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BY CORK ADO R1CCI
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ROME

LONDON. WILLIAM HEIXEMAN.X.

BAROQUE ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE IN ITALY .

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Ill BAROQUE ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE IN ITALY BY CORRADO RICCI DIRECTOR GENERAL OF FINE ARTS AND ANTIQUITIES OF ITALY LONDON WILLIAM HEINEMANN 1912 .

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Sansovino. Magnificence was the prevailing note when society showed above all things a desire to be astonished. inclined to this art because it answered perfectly to their taste. in short. and period most even of in life itself. there were lightning flashes. a very gifted autocrat. indeed. as has been sometimes asserted say that . as in those and his disciples. Thus its manifestations art the 17 th century invented the it needs of a factitious enthusiasm. and if these were not very insistent.ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE OF THE ITALIAN ROCOCO PERIOD emotional faculties of the human soul are The them infinite. or several such. even in the 14 many only others. art takes the form harmony with the dominant taste. eccentricities of the victor and exaggeration of the muscles even in the feminine forms. one particular sentiment. and pain. and Vignola. it is unjust to their own itself veiled too became sombre. at other periods. and why this was one of the main reasons for the discredit of Baroque Art. For indeed. *) The aim of the poet is to surprise. 'C . as well as the public. In in it every artistic was evolved. but neither the one nor the other ever dreamt of a drastic in with Baroque Art. according to the Baroque poet par excellence. simultaneously. Wonder was the sentiment most in harmony They may have sometimes vied with each other the exaggeration of their principles. while in certain buildings. was based upon an- tiquity. of talent. that it we corresponded to the psychological the plastic arts. At the of the Renaissance. general culture. not explain why. Artists. it of Michelangelo the sculptures of the altar of Zeus. of the Baroque th and 15 th centuries. sure of satisfying them. will *) change in those principles. why. Such a consideration will suffice to dispel the notion that Baroque art was insincere. and souls found a voluptuous pleasure in Baroque Art was. but also that it was it was because other tastes were in the ascendant. and it is the function of art to satisfy shall find that full Hence we above when in dif- ferent periods. tury with Michelangelo. like or as a phase necessary to the intimate development of art itself. the Cavaliere Marino: E This del poeta il fin la maraviglia Chi non sa far stupir vada alia striglia. fire. whether we look upon the Baroque Style as a spontaneous form of art expression. in But the tendency began to develop the 16 th cen- marked by similar characteristics centre where at a given moment. art returned to that ideal calm and correct beauty which we call classical. we observe the showed the happy irrepressible the audacities of the conqueror. Artists and theorists alike of- Baalbek the autocrat. We shall see presently when and why the equilibrium broke down. all. melancholy became fashionable. we may say. so to say. and resource. in sadness. Correggio. we will consider it in its equilibrium and its harmony. that might have the plea- were successively tragic. The love of the stupendous made its claims felt even then . For the moment. in other words. who neglected nothing that could tend to establish the harmony and stability of his kingdom. we shall note. an art evolved in perfect good faith. He who cannot astonish us deserves a cudgelling-. Style. Baroque Art was. During the Romantic period. joyous and magnificent. prevail all others. there are features which might have been designed by Bernini or Borromini. notably those of in Syria. it acquired a force which became boldness. find fugitive traces of its pomp in faculty of astonishment and to the general conditions of public sentiment.

embroideries. newspaper in hand. but the word appears Italian. the elaborately decorated stucco ceilings often seem about In barous to Pointed architecture. They were the If the Baroque Style are no longer first enunciated at the moment may result from the difference and the changes that have come about when this exuberant though after o'f wearying centuries. Buontalenti and Giacomo della Porta. would not as a philosophical term. delirious. rouged complexions).. and that with on the other hand. into if these could be transformed in a multi-coloured throng every variety of VI . feathers and flowing is to appellation describe the this violent reaction that we owe the Baroque or Barocco. which corresponds to mad. a cross-bearer in front.A pretentious and eccentric style which Would our Roman more lightly? palaces seem to threaten came into vogue at the end of the 16 th and lasted throughont the 18 th century. his pupils to use ornament with restraint and soDoric buildings. it in 17 th century later. the women with their prim coiffures and discreetly new enjoyment. whether it be derived from the Latin Verruca. A century these ceilings seem to rise passed into the vocabulary of art with this definition: . who denounced all imitation and exaggeration.. of nature. a Baroque build- do we not admit similar effects. history and criticism should return to the impartial exercise of their judicial functions. has. would the architecture seem as heavy as it now the 17"' century. Such was the good faith of these artists that as early as 1591 G. when we look inhabitants. B. and advance along the path of progress.ten appealed to the past and to reality. chromolitho- graphs and the is not known who first applied the term to art. It it were possible to substitute the resplendent public of the days when the Bibiena designed these theatres. little photographs. or some confraternity passes along with religious in of such good intentions as theirs that men finally faces muffled cowls. a similar reaction in the sixteenth century applied the invidious term Gothic or bar- does? the saloons of the Baroque palaces. the Companies of the various Contrade sally forth equipped for the Pallio. and reason with the same justice? Why do we not allow that the lack of unity of costume. if we were to strip us. the very ones briety. a wart. in The accusations levelled against of falsity and of folly formerly tenable. meaning an irregular pearl.a capricious style prevalent in Italy from 1580 to abont 1760. ing. but they stultified together all the products of the three kingdoms themselves unconsciously when they formulated their calm and reasonable theories." or: . candelabra. the damasks. in the persuasion intentions. laces. is at perfectly sound. and if we could illuminate these with thousands of candles inside and ontside the boxes. and replace them old imposing furniture. by which we now style which reached its apogee in wigs. or flagaxunoi. Many critics consider them in the domain the fine arts. ribbons. was even more baroque than has been said that ancient streets the when one wanders through and squares of Siena. or the Greek /frxooi. sense of fitness trians when. world. or even of discredit has passed. It to crush serable we were to remove our modern furniture.. came to the style of Fontana. with its painting by and gilding. Vignola was much more attached to antiScamozzi adjured quity in theory than in practice.the style which for two centuries heaped : anaemic crowd that hurries through our streets to-day. the Portuguese baroque. Paggi thought he had discovered an inherent harmony between the art principles of his day. the tapestries.. one's the rest. an opprobrious sense. jabots. admitted that the initial must be tormented with curves." or again . but when the hour of reaction. one recognises the harmony that formerly existed between costumes and buildings. it The word Baroque must be confessed. a powerful art was domination of two the style of decorations? Let as take the magnificent theatre interiors built by the Bibiena. procures men with bald or closely cropped hair in their tightly fitting gray or black coats. and our ill kept carriages. dwellings and The impression But why then." that their art corresponded to their It Lomazzo. and the forces of Nature. is outraged by the sight of pedesumbrellas and over -coats. signifying weight. but if mithe walls of their cheap flowered papers. heaviness. of to-day (the But for the audiences cause of such progress is the satiety engendered by the abuse of preThe desire for new manifestations vailing forms. pictures and mirrors with frames in high relief.. societies it overloaded with consoles and balustrades if . drawn by horses which exhibit more to crush the bone than muscle. especially in was by virtue It he himself over-loaded most.

striated or opaque . inpublic sites Nor must vented surprise machines. as of the most admired work of Bernini and of his pupils. much goodness of philosophy. colours? the historian overlook the psychological relation between Baroque Art and the society which produced it. this period. wrote comedies and satires. painting was less flourishing in then in other countries. which could boast Italy At their and their Van Dyck. their heads crowned with nodding plumes of various tains. but the decorative produced a genius worthy to rank with Rubens. with the curving flanks spective 1 master of effect. Peter's of the Scala highest expression. their Rembrandt Frans Hals. Michelangelo da Caravaggio. Pietro da Cortona. of bombast and exagvirtues. of their it is true. the mise-en-scene. other large towns owe to Bernini their present aspect and their abiding character. who loaded him with riches and honours. to the Piazza di San Pietro. could not point to manifestations even at this is works of art full of seduction and vigour. with light reflected from the waters that inundate the the Barcaccia. enframed coats of arms. creations on Rome. he built magnificent palaces. courage and audacity. laid the grandiose impress were. and vivacity never as yet surpassed. joyous allegorical the gorgeous coaches and popes. It is to him and his contemporaries that the technique of sculpture owes the perfected methods now in general use. designed mosaic pavements and coaches. of initiative resourcefulnes. He worked incessantly. Luca Giordano. lined with satin. its gigantic fountains with their iridescent cascades. princes and popes. He was a supreme character. the greatest difficulties seemed but to stimulate him to the invention of the most skilful quadruple Colonnade. and for sorts and conditions of men he worked for . lakes of molten metal. I must not be understood to Rubens and Like the magician of a fairy-tale. and carried out the transformation Regia in the Vatican give us the full lower part sparkling Spagna. the attacks of the ill-disposed. and the viva- He speckled or polished. and transformed them all their mean that Italy of pictorial art of a very high quality. driven by splendidly dressed coachmen. and its in him the sense of the grandiose attained of S. The incessant struggle in which he was engaged against geration. adorned with and mythological figures and among in versatility was amazing. and drawn by great Saxony horses covered with rich draperies. and the Spaniards were uplifted by the inspiration of genius. his own delight. it must be admitted that while the Italians did not not lack talent and application. perhaps even their Murillo. cardinals. subtlety. as well as to satisfy the demands of kings. and even of his own brother. Rembrandt and Velazquez. the Dutch. also. the Flemings. executed colossal statues for bridges. raised catafalques. full. circulating of princes. VII . in the person of Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Genoa. attended by magnificent lackeys. compounded fire-works. country. He painted pictures the style of Poussin. and the streams of rivers. foun- His gilded reliefs. in a word. of scientific and of superstition. Yet cious Bolognese School formed by the Carracci. pendants. but sustained was still of art. in support of my contention. marble into moment. and arranged masquerades. he moved mountains of marble. Bologna. the contrary enumeration of artists sufficiently proved by the scattered throughout took on a melting and almost pictorial splendour whether according to its character and colour . of contrasts and contradictions. Do not Naples. their Velazquez. the perportions are the it . and the upper part climbing to the measure of his extraordinary skill. the Piazza Navona of its expedients. Lecce and Palermo impress us as Baroque cities? Michelangelo and and a fire Rome and many the domain of architecture and sculpture. Thanks to him. animating every thing he touched wirth a spirit of and heroism and debasement. and statues of smaller size for galleries and saloons. Borromini's masterpiece. painted scenery for the theatre. did not disall courage him. The problems he solved when he designed the Colonnade with the Church of Sant' Agnese. envious rivals. the Baciccia. and the fire of enthusiasm. would point. modelled stucco in situ with astonishing rapidity. erected obelisks. the Palazzo Pamphili by Girolamo Rainaldi and the three fountains with the Piazza di their numerous figures. a society of conflicting faults and churches. drew portraits and caricatures.costume. His facility of conception was equalled by the ease with which he translated his ideas into buildings and statues. the Italians held the first place in these arts they But in Vignola had. in that by the conviction that there much beauty to discover in the domain much truth in that of science. and bows of ribbon. modelled ornaments for litters.

