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Port Freight Logistics Plan

Port Freight Logistics Plan

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SYDNEY PORTS CORPORATION

Port Freight Logistics Plan
A framework to improve road and rail per formance at Por t Botany
J une 2008
2
Contents
Sydney Ports Corporation
1. Introduction 3
2. Existing container freight operations 4
2.1. Portside freight operations
2.2. Landside freight operations
Road
Rail
Intermodal terminals
2.3. Future challenges
Areas for improvement
Consistency with best practice
3. Maximising the use of rail infrastructure in servicing the port 11
3.1. Enhancing rail access and operations at Port Botany
Port Botany container terminals
Botany Yard
Port Botany Freight Line
3.2. Upgrading rail freight corridors in metropolitan Sydney
3.3. Intermodal terminal development to support rail movements
4. Minimising truck movements in servicing the port 16
4.1. Optimising road operations at Port Botany
Encouraging truck movements away from peak periods
Introduction of high efficiency container trucks in Port Botany
Road enhancements in Port Botany
Operating hours of port logistics industries
4.2. Increasing truck efficiency to minimise road movements
Higher Mass Limits (HMLs)
Mechanisms to support better truck scheduling and utilisation
4.3. Expanding road freight corridors in metropolitan Sydney
5. Implementation program 21
5.1. Consultation
5.2. Deliverable milestones
5.3. Reforming Port Botany’s links with inland transport – IPART
5.4. Efficiency indicators
3
The Port Freight Logistics Plan represents a framework
by Sydney Ports Corporation for improvements to
landside logistics to meet the challenges of managing
port activities in light of anticipated demand. The
Plan discusses existing port operations, initiatives to
maximise the use of rail, and initiatives to minimise
the impact of truck movements generated by the port.
The successful implementation of the Plan will require
ongoing facilitation with a number of industry and
government stakeholders. Sydney Ports believes that
the matters and issues discussed in the Plan will assist
in improving port freight logistics to the benefit of the
port, industry and the community.
The Port Freight Logistics Plan also fulfils the
development consent conditions of the Port Botany
Expansion, as shown in Table 7 on page 27. This
project will support the growth in container volumes
by providing an additional five berths and 60 hectares
of container terminal area. The expanded container
terminal area will also have dedicated road and
rail access.
Sydney Ports Corporation
Sydney Ports Corporation is a State-owned corporation with a mandate
for managing port activities at Port Botany and Sydney Harbour, and a key
stakeholder in facilitating the efficient landside movement of containers
and general cargo.
Introduction
4
Sydney’s sea ports are a focal point of a network of
sea, road and rail links connecting the importers and
exporters of NSW with international markets. Growth in
container trade is strongly linked to economic growth.
While there are a number of predictions for container
growth, the annual growth rates for Sydney’s container
trade are predicted by Sydney Ports to be between 4.8
per cent and 5.6 per cent per year for the next 20 years.
Port Botany’s container trade is forecast to increase
from around 1.6 million TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent
units) per year to more than 3 million TEUs per year
by 2025.
Sydney’s sea ports constitute a significant asset, handling
in excess of $50 billion worth of trade per year. Around
45 per cent of the cargo by volume and 80 per cent by
value handled through Sydney’s sea ports is containerised
cargo. Containers carry a broad range of primary products,
manufactured items and consumer goods which are
distributed widely within metropolitan Sydney. More
than 97 per cent of this volume is handled at Port Botany
and over 85 per cent of these are containers packed or
unpacked within the greater metropolitan area of Sydney.
Due to its proximity to the Sydney market, Port Botany is
and will remain the primary port for the import and export
of containerised cargo in NSW.
2.1. Portside freight operations
The portside freight operations consider the
arrangements in place to unload and load containers
from a vessel that arrives at the port. At Port Botany,
there are two container terminals where the initial
storage of containers and the initial transfer of
containers by road or rail are currently undertaken, at
Brotherson Dock North and Brotherson Dock South by
two stevedoring companies: DP World (formerly P&O
Ports) and Patrick (owned by Asciano). The expansion
of Port Botany will create a third container terminal.
2.2. Landside freight operations
An efficient transport system in a capital city such as
Sydney depends on the effective integration of the
various components within the transport chain. The
port’s area of influence and involvement therefore
extends beyond the traditional confines of the maritime
activities and port operations and into the area of
landside logistics and supply chains. Sydney is a heavily
import dominant port. For every two containers that
arrive with cargo, one returns overseas empty. The
export trade is split between regional product and
metropolitan manufactured goods. The inbound supply
chain for containers is almost exclusively restricted to
the Sydney metropolitan area, with containers being
unpacked in warehouses across the city. However,
there are four concentrated areas for industrial
distribution within the metropolitan area: Port Botany,
inner and middle west, south west and far west.
The logistics chain for the transfer of container cargo
through the port is shown in Figure 1. It operates in
two ways:
Road based – where containers are transported directly
by truck to importers warehouses and distribution
centres for unloading. Containers are returned, via
an empty container park, to the port empty or sent
to another warehouse for packing with export goods
and transported to the port for shipment off-shore.
Road and rail based – where containers are
transported by rail to intermodal terminals close to
the market being served and unloaded for transport
by truck to warehousing and distribution areas within
that market area. This process reduces the truck
distance involved and will improve the reliability in
delivery times. Empty containers can make the return
journey via the intermodal terminals, or be sent to
exporter’s warehouses for packing with export goods
and returned to the port via the intermodal terminal.


Sydney Ports Corporation
About 98 per cent of Australia’s international trade is undertaken by
sea and provision of adequate port facilities and associated landside
logistics is vital for the continued growth of the NSW economy.
2. Existing container freight operations
5
Sydney Ports Corporation
Figure 1: Logistics chain for road and rail based transfer of containers
2. Existing container freight operations
Transport chain using direct road movement
Transport chain using intermodal terminal
ROAD MOVEMENT
ROAD MOVEMENT WAREHOUSE
PORT & STEVEDORING OPERATIONS
INTERMODAL TERMINAL
PORT & STEVEDORING OPERATIONS
WAREHOUSE
RAIL MOVEMENT
IMPORTER/EXPORTER
IMPORTER/EXPORTER
ROAD MOVEMENT
6
Sydney Ports Corporation
Road
Sydney is supported by a motorway system that
forms an orbital network within the metropolitan areas
(Figure 2). This network provides direct linkages to
industrial areas, warehousing and port related areas
at Port Botany, inner and middle west, south west
and west of Sydney. The orbital network includes the
following roads:
M1 Motorway from Sydney Airport to Sydney CBD.
M2 Motorway and Lane Cove Tunnel from Seven
Hills to Gore Hill Freeway.
M4 Motorway from Penrith to Strathfield.
M5 Motorway from Campbelltown to Sydney
Airport.
M7 Motorway from Liverpool to Pennant Hills
(crossing the M4 Motorway).
Cross City Tunnel linking the City West Link to the
M1 Motorway.
There is direct road access at Port Botany to the
Sydney orbital network via Foreshore Road (the main
port access road). Over three-quarters of containers
are transported to and from the port by road by over
200 road transport carriers.






Rail
A dedicated rail freight line exists between Port Botany
and Enfield/Chullora, a distance of approximately 20
kilometres. There is also a freight rail link to the port
at White Bay which joins the main Port Botany Freight
Line at Wardell Junction in Marrickville (Figure 2).
A freight line extension to the south west exists from
Chullora to Sefton Junction (about 2.5 kilometres).
From Sefton Junction to Macarthur, freight trains
traverse and share the passenger network on the
Main South Line. The Australian Rail Track Corporation
received planning approval in December 2006 to
provide a freight line along the existing rail corridor
between Sefton Junction and Macarthur. This project
is expected to be completed by 2009.
A further freight line extension to the north runs from
Chullora to Flemington Junction, Strathfield and North
Strathfield (about five kilometres), where freight trains
then use the passenger network on the Main North
Line to Hornsby via Epping.
Freight trains travelling from Enfield/Chullora to the
west share the passenger rail network on the Main
West Line from Lidcombe to Penrith.
Along the metropolitan rail corridors where freight
trains share the network with passenger trains,
priority is given to passenger services. This represents
a significant constraint to rail freight efficiency,
particularly during the peak commuter hours and when
curfews prevent any activities by freight trains on the
metropolitan rail network.
2. Existing container freight operations
Sydney Ports Corporation
7
Sydney Ports Corporation
2. Existing container freight operations
Motorways
Main roads
Dedicated freight rail lines
Shared passenger/freight rail lines
Dedicated passenger rail lines
Southern Sydney Freight Line (planned)
Intermodal Terminals
Industrial zones
Port facilities
Enfield Intermodal Logistics Centre (planned)
Moorebank Intermodal Terminal (proposed)
Port Botany development area
February 2008
Figure 2: Metropolitan road and rail links
8
Sydney Ports Corporation
The Botany to Enfield freight line is linked to
operational sidings in Port Botany on the Patrick
container terminal, DP World container terminal and
the P&O Trans Australia container park. The port is
serviced by a number of rail operators:
Macarthur Intermodal Shipping Terminal at Minto
is using Independent Rail as its train provider for its
Port Botany shuttle.
Mannway Intermodal Terminal at Villawood have
appointed Southern&Silverton as their rail operator
for Port Botany shuttles.
Maritime Container Services at Cooks River uses
Independent Rail as its rail operator for Port Botany
shuttles.
Camellia Intermodal Terminal is using Patrick
PortLink as its train provider for its rail shuttles.
Yennora Intermodal Terminal is using Patrick
PortLink and InterLink (QR National) as its train
provider for its rail shuttles.
Australian Railway Group (QR National) is operating
the Manildra Group’s Manildra and Nowra rail
services.






Patrick PortLink, Southern&Silverton and
Independent Rail are servicing clients in the Central
West, including Bathurst, Blayney, Dubbo, Warren
and Forbes.
Patrick PortLink, Southern&Silverton and
Independent Rail are servicing clients in the North
West, including Narrabri, Wee Waa and Moree.
Sydney Ports and the NSW Government have
identified the need to increase the proportion of
containers transported by rail to and from Port Botany
from the current mode share of 20 per cent to a rail
mode share to 40 per cent.
Intermodal terminals
A number of intermodal terminals are located within
the Sydney metropolitan area. These are primarily
located in close proximity to areas of concentrated
industrial distribution. These intermodal terminals
service the port or function as a transfer point
for interstate cargoes. Further information on the
intermodal terminals in Sydney is provided in
Table 1.


Table 1: Intermodal terminals in Sydney
Location Users Siding length Estimated capacity
Camellia Patrick PortLink 300 metres 80,000 TEU
Chullora Pacific National
(interstate operations only)
680 metres 300,000 TEU
Cooks River Maritime Container Services 500 metres 150,000 TEU
Villawood Mannway 350 metres 20,000 TEU
Minto Macarthur Intermodal Shipping Terminal 390 metres 45,000 TEU
Yennora Patrick PortLink/QR National 500 metres 50,000 TEU
Note: Terminal capacity is limited in some cases by the availability of freight train paths.
2. Existing container freight operations
9
Sydney Ports Corporation
2.3. Future challenges
The existing road and rail freight networks have
generally been able to efficiently handle the freight
task. However, there are a number of indicators that
suggest supporting the future freight task will pose
significant challenges:
The volume of road general freight in Australia is
forecast to double over the next 20 years.
Container volumes at Port Botany are anticipated
to increase from 1.62 million in 2006/07 to over
3 million within 20 years.
Continued growth in population and economic
activity also means that increases in freight
movements are inevitable.
The Metropolitan Strategy, released by the NSW
Government in December 2005, provides a strategic
response to these trends and the identification of
a possible future freight network for metropolitan
Sydney. The task of Sydney Ports, other government
agencies, professionals and industry involved in
logistics planning is to use this direction to develop
a series of outcomes that can be achieved in the
short, medium and long term. This will require
close collaboration between all stakeholders. The
Port Botany Logistics Taskforce established by the
NSW Government is a forum where collaboration
on a number of logistics issues is being undertaken
between government and industry.



