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He Loves You, He Beats You - Family Violence in Turkey and Access to Protection

He Loves You, He Beats You - Family Violence in Turkey and Access to Protection

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Published by Kaan Doren
This report documents brutal and long-lasting violence against women and girls by husbands, partners, and family members and the survivors’ struggle to seek protection. Turkey has strong protection laws, setting out requirements for shelters for abused women and protection orders. However, gaps in the law and implementation failures by police, prosecutors, judges, and other officials make the protection system unpredictable at best, and at times downright dangerous.
This report documents brutal and long-lasting violence against women and girls by husbands, partners, and family members and the survivors’ struggle to seek protection. Turkey has strong protection laws, setting out requirements for shelters for abused women and protection orders. However, gaps in the law and implementation failures by police, prosecutors, judges, and other officials make the protection system unpredictable at best, and at times downright dangerous.

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Categories:Types, Research, Law
Published by: Kaan Doren on May 08, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/25/2012

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Turkey entered the vanguard of countries offering civil mechanisms to protect against

domestic violence with its 1998 adoption of Law 4320 on the Protection of the Family. The

law, amended in 2007, established a protection order system whereby a person subjected to

abuse by a family member living under the same roof, male or female, can apply directly or

through a prosecutor for an order from a family court. It is intended that these orders be

issued quickly, within days at most, since the individuals who apply for them are often in

extremely dangerous situations.

A family court judge can issue a protection order for a maximum of six months, which can

require that an offender vacate the home; stay away from the home or school of the victim

and their children; surrender weapons; and refrain from violence, threats, damaging

property, contacting the victim, or using intoxicating substances in the house. The order can

5

Human Rights Watch | May 2011

be renewed for another six months if a new case or situation arises involving violence. The

judge can require the abuser to make maintenance payments to the victim.

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