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GRE 5 Sample Tests

GRE 5 Sample Tests

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TEST 1

SECTION 1 Time—30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence aw five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the words or set of words for/each blank that best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. Nonviolent demonstrations often create such tensions that a community that has constantly refused to------its injustices is forced to correct them: the injustices can no longer be ——, (A) acknowledge..ignored (B) decrease..verified (C) tolerate..accept (D) edaddress..eliminated (E) explain..discussed 2. Since 1813 reaction to Jane Austen's novels has oscillated between------and condescension; but in general later writers have esteemed her works more highly than did most of her literary------. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) dismissal..admirers adoration..contemporaries disapproval..readers indifference..followers approbation..precursors

3. Then are, as yet, no vegetation types or ecosystems whose study has been-------to the extent that they no longer —— ecologists. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) perfected..hinder exhausted..interest pro|onged..require prevented..challenge delayed..benefit

4. Under ethical guidelines recently adopted by the National Institutes of Health, human genes are to be manipulated only to correct diseases for which------treatments are unsatisfactory. (A) similar (B) most (Q dangerous (D) uncommon (B) alternative

5. It was her view that the country's problems had been------by foreign technocrats, so

that to invite them to come back would be counterproductive. (A) foreseen (B) attacked (Q ascertained (D) exacerbated (E) analyzed

6. Winsor McCay, the cartoonist, could draw with incredible------: his comic strip about Little Nemo was characterized by marvelous draftmanship and sequencing. (A) sincerity (B) efficiency (Q virtuosity (D) rapidity (E) energy

7. The actual------of Wilson's position was always -— by his refusal to compromise after having initially agreed to negotiate a settlement. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) outcome..foreshadowed logic..enhanced rigidity..betrayed uncertainty..alleviated cowardice..highlighted

Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8.SEDATIVE: DROWSINESS:: (A) epidemic: contagiousness (B) vaccine: virus (C) laxative: drug (D) motor: car (E) therapy: psychosis 9. LAWYER: COURTROOM:: (A) participant: team (B) commuter : train (C) gladiator: arena (D) senator: caucus (E) patient: ward 10. CURIOSITY: KNOW:: (A) (B) (C) (D) temptation: conquer starvation: eat wanderlust: travel humor: laugh

(E) survival: live

11. FRUGAL: MISERLY:: (A) confident-: arrogant (B) courageous: pugnacious (C) famous: aggressive (D) rash: foolhardy (F) quiet: timid 12. ANTIDOTE: POISON :: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) cure: recovery narcotic: sleep stimulant: relapse tonic: lethargy resuscitation: breathing

13. STYGIAN: DARK:: (A) abysmal: low (B) cogent: contentious (C) fortuitous: accidental (D) reckless: threatening (E) cataclysmic: doomed 14. WORSHIP: SACRIFICE:: (A) generation : pyre (B) burial: mortuary (D) massacre: invasion (E) prediction: augury 15. EVANESCENT: DISAPPEAR: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) transparent: penetrate onerous: struggle feckless: succeed illusory: exist pliant: yield

16. UPBRAID: REPROACH:: (A) dote: like

the Sun's large-scale magnetic field is taken to be self-sustaining. In short. however. and x-radiation all vary directly with the sunspot cycle. however. Thus. The alternative explanation supposes that the Sun's large-scale magnetic field is a remnant of the field the Sun acquired when it. Invariably. . known collectively as the solar-activity cycle. formed. the characteristics of the solar-activity cycle could be expected to change over a long period of time. Effects of solar variability over longer terms have also been sought. failed to link unequivocally terrestrial climate and the solar-activity cycle. or even to confirm the cycle's past existence. The Maunder minimum has been linked to a span of Unusual cold in Europe extending from the sixteenth to the early nineteenth centuries. After reading a passage. with an average cycle of eleven years. ultraviolet radiation. and is not sustained against decay. the incidence of solar flares and the flux of solar cosmic rays. Moreover. The absence of recorded sunspot activity in the notes kept by European observers in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries has led some scholars to postulate a brief cessation of sunspot activity at that time (a period called the Maunder minimum). Modern solar observations span too short a time to reveal whether present cyclical solar activity is a long-lived feature of the Sun. the sunspot cycle and the allied magnetic-polarity cycle have been linked to periodicities discerned in records of such variables as rainfall. The first supposes that the Sun's internal motions (caused by rotation and convection) interact with its large-scale magnetic field to produce a dynamo. temperature. the relation is weak. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. Scientists have also sought evidence of long-term solar periodicities by examining indirect climatological data.(B) (C) (D) (E) lag: stray vex: please earn: desire recast: explain Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. In this model. a device in which mechanical energy is converted into the energy of a magnetic field. so that the solar-activity cycle it drives would be maintained with little overall chance for perhaps billions of years. It has been known for many decades that the appearance of sunspots is roughly periodic. The reality of the Maunder minimum has yet to be established. however. Currently. If consistent and reliable geological or archaeological evidence tracing the solaractivity cycle in the distant past could be found. such as fossil records of the thickness of ancient tree rings. there are two models of solar activity. the solar mechanism dependent on the Sun's magnetic field runs down more quickly. it might also resolve an important issue in solar physics: how to model solar activity. But after more than a century of investigation. especially since the records that Chinese naked-eye observers of solar activity made at that time appear to contradict it. These studies. choose the best answer to each question. to terrestrial weather and climate remains unclear. the relation of these and other phenomena. For example. and commonly of dubious statistical significance. and winds. or merely a transient phenomenon.

late seventeenth. as they are described in lines 37-55. (E) They establish that solar activity at the time of the Maunder minimum did not significantly vary from its present) pattern.and early eighteenth-century Chinese records are important for which of the following reasons? (A) They suggest that the data on which the Maunder minimum was predicated were incorrect. (E) In one model cycles of solar activity with periodicities longer than a few decades are considered to be impossible. Which of the following statements about the two models of solar activity. (C) In one model the Sun's magnetic field is thought to play a role in causing solar activity. whereas in the other model such cycles are redirected.According to the passage. The author implies which of the following about currently available geological and archaeological evidence concerning the solar-activity cycle? . persisting with little change over billions of years. 19. (B) In both models the solar-activity cycle is hypothesized as being dependent on the large-scale solar magnetic field. 20. whereas in the other model it is not. (C) They suggest that the Maunder minimum might be valid only for Europe (D) They establish the existence of a span of unusually cold weather worldwide ay the time of the Maunder minimum. (D) In one model solar activity is presumed to be unrelated to terrestrial phenomena. The author focuses primarily on (A) presenting two competing scientific theories concerning solar activity and evaluating geological evidence often cited to support them (B) giving a brief overview of some recent scientific developments in solar physics and assessing their impact on future climatological research (C) discussing the difficulties involved in linking terrestrial phenomena with solar activity and indicating how resolving that issue could have an impact on our understanding of solar physics (D) pointing out the futility of a certain line of scientific inquiry into the terrestrial effects of solar activity and recommending its abandonment in favor of purely physics-oriented research (E) outlining the specific reasons why a problem in solar physics has not yet been solved and faulting the overly theoretical approach of modem physicists 18.17. whereas in the other model solar activity is thought to have observable effects on the Earth. (B) They suggest that the Maunder minimum cannot be related to climate. is accurate? (A) In both models cyclical solar activity is regarded as a long-lived feature of the Sun.

It can be inferred from the passage that studies attempting to use tree-ring thickness to locate possible links between solar periodicity and terrestrial climate are based on which of the following assumptions? (A) The solar-activity cycle existed in its present form during the time period in which the tree rings grew. It can be inferred from the passage that the argument in favor of the model described m lines 37-45 would be strengthened if which of the following were found to be true? (A) Episodes of intense volcanic eruptions in the distant past occurred in cycles having very long periodicities. (E) Hundreds of millions of years ago. (B) At the present time the global level of thunderstorm activity increases and decreases in cycles with periodicities of approximately 11 years. (D) In the last century the length of the sunspot cycle has been known to vary by as much as 2 years from its average periodicity of 11 years. (B) The biological mechanisms causing tree growth are unaffected by short-term weather patterns. (D) Tree-ring thicknesses reflect changes in terrestrial climate.(A) It best supports the model of solar activity described in lines 37-45. (E) It disproves the theory that terrestrial weather and solar activity are linked in some way. (D) It contradicts both models of solar activity as they are presented in the third paragraph. It can be inferred from the passage. (E) Both terrestrial climate and the solar-activity cycle randomly affect tree-ring thickness. . 21. solar activity cycles displayed the same periodicities 22. that Chinese observations of the Sun during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries (A) are ambiguous because most sunspots cannot be seen with the naked eye (B) probably were made under the same weather conditions as those made in Europe (C) are more reliable than European observations made during this period (D) record some sunspot activity during this period (E) have been employed by scientists seeking to argue that a change in solar activity occurred during this period 23. (C) Average tree-ring thickness varies from species to species. (B) It best supports the model of solar activity described in lines 45-52. (C) It is insufficient to confirm either model of solar activity described in the third paragraph. (C) In the distant past cyclical climatic changes had periodicities of longer than 200 years.

" I only II only III only I and II only II and III only the following EXCEPT 26. so also many linguists are deaf to those instances in which the very nature of a language calls forth misunderstandings in everyday conversation. and if we admit this truth." but Y mistakenly thinks that bachelor means "unmarried woman. The primary purpose of the passage is to (A) analyze an interesting feature of the English language (B) refute a belief held by some linguists (C) show that economic theory is relevant to linguistic study (D) illustrate the confusion that can result from the improper use of language (E) suggest a way in which languages can be made more nearly perfect 25. not John's." No language is perfect. In presenting the argument. consequently. but Y thinks that X is referring to one person only. 24. the exact counterpart of the conviction of the Manchester school of economics that supply and demand will regulate everything for the best." X uses the word "bachelor" to mean "unmarried man. a word has to be modified or defined in order to present the idea intended by the speaker: "He took his stick—no. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) X uses the word "you" to refer to a group. and in which. Just as economists were blind to the numerous cases in which the law of supply and demand left actual wants unsatisfied. The misunderstanding presented by the author in lines 13-14 is similar to which of the following? I. but his own. we must also admit that it is not unreasonable to investigate the relative merits of different languages or of different details in languages. X mistakenly uses the word "anomaly" to refer to a typical example. but Y knows that "anomaly" means "exception.The common belief of some linguists that each language is a perfect vehicle for the thoughts of the nation speaking it is in some ways. the author does all of ' (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) give an example draw a conclusion make a generalization make a comparison present a paradox 27. Which of the following contributes to the misunderstanding described by the author in lines 13-14? . II. III.

Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning. followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. (C) It is unclear to whom the word "his" refers the second time it is used. ADULTERATION: (A) consternation (B) purification rejuvenation 32. ENERVATE: (A) recuperate (B) resurrect (C) renovate (D) gather (E) strengthen (C) normalization (D) approximation (E) 34. DEPOSITION: (A) process of congealing (B) process of distilling (C) process of eroding (D) process of evolving (E) process of condensing 33. BOYCOTT: (A) extort (B) underwrite (C) underbid (D) stipulate (E) patronize 31. (B) It is unclear to whom the word "his" refers the first time it is used. 28. DIVULGE: (A) keep secret (B) evaluate by oneself (C) refine (D) restore . LOQUACIOUS: (A) tranquil (B) skeptical (C) morose (D)" taciturn (E) witty 35. Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters. FALLACY: (A) persona! Philosophy (B) imaginative idea (C) unconfirmed theory (D) tentative opinion (E) valid argument 29. be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. REPINE: (A) intensify (B) excuse (C) express joy (D) feel sure (E) rush forward .(A) It is unclear whom the speaker of the sentence is addressing. (E) copy 30. (D) The meaning of "took" is ambiguous. (E) It is unclear to whom "He" refers.

36. VENERATION: (A) derision (B) blame (C) avoidance 37. INVETERATE: (A) casual (B) public (C) satisfactory (D) trustworthy (E) sophisticated 38. UNDERMINE: (A) submerge (B) supersede (C) overhaul (D) undergird (E) intersperse (D) ostracism (E) defiance

SECTION 3 Time—30 minutes 30 Questions All numbers used are real numbers. Numbers: Figures: Position of points, angles, regions, etc. can be assumed to be in the order shown; and angle measures can be assumed to be positive. Lines shown as straight can be assumed to be straight. Figures can be assumed to lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated. Figures that accompany questions are intended to provide information useful in answering the questions. However, unless a note states that a figure is drawn to scale, you should solve these problems NOT by estimating sizes by sight or by measurement, but by using your knowledge of mathematics (sec Example 2 below). Directions: Each of the Questions 1-15 consists of two quantities, one in Column A and one in Column B. You are to compare the two quantities and choose A B C D if the quantity in Column A is greater; if the quantity in Column B is greater; if the two quantities are equal; if the relationship cannot be determined from the information given.

Note: Since there are only four choices, NEVER MARK (E). Common Information: In a question, information concerning one or both of the quantities to be compared is centered above the two columns. A symbol that appears in both columns represents the same thing in Column A as it does in Column B. Column A 2X6 Example 1: Examples 2-4 refer to ∆PQR. Column B 2+6 Sample Answers

Example 2: (since equal measures cannot be assumed, even though PN

and NQ appear equal) x Example 3: (since N is between P and Q) Example 4: w + z (since PQ is a straight line) 180 y

A if the quantity in Column A is greater; B if the quantity in Column B is greater; C if the two quantities are equal; • ; D if the relationship cannot be determined from the information given. Column A 1. x = 2y + 3 y=-2 2. x 34 Column B 43

-1

d = 5.03894 and d is the decimal expression for d rounded to the nearest thousandth. 3. The number of decimal places where d and [d] differ x + 2y > 8 4. 2x + 4y 20 4

Square MNPQ has area 36. 5. The perimeter of pentagon MNOPQ 30 p and q are different prime numbers, r is the least prime number greater than p, and s is, the least prime number greater than q. 6. r–p s -q

The volume of a cylindrical tank that has a radius of 2 meters and a height of 10 meters The volume of a cylindrical tank that has a meter and a height of 20 meters. and R of the circles.|-3|+_m 7. . Each pair of circles has exactly one point in common.The perimeter of triangle PQR The circumference of the circle with center Q 10. 9. 8. The remainder when n is divided by 12 6 Equilateral triangle PQR is formed by joining centers P. m 3 n is an even integer and a multiple of 3. Q.

The time required to travel d miles at s miles per hour The time required to travel d/2 miles at 2s ∆RST is isosceles and ∟RST = 40. her new salary was 24 percent less than her old salary.18 .19 . (19 . If 3x -2 = 7. B if the quantity in Column B is greater. The sum of the measures 120° of the two angles of ∆RST that have equal measure 13. 16. then 4x = . After Maria changed jobs. √x4+6X2+ 9 x2 + 3 0 is the center of the circle aud LAOC is a right angle.17 . her salary was 24 percent more than Julio's salary. C if the two quantities are equal.18 . Julio's salary Maria's new salary Directions: Each of the Questions 16-30 has five answer choices. D if the relationship cannot be determined from the information given.16) . 14. OD BD Before Maria changed jobs.17)= (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) -36 -6 –4 l 2 17. For each of these questions. Column A Column B ds # O 11. select the best of the answer choices given.(20 . 15.A if the quantity in Column A is greater. 12.

The greatest number of diagonals that can be drawn from one vertex of a regular 6sided polygon is (A) 2 (B) 3 (C) 4 (D) 5 (E) 6 . which is closest to 3√30? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 6 5 4 3 2 19. The dots on the graph above indicate age and weight for a sample of 25 students.(A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 3 5 20/3 9 12 18.Of the following. What percent of these students are less than 19 years old and weigh more than 110 pounds? (A) (B) (C) (D) (F) 36% 40% 44% 48% 52% 20.

AVERAGE DAILY'CIRCULATION FOR NEWSPAPER* TOTAL YEARLY ADVERTISING REVENUE FOR NEWSPAPER X AVERAGE NUMPER OF PAGES PER NEWSPAPER FOR NEWSPAPER X 21. In 1980 the number of dollars of advertising revenue was how many times as great as the average daily circulation? .600 23. it the printing cost per newspaper. what would have been the total cost of printing the average daily circulation? (A) $32. was $0.Questions 21-25 refer to the following graphs. In 1950.500 (D) $22.500 (B) $26.05.000 (C) $23. In how many of the years shown was the average number of pages per newspaper at least twice as much as the average in 1940? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Four Three Two One None 22.000 (E) $2.

In each of the 10-year period* shown in which yearly advertising revenue decreased. and YZ is twice WX. III. if WY = 21. From 1970 to 1980 the average number of pages per newspaper increased by 10. I only II only III only I and II II and ill 26. II. what is the value of XY? (A) 5 . then which of the following can be true? (A) s < -1 and / > 0 (B) s < -1 and / < -1 (C) s > -1 and ». If 0 < st < 1. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) The greatest increase in total vearly advertising revenue over any 10-year period shown was $27 million.(A) 500 (B) 200 (C) 100 (D) 50 (E) 20 . On segment WZ above. 27. 24. Which of the following statements can be inferred from the data? I.< -1 (D) s > 1 and / < -1 (E) s > 1 and / > 1 | W | X | Y | Z . XZ = 26. average daily circulation also decreased. The percent decrease in average daily circulation from 1960 to 1970 was approximately (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 10% 12% 20% 26% 32% 25.

3x/5 dollars for each of the first 10 prints. Which of the following is equal to ¼ of 0.25 30. what is the perimeter of ∆ PQR in terms of x? (A) 2x√2 (B) x√2 /2 +x (C) 2x + √2 (D) x √2 +2 (E) 2x + x√2 .5 (E) 5 29. what is the value of x? (A) 3 (B) 3. If ∆ PQR is formed by joining the centers of three of the squares. a photographer charges x dollars to make a negative. 28. and 4 dollars for each print in excess of 10 prints.00025 (C) 0. In the figure above.(B) (C) (D) (E) 10 11 16 It cannot be determined from the information given.0025 (D) 0. each of the four squares has sides of length x.01 percent? (A) 0. If $45 is the total charge to make a negative and 20 prints from an old photograph.025 (E) 0.5 (C) 4 (D) 4. To reproduce an old photograph.000025 (B) 0.

.unclear tarnished.undeserving 5.incline (E) 4. Experienced employers recognize that business students who can-------different points.unscathed destroyed.SECTION 4 Time—30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks.relate (B) assimilate.unappreciated enthusiastic.intact damaged... (A) discredit. emerged from the ordeal _____.impaired impugned. though------by false allegations of misconduct.completed petulant..... 'each blank indicating that something has been omitted. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) shaken. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.. which often find great merit in otherwise------literary gems. The senator's reputation.adhere (Q impose... must make us respect his critical judgment in addition to his wellknown literary talent..acclaimed harsh. (A) specific (B) revolutionary (C) implicit (D) controversial (E) finite ..revert advocate. (A) familiar (B) democratic (C) technical (D) complex (E) provincial 3..unpopular insightful.refer (D) disregard.of view are ultimately more effective as managers than are the brilliant and original students wtfo------dogmatically to their own formulations. but in its broader impact: it made the king subject to the law. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) thorough. The significance of the Magna Carta lies not in its------provisions.. 1.sullied 2 This poetry is not------. it is more likely to appeal to an international audience than is poetry with strictly regional themes. Poe's------reviews of contemporary fiction..

accelerated intelligibility.. MUTTER: INDISTINCT:: (A) demand: obedient (B) plead: obligatory (C) flatter: commendab (D) drone: monotonous (E) confirm: proven 10..developed 7. The theory of cosmic evolution states that the universe.evaluating (B) inquisitive.observing Direction: In each of the following questions. FRAGILE: BREAK:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) invisible: see erratic: control flammable: burn noxious: escape industrial: manufacture 9..differentiated contrast. FAULTFINDER: CRITICIZE:: (A) luminary: recognize (B) athlete: cheer (C) arbitrator: mediate (D) pharmacist: prescribe .modulated homogeneity...6. 8. a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases.. (A) reluctant.. Not wishing to appear-------.offering (C) presumptuous..venturing (D) censorious. having begun in a state of simplicity and------.metamorphosed proportion. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair.undercutting (E) moralistic. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) equilibrium.. has------into great variety. the junior member of the research group refrained from------any criticism of the senior members' plan for dividing up responsibility for the entire project..

PEST: IRKSOME:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) satesclerk: courteous expert: proficient enigma: unexpected leader: nondescript accuser: indicted 12. EXPAND-. PROHIBITIVE: PURCHASE:: (A) preventive: heal (B) laudatory: praise (C) admonitory: fear . PROLOGUE: NOVEL:: (A) preamble: statute (B) sketch: drawing (Q movement: symphony (D) index: book (E) blueprint: building 13. SUITCASE: LUGGAGE:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) gift: package necklace: garment room: house hat: millinery faucet: sink 16.(E) dawdler: toil 11.VOLUME:: (A) ascend: flight (B) proliferate: number (C) bend: flexibility (D) cool: temperature (E) deflect: heading 14: CONTIGUOUS: ABUT:: (A) possible: occur (B) simultaneous: coincide (C) comprehensive: except (D) synthetic: create (E) constant: stabilize 15.

After reading a passage. while women's household labor remains demanding. women would give up their femininity. 17. the only women employers would hire. predicted that women would be liberated from the "social. single women as domestics. when women began to enter factories. but rather the separation of secretarial work. Recent historical investigation has led to a major revision of the notion that technology is always inherently revolutionary in its effects on society. but they agreed that it would transform women's lives. Jules Simon. a French politician. thenceforth considered "women's work. The employment of young women in textile mills during the Industrial Revolution was largely an extension of an older pattern of employment of young. Women's work has changed considerably in the past 200 years.. warned that by doing so.. Friedrich Engels. Fundamentally. and economic subordination" of the family by technological developments that made possible the recruitment of "the whole female sex . lower pay for women as a group. Historians. jobs that require relatively low levels of skill and offer women little opportunity for advancement ' all persist. particularly those investigating the history of women. however. and the vacuum cleaner have not resulted in equally dramatic social changes in women's economic position or in the prevailing evaluation of women's work. from administrative work that in the I880's created a new class of "dead-end" jobs. moving from the household to the office or the factory. and later becoming mostly white-collar instead of blue-collar work. however. Mechanization may even have slowed any change in the traditional position of women both in the labor market and in the home. now seriously question this assumption of transforming power. choose the best answer to each question. into public industry. It was not the change in office technology. It is frequently assumed that the mechanization of work has a revolutionary effect on the lives of the people who operate the new machines and on the society into which the machines have been introduced. They conclude that such dramatic technological innovations as the spinning jenny. the sewing machine.(D) peremptory: dispute (E) imperative: comply Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. previously seen as an apprenticeship for beginning managers. (!) it has been suggested that the employment of women in industry took them out of the household." The increase in the numbers of married women employed outside the home in the twentieth century had less to do with the mechanization of housework and an increase in leisure time for these women than it did with their own economic necessity and with high marriage rates that shrank the available pool of single women workers. legal. previously. the conditions under which women work have changed little since before the Industrial Revolution: the segregation of occupations by gender. and fundamentally altered their position in society. For example. Which of the following statements best summarizes the main idea of the passage? . in many cases." Observers thus differed concerning the social desirability of mechanization's effects. In the nineteenth century. the typewriter. their traditional sphere. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage.

(E) spinning 19. . as high as those of working men. (B) Recent studies have shown that mechanization revolutionizes a society's traditional values and the customary roles of its members. (D) The mechanization of work creates whole new classes of jobs that did not previously exist. The passage states that. It can be inferred from the passage that. on the average. which of the following was true of many employers? (A) They did not employ women in factories.. white extremely revolutionary in its effects. before the twentieth century. 18. (E) Enrollment figures from universities demonstrating that increasing numbers of young women are choosing to continue their education beyond the undergraduate level 21. the majority of women's work was done in which of the following settings? (A) Textile mills (B) Private households (Q Offices (D) Factories (E) Small shops 20. The author mentions all of the following inventions as examples of dramatic technological innovations EXCEPT the (A) sewing machine (B) vacuum cleaner (C) typewriter' (D) telephone jenny . had the deleterious effects that 'some critics had feared. (C) Mechanization has caused the nature of women's work to change since the Industrial Revolution. has not. (E) The mechanization of women's work. (C) They employed women in only those jobs that were related to women's traditional household work. before the Industrial Revolution. (D) They resisted technological innovations that would radically change women's roles in the family. (A) The effects of the mechanization of women's work have not borne out the frequently held assumption that new technology is inherently revolutionary. on the whole. It can be inferred from the passage that the author would consider which of the following to be an indication of a fundamental alteration in the conditions of women's work? (A) Statistics showing that the majority of women now occupy white-collar positions (B) Interviews with married men indicating that they are now doing some household tasks. (B) They tended to employ single rather than married women. (C) Surveys of the labor market documenting the recent creation of a new class of jobs in electronics in which women workers outnumber men four to one (D) Census results showing that working women's wages and salaries are.

