Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017

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Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017

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Coastal Resource Management Plan, CY 2008-2017 by Municipal Planning and Development Office, Municipality of Leganes

2011

Printed in Leganes, Iloilo, Philippines

Citation: Municipal Planning and Development Office-Leganes. 2011. Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017. Municipality of Leganes, Iloilo, Philippines. This publication was made possible through the efforts of the Municipal Planning and Development Office of the Municipality of Leganes. The publication may be reproduced or quoted in other publications as long as proper reference is made to the source.

CRMP Document No. 01-CRM/2011

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017

2 TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page List of Acronyms and Abbreviations Conceptual and Operational Definition of Terms Foreword Preface Chapter 1. Introduction Why the Plan? Scope of the Plan History of the Planning Process Coastal Resource Assessment Integrated Coastal Management Plan’s Vision, Mission and Goals Chapter 2. Coastal Environmental Profile Brief Historical Background Geography and Physical Settings Demography Economic Resources Social Services Land Uses of Coastal Areas Status of Coastal Resources Infrastructure Institutional Support for CRM Chapter 3. Management Issues, Strengths and Opportunities Strengths Management Issues Opportunities Chapter 4. Management Programs, Strategies and Policies Key Result Areas, Objectives, Strategies and Policies Fisheries and Habitat Management Livelihood and Enterprise Management Coastal Land Use and Zoning Coastal Tourism Shoreline and Waste Management Legal Arrangement and Institutional Development Chapter 5. Administration and Coordination of Implementation Guiding Principles Organization and Management Plan Implementation, Processes and Mechanism References 3 5 8 10

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20 21 24 35 42 48 49 49 53 56 57 59

61 63 64 66 66 68 69 69 74 75

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LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

ABC AQD BFAR BFARMC BN BNS BNVL Brgy. CDA CDP CENRO CEP CLUP CRM CRMP DA DENR DepEd DOLE DOST DOT DPWH DTI EO FRMP ICM ICRMP IEC IGC ILECO I LCC LCE LGC LGU MAO MARICOM MCD MCEP MDC MEA MFARMC MIGEDC MIS

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Association of Barangay Councils Aquaculture Department Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Barangay Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Management Council Below Normal Barangay Nutrition Scholars Below Normal Very Low Barangay Cooperative Development Authority Comprehensive Development Plan Community Environment and Natural Resources Office Coastal Environmental Program Comprehensive Land Use Plan Coastal resource management Coastal Resource Management Plan Department of Agriculture Department of Environment and Natural Resources Department of Education Department of Labor and Employment Department of Science and Technology Department of Tourism Department of Public Works and Highways Department of Trade and Industry Executive Order Fishery Resource and Management Program Integrated Coastal Management Integrated Coastal Resource Management Plan Information and education campaign Industrial Growth Center Iloilo Electric Cooperative I Leganes Commercial Complex Local Chief Executive Local Government Code of 1991 Local government unit Municipal Agriculture Office Maritime Command Municipal Coastal Database Municipal Coastal Environment Profile Municipal Development Council Monitoring, evaluation and adjustments Municipal Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Management Council Metro Iloilo Guimaras Economic Development Council Management Information System

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 MOA MPA MPDC MPDO MTWG MTWG-ICM NEDA NGA NGO NIA OGA OTOP PCG PCRA PEZA PNP PO PS RDC SB SEAFDEC SK TESDA UPV-BAC URC-CPU ZSL Memorandum of Agreement Mangrove Protected Areas Municipal Planning and Development Coordinator Municipal Planning and Development Office Municipal Technical Working Group Municipal Technical Working Group on Integrated Coastal Management National Economic and Development Authority National Government Agency Non-governmental organization National Irrigation Administration Other Government Agency One town, one product Philippine Coast Guard Participatory coastal resource assessment Philippine Economic Zone Authority Philippine National Police People’s organization Preschoolers Regional Development Council Sangguniang Bayan Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center Sangguniang Kabataan Technical Education and Skills Development Authority University of the Philippines in the Visayas Brackish Aquaculture Center University Research Center–Central Philippine University Zoological Society of London

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CONCEPTUAL AND OPERATIONAL DEFINITION OF TERMS

Aquaculture: fishery operations involving all forms of raising and culturing fish and other fishery species in fresh, brackish and marine areas. Base map: a predrawn map of selected features that serves to orient the mapper to the area and provides a consistent scale for the mapper to draw in additional features or elements of the coastal resource system. Closed season: the period during which the taking of specified fishery species by a specified fishing gear is prohibited in a specified area or areas in Philippine waters. Coastal area profile: a document produced using various resource assessment and analysis techniques, including PCRA. It presents a variety of information required for effective decision-making and planning, including environmental and socioeconomic information, and analyses of problems and opportunities for sustainable coastal development. Coastal habitat: any ecologically distinct ecosystem that supports the production of coastal resources, including coral reefs, mangrove swamps, tidal flats, seagrass beds, and beaches. Coastal resource management: the wise use of coastal resources to promote and maintain sustainable development in coastal areas. CRM involves maximizing the utility of coastal resources by regulating human behavior and activities in coastal areas. Successful CRM requires multi-sectoral collaboration and strong community participation. Coastal resource regime: the system of rights and responsibilities that governs the use of coastal resources. Often, the operative or de facto regime is not the same as the legal or de jure regime. Despite a relatively well developed de jure regime of laws and regulations, the operative coastal resource regime in many areas of the Philippines is described as an open access regime, an unregulated free-for-all situation in which sustainable use is unlikely to occur. Coastal resource system: a diverse human-ecological system composed of all coastal habitats and the various aspects of coastal economies related to the production, distribution and consumption of coastal resources, as well as other products and economic activities derived from coastal resources. Coastal resource: any non-living or living natural product, such as finfish, marine invertebrates and aquatic plants, that is found in coastal areas and is of use or value to humans.

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Commercial fishing: the taking of fishery species by passive or active gear for trade, business or profit beyond subsistence or sports fishing. Community worker: any person involved in community organization or community development, usually associated with NGOs and LGUs. Fish refuge and sanctuary: a designated area where fishing or other form of activities which may damage the ecosystem of the area is prohibited and human access may be restricted. Fisheries: refers to all activities relating to the act or business of fishing, culturing, preserving, processing, marketing, developing, conserving and managing aquatic resources and the fishery areas, including the privilege to fish or take aquatic resources. Local coastal resource users: coastal residents who live in the management area, including municipal fishers and small-scale aquaculturists, whose primary basis of livelihood or subsistence involves capturing, harvesting or growing of any fishery resource; or deriving economic (cash and noncash) benefit from coastal resources. Municipal fishing: refers to fishing within municipal waters using vessels of three(3) gross tons or less, or fishing not requiring the use of fishing vessels. Municipal waters: include not only streams, lakes, inland bodies of water and tidal waters within the municipality which are not included within the protected areas as defined under Republic Act No. 7586 (the NIPAS Law), public forest, timber lands, forest reserves or fishery reserves, but also marine waters included between two(2) lines drawn perpendicular to the general coastline from points where the boundary lines of the municipality touch the sea at low tide and a third line parallel with the general coastline including offshore islands and fifteen(15) kilometers from such coastlines. Non-government organization: an agency, institution, a foundation or a group of persons whose purpose is to assists people’s organizations/associations in various ways including but not limited to, organizing, education, training, research and/ or accessing resources. Participatory coastal resource assessment: resource assessment accomplished with extensive participation and contributions from local coastal resource users. People’s organization: a bona fide association of citizens with demonstrated capacity to promote the public interest and with identifiable leadership, membership and structure. Its members belong to a sector/s who voluntarily band

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themselves together to work for and by themselves for their own upliftment, development and greater good. Private sector: private sector shall refer to individuals/institutions/entities privately operated/managed whose activities or operations involve the use of or affect the coastal environment and is considered a stakeholder of the coastal resources. These may include but not limited to operators/owners of shipping and navigation companies, ship building, beach resorts, tourist attractions, factories, mining and quarrying operations, logging, oil refineries and hotels. Propagules: The germinating seeds of the family rhizophoraceae while still attached to the mother tree. Also known as viviparous seeds. Resource assessment: the process of producing information required for effective resource management planning; a research process involving a variety of methods and techniques that allow a better understanding of environmental and social factors affecting coastal resource systems, and the elucidation of problems and opportunities for sustainable development in coastal areas. A resource assessment usually culminates in the production of a coastal area profile.

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8 FOREWORD

For a coastal municipality like Leganes, with much of the municipality’s territory and much of its development potential lie in its coastal and marine waters – composed of seagrass beds and mangrove forests. Yet the importance and potential of our coastal and marine ecosystem have been unappreciated. Their conservation has been neglected; habitat loss, overexploitation, and destructive fishing practices are increasingly threatening coastal biodiversity and livelihoods. Our shores have come under pressure from rapid population growth and uncontrolled development. The consequence of this coastal degradation is the decline in fisheries catch-per-unit effort. As a result, we find the phenomenon of poverty amidst potential wealth in the coastal barangays. In a very short time we could find ourselves in a situation of increasing poverty, as the vicious cycle of poverty and environmental degradation proceeds at an alarming pace. While existing laws and regulations provide a basic framework for coastal management, in practice coastal management has been inefficient and piecemeal. Public participation and involvement in coastal law enforcement and heightened awareness of the state of these resources are crucial in improving management and sustainability. The protection and conservation movement will bring understanding to the importance and potential of our coastal and marine waters to the larger public. This document will assist in valuing our natural resources. It will serve as a reference in making informed decisions about when and how to protect and manage coastal resources in the municipality. It will be used to manage and ensure resource sustainability for the future. The CRMP provides stopgap measures for resource utilization and allocation of natural seagrass, mangroves, fisheries and coastal water quality. It provides information on the economic and other values of coastal habitats and ecosystems in terms of direct production, loss of earnings from destruction and values created by tourism. Ensuring the vitality of coastal resources and their ability to continue providing benefits to society and economies is critically important. This document is a first in the municipality that aims to protect and conserve our local coastal resource. What has been formulated is a document that goes beyond the biology of mangroves and fisheries, and involves people and communities. The plan has been the outcome of a series of stakeholder consultations involving national agencies, civil society, the academe and local communities. Implementation of this plan will go a long way in reversing coastal degradation. This plan will help remedy existing problems by assisting us to value our immediate sources of subsistence and putting them in perspective with various options for development.

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Indeed in a short time, it is expected that our work will produce the critical mass of Leganesnons that are not only committed but also well-informed advocates of coastal conservation. The political will, so necessary to shift from today’s destructive exploitation to one of sustainable development, would then be generated. We hope that this plan will raise awareness of the technical and policy aspects of coastal management and improve local capacity to implement the far-reaching reforms necessary to protect valuable coastal resources. There is hope yet for our coastal and marine resources-but this ultimately depends on all of us.

ENRIQUE M. ROJAS Municipal Mayor

ATTY. JOSE ROMI S. MARAÑON Municipal Vice Mayor

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10 PREFACE

It is a fact that ecosystems are vital, complex and interdependent. An ecosystem is the basic functional unit of ecology where both biotic communities and abiotic environment are inseparably connected and interacts, maintaining the equilibrium necessary for life. All biotic organisms are bound together in a bioregion – food chains, symbioses, nutrient cycles and other ecological interactions. We cannot limit our view to a specific locality as there are tight linkages between upland and coastal ecosystems, what occurs in one ecosystem inevitably affects the other. Man is an integral part of this bioregion. We have shaped and re-shaped our environment, sometimes changing it, for better or worse. Human interactions with the various ecosystems are perhaps the most influential factor affecting the coastal environment and the vital natural processes occurring therein. The coast is central to the Filipino culture and identity. Our countrymen rely on these seemingly endless resources for food, medicine and livelihood. In the coastal barangays of the municipality, the majority of households are dependent on coastal resources for subsistence and income. Although it may seem inexhaustible, the fact remains that our needs far exceed what nature can provide. There is an accelerating demand for resources that is stretching the existing capacity to near limit. The interminable population growth and ceaseless influx of inmigrants continue to feed the demand. The growing gap between demand and supply threatens to hold back the sustainable economic transformation of the municipality. The rate of daily fish catch is directly proportional to income of coastal households, compromising nutrition security and wellbeing. If the trend will continue, it will be insufficient to provide the basic needs of the family. Some fisherfolks have resorted to destructive fishing techniques involving dynamite, cyanide and over-fishing that is putting strain on our sensitive coastal resources to serve the ever growing demand. The extraction of sand and gravel from coastal ecosystems for construction, pollution from domestic and industrial sources, and the clearing of mangroves are the more pressing environmental concerns that compound the problem of depleting coastal resources. Being in a tropical zone, our climate is naturally prone to typhoons; there has been a four-fold increase in the frequency of typhoons between 1990 and 2009. Recorded floods and storms have also risen dramatically due to increasingly erratic and intense rainfall. These changes to precipitation patterns and the resultant disasters damage fishing grounds and infrastructure and increase the rate of soil erosion. Rising sea level is also already evident.

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The social and economic implications of climate change for coastal communities are profound. Climate change will aggravate the environmental degradation already apparent in Leganes, and intensify existing pressures on coastal resources. This can give rise to spontaneous, unplanned, and poorly managed development activities and resource use conflicts that can put local livelihoods at risk. It is clear that only a comprehensive response to these environmental impacts would allow our coastal communities to tackle the core issues of livelihood and nutrition security. The local government of Leganes has joined forces with the Community Environment and Natural Resources Office (CENRO) of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), the Barangay and Municipal Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Management Council, and with coastal communities to introduce an environmental intervention. The plan evolved through a series of consultations and workshops conducted at the grassroots level. Covering all six coastal barangays of the municipality, this plan is the amalgamation of the multi-faceted agenda of sustainable development as it harmonizes the interplay of environmental quality, social equity, economics and governance in its objectives; and it will proactively respond to debilitating realities of climate change and environmental decline. The plan will focus on strengthening the governance of coastal communities through a carefully planned intervention for the protection and conservation of resources as mechanisms for achieving the goals of sustainable development. Particular attention is given to the assessment of the resources in relation to development needs, crafting administrative mechanisms and enhancement of democratic accountability for the development and management of coastal resources, and deploy co-management initiatives and collaborative partnership with stakeholders and civil society organizations associated with managing coastal resources towards the efficient, effective, and efficacious delivery of holistic development on the shoreline and around associated watersheds. Increased fish yields, environmental restoration, and greater cooperation within communities to protect their livelihoods are a few of the promising results of this intervention. We recognize the inextricable role of economics in the management of our coastal ecosystems to ensure the sustainability of these resources. The income base of households should be diversified so it releases some pressure on coastal resources. Coastal resource management is above all else aims to manage people and our negative impacts on the coastal environment. This plan is the first step in a long road to sustainability. It provides long-term solutions to problems that have plague our coastal barangays. We may not see the immediate results of this plan but it will ensure the preservation of our susceptible coastal resources for future generations.