Areas for improvement
A key objective of the Port Freight Logistics Plan is
to identify areas for improvement in the efficiency
of container movements and rail interfacing through
operational, technological or administrative changes.
Further details on possible improvements in the
efficiency of container movements and rail interfacing
are outlined in Sections 3 and 4. An implementation
program in achieving these improvements with the
involvement of government and industry is outlined in
Section 5.
One area where improvements can be made for
landside logistics relate to operational changes.
These consider commercial and non-commercial
arrangements that can enhance the practices by each
stakeholder or across a number of stakeholders within
the supply chain. The changes can have an impact
on efficient container movement and rail interfacing
by encouraging practices that support better truck
utilisation or increase the viability of train services
by using mechanisms that influence the price and
allocation of transport movements for freight.
Technological changes are another area where
landside logistics improvements are possible.
Technological changes consider the use of electronic
methods to streamline or improve operations by each
stakeholder or across a number of stakeholders within
the supply chain. These changes can have an impact
on efficient container movement and rail interfacing
by allowing for the introduction of tools that allow for
real savings in labour and resource utilisation, thereby
allowing for greater efficiencies in the movement of
freight into and out of the port.
Administrative changes can also provide improvements
to the management of logistics at the port. These
changes consider the role of institutions, frameworks,
practices and procedures that support the needs of
each stakeholder or across a number of players within
the supply chain. The changes can have an impact
on efficient container movement and rail interfacing
by allowing for richer information flows, improved
co-ordination and better co-operation within one
element of the supply chain or amongst a number of
stakeholders across the supply chain.
2. Existing container freight operations
10
Sydney Ports Corporation
Consistency with best practice
Sydney Ports closely monitors the performance
of Australian and international ports in relation to
landside logistics operation and management. This is
an important element in benchmarking our strategic
and operational outcomes achieved over a defined
period. The key areas of interest for Sydney Ports are
investigating methods in improving road transport
movements and management, and understanding
identifying ways in increasing the mode share towards
rail that can support the efficient movement of port
related containers within metropolitan Sydney and
regional New South Wales.
It is important that the Port Freight Logistics Plan
is informed by leading examples by other container
ports to ensure that best practice in relation to
freight logistics is being achieved. Table 2 outlines
a range of ports in Australia, Asia, North America
and Europe that have been examined in relation to
landside logistics management – Port of Melbourne,
Port of Yokohama, Port of Los Angeles and Port of
Rotterdam. A number of initiatives in relation to road
and rail in the ports at these locations are consistent
with the outcomes being sought by Sydney Ports
and the NSW Government. These include additional
rail infrastructure to provide new access or enhance
existing operations, trucks that can handle a greater
number of containers per vehicle, and mechanisms to
encourage truck movements away from peak periods.
Table 2: Landside logistics improvements in Australian and international ports
Port location
Landside logistics improvements
Rail Road
Port of Melbourne
Australia
Target to increase rail mode share
to 30 per cent
Dynon Port Rail Link to provide rail
access to container terminals


‘Higher Efficiency Container Trucks’ with
additional container capacity per vehicle
and measurable operational efficiencies to
be introduced within an extended area at
the port

Port of Yokohama
Japan
Provision for direct rail access to
selected container terminal

Port of Los Angeles
United States of America
Completion of Alameda Corridor with
high speed rail access between port
and industrial areas
• ‘PierPass’ charging regime to discourage
truck movements at port during peak
periods

Port of Rotterdam
Netherlands
Expanding rail capacity and removing
operational limitations
• Encouraging staggered transport
throughout the day
Introduction of larger trucks
(up to 3 TEU capacity)


2. Existing container freight operations
11
Sydney Ports Corporation
The volumes transported by rail to and from Port
Botany have increased from 123,000 in 1997/98
to 300,000 in 2006/07, and currently represents
20 per cent of all containers transported to and
from the port (Figure 3). These volumes include
export products from regional NSW, and port
shuttle movements of exports and imports within
metropolitan Sydney.
The NSW Government and Sydney Ports has a
shared objective of achieving a 40 per cent rail mode
share for containers that are transported into and
out of Port Botany. Sydney Ports has developed a
rail simulation model as a tool to test the suitability
of various scenarios in meeting the rail mode share
target. A number of initiatives have been identified to
increase the role of rail in meeting the freight task for
metropolitan Sydney. In supporting these initiatives,
the key is to encourage market forces to drive the
modal shift towards rail in a sustainable manner.
This requires clear policy and investment in certain
network infrastructure to provide the platform for rail
to compete efficiently.
Figure 3: Port Botany rail volumes (1997/98 to 2007/08)
300
350
250
200
150
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1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2005/06 2007/08
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A key element in logistics planning for metropolitan Sydney is
maximising the use of rail. The ability of this mode to transport large
volumes offers industry a transport mode that has a higher level of
efficiency, competitive usage costs, reduced environmental impacts
and less road congestion.
Sydney Ports Corporation
3. Maximising the use of rail
infrastructure in servicing the port
12
Sydney Ports Corporation
3.1. Enhancing rail access and
operations at Port Botany
A key component in maximising the use of rail
infrastructure is to ensure that Port Botany can cater
for projected demand. A number of initiatives have
been identified that can enhance rail access and
operations, as well as assist in encouraging a higher
mode share for rail of containers entering and leaving
Port Botany.
Port Botany container terminals
This area covers the movement of train services
between Botany Yard to the DP World and Patrick
container terminals. A number of initiatives have been
identified that will improve the efficiency and reliability
of these movements:
Continuing productivity improvements in loading
and unloading containers at stevedore container
terminals. Areas of future focus include stevedore
sidings to accommodate 600 metre train lengths,
introduction of improved rail handling equipment and
technology by stevedores to handle larger container
volumes and implementation of separate shuttle
services to each stevedore’s sidings.
Provision of crossover to access the DP World
terminal to increase capacity for DP World rail
operations as this is currently impeded by single
line access. This will reduce the number and
duration of delays for DP World when a train is
waiting on the rail corridor for entry or exit into
Patrick container terminal.
Closure of the Interterminal Access Road rail
level crossing and construction of a grade
separated junction.
Providing rail infrastructure to support the use of
rail by the operator of the third container terminal at
Port Botany. Sydney Ports will provide an additional
track from Botany Yard to the new terminal that
offers a flexible and efficient arrangement for
prospective users.




Botany yard
Botany Yard is located just outside the port precinct.
The role of Botany Yard is to receive freight trains prior
to exchanging containers at the stevedore sidings
(imports and exports), depart trains along the Port
Botany Freight Line to Cooks River, Enfield and the
metropolitan rail network, and control the access of
trains into and out of the yard, Patrick PortLink yard
and the container terminal sidings. The anticipated
increase in the number of containers transported by
rail will place limitations on effective performance of
the yard, including the availability of track to allow for
the staging and through movement of train services,
suitable lengths of sidings to support standardised
train services, and operational arrangements that allow
for timely and efficient movement of train services
into and out of the yard. A number of initiatives are
proposed over the next five years to support a greater
number of train movements:
Fostering closer management of rail operations
between the Botany Yard and rail sidings at
the container terminals. This includes ongoing
involvement in planning and managing train paths
and stevedore ‘window’ allocations by Sydney Ports,
RailCorp, Australian Rail Track Corporation (ARTC),
DP World and Patrick.
Agreeing to a standardised train length consist
(600 metres) that reduces shunting and checking
trains.
Providing dedicated trains between each Port
Botany container terminal and metropolitan
intermodal terminals, subject to economically
feasible volumes.
Provision of additional track and infrastructure
in Botany Yard, including lengthening of sidings,
additional through tracks and signalling upgrade.
These works will cater for an increase in the
number of train movements to the port and
support standardised train lengths of 600 metres.




3. Maximising the use of rail infrastructure in servicing the port
Sydney Ports Corporation
13
Sydney Ports Corporation
Port Botany Freight Line
The Port Botany Freight Line covers the length of
dedicated freight railway between Port Botany and
Enfield/Chullora in central-west Sydney. A number of
initiatives are proposed to ensure that rail operations
can cater for future movements into and out of the
port, as well as supporting more reliable and efficient
operations at pinch points:
Closure of Banksia Road pedestrian crossing on
the Port Botany Freight Line and construction of a
pedestrian overbridge to enhance operational safety.
Closure of General Holmes Drive level crossing
and (if required) investigation and construction of
alternate road access to minimise conflicts between
trains and vehicles, as well as eliminating a speed
restriction to the efficient operation of the Port
Botany Freight Line.
Refining access into and out of the Cooks River
intermodal facility through improved coordination
and infrastructure to minimise conflicts on through
movements along the Port Botany Freight Line.
Permitting use of tracks within the Enfield
Marshalling Yards as a common-user facility for rail
freight operators to stage trains which will improve
the efficient management of train services to and
from Port Botany, particularly through the passenger
curfews for regional trains and those metropolitan
intermodal terminals not on the dedicated
freight network.
Commitment to complete the duplication of the Port
Botany Freight Line between Mascot and Cooks
River or equivalent works to provide the necessary
track capacity to meet projected demand. Rail
modelling undertaken by Sydney Ports indicates that
this work would be required within the next five to
eight years.





3.2. Upgrading rail freight corridors in
metropolitan Sydney
The anticipated growth in the volume of containerised
freight moved by rail will place more pressure on
existing rail arrangements. Along the metropolitan
rail corridors where freight trains share the network
with passenger trains, priority is given to passenger
services. This represents a significant constraint to
rail freight efficiency, particularly during the peak
commuter hours and when curfews prevent any
activities by freight trains on the metropolitan rail
network. As a consequence of these constraints,
reliability decreases from 80 per cent to 30 per cent
between Newcastle and Sydney and from 60 per cent
to 40 per cent between Macarthur and Sydney.
The planning and development of rail freight corridors,
including infrastructure design and land preservation,
is needed to improve access within the Sydney
metropolitan area and linkages north to Brisbane and
south to Melbourne. Action in this area will encourage
greater interest in using rail by customers and
operators by improving the reliability of freight train
movements. A number of projects under consideration
by government will enhance rail freight movements in,
out and within the Sydney metropolitan area:
Southern Sydney Freight Line – a bi-directional
freight priority line between Macarthur and Sefton
to allow additional train movements between
Port Botany and freight distribution activities in
south-west Sydney. This project is planned to be
completed in 2009 to ensure that sufficient train
paths are available to meet projected growth in
rail mode share.
Northern Line Upgrade – a rail grade separation in
the vicinity of North Strathfield to allow Up trains
to access the metropolitan freight network without
the need to cross Down tracks, completion of full
quadruplication between North Strathfield and
West Ryde and dedicated freight access between
metropolitan Sydney and Newcastle. This project
will allow for additional train movements between
Port Botany and freight distribution activities in north
and west Sydney.