(E) They hired women only when qualified men were not available to fill the open positions. 37" C). When animals at 42° C were injected with an iron solution. apparently increasing stress on the infected organism? It has long been known that the level of serum iron in animals falls during infection. fever would make it more difficult for an infecting bacterium to acquire iron and thus to multiply. tends to perpetuate existing inequalities in society. (E) They oppose the further mechanization of work.3° C. (B) Their work can only be used cautiously by scholars in other disciplines. 23. Garibaldi first suggested a relationship between fever and iron. (D) It qualifies the author's agreement with scholars who argue for a major revision in the assessment of the impact of mechanization on society. Thus. (E) It suggests a compromise between two seemingly contradictory views concerning the effects of mechanization on society. Kluger reported that of iguanas infected with the potentially lethal bacterium A. Cold-blooded animals were used to test this hypothesis because their body temperature can be controlled in the laboratory. 22. which.) Warm-blooded animals have elaborate physiological controls to maintain constant body temperature (in humans. their work has not had an impact on most historians current assumptions concerning the revolutionary ' effect of technology in the workplace. hydrophilia. according to their findings. Which of the following best describes the function of the concluding sentence of the passage? (A) It sums up the general points concerning the mechanization of work made in the passage as a whole. Why then during sickness should temperature rise. (This passage is excerpted from an article that was published in 1982. (C) It restates the point concerning technology made in the sentence immediately preceding it. He found that microbial synthesis of siderophores--substances that bind iron—in bacteria of the genus Salmonella declined at environmental temperatures above 37° C and stopped at 40. however. even though healthy animals prefer the lower temperature. mortality rates increased significantly. more survived at temperatures of 42° C than at 37° C. It can be inferred from the passage that the author most probably believes which of the following to be true concerning those historians who study the history of women? (A) Their work provides insights important to those examining social phenomena affecting the lives of both sexes. (C) Because they concentrate only on the role of women in the workplace. (D) While highly interesting. Research to determine whether similar phenomena occur in warm-blooded animals is sorely . they draw more reliable conclusions than do other historians. (B) It draws a conclusion concerning the effects of the mechanization of work which goes beyond the evidence presented in the passage as a whole.

Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly . assuming each is possible. which of the following. If it were to be determined that "similar phenomena occur in warm-blooded animals" (lines 22-23). 24. The passage is primarily concerned with attempts to determine (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) the role of siderophores in the synthesis of serum iron new treatments for infections that are caused by A. which.needed. (C) Warm-blooded animals are more comfortable at an environmental temperature of 37° C than they are at a temperature of 42° C. make iron available to the animal. (D) In warm-blooded animals. hydrophilia the function of fever in warm-blooded animals the mechanisms that ensure constant body temperature iron utilization in cold-blooded animals 25. is likely to be the most effective treatment for warm-blooded animals with bacterial infections? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Administering a medication that lowers the animals' body temperature Injecting the animals with an iron solution Administering a medication that makes serum iron unavailable to bacteria Providing the animals with reduced-iron diets Keeping the animals in an environment with temperatures higher than 37°C Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters. infections that lead to fever are usually traceable to bacteria. (B) Warm-blooded animals require more iron in periods of stress than they do at other times. Which of the following can be inferred about warm-blooded animals solely on the basis of information in the passage? (A) The body temperatures of warm-blooded animals cannot be easily controlled in the laboratory. (E) In warm-blooded animals. bacteria are responsible for the production of siderophores. According to the passage. 27. in turn. followed by five lettered words or phrases. Garibaldi determined which of the following? (A) That serum iron is produced through microbial synthesis (B) That microbial synthesis of siderophores in warm-blooded animals is more efficient at higher temperatures (C) That only iron bound to other substances can be used by bacteria (D) That there is a relationship between the synthesis of siderophores in bacteria of the genus Salmonella and environmental temperature (E) That bacteria of the genus Salmonella require iron as a nutrient 26.

POLEMICAL: (A) imitative (B) lavish (C) conciliatory (D)-attractive (E) modest .opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. FREQUENCY: (A) unity (B) rarity (C) gradualness (D) persistency (E) moderation 30. DEFERENCE: (A) aversion (B) resignation (C) suspicion contempt (D) inattention (E) 36. ARRHYTHMIC: (A) timely (E) exhibiting regularity 32. AMALGAMATE: (A) study (B) circulate (Q reduce 31. VERITABLE: (A) impetuous (B) pernicious (C) inefficacious (D) disastrous (E) specious (E) ambitious . 28. UNTOWARD: (A) direct (B) decisive (C) necessary (D) favorable and anticipated (E) confident and prepared 37. PRECIPITATE: (A) deliberate (B) determined (C) dissident (D) desperate (E) divided 35. PERTAIN: (A) be apathetic incongruous (E) be irrelevant (B) be illegitimate (C) be irrevocable (D) be 29. 34. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning. be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. BLITHE: (A) conceited (D) endure (E) separate (B) subordinate (C) terminal (D) lacking precision (B) dim (C) sturdy (D) laconic (E) grave 33. OPPROBRIOUS: (A) meretricious (B) innocuous (C) invulnerable (D) irreproachable 38.

FOR GENERAL TEST 2 ONLY Answer key and Percentage of Examinees Answering Each Question Correctly VERBEL ABILITY Section 1 Section 4 Number Answer P + Number Answer P + 1 A 90 1 A 84 2 B 82 2 E 86 3 B 81 B 87 3 4 E 77 4 C 80 5 D 70 5 A 74 6 C 62 8 B 71 7 C 28 7 C 68 8 D 96 8 C 98 9 C 85 9 D 76 10 C 46 10 C 70 11 A 46 11 B 63 12 D 46 12 A 60 13 A 39 13 B 48 14 E 36 14 B 48 I5 E 35 15 D 26 16 A 26 16 D 35 17 C 63 17 A 56 18 B 63 18 D 97 19 A 64 19 B 89 20 C 75 20 D 51 21 E 64 21 B 66 22 D 46 22 A 33 23 D 51 23 B 48 24 B 62 24 C 74 25 A 59 25 D 70 26 E 52 26 A 51 27 B 66 27 C 48 28 E 89 28 E 89 29 A 86 29 B 87 30 E 76 30 E 69 31 B 78 31 E 58 32 C 41 32 E 30 33 E 37 33 C 44 34 D 36 34 A 25 35 C 25 35 E 31 36 A 29 36 D 36 37 A 18 37 D 25 38 D 21 38 E 19 .

QUANTITY ABILITY Section 3 Section 7 Number Answer P+ Number Answer P+ 1 A 85 1 C 94 2 C 84 2 A 80 3 B 79 3 C 65 4 D 76 4 B 76 5 C 57 5 A 64 6 D 70 6 B 67 7 B 69 7 B 72 8 D 52 8 D 69 9 B 52 9 A 34 10 A 50 10 C 38 11 A 42 11 D 19 12 D 26 12 D 59 13 C 57 13 C 42 14 B 52 14 D 26 15 A 35 15 B 40 16 E 75 16 B 88 17 E 86 17 E 80 18 D 81 18 B 77 19 A 83 19 A 74 20 B 63 20 C 71 21 B 92 21 B 84 22 C 90 22 D 58 23 B 71 23 D 54 24 E 58 24 E 63 25 D 71 25 A 34 26 C 47 26 D 51 27 D 32 27 C 52 28 E 44 28 B 32 29 A 19 29 E 49 30 E 47 30 D 57 .

(A) (B) (C) (D) (E) a permanent. designers. An institution concerned about its reputation is at the mercy of the actions of its members. In the British theater young people under thirty-five have not had much------getting recognition onstage. the cuckoo would be one of nature's more------. and leaving the incubating &id nurturing to them.. blank indicating that something has been omitted.reliance upon regular... administrators—they have mostly been relegated to relative obscurity. scientists believe that individuals differ in their--------the cancer-causing agents known to be present in cigarette smoke..impose an irreparable..escape a political..concern about habitual.susceptibility to chronic.avoid 5. (A) trouble (B) satisfaction (C) curiosity about (D) success at (E) fear of 2. because the misdeeds of individuals are often used to------the institutions of which they are a part. (A) reform (B) coerce (C) honor (D) discredit (E) intimidate 3. blithely laying its eggs in the nests of other birds.. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole...TEST 2 SECTION 1 Time—30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks. If animal parents were judged by human standards.condition that most will seek to------.creatures. they begin to feel so isolated and lonely that freedom becomes-----. We accepted the theory that as people become more independent of one another.enter a negative. Since many casual smokers develop lung cancer and many-------smokers do not.proximity to devoted. 1. but offstage—in the ranks of playwrights. directors.postpone a common. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words..exposure to 4. . (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) heavy.

inefficient touting. SOOT: COMBUSTION:: (A) (B) (C) (D) lint: brushing gravel: crushing gristle: tenderizing rubbish: housecleaning ... His imperturbability in the face of evidence indicating his deliberate fraud failed to reassure supporters of his essential------. compromise Directions.cumbersome flaunting..(A) mettlesome (B) industrious (C) domestic (D) lackluster (E) feckless 6.gullible 7. guile (E) combativeness. it suggested a talent for-------that they had never suspected. JUDGE: GAVEL:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) detective : uniform doctor : stethoscope referee : whistle soldier: insignia lecturer: podium 9... seems somewhat------: suppose the consumer remembers only the rival's name? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) criticizing.insipid evaluating.. named in the advertisement by brand name. a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. In each of the following questions..loquacity (D) probity. The current penchant for------a product by dent-grating a rival.reproof (C) remorse. ORGAN: KIDNEY:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) skeleton: kneecap bone: rib neuron: synapse abdomen: stomach blood: aorta 10. 8. instead.foolhardy enhancing. (A) culpability.. . intrigue (B) wisdom..

MOCK: IMITATE (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) satirize: charm condense: summarize placate: assuage adapt: duplicate taunt: challenge 14. VOLATILE:TEMPER:: (A) prominent: notoriety. CENTRIFUGE: SEPARATE:: (A) thermometer: calibrate (B) statue: chisel (C) floodgate: overflow (D) colander: drain (E) television: transmit 13. EQUIVOCATION: AMBIGUOUS (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) mitigation: severe contradiction: peremptory platitude: banal precept. (B) ready: wit . MALADROIT: SKILL:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) intemperate r anger unreasonable: intuition sluggish: fatigue glib: profundity morose: depression 15.(E) sawdust: woodcutting 11. obedient explanation: unintelligible 16.PURIFY : IMPERFECTION:: (A) Align : adjustment (B) Weary: Boredom (C) Disagree : controversy (D) Verify : doubtfulness (E) Hone : sharpness 12.

Therefore. The passage implies that which of the following is a factor conducive to a more equitable representation of women in the United States armed forces than has existed in the past? . certain other factors preclude women's (A) receiving equal pay for equal work (B) having access to position of responsibility at most levels (C) drawing assignments from a wider range of assignments than before (D) benefiting from opportunities arising from new noncombat functions assigned to men (E) being assigned all of the military tasks that are assigned to men 19. The difficulty.(C) catastrophic: disaster . Opportunities seem certain to arise. This is so even though the armed forces operate in an ethos of institutional change oriented award occupational equality and under the federal sanction of equal pay for equal work. not identity or even similarity of task. The primary purpose 01 the passage is to (A) present an overview of the different types of assignments available to women in the new United States all-volunteer armed forces (B) present a reasoned prognosis of the status of women in the new United States allvolunteer armed forces (C) present the new United States all-volunteer armed forces as a model case of equal employment policies in action (D) analyze reforms in the new United States all volunteer armed forces necessitated by the increasing number of women in the military (E) analyze the use of functional equivalence as a substitute for occupational equality in the new' United States all-volunteer armed forces 18. choose: best answer to each question. A significant portion of the larger society remains uncomfortable as yet with extending equality in this direction. 17. but probably dramatic gains for women that might have been expected. is that women are unlikely to be trained for any direct combat operations. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. to become involved in novel types of noncombat military assignments. (This passage is from an article published in 1973) The recent change to all-volunteer armed forces in the united States will eventually produce a gradual increase in the proportion of women in the armed forces variety of women's assignments. According to the passage. despite the United States armed forces' commitment to occupational equality for women in the military. the search for equality will still be based on functional equivalence. After reading a passage. The growing emphasis on deterrence is bound to offer increasing scope for Women. for women in the military.(D) gentle: heart (E) expressive: song Direction: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content.

In order to account for such an unlikely source. recent measurements suggest that since lo's surface is rich in sulfur and sodium. Shergottites crystallized from molten rock less than 1. Most are thought to have been dislodged by interbody impact from asteroids. of a "significant portion of the larger society" are logically related to each other inasmuch as the author puts forward the latter as (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) a public response to achievement of the former the major reason for absence of the former a precondition for any prospect of achieving the former a catalyst for a further extension of the former a reason for some of the former being lost again Of the thousands of specimens of meteorites found on Earth and known to science. The "dramatic gains for women" (line 5) and the attitude.(A) The all-volunteer character of the present armed forces (B) The past service records of women who had assignments functionally equivalent to men's assignments (C) The level of awareness on the part of the larger society of military issues (D) A decline in the proportion-of deterrence oriented noncombat assignments (E) Restrictive past policies governing the military assignments open to women 20. Shergottites. conceivably Mars. any fragments dislodged > from lo by interbody impact would be unlikely to escape the gravitational pull of Jupiter. present scientists with a genuine enigma. While some scientists speculate that Shergottites derive from lo (a volcanically active moon of Jupiter). the name given to three anomalous achondrites so far discovered on Earth. Shergottites exhibit properties that indicate that their source was a large planet. The only other logical source of Shergottites is Mars. Achondrites are the only known samples of volcanic rocks originating outside the Earth-Moon system. Moreover. While most meteorites appear to derive from comparatively small bodies. Space-probe photographs indicate the existence of giant volcanoes on the Martian surface. with diameters of from 10 to 500 kilometers. in solar orbit between Mars and Jupiter.5 billion years later than typical achondrites) and were presumably ejected into space when an object impacted on a body similar in chemical composition to Earth. that is. as described in lines 11-12. they have undergone melting by volcanic action at some time since the planets were first formed.1 billion years ago (some 3. because the impact needed to accelerate a fragment of rock to escape the gravitational field of a body even as small as the Moon is so great that no meteorites of lunar origin have been discovered. These igneous meteorites §re known as achondrites because they lack chondrules— small stony spherules found in the thousands of meteorites (called "chondrules") composed primarily of unaltered minerals that condensed from dust and gas at the origin of the solar system. one can estimate that the planet was . some unusual factor must be invoked. only about 100 are igneous. From the small number of impact craters that appear on Martian lava flows. the chemical composition of its volcanic products would probably be unlike that of the Shergottites.

A recent study suggests.volcanically active as recently as a half-billion years ago—and may be active today. (D) There are no achondrites occurring naturally on Earth and probably none on other large planets. The passage suggests that the age of Shergottites is probably (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) still entirely undetermined less than that of most other achondrites about 3. a meteorite discovered on Earth is unlikely to have come from a large planet for which of the following reasons? (A) There arc fewer large planets in the solar system than there are asteroids. II. The great objection to the Martian origin of Shergottites is the absence of lunar meteorites on Earth. If the ices had been rapidly vaporized by.5 billion yean the same a* that of typical achondrites greater than that of the Earth . analyses performed by space probes show a remarkable chemical similarity between Martian soil and the Shergottites. (B) Most large planets have been volcanically inactive for more than a billion yean (C) The gravitational pull of a large planet would probably prohibit fragments from escaping its orbit. III. an impacting object. in view of the Moon's smaller size and closer proximity to Earth. The passage implies which of the following about Shergottites? I. An impact capable of ejecting a fragment of the Martian surface into an Earthintersecting orbit is even less probable than such an event on the Moon. They come from a planetary body with a chemical composition similar to that of lo. that permafrost ices below the surface of Mars may have altered the effects of impact on it. Finally. They derive from a planet larger than Earth. 21. the expanding gases might have helped the ejected fragments reach escape velocity. They are products of volcanic activity. (E) Interbody impact is much rarer on large than on small planet* because of toe density of the atmosphere on large planets. and HI 22. According to the passage. 23. II. (A) I only (B) II only (Q I and II only (D) II and HI only (E) I. however.

Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning.24. STABILITY: (A) disparity (B) inconstancy (C) opposition (D) carelessness (E) . It can be inferred from the passage that each of the following is a consideration in determining whether a particular planet is a possible source of shergottites that have been discovered on Earth EXCEPT the (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) planet's size planet's distance from Earth . strength of the planet's field of gravity proximity of the planet to its moons chemical composition of the planet's surface 27. According to the passage. be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. LIMP: (A) true (B) firm • (C) clear (D) stark (E) endless 29. followed by five lettered words or phrases. It can be inferred from the passage that most meteorites found on Earth contain which of the following? (A) Crystals (B) Chondrules (C) Metals (D) Sodium (E) Sulfur Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. 28. The passage provides information to answer which of the following questions? (A) What is the precise age of the solar system? (B) How did shergottites get their name? (C) What are the chemical properties shared by Shergottites and Martian soils? (D) How volcanically active is the planet Jupiter? (E) What is a major feature of the Martian surface? 26. GLOBAL: (A) local (E) single-minded (B) unusual (C) unpredictable (D) hot-headed 30. the presence of chondrules in a meteorite indicates that the meteorite (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) has probably come from Mars is older than the solar system itself has not been melted since the solar system formed is certainly less than 4 billion years old is a small fragment of an asteroid 25.

EXCULPATE: (A) attribute guilt ' (B) avojd responsibility (Q establish facts (D) control hostilities (E) show anxiety 34. CONSOLE: (A) pretend sympathy (B) reveal suffering (Q aggravate grief (D) betray (E) vilify 33. DILATE: (A) narrow (B) strengthen (C) bend (D) push (E) soften 32. CADGE: (A) conceal (B) influence (C) reserve (D) earn (E) fevor 36. ACCRETION: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) ingestion of a nutrient loss of the security on a loan discernment of subtle differences reduction in substance caused by erosion sudden repulsion from an entity 35. SPECIOUS: (A) unfeigned (B) arbitrate * (Q espouse (D) appease (E) pardon (B) significant (Q valid (D) agreeable (E) restricted 38. ABJURE: (A) commingle 37.weariness 31. QUOTIDIAN: (A) extraordinary. (B) certain (Q wishful (D) secret (E) premature .

O. M. Act X must be the second act that takes place in ring 2. and T M. which of the following acts must perform in ring 2? (A) (B) (B) (D) (E) F L M R Z 3. in ring 2. In answering some of the questions. X. one act at a time. in ring 1 and the other group scheduled to perform. which of the following must be the second act in ring 1 ? (A) F . could be the group of acts to be scheduled for performance in ring 1? . and Z—into two groups of four acts each. R. If act R must perform in one of the rings at the same time that act T performs in the other ring. also one act at a time. Act T must take place in the same ring as act O. L. T. Questions 1-6 A circus manager must divide eight circus acts—F. O. R. Which of the following. T. select the best answer choice given. O. Act R must take place in the same ring as act F. O.SECTION 3 Time—30 minutes 25 Questions Directions: Each question or group of questions is based on a passage or set of conditions. it may be useful to draw a rough diagram. and R L. For each question. and every act that takes place in one of the rings must be scheduled for exactly the same time slot as an act that takes place in the other ring. The schedule must also conform to the following conditions: Act F must take place in one of the rings at the same time that act M takes place in the other ring. All acts take equally long to perform. M. If act T performs in ring 1. without regard to the order in which they will be performed. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) F. L. and Z ' 2. and Z O. L. 1. T. and T F. Act L must take place in one of the rings at the same time that act O takes place in the other ring. M. one group scheduled to perform.

F Z. (B) The number of car and motorcycle accidents will increase significantly during the next year. F. R Z. which of the following must be the first act in ring 1? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) L M O T Z 6. Z L. R. F. If act T must take place in ring 1 immediately after act F and immediately before act R. of circus acts in ring 2 is O. R. which act must be the third act in ring 2? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) L M O T Z 7. Z. M. also from first to last? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) F. F 5. X.000 organ transplants next year. The argument above makes which of the following assumptions? (A) A significant number of the organs used in transplants come from people who die in car and motorcycle accidents. which of the following is an acceptable order of acts in ring 1. Z. T. R. since the number of fatalities resulting from car and moto4 cycle accidents has been dropping steadily over the past decade. If act F must perform between act X and act R in ring 2. But it is doubtful' that this many donor organs will be available. If the order. L. L. (C) No more than 10. (D) In the past the federal government's estimates of the number of organ transplants . from first to last. R L. The federal government expects hospitals to perform 10. L.(B) (C) (D) (E) L M 0 Z 4.000 people will be in need of-organ transplants during the next year.

incumbents met with a larger number of lobbyists than did challengers. Because incumbent members of Congress are given a great deal of attention by the news media and because they enjoy such perquisites as free mail privileges and generous travel allowances. (B) Writers from different historical periods sometimes use«the same words and phrases. Which of the following. but the meanings of such words and phrases change over time (C) Many writers consciously attempt to experiment with innovative verbal patterns in each new work. 8. if true. (E) Of all incumbent senators surveyed before the last congressional elections.of Congress are frequently critical of the amount of attention given to them by the news media. 98 percent of the incumbents in the house of Representatives who were seeking reelection won. 78 percent said that their challengers did not pose a serious threat to their chances for reelection. Verbal patterns in four works known to be written by a certain author were compared to those in a work of uncertain authorship sometimes attributed to that author.needed during a given year have been very unreliable. most strengthens. Many patterns were studied. if true. Ouestions 10-14 In a display of products available from a paper manufacturer. exactly eight folders are to be displayed on eight stands t\at are lined up in a straight line and numbered . incumbents enjoy an overwhelming advantage over their challengers in elections for the United States Congress. (D) A relatively small number of words in any language occur with great frequency. The questioned work displayed verbal patterns very similar to those in the other four works. there is a hospital in the vicinity in need of an organ for a transplant. establishing that the same author wrote all five. best supports the claim above? (A) In the last congressional elections. (E) For any given fatality resulting from a car or motorcycle accident. (B) In the last congressional elections. including frequency of specific words and recurrence of certain phrases. 9. (D) The support that political action committees provide to challengers for congressional seats often compensates for the perquisites enjoyed by incumbent members of Congress. Which of the following. (C) Incumbent members . (E) Word choice is generally considered an insignificant component of an author's style. the conclusion above? (A) No two writers are likely to display similar verbal patterns in their works. and those words make up the largest portion of all discourse.

The folders must be displayed according to the following conditions: At least one of the purple folders must be next to a yellow folder. another gray folder could be placed on any of the following stands EXCEPT.consecutively 1 through 8 from left to right. Stand 5 must hold a gray folder. (E) Stand 8 holds a yellow folder. any (ff the following could be true EXCEPT: . two yellow folders. (A) 1 (B) 3 (C) 5 (D) 7 (E) 8 12. If a gray folder is placed on stand 4. (D) Stand 7 holds a yellow folder. Gray Yellow Stand 4 Orange Gray Gray Yellow Gray Stand 5 Gray Purple Gray Gray Gray Stand 6 Purple Purple Orange Orange Purple Stand 7 Purple Gray Purple Purple Orange Stand 8 Yellow Yellow Yellow Gray Purple 11. If stand 2 holds an orange folder. and one orange folder. (B) Stand 3 holds a purple folder (C) Stand 6 holds a purple folder. two purple folders. which of the following must be true? (A) A gray folder is on stand 3. Either stand 1 or stand 8 or both must hold a yellow folder 10 Which of the following is an acceptable ordering of colors of folders from left to right? Stand 1 (A) Gray (B) Orange (C) Purple (D) Yellow (E) Bellow Stand 2 Stand 3 Gray Yellow Gray YellowYellow Gray Gray Purple. (C) A gray folder is on stand 4 (D) A yellow folder is on stand 6 (E) The orange folder is on stand 8. If stands 1 and 3 hold gray folders. which of the following must be true? (A) Stand 1 holds a gray folder. 14. If purple folders are on stands 1 and 2. (B) The orange folder is on stand 4. The orange folder cannot be next to a yellow folder The three gray folders cannot be placed on three consecutive stands. There are three gray folders. 13.

one person from the losing team in that round must sit out the next round of the game. Stand 6 holds a purple folder. The players have agreed on the following rules of participation: No two players can play as a team in two consecutive rounds of the game. After a round is concluded. with one person sitting out. After a round is concluded. If J and M are the winning team in the first round each of the following could be a . L. and L are the winning team and J sits out. L and O can never play on the same team." Four players play in each round. Rounds are played by two competing teams of two persons each. Questions 15-18 Five persons—J. and O—have gathered to play a game called "forest and trees. Stand 4 holds an orange folder. After a round is concluded. and M L and M M and O 16 If. J and O are the winning team and L sits out. one person from the losing team in that round and one person from the winning team in that round join to form the team that is known as "the trees" for the next round. Stand 7 holds an orange folder. If. Because L and O are perceived as having the greatest individual strengths as players. in the first round of a game. which of the winning could be a team in the second round of the game? (A) J and M (B) J and O (C) K and L (D) K and O (E) M and O 17. No round of the game can end in a tie. which of the following must be a team in the second round of that game? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) J and L K and L K.(A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Stand 2 holds a yellow folder. in the first round of a game K. I5. M. K. the person who has sat out that round and a person from the winning team in that round join to form the team that is known as "the forest" for the next round. Stand 7 holds a yellow folder.

each of the following could be a team in the first round EXCEPT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) J and. U. T. at a certain point during the party. and W Q. conversational group that includes cither S or W. K J and L J and O K and L K and O Questions 19-22 Seven persons—N.member of “the forest” during the second round EXCEPT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) J K L M O 18. or four persons at a time. three. T. and W—arc all the persons present at a party. and W Q. but T cannot be in a conversational group with both S and W W must be in a conversational group that consists of exactly three persons. and W are members of three distinct conversational groups. At any time during the party. T. R. If. U. each of the persons present is considered to be a member of exactly one of the conversational groups during the party the following conditions are satisfied: N can never be in the same conversational group as S T must be in a. S must at that point be in a conversational group that includes (A) (B) (C) (D) Q R T U . R. and W Q. and W R and S R and S S and U S and O R and U Q. Q'. R. T. If M sits out the first round. and T R and T 20. 19 Which of the following lists three conversational groups that tan exist at the same time during the party? (A) N and S (B) N and T (C) N and U (D) N and W (E) N. S. All of the join distinct conversational groups that form during the party and that consist of two. U.

