NAVAIR 00-80R-14

NATOPS U.S. NAVY AIRCRAFT FIREFIGHTING AND RESCUE MANUAL
THIS PUBLICATION SUPERSEDES NAVAIR 00-80R-14 DATED 1 SEPTEMBER 2001.

DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT C — Distribution authorized to U.S. Government Agencies and their contractors to protect publications required for official use or for administrative or operational purposes only (1 January 1991). Other requests for this document shall be referred to Commanding Officer, Naval Air Technical Data and Engineering Service Command, Naval Air Station North Island, Bldg. 90, Distribution, P.O. Box 357031, San Diego, CA 92135-7031. DESTRUCTION NOTICE — For unclassified, limited documents, destroy by any method that will prevent disclosure of contents or reconstruction of the document. ISSUED BY AUTHORITY OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS AND UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE COMMANDER, NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND.

0800LP1032703

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15 OCTOBER 2003

NATEC ELECTRONIC MANUAL

NAVAIR 00-80R-14

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY
CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS 2000 NAVY PENTAGON WASHINGTON, D.C. 20350-2000

15 October 2003

LETTER OF PROMULGATION 1. The Naval Air Training and Operating Procedures Standardization (NATOPS) Program is a positive approach toward improving combat readiness and achieving a substantial reduction in the aircraft mishap rate. Standardization, based on professional knowledge and experience, provides the basis for development of an efficient and sound operational procedure. The standardization program is not planned to stifle individual initiative, but rather to aid the commanding officer in increasing the unit’s combat potential without reducing command prestige or responsibility. 2. This manual standardizes Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Procedures. Compliance with the stipulated manual requirements and procedures is mandatory except as authorized herein. In order to remain effective, NATOPS must be dynamic and stimulate rather than suppress individual thinking. Since aviation fire suppression and protection is a continuing, progressive profession, it is both desirable and necessary that new ideas and new techniques be expeditiously evaluated and incorporated if proven to be sound. To this end, commanding officers of aviation units are authorized to modify procedures contained here, in accordance with the waiver provisions established by OPNAVINST 3710.7 series, for the purpose of assessing new ideas prior to initiating recommendations for permanent changes. This manual is prepared and kept current by the users in order to achieve maximum readiness and safety in the most efficient and economical manner. Should conflict exist between the training and operating procedures found in this manual and those found in other publications, this manual will govern. 3. Pertinent extracts from this publication necessary to normal operations and training should be made as required. It is forbidden to make copies of this entire publication or major portions thereof without specific authority to the Chief of Naval Operations.

T.L. HEELY Rear Admiral, United States Navy By Direction of Commander, Naval Air Systems Command

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ORIGINAL

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 INTERIM CHANGE SUMMARY The following Interim Changes have been cancelled or previously incorporated into this manual. INTERIM CHANGE NUMBER(S) REMARKS/PURPOSE Interim Changes Outstanding — To be maintained by the custodian of this manual. INTERIM CHANGE NUMBER(S) REMARKS/PURPOSE The following Interim Changes have been incorporated into this Change/Revision. INTERIM CHANGE NUMBER ORIGINATOR/DATE (or DATE/TIME GROUP) PAGES AFFECTED REMARKS/PURPOSE 5/(6 blank) ORIGINAL .

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NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Summary of Applicable Technical Directives Information relating to the following recent technical directives has been incorporated into this manual. IN MANUAL DESCRIPTION VISUAL IDENTIFICATION Information relating to the following applicable technical directives will be incorporated in a future change. CHANGE NUMBER DATE INC. IN MANUAL DESCRIPTION VISUAL IDENTIFICATION 7/(8 blank) ORIGINAL . CHANGE NUMBER DATE INC.

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and Date of Change Date of Entry Page Count Verified by (Signature) 9/(10 blank) ORIGINAL .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 RECORD OF CHANGES Change No.

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. . . . .8 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHAPTER 1 — INTRODUCTION 1. . . . . . and Fire Accelerating Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . Flammable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 FIRE CHEMISTRY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 2. . . .2. .3 2. . . . . .3. . . . . . .2 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fuel-Air Mixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FUEL. . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 WAIVERS . . 1-2 CHAPTER 2 — AIRCRAFT FIRE HAZARDS. . . . . . . . . . .1 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 2. . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 2. . . . JP-5 Flashpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 GENERAL . . . .1 2. . . . AVGAS Flashpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . .7 2. . . . . .1 1. . . . . . . . . .9 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JP-8 Flashpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Class B Fires . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 2. . . 1-1 SCOPE AND PURPOSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 2. . . . . . . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 80R-14 Firefighting and Rescue Manual CONTENTS Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 CLASSIFICATION OF FIRES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Class C Fires . . 1-1 ADVISORY GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 1. . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Class A Fires . . . Fuel Tank Fire with Explosive Suppressant Foam (ESF) Installed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Severity After Ignition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 2. . . . . . . Class D Fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JP-4 Flashpoint .2 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hazardous. . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FUEL TANKS . . . . . . . . 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-2 11 ORIGINAL . . . . .10 2. . . . . .3 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jet Fuels/Aviation Gasoline . . . . . . .2. . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fuel Tank Fire Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ORDNANCE 2.5 2. . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . Tank Location . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .4 2. . . . .8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 2. . . . . . . . . Firefighting Efficiency . . . . .8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12 Otto Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 2.2 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . 2-14 Composite Materials Reinforced with Carbon/Graphite Fibers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . 2-14 Composite Materials Reinforced with Boron/Tungsten Fibers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1 WATER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Hypergolic Mixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 3. . . . .1 2. . . . 2-3 Class A Combustibles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 2. . . . . . . . . . . . .7 2. .5. . . . . . . . . . PERSONNEL HAZARDS/PROTECTION . . .6 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fluoroelastomer (Viton) . . . . . . .9. . .5. .2 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Radiological . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 SPECIAL HAZARDS . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . .5. . 2-5 Flare Dispensers . . . . . 3-2 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Materials in Combination with Liquid Oxygen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Ordnance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . Nonradiological Metals/Compounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 2. . . . .4 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fire Extinguishing Agent Supply Requirements . .8 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Anti-Icing Fluids . . . 2-11 Overheated Batteries . . . . . . . .3 3. . .1 2. .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13 NUCLEAR WEAPONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 3. . . . . . . . .3 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . AMERICIUM 241 . . . 3-2 AIRFIELD FIRE PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12 Lithium Batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Polyethylene Packaging Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 OXYGEN SYSTEMS . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Rocket Engines (JATO) . . . .7. . . . . . . . .3 3. . . . . . . . . . . . .5 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 GENERAL HAZARDS AND PRECAUTIONS . 2-14 2-14 2-15 2-16 2-16 2-16 2-16 2-16 REFERENCE . . . .1 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . 2-13 COMPOSITE MATERIALS . . . . . . .6 2. . . .9 2. . . . . . . . . .3 2. 3-2 Fire Protection . . . . . . . . 2-17 CHAPTER 3 — FIREFIGHTING AGENTS AND EQUIPMENT 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lithium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 ORIGINAL AQUEOUS FILM FORMING FOAM . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 2. . . . . . . . . . . .8. . . . . . . .3. . . .

