INTRODUCTION TO THE IELTS TEST

IELTS test has two forms: the Academic test (or module) and the General Training test (or module). The module that you
t:',,:k(, depends on the reason that you are taking it for. Generally speaking, the Academic Module is for those people who are
to gain entry onto undergraduate or postgraduate education courses or for professional reasons. The General Training
,', f, ,liE: is for those people who wish to join some kinds of vocational or training courses, secondary schools or for immigration
[:C'>:'" and General Training modules try and reflect real life situations to test whether a candidate would survive in
[",gii:;1: speaking social and academic environments. For example, the Part 2 section of the speaking asks candidates to talk,
after 1 minute's preparation, for 1 to 2 minutes on a given general topic. This would test General Training candidates to see if
Hu:;y c;juki give a "work related presentation" to fellow work colleagues and, would test Academic candidates if they can give a
"university style presentation" to fellow students, It tests whether candidates have the English language capability to perform
t;',(:s!'; under some kind of pressure.
JELl'':', ti"'st (both Academic and General Training modules) is divided into four parts: reading, writing, listening and
n,(: listening and speaking tests are exactly the same for the Academic andGeneral Training modules but the
c;;"j writing tests are different. Thus the test appears like this (in the order that you will take the different parts):
ACADEMIC GENERAL TRAINING
Listening 4 sections; 40 questions. 30 minutes 4 sections; 40 questions. 30 minutes
3 sections; 40 questions
3 long texts
1 hour
3 sections; 40 questions
3 long texts
1 hour
2 tasks
1 hour
2 tasks
1 hour
sections
1 14 minutes
3-5eGtkms-"
11 - 14 minutes
1
IELTS ACADEMIC WRITING TEST - TASK 1 TUTORIAL
The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing is not an easy part of the exam. Describing a graph well in 20 minutes is not something
most people can do straight away whether they are English speakers or not. The fact that it is in a foreign language for you as
well doesn't help. Practice is the magic word though. Even good English users need practice for the IELTS exam and it could
mean all the difference between pass and fail. There is limited practice available and it's quite expensive. That's why we
would recommend you download our practice material. You will get more practice for less money. Go to the Home Page to
find more information about our Practice Tests and other Practice Tests available.
The Task
Basically The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing is an information transfer task related to the factual content of an input text(s),
graph(s), table(s) or diagram(s). It can be combinations of these inputs. Usually you will have to describe the information
given in 1, 2 or 3 three inputs but sometimes you have will have to describe a process shown in a diagram.
Marking for the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing will be marked in three areas. You will get a mark from 1 to 9 on Task Fulfillment,
Coherence & Cohesion and Vocabulary and Sentence Structure. Your final band for task 1 will be effectively an average of the
three marks awarded in these areas. Task 1 writing is less important than task 2 and to calculate the final writing mark, more
weight is assigned to the task 2 mark than to task l's mark. To get a good overall mark for The IELTS Academic Task 1
Writing though, both tasks have to be well answered so don't hold back on task 1 or give yourself too little time to answer it
properly.
Task Fulfilment This where you can really make a difference through careful preparation. This mark grades you on basically
"have you answered the question".
Cohesion and Coherence These two are interrelated which is why they are done together. Cohesion is how your writing fits
together. Does your writing with its ideas and content flow logically? Coherence is how you are making yourself understood
and whether the understands what you are saying. An example of bad coherence and cohesion would
be as follows:
1 We went to the beach because it was raining.
Probably the writer of this sentence does not mean "because" as people don't usually go to the beach when it is raining. The
writer should have written:
2 We went to the beach although it was raining.
Sentence 1 has made a cohesion and coherence error (as well as a vocabulary one). "Because" does not join the ideas of the
sentence together correctly and, as a result, the reader does not understand what the writer wants to say. This is an
exaggerated example but it shows what I mean.
Vocabulary and Sentence Structure This area looks at the your grammar and choice of words. The marker will look at whether
the right grammar and words are used and whether they are used at the right time in the right place and in the right way.
Many people are worried about their grammar but, as you can see, grammar is only half of one section of three used to grade
your writing. IELTS is much more interested in communication rather than grammatical accuracy.
Paragraphing for the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
Tilis is a very easy thing to do but it can have an enormous effect on the intelligibility of your writing. Very often people use
no paragraphing in The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing and the examiner is faced with a "sea" of writing with no breaks from
start to finish. For me, the best writings are those where there are paragraphs separated by an empty line and also indented.
In this way your ideas are separated clearly. It shows and gives organization to your writing and makes it more readable. For
teh IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing, you should have a paragraph for your small introduction, a paragraph for each graph that
you are describing and a paragraph for your ending. If there's only one graph to be described, then you should split your
writing into 2 or maybe 3 paragraphs for the one graph.
For a longer section on paragraphing and how useful it can be, see Academic Writing Task 2 Tutorial.
Scales for the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
What I mean by the scale is whether the graphs are marked in hundreds, thousands, millions, pounds, dollars (US, Canadian,
Australian, New Zealand, etc.), kilograms, tons, metres, kilometres, percent and so on. It's important for you to make clear
what your numbers mean for an accurate report of the graph. Don't just say that something cost 1000 for instance. Say it
cost 1000 US dollars. You can either specify the scales at the start in your introduction so the reader knows it for the whole
report or you can use the scale each time you quote a detail in the report.
2
Writing the Task for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
The Introduction
You don't need much here. You only have 150 words to fully answer the question and this is not much. So, you need 1 or 2
sentences describing the following:
• The type(s) of graph you are describing
• The titles of the graph(s)
• The date of the graph(s)
• The scale (see the paragraph above)
You might not have all this information but you should report what you do have. So, for example, your beginning could look
like this:
In this report I am going to describe 2 graphs. The first one is a bar chart showing the relationship between age and crime
and the second is a pie chart showing the types of reported crime in the UK in 2002.
(This example gives an introduction to the Academic Writing Task 1 in Test 3 from ieltshelpnow.com.)
Describing Graphs for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
What you need to do here is factually describe the graphs. You don't need to analyse the data, For example you don't need to
give reasons for why figures are high or low. Sometimes, when there is more than 1 graph, there is a relationship between
the two and you can bring in some comparison but more than this is not necessary. In the same way, no specialised
knowledge of your own is needed or wanted nor your opinions.
Remember the function of many graphs is to describe a trend so be sure that you describe the trends. A trend is how values
change generally over time and it is important to describe the changes along with some of the individual values. We will look
dt trends'abil: later under line graphs.
One important issue with The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing is how much detail to include in your report. This depends really
on how much detail there is in the question. If there is only 1 graph and it doesn't have much numerical data in it, then you
will be expected to include all or nearly all of the numerical detail. If, however, you have 2 graphs, both of which are very
complicated with lots of values, you will not be expected to include everything as you only have 150 words to do the job.
What you will have to do is to include a selection of what you feel is the most important and significant detail that needs to be
included to accurately describe the graph.
You must always have some numerical detail though.
Now let's look individually at the types of graph that you are likely to meet in the exam and how to describe them.
Bar Charts for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
Hopefully you will have described the title of the bar chart in your introduction so you can go straight into the description.
Basically, with a bar chart, you need to describe the bars and their values. When describing a bar chart you first have to
decide in what order to describe the bars, highest value to lowest value or lowest value to highest value. It may be a mixture
of this. If there are very many bars, you can sometimes group together for description 1 or 2 or 3 bars which have similar or
the same values. If there are very many and you can't group them, then just describe the ones that are the most Significant.
Pie Charts for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
Pie charts are relatively straightforward as they only usually have a few sections though this is not always the case. You need
to describe the segments and their values. If there are very many then just describe the ones that are the most significant.
The values are often expressed in percentages but not always so be careful what scale you are using.
Tables for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
These can sometimes be tricky as they provide a lot of information and it is often awkward and difficult to describe every
piece of information. You have to decide and describe the values and sections that are the most significant.
Line Graphs for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
The function of a line graph is to describe a TREND pictorially. You therefore should try and describe the trend in it. If there
are many lines in the graph(s), then just generally describe the trend. If there is only one or two, then use more detail. So,
3
describe the movement of the line(s) of the graph giving numerical detail at the important points of the line.
To describe the movement, there is some language which will always be useful. Below is a list of language you can use. Check
with your dictionary words that you don't understand and practice using the words/phrases so you use them in the right way.
As you will see, there are a number of words which are similar in meaning. This means that you will be able to use a variety
of vocabulary which gives a good impression to the examiner who will read and mark your writing. The words below are
particularly useful for line graphs but they can also be used where appropriate to describe the other types of graph.
Expressing the Movement of a Line
Rise (to)
Increase (to)
Go up to
Grow (to)
Climb (to)
Boom
Peak (at)
Fall (to)
Decline (to)
Decrease (to)
Dip (to)
Drop (to)
Go down (to)
Reduce (to)
Level out
No change
a rise
an increase
growth
a climb
a boom
(reach) a peak (at)
a fall (of)
a decline (of)
a decrease (of)
a dip (of)
a drop (of)
a red uction (of)
A slump
a leveling out
no change
Remain stable (atr ---­
Remain steady (at)
Stay (at)
Stay constant (at)
Maintain the same
~ e v e l
Dramatic dramatically
Sharp sharply
Huge hugely
Enormous enormously
Steep steeply
Substantial substantially
Considerable considerably
Significant Significantly
Marked markedly
Moderate moderately
Slight slightly
Small
Minimal minimally
Describing the Speed of a Change
Agjectives
Rapid rapidly
Quick quickly
Swift swiftly
4
Sudden suddenly
Steady steadily
Gradual gradually
Slow slowly
The Ending for the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
You do not need a long and analytical conclusion for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing, but I do feel that you need to write
something to end the report for reasons of structure. All you need to do is to write:
This ends my report.
This is all you need to end your Task 1; I think it's important to do this as it rounds off the report for the reader.
Describing a Process for the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
We have looked at the various types of graph that you might be asked to describe but you also might have to describe a
diagram representing a process,
First of all, the introduction and the ending should be more or less the same.
Then, work out the various stages of the process. Take each one separately (it's only probably gOing to have a limited number
of stages) and describe them fully. Fully is the important word as reaching the word limit has proved harder in this task, If
you have this problem, don't be afraid to use your imagination to add to detail about the process,
Other Hints for the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
• DON'T copy any part of the question in your answer. This is not your own work and therefore will be disregarded by
the examiner and deducted from the word count. You can use individual words but be careful of using long "chunks"
of the question text.
• Don't repeat yourself or the same ideas. This gives a bad impression and the examiner realises that it isn't adding to
the content of your report.
• If you are weak at English grammar, try to use short sentences. This allows you to control the grammar and the
meaning of your writing much more easily and contributes to a better cohesion and coherence mark, It's much easier
to make things clear in a foreign language if you keep your sentences short!
• Think about the tenses of your verbs. If you're writing about something that happened in the past, your verbs wHl
need to be in the past tenses, If you're describing the future, you will need to use the future tenses. If it's a habitual
action, you'll need the present simple tense and so on, If you have time, a quick check of your verbs at the end of the
exam can help you find errors. For describing graphs you will probably need past tenses whereas, for describing a
process, you will probably need the present simple. Think about the verbs while practising and then it will become
easier when you do the exam.
• As I just said, if you have finished the exam with time to spare, DON'T just sit there!! Check what you have done. If
you have time after the check, check again. And so on ....
• Don't be irrelevant. Although you can use your imagination to expand on your answer, if any part of your report is
totally unrelated to the question and put in to just put up the word count, then the examiner will not take it into
account and deduct it from the word count,
• If you want to improve, there's no secret. Practice, Practice, Practice. You won't get better sitting and doing nothing.
Even good English users need practice for the IEL TS exam. It could make all the difference between your getting the
band that you need, and getting half a band less than you need and having to wait 3 months to do the exam again.
Finally, there are no correct answers or methods. Here I've given you some ideas to guide you and hopefully to help you but
the questions can be answered well in different ways. Good luck with the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing. I hope that this free
tutorial has helped you! Below are links to the other free IEL TS academic tutorials,
While taking this test, many non native english speakers do not properly join 2 small
sentences. The proper use of connectives mentioned below will be helpful. Try to use
them in your sentences.
Familiarity with these words would be useful in all IELTS test modules.
Common connective words indicating:
Addition Sequence
II Consequence
Contrast
I II II I
however on the other
in addition
first(ly) initially hand despite in spite of as a result thus
and similarly
second(ly) etc.to though although but so therefore
likewise as well as
on the contrary begin with then consequently
besides further more
otherwise yet instead next earlier/later it follows that
also moreover and then
after this/that thereby of
too not only ..; but
following this/that rather whereas eventually
even besides this/that
afterwards nonetheless even
admittedly
then in that case
though
compared with in
contrast alternatively

I
Certainty
II
Condition
II
Definition
II
Summary
I
certainly is refers to in conclusion in
plainly of course
if unless whether
means that is provided that for summary lastly finally
undoubtedly consists of so that whether to sum up to conclude
depending on to recapitulate in short
Example Reason
I II II
Time
II I
for instance one
smce as so
before since as example for example
because (of)
until meanwhile pust as in particular
due to owing to
at the moment such as namely
the reason why
when whenever to illustrate
in other words
-." .
as soon as just as
leads to cause
6
Writing: Task 2
Name: Date:
Topics Issues Positive
Needs
attention
Topic / Task
Main Issues identified at beainnina
Clear, justified paragraph structure
Topic sentence in each paraaraoh
Ideas in supporting sentences:
,!i10
,;
Ideas and ,/
Relevant
supporting
,/
Consistent, easy to understand
arguments
,/
Clearly presented, sufficiently developed
,/
Give adequate attention to all aspects of topic
~ ,
Conclusion:
"
" ~
,/
Summarises main points
- . - - ~ - . - ~
,/
Indicates argument ended
Essay right length
Register appropriate
Ideas relevant to topic
Text:,
"
, ,
Clarity of
,/
Easy to understand
message
,/
Logically organised
,/
Contains appropriate paragraphing
,/
Contains relevant cohesive devices
Errors have minimal effect on message
Varied and accurate set of vocabulary including: "
>
"
-,
,/
Word formation
,/
Phrasal verbs
,/
Idiomatic expressions
,/
Collocations
,/
Fixed expressions
Varied and accurate use of structures including:
' ,
%
.
Vocabulary
,', ;,.,.,
,/
Verb constructions
and syntax
,/
Relative clauses
,/
Sentence types
,/
Active and passive voice
,/
Conditionals
,/
Infinitives and gerunds
,/
Prepositions
,/
Articles
Other
7
June 1 2002
Soon people who cannot work with computers will be disadvantaged. To what extent do you agree or
disagree with this idea?
Sep 12 2002
Task 1: Write a letter to a bus company saying you have left something valuable on the bus and tell them
what to do if they [md it.
Task 2: Nowadays, radio is being replaced by TV and the Internet. To what extent do you agree or
disagree with this idea?
?
These days, schools introduce behaviour of what is 'right' or 'wrong'. This responsibility is not only
parents'. To what extent do you agree or disagree?
13 Feb 2003
Education is a lifelong task. Do you agree or disagree?
14 Feb 2003
Young people are encouraged to travel or work for one year after high school and before
university studies. Write the advantages and disadvantages of this matter.
OR
Young people are encouraged to travel or work for one year after high school and before
university studies. Do you think it is a good idea to do so?
March 3 2003
Task 1: You have recently moved to a new house. There has been damage after you have moved into the
house. Write a letter to your landlord explaining what has happened and ask him what you can do.
Task 2: Nowadays, people care about their appearance more than before. Do you agree or disagree?
7 March 2003
Governments should spend more money on education than on recreation and sports. Do you agree or
disagree?
9 March 2003
Technology has facilitated our lives so much and given us a lot of freedom. Some people, however,
believe that it has caused more problems for us. What is your opinion? (ai p p g . co m)
April 25 2003 (General)
Task 1: You have asked for accommodation to do a course in a country; your plan has changed and you
would like to ask for new accommodation. Write the agency and explain your situation and ask for your
new accommodation.
Task 2: Shopping has become a :favourite pastime among young people. Why do you think it is like that,
and do you think they must be encouraged to do other things rather than shopping?
8
April 23 2003
Task I: Write a letter to a company you worked for and say what you think about good or weak points of
the company; say whether you think some changes should be made.
Task2: Nowadays, some people still prefer to ride bicycles. To what extent do you think this will help us
in today's life?
May 8 2003
Academic Task 2: Governments have to place the same number of men and women in different fields of
study in universities. To what extent do you agree or disagree with this statement?
May 18,2003
People's character is influenced by environment rather than genetics. Do you agree or disagree?
May 21 2003
Task 1- a table showing difference between two African countries was given, and it was asked to compare
them from different points of view.
Task 2- in the 21 st century, there is no use to pay expenses for wild animals protection. What's your idea
about this matter?
31 May 2003
Task 2: Is technology time-consuming or does it save time?
Task 2: The elderly people of over 50 years of age should be retired and be replaced by the young. Do you
agree or disagree?
30 May (Abu Dhabi)
First task: write a letter to the sports center manager complaining
about some problems you face when you go to his sports center.
Second task: write whether you support that employees' salaries are.
not enough to make them happy. Benefits like health insurance etc.
shou1d be given to make them happier.
7 June 2003
Task 1: You have been going to a sport club. Recently there are some problems with the club. Write a
letter to the club, mention the problems and make suggestions.
Task 2: In the world today, how can the companies keep their employees happy? Express your idea and
bring reasons, for example how salary, health care and holiday can make employees happy.
Task One: A company has invited you for a job interview, but the train that you have taken was delayed.
Write a letter to the railway company and explain the situation. Write what they can do for you. (What
you want them to do for you?)
Task Two: People follow interests and have hobbies (e.g. collecting or making things) Do you think it is
pointless? How can people learn from hobbies?
14th June 2003 (Academic)
Smoking tobacco like other dangerous drugs should be made illegaL Agree or disagree?
15 June 2003 (Academic)
Task one: A table comparing economic and social features of two Indian Ocean countries.
9
Task two: Wild animals have no place in the 21st century and trying to preserve these animals is a waste
of resources. To what extent do you agree or disagree?
July 62003
Task 1: A friend has written you a letter and offered you help in your forthcoming trip to a foreign
country. He has offered you to help you find suitable accommodation. Write him a letter and tell him what
you have in mind for accommodation.
Task 2: Education is sometimes considered as something for the y o u t h ~ Some people, however, consider it
as a lifelong task. What is your opinion? Give reasons and support your ideas with specific supports.
Task 2: It is good for school and university students to take part in part-time jobs. Do you agree or
disagree?
20 July 2003 (Academic)
Task 1: A graph comparing the value of videos for sale and rental
in the u.s and ED between 1992 and 2000 (It consisted of 4 graphs in one).
Task 2: Some people argue that governments should spend money only on
medicine and education and that things like theaters and sports stadiums are
luxurious. Agree or disagree?
25 July 2003 (Academic)
Task 1: A diagram about some forest which has burnt out and started fo grow again. After 50, 100, 150,
and 300 years of time, the forest has reached its pre-fire status.
Task 2: Nowadays, the gap between countryside and cities has increased in many countries. Is it the same
in your country? What can governments do to reverse this?
OR
There is a gap in standards of living between countryside and cities.
How true is this in your country? What measures should be taken to reduce this gap?
28 July 2003 (Academic)
Task 1: Rainfall and temperature changes in .two different countries (Nigeria and Brazil) _ the graph
included in the group files.
Task 2: Young people are encouraged to travel or work for one year after high school and before
university studies. Write the advantages and disadvantages of this matter.
9 Aug 2003
Task 1: You are invited for a job interview recently, but the train that you have taken delayed. Write a
letter to the railway company and
a. Explain your journey
b. Write what you want them to do
Task 2: Some people follow interests have hobbies (collection, making things), but some people think that
it is pointless. Why do people need hobbies? How can they learn from hobbies?
9 Aug 2003 (Academic)
Task one: A table showing the increasing number of elderly aged more than 100, by
gender in UK in four consequent different years in 20th century.
Task two: With the advent of computers the role of teachers are going to be faded in
classrooms. Agree or Disagree?
OR
10
Task1: A table with 12 numbers giving information about UK residents who are aged over 100 between
1941 and 2001.
Task2: As computers are more and more used in education, some people argue that in future there will be
no role for teachers. Agree or disagree?
16 Aug 2003 (Academic)
Language and culture are respected less in comparison with the past. Do you agree or disagree?
28 Aug 2003 (Academic)
Task 2: Ki1ling animals and using their flesh for food is not right. Do you agree or disagree?
30 Aug 2003 (General)
Task 1: You have just fmished a two-day course in a college. Write a letter and explain the details of the
course. Give suggestions to make the course better.
Task 2: Riding bicycles ...
30 Aug 2003 (General)
Task 1: You are going to do a course in another country; your plan has changed. Write to the agency,
explain the situation and ask them for new acconunodation.
Task 2: Young people nowadays would like to go shopping in their free times. Why do people do this? Is
it good or should it be substituted by other activities?
30 Aug 2003 (General)
Task1: you took a two-day course. You are asked to send your
conunents. Write a letter and:
· Say details about this course
· which part of course was useful?
· Give your suggestions
Task2: in spite of modem technologies for transport, many people
believe bicycle is the best vehicle for transportation. OR
In the present world, how bicycle is effective on everyday life?
13 Sep 2003 (General)
Task 1: You have broken your leg and are staying at home for a few weeks. Your classmates have sent
you so many presents and cards. Write a letter to them and describe how you spend your time and tell
them about your recovery.
Task 2: Nowadays, children have a lot of homework to do. Some people, however, believe that less
homework means less stress for children, so they will be able to learn other useful skills, too. What is
your opinion?
20 Sep 2003 (General)
Taskl: One ofyour pen friends wants to come to your country and you ha ve never seen himlher. You will
be late at the airport. Write a letter to himlher and
*Explain why you will be late
*Tell a place in order to find him so easily
*How you should recognize himlher
T ASK2: Should mass media publish details of people's private lives or should they be controlled?
11
20 Sep 2003 (Academic)
Task 2: The British police do not cany guns. Do you think it is good or bad?
25 Sep 2003 (General)
Task 1: You have purchased a camera from the duty free shop. There has been something wrong with the
camera. Write a letter to the shop and describe what you felt when you found out about the problem. Tell
them what you expect them to do.
Task 2: Nowadays, many people from different nationalities and cultures get married together. What do
you think are the advantages and disadvantages of this?
4 Oct 2003 (Academic)
Task 1: Two charts comparing the number of UK households across 2 different years: 1981,2001.
Task 2: Nowadays environmental problems are too big to be managed by individual persons or individual
countries. In other words, it is an international problem. To what extent do you agree or disagree?
12 Oct 2003 (Academic)
Task 2: Juvenile delinquents should undertake such punishments as cleaning the streets or such rather
than be imprisoned. To what extent do you agree or disagree?
18 Oct 2003 (General)
Some people believe----':-ith-a--:-t-u-m-=-·v·ersities are responsible for preparation of young people for employment.
Others believe universities have other responsibilities. What do you think about the responsibility of
universities?
12
Plague words or phrases for IElTS Examination
Avoid problems created by these words or phrases:
1. And also nris is often redlU1dant.
2. And/or Outside of the legal world, most of the time this construction is used, it is neither
necessary nor logical. Try using one word or the other.
3. As to whether The single word whether will suffice.
4. Basically, essentiaJly, totally These words seldom add anything useful to a sentence. Try
the sentence without them and, almost always, you will see the sentence improve.
5. Being that or being as These words are a non-standard substitute for because. Being that
Because I was the youngest child, I always wore hand-rue-downs.
6. Considered to be Eliminate the to be and, unless it's important who's doing the considering,
try to eliminate the entire phrase.
7. Due to the fact that Using this phrase is a sure sign that your sentence is in trouble. Did you
mean because? Due to is acceptable after a linking verb (The team's failure was due to
illness among the stars.); otherwise, avoid it.
8. Each and every One or the other, but
9. Equally as Something can be equally important or as important as, but not equally as
important.
10. Etc. This abbreviation often suggests a kind of laziness. It might be better to provide one
more example, thereby suggesting that you could have written more, but chose not to.
11. He/she is a convention created to avoid gender bias in writing, but it doesn't work very
well and it becomes downright obtrusive if it appears often. Use he or she or pluralize (where
appropriate) so you can avoid the problem of the gender-specific pronolU1 altogether.
12. Firstly, secondly, thirdly, etc. Number things withfirst, second, third, etc. and not with
these adverbial forms.
13. Got Many writers regard got as an ugly word, and they have a point. If you can avoid it in
writing, do so. I Hff'/e got to must begin studying right away. I have get two pairs of sneakers.
14. Had ought or hadn't ought. Eliminate the auxiliary had. You Ha6B!t ought not to pester
your sister that way.
15. Interesting One of the least interesting words in English, the word you use to describe an
ugly baby. If you show us why something is interesting, you're doing your job.
16. In terms of See if you can eliminate this phrase.
17. Irregardless No one word will get you in trouble with the boss faster than this one. (A I P
PG . com)
18. Kind of or sort of. These are OK in informal situations, but in formal academic prose,
substitute somewhat, rather or slightly. We were pleased with the results.
19. Literally Ibis word might be confused with literarily, a seldom used adverb relating to
authors or scholars and their various professions. Usually, though, if you say it's "literally a
13
jungle out there," you probably meanjiguratively, but you're probably better off without
either word.
20. Lots or lots ofIn academic prose, avoid these colloquialisms when you can use many or
much. Remember, when you do use these words, that lots of something countable are plural.
Remember, too, that a lot of requires three words: "He spent a lot of money" (not alot of).
21. Just Use only when you need it, as in just the right amount.
22. Nature See if you can get rid of this word. Movies of a violent nature are probably just
violent movies.
23. Necessitate It's hard to imagine a situation that would necessitate the use of this word.
24. Of Don't write would of, should of, could of when you mean would have, should have,
could have.
25. On account of Use because instead.
26. Only Look out for placement. Don't write "He only kicked that ball ten yards" when you
mean ''He kicked that ball only ten yards. "
27. Orientate The new students become oriented, not orientated. The same thing applies to
administrate -- we administer a project.
28. Per Use according to instead. We did it per your instructions? Naah. (This word is used
frequently in legal language and in teclmical specifications, where it seems to be necessary
and acceptable.)----­
29. Plus Don't use this word as a conjunction. Use and instead.
30. Point in time Forget it! At this time or at this point or now will do the job.
31. Previous as in "our previous discussion." Use earlier or nothing at all.
32. So as to Usually, a simple to will do.
33. Suppose to, use to. The hard "d" sound in supposed. to and used. to disappears in
pronunciation, btt it shouldn't disappear in spelling. "We used to do that" or "We were
supposed to do it this way."
34. The reason why is because. Deja vu all over again!
35. Thru This nonstandard spelling of through should not be used in academic prose.
36. 'Til Don't use this word instead of until or till, even in bad poetry.
37. Try and Don't try and do something. Try to do something.
38. Thusly Use thus or therefore instead.
39. Utilize Don't use this word where use would suffice. (Same goes for utilization.)
40. Very, really, quite (and other intensifiers) Like basically, these words seldom add
anything useful. Try the sentence without them and see if it improves.
14
• What should a government do for a country to become successful?
• Should sports classes be sacrificed in High School so students can concentrate on
Academic subjects?
• Nowadays doctors can become very rich. Maybe they should not focus on profitable
activities such as plastic surgery or looking after rich patients and concentrate more on
patients health, no matter how rich they are?
• Will modern technology, such as the internet ever replace the book or the written word
as the main source of information?
• Discuss the advantage and disadvantage of giving international Aid to poor countries.
• Should criminals be punished with lengthy jail terms or re-educated and rehabituated,
using community service programs for instance, before being reintroduced to society?
• Computers can translate all kinds of languages well so our children don't need to learn
more languages in the future?
The following are the topics of previous IELTS Writing test:
June 1 2002
Soon people who cannot work with computers will be disadvantaged. To what extent do you
agree or disagree with this idea?
SeD 122002
Task 1: Write a letter to a bus company saying you have left something valuable on the bus
and tell them what to do if they find it.
Task 2: Nowadays, radio is being replaced by TV and the Internet. To what extent do you
agree or disagree with this idea?
These days, schools introduce behaviour of what is 'right' or 'wrong'. This responsibility is not
only parents'. To what extent do you agree or disagree?
13 Feb 2003
Education is a lifelong task. Do you agree or disagree?
14 Feb 2003
Young people are encouraged to travel or work for one year after high school and before
university studies. Write the advantages and disadvantages of this matter.
OR
Young people are encouraged to travel or work for one year after high school and before
university studies. Do you think it is a good idea to do so?
March 3 2003
Task 1: You have recently moved to a new house. There has been damage after you have
moved into the house. Write a letter to your landlord explaining what has happened and ask
him what you can do. '
Task 2: Nowadays, people care about their appearance more than before. Do you agree or
disagree?
15
7 March 2003
Governments should spend more money on education than on recreation and sports. Do you
agree or disagree?
9 March 2003
Technology has facilitated our lives so much and given us a lot of freedom. Some people,
however, believe that it has caused more problems for us. What is your opinion?
April 25 2003 (General)
Task 1: You have asked for accommodation to do a course in a country; your plan has
changed and you would like to ask for new accommodation. Write the agency and explain your
situation and ask for your new accommodation.
Task 2: Shopping has become a favourite pastime among young people. Why do you think it is
like that, and do you think they must be encouraged to do other things rather than shopping?
April 23 2003
Task 1: Write a letter to a company you worked for and say what you think about good or
weak pOints of the company; say whether you think some changes should be made.
Task2: Nowadays, some people still prefer to ride bicycles. To what extent do you think this
will help us in today's life?
May 82003
Academic Task 2: Governments have to place the same number of men and women in
different fields of study in universities. To what extent doyouallree-or disagree with this
statement?
May 18,2003
People's character is influenced by environment rather than genetics. Do you agree or
disagree?
May 212003
Task 1- a table showing difference between two African countries was given, and it was asked
to compare them from different points of view.
Task 2- in the 21st century, there is no use to pay expenses for wild animals protection.
What's your idea about this matter?
31 May 2003
Task 2: Is technology time-consuming or does it save time?
Task 2: The elderly people of over 50 years of age should be retired and be replaced by the
young. Do you agree or disagree?
30 May (Abu Dhabi)
First task: write a letter to the sports center manager complaining about some problems you
face when you go to his sports center.
Second task: write whether you support that employees' salaries are not enough to make
them happy. Benefits like health insurance etc. should be given to make them happier.
7 June 2003
Task 1: You have been going to a sport club. Recently there are some problems with the club.
Write a letter to the club, mention the problems and make suggestions.
Task 2: In the world today, how can the companies keep their employees happy? Express your
idea and bring reasons, for example how salary, health care and holiday can make employees
happy.
16
Task One: A company has invited you for a job interview, but the train that you have taken
was delayed. Write a letter to the railway company and explain the situation. Write what they
can do for you. (What you want them to do for you?)
Task Two: People follow interests and have hobbies (e.g. collecting or making things) Do you
think it is pointless? How can people learn from hobbies?
14th June 2003 (Academic)
Smoking tobacco like other dangerous drugs should be made illegal. Agree or disagree?
15 June 2003 (Academic)
Task one: A table comparing economic and social features of two Indian Ocean countries.
Task two: Wild animals have no place in the 21st century and trying to preserve these animals
is a waste of resources. To what extent do you agree or disagree?
July 62003
Task 1: A friend has written you a letter and offered you help in your forthcoming trip to a
foreign country. He has offered you to help you find suitable accommodation. Write him a
letter and tell him what you have in mind for accommodation.
Task 2: Education is sometimes considered as something for the youth. Some people,
however, consider it as a lifelong task. What is your opinion? Give reasons and support your
ideas with specific supports.
Task 2: It is good for school and university students to take part in part-time jobs. Do you
agree or disagree?
20 July 2003 (Academic)
Task 1: A graph comparing the value of videos for sale and rental in the U.S and EU between
1992 and 2000 (It consisted of 4 graphs in one).
Task 2: Some people argue that governments should spend money only on medicine and
education and that things like theaters and sports stadiums are luxurious. Agree or disagree?
25 July 2003 (Academic)
Task 1: A diagram about some forest which has burnt out and started to grow again. After 50,
100, 150, and 300 years of time, the forest has reached its pre-fire status.
Task 2: Nowadays, the gap between countryside and cities has increased in many countries. Is
it the same in your country? What can governments do to reverse this?
OR..
There is a gap in standards of living between countryside and cities.
How true is this in your country? What measures should be taken to reduce this gap?
28 July 2003 (Academic)
Task 1: Rainfall and temperature changes in two different countries (Nigeria and Brazil) _ the
graph included in the group files.
Task 2: Young people are encouraged to travel or work for one year after high school and
before university studies. Write the advantages and disadvantages of this matter.
9 Aug 2003
Task 1: You are invited for a job interview recently, but the train that you have taken delayed.
Write a letter to the railway company and
a. Explain your journey
b. Write what you want them to do
Task 2: Some people follow interests have hobbies (collection, making things), but some
people think that it is pOintless. Why do people need hobbies? How can they learn from
hobbies?
17
WRITING
WRITING TASK 1
You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.
The charts below show the results ofa survey ofadult education. The first chart
shows the reasons why adults decide to study. The pie chart shows how people
think the costs ofadult education should be shared.
Write a report for a university lecturer, describing the information shown below.
You should write at least 150 words.
Interest in subject
To gain qualifications
Helpful for current job
To improve prospects
of promotion
Enjoy
leaming/studying
To able to change
jobs
To meet people
10 % 20 30 40
Individual
40%
How the costs of each
coul"se should be shal"ed
Taxpayer
25%
Employer
35%
18
WRITING TASK 2
You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.
Present a written argument or case to an educated reader with no specialist knowledge ofthe
following topic:
There are many different types ofmusic in the world today. Why do we need
music? Is the traditional music ofa country more important than the
Internarional music that is heard everywhere nowadays?
You should write at least 250 words.
Use your own ideas, knowledge and experience and support your arguments with examples
and relevant evidence.
19
WRITING
WRITING TASK 1
You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.
The diagram below shows how the Australian Bureau ofMeteorology
collects up-to-the-minute information on the weather in order to produce
reliable forecasts.
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information shown
below.
You should write at least 150 words.
INCOMING
INFORMATION
ANALYSIS &
FORECASTING
P R E ~ A R I N G THE
BROADCAST
BROADCAST
20
WRITING TASK 2
You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.
Present a written argument or case to an educated reader with no specialist knowledge of the
following topic.
Should wealthy nations be required to share their wealth among poorer
nations by providing such things as food and education? Or is it the.
responsibility ofthe governments ofpoorer nations to look after their
citizens themselves?
You should write at least 250 words.
Use your own ideas, knowledge and experience and support your arguments with examples
and with relevant evidence.
21
WRITING
WRITING TASK 1
You should spend about 20 minutes on this task
The chart below shows the amount Qf moneyper week spent on fast foods in
Britain. The graph shows the trends in consumption offast foods.
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the infonnation shown below.
You should write at least 150 words.
Expenditure on fast foods by income groups
Pnnce prJ! ~ } ( ; ( : ~ ; ( ! n
ppr
40
:30
20
15
10
5
Hlghlncom0
Consumption of fastfoods 1970 -1990
graMme;:;
22
WRITING TASK 2
You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.
Present a written argument or case to an educated reader with no specialist knowledge of the
following topic:
News editors decide what to broadcast on television and what to print in
newspapers. What factors do you think influence these decisions? Do we
become used to bad news? Would it be better ifmore good news was
reported?
You should write at least 250 words.
Use your own ideas, knowledge and experience and support your arguments with
examples and relevant evidence.
23
WRITING
WRITING TASK 1
You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.
Chorleywood is a village near London whose population has increased
steadily since the middle ofthe nineteenth century. The map below shows
the development ofthe village.
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the development ofthe
village.
You should write at least 150 words.
Omfll.'lywood Parl{
i;lI\i..l Golf GIJ'Jn1e
1883 ·1022
.. - _. Fmifway (bl"ilt 1QOG)
24
WRITING TASK 2
You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.
Present a written argument or case to an educated reader with no specialist knowledge of the
following topic:
The idea ofhaving a single career is becoming an old fashioned one. The
new fashion mil be to have several careers or ways ofearning money and
further education will be something that continues throughout life.
You should write at least 250 words.
Use your own ideas, knowledge and experience and support your arguments with examples
and relevant evidence. .
25
PRACTICE WRITING TEST
Writing Task 1
You are advised to spend a maximum of 20 minutes on this task.
The flowchart below shows the process involved in writing a formal
academic essay for a particular university course.
Describe the stages ofthe process in a reportfor a university lecturer.
You should write at least 150 words.
- G> First Private Tutorial
- Topic: discuss task and topic
with tutor
1
- Reading List; obtain list of
resources - books, articles
G> Research
1
- Library: read literature, take
notes
- Field work: give questionnaires,
interviews, surveys
G> First Draft
.. Plan: organise essay content,
produce brief outline
- First Draft & Check: use formal
check
G> Second Private Tutorial OR
Study Group Discussion
- Analysis: discuss first draft
problem areas
- Advice: Ask for further ideas,
...
G> Second Draft
1
- Input Revision: read resource
material again
- Second Draft &Check: include
check
0- Final Draft
- Final Draft & Check; do final
rewrite, spellcheck
+ compile bibliography *
+ add title page
SUBMIT BY DEADLINE
Preparation and Writing of a Formal Essay