Which of the following is a principle on which the position above could be based? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) The number of users of a public service should determine the amount of governmental financial support for the service.(E) W 21. whose other member is U for persons. but the. whose other members include T four persons. If. General tax revenues should not be used to finance public services that benefit a limited. to ensure that public transportation services are provided. Analysts concluded that the original formula of Voltage contained vanilla from beans. the export earnings of an island in the Indian Ocean began to fall. at a certain point during the party. at that point N must be part of a group of exactly (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) two persons. The amount of public transportation provided should be dependent on the operating cost of each transportation service. a major soft drink. changed its secret formula last year. number of people. as it now does. If. Instead of relying on general tax revenue. R. If necessary. one of the conversational groups consists only of Q. When the manufacturer of Voltage. users should pay all the operating costs even if these costs should increase. at a certain point daring the party. a group of three persons and a group of four persons have formed and W is in the same conversational group as U. This island's only export comprises more than half of the world's supply of vanilla . and W. the government should rely more heavily on passenger fares to finance public bus and train service. whose other members include U 23. whose other members include S four persons. new formula did not. In order for public transportation to lie maintained without cutting service. Such charges would be fair since only users benefit from public transportation. whose other member is T two persons. The government should provide support from general tax revenue to any transportation industry that has passenger service available to the public. general taxes should be raised. . 24. which of the following must at that point be in the group with W and U? (A) N (B) Q (C) R (D) S (E) T 22.

but the is taller than Ed. 25.Which of the following. (C) The eland's trade agreement. and she is shorter than Ed. Sandra is shorter than Juan. If the statements above are true. would most the conclusion drawn by the analysts? (A) The vanilla-bean plantings of a nearby island were beginning to produce crops. (B) A new process for synthesizing vanilla was under development in a laboratory in the United States. one can validly conclude that Bill is shorter than Carol if it is true that (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Carol is equal in height to Wallie Wallie is equal in height to Bi8 Bill is taller than Sandra. but taller than Ed Wallie is taller than Bill. (D) Imports of vanilla beans dropped in countries Voltage is made. Carol is shorter than Juan. but shorter than Wallie Bill is shorter than Juan. had lapsed. Wallie is taller than Sandra. under which the vanilla beans were exported to the country that manufactures Voltage. but shorter than Ed . (E) There were decreases in sales of several widely sold products that were known to contain. if true. but shorter than Juan.

“mechanism “ and “vitalism” ought not to be considered ---.There is something ------. Neither the ideas of philosophers nor the practices of ordinary people can.------reality. find the recent insistence that the terms had single definitions entirely------(A) Umvocal: Erroneous (B) Problematic : anachronistice (C) Intractable: ob (D) Congruent: suspect (E) Multifaceted: vapid (4) Many Americans believe that individual initiative optimized 1890 ‘s and see the entrepreneur as the ----.about the way the building of monasteries proliferated in 18th century Babaria. (A) constitute. Because they had various meanings in 19th century biological thought. Choose the word or set of words for each) blank that best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 2.of that age (A) Caricature (B) Salvation (C) Throw back (D) aberration (E) personification 5. what in fact changes reality.terms.SECTION 4 Time—30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks. by themselves.aim . divergence (B) affect.and church building was consequently declining (A) enigmatic: coalescing (B) Destructive: changing (C) Immutable: dissipating (D) Incongruous: Diminishing (E) Momentous: Diversifying 3. each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. and kindles revolution is the------of the two. While in the rest of the western world religious ardor was ----... Thus.

8.intervention 6. (A) explain (B) extol (C) transmute (D) regret (E) contest 7. PRUNE: HEDGE:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) shuck: corn trim: hair cut: bouquet reap: crop shave: mustache 10.(C) transform. PHOTOGRAPH: LIGHT:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) script: scene film: negative recording: sound rehearsal: practice concert: song 11. (A) astonishment (B) impassivity (C) resentment (D) apprehension (E) confusion Directions: In each of the following questions.. a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases.conjunction (E) alter. but its very existence.. Employees had become so inured to the caprices of top management's personnel policies that they greeted the announcement of a company-wide dress code with------. ANTIBIOTIC: INFECTION:: (A) hormone: modification (B) enzyme: digestion . Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair.interplay (D) preserve. SURGEON: DEXTERITY:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) engineer: clarity sailor: navigation magistrate: precedent industrialist: capital acrobat: agility 9.. There has been a tendency among art historians not so much to revise as to eliminate the concept of the Renaissance—to------not only its uniqueness.

DAMP: VIBRATION:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 14. QUARRY: STONE:: (A) fell: timber (B) dredge: canal (C) assay: gold (D) bale: hay (E) mold: clay 16. drench: moisture concentrate: extraction boil: liquid » seal: perforation stanch: flow ABRADED: FRICTION:: (A) refined: distillate (B) anodized: metal (C) diluted: gas (D) strengthened: pressure (E) vaporized: heat 15. CREDULOUS: DUPE:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) wealthy: monarch insensitive: boor argumentative: lawyer spontaneous: extrovert extravagant: miser Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. EULOGY: PRAISE:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) comedy: laughter epic: contempt tirade: awe elegy: lament parody: respect 13. After reading a passage. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. . choose the best answer to each question.(C) narcotic: dependency (D) coagulant: bleeding (E) stimulant: relaxation" 12.

we have found that among many strains of rats these "normal" rules of transplantation are not obeyed by liver transplants. According to the hypothesis of the author. 17. It can be inferred from the passage that the author believes that an important difference among strains of rats is the (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) size of their livers constitution of their skin strength of their immune-response reactions sensitivity of their antigens adaptability of their lymphocytes 19. Not only are liver transplants never rejected. Our hypothesis is that (1) many strains of rats simply cannot mount a sufficiently vigorous destructive immune-response (using lymphocytes) to outstrip the liver's relatively great capacity to protect itself from immune-response damage and that (2) the systemic unresponsiveness observed is due to concentration of the recipient's donor-specific lymphocytes at the site of the liver transplant. from that donor are accepted permanently. but they even induce a state of donor-specific unresponsiveness in which subsequent transplants of other organs. The primary purpose of the passage is to treat the accepted generalizations about organ transplantation in which of the following ways? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Explicate their main features Suggest an alternative to them Examine their virtues and limitations Criticize the major evidence used to support' them Present findings that qualify them / 18. and (2) the introduction of any unmatched transplantation antigens induces the development by the recipient of donor-specific lymphocytes that will produce violent rejection of further transplantations from that donor. the reason that rats do not reject further transplants of other organs from the same donor is that the (A) transplantation antigens of the donor and the recipient become matched (B) lymphocytes of the recipient are weakened by the activity of the transplanted liver (C) subsequently transplanted organ is able to repair the damage caused by the recipient's immune-response reaction (D) transplanted liver continues to be the primary locus for the recipient's immuneresponse reaction (E) recipient is unable to manufacture the lymphocytes necessary for the immuneresponse reaction .The transplantation 01 organs from one individual to another normally involves two major problems:(1) organ rejection is likely unless the transplantation antigens of both individuals are nearly identical. such as skin. However. after* successful liver transplant.

Organs from any other donor can be transplanted without rejection after liver transplantation. His early output was remarkably eclectic: it included the standard comedies. By 1910 he was using close-ups to reveal significant details of the scene or of the acting and extreme long Shots to achieve a sense of spectacle and distance. Preventing lymphocytes from being concentrated at the liver transplant produces acceptance of skin transplants. These included the flashback. Stomach transplants are accepted by the recipients in all cases. because of his love of Victorian painting. III. however. and thrillers. he could significantly vary the emphasis from camera shot to camera shot. When he . Which of the following new findings about strains of rats that do not normally reject liver transplants. In thus exploiting fully the possibilities of editing. as they would have appeared on stage. Increasing the strength of the recipient's immune-response reaction can induce livertransplant rejection. By splitting an event into fragments and recording each from the most suitable camera position. his ambitions grew. if true. Despite the reluctance of his producers. he could control the dramatic intensity of the events as the story progressed. photography in dramatic films consisted of little more than placing the actors before a stationary camera and showing them in full length. the artistic maturing of the cinema was the single-handed achievement of David W. who feared that the public would-not be able to follow a plot that was made up of such juxtaposed images. and treatments of. Griffith (1875-1948). and with them the whole of American cinema. as well as the middle distance preferred by most directors. Besides developing the cinema's language. westerns. and the crosscut between two parallel actions to heighten suspense and excitement. His appreciation of the camera’s possibilities produced novel dramatic effects. IV.20. but also such novelties as adaptations from Browning and Tennyson. Griffith also achieved dramatic effects by means of creative editing. Griffith. would support the authors' hypothesis? I. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) II only I and III only II and IV only I. Griffith persisted. From the beginning of his career as a director. II. employed composition. As his successes mounted. By juxtaposing images and varying the speed and rhythm of their presentation.II. and experimented as well with other elements of cinematic syntax that have become standard ever since. and IV only Practically speaking. III. permitting broad psychological and emotional exploration as well as narrative that was not chronological. social issues. Griffith transposed devices of the Victorian novel to film and gave film mastery of time as well as space. melodramas. Before Griffith. He conceived of the camera image as having a foreground and a rear ground. and III only I. Griffith immensely broadened its range and treatment of subjects.

deplore the state of American cinema before the advent of Griffith analyze the changes in the cinema wrought by the introduction of the multireel film. 21. Literary works. II Audience appreciation of other film directors' experimentations with cinematic syntax . The author suggests that Griffith's film innovations had a direct effect on all of the following EXCEPT (A) film editing directing (B) camera work (C) scene composing (D) sound editing (E) 23. Judith of Bethulia. 22. he insisted that a subject of such importance could not be treated in the then conventional length of one reel. or one hour's running time. an elaborate historicophilosophical spectacle. the pretensions of this film may seem a trifle ludicrous. Two years later. but at the time it provoked endless debate and discussion and gave a new intellectual respectability to the cinema. The author asserts that Griffith introduced all of the following into American cinema EXCEPT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) consideration of social issues adaptations from Tennyson the flashback and other editing techniques photographic approaches inspired by Victorian painting dramatic plots suggested by Victorian theater 25. (E) document Griffith's impact on the choice of subject matter in American films. especially Victorian novels. It can be inferred from the passage that before 1910 the normal running time of a film was (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 15 minutes or less between 15 and 30 minutes between 30 and 45 minutes between 45 minutes' and 1 hour 1 hour or more 24. reached the unprecedented length of four reels. The author suggests that Griffith's contributions to the cinema had which of the following results? I.remade Enoch Arden in 1911. From our contemporary viewpoint. The primary purpose of the passage is to (A) (B) (C) (D) discuss the importance of Griffith to the development of the cinema describe the impact on cinema of the flashback and other editing innovations. became popular sources for film subjects. Griffith's introduction of the American-made multireel picture began an immense revolution.

(B) The most important element contributing to a film's success is the ability of the actors. UNCONVENTlONALITY: (A) perceptibility (B) inscrutability. in the creation of a film. III. be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which o. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning. 27. (D) The cinema should emphasize serious and sober examinations of fundamental human problems.ne is best. 28. The author's attitude toward photography in the cinema before Griffith can best be described as (A) sympathetic (B) nostalgic (C) amused (D) condescending (E) hostile Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters. It can be inferred from the passage that Griffith would be most likely to agree with which of the following statements? (A) The good director will attempt to explore new ideas as quickly as possible. OUTSET: (A) regression (B) series (C) exit (D) interruption (E) termination .was increased. (E). (A) II only (B) III only (Q I and II only (D) II and III only (E) I. followed by five lettered words or phrases. ADHERE: (A) detach (B) cleanse (C) engulf (D) indie (E) contain 29. II. Many of the artistic limitations thought to " be inherent in filmmaking were shown to be -really nonexistent. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital Letters. and III 26. The proper composition of scenes in a film is more important than the details of their editing.(C) imperturbability (D) fidelity to custom (E) formality of discourse 30 PINCH: (A) important accomplishment (B) apt translation (C) abundant amount (D) opportune acquisition '(E) unfamiliar period 31. (C) The camera must be considered an integral and active element.

(C) (E) 36. PITH: (A) untimely action (B) insufficient attention (Q routine treatment (D) rigid formulation (E) superficial element 38. SCURVY: (A) completely centered (B) above reproach (C) imaginative (D) valiant (E) carefree . 35. (A) (C) OBDURATE: (A) complaisant (B> similar commensurate (D) uncommunicative transitory AVER: resign indignantly (B) condemn unjustly refuse (D) deny (E) resent 37.32. EFFRONTERY: (A) charity (B) deference (C) simplicity (D) deceitfulness (E) stupidity 34. RAREFY: (A) make less humid (B) make less opaque (C) make more voluminous (D) make more dense (E) make more oily 33. SUPINE: (A) vigilant (B) flustered (C) distorted (D) brittle (E) awkward .

Y is 25 percent of 96. if the two quantities are equal. 95. mean) of 87. s Ms. if the relationship cannot be determined from the information Column A Column B N/x=428 and n/y = 107. 95. if the quantity in Column B is greater. if the relationship cannot be determined from the information given . The amount she paid was SI 20 down and 12 monthly 6 is x percent of 24. and 1 30 mean) of 88. The length of chord PQ The length of chord XY A B C D if the quantity in Column A is greater. n>0 x y 2. y 0 6. The average (arithmetic The average (arithmetic 7. and 2 29 3. The cash price of the range was $400.SECTION 5 Time-30 minutes 30 Questions A B C D Column A. if the quantity in Column B is greater. 5 The amount she paid for range in excess of the cash price / S56 the electric 9. (-5f (~6)5-- 8. 1. x 60 y 2x + y <3 x>2 10. 4/5 4/7 Column B 4/7-2/5 if the quantity in Column A is greater. payments of S28 each. if the two quantities are equal. Rogers bought an electric range on the installment plan. The time that it takes The time that it takes Jim to drive 300 miles Lila to drive 240 miles speed of 52 miles at a speed of 40 miles per hour per hour 4.

The ratio of the circumference of C to the diameter of C c/b x+3 15. 0 4237 18 If 3(x + 2) = x .423 (C) 0. 92 – 62 /3 = (A) 1 (B).4236 (E). The length of a Side of 5 0<a<b<c 12 b/a C is a circle with radius 3.424 (D) 0.4. 13. then x = (A) -5 (B) -3 (C) 1 (D) 3 (E) 5 19.Column A Column B Column rt > 0 14 3/r + 4/t Column B x x 3t + 4r/r + t The perimeter of square S is equal to the perimeter of the rectangle above 11. If x2 + 2xy + y2 = 9 then (x + y) 4 = . z-x y Directions: Each of the Questions 16-30 has five answer choices For each of these questions. select the best of the answer choices given 16. 15/9 (C) 5 (D) 8 (E) 15 17 What is 0 423658 rounded to the nearest thousandth? (A) 042 (B) 0.

2 34 3.6 3. then > = 3. 1975-1986 (1 billion =1. if x =48.000.000) .(A) 3 (B) 18 (C) 27 (D) 36 (E) 81 20 (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) In the rectangular coordinate system above.000.0 3.8 Questions 21-25 refer to the following graphs. NATIONAL HEALTH EXPENDITURES FOR COUNTRY X.

For how many of the years shown was the amount of private health expenditures at least double the amount of public health expenditures? (A) None I (B) One (C) Two (D) Three (E) Four 22 In which of the years from 1975 through 1986 was the national health expenditure per capita most nearly equal to half the per capita expenditure for 1984? (A) 1975 (B) 1977 .21.

Of the following. Which of the following CANNOT be the number of stamps in Jane's collection? (A) 96 (B) 80 (C) 72 \ . in 1980? / (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 25 30 35 45 70 25.(C) 1979 (D) 1980 (E) 1982 23. which is the best approximation of the percent increase in the national health expenditure per capita from 1981 to 1982? (A) 35% (B) 30% (C) 20% (D) 10% (E) 5% 24. Of the following. Jane has exactly 3 times as many Canadian Is non-Canadian stamps in her collection. in billions of dollars. was closest to which of the following? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 120 150 190 240 250 26. then x is (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 5 2/3 10 11 2/3 12 ½ 13 1/3 27. It can be inferred from the graphs that in 1977 the population of Country X. If x is the number on the number line between 5 and 15 that is twice as far from 5 as from 15. in millions. which is closest to the amount of public national health expenditures.

then the diagonal of the larger square is how many inches longer than the diagonal of the smaller square? (A) √2 –1 (B) ½ (C) √2/2 (D) √2+1/2 (E) √2 29. if the area of the smaller square region is ½ the area of the larger square region. If the rate of flow through A is 2 gallons per hour. A farmer has two rectangular fields. A distillate flows into an empty 64-gallon drum at spout A and out of the drum at spout B. The larger field has twice the length and 4 times the width of the smaller field. then the area of the larger field is greater than the area of the smaller field by what amount? (A) 2K (B) 6K (C) 7K (D) 8K (E) 12K . In the figure above.(D) 68 (E) 54 28. how many gallons per hour must flow out at spout B so that the drum is full in exactly 96 hours? (A) 3/8 (B) 1/2 (C) 2/3 (D) 4/3 (E) 8/3 30. If the smaller field has area K.

FOR GENERAL TEST 2 ONLY Answer Key and Percentages of Examinees Answering Each Question Correctly VERBAL ABILITY Section 1 Section 4 Number Answer P+ Number Answer 1 A 79 1 C 2 D 95 2 D 3 A 88 3 A 4 C 75 4 E 5 E 56 5 C 6 B 57 6 E 7 D 42 7 B 8 C 82 8 E 9 B 87 9 B 10 E 86 10 C 11 D 83 11 D 12 D 66 12 D 13 E 38 13 E 14 D 35 14 E 15 C 27 15 A 16 B 20 16 B 17 B 72 17 E 18 E 76 18 C 19 A 52 19 D 20 B 48 20 A 21 D 46 21 A 22 C 79 22 D 23 B 73 23 A 24 C 47 24 E 25 E 32 25 B 26 D 47 26 C 27 B 59 27 D 28 B 94 28 A 29 A 88 29 D 30 B 80 30 C 31 A 82 31 E 32 C 76 32 D 33 A 42 33 B 34 D 36 34 B 35 D 23 35 A 36 C 26 36 D 37 C 27 37 E 38 A 20 38 A P+ 76 70 57 72 63 55 52 69 83 85 76 52 51 38 26 25 34 77 45 36 92 83 79 59 40 75 55 96 82 92 63 34 37 38 37 31 27 26 .

QUANTITATIVE ABILITY Section 2 Section 5 Number Answer P + Number Answer 1 B 80 1 A 2 D 82 2 C 3 A 78 3 B 4 D 80 4 A 5 B 81 5 C 6 A 76 6 B 7 B 72 7 8 8 A 62 8 D 9 D 59 9 A 10 A 56 10 B 11 C 36 11 C 12 B 38 12 D 13 D 34 13 A 14 B 27 14 D 15 C 22 15 C 16 D 94 16 E 17 D 79 17 C 18 C 78 18 A 19 B 74 19 E 20 D 72 20 B 21 A 82 21 C 22 D 75 22 B 23 B 69 23 D 24 E 52 24 A 25 B 40 25 C 26 C 61 26 C 27 A 52 27 E 28 C 48 28 A 29 E 40 29 D 30 E 39 30 C P+ 82 89 77 86 79 70 66 72 65 77 61 47 61 39 30 92 88 80 71 53 78 81 62 21 42 52 52 27 35 20 .

ANALYTICAL ABILITY Section 3 Section 6 Number Answer P + Number Answer 1 D 73 1 B 2 B 65 2 D 3 E 52 3 E 4 C 82 4 E 5 C 42 5 D 6 E 50 6 C 7 A 92 7 C 8 A 78 8 D 9 8 68 9 E 10 D 81 10 B 11 B 77 11 E 12 C 62 12 E 13 E 61 13 B 14 E 48 14 A 15 A 53 15 A 16 D 48 16 A 17 B 40 17 C 18 A 34 18 B 19 C 62 19 E 20 C 46 20 C 21 A 27 21 C 22 8 46 22 B 23 E 58 23 C 24 D 46 24 E 25 E 28 25 B P+ 90 79 36 58 79 75 66 77 71 50 61 52 76 35 51 58 43 38 61 45 58 60 68 44 45 .

