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St. Patrick's Day Mini Unit

St. Patrick's Day Mini Unit

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Published by: Rachelle Gunderson Smith on May 04, 2011
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St.

Patty’s Day
Mini-unit
Rachelle Smith whattheteacherwants.blogspot.com

Name_______________________________________

S________________________________ H________________________________ A_______________________________ M______________________________ R______________________________ O_______________________________ C_______________________________ K_______________________________

Shamrock Place Value
{Read each clue and write the correct number on the line. Color the matching shamrock.}

I have 4 tens and 3 ones. What number am I? __________ I have 1 tens and 8 ones. What number am I? __________ I have 0 tens and 9 ones. What number am I? __________ I have 1 tens and 2 ones. What number am I? __________

I have 6 tens and 1 ones. What number am I? __________ I have 7 tens and 0 ones. What number am I? __________ I have 2 tens and 9 ones. What number am I? __________ I have 0 tens and 4 ones. What number am I? __________

29

18

12

4

43

61

9

70

Name_________________________________________

We’re more precious than gold!
{Bulletin Board Idea}
Copy gold pieces on yellow paper (or white paper and have the student color them). Have the students cut out the coins and draw themselves construction paper (laminate for durability). Put the pot on the bulletin board with the gold pieces falling out of the pot. Title your board “We’re more precious than gold”. or snap a photo of them and glue it on. Make a pot out of black

Extension: Talk to your students about gold. Teach them about the “gold Rush”. Here is a great website: http://www.isu.edu/~trinmich/home.html

Supplies: • Clear Jar • Red, blue, and yellow food coloring • water (hot) • recording sheet Experiment for Constant Motion

1. Show the students the jar of water. Ask, “Is the water moving?” 2. Talk about how you could tell if the water was moving. What are some examples of moving water? How does water get from one place to another? Is all water movement noticeable? Does man create some water movement? Stress to the students that most water we receive and use is because man has engineered a way for gravity to move water to desirable locations. Drinking fountains, bathtubs, and sinks all of these allow us to receive water. 3. Prepare for the demonstration by using hot water to improve the liquid movement. Place a few drops of red food coloring into the jar. As you wait, ask students to predict what will happen. The teacher may need to lead the prediction by asking the following questions: will the food coloring stay in one place? Will the food coloring drop straight down to the bottom? Will the food coloring swirl throughout the jar? Once the red food coloring begins to swirl throughout the water, instruct the students to color their worksheet. 4. Add a few drops of blue food coloring next to but not directly on the red food coloring. Ask students to predict what will happen. Use the questioning techniques if necessary. When the blue starts to swirl in, instruct the students to color their worksheet. 5. Add a few drops of yellow food coloring in a different spot in the jar. Go through the process of predicting, observing, and recording. Talk to the students about water movement. The teacher will be able to complete a quick informal assessment of student understanding by listening to responses as the yellow food coloring is added to the jar. 6. Have the students record their finding and write about their conclusion.
Adapted from uen.org {Utah education network}

L can write about the experiment:

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Name_________________________________

St. Patrick’s Day
all things green


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Name____________________________
 
 
 



NAME______________________________


 


Data 1. How many balloons did you have?___________ 2. Which did you have the least of? _____________ 3. Which did you have the most of? _____________ 4. How many stars, hearts, and hats did you have all together? _____ + ______ + ______ = ________ 5. How many marshmallows do you have all together? ___________ I can write that number in expanded form! _____ + _____ = _______

Name ______________________________________________


Shamrock patterns



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 



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New words that I have learned!

____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________
Name:


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


there

all
Where

all

they

was

Said

who

which

who

Color Code:
there – where-

green green

whichall-

blue

theywho-

tan tan

said-

yellow

brown

was-green

Leprechaun traps
Read the book: Lucky O’ Leprechaun by Jana Dillon The day before St. Patrick’s Day we make leprechaun traps and set them up in our classroom. I send home a letter to collect “trash” from parents. I split the students into groups of 3 or 4. They have about 40 minutes (they always ask for more time) to plan and execute their leprechaun trap. Using the “Catching a Leprechaun” sheet (with the boxes found below), they must work together to write the steps first (I have them draw the pictures after they finish their trap). Then, they can use the trash to make a trap on the floor. I supply the tape and glue. It’s hilarious because the next day...their traps are all ruined by that darn leprechaun and he left his footprints (green paint) all over our classroom! I have provided the note that I use to send home to parents to collect supplies. 
 