I* bibliography -list of books referred to
Writing Task 2
You are advised to spend a maximum of 40 minutes on this task.
Write an essay for a tutor on the following topic:
The world is experiencing a dramatic increase in population. This is causing
problems notonlyforpoor, undeveloped countries, butalsofor industrialised
and developing nations.
Describe some of the problems that overpopulation causes, and suggest at
least one possible solution.
You should write at least 250 words.
You are required to support your ideas with relevant information and examples based on your
own knowledge and experience.
26
Writing module (1 hour)
-­ - "
:
Tip Strip
• Read the ques1ion very
carefully.
• The instructions state
that you should
'describe'the
information in the
graph. You should
NOT speculate about
the reasons for the
data or give reasons
for it.
• Look carefully at the
labels. What do the
diagrams represent?
• Take a minute to plan
how you will describe
the information. Are
there any significant
features? Can you
compare or contrast
any of the data?
• Think of how best to
group the information
in the diagram.
• Write one or two
paragraphs, making
sure that you cover all
the important points.
• Read through your
answer when you
have finished and
check grammar.
spelling and
punctuation.
• Check that you have
linked your points
together well.
• Make sure you have
written enough
words. You will not be
penalised for writing
too much but keep an
eye on the time: you
will need. to leave
about 40 minutes for
Task 2..
You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.
The graph below shows how money was spent on ofentertai11lnent
over afive-year period.
Write a reportfor a unh'el'sity lecturer describing the informatiol1 shown below.
You should write at least ISO words.
Cinema
250
Video
Fun Money
Music
World entertainment markets
200
Publishing
150
100
Television
50
1995 2000
Asia United· States
SOlllce: Booz AUen & Hamilton Figures are in $ billion
1995 2000
7
Tip Strip
• Read the question very
carefully.
• Underline key points in
the question and make
sure your answer is
relevant to these.
• Consider your
personal view on the
topic. Do you agree,
disagree or have an
impartial view?
• Take a minute to plan
what you are going to
say in your answer.
Think of the main idea
you will include in
each paragraph, then
think of some
supporting points.
• Before you start
writing, think about
how you will introduce
the topic. DO NOT
copy the question.
• Include some
arguments that are
relevant to your own
society or personal
experience.
• Clearly state your
conclusion. Make sure
that you address the
question.
• Read through your
answer when you have
finished and check
grammar, spelling and
punctuation.
• Check that you have
linked your points
together well.
• Make sure you have
written enough
words. You will not be
penalised for writing
more than 250 words
but you will not gain
extra marks either.
You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.
Present a written argument or case to an educated non-specialist audience on the
following topic:
Under British andAustraliull laws ajll1Y ill a criminal case has no access to
information about the defendant's past criminal record. This protects tlte
person who is being accused ofthe crime.
Some lawyers have suggested that this practice should be changed and that a
jury should be given all the pastfacts before they reach their decision about
the case.
Do you agree or disagree? Give reasons for your answer.
You should write at least 250 words.
You should use your own ideas, knowledge and experience and support your arguments
with examples and relevant evidence.
28
Writing module (1 hour)
'WRITING TASK 1
< ~ " ~
You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.
The graphs below show the types o/music albums purchased by people in
Brit"in according to sex and age.
Write a report/or a university lecturer describing the in/ontUition shown below.
You should write at least 150 words.
Percentage of people
50·,
who buy Pop Music
40
Percentage of people
who buy Rock Music
01 percentage of people
25° who buy Classical Music
OJ male
I female
016-24
• 25·34
D 35-44
. ~
rQjmale
., I
I[HH,-24
female
i' 25-34.
in .3544
d045+ .
29
WRITING TASK 2
w .",,___ ___
You should spend about 40 minutes on this task
Present a written argument or case to an educated non-specialist audience on the
followingtopic:
Some employers reward members ofstaff for their contribution to
the company by giving them extra money. This practice can act as an incentive
for some but may also have a negative impact on others.
To what extent is this style ofmanagement effective?
Are there better ways ofencouraging employees to work hard?
You should write at least 250 words.
You should use your own ideas, know ledge and experience and support your arguments
with examples and relevant evidence.
30
Writing module (1 hour)
Q
You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.
The graphs below show the number ofmen and women infit/! andpart-time
employmel11 in Australia between 1973 and 1993.
Write a report/or a university lecturer describing the information sh01vn
below.
You should write at least 150 words.
15-19 25-29 35-39 45-39 55-59 65+
Age group (years) Age group (years)
Part-llme·mBieli Part-time females
Full-time females
15-19 25-29 35-39 45-39 55-59 65+
25
'JI>
::;0':
.
15
'0·
, " '""""':(' o
15-19 25-29 35-39 45-39 55-59 65+ 15-19 25-29 35-39 45-39 55-59 65'
Age group (years) Age group (years)
Source: labour Force Survey
31
You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.
Present a written argument or case to an educated non-specialist audience on the
following topic:
In the past, sporting champions used to be motivated primarily by the (lesire
to win a match or to break world records. These days, they are more likely to
be motivated by prize money and the opportunity to befamolls.
What message does this send to young people and how does this altitude to
sport affect the sports themselves?
Give reasonsforyour answers.
You should write at least 250 words.
You should use your own ideas, knowledge and experience and support your arguments
with examples and relevant evidence.
32
Writing module (1 hour)
You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.
The diagrams below show the development ofthe horse over a period of40
million years.
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information shown
below.
You should write at least 150 words.
\
I
Eohippus - 40 million years ago
\
r
t
/
Mesohippus - 30
IIl
illion years ago
Mcrychippus - 15 million years ago
Horse" modern
TM eVolution. ojthehorse,withpl1r/ieularernPliasis
the ·changJngfoot strUctUre
33
You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.
,
Present a written argument or case to an educated non-specialist audience on the
following topic:
'Failure is proofthat the desire wasl1 't strong enough.'
To what extent do YOll agree with this statement? Give reasons
for yoIll' answer.
You should write at least 250 words.
You should use your own ideas, knowledge and experience and support your arguments
with examples and relevant evidence.
Writing module (1 hour)
;VVRIT)NG TASK
;.'" ,--"", - .. -
You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.
The graph andpie chart below give information on in-house training
courses in a large financial company.
Write a reportfor a university lecturer describing the information shown
below.
You should write at least 150 words.
Training - hours per year
EJ Technical
• Career development
LI Healh and safety
• Interpersonal skills
Office Workers' Attitude to Training
Waste of
valuable time
Important for job
Good for
networking .
Good excuse
for achange
%
o 90
[J Manager
Li Secretary
35
I;WRITING TASk"'2
1 ..
You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.
Present a written argument or case to an educated non-specialist audience on the
following topic:
To be label/ell II 'Work ofArt', a painting, sculpture or other artform should
(lispia)' certain qualities that are IInique. However, over the past centwy
there has been a (lecline in the quality of prize-winning artwork and it is
now possiblefor quite ordinary pieces ofart to be labelled 'masterpieces'
whilst true works ofart pass unnoticed.
Do you agree or disagree? Give reasol1sforyour answer.
You should write at least 250 words.
You should use your own ideas, knowledge and experience and support your arguments
with examples and relevant evidence.
36
PRACTICE WRITING TEST
Writing Task 1
You are advised to spend a maximum of 20 minutes on this task.
The table below summarises some data collected by a college books hop
for the month ofFebruary 2000.
Write a report describing the sales figures ofvarious types ofpublications,
based on the information shown in the table.
You shOuld write at least 150 words.
Non- Book Club Members
Book Club
Members Total College Staff College Students Members of Public
Fiction '
Non-fiction
Magazines
44
29
332
31
194
1249
-
122
82
76
942
33
151
1287
1696
Total 40S 1474 204 1051 3134
Writing Task 2
You are advised to spend a maximum of 40 minutes on this task.
Your college tutor has asked you to write an essay on the following topic:
Studying the English language in an Ellglish-speakingcountry is the best but
not the only way to learn the lallguage.
Do you agree or disagree with this statement?
You should write at least 250 words.
You are required to support your arguments with relevant information and examples based on
your own ideas, knowledge and experience.
37
PRACTICE WRITING TEST
Writing Task 1
You are advised to spend a maximum of 20 minutes on this task.
The bar chart below shows the number ofoverseas students enrolled in
a second year Graphic Design course at a college in the south ofEngland.
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information
shown.
You should write at least 150 words.
KEY
titii.l Enrolled in CAD core option I M Male students
Enrolled in Photography core option F - Female students
10
Sweden
8
France Germany
No. of
enrQlled 6
students
from
4
abroad
2
0
M F M F M F M F M F
It CAD - Computer-Aided Design
Writing Task 2
You are advised to spend a maximum of 40 minutes on this task.
Write an essay for a university lecturer on the following topic:
People in all modern societies use drugs, but today 's youth are experimenting
with both legal and illegal drugs, and at an increasingly early age. Sotire
sociologists claim that parents and other members ofsociety often set a bad
example..
Discuss the causes and some effects ofwidespread drug use byyoungpeople
in modern day society_ Make any recommendations youfeelare necessary to
help fight youth drug abuse.
You should write at least 250 words.
You are required to support your arguments with relevant information and examples based on
your own ideas, knowledge and experience.
38
• •
PRACTICE WRITING TEST
Writing Task 1
You are advised to spend a maximum of 20 minutes on this task.
The graph below shows the montMy profits of3 British companies in the
car retail industry for the 2000 financial year.
Write a report for a university lecturer comparing the peifonnallce of
Acme Sports Cars and Branson Motors for the period given.
You should write at least 150 words.
End of 1st Quarter: End of 2nd Quarter: End of 3rd Quarter: End of Financial
Profit Introduction of tax Oil Media reports boost Year:
(in £1()()()s)
luxury goods in economy
Writing Task 2
You are advised to spend a maximum of 40 minutes on this task.
Write an essay for a university lecturer on the following topic:
We have been living in the nuclear age IlOWfor overhalfa century. Since the
first atomic bombs were developed, nuclear technology has provided
government:f with the ability to totally destroy the planet. Yet the technology
has been put to positive use as an energy source and in certain areas of
medicine.
To what extent is nuclear technology a danger to life on Earth? What are the
benefits and risks associated with its use?
You should write at least 250 words.
You are required to support your arguments with relevant information and examples based on
your own ideas, knowledge and experience.
80
60
40
20
o
"Y "Y

Acme Sports I

1. /'.
Cars
/'
/'
Branson
Motors \j
..
--:"
• ............ /,,/,.-­
11",0 _ _
• •
a 1""'- I
-
..... ).

<'Isa - - .......
I
A1'<Qr ;q .1.
l>
Apr '00 May Jun Jut Allg Sep Oct Nov Dec '00 Jan 'Of Feb Mar '01
2000 FinancialYear
39
1
The chart and graph below give information about sales and
share prices for Coca-Cola.
. Write a report for a university lecturer describing the
information shown below.
• You should write at least 150 words.
• You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.
Alot of bcn1u
Cl>t1l-Con.'U••1t _ \,<4_ bY 2OIiO. % 1I>J1OU1 e_..colubanl price, $

199& 97 98 99 2000 01
model answer:
The pie chart shows the worldwide distribution of sales of Coca­
Cola in the year 2000 and the graph shows the change in share
prices between 1996 and 2001.
In the year 2000, Coca-Cola sold a total of 17.1 billion cases of
their fizzy drink product worldwide. The largest consumer was
North America, where 30.4 per cent of the total volume was
purchased. The second largest consumer was Latin America.
Europe and Asia purchased 20.5 and 16.4 per cent of the total
volume respectively, while Africa and the Middle East remained
fairly small consumers at 7 per cent of the total volume of sales.
Since 1996, share prices for Coca-Cola have fluctuated. In that
year, shares were valued atapproximately $35. Between 1996
and 1997, however, prices rose significantly to $70 per share.
They dipped a little in mid-1997 and then peaked at $80 per
share in mid-98. From then until 2000 their value fell
consistently but there was a slight rise in mid-2000.

40
2
The chart below gives information about global sales of
games software, CDs and DVD or video.
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the
information.
have -changed
$bn
_Games
, • software
lli.0' D\/Dlvideo
model answer: -,--­
The chart shows the changes in the sales of video material /
DVDs, games software and CDs around the world in billions of
dollars over a three-year period. It can be seen that the sales of
videos / DVDs and games software have increased, while the
sales of CDs have gone down slightly.
Between 2000 and 2003, the sale of videos and DVDs rose by
approximately 13 billion dollars. In 2000, just under 20 billion
dollars worth of these items were sold, but 'in 2003, this figure
had risen to a little over 30 billion dollars.
The sales of games software also rose during this period, but less
sharply. Sales increased from about 13 billion dollars in 2000 to
just under 20 billion dollars three years later. By contrast, during
the same time period, the sale of CDs fell from 35 billion dollars
in 2000 to about 32.5 billion dollars in 2003.
41
3
The graphs below show the types of music albums purchased
by people in Britain according to s3x and age.
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the
information shown below.
Percentage of people
%
Who buy Pop Music
'.mali;
• female
.16-24
825-34
.35-44
.45+
Percentage ofpeople
%
who buy Rock Music
••mala
• female
.16-24
.25-34
.3544
1145+
-,._--------------------.....,
Percentage of people
Who buy Classical Music
II male
. f W n . l ~
.16-'24
.2S>34
IISSM
11145+
42
model answer:
The three graphs provide an overview of the types of music people
purchase in the UK. At first glance we see that classical music is
far less popular than pop or rock music.
While slightly more women than men buy pop music, the rock
market is dominated by men with 30% buying rock, compared to
17% of women. From the first graph we see that interest in pop
music is steady from age 16 to 44 with 20% of the population
continuing to buy pop CDs after the age of 45.
The interest in rock music reaches its peak among the 25 to 34
year aIds, though it never sells as well as pop. Interest also drops
off after the age of 35 with an even sharper fall from age 45
onwards, a pattern which is the opposite to the classical music
graph.
4
You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.
The graphs below show the numbers of male and f e m a l e ~
workers in 1975 and 1995 in several employment sectors of
the republic of Freedonia.
Write a report for a university teacher describing the
information shown.
43
Employment in Freedonia by sex in 6 sectors, 1975
Finanve!banklll9
WhOleSaleS,
retail tl'ade
Pubtll>
(non..aehmce)
pubflc sector

---------------..
t-----_..
}---.--. ---_.­ ....•
1---------­____--­ ----.
II Women
• Men
\-------------..__ .-- _.- e
o 200 400 600 eoo 1000
Number of emplo)'ees (1000)
Employment in Freedonia by sex in 6 sectom, 1996
!
leommun!caUOJl$ 1-----..--.4..--_._-------.
!
• Women
eM(!ln
I J---------liIJ.
1---­........------­.......
1-------------4..._--..--.
o 200 400 600 600 1000
Number of employees (1000}
model answer:
The two decades between 1975 and 1995 brought significant
changes in the representation of women in Freedonia's work
force, according to the graphs.
In 1975, for example, some 300 000 men and 250 000 women
worked in the communications sector. Twenty years later, though
the number of men remained unchanged, the number of women
rose to 550 000.
A similar situation was seen in the wholesale and retail trade
sector, where the number of women rose from about 550 000 in
1975 to almost 800 000 two decades later. The number of men in
44
5
this sector remained stable over the period, at around 700 000.
Women also made gains in both the finance jbanking industries
and in the defence-related public sector. Whereas some 125 000
women worked in finance and banking institutions in 1975, the
number increased to 450 000 by 1995. The number of men grew
only marginally from 425 000 to 480 000 over the same period.
In defence, the number of men declined from 225 000 to 200
000, while the number of women rose from 25 000 to over 100
000.
Two sectors that retained stable employment numbers for both
men and women were manufacturing, which had about 300 000
women and 650 000 men in both surveyed years, and the public
sector (non-defence), which employed 650 000 women and 850
000 men.
Thus, women appear to have made gains in the Freedonian work
force but not at the expense of men.
(243 words)
You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.
Eating sweet foods produces acid in the mouth, which can
cause tooth decay. (High acid levels are measured by low pH
values)
Describe the information below and discuss the implications
for dental health.
45
Atid in molJl:h from consumption of sugars/honey
7
at whicn IO'Jlh tlecay is ,/l'llik-ely
aClaieverai wni';; iooih"Oica;"oCCUrs
,,_,_ Fftllt sugar
Cane sugar
Hoooy
Moment 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40
eaten minutes mjlluWs minutes minutes minutes minutes minutes mlnllles
11111& maf>SCI<1 after eating sugar/honey
model answer:
Anyone who has visited a dentist has been told that eating
excessive amounts of sweets risks harming the teeth. This is
because sweets lower pH levels in the mouth to dangerous levels.
When the pH level in the mouth is kept above 5.5, acidity is such
that teeth are unlikely to be uinanger of decay. Sweet foods,
however, cause pH in the mouth to drop for a time, and the
longer pH levels remain below 5.5, the greater the opportunity for
decay to occur.
By comparing fruit sugar, cane sugar and honey, which are all
common ingredients of sweet foods, we find that cane sugar
lowers pH levels for the longest period, thus producing the
greatest risk of the three. Approximately five minutes aftfter
consuming cane sugar, pH levels drop to as little as pH 3.5. They
then begin to rise slowly, but do not rise above pH 5.5 until at
least 30 minutes have elapsed. By contrast, fruit sugar, which
causes the mouth's acidity to fall to just above pH 4, poses a
danger for a shorter period: tooth decay is unlikely 20 minutes
after consumption. Honey appears an even less risky substance.
Though acidity falls to about pH 4.75 within five minutes of
consumption, it returns to above pH 5.5 in under fifteen minutes.
The implications, then, are that people who insist on eating sweet
foods should be aware of the ingredients, and that fruit sugar or
honey appear preferable to cane sugar.
(242 words)
6
46
The diagram below shows the typical stages of consumer
goods manufacturing, including the process by which
information is fed back to earlier stages to enable
adjustment.
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the process
shown.
1;lo\;\, uf manufacmring
ftroccss
mnllufhctnred
ihHV of ioJormnlion
materials
feedhack
model answer:
Most consumer goods go through a series of stages before they
emerge as finished products ready for sale.
47
Raw materials and manufactured components comprise the
initial physical input in the manufacturing process. Once
obtained, these are stored for later assembly. But assembly first
depends upon the production planning stage, where it is decided
how and in what quantities the stored materials will be processed
to create sufficient quantities of finished goods. The production
planning stage itself follows the requirements of the goods' design
stage that proceeds from extensive research. After assembly, the
products are inspected and tested to maintain quality control I
Those units that pass the inspection and testing stages are then
packaged, despatched and offered for sale in retail outlets. The
level of sales, which is the end point of the manufacturing
process, helps determine production planning.
A product's design is not only the result of product research, but
is also influenced by testing and market research. If the testing
stage (after assembly and inspection) reveals unacceptable
problems in the finished product, then adjustments will have to
be made to the product's design. Similarly, market research,
which examines the extent and nature of the demand for
products, has the role of guiding product design to suit consumer
demands which may change with time. Market research, while
influenced by product sales, also serves to foster future sales by
devising suitable advertising for the goods.
Thus the reality of consumer goods manufacturing goes well
beyond a simple linear production process.
7
The table below shows social and economic indicators for
four countries in 1994, according to United Nations
statistics.
Describe .the information shown below in your own words.
What implications do the indicators have for the ,countries?
48
Adult literacy rate (%) 99 99 68
model answer:
A glance at four indicators of economic and social conditions in
four countries, Canada, Japan, Peru and Zaire, in 1994 reflects
the great differences that exist between wealthier and poorer
nations.
The table shows that Japan and Canada had annual incomes of
$15 760 and $11 100 per person, respectively. These figures were
overwhelmingly greater than the corresponding figures of $160 in
Peru and $130 in Zaire.
Health indicators, too, reflected overall levels of affluence in the
four nations. Life expectancy at birth, for example, was higher
among the more economically developed countries. Japan
reported the highest life expectancy, 78. This was followed by
Canada, 76; Peru, 51; and Zaire, 47; This suggests that richer
societies are able to put more money into health care than poorer
ones. _____
The amount of calories consumed daily per person roughly
followed the same ranking. Canadians each consumed some 3
326 calories per day while the Japanese took 2846 calories. The
corresponding figures for Peru and Zaire were 1927 and 1749,
respectively.
Literacy rates among adults, too, were higher in wealthier
countries, no doubt a reflection of ability to invest in education.
Canada and Japan both reported literacy rates of 99%, while
Peru claimed 680/0. Zaire, the least economically developed of the
four countries, had a literacy rate of 34%.
The data appear to confrrm the often cited link between national
wealth and health and education standards.
The diagram below shows the average hours of unpaid work
per week done by people in different categories. (Unpaid work
refers to such activities as childcare in the home, housework
and gardening.)
8
49
Describe the information presented below, comparing results
for men and women in the categories shown. Suggest reasons
for what you see.
Unpaid work hours per week .
• Maried women
• Mariedmen
W1h1-2
dllldren
model answer:
The diagram reveals that the number of hours per week spent in
unpaid work is unequally distributed between men and women.
In households where there are no children, women are reported
to work some 30 hours per week in such tasks as housework and
gardening. Men's contribution to these unpaid jobs averages a
considerably lower 18 hours.
When children enter the household, however, the inequality
becomes even more pronounced. In families of 1 - 2 children,
men maintain approximately the same number of hours of
unpaid work as in childless households, but the number of hours
women work in the home rises to 52 per week, much of it, on
doubt, due to childcare responsibilities.
Interestingly, when there are three or more children in the
household, men are found to work even fewer hours around the
house than b e f o r ~ the appearance of the third child. Whereas
women's unpaid hours rise to approximately 56 per week, the
corresponding figure for men, 16, actually represents a decrease.
50
9
The data suggest that the increased presence of women in the
paid work force has yet to lead to an increased role for men in the
horne.
The chart below shows the sleep patterns of people in five
different occupations according to a Canadian study.
Write a report for a university lecturer, describing the
information below.
Give possible reasons for the differences.
51
asleep awake:
Occupation Student Truck Driver Fullt-thime EBusinte.ss Doctor
mo er xecu Ive
6-7 pm
7-8 pm
:---------1:
1
......
8-9 pm
i------+....... .
9-10 pm
10-11 p
11-12p
1-2 am
2-3 am
3-4 am
4-5 am
5-6 am
6-7 am
7-8 am
8-9 am
9-10 am
10-11 am
11-12 am
1 1 pm
1-2 pm
2-3 pm
3-4 pm
4-5 pm
5-6 pm
model answer:
52
Differences in sleep patterns appear to reflect differences in
individuals' occupations.
A Canadian study has pointed out, for example, that students
typically sleep for a consecutive 8-hour period each night, from
11 p.m. to 7 a.m. This may be because the central activity in
their lives, study, takes place in normal daylight hours. Similarly,
business executives sleep consecutive hours, but perhaps
because their jobs are especially busy and stressful they sleep for
6 hours on average, getting up around 5 a.m..
By contrast, truck drivers, probably because of their need to keep
their trucks on the road over long periods, tend to sleep in two 3­
hour blocks: one between 7 and 10 a.m. and another from 4 to 7
,
p.m. Another occupation associated with broken sleep schedules
is that of doctors. They tend to retire to bed around 1 a.m. and
start their day at 7 a.m.. , but may be woken up to deal with
emergencies in the middle of the night. Finally, full-time mothers,
especially those with young children, tend to sleep when their
babies do. Typically, they will sleep from 10 p.m. and be awoken
at 1 a.m. to comfort their babies for a couple of hours. They then
go back to bed to wake at 6 a.m., but nap for two hours or so in
the early afternoon.
Thus the influence on one's sleep pattern is worthy of
consideration when choosing an occupation.
10
The chart below shows the amount of leisure time enjoyed by
men and women of different employment status.
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the
information shown below.
53
leisure time in a typical week: by sex and employment status, 1998.99
100
II
Mates
F..males
3D

Housewives
rulltime
model answer:
The chart shows the number of hours of leisure enjoyed by men
and women in a typical week in 1998-9, according to gender and
employment status.
Among those employed full-time, men on average had fift-*
-+----------y hours of leisure, whereas women had approximately
thirty-seven hours. There were no figures given for male part-time
workers, but female part-timers had forty hours of leisure time,
only slightly more than women in full-time employment, perhaps
reflecting their work in the home.
In the unemployed and retired categories, leisure time showed an
increase for both sexes, as might have been expected. Here too,
men enjoyed more leisure time over eighty hours, compared with
seventy hours for women, perhaps once again reflecting the fact
that women spend more time working in the home than men.
Lastly, housewives enjoyed approximately fifty-four hours of
leisure, on average. There were no figures given for
househusbands! Overall, the chart demonstrates that in the
categories for which statistics on male leisure time were
available, men enjoyed at least ten hours of extra leisure time.
11
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the
information in the graph below.
54
Per 1,00.0 People
700
600 1·-··.... -- .....- .....-......,..'..',,--.-...--.---.'...... -......... ._,-_._--..._...... '.'..
500
__
400 .,.... , ..,.........,.... ,.,' ,..,.....,.................,.. , ..,.__.... ,--, ...... , ..
o
1960 19651970 1975 1990 1985 19,90 1995 2000
Rates of smoking itl Somelaml • men ami women
model answer:
The graph compares the rate of smoking in men and women in
Someland between the years 1960 and 2000. It can be clearly....
seen that the rate of smoking for both men and women is
currently declining and that fewer women have smoked
throughout the period.
, In 1960,600 men in every 1,000 was smoking. This number
decreased gradually to 500 by 1974 and continued to decrease
but more steeply to 250 in 2000. In contrast, the rate of smoking
in women in 1960 was very low at only 80 in every 1,000. By
1968 this increased to 170, and increased again but more steeply
to 320 in 1977. The rate of female smokers then remained stable
, at 320 until 1984 at which point the figures began to decline and
had dropped to 200 by 2000.
In conclusion we can see that the rate of smoking in men
dropped throughout the whole period but was always at a higher
level than the female figures. The rate of smoking in women
increased unti11977 but then decreased for the rest of the
period.
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the
information in the graphs below.
300 ........
200
100 ..__........_.._,________.-.
12
55
Deaths in Someland 1990 (millions)
AIDS
Lepro5'{
Tropical Diseases
Diarrhoea
Malaria
TB
o 0.5 1 1.5
Medical research funding inSOmeland {millions}
AIDS
leprosY
Tropltal O l s e a s ~
lB.
50 100 150
model answer:
The graphs compare the number of deaths caused by six diseases
in Someland in 1990 with the amount of research funding
allocated to each of those diseases. It can be clearly seen that the
amount of research funding in many cases did not correlate with
the seriousness of the disease in terms of numbers of deaths.
In 1990 there were around 0.2 million deaths from AIDS, 0.1
million deaths from leprosy, 0.3 million deaths from tropical
diseases, 0.5 million deaths from diarrhoea, 0.4 million deaths
from malaria and l.8million deaths from TB. These figures can
be contrasted with the amount of funding allocated for each
disease. In 1990 AIDS received 180 million dollars in research
56
13
funding, leprosy 80 million dollars in research funding, tropical
diseases 79 million dollars in research funding, diarrhoea 60
million dollars. in research funding, malaria 50 million dollars
and TB 20 million dollars in research funding.
In conclusion it is clear that funding allocation for disease
research in Someland is not wholly determined by the number of
deaths for which each disease is responsible in a given year.
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the
information in the two graphs below.
Highest level of education of women in someland-1945
II No Schooling
.. Third Grade
IiIi Yearn
IiIII Year 12
l1li Arst Oegree
I'll Port GeadlIate
Higbest level ofeducationofwomenin someland-1995
• No Schooling
.. ThirdGrade
IIVear6
IIVear9
II Year 12
II First Oegree
II PostGeaduate
model answer:
57
The pie charts compare the highest level of education achieved by
women in Someland across two years, 1945 and 1995. It can be
clearly seen that women received a much higher level of
education in Someland in 1995 than they did in 1945.
In 1945 only 30% of women completed their secondary education
and 1% went on to a first degree. No women had completed post­
graduate studies. This situation had changed radically by 1995.
In 1995,90% of women in Someland had completed secondary
education and of those, half had graduated from an initial degree
and 20% had gone on to postgraduate studies. At the other end
of the scale we can see that by 1995 all girls were completing
lower secondary, although 10% ended their schooling at this
point. This is in stark contrast with 1945 when only 30% of girls
completed primary school, 35% had no schooling at all and 35%
only completed the third grade.
In conclusion, we can see that.in the 50 years from 1945 to 1995
there have been huge positive developments to the education
levels of women in Someland.
14
Write a report for a university lecturer describing the
information in the table below.
'"'''' C",. ec,' ,"Y •••" .,"X· .•., '''••