3. Maximising the use of rail infrastructure in servicing the port
Sydney Ports Corporation
14
Sydney Ports Corporation
3.3. Intermodal terminal development to
support rail movements
The need to expand the intermodal network within
Sydney is a prerequisite for the greater use of rail.
An intermodal terminal is a facility that allows for
the loading and unloading of containers and general
cargo between road and rail based transport.
These facilities are used for container movements
to/from the port and between different states. The
Sydney metropolitan area comprises of a number of
intermodal terminals that serve port and interstate
movements. Analysis of container movements by the
Sea Freight Council of NSW in their February 2004
report New South Wales Import Export Container
Mapping Study indicates that areas in the central-
west, south-west and west of metropolitan Sydney
account for 70 per cent of full import and 34 per cent
of full export container movements. The growth in
container volumes and improvements to transport
capacity can support the development of additional
intermodal terminals.
The Metropolitan Strategy outlines a proposed network
of additional intermodal terminals in the central-west,
south-west and west of metropolitan Sydney to meet
predicted demand (Figure 4). These facilities are
proposed at Enfield, Moorebank and Eastern Creek
respectively. The NSW Government endorsed plans
for this metropolitan Sydney intermodal network in
May 2007. There are also other proposed intermodal
facilities being undertaken by the private sector,
including an expansion of the Macarthur Intermodal
Shipping Terminal at Minto and a joint venture
arrangement between Kaplan Investment Funds,
QR National and Stocklands for a new intermodal
facility at Moorebank.
The proposed intermodal terminals would have a
number of common elements to meet the required
freight logistics task. There would be direct rail links
(dedicated or shared) to Port Botany. Road transport
will provide and deliver containers and goods to
destinations within the catchment area. The inclusion
of warehousing and freight support services within the
site also provides an opportunity to reduce the number
of large truck movements within local communities.
Sydney Ports has developed a proposal for an
Intermodal Logistics Centre at Enfield that provides
an intermodal facility to cater for demand generated in
central-west Sydney. It is envisaged that this would be
one of the initial intermodal terminals implemented as
part of the proposed metropolitan intermodal network
for Sydney. Planning approval for the facility was given
by the NSW Government in September 2007. It is
envisaged that the facility will be operational by 2011.
3. Maximising the use of rail infrastructure in servicing the port
15
Sydney Ports Corporation
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Figure 4: Proposed intermodal network for metropolitan Sydney
3. Maximising the use of rail infrastructure in servicing the port
Existing intermodal terminals
Possible intermodal terminals
Proposed dedicated freight rail lines
Existing dedicated freight rail lines
Shared passenger freight rail lines
Motorway network
Ports
Employment lands
Planned employment lands
Potential employment lands for investigation
Existing urban area
Note: Chullora Intermodal Terminal is dedicated to interstate and regional freight.
December 2005 Source: NSW Department of Planning
16
Sydney Ports Corporation
Logistics planning also requires an acknowledgement that road
transport will continue to support the majority of freight movements
within metropolitan Sydney. Recent extensions to the motorway
network have improved accessibility between Port Botany and key
distribution and industrial areas across Sydney.
Sydney Ports Corporation
Figure 5: Port Botany truck arrivals by hour of day
4. Minimising truck movements in
servicing the port
Nevertheless, this infrastructure is shared with
commuter vehicles and can have heavy traffic volumes
during peak periods. An increase in the volume of
freight will translate into an increase in the number of
trucks using the road system. While the future number
of port trucks on the road will continue to represent
a low proportion when compared to total traffic
(between 1 per cent and 2 per cent), it is important
that this growth be accommodated in future road
network planning.
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2004 2007 1999
17
Sydney Ports Corporation
4.1. Optimising road operations at
Port Botany
A number of initiatives have been identified that can
optimise road operations at the port, thereby making
the most productive use of road infrastructure and
operational resources.
Encouraging truck movements away from
peak periods
Analysis by Sydney Ports indicates that a trend
towards truck movements away from peak periods
is emerging (Figure 5). There is also a proportionate
increase in truck movements on weekends
(Figure 6). This trend has been accompanied by
reductions in truck turnaround times during a period
of strong container growth. The anticipated increase
in truck volumes over the next few years will require
a further shift towards operations on a 24 hour,
seven day a week basis.
Introduction of high efficiency container
trucks in Port Botany
Sydney Ports is seeking approval from the Roads
and Traffic Authority (RTA) for the use of high
efficiency container trucks (HECT) in a defined area
within the Port Botany precinct. These vehicles offer
additional container capacity per vehicle and provide
measurable operational efficiencies for the movement
of containers within the port precinct. No operational
impediments have been identified that could hinder
the effective operation of high efficiency container
trucks. The introduction of high efficiency container
trucks will facilitate improved container terminal
operation and provide more reliable delivery times,
thereby offering greater operating efficiencies for
importers and exporters in receiving and delivering
their cargo. The Port of Melbourne and the Port of
Brisbane already use high efficiency container trucks
within their port precincts.
Figure 6: Port Botany truck arrivals by day of week
4. Minimising truck movements in servicing the port
Monday
25
15
10
5
P
e
r

c
e
n
t
0
Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Day of week
Saturday Sunday
20
2004 2007 1999
18
Sydney Ports Corporation
Road enhancements in Port Botany
A number of incremental operational and minor
infrastructure road enhancements have been
identified that can provide for better traffic flows and
management to cater for current and future volumes:
A new road access point at Foreshore Road to
support the new container terminal expansion.
This new road will enable traffic generated by the
new terminal to avoid the Penrhyn Road/Botany
Road/Foreshore Road intersection, thereby avoiding
potential capacity problems at this intersection.
The new road will also facilitate a reduction in the
number of port trucks using Botany Road north of
Foreshore Road. This road is the main access route
for port traffic into and out of the port.
The progressive updating of traffic management
plans for individual sites at Port Botany port to
mitigate and manage truck queuing and access
arrangements.
Sydney Ports will work with other government
agencies to analyse short and long term
improvements to intersection performance, truck
staging areas and contingency management for
Port Botany roads. These proposals would assist in
managing truck movements that balances the need
for operational efficiency and community amenity.
Construction of the proposed extension of Hale
Street by a private developer at Botany to Foreshore
Road. This will allow for direct truck access to Port
Botany. The new road will also facilitate a reduction
in the number of port trucks using Botany Road
north of Foreshore Road. This road is the main
access route for port traffic into and out of the port.




Operating hours of port
logistics industries
The stevedoring terminals at Port Botany operate
on a 24 hours per day, seven days per week basis
(24/7). The other parties in the transport chain for
containerised cargo operate varied hours, with many
businesses continuing to operate on a business
hours/Monday to Friday basis. The latter situation
means that resources, including transport
infrastructure and equipment, are under utilised.
This issue was examined by the Sea Freight Council
of NSW in the report released in January 2005 titled
Freight Supply Chain – Coordination of Working
Arrangements.
Industry has identified that an extension of the
operating hours by an increased number of
organisations would provide efficiencies in the
transport chain as well as improved use of freight
transport infrastructure, such as the road network, in
non-peak periods. Government and industry should
continue to work together to implement strategies to
spread the working hours of those organisations in the
freight transport chain. The introduction of incentives
and/or penalties may be considered to encourage a
change in operating practices.
4. Minimising truck movements in servicing the port
19
Sydney Ports Corporation Sydney Ports Corporation
4.2. Increasing truck efficiency to
minimise road movements
Government and industry are working together to
identify and implement a range of measures that
improve truck efficiency and reduce “unnecessary”
road movements.
Higher Mass Limits (HMLs)
The NSW Government introduced the Higher Mass
Limit (HML) network from July 2006. HML allows
eligible road carriers to operate at increased mass limits
compared to statutory limits (Table 3). Road carriers
have to be accredited under the mass management
module of the National Heavy Vehicle Accreditation
Scheme (NHVAS). Continual maintenance of a
vehicle’s suspension is a requirement for NHVAS
accreditation. This initiative offers greater truck
efficiency while ensuring that the integrity of road
network infrastructure is maintained.
The NSW Government has also approved a number
of roads within metropolitan Sydney where HML
vehicles can operate and also cover other roads within
a 10 kilometre radius where the destination is in a
defined industrial zone. These include:
Princes Highway (from intersection with
King Georges Road) – F6 Freeway.
F3 Freeway.
M4 Motorway (west of the M7 interchange) –
Great Western Highway (west of the M4 Motorway).
M5 Motorway – General Holmes Drive –
Foreshore Road (to Port Botany).
M7 Motorway (M7 Motorway to Pennant Hills
Road) – M2 Motorway – Pennant Hills Road
(M2 Motorway to F3 Freeway).
King Georges Road – Roberts Road.






4. Minimising truck movements in servicing the port
Vehicle
configuration
Standard (Gross)
Mass Limit
Higher Mass Limit
(HML)
Payload increase
(higher compared
to standard)
19 metre (6 axle)
semi-trailer
42.5 tonnes 45.5 tonnes 10 per cent
25 metre (9 axle)
B-double
62.5 tonnes 68 tonnes 13 per cent
Table 3: Higher Mass Limits of approved NSW roads
20
Sydney Ports Corporation
Mechanisms to support better truck
scheduling and utilisation
A number of operational and technological
improvements have been implemented by industry,
such as vehicle booking system and automation of
truck scheduling processes, which has delivered
real benefits in managing truck scheduling and
utilisation. This improvement can be seen in average
truck turnaround times per truck at the Port Botany
container terminals, which have decreased from an
hour in 2000 to 50 minutes in 2007.
Government and industry will continue to examine
and progressively introduce a range of mechanisms to
allow for even more efficient use of container trucks,
including:
Delivering an export container or an empty container
to the port precinct and collecting an import
container in the same journey (backloading).
Investing in equipment that can assist trucking
operations such as global positioning systems,
transponders and web camera technology.
Enhancing computer systems, such as vehicle
booking systems.
Supporting greater use of electronic bulletin boards
and SMS technology to disseminate up-to-date
information on port activities and operational delays.
Facilitating greater use of electronic commerce to
eliminate paper documentation.
Examining greater use of technology to assist with
container examination by the border protection
agencies.
Continuing conformance to the introduction of the
Road Transport (General) Act 2005, which defines
mass, dimension and load restraint requirements
for vehicles.







