ExAL ExlistChecklist.doc LIST OF EXHIBITS AND WORKSHEET field trips and guest speakers is accessed in Ex AI. 6-b table revised 7 revised to accommodate theory and practice 7-b revised 7-c revised 8-b revised 8-f inclusion of Provost’s program 9-b revised 10, 10-f revised 11. Comment: It is painful but there are a number of “overlaps” with the ACF Self Study template. They ask the same questions and it seems illogical to answer them again but rather refer to the other sections. 11-b revised to direct attention to cleaning and sanitation checklists 12-¶-2 revised 14-a, b revised ☻ 1-a-¶-10 revised 1-d-¶3 revised 4-b revised ☻ 1-¶-3 revised 4 Comment: The numbers represented in this section are the only ones I found to represent culinary. There is not much there and I think the evaluators would like to understand the retention policies and procedures. 4-a data review made available 4-b-¶-1 revised 4-b-¶-5 revised 6 Comment: The Student Complaint Procedure is taken from the UM COT Bargaining Agreement. 7-b-6 revised 9 revised 10-¶2 relocated to Section 9 ☻ 2-a Comment: Again, another example of ACF “overlapping”.

Section 6 Section 7

Standard 6 Standard 7

Completed 8-7-08 Completed 8-7-08

Section 8

Standard 8

Completed 8-7-08

administrators.ExAL ExlistChecklist. Brochures. Current Contact Numbers Program Application for ACF Accreditation (Same as ExA) Program Application for ACF Accreditation to be in Exhibits and Appendix 3 1. FY2007 Budgets ☻ Faculty Meeting Minutes for 2007 . Sign Application Faculty Professional Development (Attachment B In ExB) ☻ List of 10 recent graduates & their places of employment ☻ Sample of the review methods (surveys from students. advisory committee) used to evaluate Culinary Program ☻ University of Montana Catalog Faculty Professional Development Report (Laura.doc LIST OF EXHIBITS AND WORKSHEET Section 9 Appendix 1 Appendix 2 Appendix 3 A ☻ 7-revised ☻ List of Exhibits and Sections ☻ Maps. Current Record of Institutional Accreditation 4. faculty. Number of Students Graduated & Degree. Current Catalogue and Brochures 2.2008 ☻ Teaching schedule in effect for the time of the on-site visit ☻ Completed “Required Knowledge and Competencies” ☻ Course Syllabi ☻ Sample of Laboratory Evaluations ☻ List of Major Equipment ☻ Floor Plans of Facilities ☻ Most recent sanitation inspection ☻ Retention statistics for the last two years ☻ Program Advertisement Brochures Standard 9 Program’s Director Program’s Director Standard 1 Standard 1 Completed 8-7-08 Completed 7-25-08 Completed 7-16-08 B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T Standard 5 Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 7 Standard 4 Standard 3 Standard 3 Standard 3 Standard 3 Standard 4 Standard 4 Standard 5 Standard 5 Standard 5 Standard 6 Standard 6 Standard 6 Standard 7 Standard 7 Completed 7-25-08 Completed 7-25-08 Completed 7-5-08 Completed 7-2-08 Completed 7-5-08 Completed 7-3-08 Completed 7-15-08 Completed 7-10-08 Completed 7-11-08 Completed 7-15-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-14-08 Completed 7-14-08 Competed 7-25-08 Completed 7-24-08 Completed 7-16-08 . Last 2 Years 3.) Need to sign ☻ Organizational Charts ☻ Faculty and Staff Job Descriptions ☻ Advisory Committee Members and Minutes ☻ Program’s FY2006. Andrea.

MSDS Sheets Media Outlet Activities (need copies of current news articles) Culinary Arts Student Handbook Culinary Arts Internship Course Contact Hours Worksheet Display of Student Projects Laboratory Resource Materials.doc LIST OF EXHIBITS AND WORKSHEET U V W X Y Z AA AB AC AD AE AF AG AH AI AJ AK AL AM AN AO 41 entries ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ Placement statistics for the last two years Summary of recent assessment data and surveys Daily Assignment Sheets. one for each course Consultation Dialogues (wait till finished) Safety Inspections. 2004 U.M. Guest Speakers. April 14. Catering Functions Culinary Arts Conspectus Report Guidelines Exhibit Worksheet Standard Hygiene and Dress Code ACF Culinarian’s Code Library Resources Standard 8 Standard 8 Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Standard 5 Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Completed 7-15-08 Completed 7-25-08 Completed 7-24-08 Completed 7-11-08 Completed 7-4-08 Completed 7-11-08 Completed 7-14-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-1-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-1-08 Completed 7-5-08 Completed 7-11-08 Competed 7-25-08 Competed 7-25-08 Completed 7-11-08 Completed 7-11-08 Completed 7-15-08 .ExAL ExlistChecklist. Grade Sheets Business Technology Department Assessment. Dining Services College of Technology Mission Statement Field Trips.

Brochures. administrators. Last 2 Years 3.doc LIST OF EXHIBITS AND WORKSHEET RED TEXT INDICATES PENDING TASKS Exhibit/Section Description or Title Transmittal ☻ Number of Current Full and Part Time Students Sheet Number of Graduates from past two years Foreword ☻ Maps. current contact phone numbers to be sent with report in Appendix 2 Contents Update Page Numbers – need to wait until final revisions are made Section 1 ☻ Written and filed – sill need to pay Application Fee of $200 (ExA and Appendix 3) Section 2 ☻ Written and filed Section 3 ☻ Written and filed Section 4 ☻ Written and filed .ExAL ExlistChecklist.still need ExF from Laura and Andrea Section 5 ☻ Written and filed Section 6 ☻ Written and filed Section 7 ☻ Written and filed Section 8 ☻ Written and filed Section 9 ☻ Written and filed Appendix 1 ☻ List of Exhibits and Sections Appendix 2 ☻ Maps. Number of Students Graduated & Degree. advisory committee) used to evaluate Culinary Program Required By Standard 1 Program’s Director Program’s Director Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Standard 5 Standard 6 Standard 7 Standard 8 Standard 9 Program’s Director Program’s Director Standard 1 Standard 1 Tasks to Complete Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-5-08 Completed 7-4-08 Completed 7-5-08 Completed 7-15-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-24-08 Completed 7-25-08 Completed 7-25-08 Completed 7-25-08 Completed 7-16-08 Standard 5 Standard 1 Standard 2 Completed 7-25-08 Completed 7-25-08 . Brochures. Current Contact Numbers Appendix 3 Program Application for ACF Accreditation (Same as ExA) A Program Application for ACF Accreditation to be in Exhibits and Appendix 3 1. faculty. Current Record of Institutional Accreditation 4. Sign Application B Faculty Professional Development (Attachment B In ExB) C ☻ List of 10 recent graduates & their places of employment D ☻ Sample of the review methods (surveys from students. Current Catalogue and Brochures 2.

doc LIST OF EXHIBITS AND WORKSHEET E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z AA AB AC AD AE AF AG AH ☻ University of Montana Catalog Faculty Professional Development Report (Laura.M. Andrea. Dining Services ☻ College of Technology Mission Statement Standard 7 Standard 4 Standard 3 Standard 3 Standard 3 Standard 3 Standard 4 Standard 4 Standard 5 Standard 5 Standard 5 Standard 6 Standard 6 Standard 6 Standard 7 Standard 7 Standard 8 Standard 8 Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Standard 5 Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Completed 7-5-08 Completed 7-2-08 Completed 7-5-08 Completed 7-3-08 Completed 7-15-08 Completed 7-10-08 Completed 7-11-08 Completed 7-15-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-14-08 Completed 7-14-08 Competed 7-25-08 Completed 7-24-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-15-08 Completed 7-25-08 Completed 7-24-08 Completed 7-11-08 Completed 7-4-08 Completed 7-11-08 Completed 7-14-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-1-08 Completed 7-16-08 Completed 7-1-08 . 2004 ☻ U. FY2007 Budgets ☻ Faculty Meeting Minutes for 2007 .2008 ☻ Teaching schedule in effect for the time of the on-site visit ☻ Completed “Required Knowledge and Competencies” ☻ Course Syllabi ☻ Sample of Laboratory Evaluations ☻ List of Major Equipment ☻ Floor Plans of Facilities ☻ Most recent sanitation inspection ☻ Retention statistics for the last two years ☻ Program Advertisement Brochures Placement statistics for the last two years ☻ Summary of recent assessment data and surveys ☻ Daily Assignment Sheets.ExAL ExlistChecklist. Grade Sheets ☻ Business Technology Department Assessment. MSDS Sheets ☻ Media Outlet Activities (need copies of current news articles) ☻ Culinary Arts Student Handbook ☻ Culinary Arts Internship ☻ Course Contact Hours Worksheet ☻ Display of Student Projects ☻ Laboratory Resource Materials. April 14. one for each course Consultation Dialogues (wait till finished) ☻ Safety Inspections. Robert) Need to sign ☻ Organizational Charts ☻ Faculty and Staff Job Descriptions ☻ Advisory Committee Members and Minutes ☻ Program’s FY2006.

ExAL ExlistChecklist.doc LIST OF EXHIBITS AND WORKSHEET AI AJ AK AL AM AN AO 41 entries ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ ☻ Catering Functions Culinary Arts Conspectus Report Guidelines Exhibit Worksheet Standard Hygiene and Dress Code ACF Culinarian’s Code Library Resources Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Program’s Director Completed 7-5-08 Completed 7-11-08 Competed 7-25-08 Competed 7-25-08 Completed 7-11-08 Completed 7-11-08 Completed 7-15-08 .

CUL 165T FSM 275T 1 4 3. CUL 165T FSM 275T :15 5 5.ExM-1. COMPETENCIES: Students will be able to: Course Number CUL 165T FSM 275T Contact Lecture 4 Hours Lab 4 1. Describe properties and list function of various ingredients. Identify ingredients used in baking. Section 1 of 12 Sections Basic Baking . Demonstrate proper scaling and measurement techniques. Apply basic math skill to recipe conversions. CUL 165T FSM 275T :15 5 6. 2. Demonstrate proper selection of equipment and utensils for specific application. CUL 165T FSM 275T 1 4 4. Identify equipment and utensils used in baking and discuss proper use and care. To use and care for equipment normally found in the bakeshop or baking area. Define baking terms.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Basic Baking _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Course Numbers (s) and Titles Where Competencies are met (attach Course outlines/Syllabi): CUL 165T Baking and Pastry PURPOSE: To apply the fundamentals of baking science to the preparation of a variety of products. CUL 165T FSM 275T 1 4 7.24 Competencies Revised 2008 CUL 165T 1 4 .

panning. CUL 165T FSM 275T :15 5 11. CUL 165T FSM 275T :15 5 9. Prepare quickbreads.24 Competencies Revised 2008 CUL 165T FSM 275T :15 5 . Section 1 of 12 Sections Basic Baking . Prepare a variety of types of cakes and describe techniques used in mixing. CUL 165T FSM 275T :15 5 10. CUL 165T FSM 275T :15 5 12. CUL 165T FSM 275T :15 5 14. Demonstrate basic icing and decorating techniques. Prepare laminated doughs. soft and specialty yeast products. CUL 165T FSM 275T :15 5 15. baking and basic decorating.ExM-1. Produce a variety of types of pies and tarts. Prepare crusty.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Basic Baking _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ FSM 275T 8. Prepare Choux pastries. CUL 165T FSM 275T 3:15 7 13. Produce a variety of types of cookies.

CUL 165T FSM 275T 3 7 23. Prepare a variety of fillings and toppings for pastries and baked goods.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Basic Baking _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 16. Prepare fritters. CUL 165T FSM 275T 5 8 22. CUL 165T FSM 275T 1 5 24. Prepare a variety of basic hot soufflés. Prepare a variety of dessert sauces. Demonstrate the presentations of baked goods and desserts. Discuss the application of mixes and other value added products. Prepare creams. cobblers and crisps. Prepare the three basic meringue types.24 Competencies Revised 2008 122 . CUL 165T FSM 275T 3:15 7 19. CUL 165T FSM 275T 3:15 7 18. CUL 165T FSM 275T 3 1 21.ExM-1. crepes. CUL 165T FSM 275T 3:15 7 17. custards. puddings and related sauces. CUL 165T FSM 275T 4 8 48 Section 1 of 12 Sections Basic Baking .

doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Nutrition ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ Course Numbers (s) and Titles Where Competencies are met (attach Course outlines/Syllabi): FSM 180T Nutritional Cooking PURPOSE: To describe the characteristics. FSM 180T 1:30 6. Discuss the current dietary guidelines and adapt recipes accordingly. Section 10 of 12 Sections Nutrition .ExM-10. List the primary functions and best sources of each of the major vitamins and minerals. FSM 180T 1:30 4. functions and best sources of each of the major nutrients. Describe the characteristics. List the major nutrients contributed by each of the food groups 2. FSM 180T 1:30 3. COMPETENCIES: Students will be able to: Course Number FSM 180T Contact Lecture 1:30 Hours Lab 1. Describe the process of human digestion. and food sources of the major nutrients and how to maximize nutrient retention in food preparation and storage. List the six food groups in the current USDA Food Guide Pyramid and the recommended daily servings from each. FSM 180T 1:30 5. functions.11 Competencies Revised 2008 FSM 180T 1:30 . Evaluate diets in terms of the recommended dietary allowances. Calculate energy needs based upon basal metabolic rate and exercise expenditure. FSM 180T 1:30 7. To apply the principles of nutrient needs throughout the life cycle to menu planning and food preparation.

FSM 180T 1:30 11. Discuss contemporary nutritional issues such as vegetarianism. Categorize foods into exchange groups and plan menus applying the exchange system. Identify common food allergies and determine appropriate substitutions.ExM-10. heart healthy menus and religious dietary laws. FSM 180T 1:30 10. FSM 180T 35:00 9. Discuss and demonstrate cooking techniques and storage principles for maximum retention of nutrients.11 Competencies Revised 2008 .doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Nutrition ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ 8. FSM 180T 1:30 Section 10 of 12 Sections Nutrition .

Section 11 of 12 Sections Purchasing & Receiving . CUL 156T FSM 270 4:00 4:00 5.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Purchasing and Receiving ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ Course Numbers (s) and Titles Where Competencies are met (attach Course outlines/Syllabi): CUL 156T Dining Room Procedures FSM 270 Purchasing and Cost Controls PURPOSE: To understand the overall concept of purchasing and receiving practices in quality foodservice operations. Discuss the flow of goods in a foodservice operation. fruits and vegetables. Write a bid specification. dairy products.16 Competencies Revised 2008 CUL 156T 4:00 . Describe the various formal and informal purchasing methods.ExM-11. seafood. To apply knowledge of quality standards and regulations governing food products to the purchasing function. Discuss legal and ethical considerations of purchasing. CUL 156T FSM 270 4:00 4:00 7. COMPETENCIES: Students will be able to: Course Number CUL 156T FSM 270 Contact Lecture 4:00 4:00 Hours Lab 1. CUL 156T FSM 270 4:00 4:00 6. CUL 156T FSM 270 4:00 4:00 3. CUL 156T FSM 270 4:00 4:00 4. To receive and store food and non-food items properly. Analyze market fluctuations and product cost. Explain regulations for inspecting and grading of meats. 2. Outline yield grades and National Association of Meat Purveyors (NAMP) specifications for meats. eggs. poultry.

FSM 270 CUL 156T 4:00 4:00 9.16 Competencies Revised 2008 . CUL 156T FSM 270 4:00 4:00 15.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Purchasing and Receiving ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ FSM 270 4:00 8. refrigerated and staple goods. Conduct a yield and cost comparison test of pre-fabricated products and on-premises butchered products. Evaluate received goods to determine conformity with user specifications. CUL 156T FSM 270 4:00 4:00 12. CUL 156T FSM 270 4:00 4:00 13. Explain the procedures for rotation of stock and for costing and evaluating. CUL 156T FSM 270 4:00 4:00 Section 11 of 12 Sections Purchasing & Receiving . frozen and prepared food products. Conduct yield and quality tests on canned. Inventory food and non-food items on hand. FSM 270 CUL 156T 4:00 4:00 10. CUL 156T FSM 270 4:00 4:00 11. Describe proper procedures of issuing product according to requisition.ExM-11. frozen. fresh. including FIFO and LIFO. Receive and store fresh. Explain proper receiving and storing of cleaning supplies and chemicals. CUL 156T CUL 161T 4:00 4:00 14.

doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Purchasing and Receiving ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ 16.ExM-11. CUL 156T FSM 270 4:00 4:00 Section 11 of 12 Sections Purchasing & Receiving .16 Competencies Revised 2008 . Describe current computerized systems for purchasing and inventory control.

COMPETENCIES: Students will be able to: Course Number CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 290T Contact Lecture 1:25 Hours Lab 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 1. 2.ExM-12. Identify the critical control points during all foodhandling processes as a method for minimizing the risk of foodborne illness (HACCP system). To reinforce personal hygiene habits and food handling practices that protect the health of the consumer. Stocks.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs Sanitation and Safety KNOWLEDGE AREA: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ Course Numbers (s) and Titles Where Competencies are met (attach Course outlines/Syllabi): CUL 151T Introduction to the Food Service Industry FSM 180T Nutritional Cooking CUL 156T Dining Room Procedures CUL 157T Pantry and Garde Manger CUL 158T Short Order Cookery CUL 160T Soups. describe their requirements and methods for growth. Identify microorganisms which are related to food spoilage and foodborne illnesses. and Sauces CUL 161T Meats and Vegetables CUL 165T Baking and Pastry FSM 275T Patisserie FSM 290T Internship PURPOSE: To develop an understanding of the basic principles of sanitation and safety and to be able to apply them in the foodservice operations.18 Competencies Revised 2008 . 1:25 CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 Section 12 of 12 Sections Sanitation and Safety .

Demonstrate good personal hygiene and health habits. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 Section 12 of 12 Sections Sanitation and Safety .doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs Sanitation and Safety KNOWLEDGE AREA: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ CUL 158T :45 CUL 160T :45 CUL 161T :45 CUL 165T :45 FSM 290T :45 3. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 290T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 4. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 290T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 5. Use acceptable procedures when preparing potentially hazardous foods to include time/temperature principles.18 Competencies Revised 2008 .ExM-12. Describe symptoms common to foodborne illnesses and how these illnesses can be prevented.

OSHA ADA. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 290T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 8.e. Outline the requirements for proper receiving and storage of both raw and prepared foods.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs Sanitation and Safety KNOWLEDGE AREA: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ CUL 160T :45 CUL 161T :45 CUL 165T :45 FSM 275T :45 FSM 290T :45 6. UL. etc.) CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 Section 12 of 12 Sections Sanitation and Safety . NSF.. (i. Recognize sanitary and safety design and construction features of food production equipment and facilities. List the major reasons for and recognize signs of food spoilage.18 Competencies Revised 2008 .ExM-12. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 290T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 7.

CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 Section 12 of 12 Sections Sanitation and Safety . Discuss right-to-know laws. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 290T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 10.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs Sanitation and Safety KNOWLEDGE AREA: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ CUL 158T :45 CUL 160T :45 CUL 161T :45 CUL 165T :45 FSM 275T :45 FSM 290T :45 9. Review Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and explain their requirements in handling hazardous materials.ExM-12. Describe types of cleaners and sanitizers and their proper use. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 290T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 11. Develop cleaning and sanitizing schedule and procedures for equipment and facilities.18 Competencies Revised 2008 .

18 Competencies Revised 2008 . Identify proper methods of waste disposal and recycling. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 290T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 14. Conduct a sanitation self-inspection and identify modifications necessary for compliance with standards.ExM-12. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 290T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 13. rodents and pest control irradication. Describe appropriate measures for insects. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 Section 12 of 12 Sections Sanitation and Safety .doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs Sanitation and Safety KNOWLEDGE AREA: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ CUL 158T :45 CUL 160T :45 CUL 161T :45 CUL 165T :45 FSM 275T :45 FSM 290T :45 12.

CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 Section 12 of 12 Sections Sanitation and Safety .ExM-12.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs Sanitation and Safety KNOWLEDGE AREA: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ CUL 158T :45 CUL 160T :45 CUL 161T :45 CUL 165T :45 FSM 275T :45 FSM 290T :45 15. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 290T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 16.18 Competencies Revised 2008 . List common causes of typical accidents and injuries in the foodservice industry and outline a safety management program. Demonstrate appropriate emergency policies for kitchen and dining room injuries. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 290T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 17. Describe appropriate types and use of fire extinguishers used in the foodservice area.

ExM-12. Review laws and rules of the regulatory agencies governing sanitation and safety in foodservice operation. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 160T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 290T 1:25 1:25 :30 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 :45 Section 12 of 12 Sections Sanitation and Safety .doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs Sanitation and Safety KNOWLEDGE AREA: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ CUL 158T :45 CUL 160T :45 CUL 161T :45 CUL 165T :45 FSM 275T :45 FSM 290T :45 18.18 Competencies Revised 2008 .

CUL 156 FSM 271 1 5 7. non-alcoholic and de-alcoholized beverages. CUL 156 FSM 271 1 3. Identify equipment and glassware used for beverage preparation and service. Discuss the basic production process for distillation and fermentation. Distinguish wines by grape and/or other fruit variety.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Beverage Management _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Course Numbers (s) and Titles Where Competencies are met (attach Course outlines/Syllabi): FSM 170T PURPOSE: To become familiar with and varieties of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. Evaluate the relationship of beverages to food. CUL 156 FSM 271 1 20 6. country. presentation and service of alcoholic. COMPETENCIES: Students will be able to: Course Number CUL 156 FSM 271 Contact Lecture 1 Hours Lab 1. Discuss opening and closing procedures of a beverage operation. Identify local. growing region and production process. 2. state and federal laws pertaining to the purchase and service of alcoholic beverages. Section 2 of 12 Sections Beverage Management .9 Competencies Revised 2008 CUL 156 FSM 271 1 5 .ExM-2. CUL 156 FSM 271 2 20 5. CUL 156 FSM 271 5 15 4. Identify and preparation. To develop an appreciation for wine and food affinity. To explain laws and procedures related to responsible alcohol service.

Identify levels of intoxication and methods to control excessive consumption by guests. Explain procedures for implementing internal beverage controls.ExM-2. CUL 156 FSM 271 1 9. Discuss Dram Shop Act and liquor law liability.9 Competencies Revised 2008 .doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Beverage Management _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 8. CUL 156 FSM 271 1 18 65 Section 2 of 12 Sections Beverage Management .

tip credit. computers. and other employee-related tax computations. FSM 266T Food Service Management Accounting PURPOSE: To perform mathematical functions related to foodservice operations COMPETENCIES: Students will be able to: Course Number MAT 100 Contact Lecture 10 Hours Lab 1. beverage and cost percentages MAT 100 10 3. Calculate food. POS). MAT 100 5 7. Calculate labor costs and percentages MAT 100 FSM 270 MAT 100 5 5 5 4. Demonstrate process of recipe yield adjustment.ExM-3.e. Perform basic math functions 2. FSM 270 10 8. 5. Discuss a financial statement for a foodservice operation FSM 270 10 9.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Business and Math Skills ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Course Numbers (s) and Titles Where Competencies are met (attach Course outlines/Syllabi): MAT 114T Food Production Math. Perform calculations using current technology (i. Determine selling price of menu items. Demonstrate the process of recipe costing MAT 100 5 6. calculators.9 Competencies Revised 2008 MAT 100 FSM 270 5 5 . Section 3 of 12 Sections Business and Math Skills . Calculate payroll tax.

ExM-3.9 Competencies Revised 2008 .doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Business and Math Skills ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Section 3 of 12 Sections Business and Math Skills .

Discuss procedures for processing guest checks using current technology.ExM-4. 2. Discuss sales techniques for service personnel including menu knowledge and suggestive selling. Describe the functions of dining service. Explain inter-relationships and work flow between dining room and kitchen operations. COMPETENCIES: Students will be able to: Course Number CUL 156T Contact Lecture :30 Hours Lab 12 1. CUL 156T :30 12 4. Layout. English. Discuss service methods such as banquets. and Analysis PURPOSE: To perform dining room service functions using a variety of types of service. Section 4 of 12 Sections Dining Room Service . Demonstrate an understanding of guest service and customer relations. To demonstrate an understanding of quality customer service. CUL 156T :30 12 5.10 Competencies Revised 2008 CUL 156T :30 12 . CUL 156T :30 12 8. CUL 156T :30 12 3.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Dining Room Service _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Course Numbers (s) and Titles Where Competencies are met (attach Course outlines/Syllabi): CUL 156T Dining Room Procedures. FSM 271 Menu. Discuss training procedures for dining room staff. CUL 156T :30 12 7. French and Russian Service. Design. buffets and catering and a la carte. Describe specific American. CUL 156T :30 12 9. including handling of difficult situations and accommodations for the disabled. Demonstrate the general rules of table settings and service. CUL 156T :30 12 6.

Discuss industry efforts to combat excessive consumption CUL 156T :30 12 FSM 271 2 Section 4 of 12 Sections Dining Room Service .ExM-4.10 Competencies Revised 2008 .doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Dining Room Service _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 10.

COMPETENCIES: Students will be able to: Course Number CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 290T Contact Lecture Hours Lab 15:30 6:45 9:00 8:30 9:00 13:45 8:30 14:00 1.ExM-5. To apply knowledge of laws and regulations relating to safety and sanitation in the kitchen. Section 5 of 12 Sections Food Preparation . Demonstrate knife skills. 2. tool and equipment handling and apply principles of food preparation to produce a variety of food products. and Sauces CUL 161T Meats and Vegetables CUL 165T Baking and Pastry FSM 275T Patisserie FSM 290T Internship MAT 100T Intermediate Algebra CRT 205T Food Service Management Computer Applications FSM 270T Purchasing and Cost Controls FSM 271T Capstone PURPOSE: To develop skills in knife. Demonstrate how to read and follow a standard recipe. To operate equipment safely and correctly.17 Competencies Revised 2008 CUL 151T FSM 180T 15:30 6:45 . emphasizing proper safety techniques.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Food Preparation _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Course Numbers (s) and Titles Where Competencies are met (attach Course outlines/Syllabi): CUL 151T Introduction to the Food Service Industry FSM 180T Nutritional Cooking CUL 156T Dining Room Procedures CUL 157T Pantry and Garde Manger CUL 158T Short Order Cookery CUL 160T Soups. hand tool and equipment operation. Stocks.

17 Competencies Revised 2008 . ovens.ExM-5. frying. sautéing.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Food Preparation _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ CUL 157T 9:00 CUL 158T 8:30 CUL 161T 9:00 CUL 165T 13:45 FSM 275T 8:30 MAT 100T 7:00 CRT 205T 8:00 FSM 270T 17:00 FSM 271T 8:00 3. mixers. etc. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 271T 15:30 6:45 9:00 8:30 9:00 13:45 8:30 4. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 161T FSM 271T 15:30 6:45 9:00 8:30 9:00 8:30 Section 5 of 12 Sections Food Preparation . CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 161T FSM 271T 15:30 6:45 9:00 8:30 9:00 8:30 5. griddling. pots and pans and demonstrate safe practices using stoves. Demonstrate combined methods of cooking including braising and stewing.. Demonstrate moist heat methods of cooking including roasting and baking. Identify and use utensils. broiling and grilling. and deep frying.

CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 161T FSM 271T 15:30 6:45 9:00 8:30 9:00 8:30 Section 5 of 12 Sections Food Preparation .ExM-5. spices. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 271T 15:30 6:45 9:00 8:30 9:00 13:45 8:30 8. Identify and prepare stocks. condiments. Identify and prepare meats. poultry and variety meats.17 Competencies Revised 2008 . CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T FSM 170T 15:30 6:45 9:00 8:30 9:00 13:45 8:30 9:00 7. Identify and use herbs.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Food Preparation _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 6. Utilize standard weights and measures to demonstrate proper scaling and measurement techniques. soups and sauces. oils and vinegar. seafood. marinades and rubs. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 161T FSM 271T 15:30 6:45 9:00 8:30 9:00 8:30 9.

CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 157T FSM 271T CUL 151T CUL 156T CUL 158T FSM 271T 15:30 6:45 9:00 10:00 15:30 6:45 9:00 10:00 14. FSM 180T 6:45 CUL 157T 9:00 CUL 158T 8:30 CUL 161T 9:00 FSM 271T 8:30 11. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 157T CUL 158T 15:30 6:45 9:00 8:30 13. eggs. Identify and prepare salads and salad dressings.17 Competencies Revised 2008 CUL 151T FSM 180T 15:30 6:45 . starches. Identify and prepare fruits.ExM-5. Identify and prepare canapés and cold and hot hors d’eouvre. Identify and prepare hot and cold sandwiches. Identify and prepare breakfast meats. legumes and grain products. 15.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Food Preparation _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ CUL 151T 15:30 10. Section 5 of 12 Sections Food Preparation . and battered products. vegetables. Identify and prepare a variety of beverages. including coffees and teas. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 271T 15:30 6:45 9:00 8:30 9:00 13:45 8:30 12. cereals.

