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Wired Workforce Networked CSR Final

Wired Workforce Networked CSR Final

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A white paper by Howard Greenstein and Tom Watson vetted by NYU Heyman Center and sponsored by JK Group about the use of Social Media in Corporate Social Responsibility.
A white paper by Howard Greenstein and Tom Watson vetted by NYU Heyman Center and sponsored by JK Group about the use of Social Media in Corporate Social Responsibility.

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Wired Workforce, Networked CSR Employee Involvement in the Age of Social Media

 

Authors:   Howard  Greenstein,  Adjunct  Lecturer,  NYU  Heyman  Center  for  Philanthropy  and  Fundraising,   and  President,  the  Harbrooke  Group,  Inc.   Tom  Watson,  President,  CauseWired  Group  
   

A  Special  Report  Sponsored  by  the  JK  Group  

 
   

Reviewed  by  Doug  White,  Academic  Director,  Heyman  Center  for  Philanthropy  and  Fundraising   at  New  York  University  

(CC)  2011  BY  THE  JK  GROUP  –  SOME  RIGHTS  RESERVED   THIS  PAPER  IS  LICENSED  UNDER  A  CREATIVE  COMMONS  ATTRIBUTION-­‐NONCOMMERCIAL-­‐SHAREALIKE  3.0  UNPORTED  LICENSE    
 

 

Table of Contents
1.  INTRODUCTION  AND  EXECUTIVE  SUMMARY  .....................................................................................................................  3   Goals  for  This  White  Paper  .................................................................................................................................................     4 Emerging  Social  Media  Trends  .........................................................................................................................................     4 2.  CORPORATE  CASE  STUDIES  ..................................................................................................................................................  6   Kaiser  Permanente  .................................................................................................................................................................     6 Microsoft  .....................................................................................................................................................................................     8 Pfizer  ..........................................................................................................................................................................................  10   UnitedHealth  Group  ............................................................................................................................................................  11   Western  Union  .......................................................................................................................................................................  12   Yahoo!  .......................................................................................................................................................................................  13   IMPORTANT  PUBLIC  CAMPAIGNS  .........................................................................................................................................  14   PEPSICO  ....................................................................................................................................................................................  14   JP  Morgan  Chase  ...................................................................................................................................................................  16   American  Express  .................................................................................................................................................................  16   3.  COME  GATHER  ‘ROUND  PEOPLE:  DISCUSSION  AND  CONCLUSIONS  ...........................................................................  18   The  Socially  Wired  Workforce  ........................................................................................................................................  18   Social  Media  Wave  in  Employee  Involvement  Programs?  .................................................................................  20   Conclusions:  What  Do  We  Know?  ..................................................................................................................................  22   The  Final  Score  ......................................................................................................................................................................  24   JK  GROUP  STATEMENT  ...........................................................................................................................................................  25   THE  CONVERSATION  ...............................................................................................................................................................  25   METHODOLOGY  ........................................................................................................................................................................  25   RESOURCES  AND  ACKNOWLEDGMENTS  ..............................................................................................................................  25   Reference  Section:  ................................................................................................................................................................  25   Acknowledgements  ..............................................................................................................................................................  27   About  JK  Group  ......................................................................................................................................................................  27   About  NYU  Heyman  Center  for  Philanthropy  and  Fundraising  .......................................................................  28   About  the  Authors  ................................................................................................................................................................  29  
       

WIRED  WORKFORCE,  NETWORKED  CSR      
 

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APRIL  29,  2011  

 

1.  Introduction  and  Executive  Summary  
The  terms  have  changed  over  the  last  decade.  Corporate  philanthropy  has  broadened  into  corporate  social   responsibility.  Companies  across  the  Fortune  500  and  the  small  and  mid-­‐sized  markets  moved  to  introduce  a   greater  sense  of  supporting  the  social  commons  in  their  operations.  Employee  giving  has  also  broadened  and   changed  dramatically  since  the  turn  of  the  Millennium.  Traditional  workplace  giving  campaigns  are  still  raising   funds  for  nonprofit  causes,  of  course.  But  the  disintermediation  of  digital  information  widely  available  over  the   Internet  opened  up  employee  involvement  in  causes,  even  in  company-­‐led  initiatives.  More  and  more,  executive   management  came  to  realize  that  employees  expected  choice  and  access  in  their  giving  and  volunteering.  And  as   individual  employees,  regional  and  retail  teams,  and  entire  divisions  began  to  take  more  charge  of  their  company-­‐ endorsed  social  action,  they  began  to  share.   Sharing  is  at  the  heart  of  social  media,  as  online  users  in  2011  are  rarely  one  click  away  from  being  able  to   communicate  their  interests  and  passions  with  their  networks  of  friends  and  contacts.  With  one  button  they  can   encourage  connection  to  a  cause,  share  direct  news  of  a  campaign,  recruit  donations  for  a  walk-­‐a-­‐thon,  or  mobilize   people  for  a  volunteer  event.  The  rise  of  Facebook,  with  its  special  treatment  of  the  Causes  application  has  done   much  to  increase  passive  participation  and  awareness,  if  not  encourage  donations  and  actions.  Twitter  campaigns   raised  attention  and  funds  for  organizations.  And  new  platforms  like  Kiva,  DonorsChoose,  GlobalGiving  and  many   others  experimented  with  new  and  often  successful  models  of  philanthropy  and  involvement.   Additionally,  recent  data  show  that  social  media  and  volunteering  are  highly  correlated.  A  national  survey  by  the   Pew  Research  Center’s  Internet  &  American  Life  Project  found  that  75%  of  all  American  adults  are  active  in  some   kind  of  voluntary  group  or  organization  but  Internet  users  are  more  likely  than  others  to  be  active:  80%  of  Internet   users  participate  in  groups,  compared  with  56%  of  non-­‐Internet  users.  And  social  media  users  are  even  more  likely   to  be  active:  82%  of  social  network  users  and  85%  of  Twitter  users  are  group  participants.  Of  those  in  groups,  22%   work  with  charitable  or  volunteer  organizations  and  the  Internet  users  report  higher  levels  of  active  group   participation.  Specifically,  Internet  users  report  higher  rates  of  charitable  donations,  volunteering,  attending   meetings  and  events,  and  taking  leadership  roles.  [Pew,  2011]   Companies  have  also  learned  to  use  the  power  of  the  social  web  to  get  their  messages  out,  from  major  corporate   participants  like  Pepsi,  American  Express  and  Chase  who  have  actively  encouraged  their  customers  to  vote  on   donations  via  social  networks,  to  smaller  efforts  using  the  internal  corporate  networks  to  encourage  participation   and  giving.  As  the  professionals  in  the  marketing  and  communications  functions  of  companies  adopt  this  method   of  web  communications,  the  giving  and  CSR  personnel  will  begin  to  see  where  it  fits  in  their  arsenal  of  tools.   Companies  have  begun  to  understand  that  their  work  and  their  social  responsibility  go  hand-­‐in-­‐hand.  Additionally,   their  philanthropic  donations  are  still  a  major  part  of  the  contributions  made  outside  the  company;  that  giving  is   the  result  of  both  direct  corporate  donations  and  employee-­‐directed  funds.  Employee  campaigns  are  typically  still   encouraged  by  internal  company  campaigns  that  utilize  lobby  or  coffee-­‐room  signs  and  email  notices,  floor/store   captains,  and  management  encouragement.  However,  as  noted  in  the  report  below,  we  see  these  “traditional”   methods  of  engagement  changing.  

WIRED  WORKFORCE,  NETWORKED  CSR      
 

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  Goals  for  This  White  Paper   The  purpose  of  this  report  is  to  place  a  marker  in  this  continuum  of  change,  and  provide  an  actionable  account  of   trends  and  best  practices  to  corporate  social  change  officers  and  executives.  With  its  publication,  we  hope  this   white  paper  will:   § § § § §   The  research  for  this  report  came  from  several  sources:  interviews  with  key  change-­‐makers  at  companies  in   various  stages  of  social  media  integration;  news  reports;  analysis  and  publications  from  trusted  research   organizations;  and  the  authors’  own  observations.       Emerging  Social  Media  Trends   • Companies  are  more  comfortable  using  Social  Media  tools  internally,  but  they’re  waiting  for  external   adoption  by  marketing:     o Internal  programs  for  employee  involvement  are  increasingly  socially  wired  using  a  variety  of   tools  and  platforms  to  encourage  employees  and  manage  to  collaborate,  both  locally  and   globally.  Companies  want  to  be  able  to  do  more  storytelling  to  show  community  involvement.     o Externally  transparent  social  media  programs  for  employee  involvement  are  still  the  exception   rather  than  the  rule.     o Consumer  brand  companies  are  the  early  adopters  of  public  social  media  networks  for   community  involvement  and  employee  engagement,  especially  those  that  embrace  social  media   for  consumer  marketing  and  branding.     o Few  companies  are  actively  engaging  their  customers  or  social  media  “fans”  or  followers  to  tell   them  how  to  use  their  CSR  and  philanthropy  dollars,  even  though  their  marketing  and   communications  strategies  make  use  of  the  tools.  Notable  exceptions  include  companies  like  JP   Morgan  Chase,  Pepsi  and  American  Express,  which  use  social  media  across  both  marketing  and   giving  channels  (though  not  necessarily  in  tandem).   o Corporate  community  involvement  officers  are  enthusiastic  about  future  adoption  of  more  public   forms  of  social  media  -­‐  in  concert  with  companywide  adoption  for  marketing  and  branding.   Employees  seek  choice  and  appreciate  democratic  participation:     o Employees  have  more  control  and  greater  choices  of  causes  to  support  in  corporate  community   involvement  programs  when  social  media  is  in  the  mix,  whether  the  programs  are  internally  or   externally  focused.  This  usually  involves  decentralizing  some  responsibility  from  corporate   Inform  and  encourage  practitioners  and  company  leaders  adapting  to  the  changing  communications   landscape  in  CSR  work.   Encourage  actions  and  experimentation  –  including  new  pilots,  different  strategies,  and  new  ideas.   Provide  best  practices,  stories  from  the  field,  and  usable  resources  to  professionals.   Consider  appropriate  directions  and  strategies  for  CSR  professionals  to  consider.   Warn  of  potential  pitfalls,  challenges,  and  cautions  in  adapting  to  social  media  in  CSR.  