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Implementing this plan is a challenge that will test our determination to sustainably manage and equitably utilize our scarce resources without jeopardizing future rewards.

ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE MGDH I – Municipal Planning and Development Coordinator

ERNEST-CARL J. BADANA Planning Assistant

SHIRLEY J. SALIGBON Administrative Aide VI

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WHY THE PLAN?

Brief Description of the Municipality The Municipality of Leganes is one of the nineteen (19) coastal towns of the Province of Iloilo. It is the only municipality that shares a common boarder with Iloilo City, which is the provincial and regional administration center of Western Visayas in Region VI. It is located along the Guimaras Strait, opposite the town of Buenavista which is only about 4.5 kilometers from Leganes shoreline in the Island-Province of Guimaras. The municipality has six (6) coastal barangays namely: Camangay, Bigke, M.V. Hechanova, Napnud, Gua-an and Nabitasan with a total coastline of approximately six (6) kilometers. The Guimaras Strait is considered as the only fishing ground for marginalized fisher folks of the municipality.

Key Indicators for Sustainable Coastal Resource Management Identifying the following critical areas which requires specific intervention concerning coastal resource management issues and problems, planners can on the basis of quantitative information, analyze the causes and provide a diagnostic tool to the Local Government of Leganes in formulating programs and activities that aimed at improving sustainability of coastal resources.

A. Coastal Habitat Productivity 1. Percent of mangroves remaining. Indicates the level of production of an important coastal resource that protects the land from storm surges, recycles nutrients and is important for fish breeding. 2. Coastal fish catch. Determines productivity of coastal and marine fishing grounds. 3. Percent of wetlands/marshland reclaimed. Determines extent of loss of marshland areas. 4. Mangrove conservation. Determine the extent of mangrove degradation. 5. Illegal fishing. Determines the extent of illegal fishing such as fine mesh nets, etc. and indicates the destruction of coastal fishery habitats. 6. Incidence of fish kills. Phenomenal environmental event indicating high levels of pollution from land that may have resulted in toxic algal bloom or pollution from some other source has caused massive destruction.

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1. Level of water pollution. Indicates water quality and extent of coastal water pollution. 2. Presence of polluting industries located in coastal areas without pollution control facilities or wastewater treatment facilities. 3. Presence of squatter household on coastline. Indicates the extent of coastal water pollution in the absence of water quality monitoring data. 4. Presence of waste heaps on coastline 5. Marine floating waste

Purpose of the Plan The Plan will serve as a guide of the municipal government in the implementation of its mandated functions and defined roles relative to coastal resource management. This will be considered as a component of the Comprehensive Development Plan (CDP) and a complementary to the Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) of the municipality. It sets the framework and operational mechanisms by which all municipal level CRM implementers will base their interventions, decisions and or actions towards an efficient and effective coastal resource management. The purpose of the plan is indicated as follows: 1. Provide baseline data on the coastal resources and socio economic condition of the municipality. 2. Define directions and guidelines in the formulation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of CRM sectoral programs, projects and activities. 3. Clarify mandates, authority, accountability and commitments in the implementation of CRM in the municipality. 4. Leverage for internal and external support for sustainable CRM effort 5. To raise the level of local awareness and consciousness of coastal resource management issues and concerns by providing information to the local population, cause oriented Non-governmental Organizations and People’s Organization. This helps them rally behind important issues and problems that should be given proper attention by local government officials.

SCOPE OF THE PLAN

The Municipality of Leganes Integrated Coastal Resource Management Plan (ICRMP) is a ten (10) year plan starting year 2008 to 2017, formulated to address on the rehabilitation, development, and management of the coastal resources of the municipality. This will serve as a reference by which all municipal level CRM implementers could effectively discharge their functions in project implementation within a legal framework. Its purpose is largely to set a guiding document by which all

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municipal and barangay level implementers will base their interventions, decisions or actions in accordance with the legal jurisdictional mandate.

HISTORY OF THE PLANNING PROCESS

The formulation of the Ten-year Coastal Resource Management Plan was implemented through the effort of the local government of the Municipality of Leganes with technical assistance of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources personnel. This went through a three-year planning process with interventions from the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources and the Zoological Society of London. These include coastal barangay Participatory Coastal Resource Assessment, Mangrove Management Training and Fishery Law Enforcement Training. The municipal coastal resource management planning started on June, 2005.

COASTAL RESOURCE ASSESSMENT

The coastal resource assessment made use of primary data from the Comprehensive Land Use Plan of the Municipality of Leganes 2004-2014. The secondary data collection involved the participation of stakeholders in the six (6) coastal barangays (i.e. Camangay, Bigke, MV Hechanova, Napnud, Gua-an, and Nabitasan). A major output of the coastal resource assessment was the Municipal Coastal Environment Profile that presents facts and information on the various coastal habitats in land and foreshore fisheries, tourism, management issues and problems and development initiatives. To facilitate the assessment process, the six (6) coastal barangays were clustered into three based on geographical and resource considerations. The three clusters are: 1. Barangay Bigke and Camangay 2. Barangay MV Hechanova and Napnud 3. Barangay Gua-an and Nabitasan

CRM Planning On August 17-19, 2005, the Municipal Government of Leganes, Iloilo in collaboration with Community Environment and Natural Resources Office (CENRO), Iloilo City, of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) had jointly conducted a three day Participatory Coastal Resource Assessment (PCRA) Training

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Workshop. The training-workshop was attended by participants from the six (6) coastal barangays of the municipality which comprised of barangay officials, Bantay Dagat members, Barangay/Municipal Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Management Council (B/MFARMC) members, fisher folks and coastal residents, some Sangguniang Bayan members and department heads. Various issues and concerns affecting the depletion of coastal resources were identified. Output of the first level of the planning process was presented to the community on June 26 to 27, 2006 in the form of barangay consultation purposely to validate the consolidated information and to gather additional relevant inputs especially in legal and jurisdictional mandates, programs and projects to be included in the coastal profile of the municipality. The activity was spearheaded by the Municipal Agriculture Office (MAO). To further the planning process, the personnel from CENRO, Iloilo City in coordination with the Local Chief Executive of the municipality has initiated another barangay consultation of the six (6) coastal barangays on April 14, 15 and 16, 2009. It was attended by barangay officials, barangay health workers, tanods, Sangguniang Kabataan representatives, civilian volunteers organization members and the marginal fisher folks. The following concerns were discussed during the consultation: 1. Presentation to the community the proposed coastal zoning, boundaries of municipal territorial waters and other proposed projects; 2. Information and education campaign (IEC) on Municipal Fishery Ordinances and functions of the Municipal/Barangay Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Management Councils (M/BFARMC); and, 3. Identification of pertinent issues and problems to be incorporated in the finalization of the Municipal Coastal Environment Profile (MCEP). Gathered information during the barangay consultations are vital inputs for the Coastal Resource Management Planning (CRMP) Training Workshop. In coordination with DENR, Coastal Resource Management Planning (CRMP) Training-Workshop was finally conducted on May 19 to 21, 2009 attended by 28 participants (11 female and 17 male) composed of Municipal Agriculturist, Municipal Planning and Development Office (MPDO) representatives, MFARMC Chairman, Punong Barangays, Barangay Kagawads, fisher folks of the six (6) Coastal Barangays and representative from the Zoological Society of London. There were nine (9) management options prepared by the participants during the workshop which formed part of the Coastal Resource Management Plan to include Livelihood and Enterprise Development, Waste Management, Coastal Zoning, Legal and Institutional Development, Habitat Management, Shoreline Development, Coastal Tourism, Watershed and Fisheries Management Option. The objectives, strategies, activities, location, time frame, budget funding source and institution involved in each management option including the formation of vision,

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mission, goals and objectives, implementing structure and the composition of the CRMTWG were jointly prepared by the participants. To finalize the formulation of the Municipal’s CRM Plan, Atty. Adolfo E. Jaen, the Local Chief Executive of Leganes organized the Municipal Technical Working Group for Integrated Coastal Management (MTWG – ICM) per Executive Order No. 17, s. of 2009 composed of: 1. Municipal Agriculturist 2. Municipal Planning and Development Coordinator 3. SB Chairman, Committee on Fisheries and Agriculture 4. SB Chairman, Committee on Environment 5. Captain of six (6) coastal barangays 6. Bantay Dagat 7. MFARMC 8. DENR 9. DA/BFAR/DOT,PNP (OGAs) 10. APEX Club of Leganes and other NGOs 11. UPV Brackishwater Aquaculture Center (Academe) The MTWG-ICM is tasked to consolidate the results of series of community consultations and prepare a draft of CRM Plan. The proposed plan will be presented in multi sectoral forum to fill up the data gaps relative to the plan. After consolidating relevant comments and suggestions, the plan will be submitted to the Municipal Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Management Council (MFARMC) and Municipal Planning and Development Office (MPDO) for review, evaluation and recommendation for approval. Then the plan will be submitted to the Sangguniang Bayan (SB) for legislation. Then it will be forwarded to the Municipal Mayor for approval. Implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the plan will follow.

INTEGRATED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN’S VISION, MISSION AND GOALS

Vision A progressive municipality with rich and diverse coastal resource collectively managed by healthy, God-loving and environmentally-awake community.

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To implement an integrated coastal land base development programs that will ensure the sustainable utilization and management of the coastal and marine resources through the collective efforts of the different stakeholders in the community.

Goals 1. 2. 3. 4. To protect and conserve the coastal and land base resources of the municipality. To uplift the living condition of the people To achieve food security To develop and promote the eco-tourism potential of the municipality

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 PARTICIPATORY PLANNING COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

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CRM PLANNING WORKSHOP

Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation

Conduct of Community/Brgy. Consultation on:  Issues, problems and Opportunities  Proposed Zoning of Coastal areas  Strategies and actions  Policies  Implementation Process

CRM Plan Implementation

Creation of CRM Plan MultiSectoral Technical Working Group (TWG)

Submission and Legislation  Municipal Fisheries and Aquatic Resource Mgt. Council (MFARMC)  Municipal Development Council (MDC)  Sangguniang Bayan (SB)  Mayor

Finalization of the CRM Plan

Consolidation of Results of Community Consultation and Drafting of CRM Plan

Presentation/Critiquing of the Proposed CRM Plan in a MultiSectoral Forum

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Chapter 2 COASTAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILE

This chapter presents the Municipal Coastal Environmental Profile in terms of history, geography and physical settings, status of resources, population, demography, socio-economics, resource uses. This will also include the legal and institutional framework that indicates the policy, jurisdictional and administrative mandates of the municipal government relative to coastal resource management.

BRIEF HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

The Municipality of Leganes sprang from a small settlement in the early part of 1840 in the site now known as Barangay Guihaman. The word “guihaman” originated from the presence of wild boars or “guiham” which inhabited the place. The early founders of the municipality named the place “Valencia”, a town in Spain whose patron saint is San Vicente Ferrer. Learning the existence of the settlement, Don Isidro A. Brudit, the Spanish Governor of Iloilo decreed in 1856, that the settlement be registered as a “pueblo” otherwise a fine of P600 will be levied upon the inhabitants. In compliance to the decree, the place was registered as pueblo in 1858. The little pueblo at the time had grown into a thriving community with the influx of settlers from the adjacent towns of Jaro and Sta. Barbara. One of its founders, Don Miguel Valencia, seemed to enjoy unmerited, if not unusual honor after the settlement was named Valencia. The other founders moved to have the name changed through a petition to the Alta Mar in Spain. The Spanish authorities, annoyed by the complaint, named the pueblo Leganes---after a town in Spain which is of little significance, just to settle the seemingly heedless dispute. The other originators, Don Angel Gustilo, Don Mariano Gustilo, Don Jacinto Sandoval, Don Lorenzo Gustilo, Don Juan Hilado and Don Fulgencio Espino fought hard for the autonomy and independence of the little pueblo. After having been administered by “Kapitanes” from 1860 up to the close of the Spanish rule in 1899 the town under the American regime appointed its first president, Zacarias Jaen who reigned from 1900 to 1902. He was succeeded by Tomas Gustilo who headed the pueblo from 1902 to 1904. Because of slow progress and lack of harmony among leaders, the pueblo was annexed as an arrabal of Sta. Barbara by order of Governor Martin Delgado in 1905. Leaders like Councilor Tomas Gustilo and Mariano Jagunap who represented the pueblo from 1907-1908 and Arsenio Guillergan together with Eugenio Marañon from 1914-1915 gave their best in working for the autonomy of infrastructure projects like building of school houses, police station, wells, roads, etc.. They also put up a fight in transferring the revenues of Leganes fishpond from Sta. Barbara to the town treasury of Leganes. With the aid of Jaro councilors Petronilo Gumban and Valentin Jordan, the

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fishpond revenue was eventually moved from Sta. Barbara to Leganes. This was used in the improvement of roads around the plaza and telephone connections to Jaro. Through the efforts of then Jaro President Petronilo Gumban and his successor Valentin Jordan, Leganes was transferred as an arrabal of Jaro on January 1, 1916. Under these two successive presidents of Jaro who were in sympathy with the cause of the Leganesnons, the arrabal progressed steadily. Philanthropic landowners, notably Florencio S. Jagunap and Melencio Espinosa donated lots for school sites on which the school buildings of Leganes Primary School (now Leganes Elementary School) were constructed. The Sta. Barbara Irrigation System was constructed in 1919 and was completed on July 4, 1922. A monument for Dr. Jose Rizal was erected in the school site of Leganes Primary School and completed on October 21, 1927 from funds raised by the people and donations from the wealthy family of spouses Modesto Jinon and Capitana Anding Espino. A concrete Gabaldon type school building was built and finished in 1929 from Insular funds through the efforts of Assemblyman Vicente Ybiernas. A new era of peace and progress began when Leganes finally gained its autonomy from Jaro and became a full pledge town through the efforts of the late Congressman Tomas Confesor, then Governor of Iloilo Province. Leganes was created a Municipality pursuant to Executive Order No. 241 of then Commonwealth President Manuel Luis Quezon on January 1, 1940. Marcos Espino was appointed mayor; Martin Jaen as vice mayor, while Constantino Gulmatico, Vicente Guinalon, Severino Quidato, Simplicio Griño, Primitivo Gustilo and Marcial Jacildo were appointed councilors. Their tenure of office lasted only for one year because of the election that followed in November, 1940. In that election, the following candidates were elected: mayor-Marcos Espino; vice mayor-Marcial Jacildo. For councilors: Felix Trespeces, Primitivo Gustilo, Simplicio Griño, Valencia Solinap, and Fausto Espinosa.