TEST 3
SECTION 1 Time— 30 minutes 21 Questions Directions: Each question or group of questions is based on passage or set of conditions. In answering some of the questions, it may he useful to draw a rough diagram. For each question, select the best answer choice given. Questions 1-6 A personnel officer is scheduling a single, interview with each of seven individuals Fay, Gary, Julio Mary, Nicholas, Pilar, and Teresa Each interview is to be 30 minutes in length, and the interviews are to be scheduled back-to-back, starting at 9 a.m., according to the following conditions: Gary's interview must be scheduled to begin at either 9am or 10 30 a.m. Pilar's interview must be scheduled either as the next interview after Gary's interview or as the next interview after Nicholas' interview. Nicholas' interview must be scheduled to occur sometime after Mary's interview and sometime before Fay's interview. Julio's interview must be scheduled to begin exactly one hour after Teresa's interview is scheduled to begin. 1. Which of the following is an acceptable schedule for the seven people? 9 a.m. (A) Gary (B) Gary (C) Mary (D) Mary (E) Teresa 9:30 a.m. Nicholas Pilar Gary Teresa Pilar 10 a.m. Pilar Teresa Pilar Julio Julio 10:30 a.m. Mary Mary Teresa Gary Gary 11 a.m. Teresa Julio Nicholas Nicholas Mary 11:30 a.m. Fay Nicholas Julio Pilar Nicholas 12 noon Julio Fay Fay Fay Fay

2. Which of the following people can be scheduled for the interview that begins at 9 a.m.? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Fay Julio Marc Nicholas War

3 The earliest time that Julio's interview can be scheduled to begin is (A) 9:30 a.m. (B) 10 a.m.

(C) 10:30 a.m. (D) 11 a.m. (E) 11:30 a.m. 4 If Nicholas' interview is scheduled to begin at 9:30 a.m., who must be scheduled for the interview that begins at 11 a.m.? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Fay Julio Mary Pilar Teresa

5 If the interview schedule shows Teresa's-interview as the next after Pilar's and Pilar's interview as the next after Nicholas', how long after Gary's interview is scheduled lo begin must Julio's interview be scheduled to begin? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 10 minutes 1 hour 90 minutes 2 hours 3 hours

6 If Teresa is scheduled for the interview that begins at 9am, Fay's interview must be scheduled to begin at (A) 9:30 a.m. (B) 10:30 a.m. (C) 11 a.m. (D) 11:30 a.m. (E) 12 noon 7 Wearing either a lap seat belt or a shoulder-and-lap seat belt protects, passengers from the major types of injuries incurred in head-on automobile collisions In such collisions, however, passengers, wearing lap seat belts alone frequently suffer internal injuries caused by the seat belt itself Such injuries do not occur when shoulder-and-lap seat belts are worn Which of the-following conclusions about passengers involved in head-on automobile collisions is best supported by the statements above? (A) No type of seat belt provides passengers with adequate protection from injury (B) The injuries that passengers most frequently incur are internal injuries (C) Head-on automobile collisions cause more injuries to passengers than any other kind of automobile accident does (D) It is safer for passengers to wear a shoulder and-lap seat belt than to wear a lap seat belt t alone

(E) It is safer for passengers to wear no seat belt than to wear a lap seat belt alone 8 Nonprescription sunglasses shield the wearer s eyes from damaging ultraviolet sunlight Squinting, however, provides protection from ultraviolet rays that is at least as good as the protection from nonprescription sunglasses There is, therefore, no health advantage to be gained by wearing nonprescription sunglasses rather than squinting Which of the following, if true, most seriously weakens support for the conclusion above? (A) Many opticians offer prescription sunglasses that not only screen out ultraviolet sunlight but also provide corrective vision (B) Some nonprescription sunglasses provide less protection from ultraviolet sunlight than does squinting (C) Squinting strains facial muscles and causes headaches and fatigue (D) Many people buy sunglasses because they feel that sunglasses are fashionable (E) Some people squint even when they are wearing sunglasses Studies of workplace safety in construction and manufacturing firms have found that the rate of injuries tends to rise when the firms' work loads increase Since inexperienced workers are often hired by these firm1; when work loads increase, the higher rate of injuries is undoubtedly due to a higher accident rate for inexperienced workers. Which of the following statements, if true, would most weaken the conclusion drawn above? (A) Many of the inexperienced workers hired when the firms' work loads increase are hired only for temporary positions (B) The studies of workplace safety were focused only on injuries that resulted in lost workdays (C) There is a much higher rate of injury in construction firms than in manufacturing firms (D) The accident rate for experienced workers tends to increase whenever the firms' work loads increase (E) Firms that hire inexperienced workers for potentially dangerous jobs are required to provide them with training Questions 10-14 A researcher is experimenting with varying arrangements of exactly six units that are electrical conductors—G, J, K, M, P, and S—in a loop containing eight positions, each capable of containing one conductor. In each arrangement, each conductor is at one of the eight positions and two positions are empty. In devising arrangements, the researcher must obey the following restrictions: G must be directly adjacent to J.

and only then. If a signal can be transferred from G to S.on the other. from J to K. that can be used in the transfer of a single signal? (A) Two (B) Three (C) Four (D) Five (E) Six 13. from one conductor to another. If there is one conductor that is directly adjacent to both of the empty positions. A signal cannot be transferred across an empty position.P . either directly or indirectly. 10.must be directly adjacent to S. from (A) G to K (B) G to M (C) J to M (D) J to P (E) J to S 12. it must be true that a signal can be transferred. any of the following could be true EXCEPT: . including starting and ending conductors. any of the following conductors could be directly adjacent to an empty position EXCEPT (A) G (B) J (C) K (D) M (E) P 11. If P is directly adjacent to an empty position. that conductor must be (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) J K M P S 14. A signal can be transferred either way around the loop. M must be directly adjacent to S on one side and to an empty position . A signal can be transferred from one conductor directly to another when the two conductors at directly adjacent to each other. If a signal can be transferred. If K is directly adjacent to P. which of the following is the greatest number of conductors. until it reaches an empty position. either directly or indirectly.

S. the researchers have discovered three objects—1. none of them was made at S. 2. Questions 15-18 Researcher know that exactly six prehistoric iron-working sites—Q. and Object 3. the researchers have established the following. and Q 17 If neither Q nor T was a site at which any of the objects was made. and 3—that they know must have been made by ironworkers in the Windham area The researchers would like now to determine the specific site at which -each object was made The objects are different enough in composition and style to leave no doubt that each was made at a different site In addition. One of the objects was made at V Object 2 was not made at X Object 3 was made neither at S nor at X. which of the following must be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Object 1 was made at X Object 2 was made at S Object 2 was made at V Object 3 was made at R Object 3 was made at V 18 The researchers could determine exactly which object was made at which site if they . J is directly adjacent to an empty position. Q. respectively. If any of the objects was made at Q. V. S. T. Object 3 could have been made at which of the following? (A) Q (B) R (C) S (D) T (E) X 16. none of them was made at T. and X R. and S V. G is directly adjacent to an empty position. 15 If Object 1 was made at T.'V. Object 1. Object 2. and X— existed in the Windham area Recently. X. J is directly adjacent to K.(A) (B) (C) (D) (E) G is directly adjacent to K. S. If any of the objects was made at R. could nave been made at (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Q. and T V. and V T. J is directly adjacent to P. R.

and Sam Kate. Kate. V. Kate. two teams must be formed.. and V Q. V. Manuel. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Q. Kate. Rose. If Manuel and Frank are both on the red team. and X R. R. must be on the green team. Rose cannot be on the same team as Sam.Rose. and . Sam. the green team can consist of which of the following? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Joan. a red team and a green team. From these seven. Sam and Theresa—are eligible to enter a spelling contest. Team selection is subject to the following restrictions: If Manuel is on the red team.V S. No child can be selected for more than one team. and Theresa Rose. Rose. Kate must be selected for the green team. Which of the following can be the three members of the red team? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Frank. Seven children—Frank. and Rose Joan. each team consisting of exactly three of the children. If Frank is on the red team. Rose. and X Questions 19-22. Joan cannot be on the same team as Kate. and Theresa 21. Manuel. and Theresa Kate. must also be on the red team? (A) (B) (C) (D) Frank Joan Rose Sam . If Manuel is on the red team. T. Sam. 19. if selected. if selected. Rose. Joan. which of the following. Joan. and V S. and Theresa 20. T. and Kate Frank. and Rose Manuel. and Theresa Kate. and Theresa Joan.knew that the only three sites at which objects were made were. Rose.

which of the following would be most important to know in order to evaluate the force of that evidence? (A) Whether repeated airplane travel allays fear of flying in airplanes (B) Whether regional and domestic airlines spend the same average amount of time per aircraft on maintenance (C) How many people reported a fear of flying in airplanes that was strong enough to prevent them from traveling by air (D) How many people per year have traveled by highway and how many by air since 1980 E) How much higher the accident rate has been for regional airlines than for major domestic airlines since 1980 24. then which of the following CANNOT be a member of the green team? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Joan Kate Manuel Rose Sam Questions 23-24 The facts show that the fear of flying in airplanes is not rational. if true. In 1986 alone. and then repairs are carefully made and checked. Which of the following. would argue most strongly against the conclusion above? (A) Since the inventory of spare parts kept at each airport if smaller than in earlier years. 23. even with double the traffic of the 1960's. The rate for regional airlines was only slightly higher. If Frank is selected for the red team and Theresa is not selected for either team. there were 46. (B) Air fatalities from 1980 to the present have been concentrated in the last two years.(E) Theresa 22. (D) Many reported near collisions in midair are t Closer than regulations allow but are nevertheless without actual danger. (C) The number of reports of near collisions in midair in 1986 was less than half those in a typical year of the 1960's. If the evidence cited above is accurate. with the rate rising sharply. but from 1980 to the present an average of only 77 per year in accidents on major domestic airlines. planes are often delayed at an airport while parts are flown in from another airport. (E) Between 1980 and 1986. safety improvements in the design of automobiles steadily improved their crashworthiness.000 fatalities in highway accidents. .

In 1985 a consumer agency concluded that Xylo brand bicycles are safer to ride than are Zenon brand bicycles. . Zenon owners were more likely than Xylo owners to report the injuries they sustained while riding their bicycles. (D) In 1985 the agency had miscalculated the ratio for Xylos. 1984. the agency's conclusion would have been different for the period since 1985. Therefore. the number of riding hours for Zenons totaled at least half the number of riding hours for Xylos. Yet for identically designed bicycles manufactured since 1985. (B) Of all the bicycles ridden in the period since 198S. Which of the following is an assumption that. (E) Soon after the agency had issued its report. the percentage of Xylos ridden was twice the percentage of Zenons ridden. the number of rider injuries has been twice as great among riders of Xylos as among riders of Zenons. supports the claim that the agency's conclusion would have been different for the period since 1985? (A) For the period since 1985. (C) Prior to 19. for Zenons.25.85. consumer demand for Xylos increased more rapidly than did consumer demand for Zenons. or for both. The Agency based the conclusion on the ratio of the number of rider injuries to the number of riding hours for each brand of bicycle from 1981 through. if true.

replicated compromised. fiction gained its greatest ascendancy. Although Johnson's and Smith's initial fascination with the fortunes of those jockeying for power in the law firm-------after a few months.4.. the two paid sufficient attention to determine who their lunch partners should be. (A) revived (B) emerged (C) intensified . . these activities seem to be actually------to the area.SECTIONS 3 Time—30 minutes 37 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks.diminishing (C) beneficial.. published validated.. counterbalancing (B) rehabilitative! ... (A) destructive. enhancing (D) detrimental. 1.fabricated resuscitated. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) decimated' denigrated dominated emphasized resurrected 3. In an age without radio or recordings. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.------its productivity. Scientists' pristine reputation as devotees of the disinterested pursuit of truth has been-----by recent evidence that some scientists have deliberately ------experimental results to further their own careers. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) reinforced. an age------by print. challenged . redirecting (E) superfluous... Although the feeding activities of whales and walruses give the seafloor of the Bering Shelf a devastated appearance.. each blank indicating that something has been omitted. encumbering 2. suppressed exterminated.

applied to decorum.. A war. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) risk. illuminated by rate.. a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) espoused. for they are------the regimentation and discipline necessary for military efficiency.. disruptive of rejected. usually requires that these principles be------. even if fought for individual liberty and democratic rights. novelist William Thackeray considered the cult of the criminal so dangerous that he criticized Dickens' Oliver Twist for making the characters in the thieves' kitchen so-------..superseded by efficacy . (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) threatening riveting conniving fearsome irritating Directions: In each of the following questions. simply investigate the extent to which terms from . 8.. contrary to suppressed. be------the other.(D) Hagged (E) persisted 5. ANIMAL: CAT:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) apple: pear club: player furniture: chair landscape: tree body: toe 9. To test the------of borrowing from one field of study to enrich another. CURTAIN: STAGED . incompatible with followed.. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. The English.the one may..utilized by 7.. without forcing. fulfilled through suspended..confused with universality. Inherentin 6.

INTEREST: INVEIGLE (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) evaluate: suggest foresee: predict plan: scheme interpret: examine neglect: persecute 14. BARTER: COMMODITIES (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) arbitrate: disputes invade: boundaries debate: issues correspond: letters promote: ranks . INSOMNIA: SLEEP:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) dyslexia: read hemophilia: bleed hyperactivity: move paranoia: hallucinate malnutrition.(A) (B) (C) (D) (E) footlight: orchestra lid: jar upholstery: sofa veil: face screen: film 10. JEER: DERISION:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) fidget: restraint cower: menace slouch: vigilance reprimand: censure frown: adversity 12. HUMILITY: SUPPLICANT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) espionage: felon dilettantism: connoisseur dogmatism: scholar gregariousness: teammate resistance: adversary 13. eat 11.

If such astonishing concentrations of bacteria were typical of vent outflow. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. that these large.15. however. and extremely large concentrations of bacteria were found in samples of vent water thought to be pure. Later. Unless smokers are consistently located near more. chemosynthesis. ultimately derived from photosynthesis. near hydrothermal vents. can account for only a fraction of the vent faunas it is conceivable. For example. then food within the vent would dwarf any contribution from advection. and advection. This suggests that bacterial chemosynthesis is not a sufficient source of nutrition for these creatures. The food supplies necessary to sustain the large vent communities. blind crabs. After reading a passage. must be many times the ordinary fallout. however. This final observation seemed decisive. Hence. however. the drifting of food materials from surrounding regions. sedentary organisms do in fact feed on bacteria that grow in warm-water vents. falling from above.. many vent-site bacteria were found to be capable of chemosynthesis. No bacteria can survive such heat. certain difficulties with this interpretation. and fish. Most deep-sea faunas rely for food on particulate matter. The first reports describing vent faunas proposed two possible sources of nutrition: bacterial chemosynthesis. Another difficulty is that similarly dense populations of large deep-sea animals have been found in the proximity of "smokers"—vents where water emerges at temperatures up to 350° C. rise in the vent water. with an even sparser distribution of larger animals. PARRY: QUESTION:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) return: affection shirk: duty confront: dread hurl. choose the best answer to each question. production of food by bacteria using energy derived from chemical changes.: insult surrender: temptation Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content.hospitable warm-water vents. and no bacteria were found there. evidence in support of the idea of intense local chemosynthesis was accumulated' hydrogen sulfide was found in vent water. and then ram in peripheral areas to nourish animals living some distance from the warm-water vents. .) The deep sea typically has a sparse fauna dominated by tiny worms and crustaceans. areas of the ocean where warm water emerges from subterranean sources. However. live remarkable densities of huge clams. some of the large sedentary organisms associated with vents are also found at ordinary deep-sea temperatures many meters from the nearest hydrothermal sources. the widely quoted conclusion was reached that bacterial chemosynthesis provides the foundation for hydrothermal-vent food chains—an exciting prospect because no other communities on Earth are independent of photosynthesis There are. (This passage is excerpted from an article that was published in 1981.

They are smaller than many vent faunas. 16. it is likely that small live animals in the advected water might be killed or stunned by thermal and/or chemical shock) thereby contributing to the food supply of vents. Which of the following-does the author cite as a weakness in the argument that bacterial chemosynthesis provides the foundation for the food chains at deep-sea vents? (A) Vents are colonized by some of the same animals found in other areas of the ocean floor.Nonetheless. 350 milligrams of particulate organic material would be advected into the vent area. They are predators. They derive nutrition from a chemosynthetic food source. Estimates suggest that for every cubic meter. (E) Some bacteria found in the vents are incapable of chemosynthesis. advection could provide more than 30 kilograms of potential food per day. transports some of that matter and water to the vents. of vent discharge. for an averagesized vent. (D) Large concentrations of minerals are found invent water. Thus. The information in the passage suggests that the majority of deep-sea faunas that live in nonvent habitats have which of the following characteristics? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) They do not normally feed on particles of food in the water. They congregate around a single main food source. advection is a more likely alternative food source. 18. The passage provides information for answering which of the following questions? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) What causes warm-water vents to form? Do vent faunas consume more than do deep-sea faunas of similar size? Do bacteria live in the vent water of smokers? What role does hydrogen sulfide play in chemosynthesis? What accounts for the locations of deep-sea smokers? 17. (C) Bacteria cannot produce large quantities of food quickly enough. Research has demonstrated that advective flow. The primary purpose of the passage is to (A) describe. In addition. a previously unknown natural phenomenon (B) reconstruct the evolution of a natural phenomenon (C) establish unequivocally the accuracy of a hypothesis (D) survey explanations for a natural phenomenon and determine which is best supported by evidence (E) entertain criticism of the author's research and provide an effective response 19. (B) Vent water does not contain sufficient quantities of hydrogen sulfide. which originates near the surface of the ocean where suspended particulate matter accumulates. .

The author refers to "smokers" (line 38) most probably in order to (A) show how thermal Shock can provide food for some. Which of the following is information supplied in the passage that would support the statement that the food supplies necessary to sustain vent communities must be many times that of ordinary fallout? I. If the argument in the passage is valid. III. during those times. It is transported as large aggregates of particles. or between those already satiated and those who appear to be. not to offer half of the little food one had was unthinkable. 23. but there is an additional element with a much more fundamental importance. Vent faunas are not able to consume food produced by photosynthesis. by extension. and III 21. preserving one's self. since every glance was a plea for life. II. Throughout human history there have been many stringent taboos concerning watching other people eat or eating in the presence of others. II. and the sharing of food was quite literally supporting one's family or. people existed in nuclear or extended family groups. vent faunas by stunning small animals (B) prove that the habitat of most deep-sea animals is limited to warm-water vents (C) explain how bacteria carry out chemosynthesis (D) demonstrate how advection compensates for this lack of food sources on the seafloor (E) present evidence that bacterial chemosynthesis may be an inadequate source of food for some vent faunas 22. shamelessly gorging. when food was so precious and the on-lookers so hungry. It may provide an important source of nutrition for vent faunas. Undoubtedly such elements exist in the taboos. It may cause the internal temperature of the vents to change significantly. Vents are more densely populated than are other deep-sea areas. taboos against eating in the presence of others . Large vent faunas move from vent to vent in search of food. It contains hydrogen sulfide.20. In prehistoric times. Further. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) I only III only I and II only II and III only I. There have been attempts to explain these taboos in terms of inappropriate social relationships either between those who are involved and those who are not simultaneously involved in the satisfaction of a bodily need. Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about the particulate matter that is carried down from the surface of the ocean? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) It is the basis of bacterial chemosynthesis in the vents.

In developing the main idea of the passage. the author believes that past attempts to explain some taboos concerning eating are (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) unimaginative implausible inelegant incomplete unclear 26. Adapts a scientific theory and applies it to a spiritual relationship. followed by five lettered words or phrases. According to the passage. Codifies earlier. CONSOLIDATION: (A) instigation (B) fragmentation (C) restriction (D) opposition (E) provocation . The author's hypothesis concerning the origin of taboos against' watching other people eat emphasizes the (A) general palatability of food (B) religious significance of food (C) limited availability of food (D) various sources of food (E) nutritional value of food 25. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters.who are not also eating would be LEAST likely in a society that (A) had always had a plentiful supply of food (B) emphasized the need to share worldly goods (C)' had a nomadic rather than an agricultural way of life (D) emphasized the value of privacy (F) discouraged overindulgence 24. unsystematized conjecture about family life. Simplifies a complex biological phenomenon I explaining it in terms of social needs. be sure to consider all the' choices before deciding which one is best. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning. Reorganizes a system designed to guide personal behavior. 27. the author does which of the following? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Downplays earlier attempts to explain the origins of a social prohibition. Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters.

HYPERBOLE: (A) equivocation (E) skepticism (B) criticism (C) understatement (D) pessimism 32. PLATITUDE: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) concise formulation original observation unsubstantiated claim relevant concern insincere remark . NATTY. STEEP: (A) relax (B) repulse (C) plummet (D) clarify (E) parch 34. (C) acknowledge (D) forgive (E) improve 31. 35. SECURE: (A) infest (B) unearth (C) impart (D) implant (E) unfasin 29. GRATE: (A) soothe (B) gather . INERRANCY: (A) productivity (B) generosity (Q volubility (D) fallibility (E) plausibility 33. EXIGENT: (A) unprepossessing (B) inquisitive (C) devoted (D) absurd (E) deferrable 37. FRACAS: (A) rapture (C) novel predicament (E) just reward (B) relic (D) peaceful situation 30. RECUMBENT: (A) well fortified (B) standing up (C) lacking flexibility (D) constricted (E) alarmed .28. (A) sloppy (B) quiet (D) common (E) difficult (C) loose 36.

If Q is printed on Wednesday. T must be printed on the day immediately before or the day immediately after the day on which X is printed. T. Each job can be completed in one full day and exactly one job will be scheduled for each day. Any of the following could be printed on Saturday EXCEPT (A) P (B) Q (C) S (D) T (E) X 3. S is printed on Monday. Q. For each question. . which of the following could be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) P is printed on Tuesday. W. it may be useful to draw a rough diagram. W must be printed on Thursday. 1. and X—for a particular week Monday through Saturday.SECTION 4 Time—30 minutes 25 Questions Directions: Each question or group of questions is based on a passage or set of conditions. Questions 1-7 The manager of a commercial printing firm is scheduling exactly six jobs—P. X is printed on Thursday. select the best answer choice given. In answering some of the questions. S is printed on Friday. T is printed on Monday. The jobs must be scheduled according to the following conditions: P must be printed sometime before S is printed. Which of the following is an acceptable schedule of jobs for the week? Mon (A) P (B) O (C) Q (D) T (E) X Tues Q W W X P Wed T S T P T Thurs W X W W W Fri X T S Q S Sat S Q P S Q 2. S.

which of the following must be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Q is printed on Monday. If P is printed on Tuesday. where songbirds spend the winter months. the amount of forestland has not been reduced. S is printed on Friday. most seriously weakens the conclusion above? (A) As the human population of Middlesex County has grown. 7. (D) T is printed on Monday. there has been an increase in the number of shopping malls built. S is printed on Saturday. (B) P is printed on Wednesday. If X is printed on Monday. (B) The presence of more garbage cans resulting from the increase in the county's human population ensures the survival of more raccoons. X is primed on Wednesday. Q is printed sometime before S. X is printed on Saturday. If T is printed on Tuesday. the decrease in the county's songbird population cannot be attributed to the growth in the county's human population. 6. if true. Although the human population around the forest-kind in Middlesex County has increased. S is printed on Thursday. which prey on songbird eggs whenever available. S is printed on Wednesday. (C) There has recently been a decrease in the amount of rain-forest land in Central and South America. any of the following could be true EXCEPT: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) P is printed on Monday. Which of the following. T is printed on Wednesday. (E) X is printed on Tuesday. 5. Q is printed on Saturday. P is printed sometime before W. which of the following must be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) P is printed sometime before Q. If Q is printed on Friday. . W is printed sometime before Q. 8. W is printed sometime before S. which of the following must be true? (A) P is printed on Monday. (C) S is printed on Saturday.4. Therefore.

The" three discussants will be selected from seven volunteers. 9. if true.(D) Although several species of songbirds are disappearing from Middlesex County. (D) The greater the volume of stocks traded in a given year. resolves the apparent contradiction presented in the passage above? (A) Foreign investors usually buy United States stocks only when prices are low. (E) California had more acreage that could be devoted to agriculture than did Florida. (D) California's proportion of non-orange citrus crops was higher than Florida's. (C) For some portion of 1987. (B) Florida produced larger oranges than California did. the lower the average price per share on the United States stock market for that year. (C) California produced more oranges than it did non-orange citrus. (B) The number of stock buyers in 1987 remained about the same as it had been the preceding year. the conference organizer must observe the following restrictions: . and Ullman—are known to be hostile to the speaker's theoretical point of view. were compared. of whom four—Ito. During the weeks after the drop. In October 1987 the United States stock market suffered a major drop in prices. 10. In a recent year California produced an orange crop equal to only seventy-six percent of Florida's orange crop. these species are far from being endangered. Thompson. Which of the following. Questions 11-15 A conference organizer must select exactly three discussants to respond to a paper to be presented by an invited speaker. Lopez. the volume of stocks traded was higher than the average for that year. However. the volume of stocks traded also dropped sharply to well below what had been the weekly average for the preceding year. (E) The disappearance of songbirds. which eat insects. including oranges. and Miller—are known to be friendly to the speaker's theoretical point of view. (E) The volume of stocks traded rises and falls in predictable cycles. the California crop was twenty-three percent greater than Florida's crop for the same year If the information above is true. The other three—Shapiro. often results in increased destruction of trees by insects. the volume for the entire year was not appreciably (different from the preceding year's volume. In selecting the three discussants. However. when citrus crops as a group. Kemble. which of the -following can properly be concluded about the Florida and California citrus crops in the year mentioned? (A) Florida's climate was suited only to growing oranges.

15. and Ullman Lopez. Thompson cannot be selected. Neither Ito nor Thompson can be selected.At least one friendly discussant and at least one hostile discussant must be among those selected. Shapiro. Neither Lopez nor Thompson cam be selected. Which of the following is a pair of volunteers that can be selected together as discussants? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) It® and Lopez Ito and Shapiro Kemble and Lopez Miller and Shapiro Miller and Ullman 14. 11. Neither Kemble nor Shapiro can be selected. The members of the group of discussants would be completely determined if which of the following additional restrictions had to be observed as well? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Friendly discussants must be in the majority. which of the following must also be among those selected? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Lopez Miller Shapiro Thompson Ullman 13. Which of the following could be the group of discussants selected? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Ito. If either Lopez or Miller is selected. the other must also be selected. and Thompson Miller. Lopez. If Ito is selected. Hostile discussants must be in the majority. and Miller Ito. If Ito is selected as a discussant. and Thompson Kemble. If either Kemble or Ullman is selected. Shapiro. Shapiro. and Ullman 2. The group of discussants selected must include either (A) Ito or Shapiro (B) Kemble or Shapiro (C) Kemble or Thompson (D) 'Lopez or Miller . Thompson. the other must also be selected.