Urban VIII. not always natives list of which they flourished. are the features which or Renaissance buildings. in southern Francesco Picchiata (d. retired but nevertheless architecture Sant' Ignazio and Santa majestic Piazzi of Trevi. Gherardo Silvani. Paul V. a practice Berrettini da Cortona (1596 Greca (working in the first tury). and his son Pier Francesco (1620 1685). B. . Pietro Paolo Floriani (about 1630). the States of In Rome and in- a large part of the Church. B. with a mix- and Baldassarre Longhena (1604 1682) in Emilia. or more often still. All the great it of its unswerving adherence to the very established at the Renaissance would have enabled definite rules mediocre artists to towns of Italy began hereupon every chance of success. besides being the model for the Roman churches of the new type. Bartolomeo Provaglia (d. 1672) Bartolomeo Avanzini . 1615). the Longhi. they wished to show by this means character that the overthrow of Catholicism in would have been easy in for the architects of the rest of Italy to follow the same path. let us not be men began to feel a beneficent weaprepared the way for everywhere churches arose. rather than Forum or Palatine. and many Tuscany. and produced architects. is The architectonic motive of the exterior relation worked out without any Italy. Caterina da Siena. tondi in Antonio Rocca and Gregorio PeVenetia. 1690). Peter's was the first and to mention the most distinguished. Pace. Bernini (15981680). see hundreds of cupolas raising their heads. An many Euroeconomic pean countries had not robbed power or its moral empire. G. mirable calm and solemnity. like a perfectly independent design. . or generally in some cases by of two narrow aisles. bel- became Maderna (15561629). re- suppose the church to have two aisles. Carlo Fontana (1634etc. who may instance Giulio Parigi. compete with the greatest with Happily. perched apon of Babylon in the hanging gardens great walls as and the mighty masses of San Giovanni Laterano. these would be interminable. to imitate the splendour of the Roman buildings. of the places in A The cupola of S. and set them on either side of the principal facade. and the two Rainaldi. Francesco Borromini (1599 - Bernini. decorated with stucco. died in 1675 almost a centenarian. In the interior. Cosimo Fanzaga others. . Soria (15811651). In their hands. we however. afraid to say. was 1667). Rome its grandiose and sumptuous character. G. Francesco Grimaldi. to the interior. by chapels. San Doby the churches. Alessandro Algardi (15921654) Pietro not able to bring belfries into favour again. . Looking at the facade of Santa Maria in Via Lata by Berrettini. small. Aleotti callled L'Argenta (15461636). ture of stucco and painting. even great liking for cupolas. It seemed essential to Popes like Sixtus V. Tuscan to the old tradition. less Piedmont we find Ascanio Vittozzi 1714) Guarino Guarini (1624 1683). the works of skilful architects. look down on Rome from a height. which liberation. in which the bell-tower loses cluding Umbria and the Marches. in more or who seems resembling their majestic mother. always cautious and correct. Francesco (d. to be watching over them with ad- Gallo (1672-1750). Maria della was a continuation of that under Cosimo I which carrying on the . designed by Carlo Fontana.Lombardy. mained graceful and composed in her art. Innocent X. the small. who clung and so attracted little attention. in Liguria. Filippo Juvara (16851735). and Alexander VII. From this time forth.Church of La Trinita dei Monti by the majestic the group formed steps of Alessandro Speech!. in vogue tradition mediaeval These. Some names. must not be passed over in silence. give this of Michelangelo in the persons of Vasari and Amthe manati. and colossal palaces. facing that of San Marcello. B. persisted in that of Buontalenti under Grand Duke Francesco. Vincenzo Scamozzi (1562 1616) . sustained pilasters. The vaults are nearly always barrel vaults. most powerful affirmation of this enfranchisement. of the Vatican . Francesco Maria Ricchini and G. the following were active: Giacomo della Porta (15411604). no one would (15911678). Santa menico and San Sisto among the clustering trees the of the Aldobrandini gardens. the churches consisted of a vast hall flanked in. who had no humble and unobtrusive. Pessina (working in the first half of the 17 th century) . Carlo much fries of its importance. could we imagine that the interior is single-aisled? VIII . Bartolomeo Triachini. Vincenzo della half of the 17 th cen- When we we all which found many imitators. Luca Danes! (15981672). although he gave them much architectonic richness. We must be content riness of these rules. (working between 1630 and 1670). Girolamo (1570 1655) and Carlo 16111691). 1669).

which latter are merely amplifications of a motive already after the tombs sculptured by Sansovino for Santa with Maria del Popolo. fonts. Holy water stoups. the Cathedral at Turin. while confessionals were introduced among the mouldings that sustain singers' tribunes.into half Generally. nificent results forms. but it statues completely superseded terra-cotta both for All that Jacopo della Quercia. while on every side. of this tradition. Around their tombs. at Venice it was IX material. passing from marble and bronze to Among those who worked in this medium were now attached to the columns and pillars of were Alessandro Vittoria. and shade. with terrifying and grotesque grins. in the decoration of which skilful painters and vigorous console which of light melts away in its turn. in be seen in Santa San Francesco at columns. all are the objects of an equal effort. the next it is hidden by a sinuous . which had heretofore been all Such was the dominant type of the Baroque church. these facades are divided two storeys. th to my mind. Antonio Raggi. - ciboriums. as is well known. Camillo Rusconi. and an oval niche for the bust of the deceased became very popular in the 16 th century. The figure of the defunct rising upon his elbow in accordance with Etruscan tradition. desks. a lower one with columns and columns. from the spectacle at every turn at one moment a graceful curve appears. with which they brought every minor fullest development. in to that of sculpture gave it an importance equal the greatest artists saw nothing confessionals." as if as "a miracle of arbitra- tage from Etruscans and Romans. in When we descend the Grand Canal gondola from the Accademia this admirable building presents a fresh eastwards. and passed unknown. Only a it narrow academic spirit could have condemned riness. it to the altar itself. canopies and banners. at It is to Maria Novella Ferrara. but this did not preclude occasional essays in churches with a central space. The 17 th century welcomed aspects and all were obtained. this play modellers of stucco vied with each other. Gian Lorenzo Bernini. della these lines was conceived by architect of Santa Maria Salute at Venice. to the pavement. in Sant' Agostino and Santa Maria del Popolo at Rome and else. organs and altar frontals and reliquaries. Begarelli. skill they have left us admirable samples of their lost sight The Middle Ages never in this domain. skeletons and death's heads peer out. The of splendour of marble and the sombre vigour bronze were never abandoned for stucco. in which mag- relegated to bas-reliefs or accessory decorations. and an upper one with storey floral is pilasters. almost amounting the the 16 th century gave it in the 17 "'century that its new work vigour. The example or of the Medici tombs further gave rise to the introduction of a multitude of allegorical where. In Italy. thus Bernini showed an elegant freedom in his adaptation of the Pantheon to the construction of Sant' Andrea Quirinale and the church of Ariccia. and this the other had been fragile as to . Area. the the finest church of the Bal- 17 century on dassarre Longhena. combined with the perpetual of the water. in Florence. Mazzoni. balconies. feminine faces. Ercole Ferrata. Giacomo Serpotta and Antonio Calegari. restrained in art to the designing of The Renaissance tomb was sober and by their rich successors Rome and Tuscany . however. gives extraordinary animation the art of stucco ornament was a heri- shimmer to the building. The Baroque derogatory stucco. a Marble polychroniy achieved a richness hitherto altar-frontal and the tomb. But. the Renaissance revived The most Baroque architects surprising quality perhaps is the care. candelabra. Niccolo ferred dell' and felicitous were applied by Baroque tombs. and Alfonso Lombardi had executed in terra-cotta was trans- the building. symbolic figures. an inscription between two The small architectural tomb. and treated them with a breadth and freedom that sometimes verged on exaggeration. The wider lower upper storey by related to the narrower statues. harmony with the grandiose aspect and Althe splendour of the monument as a whole. an arbitrary way! at Cividale in Friuli. pillars or small used in the 15 th century. detail into tars. the general being similar to that of a polyptych. or by heavy consoles and volutes. in stucco but it was reached to a passion. these artists lavished genii and figures with plump forms and smiling between the draperies of coloured marble ornamented with gilded bronze. and stucco. and adorned with many effect decorations (festoons or palms). formerly isolated basins or cups. as the way of art were not very often of we may see at Ravenna and it. artists . the pillars of the vaults and lunettes. and even cenotaphs. all are treated with equal richness. had a great vogue rich. But conceptions even more varied and ornament.