GEOGRAPHY AND PHYSICAL SETTINGS

Geographic Location The Municipality of Leganes is one of the nineteen (19) coastal towns of the Province of Iloilo. It is the only coastal municipality that shares a common border with Iloilo City, which is the provincial capital and regional administration center of Western Visayas in Region VI. It is located along the Guimaras Strait, opposite the town of Buenavista (which is only about 4.5 kilometers from Leganes’ shoreline) in the islandProvince of Guimaras. It is adjacent to the city of Iloilo in the South, bounded by Pavia in the Southeast, Sta. Barbara in the West and Zarraga in the North. It is eleven (11) kilometers from the Poblacion of Pavia and approximately five (5) kilometers from the Poblacion of Zarraga. Leganes can be found between the coordinates of 122°39’35” west to 122°39’45” east latitude and between 10°51’48” north to 10°45’15” south longtitude.

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 Land Area Leganes has a total land area of 3,220 hectares. It ranks as the third smallest town of the forty two (42) municipalities and one (1) component city (Passi City) of the Province of Iloilo. The smallest town is San Miguel with an area of 2,130 hectares. The second smallest municipality is Pavia which has a land area of 3,139 hectares. It is smaller than Leganes by only 81 hectares. The Poblacion of Leganes has a total area of 58.9198 hectares.

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Topography and Slope Well cultivated fields, coconut trees and bamboo clumps dominate the landscape of the entire municipality. The terrain is characterized by level plains but slightly higher in the northwest of Lapayon and Calaboa with a slope of not exceeding 3%. The plains are prime agricultural lands that produce rice which is the municipality’s prime commodity. The areas along the coastline are swampy and a large portion of these swampy areas had been converted into fishponds and salt beds.

Soil Type The soil of Leganes is classified by the Bureau of Soils in two categories: soil of swamps and marshes and soil of the lowlands and plains. The lowland plain soil is of Sta. Rita clay loam variety, which covers 75% of Leganes or 2,415.5 hectares of land. The swamp and marsh land is of Umingan fine sandy loam type which covers 25% or 804.5 hectares. This type of soil can be found in portions of Barangay Cari Mayor, Cari Minor, Nabitasan, Gua-an, Napnud and MV Hechanova. There is no forest area in Leganes.

Water Source Leganes’ sources of Level III potable water are the deep wells in the barangays of Guihaman and Cagamutan Sur. The municipality has adequate underground water supply, which can be tapped for domestic and commercial uses. The surface water in Calaboa Creek, Carismo-an Creek and Janipaan River are utilized for irrigation purposes.

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 Hydrology

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The Buntatala and Janipaan are the major river systems traversing in the municipality that drain to the sea. The Janipa-an river winds from Calaboa to Cagamutan Norte to Cari Mayor where it merges with Buntatala River then to the big Jalaur River that empties into the Iloilo Straight. The Buntatala River traverses the barangays of Buntatala, Guintas, Napnud, Guinobatan, Gua-an, Cari Mayor and Cari Minor, where it merges with Janipa-an River in Barangay Cari Mayor to Jalaur River then to Iloilo Straight. The two (2) rivers (Buntatala and Janipa-an) had ceased to be effective natural water drainage since their course have been narrowed and obstructed by nipa clumps, vegetative growth, floating logs, debris, rubbish and indiscriminate construction of fishpond dikes along both banks of the rivers. These obstructions have created bottlenecks that force back water during continuous rain and spill off towards the lowlying residential and agricultural areas of the municipality. The situation resulted to the flooding of rice fields in Cari Mayor, Cari Minor, Guinobatan, Gua-an, Napnud and Nabitasan. At its highest level in 1995, the flood reached portions of Guihaman, Buntatala, Poblacion and Cagamutan Norte covering an area of about one-third of the entire Municipality of Leganes. Tributaries of Janipa-an and Buntatala rivers traversing the swamp lands to the sea are no longer visible having been converted into fishponds. This has aggravated the worsening flood problem that brings tremendous losses to private and public properties. There is no proper drainage system and drainage problem is serious concern of the municipality. The canals and natural outlets of water are fast disappearing due to the rapid pace of development. Man-made structures have contributed to the siltation of natural drainage. Resolving the flood problem has been already discussed with the Department of Public Works and Highways. A flood control program has been already designed where a cut-off channel shall be constructed to redirect floodwater to Guigui Creek towards the Iloilo Straight. Two (2) of the fishpond owners that will be affected by the proposed cutoff channel have already expressed willingness to provide the right-of-way. As to the voluminous number of floating logs, debris and rubbish, dredging and clearing of the silted Buntatala Creek has been proposed. Once the funded and implemented by DPWH, the said flood control program will eventually solve the problem on recurrent floods in the municipality during continuous heavy rains.

Climate Pattern Leganes has two distinct seasons, wet and dry. The wet season is from July to November and dry season is from December to June. It is cold in the months of December, January and February and usually hot during the summer months of March,

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April and May. There is a slight difference in the weather condition in the barangays along the coast compared to the non-coastal barangays as the former barangays are more humid due to their proximity to the sea.

Accessibility Leganes is only about 11 kilometers from Iloilo City and about 13 kilometers from the Iloilo Airport through the provincial access road. It can be reached from Iloilo City through the National Highway to the North or the Coastal Highway to the Municipality of Dumangas. The coastal road serves as the shorter link of the town to the International Port in Bo. Obrero, Lapuz, Iloilo City and to some of the municipalities in the north. There also barangay roads that connect the municipality to the adjacent towns like Sta. Barbara and Pavia.

Political Subdivisions
Barangay Bigke Buntatala Cagamutan Norte Cagamutan Sur Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Cari Minor Gua-an Guihaman Guinobatan Guintas Lapayon M. V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud Poblacion San Vicente Area 41.5521 116.1105 148.4318 138.5658 286.7967 39.4935 344.0093 113.0945 157.1484 140.1166 115.0624 103.7392 426.0592 69.7926 583.9182 138.0531 75.5000 182.5561 Distance from the Poblacion (km) 3.00 1.30 3.00 0.50 3.90 3.30 3.50 2.10 3.60 0.60 1.50 2.90 3.50 2.20 4.80 1.60 1.30

DEMOGRAPHY Population A. Historical population and growth rate Leganes has steadily grown in population from 3,837 in 1903 to 27,555 in year 2008 based on the actual total enumeration conducted by the local government unit (LGU) of Leganes through its barangay nutrition scholars (BNS). Its population has

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grown by 23,718 in a period of one hundred five (105) years. Over these years, growth rate ranged from 0.72% to 3.98% with the lowest growth rate in year 2008 and the highest in year 2000. In 1918 and 1939, Leganes was not surveyed as a municipality because the town was a part of the former Municipality of Jaro, which is now a district of Iloilo City.

Historical Population and Growth Rate
Year Population Increase/ Decrease 1903 3,837 1948 7,447 3,610 1960 9,244 1,797 1970 11,480 2,236 1975 12,328 848 1980 14,285 1,957 1990 18,505 4,220 1995 19,235 730 2000 23,475 4,240 2006 27,103 3,628 2007 27,357 254 2008 27,555 198 *Growth rate from 1903-2000 was based on the national average. Growth Rate per Year (%)* 1.47 1.80 2.17 1.43 2.95 2.59 0.77 3.98 2.58 0.94 0.72

Growth Rate
4.50 4.00 3.50 3.00 2.50 2.00 1.50 1.00 0.50 1903 1948 1960 1970 1975 1980 1990 1995 2000 2006 2007 2008 Year

%

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 B. Actual and projected population

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Actual and Projected Population by Year and Age Group CY 2006 – 2015
Actual Population 2006 2007 2008 2,671 2,907 2,524 2,904 3,070 2,729 2,887 3,051 2,729 2,876 2,914 2,676 2,538 2,589 2,631 2,344 2,287 2,471 2,038 1,993 2,193 1,768 1,739 1,826 1,600 1,535 1,698 1,370 1,302 1,465 1,149 1,088 1,244 880 813 1,066 665 655 742 501 510 611 361 381 395 296 278 310 255 243 245 27,103 27,357 27,555 Projected Population* 2011 2012 2013 2,407 2,333 2,260 2,551 2,464 2,376 2,573 2,494 2,415 2,422 2,322 2,222 2,772 2,818 2,865 2,621 2,685 2,748 2,385 2,462 2,540 1,894 1,923 1,952 1,807 1,856 1,905 1,569 1,617 1,664 1,350 1,398 1,445 1,292 1,385 1,478 841 880 918 761 816 871 447 464 481 323 330 337 228 223 218 28,242 28,468 28,694

Age Group 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-above TOTAL

2009 2,554 2,726 2,731 2,622 2,679 2,494 2,230 1,836 1,709 1,474 1,255 1,106 764 651 413 309 238 27,790

2010 2,480 2,639 2,652 2,522 2,725 2,558 2,307 1,865 1,758 1,522 1,303 1,199 803 706 430 316 233 28,016

2014 2,186 2,289 2,336 2,122 2,911 2,812 2,617 1,981 1,954 1,712 1,493 1,571 957 926 498 344 213 28,920

2015 2,113 2,201 2,257 2,022 2,958 2,875 2,695 2,010 2,003 1,759 1,540 1,664 995 981 515 351 208 29,146

Population for 2006-2015
29,500 29,000 28,500
Population

28,000 27,500 27,000 26,500 26,000 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Year

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The actual population of the Municipality of Leganes, as a result of the enumeration conducted during calendar year 2008, is 27,555. It has increased by 198 or 0.72% since last year. It is estimated that the municipal population will reach 29,146 in 2015. Population by Year and Barangay CY 2006 – 2015
Barangay Bigke Buntatala Cagamutan Norte Cagamutan Sur Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Cari Minor Gua-an Guihaman Guinobatan Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud Poblacion San Vicente TOTAL Actual Population 2006 2007 2008 602 608 599 1,342 1,346 1,357 2,303 2,286 2,120 1,534 1,806 1,801 1,431 1,261 1,340 590 436 560 1,288 1,274 1,463 698 804 735 1,066 1,086 1,186 2,089 1,866 2,036 2,056 2,060 1,955 1,160 1,134 1,196 2,085 2,242 2,197 571 600 607 2,628 2,651 2,739 1,850 1,780 1,921 2,619 2,767 2,443 1,191 1,350 1,300 27,103 27,357 27,555 2009 600 1,363 2,053 1,981 1,253 499 1,517 783 1,233 1,944 1,923 1,199 2,287 629 2,784 1,921 2,434 1,389 27,790 2010 599 1,371 1,962 2,114 1,208 484 1,604 801 1,293 1,918 1,872 1,217 2,343 647 2,839 1,957 2,346 1,444 28,016 Projected Population 2011 2012 2013 597 596 594 1,378 1,386 1,393 1,870 1,779 1,687 2,248 2,381 2,515 1,162 1,117 1,071 469 454 439 1,692 1,779 1,867 820 838 857 1,353 1,413 1,473 1,891 1,865 1,838 1,822 1,771 1,721 1,235 1,253 1,271 2,399 2,455 2,511 665 683 701 2,895 2,950 3,006 1,992 2,028 2,063 2,258 2,170 2,082 1,498 1,553 1,607 28,242 28,468 28,694 2014 593 1,401 1,596 2,648 1,026 424 1,954 875 1,533 1,812 1,670 1,289 2,567 719 3,061 2,099 1,994 1,662 28,920 2015 591 1,408 1,504 2,782 980 409 2,042 894 1,593 1,785 1,620 1,307 2,623 737 3,117 2,134 1,906 1,716 29,146

Population by Year and Barangay
3,500 3,000 2,500
Population

2,000 1,500 1,000 500 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Year

Bigke Buntatala Cagamutan Norte Cagamutan Sur Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Cari Minor Gua-an Guihaman Guinobatan Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud Poblacion San Vicente

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Nabitasan recorded the highest population with 2,628 or 9.94% of the total population of the municipality. In contrast, Camangay has the lowest population of only 560 or 2.03% of the total population of Leganes.

Percentage to Total Population by Barangay CY 2008
Barangay Bigke Buntatala Cagamutan Norte Cagamutan Sur Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Cari Minor Gua-an Guihaman Guinobatan Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud Poblacion San Vicente TOTAL Population 599 1,357 2,120 1,801 1,340 560 1,463 735 1,186 2,036 1,955 1,196 2,197 607 2,739 1,921 2,443 1,300 27,555 Percentage to Total Population 2.17% 4.92% 7.69% 6.54% 4.86% 2.03% 5.31% 2.67% 4.30% 7.39% 7.09% 4.34% 7.97% 2.20% 9.94% 6.97% 8.87% 4.72% 100.00%

C. Male-female population distribution The male population in 2008 across various age groups is 13,752, while the female population is 13,803 or with a ratio of, roughly, 99 males for every 100 females.