2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 5. . . 4-7 P-19/P-19A (7160) . . 4-7 Twin Agent Unit . . . 4-1 P-4A (7180) . . . . . . Halon 1211 (Bromochlorodifluoromethane) Portable and Wheeled Unit Extinguishers . . . . . . . . . . Air Bag Rescue and Lifting System . 4-1 CF 4000L (7160) Amertek . . . . . . . .2 Primary Airfield Extinguishers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 Oshkosh T-Series Vehicles . . . . . . . .4 3. . .2 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 3. . . . . . . 3-5 3-6 3-6 3-7 PROTECTIVE CLOTHING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 5. . . . . 4-10 P-10 Rescue Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 4. . . . . . . . . . .9 4. . . . . .5. . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 5. . . . Minimum Response Requirements for the Marine Air Ground Task Force Forward Operation Base Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . .1 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 3. . . . . . . . . . . .6 4. . . . . 3-5 EXTINGUISHER TYPES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 4-11 4-11 4-13 4-13 4-13 4-13 CHAPTER 5 — AIRFIELD FIREFIGHTING AND RESCUE ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS 5. Requests . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 P-15 (7195) . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carbon Dioxide15-Pound Portable Units and 50-Pound Wheeled Extinguisher Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emergency Rescue Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tires . . . . . . Fire Hoses . 4-11 Other Rescue Vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 4. . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minimum Response Requirements at Category 4 Airfields (USMC Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 5. . .3 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. 3-8 Care of Facepiece . . . . . . . . . . Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . AGENTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . 5-7 13 ORIGINAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Portable Extinguisher Training Requirements . . . . . .1 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 4.1. . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 Care and Maintenance . .1. . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . .5 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . Filter Breathing Masks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 A/S32P-25 Firefighting Vehicle . 3-8 CHAPTER 4 — AIRCRAFT FIREFIGHTING AND RESCUE VEHICLES AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT 4. . . . . . .1. . . .1 3. . . . . . and Hydrostatic Tests . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 3.7 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minimum Response Requirements Categories 1 Through 4 . . 5-1 5-1 5-2 5-5 5-5 MAJOR AIRCRAFT FIREFIGHTING AND RESCUE VEHICLES .3.2 4. . . . . . Purple-K-Powder Dry Chemical Powder Extinguishers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Inspection. . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AND METHODS OF APPLICATION . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 FIREFIGHTING AND RESCUE VEHICLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 3. . . . . .5 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . .8 4. . . . . . . . . . . .2 FIRE PROTECTION ORGANIZATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . .

.8 5. . . . . . . . . . . . .10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. . . . .1 5. . . . . . .4 ORIGINAL SUPPORT AIRCRAFT FIREFIGHTING AND RESCUE VEHICLES . . . Fire Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. . . . . . . . . . . Training Funds . . . .2 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . .10. . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 5. . . . . . . . . . HELIPORT FIRE PROTECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 5. . . . . . . . . . . . Ejection Seat Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 5. . . . . . . . . . .3 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crash Crane Category Changes . . . . . . Training Requirements .S. . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . .10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Navy Aircraft Firefighting Unit Inspections . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Immediate Response Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mutual Assistance . . . . . . . Aircraft Fire and Rescue Response Reporting Requirements . .7. . . . . . TRAINING . . . . . . .4 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 5. .2 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10. . . . . Formal Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . Navy Airfield Salvage Crane Requirements . Training Aids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 5. . . . . . . . .1 5. . . . . . . . . .3 5. . . . . . . . . . . . .1 5. . . . . .8. .9. . .8. . . . . . Training Program Subjects . . Backup Standby Alert . . . . . . . . . . . .8. U. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . Notification of an Off-Station Mishap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 5.9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 5. . . 5-7 5-7 5-7 5-7 PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS AND ORGANIZATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wire Communication Systems . . . . . .S. . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 5. . . . . . . . 5-9 EXTRA-HAZARDOUS FLIGHT OPERATIONS .1 5. . . . Aircraft Fire and Rescue Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 5. . . . . . .8. . . . . . . . . Heliport Crash Crane Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. 5. . . . . . . . . . 5-9 ALERT REQUIREMENTS . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 5. . . . . . . . . . . . Fire Prevention and Extinguisher Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 5. . . . . 14 5-10 5-10 5-10 5-10 5-10 5-10 5-11 5-11 5-11 5-11 5-11 5-12 5-12 5-12 5-12 5-13 5-13 5-13 5-14 5-14 5-14 5-15 5-15 5-15 5-15 5-15 5-15 5-15 5-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Standby Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 5. . . . . . Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MUTUAL ASSISTANCE AND ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS . .3 5. .3 5. .4 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Category I Outlying Fields with No Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Notification of an On-Station Mishap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 5. Marine Corps Air Station Salvage Crane/Support Equipment Requirements . . . . .9. . . . . . . .3 5. . . . . . . . .7 5. Response Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Daily Journal . . .7 5. .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 5. . . . . . . . . EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS . . . . . . . . . .8. . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 5. . . . . . Fire Protection Requirements . . . .