WIRED  WORKFORCE,  NETWORKED  CSR      
 

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headquarters  to  teams  of  workers,  including  regional  management  in  the  field  and  can  lead  to  a   great  sense  of  long-­‐term  community  involvement.     o Many  socially  enabled  programs  rely  on  democratic  components  to  power  involvement:  voting,   contests,  transparent  nomination  processes,  and  open  campaigns  to  encourage  participation.   These  encourage  more  “ownership”  of  community  programs,  and  lead  to  better  stories  and   sharing  among  employees.   Leadership  is  required  to  ensure  continued  participation  in  campaigns,  since  employee  participation  is   decreasing:     o Personal  management  participation  -­‐  aka  leadership  -­‐  is  seen  as  a  crucial  element  of  success,   even  in  pure  “crowdsourced”  employee  engagement  programs.  When  senior  people  are   involved,  vocal  and  active  participation  increases  and  the  impact  is  seen  on  both  fundraising  and   volunteering,  as  well  as  in  softer  benefits  like  morale  and  internal  communications.     o Employee  participation  is  decreasing.  There  has  been  a  steady  decrease  in  the  number  of  eligible   employees  participating  in  the  annual  fund  raising  drive  (despite  some  of  the  “hot  spots”  in  this   report).  Younger  employees  participate  less,  and  campaign  managers  are  struggling  to  find  ways   to  make  the  campaign  more  appealing  to  their  newer  employees.  Research  finds  traditional   workplace  campaign  isn’t  as  appealing  to  younger  employees.   Both  social  media  and  traditional  communications  methods  are  used  in  employee  giving  campaigns  and   external  outreach  to  communities:     o Facebook  and  Twitter  are  rarely  adopted  for  employee  engagement  due  to  corporate  concerns  in   several  key  areas,  including  legal  liability,  marketing  control,  public  relations,  and  human   resources.  Blogs  are  rare  but  deployed  in  some  instances.     o “Old  school”  corporate  communications  still  hold  prominence  in  employee  involvement   campaigns  over  social  media  -­‐  corporate  intranets,  newsletters  (print  and  online),  and   office/store  bulletin  boards  remain  vital  communications  tools  in  the  chain  of  promotion.     o Technology  used  includes  many  and  varied  platforms.  Some  companies  are  adapting  software   made  for  other  purposes,  including  Microsoft  and  Yahoo.     o The  role  of  video  is  growing  (Microsoft  case  study,  Kaiser  Permanente  case  study).  However,   there  is  a  lack  of  feedback  and  companies  are  not  evaluating  whether  the  giving  is  affected  by   video  either  in  a  positive  or  negative  way.   Formal  feedback  loops  for  Social  Media  are  the  exception  rather  than  the  rule:     o Specific  quantitative  analysis  of  employee  giving  and  involvement  is  relatively  rare.     o Focus  tends  to  stay  on  top-­‐line  results  like  total  of  funds  raised  and  number  of  employees   involved,  so  the  formal  linkage  to  social  media-­‐driven  success  is  still  hard  to  come  by.  

 

WIRED  WORKFORCE,  NETWORKED  CSR      
 

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2.  Corporate  Case  Studies  
The  following  case  studies  were  created  by  interviewing  the  people  and  teams  responsible  for  the  efforts  analyzed.   The  authors  sought  diversity  in  industry,  location,  and  company  size.     Kaiser  Permanente   Denver,  Colorado   Goals:  Kaiser  Permanente  is  a  nonprofit  Healthcare  System  that  provides  health  care  and  health  insurance.   According  to  Steve  Krizman,  Senior  Director  of  integrated  communications  for  KP  Colorado,  community  benefit  is   “interwoven  into  everything  we  do.”   Short  Story:  Kaiser  Permanente  is  using  social  media  efforts  on  Facebook  as  well  as  a  blog  and  connections  with   local  traditional  media  to  serve  the  community  and  make  their  expertise  known.   Tactics:  Kaiser  Permanente,  a  nonprofit  health  system  in  Colorado  (and  other  states)  recently  started  an  initiative   via  a  “Fan  Page”  on  Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/KPColorado.      

    The  fan  page  serves  several  purposes,  including  getting  people  into  conversations  about  good  health.  For  instance,   Kaiser  donated  money  to  the  City  of  Denver  bike-­‐share  program,  which  lets  people  borrow  bikes  and  commute.  In   addition  to  providing  funding,  Kaiser  Permanente  uses  the  Facebook  page  to  support  and  encourage  the  use  of  the  
WIRED  WORKFORCE,  NETWORKED  CSR      
 

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program.  They  asked  people  to  share  stories  about  their  most  memorable  bike  experience,  and  the  people  with   the  best  stories  got  free  bike  helmets.  Their  intent  and  goal,  according  to  Krizman,  is  to  “create  a  groundswell   about  this  healthy  commute.  It  is  not  only  for  marketing  Kaiser  Permanente,  but  we  make  it  clear  to  prospects  that   we  are  an  organization  that  cares  about  total  health  of  our  community  and  we  highlight  the  quality  of  our   clinicians.”     The  Kaiser  Permanente  Colorado  Facebook  fan  page  grew  to  780  followers  over  an  18-­‐month  period.  “We  post   two  to  three  items  to  the  page  each  week,  and  nearly  every  one  generates  “likes”  or  comments,  which  means  the   post  is  exposed  to  each  fan’s  social  network.  This  magnifies  the  reach  of  news  releases  and  content  we  post   elsewhere  online.”     Kaiser  Permanente’s  other  initiative  involved  creating  a  health  information  campaign  online,  on  TV  and  in  print   called  “Elevate  Your  Health  Colorado.”  A  partnership  between  the  Denver  Post,  CBS4,  and  Kaiser  Permanente,  the   campaign  features  patient  stories,  online  videos  and  physician  blogs.     The  goal  is  to  provide  important  health  information  to  the  public  and  to  promote  the  top-­‐notch  care  Kaiser   Permanente  physicians  provide.  Kaiser  Permanente  runs  the    www.elevateyourhealthco.com  website  and  provides   stories  and  video  from  their  own  staff  and  an  agency.  KP  also  buys  TV  and  print  ads  that  drive  people  to  website   with  stories.  Their  partnership  enables  a  community  benefit  rate  for  ads  on  the  CBS4  and  in  the  Post.     Additionally,  Kaiser   Permanente  encourages   its  6,000  employees  to  get   the  word  out  about  the   “Elevate  Your  Health”  site   and  the  Facebook  page  by   asking  the  employees  to   promote  these  properties   with  their  friends  and   family.  They  are  in  the   process  of  distributing  a   corporate  social  media   policy  so  employees  know   how  to  communicate.     Krizman  notes:  “For  the   Elevate  Health  site,  we   can  measure  the  visits  and   time  on  site,  which  is   same  as  on  a  non-­‐social   site,  but  we  can  also  measure  engagement.  We  look  at  how  many  people  write  comments  or  ask  questions  of   physicians,  and  try  to  judge  the  quality  of  interaction.  We  ask,  ‘how  does  it  drive  messages  about  the  quality  of   care?’”     The  feedback  becomes  more  rich  and  detailed  than  just  running  in  print  ads,  which  they  hope  people  saw.  “In   print,  TV  or  online,  we  can  have  call  to  action.  But  the  call  to  action  online  has  higher  response  rate.”      
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Microsoft   Redmond,  WA   Goals:  Microsoft’s  Employee  Engagement  program’s  goal  is  to  help  support  the  passions  of  its  employees,  whether   through  matching  gifts  of  up  to  $12,000  per  employee,  per  year,  or  $17  per  hour  paid  to  the  nonprofit  with  which   the  employee  volunteers.  They  support  employees  and  help  create  lasting  relationships  between  employees  and   their  community.  Internally  the  programs  assist  with  recruiting  and  retaining  employees  as  well  as  improving   morale.   Short  Story:  Re-­‐use  of  Microsoft  technology  originally  used  for  an  ad  campaign  yielded  interest  for  the  employee   engagement  programs,  specifically  during  the  giving  campaign.     Tactics:  Microsoft’s  internal  employee  giving  site  “Give”  has  been  run  as  an  internal  Microsoft  SharePoint  site  with   integrated  links  out  to  JK  Group’s  EasyMatch  vendor  portal.  Traditionally,  the  site  had  lots  of  information,  but  was   not  a  “feel  good  site.”  It  was  more  about  disseminating  information  than  inspiring  their  employees  to  get  involved   and  participate  in  the  programs.  Then  Microsoft  had  its  first  ever  layoffs  in  2009,  just  two  weeks  prior  to  the  start   of  the  giving  campaign,  and  there  was  announcement  of  further  cost  cutting  measures.  The  team  decided  that   instead  of  their  informational  site  they  needed  an  inspirational  site  where  employees  could  tell  their  own  stories  of   community  involvement  –  more  of  a  grassroots  effort.  They  created  a  warm  feeling,  inspirational  site  replacing   much  of  the  text  and  heavy  navigation  with  images,  warm  color  tones,  easy  buttons,  and  direct  links  to  tools  from   the  JK  Group.     Original  Informational  site,  before  redesign:    

    For  the  end-­‐of-­‐year  2009  campaign  the  giving  team  created  a  video  wall  idea.  They  borrowed  the  code  from  the   “I’m  a  PC”  consumer  campaign,  which  uses  Silverlight  technology  to  show  video  clips.  They  repurposed  this  ‘code’   to  create  a  video  wall  where  employees  could  post  videos,  pictures  and  type  in  their  stories  of  community   involvement.  The  site  allows  any  employee  to  search  and  view  their  colleague’s  stories  and  text  descriptions,   which  can  include  links  to  the  nonprofits  that  employee  is  passionate  about.      
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Post-­‐redesign,  with  video  wall  image:    

    During  the  first  year  of  use,  the  Microsoft  team  saw  about  100  stories  uploaded.  Now  they  are  up  to  250  videos   and  stories  on  wall.  Most  employees  create  the  videos  themselves,  but  several  executives  created  their  stories  in   professional  studios  that  are  built  on  the  Microsoft  campus.     Employees  fill  out  a  simple  form,  upload  video  or  pictures,  and  type  in  a  story  as  well.  The  community  affairs   “Give”  team  gets  a  list  of  videos  to  review  and  publish.  Once  approved,  the  videos  and  pictures  are  automatically   compressed  and  converted  into  a  usable  format  and  stored  on  a  server  for  display  on  the  video  wall.  Each  story  has   its  own  dedicated  link,  so  employees  are  able  to  add  a  small  picture  icon  to  their  auto  signature  within  Outlook   email  and  link  to  their  story.  This  way,  anyone  who  they  email  internally  is  able  to  click  on  the  internal  link  to  view   the  personal  story  pages,  pictures,  and  videos  –  thus  empowering  employees  to  promote  their  video  and  giving   efforts  to  each  other  without  effort.     For  2010,  the  team  added  the  ability  to  search  by  area  of  interest.  “We  found  this  was  an  outlet  for  employees   wanting  to  share  their  stories  and  promote  their  favorite  nonprofits,”  said  Kevin  Espirito,  senior  mananger  for   Microsoft  Community  Affairs.  “Employees  that  had  an  area  of  interest,  say  ‘animals,  or  environment,’  could  search   and  pull  up  employee  stories  on  these  topics.  We  also  enabled  employees  to  search  for  causes  supported  by  peers   in  their  group,  by  creating  a  filter  “by  manager”  or  “by  team  leader”  as  well  as  an  open  search  that  scans  the   written  summary  text  of  the  stories.”     Espirito  also  noted  that  anecdotally  they  had  heard  several  different  stories  where  employees  saw  videos  and  took   action.  One  east  coast  employee  posted  a  story  about  a  cancer  research  nonprofit  he  supported,  and  the  video   mentioned  a  specific  child  who  had  to  travel  for  treatments.  Someone  from  the  Zune  music  player  team  saw  the   video  and  offered  to  send  that  child  a  music-­‐filled  Zune  for  travel,  and  also  asked  a  friend  on  the  Xbox  team  to   donate  an  Xbox  for  the  child  to  use  at  home  while  convalescing.     “One  other  thing  we  did  find,”  said  Espirito,  “was  that  as  we  share  how  we  are  using  technology  internally  with   nonprofits  and  they  are  hearing  about  the  video  wall  from  employees  and  others  in  the  industry,  it  is  now   something  thing  that  the  nonprofits  ask  of  Microsoft  employees  involved  with  their  organizations  –  ‘please  make  a   video  to  help  promote  our  cause  with  other  Microsoft  employees.’”    

