You are on page 1of 14

ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

Chapter 10: 
Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of 
Control Systems: Block Diagram Reduction
A. Bazoune 

 
10.1 INTRODUCTION 
 
 
Block Diagram: Pictorial representation of functions performed by each component of a 
system and that of flow of signals. 
 

C (s )
G (s )
R (s )

C ( s) = G (s) R( s)
 
 
Figure 10‐1. Single block diagram representation. 
 
 
 
Components for Linear Time Invariant System(LTIS):  
 

 
 
Figure 10‐2. Components for Linear Time Invariant Systems (LTIS). 

1/14
ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

Terminology:  
 

Disturbance U ( s )

R (s ) G1 (s ) G2 (s ) C (s )
± E (s ) = R (s ) ± b (s ) m (s )
b (s )

H (s )

 
Figure 10‐3.   Block Diagram Components. 
 
 
1. Plant:  A  physical  object  to  be  controlled.  The  Plant  G 2 ( s ) ,  is  the  controlled  system,  of  which  a 
particular quantity or condition is to be controlled. 
 
2. Feedback  Control  System  (Closed‐loop  Control  System):  A  system  which  compares  output  to  some 
reference input and keeps output as close as possible to this reference. 
3. Open‐loop Control System: Output of the system is not feedback to the system. 
 
4. Control  Element  G 1 ( s ) ,  also  called  the  controller,  are  the  components  required  to  generate  the 
appropriate control signal  M ( s )  applied to the plant. 
 
5. Feedback Element  H (s )  is the component required to establish the functional relationship between 
the primary feedback signal  B ( s )  and the controlled output  C ( s ) . 
 
6. Reference  Input  R ( s )   is  an  external  signal  applied  to  a  feedback  control  system  in  order  to 
command a specified action of the plant. It often represents ideal plant output behavior. 
 
7. The Controlled Output  C ( s )  is that quantity or condition of the plant which is controlled. 
 
8. Actuating Signal  E ( s ) , also called the error or control action, is the algebraic sum consisting of the 
reference input  R ( s )  plus or minus (usually minus) the primary feedback  B ( s ) . 
 
9. Manipulated  Variable  M ( s )   (control  signal)  is  that  quantity  or  condition  which  the  control 
elements  G 1 ( s )  apply to the plant  G 2 ( s ) . 
 
10. Disturbance  U ( s )   is  an  undesired  input  signal  which  affects  the  value  of  the  controlled  output 
C ( s ) . It may enter the plant by summation with  M ( s ) , or via an intermediate point, as shown in 
the block diagram of the figure above. 
 
11. Forward Path is the transmission path from the actuating signal  E ( s )  to the output  C ( s ) . 
 

2/14
ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

12. Feedback Path is the transmission path from the output  C ( s )  to the feedback signal  B ( s ) . 


 
13. Summing Point: A circle with a cross is the symbol that indicates a summing point. The  ( + )  or  ( − )  
sign at each arrowhead indicates whether that signal is to be added or subtracted. 
 
14. Branch Point: A branch point is a point from which the signal from a block goes concurrently to other 
blocks or summing points. 
 
 
Definitions 
 
• G ( s ) ≡ Direct transfer function = Forward transfer function. 
• H ( s ) ≡ Feedback transfer function. 
• G ( s ) H ( s ) ≡  Open‐loop transfer function. 
• C ( s ) R ( s ) ≡  Closed‐loop transfer function = Control ratio 
• C ( s ) E ( s ) ≡  Feed‐forward transfer function. 
 

E (s )
R (s ) G (s ) C (s )
Input Output
B (s )
H (s )

 
 
Figure 10‐4  Block diagram of a closed‐loop system with a feedback element. 
 
 
10.2 BLOCK DIAGRAMS AND THEIR SIMPLIFICATION 
 
Cascade (Series) Connections 
 
 

 
Figure 10‐5  Cascade (Series) Connection. 
 

3/14
ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

Parallel Connections 
 

 
 
Figure 10‐5  Parallel Connection. 
 
 
Closed Loop Transfer Function (Feedback Connections) 
 

E (s )
R (s ) G (s ) C (s )

B (s )
H (s )

 
Figure 10.4 (Repeated)    Feedback connection 
 
For the system shown in Figure 10‐4, the output  C ( s )  and input  R ( s )  are related as follows: 
 
C (s ) = G (s ) E (s )  
where 
E ( s ) = R ( s ) − B ( s ) = R ( s ) − H ( s )C ( s )  
Eliminating  E ( s )  from these equations gives 
C ( s ) = G ( s ) [ R ( s ) − H ( s )C ( s )]  
This can be written in the form 
[1 + G ( s ) H ( s )]C ( s ) = G ( s ) R ( s )  
or 
C (s) G (s)
=  
R (s) 1 + G (s) H (s)
The  Characteristic  equation  of  the  system  is  defined  as  an  equation  obtained  by  setting  the 
denominator  polynomial  of the transfer  function to zero. The Characteristic equation for the above 
system is  
1+ G ( s ) H ( s ) = 0 . 

4/14
ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

Block Diagram Algebra for Summing Junctions 
 
 
 
C = G ( +R ± X )
 
= +GR ± GX

 
 
C = GR ± X
 
= G ( +R ± X G )

Figure 10‐6  Summing junctions. 
 
Block Diagram Algebra for Branch Point 
 
 

 
Figure 10‐7  Summing junctions.  
 