4.3. Expanding road freight corridors in
metropolitan Sydney
The Metropolitan Strategy includes a careful
examination of transport needs. The objectives in the
Strategy include improving the efficiency of all types
of freight movements in Sydney and connecting the
metropolitan regions with the economic gateways,
namely Port Botany and Sydney Airport. Sydney Ports
supports the examination of proposals to improve the
road connections between Port Botany and Western
Sydney, including an eastern extension of the
M4 Motorway and an increase to the capacity
of the M5 Motorway. These will be important
initiatives to ensure that landside logistics meets
long-term demand.
4. Minimising truck movements in servicing the port
21
The Port Freight Logistics Plan provides a framework to meet the
challenges of managing port activities in light of anticipated demand.
Figure 7: Sydney Ports stakeholder relationships
Transport Chain
Sydney Ports Users Consultative Group
Sydney Ports Cargo Facilitation Committee
Industry Groups
NSW Sea Freight Council
Australian Logistics Council
Shipping Australia
Transport Industry Associations
Government Agencies
– Ministry of Transport
– RailCorp
– Roads and Traffic Authority
– Local Councils
– Australian Rail Track Corporation
Rail Groups
Botany Rail Steering Group
Botany Rail Operations Group
Botany Corridor/Botany Rail Yard/
Container Terminals Interface
Group (joint working group)
Sydney Ports Corporation
Sydney Ports Corporation
The Plan discusses existing port operations, initiatives
to maximise the use of rail, and initiatives to minimise
the impact of truck movements generated by the port.
Sydney Ports believes that the matters and issues
discussed in the Plan will assist in improving port
freight logistics to the benefit of the port, industry
and the community.
5.1. Consultation
The successful implementation of the Port Freight
Logistics Plan requires close collaboration between
Sydney Ports and all stakeholders in the logistics
chain, including stevedores, rail operators, the road
haulage industry, importers, exporters, the forwarding
community and related government agencies. Sydney
Ports already works with a number of industry and
government stakeholders to resolve strategic and
operational matters and issues related to port freight
logistics (Figure 7). These relationships will be pivotal
in progressing with the successful implementation of
the Port Freight Logistics Plan.
5.2. Deliverable milestones
A number of initiatives have been identified in Sections
3 and 4 that have been included in an implementation
program to ensure best practice efficient and
advanced port freight logistics. The initiatives
included within the implementation program offer
discrete and incremental operational, technological
and administrative improvements to maximise the
use of rail infrastructure and improve the scheduling
and utilisation of container truck movements.
These initiatives also need to consider and address
environmental impacts as appropriate. The deliverable
milestones of the program are categories as short
term (2008–2009), medium term (2010–2012), long
term (2013–2016) and ongoing. The milestones related
to the implementation program to maximise the use of
rail are provided in Table 4. The milestones related to
measures to improve the scheduling and utilisation of
container truck movements are provided in Table 5.
5. Implementation program
22
Sydney Ports Corporation
5.3 Reforming Port Botany’s links with
inland transport – Independent
Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal
The NSW Government commissioned a review by
the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal
(IPART) into the Interface between the Land Transport
Industries and the Stevedores at Port Botany.
On 18 March 2008, the Independent Tribunal released
its final report titled Reforming Port Botany’s Links
with Inland Transport. The Independent Tribunal
has made 18 recommendations to improve port
performance.
A number of recommendations relate to the vehicle
booking system, Port Botany Rail Logistics team and
road transport industry matters.
At the time of publishing the NSW Government was
reviewing the recommendations and preparing a
response. Sydney Ports will have a key role to play in
the implementation of the agreed recommendations.
5. Implementation program
* Definition of timing: short term (2008–2009); medium term (2010–2012); long term (2013–2016).
Table 4: Implementation program to maximise the use of rail infrastructure
Enhancing rail access and operations at Port Botany
Program initiative Stakeholder(s) Timing*
Fostering closer management of rail operations
between the Botany Yard and rail sidings on
stevedores container terminals
Sydney Ports, RailCorp, Australian Rail
Track Corporation, DP World, Patrick
Short term
Provision of infrastructure improvements to Botany
Yard to support future growth and
improve access to the container terminals
Sydney Ports, Ministry of Transport,
RailCorp, Australian Rail Track
Corporation, DP World, Patrick
Short term –
Medium term
Refining coordination and signalling infrastructure
to support efficient access into and out of the
Cooks River intermodal facility
Sydney Ports, Ministry of Transport,
RailCorp, Australian Rail Track
Corporation
Short term –
Medium term
Permitting use of tracks within the Enfield
Marshalling Yards as a common-user facility
for rail freight operators to stage trains
Ministry of Transport, RailCorp,
Australian Rail Track Corporation
Short term –
Medium term
Closure of Banksia Road pedestrian crossing
on the Botany Goods Line and construction
of a pedestrian overbridge
Sydney Ports, Ministry of Transport Medium term
Continuing productivity improvements in
container handling at container terminals
DP World, Patrick Medium term
Agreeing to a standardised train length
consist (600 metres) that reduces shunting
and checking trains
Sydney Ports, RailCorp, Australian
Rail Track Corporation, DP World and
Patrick
Medium term
Provision of additional track and infrastructure in
Botany Yard to cater for increase in train
movements and 600 metre train lengths
RailCorp, Australian Rail Track
Corporation
Medium term
Closure of the Interterminal Access Road
rail level crossing and construction of a grade
separated junction
Sydney Ports, RTA, Railcorp, Australian
Rail Track Corporation
Medium term
23
Sydney Ports Corporation
Upgrading rail freight corridors in metropolitan Sydney
Program initiative Stakeholder(s) Timing*
Closure of General Holmes Drive level crossing and
construction of alternate road access
Ministry of Transport, Roads and
Traffic Authority, RailCorp, Australian
Rail Track Corporation
Medium term
Providing rail infrastructure to support the use
of rail by the operator of the third container terminal
at Port Botany
Sydney Ports Medium term
Complete the duplication of the Botany Goods Line
between Mascot and Cooks River or equivalent
works to provide track capacity
Ministry of Transport, RailCorp,
Australian Rail Track Corporation
Long term
Construction of Southern Sydney Freight Line
between Macarthur and Sefton Junction
Australian Rail Track Corporation Short term –
Medium term
Complete rail grade separation on Main North
Line (at North Strathfield) to segregate freight and
passenger train movements
Ministry of Transport, RailCorp,
Australian Rail Track Corporation
Medium term –
Long term
Completion of full quadruplication on Main North
Line (North Strathfield and West Ryde)
Ministry of Transport, RailCorp,
Australian Rail Track Corporation
Medium term –
Long term
Dedicated freight access on Main North Line
(West Ryde to Newcastle)
Ministry of Transport, RailCorp,
Australian Rail Track Corporation
Long term
Intermodal terminal development to support rail movements
Program initiative Stakeholder(s) Timing*
Progressive development and/or enhancement of
private sector port related intermodal terminals
Private sector Ongoing
Completion of Enfield ILC Sydney Ports Medium term
Completion of Moorebank Intermodal Terminal Ministry of Transport Long term
* Definition of timing: short term (2008–2009); medium term (2010–2012); long term (2013–2016).
5. Implementation program
Table 4: Implementation program to maximise the use of rail infrastructure (continued)
24
Sydney Ports Corporation
Optimising road operations at Port Botany
Program initiative Stakeholder(s) Timing*
Updating traffic management plans for individual
sites at Port Botany port to mitigate and manage
truck queuing and access arrangements
Sydney Ports Ongoing
Introduction of High Efficiency Container Trucks in
Port Botany, subject to approval by the Roads and
Traffic Authority
Sydney Ports, Roads and Traffic
Authority, Australian Trucking
Association
Short term
A new road access point at Foreshore Road to
support the new container terminal expansion
Sydney Ports, Roads and Traffic
Authority
Short term –
Medium term
Construction of the proposed Hale Street extension
to Foreshore Road
EG Property Group, Sydney Ports,
Roads and Traffic Authority
Short term –
Medium term
Analyse improvements to intersection performance,
truck staging areas and contingency management for
Port Botany roads
Sydney Ports, Roads and Traffic
Authority, City of Botany Bay, Randwick
City Council
Short term –
Medium term
Encouraging truck movements away from peak
periods
Sydney Ports, DP World, Patrick,
Australian Trucking Association, Sydney
Ports Cargo Facilitation Committee
Medium term
Extension of operating hours of port logistics
industries
Sydney Ports Cargo Facilitation
Committee
Medium term
Increasing truck efficiency to minimise road movements
Program initiative Stakeholder(s) Timing*
Continuing conformance to the introduction of the
Road Transport (General) Act 2005, which defines
mass, dimension and load restraint requirements
for vehicles
Roads and Traffic Authority, Australian
Trucking Association, Sydney Ports
Cargo Facilitation Committee
Ongoing
Investing in equipment that can assist trucking
operations including webcams
Private sector, Sydney Ports Ongoing
Reducing barriers to backloading in the port precinct DP World, Patrick, Sydney Ports Cargo
Facilitation Committee
Medium term
Enhancing computer systems, such as vehicle
booking systems
DP World, Patrick Medium term
Supporting greater use of electronic bulletin boards
and short message services (SMS) to disseminate
up-to-date information on port activities and
operational delays
DP World, Patrick, Sydney Ports Cargo
Facilitation Committee
Medium term
Facilitating greater use of electronic commerce to
eliminate paper documentation
Sydney Ports Cargo Facilitation
Committee
Medium term
Examining greater use of technology to assist with
container examination by the border protection
agencies
Sydney Ports Cargo Facilitation
Committee
Medium term
5. Implementation program
Table 5: Measures to improve the scheduling and utilisation of container truck movements
* Definition of timing: short term (2008–2009); medium term (2010–2012); long term (2013–2016).
25
Sydney Ports Corporation
Expanding road freight corridors in metropolitan Sydney
Program initiative Stakeholder(s) Timing
Consideration of proposals regarding an eastward
extension of the M4 Motorway
Ministry of Transport, Roads and
Traffic Authority
Ongoing
Consideration of proposals regarding enhancements
to the M5 Motorway
Ministry of Transport, Roads and
Traffic Authority
Ongoing
* Definition of timing: short term (2008–2009); medium term (2010–2012); long term (2013–2016).
5. Implementation program
Table 5: Measures to improve the scheduling and utilisation of container truck movements (continued)
5.4. Efficiency Indicators
The effectiveness of the port freight logistics
framework can be monitored though the development
of key indicators to determine any improvements in
the efficiency of the movement of freight. A number of
draft indicators have been identified for port operations,
rail transport, road transport and empty container parks
to provide some information on progress made in the
movement of containers (Table 6). The indicators for
2001 and 2006 are from actual aggregated information
provided by the stevedores. The indicators for 2011 and
2016 are estimated values that have been developed
through projections by Sydney Ports relating to
container throughput and may be reviewed due to
changing circumstances. Information on the indicators
will also be compiled by Sydney Ports on an
annual basis.
26
Sydney Ports Corporation
Table 6: Indicative Sydney Ports freight logistics efficiency indicators at Port Botany (Table to be reviewed)
Indicator 2001 2006 2011 2016
P
o
r
t

o
p
e
r
a
t
i
o
n
s
Crane rate (lifts/hour) 24.8 26.8 28.0 30.0
Ship rate (lifts/hour) 40.5 46.5 48.0 50.0
Total containers (TEU) 890,000 1,440,000 1,750,000 2,200,000
Import containers (TEU) 475,000 740,000 962,500 1,210,000
Export containers (TEU) 415,000 700,000 787,500 990,000
20’ containers (per cent) 50 per cent 40 per cent 35 per cent 35 per cent
40’ containers (per cent) 50 per cent 60 per cent 65 per cent 65 per cent
Empty export containers
(per cent of all containers)
<30 per cent <30 per cent <30 per cent <30 per cent
R
a
i
l
Rail mode share (per cent) 20 per cent 21.5 per cent 20 per cent
– 30 per cent
30 per cent
– 40 per cent
Total containers (TEU) 214,000 290,000 350,000
– 525,000
660,000
– 880,000
Container lifts/shift 101.7 123.9 130.0 135.0
Train utilisation (per cent) 50 per cent 55 per cent 60 per cent 70 per cent
Train lengths (m) 300m – 900m 300m – 900m 600m 600m
Import containers (per cent) 25 per cent 30 per cent 40 per cent 50 per cent
R
o
a
d
Total containers (TEU) 776,000 1,150,000 1,225,000
– 1,400,000
1,320,000
– 1,540,000
Truck movements (day) 2,910 3,500 3,900 – 4,400 3,800 – 4,400*
Average truck turnaround
times (minutes)
60.0 45.0 40.0 40.0
Truck utilisation (TEU) 1.8 2.1 2.2 2.3
Backloading (per cent) 8 per cent 10 per cent 15 per cent 20 per cent
E
m
p
t
y

c
o
n
t
a
i
n
e
r

p
a
r
k
s
Port related empty container
park storage capacity (TEU)
52,500 53,000 70,000 100,000
Average utilisation of port
related empty container park
storage capacity (per cent)
75 per cent 67 per cent 65 per cent
– 80 per cent
70 per cent
– 80 per cent
* Range of truck movements per day influenced by higher rail mode share, longer operating hours for receival and delivery at container terminals, and greater
efficiency in the number of containers transported per truck.
5. Implementation program
27
Sydney Ports Corporation
Table 7: Development Consent Conditions for the Port Botany third terminal expansion
Development Application
DA-494-11-2003-I, lodged by
Sydney Ports Corporation with
the Department of Planning
on 26 November 2003, for the
construction and operation of
a new container terminal and
associated infrastructure
Stage 1 development consent
approved by the Minister for
Planning on 13 October 2005
A2.4 Prior to the commencement of construction, the applicant shall prepare,
and submit, for the approval of the Minister, a Port Freight Logistics Plan which:
a) Examines existing container freight logistics and identifies areas for
improvement in the efficiency of container movements and rail interfacing
through operational, technological or administrative changes;
b) Proposes and develops an implementation program to maximise the use of
rail infrastructure;
c) Proposes and develops measures to improve the scheduling and utilisation of
container truck movements so as to minimise the number of trucks attending
the port and truck turnaround times; and
d) Proposes an implementation program (including deliverable milestones and
efficiency indicators) so as to ensure efficient and advanced port freight
logistics consistent with best practice.
The plan must be submitted and approved by the Minister prior to the
commencement of construction.
Development Application
DA-494-11-2003-I, lodged by
Sydney Ports Corporation with
the Department of Planning
on 26 November 2003, for the
construction and operation of
a new container terminal and
associated infrastructure
Stage 2 development consent
approved by the Minister for
Planning on 22 August 2006
A1.4 The scope of the Port Freight Logistics Plan required under condition A2.4
of the development consent granted by the Minister for Planning on 13 October
2005 with respect to development application DA-494-11-2003-I shall be
expanded to also address the following matters:
a) Consideration of the Botany Yard and any constraints on the yard with respect
to capacity or timing of any necessary upgrade and/or expansion works;
b) The need and timing of any necessary upgrades and/or expansion works to
provide dedicated departure and arrival roads for the Botany Yard; and
c) A production line arrangement of separate shuttle services to each stevedore
siding for future operations, or other appropriate measure.
Disclaimer The information contained in this publication is produced in good faith and according to the knowledge available
to Sydney Ports Corporation at the time of publication. No warranty is given or representation made as to its accuracy..
Sydney Ports Corporation Port Freight Logistics Plan – June 2008
Level 8, 207 Kent Street
Sydney NSW 2000, Australia
PO Box 25
Millers Point, NSW 2000, Australia
Telephone 61 2 9296 4999
Facsimile 61 2 9296 4742
enquiries@sydneyports.com.au
www.sydneyports.com.au