.3 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S-3B. . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 5. . . . . . . . . 5-16 Crash Grid Map System .7. . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6 HOT BRAKES . . . . . . . . . . 6-12 15 ORIGINAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Passenger. . .7 Marine Corps Aircraft Firefighting Unit Inspections . . .9 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 V-22 Aircraft Engine Compartment and Midwing Compartment Fires . . . . . . . . . . .3 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5 S-3A. . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using Vehicle-Mounted Twin Agent Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Initial Attack . . . . . . . . . . . .6 6.4 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . COMPRESSOR COMPARTMENT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AND TILT-ROTOR AIRCRAFT . . . ROTARY-WING. . 5-16 CHAPTER 6 — FIREFIGHTING AND RESCUE OPERATIONS 6. . . . . . . . . . . .7. .5 6. . . . . . . . . . Basic Approach . . . . . . Handlines . . . . . . . . . . . .4 6. . . .7 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 6-1 6-1 6-1 6-1 6-3 6-3 6-3 6-3 6-3 ACCESSORY SECTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 6.10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 6. 6-8 Preliminary Contamination Assessment . Attack from Uphill . . . . . . Response Routes and Vehicle Speed . . . 6-9 Cleanup (Ashore) . . 6-5 ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT FIRES . . . . . .8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ES-3A. 5-15 Crash. and Rescue Bill . . . . . . .1. 6-11 Large Frame. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 6. . . . .2 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . and US-3A Aircraft Engine Fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 TACTICS . . . . . . . . . . .1. Basic Vehicle Spotting Procedures . . . . . . 6-12 Determine Direct Attack Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 6. . . . . .9 6. . . . . .8 6. .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Extinguishment (Ashore and Afloat) . . . . . . . .1 6. . . . . . . and Cargo Aircraft Emergency Response Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 INTERNAL ENGINE FIRES . . . . . . . . . AND PASSENGER/CARGO AIRCRAFT . . . . . . .10. . . . . . . . . . . .8 6. . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10. . . .1 6. . . .2 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fire. . . .5 6. . . . . . . . . . .1. . . 6-9 Cleanup (Afloat) . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6 Wheel Assembly Fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Use the Wind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9 Interim Containment (Ashore and Afloat) . . . . . .5 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GENERAL ENGINE COMPARTMENT FIRES — JET FIXED-WING. . . . . . . . . .1 6. . . . . . . . 6-6 TAILPIPE FIRES . . . . . . 6-10 INTERNAL FIREFIGHTING ON LARGE FRAME. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 HANGAR DECK FIREFIGHTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 INCIDENTS INVOLVING AIRCRAFT CONTAINING COMPOSITE MATERIAL REINFORCED WITH CARBON/GRAPHITE OR BORON/TUNGSTEN FIBERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ordnance Stores . . . . . .4 6. . . . .2. . . .

. . . . . . . . .4 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 7. . . . . . . . . . .9 ORIGINAL ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . MOBILE FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crash Forklift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 7.3. . . . . . . . . . .3. .4. . .1. . . . Integrity Watch Officer . . . .4 7. . . . . Flight Deck Weapons Staging Area (Bomb Farm) AFFF Sprinkler System . Tool Inventory . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 7. . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . .9 7. . . . . . . . . . Salvage. . . . . . . . . . . AND RESCUE ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS 7. . . . . MFFV Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . Launch . . . . . . . . . . . . AFFF Proportioning System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Air Department Repair Teams . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aircraft Crash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Limited Flight Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.4 7. . . .3. . . . . . . . . .7 7. . . . . . . . . AFFF Flight Deck Fire Extinguishing Systems . . . . . . . . . . . Aviation Squadrons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MANNING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . .2 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aviation Fuel Officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . Team Organization During Normal Flight Operations . . .2 7. . Underway Replenishment . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hangar Deck Officer . Aircraft Handling Officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHAPTER 7 — AVIATION SHIP (CV/CVN) CRASH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIRE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 7.3. . . . . . . Hangar Deck Tool Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . Crash Crane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 7. .3 7.4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EQUIPMENT . . .2 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hangar Deck Salvage Forklift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and Rescue Team . . . . . Crash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . .10 7. . . Ordnance Handling Evolutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 7. . . . . . 16 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-1 7-3 7-3 7-3 7-4 7-4 7-4 7-5 7-5 7-5 7-6 7-6 7-6 7-6 7-7 7-7 7-7 7-7 7-7 7-7 7-7 7-7 7-7 7-7 . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hangar Deck AFFF Sprinkler System . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duties and Procedure Requirements . Recovery . . . . . Respot . . . . .5 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 7. . . . . . .2. . . . . . . .1 7. .8 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . AFFF Hose Outlets . . . . . . . . . . . .1 7.7 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hose Outlets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Air Officer (Air Boss) . . Fueling .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Salvage. . . . . . . . . . . . and Rescue Officer (Air Boatswain) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . .6 7. . . . . . . . . . . Hangar Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . .7 7.4. . . .5 7. .1 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance Turnups . . . .

