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2011.May.voterguide

2011.May.voterguide

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Allen City Council, Place 2
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Jim Gauch
Biographical Info: Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: - no response Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: - no response Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: - no response Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: - no response Q: Education A: - no response Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: - no response Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: - no response Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: - no response Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: - no response Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: - no response Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: - no response Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: - no response Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: - no response Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: - no response Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: - no response Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: - no response Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: - no response Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to

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taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: - no response Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: - no response Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: - no response Ross Obermeyer

Biographical Info:

Name: Ross Obermeyer Street Address: 927 Rush Creek City/Town: Allen State: TX Date of Birth: 8-23-49 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-727-3453 E-mail Address: reo@sbcglobal.net Campaign Web Site Address: www.rossobermeyer.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: My wife and I have lived in Allen for 35 yrs. Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: Same Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Retired executive - 33 years with Texas Instruments Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Now completing my 9th year of service on the Allen City Council; Allen Parks Foundation – Board of Directors; Connemara Conservancy – Board of Directors; Community Development Corporation (City of Allen) – Board of Directors; Member of the Advisory Board for Friends of the Library Endowment Fund; Council liaison to the North Texas Municipal Water District; Leadership Allen Alumni Association; Volunteer work with the Allen Chamber of Commerce; Allen Heritage Guild – Member Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Graduate of Leadership Allen Class III - 1992; Served on the Parks and Recreation Board 1992-1994; Appointed to the Planning & Zoning Commission in 1994 and served 8 years on P&Z, the last 4 years as Chairman; Elected to the Allen City Council in 2002, re-elected in 2005 and 2008; Recipient of 2009 “21 Leaders for 21st Century” Collin County Business Press Award Q: Education A: 1975 Graduate of Univ. of North Texas – BS Biology/Chemistry Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Allen City Council - Elected to the Allen City Council in 2002, re-elected in 2005 and 2008; Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $500 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: - no response Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: Why am I running for re-election to the Allen City Council? My history with Allen goes back 35 years, moving here in 1976. My wife and I have raised our kids here and watched Allen grow from 4000 to 85,000. I have served 9 years on the Allen City Council, since first

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being elected in 2002, and re-elected in 2005 and 2008. I believe there is no substitute for experience. I am a 1992 graduate of the Chamber’s Leadership Allen Class 3. I served on the City of Allen Parks Board (92-94), served on the Planning and Zoning Board from 1994 until 2002, the last 4 years as chairman, and then elected to the Allen City Council in 2002. Since being elected to Council in 2002, I have worked hard utilize my past experience to provide leadership and direction to insure we stay committed to the course we have set for Allen’s ultimate development. Allen is a great place to live but it didn’t just happen by accident. There are untold numbers of volunteers that spend their time, energy, and often times their money to insure Allen continues to be just that. The City is fortunate to have such a resource to draw upon to serve on our city boards, commissions, and various capital and bond committees. As a Council, we also work hard to create relationships and opportunities to partner with various independent groups such as the Allen Chamber, AISD, Allen Parks Foundations, Arts of Collin County, Friends of the Allen Library, Allen Heritage Guild, and many others. Working together, we can continue to make Allen a great place to live, work, raise a family, and enjoy life to the fullest. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1) Insure we maintain our current levels of quality for city services, delivery, and overall quality of life in Allen (ex: parks, infrastructure, public safety, and sound fiscal programs). We have an outstanding city staff that is aligned with the Council to make sure we are ready to meet any challenge. 2) Expand our focus in specific areas that will affect future citizens by insuring we address now what these needed services will someday be. Regional transportation, quality water supply, public safety, development of the S.H. 121 corridor, managed build-out for our remaining open land, and continued economic development efforts are all essential for Allen to retain the quality of life we enjoy today. 3) Work with the other cities in Collin County and various groups at both the county level and the state level to enhance our influence as a decision maker within Collin County. We need to maintain our role as a key player in this region. This will become more challenging for 2011-12 and the years ahead as we face potential economic pressures in Texas and the U.S. We must continue to closely monitor legislative activity and maintain strong ties with our state and county representatives in an effort to insure frugal spending, less government interference, no unfunded mandates, and work to keep local control for Allen. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I can sum up the difference in one word - experience. To be an effective leader for the City of Allen, I believe it is crucial to have a background of service in as many areas of the city as possible in order to have the solid foundation needed for being an effective member of the City Council. This also includes having an understanding of our strategic and comprehensive plans, our capital improvement programs, thoroughfare and park plans, zoning and land development codes, public safety needs, finance and city services, economic development goals and our sales and ad valorem tax structures and impact. Being a knowledgeable and experienced leader for the citizens of Allen means having a solid understanding of these items and working with these issues on a daily basis. I believe it is also important to understand how the various service groups, boards and commissions, and non-profit volunteer civic organizations all work together to make Allen such a great place to live, work, and enjoy life. There are a number of excellent volunteer opportunities in Allen if someone wants to get involved. Many people already are involved, in organizations like Kiwanis Club, Rotary Club, Lions Club, the Allen Chamber of Commerce, the Allen Heritage Guild, the Allen Parks Foundation, Friends of the Allen Library, many of the AISD programs, ASA, Citizens Fire and Police Academies, and Allen Community Outreach, just to name a few. The City of Allen also has 13 boards and commissions with over 100 volunteers serving on these boards such as the Planning and Zoning Commission, Parks and Recreation Board, Keep Allen Beautiful Board, the Library Board, the Allen Economic Development Corporation and many others. All this didn’t happen overnight. It has taken lots of dedicated volunteers donating their time and hard work. These volunteers in service are one of the reasons why Allen is such a great place to live. I am fortunate to have had the opportunity through my work on the City Council, to provide support for many of these service groups and civic organizations’ activities through our board and commission appointments, recognition programs, and our budget allocations. I believe my involvement and support of these groups has made a positive difference. During the last 19 years of serving in both appointed and elected positions for the City of Allen, I have demonstrated that I have the knowledge and experience to best serve our citizens. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you

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evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Allen ranks at the top of the DFW communities for successfully attracting both commercial and residential development. This remains a top priority for our council and we have been extremely successful in the last 2-3 years. Allen is now a destination for the metroplex with restaurants, hotels, retail, hockey and arena football that provide an overall entertainment experience and equally important, a strong incentive for businesses to relocate to Allen. During my last 3-year term, we have seen some very significant developments take place in Allen, both from a commercial and municipal standpoint. We have added several million square feet of retail and some significant municipal structures. We have increased our tax base, brought to Allen new stores and restaurants, and completed new city buildings and parks which allow for continuing the quality of service and amenities the city provides. Developments like Watters Creek and The Villages of Allen, the Allen Event Center, City of Allen Service Center, expansion of the Premium Outlet Mall, Cisco, the Walmart Superstore, Cabela’s, Andrew’s, Top Golf, and many others that will be critical to the landscape and economic vitality of Allen for the future. We must also remain competitive with other cities in our region to attract quality businesses to Allen to provide job growth and insure we maintain our solid tax base. We have lowered the tax rate in Allen for 18 consecutive years while making Allen the safest city in Texas. Most importantly, we must continue to provide affordable municipal services to our citizens, while managing the expenditures of our tax and bonds dollars as cost-effectively as possible. This requires diligence, attention to details, and building consensus within the council to insure we make the right decisions for all the citizens in Allen. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: We have been successfully following our comprehensive plan for two decades and the result is a great place to live, work, and play. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: I am very concerned that our federal government does not feel it necessary to enforce our laws. Any person that is in the United States illegally is breaking the law, yet the current administration does very little to address this problem. Allen has been ranked as the safest city in Texas for the last two years. Diverting our resources to address the issue of illegal immigration will add an unfair burden on our police department and even if we successfully apprehended illegal aliens, there is inadequate support at the federal level. We need strong leadership in Washington that believe in and pledge to support our laws and our constitution. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: Allen continues to support regional transit efforts, working with NTCOG, TXDOT, Regional Transportation Council, and with our elected state representitives to find a solution that is affordable and sustainable. As a key player in Collin County, we must continue to partner with other with cities in Collin County to work toward a common solution. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: As an emerging destination spot for Collin County and the DFW metroplex, we are also working with regional, state and national toursim groups to expand visitors to Allen. We have recently created a Convention and Visitors Bureau to expand awareness of Allen's retail, historical, and entertainment venues and help bring visitors to Allen to shop, and enjoy the variety of entertainment and sporting events. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: The City of Allen has an outstanding record for customer service and reliable low-cost service delivery. Our PRIDE program encourages city employees to work together to insure our citizens receive quality services at the most cost-effective level possible. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Our council has for a long time, maintained a very conservative fiscal position in our budget process, regardless of the economic situation, in good times or bad times. We have worked hard through our economic development efforts to keep Allen well positioned be remain financially viable. As a result, we continue to see increased revenue month to month despite other cities losing revenue. We have new retail and businesses opening in Allen, housing starts continue, and our economic status remains strong. We also continue

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to budget millions of dollars toward infrastructure for future maintenance to allow cash purchases rather than having to sell bonds and create debt. This strategy will help ensure we continue to meet our infrastructure needs while we maintain our financial strength long into the future. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Nothing! Allen is a wonderful place to live. We have outstanding parks, robust retail and business growth, and increased tax revenue from year to year. Our fund reserves are stable at over 120 days and we have lowered tax rate for 18 consecutive years. We have been selected as the safest city in Texas last two years and our school system is exemplary. It is an honor for me to be able to serve the citizens of Allen.

Allen Mayor
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Blake Beidleman

Biographical Info:

Name: Blake Beidleman Street Address: 1432 Autumnmist Drive City/Town: Allen State: Texas Date of Birth: June 1967 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-535-4066 E-mail Address: blake@voteforblake.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.voteforblake.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 10 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: N/A Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Sales Management. I recently was the National Sales Manager for the Law Enforcement Division of large commercial firearms manufacturer. My background includes management positions with AT&T, General Dynamics, and ATK Defense. I am currently doing private consulting for law enforcement, military and specialized government operations units. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Civic involvement has a broad definition. I define it as being actively interested in the life of your community, city, state and country. It means getting informed about the issues that affect you, and making a choice about who represents you. I vote, look at issues and I am involved with our community. I have been a police officer and volunteer firefighter. Allen Touchdown Club, Toys for Tots, ACO food drives, Morningside HOA. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: I have volunteered countless hours with our local youth. I was treasurer/ secretary for my local fraternal order of police chapter. I have been on the Board of Directors for the Plano Sports Authority football board as well as on the football and baseball Board of Directors for the Allen Sports Association. Security Director Morningside HOA, Crime watch Commander. Head Coach of the 6 time Super Bowl winning Allen Warriors. Allen Sports Association Football Commissioner Q: Education A: I began general study at Richland College in Dallas, TX, and earned a degree in Law Enforcement Technology with Rio Salado College. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: N/A Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Locally, I'm limiting contributions to a nominal amount and have raised less than $1000.

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Outside of Allen? Offers have been extended, but I refuse to accept campaign contributions from those without an Allen zip code. Accepting campaign funds from people in Dallas, or anyone that is not a resident of the City of Allen, in my opinion, screams special interests. If you are not a registered voter, and you are not going to vote in the elections in Allen, then I do not feel you should contribute funding to candidates, nor should they be accepted. Candidates who are running for a local office should not accept funds from anywhere outside of the City. I do not feel those that hold a current elected position or appointed position should contribute campaign funds to local candidates that they would be serving and voting with either. Instead of canvassing all of North Texas looking for a campaign handout I am spending my time in Allen becoming informed about the local issues, and talking to those that are impacted by local decisions. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: N/A Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: I have been involved in numerous criminal proceedings as a police officer, and have testified on numerous occasions for the prosecution in cases where I was involved as a police officer or as the arresting officer. I have never been arrested or involved with any other criminal or civil proceedings outside my role as a police officer. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: Elected officials should be accessible and responsive to not only the people who elected them, but to all citizens in their community. I meet or exceed all qualifications to hold the position of Mayor. During these tough times, the City of Allen needs a new voice and a fresh start with a strong, conservative mayor who will partner with city leadership and the citizens of Allen to face the on-going challenges of our dynamic city. I intend to represent our community with fortitude, compassion, and the dedication it takes to be a successful Mayor. It is time for a new voice and a fresh start. I am not, nor ever intend to be, a career politician. To the contrary, I am a hands-on, ordinary, everyday “Allenite” who wants to bring a new voice to the Allen City Council. I want to represent people who feel they have lost, or never even had a connection or voice to local government. In Allen there is, in my opinion a handful of people involved with the local government, and I want to change that. In my grassroots effort, I have met many Allen residents and have learned a great deal about what the average person wants and needs in terms of city services. I'm ready to bring that perspective to the city council. The experience of working with and for many groups of people in our City will allow me to make a smooth transition into the Mayor’s seat. I will adapt quickly and take on the many tasks of the Mayor’s office with unbiased dedication. My years as a police officer gave me invaluable experience working closely with all phases of city government. It also taught me that in order to truly serve the citizens of a community; you have to do two things: listen to their voice and be involved. I will do both. I am a native Texan and my wife and I have called Allen home for over 10 years. I have two boys, a 4th grader and a 7th grader, who attend Allen ISD schools and during my time in Allen, we have experienced incredible growth and changes. While much of our growth has resulted in a thriving community, there is still much work to be done. We need a Mayor from the people, for the people, and I am that candidate. My background in management includes budgeting and being in a position to make tough decisions. My background over the last 20 years, gives me the experience needed to excel in the position of Mayor. My experience includes process management and communications. I have a fresh and unique perspective on important issues affecting people, neighborhoods, and businesses of Allen. In my experience I've helped existing companies expand and worked with multi-million dollars projects. I have developed processes and policy around the Country. I have also been instrumental in bringing in new companies to my industry that has resulted in new jobs. I will bring that same successful experience to the Mayor’s office for the people of Allen. I am not a politician and won’t ever fit into that mold. I have never been affiliated with a good ole boy network nor, been involved in a stagnant system full of political red tape and biased special interests. I have a new, comprehensive, proactive approach that is not being used in Allen and that type of approach has not been a priority in the past. Now is the time for a new voice and a fresh start and I am exactly the one to bring that. A vote for me is a vote for Allen. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: If elected, I will continue to bring businesses and restaurants to Allen. We have a great foundation to build from but we need to make sure we are doing all we can. My plan includes being proactive in working with the Allen Economic Development Corporation and

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to use my training, experience and skill set to market the great assets of Allen. Bringing new businesses and restaurants to Allen will lessen and stabilize property taxes. We have to find ways to help all business thrive and when we can do that and increase sales tax revenue that is a win for everyone. The City of Allen, basically on auto pilot, has experienced significant growth over the years, attracting families and businesses. In order to ensure our continued success, we must focus on providing reliable public safety, protect our environment and our neighborhoods, and deliver efficient, affordable city services and infrastructure. Our city government must also best represent the needs of the citizens of Allen by actively engaging every segment of our community. My top three priorities include the economy and its impact on our city, maintaining and supporting our public safety efforts (Police and Fire), and an accessible city structure that provides world class service to the citizens who call Allen home. In order to help our economy and grow, I believe we need to focus on helping our local businesses succeed, and looking for ways all of our businesses can generate more sales tax revenue. This type of approach can be uncomfortable for some but with the challenges we face no one can afford to remain in their comfort zone. There are many challenges to face and overcome. Creating a new, citizen Commission on Local Business who works directly with the AEDC would be the first step in a very positive direction. Our business community has a voice that needs to be heard. We can not continue to move forward with only a very small part of our community voices being heard. In order to strengthen our community’s safety net, we all need to make commitments to oppose any funding cuts that would negatively impact the delivery of vital services or public safety services. We have to maintain what we have and make sure we are getting the maximum benefit out of every tax dollar spent. No one wants tax increases - I don’t, and I pay taxes too - so what are the things we can do to make sure that we are doing all we can in this challenging time? Finally, I believe we need to take meaningful steps to make city government more transparent and accountable. This includes citizen involvement. We have no voice from 90 plus percent of the people that live here. No one has been doing anything to involve the people more. I will. Our resources and solutions best come from the people that live here. Accordingly I will propose extending the time between finalizing City Council meeting agendas and holding meetings, so everyone has more lead time to see big issues coming; I will push this information out to the community to make sure people are aware of the issues. I will propose holding regular Council meetings in non- traditional locations and outside of City Hall. I have a plan that includes the creation of a “Mayor’s Community Action Committee” – a new standing advisory body of leaders from all parts of the community including business, community, and recreational that can enhance the voice of the community to make sure we are doing all we can to better the City and to make it a better place for those that live here. We need to enhance our focus on our Keep Allen Beautiful program, we need to be more involved with our most valuable asset – out youth; and we need to become more involved with the Allen Community Outreach and other programs that offer vital services to our citizens. We need representation from all community interests. The people of Allen are the best resource and we need their involvement and voices in this critical time. This is an ambitious agenda, and I’m certainly not going to pretend that we can accomplish miracles. Most folks know that city government is highly dependent on sales tax revenue, and while we are not in the worst case with tax revenue it comes as no surprise there are revenue issues for everyone and we need to be cautious. If elected, I’ll approach the difficult budget decisions ahead with a clear and unbiased set of priorities with no concern for any special interests. We have a lot of great people in place to face this challenge and as a team we will establish the common goal and do the best we can to work toward that goal. Only then we will be successful. For me, City services will always come first – water, trash, roads, public safety, health, parks, and libraries. Once we’ve done what we must to ensure that our basic needs are met today, we should do everything we can to advance an agenda that makes Allen even better tomorrow. By pursuing a clear, ambitious vision and doing a better job of working more closely together as a community, I’m shamelessly optimistic that we can make incredible progress over the years ahead. I promise to continue to maintain and strengthen Allen. I will continue to demand increased efficiency in city operations and feel each of these actions will grow the tax base and tax revenues of the city, which can be used to pay for the initiatives and maintain city services. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: The biggest difference that makes me the best choice is that I am not a politician and have no political ambitions whatsoever. I am a regular guy that wants to step up and serve the City of Allen and my focus is on the people and the businesses of Allen, period. You will find when politicians get worried or run out of answers they resort to mudslinging and personal attacks and it is important that the election is not viewed by anyone as a Blake

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versus Steve event. I am not a socialite, nor do I have any ambition to partake in every single gala event, photo-op or ceremony that comes along. There is work to be done and I am eager to get work. I respect the fact that Mr. Terrell has stepped up and served in a way that he feels is the best way to do it. He put in the time and effort and served his time and for that he should be commended. When the rubber hits the road with this election you will have only two choices for Mayor: me or him. I have no existing relationships with any special interests and if elected, everyone, and the entire city of Allen, gets a fresh start. I do feel that there is a difference of philosophies in that I do not feel that you can treat or try to run the City of Allen simply as a business. I have no experience standing behind a counter waiting for people to come in so I can be reactive to their needs. I do have over 20 years of experience in building rapport, listening to people’s needs and working with them to overcome objections, and offering solutions to meet their needs. That takes a proactive person and that I am. I do not know how to simply wait for people to come to me and provide a service, take their money and then just wait for the next person to come along. Transactional business is not a model that you can use to run a city because that removes the most important part of the City - the people. Operating a city like a business also removes the compassion you must have when dealing with people. Everyone has heard the trumpet blowing of who all has accomplished what around here but I have yet to hear anything from anyone in office about the city as a collective body of people. By electing me, one advantage the people of Allen will have is finding me. Every Friday night I can be found at Allen Eagle home games; on Saturdays I can be found on a football field somewhere in Allen working with the kids. I am available and accessible. I am not talking about finding me in a VIP area or when there is a photo-op or a ribbon cutting ceremony or on the 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month. I am talking about finding me at places like the Jupiter Park mulch station - I picked up a shovel and loaded some buckets a couple of weeks ago and helped load it in a car- I get my hands dirty and don’t ask anyone to do anything that I am not willing to do myself. The office of Mayor comes with no compensation to speak of and is something that requires a full time dedication and desire. When you allow the office to become anything more than a representation of the people, then it’s time for a new voice and a fresh start. That time is now. While I am not a career politician I will stay fully committed to the position. If the state redraws some map or other positions become available I won’t jump and run to chase after personal ambitions. I can guarantee that I will finish the term. Now is the time to give the City of Allen a new voice and a fresh start and I am clearly the best choice. I am dedicated to the office and I will do everything I can to keep the city growing without raising taxes. My commitment is solely to the people of Allen, and without any thought or desire of moving forward into some type of full- time politician. The office of the Mayor will not be just a stepping stone for me. I will apply myself and take on the challenge of improving each week. I will take on all the challenges and be open to getting feedback and hearing the voice of the community. I will work hard to learn what I need to. I have never claimed to be perfect but my promise is to be perfectly committed to doing the best I can to quickly become part of the team that is leading the City of Allen. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Development ranks very high on my list of priorities. We have to market our area and attract the business that best serve the people of Allen and the surrounding communities. The Allen City Council, and City staff, have planned and started a foundation to grow from. There are now mega shopping areas in places that were dirt fields when I was growing up in the area. We are positioned well and have a very bright future and must continue moving forward with development. We can not leave behind the existing businesses including our small local mom and pop businesses. We have to anticipate how we can benefit them as well and make their cash register ring. The goal of all our development should focus on generating sales tax revenue for the benefit of the City and to keep taxes low. We must not build just for the sake of building. We have to do it the right way with proper infrastructure. Coordination and cooperation in all areas are key to reduce issues and pave the road to success. We must have very high standards and demand excellence from everyone involved. We must partner with developers and builders that have a priority in not just putting up a building but in making Allen a better place. We must also look at our restrictions on our local businesses. One area is if a business wants to hang a special sign or banner, the process is cumbersome and the time frame allowed is so short that by the time you pay for the banner, and the permit you might not have the time to recoup the investment on just the banner. We have to make sure that we use common sense and partner with all businesses to make sure we are helping them attract customers and we are maintaining our standards.

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Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: With the growth, Allen is quickly becoming a culturally diverse city. We can maintain our history and heritage but start a trend of citizens working together and getting move involved for our greater good. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: This remains largely a federal issue. Allen PD does an outstanding job of fairly and consistently enforcing existing laws. We must continue to treat everyone fairly and consistently enforce the law to everyone the same so our taxpayers can avoid paying to fight costly lawsuits. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I support regional mobility and transportation. DART’s light rail is important to regional growth and our transportation corridor is critical. We want people coming here to shop, eat and explore all our City has to offer. The best way to accomplish that still needs to be discussed and has only been initially considered. I am in favor of the best way to create new opportunity for businesses and transportation into and out of Allen. Allen has the largest potential along the 75 corridor, however, the issue is going to come down to a dedication of some sales tax revenue and right now we have other areas that need to benefit from our sales tax base. There is a whole process and we would need a county wide initiative. It will take some work and is something we should stay involved with but the critical question here is what do the people of Allen want to do? I don’t think we have enough data to even ask that question yet and it is their money. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: I am more than likely a little different here and will always put Allen first. Allen is an important part of the area. It is important to not create regional partnerships to just create regional partnerships. We have to look at what is best for Allen and not just what a handful of people think is best for Allen. We face just that issue now with the Arts of Collin County facility. What was supposed to be a regional partnership is now being reevaluated by some. I think there is a need for such a facility and we have committed to it but when others decide to reevaluate it throws a wrench in the deal. I would ask this: is facility like that going to benefit the majority of the people in Allen? Will single working mom’s take advantage of it? Will families take advantage of it and use it? Will it reach the majority or just a specific demographic? We need to always be cautious and have the expectation that if partners commit to a project that they are in it to win it and must stay the course. If others are going to reevaluate it, is it time that we do? I know some City workers are being asked to do more with less so what is the priority for the people in this challenging time? You get one chance to leave a footprint so you have to do it wisely and in the best interest of Allen and if you are going to commit to a project then you must keep that commitment. If we have a chance to create something that makes sense and will help the regional economy and benefit the majority of citizens then we should look at it, solicit feedback from our community and move on it. The downside is if we are not cautious and do not make sure that partnerships are true partnerships then we end up costing our taxpayers money. If we don’t look for regional projects or become involved with regional initiatives then we risk road projects won't get done, air quality wouldn't improve, and the quality of life for everyone in the region would not be the best that it can be. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: The City of Allen has great employees and I will strive to keep them all in place doing what they are doing because it works! We deliver excellent service to our citizens and businesses. We need to spend less on studies because when studies don’t reach the majority of the citizens or when citizens take the time to complete a study and the results are ignored then they are not an effective use of taxpayer money. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: The Allen City Council, and city staff, have planned and anticipated our future and we must continue to take steps in the budget, so that no city employees loses their jobs and essential city services are maintained. It is critical that our basic infrastructure be maintained, and enhanced. Expensive new projects need to be delayed until we are certain that we can maintain our basic services and keep the right people in place who provide those services. When the economy improves lets look at projects that fill our wants but for

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now we must look at our needs. We must do everything we can to continue new development and enhance redevelopment opportunities and keep our local economy growing and strong. Allen has in my opinion the absolute best Parks and Recreation department in North Texas. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: We need a clear path to communicate and a clear path to get more people involved. There are many low cost ways to do this. I do not see any uncomfortable truths about Allen. Allen is a forward-thinking community, and everyone who calls Allen home is blessed to have a safe, secure place to live. The City of Allen needs a breath of fresh air. I want to give a new voice to the citizens of Allen, both young and old alike. I will never speak like a politician because I'm not one. I will only speak and vote my convictions. There's nothing wrong with Allen that can't be fixed by what's right with Allen. As a city, we are the sum of our parts. I sincerely believe that I can help enrich Allen because when you put an “outsider” working inside the city council you will get a new voice and a fresh start and that leads to better results. It’s been stated that the mayoral office is not one of entry level. For me, that begs the question: is it a seat of incumbency? A passion to better Allen is my promise, and if elected I will deliver on that. Steve Terrell

Biographical Info:

Name: Steve Terrell Street Address: 611 Glen Rose City/Town: Allen State: Texas Date of Birth: 9-10-1955 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-727-4074 Home Phone Number: 972-727-4074 Fax Number: 972-727-3840 E-mail Address: stevete@swbell.net Campaign Web Site Address: steveterrell.org
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: I moved to Allen in February 1980. Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Since 1986, I have owned and operated Terrell's Dry Cleaning, located in Allen. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Mayor, City of Allen; Allen Chamber of Commerce, Board of Directors; North Texas Council of Governments, Board of Directors; Dallas Regional Mobility Coalition, Board of Directors; Mayors Metroplex Association; Allen Noon Rotary Club, Member and Paul Harris Fellow; Allen High Noon Lions Club, Member; Various youth sports sponsor Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Allen Philharmonic Symphony, Board of Directors; Allen Rotary Club, Past President; Christ the Servant Lutherna Church, Finance Committee; Allen Community Development Corporation, Board of Directors; Allen Industrial Alliance, Board of Directors; City of Allen, Finance Committee; Regional Transportation Commission; Health South Advisory Board Member; Presbyterian Allen Advisory Board Member Q: Education A: - no response Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Mayor, City of Allen, 1997 to current Allen City Council, Place 5, 1991 through 1997 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $3400. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Joe Farmer, Ken Fulk, Dr. David Bishop Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?

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Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I want Allen to continue with the successes that we are experiencing. Under my leadership, our property tax rate has been reduced 18 consecutive years. But, the other part of that story is that city services have increased. In addition, voters have consistently approved bond projects that built fire stations, the library, the police station, parks, roads, a senior center, and recreation centers. Conservative management, aggressive pursuit of quality economic development, and strategic planning has made it possible to fund these projects without raising taxes. While serving as Mayor, I have actively participated in business development. Most recently, I met with leaders of Cabela’s and Andrews Distributing to encourage them that Allen was the best choice for them. Their decision to locate in Allen was not based solely on our location. I make sure that city hall has a business friendly attitude, without compromising our quality standards. Since first being elected, I have been focused on bringing economic development to Allen. Business is the funding engine for all of our amenities, and it has greatly reduced the tax burden on the homeowner. Our property tax rate has decreased .21 cents while I have served on the city council. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1. Our budget will need to provide for Public Safety increases. We are opening our 5th fire station this year, and it will need to be staffed. Secondly, we need to hire more police officers. Our population growth naturally leads to a need for more officers on the police force. I am very proud of both departments, and I appreciate their patience over the past few years while we have phased in budgetary adjustments for their staffing needs. 2. Water conservation and supply is a regional issue that affects Allen residents. Allen is a member city of the North Texas Municipal Water District (NTMWD), and our two citizen representatives on that board are Joe Farmer and Jim Kerr. We must continue to work with our water district to develop more sources of water. In the meantime, we will continue to work on educating our citizens and businesses on better conservation methods. 3. The Strategic Planning process is an annual work session that is conducted by the city council with participation by the City Manager and department directors. Each year, we review our goals, concerns, and their possible budget impact for the next 3 to 5 years. Budget forecasting is an important component of the planning session. For example, we were able to make budget adjustments several years ago when the national economy began a downturn. In addition, council members are expected to bring any ideas, goals, and issues to the table. We discuss them with our department heads, and together we find solutions. This is a great process, and it has served our city well for many years. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I am the owner of a service oriented business that has been in Allen since 1986. I am very assessable during the work day. I also have the flexibility to attend to mayoral duties throughout the day. Many times, I am called on very short notice to meet with various people regarding city business. The job of Mayor is very time consuming, and my typical day includes consulting with city staff and business leaders, assisting with economic development, representing the City at various functions and most important, seeking input from citizens. My wife, Sally and I have lived in Allen since 1980…before our first child was born. Our two children are adults now, and they are both graduates of Allen High School. As native Texans, Sally and I have numerous relatives that live in Allen and Collin County. So, I have a good understanding of our city’s history and roots. I know why Allen is what it is! I have a great appreciation for the work and efforts of all who helped to create Allen. Volunteers are the backbone of our city, and these hard-working people have a great love and appreciation for Allen. There are over 100 city board members who volunteer their time to advise the city council on development, library, animal shelter, health, arts, beautification, senior citizen issues, parks, and downtown development. I truly appreciate their time and efforts. I began volunteering and participating in Allen through the Allen Sports Association. From there, I joined Rotary, and eventually became President, and I am a Paul Harris Fellow. I am also a member of the Allen High Noon Lions Club. I serve on the Allen Chamber of Commerce Board, and have been a long-time member. I have served on the Allen Philharmonic Symphony Board, the Health South Advisory Board, and the Allen Community Development Board. I am a member of Christ the Servant Lutheran Church, and have served as a member of their finance committee. My experience as Mayor and the results we have achieved are the key differences between

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me and my opponent. I understand the details of our government, and each year, for the last 18 years, I have voted to lower our property tax rate. Despite the economy, Allen has been successful in attracting new businesses that have invested millions of dollars into our local economy. This has been particularly important because it has relieved the tax burden on the homeowner. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Since first being elected, economic development has been my focus, because I knew this was the answer to relieving the tax burden on homeowners. Allen citizens developed a Comprehensive Plan that is our road map for quality development. I supported, and Allen voters approved, the creation of the Allen Economic Development Corporation (AEDC) to provide incentives for business development. So, by using the AEDC and the Comprehensive Plan, Allen has been one of the most successful Metroplex cities in attracting commercial development. Most recently, Andrews Distributing, Cisco Systems, Cabela’s, Watters Creek, and the Villages at Allen have located to our city. Our residential development is close to build-out, and we have a good variety of home values and sizes. We have an excellent neighborhood integrity program that helps to maintain and improve infrastructure in our neighborhoods. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: The major residential growth in Allen over the last 20 years was from families looking for a good school system. Today, many of those families are now “empty nesters”, and some of our high school graduates are returning to Allen to raise their own families. The empty nesters have moved their parents to Allen to be closer to them. So, now we have a greater population of senior citizens who live in Allen, and some families can boast of three and four generations living in Allen! As people retire, their income usually becomes fixed. To ease their property tax burden, I supported a $50,000 senior citizen Homestead Exemption ordinance that was approved by the city council. I also supported and the voters approved bonds for construction of a senior recreation center. We have an excellent group of volunteers who assist with senior activities and needs, and I am particularly proud of the Meals on Wheels program in Allen. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Federal law prohibits police officers from profiling, and the Department of Justice monitors policing agencies regarding profiling laws. Upon arrest, it may be determined that the defendant is an illegal immigrant. And in that case, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is notified. ICE will then decide if they wish to take custody of the defendant. The defendant is fingerprinted, and the arrest is registered in Austin. If ICE does not take custody of the defendant, Allen has no jurisdiction to hold defendants solely because of their illegal status. Currently, I regard illegal immigration as a federal issue, and I believe that the federal government needs to do their job in securing our borders, and in providing law abiding immigrants with sensible access to the United States. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: We have to take the politics out of DART before this issue can be resolved. One person or one city is not going to solve the problem because this is a regional issue. The cost per mile to build light rail is about $85 million dollars, and many people believe that it is more sensible to add lanes to the roadways. Some member cities have been paying into DART for years, and have yet to see light rail brought to their city. It is understandable that they would want to be served before any possible new members cities. In a perfect world, I would like to see all surrounding counties work together to create and implement a regional light rail system that is affordable and usable! Allen has recently worked with member cities to help move our workforce, by developing a reverse commute system that will provide transportation from a DART rail station to our shopping and hotel businesses. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: I am a board member of the North Texas Council of Governments, a regional board that oversees many grants, road funding, and helps to develop partnerships that create more efficient government services. In the past, I have served on the Regional Transportation Council which makes decisions on how road money will be spent and what projects are most important. Allen is also a member of the North Texas Municipal Water District, which provides us with our water supply. I believe Allen has done a great job in working with other cities and the region to save time and tax payer money. Locally, Allen works closely

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with its neighboring cities and the county to provide public safety. We partner with Plano, McKinney, Frisco, and Fairview in fire protection. And, we have a seamless 911 radio system. Our police department exchanges training facilities with McKinney. They use our driver course and we use their gun range. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Yes! We constantly re-evaluate our costs, and look for ways to improve. Our strategic planning and excellent budget process have been instrumental in making sure that we are constantly working to keep costs as low as possible. I support a budget that ensures that city services, other than water and sewer, are funded through property tax, not through sales tax and fees. Property tax is a more stable source of income, and can be adjusted if necessary. Sales tax collections and collected fees pay for amenities and improvements. A great example is the antenna fund (money collected from cell phone antennas on our public property) is used to fund public art. This system also helps us to avoid unnecessary issues over budget changes. Our water and sewer system is self funded and has very little debt. We have consistently kept our infrastructure in good shape, and have replaced worn out lines as needed. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: I believe Allen has done an excellent job of adjusting to the economy. Because of our strategic planning and our budget process, we were aware of potential problems with the economy several years ago. We were able to make adjustments, lower taxes, and continue providing excellent services to our citizens. Under my leadership, Allen has been able to prosper and plan for future needs. The residents of Allen can be assured that I will not ask for more tax money from them in the next budget. When residents must tighten their belts, it is expected that the City will do the same. The next budget will require experienced leadership to make certain that we provide the citizens with a sensible budget without compromising our services. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: There is nothing uncomfortable about Allen. We are a great city with wonderful volunteers and citizens. Our budget is sound and our local economy is doing well. It is, and has always been, a great honor to serve as Allen’s Mayor.

Arlington City Council, Place 3
Candidates (choose 1):
Zack Maxwell

Description: Note: Only Arlington residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Biographical Info:

Name: Zack Maxwell Street Address: 316 Tabor Dr City/Town: Arlington State: Texas Date of Birth: July 2, 1990 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-546-7301 Home Phone Number: 972-546-7301 Mobile Phone Number: no answer E-mail Address: vote@zackmaxwell.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.zackmaxwell.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: Over 15 years.

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Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: Over 10 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: My income from a mixture of web and graphic design jobs, as well as a steady hourly job as a packing clerk at a small, privately owned post office. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: I have been attending several town hall meetings where I have made it a point to express my points and opinions on bills moving through our cancel. My civic involvement has just begun. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: - no response Q: Education A: Graduated from Martin High School and took some classes at Tarrant County Community College. Aside from that, I'm a self-taught entrepreneur. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: I've raised over $1000 in campaign contributions. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Individual citizens in Arlington who simply share the same concerns I do. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: I have never been arrested or involved in criminal proceedings. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: Our country, our state, and our city is in financial turmoil. Our local Arlington officials are becoming either exceedingly power-hungry or naive to legislation moving through council at the moment. The people of Arlington are looking for constitutionally restrained officials who will properly examine each bill along with the participating organizations involved, and provide a prompt response to where they stand on issues. I am running to curb the complacency that exists in our council. Bills such as the Thoroughfare and Development plan and the Hike and Bike Master Plan (400 pages) are only a few examples of job-killing legislation moving with little public notice or input. As a council member, I aim to increase awareness to the life changing bills and policies our local government is forcing upon us. I have examined and read hundreds of pages of legislation, ideologies, and documents wrote by numerous organizations involved in Arlingtons public policy process. I cannot agree with the philosophies emitting from these groups. The people will understand that I am the right choice for office because I have the most understanding of policies moving through our city council right now. The job of public officials has skewed far from their original purpose: to protect the fundamental rights of the people. I intend to do just that. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: The first action I would take is voting down the adoption of the Arlington Thoroughfare and Development plan as well as the Hike and Bike Master plan. These two bills are wrote and based off of policies from the Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU). The CNU has a video online called "Built to Last" which informs us the greatest threat to the planet is "Cul-De-sacs, single-family homes, and automobiles" among other things. I cannot agree with this philosophy. The second issue I would take up is Arlington involvement in ICLEI, an organization who "seeks to bring rapid and radical change" to local governments across the world. A lot of ICLEI's beliefs are parallel to the of CNU. The third issue I would take action on is the enormous amount of fees we burden small businesses in Arlington with. Fees such as "roadside sign adjustment permits" and "fire marshal inspection fees" are among over 300 fees we put on small businesses of all types. None of my actions would require any kind of funding to implement. In fact, everything discussed above could be achieved in comprehensive City Council meetings. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: The biggest difference is obviously my age. I do feel like I bring more energy to the table and more attention to the details inside certain bills. I also read the bills that go through council unlike a majority of our current members. My attentiveness and my willingness to connect with the citizens of Arlington sets me apart from my opponents. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you

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evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Making Arlington and attractable city to start and grow a business in is in my list of top 3 priorities. I believe we should keep taxes low and reduce the amount of fees we impose on small business owners. The residential growth will happen because Arlington has the jobs available to support it. If we continue to burden our business climate with frivolous fees, they will be unable to create new jobs and promote growth. The city has done a good job at maintaining one of the lowest sales tax rates around. However, the city is becoming increasingly complacent to refusing ordinances that would take away private land from businesses and force them to pay more fees. There is a lot more the city could do to restore the connection between the government and the business community. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Arlington is experiencing an increase in the amount of youth that move to Arlington to attend UTA. This is certainly not a problem that needs to be shared regionally. Right now the city is working on a hike and bike master plan and a skatepark master plan to appease the youth of Arlington. The hike and bike plan involves a lot of eminent domain measures that I can't agree with. The plan also calls for forcing businesses to purchase bicycle parking that would not get used. A lot of these issues need to be discussed extensively with the long-time residents of Arlington. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: The city should examine its current immigration enforcement strategies and develop innovative methods of identifying and dealing with illegal immigrants. This country does have an immigration process for newcomers that needs to be respected and enforced. Legal immigrants often feel undercut when they learn about illegals who are entering the country without going through the same process they have. This is an issue that needs to be addressed. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I oppose any mass transit system that is funded by taxpayer dollars. Dart and the Trinity Railway Express are experiencing some of the lowest ridership numbers seen since its inception. This is proof that the citizens of Arlington and DFW are not up for participating in mass transit. I would gladly encourage any private company to move in and set up mass transit that is not funded by taxpayer monies. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: I would not encourage regional partnerships on anything. Arlington currently holds a strong regional partnership with the North Central Texas Council of Governments. The problem I see with regional partnerships is the public oversight. I have yet to speak with a single resident who know hows the Council of Governments is formed and elected, I view that as a serious issue, especially when the NCTCOG consists of over 40 committees and boards that reach into every aspect of living (law enforcement, transportation, water conservation, etc.). The city has done well up to this point without regional partnerships, there is no need to seek new ones. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: I believe that our city delivers plenty of services to the residents. Whether these services are delivered effectively and efficiently is determined by the opinions of the citizenry. I work at a privately owned postal center which delivers service to customers much more efficiently than the post office. I advocate privatizing as much of our city services as possible. My job is physical proof that private business does better at delivering service than the government. Government understands that they don't have compete with private business to stay in service, so efficiency and cost-effectiveness often suffer because of this thinking. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: The city is just barely scraping by in the current recession in terms of maintaining high employment and low foreclosure rates. Our city cannot fund their current level of retirement liabilities, which means that we have too many government employees. We need to start looking for ways for citizens to become entrepreneurs and business owners, rather than relying on the government for employment. We can do this by going line-by-line through the current budget and finding areas we can cut spending in. Giving out free low-flow toilets certainly does not help our economic situation. Frivolous spending

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on such programs needs to be reduced and allocated to fixing our streets and infrastructure. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: The city's extensive involvement with the North Central Texas Council of Governments is a huge issue. Why? Because citizens are not aware of how the council of governments is formed or what they do. What bothers myself and other concerned voters is that the NCTCOG develops "recommendations" on a daily basis and simply injects them into our local bills and plans. Hence the hike and bike master plan. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: Any changes the city makes to gas drilling laws and ordinances needs to be discussed with the residents of Arlington. I understand there is currently a lot of concern regarding the drilling process and the chemicals involved in hydraulic fracturing. The city is obviously not doing enough to address these concerns or it would not be hot button issue. I am not familiar with each ordinance the city has on the gas wells; however, it will be a top priority if elected for office. Robert Rivera
Biographical Info:

Name: Robert Rivera Street Address: 1921 Edgehill Dr. City/Town: Arlington State: Texas Date of Birth: July 16, 1971 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 817-557-1542 Home Phone Number: 817-557-1542 E-mail Address: voterobertrivera@yahoo.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.voterobertrivera.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 36 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 36 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Banker Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Arlington City Council Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Chairman Arlington Convention and Visitors Bureau Q: Education A: University of Texas at Arlington B.A. Political Science Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Arlington City Council Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $25,000 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Jim Maibach, Arlington Professional Firefighters PAC, Arlington Board of Realtors, Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I love Arlington and have been part helping our commununity for over 20 years. As a member of our city council I've been able to see first hand numerous issues and solutions for a brighter city. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Public Safety, economic developement, and supporting our public schools. Arlington is a city blessed with significant opportunity; building on expanding our tax base will help pay for our needs. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice?

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A: Experience. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: The expansion of our tax base is paramount to our growth. The addition of new and stronger commercial development will continue to be a focus as we keep Arlington moving forward. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Change is part of every community. Arlington is taking all the strenghts which exist in our city and embracing the very best qualities to help advance our entire region. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: This is a federal issue. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I support mobility for Arlington and feel this requires a regional approach. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: The Super Bowl is a good example of the region working together. I'd like to see more mega events coming to our area and all of North Texas having parts of the event and tourism dollars. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Yes. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Arlington is doing well today because of our planning for the future. I'd like to see select corporate naming rights to our parks and other city venues for needed new dollars. The children who would be playing in our updated and new parks would not care if the park was named Tonka Toys Park, they would only care about the experience of being at the park. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: That just a few voters decide the future of Arlington. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: Arlington is always looking at best practices and ways to improve the safety for everyone involved. Marvin Sutton

Biographical Info:

Name: Marvin Sutton Street Address: 5311 Manhassett Drive City/Town: Arlington State: Texas Date of Birth: October 16, 1962 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 817 602-0644 Home Phone Number: 817 465-0677 Mobile Phone Number: 817 602-0644 Fax Number: 817 465-0677 E-mail Address: msutton4council@gmail.com Campaign Web Site Address: wwww.electmarvinsutton.com
Questions:

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Q: Length of residency in the city A: 20 years 2 months Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 20 years 2 months Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Air Traffic Controller Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Manhassett Community Watch Group Crime Watch Coordinator, Election Judge, Volunteer Deputy Voter Registrar, Disaster Relief Volunteer, Community Organizer, Ruth E. Roberts Community Service Award, Martin Luther King Celebration Committee Inc. Community Service Nominee Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Manhassett Community Watch Group Crime Watch Coordinator, Election Judge, Volunteer Deputy Voter Registrar, and Volunteer, Community Organizer Q: Education A: Bachelor of Science in Accounting from University of Texas at Arlington 2005 Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Arlington City Council, District 3 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $2,754.76 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Barbara Shuler, Marvin Sutton, and Dwight McKissic Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I’m running for the Office of Arlington City Council, District 3, because I believe I can provide the focused leadership needed to improve the quality of life for our citizens, creating a safer, smarter, and greener Arlington. I’m a visionary with the intellect and due diligence to navigate through complex local issues and base my decisions on sound and effective solutions. As an air traffic controller, community crime watch coordinator, UTA honor graduate, and United States Air Force veteran, I possess the skills, commitment, and confidence to move Arlington in a positive direction. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: I would attract quality jobs, create a privately funded rail system, and strengthen the gas drilling ordinance. I would work to encourage the Chamber of Commerce to develop an aggressive plan to attract companies that are a good fit for our city. I think the Chambers influence and Regional Transportation Council logical support would be useful in securing a company to developing an above ground rail system for the district. I would solicit the help of local active group to assist in rewriting the gas drilling ordinance. Most of these items require little or no funding. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I’m proactive, capable of making informed decision with undue influence. My approach government is community-focused balanced with economic development. I am committed to improving the quality of our infrastructure, economic environment, and public safety services. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Our number one priority for stimulating our local economy should be attracting quality jobs in the area to stabilize our local economy, Arlington performance has been lacking in this area Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Over past several years, our city has experienced a surge in its Hispanic and African American population as well as a moderate increase in our senior citizen population. Our policies should embrace the great diversity that reflected in our population as well as endorsing a flexible and efficient transportation system and quality medical facilities for our aging population Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal

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immigration? A: Nothing. This is a federal issue. Local should be engaging in activities that protect and serve the Arlington citizens. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I support a seamless regional transit system. I'd get private investors, Regional Transportation Council, and local governments to develop a plan that allow for a above ground rail system. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Crime is a major issue for this region. Burglaries are trending upward. Regionally we could develop better ways to share information on trends and best practices for prevention between public safety departments and disseminate this information to the public. Transportation is a complex issue for most cities. We can effectively address these problems by minimizing the bottlenecks and congestions on streets,developing a regional transit system,and encouraging car pooling. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Generally yes, however, I believe the city must continue to find ways to deliver quality services at an effective price that shows good stewardship of taxpayers dollars. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: The current leadership used some the Tomorrow Fund to balance our city's deficit. Our leadership need to come up with innovative ways to generate additional revenue. I would recommend advertising on city websites and vehicles. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Arlington is the largest city in the US with no mass transportation system. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: I'd increase the distance from 600 feet to at least 1000 feet, ensure proper monitoring and oversight by a third party.

Arlington City Council, Place 4
Candidates (choose 1):
Kelly Canon

Description: Note: Only Arlington residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Biographical Info:

Name: Kelly Canon Street Address: 901 Kristin Ct City/Town: Arlington State: Texas Date of Birth: 06-06-1959 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 817-929-3299 Home Phone Number: n/a Mobile Phone Number: 817-929-3299 Fax Number: n/a E-mail Address: kjcanon_campaign@att.net Campaign Web Site Address: http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Kelly-Canonfor-Arlington-City-Council-District-4/183754318328277?sk=info
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city

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A: 13 years (Since 1998). Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 7 Years (since 2003) Q: Occupation/main source of income A: I work as an interior designer/space planner for the Facilities department of L-3 Communications, in Arlington, TX. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Over the past few years, I have been involved with the Arlington Tea Party, where we work at the grassroots level by getting out the vote, registering people to vote, and campaigning for conservative candidates in various elections. The most recent effort was for the November 2010 election, where I campaigned for Bill Zedler, State Representative for State District 96. He won the election by 52% of the vote. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: As a graduate of Texas A&M University, I’ve been involved with my local chapter of the Association of Former Students, where we’ve helped with the construction of several homes for Habitat for Humanity, as well as numerous visits to assisted living locations in Tarrant County, especially during the holidays. I am a Century Club level member, and believe in giving back to my university for the support of a higher education, benefiting our future generation of college students. Q: Education A: I attended and graduated from Texas A&M University with a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Design, from the School of Architecture, in 1982. I minored in Building Construction. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None. Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Approximately $250 so far. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Private donors, so far. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: As a 13-year resident of Arlington, I’ve come to know this city as my home. I’ve lived and worked in Arlington since 1998, and hopefully, I’ll retire here. As such, I feel I have an investment in the well-being of the city, and decided to get more involved with the city-level government, to insure that our way of life in Arlington will continue to foster lower taxes, safer neighborhoods by way of a stronger police presence, strong fire services, and improved/continual maintenance of our city streets. I plan to address these issues by always voting against any issue that will raise our taxes, by voting for measures that will make it very inconvenient for crime to exist in our neighborhoods with a very strong police presence, and by supporting our fire services in every way possible. I believe my architectural background and technical background in the building construction industry gives me the added benefit of being able to understand and interpret city development (vision) plans and project proposals. I believe my real-world professional experience will be a valuable asset as a council member, when deciding on the fate of various projects and proposals that are presented to the council for approval. I’ll be able to weigh certain aspects of these proposals in terms of their value to the community, their initial cost, their adherence to building codes and zoning ordinances, and their long-term effects on the economic growth of the community. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: I would work to do the following: #1: Keep Taxes Low. #2: Ensure adequate police, fire, and other city-provided services such as sanitation, water, and other utilities. I would also look at ways to privatize certain city services (where practicable), to ease the city's financial burden of benefit and pension plans. #3: Maintaining and improving our streets, city-wide. By voting against frivolous plans (like the current "Through Fare Hike & Bike" plan), and making better use of our financial resources, this can easily be addressed. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: One of the most significant differences between me and my opponent is my strong education and building construction background. Another key difference is our view on the issue of mass-transit for Arlington. Kathryn Wilemon is a strong advocate for mass-transit

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in Arlington, whereas I am opposed to it. She has proven to be out of touch with the needs and concerns of the citizens, as the mass transit issue has been repeatedly voted down in past elections, by increasing margins of opposition in each election. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Bringing new quality development to Arlington is a high priority. Arlington still has prime development tracts for commercial projects, and although limited some residential tracts. The development of the Highlands has given Arlington a major boost in sales tax revenue at a critical time. We need to be constantly looking for new opportunities that are a right fit for our city. We also need to be looking at re-development opportunities for some of the older areas of the city. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Arlington is one of the most diverse cities in the DFW area. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: The Police department should be encouraging strict enforcement of the immigration and illegal alien laws (federal, state, and local) that are already in place. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I am not in favor of a mass-transit system for Arlington. As for “regional” transit, we already have the “TRE”, which is very under-utilized. Just recently, the TRE cancelled all services on Sundays, due to under-utilization. Why should Arlington spend money it doesn’t have on a system that would be equally under-utilized compared to the cost of its implementation and maintenance? Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: One of the most productive areas we can work together in is bringing new major businesses to the DFW Region. When major companies come in they also bring suppliers and other ancillary businesses. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Arlington does a good job of delivering services at a reasonable price, however there is always room for improvement, as was shown a year ago when the city out-sourced it’s health inspections. We were able to have more inspections done for a lower cost and with no long term liability for pensions. We need to look at other departments to see if we can make similar changes. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: The present council has done a better job than most of the city councils in the DFW area, however we should be looking at better ways to use the Oil and Gas Revenue that the city receives. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Because of the explosive growth that Arlington experienced during the last 40 years, we are now facing a major crisis in road maintenance and rebuild. Several years ago we voted a ¼ cent sales tax to be used just to repair and rebuild streets, at a time when we were told that we had a $100 million dollar back log. Today it is closer to $200 million. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: I would make sure that ordinances were uniformly implemented throughout the city, with respect to distance, noise levels and air-quality of the wells. Kathryn Wilemon

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Biographical Info:

Name: Kathryn Wilemon Street Address: 4100 Shady Valley Drive City/Town: Arlington State: Texas Date of Birth: Feb 21, 1937 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 817-994-5129 Home Phone Number: 817-461-9615 Mobile Phone Number: 817-994-5129 Fax Number: 817-461-9615 E-mail Address: KAWilemon@aol.com Campaign Web Site Address: none
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 61 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 40 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Retired / Social security, pension and investment income Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Arlington Convention & Visitors Bureau – Board member Partner’s Foundation for JPS Hospital- Chairman Nurse Family Partnership- County & state advisory Board Arlington Tomorrow Foundation-board member UTA School of social work advisory board Tarrant Regional Transportation Coalition –chair Arlington Civic League- member United Way Arlington advisory Board-member NTCOG Regional Transportation Council-member Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Tarrant County Hospital JPS Board member- 9 years, Tarrant County Commission on Aging- Board member, Downtown Arlington Inc. - Board member Awards: John Peter Smith – Harold D. Samuels Award 2006; Fort Worth Business Press Great Women of TexasWomen of Influence Award 2008; Boy Scouts of America Silver Eagle Award 2007 Q: Education A: Arlington High School- graduate; Arlington State College (UTA) – attended; Southwestern Graduate School of Banking at SMU – graduate Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Arlington City Council Dist. 4 elected 2003 until present Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $14,600 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Gayle Crouch, Gary Martin, Kathy Petche Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: Civil Suit in official capacity Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I am seeking re-election to continue to represent not only the citizens of district 4 but all the citizens of Arlington. Experience is invaluable and I have the experience as a council representative for the past eight years. Prior to being elected to the Arlington City Council I had over twenty five years of community involvement, including serving on two city bond committees and as a county appointee to JPS County Hospital Board of Trustees. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Continue to enhance public safety. Continue to enhance and build safe clean neighborhoods. Continue to include citizen input and transparency on all issues facing the city. All of the above will be accomplished through conservative policy making and budgeting. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I am not familiar with my opponent so I can only speak for myself. Experience, knowledge and integrity are the cornerstones of my service on the Arlington City Council. Experience is especially important when dealing with a multi- million dollar budget and municipal policy affecting the entire city. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you

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evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Due to the economy, residential development has not kept pace with commercial development in Arlington. Arlington has been aggressive in attracting commercial developments such as the very successful Highlands, the redevelopment of downtown, including many new restaurants. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Arlington has been a very diverse community for many years and we have worked to be inclusive and to find positive solutions to any and all issues. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Arlington has and will continue to enforce all applicable state and federal laws dealing with immigration. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I favor a seamless regional transit system because it enables citizens to have a choice for their mobility needs. It also is a factor in decreasing congestion, improving air quality and an economic development tool to attract new businesses to the area. However, it will be up to the citizens of Arlington to make that decision. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Transportation, air quality, water resource management and public health are key elements of providing core services in an efficient regional cooperative manner. Another recent example of regional cooperation was Super Bowl XLV. It had a positive impact on the North Texas region. My experience on the Regional Transportation Council and the Tarrant County Hospital Board has provided invaluable experience of working and thinking regionally. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Yes, Arlington has one of the lowest employee to citizen ratio in the north Texas region. Our staff is constantly looking for ways to save taxpayer dollars. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Last year staff proposed the challenge grant program in which one-time money was used to give time to departments to either make appropriate cuts or increase revenues to cover their budget. It is part of many strategies the city has incorporated to reduce the budget and to accelerate core service to a growing population. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: The continued growth of our city and the associated demand for core services will always be a challenge for future generations. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: We will continually be reviewing the gas well ordinance as new concerns are brought forward. Public safety is of utmost importance as is the protection of private property rights.

Arlington City Council, Place 5
Candidates (choose 1):
Chris Hightower
Biographical Info: Questions:

Description: Note: Only Arlington residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Q: Length of residency in the city A: - no response Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income

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A: - no response Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: - no response Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: - no response Q: Education A: - no response Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: - no response Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: - no response Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: - no response Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: - no response Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: - no response Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: - no response Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: - no response Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: - no response Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: - no response Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: - no response Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: - no response Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: - no response Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: - no response Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: - no response Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: - no response Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: - no response Lana Wolff
Biographical Info:

Name: Lana Wolff Street Address: 1709 Norwood Lane City/Town: Arlington State: TX Date of Birth: 8-27-46

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Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (w)817-459-6141 Home Phone Number: 817-274-5972 Mobile Phone Number: 817-946-5343 Fax Number: 817-274-2213 E-mail Address: wolff55@swbell.net Campaign Web Site Address: N/A
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 58 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 22 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Retired Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Councilmember District 5; Mayor-Pro Tem; National League of Cities Community & Economic Development Steering Committee; TX Municipal League Eminent Domain/Regulatory Policy Committee; City Council Committees: Building Equitable Communities, Chair; Municipal Policy Committee; Regional Policy & Municipal Infrastructure; Community & Neighborhood Development Committee; Downtown Arlington Management Corp., Board; Tax Increment Reinvestment Zone Board; East Arlington Kiwanis; Arlington Sculpture Garden Foundation; Arlington Childcare Council; 76010 Weed & Seed REACH Project. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Leadership Arlington Graduate; Arlington Human Service Planners; River Legacy Foundation, Founding Director; Jr. League of Arlington, Past President; Theatre Arlington; Past President; Arlington Historical Society; and Richard Greene Scholar Mentor; 2002 American Business Women’s Association ‘Distinguished Circle of Success’ Award; Leadership Arlington Outstanding Leadership Award 2006; Arlington Arts League “2007 Friend of the Arts Award”. Q: Education A: Arlington Public Schools 1953-1964; East Texas State University 1964-66. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Arlington City Councilmember, District 5: 2003-11 Mayor Pro-Tem, 2008-11 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: No fundraisers or 2011 contributions to date. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: N/A Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: One frivolous civil suit filed and never followed up. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: To actively serve the community and make a positive difference in my hometown. As the representative of the ‘Original Old Town’, I want to foster a vibrant university district surrounded by strong neighborhoods with a focus on code enforcement, public safety and street improvements. I am a longtime ‘eastside pride’ community volunteer and central sector redevelopment advocate. I am accessible, open and responsive to citizens and stakeholders. Having grown up in this district, attending Southside and Berry Elementary schools, Carter Jr. High and Arlington High School, I have an excellent grassroots feel for this district. An active community volunteer for over 30 years, with 16-year professional career in community planning, economic development and neighborhood advocacy combined with the last 8-years on council have prepared me to continue to serve in this office. I am able to grasp the big picture of the city’s future needs in terms of economic development, government operations, and current budget restraints. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Top priorities: 1) public safety; 2) low taxes; 3) jobs. Align public policy to successfully achieve quality redevelopment and new jobs; build strong neighborhoods with active and engaged citizens; develop public-private collaborations to identify assets. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I am a proven community leader with ability to build consensus. Unlike my opponents, I have a strong record of open and responsive communication with citizens and

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stakeholders. I am politically independent with no hidden agenda. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Our City offers a mix of healthy land uses that encourages redevelopment reinvestment that creates lasting value in existing areas. Expanding business translates into more tax revenue and a healthier economy. Generating more business opportunities drives our efforts to retain and grow jobs. Creating a more vibrant downtown is an economic development strategy that contributes greatly to the success of UT Arlington and quality of life in the city. With over 33,000 in student enrollment, This past year, College Town, USA emerged with a vision to align a revitalized downtown with performing arts, historic neighborhoods, libraries, parks, research, tourism, and mixed use retail/residential development. A new $12 million medical clinic opened in 2010 creating 200 new jobs in the three-story, 110,000-square-foot medical complex. The GM Assembly Plant remains a vital part of the local economy. GM employees number 2,400 and produces nearly 1,140 vehicles a day. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Arlington is and continues to be a growing and culturally diverse city as reflected in the 2010 Census results. Changing demographics should not negatively affect basic services to our citizens. Every resident and stakeholder, regardless of race, religion or socio-economic status, expects and is entitled to the best ambulance service, fire and police protection, streets, water and sewer services; garbage collection; parks and libraries that we can fiscally provide. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: This is a federal issue and should be addressed through amendments to the Immigration and Nationality Act. We must insist the U.S. Congress take action in order to relieve our local schools, hospitals and taxpayers from the financial burden of illegals. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: A seamless Regional Transit System is well underway in the Metroplex. Unfortunately, Arlington is not a part of it. A system that offers safe, reliable, and efficient options, could help to meet future demands for both passengers and promote economic vitality. Input from citizens and stakeholders is necessary if our City is to move forward and partner with the region. The will of the people will determine the outcome. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: It makes good sense to consider collaborative efforts to increase joint utilization and shared services or opportunities to maximize taxpayer return on investment to address common issues. Technology, telecommunication innovation, water supply and air quality issues are examples for consideration. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: 2011 Citizen Survey shows ratings and perceptions of most city services receive high overall ratings. We can always do better! Streets continue to be an area where there is much room for improvement. City Services rated very high include municipal airport, garbage collection, convention center, emergency management, and action center. Needed improvements are within code enforcement, Handitran, and health inspection. I recommend the City Manager consider reorganizing Community Services Department. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Under the leadership of this Mayor and City Council, Arlington is preparing for a brighter future. I believe that our work, the commitment of our community partners and the involvement of our residents will result in excellence. Not by accident, nor did it come easily, but by our decisions we were able to decrease General Fund expenditures by 3.2% in one-time expenditures and a reduction of 70 non-public safety positions. First Quarter 2011 General Fund projections are approximately $1 million better than budget revenues. Expenditure outlook for same period is $648,000 under budget. The FY2012 budget must be balanced and we have already begun the work. We can do it by decreasing expenditures and not raising property taxes. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Quality of Life and how to pay for it. Arlington has entered a stage of maturity where

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build-out is beginning to limit our capacity for growth and development. Our tax base is supported primarily through tourism, property taxes and retail sales. Identifying new ways to expand and diversify the tax base is critical to economic success. Quality of life is community, connectivity and identity. It is civic pride. We must continue to explore options and create solutions to engage citizens and stakeholders in partnerships to revitalize declining neighborhoods and commercial corridors that will provide new choices. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: The current Gas Drilling Ordinance is being revised. The ordinance should establish clearly stated governance to enable financial benefits to the natural gas industry, businesses, institutions and residents who reside in the Barnett Shale. Arlington is blessed. Our ordinance must provide reasonable protection to both ensure safety compliance and future land use issues.

Arlington City Council, Place 8
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Chris Dobson
Biographical Info:

Name: Chris Dobson Street Address: 2708 Buffalo Dr. City/Town: Arlington State: Texas Date of Birth: 10/28/78 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 8176026061 Mobile Phone Number: 8176026061 Campaign Web Site Address: New Arlington on fb
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 1979 to 1999, 2006 - present Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 2006-present Q: Occupation/main source of income A: - no response Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: - no response Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: - no response Q: Education A: B.S. in Political Science, minor in History from TCU in 2002; Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: I ran last year for another at-large district in Arlington. Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: None, one of the worst aspects of our political system is the reliance on money to create 'viable' candidates. Candidates who take money to 'improve their visibility' end up agreeing with the people paying the money. Money is best spent on real products, not on convincing people that ones ideas are correct, instead my campaign predicates itself on the conversations people have with each other and the ability to spread memes virally through electronic media. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Doesn't this question just prove the point above, none. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: Yes in 2000,in Kentucky, I was charged with possession of Marijuana under two ounces,actually .02 grams, and possession of paraphernalia. I paid court cost and had them expunged from the record, but looking back it was an important event in my life which underscored the need to remain vigilante in defense of one's rights despite the application of power by authorities. I wish I had handled the encounter differently. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you

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to serve in this office? A: Once again this year the city of Arlington with its nearly 180,000 thousand voters failed to provide a challenger for city council district #8. Unopposed races are disgusting. Having guessed this might happen, I used ballot petitions(it's free) for access to the ballot, and had wonderful conversations with residents of Arlington. By the way I'm also above 18 and been a resident in the district for longer then six months. As to the preparation for this job, I care not just for winning or being right, but about the lack of involvement by voters and residents generally. If the candidates and issues are not valuable or enticing enough for full participation then I suggest providing sweat equity in the form of a raffle ticket to all persons showing up at a polling place or voting. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: I would like to switch to Mai-in balloting for all city elections as part of a push to modernize the breadth and scope of our voting. Secondly, Id like to see the Arlington City Council reconstituted with all single member districts, with the Mayor voting to break ties, and capped at 50,000 residents per district. Thirdly, I'd like to rescind the City Council's and manager's use of the luxury boxes at Cowboys Stadium and The Ball Park in favor of a raffle system open to the public that maximizes revenue for the city. However, since these monies are not taxes or fees, but instead a voluntary contribution from the public, I'd like to see a fund created to hold them to be dispersed yearly by vote of the residents. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I have five planks on my platform which I believe are the means to which Arlington can change its nature into the crown jewel of the FWAD, both democratically and financially. Switching to Mail-in balloting and reconstituting the city council reform the system, Raffling off the luxury boxes provides the funding for the previous two actions. Furthermore a moratorium on gass well drilling special use permits will require the drilling companies to play by the rules. Finally, by requiring the Chief of Police to make marijuana prohibition its lowest priority it will allow the police force to focus on crimes with victims and create the vibrant nightlife needed to keep many of the dollars we loose to cities with a nightlife. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Rather then attract new development to our city I find it far more reasonable to encourage development of local business as those businesses continue to circulate that money in the local economy. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: - no response Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: - no response Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I'm in favor of a seamless transit system because it would increase the convenience and mobility for the majority of people. In order to make it happen I'm willing to encourage people to vote. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Our region needs to seriously address the issue of industrial and toxic pollutions, this is not 'climate change.' I mean the spewing of 25 tons of Benzene and other volatile organic compounds from each well drilled, with some drilling sights having over twenty wells meaning a yearly output of 1 million pounds of pollution from such sites. Also I believe our region would great benefit from a tier one university in the FWAD.(Fort Worth-ArlingtonDallas) Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: - no response Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: While Arlington remains able to fulfill its basic financial obligations, the long term debt taken on by the city, as well as unexpected costs from the operation of the Entertainment district, have generally left the city operating with a year to year deficit which will be made

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up from increased fees and taxes, reduced services, or dipping into the Arlington tomorrow fund. Meanwhile a veritable goldmine exists in the luxury boxes which would allow us to maintain services without further burdening the general population with coercive taxes or fees. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: We don't vote and we need public transit. The solution is to get more people to vote. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: I think first the city needs to enforce its current drilling ordinance rather then the ad-hoc system of Special Use Permits. I fsr as safety and interests of the citizen that needs to be viewed in the long run as over the life of the wells a number of problems could arise which will require remidiation. Gene Patrick
Biographical Info:

Name: Gene Patrick Street Address: 2305 Castlerock City/Town: Arlington State: Texas Date of Birth: July 16,1940 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 817-640-1694 Home Phone Number: 817-640-1563 Mobile Phone Number: 817-475-1966 E-mail Address: gparlington@aol.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: My family moved to Arlington in 1951 and I have lived here from then thru 1966 and again from 1986 to the present. Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 1951-1966 and 1986-2011 Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Creative Consultant and investor Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Member at-large Arlington City Council Chairman-Fiscal Policy Commitee Arlington Chamber Board of Diectors Downtown Management Corp Board Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: American Heart Assn. Board Arlington Art Museum Board Theatre Arlington Board President Downtown Arlington Inc. Q: Education A: Arlington High School Arlington State College Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: - no response Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: About $5000 to date Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: ARBOR TXPAC Rick Merritt Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: no Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: Long time knowledge of Arlington and it's issues plus a very full business and management career. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1-Redevelopment policies 2-More attention to basic City services 3-More effort and action toward Infastructure improvments. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: Experience and motavation to serve. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you

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evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: It is a high pritory and I intend to put more attention on attracting new small business as well. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: I think we are changing rapidly and we need to begin adjusting to the new conditions now. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Work closly with State and Federal agencies including pushing them to act! Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I do and I favor the local option method. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: - no response Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Yes,but there is always room to improve. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: We have supported several developments that have built our sales tax base...we should continue that policy. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: - no response Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: We are in the process of revising our existng laws and should complete that work as soon as possible.

