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Patio Produce

Patio Produce

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Published by Melissa Nadeau

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Published by: Melissa Nadeau on Apr 25, 2011
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12/20/2015

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Swedes are wonderful plants; they are packed with sugar yet to taste them you wouldn’t
imagine so. They are also like a cabbage with a thick root and if you cook a cabbage
root you’ll see the resemblance.

They grow easily in any kind of compost but in the first weeks they need extra feed.
They HATE their roots being messed about with and because of this they are difficult
to transplant.

H O W T O G R O W V E G E T A B L E S O N T H E P A T I O

105

Swedes are longer in the ground than turnips and have a lot of structural tissue to build,
so it is no surprise they take longer to mature. In pots they never reach their full
potential, and can have a tendency to bolt to seed.

You can grow them in plugs indoors in late March and then plant the whole plug
without disturbing the roots into a 12 inch (30cm) pot of compost, enriched with a
handful of rotted manure. Do not try to transplant them in any other way, it never
works! Feed them fortnightly when watering through the summer. Apart from greenfly
and cabbage root fly they do not really have any problems. Harvest them when the roots
swell to a ball. It is probably best to take them when they are smaller than you would
find in the shops, around the size of a large turnip.

Swede at a glance

Pot size

Sow/Plant

Care

Harvest

Plugs

March

Feed fortnightly through summer

September

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