 
Block Diagram Reduction Rules 
 
In  many  practical  situations,  the  block  diagram  of  a  Single  Input‐Single  Output  (SISO),  feedback 
control  system  may  involve  several  feedback  loops  and  summing  points.  In  principle,  the  block 
diagram  of  (SISO)  closed  loop  system,  no  matter  how  complicated  it  is,  it  can  be  reduced  to  the 
standard single loop form shown in Figure 10‐4. The basic approach to simplify a block diagram can be 
summarized in Table 1: 
 
 

5/14
ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

TABLE 10‐1  Block Diagram Reduction Rules 
 
1.  Combine all cascade blocks 
2.  Combine all parallel blocks 
3.  Eliminate all minor (interior) feedback loops 
4.  Shift summing points to left 
5.  Shift takeoff points to the right 
6.  Repeat Steps 1 to 5 until the canonical form is obtained 
 
TABLE 10‐2.  Some Basic Rules with Block Diagram Transformation 
 

X G1 G2 Y X G 1G 2 Y Y = (GG
1 2 )X

X G1
± Y X G1 ± G 2 Y Y = (G1 ±G2 )X
G2

u G u G y y = Gu
y 1
u u 1/ G u = y
G
u G u G y
y y = Gu
y y G

u1 G u1 G y
y e2 = G ( u1 − u2 )
u2 u2 G

u1 G u1 G y
y y = Gu1 − u2
u2 1/ G u2
G2 1/ G2 G1 y
u y = ( G1 − G2 ) u
 
 
█  Example 1: A feedback system is transformed into a unity feedback system 
 

R ( s) C (s)
G (s) R ( s) C (s )
1 H (s ) G ( s) H ( s)

H ( s)
 
C G 1 GH
= = ⋅ = Closed‐loop Transfer function 
R 1 ± GH H 1 ± GH

6/14
ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

█  Example 2:  
 
Reduce the following block diagrams 
 

 
 
 

7/14
ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

█  Example 3:  

 
█  Example 4  
 
 
 
G1 and G2 are in series 
 
 
H1 and H2 and H3 are in 
parallel 
 
 
G1 is in series with the 
feedback configuration.  
 
 
C(s) ⎡   G 3G 2 ⎤
= G1 ⎢ ⎥
R(s) ⎣ 1 + G 3G  2 ( H1 - H 2 + H 3 ) ⎦

 
█  Example  5:  The  main  problem  here  is  the  feed‐forward  of  V3(s).  Solution  is  to  move  this 
pickoff point forward. 
 

8/14
ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

 
 
 
 
 

9/14
ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

█  Example 6:  
 

10/14
ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

█  Example 7  
 
Use block diagram reduction to simplify the block diagram below into a single block relating 
Y ( s )  to  R ( s ) . 

 
█  Solution 

 
 
█  Example 8  
 
Use block diagram algebra to solve the previous example. 
 

11/14
ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

█  Solution  

 
 
Multiple‐Inputs cases 
 
In feedback control system, we often encounter multiple inputs (or even multiple output cases). For a 
linear  system,  we  can  apply  the  superposition  principle  to  solve  this  type  of  problems,  i.e.  to  treat 
each  input  one  at  a  time  while  setting  all  other  inputs  to  zeros,  and  then  algebraically  add  all  the 
outputs as follows: 
 
TABLE 10‐3: Procedure For reducing Multiple Input Blocks 
 
1  Set all inputs except one equal to zero
2  Transform the block diagram to solvable form. 
3  Find the output response due to the chosen input action alone 
4  Repeat Steps 1 to 3 for each of the remaining inputs. 
5  Algebraically sum all the output responses found in Steps 1 to 5 
 
█  Example 9 :  We shall determine the output C of the following system: 
 

D( s)

R ( s)
G1 ( s ) G2 ( s ) C (s)

12/14
ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

█  Solution  
 
Using the superposition principle, the procedure is illustrated in the following steps: 
 
Step1:  
R ( s) C (s)
Put  D ( s ) ≡ 0  as shown in Figure (a).  G1 ( s ) G2 ( s )
 
Step2:  
The  block  diagrams  reduce  to  the  block   
shown in Figure. b  Figure (a) 
   
Step 3:   R ( s)
The  output  C R   due  to  input  R ( s )   is  G1 ( s) G2 ( s) C (s)
shown  in  Figure  (c)  and  is  given  by  the 
relationship 
G1G 2  
CR = ⋅ R  Figure (b) 
1 + G1G 2  
Step 4:  
Put  R ( s ) ≡ 0  as shown in Figure (d).  R ( s) G1 ( s ) G2 ( s ) C (s)
  1+ G1 ( s ) G2 ( s )
Step  5:  Put  ‐1  into  a  block,  representing 
the negative feedback effect. (Figure d)   
Figure (c) 
Step  6:  Rearrange  the  block  diagrams  as 
D (s )
shown in Figure (e).  CD ( s )
  G1 ( s ) G2 ( s )
Step 7: Let the ‐1 block be absorbed into 
the, summing point as shown in Figure (f). 
  −1
 
Step 8: By Equation (7.3), the output  CU   Figure (d) 
due to input U is :   
G2
CU = ⋅U  
D (s ) CD ( s )
1 + G1G 2
G2 ( s )
 
Step 9: The total output is C: 
G1G2 G2 −1 G1 ( s)
C = CR + CU = ⋅R+ ⋅U
1 + G1G2 1 + G1G2 Figure (e) 
 
G2
= ⋅ [G1 R + U ]  
1 + G1G2
D (s ) CD ( s )
  G2 ( s)

G1 ( s)
Figure (f) 

█  Example 10:  
 

13/14
ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control    Chapter 10: Time‐Domain Analysis and Design of Control Systems

14/14