Very often. small. to support a balcony. lunettes over doors sea-shells and coral. The and windows on the ground and Strozzi Palaces at Florence. It should be noted that the architectural organism is especially solid in the Roman palaces. and X . and here of the Palazzo Farnese which looks upon the Tiber. was the arrangement in the most important palaces. tain pomp and solidity of aspect. floor are filled in with gratings of hammered iron. the perof influence Palladio manifests itself in buildings of the Renaissance. but they remained comparatively conies. The Marches and Romagna imitated Rome Milan combined the principles of Roman and Genoese . and in buildings inspired by these. and sometimes are large also building. luxuriance the gratings produce an effect of mingled strength and elegance. From the atrium fa$ade that of the Barberini Palace is identical with we pass into the inner court. At Venice. On the at doorways and bal- fountain. palaces Alessi. Thus the plan at Milan. during the Renaissance. Florence and Rome throughout Italy. the lower part of his palaces is built of rusticated stones and surmounted by two storeys with balus- Longhena followed palaces will larly in the now enable 17 th century. The of Vignola. with columns began with Antonio di San Gallo. derived from the colossal ruins of antiquity and the buildings The Roman The atrium Bevilacqua Palace at Bologna. is identical with that of the Borghese Palace at Rome by Martino Longhi the elder. we which is not detrimental to the general design. But this solidity is pass from the churches to the palaces. When. in in as human we may see in the palace of Urbino. the second by Alessi. painted or modelled. Bologna. designed to harmonise with the heavy adjacent mouldings. it was only possible But more frequently still. much more of fluence of Spain. optical illusions designed to increase the apparent size of the court. as at Montecitorio. This cornice. the simple and Robust fagade is only relieved by a doorway with three connected openings. in which Michelangelo's influence was most apparent. the Baroque artists followed the Renaissance detheir courts are generally square with a sign . us to define some of the characteristics which were evolved more particu- trades. by Ricchini. the first transmitted to her by the and Tibaldi. architects went on building the style made fashionable by Galeazzo At Bologna. they were enlarged to some extent. Bianco. FiNaples.sober and durable. on the other hand. the Giraud. sometimes a landscape. and very often architectural perspectives. in the midst of a pro- the Riccardi the fusion of flowers. elaborately worked and very heavy. tectonic sentiment is totally different. in which they intertwine monsters which twist and struggle. which would by themselves suffice to show the prolific fancy Everything serves them as a pretext for ornament. figures. Lecce and Sicily also felt the in- as well as at Milan. Padua. in At Genoa. sistent and large round-headed windows flanked At Verona and Vicenza. was used even on the exteriors of buildings. giving access to magnificent In the the tall columns like buttresses. at Genoa architecture. and that of the University of Genoa. and more especially Alessi. developed with the utmost lightness and . and structures adopted a cerporticoes. shields the angles of the and coats of arms. we shall notice at once that the decorative style varies very little but. and animals fruit. individual due to the habitual use of the Strozzi and Riccardi Palaces at Florence. court of the Brera Palace. stairs were steep and narrow. A brief examination of the various parts of the in the footsteps of Sansovino. such as the ducal palace at Urbino. della Cancelleria and di Venezia Palaces at Rome. In the Middle Ages. Pellegrini nally. Brathe so-called mante introduced cordonate. double row of loggias. the twin columns which were popular it is true. the the second half of the 16"' century. Castello at Milan and elsewhere. the buildings have a very character. the main doorway opened into a relatively modest entrance with lateral doors. they preferred. the archiIf . and to place a in the niche a statue. the portal consists of one large bay with an architrave or a round-headed arch (very seldom modified or pointed) surrounded by rusticated stones between two columns it serves . rising to the upper inner courtyards surrounded by loggias. of the Baroque artists. courts resemble each other . who at Genoa connected the vestibules of several palaces to enhance the effect of the perspective. to follow up the atrium by a small \court. for lack of space. by Bartolomeo the closely than facades. with columns. it was usual to construct a niche in trie wall facing the entrance door.

his Vignola. like the Fountain of Trevi. the palace stood upon a slope. In narrow streets. was the limitation of space or a river-god. impelled by its natural altitude. centrally planned. caused by the inequalities of the ground on which the city stands. The book-shelves. . The various forms for hung with a given were often made to fit and adapted to the measurements space pictures. from the Palazzo of the Via Giulia to the Barberini and Borghese Palaces) had its spiral staircase. Moses or Neptune. and in courts. by nymphs and cupids. monumental in all the Italian staircases are to be found volume cities. the staircase was put in the vestibule at Bologna. cascades. so to speak. an more magnificent than Rome each of these cities At gave a special character to its staircases. real in monuments. statues and busts were ranged on pedestals and brackets. In the intervening spaces huge mirrors. * * may be (from said that every important palace in the Vatican tho the Casino of the Rome Villa Borghese. which of the fountains of water tain at the disposal were determined by the quantity the Founof the artist . from Turin to Naples. were in two storeys. The talent of the designer adapted itself with admirable facility to the exigencies of the situation. the beak of an eagle. But scholars were not numerous Villa d'Este at Tivoli. was richly decorated with stucco and down tumultuously. separated by a circular gallery. river which has the appearance of a dam. and turned the force and However. . broad pools. It in order to leave the entrance free. the jaws of a griffin or a dragon on every side. capricious expression was the construction of founTo this they applied the most fantastic forms of architecture. and even to * ventilate the room. or bringing it down in miniature cascades. the walls were on the other hand. Genoa. large gishly is collected round carved furniture as solemn as fune- be sinking. so to speak. arrangements for the bestowal of collections of open up isolated fountains. increased that tains. as we know from several famous examples in Rome. sometimes from that of a Triton or Siren. the ascent began on the threshold. . But all these staircases occupied a relatively The genre the of all others in which the talent of artists Baroque found its fullest and most modest space. in the Colonna. as at Frascati. Large windows admitted the light from above. he gives us a nymph rising from a basin and wringing out When the stream the moisture from her hair. which The vigorous but slender water size. and rising in pyramidal form. which in were more extensive consisted of in vertical or curved in jets. rushes the ceiling paintings. the Piazza di Spagna. and these accorded well of to such they invaded half the with the restlessness water. from Venice to Palermo. a dolphin. whereas in parks. the water which rises sluga boat which seems to monasteries than halls filled with palaces. were hung with damask or tapestry. Spada and Doria-Pamphili palaces. It to study them at ease. in a but when the is rushing over rocks. water merely trickles drop by drop. In princely fafade of a building. of Trevi and the small the large pictures were cut down ones enlarged. We have still to note two other features of the th palaces of the 17 century: picture Architects made special galleries and libraries. now rushing down in abundant gushed sometimes from the mouth of a God or a monster. on the upper storeys. Genoa and Bologna had examples even . The walls plaques and candelabra were displayed. a lion. Every thing was uncomfortable it was difficult to reach the books. When XI a city lacked springs. On the ground-floor. pictures and statues. on the other hand.spiral stair-cases. and the convenience of readers was but little consulted. and the steep inclines gave opportunities leading the water over steps. One of the in reasons for the introduction of the staircase vestibule at the Genoa. the level open spaces allowed them to extend at pleasure. or the Acqua Paola at Rome. artists set of water to excellent account. multiplied by descending superimposed basins of increasing successively into several and thus the same effect is won in the descent as that of an ascending column of abundant volume and energy. imposed by symmetry or architectural decorations. and later example was followed by by Bernini and others. now falling into like palace. fountains were always set against the wall. now iridescent rising in delicate spray. proportions architects Those which the Baroque constructed. the architect makes it escape by a hundred The libraries. the stairs were built in a lateral space. and had only wells . a serpent. were generally very lofty. save when such fountains formed the spaces or squares. a horse. a marine mist. at the and the Villa Aldobrandini jet is those days. these were supported .

Mantua. XII . in other words. The Villa Ambrogiana period near Florence on the site of an ancient castle of the Ardinghelli family. This had been respected by the art of the first that wings in the manner of a donjon.and with cisterns. acquired individual character from the construction of ar- Of course replaced by pilasters at the sides. adapted to the attitude while the wide ledges serve as a stand for pails and bowls. most sumptuous buildings to be found among the mountains and fields. here sun- on each side of the building. Outside the meter in length. Padua. produces a play of lines and light which must have to evade the annoyance of perpetually going up stairs of the proved very stimulating to the great perspective and scenographic school which flourished at Bologna for inhabited towers. and to a certain extent also in the it Rome. these doorways were suggested by the ancient cades which extend for considerable distances. and Alessi. a transformation effected illumined in contrast to a dark winding lane. This development may be studied in the so- called Castello of Aglie in Piedmont. All. This school. here dark in contrast to a sunny piazza. A great the Bolognese 13 th century. into two lateral structures. battlements. like many were built in the wooden beams. in the Villa Rospigliosi at Lamporecchio. qualities is due to Sanmicheli. and a hundred was built at this others. a very nothing of less important centres. to say They consisted generally of a lofty arch. sometimes curving an avenue of trees along the banks of a canal. they were As the fortified castles of the nobles were the very magnificently developed at Bologna in particular. and above Bologna. and at Renaissance. with elaborate marble capitals. became a source of inspiration for later architects in some of their most effective achievements. or nearly the streets here are flanked by open galleries. the height and the curves of which are so well of the drawer of water. the force of tradition imposed them upon architects as models for the country villas all they began to create. as may be seen in the Villa Rezzonico. indeed. This wealth of columns and vaults and arches. were gradually transformed into two large wings. the towers erected is interesting to see how the aisles of a basilica. which was more exposed than any of the other cities to the rigours of winter. of line the valley of the Po. where It Casino of the Villa Borghese in may too be noted that the central rises was in the second half of the 16 th century body of the building above the two front the gates of cities lost their likeness to fortified towers with their donjons and draw-bridges. Michelangelo. at It Bassano in Venetia. was connected with of the Alemanni by an arcade a good kiloparish The period of political tranquillity which had followed upon the warlike and stormy era of the Renaissance suggested the transformation of these into structures triumphal monuments. Certain towns in forms demanding a combination of robustness with The perfect fusion of these two artistic feeling. and the richly decorated wen or fountain wells of Venice. merely by them in the began At first they had been supported first to erect 17 th century on the plan of fortresses with four towers at the angles. Torchiara. too fragile as yet to adapt itself to the Este Palace at Belriguardo in Ferrara. tants of the lower valley of the Po had recourse 17"' century was to to the expedient of arcaded porticoes. but they gradually assumed a more beautiful and more dignified form as art progressed and wealth increased. all. was to protect themselves from the heary It snow-falls 666 arches built gates fields. lay the common in the district that the inhabi- and quiet country with its well-tilled the villas in which the art of the find a fresh development. The Baroque artists transformed them into veritable triumphal arches. and with the Sanctuary of of the off. the artist constructed well-heads columns such as we see in many monasteries. and the type perth sisted to the 18 century. The original wooden piers were replaced by pillars of brick or stone. or. military Thenceforth there were no more donjons. Modena. the the advantage of floors on a level wings offering with the body of the dwelling. like like the castles of Ferrara. and down the two centuries. flanked by double columns surmounted by an entablature Sometimes the columns are with a pediment. some three kilometers by an uninterrupted series between 1674 and 1739. machicolations or drawbridges. the suburban Bologna. sometimes in alignment on either side of the street. Monte della Guardia. thus affording a second type which may further be observed in the Villa Piccolomini Lancillotti at Frascati. Roman gates and triumphal arches. in its turn. who designed city-gates which united nobility and great solidity.