Teens .20s. lOs 40s 50s 60s 105+
Watching
TV/videos
1.200 700 400 500 600 700 1,100
SociaJisjng with
4 or less people
160 160 300 260 250 200 200
SocialiSing With
4 or more
people
350 360 60 60 25 25 25
IndIVidual
exercise
160 100 200. 200 50 75 160
Group
eX9roiselspoJt
450 350 200 160 60 0 0
Cinema 100 15 50 25 25 50 75
model answer:
The table shows how people in different age groups spend their
leisure time in Someland over the course of a year. It can be
clearly seen that the amount of leisure time available varies
58
considerably across the age groups and that people of different
age levels have very different ways of spending their leisure time.
According to the figures, as people age in Someland their social
lives reduce. Teenagers and people in their twenties spend on
average 500 hours per year on socialising and 350 hours of that
time is with a group of more than 4 people. Although the total
hours of socialising in their 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s is fairly
constant (between 300-350), socialising with more than 4 people
drops dramatically to 50 hours in the 30s and 40s age groups
and only 25 from 50 years old. Group and individual exercise
follow a similar pattern.
People of all ages spend a good part of their leisure time on
entertainment such as TVjvideo viewing and cinema. In both
cases, teenagers and retired people spend around twice as much
time as those who are at working age. Home entertainment
ranges from just over a thousand hours for teenagers and retired
people and an average of 600 hours for everyone else. Cinema
accounts for 100 hours of the teenagers and retired people's
leisure time and 25-50 hours for the rest.
In conclusion we can see there is a significant trend towards
solitary and smaller group activities as people grow older and
that teenagers and retired people spend a lot more time on
entertainment than those of working age do.
59
THE IELTS ACADEMIC SPEAKING TEST TUTORIAL
The IELTS Academic Speaking test is the shortest of the components of the IELTS test - only 11 to 14 minutes. In this short
time you have to convince the examiner who will be speaking with you of your level of English.
The IELTS Academic Speaking Test is the same for both the Academic and General Training modules. The test is conducted
with 1 examiner and 1 candidate. The Speaking test is recorded. The Speaking Test is divided into 3 sections.:
Section 1 Section 1 begins with some general introductory questions. This is followed by some questions on personal
information similar to the type of questions one would ask when meeting someone for the first time. Finally the examiner asks
a series of questions of 2 topics of general interest. (4 - 5 minutes)
Section 2 Section 2 is a monologue (1 person speaking) by the candidate. The examiner will give the candidate a card with a
subject and a few guiding questions on it. The student must talk for 1 to 2 minutes on this subject. The examiner decides on
the exact length. The student has an optional 1 minute in order to prepare for his talk and is provided with some paper and a
pencil in order to make some brief notes. After the candidate's talk the examiner will ask 1 or 2 brief questions in order to
finish off the section. (3 - 4 minutes)
Section 3 Here the examiner will ask some more questions generally related to the subject spoken about in section 2. These
questions will be more demanding and require some critical analysis on the part of the candidate. (4 - 5 minutes)
Question Types
The types of questions that come in the IELTS Academic Speaking Test are very general in nature and are designed so that
anyone around the world, regardless of what background or culture they come from, should be able to answer them. The
questions will not be overly personal and will avoid contentious subjects such as politics, sex or religion.
All the questions will be open questions rather than closed questions. An open question asks the candidate to give an
extended answer, and so have the opportunity to show how good his English is. A closed question is one that can be
answered by a single word or a couple of words. So, you will not get a question like:
Do you like living in your town?
A student could just answer yes. Any answers like this will just be followed by the question why? so you have to extend your
answer (what you should have done after the "yes" anyway). Anyway, the question is more likely to be:
Why do you like living in your town?
Here the candidate has to give an explanation and therefore the examiner hears plenty of English which will help him or her
evaluate you.
Marking - IELTS Academic Speaking Test Marks, Bands and Results
In the IELTS Academic Speaking Test you will be marked in 4 areas. These 4 areas are: Fluency and Coherence, Lexical
Resource, Grammatical Range and Accuracy and Pronunciation. For the first 3, you get a mark out of 9. For Pronunciation you
get a 2, 4, 6 or 8. Finally an average is taken to give you your final band for the Speaking. Let's look at these areas in more
detail.
Fluency and Coherence: The examiner grades your fluency, which is how easy, smooth and flowing your speaking is. To get a
good grade here, any gaps in your speaking should be associated with searching for the right idea rather than hesitancy with
finding the right word or structure. For the coherence part, the examiner looks at how easy you are to understand. Does your
flow of ideas run smoothly, logically and with conSistency? Do you communicate well?
Lexical Resource: This mark grades the range of words that you use in your speaking test and whether you use the words in
the right way, at the right time and in the right place. .
Grammatical Range and Resource: This mark grades your range of grammatical structures, your a·ccuracy at producing them
and whether you use the right structure at the right time and in the right place. This is the area that worries the candidates
the most as it is the dreaded grammar. Remember it is only 1 part out of 4.
Pronunciation: This mark grades you on how clearly you speak English.
The Three Sections of the IELTS Academic Listening Test
Here we will look at the three sections in more detail. Remember, the IELTS test always tries to mirror situations that you will
encounter as a student or immigrant in an English speaking country. The speaking test is no different and each of the sections
has a specific purpose. Like all the different modules of the IELTS, the speaking gets more difficult as it goes on. The
questions that are asked in Section 1 are easier than in Section 2 and so on. This does not mean that by Section 3 they are
60
impossible but they are more demanding linguistically.
Section 1 (4 - 5 minutes)
This sedion is divided into three parts.
i) The first part involves general introductions. Here the examiner checks that he or she has the right person by checking the
candidates name, origin and identification. This only takes a few seconds.
ii) In the second part the examiner asks some personal (not too personal so don't worry) questions about some familiar topics
such as yourself, your family, your home or your work/study. These questions are the type that people would use when
meeting someone for the first time. This should last for a couple of minutes.
iii) In the third part the examiner chooses 2 sets of questions from his selection. These sets of questions will cover general
ideas on a theme of general interest.
Section 2 (3 - 4 minutes)
In this section the candidate has to give a small "speech" or monologue on a general subject chosen by the examiner. The
examiner will hand you a card with the subject written on it, along with about three questions on the subject in order to guide
and help your speaking. The examiner will then tell you that you have 1 minute to prepare your mini-talk and he or she will
give you some paper and a pencil to make some notes during that minute. You can refer to your notes while you are
speaking. After the minute, the examiner will ask you to start talking and you must talk on the subject until the examiner
asks you to stop. After he has asked you to stop, he may ask you 1 or 2 general questions about what you have been
discussing. You cannot ask the examiner for another card. You must use the one that he gives you.
Section 3 (4 - 5 minutes)
In Section 3 the examiner will ask you a series of questions thematically linked to the subject that you spoke about in Section
2. These questions will be of a more demanding nature and will require a more analytical and thoughtful answer. You will also
probably need to use more complex language as regards grammatical structure and vocabulary.
!How to do Better in the IELTS Academic Speaking Test
There are a number of things you can do to have a better performance in the IELTS Academic Speaking Test.
First of all practice. This is the key to all the different modules of IELTS. Below you will find a separate section devoted to
practising the speaking.
When you are in the test, smile and look the examiner in the eye. Try and be friendly and look as though you are enjoying the
conversation. This has a big effect on the examiner. If an examiner has to talk with someone who doesn't talk much, doesn't
smile at all and who clearly doesn't want to be there, then it has a negative effect on the examiner. Being nervous is fine. The
examiner understands that and will try and put you at ease. But be friendly. It makes a difference.
Don't worry about the occasional mistake. The examiner will expect some mistakes - after all, English is a foreign language
for you and people make mistakes in speaking foreign languages. The examiner is not making a note of every single mistake
that you make. This would be impossible to do and concentrate on your speaking. He will more get a general impression of
your English accuracy so individual errors don't matter. More important is your communication.
You have to talk. Without your talking input, the examiner can't grade you very well. Try and give as full an answer as you
can so that you show the examiner that you are comfortable at talking at length and can communicate well. Don't do this to
(:,xtremes though. When you have finished what you have to say stop. Don't try and force more out as it will probably be
strained and repetitive. The examiner will see that you have finished and will give you the next question. Similarly, you won't
be able to answer all questions at length. Different people can talk about different questions more and the examiner knows
this. If you don't know much about something, say so and then say what you do know. When you're finished, the examiner
wi!! give you another question. You can't duck out of every question though - the responsibility is on you to talk.
Don't try and be too clever. Just try and talk normally as that is when you will perform at your best. If you try and extend
yourself too much, then that is when you will make the most errors.
Perfection is not needed. You can still make some errors and get a 9 (not many errors though). So don't let making errors
upset you. Get on with the talking and concentrate on your communication.
One thing that puts candidates off is that the Speaking test is recorded. This is done so that, if necessary, the speaking can
be re-marked. If the bands for a candidate's writing and speaking for instance are very different, then the candidate's test is
re-<:hecked. If the speaking was not recorded, then this could not be done. This doesn't happen very often. Sample recordings
'-Ire ,)Iso sent to the IELTS administration to be monitored to make sure that examiners are doing a good job and assigning
the correct bands. So, try and forget that the recorder is there and get on with answering the questions.
Don't forget your ID! You need it at the start of the test.
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Don't give yes/no answers unless you continue with a because. It gives a bad impression. If you do give a yes/now answer,
you'U probably get a why next anyway.
Practice
As in all parts of the IELTS, this is the one thing that will really improve your band. There are various things that you can do
to improve your performance.
Prepare the types of questions for each of the different sections.
Section 1
In section 1 you start with personal questions such as about yourself, your family, your home or your work/study. So, sit
down with your dictionary and try and think of all the vocabulary you would need to completely describe all parts of your tife,
home, family and work/study. Then sit down with a piece of paper and write" down every question you can think of about
these ideas. Try and come up with about 20. You can then practice them in 2 ways:
i) Get a friend to ask you the questions and practice giving long, full answers. Do this again and again. It doesn't matter if
you do the same question frequently, as you will give better and better answers with more and more information. The more
often you practice this, the better you'll get.
ii) If you don't have a friend who can do this, then you can do it by yourself. You just look at your list and imagine that
someone has asked you the question. Then, off you go. You can do this sat at home, you can talk to .the cat, the mirror or do
it driving on the way to work. It may feel a bit strange at first, talking by yourself, but it works and you will improve. You
don't have to do either method i or ii, you can mix both. It all helps.
In the second part of Section 1 you have to answer questions on themes of general interest. These are not complicated but
are more demanding than the ones that you did in the part before. Let's say for example that the theme the examiner
chooses is travelling. The examiner will have a set of questions to ask you. How many he asks depends on how long you talk
for in your answers. The first question could be:
Do you enjoy traveling and why/why not?
Then this could be followed by:
Where would you like to travel to and why?
yOu can find other sample themes and questions in IELTS Practice Now Question Papers and from other sources. Once you"
have an idea of the types of theme and question, you can start to make your own examples and practice answering them in
the ways (i and ii) above. I have done this with classes and it works very well. Students doing this, more often than not,
come up with actual themes and questions from the test itself!!
Section 2
Preparation and practice for Section 2 is similar to the practice in Section l.You have to talk for 1 to 2 minutes in English.
Speaking for this time in your own language is quite hard, so in a foreign language it is harder. The reason it is hard is that
you don't often talk uninterrupted for 1 to 2 minutes about anything, whether it is in your language or English. So, how do
you get better at it? By practising it again and again. Let's say that your task is as follows:
Describe a favourite holiday destination that you like.
You should say:
• When you first went there.
• How you get there.
• What you do when you're there.
• And explain why this place is so speCial for you.
So, you can see the format of this section. The practice procedure is as before. Check out other question types and soon
you're be able to develop your own. Then practice them with someone or by yourself. Soon, talking for 2 minutes without
stopping won't be a problem. Remember you don't have to talk fast or without breaks. They want you to talk normally. Talk
at a normal speed, pause to take breaths and take time to consult your notes to give yourself ideas about what to talk about
next.
The follow up question to end Section 2 is not so important that it needs to be practiced as it only requires a few words as an
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answer. An example question from the examiner for the subject above could be:
"Do you think I would enjoy a holiday in this place too?"
The candidate would just be expected to say something like:
"Oh yes, I think so."
Or:
"Maybe not. It might be too hot for you. "
You can see that nothing very long is required.
At this point I'd like to explain about the 1 minute preparation time and the notes that you can write during it. First of all, use
your preparation time and make notes. Before you begin your monologue, you will have 1 minute to prepare for it. Some
people think that they don't need the time at all and will start straight away. Very often these people will dry up early and be
at a loss about how to continue. Use your time. Someone starting straight away does not get any advantage at all over
someone who takes the full minute to prepare.
So, what should you write in your notes? First of all, don't try and write out your whole talk word for word. You don't have
enough time. Looking at the question above (which is a typical layout for this section) you can see that there is a main
question (Describe a favourite holiday destination that you like.) and then 3 mini-questions following (Say when you first went
there, how you get there what you do when you're there and explain why this place is so special for you).
These questions are here to help you as they give you ideas to talk about and give your talk a bit of structure. However, it
asks you to talk about these things so you should talk about them. In your notes quickly jot down one or two ideas for each
of the questions, so that they will remind you about things to talk about when you look at your notes during your talk. Finally,
if you have time, maybe make a note of something from your own experience connected to the talking theme. When you are
talking about something from your own experience, it is easier to talk at length. For for question above, you
could be just finishing and still have 45 seconds left to talk. You could be saying why the place is so special to you. As you run
out of ideas you could give an example out of your own experience. You could say:
"Actually why I like the place so much is shown from something that happened to me the last time I was there. I was in a
restaurant having some food and .•. "
The subject of your story doesn't matter as you are still on the subject of your talk. The main thing is that it's keeping you
talking.
Section 3
Section 3 really carries on from where Section 2 left off. The examiner will ask you questions that are thematically linked to
the subject that you talked about in Section 2. For example, for the question we looked at above about a holiday destination,
the examiner might choose to ask you questions about tourism and the airline industry. The examiner will have a set of
questions to ask you. How many he asks depends on how long you talk for in your answers.. None of the questions will be of a
technical nature or require any specialist knowledge as that would be unfair, but you will be expected to give your opinion on
what is asked you.
So, let's look at some examples.
Tourism
• Can you predict any major changes that could happen in the Tourist Industry over the next 50 years?
• Can you compare the tourist industry in your country today with the tourist industry when your grandparents were
young?Can you identify some of the factors that have led to the Industry success of the airline industry?
Airline
• Can you suggest any ways in which air travel could be made safer?
• You can see that the questions here are more analytical and require more thought than the questions in the previous
sections.
As regards practice, the procedure is as in the previous sections. You need to get someone to do the questions with you, or
do them alone and then develop your own questions and practice with them. ieltshelpnow.com Practice Tests also provide
practice and often we provide much fuller examples. Our tests are also at least half the price! The choice is yours.
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Speaking Topics for IELTS Test
1. Introduce yourself.
2. Describe your hometown. What is special about it?
3. Compare your hometown with another town.
4. Describe your country's education system. What is your attitude toward this system?
Do you think it's effective?
5. Describe the organization you work for. Where is it? What does it do? What is your
job function?
6. Describe the process of taking a job in your country.
7. Compare the role of men and women in your country.
8. What is Brain drain? What are the causes and effects of it?
9. Discuss why you would like to visit a particular country. When are you going to visit
it and why?
10. Discuss the factors affecting people to have more or less children in your country.
11. Describe a traditional dish in your country. What are the ingredients?
12. Describe the traditional Architecture of your country. Is there something special about
it?
13. Compare traditional houses with modem houses in your country.
14. Discuss why you like a special kind of book, music, sports, or film.
IS. Give reasons why the divorce rate has or has not increased in your country.
16. Describe a traditional instrument in your country.
17. Describe an important festival in Iran. When is it? What do people do then?
18. Describe the ethnic mix in your country.
19. Describe a in your country.
20. What is your favourite colour? Why? What is the relationship between the colour of
c10thes and the personality of people? What is the relationship with mood?
21. Describe a historical place in your country. Where is it? What is special about it?
22. Talk about mass media. Newspapers and their attractions for you.
23. Describe a traditional /children's/intemationaVcard game.
24. Why do people play games?
25. What is your greatest wish! one of your wishes?
26. What don't you know about your future?
27. Why do people collect things? Do you collect anything?
28. Describe an invention before or after computer. Should the governments support
inventors? Why do inventors invent?
29. What is fashion? Do you follow fashion? Why do people follow fashion? How do
people in your country follow fashion?
30. What is the process of obtaining a driving license/passport/etc. in your country?
31. Describe one of your photos. Where, when and with whom did you take it?
32. Describe the present situation ofTourism in Iran. What is the future of Tourism like
in Iran?
33. Name a book, film, or a piece of music that you like most and say why.
34. Describe IT or a databank system. .
35. Why always women cook and men do not in your country? Which is a better cook, a
man or a woman?
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36. Compare your time with your parents'. What is the same and what has changed since
then?
37. How has traveling changed since 100 years ago?
38. Describe your best holiday, party, event in your life. When was it, where and why?
39. Talk about the best present you have ever had in your life. When, why and who gave
it to you?
40. In what occasions do people give presents in your country?
41. How do you choose a gift for your friends?
42. What do people do in 4 seasons in your country?
43. What do governments do in case of disasters? What should they do?
44. Talk about the most populated area in your country. Where is it? What is its
population? Why is it so populated?
45. Describe a competition you have entered. What was your stand?
46. What is the role of public artworks?
47. Describe a city you have visited and impressed you so much. Why was it so
impressive?
48. Compare Iranian eating with other countries.
49. Compare a person who has been in a foreign country with someone who hasn't.
50. What is capital punishment? Is it necessary to control crime?
51. What do you think will be the world's greatest problem in 100 years time?
52. What do you think pastime and hobbies will be in 100 years time?
53. What do you know about the wildlife in your country? Who is responsible for its
preservation?
54. What do you know about Global Warming? What is Greenhouse Effect?
55. Shopping: who does the shopping in your home? Do you go shopping?
What have you found difficult in shopping?
56. Describe a child that you know. Who is he/she? Your relation, what does he/she like,
and how has re/she influenced you?
57. School pressure on children. Is there any in your country? What can be done ifthere
is?
58. What was the most interesting (impressing) period of time in your life? Describe it.
59. What do you think about children's school age? Advantages or disadvantages?
60. What time are children considered to be adults in your country?
61. Describe a park (or garden) near your home. Why people want to have private
gardens?
62. What are the advantages and disadvantages ofphotographs and filming
(handy camera)?
63. Describe a sportsman who you admire. Who is he/she? What he/she has done?
Why you admire this person?
64. Describe the fITst toy you got. Who gave it to you? When? How did you like it?
65. Who is your closest friend? When did you meet himlher? How? Who is a good
friend? What are the properties of a good friend? What do you expect from your
friends?
66. What is the main industry of your country?
67. How is it easy to travel in your country?
68. What kind of food you prefer?
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Speaking test samples
Part One
What is your hometowns shape? Can you describe it for me
What is your hometowns history?
Do you prefer going out or staying at home? Why?
What will do if you go out?
Part Two A
I'd like you to teU me about an equipment of your household (such as computer,
television, refrigerator, Mobile Phone as so on).
You should say
What it is?
What do you do with it?
And explain why it is important for you.
Part Two B
Will you always keep it?
Is it worth
Could you please explain with some examples about the changes of technology
which are used by people in our daily life between now and the past 20 years?
Whether those equipment you've ever mentioned in your examples is used in you
home?
How about other Indian families?
Do you think the technology will have what development in the future?
Do you think it is important?
How often do you access internet?
Do you have one computer? .
Sample 2
Part One
Good morning. My name is ... could you tell me your name please?
Please show me your identification! passport? That's fine thanks you.
Where are your from?
Do you have a large family or a small family?
Can you tell me something about them
Now I'd like to ask you a few questions about your family
How much time do you manage to spend with members of your family?
What sorts ofthings do you like to do together?
Do you get on well with your family? Why?
Part Two A
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I'd like you to tell me about your learning English
All right? Remember, you have only 1 or 2 minutes for this so doesn't worry if I stop
you. I'll tell you when. Can you start speaking now, please?
You should say
When and where you study English
What English course do you iike best?
And explain why it is important for you.
Part two B
Why are you study English?
Do you think learning English will benefit to your first language study?
We've been talking about household equipments and I'd like to discuss with you one
or two question related to this. let's consider:
What do you think is the best way to study English?
What is the most difficulties do you think ofteaching of English in you country?
How this can be solved in the future?
Sample 3
Part One
Good morning. My name is ... could you tell me your name please?
Please show me your identification! passport? Thats fine thanks you.
Do you work or are you a student?
What subject are you a studying?
Why did you choose that subject?
Are there things you dont like about it?
Now Id like to ask you a few questions about transport systems in your hometown
What is the mostpopular transport system in use? Talk about its reliability,
frequency and fare.
Do you have any problems using the public transport?
Part Two
Your topic
I'd like you to tell me about your favorite news channel
You should say
What is it
How often do you use it?
And explain why you like it.
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Part Two B
What do you think for ordinary people the most effective media to get news is?
Whether all people wil1 be interested in national or international news in your
country.
Compare the people's attitude to media between now and the past 20 years?
Should we trust the journalists?
What do you think what a good journalist should be?
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Part 1 of the IElTS Speaking Module consists of personal questions about you, your
family, your work, your education or other familiar topics. A categorized list of such topics
and questions is given below. You can use these sample questions to rehearse for this
part of the oral interview. Make sure you can speak correctly, clearly, and with ease and
confidence in response to each question. Remember to make your answer interesting by
providing more than the most basic information. Some of these sample questions are
highly likely to appear on your exam, so review them well.
YOU
Describe yourself.
FAMILY

Describe your family?

Do you have a large or small family?

How much time do you spend with your family?

What do you like to do together as a family?

Do you get along well with your family?

Are people in your country generally close to their families?
WORK

What do you do?

What are your responsibilities?

How many hours do you work each day?

Do you enjoy your work?

Is there some other kind of work you would rather do?

If you could change your job or profession, what would you do?

Describe the process of getting a job in your country.

Describe the company or organization you work for.

What is your position?

What do you like about your job?
What do you dislike about your job?

EDUCATION

Describe your education.

What kind of school did you go to as a child?

D.id you go to a co-educational school?
.. What was your favourite subject as a child?

Who was your favourite teacher?

What is the education system like in your country?

Do you think your country has an effective education system?
STUDIES
• What are you studying now?
• What is your area of specialization?
HOMETOWN
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WEATHER







HOME



WEDDING







TRAVEL




COMPUTERS



Describe your hometown.
What's special about it?
Where is your hometown located?
Is it easy to travel around your hometown?
What is it known for?
What do people in your town do?
What are the main industries in your hometown?
What problems face your hometown?
What languages are spoken in your hometown?
What are the advantages of living in your hometown?
What are some problems faced by your hometown?
Compare your hometown with another city.
What are some environmental problems faced by your hometown?
What's the weather like in your country?
Does the weather affect your mood?
How do rainy days make you feel?
What's your favourite season of the year?
What do you like to do when it's hot?
What do you usually do in the winter?
How many seasons does your country have?
Describe your home.
What kind of building do you live in?
How long have you lived there?
Have you ever been to a wedding?
Whose wedding was it?
Where was it held?
What clothes do people wear?
Describe the wedding ceremony.
What sort if gifts do people buy for the bridal couple?
What kind of clothes did the bride and groom wear?
Do you like to travel?
What kind of places have you visited in your life?
Which place would you really like to visit? Why?
What's the best place you've ever visited?
Do you think computers help society?
Do you think computers are bad for health?
How do you think computers have changed the world?
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INTERNET
Do you use the Internet much during the day?

What do you usually do on the Internet? \

What are some advantages of the Internet?


What are some disadvantages?

Do people in your country use the Internet a lot?

Do you do any shopping on the Internet?
EMAIL

Do you send and receive email regularly?

Who do you usually communicate with?

How often do you check your email? .

Do you think writing email has strengthened or weakened people's writing
skills?
What are some disadvantages of email?

FRIEND

Describe a friend.

How long have you known each other?

What do usually do together?

What do you like the most about him I her?
How often do you see each other?
PLACE

Describe a place you like to go.

Why is this place special to you?
When did you first visit this place?


Where is this place located?

What language is spoken here? Do you speak this language?
SMOKING

What do you feel about smoking in public places?

Do you think smoking should be banned in people's homes?
MARRIAGE

What is the attitude toward marriage in your country?

Do most young people plan on getting married in your country?

What are some of the advantages of marriage?

. What are some of the disadvantages?

Is the divorce rate high in your country?

Do you think people should be allowed to get divorced?
HOBBIES

Do you have any hobbies?
What are some of your hobbies?


When did you first develop tis hobby?
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What are some of the advantages of having a hobby?

How much time do you spend on your hobby?
FILMS

Do you enjoy watching movies?

What's your favourite film?

Who are your favourite actors?

How often do you watch films?
SHOPPING

Do you enjoy shopping?

How do you feel about shopping?

Do you like shopping on the Internet?' f.

Do you have any favourite stores?

What don't you like about shopping?

Which is the most popular place to shop in your hometown?
SPORTS

Do you like sports?

Do you enjoy watching sports?

Do you enjoy participating in any sports?

Which sports are most popular in your country?

. What's your favourite sport/

When did you first become interested in sports?

How often do you participate in sports?

What equipment do you need for your favourite sport?
FOOD

What are some of your favourite foods?

What foods are popular in your country?

What are some of the famous dishes of your country?

Do you enjoy cooking?
FESTIVAL

What's the most important festival in your country?

How do people celebrate this festival?

What special food is associated with this festival?

What special activities are associated with this festival?

What do you enjoy most about this festival?

Do you think festivals are important for a society?
TELEVISION

Do you watch television a lot?

What do you usually watch on television?

How many hours of television do you usually watch?

What are the most popular shows in your country?

What kind of shows do you like to watch?
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What are some advantages of television?

What are someof the disadvantages of television?


What did you last watch on television?

Why do you think certain TV shows are so popular?
TOURISM
Which places would you recommend to a visitor to your country?


Do a lot of tourists visit your country?
What do they usually do there?


How has tourism changed your country?

Is your country expensive for most tourists?
What are some famous landmarks in your country?

DAILY ROUTINE
Describe your daily routine.


What do you usually do?

What do you do on the weekend?

What is you typical weekday like?

Does your life change much from week to week?
Do you have any free time during the week?

YOUR COUNTRY

Describe your daily routine.

What do you usually do?

What do you do on the weekend?
What is you typical weekday like?

Does your life change much from week to week?


Do you have any free time during the week?
CLOTHES

What type of clothes do you like to wear?

What kind of clothes do people in your country usually wear?

How important is fashion to you?

What kind of clothes do you dislike?

Do you think people behave differently in different kinds of clothes?

What kind of clothes do people wear to work in your country?
Are clothes expensive in your country?

GOING OUT

Do you like going out or staying at home?
What do you like to do when you go out?

How often do you go out?


Do people in your country go our a lot?

How and where do people in your country usually socialize?

What kind of entertainment is popular in your country?
GAMES
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Do you enjoy playing any games?


What kind of games do you play?

Do you think adults should play games?
What do children learn from games?

What kind of games did you play when you were a child?

What games are popular in your country today?


What kind of games were popular when you were young?
Do you think mental games like chess are good for you?


COLOURS

Do you have a favourite colour?
What are your country's colours?


Do you think colours affect our moods?

Can you learn anything about a person from the colours he I she likes?
Do you like the same colours now as you did when you were a child?

MUSIC
Do you like music?


What kind of music do you like?

When do you usually listen to music?
What kind of music did you like when you were younger?

What kind of music is popular in your country?


Do you play any musical instruments?
Do you wish you could play any musical instruments?


Which is your favourite instrument?