 


Dear Parents, We will be doing a project for St. Patrick’s Day in our classroom in March. We are looking for your garbage! Here are some ideas of items to send in by March 14th : • Paper towel rolls • boxes (any size) • newspaper • milk jugs (cleaned out) • wrappers (cleaned off) • tin foil • string • rubber bands • paper cups or plates (cleaned off)

Thank you!

Dear Parents, We will be doing a project for St. Patrick’s Day in our classroom in March. We are looking for your garbage! Here are some ideas of items to send in by March 14th: • Paper towel rolls • boxes (any size) • newspaper • milk jugs (cleaned out) • wrappers (cleaned off) • tin foil • string • rubber bands • paper cups or plates (cleaned off)

Thank you!


 



 
 


Catching a Leprechaun

______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________

______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________

_____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Catching a Leprechaun

///////////////////////// ///////////////////////// ///////////////////////// ///////////////////////// ///////////////////////// ///////////////////////// ///////////////////////// ///////////////////////// ///////////////////////// Name:///////////////////

I’m lucky to know you!

////////// Dear /////////, ////////////////////// ////////////////////// ////////////////////// ////////////////////// ////////////////////// ////////////////////// ////////////////////// ////////////////////// Love, ///////////

Facts
FOR KIDS ABOUT ST. PATRICKS DAY!
WWW.HOLIDAYS.KABOOSE.COM

Facts about St. Patrick's Day Holiday • St. Patrick’s Day is observed on March 17 because that is the feast day of St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. It is believed that he died on March 17 in the year 461 AD. It is also a worldwide celebration of Irish culture and history. St. Patrick’s Day is a national holiday in Ireland, and a provincial holiday in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

In Ireland on St. Patrick’s Day, people traditionally wear a small bunch of shamrocks on their jackets or caps. Children wear orange, white and green badges, and women and girls wear green ribbons in their hair. Many cities have a St. Patrick’s Day parade. Dublin, the capital of Ireland, has a huge St. Patrick’s Day festival from March 15-19, that features a parade, family carnivals, treasure hunt, dance, theatre and more. In North American, parades are often held on the Sunday before March 17. Some paint the yellow street lines green for the day! In Chicago, the Chicago River is dyed green with a special dye that only lasts a few hours. There has been a St. Patrick’s Day parade in Boston, Massachusetts since 1737. Montreal is home to Canada’s longest running St. Patrick’s Day parade, which began in 1824.

Facts about Saint Patrick • St. Patrick was born in 385 AD somewhere along the west coast of Britain, possibly in the Welsh town of Banwen. At age 16, he was captured and sold into slavery to a sheep farmer. He escaped when he was 22 and spent the next 12 years in a monastery. In his 30s he returned to Ireland as a Christian missionary. He died at Saul in 461 AD and is buried at Downpatrick.

Facts about the Irish • 34 million Americans have Irish ancestry, according to the 2003 US Census. That’s almost nine times the population of Ireland, which has 4.1 million people. • Some American towns have “Irish” names. You could visit: Mount GayShamrock, West Virginia; Shamrock Lakes, Indiana; Shamrock, Oklahoma; Shamrock, Texas; Dublin, California and Dublin, Ohio.

The harp is the symbol of Ireland. The color green is also commonly associated with Ireland, also known as “the Emerald Isle.” The Irish flag is green, white and orange. The green symbolizes the people of the south, and orange, the people of the north. White represents the peace that brings them together as a nation.

The name “leprechaun” has several origins. It could be from the Irish Gaelic word “ leipreachan ,” which means “a kind of aqueous sprite.” Or, it could be from “ leath bhrogan ,” which means “shoemaker.” Facts about Clovers • According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the highest number of leaves found on a clover is 14!
• •

One estimate suggests that there are about 10 000 regular threeleaf clovers for every lucky four-leaf clover. Legend says that each leaf of the clover means something: the first is for hope, the second for faith, the third for love and the fourth for luck.

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