7-10 7-10 7-11 7-11 7-14 7-14 7-18 7-20 7-20 7-21 7-21 7-21 7-21 JETTISON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . .8 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . .9. . . FIRE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 7. . . . . . . . . .7.9. . . . . . . . . . . . .2 8. Notification . . . Multiaircraft CONFLAG . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Liquid Oxygen Converter Bottles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 7. . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS . . . . . . . .6 7. . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 8-1 8-1 8-1 8-1 ORIGINAL . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . Minimum Initial Response . . . . .6 7. . . . . . .7 TRAINING REQUIREMENTS . . Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aircraft Handling Officer . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . .1 7. .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10 FLIGHT QUARTERS PREPARATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIREFIGHTING PROCEDURES . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 7. . . . . . . . . .5 7. . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 7. .4 7. . . . . . . . . AFFF Proportioning System Manning Requirements . . . . . . .4 7. . . . . . . .5 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . and Rescue Crewmember Training . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8 Crash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . Aircraft Debris Pile/Running Fuel Fires . . Aircraft Engine Wet Start Fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Air Officer (Air Boss) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 7. . . . . . . . .2 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7 Embarked On-the-Job Training Requirements . . . . 7-8 Drills . CONFLAG Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 7. . . . . . . Fire-Involved Ordnance Training . Estimated Ready Deck/Salvage . . . . . . . . .7 7. . . . . . . Residual Fire Overhaul/Reflash Watch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AFFF Proportioning System Manning Requirements . . . . . . . 7-22 AIRCRAFT FIREFIGHTING TACTICS AND PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . . .3 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 7. . . . . . . . . .6 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Initial Response MFFV Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hangar Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 7. . . . . . . . . . 7-9 Drill Sequence of Events for Fuel Station Fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . 7-8 Conduct of Drills . . . . . AND RESCUE ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . .3 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . .7 7. .9. . . . . . . . .5. 7-9 Drill Sequence of Events . . . . . . . . . AFFF Ordnance Cooling Teams . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . Nursing/Replenishment of MFFVs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 7. . .1 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22 7-22 7-22 7-22 7-23 7-23 7-24 7-24 CHAPTER 8 — AMPHIBIOUS AVIATION SHIPS (LHA/LHD)* CRASH. Salvage. . . .1 8. . . . . . . . . . Air Department Repair Teams and Repair Party . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . .5 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fueling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crash Forklift . . . . . . . .4. . . . . Limited Flight Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ORIGINAL Aircraft Crash. . . . . . . . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MOBILE FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . . and Rescue Officer (Air Boatswain) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 8. . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . or Dry Chemical Extinguishers . . . . . . . . . .4 8. . . . . . . . . Hangar Deck Tool Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . Recovery . . . . . . . . . . .10 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crash and Rescue Tool Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 8. Launch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hose Outlets . . . . Extended Flight Operations . . . . . . . Crash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . AFFF Proportioning Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 8. . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crash Locker . . . . .2. . . Salvage. . . . . . . . . Marine and Navy Aviation Squadrons/Detachments . . . . . . . EQUIPMENT . .4 8. . . . . . . . . .6 8. . . . . . . . .2 8. . . . . . . . . . . .12 8. 8. . . Maintenance Turnups . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duties and Procedure Requirements . . Flight Deck Weapons Staging Area (Bomb Farm) AFFF Sprinkler System (LHA. . . . . . . .5 8. . .1. . . . .8 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hangar Deck Officer . Drills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. CO2. Salvage. . . . . . . . . . . .3 8.5 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 8. . .4. . .3. . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Embarked On-the-Job Training Requirements . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . and Rescue Crewmember Training . . . . . .9 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MFFV Requirements . . . . . . . .2 8. .3 8. . .3 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AFFF Flight Deck Fire Extinguishing System . . . . . . . . . . . . Integrity Watch Officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 8. . . . . . Team Organization During Normal Flight Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ordnance Handling Evolutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crash Crane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 8.3. . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Respot . . . . . . . . . . . 18 8-1 8-1 8-1 8-1 8-1 8-1 8-1 8-2 8-3 8-3 8-3 8-4 8-4 8-4 8-5 8-5 8-5 8-5 8-5 8-6 8-6 8-6 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-8 8-8 8-8 8-8 . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Halon 1211. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hangar Deck AFFF Sprinkler System . . . Aviation Fuel Officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 8. . . . . . TRAINING REQUIREMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 8. . . . .1 8. . . . .8 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Operations . . . . . . . . Crash. . . . . . . . .4. . and Rescue Team . . . . . . . .1 8. . . . . . . . .3. . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AFFF Hose Outlets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . Salvage. . . . LHD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . MANNING . . . . .4. .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . .7 8. . . . . . . . . Underway Replenishment . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 9-1 9-1 9-1 9-1 9-1 9-1 9-1 9-3 9-4 EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 8. . . Aircraft Engine Wet Start Fires . . AFFF Ordnance Cooling Teams . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . . .3 ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Air Officer (LPD)/Helicopter Control Officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 8.2 8. . . . . .6 8. . . . . . . . .1 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 9. . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . Initial Response MFFV Operations . . . . . . . AFFF Proportioning System Manning Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . Mass Casualty/CONFLAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rescue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . Notification . . .2 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 9. . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . Aircraft Debris Pile/Running Fuel Fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Air Wing/Helicopter Detachments (Ships with Aircraft Embarked) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 Drill Sequence of Events for Fuel Station Fires . . . . . . . Air Officer (LPD)/Helicopter Control Officer (Others) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4 19 ORIGINAL . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . Salvage. . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 9. . . . . . . . . . . . FIRE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . Minimum Initial Response . . . . . . . . . . and Rescue Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 8. . . . . . . . . .1 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 8.2 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10 8-10 8-10 8-11 8-16 8-16 8-16 8-19 8-20 8-20 8-20 8-21 JETTISON . . MANNING . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . .1 9. . . . . . . . . . Fire-Involved Ordnance Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 8. . . . . . .2 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 8. . . . . .7 8. . . . . . . . . Responsibilities . . . . . . .7. . . . . . .6 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aircraft Crash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 8. . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 Drill Sequence of Events . . . . . .6. . . . .9 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nursing/Replenishment of MFFVs . . .2 8. . . . . . . . . . . . .8 8. . 8-21 AIRCRAFT FIREFIGHTING TACTICS AND PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . Team Organization During Flight Operations . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 8. . .2. . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CONFLAG Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . .1 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . AFFF Proportioning System Inspection and Reporting . . . . . . . FIREFIGHTING PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and Salvage Supervisor (LPD)/Damage Control Assistant . . . .9. . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residual Fire Overhaul/Reflash Watch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction . . . . . . . . . . Duties and Procedure Requirements . . . . . . . . . 8-21 8-21 8-22 8-22 8-22 8-23 8-23 CHAPTER 9 — LPD* AND OTHER AIR-CAPABLE SHIPS CRASH. . . . . . . . . .7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Conduct of Drills . . . . . . .5 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 8. . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10 FLIGHT QUARTERS PREPARATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AND RESCUE ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS 9. . . . . . Hangar Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . AFFF Ordnance Cooling Teams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 ORIGINAL AFFF Proportioning Stations . . . . . . . . 9-11 9-11 9-11 9-12 9-12 9-13 9-13 9-14 9-14 JETTISON .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . Minimum Initial Response . . Conduct of Drills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . Drills . . . . . . . Rescue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 9. . . . . . . . .8. . . . . . . . . Embarked On-the-Job Training Requirements . . . . . . . Hose Outlets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crash. . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . .1 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Firefighting Clothing Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4. . . . . . . . . . . . .1 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRAINING REQUIREMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . MFFV (LPD Only) . . . . . . .4 9. . . . . . . . . . . . 20 9-15 9-15 9-15 9-15 9-16 9-16 9-16 . . . . Breathing Apparatus Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drill Sequence of Events . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. . . 9-9 AFFF System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Initial On-Scene MFFV Operations (LPD Only) . .1 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emergency Techniques . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 9. .3. . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . .4 9.3. . . . . .3 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 9. . . . . . .10 9. . . . . . . . . . Hangar Deck AFFF Sprinkler System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AFFF Flight Deck Fire Extinguishing System . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . .5 9. . . . . . . . . . .4 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14 AIRCRAFT FIREFIGHTING TACTICS AND PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hangar Deck Fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9 FIREFIGHTING PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . .8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 9. . 9-4 9-5 9-5 9-5 9-5 9-6 9-6 9-6 9-6 9-7 9-7 9-7 9-7 9-8 9-8 9-8 FLIGHT QUARTERS PREPARATION . . . . . .3. .4. . . . . . . and Salvage Crewmember Training . . . .5 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aircraft Debris Pile/Running Fuel Fires . . . . . . . .8. . . . . .4 9. . . . . .5 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residual Fire Overhaul/Reflash Watch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flight Deck Weapons Staging Area (Bomb Farm) AFFF Sprinkler System (LPD) . . Notification . . . . . . . . . .9 9. . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. .1 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tool Roll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . .2 9. . . . . . . . . . . . .4 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . Aircraft Engine Wet Start Fires . . . . .7 9. . .6 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. . . .6 9. . . . . . Fire-Involved Ordnance Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Approaching and Entering a Burning Helicopter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 9. . . . . . . . . . . .1 9. .7 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 9. . Rescue . . . . . .5 9. . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . Mass Casualty/CONFLAG . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AFFF Hose Outlets . . . . . . . .6. . .5. . . . . . . .