D. Population density The municipality of Leganes has a density of nine persons per hectare. The Poblacion is the most densely populated with thirty-two persons per hectare. The barangay with the lowest density is Cari Mayor with only four persons per hectare. The Poblacion has the highest density considering that it has a small land area, its accessibility to the national highway, most public facilities are located within the area, and the concentration of subdivisions in the area to accommodate the spillover from the city.

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The urban barangays of the municipality has a density of fifteen persons per hectare while the rural barangays has a density of seven persons per hectare.

Male-Female Population by Barangay CY 2008
Barangay Male Bigke Buntatala Cagamutan Norte Cagamutan Sur Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Cari Minor Gua-an Guihaman Guinobatan Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud Poblacion San Vicente TOTAL 304 692 1,049 858 670 299 737 373 607 1,032 957 587 1,126 303 1,400 981 1,121 656 13,752 Sex Female 295 665 1,071 943 670 261 726 362 579 1,004 998 609 1,071 304 1,339 940 1,322 644 13,803

Male-Female Population by Barangay for CY 2008
1,600 1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 r ke la rt e u oa ay or or an an a n as on va an ud n t e ig tata No n S lab ng ay Min ua- am bat int ay no ta s pn acio cen B n n a i M ri ta a G uih ino Gu Lap cha abi Na obl Vi Bu uta mu C Cam ar Ca e N G Gu P an C a H S a m ag V. . ag C M C Barangay

Population

Male Female

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 Population Density by Barangay Classification CY 2008
Barangay A. Urban Buntatala Cagamutan Sur Cari Minor Guihaman Guinobatan Poblacion Sub-total B. Rural Bigke Cagamutan Norte Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Gua-an Guintas Lapayon MV Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud San Vicente Sub-total TOTAL Area (hectares) Population

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Population Density (person/ha.)

116.1105 138.5658 113.0945 140.1166 115.0624 75.5000 698.4498 41.5521 148.4318 286.7967 39.4935 344.0093 157.1484 103.7392 426.0592 69.7926 583.9182 138.0531 182.5561 2,521.5502 3,220.0000

1,357 1,801 735 2,036 1,955 2,443 10,327 599 2,120 1,340 560 1,463 1,186 1,196 2,197 607 2,739 1,921 1,300 17,228 27,555

12 13 6 15 17 32 15 14 14 5 14 4 8 12 5 9 5 14 7 7 9

Population Density by Barangay Classification
16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Urban Rural Municipal Average 1

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 E. Urban-rural population distribution

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The barangays adjacent to the Poblacion and along the National Highway are classified as urban barangays. The urban barangays are situated along the National Highway and are centers of residential subdivisions growth and expansion. The municipality’s urban to rural population ratio is 3:5. Among the urban barangays, Poblacion is the most populated due to the presence of three subdivisions and population catalysts like business establishments, and major public and social service institutions. Six (6) of the rural barangays – Bigke, Camangay, Gua-an, M.V. Hechanova, Nabitasan and Napnud are coastal barangays and are situated along the coastal Highway connecting Iloilo City and the municipality of Dumangas. The municipality has a total urban population of 10,327 and a rural population of 17,228.

Population by Year and Barangay Classification CY 2006 – 2015
Barangay A. Urban Buntatala Cagamutan Sur Cari Minor Guihaman Guinobatan Poblacion Sub-total B. Rural Bigke Cagamutan Norte Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Gua-an Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud San Vicente Sub-total TOTAL Actual Population 2006 2007 2008 1,342 1,534 698 2,089 2,056 2,619 10,338 602 2,303 1,431 590 1,288 1,066 1,160 2,085 571 2,628 1,850 1,191 16,765 27,103 1,346 1,806 804 1,866 2,060 2,767 10,649 608 2,286 1,261 436 1,274 1,086 1,134 2,242 600 2,651 1,780 1,350 16,708 27,357 1,357 1,801 735 2,036 1,955 2,443 10,327 599 2,120 1,340 560 1,463 1,186 1,196 2,197 607 2,739 1,921 1,300 17,228 27,555 2009 1,363 1,981 783 1,944 1,923 2,434 10,427 600 2,053 1,253 499 1,517 1,233 1,199 2,287 629 2,784 1,921 1,389 17,363 27,790 2010 1,371 2,114 801 1,918 1,872 2,346 10,422 599 1,962 1,208 484 1,604 1,293 1,217 2,343 647 2,839 1,957 1,444 17,595 28,016 Projected Population 2011 2012 2013 1,378 2,248 820 1,891 1,822 2,258 10,416 597 1,870 1,162 469 1,692 1,353 1,235 2,399 665 2,895 1,992 1,498 17,826 28,242 1,386 2,381 838 1,865 1,771 2,170 10,411 596 1,779 1,117 454 1,779 1,413 1,253 2,455 683 2,950 2,028 1,553 18,058 28,468 1,393 2,515 857 1,838 1,721 2,082 10,405 594 1,687 1,071 439 1,867 1,473 1,271 2,511 701 3,006 2,063 1,607 18,289 28,694 2014 1,401 2,648 875 1,812 1,670 1,994 10,400 593 1,596 1,026 424 1,954 1,533 1,289 2,567 719 3,061 2,099 1,662 18,521 28,920 2015 1,408 2,782 894 1,785 1,620 1,906 10,394 591 1,504 980 409 2,042 1,593 1,307 2,623 737 3,117 2,134 1,716 18,752 29,146

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Population by Year and Barangay Classification
20,000 18,000 16,000 14,000
Population

12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Year Urban Rural

F. Households Household Size per Barangay CY 2008
Population
A. Urban Buntatala Cagamutan Sur Cari Minor Guihaman Guinobatan Poblacion Sub-total B. Rural Bigke Cagamutan Norte Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Gua-an Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud San Vicente Sub-total TOTAL 1,357 1,801 735 2,036 1,955 2,443 10,327 599 2,120 1,340 560 1,463 1,186 1,196 2,197 607 2,739 1,921 1,300 17,228 27,555

Number of Households
299 376 146 430 406 696 2,357 125 436 254 105 300 222 280 458 129 542 396 273 3,520 5,873

Average Household Size
4.54 4.79 5.03 4.73 4.82 3.51 4.39 4.79 4.86 5.28 5.33 4.88 5.34 4.27 4.80 4.71 5.05 4.85 4.76 4.89 4.69

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The total number of households in the municipality is 5. Poblacion has the highest number of households with 696 while Camangay has the lowest with 105. The total number of households in barangays classified as urban is 2,357 and 3,520 in rural barangays. The average household size in the municipality is 5 persons per household.

Family Size per Barangay CY 2008
Barangay A. Urban Buntatala Cagamutan Sur Cari Minor Guihaman Guinobatan Poblacion Sub-total B. Rural Bigke Cagamutan Norte Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Gua-an Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud San Vicente Sub-total TOTAL Population 1,357 1,801 735 2,036 1,955 2,443 10,327 599 2,120 1,340 560 1,463 1,186 1,196 2,197 607 2,739 1,921 1,300 17,228 27,555 Number of Families 325 376 150 469 429 721 2,470 128 492 273 113 324 248 319 516 154 602 454 274 3,897 6,367 Average Family Size 4.18 4.79 4.90 4.34 4.56 3.39 4.18 4.68 4.31 4.91 4.96 4.52 4.78 3.75 4.26 3.94 4.55 4.23 4.74 4.42 4.33

Number of Families per Household CY 2008
Barangay A. Urban Buntatala Cagamutan Sur Cari Minor Guihaman Guinobatan Poblacion Sub-total Number of Families Number of Households 299 376 146 430 406 696 2,353 Number of Families per Household 1.09 1.00 1.03 1.09 1.06 1.04 1.05

325 376 150 469 429 721 2,470

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017
Barangay B. Rural Bigke Cagamutan Norte Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Gua-an Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud San Vicente Sub-total TOTAL Number of Families Number of Households 125 436 254 105 300 222 280 458 129 542 396 273 3,520 5,873

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Number of Families per Household 1.02 1.13 1.07 1.08 1.08 1.12 1.14 1.13 1.19 1.11 1.15 1.00 1.11 1.08

128 492 273 113 324 248 319 516 154 602 454 274 3,897 6,367

Number of Toilets per Barangay CY 2008
Barangay Bigke Buntatala Cagamutan Norte Cagamutan Sur Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Cari Minor Gua-an Guihaman Guinobatan Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud Poblacion San Vicente Total Number of households with toilets Fushed/ Water Sealed Antipolo/ Pit Privy 95 10 276 421 9 376 222 32 92 8 263 16 94 51 76 74 388 17 362 32 236 430 103 2 417 353 21 696 232 5,132 272 None/ Shared Open Pit 7 5 3 1 18 55 15 9 1 15 10 11 4 154 13 18 3 4 3 1 17 10 12 35 27 9 115 11 37 315

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 Number of Households with Vegetable Gardens and Livestock per Barangay CY 2008
Barangay Bigke Buntatala Cagamutan Norte Cagamutan Sur Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Cari Minor Gua-an Guihaman Guinobatan Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud Poblacion San Vicente Total Vegetable Garden 2 111 84 182 27 146 20 45 165 15 50 123 39 12 35 58 107 1,221 Livestock

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30 24 240 17 201 47 440 106 103 210 130 202 13 38 81 61 88 2,031

ECONOMIC RESOURCES

Agriculture Area Devoted to Agricultural Crop Production CY 2008
Crop Area (has.) % to Total Agricultural Land Area for Crop Production 88.349 11.274 0.365 0.011 100 % to Total Land Area of the Municipality 52.639 6.717 0.217 0.007 59.581

Rice Other crops Mongo and watermelon (secondary crops after rice) Vegetables High value crops Ornamental Total Agricultural Land Area for Crop Production Total Land Area of the Municipality

1,694.98 216.30 7.00 0.22 1,918.50 3,220.00

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 Number of Rice Farmers per Barangay CY 2008
Barangay Bigke Buntatala Cagamutan Norte Cagamutan Sur Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Cari Minor Gua-an Guihaman Guinobatan Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud Poblacion San Vicente Total Area (has.) 23.60 53.00 88.30 65.75 226.95 30.35 137.60 74.80 42.25 91.50 99.73 83.95 359.00 32.00 34.80 62.40 7.50 181.50 1,694.98 No. of Crop Farmers

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28 34 46 35 125 19 84 53 33 66 62 70 180 45 16 49 8 95 1,048.00

Major and Minor Occupational Groups CY 2008
Major and Minor Occupational Groups A. Farmers Crop farmers Orchard farmers Ornamental plant growers Location 18 barangays Napnud Buntatala, Cagamutan Norte, Cari Mayor, Gua-an, Poblacion, San Vicente Calaboa, Lapayon 18 barangays 18 barangays 18 barangays Bigke, Gua-an, M.V. Hechanova, Nabitasan, Napnud Napnud Number of Producers 1,048 1 18

Rice seed growers Livestock farmers Poultry farmers Game fowl producers B. Aqua farm cultivators/Brackish water fish producers C. Inland water fish producers Total

4 3,780 1,570 50 22 1 6,494

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Area Production and Value of Rice Production CY 2008
Type of Riceland Irrigrated Non-irrigated Total Area (has.) 1,660.18 34.80 1,694.98 % to Total Agricultural Land for Rice Production 97.95 2.05 Production Total (in MT) 12,484.93 161.02 12,645.95 Value of Production at P 12.00/kg (Php) 149,819,160.00 1,932,240.00 151,751,400.00

Total Number of Livestock and Poultry CY 2008
Livestock/Poultry Commercial Carabao Cattle Hog/Swine Goat Duck Chicken Broiler Layer Native Total 10,500 6,500 17,000 No. of Heads Backyard 104 446 2,811 510 3,260 8,355 15,486 Total 104 446 2,811 510 3,260 10,500 6,500 8,355 32,486

Aquatic Resource Land Area
Coastline length (km.) Aqua farm/Brackish water (has.): Title areas Fishpond lease agreement with BFAR Municipal fishpond Total 6.23

446 13 187 646

of which 120 has. is semi-developed

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 Tourism A. Events Calendar of Annual Events
Date January 1 Event Title Parada sa Kasisidmun/ Foundation Anniversary Venue Poblacion, Leganes, Iloilo Description Parada sa Kasisidmun is a torch parade during the twilight of January 1 when Leganes celebrates its Foundation Anniversary. The torch paraded by the participants of the parade which include LGU officials and employees, DepEd and the church brings about a message of hope, that despite the political and economic turmoil the country is facing, Leganesnons believe that there is still hope and that the people’s dreams and aspirations for this town will serve as a benchmark towards excellence. This is a dance drama and street dancing competition participated in by the different elementary and high schools in the municipality. The dance drama depicts the Leganesnons humble history and the peoples’ way of life with the intervention of St. Vincent Ferrer, the Patron Saint of the town. It is highlighted by the “palapak”, this is the treading of the image of the saint to the head of the devotees while they make a vow or saad to be fulfilled for their sickness to be healed. A sought after event before the day of the town fiesta, this festivity showcases the Leganesnons innate skills and artistry in dancing. It has strengthened the collaboration among the 3 basic institutions-the LGU, the church and the school. Celebration of the town’s annual fiesta done with pageantry featuring the beautiful youths of Leganes.

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Program of Activities Torch parade, short program in celebration of the Leganes founding anniversary and fireworks display.