Baroque Art. which furnished it with forms and ideas. to its Rome was the last to yield her great tradition was hostile to puerile. though graceful forms. Baroque Art is often confounded with that of Michelangelo and the epigoni of the Retrue The gance which was factitious and mannered. sumptuous abodes of pleasure and mont and Lombardy. columns. may be said that Baroque art in its essen- features persisted here longer than elsewhere. balustrades. CORRADO RICCI. XIII . statues. while the Rococo Style flourished under Louis XV. Baroque lightness and fragile grace. In art meadows vases. Rome. coincided with the reign of Louis XIV. the two styles cannot be attached in Italy. lakes. alternating with spaces reserved for pasturage or hunting. because its accents had harmonised with the sonorous voices of ancient naissance. adorned with fountains. and I think there can be few pilgrimevoke a deeper emotion than a lingering walk through the leafy solitudes of a 17 th century villa. which and began to decline only towards the middle of the 18"' century.These 17 th century villas were surrounded by immense parks of almost royal splendour. after making appearance Pied- decay of these well-being. birds and waters ages but tial it same manner to any prominent personality. urns. most ravaged with her numerous states of greater or less importance. are of all others the most poetical. which transformed its solid. flights of steps. and to an eleinfluences. The spots which are most deserted. contrasted with dense and sombre woods. had triumphed there. where leaves. vigorous and emphatic qualities into In France. cascades. and wild brilliant flower-beds. the by the flight of time. seats. The Rococo its found its way from Northern first Italy Style gradually towards the in seem to lament in unison over the inexorable South. on the other hand. sunlit and also with the Rococo Style.

.

Beginning of the Colonnade of St.(Phot. Anderson) Rome. Peter's. by Bernini (1656 Fountain by Carlo Maderna (c. . 1610) 1663).

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Rome. Alinnri) . S'a Maria della Vittoria (1605). by Carlo Maderna (Phot.

Vincenzo e Anastasio (1600). SS. by Martino Longhi the Elder.(Phot. Alinari) Rome. Portion of the Facade .

8 a s pa o bf 'w Q CN u O S bO -o c C/3 C .

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10 Rome. Cupola by Pietro Berrettini da Cortona . (Phot. Moscioni) S. Carlo al Corso (1612).

11 (Phot. by Baldassarre Longhena . S. Alinari) Venice. Maria della Salute (1631 1656).

Alinari) Rome.12 (Phot. SS. Domenico e Sisto (1623) by Vincenzo della Greca .

13 a. D a o a _2 -o o c N CO cs c/2 o 'c o u Q o t/l .

S.14 Rome. by Francesco Borromini (Phot Alinari) . Carlo alle Quattro Fontane (1640).

Andrea delle Fratte. S.15 (Phot. by Francesco Borromini Belfry (middle of the 17 . th century). Alinari) Rome.

(Phot Moscioni) S. by Francesco Borromini. Belfry . Agnese in the Piazza Navona (16451650).16 Rome.

17 o I* c o CQ a I 03 <U -c bfl O o: .

Alinari) Rome. by Pietro Berrettini da Cortona . Maria della Pace. S.18 (Phot. Facade (16551667).

Alinari) Rome.19 (Phot. Ignazio. Portion of the Facade (1650) by Alessandro Algardi . S.

by Alessandro Tremignan . S.20 Venice. (Phot. Moise. Alinari) Facade (1668).

21 .

S. Andrea del Quirinale (1678) by Lorenzo Bernini (Phot. Gargiolli) .22 Rome.

S. Gargiolli) Rome.23 (Phot. Andrea del Quirinale (1678) by Lorenzo Bernini .

24 U CQ _Q s 35 a c a "u "O CO t/2 - O OS .

Cathedral of St. near Rome.25 (Phot. Peter (1700). Alinari) Frascati. Design by Girolamo Fontana .

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27 g M > ro CB I" 2 c _ u o c/ .

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29 .

Alinari) Syracuse.30 (Phot. Cathedral. formerly Temple of Athena. Fa9ade (17281757) designed by Pompeo Picherali of Syracuse .

31 Rome. Maria Maggiore. (Phot. Alinari) S. Fa$ade (1750) by Ferdinando Fuga .

Moscioni) in Laterano (1734). Giovanni Design by Alessandro Galilei (Phot. Decoration of fagade of S.32 (Phot. in Laterano (1734). Moscioni) Rome. facade of S. Rome. Decoration of plinth. . Giovanni Design by Alessandro Galilei plinth.

33 a -a c CO < _OJ a to o c OJ u Jj c 'c e ra o O co .

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36 (Phot. S. by Domenico Castelli . Alinari) Rome. Girolamo della Carita (1660).

Gargiolli) Palermo. Shield (1705) in the manner of Giacomo Serpotta .37 (Phot. Church of the Jesuits.

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39 co v bo c o CO CQ u -O .

40 (Phot. S. from designs by Domenico Zampieri. Domenichino . Alinari) Rome. Ignazio (1626) by Orazio called Grassi.

Portico (16061626) by Carlo Maderna .41 (Phot. Peter's. St. Alinari) Rome.

42 c I U * o ~ < re U o c 2 o J3 _c o 'S c re o O t/i I .

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Bergonzoni (Phot.44 Bologna. B. dell' Emilia) . Maria della Vita (1688) by G. S.

Church. View towards the south Transept . Alinari) Montecassino (Prov.45 (Phot. Caserta). by Cosmo Fanzaga (1658).

Frate Giovanni da Monreale by Cathedral. .46 (Phot. Cappella del Crocifisso (1692). Garffiolli) Monreale (Palermo).

rebuilt by Carlo Fontana . Apostoli (1702). Alinari) Rome. SS.47 (Phot.

Design by Carlo Francesco Dotti . Alinari) Bologna. Madonna di San Luca (1723).48 (Phot.

CQ o -S < 03 u * ** SP (U -^1 S o p^ 3 to .49 s. O u U CB C c >- -j j o C C3 C3 03 a- U .

50 (Phot. St. Peter's. Alinari) Rome. Loggia di Longino (1629 1639) by Lorenzo Bernini .

Maria dell' Orto (middle of 17 th century) by Martino Longhi the Younger. Alinari) Rome. S.51 (Phot. Picture by Andrea Procaccini .

52 Q o o o O d Q O S U o h* 3 o U 60 _O O oa .

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of Urban VIII (1632) (Phot.54 (Phot. Moscioni) Rome. Rocco Lentini) Palermo. Domenico (1720). Oratorio del Rosario in S. Stucco decoration by Giacomo Serpotta . Peter's. Coat of Arms St.

Rocco Lentini) Palermo.55 (Phot. Oratorio di Santa Cita. his pupils Stucco decoration by Giacomo Serpotta and (1717 1718) .

56 (Phot. S. Ceiling (1606) of the Nave . Istituto d'Arti Grafiche) Pescocostanzo. Maria.

57 (Phot. l the Aisles Ceiling of one of half of the 17 th century) . Maria. (l S. Istituto d'Arti Grafiche) Pescocostanzo.

Bari). Istituto d'Arli Grafiche) Andria (Prov. Ceiling of 1633 . Maria dei Miracoli.58 (Phot. S.

59 (Phot. also painted the Ceiling (1617) from a design by Domenichino. who Assumption of the Virgin . S. Maria in Trastevere. Alinari) Rome.

60 (Phot. Ricci of Novara St. B. Peter's. Rome. Stucco decoration from a design by G. Alinari) Vault of the Portico (16061626). .

Gariolli) Rome. .61 (Phot. Centre of the Stucco decoration by Martino Ferabosco ceiling. Quirinal. Cappella Paolina (1617).

Portion of the Ceiling. Stucco decoration by Martino Ferabosco. . Gargiolli) Quirinal. Cappella Paolina (1617). (Phot.62 Rome.

63 .

called Filippone th (beginning of the 18 century) . Cappella Lancellotti.64 (Phot. Giovanni in Laterano. Moscioni) Rome. S. Vault with stucco decoration by Filippo Carcani.

65 bo bo to OS _o '5 00 VO O O o 3 t/5 o i! o oi .

(Phot.66 Rome. Alinari) Gesii. Stucco decoration (16681683) by Antonio Raggi .

Cappella Borghese (1611) by Flamlnio Ponzio. Arches and pendentives of the Cupola. S. Alinari) Maria Maggiore. . and stucco decorations by Cristoforo and Francesco Stati and Pompeo Ferrucci Rome. with frescoes by Guido Reni.67 (Phot.

68

(Phot. Istituto d'Arti Grafiche)

Pisa.

S.

Matteo.

Frescoed Vault

(c.

1720).

Architectural painting by Francesco Melani,

Figures by his brother Giuseppe

69

(Phot. Anderson)

Rome.

S. Ignazio.

Vault decorated by P. Andrea Pozzi

(c.

1680)

70

(Phot. Noack)

Genoa.

SS. Annunziata del Vastato (1587).

Cupola decorated (1635

1638) by Andrea Ansaldo

71

(Phot. Anderson)

Castel Gandolfo, near

Rome.

S.

Tommaso

di

Villanova (1661), by Lorenzo Bernini.

Cupola

72

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Cecilia (c. 1685) by Antonio Gherardi . Carlo a' Catinari. S. Gargiolli) Rome. Cappella di S.74 (Phot.

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Palermo). Gargiolli) S.76 (Phot. Martino delle Scale (Prov. Neapolitan work . Choir-stalls (1597).

77 (Phot. S. Istituto d'Arti Grafiche) Campo di Giove (Prov. Eustachio. . Aquila). ascribed to Pecorari di Rivisondoli or Paolo Balcone Choir-stalls (end of 16 th century).

78 ON ON O U c/ a 03 .

79 .

Sepolcro . Alinari) Arezzo. Badia.80 (Phot. Choir -stalls (end of 17 th century) by Romano da S.

Agostino. High Altar (1627) by Lorenzo Bernini . Gargiolli) Rome. S.81 (Phot.

82 (Plmt. S. Design by Lorenzo Bernini . Tabernacle (16271632). Peter's. Anderson) Rome.

83 (Phot. Maria della Vittoria. Altar and St. Theresa (1646) by Lorenzo Bernini . Gargiolli) Rome. S.

S. Maria del Popolo. Gargiolli) Rome.84 (Phot. High Altar (1658) by Lorenzo Bernini .

S. . Maria del Popolo. Gargiolli) Rome. Angels on the four altars Lorenzo Bernini (c. 1658) Design by of the Transepts.85 Ercole Ferrata Antonio Mari Antonio Mari Oreste Raggi (Phot.