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No.

APPENDIX A — REFERENCES APPENDIX B — SUMMARY DATA ON THE FIRE HAZARD PROPERTIES OF AVIATION FUELS APPENDIX C — AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS APPENDIX D — GENERAL AIRCRAFT HANDLING SIGNALS APPENDIX E — NATOPS TEST QUESTION BANK
E.1 E.1.1 E.1.2 E.1.3 E.1.4 E.1.5 E.1.6 E.1.7 E.1.8 E.2 E.2.1 E.2.2 E.2.3 E.2.4 E.2.5 E.2.6 E.2.7 E.2.8 QUESTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aircraft Fire Hazards, Fuel, and Ordnance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Firefighting Agents and Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicles and Associated Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Airfield Firefighting and Rescue Organization and Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Firefighting and Rescue Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aviation Ship (CV/CVN) Crash, Fire, and Rescue Organization and Operations . . . . . . . Amphibious Aviation Ships (LHA/LHD/MCS) Crash, Fire, and Rescue Organization and Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LPD and Other Air Capable Ships Crash, Fire, and Rescue Organization and Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ANSWERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aircraft Fire Hazards, Fuel, and Ordnance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Firefighting Agents and Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicles and Associated Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Airfield Firefighting and Rescue Organization and Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Firefighting and Rescue Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aviation Ship (CV/CVN) Crash, Fire, and Rescue Organization and Operations . . . . . . . Amphibious Aviation Ships (LHA/LHD/MCS) Crash, Fire, and Rescue Organization and Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LPD and Other Air Capable Ships Crash, Fire, and Rescue Organization and Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1 E-1 E-2 E-2 E-2 E-3 E-4 E-5 E-5 E-6 E-6 E-6 E-7 E-7 E-8 E-8 E-9 E-9

INDEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Index-1

21/(22 blank)

ORIGINAL

NAVAIR 00-80R-14

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Page No.

