P. 1
BEACON May 2011 - Unity Temple Unitarian Universalist Congregation

BEACON May 2011 - Unity Temple Unitarian Universalist Congregation

|Views: 244|Likes:
Published by UTUUC
The monthly newsletter of the Unity Temple Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Oak Park, Illinios. www.unitytemple.org.
The monthly newsletter of the Unity Temple Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Oak Park, Illinios. www.unitytemple.org.

More info:

Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: UTUUC on Apr 29, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/08/2013

pdf

text

original

BEACON

Unity Temple Unitarian Universalist Congregation

MAY 2011

FROM REV. E MILY GAGE
ou forget how much there  is to learn.    I’ve thought of this from  time to time as I’ve been on  maternity leave, spending  time with our son. There are  the big things that we think of  when we think of what babies  and toddlers need to learn,  like talking and walking. And then there are other little  every day things, like learning to use your hands to grasp  a rattle or suck your thumb, or beginning to understand  that the bottle comes after a diaper change and putting  on a bib, or that there’s a difference between day and  night. Everything is new and something to be under‐ stood.       You forget how much there is to learn—or at least I  had—until you watch someone having to learn it all for  the first time. It makes you appreciate how wonderful  and amazing human beings are. It makes you see the  world with new eyes. Every morning when I bring Paul  downstairs, he looks all around like it’s the most amazing  thing. Which it is, of course, though I don’t always  remember that either.      You forget how much there is to learn, I think, because  so much of what babies are mastering we forgot we ever  had to learn ourselves. We do them so automatically  that we don’t think about it. (Unless they become  difficult for some reason.) We can just mark them off our  developmental checklist and move on.      There are, however, things in this life that we seem to  have to learn over and over again. Spring has been a  long time coming this year, it seems, and I know on  some level that things will eventually turn green. That is,  I know that in my head. It’s just that it doesn’t always  feel like spring is going to come. But it does.     As I write, the holidays of Easter and Passover have just  passed, and I am still thinking of their stories, the stories  that tell, in part, of terrible things happening. Things that  may remind us of the own challenges in our lives, the  events that have brought our spirits low, that make our  hearts hurt. It can be all too easy to get caught up in  what went wrong, what continues to be wrong, 

revisiting pain and hurt and discouragement.       But this is not the end—or it does not have to be the  end—of those stories. Love prevails over death.  Freedom is possible. Forgiveness can occur. We can heal,  learn from the past, and move on. A wintry soul can  bloom into an abundant green. Sometimes it happens  despite ourselves, sometimes it only happens through  our own hard work of holding onto a thread of hope.       These are the lessons we don’t just learn once, and  check them off our list. These are the ones that we learn  over and over again, whatever our age, whoever we are,  wherever we are on our life’s journey.       May we remember that springtime will prevail, and  that it can prevail in our minds and hearts.         P.S. Thanks to the many, many of you who pitched in  large and small ways to help make it possible for me to  be on maternity leave! I so greatly appreciate it, and so  do Karen and Paul!  

UTUUC ANNUAL MEETING
  When:   Sunday, May 22, 12:30 p.m.  Where:  Unity Temple Sanctuary   Who:   All UTUUC members   
The agenda includes receiving reports, electing  members of the Board of Trustees, approving the  FY12 operating budget, and voting on the Peace  Resolution.  All members are asked to attend: a  quorum of at least 20 percent of voting  membership is required.  

G

2

d d p b

c $ o 1

w

2   •   The Beacon 

IN OUR PULPIT
May 1:: Big Questions, a UTUUC Youth Service and  Bridging Ceremony  Created by the senior high youth group, this service will  reflect the discussions they’ve had this year about what  Unitarian Universalism says about the "big questions.”  We’ll also formally recognize the transition of our seniors  from youth group to young adult status.  
 

INSIDE THIS ISSUE
In Our Pulpit          Membership Opportunities      Board of Trustees         Annual Fund Drive Wrap‐Up      Community Minister        Interim Membership Director      Nominations for UTUUC Board  of Trustees  Adult Religious Enrichment      Religious Education         Music Director          Chalice Circles          Social Mission          Sabbatical Minister for Pastoral Care    UT Restoration Foundation Events    2  2  3  3  4  4  5  6  6  7  8  9  9  10 

May 8  ::  Beyond Light Bulbs: Covenant and Collective  Action with Matt Meyer  Matt Meyer is a graduate of the Berklee College of Music  and has studied abroad in Cuba, Ghana, and Central  America. Matt has lead hundreds services for UU congre‐ gations across the country and lives in Boston, where he  plays with several world music groups.  He is also a  member of the UUA's Council on Cross Cultural Engage‐ ment and a board member and resident of the Lucy  Stone Cooperative, a newly‐formed Unitarian Universal‐ ist housing cooperative creating an intentional commu‐ nity and a center for social justice in the Boston area. 
 

MEMBERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
Are YOU New? Welcome!
Introduction to Unitarian Universalism  This session is the prerequisite for the Pathways to  Membership course, and is open to anyone who would  like to learn more about Unitarian Universalist philoso‐ phy, identity, history, and theology. For more informa‐ tion and to register for this class, contact Sue Stock at  membership@unitytemple.org or 708‐445‐0306.  Instructor is Rev. Emily Gage. This month’s class will be  offered Sunday, May 15, from 1 to 3 p.m. Location:  Unity House. No charge. ITUU will be offered again on  Sunday, June 5. There will be no ITUU offered in July.     Pathways to Membership  This two‐session class is for those who have already  taken Introduction to Unitarian Universalism. Partici‐ pants will reflect on and discuss their personal attitudes  and beliefs about religion and spirituality with others in  the class, and learn more about our congregation and its  programs. For more information or to register for this  class, contact Rob Bellmar at rbellmar@gmail.com or  708‐763‐0260. This month’s sessions will be offered  Sundays, May 15 and 22, from 1 to 4:30 p.m.  Location:  Unity House. Cost: $20. There will be no Pathways  classes in June or July. Pathways will be offered again on  August 13 and 20. 
 