Sydney Ports Corporation

Contents

1. Introduction 2. Existing container freight operations 2.1. Portside freight operations 2.2. Landside freight operations Road Rail Intermodal terminals 2.3. Future challenges Areas for improvement Consistency with best practice 3. Maximising the use of rail infrastructure in servicing the port 3.1. Enhancing rail access and operations at Port Botany Port Botany container terminals Botany Yard Port Botany Freight Line 3.2. Upgrading rail freight corridors in metropolitan Sydney 3.3. Intermodal terminal development to support rail movements 4. Minimising truck movements in servicing the port 4.1. Optimising road operations at Port Botany Encouraging truck movements away from peak periods Introduction of high efficiency container trucks in Port Botany Road enhancements in Port Botany Operating hours of port logistics industries 4.2. Increasing truck efficiency to minimise road movements Higher Mass Limits (HMLs) Mechanisms to support better truck scheduling and utilisation 4.3. Expanding road freight corridors in metropolitan Sydney 5. Implementation program 5.1. Consultation 5.2. Deliverable milestones 5.3. Reforming Port Botany’s links with inland transport – IPART 5.4. Efficiency indicators

3 4

11

16

21

2

Sydney Ports Corporation Introduction Sydney Ports Corporation is a State-owned corporation with a mandate for managing port activities at Port Botany and Sydney Harbour. The expanded container terminal area will also have dedicated road and rail access. and a key stakeholder in facilitating the efficient landside movement of containers and general cargo. This project will support the growth in container volumes by providing an additional five berths and 60 hectares of container terminal area. The successful implementation of the Plan will require ongoing facilitation with a number of industry and government stakeholders. 3 . as shown in Table 7 on page 27. The Plan discusses existing port operations. initiatives to maximise the use of rail. Sydney Ports believes that the matters and issues discussed in the Plan will assist in improving port freight logistics to the benefit of the port. The Port Freight Logistics Plan also fulfils the development consent conditions of the Port Botany Expansion. The Port Freight Logistics Plan represents a framework by Sydney Ports Corporation for improvements to landside logistics to meet the challenges of managing port activities in light of anticipated demand. industry and the community. and initiatives to minimise the impact of truck movements generated by the port.

Existing container freight operations About 98 per cent of Australia’s international trade is undertaken by sea and provision of adequate port facilities and associated landside logistics is vital for the continued growth of the NSW economy. However. While there are a number of predictions for container growth. road and rail links connecting the importers and exporters of NSW with international markets. inner and middle west. The export trade is split between regional product and metropolitan manufactured goods. manufactured items and consumer goods which are distributed widely within metropolitan Sydney. The port’s area of influence and involvement therefore extends beyond the traditional confines of the maritime activities and port operations and into the area of landside logistics and supply chains. handling in excess of $50 billion worth of trade per year. Containers carry a broad range of primary products.1. the annual growth rates for Sydney’s container trade are predicted by Sydney Ports to be between 4. or be sent to exporter’s warehouses for packing with export goods and returned to the port via the intermodal terminal. with containers being unpacked in warehouses across the city. at Brotherson Dock North and Brotherson Dock South by two stevedoring companies: DP World (formerly P&O Ports) and Patrick (owned by Asciano). to the port empty or sent to another warehouse for packing with export goods and transported to the port for shipment off-shore. Port Botany’s container trade is forecast to increase from around 1. More than 97 per cent of this volume is handled at Port Botany and over 85 per cent of these are containers packed or unpacked within the greater metropolitan area of Sydney. Sydney is a heavily import dominant port. For every two containers that arrive with cargo. there are four concentrated areas for industrial distribution within the metropolitan area: Port Botany. 4 .8 per cent and 5. Sydney’s sea ports constitute a significant asset. one returns overseas empty. 2. It operates in two ways: • Road based – where containers are transported directly by truck to importers warehouses and distribution centres for unloading. Port Botany is and will remain the primary port for the import and export of containerised cargo in NSW. The inbound supply chain for containers is almost exclusively restricted to the Sydney metropolitan area. Around 45 per cent of the cargo by volume and 80 per cent by value handled through Sydney’s sea ports is containerised cargo. 2. This process reduces the truck distance involved and will improve the reliability in delivery times. The logistics chain for the transfer of container cargo through the port is shown in Figure 1.Sydney Ports Corporation 2. Empty containers can make the return journey via the intermodal terminals. • Road and rail based – where containers are transported by rail to intermodal terminals close to the market being served and unloaded for transport by truck to warehousing and distribution areas within that market area. Growth in container trade is strongly linked to economic growth. south west and far west. there are two container terminals where the initial storage of containers and the initial transfer of containers by road or rail are currently undertaken.2. via an empty container park. Containers are returned.6 million TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent units) per year to more than 3 million TEUs per year by 2025. Due to its proximity to the Sydney market. The expansion of Port Botany will create a third container terminal. Sydney’s sea ports are a focal point of a network of sea. Portside freight operations The portside freight operations consider the arrangements in place to unload and load containers from a vessel that arrives at the port. Landside freight operations An efficient transport system in a capital city such as Sydney depends on the effective integration of the various components within the transport chain.6 per cent per year for the next 20 years. At Port Botany.

Sydney Ports Corporation 2. Existing container freight operations Figure 1: Logistics chain for road and rail based transfer of containers Transport chain using direct road movement IMPORTER/EXPORTER ROAD MOVEMENT PORT & STEVEDORING OPERATIONS ROAD MOVEMENT WAREHOUSE Transport chain using intermodal terminal INTERMODAL TERMINAL PORT & STEVEDORING OPERATIONS RAIL MOVEMENT IMPORTER/EXPORTER ROAD MOVEMENT WAREHOUSE 5 .

a distance of approximately 20 kilometres. Along the metropolitan rail corridors where freight trains share the network with passenger trains.Sydney Ports Corporation 2. The Australian Rail Track Corporation received planning approval in December 2006 to provide a freight line along the existing rail corridor between Sefton Junction and Macarthur. • M5 Motorway from Campbelltown to Sydney Airport. There is also a freight rail link to the port at White Bay which joins the main Port Botany Freight Line at Wardell Junction in Marrickville (Figure 2). Rail A dedicated rail freight line exists between Port Botany and Enfield/Chullora. warehousing and port related areas at Port Botany. Strathfield and North Strathfield (about five kilometres). inner and middle west. There is direct road access at Port Botany to the Sydney orbital network via Foreshore Road (the main port access road). priority is given to passenger services. Over three-quarters of containers are transported to and from the port by road by over 200 road transport carriers. where freight trains then use the passenger network on the Main North Line to Hornsby via Epping. Existing container freight operations Road Sydney is supported by a motorway system that forms an orbital network within the metropolitan areas (Figure 2). A further freight line extension to the north runs from Chullora to Flemington Junction. 6 . A freight line extension to the south west exists from Chullora to Sefton Junction (about 2. This project is expected to be completed by 2009. Freight trains travelling from Enfield/Chullora to the west share the passenger rail network on the Main West Line from Lidcombe to Penrith. • M7 Motorway from Liverpool to Pennant Hills (crossing the M4 Motorway). From Sefton Junction to Macarthur. The orbital network includes the following roads: • M1 Motorway from Sydney Airport to Sydney CBD. This represents a significant constraint to rail freight efficiency. particularly during the peak commuter hours and when curfews prevent any activities by freight trains on the metropolitan rail network. freight trains traverse and share the passenger network on the Main South Line.5 kilometres). south west and west of Sydney. • M2 Motorway and Lane Cove Tunnel from Seven Hills to Gore Hill Freeway. • M4 Motorway from Penrith to Strathfield. This network provides direct linkages to industrial areas. • Cross City Tunnel linking the City West Link to the M1 Motorway.

Existing container freight operations Figure 2: Metropolitan road and rail links February 2008 Motorways Main roads Dedicated freight rail lines Shared passenger/freight rail lines Dedicated passenger rail lines Southern Sydney Freight Line (planned) Intermodal Terminals Industrial zones Port facilities Enfield Intermodal Logistics Centre (planned) Moorebank Intermodal Terminal (proposed) Port Botany development area 7 .Sydney Ports Corporation 2.

DP World container terminal and the P&O Trans Australia container park.000 TEU Cooks River Villawood Minto Yennora 500 metres 350 metres 390 metres 500 metres 150. including Narrabri. • Australian Railway Group (QR National) is operating the Manildra Group’s Manildra and Nowra rail services. Southern&Silverton and Independent Rail are servicing clients in the North West.000 TEU 45. Existing container freight operations The Botany to Enfield freight line is linked to operational sidings in Port Botany on the Patrick container terminal. Blayney. The port is serviced by a number of rail operators: • Macarthur Intermodal Shipping Terminal at Minto is using Independent Rail as its train provider for its Port Botany shuttle. • Mannway Intermodal Terminal at Villawood have appointed Southern&Silverton as their rail operator for Port Botany shuttles.Sydney Ports Corporation 2.000 TEU 300. 8 . Sydney Ports and the NSW Government have identified the need to increase the proportion of containers transported by rail to and from Port Botany from the current mode share of 20 per cent to a rail mode share to 40 per cent. Southern&Silverton and Independent Rail are servicing clients in the Central West. including Bathurst. Further information on the intermodal terminals in Sydney is provided in Table 1. • Maritime Container Services at Cooks River uses Independent Rail as its rail operator for Port Botany shuttles.000 TEU 20. These are primarily located in close proximity to areas of concentrated industrial distribution.000 TEU Note: Terminal capacity is limited in some cases by the availability of freight train paths. Wee Waa and Moree. Table 1: Intermodal terminals in Sydney Location Camellia Chullora Users Patrick PortLink Pacific National (interstate operations only) Maritime Container Services Mannway Macarthur Intermodal Shipping Terminal Patrick PortLink/QR National Siding length 300 metres 680 metres Estimated capacity 80. • Camellia Intermodal Terminal is using Patrick PortLink as its train provider for its rail shuttles. • Yennora Intermodal Terminal is using Patrick PortLink and InterLink (QR National) as its train provider for its rail shuttles.000 TEU 50. Intermodal terminals A number of intermodal terminals are located within the Sydney metropolitan area. Dubbo. Warren and Forbes. These intermodal terminals service the port or function as a transfer point for interstate cargoes. • Patrick PortLink. • Patrick PortLink.