CHAPTER 2 — AIRCRAFT FIRE HAZARDS, FUEL, ORDNANCE
Figure 2-1. Figure 2-2. Figure 2-3. Figure 2-4. Figure 2-5. Bomb Cookoff Time Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4 Air-Launched Missile Cookoff Time Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 Rocket Cookoff Time Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 M61A1 Aircraft Gun/MK 4 Gun Pod Time Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 Torpedo and Mine Cookoff Time Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10

CHAPTER 3 — FIREFIGHTING AGENTS AND EQUIPMENT
Figure 3-1. Figure 3-2. Airfield Fire Protection Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 Wand Extension for 150-pound Wheeled Halon 1211 Fire Extinguishers (V-22 only) . . . 3-4

CHAPTER 4 — AIRCRAFT FIREFIGHTING AND RESCUE VEHICLES AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT
Figure 4-1. Figure 4-2. Figure 4-3. Figure 4-4. Figure 4-5. Figure 4-6. Figure 4-7. Figure 4-8. Figure 4-9. Figure 4-10. Figure 4-11. Technical Manuals for Major Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting Vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 CF 4000L Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3 T-3000 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4 T-1500 Oshkosh Truck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 P-4A Aircraft/Structural Firefighting and Rescue Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6 P-15 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8 A/S32P-25 Firefighting Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9 P-19 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10 Shore-Based TAU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 P-10 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12 Typical Tools in Rescue Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14

CHAPTER 5 — AIRFIELD FIREFIGHTING AND RESCUE ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS
Figure 5-1. Figure 5-2. Figure 5-3. Figure 5-4. Figure 5-5. Figure 5-6. Minimum Response Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2 U.S. NAVY Airfield Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3 U.S.M.C. Airfield Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 Minimum Response Requirements for Active Forward Operating Base Facilities . . . . . . 5-6 Approved Airfield Categories I, II, IIA, and Crash Crane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 Minimum Response Requirements for Heliports Not Assigned an Airfield Category . . . 5-11

CHAPTER 6 — FIREFIGHTING AND RESCUE OPERATIONS
Figure 6-1. Figure 6-2. Figure 6-3. Fire Control Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2 Attack from Tail Using Wind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2 Position to be Clear of Line Fire of Ordnance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4 23 ORIGINAL

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. Figure 6-4. Figure 6-5. Attack Fire from Uphill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5 Danger Zones and Attack Zones in Combatting Wheel Fire (Attack the Fire from Fore and Aft — Do Not Attack from the Side) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7

CHAPTER 7 — AVIATIONS SHIP (CV/CVN) CRASH, FIRE, AND RESCUE ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS
Figure 7-1. Figure 7-2. Figure 7-3. Figure 7-4. Figure 7-5. Team Organization During Normal Flight Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2 Aircraft Carrier Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Identification of Inoperable Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-13 Aircraft Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Maximum Inoperable AFFF Services Permitted on the Hangar Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-15 Aircraft Carrier Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Maximum Inoperable AFFF Services Permitted on the Flight Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-16 Aircraft Carrier Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Inadequate AFFF Coverage Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-17

CHAPTER 8 — AMPHIBIOUS AVIATION SHIPS (LHA/LHD)* CRASH, FIRE, AND RESCUE ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS
Figure 8-1. Figure 8-2. Figure 8-3. Figure 8-4. Figure 8-5. Team Organization During Normal Flight Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2 Aircraft Carrier Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Identification of Inoperable Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13 Aircraft Carrier Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Maximum Inoperable AFFF Services Permitted on the Hangar Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-14 Amphibious Aviation Ships Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Maximum Inoperable AFFF Services Permitted on the Flight Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-15 Aircraft Carrier Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Inadequate AFFFF Coverage Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17

APPENDIX C — AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS
Figure C-1. Color-Coded Functional Identification Tapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2

APPENDIX D — GENERAL AIRCRAFT HANDLING SIGNALS
Figure D-1. General Aircraft Handling Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1

ORIGINAL

24

A general term applied to the instruments provided to enable the pilot to control the speed. C D deflagration: 1. Commandant of the Marine Corps. CMWD. Removable sections. chemical transportation emergency center (CHEMTREC). 25 eductor: 1. 2. etc. B The CVR recorder is a continuous 30-minute tape that requires the power to be removed by pulling the CVR circuit breaker in the flight deck to preserve communication recordings that may be vital to the accident investigation. An information center for transportation emergencies involving hazardous chemicals operated by the Manufacturing Chemists Association. Department of Defense. of an aircraft. The cockpit voice recorder monitors crew communication through a pickup on the flight deck to a recorder usually mounted in the tail area of the aircraft and designed to withstand certain impact forces and a degree of fire.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 GLOSSARY A ACHO. A method of cleaning firefighting equipment by running plain water from the discharge outlets to the suction inlets to remove clogged debris and traces of saltwater or chemicals. and a control valve. open sprinkler heads or nozzles. ORIGINAL . power. it can be reached day or night toll-free at 800-424-9300. It consists of piping. The acronym for Aqueous Film Forming Foam. Countermeasure washdown. ARFF. A large. conflagration (CONFLAG). cowling. AVGAS. AFFF. covering around engine back flushing. AM-241. cockpit voice recorder (CVR). Crash crew information diagram in NAVAIR 00-80R-14-1. 3. Chief of Naval Operations. Thermal decomposition that proceeds at less than sonic velocity and may or may not develop hazardous pressures. A burning that takes place at a flame speed below the velocity of sound in the unburned medium. Chief of Naval Air Training. CNATRA. A device placed in a hose line to proportion liquid foam or wetting agents into the fire steam. fire. Aviation gasoline. that is by turning a valve or operating an electrical switch. A rapid combustion that does not generate shock waves. the Department of Defense standard firefighting agent for flammable and combustible liquid fires. destructive controls. Americium 241. All AFFF and certain saltwater systems are activated by human action. E CCIDs. deluge sprinkler system. Magazinetype saltwater systems utilize heat detectors to automatically operate control valves. A saltwater or AFFF sprinkler system used to protect special risks. Aircraft rescue and firefighting.. altitude. Aircraft Handling Officer. CNO. direction of flight. DOD. CMC.