Arlington Mayor
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Robert Cluck
Biographical Info:

Name: Robert Cluck Street Address: 5820 Bay Club Dr City/Town: Arlington State: Texas Date of Birth: 3/20/1939 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 817 265 6777 Home Phone Number: 817 265 6777 Mobile Phone Number: 817 823 3788 Fax Number: 817 457 4766 E-mail Address: rcluck@sbcglobal.net Campaign Web Site Address: None
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 40 Great Years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 40 wonderful years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Physician and Medical Director Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: I serve as Vice President for Medical Affairs at Arlington Memorial Hospital. Previously, I was a practicing physician (ob/gyn) in Arlington, where I delivered many babies (citizens) Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: I received my medical training from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical

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School, and then served in the U.S. Air Force as a medical officer. I was a co-founder with my physician partners, of the Medical Clinic of North Texas. Previous to my election as Mayor, I served two terms on the Arlington City Council. Q: Education A: SMU:BS Southwestern Medical School: MD Parkland Hospital : Rotating internship followed by OB-GYN residency Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: I first ran for public office in 1999 when I was elected to Arlington City Council. After four years service as a member of the Council, I successfully ran for Mayor in 2003 and have been re-elected in three subsequent elections. I am honored the citizens of Arlington allow me the opportunity to serve as their voice in the Mayor’s Office. Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: A little over $100,000 which will help me communicate with the citizens that my vision for Arlington includes more good paying jobs, strong police and fire departments and continued improvement of our roads, streets and highways. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Mike Patterson Chris Carroll Arnold Petsche Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: Working with my fellow City Council members, Arlington has created jobs and economic opportunity, even in a very tough economy. I want to continue working with my colleagues to see that more good jobs are created in Arlington. Our community has significant opportunities to increase our standing as a destination for corporate headquarters. My experience helps ensure we realize these opportunities. I also want to continue improving our mobility. Now that I-30 has been expanded and improved, my focus is on needed upgrades for State Highway 360 and continuing to improve our city streets. And I have the experience in public safety to ensure our police and fire departments are strong and staffed with the best trained professionals. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: I will continue pursuing good jobs for our community by recruiting responsible development and corporate campuses. Our City must continue to strongly support UTA and its state funding. And I will continue to look for innovative initiatives that can help ensure our mobility is improved. We have the means to accomplish our goals without raising the property tax rate. Also I am seeking new hotel opportunities. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: The citizens have honored me by electing me to represent them at City Hall. We have worked with our citizens on hundreds of issues and together we have a record of strengthening public safety, delivering high quality, dependable neighborhood services and living within our financial means. I believe I am the best choice because I listen to our citizens and then work with them to accomplish our goals. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Arlington has always been a destination for out of town visitors. Cowboy Stadium has joined Six Flags, Texas Rangers baseball, Levitt Pavilion and other destinations as a premiere attraction. With more visitors and tourists come more opportunities. We must seize these opportunities by expanding our hotel accommodations and strongly considering an expansion of our convention center. Tourism has long been an economic strength of Arlington. By accommodating the increased demand for hotels and convention and meeting space, we further expand job opportunities and our city’s tax base. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: As I have previously stated, it is the responsibility of the U.S. Congress and the federal government to determine the immigration laws of our country. I do not believe it is appropriate for our city to undertake what is clearly the responsibility of another level of government. When the federal government determines future immigration laws, we will abide by and enforce the laws of the land. Regardless of an individual’s status, Arlington will continue to aggressively seek prosecution of those who commit personal or property

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crimes against our citizens. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Arlington continues to responsibly address the challenges of natural gas drilling. From public safety to clear water and air, we continually work with our staff experts and outside experts to ensure our citizens are able to reap the benefits of gas drilling in a safe and non-obtrusive way. We will continue to ensure the drillers and producers respect our city and its residents. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I support giving our citizens a choice, an opportunity to vote on supporting or not, a regional transit system. Ultimately, as I have in the past, I will respect the choice our citizens make. In the meantime, I am pleased our citizens and visitors have a much improved I-30 corridor, which has greatly improved east-west mobility in North Arlington. Now, we must focus on north-south mobility improvements. I am dedicated to working on SH 360 improvements as well as continued street improvements through our voter approved street maintenance tax. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Super Bowl XLV was a shining example of regional cooperation. I expect the spirit of cooperation to continue as the region vies to host other significant sports and political events. The economic boost – long term and short term - is so significant for the entire Metroplex that we must work together in our pursuit of these events. And of course, we will continue to work in unity on regional transportation and air quality solutions. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: We deliver dependable and high quality services in a cost-effective manner. That in part is why we have not increased the property tax rate in many years. We have well educated and trained police officers and fire fighters. Our water service is dependable and safe. Our garbage collection is completed on time and we have a comprehensive curb-side recycling program. Our landfill efficiency is maximized through best practices implemented by our operator. Code Compliance has been strengthened over the last few years and our Parks Department is outstanding. I am very proud of the citizen services we provide every day. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: We have balanced the budget without an increase in the homeowner property tax rate every year during the “storm”. Arlington tightened its financial belt, just like Arlington families and we were able to maintain a better financial position than many cities because of the sales tax revenue generated from visitors coming to our destinations. We will continue to maintain our city services at appropriate levels without a tax rate increase. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: We are confronting the need to help some of our citizens who have suffered due to regular flooding of their homes and neighborhoods. In concert with the federal government, we are fixing this problem. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: Arlington continues to responsibly address the challenges of natural gas drilling. From public safety to clear water and air, we continually work with our staff experts and outside experts to ensure our citizens are able to reap the benefits of gas drilling in a safe and non-obtrusive way. We will continue to ensure the drillers and producers respect our city and its residents. Carl Scrivner

Biographical Info:

Name: Carl Scrivner Street Address: P. O. Box 2052

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City/Town: Arlington State: TX Date of Birth: 02-12-1942 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 817-548-1067 E-mail Address: CarlScrivner@att.net Campaign Web Site Address: CelebrateAmericaVote.org
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: I have lived in Arlington Texas for 39 Years. Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: I am a Business Owner providing Bookkeeping and Tax Services. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Involvement in the community for me spans 39 Years. My children and my grandchildren make Arlington their home. My current community involvement includes: member of the Arlington Chamber of Commerce; member of the Kiwanis; and Treasurer of the Tarrant Alliance for Responsible Government PAC. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: In addition to my current involvment, I served as AARP Tax Volunteer and member of the 2010 AISD Citizens Advisory Committee-Financial Futures Committee. Q: Education A: I have a Business Bacuralate (Bachlor's) Degree-Accounting, Business Major, University of Texas at Arlington. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Candidate for Arlington District 5 City Council in 2005 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Contributions are still in progress for my campaign by concerned citizens. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: My top contributors are Arlington Citizens who want a "No Debt" with "No Tax Increase" government. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: My supporters consider me the “No Debt” with "No Tax Increase" candidate for Arlington mayor. For those seeking a caring quality of life, this community does not want to be deep in debt, densely populated and heavily taxes. Other cities have mistakenly been lured into this path with tragic economic and social consequences. Strong financial and management skills are needed to reduce our City’s debt while maintaining a high quality of essential city services. These skills include: UTA accounting graduate; successful small business owner providing tax and bookkeeping services; Internal Revenue Service Enrolled Agent; and a proven leader as a financial manager with 30 years experience. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Our long-term local government debt is $2.4 Billion. Arlington budgets approximately $14 million for interest each year on debt that is not related to essential city services or the stadium. This subject debt is for improvement projects which should be prioritized and completed as cash becomes available. Second, available cash from debt reduction would eliminate a Challenge Grant ($5 million loan) that was required to balance the budget this year and is forecast for next year. Third, money is needed to close a $245,000 shortage in Arlington's retirement fund. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: The key difference is that my opponent is moving debt down the "road" for future generations to pay. My supporters and I want Arlington City to move toward "cash and carry" which is possible with prioritization of capital projects. Currently about 35% of property taxes are earmarked for debt. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: If development is attracted to the city, that means that Arlington is a good place to live

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and work and that is high on my priority list. A city that is out of debt is even more attractive. I think that too much emphasis has been placed on Arlington being a "fun" city for visitors and not enough on Arlington being a "family" city for its citizens. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: The 2010 initial census reports indicate the population for Arlington did grow but growth was moderate. This indicates that Arlington is no longer a primary developing and expanding city, but now needs to concentrate on maintaining high quality essential services. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: People in this country illegally are breaking the law. The police department should enforce all laws with evidence of probable cause that a crime has been committed. Citizens can help by reporting crime to form an accurate profile of crime to expend and allocate resources. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I favor a private transit system that will pay to Arlington a franchise fee for use of Arlington's streets. Taxpayer money should not be spent for a system that nobody will ride. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Arlington is only 7 miles wide, East to West, and only 14 miles deep, North to South. Arlington is a part of a multi-city network. Regional partnerships that benefit Arlington citizens should be considered. The partnership and benefit needs to be identified and evaluated for any further comment. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: I do think that Arlington employees are the best and the most cost-effective. I do think that "consultants" are "over" used by the city council. Arlington has a wide variety of citizens with expertise in many areas. I think that Arlington should look to its citizens for solutions to problems before hiring consultants. An example is a recent consultant study for "Hike and Bike" that cost approximately $250,000 and is based on data that is very, very questionable. A citizens volunteer task force could have done a better job. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Our long-term local government debt is $2.4 Billion. Arlington budgets approximately $14 million for interest each year on debt that is not related to essential city services or the stadium. This subject debt is for improvement projects which should be prioritized and completed as cash becomes available. With proper Prioritization, debt can be eliminated. Debt is bad and very bad for the future of our children. Our children deserve a debt-free future. My supporters consider me the “No Debt” and "No Tax Increase" candidate for Arlington mayor. For those seeking a caring quality of life, this community does not want to be deep in debt, densely populated and heavily taxes. Other cities have mistakenly been lured into this path with tragic economic and social consequences. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: The uncomfortable truth is that Arlington City is in debt. City debt issued in 1993 is still outstanding. Debt is being refinanced and pushed into the future. This is bad for the future of our children. This subject debt is for improvement projects which should be prioritized and completed as cash becomes available. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: Gas drilling is dangerous but profitable. There has to be a balance between property owners and gas producers. Current ordinances are design to protect citizens based on the best safety industry knowledge currently available. These ordinances must be constantly managed and monitored to ensure citizen safety as new knowledge for safe practices becomes available. Citizen safety is the highest priority.

Carrollton City Council, Place 2
Description:

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Candidates (choose 1):
Bonnie Kaplan

Biographical Info:

Name: Bonnie Kaplan Street Address: 2232 Meadow Dr. City/Town: Carrollton State: Texas Date of Birth: 10/24/1945 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-315-9005 Mobile Phone Number: 214-315-9005 E-mail Address: bonniekaplan@mac.com Campaign Web Site Address: pending
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 14 years Q: Length of residency in the district A: 14 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Attorney/Mediator Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: President, A.W. Perry Museum Society Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Vice-President - Metrocrest Social Services, Vice-President - Carrollton Womens' Club, President - Denton County Child Protective Services Board, Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) Denton County advocate, DCRP precinct chair - 203, President - Denton County Pachyderm Club, Volunteer mediator - Denton County Mediation, Volunteer mediator - Dallas County Mediation Q: Education A: B.A. Barat College - Political Science, Juris Doctorate - Illinois Institute of Technology Kent College of Law Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Carrollton City Council Place 1 - elected in 1999, ran for Carrollton Mayor - defeated in 2000 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: I have not sought funding for my campaign. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: n/a Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: I have never been arrested. I have never been personally involved in any criminal proceedings. I am a former criminal prosecutor and judge and there have been several background checks made on me for my profession and work. I have passed all of them. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I am running for Carrollton City Council, Place 2 because these are difficult times that require a council member to have experience working with a city council. I am the only candidate in my race who has the proven experience of being a council member. Watching city council meetings is no substitute for actually being the decision maker. Besides being a council member, I have served as President or Vice-President on several local boards of directors. I have always assumed a leadership position in the organizations I have served. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1. I would do everything in my power to balance the budget. There are items in the budget that will need to be cut or reduced and I will advocate for such cuts or reductions. There is no cost associated with this. 2. At the present time, there is a judicial committee within the council that oversees the municipal judges. I will advocate returning this

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oversight power to the city manager. That would prevent political pressures being placed on the judicial committee. This probably requires a change to the city charter. 3. Three quadrants of our city have an ambulance at one of their fire stations. The northeast quadrant does not have a city ambulance within its boundaries. This area includes Hebron High School. I know that fire trucks have the ability to respond to emergency calls, but only an ambulance can transport a patient to the hospital. It seems that fairness and necessity require that we purchase another ambulance. I am already "pushing for them." Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: Both of my opponents are very nice men. The key difference between my opponents and myself is legislative experience and proven leadership. One of my opponents has never served the city in any capacity, for instance, as a board member. The other has some board experience, but by his own admission, is trying to sort out how things are done on council. I already know how the council works and how to accomplish goals.I already have worked on a variety of boards to achieve desired goals. I am a proven leader. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Attracting commercial development to Carrollton is one of my top priorities. In the past, the city has lost opportunities for attracting development due to previous city councils. The current council is very aware of the need to attract development, perhaps by using incentives. The last few years have demonstrated the city's ability to expand development by attracting 3 new hotels to be built near the George Bush tollway. That was accomplished by the Mayor speaking directly with private investors. This showed initiative and creativity on the part of our leaders. This current council has done an excellent job. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Carrollton is now a minority/majority city. There has been tremendous growth in the Hispanic and Asian communities. The city has dealt effectively with the Asian community as evidenced by the stores, restaurants, and spa located near Old Denton and the George Bush tollway. Also, the area around Beltline and Josey has had some renovations. The city is planning more changes to the storefronts in this area to make it more attractive to customers. I have noticed more participation in community activities by the Asian communities. We need to find some way to reach out more effectively to the Hispanic community. In this year's election, we have candidates from these minority communities. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: This is a very touchy issue. Farmers Branch has incurred huge legal fees because of their ordinances that refer to illegal immigration. My main concern with this issue is that the Federal Government has preempted the issue of immigration, yet they do not enforce their own laws. I would not favor passing ordinances to address illegals at this time until we see the ultimate outcome of the Farmers Branch litigation. Our police department should enforce all local laws and if this means arresting illegals for violations of the law, then that should be done. Persons should not be arrested just because they are illegal. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I favor a seamless regional transit system. All of us in Carrollton who purchase things have helped to make it happen because we pay 1% extra per dollar spent in sales tax to fund DART. Make no mistake, our citizens have helped to make the transit system a reality. We politicians now must cooperate with other entities, such as the Denton County Regional Transportation authority to make sure the routes are seamless. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Regional partnerships can be very effective, but not for all areas of city government. I am concerned about regional partnerships affecting the delivery of services in the area of public safety. I understand that no one wants to duplicate expensive services that could be shared, I have concerns that in case of a large emergency or natural disaster, a city could be under-protected. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Carrollton's city manager, chief financial officer, and city council have worked diligently to remove wasteful spending from the city budget. Carrollton uses the concept of managed competition to lower the departmental costs. If a department cannot lower their costs, the

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city attempts to outsource the work at a lower cost than it can do in house. Other cities consult with Carrollton to emulate our success with managed competition. As a new city council member I would continue to carefully look for waste or duplication in services. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: The current leadership has been very successful in weathering the economic storm. Unfortunately, this year the city expects to have a $2.3 million shortfall due to the decreases in revenue from property, sales and franchise taxes. I expect that we will have to reduce or eliminate programs or activities that are not essential. I consider maintaining roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure to be essential. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Although Carrollton's crime rate has declined, there is still too much gang activity in various parts of the city and just outside our borders. This is of great concern to citizens who live in the affected areas. Q: What are the key development issues in Carrollton? How do you propose creating more development at your three DART transit centers? A: The key development issues are at the three DART transit centers. The plans for development in downtown Carrollton are in place. It is important to develop the Frankford and Trinity Mills transit centers as carefully as has been done for downtown Carrollton. Incentives to developers can and should be used at these locations. Redevelopment is also an important issue. The shopping center at Old Denton and George Bush Tollway is an example of excellent redevelopment. Q: Do you support the formation of a separate Farmers Branch Independent School District? If so, how will you go about obtaining the necessary special legislation to change current requirements that a new school district have 8,000 students? A: Although I am not a resident of CFBISD, I am not in favor of forming a separate Farmers Branch Independent School District. With the current trend being for regional cooperation, it would be a waste of taxpayers' money to establish a new and separate school district. I do not see any benefits from a separate Farmers Branch Independent School District. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: Texas state law regulating oil and gas production is in a constant state of change. Rules governing conservation of oil and gas are regulated by statute and the Railroad Commission rules regarding drilling and production. Not being familiar with natural gas drilling, I do not know if the city is doing enough to ensure the safety and interests of its citizens. I will definitely look into this if elected to city council. Anthony Wilder

Biographical Info:

Name: Anthony Wilder Street Address: P.O. Box 117298 City/Town: Carrollton State: TX Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (214) 919-4958 E-mail Address: Anthony@WilderForCarrollton.com Campaign Web Site Address: WilderForCarrollton.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 3.5 years - I was born and raised in Dallas, Texas. We moved to Carrollton in September, 2007. North Texas has been my home for all but 3 years in Austin while attending the University of Texas. Q: Length of residency in the district A: 3.5 years

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Q: Occupation/main source of income A: I am self-employed in software development. I’m currently directing the expansion of online services for a client from a full, robust website to mobile platforms, including Apple iOS, Android, BlackBerry and Window Phone 7. I also assist a client with the implementation of their proprietary administrative software for their clients. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Attended 45 of the last 54 Carrollton City Council meetings/work sessions DCRP Area Leader for east Carrollton, Dallas and Plano DCRP Chair for Precinct 200 Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Member of City of Carrollton's Property Standards Board 2009-2011, Vice-Chair 2010-2011 Election Judge for Precincts 200 and 221 in 2010 RPT State Convention Delegate 2010 RPT Senatorial District 9 Convention Delegate 2010 Youth Mentor at Sojourn Church 2006-2010 Vice-President of Lighthouse International Missions, Inc. 2003-2006 Eagle Scout – attained in 1988 Q: Education A: University of Texas at Austin Major: Mathematics Concentrations: Actuarial Sciences, Risk Management and Insurance Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Monetary funds - $966, In-kind Contributions - estimated $201 value Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Individuals and families Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: In October of 2008, I was frustrated with the events going on nationally. I wanted to make a difference, so I got more involved. I could not go to Austin or Washington, D.C., so I went to city hall. Since then, I have attended 45 of the last 54 city council meetings/work sessions and served for 17 months on the Property Standards Board. I’m now seeking your support to bring transparency, efficiency and accountability to the city government. Within our city government, ordinances, inter-local agreements, change orders and large construction contracts can be added to an agenda on a Thursday, posted on a Friday, voted for on Tuesday and executed later that week. There are some checks and balances in place, but it really is that simple and that fast. This authority requires stewardship by principled people of integrity, character and perseverance. I have proven to be an individual of high integrity, whether it was in my efforts as the Vice-President for Lighthouse International Missions, Inc. in which I handled the receipt and deposit of all monetary funds for 3 years or in the time tracking approach I use to bill clients in which I track every minute I’m working and not working on billable activity. In my activities with several prior employers as well as in work-related assessments, it has been noted repeatedly that I persevere to get problems resolved. The perseverance was initially noted with my achievement of the Arrow of Light and attainment of Eagle Scout. My character is clearly defined in my reliance and faith in the Bible. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Balance the Budget - Balancing the budget with a tax rate increase is not an option. The city faces a projected $2.1M shortfall in the next fiscal year. Cuts in the general fund budget are inevitable, but necessary. In addition to cuts, I will push for more efficiency by supporting and promoting the implementation of the managed competition program in departments that have not done so already, including Accounts Payable, Streets & Drainage (within Public Works), Engineering and Library Services. I’m committed to keeping the council and City Manager on course to determine the most efficient and effective ways to provide necessary city services, whether they are through co-sourcing, insourcing or shared services. Public Safety - Fire station number 8 near the corner of Huffines Blvd and Hebron Pkwy needs to be built to provide adequate fire protection for the northwest portion of the city. The funds to build the station are available if 3 other CFR projects are deferred and an additional $550,000 is made available. I will pursue the additional funds from other projects in the Capital Improvement Plan for fiscal years 2012-2014. The recurring costs of the station is the more difficult problem to solve, specifically the costs of the 11-14 personnel that is projected to average $1.1M over the first 9 years of the station. The current council is pursuing the reallocation of engine 112

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from station 2 to station 8 to provide the initial staffing, thus removing the need for extra recurring costs in the general fund budget. Economic Growth - I’m in favor of economic development and retail redevelopment like almost all other citizens of the city. Carrollton has 3 DART rail stations in the city that will have transit-oriented development. I intend to push forward with the plans that were agreed to 2 years ago for development at the downtown station and to actively seek opportunities for growth at the other 2 stations. We also are beginning work on 2 new hotels and a conference center in the city. I will push the developers for achievement of already agreed upon milestones and initiatives. Two other keys to economic growth are the attraction/retention of the commercial industrial entities and redevelopment of the many retail sites without anchor stores. Although we all want more retail and restaurants, we cannot lose sight of these two key pieces of the tax base. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I have attended 45 of the last 54 Carrollton City Council meetings/work sessions and have served on the city's Property Standards Board for the last 17 months. I have become engaged in the affairs of the city council and staff. I have spent countless hours meeting with staff, council members and citizens. I have been preparing for some time to be the best public servant possible for the citizens of Carrollton. In contrast, my opponents started showing up at the council meetings in March now that it is election time. Additionally, I have the disposition and perseverance to work through the issues to provide and implement solutions. I'm not a former council member from 1999 who did not fulfill a full term, but an individual of integrity and character who will bring fresh, new ideas to the council. I desire and enjoy engagement with the community about the municipal government and the future of the city and encourage and welcome community involvement, especially after the election when it is needed the most. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Economic development is one of the top 3 priorities (see earlier question about three important actions). We have excelled in the attraction of commercial industrial entities to the city and there is no reason to doubt we will not be the regional and national leader in this area going forward. In the last 3 years, I think the city has done a good job attracting retail and residential development. We have a TOD catalyst that should break ground in June, a mixed use/high density development near Hebron and Josey (including a Sprouts) and a two hotel/conference center project kicking off in the near future. However, if you look back 5-7 years, the city has not done well compared to our neighbors. As some council members in the recent past have admitted, they deferred action too long on transit oriented development while neighboring cities pushed forward and completed similar mixed use/high density projects. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: The Asian and Hispanic populations are increasing, the median age is now below 35 years and over two-thirds of the city is below age 45. Carrollton is open to the growth and diversity, regardless of ethnic background or age. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Before addressing the city’s efforts, we cannot overlook the responsibility that the Executive Branch of the US Government has with respect to this issue. For far too long, the Executive Branch has neglected to address this growing problem. The Executive Branch must secure the southern border of the United States in order to deal with the root cause of the issue. Efforts by state or local law enforcement only address the symptoms of the issue. The city participates in the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) Section 287(g) program. The city detention facility searches an immigration database to determine if a detainee is wanted for immigration related issues. Per a Memorandum of Agreement between the city and ICE, the Carrollton Police Department (CPD) can perform interviews with those arrested for state offenses. If there are county charges, those arrested are transported to county jails. ICE eventually takes custody of those arrested for state offenses. The CPD is doing what it can to curb the problems from illegal immigration in the city via the 287(g) program and their efforts are in alignment with citizen feedback received by the council in early 2009. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I am currently opposed to a seamless transit system for the DFW region for a couple of reasons. First, who is going to pay for the extra 251 miles of rail to achieve the 2030 vision

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map, which has been estimated at $18.5B (including $7.6B from DART alone)? Second, will DART and other transit entities within the region maintain autonomy over their sections? Third, it has been suggested that the projected Cotton Belt Line be funded through a public private partnership. If so, what happens if the usage does not meet the expectations of the private entity? Are tax rates increased to fund the lack of usage? I’m willing to discuss this topic further, but am inclined not to support it at this time. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Public safety accounts for 63.88% of the general fund budget in Carrollton. I support and will encourage investigating approaches to more efficiently provide this necessary city service. Limited regional shared services with the Addison, Carrollton, Coppell and Farmers Branch police departments occurs currently. I would like to pursue expansion of shared services for the police department, but do realize that adjacent cities do have distinctly different forced compliance techniques and paperwork. For the fire department, I’m interested in the costs and implications of implementing a regional dispatch with adjacent cities, such as Farmers Branch and Addison. If it produces better service at a cheaper long term cost without sacrificing the autonomy of the municipalities, I would be supportive of the transition to regional dispatch. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Since 2001, the city has pursued managed competition in many departments to reduce waste and inefficiencies. This program has resulted in $25,000,000 in cost savings, but there is still more efficiency that can be achieved. Four business units are currently under evaluation for the managed competition program: Accounts Payable, Streets & Drainage (within Public Works), Engineering and Library Services. I’m committed to keeping the council and City Manager on course to determine the most efficient and effective ways to provide necessary city services, whether they are through co-sourcing, insourcing or shared services. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: As mentioned in the answer to the last question, the city began implementing the managed competition program several years ago. When the recent economic downturn occurred, Carrollton was better positioned than most municipalities to handle the decreased revenues. I think the current leadership made the right choice to make cuts instead of increasing the tax rate in 2009. Revenues from sales and ad valorem taxes are still low to the point that we have a projected $2.1M shortfall in the fiscal year 2012 budget, so further reductions are necessary. I would like to pursue the movement of items from the general fund to the enterprise fund for some city services that are not vital. As for maintaining infrastructure, the city currently uses bond funds from a 2007 election to fund the capital improvement projects. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Debt servicing and continued reliance upon debt to fund capital improvements are disturbing to me and many of the citizens of Carrollton. The outstanding debt principal is currently above $193M. Over $8M in the fiscal year 2011 budget will go towards interest alone. Over 34% of the ad valorem tax revenue will go straight to debt servicing in fiscal year 2011. A few citizens have mentioned this will be paid off in 10 – 20 years, but more borrowing in the amount of $60.79M is on the way in fiscal years 2011 – 2016. We cannot keep borrowing from tomorrow to pay for today’s desires. Q: What are the key development issues in Carrollton? How do you propose creating more development at your three DART transit centers? A: The current transit oriented development catalyst project at the downtown station is not progressing as expected. The current council has begun work on backup plans in case the June 1 ground breaking does not occur. We have to decide whether to continue with the current vendor or move on and hire another vendor to get the job done. Until this project moves past phase 1, I believe we are hamstrung in attempts to attract other private investment to the 3 DART stations. Q: Do you support the formation of a separate Farmers Branch Independent School District? If so, how will you go about obtaining the necessary special legislation to change current requirements that a new school district have 8,000 students? A: No Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: I do not think this is an issue for Carrollton. The local natural gas drilling efforts have

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focused on the Barnett Shale. The formation’s eastern border is approximately 10 – 15 miles west of the city limits.

Carrollton City Council, Place 4
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Bob Garza

Biographical Info:

Name: Robert (Bob ) Garza Street Address: 2102 Cannes Drive City/Town: Carrollton State: Texas Date of Birth: 12/28/1944 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-533-8782 Home Phone Number: 972-820-6964 Mobile Phone Number: 214-533-8782 E-mail Address: bobgarzacampaign@hotmail.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.bobforcarrollton.wordpress.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 22 years Q: Length of residency in the district A: 22 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Recently retired Income sources are Social Security and Pension Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: City of Carrollton Transit Oriented Development Committee City Charter Review Committee Senior Adult Services ---- Chairman Dallas Telco Credit Union Board Member Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Trinity Medical Center Board (now known as Baylor Medical Hospital - Carrollton) Bea's Kids Board Member Metrocrest and Farmers Branch Chambers Board Member Oak Cliff Chamber Board of Direectors Chairman Brookhaven Country Club Board of Directors Chairman Q: Education A: Obtained BBA in Management Science from The University of North Texas Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Ran for Carrollton City Council Place 3 in 2006 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $3200 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Bob Garza Herb Weidinger Jeff Andonian Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I have always had a passion to serve and I feel I have a lot to offer the residents of Carrollton. I just recently retired with 35 years of business experience and a diverse background in Finance, Auditing, IT, International and Governmental Relations. I have served on the Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Committee for the last 3 years and also served on the Charter Review Committee appointed by council. I have served on chamber boards, hospital board and other non-profits in the city and familiar with city needs. Prior to retiring, I worked with cities, counties and Texas agencies across the state

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for several years and know how these entities operate and what they are going through. Armed with all this experience has prepared me for the council position. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1. Develop the TIRZ/TOD area with quality business and retail tenants; 2. Create incentives to attract domestic and international companies; and 3. Look for new sources of revenue and maximize existing revenue streams Developing the TOD is the cities biggest challenge and biggest opportunity at the same time. The TOD area has been designated for tax abatement but needs developer's commitment to begin the job of building. As a member of the council I will work hard to create attractive incentives to encourage interest. I personally will work with TxDOT and DART to make the TOD area a destination. Financing to build the city's infrastructure is a task the council will need to focus on and I plan to be a part of that using my business and transportation experience. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I have 35 years of business experience in Finance, Auditing, IT, international and Governmetal Relations. I am retired and dedicated to focus my energy to do the best job possible. I have experience in working with city, county goverments as well as TxDOT. I understand how city governement works and know how to work within the city charter and state law requirements. I have lived in Carrollton for 22 years and have invested many years of volunteer work to help senior citizens and underprevildged kids in the community. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: This is tops in my list of priorities. Of the 3 main revenue streams for the city, the sales tax revenue is a very important one. Sales tax revenues between businesses is my major focus. It is also key to the city's sustainability. Carrollton has done well internationally in Korea and other asian countries but we must also focus on residential/commercial development as well. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Carrollton is rich in culture and is blessed with a number of different ethnicities. The names on the Carrollton ballot this election speak for themselves. This is perhaps the most diverse list of candidates ever seen on a city council ballot. This,in my opinion is due to a very positive and inclusive attitude among Carrollton residents. My pledge to the people of Carrollton is to bring these cultures together and begin with gaining better knowledge and understanding of our differences and celebrate those differences in a positive way. Creating a multicultural group to begin that process is something I would work on. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Carrollton previously elected to participate in the 287G program, and I would not change that now or in the future. Our efforts should focus on public safety for Carrollton citizens. We have a good trend in decreasing crime in our city and we should keep our focus on that and leave immigration to the federal government. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: Transportation is certainly high on my list. Interstate 35E is in dire need of a complete redo that would complement our TOD area from Old Downtown Carrollton to Frankford. I would get invovled with the RTC, NCTCOG, DART, NTTA and TxDOT and make sure Carrollton is represented when regional transportaion decisions are made. Carrollton must be a player if we are to get the funding needed. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: There is more leverage in numbers and with the help of other cities in the region I think we could negotiate better medical rates, better purchasing power for materials and fuel if we collaborate with our neighboring cities. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Carrollton does a good job in many areas but I beleive there is more that can be done. Technology I believe is a big key to delivering services better, faster and cheaper. The cost of technology is a challenge but certainly needs to be considered. Offering residents the ability to do business with the city online and on demand is certainly an area I would explore. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do

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you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: The city has taken some very effective measures which include introducing competition at the department level and outsourcing when it makes sense. Several force reductions and a hiring freeze has brought the employee number back to what they were in mid 1980s with no apparent negative impact on services to date. Addionally, some contracts have been renegotiated and the introduction of managed shared services has brought about new thinking. The cutting of nonessential services has been key cost cutters. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Getting voters to vote. In a city of 120,000 it is good if 10 to 12 per cent of the voters turn out to vote. I would really like to see more voters have a say in who runs our city and state government. We must also embrace the many cultures by celebrating our diversity. Q: What are the key development issues in Carrollton? How do you propose creating more development at your three DART transit centers? A: The development issues center around the transportation areas of DART, I-35E, Beltline and the cottonbelt. The three DART stations are destinations areas that need to be developed. The area has been designated as a tax abatement zone but I propose we must take a deeper look and create some inviting incentives if we are to get this done. The economy and lack of financing on specualtive projects has been tough to overcome. We MUST figure out a way to work around this. Q: Do you support the formation of a separate Farmers Branch Independent School District? If so, how will you go about obtaining the necessary special legislation to change current requirements that a new school district have 8,000 students? A: I beleive it to be very risky and expensive to create a separate ISD for Farmers Branch. With districts across the state laying off teachers and staff and cutting budgets, it does not make sense to be adding to the stress here in the Carrollton/Farmers Branch area. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: At the moment there is no drilling activity and probably will not happen soon. However, in the event there was signifcant interest, the city has the proper ordinances to deal with that demand. Cathy Henesey

Biographical Info:

Name: Cathy Henesey Street Address: 3903 Cedar Ridge Lane City/Town: Carrollton State: Texas Date of Birth: 5/13/64 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-725-0710 Home Phone Number: 214-725-0710 Mobile Phone Number: 214-725-0710 E-mail Address: cathysphr@verizon.net Campaign Web Site Address: www.cathyforcarrollton.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: I grew up in Carrollton and graduated from Newman Smith High School in 1982. I attended Texas Tech University receiving my MBA in Human Resources Management. I have lived in multiple cities and traveled extensively for my career. When it was time to settle down, I came back to Carrollton to purchase my first home. I have lived there for the last 10 years. Q: Length of residency in the district A: I have lived in the Dallas and Carrollton area for a total of 18 years after high school. Q: Occupation/main source of income A: I have been in recruiting for the last 20 years and currently work full time as a Recruiting Manager for Children's Medical Center of Dallas. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights

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A: Hunters Creek HOA President – 2006 - present • Major Budget Overhaul and Property Dispute Resolution • Ensure City Ordinance Enforcement Keep Carrollton Beautiful – Current Chair • Major Budget Overhaul and Reorganization • Plan and Organize Green events that promote reuse and recycle Republican Precinct Chair 215 – 2008 - present • Election Judge last two elections and consistent participation and financial support • Precinct 215 voted all GOP candidates! Dallas Mayor’s Committee for the Employment of People with Disabilities - Current Board Member Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Traffic Advisory Board –2 yrs • Perfect Attendance for all Meetings • Reviewed city recommendations A.W. Perry Museum Society - Carrollton • Charter Member and First Year President Career Counselor Volunteer • Hosted City’s first resume review and social media training prior to City Job Fair – 100s participated and featured on Fox News; continue to speak to Metroplex career focus groups and churches on job searching • DFW Texas Recruiters Network – Started successful organization and President for 10 years; resigned in Dec. 2010 to focus on city interests • Toastmaster – DTM(highest certification awarded) • Past Wish Granter – Make-A-Wish Foundation Q: Education A: Texas Tech University – Bachelors and MBA in Human Resources Management Certifications: SPHR – Senior Professional in Human Resources; Lean Six Sigma Green Belt Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Previously sought Carrollton City Council Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: I am not focusing on campaign contributions right now. Citizens can do so much more than for my campaign than donate money. I am focusing on introductions to neighbors and networking activities from supporters Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: N/A Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I have continuously wanted to serve the citizens as a way to give back to the community. I have been very involved in city elections, issues, community events and other groups for the past 10 years; I feel I have a good relationship with many of the Carrollton city staff. My opponents don’t have this vast local experience and it would take at least a year to understand how processes work. I feel as though I can hit the ground running and make immediate contributions. I have over 20 years as a career human resources professional working for both small and Fortune 100 companies. I have managed budgets and staff in excess of $12M dollars; I have been responsible for teams that have hired 1000s of people in a year. I know what it takes to work under pressure with short staffs and reducing budgets. I continue to work in the professional field where I study best practices, conduct competitive analysis, and make daily decisions that impact business. I am an expert in networking with others to solve the most complex business problems as well as engage many different parties to gain consensus. I grew up in a entrepreneurial family who opened numerous restaurants in many cities; I gained knowledge how city politics, city ordinances, and city officials can attract businesses into a city. I feel my combination of both my personal and professional experience will bring a unique aspect to the council and I will offer a fresh approach to some old problems. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1) Economic Development – I would immediately engross myself with all current businesses operating in Carrollton and understand what it will take to make them stay in Carrollton; then, I would like to solicit a group of citizens who would be willing to be part of a economic development committee to help advise the council and city employees on what residents want in the city. My hopes would be to take a well known retailer or restaurant a very large list of citizens who would welcome them to the city. I would also like to start a “buy local” campaign that would promote buying in Carrollton and educating citizens about how spending local helps their home values rise, thus making our city tax base increase. I would continue to look for incentives that would attract companies to our area. 2) Public Safety – I would continue to support a concerted effort to reduce crime in Carrollton. Mayor Ron Branson has moved the city in the right direction and our crime is down 14% in the last year. I would like to continue to support the new Chief of Police and provide the

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police with the latest technology available to be successful. Maintaining our budgets will constantly be a struggle for the next two years so we will have to manage to our needs. I feel as though I can provide a fair balance to meet the goals of crime reduction and increasing public safety. 3) Communications/Citizen Involvement – The more I am involved with the city, the more I learn how much a very small group of citizens really get involved with the issues. We have over 122,000 citizens, yet we expect about 5,000 citizens to vote in this May election. Less than 5% of our residents shape our city for the future. Most citizens I encounter just really don’t how things get done in the city; they don’t know the meetings are taped and available to watch online. They don’t know there are boards and commissions to volunteer on; they don’t know about the citizens patrol group or the community government class. I don’t feel our council members reach out enough to the citizens in their own neighborhoods to tell them what the issues are and how they intend to vote. I would like to have a continuous web presence like many of our state and congressional seats to show how they vote on every single issue on the city meeting agenda and more importantly, why. I would like to see more than 25 people come to a meeting at every given time. I would like to see the council members share at the meetings why they are voting a certain way before they vote. Most meetings are less than 15 minutes and there is no discussion other that what was in a work session. I would like to see these discussions in front of a larger audience. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I don’t know my opponents’ very well because they have not been involved in the city before deciding to run. I commend them for wanting to get involved, yet they are representative of citizens that may not have known how to get involved, so they have decided to run for city council. One opponent does own commercial land in Carrollton and has experienced his own frustrations with zoning and approvals. While I empathize with his frustrations, he admitted that he will have to recues himself if it relates to his land or anything deemed as a conflict of interest. I also don’t plan on using this position as any stepping stone to a higher political position. I have a career that I love very much and my sole purpose is to be a public servant. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: As noted above, economic development is my first priority. The city has lived with many decisions of past councils who respectively tried to maintain a bedroom community thus discouraging businesses from coming to Carrollton. These businesses simply chose to surround us in Addison, Lewisville and Coppell. We could have had Vista Ridge Mall, Super Target and other major restaurant changes, but for reasons I cannot understand, these were turned away. So, now we struggle with attracting places to Carrollton without fear of competing with their own stores in these other surrounding suburbs. We need to find ways to deal with grandfather clauses that impede us from upgrading dilapidated shopping centers such as Beltline and Josey. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Our city demographics are changing with vast mixtures of cultures, national origins, and diversities. As a HR professional, I welcome all demographics and will make sure that I represent all citizens in Carrollton. When I make selections for boards and commissions, I will work to make sure we have a diverse group of participants that represent those of our census. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: I would continue to support Mayor Ron Branson’s and council's commitment to 287(g), which provides state and local law enforcement with the training and subsequent authorization to identify, process, and when appropriate, detain immigration offenders they encounter during their regular, daily law-enforcement activity. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I enthusiastically support a regional transit system because it is here in Carrollton and just opened in December. I will continue to support the infrastructure and development needed around our Green Line stations to encourage new residents to not only visit Carrollton, but more importantly, want to buy and live in Carrollton. I would also work with Denton to welcome their new line into Carrollton. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?

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A: I think there are tremendous purchasing and buying power with regional partnerships. I would support current efforts to move towards a regional dispatch center that could provide faster response for fire and police. Like a large company who looks to centralize buying powers, there are endless opportunities for regional partnerships to change the way cities think and operate. These initiatives are creative ways to reduce costs and in many ways, increase customer service. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: I think our city manager has done an outstanding job and looking for cost reductions and gaining efficiencies. He challenges our city employees to be competitive against the market competition. His unique approach to challenge city departments to bid on their on their own jobs keeps them thinking creatively which has kept the city from having to conduct any layoffs of core essential jobs. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Our current leadership has reduced the costs to align with our lowering tax base. The city will still face a $2.5 deficit next year if we don’t see any changes. The newly elected council members along with existing council will have to figure out where to make these cuts as soon as this summer. This is where my increased communication plan will be imperative in this budget development. We need citizens to tell us what services they could do without for the next year or what would they like to change or see added. It would be my mission to involve many leaders in Carrollton that can assist the council in making these tough decisions. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: The uncomfortable truth is we have gangs in Carrollton and we need to assure that we support our police to make sure these gangs are monitored and eliminated. We also have some very old hotels in South Carrollton that harbor illicit activity; we need to look at our zoning of these hotels and find ways to redevelopment them to upgraded type establishments. Q: What are the key development issues in Carrollton? How do you propose creating more development at your three DART transit centers? A: Of course, the three main stations should be our main focus for the next 10 years. I think the city council has developed master plans that I support that have mixed use housing and retail. The downturn in the economy has certainly stifled many constructions projects in North Texas. We have to continue to attract businesses to tour the area and see the potential as the economy starts to rise. We need to find funding for some initial projects to show our commitment to these stations. Once we show our commitment, I believe others will follow. Q: Do you support the formation of a separate Farmers Branch Independent School District? If so, how will you go about obtaining the necessary special legislation to change current requirements that a new school district have 8,000 students? A: I do not support the formation of a separate school district. Larger school districts have opportunities to attract the best teachers, best athletic programs, and the best opportunities to attract homebuyers who want a higher quality of education for their children. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: Unfortunately, reports cited from various internet articles state that Carrollton isn’t one of the lucky places to benefit from the Barnett shale, so our city ordinances are a mute point. Should and if we ever find a natural untapped resource, I believe a city council should provide ordinances that protect the homeowner’s property first.

Carrollton Mayor
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Ronald F. (Ron) Branson

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Biographical Info:

Name: Ronald F. Branson Street Address: 1406 Charlotte Way City/Town: Carrollton State: Texas Date of Birth: 06/26/1947 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972 466-3319 Home Phone Number: 972 492-7688 Mobile Phone Number: 214 998-1962 E-mail Address: RunWithRon@verizon.net Campaign Web Site Address: www.RunWithRon.net
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 29 Years Q: Length of residency in the district A: 29 Years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Retirement Pension and Social Security, plus $375 per month as Mayor of Carrollton Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: •Long time member of Aldersgate United Methodist Church 1. Just resigned as Chair of Staff Parrish Relations Committee due to campaign demands •LISD (Hebron High School, et al) 1. Building Leadership Team 2. Numerous activities including JROTC events, addressing teachers on 1st day, etc. 3. Veterans and Memorial Day Events as a Vietnam Veteran •CFBISD 1. District Improvement Council 2. Speaker National Honor Society Awards 3. Veterans and Memorial Day Events as a Vietnam Veteran •Hebron Business Alliance •Metrocrest Social Services 1. Annual Santa’s Helper for Christmas Store •VFW TX Post 8923 Carrollton 1. United States Air Force Veteran (1965-1969) 2. Vietnam Veteran (1967-1968) •American Legion Post 597 1. United States Air Force Veteran (1965-1969) 2. Vietnam Veteran (1967-1968) •Medical City Dallas 1. Heart Transplant Mentor 2. Transplant Advocate Speaker Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: •Long time member of Aldersgate United Methodist Church 1. Former Treasurer, member of Finance Committee 2. Former Chair Staff Parrish Relations, member of SPR 3. Member of Capital Campaign Committees 4. Member of Community Garden Team •CFB Girls Softball League 1. Coach 20 years 2. President 4 years 3. VP, too many to remember 4. Dallas Metro Junior Olympic Commissioner 5. Umpire, league, ASA, High School •LISD (Hebron High School, et al) 1. Building Leadership Team 2. Numerous activities including JROTC events, addressing teachers on 1st day, etc. 3. Veterans and Memorial Day Events as a Vietnam Veteran •CFBISD 1. School Finance Committee (Robin Hood) 2. District Improvement Council 3. Speaker National Honor Society Awards 4. Veterans and Memorial Day Events as a Vietnam Veteran •Metrocrest Social Services 1. Former Liaison from City Council 2. Annual Santa’s Helper for Christmas Store 3. Founding member of annual Christmas softball tournament fund raiser •Denton County Veterans Memorial Committee 1. Member of team that lead to building of the memorial at the Sandy Jacobs Center •VFW TX Post 8923 Carrollton 1. United States Air Force Veteran (1965-1969) 2. Vietnam Veteran (1967-1968) •American Legion Post 597 1. United States Air Force Veteran (1965-1969) 2. Vietnam Veteran (1967-1968) •Medical City Dallas 1. Heart Transplant Mentor 2. Transplant Advocate Speaker Q: Education A: Graduated from Southeast Guilford High School, Greensboro, North Carolina in 1965. I majored in getting out of high school. After high school I worked for a short time and then enlisted in the U.S. Air Force in the field of communications. During my 4 year tour, I took advantage of the opportunity to move into a new field called "computers". While combining working multiple jobs, raising a family, and going to school nights and weekends, I graduated from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro with a B.S. Degree in Business Administration and Economics in 1981. Besides UNCG, I also attended Florida Junior College and Memphis State University. After reconsidering my pledge to

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"never go to night school again", I graduated from the University of Dallas in 1986 with an M.B.A. Information Systems Management graduate degree. Life is a series of educational opportunities. Sometimes we have to sit in a classroom, but there are also many lessons to be learned via experience. It is that combination of formal education and life's lessons that have positioned me to qualify to be mayor. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: 2001 Ran for Carrollton City Council Place 5 2002 Elected to Carrollton City Council Place 6 2005 Re-Elected to Carrollton City Council Place 6 2008 Elected Carrollton Mayor 2011 Re-Elected Mayor? Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: In 10 years of campaigning, I have completely funded my own campaigns. For the current campaign, I have had to review that commitment because my opponent has pledged "to spend whatever it takes to tarnish my record". Because of that, and even though I have not asked for donations, I have accepted about $3,000 which I have not spent, but am keeping it in reserve. Carrollton deserves the best mayor, not the best funded mayor. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: I have decided to not answer this at this time. In 10 years of campaigning I have never accepted so much as a dime, and it is only after a great deal of soul searching and encouragement that I have decided to give in. My opponent has said that he is going to "spend whatever it takes" and "do whatever he has to do" to soil my record and add "Mayor" to his resume. The amount of campaign support that I will accept will be a small percentage of the dollars donated to my opponent due to his political name, but let him wait on my official campaign filings to find out like everyone else. Why should I make his job easier? Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: I think there have been a couple of minor traffic related lawsuits between insurance companies. Nothing criminal, ever. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: In 2008 the voters determined that I was the best candidate, even against an incumbent, and now I am the best candidate with three years of successful mayoral experience. Council's record, therefore my record, clearly highlights success after success, with this past year experiencing a crime rate that significantly dropped in all categories, including 14% in the critical Part I category, and economic development progress that had a growth of over 6.8 million square feet of new business representing the best growth in the past 7 years. My open door policy has only been denied three times, and this was to lawyers threatening to sue the City. I felt it prudent to send them down the hall to our highly qualified City Attorney. I am embedded, engaged, and a part of the community, and do not view the position of Mayor as a stepping stone to any place other than here. In 2008 I was elected to change "business as usual", to "rock the boat" if you will. Televising and web streaming of our work sessions was implemented on my watch despite some complaints by Council members. I believe that half-truths are whole lies and I will not sugar coat issues. Some on Council, and my opponent, want to go back to business as usual. I will not backslide from what is working and what is transparent to the voters. B.S. Degree in Business Administration and Economics University of N.C. at Greensboro M.B.A. Degree in Information Systems Technology University of Dallas Veteran U.S. Air Force with a year tour in Vietnam 35 years business experience, retiring as a Vice President with MBNA Information Systems 2005 Elected two terms to Carrollton City Council Currently serving as Carrollton Mayor with a highly successful safety and economic record Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Public Safety - Carrollton has long needed the construction of fire station number 8, and the addition of a 4th ambulance. Some have played politics with this and delayed addressing it until the "time was politically right". Public Safety is too important to use as a pawn and we need to do the right thing now. Bonds will build it, but revenue must staff it. We can start the funding process by not approving projects such as the money we wasted developing and implementing a new logo, and not attending some of the Washington D.C. conventions that are really just liberal festivals. Economic Development cannot be shortchanged any more than product development can be down-sized bay a business just because times are bad. Decreasing business recruitment efforts is just like borrowing from your 401k; it feels good now but in 20 years you might have to get a part time job. We have some funding and plans in place to get our Transit Oriented Development project

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moving. We must make that happen to get those properties on the tax rolls, and to stimulate other development around those areas and around our City. Protect Our Reserves - We are one of only about a dozen towns and cities in Texas with a triple A bond rating. A primary reason is that we steadfastly maintain a 60-day reserve of funds to protect us from a major economic disaster. To dip into those funds rather than to make hard decisions is unconscionable. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: It takes a different skill set and level of maturity to be a mayor than it does to be a council member, even for a good council member. My priorities are my family, and then my responsibilities as Mayor. Carrollton is too big, too important, and faces too many challenges to settle for a part-time temporary leader with an eye already on Austin or Washington. The Carrollton mayor position should never be a planned pit-stop on a schedule to someplace else. My opponent is claiming credit for everything that "our" council has accomplished. None of the successes would have been possible without a total team effort, or without an experienced coach. I don't beat my own chest, but I sure love it when "we" succeed. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: If you could have multiple number 1's, it would be a shared number 1. I gave this responsibility more than lip service, and implemented plans of action that were successful. I did not "delegate" this task to our Economic Development Department, but worked in parallel to make personal contacts, hold the first of what I hope to be annual Mayors Economic Development Forums, that attracted over 50 developers, investors, and restaurant and hotel franchise personnel in its inaugural event. My contributions have resulted in the ongoing construction of Spa Castle, the approval of a conference center and three hotel complex project, and endorsement by the MetroTex Association of Realtors for my 2011 Mayoral Campaign. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: We are a very diverse community that has changed in just a few short years. I don't understand the "dealing" question. Carrollton is an outstanding place to live that is attracting people with all ranges of backgrounds, religions, race, etc. I think it is great that everyone recognizes what a terrific place we are to live, work and play. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: We are already on the leading edge of addressing this issue. We were the first city in Texas to implement the jailer portion of the 287g Homeland Security program, and have received recognition for our joint efforts with ICE in identifying and processing illegal criminal elements in our city. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I am not sure that everyone has the same interpretation of what "seamless" means. Carrollton, as one of the key members of the 13 DART Cities, has invested decades of sales tax revenue dollars to see DART reach fruition. Some cities now want to "pay a little extra" and join in. Cities should be able to develop their transportation systems and connect, but the DART Cities should be monetarily protected for their contributions that got transportation to the advanced stage it is today. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Carrollton is a regional leader in forging jointly beneficial partnerships that allow cities to capitalize on their strengths while at the same time benefiting from the strengths of their neighbors. We formed an alliance with Grand Prairie to develop and maintain computer financial and personnel systems, have joint support agreements with Farmers Branch, Addison, etc. for public safety support, and are currently working on a plan to create a central 911 dispatch center that will be tremendous savings for at least four cities. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Carrollton, with a current population of approximately 120,000 has fewer city employees now than we did in 1987 when the population was around 72,000. Our cost of municipal services per household for 2011 ranks the 4th lowest of our neighboring 19 north Texas cities. Given time for our recent successes in economic development, completion of our conference center and three hotel complex project, and we will be inching towards that

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#1 lowest position. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: The "Carrollton Model" is a process of introducing "Managed Competition & Shared Services" into the structuring of departments and the providing of services within a city. The process consists of individual departments evaluating their own operations for cost savings and efficiencies, and implementing them. Additionally, city services are then evaluated for outsourcing, and where applicable are submitted for bid with the departments biding along with the outside providers. Since 2002 eleven services have been outsourced for a savings of over $25 million dollars. Included in this process are Solid Waste Operations (2002), Water/Wastewater Operations (2005), and Fleet Maintenance (2010). Additionally, those services deemed to be less critical have had increased or implemented user fees to offset portions of their overhead. Going forward these procedures must be implemented more thoroughly, along with every effort to increase our tax base via more creative economic development tactics. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Homeowners want their property taxes decreased, yet who wants to do so via decreases in their property values? Unfortunately that is the scenario we are facing for our immediate future. Additionally, even though our neighboring cities are experiencing slight increases in sales tax revenues, Carrollton has not followed suit as well. Our Public Safety communications system is targeted to be obsolete in the next two years, meaning that parts and service will be difficult at best. Current estimates place the replacement cost between $10-13 million. This is a problem that it too important to pass on to a future council, and needs to be addressed immediately. The obvious question is how to fund the project. Q: What are the key development issues in Carrollton? How do you propose creating more development at your three DART transit centers? A: Carrollton has plans in place for our primary DART station, being the Old Downtown Carrollton Station (ODC) at Beltline and I35. We have a projection from primary developer for groundbreaking to begin by June 1, 2011. Funding on that project continues to be a problem, but there are signs of investor interest. The ODC project is correctly referred to as the "stimulus project", and we are counting on that leading to further development both around ODC and the other two DART stations. Current economic development successes, such as the Conference Center and three hotel project are excellent signs that we are headed in the right direction. Q: Do you support the formation of a separate Farmers Branch Independent School District? If so, how will you go about obtaining the necessary special legislation to change current requirements that a new school district have 8,000 students? A: That is Farmers Branch business, and any steps taken on that issue should be in the best interest of the citizens of Farmers Branch. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: Drilling is not an issue that directly impacts Carrollton, but I have supported state level legislation submitted by other cities that have experience and concerns. The safety of our citizens should never be lower than our number one priority. Matthew Marchant

Biographical Info:

Name: Matthew Marchant Street Address: 1846 E. Rosemeade, #108 City/Town: Carrollton State: Texas Date of Birth: August 31, 1976 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-342-0332 Home Phone Number: 972-342-0332

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Mobile Phone Number: 972-342-0332 E-mail Address: mhmarchant@hotmail.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.matthewmarchant.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: Lifetime resident of the Carrollton area. Q: Length of residency in the district A: Lifetime resident of the Carrollton area. Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Real Estate Attorney at Strasburger & Price, LLP. Employed at the Firm since 2002 and currently serving as a partner in the real estate and finance practice group. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Mayor Pro Tem, City of Carrollton Member, Regional Transportation Council Advisory Board, Children's Advocacy Center of Denton County Denton County Community Justice Council Transit-Oriented Development Committee, City of Carrollton Redevelopment Committee, Chairman, City of Carrollton Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Carrollton City Council and Mayor Pro Tem, 2002 - present Carrollton Development Ordinance Advisory Council, 2001 Audit and Finance Committee, City of Carrollton Judicial Committee, City of Carrollton Metrocrest Family Medical Clinic Board Member, 2003 2006 Keep Carrollton Beautiful, Board Member, 2005 Crime Watch Chairman, Savoy of Josey Ranch Neighborhood Association, 2003 Graduate of Metrocrest Leadership, Class XXI Asst. Coach, Carrollton-Farmers Branch Soccer Association, 2010 - present Q: Education A: Juris Doctorate, University of Texas School of Law, December 2000 Bachelor of Science (with honors), Southern Nazarene University, May 1998 Attended CFB-ISD schools (Central Elementary) and graduated from Trinity Christian Academy Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Mayor Pro Tem, City of Carrollton (current) Carrollton City Council, Place 4 (2006 present) Carrollton City Council, Place 3 (2002 - 2005) Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: I am spending my own money on the campaign, and have also raised around $5,000.00 as of April 4, 2011. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Doug Rudman Sharon Hill Trevor Ahlberg Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: I have never been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I am running for Mayor because I love Carrollton and want to make sure it continues to be the best city to live, work and raise your family. I was strongly urged to run for Mayor by all of those that have served in the past 9 years because of my objectivity, fairness and proactive agenda on behalf of the City of Carrollton. I am the most qualified candidate because of my professional and educational background as well as my nearly 9 years of experience on the City Council. In addition, I have an extensive background in transportation, having served on the Regional Transportation Council since 2008. My experience in real estate and finance will be crucial as Carrollton fosters transit oriented development and continues the redevelopment program. I am a real estate and finance partner at Strasburger & Price, LLP. I also believe my longstanding involvement in the community and my perspective as a father and husband are important as I lead the City and Council through important policy discussions. I will live with the decisions made by the Council for the next several decades and I want to make my time in office count. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1. Crack down on crime-ridden apartments. This can be accomplished by immediately adopting an ordinance affecting all apartments and will require security measures be taken if a certain number of offenses occur at the property or by residents of the affected complex. These measures include lighting, off-duty security, fencing and other stringent crime controls. We have several areas across our City that are being held back by nearby blighted and crime-ridden apartment complexes – the City needs to work to remove these barriers to progress. 2. Attract high-quality restaurants and retail. Carrollton needs more high-quality restaurants and retail development. Period. As Mayor, the retention and

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attraction of restaurants and retail development will be among my top priorities. As Mayor I will have the platform to use my network of contacts in the real estate and retail industry to the City’s benefit. The City should focus intensely on a goal of bringing in more brand name and exciting restaurants to serve our citizens. I support using aggressive economic development tools to achieve this goal and have the know-how and experience to structure and negotiate these deals on behalf of the City. 3. Redevelopment of aging shopping areas. Like any inner-ring suburb, Carrollton has its share of struggling retail centers throughout our City. Our redevelopment of these centers must be continued and increased in number and scope to give those areas and the surrounding homes a jolt of energy. I have already provided substantial leadership in this area with the conception and execution of the program, and I intend to lead us forward to redeveloping the remaining detrimental sites in our city. The funding for this is already available through a previously passed bond election. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: Every person that has served with me and my opponent is strongly endorsing me, which includes every other Carrollton elected official since 2002. That is unprecedented in the history of Carrollton politics and speaks volumes about the qualifications and leadership ability of the two candidates for Mayor. My professional demeanor, proactive agenda, objectivity and even temperament are critical to the leadership I plan to bring to the City. A major policy difference between the candidates is on taxes. My opponent has repeatedly pushed for tax rate increases, voting for an increase in 2005 and aggressively pushing one even in 2009 during some of the worst economic times our citizens have experienced. In contrast, I have voted on 8 budgets and have never voted for a tax rate increase. Another key difference is the record of results of two candidates. I have an extensive list of initiatives that have been implemented with the Council team. I believe leading means initiating ideas and championing them through to completion. Please visit http://www.matthewmarchant.com/vision-goals.php for more information. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Economic development is a top priority. We must attract new businesses and residents to increase our tax base and improve our standing in the Metroplex. Our City staff has done a good job on economic development, but we need more dynamic leadership from the elected officials to pursue brand name economic development. Staff was especially critical in the attraction of our potential hotel project, having fostered relationships over the last decade that will hopefully result in construction of a hotel. I believe we need to focus more on the restaurant and retail aspect of economic development to bring in those much needed amenities for our citizens. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Our population is trending the same way as the region, and we are taking a number of steps to address this. The Council recently approved an additional demand-medic in part to make sure that the large contingent of baby-boomers in our City have adequate ambulance coverage as they enter their retirement years. We need to continue to focus on similar measures and also partner with local services like Senior Adult Services, Metrocrest Family Medical Clinic, Metrocrest Social Services and Bea's Kids to help all of those in our community. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Carrollton is currently a member of the 287(g) program which allows our local police the ability to search the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) database to see if any arrested persons are illegally in the country and/or have other pending federal charges. Carrollton should continue to monitor the options available to address this issue and stay at the forefront of immigration enforcement. I led the adoption of the 287(g) program in Carrollton and have also led the implementation of an ordinance requiring uninsured motorists to be towed. Immigration is an important issue that must be closely monitored by the Mayor and Council. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I am in favor of a seamless regional transit system to deal with the incredible growth demographers are predicting for our region. The key to achieving this is to attract existing non-transit cities into the system in a manner that does not increase the tax or fee burden on existing transit cities. Carrollton has paid 1 cent of our sales tax capacity to DART for

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the past 28 years, and that hard-fought equity position in the transit system must be honored. I would like to work with the Dallas Regional Mobility Coalition and the Regional Transportation Council to seek out innovative ways of making the regional transit system a reality. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Carrollton is leading the way in regional partnerships through a shared dispatch program, existing mutual aid agreements with our neighboring cities, and an innovative health purchasing program. I believe further partnerships to eliminate redundant spending and inefficiencies is part of the new paradigm for all governmental entities, and I will use my relationships in the region to make that a reality. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: In the last decade, Carrollton has streamlined its operations through the use of managed competition and other cost-saving measures. While I believe our municipal government is the most efficient in North Texas, there is always room for additional efficiencies and I intend to seek them out as Mayor. We need to offer several more services, payments and permit submittals online than we currently do - this will save time and money for our constituents. I would also like us to put our checkbook online on a monthly or bi-weekly basis to ensure taxpayers have the best access to how their money is being spent. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Our Council and staff has been way ahead of the curve on trimming needless expenses from the city budget and as a result the impacts of the recession have not been as difficult as they have in other cities. The budget should be balanced through additional efficiencies and tough choices, not an increase in the tax rate. That being said, I do not believe that core services should be cut further because citizens deserve a quality municipal government they can be proud of. The Council needs to take a look at any expenses that are not critical to citizen service and revisit the current reserve fund policy to continue to manage through the difficult financial times. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Carrollton is an aging inner-ring suburb. If city leaders are not proactive in redevelopment, code enforcement and attracting the next generation of residents, the City's longstanding place at the top of the Cities in North Texas will be difficult to maintain. Q: What are the key development issues in Carrollton? How do you propose creating more development at your three DART transit centers? A: Attracting high-quality restaurants and retail development is a key development issues. Another key issue is the redevelopment of our aging retail centers. Our greatest opportunities lie in the possibilities for transit oriented development surrounding our three DART stations. I want to partner with a university to turn the Gravley Center in Downtown Carrollton into a satellite campus. This will bring energy, walkability and revenue to one of our key areas and move us toward the critical mass necessary to complete the emergence of this area as a major visitor attraction. We have recently reviewed a promising project for the Frankford Station, and I look forward to working with any other potential investors in our City. I believe my background in real estate and finance is crucial to lead the City team in these efforts the next three years. Q: Do you support the formation of a separate Farmers Branch Independent School District? If so, how will you go about obtaining the necessary special legislation to change current requirements that a new school district have 8,000 students? A: No. Carrollton and Farmers Branch have a longstanding relationship and that is important to me as a native of this area. I would like to strengthen the relationship Carrollton has with the Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District and work together with them to provide the best City and School District we can for our citizens. Further, I want to promote the multiple exemplary schools throughout our City. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: Carrollton recently adopted a drilling ordinance that provides protection to our citizens. Because the vast majority of our City and 98% of our residents live east of I-35 and the Muenster Arch, there is not currently a lot of active drilling but I believe we need to keep a close eye on this issue and make sure we have the most protective regulations in place.

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Coppell City Council, Place 1
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Raj Akula

Biographical Info:

Name: Raj Akula Street Address: P O BOX 1640 City/Town: Coppell State: TX Date of Birth: 3/12/1971 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-744-9011 Mobile Phone Number: 214-744-9011 E-mail Address: raj.akula@akulaforcoppell.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.akulaforcoppell.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: Since May 2007 Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Business Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: - no response Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: *Case management volunteer during rescue efforts of Hurricane Katrina (2004) *Provided counseling and support to people at thier homes and shelters affected by Hurricane Katrina (2004 - 2005) *Volunteered at various events hosted by NJ Charity of Homeless Housing, Bread for the world and American Red Cross (1994-2003) *Member of the university Ad-hoc Advisory Board of Southern University, LA (2005 - 2006) Q: Education A: Masters in Computer Science, New York Institute of Technology, NYC - 1993 Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $3000 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Enternet Busainess Systems, Inc. Mike Patel Pavan Akula Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: 1)I am a co-defendent in the bankruptcy court 2) I am a plantiff in a breach of contract suit in NJ Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I believes that, together, we can make Coppell a better place to live. I am uniquely qualified to help Coppell move forward. I have proven experience and leadership skills in the business world and as an award winning Entrepreneur. My real passion is community service. Working as a Long Term Case Management Volunteer during Hurricane Katrina, I gained personal satisfaction and joy through my efforts in helping the people of southern Louisiana revitalize their communities. I will use excellent leadership and communication skills and broad background in the business community to tackle the difficult tasks facing Coppell. I graduated from New York Institute of Technology, NYC earning a Master’s

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degree in Computer Science, and a Bachelors Degree from India where I served as the General Secretary of the Student Body. I am President & CEO of an information technology company based out of Irving, TX and also manage my wife’s law firm. I contribute to the leadership of both organizations as a strategic partner to help drive their growth. This experience will serve me well as your City Councilman. I am highly motivated to bring new businesses into Coppell which will promote sustainable economic growth. I will be creative in finding real solutions for problems which are faced by the citizens of Coppell and will implement new approaches that will make Coppell better. I am dedicated to serving the City of Coppell in an effort to keep neighborhoods safe and strong. I am a leader who knows how to bring out the best in people and believes that we can all work together to make Coppell a better place to live. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: The three most important actions I will take are: 1) Fiscal restraint on City Spending 2) No to Propoerty Tax Increases 3) Encourage job growth in the city by bringing in more businesses and planning wisely for future growth. I will evaluate City Government services to keep what works and get rid of what doesn't. We must structure services equitably and in a sustainable manner. To restrain city spending, I will take apart the budget, study it line-by-line and eliminate waste and redundancy in an effort to find more efficient ways to deliver services to our citizens. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I am dedicated to serving the City of Coppell in an effort to keep neighborhoods safe and strong and improving and protecting the quality of life for our citizens. I will be creative in finding real solutions for problems which are faced by the citizens of Coppell and will implement new approaches that will make Coppell better. I know how to bring out the best in people I work with and believe that we can all work together to make Coppell a better place to live Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: One of my higestest priorities is sustainable economic growth in the city of coppell. I am highly motivated to bring new businesses into Coppell which will promote sustainable economic growth. Compared to neiboring cities we rank poorly in attracting such development. I plan to have a directed marketing campaign where our councilmen sell our city directly to decision makers to bring in the economic growth. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: City of Coppell is a very unique community. We have very good age and ethnic diversity in the city. We have experinced a growth approx. 3600 people in last 10 years. Currently our demographics show less percentage of empty nesters & seniors in the city. We all love the city of coppell but due to high property taxes compared to other cities in north texas, we were not able to retain empty nesters and seniors in coppell. My goal is to change that by being creative in finding solutions to increased property taxes issue for our citizens. I also proposed to freeze property taxes for seniors citizens. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: - no response Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: - no response Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: - no response Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: - no response Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Although Coppell has weathered the economic storm nicely, nobody can predict if that will hold up. It is far better to be proactive in this regard than reactive. I will cut city spending by evaluating City Government services to keep what works and get rid of what doesn't. I will take apart the budget, study it line-by-line and eliminate waste and

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redundancy in an effort to find more efficient ways to deliver services to our citizens. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: It is time for the citizens of coppell to confront an imperative issue- Property Taxes. In the comming years, the choices our city governement makes regarding property taxes will play an important role in our desire to attract homebuyers and businesses. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: - no response Tim Brancheau

Biographical Info:

Name: Tim Brancheau Street Address: 106 Dobecka Drive City/Town: Coppell State: Texas Date of Birth: June 10, 1957 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-978-0195 Home Phone Number: 972-462-7431 Mobile Phone Number: 972-978-0195 Fax Number: 972-393-3451 E-mail Address: tim@TimForCoppellCouncil.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.TimForCoppellCouncil.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: I have lived in Coppell since 1984 (27 years) Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Owner of Brancheau Energy Solutions: Energy Consultant Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Current member of Coppell City Council, Council liaison for Coppell Senior Center, Council liaison for ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability (formerly called International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives), Reading Buddy for students needing to improve their reading skills through church affiliation with Irving schools, member of Coppell Texas Exes. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: President of Exchange Club of Coppell, Chairman of Coppell Chamber of Commerce, Board of Directors on Coppell Chamber of Commerce, Member of Coppell Economic Development Committee, Chairman of 1999 Coppell Bond Program Committee, 2000 Governor’s Volunteer Award Nominee by the City of Coppell, 20 year Charter member of Hackberry Creek Church, coached numerous youth teams for CYSA (Coppell Youth Soccer Association), CBA (Coppell Baseball Association) and Coppell YMCA. Q: Education A: Bachelor of Arts – University of Texas, Master of Business Administration – University of North Texas Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Coppell City Council, Place 1 since 2002 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: None Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Not applicable Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: Not applicable Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most

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qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: Coppell is about good people working together toward a common goal: Keeping our city a safe, friendly place to live while managing growth that will add value and maintain our small-town feel. The City Council should represent all of its citizens to achieve that primary goal in maintaining a high level of service and amenities our city provides and our citizens expect. I am running for re-election because of ongoing projects that are important to this city and its future such as the development of Old Coppell, our Aquatic Center expansion, and North Lake/Cypress Waters. I want to continue working with our City Council and City staff to ensure these and other projects are completed in a fiscally sound manner. My professional background within the energy industry has enabled me to contribute that knowledge and expertise in Council affairs. At a personal level, I honestly care. I, along with every other Coppell citizen, have a vested interest in the welfare of our city. This is my home and where my wife and I have raised our family. For many years I have volunteered and participated in community events, programs, and organizations. I know Coppell, I network daily, and I have been an active part of our city’s growth and evolving needs. If re-elected, it would be a privilege and honor to continue serving as a member of the Coppell City Council. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1) Keep the tax rate flat and look for varied sources of revenue to avoid future tax increases. 2) Continue working to soften the impact of North Lake by reducing its growth impact and maximizing our value for that project. 3) Continue providing a high level of public safety services and the amenities our citizens expect while keeping our tax rate flat. It is important to note that the City Council has worked to achieve these goals through the years and has found ways to pay for our services without raising property taxes for our citizens. Were it not for the voter-mandated purchase of the North Lake property, our tax rate now would be lower than in 1992. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I have lived in Coppell for many years and have been involved in the community on many levels. I understand the needs of our community because I have been involved in the community and know what the citizens want and what they expect for their tax dollars. Being a member of the Coppell City Council is not an entry-level position. In order to represent the community one must know the history and desires of the community. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: We are almost at build out for residential construction and have about 600 acres remaining for commercial development. The goal of numerous City Councils has been to attract quality commercial development to the west side of town so we can utilize their taxable values to help shift the tax burden from the residential sector. Fifteen years ago we had very little sales tax generating commercial developments in town but now we have good, strong sales tax generating businesses on the west side of town and those businesses add quality ad valorem tax value to our city. This added value to our city was the work of many individuals on our City Council and Economic Development Committee. This approach has helped us diversify our tax base and happened only because we had forward thinking people working on a goal as a team. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Our Asian community is growing because we have a strong school district and parents want their children to have a quality education. The utilization of our library is exploding and we need to address that need but that is an issue that will need to be taken to the voters to approve funding. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: The police should enforce the laws they have authority to enforce on illegal immigration. Our illegal immigration issue is not a huge one. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: While I personally favor a regional approach to a seamless transportation system, we do not have the ability to fund anything under the current funding mechanisms available. We utilize the 1-cent required for DART with a sales tax for CRDC (Aquatic Center, parks and trails), a crime control district and a street maintenance fund. We would need to find

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another way to buy into DART and since the Cotton Belt line will eventually be developed it is something we will need to work on to make it happen. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Improving air quality is another area we could work on more as a region. The Council of Governments has worked on this issue for a while by encouraging cities to purchase more hybrid vehicles for fleets. Coppell started purchasing hybrids a few years ago and we have increased the total number in our fleet so we have seen how much fuel they save and how they operate for certain jobs. We have been pleased with the performance of these hybrids and I anticipate we will continue increasing their numbers as we move forward. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Yes, I believe our citizens get a great product for their tax dollars. We have a city others admire and a city others want to move to. Our staff has been working on five year plans for budgeting for the past 12 years and that has allowed us to anticipate the fiscal demands for the needs and desires of the citizens. The city manager is great about finding savings and requiring his staff to be as efficient as possible. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: While taxable property values didn’t grow as much as they have in the past, for the most part we were able to maintain our values better than most cities. Our sales tax collections slipped but once again it didn’t hurt us as much as other cities. My goal, and this Council’s goal, is to attract high quality businesses to Coppell and we will continue to target those able to add to our sales tax collection. These businesses do not put a big strain on city infrastructure and this focus helps us with those costs associated with the maintenance of the streets and other infrastructure. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: There will come a time when our citizens will need to make a decision on bond programs for some projects. Our library is extremely busy and at times it is very crowded. Our parks are aging and need some improvements. We have seen plans for a library expansion and park improvements. These projects would require voter approval. Decisions like this confront cities just like they confront us as individuals. We have to ask ourselves about those amenities we value and which ones we value enough to pay more for in taxes. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: We looked at this about 18 months ago and I feel we have proper protections in place. We are on the eastern fringe of the Barnett Shale so we won't have the activity other cities have seen because we just don’t have the concentration of natural gas other cities have within their city limits.