improved co-ordination and better co-operation within one element of the supply chain or amongst a number of stakeholders across the supply chain.62 million in 2006/07 to over 3 million within 20 years.3. there are a number of indicators that suggest supporting the future freight task will pose significant challenges: • The volume of road general freight in Australia is forecast to double over the next 20 years. professionals and industry involved in logistics planning is to use this direction to develop a series of outcomes that can be achieved in the short. provides a strategic response to these trends and the identification of a possible future freight network for metropolitan Sydney. Administrative changes can also provide improvements to the management of logistics at the port. The Metropolitan Strategy. However. An implementation program in achieving these improvements with the involvement of government and industry is outlined in Section 5. These consider commercial and non-commercial arrangements that can enhance the practices by each stakeholder or across a number of stakeholders within the supply chain. The changes can have an impact on efficient container movement and rail interfacing by encouraging practices that support better truck utilisation or increase the viability of train services by using mechanisms that influence the price and allocation of transport movements for freight. thereby allowing for greater efficiencies in the movement of freight into and out of the port. 9 . Further details on possible improvements in the efficiency of container movements and rail interfacing are outlined in Sections 3 and 4. Technological changes are another area where landside logistics improvements are possible. other government agencies. The task of Sydney Ports. medium and long term.Sydney Ports Corporation 2. These changes consider the role of institutions. technological or administrative changes. frameworks. Existing container freight operations 2. The Port Botany Logistics Taskforce established by the NSW Government is a forum where collaboration on a number of logistics issues is being undertaken between government and industry. These changes can have an impact on efficient container movement and rail interfacing by allowing for the introduction of tools that allow for real savings in labour and resource utilisation. One area where improvements can be made for landside logistics relate to operational changes. This will require close collaboration between all stakeholders. Future challenges The existing road and rail freight networks have generally been able to efficiently handle the freight task. Areas for improvement A key objective of the Port Freight Logistics Plan is to identify areas for improvement in the efficiency of container movements and rail interfacing through operational. practices and procedures that support the needs of each stakeholder or across a number of players within the supply chain. Technological changes consider the use of electronic methods to streamline or improve operations by each stakeholder or across a number of stakeholders within the supply chain. • Container volumes at Port Botany are anticipated to increase from 1. released by the NSW Government in December 2005. The changes can have an impact on efficient container movement and rail interfacing by allowing for richer information flows. • Continued growth in population and economic activity also means that increases in freight movements are inevitable.

North America and Europe that have been examined in relation to landside logistics management – Port of Melbourne. This is an important element in benchmarking our strategic and operational outcomes achieved over a defined period. trucks that can handle a greater number of containers per vehicle. Port of Yokohama. It is important that the Port Freight Logistics Plan is informed by leading examples by other container ports to ensure that best practice in relation to freight logistics is being achieved. Asia. These include additional rail infrastructure to provide new access or enhance existing operations. Existing container freight operations Consistency with best practice Sydney Ports closely monitors the performance of Australian and international ports in relation to landside logistics operation and management.Sydney Ports Corporation 2. Table 2 outlines a range of ports in Australia. and understanding identifying ways in increasing the mode share towards rail that can support the efficient movement of port related containers within metropolitan Sydney and regional New South Wales. The key areas of interest for Sydney Ports are investigating methods in improving road transport movements and management. Table 2: Landside logistics improvements in Australian and international ports Landside logistics improvements Port location Rail • Target to increase rail mode share to 30 per cent • Dynon Port Rail Link to provide rail access to container terminals • Provision for direct rail access to selected container terminal • Completion of Alameda Corridor with high speed rail access between port and industrial areas • Expanding rail capacity and removing operational limitations • ‘PierPass’ charging regime to discourage truck movements at port during peak periods • Encouraging staggered transport throughout the day • Introduction of larger trucks (up to 3 TEU capacity) Road • ‘Higher Efficiency Container Trucks’ with additional container capacity per vehicle and measurable operational efficiencies to be introduced within an extended area at the port Port of Melbourne Australia Port of Yokohama Japan Port of Los Angeles United States of America Port of Rotterdam Netherlands 10 . Port of Los Angeles and Port of Rotterdam. A number of initiatives in relation to road and rail in the ports at these locations are consistent with the outcomes being sought by Sydney Ports and the NSW Government. and mechanisms to encourage truck movements away from peak periods.

competitive usage costs. Maximising the use of rail infrastructure in servicing the port A key element in logistics planning for metropolitan Sydney is maximising the use of rail. reduced environmental impacts and less road congestion. A number of initiatives have been identified to increase the role of rail in meeting the freight task for metropolitan Sydney. This requires clear policy and investment in certain network infrastructure to provide the platform for rail to compete efficiently. and port shuttle movements of exports and imports within metropolitan Sydney. the key is to encourage market forces to drive the modal shift towards rail in a sustainable manner.000 in 2006/07. Figure 3: Port Botany rail volumes (1997/98 to 2007/08) 350 300 250 FORECAST TEUs (’000) 200 150 100 50 0 1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2005/06 2007/08 11 .Sydney Ports Corporation 3. The NSW Government and Sydney Ports has a shared objective of achieving a 40 per cent rail mode share for containers that are transported into and out of Port Botany.000 in 1997/98 to 300. These volumes include export products from regional NSW. Sydney Ports has developed a rail simulation model as a tool to test the suitability of various scenarios in meeting the rail mode share target. and currently represents 20 per cent of all containers transported to and from the port (Figure 3). The volumes transported by rail to and from Port Botany have increased from 123. In supporting these initiatives. The ability of this mode to transport large volumes offers industry a transport mode that has a higher level of efficiency.

• Agreeing to a standardised train length consist (600 metres) that reduces shunting and checking trains. • Closure of the Interterminal Access Road rail level crossing and construction of a grade separated junction. Enfield and the metropolitan rail network. Areas of future focus include stevedore sidings to accommodate 600 metre train lengths. Patrick PortLink yard and the container terminal sidings. This will reduce the number and duration of delays for DP World when a train is waiting on the rail corridor for entry or exit into Patrick container terminal. Maximising the use of rail infrastructure in servicing the port 3. Port Botany container terminals This area covers the movement of train services between Botany Yard to the DP World and Patrick container terminals. including the availability of track to allow for the staging and through movement of train services. A number of initiatives are proposed over the next five years to support a greater number of train movements: • Fostering closer management of rail operations between the Botany Yard and rail sidings at the container terminals. subject to economically feasible volumes. as well as assist in encouraging a higher mode share for rail of containers entering and leaving Port Botany. • Providing rail infrastructure to support the use of rail by the operator of the third container terminal at Port Botany. This includes ongoing involvement in planning and managing train paths and stevedore ‘window’ allocations by Sydney Ports. and operational arrangements that allow for timely and efficient movement of train services into and out of the yard. additional through tracks and signalling upgrade. A number of initiatives have been identified that can enhance rail access and operations. Australian Rail Track Corporation (ARTC). including lengthening of sidings.1. depart trains along the Port Botany Freight Line to Cooks River. 12 . Sydney Ports will provide an additional track from Botany Yard to the new terminal that offers a flexible and efficient arrangement for prospective users. DP World and Patrick. • Provision of additional track and infrastructure in Botany Yard. • Providing dedicated trains between each Port Botany container terminal and metropolitan intermodal terminals. suitable lengths of sidings to support standardised train services. Enhancing rail access and operations at Port Botany A key component in maximising the use of rail infrastructure is to ensure that Port Botany can cater for projected demand. These works will cater for an increase in the number of train movements to the port and support standardised train lengths of 600 metres. introduction of improved rail handling equipment and technology by stevedores to handle larger container volumes and implementation of separate shuttle services to each stevedore’s sidings. The role of Botany Yard is to receive freight trains prior to exchanging containers at the stevedore sidings (imports and exports).Sydney Ports Corporation 3. Botany yard Botany Yard is located just outside the port precinct. The anticipated increase in the number of containers transported by rail will place limitations on effective performance of the yard. • Provision of crossover to access the DP World terminal to increase capacity for DP World rail operations as this is currently impeded by single line access. A number of initiatives have been identified that will improve the efficiency and reliability of these movements: • Continuing productivity improvements in loading and unloading containers at stevedore container terminals. and control the access of trains into and out of the yard. RailCorp.

completion of full quadruplication between North Strathfield and West Ryde and dedicated freight access between metropolitan Sydney and Newcastle. out and within the Sydney metropolitan area: • Southern Sydney Freight Line – a bi-directional freight priority line between Macarthur and Sefton to allow additional train movements between Port Botany and freight distribution activities in south-west Sydney. • Closure of General Holmes Drive level crossing and (if required) investigation and construction of alternate road access to minimise conflicts between trains and vehicles. • Permitting use of tracks within the Enfield Marshalling Yards as a common-user facility for rail freight operators to stage trains which will improve the efficient management of train services to and from Port Botany. 13 . Maximising the use of rail infrastructure in servicing the port Port Botany Freight Line The Port Botany Freight Line covers the length of dedicated freight railway between Port Botany and Enfield/Chullora in central-west Sydney. • Commitment to complete the duplication of the Port Botany Freight Line between Mascot and Cooks River or equivalent works to provide the necessary track capacity to meet projected demand. Action in this area will encourage greater interest in using rail by customers and operators by improving the reliability of freight train movements. The planning and development of rail freight corridors. particularly during the peak commuter hours and when curfews prevent any activities by freight trains on the metropolitan rail network. reliability decreases from 80 per cent to 30 per cent between Newcastle and Sydney and from 60 per cent to 40 per cent between Macarthur and Sydney. particularly through the passenger curfews for regional trains and those metropolitan intermodal terminals not on the dedicated freight network. As a consequence of these constraints.2. Along the metropolitan rail corridors where freight trains share the network with passenger trains. as well as eliminating a speed restriction to the efficient operation of the Port Botany Freight Line. including infrastructure design and land preservation. • Refining access into and out of the Cooks River intermodal facility through improved coordination and infrastructure to minimise conflicts on through movements along the Port Botany Freight Line. Rail modelling undertaken by Sydney Ports indicates that this work would be required within the next five to eight years. Upgrading rail freight corridors in metropolitan Sydney The anticipated growth in the volume of containerised freight moved by rail will place more pressure on existing rail arrangements. is needed to improve access within the Sydney metropolitan area and linkages north to Brisbane and south to Melbourne. A number of initiatives are proposed to ensure that rail operations can cater for future movements into and out of the port.Sydney Ports Corporation 3. This project will allow for additional train movements between Port Botany and freight distribution activities in north and west Sydney. • Northern Line Upgrade – a rail grade separation in the vicinity of North Strathfield to allow Up trains to access the metropolitan freight network without the need to cross Down tracks. This project is planned to be completed in 2009 to ensure that sufficient train paths are available to meet projected growth in rail mode share. priority is given to passenger services. as well as supporting more reliable and efficient operations at pinch points: • Closure of Banksia Road pedestrian crossing on the Port Botany Freight Line and construction of a pedestrian overbridge to enhance operational safety. A number of projects under consideration by government will enhance rail freight movements in. This represents a significant constraint to rail freight efficiency. 3.