chlorine. Navy fire brigades. Atlantic. Any substance that. the common halogen elements used are fluorine. corrosive. fire wall. poisonous. A ground control approach is a technique whereby a ground operator “views” the aircraft electronically and directs the actions of the pilot by voice to bring the aircraft in for landing. Jet fuels. IFSTA. A movable airfoil attached to the trailing edge of the wing that improves the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft during takeoffs and landings. An ejector that siphons water by creating a vacuum from the velocity of water passing through it. Fire Service Training Individual materiel readiness list.000 feet. A common name given to the vertical stabilizer. by reason of being explosive. IMRL. G exhaust. EPU. It . Explosive ordnance disposal. A bulkhead separating two compartments of an aircraft. flaperon. EOD. irritating. A dense layer of foam applied to a burning or susceptible surface to smother flames or prevent ignition. ETA. L landing gear. H fin. fire chief/ARFF officer. Integrity watch officer. The flight data recorder is an instrument that monitors performance characteristics of aircraft in flight. It is mounted in the tail area of the aircraft and designed to withstand certain impact forces and a degree of fire. The part of the engine through which the exhaust gases are ejected. fire department/ARFF branch. such as a tail fin or a skid fin. FMFPAC/LANT. Aircraft tail assembly including stabilizers. IWO. flaps. Marine aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF) units. bromine. An extinguishing agent composed of hydrocarbons in which one or more hydrogen atoms have been replaced by halogen atoms. A fixed or adjustable airfoil for directional stability. Pacific or foam blanket. Fleet Marine Force. Instrument flight rules apply when visibility is less than 3 miles and ceiling is below 1. and iodine. hypergolic. J JP. International Association. Estimated time of arrival. can cause death or injury or damage to the environment. flight data recorder (FDR). Used in this manual as generic terms to indicate the head of the firefighting organization itself. I instrument flight rules (IFR). A combined flight surface applicable to the A-6 and F/A-18. or otherwise harmful. and Navy civilian fire departments. oxidizing. Emergency power unit. elevators. hazardous material (HAZMAT). flammable. A mixture that ignites without the need for a separate ignition source. rudders. It is meant to include Marine fire departments.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 2. F ground control approach (GCA). Its purpose is to provide investigators with flight performance data that may be relevant in determining the cause of an accident. etc. ORIGINAL 26 halogenated agent. The understructure that supports the weight of an aircraft when in contact with land. empennage.

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 usually contains a mechanism for reducing the shock of landing (also called undercarriage). written or not. PriFly. Naval Air Systems Command. metal oxides. and SCBA worn by firefighters. 2. pylon. Retractable Landing Gear — A type of landing gear that may be withdrawn into the body or wings of an aircraft while it is in flight in order to reduce the drag. and permanganates (also called oxidizing agent). nickel cadmium (NICAD). N PKP. Mutual aid is synonymous with “mutual assistance. NAVFAC. 2. Navy Publications and pod. natural or manmade. chlorates. A screw-like fastener with a slotted head. One half turn either secures or releases the fastener. such as oxygen. A nacelle is usually shorter than a fuselage and does not carry the tail unit. M NAVMARFPA.” “ outside aid. ozone. protective clothing. oxidizer: 1. The enclosed streamlined housing for a powerplant. a short distance behind the center of gravity. Naval Facilities Engineering Command. protective equipment. Purple-K-Powder. that constitute an agreed reciprocal assistance plan between emergency services. nacelle strut. coat. The protective equipment: helmet/hood. Chief of Naval Operations Instruction. ORIGINAL . The structure that attaches a jet engine to the wing. Marine Corps Fire Protection nursing. (Camlock or Dzus fastener). or as a coverall and designed to provide protection to the fire fighter. Protective garments that are configured as an ensemble of a coat and trousers.” “letters of agreement. boots. NAVAIR. National Fire Protection Association. longerons. The enclosed streamlined housing around the jet engine. mutual aid. NAVSEA. hydrogen peroxide. Q NAVPUBFORMSCEN. Primary flight. The main wheels are usually located at midwing. The principal longitudinal structural members of the fuselage. or from supplies transported to the scene. chlorine. NAVSUP. P MFFV. Resupplying MFFVs from water supplies on the fireground. A substance that contains an atom or atomic group that gains electrons. NATSF. The nosewheel is placed well forward and under the fuselage of the aircraft. nacelle. A substance that readily gives up oxygen without requiring an equivalent of another element in return. Navy. Forms Center. Association. Naval Air Technical Services Facility. Mobile firefighting vehicle. nitric acid. Tricycle Landing Gear — Most multiengine aircraft are equipped with tricycle landing gear. 1.” or other similar agreements. NFPA. The final phase of firefighting during which all of the fire is searched out and extinguished. Naval Supply Systems Command. Naval Sea Systems Command. trousers. overhaul. gloves. 27 quick release fastener.” “memorandums of understanding. O OPNAVINST. A type of battery commonly used in aircraft.

special aircraft hazard. The term stabilizer is most commonly used in reference to the fixed horizontal tail surface of the aircraft. Technical order. Slats are found on the leading edge of the wing. Transportation Center. Self-contained breathing apparatus. and access panels throughout the aircraft. hundred to 300. such as magnesium. combustible materials. rudder. turret. Solenoid-operated pilot valves. ribs. Clamshell arrangement aft of a jet engine to divert exhaust gas and reverse the thrust of the engine to slow the aircraft. Any wetting agent. A term used to describe structural members that are designed to resist pressure in the direction of their length (e.000 MHz. SAR. U ultra high frequency (UHF) (radio). Secondary structural members of fuselage and wings. slat. Twin agent unit. suppression. The gear can swivel up and down so all wheels follow the ground as the surface contour changes. Capable of producing its own oxygen source. Surface-to-surface missile.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 This type screw is used on engine cowlings. SOPV. the primary function of which is to increase the stability of the aircraft.. The outer covering of the fuselage and wings. 28 thrust reverser. SCBA. Three ORIGINAL .O. weapons/armament. S stabilizer.g. surfactant. response time. The time elapsed between the initial notification of an accident/incident and the time of the first discharge of extinguishing agent at the incident site. cover plates. A movable auxiliary airfoil. landing gear). A manually or hydraulically operated cannon mounted on a fire truck that can be used to dispense water or AFFF. Surface-to-air missile. components. R spars. Rapid In-Line Emergency Disconnect valve located between the mask and tactical ventilator airhose couplings on the MCK series aircrewman respirator assembly. Any airfoil the primary function of which is to increase the stability of the aircraft. The principal structural members or beams of a wing. T SAM. Equipment Management self-oxidizing. The upright movable part of the tail assembly that controls the direction (yaw) of the aircraft. tandem gear. A tandem arrangement of landing gear wheels. stiffeners. TAU. SSM. This specifies those items of fuel. strut. RIED. TEMC. T. All actions taken to extinguish a fire from the time of its discovery until fire extinguishment. The force and aft structural members of the wing that determines the shape of the wing cross-section. or situations that require deployment of special fire suppression tactics in addition to normal preplanned procedures to effect personnel rescue and/or combat fire mishaps. skin. Search and rescue.