Coppell City Council, Place 5
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Thomas Burrows

Biographical Info:

Name: Thomas Burrows Street Address: 138 Wynnpage Drive City/Town: Coppell State: Texas Date of Birth: 24 September 1957 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 469-693-2533 Home Phone Number: 469-549-0131

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Mobile Phone Number: 469-693-2533 E-mail Address: thomas.burrows.1957@gmail.com Campaign Web Site Address: http://144.162.90.48/thomas/citycouncil/
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: Almost seven years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: N/A Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Software Developer for Bank of America Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Captain in the United States Air Force Civilian Auxilary, Prec. Chair 4702 for the Republican Party in Coppell, Election Judge for prec. 4702 last two election cycles. Active blood donor for Carter Bloodcare. Close to three gallons. Coppell Republican Club. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Former squadron commander of Captain in the United States Air Force Civilian Auxilary - worked Columbia Orbiter recovery effort in 2003, Graduate of Coppell Citzens Police Academy, Collin County Republican Party prior to June 2004, election judge in Collin County several election cycles prior to 2004. Q: Education A: B. S. in Computer Science from Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, TX 84 hours of retooling per recent computer classes in the Dallas County Community College District. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None as an adult. Was Junior and Senior Class President in Student Government in College. External Affairs Chairman. On board of the then Texas Student Association. Worked with now mayor of Denton - Mark Burroughs - to bring about real changes for the students in representation of students on the Board of Regents since students paid most of the budget for the university. That is other than state funding Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $70 and whatever my wife will let me spend:-) Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Don David of El Paso - former HS football coach Dr. Terri Burrows - spouse Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: Civil suit older son in 1985 per a hospital injury. Very small suit - cover hospital bills from accident at an amusement park in 1995. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: It is time for a fresh set of eyes on our local city government. The current city council person I am running against has done a good job. However, I am his 1st opponent in now his 3rd election. I believe the voters should have a choice. Even if I lose now my opponent is having to campaign. Listen to the voters. At a recent city budget meeting open to the public the two city councilmen with opposition were there. Along with myself and the other opponent. The two city council members without opposition were not there. How is council going to know what the voters want if there is not a campaign. Too many brave Americans have given their lives or come home with broken bodies buying us the right to choose out leadership. It is not my opponent's fault no one has run against him. I comment the gentleman for stepping up and serving. But it is time for new ideas and a fresh prespective on the issues facing Coppell. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Actually none of my issues will cost any money. 1. Run thru the city budget with a fine tooth comb and look for savings. Like eliminating bottled water at city hall. The signs on the edge of our city say we have a SUPERIOR water system. So let us drink the water at city hall. Or bring in privtely purchased bottled water. 2. Increase recycling. The largest component of the waste stream in the growin months is yard waste. Aready the city is paying for a recycling truck to run up and down our alleyways to pick up yard recycling bags. Yet most people and the lawn crews put the grass in plastic bags heading to the landfill. I would propose the council would make it that the citizens of Coppell use recycling bags for the yard waste. After all in the long run that will save the city allot of money. And be good for the environment. Biggest bang for the buck 3. As an Information Technology professional I would propose the city put together a volunteer group of programmers, etc

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that could help the city move forward with its IT needs. Coppell is a community with lots of IT people. Or retired IT people. Many want to help. But how???? Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: Again my opponent is a good man. I have heard nothing bad about the guy. This makes the election hard in some ways. Would be easy to run against someone who was doing minor corruption, etc. Or just plain lazy. That is not true of my opponent. However, my background brings some skills to the job of city council member that could help accomplish my above mentioned goals. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Being right on top of the DFW airport Coppell has an opportunity to attract companies that export and import via air services. For example Texas Instruments has recently - this week - announced it will buy National Semiconductor. National Semiconductor has its corp HQ in Santa Clara, CA if I am not mistaken. At the present no one knows what percentage of that operation for the HQ will come to Texas. But anyone can see the Texas Instrument Expressway site has been built out for years now. i.e. I worked at TI many years ago. Would be a good time for Coppell to approach TI and see how a relationship with the company could work for both parties. Overall I feel city staff of Coppell - Clay Phillips the city manager, city council overall has done a good job of attracting jobs and business to our city. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: There is four or five racial groups on my street. My son has had birthday parties where boys of five races have attended. What does these kids all have in common? Their parents are very educated and want their children to succeed. Whereas in parts of the metro area no one shows up for PTO meetings. There is no parental involvement with the school, etc. Here in Coppell the biggest elections can be for PTO president at the elementary schools. Typical PTO for an elementary school has fifty or sixty very active parents working to make life better for the students. And a couple of hundred extra parents in committees. I am not sure there needs to be any changes. We have a great school system and the kids learn. Are prepared for college. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Coppell has a great police department. Being a graduate of the Police Citzens Academy I have written a day with an officer. What Coppell does is watch the little things. The reason people do not have inspection stickers or current registration on vehicles. The reason most vehicles would not have this is there is issues. Outstanding warrants. Lack of proper citzenship or residence paperwork. Thus the bad folks and most illegal immigration issues tends to go around Coppell. They know our police watch for the little issues and people get arrested. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I favor a seamless regional transit system. However, Coppell - right or wrong- decided over 20 years ago not to be in DART. At the moment that is not an issue I plan to work on. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Recycling of water after sewage treatment. At the moment our current council, mayor, and city manager are doing a fine job in the existing regional partnerships. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Overall Coppell has done a good job of delivering services to the residents. Again review my suggestions per recycling, IT improvements to see where I would make changes. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Coppell is lucky - blessed - whatever word one wants to use that the economic storm has not hit this city as hard as most areas around the DFW metro area. However, my next door neighbors are moving as they can no longer afford to live here. Overall the City of Coppell is doing a fine job of maintianing basic infrastructure and the roads. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: That most of our voters are taking their freedom for granted. Our extremely low voter

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turnouts for city elections in my opinion are a JOKE. To be honest it is a disgrace. Current coucil, mayor, and city manager cannot be blamed for that. No one can force people to vote. Come and vote. Make a difference. Your vote does count. The statement that my vote does not count is the biggest lie ever. The use of English instead of German as the national language was decided by one vote. The draft was kept going in 1941 by one vote. Think of how that would effect our country's preparation for WWII without the draft. The space shutle was approved by one vote. Folks get out to vote even if I am not elected. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: I would not make any changes to the current policy that Coppell has. Billy Faught

Biographical Info:

Name: Billy Faught Street Address: 117 Dobecka City/Town: Coppell State: Texas Date of Birth: September 20, 1955 Home Phone Number: 972/393-7235 Mobile Phone Number: 214/325-8677 E-mail Address: billy.faught@verizon.net
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: Over 25 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Construction Manager for Robertson Commercial Pools, Inc. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Serving my eighth year as City Councilmember Place 5 Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Coppell Park Board 1993-98, Coppell Park Board Chair 1996-98, Citizen Bond Committee Parks Chair 1999, City Council Place 5 2003-11, Numerous Boards and Committees First United Methodist Church Coppell, Coaching Youth Sports and Board Member of Coppell Youth Baseball and Coppell High School Baseball and Football Booster Clubs Q: Education A: Bachelor of Science Landscape Architecture Texas A&M University Class of '79 Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Ran for City Council Place 3 1998 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: None to date Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: The campaign will be self-financed Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I am running for re-election to continue my service to the citizens of Coppell. It is important to me to give back to the community that has been my family’s hometown for over 25 years. My long history of service in many different positions, my involvement in programs such as youth sports and Community organizations, and my love for Coppell all qualify me as the best candidate for City Council Place 5. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Maintaining the fiscal health of our City, helping provide access to government for all

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citizens, and insuring that the City is receptive to ideas concerning new commercial development. I cannot accomplish anything on my own; I will remain open to working with other members of Council while maintaining my independent perspective. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I have a long history of involvement in many different tiers our community. I have prepared myself by serving with citizens of all ages. My eight years of service on the City Council will provide a seamless transition in the continued growth of Coppell. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: As Coppell approaches residential build out, our focus must remain on seeking desirable commercial development. This will reduce the tax burden on citizens while stabilizing and even increasing our revenue stream. The fact that major corporations such as The Container Store, Samsung, U-Line, and QT among many others have chosen Coppell proves that we are receptive and “open for business”. This will remain one of my primary objectives while serving on Council. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: The demographics of Coppell mirrors many other communities. One of my priorities has always been to insure that we maintain our programs, services, and facilities for all citizens. Our new Senior and Community Center is one such example. Another area of importance is to keep Coppell attractive to those who grew up here and now are returning “home” to raise their families. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Illegal immigration enforcement is a Federal issue. I expect our Public Safety departments to continue their diligence so that Coppell remains a safe place to work and to live. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I strongly favor a regional approach to transportation issues and development. Coppell’s proximity to major freeways and to DFW Airport makes us attractive to both residents and businesses. We must remain involved in transportation decisions that affect regional mobility. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: We are now studying a regional approach to Fire and Police dispatch. This could improve the overall coverage of Public Safety in the region while continuing the excellent service provided by Coppell fire and Police departments. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Yes, without hesitation. Our Staff and Council are constantly monitoring the cost of services and looking for ways to improve them without extra burden. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: We have done an excellent job. Our services, programs, and facilities have been maintained without cuts and we have money in the bank. The Infrastructure Maintenance Fund is only one of the ways we insure that we invest in what we have built without excessive burden on the citizens. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: That State budget and program cuts will affect Coppell as well as all cities in Texas. We diligently monitor the Legislature in order to plan for the future. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: None, we do a great job overseeing the few well sites we have in Coppell. The City has hired an independent consultant to inspect and report on drilling sites and active wells.

Dallas City Council, Place 2

Description: Note: Only Dallas residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

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Candidates (choose 1):
Billy MacLeod

Biographical Info:

Name: Billy MacLeod THIS QUESTIONNAIRE IS NOT FINALIZED YET Street Address: 3100 Main Street # 68 City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: September 15, 1968 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-296-4000 x 200 Mobile Phone Number: 214-616-9445 E-mail Address: vote4billy@gmail Campaign Web Site Address: http://www.billymacleod.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: I have lived in Dallas since 1981. Q: Length of residency in the district A: I have lived in District 2 for 9 years. Q: Occupation/main source of income A: I am a National Sales Manager for a Accounts Receivable Management firm in Downtown Dallas and I specialize selling Accounting Services to busisness all over the United States. Each day I speak to Chief Executive Officers, Chief Financial Officers, and owners of businesses about the biggest problems that face their business, bad debt. Each day I build my pipeline opportunities and I speak to top level executives and decision makers who have a very limited amount of time available, and each day I convince these powerful people to make decisions that, if not for my direct contact with them, they would not have made. I make real business happen every single day of the week and when I am elected to Dallas City Council I will take this talent and put it to work for District 2. The Dallas City Council needs a leader who is willing and able to sit amongst the most powerful decision makers in business and convince them to make the tough decisions. When I am elected to Dallas City Council I will be the leader Dallas needs to fill that role at Dallas City Hall. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: I am an influences r in the Dallas Community and have publicly fought for Dallas residents both in Dallas and in Austin. I have been elected Delegate for the my political party in Precinct 3340 which sits in Senate District 23. I attended the my party's state convention in and was actively involved in caucusing for Dallas issues. I am a volunteer at Volunteer Center of North Texas and have worked with them during important times such as the Hurricane Katrina disaster relief effort at The Dallas Convention Center. I am an active participant in the Deep Ellum Association and each year I work to help organize the Deep Ellum Art Walk and The Deep Ellum Arts Festival activities. I have been an active advocate of small business for the Lower Greenville Avenue Bar Owners Association and have spoken dozens of time before the Dallas City Council as an unpaid adviser. I founded the Street Solutions Job Training Program in the Deep Ellum and Cedars area to train homeless men and women to fill out job applications, on how to interview for jobs, them how to prepare themselves for a life of work. I have volunteered my time with The Cedars Neighborhood Association Clean-up efforts and the Graffiti Wipe-out in Deep Ellum. And finally I am a founding member of The South Side on Lamar Business Association. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: I have publicly fought for Dallas residents on a whole range of social issues including Urban Renewal, Economic Development, and Public Safety; and has engaged the Dallas City Council on issues such as the construction of the Homeless Center to funding for the new Animal Shelter in Dallas. In 2007 I was elected as a delegate for my party's State Convention in Precinct 1110 in Senate District 8. In 2008 I was asked to speak on his behalf and did so at the Senate District 8 Convention. I 2009 I served as Community Ambassador and Development Director Freedom Release Reentry Services, helping formerly incarcerated men end the cycle of recidivism. I met with Bush Administration

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Officials in the Veterans Affairs, The Department if Education on behalf of Prisoner Reentry Programming at the Dallas Conference on Faith Based Initiatives. I worked directly with Mayor Tom Leppert in lobbying local leaders such as Jack Hammock, Tom Dunning, and Gary Griffith for help with a new City Dallas Program ultimately named Dallas One-Stop Optimized Reentry System (DOORS). I have worked as an neighborhood organizer for Texas Campaign for the environment and lobbied successfully on their behalf in Austin at the Texas Democratic Convention for the Electronic Recycling Bill HB 2714 when it was still only a resolution. I have served on the United States Chinese Chamber of Commerce Public Affairs Committee and I founded the group Operation Helping Hand while I was still in the United States Navy helping to raise awareness and money for Military Families in Gulfport, Mississippi. Q: Education A: 1986 WT White High School Graduate 1989 Navy Supply School Graduate 1996 Stephen F. Austin State University Graduate BBA Marketing Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: 2003 Dallas City Council Candidate District 2 2007 Dallas Mayoral Candidate (Did not file for ballot) 2009 Dallas City Council Candidate District 2 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: I have raised over $3000 in cash donations and over $8,000 in-kind service donations. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Kelly Warren Barry Curtis Paul Deleshaw Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: Yes. I have been arrested in the past I have addressed it publicly. I am not running in spite of my past I am running because I have overcome it. I am a better man today because I survived and overcome my past. I have been able to help others from making the same mistakes I have made. I have founded an organization to help homeless ex-offender persons and I have helped to found another Prisoner Re-entry program inside the a local jail to teach life skills to inmates before they exit. I have paid for my mistakes of the past and I have used the lessons I learned to help me become a better candidate. If someone is interested in knowing about my past they can Google: Billy MacLeod, Dallas and it is all there for the world to see. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: It is time for a change at Dallas City Hall. I am a running for Dallas City Council in District 2 because I want to serve my community. I am looking to give back to my community who has given back so much to me. Voters should consider me the most qualified candidate because I have worked tirelessly in District 2 to stand up for what is right and just. I have stood up and been counted since 2001 to advocate for all residents, neighborhoods, and business owners in District 2. I have not only done so on streets and in the neighborhoods of District 2 but also by speaking in front of the City Council itself. I have spoken over 50 times at Dallas City Hall and I understand how it works. I am a graduate of W.T. White H.S. which is a DISD school. I received a BBA in Marketing from Stephen F. Austin State University. I honorably served in the United States Navy for 8 years and I understand, I understand what hard and determination is all about. I have been a small business owner, a small business consultant, and a vocal community activist. I have been on the record on issues affecting District 2 and especially for people in need. I have fought for residents and small business owners in my district on my own time for over 10 years. I have aligned myself with foundational community groups such as the Texas Campaign for the Environment and helped start Freedom Release Reentry Services, an innovative Prisoner Re-entry program in Downtown Dallas. I found that working with formerly incarcerated men and women and helping them learn the life skills necessary to re-enter society successfully was some of the most rewarding work I had ever been involved with. My platform is detailed and it is laid on my website. I believe that I have been preparing for this job for my whole life and I believe I will be the lone representative on regular men and women on the Dallas City Council, I am one of us and I will be working hard for you at Dallas City Hall. My combination of military, business, and non-profit experiences have prepared me to be a successful Dallas City Councilman. but more that anything I want to serve my community. My main goal will be to help the average man and woman have access to and fully understand Dallas City Hall. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: I work in the commercial collection industry and I understand the process of collecting unpaid debt completely. Dallas currently has a half a billion dollars in uncollected fines and

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fees on the books. This pool of uncollected debt could be an immediate solution to our budget difficulties at City Hall. On the very first day in office I would examine the collection agency contract with the City of Dallas. I will immediately review the portfolio of $500,000,000 in fines and fees that are on the books and have not been collected and determine if those accounts can be worked a different way and determine if we could put a bid out for a secondary agency who specializes in distressed receivables. If we were able to improve the collection rate on this pool of receivables by only 10% we could raise $50 million dollars. This can be done at no cost to the City of Dallas. I would immediately examine the buildings, land, and liquid assets Dallas currently owns. I would do this for two reasons. I have openly advocated that the City of Dallas review its long standing deal with TXU and bid out a power purchase agreement. I would immediately take steps to install solar panels on every City Building and on certain city owned land, a deal like this would not cost the city a penny, in fact it will save the City of Dallas money, it will create immediate jobs, and it would make Dallas a leader in the green revolution sweeping the nation. A PPA is a type of solar financing where someone else owns and installs the solar system on city property but the City of Dallas would receive discounted power of anywhere from 5 to 10 cents per kilowatt hour and such a plan has the ability to earn money. That program would also create jobs for Dallas Residents immediately. The discount electricity rates would save the city millions of dollars so this idea could be implemented at no cost to the City of Dallas. I would immediately implement a program that would gather a together a District 2 Residents Council made up of leaders from all across the District and would immediately start planning creative ways to unite District 2. I would immediately organize a District 2 picnic and event schedule to introduce the far reaching neighborhoods to each other. The district is laid out in such a way that District 2 has no identity. I would immediately take the necessary steps to build a feeling of community and I would do this from day one after the election is over. There are 6 distinct population centers in District 2 and culturally they are very different.In the past there has been a lack of leadership in this area of community building and these diverse neighborhoods have never interacted with each other. The cost of this unifying program would be low and I feel comfortable that much of the cost would be covered thought sponsoring organizations and associations in and around the neighborhoods themselves. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I have a platform and a plan for District 2 but my opponent sitting high in her office at Dallas City Hall has neither. I have a detailed and interactive website which people in District 2 can use to contact me directly and and contribute to the conversation. My opponent has posted no campaign platform or plan for District for constituents to view or comment on and no way for them to interact with them on a daily basis. I have consistently used platforms such as Facebook and Twitter to move messages of information and inspiration to over 5000 local men, women, and business owners. I have used this platform and to interact with people in District 2 and to seek their input and guidance on a daily basis. I have a detailed Linkedin page that details my business background and connects me with over 1100 solid influencers with whom I interact daily. I have the ability to use my interactive platform to support my District, they can message me and get a response back immediately sometimes in seconds. My opponent has no Facebook or Twitter page by which she can interact with her district, she is badly detached and disconnected from her constituents and this is refected in her decision making. My opponent has no Linkedin page by which she can network with local business leaders and share her background with the public. I am on firmly on the record on almost every issue affecting Dallas City Government and the needs wants and desires of District 2 residents and business owners. My opponent never reveals her opinions or reports her activities to her constituents unless she needs something and in the rare cases she does interact it is through the mail. My simply not accessible to her constituents. Most disturbing is that my opponent has taken no position against the voter fraud allegations that have been swirling around this town regarding the activities of her own family. I am on the record that voter fraud is a plaque that affects every part of this city. Dallas Morning News reporters cannot even get a comment on anything of interest from my opponent, in fact "no comment" is my opponents favorite sentence to the media, and this is totally unacceptable for a public servant in 2011. I interact with District 2 on a minute to minute basis and I move information and ideas along at the speed of light using platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Myspace, and Linkedin. I reach out and ask for ideas and suggestions because I admittedly do not know everything. My opponent is behind the times and I am a part the future. I pledge to be the most accessible Dallas City Councilman in decades. Dallas City Hall and District 2 specifically needs a leader like myself with the ability to quickly move a message and who has the ability to build a coalition with the click of a mouse to get behind it. I

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pledge to change the game at Dallas City Hall by using my social working skills and my access to the media I can get that done better than my opponent. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: These is no question that The City of Dallas is over taxing and under-serving not only her residents but also local small business owners. The tax rate is one issue but continuing to add to cumbersome and expensive regulation of area small business owners only makes the problem worse. Dallas has not been able keep up with the needs, wants and desires of both their residents and business owners and because of this both people and small business owners are moving out of the City in droves. Loosing these people and business owners reduces our base and kills our economy and our spirit. When you add to this dilemma the poorly managed and operated school system we are in a bad situation at Dallas City Hall. It is in these tough times Dallas needs a vocal and dynamic leader to be an ambassador and to inspire people and business to stay. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: Dallas has hit at the 3 officer per thousand number but in difficult economic time the Dallas Police Department must work smarter in allocating resources. I believe that DPD must continue to hire to replace retiring, resigning and fired officers or the DPD will quickly fall below the three-officer threshold (if we have not already). I have studied the subject in detail. I have concluded that there are currently enough officers on the force now to handle the work load we have. I believe that we can supplement our current force by recruiting trained officers from other cities instead of starting from scratch, I also believe that Dallas should allow overtime to cover needed shifts. I believe we need to maintain the size of our force and since January 1st have lost over a 100 officers this year already, we need to fill those gaps. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No. We need to improve efficiencies and increase revenue. I have outlined ways to do that. Dallas has $500 million owed to our City in fines and fees and we have a collection agency who is not doing their job. I work in that industry and I would light a fire under them to handle up their business or I would force them to re-bid the deal. If we could increase our collection percentage of fines and fees by only 10% we could kick that shortfall right in the face and this is not an ridiculous number, it can be achieved. A second idea has been floated before but I believe is valid more today than ever. Dallas should consider going paperless as much as possible, doing so could save the city millions of dollars immediately. When Dallas Water is sending out bills for 25 cents for residential and commercial properties that are vacant we loose money. I believe Dallas should look at temporarily renegotiating some long term tax abatement's and water deals with our commercial partners, I believe they too need to be good stewards of our City and pay their portion of the bills for a temporary amount of time. This is a tough coarse to navigate but it would be an immediate source of funds and we should consider it. I have openly advocated that the City of Dallas should review its long standing deal with TXU and bid out a power purchase agreement(PPA)to install solar panels on every City Building and on certain city owned land. A PPA is a type of solar financing where someone else owns and installs the solar system on city property but the City of Dallas would receive discounted power of anywhere from 5 to 10 cents per kilowatt hour and even has the ability to earn money. That program would also create jobs for Dallas Residents immediately. The discount electricity rates would save the city millions more. I have gotten creative and suggested we look at taking 2 cents from each dollar from NTTA tollbooths inside Dallas City Limits. The NTTA roads pollute our air every day but contribute noting to our economy. I would at the very least life to force the NTTA to open their books and take a look at the real numbers. This may require legislation in Austin but I would be willing to work hard to get NTTA to contribute their 2 cents to our economy. These are all just ideas and I am not an economics expert, but I do believe there are ways to cut costs without cutting services. There are also ways to increase revenue immediately to get to the number we need to be at but we need to get creative. The Dallas City Council needs someone like myself with a whole different set of skills to add some balance. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: 1)I would help Dallas a "nearly paperless program",this would save the city millions. 2)I would cut Dallas Parking Authority costs by install digital meters across the city. 3)I would reduce the salaries of top Dallas City Administrator across the board by 5%

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Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: Based on Army Corps of Engineers reports, the weakest part of the levee is squarely in District 2. My opponent has had no voice and shown no leadership on this issue. The sitting Council person agreed with the power brokers and pushed a toll road. The sitting Council person did not stand up for the safety of the people who live in District 2. I will change that; I will immediately report back to the district the true state of the levee. I will do what it takes to build the park. I will reverse the errors of the past and move forward with bold leadership and bold strokes. Where is the Trinity River Park? As of today the Park is dead, that project was laid to rest long ago. The Trinity Project is dead thanks to a lack of leadership in District 2. The powers at City Hall sold the Trinity River Park Project down the toll road and all we have to show for it is a broken levee system. The worst part is consultants took most of the money. Now, there is no money to fix it. I will make it a priority to revive the recreational aspects of the Trinity River Project as part of my greening initiative. As Dallas City City Councilman in District 2, I will reach out to the private sector and seek private funding for the project. I will reach out to Austin and Washington and seek State and Federal dollars. The recreational elements of the Trinity River project must be brought back to life, the big deception must be reversed. We were promised a park and some ball fields. I will do everything in my power as a City Councilman to see it play out like we were promised. I supported the Trinity River Project as it was laid out to the voters. That included a park with a lake and athletic fields. When it was originally sold to the voters, the Trinity River Project was going to be a hallmark recreational project that would rejuvenate the spirit of District 2. When I am elected to Dallas City Council, I will make sure increasing green spaces and rejuvenating both the spirit and bank account of District 2 residents will be my number one priority. A large portion the Trinity River Project is in my district and sadly it has become a national joke. There are seven miles of the Trinity River in district 2including both designer bridges as well as the Trinity River Park. The Dallas City Council “sold” a Trinity River Park to Dallas voters and then replaced that vision with a reality of 10 miles of concrete toll road plans. Dallas needs a road to relieve congestion in the Downtown Corridor for the future but placing a toll road inside the levy is not a viable option anymore. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: Dallas needs to be more proactive and less reactive.We need to keep the people who are already here happy and we need to have a friendly and affordable city which can people can feel comfortable moving into. The Dallas City Council needs some salesmanship and because we do have the steak we must sell the sizzle. Dallas needs to be business friendly and we need better schools. When I talk to CEO’s and CFO’s about their businesses, I am selling myself, my company, and the City of Dallas. As City Councilman for District 2 I will build an opportunity pipeline of economic development and relocation/expansion prospects which I will personally call on. District 2 needs a bold and dynamic leader like me to get out there to sell the benefits of the City of Dallas. Anyone can recite statistics, talk about landmarks, or give tours of the Arts District, but at the end of the day that alone will not get it done. I am going to work on reaching out to corporate leaders, leverage federal and state resources, as well as develop the talent and entrepreneurship that already exists within the city and district to attract new tax producing projects. District 2 represents so many crucial areas of commerce to Dallas including Stemmons Corridor, The Hospital, District, The Fashion District, The Design District, American Airlines Center, Victory, The Dallas Convention Center, The Cedars, Deep Ellum, and the newly rejuvenated Henderson Ave. It also includes many diverse neighborhoods such as the Oak Lawn neighborhood, Grauwyler Park, Little Mexico and Old East Dallas. When I am elected I will immediately reach out to leaders at the Dallas Economic Development team, The Dallas Convention and Visitors Bureau, all local Chambers of Commerce, and DowntownDallas.org to identify projects and prospects which are either on the horizon, currently in the pipeline or those which should be completed and have not. These people must have confidence in their leaders and see a passion, they must be inspired and that is what I bring to the table. District 2 and the City of Dallas deserve a City Councilman who can make the contacts, establish the relationships, and who can close the deal. It takes bold action and dynamic leadership to ensure these changes will happen. It is essential that I partner with other organizations who share this vision. My education and experience make me the preferred candidate. I have my degree in business administration, successfully served in the United States Navy, and have owned several small businesses. We need someone who can be engaging but convincing, someone who can get the appointment and the commitment, and I am that type of leader. I live in

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South Side on Lamar, and Mathews Southwest is a shining example of how an organization can develop an entire community. Jack Mathews and Mathews Southwest has attracted and invested in prime economic development, most recently they announced the NYLO Hotel project. He has created new retail where there was none and with every new project his hard work has increased sales tax revenue it here in the Cedars. I plan to follow his lead. I believe it is the redevelopment of our existing neighborhoods which is the answer in tough economic times. I will seek his advice and the advice of others in the Dallas business community to find creative ways to increase sales tax revenue throughout the many diverse areas of District 2. He was wise in using federal Community Development Block Grant money to fund this project and I will look for similar opportunities when I am elected. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: The City of Dallas is lacking in every area where customer service is a necessary. There is no City Service that I can mention here at which Dallas is exceptional. Dallas Parks should be beautiful places for family's to visit but the City of Dallas has put them on the chopping block. Once a week trash pick up is a failure in areas of District 2 where multiple family members live in the same home. When trash piles up in Old East Dallas and in the Grauwyler Park neighborhoods it becomes a health hazard very quickly. Dallas residents deserve better. Recent news reports state that Dallas Water Utilities has one of the most concentrated levels of fluoride in the country. According to the handbook, Clinical Toxicology of Commercial Products, fluoride is more poisonous than lead and just slightly less poisonous than arsenic. It is a cumulative poison that accumulates in bone over the years and Dallas has known this for years. This is unacceptable. Finally Dallas code enforcement has become an enforcer and profit center not a change agent. There is nothing good to report at Dallas City Hall and when I get to Dallas City Hall I will focus on implementing a Customer Service focus withing all departments. One idea I do have is that Dallas should offer recycling services to multi-family residential communities. Dallas Could show a profit if this program is done right and we could also show our residents that we believe in a Greener Dallas. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: We are loosing or tax base. Less rundown buildings and more green spaces create environments where families and businesses want to grow will retail and attract more young families. When government and business work together, great things can happen. I would like to work with developers, REALTORS, business owners, and residents in planning and executing more housing plans where federal funds are used to revitalize blighted areas of the city and bring new life. This type of public/private collaboration will be the hallmark of my time spent on the Dallas City Council. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: This is a tricky question. I found out online that giving a density number for an entire county is WAY too broad. I found that you need to look at individual zip codes and neighborhoods. The numbers I looked at from the U.S. Census Bureau are from 2000, so areas like Uptown and Downtown have increased dramatically since the last census was taken, but even in 2000, there were at least 4 zip codes in Dallas with 10,000 people per square mile: 75206, 75231, 75219, 75246. That number is too high for residential developments. A believe a good model for growth is the Uptown Dallas area and Midway at Frankford area. These two areas had around 8,000 people per square mile in 2000. I would defer to the experts but I am in favor of a density somewhere between these and the Highland Park area which had 5,300. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: I have studied the Downtown 360 plan and I believe it is a good vision to transform these streets to places where people want to be seen, where they want to eat, where they want to shop, where they want to walk, where they feel safe, where they feel comfortable.believe there needs to be more communication between the Dallas City Council, downtown residents, and its business owners. Simply put, I plan to knock down the brick wall that currently exists between real people and their local government. I have the proven networking and leadership experience. I have plenty of energy in the tank and I have the long term vision to make District 2 and downtown Dallas better place to live work and play.

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Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Immigration policy is a national issue and Federal and State responsibility. To bring this issue into Dallas would only add another unfunded mandate on our balance sheet. That being said it is a real issue in District 2 which by some estimates has as many as 100,000 undocumented aliens living amongst our residents. I believe a leader like myself at Dallas City Hall can shine a light on the subject of illegal immigration and how it affects our city at the street level. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: Southern Dallas is the size of Atlanta GA and needs vocal and dynamic leadership to help bring investors into the area to develop it properly. Organization like The Southern Dallas Development Corporation helps offer small business loans, they provide fixedinterest rate, the allow term loans for permanent working capital, machinery, equipment, and they advocate commercial real estate acquisition and development. District 2 specifically needs a Dallas City Councilman who can talk to promote organizations like The Southern Dallas Development Corporation and communicate their services to potential developers. Southern Dallas needs regular person who will listen and who will lead without any ulterior motives. My experience in the private sector and my ability to communicate with a business mind makes me a superior candidate. And when I am elected, I will bring this leadership style to the Dallas City Council. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I am in favor of the concept of a public-private economic development corporation but it will need strict oversight. DowntownDallas.Org is already functioning like a economic development corporation but they do this with very little oversight and they like it that way. They offer marketing, networking, safety patrols, and street cleaning services in Downtown. I would advocate a board or commission be formed to oversee the operation of such an entity and ask for complete transparency from day one.. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: Yes, I believe the plan to redevelop West Dallas can and should be duplicated. I believe a good place to start would be in The Cedars just South of Downtown Dallas. The Cedars is the largest undeveloped piece of land near Downtown Dallas and brings with it the most spectacular view of Downtown Dallas available in the city. The land is still affordable and it is also designated as a Federal HUB Zone which brings with it some distinct advantages. HUB Zones are designated as by the Federal Government as underutilized business zones which get front of the line privileges whereas it concerns loans and grants. Jack Mathews of Mathews Southwest has already started the transition but District 2 needs a vocal and dynamic leader to move such a plan forward and I have the perfect skill set and the relationships to get the job done. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: I am a United States Navy Veteran who honorably served with the US Navy Seabees in the first Gulf was in Desert Shield. I also aboard the Guided Missile Cruiser CG-61 USS Monterrey and traveled throughout the Mediterranean and was the first US Navy Warship to enter into the Black Sea since World War II. I was also a boxer and I played rugby competitively for the United States Navy. I proudly served our Country in 14 countries and I received a Coast Guard Commendation Medal for Hurricane relief work in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Hugo devastated the island territory. I am very proud of my military service and wish more people knew about it. The fact is that I was raised by a single Mother and money was always tight. I attended Stephen F. Austin directly out of High School but I simply did not have the money to cover my costs. I chose to join the Navy. My Navy experience is extremely valuable in many ways but it allowed me to complete my college education. My boxing training in the US Navy got me polished and I ended up being a two-time Boxing Champion when I returned back to Stephen F. Austin after my active duty service was completed. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: Dallas residents that blatant voter fraud determines many Dallas elections and this is possible because of the lack of voter participation by or residents. There has been a small number of people who have controlled Dallas elections and these people have run them from a position of power acquired on the back of the elderly and the poor. This obvious and systematic abuse of power and influence has contributed to the current perception of

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Dallas as a politically corrupt city. Currently there ongoing investigations and a grand jury has already indicted one member of the Medrano family for felony vote fraud. This indictment has shown that ground zero for the fraud resides squarely within District 2. This has to end and I plan to fight vote fraud at every corner by shining a spotlight on it. I advocate moving the local municipal election out of the dark closet it has been in and back into the light of day. Dallas has always held it elections away from all others and I believe it is time to get back with the November elections cycle. There currently is legislation in Austin that will move towards this end and I will lobby for the passage of this bill. Dallas voters must have confidence that elections are free and fair and I will be their champion on the inside of Dallas City Hall. Pauline Medrano

Biographical Info:

Name: Pauline Medrano Street Address: 2346 Douglas Ave City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: November 16, 1953 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (214) 528-7808 Home Phone Number: (214) 528-7808 Mobile Phone Number: (214) 923 2781 Fax Number: (214) 526-1480 E-mail Address: paulinemedrano@sbcglobal.net
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: I am a Life long resident of Dallas. Q: Length of residency in the district A: I am a Life long resident of District 2. Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Dallas City Council Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: I currently serve as our city’s Deputy Mayor Pro Tem. I serve as Chair of the Quality of Life Committee and serve on the Transportation & Environment, Housing, and Trinity River Corridor Project Committees. I also serve on the Regional Transportation Council. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: I have served 6 years on the Dallas City Council as a full time council representative for District 2. Q: Education A: Graduate of DISD, Skyline High School 1972 Bachelor of Arts, University of Texas @ Arlington 1976 Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: none Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Approximately $18,000 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Frank Ashmore, Sr Dr. Chad Park Metrotex Association of Realtors Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I have over 26 years of experience serving our city and the district I love. I have a knowledge of the district and a commitment to its residents that is unmatched by my opponent. I am running for re-election to use my experience to provide the highest quality of representation for the people of District 2 and to be a strong advocate for their interests

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and concerns. I have served for 6 years as full-time representative for District 2 on the Dallas City Council. I have worked with the people in my district and with its community and neighborhood leaders. This knowledge and understanding of the district and my experience at City Hall best prepares me to serve our district and our city. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: I would use the relationships and partnerships I have worked to build in the private sector to continue the revitalization of our intercity neighborhoods and to provide for more opportunities and jobs in the district. As someone who has a life time commitment to education, I would like to help lead our city to do more to support and promote our Dallas Public Schools. The involvement of residents to help prevent and report crime has been an important component to bringing the crime rate down in Dallas. I worked with our police to implement the 10-70-20 program in District 2, walking door to door with the police to help educate residents and enlist their help to prevent and report crime. I would work with city leaders and the police to implement the program citywide and would like to offer my experiences and leadership to expand this important program to other parts of our city. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I have over 26 years of experience and dedication to District 2 and our city. My opponent has no record of service to the district or the city. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: Dallas has a competitive tax rate with cities of its size in Texas and across the country. Our city provides services and amenities not found in smaller cities. I do think the citizens of Dallas are getting a good value for their tax dollars but we should always be looking for ways to get more bang for our buck, and as a council representative, I will continue to work to keep our tax rate low and work to provide the greatest value possible for our tax dollars. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: I would look at resuming the effort if needed but currently we are exceeding our goals. We have a goal of 3 officers per 1000 residents and we currently have 3.04 officers per thousand residents. Our goal for emergency response is 8 minutes and we are currently exceeding that goal with an average response time of 6 minutes. We have seen a drop in crime by 10% citywide. I support our current policies but would consider changes if Chief Brown recommended them. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No. I will work with our mayor, council and the city staff to make sure we have a budget that doesn’t raise taxes that responsible civic leaders can embrace. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: I would like to reduce spending on outside consultants and outside attorney fees, and cut incentives to companies that do not offer their employees a living wage or benefits. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: Flood protection for our city has always been the priority for the project. We should add other parts of the project as funds become available to do so. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: We should do more to promote our city and our schools. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: We have done an excellent job in reducing crime. We need to do more to promote our city and our exemplary and blue ribbon schools. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: We need to do better. We need to do more to promote our city and our public school to attract residents to our city.

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Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: We have a density goal of 10,000 residents for the Central Business District (CBD) and we currently have 7500 residents. We need to continue to build density in the CBD until we have reached our goals. We also need to work to bring higher density to our city’s transportation corridors to encourage the use of public transportation. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: Reform our approach to parking downtown and modernize our parking meters to be more user friendly and more accommodating to visitors. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: This is a federal issue and there are no funds available to address this issue locally. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: We need to work to create educational opportunities and jobs in the southern sector. We also need mixed income housing and improved transportation. I will continue to work for those goals. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I would be supportive. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: The City Design Studio is an effort between the public and the private sector that has earned success by working with all of the stakeholders to create solutions for residents and businesses. We should look at using this type of collaborative effort to revitalize other inner city neighborhoods. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: I wish more non-Dallas residents knew about the gains we have made in public education. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: Dallas currently has a shrinking tax base. I am committed to reversing this trend so we can lower the tax burden on our Dallas residents.

Dallas City Council, Place 3
Candidates (choose 1):
Scott T. Griggs

Description: Note: Only Dallas residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Biographical Info:

Name: Scott Griggs Street Address: 1803 Marydale Road City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: 12/13/1974 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-695-7471 Home Phone Number: 214-695-7471 Mobile Phone Number: 214-695-7471 Fax Number: N/A E-mail Address: scott@griggsfordallas.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.griggsfordallas.com

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Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 34 years Q: Length of residency in the district A: 9 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Attorney, Partner at Griggs Bergen LLP Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Board of Directors & Executive Committee, Oak Cliff Chamber of Commerce; Past President, Fort Worth Avenue Development Group; Board of Directors, North Texas Chapter of the Congress for the New Urbanism; and Advisory Member, Board of Directors, The Kessler School. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Board of Directors & Executive Committee, Oak Cliff Transit Authority; Vice President & Two-term President, Fort Worth Avenue Development Group; City of Dallas Appointee, Reinvestment Zone 15 – Fort Worth Avenue Tax Increment Finance District; City of Dallas Appointee, Fort Worth Avenue Tax Increment Finance District Design Review Committee; Member/Alternate Member, City of Dallas Board of Adjustment; Managing Member, Citizens for Responsible Beverage Sales LLC; and President, Stevens Park Estates Neighborhood Association. My accomplishments include: • Passage of Fort Worth Avenue Tax Increment Finance District (2007) • Reducing crime by closing Passions Sports Bar (2009) • Protecting our neighborhoods by preventing the widening of Sylvan and Beckley to 8 lanes (2010) • Returning the streetcar to the Southern Sector and winning the TIGER grant as part of the Oak Cliff Transit Authority (2010) • Fighting for the equitable distribution of subsidized housing throughout the City of Dallas and related changes to City Permanent Supportive Housing policy (2010) Q: Education A: J.D., University of Texas (Austin, Texas) B.A. Chemistry, Texas A&M University (College Station, Texas) Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None. Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: I have raised over $30,000 for my campaign. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: My top three contributors are the Dallas Police Association, Susan & Woody Gandy, and Lena Liles. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: Yes. During my freshman year of college, I was arrested by Texas A&M University campus police for trespass and given probation. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I am running for office to give all residents of District 3 – West Dallas, Mountain Creek/The Woods, and Oak Cliff – a voice and representation on City Council. I have a personal and professional background of being vested in District 3 as a homeowner, property owner, small business owner in the Bishop Arts District, and attorney. I have a record of community and civic service on non-profit boards and City boards and commissions. I am going to use my experience as an accredited New Urbanist, president of the Fort Worth Avenue Development Group, and former board member of the Board of Adjustment and Forth Worth Avenue TIF Board to bring about economic development to expand the tax base and increase sales tax revenue. I will implement infrastructure, economic development, and housing policies that create a livable city and benefit those that live, work, or attend school in Dallas. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Once elected, I will (1) re-establish trust with the residents of District 3 through regular town hall meetings and responsive communication; (2) push for a moratorium on dangerous gas drilling; and (3) push for a more market-based economic development policy. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: Trust is the difference that makes me the better choice. I am the trusted candidate and leader who takes a position and communicates that position to the community and

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developers. I am the trusted candidate and leader who responds to telephone calls and communications. I am the candidate and leader that is responsible and can be trusted to manage taxpayer money. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: Dallas residents are not getting sufficient band for their buck. Dallas residents are paying too much in taxes for too little services. In the last decade, the City of Dallas population increased by less than percent while we saw a continued migration to the Richardson Independent School District and Duncanville Independent School District areas. In the next decade, we need to attract more residents by making our city more livable. Quality of life issues – schools, streets, libraries, parks, rec centers, and the arts – need to be priorities. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: Budget concerns must be prioritized and balanced. The goal for the City of Dallas is 3 officers per 1,000 residents and an emergency response time of less than 8 minutes/call. We presently have 3.04 officers per 1,000 residents and are meeting our emergency response time. Our goal is currently met and additional officers should be added as recommended by the Dallas Police Department and Public Safety Committee. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No. We must look for alternatives. One tool we haven’t used yet is zero-based budgeting (as opposed to our traditional budgeting). Zero-based budgeting often leads to an efficient allocation of resources, drives management to identify cost effective ways to improve operations, and eliminates waste. We must consider implementing zero-based budgeting. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: We need to lower spending by reducing reliance on outside consultants, reforming the in-house counsel/outside counsel ratio, and reducing reliance on financial incentives to spur economic development. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: With respect to priorities, flood control is the foremost priority of the Trinity River Corridor Project. Our levees must be unquestionably safe to protect lives in West Dallas and over $6 billion in tax base on the downtown side of the levees. Beyond upgrading the levees, correcting S.M. Wrights’ “Dead man’s curve” must be the top priority. S.M. Wright should be transformed into a multi-way boulevard to bring about economic development. Funding should be obtained through TXDOT, bond packages, as well as private donations. Other parts of the project should be prioritized based on ability to withstand a flood within the levees, time to completion, and everyday use. Those amenities that can withstand a flood within the levees, may be completed quickly, and used by people everyday should be built first. Additionally, we need to ensure that the water in the Trinity River is suitable for recreational contact by identifying any upstream polluters and aggressively ending pollution. The toll road remains unfunded and currently is not economically feasible. The cost is approaching $2 billion for the 10-mile toll road. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: To spur economic development and grow our tax base, we must expand our economic development models for Dallas. Dallas has traditionally used two models: (1) development along new roadways (e.g., highways, tollways, and large arterials); and (2) a cycle of allowing existing uses to deteriorate, razing the building once obsolescence is reached, rezoning, and adding financial incentives (tax abatements, TIFs, MMDs, etc.). As we approach build-out as a city, we must have additional approaches to economic development that allow more market paths and means for return on investment: (A) clean the Dallas Development Code; (B) adaptive re-use through the development of equivalencies; (C) temporary zoning; (D) infrastructure-driven latent market activation; (E) neighborhood stabilization through proportional infrastructure spending; and (F) multipurpose infrastructure. (A) Clean the Code. The Dallas Development Code is bloated and over regulates the market. Whole sections of the Dallas Development Code haven’t been revisited since 1941, when the DDC was first compiled. I will advocate an overhaul of the Dallas Development Code instead of only passing additional ordinances. (B)

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Equivalencies. The Dallas Development Code is overly restrictive and usually prescribes only way to achieve an end. Choice needs to be introduced into the market through equivalencies. By way of example, Jack’s Backyard on West Commerce was blocked from opening because there was no parking. Parking was only defined in the Dallas Development Code as impermeable (i.e., cement) spaces. The storm water management system around Jack’s Backyard cannot support additional runoff as it has not been upgraded since World War II. The City’s solution was for Jack’s Backyard to spend millions on a new storm water management system. This was not economically feasible. As president of the Fort Worth Avenue Development Group, we imported best practices from other cities, and proposed an equivalency to an impermeable parking space: a permeable parking space that would handle cars as well as not stress the storm water management system. As a result, Jack’s Backyard was able to open. The practice of equivalencies is common in other cities, such as Vancouver and in parts of revitalized New Jersey, and should be brought here as a best practice. (C) Temporary Zoning. I support the creation of temporary zoning ordinances that permit a developer or other user to have a use for 1 or 5 years, for example, without sacrificing the underlying zoning. This and the other recommendations presented in these responses are focused on creating choice for developers in the marketplace and providing more than one mechanism for monetization of property and investment. (D) Infrastructure-driven Latent Market Activation. I will encourage and include small infrastructure projects “between the buildings” that benefit people that live and work in a community. Dallas presently has a limited approach to new infrastructure, which is new and improved infrastructure must follow new development. I support infrastructure-driven redevelopment as well that unlocks latent market potential. One example is the Bishop Arts District. (E) Neighborhood Stabilization through Proportional Infrastructure Spending. Successful economic development follows stabilization of existing neighborhoods. Large infrastructure expenditures should be stepped-down and connected to neighborhood level infrastructure projects, particularly in the Southern Sector where a focus is stabilizing existing single family neighborhoods and bringing econmic development. By way of example, the first Calatrava bridge ($120 million) is being built adjacent to the La Bajada neighborhood. As part of this project, a deck park is also being built on the soon-to-be decommissioned Continental Bridge ($10 million). The residents of La Bajada say that they didn’t ask for a $120 million bridge or $10 million deck park. The residents need a neighborhood park upgraded, an internal street repaired, and a community-center roof rebuilt. Infrastructure spending should be proportional such that when a $120 million bridge and $10 million deck park are built adjacent to a neighborhood, a small amount of money (e.g., $500,000 - $1,000,000) is reserved for neighborhood level improvements that stabilize the existing neighborhood and encourage neighborhood buy-in by demonstrating city buy-in of the neighborhood. (F) Multi-purpose Infrastructure. The most successful DISD-City of Dallas projects are the multi-purpose libraries at Arcadia Park and Hampton/Illinois. I will bring about more multipurpose structures and projects, including advocating for multi-purpose parking lots that can serve the school during the day and retail during the evenings/weekends. Such multipurpose structures reduce costs and increase use while improving the good will between DISD and the City. Future multi-purpose possibilities include the new parking lot at Adamson High School near Jefferson Blvd, a corridor in need of parking on the evenings/weekends. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Currently Dallas excelling in crime reduction. We need to improve building permitting and inspection. Presently, a building permit takes 3-4 months to secure and a rezoning case may take 9 months. Even with recent fee increases, the City of Dallas is not providing an adequate, much less competitive, level of service. This is unacceptable. Our level of service and staffing are completely within our control and as one of the largest cities in the United States, we should be the best. Monies need to be immediately appropriated – and, if need be, from the general fund or other funds – to return and maintain our city at a competitive level of service. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: It is very bad that the City of Dallas population grew by less than 1% in the last decade. The number one challenge for the City of Dallas in the next decade is to increase its population while increasing the quality of life. Quality of life issues – schools, streets, libraries, parks, rec centers, and the arts – need to be priorities. We must increase the number of residents to grow our tax base.

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Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: Within the core and inside Loop 12, higher targeted density must be developed. Mixed-use residential or commercial areas that maximize access to public transport and incorporate features to encourage transit ridership are critical to alleviating transportation congestion and providing mixed income neighborhoods with higher targeted density. We must achieve higher levels of targeted density by recognizing the relationship between land use and transportation and fully leveraging Transit Oriented Developments (TODs). To date, Dallas has not fully leveraged TODs. By way of example, both the Hampton and Corinth DART light rail stations (each $100 million or more in infrastructure) are surrounded by parking lots without sufficient housing density or retail within walking distance. Better land use and transportation planning is required to leverage most public transport facilities into TODs. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: One action we can take to jumpstart the revitalization is to revise the Dallas Development Code and remove self-imposed obstacles to livability and economic development. Much of the Dallas Development Code hasn’t been reviewed since 1941 and the ordinances are outdated. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Immigration is a federal issue and financial burden. The city and police department should continue the current policies that recognize immigration as a federal issue. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: The City of Dallas should make it a priority to advocate for new state and federal housing policies which remove the bias of placing the lion’s share of subsidized housing in the Southern Sector. A strong correlation exists between mixed-income neighborhoods and successful schools, as well as economic development. I will advocate at the state and federal level for legislation to remove large-acre, low income Land Use Restriction Agreements (LURAs). The Southern Sector contains too many large-acre, low income LURAs that do not permit the creation of mixed-income neighborhoods. By way of example, in District 3, a 40-acre LURA blocks the redevelopment of the apartments around Wynnewood shopping center, and by extension the Wynnewood shopping center. The City has a difficult choice with the existing deteriorating apartments: (1) allow new low-income units to be built and extend the LURA; or (2) continue to allow the existing low-income apartments to deteriorate. Such large-acre, low income LURAs should be removed to allow the development of mixed-income neighborhoods and activate the Southern Sector. I will also advocate at the state and federal level for legislation to remove the requirement that certain financing programs (e.g., LIHTCs) for low income tax credit housing be used only in low income census tracts. Such programs often perpetuate a legacy of concentrated low income housing. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I support the creation of a public-private economic development corporation. Many of our neighboring suburbs have economic development corporations and have used this tool to spur economic development. We need to advocate at the state level for local options that could help fund an economic development corporation in Dallas. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: The City Design Studio effort can be replicated by enhancing the public-private partnership that funds the City Design Studio and encouraging more private donations. Good design has a public benefit and additional donations for the City Design Studio should be solicited. We should start replicating the success of the City Design Studio to the west and south in the Southern Sector. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: The best under-publicized thing is the success of organic development in Oak Cliff and the small investment by the City of Dallas that helped catalyze this organic development. Small investments that benefit people that live and work in a community can be very successful. Ten years ago, $2.6 million was invested in the Bishop Arts District, which was worth $1.7 million, according to the Dallas County Appraisal District, at the time. The $2.6

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million was spent in between the buildings on water improvements, parallel parking, street trees, and wider sidewalks. Money was only spent on improvements that can be enjoyed by people that live and work in the community. Today, the same area of land is worth $6.2 million, which represents a 13% growth per year. Additionally, for some establishments, Dallas now collects more sales tax in one Saturday night than previously in an entire year. The Bishop Arts District was not an accident, but rather a success story waiting to be repeated. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: The uncomfortable truth is that our schools are not where they need to be despite large gains and big successes. Good schools are the number one attraction to residents and we must all continue to work to improve DISD. If our schools are not where they need to be in the next decade, then there is a very real possibility that the City of Dallas will lose population and begin a decline marked by an ever increasing tax burden on the residents. Dave Neumann

Biographical Info:

Name: Dave Neumann Street Address: 1031 North Winnetka Avenue City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: 02/01/1960 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-670-0776 Fax Number: 214-670-1833 E-mail Address: dave@daveneumann.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.daveneumann.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 29 Years Q: Length of residency in the district A: 9 Years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Dallas City Councilman General Partner of IJN/CJN Investments, Ltd., a small business that owns and operates commercial property. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Dallas City Council: • Chairman, Trinity River Corridor Project Committee • Member – Budget, Finance, & Audit Committee • Member – Quality of Life Committee • Member – Public Safety Committee • Member – Legislative Affairs Committee Other: • Board of Trustees, Dallas Police and Fire Pension System • Board of Directors, Oak Cliff Chamber of Commerce • Oak Cliff Lions Club • DBU-Oak Cliff Partnership • Methodist Health System Community Council • Dallas Breakfast Group Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: • Vice Chairman, Dallas City Plan & Zoning Commission • Chairman, Dallas Zoning Ordinance Advisory Committee • Chairman, Stemmons Corridor Business Association • Chairman, North Oak Cliff Weed & Seed Initiative • Board of Directors, Trinity Commons Foundation • Board of Directors, Dallas Friday Group • Board of Directors, Greater Dallas Planning Council • Board of Trustees, First Baptist Academy • Treasurer, Kessler Neighbors United • Board of Adjustment, City of Dallas • Vice President, Dallas Apparel Mart Board of Governors • Treasurer, Dallas Apparel Manufacturer’s Association Q: Education A: B.S. 1982, Business-Finance, Indiana University Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None. Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $110,000 for this campaign cycle Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Metrotex Association of Realtors PAC Apartment Association of Greater Dallas PAC Rick Garza

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Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: Never arrested. As former President & CEO of F.L. Malik, Inc., the company filed criminal and civil charges against an employee. The employee pled guilty and is now serving 12 years in prison. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I am running for re-election as a Dallas City Councilman because I sincerely enjoy working with people to bring them together to solve issues for our neighborhoods and our City. I want to continue our positive impact on the Quality of Life for the citizens in my District 3 and our City of Dallas. I am the most qualified candidate because of our proven track record of achieving results over the last four years for my District and the City of Dallas: Economic Development and Job Creation through public/private partnerships, Reduced Crime (15% for District 3 vs. 10% for City), and successfully empowering neighborhoods through their elected leaders to resolve unique and common issues. My leadership for the City has been focused as the Chairman of the Trinity River Corridor Project. We have successfully achieved tangible results of keeping the project moving forward despite known and unknown challenges. While still ensuring our #1 goal of flood protection, we have also been able to move forward on signature bridges, the Trinity River Audubon Center, and the planning for trails and lakes between levees. Under my leadership, the Trinity River Corridor Project has rallied local, state and national stakeholders to address critical issues including flood control, transportation, and recreation along the banks of the Trinity River. My 20+ years of owning and operating a small business has prepared me to approach the role of a City Councilman with the right balance of business sense yet care and compassion for our citizens. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1) Ensure the Financial Integrity of the City by adopting a balanced budget based on reasonable revenue assumptions and strict cost controls. 2) Strengthen the beat police patrol policy to ensure maximum visibility and accessibility of Dallas police Department officers within residential neighborhoods. 3) Broaden the public/private partnership program where economic development projects create catalysts for private investment and new job growth. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: -I have a consistent track record of positive leadership and inclusion for all parts of my District. -I am an advocate for key economic development catalyst projects for our City: Convention Center Hotel and Trinity River Corridor Project. -I have demonstrated my leadership through inclusion of citizen input prior to a final decision or recommendation has been made instead of making a unilateral decision without feedback. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: As a Councilman, it is our responsibility to constantly question the allocation of resources to meet the changing expectations of citizens and their tax dollars. Several years ago, the emphasis was on spending additional funds in order to improve public safety. Tax revenues that have been collected from citizens and spent on public safety have indeed been well spent. The city has now enjoyed multiple year reductions in crime, particularly homicide. In last years budget discussion, the City was successful in reallocating health-related services to the County without a significant gap in coverage for citizens. Full cost recovery in the form of fees for services utilized needs to be further explored in order to ensure that the City's scarce general fund revenue is not mis-allocated. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: The city has been successful in reducing crime over multiple years due to our commitment to three officers per thousand and the reallocation of patrol officers into neighborhood beat patrols. Given the budget shortfall, the city should carefully look at hiring only for attrition to maintain the current staffing level. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be

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specific. A: -Review all city departments to identify the feasibility of combining departments and functions in order to save overhead and reduce layers of management and support. -Review debt obligations to determine feasibility of refinancing medium and long-term debt to achieve interest rate margin savings given the historically low interest rates. -Consider outsourcing some departments or functions to achieve savings while maintaining sufficient control, i.e. auto pound and equipment and building services. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: I am pleased that as Chairman of the Trinity River Corridor Project Committee that we have successfully marshalled the Corps of Engineers to tentatively accept our levee remediation plan and remove the threat of FEMA remapping of adjacent property owners. Beyond upgrading the levees, our focus needs to be to expedite our bridges: Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge, Margaret McDermott bridge and the Sylvan bridge. Funding for all of the these bridges is being drawn from federal and state sources and from private donations. The construction and utilization of these bridges will assuredly spark community interest, access, and investment in the greater Trinity River Corridor Project. Secondly, the City needs to move forward assertively with the interconnection of trails in and through the Trinity to complete our Master Trail System. The Trinity Parkway needs to be evaluated for its financial viability after we obtain the Environmental Impact Study. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: We need to prioritize the creation of public/private partnerships that create catalyst projects in areas of the city where "but for" the taxpayers involvement the surrounding property values would not increase. These projects have proven to provide a multiple tax base impact. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: The city has done an excellent job in introducing and converting to One Day Dallas. We have lowered the sanitation rate now two years in a row based on savings from the recycling program. Neighborhood beat patrol as adopted by the City Council in 2007, has generated successive years of reduction in crime. The city needs to always be looking to bring in private sector expertise to review its municipal services so as to adopt efficiencies and cost effectiveness from the private sector to a public environment. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: I am pleased that my District 3 showed the largest increase of residents in our City of Dallas. Residents are voting with their feet and their pocket book because the quality of life is improving. It is disconcerting to see the city's growth only by 1% when the State of Texas grew by 20%. Dallas needs to sharpen its competitiveness to lure more companies and jobs to invest here further strengthening neighborhoods. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: The change in density throughout our City needs to be carefully managed to not de-stabilize single family neighborhoods. We need to properly inform homeowners as to the long-term necessity of increased density as we literally run out of undeveloped land in our center city. Successful increases in density allow for residents to live, work, and play in closer proximity. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: The city needs to leverage development opportunities with the creation of the Woodall Rogers Deck Park. An example would be to focus on catalyst projects similar to the Mercantile, Main Street Gardens, and the conversion of Old City Hall to the UNT Law school. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Illegal immigration is a matter for the federal government. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: Quality of Life is measured by a homeowner or a commercial property owner's "feeling"

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of whether they feel safe, clean, and secure in their respective neighborhoods. The city should redouble its efforts to make sure the residential and commercial corridors and neighborhoods are safe, clean, and secure to retain property owners and lure new property owners to the southern half of the City. Continued investments in public/private partnerships that realize a multiple effect in private investments and jobs is critical. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I agree. Catalyst projects funded by private/public partnerships have proven to be successful throughout our city. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: The success of the CityDesign Studio within West Dallas was based on a carefully calculated balance of design creativity and community involvement and feedback. This neighborhood "buy-in" while pressing the envelope needs to be replicated in other areas of the city that are at-risk in a downward spiral of their quality of life. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: Dallas has proven to be a "can-do" city that is resilient to economic downturns and challenges known and unknown. The success in turning around our Trinity levees, the building of our Convention Center Hotel to attract and protect our Convention and Visitors business, the creation of an International Airport at DFW, build an Arts District, and the investment in DART all prove that Dallas has the resiliency to do business, have a family, and be a city that you can be proud of. Dallas has and will continue to be an International city and weather economic downturns. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: Still today, race relations are unsettled when dealing with a controversial issue. Too often votes or issues are decided along racial lines. We collectively need to work together as leaders to bridge this gap so that we can over time convince citizens that Dallas can be one city....not quietly divided. We are making progress. Economic Development and Jobs are the great equalizer.

Dallas City Council, Place 6
Candidates (choose 1):
Monica Alonzo

Description: Note: Only Dallas residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Biographical Info:

Name: Monica R. Alonzo Street Address: P.O. Box 4126 City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: 03-13-65 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-207-6762 Home Phone Number: 214-207-6762 Mobile Phone Number: 214-207-6762 Fax Number: n/a E-mail Address: monica@monicaalonzo.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.MonicaAlonzo.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 22 years Q: Length of residency in the district

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A: 1 year Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Community Volunteer Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Former Member, Dallas Parks and Recreation Board • Chairperson, Planning and Design Committee Former Board Member, Sundown Community Corp. 1st Vice President, Council of CatholicWomen Advisory Council Member, St. Cecilia Catholic School Member, Oak Cliff Coalition for the Arts Volunteer for: • Southwest Voter Registration & Education Project • “A Senior Celebration” •Weatherization Assistance Program • Girl Scout Troop Leader • Carter BloodCare • St. Joseph Guild • “Unlock Your Vote” • “Ya Es Hora” Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Former Member, Dallas Parks and Recreation Board • Chairperson, Planning and Design Committee Former Board Member, Sundown Community Corp. 1st Vice President, Council of CatholicWomen Advisory Council Member, St. Cecilia Catholic School Member, Oak Cliff Coalition for the Arts Volunteer for: • Southwest Voter Registration & Education Project • “A Senior Celebration” •Weatherization Assistance Program • Girl Scout Troop Leader • Carter BloodCare • St. Joseph Guild • “Unlock Your Vote” • “Ya Es Hora” Q: Education A: UT Austin Del Mar College Mt. View College Crystal City H.S. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Precinct Chair Election Judge State Democratic Executive Committeewoman - S.D. 23 Board Member - Dallas Park and Recreation Board of Directors Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: close to $40,000 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: 1. Although I have good financial support across the District and the city, the contribution I received from my neighbor ($10 money order), tops my list of contributors....people support! 2. Roberto R. Alonzo 3. Amanda Moreno Cross Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I have worked on and helped to resolve many issues affecting our neighborhoods in diverse communities in District 6 and throughout Dallas. Because of my varied experience, I am ready to provide active, approachable and responsive leadership on the Dallas City Council for both District 6 and all of Dallas….leadership that will assist in moving the city of Dallas in a positive, progressive manner. My knowledge, experience and ability to create good working relationships are what best prepare me to serve in this post. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1)Open Communication - I would continue to communicate with the residents of the district as well as the business community to inform them of the services this beautiful city provides, have monthly meetings to have continued communication, and have an open door policy. 2)Infrastructure - work with the community to seek input for a 2012 bond program and talk about needs in the district. 3)Economic Development - work with the business community to bring development and jobs to the district. Accomplishing these 3 actions would be at no extra cost. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I bring Knowledge, Experience and the Ability to build positive, working relationships with people. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: No, I do not believe the residents are getting sufficient bang for their tax dollars; However, I believe in prioritizing services for Dallas residents and placing all funding opportunities on the table. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: I would put this issue on the table as I don't want for Dallas to be the #1 crime city, again. I would also work with the Police Chief to understand priorities, support maintaining pensions for police and firefighters, and offer incentives for them to stay and not go

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anywhere else, nor to retire early. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No, I would not support a tax rate increase. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: As a former Park & Recreation Board member, one of the most difficult and compelling things that my colleagues and I had to do was to reduce spending. I would recommend not filling positions that are currently vacant, re-evaluate the ratio of Manager to staff and review fees structure. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: As a former Park & Recreation Board member, I believe that all of the voter-approved projects for Park amentities need to be fully developed and implemented; paid for by bond funds. Yes, I believe that the toll road is a viable option if the funding is available to do it. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: I believe District 6 has a great opportunity to contribute to the growth of the city population and tax base. Planning should be implemented to move resources (whether economic development or bond program) to support Transit Oriented developments in District 6 as well as the other rail stations in Dallas. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Code Enforcement has improved. I believe there is always room for improvement. I also believe that the community should be involved, to provide suggestions and ways from which we can all benefit. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: Indifferent. Although I didn't see it as bad, I believe District 6 has a great opportunity to contribute to the growth of the city population and tax base. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: I believe we can achieve a good level of density in our neighborhoods by promoting infrastructure development in key areas and attracting well paying jobs in the city as a whole. We must also highly consider reviewing areas like the mockingbird rail station and possibly implement it around the Royal, Walnut Hill and Bachman rail station areas. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: City Council should continue to be supportive of plans that address the revitalization and development of downtown Dallas. Utilizing opportunities offered by HUD, Block Grants, and promoting the UNT Law School, are all ideas to consider supporting. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: As a supporter of a Comprehensive Immigration Reform package, I believe this reform would solve this issue and the city would be able to better concentrate and follow state and federal laws ...."serve and protect". Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: The Council’s priorities should be to provide basic city services, accordingly, especially in the southern half of the city. If the city would focus on just this basic priority, my objective and goal would be accomplished. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I believe this idea is good and necessary, yet we must work closely to assure it functions properly and adequately. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: Yes, certainly I understand, since this is the area in which I reside and will be representing. This effort can and should be replicated, especially in other areas of the

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same District 6 as it is presently, especially the Northwest corridor - Asian Trade District. Another area that has tremendous potential and needs strong support is the Fair Park area. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: I would like everyone to know that the City of Dallas has the BEST employees in the Metroplex - and we should do more to support our City of Dallas employees. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: As a longtime resident of this beautiful city of Dallas, I believe the ‘ism’s’….racism, especially, are an uncomfortable truth that voters must confront. We must do more to reach out to everyone in the community. Norberto Ornelas
Biographical Info: Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: - no response Q: Length of residency in the district A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: - no response Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: - no response Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: - no response Q: Education A: - no response Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: - no response Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: - no response Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: - no response Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: - no response Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: - no response Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: - no response Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: - no response Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: - no response Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: - no response Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: - no response Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: - no response Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: - no response -

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Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: - no response Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: - no response Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: - no response Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: - no response Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: - no response Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: - no response Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: - no response Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: - no response Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: - no response Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: - no response Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: - no response Luis Sepulveda

Biographical Info:

Name: Luis Daniel Sepulveda Street Address: 5105 Goodman St City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: June 29, 1952 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-628-3477 Home Phone Number: 214-330-7947 Mobile Phone Number: 214-769-9904 E-mail Address: campaign@judgesepulveda Campaign Web Site Address: Luisdanielsepulveda.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: I have lived in the city of Dallas for 57 years; all of my life. Q: Length of residency in the district A: I have lived in my district 57 years; all of my life. Q: Occupation/main source of income

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A: Retired Justice of the Peace Rental Properties Weddings Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: President of Solitary Latinos President of West Dallas Coalition President of Lake West Chamber of Commerce Vice Present of Arcadia Community Counsel Vice President of Disabled People Vice President of Walk this Way Member of LULAC Member of East Dallas Chamber of Commerce Founder S.M.I.L.E Scholarship Foundation Endorsed by MetroTex Association of Realtors Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Past President of Thomas A. Edison PTA Past President of Health Magnet PTA Past President of Arcadia Park PTA Founder and President of West Dallas Little League Founder and Past President of Latino Baseball Founder of West Dallas Coalition for Environmental Justice West Dallas Man of the Year LULAC Community Award Dallas Community Relations Award State House of Representatives Award 30th Congressional District Award Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning Thomas A. Edison PTA Award National Environment Award 96, 97, 98, 99 Mayor's Environmental Honoree 10' Greater Dallas legal Community Development Foundation Award Greater Dallas Community Relations Committee Award The Zapata Award Testified before the U.S. Congress on Environmental Issues Honored as High Profile's Man of Year Published in Environmental Action Magazine Published in West Dallas Toxic Times Q: Education A: Graduated from Crozier Technical High School Attended San Marcos University from 2000 to 2010 Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Justice of the Peace Precinct 5-1 State Representative Dallas City Council Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $4,305 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Avo Marzwanian Jessica Lynn Sepulveda Roman M. Gonzales Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: Yes, I was arrested twice for Civil Disobedience for protesting. I was released the very same day each time and without any convictions, criminal proceedings or legal activity. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I have always been involved in my community and I find that I have the most experience in this race, having lived here for 57 years. My district is more than residency, it is my community for which I strive to give better opportunities and have continually devoted years of my life. I have been appointed to countless committees, boards and founded many organizations in order to be in touch with the community of District 6. As Judge for ten years, I have experience in creating a budget, administering cuts and finding alternative routes in creating better opportunities for staff. Having ten years of experience as an elected official is extremely important to acknowledge, this experience exemplifies to the voters of District 6 that if elected, I will be qualified to begin my position immediately due to my seasoned involvement in an administrative, elected position. The business community as well as the residents of District 6 pledged their support to me and I will not let them down. I believe all of past community work illustrates my continued commitment and understanding of the people, coupled with my ten year elected position of running a court for the city, qualifies me to know my district personally and legally, to be an excellent candidate to represent District 6. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Economic Development Code Enforcement Environmental Services and Education Of course no one wants more taxes. I would approach these areas by seeking help from the Private Sector and/or grant monies which might be available. The beauty of being an entrepreneur and environmental activist within the community is that I have met many individuals and company owners within the private sector that are interested in being involved financially within city government. I intend on utilizing any and all sources available in this fashion. Most important would be my ability to analyze the budget. I have spoken with some current council members, residents and small company sectors that agree that my top three issues of concern are important key actions that must be addressed. I believe that the action must be taken with the involvement of community, fellow council members and local businesses. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice?