17 Competencies Revised 2008 . Outline the procedure for writing a standardized recipe. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T CRT 205T FSM 266T FSM 270T FSM 271T 15:30 6:45 9:00 8:30 9:00 13:45 9:00 8:30 8:00 9:00 8:00 8:00 17. Prepare written requisitions for recipe.ExM-5. CUL 151T FSM 180T CUL 156T CUL 157T CUL 158T CUL 161T CUL 165T FSM 275T CRT 205T FSM 270T FSM 271T 15:30 6:45 9:00 8:30 9:00 13:45 9:00 8:30 8:00 8:00 8:00 Section 5 of 12 Sections Food Preparation .doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Food Preparation _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ CUL 158T 9:00 CUL 161T 9:00 16.

terrines and sausages). Identify tools and equipment used in garde manger. salads. 2.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Garde Manger _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Course Numbers (s) and Titles Where Competencies are met (attach Course outlines/Syllabi): CUL 157T Pantry and Garde Manger PURPOSE: To develop skills in producing a variety of cold food products. sauces. Prepare mousses and gelatins..ExM-6. COMPETENCIES: Students will be able to: Course Number CUL 157T Contact Lecture :30 Hours Lab 12:00 1. Develop fundamental skills in the preparation of forcemeats (pates. bowls and plates. platters. marinades. CUL 157T :30 12:00 7. CUL 157T :30 12:00 Section 6 of 12 Sections Garde Manger . Preparation of cold items to include soups. Demonstrate food presentation techniques. including decorative pieces. emphasizing safety and sanitation procedures. i. canapés and hors d'eouvre. sandwiches.e. CUL 157T :30 12:00 6. CUL 157T :30 12:00 4. CUL 157T :30 12:00 3.9 Competencies Revised 2008 . ballantines. To prepare items appropriate for buffet presentation. CUL 157T :30 12:00 5. relishes. dressings. Demonstrate fundamental skills in the preparation and uses of aspic. Demonstrate basic garnishes. galantines.

vegetable carvings. CUL 157T :30 12:00 9. Produce decorative centerpieces (ie. Identify and discuss ingredients used in the cold kitchen. CUL 157T :30 12:00 Section 6 of 12 Sections Garde Manger . Identify and discuss cheese and dairy products. salt dough. CUL 157T :30 12:00 10. tallow and ice carvings).ExM-6. fruit.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Garde Manger _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 8.9 Competencies Revised 2008 .

To evaluate styles of leadership and develop skills in human relations and personnel management. BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 3. Describe procedures of new employee orientation. job applications and cover letters. COMPETENCIES: Students will be able to: Course Number BUS 243T COM 150S Contact Lecture 3:45 2:45 Hours Lab 1. Outline the supervisor’s role in decision-making. BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 Section 7 of 12 Sections Human Relations Management . BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 6. BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 5. prepare resumes. problem solving and delegation of duties. Describe process of management through effective communication skills.ExM-7.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Human Relations Management _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Course Numbers (s) and Titles Where Competencies are met (attach Course outlines/Syllabi): BUS 243T Psychology of Management and Supervision COM 150S Interpersonal Communication PURPOSE: To prepare for the transition from employee to supervisor.16 Competencies Revised 2008 . Explain the role of job descriptions and specifications and develop written examples. Perform mock interviews. Summarize leadership styles and analyze when each is most appropriate. 2. BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 4.

BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 14. BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 9. Analyze ways of dealing with stress in the workplace.ExM-7. BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 11. Compare training methods. BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 12. Analyze types and methods of employee evaluation. Discuss time management and other organizational management techniques. Identify reasons for disciplinary problems and discuss the supervisor’s role in handling them. construct an effective employee training program to include follow-up BUS 243T 3:45 training and cross-training. Analyze motivational techniques/problems. BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 Section 7 of 12 Sections Human Relations Management .16 Competencies Revised 2008 . BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 15. Describe the procedure for terminating employees. Evaluate methods of conflict resolution and grievance procedures (union/non-union). Describe necessity of change and ways of implementing change with the least employee resistance. discuss procedures for attitudinal changes. BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 13.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Human Relations Management _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 7. BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 10. COM 150S 2:45 8.

Discuss legal issues related to managerial decisions ( sexual harassment.ExM-7.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Human Relations Management _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 16. discrimination. violence/anger and unemployment compensation) BUS 243T COM 150S 3:45 2:45 Section 7 of 12 Sections Human Relations Management .16 Competencies Revised 2008 .

Describe the various cuisines and contributions of leading culinarians. CUL 151T 5:00 7. Evaluate career opportunities through participation in field trips and guest speakers in class.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Introduction to the Hospitality Industry ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ Course Numbers (s) and Titles Where Competencies are met (attach Course outlines/Syllabi): CUL 151T Introduction to the Food Service Industry PURPOSE: To develop an understanding of the hospitality industry and career opportunities in the field. purchasing. food and beverage controls. food production and service. CUL 151T 5:00 6. management. Identify professional organizations within the field. Discuss and evaluate industry trade periodicals. Discuss/evaluate industry trends as they relate to career opportunities and the future of the industry. etc. CUL 151T Section 8 of 12 Sections Introduction to the Hospitality Industry . CUL 151T 5:00 5. Outline the organization. Define hospitality and the philosophy of the hospitality industry. structure and functional areas in various hospitality organizations as a perspective for later courses in menu planning.9 Competencies Revised 2008 5:00 . Trace the growth and development of the hospitality and tourism industry. COMPETENCIES: Students will be able to: Course Number CUL 151T Contact Lecture 5:00 Hours Lab 1. To become familiar with the organizational structure and basic functions of departments within hospitality and foodservice establishments. 2. CUL 151T 5:00 8.ExM-8. CUL 151T 5:00 3. To investigate trade publications and professional organizations appropriate for continuing education. CUL 151T 5:00 4. explain purposes and benefits.

doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Introduction to the Hospitality Industry ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ 9. CUL 151T 5:00 10:00 Section 8 of 12 Sections Introduction to the Hospitality Industry . Demonstrate basic cooking principles. CUL 151T 5:00 10. CUL 151T 5:00 10:00 11. CUL 151T 5:00 10:00 12.ExM-8. Demonstrate basic fundamentals of sanitation and safety.9 Competencies Revised 2008 . Discuss professional ethics practiced in the Industry. Demonstrate basic knife skills.

10 Competencies Revised 2008 18:45 2:15 13:00 . Identify principles of menu layout and design. List basic menu planning principles. FSM 271 CRT 205T CUL 156T FSM 180T 6:00 5:00 13:00 1:45 3. FSM 271 FSM 180T 18:45 11:15 5.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Menu Planning ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ Course Numbers (s) and Titles Where Competencies are met (attach Course outlines/Syllabi): FSM 271 Capstone CRT 205T Food Service Management Computer Applications CUL 156T Dining Room Procedures FSM 180T Nutritional Cooking PURPOSE: To apply the principles of menu planning and layout to the development of menus for a variety of types of facilities and service. Determine menu prices utilizing proper cost controls. COMPETENCIES: Students will be able to: Course Number FSM 271 CRT 205T CUL 156T FSM 180T Contact Lecture 6:00 5:00 13:00 1:45 Hours Lab 1. FSM 271 CRT 205T CUL 156T Section 9 of 12 Sections Menu Planning . CUL 156T CRT 205T FSM 271 1300 2:15 18:45 4. Create menu item descriptions following established truth-in-menu guidelines.ExM-9. Apply principles of nutrition to menu development. 2.

Plan a la carte. CRT 205T FSM 271 2:15 6:00 9. ethnic.10 Competencies Revised 2008 . Develop a menu layout for a foodservice operation.doc REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES Cooking Programs KNOWLEDGE AREA: Menu Planning ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ FSM 180T 1:45 6.ExM-9. banquet and buffet menu. cycle. check average and their impact on profit contribution. FSM 271 CRT 205T CUL 156T FSM 180T 6:00 5:00 13:00 1:45 10. Discuss Menu Planning resources (Internet. professional and vendors) FSM 271 CRT 205T CUL 156T 6:00 5:00 13:00 Section 9 of 12 Sections Menu Planning . FSM 271 CRT 205T CUL 156T FSM 180T 6:00 5:00 13:00 1:45 7. Discuss the availability of Food and Seasonal Menus. FSM 271 CRT 205T CUL 156T FSM 180T 6:00 5:00 13:00 1:45 8. Discuss importance of product mix.

 truffles. confections.  A strong emphasis will be placed on  presentation of plated desserts.ExN-1 Culinary Arts  THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY              BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT   FACULTY: Chef Thomas Campbell. MAT 114T or consent of instructor. director. tempering chocolate.campbell@umontana.  molding chocolate.    HOURS: 7a.m.    COURSE DESCRIPTION: Advanced principles and techniques in preparing sugar  syrups. frozen desserts.–3 p.  The final project will coincide with the Capstone  dinner presentation. caramel. or by appointment.           thomas.    OFFICE:  Culinary Offices.m. dessert sauces.edu                                                                                      243‐7831     CREDITS: 2     PREREQUISITES:  CUL 165T.  COURSE SYLLABUS   FSM 275T  Patisserie    Date revised: Spring 2008     .

  Apply good sanitation practices when preparing pastries. color.  Cook sugar syrups to the seven stages of hardness. quality of finished product. sanitation and  organizational skills. and dessert soufflés. pastry cream and baked custards.  Prepare starch – thickened puddings and baked puddings. and flavor components for present plated desserts.  Students will be evaluated on teamwork.  professionalism.   Total points earned will be divided by points possible.FSM 275 Patisserie Page 2     STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES:       Upon completion of this course.  Determine when chocolate tempering is necessary and apply the principles of  proper tempering.  Utilize texture. mise en place.    STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES:    Students will be required to demonstrate daily production assignments requiring pre‐ planning of methodology and recipes. the student will be able to:    Use appropriate terminology used in patisserie.  Assemble frozen desserts.  Prepare chocolate confections. projects and tests will be assigned point values. mousses.  All assignments.  Prepare dessert sauces. and a letter grade will be  assigned based on the following:    Evaluation Criteria          Grade Scale    Tests      20 percent      90 – 100  A  Projects    20 percent      80 – 89  B  Daily Production  60 percent      70 – 79   C    Grade Sheet (example)    Student Cher Hillary Tiger Sting Ringo Opra Quiz 1  5 pt Quiz 2  5 pt Quiz 3 5 pt  Quiz 4 5 pt Notebook  10 pt Capstone 10 pt Production 60 pt Total 100 pt       .  Prepare Bavarians. chiffons.  Prepare crème anglaise.

  If students are  absent for any reason. or personally prior to the  test.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production.  Academic misconduct is subject to an  academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the  University.  The code is available  for review online at http://www.    All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code.    All students must practice academic honesty.  Students who read text assignments prior to class  will be equipped to participate and will obtain the most from this course. they will be accountable for any information disseminated and  be held responsible for class notes.    PARTICIPATION:    Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry. A score of zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed test.edu/studentaffairs/.   Participation points will be granted or denied depending on how the student exhibits  enthusiasm.    TESTS:    Tests will be given during the semester as announced. organization.    ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:    Students are required to adhere to standards of academic integrity.  Students should  review The University of Montana Conduct Code regarding their rights and  responsibilities. announcements of tests.    DUE DATES:    To receive full credit. teamwork. assignments must be submitted by stated due dates.umt.  Late  assignments will be lowered by 50 percent. interest.            .  The Conduct Code is located at  http://www. e‐mail.  This is necessary  as students contribute to the learning environment and become active learners by  attending class and participating.edu/SA/VPSA/index.cfm/page/1321. and assignments.FSM 275 Patisserie Page 3   ATTENDANCE POLICY:    Attendance will be taken. and preparedness.  Each missed class will result in a 5‐point deduction from  final points accumulated.  Assignments for makeup tests  will be made only if faculty is notified by voice mail.  No late assignments will be accepted  after week 13.umt.

.    REQUIRED TEXT:     Gissen.    ISBN 0‐471‐43625‐9    SUGGESTED REFERENCE MATERIALS:    Sokol.    . the New Professional Chef. Inc. ISBN 0‐442‐01961‐0    SUPPLIES:    Standard culinary knife kit. Van Nostrand. ISBN 1‐4018‐ 4922‐9    Reinhold.FSM 275 Patisserie Page 4     CELL PHONE POLICY:    Cell phones must be turned off prior to class. About Professional Baking. Gail. Thomson Delmar Learning. 6th Edition. 6th edition. Professional Cooking. John Wiley & Sons. Wayne.    UNIFORM POLICY:    Students will be required to be in full Culinary Uniform to be accepted into class.

 10. project due dates.    Week 1 and 2  Week 7 and 8  Sugar Cooking  The  purpose of dessert  Basic principles  sauces  Simple syrup  Types of dessert sauces  Crystallization  Painting a plate with  Stages of sugar cooking  dessert sauces  Basic Custards and Creams  Layering of sauces on one  Crème anglaise  plate  Pastry cream  Garnishes  Pastry cream variations    Baked custard  Week 9. 11.FSM 275 Patisserie Page 5   COURSE OUTLINE:    All weekly plans. 12. reading assignments.  Final comprehensive exam date will  be announced at this time. 13    Research for Capstone  Week 3 and 4         dessert course  Blancmange  Research for Capstone  Baked puddings  dessert centerpiece  Rice puddings  Preparation for Capstone  Bread and butter puddings  dessert course  Bavarians  Preparation for Capstone  Chiffons  dessert centerpiece  Bavaroise    Dessert soufflés    Week 5 and 6  Churn frozen desserts  Still‐frozen desserts  Texture and mouth feel in  frozen desserts  Building flavor in frozen  desserts  The origins of chocolate  Types of chocolate  Chocolate tempering  Tempered chocolate  applications  Blooming chocolate  Ganache  Truffles  Molding chocolate          . and testing dates are to be  delivered and explained the first day of class.

  Seasoning  Presentation  Sanitatio 15%  n 5%  Balance. Recipes. and plate appropriateness.  Garnish. flow.  Demonstrated leadership skills and teamwork throughout preparation.  Texture. organized.  point. Flow.    Application of organizational “tools” during the preparation process:  Mise en  place sheets. Plate  Color. streamlined/personalized recipes.FSM 275 Patisserie Page 6   DEMONSTRATED COMPETENCIES:    Proficient in demonstrating the technique by accomplishing the recipe  assigned. production schedules. Requisition. color. Focal  Mandatory.  Professional presentation techniques demonstrating the principals of  balance focal point.    To earn a B: 80% accomplishment of required competencies.  Utilization and compilation of a throughout the course.    To earn an A:  90% accomplishment of required competencies.  Leadership. garnish.  Temperature.  Timing.  Timely preparation and submission of product requisition.  Flavor  profiles. Skills.  Costs. sanitary work area at all times.  Teamwork.  plating diagrams/photographs.    COMPETENCY VERIFICATION SHEET (example)  Taste  40%    Assignment  Organization  Technique   15%  25%  MEP.  All recipes costed to reflect a 33% food cost and the appropriate menu price  applied accordingly.  Total                                        Soufflé’  French  Meringue  Bavarian                                Sugar Syrup    Spun sugar  Pastry  Cream      . Notebook  Method.    To earn a C: 70% accomplishment of required competencies.  Maintenance of a clean.  Proper utilization of ingredients without waste according to professional  standards.  Production  Schedule. Utilization  Taste.  Cleanliness  Garnish.  Doneness.

FSM 275 Patisserie Page 7   Organization and Professional Presentation    • Table of contents  • Cover page  • Index  • Dividers  • Typed    Content of Note Book    • Recipes  • Requisitions  • Mise en Place Sheet  • Production Schedules  • Menus  • Photographs  • Plate Diagrams  • Costed recipes  • Competency verification sheet  • Notes                                                  Note Book Requirements    .

    OFFICE:  Culinary Offices.ExN-1   Culinary Arts  THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY              BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT   FACULTY: Chef Thomas Campbell.m.edu                                                                                      243‐7831     CREDITS: 2     PREREQUISITES:  MAT 114T or consent of instructor.  COURSE SYLLABUS     CUL 165   Baking and Pastry  Date revised: Spring 2008    .m.    COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction of various ingredients and how they affect  the finished product by giving a tender crumb and a well‐developed crust. and pastry bag work. pan preparation. director.           thomas.  Six  basic functions of ingredients and the techniques of scaling.    HOURS: 7a. chocolate.campbell@umontana.  sifting. or by appointment.–3 p.

  Students will be evaluated on teamwork.  Select ingredients with care to produce high‐quality baked goods.  Demonstrate proper scaling and measurement techniques. projects and tests will be assigned point values.  Prepare a variety of fillings and toppings for pastries and baked goods.  All assignments.  professionalism.  Prepare fritters. quality of finished product.  Prepare a variety of cakes and demonstrate basic decoration.   Total points earned will be divided by points possible. crepes. pies and tarts.CUL 165 Baking and Pastry Page 2     STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES:       Upon completion of this course. scones. and crisps.  Apply good sanitation practices when preparing pastries. and a letter grade will be  assigned based on the following:    Evaluation Criteria          Grade Scale    Tests      20 percent      90 – 100  A  Projects    20 percent      80 – 89  B  Daily Production  60 percent      70 – 79   C    Grade Sheet (example)    Student Cher Hillary Tiger Sting Ringo Opra Quiz 1  5 pt Quiz 2  5 pt Quiz 3 5 pt  Quiz 4 5 pt Notebook  10 pt Practical Exam Production 10 pt 60 pt Total 100 pt   . cobblers. mise en place.    STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES:    Students will be required to demonstrate daily production assignments requiring pre‐ planning of methodology and recipes. muffins.  Prepare yeast breads. cookies.  Apply the factors that control the development of gluten and explain the  changes that take place in a dough or batter as it bakes. the student will be able to:    Use appropriate terminology used in baking and pastry.  Prepare quick breads such as biscuits.  Identify equipment and utensils used in baking and discuss proper use and care.  Prepared laminated dough and choux paste. sanitation and  organizational skills.  Calculate formulas based on baker’s percentages.

CUL 165 Baking and Pastry Page 3       ATTENDANCE POLICY:    Attendance will be taken. and preparedness.umt.cfm/page/1321. teamwork.umt. interest. and assignments.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production. they will be accountable for any information disseminated and  be held responsible for class notes.  Assignments for makeup tests  will be made only if faculty is notified by voice mail.  Each missed class will result in a 5‐point deduction from  final points accumulated.    All students must practice academic honesty. organization.  No late assignments will be accepted  after week 5. announcements of tests. e‐mail.    PARTICIPATION:    Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry.edu/studentaffairs/.  If students are  absent for any reason.   Participation points will be granted or denied depending on how the student exhibits  enthusiasm.    All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code.  Students should  review The University of Montana Conduct Code regarding their rights and  responsibilities.        . A score of zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed test. or personally prior to the  test.edu/SA/VPSA/index.    TESTS:    Tests will be given during the semester as announced.    DUE DATES:    To receive full credit.    ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:    Students are required to adhere to standards of academic integrity.  The code is available  for review online at http://www. assignments must be submitted by stated due dates.  Academic misconduct is subject to an  academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the  University.  Late  assignments will be lowered by 50 percent.  The Conduct Code is located at  http://www.  Students who read text assignments prior to class  will be equipped to participate and will obtain the most from this course.  This is necessary  as students contribute to the learning environment and become active learners by  attending class and participating.

 6th edition. About Professional Baking.    UNIFORM POLICY:    Students will be required to be in full Culinary Uniform to be accepted into class. 6th Edition.    REQUIRED TEXT:     Gissen. Wayne..CUL 165 Baking and Pastry Page 4         CELL PHONE POLICY:    Cell phones must be turned off prior to class.    ISBN 0‐471‐43625‐9    SUGGESTED REFERENCE MATERIALS:    Sokol. John Wiley & Sons. Gail. the New Professional Chef. ISBN 0‐442‐01961‐0    SUPPLIES:    Standard culinary knife kit. Van Nostrand.        . ISBN 1‐4018‐ 4922‐9    Reinhold. Inc. Thomson Delmar Learning. Professional Cooking.

 project due dates. Pies and Tarts  benching  Bread. pastry and all  Make up and panning  purpose flours  Proofing  Whole wheat flour  Rye flour  Cooling and storing   Starches  Cookie crispness. Baking  air    Methods.     Measurement    Yeast Products  Baker’s Percentages  Yeast  Selection of ingredients  Chemical leaveners  gluten  Chocolate tempering  Mixing methods  Air and steam  Shortening  Lean and rich doughs  Rolled‐in yeast dough  Liquid  Straight dough method  Formation and expansion of  Modified straight dough  gasses  method  Coagulation of protein  Sponge method  Gelatinization of starches    Protecting the product from  Week 4 Mixing Methods.  chewiness  Shortenings. butter.  Final comprehensive exam date will  be announced at this time. Sugars.    Week 1 Basic Principles of Baking  Week 3 Liquids.  Sweeteners. softness. Cookie  Adding moisture retainers    Characteristics  to the formula  Scaling ingredients  Freezing  Mixing    Fermentation  Week 2 Flours. Panning. reading assignments. Baking.  Punching. and testing dates are to be  delivered and explained the first day of class.  Malt syrup    and Cooling  Hidden sources of salt  Spread  Nature’s sweeteners  One‐stage method  Hidden sources of sugar  Creaming method  Serving temperature  Sponge method  Pies and Tarts  Dropped cookies    Bagged cookies    Rolled cookies    Molded cookies    Icebox cookies    Bar cookies    Sheet cookies      . rounding. Types of  Corn syrup and glucose    Cookies. oils  Refined sugar and sucrose    Molasses and brown sugar  Week 5 Mixing Methods. cake. Leavening Agents.CUL 165 Baking and Pastry Page 5   COURSE OUTLINE:    All weekly plans.

 and plate appropriateness.    To earn an A:  90% accomplishment of required competencies. flow.  Timely preparation and submission of product requisition.    To earn a B: 80% accomplishment of required competencies.  All recipes costed to reflect a 33% food cost and the appropriate menu price  applied accordingly.    .  plating diagrams/photographs.  Utilization and compilation of a throughout the course. production schedules.  Proper utilization of ingredients without waste according to professional  standards. garnish.    To earn a C: 70% accomplishment of required competencies. sanitary work area at all times.  Professional presentation techniques demonstrating the principals of  balance focal point.  Maintenance of a clean. organized.CUL 165 Baking and Pastry Page 6     DEMONSTRATED COMPETENCIES:    Proficient in demonstrating the technique by accomplishing the recipe  assigned. streamlined/personalized recipes.  Demonstrated leadership skills and teamwork throughout preparation.    Application of organizational “tools” during the preparation process:  Mise en  place sheets. color.

  Seasoning  Presentation  Sanitation  Total  15%  5%  Balance.  Timing.  Sourdough    Brownies  Butter  Cream  Cake. Notebook  Method. Requisition.  Poolish   Bread.  Production  Schedule.  Doneness.CUL 165 Baking and Pastry Page 7   COMPETENCY VERIFICATION SHEET     Assignment  Organization   Technique  15%  25%  MEP. Utilization  Taste  40%  Taste.  Chiffon  Cake.  Cleanliness  Garnish. Plate  Color.  Teamwork.  Garnish.  Challah  Bread.                                                                                                            Biscuits  Boiled  Frosting  Bread .  Texture. Skills. Two­ stage   Caramel  Sauce  Chocolate  Sauce  Cinnamon  Rolls  Cobblers                                                                                                        .  Flavor  profiles.  Temperature.  Leadership.  Costs. Flow. Recipes.  point.  Pound   Cake.  Banana   Bread.  French  Bread. Focal  Mandatory.  Flavored   Cake.

  Danish   Dough.CUL 165 Baking and Pastry Page 8 Cookies   Rolled   Cookies   Sheet   Cookies .  Cake  Doughnuts.  Flaky Pie   Dough.  Yeast  Eclairs  Flat Icing  Focaccia  Fritters  Ganache  Genoise                            .  Icebox  Cookies.  Bar     Cookies.  Molded  Coulis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Cream Puffs    Créme  Anglaise  Dough.  Bagged  Cookies.  Mealy Pie   Doughnuts.  Dropped   Cookies.  Croissant   Dough.

CUL 165 Baking and Pastry Page 9 Muffins                                                                                                                                                Panna Cotta    Pastry  Cream  Pâte Brisée      Pâte Sucrée    Pies   Pizza  Puff Pastry  Scones  Shortcake  Simple  Syrup  Tarts  Tortes  Turnovers                    .

CUL 165 Baking and Pastry Page 10   Organization and Professional Presentation    • Table of contents  • Cover page  • Index  • Dividers  • Typed    Content of Note Book    • Recipes  • Requisitions  • Mise en Place Sheet  • Production Schedules  • Menus  • Photographs  • Plate Diagrams  • Costed recipes  • Competency verification sheet  • Notes                                                  Note Book Requirements    .

 tool and equipment skills. cooking methods.campbell@umontana. history.edu                                                                                      243‐7831     CREDITS: 5    PREREQUISITES:  None    OFFICE:  Culinary Offices    HOURS: 7a.  safety and sanitation.Page |1 ExN‐10    Culinary Arts  THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY              BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT   FACULTY: Chef Thomas Campbell.    COURSE SYLLABUS     FSM 151T Introduction to  the Food Service Industry  Date revised: Spring 2008                                                 . recipe and menu development.m. Chef Laura Swanson.–3 p. Chef Aimee Ault           thomas. or by appointment    COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will introduce the student to fundamentals in  food handling practices.m.

 the student will be able to:    Discuss and describe appropriate terminology used for future coursework in the  Culinary Arts Department and in the food service profession. mise en place.  food production and service.  Demonstrate the fundamental theories regarding taste.Page |2   STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES:       Upon completion of this course.  Analyze a recipe and identify the basic cooking method to be applied.  Discuss professional ethics practiced in the Industry.  Total points earned will be divided by points possible. quality of finished product.  Trace the growth and development of the hospitality and tourism industry.  All assignments.  Outline the organization.  Demonstrate basic knife skills.  and methods employed in food preparation. structure and functional areas in various hospitality  organizations as a perspective for later courses in menu planning. etc.  Realize the importance of and have the ability to set mise en place correctly. sanitation and  organizational skills. projects and tests will be assigned point  values.  professionalism.  Identify professional organizations within the field and explain purposes and  benefits.  Discuss/evaluate industry trends as they relate to career opportunities and the  future of the industry. temperature and  doneness relating to proper presentation of food.  Students will be evaluated on teamwork. and a letter grade will  be assigned based on the following:      . management.  Evaluate career opportunities through participation in field trips and guest  speakers.  Identify and handle ingredients and understand classifications. purchasing.  Apply proper sanitation and safety procedures to food service production.        STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES:    Students will be required to demonstrate daily production assignments requiring  pre‐planning of methodology and recipes.  Describe the various cuisines and contributions of leading culinarians. specifications. texture.  Discuss and evaluate trade periodicals. food and beverage controls.  Define hospitality and the philosophy of the hospitality industry.

  Students who read text assignments  prior to class will be equipped to participate and will obtain the most from this  course.  If students are  absent for any reason.  Participation points will be granted or denied depending on how the  student exhibits enthusiasm.    PARTICIPATION:    Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry. assignments must be submitted by stated due dates.  Each missed class will result in a 5‐point deduction from  final points accumulated.  This is  necessary as students contribute to the learning environment and become active  learners by attending class and participating. and assignments.  Assignments for make‐up  tests will be made only if faculty is notified by voice mail. e‐mail.    TESTS:    Tests will be given during the semester as announced. interest.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production. announcements of tests.  No late assignments will be accepted  after week 13.  . and preparedness. organization.  Late  assignments will be lowered by 50 percent. A score of zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed  test.    DUE DATES:    To receive full credit. teamwork. they will be accountable for any information disseminated  and be held responsible for class notes.Page |3 Evaluation Criteria    Tests      Quizzes    Practical Exam  Projects                    Grade Scale  A  B  C  20 percent  40 percent  20 percent  20 percent      90 – 100    80 – 89    70 – 79           Grade Sheet (example)  Student Quiz 1 Quiz 2 Quiz 3 Quiz 4  Quiz 5 Quiz 6 Quiz 7 Quiz 8 Proj 1 Proj 2 Prac 1 Prac 2 MidtermFinal 5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt 10pt 10pt 10pt 10pt 10pt 10pt Cher Hillary Tiger Sting Ringo Total 100pt     ATTENDANCE POLICY:    Attendance will be taken. or personally prior  to the test.

 Van Nostrand.    UNIFORM POLICY:    Students will be required to be in full Culinary Uniform to be accepted into class.      CELL PHONE POLICY:    Cell phones must be turned off prior to class..    All students must practice academic honesty. 6th edition.cfm/page/1321.    REQUIRED TEXT:     Gissen. John Wiley & Sons. Professional Cooking.    All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code.    .    ISBN 0‐471‐43625‐9    SUGGESTED REFERENCE MATERIALS:    Handout from Chef Campbell    Reinhold. Inc.Page |4   ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:    Students are required to adhere to standards of academic integrity. ISBN 0‐442‐01961‐0    SUPPLIES:    Standard culinary knife kit.  Students should  review The University of Montana Conduct Code regarding their rights and  responsibilities.  Academic misconduct is subject to an  academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the  University.umt. Wayne.edu/SA/VPSA/index. 6th Edition.umt. the New Professional Chef.  The Conduct Code is located at  http://www.  The code is  available for review online at http://www.edu/studentaffairs/.