Most high level jobs are done by men. Should the government encourage a certain
percentage of these jobs to be reserved for women.
• Are famous people treated unfairly by the media? Should they be given more privacy,
or is the price of their fame an invasion into their private lives?
• Should developing countries concentrate on Improving industrial skills or should they
promote education first?
• Safety standards are important when building people's homes. Who should be
responsible for enforcing strict building codes - the government or the people who
build the homes?
• Does modern technology make life more convenient, or was life better when
technology was simpler?
• In your opinion what factors contribute to a good movie?
• Does modern technology make life more ,convenient, or was life better when
technology was simpler?
• Does travel help to promote understanding and communication between countries?
• If children behave badly ,should their parents accept responsibility and also be
punished?
74
9 Aug 2003 (Academic)
Task one: A table showing the increasing number of elderly aged more than
100, by gender in UK in four consequent different years in 20th century.
Task two: With the advent of computers the role of teachers are going to be faded in
classrooms. Agree or Disagree?
OR
Taskl: A table with 12 numbers giving information about UK residents who are aged over 100
between 1941 and 2001.
Task2: As computers are more and more used in education, some people argue that in future
there will be no role for teachers. Agree or disagree?
16 Aug 2003 (Academic)
Language and culture are respected less in comparison with the past. Do you agree or
disagree?
25th March 2004 (mine)
Some people say all these advertisements are making people buy things they donot really
need. Discuss.
Coaching IELTS
IELTS, which stands---fol:.-lntemational English Language Testing System is a test mandatory for
students aspiring to study in most of the countries such as USA, UK, Ireland, Canada, Australia,
New Zealand. People who wish to migrate to the west including Canada are required to clear IELTS
with requisite band score. IELTS offers a maximum of 9-band score. The test fee is around Rs
7,600/-. IELTS is conducted by two autonomous organizations namely: The British Council and IDP
Australia.
Test structure
Candidates are tested in Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking. Total test time is 2 hours 45
minutes. The first three modules- Listening, Reading and Writing- must be completed in one day.
The speaking module may be taken, at the discretion of the test center, in the period seven days
before or after the other Modules. The tests are designed to cover the full range of ability from non­
user to expert user.
IELTS - Pattern
Section Number of Question Time
Listening 40 30 Minutes
Reading 40 60 Minutes
Writing 2 Tasks 60 Minutes
Speaking 10 Questions 15 Minutes
In the listening module students are expected to listen to conversations & talks and answer the
questions, which follow. In the reading section the test takers are expected to read the passage and
answer the questions on the grounds of what is stated directly or implied. In the writing section
they are expected to write essays on the task given, of course, the speaking test looks like an
interview between the examiner and the candidate where the examiner assesses the proficiency of
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the candidate in terms of fluency, vocabulary, accent etc. IELTS is a paper based test and can be
taken according to the test dates announced;
What you should know about the sections
Listening
• British Accent
• . Idioms
• Answer while you listen
Reading
• Long passages
• Dry content
• Technical Jargon
• Time Hurdles
• Peculiar Question Models
Writing
• Two tasks
• Ability to describe, analyze & argue over
• Standard format
• Parameters of evaluation
Speaking
• One to one interview
• Don't give one-word answers
• Be fluent in speech
• Extremely important for a good band score.
I cannot stress this enough - the success in IELTS test largely depends on students' ability to
follow the instructions. It sounds ridiculously simple, and yet it is a common mistake to
underestimate the importance of following the instructions precisely. So here is a list of 8 most
famous IELTS pitfalls that cost test takers precious points.
1. More is less. A very common mistake is to answer in more words than instructed. If
the task says "Not more than 3 words", answering in 4 or more words will definitely cost
marks.
. 2. Less is less. The length of a written task is crucial. When instructions mention a
minimal number of words (250 for essay, 150 for report or letter), it means that any
work shorter than required will be penalized.
3. Longer essay doesn't mean better mark. Another common misconception is that
longer essays score better in IELTS. Not only is this a myth, but also a dangerous one.
Writing a long essay can indirectly cost marks, because the chances of making mistakes
increase with the number of words and sentences.
4. Changing the subject is unacceptable. Every so often a student is asked to write on
topic, that he doesn't understand. To avoid the disaster of missing a whole task they
decide to write on a slightly - or entirely different topic. The sad fact is that 1:10 matter
how beautiful the submitted work is, the wrong topic means zero score. Another similar
pitfall is to omit parts of the given topic or ignore the guidelines in your work. Every point
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the topic refers to needs to be covered because the examiners will be actually counting
iliem. .
5. Good memory can get you in trouble. Having seen that the topics sometimes repeat,
"smart" students with good memory decide to memorize essays. This is a terrible mistake
to make because the examiners are trained to look for memorized essays and have firm
instructions to disqualify such works on the spot.
6. Accent is not important. Pronunciation is.! IELTS, being a test for non-native English
speakers can't penalize people for having an accent. The problem here is that not
everyone knows the difference between speaking with an accent and mispronouncing the
words. No matter how strong of an accent a person has, the words are to be pronounced
correctly or it will cost marks.
7. It is not the ideas that are important, but the way they are described in. Many
students think that expressing the wrong ideas (whether it is in essay, letter or
discussion) can harm their score. The truth is that no idea can be wrong and the ideas
are not important on their own, it is the way they are expressed in that important.
8. Connective words: the more is not always the better. Smart students know that one of
the essay marking criteria are coherence and cohesion, and what better way is there to
demonstrate cohesion than to use lots of connective words, right? Wrong. Overuse of
connective words is a know problem, which is easily recognized and penalized by the
examiners.
And in conclusion, a word of advice: to stay out of trouble, it is equally important to be aware
of the pitfalls and to practice enough before the exam. Being familiar with the structure and
the procedure of the test will build up confidence and that will reflect in your score.
THE IELTS ACADEMIC SPEAKING TEST TUTORIAL
The IELTS Academic Speaking test is the shortest of the components of the IELTS test­
only 11 to 14 minutes. In this short time you have to convince the examiner who will be
speaking with you of your level of English.
The IELTS Academic Speaking Test is the same for both the Academic and General
Training modules. The test is conducted with 1 examiner and 1 candidate. The Speaking
test is recorded. The Speaking Test is divided into 3 sections:
Section 1 Section 1 begins with some general introductory questions. This is followed by
some questions on personal information similar to the type ofquestions one would ask
when meeting someone for the first time. Finally the examiner asks a series· of questions
of2 topics of general interest. (4 - 5 minutes)
Section 2 Section 2 is a monologue (1 person speaking) by the candidate. The examiner
will give the candidate a card with a subject and a few guiding questions on it. The
student must talk for 1 to 2 minutes on this subject. The examiner decides on the exact
length. The student has an optional 1 minute in order to prepare for his talk ,and is
provided with some paper and a pencil in order to make some brief notes. After the
candidate's talk the examiner will ask 1 or 2 brief questions in order to finish off the
section. (3 - 4 minutes)
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Section 3 Here the examiner will ask some more questions generally related to the
subject spoken about in section 2. These questions will be more demanding and require
some critical analysis on the part of the candidate. (4 - 5 minutes)
Question Types
The types of questions that come in the IELTS Academic Speaking Test are very general
in nature and are designed so that anyone around the world, regardless of what
background or culture they come from, should be able to answer them. The questions will
not be overly personal and wiJI avoid contentious subjects such as politics, sex or
religion.
All the questions will be open questions rather than closed questions. An open question
asks the candidate to give an extended answer, and so have the opportunity to show how
good his English is. A closed question is one that can be answered by a single word or a
couple of words. So, you will not get a question like:
Do you like living in your town?
A student could just answer yes. Any answers like this will just be followed by the
question why? so you have to extend your answer (what you should have done after the
"yes" anyway). Anyway, the question is more likely to be:
Why do you like living in your town?
Here the candidate has to give an explanation and therefore the examiner hears plenty of
English which will help him or her evaluate you.
Marking ·IELTS Academic Speaking Test Marks, Bands and Results
In the IELTS Academic Speaking Test you will be marked in 4 areas. These 4 areas are:
Fluency and Coherence, Lexical Resource, Grammatical Range and Accuracy and
Pronunciation. For the first 3, you get a mark out of 9. For Pronunciation you get a 2,4,6
or 8. Finally an average is taken to give you your final band for the Speaking. Let's look
at these areas in more detail.
Fluency and Coherence: The examiner grades your fluency, which is how easy, smooth
and flowing your speaking is. To get a good grade here, any gaps in your speaking should
be associated with searching for the right idea rather than hesitancy with finding the right
word or structure. For the coherence part, the examiner looks at how easy you are to
understand. Does your flow of ideas run smoothly, logically and with consistency? Do
you communicate well?
Lexical Resource: This mark grades the range of words that you use in your speaking test
and whether you use the words in the right way, at the right time and in the right place.
Grammatical Range and Resource: This mark grades your range of grammatical
structures, your accuracy at producing them and whether you use the right structure at the
78
right time and in the right place. This is the area that worries the candidates the most as it
is the dreaded grammar. Remember it is only 1 part out of 4.
Pronunciation: This mark grades you on how clearly you speak English.
The Three Sections of the IEL TS Academic Listening Test
Here we will look at the three sections in more detail. Remember, the IELTS test always
tries to mirror situations that you will encounter as a student or immigrant in an English
speaking country. The speaking test is no different and each of the sections has a specific
purpose. Like all the different modules of the IEL TS, the speaking gets more difficult as
it goes on. The questions that are asked in Section 1 are easier than in Section 2 and so
on. This does not mean that by Section 3 they are impossible but they are more
demanding linguistically.
Section 1 (4 - 5 minutes)
This section is divided into three parts.
i) The first part involves general introductions. Here the examiner checks that he or she
has the right person by checking the candidates name, origin and identification. This only
takes a few seconds.
ii) In the second part the examiner asks some personal (not too personal so don't worry)
questions about some familiar topics such as yourself, your family, your home or your
work/study. These questions are the type that people would use when meeting someone
for the first time. This should last for a couple ofminutes.
iii) In the third part the examiner chooses 2 sets of questions from his selection. These
sets of questions will cover general ideas on a theme of general interest.
Section 2 (3 - 4 minutes)
In this section the candidate has to give a small "speech" or monologue on a general
subject chosen by the examiner. The examiner will hand you a card with the subject
written on it, along with about three questions on the subject in order to guide and help
your speaking. The examiner will then tell you that you have 1 minute to prepare your
mini-talk and he or she will give you some paper and a pencil to make some notes during
that minute. You can refer to your notes while you are speaking. After the minute, the
examiner will ask you to start talking and you must talk on the subject until the examiner
asks you to stop. After he has asked you to stop, he may ask you 1 or 2 general questions
about what you have been discussing. You cannot ask the examiner for another card. You
must use the one that he gives you.
Section 3 (4 - 5 minutes)
In Section 3 the examiner will ask you a series of questions thematically linked to the
subject that you spoke about in Section 2. These questions will be of a more demanding
79
nature and will require a more analytical and thoughtful answer. You will also probably
need to use more complex language as regards grammatical structure and vocabulary.
How to do Better in the IEL TS Academic Speaking Test
There are a number of things you can do to have a better performance in the IELTS
Academic Speaking Test.
First of all practice. This is the key to all the different modules of IELTS. Below you will
find a separate section devoted to practising the speaking.
When you are in the test, smile and look the examiner in the eye. Try and be friendly and
look as though you are enjoying the conversation. This has a big effect on the examiner.
If an examiner has to talk with someone who doesn't talk much, doesn't smile at all and
who clearly doesn't want to be there, then it has a negative effect on the examiner. Being
nervous is fine. The examiner understands that and will try and put you at ease. But be
friendly. It makes a difference.
Don't worry about the occasional mistake. The examiner will expect some mistakes ­
after all, English is a foreign language for you and people make mistakes in speaking
foreign languages. The examiner is not making a note of every single mistake that you
make. This would be impossible to do and concentrate on your speaking. He will mOle
get a general impression of your English accuracy so individual errors don't matter: More
important is your communication.
You have to talk. Without your talking input, the examiner can't grade you very well. Try
and give as full an answer as you can so that you show the examiner that you are
comfortable at talking at length and can communicate welL Don't do this to extremes
though. When you have finished what you have to say stop. Don't try and force more out
as it will probably be strained and repetitive. The examiner will see that you have .
finished and will give you the next question. Similarly, you won't be able to answer all
questions at length. Different people can talk about different questions more and the
examiner knows this. If you don't know much about something, say so and then say what
you do know. When you're finished, the examiner will give you another question. You
can't duck out of every question though - the responsibility is on you to talk.
Don't try and be too clever. Just try and talk normally as that is when you will perform at
your best. If you try and extend yourselftoo much, then that is when you will make the
most errors.
Perfection is not needed. You can still make some errors and get a 9 (not many errors
though). So don't let making errors upset you. Get on with the talking and concentrate on
your communication.
One thing that puts candidates off is that the Speaking test is recorded. This is done so
that, if necessary, the speaking can be re-marked. If the bands for a candidate's writing
80
and speaking for instance are very different, then the candidate's test is re-checked. If the
speaking was not recorded, then this could not be done. This doesn't happen very often.
Sample recordings are also sent to the IELTS administration to be monitored to make
sure that examiners are doing a good job and assigning the correct bands. So, try and
forget that the recorder is there and get on with answering the questions.
Don't forget your ID! You need it at the start of the test.
Don't give yes/no answers unless you continue with a because. It gives a bad impression.
If you do give a yes/now answer, you'll probably get a why next anyway.
Practice
As in all parts of the IELTS, this is the one thing that will really improve your band.
There are various things that you can do to improve your performance.
Prepare the types of questions for each of the different sections.
Section 1
In section 1 you start with personal questions such as about yourself, your family, your
home or your work/study. So, sit down with your dictionary and try and think of all the
vocabulary you would need to completely describe all parts of your life, home, family
and work/study. Then sit down with a piece ofpaper and write down every question you
can think of about these ideas. Try and come up with about 20. You can then practice
. them in 2 ways:
i) Get a friend to ask you the questions and practice giving long, full answers. Do this
again and again. It doesn't matter if you do the same question frequently, as you will give
better and better answers with more and more information. The more often you practice
this, the better you'll get.
ii) If you don't have a friend who can do this, then you can do it by yourself. You just
look at your list and imagine that someone has asked you the question. Then, off you go.
You can do this sat at home, you can talk to the cat, the mirror or do it driving on the way
to work. It may feel a bit strange at first, talking by yourself, but it works and you will
improve. You don't have to do either method i or ii, you can mix both. It all helps.
In the second part of Section 1 you have to answer questions on themes of general
interest. These are not complicated but are more demanding than the ones that you did in
the part before. Let's say for example that the theme the examiner chooses is travelling.
The examiner will have a set of questions to ask you. How many he asks depends on how
long you talk for in your answers. The first question could be:
81
Do you enjoy traveling and why/why not?
Then this could be followed by:
Where would you like to travel to and why?
You can find other sample themes and questions in IELTS Practice Now Question Papers
and from other sources. Once you have an idea of the types oftheme and question, you
can start to make your own examples and practice answering them in the ways (i and ii)
above. I have done this with classes and it works very well. Students doing this, more
often than not, come up with actual themes and questions from the test itself!!
Section 2
Preparation and practice for Section 2 is similar to the practice in Section I.You have to
talk for 1 to 2 minutes in English. Speaking for this time in your own language is quite
hard, so in a foreign language it is harder. The reason it is hard is that you don't often talk
uninterrupted for 1 to 2 minutes about anything, whether it is in your language or
English. So, how do you get better at it? By practising it again and again. Let's say that
your task is as follows:
Describe a favourite holiday destination that you like.
You should say:
• When you first went there.
• How you get there.
• What you do when you're there.
• And explain why this place is so special for you.
So, you can see the format of this section. The practice procedure is as before. Check out
other question types and soon you're be able to develop your own. Then practice them
with someone or by yourself. Soon, talking for 2 minutes without stopping won't be a
problem. Remember you don't have to talk fast or without breaks. They want you to talk
normally. Talk at a normal speed, pause to take breaths and take time to consult your
notes to give yourself ideas about what to talk about next.
The follow up question to end Section 2 is not so important that it needs to be practiced
as it only requires a few words as an answer. An example question from the examiner for
the subject above could be:
liDo you think 1 would enjoy a holiday in this place too?"
The candidate would just be expected to say something like:
82
"Oh yes, I think so."
Or:
"Maybe not. It might be too hot for you. If
You can see that nothing very long is required.
At this point I'd like to explain about the I minute preparation time and the notes that you
can write during it. First of all, use your preparation time and make notes. Before you
begin your monologue, you will have 1 minute to prepare for it. Some people think that
they don't need the time at all and will start straight away. Very often these people will
dry up early and be at a loss about how to continue. Use your time. Someone starting
straight away does not get any advantage at allover someone who takes the full minute to
prepare.
So, what should you write in your notes? First of all, don't try and write out your whole
talk word for word. You don't have enough time. Looking at the question above (which is
a typical layout for this section) you can see that there is a main question (Describe a
favourite holiday destination that you like.) and then 3 mini-questions following (Say
when you first went there, how you get there what you do when you're there -au<fexplain
why this place is so special for you).
These questions are here to help you as they give you ideas to talk about and give your
talk a bit of structure. However, it asks you to talk about these things so you should talk
about them. In your notes quickly jot down one or two ideas for each of the questions, so
that they will remind you about things to talk about when you look at your notes during
your talk. Finally, if you have time, maybe make a note of something from your own
experience connected to the talking theme. When you are talking about something from
your own experience, it is easier to talk at length. For example, for the question above,
you could be just finishing and still have 45 seconds left to talk. You could be saying why
the place is so special to you. As you run out of ideas you could give an example out of
your own experience. You could say:
"Actually why I like the place so much is shown from something that happened to me the
last time I was there. I was in a restaurant having some food and ... "
The subject of your story doesn't matter as you are still on the subject of your talk. The
main thing is that it's keeping you talking.
Section 3
Section 3 rea]]y carries on from where Section 2 left off. The examiner will ask you
questions that are thematically linked to the subject that you talked about in Section 2.
83
For example, for the question we looked at above about a holiday destination, the
examiner might choose to ask you questions about tourism and the airline industry. The
examiner will have a set of questions to ask you. How many he asks depends on how
long you talk for in your answers. None of the questions will be of a technical nature or
require any specialist knowledge as that would be unfair, but you will be expected to give
your opinion on what is asked you.
So, let's look at some examples.
Tourism
• Can you predict any major changes that could happen in the Tourist Industry over the next 50 years?
• Can you compare the tourist industry in your country today with the tourist industry when your
grandparents were young?Can you identify some of the factors that have led to the Industry success of
the airline industry?
Airline
• Can you suggest any ways in which air travel could be made safer?
• You can see that the questions here are more analytical and require more thought than the questions in
the previous sections.
As regards practice, the procedure is as in the previous sections. You need to get
someone to do the questions with you, or do them alone and then develop your own
questions and practice with them. ieltshelpnow.com Practice Tests also provide practice
and often we provide much fuller examples. Our tests are also at least half the price! The
choice is yours.
Anyway, work hard and good luck with the IELTS Academic Speaking Test. I hope that
this free tutorial has helped you. Below are links to the other free IELTS academic
tutorials.
84
SPEAKING TEST HINTS
BE PREPARED AND TRY TO RELAX
You should be on time and prepared for the interview. (See also IELTS Test Basic Hint 3.)
Remember to have your passport with you to show to the examiner for identification.
The examiner is provided with a list of standardised questions to ask you, and will conduct the
interview in a manner that you might not be used to if you have not had some previous practice. The
Speaking Sub-test is a formal interview, not an ordinary conversation. In Parts 1 & 2 of the test, the
examiner cannot talk to you freely. He or she must follow a strict set of questions that is determined
in advance of your test. In Part 3 the examiner can talk with less restriction.
Do not worry about the interview being recorded. The recording is made to ensure that the examiner
conducts the interview properly, and is not used to test your English.
Firstimpressionsare very important. You should always reply with an answerthat is informative
and as interesting as possible.
Body Janguage is also important. Sit comfortably and try to show with your body that you are
relaxed, but not too relaxed! Remember that the speaking part of the IELTS test is the same for
Academic and General Training Module candidates and is formal in style. With your body, aim to
create a relaxed impression, and by what you say, aim to create an intelligent impression.
BE WILLING TO TALK, AND BE POSITIVE
Do not simply reply yes or no to a question and wait for the next one. Remember, this test is your
opportunity to speak. Try to be as helpful and willing to talk as you can. The examiner is there to
guide you as towhatto say and will do as little ofthetalking as possible. You shouldaimto betalking
for at least 75-80% of the time. Also, take advantage of every question to show that you are an
interesting and informed person. ".
In order to present yourselfin the best waypossible you should try to sound positive about yourpast,
present and future. Candidates sometimes thinkthat absolute honesty is always necessary. However,
if you are studying in a foreign country, for ex.ample, and you are asked what you think of that
country, it is unwise to say that you think it is terrible - even if you believe it to be true!
The examiner is expecting to talk to a positive, intelligent and courteous candidate
THE EXAMINER FRAME
-
probably heardor been told by your English teacher that the examiner uses what is calJed
a "frame" from which to ask you questions. A frame is simply a set of pre-determined questions
on a topic. Forexample, in order tofirst getto know you, the examiner will ask a few questions about
your background, but he or she will only ask the questions in the chosen frame.
Does this mean you can find out from other students who have previously taken the test what the
questions are going to be in your test? Unfortunately, this is not possible! The use offrames does
not mean that alJ students hear exactly the same set ofquestions. In fact, there are many frames from
which the examiner can choose questions.
You might beinterested to know that the introduction ofstandard sets ofquestions onvarious topics
85
for all candidates means the accuracy of your assessment is further guaranteed.
Although you do not have to concern yourself about where the questions come from, it is essential
to understand that the standardisation of questions means that your answering technique is very
important (see Speaking Hint 86).
In addition, you should know that the examiner is giving you a score out of9 in four areas ofspeaking
ability:
I. Fluency and Coherence - (Does your speech flow? Can you be easily understood?)
2. Lexical Resource (Do you use a reasonably wide range o/vocabulary in your speech?)
3. Grammatical Range and Accuracy - (Do you use English grammar properly when you speak?)
4. Pronunciation - (Do you use English sounds. stress and intonation patterns etc. correctly?)
Your final Band Score for the Speaking Sub-test is the average of these four scores.
MAKE GOOD USE OF THE QUESTIONS ASKED
If the situation 'was an ordinary conversation, it would be perfectly reasonable to answer some of
the questions with a short one or two word answer, but this is not an ordinary conversation.
Ordinary conversation
Question: Where do you come from?
Answer: Germany.
Question: Which part of Germany?
Notice that the questioner has asked a second question to get more detail.
Formal IELTS interview
Question: Wbere.do you come from?
Answer: Germany. Hamburg. It's in the north. you know ... a very busy city with a
population of over one and half million people. But actually I live about 15
kilometres out of town - on a small farm.
In this case the candidate has given a briefbut satisfactory answer that makes full use ofthe question
asked. Remember, especially in Parts I & 2 of the test, the examiner cannot ask flI$er questions
to find out what you should have told him or her in the first place.
However. do not fall into the trap of trying to impress with large words and complex explanations.
A complicated answer is not necessarily better than a simple and concise answer because you can
easily become lost for words! The examiner is listening for a level of fluency, and hesitation does
not help your overall Band Score.
Ingeneral, itis better to give simple and accurate answers than complex, inaccurate answers. Simple
answers, however, do not mean one-word answers; this will prevent youfrom showing the examiner
how well you can speak and require the examiner to move on to the next question too soon.
Answer the questions in full when they are given to you - you are unlikely to get a
second chance to answer them
86
#MilI, PART 1. INTRODUCTION & INTERVIEW (4-5 minutes)
... . ,.".,.,,,.. , ., •..,-.
CD Requirements
You will certainly be asked general questions about your background, so you should have already
prepared answers to some basic questions about yourself. For practice, write a short description of
your present situation, and imagine the questions a stranger might ask you based on what you have
written.
The requirements for effective performance in Part 1 are that you:
• introduce yourself in a relaxed, friendly manner
• produce basic information about yourself simply, accurately, and as fluently as
possible
• present yourself as a person who is willing to talk and has interesting things to
say about himself or herseJf.
Remember, Pat1i is mainly concerned with who you are, what you have done, your
home or yourfamily> your job or your studies, and your interests
CD What To Do and What Not To Do
../ x
Show the examiner you are confident Do not tell the examiner that you are nervous,
---"-_._--­
siiiiliiig -and looking him or her in or blink your eyes and move about too much.
2 If the examiner offers to shake your hand, 2 Do not shake hands with the examiner as if
return his or her handshake firmly. your extended band were a cold wet fish!
3 Answer the questions you are asked clearly 3 Do not cut the interview questions short with
and in some detail (using at least two or one-word or very short answers.
three sentences).
4 Do not wait for another question - the examiner
4 Show that you are in control by talking wants you to answer each question in fuU.
freely about yourself and your past.
5 Do not be afraid to correct yourself if you
5 Make sure you have practised well enough make a grammatical mistake, but fluency is
before the test so. that the past tenses you just as important. Your grammar practice
use are accurately formed and appropriate. should take pJace in the classroom or at horne.
CD Suggested "Opening" Words and Phrases
@ Practise using the phrases and sentences below with the help of a partner. Ask your partner to ask
you some basic "getting to know you" questions.
As you can see, I corne from ... I was born in ... but now I live in ...
You can see that I'm (nationality) .., but I've been living in (your host country) for (periodojtime)?
I am very dose to my family, although I don't live with them any longer.
Recently, I've been Istudy.ing I at ... Before that I Istudied I at ...
working worked
I've been studying English now for (1 year) ...
At the moment I'm I I
at .. ,
. working
87
G Part 1 - Background Information Topic Areas:
Your Home and Family
Questions about this topic are fairly common in all English test interviews, including the IELTS.
The examiner wishes to find out some general background infonnation about you, and your home
and family is a good place to start.
@ Common questions might include:
Where do you live?
Do you live by yourself or with your family?
Who do you share with?
>Js it a nice place? What's it like?
Are you here in (your host country) alone or
. is your family with you?
Do you like living in (your host country)?
.:\
, What do your parents do? •
. Do you have any brothers and
i.e. what is their profession or work
" ',. '. ":: "'
You will probably not be asked all ofthese
questions, but be ready to answer these or
similar questions clearly and willingly.
Show as much interest in your own answers
as the examiner does listening to the answers
you give.
Try to think ofyourself, and sound like,
someone special - which, ofcourse, you are!
Do not take too long to answer each question
at this stage - let the examiner guide you. You
should sense when he or she wants to move on
to the next question.
Remember to smile!
Jobs and/or Studies
If you have a job (or have had a job in the past), that could be of interest to the examiner. If not, it
does not matter - you are probably engaged in study orcan talk about your English course. Ifcurrent
work or study does not apply to you, then talk briefly about how you began to learn English and the
school in which you studied.
Your Interests
Most students have interesting hobbies or activities that they enjoy doing - make sure that you are
prepared to talk about what interests you and what you do in your spare time. Again, make yourself
sound as if you are the only person in the world who does these exciting things.
Other Familiar Topic Areas
Refer to the Speaking Game on page 152 for more topic ideas for Part 1.
_ Suggested Words and Phrases ... ifyou are unsure ofthe question or how to answer
Jl}\110I'eX,aCIJIV, sure whatyou.mean. Couldyon retlealtUlieQtue:stl(]
. . . . . ' . . . .
sure how to answeTthat question, but (oe:r.hflt!S:);:.,:.
'c':"i,;r"t,h"."', but(mayoe) I can,u'""",]up.f,;;tnir'i·+",
... ifyou cannot think of what else to say
88
IJIIW PART 2. INDIVIDUAL LONG TURN (3-4 minutes)
G Requirements
You will know that Part 2 has begun when the examiner asks you to talk in some detail about a
particular topic - a topic which is usually easy for you to find things to talk about. Note that you are
only asked to talk about one topic.
The requirements for effective performance in Part 2 are that you:
• talk in some detail about the topic referred to on the card you are given
• try give an organised answer by following the instructions written on the card
• keep talking about the topic - with no help from the examiner for at least one
minute and up to 2 minutes
Remember, Part 2 is concerned with your ability to speak with little or no hesitation
and in some detail about a simple topic
41
What To Do and What Not To Do
./ X
Use your preparation time to think about Do not digress; that is, do not talk of things
your answer think only about what is which are not directly related to the topic on
written on the c ( l f d . ~ __ the card.
2 Organise your reply by fol1owing the order 2 Do not hesitate for too long in your answer. It
of the instructions given on the card. (See is better to speak about anything than not to
Speaking Hint 94.) speak at all! .
3 Be aware ofhow long you have been talking 3 Do not be afraid to correct a grammatical
by practising with a wristwatch before mistake, but fluency is just as important as
you do the test. (See Speaking Hint 94.) grammar. and too much correction will make it
hard for yOll to be understood.
4 Make sure you have answered all that is
required on the card, and be prepared to 4 Donot expect the examiner to give you feedback
answer a couple of questions at the end. on how well you performed in your talk.
CD Part 2 - What To Do in the Minute of Silence
When the examiner hands you the card youroneminute's preparation time has begun. Read the card
carefully, noting what the topic is. Since there is no title on the card', the topic might not be
immediately clear, but the topic is given in the very first sentence.
You will see that there are a number of instructions to follow, and all the items of information
required are expected to be referred to in your answer. You can certainJy add extra infonnation if
you think it is appropriate, and you are wise to do so - if you have time - provided that you do not
digress (speak "off' or away from the topic).
The best approach is to read the card quickly from beginning to end, and then go back to the first
specific instruction after the topic sentence. Think ofthings to say about each ofthe instructions in
the remaining time you have. Although you are allowed to make notes (and refer to them in your
answer). unless you have practised this approach. it is probably best to spend your time thinking
rather than writing. But some candidates may wish to ask the examiner for notepaper to write on.
There are usually 3 or 4 instructions to speak about - so aim to speak for 30 seconds on each one.
• the use ofcard titles in the Speaking Test Game 00 page 152 is for ease of use in the game
89
A Sample Topic Card:
Describe a city or a town that you know well.
You should include in your answer:
the location of the city or town
the part of the city or town you are most familiar with
important landmarks and places to visit
... and what makes that city or town special to you and to others.
Notice that the topic is there in the very first sentence. Note also that there are 4 further instructions
that follow (there may be more or less). If you speak for about 30 seconds on each of these 4
instructions, you will have spoken for about 2 minutes - which is more than adequate. Do not speak
for longer than 2 minutes.
The examiner mayor may not stop you talking after two minutes, so aim to finish within that period
of time. Of course, it is very important to speak for at least one minute, so jf you have difficulty
speaking for that length of time you will have to practise, practise, practise.
Try using a wristwatch, and time yourselfon each part ofthe topic. Become accustomed to speaking
for approximately 30 seconds on one instruction. Then move on to the next instruction. You can
look quickly at your watch in the test itself, but we do not advise it. It is much better to practise
recognising how long 30 seconds "feels".
When you get better at "feeling" how long you take to speak about parts ofthe main topic, you can
approach the entire answer in. a similar way - that is, by estimating how long you have spoken for,
and making sure you have included all parts of the answer within two minutes.
So, what specifically can you talk about? Look at a breakdown of the above topic:
h€K9.Q!!C.9itY..-.
the location of the city or town ------­
••••••••.
•••. .•
the part of the city or town you ...... .
are most familiar with
/Wnnr,Jf.filfltIJ.filL. kll!/il.$lfil1/i.. mflf/.l1m.
kf.JjJ!t{f]g$.................................... .
€ •• ••••••.
important landmarks and
places to visit
•.••.
.E!. f9.£!!:n?rjg{JI............... ..
gt.$P.€!9f!. tmf#dwlJ•. ••.•.•..
what makes that city or town
special to you and to others .tQ.Wf!tt?!.iln«ktJ.?JlntJ.f?
90
PART 3. TWO-WAY DISCUSSION (4-5 minutes)
AM'
G Requirements
Part 3 of the Speaking Sub-test is the most demanding. Although it is described as a two-way
discussion, you wiH be expected to do most of the talking. The questions or prompts you must
answer are linked to the topic you spoke about in Part 2, but they take the topic further away from
you and your immediate life and into areas of more general interest.
The discussion is designed to:
• make you think and comment about various issues (within a specific topic area) that
concern people living in today's world
• encourage you to give your opinions
• extend your range of responses to include some or all of the following:
- describing in detail
- contrasting and comparing
- discussing situations as they were in the past
imagining situations as they might be in the future
Remember; effeCtive performance in Part 3 requires an ability to respond to
questions and prompts about abstract ideas .
• __~ ~ ! To Do and What Not To Do
..I x
Try to talk around a difficult question by Do not repeat the information you gave in
speculating (guessing), using simple words
the original talkyou gave in Part 2. Although
if you can to express complex ideas. This
the questions and prompts in Part 3 are
is much better than trying to impress with
connected to the topic in Part 2, it is unlikely
big words that you may use incorrectly. that information you gave then will be
appropriate now.
2 It is not a good idea to just give up; always
attempt to answer a question as fully as
2 Do not worry if you cannot answer easily.
possible and the best way you can. If you The examiner is asking more difficult
get stuck and cannot continue, the examiner
questions in Part 3, and is probably trying
might be able to help you if you say: "Can
to find your "ceiling" - the point at which
you ask the question in a different way?"
you cannot communicate easily (for lack of
vocabulary or some other speaking skill).
3 Use a variety of introductory phrases to
begin expressing ~ opinion (see Speaking
3 If asked to talk about the future, do not
Hint 97).
overuse the word "will". There are many
ways to express the future in English. (See
4 Use appropriate future forms and phrases
Speaking Hint 99.) The word "will" is
to express the possibility ofa future situation
often too definite to use to guess about
occurring. (See Speaking Hint 99.)
things which, after all, may not happen.
ED Introductory Phrases for Giving Opinions
91
;;:,_·,::t:'>; ......
'{ our answer should not only be interesting, it should also be informative,
Look at the following possible answer:
.. .
r n1 going to talk about the city ofSydney -on the east coast of very mpdetri,and.cJean city with
a beautiful harb()ur ,,. Cr ,'_ with a population of about rour and II half million inhabitants elf getsquitc.busy in
peak hour because just about everyone travels to workby car or \I'aili; butit rsa great piigelo.i:IVcb¢causethere
. are many exciting things to see and do - especially for ' •• ,'" .' .. '. ::.::::}Y,·}··
,)live in the inner-city - in a typical olderstyle bUilding ... exI abou(JOOyearsagp,,;i!'squite
•spacious, but many people live inrooi:lern tall dty c but
arc lots of wide streets often Hned with is
';j(\;k<1alas and kangaroos can only be'toundinihe zoo days
there are blue skic!> and sunshine - because of this, peOple a ..
. . " . .' .'. ",.," _><... ,_, '-: ;" . ,c',
Opera House is a favourite pJHce for tourists to it lo:Oks;like tliesai'IspfashilHfum adistailce, And'·
Bridge is aho strange -it looks and Xmas·
New Year to put 011 wonderful tlrework displays. . . . ... ;.. ···.··>:."C ...• >-)' .
it's the sense of space and freedom that people
people come from so many
oiher cities. Perhaps peopJearetoo busy dreari)iiig ......'..'
iiltl!irig, Water;isalwriyi:; I!earby, and the bllroqur is mostbeiiutiftl(siiWilf.
:_:.,- ... ?'<' '. . -' • '". '" . ...: .; ':<:.. :; :'>.
The answer is given in fairly simple English you should avoid giving a complex answer with
difficult vocabulary. It contains all the points written in note-fonn on the previous page, and is
approximately the right length for a good answer. Ofcourse, the speed at which you speak will also
determine how much you are able to say. Increase your speaking speed by practising 'topic talking'
daily and by improving your pronunciation,
Use the sample cards below and in the Speaking Test Game on page 152 to practise writing out an
answerofsimilar length, and ask a teacher to check your work. Then try giving a spoken answer from
the notes you have made, It is fine to memorise an answer for practice if it helps to speed up your
English, but do not waste your time memorising large pieces of English to speak in the test. The
examiner will not be fooled by this approach! Besides, you would be very lucky to guess your topic
before the test.
.You might be able to make your talk sound more interesting by "lifting" your voice a
little higher than when you speak normally
More Sample Topic Cards
t::\ r-----------------­

Talk about a holiday you have taken recently
or at some time in the past.
You should include in your answer:
where you went on your holiday
why you went to this particular place
what you did aOd with whom
.•. and why you enjoyed your holiday or not
Describe a health problem you once had
(or talk about someone else's problem).
You should mention:
the nature of the health problem
why the problem. occurred
what you (or the other person) could not
do because of the problem
." what you (or the other person) had to do to
get better
92
e Part 3 - Practice Topics for Discussion:
Since you cannot know what topic you will be asked to talk about in Part 2 of the Speaking Sub­
test, it follows that you cannot know in advance any particulars about the wider topic area that is
discussed in Part 3. The following possible discussion topics are for practice only:
• Problems that affect your country
• Financial success and how to achieve it
• Poverty and hunger in the Thield World
• Crime and punishment
• Fashion and design
• Public transport
• Youth and the problems they face
• The role of television and radio in society
• The influence of the print media
• Current affajrs
• The changing nalure of family life
• Nuclear energy
• World economic solutions
• Diet, health and exercise
• The consequences of global warming
• Recreational facilities in modem cities
• Future energy resources
• The relevance of school examinations
• Materialism and the consumer
• Space travel
• Modem medicine
• Censorship and the Internet
• Types of governments in the world today
• Women in the workplace
• The qualities and skills of a good company manager
• The necessity of a strong defence force
• The advantages of an international language
• The design of modern cities
• The influence of sport'in society
• Street protests and individual rights
• Religion and the church in the modern world
" The pros and cons of living in a foreign country
• The meilJ)ing of happiness
• Living together, marriage and divorce
When you first practise speaking about these topics, try it in your own language. Think about the
situation as it might have been in the past, the way things are now, and how things might become
in the future. Ma.kecomparisons, give opinions, aridtrytosound authoritative. Then practise in English!
f) Suggested Phrases for Speaking About The Future
I'm certain that ... (something will/is going to happen)
Most probably ... (something will/is going to happen)
It's (always) possible that ... (something might happen)
I hope that ... (something happens or doesn't happen)
There's
j-
migbteven :,. (h(j.ppen),c,,;.,
(something) wiH eVen .. , (happen)
coul0!Uway; (htlppen), especially if
a good
a 50-50
a reasonable
little
not much
cbance that ... (something will happen)
possibly I
(may)
er or not .,.
Note the inclusion of first conditional "if clauses", which can be useful when asked to speculate about the possibility
of something happening in the future.
93
CONCLUDING THE INTERVIEW
e Requirements
When the examiner has finisQed the discussion in Part 3, the Speaking Sub-test has come to an end.
The examiner will thank you for talking and the interview is concluded.
• remember to thank the examiner for his or her time and say goodbye.
• as you leave the room, don't forget to remain positive the examiner might not
have yet completely made up his or her mind about your score, and the final
impression you make is important.
Ifyou have questions about the test itse.lf, such as when the results will become
available, talk to the person in charge ofthe day sproceedings
_ What To Do and What Not To Do
./ x
Relax and remain in control right up until Do not tell the examiner how relieved you
the moment you leave the interview room. are the test is over, and there is no need to
comment on your performance!
2 Shake hands confidently, ifyou are invited
to do so, and thank the examiner for his or 2 Do not overdo your friendliness at the end .
her time. . Be glad you did your best, smile and leave
the room.
3 Simply say:
3 Do not ask the examiner for your Band
"Thank you very much for your time. I
Score. He or she is unable to give you that
enjoyed talking with you. Goodbye."
information .
... or a similar concluding sentence or two
. of your own.
A FINAL WORD .••
IELTS is a demanding and challenging examination. Because the Band Score you receive is
probably of great importance to your future you should a make a 'serious effort RIGHTNOW to
achieve the level ofEnglish you require. Don't wait until tomorrow - tomorrow never comes.
Think deeply about what you can achieve with your life ifyou score well. Think about what you
will be able to do later.
Well-placed effort is always rewarded. The hard work you do now will eventually make your life
easier. A little pain now for a lot ofgain later. That is the secret ofsuccess - perhaps the secret of
living itself - for learning never ends.
The fIrst time you take any test you are unfamiliar with the way in which it is conducted and will
naturally feel slightly nervous. Many candidates take the IELTS test the first time for practice - to
get an accurate assessment of their level and to familiarise themselves with the process - before
takingit a second or even third time. Each time you must wait for three months before being allowed
to take the test again. It takes at least that period oftime to increase your overall Band Score by one
Band, and requires intensive daily study.
Good luck ... and remember the Golden Rule
94
PRACTICE SPEAKING TEST
Practise answering the questions below, giving answers that are at least one or two sentences
long (ifnot more). Ifpossible, practise with another person - taking it in turns to answer the same
question - and compare your responses.
(Please note that the following questions are only a guide to the type ofquestions you might be
asked in the actual test.)
Part 1
Please enter and take a seat. Yes, just here. First, I need to see your passport .
... it's only for security purposes.
Thank you. My name is (interviewer's name). And yours is ... ?
So, I see you are from (your country).
Can you tell me about the town you come from?
Has your family always lived in (your town)?
Where are you living now?
How often do you contact your parents?
Do you have any brotbersand sisters?
Can you teU me what you are studying or where you are working at the moment?
What do you like about the work or study you are doing?
Describe your school or workplace.
What is ( or was) your favourite subject at school? Why?
Whatbobbies do you have ifany?
Why do you enjoy this activity (these activities)?
What do you do and where do you go when you get together with your friends?
What kind of holidays do you like?
What sports do you play or like to watch?
95
Part 2
Thank you. Now I'd like you to take this card. I want you to speak for one or two minutes about
the topic written on this card. Follow the instructions. I will give you one minute to prepare
before I ask you to give your talk.
Talk about a library that you belong to or have visited.
You should say:
where it is located and how the library is organised
who visits the library and why people go there
when and why you last visited the library
... ·and what rules the library has.
Part 3 (begins after one or two follow-up questions on the talk above)
Please hand me the card. Thank you. Libraries have always been very important to the
community and especially to students.
As well as lending books to borrowers, what other services are provided by a good library?
Does a library serve any other function in the communinty?
How has access to infonnation changed over the last hundred years or so?
What are the advantages of using the Internet over visiting a library?
Are there any advantages of using a library in preference to searching the Internet?
Do you think that the Internet disadvantages some people over others? In what way?
Many people cannot read or write well in their own language. How can this be solved?
People are reading less and less these days.; why do you think this is?
How can people be encouraged to read more?
What about electronic books - do they have a future?
That is the end of the Thank you and goodbye.
96
Speaking
SPEAKING
CANDIDATE'S CUE CARD Task 1
UNIVERSITY CLUBS AND ASSOCIATIONS
You have just arrived at a new university. It is orientation week and you
want to know about the different clubs and associations you can join.
Your examiner is a Student Union representative.
Ask the examiner about: types of clubs
meeting times
benefits
costs
97
Speaking
SPEAKING
CANDIDATE'S CUE CARD Task 2
ASKING FOR AN EXTENSION
You have to give in a piece of work to your lecturer next Wednesday.
You need two more weeks to prepare the assignment because you have
had difficulty obtaining the reference books. Your examiner is your
lecturer. Find out if you can have an extension .
. Ask the examiner about: regulations regarding late work
possibility of having more time
different sources for books/information
assistance with writing for overseas students
98
SPEAKING
CANDIDATE'S CUE CARD
Task 3
THE PUBLIC HOLIDAY
There will soon be a public holiday in the country your examiner comes
from. You want to find out about the holiday.
Ask the examiner about: the name of the public holiday
the significance of tQe holiday
availability of services on the day
(banks/shops/cinemas)
things for visitors to do
how shelhe plans to spend the day
99
SPEAKING
CANDIDATE'S CUE CARD Task 4
THE EXCURSION
The Overseas Students' C1ub is organising an excursion to a local tourist spot.
You are thinking of joining the exursion. Your examiner is one of the
organisers.
Ask the examiner about: destination
means of transport
length of excursion
cost
meals
clothing/equipment
100
Speaking module (10-15 minutes)
Tip Strip
• The examners want you to
ptskxrn to the best of
your afaCty and the test is
designed to give you every
opportunity to speak, but.
examiners can only rate
what they hear from you.
So make sure you speak
up and use the time as
effectively as possible.
• In Part 1, if the examiner
asks you a question which
can be answered by 'Yes'
or 'No', try to give some
extra information to
extend your answer.
YeslNo questions in
English are often an
invitation to say more.
• Make sure you answer the
question you are asked.
Do not come to the
interview with a learned
talk.
PART 2-- .. - ~
. ..
Tip Strip
• In Part 2, try to make
your talk as interesting as
possible. You have a
minute to prepare what
you are going to say and
you can make some
notes. Write dowhsome
·.keywords or ideas only.
Do not write out
. everything you are going
to say.
• Look carefully at the
. prompt card on this page.
think of a city which
. impressed you.
•.Think of2 or3· things you
really remember about
the city. Try to interest the
eXfliTlinerin wl'!at you say.
The examiner will ask you questions about yourself, such as:
/tVhat s your name?
Where do you live?
What/amily members do you live with?
1¥hat are you studying?
What do you like about your studies?
What do you like about learning English?
How often do you use English?
The topic for your talk will be written on a card which the examiner will hand you.
Read it carefully and then make some brief notes.
you have visited
- - - - - - ~ - - ..~ - - - . - ~ - · · ~ " ..···"..- · - · · · · - - ~ - - 1
I
I INSTRUCTIONS I
i Please read the topic below carefully. You will be asked to talk about it for I,
I to 2 minuteS;
I
IYou have one minute to think about what you're going to.say.
I You can make some notes to help you ifyou wish.
L---,---------__~ - - - - ~ ~ - - - - - ..·-..·-·---·-··-,,-·-·-..·.c-··· '.. -.-'­
Describe a city you have visited which has impressed you.
You should say: where it is situated
why you visitedjt
what you likedabo.ut it
At the end of your talk, the examiner will ask one or two brief questions to signal that it
is time to stop talking. For example, he or she mIght ask you:
.. .
. . .. .
Do you like cities generally? .'. . ........ .. '.
.Wouidyou like to live iiitheciiy,Yijit:ijJiJkeabout?·
. ,....... ..,.
Tip Strip
• Look at the
discussion ideas for
Part 3 on this page.
See how they are
broadly linked to the
topic of Part 2.
• Make a few notes in
response to each of
the prompts given
here. The discussion
could take any of
these directions.
• Try to think of at least
five other interesting
ideas linked to this
topic. Remember! You
can take the
discussion in a
direction of your
choice, if it is
appropriately linked.
• Don't be afraid to take
the initiative in Part 3
of the speaking test.
This is your chance to
show your fluency,
your ability to give
and support an
opinion and your
range of grammatical
forms a,!d vocabulary.
Once your talk in Part 2 is over, your examiner will ask you further questions related to
the topic in Part 2. The examiner may ask you to speak about tllese points.
A city you have visited
• advantages ofliving in a big cJIY
• negative aspects o.fcrowded cities
• architectural design
• payingfor the
• transport
102
Speaking module (10-15 minutes)
l;PART" 1
l ' ~ ,", _
The examiner will ask you questions about yourself, sllch as:
What s your name?
What nationality are you?
• What part of your countr}' do you come Fom?
Can you describe your home town/village'!
What do you like doing il1 yourfree time? Why?
• Are there any new hobbies that you would like to take up? Why?
The topic for your talk will be written on a card which the examiner will hand you. Read
it carefully, then make some briefnotes.
INSTRUCTIONS
Please read the topic below carefully. You will be asked to talk about it for I to 2
minutes.
You have one minute to think about what you're going to say.
can make some notes to help you ifyou wish.
Describe a competition (or contest) that you have entered.
You should say: when the competition took place
what you had to do
how well you did it
Describe how you felt about the competition.
PART 3
~ ~ ,
At the end ofyonr talk, the examiner will ask one ortwobriefquestions to signal that it
is time to stop talking. For example, he or she might askyou:
Do you enjoy entering competitions?
Have you entered any other competitions?
Once your talk in Part 2 is over, your examiner will ask you f1:u'merquestions related to
-~
the topic in Part 2. The exaimer may ask you to speak about these points .. '
Competition
• , COTIJp€ ctition at a young age
'.
the psychology of(:ornpeting
• < <.' '.
• competition at school • competitive .spirit
• wilueofinternational competitions
103
Speaking module (1 0-15 minutes)
PART L; _ _ ",
PART 3
The examiner will ask you some questions about yourself, such as:
• What 'COUl1l1y do you comeji'om?
• Which other countries have you visited?
• Are there al1v countries you would like to visit? Why?
• What do you find difficult about travelling?
• What do you enjoy about travelling?
• What is your preferred method oj travel?
The topic for your talk will be written on a card which the examiner will hand you, Read
it carefully and then make some briefnotes.
I ~ - ~ ~ you have ~ ' : . ~ ..
! ! INSTRUCTIONS
I i
· I Please read the topic below carefully. You will be asked to' talk about it for
I I to 2 minutes.
1
I
I
You have one minute to think about what you're going to say.
i
!
You can make some notes tohclJLyou ifyou wish.
.......J
Describe ajob that you have done.
You should say: how you got the job
. what the job involved
how long the job lasted
Describe how well you did the job.
At the end of your talk, the examiner will ask one or two brief questions to signal that it
is time to stop talking. For example, he or she might ask you:
Do you value the experience you had in thisjob?
Wouldyou consider doing the same type ofjob again?
Once your talk in Part 2 is over, your examiner wilJ ask you further questions related to
the topic in Part 2. The examiner may ask you to speak about these points.
A job you have done '
• advantages of young people working • motivating people to work
• types ofpart-time work-job security -vs- haVing more than one career
• choosinga career,
104
Speaking module (1 0-15 minutes)
The examiner will ask you some questions about yourself, such as:
What town or city do you comefrom?
Can you describe your(amily home?
What does your(amily usually do at the weekend?
• Do you like going out with Why?
• Where would you like to take a holiday? Why?
Who would you most like to go on holiday with?
What was the best holiday you've ever had?
The topic for your talk will be written on a card which the examiner will hand you. Read
it carefully and then make some briefnotes.
A museum you have visited
INSTRUCTIONS
Please read the topic below carefully. You will be asked to talk about it for
I to 2 minutes.
You have one minute to think about what you're going
You can make some notes to help you ifyou wish.
Describe a museum or art gallery that you have visited.
You should say: where it is
why you went there
what you particularly remember about the pJace
PART "3
At the end ofyour talk, the examiner will ask one or two briefquestions to signal that it
is time to stop talking. For example, he or she might ask you:
Do you like museums/art galleries?
Wouldyou recommend this one to otherpeople?
Once your talk in Part 2 is over, your examiner will ask you fui"ther questions related to
the topic in Part 2. The examiner may ask you to speak about these points.
Mllseums
• the need/or museums and art galleries in our society
• makjng museuins more interesting
• art -vs-popular art
, . i"lJiti* art or vandalism ?
-the role a/public .artworks, e.g, statues and buildings.
l*dra,wingSmllde with spraypaintin puhIlc spaces]
105
Speaking module (10-15 minutes)
" .... _ .. _ .... '" __ ...