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As  of  April,  2011,  Microsoft  has  packaged  the  video  wall  for  free  use  by  nonprofits.  They  can  put  it  on  their  own   websites  and  have  supporters  contribute  videos  or  have  the  ability  to  upload  videos  and  stories  they  want  viewed   from  the  story  wall  placed  on  their  website.  The  software  bundle  is  distributed  for  free  via  Npower   (http://www.npower.org/).  The  software  is  currently  built  on  Microsoft’s  .NET  platform,  but  they’re  also  building  it   out  for  open  source  technologies,  and  looking  at  putting  it  on  Windows  Azure  (cloud  hosting  services)  so  it  can  be   hosted  off  premises  by  a  nonprofit.  They  are  also  exploring  how  they  can  help  other  companies  use  this  technology   (as  well  as  the  customized  SharePoint)  in  the  hopes  of  scaling  good  through  the  use  of  technology.     Pfizer   New  York,  NY   Goals:  As  a  member  of  today’s  rapidly  changing  global  community,  Pfizer  is  striving  to  adapt  to  the  evolving  needs   of  society  and  contribute  to  the  overall  health  and  wellness  of  our  world.  More  information:   http://www.pfizer.com/responsibility/   Short  Story:  Without  relying  on  public  social  media  platforms,  Pfizer  has  nonetheless  implemented  effective   programs  that  are  both  internal  and  “social”  in  its  use  of  technology  and  the  creation  of  peer-­‐to-­‐peer  networks.   Tactics:  “We  don’t  (explicitly)  use  social  media  to  promote  employee  engagement,”  explained  Dezarie  Mayers,   senior  manager  for  corporate  responsibility.  However,  Pfizer’s  volunteer  initiative  -­‐  called  VOL.UNTEERZ  -­‐  is  highly   networked  and  has  used  the  socially-­‐connected  on  line  contest  structure  to  increase  employee  engagement.  The   program  is  essentially  a  volunteers  challenge  -­‐  “the  opportunity  for  colleagues  to  share  volunteer  projects  with  the   rest  of  us,”  according  to  Mayers  -­‐  and  employees  can  propose  and  vote  up  projects.   “The  emphasis  is  on  volume  and  impact  -­‐  actual  employee  initiative  -­‐  and  doing  great  work  around  the  world,”   Mayers  explained.  Pfizer’s  employees  nominated  668  projects  from  41  countries  within  a  five-­‐week  period  in   2010.“We  are  stunned  and  excited  at  the  same  time,”  said  Mayers.  Pfizer  has  offices  in  93  countries  and  operates   in  150,  so  the  program  quickly  gained  wide  participation.   There  were  over  22,000  votes  using  an  internal  system  provided  by  Spigot  Software  (a  human  resources  platform);   employees  read  submissions  and  voted.  The  most  successful  projects  had  active  teams  seeking  votes  and  executive   leadership  mattered  quite  a  bit.   The  winner  (with  700  votes)  was  a  nutritional  program  in  the  Philippines  that  provides  food  for  indigent  students   at  an  elementary  school,  helping  to  house  and  feed  them.  The  victory  showed  a  social  approach,  with  employees   sharing  the  opportunity.  The  program  was  considered  a  big  success  at  Pfizer  with  a  high  participation  rate,  low   campaign  cost,  and  real  social  impact.  It  was  so  successful  that  Pfizer  extended  the  winners  pool  to  the  top  25   projects  (it  only  planned  on  15  originally)  and  each  received  $1,500.  There  were  15  awards  made  in  the  U.S.  and   Puerto  Rico  and  10  overseas,  including  Ireland,  Philippines,  Australia,  Brazil,  France,  India  and  Pakistan.   The  internal  social  contest  is  also  important  in  context  of  Pfizer’s  recently-­‐launched  volunteers  network  in  which   the  aim  is  to  encourage  volunteerism  around  the  world,  beginning  with  eight  countries  -­‐  Australia,  Canada,   Philippines,  India,  Ireland,  Puerto  Rico,  Russia,  and  the  U.S.  -­‐  or  about  50%  of  the  company  population.  Pfizer  tracks   volunteer  work  online  through  JK  Group’s  Integrated  Volunteer  Management  System  (IVMS)  software.  The  pilot   phase  featured  121  projects  from  126  employees  and  involved  1,600  employees  through  the  site.      

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UnitedHealth  Group   Minneapolis,  MN     Goals:  To  help  people  achieve  the  goal  of  living  healthier  lives,  UnitedHealth  Group  believes  it  is  necessary  to  be   active  citizens  of  our  communities,  nation,  and  world.  Through  its  foundations,  volunteerism,  community   involvement,  and  commitment  to  the  environment,  the  company  endeavors  to  positively  impact  people’s  health   and  communities.  More  information:  http://www.unitedhealthgroup.com/main/socialresponsibility.aspx   Short  Story:  As  the  leader  in  a  highly-­‐regulated  industry,  UnitedHealth  Group  has  been  careful  in  the  adoption  of   social  media,  but  has  used  internal  social  networks  to  great  effect  with  employees  across  its  large,  multinational   workforce.   Tactics:  Employee  engagement  for  a  diverse  worldwide  workforce  of  87,000  people  is  important  to  UnitedHealth   Group,  and  internal  digital  and  socially-­‐networked  tools  and  techniques  are  increasingly  important  to  the   company’s  efforts.  The  company  has  seen  a  steady  increase  over  the  past  seven  years  in  its  United  Giving  Program.   “We’re  committed  to  growing  the  program  and  documenting  results  through  our  giving  partner  platform,”  said   Alisson  Ptak,  Program  Manager,  Social  Responsibility.  Last  year  saw  an  11-­‐percent  increase  to  a  total  of  $13.9   million  pledged.   The  company  works  with  VolunteerMatch  on  employee  involvement,  in  a  program  that  includes  both  company-­‐ sponsored  and  non-­‐sponsored  volunteer  opportunities,  as  well  as  team  and  individual  efforts.  “Our  goal  for  2010   was  145,000  volunteer  hours  and  we  hit  that  in  late  October,”  said  Ptak,  who  said  the  company  had  cleared   200,000  volunteer  hours  for  the  full  year  “and  we’re  really  proud  of  that.”   UnitedHealth  Group  runs  all  the  programs  through  its  intranet  site;  individuals  can  find  information  on  corporate   philanthropy,  employee  giving,  volunteerism,  guidelines,  and  policies.  On  the  philanthropy  side,  the  company   works  with  nine  giving  partners  and  more  than  7,300  member  agencies  -­‐  and  UnitedHealth  Group  matches  pledges   to  these  organizations  dollar  for  dollar.   Social  media  integration  has  been  a  small  but  important  part  of  the  effort.  In  2010,  the  theme  for  the  giving   campaign  was  “Get  into  Giving”  and  the  company  held  an  employee  video  and  photo  contest  for  employees  “to   tell  us  why  you  get  into  giving.”  Peers  voted  on  employee  videos  and  winners  from  across  the  company  received   $250  for  their  favorite  giving  partner,  with  $1,000  for  the  overall  winner.  The  contest  ran  through  the  company’s   intranet  site  “and  we  got  a  great  response,”  said  Ptak.  More  than  30,000  “like”  votes  were  recorded  from  the   company’s  employees.   “For  an  employee  giving  campaign  we  were  thrilled  with  employee  response,”  said  Ptak.  “We  got  eight  times  the   normal  traffic  to  our  internal  giving  site  and  people  shared  the  videos  all  over  the  company.  The  submissions  were   really  awesome.”  

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  Western  Union   Englewood,  Colorado     Goals:  The  Western  Union  Foundation  supports  initiatives  to  empower  people  through  access  to  education  and  by   fostering  economic  opportunity.  More  information:  http://foundation.westernunion.com/     Short  Story:  Western  Union  uses  a  range  of  social  tools  from  blogs  to  Facebook  to  promote  employee  giving  and   engagement  in  campaigns  that  are  both  internally  and  externally  focused,  and  which  lead  to  more  exposure  for   Western  Union’s  corporate  social  responsibility.     Tactics:  Western  Union  is  using  social  media  to  communicate  its  corporate  social  responsibility  work,  as  well  as   cause-­‐related  and  Foundation  programs,  via  regular  updates  on  Facebook  and  other  online  sites  and  social  media   networks.  “We  are  using  the  web  and  social  media  to  actively  incent  consumer  engagement  in  charitable   programs,”  explained  Carolyn  Cavicchio,  director  of  stakeholder  engagement  for  Western  Union  Foundation.  “For   example,  we  are  encouraging  Facebook  visitors  to  take  part  in  and  tell  their  friends  about  a  campaign  to  support   Mercy  Corps,  our  leading  NGO  partner.  The  Western  Union  Foundation  will  match  all  gifts  for  Mercy  Corps’s  work   in  Haiti  dollar-­‐for-­‐dollar  up  to  $500,000,  for  a  total  fund-­‐raising  goal  of  $1  million.  Donations  can  be  made  online,   via  text-­‐to-­‐give  on  mobile  phones,  or  in-­‐person  at  participating  US  Western  Union  agent  locations.”     Western  Union  also  used  social  media  extensively  in  its  year-­‐end  “50  Days  of  Giving”  Facebook  campaign  in  2010.   The  company  encouraged  both  consumers  and  employees  to  log  in  on  a  daily  basis  and  vote  for  one  of  five   charities.  Each  charity  received  a  grant  of  $20,000  to  participate,  and  the  winning  charity  received  an  additional   $150,000.  This  built  on  the  success  of  a  2008  Facebook  campaign,  which  reached  Western  Union’s  traditional   consumers  across  borders  as  well  as  mass-­‐market  audiences  –  generating  millions  of  media  impressions,  driving   172,248  visitors  and  helping  to  spark  the  charity  voting  trend.  The  Red  Cross  was  the  “winner”  of  that  campaign.     Employees  are  encouraged  to  participate.  “We   promote  employee  engagement  in  a  number  of   ways,”  explained  Cavicchio.  “For  example,  for   “50  Days  of  Giving”  we  sent  internal  emails  to   our  global  employee  base,  and  also  posted   messages  on  our  Intranet,  educating  employees   about  the  program  and  encouraging  them  to   both  vote  as  well  as  share  the  campaign   message  with  their  own  Facebook  friends.  We   also  posted  signage  all  around  our  office  about   the  campaign  and  held  a  holiday  event  -­‐  with   music,  games,  and  prizes  -­‐  when  the  campaign   launched.”       Western  Union  also  holds  “Foundation  Fridays”   on  the  company  intranet,  which  features  a   photo  from  one  of  the  Foundation’s  grantees   and  a  quick  blurb  about  the  work  it  is  funding.  A  
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“Community”  tab  in  the  weekly  company-­‐wide  e-­‐newsletter  that  features  more  in-­‐depth  stories  of  grantees.   Western  Union  has  also  just  added  both  a  blogging  and  an  online  “communities”  function  to  the  intranet,  so  that   employees  can  “gather”  around  issues  of  interest;  this  was  used  during  the  2010  employee  giving  campaign,  for   employees  to  share  their  reasons  for  participating  and  to  encourage  others  to  give.   Yahoo!   Sunnyvale,  CA   Goals:  The  goal  at  Yahoo!  for  Good  is  to  empower  people  to  make  a  positive  impact  by  leveraging  our  audience,   our  products,  and  our  employees.  More  information:  http://forgood.yahoo.com     Short  Story:  Yahoo!  uses  its  huge  online  audience  to  spread  news  of  good  things  in  the  world,  and  to  encourage   the  growth  of  good  deeds.     Tactics:  The  Yahoo!  For  Good  group  is  part  of  Yahoo!’s  Corporate  Marketing  team.  According  to  Connie  Chan,   Manager  of  Yahoo!  for  Good,  one  initiative  they  have  is  reporting  on  elements  of  “good  in  the  news”  and  pushing   that  content  to  Yahoo!  landing  pages,  like  the  Home  page,  with  millions  of  viewers  per  day.  One  member  of  their   team  is  focused  on  surfacing  more  “For  Good”  content,  since  content  is  a  huge  part  of  what  Yahoo!  does.  This   effort  drives  engagement,  is  good  for  advertisers  and  is  compelling  to  Yahoo!’s  customers.     For  the  “How  Good  Grows”  campaign,  http://kindness.yahoo.com  the  goal  is  to  challenge  Yahoo!  users  to  create  a   ripple  of  kindness  by  doing  a  good  act,  then  sharing  it  online.  By  showing  what  they  are  doing  that  is  “good  and   kind”  it  will  be  inspiring  their  friends  to  do  something  else  good.  This  effort  is  centered  on  trying  to  increase  the   amount  of  good  in  the  world  with  a  goal  to  spread  goodwill  and  kindness.  This  campaign  is  more  individual   focused,  because  anyone  can  contribute  without  being  part  of  a  charity.     During  2009  the  company   had  more  than  300,000   updates  for  acts  of   kindness.  However,  in  2010,   that  number  dropped  (as   expected)  to  only  93,000   updates.  The  difference  was   that  in  2009  the  team   integrated  this  campaign   into  Yahoo  Mail,  with  its   millions  of  users,  but  were   not  able  to  get  that   positioning  in  2010.  The   lesson  they  learned  is   simple.  “Go  where  people   already  are,  rather  than   trying  to  drive  them  to  a   destination,”  according  to   Chan.  However,  she  stated   that  her  goal  for  the  campaign  revolves  more  around  Yahoo!’s  reputation  rather  than  raw  numbers.  They  were   able  to  obtain  lots  of  positive  public  relations  mentions,  and  able  to  get  a  lot  of  viral  impressions,  including  over  10  
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million  exposures  via  Twitter.  While  internally,  Yahoo!’s  CMO  is  an  unofficial  executive  sponsor,  this  campaign   doesn’t  have  an  “official”  corporate  sponsor.   Yahoo!  also  has  a  Yahoo!  employee-­‐run  foundation.  All  money  donated  to  the  foundation  and  all  volunteer  events   sponsored  are  run  by  Yahoo!  employees,  with  $2  million  a  year  given  to  community  organizations  that  are   championed  by  employees.  Employees  can  donate  a  minimum  of  $50,  and  then  may  champion  a  grant  for  their   cause  for  up  to  $40,000.  All  grants  and  organizations  are  vetted,  and  a  group  of  employee  volunteers  pick  the   recipients  of  the  grants.     One  benefit  of  this  foundation  is  program  and  leadership  growth.  From  a  recent  research  study  by  Adam  Grant  at   Wharton,  the  foundation  discovered  that  involved  employees  develop  skills  and  join  new  projects  –  which  they   may  not  have  been  able  to  do  with  the  skills  from  their  current  positions.  For  example,  one  of  the  employee   foundation  board  members  in  New  York  works  with  the  sales  organization.  When  his  managers  found  out  about   his  involvement,  he  was  asked  to  create  a  volunteer  program  with  sales  team  members  and  clients,  which  was   successful.  His  professional  skill  set  grew  from  his  foundation  work.  