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A: My opponent lacks experience and knowledge of the community. Having been an active figure either through community work or through my ten year elected position, I have proven that I am deep rooted within District 6. Having lived in the district for my entire life (57 years), I know most of the problems and concerns of the people and I acknowledge that the community wants more than just an elected official, they need a voice of the people, someone who genuinely knows the District and has proven being proactive on solutions to community problems. Additionally, through my ten years of experience as an elected Judge, I have experience with creating budgets, setting policies, hiring and firing employees, dealing with bonds, and maintaining meetings on key issue with city employees. Since my opponent moved into the district 9 months ago and does not have any previous elected position experience, it is my opinion she does not have the ability to hit the ground running as I can. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: I would favor employment with the City of Dallas, in the future require that a person at least live in the City of Dallas. This would mean that tax revenue would stay within our borders. We need industries to remain in the City of Dallas. We have not had any real progress since the Ford Plant moved out of Dallas. Even the Boy Scouts moved to Irving, the Cowboys moved to Arlington. Our tax base can only increase when we have a stable tax base. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: We need to study what attrition is going to do and has done to our workforce. We have to keep a certain level of police officers remaining. As a Judge, I absolutely realize the importance of our police force within our community, I believe that cutting back even more on our enforcement would not be beneficial for our residents. Of course we have to be mindful of budgetary restraints, however, not at the risk of our community's safety and police force employment. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No, I would not be in favor of a tax increase on property. I believe that Dallas residents have definitely felt the strain of the heavy taxes on their homes. During these economic times, many struggle to maintain their present property, let alone adding another tax increase. Equally important to note, is that with another tax increase we are pushing potential residents away and forcing some residents out of Dallas County. As a property owner, I am very mindful of the ramifications that a property tax increase can do to homeowners and business owners. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: Consultants-The amount of consultants hired out of city City employee transportation costs Purchasing policies for the bidding process Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: I am a strong supporter of the Private Sector. Things happen and things get done. I do not believe building in a Flood Zone is a sound practice. There are too many things that can happen environmentally. Funding should come from Private Sources not our tax dollars. Toll roads require the user to pay. This may be a pipe dream if we think the revenue source is forgotten. Like a sales tax they are here to stay. Mass transportation is the answer and more cars are the problem not the solution. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: I believe we need to support the 10/8/2 system. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Yes, we have excellent delivery of city services. I believe that our law enforcement, fire departments, and sanitation services do a good job of utilizing their sources for the City of Dallas. That being said, however, I believe that we can excel more to the community's requests for improvement on community roads, sidewalks and public parks. Small projects that are genuinely important to taxpayers of Dallas County need to be addressed. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more

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people to live here? A: I believe that the population decline within the city of Dallas has a lot to do with the increases in taxes. I have spoken to many individuals and business owners that voiced their concern over these increases and further acted on such increases by moving outside Dallas County. It goes without saying that affecting people financially will force them to move outside of Dallas. People moving outside of Dallas county then means loss of businesses, loss of employment opportunities, loss of income and further loss of consumers. Clearly, the hot issue will be reviewing budget concerns and taxes on property in order to attract new Dallas County residents and/or giving old residents an incentive to move back. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: I do not believe the right level of density can be decided without better quantitative representation given. What is important for city government to maintain is code enforcement and staying in line with Housing Discrimination policies. We must maintain growth but not at the cost of illegally limiting families and individuals. As a Judge, I saw many cases a week of the housing policies that were being executed It is important to me that all laws be followed in response to the level of density control. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: I would support more mass transportation to downtown Dallas. It has long been a benefit to smaller communities to have access to DART rail, that can essentially bring more of the workforce and consumers to downtown Dallas. Mass transportation helps environmentally and financially, therefore bringing a twofold benefit for revitalization. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: I do not believe that the city or police department have the authority to address the issue of illegal immigration. Giving such authority to city officials, is a fine line to overstepping immigration entities and procedures that Federal government oversees, as well as Constitutional rights that may be violated. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: Economic development is what will help South Dallas. I believe that many people are focusing on the aesthetics of South Dallas. Many believe that the area is not attractive to small businesses, homeowners and consumers of Dallas. Additionally, many individuals cite safety as another concern for its lack of development, while others blame the high use of beer and wine sales. I believe that this area has much opportunity for growth. Small steps toward this transition would be road development, environmental advancement-perhaps getting Dallas sanitation involved and increasing involvement of the law enforcement. It is important to note that South Dallas does visibly contain many bars within the area-thus limiting the amount of business that may want to move into the area. We must not halt South Dallas growth based on these reasons, I believe that change does not occur without community involvement, addressing these facilities and pushing for smaller businesses to take awareness of the ample opportunities that are waiting in South Dallas. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I would look forward to becoming a part of the plan. I do not believe this public-private economic development corporation plan has been given enough publicity to gain momentum. I am very interested in receiving public opinions and concerns on this matter. Any plan that utilizes economic development within this sector should be given considerable thought. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: I am a strong advocate of economic development in smaller, "ignored" communities and I will work with other Council members to expand this development. I believe there are many areas of Dallas that are believed to be "under developed" and do not generate attraction from residents, however there is ample opportunity to create such a development. One notable area would be South Dallas. I think what we should focus on the possibilities that can arise from such an array of land. One issue that must be noted about the West Dallas development, is that the area has always been available for transition, the residents ready for advancement in growth. We must learn from this propagation, that with every community comes the opportunity of expansion.

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Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: The diversity and entrepreneurship of Dallas residents with the ability of businesses to flourish within the city of Dallas. There are many examples of how Dallas has pushed for economic entrepreneurship in communities: Bishop Arts District, West Dallas, Trinity River etc. The ability to transition communities into flourishing consumer areas is a great ability that I believe non Dallas residents need to be aware of. This exemplifies why individuals should want to live, shop and maintain businesses within Dallas County. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: I believe, unfortunately, that many do not want to address the many budget cuts that have occurred and that many say need to be done.

Dallas City Council, Place 7
Candidates (choose 1):
Carolyn Davis
Biographical Info:

Description: Note: Only Dallas residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Name: Carolyn R. Davis Street Address: 2611 Burger Street City/Town: Dallas State: TX Date of Birth: 12-01-1961 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-670-4689 E-mail Address: carolyndavis2292@yahoo.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: Life long resident of Dallas - 49 years Q: Length of residency in the district A: Resident of District 7 for the past twenty (20) years. Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Councilmember - City of Dallas Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Economic Development Committee member - National League of Cities Women in Municipal Govt. Committee member - National League of Cities National Black Caucus member - National League of Cities Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Former Board member - City of Dallas Community Development Commission, Urban Rehabilitation Standards Board, North Texas Housing Coalition, African-American Museum of Arts, Preservation Dallas, Former President - Queen City Neighbors in Action/Crime Wath, Pearl C. Anderson PTA Advisory Committee - "forward dallas" Comprehensive Plan Vision DISD Area 2 Representative for District 9 (elected by parents and teachers) Recipient of Allstate Community Service Award Task Force Member, Single Family Housing Standards Q: Education A: graduate of James Madison High School; attended Charles Rice Elementary and Pearl C. Anderson Middle School. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Dallas City Council, District 7: 2007 - present Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Please refer to my campaign finance report scheduled to be filed with the City Secretary on April 14, 2011. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: see answer above Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: none Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I have accomplished a considerable amount since being elected to the City Council in

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2007, bringing much needed development to District 7. However, there are numerous projects that I want to see through to completion. I have the necessary background knowledge, experience and expertise to get the job done. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Grand Robert B. Cullum TOD (transit-oriented development) and Hatcher/Scyene TOD both of these projects are in predevelopment with most of the funding already in place. Cedar Crest Brdige Improvements and Pedestrian Amenities - funding for design and construction already in place. Completion of Bexar Street Corridor and Frazier/Spring Avenue Commercial revitalization projects. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I have considerable experience in the key areas of housing, budgets and zoning which enables me to get things done at City Hall. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: I supported last year's property tax increase to avoid overly drastic budget cuts that would have harmed many of my constituents. Dallas, as the largest city in North Texas, provides a broader array of services than many of our suburban neighbors. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: Crime is down considerably in Dallas, having dropped for the past seven consecutive years and is tracking better than the national average. In the current budget environmeent, we can slow the growth of DPD while we address other critical city service issues. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: no. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: no additional police officers hired next year eliminate red light cameras alternative less expensive ways to meet emergency calls Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: The Margaret Hunt Bridge connecting downtown to West Dallas should be prioritized; funds are already identified in the budget for this Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: We must continue to work with the City Manager to think outside of the box to attract new businesses to Dallas; also, continued efforts to build affordable housing and partnering with DISD to improve our schools will attract middle class families back to the city and grow the tx base. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Dallas offers a good quality of life, including cultural and recreational venues. We must continue to improve our customer service, particularly in the area of code compliance (illegal dumping, high weeds, etc). Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: In recent years, the surrounding cities have been very aggressive in marketing. Those efforts, combined with the lack of affordable (i.e. < $150,000) new construction single family homes, resulted in an exodus of middle class families from our city. We need to invest in marketing and affordable housing to reverse the 2010 trend. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: Dallas neighborhoods are all unique. The appropriate density will vary, depending on each neighborhood. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort?

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A: Downtown needs more retail and it needs to be a priority for the new mayor to attract new businesses to the downtown area. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: This has not been raised as an issue by my constituents or those with whom I work in the DPD. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: Continue initiatives outlined by the Southern Dallas Mayor's Task Force. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I support this concept as long as there are adequate sources of funding. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: We have been working with the CityDesign Studio on the Cedar Crest Bridge Improvements and the MLK Boulevard redesign. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: Dallas has lots of wonderful old-fashioned neighborhoods and great restaurants and other retail. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: n/a Helene McKinney

Biographical Info:

Name: Helene McKinney Street Address: 8824 Bretshire Dr City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: Home Phone Number: 214 367 0293 Campaign Web Site Address: www.hmkckinneydallas.com or www.hmckinneydallas.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: Homeowner in district 7 since 1975 Q: Length of residency in the district A: See above Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Retired/self employed Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Active board member of the Friends of Oak Cliff Parks (FOCP) since 2009 Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: As a board member of FOCP over the past 3 years I have volunteered many, many hours to restore horticulture and our heritage at Kiest and Lake Cliff Parks. In 2010, from February to December, I volunteered 65 hours for the restoration of the South Kiest Park WPA trail (Loving My Community Grant). On March 25th. of this year, I volunteered for the planting of some 150 trees donated by the Mavericks organization at Lake Cliff. Q: Education A: Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting. University of North Texas, Denton Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Candidate for District 7 in 2007 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Not accepting contributions. Self funded Q: Who are your top three contributors?

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A: - no response Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: District 7 has been poorly served for many years. I am the candidates with a better understanding of business. I have worked for many years for large corporations and small minority businesses. I see first hand the difficulties at hand. My goal is to serve all the people of District 7, not a few. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: I would oppose any increase in property taxes. Property tax increases have devastated areas of our district for years. Many of our aging neighborhoods are owned by retirees or families on stagnant income. The costs of repairs are higher for older structures and homeowners have little choice but to delay needed repairs....homes go into disrepair, property values go down and crime moves in. That is the story of District 7. The City needs to live within its means, like the rest of its residents. In these difficult economic times Dallas has to concentrate on core activities and make better use of revenues. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I will oppose any program funded to improve the "quality of life" of a few by taxing the quality of life of all homeowners. The incumbent voted to do just that. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: No. Not all neighborhoods are created equal. See above. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: Dallas has enough police officers. Additional officers should be funded by properties owners who make excessive use of fire and police services. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: See economic development question below. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: Green spaces and trails. Why not a tunnel instead of a road? I would oppose a toll road. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: Dallas must stop funding activities that were once the domain of charities, churches and businesses. Stop funding shelters, housing and hotels. Let private enterprises come to Dallas, invest and create jobs. I will oppose any project not related to core City business. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: I see no problems with garbage, recycling, and water services. Improvements are needed in code enforcement (it should be pro-active, not reactive), maintenance of streets, infrastructures and our parks. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: Smaller is not always bad. Dallas must live with the reality of current economic conditions. However, to attract growth Dallas must be perceived as an efficient City, run by honest City officials. A bad reputation can destroy years of hard work. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: Houston has had no or little zoning and is still a vibrant city. Dallas must allow entrepreneurs, business people and residents to make decisions on where to invest and

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take risks. The many are a lot smarter than the few. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: See above. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: If laws are not enforced why have them? Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: Nothing will change until the gatekeepers depart. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I oppose it. It is not the job of Cities to fund private activities. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: As long as replication does not imply look alike neighborhoods. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: Our many beautiful and diverse neighborhoods. The museums and art district downtown. Our parks, the Trinity river forest, Fair Park, the Arboretum, White Rock lake and the wonderful people of Dallas who are so passionate and generous about improving, preserving and restoring their City! Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: City Hall cannot be everything to everyone. Casie Pierce
Biographical Info:

Name: Casie Pierce Street Address: 6047 Parkdale Dr. City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: August 8, 1975 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-613-5404 Home Phone Number: 214-727-4605 Mobile Phone Number: 214-727-4605 E-mail Address: casiepierce@yahoo.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.casiepierce.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: Sixteen years Q: Length of residency in the district A: Eleven years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Grant Writer Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Parkdale/Lawnview Association of Neighbors Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: - Treasurer Parkdale/Lawnview Association of Neighbors 2000 – 2002 - President Parkdale/Lawnview Association of Neighbors 2002 – 2007 - Founder, Groundwork Dallas 2003 - Dallas City Council District 7 Appointee, Environmental Health Commission 2003 – 2007 - Vice Chair, Southeast Dallas Economic Development Task Force, 2002 - 2003 Co-Founder, White Rock Heritage District 2002 - 2005 - Dallas Independent School District Area 9 Appointee, Citizen’s Advisory Board 2003 - 2009 - PR Chair, Larry Johnson Recreation Center Advisory Committee 2005 – 2008 - Dallas Area Rapid Transit Southeast Corridor Workgroup Committee 2000 – 2009 - Board Member, Save Open Spaces 2004 – 2006 - Board Member, Youth Conflict Resolution Center 2003 – 2006 - Board Member, Parkdale/Lawnview Association of Neighbors 2009 – 2011 Q: Education A: - Garland High School - Art Institute of Atlanta Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?

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A: $4800.00 as of April 8, 2011 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Casie Pierce Joe Binford Cathy Dyer-Walker Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: I have never been arrested; however, I have been involved in criminal proceedings. As the former executive director of Vickery Meadow PID, I thought it was my duty to stand up for the people in the area. In doing so, I became the victim of attack by a few developers who were more interested in moving poor people out than they were about improving the neighborhood. They attacked me the only way they could by trying to ruin my reputation. The case boiled down to a dispute over reimbursements totaling $2,000.00. After fighting the issue for two years with no resolution, and consulting with my attorney, family and friends, I decided to plea to a misdemeanor. I’m not rich and I simply did not have the resources to continue the fight. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: -I am running because I have seen very little progress in my community over the past decade. We have a huge opportunity for growth in District 7, but there is a lack of ingenuity and ability to plan comprehensively. We are at a disadvantage because of decades of injustice, but we have a great deal of potential and I think it’s time we stopped settling for mediocrity. I believe that I can bring much needed change. -As a business woman, founder of a non-profit, executive director of a PID and homeowner in the Parkdale neighborhood, I believe that I represent a greater cross-section of the district. While I know what it means to manage day-to-day operations, I also know that being a city council person is more than attending committee meetings and ground breaking ceremonies. I believe that due to decades of neglect and injustice the future council members of the districts in the southern part of the city are going to have to work twice as hard to attract development. My professional background and life experience makes me the best candidate for this district. -There are three major things in my personal and professional background that best prepare me for service. The first, is my long history of community advocacy. As a past president of my homeowners association, I know what it means to have your neighbors depend on you to get things done. I served in that position for five years and I am still an active member. The next is my work at Vickery Meadow. I was not pleased with the way things ended of course, but I learned a lot working with the people in the community, the developers and the city government. It taught me a great deal about how to plan comprehensively and actually achieve goals for the improvement and protection of the community. Finally, founding a successful non-profit in Dallas. There is no greater heartache and no greater reward than getting a non-profit off the ground and making it successful. It takes countless hours of working to gain the trust of the people you serve, finding the money to keep the lights on and the doors open, and maneuvering through the bureaucracy of city government. When it’s all done and the people in the community are happy with the results and become good stewards of resources, the work speaks for itself. That’s what I hope to bring to the city council. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Helping public schools - I know there is this mentality that the council has nothing to do with the school board and we have to let DISD handle itself. Honestly that type of thinking has gotten us to this point. If the primary reason people left the city was the belief that DISD could not offer their children an adequate education, how is this not the top priority of the city council? I believe that there is no need to create another bureaucratic committee or department. We already have the tools we need to get this done. It takes the city council making education a focus and reaching out to the school board, communities, parents and teachers. Redistricting - While I am aware that the current council members have already appointed the committee that will do much of the work, I believe that the council members have the obligation of getting involved in the process. Redistricting is a serious subject with repercussions that will be felt for at least the next decade. My main concern is making sure the process is fair, balanced and transparent to the people who will be affected. I believe that the people in the Southeast area of Dallas have long been under-represented and we should do everything in our power to make sure that wrong is corrected. Development - Development is the single biggest challenge and the single greatest opportunity for District 7. Their are some bright spots to point to in District 7. However, we cannot grow our community by only building one type of housing for people. We have an abundance of usable land in District 7. We also have had years of short-sighted development riddled by cronyism and poor zoning. Development that brings

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about real change is comprehensive. Dallas has already spent millions of dollars performing studies and preparing revitalization plans. I would work to review the various existing plans and studies to bring about a comprehensive development plan. I would seek out private sector funds to get this accomplished. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: As previously stated, I believe that I represent a greater cross-section of the district, but the key difference between me and my opponents is that I have the life and work experience necessary to see the big picture. Current and past councils have suffered from the inability to think about this city, and the planning thereof, in a comprehensive manner. Everyone is more concerned about protecting the fiefdom created by their “silo” approach to governing than they are about doing what’s right by the people they serve. While I am not naive about the machinations of City Hall, I feel a great sense of duty to the people I seek to represent. I will always do what needs to be done based on what my constituents tell me they need. I have a track record of getting results and this will be no different. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: No. Dallas residents are not getting sufficient bang for their tax buck. The Census numbers tell a stark tale and Dallas can no longer afford to deny the truth. Families fled to the suburbs during the last decade for a reason. The city council lost sight of the very thing that makes this city great, it’s diverse neighborhoods. Every city in the North Texas Region has grown while Dallas has not. We have not attracted business development in the ways that we should have, and the tax burden is being felt by the residents and the existing businesses here. Dallas has had a very short-sighted plan and can no longer give away the store the way we have over the past fifteen years. The businesses that have come have done so because of hefty incentives such as tax abatement. This simply is not a sustainable way for the city to do business. There comes a point when that “check” has to be covered and we are feeling that pain right now. The change we need begins with creating sustainable neighborhoods that attract young families and the middle class back to Dallas. That will allow us to spread our tax burden across a wider group. I believe this starts with education and job creation. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: We should not cut a high priority service like policing. However, I do think that we need to change our style of policing. Some people may disagree, but many large metro areas are going back to (or even starting for the first time) the community policing concept. There are certain areas that have Neighborhood Police Officers and that is a good resource if the community needs someone to come out to a crime watch meeting. We need true community policing and try to move away from strictly response driven police force. I believe that this will allow for more efficient use of the police force we currently have and foster better relationships between law enforcement and the community. Having the same officers cruising the same beats and getting to know the residents and each community’s issues on a regular basis will not only reduce crime, but give the officers information that is concise and up-to-date. This information can be shared among the community police force and members of the community. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: Absolutely not and I would support rolling back the most recent tax increase. City officials haven’t done their jobs in the last decade and now they want the rest of us to foot the bill. This tax increase hit hardest those who can least afford it. Elderly people on fixed incomes and homeowners have no reprieve. We can’t continue to run our government on the backs of poor people. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: I cannot list three specific areas to reduce spending. I believe it over simplifies our greater budget problems. While I realize this will be a very unpopular viewpoint to some, I believe that we need to take a look at the entire budget. Every line item. We should look at the budget line by line and find ways to increase efficiency and reduce waste. Every month when I sit down to pay my bills, I have choices to make. I have to look at all the money coming in and what is needed to pay the bills. City Hall should be no different. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option?

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A: At this point in the planning and progression of this plan, we should do our best to complete those projects that are underway. I also believe that the portions of the plan that are focused on the recreational use of the Trinity should be the priority. I don’t believe the tollroad-once it changed to the high-speed highway inside the levees- was ever a viable option. The very nature of high-speed roads defeats the greater purpose fostering some economic development around this venture. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: Create an economic development partnership, which also includes their school district and the college district. The goal is to bring together city leaders (Mayor and council), business leaders (chambers of commerce) and leaders in the education community to boost economic development. I think when developers and outside businesses see cities working together with private sector coupled with an active interest in economic development from the school district, they have more faith in the overall viability of the city, and will want to invest here. Attracting families and successful business is the key to growing our tax base. The council must get away from the “silo” management style and start reaching across, as much as possible, to provide comprehensive solutions to the problems that we face. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Other than police and fire, I believe our city water and sanitation departments do a fantastic job. Their departments provide a service that none of us can do without, but are never recognized for their hard work. The departments offer good customer service and are efficient in delivering that service. I believe that the permits and inspections department could use an overhaul. There is a great deal of bureaucracy still prevalent in that department. We could also make the process more helpful for business people, developers, contractors, and ordinary citizens on the front end. I believe this will help the department become more efficient. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: I believe this shrinkage is bad for Dallas. Families are attracted to areas where they can buy an affordable home in mature neighborhood with good schools. We need a school system that parents have faith in district-wide, not just a few top schools in East Dallas. Middle-class families will not come to live in Dallas because of the Arts District and a pretty bridge. But they will come to a city with are good schools and safe neighborhoods. As much as this pains some folks around City Hall, the hard reality is the suburbs are thriving at our expense because we been focusing on all the wrong things. Dallas has the great potential for growth. The vast majority of that potential lies in the southern districts. We have good schools. Yes it’s true. All the elementary schools in South Dallas, save one, are either exemplary or recognized. We also have Lincoln High School Communications Magnet. This is something we should be proud of and it’s something we can build on. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: Dallas is a city of very distinct and established neighborhoods. Some of these folks don’t like change and they see increased density as a threat. Getting some people to embrace higher density will be a challenge, even inside the loop. They think density equals apartments, higher crime rates and low property values. Developers will tell you that they will go where there are roof-tops. I ask them to drive around my community. There are roof tops, but no development. It obviously takes more than just roof-tops. What we should be focused on is the quality of housing and development that comes into a neighborhood and that will look different based on the neighborhood is question. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: Our new economy will not allow the purchase of high-priced condos and lofts, by the regular working person. We must do more to attract middle income people by providing housing that is affordable by the average person. We have priced out the very people who can make the city center a more vibrant place. This is Dallas and I believe that there’s room to have it all, but we must be consistent. When more people live in downtown, then more businesses will follow. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Immigration enforcement is the responsibility of the federal government. Our police

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officers are already doing more with less to serve the community. The priority of local law enforcement should remain focused on resident and neighborhood safety. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: First, the people of the southern Dallas are just as proud our neighborhoods as they people in the northern part sector of the city. We have good schools and great neighborhoods. The council members and the various mayors have been telling us for the past twenty years that southern Dallas is a priority. However, if you drive around and look at the area it looks like it did twenty years ago. The City of Dallas has proven to us over and over again that southern Dallas is not a priority, simply by the lack of oversight of significant amounts of money that are supposed to be dedicated to business investment. If they were at all serious, that type of mishandling of precious funds would not be tolerated. That being said, there are challenges to development that must be addressed including planning and zoning. The homeowners and business people are not looking for a hand out. We simply want the same effort in investment that the northern and eastern parts of Dallas have received. I believe that starts with the council members who represent the districts. It is the responsibility of the council members to actively seek out business investment that fits the needs of the people in the district. That sort of pro-active approach has not been the norm in this area. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: That’s a great idea, but I think it can be expanded. As previously stated, in successful urban areas that have managed to remain highly competitive, they have created an economic development partnership, which also includes their school district and the college district. The goal is to bring together city leaders (Mayor and council), business leaders (chambers of commerce) and leaders in the education community to boost economic development. I think when developers see cities working together with private sector and an active interest in economic development from the school district, they have more faith in the overall viability of the city, and will want to invest there. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: I believe this effort can be replicated in South Dallas. There already exists a comprehensive plan that would benefit from investment by city, state and federal government. The South Dallas Action Plan (http://www.slideshare.net/changarocc/southdallas-action-plan) is a comprehensive plan that takes into account issues of balancing development, environmental justice and community needs. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: The Great Trinity Forest. The improvement of this gem has been my focus for the past nine years. I’ve help to build trails, kiosks and pavilions in and around the forest. While doing this work, I have seen and photographed owls, hawks, bald eagles, rabbits, deer, fox, beaver and other wildlife. People are always amazed that we have this thing of beauty right here, in our own backyard, all within the city limits and only eight minutes from downtown. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: A city council, stifled by years of poor planning and a lack of ingenuity, the current high tax burden on ordinary people, and the erosion of trust in our educational system will have long lasting effects on the viability of this city.

Dallas City Council, Place 9
Candidates (choose 1):
Robert L. Foster
Biographical Info:

Description: Note: Only Dallas residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Name: Robert L. Foster Street Address: 2807 Crest Ridge Drive City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: 03/30/1993

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Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (972)951-7245 Home Phone Number: (972)613-8951 Mobile Phone Number: (972)951-7245 Fax Number: (972)613-8951 E-mail Address: foster2807@sbcglobal.net Campaign Web Site Address: Campaign Web Site is under construction. Youtube is also under construction.
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 18 years Q: Length of residency in the district A: 18 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: High School student Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: I am currently active in Community Emergency Responce Team (CERT), Crime Watch. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: I am (CERT) certified. I am certified in FEMA Active Shooter: What You Can Do. Q: Education A: High School Senior Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Around four fiqures. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: My top three contributors do not wish for their name to be disclosed at this time. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I am unhappy with the current situation that plagues the City of Dallas and its time for a change.Helping people is a passion of mine.I am very involved in my community.I would encourage others to be involved as well. I hope to bring new life into our city government,new ideas, a fresh approach and untainted views. I plan to maintain a constant focus on the key issues that seem to plague our city.I am committed to being the voice of the people.I stand for positive politics. I am an active board member of a non profit organization known as DFSC Jr. Board Positions held are as follows; Treasurer 2009-2010, Vice President 2010 to currently. I personally believe that your accomplishments should not be measured by you height attain but rather by the obstacles that you overcome. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: I would make Dallas more accountable for it actions.I plan to stabilize taxes by working with other council members.I would inprove public safety by increasing public awareness. This is a serious issue that does not need to be overlooked community involvement would help improve public saftey at no additional cost to the city. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I am dedicated to being the voice of the people. My opponent(s)current and prior view points. I bring new life, new ideas, and a fresh approach to the city. I beleive in positive politics. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: No,the residents of Dallas are not getting a sufficient bang for their tax buck. I would try to reinvest in Dallas' Economic Growth. I plan to revitalize the city. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: No, due to the city's shortfall it can not hire as many officers as the city would like. However,once the budget started showing stability hiring could resume,to do so without a stablize ecomony would mean cut backs in other areas.

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Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: I oppose any tax increase unless all other avenues have proven unsuccessful. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: I plan to reduce spending in three areas; I would elimate earmarks, Example; Trinity River Project. The city should try to go paperless. Wasteful Electricity Usage within city owned buildings. Example; lights that are left on, after the buildings are closed. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: At this time I would not consider a toll road option.We have more pressing issues with our current budget that needs to be address first. I do however think we need to get the safety of our levees under control. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: The city could offer some form of tax incentive to all new business based on a new evaluated net worth. I beleive long term business that have not filed for bankrupcy and, are currently in good standing with the city should also qualify for some sort of a tax incentive. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: I would like to first take a monent to say thank you to our Police Department,Fire Department, Sanitation, Transportation Department and all our public servants for a job well done.However, additional training and alleviating some of the red tape would allow the department to do their jobs in which they were intended to do. Therefore, creating a better quality of life for our city. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: This is indifferent for the people of Dallas and its surrounding areas. Because the North Texas area saw a population increase. If the City of Dallas stabilize taxes and offered bussiness better incentives it would spur economical growth within the local economy. That means more business would be attracted to the Dallas area. Therefore, more people would likely move to the Dallas and North Texas area. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: Further studies are need to help evaluate the density within this given area. I want to reach out to the community. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: Try to spur economic development. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: This is not a city issue. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: At this time I would not consider a toll road option. We have more pressing issues with our current budget that needs to be address first. I do however think we need to get the safety of our levees under control. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I would like to know more about this public-private economic development corporation and how it will effect the surrounding communities. I am always for helping the needy and the elderly. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: This can only be replicated with public involement. We should start in the Fairpark and surrounding neighborhoods. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew?

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A: The Bishop Arts District and our Historical landmarks within the city. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: Dallas is losing revenue to its surrounding suburbs. Dallas is also landlock. Sheffie Kadane
Biographical Info:

Name: Sheffie Kadane Street Address: 6841 Lakeshore Drive City/Town: Dallas State: TX Date of Birth: November 2, 1944 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-244-0147 Fax Number: 972-733-8013 E-mail Address: tgpeyton@swbell.net Campaign Web Site Address: www.sheffiekadane.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 66 years 4 months Q: Length of residency in the district A: 66 years 4 months Q: Occupation/main source of income A: PICS Investment Company Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Current Council member representing District 9. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: District 9 Served as Park Board member, Board of Adjustments also the Northeast Dallas Chamber of Commerce,and the Greater Dallas Rotary Q: Education A: Dallas Public School, Woodrow Wilson High School Arlington State College Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Dallas City Council, Place 9 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Over $35K Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Many contributors have graciously given at the $1000 max as have a few of the PACS who have made decisions to this point. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: I have never been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings. I have been involved in business litigation in the past, nothing current. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: My goal is to make Dallas a better place to live, work and raise a family. I have lived in this district all of my life. My father served as Councilman for East Dallas many years ago. My business background and city experience on boards and commissions best qualifies me for this position. I am aware of the financial position and challenges the city faces. I have been involved with this process over the past 4 years. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1. Building a coalition to address economic development and revitalization in the Casa View area of my district. This is being addressed through a partnership with the Ferguson Road Initiative which to date has not cost the taxpayers any money. Working with Code Enforcement and our Community Prosecutor we have made great strides in this area. 2. Erosion and flood control are also top priorities. We must find a way to help the homeowners who choose to live along our creeks and rivers. I am hopeful to address these concerns thru future bond programs. 3. The Garland Road Initiative, which was set up through funds I lobbied for thru the NCTCOG and other private partnerships engages the community to develop a long range plan for the Garland Road Corridor. The plan has now been approved by Council and is an opportunity for us to entice developers to come in and work with us to enhance and redevelop this historic area of our city. 4. The Trinity River Corridor must get off the ground. It will be the largest development opportunity for the city in the for-seeable future. There will be some incentives required to make this work in the current economic environment, but those will be far outweighed by the opportunity it

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will create for the city's tax base. This will be accomplished by public and private partnerships and future bond programs and possibly grants. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: Experience. While I applaud anyone who wants to put themselves up for public office and all it entails, in this race, the experience I bring to the table is really needed to move the city forward. As I stated I have lived in this district my entire life. I am vested in both my city and district 9 and have compassion for all of my neighborhoods. I work tirelessly to improve the quality of life for everyone in East Dallas and I feel I bring the experience necessary to move our city and my district forward in these difficult times. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: While I did not support the tax increase this last year, I do believe that our citizens are getting the most for their tax dollars. Our City Manager and the Council are consistently looking for ways to cut expenses without harming the delivery of services. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: We have achieved our goal of 3 officers/1000 residents. We MUST maintain that level of protection for our citizens. Attrition will guide our hiring, but we will be consistently recruiting for new officers. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: As property values continue to drop, we have to look at alternate ways to raise revenue and cut expenses. Some of my colleagues prefer raising taxes to looking at other options, but I believe the worst thing we can do in these uncertain economic times is place a larger tax burden on our constituents. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: Reduce Boards and Commissions Utilities Reduce supplies Get more life out of city vehicles; reduce the number of fleet vehicles (except for Public Safety) Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: Citizens of Dallas have spoken on more than one occasion about the importance of this project and the road that goes with it. I believe the park and recreation facilities in the Trinity should be a priority with funding from public/private partnerships and possibly grants. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: Recruit. Continue enticing business owners, thru our amenities, to come to our city. Work with prospects to find their niche in our city. Bring prospective clients to our city and make sure we have the right amenities they need to operate their business in Dallas, Texas. Also we might be able to offer incentives such as TIF's, MMD's and some grants that may be applicable. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Our police and fire departments are second to none and all of our emergency services are excellent. The Dallas Water and Sanitation Departments do an excellent job in response to issues as well as planning for and rebuilding our infrastructure. Code Enforcement is making much progress throughout our city. Our streets require much work. DISD needs to continue to work on their graduation rate. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: The numbers were disappointing,but provide incentive for us to look at all of the issues big metropolitan areas face. I also believe that until we can provide a quality education to our citizens' children we will continue to loose population to the suburbs. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: While we would like to see the core of the city be a greater percentage of single family houses, we know that with the growth of our region we will need to look at ways of

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providing the proper zoning for more housing in less space. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: The Central Business District members must find ways to bring retail to downtown. Retail will provide the draw for people to come to town and stay. More public/private partnerships. We need a grocery, specialty shops and day care. These are all quality of life issues to be provided by the private sector. All will enhance the Woodall Rodgers Deck park that will be completed in 2012. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Immigration is a federal issue. ICE agents and our police officers are doing what they can. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: The Council is dependent upon the representatives of those districts to come to the table with ideas and recommendations for their districts. The council can then prioritize any action that the council can pursue. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I have no issues and have greatly supported partnerships in the past. Each project must stand on its own merit and scored to determine the cost benefits. You must have viable projects and the proper oversight for this to be successful. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: What the CityDesign Studio has done is unique. We are fortunate to be the recipient of a grant which allowed the West Dallas Development. I welcome the opportunity to focus on the Casa View area of district 9 should another grant develop. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: Our fabulous Arts District and Arboretum do not get the publicity and notoriety they deserve. They are true gems for the city. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: The most uncomfortable issue voters face is the realization that the City cannot afford to do everything anymore. Kirk D. Launius

Biographical Info:

Name: Kirk Launius Street Address: 6719 Patrick Drive City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: May 12, 1966 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-515-0740 Home Phone Number: 214-515-0740 Mobile Phone Number: 214-515-0740 E-mail Address: District9@planetkirk.com Campaign Web Site Address: http://www.KirkForDallas.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: I grew up here, graduated from Dallas ISD’s Hillcrest High School (where I was elected president of the Student Congress), started businesses and created jobs in Dallas. Q: Length of residency in the district A: East Dallas has been my home for almost 4 decades. I did leave for college and the Navy and taught English in South Korea, but I always came back to my home near Mockingbird Lane and Abrams Road.

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Q: Occupation/main source of income A: I am a small-business entrepreneur who has worked for years to build strong neighborhoods, provide good city services, and grow business in Dallas. I served as a Dallas Police Officer from 2002 to 2006 -- years in which our city experienced significant overall crime reduction, as well as a decrease in violent crime. I have leveraged years of law enforcement and military experience into a successful business which assesses security vulnerabilities and designs solutions to protect the lives and property of many happy commercial and residential customers. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Member of the Texas Burglar and Fire Alarm Association Member of the North Texas Alarm Association Volunteer with Cornerstone Ministry providing meals, outreach, and hope to the homeless in the same inner-city South Dallas neighborhood that I patrolled as a Dallas Police Officer Volunteer crime watch speaker via Dallas Asian American chambers of commerce Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Former member of the Dallas Police Crime Watch Executive Board (CWEB) representing the Northeast Patrol Division First graduate of the Dallas Citizens Police Academy to become a full-time Dallas Police Officer Former Reserve Dallas Police Officer with no disciplinary action, and multiple commendations for service to Dallas PD’s homeland security operations in coordination with the FBI and United States Secret Service United States Navy Veteran – Chief Petty Officer, honorably discharged 2009 Reserve Sailor of the Year at Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth and Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command Q: Education A: Bachelors Degree in Economics from The University of Texas at Austin Honors Graduate of the Dallas Police Academy with highest academic and overall averages in Recruit Class #274, continuing professional education as a licensed Texas Peace Officer Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Vice president of student government for the more than 50,000 students at The University of Texas at Austin Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $100.00 received, with more pledged Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Julian E. Strucely, Dr. Fred D. Minton & Mrs. Marlane S. Minton I am proudest of the unsolicited check I received from my uncle -- also a U.S. Navy Veteran – who retired from the City of Dallas after more than 30 years of service. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: Some children excel in music, math, or athletics. As a young child, I would draw and color pictures of make-believe “cities”. Upon earning the rank of Eagle Scout, I opted to spend my “Eagle Scout Day” with then Dallas City Manager George Schrader who encouraged me to give something back through service to my community. One example of that ethic is the fact that I volunteered more time as a non-paid, volunteer Reserve Dallas Police Officer than I worked as a paid, full-time Dallas Police Officer in Southeast Dallas. Unfortunately, my e-mails and phone calls to members of the Dallas City Council have usually gone unanswered. As I knock on doors, many friends and neighbors complain of this same “non-responsiveness” from their municipal elected officials. I will respond to every e-mail, phone call, and letter, just as I did while serving as vice president of student government for the more than 50,000 students at The University of Texas at Austin. If elected, I will be one of the few members of the Dallas City Council who actually understands the inner workings of our city from the perspective gained through my years of service in Dallas Fire-Rescue telecommunications (911/311) and as a Dallas Police Officer. I can also read signs and advertisements in English, Spanish, and Hangeul (Korean), and that makes me better prepared to represent the interests of a changing Dallas. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1) Enforce our Code of Ethics and improve Dallas’ image. I will join and help our new mayor shape a team that will elect the most qualified City Councilmembers to positions of great responsibility -- especially mayor pro tem and committee chairmanships like Public Safety -- considering candidates’ moral, ethical, and work histories to avoid

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non-productive, embarrassing, “high-profile” incidents, and insure that Dallas has the most qualified leaders at the helm, regardless of race, ethnicity or other factors. I will adhere to and utilize the City of Dallas Code of Ethics fairly and appropriately in a routine and ongoing fashion. The cost? Time and effort. The benefit? Incalculable improvement to Dallas’ image as a can-do City where businesses grow and move here, thus increasing our tax base and lowering the burden to property tax paying homeowners. I will seek to change Dallas’ motto, or “tagline” to something that reflects a new, cleaner image. 2) Get rid of drug houses and secure Dallas. I was a proud military Veteran present at the December, 2010 demolition of a known drug house in the area near the VA Hospital where I used to patrol as a Dallas Police Officer. As children from Lisbon Elementary School shouted “knock it down”, a Texas National Guard bulldozer did just that. "Operation Crackdown" has saved the City of Dallas an estimated $70,000 while providing valuable training for the National Guard. I will continue to support various partnerships to rid our city of abandoned structures, drug houses, and illegal businesses, many of which are located in the southern sectors of our City which are in most need of economic development, and in dangerous proximity to our schools. We must clean up Dallas so that our next generation can grow up and play in safe neighborhoods and parks, and maintain unmolested access to quality education. I am a proud graduate of the Dallas ISD, and I will meet regularly with my counterparts on the school board to improve communications and ensure that we as a City are doing everything we can to provide a safe and high quality education for our children. As a law enforcement professional, I will seek a top-tobottom review -- in coordination with state and federal authorities -- of our city’s security posture, in light of recently foiled terrorist attacks. Safety is an essential service that our city can and must provide without breaking our budget. 3) Roll back taxes, deliver essential services well, and help grow business. As a business owner and former police officer, I do a lot of listening. I’m good at it, and I’ve heard my neighbors’ concerns about tax increases and the impacts they are having on our families. We were blessed to have a fiscally conservative mayor, and I am voting for another such individual on May 14th. But, Dallas does not have a “strong mayor” system, and he will need the support of at least 7 other city councilmembers who understand the need to create jobs and keep taxes low. Otherwise, we may end up like other cities which are bogged down by high taxes, huge debt, and a scarcity of jobs. As a former marketing manager of one of America’s fastestgrowing telecommunications companies, and an avid cyclist and outdoorsman, I will immediately begin to recruit trade shows – such as Interbike, the world’s largest cycling industry exhibition – to come to Dallas instead of Las Vegas. That’s just one example of a low- (or no-) cost initiative that I will spearhead to allow an international industry to leverage Dallas’ natural and man-made assets (in this case, miles of existing and soon-to-be built hike and bike trails) and bring millions of dollars of business to the Dallas Convention Center, Convention Center Hotel, restaurants, and hundreds of other local venues. When the Starbucks chain wandered from their main mission of delivering good coffee and the “Starbucks Experience” of interaction with the barista, etc., their business suffered. When Dallas returns to a focus of providing good basic services, we taxpayers will receive a good value. What should Dallas’ new tagline be? How about something like: “Dallas, essentially yours”. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: As I walk the neighborhoods of District 9, many residents tell me that I am the first candidate for city council that has ever made the effort to ask them their opinions and listen to their concerns and ideas. As I noted previously, lack of response has been a major problem with all of the city council members whom I have written, e-mailed or called. My offers two years ago to serve on city boards or commissions went completely unanswered. When I write my state or federal representatives, I always get letters or e-mails in return. Why isn’t that the case at Dallas City Hall? If elected to the Dallas City Council, I will answer all correspondence and phone calls. As a proud United States Navy Veteran, I subscribe to the Navy’s core values of: Honor, Courage and Commitment. Prior to my decision to run for Dallas City Council District 9, I called our incumbent city councilman and expressed my disappointment that the city council had failed to enforce the City’s code of ethics and failed to even discuss removal of the chairman of the Public Safety Committee after he violated the City Charter in bypassing the city manager to directly intervene in police enforcement. In a “high profile” incident involving the use of “special police” (specifically prohibited by our City Charter), our current mayor lied about police officers’ reports of a domestic violence call at his home. I told our incumbent that “actions speak louder than words”, but he was unaware that our mayor was suing our city to suppress public records. How can a man that sues the city hold its gavel? Just as bad, how can a city councilmember who is not even aware that the acting mayor is suing the city keep him in

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check? As I walk the neighborhoods of District 9, these are the questions my neighbors want answered. As your city councilman, I will not sit idly by as others violate the law and put our police officers in jeopardy when they dial the police chief’s cell phone number to play a “stay out of jail card” instead of calling 911. If you’re happy with the “Caraway Council”, then vote for our incumbent. If not, then vote Kirk Launius for Dallas City Council District 9. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: No. We are overtaxed, and receive fewer services than we deserve for what we pay. Unfortunately, Dallas has had an infatuation with big ticket items that often do not result in any tangible benefit for our residents. With your help, I will work tirelessly to shift our city’s focus away from grand projects, and back to the provision of good, basic city services. We must create a better business environment here in the City of Dallas. Sure, there will be tough budget decisions to make, but we can make the right ones. An example? My business depends upon city permits to complete jobs in large office buildings where we serve as a sub-contractor to some of the largest construction companies in the nation. Recently, a permit, which used to take a week or two to obtain from Dallas’ Office of Building Inspection, took several times that long to get. The reason? We were told that the plans examiner we had worked with for months had been laid off. If you are happy with a city council that has failed to protect staffing positions which are essential to business and growing our tax base, then don’t vote for me. But, if you would like to see us enhance our business tax base, and unburden our residential taxpayers, then go to www.KirkForDallas.com to donate or volunteer, and vote Kirk Launius for Dallas City Council District 9. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: The tendency of governments, unchecked, is ALWAYS to grow bigger and bigger. Dallas is a safer city in recent years due to the outstanding efforts of the men and women of our police and fire departments. I am proud to have played a small role in that “boots on the ground” success. As a patrol officer in some of the toughest neighborhoods of our city, my fellow officers and I battled daily with squad cars in need of maintenance, along with the crack cocaine, prostitution, and murder, and we kept each other alive. Our chief has stated that he believes the department has “adequate resources” to do the job. Our city manager says that she does not want to see the size of the force fall significantly. Having worked for the City, I am better prepared than others to identify areas where we can eliminate waste and cut costs. With these savings, Dallas will be able to resume its hiring of new police officers to meet our decades-old goal (and City ordinance) of having three police officers per thousand residents. I don’t think we’re going to need a tax increase to keep the public safety force at the levels we desire. I believe that the force can be maintained without a tax hike. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No. Dallas will continue to face difficult budget years until the economy improves. Raising property taxes during a recession was not a solution, but a shortsighted move which prolongs our recovery. Government should also not attempt to compete with private enterprise. It should get out of the way so businesses can thrive in a free market. According to the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), small businesses make up more than 99.7% of all employers, generated 65% of net new jobs over the past 17 years, and are 52% home-based. Citizens who keep more of the money they earn can reinvest those dollars in job-creating small businesses, like I do. If you are tired of our “tax and spend” council who pile up debt for our children, then elect me as your Dallas City Councilman, and together we will reduce government waste, provide good city services, and roll back the tax increase. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: Reduced spending does not have to result in reductions to basic city services. I have a track record of building partnerships with the private sector to provide taxpayers with the amenities and services they desire. Replace reduced spending on parks and recreation with private partnership money. I am a runner, a cyclist, and a big fan of Dallas Parks. I would explore cutting costs within the Dallas Park and Recreation Department while boosting services via innovative public-private partnerships – like the successful one involving the Dallas Zoological Society -- that provide children and their parents safe and fun activities. Such partnerships give entrepreneurs the opportunity to sponsor and support

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quality of life enhancing programs and facilities, as those businesses help create jobs, grow our economy, and expand our tax base. Reduce vehicle and travel expenditures. In my extensive experience as a member of various public and private boards and committees, and as a city employee and a business owner, I have often found that significant savings can be achieved through cutting unnecessary travel expenses and more careful and systematic use of vehicles. This can take many forms, aided by fuel-saving computer technology and tracking. Some meetings can be held via the Internet, instead of sending people there via car or airplane. Technologies exist to help cities achieve better fuel-efficiency from their fleets, and to better manage the time that employees and staff waste stuck in traffic. Use of alternative fuels such as natural gas can help clean our air, while reducing the cost of transportation. Establish what items really cost, and reduce what the City pays to contractors. Recent news reports revealed what a terrible waste of money our city’s “Weatherization Assistance Program” has been. Dallas paid $8.10 for light bulbs one could purchase at The Home Depot for less than $1.50 a piece. According to WFAA TV, "Invoices showed the city paid for a 40-gallon water heater at a cost of $1,500. But News 8 discovered it's not a 40-gallon tank after all, but rather the smaller 29-gallon one which sells online for as low as $381. The city overpaid by $1,100." Funds, from any source, expended by the departments responsible should be scrutinized and reduced if necessary. The Dallas tagline currently reads: “Dallas, The City That Works. Diverse, Vibrant, and Progressive”. Really? Let’s truly be ‘progressive’, provide essential city services well, remind our city managers and employees that they work for us the taxpayers, and change the environment at City Hall to something like: “Dallas, essentially yours”. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: The Trinity River is the “eye gate” of Dallas. Some people look at the areas south of I-30 and the Trinity River and cringe. I see hope and natural beauty, such as the largest urban bottomland hardwood forest in North America, and I have been building bridges there for years. I have stood in that forest at 3:00 in the morning, and heard the peaceful sounds of nature interrupted by the crackle of my portable police radio and the sounds of gunfire or a police helicopter. I would prioritize the goals of the Trinity River Corridor Project to bring nationally acclaimed parks, trails, lakes, nature education and recreational opportunities to our center city within the Trinity River Basin. In 2006, Dallas allocated money for a whitewater project in the city's bond program. The Audubon Center and Santa Fe Trestle Trail are lovely additions to Dallas’ parks ‘inventory’, and the new Trinity Park Standing Wave Kayak Course is already being greatly enjoyed by paddlers, and more amenities will come with time. I have questions about the toll road, as there is a worrying scarcity of transportation funding. As a fiscal conservative, I believe if we eliminate waste in government at all levels, then we will have what we need, and can even cut taxes. As a public safety professional, I believe our focus must be upon providing flood protection for all our citizens, visitors, and businesses in West Dallas, Oak Cliff, and Downtown. We can’t just sit back and say, “it will never happen here”. In May of 1995, I assisted in a swift water rescue of a neighbor who lived directly across the street from me. She was almost swept away in a swollen Rush Creek, and conditions were so bad that day that several people drowned in Dallas, and fire trucks weren’t able to get into some neighborhoods. We had to fend for ourselves. Dallas needs to re-focus on providing good basic city services such as fixing roadways and maintaining public safety. Fortunately, we received some good news recently that the Army Corps of Engineers anticipates approval of a levee repair plan that will lead to Dallas' Trinity levees being recertified by Spring 2012, and I am hopeful that we North Texans can manage our transportation needs without heaping more massive debt upon our children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: For the most part, government should get out of the way, and stay out of the way of entrepreneurs. I am an advocate for limited government, but believe that our City can and must continue to play a role in safeguarding our citizens. I hear many complaints from residents in District 9 about downtown. They believe it’s not clean and it’s not safe. Many tell me there is “nothing to do down there”. I think it is sad that many Dallasites spend less time downtown than our tourists and out-of-town visitors. I believe we can and should incentivize urban development in the downtown core. Dallas has tax incentives and abatements, as well as programs to encourage overseas businesses to relocate here. On April 9th, I met with a well-known international architect and engineer who was visiting North Texas and we talked about the proper level of density for a city like Dallas. I read and understand the reports and white papers from organizations like the Urban Land

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Institute and the North Central Texas Council of Governments. Having lived for 3 years in the bustling port city of Busan and the giant capital city of Seoul, South Korea -- with a population of over 10 million people -- I have the knowledge and experience to help bring order and direction to our home on the North Texas prairie. This is the kind of stability that business leaders look for when thinking about relocating to a city like Dallas. Our Tax Increment Finance Districts (TIFs) and Public Improvement Districts (PIDs) are serving well to increase the density of development and improve infrastructure. If you are happy with the “tax and spend” city council of the past two years, then vote for the other guy. If you want to help a change agent go to City Hall, then vote for me. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Trash pickup, recycling, and water delivery are excellent. Road maintenance needs to improve, especially in the area of preventative maintenance. For instance, in many neighborhoods, water meters are sunken and sidewalks are in disrepair. Currently those are addressed on a per-request basis. It would be much more efficient to make all repairs in a single block at the same time, rather than piecemeal as is done now. Cut spending on streets and infrastructure replacement through better maintenance schedules. As a 311 operator, I took thousands of calls from residents, and I was always cognizant of the fact that each call usually resulted in rubber tires burning gasoline hitting concrete streets. Each call equaled one trip or more. Other calls brought complaints that days or weeks or months had passed with no response. We should replace broken sidewalks and water meters on a street-by-street, scheduled basis instead of the ‘normal’ piecemeal, fuel-slurping single trips when a resident calls to complain. Streets need to be properly maintained in order to lower the frequency and cost of wholesale replacement of thoroughfares. Every department within the city has the opportunity to be more efficient in how it operates and provide the same or a better level of service. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: It’s a bad symptom. We need to do a better job of encouraging “organic” business growth. As an employer in the security services industry, my company -- an installer of burglar alarm, video surveillance and access control systems – creates jobs for sales people, security consultants and installers. I know how to attract people to Dallas. Some of my young Asian friends are just starting to move to what they call “the SMU area”. They love the gardens of the Dallas Arboretum and the trails of White Rock Lake, and they are pondering the notion of moving further east, deeper into District 9, which I wholeheartedly encourage. Some friends recently opened a wonderful Korean restaurant on Greenville Avenue at Lovers Lane. We have wonderful amenities in our downtown core, such as the arts district. I believe the deck park is going to make downtown more livable, as it becomes easier for downtown residents to access Uptown. The early stages of our urban core re-do are the toughest, but as we stay in the game, so to speak, the economies of scale will emerge so that the incentives will be self-evident, self-reinforcing, and require fewer tax abatements. Ultimately, the answer is to cut waste in government, provide excellent essential services such as police, fire, streets, sanitation, building permits and inspections, etc., cut taxes, and allow our citizens to keep more of their hard-earned dollars which they will re-invest in the marketplace as entrepreneurs and consumers. We can, and will, expand our tax base, while cutting taxes for our urban resident business owners and their employees, and the result will be fantastic, and in line with Dallas’ history as a can-do business City. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: Let’s be realistic. There is no single correct answer to this question. Neighborhood density can and does vary greatly from neighborhood to neighborhood, and will be greater as you get closer to downtown. In recent years, residents near the southern shore of White Rock Lake successfully fought back development of “mid-rise” housing in their neighborhood. So, it’s a sensitive subject, but one that is being addressed through educational outreach efforts by proponents of responsible, mixed-use development. Property values in the suburbs may have peaked, and the younger crowd is calling for “sustainable development”, where they can walk to restaurants and walk or cycle to work. Dallas is changing demographically with more Hispanics and Asians arriving every day. I have the historical perspective as a lifelong resident of District 9, as well as the international travel experience and time living and working abroad in Europe and Asia to help make the next few years the best for Dallas. Population density seems to be growing

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in areas that make sense – for example, around the DART stations at Mockingbird and Park Lanes. As an inside-Loop 12 resident, I honor my neighbors’ desire to maintain the tree-lined “roominess” of our District. I also believe that mixed-use developments can bring new life to tired, old sections of our city, and I will work with neighbors and developers to ensure that we achieve and maintain balance in our quality of life, while welcoming new residents to our district who will broaden our tax base, start small businesses, and help us reduce our tax burdens. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: Re-establish, enlarge or revitalize a commission of downtown business leaders to make suggestions on the downtown area, and encourage them to participate financially in making it happen. They would greatly benefit from a revitalized downtown, and should participate in bringing that to fruition. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Follow the laws that are on the books, and report all criminal illegal immigrants to the federal government. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: The unemployment situation in Dallas County, and in particular South Dallas, has reached a critical stage which affects everyone in one capacity or another. For the last 10 or 15 years, our situation has been generally ignored or overlooked by the federal and state government to a point that we can no longer rely on the federal government, especially during tough economic times like we are currently experiencing. Even when the federal government does something in our area, it usually has strings attached or favors a small group of established business favorites. More often than not, the entrepreneurs of South Dallas are left out. Dependence upon state and federal government needs to cease and each of us needs to take charge of our individual and community needs for the future. Instead of looking for outside help, we need to focus on our own community businesses and services so they can grow and create jobs for Dallas residents right here at home. There are entrepreneurs within the South Dallas community who need a little encouragement to undertake the business of their dreams. These businesses often become the foundation for long-term jobs within our entire city and North Texas. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I believe it is an excellent idea, and we should go even further. As a recruit police officer at the Dallas Police Academy on Red Bird Center Drive in 2002, I couldn’t help but notice the aircraft coming in for a landing on the runway just on the other side of the chain link fence. About that same time, and during the past 8 years, some of our Dallas City leaders have had the foresight to prepare a “diamond in the rough” for southern Dallas. They have worked with City management to systematically develop and modernize the old Red Bird Airport – now named, appropriately, Dallas Executive Airport. The City has a long-term master plan for the development of this facility and the 300+ undeveloped acres associated with it. Dallas Executive Airport is the perfect location for companies who want to do business in Dallas. Prime land in our community is ready for development – both industrial and aeronautical – within only 10 minutes of Downtown Dallas. It is also convenient to the entire D/FW Metroplex via I-35E, I-20, I-45, I-30, US-67, and Loop 12, and is in close proximity to the International Inland Port of Dallas (IIPOD). In February, 2002, the City of Dallas gave our southern airport a new name and a new direction to reflect its new future serving the corporate and business segment of general aviation. But, the City’s actions did not stop with a new name. We invested $6 million in capital improvements and adopted the 2001 updated master plan. These actions resulted in the designation of industrial, commercial, and aeronautical land uses on the airport grounds, supported by a 20-year Capital Improvement Plan. This will enable the airport to keep up with the growth in aviation demand, which has already resulted in an additional $10 million in private investment. This is a local community asset owned and operated by the City of Dallas that is “here and now” and is not something “dreamed of” for the future. It is available for the citizens and businesses of South Dallas – and all of Dallas -- to develop so that we may create jobs, revenue, job training facilities, and other enriching community benefits. It is up to us to identify businesses here, and in other states, to come to South Dallas and develop this property. We all know people in various states like California, New York, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, and others that are suffering terribly from excessive taxation and government red tape. A single person could make one phone call to a friend

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in one of these states and obtain the names of companies that might consider relocating to Dallas. Besides the excellent facilities, the City of Dallas and the State of Texas have provided numerous economic development incentives for companies to move here and create jobs. Individuals and the community need to work closely with the Dallas Executive Airport officials and the numerous chambers of commerce and and other business organizations which are active in South Dallas to identify businesses for the chambers of commerce to contact and invite to visit our area. A single phone call could mean hundreds of new jobs for South Dallas. The jobs future of South Dallas is in our hands. Let us work together with the local chambers of commerce to develop this tremendous asset available to us now. Let us safeguard these assets from corrupt individuals seeking only their own, dishonest enrichment. Let us encourage new business development within our community. If we act with the best interests of South Dallas, and all of Dallas, in mind, then we will succeed. I have the vision, drive, and experience working as a bridge builder in southern Dallas to help make this a reality for all of us. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: There are several areas that would be good to start in, but I would suggest Pleasant Grove. The name is pleasant enough, and so are the residents. I know from experience working there as a police officer. Although many neighbors there don’t have as much in the way of material things as residents in other parts of Dallas, I met neighbor after neighbor who was just as committed – if not more – to preserving and improving what they do have. There is a lot of pride and love in Pleasant Grove, and its residents deserve the support of District 9 and other Dallas residents to help them rise above the crime and scarcity of economic opportunity to make life better for themselves. Jubilee Park is a good example of the type of revitalization that an urban neighborhood can undergo with the help of donations from private businesses. It is a 62-block neighborhood in South Dallas that I used to patrol as a Dallas Police Officer. I’d like to see that kind of hope and success spread east into Pleasant Grove, and other parts of Dallas. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: You can go on a hike or ride horses in the nation’s largest urban bottomland hardwood forest right here within our city limits. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: A lack of educational programs for poll workers and the public has created conditions which make Dallas one of the prime spots for election fraud in the country. The vast majority of those breaking the election laws do so unwittingly and unintentionally, just “doing things the way they’ve always been done”. Some poll workers depend upon their day as a county employee for “Christmas money”, and the focus is not on ensuring honest elections. Foreign and outside interests could easily co-opt our free elections, and may have already done so. Iraqis emerge from their polling places with smiles and purple thumbs raised high, but do our elections meet international standards? Dallas residents express their concerns to me about electronic voting machines and “institutionalized fraud” involving Dallas elections. On April 9th, I attended an election integrity “boot camp” where a grassroots organization from Harris County taught approximately 100 North Texans how to combat election fraud. I did not see a single member of the Dallas City Council or the Dallas County Commissioners Court present at this well-publicized event. Sadly, we can expect more indictments for election fraud violations before this situation improves. Safeguarding our elections is a non-partisan issue that we must all support and become engaged in. If you are fed up with the way things are going at City Hall, then vote Kirk Launius for Dallas City Council District 9. www.KirkForDallas.com

Dallas City Council, Place 10
Candidates (choose 1):
Jerry R. Allen
Biographical Info:

Description: Note: Only Dallas residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Name: Jerry Allen Street Address: 9426 Dartcrest City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: 9/4/1949

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Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 9729225775 Home Phone Number: 2143497518 Mobile Phone Number: 9729225775 Fax Number: 2146701843 E-mail Address: allens9426@sbcglobal.net Campaign Web Site Address: NA
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 61 years Q: Length of residency in the district A: 46 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: City of Dallas Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Trustee Dallas Police/Fire Pension Plan, ARC of Dallas Ambassador, Local School Council Merriman Park Elementary, Local School Council Forest Lane Academy Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: DART Board, Treasurer RISD Tomorrow Foundation, President and Treasurer Exchange Club of Lake Highlands, Founding Director Wild For Cats, Emergency Preparedness Planning Council Q: Education A: North Texas University, BS, Banking and Finance, Bank Administration Institute of Banking, University of Wisconsin Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Dallas City Council, District 10 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $25,000 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Jim and Kathy Adams, Alan and Joan Walne, Urban Rural Community Conservation PAC Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: 1)Never arrested 2)As a Councilman I have been named in suits along with the city. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I am running for office to improve the quality of life of the citizens in my district and the citizens of Dallas. My 35 plus years in banking have given me a broad-based business background and my years of community service have given me the passion to pursue the very best for all citizens. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1)Continue support for public safety by making sure there is no net reduction in staff and our officers have all needed resources to do their job. This will continue to be paid for out of the normal operating budget. 2)Promote economic development by "selling" all of the positive attributes of Dallas. Dallas has so much to offer and our positive story must be told loudly and clearly across America and the rest of the world to attract new businesses and families, particularity to our southern sector. While it does not cost a dime to clap, the city must continue to partner with all like minded groups to promote Dallas. 3)Eliminate predatory lending. There is groundswell in the court of public opinion that states we can no longer turn our backs for fair lending practices for those that are asset poor. We will plus for reform by working with the Bank on Dallas program and lobbying Austin for meaningful reform for Consumer Service Organizations. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: Experience and proven track record. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: I voted against the tax hike. The wish list will always be greater than incoming revenues. It is very important that the citizens make their voices heard about what should or should not be on the wish list. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now?

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A: Staffing levels appear adequate. Attrition must be offset by new officers. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: NO Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: 1)Right of Way maintenance ($6,411,629). The city took this over from TXDOT and funded this maintenance by the tax increase. The city received nothing in return from TXDOT. Make TXDOT accountable. 2)Park mowing ($2,020,000). Part of the tax increase went to increase the number of mowing cycles of our parks. Until revenues come back up, reduce the number of mowing cycles. 3)With the tax increase, the city opened 16 of the 21 city pools with no regard to attendance. Pools are very expensive to maintain. Attendance levels continue to drop. We need to find better uses for the limited amount of park funds. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: The Trinity Trust works hand in hand with the city manager. Now that we appear to have received a breather on the levees the Trust is back out fund raising and will help prioritize projects. The citizens of Dallas have spoken and said to go forward with the toll road. With the current conditions in Washington, funding will be an issue. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: Economic development is about attitude. We must be smart about development while having our best foot forward to attract developers. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Our water department is nationally recognized as one of the best of any city in the U.S. Our permit and licensing department needs improvement. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: While Dallas did not reflect sharp growth, the over all metropolitan area did. Dallas is the heart beat of the metropolitan area. Growth in the over all metropolitan area is expected to be robust as it will also be in Dallas, particularity in light of the vast amount of vacant land in the southern sector. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: Density is expected in metropolitan areas. A solid transportation system built around neighborhoods that will embrace the concept of live, work and play is the future. The city must promote this concept and take the lead role to help create this environment. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: I believe the city is doing a good job in revitalizing downtown. To some degree these efforts might not be completely visible right this moment but the seeds are taking hold. Downtown Dallas Inc. is a great partner with the city. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: This is much bigger than a city issue. In the end this must be addressed by the federal government. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: I beleive the most important aspect for success in the southern sector is a business friendly attitude. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I agree Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: Where should we start? Answer: Forest Lane and Audelia. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas

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residents knew? A: What a truly giving city we have. When there is a need the citizens will reach in their pockets and in addition give of their time. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: We have a large number of our neighbors that are being charged 300% plus interest by predatory lenders under the veil of Consumer Service Organizations. It is shameful to say that it is OK for CSO's to charge our citizens 300% plus interest and it is even more shameful to hide behind the fairy tale that there is not a better way to help these neighbors. We are better than that. Dallas is better than that. Cynthia J. Durbin
Biographical Info:

Name: Cynthia Durbin Street Address: 8436 Birchcroft Drive City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: 11/26/1940 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-348-8612 Home Phone Number: 214-348-8612 E-mail Address: durbinuscg@hotmail.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.CynthiaDurbin.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 44 years Q: Length of residency in the district A: 44 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Retired Teaching - retirement benefits Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Volunteer: 1) Stults Road Neighborhood Group;2) Hamilton Park Elementary School,RISD;3) Girl Scouts of America;4) Sierra Club;5) Dallas International Film Festival;6) DMA;7) MADI Museum;8) Modern Museum of Fort Worth;9) Kimble Art Museum;10) Fort Worth Museum of Science & History;11) South Dallas Cultura Center;12) Lone Star Film Society;13) YMCA;14) Emeritus Program, Richard College, RISD Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: 1) Stults Road PTA Board - Pre-School, Program and Legislative Chairs 2) Northaven Methodist Church - Administrative Board and Mission Commission 3) City of Dallas Department of Planning and Urban Development - (Highlands Area Neighborhood Design Citizen's Committee) - one of 8 members helping city departments to develop a plan for a Dallas community (Lake Highlands) of 10,000 people 4) Stults Road Community Organization Board - Zoning Chair 5) League of Women Voters - US Congress Committee, Local Boards and Commissions Committee Q: Education A: BS Degree, UTHSCD, Medical Technology - Chemistry, Biology BA Degree, UTD Psychology, Biology Teaching Certifications - UTD - Biology, Composite Science, Psychology - NTU - Vocational Education - Health Professions MA of Teaching in Science Education, UTD -Geology, Biology MS in Geosciences, UTD - course work and field work completed except for Thesis Oil Institute, University of Houston Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $500 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: 1)Kay deWitt - Retired, Telecommunications 2)Frank P.Hernandez - Chairman of the board, Vista Film Festival 3)John Wellik - Senior Vice President, Finance - United Surgical Partners Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: Yes. The longest running Federal Class Action Case for Minorities and Women in the State of Texas: we won the case. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I'm running for the District 10 office: 1) To preserve established neighborhoods which

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are threatened from outside spot zoning 2) To protect the environment of District 10, especially, the White Rock Water Shed into which all of the creeks of District 10 feed into 3) To maintain safe neighborhoods. I am most qualified due to my Education, my experience with the City of Dallas, my 28 years of Law Enforcement experience, both local and Federal, my civic involvement and activism and my passion for good government. My experience with the City of Dallas - Department of Planning and Urban Development Highlands Area Neighborhood Design Citizen's Committee best prepares me to serve in this post. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: I would: 1)investigate a similar Task Force to former Eric Johnson's Goals for Dallas, emphasizing preservation of intact neighborhoods; 2)join Angela Hunt's proposed Task Force to investigate gas drilling within the Dallas City limits; 3) review the investment practices of the Dallas Pension Plans with the goal of retuning to conservative investment practices to insure that all employees have adequate retirement benefits. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: 1)I have extended experience as an activist in getting tangible projects for my District 10: Forest Green Library, extension of Royal Lane, a park, and a bus line through Hamilton Park and Stults Road neighborhoods.Jerry Allen showed his disregard for our neighborhood in a recent zoning case #Z090-221(WE). 2)I've been a Dallas Police Officer and a USCG Federal Law Enforcement Officer, giving me insight into local and corporate crime. Jerry Allen does not have the experience. 3)I've been decorated in the Desert Shield/Desert Storm War for balancing the budget of the logistics unit first in the nation. Jerry Allen is a banker but I showed leadership under tight time restraints. During my tenure at UTD as project supervisor for science tutoring, my program, The Academic Bridge Program, won the Tech Titan Award, sponsored by the Metroplex Technology Business Council consisting of over 50 tech companies. The award was for $10,000 in addition to funds for a computer lab for the program.Most of our students come from the DISD. DISD is one of our greatest assets in Dallas and my experience in academia and education is an asset to the governance of Dallas. Jerry Allen has not had this experience. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: During these hard economic times at all levels of government I would concentrate the budget of Dallas on needed City Services such as streets, police, fire and health rather than on big ticket items such as tax supported sports arenas, World Class bridges, unsafe levee toll roads and hotels. Then most of the residents would get sufficient bang for their tax buck. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: Perhaps Dallas could start a program to recruit many, many more reserve police officers and when economic conditions are better new police officers could be recruited from this pool of highly trained reserve officers. The slowing of hires should continue with increment increases as economic conditions improve. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: I would be for taxes targeted to basic services such as health, safety, and transportation. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: I would reduce spending for tax supported toll roads, contracted out commercial endeavors, overly priced public works and fancy bridges. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: Improvement of parks in the flood plains of the levee system should be prioritized and access to those parks via small roadways, NOT toll roads. Funds should be raised with bond issues. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: The Mayor and Council in order to spur economic development and grow the tax base should consider renovating abandoned commericial properties to buffer in tact neighborhoods. These neighborhooh commercial intities would raise the tax base and

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provide much needed retail needs, as well as, supporting art districts like Downtown, Uptown, East Village, West End, Bishop Art District, and Fair Park presently do for their neighborhood. The City Council could help these commercial and art districts to find outside and private funding. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Dallas excells in police,fire, and the arts; Dallas needs improvement in street maintence, health and creek stablization. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: I see it as good for Dallas residents. Resident will be able to take a breath and nurture the people now living in the city with the resources we have. The surrounding metroplex brings lots of money into the city attracted by the arts, sports and the vitality of the city. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: Density is fine and good for those parts of the city where young professionals are moving into Downtown and Uptown, settling into refurbished old commercial buildings, new apartment buildings and condos. Older established and affordable neighborhoods should not be torn down and invaded by commercial box interests. The city has too few affordable housing units for young families which could generate a future tax base. We don’t want to be left with a city full of abandoned commercial businesses and no people. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: Perhaps, City Council could find block grants to help finance small businesses which are for every day life, such as , cleaners, drug stores, flower shops, small specialty restaurants, newsstands, coffee shops. organic food markets, etc. These could be modeled after the small shops on the streets and sidewalks of New York City where in Manhattan it almost feels like a small town. People would enjoy walking and eating outside. The Dallas Architecture Center recently had a program on this very thing. Small businesses should be geared to neighborhood living and to walking the downtown streets - eating, movies, music and not just shopping. The Architecture Center plan would have these businesses no more than 2 blocks from living spaces. Main Street in Dallas has already started this process but many of the businesses are hotels and night clubs more for out of town visiters rather than for everyday living within a neighborhood. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: City and police should concentrate on enforcing the laws which punish corporate businesses for illegally hiring illegal immigrants. People throughout history and through out the world go where there is work, at any cost. Stop it where it begins. All of our ancestors came to this country for that reason. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: Fair Park, Dart, and the South Dallas renewable housing are a good start for improving the quality of life in the southern sector ,as well as, art districts and the Oak Cliff Cultural Center. Efforts could be made with the adjoining cities, Duncanville, Desota, Landcaster, etc., to have cross cultural ties. The southern Inland Port Plans should be stepped up to provide jobs. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I think this is an excellent idea, as long as, the established neighborhoods get input and transparent feedback to the economic development. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: I would design the effort around former mayor Eric Johnson's Goals for Dallas. We should start with South Dallas, Pleasant Grove and East Dallas. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: The South Dallas Cultural Center and Latino Cultural Center are way under publicized. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: The lack of transparency of planned projects until they are already off the ground or

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funded is the uncomfortable truth voters must confront.