All transportation at the airport operates continuously and is available at no charge to all who wish to travel . A2.The bus makes four stops of terminal A –these are called Al. but neither monorail (C) monorail to Terminal A . the trip that requires use of both a monorail and the loop bus is (A) A2 toA3 (B) A4toBl (C) Long-Term Parking to A2 (D) Long-Term Parking to A4 (E) Long-Term Parking to B2 . The loop bus and two monorails are the only ways to move among the stops above. the airport loop bus travel to Terminal A. and A4 in that order three stops at Terminal B--B1 order The bus then stops at Long-Term Parking From the long term parking the bus proceeds to A1 and repeats entire loop. and another express monorail travels back and forth between B2 and LongTerm Parking only. but neither the loop bus nor the other monorail (C) loop bus first and the monorail to Terminal A second (D) monorail to terminal A first and the loop bus second (E) monorail to Terminal B first and the loop bus second 17 Which of .(E) Lopez or Ullman Questions 16-18 At a large airport. a person must take the (A) loop bus. Terminal B and long-term parking .the following could be the second intermediate stop for a person traveling from A2 to B3 ? (A) A3 (B) Bl (C) B2 (D) B3 (E) Long-Term Parking 18 If all of the following trips are to be made with the fewest possible intermediate stops. To travel from Long-Term Parking to A4 making the fewest possible intermediate stops. 16. At the same airport . A3.an expert monorail travels back and forth between A3and Long term Parking only.

Rover. Tache. Rover. If Spot is taller than Tache. Monet. Quixote. Monet Spot. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Quixote is taller than Fido. 19. Spot. Quixote. Tache. Spot Quixote. (E) Tache is taller than Spot. Tache is taller than Quixote. Quixote is taller than Pal. . Pal. Quixote. which of the following must be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 22.* Tache.. Monet 20. The veterinarian's assistant collected the following comparative data concerning the poodles' heights: Rover is taller than Tache. Rover. Rover. Rover is taller than Fido. None of the seven poodles is exactly the same height as any other poodle from the litter. Spot. Spot is taller than Pal. Which of the following must be true? (A) Fido is taller than Pal. Which of the following could be the correct ordering of the poodles from tallest to shortest? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Fido. 21. Spot is taller than Monet. Quixote is taller than Rover. Quixote. Pal. Quixote is taller than Spot. Fido is taller than Tache. Fido. Spot. Monet. Pal. Fido.Questions 19-22 A veterinarian is doing an informal study of the growth of exactly seven poodles—Fido. Fido. (C) Quixote is taller than Pal. Pal. any of the following can be true EXCEPT: Monet is taller than Quixote Quixote is taller than Pal. Monet Rover. Pal. Fido. If Tache is taller than Quixote. Quixote. Monet. Tache. Quixote is taller than Rover. Spot Rover. but Tache is taller than Pal. (D) Spot is taller than Monet. Pal. Tache. (B) Fido is taller than Rover. and Tache—all six-month-old puppies from the same litter. Pal is taller than Monet.

23. using them only to store commercially frozen foods. (E) An electric freezer can operate efficiently only if chilled air is free to circulate within the freezing compartment. . medical history. Researchers studying sets of identical twins who were raised apart in dissimilar environments found that in each case the twins were similar in character. if true. the average temperature of a given volume o air inside that freezer rises temporarily. and life experiences. many people keep their electric freezers half-empty. contributes most to an explanation of the apparent discrepancy described above? (A) A given volume of air in a freezer requires much more energy to be maintained at a temperature below freezing than does an identical volume of frozen food. The researcher saw these results as confirmation of the hypothesis that heredity-is more important than environment in determining human personalities and life histories. Which of the following. Because the process of freezing food consumes energy. the more energy is required to maintain that freezer's normal temperature. Yet freezers that are half-empty often consume more energy than they would if they were kept fully stocked. (C) When unfrozen foods are placed in. The existence of which of the following would tend to weaken the support for the hypothesis above most seriously? (A) A set of identical twins raised together who are shown by appropriate tests to have very similar value systems (B) A pair of identical twins raised apart who differ markedly with respect to aggressiveness and other personality traits (C) A younger brother and older sister raised together who have similar personalities and life experiences (D) A mother and daughter who have the same profession even though they have very different temperaments (E) A pair of twins raised together who have similar personality traits but different value systems 24. (B) The more often a freezer's door is opened.a freezer. (D) A person who normally maintains a half-empty freezer can cut energy costs considerably by using a freezer that is 50 percent smaller.

people process information in ways that . People often do not make decisions by using the basic economic principle of rationally weighing all possibilities and then making the choice that can hx expected to maximize benefits and minimize harm.25. independent of its perceived relative merit. even if they know that the voluntarily taken risk is statistically more dangerous. rather than on information they already have. even though they realize that an accident is more likely in the latter situation than in the former. . are irrational in this sense. would provide evidence in support of the assertions above EXCEPT: (A) People tend to act on new Information. Routinely. (B) People prefer a major risk taken voluntarily to a minor one that has been forced on them. (D) People avoid situations in which they could become involved in accidents involving large numbers of people more than they do situations where singlevictim accidents are possible. (E) People usually give more weight to a physician’s opinion about the best treatment for a disease than they do to the opinion of a neighbor if they realize that the neighbor is not an expert in disease treatment. Any of the following. if true. (C) People tend to take up potentially damaging habits even though they have clear evidence that their own peers as well as experts disapprove of such behavior.

. grudging 4. revealed (E) clever. at best. all bodies fall at the same rate is so Simple to state and to grasp that there is a tendency to------its significance. It has been argued that politics as------. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) a theory an ideal a practice a.... has always been the systematic organization of common hatreds. unavoidable (B) regard. negotiable (E) patience.Choose the word or set of words for each blank that best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole..for complying with the corporation's new safety regulations.SECTION 5 Time—30 minutes 38 Questions Directions :... averted 3 Noting that few employees showed any...... indeterminate (D) respect.. friction excluded. but n fact it ------a long-standing hostility.... each blank indicating that something has been omitted. contravened (D) bitter. imminent (E) enthusiasm. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words.. (A) aimless produced (B) friendly masked (C) playful. (A) aptitude. whatever its transcendental claims. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) underrate control reassess praise' eliminate 2 Their mutual teaming seemed. Peterson was forced to conclude that acceptance of the regulations would be------...Each sentence below has one or two blanks. 1..contest an enigma . The discovery that.

. attribute tussle. Beneficent (E) Similarity. . the opposition of good and evil is portrayed as a------between technology. and . subtle (B) unidimensional. substitute .... prefer deliberation. (A). Unfettered (D) Conflict.. Useful (B) Struggle. Although scientists claim that the seemingly-----language of their reports is more precise than the figurative language of fiction.. In many science fiction films. the language of science... In recent decades the idea that Cézanne influenced Cubism has been caught in the-------between art historians who credit Braque with its invention and those who------Picasso.the errant will of a depraved intellectual.5. advocate paradox. Malevolent 6.tout interplay. (A) Fusion. Dehumanizing (C) Parallel. is inherently------. like all language..ornamental. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) crossfire .... allusive (E) subjective metaphorical 7. which is------..unintelligible (C) symbolic. complex (D) literal.

five lettered pairs of words or phrases follow a related pair of words or phrases. CARET: INSERTION:: (A) pound: heaviness (B) tongs: extraction . ELBOW: JOINT:: (A) cell: tissue (B) corpuscle: blood (C) muscle: bone (D) skull: skeleton (E) heart: organ 11. BOMBAST: POMPOUS :: (A) (C) (D) (D) (E) prose: economical circumlocution: patient prattle: succinct verbiage: mundane tirade: critical 13. ENDOW: INC6ME:: (A) (B) (D) (E) emit: signals endorse: approval (Q enchant: magic embark: voyage endure: hardships 12.Directions: in each of the following questions. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. (E) manipulation: advantage 9. DISGUISE: IDENTIFICATION:: (A) equivocation: ambiguity (B) facade: decoration (Q forgery: wealth (D) camouflage: detection. 8. BIRD: FEATHERS :: (A) mammal: spine (B) hand: fingers (C) branch.-scales 10. fruit (D) limb: fur (E) fish .

(C) comma: pause (D) quotation: agreement (E) clip: attachment 14. QUERULOUS: COMPLAIN (A) (B) (D) (E) (F) humble: fawn prodigal: spend treacherous: trust laconic: talk culpable: blame . FEARLESS: DAUNT:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) perplexed: enlighten nondescript: neglect avaricious: motivate impassive: perturb tranquil: pacify 16. OPAQUE: LIGHT:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) inaudible: sound unbreakable: plastic reflective: mirror nonporous : liquid viscous: fluid 15.

even entire environments create a mysterious.Directions: Each’ passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. she assembles architectural constructions of great beauty and power. and the Merzbau of Schwitters. Nevelson says." Using mostly discarded wooden objects like packing crates. in the field of sculpture Since Neolithic times. partly. and by Native American and pre-Columbian art. or working in metal. such as Sky Cathedral and Night Cathedral. who in the eyes of many critics is the most original female artist alive today. and places them in boxes. These assemblages. their three-dimensional grandeur and even their titles. broken pieces of furniture. "For myself. it was only after 1945—when New York was rapidly becoming the art capital of the world—that major sculpture was produced in the United States. that women sculptors have shown the greatest originality and creative power. choose the best answer to each question. In some ways. the Surrealistic objects of Miro. Some of the best was the work of women. perhaps. and abandoned architectural ornaments. sculpture has been considered the prerogative of men. except that it has to pass through a creative mind. . After reading a passage./ and it has been in the United States. but she has absorbed all these influences and still created a distinctive art that expresses the urban landscape and the aesthetic sensibility of the twentieth century. "I have always wanted to show the world that art is everywhere. for purely physical reasons: it was erroneously assumed that women were not suited for the hard manual labor required in sculpting stone. especially since the decades of the fifties and sixties. walls. Although she has denied any symbolic or religious intent in her works. Their rise to prominence parallels-the development of sculpture itself in the United States: while there had been a few talented sculptors in the United States before the 1940's. One famous and influential critic. Nevelson would be the first to admit that she has been influenced by ail of these. her most ambitious works are closer to architecture than to traditional sculpture. suggest such connotations. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. Creating very freely with no sketches. but then neither Louise Nevelson nor her art fits into any neat category. as well as by African sculpture. all of which she has hoarded for years." Her works have been compared to the Cubist constructions of Picasso. By far most outstanding of these women is Louise Nevelson. she glues and nails objects together. until recently. It has been only during the twentieth century that women sculptors have been recognized as major artists. I think Ms. said of her work. Nevelson succeeds where the painters often fail. or more rarely white or gold. (This passage is from a book published in 1975. Hilton Kramer. paints them black. almost awe-inspiring atmosphere. carving wood.) That Louise Nevelson is believed by many critics to be the greatest twentieth-century sculptor is all the more remarkable because the greatest resistance to women artists has been.

. Which of the following statements is supported by information given in the passage? (A) Since 1945 women sculptors in the United States have produced more sculpture than have men sculptors. (C) She makes no preliminary sketches but rather allows the sculpture to develop as she works. The unique qualities of Nevelson's style The extent of critical approval of Nevelson's work A distinction*between sculpture and painting A reason for the prominence of women sculptors since the 1950's 20. (E) Prior to 1945 there was little major sculpture produced by men or women sculptors working in the United States. (C) From 1900 to 1950 women sculptors in Europe enjoyed more recognition for their work than did women sculptors in the United States. (B) Since 1950 sculpture produced in the United States has been the most original and creative sculpture produced anywhere. Which of the following is one way in which Nevelson's art illustrates her theory as it is expressed in lines 36-38? (A) She sculpts in wood rather than in metal or stone. (D) She puts together pieces of ordinary objects once used for different purposes to make her sculptures. The passage focuses primarily on which of the following? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) A general tendency in twentieth-century art The work of a particular artist The artistic influences on women sculptors Critical responses to twentieth-century sculpture Materials used by twentieth-century sculptors 18. (B) She paints her sculptures and frames them in boxes. 19. (E) She does not deliberately attempt to convey symbolic or religious meanings through her sculpture. (D) Prior to 1945 there were many women sculptors whose work was ignored by critics.17. The author quotes Hilton Kramer in lines 25-27 most probably in order to illustrate which of the following? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) The realism of Nevelson's work .

The author regards Nevelson's stature in the art world as "remarkable" (line 3) in part because of which of the following? (A) Her work is currently overrated. Volcanic rock that forms as fluid lava chills rapidly is called pillow lava. While the term "pillow lava" suggests a definite shape. ellipsoidal masses. (C) They are mysterious and awe-inspiring. is probably a misnomer.sculptors have found it especially difficult to be accepted and recognized as major artists. Which of the following statements about Nevelson's sculptures can be inferred from the passage? (A) They are meant for display outdoors. Some geologists argue that pillow lava is characterized by discrete. (B) They do not have qualities characteristic of 1 sculpture. Virtually any cross section cut through a tangled mass of interconnected flow lobes would give the appearance of a pile of discrete ellipsoidal masses. (E) They show the influence of twentieth-century architecture. (C) They are sometimes very large. (D) They are uniquely American in style and sensibility. Adequate three-dimensional images of intact pillows are essential for defining the true geometry of pillowed flows and thus ascertaining their mode of origin. (D) They are hand carved by Nevelson. Much of this controversy probably results from unwarranted extrapolations-of the original configuration of pillow flows from twodimensional cross sections of eroded pillows in land outcroppings. interconnected flow lobes. (B) Women . in fact geologists disagree. (B) They are often painted in several colors. (E) They are built around a central wooden object. Indeed. This rapid chilling occurs when lava erupts directly into water (or beneath ice) or when it flows across a shoreline and into a body of water. It can be inferred from the passage that the author believes which of the following about Nevelson's sculptures? (A) They suggest religious and symbolic meanings. (C) Nevelson's sculptures are difficult to understand. (D) Many art critics have favored painting over sculpture in writing about developments in the-art world." itself suggestive of discrete masses. but not beautiful. 23. Others describe pillow lava as a tangled mass of cylindrical. the term "pillow. (E) Few of the artists prominent in the twentieth century have been sculptors. .21. 22.

followed by five lettered words or phrases Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. 25. In the passage. (D) No three-dimensional examples of intact pillows currently exist.Each question below consists of a word printed in capita letters. III. The author of the passage would most agree that the geologists mentioned in line 6 ("S geologists") have made which of the following I. Deliberately ignored existing counterevidence. sacklike masses in pillow lava is unknown. II. (C) Water or ice is necessary for the formation of pillow lava. Repeatedly failed to take new evidence into account.24. the author is primarily interested in (A) analyzing the source of a scientific controversy (B) criticizing some geologists' methodology (C) pointing out the flaws in a geological study (D) proposing a new theory to explain existing scientific evidence (E) describing a physical phenomenon 26. Which of the following is a fact presented in the passage? . geologists were More willing to confer directly with one another two-dimensional cross sections of eroded pillows were available existing pillows in land outcroppings were not so badly eroded Directions :. (A) I only (B) II only (C) III only (D) I and II only (E) II and in only 27. Generalized unjustifiably from available evidence. (A) The shape of the connections between the separate. The author implies that the "controversy" (line 9) might be resolved if (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) geologists did not persist in using the term "pillow" geologists did not rely potentially misleading information. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning. be sure to consider all the i hoices before deciding which one is best . (B) More accurate cross sections of pillow lava would reveal the mode of origin. (E) The origin of pillow lava is not yet known.

} remove air from 33 FALLOW (A) abundant (D) arrange incorrectly (B) valuable (C) necessary (D) in use (E) in demand (D) antagonize (E) disengage 34 CORROBORATE (A) tire (B) rival (C) deny 35 PERUSE (A) glide along glance at 36.28 PEER (A) a complicated structure (B) an insignificant explanation (C) a subordinate person (D) an inept musician (E) an unreliable worker 29 SINCHRONOUS (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) unusual in appearance of a distinct origin occurring at different times monotonous shapeless (E) revitalize 30 ALIENATE (A) reunite (B) influence (C) relieve (D) match 31 PREDESTINE (A) jumble (B) doubt (C) leave to chance (E) defy authority 32 AERATE (A) generate (B) create (C) elevate (D) combine water with (P. SFFMIY (A) indecorous deleterious 37 TENUOUS (A) substantial (C) permanent (B) argue against (C) strive lor (B) mapparent (C) disconnected (B) obdurate (D) pick up (f ) (D) disingenuous (F) (J)) ubiquitous (f ) intelligible (B) warranted (C) trying (D) discreet (F) 38 GRATUITOUS (A) thankless spurious .

VERBAL ABILITY Section 3 Section 5 Number Answer P + Number Answer 1 C 93 1 A 2 C 91 2 B 3 D 79 3 E 4 D 69 4 C 5 C 68 5 D 6 E 54 6 D 7 B 58 7 A 8 C 90 8. D 9 D 70 9 E 10 A 49 10 E 11 D 46 11 B 12 E 36 12 E 13 C 34 13 C 14 D 28 14 D 15 B 31 15 D 16 C 53 16 B 17 B 26 17 B 18 D 76 18 E 19 A 5 0 19 C 20 B 56 20 D 21 E 58 21 A 22 B 70 22 B 23 A 70 23 C 24 C 84 24 C 25 D 66 25 A 28 A 40 26 A 27 B 85 27 B 28 E 87 28 C 29 D 79 29 C 30 A 78 30 A 31 C 70 31 C 32 D 54 32 E 33 E 32 33 D 34 B 33 34 C 35 A 24 35 E 36 E 22 36 A 37 B 22 37 A 38 8 P+ 89 82 56 55 45 42 49 86 91 75 52 44 43 32 28 29 82 67 54 68 55 89 61 70 47 56 43 85 90 81 81 72 37 37 37 27 24 18 .

ANALYTICAL ABILITY Section 1 Section 4 Number Answer P + Number Answer 1 B 76 1 D 2 C 83 2 A 3 B 69 3 D 4 E 32 4 E 5 E 34 5 A 6 E 51 6 C 7 D 99 7 C 8 C 62 8 B 9 D 72 9 C 10 A 60 10 D 11 C 57 11 C 12 B 54 12 E 13 B 57 13 D 14 E 38 14 D 15 B 66 15 E 16 E 54 16 D 17 A 29 17 E 18 E 24 18 D 19 E 51 19 C 20 D 60 20 A 21 B 48 21 B 22 E 35 22 C 23 D 62 23 B 24 B 61 24 A 25 A 19 25 E P+ 90 86 59 56 59 61 61 75 76 88 83 41 33 24 18 60 38 52 73 68 59 50 72 64 38 .

his conduct toward the child betrayed his ------her.. discernible 3. (A) huts (B) varies (C) falters (D) accelerates (E) dwindles 2... in each blank indicating that something has been omitted.. 1.. adoration of promising. they’re timing------with regard to onset and duration. Many of the earliest colonial houses that are still standing have been so modified and enlarged that the------design is no longer------.adolescent maturational and developmental states occur in an orderly sequence. A leading chemist believes that many scientists have difficulty with stereochemistry because much of the relevant nomenclature is------. The old man could not have been accused of------his affection. relevant (B) intended. A) B) C) D) E) lavishing. fondness for sparing. applicable (E) initial . Choose the word or set of words for each blank that fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words or sets of words.TEST 4 SECTION 1 Time—30 minutes Directions : Each sentence below has one or two blanks. attractive (D) appropriate. in that it combines concepts that should be kept— -„ . necessary (C) embellished..While the delegate clearly sought to------the optimism that has emerged recently. she stopped short -f suggesting that the conference was near collapse and might produce nothing of significance. antipathy for stinting.. .Although. (A) pertinent. dislike of 4. A) substantiate (B) dampen (C) encourage (D) elucidate (E) rekindle 3. tolerance of rationing. ..

(A) obscure.. interrelated (B) specialized.. intact (C) subtle.. inviolate (D) descriptive.. separate (E) imprecise.. discrete 6. Among the many------of the project, expense cannot be numbered; the goals of the project's promoters can be achieved with impressive------. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) highlights.. efficiency features.. savings disadvantages.. innovation claims.. speed defects.. economy

7. Though science is often imagined as a------exploration of external reality, scientists are no different from anyone else: they are------human beings enmeshed in a web of personal and social circumstances. (A) (B) (C) (D) (F} fervent.. vulnerable neutral.. rational painstaking.. careless disinterested.. passionate Cautious dynamic

Directions: In each of the following questions, five lettered pairs of words or phrases follow a related pair of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. DRAWBRIDGE: CASTLE:: (A) lawn : house , (B) gangway : ship (C) aisle : stage (D) hallway : building (E) sidewalk : garage 9. INSULIN: PANCREAS:: (A) bile: liver (B) menthol : eucalyptus (C) oxygen: heart (D) ' honey : bee (E) vanilla: bean 10. TALON : EAGLE :: (A) fang: snake (B) hoof: horse (C) quill: porcupine (D) tusk : elephant (E) claw: panther 11. ARTICULATE : CLEARLY:: (A) orate: strongly (B) shout: loudly (C) Lecture: willfully

(D) malign: incoherently (E) jest: Belligerently 12. NUANCE: DISTINCTION:: (A) remnants-preservation (B) Shade: spectrum (C) Hint: suggestion (D) Trace: existence (E) Splinter: disintegration 13. URBANE: GAUCHERIE.: (A) Confident: coterie (B) Calculating: imposture (C) Diffident: goodwill (D) Fearful’: destruction (E) Guileless. Chicanery 14. VOTING: ROLL CALL:: (A) Termination: cloture (B) Amendment: constitution (C) Majority: concession (D) Quorum : filibuster (E) Investigation: legislation 15. DEMUR QUALMS: (A) Placate: pique (B) Obligate: benevolence (C) Atrophy . Rehabilitation (D) Manipulate: experience (E) waver: irresoluteness 16. MISER: THRIFT:: (A) Performer: artistry (B) Chauvinist: patriotism (C) Mimic: ridicule (D) Politician: compromise (E) Scientist : discovery

Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by-questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. Of Homer's two epic poems, the Odyssey has always been more popular than the Iliad, perhaps because it includes more features of mythology that are accessible to readers. Its subject (to use Maynard Mack's categories) is "life-as-spectacle," for readers, diverted by its various incidents, observe its hero Odysseus primarily from without; the tragic Iliad, however, presents "life-as-experience": readers are asked to identify with the mind of Achilles, whose motivations render him a not/particularly likable hero. In addition, the Iliad, more than the Odyssey, suggests the complexity of the gods' involvement in human actions, and to the extent that modern readers find this complexity a needless complication, the Iliad is less satisfying than the Odyssey, with its simpler scheme of divine justice. Finally, since the Iliad presents a historically verifiable action, Troy's siege, the poem raises historical questions that are absent from the Odyssey's blithely imaginative world. 17. The author uses Mack's "categories'" (lines 4-5) most probably in order to (A) argue that the Iliad should replace the Odyssey as the more popular poem (B) indicate Mack's importance as a commentator" on the Iliad and the Odyssey (C) suggest one way in which the Iliad and the Odyssey can be distinguished (D) point out some of the difficulties faced by readers of the Iliad and the Odyssey (E) demonstrate that the Iliad and the Odyssey can best be distinguished by comparing their respective heroes 18. The author suggests that the variety of incidents in the Odyssey is likely to deter the reader from (A) (B) (D) (E) concentrating on the poem's mythological features concentrating on the psychological states of the poem's central character accepting the explanations .hat have been offered for the poem's popularity accepting the poem's scheme of di\me justice accepting Maynard Mack's theory that the poem's subject is "life-as-spectacle

19. The passage is primarily concerned with (A) distinguishing arguments (B) applying classifications (C) initiating a debate

The hero's emotions are not sufficiently various to engage the reader's attention. Parker (35) reasoned that if. Flatfish. In all flatfish the optic nerves cross.(D) resolving a dispute (E) developing a contract 20. which might be mechanically disadvantageous. For the starry flounder this interpretation implies that a geometric difference (between fish that are mirror images of one another) is adaptive. as one optic nerve must cross above or below the other. G. such as the flounder. It can be inferred from the passage that a reader of the Iliad is likely to have trouble identifying poem's hero for which of the following reasons? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) The hero is eventually revealed to be unheroic The hero can be observed by the reader only from without. for example. so that the right optic nerve is joined to the brain's left side and vice versa. H. that left-eyedness in the Japanese starry flounder has been selected for. While in most species with asymmetries virtually all adults share the same asymmetry. The hero's psychology is not historically verifiable The hero's emotions often do not seem appealing to the reader. having both eyes on one side rather than on the other? The ease with which a fish can reverse the effect of the sidedness of its eye asymmetry simply by turning around has caused biologists to study internal anatomy. the left-eyed . members of the (10) starry flounder species can be either left-eyed (both eyes on the left side of head) or right-eyed. (30) especially the optic nerves. the starry flounder populations vary from about 50 percent left-eyed off the United States West Coast. Biologists call this kind of gradual variation over a certain geographic range a "cline" and interpret clines as strong indications that the variation is adaptive. through about 70 percent left (15) eyed halfway between the United States and Japan. Most striking among (5) the many asymmetries evident in an adult flatfish is eye placement: before maturity one eye migrates* so that in an adult flatfish both eyes are on the same side of the head. to nearly 100 percent left-eyed off the Japanese coast. a (20) response to environmental differences. there would be a twisting of nerves. This crossing introduces an asymmetry. for the answer. then. which provokes a (25) perplexing question: what is the selective advantage in . are among the few vertebrates that lack approximate bilateral symmetry (symmetry in which structures to the left and right of the body's midline are mirror images). For starry flounders. a flatfish's left eye migrated when the right optic nerve was on top. In the waters between the United States and Japan.