Important  Public  Campaigns  
We  also  studied  three  well-­‐branded  public-­‐facing  campaigns  of  note  to  study  their  use  of  social  media  and   implications  for  employee  involvement.   PEPSICO   Purchase,  NY     Goals:  The  Pepsi  Refresh  Project  is  a  brand  marketing  initiative  from  Pepsi  to  help  the  beverage  side  of  the   business  achieve  brand  health  objectives.  It  aligns  with  Pepsico’s  “Performance  with  Purpose”  initiative  and  is   driven  by  the  philosophy  that  in  future  the  company  can  build  up  business,  perform  effectively  and  yet  be  a   positive  organization  with  a  positive  role  in  society.  The  goals  are  not  mutually  exclusive.  Along  with  strong   financial  performance  and  business  performance,  PepsiCo  also  focuses  on  human  sustainability,  environmental   sustainability  and  talent  sustainability.  The  company  is  investing  in  sustainable  growth  in  a  way  that  also   acknowledges  its  role  in  society  and  the  world  at  large.     Short  Story:  Pepsi  uses  its  marketing  muscle  across  multiple  consumer  engagement  channels  (TV,  print,  digital,   web,  and  social)  to  encourage  submission  of  projects  that  will  “Refresh  the  World”  and  allows  its  customers  and   fans  to  vote  on  where  it  spends  over  $20  million  per  year.  

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  Tactics:  In  2010,  Pepsi  very  publicly  launched  its  “Refresh  Project”  through  their  website  at   http://RefreshEverything.com.  It  is  important  to  note  that  “the  Refresh  Project  is  not  a  corporate  philanthropy  or   CSR  effort,  it  is  a  brand  marketing  effort,”  said  Shiv  Singh,  head  of  digital  for  PepsiCo  Beverages  America.  “We  are   bringing  the  worlds  of  brand  marketing,  digital  marketing  and  cause  or  purpose  driven  marketing  together  to   achieve  brand  objectives.  If  you  go  back  1.5  years  and  think  about  where  country  was,  we  were  in  an  economic   crisis;  it  was  a  depressing   time  in  America  for  many   reasons.  We  landed  on  the   premise  that  Pepsi  is  about   refreshing  the  world  and   Pepsi  is  fun  and  light.  We  saw   with  the  crisis  that  people   wanted  to  make  a  difference   in  their  world,  and  they  felt   that  they  could.  When  we   aligned  with  those  values  of   making  a  difference  and  ‘can   do’  it  benefits  our  consumers,   it  builds  brand  loyalty  and  it   drives  our  business  forward.”     Pepsi  announced  it  would  award  more  than  $20  million  dollars  in  2010  to  ideas  that  will  move  the  world  forward,   including  $1.3  million  a  month  to  the  ideas  Americans  select  as  the  best  in  open  online  voting.  Pepsi  will  fund  ideas   that  will  move  the  world  forward  in  six  categories:  health,  arts  &  culture,  food  &  shelter,  the  planet,   neighborhoods  and  education.     Pepsi  is  partnering  with  several  groups  to  help  it  run  the  program.  GOOD,  a  for-­‐profit  collaboration  linking  people,   businesses  and  nonprofits,  will  develop  criteria  for  the  projects  and  help  people  craft  their  ideas.  Other  groups  will   help  administer  the  program’s  grants,  among  other  functions.  Pepsi  also  worked  with  traditional  agency  Chait,   digital  agency  Huge,  PR  firms  Weber  Shandwick,  Edelman,  Undercurrent  and  a  few  other  agencies  to  execute  the   campaigns.     The  Refresh  Project  worked  by  allowing  individuals  and  organizations  to  submit  proposals  for  specific  projects  in   areas  listed  above.  The  categories  have  been  modified  in  2011  to  include  new  categories  arts  &  music,   communities,  education,  and  a  new  rotating  category  called  the  Pepsi  Challenge  and  removed  health-­‐related  and   advocacy  causes.  Groups  accepted  are  allowed  to  compete  and  have  their  efforts  voted  upon  by  fans  via  Pepsi’s   Refresh  Everything  Facebook  application  and  at  RefreshEverything.com.     In  2011,  Pepsi  will  give  out  more  than  a  million  dollars  in  grants  each  month,  with  60  grants  ranging  from  $5,000  to   $50,000.  The  number  of  overall  grants  awarded  each  month  will  almost  double  compared  to  last  year,  while  Pepsi   is  introducing  four  grant  tiers:  $5K,  $10K,  $25K  and  $50K.  Pepsi  is  also  amending  the  submission  process  by   accepting  project  entries  during  a  five-­‐day  period  at  the  beginning  of  each  month.  Each  month,  1,500  new  ideas   will  be  randomly  selected  for  voting,  increasing  the  number  of  ideas  posted  to  the  site.  Staying  true  to  the   democratic  process,  ideas  with  the  most  consumer  votes  will  be  funded.  From  May  through  December,  voting   opens  on  the  first  of  each  month,  and  60  monthly  grantees  will  be  announced  beginning  in  June.    
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Singh  said:  “In  2010  we  gave  out  $1.3  million  per  month  to  fund  the  ideas  that  have  the  most  votes  that  make  a   difference  in  people’s  community,  and  then  we  play  a  role  in  helping  them  come  to  life.  These  are  large  sums  of   money.  With  that,  unfortunately,  there  are  always  a  few  people  who  try  to  game  the  system  to  win  grants.  We’ve   seen  a  few  occasions  where  people  have  tried  to  hack  the  system  or  get  additional  votes.  When  we  found  this  out  -­‐   we  rescinded  grants  and  gave  them  to  the  next  group  on  the  leader  board.  We’ve  had  87  million  votes,  an   immense  amount  of  traffic,  comments,  engagement  and  interactions.  The  hacking  was  really  small,  so  I’ve  come   away  with  an  incredible  faith  in  humanity  that  there  are  so  few  trying  to  cheat.”     Pepsi  has  also  decided  to  roll  out  the  program  to  Europe  starting  in  2011.  “At  Pepsi  we  are  looking  at  global   conversations,  borderless  brands,  and  topics  that  are  global  in  nature,”  said  Bonin  Bough,  global  director  of  digital   &  social  media  at  PepsiCo  told  the  author  at  the  SXSW  conference  in  March  2011.  “If  you  look  at  our  big   participation  in  Social  Media  Week,  in  four  countries,  we  want  to  have  conversations  from  a  global  perspective.   We  are  looking  at  changing  the  world,  so  we  have  to  look  at  the  entire  world.”  This  campaign  is  one  of  the  most   visible  public  efforts  by  a  major  global  firm  to  tie  corporate  giving  to  a  public-­‐facing  campaign  linked  to  social   media.     Other  campaigns  (not  interviewed  for  this  report):   JP  Morgan  Chase   New  York,  NY   The  Chase  Community  Giving  effort  was  one  of  the  largest  online  contests,  open  to  more  than  500,000  charities  at   the  outset  in  late  2009.  More  than  one  million  people  joined  Chase’s  Community  Giving  Facebook  page  and   received  five  votes  per  day  to  apply  to  five  different  nonprofits.  The  top  100  vote-­‐getters  received  $25,000  in   donation,  and  were  eligible  for  the  final  round,  where  the  four  runners-­‐up  got  $100,000  and  the  winner   organization  received  $1  million  in  a  donation.     Chase’s  decision  to  make  the  contest  a  “popular  vote”  and  to  remove  the  online  tallies  hours  before  the  end  of  the   contest  caused  critics  to  question  the  format  of  the  online  contest  and  brand  it  a  marketing  vehicle  for  the  bank   instead  of  a  fair  way  to  distribute  funds.  Several  critics  noted  the  need  for  nonprofits  to  beg  for  votes  from  their   constituencies,  including  one  Chicago  Tribute  editorial  that  claimed,  “it  turns  theaters  into  on-­‐line  hucksters,  which   lacks  dignity  and  turns  off  many  real  artists.”  Noted  social  media  and  nonprofit  writer  Beth  Kanter  reported  on   these  questions  and  the  many  voices  crying  “foul.”  Kanter  notes  in  a  follow  up  blog  post  “It’s  unclear  how  much   damage  this  has  done  to  their  brand,  if  at  all  -­‐  and  if  damage  could  have  been  reduced  if  they  were  more   responsive  earlier  on…If  anything,  it  provides  lots  of  learning  which  is  the  heart  of  success  of  social  media  and   potential  for  constructive  discussion  and  debate  about  social  media,  online  giving,  transparency,  and  more.”     American  Express   New  York,  NY   Another  large-­‐scale  public  social  media-­‐based  campaign  is  the  American  Express  Members  Project.  Officially,  “it  is   an  innovative  initiative  that  enables  people  to  get  involved  and  to  take  part,  their  way.  In  partnership  with  Take   Part  (http://takepart.com),  a  digital  media  company  and  social  action  network,  Members  Project  provides  the   opportunity  for  everyone  to  be  part  of  a  community  that’s  passionate  about  making  a  difference  in  the  world.”  