"PART 3
The examiner will ask you some questions about yourself, sllch as:
/iVhat part ofvow counlly do you come from?
• How long have you lived there?
• How do you like to travel around?
What type o{restaurants are there in your ci(v/town/village?
Which is voU/favourite? Why?
!¥hat sort offood do your parents like to eat?
The topic for your talk will be written on a card which the examiner will hand you.
Read it carefully and then make some brief notes.
Your school days
,---'
l
,
INSTRUCTIONS
! Please read the topic below carefully. You will be asked to talk about it for
,
i I to 2 minutes.
IYou have one minute to think about what you're going to say.
! You can make some notes to help you if you wish.
L ..._.. _.._.... ___,_.....____,_____
Describe an enjoyable event that you experienced when you were at school.
You should say: when it happened
what was good about it
whyyou particularly remember this event
At the end of your talk, the examiner will ask one or two brief questions to signal that it
time to stop talking. For example, he or she might say:
Didyou enjoy your time at school?
Wouldyou recommend your school to others?
Once your talk in P·art 2 is over, your examiner will ask you further questions related to
the topic in Part 2. The examiner may ask you to speak about these points. .
School
a Single sex -vs .: co-educational schools
• school uniforms
a the teacher as authority orfriend
• the role pftheteacher intheJanguageclassroom
• education. - vs .training
106

IELTS ACADEMIC WRITING TEST - TASK 1 TUTORIAL
The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing is not an easy part of the exam. Describing a graph well in 20 minutes is not something most people can do straight away whether they are English speakers or not. The fact that it is in a foreign language for you as well doesn't help. Practice is the magic word though. Even good English users need practice for the IELTS exam and it could mean all the difference between pass and fail. There is limited practice available and it's quite expensive. That's why we would recommend you download our practice material. You will get more practice for less money. Go to the Home Page to find more information about our Practice Tests and other Practice Tests available.

The Task
Basically The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing is an information transfer task related to the factual content of an input text(s), graph(s), table(s) or diagram(s). It can be combinations of these inputs. Usually you will have to describe the information given in 1, 2 or 3 three inputs but sometimes you have will have to describe a process shown in a diagram.

Marking for the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing will be marked in three areas. You will get a mark from 1 to 9 on Task Fulfillment, Coherence & Cohesion and Vocabulary and Sentence Structure. Your final band for task 1 will be effectively an average of the three marks awarded in these areas. Task 1 writing is less important than task 2 and to calculate the final writing mark, more weight is assigned to the task 2 mark than to task l's mark. To get a good overall mark for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing though, both tasks have to be well answered so don't hold back on task 1 or give yourself too little time to answer it properly. Task Fulfilment This where you can really make a difference through careful preparation. This mark grades you on basically "have you answered the question". Cohesion and Coherence These two are interrelated which is why they are done together. Cohesion is how your writing fits together. Does your writing with its ideas and content flow logically? Coherence is how you are making yourself understood and whether the readel'-~Ul'-WFiting understands what you are saying. An example of bad coherence and cohesion would be as follows: 1 We went to the beach because it was raining. Probably the writer of this sentence does not mean "because" as people don't usually go to the beach when it is raining. The writer should have written: 2 We went to the beach although it was raining. Sentence 1 has made a cohesion and coherence error (as well as a vocabulary one). "Because" does not join the ideas of the sentence together correctly and, as a result, the reader does not understand what the writer wants to say. This is an exaggerated example but it shows what I mean. Vocabulary and Sentence Structure This area looks at the your grammar and choice of words. The marker will look at whether the right grammar and words are used and whether they are used at the right time in the right place and in the right way. Many people are worried about their grammar but, as you can see, grammar is only half of one section of three used to grade your writing. IELTS is much more interested in communication rather than grammatical accuracy.

Paragraphing for the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
Tilis is a very easy thing to do but it can have an enormous effect on the intelligibility of your writing. Very often people use no paragraphing in The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing and the examiner is faced with a "sea" of writing with no breaks from start to finish. For me, the best writings are those where there are paragraphs separated by an empty line and also indented. In this way your ideas are separated clearly. It shows and gives organization to your writing and makes it more readable. For teh IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing, you should have a paragraph for your small introduction, a paragraph for each graph that you are describing and a paragraph for your ending. If there's only one graph to be described, then you should split your writing into 2 or maybe 3 paragraphs for the one graph. For a longer section on paragraphing and how useful it can be, see Academic Writing Task 2 Tutorial.

Scales for the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
What I mean by the scale is whether the graphs are marked in hundreds, thousands, millions, pounds, dollars (US, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand, etc.), kilograms, tons, metres, kilometres, percent and so on. It's important for you to make clear what your numbers mean for an accurate report of the graph. Don't just say that something cost 1000 for instance. Say it cost 1000 US dollars. You can either specify the scales at the start in your introduction so the reader knows it for the whole report or you can use the scale each time you quote a detail in the report.

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Writing the Task for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
The Introduction You don't need much here. You only have 150 words to fully answer the question and this is not much. So, you need 1 or 2 sentences describing the following: • • • • The The The The type(s) of graph you are describing titles of the graph(s) date of the graph(s) scale (see the paragraph above)

You might not have all this information but you should report what you do have. So, for example, your beginning could look like this: In this report I am going to describe 2 graphs. The first one is a bar chart showing the relationship between age and crime and the second is a pie chart showing the types of reported crime in the UK in 2002. (This example gives an introduction to the Academic Writing Task 1 in Test 3 from ieltshelpnow.com.)

Describing Graphs for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
What you need to do here is factually describe the graphs. You don't need to analyse the data, For example you don't need to give reasons for why figures are high or low. Sometimes, when there is more than 1 graph, there is a relationship between the two and you can bring in some comparison but more than this is not necessary. In the same way, no specialised knowledge of your own is needed or wanted nor your opinions. Remember the function of many graphs is to describe a trend so be sure that you describe the trends. A trend is how values change generally over time and it is important to describe the changes along with some of the individual values. We will look dt trends'abil: later under line graphs. One important issue with The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing is how much detail to include in your report. This depends really on how much detail there is in the question. If there is only 1 graph and it doesn't have much numerical data in it, then you will be expected to include all or nearly all of the numerical detail. If, however, you have 2 graphs, both of which are very complicated with lots of values, you will not be expected to include everything as you only have 150 words to do the job. What you will have to do is to include a selection of what you feel is the most important and significant detail that needs to be included to accurately describe the graph. You must always have some numerical detail though. Now let's look individually at the types of graph that you are likely to meet in the exam and how to describe them.

Bar Charts for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
Hopefully you will have described the title of the bar chart in your introduction so you can go straight into the description. Basically, with a bar chart, you need to describe the bars and their values. When describing a bar chart you first have to decide in what order to describe the bars, highest value to lowest value or lowest value to highest value. It may be a mixture of this. If there are very many bars, you can sometimes group together for description 1 or 2 or 3 bars which have similar or the same values. If there are very many and you can't group them, then just describe the ones that are the most Significant.

Pie Charts for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
Pie charts are relatively straightforward as they only usually have a few sections though this is not always the case. You need to describe the segments and their values. If there are very many then just describe the ones that are the most significant. The values are often expressed in percentages but not always so be careful what scale you are using.

Tables for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
These can sometimes be tricky as they provide a lot of information and it is often awkward and difficult to describe every piece of information. You have to decide and describe the values and sections that are the most significant.

Line Graphs for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing
The function of a line graph is to describe a TREND pictorially. You therefore should try and describe the trend in it. If there are many lines in the graph(s), then just generally describe the trend. If there is only one or two, then use more detail. So,

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This means that you will be able to use a variety of vocabulary which gives a good impression to the examiner who will read and mark your writing.describe the movement of the line(s) of the graph giving numerical detail at the important points of the line. Expressing the Movement of a Line Rise (to) Increase (to) Go up to Grow (to) Climb (to) Boom Peak (at) Fall (to) Decline (to) Decrease (to) Dip (to) Drop (to) Go down (to) Reduce (to) a rise an increase growth a climb a boom (reach) a peak (at) a fall (of) a decline (of) a decrease (of) a dip (of) a drop (of) a red uction (of) A slump Level out a leveling out No change no change Remain stable (atr . As you will see.. Below is a list of language you can use.. Check with your dictionary words that you don't understand and practice using the words/phrases so you use them in the right way. there is some language which will always be useful. The words below are particularly useful for line graphs but they can also be used where appropriate to describe the other types of graph.­ Remain steady (at) Stay (at) Stay constant (at) Maintain the same ~evel Dramatic Sharp Huge Enormous Steep Substantial Considerable Significant Marked Moderate Slight Small Minimal dramatically sharply hugely enormously steeply substantially considerably Significantly markedly moderately slightly minimally Describing the Speed of a Change Agjectives Rapid Quick Swift rapidly quickly swiftly 4 . there are a number of words which are similar in meaning. To describe the movement.

Think about the verbs while practising and then it will become easier when you do the exam. Finally. check again. you will probably need the present simple. Practice. • As I just said. If you have time.Sudden Steady Gradual Slow suddenly steadily gradually slowly The Ending for the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing You do not need a long and analytical conclusion for The IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing. a quick check of your verbs at the end of the exam can help you find errors. work out the various stages of the process. This is not your own work and therefore will be disregarded by the examiner and deducted from the word count. I think it's important to do this as it rounds off the report for the reader. Then. For describing graphs you will probably need past tenses whereas.. If it's a habitual action. try to use short sentences. If you have this problem. First of all. It's much easier to make things clear in a foreign language if you keep your sentences short! • Think about the tenses of your verbs. Although you can use your imagination to expand on your answer. there are no correct answers or methods. if you have finished the exam with time to spare. • Don't be irrelevant. Good luck with the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing. .. but I do feel that you need to write something to end the report for reasons of structure. I hope that this free tutorial has helped you! Below are links to the other free IELTS academic tutorials. your verbs wHl need to be in the past tenses. Even good English users need practice for the IELTS exam. And so on . • Don't repeat yourself or the same ideas. Practice. Fully is the important word as reaching the word limit has proved harder in this task. This allows you to control the grammar and the meaning of your writing much more easily and contributes to a better cohesion and coherence mark. Other Hints for the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing • DON'T copy any part of the question in your answer. there's no secret. if any part of your report is totally unrelated to the question and put in to just put up the word count. for describing a process. • If you are weak at English grammar. This is all you need to end your Task 1. Here I've given you some ideas to guide you and hopefully to help you but the questions can be answered well in different ways.. If you're writing about something that happened in the past. then the examiner will not take it into account and deduct it from the word count. If you have time after the check. Practice. If you're describing the future. Describing a Process for the IELTS Academic Task 1 Writing We have looked at the various types of graph that you might be asked to describe but you also might have to describe a diagram representing a process. you'll need the present simple tense and so on. the introduction and the ending should be more or less the same. Take each one separately (it's only probably gOing to have a limited number of stages) and describe them fully. and getting half a band less than you need and having to wait 3 months to do the exam again. This gives a bad impression and the examiner realises that it isn't adding to the content of your report. You won't get better sitting and doing nothing. It could make all the difference between your getting the band that you need. All you need to do is to write: This ends my report. • If you want to improve. You can use individual words but be careful of using long "chunks" of the question text. don't be afraid to use your imagination to add to detail about the process. you will need to use the future tenses. DON'T just sit there!! Check what you have done.

­ Certainty II Condition II Definition II Summary I . Common connective words indicating: Addition Sequence I II II Consequence II Contrast I in addition and similarly likewise as well as besides further more also moreover and then too not only . The proper use of connectives mentioned below will be helpful. 6 .. but even besides this/that first(ly) initially second(ly) etc. many non native english speakers do not properly join 2 small sentences.While taking this test." . Familiarity with these words would be useful in all IELTS test modules..~bviously certainly plainly of course undoubtedly if unless whether provided that for so that whether depending on is refers to means that is consists of in conclusion in summary lastly finally to sum up to conclude to recapitulate in short I Example II Reason II Time II I for instance one example for example pust as in particular such as namely to illustrate smce as so because (of) due to owing to the reason why in other words leads to cause before since as until meanwhile at the moment when whenever as soon as just as -.to begin with then next earlier/later after this/that following this/that afterwards however on the other as a result thus hand despite in spite of though although but so therefore on the contrary consequently otherwise yet instead it follows that thereby of rather whereas eventually then in that case nonetheless even admittedly though compared with in contrast alternatively I -~-- . Try to use them in your sentences.

./ Easy to understand . ./ Contains relevant cohesive devices Errors have minimal effect on message -. . . " ~ " "./ Collocations ./ Indicates argument ended Essay right length Register appropriate Ideas relevant to topic Text:./ Active and passive voice ./ Prepositions .--~-. justified paragraph structure Topic sentence in each paraaraoh Ideas in supporting sentences: ./ Phrasal verbs . sufficiently developed . Ideas and supporting arguments ~ .../ Clearly presented. easy to understand .Writing: Task 2 Name: Topics Issues Topic / Task Main Issues identified at beainnina Clear. % ./ Infinitives and gerunds . Other 7 ./ Logically organised ./ Consistent./ Contains appropriate paragraphing .!i10 ../ Sentence types .-~ Date: Positive Needs attention ./ Word formation ./ Verb constructions ./ Give adequate attention to all aspects of topic Conclusion: ...'./ Relevant ./ Idiomatic expressions ./ Relative clauses ./ Fixed expressions " > " -. Clarity of message Varied and accurate set of vocabulary including: ./ Summarises main points . . Vocabulary and syntax Varied and accurate use of structures including: ./ Articles ' ./ Conditionals .

There has been damage after you have moved into the house. Write the agency and explain your situation and ask for your new accommodation. Do you think it is a good idea to do so? March 3 2003 Task 1: You have recently moved to a new house. radio is being replaced by TV and the Internet. Write the advantages and disadvantages of this matter. and do you think they must be encouraged to do other things rather than shopping? 8 . This responsibility is not only parents'. schools introduce behaviour of what is 'right' or 'wrong'. OR Young people are encouraged to travel or work for one year after high school and before university studies. Why do you think it is like that. Task 2: Nowadays. To what extent do you agree or disagree with this idea? Sep 12 2002 Task 1: Write a letter to a bus company saying you have left something valuable on the bus and tell them what to do if they [md it. Do you agree or disagree? 9 March 2003 Technology has facilitated our lives so much and given us a lot of freedom. Task 2: Nowadays. people care about their appearance more than before. Do you agree or disagree? 14 Feb 2003 Young people are encouraged to travel or work for one year after high school and before university studies. Some people. believe that it has caused more problems for us. however.June 1 2002 Soon people who cannot work with computers will be disadvantaged. Task 2: Shopping has become a :favourite pastime among young people. Do you agree or disagree? 7 March 2003 Governments should spend more money on education than on recreation and sports. To what extent do you agree or disagree with this idea? ? These days. your plan has changed and you would like to ask for new accommodation. To what extent do you agree or disagree? 13 Feb 2003 Education is a lifelong task. Write a letter to your landlord explaining what has happened and ask him what you can do. co m) April 25 2003 (General) Task 1: You have asked for accommodation to do a course in a country. What is your opinion? (ai p p g .

Recently there are some problems with the club. for example how salary. What's your idea about this matter? 31 May 2003 Task 2: Is technology time-consuming or does it save time? Task 2: The elderly people of over 50 years of age should be retired and be replaced by the young.a table showing difference between two African countries was given. mention the problems and make suggestions. Benefits like health insurance etc. 9 .April 23 2003 Task I: Write a letter to a company you worked for and say what you think about good or weak points of the company. some people still prefer to ride bicycles. Write what they can do for you. health care and holiday can make employees happy. say whether you think some changes should be made. collecting or making things) Do you think it is pointless? How can people learn from hobbies? 14th June 2003 (Academic) Smoking tobacco like other dangerous drugs should be made illegaL Agree or disagree? 15 June 2003 (Academic) Task one: A table comparing economic and social features of two Indian Ocean countries. Task 2.in the 21 st century. but the train that you have taken was delayed. To what extent do you think this will help us in today's life? May 8 2003 Academic Task 2: Governments have to place the same number of men and women in different fields of study in universities. Write a letter to the club. Task2: Nowadays. not enough to make them happy.2003 People's character is influenced by environment rather than genetics. To what extent do you agree or disagree with this statement? May 18. how can the companies keep their employees happy? Express your idea and bring reasons. shou1d be given to make them happier. and it was asked to compare them from different points of view. there is no use to pay expenses for wild animals protection. Task One: A company has invited you for a job interview. Write a letter to the railway company and explain the situation. 7 June 2003 Task 1: You have been going to a sport club. (What you want them to do for you?) Task Two: People follow interests and have hobbies (e. Do you agree or disagree? 30 May (Abu Dhabi) First task: write a letter to the sports center manager complaining about some problems you face when you go to his sports center. Do you agree or disagree? May 21 2003 Task 1. Second task: write whether you support that employees' salaries are. Task 2: In the world today.g.

consider it as a lifelong task. Task 2: It is good for school and university students to take part in part-time jobs. Task 2: Young people are encouraged to travel or work for one year after high school and before university studies. Write him a letter and tell him what you have in mind for accommodation. After 50. To what extent do you agree or disagree? July 62003 Task 1: A friend has written you a letter and offered you help in your forthcoming trip to a foreign country. but the train that you have taken delayed. Task 2: Nowadays. Write the advantages and disadvantages of this matter. however. Task 2: Some people argue that governments should spend money only on medicine and education and that things like theaters and sports stadiums are luxurious. Task two: With the advent of computers the role of teachers are going to be faded in classrooms. Write a letter to the railway company and a. What is your opinion? Give reasons and support your ideas with specific supports.two different countries (Nigeria and Brazil) _ the graph included in the group files. making things). How true is this in your country? What measures should be taken to reduce this gap? 28 July 2003 (Academic) Task 1: Rainfall and temperature changes in . by gender in UK in four consequent different years in 20th century. the forest has reached its pre-fire status. Task 2: Education is sometimes considered as something for the youth~ Some people. but some people think that it is pointless. Explain your journey b. 100.Task two: Wild animals have no place in the 21st century and trying to preserve these animals is a waste of resources. Agree or disagree? 25 July 2003 (Academic) Task 1: A diagram about some forest which has burnt out and started fo grow again. Write what you want them to do Task 2: Some people follow interests have hobbies (collection. the gap between countryside and cities has increased in many countries. Do you agree or disagree? 20 July 2003 (Academic) Task 1: A graph comparing the value of videos for sale and rental in the u. and 300 years of time. Why do people need hobbies? How can they learn from hobbies? 9 Aug 2003 (Academic) Task one: A table showing the increasing number of elderly aged more than 100. Is it the same in your country? What can governments do to reverse this? OR There is a gap in standards of living between countryside and cities. Agree or Disagree? OR 10 .s and ED between 1992 and 2000 (It consisted of 4 graphs in one). 150. He has offered you to help you find suitable accommodation. 9 Aug 2003 Task 1: You are invited for a job interview recently.

Write a letter and explain the details of the course. so they will be able to learn other useful skills. What is your opinion? 20 Sep 2003 (General) Taskl: One of your pen friends wants to come to your country and you ha ve never seen himlher. however. many people believe bicycle is the best vehicle for transportation. Task 2: Young people nowadays would like to go shopping in their free times. Task 2: Nowadays. explain the situation and ask them for new acconunodation.Task1: A table with 12 numbers giving information about UK residents who are aged over 100 between 1941 and 2001. Some people. Give suggestions to make the course better. too. Task2: As computers are more and more used in education. Write to the agency. believe that less homework means less stress for children. Write a letter and: · Say details about this course · which part of course was useful? · Give your suggestions Task2: in spite of modem technologies for transport.. Write a letter to himlher and *Explain why you will be late *Tell a place in order to find him so easily *How you should recognize himlher T ASK2: Should mass media publish details of people's private lives or should they be controlled? 11 . Why do people do this? Is it good or should it be substituted by other activities? 30 Aug 2003 (General) Task1: you took a two-day course.. some people argue that in future there will be no role for teachers. 30 Aug 2003 (General) Task 1: You are going to do a course in another country. Task 2: Riding bicycles . your plan has changed. Do you agree or disagree? 30 Aug 2003 (General) Task 1: You have just fmished a two-day course in a college. Write a letter to them and describe how you spend your time and tell them about your recovery. Agree or disagree? 16 Aug 2003 (Academic) Language and culture are respected less in comparison with the past. You are asked to send your conunents. children have a lot of homework to do. how bicycle is effective on everyday life? 13 Sep 2003 (General) Task 1: You have broken your leg and are staying at home for a few weeks. OR In the present world. Your classmates have sent you so many presents and cards. Do you agree or disagree? 28 Aug 2003 (Academic) Task 2: Ki1ling animals and using their flesh for food is not right. You will be late at the airport.

There has been something wrong with the camera. To what extent do you agree or disagree? 18 Oct 2003 (General) Some people believe----':-ith-a--:-t-u-m-=-·v·ersities are responsible for preparation of young people for employment. Task 2: Nowadays. Others believe universities have other responsibilities. Write a letter to the shop and describe what you felt when you found out about the problem. Tell them what you expect them to do.20 Sep 2003 (Academic) Task 2: The British police do not cany guns. many people from different nationalities and cultures get married together. What do you think about the responsibility of universities? 12 . Task 2: Nowadays environmental problems are too big to be managed by individual persons or individual countries. it is an international problem. To what extent do you agree or disagree? 12 Oct 2003 (Academic) Task 2: Juvenile delinquents should undertake such punishments as cleaning the streets or such rather than be imprisoned. Do you think it is good or bad? 25 Sep 2003 (General) Task 1: You have purchased a camera from the duty free shop. What do you think are the advantages and disadvantages of this? 4 Oct 2003 (Academic) Task 1: Two charts comparing the number of UK households across 2 different years: 1981. In other words.2001.

12. most of the time this construction is used. Firstly. You Ha6B!t ought not to pester your sister that way. a seldom used adverb relating to authors or scholars and their various professions. Use he or she or pluralize (where appropriate) so you can avoid the problem of the gender-specific pronolU1 altogether. second. Try using one word or the other. Being that Because I was the youngest child. 4. secondly. but not equally as important. Considered to be Eliminate the to be and. Usually. third. you're doing your job. He/she is a convention created to avoid gender bias in writing. but not-both:. but chose not to. essentiaJly. Got Many writers regard got as an ugly word. thereby suggesting that you could have written more. Equally as Something can be equally important or as important as. Interesting One of the least interesting words in English. 16. 2. Try the sentence without them and. Due to the fact that Using this phrase is a sure sign that your sentence is in trouble. rather or slightly. And/or Outside of the legal world. unless it's important who's doing the considering. These are OK in informal situations. Literally Ibis word might be confused with literarily. 14. Eliminate the auxiliary had. 10. etc. (A I P PG . 15. 11. We were ~rather pleased with the results. try to eliminate the entire phrase. This abbreviation often suggests a kind of laziness. it is neither necessary nor logical. 17. avoid it. etc. Etc. 6. 3. Number things withfirst. 13. but in formal academic prose. 7. com) 18.--~ 9. and they have a point. If you show us why something is interesting.Plague words or phrases for IElTS Examination Avoid problems created by these words or phrases: 1.). As to whether The single word whether will suffice. Kind of or sort of. otherwise. And also nris is often redlU1dant. but it doesn't work very well and it becomes downright obtrusive if it appears often. Being that or being as These words are a non-standard substitute for because. if you say it's "literally a 13 . I have get two pairs of sneakers. Had ought or hadn't ought. Basically. If you can avoid it in writing. substitute somewhat. and not with these adverbial forms. It might be better to provide one more example. though. 19. 5. the word you use to describe an ugly baby. Did you mean because? Due to is acceptable after a linking verb (The team's failure was due to illness among the stars. thirdly. In terms of See if you can eliminate this phrase. you will see the sentence improve. almost always. Irregardless No one word will get you in trouble with the boss faster than this one. do so. I Hff'/e got to must begin studying right away. Each and every One or the other. 8. I always wore hand-rue-downs. totally These words seldom add anything useful to a sentence.

could have. 26. could of when you mean would have. too. 39. use to. Plus Don't use this word as a conjunction. should of. Lots or lots ofIn academic prose. really. these words seldom add anything useful. Try to do something. btt it shouldn't disappear in spelling. Remember. Deja vu all over again! 35. 23. Point in time Forget it! At this time or at this point or now will do the job." 34. 37. Remember. avoid these colloquialisms when you can use many or much. "We used to do that" or "We were supposed to do it this way. Try the sentence without them and see if it improves. Don't write "He only kicked that ball ten yards" when you mean ''He kicked that ball only ten yards. Movies of a violent nature are probably just violent movies. 21. 32." you probably meanjiguratively. 38. 20. Very. even in bad poetry. 28. Nature See if you can get rid of this word. when you do use these words. Per Use according to instead. as in just the right amount. 31. Utilize Don't use this word where use would suffice. but you're probably better off without either word. 14 . Thru This nonstandard spelling of through should not be used in academic prose. to and used. The reason why is because. that lots of something countable are plural. Just Use only when you need it.jungle out there. Orientate The new students become oriented. 24. 33. On account of Use because instead. Use and instead. Only Look out for placement. Of Don't write would of. So as to Usually. The hard "d" sound in supposed. 22. 36. (Same goes for utilization.we administer a project. (This word is used frequently in legal language and in teclmical specifications. The same thing applies to administrate -. Suppose to. Try and Don't try and do something. We did it per your instructions? Naah.) 40. Thusly Use thus or therefore instead. not orientated. Necessitate It's hard to imagine a situation that would necessitate the use of this word. a simple to will do. 30. that a lot of requires three words: "He spent a lot of money" (not alot of). 'Til Don't use this word instead of until or till. quite (and other intensifiers) Like basically. to disappears in pronunciation." Use earlier or nothing at all. 25. should have.)----­ 29. Previous as in "our previous discussion. " 27. where it seems to be necessary and acceptable.

such as the internet ever replace the book or the written word as the main source of information? Discuss the advantage and disadvantage of giving international Aid to poor countries.• • What should a government do for a country to become successful? Should sports classes be sacrificed in High School so students can concentrate on Academic subjects? Nowadays doctors can become very rich. To what extent do you agree or disagree with this idea? SeD 122002 Task 1: Write a letter to a bus company saying you have left something valuable on the bus and tell them what to do if they find it. Do you agree or disagree? 1: 15 . To what extent do you agree or disagree? 13 Feb 2003 Education is a lifelong task. Should criminals be punished with lengthy jail terms or re-educated and rehabituated. people care about their appearance more than before. Do you think it is a good idea to do so? March 3 2003 Task You have recently moved to a new house. schools introduce behaviour of what is 'right' or 'wrong'. Task 2: Nowadays. Write the advantages and disadvantages of this matter. radio is being replaced by TV and the Internet. There has been damage after you have moved into the house. OR Young people are encouraged to travel or work for one year after high school and before university studies. no matter how rich they are? Will modern technology. Do you agree or disagree? 14 Feb 2003 Young people are encouraged to travel or work for one year after high school and before university studies. Write a letter to your landlord explaining what has happened and ask him what you can do. ' Task 2: Nowadays. To what extent do you agree or disagree with this idea? These days. before being reintroduced to society? Computers can translate all kinds of languages well so our children don't need to learn more languages in the future? • • • • • The following are the topics of previous IELTS Writing test: June 1 2002 Soon people who cannot work with computers will be disadvantaged. using community service programs for instance. Maybe they should not focus on profitable activities such as plastic surgery or looking after rich patients and concentrate more on patients health. This responsibility is not only parents'.

Do you agree or disagree? 30 May (Abu Dhabi) First task: write a letter to the sports center manager complaining about some problems you face when you go to his sports center. and do you think they must be encouraged to do other things rather than shopping? April 23 2003 Task 1: Write a letter to a company you worked for and say what you think about good or weak pOints of the company. Task2: Nowadays. there is no use to pay expenses for wild animals protection. for example how salary. To what extent doyouallree-or disagree with this statement? May 18. Task 2.7 March 2003 Governments should spend more money on education than on recreation and sports. Do you agree or disagree? 9 March 2003 Technology has facilitated our lives so much and given us a lot of freedom.2003 People's character is influenced by environment rather than genetics.in the 21st century. how can the companies keep their employees happy? Express your idea and bring reasons. should be given to make them happier. Second task: write whether you support that employees' salaries are not enough to make them happy. some people still prefer to ride bicycles.a table showing difference between two African countries was given. say whether you think some changes should be made. What is your opinion? April 25 2003 (General) Task 1: You have asked for accommodation to do a course in a country. Write a letter to the club. Do you agree or disagree? May 212003 Task 1. mention the problems and make suggestions. Benefits like health insurance etc. 7 June 2003 Task 1: You have been going to a sport club. believe that it has caused more problems for us. health care and holiday can make employees happy. To what extent do you think this will help us in today's life? May 82003 Academic Task 2: Governments have to place the same number of men and women in different fields of study in universities. 16 . What's your idea about this matter? 31 May 2003 Task 2: Is technology time-consuming or does it save time? Task 2: The elderly people of over 50 years of age should be retired and be replaced by the young. Task 2: Shopping has become a favourite pastime among young people. Write the agency and explain your situation and ask for your new accommodation. your plan has changed and you would like to ask for new accommodation. Task 2: In the world today. Why do you think it is like that. Recently there are some problems with the club. however. Some people. and it was asked to compare them from different points of view.

Write what they can do for you. and 300 years of time. Do you agree or disagree? 20 July 2003 (Academic) Task 1: A graph comparing the value of videos for sale and rental in the U. however. consider it as a lifelong task. Agree or disagree? 15 June 2003 (Academic) Task one: A table comparing economic and social features of two Indian Ocean countries. How true is this in your country? What measures should be taken to reduce this gap? 28 July 2003 (Academic) Task 1: Rainfall and temperature changes in two different countries (Nigeria and Brazil) _ the graph included in the group files. making things). Write him a letter and tell him what you have in mind for accommodation. To what extent do you agree or disagree? July 62003 Task 1: A friend has written you a letter and offered you help in your forthcoming trip to a foreign country. Task 2: Nowadays. Why do people need hobbies? How can they learn from hobbies? 17 . Write a letter to the railway company and a. Write what you want them to do Task 2: Some people follow interests have hobbies (collection. Task two: Wild animals have no place in the 21st century and trying to preserve these animals is a waste of resources. Write a letter to the railway company and explain the situation. There is a gap in standards of living between countryside and cities. the gap between countryside and cities has increased in many countries. Agree or disagree? 25 July 2003 (Academic) Task 1: A diagram about some forest which has burnt out and started to grow again. Task 2: Young people are encouraged to travel or work for one year after high school and before university studies. He has offered you to help you find suitable accommodation. but some people think that it is pOintless. Explain your journey b.g. Task 2: Education is sometimes considered as something for the youth. After 50. the forest has reached its pre-fire status. 100.Task One: A company has invited you for a job interview. 9 Aug 2003 Task 1: You are invited for a job interview recently. (What you want them to do for you?) Task Two: People follow interests and have hobbies (e. What is your opinion? Give reasons and support your ideas with specific supports. 150.. collecting or making things) Do you think it is pointless? How can people learn from hobbies? 14th June 2003 (Academic) Smoking tobacco like other dangerous drugs should be made illegal. Some people. but the train that you have taken was delayed.S and EU between 1992 and 2000 (It consisted of 4 graphs in one). Task 2: It is good for school and university students to take part in part-time jobs. Is it the same in your country? What can governments do to reverse this? OR. Task 2: Some people argue that governments should spend money only on medicine and education and that things like theaters and sports stadiums are luxurious. but the train that you have taken delayed. Write the advantages and disadvantages of this matter.

The first chart shows the reasons why adults decide to study. describing the information shown below. Write a report for a university lecturer.WRITING WRITING TASK 1 You should spend about 20 minutes on this task. The pie chart shows how people think the costs ofadult education should be shared. Interest in subject To gain qualifications Helpful for current job To improve prospects of promotion Enjoy leaming/studying To able to change jobs To meet people 10 How the costs of each coul"se should be shal"ed Taxpayer 25% 20 30 40 Individual 40% % Employer 35% 18 . You should write at least 150 words. The charts below show the results ofa survey ofadult education.

Why do we need music? Is the traditional music ofa country more important than the Internarional music that is heard everywhere nowadays? You should write at least 250 words. 19 .WRITING TASK 2 You should spend about 40 minutes on this task. Use your own ideas. knowledge and experience and support your arguments with examples and relevant evidence. Present a written argument or case to an educated reader with no specialist knowledge ofthe following topic: There are many different types of music in the world today.

You should write at least 150 words. Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information shown below. INCOMING INFORMATION ANALYSIS & FORECASTING PRE~ARING THE BROADCAST BROADCAST 20 . The diagram below shows how the Australian Bureau ofMeteorology collects up-to-the-minute information on the weather in order to produce reliable forecasts.WRITING WRITING TASK 1 You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.

responsibility ofthe governments ofpoorer nations to look after their citizens themselves? You should write at least 250 words.WRITING TASK 2 You should spend about 40 minutes on this task. knowledge and experience and support your arguments with examples and with relevant evidence. 21 . Should wealthy nations be required to share their wealth among poorer nations by providing such things as food and education? Or is it the. Present a written argument or case to an educated reader with no specialist knowledge of the following topic. Use your own ideas.

Expenditure on fast foods by income groups Pnnce prJ! ppr ~}(. Write a report for a university lecturer describing the infonnation shown below.(!n 40 :30 20 15 10 5 Hlghlncom0 Consumption of fastfoods 1970 -1990 graMme.WRITING WRITING TASK 1 You should spend about 20 minutes on this task The chart below shows the amount Qf money per week spent on fast foods in Britain. The graph shows the trends in consumption offast foods. You should write at least 150 words.(:~. 22 .:.

What factors do you think influence these decisions? Do we become used to bad news? Would it be better ifmore good news was reported? You should write at least 250 words. Use your own ideas. Present a written argument or case to an educated reader with no specialist knowledge of the following topic: News editors decide what to broadcast on television and what to print in newspapers.WRITING TASK 2 You should spend about 40 minutes on this task. knowledge and experience and support your arguments with examples and relevant evidence. 23 .

Fmifway (bl"ilt 1QOG) 24 . The map below shows the development ofthe village. - _. You should write at least 150 words.'lywood Parl{ i. Chorleywood is a village near London whose population has increased steadily since the middle ofthe nineteenth century..lI\i.WRITING WRITING TASK 1 You should spend about 20 minutes on this task. Write a report for a university lecturer describing the development ofthe village.l Golf GIJ'Jn1e 1883 ·1022 .. Omfll.

. knowledge and experience and support your arguments with examples and relevant evidence.WRITING TASK 2 You should spend about 40 minutes on this task. Present a written argument or case to an educated reader with no specialist knowledge of the following topic: The idea ofhaving a single career is becoming an old fashioned one. 25 . Use your own ideas. The new fashion mil be to have several careers or ways ofearning money and further education will be something that continues throughout life. You should write at least 250 words.