April 4

Saad Festival: Panaad kay San Vicente Ferrer

Poblacion, Leganes, Iloilo

Dance drama and street dance competition, band staged after the awarding ceremony in the afternoon

April 5

Leganes Town Fiesta

Poblacion, Leganes, Iloilo

June 24

Biray Piraw

M.V. Hechanova, Leganes,

Leganesnons coming from the coastal areas are widely known as undefeated riggers and bangka sailers in the annual

Ms. Leganes Youth for Progress Beauty Pageant, the awarding of Outstanding Leganesnons and a night for the Balikbayans Coronation of the year’s fiesta queen Food fest, Boat sailing

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017
Date Event Title Venue Iloilo Description Piraw Regatta competition in the City. To exploit the opportunities brought about by their innate skill, so emerged Biray Piraw to boost Leganes tourism and give livelihood to some of the residents. Sail lovers can have a taste of sea air while riding in the paraw and can experience biray-biray. It is a once in a lifetime experience for beach and sea lovers. A Christmas celebration activity highlighted by the Christmas trees lighting ceremony Program of Activities

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Dec. 1631

Paskwa Fiesta

Poblacion, Leganes, Iloilo

Daigon Contest, Christmas Tree Making Contest, Bibingka Feast

Leganes is a town of essence, Mecca of Western Visayas. Leganes is known for its miraculous Patron Saint, Vincent Ferrer, the tutelage of the sick. Leganes has been the visitation area of the devotees of the winged saint to make a vow or “saad”. Ones visit to Leganes will not be complete without attending the mass and experiencing the “palapak” wherein the image of St. Vincent Ferrer is being treaded on ones head accompanied by the faith of the latter that his illness will be healed. The people of Leganes, even those residing or are working abroad come home to celebrate together the feast of the miraculous saint every April 5. Along with this joyous and remarkable festivity is the Saad Festival which is a religious-cultural presentation showcased a day before the fiesta and the crowning of the year’s Leganes Fiesta Queen. With the holding of Saad Festival, now on its 4th year, Leganes joined the yearly Kasadyahan Festival conducted by the Dinagyang Foundation of the Iloilo City Government. Leganes won the grand prize and was invited to join the Aliwan Festival in Metro Manila. This is an indication that albeit financial constraint, Leganesnons has talents to offer and ingenuity to compete.

Cultural Attractions
Site Name St. Vincent Ferrer Parish Museum Location Poblacion, Leganes, Iloilo Description The museum features the old images and church paraphernalia used since the 1870’s.

Historical Attractions
Site Name Gabaldon Building Location Leganes Central Elementary School Description The Gabaldon Building was built during the pre- Japanese era and was used as the Japanese garrison. It is now used until today as classrooms.

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 Living Cultural Attractions
Attraction Title Pangaypot asin Description/Details During the summer season, the saltbeds are glistening again with crystal white salt and this signals pagpangaypot or the gathering of salts. It seems like the people in this activity are enjoying so much that would be mistaken as if they’re fiesta a fiesta out there. This is one of the activities Leganes is known for. The town boats its crystal clear produced salts.

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Other Information As early as the month of November, when the climate so warrants, salt beds owners are already busy preparing the salt for salt making. When the summer season starts in the early part of the year, the pangaypot starts as early as the mid-month or February until June.

B. Accommodation The Jaen Beach Resort in M.V. Hechanova, Leganes, Iloilo is a venue for an overnight stay in nipa huts (cottages) for families and lovers alike. For as low as P 200.00/night, one can have a breath of cold and fresh sea breeze and a fascinating view of Guimaras. These one-bedroom cottages can accommodate 2-4 persons with a toilet and bathroom. It has a window overlooking the sea where one can wander ones eyes around the mesmerizing beauty of sunrise and of sunset. It offers a rural ambiance, away from the busy urban life. Aside from staying in the hut and gaining ones spiritual strength there, one can have a videoke experience at the beach pavilion. With a reservation or upon request, paraw (a non-motorized bangka with sails) riggers may be available for a biray-biray (boat sailing) along the Iloilo and Guimaras Strait. The Gethsemane Retreat House in Napnud is an ideal place for retreats and live-in seminars with its soothing ambiance. It has eight bedrooms, which can accommodate four persons per room. It has a big gazebo where lectures can be conducted. It has also a chapel for spiritual activities.

C. Foods Restaurants and Food Specialty
Facility Name Tipong’s Gamefishing and Restaurant Leganes Commercial Complex Hut Stop Big K Location Nabitasan, Leganes, Iloilo Poblacion, Leganes, Iloilo Guihaman, Leganes, Iloilo Bigke, Leganes, Iloilo Food Specialty Bangus sisig, bangus belly sinigang, boneless grilled bangus Fresh half-boiled or steamed talaba Pata Plant nursery Other Services Hook fishing (pamunit)

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 D. Specialty (Products)

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The municipality is known for its bangus and salt production. The municipal government is into studies at making bangus its product to the OTOP (one town, one product). Hence, the research for other food products that be made out of this “milky fish.” The municipality is also a venue for the ukay-ukay from Saturday to Sunday weekly. Specialty Products
Specialty (Products) Woodcrafts Description These are products made of finely carved woods like lamps, wine holders, ships and the like that manifests aestheticism and conscientiousness Exported to other countries and widely sold in Boracay as well as in the city, these lanot lampshades are made from carefully chosen abaca fibers with the use of other indigenous products to produce an electricitydriven lamp with a touch of artistry and could bring about a message of serenity. From the unused newspapers and other paper materials, these are recycled and made into strips and covered with colored plastics to make up paper flowers. The rattan raw materials can’t be found in Leganes yet bamboo is abundant. Despite the absence of the former in the locality, some Leganesnons ventured into this business for they have seen its marketability and displaying the products on the national highway going to the northern part of the province is but a strategic location where one may stop and shop first at Leganes finest rattan furniture ranging from sala set to dining tables and beds. Bamboo made furniture are paired with rattan for both displays equal aesthetics depending on the tastes and preference of the consumers. Rates/Price From P 200.00 to P 2,000.00 From P 500.00 to P 10,000.00

Lanot lampshades

Paper flowers

From P 25.00 to P 100.00

Rattan and bamboo furniture

From P 5,000.00 to P 20,000.00

E. Entertainment Entertainment Facility
Facility Name Gallera de Leganes Leganes Gymnasium Leganes Amphitheater Location Cagamutan Sur, Leganes, Iloilo Poblacion, Leganes, Iloilo Poblacion, Leganes, Iloilo Description The Gallera de Leganes teems with people during weekends and special occasions. Cock fighting aficionados go to Leganes for a different and enjoyable experience. The Leganes Gymnasium is the venue for cultural, sports and historical events. It can cater to as much as 3,000 people. The Amphitheater offers a nice ambiance for open-air concerts and other cultural activities.

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017
Facility Name Fiesta Pavilion Location Poblacion, Leganes, Iloilo Poblacion, Leganes, Iloilo

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Tennis Court

Description The historical Fiesta Pavilion (Public Plaza) witnesses every year the crowning of the Leganes Fiesta Queen and other related events. It is also designated as the Freedom Park. The Tennis Court is available daily for lawn tennis and other sports activities. On weekends, the area is used as flea market (ukay-ukay).

SOCIAL SERVICES

Health Health Status CY 2008
Crude birth rate Crude death rate Infant mortality rate Maternal mortality rate Fetal mortality rate General consultation rate 20.00 4.80 7.00 23.00 /1,000 population /1,000 population /1,000 live birth

%

10 Leading Causes of Morbidity CY 2008
Cause Upper respiratory tract infection Urinary tract infection Dermatitis Wounds Hypertension Gastroenteritis Gastritis Bronchial asthma Roll out allergy Myalgia Number of Cases 1,623 282 252 251 221 186 163 161 124 123

10 Leading Cause of Mortality CY 2008
Cause Multi-organ failure Hypertensive cardiovascular disease Pneumonia Number of Cases 20 18 13

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017
Cause Diabetes mellitus Bronchial asthma Cancer Pulmonary tuberculosis Drowning Myocardial infarction Aspiration pneumonia Number of Cases

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11 10 9 8 7 7 3

Causes of Infant Mortality CY 2008
Cause Dehydration Sepsis Asphyxia Number of Cases 2 1 1

Nutritional Status of Preschool Children CY 2008
Barangay No. of Preschoolers No. of Preschoolers Weighed % Covered Normal Nutritional Status Below Below Normal Normal Very Low 10 20 35 1 4 40 1 8 11 3 14 2 12 33 4 29 12 1 31 2 6 57 3 6 19 4 41 3 388 24 Above Normal Total BN and BNVL 10 20 36 4 41 8 14 16 12 37 29 13 33 6 60 6 23 44 412 %to Total No. of PS weighed 14.29 17.54 13.95 2.21 25.31 9.88 8.38 24.62 7.84 16.74 15.18 8.84 16.26 7.79 15.19 2.43 10.70 28.95 13.29

Bigke Buntatala Cagamutan Norte Cagamutan Sur Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Cari Minor Gua-an Guihaman Guinobatan Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud Poblacion San Vicente Total

70 143 258 183 162 81 167 65 153 226 191 147 212 78 396 247 215 152 3,146

70 114 258 181 162 81 167 65 153 221 191 147 203 77 395 247 215 152 3,099

100.00 79.72 100.00 98.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 97.79 100.00 100.00 95.75 98.72 99.75 100.00 100.00 100.00 98.51

60 91 222 175 121 73 144 49 139 183 160 125 169 72 147 235 184 108 2,457

3 2 1 2 2 2 9 1 6 8 36

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Nutrional Status of Preschool Children
N o . o f P re s c h o o l C h ild r e n

250 200 150 100 50 ke m u nt a ta C a ta n N la ga m u or te ta n S C a ur lab Ca o ma a ng Ca r i M ay C a ay o r ri M ino Gu r a- a Gu ih n Gu ama in o n ba ta Gu n in t as L M. V. ap a yon He ch an N a ova b it as a Na n pn ud Po b S a l a c io nV n ic e n te B ig

Normal Below Normal Below Normal Very Low Above Normal

Ca

ga

Bu

Barangay

Comparative Results of Malnourished Preschoolers Below Normal - Very Low Below Normal Combined CY 2006-2008
Barangay No. of PS Weighed 84 132 214 129 161 69 157 64 141 219 222 148 219 61 394 226 187 151 2,978 2006 BN BNVL Total No. of PS Weighed 79 135 295 109 161 73 155 66 160 224 221 153 222 75 387 228 206 155 3,104 2007 BN BNVL Total No. of PS Weighed 70 114 258 181 162 81 167 65 153 221 191 147 203 77 395 247 215 152 3,099 2008 BN BNVL Total

Bigke Buntatala Cagamutan Norte Cagamutan Sur Calaboa Camangay Cari Mayor Cari Minor Gua-an Guihaman Guinobatan Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud Poblacion San Vicente Total

8 20 42 4 38 3 35 8 10 29 28 14 21 3 75 24 32 35 429

9 5 6 2 8 3 5 1 3 3 45

8 20 51 4 43 3 41 10 10 37 31 19 22 3 78 24 35 35 474

8 27 38 2 40 4 25 14 18 33 25 24 16 6 75 22 30 31 438

2 4 6 3 1 10 1 1 3 1 32

8 27 40 2 44 4 31 17 19 43 26 25 16 6 78 22 31 31 470

10 20 35 4 40 8 11 14 12 33 29 12 31 6 57 6 19 41 388

1 1 3 2 4 1 2 3 4 3 24

10 20 36 4 41 8 14 16 12 37 29 13 33 6 60 6 23 44 412

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Comparative Results of Malnourished Preschool Children
No. of Preschool Children

90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 e la te ur oa ay or or an an tan tas on va an ud ion nte y S b o s y g gk ta or n in Bi nta N tan ala an Ma i M ua iham oba uin pa an ita ap blac ice n u G u G La ch ab N o nV u ta in C am ari ar B u P a G Gu C C C He N am S am ag V. . ag C M C Barangay

2006 2007 2008

Health Manpower CY 2008
Position Physician Nurses Medical Technologist Dental Aides Dentists Midwives Sanitary Inspectors Barangay Health Workers Nutrition Action Officers Barangay Nutrition Scholars Total Barangay Health Stations Number 1 2 1 1 1 5 2 146 1 26 186 4

Family Planning

No. of Married Couples Practicing Family Planning per Barangay CY 2008
Barangay Bigke Buntatala Cagamutan Norte Cagamutan Sur Calaboa No. of Married Couples Practicing Family Planning 14 60 56 30

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017
Barangay Camangay Cari Mayor Cari Minor Gua-an Guihaman Guinobatan Guintas Lapayon M.V. Hechanova Nabitasan Napnud Poblacion San Vicente Total No. of Married Couples Practicing Family Planning 18 28 21 25 74 78 39 50 12 48 71 50 30 704

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Social Welfare

Number of Clients Served CY 2008
Clientele Category Family heads and other needy adults Children Needy preschoolers Children in need of special protection Children in conflict with the law Victims of abuse Children at risk Youth Out of school Needy in school Youth offender Women Persons with disabilities Senior citizens Solo parents Individual/Families in crisis situation Total Number 296 559 25 10 75 10 700 5 727 50 4,500 10 4,656 11,623

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 Education

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Public School Performance Indicators SY 2007 – 2008
Indicator Participation Rate Retention Rate Survival Rate Graduation Rate Transition Rate Drop-Out Rate Completion Rate Repetition Rate Teacher-Student Ratio Classroom-Student Ratio Furniture-Student Ratio Textbook-Student Ratio Literacy Rate Elementary 97.91% 93.77% 67.58% 95.82% 97.10% 4.70% 74.66% 5.27% 1:31 1:31 1:1 1:4 93% Lapayon National High School 96.98% 90.01% 85.71% 95.00% 78.12% 4.71% 90.47% 13.40% 1:25 1:1 1:3 93% Leganes National High School 71.56% 86.57% 80.73% 95.79% 75.28% 6.79% 91.53% 2.24% 1:31 1:60 1:6 93% Nabitasan National High School 94.00% 98.00% 87.00% 99.00% 38.00% 7.50% 96.25% 3.80% 1:27 1:43 1:1 1:1 93%

Public Order and Safety Crime Volume CY 2008
Index Crimes Against Person Murder 3 Homicide 8 Physical Injury Rape 2 Against Property Robbery Theft 2 7 Total Nonindex Crimes Total Crimes Crime Solved Crime Solution Efficiency Rate 96.88%

22

10

32

31

Fire Incidence CY 2008
Total Fire Incidence Resulting in: Death Injury Amount of damages to property 2 P 81,000.00

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 LAND USES OF COASTAL AREAS

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Based from the approved Municipal Comprehensive Land Use Plan (MCLUP), the coastal barangays of the Municipality of Leganes has the following general land uses, to wit:

Built-up Areas Built-up areas used as residential, commercial, institutional and recreation areas cover approximately 121.6950 hectares or 11.85% of the total land area of the six (6) coastal barangays of the Municipality of Leganes.