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This  giveaway  format  campaign  began  in  2007.  Initially,  projects  were  submitted  and  voted  on  only  by  American   Express  card  members,  but  some  rules  have  changed  in  2010.  The  top  initial  submissions  are  vetted  by  a   committee  of  inside  experts  and  by  members  of  the  philanthropy  community.  The  public  votes  on  the  top  choices.   Organizations  are  encouraged  to  activate  their  fans  via  their  own  social  and  marketing  channels,  and  to  send  them   to  a  Facebook  app  and  a  website  created  by  Take  Part  to  vote  for  their  submission.  The  top  four  runner-­‐up   entrants  each  received  $200,000  and  the  winner  got  $1  million.  American  Express  notes  that  it  facilitated  over  $4.2   million  in  donations  including  donations  of  its  membership  rewards  points  and  direct  donations  from  card   members  in  2010.  The  project  portrays  American  Express  in  a  positive  light,  and  makes  card-­‐holders  feel  as  if  they   have  more  than  just  a  credit  card  –  they  feel  they  have  a  say  in  the  philanthropic  donations  by  the  company.       The  Challenge  of  Challenges   The  challenges  Chase,  American  Express  and  Pepsi  have  faced  due  to  holding  contests  are  a  tough  nut  for  some  to   swallow.  On  the  one  hand,  here  are  companies  handing  out  millions  of  dollars  to  causes,  and  encouraging  their   communities  (including  employees)  to  direct  that  giving.  Organizations  that  normally  might  be  overlooked  can   receive  $5,000  or  $25,000  that  may  make  a  huge  positive  impact  on  their  operating  budgets.     On  the  other  hand,  many  nonprofits  resent  having  to  “jump  through  hoops”  and  ask  their  entire  support  base  to   vote  daily  in  contests,  potentially  using  up  good  will  and  attention  on  a  contest  they  may  not  win.     As  Forge  (forgenow.org)  founder  Kjerstin  Erickson  noted  on  a  post  about  the  “Dark  Side  of  Online  Voting  Contests,   “Each  time,  it  takes  a  considerable  amount  of  effort  to  notify,  encourage,  and  thank  our  network  for  taking  action   on  our  behalf.  More  importantly,  though,  each  time  we  ask  our  network  to  vote  we  use  a  valuable  asset  (the  time   and  attention  of  our  network)  that  we  could  have  used  for  something  else.  That  is,  each  request  for  a  vote   (whether  fulfilled  or  not)  represents  an  opportunity  cost  to  the  organization  doing  the  asking.”     Writer  Geoff  Livingston  adds  “In  actuality,  there  are  many  losers  who  expend  a  tremendous  amount  of  effort  that   don’t  walk  away  with  a  dollar,  who  have  exhausted  their  donor  base  with  solicitations  for  votes,  and  who  have  lost   time  that  could  have  been  spent  on  mission  based  activity  or  fundraising.”   For  companies,  there  is  a  potential  reputation  risk  as  well.  During  the  recent  Japan  earthquake  and  tsunami   response,  Microsoft’s  Bing  search  property  offered  to  donate  $1  for  every  person  on  Twitter  who  re-­‐tweeted  their   message  describing  how  to  help,  up  to  $100,000.  The  company  was  quickly  criticized  for  making  the  donation   “about  them”  instead  of  about  relief.  Hours  later,  Microsoft  apologized  and  donated  the  $100,000  without  any   preconditions.  In  contrast,  Apple  Computer  provided  donation  links  on  their  popular  iTunes  music  store,  but  made   no  public  announcements  of  donations.  Merely  by  facilitating  donations,  the  company  was  publicly  lauded.     PepsiCo’s  Singh  offers  this  advice  for  other  companies  thinking  of  taking  on  similar  efforts:  “One  key  piece  of   advice,  and  we’ve  see  this  with  the  American  Express  Members  Project,  is  that  these  are  long-­‐term  relationship-­‐ building  efforts.  They’re  strongest  when  they’re  thought  of  as  multi-­‐year  efforts.  We’ve  had  success  and  benefit   with  year  one,  but  every  year  we  have  multiplying  benefit,  as  this  is  a  commitment  not  a  campaign.  We  have  to   think  about  pacing  without  consumer.  The  way  our  consumer’s  media  consumption  habits  are,  we  need  to  align   with  their  value  system,  it  makes  no  sense  to  do  stuff  not  in  sync  with  them.  Programs  like  this  are  like  a   symphony,  it  takes  very  large  internal  teams,  executive  support  at  highest  levels,  and  very  strong  external   partners,  getting  the  right  partners  are  key.”  

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3.  Come  Gather  ‘Round  People:  Discussion  and  Conclusions  
  The  present  now     Will  later  be  past     The  order  is  rapidly  fadin’     And  the  first  one  now  will  later  be  last     For  the  times  they  are  a-­‐changin’     Bob  Dylan,  1963       By  giving  people  the  power  to  share,  we’re  making  the  world  more  transparent.     Mark  Zuckerberg,  2010       Companies  face  a  choice.  It’s  the  same  choice  faced  by  governments  and  by  organizations  of  all  shapes  and  sizes.   Indeed,  it’s  the  same  choice  faced  by  every  human  with  an  Internet  connection.  That  choice  is  whether  to  share,  or   to  opt  out  of  the  social  graph.   Simple  enough,  and  most  people  -­‐  even  if  they  opt  out  -­‐  now  recognize  the  power  of  Facebook,  Twitter,  blogs  and   wireless  apps  of  endless  variety  to  shape  both  the  marketplace  and  the  social  commons.     Yet  for  companies,  the  social  media  choice  presents  nothing  like  a  simple  A/B  switch.  The  question  isn’t  so  much   “do  we  do  Twitter?”  or  “do  we  launch  a  Facebook  page?”  but  rather  how  much  control  a  company  is  willing  to   yield  to  its  consumers,  to  the  crowd,  to  the  wired  world  at  large.  Billions  are  spent  to  create,  build,  manage,  tweak   and  promote  that  most  fragile  of  corporate  assets:  the  brand.  Yet  social  media  inherently  means  ceding  some   control  to  anyone  with  a  smartphone  and  a  few  minutes  to  kill  on  Twitter.   To  take  that  question  farther  inside  companies  -­‐  to  the  workforce  itself  and  how  a  company  encourages  its  own   good  citizenship,  as  we  have  chosen  to  do  with  this  white  paper  -­‐  presents  another  level  of  challenge  for  the   corporation  in  the  age  of  social  media.  More  than  anyone  else,  an  employee  carries  an  organization’s  reputation   with  them  in  the  world,  virtual  and  otherwise.  And  the  challenge  -­‐  and  opportunity  -­‐  of  social  media  for  employee   engagement  is  quite  real.   We  asked  Carol  Cone,  the  widely  acknowledged  “mother  of  cause  marketing”  and  managing  director  of  brand  and   corporate  citizenship  at  Edelman  to  consider  social  media  and  employee  engagement  as  we  started  work  on  this   paper.  Carol’s  advice  was  right  on:  “Brands  are  built  from  the  inside  out:  thus  employee  engagement  is  critical  to   grow  compelling  and  powerful  brands  and  corporations.  Social  media  will  continue  to  grow  in  its  use  by  savvy   companies  who  understand  their  employees’  desire  involvement  in  relevant  social/environmental  issues  to  their   organizations.”   The  Socially  Wired  Workforce   The  companies  we  interviewed  for  this  report  vary  in  size  and  sector;  some  are  very  active  in  using  social  media  for   their  brands  and  marketing,  while  others  are  understandably  more  cautious.  Yet  there  was  one  factor  that  united   the  viewpoints  of  everyone  we  spoke  to:  companies  are  well  aware  that  their  employees  are  using  social  media  