Dallas City Council, Place 12
Candidates (choose 1):
Sandy Greyson

Description: Note: Only Dallas residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Biographical Info:

Name: Sandy Greyson Street Address: 7238 Heathermore Drive City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: January 28, 1946 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: n/a Home Phone Number: n/a Mobile Phone Number: n/a Fax Number: n/a E-mail Address: sandy@sandygreyson.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.sandygreyson.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 31 years, 3 months Q: Length of residency in the district A: 31 years, 3 months Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Community Volunteer Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: President of the League of Women Voters of Dallas, 2009-2011 Vice chair of the board of the (JFK) Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, 2009-2011 Vice president of the Domestic Violence Legal Help Center, 2010-2011 Board member of Save Open Space, 2009-present Monthly columnist for the Far North Dallas Advocate Magazine, 2008-2011 Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Dallas City Councilmember, District 12, 1997-2005 Chair, Transportation and Telecommunications Committee, 2001-2005 Chair, Legislative Affairs Committee, 1999-2001 Vice Chair, Trinity River Committee, 2002-2005 Member, Public Safety Committee, 1997-2005 Chair, City of Dallas Domestic Violence Task Force, 1998-2004 Dallas Representative, Regional Transportation Council of the North Central Texas Council of Governments, 1996-2005, and Chair, Mobility Plan Implementation Committee Vice Chair, Dallas Regional Mobility Coalition, 2002-2005 Treasurer, TEX-21 (Transportation Excellence for the 21st Century), 2002-2005 Chair, Transportation Infrastructure and Services Steering Committee, National League of Cities, 2003 Chair, National League of Cities Task Force on TEA-21 (federal transportation funding bill) Reauthorization, 2001-2002 Board Member, Association of Metropolitan Planning Organizations, 2002-2003 Board Member, North Dallas Chamber of Commerce, 1993-1996, 2002-2005 Member, Leadership Dallas, Class of 1995 Board Member, Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) 1991-1996 Member, City of Dallas Civil Service Board Adjunct Panel, 1989-1991 Member, City of Dallas Zoning Ordinance Advisory Committee, 1988-1996 President, North Dallas Neighborhood Alliance (umbrella organization of HOAs in Far North Dallas), 1991-1996 Co-Founder, Prestonwood East Homeowners Association, 1986; President, 1989-1990 Q: Education A: University of Illinois, 1964-1966 Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Dallas City Councilmember, District 12, 4 terms from 1997-2005 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Around $20,000 in 2 weeks

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Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Max & Margaret Wells, Marvin & Joan Lane, Dallas Police & Fire PACs Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: Auto accident, 1993, settled. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I served as the Dallas City Councilmember for District 12 from 1997-2005. I've received many, many requests to run again from people who believe I know the district and the city well and can significantly contribute to successful solutions to our serious issues. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1. Make sure the levees are repaired to the Corps satisfaction. Ensure repairs to pumps and sumps along the river are done expeditiously. The large majority of the 2012 bond program funds should be devoted to pump and sump repairs. 2. Hold the line on tax increases. Provide services within our means. 3. Examine regional transportation funding to see if funds for the eastern part of the region have instead gone to the western part of the region and, if so, why. Work on transportation congestion relief and reliability so businesses can move their goods and people can get to work. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I am the best choice because I've worked for 25 years for the betterment of District 12 and the City of Dallas. I know the district well and have worked with neighborhoods all across Far North Dallas on their issues. I have been a leader on transportation issues. I strongly believe that candidates for city council should show a commitment to their community before they run for council. My opponents have not done any work on behalf of the district. Experience counts--I have it and my opponents do not. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: Dallas residents are not getting sufficient bang for their tax bucks. This is especially apparent to District 12 residents. We are surrounded by suburban cities on three sides and see our suburban neighbors enjoy beautifully maintained parks and medians, good streets, good code enforcement, and a focus on excellent quality of life. It's easy for our residents to vote with their feet and move one mile to the north, east, or west, and get this good quality of life. Dallas needs to make neighborhood improvement a priority. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: It's always best to have more police officers, but Dallas can use the officers it has in more efficient ways. The new community policing efforts now underway are an example of this and a good use of resources. The chief has said he can be successful with the officers he now has. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No, I would not. Our tax rate is already too high compared to our surrounding cities, many of whom manage to provide superior services with a lower tax rate. We can scrutinize our provision of services for cost efficiencies and prioritize services. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: 1. Around 1/3 of the city budget goes to debt service. Although the city's bond rating is still excellent, we need to be careful about incurring a lot more debt. Debt service payments reduce the amount of funds available for the operating budget. The 2012 bond program needs to be devoted mainly to sump and pump repairs along the river. 2. Don't build new facilities that the city doesn't have the money to operate and maintain. Don't send courtesy reminders about parking or other tickets--in some instances, people receive these notices even after they've already paid. 3. It is penny wise and pound foolish to reduce civilian employees in the police and fire departments and then have highly trained officers sit at desks doing paperwork. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: The Trinity Project was sold to voters first and foremost as a flood control project, so repair of levees, sumps and pumps must be the first priority, funded by the 2012 bond

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program. After flood control components are addressed, the lakes and downtown park elements can be looked at next as their costs are small relative to the overall cost of the Project. However, nothing should be started unless and until funding is identified and available for maintenance. The Park Department will be responsible for maintenance and that department is chronically underfunded. Maintenance of community and neighborhood parks should not be sacrificed to maintain Trinity elements. There is no funding available for the Trinity toll road and there won't be any for many, many years. The Corps has never committed to the road in writing and keeps changing the standards under which it could be built. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: Make neighborhoods places where families want to live, with quality services and amenities. Even when companies relocate here, their employees aren't choosing to live in Dallas, as evidenced by census figures showing the city of Dallas grew by only 9500 people during the last decade. A poorly regarded DISD plays a big role in decisions by families to move to the suburbs. District 12's population grew in the last decade and that's partly because of suburban type development here and partly because of our quality ISDs-Richardson, Plano, and Carollton-Farmers Branch. Dallas is a distribution and transportation hub. The city needs to refocus on the inland port as an excellent opportunity to provide good-paying jobs and grow the city's tax base. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Dallas excels in picking up the garbage and that's no small thing--people really care if their garbage gets picked up on time. Bulk trash pickup is a different story--that needs improvement. Trash sits out for 1 to 2 weeks, blocking sidewalks and making neighborhoods look unsightly for half the month. Code enforcement needs improvement. Over the years, code enforcement policy swings from proactive (inspectors authorized to actively seek out violators) to reactive (inspectors responding only to complaints from citizens) and back again. Suburban cities have much stronger code enforcement and their cities look a lot better for it. That makes people want to live there. Pothold repairs should be grouped together by area so that repair crews aren't fixing some and leaving others while crisscrossing the city responding to complaints in different areas. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: I've referred to this in previous answers--if Dallas wants to attract more residents, they need to beef up their quality of life services, have better schools, and provide a range of attractive, affordable housing types. Families with young children generally don't want to live in densely developed housing if they have a choice. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: Density works in some areas of the city such as downtown and Uptown. Transit oriented developments (TODs) are a good idea along rail lines as their density makes them work in those locations. However, those developments usually attract young singles and empty nesters, not families. As noted above, young families want more room, and opportunities need to be available to them for reasonably priced single-family housing that's close to public transportation. Unfortunately, DART bus routes with their long wait times and limited transfer opportunities are not user friendly. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: The one action that would immediately jumpstart downtown Dallas is to bring the stores up out of the tunnels. That would get people walking up and down the streets. The streetscapes need to be attractive. That can be done fairly inexpensively with colorful awnings (which would also provide shade) and more greenery. There aren't enough convenient places to eat downtown. The city also needs to encourage food cart vendors, who would add life to our streets. The streetcar plan needs to be implemented so that people can get around downtown easily. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: They should adopt Irving's and Carrollton's approach. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives?

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A: The single greatest benefit to the southern sector would be for the city to make the inland port a priority as the recession ebbs and the economy picks up again. As the city council's transportation chair, I brought the port project to the council in 2004--the council moved agressively on it and attracted a developer. The city and county then later slowed that project down at a critical time in its development and the port suffered. Then the recession began. If elected, I would make the inland port a priority again. Once activity picks up there, more warehouse and distribution development would occur, attracting good jobs and then housing. Housing attracts retail, the tax base grows and more money is available to improve quality of life. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: Public/private development corporations usually want the power of eminent domain, which frightens current property owners. If such a corporation could be structured without that power, it would be more readily accepted. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: The City Design Studio is a public-private partnership focused on planning and development along the Trinity. Unless private dollars step up to provide funding, the city doesn't have the money right now to finance any expansion of this effort to other parts of the city. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: One of the best things to see in Dallas is the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza. To change the question slightly, non-Dallas residents come to the Museum by the hundreds of thousands every year (it's the second most visited site in Texas), but Dallas residents don't come. They are missing a profound and moving experience. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: The uncomfortable truth is that hardly anyone votes in municipal elections. Turnout averages around 7% and that means most people in the city allow a relative handful of others to make the decisions about who governs their everyday lives. Donna Starnes

Biographical Info:

Name: Donna J. Starnes Street Address: 17106 Wester Way Place City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: 10/05/1951 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-535-6201 Home Phone Number: 972-250-1119 Mobile Phone Number: 214-535-6201 Fax Number: 972-250-1123 E-mail Address: donna@donnastarnesforcitycouncil.com Campaign Web Site Address: http://www.donnafordallas.com/
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 20 years Q: Length of residency in the district A: 20 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: CPA, Financial Planner (CFP) Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Treasurer Highland’s of McKamy Homeowner’s Association, Deputy voter registrar, Military Order of the World Wars. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Election volunteer, organized candidate forums and seminars to educate voters about the functions of local office holders and important issues. Volunteer: Highland’s of McKamy

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Homeowner’s Association, Dallas Public Library, Dallas Museum of Art, Participant and mentor - Leukemia and Lymphoma Society marathons, Professional Society Associations have included: President Institute of Internal Auditors - Dallas Chapter, Texas Society of CPA’s – Dallas Chapter. Junior Achievement Instructor, American Institute of Individual Investors – Dallas Chapter. Q: Education A: Rice University: BA in Economics, SMU: Executive MBA Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Individuals interested in my campaign finance reports can view them on The City of Dallas Campaign Finance Filing System which can be located in the City Secretary’s section on the City of Dallas’ web site. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Individuals interested in my campaign finance reports can view them on The City of Dallas Campaign Finance Filing System which can be located in the City Secretary’s section on the City of Dallas’ web site. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No arrests or involvement in criminal proceeds. I was an auxiliary party to a suit over unpaid property taxes by the purchaser of land from a family trust (I was a party because of my position as one of the trustees of the trust.) Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I am running because I am concerned about the critical financial situation that Dallas is facing with uncertain property tax revenues and rising debt. Also, the state and Federal government are cutting back and that will have a cascading effect on the City of Dallas’ budget. This critical situation calls for someone with business and financial acumen. I am a CPA and CFP (Certified Financial Planner) with 26 years of financial and executive experience. I’d like to put my experience to work. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: I would read the 650-page budget document from top to bottom and discuss in depth with council members and city staff ways to streamline and trim the budget. In order to fund essential services, we can increase revenue to the City by growing the tax base. That can be accomplished by keeping taxes low, keeping crime low and aggressively recruiting new businesses to move to Dallas that create the jobs our citizens want. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I running because I love my community, I am proud to live in Dallas and am concerned about the city’s current fiscal environment. Because I hold the unique professional qualifications and credentials of CPA and financial planner (CFP), including 26 years of executive financial experience, I have the know how to help meet the fiscal challenges we will face. I have the ability, the determination and the independent perspective to make the fiscally responsible decisions required to affect real change. As a successful CPA I preached fiscal responsibility and practiced this philosophy in my own life which has allowed me to retire. Therefore, I will be a full time Councilperson with the ability to dedicate all of my time toward service to the City. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: I think the City does several things well. We have great public safety and we have 24-hour pothole repair. Also the Council has made strides in saving money, while providing essential services. For instance, the change to once-a-week garbage and recycling pick-up combined with new waste management GPS technology is saving the City millions. In short, we can do more with less through ingenuity and applying basic business practices to our city services. I will bring my 26 years in financial consulting and accounting to help departments find new ways to become more efficient and give the taxpayers more bang for their buck. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: Low crime is one of the most critical elements for attracting businesses, creating jobs and attracting qualified employees. As a result this is a crucial expense in the budget. We

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need to make sure that the police and fire departments have the technology and equipment they need. However, at this critical financial juncture, we need to make sure that every department is thoroughly reviewed for efficiency and streamlining, including the police department. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: Absolutely not. The key to future growth is to make Dallas an attractive home for businesses, their employees and families. Low taxes are an essential part of that attraction. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: Debt costs – Review for reduction in interest costs through refinancing, Review of employee and retiree benefits in line with competitive private business alternatives, and review all city administrative expenses through management span of control metrics. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: Beyond flood control, the main reason voters passed the original bond was to create the recreational features. And progress has been made. The Trinity River Audubon Center is open, the white water rapids features are near completion and I have reports that kayak enthusiasts are already using this feature even before it is open. We need to continue with the promise the City made to voters to continue to develop the recreation features. I believe this is an investment that will draw people from all over the region and country to Dallas and will help expand our tax base. The Trinity River Project has the potential to be a catalyst for growth in the region for the next several decades. The most controversial aspect is, of course, the Trinity tollroad. The City had an election in 2007 and the voters voted to move forward with the tollroad. I am concerned with the ever-growing price tag attached to this project and how it may impact the City’s overall budget and our ability to provide quality essential services. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: As the Panama Canal is widened over the next several years, the Inland Port should gain in activity from the distribution route through the Houston ship channel. We should promote that activity in our city. Also we should continually work to create sensible regulations and zoning for new businesses and encourage business-friendly policies by all city employees. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Crime has decreased dramatically over the last 10 years. We need to refine our techniques and reevaluate what works best and what can be scrapped or needs to be emphasized. There is room for improvement in street services, including paving roads and upgrading neighborhood curbing in some cases. Also, I believe we need to take a look at library and recreation center services and make sure we are providing the services needed by the local community and possibly look for ways to re-align the services that go beyond basic requirements or needs. Currently, libraries, for example, provide many valuable services to the community, such as a learning and job resource, a recreation outlet and as a safe place for children to go after school. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: Fiscal restraint is the best way to attract businesses, create jobs and grow the tax base. Fiscal restraint facilitates lower taxes over time. Good schools and low crime also are key determinants. Although schools are not in the purview of the city of Dallas, I think all community and business leaders should get involved in helping to improve Dallas schools. Margaret Spelling, former Secretary of Education spoke recently at SMU, encouraging business leaders to get involved in Dallas schools, “get smart on the metrics from the No Child Left Behind Program” and ask critical questions. I think we need to make some radical changes, because what we are doing now isn’t working. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: As evident in the recent 2010 census, much of the growth in the metroplex has occurred outside the City of Dallas. However, looking forward we know that there is only so far that we can grow out and with the estimated population growth Dallas will experience greater

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levels of density. I don’t agree with the notion that there is a “right” level of density that we can apply throughout the City. We have seen successful mixed-use developments such as Mockingbird Station, the Knox-Henderson area, Turtle Creek and Uptown. Each is unique in its own regard and offers different residential and commercial opportunities. As we find areas of future opportunities to create mixed-use, high-density development we must also be cognizant of the impact that such development may have on adjacent singlefamily neighborhoods. Recently, the City of Dallas successfully approved the single largest rezoning case in City history along the Bishop-Davis corridor in Oak Cliff. The purpose of this rezoning was to remove barriers, such as parking requirements, height limitation and slope requirements, in order to encourage dense, mixed-use development. Through a series of neighborhood town halls, input was gathered from the home owners, developers, City planners and other stakeholders as a means to develop a plan that would encourage development and satisfy concerns of the adjacent homeowners. The product of this effort created 8 subsections, all with varying degrees of zoning regulations. This process is a good example of how “one shoe does not fit all” and can be a model for obtaining feedback and compromise from all the stakeholders involved. Where it make sense, encouraging density through lowering barriers will allow the City to grow its tax base and fund essential City services while keeping taxes low. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: The convention center and the convention center hotel have had or are projected to have great success and are near the Arts District and downtown entertainment. I would encourage civic, business and academic leaders to take advantage of this convergence to promote the downtown. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: I would encourage the city to investigate how we could promote the use of e-verify to deter people that are not U.S. citizens from entering Dallas in the first place. Police should be flexible with policies, so as not to impede the arrest of criminals, but should work with Federal authorities in identifying the citizenship of apprehended criminal suspects. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: For Dallas to grow and be prosperous, all of Dallas needs to work towards maintaining and/or improving the quality for life for our citizens. Before proposing initiatives for South Dallas, I would consult with the Council Members who represent those areas to determine the needs of their constituents and how we might all work together to achieve sensible policies that benefit South Dallas. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I favor any effort to bring stakeholders together to help move our City forward. The City can be a partner in listening to the needs of businesses when it comes to zoning, permitting and regulations and how the City might remove barriers for growth and development in South Dallas. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: I certainly hope the City Design Studio proves to be one of the catalysts that encourage growth and development in West Dallas. Before we start replicating initiatives and programs in other parts of the City, we should first evaluate the efficacy of this program. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: There is a strong arts district with a full range of cultural activity, all within a few blocks. I hope the new pedestrian park that will link Uptown to the Arts District will encourage more use of our arts venues and encourage private business to create more restaurant and retail amenities surrounding the Art District. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: The city of Dallas is facing a large budget shortfall over the next several years, because of declining revenues due to cutbacks at the state and Federal government and because of a less robust economy. The city leaders will need to make uncomfortably sharp cuts in expenses, because increasing tax rates would be counterproductive to the growth of our city in terms of encouraging new business. We need to make tough business decisions, combined with an eye to keeping the quality of life in our beautiful Dallas neighborhoods. That’s where my executive experience as a CPA and Financial Planner, along with my balanced outlook for current and future taxpayers will benefit our fine city.

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Dallas City Council, Place 13
Candidates (choose 1):
Ann Margolin

Description: Note: Only Dallas residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Biographical Info:

Name: Ann Margolin Street Address: 1500 Marilla St. 5FS City/Town: Dallas State: TX Date of Birth: 8-27-52 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-696-4591 Home Phone Number: 214-696-4591 Mobile Phone Number: 214-212-1121 Fax Number: 214-696-4591 E-mail Address: annmargolin@gmail.com Campaign Web Site Address: annmargolin.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 33 years Q: Length of residency in the district A: 28 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Spouse's income and investments that I actively manage. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Dallas City Council Advisory Boards: Safer Dallas Better Dallas - supports the police; DOORS Prison Reentry Program; The Chiapas Project (microfinance); Girls Inc. – after school programs for low income girls; Dallas Women’s Foundation Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Park and Recreation Board; Planning and Zoning Commission; North Dallas Chamber of Commerce board; YWCA board; Girls Inc. board president; The Chiapas Project board chairman; Martin Luther King Center board; Parkland Hospital Board Chair Temple EmanuEl sustaining campaign co-chair Member, Town North YMCA Q: Education A: MBA: Columbia University; BS and MA: Northwestern University, Communication Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $149,000 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: I have received the maximum contribution of $1000 from 55 individuals Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: MBA: Columbia University BS and MA: Northwestern University, Communication Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I want to continue to work on issues that are important to the future of District 13 and Dallas: Strong, safe neighborhoods: - Continuing to bring down crime: I support the police chief and commend him for innovative programs and use of technology to substantially reduce crime. Crime was down 10.2% last year and is running at a 15% further reduction so far this year. - I support District 13’s crime watch groups and neighborhood associations and meet with the leaders of these groups on a quarterly basis.

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- I am working with neighborhoods to access city services such as code enforcement, sanitation and streets. Fiscal Responsibility: I believe that the most important issue that Dallas faces in the next few years is balancing our quality-of-life, public safety and infrastructure needs with a budget that is increasing due to public safety commitments and increasing debt service caused by the $1.3billion bond package. We absolutely must find ways to reduce expenses, and look carefully at which services are necessary and which are optional or can be scaled back. We must also examine how services are performed, continuing to streamline for increased service and decreased cost. Given that we have limited resources, it is important to make spending decisions based, in part, on usage of amenities. I would like to work toward a park and recreation system that has fewer but better facilities that are accessible to more people rather than the current system of many facilities, some of which have low usage. Economic Development: I want the city to grow its tax base. I believe that the city needs a more targeted economic development plan. It is good that we respond to opportunities for business relocations or for development projects and assist in seeing them through. But we do not have a true strategic economic development plan in place that targets certain industries and offers tactics for implementation. I will work toward a clearer, more defined and targeted economic development plan. I would like to see emphasis on Southern Sector development and believe we have an excellent opportunity to develop the Inland Port and the area surrounding the University of North Texas Dallas Campus in southern Dallas. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: The actions I would take would not cost new money. I have detailed them in the responses above. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I am focused on issues related to District 13 and the City of Dallas. I have relevant civic and business experience. My opponent is focused on federal issues such as abolishing the IRS and the Federal Reserve Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: Dallas is in a difficult position because, as the major city in the region, we pay for amenities for the entire region. We are funding the Arts District and the Trinity levees which are regional in nature. We fund Fair Park, the Dallas Zoo (through our commitment of $15 million annually to the privatized zoo) and the convention center. We have an aging infrastructure that must be maintained. The simple answer is “no,” residents do not get sufficient bang for their tax buck. My solution is to carefully prioritize and monitor the investments we make in the future of the city so that we are not squeezing out operating dollars with debt service. We should not be paying for TxDOT’s maintenance of highway right-of-way to the tune of $6.5 million per year. There are parcels of park property that can be sold to help fund a better park and rec system (particularly a parcel in Rockwall worth about $20 million). We are looking at privatizing the Farmer’s Market. There are savings being realized (and more are coming) through reorganizing our auto fleet management system. It is critical that we keep our tax rate as low as possible so that we do not discourage businesses and individuals from moving to Dallas. While there will always be those who want to live in the city, there are many for whom the tax rate is a deciding factor. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: For the time being, I would agree that we can keep our force at the current size. The city has added about 750 officers in the past 5 years. In addition, new ways of fighting crime have evolved. For example, 50% of crime comes from 27 areas so additional resources have gone into those areas. The Mandatory Crime Reduction initiative targets high crime apartment complexes and requires that they improve such things as tenant background checks, lighting, and code violations in order to bring down crime. This spring the police are targeting 5 high crime areas. Police are using new predictive model called GEOFORCE to identify neighborhoods with high levels of gang and drug activity. The Fusion Center takes intelligence from all over the country to solve local crime. As a result, crime has come down 36% in the last 7 years. Chief Brown is involving more citizens through his iWatchDallas program that uses citizen tips to fight and solve crime. According to Chief Brown we need time to season all of the new officers that have recently been hired. If he is comfortable, I would agree that we can keep our force at the current size. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an

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additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: After the 6.5% increase we had last year, I would not support another increase this year. Assuming the state does not take city revenue, we should be able to manage within our current projected revenues and will not need a tax increase. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: I would like to see us slow down on the sale of the 2006 bonds particularly for projects that will incur additional operating expenses. Every time we sell bonds we increase debt service and this competes for the same dollars that go to operate parks and libraries. I would like to see us slow down these new projects until the economy turns around. We are spending $6.5 million to care for TxDOT righ-of-way. I would eliminate this spending. Recreation Centers and Swimming Pools: I believe that these should be open in accord with usage. If they are not used by many people and there is another facility nearby they should be closed. We cannot keep everything open if it is underutilized. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: I believe that the Trinity Project is a very long-term project that will come to fruition over a long period of time. Our first priority is to get the levees fixed. After that the next priority would be the park and the lakes. If these are possible with federal funds and private donations we should move ahead assuming that we can pay for maintenance and security. As we come to each new bond package we should weigh the Trinity Project against other priorities to see what belongs in that bond program. We have many priorities and many needs. This is important but will have to be weighed against everything else. The possibility of building the road is becoming more doubtful due to lack of federal and state funding. If the toll road can be funded using already allocated city funds along with federal, state and toll funds, I would be open to it -- although it is not ideal. We need a way to offload traffic from I35 and owning the land for the road makes it more feasible than acquiring land elsewhere. I would prefer a regional approach that would build a loop around Dallas instead of through Dallas. We will not know whether the Army Corps of Engineers will approve this for another 3 years or so. Then funding must be found. Since this is a regional traffic problem, I believe that the funding has to come from state and federal funds which barely exist right now. I would say the odds of this road being built are very low. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: I partly responded to this question above when asked “Why are you running for this office” above. In addition: I would like to see more focus on smaller businesses. I continue to hear that our permitting processes are onerous and expensive. We have always treated these as “enterprise funds” meaning that the fees pay for the total cost of the services provided. This does not make sense if it means that our fees have to be higher than surrounding cities in order to pay the cost of the service. It does not make sense if it means that we take longer than surrounding cities. We have to look at this as a competitive market, reduce red tape and, if called for, reduce fees. Other ways to spur small business can be found in reducing unnecessary regulations such as our ban on food trucks in the Central Business District. The recently approved West Dallas Plan proponents want to see West Dallas become an “Urban Innovation Zone” that would allow that area to experiment with innovative land uses and expedited permitting. We need to look at the ways in which we slow or harm business growth. I support the Greater Dallas Chamber’s goal of increasing the flow of venture capital to Dallas. We have a great number of tech-oriented startups that cannot get local funding. Venture capital is more plentiful in other cities and I am supporting the chamber in making it more available in Dallas. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Our water is cheap, plentiful and reliable. We have secured sufficient supplies for 30 years. Our bulk trash pickup is included in the monthly $20 sanitation fee which is a great bargain. We could improve in the evenness with which our code is enforced. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: This is a problem. I believe that much of our problem stems from the quality of our schools. Those moving to the region can enjoy our amenities while living in the suburbs and sending their children to better suburban schools. Where possible, we need to work with DISD to continue to improve education. In addition, we need to continue to make

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Dallas an attractive place to live by implementing desirable amenities that enhance quality of life such as our trails, our bicycle plan, and encouraging a variety of living options – single-family, mixed use, transit-oriented, urban. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: There is no single level of density that is right. We must have options. I believe that a dense core is good and that density around transit stations is good to reduce reliance on automobiles. The city receives funding from the federal government each year to incentivize development, particularly low and moderate income housing. It is appropriate to use that funding to encourage development in the areas where density is desirable. We also have several land use plans – West Dallas, Downtown, the Stemmons Corridor – that serve as guidelines for future zoning. The Forward Dallas Plan is also a guide. We must continue to refer to these plans as we determine where to use our federal funds and other economic incentives. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: The recent Downtown Dallas 360 study (http://dallascityhall.com/council_briefings /briefings0211/Downtown360Plan_021611.pdf) shows graphically how creating “active street frontages” in the form of kiosks, newsstands, food stands and other sidewalk activity leads to a more vibrant street life. The zoning and permitting process should be changed to allow these businesses to function on our downtown streets as they do so successfully in other cities. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: It is first and foremost the responsibility of the federal government to protect our borders and address the problem of illegal immigration. In the absence of that we must address this at the local level with the assistance of the feds. Our current practice is that once someone is arrested and brought to the jail, ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) provides personnel who determine the legal status of the person who was arrested. If ICE determines that the individual is here illegally they have the authority and responsibility to detain and deport that person. I understand that there are insufficient ICE personnel available at all times. We must advocate for the appropriate number of ICE staff and we must advocate with our federal officials that they be responsible and accountable for securing our borders and developing an appropriate plan for the illegal immigrant population. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: I would target economic development opportunities that will result in long-term growth and gains. The two greatest opportunities are the Inland Port and the University of North Texas area. The city should provide infrastructure such as roads, water and sewage to these areas so that private development can move in. Where appropriate, economic incentives may be warranted for these areas. In addition, the 5 Neighborhood Investment Programs areas which are all in southern Dallas should be favored for a variety of federal funds. It is appropriate to target certain areas with the goal of making them catalysts for economic growth. The city continues to support nonprofit housing organizations by providing vacant lots for development. It is important to target spending so that results can be realized. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I am not clear what is meant by “public-private” in that I am not sure where the public funding would come from. I would not support an entity that has a board of directors that is separate from the city council. I would not be comfortable handing off my fiduciary responsibility to an outside board. I think it could be open to political pressure and political favors. Having a separate entity with its own board presents a host of potential problems. We have seen this on a small scale with the South Dallas Fair Park Trust Fund. This does not mean that I am opposed to investment in southern Dallas. We must particularly nurture the UNT area, the Inland Port area which have huge growth potential. This part of our city must continue to receive resources to encourage growth. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: The Studio can look at a variety of areas that are struggling to help create plans for envisioning future development. Each area is unique. Their practice of involving residents,

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property owners, business owners and other stakeholders is very positive. I am currently working with the design studio to look at an area in District 13. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: I wish people from out of the area knew that Dallas is a great place to come as a tourist. A weekend in Dallas can be spent visiting our museums and galleries, seeing Fair Park and the Zoo, going to performances in the evening and eating at a variety of restaurants at every price. There is so much to see and do. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: Voting for bonds is like voting for a mortgage. It is not free money. It has to be paid back in the form of debt service which can cause an increase in taxes or a decrease in other services. Richard P. Sheridan
Biographical Info:

Name: Richard P. Sheridan Street Address: 3022 Forest Lane City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: july 17, 1946 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-815-7570 Home Phone Number: 972-815-7570 Mobile Phone Number: 972-815-7570 Fax Number: none E-mail Address: richardforcitycouncil13@gmail.com Campaign Web Site Address: none
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 14 years in Dallas, and 30 years in Texas Q: Length of residency in the district A: 14 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Social Security Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Richard P. Sheridan, P.E. for (Photo Here) Dallas City Council, Dist 13 Age: 64 (I still have most of my hair and teeth!) Lived in Dallas: 14 years Lived in Texas: 30 Years Married 13 yrs, and Divorced 27 years; Sons, Michael 34, Nicholas 30 Ethnicity: 70% Irish, 20% Italian, 10% English, and 100% Patriotic American Born:The Bronx, New York (Rooted for the Tigers 'n the Braves) Education: Manhattan College: Bachelor of Civil Eng.,1969; Master of Environmental Eng., 1970; P.E., NY, 1974 Financial Condition: Struggling like many other Americans Strengths: Communication, Personality, Sense of Humor, and Persistence I have been active in City and County politics for 8 years, being an advocate for representative and ethical government, social justice, and responsible spending of taxpayer money. I was cited by the Dallas Morning News in 2007 as one of the top 5 speakers before the Dallas City Council. Rev. Joseph Clifford, head of First Presbyterian Church, has called me a prophetic presence, a modern day John the Baptist. So why haven't you heard about me? Fox 4's Shaun Rabb said it best when he stated to me recently, "Rich, the media doesn't cover you because you tell the truth." I ran for City Council '05, and Mayor in '07 as a write-in. Some of my activities include(ed): 1. Instrumental in the construction of the Homeless' The Bridge. 2. Assisted with the "Blockthe-Box" jobs program 3. Advocate for Major Changes to City's Ethics Code which is a billboard. It has done little to stop City Hall corruption, 4. Advocate for breathlyzers in all drinking establishments. 5. Advocate for Dallas adoption of Ft. Worth's C.O.P.s program. 6. Creator of the Solomon Solution to the Trinity River Fiasco. 7. Advocate for a lowering of taxes on District 13 homes thru the economic development of Dallas southern sector and the Trinity. 8. Advocate for Major Revisions to our Criminal Justice System. 9. Advocate for the Removal of Commissioner John Wiley Price. (For additional information Google: "Richard P. Sheridan Dallas") Paid for by Richard P. Sheridan for City Council, Richard P. Sheridan Treasurer. Campaign Headquarters: 3022 Forest Lane, No. 304, Dallas Tx. 75234 www.RichardforCityCouncil13@gmail.com 972-815-7570 4/4/11 Sheridan's "Radical" Campaign Platform Today, our city's budget condition/crisis is more and more a reflection of the failure of our Federal Government to promote the general welfare, fulfill their Constitutional responsibilities, and serve the needs of We the People. I believe it is circumstances as these, similar to what our Revolutionary Forefathers faced, that it is the

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responsibility of a City Council Member, of a City or State, of We the People to "Speak to Power", to rally the constituency, and find unique ways to communicate to our Federal Government that it has gone astray, acted against the people, and in violation of our Constitution, and then to force change. The short term solution to Dallas', and our Nation's recession, tax revenue shortfall, and the major budget cutbacks is: 1. Eliminate the Federal Reserve System. 2. Eliminate the IRS. These two actions annually will put about $1 Trillion into our Nations economy, and about $3 billion into Dallas economy. There are very credible references, and people who will confirm the validity, and constitutionality of both, or one of these actions. They include: Ronald Reagan, and his Grace Commission; JFK's Executive Order 11110; U.S. Congressman Ron Paul; Five former IRS Commissioners; Thomas Jefferson; Andrew Jackson; Former U.S. Congressman Louis T. McFadden; Film Producer Aaron Russo's, America: From Freedom to Fascism. This National Monetary/Tax Reform advocacy will be balanced by addressing District 13's, and Dallas' specific needs, which include, 1. Morally and cost-effectively serving the least of us, the poor and homeless, 2. Economic Development of the Southern Sector, and, 3. the Resurrection of the Trinity River Plan with the Solomon Solution, both which will reduce District 13s heavy tax burden, 4. An integrated approach to Crime Reduction, and, lastly, 5. Major Revisions to Dallas Ethics Code. My administration will be very open, with monthly group meetings with my constituency. I will also push for an evening or Saturday City Council meeting each month. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: 8 years as a activist in Dallas, and 13 years as a national activist. Q: Education A: Covered in campaign flier Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: As a write in, Citry Council in 2005, and Mayor in 2007 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $100 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Denis Rd. Automotive Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: three times. Once for a bad $50 check, once for contempt of court, and once for allegations of criminal harassmant Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I know most of the major issues, and I am the boldest, most outspoken candidate of ALL candidates in all districts. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1. Take care of ther poor and homeless. 2. Economic Development of the Southern Sector, Dallas Cancer. G3.et the Solomon solution to the trinity River project implimented Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I am a licenced professional engineer, and much bolder and outspoken, which is very much needed in Dallas politics today Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: Dallas is under served and over taxed...per David Kunkle. Our city needs to get back into balance, and take care of the basics like libraries, parks, rec centers, and pot holes. With a world class Trinity Park, our tax base will significantly increase. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: We should embrace Ft. Worth's COPs program throughout the city. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No. Let all city employees earn proportionately less in pay. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: - no response Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and

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how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: - no response Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: - no response Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: - no response Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: - no response Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: - no response Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: Running out of time at the library..sorry. This should fill in some blanks. Bio of Richard P. Sheridan, Dallas City Council Candidate, Dist 13 Age: 64 (I still have most of my hair and teeth!) Lived in Dallas: 14 years. Lived in Texas: 30 Years Married 13 yrs. Divorced 28 yrs. It cured me! and her too. Two Sons, Michael 34, Nicholas 30 Ethnicity: 70% Irish, 20% Italian, 10% English, and 100% Patriotic American Born: The Bronx, New York (Rooted for the Tigers 'n the Braves) Education: Manhattan College: Bachelor of Civil Eng., 1969; Master of Envy. Eng., 1970; P.E., NY, '74 Financial Condition: Broke like many other Americans Strengths: Communication, Personality, Interpersonal Skills, Sense of Humor, and Persistence Political affiliation: None. An independent, supporting the Tea Party at present for election reform. I have a very diverse background, beginning with a traditional engineering career, focusing on water pollution control, industrial and municipal wastewater treatment, and hazardous site cleanups, moving up financially and professionally, until I experienced a recession in the early 1980s. The recession and my very strong New York "culture/accent" made it difficult to get a job in Dallas in my profession, or at my previous salary, which in the early '80s was about $50,000/yr. This caused me to open up to all employment opportunities because I wanted to live in Dallas near my two sons. I gravitated to sales, as if you're good with people, almost anything can be sold, as long as you believe in the product or service. In 1998 I became an independent contractor courier and Notary Public offering my services to a number of firms like Special Delivery, On time, Eagle, Countdown, Guaranteed, etc. It started as temporary work, but wound up a 13 year journey. Being a courier is a real adventure. Many former business owners work as couriers because of either failed businesses, or trouble with the IRS. In 2003 I became active in Dallas politics, both at the county and city level, perhaps giving more speeches before the Dallas City Council, and County Court than any other Dallas Resident. My campaign flier summarizes my activities/accomplishments over the past 8 years as a political activist. I have developed a hard head, a thick skin, and a good sense of humor (to some people!). Employment/Work: Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade and Douglas, New York, Late '60s College summer employment, Highway Engineering, and flooding engineering. Hydroscience/DOW, New Jersey 1971-76 Water Pollution Control Brown and Caldwell, California, 1976 - 1981 Water Pollution Control Celanese Chemical Company/Badger, 1981- 83 Water Pollution Control Frito-Lay, Plano 1985-87 Water Pollution Control Entertainment Publications, Dallas, 1988-90 A fundraising coupon book for organizations, churches, and businesses. Water Point Systems/Water Event Water Store/Clearwater Coolers, 1990-96 Home and business water filtration/cooler systems. Retail water store. Courier Service, Independent Contractor, Dallas Metroplex 1998 2010. Delivery of business documents, securities, engineering docs, and Notary Service. Political Activist, Dallas, 2003-today. Full time since early 2010 References: Rev. Joseph Clifford, Pastor of First Presbyterian Church, Juanita Wallace, Head of the NAACP Dallas Chapter, Willie Cothrum, Owner of MasterPlan, Betty Culbreath, Dallas Int'l Airport Board Member, Dallas County Commissioners Dr. Elba Garcia and Maurine Dickey, Dallas Mayor Dwaine Caraway, Shaun Rabb, Fox 4 News, BJ Austin, KERA News. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Encourage the City to issues citizens IDs to protect the good "illegals". Our immigration was caused by the Federal Government. A city must protece all its citizens Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any

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measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: We must approach the southern sector holistically. This will involve a drug rehabilitaton, education, jobs program. The mind set of many southern sector black man and women need a major transformation, from hangin pants, and gutteral language, and a "Ho" mentality, to one of ladies and gentlemen. This will involve elected officials at all levels of Govt, ministers, and Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: We will obviously need such a partnership, BUT will this just be gentrification again, and again? Why not encourage coops, where there is employee ownership in businesses...supermarkets, clothing stores, etc...to give a good future, jobs, and economic stablity to existing residents. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: I haven't signed off on their plan. As far as I can see, good, hard working businesses are being driven out, and are not being compensated to start their businesses elsewhere. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: That you can find some really good, dow to earth people here. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: Its mostly abvout image, and not substance. Dallas is too much a billboard, pretencious and materialistic

Dallas City Council, Place 14
Candidates (choose 1):
Vernon Franko

Description: Note: Only Dallas residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Biographical Info:

Name: Vernon Franko Street Address: 5211 Cedar Springs Rd City/Town: Dallas State: TX Date of Birth: 46 yrs old Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-351-4097 Mobile Phone Number: 214-213-5782 E-mail Address: vern@vernonfranko.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.vernonfranko.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 30 plus years Q: Length of residency in the district A: 20 plus years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Insurance Agent Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: None at the moment, I’m busy campaigning for City Council. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: I provide free small business development, consulting and guidance service for primarily minority low income Dallas residents with an entrepreneurial spirit in starting their own business. It's not a foundation and I don't write it off on my taxes. There are no

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committees to decide who deserves help. I enjoy helping people with an entrepreneurial spirit and a desire to succeed. Q: Education A: GED Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Self Financed Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Self Financed Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: Unfortunately, Yes, twice when I was a teenager. Once when I set out some traffic tickets that I could not afford to pay, and another time for a property offense that was later dismissed. I am confident that these experiences have given me some positive insight in dealing with some of the issues that may be faced by inner city youth of low income families Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: District 14 needs experienced leadership with a proven track record that can provide sound common sense civic policy that allows individuals and families the peaceful enjoyment of our city and its many beautiful places, encourage and promote the personal and economic industry of our citizens, provide for security and the future quality of life in District 14 and all of Dallas for our residents. As a thirty year resident, I’ve seen Dallas go through boom times and hard times. My district with the proper experience and leadership can be instrumental in directing our civic policies on a productive path that serves the needs and aspiration of our residents. As an Insurance Agent my experience primarily focuses on providing fiscally responsible solutions for the security of our property, our finances and our futures. Financial planning and fiscal responsibility need to be an important component of our cities focus moving forward. I’m a small Business Owner. I know how to create jobs. In Fact I have personally created dozens of jobs and assisted in the creation of hundreds throughout my career. Before starting my own business, I managed several others. After managing Retail, Manufacturing and Service related businesses for a number of companies I decided it might be smarter to take that experience into my own endeavor. Having grown up as the youngest child in a low income family and moving to Dallas at an early age, I am familiar with the economic challenges that can be faced by the least advantaged members of our society. The opportunities I have found in our great City of Dallas and the doors that opened for me are far more than I could ever have dreamed possible considering my origins. I am very grateful to the City of Dallas. I am interested in paying it back by making a positive difference in our city and helping us get back on the path to growth and prosperity. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: I believe I am in agreement with our incumbent Angela Hunt. I have no Pet Projects or New Committees to promote that would add to the current budget deficit. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: Dallas is a city like no other in this country and it requires local leadership with the experience to recognize the historical uniqueness of the city we live in. We need local solutions that are germane to our community. I’ve lived in the City of Dallas and in District 14 longer than any of my opponents. I am the only candidate in my district that has ever managed a business and created jobs that provide employment. Over the decades I’ve seen some successful city initiatives and a number of misguided ones. I believe that I am the candidate with a familiarity to the needs and the sensibilities of my district, my city and our region. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: I don't think we are getting what we should for the funds spent. If we want to grow our tax base we have got to grow our local economy. We need to make changes in the municipal bidding process. It’s important that we encourage local talent to participate in the building of our city. Locally owned businesses will tend to spend more of their profits back at the stores and shops of our own communities growing our business and sales tax base and relieving the tax burden on our residents, resulting in jobs for our local

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population and tax revenues from those dollars spent here. Larger companies from elsewhere may take their profits elsewhere to spend. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: Recent reports indicate that the City of Dallas has successfully reached our target goal for the number of Uniformed Officers. Should the city begin to suffer safety issues or from a lack of response ability I would support an effort to increase recruiting at that time. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No, I’m for a tax roll back at the earliest opportunity. In economic times like this, when families are having to economize and reduce household budgets even for the essentials of life, when most every household has been touched in some way by unemployment, our Dallas City Council must find the courage to reign in unnecessary wasteful spending. This is not the time to further increase taxes on already financially strapped residents of Dallas. We must learn to spend our tax dollars smarter. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: I intend to comb every area of our budget to root out wasteful and inefficient spending. I want to concentrate on Contracted Services, Materials and Supplies first to make sure we are getting the best value for our tax dollars. I better not find any three thousand dollar hammers in there. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: Our future is here now! We need to be moving forward on the development of our green park plan and water amenities. This is an important component of spurring the downtown urban development plan as well as economic growth and will increase our city tax base alleviating some of our budget woes. It will also enhance the quality of life for all Dallas residents as well as provide local jobs. The Trinity River Project bond issue has sufficient funds still in place to begin the necessary work. The park can be built in fiscally responsible stages and within budget. The toll road though perhaps not in as ideal a location as we would like, is viable in recognition that it will be paid for by the collected tolls of those who use it. We have local design and engineering talent right here in Dallas that can address any aesthetic concerns making it workable. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: We need leadership with the experience to root out inefficient or excessive regulations and requirements that could discourage economic investment. We must revisit our local codes and policies to ensure that we are not cutting off our nose to spite our face. We need to be making every effort to send out the word that Dallas will welcome the business community. We have some of the hardest working and most industrious people you’ll find anywhere in the world. Our business community also pays taxes and provides jobs for our residents. We can’t expect to grow our tax base or our population if we don’t have living wage jobs available. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Although there is always room for improvement in almost any system, I think we need to resolve our budgetary concerns before we add additional expenses. Considering our current fiscal condition I believe that our current leadership has done an excellent job in maintaining the best city services that one could expect. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: It is obviously not good to have a zero growth rate. It indicates that our economy is in a depression. In order to attract more people we must have living wage jobs available for them. In order to do this we must encourage investment in the development of our economy increasing the number of available jobs. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: Ideally we would have a population density that is in harmony with the available housing, amenities and employment opportunities along with a reasonable taxation rate. Unfortunately, in uncertain fiscal times like now, there is no practical straight forward

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answer to this question. Encouraging an increase in population density at this time without a commensurate density of available jobs to employ that population would be folly due the expectation of the need for increased city services. By the same token a decrease in the population of the moment may lead to further degradation of the existing tax base. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: There are many things that need to be done. The single most important thing we could do to revitalize downtown is to move the Trinity River Park Project forward. This is a project that will enhance our quality of life and available recreational facilities for downtown and all of Dallas. It will lead to economic development by attracting jobs back downtown as well as provide the spark for our downtown urban goals. It will also revitalize our downtown and all its surrounding areas. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: There is not much our police department can do under current regulation other than to cooperate with federal authorities. Statistics indicate that most employers found employing illegal immigrants never face a fine or criminal prosecution. I would support initiatives designed at putting teeth into fines and strengthening penalties civil and criminal imposed on those who attract illegal immigration by offering them employment. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: I would like to see more focus on economic development in all of Dallas including the southern sectors. Focus should be on economic development as well as quality of life amenities that attract investment in both residential and a living wage jobs base. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I think it's a Fine Idea. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: Perhaps we should entertain the idea of expanding their scope and putting them to work on development in our southern sectors. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: Our people, Dallas has some of the Finest, most engaging, concerned and intelligent citizens that can be found anywhere in the United States or the world. We need experienced leadership on the council level and in the Mayors office that will facilitate the blossoming of the native talent we have in all areas of personal and commercial endeavors. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: Our economy and population growth has stagnated. We need Council leadership that has demonstrated experience in resolving issues of importance to us all and who will continue to have the courage of their convictions in spurring our economic growth. Angela Hunt

Biographical Info:

Name: Angela Hunt Street Address: 5306 Mercedes Ave. City/Town: Dallas State: TX Date of Birth: 12/11/1971 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (214) 907-4600 Fax Number: (214) 292-9685 E-mail Address: angela@angelahunt.com Campaign Web Site Address: http://www.angelahunt.com

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Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 12 1/2 years Q: Length of residency in the district A: 12 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Dallas City Councilmember (full-time) Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Dallas League of Women Voters Virginia Macdonald Leadership Award, Marshall Memorial Fellow, Voted "Best City Council Member" Dallas Observer (2006-2010), Voted "Best Dallas City Council Person" Dallas Voice Readers Voice Awards (2008-2010), Chair of Dallas City Council Judiciary Committee, Co-Chair of City of Dallas Bike Plan 2011, led Trinity Vote campaign, First Place - Keep America Beautiful "Graffiti Hurts" Award (group award) Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Dallas Homeowners League - Board Member, led M Streets Conservation District effort, Greenland Hills Neighborhood Association - Board Member, City of Dallas Permit & License Appeals - Board Member representing District 14, City of Dallas Cultural Affairs Commission - Commissioner representing District 14, Greater Dallas Planning Council Dream Award, Thomas J. Watson Fellow, White House Intern Q: Education A: Rice University (B.A. 1994) University of Texas School of Law, (J.D. 1998) Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None. Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Since November, I have raised roughly $60,000 for my re-election effort. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Dallas Police Association John & Anne Mullen Bill Brosius & Ron Guillard Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: It has been an honor to represent one of the most diverse and exciting council districts in our city over the past six years. During that time, we've been able to improve neighborhoods throughout District 14, from enhancing our parks and trails to preserving our historic neighborhoods. We've fostered economic growth and walkable communities while protecting established neighborhoods from commercial encroachment and inappropriate development. We've fulfilled the dream of a nationally-renowned Arts District and revitalized downtown Dallas. And, most importantly, we've made our city safer in the process – adding over 600 police officers to our streets and bringing crime down 30%. Although I gave up my law practice to serve my constituents full-time, my legal background has helped me navigate and improve complex city ordinances and contracts presented to the council. More important than my law degree, however, is my background as a grassroots, neighborhood leader. Years before running for office, I worked to improve my own neighborhood as well as other communities throughout the city. I led my neighborhood's effort to become a conservation district, and as a board member of the Dallas Homeowners League, I assisted community leaders throughout the city on issues ranging from crime prevention to zoning education. As a councilmember, my focus has remained on improving our neighborhoods and making our city a better place to live. On issues large and small, I do my homework, I stand up for my constituents, and I'm not afraid to be an independent voice on tough issues. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Protecting our Residents and Environment - As cities across North Texas struggle with the problems associated with urban gas drilling, I have led the effort to create a City of Dallas taskforce to revise Dallas' gas drilling ordinance to ensure our residents and environment are protected. Making the City More Business-Friendly - Owners of businesses large and small tell me how challenging it is to work with the City's Building Inspections Department. We lose business to suburban cities that have more efficient and business-friendly processes in place and that must change. Dallas must work with partners like The Real Estate Council and the Dallas Regional Chamber to re-evaluate the City's Building Inspections Department with the goal of making it more efficient and more

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customer-service-oriented. Improve Basic City Services - Our city must focus on providing taxpayers with city services they can be proud of -- safe neighborhoods, good streets, clean parks, and a responsive city government. By creating a great place to live, we will attract quality employees, which will in turn encourage business relocation -- all of which improves our tax base. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I bring a strong record of community involvement and leadership in District 14 long before I decided to run for office. That grassroots experience has served me well and kept my focus on our residents, not special interests. I fight for my constituents, even when it's not popular with the politically powerful or well-connected. There is no question that it is easier to "go along to get along" at City Hall. But on the tough issues, whether it's gas drilling, the Trinity Project, or protecting our neighborhoods from bad zoning, my priority has always been doing what's right for our citizens. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: In recent years, Dallas has funded major capital improvements by borrowing too much money, too quickly. As a result, our city is spending more and more on debt, leaving significantly less for basic city services. For example, the city eliminated basic street maintenance (among other things) in the last two budgets in order to pay for our growing debt. (I voted against this and proposed other cuts instead.) We should reduce the amount of money Dallas is borrowing every year so that we can make more funds available for police and fire, streets, parks, libraries, code enforcement and other critical city services. Debt should be focused on projects that improve our neighborhoods and are a catalyst for economic development, which will help grow our tax base. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: Unlike other cities that have cut their police departments during this economic downturn, our City Council has been steadfast in its commitment to hire officers. Thanks to the City Council's investment in police resources, we have added more than 600 officers to our police force over the last six years, reducing crime by more than 30%. Our efforts have resulted in the lowest crime rate since the 1960s, so we must be very careful not to lose ground by reducing our police force. We must work closely with our DPD leadership to ensure our police department has the staff it needs to patrol our neighborhoods and protect our businesses. I will be working closely with the leadership in our police department during the coming budget season to address these issues. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No. Thanks to tough choices we made last year, we are in a much better situation financially than we would have been otherwise. It will be another tough budget year, but we will be able to manage short-term cuts as our economy rebounds. Already there are signs that the Dallas economy is on the upswing -- sales tax revenue is increasing and Realtors as well as real estate developers tell me they are seeing positive signs of improvement. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: It's unlikely that any city department will remain unscathed in the next budget. It will be a matter of deciding which departments to cut the least. Public safety must continue to be a priority, so we must be cautious in any cuts to either police or fire. Development services holds the key to future economic growth, so additional cuts there would be unwise. Otherwise, we will see cuts throughout most of our city departments. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: After ensuring our levees will protect surrounding homes and businesses, the Downtown Trinity Park must be our focus. The park will be an incredible recreational amenity as well as a catalyst for redevelopment projects along the levees. However, we need not wait for the park to be fully realized before making it accessible to the public. This greenspace is a wonderful asset just as it is, but it is under-appreciated and under-utilized due to lack of easy public access. Not only will this allow the public to enjoy the park, accessibility will help spur redevelopment as the economy improves. In relation to the levee upgrades, I object to the city's current plan to pay for federally-mandated levee improvements by transferring funds from other critical flood control projects. These projects, such as Mill

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Creek reconstruction and sump overhauls, are critical to protecting our residents and businesses from flooding. We should use funds from such projects only AFTER we have exhausted the remaining $30 million set aside for the defunct toll road. The toll road remains unviable, and the city's insistence on its inclusion in the Trinity Project -intertwining it with our park and levee improvements -- only serves to grind those other critical projects to a halt. Just as troubling, we are delaying the inevitable need to find other solutions to the transportation problems that the toll road was allegedly going to solve. Over the next two years, we must engage transportation experts who have experience with similar challenges to help us address our transportation needs using creative 21st century solutions. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: The key to attracting economic development and corporate relocations to Dallas is an improved quality of life for residents. Dallas must attract residents and families to our city by making Dallas safe, clean, and livable. When desirable employees choose to live in Dallas, economic development and corporate relocations follow. In addition, our city will attract and maintain businesses by ensuring we are business-friendly on a very practical level. This means making sure our Building Inspections Department is efficient and customer-service-oriented. If developers cannot easily obtain permits, they will take their business elsewhere, pushing retail, residential, and mixed-use developments to the suburbs. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Our police and fire departments regularly receive high marks from District 14 residents, and the fact that we have the lowest crime rate since the 1960s underscores that fact. As I mentioned above, basic city services are critical to strong, healthy neighborhoods. Over the last decade we have cut spending on our streets and parks, and the effects of that deferred maintenance is costly. We must also make code enforcement and animal control more responsive to residents. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: Growth for the sake of growth isn't necessarily a good thing. However, if other nearby cities and suburbs are experiencing growth while Dallas is not, we should look to the surrounding communities to see what they have done to encourage growth. Do they have better schools? More affordable housing? Better economic investment incentives for corporate relocations? More job growth? Better city services? If there is something that Dallas should be doing differently, we should take this opportunity to learn from our neighbors and adopt their best practices, so the next census will perhaps reflect a different outcome. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: Proper density in our city's core will vary by neighborhood. Density shouldn't be shoehorned into established single-family neighborhoods and density isn't a goal in and of itself. Rather, it should be part of a larger plan to reduce our dependence on cars, in which case dense housing stock must be paired with public transportation options like DART light rail or streetcar service, as well as nearby community service retail. Neighborhoods in and around Downtown should be the most dense -- as the major job center, living in downtown allows residents to walk, bus, or take the future streetcar to work rather than drive. Our city center will continue to see denser development and the census bears this out -- while Dallas' population remained almost flat over the last decade, the population of District 14 rose by nearly 15%. People want to live in walkable, vibrant, urban communities like Uptown, Cedar Springs, and Downtown Dallas. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: The city has made great strides in revitalizing downtown Dallas. The Mercantile, Main Street Garden, Main Street retail, the Arts District, the Farmers Market, and other areas of downtown have benefited and flourished thanks to public-private partnerships. We can build on these successes using the Downtown 360 Plan as our guide, particularly those aspects that require little financial investment, such as ordinance changes that would encourage street vendors and outdoor restaurant seating. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration?

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A: When people are arrested, their citizenship status should be determined, and those who are here illegally should be deported to the proper authorities in their home country. However, District 14 residents I talk with want our police focused on things like preventing car thefts and home burglaries, patrolling their neighborhoods, and addressing unruly crowds in entertainment districts. If Dallas police are forced to take over the federal responsibility of immigration enforcement, they will not have the resources or manpower to respond to local law enforcement needs. Moreover, the city will not reduce crime if crime victims or witnesses are afraid to contact the DPD for fear of deportation. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: There are, of course, no easy answers here, but I believe improving southern Dallas starts by improving the neighborhoods. The broken-windows theory of crime would dictate beefing up code enforcement, animal control, and graffiti abatement in problem areas. To spur growth, economic incentives for redevelopment, like the Mockingbird-Lancaster TIF, should be more widely implemented to encourage real change and growth in disadvantaged area. The city should continue to champion the Inland Port project, which has great potential to bring business and jobs to the Southern Sector. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: Public-private partnerships have worked well to bring development to other parts of our city, particularly Downtown Dallas. The devil is in the details, of course, but a publicprivate economic development corporation could serve as the catalyst for real change in the Southern Sector. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: The Southern Sector could benefit from the type of redevelopment plans created by the CityDesign Studio for West Dallas. We must ensure, however, that the goal is to uplift, not merely gentrify, communities. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: Dallas has some amazing public schools. Yes, DISD has many challenges, but it also boasts many top-rated schools like Booker T. Washington High School for the Visual and Performing Arts, Stonewall Jackson Elementary, and Woodrow Wilson High School (which is now an International Baccalaureate World School that offer a diverse and rigorous education), to name just a few. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: For too long, Dallas has desperately sought approval from those outside our city -- note how we're constantly striving to portray ourselves as a "world-class city" and investing in large, but arguably unnecessary, big ticket projects. Most residents I talk with are less interested in being spoken of in the same breath as London and Paris than having a clean, safe, livable city to call home. I would hope we would become less concerned with how visitors and tourists perceive our city and focus instead on creating a safe city with good schools and beautiful neighborhoods. Chad Lasseter
Biographical Info: Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: - no response Q: Length of residency in the district A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: - no response Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: - no response Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: - no response Q: Education A: - no response Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: - no response Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?

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A: - no response Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: - no response Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: - no response Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: - no response Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: - no response Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: - no response Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: - no response Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: - no response Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: - no response Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: - no response Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: - no response Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: - no response Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: - no response Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: - no response Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: - no response Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: - no response Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: - no response Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: - no response Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: - no response Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start?