Industrial Areas Coastal area was considered as the industrial growth center of the Municipality of Leganes in which 11.84% of the total land areas of the six coastal barangays were converted into industrial areas. Industries started to grow in coastal area in 2004, like wood treatment plant, oxy-acetylene refilling station, LPG gas tank repair, ice plant, water refilling stations and warehousing and a slaughterhouse.

Parks and Open Spaces These are the children’s playground and barangay basketball court in the six (6) coastal barangays. These cover about 15.36 hectares or 1.49% of the total land area of thee coastal barangays

Agricultural Areas Farmers of the coastal barangays adopt the diversified farming technology. Agricultural farms in this area which comprises 20% of the total land area do not avail the services of the National Irrigation Administration (NIA). Rice farming is on seasonal basis specifically during the on-set of the rainy season. To maximize its use, farmers utilize some areas as vegetable gardens, planted fruit trees and root crops.

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 Marshes and Swamps Marshes and swamps cover an area of 21.2 hectares or 2.05% of the total land area of the coastal barangays of Napnud, Gua-an and Nabitasan. These could be found along the river bank of Buntatala River that serves as the natural boundary to the adjacent barangays.

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Fishponds and Salt beds These areas are located along the coastal barangays of Bigke, MV Hechanova, Napnud, Gua-an and Nabitasan. These covers an area of 573.5473 has. or 52.77% of the total area of the coastal barangays.

Dumpsite A privately owned 0.2 has. Unutilized fishpond of Mayor Adolfo E. Jaen is presently being used as the municipal open dumpsite. It is located in Brgy. M.V. Hechanova in a flat tidal environment.

STATUS OF COASTAL RESOURCES

The Municipality of Leganes is endowed with diverse and economically productive coastal and marine resources. These resources if properly managed could sustainably contribute towards food security.

INFRASTRUCTURE

Physical infrastructure that support the fishery industry of the municipality consist of public wharves, wet market in the Leganes Commercial Complex (LCC) and shore protection infrastructure. The municipality has two (2) public wharves, the Jalaur River Wharf constructed by DPWH located in Sitio Pandan, Brgy. Nabitasan and the Gui-gui Creek Wharf located in the barangay proper of Barangay Nabitasan. The capacity of these wharves limits usage to marginal fishing bancas only. The Gui-gui Creek Wharf which was constructed during the term of Mayor Josil P. Jaen that accommodate cargo vessel is no longer used

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017

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for cargo transport. Rehabilitation of the creek bed to remove accumulated silt caused by the presence of various fish traps and oyster culture set-ups is necessary. The shoreline protection is limited only to areas previously occupied by Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC) in Barangay Nabitasan and a wave breaker spur dike constructed in Barangay Bigke. Because of lacks of technical knowledge in hydraulics and coastal engineering the wave breaker dike in Brgy. Bigke did not serve its purpose in minimizing soil erosion. All six (6) coastal barangays of the municipality are served by the Iloilo Electric Cooperative I (ILECO I). An exemption to this is coastal squatter household built outside household cluster of the coastal barangays. There is one (1) aquaculture research center in the municipality. The University of the Philippines in the Visayas – Brackishwater Aquaculture Center (UPV-BAC) located in Barangay Nabitasan has a complete laboratory facilities and research programs for aquaculture. New technologies can be availed to enhance aquaculture production.

Fisheries and other marine commodities The Municipality of Leganes is teemed with various species of fish and mollusk identified during the PCRA Training Workshop are the following: sap-sap, lilang, asu-os, gurayan, gonggong, balanak, pagi, gusaw, sumaral, talakitok, lapu-lapu, alimusan, bangus, lipis, liwit, lokus, lambiyaw, pasayan, (shrimp), alimango (mud crab), kasag (blue crab). Shellfish or bivalves also in seasonal basis like green shells, bay-ad and litub.

A. Municipal Fishing The Municipal Fishing operation is characterized by small-scale fishing which makes the use of unmotorized and motorized bancas and marginal fishing that makes use of hook and line method and trap and gill nets. As presented during the PCRA, marginal fisherfolks faced the problem of low fish catched. This is the result of coastal resource over exploitation like illegal fishing and habitat destruction. Based on the summary of fish catch the community could hardly get two (2) kilos of fish catch per unit effort. B. Aquaculture and/or Mariculture Aquaculture and/or mariculture are characterized by brackishwater, fishpond, seaweeds and oyster culture. Presently, the estimated area occupied by brackishwater ponds is 646 hectares distributedly located in Brgys. Bigke, MV Hechanova, Napnud, Gua-an and Nabitasan.

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Brackishwater fishponds are utilized for bangus, tilapia and shrimp production adopting traditional culture method. Target production is from 300 kgs to 500 kgs per hectare per year. However, current conditions of these fishponds require major repairs on damages brought about by flush flood during Typhoon Frank that occurred in June 21, 2008. Seaweeds and oyster culture are found along the watered area of Gui-gui Creek in Barangay Nabitasan in a small scale production set-up. Financial and technical support from the local government, NGOs and NGAs and other financial institution is needed to improve harvest of mariculture products. Mariculture is considered to be the supplemental source of income of marginal fisherfolks of Barangay Nabitasan. Despite the presence of large fishpond areas in the municipality, only few is currently productive. Fish produced is unable to meet the level of demand of the municipality. To fill in the supply and demand gap, the municipality source out its supply of marine, brackishwater fish from neighboring towns.

Coastal Habitats The coastal habitats are varied results of Participatory Coastal Resource Assessment (PCRA) conducted through the Coastal Resource Management Project (CRMP) of the DENR. The assessments provide the actual condition of the state of the coastal habitats of the six (6) coastal barangays of the Municipality of Leganes.

A. Mangroves Mangroves are essential to the ecological and socio economic condition of the area in which they grows. They play an important role in nutrient cycling and provide a habitat to many species of fish and mollusk. They also control soil erosion and sediment deposits in sea beds. Approximately, 1.0 hectare of natural grown and planted mangrove thrive along the shorelines and estuarine of Barangay Camangay and Bigke, almost 1.0 hectare naturally grown mangrove in Barangay Gua-an, and estimated 3.0 hectares mangrove cover that sporadically grown in a 10.0 hectare abandoned fishpond owned by the Municipality of Leganes, about 2.0 hectares of mangrove forest in the area previously occupied by SEAFDEC, 1.0 hectare fully grown mangroves that covers an islet at the delta of Jalaur River in Barangay Nabitasan, and a 3.0 hectares mangroves that protect the riverbank along Jalaur River. Dominant mangrove species found in the Municipality of Leganes as follows: 1. Bungalon 2. Pagatpat 3. Bakhaw

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 4. Nipa

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B. Coral Reef All coastal barangays of the Municipality of Leganes has no coral reefs within their territorial waters. This was determined when a group of divers from DOST make an underwater assessment in early 2009 as a one of the requirements for the proposed reclamation project of Leganes Industrial Growth Center. Siltation was noticed to have accumulated in seabed to approximately 0.66 meters to 0.90 meters depth. This condition is due mainly to the discharge of Jalaur River and the Salog River.

C. Sea Grass The Sea grass eco system serves as habitat to many marine species where fish juvenile thrive and fed themselves with marine micro-organisms that sticks on the leaves. A 2.50 hectares sea grass cover was noticed by DOST divers about a kilometer distance from the shore, on territorial waters of Barangay Nabitasan.

Coastal Tourism Leganes being a coastal municipality with a coastal road from Iloilo City to Dumangas traversing it, is an ideal area for eco-tourism. It is eleven (11) kilometers from the city and fifteen (15) kilometers away from the New Iloilo Airport of International Standard. It is a thirty (30) and forty five (45) minutes ride respectively through a public utility vehicles. The coastline may not be so inviting due to presence of seaside dwellers that contribute to coastal pollution but making a closer look through would reveal more of significant number of attractions.

Attractions Jaen Fish Fun and Beach Resort Inayan Beach Resort

Jalaur River

Lulubog-lilitaw islet

Location Description Brgy. M. V. It is a beach resort and the venue of the annual Hechanova biray paraw sa Leganes. One can go fishing and biray-biray in this place Brgy. With cottages situated in the water, one can feel Camangay the cool breeze of the sea and have a sight seeing of the different colored jellyfish swimming during summer on knee deep water. Barangay Surrounded by nipa on both sides of its body, the Nabitasan Jalaur River is teeming with fish and has been the source of water on inland fishfarm. The site is also conducive for boating. Barangay It is a more or less one (1) hectare islet located at Nabitasan the delta of Jalaur River. This islet is fully

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 Attractions Location

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Mangrove Sitio 30, Protected Reserve Barangay area Nabitasan

Tipong’s Fishing Restaurant

Game Barangay and Nabitasan

Jamora’s Orchard

Barangay Napnud

Description covered with mangroves that serves as sanctuary for various species of shore birds and fish juveniles. During the occurrence of high tide, the islet is fully underwater and during low tide the islet will again appear showing the fully grown mangroves. A 10 hectare abandoned fishpond owned by the municipal government where almost 3 hectares of fully grown mangrove is visible and the remaining area is sporadically covered by secondary grown mangrove. Thru the effort of Zoological Society of London (ZSL) the vacant spaces are being planted with mangrove seedlings. Whenever in Leganes, local and foreign tourist may enjoy game fishing delectable seafood. They will experience the thrill of hook fishing, taste the fresh seafood a breath of fresh air and wide parking space. It is an ideal place for live-in training and retreats. It is also an ideal venue to commune with nature and for those who want to get away from the urban crowd. It is a place where one can truly relax his mind and meditate. It has a big gazebo wherein lectures can be conducted.

INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT FOR CRM

An effective coastal resource management should be provided with an institutional arrangement that relate to annual operational budget, logistical support, staffing, policy issuances, enforcement of fishery and environmental laws, development programs, capability enhancement and operational systems linkages. The absence or presence of these components indicates the level of priority accorded to the performance of CRM-related functions.

Organization There are various organizations that operate within the municipality to promote effective coastal resource management. These organizations include the municipal government, non-governmental organizations and national government agencies.

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 A. Municipal Government

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The municipal government is headed by the Municipal Mayor who is the Local Chief Executive. Under the mayor are the various executive instrumentalities as follows: 1. The Municipal Planning and Development Office (MPDO) serves as the center for the local planning activities. MPDO also serves as technical secretariat for the Municipal Development Council. 2. The Municipal Agriculture Office looks into the fisheries management aspect of coastal resources management together with the concern enterprise and livelihood management. 3. The Tourism Office deals with the coastal tourism concerns which linked to the over-all tourism development plan of the municipality. 4. The legislative branch of government at the municipal level, which is the Sangguniang Bayan headed by the Vice Mayor. He acts as presiding officer to the eight (8) elected SB members, two (2) sectoral representatives from the Federation of Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) and Association of Barangay Councils (ABC). To pass an effective legislation, public consultations are needed. To focus issues and concerns on sectoral basis twenty (20) Standing Committees were created. To address the concerns on food security, the environment and coastal resources, the Committee on Agriculture and the Committee on Environmental Protection should study and recommend policies and regulations including management and livelihood options and other development projects. 5. Non-governmental organizations (NGO) and Private Sector. A major actor outside the control of the municipal government are non-governmental organizations (NGO) that implement CRM related programs and projects either solely through government funding or in partnership with foreign donors. To name a few are the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and IKAW AKO Japan Negros Partnership for Environmental Protection. 6. National Government Agencies a. Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) – Create the Coastal Environmental Program (CEP) as an approach to environmental protection management and conservation b. Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) created the Fishery Resource and Management Program (FRMP)

B. Legal Basis 1. MOA between Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and the Municipal Government in the implementation of the Community-Based Mangrove Rehabilitation Project that covers two sites Barangay Bigke and Barangay Nabitasan of the Municipality of Leganes.

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2. Executive Order No. 17 Series of 2009: Creation of Municipal Technical Working Group on Integrated Coastal Management (MTWG-ICM) of the Municipality of Leganes.

C. Projects Community-Based Mangrove Rehabilitation Project. This is a Three-Year (20082010) project, which provides technical assistance and training in coastal resource management and rehabilitation to coastal barangays.

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Chapter 3 MANAGEMENT ISSUES, STRENGTHS AND OPPORTUNITIES

This chapter presents management issues and strengths prevailing within the six (6) coastal barangays and the opportunities by which the Municipal Government can effectively assist in carrying out their respective CRM functions. The strength and opportunities of each barangays as well as those of the municipality are also highlighted. Strengths refer to the physical, natural, human and institutional attributes while opportunities are the situations that maybe capitalized on. These management issues are classified into the following: 1. Resource degradation relate to the state of coastal habitat productivity and coastal water quality that are affected by various factors, mostly humaninduced. It reflects haw communities and institutions, whether they are from upland, lowland or coastal areas do their part in the proper management and utilization of limited and fragile resources. 2. Socio-economic and livelihood pertain to the limited or lack of opportunities for people to improve their lives through productive means. 3. Legal or institutional and/or administrative concerns link to the absence or weak mechanism that makes CRM implementation effective. 4. Awareness and people participation describe how people’s level of awareness hinders meaningful participation in CRM related endeavors. The analysis presented in this chapter derives foundations from data and information presented in Chapter II on Coastal Environmental Profile. The analysis will serve as a guide, most especially to the municipal implementers in deciding on strategy options that would best address the issues presented and packages of programs, projects and activities that would effectively bring about the desired outcome.