An intermodal terminal is a facility that allows for the loading and unloading of containers and general cargo between road and rail based transport. The NSW Government endorsed plans for this metropolitan Sydney intermodal network in May 2007. There would be direct rail links (dedicated or shared) to Port Botany. Moorebank and Eastern Creek respectively. Planning approval for the facility was given by the NSW Government in September 2007.Sydney Ports Corporation 3. The growth in container volumes and improvements to transport capacity can support the development of additional intermodal terminals. Maximising the use of rail infrastructure in servicing the port 3. The Metropolitan Strategy outlines a proposed network of additional intermodal terminals in the central-west. The Sydney metropolitan area comprises of a number of intermodal terminals that serve port and interstate movements. 14 . Intermodal terminal development to support rail movements The need to expand the intermodal network within Sydney is a prerequisite for the greater use of rail. The inclusion of warehousing and freight support services within the site also provides an opportunity to reduce the number of large truck movements within local communities. It is envisaged that the facility will be operational by 2011. Road transport will provide and deliver containers and goods to destinations within the catchment area. The proposed intermodal terminals would have a number of common elements to meet the required freight logistics task. These facilities are used for container movements to/from the port and between different states. including an expansion of the Macarthur Intermodal Shipping Terminal at Minto and a joint venture arrangement between Kaplan Investment Funds. These facilities are proposed at Enfield. Sydney Ports has developed a proposal for an Intermodal Logistics Centre at Enfield that provides an intermodal facility to cater for demand generated in central-west Sydney. south-west and west of metropolitan Sydney to meet predicted demand (Figure 4). It is envisaged that this would be one of the initial intermodal terminals implemented as part of the proposed metropolitan intermodal network for Sydney. QR National and Stocklands for a new intermodal facility at Moorebank.3. Analysis of container movements by the Sea Freight Council of NSW in their February 2004 report New South Wales Import Export Container Mapping Study indicates that areas in the centralwest. south-west and west of metropolitan Sydney account for 70 per cent of full import and 34 per cent of full export container movements. There are also other proposed intermodal facilities being undertaken by the private sector.

15 . Maximising the use of rail infrastructure in servicing the port Figure 4: Proposed intermodal network for metropolitan Sydney 94 December 2005 Source: NSW Department of Planning Existing intermodal terminals Possible intermodal terminals Proposed dedicated freight rail lines Existing dedicated freight rail lines Shared passenger freight rail lines Motorway network Ports Employment lands Planned employment lands Potential employment lands for investigation Existing urban area Note: Chullora Intermodal Terminal is dedicated to interstate and regional freight.Sydney Ports Corporation 3.

Figure 5: Port Botany truck arrivals by hour of day 10 9 8 7 Per cent 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1999 2004 2007 16 00 10 :0 0 11 :0 12 0 :0 0 13 :0 14 0 :0 0 15 :0 16 0 :0 0 17 :0 18 0 :0 0 19 :0 20 0 :0 0 21 :0 22 0 :0 0 23 :0 0 Time 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 7: 0: 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 8: 00 9: . this infrastructure is shared with commuter vehicles and can have heavy traffic volumes during peak periods. it is important that this growth be accommodated in future road network planning. An increase in the volume of freight will translate into an increase in the number of trucks using the road system. Minimising truck movements in servicing the port Logistics planning also requires an acknowledgement that road transport will continue to support the majority of freight movements within metropolitan Sydney. Recent extensions to the motorway network have improved accessibility between Port Botany and key distribution and industrial areas across Sydney. While the future number of port trucks on the road will continue to represent a low proportion when compared to total traffic (between 1 per cent and 2 per cent).Sydney Ports Corporation 4. Nevertheless.

thereby making the most productive use of road infrastructure and operational resources. thereby offering greater operating efficiencies for importers and exporters in receiving and delivering their cargo. Optimising road operations at Port Botany A number of initiatives have been identified that can optimise road operations at the port. This trend has been accompanied by reductions in truck turnaround times during a period of strong container growth. Encouraging truck movements away from peak periods Analysis by Sydney Ports indicates that a trend towards truck movements away from peak periods is emerging (Figure 5).1. No operational impediments have been identified that could hinder the effective operation of high efficiency container trucks. Introduction of high efficiency container trucks in Port Botany Sydney Ports is seeking approval from the Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) for the use of high efficiency container trucks (HECT) in a defined area within the Port Botany precinct. The Port of Melbourne and the Port of Brisbane already use high efficiency container trucks within their port precincts. Minimising truck movements in servicing the port 4. There is also a proportionate increase in truck movements on weekends (Figure 6). seven day a week basis. The introduction of high efficiency container trucks will facilitate improved container terminal operation and provide more reliable delivery times.Sydney Ports Corporation 4. These vehicles offer additional container capacity per vehicle and provide measurable operational efficiencies for the movement of containers within the port precinct. Figure 6: Port Botany truck arrivals by day of week 25 1999 20 15 10 5 0 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Day of week Friday Saturday Sunday 2004 2007 Per cent 17 . The anticipated increase in truck volumes over the next few years will require a further shift towards operations on a 24 hour.

Operating hours of port logistics industries The stevedoring terminals at Port Botany operate on a 24 hours per day. Industry has identified that an extension of the operating hours by an increased number of organisations would provide efficiencies in the transport chain as well as improved use of freight transport infrastructure.Sydney Ports Corporation 4. seven days per week basis (24/7). including transport infrastructure and equipment. in non-peak periods. This road is the main access route for port traffic into and out of the port. This road is the main access route for port traffic into and out of the port. The other parties in the transport chain for containerised cargo operate varied hours. This issue was examined by the Sea Freight Council of NSW in the report released in January 2005 titled Freight Supply Chain – Coordination of Working Arrangements. such as the road network. are under utilised. Minimising truck movements in servicing the port Road enhancements in Port Botany A number of incremental operational and minor infrastructure road enhancements have been identified that can provide for better traffic flows and management to cater for current and future volumes: • A new road access point at Foreshore Road to support the new container terminal expansion. • Construction of the proposed extension of Hale Street by a private developer at Botany to Foreshore Road. This new road will enable traffic generated by the new terminal to avoid the Penrhyn Road/Botany Road/Foreshore Road intersection. with many businesses continuing to operate on a business hours/Monday to Friday basis. truck staging areas and contingency management for Port Botany roads. • The progressive updating of traffic management plans for individual sites at Port Botany port to mitigate and manage truck queuing and access arrangements. • Sydney Ports will work with other government agencies to analyse short and long term improvements to intersection performance. 18 . This will allow for direct truck access to Port Botany. These proposals would assist in managing truck movements that balances the need for operational efficiency and community amenity. The new road will also facilitate a reduction in the number of port trucks using Botany Road north of Foreshore Road. The latter situation means that resources. Government and industry should continue to work together to implement strategies to spread the working hours of those organisations in the freight transport chain. The introduction of incentives and/or penalties may be considered to encourage a change in operating practices. The new road will also facilitate a reduction in the number of port trucks using Botany Road north of Foreshore Road. thereby avoiding potential capacity problems at this intersection.

Table 3: Higher Mass Limits of approved NSW roads Vehicle configuration 19 metre (6 axle) semi-trailer 25 metre (9 axle) B-double 62. • M4 Motorway (west of the M7 interchange) – Great Western Highway (west of the M4 Motorway). • F3 Freeway. Increasing truck efficiency to minimise road movements Government and industry are working together to identify and implement a range of measures that improve truck efficiency and reduce “unnecessary” road movements. These include: • Princes Highway (from intersection with King Georges Road) – F6 Freeway. • M5 Motorway – General Holmes Drive – Foreshore Road (to Port Botany). Minimising truck movements in servicing the port 4.Sydney Ports Corporation 4. This initiative offers greater truck efficiency while ensuring that the integrity of road network infrastructure is maintained. Road carriers have to be accredited under the mass management module of the National Heavy Vehicle Accreditation Scheme (NHVAS). Higher Mass Limits (HMLs) The NSW Government introduced the Higher Mass Limit (HML) network from July 2006. • M7 Motorway (M7 Motorway to Pennant Hills Road) – M2 Motorway – Pennant Hills Road (M2 Motorway to F3 Freeway).5 tonnes Higher Mass Limit (HML) 45.2. The NSW Government has also approved a number of roads within metropolitan Sydney where HML vehicles can operate and also cover other roads within a 10 kilometre radius where the destination is in a defined industrial zone. Continual maintenance of a vehicle’s suspension is a requirement for NHVAS accreditation. • King Georges Road – Roberts Road.5 tonnes 68 tonnes 13 per cent Standard (Gross) Mass Limit 42. HML allows eligible road carriers to operate at increased mass limits compared to statutory limits (Table 3).5 tonnes Payload increase (higher compared to standard) 10 per cent 19 .

dimension and load restraint requirements for vehicles. This improvement can be seen in average truck turnaround times per truck at the Port Botany container terminals. • Investing in equipment that can assist trucking operations such as global positioning systems. The objectives in the Strategy include improving the efficiency of all types of freight movements in Sydney and connecting the metropolitan regions with the economic gateways. such as vehicle booking systems. Minimising truck movements in servicing the port Mechanisms to support better truck scheduling and utilisation A number of operational and technological improvements have been implemented by industry. including: • Delivering an export container or an empty container to the port precinct and collecting an import container in the same journey (backloading). These will be important initiatives to ensure that landside logistics meets long-term demand. including an eastern extension of the M4 Motorway and an increase to the capacity of the M5 Motorway.3. which has delivered real benefits in managing truck scheduling and utilisation. Sydney Ports supports the examination of proposals to improve the road connections between Port Botany and Western Sydney. 4. such as vehicle booking system and automation of truck scheduling processes. 20 . • Examining greater use of technology to assist with container examination by the border protection agencies. namely Port Botany and Sydney Airport. • Facilitating greater use of electronic commerce to eliminate paper documentation. • Continuing conformance to the introduction of the Road Transport (General) Act 2005. Government and industry will continue to examine and progressively introduce a range of mechanisms to allow for even more efficient use of container trucks. Expanding road freight corridors in metropolitan Sydney The Metropolitan Strategy includes a careful examination of transport needs. • Supporting greater use of electronic bulletin boards and SMS technology to disseminate up-to-date information on port activities and operational delays. • Enhancing computer systems.Sydney Ports Corporation 4. which defines mass. transponders and web camera technology. which have decreased from an hour in 2000 to 50 minutes in 2007.

exporters. Sydney Ports believes that the matters and issues discussed in the Plan will assist in improving port freight logistics to the benefit of the port. including stevedores. medium term (2010–2012).Sydney Ports Corporation 5. The deliverable milestones of the program are categories as short term (2008–2009). The Plan discusses existing port operations. and initiatives to minimise the impact of truck movements generated by the port. the road haulage industry. long term (2013–2016) and ongoing. 5. Sydney Ports already works with a number of industry and government stakeholders to resolve strategic and operational matters and issues related to port freight logistics (Figure 7). Implementation program The Port Freight Logistics Plan provides a framework to meet the challenges of managing port activities in light of anticipated demand.2. These initiatives also need to consider and address environmental impacts as appropriate. The initiatives included within the implementation program offer discrete and incremental operational. Consultation The successful implementation of the Port Freight Logistics Plan requires close collaboration between Sydney Ports and all stakeholders in the logistics chain. the forwarding community and related government agencies. The milestones related to measures to improve the scheduling and utilisation of container truck movements are provided in Table 5. rail operators. Figure 7: Sydney Ports stakeholder relationships Transport Chain Sydney Ports Users Consultative Group Sydney Ports Cargo Facilitation Committee Rail Groups Botany Rail Steering Group Botany Rail Operations Group Botany Corridor/Botany Rail Yard/ Container Terminals Interface Group (joint working group) Government Agencies – Ministry of Transport Sydney Ports Corporation – RailCorp – Roads and Traffic Authority – Local Councils – Australian Rail Track Corporation Industry Groups NSW Sea Freight Council Australian Logistics Council Shipping Australia Transport Industry Associations 21 . initiatives to maximise the use of rail. 5.1. technological and administrative improvements to maximise the use of rail infrastructure and improve the scheduling and utilisation of container truck movements. The milestones related to the implementation program to maximise the use of rail are provided in Table 4. industry and the community. importers. Deliverable milestones A number of initiatives have been identified in Sections 3 and 4 that have been included in an implementation program to ensure best practice efficient and advanced port freight logistics. These relationships will be pivotal in progressing with the successful implementation of the Port Freight Logistics Plan.