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and  that  efforts  to  empower  employees  in  volunteering,  philanthropy,  and  corporate  social  responsibility  efforts   must  take  that  into  consideration  -­‐  now,  or  in  the  near  future.   Indeed,  the  corporate  community  involvement  and  social  responsibility  officers  we  spoke  to  are  themselves  a  well-­‐ connected,  networked  group  of  professionals.  And  they  realize  that  their  companies’  socially  networked   employees  are  vital  to  the  overall  corporate  strategy.   How  important?   Well,  according  to  recent  research,  very  important.  In  short,  companies  factor  in  their  employees  almost  above  all   other  considerations  in  defining  giving  and  community  involvement  programs.  A  2009  study  by  McKinsey  in   partnership  with  the  Committee  Encouraging  Corporate  Philanthropy  surveyed  more  than  700  U.S.  C-­‐suite  leaders.   Not  surprisingly,  77%  of  those  surveyed  formally  encourage  employee  volunteering  and  41%  will  match  employee   charitable  contributions.   Here’s  where  it  gets  interesting.  Asked  what  stakeholders  the  company  specifically  addressed  with  its  corporate   philanthropy,  the  largest  response  was  “employees”  -­‐  88%  said  they  addressed  their  workforce  with  company   philanthropic  goals,  more  than  the  communities  they  serve.  And  in  tracking  business  goals  related  to  corporate   philanthropy,  employees  were  second  only  to  enhancing  overall  company  reputation  -­‐  62%  of  executives  said   building  employee  leadership  was  a  business  goal  of  CSR  and  57%  said  employee  retention  and  recruitment  were   legitimate  business  goals  related  to  corporate  philanthropy.   And  it’s  important  to  note  that  corporate  employees  naturally  flock  to  social  tools  to  help  get  their  work  done.  A   landmark  2008  report  from  the  Pew  Internet  &  American  Life  Project  identified  the  new  “Networked  Worker”  and   found  that  the  overwhelming  belief  that  the  Internet,  email,  cell  phones  and  instant  messaging  have  “improved   their  ability  to  do  their  job”  (80%),  “improved  their  ability  to  share  ideas  with  co-­‐workers”  (73%)  and  “allowed   them  more  flexibility  in  the  hours  they  work”  (58%).  In  addition,  80%  of  reported  that  these  tech  tools  have   expanded  the  number  of  people  they  communicate  with.   Corporate  leaders  are  coming  to  understand  quickly  that  today’s  workforces,  particularly  the  Millennials  born  after   1980,  have  a  view  of  work  that  includes  doing  something  positive  for  society.  “Millennials  are  fascinating  for  how   they  work  (collaboratively);  what  they  believe  (that  they  can  make  the  world  a  better  place);  and  how  they  are   living  (immersed  in  causes),”  wrote  author  Allison  Fine  in  the  Chronicle  of  Philanthropy  two  years  ago.  “And,”  she   added,  “their  signature  characteristic  is  their  digital  fluency.”   Younger  workers  are  uniquely  comfortable  using  a  wide  variety  of  social-­‐media  tools.  This  mirrors  the  view   inwards,  from  consumers  and  customers  towards  products  and  services.  In  the  Good  Purpose  study,  an  Edelman   annual  global  research  report  that  explores  consumer  attitudes  around  social  purpose  and  their  commitment  to   specific  social  issues  and  their  expectations  of  brands  and  corporations,  64%  of  the  7,000  adults  surveyed  said   believe  it  is  no  longer  enough  for  corporations  to  give  money;  they  must  integrate  good  causes  into  their  everyday   business.   Carol  Cone  calls  this  trend  “the  rise  of  the  citizen  consumer.”  For  the  purposes  of  this  report,  we’d  posit  the  rise  of   the  “citizen  employee.”   Further,  the  more  wired  people  are,  the  more  socially  conscious  and  active  they  seem  to  be.  A  2011  national   survey  by  the  Pew  Research  Center’s  Internet  &  American  Life  Project  found  that  75%  of  all  American  adults  are   active  in  some  kind  of  voluntary  group  or  organization,  and  Internet  users  are  more  likely  than  others  to  be  active:  
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80%  of  Internet  users  participate  in  groups,  compared  with  56%  of  non-­‐Internet  users.  Moreover,  social  media   users  are  even  more  likely  to  be  active:  82%  of  social  network  users  and  85%  of  Twitter  users  are  group   participants.   “One  of  the  striking  things  in  these  data  is  how  purposeful  people  are  as  they  become  active  with  groups,”  noted   Kristen  Purcell,  the  research  director  at  Pew  Internet  and  co-­‐author  of  the  report.  “Many  enjoy  the  social   dimensions  of  involvement,  but  what  they  really  want  is  to  have  impact.  Most  have  felt  proud  of  a  group  they   belong  to  in  the  past  year  and  just  under  half  say  they  accomplished  something  they  couldn’t  have  accomplished   on  their  own.”   Social  Media  Wave  in  Employee  Involvement  Programs?   Let’s  take  stock.  Connected  employees.  Check.  Consumers  and  employees  who  value  companies  that  give   something  back.  Check.  Wide  acceptance  of  social  media  in  society.  Check.  So  is  there  a  strong  connection?  Are   companies  using  social  media  widely  and  effectively  to  encourage  employee  giving  and  community  involvement?   Our  verdict:  it’s  coming,  but  it’s  not  there  yet.   According  a  study  by  Weber  Shandwick  and  KRC  Research,  seven  in  ten  executives  says  social  media  has  been  used   in  their  company’s  CSR  efforts,  and  six  in  ten  say  it  has  had  a  positive  effect.  But  a  2010  study  by  UK-­‐based  social   media  research  firm  SMI  on  how  287  of  the  most  sustainable  companies  are  communicating  their  actions  through   social  media  found  a  mixed  bag:  “While  a  few  companies  excel  in  social  media  CSR  communications,  fewer  than   half  of  nearly  300  North  American  and  European  companies  currently  considered  sustainability  leaders  in  their   fields  are  using  social  media  to  communicate  their  corporate  and  social  responsibility  accomplishments.”  And   while  a  whopping  85  percent  use  social  media  as  “some  part  of  their  general  communications  portfolio,”  a  mere  22   percent  have  social  media  communications  dedicated  to  sustainability  and  CSR  issues,  according  to  the  study.   And  there  are  other  challenges,  according  to  exclusive  research  by  the  JK  Group,  which  manages  nearly  110   employee  giving  campaigns  for  its  clients.  [Note:  JK  is  the  corporate  sponsor  of  this  white  paper].  JK’s  work  with   these  clients  confirms  two  key  trends:   Employee  participation  is  decreasing.     There  has  been  a  steady  decrease  in  the  number  of  eligible  employees  participating  in  the  annual  fund  raising   drive.  Gone  are  the  days  when  employee  participation  rates  were  in  the  80  percent  range.  Current  employee   giving  statistics  indicate  that  it  is  far  more  likely  to  see  less  than  50  percent  of  employees  participating  than  the   previous  higher  participation  rates.  In  many  companies  it  is  far  less  than  50  percent  of  the  eligible  employees   participating.  (Participation  is  being  defined  as  the  number  of  employees  who  make  a  financial  contribution.)   The  current  participation  rates  among  JK  clients  ranges  from  a  high  of  75  percent  to  a  low  of  3  percent.  Two   independent  studies  by  outside  consulting  firms  document  this  trend.  For  example,  a  2010  survey  conducted  by   The  Consulting  Network,  a  national  management  consulting  firm  specializing  in  corporate  social  responsibility  and   employee  engagement,  found  the  average  employee  participation  rate  among  its  benchmark  sample  of  nearly  75   clients  was  42  percent,  according  to  a  survey  of  60  national  companies  by  The  Consulting  Network  in  April,  2010.     JK  Group  has  identified  some  key  factors  among  its  clients  that  can  impact  employee  participation.  Companies  with   higher  participation  rates  tend  to  offer  a  broader  range  of  giving  options.  They  have  expanded  the  campaign   beyond  the  traditional  United  Way  as  the  only  featured  charity  partner  model.  A  recent  study  found  that  more  

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than  75  percent  of  companies  offering  a  workplace-­‐giving  program  now  allow  employees  to  contribute  to  any   charitable  organization  regardless  of  affiliation  with  United  Way  or  other  umbrella  federation  organization.   Several  companies  have  implemented  a  match  of  employee  donations  as  a  strategy  to  increase  employee   participation.  Nearly  40  percent  of  companies  now  match  payroll  contributions  made  by  employees  through  the   annual  giving  campaign.   Some  observers  of  this  trend  suggest  that  the  higher  participation  rates  of  the  past  might  have  been  the  result  of   pressure  to  give  rather  than  a  truly  voluntary  approach  and  the  lower  rates  of  today  are  more  reflective  of   employee  satisfaction.  Others  suggest  that  the  giving  campaign  is  lacking  relevance  and  is  not  changing  with  the   times  to  make  it  an  appealing  option  for  supporting  charitable  causes.  Regardless  of  the  perspective,  companies   are  concerned  about  this  lack  of  employee  participation  and  are  looking  for  strategies  and  tactics  to  help   invigorate  the  annual  giving  campaign.   Younger  employees  aren’t  participating.     Another  trend  in  employee  giving  campaigns  is  that  younger  employees  aren’t  participating.  This  is  probably  a   significant  reason  contributing  to  the  decrease  in  employee  participation.   JK  Group  has  documented  that  current  increases  in  revenue  from  the  employee  giving  campaign  is  a  result  of  an   increase  in  the  average  gift,  not  in  the  number  of  new  donors  to  the  campaign.  In  other  words,  current  donors  are   giving  more  while  the  campaign  isn’t  attracting  a  new  donor  base.   Anecdotally,  campaign  managers  are  telling  JK  Group  that  they  struggle  with  finding  ways  to  make  the  campaign   more  appealing  to  their  newer  employees.  Younger  employees  remain  philanthropically  minded  and  do  give  to   charities,  but  it  appears  they  are  seeking  other  opportunities  to  fulfill  their  charitable  interests.  Many  contribute   outside  the  workplace,  often  giving  online  directly  to  charity.  Some  choose  to  volunteer  their  time.     Generations,  like  people,  have  personalities.  The  Millennials,  those  between  18-­‐29  years  of  age,  have  begun  to   express  their  personality.  A  study  conducted  by  Pew  Research  Center  in  2010  found  61  percent  of  the  Millennials   participating  in  the  study  say  their  generation  has  a  unique  and  distinctive  identity.  In  response  to  an  open-­‐ended   follow-­‐up  question,  24  percent  say  it’s  their  use  of  technology  that  makes  them  distinctive  from  other  generations.   Focus  groups  conducted  by  The  Consulting  Network  among  younger  employees  (age  20-­‐35)  in  April  2009  found  the   traditional  workplace  campaign  isn’t  as  appealing  to  younger  employees.  This  doesn’t  mean  they  aren’t  giving  to   charity.  Quite  the  contrary,  they  have  favorable  attitudes  towards  charitable  giving  and  they  identify  one  of  their   top  priorities  as  helping  others  in  need.  They  are  giving  to  charity  but  are  seeking  different  tools  and  venues  for   making  their  gifts.   The  focus  group  found  three  key  components  of  the  traditional  campaign  that  aren’t  attractive  to  this  younger   generation.   The  paper  pledge  form  and  printed  brochures  are  relics  to  them.  They  grew  up  with  the  Internet  and  much  prefer   to  receive  information  electronically  or  online.   CEO  endorsement  is  not  as  important  to  them  as  what  their  peers  are  supporting.  They  would  rather  receive  an   endorsement  from  a  peer  than  a  senior  company  official.  They  don’t  want  the  company  telling  them  what  charities   they  should  contribute  to.  This  generation  is  much  more  interested  in  doing  their  own  charitable  research  and   identifying  issues  and  causes  they  think  are  relevant  and  worthy  of  their  personal  support.  
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Payroll  deduction,  the  staple  of  workplace  giving,  may  not  be  as  important  to  them  as  it  was  to  their  peers.  In  fact,   they  perceive  payroll  deductions  as  locking  them  in  and  taking  the  spontaneity  out  of  charitable  giving.  They  prefer   to  make  one-­‐time  gifts.   “While  the  annual  giving  campaign  has  seen  an  evolution  from  a  strictly  paper  campaign  supporting  United  Way  to   putting  up  a  Web  site  where  employees  can  make  a  contribution  to  a  broad  range  of  charitable  organizations,  we   haven’t  made  the  campaign  relevant  to  a  broader  audience,”  says  Stephen  Greenhalgh,  director,  program  analytics   and  research,  the  JK  Group.  “We’ve  been  successful  in  putting  a  paper  form  online  and  directing  employees  to  a   website  where  they  can  make  a  charitable  contribution.  We  haven’t  been  as  successful  in  evolving  the  way  we   communicate  and  engage  the  younger  generation.  The  campaign  is  so  different  from  how  employees   communicate  and  engage  in  other  aspects  of  their  lives.”   “Employees  are  increasingly  aware  of  the  opportunities  to  participate  and  give  outside  of  their  workplace,”  says   Gary  Carr,  CEO  of  Carr  Systems,  Inc.  and  a  former  regional  director  for  the  United  Way.  “Some  may  feel  that  their   company  environments  may  be  holding  them  back.  As  an  example,  look  at  the  Susan  G.  Komen  Foundation’s   events.  They  are  one  of  the  more  creative,  interesting  and  forward  thinking  nonprofits.  An  opportunity  to   participate  in  a  Komen  event  has  components  of  online,  active  engagement,  experience  and  giving.  Compare  that   to  a  workplace  giving  campaign,  there  is  usually  just  an  option  to  donate.  Corporate  culture  and  leadership  will   make  a  difference  in  giving,  and  there  is  an  experiential  gap  needs  to  be  closed.”   Carr  also  noted  “social  media  in  a  workplace  giving  campaign  doesn’t  mean  you  need  to  run  it  on  Facebook  or   externally.  Companies  can  use  their  intranets  and  internal  capabilities  to  connect  employees  -­‐  there  could  be  a   “Wall”  for  a  campaign  inside  the  company  firewall.  Many  companies  have  an  active  intranet  space,  but  there  is  no   use  of  these  tools  for  CSR  purposes.  We  still  see  traditional  campaigns  managed  by  traditional  program  mangers   who  don’t  always  see  the  opportunities  to  use  these  technologies.”     And  that  fits  the  evolving  workforce.  Millennials  embrace  multiple  modes  of  self-­‐expression.  The  2010  Pew  study   found  that  three-­‐quarters  have  created  a  profile  on  a  social  networking  site.  One-­‐in-­‐five  have  posted  a  video  of   themselves  online.  They  are  seeking  these  same  opportunities  in  their  charitable  giving  activities.  In  our  view,  they   want  a  workplace  giving  program  that  incorporates  events  and  a  social  component  allows  collaboration  and   dialogue  among  peers  and  offers  tools  that  make  giving  fun  easy  and  convenient.   Conclusions:  What  Do  We  Know?   So  what  does  the  corporate  experience  thus  far  in  employee  involvement  and  social  media  tell  us?  Based  on  our   interviews  with  CSR  executives  at  major  companies  and  JK’s  experience  -­‐  as  well  as  research  and  discussions  with   other  practitioners  -­‐  we  offer  these  conclusions:   1. 2. 3. 4. 5.  
WIRED  WORKFORCE,  NETWORKED  CSR    
 