III They occur in different proportions in different locations. The author would be. a possible disadvantage ° associated with eye migration in flatfish is that the optic nerves can (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) adhere to one another detach from the eyes cross stretch twist 24. most likely to agree with which of the following statement* about left-eyedness and right-eyedness in the starry flounder? I. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) I only'" II only I and III only II and III only I. 21.variety would be selected against. since in a (40) starry flounder the . According to the passage. biologists concluded that there is no important adaptive difference between left-eyedness and right-eyedness and that the two characteristics are genetically associated with some other adaptively significant characteristic. however striking. This situation is one (50) commonly encountered by evolutionary biologists.flounder (A) are not basically bilaterally symmetric (B) do not become asymmetric until adulthood (C) do not all share the same asymmetry (D) have both eyes on the same side of the head (E) tend to cluster in only certain geographic regions 22. and natural selection never promotes a purely less advantageous variation. appears to be an evolutionary. As for the left-eyed and right-eyed flatfish. According to the passage. starry flounder differ from most other species of flatfish in that starry . They do not seem to give obvious selective advantages to the starry flounder. The problem with the above explanation is that the Japanese starry flounder population is almost exclusively left-eyed. II. and III 23. Which of the following best describes the organization of the passage as a whole? . red herring. II. They are adaptive variations by the starry flounder to environmental differences. their difference. who must often decide whether a characteristic is adaptive or selectively neutral. AS other explanations (45) proved equally untenable.left optic nerve is uppermost.

The passage supplies information for answering which of the following questions? (A) Why are Japanese starry flounder mostly left eyed? (B) Why should the eye-sidedness in starry flounder be considered selectively neutral? (C) Why have biologists recently become interested in whether a characteristic is adaptive or selectively neutral? (D) How do the eyes in flatfish migrate? (E) How did Parker make his discoveries about the anatomy of optic nerves in flatfish? 26. in which the various items are grouped according to place of origin (B) A wheat field in which different varieties of wheat are planted to yield a crop that will bring the maximum profit (C) A flower stall in which the various species of flowers are arranged according to their price (D) A housing development in which the length of the front struts supporting the porch of each house increases as houses are built up the hill (E) A national park in which the ranger stations are placed so as to be inconspicuous. A series of observations is presented and explained in terms of the dominant theory A hypothesis is introduced and corroborated in the light of new evidence. A generalization is made and supporting evidence is supplied and weighed. and yet as* easily accessible as possible 27. Which of the following is most clearly similar to a cline as it is described in the second paragraph of the passage? (A) A vegetable market. A contradiction is noted and a resolution is suggested and then modified.(A) (B) (C) (D) (E) A phenomenon is described and an interpretation presented and rejected. 25. . Which of the following phrases from the passage best expresses the author's conclusion about the meaning of the difference between left-eyed and right-eyed flatfish? (A) "Most striking" (line 4) (B) variation is adaptive" (line 19) (C) mechanically disadvantageous" (lines 37-38) (D) adaptively significant" (lines 48-49) (E) "evolutionary red herring" (line 54).

the possible groups of courses to fulfill the course distribution requirements must include at least (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) two humanities courses three humanities courses one natural science course one social science course three social science courses . and social science—in order to graduate. If a student has completed six natural science courses. and two social science courses 2. and four social science courses one humanities course. The minimum number of social science courses required in order to fulfill the course distribution requirements is (A) 1(B) 2 (Q 3 (D)4 (E) 5 3. with at least one. select the best answer choice given. If a student has completed six natural science courses and one social science course. and three social science courses. three humanities courses. Students at the Elmwood College of Natural Science must complete a total of twelve courses selected from three different general areas—humanities. In answering some of the questions. Questions 1-3. but no more than three. natural science. two natural science courses. 1. one natural science course. At least five of the required twelve courses must be from Humanities and social science. all of the following are possible groups of courses that fulfill the course distribution requirements EXCEPT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) three humanities courses and three social science courses two humanities courses and four social science courses one humanities course. The students must meet the following course distribution requirements: At least six of the required twelve courses must be from natural science. one natural science course.SECTION 3 Time—30 minutes 25 Questions Directions: Each question or group of questions is based on a passage or set of conditions. selected from humanities. it may be useful to draw a rough diagram. For each question.

most seriously weakens the argument above? (A) A number of job categories. including one that involves the activation of neutrons. especially details both of shading and of brushwork. who base their conclusion on an analysis of stylistic features. (B) If even The Man with the Golden Helmet is of questionable attribution. (E) There are significant consistencies among authentic Rembrandts in certain matters of style. the experts have begun a series of sophisticated new tests. then any supposedly • authentic Rembrandt has now become suspect. (E) The increase in job-related accidents has occurred mainly in a single job category. So say several art experts. The Man with the Golden Helmet. is not a Rembrandt after all. whereas the number of job-related accidents has remained approximately constant in . if true concerning the period during which the increase occurred.One of the world's most celebrated paintings. In order to ascertain who really painted the well-known masterpiece. excluded from the jurisdiction of OSHA in the legislation originally establishing the agency. (B) OSHA has been assigned a greater number of kinds of workplace activities. to monitor. and the ratio of work-related deaths and injuries to size of work force has fallen in OSHA-supervised occupations (D) Regulations issued by OSHA have met with political criticism from elected officials and the mass media. (D) The original ascription of The Man with the Golden Helmet to Rembrandt was a deliberate fraud. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was established to protect workers from accidents and unsafe conditions on the job. This demonstrates the agency's ineffectiveness. (C) There has been an increase in the total number of people at work. These tests yield patterns for any painter that are as distinctive as a good set of fingerprints. There has actually been an increase in the number of job-related accidents under OSHA. long attributed to Rembrandt. have continued to be outside OSHA's jurisdiction. Which of the following is an assumption on which the conclusion of the art experts depends? (A) The Mart with the Golden Helmet was not painted during Rembrandt's lifetime. 6. Which of the following. (C) The painting known as The Man with the Golden Helmet is a copy of a Rembrandt original.

In some cases. regardless of the prognosis (B) the health of some patients can improve simply from their knowledge that they are under a physician's care (C) many patients actually suffer from imagined finesses that are best treated by placebos (D) physicians could prescribe less medication and achieve the same effect (E) it is difficult to determine what. In discussing the use and effect of placebos.other categories. the researcher sought to imply that (A) physicians should always maintain and communicate an optimistic attitude toward their patients. 5. By comparing a physician to a placebo. the placebo actually produces improvement in the patient's condition. It is prescribed in the hope of Instilling in the patient a positive attitude toward prospects for his or her recovery. if any. effect a physician's behavior has on a patient's condition . a well-known medical researcher recently paid physicians the somewhat offbeat compliment of saying that physicians were the ultimate placebo. A placebo is a chemically inert substance prescribed more for the mental relief of a patient than for its effect on the patient's physical disorder.

Questions 7-10 A garden plot consists of seven parallel rows of vegetables, the rows numbered consecutively one through seven In each row a different one of seven vegetables— J, K, L, M, N, O, P—is to be grown according to the following conditions Neither J nor K, can be in a row next to the row P is in M must be grown in either row one or row seven L must be grown in a row next to a row containing either N or P, or in a row that is the only row between the rows containing N and P If O is next to only one other row of vegetables, that row must contain K 7 If P is next to M, and O is in the seventh row, in which row must P be planted7 (A) 2 (B) 3 (C) 4 (D) 5 (E) 6

8.Which of the following is a possible order for the vegetables in the garden plots beginning with row one9 (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) LJKNPOM MPJLNKO MNLPOJK MNLPJKO NPLJMOK

9 If O is in the first row and J is in the sixth row, which vegetable must be in the fourth row? (B) L (C) M (D) N (E) P

10 If J, K, L, N, and P are in the inner five rows, which of the following is a possible ordering of these vegetables in the five rows? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) JKLPN JNLPK K L J N P. KNPLJ LJKNP

Questions 11-16 A museum curator must group nine paintings— F, G, H, J, K, L, M, N, and O—in twelve spaces numbered consecutively from 1-12. The paintings must be in three groups, each group representing a different century. The groups must be separated from each other by at least one unused wall space. Three of the paintings are from the eighteenth century, two from the nineteenth century, and four from the twentieth century Unused wall spaces cannot occur within groups. G and J are paintings from different centuries. J, K, and L are all paintings from the same century. Space number, 5 is always empty. F and M are eighteenth-century paintings. N is a nineteenth-century painting. 11. If space 4 is to remain empty, which of the following is true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Space number 10 must be empty The groups of paintings must be hung in chronological order by century. An eighteenth-century painting must be hung in space 3. A nineteenth-century painting must be hung in space 1. A twentieth-century painting must be hung in space 12.

12. If the paintings are hung in reverse chronological order by century, the unused wall spaces could be (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 1,5, and 10 1,6, and 10 4, 7, and 8 5, 8, and 12 5,9, and 10

13. Which of the following is a space that CANNOT be occupied by a nineteenth-century painting? (A) Space 1 (B) Space 6 (C) Space 8 (D) Space 11 (E) Space 12

14. If J hangs in space 11, which of the following is a possible arrangement for spaces 8 and 9 ? (A) (B) (D) (E) F in 8 and M in 9 K in 8 and G in 9 (Q N in 8 and G in 9 8 unused, and H in 9 8 unused and F in 9

15. If the twentieth-century paintings are hung in spaces 1 - 4, which of the following CANNOT be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Space 8 is unused. Space 9 is unused. F is hung in space 6. M is hung in space -12. N is hung in space 9.

16. If the first five paintings, in numerical order of spaces, are F, O, M, N, G, which of the following must be true? (A) Either space 1 or space 4 is unused. (B) Either space 7 or space 12 is unused. (C) H hangs in space 11. (D) Two unused spaces separate the eighteenth-century and nineteenth-century paintings. (E) Two unused spaces separate the nineteenth-century and twentieth-century paintings.

At most two wires in a single cable can be black At most two wires in a single cable can be white. then no wire can be green. The cable contains exactly six wires. green. and a green wire (D) A yellow wire and exactly two black wires (E) Exactly two black wires and exactly two white wires 18. If one wire is violet. yellow. The cable does not contain a red wire. Which of the following could be the complete set of wires in an acceptable cable? (A) green wire. If exactly one black wire and exactly one white wire are used in an assembled cable. violet.. and black. 17.Questions 17-22 In a telecommunications cable assembly plant. If a white wire and a violet wire must be among *he wires chosen for a particular cable. a black wire. The maximum number of wires that can be used in an acceptable cable is (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 8 7 6 5 4 19. a black wire. a white wire. There can be at most one wire of each of the other colors in a single cable. There are wires of exactly six different solid colors—red. which of the following must be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) The cable contains no more than five wires. twisting plastic-coated wires together assembles cables. If one wire is red. any of the following pairs of wires could complete the cable EXCEPT a (A) (B) (C) (D) black wire and a second white wire yellow wire and a second white wire yellow wire and a black wire red Wire and a yellow wire . and a violet wire (B) A violet wire. then one wire must be yellow. The cable does not contain a violet wire. white. The cable contains a yellow wire. Wires must be assembled into single cables according to the following rules: I Each cable must contain at least three wires and wires of at least three different colors. and a white wire (C) A red wire. 20.

it could be true that a color NOT used is (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) black white green red yellow 22. Manufacturers of household appliances in the United States are introducing an array of computerized technologies in the work of many of their factories in an effort to regain a lead. (B) More time was spent observing the interactions of children with their mothers than with their fathers. No cable contains more than five wires. 23. experts predict a golden age for the consumer of better-designed and betterbuilt products. Which of the following. (D) The first-born children were. (C) Most of the researchers involved in the study were persons who had no brothers-or sisters. 24. on the average. would LEAST support the experts' claim that appliances produced by computerized technologies will be better built? . three when their parents had second children. their parents. Being an only child has little to do with a child's social development. if true. Green is never used if red is used.If there is an additional requirement that violet must be used if yellow is used. and other adults.(E) red wire and a black wire 21 If an assembled cable consists of exactly five wires. On the basis of changes that have already taken place. most weakens the conclusion drawn above? (A) The groups being compared did not contain the same number of children. each a different color. if. A recent study that followed thirty only children and thirty-five first-born children to the age of three found that the two groups of children behaved very similarly to each other toward their peers. nearly. Which of the following. Black is used exactly once if yellow is used. which of the following must be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) No cable contains fewer than six wires. Red is always used if violet is used. eroded by international competition. true. (E) The "other adults" described in the study consisted mainly of members of the research team.

000 and 9. (C) There are only a few sixteenth-century global maps that show a continental landmass at the South Pole. (D) Most attributions of surprising accomplishments to ancient civilizations or even extraterrestrials are eventually discredited or rejected as preposterous. (B) Computer-directed machines carry out repetitive tasks with the result that errors due to human fatigue are eliminated.000 years ago. (C) Computer-controlled ultrasound devices are better able to detect hidden flaws and defects that require repair than are human inspectors. if true. argue that the continent must have been discovered and mapped by the ancients. (D) The flow of heat used to weld parts together is more consistent when directed by computer programs and results in a more accurate and uniform weld. Which of the following. Geographers and historians have traditionally held the view that Antarctica was first sighted around 1820. whose maps are known to have served as models for the European cartographers. therefore. (B) Between 3. Some scholars. the world was warmer than it is now. and the polar landmass. . (E) Ancient philosophers believed that there had to be a large landmass at the South Pole to balance the northern continents and make the world symmetrical. and no one has been able to present conclusive evidence. even though explorers of the period never saw it. (E) Computer-driven screwdrivers ensure that screws used in appliances will be consistently tight. 25.(A) Computerized inventory procedures ensure that parts are ordered in sufficient quantities and that production moves smoothly and consistently. is w damaging to the inference drawn by the scholars? (A) The question of who first sighted Antarctica in modern times is still much debated. was presumably smaller. but some sixteenth-century European maps show a body that resembles the polar landmass.

rigidity estimates. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. belied familiar.. confirmed explosive. 1. indirectness norms. its long dormancy before its recent eruption-----its violent...SECTION 4 Time—30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks. We realized that John was still young and impressionable. (A) allies (B) resources (C) freedom (D) education (E) self-determination 3. they must depend on------. Changes of fashion and public taste are often-----. restrained gaseous. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) awe-inspiring..that describe the appropriate behavior of children and adults. confusion regulations.about what constitutes appropriate behavior for adolescents.500 years than any other Volcano in the coterminous United States. but there seems to be ------. Although Mount Saint Helens has been more during the last 4. and yet they are among the most------gauges of the state of the public's collective consciousness. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) functions.. (A) transparent.. nature. As long as nations cannot themselves accumulate enough physical power to dominate all others.and resistant to analysis. Social scientists have established fairly clear-cut ------.. but were nevertheless surprised at his------. certainty studies... moderated' volatile. underutilized . sensitive (C) faddish.. suggested 5. misapprehension 2.. useful (B) ephemeral. Choose the word or set of words for each) blank that best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole... (A) naiveté (B) obstinate ness (Q decisiveness (D) ingeniousness (E) resolve 4. each blank indicating that something has been omitted.

. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) negates. reliable 6... The self-important cant of musicologists on record jackets often suggests that true appreciation of the music is an------process closed to the uninitiated listener. The poet W.. problematic (E) permanent. temptation controls. (A) unreliable (B) arcane (C) arrogant (D) elementary (E) intuitive . . inclination 7..(D) arbitrary. H..proclivity obviates. resolution engenders. propensity tempers. however enthusiastic. Auden believed that the greatest poets of his age were almost necessarily irrespon-sib1 v that the possession of great gifts------the ------to abuse them.

NICOTINE: TOBACCO:: (A) calcium : bone. ASTRINGENT: CONTRACTION (A) anesthetic : insensibility. (B) iodine: salt (C) protein : meat (D) pulp : fruit (E) caffeine: coffee 10. COMPLIANT: SERVILE:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) trusting: gullible cringing: fawning pleasant: effortless adventurous: courageous arduous: futile 14. BIT: PRILL:: (A) nut: bolt (B) nail: hammer (C) Made: razor -(D) stapler: paper (E) chisel: stone 12. CANDLE: WAX:: (A) metal: corrosion (B) leather: vinyl (C) curtain: pleat (D) tire: rubber (E) wood: ash 11. five lettered pairs of words or phrases follow a related pair of words or phrases. MISJUDGE: ASSESS :: (A) (B) (C) (D) misconstrue: interpret misconduct: rehearse misinform : design misguide : duplicate 13. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. . FORGERY : COUNTERFEIT:: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) duplicity: testimony arson: insurance embezzlement: fraud theft: punishment murder: life 9. 8.Directions: in each of the following questions.

NOMINAL : FIGUREHEAD :: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) absolute: autocrat cloistered : bishop military: tribunal statutory: defendant monolithic: legislature 16. PHILOSOPHER : COGITATE :: (A) linguist: prevaricate (B) politician : capitulate (C) scholar: extemporize (D) misanthrope: repeat (F.} iconoclast :attack .(B) (C) (D) (E) analgesic: pain coagulant: euphoria stimulant: drowsiness emollient: irritation 15.

then a chain of star-forming regions would result If many such chains were created in a differentially rotating galaxy. and if the most massive star to be formed from the cloud evolved into a supernova and triggered a new round of star formation. a spiral galaxy This line of reasoning underlies an exciting new theory of spiral-galaxy structure A computer simulation based on this theory has reproduced the appearance of many spiral galaxies without assuming an underlying density wave. and so on. would most discredit the new theory as described in the passage? (A) The exact mechanism by which a star becomes a supernova is not yet completely known and may even differ for different stars (B) Chains of star-forming regions like those postulated in the new theory have been . which collapse into stars that form a spiral pattern 17.Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content After reading a passage. according to the new theory of spiral-galaxy structure. choose the best answer to each question Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage If a supernova (the explosion of a massive star) triggered star formation from dense clouds of gas and dust. the hallmark of the most widely accepted theory of the large-scale structure of spiral galaxies That theory maintains that a density wave of spiral form sweeps through the central plane of a galaxy. compressing clouds of gas and dust. The primary purpose of the passage is to (A) describe what results when a supernova triggers the creation pf chains of starforming regions (B) propose a modification in the most widely accepted theory of spiral-galaxy structure (C) compare and contrast the roles of clouds of gas and dust in two theories of spiralgalaxy structure (D) describe a new theory of spiral-galaxy structure and contrast it with the most widely accepted' theory (E) describe a new theory of spiral-galaxy structure and discuss a reason why it is inferior . if true. supernovas can create a spiral galaxy when the supernovas are (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) producing an underlying density wave affected by a density wave of spiral form distributed in a spiral pattern located in the central plane of a gala/y located in a differentially rotating galaxy 19 Which of the following. the distribution of stars would resemble the observed distribution in.to the most widely accepted theory 18 The passage implies that.

observed in the vicinity of dense clouds of gas and dust (C) The most massive stars formed from supernova explosions are unlikely to evolve into supernovas (D) Computer simulations of supernovas provide a poor picture of what occurs just before a supernova explosion (E) A density wave cannot compress clouds of gas and dust to a density high enough to create a star 20 The author's attitude toward the new theory of spiral-galaxy structure can best be described as (A) euphoric (B) enthusiastic (C) concerned (D) critical (E) disputatious .

however. the cause of prejudice. (20) First. Such discrimination (30) sometimes stopped short of lifetime servitude or inherited status—the two attributes of true slavery—yet in other cases it included both. as many historians including the Handlins have argued. The Handlins' argument excludes. The Handlins explain the appearance of legal slavery (15) by arguing that. But this cannot be . This possibility has important ramifications. There are. did in law. But "this should not overshadow evidence from the 1630's on that points to racial discrimination without using the term slavery. In addition. the existence of discrimination before the advent of legal slavery offers a further explanation for the harsher treatment of Black slaves in (45) North than in South America. Freyre and Tannenbaum have rightly argued that the lack of certain traditions in North America—such as a Roman conception of slavery And a Roman Catholic emphasis on equality—explains why the treatment of Black slaves was more severe there (50) than in the Spanish and Portuguese colonies of South America. Another flaw in the Handlins' interpretation (25)is their assumption that prior to the establishment of legal slavery there was no discrimination against Black people. Oscar and Mary Handlin assure UN that the status of Black people down to the 1660's wax that of servants A critique of the Handlin`s interpretation of win legal slavery did not appear until the 1660`s suggests that assumptions about the relation (10) between slavery and racial prejudice should be reexamined and that explanations for the different treatment of Black slaves in North and South America should be expanded. then legal slavery should be viewed as a reflection and an (40) extension of racial prejudice rather than. several acts of the Maryland and Virginia legislatures indicate otherwise. heretofore.The first mention of slavery in the statutes of the English colonies of North America does not occur until after 1660 some forty years after the importation of the first Black people Lest we think that slavery existed in (5) fact before it. important objections to this argument. If from the outset Black people were discriminated against. It is true that before the 1660's Black people were rarely called slaves. each attained a different status. the real possibility that Black people in the (35)English colonies were never treated as the equals of White people. treated alike. the position of White servants was improving relative to that of Black servants Thus. Black and White servants. during the 1660's. the Handlins contend. the Handlins cannot adequately demonstrate that the White servant's position was improving during and after the 1660's.

22. at the very least. With which of the following statements regarding the status of Black people in the English colonies of North America before the 166Q's would the author be LEAST likely to agree? (A) Although Black people were not legally considered to be slaves. (B) The acts had the effect of impairing rather than improving the position of White servants relative to What it had been before the 1660Ts. best describes the organization of lines 1-8 of the passage? (A) A historical trend is sketched and an exception to that trend is cited (B) Evidence for a historical irregularity is mentioned and a generalization from that evidence is advanced (C) A paradox about the origins of an institution is pointed out and the author's explanation of the paradox is expounded (D) A statement about a historical phenomenon is offered and a possible misinterpretation of that statement is addressed (E) An interpretation the rise of an institution is stated and evidence for that interpretation is provided. possessed the legal status of servants. tended to reflect the attitudes toward Black servants that already existed before the 1660's. (E) The acts. based only on a lack of something. they were often called slaves. at the very least. (D) Although often not treated the same as White people. . Black people were not legally considered to be slaves. A more compelling explanation is that the early and sometimes extreme racial discrimination in the English (55) colonies helped determine the particular nature of the slavery that followed. 23. 21 Which of the following statements. (D) The acts. (B) Although subject to some discrimination. Which of the following is the most logical inference to be drawn from the passage about the effects of "several acts of the Maryland and Virginia legislatures" (lines 22-23) passed during and after the 1660's? (A) The acts negatively affected the pre-1660's position of Black as well as of White servants. (C) The acts had a different effect on the position of White servants than did many of the acts passed during this time by the legislatures of Bother colonies.the whole explanation since u is merely negative. (C) Although sometimes subject to lifetime servitude. caused the position of White servants to remain no better than it had been before the 1660'$. Black people had a higher legal status than they did after the 1660's. like many White people. Black people.

the Handlins have argued which of the following about the relationship between racial prejudice and the institution of legal slavery in the English colonies of North America? (A) Racial prejudice and the institution of slavery arose simultaneously. in the Spanish and Portuguese colonies. Black people from 1620 to the 1660's were legally considered to be servants. (D) delaying the introduction of slavery into the English colonies (E) bringing about an improvement in the treatment of Black slaves in the English colonies 26. (C) The introduction is more likely to be explained by reference to a decline than to an improvement in the position of White servants in the colonies during and after the 1660's. (D) Because of the influence of the Roman Catholic church. The passage suggests that the existence of a Roman conception of slavery in Spanish and Portuguese colonies had the effect of (A) extending rather than causing racial prejudice in these colonies (B) hastening the legalization of slavery in these colonies (C) mitigating some of the conditions of slavery for Black people in these colonies. 24. (C) The source of racial prejudice was the institution of slavery. 25. With which of the following statements regarding the reason for the introduction of legal slavery in the English colonies of North America 'would the author be most likely to agree? (A) The introduction is partly to be explained by reference to the origins of slavery. racial prejudice sometimes did not . The author considers the explanation put forward by Freyre and Tannenbaum for the treatment accorded Black slaves in the English-colonies of North America to be (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) ambitious but misguided valid but limited popular but suspect anachronistic and controversial f premature and illogical 27.(E) Although apparently subject to more discrimination after 1630 than before 1630. result in slavery. racial prejudice increased sharply after slavery was legalized. one of the attributes of slavery. (B) Racial prejudice most often took the form the form of imposition of inherited status. According to the passage. (D) The introduction is more likely to be explained by reference to the position of Black . (B) The introduction is to be explained by reference to a growing consensus beginning in the . before the 1660's.1630's about what were the attributes of true slavery. (E) Although existing 4n a lesser form before the1660's.

Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters. ALACRITY: (A) hesitance and reluctance (B) caution and fear .FERROUS: A) affected by rust (B) containing no iron fO chemically inert |D) combined with water (F) permanently magnetized 32.AMALGAMATE: (A) congregate {B) insulate (C) isolate (D) layer (E) revive 31. 28. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning. CONCUR: (A) expose 30. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. PALPABILITY: (A) infertility (B) inflammability (C) intangibility (D) intractability (E) intolerability 36. CORROBORATION: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) weakening of utility lessening of certainty reduction in generality implausibility inadequacy 35. (E) The introduction is more likely to be explained by reference to the history of Black people in the colonies before 1660 than by reference to the improving position of White servants during and after the 1660's. followed by five lettered words or phrases. PRODIGIOUS: (A) implicit (B) slight (C) constant (D) unnecessary (E) premature 34.(A) duty (B) qualification (C) denial (D) liability (B) incite 4C) prolong (D) dissent (E) instability (E) forgive 29.PHLEGMATIC: (A) vivacious (B) valiant |O and (D) healthy (E) mature 33.ASSET.servant in the colonies in the 1630's than by reference to their position in the 1640's and 1650's. be sure to consider all the before deciding which one is best.

(C) cynicism and skepticism (D) suspicion and doubt (E) concern and anxiety 37. MANNERED: (A) plain (B) infantile (C) progressive (D) ignorant (E) natural 38. DISSEMBLE: (A) act conventionally (B) put together (C) appear promptly (D) behave honestly (E) obtain readily .

However. if the two quantities are equal. Column A 2X6 Example 1: Examples 2-4 refer to ∆PQR. but by using your knowledge of mathematics (sec Example 2 below). Figures that accompany questions are intended to provide information useful in answering the questions. angles. Directions: Each of the Questions 1-15 consists of two quantities. unless a note states that a figure is drawn to scale. Common Information: In a question. etc. regions. Lines shown as straight can be assumed to be straight. A symbol that appears in both columns represents the same thing in Column A as it does in Column B. NEVER MARK (E). one in Column A and one in Column B. if the quantity in Column B is greater. Note: Since there are only four choices. Column B 2+6 Sample Answers Example 2: (since equal measures cannot . You are to compare the two quantities and choose A B C D if the quantity in Column A is greater. Figures: Position of points. if the relationship cannot be determined from the information given. and angle measures can be assumed to be positive. information concerning one or both of the quantities to be compared is centered above the two columns.SECTION 5 Time—30 minutes 30 Questions Numbers: All numbers used are real numbers. can be assumed to be in the order shown. you should solve these problems NOT by estimating sizes by sight or by measurement. Figures can be assumed to lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated.

if the relationship cannot be determined from the information given .be assumed. even though PN and NQ appear equal) x Example 3: (since N is between P and Q) Example 4: w + z (since PQ is a straight line) 180 y A B C D if the quantity in Column A is greater. if the quantity in Column B is greater. if the two quantities are equal.

Then during the next five minutes.Cathy had left at five minutes past noon minutes past noon today today 3. The number of prune The number of odd numbers less than IS integers greater than * 5 and less than 1 5 ' A I* 24\ 7 1 4y'2sj'3 l x + 17 . Ann. if the two quantities are equal. Ann gave $1 to Betty who gave $2 to Cathy who gave S3 to Dot None of them gave or received an> other money. of a cube with edge 4 centimeters " of length 2 centimeters 6. 2.-8-5. x y 11 x y The sum of 3 integers is 5 1 12 The average (arithmetic The median of the mean) of the 3 integers 3 integers \ . if the quantity in Column B is greater. > GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE A B C D if the quantity in Column A is greater. Betty. The amount of money The amount of money Betty had left at five . Cathy. and Dot had exactly $1 apiece. if the relationship cannot be determined from the information given .Column A i 11 -y = 6 1 Column B t 3* + 4 = 13 6x 4y Column A x>0 7 x Column B x 51 At noon today. *+8 / -17 » 8 t w9 33(125) 32(375) 10 The volume of a cube Four times the volume with edge of length.

and v. . For each of these questions. 16. y ≠ 1 15 √ y y2 Directions: Each of the Questions 16-30 has five answer choices. and z represent the lengths of the line segments 13 8∏ v+w+x+y + z y > 0. 2x2x2x2x2 = 2+2+2+2 (A) 1 (B) 2 (C) 4 (D) 8 (E)16 . x. ' '. .Column A Column A Column B d 0 14 The total interest earned on d dollars invested for 3 months at 1 1 percent simple annual interest Column B 11 { d} dollars 3 100 The area of the circular region with center O is I6∏. select the best of the answer choices given. y. w.

what will carpeting for the entire floor of the room cost? (A) $800 (B) $1. which of the following CANNOT be the number of $20 checks purchased? (A) 10 (B) 15 (C) 18 (D) 20 (E) 25 19. Which of the following is a multiple of both 7 and 13? (A) 52 (B) 65 (C) 77 (D) 156 (E) 182 18. c. d.280 (C) $1.680 (E) $2. If the value of the expression above is to be halved by doubling exactly one of the five numbers a. AH angles shown are right angles.17. If carpeting costs $20 per square meter. Mario purchased $6QO worth of traveler's checks. or e.600 ' (D) $1.320 20. The figure above shows the floor dimensions of an L-shaped room. If each check was worth either $20 or $50. b. which should be doubled? (A) a (B) b (C) c (D) d (E) e .

for which was the percent of total health expenditures in 1979 least? (A) Dentist services (B) Nursing home care . 1950 AND 1979 21.Question. Of the following categories. HEALTH EXPENDITURES IN THE UNITED STATES.2J-25 refer to he following graph. For how many of the categories was the percent of total health expenditures greater in 1979 than (A) Two (B) Three (C) Four (E) Seven 22.

The difference between two positive numbers is 16. If the perimeter of the rectangle above is 36. Which of the following can be inferred from the graph? I. The number of patients needing hospital care increased from 1950 to 1979 The dollar amount of health expenditures for construction was greater an 1979 than in 1950 In 1979 the dollar amount of health expenditures for dentist services was more than half the dollar amount of health expenditures for physician services (A) I only (B) II only (C) III only (D) I and II (E) II and III 26.If 4x is 6 less than 4y. then y – x = ------(A) -24 (B) -3/2 (C) -2/3 (D) 3/2 (E) 24 28. 27.(C) Drugs and drug sundries (D) Government public health activities (E) Research 23 In 1979 for how many of the categories was the amount of health expenditures less than $21 billion? (A) Two (B) Three (C) Nine (D) Ten (E) Twelve 24 Approximately what was the ratio of health expenditures for hospital care in 1979 to health expenditures for hospital care m 1950 ? (A) 22/1 (B) 17/1 (C) 15/1 (D) 25/2 (E) 4/3 25. then l = (A) 9 (B) 14 (C) 16 (D) 28 (E) 32 . If the smaller of these two . II. III.

numbers is of the larger what is the value of the smaller number? (A) 18 (B) 24 (C) 30 (D) 33 29. (1 .X)(X . then the area of the square region is (A) r2/2π (B) πr2 /2 (C) πr2 (D) 2r2 FOR GENERAL TEST 4 ONLY Answer K«y and Percentages of Examinees Answering Each Question Correctly QUANTITATIVE ABILITY Section 2 Number Answer P+ Section 5 Number Answer P+ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 B E B D E E D B A E B C E 96 89 60 51 39 39 28 84 61 64 65 49 36 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 C A A C B C B C E D C A A 89 92 71 60 41 47 38 91 92 87 78 71 52 .1) = (A) –(X –1)2 (B) (X --1)2 (C) 0 (D) X2 –1 (E) 1 –X2 30. If a square is inscribed in a circle of radius r as shown above.

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 28 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 A E B C B E D C D E A B D E C B E B D B A A C C A 29 35 22 70 57 82 58 56 40 63 53 50 46 63 90 84 80 74 75 54 35 37 39 33 23 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 A A E D E C B D D A C C B E D D C B A B D C A E D 37 41 19 63 51 36 84 48 42 27 45 60 61 45 64 77 73 74 39 44 46 45 35 20 10 QUANTITATIVE ABILITY Section 2 Number Answer 1 B 2 A 3 B 4 B 5 D 6 A 7 A 8 C 9 D 10 B 11 A 12 C 13 C 14 D 15 C 16 B 17 E 18 E 19 B 20 E P+ 93 87 82 85 77 71 74 69 62 66. 65 53 37 45 37 81 80 91 56 62 Section 5 Number Answer 1 B 2 C 3 A 4 B 5 C 6 A 7 D 8 A 9 C 10 A 11 D 12 D 13 A 14 B 15 D 16 C 17 E 18 C 19 B 20 0 P+ 84 87 82 85 84 80 77 65 64 61 62 53 55 35 30 91 87 88 76 63 .

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 A D D B A C A C D A 90 90 68 54 46 85 52 43 27 34 21 22 23 24 25 28 27 28 29 30 B E D A B B D B A E 70 91 77 22 27 68 53 60 54 43 ANALYTICAL ABILITY Section 2 Number Answer P+ 1 D 73 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 B D E B C A C E D C D A D E A B B A E C C D A E 72 51 74 80 65 72 54 53 50 54 58 43 43 32 33 64 38 43 30 61 42 49 39 30 Section 5 Number Answer 1 D 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 A B A E E B C C D D B A E D B C D A A B C C B E P+ 86 75 61 66 44 83 56 82 77 51 75 40 37 41 66 58 35 32 27 72 27 36 47 41 30 .

the one to the left must be less than the one to the right. If the first symbol in a code is 2. (C) The letter Z also occurs in that code. • 3. The two digits must be next to each other. 1. W occurs in that code-exactly twice. select the best answer choice given.TEST 5 SECTION 1 Time—30 minutes 25 Questions Directions: Each question or group of questions is based on a passage or set of conditions. 3. locate. Which of the following could be the third symbol in a code in which the fourth symbol is 3 ? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) W X Z 1 4 2. In answering some of the questions. and catch their prey. and 4 and the four letters W. (B) The letter Y also occurs in that code. any one of the following.2. (D) The letter W occurs in that code exactly once. However. Questions 1-3 Packing labels identify individual packages by means cf a tour-symbol identification code running left to right. X. The two letters must be different letters. The symbols used arc .the four digits 1. and the two letters must be next to each other. (E) The kite. it is claimed that the characteristic efficiency of this process is reduced by moths able to hear the sounds emitted by insect- . and Z. Bats emit sounds and generally use the echoes of these sounds highly efficiently to detect. symbols could occur in one of the remaining three positions EXCEPT the (A) digit 1 (B) digit3 (C) digit 4 (D) letter Y (E) letter Z 4. Which of the following must be true of any code in which the letter W occurs? (A) The letter X also occurs in that code. For each question. Each code consists of two digits and two letters. Of the two digits. it may be useful to draw a rough diagram. Y.

Mass transit authorities in large cities are struggling with deficits.000 teachers who responded to survey questionnaires expressed a high level of interest in microcomputers. best supports the claim above? (A) Those moths that cannot hear the sounds emitted by insect-eating bats live longer on the average than those that can hear such sounds when both kinds of moth are in an environment continuously free of such bats. 5. (D) Moth species that can hear the sounds emitted by insect-eating bats are less likely to be caught by such bats than are moth species that cannot hear these sounds. or at least dated: a recently published survey indicates that 86 percent of the 5. (E) Moths that are capable of hearing the sounds emitted by insect-eating bats differ in their abilities to use evasive action to escape capture by such bats. Which of the following statements. (C) If the price of gasoline rises to a prohibitive level. cuts in service. fluctuations in gasoline prices are unlikely to affect the number of riders using public transportation. and fares higher than they are accustomed to paying. the number of passengers using public transportation has fallen. (C) When a moth changes its speed or direction of flight. Which of the following. Which . 6. (B) Those moth species that cannot hear the sounds emitted by insect-eating bats are among the species of insects that are most likely to be caught by such bats. The popular notion that teachers are generally apathetic about microcomputer technology is false. the number of riders using public transportation will continue to decline. if true. (D) The majority of riders using public transportation do not use gasoline. the number of riders using public transportation rises. (B) Even if the price of gasoline rises.of the following statement about the relationship between the number of riders using public transportation and the price of gasoline is best supported by the passage above? (A) As the price of gasoline rises. hence. adding to the deficits. would be most damaging to the argument above? (A) No attempt was made in the survey to determine whether the teachers who received questionnaires had any previous experience with microcomputers. For all these reasons and because the price of gasoline is still not prohibitive. Riders complain about delays and breakdowns. if true. (B) Teachers who are interested in microcomputer . the number of riders using public transportation will rise. hence. there is a change in the sound pattern generated by the moth's wing movements.eating bats. (E) The price of gasoline is always low enough to make private transportation cheaper than public transportation. fluctuations in gasoline prices are unlikely to affect the number of riders using public transportation.

T is seated on the opposite side of the table from I. I. Questions 7-11 Four women—G. If J is to be seated at the head of the table. each of the following could be seated at the foot of the table EXCEPT (A) H (B) R (C) S (D) T (E) U 9. (C) Questionnaires were sent to teachers without regard to their areas of subject-matter expertise or teaching experience. G is seated on the same side of the table as I. S is seated on the opposite side of the table from I. U cannot be seated on the same side of the table as J. three are to sit on the other side of the table one is to sit at the head of the table.technology were more likely than others to complete and return their questionnaires. ' which of the following must be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) J is seated at the foot of the table. (D) There have been several important developments in the classroom applications of micro-computer technology since the survey results were' tabulated. The following restrictions on seating Arrangements must be observed: Persons of the same sex cannot sit next to each other on the same side of the table. where must T be seated? . T. If U is seated at die head of the table and I is seated in the middle seat on one side of the table. R is seated at the foot of the table. and I is seated in an end seat on the other side of the table. (E) The survey was conducted as part of a marketing study by a company that manufactures and sells microcomputers. H. T cannot be seated on the same side of the table as I. Three of the people are to sit on one side of the table. 8. 7. and one is to sit at the foot of the table. S.If S is seated at the foot of the table. The person seated at the foot of the table cannot be the same sex as the person seated at the head of the table. and J—and four men—R. U is seated in an end seat on one side of the table. and U—are the eight people to be seated at a rectangular table.

H is seated on the same side of the table as I. 11. If T is seated at the foot of the table. J is seated on the same side of the table as I. U is seated in the middle seat on one side of the table. R is seated in the middle seat on one side of the table. and 1 is seated in the middle seat on the other side of the table. and I is seated in the middle seat on the other side of the table. U is seated on the same side of the table as R. If T is seated at the head of the table. which of the following must be seated at the head of the table? (A)G (B) H (C) J (D) R (E) S .(A) (B) (C) (D) (E) At the head of the table In the middle seat on the same side of the table as U In an end seat on the same side of the table as U In the middle seat on die same side of the table as I In an end seat on the same side of the table as I 10. which of the following can be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) G is seated at the foot of the table. S is seated on the same side of the table as-R.

15. which of the following must be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) L plays in rounds three and four. M (C) J. L (B) J. O (D) K. M. and M play in the third round. L. in an individual game. K. in an individual game. K. an individual game No person can play in three consecutive rounds. In any game. the players in the second round must be (A) J. and M play in the first round. M and O both play in round four. O (E) K. exactly three of these persons must play The following are all the rules that affect the order of participation in. K. L.Questions 12-17 Exactly five persons—. J. O 13. and O—have gathered to play a game called Trios In each round of the game. K. O plays in rounds three and five. L and O both play in round five. L. L. M. M. which of the following could be the trio who play in that game's second round? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) J. If. and the length of.. No person can sit out two consecutive rounds. M J. 12. K. L. and O play in the second round. L and O do not play in the first round. L. O J. each of the five persons must play in exactly three rounds. U and O both play in round four. and L play in a first round. O 14. M. M K. If. L. and K. O K.!. in an individual game. If. K. If J. and M play in the first round and J. K. which of the following must play in the fourth round? (A) J (B) K (C) L (D) M (E) O . K.

J. If. in an individual game. M. and 6 must be played by females Roles 7 and 8 can be played by either males or females Each actor must play at least one role and the number of roles necessitates that some of the actors will play more than one role The pairs of roles below are the only pairs that do not require the actors playing the roles to be on stage at the same time.I6. If. and O play in the third round. J.2. appearances in these roles are spaced far enough apart to allow time for costume changes for actors playing more than one role Roles 1 and 2 Roles 3 and 6 Roles 3 and 7 Roles 4 and 5 Roles 4 and 8 Roles 5 and 8 Rena and Sara cannot play roles that require them to be on stage together at the same time. Sara. K. which of the following CANNOT have played in the third round? (A) J (B) K (C) L (D) M (E) O 17. and M play in the first round and K. 18 Each of the following pairs of roles could be played by the same actor EXCEPT (A) roles 1and 2 (B) roles 3 and 6 (C) roles3 and 7 (D) roles 4 and 5 (E) roles 5 and 8 . O play in the first round. and if M and K play in the fourth round. and Tanya—plans to give a performance of a play that has exactly eight roles Roles 1. M. which of the following CANNOT play in the fourth round and must play in the fifth round? (A) J (B) K (C) L (D) M (E) O Questions 18-22 A theater ensemble group consisting of two male actors—Jeff and Kirk—and three female actors— Rena. and 3 must be played by males. and. in an individual game. roles 4. 5.

19 If Kirk plays role 1. Tanya. Tanya. regardless of the other role assign ments7 (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Jeff Kirk Rena Sara Tanya 23 In March 300 college students turned out in Washington to protest against proposed cuts in student loan funds Another 350. Rena (B) Rena. 5. and 6. Tanya (D) Sara. they were more representative of today's students than those who protested m Washington. Rena .proposed cut in loan funds (C) The students who protested in Washington more seriously concerned about their . which of/the following must be true7 (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Jeff plays role 2 Jeff plays role 7 Sara plays role 4 Rena plays role 4 Rena plays role 8 20 Which of the following is an acceptable assignment of roles 4. respectively7 (A) Rena. Tanya 21 Jeff could play any of the following roles EXCEPT (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 1 2 3 7 8 22 Which of the following actors CANNOT play more than one role. (E) Sara. and therefore Congress need not heed the appeals of the protesting students The argument above makes which of the following assumptions? (A) The students who vacationed in Florida did not oppose the cutting of student loan funds by Congress (B) The students who vacationed in Florida were not in agreement with the opinion of the majority of United States citizens about the . Rena (C) Rena.000 collegians flocked to Florida's sun-drenched beaches during March for "spring break"" Since the Florida sun-seekers were more numerous. Sara. Rena. Tanya.

2 percent-in comparison with 1981. . 25. point out that. even if such drifts in average temperature do occur. from the number of crimes reported. "We see here the result of the innovative police program put into effect in7 the city at the beginning of 1982. Which of the following is an assumption on which the more optimistic reports mentioned in the passage are based? (A) Long-range changes in weather patterns cannot be accurately predicted. as against 1981." Which of the following. (D) The number of crimes committed in the city in1982 was 10 percent higher than the number committed in 1972. the police chief of the city said. Noting that the number of crimes committed in a • certain city had decreased in 19&2 by 5. (C) Trends in rainfall patterns are more difficult to isolate than are trends in temperature. we should expect little change in grain production because there is little evidence that changes in rainfall patterns will occur. regardless of climatic conditions. most seriously weakens the conclusion drawn by the police chief? (A) Several cities that have recently increased spending for police programs experienced no decrease in crime in 1982. (E) Long-range cooling trends are potentially more destructive to grain production than are long-range warming trends. because of a declining birth rate. Some doomsayers are warning that long-range warming or cooling trends in weather patterns will drastically reduce grain production. More optimistic reports. Moreover. (D) Long-range warming or cooling trends are more damaging to grain production if they are accompanied by changes in rainfall patterns than if they are not. however. as compared with 1981 (B) The number of crimes committed in the city is estimated. (C) The number of crimes committed in the suburban areas surrounding the city rose by about 5 percent in 1982 over the figure for 1981 and were nearly equal in number to those in the «ity in 1982. . by the same method each year. climate-induced yield trends will be masked by both the year-to-year fluctuation of yields and by the enhancement of yields because of technological factors. for most crops. if true. (E) The size of the age-group most likely to commit crimes decreased considerably in the city in 1982. (B) The growing of grain is so highly dependent on technological factors that improvements in yield are unlikely.education than were the students who vacationed in Florida (D) The students who neither protested in Washington in March nor vacationed in Florida HA March are indifferent to governmental policies on education (E) The best way to influence congressional opinion about a political issue is to communicate with one's elected representative in Washington 24.

Common Information: In a question. However. Numbers: Figures: Position of points. one in Column A and one in Column B. if the two quantities are equal. Column A 2X6 Example 1: Examples 2-4 refer to ∆PQR. if the quantity in Column B is greater. if the relationship cannot be determined from the information given. angles. etc. you should solve these problems NOT by estimating sizes by sight or by measurement. can be assumed to be in the order shown. Lines shown as straight can be assumed to be straight. regions. Column B 2+6 Sample Answers Example 2: . You are to compare the two quantities and choose A B C D if the quantity in Column A is greater. information concerning one or both of the quantities to be compared is centered above the two columns.Section 3 Time—30 minutes 30 Questions All numbers used are real numbers. Directions: Each of the Questions 1-15 consists of two quantities. unless a note states that a figure is drawn to scale. Figures that accompany questions are intended to provide information useful in answering the questions. Note: Since there are only four choices. A symbol that appears in both columns represents the same thing in Column A as it does in Column B. and angle measures can be assumed to be positive. NEVER MARK (E). but by using your knowledge of mathematics (sec Example 2 below). Figures can be assumed to lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated.

(since equal measures cannot be assumed. B if the quantity in Column B is greater. N. C if the two quantities are equal. Column A Column B Column A Column B A man left 1/3 of his estate to his widow . and Q are midpoints of the sides of the rectangle. even though PN and NQ appear equal) x Example 3: (since N is between P and Q) Example 4: w + z (since PQ is a straight line) 180 y A if the quantity in Column A is greater. 2.and designated that the remainder be divided equally among his 4 sons. 1 . ' D if the relationship cannot be determined from the information given. The sum of the areas The area of the un shaded of the shared regions 6. P. The altitude of Triangle PQR from Q M. The fraction of the estate designated for each son 1/12 ^ 5. shaded region MNPQ x y .

4.205 200 7. B if the quantity in Column B is greater. n/p 10100 1020 = 10n 10 ----------- Column B The largest circular tabletop that can be cut from a certain square piece of wood has a circumference of 1057∏ inches. X>0 a. C if the two quantities are equal. √38. 3.X > 1. Maria's weekly gross salary $900 15. The length of a side inches of the piece of wood before the tabletop is cut from it 105∏ 3(x-y) 2/3 n : 5 Maria's weekly net salary of $585 is 65 percent of her weekly gross salary. x y . 9. and c are negative integers. Column A Column B Column A x-y≠0 13. 3x2-3y2/x-y 3x3x n=2x2xp np ≠ 0 14. 11. b. a(b + c) X (x + 5)(2x + 3) (x + 3)(2* + 5) l4 abc 8 x/14 14/x A if the quantity in Column A is greater. D if the relationship cannot be determined from the information given.

what is the value of 22n +1 =? (A) 9 (B) 13 (C) 17 (D) 33 (E) 65 19. and x is (A) 6 (B) 7 (C) 8 (D) 9 (E) 10 18. If 8x . 16. 7. For each or these questions. and x is 18. If n = 3. 7. x = (A) 30 (B) 35 (C) 60 (D) 75 (E) 150 . The number of differThe number of different ent positive divisors positive divisors of 50 of 12 Directions: Each of the Questions 16-30 has five answer choices. If the sum of 3.3y = 24 and y = 0. In the figure above. then the average (arithmetic mean) of 3. select the best of the answer choices given.12. then x = ? (A) 3 (B) 4 (C) 5 (D) 6 (E) 8 17.

950 plus 10 percent sales tax.20. In 1969 approximately what was the amount of private health expenditures? (A) $25 billion (B) $30 billion (C) $45 billion (D) $50 billion (E) $70 billion . how much money should be refunded to each individual? (A) $65 (B) $85 (C) $150 (D) $195 (E) $255 21. If they bought the computer on sale for $1. Three individuals contributed $800 each toward the purchase of a computer.