May 15 :: A Choral Service: Requiem, with Music Direc‐ tor Mary Swisher  A special choral service featuring small orchestra and The  Unity Temple Choir and soloists.  Under the direction of  Music Director Marty Swisher, The Unity Temple Choir  will perform Requiem, by John Rutter, in its entirety  during the May 15 services. Sopranos Audrey Cole and  Beverly Escuder will sing the soloist movements with  choral and instrumental support. Harpist Stephen Hart‐ man, oboist Deb Stevenson, cellist Rich Lukes, timpanist/ glockenspielist Jim Holland, flutist Jane Wood, and our  own UT organist, Peter Storms, will provide instrumenta‐ tion for this enchanting music replete with tender,  comforting  melodies and dramatic expressions of hope  and longing.  
 

May 29  :: “Love in Action” with Andrew Harvey  Harvey is an internationally acclaimed poet, novelist,  translator, mystical scholar, and spiritual teacher. He has  published over 20 books, including The Hope: A Guide to  Sacred Activism (Hay House) and Heart Yoga: The Sa‐ cred  Marriage of Yoga and Mysticism (North Atlantic  Books). Harvey is a Fellow of All Souls College Oxford  from (1972‐1986) and has taught at Oxford University,  Cornell University, The California Institute of Integral  Studies, and the University of Creation Spirituality, as  well as various spiritual centers. He was the subject of  the 1993 BBC film documentary The Making of a Modern  Mystic.  He founded the Institute for Sacred Activism in  Oak Park, where he lives. His website is  www.andrewharvey.net.  

For free childcare at all of these opportunities, contact  childcare@unitytemple.org at least one week in advance.    

May 2011   •    3 

REPORT FROM THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES
From the Board President Duane Dowell
president@unitytemple.org
Here comes the Annual Meeting!  As you remember,  we changed the by‐laws last year to have more flexibility  in the date of the Annual Meeting and not continue to  conflict with Oak Park’s “A Day in Our Village.”   We will  be voting on a resolution from our Peace group for our  congregation to take a public stand for peace and the  withdrawal of troops from Iraq and Afghanistan.   Furthermore, we will approve our annual budget, elect  our new church leadership and hear some updates from  some very active groups that have been working hard on  our behalf this year.  This is the official time of the year  when we meet together as our congregational family to  participate in the business of our church.  Y’ALL COME!  Meanwhile things are humming along back at the  Temple.  The Program Council (consisting of the chairs of  all church committees and the Board of Trustees) had its  final meeting of this church year on April 16, chaired by  Polly Walwark and Betsy Davis.  Reports from commit‐ tees and groups drove the agenda. Several are moving in  exciting new directions.  Also, four of the folks that  attended the UUA Conference of Large Churches at the  end of March shared some thoughts they brought back  with them:  From Betsy Davis:  “Who Owns the Congregation?”   Everyone...the Board, the ministers, the committees, the  members of the congregation...is responsible first of all  to the mission.  Not to each other, not to the real or  perceived needs of either individuals or groups, but to  the mission above everything.  And Betsy suggests that  our mission is encompassed in the covenant we recite  together each Sunday morning.  From Ian Morrison: “The Question Driven Church.”   This is the suggestion that the Board identify about two  questions for the entire congregation to consider, study,  discuss in a particular year.  These are to be questions  that are neither too specific (inviting quick and easy  answers) nor too general (inviting perpetual vagueness).   Examples of the kind of question that can be useful:   “How shall we change the lives of those who walk the  journey with us?”  “What special efforts shall we take to  reach groups we are not now reaching?” 

Celebrating Seniors in May
UTUUC will participate in the village‐wide Celebrat‐ ing Seniors Week, May 6‐13, by celebrating our own  amazing seniors! Members 65 and older have been in‐ vited to come to either coffee hour on Sunday, May 1, to  be briefly interviewed and photographed. The following  Sunday, May 8, we’ll host a special coffee hour displaying  a gallery of the faces and stories of those among us who  carry our collective memories.  If you want to participate on May 1 and have not  been contacted, please call either TIna Lewis 708‐207‐ 4190 or Carrie Bankes 7608‐383‐9181.   All seniors will receive free admittance to any of the  week’s events, which will feature the creative ideas of  community organizations such as libraries, park districts,  hospitals and senior service agencies. In addition, local  businesses will honor seniors by offering dining deals,  special discounts and promotions.  The week kicks off with a Ribbon Fest ceremony from  6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 28, at the Nineteenth Cen‐ tury Club, 178 Forest Ave. in Oak Park. For a listing of  related events, go to www.celebratingseniors.net.     

2011-2012 Annual Fund Drive Wrap-up
Thank you to everyone who made a  commitment during our 2011‐2012 An‐ nual Fund Drive. To date we have raised  $594,000 with more than 50 percent of  our households increasing their commit‐ ments by an average of 11 percent.  However, based on past giving and  outstanding commitments the projected  target for the Drive is $622,000, which the  Board of Trustees has approved as our  budget number for the fiscal year  begin‐ ning on July 1.   The Committee needs your help to raise the addi‐ tional $28,000 so we can fully fund our Congrega‐ tion. These funds will ensure that we are able to con‐ tinue to fulfill our mission through worship, religious  education, music, small group ministries, social action,  and much more.  If you have not yet made your commitment please  make it today‐ or if you are able to increase your com‐ mitment by any amount.  For additional information on  this year's Annual Fund Drive and for an online pledge  form, visit our website: www.unitytemple.org.  Thank you for your continued support of our Congre‐ gation!  If you have any questions, feel free to contact  me at annualfund@unitytemple.org or David Wilke, Di‐ rector of Administration at dwilke@unitytemple.org.    

Continued on page 10 

4   •   The Beacon 

FROM THE COMMUNITY MINISTER
Rev. Clare Butterfield
Clare@faithinplace.org   trange doings in the  world of public policy  lately make me think it’s not  a bad use of this column for  May to update you. For  those who didn’t yet hear,  the bill requiring disclosure of the contents of any natural  gas hydraulic fracturing formula that Faith in Place put  forward passed the Illinois State Senate unanimously in  April. Thanks to the many people from Unity Temple who  joined us in Springfield (they had fun – ask them!) and  signed postcards, and called. At time of writing there was  still plenty of work to do in the Illinois House, so if you  haven’t called your state representative asking them to  pass Senate Bill 664, now is a good time to do that. More  information on all this can be found at the Faith in Place  home page (www.faithinplace.org).  Bringing a bill through the General Assembly has  been an adventure for all of us in How Things Work.  Another one arrived the other morning in Chicago, when  an ordinance offered by Ald. Joe Moore that would  require the clean‐up or shut‐down of Chicago’s two  ancient and dirty coal plants was supposed to come up  for a vote in committee. A large coalition of organizations  had been working on this ordinance for some time (Faith  in Place has tried to do its part in that, though other  groups have done much more). By Thursday, April 21,  they believed they had the 26 votes needed to pass the  ordinance. When the crowd of supporters arrived at the  City Council chambers on Thursday morning they found it  full of Midwest Generation employees (most of whom  were from plants outside the city – only about 200  people work at the city plants, and only 20 percent of  those are from the communities where the plants are  located). The employees, in uniform and hardhats, were  reportedly even blocking the doors to the chambers and  reserving empty seats for colleagues who somehow  never emerged from the restroom. Supporters had to  stand out in the hall. The two chairs of the environment  committee, neither of whom supports the ordinance,  then announced that they would table the issue until  after the new administration is in place.  Events like this are best viewed through the tragic‐ ironic lens, but with as much sense of tragedy as irony. A 

very big slice of America seems to be refusing to adapt to  the new place in which we find ourselves. Change may  be scary, because it’s unpredictable, but it’s sometimes  wonderful. How do we feed each other’s courage – call  each other out into the new and maybe beautiful world  that is coming? Looks like we still have some work to do,  especially in Chicago.   

FROM THE INTERIM MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR
From Tina Lewis
tlewis@unitytemple.org elcoming Sunday always makes me cry.  It never  fails, as soon as I hear the beginning of "Come,  Sing a Song with Me," I turn to mush. Though I managed  to maintain my composure, the April Welcoming Sunday  was a particularly moving experience for me.  I knew I  would be in a risky situation.  The sound of everyone  singing, greeting new members with a rose, and all the  happily hugging people would surely cause me to be  overcome by emotion. Somehow, I did not require an  emergency tissue or need to be excused at an inappro‐ priate time, however, I was feeling every bit of the usual  mushiness that I always feel when we welcome new  people into our religious community. It was truly a  beautiful and meaningful morning.   The celebration dinner that followed in the evening  was equally wonderful. Everything worked out just  perfect. Of course, things could not have worked out  "just perfect" without the time and energy of volunteers  in the congregation. Many thanks to those people who  worked hard to make Welcoming Sunday a pleasure:  Rev. Clare Butterfield, Rev. Scott Lewis, Mona McNeese,  Mary Ellen Munley, Mark Robinson, Sue Anderson, Rob  and Laurie Bellmar, Lisa Gariota, Hilary Gray, Tom and  Sunny Hall, Margaret Klemundt, Allen McVey, Christine  Steyer, Sue Stock, Joan Van Note, Jennifer Walters, Vera  Dowell, Charlie Rossiter, Jane Ditelberg, Jan Johnston,  Bonnie and Stephen Jordan Collette Clark, Brian Hance,  Allen Van Note, Diane Maciejewski, Gary Wilson, Alison  Price, and David and Luis Osorio. Your efforts are greatly  appreciated. Thank you.  

May 2011   •    5 

NOMINATIONS FOR UTUUC BOARD OF TRUSTEES
The Nominating Committee is pleased to present the  following members of our congregation as candidates for  the UTUUC Board of Trustees.  If elected by vote of the  Congregation at the Annual Meeting on May 22, 2011,  they will serve a 3‐year term beginning July 1, 2011 and  ending on June 30, 2014.     LARRY STUDER  Larry Studer was sampling religions in 1993 when he  began attending the Beacon UU Church.  Larry continued  to attend after Beacon merged with UTUUC and has  been a member since 1994.  He has taught classes in the  RE Program for 15 years and considers the experience to  be very satisfying. He’s had the rather unique experience  of daughter Caroline being in his classes K‐6, and daugh‐ ter Julia K‐8. He now serves on the Religious Education  Committee and plans to continue teaching.  Larry lived in Oak Park for 32 years in a house that his  wife Carol and he restored several times over a number  of years. In 2006 Larry and his family moved into a new  house in Elmhurst. He was surprised to find out that new  homes require projects, too.  Larry has worked in the corporate aviation business  for 37 years and has held technical and managerial posi‐ tions with large corporations. His aviation experiences  have been challenging, demanding, and rewarding. He  served on several technical boards and the National Busi‐ ness Aviation Association Technical Committee. He vol‐ unteers time working at the Elmhurst Food Pantry two  days a week. Larry enjoys working with daughter Julia  and her team during softball season.  Larry appreciates being nominated to the Board of  Trustees. He looks forward to working with the board in  serving the needs of our congregation.    KRISTINA ENTNER  Kristina Entner began attending UTUUC in 1999.  She  was drawn into the building by its famous exterior, only  to discover that what happened inside was what was  truly extraordinary and revolutionary.  She has been a  member of the congregation for about 8 years.  Kristina  has been a member of the Green Sanctuary Committee  for several years and has chaired the committee since  2009.  She has also assisted in her daughters’ RE classes  throughout the years and worked on Social Mission Sun‐ days for all Ages.  Kristina is married to Ed Malone and  has two daughters, Hannah and Marlena.  Kristina is the  chair of the Whittier Elementary School Green Team and  is active in the West Cook Pro Bono Network, a group of 

attorneys who share their legal skills with the under‐ served. She also serves on the development committee  for Faith in Place. Prior to her work at home and in the  community, Kristina practiced law at Jenner & Block.    JOSHUA DITELBERG  Josh and his wife, Jane, have been members of Unity  Temple since 2009. Coming from different religious back‐ grounds, they wanted to find a common spiritual home  in which to raise their daughter, Claire.  Josh and Jane  have been delighted at how welcoming the congregation  is at UT. Josh presently is serving as a member of the  Worship Committee, the Personnel Committee, and as  an Usher. He is a Partner at Seyfarth Shaw LLP in Chicago,  specializing in labor and employment law.  He has a BA  and an MA from the University of Pennsylvania and a JD  from the University of Michigan. Originally from the Bos‐ ton area, Josh moved to Chicago in 1996 after Jane (a  St. Charles native) convinced him that it would be the  best place to start their lives together. Nonetheless, Josh  maintains a fierce allegiance to Boston, including Bos‐ ton's sports teams. He is somewhat horrified that Claire,  having been taken to yearly Red Sox–White Sox games,  has become a White Sox fan.  ("But I'm from Chicago,"  says Claire, with devastating logic).  Josh hopes to use his  perspective as a relatively new UT member to look for  ways to integrate new members into congregational life,  and to strengthen overall membership.       In addition, the Nominating Committee is presenting  the UTUUC member JEFFREY STOCKER as a candidate for  the UTRF Board of Trustees.  If elected, he will serve a  three‐year term.  

 

Unity Temple Gives...
The generosity of our congregation is making a   difference in people’s lives.  Every Sunday our   collection plate offerings are donated to a worthy  charitable organization in support of our mission and  values.  During the month of March 2011, your weekly  collection donations contributed the following  amounts to these organizations:  Lawyers Committee for Better Housing: $763.43  Parenthesis: $1104.35  UUA Fund for Japan Earthquake Relief: $2,009.95  Austin Scholarship Fund: $1091.94 
 

Thank you for your generosity!   

6   •   The Beacon 

ADULT RELIGIOUS ENRICHMENT
Movies with Meaning
The “ah‐ha” moment is when something makes  sense in a new way or an insight is gained. “Movies with  Meaning” is an ongoing Adult Religious Enrichment  program that uses movies and group discussion to gain  new insights into the human situation. A Latino father  copes with the reality of his son’s sexuality and his own  machismo. An American woman living in Australia tries  to heal the racism in both her community and her family.  A harsh and tyrannical nun uses any means at hand to  defeat an adversary she considers pure evil. These  characters and situations from three recent films in our  series have helped us grow in both insight and empathy.  Through film we encounter human realities we might not  otherwise experience. Our next Movie with Meaning:  Thursday, May 19 – The White Ribbon (2009)  In a German village, the reasons behind a series of  strange “accidents” threaten the authority of three of  the community’s patriarchs, as a young school teacher  tries to unravel the mystery beneath these events.  (German with English subtitles/Rated R)  Films screen at 6 p.m. and are followed by discussion  at 8 p.m. For more information contact Scott Talbot  Lewis at 708‐445‐1466. 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION
Urgent: Please Return Registration Forms for 2011-12 Religious Education Classes
Though autumn seems far, far away, the Religious  Education Committee will soon be planning for the 2011‐ 12 year. The curriculum, number of teachers and assis‐ tants recruited, classroom assignments, and materials  ordered all depend on estimated enrollment and class  sizes.  You can make the Committee’s job easier—and  the programs better!—by enrolling your child(ren) for  the 2011‐12 year now.  If you received in the mail a pre‐ printed registration form to enroll your child(ren), please  complete and check the information and return it.  If you  haven’t received a form but anticipate your child(ren)  participating in RE, please contact Tina Lewis at  tlewis@unitytemple.org. RE classes are open to mem‐ bers and non‐members alike (though different fees ap‐ ply).   The more you do now, the better we can prepare for  wonderful programming for the fall!  Thank you!    

Dedications on May 8
During the worship service on May 8, Rev. Emily Gage  will officiate at a baby dedication. It's our Unitarian Uni‐ versalist tradition to bless our youngest and dedicate our  religious community to helping raise and care for them. If  you are a member of Unity Temple, and are interested in  having your baby or child dedicated on May 8, please be  in touch with Rev. Emily Gage. If you reach her during her  maternity leave, you can be sure she will be back in  touch immediately upon her return. Thank you!   

Parents Support Group
UT families with special needs children meet on the third  Tuesday of each month at 709 S. Oak Park Ave, Oak  Park, at 7:30 p.m. Contacts are Carol DiMatteo or Tom  Dunnington, 708‐524‐2859 or carold27@att.net.    

Career Transition Outreach
Every Monday from 8:45 to 9:45 a.m. at Unity Temple,  Diane Wilson, LCPC, and Brooke McMillan, LCSW, help  those facing job loss and career uncertainty.  This  outreach helps participants manage the psychological  and practical aspects of their job transition.  Author of  Back in Control, Wilson is a coach, counselor, and  neurofeedback specialist. For more information email  Diane.G.Wilson@gmail.com. No registration or fees. 

Sixth Grade Fundraising Brunch May 15
The sixth grade classes will host a brunch immediately  following the second service coffee hour in Unity House  on May 15. Enjoy waffles or pancakes with a variety of  toppings, meat, fruit salad, and a beverage of your  choice. Adults $10 and kids $5. All proceeds will benefit  charity. Tickets on sale at coffee hours. Contact is Jen  Marling, jmarling7@comcast.net, Paula Spears at bol‐ la8@att.net or Kathy Wyman at kathy‐ wyman@hotmail.com.  

Purple Sages
On Wednesday, May 25, Marty Swisher, Music Director,  will share thoughts about UTUUC’s music program. The  Sages meet the fourth Wednesday of each month in the  second floor Book Discussion Room of the Oak Park  Public Library, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Contacts are  Joyce Marco, joycemmarco@hotmail.com, and Joan  Van Note at 708‐705‐1428.  

Knitting for Peace
Knitters meet on the second and fourth Saturdays of  every month at 2 p.m. in the Gale House. Output is  donated to the University of Chicago Hospital, Project  Linus, and others who we personally are told are in need  because of illness. Contact: Sarah Muller,  sarah.nmn.muller@gmail.com or 708‐763‐8736.   

May 2011   •    7 

FROM THE MUSIC DIRECTOR
Marty Swisher
music@unitytemple.org
Music in May at Unity Temple will offer some of its  best efforts as we present two services presented by our  youth on May 1 and 22.  Planning has been underway for  weeks by both our Sr. High and Middle School  students in preparation for their unique and inspiring  services.  On May 8, we are proud to present the debut  appearance of the Unity Temple Women's  Ensemble. This is a non‐audition group comprised of  women from the choir.  We invite non‐choir members to  join this ensemble that rehearses after choir rehearsals  on Wednesday night.  This group will appear three times  a year and sing music "near and dear" to the causes of  women.  We are excited to announce that on May 15, the  Unity Temple Choir accompanied by an instrumental  chamber ensemble will present Requiem by John Rutter  in its entirety.  On May 7, the choir will retreat for a full  day of preparation for this presentation.  Dan Broner,  conductor and Music Director from First Unitarian  Society in Madison, Wisconsin, will serve as clinician for  the morning followed by a lunch and final rehearsal with  instrumentation.  This is a beautiful work in seven  movements with soprano soloists, organ, flute, harp,  oboe, timpani, glockenspiel and cello.  Harpist Stephen  Hartman and oboist Deb Stevensen will join us once  again with our own Jane Wood on flute and Peter Storms  on organ.  The ensemble will be completed by Jim  Holland on timpani/glockenspiel and cellist Rich Lukes  from the West Suburban Symphony.  We invite you to be  a part of this very special presentation.  Meadeville Lombard Theological Seminary has once  again invited the The Unity Temple Choir to sing at their  commencement ceremony.  The service will be held at  The First Unitarian Church in Hyde Park at 3 p.m. on the  afternoon of May 15.  After singing the Rutter Requiem,  the choir will travel to sing for this event, making for  a very long day of service.  It is gratifying to work with a  team that chose to accept this invitation and that  embodies the true spirit of dedication, inspiring those of  us who work with them. How proud we are of all of you!  We are thrilled to welcome saxophonist Cody  Stocker as our featured soloist during the Coming of Age  Services on May 22.  Many of our youth will present their  special talents on this day as well.  We are so grateful to  have all of them as part of our musical family to  contribute to this very special worship experience.  

Christine Steyer will once again grace our services  with her poignant and lovely soprano voice on May  29.  We are fortunate to have this outstanding  professional as a member of Unity Temple.  Our fourth Friday service, In the Style of Taize will be  held on May 27.  Harpist Steven Hartman will be  featured as we continue this musical meditation.  Attendance from our UU family as well as from non‐ members and guests is strong. The organization team is  in need of a bit of a break so we have decided to suspend  services for the summer months of June, July and August  with plans to resume in September.  We are looking for  additional volunteers to help the continuance of this  service and seek support for tech set‐up, musicians and  service leaders.  Please contact Music Director, Marty  Swisher (music@unitytemple.org) if you are interested in  securing the future of these services.  

RACINE POET NICK DEMSKE AT 3RD SATURDAY COFFEEHOUSE
Nick Demske is a poet who lives in Racine, Wisconsin,  and works at the Racine Public Library.  His self‐titled  manuscript was selected by Joyelle McSweeney for the  2010 Fence Modern Poets Series prize and was published  in November of 2010. He has been a curator of the  BONK! performance series, a founder of the Racquetball  Chapbook Tournament and an editor of the online venue  boo: a journal of terrific things. His work has appeared in  Action Yes, Conduit, Sawbuck, Artful Dodge, PinStripe  Fedora and other places. Takes place Saturday, May 21,  in Unity House. Doors open 7:30 p.m., Open Mic at 8  p.m., featured performer at 9 p.m. Donation $3‐$5. Open  mic limited to 5 minutes. Info at 708‐660‐9376.  

TAIZÉ AT UNITY TEMPLE
Please join us again for Taizé Service in the Unity Temple  Sanctuary, on Friday, May 27, at 7 p.m. This service  offers a time for meditation, reflection, and renewal  through music, brief words, and silence. Come sing, light  a candle, and nurture your spirit during this non‐ traditional worship experience—and bring a friend.  The  service will conclude before 8 p.m. For more  information, contact Marty Swisher, Music Director, at  music@unitytemple.org.   

