³Humans are not ideally set up to understand logic; they are ideally set up

to understand stories.´ - ROGER C. SCHANK, cognitive scientist
³Our tendency to see and explain the world in common narratives is so
deeply ingrained that we often don¶t notice it²even when we¶ve written the
words ourselves. In the Conceptual Age, however, we must awaken to the
power of narrative.´ ± DANIEL PINK, Author ³A Whole New Mind´
Robert McKee: ³Although businesspeople are often suspicious of
stories«the fact is that statistics are used to tell lies and damned lies,
while accounting reports are often BS in a ball gown«. If a
businessperson understands that his or her own mind naturally wants to
frame experience in a story, the key to moving the audience is not to
resist this impulse but to embrace it.´3 ± ROBERT MCKEE, Story Seminar
³Stories are easier to remember²because in many ways,
stories are how we remember. ³Narrative imagining²story²is
the fundamental instrument of thought´
³Rational capacities depend on it. It is our chief means of
looking into the future, of predicting, of planning, and of
explaining«. Most of our experience, our knowledge and our
thinking is organized as stories.´1 ± MARK TURNER, author
³The Literary Mind´
³When facts become so widely available and instantly accessible, each one
becomes less valuable. What begins to matter more is the ability to place
these facts in context and to deliver them with emotional impact.´ ± DANIEL
PINK, Author ³A Whole New Mind´
‡3M gives its top executives storytelling
lessons.
‡NASA has begun using storytelling in its
knowledge management initiatives.
‡Xerox³recognizing that its repair personnel
learned to fix machines by trading stories
rather than by reading manuals³has collected
its stories into a database called Eureka that
Fortune estimates is worth $100 million to the
company.
NO««
He wasn·t on ´Survivorµ
He wasn·t a cast member on ´Lostµ



SOá..

.

.

cognitive scientist ³Our tendency to see and explain the world in common narratives is so deeply ingrained that we often don¶t notice it²even when we¶ve written the words ourselves. Story Seminar ³Stories are easier to remember²because in many ways. while accounting reports are often BS in a ball gown«.´ . our knowledge and our thinking is organized as stories.³Humans are not ideally set up to understand logic. Author ³A Whole New Mind´ Robert McKee: ³Although businesspeople are often suspicious of stories«the fact is that statistics are used to tell lies and damned lies. of planning.ROGER C. Most of our experience. they are ideally set up to understand stories. In the Conceptual Age. of predicting. It is our chief means of looking into the future. stories are how we remember.´1 ± MARK TURNER. the key to moving the audience is not to resist this impulse but to embrace it. however. SCHANK. and of explaining«.´ ± DANIEL PINK. author ³The Literary Mind´ . we must awaken to the power of narrative.´3 ± ROBERT MCKEE. ³Narrative imagining²story²is the fundamental instrument of thought´ ³Rational capacities depend on it. If a businessperson understands that his or her own mind naturally wants to frame experience in a story.

´ ± DANIEL PINK. ‡Xerox³recognizing that its repair personnel learned to fix machines by trading stories rather than by reading manuals³has collected its stories into a database called Eureka that Fortune estimates is worth $100 million to the company.³When facts become so widely available and instantly accessible. . What begins to matter more is the ability to place these facts in context and to deliver them with emotional impact. Author ³A Whole New Mind´ ‡3M gives its top executives storytelling lessons. ‡NASA has begun using storytelling in its knowledge management initiatives. each one becomes less valuable.

.

NO«« He wasn·t on ´Survivorµ He wasn·t a cast member on ´Lostµ .

.

touching. and relatable.His story is simple. ´Spend a day functioning without shoes!µ .

SOá.. .

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful