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Natural Gas Vehicles

Natural Gas Vehicles

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Given the multiple large urban areas within Pennsylvania, and considering the strategic
importance of Pennsylvania's distribution and warehousing sectors, GNA has determined that a
minimum of eight publicly accessible natural gas refueling stations will be required to provide
sufficient fueling coverage to support the development of the PCTC concept. Looking at a more
aggressive case, up to 17 publicly accessible natural gas refueling stations could be developed
as part of the PCTC. A summary of the general conceptual locations for this infrastructure
network is as follows:

Table 3: Potential Natural Gas Refueling Stations (Conceptual)

FOUNDATION

DEVELOPED

Philadelphia

3

6

Pittsburgh

3

4

Harrisburg

1

3

Scranton

1

2

Allentown

0

1

Williamsport

0

1

Total

8

17

While there are already more than 20 natural gas refueling stations within Pennsylvania, few of
these sites are accessible to outside users, and those that are accessible are often meant to
support light-duty vehicles (such as pickup trucks and sedans), not the heavy-duty vehicles that
are the focus of the PCTC. However, in some cases, this existing infrastructure can be
leveraged as part of the PCTC roadmap.

For the purposes of this report, it is assumed that each natural gas refueling station –
appropriate for the refueling of heavy-duty natural gas vehicles – will be capable of refueling at
least 50 heavy-duty trucks each day. With 50 trucks a day as the minimum, each station able to
fairly easily accommodate up to 100 to 125 heavy-duty trucks each day, as well as the
additional of a few hundred of light-duty natural gas vehicles. Therefore, the projected PCTC
infrastructure, under the Foundation and Developed Case plans, will be able to support a base
of 400 to 850 heavy-duty natural gas vehicles respectively and up to 1,000 to 2,215 heavy-duty
trucks and thousands of light-duty natural gas vehicles. The 400 and 850 truck number is

When faced with the classic “chicken and the egg” conundrum, the alternative
fuels industry has most often found success by cooking both!

NGV ROADMAP FOR PENNSYLVANIA JOBS,
ENERGY
 SECURITY AND CLEAN AIR

Gladstein, Neandross & Associates: Final Report (April 2011)

p. 35

therefore considered the minimum required to justify the investment of the refueling
infrastructure under each respective plan.

While the size, shape and cost of natural gas vehicles vary greatly, for the purpose of this PCTC
roadmap, it is estimated that each heavy-duty vehicle will carry a total cost of approximately
$165,000, thus requiring a total of $66 million to $140 million in capital expenditures under the
two respective plans.

Constructing a publicly accessible natural gas refueling station capable of supporting 50 heavy-
duty vehicles each operating day will require an estimated $2.6 million per station, or $21 million
to $45 million for all stations under the two respective scenarios.

In addition to the refueling infrastructure, it will be required that modifications be made to
maintenance garages in order to properly repair and maintain these heavy-duty natural gas
vehicles and keep them up to code. For the purpose of this PCTC roadmap report, it is assumed
that one maintenance garage will be retrofit for this purpose for each natural gas fueling station
constructed. Based upon industry experience, it is estimated that each garage will require
approximately $400,000 for retrofitting, yielding a total of $3.2 million to $6.8 million in capital
expenditures in order to retrofit anywhere from eight to 17 maintenance garages under the two
respective plans.

The total investment required for the incremental cost of the natural gas trucks, refueling
stations and maintenance garage modifications proposed as part of the PCTC under the
Foundation and Developed Case scenarios – the Incremental Project Investment – is $50
million to $107 million. In addition to these costs, as well as the base diesel cost of the trucks, a
5% budget line item for personnel training and project management is proposed, as is an overall
10% cost contingency, thus bringing the total potential investment in Pennsylvania as a result of
the successful implementation of the PCTC roadmap to $98 million to $208 million.

Table 4: Pennsylvania Clean Transportation Corridor - Station and Truck Summary

FOUNDATION

DEVELOPED

Total Stations

8

17

Total Trucks

400

850

Total Investment in Pennsylvania (in millions)

$98

$208

NGV ROADMAP FOR PENNSYLVANIA JOBS,
ENERGY
 SECURITY AND CLEAN AIR

Gladstein, Neandross & Associates: Final Report (April 2011)

p. 36

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