STRENGTHS

A closer look at the municipality and its six (6) coastal barangays reveals the following strengths: 1. Organized municipal technical working group on integrated coastal management represented by different sectors. 2. On-going CRM project (Community-Based Mangrove Rehabilitation Project of the Zoological Society of London). 3. On-going livelihood assistance projects (salt making and fish vending by the Department of Agriculture) in support to CRM program implementation. 4. Budget allocation for coastal clean up

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5. Active support of Local Chief Executive and Legislators 6. A one hundred eighty seven (187) hectares of municipal owned fishpond 7. The presence of Brackishwater Aquaculture Center of the University of the Philippines in Barangay Nabitasan that extends technical support to fishpond operators 8. The existing 2.5 hectares sea grass beds in Barangay Nabitasan and Gua-an and 1.0 hectare in Barangay Camangay indicates that the habitat is still healthy and capable of supporting marine life 9. A ten (10) hectares secondary grown mangrove on the abandoned municipal owned fishpond that will eventually restore fish sanctuary and fish nutrient recycling area 10. The existing mariculture and handicraft (lanot making) in Barangay Nabitasan offer chances for augmenting family income without relying too much on fishing 11. The newly completed farm to market road of Sitio Panusu-on, Nabitasan for easy transport of fishery products 12. Inter-agency collaboration and convergence of efforts of national, provincial, municipal and barangay agencies and or organizations towards effective implementation of CRM programs and projects. 13. On-going land based projects in Barangay Gua-an, Napnud, Bigke and Camangay which though need regulations to lessen impacts to coastal habitats, provide employment and alternative livelihood to people 14. Beautiful beaches in Barangay Camangay and M. V. Hechanova that support the tourism industry 15. The presence of specialized manufacturing fabricating industries in Brgy. Camangay and Bigke that offers work opportunities.

MANAGEMENT ISSUES

Resource Degradation Declining Fisheries. Based on the summary of fish catch, a fisherfolk could hardly get two (2) kilos of fish catch per unit effort per fishing activity for the past three (3) years that reveals an alarming coastal resource productivity. This resulted to the number of people who depend on the resources of the sea for their livelihood making competition for scarce resources.

Unstable Fishing Practices To ensure a substantial catch per unit of effort, fisherfolk resort to the use of unsustainable and or highly efficient but destructive fishing gears and methods (such as fine mesh nets) and unregulated fishing activities that caused resource degradation.

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 Pollution

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Industrial and agricultural wastes, municipal waste and erosion contribute to the habitat destruction and resource degradation.

Industrial and Agricultural Wastes Discharge of agricultural chemicals, inorganic fertilizers, industrial waste of sugar centrals and other liquid and solid wastes by agricultural farms and land-based industries are highly concentrated at the delta of Jalaur River and the Jaro River. High suspended and settleable solids saturates the sea water area of the coastal barangays of Nabitasan, Gua-an, Napnud, M.V. Hechanova, Bigke and Camangay. This affect the on-going mariculture activities in this coastal barangays which depends on the sea as their main source of water during this fish culture period.

Municipal Waste Municipal sewage directly to the river (Buntatala, Janipa-an and Jalaur River) into the sea without undergoing treatment. Although the local government is aware on the problems of liquid and solid waste implementation of an integrated solid waste management system is limited and concentrated in the Poblacion only. Segregation of waste into biodegradable and non-biodegradable materials is not practiced at source. Plastic materials are evidently scattered along beaches.

Erosion Upland erosion contributes to habitat destruction and resource degradation that causes siltation and sedimentation on water ways that also ends up in coastal areas and sea beds. It significantly affects sanctuaries and other coastal resources. Almost 30% of the coastal barangays land areas were eroded due to its exposure to open seas that directly destroy growing mangroves along the coastline.

Socio-economic and Livelihood

A. Inadequate Alternative Livelihood and Lack of Settlement Area The inadequacy of alternative livelihood opportunities and lack of settlement area in some part of the province pushes people to live in coastal areas and engage in activities that adds more pressure to the existing settlers for livelihood. Low level of educational attainment, poverty and unemployment also contributes to the issue.

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Lack of institutional arrangements. For the past years, the coastal resource management was neglected by the local government. In spite of some interventions by NGOs and government agencies by introducing trainings and projects to restore the coastal habitat, the activities could not be implemented. The absence of a Comprehensive Ordinance for the protection of mangrove and the Municipal Fishery Ordinance Compounds the prevailing issues especially that of resource degradation. The need for database organization and management is seen as necessary for any development planning activities from the municipal level to the barangay level. Relevant, updated and accurate data serve as important tools for decision making. At present, coastal development planning activities are only confined to the limited information available.

C. Awareness and People Participation Limited people awareness and participation. This is the prevailing issue in all coastal barangays. People awareness and participation is important in all CRM interventions to ensure best results. It is a common observation that community participation has been limited since the past years. At the LGU level, coastal resource management are not well defined. Therefore, all programs, projects and activities relative to CRM are not given due priority.

OPPORTUNITIES

At the municipal level, the following attributes are considered opportunities for better CRM implementation: 1. The ten (10) hectares secondary grown mangrove in Barangay Nabitasan and the one (1) hectare fully grown mangrove in an islet at the north of Jalaur River is an opportunity for the establishment of Mangrove Protected Areas (MPA) and ecotourism industry. 2. Beautiful beaches offer an opportunity for the development of the tourism industry. 3. The on-going salt making and fish vending livelihood project in Barangay Nabitasan promote economic enterprise. 4. Organized Bantay Dagat in Barangay Camangay may be an opportunity for effective law enforcement. 5. The active support of Zoological Society of London (ZSL), the Metro Iloilo Guimaras Economic Development Council (MIGEDC), the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), the Department of Agriculture

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(DA), the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) may be a good channel to generate funds. 6. Portion of 187 hectare of municipal-owned fishpond that could be converted into various aquaculture livelihood projects.

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Chapter 4 MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS, STRATEGIES AND POLICIES

The current state of coastal resources of the Municipality of Leganes indicates the intensified abused on the utilization of these resources in the coastal areas that resulted to environmental and special program. This situation gradually affected the economic activities of the coastal barangays especially those who solely depends on fishing as a source of livelihood. In support for an efficient and effective performance of the coastal resource management functions, formulation of strategies and policies is needed. This will serve as guideline and common reference of the municipality and the coastal barangays in discharging their mandated functions and roles.

KEY RESULT AREAS, OBJECTIVES, STRATEGIES AND POLICIES

Fisheries and Habitat Management This key result area addresses problems on coastal resource productivity. The over exploitation of coastal areas and the destructive method of fishing activities was due to the absence of an ordinance protecting the coastal resources.

A. Objectives 1. To rehabilitate existing habitats to restore productivity of coastal resources. 2. To enhance people participation in the conservation, protection and proper management of coastal habitats.

B. Strategies 1. Provision of technical assistance to the municipality and the coastal barangays in the: a. establishment of fish sanctuaries b. formulation of ordinances pertaining to the proper utilization of coastal resources 2. Develop a monitoring mechanism and strengthen law enforcement unit. 3. Organize and form community organization and councils for the protection and conservation of coastal resources. 4. Conduct massive information and education campaign on the importance of coastal habitat.

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a. The municipal waters should be reserved for municipal fisheries. Other activities, such as, but not limited to, research and monitoring activities may be allowed under appropriate regulation for purely research and scientific, technological and educational purposes. b. Commercial fishing vessel will be allowed to operate within the municipal waters. c. The coastal barangays should maintain a registry of fishers for the purpose of determining priorities among them, of regulating and limiting entry into the municipal waters and of monitoring fishing activities and other related purposes. Such list of fishers should be updated annually or as often as may be necessary and should be posted in barangay halls and other strategic locations open to the public. d. List of local fishing vessel, boat, type of gears and other fishing paraphernalia should be maintained by the barangay. e. Duly registered and accredited organizations, cooperatives of coastal barangays fishers and people organizations having fisherfolks as majority of their numbers should be given preference in the grant of exclusive fishery privilege by the Sangguniang Bayan, pursuant to Section 149 of the Local Government Code of 1991. 2. Fisheries Protection Measures The municipality should initiate inter barangay law enforcement activities among coastal barangays, the different community based law enforcement groups such as Bantay Dagat and other people organizations. 3. Habitat Protection Measure a. The municipal government in coordination with the DENR and FARMCs should initiate in the mangrove development projects that promote and ensure community participation. b. The municipality through an ordinance should establish and declare a twenty (20) meters strip toward the sea along the coastal area of Barangay Camangay to Barangay Nabitasan as Greenbelt Area. c. The municipality should declare the area where vast of secondary grown mangroves are found in an abandoned ten (10) hectares municipal owned fishpond as mangrove reserve and protected area. d. Conduct massive information and education campaign on the importance of habitat protection measures. e. The municipality should pass a comprehensive ordinance prohibiting the conversion of mangrove areas into other uses, regulating the presence of marine squatter/household on coastline, required waste water treatment

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plant of industries in coastal areas and strict prohibition of raising domestic animals at large in mangrove areas. f. The municipality should declare the water area where presence of sea grass is found as special marine protected area. 4. Aquaculture Development a. The municipality should consider aquaculture as a means to promote supplemental sources of income and preservation of coastal resources. b. The municipality should establish an effective monitoring and evaluation mechanism on the culture method used by fishpond operators that may contribute to adverse ecological changes especially the quality of seawater that serves as source of water in the water management activities during culture period. c. The municipality in coordination with DA, BFAR should require fishpond operator that adopt an intensive culture of high value sea products to provide the culture area with a waste treatment pond or canal that will allow toxic effluents to evaporate before it will be discharged to the sea. 5. Fishery Licensing and Permitting System a. The municipality should maintain a Registry of Municipal Fishers as the basis in issuance of non-transferable fishery license. b. The holders of fishery license should unconditionally comply with all the laws, orders, policies, rules and regulations governing fishing operations. c. The municipality should formulate a Comprehensive Fishery Ordinance in support to CRMP.

Livelihood and Enterprise Management This corresponds to the need of coastal barangays who have come in search for an alternative livelihood opportunity that develop their entrepreneurial skills without sacrificing the sustainability of coastal resources. This will also divert their dependency on coastal services as their only source of income.

A. Objective To provide supplementary and alternative source of income to coastal barangays from land base enterprises and other livelihood activities.

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1. Introduction of skills development training in the production of fishery based value added commodities like fish processing and other related small-scale industry. 2. Provision of financial assistance as initial capital in the implementation of livelihood projects. 3. Extending technical assistance in the identification, development and implementation of an environment friendly and sustainable aquaculture and mariculture livelihood projects.

C. Policies 1. The municipality should coordinate with the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA). The Department of Science and Technology (DOST) and the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) should provide appropriate technology to fisherfolks that includes, research, credit, production, packaging, marketing assistance and training for supplementary livelihood. 2. The municipality in coordination with the Cooperative Development Authority (CDA) should encourage fisherfolks of coastal barangays to organize a cooperative in search for an appropriate livelihood technology. 3. The municipality should allocate portion of 187.0 hectare municipal owned fishpond for aquaculture and mariculture livelihood projects for marginal fisherfolks.

Coastal Land Use and Zoning Proper zoning scheme could be considered as an effective coastal resource management strategy. This will delineate and ensure compatibility of coastal resource and will resolve conflicting interest of users.

A. Objective To assign specific resource uses in the coastal areas and eliminate conflict in the utilization of municipal waters.

B. Strategies 1. Pass an ordinance for coastal zoning that focus in the delineation of municipal coastal waters and designation of zone for specific uses.

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2. Conduct massive information and education campaign (IEC) regarding specific zone assignment and use.

C. Policies 1. The municipality and the coastal barangays should establish and implement coastal zoning scheme that is simple and manageable. The following are the supplemented zones: a. Greenbelt Zone (twenty meter strip of coastline toward the sea) i. Cutting of mangroves is not allowed ii. Raising of domestic animals at large that destroy secondary grown mangroves is prohibited in the area iii. Mangrove reforestation project is encourage iv. Conversion of the area into other uses is not allowed b. Mangrove Protected and Eco-Tourism Zone (ten (10) hectares abandoned municipal owned fishpond where secondary growth mangroves are found and the more or less one (1) hectare islet at the mouth of Jalaur River) c. Aquaculture Zone (the tidal flat areas before the green belt zone) i. Construction of fishpond is allowed but cutting of mangroves is prohibited; and, ii. An aquasilvi culture technology is suggested where mangroves inside the pond is preserved at the same time culture of marine commodities is on going. d. Industrial Zone (refer to the Comprehensive Land Use Plan) i. Establishment of manufacturing and fabricating industries including warehousing is allowed but a waste treatment facility is required. e. Protected Fish Sanctuary Zones i. Fishing is not allowed; and, ii. Other human activities or access such as research and other scientific purposes to the area may be allowed but with limitations. 2. Existing coastal resources in the area such as mangroves, sea grass beds estuarine, etc. should be protected. 3. Land uses of the coastal area should harmonize with coastal zoning scheme. Present but inappropriate use should be corrected so that adjacent areas complement each other.

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Developing a coastal eco-tourism is an alternative way of protecting the coastal resources and preserving the natural coastal environment. It also deals with opportunities that respond to a sustainable socio-economic development.

A. Objectives 1. To protect and preserve coastal environment by promoting eco-tourism projects. 2. To provide economic incentives and other income generating opportunities to coastal barangays. 3. To develop local capability in establishing eco-tourism projects that contributes to a better coastal resource management.

B. Strategies 1. Conduct seminar workshops on the formulation of Municipal Tourism Plan 2. Introduce tourism related policies and standards with focus on the coastal habitat protection. 3. Promotion of the user’s fee concept. 4. Encourage coastal barangays to identify potential coastal areas for tourism projects and activities.