Altar of the Annunciation 1730). Relief by Filippo Valle. S. Alinari) Rome. Angels by Pietro Bracci (c. .86 (Phot. Ignazio.

Design by Lorenzo Bernini . S. near Rome. Altar.87 (Phot. Garstiolli) Castel Gandolfo. Tommaso di Villanova (1661).

88 .

High Altar (1762) by Antonio Minelli. Istituto d'Arti Grafichc) Terni (Prov.89 (Phot. Perugia). of the Tabernacle by Carlo Murena Design Cathedral. .

Gar?iolli) Rome. S.90 (Phot. Ciborium by Lorenzo Tedesco (17"' century) . Spirito in Sassia.

Sculpture by Pompeo Targioni from a design_by Girolamo Rainaldi . Alinari) Rome. S. Cappella Borghese. Tabernacle of the Madonna (1611).91 (Phot. Maria Maggiore.

Valentino. Perugia). Istituto d'Arti Grafiche) Terni (Prov. Maria del Monte. Vestment Cupboard of gilded metal (17 th century) . Perugia).92 Wood carving. S. 17 th century (Phot. Vestment Cupboard. 17 th century (Phot Istituto d'Arti Grafiche) Bevagna (Prov. S.

Negri Pulpit (1677) by Bartolo Cavalieri . Alinari) Chioggia (Prov. and C.93 (Phot. Venice).

94 (Phot. Como). Pulpit (1685) by Fedele Pirovano . Istituto d'Arti Grafiche) Asso (Prov.

Holy water basin (17231725) by Pietro with cherubs by Francesco Moderati Lironi. Peter's. (Phot. Moscioni) Rome.95 SOLEMNl RITV DbDfCAVl I (Phot. S. S. Maria del Popolo. Organ loft with the coat of arms of Alexander VII Stucco decoration by Antonio Raggi (c. 1658). Anderson) Rome. .

96 u. .

97 < t -o _c V u O o Is t J2 c < 1.8 a 00 - a is S o .

Alinari) Ascoli-Piceno (Prov. Alinari) Lucca. Barbantine Monastery.98 (Phot. Iron Door-grating (end of 16 lh century) (Phot. Iron Door-grating (17 th century) . Marche). Palace in the Piazza Arringo.

Liguria). Ricci) Ravenna. formerly in the Via Cerchio (18"' century) (Pilot. Alinari) Sarzana (Prov.99 (Phot. Palazzo Picedi. Iron window-grating (17 th century) . Window-grating.

Andrea. Confessional (18 th century) . S. Piemont). Alinari) Vercelli (Prov.100 (Phot.

Marche). Model by Paolo Lombardo. Baptistery.101 (Phot. Font (c. Alinari) Osimo (Prov. executed by Pier Paolo and Tarquinio Jacometti . 1610).

102 (Phot. Cupboards in Sacristy (1615) by Virgilio de' Conti and G. Alinari) Certosa di Pavia. Favorino .

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Moscioni) Rome.ET (Phot. Maria Anima. S.107 AVVNCVLVS . called Fiammingo dell' . Monument to Adrian Vryburch (1628) by Frangois du Quesnoy.

108 (Phot. Anderson) Rome. St. Monument to Urban VIII (16421647) by Lorenzo Bernini . Peter's.

S. Calandra of Vercelli . Monument (1644) to Ottaviano Ubaldini della Gherardesca. The mosaic portrait by G. Maria sopra Minerva. Moscioiii) Rome. B.109 (Phot.

Peters. Anderson) bt. Monument to Alexander VII The Caritas by Giuseppe Mazzuoli. (Phot. the Veritas by Giulio Cartari (16721678) by Lorenzo Bernini.110 Rome. .

Ill (Phot. Monument to Ercole and Luigi Bolognetti d by Francesco Cavallini (2 half of 17 th century) . Gesii e Maria. Moscionl) Rome.

Peter's. Moscioni) St. i Design by Filippo Barigioni. Sculptures by Pietro Brace . Monument to Maria Clementina Sobiesky Stuart (f 1735).112 Rome. (Phot.

113 (Phot. Andrea della Valle. S. Alinari) Rome. Monument to Count Gaspare Thiene (1678) by Domenico Guidi .

erected by himself . S. Portion of the Monument to G.114 (Phot. Gargiolli) Rome. Gisleni (f 1670). B. Maria del Popolo.

S. dell'Emilia) Bologna. Octagonal Cloister by Pietro and Guglielmo Conti Fiorini . Michele in Bosco (16021603).115 (Phot.

116 o o V a a. U C8 '5n JT .

117 -o ti _c o B a CO _to tS. o 03 .

now the Municipio (Town-hall) 1590. By Rocco Lurago . Alinari) Genoa. Palazzo Doria-Tursi.118 (Phot.

119 (Phot. formerly Lanf reduce! (c. 1600) ascribed to Cosimo Pagliani . Palazzo Upezzinghi. Alinari) Pisa.

120 (Phot. Restored and enlarged by Luigi Vanvitelli (1771) . Istituto d'Arti Grafiche) Macerata. Palazzo Compagnoni-Marefoschi (1609 1632).

121 u 3 Q o a a a 3 re e o <a .

122 V lit < <u CQ a D V o CO ON CN CO oa CO CL .

8- CO CQ C8 D3 O .123 ' c 2 o 03 O o V O cfl CO a s Q.

124 O en i o h kn o u ro O U O 3 Q o o 18 03 I o: .

125 _ 's > o v O 03 03 QD O CO ra oa O 05 .

126 II so 'c c "So V 2 -o C8 O- o o" _o 3 I o 'So U o .

127 V o I Q V J2 CO cu .

128 (Phot. Gargiolli) Caltanissetta. Palazzo del Tribunale. formerly Moncada (1635 1638) .

129 bo U -o V U -a to o o bo CS ctt -a cs o .

130 I i c ^ CJ _D C -o re .

131 I o o o o: .

o J3 n Cu O DC 3 o (A d a S I .132 (3 '8 o u o ~o ca CQ O C eo flJ 1 O CQ ^ E 4) a 3 oa c K > .

it 3 JU -o -O 4) J3 U O u b H H H H H H"'\\ <u CM 3 CJ 1) tj Du V o o 1) .133 >-.

th century) Loggetta by Carlo Rainaldi (about the middle of 17 . Palazzo Borghese. Moscioni) Rome.134 (Phot.

Alinari) Bologna.135 (Phot. by Bartolomeo Provaglia . Palazzo Davia-Bargellini (middle of 17"' century).

136 I CO rt O a e "C H .

137 l a. > c -o a ra to :2 "3 o o JD O 3 O _Q CS -o u c Cfl o -o O V o .

restored in 1858 .138 (Phot. deU'Emilia) Cremona. Palazzo Stanga (17 lh century).

139 (Phot. Calisto (17 th Marucelli century). Palazzo di S. Alinari) Rome. ascribed to Paolo .

o u oT vo as v bo a 5 CQ .140 o f 1 I E -o jy a.

.141 o oo OJ 60 3? i S s -g 8 II 3 1) CO 0.

142 00 TH r- I o Q. re M -o re _re re cu . a.

143 to =5 o c CO O 00 < c CO bo jy O "co bo D .

Moscioni) . called the Palazzo dei th Pupazzi (18 century) (Phot. Palazzo Toni.144 Rome.

Alinari) Florence.145 (Phot. Casino di Livia (1775) by Bernardo Fallani .

Painting by Andrea 1580). formerly Pessagno (1570 il Bergamasco. stuccoes by Andrea da Carona . Alinari) Genoa. B. perhaps by G.146 (Phot. Palazzo Pallavicino. Castello. called Semini.

Palazzo Pallavicino.147 (Phot. called il Bergamasco. B. formerly Pessagno (1570 1580). stuccoes by Andrea da Carona . Painting by Andrea Semini. perhaps by G. Alinari) Genoa. Castello.

B. .148 (Phot. Palazzo Imperial! (1580) by G. Castello. called Stuccoes by Marcello Sparzo il Bergamasco. Alinari) Genoa.

149 .

150 _0 V 00 CN -o v O oo _Q a v cu 3 u 1) .

151 o -o I -a a CO a o o t* a CO CO > _ CO u N N o CO 2 03 a O e v .

152 _a co o a -o CO <N o OS ' 2 a o BQ o -o o ca I? o Q o o e U v o a 5 .

153 a c re c U. o a. o U CO a Q c 'ro o o C c '3 LH 11 03 " _ a. .

Palazzo Ruspoli (1586) by Bartolomeo Ammannati.154 (Phot. Moscioni) Rome. Balcony .

Doorway . Moscioni) Rome. by Domenico Fontana (1587). The Lateran Palace.155 (Phot.

156 (Phot. House of the Zuccari (1590). Doorway by Federico Zuccari . Moscioni) Rome.

House of the Zuccari (1590). Window by Federico Zuccari . Moscioni) Rome.157 (Phot.

Palazzo Sylos-Sersale. Bari). Istituto d'Arti Grafiche) Bitonto (Prov.158 (Phot. Doorway (IS*" century) .

Doorway . Milan. Istituto d'Arti Grafiche) th Palazzo Trivulzio (17 century).159 (Phot.

160 o oa I :EBRCIEhHEBeB<B~. S C8 o > o 1 N JS CU 1 o C8 6? u oa .

a -o "3 o O o Q a 'S .161 O r U C8 Q O O cr O o ft V a. ~ 2 (D O -= r^ _o "o -o CO C o Cu .

s Q O O (X I I o o c CQ a o B .162 a "o I Q c O o o CO I .

S "2 U5 o S CD " | 1 6? qj * *S oa CU . -a o 2 o x o . u ^ TO c n) -- O s ft.163 1 b s o H >~.3 si ..

Istituto d'Arti Grafiche) Bitonto (Bari). Balcony (Phot.164 (Phot. Entablature of Doorway (17 th century) from the Casa Barigioni Pereira (now destroyed) . Palazzo Cernitto (17 th century). Moscioni) Rome.

Alinari) Rome. th Palazzo del Grille (18 century).165 (Phot. Doorway .

166

;

(Phot. Istituto d'Arti Grafiche)

Bitonto.

Arch and Window (17

th

century)

167

(Phot. Alinari)

Perugia.

Palazzo Sertori

in the

Via Vecchia.

Window

(17

th

century)

168

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172 u -o O 3 3 u _= bo j o O CQ cs 2 o OS .

173 U o o c re o s _o _o C re CQ 00" CM ' D a c u .

174 5 I c V 5 'So _Q U -o I u U o -a IS U o a I I V T3 a o E o .