Dress code  e. Building a menu  c. Preparation for frying  d. Reductions and glazes  d. fish  cookery  a. Mise en place  g. Food cost  The menu  a.   X. Deep‐frying  g. Sauce families  Soups  a. Pan‐frying  e.  I. Hot food presentation    VIII. Heat and food  b. Understanding soups  b. Seasoning and flavoring  Recipes  a. Equipment and tool ID  b. XI. Measuring devices  Cooking principles  a. The food service industry  a. Written recipes  b. Grain cookery  d. reading assignments. Planning and organizing    production  b. Controlling quality       changes during cooking  b.   IX. Grilling  c. Rice cookery  c.   II. Convenience foods  VII. Clear soups  c. Knife skills  Tools and equipment  a. poultry. Roasting  b. Roux  f.   III. Menu forms and  functions  b. Braising  f. Classification and       market forms    Vegetables  a. and testing dates are to be  delivered and explained the first day of class. XII. Holding and storage  equipment  e. game. Safe workplace  f. Processing equipment  d. Preliminary cooking  c. Poaching and    simmering  h.  Final comprehensive written and  practical exam date will be announced at this time.Page |5   COURSE OUTLINE:    All weekly plans. VI. Cooking potatoes  b. Sautéing  d. Procedures  c. Measurement  c. History of food service  b. Pasta  e. Ingredients  b. Handling vegetables  c. Recipe conversion  d. Bases  e. Thick soups  Potatoes and starches  a. Cooking vegetables    Food presentation and  garnish  a. .   V. Cooking equipment  c. Standards of  professionalism  d. Organization of kitchens  c. Cooking methods  c. Stocks and sauces  a. Dumplings  Meats. project due dates. Nutritional  considerations    Mise en place  a.   IV.

        To earn an A:  90% accomplishment of required competencies. color. Development of a  practical menu    DEMONSTRATED COMPETENCIES:    Production schedule  Requisition of product  Presentation  Review and suggestions      Final Exams  a. streamlined/personalized recipes.  b.  Timely preparation and submission of product requisition. c. Cold food presentation  Buffet service  Fundamentals of plating  Garnish  Decoration techniques    XVI. Final written  b.    Review and practice  a. XII.    .  Professional presentation techniques demonstrating the principals of balance  focal point.    To earn a C: 70% accomplishment of required competencies. organized. Project  Proficient in demonstrating the technique by accomplishing the recipe assigned. sanitary work area at all times. f.    Application of organizational “tools” during the preparation process:  Mise en  place sheets. e. plating  diagrams/photographs.  Proper utilization of ingredients without waste according to professional  standards. garnish. c.  Maintenance of a clean. d. e.  Demonstrated leadership skills and teamwork throughout preparation. flow. d.  All recipes costed to reflect a 33% food cost and the appropriate menu price  applied accordingly.Page |6   b. Final practical  c.    To earn a B: 80% accomplishment of required competencies. production schedules. and plate appropriateness.

 Notebook  Method.  Temperature.  point.  Seasoning  Presentation  Sanitation  Total  15%  5%  Balance. Flow. Focal  Mandatory.  Timing. Plate  Color.  Leadership.Page |7 COMPETENCY VERIFICATION SHEET (example)    Assignment  Organization   Technique  15%  25%  MEP.  Teamwork.  Texture.  Production  Schedule.  Cleanliness  Garnish.  Costs. Skills.  Utilization  Taste  40%  Taste.  Flavor  profiles. Recipes. Requisition.                                                                                                          Equipment  ID  Tool ID  Station Set­ up  Sharpening  Knives  MEP  Chicken  Stock  Brown  Stock  Fish Stock  Rouxs  Béchamel  Velouté  Espagnole  Demi­glace                                                                                                Hollandaise    Béarnaise    Tomato    Sauce  Mayonnaise    .  Garnish.  Doneness.

Page |8 Salsa  Coulis  Puréed  Soup  Clear  Soup                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Cream Soup    Consommé  Rice  Cookery  Potato  Cookery  Polenta  Cookery   Pasta  Cookery  Carrot  Cookery  Bean  Cookery  Cauliflower  Cookery  Frying  Sauté  Braise  Roast  Grill  Poach  Steam                                .

          .  Teamwork. the student team  has failed in its most important mission.  This project is preparation for and execution of the final practical and it is 20% of your  grade.  We will be cooking from these recipes.Page |9 Project Assignments and Due Dates      Project 1    Find 3 recipes to complete a traditional dinner plate presentation: meat.  timing and presentation will be graded. groups will be assigned and will be expected to meet and execute ONE  of the pre‐prepared recipe combinations from a member within the group. vegetable.  All members  must be involved in the application of skills and techniques.  If a guest would not pay for the dish as prepared.    Due:  Prior to mid‐term week 10            Project 2    At mid‐term review.  Not photocopied.  The 3 recipes must include the following:    Sauce  Three (3) Classic knife cut vegetables  Three (3) demonstrated cooking techniques  Balance with texture  Balance of colors  Recipes appropriate to the dish and each other  Appropriate portion size  Hot  Properly cooked  Properly seasoned  Tasty    This must be typed in professional recipe style. printed off the internet.  or hand written. participation. not difficulty is the goal.  The purpose of this project is to emphasize the commercial nature of most food  service transactions. starch.  Successful completion.   You are expected to come prepared and practiced for Project #2.

our understanding of interpersonal communication and the role we play in it will not only contribute to our sense of well-being and success in personal relationships.umt.5). and more empathetically. Communicating more clearly and listening more effectively will be addressed as well as the following topics: creating identities through communication.. supervisors recognize the importance of considering the communication skills of prospective employees. OFFICE LOCATION: Main Faculty Office in HB Building OFFICE HOURS: 9-10 Monday and Wednesday or By Appointment COURSE RATIONALE Beebe.Reiser@mso. Interpersonal Communication is particularly useful at the A. COURSE PURPOSE The purpose of this course is for students to become aware of their present communication styles and decide what is effective and what can be improved in order to build healthier relationships on an interpersonal level. Recognize passive. E-MAIL ADDRESS: Kim. Beebe et al. 2.5). 5. explain that “it is through these interactions with others that we develop interpersonal relationships” (p. communication and emotion. Most people spend between 80 and 90 percent of their waking hours communicating with others” (p. “In a 1999 report. and the effect this has on relationships personally. 4. COURSE SYLLABUS COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: Com 150S. Practice skills in listening reflectively.4). Therefore. communication defines our relationships with friends. Students will learn skills to help them manage conflict both in personal relationships and professional relationships. Beebe and Redmond (2002) write that “communication is at the core of our existence. family.A.edu I am most easily reached by e-mail. Beebe et al.TR SEMESTER CREDITS: 3 PREREQUISITES: None INSTRUCTOR NAME: Kim Reiser. However. it is also possible for you to leave messages for me at 2437839. Interpersonal Communication . the student will be able to: 1. creating healthy communication climates. gender communication. passive-aggressive and assertive behaviors and learn how to deal more effectively with them through conflict management skills. interpersonal conflict management. attentively. the National Association of Colleges and Employers listed characteristics employers consider most important when hiring an employee.THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA-MISSOULA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY APPLIED ARTS AND SCIENCES DEPARTMENT SPRING 2008.. STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES: Upon completion of this course. Grice and Skinner (2004) write. level as it is a type of communication that can be applied to many occupational fields. M. In fact. Furthermore. (2002) write that communication affects the quality of our physical and emotional health. Understand how the quality of communication directly affects the quality of relationships and ultimately the quality of life.. Understand relational meaning of what we say both verbally and nonverbally. professionally and in an educational capacity.S. Recognize communication patterns from family of origin. and colleagues. . 3. In addition. loved ones. Our communication encounters create our identities. but to our success in work relationships as well. and cultural diversity and communication.A. Communication will be viewed from both a verbal and nonverbal perspective. At the top of the list was communication skills” (p. aggressive.

DISABILITY STUDENT SERVICES: Eligible students with disabilities will receive appropriate accommodations in this course when requested in a timely way. All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code. absolutely no text messaging. 2. Test makeup policy: I believe the classroom setting should be treated like any other professional setting.e. This means fewer than three absences. Within 24 hours of missing the test. no late assignments and passing grades on all completed assignments. and notify me of the time of that appointment.cfm/page/1321. Understand the role emotions play in communication. 79-70 (C). turn off cell phones. If the following conditions are met. *COURSE POLICIES ARE APPLIED AT THE DISCRETION OF THE INSTRUCTOR. You must notify me prior to missing the test that you will be unable to attend that class period. You must be in good standing in the class. ASSIGNMENTS TURNED IN A CLASS DAY LATE WILL BE GRADED OUT OF HALF CREDIT. and in the family. Personal illness. Identify practical skills geared towards improving communication in the workplace. you may be given an opportunity to make up a test: 1.6. in personal relationships. Students with fewer than two absences during the semester will see their final grade increased by 5%. Please speak with me after class or in my office. Students with more than two absences may lose their privilege for a makeup should an emergency arise. GRADING: Exams (3) – 50% of grade Journal – 30% of grade Interpersonal Relationship Paper – 20% of grade GRADING SCALE: 100-90 (A). 59 and Below (F) ATTENDANCE POLICY: It is my belief that what you gain from a course is dependent on what you put into it.edu/SA/VPSA/index. The Academic Support Center requires that you schedule an appointment with them 48 hours before the time you plan to take your test. . you must schedule an appointment to make up your test with the Academic Support Center. 89-80 (B). The Code is available for review online at http://www. If you miss a class. and provide an explanation for your absence. avoid disclosing too much personal information. 3. 7.umt. do not use language that might offend others. Academic misconduct is subject to an academic penalty by the course instructor and/or disciplinary sanction by the University. You may be asked for documentation of verification of your excuse. 69-60 (D). ASSIGNMENTS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. My policy follows this principle. Please be prepared to provide a letter from your DSS Coordinator. ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT: All students must practice academic honesty. BEYOND THIS DATE. Employers and coworkers tend to be forgiving of a person’s absence for an important meeting or engagement if that person has proven to be dependable in the past. Attendance will determine a student’s level of success. you will miss a learning opportunity. STUDENT CONDUCT: Please conduct yourself in a way that promotes learning for all students in the classroom (i. family emergencies and unexpected events are acceptable reasons for rescheduling a test. and avoid monopolizing class discussion).

JOURNALS DUE EXAM #1 (Ch 1-3) Chapter 4 Chapter 4 Continued Chapter 5 Chapter 5 Continued March 4 ABSTRACT DISCUSSION AND JOURNALS DUE 6 11 13 18 Chapter 6 Chapter 6 Continued EXAM #2 (Ch 4-6) MOVIE . (2007). January 22 Introductions 24 29 31 Introduction to Chapter 1 and Interpersonal Communication Chapter 1 Continued Chapter 2 February 5 Chapter 2 Continued 7 12 14 19 21 26 28 Chapter 3 Intro to Research. and tests are due on the day they are listed.). DROP POLICY: “Beginning the thirty-first day of the semester through the last day of instruction before scheduled final exams. documented justification is required for dropping courses by petition. REQUIRED TEXTS: th Wood. be sure to bring the DSS testing form to me in advance of the two-day deadline for scheduling in ASC. family emergency. *An online Blackboard page will be utilized for this course. COURSE OUTLINE: The following readings. Journal assignments will be announced in class and posted on Blackboard the beginning of each week. or other circumstances beyond the student’s control” (UM Catalogue). accident or illness. J. Failing is not an acceptable reason to drop the course. CA: Wadsworth. Belmont. change in work schedule. journal deadlines. no assessment of performance in class until after the deadline. T. Interpersonal communication: Everyday encounters (5 ed. Some examples of documented circumstances that may merit approval are: registration errors.For students planning to request testing accommodations.

RELATIONSHIP PAPERS DUE FINALS WEEK. EXAM 3 (Ch 7-9) WILL BE DURING OUR PRESCRIBED FINAL TIME .20 24-28 April 1 3 8 10 15 17 22 24 29 May 1 5-9 MOVIE SPRING BREAK MOVIE DISCUSSION AND JOURNALS DUE Chapter 7 Assertiveness Lecture Chapter 7 Continued Chapter 8 Chapter 8 Continued ABSTRACT DISCUSSION AND JOURNALS DUE Chapter 9 Chapter 9 Continued Gender Article.

 Chef Laura Swanson.    COURSE DESCRIPTION: To introduce a hands‐on approach to principles of  healthy and nutritious culinary procedures.  Adjustment of classic methods to  suit preparations designed to extend variety on “lighter” menus. To describe the  characteristics.campbell@umontana. Chef Aimee Ault.  To apply the  principles of nutrient needs throughout the life cycle to menu planning and food  preparation.    OFFICE:  Culinary Offices.Page |1 ExN‐12    Culinary Arts  THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY              BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT   FACULTY: Chef Thomas Campbell. and food sources of the major nutrients and how to  maximize nutrient retention in food preparation and storage.           thomas. functions.m.  COURSE SYLLABUS     FSM 180T  Nutritional Cooking  Date revised: Spring 2008     . or by appointment.    HOURS: 7a.m.edu                                                                                      243‐7831     CREDITS: 3    PREREQUISITES:  CUL 151 or consent of instructor.–3 p.

  Select ingredients with care to design menus emphasizing high‐quality.  Incorporate a variety of plant‐based dishes emphasizing grains.  Evaluated diets in terms of the recommended dietary allowances.  List the primary functions and best sources of each of the major vitamins and  minerals. color and nutritional  value. projects and tests will be assigned point  values. heart healthy  menus and religious dietary laws.  Manage the amount of fat used as an ingredient and in preparation.  seasonal ingredients.  Discuss the current dietary guidelines and adapt recipes accordingly.Page |2   STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES:       Upon completion of this course.  Categorize foods into exchange groups and plan menus applying the exchange  system.  Identify common food allergies and determine appropriate substitutions.    STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES:    Students will be required to demonstrate daily production assignments requiring  pre‐planning of methodology and recipes.  Discuss contemporary nutritional issues such as vegetarianism.  Store and prepare foods to ensure best flavor. sanitation and  organizational skills. and  fruits. and cooking  techniques to reduce reliance on salt.  professionalism. preparation methods.  Total points earned will be divided by points possible. legumes.  Students will be evaluated on teamwork.  Demonstrate a variety of seasonings.  List the major nutrients contributed by  each of the food groups.  All assignments. the student will be able to:    List the six food groups in the current USDA Food Guide Pyramid and the  recommended daily servings from each. texture.  Describe the process of human digestion. quality of finished product. mise en place. and a letter grade will  be assigned based on the following:      .  Calculate energy needs based upon basal metabolic rate and exercise  expenditure. fresh.

  Students who read text assignments  prior to class will be equipped to participate and will obtain the most from this  course.    PARTICIPATION:    Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry.  Participation points will be granted or denied depending on how the  student exhibits enthusiasm.  Each missed class will result in a 5‐point deduction from  final points accumulated.J. interest. organization.  Mike  Cher  Osama  Snoop  Berak    Quiz  Quiz  Quiz  Video  Video  Video  Project 1  2  3  1  2  3  5pt  5pt                                          5pt                      5pt                      5pt                      5pt 15pt Final  Exam  15pt                      Practical  Attend‐ Total Final  Exam  dance  Grade 25pt                      100     ATTENDANCE POLICY:    Attendance will be taken. they will be accountable for any information disseminated  and be held responsible for class notes. and assignments. teamwork.Page |3   Evaluation Criteria    Tests      Project    Practical Exam  Daily Production  Video Assignments                Grade Scale  A  B  C  30 percent      90 – 100  15 percent      80 – 89  25 percent      70 – 79   15 percent  15 percent    Grade Sheet (example)    Daily Assignments 3pt 3pt 3pt 3pt 3pt Name    Opra  Tiger  Sting  O.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production.  If students are  absent for any reason. announcements of tests.        .  This is  necessary as students contribute to the learning environment and become active  learners by attending class and participating. and preparedness.

 A score of zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed  test.    All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code.cfm/page/1321. assignments must be submitted by stated due dates. Inc.  Late  assignments will be lowered by 50 percent.umt.    UNIFORM POLICY:    Students will be required to be in full Culinary Uniform to be accepted into class. Techniques of Healthy  Cooking..edu/SA/VPSA/index.  Assignments for make‐up  tests will be made only if faculty is notified by voice mail.    .    TESTS:    Tests will be given during the semester as announced.Page |4 DUE DATES:    To receive full credit. ISBN 978‐0‐470‐05232‐7    SUPPLIES:    Standard culinary knife kit. e‐mail.umt.edu/studentaffairs/.  No late assignments will be accepted  after week 13.  The code is  available for review online at http://www.  Students should  review The University of Montana Conduct Code regarding their rights and  responsibilities.  The Conduct Code is located at  http://www.  Academic misconduct is subject to an  academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the  University.    ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:    Students are required to adhere to standards of academic integrity.    CELL PHONE POLICY:    Cell phones must be turned off prior to class.    REQUIRED TEXT:     The Culinary Institute of America. John Wiley & Sons. or personally prior  to the test.    All students must practice academic honesty.

  II.  Types of fat  c.  Hidden sources of sodium  c.   Nature’s Sweeteners  c.  Using standard portions  e.  Getting the most from the  least  d. Grains and  Legumes  a.   VI.  Cholesterol  f.   Free range poultry  d. reading assignments.  The function of fat  b.   IX.   Sautéing  b.   Organic farming  c.   XI.   Broiling  e. project due dates.  Plant based menu options  d.     IV.  Fat  e. and testing dates are to be  delivered and explained the first day of class.   Grilling  d.  The language of Nutrition  a.Page |5     I.  Vitamins and minerals   The Pyramids  a.   Shallow poaching  h.   Boiling  i.  The Vegetarian Pyramid   The Elements of Flavor  a.   III.  Moderating Salt  a.  Sodium and hypertension  b.   Refined sugar  b.  Hearing flavor    VII. COURSE OUTLINE:    All weekly plans.  Tasting flavor  b.  Fruits and Vegetables.  Carbohydrates  d.  The Mediterranean Pyramid  c.  Replacing fat  f.   Steaming  g.  Smelling flavor  a.  Grains and legumes  b.  Choosing the right  ingredients  d.   Plant biotechnology   Menu and Recipe Development  a.  Choosing the right  equipment  e.  Seeing flavor  b.  Water  h.  Phytochemicals and  antioxidants  c.  Nutrients  b. Deconstructing flavor  V.  Planning parameters  d.  Reducing fat    X.  Final comprehensive written and  practical exam date will be announced at this time.   Roasting  f.  Calories  c.  Standards for menu  development  c.  Fruits and vegetables   Cooking with Less Fat  a.   Serving temperature  The Techniques of Healthy Cooking  a.  The market place  b.   Stewing and braising    Agricultural Issues in Ingredient  Selection  a.   .   Hidden sugar sources  d.  Protein   g.  Highlighting natural flavors  e.  Recipe development    VIII.   Sustainable agriculture  b.  MSG  Sweeteners  a.   Stir‐frying  c.  The USDA Food Guide  Pyramid  b.

 organized. flow.   The kitchen staff  c.   Cooking with alcohol  c.   Rules for menus and  advertisement  c.  Maintenance of a clean.    To earn an A:  90% accomplishment of required competencies.  Timely preparation and submission of product requisition.    To earn a C: 70% accomplishment of required competencies.    To earn a B: 80% accomplishment of required competencies.   Analyzing the Nutrient Content of  Recipes  a.       DEMONSTRATED COMPETENCIES:    Proficient in demonstrating the technique by accomplishing the recipe assigned.   Health claims  e.  Professional presentation techniques demonstrating the principals of balance  focal point.   Food labeling in the United  States  b.   Variables of analysis  Nutrition Labeling in Menus and  Advertisements  a. sanitary work area at all times.   Dietary guidelines    XIV.  All recipes costed to reflect a 33% food cost and the appropriate menu price  applied accordingly.   Nutrient content claims  d.   Health and alcohol  b.   Beverage promotion    XV. production schedules. and plate appropriateness. garnish.   XIII.   Methods of analysis  b. streamlined/personalized recipes.   Communicating Nutrition  Beverages  a. color.   The service staff  b.  Proper utilization of ingredients without waste according to professional  standards. Staff Training and Customer  Communication  a.    Application of organizational “tools” during the preparation process:  Mise en  place sheets.    .Page |6 XII. plating  diagrams/photographs.  Demonstrated leadership skills and teamwork throughout preparation.

Page |7 COMPETENCY VERIFICATION SHEET (example)    Assignment  Organization   Technique  15%  25%  MEP.  Garnish.  Costs.  Cleanliness  Garnish.  Flavor  profiles.  Doneness.  Production  Schedule.  Leadership.  point. Notebook  Method. Requisition.  Seasoning  Presentation  Sanitation  Total  15%  5%  Balance.  Texture.                                                                                                          Sautéing  Stir­frying  Grilling  Broiling  Roasting  Steaming  Shallow  poaching  Boiling                                                                                      Stewing and    braising  En Papillote    Smoke  Roasting  Coulis  Chutney  Puréed  Soup  Clear  Soup  Beverage                  . Plate  Color.  Temperature.  Timing. Focal  Mandatory.  Utilization  Taste  40%  Taste. Recipes.  Teamwork. Skills. Flow.

 and  • Roll.    No recipes from the text may be used  • Sauce is suggested for most desserts. salt  • Garnish appropriately.  A dinner menu summary for one portion must be included. 1200 mg sodium and added sugar no more than 10% of the  total calories.Page |8 Nutritional Cooking Menu Project Guidelines    Objective:    Plan a nutritious. 15%‐20% protein.  Entrée’  • Items such as capers and olives are  • Start with 180 gm center of the plate  acceptable. 25%‐30% fat.  (protein) portion size. prices and  introduction. creative sit‐down menu for 10 persons.  except:  • Sorbet is acceptable but it must be:  • Fond de veau lie’.    • List the types of fresh herbs you want  Dessert  to use.  The menu itself must be presentable with proper menu copy.    • Avoid soft drinks.  Be able to utilize COT standard cooking principles. 50‐ 60% carbohydrates.  • Pasta. beer.  Salad    • Maintain proper acid/flavor balance.  • Low in sugar (avoid lemon sorbet).  • A fruit dessert is recommended.  limitations.  Each recipe must include caloric counts according to worksheet provided.  Ingredients:  • You must have a recipe for the  • The menu is not bound by seasonal  dressing. starch and vegetable.  non‐dairy whipped topping.  • Do not use margarine.  substitutes.    Menu requirements:  • May be served with butter.  Appetizer or soup    Beverage  • 160 gm portion after cooking  • Fruit soup cannot be used  • Should harmonize with the meal.  • Served with a sauce.  • Provide a sauce.  Provide proper. cut fruit.  but its caloric count is included.          . and liquor.  not presented in a wine glass. Nutra Sweet. cohesive theme throughout the menu and maintain professional  presentations illustrated with plate diagrams.  Roll  • A recipe does not have to be provided.  • Velouté’.    • Processed foods should be avoided.  Meet nutritional goals of 1000 calories.

Page |9   Organization and Professional Presentation    • Table of contents  • Cover page  • Index  • Dividers  • Typed    Content of Note Book    • Recipes  • Requisitions  • Mise en Place Sheet  • Production Schedules  • Menus  • Photographs  • Plate Diagrams  • Costed recipes  • Competency verification sheet  • Notes                      Note Book Requirements    .

Be able to understand operations of automated food and beverage control and take corrective actions by identifying factors that affect work performance and labor control. Tests will partially cover specific material contained in the text. and seasonality. Let me stress that there are no exceptions to this – if there’s a problem. 6. call/email me a message or you have lost the chance to take that particular exam. control. Be able to comprehend standard cost tools. Be able to read. budgeting. but will in large part be based upon discussions and elaboration in class.edu Course Number: FSM270 Credits: 5 Office: AD 11H Date: Autumn 2007 PREREQUISITES: CUL 151T. – Thurs. write. facilities. profit/loss and understand ramifications of poor financial reports. and its importance to the management system.Missoula COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT Course Title: Faculty: Office Hours: Office Phone: Email: Purchasing and Cost Controls Tim Olson Mon. I expect you to be able to apply text material and information discussed in class to real-life case studies and situations. 11:10 – 12:00 243-7862 Timothy. availability. Costs of doing business including products. cost volume-profit analyses and estimate allowable food and beverage costs or forecasts. 5. Tests may not be made up unless prior arrangements are made. 4. budgets. the student will be able to: 1. specifications. MAT 100. You must take the makeup test the day you return to school.ExN-13 The University of Montana . 6 edition. 3. Ninemeier. REQUIRED TEXTS: th Planning and Control for Food and Beverage Operations. Be able to comprehend and analyze financial records and reports presented in the Hospitality Industry and be able to design corrective action plans for specific organizational problems. Understand purchasing procedures.Olson@umontana. . and preparing financial statements COURSE OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course. ATTENDANCE: You are expected to come to class. 2. You should not expect to get all that you need to succeed in this class from only reading the text. Be able to understand control and marketing in relation to the menu and profit requirements in menu pricing. labor. by Jack D. and design control systems and procedures for inventory. OR CONSENT OF INSTRUCTOR COURSE DESCRIPTION: Principles of purchasing foods and materials based on needs.

14 Parts 1. 8. GRADING SCALE 90 .EVALUATION: Grading and evaluation are based upon the following points.69% Below 60 A B C D F All students must practice academic honesty.cfm/page/1321 .79% 60 . 13. 3 Chapters 4. Total points earned will be divided by the total points available to determine your grade. 4 over entire course 100 100 200 400 800 This syllabus is subject to change. 6 Chapters 7. The code is available for review online at http://www.edu/SA/VPSA/index.100% 80 . 3.umt. Test #1 Test #2 Test #3 – take home test Food Service Business Project Total Chapters 1.89% 70 . All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code. Academic misconduct is subject to an academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the University. 5. 2. 2.

invoicing. food cost analysis. FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT COMPUTER APPLICATIONS DATE REVISED: Spring 2004 SEMESTER CREDITS: 2 PREREQUISITES: CRT 101. Use basic features of Windows operating system 2. and scale recipes. Design fliers. Use a recipe management software to develop weekly menus.ExN-14. 6. export and scale recipes.edu Phone: 273-7817 Office: AD17 Office Hours: M W 10:00 – 11:00.Hinricher@umontana. and calculate food cost. 5. import. complete calculations. digital imaging and word processing software. recipe management. import. and budgeting. Create Food Service Management Reports to include payroll. Students will develop appropriate industry reports. the student will be able to: 1. income statements. 4. Proficiently operate a graphical user interface. 8. analyze nutrition. STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES: Occupational Performance Objectives Upon completion of this course. recipe management and word processing software. and create a shopping list. posters and menus. Introduction to Computers FACULTY: Carol Hinricher E-Mail: Carol. COURSE DESCRIPTION: An introduction to computerized applications relevant to the food service industry utilizing spreadsheet. 3. design menus and fliers. Build a personal cookbook. 7. export. graph data and develop professional reports utilizing a spreadsheet software. Organize data. 1 . Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of integrating business applications using spreadsheet and word processing software. Friday 12:00 – 12:30 RELATIONSHIP TO PROGRAM(S): This course provides students with a comprehensive foundation for practical food service applications using spreadsheets. analyze nutrition.doc THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA--MISSOULA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT COURSE SYLLABUS COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: CRT 205.

Moving/Copying 6. Windows Explorer B. Functions of Settings. Document production activities will occur on a regular. Application tests will follow each unit and will be written or application using a computer.Food Service Computer Applications Page 2 STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES: Production and Testing 1. however. Software 1. A 10% penalty will be assessed. Opening/Closing/Executing 3.5" diskette. Environments 4. Integrated Windows Operating System A. Assignments are accepted up to one week beyond the identified due date. HD (high density) is required for saving student data.93 B 80 . homework and tests in relationship to total points available. COURSE OUTLINE: I. Desktop/Windows 2. Control Panel.100 A 88 . Types 2. it is your responsibility to see that it is in my mailbox by class time on the due date. etc. Grading Scale: 94 .79 D Final grade will be determined by total points received on production. C. Basic Operations 1. Introduction to the Computer A. It is the expectation that in-class production or homework assigned outside of class will be turned in when due. Maximum/Minimizing 4. Class attendance is an integral part of this course. SUPPLIES: One 3. Scrolling 5.87 C 74 . Operating Systems 3. 2 . Final Schedule: Monday May 10 1:10-3:10 ATTENDANCE POLICY: Students are expected to come prepared for class each day and to participate in the assigned activity. 2. If you are not present. if not daily basis. Customizing II.

Fliers D. Change Fonts C. Local and World Wide Communication A. Terms B. Sum B. Linking Worksheets VIII Format Commands A. Excel Screen C. Copy C. Publishing recipes. Range D. Enter Text. Function Wizard F. Borders IX. Date and Time G. Toolbars B. Autosum E. Formulas VII. Nutritional Analysis G.ExW-14 Food Service Computer Applications III. Cell Commands--Clear. Modifying Worksheet D. Cell Alignment D. Organizing and working with Recipes C. Numbers. Shopping List F. Functions A. Worksheets A. Menu Inserts VI. Financial Functions 3 . Excel Basics A. Creating personal cookbook(s) D. Meal Manager E. Word Processing/Desktop Publication A. Internet B. Average C. E-Mail IV Master Cook A. Numbers. Formatting Numbers B. Formulas D. Start a New Worksheet B. Delete. Insert. Move. cookbooks V. Editing Text. Menu Creation C. Tool bar B. Posters E.

ExW-14 Food Service Computer Applications 4 .

Daily Sales/Cash Report E.ExW-14 Food Service Computer Applications X. Daily Purchases Register D. Separate Charts B. 5 . Budgeting B. Charting Data A. Daily and Period-to-Date Report F. Menu Engineering XI. Chart Wizard Applications A. Embedded Charts C. Daily Labor Report C. Inventory G.

Delete file assignment 1.doc. Change the background on your display to a background of your choice. Find the number of files on C: with an extension of . 6 . Copy the files Practice 1.BMP. Copy this file to C:/My Documents. How many files on C:/Windows begin with the letter P? Create a new folder in your personal folder titled “MasterCook: Have your instructor check this step. Let your instructor check this process.coc located on I:/student common/Hinricher/Food Service Folder to your personal folder. Have your instructor check this step. Undelete the file assignment 1 from the recycle bin. Rename file to assignment 1. Have your instructor check this step. Add a screensaver to your personal computer.ExW-14 Food Service Computer Applications Windows Explorer Name: Identify three folders or directories on the hard drive. Have your instructor check this step.

edu                                                                                      243‐7831     CREDITS: 2    PREREQUISITES:  None    OFFICE:  Culinary Offices    HOURS: 7a.  Emphasis on development of a well  designed food safety program centered on Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point  (HACCP).Page |1 ExN‐14    Culinary Arts  THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY              BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT     FACULTY: Chef Thomas Campbell.   COURSE SYLLABUS         FSM 175T Food Service  Sanitation  Date revised: Spring 2008 . or by appointment    NRAEF PROCTOR ID NUMBER: 2208849    COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will introduce the student to fundamentals in  safe and sanitary food handling practices.m.campbell@umontana.m. Chef Aimee Ault           thomas.–3 p. Chef Laura Swanson.

  Conduct a sanitation self‐inspection and identify modifications necessary for  compliance with standards.    . ADA.  Discuss right‐to‐know laws. UL.  Outline the requirements for proper receiving and storage of both raw and  prepared foods. rodents.  Monitor the flow of safe food through the food service operation from receiving  through preparation and service. describe their requirements and methods for growth.  Identify proper methods of waste disposal and recycling.)  Describe types of cleaners and sanitizers and their proper use.  (i.E.F. and food borne illness  on a food service establishment.  Review Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and explain their requirements in  handling hazardous materials. ware washing.  Understand and apply procedures which recognize. etc. the student will be able to:    Discuss and describe appropriate terminology used for sanitation in the food  service industry.  and facilities.  List the major reasons for and recognize signs of food spoilage.  Pass the N.  Recognize sanitary and safety design and construction features of food  production equipment and facilities.  Understand the impact of contamination. examination earning their certificate of completion. prevent and respond to food  borne illness.e.   Demonstrate a personal hygiene program for food handlers.  Use acceptable procedures when preparing potentially hazardous foods to  include time/temperature principles.  List common causes of typical accidents and injuries in the foodservice industry  and outline a safety management program. food allergies.A.  Identify the critical control points during all foodhandling processes as a method  for minimizing the risk of foodborne illness.R.  Review laws and rules of the regulatory agencies governing sanitation and safety  in foodservice operations.  Demonstrate good personal hygiene and health habits.  Demonstrate appropriate emergency policies for kitchen and dining room  injuries.  Describe appropriate types and use of fire extinguishers in the foodservice area.Page |2 STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES:       Upon completion of this course.  Develop cleaning and sanitizing schedule and procedures for equipment and  facilities. and pest control eradication. NSF.  Describe appropriate measures for insects.   Develop a HACCP system to facilitate sanitation management.  Identify microorganisms which are related to food spoilage and foodborne  illnesses.  Describe symptoms common to foodborne illnesses and how these illnesses can  be prevented. OSHA.  Apply principles of cleaning and sanitation to kitchen equipment..

  This is  necessary as students contribute to the learning environment and become active  learners by attending class and participating.    PARTICIPATION:    Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry. projects and tests will be assigned point  values. quality of finished product. and assignments.Page |3 STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES:    Students will be required to demonstrate daily production assignments requiring  pre‐planning of methodology and recipes.  . teamwork.  Total points earned will be divided by points possible.  No late assignments will be accepted  after week 13.  Late  assignments will be lowered by 50 percent.    DUE DATES:    To receive full credit.  If students are  absent for any reason.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production. they will be accountable for any information disseminated  and be held responsible for class notes.  Each missed class will result in a 5‐point deduction from  final points accumulated. mise en place.  professionalism. announcements of tests.  Participation points will be granted or denied depending on how the  student exhibits enthusiasm. interest.  Students who read text assignments  prior to class will be equipped to participate and will obtain the most from this  course.  Students will be evaluated on teamwork. sanitation and  organizational skills. and preparedness. organization. and a letter grade will  be assigned based on the following:    Evaluation Criteria    Tests      Quizzes    Inspection     Projects                      Grade Scale  A  B  C  45 percent  15 percent     5 percent  35 percent    90 – 100    80 – 89    70 – 79         Grade Sheet (example)  Student Cher Hillary Tiger Sting Quiz 1 5pt Quiz 2 5pt Quiz 3 5pt Proj 1 15pt Inspection 5pt Proj 2 20pt Midterm Final 15pt 30pt Total 100pt     ATTENDANCE POLICY:    Attendance will be taken. assignments must be submitted by stated due dates.  All assignments.

  Academic misconduct is subject to an  academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the  University.      CELL PHONE POLICY:    Cell phones must be turned off prior to class.    ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:    Students are required to adhere to standards of academic integrity.  The Conduct Code is located at  http://www.    REQUIRED TEXT:     Gissen.edu/studentaffairs/. Van Nostrand. e‐mail. Professional Cooking.  The code is  available for review online at http://www.umt. or personally prior  to the test.  Assignments for make‐up  tests will be made only if faculty is notified by voice mail.cfm/page/1321. Inc.    All students must practice academic honesty.    UNIFORM POLICY:    Students will be required to be in full Culinary Uniform to be accepted into class.Page |4 TESTS:    Tests will be given during the semester as announced. ISBN 0‐442‐01961‐0    SUPPLIES:    Standard culinary knife kit.. A score of zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed  test.    . 6th edition.    All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code.umt.  Students should  review The University of Montana Conduct Code regarding their rights and  responsibilities. John Wiley & Sons.edu/SA/VPSA/index. Wayne.    ISBN 0‐471‐43625‐9    SUGGESTED REFERENCE MATERIALS:    Handout from Chef Campbell    Reinhold. 6th Edition. the New Professional Chef.

Components of a food  personal hygiene  program  d. Physical contaminants  c.Page |5   COURSE OUTLINE:    All weekly plans. Inspection Procedures  c. Serving food safely  c. Emerging pathogens  and issues  Contamination . Holding food for service  b.  I. Providing save food  a. Preparing specific food  c. Storing specific food  Preparation  a.   IX. How foodhandlers can  contaminate food  b. Time and temperature  control    Purchasing and receiving  a. Bacteria  d. Viruses  c. Fungi  f. Storage techniques  d. Preventing foodborne  illnesses  c. Receiving and    inspection specific food    Storage  a. General storage    guidelines  b. Key practices for  ensuring food safety  d. Cooling food  e. Biological toxins  g. and foodborne  illness  a. Reheating food  Service  a.   VIII. The food safety  responsibilities of a  manager  The microworld  a. food  allergens. Diseases not  transmitted through  food  c.   II. Foodborne illnesses  b.   IV. Chemical contaminants  b. Types of storage  c. reading assignments. project due dates.   III. Pathogens  b. Food allergens  The save foodhandler  a. Parasites  e. VII. Cooking requirements  d. Thawing food  b. and testing dates are to be  delivered and explained the first day of class. Preventing cross‐ contamination  b. The deliberate  contamination of food  d. The flow of food  a.                     . Off‐site service  VI. Choosing a supplier  b. Management’s role in a  personal hygiene  program    V.  Final comprehensive written and  practical exam date will be announced at this time.

The FDA Food Code  d. Crisis management    Sanitary facilities and  equipment  a.  tableware.   Employee food safety     Training  a. Food safety management  systems  a. Tools for cleaning  h. XII. Hazard Analysis Critical  Control Point (HAACP)  d. Cleaning vs. Manual dishwashing  f. Utilities    Cleaning and sanitizing  a. Prerequisite food safety  programs  b. Treatment  e. The integrated pest  management program  b. Sanitizing  d. Machine dishwashing  e.    Integrated pest  management (IPM)  program  a. Using and storing  pesticides        XVI. and  equipment    XI. Sanitation standards for  equipment  d. Training staff  b. Considerations for other  areas of the facility  c. Identifying pests  c. Storing utensils.  Food safety regulation and  standards  a. Objectives of a  foodservice inspection  program  b. Government regulatory  system for food  c.   XII. Self‐inspections  f. Control measures  f. Active managerial  control  c. Cleaning the premises  g. Federal regulatory  agencies  g. Voluntary controls  within the industry    XV. Cleaning  c.Page |6   X. The inspection process  e. Designing a sanitary       establishment  b. Training delivery  methods      . sanitizing  b. Installing and  maintaining kitchen  equipment  e. Working with a pest  control operator (PCO)  d.

  Use your recipes from the Introduction to the Food Service Industry class  project to simulate the management of the Seven Principles.  In other words.Page |7 Project Assignments and Due Dates      Project 1    Your mid‐term project is in effect an important component of the Crisis  Management Plan.  You guessed it.        Due:  Finals week 15    .   Follow all the guidelines listed to help keep on track.  We will make this as realistic as possible using this kitchen as our Guinea Pig. chart  the progress of the recipe food items through the kitchen from receiving to  service.  Develop a HACCP program outlined in chapter  10.      Due:  Mid‐term week 9            Project 2    Your final project is to develop a Crisis Management Plan as outlined in chapter  10.

and basic culinary terminology related to dining room and beverage service are included. Students will learn techniques for gaining a competitive advantage in the marketplace.    HOURS: 7a.M. mathematics. or by appointment.M. Personal hygiene.           thomas.    OFFICE:  Culinary Offices.campbell@umontana.edu                                                                                      243‐7831     CREDITS: 3     PREREQUISITES:  CUL 151T or consent of instructor.    STATION HOURS:       Espresso Station 7:30 A.  – 1:30 P. – 10:00            Dining room Procedures Station – 7:30 A.ExN-2   Culinary Arts  THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY              BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT     FACULTY: Chef Thomas Campbell.m.M. Students will be encouraged to provide a “customer service centered” service that culminates an experience that exceeds the guests’ expectations.    COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to the basic foundations of dining room service and protocol. COURSE SYLLABUS     CUL 156   Dining Room Procedures  Date revised: Spring 2008                                                .–3 p. director.m.

  Be  able  to  explain  the  inter‐relationships  and  work  flow  between  dining  room  and  kitchen  operations.  Demonstrate the general rules of table setting and service.  Demonstrate the proper method of handling guest checks and payment.  Discuss Dram Shop Act and liquor liabilities. quality of finished product. the student will be able to:    Demonstrate beverage service and management using espresso station equipment. country. buffets.  Demonstrate an understanding of guest service and customer relations. including handling of  difficult situations and accommodations for the disabled. production process. English.  Discuss the basic production process for distillation and fermentation.  professionalism.      STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES:    Students will be required to demonstrate daily production assignments requiring pre‐ planning of methodology and recipes. catering and a la carte.CUL 156 Dining Room Procedures Page 2   STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES:       Upon completion of this course.  state  and  federal  laws  pertaining  to  the  purchase  and  service  of  alcoholic  beverages.    Demonstrate the use of tableside cookery.  Identify levels of intoxication.  All assignments. varietal.  Evaluate food and beverage pairings.  Demonstrate sales techniques including menu knowledge and suggestive selling. mise en place. and a letter grade will be  assigned based on the following:    Evaluation Criteria          Grade Scale    Tests      10 percent      90 – 100  A  Projects    5   percent      80 – 89  B  Daily Production  75 percent      70 – 79   C  Practical Exam  10 percent      . sanitation and  organizational skills. growing region.  Discuss and demonstrate the proper procedures for training dining room staff.  Describe specific American.   Total points earned will be divided by points possible. French and Russian service. projects and tests will be assigned point values.  Identify  local.  Distinguish wines by grape.  Students will be evaluated on teamwork.  Discuss service methods such as banquets.

 they will be accountable for any information disseminated and  be held responsible for class notes.  This is necessary  as students contribute to the learning environment and become active learners by  attending class and participating.  Assignments for makeup tests  will be made only if faculty is notified by voice mail. and preparedness.   Participation points will be granted or denied depending on how the student exhibits  enthusiasm. or personally prior to the  test. assignments must be submitted by stated due dates.  Late  assignments will be lowered by 50 percent.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production. and assignments.  The Conduct Code is located at  . organization. e‐mail.    ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:    Students are required to adhere to standards of academic integrity.CUL 156 Dining Room Procedures Page 3   Grade Sheet (example)    Student Cher Hillary Tiger Sting Ringo Opra Final Exam 10 pt Project 5 pt Practical Exam 10 pt Production 75 pt Total 100 pt     ATTENDANCE POLICY:    Attendance will be taken. A score of zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed test.    DUE DATES:    To receive full credit.  If students are  absent for any reason. interest. announcements of tests.  Each missed class will result in a 5‐point deduction from  final points accumulated.  No late assignments will be accepted  after week 5.    PARTICIPATION:    Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry. teamwork.  Students who read text assignments prior to class  will be equipped to participate and will obtain the most from this course.  Students should  review The University of Montana Conduct Code regarding their rights and  responsibilities.    TESTS:    Tests will be given during the semester as announced.

    All students must practice academic honesty. ISBN1‐ 4018‐3711‐5    SUGGESTED REFERENCE MATERIALS:  The Waiter and Waitress Training Manual.cfm/page/1321.    UNIFORM POLICY:    Students will be required to be in full Front of the House Attire (see Syllabus  Addendum) to be accepted into class. John Wiley & Sons. 6th edition.umt.  Table Side Cookery  Author:  Anddrioli  Publisher:      Van Nostrand Reinhold    Videos:   Food and Beverage Institute    Introduction To Table Side cooking – CIA          Sit‐ Down Buffet  Preparation To Order Taking      Understanding Wines      Managing the Rush        Liquid Assets        . K. Wayne.    All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code. Kahl  Reserved Curriculum Materials In The Library  Title:  The Professional Host  Author:  CBI Food Service Edition            Publisher: Van Nostrand Reinhold    Title:  Professional Table Service  Author:  Meyer  Publisher:       Van Nostrand Reinhold    Title:  A Guide to Napkin Folding  Author:  Ginders  Publisher:      Van Nostrand Reinhold    Title. Professional Cooking.edu/SA/VPSA/index.    REQUIRED TEXT:     Gissen.. J.    CELL PHONE POLICY:    Cell phones must be turned off prior to class.umt. Dahmer. Rex.CUL 156 Dining Room Procedures Page 4 http://www. Thomson Delmar Learning.  Academic misconduct is subject to an  academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the  University. Dellie. S.edu/studentaffairs/.    ISBN 0‐471‐43625‐9    Henderson. Inc. About Wine. Patrick.  The code is available  for review online at http://www.

 Signs ‐and promotion             c. Coffee making 101          1. Take‐down    2. Neat and Tidy          f. Typing up and distributing daily menu             b.    COURSE OUTLINE:    All weekly plans.CUL 156 Dining Room Procedures Page 5   The Server      Flambé  Cookery     Beverage and Food Service                Wine Service  Dessert To Check Handling  Super Size Me  1. Reliable         b. Reservations            a. Healthful         e. Knowledgeable          g.   The Server         a. Varieties Roasts and Blends                  e.. Personable         d. project due dates. Opening and Closing             b. Use reservation form            b. Handouts ‐Station Assignments ‐Syllabus    a. Steamer             d. Attentive              SUPPLIES:  Wine opener. Basic operations of Espresso machine              c.   Espresso Station Equipment Review             a. Varieties            3. pen. Marketing ‐suggestive selling    4. and testing dates are to be  delivered and explained the first day of class. Menu Procedure and Daily Specials              a.    . Tea making 101          1.  Final comprehensive exam date will  be announced at this time. Ask appropriate questions and record information    3. Iced Tea          5. reading assignments. Cooperative            c. Procedure for Preparing Tea          2. Basic Principles of Coffee             2. Set‐up      2. Dining Room Station      1. Marketing           h.

 Proper set‐up and breakdown          d. 50 Guests          c. Formal ‐Multiple Service ware     2. Gueridon ~ Flambé' Cart         b. Set up                        d. Formal                2. Servants        d. Buffets                        c. Less formal           2. A la carte    11. Russian service              1. Safety and operation                b.          b. Finger bowls    c. Carving at the table                3. One server                4. Heavy silver service ware                 3.  Private  home  or  dining    room                2. Service ware minimal               3. Heated Plates                5. Service Methods                        a. Video "Flambé' Cookery"    10. Catering                        d. French Service    1.   Video ‐"Managing the Rush"    9.   Flambé' Cooking and Cart Review   a. Teamwork and coordination           with kitchen. Lighting                       c. Servers    8.CUL 156 Dining Room Procedures     6. Napkin Folds                        a. Video "Napkin Folds of New       Orleans"                         Page 6   . Banquets                        b. Types of Table Service        a. Food brought to table            4. Table side cooking     3. American Service                1. Proper service during buffet    7. Video "5 minute Napkin Folds"                        b. English Service                1.  Buffet Project        a.

 Before the guests arrive                        a. Seating the guests properly                        c. Orally    b. Sanitation and Emergency Procedures    17. Handling Unusual Circumstances    16. Types of Wine  c.CUL 156 Dining Room Procedures   12. Distilled Spirits and Cocktails  Page 7   . Handling Difficult people      14. Video    13. Efficiency                        g. Characteristics of Wine                         b. Communication      d. Studying the menu                        d. Marketing the food                        e. Approaching the guests                        b. Cooperation      e. Handling Complaints                         d. Seating the guests                        c. Non‐alcoholic Beverages  d. Placing orders in the kitchen    a. Beverage Service                        a. Written      c. Etiquette                        a. Timing of plate presentation to         order    15. Dining room assignments                         b. Know what you are selling   f.

   Demonstrated leadership skills and teamwork.    To earn an A:  90% accomplishment of required competencies. organized.  Professional service techniques.  All recipes costed to reflect a 33% food cost and the appropriate menu price  applied accordingly.    .CUL 156 Dining Room Procedures Page 8     DEMONSTRATED COMPETENCIES:    Proficient in demonstrating the technique assigned.  Proper utilization of ingredients without waste according to professional  standards.    Application of organizational “tools” during the preparation process:  Mise en  place.   Maintenance of a clean.   Timely preparation and submission of product requisition. sanitary work area at all times.  Utilization and compilation of a notebook throughout the course.    To earn a B: 80% accomplishment of required competencies.    To earn a C: 70% accomplishment of required competencies.

  Doneness./MEP  Rapport  with Guests   Self  Organization   Station  Coordination  Professional  Attitude                .  Cleanliness  Garnish.  Temperature. Requisition. Costs.  Production  Schedule.  Recipes.  Leadership. Plate  Color.                                                                                                Caesar Salad    Bananas  Foster  Crepes  Suzette   Cherries  Jubilee   Appetizer  Special  Espresso                                                                        Coffee/Tea      French Press    Still Wine  Sparkling  Wine  Org.  Garnish. Focal  Mandatory. Skills.  Teamwork.  Timing.  Notebook  Method.CUL 156 Dining Room Procedures Page 9   COMPETENCY VERIFICATION SHEET     Assignment  Organization   Technique  15%  25%  MEP. Flow.  Utilization  Taste  40%  Taste.  Seasoning  Presentation  Sanitation  Total  15%  5%  Balance.  point.  Flavor  profiles.  Texture.

  . Service  3. Cleanliness  5. you must say why you believe your  evaluations.  2.  .  In other words. A restaurant evaluation and review.    1.Vintage (when appropriate).  The more  people with you the better for you to include in your evaluation.  It is due the Monday of week five.  .  .All items costed at a 20% beverage cost.  .Bin numbers.Fortified wines. Include what you surmise the concept of the establishment to be  and explain your feelings on how well they succeeded with it.  . A properly written wine list.  .Evaluate all aspects of the dining experience:  1.  You may choose between  two topics.  6.  .CUL 156 Dining Room Procedures Page 10     Project:    There is a special project which is worth 5% of your total grade.Dessert wines.Have a dining experience in an establishment other than fast food. Make your judgments and support them with observations and  evidence.Reds.Sparklers.Appropriate product for a white table cloth establishment.    Wine list parameters:  .  .Presented in folder and type written. Ambiance  4.  7.  .    .  That is to say you must use a  professional level of culinary language.  .Whites.Presented in attractive folder and printed as if we would use it in our  restaurant.  . The evaluation must be well written.    Restaurant Evaluation:  .Proper label/wine description.  .  .Rosés.Aperitifs. Food  2.

CUL 156 Dining Room Procedures Page 11                     .

m.ExN‐3 CAPSTONE FSM 271  Culinary Arts  THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY              BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT   FACULTY: Chef Thomas Campbell. Patisserie – FSM 275. menu planning/design.edu                                                                                      243‐7831     CREDITS: 4     PREREQUISITES:  Completion of Station Experience Courses. beverage service and appreciation.  The course plan  includes writing a restaurant business plan. facilities planning.  and Internship –  FSM 290T to create a virtual food and beverage service establishment.           thomas. director.    HOURS: 7a.  Students will be  expected to build a comprehensive portfolio/storyboard to be displayed at the capstone  dinner.  The course content coordinates and integrates Food Service  Management Computer Applications – FSM 271. the course  culminates with an “opening night” formal. purchasing.campbell@umontana.  It is designed to demonstrate all skills learned over the  last three semesters.  marketing.    COURSE SYLLABUS   FSM 271    Capstone                      Date Revised: Spring 2008                                                      .–3 p.  Finally.m. multi‐course dinner. labor. or by appointment.    COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is the conclusion of the two‐year Food Service  Management Degree Program. Introduction to  Computers – CRT 101 or consent of instructor.    OFFICE:  Culinary Offices.

  Design a financial plan for the business.  Total points earned will be divided by points possible.   Create and utilize banquet service management documents. furnishings. and décor.  All assignments.  Work with local businesses and fund raising experts to market and fund their project  and Capstone Dinner.      STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES:    Students will be required to demonstrate daily assignments. projects and  tests will be assigned point values.  Purchase equipment.  Plan and execute the Capstone (Opening Night) Dinner and Portfolio Review.  Recognize and understand various beverages and their service styles.  Demonstrate the principles of menu development and design. the student will be able to:    Write a business plan for their conceptualized restaurant. and  a letter grade will be assigned based on the following:    Evaluation Criteria          Grade Scale    Quizzes      30%      90 – 100  A  Project       20%      80 – 89  B  Capstone Dinner    25%      70 – 79  C  Practical Exam     25%      Student Cher Hillary Tiger Sting Ringo Oprah Quiz 1  10 pt Quiz 2  10 pt Grade Sheet (example)  Quiz 3 10 pt  Project  20 pt Capstone 25 pt Practical 25 pt Total 100 pt               .  Present a restaurant floor plan designed according to the flow of production.Page |2   STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES:       Upon completion of this course.  Plan and execute a final practical exam.

    DUE DATES:    To receive full credit.  Assignments for makeup tests  will be made only if faculty is notified by voice mail.            .umt. A score of zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed test.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production.  Students who read text assignments prior to class  will be equipped to participate and will obtain the most from this course.    PARTICIPATION:    Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry.cfm/page/1321.edu/SA/VPSA/index.  Late  assignments will be lowered by 50 percent.  Students should  review The University of Montana Conduct Code regarding their rights and  responsibilities.  Each missed class will result in a 5‐point deduction from  final points accumulated.edu/studentaffairs/.   Participation points will be granted or denied depending on how the student exhibits  enthusiasm.  The code is available  for review online at http://www.  No late assignments will be accepted  after week 13. or personally prior to the  test.  If students are  absent for any reason.  Academic misconduct is subject to an  academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the  University.    All students must practice academic honesty.  The Conduct Code is located at  http://www.  This is necessary  as students contribute to the learning environment and become active learners by  attending class and participating. e‐mail.umt.    TESTS:    Tests will be given during the semester as announced. teamwork.    ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:    Students are required to adhere to standards of academic integrity. announcements of tests. organization.    All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code. and assignments. interest. and preparedness. assignments must be submitted by stated due dates.Page |3   ATTENDANCE POLICY:    Attendance will be taken. they will be accountable for any information disseminated and  be held responsible for class notes.

Page |4     CELL PHONE POLICY:    Cell phones must be turned off prior to class. ISBN 0­471­28865­9  WEBSTER’S NEW WORD DICTIONARY OF  CULINARY ARTS.    SUGGESTED TEXT(S):          OPENING A RESTAURANT. John C.. Atlantic  Publishing Group. Sharon L. Prentice Hall. ISBN 0‐13‐182726‐X    SUGGESTED REFERENCE MATERIALS:      SUPPLIES:    Standard culinary knife kit. Fullen. 2nd Edition.  Birchfield. Steven  Labensky. Inc.    UNIFORM POLICY:    Students will be required to be in full Culinary Uniform to be accepted into class. John Wiley & Sons.    . ISBN 0‐910627‐36‐3  DESIGN & LAYOUT OF FOODSERVICE FACILITIES.

 and testing dates are to be  delivered and explained the first day of class.Page |5   COURSE OUTLINE:    All weekly plans. lunch. reading assignments. beverage menus  Menu copy  Design and printing    Facility Planning  Planning  Food service design  The principals of design  Equipment layout  Food service equipment  Facilities engineering  Interior design    Catering  Types of catering  Determining function space  Staffing and personnel  Pricing considerations  Revenue accounts  Expense accounts  Operating costs  Contracts  Determining charges  Capstone dinner  production and portfolio   Practical Exam    .  Final comprehensive exam date will  be announced at this time.  Business Plan  Business description  Management  Mission goals/mission  Philosophies/identity  Location  Geographical markets  Main objectives  Cooperation  Strategic alliance  Licenses  Estimated sales  Internet  Personnel  Funds required  ABC product mix  SWOT analysis  Problems  Possibilities  Organizational structure    Financial Plan          Fixed assets  Current assets  Statistical data  Risk management  Timeline    Marketing  Marketing analysis  Customer profile  Marketing strategies  Competitive research  Pricing strategies  Marketing goals    Wine and Spirits  Tasting wine  Buying wine  Alcohol responsibility  Alcohol liability  Licenses  Menus  Menu styles  Menu characteristics  Breakfast. dinner   Special occasion menus  Room service menus  Ethnic menus  Dessert. project due dates.

  Leadership.  Maintenance of a clean.  Timely preparation and submission of product requisition.    COMPETENCY VERIFICATION SHEET (example)  Taste  40%    Assignment  Organization  Technique   15%  25%  MEP.  Texture.  Seasoning  Presentation  Sanitatio 15%  n 5%  Balance.  Teamwork. Recipes. and plate appropriateness.  All recipes costed to reflect a 33% food cost and the appropriate menu price  applied accordingly.  Garnish.    Application of organizational “tools” during the preparation process:  Mise en  place sheets.    To earn a C: 70% accomplishment of required competencies. Skills.  Total                                        Teamwork  Menu  Design  Kitchen  Staffing  Function  Sheet  Floor Plan  Business  Plan                                      .    To earn a B: 80% accomplishment of required competencies. Utilization  Taste. color.  plating diagrams/photographs.  Proper utilization of ingredients without waste according to professional  standards. Notebook  Method.  Doneness. production schedules.  Timing.  Flavor  profiles.  Professional presentation techniques demonstrating the principals of  balance focal point.    To earn an A:  90% accomplishment of required competencies.  Demonstrated leadership skills and teamwork throughout preparation. Plate  Color.  Production  Schedule. Requisition.  Costs. garnish.  Utilization and compilation of a throughout the course. organized. streamlined/personalized recipes.  point. sanitary work area at all times.  Temperature.  Cleanliness  Garnish. flow. Focal  Mandatory.Page |6   DEMONSTRATED COMPETENCIES:    Proficient in demonstrating the technique by accomplishing the recipe  assigned. Flow.

  This paper should be an  example of the student’s best work that represents research (if necessary) and  writing capabilities to a potential employer.  • Overall. Submitted in a three‐ring binder  b. Resume – final version  f. double‐spaced.  • Student will address objectives met that were not defined on learning agreement. but not met. with references. correct grammar. and  references given for any resources used in the report (used www.  listed on separate page. Pertinent food photographs. if any.  i. menus. etc…  • The report should be approximately 1‐2 pages in length. extracurricular activities. etc. thank you  letters. punctuation. compiling a portfolio allows you to put together  your best work to submit to employers.  h. volunteer work.  They may request items such as written reports.  and objectives defined on learning agreement. the student will directly and specifically reflect how objectives as  defined and agreed upon by employer and student in “Learning Agreement Goals”  were met during the internship.Page |7 YOUR PERSONAL PORTFOLIO     When interviewing for Hospitality Industry Jobs. Cover letter – final version  g. the  introduction should nicely transition to the body of the report detailing how the  objectives were met. numbered pages. Cover page  c.  • This report should be formatted appropriately in educational report format as  follows:  Attractive margins. awards.  • In this report. if used. and spelling. photographs of  your work. and autobiography and more. conferences.     Portfolio Binder Requirements:  a. Web site to look  up…). letters of recommendation. and include potential actions by the student that could have  improved the experience. the report should include an introduction to define student objectives. if any. Table of contents  d.  .  In addition to using the  portfolio for your final internship project. Professional paper describing accomplishments/goals and objectives met by the student  during the internship experience. copies of your certificates. certificates.  • Student will include an analysis explaining actions the student could have taken to  improve the internship experience. One example of a project/assignment from a course in your program area taken at the  College of Technology or a project/assignment from you internship which best  represents your capabilities to a potential employer. citations used for direct quotes  borrowed from another source in the report (internship supervisor said…). Transcript  e. it is common for employers to ask for  samples of your work.  The conclusion should summarize the importance and  significance of the objectives to the internship experience.

 their score will be deducted by half a point.  For every minute the student is late after the presentation window has  ended.  Additionally.  However.  Remember. a complete menu.  The menu must have a consistent.  The first course must be presented during the  designated presentation time and each course must follow at appropriate time  intervals. it  is not advised to keep books opened on the station throughout the allotted cooking  time.Page |8   FINAL PRACTICAL EXAM (BLACK BOX)    This portion of your internship will prove quite challenging.  Also.  Each student will be randomly assigned an apprentice to help during their testing  time. or take on a  station as part of the interview process. half an hour to present their menu to the judges and half an hour to clean up  their stations.   Note: it is okay to refer to cookbooks or manuals during the testing time. each student will have access to the  rest of the kitchen for ingredients that can be used in their menu.  You will be expected to execute  a practical exam designed to evaluate your cooking expertise.  Meaning.  The parameters for the Final Practical are as follows:    PREPARE A FIVE COURSE MENU FOR FOUR GUESTS FROM MYSTERY INGREDIENTS TO BE  SUPPLIED BY THE CHEF    Menu:  Each student will be given a basket consisting of seven to eleven items that must be  used in at least one course of the menu. cohesive theme demonstrating proper basic  cooking techniques.  Judging will start at the moment of set‐up and will remain until the  station is completely cleaned.  The student will be tested on how well they manage the apprentice’s time and  responsibility.  When the basket is presented to the student. salad.   The courses presented must be an appetizer. the apprentice  cannot demonstrate any cooking or fabrication skill that can be judged during the  exam.  Each student will have four hours of cooking time to prepare the menu. soup.  each student will be given half an hour to set‐up their stations and prepare their  menu.  The completion of this internship and the entire  program hinges on a passing score for this exam.  A growing number of  employers require a prospective employee to prepare a meal. they will be given half an hour to write  a menu which will need to be displayed on the station for the floor judge to refer to.  Students who fail must pay appropriate  course fees to retake the exam. entrée and dessert.  Students who do not pass may not graduate.    . the apprentice is there to assist.

  Judging continues through this phase!    Judges will critique immediately after clean up and the practical score will be  delivered at this time.   Three portions are for judges and one is for photographs. sanitize. soup.  The apprentice may work only as a helper.  Courses will consist of an appetizer. serve. dessert.   ½ hour before the test commences is available for station set up and menu  preparation.  The order of courses will depend on the menu service style.  ½ hour after the four hour preparation time is the service/presentation window.  They may not prepare anything that affects  demonstrated cooking techniques or knife skills.  • Soup delivered five minutes later (00:05)  • Salad ‐ depending on service style ‐ five minutes after the soup (00:10).  No advance preparation or cooking is allowed.  Courses should be delivered in proper sequence observing the following time frame:  • Appetizer on the table at the end of the four hours (00:00).Page |9   Examination:    The examinant is responsible to schedule the time for the examination period.  Each student will have four hours to produce four portions of each course.       . entrée.  They may clean.  help with presentation. salad.  • Entrée ten minutes after the salad (00:20). etc. set up.  Participants are responsible for setting the evaluation table according to the  standards of table service.  • Dessert ten minutes after the entrée (00:30)  Immediately after service the student should clean their station thoroughly and store  left‐over product appropriately.

9  Under 70%  ACF Point Conversion  36.  The judging will follow the ACF Category F/1: Hot Food Student Competition criteria.  • Timing of service and follow up.0  32.0 – 100  80.  35% of the score will be the kitchen/floor evaluation covering the following:  • Mise en place and organization.P a g e | 10   Judging:    The examinant is responsible for inviting the judges for the examination.0 – 35.0 – 31.0 – 89.  • Flavor  • Texture  • Doneness    The final score tally will reflect the combined evaluation of the floor and tasting  segments and translate into ACF Point Conversions and Awards as follows:           Percentage  90. skills.9  28.  There will be one judge assigned to evaluate the student performance in the kitchen.  • Craftsmanship and professionalism.  There will be three judges assigned as taste evaluators.  • Portion size and nutritional balance.  • Apprentice coordination and task delegation.0 – 40.  • Cooking techniques. and fundamentals.9  ACF Award Guidelines  Gold  Silver  Bronze  Did not pass    . including the coordinator.  • Menu and ingredient compatibility.0 – 79.  There will be one judge assigned as the coordinator.  Judges  must be qualified chefs or restaurateurs agreed to by the program director.99  0 – 27.9  70.  • Effective utilization of all ingredients.  65% of the score will be the service/tasting evaluation accordingly:  • Serving methods and presentation.  • Sanitation and cleaning procedures.

                                                .  • Inappropriate or unsafe food handling practices.  • Late submission of required materials.  • Inappropriate conduct or unethical behavior.  • Lack of cooking integrity. or disorganization.  • Violation of the standard uniform code for the College of Technology’s  Culinary Arts Program.  • Tardiness.   Noncompliance may include.P a g e | 11   Students may lose points or be disqualified for excessive lack of compliance. but is not limited to:    • Lack of mise en place.

credit is not allowed for MAT/H 100 if it has been or is being earned in any mathematics course numbered above 100. MAT/H 100 does not substitute for any other mathematics requirement. If you have any concerns about your placement see your instructor immediately. or successful completion of MAT 005 (Introductory Algebra). 243-7905 TR: Math Bldg 002. Unless a student has prior written approval by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. Our philosophy is one of mutual respect and appreciation. To keep your balance you must keep moving.edu MWF: HB Bldg (“the fishbowl”). you must also do the same for your instructors and your classmates. as well as those who need a refresher course particularly those students intending to take MATH 130. and conversely. that includes text messaging). The more we support each other. draw graphs of relationships between numbers. It is crucial that you enroll in the proper math class at the beginning of the semester. Mathematics for Elementary Education. do your homework and read ahead if at all possible. the student. Ellenbogen. Bittinger.Albert Einstein Debbie Sloan debbie. . Precalculus. however. the better the class results will be in the end. YOU: Exactly what is this course about. 4th edition. Turn off your cell phone (and yes. BUT no one can teach you if you are not in class engaged and ready to learn. Instructor: Office: Phone: Office Hours: E-mail: Course Coordinator: -. That does not mean that math class must be dull! What it does mean is that you have a lot to do with how the “feel” of the class develops. ACT/SAT math score. Custom Edition for UM MAT/H 100 is a one-semester intermediate algebra course intended for students who have not yet mastered a second year of high school algebra. but the larger and more important goal in this course is to learn abstract reasoning. and make use of the inherent structure of our number system. and Barbara L.MAT/H 100 Course Guide INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA Spring 2008 The University of Montana Life is like riding a bicycle. East COT Campus. Instructors need to respect your efforts and appreciate your contributions. Johnson: Elementary and Intermediate Algebra. Attendance is not part of your final grade. Your role is essential if you wish to succeed in this course. If you do the work you will find the classes make sense and the challenges are not overwhelming. You ARE the class and you can make it lively and interesting or you can make it silent and boring.sloan@mso. credit is allowed toward graduation and grade point average.umt. David J. it is important to learn personal responsibility and develop a solid work ethic. or MATH 111/MAT 118. nor does it fulfill the general education mathematics requirement. Placement in MAT/H 100 is based on your individual mathematics assessment through the university placement exam. This course has been designed for you. Pay attention! No matter how you feel about studying math. Come to class prepared. by appointment Text: Marvin L. you ask? Algebra allows us to solve for unknown quantities.

edu PROBLEM SETS: MAT/H 100 uses the four problem sets as an opportunity for you to practice your written math skills.things happen. Preferred nongraphing calculators for MAT 100 are TI -30. Again. Please note that Blackboard tests will stay open for a limited time. students will be able to perform each of the following: 1. the difference between them is that the tests can only be submitted once. Operate with natural. Graph and describe the solutions linear equations and inequalities in two variables 3. Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable 2. There are practice tests worth 10% of your final grade. Blackboard will automatically correct and grade your practice tests. Operate with polynomial expressions. but this information is necessary for research purposes. A single page (8½“x11”) of notes (both sides) may be used to assist you during tests. your grade will be calculated automatically. solve integer factorable polynomial equations 5. Only under the direst circumstances will a makeup test be permitted without prior approval. In addition. The final exam is worth 15% of your final grade and will be given in class. Tests on Blackboard will not be accepted after they have been closed without a compelling reason.htm. especially if you intend to go on to MAT 117. You should not wait until the last minute to do these tests. LEARNING OUTCOMES: Upon successful completion of the course. TI-92) will not be allowed in testing situations. They are worth a total of 20% of your final grade. please wait until after class to discuss it. you are being offered 10% of your final grade if you only submit and correct your problem sets. TI-34. Model application problems using the skills listed above 10. please make every effort to notify me in advance. BLACKBOARD TESTS: This course uses Blackboard exercises to assess your progress and keep you using your developing math skills. FINAL EXAM: The final exam for this class is comprehensive. The link to Blackboard: http://courseware. Operate with complex numbers 7. integer. Apply calculator technology as an aid to problem solving in algebra IN-CLASS TESTS: Three tests will be given in class. Graphing calculators removed from their cases are permitted. You cannot expect to succeed in this course if you miss many classes.ATTENDANCE: Daily attendance will be taken in this class. we recommend that you register for MAT 100 online instead. If you have questions regarding the grading of your test.umt. Solve quadratic equations that are not integer factorable 8. important information may be shared at any time and may or may not be posted on Blackboard. TI-89. because of the quirky nature of working with computers -. The practice tests will remain open until the end of classes.g. The Texas Instruments TI-83 and TI-84 are the required calculators for MATH 100 and preferred for MAT 100.edu/instructions/finalsschedule_spr08. these practice tests can be taken multiple times to improve your grade and prepare you for the chapter tests. All scratch work must be done directly on the exam and returned to the instructor when leaving the classroom. but may not be shared with other students during the exam. At the same time. Corrected tests will be returned one week after the test date. If you don’t expect to treat this as a face-to-face class. and are available for less than $20. Solve systems of linear equations and inequalities in two variables 4. find vertices 9. there will be chapter tests posted. . and may emphasize those sections not tested on the in-class tests (Chapter 11). TI-32. and rational exponents 6. Calculators with symbolic manipulation capabilities (e. Attendance is not part of the grade. find the time and date at http://cyberbear. Graph quadratic equations. regular attendance can only boost your learning. In other words.umt. If you have special circumstances which prevent you from taking a test on time. CALCULATOR: A calculator is required for this course.

Factors beyond the student’s control make it impossible to complete the course on time. or a University-sponsored activity.umt. Family emergency 2. Failure to arrange a make-up exam within a week of the scheduled exam date will result in a score of zero for the exam. . 1. Education is not a contest: it is a goal. 3. available at http://ordway. GRADING POLICIES: MAT/H 100 can be taken for a traditional letter grade only. Discipline yourself so that you practice regularly.edu/provost/academiccalendar.cfm/name/StudentConductCode.com/ FINAL NOTE: Math can be a subject you enjoy and appreciate. injury.com/ http://algebasics.htm Some useful websites: http://www. OTHER INFO: Academic Support Center: 243-7826 (need 2 days’ notice for makeup tests) Academic calendar available at http://www. Academic misconduct is subject to an academic penalty by the instructor and a disciplinary sanction by the university. 2.math.umt. When a student receives an incomplete the student has one calendar year to resolve the incomplete (I) before it automatically reverts to a failing grade (F).ACADEMIC CONDUCT: All students must practice academic honesty as defined by the Student Conduct Code. our goal is to help you reach your goal.edu/SA/VPSA/index. When circumstances prevent a student from taking an exam at the scheduled time. family emergency. Show that you want to learn. Change in work schedule INCOMPLETES: A grade of incomplete will only be considered when all three of the following are true: The student has been in regular attendance and passing up to three weeks before the end of the academic semester. The final grade will be computed as follows: Blackboard practice tests: 10% Blackboard tests: 25% Problem sets: 20% (5% each) In-class tests: 30% (10% each) Final exam: 15% TOTAL 100% Letter grades correspond to numerical scores according to this plan: F 0-59 D 60-69 C 70-79 B 80-89 A 90-100 PETITIONS FOR LATE WITHDRAWAL: Student election for withdrawal from MAT 100 can occur up to the 30th day of instruction. MAT/H 100 cannot be taken credit/no credit. Error in registration 3. Learning math empowers you and raises your self-esteem.com/homeworkhelp/Algebra. The instructor and the student agree that there is a reasonable probability that the student will be able to make-up the work required to complete the course and specific arrangements are drawn up and signed by both. Accident or illness 4. This will reward you more than anyone else.purplemath.com/ (lessons) http://www. You must understand the basics of vocabulary and grammar so that you can speak the language. the student must contact the instructor PRIOR to the time of the exam to announce their absence.html http://www. petitions for late withdrawal will be considered only for students who provide written verification of at least one university approved excuse: 1. Arrangements for a make-up exam must occur within a week of the scheduled exam date.algebrahelp. The best way to come to appreciate how math works is to DO THE MATH. Absences are excused only for reasons of illness. After the 30th day of instruction.

Solve systems of two linear equations in two unknowns. Solve linear equations with a single variable. exponential and logarithmic functions and their  graphs. Use a calculator as a computational tool and as a means for experimenting with  mathematical ideas. 11. Solve quadratic equations by factoring and using the quadratic formula.  inverse functions. 2. COURSE OBJECTIVES: Upon satisfactory completion of the course the student  should be able to: 1. radicals and roots. solving systems of two linear equations in two unknowns. Manipulate expressions containing radicals.The University of Montana­Missoula Department of Applied Arts and Sciences Course Descriptor COURSE:  MAT 100 Intermediate Algebra CONTACT HOURS PER SEMESTER:     45  Lecture Hours per week:                                3 PREREQUISITES:   MAT 005 or appropriate score on placement exam COURSE DESCRIPTION: Properties of the real number system.  graphing linear functions. Factor algebraic expressions. Graph polynomial and rational functions. 10. 7. polynomial and rational functions and their graphs. . 6. functions and relations. Graph linear functions. 9. solving linear equations. Graph exponential and logarithmic functions. 4. Solve applied problems. 5.  polynomial and rational expressions. Manipulate exponents and logarithms. 8. 3. 12. Identify functions and relations.

Solving quadratic equations by factoring C. Roots and radicals C. Systems of linear equations A. Review of Introductory Algebra  A. . Definition and examples of relations B. Definition of a polynomial expression B.COURSE OUTLINE: I. The quadratic formula D. Algebraic manipulation of radical expressions D. Solving linear inequalities Functions and Relations A. Algebraic solutions to two linear equations in two unknowns IV. Graphical interpretations of two linear equations in two unknowns B. Polynomial and rational expressions A. Factoring polynomial expressions C. Definition of a rational expression E. III. Introduction to complex numbers VI. Solving linear equations C. Introduction to the concept of inverse function B. Polynomial and rational functions A. Rational functions and their graphs Radicals and irrational numbers A. Algebraic manipulation of rational expressions V. Applications of polynomial expressions and factoring D. Properties of the real number system B. Quadratic functions and their graphs B. Linear functions and their graphs II. Definition and examples of functions C.

Properties of logarithmic functions G. Exponential and logarithmic functions A. Applications of exponential and logarithmic functions .VII. Graphs of exponential functions D. Logarithmic functions F. Definition of an exponential function B. Properties of exponents C. More on inverse functions E.

edu                                                                                      243‐7831     CREDITS: 3    PREREQUISITES:  CUL 151 or consent of instructor. or by appointment.  Evaluate the product  and judge it according to standards of quality. observing all standards for ingredient preparation. flavor.    HOURS: 7a.Page |1 ExN‐5    Culinary Arts  THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY              BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT   FACULTY: Chef Thomas Campbell. aroma. appropriate  equipment. and flavor development.campbell@umontana. and Chef Laura Swanson.  Apply good  technique. cooking temperatures. soups and  sauces by selecting quality ingredients to produce a specific flavor.    COURSE DESCRIPTION: To introduce a hands‐on approach to stocks.  COURSE SYLLABUS     FSM 160T Soups.  Stocks.–3 p. Sauces  Date revised: Spring 2008    . body.           thomas.    OFFICE:  Culinary Offices.m. appearance.m.

 Tomato. mise en place.  Total points earned will be divided by points possible.  Prepare small sauces from Mother sauces  Identify and prepare five simple butter sauces  Prepare compound butters and apply to production  Prepare pan gravies  Prepare hot and cold sauces  Describe and prepare three basic categories of soups  Apply service procedures for holding soups at the proper temperature  Prepare clarified consommé  Prepare cream and purée soups  Prepare bisques. and  Hollandaise. quality of finished product. stocks and sauces  Prepare white. Espagnole. chowders. chicken and fish glazes  Evaluate the quality of soups.  All assignments. and brown roux. and a letter grade will  be assigned based on the following:        . projects and tests will be assigned point  values. chicken stock. blonde. the student will be able to:    Prepare basic mirepoix  Flavor liquids using a sachet d’ epice or bouquet garni  Prepare white veal or beef stocks.Page |2   STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES:       Upon completion of this course.  Students will be evaluated on teamwork. Velouté. and use them to thicken liquids  Thicken liquids with starches  Prepare and use egg yolk and cream liaison  Finish sauces  Prepare the five Mother sauces: Béchamel. fish stock and brown stock  Cool and store stocks properly  Prepare meat. sanitation and  organizational skills. specialty soups and national soups    STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES:    Students will be required to demonstrate daily production assignments requiring  pre‐planning of methodology and recipes.  professionalism.

  .  Late  assignments will be lowered by 50 percent.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production. teamwork. assignments must be submitted by stated due dates.  Each missed class will result in a 5‐point deduction from  final points accumulated. and assignments.  Students who read text assignments  prior to class will be equipped to participate and will obtain the most from this  course. or personally prior  to the test. organization. and preparedness.    DUE DATES:    To receive full credit.  This is  necessary as students contribute to the learning environment and become active  learners by attending class and participating. announcements of tests.    TESTS:    Tests will be given during the semester as announced. A score of zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed  test.  Participation points will be granted or denied depending on how the  student exhibits enthusiasm. e‐mail.  No late assignments will be accepted  after week 13.  If students are  absent for any reason.Page |3   Evaluation Criteria    Tests      Notebook    Practical Exam  Daily Production    Student Cher Hillary Tiger Sting Ringo Opra         Grade Scale  A  B  C  10 percent      90 – 100  10 percent      80 – 89  20 percent      70 – 79   60 percent        Grade Sheet (example)  Quiz 1  10 pt Notebook 10 pt Practical Exam Production 20 pt 60 pt Total 100 pt     ATTENDANCE POLICY:    Attendance will be taken.    PARTICIPATION:    Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry.  Assignments for make‐up  tests will be made only if faculty is notified by voice mail. interest. they will be accountable for any information disseminated  and be held responsible for class notes.

. ISBN 0‐442‐01961‐0    SUPPLIES:    Standard culinary knife kit. Van Nostrand.  Academic misconduct is subject to an  academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the  University.  The code is  available for review online at http://www. Professional Cooking.    UNIFORM POLICY:    Students will be required to be in full Culinary Uniform to be accepted into class. John Wiley & Sons. Wayne. Inc.umt. 6th Edition.Page |4   ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:    Students are required to adhere to standards of academic integrity.umt. the New Professional Chef.    ISBN 0‐471‐43625‐9    SUGGESTED REFERENCE MATERIALS:    Handout from Chef Campbell    Reinhold.edu/studentaffairs/.      CELL PHONE POLICY:    Cell phones must be turned off prior to class.    .cfm/page/1321. 6th edition.  Students should  review The University of Montana Conduct Code regarding their rights and  responsibilities.    All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code.  The Conduct Code is located at  http://www.    REQUIRED TEXT:     Gissen.edu/SA/VPSA/index.    All students must practice academic honesty.

Mignonette Sauce  e. Consommé garnishes  d. Quality  b.  National soups  a. Clear soups  d. Velouté  c. Sauces from Chicken  Velouté  d. White wine sauce    VII. Production  Types of soups  a. Hollandaise  Cold sauces  a. Gazpacho    . Suprême sauce  e. White. Sauces from Béchamel  b.   III. Compound butters    II. Tartar sauce  b.  Final comprehensive written and  practical exam date will be announced at this time. Compotes  f. Borscht  e. Sauces from Hollandaise  Miscellaneous cold sauces  a. Espagnole  d. Chowders and bisques  f. Puréed soups  b. Horseradish sauce  c. Allemande  f. fish stocks  a. brown. Mayonnaise  b.     V. Minestrone  d. Chutney  Basic sauce derivatives  a. Asian soups  b. French onion soup  c. Sauces from Tomato  sauce  g. project due dates. Coulis  d. Storage  c.    Garnishes for soups  a. Chilled soups  Mother sauces  a. Béchamel  b. and testing dates are to be  delivered and explained the first day of class. Sauces from Fish  Velouté  e.       VIII. Consommé  e. Cocktail sauce  d. Fond lié  c.  I. Tomato  e. Fresh herbs  b.   IV. Sauces from White Veal  Velouté  c. Salsas  e. reading assignments. Sauces from Demi‐glace  f. Consommé variations        IX. Accompaniments for  soups  c. VI. Demi‐glace  b.Page |5   COURSE OUTLINE:    All weekly plans. Jus lié  d. Aioli  c. Small sauces  a. Cream soups  c.

 Requisition. Plate  Color.  Leadership.    To earn a C: 70% accomplishment of required competencies. production schedules.  Maintenance of a clean.  point.Page |6 DEMONSTRATED COMPETENCIES:    Proficient in demonstrating the technique by accomplishing the recipe assigned.  Flavor  profiles.  Professional presentation techniques demonstrating the principals of balance  focal point. sanitary work area at all times. organized.    COMPETENCY VERIFICATION SHEET (example)    Assignment  Organization   Technique  15%  25%  MEP. streamlined/personalized recipes.  Texture. Skills.                                        White Stock    Brown  Stock  Fish Stock  Béchamel  Velouté  Espagnole                                    .  Demonstrated leadership skills and teamwork throughout preparation. Flow. Notebook  Method. flow. and plate appropriateness.  Seasoning  Presentation  Sanitation  Total  15%  5%  Balance.  All recipes costed to reflect a 33% food cost and the appropriate menu price  applied accordingly.  Temperature. color.  Garnish.    To earn a B: 80% accomplishment of required competencies.  Timing.  Costs. Focal  Mandatory.  Cleanliness  Garnish.    Application of organizational “tools” during the preparation process:  Mise en  place sheets.  Doneness.  Timely preparation and submission of product requisition. garnish.  Teamwork.  Utilization  Taste  40%  Taste.  Proper utilization of ingredients without waste according to professional  standards.      To earn an A:  90% accomplishment of required competencies. Recipes. plating  diagrams/photographs.  Production  Schedule.

Page |7 Tomato    Sauce  Hollandaise    Mayonnaise    Aioli  Salsa  Coulis  Chutney  Puréed  Soup  Clear  Soup                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Cream Soup    Consommé  Chowder  Bisque  Chilled  Soup   Demi­glace  Fond Lié  Jus Lié  Suprême  Sauce  White Wine  Sauce  Allemande  Sauce  Small Sauce  Béchamel  Small Sauce  Veal  Velouté                          .

Page |8 Small Sauce  Chicken  Velouté  Small Sauce  Fish Velouté  Small Sauce  Demi­glace  Small Sauce  Tomato  Small Sauce  Hollandaise  Tartar  Sauce  Horseradish  Sauce  Cocktail  Sauce  Mignonette  Sauce  Compote  Compound  Butter  Asian Soup  French  Onion Soup  Minestrone  Borscht  Gazpacho                                                                                                                                                                                                      .

Page |9   Organization and Professional Presentation    • Table of contents  • Cover page  • Index  • Dividers  • Typed    Content of Note Book    • Recipes  • Requisitions  • Mise en Place Sheet  • Production Schedules  • Menus  • Photographs  • Plate Diagrams  • Costed recipes  • Competency verification sheet  • Notes                      Note Book Requirements    .

 observing all standards for ingredient preparation. flavor.    COURSE SYLLABUS   FSM 161T Meats and  Vegetables  Date revised: Spring 2008     .campbell@umontana. and flavor development. cooking temperatures.edu          243‐7831   CREDITS: 3    PREREQUISITES:  CUL 151 or consent of instructor. and Chef Laura Swanson. appearance.m. body. appropriate  equipment.           thomas. poultry and game birds. fish and shellfish.    HOURS: 7a.–3 p. aroma. vegetable and starch cookery.m.Page |1 ExN‐6    Culinary Arts    THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY              BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT   FACULTY: Chef Thomas Campbell.  COURSE DESCRIPTION: To introduce a hands‐on approach to various meats and game  animals.  Evaluate the product and  judge it according to standards of quality.   Apply  good technique.    OFFICE:  Culinary Offices. or by appointment.

  Students will be evaluated on teamwork. pan‐frying. quality of finished product. split lobster and peel and devein shrimp  Cut poultry into parts and truss whole birds for cooking  Store meats. fish and shellfish by sautéing. poultry. mise en place. broiling. sautéing. fish and shellfish for portion control   Cook vegetables and starches to their proper doneness  Perform pre‐preparation tasks for fresh vegetables and starches  Store fresh and prepared vegetables and starches properly  Prepare vegetables using the batch method and blanch and shock method  Cook vegetables and potatoes by boiling. sanitation and  organizational skills. pilaf.  professionalism. braising.  baking. and risotto methods  Prepare fresh and commercial pasta      STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES:    Students will be required to demonstrate daily production assignments requiring  pre‐planning of methodology and recipes. fish and shellfish by broiling. projects and tests will be assigned point  values. the student will be able to:    Choose appropriate cooking methods according to the product used  Prepare variety meats  Determine doneness in cooked meats and vegetables  Cook meats. and deep‐frying  Prepare rice and legumes by boiling. and a letter grade will  be assigned based on the following:      . poultry. fish and shellfish by roasting and baking  Cook meats. grilling. poultry.  Total points earned will be divided by points possible. steaming. grilling  Cooke meats. fish and shellfish properly  Fabricate meats. poultry. poultry. steaming. roasting.  All assignments.Page |2   STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES:       Upon completion of this course. poultry. fish and shellfish by simmering or poaching  Cook meats and poultry by braising  Prepare dressings and stuffings  Dress and fillet round fish and flat fish  Open clams and oysters. and griddling  Cook meats. pan‐frying.

