P. 1
Zbigniew Brzezinski-Between Two Ages

Zbigniew Brzezinski-Between Two Ages

|Views: 38|Likes:
Published by 3rowski

More info:

Published by: 3rowski on Apr 26, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/10/2015

pdf

text

original

All of these factors make for a novel relationship between the United States and the world. There are imperial
overtones to it, and yet in its essence the relationship is quite different from the traditional imperial structure. To
be sure, the fact that in the aftermath of World War II a number of nations were directly dependent on the United
States in matters of security, politics, and economics created a system that in many respects, including that of
scale, superficially resembled the British, Roman, and Chinese empires of the past. 16

The more than a million
American troops stationed on some four hundred major and almost three thousand minor United States military
bases scattered all over the globe, the forty­two nations tied to the United States by security pacts, the American
military missions training the officers and troops of many other national armies, and the approximately two
hundred thousand United States civilian government employees in foreign posts all make for striking analogies
to the great classical imperial systems. 17
Nevertheless, the concept of "imperial" shields rather than reveals a relationship between America and
the world that is both more complex and more intimate. The "imperial" aspect of the relationship was, in the first
instance, a transitory and rather spontaneous response to the vacuum created by World War II and to the
subsequent felt threat from communism. Moreover, it was neither formally structured nor explicitly legitimized.
The "empire" was at most an informal system marked by the pretense of equality and non­interference. This
made it easier for the "imperial" attributes to recede once conditions changed. By the late 1960s, with a few

Scientists, Engineers and Physicians from the Developing Countries to the United States," Hearing before a Subcommittee on Government
Operations, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C., January 23, 1968, pp. 2, 96; hereafter cited as Hearing . . .).

*

It is estimated (by the Institute for Politics and Planning, Arlington, Virginia ) that the volume of digital communication will shortly exceed
human conversation across the Atlantic; it has already done so in the United States. Moreover, within the next decade the value of
information export from the United States to Europe will exceed the value of material exports.

­ 19 ­

exceptions the earlier direct political­military dependence on the United States had declined (often in spite of
political efforts by the United States to maintain it). Its place had been filled by the more pervasive but less
tangible influence of American economic presence and innovation as they originated directly from the United
States or were stimulated abroad by American foreign investment (the latter annually yielding a product
considerably in excess of the gross national product of most major countries). 18

In effect, ". . . American

influence has a porous and almost invisible quality. It works through the interpenetration of economic
institutions, the sympathetic harmony of political leaders and parties, the shared concepts of sophisticated
intellectuals, the mating of bureaucratic interests. It is, in other words, something new in the world, and not yet
well understood." 19

It is the novelty of America's relationship with the world— complex, intimate, and porous—that the
more orthodox, especially Marxist, analyses of imperialism fail to encompass. To see that relationship merely as
the expression of an imperial drive is to ignore the part played in it by the crucial dimension of the technological­
scientific revolution. That revolution not only captivates the imagination of mankind (who can fail to be moved
by the spectacle of man reaching the moon?) but inescapably compels imitation of the more advanced by the less
advanced and stimulates the export of new techniques, methods, and organizational skills from the former to the
latter. There is no doubt that this results in an asymmetrical relationship, but the content of that asymmetry must
be examined before it is called imperialism. Like every society, America no doubt prefers to be more rather than
less advanced; yet it is also striking that no other country has made so great an effort, governmentally and
privately, through business and especially through foundations, to export its know­how, to make public its space
findings, to promote new agricultural techniques, to improve educational facilities, to control population growth,
to improve health care, and so on. All of this has imperial overtones, and yet it is misleading to label it as such. 20
Indeed, unable to understand fully what is happening in then­own society, Americans find it difficult to
comprehend the global impact that that society has had in its unique role as disseminator of the technetronic
revolution. This impact is contradictory: it both promotes and undermines American interests as defined by
American policymakers; it helps to advance the cause of cooperation on a larger scale even as it disrupts existing
social or economic fabrics; it both lays the groundwork for well­being and stability and enhances the forces
working for instability and revolution. Unlike traditional imperialistic powers, which relied heavily on the
principle of divide et impera (practiced with striking similarity by the British in India and more recently by the
Russians in Eastern Europe), America has striven to promote regionalism both in Europe and in Latin America.
Yet in so doing, it is helping to create larger entities that are more capable of resisting its influence and of
competing with it economically. Implicitly and often explicitly modelled on the American pattern, modernization
makes for potentially greater economic well­being, but in the process it disrupts existing institutions, undermines
prevailing mores, and stimulates resentment that focuses directly on the source of change—America. The result
is an acute tension between the kind of global stability and order that America subjectively seeks and the
instability, impatience, and frustration that America unconsciously promotes.
The United States has emerged as the first global society in history. It is a society increasingly difficult
to delineate in terms of its outer Cultural and economic boundaries. Moreover, it is unlikely that in the
foreseeable future America will cease to exercise the innovative stimulus that is characteristic of its current
relationship with the world. By the end of this century (extrapolating from current trends) only some thirteen
countries are likely to reach the 1965 level of the per­capita gross national product of the United States. 21

Unless

there is major scientific and economic stagnation or a political crisis (see Part IV), at the end of the century
America will still be a significant force for global change, whether or not the dominant subjective mood is pro­
or anti­American.

3. Global Ghettos

The Third" World is a victim of the technetronic revolution. Whether the less developed countries grow
rapidly or slowly, or not at all, almost inevitably many of them will continue to be '' dominated by intensifying
feelings of psychological deprivation. In a world electronically intermeshed, absolute or relative under­
development will be intolerable, especially as the more advanced countries begin to move beyond that industrial
era into which the less developed countries have as yet to enter. It is thus no longer a matter of the "revolution of
rising expectations." The Third World today confronts the specter of insatiable aspirations.
At one time in history seemingly insoluble problems prompted fatalism because they were thought to be
part of a universal condition. Today similar problems stimulate frustration because they are seen as a particular
phenomenon by which others, more fortunate, are not afflicted. The plight of the urban ghettos in the United
States provides an appropriate analogy to the global position of the less developed countries, particularly in
Africa and Asia. Their problem is not that of the absence of change. *

In some cases it is not even that of

*

"The growth rate of these countries during the Development Decade has not reached the annual figure of 5 per cent which was set as the
minimum target. Actually the average rate for fifty­four countries, representing 87 per cent of the population of the developing world as a
whole, was only 4.5 per cent per annum from i960 to 1965. . . . Among the fifty­four countries mentioned, there is a group of eighteen with
an average growth rate of 7.3 per cent per annum, while the rate for fifteen countries was scarcely 2.7 per cent per annum. . . . Between these
two extremes there were twenty­one countries whose average growth rate was 4.9 per cent" ("Towards a Global Strategy of Development," a
report by the Secretary­General of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, New York, 1968, p. 5).

­ 20 ­

insufficiently rapid change, because in recent years several underdeveloped countries have attained im­pressive
and sustained rates of growth (South Korea, Taiwan, and Ghana, for example). Rather, their problem arises from
an intensifying feeling of relative deprivation of which they are made more acutely aware by the spread of
education and communications. As a result, passive resignation may give way to active explosions of undirected
anger.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->