175 u 3 O a CQ Q o -a O .

176 < e 3 "c <L) O -o I o I U .

177

Q

v

U
N c e

o

N O a

u
8

U
u o

cs

178

(Phot. Brogi)

Rome.

Palazzo Spada.

Colonnade (1632) by Francesco Borromini

179

I I

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to

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ra

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180

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183 CO a V bo o CO i CO "3 CO s in o 'So a bo CO S o 'So o O .

184 _c V I u O .

185 re (75 -a e 3 _o o V o a CQ OO CN re a O B u .

Scala Regia (16631666) by Lorenzo Bernini .186 (Phot. Vatican. Anderson) Rome.

187 (Phot. Palazzo Madama. Staircase by Filippo Juvara (1718) . Alinari) Turin.

188 (Phot. Gargiolli) Palermo. Staircase . Palazzo Bonagia (18 th century).

Palazzo Montanari. dell' Emilia) Bologna. formerly Aldrovandi.189 (Phot. and Francesco Maria Angelini Staircase (1748) by Alfonso Torrigiani .

. (Phot. Stucco decoration by Paolo Naldini (1650?) Palazzo Ginnetti. near Rome.190 Velletri.ghi the Younger. Garyiolli) Loggia by Martino Lor.

Stucco decoration by Paolo Naldini (1650?) .191 (Phot. Loggia by Martino Longhi the Younger. Gargiolli) Palazzo Ginnetti. Velletri. near Rome.

192 .

J* O u 3 o .193 rT I VO .2 N 5 O cu u U.

194 .

195 c o o o a o .

196 .

197 .

o -2 o :- u -o rt -O O -o I o I < c -a o (X S 00 ~ Ji -o -a i 1 c o _0 C8 C/5 U O .198 c o U.

199 .

200 Giuseppe Bibiena (1696 1756). Design for a Stage Scene (from an engraving) .

I a .201 c CO g O bo B (75 a Q u I s a.

202 c a o v c v o C/3 u ^4- o G 11 I cu 03 d .

203 bo u a c o g u If c/5 a bo Q SET r- V c CO CQ O .

n Cu .204 I 8 o u u '3 (8 U oo O T-H vo CO u.

205 O (X e J_ oa -a -a o o Cu CO C (2 .

Alinari) Siena. Alinari) Rome. by Alessandro Casolani (1604) . Porta Camellia. Porta del Popolo. Inner side.206 (Phot. enlarged in 1877 1879 (Phot. by Bernini (1656).

Alinari) Genoa. ascribed to Barlolomeo Bianco .207 (Phot. Porta Pila (1633).

o V ca CQ a "cB ra I o ca .208 H 8 a.

0. OH CO <u a -o CO 4J 4) O OS .

Alinari) Varese (Prov. Como). Sacro Monte. designed by Giuseppe Bernasconi . Arch (1608).210 (Phot.

e o CO o 8 o a o a o a: IM C8 H> a a rt ra CO c re 6 ra o o -o re CL .

212 W E n o "855 ^ (0 *-> C -0 O oQ CC o C u CJ g o o CO I o 03 .

213 .

214 a I o u. c 3 = > o OS ra bo n CD .

O c 'o -5 S ra O o Oi .0 'c c < *o "o o u .215 o ca <u ~a o oo .

" a o.216 _>. C ra c c o I o -a V c B CO ii nil (mm O 03 O Qi .

217 .

218 _c c 3 .

.5 'C J3 ca . re a c 3 u C o e JU CO Cu O CL.219 4) B O tfl VI U to oa d ~Q V o o a.

220 (Phot. Treviso). Florence). Alinari) Bassano (Prov. Ca' Rezzonico (17241734) . Design by Lorenzo Bernini (Phot. Istituto d'Arti Gra(iche) Lamporecchio (Prov. Villa Rospigliosi (1668).

Villa Piccolomini-Lancillotti (1764) by Ferdinando Fuga (?) . Palace of the Este family in Bereguardo. near Rome. Alinari) Frascati. Istituto d'Arti Grafiche) Porto Maggiore. of the Duca Massari (18 century) 11 ' now the Palace (Phot.221 (Phot.

222 I .

223 V 22 UJ <u bo o o c o c ra i_ "c UJ c o bo ra -o o V o o: .

224 I o T-l r^i i '5 ! OQ O 3 c CO ._ 4-t C o -= '5 C "S U o ^ 2 co c o < o B 5 [3 .

225 .

226 I u a. I a o CN " _ a I a a <u I a o V I .

227 a c u -a cs a ca S EA ra .

Villa Mondragone. the heraldic animals of Gate with Eagle and Dragon. near Rome. Alinari) Frascati.228 (Phot. the Borghese (about 1620) .

Villa Camerini. Portico. formerly the Promenade (1650 1660) of the Villa Contarini .229 (Phot. Padua). Istituto d'Arti Grafichc) Piazzola (Prov.

230 .

_o a o I _n g .231 o JU J.

Alinari) Bassano (Prov.232 (Phot. Vestibule . Treviso). Ca' Rezzonico (1724 1734).

233 -- e o o o kl c o c o 1) o t_ Cu u a o JD a a 01 o .

234 8 I CN O _5 o 2 -o O D T3 ca 5 u. o c o . .

235 CO C re I D _C CO co CO bo c 's v o bo _J UJ -o CO .

236 "c o 1) nj U. . B o en: o c is" "s ts U a o.

Q O I) o a! B JH o fa 2 O a ex .237 Q.

V -o o o o CO o o re a U bo (A re u _e CO o -o 18 -0 O -o 0) I Qi 2 k.238 I '5 o a -o a o a. .

239 o -a a U o .

240 _o "5 O o 5 o M O 03 d IU o 'So bfl O bo to oa JS o I .

241 o "o U o r- O C CO o U o 'bin bo O bo o CQ .

242 (Phot. Giardino di Boboli. 1570) . Alinari) Florence. Grotto by Bernardo Buontalenti (c.

243 V u I .

244 I * 00 TO Q o tj 6 t-t C> UJ O U O _ O c U u TO Q "u _o a V I I -o o U o o _o ^5 o U v .

245 .

Villa Weill -Weiss. Como). Villa d'Este. Montabone-Fumag-alli) Lainate (Prov. Flight of steps in Garden (18 th century) (Phot. Frig-erio) Cernobbio (Prov.246 aau (Phot. Chief Pavilion in the Garden (17*1- century) . Milan).

Palazzo Raggio-Podesta. Noack) Genoa. Grotto by Filippo Parodi d (2" half of 17> century) .247 (Phot.

248 Tivoli. near Rome. Villa d'Este. Fountain with twisted columns (1573) .

near Rome. Villa d'Este. by Claudio Venardi .249 (Phot. Fountains in the Garden (1573). Alinari) Tivoli.

Moscioni) Bagnaia. Fountain (1564 1588) . Villa Lante.250 (Phot. near Rome.

.251 .2 "5 O a O O O C I -o _o -o 2 o o! U B s I u.

252 IS e E CJ -o B u -o C CO CO I ' c CO o 6 a 3 8" V -o o OS .

253 c '3 c I 3 6 o c '-5 a O ri p a .

o O -o ce 2 E _o .254 o u. ^ 2 ^ | '3 -0* .00 O O 2 u o .

255 .

c . U a U.256 o c I -o V U o _u a v a o *-* e o u.

Aquila).257 (Phot. Istituto d'Arti Grafiche) Pescocostanzo (Prov. ' Fontana del Tritone by Lorenzo Bernini (1640) (Phot. Anderson) Rome. Fountain (17451746) .

258 (Phot. Moscioni) Rome. Fountain of S. Maria in Cosmedin (c. from a design by Carlo Bizzaccheri . 1710).

259 (Phot. Alinari) Rome. Fontana Trevi (1735). the Neptune with the Sea-horses by Pietro Bracci di . The central part by Niccolo Salvi.

Fountain in the Court of the Palazzo Santacroce (16251630). by Francesco Peparelli . Moscioni) Rome.260 (Phot.

261 (Phot. Fountain (17 th century) in the Court of the Palazzo del Vicariato with the dragon of the Boncompagni . Moscioni) Rome.

Alinari) Rome. Fountain in the Court of the Palazzo del Grille (18 th century) .262 (Phot.

by Antonio Calegari . Fountain in front of the Cathedral (18 1 1 century). Alinari) ' Brescia.263 (Phot.

264 X U o c -c :2 o " _ D- Q V bo O t U o .

265 .

5 OS . o-.266 * s <x <? B u a.-8 2 " bo . o I J 8 en v o ' t/3 c/5 -o C .

2 2 3 c I - w "c o U. 3 u E !8 J: U o U a o a U .267 7 .

268 CN CO I) C c U CB u: J5 > O .

> o c to 'c o u. v "I O 03 .269 V bo o " - a.

U S o a a Cu IS O CJ J2 a.270 (8 O _Q a. .

U re Ou .271 U I U _o re o Cu o o a re o J2 D.

| 3 . o := 5 Q O O o c > 00 c o o Q e v -o o o >-.272 = cs I* t c/5 ""o s U 5 o Q u 4 o o c u _o U.

Rome). Wooden th Reliquary (17 century) . Wooden chest (17 th century) (Phot. Istituto d'Arti Grofichc) Lucignano (Prov. Wooden chest (17 th century) (Phot. Gargiolli) Rignano Flaminio (Prov. Siena). Rome). Gargiolli) Rignano Flaminio (Prov.273 (Phot.

274

c
-o

o

c o

Q
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275

INDEX OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Aglie (Prov. Turin)
Castle

218

Brescia Casa Cocchetti
Cathedral
Fountain

Page

Terzi.

Garden Gate
Cathedral

179
9

Altavilla (Prov. Vicenza) Villa Morosini. Stables and Manger

....

233

in front of the

263

Andria
S.

(Prov. Bari)
Choir-stalls
Ceiling-

Caltanissetta
78 58
Palazzo del Tribunale, formerly Moncada

S. Francesco.

128

Maria dei Miracoli.

Campo

di

Giove

(Prov. Aquila)

Arezzo
Badia.
Choir-stalls

S. Eustachio.

Choir-stalls

77

80

Caprarola, near

Rome
236 237

Ariccia, near Rome S. Maria dell' Assunta
-

21

Palazzo Farnese. Stairway Scala dei Delfini

-

Cupola
in

72

Castel Gandolfo, near
S.