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A: - no response Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: - no response Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: - no response James Nowlin

Biographical Info:

Name: James Nowlin Street Address: 6131 Palo Pinto Avenue City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: 12/10/80 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (214) 446-8580 Fax Number: (214) 446-8556 E-mail Address: info@jamesnowlin.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.jamesnowlin.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: Five years Q: Length of residency in the district A: One year Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Small business owner Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Preservation Dallas, Lakewood Heights Neighborhood Association Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Dallas Citizens Police Review Board, Workforce Solutions Greater Dallas, AIDS Services of Dallas Board Q: Education A: B.A. - University of Virginia, J.D. - Duke University School of Law Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: N/A Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $50,000 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: We have had a number of individuals who have contributed at the maximum level. Among them are James Brewster, Karl Meyer, and Dr. Mark Parker. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I love Dallas and want to give back to the city that has been so good to me. In these challenging economic times, we need leadership that understands that we must grow our economy, not our taxes. I’ve started a small business and made a success of it. In that business, I work to bring owners and executives of businesses, large and small, a fresh perspective on increasing profitability and efficiencies. I am a consensus-builder who knows how to work with neighborhood leaders as well as business. These skills will be brought with me to the Council. Economic development coupled with working to ensure that Dallasites get the most value out of every tax dollar is my first priority. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1. I will work to grow our economy, not our taxes. By collaborating with the new Mayor and other councilmembers to identify, nurture, and execute economic development

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opportunities, we will increase revenues through growing our economy. Businesses in other states are interested in relocating to Dallas because of the vast opportunities that are here. However, we must have the right leaders on the Council to help seal the deal to get them here. As a councilmember and business leader, I will clearly articulate to the prospective companies the value of doing business in Dallas and will work with the new Mayor to lead discussions and delegation opportunities to bring economic development to our city. In addition, creating new public-private partnerships is a way in which we can achieve economic development. Tremendous opportunities exist in West Dallas and South Dallas and we must work to create a plan to harness the potential, build our tax base, and grow our city. This plan must be visionary, strategic, and attainable; it must bring together the best of all of Dallas—private and public. 2. To find more efficient ways of spending our tax dollars as well as identifying appropriate spending priorities, I would work to establish a Citizen’s Budget and Tax Review Commission. We have some of the best business and civic minds in the country living in Dallas, and we need to engage them to find the best solutions for the challenges we face. As a new voice on the City Council for District 14, I would actively collaborate with my constituents, my colleagues, the new Mayor, and other leaders. This Commission would move toward that kind of leadership and away from the contentious politics that have plagued City Hall for the last several years. 3. The City of Dallas must stop acting as if Dallas Independent School District is a separate entity that doesn’t affect the quality of life, real estate values, and business opportunities in the city. I would seek to establish a City/DISD/private coalition to specifically work on those issues which are common to the City and DISD. The ability to attract new residents to Dallas is encumbered by the reputation of DISD. We must work together to move Dallas forward. As you can see, pushing these issues is about working with others to achieve solutions, not pushing others around. And, we do not need to raise property taxes, increase fees, or cut essential services to do any of this. We need to bring the right people together and work out solutions, using the collective brainpower, experience, and perspective of the varied members of our city. It comes down to increasing efficiency, not increasing taxes. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I seek solutions in a collaborative fashion. I believe that the best solutions result from working with others to build consensus and support. Positive results are achieved through working with all the stakeholders to find common ground. I do not believe that I have all the answers. However, I do believe that by working well with others and harnessing their vision and voice, our city will move forward. Consensus-building does not result from my analyzing an issue to determine what I think is best and then leaving my office with the goal of convincing everyone else that I’m right. The citizens have been left out of too many discussions. In a recent forum, the incumbent talked about her approach to complex issues. After acknowledging that she does not have a financial background, she talked about deconstructing the city budget and putting it back together in a way that she could understand it so that she could explain it to her constituents. My approach is to review, analyze, discuss, and find a solution that works to move out city forward. I understand that the answers do not always come from politicians. If elected, I will support the establishment of a Citizens Budget and Tax Review Commission, charged with seeking new efficiencies in providing services and in reviewing spending priorities in City government. The incumbent also believes that economic development is not the priority and comes second to neighborhoods. I say, “Without a job, most of us would not have a house to call home or a neighborhood to live in. Economic development is the lifeblood of our city. District 14 deserves a leader that understands jobs and economic growth.” Our leaders need to understand that economic development is what keeps our city alive. Without it, the city dies - Detroit is an example. Without that understanding, Councilmembers may treat economic development as if it were a series of stand-alone zoning issues. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: No. Dallas residents are not getting enough bang for their buck when it comes to the high taxes that they pay. We need to revamp our process to seriously engage the citizens of Dallas in the budgeting process. It is simply insufficient for Council members to hold a handful of town hall meetings to say they have voter buy-in to their budget priorities and tax increases. When the budget process is in the hands exclusively of politicians, we should not be surprised that the budget gets politicized. I support the establishment of a Citizens Budget and Tax Review Commission, charged with seeking new efficiencies in providing services and reviewing spending priorities. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a

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budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: Public safety is job one. As a former board member of the Dallas Citizens Police Review Board, I understand firsthand how critical our men and women in uniform are to our city. While resources are stretched, it is the responsibility of the City Council to work collaboratively with the Dallas Police Department to balance hiring so that the crime rate does not increase. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: 1. We need to have a hard conversation to protect essential city services and to ensure that further staff cuts are not made. We need to consider a pay cut for top executives in the city and a smaller cut for other city employees. If we all pull together in this way, no one else loses their job or benefits, and we all weather this storm together. As I’ve said previously, I will donate my salary in service to the city (with corporate and private matches to give back to the city as well) to fill in some of the gaps in services that will come. It’s not huge, but it’s a start in looking at how we can work together and make sacrifices during this critical time for our city. In addition, I understand that I do not have all the answers and that politicians often do not always have all the answers. The Council’s focus should be on constructive and collaborative conversations to stop kicking the tax can down the road – my work to begin a Citizen’s Budget and Tax Review Commission is an example of how we can do better by working together. 2. Currently, many city employees drive cars owned, leased, and maintained at the expense of the city of Dallas. We should look at replacing these cars with either stipends or allowing employees to expense some portion of their personal vehicle usage. It saves money - It works in business and it can work in Dallas. In addition, I believe some city employees would appreciate this opportunity. 3. What’s good for the environment is good for Dallas and for our pocketbooks. We need to move toward xeriscaping with native plants rather than landscaping with plants that require significant maintenance and watering. This would save money on watering, upkeep, and staff expenses. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: The funding challenges that we face now in implementing the voter mandate are minor speed bumps in comparison to the off-tracking that an unwilling councilmember can create for this monumental project for our city. In this economy, obtaining funding for the roadway is going to be increasingly difficult. Creating an amazing park might be a more viable first step and would be a quality of life enhancement for the citizens of Dallas. Working to identify opportunities for public-private partnerships will help to reduce some funding constraints. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: More people relocating to and living in Dallas means a greater tax base. We must create an environment that is more attractive to businesses looking to relocate. But, we must also be attractive as a place for people to live as well as to work. We are competing with the suburbs for residents, and we’re losing (according to Census 2010). That must change. A big part of that is about public schools, and I discussed DISD earlier. We need to study successful models of economic development in other cities and apply what we learn right here at home. And, we have to successfully market the City of Dallas. The new Mayor and every member of the Council must be an ambassador for the City, working together to meet the challenges. The incumbent’s attitude that business and economic development are evil rather than part of the solution is destructive to the conversation about how to move our city forward. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: First of all, we owe a ceaseless debt of gratitude to our police officers and firefighters. They risk their lives every day to make us safer. What these men and women do is miles beyond excellent. The quality of drinking water in Dallas is good, right out of the tap, in most parts of our city. We are behind the times on recycling services, however. It should be a revenue-producing endeavor for the city. If we provided pick-up recycling at all or most multi-family units, office buildings, and public facilities, we could enhance that revenue stream. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents

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and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: It is bad for both Dallas and North Texas. Dallas is the heart of the North Texas economy. Again, we attract people to live here by increasing the number of jobs and business opportunities that we have in Dallas. And, we have to partner with DISD to address the problems in our public school system. People want more bang for their buck and that includes public schools. Furthermore, the Council must work to re-create Dallas’ reputation as a low tax, high return city. We cannot keep hammering homeowners with higher property taxes every few years and expect newcomers to want to move into our city. Folks relocating to North Texas must see Dallas and its public servants at City Hall as smart, focused on efficiency, and leaders of a world class destination. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: Density is not a one size fits all question for neighborhoods. Diversity in neighborhood personality and density is one of the greatest strengths of District 14. This diversity, when encouraged through strategic economic development, is what will attract new residents to our city. Finally, appropriate density for Uptown is different than it is for Lakewood Heights. As the representative for District 14 on the City Council, it will be my job to work with my constituents in each of the district’s neighborhoods to make sure I have a finger on the pulse of each one. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: We need to get serious about public-private partnerships. With the right vision, for example, gems of opportunity downtown such as the Dallas Farmer’s Market can bring in people and commerce from all across North Texas. Attractive public-private partnering is one way to achieve this along with a commitment to improved signage, parking, and resources for safety. Farmers grow some of the best tomatoes and onions in the nation within an hour’s drive of Dallas, and yet people go to specialty grocery stores and pay multiples of what the farmer’s charge for inferior produce. This makes no sense to me. In addition, most of the time, downtown streets are virtually empty. I believe that the right public-private partnerships will give people a reason to get out of the downtown tunnels and onto the street. The arts and being outside bring people together - I envision a downtown with sidewalks full of pedestrians of all different backgrounds, small business and shopping galore, jazz being played on the sidewalk, alongside street vendors. Dallas is a real city and we should start looking like one. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Immigration and customs enforcement are a federal, state, and local issue. The City of Dallas and the Dallas Police Department are often the first line of contact on local immigration issues. With the limited resources of our city’s budget and the DPD, we should continue working hand in hand with the Department of Homeland Security, Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, and other governmental agencies, as appropriate, for fair and swift action. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: South Dallas is Dallas — and I am tired of people acting like its future is separate from Dallas’ future. One of the reasons that we had no population growth in the last 10 years is because some leaders have never really gotten serious about economic development in South Dallas. Improving the quality of life south of the Trinity is all about economic development. This challenge is not going to be met with a couple of urban revitalization projects. We have to have meaningful conversations with business and neighborhood leaders and articulate a meaningful, achievable vision for southern Dallas - everyone’s voice should be welcomed at the discussion table. In addition, we have to be willing to have some hard conversations about how some plans in the past have not come to full fruition. We have to work to connect the North with the South, to provide job opportunities for all so that Dallas’ collective tax base is constantly growing. I will work with the Mayor and the council to erase the divide between the North and the South. As South Dallas progresses, all of Dallas progresses. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I completely agree. We must bring all the stakeholders together to define the vision, map out the strategy, develop the plan, and move forward to make it happen. Adding

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more stakeholders with skin in the game on any project increases the probability for success. Success will only be achieved with true collaborators leading the charge to reach a common goal. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: In South Dallas, of course. However, there is no one size fits all solution to any issue. I will work to encourage collaborative conversations between residents and businesses to build upon the strengths of Dallas. Part of the process of the South Dallas should be leveraging the best of the City Design Studio process and taking lessons learned moving forward. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: Dallas is a city that works. It is a city of diversity. It is city that embraces the best ideas. Even in these economic times, we are not faced with the monolithic challenges that some cities are facing. There is a “can do” attitude in this city, and we will draw on it again today to make us even greater tomorrow. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: We do have a divide in the city between north and south, and that divide is holding the city back. It’s a historic divide and quite unfortunate. In looking for representation at City Hall, voters should consider whether a candidate really grasps the relationship between our current economic issues, the need for economic development throughout the city, and the collective vision for the future. We have short, mid-, and long-tem challenges to address. If we continue in the reactive mode of the last couple of years, we will soon exhaust our ability to address any of these challenges. I do not fit into a box as a business leader or as a candidate. I am ready to bridge communities together for a greater Dallas and that’s why I am running for Dallas City Council. Dallas needs to thrust forward to redeem transformational opportunities, and I humbly admit that my candidacy is one. Brian Oley

Biographical Info:

Name: Brian Oley Street Address: PO Box 25232 City/Town: Dallas State: TX Date of Birth: 06/08/1976 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-377-8548 Home Phone Number: 214-377-8548 Mobile Phone Number: 214-377-8548 E-mail Address: brianoley@ymail.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.brianoley.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 6 Years (as of May 2011) Q: Length of residency in the district A: 6 Years (as of May 2011) Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Technical Real Estate and Consulting: Co Founder and Co Lead of a global specialty practice (based in Dallas) in a Fortune 500 real estate services firm. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: I currently serve on the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital’s Next Generation Committee, which is a select group who travel to the hospital in Memphis, learn the logistics and operations of the hospital, sit in on board meetings, and are being educated to serve as the hospital’s next Board of Directors. As a dog enthusiast, I currently serve as a member and foster for a local animal rescue for Dallas / Fort Worth. I have been a long time member of the Friends of the Katy Trail and the Japan American Society of D/FW; and, with safety as one of the primary issues of my campaign, I’m also a member of our

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neighborhood crime watch association. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: I was a member of a City Advisory Committee for the City of Dallas, representing District 14 on the MLK Community Center Board. I was formerly an associate member of the Asian American Bar Association, as well as a former member of the Japan American Society of Houston. Q: Education A: I achieved my undergraduate degree in 1998 from Texas Christian University, where I studied Marketing and Japanese. In 2004, I achieved my MBA from Arizona State University. And finally, in 2008, I achieved a second masters’ degree (MA) in International Economics and Policy from Southern Methodist University while working full time at my current profession. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: N/A Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Before I launched my campaign, I sat down with my family and supporters to discuss the logistics and planning. It was here I decided on an unconventional political strategy which I have formally posed as my campaign mission statement that parallels my political philosophy: to operate the most efficient campaign with budgetary limitations. When supporters approach me asking how they can help, my only response is in awareness and “sweat equity” (or, helping pass out my campaign brochures, bumper stickers, etc). Aside from the expense of running a website and printing off a few yard signs and some bumper stickers, this is how I have run my campaign and how I would run the city budget. To date, I have successfully launched a district wide campaign, leveraging word of mouth, personal involvement, and free social media while keeping expenditures at $790.99 (as of 4/8/2011). Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: As described above, my campaign is taking on a lean and mean strategic approach to victory. In lieu of financial support, I have emphasized sweat equity and awareness support. Under that direction, I have managed to gain significant, city wide support through word of mouth, as well as through getting out there and knocking on doors, by talking to the people as opposed to simply marketing to them in print form, as so many candidates do. With that, I have managed to appeal to the entire district with personal contributions from myself, and mandated (minimal) contributions from the two people in this world that I look and have looked up to the most in this world: my father and my mother. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I have framed my life around serving others, and have prepared a long time for the right time and the right opportunity to serve the public - now is that time. The recurring question seems to be, “What can you do for us in District 14?” As a former senior auditor and compliance examiner with a securities regulation firm, I bring fiscal responsibility. I have audited everything from major institutions such as Bank of America down to the small local investment firms right here in and around Dallas. I am qualified to pull apart and understand financial reports and statements, and am a very large proponent of transparency. I have lived on the east side of the district, in the middle of the district, and on the west side of the district; and from getting out there and knocking on the doors of constituents, and bring a responsible business mind and community advocate to public service. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: First and foremost is safety, and it’s very simple why - because we all deserve the right to be safe. To address this issue, there are the obvious solutions such as adding more police to the Dallas Police Department, as I believe in the strong correlation between increasing the number of police and decreasing crime. There are, however, simple and cost effective measures that can also be taken. First, in our district, we have first class neighborhood associations and crime watch groups – the best in the City. As I knock on doors talking to constituents in our neighborhoods, what I haven’t seen is a great deal of communication between these individuals or groups. These communication silos have prevented a lot of efficient discussion on maximizing efforts, or what has worked in one area versus what has not worked in another. As a community leader, engaging and

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encouraging this Interpol style method of communication is a considerably cost effective start to enhancing our quality of life. Second, there is responsible development. This element has been largely ignored both in District 14 and in the City of Dallas. If handled responsibly, this is a revenue generating investment that will both pay for itself (the tools, resources, efforts, etc), and compliments the reality of supporting a rollback in taxes. Finally, there is the element of fiscal responsibility. I advocate accountability through transparency. Take, for example, the city’s check registry. I propose to bring this process public so that the public can see who is getting cash from the city and how much they’re getting. Again, there will be minimal cost associated with this simple offering to be located on the city’s website, and if we do this we will have automatically employed anyone with internet access and interest in the city’s budget to serve as a city auditor at virtually no cost. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: There is no question that, throughout my life, I have been devoted to a strong balance of work and community; but the key differentiator, without question, between me and my opponents is that I bring a business mind to the world of politics. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: I don’t believe many people in the City of Dallas would disagree with the statement that we are overtaxed and underserved. A lot of this can be traced to a couple of fundamental considerations – that our city is not spending within our limits and that we are relying too much on the residential side of the city’s revenue equation for the city’s budget. Budget reform comes in many ways. I am currently redlining the 650 page document that is the city budget. The review proves very challenging for any single person, and there is uncertainty on a lot of interpretation from a line item review. I believe that transparency in our budget’s expenditures would be the best place to start in that there are simple measures we can consider that will encourage citizen education on and participation in our city’s budget. For example, the scanning and display of the check registry is a simple and cost effective approach to financial transparency. This process will literally employ thousands of concerned people to serve as Independent auditors to check, double check, and understand how and where our tax dollars are being spent. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: The nature of this question requires more than a simple political answer to justify. It requires more as the men and women selflessly serving our cities deserve more than just politics. I absolutely support our Dallas Police as well as our Dallas Fire and Rescue; I believe the services these groups of men and women provide is absolutely critical, providing selfless acts of valor and serving as valiant role models to our children. I accept the strong correlation between increasing the number of police and decreasing crime, and to adequately answer this without facts and figures supporting current need and demand regressed with actual and unbiased attrition rates is unfair to the City of Dallas. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: Under no circumstances would I consider, support, or propose a tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: As a former Sr. Auditor at a securities regulation firm and with plenty of education, I have the ability to audit and review financials. I am currently in the process of redlining a hard copy of the 650 page budget, a process which will take slightly beyond the time constraints associated with the response deadline on this questionnaire. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: It’s no secret the Trinity River Project has gone on too long, costing us way too much. What has gone on for over a decade is now behind us, and what is most important and is most beneficial to the City right now, especially in light of the recent news of the probable approval of the recertification of the levees to the 100 year flood protection, is that we keep the project moving with focus on flood protection. As for funding, a roll out strategy needs to be finalized on sharing the expense finding an effective balance between the public and private sector. The toll road appears to be more and more of a viable option given the recent developments on probable approval of the levees.

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Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: Let’s talk responsible development. I live in the world of economic development, and work closely with various Chambers and Economic Developments across this great nation and around the world. What I do professionally forces dialogue about doing business in these respective areas. I know what flourishing communities do right and what deteriorating communities do wrong. To summarize an effective economic development process, the first charge would be to create goals by identifying sectors, if any, that would best serve a given area or community. Too often, I see an under informed community attempt to attract a project that appears to provide favorable attributes, but is ultimately not a good or sustainable fit and fails in the end. From the city to the county to the state, the economic impact of such a failure is devastating at all levels. After, and only after, recognizable and realistic returns (both quantitative and qualitative) have been forecasted and analyzed, certain proactive measures of attraction should be deployed. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Dallas has adopted some favorable advances to going green and encouraging energy sustainability. The Recycling program has provided an easy way for residents and businesses to get involved, and substantially reduce our landfill issues. According to Dallas Sanitation Services, last fiscal year the City of Dallas collected over 45,000 tons of recyclables from their residents and diverted over 190,000 tons from the landfill. This is a great start, but there is much to be captured above and beyond these green initiatives. It starts in the least desirable place in Dallas – the landfill, and comes in the form of Renewable Energy. Waste does not have to simply sit there and rot. Why haven’t we, as a city, teamed up with both waste management companies and utilities to adopt procedures that capture the energy from waste (which comes in the form of biomass energy) released from landfills, preserve this renewable energy, and bring that renewable energy to the grid as part of our generation mix? One major city in Texas has already adopted this process, and Dallas is lagging behind. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: This lack of population growth in Dallas (estimated at 1% growth) will ultimately have a negative impact on our city. And let’s bring into consideration a situation involving a household (individual or family), and the relative unintended economic consequences resulting from the 6.5% tax hike of2010. As a base line and very simple economic example, let’s assume a household is looking to move. For most homeowners in the market, there can be little argument that price is the primary driver of location. As a potential buyer, would you stay in Dallas to pay more to government or move to the suburbs, adding more favorable living conditions balanced with some extra drive time to save the extra cash imposed by order of the largest tax increase in 20 years? The underlying premise to all this and the unexpected impact of the tax hike serves as a deterrent for home and businesses to consider Dallas. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: Further study is needed on appropriate neighborhood densities with respect to circumstance and geography. For example, an area of single family residential with some aspects of office, perhaps industrial, should be managed under different concentration parameters compared to a multifamily residential segment with a heavy dose of retail. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: This is a question of sustainability and accessibility – one method is to address the latter. How can we change the downtown environment from a place that people consider a one-time visit, who are troubled by constrained parking availability, to a more sustainable model. To achieve this, we really need to concentrate efforts to provide a more natural link between the primary occupiers of downtown who include the multifamily residential sector, the people who work downtown (how can we get them to stay downtown after work), and to the thousands who live and work close by. In our city, if people can’t park, they are less likely to visit. The city needs to review expanding parking in greater detail. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: The nature of the question and the way this is worded is a little general. But, to address the question as I see it, police should do what they do best, and enforce the law. It is up to

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the legislators and policy makers to draft the laws and legislation that the police enforce. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: I’d promote a hybrid strategy of balancing responsible economic development, incentivizing residential and commercial development when and where necessary to supply a long term return on investment, while pushing for more of a public-private partnership for the private sector to step up where the public sector falls short. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I have been a strong advocate for the public-private partnership relating to economic development. From serving on a south City of Dallas Advisory Board, I spent some time at the MLK Community Center on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. It is no secret that this area is in need of strategic commercial and residential development. There’s value in how the private sector can add to this area and a lot of areas in Dallas, and I support the active pursuit of capturing this value and adding it to our local communities. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: As I’ve previously stated, if managed responsibly, the public-private partnership works. The social, community, economic and environmental benefits move to provide a net societal benefit that all of Dallas can endure. There are many areas in need in the city, and such an effort should be thoroughly examined. The primary and initial question would be, “What area needs the economic activity the most and where would we be able to provide the greatest impact from our investment in time, resources, and efforts?” From north to south to east to west, I have spent a great deal of time working, volunteering, and enjoying leisurely activities on all sides of Dallas. I feel that from an economic perspective, the area surrounding Fair Park in the southern sector may be a great place to move to improve. Leveraging our existing infrastructure and city’s various attractions in the area creates the greatest opportunity with respect to improving our city’s quality of life. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: We are a diverse city that takes pride in our culture, people, and history, and that our city provides great opportunity to all people, regardless of age, race, or gender. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: The city faces challenges in many areas; in particular, we suffer from finding an effective way to preserve the strength of our communities and neighborhoods while encouraging the attraction and retention of responsible development.

Dallas Mayor
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
David Kunkle

Biographical Info:

Name: David Kunkle Street Address: 5538 Ridgedale City/Town: Dallas State: Texas Date of Birth: November 13, 1950 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 469-563-7583 Home Phone Number: n/a Mobile Phone Number: n/a Fax Number: n/a E-mail Address: contact@davidkunkle.com

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Campaign Web Site Address: www.DavidKunkle.com, video can be viewed on our website or on youtube at www.youtube.com/davidkunkle. Also, follow us on our facebook page, Kunkle for Dallas Mayor, or on twitter at twitter.com/davidkunkle. You may view campaign photos on our Flickr page, www.flickr.com/photos/davidkunkle/sets/ Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/v/lI2U3xrsnUw&hl=en
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: 15 years total Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Law Enforcement Consultant Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Current and previous listed under next questions. I just retired as Dallas Police Chief in May of last year. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Career Highlights • Started policing career at Dallas Police Department in February 1972 • Youngest Captain in the history of the Dallas Police Department • Chief of Police in Grand Prairie for three years • While serving as Chief of Police in Arlington for 14 years, the department was named one of the eight best police departments in the United States and the only one in the Southwest US (out of 17,000 departments evaluated) by Good Housekeeping Magazine • Deputy City Manager in Arlington for five years, with responsibility for Police/Fire, Code Enforcement, Convention Center, Budget, Finance, Parks, Libraries, Human Resources, Landfill and Housing • Chief of Police in Dallas for six years (see notes below) • Over 30 officers who served under Kunkle have gone on to become Police Chiefs in cities across the country • Jim Collins, author of the best selling leadership book Good to Great (published 2007), produced a PBS documentary highlighting Level 5 leaders across the country. Kunkle was recognized as the only example of a public sector Level 5 leader. A large portion of the documentary focused on Kunkle's leadership and the Dallas Police Department. • Top Secret FBI Clearance • Thirty-one years perfect attendance (no sick time) • Adjunct professor at University of Texas at Arlington • International policing experience in Israel, Northern Ireland and Great Britain • Masters of Public Administration from the University of Texas at Arlington • Served as a Chief of Police for 22 years of his public service Crime in Dallas while serving as Chief of Police • Six consecutive years of total crime reduction • 32% decrease in violent crime during his tenure (2004 - 2010) • The 2010 crime rate was the lowest in Dallas in 40 years • The murder rate dropped 34% since Kunkle became Chief of Police in 2004 • The 2010 murder rate was the lowest in 42 years • The per capita overall crime rate dropped 23.7% since 2004 Officer Safety and Improved Citizen Service in Dallas while serving as Chief of Police • Increase in sworn strength of more than 700 officers • Dramatic reductions in police response times • Response times for 911 emergency calls were 27.5% faster in 2008 than before Kunkle arrived in 2004 • Reduction of high risk incidents involving Dallas officers • Revision of a pursuit policy resulting in significant decreases in pursuit-related deaths and injuries • Eliminated the use of controversial choke hold • Fewer deadly force incidents • Fewer in-custody deaths • Improved response efforts for the mentally ill • Presented the 2008 Prism Award [Mental Health Advocate of the Year] from the Mental Health Association of Greater Dallas • Honored by the National Alliance of Mental Illness with the 2010 Sam Cochran Criminal Justice Award Community Confidence • A 2008 Dallas Community Survey conducted for the RAND Corp. indicated: • Residents of Dallas have at least an 80% favorable opinion of Dallas police effectiveness • More than 75% of Dallas residents were satisfied with the quality of police services • Citizen ratings of police services have improved nearly 22% since 2005 • Upon retirement, dozens of community organizations across the city presented Kunkle with certificates of appreciation Transparency and Open Lines of Communications • Created an open environment where officers were allowed to talk openly with the media • His approach to dealing with problems was direct: If you mess up, you fess up, and then you clean up • Recognized as a strong disciplinarian who dealt harshly with misconduct Innovations • Created the Dallas Police Department Fusion Center, a state of the art operations center responsible for gathering, analyzing and distributing criminal intelligence to field and investigative units at the local, regional and national level. • Helped conceive the W.W. Caruth Jr. Police Institute at Dallas, a leadership and research institute developed with a $15 million grant by the Communities Foundation of Texas • Opened the South Central Patrol Division in 2007, creating a seventh patrol division in the southern sector, reducing police response time and improving citizen service opportunities Q: Education A: I received my Bachelor's Degree and a Master's of Public Administration from the

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University of Texas at Arlington Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: I have never held elective office. Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $125,000 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: We have more than 450 individual contributions and about 70% of our contributors gave $100 or less. This is a true grass roots campaign and our strategy has intentionally focused on making this a people's campaign. We have fewer than 10 folks who gave the maximum $5,000 contribution. Phil Baker Charlie Corson Steve Wolens Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: I have never been arrested or personally involved in a criminal proceeding or civil suits. As a police chief in three different cities, I have been named in scores of suits in my official capacity. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: I still remember being a newly hired rookie cop in the early 1970’s- just arriving in the city, driving through the mix-master and seeing the Dallas skyline. I knew then that Dallas is where I belong. From the day I started my career as a beat cop, through my tenure as Dallas Police Chief, I have served and loved this city. I have a passion for making things right. That passion is what made me decide to run for Mayor. My entire career has been dedicated to public service. Specifically, I have had a long history of success turning around government organizations in turmoil and that’s exactly what Dallas City Hall needs right now. The same leadership style that enabled me to restore public trust in the Dallas Police Department, is the same skill set I will use to put our City back on course. In every post I have held, I have been able to make dramatic improvements. As your Chief of Police, Dallas saw six consecutive years of total crime reduction, as well as a 32 percent decrease in violent crime. In 2010 the city of Dallas reached its lowest crime rate in 40 years and its lowest murder rate in 42 years. I’m proud of that record and for the many innovations I brought to the department. The Dallas Morning News said I “inherited a department in disarray and left things in significantly better shape than he found them.” The paper also described me as having an “even keel, common sense leadership style.” Before becoming Dallas' Police Chief, I served as the Chief of Police in Grand Prairie and in Arlington for a total of 17 years. I also worked as Arlington's Deputy City Manager for five year and was responsible for managing Arlington's police and fire departments, code enforcement, convention center, the city's budgetary and financial concerns, parks and libraries, as well the housing department. I am proud that over 30 officers who served under me have gone on to become Police Chiefs in cities across the country. I know I am the right candidate for Dallas at this crucial time. I know the inner workings of our huge bureaucracy and I have a vision of where we need to go. In the PBS documentary Good to Great, DMN Editor Bob Mong praises my efforts turning around the DPD and said, “He’s sticking his neck out and it takes a lot of courage.” I will use that same courage to make the tough decisions at City Hall. My motto in this campaign has been: We are overtaxed and underserved. One of my commitments to the citizens of Dallas is that I will not vote to raise taxes. Across the board budget cuts are simply not working. Even in lean economic times we need to invest in services that improve the livability of our neighborhoods. We must question not just how well are we doing something but are we doing the right things. Too many budget decisions have been based on history, tradition and sacred cows. We must completely re-think the way we tackle the budget at Dallas City Hall. There are opportunities to help citizens and improve services within the existing budget, especially by improving employee morale and customer service The benefits of big-ticket projects are not flowing back to Dallas residents. The city must shift its focus away from grand projects and back to restoring and building our neighborhoods. Local government has the greatest impact on individual lives and this comes across each time a citizen goes out of their home. The only big projects that the city should examine in these times are those that impact the long term viability of our city, such as water, sanitation and the quality of our streets, sewer, and water lines. The latest census should be a huge wake-up call for all of us. North Texas is the fastest growing region in the country, yet the City of Dallas only increased by 9,000 residents. I call this the ‘donut-hole effect’. All around us good things are happening, but our city has not maximized that prosperity. Yet the only answers I hear are the same we have heard before; attract big business, offer big tax incentives, build big projects, etc. Interestingly, despite these strategies Dallas is losing out on projects to highly competitive and well-staffed suburban cities that show mastery of basic city services. The City of Dallas

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needs to work best for the residents who live here. We must concentrate on building and improving our neighborhoods. When neighborhoods are clean, safe, livable, close to parks and recreation, near stores and amenities, people will want to live here. Let’s rebuild from the bottom up not the top down. Let’s encourage businesses that relocate here to live in our neighborhoods too, and not take the first highway out of town at the end of the day. The city of Dallas must make DART into a daily asset and not simply an occasional convenience. The investment is tremendous and only by increasing density with quality will DART become a jewel that empowers the central city. We must create an economic environment that attracts small businesses as well as large employers because small businesses create thousands of new jobs. 4 of 5 private sector jobs are created by small business yet the city traditionally devotes its energies to only large relocations. We need to attract business to the southern sector of the city where opportunities for growth and employees are abundant. The people of Dallas have always been its greatest asset and this will not change. The fact that the city is a beacon for people across the country to settle here must be leveraged into a spirit of opportunity and change. I have experience working with every neighborhood in Dallas. I know the issues first hand and have direct relationships with Dallas residents throughout the city and in every community. I have a proven record of bringing groups and people together. My nearly 40 years of hands-on experience in municipal government will provide the critical foundation for success as your mayor. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1. Public Safety. I think public safety is still the basis for improvement on other fronts. We must insure people feel safe in their homes, when they are out shopping or taking their kids to the park. Our businesses must feel it is safe to open their doors or expand their business. You can’t have a great city if you don’t have a safe city. My tenure as Police Chief proved I am the candidate to protect Dallas residents. 2. Revitalize neighborhoods and get back to basics. My motto in this campaign has been: We are overtaxed and underserved. The benefits of big-ticket projects are not flowing back to Dallas residents. The city must shift its focus away from grand projects and back to restoring and building our neighborhoods. The City of Dallas needs to work best for the residents who choose to live here. If we improve the quality of life for our citizens and create a city that residents are proud of, then business will come and prosperity will follow. 3. Economic growth. We must create an economic environment that attracts small businesses as well as large employers because small businesses create hundreds of new jobs. We need to attract business to the southern sector of the city where opportunities for growth and employees are abundant. I believe in organic growth. Bishop Arts and North Oak Cliff are examples that I hope to see duplicated across the city. Small business owners partnered with community involvement to create an exciting and unique place to be. Dallas must also embrace quality development that allows for greater density and growth of the tax base. This is not in just large projects, but can be a larger office development or revitalized shopping centers. The city’s development code must be flexible enough to allow for this transition. Rather than simply pockets of prosperity in Dallas, we must strive for nodes of activity in all neighborhoods. To pay for our priorities I am committed to re-thinking and re-inventing government here in Dallas. I have a practical, hard-headed commitment to looking at everything we do to see how we can do it better, cheaper and faster without reducing the quality of the service or the satisfaction of our customers, the people of Dallas. I have a proven record of bringing groups and people together. I believe I can work well with the council and staff to bring needed change to Dallas. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I’m not a politician. I don’t believe you must be a CEO to be mayor of our great city. I believe we can reduce the size of government without cutting basic services and without raising taxes. I believe for long-term growth to occur we must start at the neighborhood level and focus on the basics. The city must work best for the people who live here. I am the only candidate talking about how our city can not only survive, but thrive by building strong neighborhoods. Building more roads to move people out of the city will not help our city grow. Our budget problems are more systemic than just a bad economy and I am the only candidate with a plan to re-invent government. I have a proven track record of turning around organizations in turmoil, not just in Dallas, but in every organization I have led. When I went to Grand Prairie as Police Chief at age 30, the department was known as corrupt. In a short time I turned the department around and changed the culture. After 14 years of building the Arlington Police Department into a nationally respected organization, I left behind sustainable leadership. My assistant chief was promoted to chief, and he is still in that position today. In Dallas, I promoted David Brown as my second in

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command and now he is leading the DPD. My leadership has been praised internationally. I am the proven candidate in this race. Being a major city police chief is perhaps one of the hardest jobs in the country. You have seen first hand how I handle crisis, you have seen my ability to take an organization plagued by scandal and turn it into an organization that is trusted and you have seen my successful leadership style. I have led a 4,200 person department with a $450 million dollar budget- but my business was about keeping citizens safe, not about making a profit. That’s the key difference. Leading a city is not like leading a company, the measures of success are different and so are the goals. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: No. We need to focus on the basics and prioritize what is most important. Safe, clean, well-maintained neighborhoods are key to growth and stability. We must return the focus on the citizens who live here. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: Dallas currently has enough police officers. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: No. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: What we need to do is far more than just identifying three areas to reduce spending. We need to re-invent how we look at our budget. We must look at privatization of areas where the public sector may be able to do a job better and cheaper than government. Even in lean economic times we need to invest in services that improve the livability of our neighborhoods. The recent census showed Dallas' growth rate since 2000 was practically zero. While many other cities had double-digit growth, Dallas not only dropped to the third largest city in Texas, but our growth rate was last among Texas' top twenty cities. With fewer federal dollars coming from Washington, this translates directly to a greater burden on our citizens. Across the board budget cuts are simply not working. With certainly 3-4 very difficult budget cycles still ahead of us I am committed to re-thinking and re-inventing government here in Dallas. I have a practical, hard-headed commitment to looking at everything we do to see how we can do it better, cheaper and faster without reducing the quality of the service or the satisfaction of our customers, the people of Dallas. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: The Trinity lakes, athletic fields, parks, trails, wetlands, and other parts of the parks portion of the plan should move forward as soon as possible. The Audubon Center is already a great asset with its’ wetlands and trails. I believe the toll road is no longer a viable option. Not only is funding not available for the foreseeable future, I fundamentally don’t believe a road should be built in a flood way. The road has no exits into downtown Dallas and does nothing for our city and it should not be built with taxpayer dollars. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: The key to growing the economy and growing the tax base is jobs. Jobs will be created when we concentrate our efforts on building strong, safe neighborhoods, better our schools and create spaces where people will want to live, work and play. Neighborhoods that promote the establishment of small businesses and create places people want to go to will then thrive. The Bishop Arts district is a perfect example of how a neighborhood came together and created a model of urban vitality and for businesses to prosper. We need to foster a strong belief in community, of neighbors working together towards of goal of improving their neighborhoods. If we promote through proper incentives establishing businesses big and small in our city that truly want to be part of our community, live in our city and be part of its’ future, then we will grow our tax base and have a growing economy. If we continue down the same path of just giving away tax breaks to lure a company to come here, I think we are headed for a future of zero growth and higher taxes for our citizens. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: Basic services at all levels need improvement. In particular, I think our streets and roadways are in dire need of repair. I also think our city does a terrible job of code enforcement in neighborhoods that are already deeply in trouble or those at risk of

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completely failing. We must also impress on our city employees to be great ambassadors and stewards of the citizens. We must immediately move to change the culture at city hall, just as I did with the every Police Department I have led. When I retired as Dallas Chief, residents had at least an 80% favorable opinion of Dallas police effectiveness. All ratings show that our library staff does a tremendous job at treating people like important customers – we need their great attitude city-wide. The water department is also still quite good. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: It is horrendous for Dallas. We are the ‘donut-hole’ in a region of huge growth. My answer is the same as in previous questions, we must re-make our city by rebuilding our neighborhoods and providing basic services to our citizens. People are voting with their feet and their wallet and finding that Dallas is not a great value. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: We need more density, but done correctly with neighborhood involved urban planning that is right for the neighborhood. What works for Bishop Arts District may not what is needed to fill the empty shopping centers in North Dallas. We must bring together the neighborhoods, developers and urban planners to develop the right plan for each neighborhood. We must make all our processes, particularly zoning and permits faster and easier so projects can move at a faster rate. Dallas is considered among the slowest and most expensive in zoning and permits than anywhere in North Texas. This must change. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: We have the opportunity to redefine the American city. To create a vibrant city neighborhood we must have a mix of homes, offices, restaurants, cafes, people friendly spaces and entertainment venues. Certainly we have many of these elements in play today. We should encourage more public-private partnerships and expand business incentives for small businesses to move downtown. We must also attract businesses to locate downtown, but I am not in favor of offering big incentives for corporate headquarters to relocate downtown then not having a strong commitment to living in our city. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Our police are here to protect the citizens of Dallas and should not to be used as immigration officers. When a person is arrested, they are taken to Lew Sterrett where the intake procedure determines residency and there are immigration officials at the jail. Immigration is a federal matter and we need to push our elected officials to solve this problem. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: The Dallas Morning News has done an exemplary job in recent Pulitzer Prize winning editorials detailing specific action that can be done today to improve the quality of life in the southern sector. As mayor, I will make sure we use our assets; police, social services, garbage pick-up, street maintenance, code enforcement and any other tools we have at our disposal to accomplish these objectives. As police chief, I targeted the worst crime areas and initiated crime sweeps. We instituted neighborhood policing. As mayor, my emphasis that each neighborhood must be strong and safe will be my mantra for the southern sector. In addition, the Inland Port project must be a top priority to get back on track. The Inland Port has the potential to create 60,000 jobs, but turning the potential into reality will take strong leadership at Dallas City Hall. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I support public-private partnerships. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: The concept of CityDesign is what needs to happen all over the city. Revitalized neighborhoods will mean a revitalized city. Working with each neighborhood, quality developers, and business entrepreneurs planning quality development that works. Bishop Arts district is also an excellent example of a neighborhood with a great vision. This is the

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very cornerstone of my campaign. As mayor, I will lead the effort so that every neighborhood can marshal its’ residents, small business and developers in planning a brighter future. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: We are more than glitzy buildings, shopping and crowded super highways. Our citizens are a rich diversity of many cultures living and working together for a better future. We have an incredible world-class arts district but just as important, we have many wonderfully talented and creative smaller arts and cultural groups throughout our city that add much to our fabric of diversity. According to DISD, there are over 70 languages spoken in the homes of our students. This already makes us a world-class city. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront? A: That we are the donut hole in a region of prosperity and if we don’t concentrate on Dallas and not the region, if we don’t put our citizens first, we will continue to decline. The city can no longer be dismissive of high quality suburbs. Instead, we must become more competitive. Q: The mayor of Dallas has only one vote and no more power than the bully pulpit affords. How would you build consensus for your agenda? A: I have experience working with every neighborhood in Dallas. I know the issues first hand and have direct relationships with Dallas residents throughout the city and in every community. I have a proven record of bringing groups and people together. I believe I can work well with the council and staff to bring needed change to Dallas. As police chief you deal with many different constituencies and you must bring them all together. A Dallas Police Chief balances seven police unions, community groups, the mayor and council and dozens of media outlets always scrutinizing your actions. The job of major City Police Chief is perhaps one of the most difficult jobs in the country. I am a good listener, but also a good persuader. Q: Too often, the Dallas City Council divides along racial and geographic lines when controversial issues emerge. As mayor, what would you do to break that cycle? A: I believe the answer to this question is the same a previous question. I have worked with every neighborhood and every community and as mayor I will work well with every council member. As Dallas Police Chief, I had good relationships with council members for six years. My entire 39 year career has depended on having successful relationships with city council members in various cities. Q: How would you assess former mayor Tom Leppert’s tenure at City Hall? What’s one issue that you would have approached differently than Leppert? A: I look to the future, not the past. I wish him well. Mike Rawlings

Biographical Info:

Name: MIKE RAWLINGS Street Address: 3232 MCKINNEY AVENUE STE 600 City/Town: DALLAS State: TX Date of Birth: AUGUST 25 1954 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-871-6802 Fax Number: 214-880-4491 E-mail Address: RAWLINGS@CICPARTNERS.COM or Mike@mikerawlingsfordallas.com Campaign Web Site Address: WWW.MIKERAWLINGSFORDALLAS.COM
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city of Dallas A: Born in Texas and moved to Dallas in 1976 Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Vice Chairman, CIC Partners and CEO of Legends Hospitality Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Recently served as President of the Dallas Parks & Recreation Board, former Chair of the Dallas Convention and Visitors Bureau, and served five years as Homeless Czar, leading Dallas’ effort to fight chronic homelessness

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Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Chairman of Dallas ISD’s Youth and Family Services Center Initiative, Director of Dallas Fort Worth Minority Business Development Council, Board of Trustees of Jesuit College Preparatory School Q: Education A: B.A. Philosophy/Communications from Boston College, Magna Cum Laude (attended on a football scholarship) Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: NONE Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: So far, I have raised a little over $1 million for my campaign from donors from all parts of the city, with more than 60% of these donations coming from smaller contributions. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Some of the contributors to my campaign include Marianne & Roger Staubach, Margot & H. Ross Perot and Linda & Mitch Hart Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: I have never been arrested. I was involved as a Plaintiff in a civil suit several years ago when my wife and I sued the people who purchased a house from us. The jury ruled in our favor. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background best prepares you to serve in this post? A: As mayor, I will put more than three decades of experience as a CEO, a sales and marketing expert and as an investor and advisor to small and medium-sized businesses, to work for taxpayers and citizens. I’ve been in business for more than three decades, serving as chief executive of three companies, the largest being Pizza Hut. At Pizza Hut, he led a turnaround of the world’s largest pizza brand resulting in highest weekly store sales in Pizza Hut history, with sales of more than $5 billion. During a tough economy, I was able to double operating profit and reach record high profit margins. During these tough economic times, we need leadership that can not only manage tough budgets, but work to streamline and re-engineer our city government and make sure that we emerge from this downturn leaner and stronger. And, as a volunteer leader I’ve taken on some of Dallas’ toughest challenges. As Chair of the Convention and Visitors Bureau, I helped bring in events worth more than $400 million in direct economic impact to Dallas – critical tax dollars from visitors that help relieve the burden on our homeowners. As the city’s Homeless Czar, I oversaw the construction and opening of The Bridge, our city’s homeless assistance center – then, I raised more than $7 million in private donations to help fund ongoing operating expenses, saving taxpayers million of dollars each year. As President of the Dallas Park & Recreation Board, when the city made drastic cuts in the Park & Recreation budget, I raised more than $1 million in private funding to keep rec centers open and fund maintenance of our parks. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: I will work to make city government more efficient and effective, and get taxpayers more for their dollars. I will use my relationships and experience as a marketing and sales expert to position the City and attract new business and development, creating jobs and growth. And I will use the mayor’s office as a bully pulpit to raise awareness and launch and execute a public-private partnership to improve our public schools. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: My opponents both come from city government. I have more than thirty years experience in business and can use private sector solutions to make our city government work better for those it serves. I know firsthand what it takes to create jobs and economic growth. And, I can use relationships I have built during thirty years as a businessman and CEO to attract new business and development and grow our tax base. Q: Even before last year’s property tax increase, Dallas had one of the highest tax rates in North Texas and among big cities in Texas. Are Dallas residents getting sufficient bang for their tax buck when other cities have lower rates? Describe any changes you favor. A: I believe we can use this economic downturn as an opportunity to re-engineer city government to make it smaller and more efficient, and to change the way we approach tax revenues, budgeting and other financial decisions. If we can emerge from this downturn leaner and stronger, then we will be a better city moving forward. Some of the changes I would propose are: • Recommend a two-year budget forecast that allows us more time to find effective solutions when we see big budget gaps, • Work department-

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by-department to cut waste and streamline systems to make sure taxpayers get a greater return for each dollar, • Establish budget priorities and ensure that these are funded before dollars go to non-essentials, • Make City Hall more user friendly for small businesses and developers by reducing development and permit fees, cutting red tape and requiring quicker decisions and approvals from city departments. Q: Budget concerns compelled the City Council to slow its program of hiring new police officers annually over attrition. Should the city resume the effort, even when facing a budget shortfall? Or does Dallas have enough police officers now? A: Yes, hiring more police officers to reach the 3 officers per every 1,000 citizens has been critical in reducing our crime rate, and I will work to maintain that standard. We can never be too safe. Q: City officials are already bracing for another lean budget year. Would you consider an additional property tax increase to avoid deep budget cuts? A: I think we can not only protect, but also improve, city services without raising taxes. Q: Please identify three areas in the city budget where you would reduce spending. Be specific. A: I would reduce spending in every city department except for Police and Economic Development. Q: The city’s Trinity River Project has run into a number of roadblocks during the last few years. Beyond upgrading the levees, what parts of the project should be prioritized, and how will they be funded? Is the toll road a viable option? A: The Trinity River Project will transform the City of Dallas. Our first priority must be making sure the levees are sounds and the surrounding communities are safe. I also believe it is critical to complete the parks and recreation component of the project, not only for the quality of life for our families, but for economic development. At some point the traffic concerns of the city will need to be addressed in a manner that allows it to complement the other parts of the project. The roads we build must be done in a smart, cost-effective manner that does not further burden our taxpayers. Q: What, specifically, should the mayor and City Council do to spur economic development and grow the tax base? A: The best solution to protecting taxpayers and improve our services is making the economic pie bigger by attracting new business, encouraging development and creating new jobs and growth. I plan to do this by: • Making City Hall more user friendly for small businesses and developers by reducing development and permit fees, cutting red tape and requiring quicker decisions and approvals from city departments, • Work at a CEO-to-CEO level to attract new business, and spend one day per week reaching out to Fortune 500 CEOs and selling them on doing business in Dallas, • Build upon beachheads like Bishop Arts, UNT Dallas, Lancaster Kiest and West Dallas to bring new growth and jobs to our city’s greatest untapped resource: the Southern Sector. Being mayor also means having the courage to take on big challenges that are crippling our City, even if it means stepping on toes or reaching beyond the traditional boundaries of the mayor’s office. For the city of Dallas, the elephant in the room that we need to acknowledge is the state of our public schools. Fact is, we cannot be a great city without great public schools, and stronger schools will build stronger neighborhoods. We must be accountable as leaders, and as a community, for helping educate our schoolchildren – because it’s an issue that touches us all. I think we can create a brighter future for our public schools and they families they serve. That’s why, as Mayor, I will implement a comprehensive and sustainable plan to help improve our public schools. Helping our schools could be the single greatest thing we do as a city to grow our economy and provide opportunity today, and for the next generation. Q: When it comes to delivering basic city services, where does Dallas excel? Where do you see room for improvement? A: I think there is always room for improvement, and a good leader always works for greater efficiency and effectiveness. We live in a global marketplace, and we must strive to be greater in order to compete. We have a great park system that we have spent millions on to get it to this point. We must be more attentive to street and road maintenance, Lemmon Avenue is a good example of that. Q: Texas and most of its metropolitan areas showed sharp population growth in the 2010 census, but the city of Dallas did not. Is this good, bad or indifferent for Dallas residents and North Texas as a region? If you see it as bad, what should the city do to attract more people to live here? A: Lack of substantial growth is bad and unhealthy. It hard for us to grow economically if our population does not grow, so in that regard it is a bad indicator. Some people think that crime and the state of our neighborhoods is hampering our growth. Well, our crime has gone down over the past few years and people are still moving to the suburbs. I think

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they are leaving for better schools, and that’s just wrong. Our parents shouldn’t be forced to choose between sending their children to an academically unacceptable school or moving to the suburbs. Fact is, we cannot be a great city without great public schools, and stronger schools will build stronger neighborhoods where people want to live. We must be accountable as leaders, and as a community, for helping educate our schoolchildren – because it’s an issue that touches us all. I think we can create a brighter future for our public schools and they families they serve. That’s why, as Mayor, I will implement a comprehensive and sustainable plan to help improve our public schools. Q: Neighborhood growth and questions about density remain pertinent issues. What is the right level of density for Dallas neighborhoods, especially in the core of the city inside Loop 12? And how should city government go about achieving that level of density? A: We have tremendous room to grow, especially in the Southern Sector. For too long we have tried to build North and the result is congestion and problems for neighborhoods. We, as a City, must make our next big initiative creating major growth south of the Trinity. There are great neighborhoods like Mountain Creek, Pleasant Grove and South Oak Cliff that are not realizing their full potential, but can, if the City concentrates efforts in that part of the City. Q: Revitalizing downtown Dallas has long been a priority for city leaders. What’s one action that the City Council could take to jumpstart this effort? A: I strongly believe that making City Hall more business friendly will not only jumpstart new projects downtown, but in all parts of our City. Dallas has earned the notorious distinction of being one of the worst cities in Texas to do business with, and we must change that image. We can start by reducing development and permitting fees, and reducing the amount of time it takes to get decisions and approvals from city departments – but the real change must be in instilling a more customer friendly attitude at City Hall. First, we must believe in the potential of our City. Second, we must be its advocates. Third, we must deliver great customer service, starting at City Hall and spreading throughout the entire city. Q: What should the city or the police department do, if anything, to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Immigration and the laws pertaining to it are federal issues. The Courts have confirmed this. We must ensure we enforce the federal statutes. And then we must turn to providing our citizens the basic services they need and the safety they deserve. Q: For decades, southern Dallas has lagged behind the rest of the city by almost any measure. What should be the council’s priorities for improving the quality of life in the southern half of the city, and how would you accomplish these objectives? A: The greatest opportunity the City of Dallas has is south of the Trinity. Development of the Southern Sector will be one of my top priorities. Also, there is no greater equalizer than education, and if our city leaders can embrace the idea of helping our schools, all parts of our city will benefit, especially the Southern Sector. We must also work to heal the racial division at the city council level, and I think we accomplish this with the right mayor. And we must work to promote business and growth by working directly with stakeholders, community leaders and business owners in the Southern Sector on real business opportunities – and by fostering and growing minority-owned businesses as we grow our economy. Q: This newspaper has advocated for the creation of a public-private economic development corporation to help speed growth in southern Dallas. What is your view of this idea? A: I am a huge proponent of public-private partnerships. They were the key to success on the homeless issue, and they are critical in my plan to help our public schools. We are fortunate to live in a city with great civic-minded corporate citizens, and we should use these resources to improve our city. Q: The CityDesign Studio has won praise for its plan to redevelop West Dallas. How can this effort be replicated in other parts of the city, and where should we start? A: First, ensure we execute the West Dallas plan as developed and celebrate its success. Second, commend the philanthropists that paid for the work and recruit more to fuel future funding. Third, pick the next key area that is in need of a holistic approach and do it again. Q: What is the best under-publicized thing about Dallas that you wish more non-Dallas residents knew? A: I wish more of our residents knew what wonderful parks and recreation amenities we have here in Dallas. From White Rock Lake, to the Katy Trail, to Fair Park – we a have a wonderful system of more than 360 parks. We are the fifth largest park system in the nation, and these are diverse amenities that offer athletics, recreation and relaxation. Also, I think more people should know about the great burgers at Adair’s. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about Dallas that voters must confront?

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A: Right now, we are a city divided. We are divided racially. We are divided economically. And we are divided by opportunity. As mayor, I will work to erase these boundaries by leading to improve our public schools, grow our economy and create jobs and opportunity for citizens on both sides of the Trinity. I believe one of our greatest untapped resources for growth is the Southern Sector, and as mayor I will work to bring real development and business to this part of our city. Q: The mayor of Dallas has only one vote and no more power than the bully pulpit affords. How would you build consensus for your agenda? A: First, as far as I am concerned, it is not about my agenda – as mayor I would lead for OUR shared agenda for our city that is the culmination of the thoughts and ideas of the Council. On a personal note, I would attribute much of my success in business to my ability to relate to all types of people. My parents were both teachers, so I grew up in a home with a lot of love and support, but not a lot of money. I got my first job when I was 12, attended college on a football scholarship, and worked my way up from an entry-level copywriter to become CEO of the largest agency in the Southwest. My life’s experiences help me relate to all types of people and perspectives, and to learn the value of teamwork. And I believe these life skills will serve me well as mayor. Q: Too often, the Dallas City Council divides along racial and geographic lines when controversial issues emerge. As mayor, what would you do to break that cycle? A: So often in life, conflict arises not by what is said, but by how it is said. As mayor, I will work to always be respectful, even when I disagree with my colleagues. Besides doing the “right” thing at City Hall, I will work to integrate our social lives as well so that we can learn how similar we are to each other. Q: How would you assess former mayor Tom Leppert’s tenure at City Hall? What’s one issue that you would have approached differently than Leppert? A: I think Mayor Leppert was an effective mayor, especially in regard to restoring a more business-friendly tone than his predecessor and working to expand our tax base. As a businessman, he understands that the only way to bring sustainable improvements to our basics without burdening homeowners is to generate new commercial tax revenues. My only regret about Mayor Leppert is that I wish he would’ve stayed for his entire term and then for another one.

Denton City Council, Place 1
Candidates (choose 1):
Eliborio "Eli Gemini" Beltrán
Biographical Info: Questions:

Description: Note: Only Denton residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Q: Length of residency in the city A: - no response Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: - no response Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: - no response Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: - no response Q: Education A: - no response Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: - no response Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: - no response Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: - no response Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: - no response Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most

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qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: - no response Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: - no response Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: - no response Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: - no response Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: - no response Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: - no response Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: - no response Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: - no response Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: - no response Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: - no response Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: - no response Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: - no response Damon J. Bullock

Biographical Info:

Name: Damon Bullock Street Address: P.O. Box 424141 City/Town: Denton State: Texas Date of Birth: 01/12/1975 Home Phone Number: 940-271-5107 Mobile Phone Number: 501-960-5791 E-mail Address: djbullock2002@yahoo.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.damonbullockcampaign.webstarts.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 4 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 4 years

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Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Instructor and member of Army National Guard Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: NAACP, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., Shamrock-Trinity Lodge #35, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, member of Calvary Church Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: NAACP, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., Shamrock-Trinity Lodge #35, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, member of Calvary Church Q: Education A: BA in sociology from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, MA in Liberal Studies from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, and pursuing PhD in sociology at Texas Woman's University Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: None Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: None Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I am running for office because of my passion to listen to the voice and concern for others. I am a progressive candidate that believe problems and issues can only be rectified my deliberate action and an understanding of the current issues. I have the fortitude to do what's right but sense to understand from the perspective of others. My membership in the Army as a leadership prepares me to serve in this office. Like the Army, a leader has to have a greater insight and desire to serve his/her community. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: I would push for economic growth, better air quality, and a sense of community in Denton. I will push them by educating the community about my ideas concerning these issues. I would pay for them by possibly allocating taxes. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: My opponents highlight the fact of living in Denton the longest as to why they should be elected. However, I believe that living or being from a community does not necessarily mean that the well-being of that community is a top priority. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: That is a top priority because commercial development leads to job opportunities for the community. Economic growth will give the residents a positive outlook towards the future. I would not readily condemn the city but things could be done better. I would suggest the city did more active recruiting of companies for commercial development. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: The city has a heterogeneous population with the majority of residents are White. However, there has been an increase in the Hispanic population over the years. I think the city is continually offering a multicultural environment. In addition, Denton houses two major universities that have students from diverse backgrounds. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: I think the city should prosecute employers that has illegal immigrants on their staff. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I oppose a regional transit system Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: I think the city can form partnerships in bringing more jobs to Denton. I would support that by having talks on the advantages for both groups. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to

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taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: I think so Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: I think the current leadership could have done more to introduce jobs for the residents and economic growth for the community. I suggest allocating funds for essential needs such as infrastructure. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Things will get done only when their voices are heard, particularly for the minority community. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: - no response Gerard D. Hudspeth

Biographical Info:

Name: Gerard D Hudspeth Street Address: 606 Wilson Street City/Town: Denton State: Texas Date of Birth: November 28, 1972 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-543-9091 Home Phone Number: 940-591-6890 Mobile Phone Number: See work Fax Number: n/a E-mail Address: ghudspeth@courtroomsciences.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.gerardhudspeth.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: I have lived in Denton for 36 years total. Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: I have lived in District 1, for 20 years. Q: Occupation/main source of income A: I currently work as an Account Executive, for Courtroom Sciences. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Currently I serve as a CASA Volunteer, I am the Chair of the Denton Community Development and Advisory Committee, and lastly I'm an Usher at the Inspiring Body of Christ Church. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: I served as both the President and VP of Thomas Rivera Elementary school PTA. I was Member of the Health Services of North Texas board. Lastly I was trained in the Citizen Patrol program (administered by DPD) IBOC. Q: Education A: I'm a Denton High school graduate. I then attended, North Central Texas College. I graduated from the Professional Development Institute and earned my paralegal certificate (accredited by The University of North Texas). Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: I previously ran for the same office (City Council District 1). Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Thus far I've raised $2,600 thus far in my campaign. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: - no response Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain:

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A: I have never been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I was born and raised in Denton and spent the majority of my time in District 1. My experience is one of the key assets. The city of Denton is diverse and the council should reflect its citizenship. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: My priority is to first, unite the district, next develop a process and procedure of communication with the citizen in the district. Lastly, the increased conversation will yield a vision. I would create daily steps to fulfill the vision. There is no cost associated with these actions. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: The key differences are my experience in the district. Also I think I have a better ability to unite the people and communicate with all its residents. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: On my list attracting commercial development ranks third. It falls directly in line with implementing a vision for the district. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: - no response Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: - no response Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I support seamless regional transit system. The Denton County rail service is in progress and will go live in June. I support this project 100%. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: - no response Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: - no response Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: The current council has done a fair job. I would take a more detailed look at the budget and the city’s spending. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: The district has very low voter participations; my goal is to work to change that. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: I would continue to work with state and federal legislators to intact tougher regulations. At this point I'm not sure about the current administration’s commitment. Timothy Wayne Morrow

Biographical Info: Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so

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had passed. Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: Occupation/main source of income A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: Education A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so

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had passed. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: The candidate advised The Dallas Morning News that he is not actively campaigning for this position. He attempted to withdraw formally from the race, but the deadline to do so had passed. Kevin Roden

Biographical Info:

Name: Kevin Roden Street Address: 322 Texas Street City/Town: Denton State: Texas Date of Birth: 6/27/74 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 940-206-5239 Home Phone Number: 940-206-5239 Mobile Phone Number: 940-206-5239 E-mail Address: kevin@rodenfordenton.com Campaign Web Site Address: http://rodenfordenton.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: I have lived in Denton since August 1992. Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: I have lived in District 1 since August 2005. Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Educator. I work as the Assistant Director of Student Life for the Texas Academy of

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Mathematics and Science, an residential academy for high school-age students located on the campus of the University of North Texas. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: I am currently the Chairperson for the Denton Historic Landmark Commission. I serve on the Citizen Advisory Team for the Denton County Transportation Authority. I run a local news and opinion website devoted to educating Denton citizens on local affairs and happenings - http://thinkdenton.com. I am the host of Denton's Drink and Think, a Denton cultural landmark which engages the community on big ideas and issues. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: I served on the City of Denton Term Limits Charter Review Committee in 2009. I have worked as an adviser for "35 Conferette," a music festival in Denton (previously NX35). I have served and continue to serve several non-profits and local agencies through community service activities. Q: Education A: PhD (in progress) - University of Dallas, Institute of Philosophic Studies, Philosophy MA (2007) - University of Dallas, Philosophy BA (1998) - University of North Texas, Political Science Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Chairperson - Historic Landmark Commission (appointed in 2009 by Denton City Council) Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Approximately $4500 so far. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Eric Pulido Eric Nichelson McKenzie Smith Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: Recently, Denton has been in a fast-paced transition from a semi-rural college town to a fast-growing cultural and intellectual center with a growing urban flare. As the upcoming DCTA A-Train connects us to the metroplex in ways previously unimaginable, Denton will be in need of a new brand of leadership to help us handle growth in a way that has an eye on the character and uniqueness of our community. One way our community has felt this pressure is from development interests in and around our precious older neighborhoods, many of which are located within District 1. My experience as Chair of the Historic Landmark Commission has given me a track record of pro-neighborhood advocacy. Instead of simply protecting our core neighborhoods, it is time for Denton to begin to cherish them through infrastructure investments. Years of city planning that has seen the city more of a place for cars rather than humans has had the result of cutting off safe walking and biking paths for neighborhoods that are otherwise quite close to our town square. Denton's citizens are our greatest, yet under-utilized asset. Denton can do better at actively involving citizen participation in civic affairs. Through my involvement with Denton Drink and Think and thinkdenton.com, I have a proven record of getting citizens involved in thinking through the future of their community. It is my belief that Denton has one of the most creative and technologically-savvy workforces in the region. Our hidden secret is that we have many post-graduate students who would rather wait on tables than leave Denton - and they will usually be ready to work at a profession for a lower cost than their counterparts in Dallas and Fort Worth. We need city leadership who has a vision for how to attract new employment opportunities to our city. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Infrastructure improvements that better connect and heal our neighborhoods. Starting with what is already planned for our downtown as part of the recent Downtown Implementation Plan, I will push to include the surrounding neighborhoods in the plan as a key amenity to the downtown area. Infrastructure needs included: sidewalks, bike lanes, and safe ways to cross busy roads. The plan could be put in place today, even if we have to wait for better financial times to begin implementation. As roads are repaved on normal schedules, that is a good time to add bike lanes at a low cost. Reexamine how Denton sells itself to potential employers. We need to develop a savvy, technologically driven marketing campaign in order to attract meaningful employment to Denton. Given the creativity already existing in this city, I trust we can enlist citizen volunteers to help with such a project in a way that avoids the cost of outside consultants who might normally create such a campaign. Historic preservation of our downtown structures. Most citizens

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would be surprised to learn that most of the historically significant structures in our downtown area are without meaningful preservation protection. The city has yet to learn the lesson from the destruction of 1920s era buildings in the Fry Street area and needs to respond with measures that prevent something similar from happening on our historic square. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I have more experience. I serve as the Chair of the Historic Landmark Commission and as a member of the DCTA Citizen Advisory Team. I have written extensively on several key city issues through my work with thinkdenton.com. I have more vision. A simple comparison of the issues on my website versus my opponents will make this clear. I have more ability to get other citizens involved in the process. My wife and I have hosted monthly gatherings in our home over the years to thousands of friends and strangers alike - many of these forums have centered on thinking through the city. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Denton continues to feel the pains of an ailing state and national economic crisis. Though sales tax revenue appears to be on a consistent rebound, the downturn of the last few years will continue to have economic consequences for some time. Expected state cuts in the areas of public schools and higher education will continue to burden our local turn-around. Municipalities across the country, in light of the national economic woes, are beginning to take a serious look at what they can do to ensure a healthy economy in their city and region in order to protect against merely being at the mercy of national or global trends. Denton needs to take a fresh look at just how we are going about attracting and retaining companies to our city. Some of our city’s most educated, talented, creative, and hard-working citizens are serving our meals at restaurants, pouring our drinks at the local bar, or pulling shots of espresso at the coffee shop. They are doing this because we have a town with a feel, a culture, and a list of amenities that makes them want to stay – and they are willing to work for minimum wage and tips in order to do so. We should be actively advertising this unique workforce to potential employers around the world. I have no doubt that many of these young college graduates would be willing to work for less than their big city counterparts if it meant being able to stay living in Denton. In order to do that, however, we need to make sure that we are continuing to pursue policies that make Denton attractive for the emerging young creative class. We need to stop seeing things such as bike lines as mere issues of concern to traffic engineers. It is precisely our lack of such amenities that are driving many talented graduates away from Denton and to places such as Austin and Seattle – and, no doubt, savvy employers follow such trends when making decisions on where to relocate. We need to understand how intricately tied our policies on issues like livability, the environment, our culture, and the arts are to our economic well-being. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: The average voting age in Denton is 61, while the median age of Denton residents is 26. Many are taking notice of an emerging crop of 30 somethings who are creating culture in new ways in Denton. Through large civic events such as 35 Conferette and the Denton Community Market to rising non-profits such as Querencia Bike Shop and Seeds of Change to voices for change found in the likes of BikeDenton.org, Denton is changing through the efforts of a younger demographic. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Immigration policy is an issue that is typically dealt with at the Federal level. But cities can and should advise state and federal representatives on how the issue effects their municipalities in various ways. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I favor a seamless regional transit system. I have been an outspoken advocate of the upcoming DCTA A-Train, a train that will connect Denton to the DART system in June of this year. It is now our turn to make sure that perceptions change enough regarding public transit in order to see increasing levels of success as we move forward. The only way to effectively argue for increased infrastructure and levels of service is to create a demand. We need to work closely with local schools, universities, citizen groups, and businesses to make sure we are providing the best education and opportunities about the possibilities of rail service in our region.

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Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: In addition to regional transit, the environment is another issue that requires regional cooperation. The nature of the environment teaches us that pollution does not remain within the limits of a city - bad policies in one area negatively effect areas where even the best practices are in place. Given the recent concern over the environmental and health effects of natural gas drilling in our area, there is an opportunity for greater cooperation and collaboration from among concerned cities. Not only will this aid in the sharing of the best information and practices, but it allows for a greater block of voices with state and federal regulators when it comes to local control over such issues. Another area for cooperation is the economy. Economic health tends to track with localities. Working together with other cities in the North Texas region can have the positive effect of identifying areas of strength and resources that can be useful to all in terms of developing and attracting industry. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: As we grow and there is increased interest in development, there needs to be continual education among the key decision makers both at the council and city staff level, of the uniqueness of our town. The state of the public administration profession today means that a good number of our city staff members are not from here and many do not even live within the Denton city limits. That presents the possibility of a vision for Denton fostered among the city’s professional workers that is at odds with the vision of our citizens. Efforts should be made to remedy this difference of perspective. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: I have little criticism of how the current leadership has handled our city budget. They have made steps to get ahead of the economic downturn impacting us through a few years of lower sales tax and diminished property tax revenue. I would continue to critically examine our use of high-paid outside consultants for things that could be done with our existing professionals and engaged citizens. We need to prioritize and identify which major purchases, replacements, or upgrades can be put off until better economic times. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: The lack of meaningful citizen engagement worries me greatly. Only about 5.3% of the voting population bothers to vote in local elections, yet it is the city where we ought to be learning how to be effective citizens in a democracy. Without this, our sense of citizenship will be reared solely through an engagement with abstracted, and often times polarizing, national issues. I wonder if we ever look at our city and ask the important question: what are we doing as a city to develop the next generation of citizens? Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: It is surprising that Denton has chosen a path of mediocrity when it comes to our approach to the environmental issue of our day – natural gas drilling in urban areas. You may recall the firestorm that erupted when the City Council voted to allow drilling at Rayzor Ranch, right next to a city park and numerous medical facilities. At the time, the Council claimed their hands were tied by state regulations and outdated city codes. After having the chance to review and begin the process of amending city ordinances on the matter, the Council has opted to reject a moratorium on drilling (a path many cities in Texas have pursued) and has chosen to implement temporary rules that are not even the toughest possible from around the state. In fact, the recently adopted rules, despite the posturing of council members during the Rayzor Ranch drilling debate, are not even tough enough to prevent a repeat of that scenario. We can and should do better than this. Recently, a group of UNT professors from various departments embarked on a research study of the environmental and health impacts of natural gas drilling in the region. Following the quite humane “precautionary principle,” Denton should immediately declare a moratorium on such drilling until the conclusion of such and other studies. Protecting the health and safety of her citizens is the most basic justification of government. In the absence of coherent or effective state regulation on the matter, cities should more forcefully assert their power in order to protect their citizens. As we re-examine our ordinances related to drilling, these are my recommendations: Denton should seek to be a state and regional leader when it comes to progressive regulations. Other Texas cities should use us as a model for tough urban drilling regulations that aims to protect our citizens. Renters need to have a seat at the table. Although the legal justification for local regulation in such matters stems from a city’s right to control nuisances, the current and

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suggested policies dealing with issues of notification and set- back requirements dictate that only actual property owners are included in the process. I can own a 100 unit apartment complex and based on my recommendation alone, set-back requirements can be eased for drilling on that property simply because I am in support. If the legal justification stems from local nuisance regulatory powers, then ANYONE potentially bothered by such drilling by virtue of their proximity (whether owners or not) should be able to support percentages of the drilling application. Gas company representatives who make it a habit of intimidating our city and residents by openly threatening lawsuits in public hearings should not have a seat at the table in such discussions. UNT’s worldrenown environmental ethics department should be brought into the discussions and representative researchers should sit on the relevant boards. A partnership should be forged with the University of North Texas to gain from their expertise on these and other environmental matters.

Denton City Council, Place 2
Candidates (choose 1):
Zorobabel Gomez
Biographical Info:

Description: Note: Only Denton residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Name: Zoro Gomez Street Address: 3101 Cedar Hill City/Town: Denton State: Texas Date of Birth: 07-22-1992 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (940) 595-5501 Home Phone Number: (940) 595-5501 Mobile Phone Number: (940) 595-5501 E-mail Address: zoro.gomez@gmail.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 18 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 11 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Student Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Attempting to get a spot on City Council to get involved in my community hoping to start getting involved at a young age. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Prosecutor for Denton County Teen Court program for two years. Q: Education A: I graduated from Denton High School (Class 2010) and I am currently a student at North Central Texas College working on my core classes. Afterwards I plan on transferring to the University of North Texas for my Bachelor's Degree in International Business. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None; This is my first time running and won't be my last. Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Right now I currently have raised around the right amount I needed for my campaign. All I am getting done is business cards, flyers, bumper stickers, a few t-shirts, and my yard signs. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: My parents have been my main contributors to my campaign funding, then comes my family (uncles, cousins, ect.) and my other top contributor is my insurance agent. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I am running for office for a lot of reasons. My main reason is because I see a lot of

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things that need to be changed and I don't want to just sit back and complain I want to take action, like Gandhi once said, "Be the change you want to see in the world." I believe the voters should consider me as the most qualified candidate because I bring in a completely different perspective to the City Council because I am young, a minority, and I don't have any preconceived notions. I would look at every problem from an un-biased point of view. In other words, I am the best qualified candidate to make the best decisions for the generations to come. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Improve infrastructure, communications between city hall and citizens, and address budgetary shortfalls. I don't think this is going to need much pushing as these are issues which should have been addressed years ago and citizens are anxious for these actions. The most prudent way to pay for these improvements would be to cut from non-essential services so that no further debt is acquired. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: The key differences between me and my opponent is that I am not an establishment candidate which means my agenda is completely different than what has been pushed for the last 35 years. Judging from the state of the city it is evident that it has not worked for us. Another is I bring a new perspective to the table: I'm young, a minority and am not set in my ways. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Denton has not done a good job of diversifying its tax base. We lack upscale developments, both residential and commercial, because we don't have good-paying jobs to support such development. Attracting this type of development would be a high priority and one way to attract it would be to streamline the planning department to be more effective and efficient so that developers would have a pleasant enough experience that other developers would be interested in coming as well. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Denton is one of the fastest growing cities in our area. In 1980 Denton's population was 40,000, today it stands at approximately 130,000. That is phenomenal growth. Denton is not doing enough to address infrastructure issues (particularly streets) to keep up with these daunting numbers. I would address the fundamentals of public safety (police, fire and ambulance) and utilities (roads, infrastructure, etc.) before earmarking funds for nonessential services. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Denton is not in a position to address the issue of illegal immigration because there is no money in the budget and secondly illegal immigration is a federal, not local issue. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: Yes, I favor a seamless regional transit system and we're well on our way to making it happen. We have buses and the train is coming in June. Now we need bike lanes which can only be done if we address the road problems. We're falling behind $16 million a year in street repairs. The other issue which needs to be addressed is that of ridership. We need to advertise and encourage everyone to use the system. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Denton has not fared well in partnerships generally speaking. Regional partnerships are always a good thing, particularly with expensive projects which would be better shared and not duplicated. I would encourage regional partnerships after becoming more familiar with regional needs at the Councils of Government meetings. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Our city utility services, etc. are absolutely great. I'm not sure how cost-effective the services are as City Hall was not able or willing to provide me with information I needed to make those assessments. The changes I would make is to ask for a complete audit of each department. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?

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A: The current leadership has not done well in weathering the economic storm because they've not made necessary cuts to the budget. We've spent some of our reserves and have even more debt obligations than ever. The only way to balance the budget and main basic infrastructure is to first acknowledge that spending is out of control and look for the appropriate solutions. Thus far, our current leadership still believes it's doing a good job. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: The most uncomfortable truth about our city which voters must confront is the debt burden they are saddling future generations with. The generation before me is the first generation which did not have the same opportunities as their parents. It is sad they are not thinking about the future generations and the hardships they'll be facing. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: City leaders promised citizens they'd have input into crafting local ordinances to protect the citizens. So far they've denied citizens any input, have not adopted the most stringent drilling ordinances and seem to love natural gas well drilling because it brings "economic development" to the city. This is sad in the sense that very little seems to have been done to protect the citizens. There are gas wells very close to schools, houses, nursing homes, hospitals and parks. This doesn't look like a concerned council to me. Dalton Gregory
Biographical Info:

Name: Dalton Gregory Street Address: 2408 Emerson Lane City/Town: Denton State: Texas Date of Birth: February 15, 1952 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 940-565-9331 Home Phone Number: 940-565-9331 Mobile Phone Number: N.A. Fax Number: N.A. E-mail Address: daltonrgregory@gmail.com Campaign Web Site Address: N.A.
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 47 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 29 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Texas Teacher Retirement System Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: I am completing my first two years on the Denton City Council representing the citizens of district 2. I serve on the Economic Development Partnership Board, the council Committee on the Environment, the council Mobility Committee, and the council Ethics Committee. I have supported stronger regulations for gas well drilling, smart growth, appropriate incentives for economic development, neighborhood integrity, and bicycle and pedestrian issues. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: I have given more than 20 years of service on boards and committees for the City of Denton. I worked to created the Teen Court for Denton, a convenient and affordable after school day care in all Denton elementary schools, and the Clear Creek Natural Heritage Center. I have served 12 years on the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board along with other city committees. Q: Education A: Graduated from Denton High School in 1970 Bachelor of Science in Education University of Texas at Austin - 1974 Master of Education (Administration) - Sam Houston State University - 1981 Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: I was elected in 2009 to the Denton City Council Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $1,000 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Four individuals have given $100 each. Others have contributed smaller amounts. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?