8   •   The Beacon 

CHALICE CIRCLES
Parenting Crimes
Reading #1  Psychologist Ronald Siegel, a leader in the field of  mindfulness and psychotherapy, believes that as parents  we are all too ready to convict ourselves of what he calls  “parenting crimes.” In a talk on mindfulness and  intimacy, Siegel notes that “Convicting ourselves of  parenting crimes is rarely helpful,” because it leads to  self‐hatred—and that self‐hatred can so easily lead us to  judge or hate the child whose behavior triggered our  “parenting crime.”    Reading #2  “For me, as a mother, the ability to ‘recreate’ my  relationship with my children is a redemptive con‐ cept.” (p. 15, How to Hug a Porcupine: Negotiating the  Prickly Points of the Tween Years by Julie Ross).    Discussion Questions  1. How hard on yourself are you when you judge yourself  as a parent? If you are not a parent, how have you  reacted when you’ve heard parents accuse themselves of  “parenting crimes”?  2. Instead of convicting ourselves of parenting crimes,  what are some other ways we could handle the mistakes  we make as parents that might lead to more positive  outcomes?  3. In the same talk quoted above, psychologist Ronald  Siegel says, “Saying no to our kids means having to bear  disconnection.” But our impulse is to try to reestablish  that connection as soon as possible. As author Julie Ross  says in the quote from her book, she believes that she  can “redeem” herself when she makes mistakes as a  parent because she can “recreate” her relationship with  her children when what she has done seems to have  damaged that relationship. What do you think of these  ideas? Is it possible to say “no,” and still stay connected?  Should parents try to learn to “bear disconnection”?  Have you found ways of “recreating” relationships when  what you’ve done seems to have damaged them? What  have your experiences been?  4. Because this topic can so easily flood parents with  memories of the moments we most regret, it might be  important to bring some positive moments to mind as  well. Can you recall a favorite memory with a child, a  memory you treasure of a time with a child? What comes  to your mind? What do you notice about these  memories?   

Closing Reading  “Here’s how I saw it. You could look at each baby as a  little Buddha or Zen master, your own private mindful‐ ness teacher, parachuted into your life, whose presence  and actions were guaranteed to push every button and  challenge every belief and limit you had, giving you  continual opportunities to see where you were attached  to something and to let go of it … the list of situations in  which you will find your equanimity and clarity sorely  challenged is endless … Your children will see your  foibles, idiosyncrasies, warts and pimples, your  inconsistencies, and your failures… These trials are not  impediments to either parenting or to mindfulness  practice. They are the practice, if you can remember to  see them in this way.” (pp. 248‐251, Wherever You Go,  There You Are: Mindfulness Meditation in Everyday Life  by Jon‐Kabat Zinn).   

Join a Chalice Circle, weekdays or any day!  
A new daytime, weekday Chalice Circle is forming.  Scott Talbot Lewis will facilitate.  In addition, there  are 15 other Chalice Circles with many possible  schedules and times for meeting. Chalice Circles  create openings for trust, friendship, honesty, growth  and reflection. They are a spiritual practice. We  welcome adults of all ages. Be known as you are, join  a group today. For information about joining any  Chalice Circle or facilitator training contact Marge  Entemann at mee2@pobox.com or 708‐445‐8544.   

First Meeting Set for New Prayer Group
Are you interested in becoming part of a regular Prayer  Group at Unity Temple?   This new group will have its  first meeting on Sunday, May 15th at 10 am, with the  location to be announced.  At that time we will select a  regular time and meeting place. The emphasis of our  meeting is to discuss modern prayer as a spiritual prac‐ tice and to practice prayer together. Discussions will in‐ clude the meaning of prayer for UUs and for you, the  impact of prayer, forms of prayer, and more. All are wel‐ come, and may contact Scott Talbot Lewis at 708‐445‐ 1466 for further information.  

Ex Libris Will Run Through June
The Used Book Fair garnered over $600, which will be  used to bring more richness to the church's commit‐ ments.  Books will be available at Ex Libris, the second  and fourth Sundays of May and June.  After a summer  break, we will continue to offer books to widen and  deepen your experience in our congregation.  

May 2011   •    9 

SOCIAL MISSION
Open Dialogue on Peace
The Unity Temple Peace Committee, together with  members of the congregation, developed a resolution  that will be voted on at the upcoming annual meeting,  Sunday, May 22.  The resolution reads:  As Unitarian Uni‐ versalists, we believe that we should work for a peaceful,  fair, and free world. We are committed to the prompt  withdrawal of troops from Iraq and Afghanistan.   You will have a chance to raise your questions/and or  concerns about the resolution at two open forums in  May:  Sunday, May 1, from 12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m. and Sun‐ day, May 8, from 12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m.  Both forums will  be held in Unity House.  For more information contact:   Ed White at ewhite0640@comcast.net  

SABBATICAL MINISTER FOR PASTORAL CARE
Scott Talbot Lewis
slewis@unitytemple.org
ach week we enact a ritual  that is symbolic of an  aspect of our faith.  When we  take time in our worship service to share personal  experiences and feelings, we proclaim the importance of  the individual in our religious community.  We find the  commonality in our humanity.  We all understand the  delight at the birth of a grandchild, just as surely as we  perceive the fear and gravity that comes with serious  illness.  It’s a time of compassion and mutual affinity.  Brevity is important. Many Sundays our Joys and  Sorrows are many.  I find that the essence of my concern  can most effectively be shared in just a couple of  sentences.  Being succinct gives more impact to my  thoughts and feelings.  It seems best if I consider my  words before I step up to the microphone.  World events certainly are worthy of acknowledge‐ ment. Empathy for the suffering is a religious essential,  but political controversy is a different matter.  We often  assume that Unitarian Universalists share one partisan  viewpoint.  That’s not fair, we proudly claim our love of  diversity, but expect conformity on political posi‐ tions.  Worship is a time to strengthen community not,  challenge it.  Getting the word out to publicize events or projects  can be achieved in a variety of ways.  Our newsletter,  email messages and coffee hour tables provide excellent  opportunities for communication with the members and  friends of the church.  These announcements can distract  us from our desire to find a less worldly place within  ourselves during worship.  Worship is a contemplative and sacred time.  Outside  concerns can be stilled, the work‐a‐day world is with us  so much, worship is separate.  If you have a pastoral care need please contact Scott at  slewis@unitytemple.org or 708‐250‐6810.   