Approximately what was the amount of the gross national product in 1968 ? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) $600 billion ' $750 billion $800 billion $950 billion It cannot be determined from the information given. 26 If x and y are integers and x > y > 0. . For the years shown.For the year in which public health expenditures were closest to $40 billion.22. total health expenditures were approximately what percent of the gross national product? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 10% 9% 8% 7% 6% 25.500 – 350 II 1/350 . For which of the following expressions would the value be less if 350 were replaced by 347 ? I 2. how many integers are there between. but not including. x and y ? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) x-y x+y x-y-l x +y -1 x-y+1 27. In 1976 approximately what was the ratio of the amount of private health expenditures to the amount of public health expenditures? (A) 3:1 (B)2:l (C) 3:2 (D)2:3 (E) 1:3 24. what was the first year in which the amount of public health expenditures was at least $30 billion? (A) 1960 (B) 1962 (C) 1964 (D) 1968 (E) 1970 23.

how many feet long is the rug? (A) 6 (B) 21 / 2 (C) 2√7 (D) 6√2 (E) 4√6 . If the circumference of circle P is 15.5 (D) 9.714 and the circumference of circle Q is 6.1 III ---------------1+ 1/ 350 (A) None (B) II only (C) III only (D) I and III (E) II and III 28. rectangular floor that is 9 feet wide and 12 feet long. which of the following points has a coordinate most nearly equal to p x r =? (A) A (B) B (C) C (D) D (E) E 30. then the diameter of circle P minus the diameter of circle Q is approximately equal to (A) 1. According to the number line above. If the dimension of the rug are in the same ratio as those of the floor.0 (E) 9.0 (C) 5.28.4 29. A rectangular rug covers half of a.5 (B) 3.

as a result.. chastisement balm..: allure qualms... festive creatively. religious subtly.SECTION 4 Time—30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks. an article used in prayer or ritual is made with extraordinary attention to and richness of detail: it is decorated more -------than a similar article intended for-------use. 1. atonement 4. charging that. (A) reconstructed. Freud derived psychoanalytic knowledge of childhood indirectly: he------childhood processes from adult-------.. anticipation 5. he acted. everyday 3. hundreds of qualified young people would be------further education.scientific theories.. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that best'fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. memory (B) condoned.. . While she initially suffered the fate of many pioneers—the incomprehension of her colleagues— octogenarian Nobel laureate Barbara McClintock has lived to------the triumph of her once------.. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) delicately. The commission criticized the legislature for making college attendance dependent on the ability to pay. vocational colorfully. Having no sense of moral obligation. behavior (D) released. Shipler was as little subject to the------. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. (A) entitled to (B) striving for (C) deprived of (D) uninterested in (E) participating in 2. monotony (E) inferred.. promptings ridicule.. In most Native American cultures. commercial lavishly... eloquence reproaches...of conscience after he acted as he was motivated by its-------before. each blank indicating that something has been {omitted. experience (C) incorporated. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) rewards.

. Broadway audiences have become inured to------....disinclined histrionics.INEVITABLE: CHANCE :: (A) absolute: variability (B) candid : openness (C) certain : regularity (D) relaxed : diligence (E) sincere: hesitancy 10.. unlikely cleverness. Any language is a conspiracy against experience in the sense that it is a collective attempt to------. eager mediocrity. tentative enjoy. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. STICKLER : APPROXIMATION :: (A) leader: guidance (C) band: signal (D) (E) manifest: debts . reluctant condescension .experience by reducing it into discrete parcels. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) sentimentality. innovative regret. (A). desperate 7.and so -—— to be pleased as to make their ready ovations meaningless as an indicator of the quality of the production before them.CENSUS : POPULAI ION :: (A) itinerary: journeys-(B) inventory: merchandise (C) roster: audience (D) slate : incumbents 9. 8. DART ..(A) (B) (C) (D) (E) descry. heterodox 6.. extrapolate (B) transcribe (C) complicate (D) amplify (E) manage Directions: In each of the following questions.. authoritative savor. a related of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs words or phrases.insignificant perpetuate...-MISSILE:: (A) skiff: boat (B) planet: star (C) page: volume (D) finger: thumb (?) car: truck 11. DECIBEL: SOUND :: (A) gallon r water (B) lumen : light weight: mineral (E) scale: music 12. .

retreat: withdraw (C) renege : promise • Directions:.(B) (C) (D) (E) connoisseur: anachronism sluggard: indolence. mycor-rhizal inoculation has increased nitrogen fixation beyond levels achieved by adding phosphate fertilizer alone Certain symbiotic associations also increase the host plant's resistance to harmful root fungi Whether this resistance results from.Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content After reading a passage. or from increased vigor is undetermined . purist: adulteration scientist: theorizing 13. but they have escaped widespread investigation until recently for two reasons First the symbiotic association is so well-balanced that the roots of host plants show no damage even when densely infected Second. STREAM : EDDY :: (A) trend : anomaly (B) Shove : punch (C) assault: defeat (D) force • motion (E) illness : symptom 16. the fungi cannot as yet be cultivated in the absence of a living root Despite these difficulties there has been important new work that suggests that this symbiotic association car be harnessed to achieve more economical use of costly superphosphate fertilizer and to permit better exploitation of cheaper. SYNONYMOUS : MEANING :: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) interchangeable: function equivocal: interpretation . INSIPID : INVENTION :: (A) ironic : gravity (B) realistic : originality (C) generic : artistry (D) foppish : affection (E) prosaic : imagination 15. PIRATE : TAKE :: (A) burgle : steal ' (B) forge : copy (D) liberate :'free (E) . from metabolic change involving antibiotic production. less soluble rock phosphate Mycorrhizal benefits are not limited to improved phosphate uptake in host plants In legumes. choose the best answer to each question Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage Mycorrhizal fungi infect more plants than do any other fungi and are necessary for many plaints to thrive. exclusion of harmful fungi through competition for sites.coincidental: cause ambidextrous : skill bilingual : language l'4.

18 The level of information in the passage above is suited to the needs of all of the following people EXCEPT (A) a researcher whose job is to identify potentially profitable areas for research and product development (B) a state official whose position requires her to alert farmers about possible innovations in farming (C) an official of a research foundation who identifies research projects for potential funding (D) a biologist attempting to keep up with scientific development n an area outside of his immediate area specialization (E) a botanist conducting experiments to determine the relationship between degree of mycorrhizal infection and expected uptake of phosphate .17 Which of the following most accurately describes the passage9 (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) A description of a replicable experiment A summary report of new findings A recommendation for abandoning a difficult area of research A refutation of an earlier hypothesis A confirmation of earlier research 19 It can be inferred from the passage that which of the following has been a factor influencing the extent to which research on mycorrhizal fungi has progressed? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Lack of funding for such research Lack of immediate application of such research Lack of a method for identifying mycorrhizal fungi Difficulties surrounding laboratory production of specimens for study Difficulties ensuing from the high cost and scarcity of superphosphate fertilizers 20 The passage suggests which of the following about the increased resistance to harmful root fungi that some plains infected with mycorrhizal fungi seem to exhibit? (A) There are at least three hypotheses that might account for the increase (B) An explanation lies in the fact that mycorrhizal fungi increase more rapidly in number than harmful root fungi do (C) The plants that show increased resistance also exhibit improved nitrogen fixation. (D) Such increases may be independent of mycorrhizal infection (E) It is unlikely that a satisfactory explanation can be found to account for the increase.

statistical in nature. before the early 1950's. We also know that the number of indictments in. The author suggests that.In the early 1950's. and local magnates who had hitherto usually filled history books. historians who studied pre industrial Europe (which we may define here as Europe in the period from roughly 1300 to 1800) began. much of the early work on the nonelite was aridly. (40) the only use to which court records may be put.. aggregate population estimates are very shaky. In addition. but this information gives us little insight into the mental lives of the nonelite. and we strongly suspect that the relationship has varied widely over time. marriage. whose court records have yielded the (35) most data to historians. (B) Used investigatory methods that were almost exclusively statistical in nature. was that few of the remaining 97 percent recorded their thoughts or had. bishops. One way out of this dilemma was to turn to the records of legal courts. Faced with this' situation. pre industrial Europe bears little relation to the number of actual (50) criminal acts. In Anglo-Saxon countries hardly any of these benefits obtain. for the first time in large numbers. for here the voices of the nonelite can most often be heard. Given these inadequacies. generals. but are not confined (30) to." Historians such as Le Roy Ladurie have used the documents to extract case histories. which makes it difficult for historians to compare rates of crime per thousand in one decade of the (55) pre industrial period with rates in another decade. One difficulty. reducing the vast majority of the population to a set of numbers was hardly more enlightening than ignoring them altogether. most historians who studied pre industrial Europe did which of the following? (A) Failed to make distinctions among members of the pre industrial European political and social elite. many historians based their investigations on the only records that seemed to exist: birth. it is clear why the case history use of court records is to be preferred. 21. attitudes toward crime and the law and have revealed how the authorities administered justice. them chronicled by contemporaries. (10) however. (C) Inaccurately estimated the influence of the preindustrial European political and social elite. plaintiffs. but it has still been possible to glean information from the study of legal documents. The extraction of case histories is not. Historians still did not (20) know what these people thought or felt. however. and (15) death records. . to inves(5) tigate more of the pre industrial European population than the 2 or 3 percent who comprised the political and social elite: the kings. This use of the (45) records does yield some information about the nonelite. It has been societies that have had a developed police system and practiced Roman law. with its written depositions. and defendants. as witnesses. These documents have (25) acted as "a point of entry into the mental world of the poor. Historians who study pre industrial Europe have used the records to establish a series of categories of crime and to quantify indictments that were issued over a given number of years. As a result. which have illuminated the attitudes of different social groups (these attitudes include. nobles. judges.

marriage. The author mentions Le Roy Ladurie (line 26) in order to (A) give an example of a historian who has made one kind of use of court records (B) cite a historian who has based case histories on the birth. and death records of the nonelite (C) identify the author of the quotation cited in the previous sentence (D) gain authoritative support for the view that the case history approach is the most fruitful approach to court records (E) point out the first historian to realize the value of court records in illuminating the beliefs and values of the nonelite .(D) Confined their work to a narrow range of the preindustnal European population (E) Tended to rely heavily on birth. written by contemporaries of the nonelite. marriage. 22. the case historic extracted by historians have (A) scarcely illuminated the attitudes of the political and social elite (B) indicated the manner in which those in power apportioned justice (C) focused almost entirely on the thoughts and feelings of different social groups toward crime and the law (D) been considered the first kind of historical writing that utilized the. and death records of . records of legal courts (E) been based for the most part on the trial testimony of police and other legal authorities 23. It can be inferred from the passage that much of the early work by historians on the European nonelite of the preindustrial period might have been more illuminating if these historians had (A) used different methods of statistical analysis to investigate the nonelite (B) been more successful in identifying the attitudes of civil authorities. especially those who-administered justice. that described what this nonelite thought (D) relied more heavily on the personal records left by members of the European political and social elite who lived during the period in question (E) been more willing to base their research.he nonelite 24. marriage. According to the passage.m the birth. toward the nonelite (C) been able to draw on more accounts. and death records.

including their feelings about authority. remained relatively constant over time. According to the passage. (C) They are not a particularly accurate indication of the extent of actual criminal activity. (E) Their problematic relationship to actual crime has not been acknowledged by most historians. which of the following is true of indictments for crime in Europe in the pre-industrial period? (A) They have. (B) They give the historian important information about the mental lives of those indicted. (D) Their importance to historians of the nonelite has been generally overestimated.25. 26. The passage would be most likely to appear as part of (A)a book review summarizing the achievements of historians of the European aristocracy (B) an essay describing trends in the practice of writing history (C) a textbook on the application of statistical methods in the social sciences (D) a report to the historical profession on the work of early-twentieth-century historians (E) an article urging the adoption of historical methods by the legal profession . in terms of their numbers. during each of the decades Under investigation (E) The possibilities for a member of the city's nonelite to become a member of the political and social elite during the two decades 27. It can be inferred from the passage that a historian who wished to compare crime rates per thousand in A European city in one decade of the fifteenth century with crime rates in another decade of that century would probably be most aided by better information about which of the following? (A) The causes of unrest in the city during the two decades (B) The aggregate mm her of indictments in the city nearest to the city under investigation during the two decades (C) The number of people who lived in the city during each of the decades under investigation (D) The mental attitudes of criminals in the city.

SIDESTEP: (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) confront directly detain temporarily comprehend accurately judge hastily treat fairly (B) hamper (Q hurdle (D) hide * (E) hold 30. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning. SQUALID: (A) florid (C) fervid (D) abundant (B) ex. MUNDANE: (A) sufficient (B) superior (Q exotic (D) agile (E) perfect 32. MANIPULATIVE: (A) impassioned (B) lethargic (D) guileless (E) unaltered .. FACILITATE: (A) hallow 31. DOMINATE: (A) have no ability to (B) have no control over (C) be irreconcilable (D) be angry (E) be undisciplined 29. ELASTICITY: (A) lack of spontaneity (B) lack of tension (D) symmetry (C) lack of resilience (E) permanence (B) underrate 33: APPRISE: (A) oblige (C) apply pressure (D) offer encouragement (E) withhold information 34.Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters. followed by five lettered words or phrases. (E) pristine (C) inept 35. be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters.

Q and U. and two female comedians. FLEDGE: (A) seek (B) call (C) mate (D) emit (E) molt (E) 38. R and V. 4. select the best answer choice given. DIATRIBE: (A) encomium epigram (B) epitome (C) euphemism. Questions 1-7 Two male singers.36 ANTIPATHIES: A) Pronounced talent (B) Settled fondness (C) Concealed passion (D) Cultivated nostalgia (E) Sustained interest 37. are the eight entertainers who are to perform at the Stuart Theater on a certain night. and the second performance ' by a male entertainer. In answering some of the questions. Time—30 minutes 25 Questions Directions: Each question or group of questions is based on a passage or set of conditions. which of the following must perform first? (A) Q (B) R (C) S (D) T (E) V . P and S. two female singers. Each entertainer is to perform alone and only once that night. The final performance must be by a male singer. T and W. it may be useful to draw a rough diagram. For each question. (D) epistle SECTION 5. If U is to perform seventh. two male comedians. The first performance that evening must be by a female entertainer. The entertainers may perform in any order that conforms to the following restrictions: The performances by singers and the performances by comedians must alternate throughout the evening.

W must perform (A) First or fifth(B) Second or fifth (C) Fourth or seventh (D) Fifth or seventh. and W fifth. which of the following must perform sixth? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) P R S T U 3. which of the following must perform second? (A) R (B) S (C) T (D) V (E) W 1. If P as to perform eighth. If R is to perform fourth.5. which of the following must perform sixth? (A) P (B) S (C) U . V fourth. Which of the following could be the first of the entertainers to perform? (A) P (B) R (C) U (D) V (E) W 6. If T is to perform third. If Q is to perform third. Which of the following could be the last of the entertainers to perform? (A) R (B) S (C) 1 (D) V (E) W 2. (E) Sixth or seventh \ 7.

taxes will probably restrict the availability of certain products. Therefore. the increase in demand resulting from greater disposable income will not result in higher prices for the products available. the author makes which of the following arguments? (A) Reducing taxes is likely to result in less disposable income! (B) Reducing taxes is likely to decrease demand. Unlike the pages of a book. However.(D) V (E) W A child watching television a procession of sights and sounds that flash from the screen just long enough for the eyes and ears . Which of the following. children will prefer reading to watching television. the next bird Luis sees will be a raven. Luis has just seen two ravens. which can best serve as that assumption? (A) When allowed to choose a form of entertainment. (D) Reducing. (E) Reducing taxes will not necessarily lead to increased prices - . (B) A child's imagination cannot be properly stimulated unless the child has access both to television and to books. since every child is different. if we cut tax rates.to take them in. Of-the following. and ravens are occasionally seen in California. In the passage above. (Q Luis is in California. therefore. (D) Children should be taught to read as soon as they are able to understand what they see on television. if true. (B) Ravens generally build their nests at a considerable distance from the nests of other ravens. television images appear with a relentless velocity that stunts rather than enhances the child's powers of imagination. When the child is able to control the pace of its entertainment. (C) Reducing taxes can fail to result in greater disposable income. It is true that increasing demand for a limited number of products drives up the price of those products. then people will retain a higher percentage of their income and will be encouraged to work harder and produce more. The view expressed above is based on an assumption. (C) A child's imagination can develop more fully. (D) Luis has seen ravens in other places than the place where he is now 10. 9. (E) A child's reaction to different forms of sensory stimuli cannot be predicted. which can be read as slowly or as quickly as the child wishes. most strengthens the argument above? (A) Ravens tend to move in flocks.

and Z mixed together Yellow: X mixed with Y X mixed with Z 11. pure Y. The chemist knows that the only six liquids that the bottles could possibly contain are pure X. depending on which of certain liquids it is dipped in. blue.Questions 11-13 A chemist has exactly four unlabeled bottles containing colorless liquids standing on a laboratory shelf. The only feasible way of testing for the identity of the liquids is to use strips of a special white reactive paper that turns red. If none of the four liquids turns the reactive paper / yellow. anrf if the liquid in the second bottle tested turns the-paper yellow. and that no two bottles are filled with the same liquid. (A) pure X (B) pure Y (C) pure Z (D) Y mixed with Z (E) X. or any mixture of two of these. or yellow. If the liquid in the first bottle tested turns the reactive paper red. Y. and Z mixed together 12. The full table of color changes and of the triggers for those changes is given below: Red Pure Y Y mixed with Blue: . then a mix of some of the liquid from each of the first two bottles tested will turn the reactive paper (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) red yellow cither red or blue either red or yellow either blue or yellow ' .. pure Z. each of the following must be the contents of one of the bottles EXCEPT . Pure X Pure Z X. Y.

' The colors from among which the designer will choose are as follows. (C) lavender is used for the middle of the three narrow stripes. brown. or dark) from each other. Which of the following. lavender must be used for the wide . brown. (D) The second bottle tested contains pure Z. Light colors: lavender and white Intermediate colors: red and orange Dark colors: brown and . white. Adjacent stripes in the fabric must also be of different levels of darkness (light. red. red. white. white. (B) The first bottle tested contains Y mixed with Z. white must be used for the medium-width stripe. (D) If white is used for any of the narrow stripes. orange (E) Brown. (E) The second bottle tested contains Y mixed with Z. beginning with the wide stripe. If the liquid in the first bottle tested turns the reactive paper red and the liquid in the second bottle tested turns it blue. Immediately after the narrow stripes. (C) The second bottle tested contains pure X. green (C) Red. orange. with the same colors as before.13. the pattern repeats. Questions 14-18 A fabric designer is selecting colors for a striped pattern with a wide stripe. and if a mix of some of the liquid from each of the first two bottles tested turns it red. green. orange (B) White. white. in either order. red. lavender. (B) The two colors must be used. then which of the following must be true? (A) The first bottle tested contains pure Y.green Adjacent stripes in the fabric must be of different colors from each other. Which of the following is true if both lavender and white are . then three narrow stripes. 14. lavender 15. white. except that the medium-width stripe and the narrow stripe adjacent to it can be of the same level as each other. brown (D) Orange. intermediate. is an order of colors that the designer can select? (A) Lavender. orange. then a medium-width stripe.used for the pattern? (A) The two colors must each be used for a narrow stripe. for the medium-width stripe and the narrow stripe adjacent to it. brown.

(D) The wide stripe can be green. brown. orange Lavender. but if it is. green. which of the following is true? (A) The medium-width stripe must be green. (E) If lavender is used for the wide stripe. but if it is. Brown cannot be used for the medium-width stripe. orange. G. orange. 16. lavender. the rest of the time it employs exactly two of them. Questions 19-22 F. and Q. (C) The wide stripe must be green. Green cannot be used for the narrow stripe adjacent to the medium-width stripe. If at least two of the stripes will be red and at least two others will be white. which of the following is true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Lavender cannot be used for the wide stripe. but if it is. . orange. and red and orange are the only other colors used. R. (B) The medium-width stripe can be green. white must be used for the narrow stripe adjacent to the medium-width stripe or for the middle of the three narrow stripes. beginning with the wide stripe. and H are insurance companies. Orange can be used fpr the middle of the three narrow stripes. Which of the following. 18. is an order of colors that the designer can select? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Green. and T are private detectives.stripe and can be used for another one of the remaining stripes as well. Q always works for F and at least one of the other companies. Some of the time G employs only one of these detectives. brown. brown. Each detective works for at least one of the insurance companies. green. the two remaining narrow-stripes must be the same color as each other. white. red Brown. lavender Orange. the two remaining narrow stripes must be of different ' colors from each other. green 17. white. green. S. white Red. Lavender can be used for the narrow stripe after which the pattern repeats. lavender. F and H each employ exactly two of these detectives all the time. white. (E) The wide stripe can be green. the two remaining narrow stripes must be the same color as each other. If green is used for the middle of the three narrow stripes and for one other stripe. lavender.

If R works for H only. T must work for (A) (B) (C) (D) both F and G both F and H either F or G but not both either F or H but not both 21. 22. Nursing homes range from three to five stories in height. it has a fire escape. Q and R cannot work for the same company Q and T cannot work for the same company. T works for either G or H but not both. which of the following must be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) R works for either F or G but not both. . (A) I only (B) II only (C) III only (D) I and II only (E) II and III only 23. Second floor rooms in nursing homes have fire escapes. and if S works for G and H only. III. Whenever only S works for G. Not all nursing home have proper fire escapes. If the above statements are true. If Q and R both work for the same two insurance companies. II. Some nursing homes have no fire escapes. T works for (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) F only „ G only H only both F and G both F and H / 20. Whenever G employs only one detective. S works for only one insurance company. R and T cannot work for the same company.R works for two insurance companies. which of the following must be true? I.19. Fire escapes are allowed but not required for first floor rooms in nursing homes. which of the following must also be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) First-floor rooms in nursing homes do not have fire escapes. T works for G. If a nursing home room is above the first floor.

Suppose we kept on. We say that that person is not bald but has hair. But surely one hair less would make no difference. (C) A word such as "cat" can be applied to several animals that differ in-some respects. (E) People cannot think clearly without using words. At Midwest University. Verbal Ability Section – 4 Ans P+ C 93 E 75 C 63 A 66 E 65 E 51 E 15 B 85 A 80 No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 . But what would be the difference between someone who had one hair and someone who had none? We call them both bald. athletic offices are often' at odds with admissions offices 25. there is no collusion between the athletic office and this admissions office.24." Which of the following statements best counters the argument above? (A) The word "bald" can he translated into other languages. with one hair less each time. It can be inferred from the passage above that A) the admission policy described above is unique to Midwest University B) some universities offer financial assistance to athletes who would not be admitted to the university on the." Suppose an average person twenty-one years of age has N hairs on his or her head. The result would be the same. as can be proved by an example. Nowhere can we make a distinction between "bald" and "having hair. (B) "A word can have more than one meaning. People think that they know the difference between the meanings of "bald" and "having hair. The university thus hopes to avoid the kind of recruiting violations that have been a problem at other universities. Athletes must be accepted for admission to the university on the basis of their academic records before they can be offered financial assistance on the basis of athletic ability. basis of their academic records C) most student athletes in universities are admitted solely on the basis of athletic ability D) admissions offices do not modify academic admission requirements for any students except student athletes ' E) In many universities. (D) Words can lack precision without being meaningless. Our words are meaningless and cannot be distinguished from their opposites. and a person with N — 1 hairs on his or her head would be said to have hair.

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 A B D A E A B B E D A D B C A C C B B A B C C E E D B E A 54 51 52 37 30 27 26 83 35 85 57 61 39 66 59 73 50 50 93' 92 80 74 57 53 35 42 29 23 21 QUANTITATIVE ABILITY Section – 3 No. Answer P+ 1 A 85 2 C 82 3 B 85 4 B 78 5 A 75 6 A 75 7 A 69 8 D 59 9 B 62 10 A 54 11 C 58 .

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 C D B D A A E D B C E C B D C C B C D 49 42 42 26 94 84 81 76 7 82 38 58 45 50 50 26 .

No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 AMALYTICAL ABILITY Section 1 Section 5 Answer P + Number Answer D 78 1 B D 86 2 C A 90 3 D D 70 4 A C 68 5 B B 60 6 D E 66 7 B A 86 8 C C 67 9 A A 81 10 E C 69 11 E E 56 12 E C 82 13 D D 24 14 C D 48 15 E B 32 16 A E 36 17 C B 54 18 A B 38 19 A C 42 20 E E 22 21 E E 18 22 C A 49 23 E D 39 24 B E 26 25 D P+ 93 71 57 69 76 66 59 87 86 77 44 51 42 58 21 41 36 23 30 39 16 32 61 64 68 .

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