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Evaluation of Flood Response Programme Georgia

Evaluation of Flood Response Programme Georgia

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Published by Oxfam
During the period 25-30 April 2005, a combination of torrential rains and snow melting caused heavy flooding in the Republic of Georgia. The floods caused massive landslides and mudflows that led to the damage and loss of agricultural land; destroyed homes, livestock and water drainage systems; roads and bridges swept away, isolating many communities in mountainous areas. This six-month project focused on the Khulo District and was implemented in partnership with the Red Cross Society of Georgia. The expected outcome was to reduce public health risks to 6,400 affected men, women and children through the provision of affordable, accessible and usable water and sanitation facilities, as well as provide mitigation, preparedness and disaster response training for communities and institutions. The responsibility for the maintenance of rehabilitated water systems was to be handed over to the local water authorities. This final evaluation sought to improve institutional learning, and enhance performance and accountability, through impact assessment and highlighting best practice.
During the period 25-30 April 2005, a combination of torrential rains and snow melting caused heavy flooding in the Republic of Georgia. The floods caused massive landslides and mudflows that led to the damage and loss of agricultural land; destroyed homes, livestock and water drainage systems; roads and bridges swept away, isolating many communities in mountainous areas. This six-month project focused on the Khulo District and was implemented in partnership with the Red Cross Society of Georgia. The expected outcome was to reduce public health risks to 6,400 affected men, women and children through the provision of affordable, accessible and usable water and sanitation facilities, as well as provide mitigation, preparedness and disaster response training for communities and institutions. The responsibility for the maintenance of rehabilitated water systems was to be handed over to the local water authorities. This final evaluation sought to improve institutional learning, and enhance performance and accountability, through impact assessment and highlighting best practice.

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Published by: Oxfam on Apr 12, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/08/2013

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The main risks in Georgia are well known (earthquakes, floods and periodic
drought). Oxfam would also seem to be well represented in structures such as
the DMT. The main opportunities to improve DRP in Georgia would appear to
be based around getting to know partner’s skills and competencies better. After
undertaking a capacity analysis of a partner, Oxfam could propose selected
training based around disaster management, but also focussing on some core
skills such as the use of SMART15

indicators and monitoring procedures.
Greater knowledge of emergency response tools, such as ERM, SPHERE and
participatory techniques would be very beneficial to both partners and Oxfam
staff. Partners and Oxfam staff should be familiar with the Oxfam public health
approach, in particular the role of PHP and gender within an integrated
programme. Familiarity with the Oxfam equipment catalogue and the various
emergency kits would also allow more informed choices to be made in the
future if necessary. Lastly, identify skills that exist already in CIS region? Who
could assist with support on specific issues? There would seem to be a wealth
of experience to draw upon.

15

Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Time bound

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