. Write an essay for a colle~e tutor on the following topic: The world is experiencing a dramatic increase in population.Field work: give questionnaires.. You are required to support your ideas with relevant information and examples based on your own knowledge and experience.. and suggest at least one possible solution.Reading List. You should write at least 250 words.Analysis: discuss first draft problem areas G> 1 . articles .PRACTICE WRITING TEST Writing Task 1 You are advised to spend a maximum of 20 minutes on this task. G> Research .First Draft & Check: use formal check 0- 1 .Final Draft & Check. surveys First Draft . take notes Second Draft . obtain list of resources . do final rewrite. . butalsofor industrialised and developing nations. The flowchart below shows the process involved in writing a formal academic essay for a particular university course.Advice: Ask for further ideas. con~uct interviews.Topic: discuss task and topic with tutor G> Second Private Tutorial OR Study Group Discussion . You should write at least 150 words. produce brief outline . Plan: organise essay content.Input Revision: read resource material again G> 1 .­ I* bibliography -list of books referred to Writing Task 2 You are advised to spend a maximum of 40 minutes on this task. spellcheck + compile bibliography + add title page SUBMIT BY DEADLINE * Preparation and Writing of a Formal Acade~ic Essay . Describe the stages ofthe process in a reportfor a university lecturer. Describe some of the problems that overpopulation causes. 26 . undeveloped countries. This is causing problems notonlyforpoor.books. G> First Private Tutorial .Library: read literature.Second Draft & Check: include check Final Draft .

to leave about 40 minutes for Task 2. • The instructions state that you should 'describe'the information in the graph. Are there any significant features? Can you compare or contrast any of the data? • Think of how best to group the information in the diagram.!_~JJ!N_g::16§"~-~ : ~ " You should spend about 20 minutes on this task. • Write one or two paragraphs. The graph below shows how money was spent on over afive-year period. • Make sure you have written enough words.Writing module (1 hour) -­ _!. ofentertai11lnent Write a reportfor a unh'el'sity lecturer describing the informatiol1 shown below. What do the diagrams represent? • Take a minute to plan how you will describe the information. Cinema Video 250 200 Fun Money World entertainment markets Music Publishing 150 100 Television 50 1995 2000 1995 2000 Figures are in $ billion Asia SOlllce: Booz AUen & Hamilton United· States 7 . spelling and punctuation. You should NOT speculate about the reasons for the data or give reasons for it. making sure that you cover all the important points. You should write at least ISO words.. • Check that you have linked your points together well. • Read through your answer when you have finished and check grammar. • Look carefully at the labels. d~[ferelltforms Tip Strip • Read the ques1ion very carefully. You will not be penalised for writing too much but keep an eye on the time: you will need.

• Read through your answer when you have finished and check grammar. DO NOT copy the question. You will not be penalised for writing more than 250 words but you will not gain extra marks either. • Consider your personal view on the topic. You should write at least 250 words.You should spend about 40 minutes on this task. Some lawyers have suggested that this practice should be changed and that a jury should be given all the pastfacts before they reach their decision about the case. • Before you start writing. • Check that you have linked your points together well. • Underline key points in the question and make sure your answer is relevant to these. Tip Strip • Read the question very carefully. You should use your own ideas. Make sure that you address the question. spelling and punctuation. then think of some supporting points. 28 . • Make sure you have written enough words. • Include some arguments that are relevant to your own society or personal experience. knowledge and experience and support your arguments with examples and relevant evidence. Do you agree or disagree? Give reasons for your answer. Think of the main idea you will include in each paragraph. • Clearly state your conclusion. Present a written argument or case to an educated non-specialist audience on the following topic: Under British andAustraliull laws ajll1Y ill a criminal case has no access to information about the defendant's past criminal record. think about how you will introduce the topic. Do you agree. This protects tlte person who is being accused ofthe crime. disagree or have an impartial view? • Take a minute to plan what you are going to say in your answer.

~ 01 25° percentage of people who buy Classical Music rQjmale . Percentage of people who buy Pop Music 40 Percentage of people who buy Rock Music OJ male I female 016-24 • 25·34 D 35-44 . Write a report/or a university lecturer describing the in/ontUition shown below. You should write at least 150 words. . in 29 . The graphs below show the types o/music albums purchased by people in Brit"in according to sex and age..3544 d045+ .Writing module (1 hour) 'WRITING TASK 1 < ~" ~ You should spend about 20 minutes on this task. 50·. I female i' I [HH.-24 25-34.

_~fl WRITING TASK 2 w . This practice can act as an incentive for some but may also have a negative impact on others.-w. know ledge and experience and support your arguments with examples and relevant evidence.~_«_'~ You should spend about 40 minutes on this task Present a written argument or case to an educated non-specialist audience on the followingtopic: ___ ~' Some employers reward members ofstafffor their exc~ptional contribution to the company by giving them extra money._ _ _ . You should use your own ideas. 30 . " . . To what extent is this style ofmanagement effective? Are there better ways ofencouraging employees to work hard? You should write at least 250 words.

The graphs below show the number ofmen and women infit/! andpart-time employmel11 in Australia between 1973 and 1993..t~. Full-time females 15-19 25-29 35-39 45-39 55-59 65+ 15-19 25-29 35-39 45-39 55-59 65+ Age group (years) Age group (years) 25 Part-llme·mBieli 'JI> ::.5.=' 15 '0· o 15-19 25-29 . "'""""':(' 35-39 )i~ (l. Write a report/or a university lecturer describing the information sh01vn below.j----.-..-~~...Writing module (1 hour) Q You should spend about 20 minutes on this task..0': Part-time females ...~__. You should write at least 150 words.-~~-_r___._-~~~ 45-39 55-59 65+ 15-19 25-29 35-39 45-39 55-59 65' Age group (years) Source: labour Force Survey Age group (years) 31 .

32 . These days. You should write at least 250 words. they are more likely to be motivated by prize money and the opportunity to befamolls. knowledge and experience and support your arguments with examples and relevant evidence. Present a written argument or case to an educated non-specialist audience on the following topic: In the past. What message does this send to young people and how does this altitude to sport affect the sports themselves? Give reasonsforyour answers. You should use your own ideas. sporting champions used to be motivated primarily by the (lesire to win a match or to break world records.You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.

40 million years ago \ r t / Mesohippus . You should write at least 150 words. Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information shown below.withpl1r/ieularernPliasis the ·changJngfoot strUctUre 33 .15 million years ago Horse" modern TM eVolution.30 IIl illion years ago Mcrychippus .Writing module (1 hour) You should spend about 20 minutes on this task. ojthehorse. \ I Eohippus . The diagrams below show the development ofthe horse over a period of40 million years.

' To what extent do YOll agree with this statement? Give reasons for yo Ill' answer. You should write at least 250 words. knowledge and experience and support your arguments with examples and relevant evidence.You should spend about 40 minutes on this task. . Present a written argument or case to an educated non-specialist audience on the following topic: 'Failure is proofthat the desire wasl1 't strong enough. You should use your own ideas. .

VVRIT)NG -TASK 1~ .--"". . .'" ~ ". Training . Write a reportfor a university lecturer describing the information shown below. The graph andpie chart below give information on in-house training courses in a large financial company.hours per year EJ Technical • Career development LI Healh and safety • Interpersonal skills Office Workers' Attitude to Training Waste of valuable time Important for job Good for networking .--·--·-·" % o [J Manager Li Secretary 90 35 .-~-' You should spend about 20 minutes on this task. You should write at least 150 words.Writing module (1 hour) ..~-. Good excuse for achange ~---~~~···T·-~--r-·--r·-:--·····""T----"--·-"~r---".

36 . You should use your own ideas.I. ~~.._ ~-.'. You should write at least 250 words. However. Present a written argument or case to an educated non-specialist audience on the following topic: To be label/ell II 'Work ofArt'. sculpture or other artform should (lispia)' certain qualities that are IInique.:>H~" You should spend about 40 minutes on this task. over the past centwy there has been a (lecline in the quality of prize-winning artwork and it is now possiblefor quite ordinary pieces ofart to be labelled 'masterpieces' whilst true works ofart pass unnoticed. Do you agree or disagree? Give reasol1sforyour answer.WRITING TASk"'2 1 . a painting. knowledge and experience and support your arguments with examples and relevant evidence..

Book Club Members College Staff College Students Members of Public Book Club Members Total 151 1287 1696 3134 Fiction ' Non-fiction Magazines 44 29 332 31 194 1249 1474 122 82 204 76 942 33 1051 Total 40S Writing Task 2 You are advised to spend a maximum of 40 minutes on this task.PRACTICE WRITING TEST Writing Task 1 You are advised to spend a maximum of 20 minutes on this task. You shOuld write at least 150 words. Non. Write a report describing the sales figures ofvarious types ofpublications. knowledge and experience. based on the information shown in the table. Your college tutor has asked you to write an essay on the following topic: Studying the English language in an Ellglish-speakingcountry is the best but not the only way to learn the lallguage. You are required to support your arguments with relevant information and examples based on your own ideas. 37 . The table below summarises some data collected by a college bookshop for the month ofFebruary 2000. Do you agree or disagree with this statement? You should write at least 250 words.

.Female students 10 8 No.l Enrolled in CAD core option I Enrolled in Photography core option M Male students F . You are required to support your arguments with relevant information and examples based on your own ideas. KEY titii.PRACTICE WRITING TEST Writing Task 1 You are advised to spend a maximum of 20 minutes on this task. Sotire sociologists claim that parents and other members ofsociety often set a bad example. Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information shown. You should write at least 150 words. but today 's youth are experimenting with both legal and illegal drugs. Write an essay for a university lecturer on the following topic: People in all modern societies use drugs. Discuss the causes and some effects ofwidespread drug use by youngpeople in modern day society_ Make any recommendations youfeelare necessary to help fight youth drug abuse.Computer-Aided Design Writing Task 2 You are advised to spend a maximum of 40 minutes on this task. 38 . The bar chart below shows the number ofoverseas students enrolled in a second year Graphic Design course at a college in the south ofEngland. knowledge and experience. of enrQlled 6 students from 4 abroad Sweden France Germany 2 0 M F M F M F t M F M F I CAD . and at an increasingly early age. You should write at least 250 words.

...1. o ....q May _ <'Isa - - _ 1""'. Since the first atomic bombs were developed.­ 20 a11".... End of 1st Quarter: End of 2nd Quarter: End of 3rd Quarter: Media reports boost in economy Profit (in £1 ()()()s) Introduction of tax Oil luxury goods End of Financial Year: "Y Acme Sports Cars • I "Y • 80 1. The graph below shows the montMy profits of3 British companies in the car retail industry for the 2000 financial year....... knowledge and experience..• Feb Mar '01 Jun Jut Allg Sep Oct Nov Dec '00 Jan 'Of 2000 FinancialYear Writing Task 2 You are advised to spend a maximum of 40 minutes on this task. nuclear technology has provided government:f with the ability to totally destroy the planet.. To what extent is nuclear technology a danger to life on Earth? What are the benefits and risks associated with its use? You should write at least 250 words./. l> • • . 39 . Yet the technology has been put to positive use as an energy source and in certain areas of medicine. Branson Motors \j /. ). /' /' /'..... You should write at least 150 words.. Write a report for a university lecturer comparing the peifonnallce of Acme Sports Cars and Branson Motors for the period given.0 Apr '00 A1'<Qr . --:" • I I - .. • • 60 40 ..PRACTICE WRITING TEST Writing Task 1 You are advised to spend a maximum of 20 minutes on this task.. Write an essay for a university lecturer on the following topic: We have been living in the nuclear age IlOW for over halfa century. You are required to support your arguments with relevant information and examples based on your own ideas.

Between 1996 and 1997. $ ----.<4_ bY ~ 2OIiO.4 per cent of the total volume respectively. • You should write at least 150 words. From then until 2000 their value fell consistently but there was a slight rise in mid-2000. 40 • . however.4 per cent of the total volume was purchased.colubanl price. Since 1996. while Africa and the Middle East remained fairly small consumers at 7 per cent of the total volume of sales. The largest consumer was North America.5 and 16. • You should spend about 20 minutes on this task. In that year.~~----_J_o10 199& 97 98 99 2000 01 model answer: The pie chart shows the worldwide distribution of sales of Coca ­ Cola in the year 2000 and the graph shows the change in share prices between 1996 and 2001.1 billion cases of their fizzy drink product worldwide.. The second largest consumer was Latin America. shares were valued at approximately $35.1 The chart and graph below give information about sales and share prices for Coca-Cola. In the year 2000. Coca-Cola sold a total of 17. . % 1I>J1OU1 e_. where 30.'U••1t _ \. Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information shown below. Europe and Asia purchased 20. They dipped a little in mid-1997 and then peaked at $80 per share in mid-98. prices rose significantly to $70 per share. share prices for Coca-Cola have fluctuated. A lot of bcn1u ~I!IjJ Cl>t1l-Con.

CDs and DVD or video.--­ The chart shows the changes in the sales of video material / DVDs.(. during the same time period. but 'in 2003. but less sharply. the sale of videos and DVDs rose by approximately 13 billion dollars. $bn _Games .2 The chart below gives information about global sales of games software.• software lli. just under 20 billion dollars worth of these items were sold.Iobal~~les.5 billion dollars in 2003.0' D\/Dlvideo model answer: -. this figure had risen to a little over 30 billion dollars. The sales of games software also rose during this period. By contrast. 41 . the sale of CDs fell from 35 billion dollars in 2000 to about 32. while the sales of CDs have gone down slightly. Sales increased from about 13 billion dollars in 2000 to just under 20 billion dollars three years later. Between 2000 and 2003. games software and CDs around the world in billions of dollars over a three-year period. Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information. Howsaf~ have -changed . It can be seen that the sales of videos / DVDs and games software have increased. In 2000.

16-24 825-34 .16-24 ...l~ . Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information shown below.3 The graphs below show the types of music albums purchased by people in Britain according to s3x and age..mali.35-44 .45+ % Percentage ofpeople who buy Rock Music • • mala • female .2S>34 II SSM 11145+ 42 . Percentage of people Who buy Classical Music II male .. • female . % Percentage of people Who buy Pop Music '.25-34 1145+ ._--------------------..3544 -.fWn.16-'24 ..

model answer:
The three graphs provide an overview of the types of music people purchase in the UK. At first glance we see that classical music is far less popular than pop or rock music. While slightly more women than men buy pop music, the rock market is dominated by men with 30% buying rock, compared to 17% of women. From the first graph we see that interest in pop music is steady from age 16 to 44 with 20% of the population continuing to buy pop CDs after the age of 45. The interest in rock music reaches its peak among the 25 to 34 year aIds, though it never sells as well as pop. Interest also drops off after the age of 35 with an even sharper fall from age 45 onwards, a pattern which is the opposite to the classical music graph.

4
You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.

The graphs below show the numbers of male and female~ workers in 1975 and 1995 in several employment sectors of the republic of Freedonia. Write a report for a university teacher describing the information shown.

43

Employment in Freedonia by sex in 6 sectors, 1975

---------------

..

t-----_..
Finanve!banklll9 WhOleSaleS, retail tl'ade

}---.--. ---_.­

~

....•
400 600

II Women • Men

1 - - - - - - - - - ­____--­ ----.

Pubtll> ~I)r

(non..aehmce)
pubflc sector
«(fef~nC&)

\-------------.. __.-- _.- e
o
200

eoo

1000

Number of emplo)'ees (1000)

Employment in Freedonia by sex in 6 sectom, 1996

! leommun!caUOJl$

!

1-----..--.4..--_._-------.

• Women eM(!ln

-t---~.

I FJ~~

J---------liIJ.
1 - - - ­........- - - - - - ­.......

1-------------4..._--..--.
o
model answer:
The two decades between 1975 and 1995 brought significant changes in the representation of women in Freedonia's work force, according to the graphs. In 1975, for example, some 300 000 men and 250 000 women worked in the communications sector. Twenty years later, though the number of men remained unchanged, the number of women rose to 550 000. A similar situation was seen in the wholesale and retail trade sector, where the number of women rose from about 550 000 in 1975 to almost 800 000 two decades later. The number of men in
200 400 600 600 1000
Number of employees (1000}

44

this sector remained stable over the period, at around 700 000. Women also made gains in both the finance jbanking industries and in the defence-related public sector. Whereas some 125 000 women worked in finance and banking institutions in 1975, the number increased to 450 000 by 1995. The number of men grew only marginally from 425 000 to 480 000 over the same period. In defence, the number of men declined from 225 000 to 200 000, while the number of women rose from 25 000 to over 100 000. Two sectors that retained stable employment numbers for both men and women were manufacturing, which had about 300 000 women and 650 000 men in both surveyed years, and the public sector (non-defence), which employed 650 000 women and 850 000 men. Thus, women appear to have made gains in the Freedonian work force but not at the expense of men. (243 words)

5
You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.

Eating sweet foods produces acid in the mouth, which can cause tooth decay. (High acid levels are measured by low pH values) Describe the information below and discuss the implications for dental health.

45

which causes the mouth's acidity to fall to just above pH 4.5."oCCUrs .5 until at least 30 minutes have elapsed. iooih"Oica. They then begin to rise slowly.5. and that fruit sugar or honey appear preferable to cane sugar. are that people who insist on eating sweet foods should be aware of the ingredients.5. and the longer pH levels remain below 5. poses a danger for a shorter period: tooth decay is unlikely 20 minutes after consumption.. pH levels drop to as little as pH 3. cane sugar and honey. Honey appears an even less risky substance. The implications. (242 words) 6 46 . acidity is such that teeth are unlikely to be uinanger of decay. then. it returns to above pH 5._. Though acidity falls to about pH 4. which are all common ingredients of sweet foods._ Fftllt sugar <~<c~" at whicn IO'Jlh tlecay is . thus producing the greatest risk of the three.5 in under fifteen minutes. This is because sweets lower pH levels in the mouth to dangerous levels. cause pH in the mouth to drop for a time. we find that cane sugar lowers pH levels for the longest period. however. By comparing fruit sugar.. When the pH level in the mouth is kept above 5. fruit sugar./l'llik-ely Cane sugar Hoooy Moment eaten 5 10 15 minutes mjlluWs minutes 20 25 30 35 40 minutes minutes minutes minutes mlnllles 11111& maf>SCI<1 after eating sugar/honey model answer: Anyone who has visited a dentist has been told that eating excessive amounts of sweets risks harming the teeth. Sweet foods. but do not rise above pH 5. By contrast. Approximately five minutes aftfter consuming cane sugar.75 within five minutes of consumption.Atid ~v(!l in molJl:h from consumption of sugars/honey 7 aClaieverai wni'. the greater the opportunity for decay to occur.

lo\. uf manufacmring ftroccss mnllufhctnred materials ihHV of ioJormnlion feedhack model answer: Most consumer goods go through a series of stages before they emerge as finished products ready for sale.The diagram below shows the typical stages of consumer goods manufacturing. 47 .\. 1. including the process by which information is fed back to earlier stages to enable adjustment. Write a report for a university lecturer describing the process shown.

the products are inspected and tested to maintain quality control I Those units that pass the inspection and testing stages are then packaged. also serves to foster future sales by devising suitable advertising for the goods. helps determine production planning. while influenced by product sales. which examines the extent and nature of the demand for products. market research. according to United Nations statistics. But assembly first depends upon the production planning stage. Thus the reality of consumer goods manufacturing goes well beyond a simple linear production process. The production planning stage itself follows the requirements of the goods' design stage that proceeds from extensive research. which is the end point of the manufacturing process.Raw materials and manufactured components comprise the initial physical input in the manufacturing process. 7 The table below shows social and economic indicators for four countries in 1994. Once obtained. but is also influenced by testing and market research. Describe . these are stored for later assembly. has the role of guiding product design to suit consumer demands which may change with time.the information shown below in your own words. What implications do the indicators have for the . If the testing stage (after assembly and inspection) reveals unacceptable problems in the finished product. A product's design is not only the result of product research. where it is decided how and in what quantities the stored materials will be processed to create sufficient quantities of finished goods.countries? 48 . After assembly. The level of sales. despatched and offered for sale in retail outlets. Market research. Similarly. then adjustments will have to be made to the product's design.

(Unpaid work refers to such activities as childcare in the home. This was followed by Canada. Canada. Life expectancy at birth. The data appear to confrrm the often cited link between national wealth and health and education standards. for example. Canadians each consumed some 3 326 calories per day while the Japanese took 2846 calories. Peru. was higher among the more economically developed countries. in 1994 reflects the great differences that exist between wealthier and poorer nations. respectively. _____ The amount of calories consumed daily per person roughly followed the same ranking. Health indicators. 51. This suggests that richer societies are able to put more money into health care than poorer ones. 47. Zaire. 78. Literacy rates among adults. These figures were overwhelmingly greater than the corresponding figures of $160 in Peru and $130 in Zaire.) 49 . respectively. Japan. Japan reported the highest life expectancy. were higher in wealthier countries. the least economically developed of the four countries. reflected overall levels of affluence in the four nations. The corresponding figures for Peru and Zaire were 1927 and 1749. housework and gardening. too.Adult literacy rate (%) 99 99 68 model answer: A glance at four indicators of economic and social conditions in four countries. no doubt a reflection of ability to invest in education. too. The table shows that Japan and Canada had annual incomes of $15 760 and $11 100 per person. and Zaire. 76. 8 The diagram below shows the average hours of unpaid work per week done by people in different categories. had a literacy rate of 34%. Canada and Japan both reported literacy rates of 99%. while Peru claimed 680/0. Peru and Zaire.

when there are three or more children in the household. women are reported to work some 30 hours per week in such tasks as housework and gardening. due to childcare responsibilities. In families of 1 . 50 . • Maried women • Mariedmen W1h1-2 dllldren model answer: The diagram reveals that the number of hours per week spent in unpaid work is unequally distributed between men and women. comparing results for men and women in the categories shown. Whereas women's unpaid hours rise to approximately 56 per week. men are found to work even fewer hours around the house than befor~ the appearance of the third child. Interestingly. actually represents a decrease. 16. but the number of hours women work in the home rises to 52 per week.Describe the information presented below. In households where there are no children. on doubt.2 children. When children enter the household. men maintain approximately the same number of hours of unpaid work as in childless households. much of it. however. the inequality becomes even more pronounced. Suggest reasons for what you see. Men's contribution to these unpaid jobs averages a considerably lower 18 hours. Unpaid work hours per week . the corresponding figure for men.

Write a report for a university lecturer. Give possible reasons for the differences. describing the information below. 51 . 9 The chart below shows the sleep patterns of people in five different occupations according to a Canadian study.The data suggest that the increased presence of women in the paid work force has yet to lead to an increased role for men in the horne.

.. .....asleep awake: Occupation Student Truck Driver Fullt-thime EBusinte...+ ....ss Doctor mo er xecu Ive 6-7 pm 7-8 pm :---------1: . 1 8-9 pm i .... 9-10 pm 10-11 p 11-12p 1-2 am 2-3 am 3-4 am 4-5 am 5-6 am 6-7 am 7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 am 1 1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm model answer: 52 .

m . 53 . Thus the influence on one's sleep pattern is worthy of consideration when choosing an occupation. and another from 4 to 7 p. but nap for two hours or so in the early afternoon.m. but may be woken up to deal with emergencies in the middle of the night. Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information shown below.. They then go back to bed to wake at 6 a. they will sleep from 10 p. Typically. between 7 and 10 a.m.. but perhaps because their jobs are especially busy and stressful they sleep for 6 hours on average. full-time mothers.m. tend to sleep when their babies do. business executives sleep consecutive hours.. for example. and be awoken at 1 a. that students typically sleep for a consecutive 8-hour period each night. 10 The chart below shows the amount of leisure time enjoyed by men and women of different employment status. to 7 a. tend to sleep in two 3­ hour blocks: one. Finally. takes place in normal daylight hours. Another occupation associated with broken sleep schedules is that of doctors. study. to comfort their babies for a couple of hours. This may be because the central activity in their lives. getting up around 5 a.m. . from 11 p. especially those with young children. A Canadian study has pointed out. and start their day at 7 a. They tend to retire to bed around 1 a.m.Differences in sleep patterns appear to reflect differences in individuals' occupations. truck drivers. Similarly. probably because of their need to keep their trucks on the road over long periods.m.m. By contrast.m.m.

men enjoyed more leisure time over eighty hours.males Ernpl~ rulltime Reti~d Housewives model answer: The chart shows the number of hours of leisure enjoyed by men and women in a typical week in 1998-9. whereas women had approximately thirty-seven hours. perhaps reflecting their work in the home.. as might have been expected. perhaps once again reflecting the fact that women spend more time working in the home than men. men on average had fift-* -+----------y hours of leisure. according to gender and employment status. only slightly more than women in full-time employment. 11 Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information in the graph below. 1998. but female part-timers had forty hours of leisure time. There were no figures given for househusbands! Overall. on average. 54 . In the unemployed and retired categories. men enjoyed at least ten hours of extra leisure time. Among those employed full-time.leisure time in a typical week: by sex and employment status. Here too. Lastly. housewives enjoyed approximately fifty-four hours of leisure. the chart demonstrates that in the categories for which statistics on male leisure time were available.99 100 II 3D Mates F. compared with seventy hours for women. There were no figures given for male part-time workers. leisure time showed an increase for both sexes.

.-.000..........._--.--.. This number decreased gradually to 500 by 1974 and continued to decrease but more steeply to 250 in 2000...-.... and increased again but more steeply to 320 in 1977..~.....--..............::.Per 1..---...-.0 People 700 600 1·-··. . The rate of smoking in women increased unti11977 but then decreased for the rest of the period.... 55 .. the rate of smoking in women in 1960 was very low at only 80 in every 1.... ._..90 1995 2000 Rates of smoking itl Somelaml • men ami women model answer: The graph compares the rate of smoking in men and women in Someland between the years 1960 and 2000........00..__._..............c.... ~~...-- .::::IL- -..'.... It can be clearly........________........-_..'...000 was smoking...._...--.. In 1960......' ....__......'....'. In conclusion we can see that the rate of smoking in men dropped throughout the whole period but was always at a higher level than the female figures.. at 320 until 1984 at which point the figures began to decline and had dropped to 200 by 2000. o 4-·-~-·--1-·---~·--~r----r---~-----~-~·----~ 1960 19651970 1975 1990 1985 19....__.._....600 men in every 1.. The rate of female smokers then remained stable ...:~ 200 100 +. ..'....... 12 Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information in the graphs below.='~-""'L"-"- 300 +--------:7~~~~-II-..-....::.. In contrast.. 500 400 .. By 1968 this increased to 170.-"'...ii!IiII.... seen that the rate of smoking for both men and women is currently declining and that fewer women have smoked throughout the period...". .

In 1990 AIDS received 180 million dollars in research 56 . These figures can be contrasted with the amount of funding allocated for each disease. 0. 50 100 150 model answer: The graphs compare the number of deaths caused by six diseases in Someland in 1990 with the amount of research funding allocated to each of those diseases.Deaths in Someland 1990 (millions) AIDS Lepro5'{ Tropical Diseases Diarrhoea Malaria TB o 0. 0.5 1 1.1 million deaths from leprosy. It can be clearly seen that the amount of research funding in many cases did not correlate with the seriousness of the disease in terms of numbers of deaths. In 1990 there were around 0. 0.4 million deaths from malaria and l.5 million deaths from diarrhoea. 0.2 million deaths from AIDS.3 million deaths from tropical diseases.8million deaths from TB.5 Medical research funding in SOmeland {millions} AIDS leprosY Tropltal Olseas~ lB.

in research funding. tropical diseases 79 million dollars in research funding. 13 Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information in the two graphs below. diarrhoea 60 million dollars. In conclusion it is clear that funding allocation for disease research in Someland is not wholly determined by the number of deaths for which each disease is responsible in a given year. Third Grade IIVear6 IIVear9 II Year 12 II First Oegree II PostGeaduate model answer: 57 . Third Grade IiIi Yearn IiIII Year 12 l1li Arst Oegree I'll Port GeadlIate Higbest level ofeducationofwomen in someland-1995 • No Schooling .funding. leprosy 80 million dollars in research funding. Highest level of education of women in someland-1945 II No Schooling ... malaria 50 million dollars and TB 20 million dollars in research funding.

.·."X· . This is in stark contrast with 1945 when only 30% of girls completed primary school.. '''•• ~ ·. No women had completed post­ graduate studies. In 1995.. In conclusion. 200 200 160 50 60 75 0 50 160 0 Cinema 100 15 50 25 25 75 model answer: The table shows how people in different age groups spend their leisure time in Someland over the course of a year.The pie charts compare the highest level of education achieved by women in Someland across two years. ec. This situation had changed radically by 1995."Y •••" . we can see that.':Ii. lOs 40s 400 300 50s 60s 700 105+ 700 500 600 250 1. 1945 and 1995. It can be clearly seen that women received a much higher level of education in Someland in 1995 than they did in 1945. 35% had no schooling at all and 35% only completed the third grade.100 200 4 or less people 4 or more people IndIVidual SociaJisjng with 160 350 160 360 260 200 SocialiSing With 60 60 25 25 25 exercise Group eX9roiselspoJt 160 450 100 350 200. '"'''' C". although 10% ended their schooling at this point.' .~~~".in the 50 years from 1945 to 1995 there have been huge positive developments to the education levels of women in Someland.200 . In 1945 only 30% of women completed their secondary education and 1% went on to a first degree.90% of women in Someland had completed secondary education and of those.•. 14 Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information in the table below. half had graduated from an initial degree and 20% had gone on to postgraduate studies. At the other end of the scale we can see that by 1995 all girls were completing lower secondary.ii:ti Teens Watching TV/videos 1. It can be clearly seen that the amount of leisure time available varies 58 .j'.20s.

People of all ages spend a good part of their leisure time on entertainment such as TVjvideo viewing and cinema. Although the total hours of socialising in their 30s. 59 . In conclusion we can see there is a significant trend towards solitary and smaller group activities as people grow older and that teenagers and retired people spend a lot more time on entertainment than those of working age do. teenagers and retired people spend around twice as much time as those who are at working age. Home entertainment ranges from just over a thousand hours for teenagers and retired people and an average of 600 hours for everyone else. Group and individual exercise follow a similar pattern. socialising with more than 4 people drops dramatically to 50 hours in the 30s and 40s age groups and only 25 from 50 years old. 50s and 60s is fairly constant (between 300-350). Teenagers and people in their twenties spend on average 500 hours per year on socialising and 350 hours of that time is with a group of more than 4 people.considerably across the age groups and that people of different age levels have very different ways of spending their leisure time. In both cases. According to the figures. Cinema accounts for 100 hours of the teenagers and retired people's leisure time and 25-50 hours for the rest. as people age in Someland their social lives reduce. 40s.

regardless of what background or culture they come from. you get a mark out of 9. This does not mean that by Section 3 they are 60 . These questions will be more demanding and require some critical analysis on the part of the candidate. 6 or 8. The examiner will give the candidate a card with a subject and a few guiding questions on it. Remember it is only 1 part out of 4. Finally an average is taken to give you your final band for the Speaking. Finally the examiner asks a series of questions of 2 topics of general interest. The student must talk for 1 to 2 minutes on this subject. Remember. In this short time you have to convince the examiner who will be speaking with you of your level of English. All the questions will be open questions rather than closed questions. sex or religion. Fluency and Coherence: The examiner grades your fluency.4 minutes) Section 3 Here the examiner will ask some more questions generally related to the subject spoken about in section 2. you will not get a question like: Do you like living in your town? A student could just answer yes. your a·ccuracy at producing them and whether you use the right structure at the right time and in the right place. The speaking test is no different and each of the sections has a specific purpose. The Three Sections of the IELTS Academic Listening Test Here we will look at the three sections in more detail. Pronunciation: This mark grades you on how clearly you speak English. smooth and flowing your speaking is. any gaps in your speaking should be associated with searching for the right idea rather than hesitancy with finding the right word or structure. the examiner looks at how easy you are to understand. A closed question is one that can be answered by a single word or a couple of words. So.: Section 1 Section 1 begins with some general introductory questions.THE IELTS ACADEMIC SPEAKING TEST TUTORIAL The IELTS Academic Speaking test is the shortest of the components of the IELTS test . Lexical Resource. Marking . and so have the opportunity to show how good his English is. 4. (3 . Bands and Results In the IELTS Academic Speaking Test you will be marked in 4 areas. The questions that are asked in Section 1 are easier than in Section 2 and so on. For Pronunciation you get a 2. the speaking gets more difficult as it goes on. An open question asks the candidate to give an extended answer. These 4 areas are: Fluency and Coherence. Grammatical Range and Accuracy and Pronunciation. To get a good grade here. . (4 . Like all the different modules of the IELTS. The Speaking test is recorded. Any answers like this will just be followed by the question why? so you have to extend your answer (what you should have done after the "yes" anyway). For the coherence part. The test is conducted with 1 examiner and 1 candidate.only 11 to 14 minutes.5 minutes) Question Types The types of questions that come in the IELTS Academic Speaking Test are very general in nature and are designed so that anyone around the world. Anyway. The IELTS Academic Speaking Test is the same for both the Academic and General Training modules. Does your flow of ideas run smoothly. After the candidate's talk the examiner will ask 1 or 2 brief questions in order to finish off the section. the question is more likely to be: Why do you like living in your town? Here the candidate has to give an explanation and therefore the examiner hears plenty of English which will help him or her evaluate you. This is followed by some questions on personal information similar to the type of questions one would ask when meeting someone for the first time. at the right time and in the right place. (4 .IELTS Academic Speaking Test Marks.5 minutes) Section 2 Section 2 is a monologue (1 person speaking) by the candidate. The examiner decides on the exact length. which is how easy. For the first 3. The student has an optional 1 minute in order to prepare for his talk and is provided with some paper and a pencil in order to make some brief notes. Grammatical Range and Resource: This mark grades your range of grammatical structures. The questions will not be overly personal and will avoid contentious subjects such as politics. This is the area that worries the candidates the most as it is the dreaded grammar. Let's look at these areas in more detail. logically and with conSistency? Do you communicate well? Lexical Resource: This mark grades the range of words that you use in your speaking test and whether you use the words in the right way. the IELTS test always tries to mirror situations that you will encounter as a student or immigrant in an English speaking country. The Speaking Test is divided into 3 sections. should be able to answer them.

When you have finished what you have to say stop. If you try and extend yourself too much.)Iso sent to the IELTS administration to be monitored to make sure that examiners are doing a good job and assigning the correct bands. He will more get a general impression of your English accuracy so individual errors don't matter. The examiner will hand you a card with the subject written on it. try and forget that the recorder is there and get on with answering the questions. Being nervous is fine. This only takes a few seconds. Similarly. These questions will be of a more demanding nature and will require a more analytical and thoughtful answer. This is done so that. You can refer to your notes while you are speaking. But be friendly. 61 . You must use the one that he gives you. When you are in the test. You will also probably need to use more complex language as regards grammatical structure and vocabulary. So don't let making errors upset you.the responsibility is on you to talk. say so and then say what you do know. First of all practice. Below you will find a separate section devoted to practising the speaking. When you're finished. Section 1 (4 . Don't try and be too clever.after all. The examiner understands that and will try and put you at ease. Don't worry about the occasional mistake. The examiner will expect some mistakes . Here the examiner checks that he or she has the right person by checking the candidates name. Get on with the talking and concentrate on your communication. then that is when you will make the most errors. your family. along with about three questions on the subject in order to guide and help your speaking. smile and look the examiner in the eye. Don't do this to (:. If an examiner has to talk with someone who doesn't talk much. if necessary. Section 2 (3 . These sets of questions will cover general ideas on a theme of general interest. So. he may ask you 1 or 2 general questions about what you have been discussing. If the speaking was not recorded. ii) In the second part the examiner asks some personal (not too personal so don't worry) questions about some familiar topics such as yourself. your home or your work/study. the examiner can't grade you very well. Try and be friendly and look as though you are enjoying the conversation. The examiner will see that you have finished and will give you the next question. Different people can talk about different questions more and the examiner knows this.5 minutes) This sedion is divided into three parts. then the candidate's test is re-<:hecked. Sample recordings '-Ire . After the minute. the examiner wi!! give you another question. English is a foreign language for you and people make mistakes in speaking foreign languages. Just try and talk normally as that is when you will perform at your best. origin and identification. This should last for a couple of minutes. iii) In the third part the examiner chooses 2 sets of questions from his selection. After he has asked you to stop. The examiner is not making a note of every single mistake that you make. You cannot ask the examiner for another card. This doesn't happen very often. then this could not be done. !How to do Better in the IELTS Academic Speaking Test There are a number of things you can do to have a better performance in the IELTS Academic Speaking Test. Try and give as full an answer as you can so that you show the examiner that you are comfortable at talking at length and can communicate well. Perfection is not needed. You have to talk. then it has a negative effect on the examiner.impossible but they are more demanding linguistically. you won't be able to answer all questions at length. The examiner will then tell you that you have 1 minute to prepare your mini-talk and he or she will give you some paper and a pencil to make some notes during that minute. This has a big effect on the examiner. i) The first part involves general introductions. These questions are the type that people would use when meeting someone for the first time. the speaking can be re-marked. It makes a difference. This would be impossible to do and concentrate on your speaking. If you don't know much about something. the examiner will ask you to start talking and you must talk on the subject until the examiner asks you to stop. You can still make some errors and get a 9 (not many errors though). If the bands for a candidate's writing and speaking for instance are very different. This is the key to all the different modules of IELTS.5 minutes) In Section 3 the examiner will ask you a series of questions thematically linked to the subject that you spoke about in Section 2. Section 3 (4 .xtremes though.4 minutes) In this section the candidate has to give a small "speech" or monologue on a general subject chosen by the examiner. One thing that puts candidates off is that the Speaking test is recorded. doesn't smile at all and who clearly doesn't want to be there. More important is your communication. Don't forget your ID! You need it at the start of the test. Without your talking input. You can't duck out of every question though . Don't try and force more out as it will probably be strained and repetitive.