C. Policies 1. The municipality through an ordinance should allow the utilization of abandoned 10 hectares municipal owned fishpond located in Sitio 30, Barangay Nabitasan for eco-tourism project. 2. The coastal barangays where beaches are located should formulate measures that would regulate on site pollution brought by beach goers and other activities that contribute to the destruction of ecosystem. 3. Local communities within the coastal tourism sites should not be deprived of opportunities for a gainful livelihood and generating local revenues.

Shoreline and Waste Management In support to the intention of developing Leganes Industrial Growth Center (IGC), the Leganes Comprehensive Development Plan adopted by the Sangguniang Bayan in 1995, (Resolution No. 40) designating an area of 850 hectares as the site of the Leganes IGC. The target area is by means of reclaimation. Also in May 14, 1997, the Philippine Economic Zone Authority (PEZA) under Resolution No. 97-144 approved the application

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of Leganes IGC as special economic zone. In 1998, the National Economic Development Authority (NEDA) and the Regional Development Council (RDC) Region VI granted the “green light” for its development. The LGC is positioned for medium and heavy industries, ship repair/building with wharf facilities. The impact of this industrial growth will likewise be seen to spur economic development, an environment that is so inviting for coastal informal settlers. This lay result area will present options and policy directions that would prevent and mitigate the risk of coastal ecosystem destruction.

A. Objectives 1. To prevent potential effect of coastal soil erosion, water quality deterioration and destruction of marine life; 2. To eliminate the adverse impact of industrial waste to the environment as well as health issues of the affected community; and, 3. To avoid disruption of sea based livelihood activities of fisherfolks.

B. Strategies 1. Establishment of green belt and mangrove protected areas; 2. Conduct massive information and education campaign (IEC) on the importance of coastal habitat coastal water quality; 3. Regulation of activities that would affect the condition of coastal habitat and coastal water; 4. Conduct trainings to coastal community and coastal water quality monitoring, domestic waste segregation and waste water treatment; and, 5. Conduct monitoring, control and surveillance activities.

C. Policies 1. Reclamation area should be established 75.0 meters to 100.0 meters offshore providing a sea water access channel that will serve as supply canal to aquaculture and mariculture set ups adjacent to the reclamation site; 2. Strict hydraulic and coastal engineering interventions should be applied in any activities that would result to the destruction of mangroves and cause soil erosion; 3. The municipality should organize a technical working group that would closely monitor all activities in the coastal areas that will affect water quality parameters, cause soil erosion and mangrove destruction.

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This key result area requires interventions from different institutions like DENR, FARMC,DA-BFAR, other research institutions like SEAFDEC AQD, UPV, URC-CPU, etc. and the local government that have a define knowledge in organizing and developing individual capacities for an effective management of coastal resources. This includes capability building in the development of coastal resource management scheme, legislative support development, etc.

A. Objectives 1. To strengthen capability of the municipality in the delivery of coastal resource management related services; and, 2. To improve community participation in coastal resource management planning, legislation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

B. Strategies 1. Legislation of comprehensive coastal resource management ordinance; 2. Creation of CRM implementing structure; 3. Enhancement of knowledge and skills of The Municipal CRM core team through continuous training; 4. Development of coastal data base; 5. Establishment of monitoring and evaluation system of CRM programs, projects and activities; and, 6. Mobilization of funds and other resources for CRM.

C. Policies 1. The municipality should include/allocate a regular annual budget for coastal resource management programs, projects and activities; 2. The municipality shall collaborate with national agencies, donor-assisted projects private organizations, academic institutions, NGOs in the implementation of its coastal resource managements programs; 3. There should be a CRM Section in every municipality for the purpose of attending to the needs on coastal resource management; and, 4. The CRM plan should be integrated in the CLUP.

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Chapter 5 ADMINISTRATION AND COORDINATION OF IMPLEMENTATION

The implementation of the Ten-year Municipal Coastal Resource Management Plan of the Municipality of Leganes is shared task and responsibility of the Office of the Municipal Mayor, the Municipal Planning and Development Office, the Municipal Agriculture Office and the Municipal Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Council. The Municipal Mayor shall however, have the over-all administrative control of CRM implementation. This chapter presents the process that will be adopted in the implementation of CRM plan. It discusses the institutional arrangement through which the Municipal Coastal Resource Management Plan can be most effectively implemented.

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

The following principles shall guide the municipal CRM responsible actors in the implementation of the Municipal CRM Plan. 1. People empowerment and community participation. People empowerment is realized when stakeholders such as the Local Government Unit (LGU), the coastal barangays, people and non-governmental organizations, programs and project implementers who are the target beneficiaries and change agent, get involved and actively participate in the change process. This can be achieved through capability building such as skills and technology development, technical assistance, information, education and community. 2. Multi-agency, multi-sectoral and multi-disciplinary approach. The municipal government is limited only by its mandate and resource capability. As such, it recognizes the critical role that the various agencies and sectors at the national, provincial, municipal and barangay levels could contribute. It is also being considered that multi-disciplinary application of field expertise enhances in achieving CRM plan, goals and objectives as defined in the previous chapter.

ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

The Municipal CRM Implementing Structure The Municipal CRM implementing structure as shown in the figure has both policy making body and implementing body. The Municipal Mayor shall have the overall administrative control of CRM implementation.

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A. Municipal Mayor  Shall have the over-all administrative control of CRM implementation B. Sangguniang Bayan  Shall formulate ordinances and resolutions related to CRM  Shall approve and appropriate funds for the CRM programs and projects  Shall conduct ocular inspection and monitoring on the programs and projects whether the same was implemented accordingly C. Municipal Planning and Development Coordinator (MPDC)  Shall assist in the planning and implementation of CRM programs  Shall conduct inspections and monitoring on the process of the plan D. Philippine National Police (PNP)  Shall be the lead agency on the enforcement of fishery laws E. Municipal Agriculture Office  Shall oversee the proper implementation of CRM programs and projects F. MFARMC  Shall assist the CRM Section in planning and programming  Monitoring and evaluation  Shall recommend programs and projects to the SB for legislation G. CRM Section As the lead coordinating office, the CRM Section shall oversee the implementation of the Municipal CRM Plan 2004-2014 given a functional structure that is defined by five programs areas, namely: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Database Management Program Information Education and Communication Program Training and Development Program Project Development and Management Program Institutional Development Program

A CRM Officer shall be appointed and designated to assist the Municipal Mayor in the performance of his responsibility with the following functions: 1. Ensure that the programs and projects are well coordinated; 2. Regularly monitors the implementation of plans and projects under each program area; 3. Identifies and communicate gaps in the performance of the respective program coordinators to come up with measures to fill the gaps; 4. Assesses and facilitates the needs of each program area; and,

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 5. Constantly updates the Municipal Mayor on development relative to CRM.

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Under the CRM Officer are Program Coordinators to be designated by the Municipal Mayor specifically to perform the following functions: 1. Facilitate the implementation of plans and projects under his/her respective programs area; 2. Coordinate with other CRM program coordinators, concerned national, provincial and municipal offices and non-governmental institution/organization in the implementation of plans and projects; 3. Regularly update the Municipal Mayor on developments of the assigned specific program area; and, 4. Share relevant information with his/her co-programs coordinators for effective performance of their functions.

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MUNICIPAL INTEGRATED COASTAL MANAGEMENT IMPLEMENTING STRUCTURE

Municipal Mayor

Sangguniang Bayan MFARMC

ICM Technical Working Group Municipal Agriculturist

Municipal Department Heads

DA/BFAR PAO Fisheries DENR DPWH MARICOM PCG OGAs NGOs, etc.

CRM Section

Brgy. Nabitasan

Brgy. Gua-an

Brgy. Napnud

Brgy. M.V. Hechanova

Brgy. Bigka

Brgy. Camangay

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Scope of Work per Program Area The scope of works of the municipality based on its mandated functions are as follows: A. Database Management Program 1. Establishment of a Management Information System (MIS) that include the Municipal Coastal Database (MCD). 2. Regular monitoring and evaluation of interventions to update the database and ensure that targets are within schedule. B. Information, Education and Communication (IEC) Program 1. Development of an effective IEC scheme for CRM. 2. Dissemination of CRM information through “pulong-pulong” involving residents of the coastal barangays. C. Training and Development Program 1. Skills development in the implementation of CRM related programs and projects 2. Coordination with various government and non-governmental agencies with development and implementation of CRM training projects D. Project Development and Management Program 1. Development and management of CRM programs and projects that addresses key results areas. 2. Generation of internal and external resources to support CRM programs, projects and activities. a. International capability building of staff through interventions such as training, educational visits, etc. b. b. Establishment of networks of CRM practitioners, implementers and supporters to strengthen the implementation of CRM programs.

Coastal Resource Management Plan CY 2008-2017 PLAN IMPLEMENTATION, PROCESSES AND MECHANISM

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The Municipal CRM implementers shall undertake or employ the following processes and mechanism to effectively and efficiently implement the Municipal CRM plan: 1. Coordination and Collaboration. To achieve a functional coordinative relationship, the Municipal Mayor shall call regular municipal coordination meeting with its key CRM partners to update each other of developments, discuss and or settle issues and concerns. The Municipal government shall also coordinate with the other relevant agencies and organizations in delivering its CRM functions. 2. Collaboration will be by way of the Municipal CRM composite team that will be assigned to perform the information and education campaign (IEC) training, technical assistance extension, monitoring, evaluation and adjustments (MEA). 3. Information and Education Campaign (IEC). In order to reach target clientele, partners and stakeholders and building constituency for CRM programs and project as regular and continuous IEC should be undertaken. This is by means of multi media presentation, print, etc. 4. Resource Generation. The target set in the plan can never be realized without the needed financial, logistical and human resources. Outsourcing is by various means such as the preparation of project proposal, feasibility studies, etc. All programs coordinators shall share in the task of resource generations. 5. Monitoring, Evaluation and Adjustment. Monitoring is the periodic review and assessment of the Municipal CRM Plan to measure progress of programs, project implementation. Education is the process of assessing the degree by which the objective as set in the plan have been achieve, analyzing contributing and constraining factors and recommending appropriate steps. Adjustment is the process of doing the necessary corrective actions, interventions to ensure that the programs or projects are implemented as planned. The monitoring, evaluation and adjustment shall be a joint undertaking between the Office of the Municipal Mayor as the lead coordinating unit and the Municipal Planning and Development Office who is the lead monitoring and evaluation arm of the municipal government for all municipal programs and projects. The ten-year Municipal CRM plan shall be reviewed annually to ascertain if its content are still relevant, responsive and attainable.

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Province of Davao del Sur (2001). Coastal Resource Management Plan for CY 20012005. Bureau of Local Government Supervision (2002). Local Development Watch User’s Manual. Primavera, Jurgenne H., et. al. (2004). Handbook of Mangrove in the Philippines-Panay. Milne, Nicole, et. al. (2003). Integrated Coastal Management Process Sustainability Reference Book. Cebu City, Philippines: University of Washington School of Marine Affairs, Siliman University, and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Dalby, Janne, et. al. (2002). Coral Reef Resource Management in the Philippines-with focus on marine protected areas as a management tool. Copenhagen: Department of Physiological Ecology, Botanical Institute, University of Copenhagen. White, Alan T., et. al. (2006). Creating and Managing Marine Protected Areas in the Philippines. Cebu City, Philippines: Fisheries Improved for Sustainable Harvest Project, Coastal Conservation and Education Foundation, Inc. and University of the Philippines Marine Science Institute. Uychiaoco, Andre J., et. al. (2010). Coral Reef Monitoring for Management Second Edition. Cebu City, Philippines: University of the Philippines Marine Science Institute, United Nations Development Programme Global Environment FacilitySamll Grants Program, Guiuan Developemnt Foundation, Inc., Voluntary Service Overseas, University of the Philippines Center for Integration and Development Studies, Coastal Resource Management Project, Philippine Environmental Governance Project 2, and Fisheries Resource Management Project. Coutney, Catherine A., et. al. (1998). Coastal Resource Management for Food Security. Cebu, Philippines: Coastal Resource Management Project-Philippines. Department of Environment and Natural Resources, et. al. (2001). Philippine Coastal Management Guidebook No. 1: Coastal Management Orientation and Overview. Cebu City, Philippines: Coastal Resource Management Project of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Department of Environment and Natural Resources, et. al. (2001). Philippine Coastal Management Guidebook No. 2: Legal and Jurisdictional Framework for Coastal Management. Cebu City, Philippines: Coastal Resource Management Project of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.

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Department of Environment and Natural Resources, et.al. (2001). Philippine Coastal Management Guidebook No. 3: Coastal Resource Management Planning. Cebu City, Philippines: Coastal Resource Management Project of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Department of Environment and Natural Resources, et. al. (2001). Philippine Coastal Management Guidebook No. 4: Involving Communities in Coastal Management. Cebu City, Philippines: Coastal Resource Management Project of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Department of Environment and Natural Resources, et. al. (2001). Philippine Coastal Management Guidebook No. 5: Managing Coastal Habitats and Marine Protected Areas. Cebu City, Philippines: Coastal Resource Management Project of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Department of Environment and Natural Resources, et. al. (2001). Philippine Coastal Management Guidebook No. 6: Managing Municipal Fisheries. Cebu City, Philippines: Coastal Resource Management Project of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Department of Environment and Natural Resources, et. al. (2001). Philippine Coastal Management Guidebook No. 7: Managing Impacts of Development in the Coastal Zone. Cebu City, Philippines: Coastal Resource Management Project of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Department of Environment and Natural Resources, et. al. (2001). Philippine Coastal Management Guidebook No. 8: Coastal Law Enforcement. Cebu City, Philippines: Coastal Resource Management Project of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Walters, Jeffrey S., et. al. (1998). Participatory Coastal Resource Assessment: A Handbook for Community Workers and Coastal Resource Managers. Cebu City, Philippines: Coastal Resource Management Project and Silliman University.

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