Australian Rail Track Corporation. Patrick Timing* Short term Sydney Ports.3 Reforming Port Botany’s links with inland transport – Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal The NSW Government commissioned a review by the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART) into the Interface between the Land Transport Industries and the Stevedores at Port Botany. Ministry of Transport Medium term DP World. Railcorp. RailCorp. Australian Rail Track Corporation Medium term * Definition of timing: short term (2008–2009). RTA. Implementation program 5. medium term (2010–2012). DP World. At the time of publishing the NSW Government was reviewing the recommendations and preparing a response. Table 4: Implementation program to maximise the use of rail infrastructure Enhancing rail access and operations at Port Botany Program initiative Fostering closer management of rail operations between the Botany Yard and rail sidings on stevedores container terminals Provision of infrastructure improvements to Botany Yard to support future growth and improve access to the container terminals Refining coordination and signalling infrastructure to support efficient access into and out of the Cooks River intermodal facility Permitting use of tracks within the Enfield Marshalling Yards as a common-user facility for rail freight operators to stage trains Closure of Banksia Road pedestrian crossing on the Botany Goods Line and construction of a pedestrian overbridge Continuing productivity improvements in container handling at container terminals Agreeing to a standardised train length consist (600 metres) that reduces shunting and checking trains Provision of additional track and infrastructure in Botany Yard to cater for increase in train movements and 600 metre train lengths Closure of the Interterminal Access Road rail level crossing and construction of a grade separated junction Stakeholder(s) Sydney Ports. Australian Rail Track Corporation Medium term Medium term Sydney Ports. RailCorp. Port Botany Rail Logistics team and road transport industry matters. Ministry of Transport. RailCorp. the Independent Tribunal released its final report titled Reforming Port Botany’s Links with Inland Transport. 22 . RailCorp. A number of recommendations relate to the vehicle booking system.Sydney Ports Corporation 5. Patrick Sydney Ports. Ministry of Transport. The Independent Tribunal has made 18 recommendations to improve port performance. Australian Rail Track Corporation. Australian Rail Track Corporation. DP World. Patrick Medium term Sydney Ports. RailCorp. DP World and Patrick RailCorp. Australian Rail Track Corporation Ministry of Transport. long term (2013–2016). Australian Rail Track Corporation Short term – Medium term Short term – Medium term Short term – Medium term Sydney Ports. On 18 March 2008. Sydney Ports will have a key role to play in the implementation of the agreed recommendations.

23 . Implementation program Table 4: Implementation program to maximise the use of rail infrastructure (continued) Upgrading rail freight corridors in metropolitan Sydney Program initiative Closure of General Holmes Drive level crossing and construction of alternate road access Stakeholder(s) Ministry of Transport. long term (2013–2016). RailCorp. medium term (2010–2012). Australian Rail Track Corporation Medium term – Long term Long term Intermodal terminal development to support rail movements Program initiative Progressive development and/or enhancement of private sector port related intermodal terminals Completion of Enfield ILC Completion of Moorebank Intermodal Terminal Stakeholder(s) Private sector Timing* Ongoing Sydney Ports Ministry of Transport Medium term Long term * Definition of timing: short term (2008–2009). RailCorp. RailCorp. Australian Rail Track Corporation Long term Australian Rail Track Corporation Short term – Medium term Medium term – Long term Ministry of Transport. RailCorp. Australian Rail Track Corporation Ministry of Transport. Australian Rail Track Corporation Sydney Ports Timing* Medium term Providing rail infrastructure to support the use of rail by the operator of the third container terminal at Port Botany Complete the duplication of the Botany Goods Line between Mascot and Cooks River or equivalent works to provide track capacity Construction of Southern Sydney Freight Line between Macarthur and Sefton Junction Complete rail grade separation on Main North Line (at North Strathfield) to segregate freight and passenger train movements Completion of full quadruplication on Main North Line (North Strathfield and West Ryde) Dedicated freight access on Main North Line (West Ryde to Newcastle) Medium term Ministry of Transport. RailCorp. Roads and Traffic Authority.Sydney Ports Corporation 5. Australian Rail Track Corporation Ministry of Transport.

Sydney Ports Cargo Facilitation Committee Timing* Ongoing Private sector. Sydney Ports Ongoing DP World. 24 . truck staging areas and contingency management for Port Botany roads Encouraging truck movements away from peak periods Stakeholder(s) Sydney Ports Timing* Ongoing Sydney Ports. Roads and Traffic Authority.Sydney Ports Corporation 5. Patrick Medium term Enhancing computer systems. dimension and load restraint requirements for vehicles Investing in equipment that can assist trucking operations including webcams Reducing barriers to backloading in the port precinct Stakeholder(s) Roads and Traffic Authority. Australian Trucking Association. Randwick City Council Sydney Ports. long term (2013–2016). Australian Trucking Association Sydney Ports. Sydney Ports Cargo Facilitation Committee Medium term Sydney Ports Cargo Facilitation Committee Sydney Ports Cargo Facilitation Committee Medium term Medium term * Definition of timing: short term (2008–2009). such as vehicle booking systems Supporting greater use of electronic bulletin boards and short message services (SMS) to disseminate up-to-date information on port activities and operational delays Facilitating greater use of electronic commerce to eliminate paper documentation Examining greater use of technology to assist with container examination by the border protection agencies Medium term DP World. Patrick. Roads and Traffic Authority EG Property Group. medium term (2010–2012). Sydney Ports. Sydney Ports Cargo Facilitation Committee Sydney Ports Cargo Facilitation Committee Short term Short term – Medium term Short term – Medium term Short term – Medium term Medium term Extension of operating hours of port logistics industries Medium term Increasing truck efficiency to minimise road movements Program initiative Continuing conformance to the introduction of the Road Transport (General) Act 2005. which defines mass. DP World. City of Botany Bay. subject to approval by the Roads and Traffic Authority A new road access point at Foreshore Road to support the new container terminal expansion Construction of the proposed Hale Street extension to Foreshore Road Analyse improvements to intersection performance. Patrick. Sydney Ports Cargo Facilitation Committee DP World. Roads and Traffic Authority. Implementation program Table 5: Measures to improve the scheduling and utilisation of container truck movements Optimising road operations at Port Botany Program initiative Updating traffic management plans for individual sites at Port Botany port to mitigate and manage truck queuing and access arrangements Introduction of High Efficiency Container Trucks in Port Botany. Roads and Traffic Authority Sydney Ports. Patrick. Australian Trucking Association.

25 . Information on the indicators will also be compiled by Sydney Ports on an annual basis. rail transport. Roads and Traffic Authority Ministry of Transport. Implementation program Table 5: Measures to improve the scheduling and utilisation of container truck movements (continued) Expanding road freight corridors in metropolitan Sydney Program initiative Consideration of proposals regarding an eastward extension of the M4 Motorway Consideration of proposals regarding enhancements to the M5 Motorway Stakeholder(s) Ministry of Transport. The indicators for 2011 and 2016 are estimated values that have been developed through projections by Sydney Ports relating to container throughput and may be reviewed due to changing circumstances.Sydney Ports Corporation 5. medium term (2010–2012).4. road transport and empty container parks to provide some information on progress made in the movement of containers (Table 6). The indicators for 2001 and 2006 are from actual aggregated information provided by the stevedores. Efficiency Indicators The effectiveness of the port freight logistics framework can be monitored though the development of key indicators to determine any improvements in the efficiency of the movement of freight. 5. long term (2013–2016). A number of draft indicators have been identified for port operations. Roads and Traffic Authority Timing Ongoing Ongoing * Definition of timing: short term (2008–2009).

500 35 per cent 65 per cent <30 per cent 2016 30.400* 40.150.200.0 Total containers (TEU) 214.3 20 per cent 100.000 3.000 1.000 962.210.910 60.000 Empty container parks Port related empty container park storage capacity (TEU) Average utilisation of port related empty container park storage capacity (per cent) 75 per cent 67 per cent 65 per cent – 80 per cent 70 per cent – 80 per cent * Range of truck movements per day influenced by higher rail mode share. 26 .000 123.000 – 525.500 2.1 10 per cent 53.400.000 Truck movements (day) 2.0 3.000 35 per cent 65 per cent <30 per cent Port operations Total containers (TEU) Import containers (TEU) Export containers (TEU) 20’ containers (per cent) 40’ containers (per cent) Empty export containers (per cent of all containers) Rail mode share (per cent) 20 per cent 21.0 50.0 60 per cent 600m 40 per cent 1.8 40.5 per cent 20 per cent – 30 per cent 350.000 740.500 787.320. longer operating hours for receival and delivery at container terminals.000 Rail Container lifts/shift Train utilisation (per cent) Train lengths (m) Import containers (per cent) Total containers (TEU) 101.0 2.000 50 per cent 50 per cent <30 per cent 2006 26.000 130.000 – 1.8 46.750.Sydney Ports Corporation 5.000 40 per cent 60 per cent <30 per cent 2011 28.7 50 per cent 300m – 900m 25 per cent 776.9 55 per cent 300m – 900m 30 per cent 1.5 890.5 1.0 Road Average truck turnaround times (minutes) Truck utilisation (TEU) Backloading (per cent) 1.2 15 per cent 70.000 2.225.500 45.0 1.000 135.000 700.000 990.000 290.000 475.000 2.0 48. and greater efficiency in the number of containers transported per truck.8 8 per cent 52.0 30 per cent – 40 per cent 660.000 3.0 70 per cent 600m 50 per cent 1.000 – 1.800 – 4.000 415.000 – 880.540. Implementation program Table 6: Indicative Sydney Ports freight logistics efficiency indicators at Port Botany (Table to be reviewed) Indicator Crane rate (lifts/hour) Ship rate (lifts/hour) 2001 24.440.400 40.900 – 4.

lodged by Sydney Ports Corporation with the Department of Planning on 26 November 2003. The plan must be submitted and approved by the Minister prior to the commencement of construction.4 of the development consent granted by the Minister for Planning on 13 October 2005 with respect to development application DA-494-11-2003-I shall be expanded to also address the following matters: a) Consideration of the Botany Yard and any constraints on the yard with respect to capacity or timing of any necessary upgrade and/or expansion works. Development Application DA-494-11-2003-I. c) Proposes and develops measures to improve the scheduling and utilisation of container truck movements so as to minimise the number of trucks attending the port and truck turnaround times. for the approval of the Minister.Sydney Ports Corporation Table 7: Development Consent Conditions for the Port Botany third terminal expansion Development Application DA-494-11-2003-I. a Port Freight Logistics Plan which: a) Examines existing container freight logistics and identifies areas for improvement in the efficiency of container movements and rail interfacing through operational. for the construction and operation of a new container terminal and associated infrastructure Stage 1 development consent approved by the Minister for Planning on 13 October 2005 A2. b) Proposes and develops an implementation program to maximise the use of rail infrastructure. b) The need and timing of any necessary upgrades and/or expansion works to provide dedicated departure and arrival roads for the Botany Yard.4 The scope of the Port Freight Logistics Plan required under condition A2. the applicant shall prepare. and submit. technological or administrative changes. for the construction and operation of a new container terminal and associated infrastructure Stage 2 development consent approved by the Minister for Planning on 22 August 2006 A1. and d) Proposes an implementation program (including deliverable milestones and efficiency indicators) so as to ensure efficient and advanced port freight logistics consistent with best practice. and c) A production line arrangement of separate shuttle services to each stevedore siding for future operations. 27 .4 Prior to the commencement of construction. lodged by Sydney Ports Corporation with the Department of Planning on 26 November 2003. or other appropriate measure.

.com.sydneyports. No warranty is given or representation made as to its accuracy.Level 8.au Disclaimer The information contained in this publication is produced in good faith and according to the knowledge available to Sydney Ports Corporation at the time of publication. Australia PO Box 25 Millers Point. 207 Kent Street Sydney NSW 2000. NSW 2000. Australia Telephone 61 2 9296 4999 Facsimile 61 2 9296 4742 enquiries@sydneyports.au www.com. Sydney Ports Corporation Port Freight Logistics Plan – June 2008 .

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