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Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: My wife and I moved back to our home town of Denton in 1982 because we believed that it would be a great place to live, work, and raise our three daughters. We have both sought ways to serve and contribute to the place we call home. I want to serve on the city council as a way to help direct our growth so that Denton becomes and even greater town. Hundreds of citizens worked to develop a comprehensive master plan in 1999. I support that plan and want to help make it a reality. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: We need to complete phase II or our gas well drilling ordinance, implement our downtown improvement plan, and complete a comprehensive bicycle plan. These items are already funded. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I have a proven record of service and leadership in Denton. Retirement gives me the time to carefully study the issues and serve on council. I have a good understanding of our issues and clear ideas about our future. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: We need a mix of residential, commercial, and industrial development. Denton is one of only three cities in the Metroplex that has more people coming to work than leaving to work elsewhere. It is important to grow a diverse economic base. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Like the region, Denton is growing rapidly. Since 2000, we have grown 40.8% in total population. Denton is an affordable place to live with great schools and opportunities to work. It is still, primarily a college town, but we have a variety of manufacturing operations and corporate offices located here. Our airport has grown from six to over 60 businesses in the last 20 years. In June of this year Denton will be connected by the A-Train (The Denton County Transit Authority's commuter rail line) to the DART system. The train's northern stop is about four blocks from our authentic downtown featuring great shops, restaurants, entertainment venues, museums, and our beautiful historic Denton County Courthouse. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: All police departments should enforce the law and work in cooperation with state and federal law enforcement. Illegal immigration is an issue that needs to be addressed at the national level. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: The citizens of Denton approved a quarter cent sales tax about ten years ago. We also agreed to share our "rails to trails" hike and bike trail with the Denton County Transit Authority for the 20+ mile A-Train that will have a link to the DART light rail system. That will provide train links to Ft. Worth and eventually DFW airport. Denton has been willing to help fund the effort and we invite other cities in the Metroplex to join us. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Transportation and air quality are two major issues that face our region. Interestingly they are linked. Our road system is not adequate for the population growth and our state government is not willing to provide adequate funds for construction and road maintenance. Regional leaders have offered alternative plans so that we can fund our own transit and road projects with mixed results from Austin. We need to keep up that effort and do more to educate our citizens so that we get more cooperation at the state level. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: We have worked hard to find every savings in order to provide the most cost-effective services to our citizens. We need to continue to seek out was to operate more efficiently. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present

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need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Denton has been able to handle the economic downturn in a variety of ways. We have cut budgets in some areas, rearranged priorities, used our fund balance, raised our property tax, while also increasing the homestead exemption for senior citizens. It has not been easy and if we do not see improvements in our revenues our citizens will likely see more impacts to city services in our next budget cycle. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Too many citizens have adopted the idea that we don't need to pay for the services we receive from our local, state, and federal governments. We can't blame teachers, police officers, and fire fighters for wanting to be paid for the jobs they perform. We can't demand more and higher quality services from our cities without paying for those services. I've never had a citizen ask me to cut back on a city service he or she depends on. Yet that same citizen might be willing to cut a service that he or she does not use. We need to remember our idea of pulling together and helping one another and understanding that paying taxes is an act of patriotism and civic responsibility. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: Denton was one of the first cities in the region with gas well drilling ordinances. Unfortunately we discovered that our rules have not kept up with industry practices. We have recently completed phase one of our revisions. We are now staffing our gas well inspection team and will begin work on phase two of our revisions. It is important for citizens to know that city authority over drilling are limited by state law. But there are things that we can and must do to provide more protection for our citizens.

Denton City Council, Place 3
Candidates (choose 1):
Jim Engelbrecht
Biographical Info:

Description: Note: Only Denton residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Name: Jim Engelbrecht Street Address: 2305 North Lake Trail City/Town: Denton State: TX Date of Birth: 06-10-1947 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: N/A Home Phone Number: N/A Mobile Phone Number: 940-206-5167 Fax Number: N/A E-mail Address: jengelb@verizon.net Campaign Web Site Address: N/A
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 30 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 29 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: N/A Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Lake Ray Roberts Planning & Zoning Commission, City Council Committees, Denton Rotery Club. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: City of Denton Planning & Zoning Commission (9years - Chair, 3 years), Several city committees over my residency, Numerous local non-profit groups over my residency. Q: Education A: MBA - Northwest Missouri State University BA - Park University Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Completing first term - Denton City Council, District 3 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: None

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Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: N/A Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: To continue to work with the citizens to further the development of the fabric of this community. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: - Development of a comprehensive plan to address street maintenance. - Development of policies to further the involvement of our growing 20 & 30 something population in civic, economic and cultural activities. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I will let that question to the electorate. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Attracting approptiate commercial development has been a priority for a number of years. Community and city policies and activities in this regard are well cordinated and focused. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Denton has experienced over 40% population growth during the last decade. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Police should interface with other law enforcement agencies as the current laws require regarding this issue. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: Favor Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Air Quality and Transportation Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: City leadership and many community members are very focused on finding and implementing cost efficiencies in all departments at all levels. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Denton included a hiring freeze and restrictions in overtime, slowed the CIP schedule, and dipped very modestly into reserve funds. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Deferred maintenance on our streets. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: A new ordinance is currently being drafted. Curretly scheduled for completion following the current state legislative session in order to address any changes in state law. Derrick Murray

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Biographical Info:

Name: Derrick M. Murray Street Address: 4516 Rhone Dr City/Town: Denton State: TX Date of Birth: 02/02/1972 Mobile Phone Number: 214-929-7790 E-mail Address: derrick@murray4denton.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.murray4denton.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: I moved to Denton in October of 2006 Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: I have lived in District 4 since October of 2006 Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Information Technology Manager for United Orthopedic Group in Plano, TX Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: I am President of the UNT Alumni Association Denton Chapter, and I am chairman of the City of Denton Parks and Recreation Board. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: I served as a Senator in the UNT Student Government Association and was chairman of the Student Affairs Committee. I was a leader in several student issues including bringing transparency and accountability to the Student Service Fee budget process. I also campaigned for the creation of the Student Athletic Fee to fund athletics at UNT. Q: Education A: I graduated from the University of North Texas in 2008 with a Bachelor of Science in Business Computer Information Systems, and I am completing my MBA in strategic management this May. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: I have never run for public office. Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Approximately $225 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Jun Lee Mark Miller Kevin Kokjohn Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: I was detained in the town of Southlake, TX in 2003 for failure to pay a traffic fine I received a year earlier. I paid the fine upon arrival at the police station and was processed in less than 30 minutes. I was not required to go to court and I was not charged with a criminal offense. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I am running for city council because I believe in public service and I believe I can help make Denton a better community. My business career has helped to shape my skills in teamwork and building consensus among many stakeholders. I have ideas on how to make Denton a better city. I want to help guide our budget process to ensure we have adequate funding for vital city services such as building roads, providing public safety, and offering reliable utilities. I want to improve relations between the city and our two outstanding universities by forming a University Relations Advisory Board. And finally, I want to help bring business and commerce to Denton so our citizens can enjoy a better quality of life, instead of wasting precious family time sitting in traffic and commuting to other cities in DFW. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1. Ensure that funding for local roads meets the recommendation submitted to City Council earlier this year. Paying for this would require fully utilizing funds provided by TXDOT. I will publicly press for roads to be fully funded, encouraging citizens to participate in the process and ask their city council to increase funding to appropriate levels. 2. I will propose an ordinance establishing a University Relations Board. I believe that the city of Denton should take full advantage of the resources offered by the two local universities. We have a thousands of students graduating every year who leave Denton for other cities and better job opportunities. I want an advisory board comprised of university officials, business leaders, citizens, and city council members. The goal of the board would be to

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ensure that the goals of the city, its citizens, and the universties are aligned. I believe such a board would have been very beneficial in negotiation a solution to the UNT football stadium traffic issue. 3. Business development needs to improve in Denton. Of the top 10 Denton employers, only 4 of them are private business. Over 27% of our citizens are employed by a government entity. Local employment of our citizens has fallen from 37.9% in 2001 to 33.6% in 2010. I believe that spending several hours a week commuting to surrounding cities in order to provide for our families abates our quality of life. I will work with city council members to encourage business development, with a special emphasis on attracting industries that can take advantage of a young, educated workforce generated by our universities. These would include computer technology, electronics, aviation, telecommunications, and biotechnology. I will support aggressive tax incentives in the form of 10 year abatements to bring these industries to Denton. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: Chris Watts has served the city of Denton honorably for 4 years. I respect his desire to serve and the success he has achieved in our community. However, his voting record has at times been adverse to the growth and progress of our city. Mr. Watts voted against the Fry Street pharmacy drive-thru that pretty much killed the plans United Equities had for that property. There were legitimate concerns about the drive-thru, but I believe United Equities offered a reasonable solution and the planning board endorsed the plan by a vote of 5-1. Partly as a result of the 4-3 council vote, the lot has remained empty after 4 years. Mr. Watts has opposed other proposed developments in the city during his two terms on the council. Mr. Watts has also voted twice for tax increases for a total increase of 9.9%. He has also voted in favor of raising the city budget by 30% over the last three years. I believe in our current economic climate, the city needs to get the budget under control. Priorities needs to be set, and vital city services need to be fully funded. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: It is one of my top priorities. The city of Denton has done a poor job of attracting commercial and industrial developments. In fact, I would call their actions in recent years borderline hostile. Boeing left Denton several years ago, and six of our top 10 employers are government entities. While Schlumberger and Target have plans to move operations into Denton, our city council needs to so a better job of encouraging economic growth. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Denton is growing rapidly. Denton County has grown by 53% since the 2000 census, and the city of Denton has grown over 40% in the same timeframe. Our universities are also growing. UNT has enrollment of about 38,000 and TWU is about 14,000. Our city needs to do a better job keeping up with our tremendous growth. That will mean we need to prioritize our city budget expenditures, with a special emphasis on roads, public safety, and utilities. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Illegal immigration is a federal issue and as such needs to be enforced by the federal government. Our police department should check the immigration status of criminal suspects in the course of performing their routine duties. However, we cannot afford for our police officers to be ICE agents and we should not target people based on their skin tone. I do not want the city of Denton to follow the lead of other communities such as Farmer's Branch in implementing local ordinances that are hostile to people who seek to make their lives better by coming to our country. Instead, I would like the city to consider actions that can put pressure on the federal government to enforce current immigration laws. Some cities and states have considered suing the federal government for compensation of the costs to educate, house, and provide medical care for illegal immigrants. I would support such a measure if the federal government continues to be lackadaisical about immigration enforcement. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I support a completely seamless regional transit system. Such a system could realize economies of scale and provide better service at the same cost to taxpayers. Our transportation issues are spreading, and they are not going to improve any time soon. We simply cannot build enough roads to keep up with our growth. I would like to see a light rail system that connects our major cities in a hub and spoke system of rail lines. DART has built a good foundation on which we can expand. My wife and I are thrilled that we can

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now take the DART Green Line to Stars and Mavs games, but we were very disappointed to find out that we would not be able to ride the train all the way to Denton. We find it hard to believe that Denton County citizens have paid millions of dollars in taxes for a light rail system that will run only part time. As a member of Denton City council, I would support any plan that would seek to consolidate DART, DCTA, and The T. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Other issues where we can benefit are education, utility services, and social services. I would like to see more regional advisory boards comprised of citizens, community leaders, and city officials to find areas where we can cooperate. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: No. Our city commissions studies regarding the condition of our roads and then fails to act upon them. In 2003, the Denia Mobility Plan urged the city focus resources on roads in the neighborhood and feeder roads in order to accomodate the planned UNT football stadium. Eight years later, the city has failed to act on this plan. Why commission these studies and then ignore their recommendations? Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Plain and simple, we need to set priorities. It is unfortunate that when revenue growth was in double digit, our city government failed to fund our most vital city services such as roads. Now that we face serious economic problems, our city council must make the tough choice of cutting some non-essential services in order to balance the budget. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: I think the thing about Denton that many find frustrating is the resistance to change. We have wonderful historic neighborhoods and our college culture is eclectic and amusing. But that does not mean we have to preserve areas of our city that have become neglected and run down. We need to realize that progress and growth can be a driver for positive change. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: Unfortunately, state law limits what cities can do to limit the impact of urban drilling. The Denton Record-Chronicle ran a series called Citizens of the Shale, and I highly recommend it to all DFW residents. I wish we could find a balance between providing energy to our citizens and protecting their health. This is a tough issue, and we are finding out more about the effects of urban drilling every day. I am encouraged that the state recently passed a bill requiring fracking chemicals be made known to local citizens. Specific to the city of Denton, I would support a 90-day moratorium while we gather more information on what we can do to protect the residents of Denton. Mike Sutton

Biographical Info:

Name: Michael Wallace Sutton Street Address: 1306 W Hickory St City/Town: Denton State: Texas Date of Birth: May 2, 1954 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 940 383 7478 Home Phone Number: 817 403 3594 Mobile Phone Number: 817 403 3594 Fax Number: 940 387 5824 E-mail Address: mike_sutton_1999@yahoo.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 18 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 18 years Q: Occupation/main source of income

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A: Business Owner (Big Mike's Coffee) and Landlord Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: I ran for Denton City Council for the first time three years ago as my first foray into formal politics. Despite not having held political office, I have been an engaged and active citizen across the spectrum of political action from protest and petition writing to involvement in actions to correct grievances with city policy at a judicial level. Even my business has become a fertile ground for political action, the community event room and even dining area are forums for vigorous discussion and planning. Currently, I am involved in the struggle of our neighbors in the McKenna Park and Presbyterian Hospital area with the companies currently exploring fracture drilling at Rayzor Ranch. Fracture drilling around the country has been called into question over benzine contamination of groundwater and the potential dangers posed to the surrounding community. As near as Parker County in Texas fracture drilling has been proven to contaminate sources of groundwater and pose a danger to nearby people. Pennsylvania, Maryland and many municipal and county authorities around the United States have issued moratoriums on fracture drilling and it is time for Denton to catch up. Additionally, I have vehemently opposed recent city council decrees which provide leeway for the municipal electric company and police to enter residences at "any reasonable time." Any measure that increases the ability of government to intrude on the quiet enjoyment of property and privacy should be rejected. Too many decisions in Denton have been made to the betterment of the bureaucracy of the city and county rather than to the people they are meant to represent. Finally, I am and have been involved in a consistent attempt to call out corruption within the municipal government. Too many instances of self-serving policy, abusive uses of municipal authority and conflicts of interest have been persisting in Denton politics for years. If there is a single reason that I am running it is to provide an honest representation of the best interest of the city rather than my church, family or own economic interest. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Covered supra. Q: Education A: Horticulture Associates Degree, Tarrant County College Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: City Council - 2008 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $120 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: All donations are under $50 and are therefore anonymous. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: Yes, I was arrested in college on misdemeanor charges, but was not convicted. I have been involved in many civil suits, most recently a civil suit brought by our mayor, who also collects taxes for various taxing jurisdictions via his private law firm, Sawko and Burroughs, P.C. I have also been the plaintiff in a term limits suit against three former city council members, including Mark Burroughs, current Mayor of Denton. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: Voters should consider me a choice without interests which run counter to the will of our citizens. I am not connected to any special interests nor do I have personal interest invested in the day to day operations of the city. By not being party or interest affiliated, I am able to make decisions on behalf of the will of our citizens and the interests of the community. What qualifies me to enter into this office is my continued vigilance and activity within the community and its government without making it an enterprise for my own gain. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1. I would eliminate gas wells. I would push for further research and cooperation with other communities which have already researched the long-term effects of fracture drilling and attempt to move the council to vote against the current zoning in the drilling areas. In order to offset the loss in tax revenue from these companies, I would encourage local businesses to stimulate our taxing jurisdictions. Additionally, I support cuts to certain city services including code enforcement and municipal involvement in the construction of the UNT football stadium. I would also favor increasing taxes and removing tax breaks on businesses from outside of our community. 2. I would repeal the recent action taken by the city to expand the authority of its municipal electric company and to increase the cost

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and credit qualifications required for service. These measures harm the least advantaged members of our community and pose a risk to all of our civil liberties. As previously stated, I believe that a mixture of economic stimulus for local businesses to keep money in Denton, targeted cuts of municipal services and some tax increases can easily offset the additional money supposedly gained at the cost of privacy. 3. I would support stringent anti-corruption legislation at the municipal level, which would be aimed at controlling the losses being sustained by the citizens as a result of the current council members' and mayor's self-interest. This measure would cost the city nothing, but gain Denton honest representation and ensure appropriate use of the city's tax funding. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: My opponent would favor outsourcing of municipal functions in tune with the supposed "ebb and flow" of the city's workforce. I would favor keeping the profits made through commerce in Denton within the city and keeping jobs generated by our citizens within our own workforce. I believe in the people, businesses, workers and spirit of Denton over and above a community of supposed expertise which might be found outside of our city. My opponent has also gone on record in favor of fracture drilling, including his vote in favor of the resolution which granted mixed use zoning of the Rayzor Ranch property. While I believe in mixed use zoning, I believe that privilege should be afforded to local businesses rather than large conglomerates outside of our municipal borders. Our multiple esteemed universities produce a wealth of expertise which can be sought out rather than looking to outside firms. A strong alliance between the city and its universities can aid both alumni of the schools and our city, while keeping jobs created by our city in Denton. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Denton has been one of the fastest growing cities in Texas over the past ten years. I do not, however, believe that growth has been promoted by the current council in the most responsible and efficacious way. Current initiatives to bring money into the city have revolved around tax incentives for firms headquartered outside of Denton. The promotion of local business and culture should be the driving force for Denton's expansion and the corresponding expansion of the tax base. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: As one of the fastest growing cities in Texas and the nation, promoting jobs within the city limits is the best economic policy. Where my opponent would contract city projects from outside I would always look to how much can be accomplished by businesses already based in Denton first. Denton is also a beautiful place to live as well as very affordable compared to other urban areas of North Texas. In that regard I will champion homeowners and support commuters from Denton to jobs across North Texas. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: I would advise the city and the police department to cooperate with federal agencies and allow the proper authorities to handle these issues. At the same time I encourage participation from all sectors of Denton. The Western part of the district in which I seek office includes many Spanish speaking households and I expect every lawful citizen to be free to pursue a means of living and be able to robustly participate in local government if they so choose. I strongly believe local government most dramatically effects the lives of Denton residents. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: While I am excited about the upcoming DART rail connecting Denton to the rest of the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex I pledge to strongly evaluate the consequences of invoking immanent domain. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: As Denton City Council I will cooperate with other communities which fracture drilling has effected in order to determine the likely short and long-term consequences of these efforts. We need to understand how our sister communities are coping with prevailing issues that effect the city's land and the health of its citizens. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: I would support a reformation of our code enforcement division, which would significantly decrease our annual expenditures. I am in favor of the method of completing

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the most cost effective projects which look foremost to the promotion of the local economy and workforce rather than seeking external solutions. The most conservative and prudent proposals for completing necessary or beneficial initiatives will always be my solution. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: The Denton waste water management system is world-class. Our continued support of efforts to modernize and engage in effective management practices will ultimately produce a value that far outstrips our investment in infrastructure. Additionally, I would favor a targeted system of tax increases and cuts to inessential community services in order to fund our continued maintenance of municipal infrastructure. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: I am most uncomfortable with the truth that our municipal government is wrought with corruption. Our current council is pre-occupied by special and personal interests which are allowed to override the best interest and will of Denton's residents. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: As stated above, I would favor a repeal of the mixed zoning privileges provided to corporations drilling for natural gas in the city. Clearly the city is neither monitoring the on-going operations of the companies involved nor has any consideration been made to the mounting evidence of health issues related to fracture drilling for the surrounding area. Chris Watts

Biographical Info:

Name: Chris Watts Street Address: 1900 Jasmine Street City/Town: Denton State: Texas 76205 Date of Birth: 03/31/1961 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (940) 594-6604 Fax Number: (940) 387-4419 E-mail Address: chriswattsatty@yahoo.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: My family moved to Denton when I ws an infant. Been here since except for 6 months in my 20's. Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: About 20 years. Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Real Estate Development/Investment Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Board of Directors Health Services of North Texas; Denton City Council; Chair of Council Audit Finance; Chair of Council Committee on Property Maintenance; Member of Council Committee on the Enviornment; Member of Council Committee for Hotel/Motel Tax; Council appointee to Board of Directors for Texas Municipal Power Association serving as Secretary; Negotiation Coach for Texas Wesleyan School of Law Student Division of American Bar Association Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Board of Dirctors Court Appointed Special Advocate CASA; Volunteer advocate for Court Appointed Special Advocate CASA Q: Education A: B.S. Computer Science University of North Texas; M.Ed Counseling and Student Services University of North Texas; J.D. Texas Wesleyan School of Law; Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Incumbent for Denton City Council District 4 2007 to present.

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Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: See campaign financing report due April 14, 2011 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: See campaign financing report due April 14, 2011 Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I am running to continue my service to the community as a Council member for District 4. Having lived and worked in Denton for the past 20 years, I am familiar with the many changes that have occurred in our city. Our population has incresed over 30% during the last ten years. During my time on Council, I have worked tirelessly to understand the issues facing our community and have been instrumental in developing solutions. My law practice and real estate development activities provide me the experience necessary to tackle issues in a growing community. I have been a leader in protecting our neighborhoods while encouraging sound and sustainable economic growth and development. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Balance the budget. Complete the gas well ordinance. Reduce city subsidy of the Water Park and Natitorium facilities. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: The key difference between my opponent and I is the familiarity of the issues facing our community. Having lived and worked in Denton for many years has allowed me to understand the short and long term issues of our city. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Attracting quality commercial development is high on my list of priorities. Recently, Denton has been able to attract a top oil and gas servicing company, retail distribution center and other commercial projects. It is critical that we balance residential and commercial growth. Having two major universities, Council must be diligent in protecting the neighborhoods from commercial, industrial and institutional encroachment. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: I believe we are experiencing the same changes as the rest of the region. Currently we are handling the changes appropriately. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: I believe the procedures in place adequately address the issue. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I favor a seamless regional transit system. The Denton County Transportation Authority is in the final phase of providing rail service from Denton County to Dart via transfer at the Carrollton station. This will allow Denton County residents access to the rail system for DART and all the desitinations DART serves. Conversely, it will allow residents throughout the Metroplex a fun and cost efficient mode of transporation to enjoy all that our great city has to offer. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: We need rail service to D/FW International Airport. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: I believe the city does a good job in delivering cost effective services. During these difficult economic times, we must continue to leave no stone unturned in trimming the budget. It is imperative that we remain focused on basic city services; public safety, road maintenace and infrastructure development. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: The current leadership has done well during this economic storm. We have a healthy

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fund balance and have cut expenditures without reducing essential city services. When replacing vehicles, we are choosing the most fuel efficient models appropriate for the job. We must continually review our costs of service during the planning and development review process to ensure our fees are in line with our costs. Any public/private partnerships or economic incentives should ensure the greatest return on tax dollars spent. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Voter turnout. We have very low voter turnout for local elections. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: We are currently in phase two of our gas well ordinances. We are waiting to see the outcome of the current legislative session to determine what, if any, new laws affecting municipal regulation of the oil and gas industry are passed. Once we know what changes have been made, we will complete the gas well ordinance. It is encumbent that we protect the health and safety of our residents.

Duncanville City Council, At-large
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Jeff Burton

Biographical Info:

Name: Jeffrey P. Burton Street Address: 810 Delphi Drive City/Town: Duncanville State: Texas Date of Birth: July 20, 1952 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-641-3084 Home Phone Number: 972-780-0723 Mobile Phone Number: 214-641-3084 E-mail Address: jeffpb88@aol.com Campaign Web Site Address: Facebook.com/JeffBurtonDuncanvilleCityCouncil
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: I have lived in Duncanville from 1983 to the present, with the exception of the years 1987 - 1989, for a total of 26 years. Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: I have lived in District 4 since the city of Duncanville initiated single-member districts. Q: Occupation/main source of income A: I work as a Special Projects Coordinator for AECOM as a direct contractor to Dallas Area Rapid Transit's Rail Program Development Group. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: I am currently an appointed commissioner on the Duncanville Planning and Zoning Commission. I have also served for approximately 10 years on the Duncanville Board of Adjustments and as the Chair of that board for approximately 3 years. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Duncanville High School Band Booster supporter (4 years). Duncanville High School Volleyball Booster Club supporter (5 years, President for 3 years). PTA President and PTA Life Member. Q: Education A: Homer High School, Homer, Illinois 1970. Electronic Technology Degree from United Electronics Institute, Dallas, Texas 1972. Brookhaven College, DCCCD, Dallas, Texas, Business Management studies 1977 - 1979. Rochester Institute of Technology, Bachelor of Electronic Technology studies 1987 - 1989 Rochester, New York. Q: Previous public offices sought/held:

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A: None. Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Approximately $1500. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: ProDunc PAC Bruce and Sue Hafer Duane Starkey Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: Duncanville is my "Hometown" and I love my city and my desire is to accentuate the positives of my city and the school district. I have a passion for improving my city and promoting this great city to our citizens and those not living in Duncanville. I have several years experience with the boards I have been appointed to and know the ordinances and zoning plans for the city. I will provide information to and seek input from ALL the citizens and businesses of Duncanville. I have managed projects for many years and have experience as a communicator and have developed my abilities as a very good listener to achieve success in these areas of expertise. Listening, communicating and being able to manage are necessary attributes for the At-Large member of the City Council as that position represents ALL the citizens and businesses of Duncanville. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1. Economic Development to include the 5 major areas designated by the Duncanville Master Plan (I-20, Hwy-67, Main Street, Camp Wisdom and Cedar Ridge) by developing ways to encourage families and businesses to come to Duncanville. 2. Promotion of the city and school district to bring young families to our great city by accentuating the positives of Duncanville. 3. Encourage the citizens of Duncanville to become more involved with their city by asking for their inputs, concerns and accomplishments and responding through "Town Hall Meetings and my Facebook Page as an interactive tool to facilitate my understanding of them and their understanding of what is before the city as a whole. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: This is an open City Council position and all of us that have chosen to offer our time and effort are to be commended. There are four people running for the At-Large position, but only two of us have been in attendance for the pre-election meetings which indicates to me that only two of us are serious about our desire to serve our city. I have the experience with the years I have served on the city boards, my attendance and involvement with the city council, and my ability to listen to the people, communicate to, and have compassion for the concerns that will be presented as I seek the input of the citizens of Duncanville. The key difference between myself and the other serious candidate are my years of service and experiences with that service. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Most people think Duncanville is totally built-out. It is not. This is a top priority of mine as we have numerous opportunities to attract residential development if we promote our school district and the attributes of living close to Downtown Dallas and the Mid-Cities. We must, and I will, publize the positives of Duncanville as they are many. This is an area our city can improve on as we seek to maintain the small-town atmosphere while providing the metropolitan amenities that are expected these days. We must be positive with this publicity and not amplify the negatives that we all need to work toward eliminating. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Again, it is believed there is no room for growth in Duncanville. This impression could not be any further from the truth. The Southwest Dallas County area is booming even in this time of economic concern. Duncanville is a great city for younger families to consider as their children approach school age. We have a great school district, know for our academic as well as our athletic achievements. We need to develop opportunities for those that would choose a more "urban" life-style. We need to do all we can to bring transitoriented-development to Duncanville which tends to encourage an alternative to singlefamily traditional housing. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration?

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A: Our police department, city officials and staff, and the citizens of Duncanville should follow the existing laws and regulations as currently constituted. When identified those laws and regulations must be followed to protect all those involved. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: Current legislation does not facilitate a "seamless" regional transit system as your question asks. For the entire Dallas-Ft.Worth metropolitan area to continue to expand, as it will, there is a need for a regional approach to the transit needs that growth will bring. I favor a regional approach to a transit system, but laws will have to be amended or completely re-written to accomplish those needs. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: We smaller cities must continue to partner our resources (people) to provide ideas and solutions to develop thge North Texas Region. The great secret of the beauty of Southwest Dallas County is no longer a secret and the region needs to recognize that not everyone that comes to this region goes north. This is not just assurance that we smaller cities are at the table, but that there is serious consideration for the needs and wants of our city. I would be ready to volunteer or be appointed to any committee or board that would address these cooperation efforts. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: We have a very good city manager and city staff that work to bring us the best service for the most efficient cost. I do believe there could be budget concerns in the near future for Duncanville, and I will seek input from the citizens to get an idea of services they think could be performed more effectively or eliminated if necessary and have the ability to bring those ideas to the council and/or the city manager. We will have to put our heads together to make sure we are using the available funds most efficiently. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Our city manager and city staff have done an excellent job of keeping the necessary needs (Police, Fire, Water, Sewer Service, etc) in good condition. The city budget is in good shape currently, but factors out of our control could affect that dramatically. We must attract more sales tax generating business to Duncanville and can do that by making sure we are as "business friendly" as possible. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: The most prevalent situation currently is the situation with what use to be a Dr. Pepper Stars Center that is now a Bobby Knights Fieldhouse. The economics of both of those businesses has raised a concern of how that will affect the tax payers of Duncanville and our Economic Development Board. This is prime retail real estate on one of our major intersections and we must assure this is developed into a very profitable business. Janet Harris
Biographical Info: Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: - no response Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: - no response Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: - no response Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: - no response Q: Education A: - no response Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: - no response Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: - no response Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: - no response Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits?

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Please explain: A: - no response Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: - no response Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: - no response Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: - no response Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: - no response Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: - no response Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: - no response Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: - no response Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: - no response Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: - no response Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: - no response Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: - no response -

Duncanville City Council, Place 1
Candidates (choose 1):
Don Freeman
Biographical Info:

Description: Note: Only Duncanville residents living in this district may vote in this race. Click here for a district map.

Name: Donald B. Freeman Street Address: 1003 Lansdale City/Town: Duncanville State: TX Date of Birth: 11-03-1941 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214.808.7299 Mobile Phone Number: 214.808.7299 E-mail Address: freemanforduncanville@gmail.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: We moved to Duncanville in the 70’s when Duncanville was a small, 2-3 red light town. We were attracted to Duncanville because of the good schools and because it is a safe community to raise a family. Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: We have lived in District 1 since the 70s. Q: Occupation/main source of income

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A: I am retired from law enforcement and now working part-time as a merchandizer. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: I am now serving my second term as Chairman of the Duncanville Board of Adjustments. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Past President, Duncanville Lions Club; Multiple years with Lions Club Las Vegas Night Scholarship Fundraiser for Duncanville High School; Helped with multiple other Lions Club projects benefiting the community; 10 years Chairman Antique Car Show for Duncanville 4th of July celebration; Treasurer, D’Ville Estates Neighborhood Crime Watch Q: Education A: Criminal Justice degree, Abilene Christian University; Associate Degree – El Centro College; Master degree courses, UTArlington Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: 2011 Duncanville City Council District 1 candidate Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: Primarily self-funded: $4000. I choose to fund my own campaign. I am grateful to those who offered me contributions. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Self, MetroTex Association of REALTORS®, Patricia Ebert Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I am running for City Council District 1 to help stop the decline of our city. We moved to Duncanville and watched its growth as a first tier city: new housing, new strip shopping centers, new schools, and new roads. Now we find our city in a state of decline: vacant housing and strip shopping centers. The current city leaders are making attempts to correct the problem. However, it does not seem to be working out as well as planned. Projects, such as Railroad Flats and Shops at Waterview Park, are not filled as expected. But, the city leaders are still planning additional projects, such as 212 North Main and 111 E. Davis. Will these fill to capacity as projected? We definitely need a new approach with new ideas and new ideals. We need greater citizen input and a bigger base of developers. I have been walking door to door throughout District 1. People are upset with our city and the direction we are going. Taxpayers want changes in leadership. These are not my words, but the words of taxpayers in District 1. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: To begin reversing the decline in our city: First, I will work to make citizens feel welcome in City Council chambers to speak their minds. I will also call for town halls when necessary. We have so many many talented and experienced citizens in all fields to help us. Second, I will work to identify developers with integrity who want to help re-vitalize our city. Third, I will work with the city leaders to ensure taxpayers get the bang for their bucks that they deserve. The cost for the above initiatives is minimal. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: The key difference between my opponent and me is that I will abide by the City Charter to ensure city board members do not have conflicts of interest. Citizen input will be what elects me to City Council. I will be their voice. Taxpayers want change. They are unhappy with status quo. They want a leader, not a follower. Most taxpayers are so busy making a living that they don’t have time to run down to every city meeting. They want a Council person in whom they can place their trust. Having worked in city and county government gives me a vast knowledge around the workings of governments. I am running to help my city regain its greatness. It may sound kind of silly, but I love my city. I moved here by choice and I’m staying by choice! Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Re-vitalizing our city ranks high with me. We have abundant available retail space for new businesses and current businesses to expand. The city needs to work with businesses so they can remain viable yet comply with codes. If we promote businesses and help them when they come to Duncanville, the works will follow: people looking for housing, which creates the need for more businesses. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should

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know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Our city is building an inclusive community with open arms to all races and religions. Like any city of our size, there may be an isolated case of non-acceptance by some individual acting alone. Local faith-based groups have established programs teaching English. I want to expand to include other languages, including Spanish. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Duncanville has a wonderful Chief of Police. The police department follows all local, state, and federal laws, which they have sworn to protect. Just because a person is suspected of being from another country does not relieve our officers of their sworn oath to protect a person’s rights. All persons have rights under the laws. Unless the State of Texas or federal laws change, the police department must follow the laws. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: DART already has buses on our western border with Dallas. As far as a rail line coming to Duncanville, the citizens have turned down this proposition 2 times before. However, should another vote arise about light rail and the citizens vote for light rail, I would work hard to make it work, realizing that it would take years and years for light rail to reach Duncanville. If the vote turns down light rail, I would work hard to take the same amount of sales tax earmarked for DART and pour that same money into our economic development. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: I support regional cooperation. One example is the Tri-City Dispatch system currently in place. Also, the Tri-City Animal Shelter and Adoption Center is proposing more cooperation within the service cities of Cedar Hill, Duncanville, and DeSoto. One proposal is combining Animal Control Officers (AOCs). Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: The city is striving to provide services in the most cost-effective manner. One example is outsourcing the refuse collections. I will be open to citizen input about other cost-saving measures. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: To maintain the current budget, the city raised property taxes and increased water fees and other fees, while cutting back recreation center and library hours. For next year’s budget, we need to take a second look at top management salaries. Optimally, we want to avoid employee furloughs. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: The uncomfortable truth about Duncanville is the lack of forethought. The city has set the salaries of top management with seemingly little planning or thought about what if… what if the federal government cuts programs? What if the State of Texas cuts down on grants and medical assistance? What if the sales tax revenue keeps falling? What if home values keep falling? Now the city has high management overhead with a decreasing revenue source. We need to take a second look at management salaries. Not raise taxes and furlough employees to fill the gaps. We need to take a second look at our Economic Development projects. We should start spending more of those dollars on preserving the businesses we have. We should help our merchants. They pay taxes. We need to fill up the vacant spaces to enhance our quality of life while increasing our tax base. Ken Weaver

Biographical Info:

Name: Ken Weaver Street Address: 110 N. Venice Dr. City/Town: Duncanville

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State: Texas Date of Birth: 05/17/1943 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-780-9810 Home Phone Number: 972-780-9810 Fax Number: NA E-mail Address: kweaver@ci.duncanville.tx.us
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 38 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 38 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Reired Chief Financial Officer, Army Air Force Exchange Service, Dallas, Texas Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Score Counselor, Board Member Best Southwest Partner, Advisory Board Member Methodist Charlton Hospital,Rotary Club of Duncanville mamber, Local Coordinator AARP Tax-Aide Duncanville, Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Past Chairman Duncanville Chamber, Past Treasurer Duncanville ISD Education Foundation, Past member and President Duncanville Community & Economic Development Corporation. Rotary Club of Duncanville Past President & Treasurer,Duncanville Chamber "Man of the Year" 2009 Q: Education A: BA Accounting - Boise State University Certified Public Accountant, Texas (Retired) Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Duncanville City Council District 1 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $550.00 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Ken Weaver - $250.00 Ray Dorton - $150.00 Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: NO Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: Since my retirement in 1999, I have been a very active volunteer in Duncanville. I began my service by being appointed to the Duncanville Economic Development Board in 1999. I have served seven years as a Councilman for District One. I spent 31 years in financial management for the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES). I was the CFO when I retired. I am committed to being involved in our City and I have a strong financial and management background Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Duncanville is a land locked first tier city. We are close to being fully built out in our 11+ square miles of land. A land locked City faces limitations on new growth and must look to redevelopment of existing structures. I will take the lead on setting up a workshop for the Council to discuss and develop a plan to give us direction going forward. The challenges we face as a land-locked first tier, older city are real. We are not going to see the type of economic development some neighboring cities will enjoy in the coming years. Therefore, we must elect leaders who have business experience to make good business decisions for our City. I will support small business expansion and assist new businesses to get started. I am a volunteer SCORE Counselor which falls under the Small Business Administration. I help motivated individuals take a business concept from an idea stage through start-up to success. We are a city of small businesses and their survival is important to our city. I will encourage citizens to become involved in our city and serve on Boards/Commissions and be active volunteers. Neighborhood Watch Associations are a good place to start getting citizens involved. We have a good Neighborhood Watch program in my neighborhood. We use an annual picnic and periodic communications via email to stay in touch. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I have served on the Duncanville Chamber Board as a member and as Chairman. I understand the local businesses. I have 31 years of financial management experience. I am a volunteer that serves as a counselor to small businesses. I am interested in prudent

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financial management and I am consistently looking for ways to improve the process and if possible do more with less. I have leadership experience in local government through serving as a Councilman for seven years and being selected Mayor-Pro-Tem twice during those 7 years. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Attracting economic development to our City is a top personal priority. I have served on the Economic Development Corporate Board as a member and President. Duncanville has an impressive record of attracting development since 2000. We have attracted a Hilton Garden Inn, Pappadeaux Restaurant, Costco, and had major expansion of Tom Thumb and Kroger grocery stores. As I noted in an earlier question, our City is land-locked and that provides a unique challenge regarding residential and commercial development. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: The demographic changes in Duncanville mirror what is happening in the region. South Dallas County is seeing changes in demographic status greater than our northern County cities. We offer Spanish speakers to assist for our courts and code enforcements activities. We have established a Multicultural Commission to promote citizen participation and engagement in the government process and to foster cooperative relationships among the culturally diverse citizens in order to fulfill the needs and desires of our culturally diverse community. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: I believe the issue of illegal immigration must be addressed by the Federal Government. Cities, such as Duncanville, do not have the authority or the resources to deal with this problem. The local police department should report illegal immigration problems to the Federal Authorities as appropriate. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I do favor a seamless regional transit system. I spent 6 years in Germany and saw what a national transit system can offer. I would support a local sales tax option to fund expansion of our transit system to include Southwest Dallas County. The citizens should have the right to vote on whether to increase the sales tax rate to fund the expansion of a transit system as an extension to the DART System. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Duncanville has been active in regional cooperation in South West Dallas County. We have a three city regional dispatch for police and fire. The same three cities have an animal shelter that they share. We have an agreement with surrounding Cities with our fire departments, where we have back up agreements with other cities. That provides the maximum protection at the lowest costs. We have a Best Southwest Partnership of four bordering cities. This partnership actively promotes economic growth in Southern Dallas Counties through image enhancement, legislation, education, and transportation initiatives. I am a member of the Board of Directors of the Best Southwest Partnership. We are benefitting from the important regional cooperation we have in place. I will continue to support regional partnerships. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Duncanville has made changes over the past few years to “do more for less” I will continue to be supportive of initiatives that allow the use of the latest technology. Recently solar panels were placed on the roofs of our major structures. With the use of grants, our cost was amortized in one year. I do think our city deliversthe necessary services in a cost effective manner especially after our budget constraints over the past several years. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Duncanville leadership has a done a good job of weathering the economic storm. We have used innovative options like employee furlough days before and after national holidays to reduce personnel costs without eliminating staff positions. Our staffing level is reasonable and fair. We review the level of staffing per 1,000 population as it relates to 20 other local cities our size. We consistently have the lowest ratio of staffing using this metric. We have reviewed our pay scale and benefits and both are competitive. One advantage to being a built-out city is our cost relative to roads, sewers and other basic

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infrastructure are primarily maintenance costs. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: The uncomfortable truth is we are not a Cedar Hill with an abundance of good land suitable for development. Duncanville is a first tier landlocked city. We are close to being fully built out in our eleven square miles of land. A “land locked City” faces limitations in new growth, therefore, we must look to redevelopment of existing structures. We have vacant retail shopping space that needs to be replaced or upgraded. The large residential development we have seen in the past will not be an option in the future. Our future planning will focus on this reality.

Farmers Branch City Council, Place 2
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Harold Froehlich

Biographical Info:

Name: Harold Froehlich Street Address: 13831 Braemar Drive City/Town: Farmers Branch State: Texas Date of Birth: 11/10/1947 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972 738 8444 E-mail Address: haroldf4fb@tx.rr.com Campaign Web Site Address: electharoldfroehlich.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 23 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Bank Employee Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Prior Planning and Zoning Commissioner, Farmers Branch Current City Council Member Place 2, Farmers Branch Current Mayor Pro-Tem Member Farmers Branch Rotary Club Member Farmers Branch Chamber of Commerce Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Foreman of Harris County Texas Grand Jury Prior Planning and Zoning Commissioner, Farmers Branch Q: Education A: Bachelor of Science University of Houston Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $3000 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Personal funds, Metro Tex Association of Realtors, Friends, Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: NO Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I am the Incumbent. I have 35 years of financial services and real estate experience. My current professional background is in property management, real estate sales and acquisitions. Farmers Branch is experiencing new growth and interest from the real estate

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development community. My experience and insight into the planning, site selection of industrial, retail and multi- tenant property users will be and has been valuable to the citizens of Farmers Branch. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Continue to review all new development initiatives projected by the City Staff. We have had GREAT success with our Four Corners area. A new Wal Mart store and CHASE Bank rebuilding in the immediate area. The Wal Mart project was recognized by The Dallas Business Journal as one of their "The Deals of the Year". Review the current city budget document and discuss current YTD expenses. Be aware only 6% of our General Fund is spent toward debt service. Farmers Branch has maintained a strong AA Bond rating and strong financials in the worst recession since The Great Depression. Review and assist where necessary in the marketing and revitalization efforts in Farmers Branch. Review current Building vacancy rates, staff marketing plans, and work with Realtors, to sell our City in a Park. I do spend my personal time to visit with City prospects as required. I do not believe any cost would be associated with my ongoing participation and reviews. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I have proven experience in many aspects of real estate management and budget planning. My work related experience has given me an advantage working on the City Council during this important time of re development in our City. My experience and insight into the demolition phase of the Four Corners project allowed the City to save several hundred thousand dollars. It was my review of the initial demolition cost, along with a recent experience on a work related project that gave me the insight to pursue a cost saving effort for the City. My local knowledge of the real estate community and costs associated with construction, gives me an enormous advantage. I am a proven "consensus builder". While I do not agree with all decisions made by the Council and Mayor, we have moved the City forward. We have brought new business and new properties to the City. Our City is cleaner, streets are safer, unsightly buildings and falling down Walls have been removed. A new Fire Station is being built. We have maintained a first rate Parks system and Programs for citizens and visitors. I have brought a sense of continuity and accountability to our City Council. We are at an important point in our City Development. Continuity is important to continue our direction. We need Leaders that can plan for our future and not have a platform dedicated to discontent, innuendo and agenized politics. Until a few months ago. I had no knowledge of my opponent. It is my understanding he has held no capacity in our city government or any of its Boards. He says he favors "term limits" for Mayor and Council as do I. I was a sponsor of the move to put the issue on the Ballot to the Voters. My wife is an employee of the School district at R L Turner. She and I have had strong ties to the District and community for many years. Organizing a new school district would be a "gigantic challenge". As a City Councilman, I will focus my efforts in the review of the city government and the continuing progress of our City revitalization efforts. School Board business should be left to the School Board. We as a City, do not need, A New Direction. We need qualified, dedicated Leaders who can keep Farmers Branch on Track! Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: It's a Top Priority and we have been successful. Attracting new business and residential development is critical. During the last three years we had had major successes in the heart of our City along Midway Road. New Apartments at Prairie Crossing and a new townhome development have attracted new and younger residents to our community. In addition, a major developer has plans to start a "patio home" development in the same area. Wal Mart, Weirs Furniture, Essilor, Colgate, Coca Cola, Wisteria, SoftLayer, Maxim all announced plans to move into our City or have had significant expansions. 2.2 Million square feet of space expanded or added to Farmers Branch in the last year. 196 new businesses moved into Farmers Branch creating more than 2000 jobs in our community. We have done an "Outstanding Job"! Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Our City, like our State is changing every decade. Our goal in Farmers Branch is to provide a safe and secure place for our citizens to work and raise their families. Market forces dictate who will move to and live in each community. We welcome all who want to take part in our City in a Park. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal

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immigration? A: Farmers Branch Police have been trained and certified under Federal program 287(g). They have an outstanding record, proven by our crime statistics. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: Yes. I would encourage any City Leader in our region to participate. Many citizens are not aware that not all cities participate in the services of the Dallas Area Rapid Transit. Making this happen depends upon how the program is sold to the regional citizen. Education, and marketing the benefits and advantages of a regional system should be an ongoing process. As Transportation costs increase, the demand for regional transit services will follow. I do support the efforts of Dallas Regional Mobility. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Shared City Services. Where City boundaries are contiguous, municipal services should be shared. Examples Fire and Police, Municipal Court Services, Emergency Medical Services. City’s sharing and cooperating in these areas would reduce taxes for all participants in such a program. Farmers Branch has several cost and equipment sharing initiatives working with Carrollton, Addison and Coppell. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Farmers Branch is one of the lowest cost and cost effective Cities in North Texas. Our staff constantly manages the budget process and is quick to make recommendations for change. As one of the most cost-effective Cities in North Texas we have attracted more than 40 Fortune 500 businesses to our City. Our Citizens do not pay for trash service. I will continue to monitor, receiving citizen input, the excellence of our services and their cost effectiveness. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Farmers Branch has a balanced budget and our reserve fund is 100% funded. We have no challenges to our basic infrastructure budget. We reduced our budget from $95 million to $78 million with no reducions in our services. We have excellant infrastructure and funding, in the event of unforseen enginerring issues. Our City staff does an excellant job of monitoring street and sidewalk repair. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: The same uncomfortable truth that City’s and Governments across the USA must confront. "Wages and Benefits for Municipal and Government Employees are not sustainable at current tax rates." Q: Do you support the formation of a separate Farmers Branch Independent School District? If so, how will you go about obtaining the necessary special legislation to change current requirements that a new school district have 8,000 students? A: No. Under current law, it is not practical. I would prefer that our voters elect officials who support those changes that reflect local needs and State requirements. Q: What are the key development issues in Farmers Branch? What do you propose to do to create development in the DART center in Farmers Branch? A: We waited 27 years for the DART rail line. Revitalization of our Four Corners area and replacing and upgrading our housing stock are key issues. During my term in office our Council has taken several bold initiatives toward Revitalization. The new Wal Mart project and citizens replacing and repairing their Homes. We are in negotiations for a new 200 unit Apartment project to be built in the Dart Station area. I would encourage similar steps in all of our neighborhoods. We have a "Housing replacement program" where the City gives a tax refund where homes are torn down and a new home built. Another option, the city could purchase "dangerous buildings or homes" demolish, and then resell the vant lots to residents or Builders. A similar program was succesful and This could be a practical long term project to provide building sites in the City. The City’s Revitalization program should be "ongoing". Q: Would you support the city of Farmers Branch spending city funds to jumpstart economic development there at the DART location, as they did in the Four Corners area when they raised taxes and purchased the land? A: That move will not be necessary. Our City owns 19 acres of "ready to build" land. There are several different options to consider with the right Developer or Site selector. The Four Corners, an award winning project, was opportunity brought about by the terrible economy, critical evaluation and a bold decision making. It is a decision, that has created a "new beginning" in our City. The decision to move forward with the Four Corners project has caused a “ripple effect” in our community. Chase Bank has announced a major

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reconstruction of their Bank building in the Four Corners area. "Success brings more Success". Q: Is there a limit to how much city funds you will allocate to legally defend the city in its immigration ordinances? If the legal bill reaches $5 million, will you vote against spending further city funds? If the legal bill reaches $6 million, will you vote against spending further city funds? A: Yes there is a limit. You should remember, 67% of our Voters indicated that they would support the city's Licensing effort. Our goal was to know our neighbors next door. The City is the envy of others in North Texas. Farmers Branch is growing new busneses and is experiencing exciting economic growth. Business and property owners will invest in a community where they know there employees and property are safe. Elected Officials take an Oath to protect the Health and Welfare of our Citizens. What is that worth? Our crime rate to date is down 30% from 2010's low numbers. We have not had a Murder in our City in more than 2 years. Our citizens enjoy safe and secure neighborhoods. In any event, as an Elected Official I cannot speak to or about ongoing litigation with the City. Q: What percentage of the city population do you think is in the U.S. with unlawful immigration status, either because they overstayed a visa or because they entered the U.S. illegally? A: I have no idea. Any number I gave would be pure speculation. Q: Farmers Branch has been polarized by the illegal immigration issue—as witnessed by the huge shouting matches outside and sometimes inside City Hall. What would you do to bring the city together? A: There is a small group of "Naysayers" who see division in our community; it would be GREAT if we could get all to share their ideas. Focus on working together, become involved instead of divisive. Nothing brings a group together like success and good leadership. We have both in Farmers Branch. As a Community, we are addressing our diversity issues on many fronts. As I attend our City functions and events, School and Church activities I see parents and children from across our community. If I could change one thing, it would be to get more parents involved with their children in church and school activities. Q: Do you support further outsourcing of various departments or services in Farmers Branch? If so, which ones? A: It depends on the City service. Major Corporations started "outsourcing" 50 years ago. Many Oil Refinery's on the Gulf Coast, had employee Pipefitters, Plumbers and Sheet Metal Workers. Today businesses outsource, Janitorial Services, Computer Maintenance, Video and technical support, Payroll Accounting, Printing and many other activities. You should be aware that Payroll and Benefits are the large expense of any City’s General Fund. As we enter the 21st century it is incumbent upon the City Fathers to use technology and innovation to provide less government and better services. In Farmers Branch we manage to maximize our services at the lowest cost to our taxpayers. Q: Do you believe the City Council made the right decision on Feb. 8 in keeping paper refuge bags for residents rather than saving more than $100,000 with a switch to plastic bags? A: The paper refuge bags in our Community are our Tradition. The actual dollar cost of the bags is not reflective of the total benefit to both citizen and the city. We have no initial cost to purchase and replace "unsightly and smelly" trash recepticles as used by other cities. The Landfill, that we own, is managed to very high enviromental standard. Plastic is not as biodegradable as the paper refuge bags. Paper bags, over many years, have proven to be stronger and more reliable to the user. If there is a total cost vs safety vs enviromental savings. Our citizens, consistantly tell us. They like the Paper. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: We like other cities in the area have experienced local drilling. It has been minor and limited to the west side of our town in a less inhabited area. We have reviewed our ordnances and are prepared to adopt additional safety standards as required. Currently, we have a watch and monitor position. Our Staff follows the actions of communities with similar issues. Jack E. Viveros

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Biographical Info:

Name: Jack E. Viveros Street Address: 2524 Danny Lane City/Town: Farmers Branch State: Texas Date of Birth: 9/15/1951 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-620-0816 Home Phone Number: 972-620-0816 Mobile Phone Number: 214-636-3523 Fax Number: 214-722-7662 E-mail Address: jeviveros@att.net Campaign Web Site Address: Jack E. Viveros (facebook) http://jackeviveros.blogspot.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 16 yrs Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 16 yrs Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Sales of investments and insurance Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: • President-elect Farmers Branch Rotary Club • Member Farmers Branch Chamber of Commerce o Selected Member of Farmers Branch C of C Education Committee • Member Greater Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce • Mentoring program at Vivian Field Middle School • Engaged with the Advancement via Individual Determination (AVID) students at Vivian Field Middle School Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: See previous response concerning civic involvement. Q: Education A: BS Sul Ross State University Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $6,505 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Self, Serena Connelly, Joseph Dingman Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I am running for the position of Farmers Branch City Council to be a new voice and create a new direction for Farmers Branch. I have a community agenda, not a personal agenda. I believe in the power of the community of Farmers Branch. I will listen to all my constituents; all includes across race, ethnicity, where one lives—the entire city. I have been a resident of Farmers Branch for 16 years. My professional background includes banking, financial services, and entrepreneurship which help prepare me to be an effective councilman. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: • Our fine city needs to have its pride, spirit and unity restored. I am committed to making this happen. Foremost we must eliminate the toxic cloud that has been hovering over us for several years and settle the legal issues that have been dividing us: enough is enough. • Maintaining high quality city services is paramount. As councilman I will work closely with the professional city manager to monitor not just the cost of our services, but

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also the high standards we expect from these services. I will also strive to work with the council to take a slightly different direction for beautifying our city. We need to improve much of the infrastructure, such as streets, alleys and sewage pipes rather than continue cosmetic enhancements. • Attracting new business, developers, and home builders is vital to ensure that Farmers Branch is a city in which people want to live and work. We are a diversified community with wonderful people. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: As a councilman for Farmers Branch I will help lead our town in a new direction. My goal is to bring all our citizens together, to have all our residents feel welcome, and to create an atmosphere of openness between the council and the city. I will hold “Jack’s Community Chats” at a local neighborhood nook. My goal is to have an inclusive community; not one of exclusivity. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Attracting more businesses and home developers is of paramount importance. The city council together with our city employees must work diligently and wisely to develop the entire city from north to south, east to west. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Based on the latest census results, Farmers Branch has an approximate Hispanic residency of 45%. The city is not addressing the population dynamics. The city should begin to study single member districts. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Farmers Branch police department participates in the Criminal Alien Program (CAP) program and has one officer trained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) who is qualified to deal with any illegal immigrant that the police may encounter as well as any gang activity. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: Farmers Branch has supported DART for over a quarter of a century and recently has had a light rail station built in our city. The arrival of DART at the Farmers Branch Station is part of our crown jewels in the city. We should continue to support a regional transit system with the current tax our citizens pay. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: The completion of the DART orange line to DFW airport will be a major benefit to not only Farmers Branch residents, but people throughout this region. Working closely with city councils in our neighboring communities on regional issues will benefit all concerned. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Overall our city has worked diligently to maintain a balanced budget. We should strive to balance present personnel providing services with fiscal responsibility for the services. I am very conservative about out-sourcing our city services. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: I believe for the near future we should not build more parks and we need to reduce expenditures on cosmetic enhancements. I want to revisit the way the council negotiates with commercial developers to increase development and increase our tax base. The infrastructure of Farmers Branch must receive higher priority. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: The uncomfortable truth is that Farmers Branch has a 45% Hispanic population and no representation in elected city government. Q: Do you support the formation of a separate Farmers Branch Independent School District? If so, how will you go about obtaining the necessary special legislation to change current requirements that a new school district have 8,000 students? A: No. The Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD continues to strive for improvement to reach the needs of all students. CFB ISD has strong leadership in the school board. We have excellent dedicated teachers and administrators. Our students want to learn, to participate in the school experience, and complete their education. We have parents who are involved in our schools with more seeking participation at all levels.

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Q: What are the key development issues in Farmers Branch? What do you propose to do to create development in the DART center in Farmers Branch? A: Key development issues are the completion of Four Corners at Josey & Valley View and the development near the DART center, developing the west side of town, and revitalization in the older neighborhoods. To create development in the DART center, it must be open to all qualified developers. A new strategy to decrease the time given to developers for funding must be put in place, with careful analysis of credits/incentives offered to developers to ensure our city profits from new development. Q: Would you support the city of Farmers Branch spending city funds to jumpstart economic development there at the DART location, as they did in the Four Corners area when they raised taxes and purchased the land? A: I would support the city spending city funds to jumpstart the development only if the voters approved it. Decisions must include realistic cost analyses to prevent our giving away too much and ending up with too little. Q: Is there a limit to how much city funds you will allocate to legally defend the city in its immigration ordinances? If the legal bill reaches $5 million, will you vote against spending further city funds? If the legal bill reaches $6 million, will you vote against spending further city funds? A: My stance regarding the immigration ordinance is that we go no further than the Fifth Circuit Court level. Enough is enough. Q: What percentage of the city population do you think is in the U.S. with unlawful immigration status, either because they overstayed a visa or because they entered the U.S. illegally? A: I have no data to support a particular figure and I will not speculate. Q: Farmers Branch has been polarized by the illegal immigration issue—as witnessed by the huge shouting matches outside and sometimes inside City Hall. What would you do to bring the city together? A: Enough is enough---settle the legal issues, and rebuild the unity of our neighborhoods by opening a two-way dialogue with our residents and listen to what they have to say. I and other council members must represent the entire city—100% of the population. Q: Do you support further outsourcing of various departments or services in Farmers Branch? If so, which ones? A: At this time I do not feel we need to out-source more departments or services. What must be done is not have the council try to determine outsourcing on its own. We have a good professional city manager: let him do his job with his staff. Q: Do you believe the City Council made the right decision on Feb. 8 in keeping paper refuge bags for residents rather than saving more than $100,000 with a switch to plastic bags? A: This is an opportunity for the city to continue something special for its residents. The paper refuge bag is worth the extra cost. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: For a newly elected city council member, this topic requires more in-depth study.

Farmers Branch Mayor
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Charlie Bird

Biographical Info:

Name: Charles L. Bird Street Address: 14635 Tanglewood Drive City/Town: Farmers Branch State: Texas

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Date of Birth: 10/2/1928 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-241-3447 Home Phone Number: 972-241-3447 Mobile Phone Number: 214-557-5658 Fax Number: 972-241-3447 E-mail Address: charles.bird@att.net Campaign Web Site Address: http://www.charliebirdformayor.org
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 30 Years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Retired Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Farmers Branch Chamber of Commerce, Farmers Branch Rotary Club, Active Member Farmers Branch Church of Christ, Farmers Branch Convention & Visitors Bureau Hospitality Team Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Public School Mentor, Farmers Branch Chamber of Commerce, Farmers Branch Rotary Club, Farmers Branch City Council (1996 - 2007) Q: Education A: Jacksonville Junior College, University of Florida Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Farmers Branch Councilman (1996 - 2007) Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: - no response Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: - no response Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I’m running for Mayor because I believe the citizens are looking for a leader who will take a new approach to meeting the urgent goals of expense control, quality education, new home construction and commercial development. My professional carrier began in the grocery foods industry ultimately becoming the youngest super market manager for a nationally known grocery chain. Subsequently, I became one of 5 Regional Directors for Mars Candies. I later purchased a single small wholesale/retail popcorn business with sales of less than $150,000. I grew that business into a multi-million dollar concern with 148 outlets located coast to coast throughout the United States. I served on the Farmers Branch City Council for 11 years (1996-2007). Prior to that, I served for 5 years on the Building Code of Appeals. I also served on the Zoning Board of Adjustment for a period of 5 years. I initiated and managed the Concerned Citizens of Farmers Branch (CCOFB), a volunteer organization that provided the labor and material to make necessary repairs to more than 150 homes that would have received a code violation had the work not been done - all at no expense to the home owner. During my time as Councilman, Farmers Branch built a new Courthouse and Jail, the Farmers Branch Senior Center, The Farmers Branch Community Recreation Center and approved the construction of Fire Station Number 3. All of this construction was paid for in cash. No bond money was required. This saved the city approximately $18,000,000 tax payer dollars in interest payments. I was a major supporter of buying the land now known as the Dart Station area. I was instrumental in supporting former councilman Berry Grubbs in creating an innovative land use project called Branch Crossing. I was a leading force in honoring our veterans. As a former Marine, I thought it time our city had a formal place for doing so, and worked to create the “Walk of Honor” and to erect the symbolic statue “Poppy” (commissioned with funds provided by Janie Scarbrough and Romona Upfield) that adorned the front of our city hall for 10 years. That same statue is now positioned in Liberty Plaza. I have received numerous awards from organizations for my volunteer work throughout the city. As a long-term member of the Farmers Branch Rotary Club, I was please to be presented the “2010 Rotarian of The Year” award. I am an active member of the Farmers Branch Chamber of Commerce and their top membership recruiter. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them?

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A: Education Improvement: The cost will be minimal. The task is one of creating awareness. It is a published fact that a 10% increase in test scores translates directly into a 10% increase in property values. Farmers Branch demonstrated in the past that citizen participation works. I initiated and managed the CCOFB – the Concerned Citizens of Farmers Branch, a group that pitched in and assisted those unable to make necessary home repairs. In that same community spirit I will create a Mayor’s Education Group with a core membership from those who have children enrolled in C-FBISD. I will ask that group to uncover ways the Mayor’s office can, among other things, contribute to increasing PTA attendance, encourage citizen participation at sporting, theatrical and musical events, expand the existing mentoring program, and create a group of volunteers ready to assist as needed. New Home Land Use & Development: This will require investment monies. I think a carefully organized and fully explained program would convince citizens to approve such an undertaking. The goal will be to repeat a housing development along the lines of what we did at Branch Crossing. This project added noticeably to our tax base. I believe this model will work equally well when applied to more modest priced housing. It is critical that we make it possible for parents of school age children to buy and build in Farmers Branch. We must encourage younger and up and coming people to our city. Reduce Legal Expenses: I will be a consensus mayor. I will fully and clearly explain our current situation, including current and probable costs and remind the citizens that it is their vote that determines how their money is spent. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I served on the Farmers Branch City Council for 11 years (1996-2007). Prior to that, I served for 5 years on the Building Code of Appeals. I also served on the Zoning Board of Adjustment for a period of 5 years. I initiated and managed the Concerned Citizens of Farmers Branch (CCOFB), a volunteer organization that provided the labor and material to make necessary repairs to more than 150 homes that would have received a code violation had the work not been done - all at no expense to the home owner. During my time as Councilman, Farmers Branch built a new Courthouse and Jail, the Farmers Branch Senior Center, The Farmers Branch Community Recreation Center and approved the construction of Fire Station Number 3. All of this construction was paid for in cash. No bond money was required. This saved the city approximately $18,000,000 tax payer dollars in interest payments. I was a major supporter of buying the land now known as the Dart Station area. I was instrumental in supporting former councilman Berry Grubbs in creating an innovative land use project called Branch Crossing. I was a leading force in honoring our veterans. As a former Marine, I thought it time our city had a formal place for doing so, and worked to create the “Walk of Honor” and to erect the symbolic statue “Poppy” that adorned the front of our city hall for 10 years. That same statue is now positioned in Liberty Plaza. I have received numerous awards from organizations for my volunteer work throughout the city. As a long-term member of the Farmers Branch Rotary Club, I was please to be presented the “2010 Rotarian of The Year” award. I am an active member of the Farmers Branch Chamber of Commerce and their top membership recruiter. I am running with my proven record. It is up to the voters to determine if my opponent’s record is as worthy. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Attracting residential and/or commercial development ranks extremely high on my list of priorities. City staff has done an excellent job marketing Farmers Branch to interested parties and in utilizing the TIF (tax incremental financing) program. Expenditures on new street signposts, logos, and decorative clocks do little to increase development. These expenditures would be better spent on improving our schools and on programs similar to Branch Crossing Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: The 2010 census indicates that Farmers Branch has realized a 4% population growth. Farmers Branch is ideally located with access to major highways, downtown, airport, and DART services. But location is not enough. We must complement our superb location with creative ways to invest our financial resources. We need to stop spending money on things that look good and sound good and start spending it on things that work. By example, we need more city investment in programs similar to Branch Crossing, initiated by former councilman Berry Grubbs. We must make this model work in other areas of the city for more modest priced housing. It is critical that we make it possible for parents of school age children to buy and build here. We need to encourage younger and up and coming

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people to our city and we need to be a visible contributor to our school system. We need to recognize that quality education drives economic growth. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Continue to support the 287(g) program. This program has proven to be effective. It is how our police department interfaces with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: The city has contributed millions to the DART transit system and area. I am personally very favorably inclined toward public mass transit. We must be diligent in working to ensure that the millions invested pay off. The DART area is a classic opportunity for employing imagination in land use. We have the mass-transit; now we must ensure that our actions contribute to population growth, tax base growth, increased sales activity, and more jobs for Farmers Branch citizens. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: I would work with cities adjacent to or close to Farmers Branch to determine where consolidation would provide better quality and lower cost. It is worth investigating, for instance, if Carrollton, Addison, Farmers Branch and nearby others could benefit from sharing a detention center rather than each paying for duplicate individual facilities, land, administrative and operations personnel. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: I doubt there are residents anywhere in the Metroplex who are better served than those of us who live in Farmers Branch. Our Fire and Police departments are exemplary, our city services are outstanding and the creative efforts of our city parks and recreation force are on display daily. Added to this list are the talented, efficient and courteous people who serve on committees and boards behind the scenes, plus those in the offices of our city administration. These are the people that make Farmers Branch - “The City Within A Park.” Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Economists tell us that changes in property values are the most direct way to measure the performance of local government. If property values rise, government is efficient. To the extent property values fall, government is inefficient. The Dallas Morning News published that Farmers Branch property appraisal values took an extraordinary drop compared to surrounding cities. (http://www.dallasnews.com/news/communitynews/collin-county/headlines/20100521-Dallas-County-land-values-plunge-4-2585.ece) Balancing the budget is a legal requirement not an accomplishment. We have an excellent City Manager and Chief Financial Officer to keep us in compliance. My focus will be to eliminate cosmetic expenditures and get control of legal expenses. We have better uses for those monies such as innovative land use programs and financial incentives to attract new businesses. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: We must fully understand and acknowledge the challenge posed to us by surrounding cities and the large undeveloped landmasses they posses. Urban planners, specialists in guiding cities like ours, tell us that Farmers Branch, like so many other towns that grew up just outside a large city, faces critical competing forces. Surrounding towns have large low cost open landmasses. These landmasses convert into low-cost building lots providing builders the opportunity to construct the larger and more expensive homes desired by high-income families. For much of Farmers Branch it is necessary to purchase an existing home and clear it to get a vacant lot. This adds considerable and, for all but a few, an unacceptable cost. This situation is a contributing reason why home rentals are an appealing business in Farmers Branch. It is more profitable to buy a home and rent it, than to tear it down and build on the land. In addition there are within Dallas, just inside LBJ, considerable areas of commercial space and facilities already available at discount prices. These circumstances make it evident that location alone isn’t enough for Farmers Branch. We must complement our superb location with creative ways to invest our financial resources. We need to stop spending money on things that look good and sound good and start spending it on things that work. By example, we need more city investment in programs similar to Branch Crossing, initiated by former councilman Berry Grubbs. We must make this model work in other areas of the city for more modest priced housing. It is critical that we make it possible for parents of school age children to buy and build here. We need to encourage younger and up and coming people to our city and we need to be a

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visible contributor to our school system. We need to recognize that quality education drives economic growth. It’s a challenge, but we can do it. We have done things like this in the past and we can do it moving forward! Q: Do you support the formation of a separate Farmers Branch Independent School District? If so, how will you go about obtaining the necessary special legislation to change current requirements that a new school district have 8,000 students? A: I am opposed to the formation of a separate Farmers Branch Independent School District. Q: What are the key development issues in Farmers Branch? What do you propose to do to create development in the DART center in Farmers Branch? A: Urban planners, specialists in guiding cities like ours, tell us that Farmers Branch, like so many other towns that grew up just outside a large city, faces critical competing forces. Surrounding towns have large low cost open landmasses. These landmasses convert into low-cost building lots providing builders the opportunity to construct the larger and more expensive homes desired by high-income families. For much of Farmers Branch it is necessary to purchase an existing home and clear it to get a vacant lot. This adds considerable and, for all but a few, an unacceptable cost. This situation is a contributing reason why home rentals are an appealing business in Farmers Branch. It is more profitable to buy a home and rent it, than to tear it down and build on the land. In addition there are within Dallas, just inside LBJ, considerable areas of commercial space and facilities already available at discount prices. These circumstances make it evident that location alone isn’t enough for Farmers Branch. We need more city investment in programs similar to Branch Crossing, initiated by former councilman Berry Grubbs. We must make this model work in other areas of the city for more modest priced housing. It is critical that we make it possible for parents of school age children to buy and build here. We need to encourage younger and up and coming people to our city and we need to be a visible contributor to our school system. We need to recognize that quality education drives economic growth. The city has contributed millions to the DART transit system and area. I am personally very favorably inclined toward public mass transit. We must be diligent in working to ensure that the millions invested pay off. The DART area is a classic example of what is meant by land use. We have the mass-transit, now we must ensure that our actions contribute to population growth, tax base growth, increased sales activity, and more jobs for Farmers Branch citizens. Q: Would you support the city of Farmers Branch spending city funds to jumpstart economic development there at the DART location, as they did in the Four Corners area when they raised taxes and purchased the land? A: We should not even consider raising taxes until we have demonstrated to the voters a disciplined control of expenses. Economic development, regardless of location, will follow when we stop spending money on things that look good and sound good and start spending it on things that work. Q: Is there a limit to how much city funds you will allocate to legally defend the city in its immigration ordinances? If the legal bill reaches $5 million, will you vote against spending further city funds? If the legal bill reaches $6 million, will you vote against spending further city funds? A: The Mayor does not have a vote in Farmers Branch except in the case of a tie. It is my understanding that as of today, costs will not be between $50,000 and $200,000 to petition the Supreme Court to hear our case. We have spent years and millions of dollars to get this far and the majority of voters have repeatedly elected officials who are in favor of continuing legal action(s). If the range of $50,000 to $200,000 is correct, and if because of a tie I was forced to vote, I would agree we should petition the Supreme Court. However, I think it unreasonable to demand the 11,000 homeowners in Farmers Branch be made to stand alone against the United States Government and pay legal fees indefinitely. Q: What percentage of the city population do you think is in the U.S. with unlawful immigration status, either because they overstayed a visa or because they entered the U.S. illegally? A: CBS News reported that 2009 United States illegal immigrant population was 10.8 million according to a report from the United States Department of Homeland Security. Q: Farmers Branch has been polarized by the illegal immigration issue—as witnessed by the huge shouting matches outside and sometimes inside City Hall. What would you do to bring the city together? A: Guarantee that the people get all the facts, fully, clearly and in a timely manner and are given an opportunity to speak and be heard before the council. Q: Do you support further outsourcing of various departments or services in Farmers Branch? If so, which ones? A: We have an extremely qualified city staff that correctly takes outsourcing into

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consideration along with other economic factors when plans are made to spend taxpayer money. However, it is not uncommon for taxpayers to elect to “Keep At Home” the operation of a city facility or service even though it may be more economical to have it outsourced. It is the people’s money and therefore I believe the people should have a voice when disagreement arises. I will work to ensure that the people will have a “Keep At Home” option made available to them when disagreement over outsourcing is strongly and deeply felt. Q: Do you believe the City Council made the right decision on Feb. 8 in keeping paper refuge bags for residents rather than saving more than $100,000 with a switch to plastic bags? A: Yes. I went before the council and argued for that decision. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: I am aware of only 1 application to drill for natural gas within the city. I do not believe any drilling has taken place since the application was granted. The application was granted with the agreement that drilling, if it were to take place, would not interfere with housing and the land drilled upon would be restored to pre-drilling condition once drilling was complete. Q: Tim O'Hare became mayor at the age of 38. How do you respond to those who suggest you may not have the energy to be mayor? A: No one has made that suggestion to me, perhaps because I energetically engage with a great many Farmers Branch residents on a daily basis. Further, I am today, the top recruiter for the Farmers Branch Chamber of Commerce and I actively mentor in our city schools. Just last year (2010) I was voted Rotarian of the Year. Bill Glancy

Biographical Info:

Name: William Glancy Street Address: 3808 Wooded Creek Dr City/Town: Farmers Branch State: Texas Date of Birth: 1/31/41 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-536-4364 Home Phone Number: 972-241-5229 Mobile Phone Number: 214-536-4364 E-mail Address: williamglancy@sbcglobal.net Campaign Web Site Address: www.billglancyformayor.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 43 Years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Retired/Social Security and 401 Funds Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Resigned from Planning & Zoning Commission Building & Standards Commission Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Farmers Branch Industrial Development Board Founding Member Farmers Branch Rotary Club and Past President Past Board Member Metrocrest Hospital Authority, Past Chairman of Board Co-Chaired last Farmers Branch Charter revision committee Planning & Zoning Commission Building & Standards Commission Q: Education A: Graduated Lebanon High School Attended Cincinnati Art Academy for two years Ohio State University, School of Commerce: Majored in Managerial Accounting (3 Years) Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Served two Terms Farmers Branch City Council Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $2215.00

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Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Dave Blair, William Martin, Bart Glancy Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I am running for office because I want Farmers Branch to continue to be a great place to live. I have been continually involved in Farmers Branch since the early 70’s. My wife and I have, between us, served on almost every board and been involved in numerous civic organizations. I am committed to walking the city of Farmers Branch and knocking on the door of virtually every voter who votes in local elections. My professional background is in Sales and Marketing and I have had great success in both the private and public sector in this area. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: 1. Identify the type of economic development our citizens desire and seek out businesses with good business models that have the best chance at long term success. 2. Develop a more open dialog between citizens and council at council meetings. 3. Work to fund city employees’ retirement program that is fair to city employees, however, meets the budget restraints, as required for a balanced budget. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I think my vision for Farmers Branch is more aligned with the majority of the citizens of Farmers Branch and my ability to enact that vision. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: It is one of the highest priorities, but certainly not the only priority. In fact, economic development doesn’t conflict with any other priorities and should complement our job of providing equitable pension compensation for city employees Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Farmers Branch is a maturing community of citizens who have lived here 30 years or more. It speaks well of their satisfaction with the City. As these citizens age it is important we provide the availability of alternative senior housing for those who choose it. Many seniors have urged us to find private developers who will provide senior housing for them. They love Farmers Branch and want stay in the city. As seniors move from their homes younger citizens are moving in. They are remodeling many of these homes and improving many of our neighborhoods. They desire different types of retail and services than the demand has been in the past. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Farmers Branch has an officer trained in the 287G immigration program. It is my understanding that if someone is apprehended and police suspect they are not here legally, they are questioned by this officer to determine their citizenship. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: Farmers Branch has just started having Dart rail service in December of 2010. I would prefer to see the results of this service before using public funds on additional transit systems. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: I think the city needs to continue involvement with The North Texas COG and The Metroplex Council of Mayors. These organizations bring forth areas where cooperation is desirable for the whole area. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Our citizens have come to expect a very high level of service. I think it is always prudent to evaluate cost cutting measures as long as the level of service is maintained Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure?