CROP Walk
Join us on Sunday, May 1, for exercise, fresh air, and that  great feeling you get when you help others. Kids love the  accomplishment of both walking and helping—so make  this a family event.   Last year, our local CROP Walk  raised $75,000 for food, disaster relief, and self‐help  projects locally and world‐wide. You can participate by  walking, sponsoring a walker, or just making a dona‐ tion.  More details at the Social Mission table during  Coffee Hour or online at  www.oakparkhungercropwalk.org or contact Mike  Delonay or Colleen Keleher.   

Community Renewal Society Springfield Lobby Day on May 10
Community Renewal Society is a progressive, faith‐ based organization working to eliminate race and class  barriers. Founded in 1882, Community Renewal informs,  organizes and trains both communities and individuals to  advocate for social and economic justice. This Lobby Day  will focus on protecting Comprehensive Community  Based Youth Services, which provides services for poor,  at‐risk youth (especially children with incarcerated par‐ ents) and safeguarding the budget for the Department of  Human Services, which supports the most vulnerable  populations in our communities.   Buses leave for Springfield at 6 a.m. with one depar‐ ture location near Oak Park. There is no cost and a free  lunch will be provided! We will have orange t‐shirts for  everyone to wear, which you can keep for $9. Contact  Alan VanNote at avannote@gmail.com or Rich Pokorny  at rvpokorny@comcast.net for more information. 

Celebrate Scott’s Ordination!   Members and friends of the Unity Temple Unitarian Uni‐ versalist Congregation are invited to attend the ordina‐ tion of Scott Talbot Lewis on Sunday, May 1, at 4 p.m., at  the Unitarian Universalist Church of Rockford, 4848  Turner Street in Rockford, IL.   

10   •   The Beacon 

UNITY TEMPLE RESTORATION FOUNDATION
Restoration Priorities
The most important restoration projects are those that help  secure and stabilize the “building envelope”—repairing the  concrete roof slabs and walls and the conservation of the art  glass. Fundraising efforts focus on these top priority projects,  which require $5 to $7 million. Additionally, we continue to  seek funding for the “green” geothermal interior climate  control system. Construction drawings for the entire system  are now complete. This spring, we will begin work on an art  glass restoration project, restoring a portion of the tall, narrow  windows in the sanctuary with a grant from The Richard H.  Driehaus Foundation. 
 

Summer Leaders: Proposals Due May 20
If you are interested in leading a summer worship service  please submit a proposal, including a title, summary of  your message, description of your ideas for the service,  and a brief explanation of your motivation for leading the  service. Also include dates you are available between July  3 and September 4. Questions about planning a service  should be directed to Rev. Scott Talbot Lewis. Email pro‐ posals to Ken Hooker, kh_lw222@sbcglobal.net or place  it in the Worship folder in the office closet by May 20.   
Report from BOT, Continued from page 3 

Programs That Support the Restoration
UTRF offers programs to introduce a larger audience to Unity  Temple’s significance and its urgent need for restoration. This  helps to deepen the public’s engagement with Unity Temple  and the work of Unity Temple Restoration Foundation. UTRF’s  programs are funded by general operating grants from The  MacArthur Fund for Arts & Culture at The Richard H. Driehaus  Foundation and the Illinois Arts Council. 
 

Writers at Wright | Roy Blount: Alphabetter Juice: Or, The Joy  of Text, Thursday, May 12, 2011, 7 pm, $10*  Rather than proper English, Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me's Roy  Blount, Jr., prescribes an "over‐the‐counter" melange of a  language, unearthing a slew of factoids, fripperies, and  flabbergasting phenomena that will change the way you speak  ‐‐ or misspeak. Books will be available for purchase and  signing. Blount is a frequent panelist on NPR’s Wait, Wait… Don’t Tell Me. *Each ticket stub may be redeemed for $10 off  the price of Alphabetter Juice on the night of the event. 
 

REGISTRATION OPEN ‐‐ Prairie School Adventures |  Printmaking Magic, July 18‐22, 2011, 9am‐12pm, $185/195  The colors, textures, and light of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unity  Temple will inspire your kids. Campers explore the magical  methods of making colorful monotype prints, from sketching  and mixing inks to using an actual printing press to create one‐ of‐a‐kind works of art. Grades 2‐6. 
 

REGISTRATION OPEN ‐‐ Prairie School Adventures | Art Glass,  Wright & Nature, July 25‐29, 2011, 9am‐12pm, $165/175  With nature and Wright as inspiration, campers create their  own art glass window designs in translucent Mylar and present  them in a group exhibit. Grades 2‐6. 
 