    PARTICIPATION:    Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry. they will be accountable for any information disseminated  and be held responsible for class notes. and preparedness.  Participation points will be granted or denied depending on how the  student exhibits enthusiasm.  This is  necessary as students contribute to the learning environment and become active  learners by attending class and participating. e‐mail.  Assignments for make‐up  tests will be made only if faculty is notified by voice mail.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production.  Each missed class will result in a 5‐point deduction from  final points accumulated. and assignments. announcements of tests.  No late assignments will be accepted  after week 13. teamwork.  Students who read text assignments  prior to class will be equipped to participate and will obtain the most from this  course. interest. A score of zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed  test.  Late  assignments will be lowered by 50 percent. or personally prior  to the test. organization.    TESTS:    Tests will be given during the semester as announced.Page |3 Evaluation Criteria    Tests      Notebook    Practical Exam  Daily Production    Student Cher Hillary Tiger Sting Ringo Opra                 Grade Scale  A  B  C  10 percent  10 percent  20 percent  60 percent    90 – 100    80 – 89    70 – 79         Grade Sheet (example)  Notebook 10 pt Quiz 1  10 pt Practical Exam Production 20 pt 60 pt Total 100 pt     ATTENDANCE POLICY:    Attendance will be taken.  .  If students are  absent for any reason. assignments must be submitted by stated due dates.    DUE DATES:    To receive full credit.

 Inc.    All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code. Van Nostrand. John Wiley & Sons.  Students should  review The University of Montana Conduct Code regarding their rights and  responsibilities. ISBN 0‐442‐01961‐0    SUPPLIES:    Standard culinary knife kit.    REQUIRED TEXT:     Gissen. Wayne.cfm/page/1321.    All students must practice academic honesty.      CELL PHONE POLICY:    Cell phones must be turned off prior to class. 6th edition.    ISBN 0‐471‐43625‐9    SUGGESTED REFERENCE MATERIALS:    Handout from Chef Campbell    Reinhold.  The Conduct Code is located at  http://www.edu/SA/VPSA/index..  Academic misconduct is subject to an  academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the  University. the New Professional Chef. 6th Edition.  The code is  available for review online at http://www.    UNIFORM POLICY:    Students will be required to be in full Culinary Uniform to be accepted into class. Professional Cooking.umt.Page |4   ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:    Students are required to adhere to standards of academic integrity.edu/studentaffairs/.    .umt.

Round fish and flat fish  d. Sautéing  e. Fricasseéing  b. j.     V. II.   VI. Smoke roasting  f.   IV. Sautéing  d. Research  b. Poaching  Vegetables  a. Steaming  f. Cephalopods  Variety meats  a. Recipes  Sautéing  Deep‐frying  Puréeing  Pilaf  Risotto  Pasta      VII. Grilling  g. Pan‐frying  c. Liver  b. Clams and oysters  e.  Final comprehensive written and  practical exam dates will be announced at this time.   . and testing dates are to be  delivered and explained the first day of class.   VIII. X. Crustaceans  g. Fabrication and portioning  a. Roasting  e. Meat and game cookery  a. Taste  d. Sanitation  c.  I. Storage of product        Menu   a. Roasting  g. Deep frying  c. Boiling  d. Pan‐frying  f. Sautéing  d.   IX. Pan‐frying  c. Sautéing  d. Kidneys  e. g. En Papillote  e. Doneness  Station organization  a. Stewing  Poultry cookery  a. Mis en place  b. Braising  Starches  a. Grilling  g. Broiling  b. Baking   f. Braising  d. Tripe  Presentation  a. Poultry  c. Roasting  f.Page |5   COURSE OUTLINE:    All weekly plans. Sweet breads  c. Tongue  d. i. Texture  e. Requisitions  d. Buffet project  c. Deep frying  c. Baking  b.   III. Timeliness  b. h. Grilling  e. Temperature  c. Poaching  Fish and shellfish  a. Grilling  b. Meats and game  b. Coordination   d. k. project due dates. Shrimp   f. Broiling  b. Roasting  e. Baking  c. reading assignments.

  Proper utilization of ingredients without waste according to professional  standards.  Temperature.  Timing.  Doneness.  Teamwork. Skills.  Notebook  Method.  Garnish.  point.Page |6 DEMONSTRATED COMPETENCIES:        To earn an A:  90% accomplishment of required competencies. Focal  Mandatory.    COMPETENCY VERIFICATION SHEET (example)    Assignment  Organization   Technique  15%  25%  MEP.  Maintenance of a clean. Requisition. color.  Flavor  profiles. Costs.  Seasoning  Presentation  Sanitation  Total  15%  5%  Balance. Plate  Color.  Professional presentation techniques demonstrating the principals of balance  focal point. production schedules.  Demonstrated leadership skills and teamwork throughout preparation.    To earn a B: 80% accomplishment of required competencies. and plate appropriateness. flow.  All recipes costed to reflect a 33% food cost and the appropriate menu price  applied accordingly.  Timely preparation and submission of product requisition. sanitary work area at all times. Flow. plating  diagrams/photographs.  Cleanliness  Garnish. garnish.                                        Grilling  Roasting  Sautéing  Braising  Stewing  Poaching                                      .  Recipes.  Texture.  Leadership.    To earn a C: 70% accomplishment of required competencies.    Application of organizational “tools” during the preparation process:  Mise en  place sheets.  Utilization  Taste  40%  Taste.  Production  Schedule.  Proficient in demonstrating the technique by accomplishing the recipe assigned. organized. streamlined/personalized recipes.

Page |7 En Papillote  Smoke  Roasting  Mayonnaise  Baking  Steaming  Deep­frying  Pan­frying  Puréeing  Pilaf  Risotto  Fresh Pasta  Dried Pasta  Fabrication  of Meat  Fabrication  of Poultry   Fabrication  of Round  Fish  Fabrication  of Flat Fish  Clams and  Oysters  Fabrication  of  Crustaceans  Fabrication  Cephalopods   Variety  Meats  Station  Organization                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              .

Page |8 Note Book Requirements      Organization and Professional Presentation    • • • • •   Table of contents  Cover page  Index  Dividers  Typed  Content of Note Book    • • • • • • • • • • Recipes  Requisitions  Mise en Place Sheet  Production Schedules  Menus  Photographs  Plate Diagrams  Costed recipes  Competency verification sheet  Notes                          .

    HOURS: 7a. proper cooking temperatures. or by appointment.  Breakfast preparations  and egg cookery are explored.P a g e  | 1    ExN‐7    Culinary Arts  THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY              BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT   FACULTY: Chef Thomas Campbell. body. aroma. flavor.           thomas.–3 p.  The product is evaluated and judged according to  standards of quality.  COURSE SYLLABUS   CUL 158T Short Order  Cookery  Date revised: Spring 2008     . appearance.  Students set up and maintain a fast‐paced  station and utilize appropriate equipment.  and sanitation practices.m.edu          243‐7831   CREDITS: 3    PREREQUISITES:  CUL 151 or consent of instructor.campbell@umontana.    OFFICE:  Culinary Offices.m. and Chef Laura Swanson.  COURSE DESCRIPTION: To introduce a hands‐on approach to various hot  and cold sandwiches and their accompaniments.

 fruits and vegetables as accompaniments to sandwich  presentations  Store eggs properly  Prepare eggs according the competencies listed  Prepare waffles and pancake variations  Prepare cooked and cold breakfast cereals  Cook various breakfast meats  Prepare breakfast compotes.P a g e  | 2      STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES:       Upon completion of this course. syrups. sanitation and  organizational skills. and starches      STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES:    Students will be required to demonstrate daily production assignments requiring  pre‐planning of methodology and recipes. mise en place. flavored butters  Prepare various breakfast potatoes.  Total points earned will be divided by points possible.  All assignments. starches. and a letter grade will  be assigned based on the following:  Evaluation Criteria          Grade Scale        Tests      Notebook    Practical Exam  Daily Production    Student Cher Hillary Tiger Sting Ringo Opra 10 percent  10 percent  20 percent  60 percent    90 – 100    80 – 89    70 – 79         Grade Sheet (example)  Notebook 10 pt         A  B  C  Quiz 1  10 pt Practical Exam Production 20 pt 60 pt Total 100 pt .  professionalism. quality of finished product. projects and tests will be assigned point  values.  Students will be evaluated on teamwork. the student will be able to:    Choose good‐quality breads  Set up an efficient station  Prepare the major types of sandwiches  and breakfast items to order  Prepare and store spreads and fillings for sandwiches  Understand and demonstrate proper portion control  Utilize vegetables.

  Participation points will be granted or denied depending on how the  student exhibits enthusiasm.    DUE DATES:    To receive full credit.    ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:    Students are required to adhere to standards of academic integrity.  If students are  absent for any reason.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production.  Assignments for make‐up  tests will be made only if faculty is notified by voice mail.  The Conduct Code is located at  http://www. and preparedness.edu/studentaffairs/.cfm/page/1321.  Late  assignments will be lowered by 50 percent.  Each missed class will result in a 5‐point deduction from  final points accumulated.P a g e  | 3      ATTENDANCE POLICY:    Attendance will be taken.umt. teamwork.  The code is  available for review online at http://www.  This is  necessary as students contribute to the learning environment and become active  learners by attending class and participating. and assignments.  No late assignments will be accepted  after week 13. interest.    All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code.  Students who read text assignments  prior to class will be equipped to participate and will obtain the most from this  course.    PARTICIPATION:    Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry. or personally prior  to the test. A score of zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed  test. announcements of tests.umt.    All students must practice academic honesty.edu/SA/VPSA/index.  Students should  review The University of Montana Conduct Code regarding their rights and  responsibilities.  Academic misconduct is subject to an  academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the  University. e‐mail.      . they will be accountable for any information disseminated  and be held responsible for class notes. organization.    TESTS:    Tests will be given during the semester as announced. assignments must be submitted by stated due dates.

 Inc. Professional Cooking..    ISBN 0‐471‐43625‐9    SUGGESTED REFERENCE MATERIALS:    Wenzel.    . ISBN  0‐8436‐2135‐4    Reinhold. 6th edition. Wenzel’s Menu Maker. Van Nostrand. John Wiley & Sons. Wayne. ISBN 0‐442‐01961‐0    SUPPLIES:    Standard culinary knife kit.    UNIFORM POLICY:    Students will be required to be in full Culinary Uniform to be accepted into class.    REQUIRED TEXT:     Gissen. 2nd edition. the New Professional Chef.P a g e  | 4    CELL PHONE POLICY:    Cell phones must be turned off prior to class. George Jr.. Van Nostrand Reinhold. 6th edition.

Soft boiled  i. French fries  b. Belgian waffles  h. Scrambled  e. Fresh fruit and vegetables  d. Hash  e. Breakfast accompaniments  a.   Lunch sides  a. Syrups  d. Classic French Omelet  t. Sunny‐side up  g. Deep‐fried sandwiches  e. Mise en place  b. Shirred  l. Hash browns  g. Breakfast cereals and starches  a. Fresh fruits  II. Over medium  c. Buffet project  c. Cinnamon rolls    Breakfast meats   a.  Final comprehensive written and  practical exam dates will be announced at this time. Over hard  d. Relishes and pickles  VIII. Research recipes  b. O’Brian potatoes  h. Granola  b. Fruit pancakes  c. Rolled Omelet    Pancakes . Multi‐Decker sandwiches  d. Crêpes  e. Storage of product        X. Whipped butter  c. Wraps    VII. waffles  and breads  a. Requisitions  d. Fish    IV. Royale  o. Gaufrette potatoes  c. and testing dates are to be  delivered and explained the first day of class. Quiche  p. Hard boiled  k. Toasts and muffins  k. Folded Omelet  v. Open‐faced sandwiches  c. Cream  of wheat  e. Buttermilk pancakes  b. reading assignments. Sandwiches  a.   V. Muesli  c. Flavored butter  b. Ham and bacon  c. Fruit filled waffles  i.  I. Swedish pancakes  f. . Patty and link sausages  b. Grits  f. Lyonnais potatoes    VI. Spanish tortilla  q. French toast  j. Poached  h. Sanitation  c. Sourdough pancakes  g. Custards  m. Station organization  a. Oatmeal  d. Over easy  b. Frittata   r. Egg cookery  a. Breakfast casserole  s. project due dates. Country French Omelet  u. Coordination and  teamwork    III. Compotes  e. Basted  f.  Breakfast and lunch specials    IX. Soufflés  n. Medium boiled  j. Canadian bacon  d.P a g e  | 5      COURSE OUTLINE:    All weekly plans.   Menu   a. Hot and cold sandwiches    b. Whipped cream  f. Stuffed pancakes  d.

  Texture. plating  diagrams/photographs.  Demonstrated leadership skills and teamwork throughout preparation.  Temperature. production schedules.  Timely preparation and submission of product requisition.  Seasoning  Presentation  Sanitation  Total  15%  5%  Balance.  Utilization  Taste  40%  Taste.  Timing. sanitary work area at all times.    To earn a C: 70% accomplishment of required competencies. garnish. streamlined/personalized recipes.  Cleanliness  Garnish.  Doneness.    Over Easy  Over  Medium  Over Hard  Scrambled                                                  .  Flavor  profiles. Plate  Color. Costs.  All recipes costed to reflect a 33% food cost and the appropriate menu price  applied accordingly.  Notebook  Method.P a g e  | 6    DEMONSTRATED COMPETENCIES:    Proficient in demonstrating the technique by accomplishing the recipe assigned.  Garnish.    To earn a B: 80% accomplishment of required competencies.  Professional presentation techniques demonstrating the principals of balance  focal point.  Leadership.  point.    Application of organizational “tools” during the preparation process:  Mise en  place sheets. Focal  Mandatory. organized.  Production  Schedule. Flow.  COMPETENCY VERIFICATION SHEET (breakfast example)    Assignment  Organization   Technique  15%  25%  MEP.        To earn an A:  90% accomplishment of required competencies.  Maintenance of a clean. and plate appropriateness. flow. Requisition.  Teamwork.  Recipes. color. Skills.  Proper utilization of ingredients without waste according to professional  standards.

P a g e  | 7    Basted  Sunny­side  Up  Poached  Soft Boiled  Hard Boiled  Quiche  Royale  Frittata  French  Omelet  Folded  Omelet  Rolled  Omelet  Pancakes  Waffles  Breakfast  Meats  Butters  Syrups   Fruits  Cereals  Potatoes                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Daily Special      .

 Skills.  Cleanliness  Garnish.  Utilization  Taste  40%  Taste.  Garnish.  Recipes.  Seasoning  Presentation  Sanitation  Total  15%  5%  Balance.  Leadership.P a g e  | 8    COMPETENCY VERIFICATION SHEET (lunch example)  Assignment  Organization   Technique  15%  25%  MEP. Requisition.  Doneness.  Temperature.    Hamburgers    Reuben                                                                                                                                                          Monte Cristo    BLT  Club  Cold Sands  Wraps  Open­faced  Submarine  BBQ Sand  Meatball  Sandwich  Pizza and  Calzone  Panini  Meat Salad  Sandwich  Philly Steak                          . Costs.  Teamwork.  Texture. Focal  Mandatory.  Timing. Flow.  Notebook  Method.  point. Plate  Color.  Production  Schedule.  Flavor  profiles.

P a g e  | 9    Taco.  Burrito  Quesadilla  French Dip                                                                                                              Grilled    Vegetable  Grilled    Chicken  French Fries    Gaufrette  Potatoes  Fresh Fruit  Side  Vegetable  Side  Relishes and  Pickles           Note Book Requirements  Organization and Professional Presentation  Table of contents  Cover page  Index  Dividers  Typed    Content of Note Book  • • • • • • • • • • Recipes  Requisitions  Mise en Place Sheet  Production Schedules  Menus  Photographs  Plate Diagrams  Costed recipes  Competency verification sheet  Notes  • • • • • .

 ice carvings as well as banquet and buffet presentation. relishes.Page |1 ExN‐8    Culinary Arts  THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY              BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT   FACULTY: Chef Thomas Campbell. salad  dressings.m. cocktails. side salads. standards of quality.–3 p.  COURSE SYLLABUS     FSM 157T Pantry  and Garde Manger  Date revised: Spring 2008    . dips.edu                                                                                      243‐7831     CREDITS: 3    PREREQUISITES:  CUL 151 or consent of instructor.  pates.  vegetables and fruits.m. cold sauces.           thomas. their general and specific use.    COURSE DESCRIPTION: Identification of a large variety of fresh greens. sausages. mousses.    OFFICE:  Culinary Offices. appetizers.    HOURS: 7a. and Chef Laura Swanson. or by appointment.campbell@umontana.  Also covered are entrée salads. canapés.  preparation and presentation.

 emphasizing safety and  sanitation procedures  Discuss preparation of cold foods. fruits emphasizing on safety  and sanitation procedures  Develop fundamental knife skills in the production of garnishes  Produce decorative centerpieces and ice carvings  Identify and discuss ingredients in the cold kitchen  Identify and discuss cheese and dairy products  Prepare mousses and gelatins    STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES:    Students will be required to demonstrate daily production assignments requiring pre‐ planning of methodology and recipes. terrines.Page |2   STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES:       Upon completion of this course. mise en place. salads. sauces.  relishes. and a letter grade will be  assigned based on the following:    Evaluation Criteria          Grade Scale    Tests      20 percent      90 – 100  A  Projects    20 percent      80 – 89  B  Daily Production  60 percent      70 – 79   C    Grade Sheet (example)    Student Cher Hillary Tiger Sting Ringo Opra Quiz 1  10 pt Quiz 2  10 pt Project 20 pt Production 60 pt Total 100 pt     .  All assignments. quality of finished product. canapés and hors d’oeuvres  Research and develop charcuterie project including canapés. and mousses utilizing aspic techniques  Discuss proper handling and storage of vegetables. relishes. cocktails. sanitation and  organizational skills. projects and tests will be assigned point values. dressings.  professionalism. galantine.   Total points earned will be divided by points possible.  sausages. dips. pates. marinades.  Students will be evaluated on teamwork. the student will be able to:    Identify tools and equipment used in garde manger.

  . teamwork.    ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:    Students are required to adhere to standards of academic integrity.  Each missed class will result in a 5‐point deduction from  final points accumulated.  If students are  absent for any reason.  This is necessary  as students contribute to the learning environment and become active learners by  attending class and participating.  No late assignments will be accepted  after week 13.  The Conduct Code is located at  http://www.edu/SA/VPSA/index.cfm/page/1321. e‐mail.umt.    TESTS:    Tests will be given during the semester as announced.Page |3       ATTENDANCE POLICY:    Attendance will be taken.    PARTICIPATION:    Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry.   Participation points will be granted or denied depending on how the student exhibits  enthusiasm.umt.    All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code.    DUE DATES:    To receive full credit.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production.    All students must practice academic honesty. assignments must be submitted by stated due dates. or personally prior to the  test.  Academic misconduct is subject to an  academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the  University. and assignments. announcements of tests.  Students who read text assignments prior to class  will be equipped to participate and will obtain the most from this course. and preparedness.  Students should  review The University of Montana Conduct Code regarding their rights and  responsibilities.  The code is available  for review online at http://www. A score of zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed test. organization. interest. they will be accountable for any information disseminated and  be held responsible for class notes.edu/studentaffairs/.  Assignments for makeup tests  will be made only if faculty is notified by voice mail.  Late  assignments will be lowered by 50 percent.

 Professional Cooking.   . Storage  c. 6th edition. Tossed Salad  b.    ISBN 0‐471‐43625‐9    SUGGESTED REFERENCE MATERIALS:    Handout from Chef Campbell    Reinhold. Bound Salad  d. Wayne. Fruit Salad        II. and testing dates are to be  delivered and explained the first day of class.    UNIFORM POLICY:    Students will be required to be in full Culinary Uniform to be accepted into class. the New Professional Chef. project due dates. Vegetable Salad  e. John Wiley & Sons. 6th Edition.  I.. Produce  a. Inc. ISBN 0‐442‐01961‐0    SUPPLIES:    Standard culinary knife kit.Page |4     CELL PHONE POLICY:    Cell phones must be turned off prior to class. Quality  b.  Final comprehensive exam date will  be announced at this time. Composed Salad  c. Handling  Types of Salads  a.    REQUIRED TEXT:     Gissen. Van Nostrand. reading assignments.    COURSE OUTLINE:    All weekly plans.

Dressing  Basic Salad Dressings  a. Brunoise  b. Appetizers  b.   V. Garnish  d. Paysanne  Cold Sauces  a. Emulsified Vinaigrette Dressings  Basic Knife Cuts  a.    Pates and Mousses        IX. Body  c. Mayonnaise‐Based Dressings  b.   VI. Base  b.   VII. Canapés    IV. Batonnet  c.  Charcuterie        . Sauce Gribiche  b.   VIII.Page |5   III. Julienne  d. Parts of Salads  a. Tartar Sauce  Hors D’oeuvres  a.

 production schedules.  Demonstrated leadership skills and teamwork throughout preparation.    . flow. organized.  Professional presentation techniques demonstrating the principals of balance  focal point.Page |6   DEMONSTRATED COMPETENCIES:    Proficient in demonstrating the technique by accomplishing the recipe assigned. streamlined/personalized recipes.    Application of organizational “tools” during the preparation process:  Mise en  place sheets. sanitary work area at all times.    To earn a B: 80% accomplishment of required competencies.    To earn a C: 70% accomplishment of required competencies. plating  diagrams/photographs.  Proper utilization of ingredients without waste according to professional  standards.  Maintenance of a clean. color.  Timely preparation and submission of product requisition. garnish.      To earn an A:  90% accomplishment of required competencies. and plate appropriateness.  All recipes costed to reflect a 33% food cost and the appropriate menu price  applied accordingly.

Page |7 COMPETENCY VERIFICATION SHEET (example)    Assignment  Organization   Technique  15%  25%  MEP. Requisition.  Leadership.  Recipes.  Flavor  profiles.  Production  Schedule.  Seasoning  Presentation  Sanitation  Total  15%  5%  Balance.  Temperature. Skills. Plate  Color.                                                                                                                Composed  Salads  Entrée  Salads  Salad Bar  Cold  Appetizers  Hors  d’oeuvres  Canapés  Amuse  Bouche  Plated  Desserts  Frozen  Desserts  Puddings  Custards  Mousses  Pâtés  Galantines  Terrines  Curing and  Smoking  Ice Carving                                                                                                            Platter    Arrangement  .  Teamwork. Costs.  point.  Utilization  Taste  40%  Taste. Focal  Mandatory. Flow.  Timing.  Texture.  Doneness.  Cleanliness  Garnish.  Garnish.  Notebook  Method.

Page |8 Cold Sauces                        Grand Buffet       Organization and Professional Presentation    • Table of contents  • Cover page  • Index  • Dividers  • Typed    Content of Note Book    • Recipes  • Requisitions  • Mise en Place Sheet  • Production Schedules  • Menus  • Photographs  • Plate Diagrams  • Costed recipes  • Competency verification sheet  • Notes                                      Note Book Requirements    .

Page |9       .

and the basic functions of supervisory skills. time management. 5.umt. Demonstrate their ability to apply the concepts discussed in class. delegation. Participate in experiential learning exercises. Discuss often conflicting messages in business ethics and the need for social responsibility.edu Course Description : Management theory. Students Will: 1. Understand the need for balancing a concern for output and a concern for the people who perform the work.larson@mso. Course Objectives: This course will provide the students the knowledge and skills required to effectively manage organizations and human resources. effective communication approaches. 4. Communicate effectively using written and oral techniques. 3. Course Outline . 2. Topics include leadership styles and techniques. decision making. research and the practice of management.ExN-9 The University of Montana – Missoula College of Technology Course Syllabus Course Number and Title: BUS 243T Psychology of Management & Supervision Date Revised: Spring 2008 Semester Credits: 4 Contact Hours: 60 Prerequisites: None Faculty: Brian Larson Chair Business Technology Department Director Business Management Office: AD11G Phone: (406)243-7823 E-Mail: brian.

Exercising control over people and processes b. Selecting the best prospects Training and Developing Employees a. Challenges for decision makers b. Defined b. X. XIII. XIV. Coping with uncertainty b. Leadership and motivation Employee Safety and health under OSHA Management’s Role in Labor relations The Nature of Management a. V. XII. VIII. Factors in learning Appraisal of Employee Performance a. Problem performance “Unhiring” Employees Motivating Employees a.I. A student may not pass this course if the final exam is not taken on the assigned date. Performance evaluations b. special projects and assigned work. Ethical dimension of Management Planning and Decision Making a. Grading: Students’ final grade will be based upon cumulative quiz/test scores. XV. III. Motivational Theory b. Please refer to your schedule book for final schedules. Making decisions c. Managing information and solving problems Staffing with Human Resources a. Forecasting workforce requirements b. Essentials of planning Decision Making and Creative Problem Solving a. Students who are absent from class when a quiz . IV. Orientation b. case studies. Planning & Control a. Unless special circumstances exist. students will receive no credit for assigned work turned in after the due date. XI. Effective Vs efficient use of resources Management’s Social and Ethical Responsibilities a. Interviewing job applicants c. IX. Quizzes may be given announced or unannounced. Definition’s and perspectives b. VII. VI. Programmed Vs nonprogrammed decisions Organizational Cultures Group Dynamics and Teamwork Influence Processes and Leadership II.

If receiving a call. some assignments may require visiting area businesses. (I. and makeup is not practical. or dropping after scheduled deadline. Please be courteous of your classmates. Students who miss group activities that are graded may not receive credit. 2. The student has a legitimate reason for missing the class when the quiz is administered. These activities can be an advantage to the businesses as well as and . A B C D F Cell phones / Pagers: As a general rule. unique circumstances require their use. you must follow the following criteria. Missed notes must be obtained through an in class student as I cannot provide students with missed notes or overhead transparencies. you may not leave the room during a quiz. mailbox. You may NOT use another student to communicate your absence. Assignments are due at the beginning of next class time unless otherwise stated. Missed handouts may be obtained from me. 2. Outside work makes up a large portion of your grade and should not be ignored. 4. emergencies. or interviewing business leaders. Incomplete Grades: An “I” incomplete grade will not be given for not doing well in the course. However. 3. The make-up test must be taken prior to the next class unless extended illness or legitimate reason is indicated. Make-up quizzes: Make up quizzes will ONLY be allowed if the student meets the following criteria: 1.is announced will not be excused from the quiz when it is administered. health. Should this policy create routine distractions. If they are not required. It remains the students responsibility to obtain information missed if absent. and course section number. please turn them off. Outside Class Work: Assignments. If possible. Grading Scale: 90-100% 80-89% 70-79% 69-64% <63% Missed Notes/Assignments: It remains the students’ responsibility to obtain lecture notes and assignments that are missed. The student contacts me PRIOR to the quiz being administered. (You are responsible for notes missed) Due to testing standards. Do not conduct your conversation in class. to some students. use the vibrating mode or turn the ring volume to its lowest setting. case studies and special projects will be assigned throughout the semester. Many of these activities are based upon group interaction. via telephone/voice mail. 1. Field/Lab Assignments (If applicable): In order to facilitate experiential learning. 3. These assignments are the sole responsibility of the student and will not be accepted late. leave the room quietly. this policy will be changed to ban their use during class. Cell phones MUST be turned off. absolute business necessity) If you absolutely require their use. This may be done by direct face-to-face contact. A positive learning environment will be maintained.e. cell phones and pagers are inappropriate during class times. and include the student’s name. test or exam. conducting observations. All assignments are expected to be typed.

Academic Integrity: All Students must practice academic honesty. Disability Accommodation: Eligible students with disabilities will receive appropriate accommodations in this course when requested during the beginning of the course. Because of these factors.economic hardship should customer traffic or purchasing be affected. Never use inappropriate language. The code is available for review online at http://www. *It is a privilege for us to learn from these businesses and not take them for granted. and your education can be adversely affected. It is possible that another source may not have accurate or complete information pertaining to a question you may have. 6. Do not create additional work for business personnel. 3. All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code. Do not visit locations in groups of more than 3. our reputation. Please speak with me after class or in my office. Please return it to the appropriate location. You may be required to provide accommodation requirements from your DSS coordinator. Please do not wait to identify accommodation requirements. Additionally. 2. . If you remove an item from inventory. Be courteous and thank the business for their time and efforts. You may call me or e-mail me with your questions.edu/SA/VPSA/index. I will do everything possible to make this course a positive learning experience.cfm/page/1321. Dress appropriately – you represent the best our college offers. 1. I will answer these as soon as possible. the following guidelines should be followed. Keep noise and distractions to a minimum. 7. Larger groups create traffic barriers that impact customer purchasing. You may also make an appointment with me should this be required. 4. Academic misconduct is subject to an academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the University. Questions or Concerns: I encourage you to contact me with any concerns or questions.umt.

Arts crt 1999-2000 1 466 11 2 156 4 3 33 36 1998-1999 cohort 2000-2001 1 471 12 2 188 4 3 39.2005 report = 2002-2003 start date cohort Column 2 .0 .2000 report = 1997-98 start date cohort 2000 .65 30.2001 report = 1998-99 start date cohort 2001 .# of students by program who started 3 years previously to report year 1999 .5 2000-2001 cohort Report Year Column # TOTALS Cul.2002 report = 1999-2000 start date cohort 2002 .2004 report = 2001-2002 start date cohort 2004 .% of students who completed within 3 years 1997-1998 cohort Report Year Column # TOTALS Cul.# of students who completed within 3 years Column 3 .Culinary Arts 3-Year Graduation Rates from Perkins Annual Reports Three-year Completion Rates by Program These are program graduation rates of students graduating within 3 years of their start dates as reported in the annual reports to the state Perkins program office.723 0 2001-2002 cohort 2003-2004 1 495 10 2 167 1 3 33.333 1999-2000 cohort 2001/2002 1 552 16 2 220 10 3 39.737 10 2002-2003 cohort 2004-2005 1 492 10 2 200 3 3 40. Arts crt 2002-2003 1 437 5 2 178 0 3 40.85 62. Column 1 .915 33.2003 report = 2000-2001 start date cohort 2003 .