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A: Farmers Branch has always done a good job in maintaining our infrastructure and providing the services our citizen’s desire. I think the present leadership has started rejuvenating economic development which was neglected prior to their being elected. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: I don’t think there is an uncomfortable truth in the city of Farmers Branch other than what is possibly created in the media. Q: Do you support the formation of a separate Farmers Branch Independent School District? If so, how will you go about obtaining the necessary special legislation to change current requirements that a new school district have 8,000 students? A: No, I do not support an independent school district. First of all, it cannot be done under present law. Secondly, under Texas school funding equalization laws, all schools receive basically the same amount of money to educate a child. A smaller district would have a difficult time providing the variety of educational opportunities that the larger systems provide. Q: What are the key development issues in Farmers Branch? What do you propose to do to create development in the DART center in Farmers Branch? A: As stated earlier, seeking out desirable, sustainable development is the key to prolonged economic development. Also, in a land locked city like Farmers Branch, it is financially desirable to have your retail on the borders of your city so people from other cities will spend money in your city and create more tax revenue for the citizens. I have long advocated drawing development and other businesses to the Dart station area with such things as a child development center that riders could drop their children at before boarding the train. Also, I talked to Wal-Mart about the idea of placing a store at the Dart Station so People riding the train could order the groceries or other merchandise on an IPOD or computer at work and have them ready for pick up as they return at night. Wal-Mart thought this was a great idea. We need to think of ways to make it easier for our citizens to enjoy life and spend more time with their families or whatever they choose Q: Would you support the city of Farmers Branch spending city funds to jumpstart economic development there at the DART location, as they did in the Four Corners area when they raised taxes and purchased the land? A: I think it behooves us to use our good sense to attract development rather than use financial incentives at this time. The City owns a large amount of land in the station area and we need to work to develop that asset in the best for our citizens. Q: Is there a limit to how much city funds you will allocate to legally defend the city in its immigration ordinances? If the legal bill reaches $5 million, will you vote against spending further city funds? If the legal bill reaches $6 million, will you vote against spending further city funds? A: I am sure there is a limit that is prudent to spend. Before a lot more money is spent I think different legal advice needs to be obtained. I also would like to see the content of all 8 or so of the cases brought against the city published, as well as all the litigants and attorneys who are involved. I think the citizens need more information about these cases before making a decision about their support or lack thereof. Q: What percentage of the city population do you think is in the U.S. with unlawful immigration status, either because they overstayed a visa or because they entered the U.S. illegally? A: I know of no one who has that answer. Q: Farmers Branch has been polarized by the illegal immigration issue—as witnessed by the huge shouting matches outside and sometimes inside City Hall. What would you do to bring the city together? A: I think the city needs to recognize the contribution that legal citizens have given the city no matter what their country of origin. Q: Do you support further outsourcing of various departments or services in Farmers Branch? If so, which ones? A: I would have to look at what the department’s function is in the city. Also, if the level of service could be maintained or improved with less cost then I think it is advisable to look at outsourcing. Another factor to be considered is what is the cost of going back to city provided service if the private provider didn’t meet the citizens’ level of expectations. Q: Do you believe the City Council made the right decision on Feb. 8 in keeping paper refuge bags for residents rather than saving more than $100,000 with a switch to plastic bags? A: I was in the packaging business. I have some knowledge of that business. I think a test should be run on an area of the city that would like to try plastic bags. Plastic costs less than paper but resin prices vary more than pulp. The key in plastic bags is the millimeter thickness of the bag and the volume you make the bag. Too large a bag is hard to load on a truck and can break open losing the content. Landfills are designed so that there is very

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little degrading so ground water is not contaminated. The volume of plastic is less in a landfill than paper. I would prefer a limited test to see what happens. Unforeseen problems might arise that would be undesirable. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: The city needs to pay particular attention to the fracturing process that is used to extract gas from many wells and the hazards that it can cause, especially the waste water that is expelled as well as escaping gases. Q: Tim O'Hare became mayor at the age of 38. How do you respond to those who suggest you may not have the energy to be mayor? A: That is a good question. I had a complete physical before I entered the race to make sure there were no health issues at present. I am 70 years old and in very good health. I have an ancestry of longevity. I feel very good and have held up very well going door to door in the city. My wife often calls me the Energizer Bunny. I have a farm in Oklahoma which I have maintained for over 15 years as well as maintaining my home in Farmers Branch. I am a member of the Bennington Oklahoma Volunteer Fire Department and am a certified First Responder in the Oklahoma EMT program. If age is an issue I am 12 years younger than my opponent.

Flower Mound Town Council, Place 1
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Kendra Stephenson

Biographical Info:

Name: Kendra Stephenson Street Address: 2321 Roadrunner Dr City/Town: Flower Mound State: TX Date of Birth: April 23, 1963 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-707-6117 E-mail Address: kendraforfm@kendrastephenson.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.kendraforfm.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 9 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: N/A Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Parent and strategy consultant within a referral network Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Recently completed a three year term on the McKamy Sanctuary HOA Board. I volunteer at my children’s schools as needed. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: 2008 -2011 – McKamy Sancturay HOA Board; two years as the board president 2009-2010 – Flower Mound Oil and Gas Board of Appeals and Board of Adjustments 2003 – 2005 - Denton County Court Appointed Special Advocate Q: Education A: B.S. Accounting University of Wisconsin Platteville, MBA emphasis in strategy and marketing University of Chicago Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: None Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign?

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A: Approximately $3000 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Kendra and Bobby Stephenson, Art House – Flower Mound, TX, Virginia and Keith Simonson Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I believe my 20 years of business experience in accounting, finance and strategy consulting will bring a new perspective to the Flower Mound town council. My desire is to help Flower Mound move past the divisive issues of the past few years and continue to grow the community into a place where • Residents can eat, shop, work and play • Quality housing options are available to all generations of Flower Mound residents • Taxes are not increased My background includes making tough choices related to spending and force reductions, establishing and building businesses in the U.S., France and China and assisting US corporations develop strategies to grow their businesses and improve their business processes. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: The three most important actions I want to take would vastly improve Flower Mound’s financial position in the future, yet cost little in monetary dollars. The first will be to streamline the development process in Flower Mound, beginning by meeting with developers around the Metroplex. The goal of this meeting would be to determine what are the root causes of the perception that Flower Mound is difficult to do business with, and to recommend immediate corrective action. Improving this negative perception will increase Flower Mound’s ability to attract the quality development that residents are demanding. The second action will be to work to bring increased housing options to Flower Mound so that residents can have all generations of their families live in Flower Mound if they choose. The third action will be to explore the use of new long distance drilling methods to find common ground between mineral owners and surface owners. The actions related to development and housing options will improve Flower Mound’s financial position in the future by expanding our tax base and allowing Flower Mound to capture more sales tax revenue. Finding common ground with large mineral owners will minimize Flower Mound’s future legal expenses. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: My opponent, Jeff Whittaker, is a respected business person in Flower Mound and has dedicated many hours to our community. That said, we have very different business experiences. My educational background and business experience has given me a deep background in identifying, developing and evaluating complex strategies for growth and improving the efficiency of business processes. Specifically, I have assisted in resolving government contract disputes, streamlined accounting processes increasing accuracy and reducing processing time, established effective internal control policies, processes and procedures, negotiated third party sales arrangements, established the related party pricing arrangements for a foreign joint venture, developed detailed growth strategies for retailers, telecommunication companies, package deliverers and government contractors. This experience will be invaluable in evaluating the complex issues that come before Town Council. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Providing a variety of quality housing options and expanding the dining, retail and recreation options in Flower Mound is one of my top priorities. Over the last year, Flower Mound has seen several traditional residential subdivision approved and progress toward filling existing commercial space with good, solid companies. What we have not seen is a consistent effort put forth to bring a variety of housing options to Flower Mound or progress towards expanding the dining, retail and recreation options to Flower Mound. The residents of Flower Mound are demanding options that allow all generations of their families to live in Flower Mound. These housing options will be in keeping with the Master Plan and should allow residents to enjoy a pedestrian oriented development. Residents are also demanding to spend their tax dollars at home, and not in surrounding communities. Development to fill these demands needs to be a priority. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should

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know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Flower Mound is becoming much more diverse. The community has embraced this change and welcomed the expanded world view that it brings. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: It has not come to my attention that illegal immigration is a huge issue in Flower Mound. Flower Mound’s current procedures are adequate. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: Yes, a seamless regional transit system would be a great way to connect Flower Mound to DFW and the Metroplex, along with reducing traffic congestion. I will work with Flower Mound’s representative to the Denton County Transportation Authority, so as plans progress, Flower Mound will be part of the discussions. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Gas drilling is a key area where North Texas would benefit from further regional cooperation. Municipal ordinances differ greatly in North Texas. Flower Mound has some of the strongest ordinances that protect our residents from drilling near our homes, schools, churches and parks. Surrounding municipalities do not always offer as much protection. Flower Mound residents who live near these municipalities are often negatively impacted. To correct this issue, I would encourage a sharing of information with the residents and city councils of our surrounding municipalities to broaden their understanding of Flower Mound’s ordinances. The goal would be to encourage a harmonization of the ordinances. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Flower Mound runs a tight ship monetarily. I would encourage this approach towards fiscal responsibility continue. However, Flower Mound should never stop looking for ways to provide more services for less money. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: Flower Mound has weathered the storm relatively well. Decreases in property appraised values have been compensated for by Flower Mound’s TIRZ zone and sales tax revenues have begun to increase. The current leadership was faced with budget shortfalls earlier in the year and made cuts to close the gap. A recovering economy should allow Flower Mound to avoid further cuts. Flower Mound must do a better job of increasing our tax base. This can be done by bringing more dining, shopping and recreation options to Flower Mound. Increasing the availability of quality housing options available in Flower Mound will also increase our tax base. Doing so will not only fill the demands of Flower Mound residents but will increase Flower Mound’s tax revenues. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Flower Mound has been in the spotlight regarding gas drilling, which has caused some division in our town. This division stems from real disagreements over key procedures, ordinances and issues. It is my hope that in the coming year, that we will be able to work together as a community and resolve these issues. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: Flower Mound has led the way in establishing ordinances that keep gas drilling away from our homes, schools, churches and parks. Flower Mound recently had a citizen’s advisory board review its ordinances and make recommendations. The new council will review these recommendations and take action. I’ve reviewed the recommendations, and also want to add mandatory vapor recovery and air monitoring at all pad sites. Long distance drilling methods may also offer further opportunities to keep drilling away from our homes, schools, churches and parks. Flower Mound should explore the use of these methods to unify mineral owners and surface owners. This could limit the push by mineral owners for new drill sites in Flower Mound, and reduce litigation costs related to Flower Mound’s oil and gas ordinances. I also believe Flower Mound should use its municipal authority to regulate the location of pipelines related to gas drilling. When unregulated, these pipelines can needlessly intrude on residents’ private property and create a spider web of pipelines on undeveloped land, limiting the future development of Flower Mound. Centralized natural gas collection facilities (CCF) are also an open issue in Flower Mound. Flower Mound has a CCF at 1171 and Scenic Road that is currently limited to natural gas compression. Flower Mound must use its municipal authority to ensure no other facilities

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are established without resident knowledge, input and approval. Flower Mound must also work to make sure the current facility is as safe as possible. Jeff Whittaker
Biographical Info:

Name: Jeffrey Whittaker Street Address: 4305 Auburn Drive City/Town: Flower Mound State: Texas Date of Birth: July 22, 1959 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-539-4977 Home Phone Number: 972-539-4977 Fax Number: 972-539-4977 E-mail Address: jeff@electjeffw.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.electjeffw.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: I have resided in Flower Mound for 13 years. Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: I resided in Carrollton for approximately 9 years. Q: Occupation/main source of income A: I am Certified Public Accountant in private practice. I own my firm and receive fee income for the completion of tax returns and providing financial and accounting assistance to hundreds of individuals and businesses in North Texas. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Board Member and Treasurer Lewisville ISD Education Foundation, Board Member and Vice Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Lewisville Chamber of Commerce, Member Board of Governors of the Texas Health Resources Presbyterian Hospital of Flower Mound, Town of Flower Mound Planning and Zoning Commissioner. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Board Member and Treasurer Friends of the Flower Mound Public Library, Board Member and Treasurer Town of Flower Mound Community Development Corporation. Q: Education A: I am a graduate of the University of South Florida with a BA in Accounting and Marketing and I obtained a Masters in Business Administration in Corporate Finance from the University of Dallas. I am a Texas and Florida Certified Public Accountant, a Certified Financial Planner and a holder of the Personal Finance Specialist designation. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: I have not previously sought public office. Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $2270 has been deposited into my account. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: I am the largest contributor to my campaign. Al Demarzo and Peter Fuenfhausen have also contributed. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No have not been been arrested or involved in an criminal proceedings or civil suits. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I seek to offer the same leadership to the Town that I have provided to many charitable and civic organizations I support. I have provided significant financial and operational leadership that has benefited those organizations. I am willing to perform most any task and have always been welcomed upon joining organizations and encouraged to lead. I am a CPA well versed in Corporate Finance and have held many financial leadership positions. I am the only candidate for Place One that has actually had control over the tax dollars of the residents and always ensured I spent less than we took in. I provide service that most people find highly beneficial thus I was voted the Best CPA and Best Financial Planner in Denton County in 2009. I believe I bring complimentary skills to add to those already found on Council. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: May initial focus will be to complete in the work currently in progress on the Town Gas Ordinance. I feel it needs to be completed, it needs to be done right the first time and we

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can move on. Next I want to do everything we can to move the development of medical facilities forward. We need to ensure the medical office building attached to the hospital is constructed and that experience is as good for the developer as was the construction of the hospital. Finally I would like to see senior housing addressed within close proximately to the medical facility. I would push to find a developer seeking an opportunity to provide a multi-level care facility. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: My opponent is also a highly qualified and skilled individual. I would point out that I have 10 years more business experience and have contributed significantly more time to the community. I have supported many charities and been an integral part of civic organizations where my opponent has not. I am fairly well know to business, banks and Town Staff and would be able to step in immediately upon election. Finally I was placed into a Town Appointed position and faced significant challenge and opposition. In my first few months some extremely important and highly contended issues came through Planning and Zoning. My opinion was frequently not in the majority. I was determined to stay through these difficult times and ensure my voice was heard. My opponent when presented with similar circumstances resigned. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Adding more high quality residential housing is very high on my list of priorities. I strongly favor home ownership projects. I have yet to have one resident say to me they request upon joining Council that I move forward projects for high density apartments. Commercial development, particularly that which adds jobs must also be a significant priority. To continue a high level of services the public demands Flower Mound will need new tax revenue. Commercial development with related jobs is a must. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: I think the predominant demographic issue in the Town is how to serve the aging. As a member of the Flower Mound Chamber of Commerce I was part of the initial Senior Resource Group. I have visited many senior housing and care facilities in the Town. We are fortunate to have one of the highest rated facilities in the state. I would gladly become a champion for senior housing, particularly in the Riverwalk area, that would serve seniors and offer varying levels of care. I have parents who reside in such a facility in California. That would be an excellent addition to the Town, particularly in an area so close to services seniors would need. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Illegal immigration is not an issue in Flower Mound. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: Regional mass transit must be viewed as an investment just as any other expenditure of the people's money. Any proposal to add Flower Mound to the regional transit system, be it bus or rail must be justified financially. While I have visited the new rail system in Lewisville and look forward to riding, I believe it remains to be proven that Flower Mound would be a logical next step. However I would be willing to listen to proposals for consideration of Flower Mound's participation. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: I support the continuing to work with our neighboring communities on Legislative initiatives that for which we have a common interest. In addition, I support working together on transportation and other similar infrastructure opportunities. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: I believe the Town, and specifically Town Staff have done an excellent job in cost control. Given my background in accounting and finance this would be an area where I would seek to participate and provide insight. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: The Town of Flower Mound has done an excellent job in maintaining a balanced budget in difficult economic times. Businesses within the Town have new facilities under construction that will in fact add to the tax base. As the hospital matures we will see

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construction of support facilities, offices and hopefully residential construction in the Riverwalk area. Further I am anxious to see new opportunities in the Lakeside area. However, I want to view what Lewisville did to lure employers like MedFusion and Netgear and then find why Flower Mound was not selected. Finally we have seen some very positive new projects for single family home construction that will contribute new tax dollars and new residents to generate sales tax revenue. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: An uncomfortable truth is that even when Flower Mound passes its new gas ordinance much of the progress made may be thwarted. There is a bill in committee in Austin as I write this that seeks to strip the ability of local communities to regulate oil and gas exploration within their jurisdiction. Mayor Northern traveled to Austin to testify against this bill. Also testifying at the recent committee hearing in Austin was a Flower Mound developer who sought to put gas wells in River Walk on land that is near a church, daycare, and now the newly built hospital. He attacked Flower Mound by urging legislators to take away our sovereign immunity – our right to self-regulate. This developer has endorsed my opponent. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: The Town Council and Mayor voted in last May took the appropriate steps to enact proper regulation for the Town. They first appointed a Board to assess the issue, included all points of view, allowed the heated rhetoric to quiet and crafted new regulation. It is now in the final stages of creation and I would look forward to voting on the final version when elected.

Flower Mound Town Council, Place 3
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Elwood Leonard
Biographical Info: Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: - no response Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: - no response Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: - no response Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: - no response Q: Education A: - no response Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: - no response Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: - no response Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: - no response Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: - no response Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: - no response Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: - no response Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice?

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A: - no response Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: - no response Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: - no response Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: - no response Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: - no response Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: - no response Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: - no response Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: - no response Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: - no response Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: - no response Mark Wise

Biographical Info:

Name: Mark Wise Street Address: 4409 Biscayne Dr City/Town: Flower Mound State: Texas Date of Birth: November 18, 1966 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: Home Phone Number: 972-355-9473 Mobile Phone Number: 972-454-9473 E-mail Address: mark@markwise.net Campaign Web Site Address: www.electmarkwise.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: November 1996-Jan 2003 Aug 2004-Present Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: November 1996-Jan 2003 Aug 2004-Present Q: Occupation/main source of income A: My main source of income comes from my full time position as a systems engineer with a global communications company headquartered in San Jose, CA. I am part owner in our family real estate business that my wife Kris manages. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: I currently serve as Place 3 on the Town of Flower Mound's Oil and Gas Board of Appeal and Flower Mound's Board of Adjustment. I'm the secretary of the Summit Club of Flower

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Mound, an organization dedicated to serving youth activities in the community. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: - no response Q: Education A: Degree in Computer and Electronic Technology along with extensive corporate training and management experience. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: To date $1225.00 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: I'm the largest contributor to my campaign, along with family, friends and supporters. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: I have not. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I’m running to make a difference in our community. In my current professional position, I take complex problems and develop solutions that best meet the needs of the client. I will bring these analytical skills and problem solving approach to the issues facing our town. I will examine all sides of an issue, gather relevant facts and move forward with a solution that is best for the whole of Flower Mound. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: First and foremost I would consider the recommendations of the Oil and Gas Advisory Board in crafting a revised oil and gas ordinance that offers our community the best health, safety and welfare protections. Secondly, I would continue the development of our medical community in and around our town to bring quality care and advanced services to our citizens. Next, I would promote sustainable economic growth, that follows the town's Smart Growth Plan and Master Plan vision. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I am active on a Town Board and in a long standing civic organization within the town. I attend and participate in community events. My opponent has not publicly stated his platform whereas I have clearly described my experience and platform positions on my website – www.electmarkwise.com so residents know exactly where I stand. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Attracting good commercial and retail is a priority for me. This is critical to the enjoyment of our community, the development of jobs and the support of our tax base. Development needs to fit our town’s Master Plan vision and SMART Growth plan, enhancing our community, not detracting from it. In the last year the town has moved forward with two park projects; Twin Coves,adding convenient access to Lake Grapevine, and WilsonCarmel, a 94 acre location with an amphitheater. I also support the continued commitment to infrastructure and city services, aligning with the town's Master Plan vision and Smart Growth Plan. These are just a few of the many current projects that support a continued growth to promote a sustainable tax base while enhancing our community character and maintaining the quality of life we enjoy and expect. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: N/A There are no measurable demographic changes. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Illegal immigration is not an issue in Flower Mound. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I do favor a regional transportation system but only when the circumstances are right. I’m not convinced the demand justifies the expense to bring it to Flower Mound. I would like to investigate usage potential for Flower Mound prior to discussing any funding or steps required. I believe such an investment would need to provide a benefit that is worth the cost to our taxpayers. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater

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regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: I support Mayor Northern's initiative to foster greater cooperation by sponsoring community meetings and workshops with other elected officials. This promotes regional cooperation through collaboration whereby we learn from each others mistakes and share best practices on what works best for our communities. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: I think our city services are outstanding and delivered in a cost effective manner. However, there are always areas of opportunity. Advances in technologies are an example of how city services can be made more efficient. I would work with town staff to identify the highest payback projects and assuming their value, champion efforts to get them funded. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: During hard economic times, families need to tighten our belts and do with less. In my view, local governments need to make difficult decisions and spend money accordingly. We should invest only where we have tax growth potential. I commit to treating our town’s budget and spending with great care and caution. I believe a strong financial position will ensure our town’s success and place us at an advantage in weathering short term economic hurdles and position us for solid economic growth as our national economy improves. The current leadership and town staff has done an excellent job in these very tough times. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: With the election of new Council leadership last year that has as its first priority protecting the health and welfare of the citizens of Flower Mound, some residents have grown complacent, believing that no further work is needed. This is not true. The Council has made tremendous progress in protecting the citizens but there is still plenty yet to be done. The new Oil and Gas ordinance needs to be reviewed by Council and approved. Just this week a bill was being reviewed in the Texas legislature that would take away Flower Mound’s authority to regulate gas drilling within the municipality. This would be devastating to progress made to date. Citizens need to continue to follow our community's progress and elect those who can best represent their concerns. Q: What changes, if any, would you make to existing city laws dealing with natural gas drilling? Is the city doing enough to ensure the safety and protect the interests of its citizens? A: It is my understanding that the Town of Flower Mound's ordinances regulating gas drilling are among the most restrictive in the nation. As a member of the Oil and Gas Board of Appeals I recently participated in two different cases where gas drilling companies sought a number of reductions from setbacks under the Town’s current ordinances. I voted against the requested variances as did the other Board members. The two applicants have since filed separate lawsuits against the Board seeking to have the Board’s decisions in these cases overturned. I believe that the gas drilling companies should comply with the Town’s ordinances, and in those situations where variances are allowed be required to fully meet the spirit and intent of our current ordinances. But, given the concerns expressed by so many residents of the Town regarding gas drilling, the Town should carefully examine and where needed strengthen those ordinances particularly when residential areas are involved. Additionally, the current town council is reviewing our Oil and Gas ordinances, after a lengthy review by our Oil and Gas Advisory Board. I look forward to participating in that process when elected.

Frisco City Council, Place 5
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Bart Crowder

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Biographical Info:

Name: Bart Crowder Street Address: PO Box 2074 City/Town: Frisco State: TX Date of Birth: 08/04/1964 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-908-7384 Mobile Phone Number: 214-908-7384 E-mail Address: bart@bartcrowder.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.bartcrowder.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 7 Years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 7 Years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Managing Director, Charles Schwab & Co. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Frisco City Council, Place 5 2008 - Present Chairman, City of Frisco Budget & Audit Committee Member, City of Frisco Governance Committee National League of Cities Representative, Washington, DC 2010 SMU Cox School of Business Associate Board Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Leadership Frisco Class XI CFA Society of Dallas / Ft. Worth Board of Directors Frisco Soccer Association, Soccer Coach Q: Education A: Master of Business Administration Southern Methodist University Bachelor of Business Administration University of Oklahoma Chartered Financial Analyst Designation (CFA) Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: N/A Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $2,500 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Sam Roach Collin County Association of Realtors Robert Medigovich Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: My strong business, management & finance background made me the most qualified candidate in 2008. Today, I add to that three years experience on City Council, working to address issues and find optimal outcomes for the city. My skills and experience will enable me to continue adding value and leading the City of Frisco. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: The three most important issues facing Frisco are: 1. Managing Continued Growth - We have been appropriately cautious in infrastructure investments during the recent economic downturn. As the city continues to attract new residents, we will have to re-engage in infrastructure development to ensure that we don't fall behind. Fortunately, Frisco weathered the economic challenges better than most and is positioned well. We continue to add new construction of business and residential properties. Sales tax receipts have been increasing over the last year. This will enable us to provide necessary funding for required development. 2. Air Quality - The challenges of a lead recycling plant in the city are well known. We must continue to take all appropriate actions to ensure compliance with safety guidelines or demand closure. 3. Housing - As a growing city, we must proactively manage housing types to ensure that we provide an appropriate array of housing at all levels and are able to remain in control of the process. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: As the incumbent, I have spent many hours studying the issues and making thoughtful strategic decisions. I have consistently taken steps that are in the best interests of the City of Frisco. Things are going well in the city and I am proud of my contribution to that success. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or

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commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: The City of Frisco does an outstanding job in economic development. We have a great structure in place with a funded Economic Development Corporation, a great City Manager and an engaged City Council. We are deeply involved in the development process and work together to create winning proposals to attract development. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: The City of Frisco embraces citizens of all backgrounds and origins. We appreciate the contributions of all people. From an economic perspective, we were not immune to challenges during the recession. Our volunteers and social service organizations were very busy helping those facing setbacks. We will continue to support social services initiatives. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Immigration is a Federal issue that should be dealt with at that level. Our local police should focus on protecting our city and prosecuting criminals regardless of immigration status. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I support regional cooperation in developing efficient transit systems. However, the vast geography of the metroplex makes it difficult to build a comprehensive system. Our goal is to attract jobs within Frisco so that fewer citizens are commuting to far away areas. Currently, I do not believe there is sufficient interest in mass transit to justify the expense of bringing it to our area. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: Our region could benefit from greater cooperation in pursuing major corporate relocations. By working together to first position North Texas as a desired location, we would present a unified front. Regardless of which city was ultimately selected, we all benefit. The lack of this coordination was cited as a factor in the Boeing move to Chicago. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: Yes. Our city is extremely efficient. Our maintenance & operations tax level is one of the lowest in the area. Our City Manager has built a strong staff with employees that take great pride in their work and do their best to meet the needs of the citizens. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: The City of Frisco has weathered the economic challenges extremely well. The City Council and City Manager have worked together to address essential needs and postpone expenditures which could wait. The worst of the downturn is behind us now and we must carefully begin to ramp up our development efforts to ensure that we meet the needs of a rapidly growing city. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Most of the current conflict is occurring between those with traditional conservative values and newer extreme conservatives. Overall, things are in great shape in our city and it is unfortunate that some are choosing to imply otherwise and detract from moving the city forward. Many of us feel there are significant fiscal issues in Washington. We need to be able to see the difference at a local level. Our city has a great City Manager and staff who have efficiently managed our development. Q: What are the next steps the city should take regarding the Arts of Collin County shared arts hall? A: The Arts Hall was one of the projects that was postponed during the recent economic downturn. It was appropriate to wait until conditions improved before moving forward. I did not support the effort to revoke bond authorization. Now that it is on the ballot, I believe we will have clear direction on next steps. If the voters re-affirm their commitment to the project, I believe we should move forward with funding and construction in the very near future. Q: Do you favor a public investment in rail service for Frisco, and, if so, how would you pay for it? A: In the current environment, I believe we have more pressing needs. I believe we should set aside appropriate right of way to keep this option open for consideration at a later date. I do not believe we should invest in rail service at this time.

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Tim Nelson

Biographical Info:

Name: Tim Nelson Street Address: 10412 Noel Dr. City/Town: Frisco State: TX Date of Birth: 11 July 1970 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-699-8461 Home Phone Number: 214-699-8461 Mobile Phone Number: 214-699-8461 E-mail Address: Tim@VoteForTim.org Campaign Web Site Address: www.VoteForTim.org
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 12 Years - Since 3/27/1999 Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Army Officer/Real Estate Investor Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: At the national level, I continue to serve as an officer in the United States Army/Army Reserve and have done so for the last 21+ years. I currently serve on the city's Veterans Advisory Committee and my homeowners association board of directors. I'm also actively involved in leadership roles in many organizations to include Cub Scout Pack 282, Frisco VFW Post 8273, the Reserve Officers Association, the PTA and Smith Elementary's Technology Funding Subcommittee. Additional service includes my life membership in the Heritage Association of Frisco, volunteering with: the Frisco Soccer Association, WatchDOGS at Smith Elementary, the Association of the United States Army and I am a trained Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) member. Lastly, I am a Mentor in FISD's Independent Study and Mentorship Program. Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: My previous service has included appointment by the Mayor and City Council to the Charter Review Commission. I have been asked to speak at Frisco Memorial Day services and to students at Allen, Bright and Smith Elementary schools. I've been awarded the Bronze Star for my military service in Iraq and the Meritorious Service Medal amongst other military awards. My involvement also includes service as a division officer and local advisor to college organizations. As a youth, I was appointed as the Chair for the Simi Valley Youth Council and served for two years as a Community Service Officer with the University of California Police Department. Q: Education A: B.A. Administrative Studies – University of California Riverside, A.A. General Studies – Moorpark College. My civic education includes: Frisco City Hall 101, Frisco Citizens Police Academy, Frisco Citizens Fire Academy and CERT - Community Emergency Response Team training. In addition I have over 22 years of leadership, management and engineering training through the United States Army, and major corporations such as EDS and UPS. Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Candidate - Frisco City Council, 2008. Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $1450 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Charles Hanebuth, William Sowell, and Robert Medigovich. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most

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qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I have lived in Frisco for the last 12 years with my wife and three children. Professionally, I serve as an Officer in the United States Army Reserve and have done so for the last 21 years. I have been continuously active in the community through government, nonprofit organizations and the schools. I bring over twenty years of varied leadership, management and values-based decision making to the table. My unique experiences both domestically and abroad provide me with a wealth of experience and perspective to draw upon. As a Soldier and businessman, I have visited 5 continents, more than 26 countries and most of the individual United States. During this time I have experienced some of the best and worst that national and local governments have to offer. Successful governments have individuals that make strong effective decisions in a timely manner. During my tour of duty in Iraq, I was awarded the Bronze Star. Since then I've received numerous other accolades for my service and leadership abilities to include the Meritorious Service Medal, the Strom Thurmond Junior Officer of the Year Award and selection as only one of two officers to the Reserve Officer Exchange Program with the United Kingdom. These awards and selections demonstrate the highest level of service and self sacrifice to our country, and also highlight my ability to make values-based decisions under the harshest of conditions. I find myself uniquely qualified to share a special blend of leadership and experience with my community. Adding my skill set to our current City Council will add the leadership decision making and consensus building that the city of Frisco needs at this time. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Frisco has and will continue to experience many issues unique to cities enduring major growth. As Frisco's population has now exceeded 120,000 I believe managing growth is the most important issue. Under the growth umbrella I see safety and security, infrastructure, land management, taxation and managing city services as top priorities. Effective budgeting, cost reductions, improving efficiency and outsourcing non-key governmental responsibilities and roles will all assist in paying for future needs. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: My opponent believes that raising taxes during budget shortfalls and funding projects outside of the city through bond sales is a priority for the city. I firmly disagree. I believe that core government functions such as Police, Fire and infrastructure should ALWAYS come first. Projects within the city limits such as the building of Grand Park should become the leading project among city "wants". I believe that an elected representative of the people should be representative of the people. This can only happen through regularly meeting with your constituents, those that you agree/disagree with and hearing their concerns. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: Attracting quality residential and commercial development is critical to the City. Quality developments increase the tax base and have allowed Frisco to grow as fast as we have. The City leaders in conjunction with our EDC, CDC and Chamber of Commerce have done an admirable job in attracting development such as Stonebriar Mall, Ikea, and many others. We need to continue to focus on attracting quality developments on both the commercial and residential sides to ensure the long term success of the city. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Demographically our city is still very young. Families move here to improve their quality of life and superb schools. Better quality of life attracts individuals from all walks of life and this has been reflected in our growing minority populations. Our city has embraced these new groups, understanding that with diversity comes strength and understanding. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: The enforcement of laws and ordinances is critical to maintaining order and quality of life that is unique to Frisco. Residents choose to live in Frisco not only because of the residential, retail and entertainment options, but because of the community that has been forged based on laws. I believe federal laws currently in place regarding illegal immigrants are adequate. If these laws are enforced throughout North Texas, controversial ordinances like those passed in Farmers Branch and Irving would not have taken place. The Frisco police department has a mandate to enforce state and local laws and ordinances. The federal government needs to uphold its responsibilities.

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Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: Suburban sprawl does not lend itself to cost effective mass/regional transportation. There must be population density to support mass/regional transportation. People love their cars, trucks and SUVs. Only when the time or costs associated with utilizing private transportation become too high will mass/regional transportation become a viable alternative. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: I think regional cooperation will always be a "force multiplier". Not every city needs a football stadium or a major performing arts complex. As our city continues to build out, we need to look at other city's strengths and resist duplication of efforts. There are plenty of projects and events that no one city could do alone. Cooperation on roads, water and other infrastructure can all be enhanced through regional cooperation. Two other examples include Super Bowl XLV and Dallas' bid to host the Olympics. Both are good examples on the types of partnerships that should be duplicated moving forward. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: I believe Frisco does an outstanding job delivering quality services in an efficient manner to the residents of Frisco. Two prime examples are strategic partnerships with Community Waste Disposal for trash AND recycling and Texas A&M for water conservation services. Also, Frisco Police and Fire Departments conduct regular outreach and educational programs such as the Citizens Police Academy, the Citizens Fire Academy and Community Emergency Response Team training. Additional educational programs and tools such as the Neighborhood Watch program and Safety Town are wonderful examples that prove an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. In addition, we should consider instituting electronic billing for utility bills, which would save the costs of printing and mailing to thousands of homes every month. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: We’ve had significant challenges in the current economy and have managed better than most. We need to continuously evaluate the programs we offer, some programs may no longer provide a benefit, or may just cost to much to justify, if that is the case we need to have strong leadership that is willing to cancel a program and not just continue to move forward because “that’s what we’ve always done”. We also need honest leadership that is willing to make courageous decisions and honestly justify and explain their actions. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Frisco is no longer a small town. The overwhelming majority of residents have lived here less than 10 years. Meeting resident’s vision of our city is a real challenge as we have a growing number of new residents that are looking for amenities similar to what they had in their previous communities. Balancing this vision with the vision of long-term residents will be a challenge for years to come. Listening to our residents and exercising leadership will provide viable solutions. We need to continuously evaluate the direction of the city to ensure we are making it the premier city in North Texas for people to work, play and live. Q: What are the next steps the city should take regarding the Arts of Collin County shared arts hall? A: The Arts of Collin County (ACC) is a current ballot item. Should Frisco residents vote "For" revoking the bonds then the city will have no realistic funding method to remain a Member City and I would notify other Member Cities of our withdrawal from the project. Should the voters elect "Against" revoking the bonds then I will move the project up on the list of prioritized "wants". At no time would I prioritize the ACC above core city "needs" such as safety, security or infrastructure. Q: Do you favor a public investment in rail service for Frisco, and, if so, how would you pay for it? A: Based on current needs and projected population density for the city of Frisco, I do not favor public investment in rail service at this time. Potential rail routes show rail lines connecting Frisco with Dallas via Carrollton or east Plano. I am interested in studying the viability of bus connector service to either of these two stations. This would provide virtually the same service to a rider but would likely be at a reduced cost to taxpayers. Peter A. Vale
Biographical Info: Questions:

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Q: Length of residency in the city A: - no response Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: - no response Q: Occupation/main source of income A: - no response Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: - no response Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: - no response Q: Education A: - no response Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: - no response Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: - no response Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: - no response Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: - no response Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: - no response Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: - no response Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: - no response Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: - no response Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: - no response Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: - no response Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: - no response Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: - no response Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: - no response Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: - no response Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: - no response Q: What are the next steps the city should take regarding the Arts of Collin County shared arts hall? A: - no response Q: Do you favor a public investment in rail service for Frisco, and, if so, how would you pay for it? A: - no response -

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Frisco City Council, Place 6
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
John C. Classe

Biographical Info:

Name: John Classe Street Address: 14688 Ballentrae Drive City/Town: Frisco State: Texas Date of Birth: October 20, 1976 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: (972) 608-0873 Home Phone Number: (972) 712-0664 Mobile Phone Number: (214) 336-5557 Fax Number: (972) 608-0874 E-mail Address: john@JohnForFrisco.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.JohnForFrisco.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: 10.5 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: 13 years Q: Occupation/main source of income A: CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Practitioner – 10 years – Bell Financial Group – Frisco, TX Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Arts of Collin County Board of Directors – Frisco Representative - October 2010-Present, Grace Avenue United Methodist Church – Discipleship Council – January 2010-Present, Heritage Association of Frisco – Lifetime Member Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Parks and Recreation Board – October 2006-September 2010 (Secretary 2008, Vice Chairman 2009, Chairman 2010), Collin County Sigma Chi Alumni Chapter – Treasurer 2004-2009, Villages of Hillcrest Homeowners Association – President – 2002-2005, Frisco FACTS Political Action Committee - 2002 Q: Education A: Vanderbilt University – Nashville, TN - Bachelor of Arts, Economics – Magna cum Laude, May 1999 Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: n/a Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $10,000 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: My top 3 donors are individual citizens and not organizations. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: As a 10-year resident of Frisco and native of the Dallas area, I have witnessed first-hand the tremendous wave of growth that has enveloped the city. From my days as a college student waiting tables at La Hacienda Ranch in the 1990s, to the establishment of my home and financial planning practice right here in Frisco a decade ago, I have

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experienced all aspects of life in this burgeoning community. My daily interaction with Frisco citizens through my practice plus my background in economics gives me the unique perspective of witnessing just how our city’s growth and the economy affect us all. When times are good, I see the direct effects on the lives of Frisco citizens. When times are tough, I work hand-in-hand with them understanding and partnering together through their struggles. I live here, I run a business here, I worship here, and I plan to remain here. Involvement in local government has long been an interest of mine. Since the early days of my residence in Frisco, I opened and maintained good lines of communication with civic leaders. I served on the Frisco FACTS political action committee in 2002. Shortly thereafter, I joined a group of concerned citizens to prevent the tolling of State Highway 121 leading up to its construction through Denton and Collin Counties. While the road is a toll way today, we were instrumental in preventing its sale to a foreign company. In 2006, I was appointed to the Frisco Parks and Recreation Board, serving for four years and as elected by my peers as board chair in my final year. Last fall, I was unanimously chosen by our current city council to represent Frisco’s interests on the Arts of Collin County Board. My family, my business and my heart are in Frisco. I am asking the citizens of Frisco to elect me to represent their vision for our city. With over 50% of our land mass yet to be developed, I want to ensure that the decision-makers we elect to shape our continued growth have both feet firmly planted here and are wholeheartedly in it for Frisco. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: Keep Tax Rates Low: When surveyed on the reasons for moving to Frisco, residents here list three features above all others: exemplary schools, low taxes and great amenities. In my decade as a citizen of Frisco, nothing gives me more pride than to see all that Frisco has to offer its citizens -- and at a total tax rate that is significantly lower than neighboring cities of comparable size. Public-private partnerships have much to do with this success and have become the jewels of Frisco: Dr. Pepper Ballpark, Pizza Hut Park, Dr. Pepper Star Center, Stonebriar Center, and Hall Office Park just to name a few. Projects like these go hand-in-hand with a low tax rate by making Frisco a destination city, bringing people from other cities here to spend money. If elected, I would encourage the continued active pursuit of these opportunities where it fills a need, by supporting policies that promote economic development. In order to lessen the tax burden on residents of Frisco, we must remain a destination city so that outside dollars help fund the high level of services that Frisco residents have come to expect. These projects will find a home somewhere; we must work hard to attract them to Frisco. Improve Air Quality: Frisco has recently faced several environmental challenges with industrial partners like the Exide Battery Plant and APAC Asphalt Batch Plant. I support the efforts of City Manager George Purefoy, the City Council and state Senator Florence Shapiro in continuing to work closely with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality in Austin and the Environmental Protection Agency to effect the necessary changes to bring business partners like these into compliance with existing rules by adopting the latest technology. Not only do we need to ensure the health and safety of our families, we must also get in front of these issues to avoid a drop in home values. If elected, I plan to represent Frisco for years to come, so I will be here to guarantee that Frisco’s industrial residents stick to their promises. Invest in Infrastructure: At its core, the city of Frisco provides its residents with roads, police and fire protection, safe water to drink, and parks where our children can play. With over 50% of Frisco’s geography still undeveloped, there will certainly be continued pressure from a growing population to provide and improve these basic services, but in a way that doesn’t disturb our existing quality of life. Responsible, effective infrastructure development requires teamwork and partnership: with state and regional entities, with agencies like the Frisco Fire Department and Frisco Police Department, and with our citizens. There must be a two-way dialogue on infrastructure. Citizens need to be heard at City Hall, and they need to receive timely, accurate information about project costs and timelines. I will ensure this communication continues and will be a citizen voice and advocate on city council. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: My decision to ask the citizens of Frisco for their vote comes solely from my desire to continue to serve the city. I have no political aspirations beyond serving the citizens of Frisco. As a 10-year resident, parent of a Frisco ISD student, and owner of a Frisco business, I have both feet firmly planted right here. If elected, I promise to serve out the entirety of my three-year term. I challenge my opponent to make the same promise. Frisco has some of the highest development standards in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex -- and for good reason. These standards keep our city looking attractive to residents and tourists, but more importantly, high-quality development lasts longer and costs less over the long term. In the recent update to Frisco’s comprehensive zoning ordinance, my

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opponent advocated lowering Frisco’s development standards. This is short-sighted, as it will lead to premature deterioration of our critical infrastructure, leaving an unreasonable and needless bill for future Frisco taxpayers. The undeveloped parts of Frisco need to develop as the earlier parts have, and we should not be in a race to fill the land with whatever can be built easily and cheaply. As a business owner, I understand the effect of staff morale on customer experience. Offering fair compensation is the best way to retain good employees. In Frisco, residents are the “customers” and therefore we expect to receive excellent service and skills from our city employees. Last year, as a cost-cutting measure, the City Manager recommended that many city staff members be asked to forego earned merit pay raises until budgets could be reassessed at the end of the fiscal year. Our Frisco employees stepped up to the plate, and delivered more work for a reduced salary, expecting that City Council would make it right as soon as possible. At year end, when all city departments had come in under budget and revenues exceeded earlier forecasts, City Council honored its word and brought back up the issue of merit pay to Frisco employees. My opponent cast the lone opposing vote to reinstate merit pay -breaking his promise to police, fire and staff groups. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: As the expansion of the Metroplex progresses, there is no doubt that development will continue northward through Frisco and beyond. The question is, “What will it look like?” Over the 10+ years of my residency in Frisco, city leadership has done an outstanding job at shaping this growth in a way that has transformed Frisco from a bedroom community into a nationally known example of what suburbs can do to diversify their economies. Thanks to the development of world-class entertainment and retail districts, and its support for high-quality education, Frisco continues to successfully attract world-class corporations whose employees want to live and play here. As the city grows, we must continue to attract new business and jobs to Frisco, —but now, we must also focus on keeping those employers, with pro-active business retention efforts through partnerships with the Frisco Economic Development Corporation and the Frisco Chamber of Commerce. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: During Frisco’s most explosive growth phases, the city and school district had to continually construct new roads, new schools, new police and fire resources. It seemed we were always playing “catch-up” with our infrastructure. Now, although still growing, Frisco’s new resident influx has slowed thanks to the recession. I believe we should take advantage of the opportunity provided by this temporary lull to responsibly manage infrastructure in the undeveloped parts of Frisco, making it more attractive to project developers. Also, 1/3 of Frisco’s population is under 18. The city is full of young families, and much of our development in the last few years has been centered on the needs of parents with young children. As those children grow and that core constituency evolves, we have to ensure that the city remains attractive and vibrant to different types of households, including young professionals, empty nesters, and families of teens and college students. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Immigration and border security are responsibilities of the federal government. When municipalities have attempted to address illegal immigration through regulation, they have opened the door to costly litigation. I believe this to be a poor use of local taxpayer dollars. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: While some neighboring cities use one cent of sales tax to fund their participation in regional transit (through DART), I believe that the city of Frisco is currently better served using its one-cent sales tax to fund the Frisco Economic Development Corporation (FEDC) and the Frisco Community Development Corporation (FCDC). With Frisco still at less than 50% build-out, the efforts of the FEDC and FCDC greatly enhance our ability to shape the city’s development. I believe, as the Metroplex grows, that there will be an increasing need and demand for alternative transportation options because continuing to expand US 75 and the Dallas North Tollway, for example, are unsustainable. This need will have to be weighed against available funding options at that point in the future, and will almost certainly require a private (e.g. corporate) component. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships?

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A: Rather than acting cohesively, North Texas sometimes suffers from an “every man for himself” mentality. Several years ago when the Boeing Corporation sought to move its headquarters from Seattle, North Texas made the short list. However, when Boeing came calling, executives had to negotiate with Dallas, Fort Worth and many of the suburbs and ultimately Chicago was chosen instead. When attracting major corporate relocations or large-scale events, we must act as one. We must play to our individual strengths and agree that having a partial involvement in a regional event is a better outcome than not having the opportunity to participate at all. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: In Frisco, I am certain that our city is run more efficiently than most. City services are provided at a high level, and at a tax rate that is the lowest in the Metroplex among cities with 100,000 residents or more. And to cut costs, the city has frozen unfilled staff positions for the last several years, while the population continues its march higher. I believe that there is always a budget item that can be reduced or eliminated when needed. Still, Frisco could benefit from a “sunset committee,” similar to the nationally acclaimed department of the State of Texas. This committee would annually evaluate all existing programs to seek places to eliminate inefficiency and needless spending. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: It is always imperative that the city act with the same fiscal prudence that we do as families. I have to balance my own household budget; deficit spending is not an option for me, nor should it be for Frisco. But, by not spending wildly in the “boom” years, we can create a financial cushion that can ease the pain of the inevitable “bust” years. Over the last two decades, city staff and leaders have been very prudent in balancing our low tax rate against expenses, and as a result we have weathered the recession more successfully than many similarly-sized cities around the state and country. I believe this steady, cautious approach should continue -- led by Frisco servants who will be here to answer for the outcomes. Thanks to careful planning, the city maintains a reserve fund for such downturns; if necessary for an infrastructure funding emergency, Frisco can tap its reserves. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Though Frisco’s population has ballooned over the past decade, citizen participation has remained relatively flat. Important issues are being considered and leadership selections are being made by fewer than 5% of the city’s residents. Demographically, we are a young community. I know first-hand that with young children comes a hectic schedule, and it can be challenging to find time to get involved, to learn about city issues and participate in elections. But if Frisco is to remain a robust and desirable place to live, citizen input is crucial. I support concerted efforts to make city government proceedings more accessible, to use affordable technology to increase communication to citizens, and to make voting as easy as possible for Frisco residents in all parts of the city. We are also about to encounter a cold, hard fact from Austin: ultimately Frisco needs to be prepared for greater self-sufficiency, as millions of dollars are about to be cut by the Texas Legislature from previously-funded local programs. Frisco leaders will need to work cooperatively with all our departments and community partners to find innovative, positive ways to cut waste while maintaining services to our growing and diverse community. To do this successfully will take City Council members who are firmly invested in Frisco’s future, and who are not afraid to have difficult conversations with state and county leaders. Q: What are the next steps the city should take regarding the Arts of Collin County shared arts hall? A: Frisco’s continued participation in the Arts of Collin County project is back in the hands of Frisco voters. The citizens will have an opportunity on May 14 to tell city leaders whether or not they want to continue with the project. The outcome of that referendum should determine the next steps for Frisco. Q: Do you favor a public investment in rail service for Frisco, and, if so, how would you pay for it? A: As discussed earlier in the question regarding a seamless regional transit system, I believe that Frisco’s existing revenue sources are currently better served in their current uses: the FEDC and FCDC. As demand for rail service grows in Frisco, I would prefer to explore alternative sources of private funding, where available. Scott Johnson

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Biographical Info:

Name: Scott Johnson Street Address: 6072 Dripping Springs Dr. City/Town: Frisco State: Texas Date of Birth: July 15, 1971 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 214-929-1189 Home Phone Number: 214-929-1189 Mobile Phone Number: 214-929-1189 Fax Number: NA E-mail Address: Scott@ElectScottJohnson.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.ElectScottJohnson.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: We have lived in Frisco 5 years Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: NA Q: Occupation/main source of income A: Partner in a local private equity firm Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: Frisco City Council since 2008 Governor Perry appointee to the Texas Economic Development Corporation Board of Directors for the Collin College Education Foundation Active member of Prestonwood Baptist Church Serve on numerous other boards and commissions Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: Recognized twice as one of the Top 40 Dallas area business professionals under the age of 40 in the Dallas Business Journal's "40 Under 40" (2005 & 2010) Q: Education A: Bachelors degree from Auburn University Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: I have been a member of the Frisco City Council since 2008 Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: $30,000 Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: Richard Strauss, David Siciliano, Charles Adams Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: No Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: When I decided to run for office, I made only one promise. That was to follow Sam Houston's maxim - "Do right. Risk consequence." Over the last three years I have consistently led with that in mind and have tried to put it into practice daily. Fortunatly, as a three year councilman, this is very simple. I stand on my record and hope that I have earned the trust and confidence of our citizens and have thousands of votes on record that go far beyond what I could write in any response here. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: The most important issue in Frisco is the health and safety of our citizens as it relates to the lead recycling plant, Exide Technologies. Finding a solutiuon to this problem will be the most important thing I do on council and I am confident that we can do that and I that I can help. Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: I am running on a three-year record that I am very proud of. We have had tremendous

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success keeping our tax rate low, cutting wasteful spending,and attracting high quality businesses to Frisco. I have experience that one can only get serving on Council and have unmatched experience in the private sector building public/private partnerships. Q: Development challenges vary from city to city. Where does attracting residential and/or commercial development to your city rank on your list of priorities? How would you evaluate the job your city has done to date in attracting such development? A: We have done an outstanding job attracting varied development to Frisco during some very difficult economic times. Diversifying our tax base and bringing high quality, high paying jobs to Frisco is essential to the long term health of our community and remains a very high priority for me. So much goes into creating a city that is attractive for growth. We have to have the best schools and make sure people are safe. We have to keep taxes in check while we build a city that has services and amenities that are secoond to none. And we have to continue to build a Community, rather than merely a City. By focusing on the long term growth of Frisco, and by structuring creative public/private partnerships, we continue to attract positive development and are in a perfect position for long term economic health. I truly believe that Frisco is at the best time in its history. The opportunities here are endless and Frisco's best days are ahead of it. Q: What demographic changes are happening in your city that the rest of the region should know more about? How is your city dealing with those changes? What, if anything, would you do differently? A: Frisco is experiencing tremendous growth. We have been named the fastest growing city in the country and that influx of new citizens requires a huge amount of planning. Frisco is less than 50% built out and how we plan for the continued growth and how we develop the infrastructure of our city will largely determine the long term success of Frisco. Q: What should the city or the police department do to address the issue of illegal immigration? A: Simply, we need to enforce the laws on the books. For our part, we need to continue to ensure that our police department is one of the best trained, the best equipped, and the highest paid forces in the State. Additionally, we need to demand that our representatives in Washington give the states the tools they need to deal with this growing problem. Q: Do you favor or oppose a seamless regional transit system, and if you favor it, what steps would you take to make it happen? A: I support finding solutions to transportation issues that we have and that our region has. I would not support re-allocating tax revenue that the city currently uses for economic development purposes to a regional transit system. The rail plans that are currently proposed are too expensive and ridership projections are too low to justify the cost. It is obvious that we have major transportation challenges and they continue to get worse with increased population and decreased funding from Austin. We need to continue to address the challenge regionally while at the same time being mindful of how our citizens want us to use their money. Q: Identify other issues you think your city and North Texas could benefit from greater regional cooperation, and what would you do to encourage regional partnerships? A: In almost every area of importance there is some level of regional cooperation that is needed. In transportation, economic development, water,and many other areas, a regional perspective is important and is often key to finding solutuions to our shared concerns. I have worked very hard while on council to foster a spirit of cooperation and open lines of communication with our North Texas neighbors. We continue our involvement on regional boards and commissions, and it is important that we continue to build relationships with elected leaders from other cities. With Frisco now at over 120,000 citizens, we are taking a leadership role in the area and are being looked at as the model for growth. I take our regional responsibilty seriously. At the same time, it is important for elected officials to remember that the money we spend is that of our citizens. While they want us to think regionally and build relationships with outside cities, and try to solve certain problems together, more than anything they want us to be resposnive to them. There is a delicate balance here that is important to recognize and maintain. Q: Do you think that your city delivers services in the most cost-effective manner to taxpayers? If not, what changes would you recommend? A: The maintainance and operations budget for Frisco compared to other cities of our size is not even comparable. We live in the fastest growing city in the country and our citizens have come to expect an extremely high level of city services at a low cost. As we grow and as we mature, that balance becomes more difficult. Our city manager and city staff have done a great job of giving our citizens value for their taxes. We deliver services in a very cost-effective manor - but there is room for improvement. Just as our citizens are scrubbing their budgets in their home lives and their own businesses, we need to be doing the same. It is often very easy for government to forget that the money we spend is not

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ours and I have often been the minory vote on council fighting against excessive spending and waste at city hall. I will continue to fight for our taxpayers to ensure that we are watching every dollar, and that we remember that the money we spend is not ours. Q: How has the current leadership done in weathering the economic storm? What ideas do you have on how to balance the budget with less revenue coming in and the ever-present need to maintain roads, sewers and other basic infrastructure? A: As part of the current leadership, I believe we have done a good job of weathering the economic downturn - but that we can do better. We raised taxes at the bottom of the economic cycle and I voted against that and still beleive that we made a tremedous mistake. I have voted against excessive spending on numerous occasions and believe that we have failed our citizens on these issues as we spent money needlessly. And after our last budget cycle we distributed excess revenue to our city employees rather than funding important capital items, or restocking our reserve fund, or sending the their money back to our citizens. So we have done well, but we have not done well enough. We should work harder to find saving in every area of our budget. We should contract labor and outsource where we can and allow private enterprise to do what they do best. And we should make certain that we are turning over every rock from the county, the state, and the federal government for grants and dollars that may be available to us. In one sense, the downturn has been a good thing. It has forced Frisco and other cities and governments to make do with less and we have found creative ways to fund our needs and accomplish our goals. If we can maintain that culture and continue to spend wisely when the economy has recovered, we will be very strong financially and will be in an even better position than we were before. Q: What is an uncomfortable truth about your city that voters must confront? A: Frisco citizens get it. They understand that maintaining a city to Frisco's standard takes capital and that we still have a tremendous amount of growth that will take place. There really needs to be nothing that is uncomfortable. We certainly have challenges that will require an honest dialogue but if their elected leaders are honest and ethical and communicate well with them, Frisco's citizens understand that tough decisions have to be made and they are comfortable with us making them. Q: What are the next steps the city should take regarding the Arts of Collin County shared arts hall? A: The next step Frisco will take concerning the ACC project is for our citizens to vote on May 14. On that day, almost 9 years after they originally approved the project, our citizens will decide whether or not they want the City Council to continue to have the authority to sell bonds to publicly fund this project. We have some pretty smart folks in Frisco and I am very comfortable letting them decide if they want their money to be spent on this project. Q: Do you favor a public investment in rail service for Frisco, and, if so, how would you pay for it? A: I do not currently favor a public investment in a rail system in Frisco. Rail is part of our master plan and remains a worthy goal as we plan long term for transportation solutions. But the current plans are too expensive and our citizens would not use it enough to even come close to justifying the cost. I welcome the exploration of a public/private transportation plan that addresses our long term needs, but to suggest that publicly funded rail is Frisco is the answer, given the current economic climate and the pressing needs our community has, is nonsense.

Frisco Mayor
Description:

Candidates (choose 1):
Maher Maso

Biographical Info:

Name: Maher Maso Street Address: 10902 Ormond Lane

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City/Town: Frisco State: Texas Date of Birth: 03/27/1964 Work or Campaign Office Phone Number: 972-746-1274 Home Phone Number: 972-335-3113 Mobile Phone Number: 972-746-1274 E-mail Address: maher@masoformayor.com Campaign Web Site Address: www.masoformayor.com
Questions:

Q: Length of residency in the city A: I have lived in Frisco since 1992 Q: Length of residency in the district, if applicable A: Same Q: Occupation/main source of income A: VP of CMTEX, a retail services company. Q: Current civic involvement/highlights A: My wife and I have been involved in Frisco and the region since we moved here in 1992. We have chaired and co-chaired several events and galas, and enjoy serving our community through civic involvement. A partial list of my civic involvement highlights include: Chairman of Collin College Education Foundation; Frisco Public Library Foundation Board Member TIRZ Board Member Regional Transportation Commission representative for Frisco, Prosper and Lucas North Texas Commission Board Member Metroplex Mayor’s Association Dallas Regional Mobility Coalition board member Tex-21 board member National League of Cities Community and Economic Development Committee U.S. Conference of Mayors International Affairs Committee and Transportation Committee Mayor’s youth Council Memorial Day Committee Community Parade Committee Chair of the NCAA Division 1 Football Championship committee & certified tourism ambassador Q: Previous civic involvement/accomplishments A: I have been involved with many civic groups in Frisco since moving here in 1992. I have enjoyed being part of the growth of Frisco, and have helped many organizations become what they are today. I am especially proud of my work with the Frisco Independent School District, where I served on the Technology Committee, and my role at Collin College, where I chair the College Foundation. In addition, I have assisted in the effort to bring Frisco the capital reserve fund, wider neighborhood sidewalks, a reduction in multi-family zoning, a water re-use master plan, stronger cultural arts programs, and assistance in neighborhood revitalization efforts. My previous civic involvement includes: ** 2005 Frisco Citizen of the Year ** 2004 “21 for 21st Century Leader” award recipient ** 2000-2007 & 2010 annual Texas Municipal League and 5-year award recipient ** Frisco City Council member, 2000-2007 ** Frisco Mayor Pro Tem, 2003-2007 ** Frisco Deputy Mayor Pro Tem, 2002-2003 ** Chair of Budget & Audit Committee for City Council, 2003-2007 ** Frisco Tax Increment Finance District Board member, 2000-2007 ** Chairman of Collin College Education Foundation ** Frisco Square Municipal Management District Board Member, 2000-2007 ** Frisco Association for the arts president 2005-2007 and board member, 2000-2007 ** Leadership Frisco Chair from 2003-2005 and curriculum committee member, 1997-present ** Collin County Bond Committee member ** Clark Middle School and Curtsinger Elementary school campus committees ** Texas Association of Mayors, Council Members and Commissioners nominating committee ** Collin County Bond Committee ** Plantation Resort-- HOA President ** Texas Municipal League training – over 500+ hours in government training including public funds investment officer training ** Frisco Chamber of Commerce committees and programs as needed ** Assistant coach, YMCA Girls & Boys Basketball ** Coach and assistant coach, FBSA girls softball and boys baseball Q: Education A: Bachelor of Science in Business Management--with honors Executive MBA w/ Asian Studies Certificate – University of Texas at Arlington Texas Municipal League - 500+ hours of continuing education Senior Officials WMD/Terrorism Incident Preparedness training (Department of Homeland Security) # FEMA IS-00288 – Emergency Management Training – Role of Voluntary Agencies Certification # FEMA IS-00800.b – Emergency Management Training — National Response Framework Certification # FEMA IS-00100.a – Emergency Management Training – Introduction to the Incident Command System Certification # FEMA IS-00700.a – Emergency Management Training – National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) Certification Q: Previous public offices sought/held: A: Frisco City Council 2000-2007 Frisco City Council Mayor Pro Tem, 2003-2007 Frisco

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Mayor, 2008-current Q: How much funding have you raised for your campaign? A: To date, I have raised approximately $65,000. With the support of civic leaders, the business community and the citizens of Frisco, I am confident that I will have the financial support needed to mount a comprehensive campaign. Q: Who are your top three contributors? A: I am fortunate to have many supporters and contributors aiding my campaign. A few of my top financial supporters include Donnie Nelson Jr., Robert Wechsler & Stanley Graff. I am thankful for all my supporters and contributors. Q: Have you ever been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings or civil suits? Please explain: A: I have never been arrested or involved in any criminal proceedings. I was mistakenly named in a civil suit many years ago when an alleged employee at one of our company job sites was injured. The case was dismissed. Q: Why are you running for this office, and why should voters consider you the most qualified candidate? What in your personal or professional background most prepares you to serve in this office? A: I have enjoyed being a public servant and serving our community. I want to continue to serve our community to ensure that Frisco remains the best place to live, do business and raise a family. During my three years as mayor, Frisco has the distinction of having one of the lowest tax rates in North Texas. Frisco was also named as the 14th safest city in the country, and 4th safest in nation for cities with population of 100,000-499,000. Money Magazine named Frisco in the top 100 places to live in the U.S. and Forbes named Frisco as the No. 7 place to relocate. During my term on council, Frisco was named No. 1 in the U.S. for number of new jobs created. I have created jobs for our citizens. During my term, Frisco has added over 5,200 jobs, realized capital investments of $484 million, and filled over 2.7 million square feet of space. During these difficult economic times, Frisco has one of the lowest unemployment rates. It takes hard work and tough choices to keep taxes low and I have committed the time and resources on behalf of our citizens. I am the only candidate that has engaged with the civic groups in Frisco long before I was mayor. I understand our community, and have volunteered my time to help our community groups grow. I am also the only candidate who has interacted with our regional and state officials on a regular basis. This includes attending meetings of the Regional Transportation Council, Dallas Regional Mobility Coalition, and Metroplex Mayor’s meetings. I have also testified in Austin on behalf of our city and citizens. I am a member of the Regional Transportation Council (RTC), representing Frisco, Prosper and Lucas. My business background, especially my experience in finance and negotiation, gives me the tools needed to handle the complex issues that growth brings. My experience in city government and leadership in some of the major initiatives in Frisco affords me the unique perspective needed to continue our long-term planning and growth management. I have earned the respect of the mayors and council members of many North Texas cities, as well as state and federal officials. This has allowed me to build relationships with which to help Frisco achieve regional cooperation on such matters as transportation, pollution and congestion. Q: What are the three most important actions you would take if elected? How would you push for them and pay for them? A: By approximately 2030, Frisco is anticipated to reach build out of approx. 280,000. Frisco has many challenges to face during this period of growth. First and foremost, as mayor, I will ensure that this growth is judicially managed. This means maintaining a low tax rate for our families, ensuring our transportation needs are met, expanding our local law enforcement and fire safety capabilities to ensure they have all the tools necessary to keep our families safe. As I have always said, while I would love to narrow it down to just three, Frisco cannot afford to focus on just a "few" issues. Frisco is the fastest growing city in the country and we must address many challenges as we continue our growth. These challenges include infrastructure, education, pollution, congestion, regional issues, public safety and a host of other important parts of having a successful community. Some of these challenges are very broad, but equally important. Creating a sustainable city for future generations and maintaining our neighborhoods as they age, are key issues that we must address. Understanding the long-term impacts of such rapid growth and putting measures in place to manage the maintenance of our structures are keys to our continued vitality. Also, during these tough economic times, we cannot increase the financial burden on our residents and the way to do that is to continue to bring new jobs to Frisco, strengthen our retail tax base and continue to invest in the community to make it attractive for corporations and residents to locate here. Additionally, I am engaged in protecting our families by addressing the Exide pollution situation and am working diligently with our legislature to address our citizen’s concerns.

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Q: What are the key differences between you and your opponent(s) that make you the best choice? A: Proven results would be the key difference. My opponent talks about low taxes. I have done something about it. Frisco has one of the lowest tax rates of any city of over 100,000 in Denton, Collin, Dallas and Tarrant Counties, while providing an ISO1 rated fire department and outstanding city services. My opponent only talks about taxes, but has no plan on how to keep them low. I have the experience and have succeeded in doing so. He uses buzz words that belong on a bumper sticker, but are not based on the reality of what it takes to keep Frisco’s tax rates one of the lowest in the region. My opponent has not engaged, spoken to or attempted to improve taxes in Frisco. He speaks about how his taxes were raised, yet he pays $3.96 less annually today in city taxes than when I first took over as mayor. Additionally, even before being elected to office, my wife and I engaged our community by volunteering our time with Frisco Family Services, Leadership Frisco, Frisco Arts and many, many other civic groups in our community. We enjoyed being part of so many groups who make Frisco what it is today. I have not seen community involvement from my opponent and I believe I have proven my dedication to the community, with no other agenda then to make Frisco the best place to live. I believe you must be a committed part of the city before attempting to lead it. Simply put, experience, a proven track record of success and an unyielding service commitment to the community are the very real differences that separate me from my opponent, making me the candidate of choice. Other highlights of my term in office include my promise to bring about a charter review, which I delivered. I also promised to strengthen our ethics code and brought forth a citizen’s committee to our council. As a result, Frisco has one of the strongest ethics code in the region. I promised transparency and our checkbook is now online for the public to view as well as live streaming of all meetings. I also established a monthly “Coffee with the Mayor” and helped put in place a new town hall format where we contact our citizens at home. In my three years as mayor, I have helped lead several projects including cleaning up the lead produced by Exide. I have spent countless hours meeting with executives from Exide and working with Senator Shapiro on legislation that protects our families. I worked with TXU in an effort to first mothball then dismantle the plant on Preston Road. Roads have been a priority for me and I was successful in gaining a seat for Frisco at the Regional Transportation Council, where I serve Frisco, Prosper and Lucas. I have worked closely with TxDOT to expedite construction of 423 and also of Main Street between Preston and Custer. I have personally led the fight against increased multifamily zoning and, in fact, my 3-step plan was the center of how we removed more than half of the excessive multi-family zoning in Frisco. If you enjoy the wider sidewalks or lighted street signs, those are initiatives I brought forth. I have sought and received training from FEMA, Texas Municipal League and Department of Homeland Security amongst others. I have represented our city and citizens by testifying when necessary in Austin to stop unfunded mandates, unn