Break :: the :: Box | Chef Gale Gand: Homage to Frank Lloyd  Wright & A Cooking Demonstration, Thursday, September 15,  2011, 7:30 pm, Ticket Price TBD 
 

Break :: the :: Box | Third Coast International Audio Festival:  Sound Evoking Space, Thursday, November 10, 2011, 7:30  pm, Ticket Price TBD 

From Tina Lewis:  “Lay Leadership as a Spiritual  Discipline.”  The emphasis in the workshop was to  encourage people to consider changing their feelings,  attitude and perspectives toward doing the nuts and  bolts work of the church; to work on creating healthy  energy around the work that needs to be done.  Though  we hold different beliefs about God, our church  community engages us in a sacred something that  nurtures our souls or sacred part.  Spirituality is being  alive and open to life as opposed to withdrawn.  Spiritual  practices enable us to deepen our life experience.  From Margaret Kelmundt:  “Personal Transforma‐ tion in a Large Church.”  Large congregations are both  blessed and cursed by their growth.  One of the  downsides of expansion in membership is that as  congregations grow, leadership is required to devote  much more of our energy to what I think of as macro  issues; space planning, financial analysis, large scale  programming, management of professional staff, etc.   Given these realities, it is understandable that we at  times can lose focus of our real mission or reason for  being.  “Growth, expanding budgets, building programs  and such trappings of success matter only if they reflect  positive transformation in the lives of the people  touched by the congregations’ work.”  (Dan Hotchkiss)   We need to keep our focus on such questions as, “How  shall we change the lives of those who walk the journey  with us?” and “What do we do early on in an individual’s  contact with UTUUC to increase the likelihood that they  sooner or later will find our community to be personally  transformative?”  Despite the size of UTUUC, our first  order of business is to lay the foundation for the types of  personal transformation that ultimately allow us to  accomplish our mission.  We will follow through on these thoughts over the  next year as we seek to refine our mission and focus our  vision.  We will need to find ways to share our thinking  and reflection with each other.  I’m certainly looking  forward to engaging the process.  Come to the Annual Meeting on May 22.  

EVENTS NOT TO MISS T HIS MONTH
 

May 2011   •    11 

May 1      May 1 & 8    May 6    May 10     May 14 & 28    May 15            May 15 & 22    May 19    May 21    May 22    May 25    May 27   

CROP Walk  Scott Talbot Lewis Ordination  4 p.m., UU Church of Rockford  Open Forums on Peace Resolution  12:30 p.m., Unity House  Teacher Appreciation Dinner  6 p.m., Unity House  Community Renewal Society Spring field Lobby Day   Knitting for Peace  2 p.m., Gale House  6th Grade Pancake Fundraiser  12:15 p.m., Unity house  Introduction to UU  1 p.m., Unity House  Movie: Why We Fight  1 p.m., Gale House  Pathways to Membership  1 p.m., Unity House  Movie with Meaning:   The White Ribbon (2009) 6 p.m., Unity House  3rd Saturday Coffeehouse  7:30 p.m., Unity Temple  Annual Meeting  12:30 p.m., Unity Temple Sanctuary  Purple Sages (Senior Women)  11:30 a.m., Oak Park Library  Taizé Service  7 p.m., Sanctuary 

Board of Trustees
board@unitytemple.org 
 

Duane Dowell     President  Ian Morrison      Vice President  Margaret Ewing      Secretary   Glenn Brewer       Treasurer  Jean Borrelli  Betsy Davis  Nina Gegenheimer  Jay Peterson  David Ripley  Diane Scott  Jennifer Walters  Polly Walwark  

Our Staff
For all calls, please dial 708‐848‐6225   and then your party’s extension: 
 

Rev. Alan C. Taylor, Senior Minister   On sabbatical through June 30, 2011  Rev. Emily Gage, Minister of Faith Development  ext. 103    egage@unitytemple.org  Rev. Scott Talbot Lewis, Sabbatical Pastoral Care  Minister  708‐250‐6810    slewis@unitytemple.org  Tina Lewis, Interim Membership Director  ext. 102    tlewis@unitytemple.org  David Wilke, Director of Administration  ext. 100    dwilke@unitytemple.org  Martha Swisher, Music Director  music@unitytemple.org  Heather Godbout, Youth Coordinator  ext.  107     indigo1370@aol.com  Meridian Herman, Rental Manager  ext. 108    rentals@unitytemple.org  Sule Kivanc‐Ancieta, Preschool Coordinator  Janet Krumm, Nursery Coordinator  David Osorio, Sexton  Rito Salinas, Sexton  Peter Storms, Accompanist  Jennifer Flynn, Publications Assistant  ext. 105     jflynn@unitytemple.org  Tracy Zurawski, Bookkeeper  ext. 104    bookkeeper@unitytemple.org 

Visit Our Calendar Online!
At www.unitytemple.org/calendar you can find real‐ time listings of everything occurring at Unity Temple  as well as schedule rooms.  Select Add Event at the  top of the calendar and complete the web form.  You  will receive an email when your UTUUC event as been  confirmed.   

BEACON Newsletter Submissions
June 2011 Beacon submissions are due at 10 a.m. on  May 23. If you are promoting an event or group, please  use the publications submission link on the lower left‐ hand side of the Unity Temple homepage,  www.unitytemple.org. Questions and inquiries an be  directed to newsletter@unitytemple.org.  

WWW. UNITYTEMPLE. ORG

Unity Temple Unitarian Universalist Congregation 875 Lake Street Oak Park, IL 60301 708-848-6225
Change service requested

Nonprofit  Organization 

US POSTAGE  PAID 
Oak Park, IL 60301 

Permit No. 305 

www.unitytemple.org

Upcoming Services
Sunday Services are at 9 & 10:45 a.m. 
    May 1 

Big Questions 
UTUUC Youth Service and Bridging Ceremony  Offering: Trinity Boy Choir, Port‐Au‐Prince, Haiti     May 8  

  May 22 

Coming of Age
Rev. Emily Gage  Offering: Parenthesis    May 27 at 7 p.m. 

Beyond Light Bulbs: Covenant and  Collective Action            
Matt Meyer  Offering: Trinity Boy Choir, Port‐Au‐Prince, Haiti     May 15 

Taizé at Unity Temple 
  May 29 

Love In Action
Andrew Harvey  Offering:  Sarah’s Inn     

A Choral Service: Requiem
Mary Swisher  Offering: Maywood Fine Arts Fund 

 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->