Companies  are  more  comfortable  using  social  media  tools  internally,  but  they’re  waiting  for  external   adoption  by  marketing  before  moving  ahead  to  use  them  in  CSR  type  efforts.     Employees  seek  choice  and  appreciate  democratic  participation.     Leadership  is  required  to  ensure  continued  participation  in  campaigns,  since  employee  participation  is   decreasing.     Both  social  media  and  traditional  communications  methods  are  used  in  employee  giving  campaigns  and   external  outreach  to  communities.     Formal  feedback  loops  for  social  media  are  the  exception  rather  than  the  rule.    

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What  We  Can  Recommend   There  are  different  levels  of  commitment  available  for  companies  looking  to  test  the  social  media  waters.   Employers  don’t  need  to  give  access  to  Facebook  in  order  to  use  social  media  in  an  internal  corporate  giving   effort.     • Microsoft’s  “Video  Wall”  effort  showed  an  appropriate  use  of  video  clips,  combined  with  email  to  alert   other  employees  to  the  causes  they  could  support.  UnitedHealth  Group  had  a  similar  effort  with  photos   and  videos.     Pfizer’s  use  of  voting  and  peer  solicitation  showed  the  power  of  employees  asking  each  other  to  support   causes,  without  a  central  “social  network.”     “Traditional”  social  networks  are  not  always  needed.  The  Kaiser  Permanente  blog  is  used  in  a  way  in   which  social  compliments  and  extends  traditional  media  outreach.    

• •

Companies  must  examine  their  comfort  level  with  social  media  and  exposing  efforts  outside  the  company.     • • Each  company  is  different  and  will  have  different  levels  of  familiarity  and  acceptance  of  the  use  of  social   media  tools  for  CSR  efforts.   Pfizer’s  employee  voting  was  done  within  the  bounds  of  their  corporate  network,  and  so  was  Microsoft’s,   while  Western  Union  used  external  sites  to  increase  employee  excitement,  allow  sharing  and  promotion   by  employees  of  the  good  works  being  done,  and  engage  with  external  partners.  Yahoo!’s  campaign  was   primarily  external,  though  they  are  arguably  a  media  company.     Companies  in  regulated  industries  may  have  a  knee-­‐jerk  reaction  to  avoid  social  media,  but  as  we’ve  seen   by  the  three  health  care  firms  represented,  there  are  ways  to  use  social  tools  without  raising  the  ire  of  the   regulators  or  compliance  committees.    

Involve  partners  to  improve  reach  and  effectiveness  of  campaigns.   • • • • Kaiser  Permanente’s  efforts  with  local  TV  and  newspaper  firms  broadened  the  reach  of  the  campaign  and   enabled  communication  exposure  the  company  could  not  have  achieved  alone.     Western  Union’s  campaign  directly  appealed  to  the  public  in  addition  to  employees  for  voting  around   their  “50  Days  of  Giving”  campaign.   Microsoft’s  internal  video  efforts  have  generated  interest  from  nonprofit  partners  in  their  region  and   have  created  requests  to  employee  supporters  for  participation.     Yahoo!’s  “For  Good”  team  partnered  with  their  top-­‐viewed  website  for  exposure  for  their  campaign.    

Seek  ways  that  social  good  can  be  done  in  the  context  of  the  core  business.     • Pepsi’s  Refresh  Everything  campaign  is  a  groundbreaking  effort  in  that  it  is  primarily  a  marketing   campaign,  not  run  by  the  CSR  or  philanthropy  teams,  and  yet  it  is  directly  parallel  to  the  kinds  of  shared   value  and  marketplace  links  noted  as  the  goals  of  many  CSR  campaigns.     Microsoft’s  efforts  repurpose  already-­‐created  software  to  enable  employee  empowerment.     Western  Union  accepts  donations  for  its  efforts  at  their  locations  worldwide.      

• •

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Finally,  consider  opening  the  corporate  wall  to  external  networks,  and  enable  employees  to  be  powerful   ambassadors  for  the  CSR  efforts.   • Western  Union,  Kaiser  Permanente,  and  Yahoo!  have  all  done  outward  facing  efforts  that  let  employees   share  campaigns,  information,  and  their  pride  in  their  company  with  their  friends,  families  and  followers   on  social  networks  and  over  other  Internet  channels.     Pepsi,  Chase  and  American  Express’  campaigns  are  clearly  forward  thinking,  exposing  the  companies  not   only  to  positive  feedback  but  to  difficult  questions  and  situations  that  involve  them  in  conversations  with   stakeholders  and  ultimately  lead  to  more  community  connections  and  involvement.  

The  Final  Score   Social  media  is  becoming  a  core  part  of  people’s  everyday  online  experience.  With  more  than  250  million  people   participating  on  Facebook  every  single  day,  and  social  connection  features  becoming  part  of  news,  business  and   entertainment  websites  across  the  board,  the  trend  is  difficult  to  ignore.  The  trend  for  employees  to  “take  the   technology  they  like  to  work”  started  back  when  IT  departments  got  requests  to  sync  Palm  Pilots  and  personal   Blackberry  devices  in  the  late  1990s.  Social  media  will  be  no  different.  Employees,  rather  than  sneaking  off  to  have   a  smoke,  will  pull  out  their  smart  phones  and  check  their  network  if  it  is  blocked  on  the  corporate  network  –  taking   extra  time  and  productivity  away  since  the  keyboard  and  screen  is  smaller,  and  the  connection  is  slower.     Employees  will  also  see  corporate  marketing  efforts  on  social  media,  and  wonder  why  those  tools  are  not  available   to  them  in  the  context  of  their  work.  Microsoft,  IBM’s  Lotus  unit,  SalesForce.com  and  other  major  purveyors  of   corporate  software  are  already  including  Twitter  and  Facebook-­‐like  functionality  to  their  enterprise  software   suites.     We’ve  seen  the  power  of  using  technology  tools  for  internal  employee  engagement  via  the  case  studies  from   Pfizer,  Microsoft,  and  UnitedHealth  Group.  Engaged  employees,  especially  Millenials,  will  be  happier  and  more   loyal  employees.  We’ve  also  seen  the  ability  to  promote  change  externally,  even  without  “standard”  social   networks  from  Kaiser  Permanente.  Western  Union’s  external  efforts  appeal  to  their  entire  customer  base,  and   Pepsi’s  non-­‐CSR  brand  campaign  is  nothing  short  of  groundbreaking.     Take  this  paper  as  an  initial  look  at  the  range  of  possibilities  for  using  social  media  tools  as  a  way  to  engage  internal   and  external  stakeholders  in  the  Corporate  Social  Responsibility  efforts  of  your  company.  It  is  a  marker  at  a  time  of   change  in  the  field.  We  urge  you  to  seek  ways  to  take  a  small  step  towards  engaging  the  power  of  the  crowd  to   promote  your  CSR  agenda.    

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JK  Group  Statement  
JK  Group  commissioned  this  white  paper  on  the  impact  of  social  media  on  corporate  philanthropy  to  identify   opportunities  for  reaching  out  and  engaging  this  younger  generation.  The  future  of  workplace  giving  will  depend   on  our  ability  to  engage  and  capture  the  interests  of  new  employees  entering  the  workforce.  Participation  will  not   increase  until  we’ve  identified  new  strategies  and  tools  and  revolutionize  the  way  we  engage  employees  in   charitable  activities.    

The  Conversation    
JK  Group  will  remain  an  active  participant  in  the  discussion  of  social  media  and  its  impact  on  corporate   philanthropic  programs.  We  will  be  incorporating  this  discussion  into  our  learning  and  educational  programs  as   well  as  identifying  specific  opportunities  to  dialogue  with  our  clients.  Data  from  these  conversations  and  identified   best  practices  will  be  shared.    

Methodology  
The  case  studies  presented  above  were  sourced  directly  from  company  representatives  knowledgeable  and   directly  responsible  for  the  efforts  documented.  They  typically  resided  in  corporate  areas  (philanthropy,  corporate   communications  or  marketing)  that  ran  the  campaigns.  All  statistics  and  quotes  attributed  to  those  representatives   have  been  fact-­‐checked  and  verified.     Additional  quotes  obtained  from  industry  experts  were  similarly  sourced  and  verified.     All  third  party  research  was  cited  directly  in  the  text  or  is  linked  or  cited  in  the  reference  section  below.  

