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c Programming

c Programming

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Published by: ezgibulut on May 05, 2011
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12/31/2012

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Variables of the int data type represent whole
numbers. If you try to assign a fraction to an int
variable, the decimal part is ignored and the value
assigned is rounded down (or TRUNCATED) from the
actual value.
Also, assigning a character constant to an int
variable assigns the ASCII value.

#include
int main() {
int a,b,c,d,e;
a = 10;
b = 4.3;
c = 4.8;
d = 'A';
e = 4.3 + 4.8;

printf("a = %d\n", a);
printf("b = %d\n", b);
printf("c = %d\n", c);
printf("d = %d\n", d);
printf("e = %d\n", e);
printf("b+c = %d\n", b+c);

return 0;

}

The output of the example is:

a = 10
b = 4
c = 4
d = 65
e = 9
b+c = 8

Obviously, 10 gets assigned to a without any
problems.
4.3 gets rounded down to 4 when assigned to b.

4.8 gets rounded down to 4 when assigned to c - not
up to 5 as one may have expected.
Now, d gets assigned 65 - the ASCII code for the
character 'A'.
9 gets assigned to e because 4.3+4.8 equals 9.1,
which gets rounded down.
The first 5 printf statements prints out the integer
values of a through to e.
The last printf statement prints out the sum of b
and c, that is, 4 and 4 and not 4.3 and 4.8.

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