How many he asks depends on how long you talk for in your answers. the mirror or do it driving on the way to work. whether it is in your language or English. this is the one thing that will really improve your band. Then sit down with a piece of paper and write" down every question you can think of about these ideas. The reason it is hard is that you don't often talk uninterrupted for 1 to 2 minutes about anything. Section 1 In section 1 you start with personal questions such as about yourself. Talk at a normal speed. Check out other question types and soon you're be able to develop your own. off you go. It doesn't matter if you do the same question frequently. you can talk to . you can start to make your own examples and practice answering them in the ways (i and ii) above. Practice As in all parts of the IELTS. your home or your work/study. The practice procedure is as before. Then practice them with someone or by yourself. The more often you practice this. You just look at your list and imagine that someone has asked you the question. So. family and work/study. how do you get better at it? By practising it again and again. You should say: • • • • When you first went there. It all helps. So. They want you to talk normally. The follow up question to end Section 2 is not so important that it needs to be practiced as it only requires a few words as an 62 . Students doing this. If you do give a yes/now answer. you can mix both. home. Try and come up with about 20. more often than not. as you will give better and better answers with more and more information. Do this again and again. but it works and you will improve. Then. talking by yourself. These are not complicated but are more demanding than the ones that you did in the part before. You don't have to do either method i or ii. Soon. come up with actual themes and questions from the test itself!! yOu Section 2 Preparation and practice for Section 2 is similar to the practice in Section l.the cat. you'U probably get a why next anyway.You have to talk for 1 to 2 minutes in English. The examiner will have a set of questions to ask you. And explain why this place is so speCial for you. In the second part of Section 1 you have to answer questions on themes of general interest. Prepare the types of questions for each of the different sections. ii) If you don't have a friend who can do this. There are various things that you can do to improve your performance. talking for 2 minutes without stopping won't be a problem. your family. you can see the format of this section. The first question could be: Do you enjoy traveling and why/why not? Then this could be followed by: Where would you like to travel to and why? can find other sample themes and questions in IELTS Practice Now Question Papers and from other sources. Let's say that your task is as follows: Describe a favourite holiday destination that you like. Once you" have an idea of the types of theme and question. sit down with your dictionary and try and think of all the vocabulary you would need to completely describe all parts of your tife. Remember you don't have to talk fast or without breaks. the better you'll get. I have done this with classes and it works very well. It gives a bad impression. So. You can then practice them in 2 ways: i) Get a friend to ask you the questions and practice giving long. It may feel a bit strange at first. Speaking for this time in your own language is quite hard. What you do when you're there. full answers. You can do this sat at home. pause to take breaths and take time to consult your notes to give yourself ideas about what to talk about next. How you get there. then you can do it by yourself. Let's say for example that the theme the examiner chooses is travelling.Don't give yes/no answers unless you continue with a because. so in a foreign language it is harder.

" The subject of your story doesn't matter as you are still on the subject of your talk. Section 3 Section 3 really carries on from where Section 2 left off. the procedure is as in the previous sections. I was in a restaurant having some food and . it asks you to talk about these things so you should talk about them. None of the questions will be of a technical nature or require any specialist knowledge as that would be unfair.com Practice Tests also provide practice and often we provide much fuller examples. so that they will remind you about things to talk about when you look at your notes during your talk. The examiner will have a set of questions to ask you. As regards practice. So. you could be just finishing and still have 45 seconds left to talk. Use your time.. In your notes quickly jot down one or two ideas for each of the questions. These questions are here to help you as they give you ideas to talk about and give your talk a bit of structure. Before you begin your monologue." Or: "Maybe not. It might be too hot for you. ieltshelpnow. For exarn~ for tl:L~ question above. As you run out of ideas you could give an example out of your own experience. Our tests are also at least half the price! The choice is yours. 63 . " You can see that nothing very long is required. for the question we looked at above about a holiday destination. but you will be expected to give your opinion on what is asked you. So. How many he asks depends on how long you talk for in your answers. You could be saying why the place is so special to you. Very often these people will dry up early and be at a loss about how to continue.) and then 3 mini-questions following (Say when you first went there. maybe make a note of something from your own experience connected to the talking theme. the examiner might choose to ask you questions about tourism and the airline industry. Looking at the question above (which is a typical layout for this section) you can see that there is a main question (Describe a favourite holiday destination that you like. The main thing is that it's keeping you talking. what should you write in your notes? First of all. if you have time. how you get there what you do when you're there and explain why this place is so special for you). you will have 1 minute to prepare for it. An example question from the examiner for the subject above could be: "Do you think I would enjoy a holiday in this place too?" The candidate would just be expected to say something like: "Oh yes. Tourism • Can you predict any major changes that could happen in the Tourist Industry over the next 50 years? • Can you compare the tourist industry in your country today with the tourist industry when your grandparents were young?Can you identify some of the factors that have led to the Industry success of the airline industry? Airline • Can you suggest any ways in which air travel could be made safer? • You can see that the questions here are more analytical and require more thought than the questions in the previous sections. don't try and write out your whole talk word for word. The examiner will ask you questions that are thematically linked to the subject that you talked about in Section 2. Finally. Some people think that they don't need the time at all and will start straight away. You need to get someone to do the questions with you. When you are talking about something from your own experience. I think so. You don't have enough time.•.answer. Someone starting straight away does not get any advantage at all over someone who takes the full minute to prepare. However. You could say: "Actually why I like the place so much is shown from something that happened to me the last time I was there. it is easier to talk at length. or do them alone and then develop your own questions and practice with them. For example. use your preparation time and make notes. At this point I'd like to explain about the 1 minute preparation time and the notes that you can write during it. let's look at some examples. First of all.

in your country? 31. Describe an invention before or after computer. Describe an important festival in Iran. Should the governments support inventors? Why do inventors invent? 29. Describe the ethnic mix in your country. Describe the organization you work for. Describe a traditional dish in your country. 14. 19. 2. 8. or a piece of music that you like most and say why. 17. when and with whom did you take it? 32. Describe your country's education system. Give reasons why the divorce rate has or has not increased in your country. IS. Why do people collect things? Do you collect anything? 28. Why always women cook and men do not in your country? Which is a better cook. What is your favourite colour? Why? What is the relationship between the colour of c10thes and the personality of people? What is the relationship with mood? 21. 34. Is there something special about it? 13. sports. Where is it? What does it do? What is your job function? 6. Where is it? What is special about it? 22. Describe your hometown. music. Describe the present situation ofTourism in Iran. 11. 35. When is it? What do people do then? 18. 4. 20. What is your attitude toward this system? Do you think it's effective? 5. Name a book. 24. What is your greatest wish! one of your wishes? 26. Introduce yourself. Describe a tradition<'llgillm~t in your country. Newspapers and their attractions for you. Describe a traditional /children's/intemationaVcard game. 23. Compare traditional houses with modem houses in your country. What is Brain drain? What are the causes and effects of it? 9. film. Why do people play games? 25. Describe a historical place in your country. Discuss the factors affecting people to have more or less children in your country. 16. . What is fashion? Do you follow fashion? Why do people follow fashion? How do people in your country follow fashion? 30. a man or a woman? 64 . When are you going to visit it and why? 10. Describe the process of taking a job in your country. 7. Describe one of your photos. Where. What is special about it? 3. What is the process of obtaining a driving license/passport/etc. What don't you know about your future? 27. Talk about mass media. Discuss why you like a special kind of book. What is the future of Tourism like in Iran? 33. Discuss why you would like to visit a particular country. Describe a traditional instrument in your country. or film. Describe the traditional Architecture of your country.Speaking Topics for IELTS Test 1. Compare the role of men and women in your country. What are the ingredients? 12. Describe IT or a databank system. Compare your hometown with another town.

What do people do in 4 seasons in your country? 43. What time are children considered to be adults in your country? 61. Describe a sportsman who you admire. and how has re/she influenced you? 57. What do you know about the wildlife in your country? Who is responsible for its preservation? 54. What is the role of public artworks? 47. How has traveling changed since 100 years ago? 38. Compare a person who has been in a foreign country with someone who hasn't. Why people want to have private gardens? 62. Who is he/she? Your relation. Describe a child that you know.36. What is the main industry of your country? 67. Shopping: who does the shopping in your home? Do you go shopping? What have you found difficult in shopping? 56. where and why? 39. Talk about the best present you have ever had in your life. event in your life. 50. 59. Who is he/she? What he/she has done? Why you admire this person? 64. When was it. Who gave it to you? When? How did you like it? 65. What was the most interesting (impressing) period of time in your life? Describe it. Who is your closest friend? When did you meet himlher? How? Who is a good friend? What are the properties of a good friend? What do you expect from your friends? 66. Why was it so impressive? 48. Describe a park (or garden) near your home. What do governments do in case of disasters? What should they do? 44. Describe a competition you have entered. In what occasions do people give presents in your country? 41. Describe a city you have visited and impressed you so much. How do you choose a gift for your friends? 42. party. Talk about the most populated area in your country. Compare your time with your parents'. What was your stand? 46. What is the same and what has changed since then? 37. What do you think about children's school age? Advantages or disadvantages? 60. How is it easy to travel in your country? 68. Describe your best holiday. What do you think will be the world's greatest problem in 100 years time? 52. Where is it? What is its population? Why is it so populated? 45. What do you think pastime and hobbies will be in 100 years time? 53. Describe the fITst toy you got. Is there any in your country? What can be done ifthere is? 58. When. What is capital punishment? Is it necessary to control crime? 51. What kind of food you prefer? 65 . What are the advantages and disadvantages of photographs and filming (handy camera)? 63. what does he/she like. 49. Compare Iranian eating with other countries. What do you know about Global Warming? What is Greenhouse Effect? 55. School pressure on children. why and who gave it to you? 40.

. My name is . television. Mobile Phone as so on). You should say What it is? What do you do with it? And explain why it is important for you. refrigerator. could you tell me your name please? Please show me your identification! passport? That's fine thanks you. Part Two B Will you always keep it? Is it worth Could you please explain with some examples about the changes of technology which are used by people in our daily life between now and the past 20 years? Whether those equipment you've ever mentioned in your examples is used in you home? How about other Indian families? Do you think the technology will have what development in the future? Do you think it is important? How often do you access internet? Do you have one computer? . Sample 2 Part One Good morning. Where are your from? Do you have a large family or a small family? Can you tell me something about them Now I'd like to ask you a few questions about your family How much time do you manage to spend with members of your family? What sorts ofthings do you like to do together? Do you get on well with your family? Why? Part Two A 66 .Speaking test samples Part One What is your hometowns shape? Can you describe it for me What is your hometowns history? Do you prefer going out or staying at home? Why? What will do if you go out? Part Two A I'd like you to teU me about an equipment of your household (such as computer..

67 . frequency and fare. you have only 1 or 2 minutes for this so doesn't worry if I stop you... could you tell me your name please? Please show me your identification! passport? Thats fine thanks you. Do you have any problems using the public transport? Part Two Your topic I'd like you to tell me about your favorite news channel You should say What is it How often do you use it? And explain why you like it. Part two B Why are you study English? Do you think learning English will benefit to your first language study? We've been talking about household equipments and I'd like to discuss with you one or two question related to this. I'll tell you when.I'd like you to tell me about your learning English All right? Remember. My name is . Do you work or are you a student? What subject are you a studying? Why did you choose that subject? Are there things you dont like about it? Now Id like to ask you a few questions about transport systems in your hometown What is the mostpopular transport system in use? Talk about its reliability. please? You should say When and where you study English What English course do you iike best? And explain why it is important for you. let's consider: What do you think is the best way to study English? What is the most difficulties do you think ofteaching of English in you country? How this can be solved in the future? Sample 3 Part One Good morning. Can you start speaking now.

Compare the people's attitude to media between now and the past 20 years? Should we trust the journalists? What do you think what a good journalist should be? 68 .Part Two B What do you think for ordinary people the most effective media to get news is? Whether all people wil1 be interested in national or international news in your country.

your work. what would you do? Describe the process of getting a job in your country.id you go to a co-educational school? What was your favourite subject as a child? Who was your favourite teacher? What is the education system like in your country? Do you think your country has an effective education system? STUDIES What are you studying now? What is your area of specialization? HOMETOWN 69 . FAMILY • • • • • • Describe your family? Do you have a large or small family? How much time do you spend with your family? What do you like to do together as a family? Do you get along well with your family? Are people in your country generally close to their families? WORK • • • • • • • • • • • What do you do? What are your responsibilities? How many hours do you work each day? Do you enjoy your work? Is there some other kind of work you would rather do? If you could change your job or profession. your family. What kind of school did you go to as a child? D. clearly. and with ease and confidence in response to each question. so review them well. You can use these sample questions to rehearse for this part of the oral interview. What is your position? What do you like about your job? What do you dislike about your job? EDUCATION . Make sure you can speak correctly. • • • • • • • • Describe your education. your education or other familiar topics..Part 1 of the IEl TS Speaking Module consists of personal questions about you. Remember to make your answer interesting by providing more than the most basic information. Describe the company or organization you work for. A categorized list of such topics and questions is given below. Some of these sample questions are highly likely to appear on your exam. YOU Describe yourself.

What sort if gifts do people buy for the bridal couple? What kind of clothes did the bride and groom wear? • • • • COMPUTERS Do you like to travel? What kind of places have you visited in your life? Which place would you really like to visit? Why? What's the best place you've ever visited? • • • Do you think computers help society? Do you think computers are bad for health? How do you think computers have changed the world? 70 . What's special about it? Where is your hometown located? Is it easy to travel around your hometown? What is it known for? What do people in your town do? What are the main industries in your hometown? What problems face your hometown? What languages are spoken in your hometown? What are the advantages of living in your hometown? What are some problems faced by your hometown? Compare your hometown with another city. What are some environmental problems faced by your hometown? • • • • • • • What's the weather like in your country? Does the weather affect your mood? How do rainy days make you feel? What's your favourite season of the year? What do you like to do when it's hot? What do you usually do in the winter? How many seasons does your country have? HOME • • • WEDDING Describe your home. What kind of building do you live in? How long have you lived there? • • • • • • • TRAVEL Have you ever been to a wedding? Whose wedding was it? Where was it held? What clothes do people wear? Describe the wedding ceremony.• • • • • • • • • • • • • WEATHER Describe your hometown.

How long have you known each other? What do usually do together? What do you like the most about him I her? How often do you see each other? • • • • • SMOKING Describe a place you like to go. Why is this place special to you? When did you first visit this place? Where is this place located? What language is spoken here? Do you speak this language? • • MARRIAGE What do you feel about smoking in public places? Do you think smoking should be banned in people's homes? • • • • • • What is the attitude toward marriage in your country? Do most young people plan on getting married in your country? What are some of the advantages of marriage? .INTERNET • • • • • • Do you use the Internet much during the day? What do you usually do on the Internet? What are some advantages of the Internet? What are some disadvantages? Do people in your country use the Internet a lot? Do you do any shopping on the Internet? \ EMAIL • • • • Do you send and receive email regularly? Who do you usually communicate with? How often do you check your email? . What are some of the disadvantages? Is the divorce rate high in your country? Do you think people should be allowed to get divorced? HOBBIES • • • Do you have any hobbies? What are some of your hobbies? When did you first develop tis hobby? 71 . Do you think writing email has strengthened or weakened people's writing skills? What are some disadvantages of email? • FRIEND • • • PLACE • Describe a friend.

What's your favourite sport/ When did you first become interested in sports? How often do you participate in sports? What equipment do you need for your favourite sport? FOOD • • • • What are some of your favourite foods? What foods are popular in your country? What are some of the famous dishes of your country? Do you enjoy cooking? FESTIVAL • • • • • • TELEVISION What's the most important festival in your country? How do people celebrate this festival? What special food is associated with this festival? What special activities are associated with this festival? What do you enjoy most about this festival? Do you think festivals are important for a society? • • • • • Do you watch television a lot? What do you usually watch on television? How many hours of television do you usually watch? What are the most popular shows in your country? What kind of shows do you like to watch? 72 .• • FILMS What are some of the advantages of having a hobby? How much time do you spend on your hobby? • • • SHOPPING • Do you enjoy watching movies? What's your favourite film? Who are your favourite actors? How often do you watch films? • • • • • • Do you enjoy shopping? How do you feel about shopping? Do you like shopping on the Internet?' f. Do you have any favourite stores? What don't you like about shopping? Which is the most popular place to shop in your hometown? SPORTS • • • • • • • • Do you like sports? Do you enjoy watching sports? Do you enjoy participating in any sports? Which sports are most popular in your country? .

What do you usually do? What do you do on the weekend? What is you typical weekday like? Does your life change much from week to week? Do you have any free time during the week? CLOTHES • • • • • • • What type of clothes do you like to wear? What kind of clothes do people in your country usually wear? How important is fashion to you? What kind of clothes do you dislike? Do you think people behave differently in different kinds of clothes? What kind of clothes do people wear to work in your country? Are clothes expensive in your country? GOING OUT • • • • • • Do you like going out or staying at home? What do you like to do when you go out? How often do you go out? Do people in your country go our a lot? How and where do people in your country usually socialize? What kind of entertainment is popular in your country? GAMES 73 . What do you usually do? What do you do on the weekend? What is you typical weekday like? Does your life change much from week to week? Do you have any free time during the week? YOUR COUNTRY • • • • • • Describe your daily routine.• • • • TOURISM What are some advantages of television? What are someof the disadvantages of television? What did you last watch on television? Why do you think certain TV shows are so popular? • • • • • • Which places would you recommend to a visitor to your country? Do a lot of tourists visit your country? What do they usually do there? How has tourism changed your country? Is your country expensive for most tourists? What are some famous landmarks in your country? DAILY ROUTINE • • • • • • Describe your daily routine.

should their parents accept responsibility and also be punished? 74 . or was life better when technology was simpler? • Does travel help to promote understanding and communication between countries? • If children behave badly .• • • • • • • • Do you enjoy playing any games? What kind of games do you play? Do you think adults should play games? What do children learn from games? What kind of games did you play when you were a child? What games are popular in your country today? What kind of games were popular when you were young? Do you think mental games like chess are good for you? COLOURS Do you have a favourite colour? What are your country's colours? Do you think colours affect our moods? Can you learn anything about a person from the colours he I she likes? Do you like the same colours now as you did when you were a child? • • • MUSIC • • • • • • • • • • • • Do you like music? What kind of music do you like? When do you usually listen to music? What kind of music did you like when you were younger? What kind of music is popular in your country? Do you play any musical instruments? Do you wish you could play any musical instruments? Which is your favourite instrument? Most high level jobs are done by men. • Are famous people treated unfairly by the media? Should they be given more privacy. or is the price of their fame an invasion into their private lives? • Should developing countries concentrate on Improving industrial skills or should they promote education first? • Safety standards are important when building people's homes. Who should be responsible for enforcing strict building codes .the government or the people who build the homes? • Does modern technology make life more convenient. Should the government encourage a certain percentage of these jobs to be reserved for women. or was life better when technology was simpler? • In your opinion what factors contribute to a good movie? • Does modern technology make life more .convenient.

People who wish to migrate to the west including Canada are required to clear IELTS with requisite band score. Ireland. IELTS offers a maximum of 9-band score. Reading. Test structure Candidates are tested in Listening. at the discretion of the test center. which stands---fol:. Writing and Speaking. Total test time is 2 hours 45 minutes. Agree or disagree? 16 Aug 2003 (Academic) Language and culture are respected less in comparison with the past. Discuss.Pattern Section Listening Reading Writing Speaking Number of Question 40 40 2 Tasks 10 Questions Time 30 Minutes 60 Minutes 60 Minutes 15 Minutes In the listening module students are expected to listen to conversations & talks and answer the questions. The tests are designed to cover the full range of ability from non­ user to expert user. Task two: With the advent of computers the role of teachers are going to be faded in classrooms. by gender in UK in four consequent different years in 20th century.Listening. New Zealand. Canada. UK.must be completed in one day. of course. The test fee is around Rs 7.9 Aug 2003 (Academic) Task one: A table showing the increasing number of elderly aged more than 100. Task2: As computers are more and more used in education. The first three modules.600/-. IELTS is conducted by two autonomous organizations namely: The British Council and IDP Australia. which follow. the speaking test looks like an interview between the examiner and the candidate where the examiner assesses the proficiency of 75 . in the period seven days before or after the other Modules. Coaching IELTS IELTS. some people argue that in future there will be no role for teachers. Agree or Disagree? OR Taskl: A table with 12 numbers giving information about UK residents who are aged over 100 between 1941 and 2001. In the reading section the test takers are expected to read the passage and answer the questions on the grounds of what is stated directly or implied. Do you agree or disagree? 25th March 2004 (mine) Some people say all these advertisements are making people buy things they donot really need. Australia. Reading and Writing. The speaking module may be taken.-lntemational English Language Testing System is a test mandatory for students aspiring to study in most of the countries such as USA. In the writing section they are expected to write essays on the task given. IELTS .

To avoid the disaster of missing a whole task they decide to write on a slightly . Every so often a student is asked to write on topic. that he doesn't understand. Longer essay doesn't mean better mark. More is less. Writing a long essay can indirectly cost marks.the candidate in terms of fluency. It sounds ridiculously simple.the success in IELTS test largely depends on students' ability to follow the instructions. Another common misconception is that longer essays score better in IELTS. Less is less. Every point 1. the wrong topic means zero score. vocabulary. I cannot stress this enough . it means that any work shorter than required will be penalized. So here is a list of 8 most famous IELTS pitfalls that cost test takers precious points. 76 . answering in 4 or more words will definitely cost marks. Idioms • Answer while you listen Reading • • • • • Long passages Dry content Technical Jargon Time Hurdles Peculiar Question Models Writing • • • • Two tasks Ability to describe. . What you should know about the sections Listening • British Accent • . and yet it is a common mistake to underestimate the importance of following the instructions precisely. A very common mistake is to answer in more words than instructed. analyze & argue over Standard format Parameters of evaluation Speaking • • • • One to one interview Don't give one-word answers Be fluent in speech Extremely important for a good band score.or entirely different topic. IELTS is a paper based test and can be taken according to the test dates announced. because the chances of making mistakes increase with the number of words and sentences. The sad fact is that 1:10 matter how beautiful the submitted work is. Changing the subject is unacceptable. The length of a written task is crucial. accent etc. 3. 2. 4. Not only is this a myth. but also a dangerous one. 150 for report or letter). When instructions mention a minimal number of words (250 for essay. If the task says "Not more than 3 words". Another similar pitfall is to omit parts of the given topic or ignore the guidelines in your work.

Pronunciation is. This is a terrible mistake to make because the examiners are trained to look for memorized essays and have firm instructions to disqualify such works on the spot. a word of advice: to stay out of trouble.5. the topic refers to needs to be covered because the examiners will be actually counting iliem. right? Wrong. The Speaking test is recorded. Good memory can get you in trouble. After the candidate's talk the examiner will ask 1 or 2 brief questions in order to finish off the section. The problem here is that not everyone knows the difference between speaking with an accent and mispronouncing the words. which is easily recognized and penalized by the examiners. the words are to be pronounced correctly or it will cost marks.4 minutes) 77 . (3 . Connective words: the more is not always the better. THE IELTS ACADEMIC SPEAKING TEST TUTORIAL The IELTS Academic Speaking test is the shortest of the components of the IELTS test­ only 11 to 14 minutes. 8. but the way they are described in. it is the way they are expressed in that important. . it is equally important to be aware of the pitfalls and to practice enough before the exam. The Speaking Test is divided into 3 sections: Section 1 Section 1 begins with some general introductory questions. letter or discussion) can harm their score. The student must talk for 1 to 2 minutes on this subject. In this short time you have to convince the examiner who will be speaking with you of your level of English. Accent is not important. 6. (4 . The test is conducted with 1 examiner and 1 candidate. The examiner will give the candidate a card with a subject and a few guiding questions on it. Overuse of connective words is a know problem. Having seen that the topics sometimes repeat.! IELTS. Being familiar with the structure and the procedure of the test will build up confidence and that will reflect in your score.and is provided with some paper and a pencil in order to make some brief notes. It is not the ideas that are important. being a test for non-native English speakers can't penalize people for having an accent. Finally the examiner asks a series· of questions of2 topics of general interest. The truth is that no idea can be wrong and the ideas are not important on their own. and what better way is there to demonstrate cohesion than to use lots of connective words. 7. No matter how strong of an accent a person has.5 minutes) Section 2 Section 2 is a monologue (1 person speaking) by the candidate. "smart" students with good memory decide to memorize essays. The student has an optional 1 minute in order to prepare for his talk . Smart students know that one of the essay marking criteria are coherence and cohesion. Many students think that expressing the wrong ideas (whether it is in essay. The IELTS Academic Speaking Test is the same for both the Academic and General Training modules. And in conclusion. The examiner decides on the exact length. This is followed by some questions on personal information similar to the type of questions one would ask when meeting someone for the first time.

To get a good grade here. logically and with consistency? Do you communicate well? Lexical Resource: This mark grades the range of words that you use in your speaking test and whether you use the words in the right way. the question is more likely to be: Why do you like living in your town? Here the candidate has to give an explanation and therefore the examiner hears plenty of English which will help him or her evaluate you. (4 . All the questions will be open questions rather than closed questions. sex or religion. your accuracy at producing them and whether you use the right structure at the 78 . An open question asks the candidate to give an extended answer. Fluency and Coherence: The examiner grades your fluency. Marking ·IELTS Academic Speaking Test Marks.5 minutes) Question Types The types of questions that come in the IELTS Academic Speaking Test are very general in nature and are designed so that anyone around the world. Grammatical Range and Accuracy and Pronunciation. Let's look at these areas in more detail. The questions will not be overly personal and wiJI avoid contentious subjects such as politics. at the right time and in the right place.Section 3 Here the examiner will ask some more questions generally related to the subject spoken about in section 2. and so have the opportunity to show how good his English is. you get a mark out of 9. Bands and Results In the IELTS Academic Speaking Test you will be marked in 4 areas. A closed question is one that can be answered by a single word or a couple of words. These 4 areas are: Fluency and Coherence. For Pronunciation you get a 2. Does your flow of ideas run smoothly. Lexical Resource. So. the examiner looks at how easy you are to understand. any gaps in your speaking should be associated with searching for the right idea rather than hesitancy with finding the right word or structure. For the coherence part. should be able to answer them. Finally an average is taken to give you your final band for the Speaking. which is how easy. Any answers like this will just be followed by the question why? so you have to extend your answer (what you should have done after the "yes" anyway). These questions will be more demanding and require some critical analysis on the part of the candidate.4. Anyway.6 or 8. smooth and flowing your speaking is. For the first 3. you will not get a question like: Do you like living in your town? A student could just answer yes. regardless of what background or culture they come from. Grammatical Range and Resource: This mark grades your range of grammatical structures.

the speaking gets more difficult as it goes on. Section 3 (4 . This does not mean that by Section 3 they are impossible but they are more demanding linguistically. These questions are the type that people would use when meeting someone for the first time. The speaking test is no different and each of the sections has a specific purpose. The questions that are asked in Section 1 are easier than in Section 2 and so on. The examiner will hand you a card with the subject written on it. Section 1 (4 . Pronunciation: This mark grades you on how clearly you speak English. the IELTS test always tries to mirror situations that you will encounter as a student or immigrant in an English speaking country. iii) In the third part the examiner chooses 2 sets of questions from his selection. You can refer to your notes while you are speaking.4 minutes) In this section the candidate has to give a small "speech" or monologue on a general subject chosen by the examiner. i) The first part involves general introductions. After he has asked you to stop. This should last for a couple ofminutes.5 minutes) In Section 3 the examiner will ask you a series of questions thematically linked to the subject that you spoke about in Section 2. he may ask you 1 or 2 general questions about what you have been discussing. Like all the different modules of the IELTS. ii) In the second part the examiner asks some personal (not too personal so don't worry) questions about some familiar topics such as yourself. The examiner will then tell you that you have 1 minute to prepare your mini-talk and he or she will give you some paper and a pencil to make some notes during that minute.right time and in the right place. This is the area that worries the candidates the most as it is the dreaded grammar. This only takes a few seconds. the examiner will ask you to start talking and you must talk on the subject until the examiner asks you to stop. The Three Sections of the IELTS Academic Listening Test Here we will look at the three sections in more detail. along with about three questions on the subject in order to guide and help your speaking. You cannot ask the examiner for another card.5 minutes) This section is divided into three parts. Here the examiner checks that he or she has the right person by checking the candidates name. your family. You must use the one that he gives you. your home or your work/study. Section 2 (3 . origin and identification. Remember it is only 1 part out of 4. These sets of questions will cover general ideas on a theme of general interest. After the minute. Remember. These questions will be of a more demanding 79 .

smile and look the examiner in the eye. Similarly. Different people can talk about different questions more and the examiner knows this. The examiner understands that and will try and put you at ease. You have to talk. First of all practice. If an examiner has to talk with someone who doesn't talk much. You can still make some errors and get a 9 (not many errors though). But be friendly. Don't try and force more out as it will probably be strained and repetitive. Try and give as full an answer as you can so that you show the examiner that you are comfortable at talking at length and can communicate welL Don't do this to extremes though. Don't try and be too clever. He will mOle get a general impression of your English accuracy so individual errors don't matter: More important is your communication. The examiner will expect some mistakes ­ after all. You can't duck out of every question though . When you are in the test. finished and will give you the next question. Don't worry about the occasional mistake. If the bands for a candidate's writing 80 . say so and then say what you do know. This is done so that. Perfection is not needed. Just try and talk normally as that is when you will perform at your best. This has a big effect on the examiner. doesn't smile at all and who clearly doesn't want to be there.nature and will require a more analytical and thoughtful answer. It makes a difference. Being nervous is fine. the speaking can be re-marked. One thing that puts candidates off is that the Speaking test is recorded. the examiner can't grade you very well. You will also probably need to use more complex language as regards grammatical structure and vocabulary.the responsibility is on you to talk. Try and be friendly and look as though you are enjoying the conversation. If you try and extend yourselftoo much. How to do Better in the IELTS Academic Speaking Test There are a number of things you can do to have a better performance in the IELTS Academic Speaking Test. If you don't know much about something. So don't let making errors upset you. The examiner is not making a note of every single mistake that you make. Without your talking input. This would be impossible to do and concentrate on your speaking. then it has a negative effect on the examiner. Get on with the talking and concentrate on your communication. you won't be able to answer all questions at length. the examiner will give you another question. Below you will find a separate section devoted to practising the speaking. if necessary. English is a foreign language for you and people make mistakes in speaking foreign languages. The examiner will see that you have . This is the key to all the different modules of IELTS. then that is when you will make the most errors. When you're finished. When you have finished what you have to say stop.

Do this again and again. full answers. Try and come up with about 20. family and work/study. Sample recordings are also sent to the IELTS administration to be monitored to make sure that examiners are doing a good job and assigning the correct bands. them in 2 ways: i) Get a friend to ask you the questions and practice giving long. You don't have to do either method i or ii. home. Section 1 In section 1 you start with personal questions such as about yourself. you can mix both. How many he asks depends on how long you talk for in your answers. your home or your work/study. ii) If you don't have a friend who can do this. Let's say for example that the theme the examiner chooses is travelling. Then. These are not complicated but are more demanding than the ones that you did in the part before. You can do this sat at home. then you can do it by yourself. You just look at your list and imagine that someone has asked you the question. the better you'll get. your family. you'll probably get a why next anyway. talking by yourself. It gives a bad impression. Don't give yes/no answers unless you continue with a because. but it works and you will improve. try and forget that the recorder is there and get on with answering the questions. Practice As in all parts of the IELTS. It may feel a bit strange at first. as you will give better and better answers with more and more information. then this could not be done. You can then practice .and speaking for instance are very different. So. It all helps. It doesn't matter if you do the same question frequently. If you do give a yes/now answer. The examiner will have a set of questions to ask you. There are various things that you can do to improve your performance. you can talk to the cat. This doesn't happen very often. Don't forget your ID! You need it at the start of the test. The more often you practice this. the mirror or do it driving on the way to work. Then sit down with a piece of paper and write down every question you can think of about these ideas. If the speaking was not recorded. The first question could be: 81 . Prepare the types of questions for each of the different sections. sit down with your dictionary and try and think of all the vocabulary you would need to completely describe all parts of your life. then the candidate's test is re-checked. In the second part of Section 1 you have to answer questions on themes of general interest. off you go. So. this is the one thing that will really improve your band.

Speaking for this time in your own language is quite hard. Then practice them with someone or by yourself. • So. Talk at a normal speed. The practice procedure is as before. So. I have done this with classes and it works very well. how do you get better at it? By practising it again and again. The reason it is hard is that you don't often talk uninterrupted for 1 to 2 minutes about anything. you can start to make your own examples and practice answering them in the ways (i and ii) above. Check out other question types and soon you're be able to develop your own. The follow up question to end Section 2 is not so important that it needs to be practiced as it only requires a few words as an answer. Soon. you can see the format of this section. talking for 2 minutes without stopping won't be a problem. You should say: • • • When you first went there. Let's say that your task is as follows: Describe a favourite holiday destination that you like. whether it is in your language or English. And explain why this place is so special for you.You have to talk for 1 to 2 minutes in English. more often than not. come up with actual themes and questions from the test itself!! Section 2 Preparation and practice for Section 2 is similar to the practice in Section I. so in a foreign language it is harder. Once you have an idea of the types oftheme and question. Remember you don't have to talk fast or without breaks.Do you enjoy traveling and why/why not? Then this could be followed by: Where would you like to travel to and why? You can find other sample themes and questions in IELTS Practice Now Question Papers and from other sources. What you do when you're there. They want you to talk normally. How you get there. An example question from the examiner for the subject above could be: liDo you think 1 would enjoy a holiday in this place too?" The candidate would just be expected to say something like: 82 . pause to take breaths and take time to consult your notes to give yourself ideas about what to talk about next. Students doing this.

. The examiner will ask you questions that are thematically linked to the subject that you talked about in Section 2. Someone starting straight away does not get any advantage at allover someone who takes the full minute to prepare.) and then 3 mini-questions following (Say when you first went there. If You can see that nothing very long is required. Before you begin your monologue. At this point I'd like to explain about the I minute preparation time and the notes that you can write during it. Use your time. you will have 1 minute to prepare for it. So. You could be saying why the place is so special to you. so that they will remind you about things to talk about when you look at your notes during your talk. maybe make a note of something from your own experience connected to the talking theme. you could be just finishing and still have 45 seconds left to talk. The main thing is that it's keeping you talking. it asks you to talk about these things so you should talk about them. if you have time. how you get there what you do when you're there -au<fexplain why this place is so special for you). " The subject of your story doesn't matter as you are still on the subject of your talk. These questions are here to help you as they give you ideas to talk about and give your talk a bit of structure. Finally. It might be too hot for you. don't try and write out your whole talk word for word. what should you write in your notes? First of all. I think so. For example." Or: "Maybe not. Very often these people will dry up early and be at a loss about how to continue. use your preparation time and make notes.. When you are talking about something from your own experience. Section 3 Section 3 rea]]y carries on from where Section 2 left off. However. I was in a restaurant having some food and . First of all. In your notes quickly jot down one or two ideas for each of the questions. it is easier to talk at length. You could say: "Actually why I like the place so much is shown from something that happened to me the last time I was there. Some people think that they don't need the time at all and will start straight away. Looking at the question above (which is a typical layout for this section) you can see that there is a main question (Describe a favourite holiday destination that you like. 83 ."Oh yes. You don't have enough time. for the question above. As you run out of ideas you could give an example out of your own experience.