Rome
Cupola

Ascoli-Piceno (Prov. Marche)
Palace
the Piazza Arringo.
Iron Door-grating-

98

Tommaso di Altar

Villanova.

....

71

87

Asso

(Prov.

Como)
94

Cernobbio (Prov. Como)
Villa d'Este.

Pulpit

Grotto.
in

Detail

Bagheria (Prov. Palermo)
Villa Valg-uarnera

~
-

Terrace

Garden Garden

di

219

Flight of Steps in

....

244 245 246

Bagnaia, near
Villa Lante.

Rome
Fountain
214, 250

Certosa

Pavia
in

Cupboards

Sacristy

102

Bassano

(Prov. Treviso) Ca' Rezzonico Vestibule Door-head in stucco

Chioggia (Prov. Venice)
220 232 274
Pulpit

93

Bergamo
Palazzo Monzini. Palazzo Terzi.

Classe, near Ravenna Great hall Library. Well in the Court of the Monastery

....

196 267

Doorway

Vestibule

-

-

Saloon

160 170 194

Cremona
Palazzo Stanga

138

Bevagna
S.

Faenza
. .

(Prov. Perugia) Maria del Monte. Vestment-cupboard

92

(Prov. Ravenna) Fountain by Dom. Castelli, called

il

Fontanino

256

Bibiena, Giuseppe Designs for a Stage Scene
Bisceglie (Pro/. Bari)
Cathedral.
dettini.

Florence
200, 201

Cappella d'Andria dei Monaci BeneChoir-stalls

Casino di Livia Casino Mediceo. Doorway Fountain at the angle of Borgo S. Jacopo and the Via dello Sprone

145 152

79

Door

of the

Church

of S.

Agata
floor

Bitonto (Prov. Bari)
Arch and Window
Palazzo Cernitto.

Giardino di Boboli.

Grotto

166

Palazzo Bartolommei.

Window on ground

Balcony

Palazzo Sylos-Sersale.

Doorway

164 158

Palazzo ,,non finite", Via del Proconsolo. SS. Annunziata. Holy-water Basin
S. Firenze

....

Court

Bologna
212 Church of Corpus Domini. Doors 52 Civic Theatre. Auditorium 199 Corner of the Corpus Domini Monastery 169 Madonna di S. Luca 29, 48 Palace of the Due de Montpensier. Doorway 160 Palazzo Davia Bargellini 135 Palazzo Malvezzi-Medici 117 Palazzo Montanari, formerly Aldrovandi. Window 168 189 Staircase 208 Porta Galliera 44 S. Maria della Vita 115 S. Michele in Bosco. Octagonal Cloister

S. Lorenzo.

The

Princes' Chapel

96 272 242 168 174 96 27 106

Arco

del Meloncello

....
. .

Foggia
Chapels on the Calvary
116

Frascati, near

Rome
25

Cathedral of S. Peter
Villa Aldobrandini.

Garden Wall with Entrance The great Cascade
Gate
side

224 238
251 211

-

Fountain

Villa Falconieri.

Casino

Villa

-

Garden Gate, inner Steps by the Lake
Entrance

....

.

.

Mondragone.

217 227 243 223

276

Page

Page

Frascati, near

Rome
Gate with coat
of

Monreale

Villa Mondrag-one. Garden arms of Pope Paul

(Prov. Palermo) Cathedral. Cappella del Crocifisso

....
.

46

V

226
heral-

-

Gate with eagle and dragon, the

Montecassino (Prov. Caserta)
Church.

dic animals of the Borghese Fontana della Girandola
Villa Piccolomini-Lancillotti

....

-

Doorway
Cascade

Villa Torlonia.

228 234 221 222 239

View towards the south Transept
Choir-stalls

-

Cupboards

in Sacristy

45 75 103

Library door

272

Osimo
Padua

Genoa
Palazzo Cambiaso. Palazzo Doria-Tursi,
hall)

Baptistery.

(Prov. Marche) Font

101

Door and Windows

.

.

151

now

the Municipio (Town-

Arco Valaresso
118 148
S. Antonio.

211

Reliquary Altar

88

Palazzo Imperial!. Stuccoes Palazzo Pallavicino, formerly Pessagno. coes

Palermo
Church of the Jesuits. Shield Museum. Stucco decoration Oratorio del Rosario in S. Domenico.
decoration

Stuc146, 147

37 38
Stucco

-

Doorway

Grotto Palazzo Raggio-Podesta. Porta Pila SS. Annunziata del Vastato. Cupola

...

...

Court University. Vestibule

and Staircase

163 247 207 70 173 185

Stucco decoration Oratorio di Santa Cita. Palazzo Bonagio. Staircase

.

54 55 188

Parma
Cupboards in the Museum Custom House
270, 271

Isola Bella (Lago Maggiore) Mosaic Grotto Villa Borromeo. Grotto - Grotto with Flight of Steps
'

...

231 240 241

Entrance to the Citadel Teatro Farnese. Coat of Entrance

132 213
over the main

Arms

Lainate (Prov. Milan)
Villa Weill -Weiss, formerly Visconti-

Wooden Door
Borromeo.

in

the

Museum

204 272

Perugia
230 246
Palazzo Gallenga, formerly Antinori Palazzo Sertori. Window
.
. . .

Mosaic Hall
Chief Pavilion
in

the garden

.

.

.

143 167

Lamporecchio
Lecce

(Prov. Florence)

Villa Rospigliosi

.220
133

Prefecture, formerly Monastery of the Celestines

Pescocostanzo (Prov. Aquila) Casa Mansi. Doorway S. Maria. Ceiling of the Nave Ceiling of one of the
-

161
Aisles

...

Loreto (Prov. Ancona) Fountain by Carlo Maderna and

Font Gate Fountain

...

56 57 97 257

Giov. Fontana

254

Lucca
Barbantine Monastery. Iron door-grating Staircase Palazzo Controni, now Pfanner. Palazzo Mansi, near S. Pellegrmo. Saloon with
.

Piazzola (Prov. Padua) Villa Camerini. Arcade formerly known as the
Passeggio della Villa Contarini

.

.

98 184
195

229

Piranesi, G. B.
Designs for a Stage Scene
202, 203

alcove

Pisa

Lucignano (Prov. Siena) Wooden Reliquary

273

Palazzo Upezzinghi, formerly Lanfreducci Frescoed vault S. Matteo.

.

.

119

68

Macerata
Palazzo Compagnoni-Marefoschi
S. Paolo.

Cupboard

120 271

Porto Maggiore
Palace of the Este family in Bereguardo, Palace of the Duca Massari

now

the

221

Messina
Monte
di Pieta

Ravenna
35,

150

Porta Nuova Porta Serrata

Milan
Collegio Elvetico, Palazzo Annoni

...
in

now the State

Archives. Facade

Palazzo Litta

126 127 130
171 181

Window-grating formerly

the Via Cerchio

.

205 205 99

Rignano Flaminio (Prov. Rome)

Wooden Chest

273

Court Palazzo Marino, now the Municipio. Palazzo Modrone. Side looking on to the Canal Palazzo Trivulzio. Doorway
.

Rome
Casa Barigioni
Pereira.

S. Alessandro

159 8

Entablature of doorway

Casanati Library.

Interior

Modena
Palazzo Ducale.

Court

175

Colonnade of S. Peter's. Beginning Fountain by Carlo Maderna

-

...
...

164 197
1
2,

3
1

277

Page

Rome
Fontana dell' Acqua Paola Fontana di Trevi Fontana del Tritone 252 259 257 255 266

Rome
S.

Giovanni

in

Laterano.

Decoration of Plinth
of

32

-

-

.

.

Facade Coat of arms

Clement

VIII.

.

.

33 42
64 36 19 40 53 69 86
107 43
31

Fountain in the Piazza Navona Fountain in the Piazza Scossacavalli 4 Fountain in the Piazza di Spagna 258 Fountain of S. Maria in Cosmedion Stucco decorations Gesii Church. 65, 66 73 Arches, Cupola, and Vault of the Apse Gesii e Maria. Monument to Ercole and Luigi Ill Bolognetti 182 Giardino Colonna. Arched Entrance

.... .... ....
. . .

Cappella Lancellotti. decoration

Vault with stucco

S.

Girolamo della Carita
Portion of the Fa9ade

S. Ignazio.

.... ....
to

-

Maria

Decoration Vault
Altar of the Annunciation
dell'

.

.

.

S.

Anima.

Monument

Adrian

Hospital of S. Spirito in Sassia. Washing-basin House of the Zuccari. Doorway Window

266
156 157 155 122 123 124

....

.

.

Lateran Palace. Doorway Palazzo Barberini. Facade Back Doorway of the Court Back
. .
. . .

...

Vryburch S. Maria in Campitelli. Capitals and Entablature S. Maria Maggiore. Facade Cappella Borghese, Arches and Pendentives of the Cupola

67
91

Palazzo Borghese.

Loggetta

.

.

...

134 104 198 180 192 165 262 129
131

-

-

Court

.172

Palazzo Chigi. Hanging lamp Saloon Palazzo Colonna.

Palazzo Corsini Palazzo Farnese. Palazzo del Grillo. Fountain
Palazzo

Saloon

Tabernacle of the Madonna S. Maria sopra Minerva. Monument to Ottaviano Ubaldini della Gherardesca S. Maria dei Miracoli S. Maria di Montesanto S. Maria dell' Orto S. Maria della Pace. Facade S. Maria del Popolo. High Altar Angels on the two Altars of the

-

....

109
5 5

51

18

84 85
95

Doorway
in

the Court

Madama
Main doorway Facade
Roof-loggia

Palazzo di Montecitorio

Transepts Organ-loft with the coat of arms of Alexander VII Portion of the monument to G. B.

....

-

Palazzo Odescalchi.

Palazzo Palombara.

Palazzo Ruspoli. Balcony Palazzo di S. Callisto Fountain Palazzo Santacroce. Palazzo Sciarra.

in

the Court

.

Doorway

Colonnade Palazzo Spada. Palazzo Toni, called the Palazzo dei Pupazzi Fountain in the Court Palazzo del Vicariato. Inner side Porta del Popolo. Quirinal. Cappella Paolina. Centre of the Ceiling Portion of the Ceiling
.
.

...

...

153 137 169 154 139 260 152 178 144 261 206
61

Gisleni
S.