2003-2004 cohort Report Year Column # TOTALS Cul. Arts crt 2005-2006* 1 440 15 2 161 4 3 36.59 26.10 20 2005-2006 cohort 2007-2008 1 2 3 .67 2004-2005 cohort 2006-2007 1 455 15 2 187 3 3 41.

 after that need to revised within  the documents that are attached. August 07. we might as well wait until editing is completed.  Nina Broshar will be the contact person for any  information you may find. Stocking.g.  review.  Department  of  Education. Nina Cc: Larson. punctuation. Sent: Friday.  So.  administrative  action). Thomas L. Brian.S. I attempted to answer with comments. 2008 2:18 PM To: Walker-Andrews. Stocking.  U. August 08.    Attached is the revised ExlistChecklist with all my revisions referenced.  inquiry. Arlene Cc: Broshar. explain:     Tom  From: Campbell. will you follow‐up with her?  She is working on it and maybe she can e‐mail  some information.      Has the institution been denied or lost accreditation by any accrediting agency?    Is  any  action  pending  (e.  You might use this to locate my  changes. anything you may have done with fonts.  grand  jury. Brian.    Tom  From: Campbell.  Thanks for helping with this. Thomas L.     Per our phone conversation below is The American Culinary Federation Foundation Accrediting  Commission’s request for lost or denied accreditation.     I’ve completed all the updates as I can.  I did not change any  page numbers in the document or table of contents. Lynn C Subject: Verification of denied accreditaiton   Hello.g. Nina.  federal  or  state  court.  by  an  court  or  administrative  body  (e.  or  has  action  been  taken. Sent: Thursday.  243‐4689.    I spoke with Dr.From: Campbell.  special  investigator.  Where there were questions. August 08.  I think you should make these changes so we don’t get them mixed  up.  We may have a problem because I used the first set of updates  you sent.  I’ve left Lynn’s original edited report for reference and a couple more exhibits that need to be  added to the exhibit notebooks. Thomas L.   Let me know if you need anything. 2008 2:19 PM To: Broshar.  as  to  the  institution  that is not otherwise disclosed in this application?          If so.  Thanks.  court  action.  audit. 2008 10:20 AM . Lynn C Subject: Self-study updates   Hi Nina.  If I’m not around. Walker‐Andrews (Provost’s Office) to respond with verification of paragraph four in the  Foreword. etc. Sent: Friday. Larson.  or  any  state  agency).

August 07.      Early on last month when I was preparing the staff standards section of the self‐study. If these are not available. Stocking. Thomas L.. Please provide for me all the recruitment documents. MT 59801 406.  Also it would be easy to delete if he was not hired (before  the report goes to the Provost).  It is evident that he will not be hired.To: Stocking. I included the bio  of Robert Wood with the possibility that he would be hired.243. July 28.stocking@umontana. 2008 10:38 AM  To: Larson. Associate Dean The University of Montana College of Technology in Missoula 909 South Avenue West Missoula. 2008 8:18 AM To: Larson. otherwise explain how this hiring could have happened or where in the recruitment process you/we currently operating--really. After reviewing the self-study report for the Culinary Arts program(s). Campbell. I see that we have hired Robert Wood as a new faculty member.I can come in  Thursday morning if need be. etc.. Lynn C Sent: Thursday.     I'm trying to be out of town for a couple weeks after Wednesday. Brian  Subject: RE: Culinary Self Study    Hi Brian.  . for my review.    Tom    From: Stocking. ☺ Lynn Lynn C. Barry Subject: Program Faculty Recruitment???? Importance: High Brian and Tom. and I will  make the changes accordingly. at least for fall semester.7801 lynn.     I’m so sorry for the confusion. Brian.  This was an effort to not have to go back  and re‐do this portion in the event of his hire. approval to hire. Thomas L..edu     ‐‐‐‐‐Original Message‐‐‐‐‐  From: Campbell. Lynn C Subject: RE: Program Faculty Recruitment???? Hi Lynn.   Sent: Monday.  I had addressed this in the body of the e‐mail sent with the self‐study  attachments. Cc: Good. or at least I thought so.

Thomas L. Brian Cc: Good. Sent: Friday.  Please let me know if you need  anything. Nina  Subject: Culinary Self Study     From: Campbell. but one never knows what may happen between then and now. Thomas L. Lynn C.    Thomas Campbell. Barry. 2008 5:15 PM To: Larson. 2008 8:27 PM  To: Campbell.  5. Broshar. Nina has the hard copy of the report to be signed and payment made.  Cc: Good. Brian  Cc: Good. Brian   Sent: Sunday. Business Management  The University of Montana ‐ Missoula  College of Technology  (406)243‐7823  brian. Brandy can  set something up for us. The attachment ExlistChecklist identifies the remaining work. Lynn C. She also has the exhibits if you need to see them. Stocking. Nina Subject: Culinary Self Study   Hi all.  Sent: Fri 7/25/2008 5:14 PM  To: Larson. CEC    . Nina  Subject: RE: Culinary Self Study    Thanks Tom ~     Let's try to get together (If possible) Thur or Friday of this week.  3. Barry.  There are a few explanations:    1. Stocking. Broshar.  I’ll remove it before the  end.  4. Thomas L. I had to divide Section 4 into A and B because it is too large to attach.  2. Business Technology  Director.larson@umontana. July 27. Stocking. Barry.    Brian Larson  Department Chair.  I know you are busy but the deadline for mailing is August 25th. Broshar. I included Robert Wood in the report thinking he would be on board. July 25.edu        ‐‐‐‐‐Original Message‐‐‐‐‐  From: Campbell.  ‐‐‐‐‐Original Message‐‐‐‐‐  From: Larson. Lynn C.     It’s almost complete!  There are just a few exhibits that need to come in but the report is ready for your  review.  They are way too cumbersome to lug around.

  I’ve e‐mailed copies of the report to Brian. Sent: Monday. Sent: Friday. July 21.     Anything you can give me will be a great help.  I’ll contact Kathy as well.net] Sent: Friday. Thomas L. Barry and Lynn for review  but asked them to see the exhibits which I’ll leave with you.  Attached you will find graduate  and employer surveys that need to be sent to those folks. 2008 9:54 AM To: tdcampbell@blackfoot.    Tom    From: Tom and Donna Campbell [mailto:tdcampbell@blackfoot. 2008 7:30 AM To: Thomas Campbell Subject: FW: Accredition   Forward    From: Kleinjan. 2008 9:51 AM To: Campbell.From: Campbell.  See you on Monday.    Tom  From: Campbell.edu] Sent: Thursday. 2008 8:54 AM To: Kleinjan.  Thanks.     I’m almost finished!  There are still a few exhibits that need tending to.  The current list of exhibits shows what is left. Thomas L.Kleinjan@mso. is there such a  thing as placement statistics (ExU)?  I will have the hard copy of the report to you on Monday so that it  can be signed and money readied.  I’ve included as many students as I have  information on and a list of employers.net Subject: FW: Accredition   From: Kleinjan. Rick [mailto:Rick. July 25. Rick Subject: FW: Accredition   Thanks Rick.umt. Rick Sent: Thursday. July 17. Thomas L. July 17. . Nina Subject: Self study   HI Nina. Subject: RE: Accredition   Tom. July 18. 2008 4:43 PM To: Broshar.

     Culinary is undergoing it’s five‐year ACF accreditation self‐study and I could use your help. 2008 4:49 PM To: Kleinjan.     Will you please review the attached section for accuracy. Brian. We have no contract as such. Sent: Wednesday. The PM is done on a annual schedule or semi annual depending on what it is and if we can get in the kitchen to do the work. Gallagher.  One of the  most important areas is facilities.   They added a new wrinkle this time around and maybe you can explain how the University  handles the following: Evidence that the physical facility meets fire and safety standards (copy of certificate (s) of insurance showing all coverage carried by the school/institution e.     Tom      From: Campbell. I have a list of what we try to get done if that would help. fire  maintenance.  If you have any information (forms. preventative maintenance. July 16. title page of insurance certificate. July 16. You could try calling Kathy Benson at 2700. Sent: Wednesday. Cec Subject: Culinary self study   Hi.  Thanks.  It was written five years ago and some things  need updating. Where might I find this insurance stuff?  Thanks. Rick From: Campbell.  Identified in red are specific areas that need changed or provided. This is a State owned building and covered by Tort Claims in Helena. we just call them when the hoods need clean and the links in the hoods are changed out or checked every 6 months by the same contractor. Thomas L. We are on their list for semi-annual service. Rick Cc: Larson.    Tom              . contracts with hood cleaners.I can get you copies of the invoices from the cleaning & hood fire maintenance from the past year. etc.g. Brian Subject: Accredition   Hi Rick. 2008 5:16 PM To: Larson.) would you e‐mail them to me or I can come by and get a  copy. she handles all the insurance for UM. Thomas L.

Thomas L.     I am in the process of writing the Culinary Self‐study report and need your help.From: Campbell.  The ACF is all about verification of everything and we can  avoid undue ramifications with the initial report if they are provided. July 04. July 01. Sent: Friday.     Today I received the newest version of the ACF accreditation template and they had a few additions  which will affect our tasks.  Mostly it is the very  important job of finding documentation.  I also  changed some boxes to √. Thomas L. 2008 11:48 AM To: Broshar.    Thanks    Tom  .  I’ve outlined these  documentations on a checklist (attached) and you might see that some are repetitious and some we  might not even have.    Tom      From: Campbell.net or 244‐0158.      Anyway I know there will be many questions and I won’t be at work unless necessary. Nina Cc: Larson.  With your help I’m confident we’ll be able to meet this date so it can be reviewed by our  administration with enough time to submit it to the ACF by September. 2008 2:34 PM To: Broshar.  Please review the attachment…you should see revisions and additions in red print.S. Brian Subject: ACF Self Study   Hi Nina.   The site visit I will plan in  October which will give us enough time to write a follow‐up report (I’m hoping we won’t need to ) by  the December 1st  accreditation deadline.     P.  plan to work from home so let’s communicate at tdcampbell@blackfoot.  I do therefore. indicating they are completed.  Attached for your perspective of the report is an ACF Accreditation review  I just completed with Walla Walla Community College and you’ll be acquainted with exactly what must  be reported.      My goal is to complete this report by the end of July and I’ll be working on the other aspects of the  exhibits as well as writing the report.  We’re fortunate to be able to refer and merely update the 2004  report.   We’ll need to just work through the deficiencies and I know no one else who can  produce them as well as you.  I’ll keep you posted on the progress.  The other attachments are the “big picture”. Thanks and let me know if you have any  questions.  I revised your checklist to accommodate these changes plus some other  details. Sent: Tuesday. Nina Cc: Larson. Brian Subject: Culinary Self-study Report   Hi Nina.

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All students must be trained in the safe operation of all kitchen equipment and demonstrate proper operation before using the item for production. This form must be signed and dated by the student and faculty upon student’s demonstration of operation. This form will be kept in program director’s and student’s file as an exhibit of proper safety training. Star Burners Fryer Hobart Mixer Hobart Slicer Ice Cream Machine Kitchen Aide Mixer Knives.3. Hand Tools Varimixer .Culinary Arts Equipment Safety Training Verification Sheet ACF Standard 6. Course Name and Number: _______________ Faculty: _______________________ Student: ___________________________ Semester: _________________________ EQUIPMENT DATE FACULTY SIGNATURE STUDENT SIGNATURE Buffalo Chopper Combi-Steamer Oven Convection Oven Deck Oven Dish Machine Disposer Emersion Blender Flat Top.

Culinary Arts Equipment Safety Training Verification Sheet ACF Standard 6. This form will be kept in student’s file as an exhibit of proper safety training.3. Star Burners Fryer Hobart Mixer Hobart Slicer Ice Cream Machine Kitchen Aide Mixer Knives. Hand Tools Varimixer . and Sauces Faculty: Chef Lodahl Semester: _______________________ Student: ___________________________ EQUIPMENT DATE FACLUTY SIGNITURE STUDENT SIGNITURE Buffalo Chopper Combi-Steamer Oven Convection Oven Deck Oven Dish Machine Disposer Emersion Blender Flat Top. Stocks. CUL 160T Soups. All students must be trained in the safe operation of all kitchen equipment and demonstrate proper operation before using the item for production. This form must be signed and dated by the student and faculty upon student’s demonstration of operation and initialed by the course chef instructor.

This form must be signed and dated by the student and faculty upon student’s demonstration of operation and initialed by the course chef instructor. Star Burners Fryer Hobart Mixer Hobart Slicer Ice Cream Machine Kitchen Aide Mixer Knives.Culinary Arts Equipment Safety Training Verification Sheet ACF Standard 6. All students must be trained in the safe operation of all kitchen equipment and demonstrate proper operation before using the item for production. This form will be kept in student’s file as an exhibit of proper safety training. CUL 162T Storeroom Procedures Faculty: Chef Lodahl Semester: _______________________ Student: ___________________________ EQUIPMENT DATE FACLUTY SIGNITURE STUDENT SIGNITURE Buffalo Chopper Combi-Steamer Oven Convection Oven Deck Oven Dish Machine Disposer Emersion Blender Flat Top. Hand Tools Varimixer .3.

All students must be trained in the safe operation of all kitchen equipment and demonstrate proper operation before using the item for production. Star Burners Fryer Hobart Mixer Hobart Slicer Ice Cream Machine Kitchen Aide Mixer Knives. This form must be signed and dated by the student and faculty upon student’s demonstration of operation and initialed by the course chef instructor.3. Hand Tools Varimixer . This form will be kept in student’s file as an exhibit of proper safety training.Culinary Arts Equipment Safety Training Verification Sheet ACF Standard 6. CUL 157T Pantry and Garde Manger Faculty: Chef Wakley Semester: _______________________ Student: ___________________________ EQUIPMENT DATE FACLUTY SIGNITURE STUDENT SIGNITURE Buffalo Chopper Combi-Steamer Oven Convection Oven Deck Oven Dish Machine Disposer Emersion Blender Flat Top.

This form will be kept in student’s file as an exhibit of proper safety training. Star Burners Fryer Hobart Mixer Hobart Slicer Ice Cream Machine Kitchen Aide Mixer Knives. Hand Tools Varimixer .3. CUL 158T Short Order Cookery Faculty: Chef Wakley Semester: _______________________ Student: ___________________________ EQUIPMENT DATE FACLUTY SIGNITURE STUDENT SIGNITURE Buffalo Chopper Combi-Steamer Oven Convection Oven Deck Oven Dish Machine Disposer Emersion Blender Flat Top.Culinary Arts Equipment Safety Training Verification Sheet ACF Standard 6. This form must be signed and dated by the student and faculty upon student’s demonstration of operation and initialed by the course chef instructor. All students must be trained in the safe operation of all kitchen equipment and demonstrate proper operation before using the item for production.

This form must be signed and dated by the student and faculty upon student’s demonstration of operation and initialed by the course chef instructor. This form will be kept in student’s file as an exhibit of proper safety training.Culinary Arts Equipment Safety Training Verification Sheet ACF Standard 6.3. Star Burners Fryer Hobart Mixer Hobart Slicer Ice Cream Machine Kitchen Aide Mixer Knives. Hand Tools Varimixer . CUL 156T Dining Room Procedures Faculty: Chef Wakley Semester: _______________________ Student: ___________________________ EQUIPMENT DATE FACLUTY SIGNITURE STUDENT SIGNITURE Buffalo Chopper Combi-Steamer Oven Convection Oven Deck Oven Dish Machine Disposer Emersion Blender Flat Top. All students must be trained in the safe operation of all kitchen equipment and demonstrate proper operation before using the item for production.

Hand Tools Varimixer .Culinary Arts Equipment Safety Training Verification Sheet ACF Standard 6. Star Burners Fryer Hobart Mixer Hobart Slicer Ice Cream Machine Kitchen Aide Mixer Knives.3. This form will be kept in student’s file as an exhibit of proper safety training. This form must be signed and dated by the student and faculty upon student’s demonstration of operation and initialed by the course chef instructor. All students must be trained in the safe operation of all kitchen equipment and demonstrate proper operation before using the item for production. CUL FSM 271 Menu Layout and Design Faculty: ____________________ Student: ___________________________ EQUIPMENT DATE FACLUTY SIGNITURE STUDENT SIGNITURE Semester: _______________________ Buffalo Chopper Combi-Steamer Oven Convection Oven Deck Oven Dish Machine Disposer Emersion Blender Flat Top.

Star Burners Fryer Hobart Mixer Hobart Slicer Ice Cream Machine Kitchen Aide Mixer Knives. This form will be kept in student’s file as an exhibit of proper safety training. This form must be signed and dated by the student and faculty upon student’s demonstration of operation and initialed by the course chef instructor.3.Culinary Arts Equipment Safety Training Verification Sheet ACF Standard 6. Hand Tools Varimixer . All students must be trained in the safe operation of all kitchen equipment and demonstrate proper operation before using the item for production. CUL 151T Introduction to Foods Faculty: Chef Campbell Semester: _______________________ Student: ___________________________ EQUIPMENT DATE FACLUTY SIGNITURE STUDENT SIGNITURE Buffalo Chopper Combi-Steamer Oven Convection Oven Deck Oven Dish Machine Disposer Emersion Blender Flat Top.

Culinary Arts Equipment Safety Training Verification Sheet ACF Standard 6. Star Burners Fryer Hobart Mixer Hobart Slicer Ice Cream Machine Kitchen Aide Mixer Knives. This form will be kept in student’s file as an exhibit of proper safety training. All students must be trained in the safe operation of all kitchen equipment and demonstrate proper operation before using the item for production. FSM 280T Nutritional Cooking Faculty: Chef Campbell Semester: _______________________ Student: ___________________________ EQUIPMENT DATE FACLUTY SIGNITURE STUDENT SIGNITURE Buffalo Chopper Combi-Steamer Oven Convection Oven Deck Oven Dish Machine Disposer Emersion Blender Flat Top. Hand Tools Varimixer . This form must be signed and dated by the student and faculty upon student’s demonstration of operation and initialed by the course chef instructor.3.

3. This form will be kept in student’s file as an exhibit of proper safety training. This form must be signed and dated by the student and faculty upon student’s demonstration of operation and initialed by the course chef instructor. Hand Tools Varimixer . All students must be trained in the safe operation of all kitchen equipment and demonstrate proper operation before using the item for production.Culinary Arts Equipment Safety Training Verification Sheet ACF Standard 6. Star Burners Fryer Hobart Mixer Hobart Slicer Ice Cream Machine Kitchen Aide Mixer Knives. CUL 165T Baking and Pastry Faculty: _______________________ Student: ___________________________ EQUIPMENT DATE FACLUTY SIGNITURE STUDENT SIGNITURE Semester: _______________________ Buffalo Chopper Combi-Steamer Oven Convection Oven Deck Oven Dish Machine Disposer Emersion Blender Flat Top.

FSM 275 Patisserie Faculty: _____________________ Student: ___________________________ EQUIPMENT DATE FACLUTY SIGNITURE STUDENT SIGNITURE Semester: _______________________ Buffalo Chopper Combi-Steamer Oven Convection Oven Deck Oven Dish Machine Disposer Emersion Blender Flat Top.Culinary Arts Equipment Safety Training Verification Sheet ACF Standard 6. This form will be kept in student’s file as an exhibit of proper safety training. Hand Tools Varimixer . All students must be trained in the safe operation of all kitchen equipment and demonstrate proper operation before using the item for production.3. Star Burners Fryer Hobart Mixer Hobart Slicer Ice Cream Machine Kitchen Aide Mixer Knives. This form must be signed and dated by the student and faculty upon student’s demonstration of operation and initialed by the course chef instructor.

This form must be signed and dated by the student and faculty upon student’s demonstration of operation and initialed by the course chef instructor. This form will be kept in student’s file as an exhibit of proper safety training. FSM 290T Internshipsd Faculty: ____________________ Student: ___________________________ EQUIPMENT DATE FACLUTY SIGNITURE STUDENT SIGNITURE Semester: _______________________ Buffalo Chopper Combi-Steamer Oven Convection Oven Deck Oven Dish Machine Disposer Emersion Blender Flat Top.Culinary Arts Equipment Safety Training Verification Sheet ACF Standard 6.3. All students must be trained in the safe operation of all kitchen equipment and demonstrate proper operation before using the item for production. Star Burners Fryer Hobart Mixer Hobart Slicer Ice Cream Machine Kitchen Aide Mixer Knives. Hand Tools Varimixer .

Culinary Arts Equipment Safety Training Verification Sheet .

plated desserts. Deadline for judgment is 10:00 a. The student should utilize lab time to investigate what theme and items to prepare for this test. trays. Students will be judged the entire week.e. Diagram of the display List of platters. the last day of class.m. but not limited to help or instruction. to be used Requisition of specialty products keeping in mind to stay within lab parameters in terms of product ♦ Recipes ♦ Production schedule for week eight ♦ Utilization of various baking & pastry preparation techniques Evaluation criteria will be as follows: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Degree of difficulty Originality Flavor profile Balance of textures Balance of colors Balance of shapes Proper doneness Demonstrated baking & pastry techniques Appropriateness of theme Sanitation Cleanliness Mise en place and organization Proper utilization of time Proper utilization of product . Bread display. etc. The blueprint for this project is due Monday of week five. This exam represents 20% of the grade for the class. specialty cakes.College of Technology Culinary Arts Baking CUL 265T FINAL PROJECT/PRACTICAL EXAM Students should be prepared to utilize all their skills to present their best effort towards the exhibition of bakery and pasty goods the last week of this course. The blueprint should include: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ A designated theme i. etc. baskets. bowls. The student will have all of week eight for preparation.

indicates defect. simple Aroma Subtle Surface should appear moist. straightforward Bouillon. not soft. Cuisson and natural conformity. simple Aroma Subtle Visible Texture Smooth Natural Conformity Tactile Texture Moist tender interior Appearance Moist Surface STEAMING Subtly flavored with May smell of Court simple. Extremely dry surface Meat displays smooth toughness or dryness indicates defect. Aromatics cooking liquid and main item Defect Causes Flavor Subtle. Moist tender interior. straightforward Bouillon. Surface should appear moist/. simple. Bouillon. toughness or dryness Extremely dry surface appeal of aromatics. be brighter than in raw state Roughness of Meat Toughness or Dryness Grey Albumen Showing Fibers High heat of cooking High heat of cooking High heat of cooking Overcooking Prolonged holding Prolonged holding Prolonged holding Visible Texture Smooth Natural Conformity Tactile Texture Moist tender interior Appearance Moist Surface EN Subtly flavored with PAPILLOTE simple. Aromatics indicates defect . simple POACHING Aroma Subtle Visible Texture Smooth Natural Conformity Tactile Texture Moist tender interior Appearance Moist Surface Subtly flavored with May smell of Court Moist tender interior. main item Roughness of Meat Toughness or Dryness Grey Albumen Showing Defect Fibers High heat of cooking. Extremely dry surface natural conformity. Roughness of meat Aromatics indicates defect. raw. indicates defect. Cuisson and appeal of aromatics. straightforward May smell of Court Meat displays smooth Moist tender interior Surface should appear moist. Cuisson and Meat displays smooth toughness or dryness appeal of aromatics. Meat should natural conformity. appear slightly more pale than Roughness of meat Vegetables should be fibers indicate defect.Cooking Methods Quality Standards Guide Flavor Subtle. cooking liquid and fibers indicate defect. cooking liquid and indicates defect main item Roughness of Meat Toughness or Dryness Grey Albumen Showing Defect Fibers High heat of cooking High heat of cooking High heat of cooking Low acidity of court bouillon Causes Overcooking Prolonged holding Prolonged holding Prolonged holding Flavor Subtle. High heat of cooking High heat of cooking Causes Overcooking Prolonged holding Prolonged holding Prolonged holding 101 A . Vegetable colors should turgid.

Extremely dry or Rubbery or rough of main item natural conformity smoke indicates a texture indicates over-charred surface are defects. depth and contribute to an richness.Flavor Distinctly Smokey Aroma Smokey but balanced Visible Texture Smooth Natural Conformity Tactile Texture Well developed Crust. Poultry. slightly charred to enhance flavor is expected. Pale Properly roasted foods natural muscle. tender interior. Deep and rich Aroma Smokey balanced with aroma of main item Visible Texture Smooth Natural Conformity of Muscle Tactile Texture Moist. The darker the meat. Overpowering of the Well-developed Crust. Chicken and Fish carbonized taste is a should be a deep brown color. well-done moist. Proper richness browness will result in appropriate depth of flavor Defect Meat displays smooth Golden brown exterior. Deep brown crosshatch marks Smokey aroma item’s natural flavor Moist. Roasted foods to over-contracting of meats will appear moist. depth and flavor. the darker balanced with aroma Meat displays smooth due to excessive the exterior. defect. overall sensation of Aroma should fullness. Bitter of defect. tender interior Appearance Moist Surface GRILLING BROILING Distinctly smoky flavor. Properly will be tender and Unnatural shape due selected and prepared. defect. not mask main item’s flavor. Meats. Marinade or glaze should support. Slice evenly against the meats color is a defect also grain Dark brown to black color Contracted sinews Unnatural shape Overcooking Prolonged holding Pale exterior Dry surface of sliced meats Dark Brown color Overcooking High cooking heat Prolonged holding Tough texture Overcooking Prolonged holding Causes 101 B . tender crisp skin contrasting meat Appearance Golden Brown Exterior ROASTING Flavor should contribute to an Rich roasted aroma. Roughness of Meat Extremely Dry Surface Fibers Rubbery Texture Black Color Defect Protruding Meat Rough Texture Over-charred Fibers High heat of cooking. Surface should appear moist. exterior indicates defect. Moist. Dry skin should be a crisp sinew shows defect. Color has a overall sensation of direct bearing on the fullness. Overcooking and Overcooking Causes Overcooking Cooling too rapidly Prolonged holding Prolonged holding Prolonged holding Flavor Full. surface of sliced meats is a contrast with the Dark Brown to black defect.

Natural muscle conformity Unnatural shape or cupping Roughness or protruding fibers Poor selection of meat item containing sinew. appear brighter than raw coatings of breaded Items are cut uniformly items always crisp ensuring doneness Excess oil coating Items swimming in sauce Limp raw vegetables Over and Undercooking Browning darker than golden brown Inconsistent item sizing Overcooking. Softened connective tissue.Flavor Aroma Visible Texture Complex. indicates proper initial step of Softened connective technique tissue. smooth natural conformity of muscle Unnatural shape or cupping Roughness or protruding fibers Poor selection of meat item containing sinew. Dryness and Defect Roughness Causes Tactile Texture Tender and moist Appearance Brown or Golden Smooth. straightforward appeal balanced with aroma of main item Defect Causes Flavor Flavorful Exterior Proper browning intensifies flavor STIR FRYING Aroma Subtle Caramelized Subtle caramelized aroma balanced with main item and peanut when used Defect Tactile Texture Appearance Crisp Vegetables and Sauce is enough only to Coatings coat item not drench Meat items should appear slightly more pale than raw Main items such as vegetable colors should vegetables are crisp. Fork-Tender Tough texture Dryness Dryness Cooked too far in advance Lack of braising liquid during Held too long Lack of braising liquid cooking or finishing defect Held at high temperature Overcooking Visible Texture Moist finish Smooth. SAUTÉING Aroma Subtle. Fork-Tender Tough texture Dryness Cooked too far in advance Held too long Held at high temperature Overcooking Appearance Brown or Golden Red Meats-Deep Brown Exterior. item torn from pan Visible Texture Pebbled or Corduroy Look Crisp and delicate crust. Caramelized Simple. Prolonged holding Old Oil Causes 101 C . Moist finish concentrated Caramelized STEWING Complex and Complex and BRAISING Sauce or braising liquid concentrated flavor concentrated aroma always needed to not possible with not possible from provide moist finish other techniques other techniques. Subtle. White Meats: Veal Pork & Poultry: Amber or gold exterior Pronounced Pale or Gray coloration Pronounced Dark Coloration Weak Coloration indicates: Low temperature sautéing Pan overcrowding Too Dark Coloration indicates: Overcooking Prolonged Holding Flavor Flavorful Exterior Flavorful exterior. Proper browning intensifies flavor. suave and Seared or browned exterior meltingly tender. item torn from pan Tactile Texture Tender and moist Smooth. suave and meltingly tender.