For example. Tourism • • Can you predict any major changes that could happen in the Tourist Industry over the next 50 years? Can you compare the tourist industry in your country today with the tourist industry when your grandparents were young?Can you identify some of the factors that have led to the Industry success of the airline industry? Airline • • Can you suggest any ways in which air travel could be made safer? You can see that the questions here are more analytical and require more thought than the questions in the previous sections. the examiner might choose to ask you questions about tourism and the airline industry. You need to get someone to do the questions with you. or do them alone and then develop your own questions and practice with them. None of the questions will be of a technical nature or require any specialist knowledge as that would be unfair. work hard and good luck with the IELTS Academic Speaking Test. but you will be expected to give your opinion on what is asked you.com Practice Tests also provide practice and often we provide much fuller examples. As regards practice. let's look at some examples. Our tests are also at least half the price! The choice is yours. ieltshelpnow. 84 . The examiner will have a set of questions to ask you. I hope that this free tutorial has helped you. the procedure is as in the previous sections. Below are links to the other free IELTS academic tutorials. So. for the question we looked at above about a holiday destination. How many he asks depends on how long you talk for in your answers. Anyway.

Try to be as helpful and willing to talk as you can. The Speaking Sub-test is a formal interview.wv~ probably heard or been told by your English teacher that the examiner uses what is calJed - The examiner is expecting to talk to a positive.ample. However. ". (See also IELTS Test Basic Hint 3. but not too relaxed! Remember that the speaking part of the IELTS test is the same for Academic and General Training Module candidates and is formal in style. The recording is made to ensure that the examiner conducts the interview properly. You might be interested to know that the introduction ofstandard sets ofquestions on various topics 85 .SPEAKING TEST HINTS BE PREPARED AND TRY TO RELAX You should be on time and prepared for the interview. A frame is simply a set of pre-determined questions on a topic. Also. He or she must follow a strict set of questions that is determined in advance of your test. aim to create an intelligent impression. With your body. for ex. BE WILLING TO TALK. For example. and you are asked what you think of that country.}:. Body Janguage is also important. Does this mean you can find out from other students who have previously taken the test what the questions are going to be in your test? Unfortunately. AND BE POSITIVE Do not simply reply yes or no to a question and wait for the next one. the examiner cannot talk to you freely.even if you believe it to be true! Y01l. but he or she will only ask the questions in the chosen frame. In Part 3 the examiner can talk with less restriction. In order to present yourselfin the best way possible you should try to sound positive about your past. present and future.) Remember to have your passport with you to show to the examiner for identification. You should aim to be talking for at least 75-80% of the time. The examiner is there to guide you as to whatto say and will do as little ofthe talking as possible. Candidates sometimes think that absolute honesty is always necessary. it is unwise to say that you think it is terrible . the examiner will ask a few questions about your background. In Parts 1 & 2 of the test. not an ordinary conversation. this is not possible! The use of frames does not mean that alJ students hear exactly the same set ofquestions. Do not worry about the interview being recorded. The examiner is provided with a list of standardised questions to ask you. Remember. Sit comfortably and try to show with your body that you are relaxed. intelligent and courteous candidate THE EXAMINER FRAME a "frame" from which to ask you questions. if you are studying in a foreign country. this test is your opportunity to speak. Firstimpressionsare very important. in order to first getto know you. and is not used to test your English. aim to create a relaxed impression. and will conduct the interview in a manner that you might not be used to if you have not had some previous practice. In fact. there are many frames from which the examiner can choose questions. take advantage of every question to show that you are an interesting and informed person. and by what you say. You should always reply with an answerthat is informative and as interesting as possible.

Formal IELTS interview Question: Answer: Wbere. Lexical Resource (Do you use a reasonably wide range o/vocabulary in your speech?) 3. stress and intonation patterns etc. especially in Parts I & 2 of the test. Answer the questions in full when they are given to you . Simple answers. In general. you know . Fluency and Coherence . It's in the north. However..(Does your speech flow? Can you be easily understood?) 2. correctly?) Your final Band Score for the Speaking Sub-test is the average of these four scores. you should know that the examiner is giving you a score out of9 in four areas ofspeaking ability: I. however. it is essential to understand that the standardisation of questions means that your answering technique is very important (see Speaking Hint 86). MAKE GOOD USE OF THE QUESTIONS ASKED If the situation 'was an ordinary conversation. but this is not an ordinary conversation. it would be perfectly reasonable to answer some of the questions with a short one or two word answer. In this case the candidate has given a briefbut satisfactory answer that makes full use ofthe question asked. do not mean one-word answers. the examiner cannot ask flI$er questions to find out what you should have told him or her in the first place. do not fall into the trap of trying to impress with large words and complex explanations. Ordinary conversation Question: Answer: Question: Where do you come from? Germany.(Do you use English sounds. Hamburg. In addition. Although you do not have to concern yourself about where the questions come from. this will prevent you from showing the examiner how well you can speak and require the examiner to move on to the next question too soon. Pronunciation . itis better to give simple and accurate answers than complex. Grammatical Range and Accuracy . Which part of Germany? Notice that the questioner has asked a second question to get more detail.do you come from? Germany. But actually I live about 15 kilometres out of town .for all candidates means the accuracy of your assessment is further guaranteed.on a small farm.. inaccurate answers. and hesitation does not help your overall Band Score. A complicated answer is not necessarily better than a simple and concise answer because you can easily become lost for words! The examiner is listening for a level of fluency.(Do you use English grammar properly when you speak?) 4. Remember. a very busy city with a population of over one and half million people.you are unlikely to get a second chance to answer them 86 .

. but now I live in .. Recently.. so you should have already prepared answers to some basic questions about yourself. CD ~ -~~~~~--. 2 Do not shake hands with the examiner as if your extended band were a cold wet fish! 3 Answer the questions you are asked clearly and in some detail (using at least two or three sentences).. Remember. The requirements for effective performance in Part 1 are that you: • introduce yourself in a relaxed. Your grammar practice should take pJace in the classroom or at horne. friendly manner • produce basic information about yourself simply... I've been I study. Before that I I studied worked I've been studying English now for (1 year) ... 4 Do not wait for another question . you some basic "getting to know you" questions. PART 1.. 2 If the examiner offers to shake your hand. Requirements You will certainly be asked general questions about your background. return his or her handshake firmly. •. and imagine the questions a stranger might ask you based on what you have written. .. I was born in .. your home or your family> your job or your studies.. 5 Make sure you have practised well enough before the test so./ Show the examiner you are confident ---"-_. or blink your eyes and move about too much. 4 Show that you are in control by talking freely about yourself and your past....#MilI... that the past tenses you use are accurately formed and appropriate..". . and as fluently as possible • present yourself as a person who is willing to talk and has interesting things to say about himself or herseJf. but I've been living in (your host country) for (periodojtime)? I am very dose to my family... I corne from ..the examiner wants you to answer each question in fuU. working I I at . Pat1i is mainly concerned with who you are.ing working I at . For practice. what you have done. study~g I at .. INTRODUCTION & INTERVIEW (4-5 minutes) . accurately.. You can see that I'm (nationality) .. Ask your partner to ask As you can see. 87 . but fluency is just as important. write a short description of your present situation. CD Suggested "Opening" Words and Phrases @ Practise using the phrases and sentences below with the help of a partner.. although I don't live with them any longer.. and your interests CD What To Do and What Not To Do ..._--­ siiiiliiig -and looking him or her in x Do not tell the examiner that you are nervous. 5 Do not be afraid to correct yourself if you make a grammatical mistake.. .-. At the moment I'm .. . 3 Do not cut the interview questions short with one-word or very short answers.

'c':"i. Could yon retlealtUlieQtue:stl(] . @ Common questions might include: Where do you live? Do you live by yourself or with your family? Who do you share with? >Js it a nice place? What's it like? Are you here in (your host country) alone or . If current work or study does not apply to you.]up. you are! . is your family with you? Do you like living in (your host country)? .. sure .G Part 1 . ' .. that could be of interest to the examiner. Try to think ofyourself. ofcourse. including the IELTS. The examiner wishes to find out some general background infonnation about you.:. if you are unsure ofthe question or how to answer .let the examiner guide you. ~'V"'HL"'~"" sure how to answeTthat question.:\ Do not take too long to answer each question at this stage . Again. but (oe:r..hflt!S:)..h".r"t.. but be ready to answer these or similar questions clearly and willingly. Do you have any brothers and ~jsters? "~. and your home and family is a good place to start. If not."'. i.make sure that you are prepared to talk about what interests you and what you do in your spare time. then talk briefly about how you began to learn English and the school in which you studied.f.~olUur Jobs and/or Studies If you have a job (or have had a job in the past).. You should sense when he or she wants to move on to the next question.aCIJIV. . someone special .~?: " . . . whatyou . '..mean. Other Familiar Topic Areas Refer to the Speaking Game on page 152 for more topic ideas for Part 1. What do your parents do? • You will probably not be asked all ofthese questions. _ Suggested Words and Phrases Jl}\110I'eX. "' --~Y. .Background Information Topic Areas: Your Home and Family Questions about this topic are fairly common in all English test interviews... Your Interests Most students have interesting hobbies or activities that they enjoy doing .you are probably engaged in study or can talk about your English course.which. Show as much interest in your own answers as the examiner does listening to the answers you give. difficultquestion~ but(mayoe) I can.:.u'""". if you cannot think of what else to say 88 .e. and sound like.tnir'i·+". make yourself sound as if you are the only person in the world who does these exciting things. . it does not matter ... Remember to smile! ":: ' . what is their profession or work siail.

X Do not digress. and be prepared to answer a couple of questions at the end. the topic might not be immediately clear.) 3 Be aware ofhow long you have been talking by practising with a wristwatch before you do the test.with no help from the examiner for at least one minute and up to 2 minutes Remember. The best approach is to read the card quickly from beginning to end. CD Part 2 .if you have time . (See Speaking Hint 94. (See Speaking Hint 94. but the topic is given in the very first sentence./ Use your preparation time to think about your answer think only about what is written on the c(lfd.What To Do in the Minute of Silence When the examiner hands you the card yourone minute's preparation time has begun. But some candidates may wish to ask the examiner for notepaper to write on.IJIIW PART 2. Read the card carefully. 3 Do not be afraid to correct a grammatical mistake.a topic which is usually easy for you to find things to talk about.) 4 Make sure you have answered all that is required on the card. but fluency is just as important as grammar. Think ofthings to say about each ofthe instructions in the remaining time you have. and you are wise to do so . noting what the topic is. Since there is no title on the card'. • the use ofcard titles in the Speaking Test Game 00 page 152 is for ease of use in the game 89 . 4 Do not expect the examiner to give you feedback on how well you performed in your talk. Although you are allowed to make notes (and refer to them in your answer). and then go back to the first specific instruction after the topic sentence. 2 Do not hesitate for too long in your answer. and all the items of information required are expected to be referred to in your answer. You can certainJy add extra infonnation if you think it is appropriate. unless you have practised this approach.~ __ 2 Organise your reply by fol1owing the order of the instructions given on the card. You will see that there are a number of instructions to follow. The requirements for effective performance in Part 2 are that you: • talk in some detail about the topic referred to on the card you are given • try give an organised answer by following the instructions written on the card • keep talking about the topic . that is.so aim to speak for 30 seconds on each one. INDIVIDUAL LONG TURN (3-4 minutes) G Requirements You will know that Part 2 has begun when the examiner asks you to talk in some detail about a particular topic . and too much correction will make it hard for yOll to be understood. Part 2 is concerned with your ability to speak with little or no hesitation and in some detail about a simple topic 41 What To Do and What Not To Do . It is better to speak about anything than not to speak at all! . do not talk of things which are not directly related to the topic on the card.provided that you do not digress (speak "off' or away from the topic). Note that you are only asked to talk about one topic. it is probably best to spend your time thinking rather than writing. There are usually 3 or 4 instructions to speak about .

Ql~!!$.-..:f?...Jf..-.i.il.fJip.'~q$. practise.l?!jg!lt? ••••••.I~f: .f?t... You can look quickly at your watch in the test itself.tl!!$~ the location of the city or town ...~t~tJ.. so aim to finish within that period of time.?JlntJ.. ~lilfln.rR9....f? 90 . Note also that there are 4 further instructions that follow (there may be more or less). ••...­ gn.....filfltIJ...tm!{£!••••••••.q. what makes that city or town special to you and to others ~~I}~ gt... Then move on to the next instruction.~... Become accustomed to speaking for approximately 30 seconds on one instruction.Wf!tt?!.. Q..tQ. . mflf/..tl]~..c!fl..£!!:n?rjg{JI.. If you speak for about 30 seconds on each of these 4 instructions. ... When you get better at "feeling" how long you take to speak about parts of the main topic.9fll{f?.. what specifically can you talk about? Look at a breakdown of the above topic: §Y."".•.Q!!C..P. you can approach the entire answer in.••.Q!!$li•••.• the part of the city or town you are most familiar with !p'y'~lJ. and making sure you have included all parts of the answer within two minutes.tm~tf?.. The examiner mayor may not stop you talking after two minutes..tt. ~T)J:J.filL..~£!~tr. you will have spoken for about 2 minutes .l~!9fl. kf.. .-.QI}~y'..A Sample Topic Card: Describe a city or a town that you know well.. Notice that the topic is there in the very first sentence.1}. It is much better to practise recognising how long 30 seconds "feels". and what makes that city or town special to you and to others. practise. You should include in your answer: the location of the city or town the part of the city or town you are most familiar with important landmarks and places to visit .: .tJ..{ilf~. iln« ktJ. important landmarks and places to visit gtQ.$P.~.that is. ...liy. f9. . and time yourselfon each part ofthe topic. a similar way . Of course.. Do not speak for longer than 2 minutes. so jf you have difficulty speaking for that length of time you will have to practise.. Try using a wristwatch..lnfl.... tmf#dwlJ•... /Wnnr..JjJ!t{f]g$.~..l!§{J"••J:I.IJ..which is more than adequate. but we do not advise it..$lfil1/i. h€K9. g~[€!.tfJ§•.$.. P..l1m.€!9f!. ..l!!... by estimating how long you have spoken for. it is very important to speak for at least one minute.. kll!/il..{QR{c§.Q!!m~..E!.•.. So.l![..9J!tfJr.~1YJf:l.I:!9...9itY.£!..9P'!fJ.

The discussion is designed to: • make you think and comment about various issues (within a specific topic area) that concern people living in today's world • encourage you to give your opinions • extend your range of responses to include some or all of the following: .G AM' PART 3. This is much better than trying to impress with big words that you may use incorrectly. Although the questions and prompts in Part 3 are connected to the topic in Part 2.) The word "will" is often too definite to use to guess about things which. 3 If asked to talk about the future. (See Speaking Hint 99. effeCtive performance in Part 3 requires an ability to respond to questions and prompts about abstract ideas.describing in detail . 2 Do not worry if you cannot answer easily. 4 Use appropriate future forms and phrases to express the possibility ofa future situation occurring. may not happen.I Try to talk around a difficult question by speculating (guessing). If you get stuck and cannot continue. always attempt to answer a question as fully as possible and the best way you can.the point at which you cannot communicate easily (for lack of vocabulary or some other speaking skill). TWO-WAY DISCUSSION (4-5 minutes) Requirements Part 3 of the Speaking Sub-test is the most demanding. Although it is described as a two-way discussion.discussing situations as they were in the past imagining situations as they might be in the future Remember. The questions or prompts you must answer are linked to the topic you spoke about in Part 2. using simple words if you can to express complex ideas. do not overuse the word "will". the examiner might be able to help you if you say: "Can you ask the question in a different way?" 3 Use a variety of introductory phrases to begin expressing ~ opinion (see Speaking Hint 97). x Do not repeat the information you gave in the original talk you gave in Part 2. it is unlikely that information you gave then will be appropriate now. and is probably trying to find your "ceiling" . (See Speaking Hint 99. 2 It is not a good idea to just give up.) ED Introductory Phrases for Giving Opinions 91 . but they take the topic further away from you and your immediate life and into areas of more general interest. There are many ways to express the future in English.contrasting and comparing . you wiH be expected to do most of the talking. after all. The examiner is asking more difficult questions in Part 3.. • __~~! To Do and What Not To Do .

..~~~~. It is fine to memorise an answer for practice if it helps to speed up your English..:. I!earby. ':<:.on the east coast of AustraIia~a very mpdetri. ~e~\I~t~.ff. ' .1jo.it looks oometbjngJikeacJ~tlhai:iger~ and iti~usedVeryt:.5~~~~·'~~:!:S(¢:.rijied ~-li~pgpulatiol1. exI thinkitw~~huilt abou(JOOyearsagp..~l.1:::.isalwriyi:.tJJ..\.."· ..-hidst days .'{!:~'..especially for youngpe~pl~~ '•• . occurred what you (or the other person) could not do because of the problem .: . .~~. you would be very lucky to guess your topic before the test. r n1 going to talk about the city of Sydney . The answer is given in fairly simple English you should avoid giving a complex answer with difficult vocabulary.L:~-:"'<:>_" .. Then try giving a spoken answer from the notes you have made. ···.~~~'$}?~ :"""~'. .~" there are blue skic!> and sunshine .<"... .>.'.and. ".ffetH~elyat Xmas· lJ~and New Year to put 011 wonderful tlrework displays. '.:>:f .j(\. . peOple tend.like tliesai'IspfashilHfum adistailce. ) live in the inner-city .stryrHffi)·Wpi~f~e is ever. and why you enjoyed your holiday or not Describe a health problem you once had (or talk about someone else's problem)...t XU~lln oiher cities.'{ our answer should not only be interesting. It contains all the points written in note-fonn on the previous page..\....:. You should include in your answer: where you went on your holiday why you went to this particular place what you did aOd with whom .::t:'>.c'.busy in peak hour because just about everyone travels to workby car or \I'aili..d$ltY. but 1.Y\(\leirlives. '..'~':-~~'~ .people come from so many dif~erent bac~grOtin~~~Jj)Jnhere d~~h.. Increase your speaking speed by practising 'topic talking' daily and by improving your pronunciation.J. . '. and the bllroqur is reallYQ~etit.:W?ITY .··>:.TheAu. the speed at which you speak will also determine how much you are able to say.. Use the sample cards below and in the Speaking Test Game on page 152 to practise writing out an answerofsimilar length.._·.:::'. are many exciting things to see and do .' :_:.You might be able to make your talk sound more interesting by "lifting" your voice a little higher than when you speak normally More Sample Topic Cards t::\ ~ r-----------------­ Talk about a holiday you have taken recently or at some time in the past. '" ..because of this...:'..t~ it lo:Oks. . . The examiner will not be fooled by this approach! Besides._."C . '\::.~lhere arc lots of wide streets often Hned with trees... :'>....·}·· . Look at the following possible answer: .f:~~~~~:\·. .. ~~~ . but do not waste your time memorising large pieces of English to speak in the test.. and ask a teacher to check your work.ywher~~..th.the mostbeiiutiftl(siiWilf." what you (or the other person) had to do to get better 92 ..':~·.qi~. it should also be informative./·:. \j\I~hil1k it's the sense of space and freedom that people np.§~~i':"" -::~:.t?~ifiile a l?t~_th~y. .io. And'· Ji~\ili~Harbour Bridge is aho strange ...'" .. Perhaps peopJearetoo busy dreari)iiig ~boQi·tl1~beactf t~...S:y.. ..::::}Y." .s..'_ with a population of about rour and II half million inhabitants elf getsquitc.'..:..' . Cr . . '-: .a tall dty c skys¢ilp~tsetc.thi. You should mention: the nature of the health problem why the problem.:'''.i:IVcb¢cause there .:''. .cJean city ::.'.. .e)-veatheds i.k<1alas and kangaroos can only be'toundinihe zoo the~eday~(~j3~~!{USe. • {~~The Opera House is a favourite _><. >-)' .•. but many people live inrooi:lern apaI1mentbJQtk. Ofcourse. " . and is approximately the right length for a good answer.i!'squite •spacious.tlYti~ii:b.~..ti~eJirstwhenthey~~.' iiltl!irig." pJHce for tourists to visi..~titQfcourse.. ..iiJja~ii. but it rsa great piigelo.:".in a typical older style bUilding . -' • '". . Water... :.. with a beautiful harb()ur . . . ?'<' '. .

Practice Topics for Discussion: Since you cannot know what topic you will be asked to talk about in Part 2 of the Speaking Sub­ test.ppen).c.. especially if There's a good cbance that .~~~'j. (h(j..m".. arid try to sound authoritative. (something will/is going to happen) It's (always) possible that . The following possible discussion topics are for practice only: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Problems that affect your country Financial success and how to achieve it Poverty and hunger in the Thield World Crime and punishment Fashion and design Public transport Youth and the problems they face The role of television and radio in society The influence of the print media Current affajrs The changing nalure of family life Nuclear energy World economic solutions Diet.~)' coul0!Uway.. Then practise in English! f) Suggested Phrases for Speaking About The Future I'm certain that .. (something might happen) I hope that . Think about the situation as it might have been in the past. try it in your own language... (something happens or doesn't happen) ...}i:~~'t j.!. (something will happen) possibly I (may) er or not .. (htlppen). . which can be useful when asked to speculate about the possibility of something happening in the future. a 50-50 a reasonable little not much Note the inclusion of first conditional "if clauses"..kecomparisons..'rm. (happen) JUI. give opinions. (something) wiH eVen . and how things might become in the future...(haPP<illl{0'~' migbteven :....e Part 3 . the way things are now. health and exercise The consequences of global warming Recreational facilities in modem cities Future energy resources • • • • • • • • • • • • • • " • • The relevance of school examinations Materialism and the consumer Space travel Modem medicine Censorship and the Internet Types of governments in the world today Women in the workplace The qualities and skills of a good company manager The necessity of a strong defence force The advantages of an international language The design of modern cities The influence of sport'in society Street protests and individual rights Religion and the church in the modern world The pros and cons of living in a foreign country The meilJ)ing of happiness Living together. Ma. it follows that you cannot know in advance any particulars about the wider topic area that is discussed in Part 3... marriage and divorce When you first practise speaking about these topics. 93 . (something will/is going to happen) Most probably .

e

CONCLUDING THE INTERVIEW Requirements

When the examiner has finisQed the discussion in Part 3, the Speaking Sub-test has come to an end. The examiner will thank you for talking and the interview is concluded. • remember to thank the examiner for his or her time and say goodbye. • as you leave the room, don't forget to remain positive the examiner might not have yet completely made up his or her mind about your score, and the final impression you make is important.

Ifyou have questions about the test itse.lf, such as when the results will become
available, talk to the person in charge ofthe day s proceedings

_

What To Do and What Not To Do

./
Relax and remain in control right up until the moment you leave the interview room. 2 Shake hands confidently, ifyou are invited to do so, and thank the examiner for his or her time. 3 Simply say: "Thank you very much for your time. I enjoyed talking with you. Goodbye." ... or a similar concluding sentence or two
. of your own.

x
Do not tell the examiner how relieved you are the test is over, and there is no need to comment on your performance! 2 Do not overdo your friendliness at the end . . Be glad you did your best, smile and leave the room. 3 Do not ask the examiner for your Band Score. He or she is unable to give you that information .

A FINAL WORD .••
IELTS is a demanding and challenging examination. Because the Band Score you receive is probably of great importance to your future you should a make a 'serious effort RIGHT NOW to achieve the level of English you require. Don't wait until tomorrow - tomorrow never comes. Think deeply about what you can achieve with your life if you score well. Think about what you will be able to do later. Well-placed effort is always rewarded. The hard work you do now will eventually make your life easier. A little pain now for a lot ofgain later. That is the secret ofsuccess - perhaps the secret of living itself - for learning never ends. The fIrst time you take any test you are unfamiliar with the way in which it is conducted and will naturally feel slightly nervous. Many candidates take the IELTS test the first time for practice - to get an accurate assessment of their level and to familiarise themselves with the process - before taking it a second or even third time. Each time you mustwait for three months before being allowed to take the test again. It takes at least that period oftime to increase your overall Band Score by one Band, and requires intensive daily study. Good luck ... and remember the Golden Rule

94

PRACTICE SPEAKING TEST
Practise answering the questions below, giving answers that are at least one or two sentences long (if not more). Ifpossible, practise with another person - taking it in turns to answer the same question - and compare your responses.
(Please note that the following questions are only a guide to the type ofquestions you might be asked in the actual test.)

Part 1
Please enter and take a seat. Yes, just here. First, I need to see your passport . ... it's only for security purposes. Thank you. My name is (interviewer's name). And yours is ... ? So, I see you are from (your country). Can you tell me about the town you come from? Has your family always lived in (your town)? Where are you living now? How often do you contact your parents? Do you have any brotbersand sisters? Can you teU me what you are studying or where you are working at the moment? What do you like about the work or study you are doing? Describe your school or workplace. What is (or was) your favourite subject at school? Why? Whatbobbies do you have ifany? Why do you enjoy this activity (these activities)? What do you do and where do you go when you get together with your friends? What kind of holidays do you like? What sports do you play or like to watch?

95

Part 2
Thank you. Now I'd like you to take this card. I want you to speak for one or two minutes about the topic written on this card. Follow the instructions. I will give you one minute to prepare before I ask you to give your talk.

Talk about a library that you belong to or have visited. You should say: where it is located and how the library is organised who visits the library and why people go there when and why you last visited the library ... ·and what rules the library has.

Part 3

(begins after one or two follow-up questions on the talk above)

Please hand me the card. Thank you. Libraries have always been very important to the
community and especially to students.
As well as lending books to borrowers, what other services are provided by a good library?
Does a library serve any other function in the communinty?
How has access to infonnation changed over the last hundred years or so?
What are the advantages of using the Internet over visiting a library?
Are there any advantages of using a library in preference to searching the Internet?
Do you think that the Internet disadvantages some people over others? In what way?
Many people cannot read or write well in their own language. How can this be solved?
People are reading less and less these days.; why do you think this is?
How can people be encouraged to read more?
What about electronic books - do they have a future?
That is the end of the int~rview. Thank you and goodbye.

96

It is orientation week and you want to know about the different clubs and associations you can join. Ask the examiner about: types of clubs meeting times benefits costs 97 . Your examiner is a Student Union representative.Speaking SPEAKING CANDIDATE'S CUE CARD UNIVERSITY CLUBS AND ASSOCIATIONS Task 1 You have just arrived at a new university.

Your examiner is your lecturer. . You need two more weeks to prepare the assignment because you have had difficulty obtaining the reference books.Speaking SPEAKING CANDIDATE'S CUE CARD ASKING FOR AN EXTENSION Task 2 You have to give in a piece of work to your lecturer next Wednesday. Find out if you can have an extension .Ask the examiner about: regulations regarding late work possibility of having more time different sources for books/information assistance with writing for overseas students 98 .

Ask the examiner about: the name of the public holiday the significance of tQe holiday availability of services on the day (banks/shops/cinemas) things for visitors to do how shelhe plans to spend the day 99 . You want to find out about the holiday.SPEAKING CANDIDATE'S CUE CARD Task 3 THE PUBLIC HOLIDAY There will soon be a public holiday in the country your examiner comes from.

Ask the examiner about: destination means of transport length of excursion cost meals clothing/equipment 100 . You are thinking of joining the exursion. Your examiner is one of the organisers.SPEAKING CANDIDATE'S CUE CARD THE EXCURSION Task 4 The Overseas Students' C1ub is organising an excursion to a local tourist spot.

-. /tVhat s your name? Where do you live? What/amily members do you live with? 1¥hat are you studying? What do you like about your studies? What do you like about learning English? How often do you use English? .. . . . the examiner .Yijit:ijJiJkeabout?· . examiners can only rate what they hear from you..Wouidyou like to live iiitheciiy . think of a city which . -·-····--~--1 I I.. Do not come to the interview with a learned talk. everything you are going I INSTRUCTIONS ------~-. ... You have one minute to think about what you're going to.. impressed you.. •. such as: Tip Strip • The examners want you to ptskxrn to the best of your afaCty and the test is designed to give you every opportunity to speak. you have visited Tip Strip • In Part 2.ut it At the end of your talk..keywords or ideas only.~---. • In Part 1... .... '. Read it carefully and then make some brief notes. For example.·-.-'­ to say. Describe a city you have visited which has impressed you. So make sure you speak up and use the time as effectively as possible. • Look carefully at the .. I I i Please read the topic below carefully. try to give some extra information to extend your answer. try to make your talk as interesting as possible.·-·---·-··-... if the examiner asks you a question which can be answered by 'Yes' or 'No'. - ~ The topic for your talk will be written on a card which the examiner will hand you. . .. You should say: where it is situated why you visitedjt what you likedabo.-~-··~" .Speaking module (10-15 minutes) The examiner will ask you questions about yourself.. Write dowhsome ·. Do not write out . PART ...say.... but.'. he or she mIght ask you: ..Think of2 or3· things you really remember about the city....-_ _~----~~-----. I I You can make some notes to help you ifyou wish.·. Do you like cities generally? ... ..c-··· '.·· ".. Try to interest the eXfliTlinerin wl'!at you say. • Make sure you answer the question you are asked. prompt card on this page... L ... . . 2-.. . YeslNo questions in English are often an invitation to say more. .-·-·-. will ask one or two brief questions to signal that it is time to stop talking. You will be asked to talk about it for I to 2 minuteS. You have a minute to prepare what you are going to say and you can make some notes.. ....

your ability to give and support an opinion and your range of grammatical forms a. your examiner will ask you further questions related to the topic in Part 2. A city you have visited • advantages ofliving in a big cJ IY • negative aspects o. See how they are broadly linked to the topic of Part 2.Once your talk in Part 2 is over. This is your chance to your fluency. • Make a few notes in response to each of the prompts given here. Tip Strip • Look at the follow~up discussion ideas for Part 3 on this page. Remember! You can take the discussion in a direction of your choice. • Don't be afraid to take the initiative in Part 3 of the speaking test. The discussion could take any of these directions. show 102 .!d vocabulary. The examiner may ask you to speak about tllese points.fcrowded cities • architectural design • paying for the sen~ices • transport • Try to think of at least five other interesting ideas linked to this topic. if it is appropriately linked.

the examiner will ask one ortwobriefquestions to signal that it is time to stop talking.' '. The exaimer may ask you to speak about these points .PART" .. competitive ." _ The examiner will ask you questions about yourself. - ~ Once your talk in Part 2 is over. Read it carefully. You should say: when the competition took place what you had to do how well you did it Describe how you felt about the competition.Speaking module (10-15 minutes) l. Describe a competition (or contest) that you have entered. You have one minute to think about what you're going to say. • the psychology of(:ornpeting • < <. he or she might askyou: Do you enjoy entering competitions? Have you entered any other competitions? PART 3 ~~. For example.spirit 103 . sllch as: What s your name? What nationality are you? • What part of your countr}' do you come Fom? Can you describe your home town/village'! What do you like doing il1 yourfree time? Why? • Are there any new hobbies that you would like to take up? Why? The topic for your talk will be written on a card which the examiner will hand you. can make some notes to help you ifyou wish. You will be asked to talk about it for I to 2 minutes. 1 l'~ . INSTRUCTIONS Please read the topic below carefully. At the end ofyonr talk. then make some briefnotes. ' Competition • . COTIJp€ctition at a young age • competition at school • wilueofinternational competitions '. your examiner will ask you f1:u'merquestions related to the topic in Part 2.

You should say: how you got the job ...~.. the examiner will ask one or two brief questions to signal that it is time to stop talking.. I ~-~~ you have~':..J I Describe ajob that you have done. You can make some notes tohclJLyou ifyou wish.. The topic for your talk will be written on a card which the examiner will hand you.. 1 I i ! You have one minute to think about what you're going to say. such as: • What 'COUl1l1y do you comeji'om? • Which other countries have you visited? • Are there al1v countries you would like to visit? Why? • What do you find difficult about travelling? • What do you enjoy about travelling? • What is your preferred method oj travel? PART L. The examiner may ask you to speak about these points. he or she might ask you: Do you value the experience you had in thisjob? Wouldyou consider doing the same type ofjob again? PART 3 Once your talk in Part 2 is over.Speaking module (1 0-15 minutes) The examiner will ask you some questions about yourself. Read it carefully and then make some briefnotes.j o b security -vs. At the end of your talk. 104 . . _ _ ". For example.haVing more than one career • choosing a career.what the job involved how long the job lasted Describe how well you did the job. ! I ! INSTRUCTIONS i · I Please read the topic below carefully. A job you have done ' • advantages of young people working • motivating people to work • types ofpart-time w o r k . You will be asked to' talk about it for I I to 2 minutes. your examiner wilJ ask you further questions related to the topic in Part 2.

The examiner may ask you to speak about these points.g. You will be asked to talk about it for I to 2 minutes. art . Read it carefully and then make some briefnotes. Describe a museum or art gallery that you have visited. PART "3 Mllseums • the need/or museums and art galleries in our society • makjng museuins more interesting • 'mu~eum art -vs-popular art ~. .wingSmllde with spraypaintin puhIlc spaces] 105 . A museum you have visited INSTRUCTIONS Please read the topic below carefully. the examiner will ask one or two briefquestions to signal that it is time to stop talking. You should say: where it is why you went there what you particularly remember about the pJace At the end ofyour talk. l*dra.i"lJiti* or vandalism ? -the role a/public . your examiner will ask you fui"ther questions related to the topic in Part 2. statues and buildings. he or she might ask you: Do you like museums/art galleries? Wouldyou recommend this one to otherpeople? Once your talk in Part 2 is over. e. For example.Speaking module (1 0-15 minutes) The examiner will ask you some questions about yourself. You have one minute to think about what you're going tl'\-~~----···· You can make some notes to help you ifyou wish.artworks. such as: What town or city do you comefrom? Can you describe your(amily home? What does your(amily usually do at the weekend? • Do you like going out with yourfami~v? Why? • Where would you like to take a holiday? Why? Who would you most like to go on holiday with? What was the best holiday you've ever had? The topic for your talk will be written on a card which the examiner will hand you.

You will be asked to talk about it for .. your examiner will ask you further questions related to the topic in Part 2..____.. _ ~~ ... _..---' l._ . ___. The examiner may ask you to speak about these points. '" __ ~~ . i I to 2 minutes. L .k..~ The examiner will ask you some questions about yourself... I You have one minute to think about what you're going to say. _ .. INSTRUCTIONS ! Please read the topic below carefully._____ . For example. School a Single sex -vs ... the examiner will ask one or two brief questions to signal that it time to stop talking. ~~_. sllch as: /iVhat part ofvow counlly do you come from? • How long have you lived there? • How do you like to travel around? What type o{restaurants are there in your ci(v/town/village? Which is voU/favourite? Why? !¥hat sort offood do your parents like to eat? The topic for your talk will be written on a card which the examiner will hand you. .'O=-.Speaking module (10-15 minutes) " . . Describe an enjoyable event that you experienced when you were at school...._. You should say: when it happened what was good about it why you particularly remember this event At the end of your talk.i"'~~ _~~_~1-.. he or she might say: Didyou enjoy your time at school? Wouldyou recommend your school to others? "PART 3 Once your talk in P·art 2 is over.training 106 .: co-educational schools • school uniforms a the teacher as authority orfriend • the role pftheteacher intheJanguageclassroom • education. Read it carefully and then make some brief notes. ! You can make some notes to help you if you wish. Your school days .._.vs .

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