Resources  and  Acknowledgments  
Reference  Section:     Bauerlein,  Valerie,  “Pepsi  Hits  'Refresh'  on  Donor  Project”,  Wall  St.  Journal,  Jan.  30,  2011,   http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704832704576114171399171138.html     Business’s  Social  Contract:  Capturing  the  Corporate  Philanthropy  Opportunity,  Committee  Encouraging  Corporate   Philanthropy,  McKinsey  &  Co.  http://www.corporatephilanthropy.org/research/thought-­‐leadership/research-­‐ reports/businesss-­‐social-­‐contract.html   Chan,  Stephanie  P.,  “Bing  gets  flamed  on  Twitter  over  Japan  earthquake  campaign”  The  Seattle  Times,  March  14,   2011,  http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/microsoftpri0/2014493218_microsoftgetsbacklash.html     “Chase  and  Facebook  Announce  100  Small  and  Local  Charities  to  Receive  $25,000  Each  From  Chase  Community   Giving,”  December  16,  2009,     http://investor.shareholder.com/jpmorganchase/releasedetail.cfm?releaseid=430809     Citizens  Engage!  Edelman  goodpurpose®  Study  2010     http://www.goodpurposecommunity.com/Pages/globalstudy.aspx  [PDF  format]   Custom  Communications,  UK,  “Social  Media  CSR  -­‐  The  Good,  the  Bad  &  the  Ugly”   www.slideshare.net/socialmediainfluence/the-­‐good-­‐the-­‐bad-­‐the-­‐ugly-­‐a-­‐short-­‐history-­‐of-­‐social-­‐media-­‐csr    

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Erickson,  Kjerstin,  “The  Dark  Side  of  Online  Voting  Contests,”  SocialEdge.org,  December  15,  2009,   http://www.socialedge.org/blogs/forging-­‐ahead/archive/2009/12/15/the-­‐dark-­‐side-­‐of-­‐online-­‐voting-­‐contests   “Invisible  Children  Wins  $1  Million  In  Chase  Community  Giving  Contest  On  Facebook,”  Huffington  Post,  Updated   March  24,  2010,  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/01/22/chase-­‐community-­‐giving-­‐co_n_433689.html     Jones,  Chris,  “Don’t  Put  Arts  Support  Up  for  a  Popularity  Vote,”  Chicago  Tribune,  June  30,  2010,   http://leisureblogs.chicagotribune.com/the_theater_loop/2010/06/dont-­‐put-­‐arts-­‐support-­‐up-­‐for-­‐a-­‐popularity-­‐ vote.html     Kanter,  Beth,  “Charities Cry Foul on Chase Facebook Charitable Giving Contest”, Dec 19, 2009, http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2009/12/charities-­‐cry-­‐foul-­‐on-­‐chase-­‐facebook-­‐charitable-­‐giving-­‐ contest.html   Kanter,  Beth,  “Deconstructing An Angry Crowd: What Can We Learn?,” Dec. 23, 2009, http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2009/12/should-­‐online-­‐contests-­‐be-­‐redesigned-­‐or-­‐just-­‐go-­‐away.html   Kleiman,  Kelly,  “What’s  Wrong  With  Chase  Community  Giving?”  Huffington  Post,  July  21,  2010,   http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kelly-­‐kleiman/whats-­‐wrong-­‐with-­‐chase-­‐co_b_653492.html     Livingston,  Geoff,  “Can  the  Contest  Craze  Sustain  Itself?”,  May  10,  2010,   http://geofflivingston.com/2010/05/10/can-­‐the-­‐contest-­‐craze-­‐sustain-­‐itself/   Livingston,  Geoff,  “Free  eGuide  on  Cause  Marketing  via  Social  Media,”  October  5,  2010,   http://geofflivingston.com/2010/10/05/free-­‐eguide-­‐on-­‐cause-­‐marketing-­‐via-­‐social-­‐media/     Madden,  Mary,  and  Jones,  Sydney,  “Networked  Workers,”  The  Pew  Internet  &  American  Life  Project,  September   24,  2008  http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/Networked-­‐Workers.aspx     Massey,  Paul,  “The  Role  of  CrowdSourcing  in  Social  Media,”  http://impact.webershandwick.com/?q=role-­‐ crowdsourcing-­‐social-­‐media  (Also  references:  http://www.slideshare.net/wssocialimpact/crowdsourcing-­‐social-­‐ impact-­‐in-­‐csr  and  http://www.scribd.com/doc/48493696/Crowdsourcing-­‐and-­‐Social-­‐Impact-­‐Fast-­‐Facts)   “Members  Project®  Announces  Final  Round  of  Winners  to  Receive  Total  of  $1  Million  in  Funding  from  American   Express,”  American  Express  Company,  March  4,  2011,   http://about.americanexpress.com/news/pr/2011/mp_winners.aspx     “Pepsi  Taps  Consumers  to  Shake  Up  Refresh  Project  in  2011”,  https://www.pepsico.com/PressRelease/Pepsi-­‐Taps-­‐ Consumers-­‐to-­‐Shake-­‐Up-­‐Refresh-­‐Project-­‐in-­‐201101312011.html     “Pepsi  Refresh  Project  Opens  Online  Site  for  Idea  Submissions,”  http://www.pepsico.com/PressRelease/Pepsi-­‐ Refresh-­‐Project-­‐Opens-­‐Online-­‐Site-­‐for-­‐Idea-­‐Submissions01132010.html   Pew  Social  Trends  Staff,  “Millennials:  Confident.  Connected.  Open  to  Change,”  Pew  Research  Center,  February 24, 2010, http://pewsocialtrends.org/2010/02/24/millennials-­‐confident-­‐connected-­‐open-­‐to-­‐change/   Porter,  Michael  E,  and  Kramer,  Mark  R.,  “Strategy  &  Society:  The  Link  between  Competitive  Advantage  and   Corporate  Social  Responsibility,”  Harvard  Business  Review  December  2006.    

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Rainie,  Lee,  Purcell,  Kristen,  and  Smith,  Aaron,  Social  Side  of  the  Internet  Study  2011,  Pew  Internet  and  American   Life  Project,  http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/The-­‐Social-­‐Side-­‐of-­‐the-­‐Internet.aspx     R  Freeman,  Strategic  Management:  A  Stakeholder  Approach  (Pitman  Series  in  Business  and  Public  Policy),  Pitman   Publishing  ,  January  1984.   Social  Media  Influcence  (Agency),  “The  Social  Media  Sustainability  Index,”   http://socialmediainfluence.com/2010/11/16/the-­‐social-­‐media-­‐sustainability-­‐index/     Strom,  Stephanie,  “Charities  Criticize  Online  Fund-­‐Raising  Contest  by  Chase,”  New  York  Times,  December  18,  2009,   http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/19/us/19charity.html?_r=4       Acknowledgements   • • • • • • • • •   About  JK  Group     Since  our  founding  in  1989,  JK  Group’s  mission  has  been  to  provide  its  clients  with  an  active  partnership  that   incorporates  the  most  comprehensive,  technologically  advanced  and  cost-­‐effective  solutions  for  corporate   philanthropy  programs.  JK  Group  offers  a  complete  suite  of  solutions  including  employee  giving  campaigns,   matching  gifts,  volunteer  grant  programs,  volunteer  event  management,  administration  of  corporate/foundation   grants,  sponsorships  and  in-­‐kind  donations,  international  programs  and  disaster  relief  efforts.  As  a  result,  we’ve   grown  to  become  the  leading  provider  of  corporate  philanthropic  solutions,  whose  client  base  includes  nearly  half   of  the  Fortune  100  companies.     The  depth  and  breadth  of  our  client  base  and  resulting  data  and  expertise  enables  JK  Group  to  offer  the  latest   research  in  trends  and  best  practices  and  information  on  the  ever-­‐changing  business  of  corporate  philanthropy.  JK   Group  offers  a  variety  of  learning  events  where  corporate  practitioners  can  come  together  to  discuss  issues  critical   to  the  success  of  their  philanthropic  programs.  We  regularly  publish  white  papers  on  topics  ranging  from  program   tips  to  technologies.    
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Carol  Cone  and  Edelman   Weber  Shandwick   Pew  Internet  and  American  Life  Project   Allison  Fine   Beth  Kanter   Geoff  Livingston   Gary  Carr   The  Consulting  Network     All  the  companies  and  named  representatives  listed  in  our  case  studies  

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About  NYU  Heyman  Center  for  Philanthropy  and  Fundraising   The  George  H.  Heyman,  Jr.,  Center  for  Philanthropy  and  Fundraising  at  New  York  University,  the  nation’s   preeminent  educator  of  fundraisers  and  grantmakers,  offers  professional  programs  to  help  students  gain  a  solid   foundation  in  the  field  while  building  their  own  fundraising  philosophy  and  framework  through  advanced  study  of   the  history  and  theory  of  philanthropy.  Since  its  inception  in  1999,  the  Heyman  Center  has  educated  more  than   4,000  practitioners,  executives,  and  volunteers  from  hundreds  of  nonprofits,  corporations,  and  foundations.  

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  About  the  Authors   Howard  Greenstein  is  a  marketing  technology  strategist  and  president  of  the  Harbrooke  Group.  He  has  been   involved  in  cutting  edge  technology  applications  including  online  communities  and  social  media  for  over  fifteen   years.  Howard’s  years  of  experience  in  the  technology  world,  combined  with  his  background  as  an  executive  coach,   help  him  bridge  the  gap  between  business  needs  and  technology  requirements,  allowing  him  to  facilitate  difficult   business  conversations  and  focus  on  the  required  results  of  any  project.  Harbrooke  nonprofit  clients  have  included   AJLI  and  New  York  Road  Runners.     His  nonprofit  experience  includes  work  as  the  director  of  operations  for  the  Twin  Towers  Fund,  the  third  largest   9/11  related  charity  serving  the  families  of  the  rescue  workers  killed  at  the  World  Trade  Center  on  September  11,   2001.  Greenstein  served  as  an  administrator  at  NYU’s  School  of  Continuing  and  Professional  Studies,  and  continues   to  lecture  in  both  the  Heyman  Center  for  Philanthropy  and  Fundraising,  and  the  Masters  of  Integrated  Marketing   program.     He  is  currently  a  blogger  for  Inc.  Magazine,  writing  the  weekly  Startup  Toolkit  column   (http://www.inc.com/howard-­‐greenstein),  sits  on  the  Board  of  Directors  of  Social  Media  Club   (http://socialmediaclub.org)  and  is  president  of  the  NYC  Chapter.  Howard  earned  a  B.S.  from  Cornell  University,   and  a  Masters  of  Professional  Studies  from  NYU’s  world-­‐renowned  Interactive  Telecommunications  Program  (ITP).   He  is  also  a  frequent  speaker,  panelist  and  moderator  on  Social  Media  and  Web  2.0  topics.  Find  out  more  at   http://harbrooke.com/     Tom  Watson  is  the  president  and  founder  of  CauseWired,  a  boutique  consulting  firm  advising  clients  on  the  social   commons:  nonprofits,  foundations  and  companies.  Tom  is  a  journalist,  author,  media  critic,  entrepreneur  and   consultant  who  has  worked  at  the  confluence  of  media  technology  and  social  change  for  more  than  a  15  years.  He   is  the  author  of  CauseWired:  Plugging  In,  Getting  Involved,  Changing  the  World  (Wiley,  2008  )  a  best-­‐selling  book   that  chronicles  the  rise  of  online  social  activism.  During  his  long  career  as  journalist,  Tom  has  written  for  The  New   York  Times,  The  Daily  Beast,  Huffington  Post,  techPresident.com,  Social  Edge,  Industry  Standard,  Inside,  Worth  and   Contribute  magazines,  among  many  other  publications.  Before  launching  CauseWired,  Tom  served  for  nine  years   as  chief  strategy  officer  of  Changing  Our  World,  Inc.,  the  international  philanthropic  services  company  he  helped  to   found.  Tom  is  the  publisher  of  onPhilanthropy.com,  CauseWired’s  extensive  online  resource  for  philanthropy   professionals.  Before  joining  the  philanthropy  sector,  Tom  was  co-­‐founder  of  @NY,  the  pioneering  Internet  news   and  information  service  that  chronicled  the  rise  of  New  York’s  Silicon  Alley  new  media  scene  in  the  1990s.  Early  in   his  career,  Tom  was  the  executive  editor  of  The  Riverdale  Press,  a  Pulitzer  Prize-­‐winning  newspaper  in  the  Bronx,   where  he  covered  politics  and  won  more  than  a  dozen  state  and  national  awards  for  excellence  in  journalism.  Tom   Watson  is  a  frequent  speaker  and  commentator  on  trends  and  issues  related  to  media,  technology  and  society.   Find  out  more  at  http://causewired.com/    

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