114

Maria in Trastevere. Ceiling S. Maria della Vittoria Altar and S. Theresa
S. Peter's.
-

59
6

83
41

Facade
Portico

-

-

-

Loggia di Longino Coat of Arms of Urban VIII
Vault of the Portico

...
...
.
. .

-

-

Tabernacle Holy-water Basin

-

62

-

-

Salone dei Corazzieri, formerly the Hall of the Swiss

-

-

Monument Monument Monument

to to

Urban

VIII

Alexander VII to Maria Clementina Soto Bishop Santoni
.

50 54 60 82 95 108 110 112 105 90
4 7

193
17 81
15

biesky Stuart
S. Prassede.

S.

A^nese

in

the Piazza

Navona

16,

Monument
.

S. Agostino. High Altar S. Andrea delle Fratte. Belfry S.
S.

....
22, 23,
.

S. Spirito in Sassia.

Ciborium

Andrea Andrea

del Quirinale
della Valle.

Cappella Barberini

S.

Monument to Count Gaspare Thiene Antonio dei Portoghesi. Upper part of the Facade
.

24 49 113 34 47 74
10

SS. Trinita dei Monti SS. Vincenzo e Anastasio. Portion of the Facade Scala Regia Vatican.
.

186

Villa

-

Borghese Entrance

...

.216
. . .

-

Fontana dei Cavalli marini
Fountain

SS. Apostoli S. Carlo a' Catinari. Cappella di S. Cecilia S. Carlo al Corso. Cupola Stucco decoration
S. Carlo alle S. Cecilia.

Villa Corsini.

225 269 267

Villa Medici,

now
back

the

French School of Art.

63
14

-

Gateway Facade

at

209 215

Quattro Fontane Entrance

28
12

S.

Martino delle Scale (Prov. Palermo)
Choir-stalls

SS. Domenico e Sisto Steps S Francesco di Paola. Circular Choir

76

13

Window

in

the

S.

Remo
Palazzo Borea d'Olmo

105

149

278

Page

Page

Sarzana (Prov. Liguria)
Palazzo Picedi.
Iron window-grating

Turin

...

99

Palazzo -

Madama.
Staircase

Facade

Siena
Porta Camollia

Palazzo Paesana.

206

Doorway

Superga

142 187 163 26

Sulmona
Badia Morronese, now the Prison. Palazzo Tironi. Doorway

Doorway

.

162 162

Varese (Prov. Como)
Sacro Monte.
Velletri, near

Arch

210

Rome
Loggia
190, 191

Syracuse
Cathedral, formerly temple of Athena.

Facade

30

Palazzo Ginnetti.

Terni (Prov. Perugia) Cathedral. High Altar S. Valentino. Cupboard
Tivoli, near Rome Casa Giannozzi. Court Court. Detail
Villa d'Este. Left

Venice
of gilded metal

.

.

89 92

Court of the Doge's Palace. Wells Monastery of S. Giorgio Maggiore. Palazzo Pesaro
Palazzo Rezzonico, now Minerbi S. Maria della Salute
S. Moise.

.

264, 265 Staircase 183
.

140
141
11,

-

-

-

wing of the winding Stairway Fountain with twisted Columns Fountains in the Garden "Le Cannelle"
. .

176 177 235

Facade

39 20

....

248 249 268

Vercelli (Prov. Piemont) Confessional S. Andrea.

100

Verona
Giardino Giusti. Fountains Gran Guardia Vecchia
.

Turin
Palazzo Carignano Palazzo Levaldigi. Door called Porta del Diavolo
.

253
121

136
161

Volterra Gate of Cathedral

....

97

279

INDEX OF ARTISTS
Page Paje
Cavalieri, Bartolo
Cavallini,

Alberghetti, Alfonso

265
170
171
19,

93
Ill

Alessandri, Filippo
Alessi, Galeazzo

Francesco

Conti, Guglielmo

115
121

Algardi, Alessandro

53
154

Curtoni,

Domenico

Ammanati, Bartolomeo Andrea da Carona
Angelini, Francesco Maria

de' Conti, Niccolo

264
102

146, 147

de' Conti, Virgilio del Grande, Antonio
della Greca,

189

198
12,

Ansaldo, Andrea
Avanzini, Bartolomeo

70
175 77

Vincenzo

13

della Porta,
della Scala,

Giacomo
Gian Battista

73, 238, 251

Balcone, Paolo
Baratta, Francesco
Barbelli,

211
4

255
194 112

de Sanctis, Francesco
di Maio,

Giacomo

Paolo

103

Barigioni, Filippo
Basile,

Antonio

35
75

Domenichino, see Zampieri, Domenico Dotti, Carlo Francesco

29, 48,
. .

212
107 145

Benvenuto da Brescia
Bergonzoni, G.

B

44

du Quesnoy, Fallani, Bernardo
Fancelli,

Francois, called

il

Fiammingo

Bernasconi, Giuseppe
Bernini, Lorenzo
.

210
1,

Giacomo

63
45

2,

3,

21, 22, 23, 24, 50, 71,

Fanzaga, Cosmo
Favorino,

72, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 87, 105,

G
61, 62,

102

108, 110, 122, 131, 137, 153,

Ferabosco, Martino
Ferrata, Ercole
Ferrucci,
Fiorelli,

266
85 67

186, 205, 206, 220, 255, 257
Bernini, Pietro
Berrettini, Pietro,
4,

49 18
143

Pompeo
Vincenzo

da Cortona

10,

219
115
5,

Bianchi,

Romano

Fiorini,

Pietro

Bianco, Bartolomeo
Bibiena, Antonio

173, 185, 207

Fontana, Carlo
Fontana, Domenico Fontana, Giovanni Fontana, Girolamo
Franzese, Gennaro

47, 153, 197

199

155
238, 252, 254
25,

Bibiena, Francesco Bibiena, Giuseppe

212
200, 201

198
103

Binago, Lorenzo
Bizzaccheri, Carlo Francesco

8
224, 258
.

Borromini, Francesco

.

.

14,

15,

16,

17,

123

Fuga, Ferdinando Gaidon, Antonio
Galilei,

28, 31, 180, 221

274
32,

124, 125, 178, 211, 217
Bracci, Pietro
86, 112, 259
96, 152,

Alessandro

33 73
'4

Gaulli, G. B., called Baciccia

Buontalenti, Bernardo

242
109

Gherardi, Antonio
Ghislandi,

Calandra, G. B
Calegari, Antonio

Domenico

194

263
35

Giovanni da Monreale

46
106

Campolo, Placido
Caniana, G.

Giovanni de' Medici
Gisleni,

B
il

170
64

G. B

114

Carcani, Filippo, called Filippone
Cardi, Lodovico, called Carracci, Agostino Carracci, Annibale
Cigoli

Grassi,

Giacomo

88 88

....

129, 174

Grassi, Giovanni
Grassi, Orazio

192 192

Guarini, Guarino

136

Carre, G. B., da Bissone
Cartari, Giulio

213
110

Guidi,

Domenico
.

H3
101

Casolani, Alessandro

206

Jacometti, the Brothers Jacometti, Pier Paolo
Jacometti, Tarquinio

Cassone, G. B
Castelli,

219
il

Domenico, called
il

Fontanino

.

.

.36, 256

Juvara, Filippo

-26,

142, 187

Castello, G. B., called

Bergamasco 146, 147, 148, 163

Labacco, Antonio

*52

280 Page Page Posi. Niccolo Matteo da Castello Mazzuoli. 77 Fausto 196 Van Santen. 215 198 Annibale Pozzi. Claudio 249 73 called Pirovano. 191 Storer. Flaminio Porissimi. Bartolomeo . Sparzo. 223 Raggi. in inscription for "four" read "two". 252. Bartolomeo Unterberger. . 247 269 86 Pecorari di Rivisondoli Pellicciotti.. Giacomo. Giovanni. Francesco . 119 Paracca. 203 Vanvitelli. . the Younger . Reni. Carlo Mari.2. 54. FHIKTEH AT STL'TTGAKT . 208 (in Lironi. 127. Giuseppe 68 2 Semini. 67 G 52 Cristoforo Morelli. Alfonso Pagliani. 190. Rocco 118 . Gian Antonio Schor. Stati. Baldassarre Longhi. 269 Torrigiani. 41. Jan. Luigi 120. 132 172. B 9 209. Martino. Giorgio 21 Romano da Ruggeri. Paolo Longhena. Procaccini. B S. Paolo 1. 59 Ponzio. .. 259 Massari. Jan Venardi. Francesco Monti. 55 (style of) Melani. 94 163 67. Paolo 89 190. .. Carlo Rainaldi. Tedesco Lotti. C Matteo Vincenzo Tencalla. Pacetti. Provaglia. Lombardo. Fedele Planteri.. 72.. Antonio Raggi. 134. Filippo 20 117 88. 141. 193. Domenichino . 194 160 168. Lippi. 39. 157 255 Erratum Plate 85. Paolo Lantana. Cosimo .. see van Santen. Alessandro Triachini. Guido Francesco Maria 67 Maderna. Filippo 163 Tremignan. .11. da Valsaldo Parodi. Pietro 95 101 . 126. Ricci. . 137 Piranesi. Bartolomeo .. Andrea Andrea the style of) 69 51 135. G. Provaglia. Martino. 194 Antonio 96 91 Napoli. 40. 140. Federico 27 156. 66. Francesco 260 30 202. Christophorus Valle. Vignola Zampieri. Claudio 193 Zanobi del Rosso Zuccari. Giacomo Silvani. B Gian Giacomo Vasanzio. Antonio Marucelli. Michelangelo Minelli. 37 168 Antonio 89 95 Gherardo Moderati. Cristoforo 170 110 68 34 146. Giov. Girolamo 65. Oreste Rainaldi. Vasanzio . Tommaso 219 93 106 Targioni. 191 Lorenzo.. 169 Lorenzetto 91 Lurago. Cristoforo Terribilia. 216 Peparelli. 169. 255 85 34. 139 G. . 49 Sanz. 73. Pompeo G.. 148 49. . Giulio 267 Francesco 67 Murena. . G 141 Salvi. . Carlo Naldini. 189 Nigetti. Giacomo Serpotta. 95. the Elder Longhi. 60 Sepolcro Marziale. 147 38. 90 104 43. 130 85 129. 51. 5. Giuseppe Melani. . Marcello Stati. 6. Andrea Serpotta. G. called Giov. Pompeo Francesco Negri. Cristoforo Susini. 254 Ricchini. Domenico. . F 80 27 137. Picherali. 183 7.

.

.

JUN1 1962 / .

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