Insufficient Mop. flavorful and crisp while interior is evenly moist and flavorful in its own right Skin should appear crisp and contrasting the meat Dry Black color Too Pale Smoke Smudge Excessive Charring Overcooked. interior is evenly moist . item torn from pan Tactile Texture Crisp and light Appearance Golden Brown Exterior Items and coatings Red Meats – Deep brown exterior. Brine or basting medium Golden Brown exterior slightly charred is acceptable Well developed color BARBECUE Defect Dry Rough excessively charred texture Overcooked. tender and Golden Brown slightly Charred Moist . straightforward appeal balanced with aroma of main item Visible Texture Pebbled or Corduroy Look Crisp and delicate crust Unnatural shape or cupping Roughness or protruding fibers Poor selection of meat item containing sinew. Exterior is highly flavored. should appear crisp. Overly pale color Pale Blotches Low Oil temperature Coating too thick Fryer Overcrowding Causes Flavor Full Deep and Rich Flavor should contribute to an overall sensation of fullness depth and richness. coated items should appear crisp and light Heavy taste Low Quality of Oil Low Frying Temperature Extreme Gray or Pale Weak colors PAN FRYING Defect Causes Low Oil temperature Too thick coating Overcrowding Flavor Clean Item flavor Product should taste like the food being fried not the oil used Defect DEEP FRYING Aroma Subtle Caramelized Simple. straightforward appeal balanced with aroma of main item Visible Texture Pebbled or Corduroy Look Crisp and delicate crust Soggy crust Prolonged holding Low Oil Temperature Excessive Coating Appearance Golden Color Strong Golden Color. Brine or basting medium Black color Too Pale Smoke Smudge Excessive Charring Bitter. Exterior is.Flavor Clean Item flavor Product should taste like the food being fried not the oil used Aroma Subtle Caramelized Simple.Brine or Marinade should support flavor. Undercooked Causes 101 D . Carbonized taste Overcooked. White meats should have amber or moist and light golden exterior Firm fish will have a Only tender items darker color should be pan fried Dryness Soggy Crust Cooked too far in advance Held too long Held at high temperature Overcooking Low oil temperature Low oil quality Tactile Texture Crisp and light Main items. except tempura. not mask main item’s flavor Aroma Rich Roasted Smoky Aroma should contribute to an overall sensation of fullness depth and richness Visible Texture CrispGolden Tactile Texture Appearance Crisp. should be light golden. Insufficient Mop.

.

 director.edu        243‐7831   CREDITS: 4     PREREQUISITES:  Enrolled in final semester of program.m.  Students  work a minimum of 180 hours at an approved site and attend scheduled one‐hour  seminars. or by appointment. and increases occupational awareness and professionalism. minimum of “C” in all  CUL and FSM courses. prepares them for initial  employment.–3 p.  COURSE DESCRIPTION: On‐the‐job training in position related to each student’s  career goal.m.      Culinary Arts    THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA—MISSOULA  COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY              BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT   FACULTY: Chef Thomas Campbell. or recommendation of Culinary Program Director.  OFFICE:  Culinary Offices.  This experience increases students’ skills.          thomas.campbell@umontana.    HOURS: 7a.  COURSE SYLLABUS   1 | P a g e                                                  Date revised: Spring 2008 FSM 290T Internship  .

 plan.  8. Be responsible to schedule for.  3. and  execution of the Portfolio Review Banquet at the end of the semester. group discussions. Attend scheduled seminars for special topics. Secure an internship position and submit completed “Learning Agreement”.   See attached document  for requirements. Be responsible to schedule for and participate in the planning.  See attached  document for requirements. the student will be able to:    Employ classroom skills in a 180 hour business environment.  5.  No hours will be recorded until this is done.  7. Complete 180 hours of supervised work at an approved internship site.    STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING PROCEDURES:  Percentage of Point Allocation per Course Requirement                                                                                          Internship Position  Program Objectives  Green Cards            10%  10%  10%  10%  20%  10%  30%  Pass or fail    Midterm Evaluation  180 Hours Supervised Work  Seminars        Portfolio Binder  Final Practical Exam    2 | P a g e     . prepare and execute Final Practical Exam.  9.   Incomplete cards will not be accepted. including  Program Director approval. Submit Midterm Evaluation at 90 hours (student responsibility) – Copy. Complete green time cards (two sides) and turn in weekly to Internship Director.  See  attached document for requirements. Final Evaluation by Supervisor (Internship Director responsibility) – Copy available for  intern.  Develop occupational preparedness and professionalism through completion of  employment credentials and attendance of seminars.  2.  COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  1.  4.  Gain experience for initial employment. guest speakers and  oral presentations.  10.  6. Prepare a portfolio organized in a bendable/foldable binder.STUDENT PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES:       Upon completion of this course. within the first two weeks of employment. Submit completed and signed program objectives identified in “Learning Agreement  Goals for management Internship”. preparation.

  Each missed class will result in a 5‐point deduction from final points  accumulated. and preparedness. and completed portfolio.  organization.  At completion of 180  hours of work with appropriate documentation and final evaluation by supervisor.  Students who read text assignments prior to class will be equipped  to participate and will obtain the most from this course. Previous work experience cannot be accepted toward internship course. announcements of tests. the required number of hours should be spread over the entire semester so that  the student is able to experience the depth of a variety of tasks.Any missing projects and seminars will decrease the student overall grade.  3.  An  incomplete grade will count as an “F” according to Financial Aid guidelines.  No make‐up is allowed for lab production. grade will be calculated using the  following grading scale:  90 – 100  = A  80 – 89    = B  70 – 79   = C  60 – 69    = D  Below 60 = F    FINAL NOTE:  1.  Students who miss  a seminar may make‐up that topic.  they will be accountable for any information disseminated and be held responsible for class  notes. Ideally. “I”. An incomplete grade. interest.  The midterm evaluation is the responsibility of the student to obtain and request  employment supervisor to complete. and  solutions that likely will not occur in a condensed time‐frame.  If students are absent for any reason.  4. teamwork. circumstances. will be assigned until all requirements have been met. All Internship positions must have prior approval from Program Director to assure  qualifications.  Participation points will be granted  or denied depending on how the student exhibits enthusiasm.  2.  The original copy of the midterm evaluation must be  turned into the Internship Director when 180 hours of work is complete.  A midterm evaluation will be done at completion of 90  hours.  3 | P a g e     . Student must ensure that internship work schedule responsibilities not interfere with the  Portfolio Review Banquet.  This is necessary as  students contribute to the learning environment and become active learners by attending  class and participating.      PARTICIPATION:    Students must demonstrate teamwork as consistent with industry. and assignments.  5.      ATTENDANCE POLICY:    Attendance will be taken. attendance  at required scheduled seminars.

 A score of  zero will be averaged into grade determination for any missed test.    ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:    Students are required to adhere to standards of academic integrity.    UNIFORM POLICY:    Students will be required to be in full Culinary Uniform to be accepted into class. Inc..cfm/page/1321. or personally prior to the test.    All students must practice academic honesty. e‐mail. 6th edition.  Late assignments  will be lowered by 50 percent. assignments must be submitted by stated due dates.    All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code.umt.    CELL PHONE POLICY:    Cell phones must be turned off prior to class. John Wiley & Sons.  The  Conduct Code is located at http://www.  Assignments for makeup tests will be  made only if faculty is notified by voice mail.  No late assignments will be accepted after week 13. Wayne.umt.    TESTS:    Tests will be given during the semester as announced.    REQUIRED TEXT:     Gissen.edu/studentaffairs/.    ISBN 0‐471‐43625‐9    4 | P a g e     .edu/SA/VPSA/index.  Academic misconduct is subject to an  academic penalty by the course instructor and/or a disciplinary sanction by the University.  The code is available for  review online at http://www.    DUE DATES:    To receive full credit.  Students should review  The University of Montana Conduct Code regarding their rights and responsibilities. Professional Cooking.

Professional paper describing accomplishments/goals and objectives met by the student during  the internship experience. if any. photographs of your work. g.  This paper should be an example of the student’s  best work that represents research (if necessary) and writing capabilities to a potential  employer. and references given for any resources  used in the report (used www. menus. numbered pages. correct grammar. b. with references. c. copies of  your certificates.  • Student will address objectives met that were not defined on learning agreement.  They may request items such as written reports. awards. extracurricular activities. f. but not met. thank you letters. certificates. etc…  • The report should be approximately 1‐2 pages in length. letters of recommendation. Pertinent food photographs.  h. and include potential actions by the student that could have improved the  experience. listed on  separate page.  • In this report. conferences.  i. the report should include an introduction to define student objectives. citations used for direct quotes borrowed from another  source in the report (internship supervisor said…). and autobiography and more. e. it is common for employers to ask for samples of  your work. etc.  The conclusion should summarize the importance and significance of the  objectives to the internship experience.     Portfolio Binder Requirements:  a. and spelling. d. and  objectives defined on learning agreement.  volunteer work. the  introduction should nicely transition to the body of the report detailing how the objectives  were met. Submitted in a three‐ring binder  Cover page  Table of contents  Transcript  Resume – final version  Cover letter – final version  One example of a project/assignment from a course in your program area taken at the College of  Technology or a project/assignment from you internship which best represents your capabilities  to a potential employer. compiling a portfolio allows you to put together your best work to submit to  employers. double‐spaced.  • Overall. if used. if any.  • This report should be formatted appropriately in educational report format as follows:   Attractive margins.  In addition to using the portfolio for your final  internship project.  punctuation.  • Student will include an analysis explaining actions the student could have taken to improve  the internship experience. Web site to look up…).YOUR PERSONAL PORTFOLIO     When interviewing for Hospitality Industry Jobs. the student will directly and specifically reflect how objectives as defined and  agreed upon by employer and student in “Learning Agreement Goals” were met during the  internship.      5 | P a g e     .

  They may clean.   Students who do not pass may not graduate. entrée. cohesive theme demonstrating proper basic cooking  techniques. or take on a station as part of  the interview process. etc. soup.  Additionally. serve.  The apprentice may work only as a helper.  However. the apprentice cannot demonstrate  any cooking or fabrication skill that can be judged during the exam. entrée and dessert.   The courses presented must be an appetizer.   Remember.  Judging  will start at the moment of set‐up and will remain until the station is completely cleaned.  The menu must have a consistent.  Each student will be randomly assigned an apprentice to help during their testing time.  They may not prepare anything that affects demonstrated cooking  techniques or knife skills.    Examination:  The examinant is responsible to schedule the time for the examination period. salad. it is not advised to keep  books opened on the station throughout the allotted cooking time.  Each student will have four hours of cooking time to prepare the menu. each  student will be given half an hour to set‐up their stations and prepare their menu.  The completion of this internship and the entire program hinges on a passing  score for this exam.  Students who fail must pay appropriate course fees to retake the exam. soup. half an  hour to present their menu to the judges and half an hour to clean up their stations. sanitize.  A growing number of employers  require a prospective employee to prepare a meal. they will be given half an hour to write a menu  which will need to be displayed on the station for the floor judge to refer to.FINAL PRACTICAL EXAM (BLACK BOX)    This portion of your internship will prove quite challenging.  Meaning.  The  student will be tested on how well they manage the apprentice’s time and responsibility. salad. dessert. their score will be deducted by half a point.   The first course must be presented during the designated presentation time and each course  must follow at appropriate time intervals. help with  presentation.  Also.  You will be expected to execute a  practical exam designed to evaluate your cooking expertise.   Three portions are for judges and one is for photographs.  For every minute the student is late after the  presentation window has ended.  The parameters for the Final Practical are as follows:  PREPARE A FIVE COURSE MENU FOR FOUR GUESTS FROM MYSTERY INGREDIENTS TO BE  SUPPLIED BY THE CHEF  Menu:  Each student will be given a basket consisting of seven to eleven items that must be used in  at least one course of the menu.  Participants are responsible for setting the evaluation table according to the standards of  6 | P a g e     .  Each student will have four hours to produce four portions of each course. set up.  When the basket is presented to the student. the apprentice is there to assist.  Note: it is okay  to refer to cookbooks or manuals during the testing time.  Courses will consist of an appetizer.  The order of courses will depend on the menu service style. a complete menu. each student will have access to the rest of the kitchen  for ingredients that can be used in their menu.

  Judging continues through this phase!    Judges will critique immediately after clean up and the practical score will be delivered at  this time.  The judging will follow the ACF Category F/1: Hot Food Student Competition criteria.   ½ hour before the test commences is available for station set up and menu preparation.  35% of the score will be the kitchen/floor evaluation covering the following:  • Mise en place and organization.  Courses should be delivered in proper sequence observing the following time frame:  • Appetizer on the table at the end of the four hours (00:00).  • Timing of service and follow up.  65% of the score will be the service/tasting evaluation accordingly:  • Serving methods and presentation.  • Flavor  • Texture  • Doneness  The final score tally will reflect the combined evaluation of the floor and tasting segments and  translate into ACF Point Conversions and Awards as follows:             7 | P a g e     .  There will be one judge assigned to evaluate the student performance in the kitchen.  • Soup delivered five minutes later (00:05)  • Salad ‐ depending on service style ‐ five minutes after the soup (00:10).  • Craftsmanship and professionalism.  • Entrée ten minutes after the salad (00:20).  • Apprentice coordination and task delegation.  • Sanitation and cleaning procedures.  • Portion size and nutritional balance.  Judges must be  qualified chefs or restaurateurs agreed to by the program director.  • Menu and ingredient compatibility.  • Effective utilization of all ingredients.  ½ hour after the four hour preparation time is the service/presentation window. skills. and fundamentals.table service.  • Cooking techniques.       Judging:  The examinant is responsible for inviting the judges for the examination.  No advance preparation or cooking is allowed.  There will be one judge assigned as the coordinator. including the coordinator.  • Dessert ten minutes after the entrée (00:30)  Immediately after service the student should clean their station thoroughly and store left‐ over product appropriately.  There will be three judges assigned as taste evaluators.

  • Inappropriate conduct or unethical behavior.0 – 89.9  28.9  70.0 – 100  80.Percentage  90.99  0 – 27.0  32.9  ACF Award Guidelines  Gold  Silver  Bronze  Did not pass    Students may lose points or be disqualified for excessive lack of compliance. but is not limited to:  • Lack of mise en place.  • Violation of the standard uniform code for the College of Technology’s Culinary Arts  Program.0 – 79.9  Under 70%    ACF Point Conversion  36.0 – 35.  • Lack of cooking integrity.   Noncompliance may include.  • Inappropriate or unsafe food handling practices. or disorganization.0 – 31.  • Late submission of required materials.  8 | P a g e     .0 – 40.  • Tardiness.

 This program combines theory. The spectrum of learning is expanded  to include more in‐depth professional studies thereby enhancing employment  options. and experience  to prepare students for entry‐level and management positions in the diverse and  dynamic hospitality industry. The Certificate Program parallels with and forms a  seamless integration into the Food Service Management Applied Science Degree. Accreditation by the American Culinary Federation ensures graduates  eligibility for certification as an ACF “Certified Culinarian. This program  incorporates comprehensive hands‐on learning experiences complemented by  supportive courses designed to prepare students for a wide range of career  opportunities in this field. practical training. Students prepare for an entry‐level  position in the expanding and challenging food service industry.”      1 | P a g e     . The degree program is designed to continue  principles taught in the certificate program.The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts  Mission and Goals    Mission of the Certificate Program:  The Culinary Arts Certificate Program is two semesters in duration and provides  an introduction to the field of culinary arts.  Mission of the Applied Science Degree:  The Food Service Management Program culminates in an Associate of Applied  Science Degree.

 and garde manger  items. and  equipment.  (5)  have a working knowledge of all mathematical computations involved in a  food service establishment.  (3)  have a broad understanding of culinary history.The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts  Mission and Goals      Goals of the Certificate Program:  Students will:  (1)  express themselves through written communication. breakfast menus. charcuterie items.  (12)  prepare eclectic entrees incorporating all cooking principles for service to the  public.      2 | P a g e     .  (7)  organize and prioritize tasks.  (6)  interact effectively within a team‐oriented group.  (11)  prepare hot and cold soups. dressings. and applicable sauce derivatives.  (2)  demonstrate computer literacy. and  basic culinary principles. and  (14)  prepare basic bread varieties and desserts. foundation stocks and broths. kitchen organization.  (4)  understand and maintain sanitary conditions in the kitchen. salads.  (10)  prepare café food selections.  (9)  prepare appetizers. and unique specialties. all the mother  sauces.  (8)  perform front‐of‐the‐house duties.  (13)  utilize purchasing procedures to procure foodstuffs. kitchen supplies.

  (2)  control portion costs. confections.  (3)  control food and labor costs.  (5)  supervise work load and coordinate station responsibilities. and write menus. analyze.    3 | P a g e     . cakes.  (4)  prepare bread varieties.  (1)  plan.  (7)  demonstrate conceptual aspects of physical layout of food service  establishments. and  (8)  apply strict dietary standards in the preparation of nutritional dishes. and ices. desserts.  (6)  serve and describe alcoholic and non‐alcoholic beverages.The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts  Mission and Goals       Goals of the Applied Science Degree:  Students will. in addition to the 14 goals listed for the Certificate program.

  COPY(S) TO SHOW APPROVAL OF CREDIT OR CLOCK HOUR PROGRAMS BY STAT OR ACCREDITING  BODY/COMMISSION .  I NEED THE MOST RECENT SYLLABI FOR THE FOLLOWING COURSES IN ELECTRONIC FORM:  COPY OF MAT 100 – INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA.  CURRENT RECORD OF INSTITUTIONAL ACCREDITATION.  THERE IS EVIDENCE OF CONTINUING FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF THE INSTITUTION TO THE NEEDS OF THE PROGRAM.)    5.  COPY OF ALL SCHOOL’S CURRENT STATE LICENSES. ME AND BRIAN. TITLE PAGE OF INSURANCE  CERTIFICATE.Culinary Self Study Report 2008    NINA’ S CHECKLIST OF TASKS TO SUPPORT CULINARY ARTS SELF­STUDY REPORT 2008    FRONT COVER    5 COPIES BOUND AND COMPILED IN A LEGIBLE MANNER.  √ THERE ARE WRITTEN JOB DESCRIPTIONS FOR THE PROGRAM COORDINATOR.    1    .  4 HARD COPIES MAILED BY AUGUST 25TH.0 PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY    PAY APPLICATION FEE OF $200. FACULTY AND SUPPORT STAFF.  INCLUDE CONTACT INFORMATION FOR  GRADUATES AND EMPLOYERS.0 CURRICULUM    COMPLETED ACFFAC “REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE AND COMPETENCIES” WITH REFERENCED COURSE SYLLABI  ATTACHED (EXHIBIT M).0  FACILITIES    EVIDENCE THAT THE PHYSICAL FACILITY MEETS FIRE AND SAFETY STANDARDS (COPY OF CERTIFICATE(S) OF  INSURANCE SHOWING ALL COVERAGE CARRIED BY THE SCHOOL/INSTITUTION E.  INCLUDE A COPY OF SELF‐STUDY FEE PAYMENT.  COPY OF FSM 270 – PURCHASING AND COST CONTROLS    6.   (NEED COPIES OF BUDGET AND OPERATING PLAN.    3.  SIGN COPY OF ACFF ACCREDITATION AGREEMENT FORM. (COPY OF CHECK OR CREDIT CARD RECEIPT)    1.  SUBMITTED ELECTRONICALLY BY AUGUST 25TH.  LIST OF 10 RECENT GRADUATES AND THEIR PLACES OF EMPLOYMENT.0 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION     √ THERE IS AN ORGANIZATIONAL CHART SHOWING THE RELATIONSHIP OF THE PROGRAM TO OTHER PROGRAMS  WITHIN THE INSTITUTION.G.  (APPENDIX 3 AND EXA)  NUMBER OF STUDENTS GRADUATED AND DEGREE GRANTED FOR LAST TWO YEARS.  COPY OF BUS 243T – PSYCHOLOGY OF MANAGEMENT AND SUPERVISION.

 (COPIES OF STUDENT TRANSCRIPTS)  ADEQUATE TO VERIFY SATISFACTION OF CERTIFICATE OR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS.)   TUITION AND FEES. AND A HARD COPY  OF THE SCHOOLS WEB PAGE.Culinary Self Study Report 2008    7.  NEED TO SHOW HOW STUDENTS HAVE ACCESS TO FILES AS THEY RELATE TO THEIR PERFORMANCE (FROM THE  ADMINISTRATION SIDE. NEWSPRINT . ADDITIONAL COSTS OF THE PROGRAM. SURVEYS .  COURSE DESCRIPTIONS.     8. PLACEMENT SERVICES. PLACEMENT. GUIDANCE.)     DOCUMENTS OF CURRENT PLACEMENT DATA TO INDICATE THAT A MAJORITY OF THE LAST TWO YEAR’S  GRADUATES WERE PLACED IN A FIELD RELATED TO THEIR TRAINING .  ETC. (ARE THERE DOCUMENTS  THAT SHOW THIS ?)   AVAILABLE TO PROVIDE VERIFICATION THAT CERTIFICATES OR DEGREES ARE CONFERRED ONLY UPON THOSE  STUDENTS WHO HAVE DEMONSTRATED EDUCATIONAL ACHIEVEMENT AS ASSESSED AND DOCUMENTED   THROUGH APPROPRIATE MEASURES. RECORDS.  (DO WE HAVE    PROCEDURES.  (COPIES OF THE  CATALOGUE AND INFORMATION ON OUR WEB‐SITE THAT DESCRIBE COUNSELING. AND GUIDANCE ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS.  COPIES OF ALL CURRENT ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS USED BY THE SCHOOL INCLUDING  RADIO .  (THIS CAN BE THE SAME AS THE LIST OF  10  RECENT GRADUATES AND THEIR CONTACT AND EMPLOYER CONTACT INFORMATION)  COPIES OR ANY INFORMATION THAT SHOWS THAT THE STUDENTS HAVE INPUT INTO COURSE EVALUATION.  (COPIES OF MISSION STATEMENT AND VERIFICATION OF WHERE THEY ARE  LOCATED . TELEVISION.  SCHOLARSHIPS. ESPECIALLY RELEVANT TO CULINARY.   ACADEMIC POLICIES.0  PROGRAM ASSESSMENT    THERE IS DOCUMENTATION OF AN ONGOING SYSTEM FOR ASSESSING FACULTY   PERFORMANCE.  (FACILITY USE FEES.0   STUDENT SERVICES    STUDENTS ENROLLING IN THE PROGRAM ARE PROVIDED INFORMATION REGARDING:  √ PROGRAM’S MISSION AND GOALS. BROCHURES. VIDEO TAPES.  (CEC’S PART IN THIS…IS THERE  DOCUMENTATION OF THIS PLAN?)  A GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE FOR STUDENTS USE.)   IF STUDENTS ARE NOT ACCEPTED INTO THE PROGRAM.  2    .   (THERE ARE SOME WE DON’T DO BUT WHATEVER WE HAVE )       RECORDS OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE AND PROGRESS ARE :    ADEQUATE TO MEET THE TRANSFER NEEDS OF STUDENTS.   (A RE THERE PROCEDURES AND DOCUMENTS THAT VERIFY THIS?)      COUNSELING. THEY ARE INFORMED OF THE REASON(S)?  (HOW IS THIS  DONE AND ARE THERE COPIES OF FORMS?)    THERE IS A PLAN FOR IMPROVING RETENTION OF STUDENTS IN THE PROGRAM. THAT DESCRIBE AND VERIFY THESE SERVICES ?)  INDUSTRY SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION IS MADE AVAILABLE TO ALL STUDENTS.  (HOW IS THIS DONE AND  WHERE IS THE PROOF?  M AYBE PAPERWORK FROM FINANCIAL  AID AND STUDENT SERVICES?)    THE DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION IN SCHOOL PUBLICATIONS IS ADEQUATE AND ACCURATE. ETC. FLYERS . LIABILITY INSURANCE. YELLOW PAGES. SCRIPTS.

Culinary Self Study Report 2008    THERE IS EVIDENCE OF AN ONGOING SYSTEM FOR COLLECTING DATA TO ASSESS THE RELEVANCE OF THE  CURRICULUM BY :     o STUDENTS (COPIES OF STUDENT EVALUATIONS)  o FACULTY (COPIES OF IPR AND PROCEDURES)  √  ADVISORY COMMITTEE  o EMPLOYERS (DO WE HAVE EMPLOYER SURVEYS?)  o GRADUATES (DO WE HAVE GRADUATE SURVEYS?)    AN ONGOING SYSTEM IS IN PLACE FOR ASSESSING AND DOCUMENTING:    o STUDENT RETENTION            o GRADUATE PLACEMENTS (PLACEMENT STATISTICS FOR THE LAST TWO YEARS)      o GRADUATE SATISFACTION WITH CAREER PREPARATION  o EMPLOYER SATISFACTION           3    .

ExY-2 ANDREA PASKERT CULINARY ARTS PROGRAM The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExY-2 UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA FORUM CHEF ARTICLES CULINARY ARTS PROGRAM The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExY-2 MONTANA TODAY CHEFS OF MONTANA COOKING SHOW CULINARY ARTS PROGRAM The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExY-2 FACULTY EVALUATION (Individual Performance Review) The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExY-2 STUDENT ASSESSMENT OF COURSE SURVEY The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExY-2 CATERING FUNCTION SHEETS 2008 The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts Culinary Arts .

2008 The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts Culinary Arts .ExY-2 MONTANA CHEFS ASSOCIATION AGENDA 2007 .

ExY-2 MONTANA CHEFS ASSOCIATION CULINARY SCHOLARSHIP 2007 .2008 The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts Culinary Arts .

ExY-2 ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING MINUTES The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExY-2 INTERNSHIP EXAMPLES The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

ExY-2 EQUIPMENT SAFETY CHECK SHEET The University of Montana College of Technology Culinary Arts .

COULIS.too high Causes Flavor STOCKS ESSENCES GLAZES JELLIES CONSOMMÉS Lingering rich of the main item. citrus peels) Improper balance of acid and tang Improper amount of acid and/or flavoring Aroma Subtly reflects flavor agent Visible Texture Smooth shiny evenly naps.smooth even consistency Fine consistency Garnish no larger the depression of soupspoon. plant particulates.deep dark color and set when cold. Liquid added too quickly during preparation. Bisque thicken with rice or bread only Particulate visible Rough Consistency Defect Causes Main ingredient to be pureed not cooked thoroughly. fine sieve Main ingredient to be pureed not cooked thoroughly 147 .Balance flavor of acidity and tanginess. Brown stock. Jellies. citrus. herbs. onions. Stocks and Sauces. Essences reflect a concentrated flavor.Quality Standards Guide Flavor EMULSION SAUCES COLD SAUCES Dressings. garlic.garnish no larger than the size of a pea.Improper salting then reducing Flavor SOUPS PUREES. chicken. Tactile Texture Smooth. Not blended well enough or run through a coarse vs.light grey Vegetable stock. Adds flavor compatible with ingredients in main dish.” Curdled.not fat pools Glazes consistency of a syrup. brief mouth coating Appearance Homogenized. heady with the main item (beef. Cloudiness Particulate present Burnt flavor Defect Fish stock harsh flavor Salty Bones roasted incorrectly Causes Boiled too long and too fast over high heat Improper skimming Fish stock cooked too long Too salty. Glazes. etc.green/amber Watery.golden White stock.rich perfume of main item Visible Texture Smooth no particulate Velvety Tactile Texture Creamy to the tongue and roof of the mouth Velvety to the tongue Syrup consistency. Consommé. Appearance Clear and Clean. Smooth. nappes or coats the back of the spoon. Not salty Aroma Of the aromatics used. Mixture has become saturated. Emulsified dressing appears homogenized. Not thick but will coat the back of the spoon (nappe) Rough consistency Appearance Homogenous. Subtly reflects flavor agents (vinegar.) Visible Texture Tactile Texture Glazes feel sticky Jellies-meltingly soft. no visible pooling of fats or oils. Jellies.Soups. Sugar counteracts acidity of vinegar. Defect Lingering oily of waxy mouth coating Incorrect balance of oil and acid Mixture separated or “broken. Viscous. BISQUES Dominant of the main item pureed Aroma Dominant of the main item pureed Bisque. Basic French may be separated. Temperature.

Contributes flavor. Not crunchy. distinct. Distinct delicate aroma of the main item Visible Texture Smooth.vegetable not sweated prior to adding. Brown sauce gives translucent light glaze. Contributes moistness.Flavor SOUPS CREAM AND VELOUTÉ Velouté. smooth. velvety. Melts away on the palate. Color accents the dish served with. Opaque= light does not pass through Tactile Texture Smooth. Defect Too thick Roux or final liaison not incorporated properly.added without first boiling. Ample broth to ingredient ratio. Contributes color and shine. creamy. glossy to the eye. excessive clumping White sauce. delicate flavor of the main items. Light but not liquid. Glutinous. NOTE: transparent= light passes through. Velouté/white sauce forms semi transparent veil. creamy white finish. Lumps or graininess Too thick Broken or curdled Roux or final liaison not incorporated properly. grisly Improper thickening procedure Not cooked long enough Improper thickening procedure Aluminum pot used Causes 148 . White sauce silky. Seasoning doesn’t form a recognizable part of the sauce. Aroma