30 to 300 29/(30 blank) ORIGINAL . The highest concentration of flammable vapor in air that once ignited.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 upper flammable limit (UFL). 136 to 174 MHz. Visual flight rules apply when visibility is greater than 3 miles and the flightpath may be controlled by visual reference to the ground. Radio commonly used in the crash fire and rescue net. fire stream. 2. W washing down: 1. vertical reach. The maximum effective height of a visual flight rules (VFR). very high frequency (VHF) (radio). Wetting down or damping down burned material to ensure complete extinguishment. Flushing away any spilled material with water. Note Comply with environmental laws during recovery and cleanups. V very high frequency/frequency modulated (radio) VHF-FM). 3. MHz. will continue to propagate flame (also called upper explosive limit). Firefighting with heavy streams and large quantities of water where it is not possible to enter a burning structure.

.

NAVAIR 00-80R-14

PREFACE
SCOPE

The NATOPS Flight Manual is issued by the authority of the Chief of Naval Operations and under the direction of Commander, Naval Air Systems Command in conjunction with the Naval Air Training and Operating Procedures Standardization (NATOPS) Program. This manual contains information on all aircraft systems, performance data, and operating procedures required for safe and effective operations. However, it is not a substitute for sound judgment. Compound emergencies, available facilities, adverse weather or terrain, or considerations affecting the lives and property of others may require modification of the procedures contained herein. Read this manual from cover to cover. It is your responsibility to have a complete knowledge of its contents.

requisition can be submitted to Naval Supply Systems Command via the Naval Logistics Library (NLL) website, www.nll.navsup.navy.mil. This publication is also available to view and download from the NATEC website, www.natec.navy.mil. 4

Automatic Distribution (with Updates)

APPLICABLE PUBLICATIONS

The following applicable publications complement this manual: NAVAIR 00-80R-14-1, U.S. Navy Aircraft Emergency Rescue Information NATOPS Manual. NAVAIR 00-80R-19, U.S. Navy Aircraft Crash and Salvage Operations Manual (Afloat) NAVAIR 00-80R-20, U.S. Navy Aircraft Crash and Salvage Operations Manual (Ashore) Air Force Technical Order, 00-105E-9, Aerospace Emergency Rescue and Mishap Response Information (Emergency Services) Link to TO 00-105E Web Site: http://www.robins.af.mil/ logistics/LGEDA/documents/to00-105E-9.htm Link to TO 00-105E-9 Safety Supplements: http://www.afcesa.af.mil/Directorated/CEX/fire/ default.html#Publications
HOW TO GET COPIES

This publication and changes to it are automatically sent to activities that are established on the Automatic Distribution Requirements List (ADRL) maintained by Naval Air Technical Data and Engineering Service Command, in San Diego, CA. If there is continuing need for this publication, each activity’s Central Technical Publication Librarian must send a revised ADRL report on floppy disk to Naval Air Technical Data and Engineering Service Command. If an activity does not have a library, send a letter to the Commanding Officer, Naval Air Technical Data and Engineering Service Command, Naval Aviation Depot North Island, Bldg. 90, Code 3.3A, P.O. Box 357031, San Diego, CA 92135-7031, requesting assignments of a distribution account number (if necessary) and automatic mailing of future issues of the publications needed. Note The ADRL floppy disk can be used only to place an activity on the mailing list for automatic distribution of future issues of the publication. It cannot be used to make one-time orders of publications from current stock. Once established on automatic distribution for this or any other NAVAIR technical publication, an activity must submit an ADRL report on floppy disk at least once every 12 months to update or confirm their automatic distribution requirements. Note Activities not submitting an ADRL report on floppy disk for more than 12 months may be dropped from distribution of all NAVAIR technical publications. 31 ORIGINAL

Additional copies of this manual and changes thereto may be procured through the local supply system from NAVICP Philadelphia via DAAS in accordance with NAVSUP P-409 (MILSTRIP/MILSTRAP), or a

NAVAIR 00-80R-14
UPDATING THE MANUAL CHANGE SYMBOLS

To ensure that the manual contains the latest procedures and information, NATOPS review conferences are held in accordance with OPNAVINST 3710.7 series.

CHANGE RECOMMENDATIONS

Revised text is indicated by a black vertical line in either margin of the page, like the one printed next to this paragraph. The change symbol shows where there has been a change. The change might be material added or information restated. A change symbol in the margin by the chapter number and title indicates a new or completely revised chapter.
WARNINGS, CAUTIONS, AND NOTES

Recommended changes to this manual or other NATOPS publications may be submitted by anyone in accordance with OPNAVINST 3710.7 series. Routine change recommendations are submitted directly to the Model Manager on OPNAV Form 3710/6 (4-90) shown herein. The address of the Model Manager of this aircraft is: Commander, Naval Air System Command PMA-251 Bldg. 2272, Suite 348 47123 Buse Road Patuxent River, MD 20670-1547 Change recommendations of an URGENT nature (safety of flight, etc.), should be submitted directly to the NATOPS Advisory Group Member in the chain of command by priority message.

The following definitions apply to WARNINGs, CAUTIONs, and Notes found throughout the manual.

An operating procedure, practice, or condition, etc., that may result in injury or death, if not carefully observed or followed. CAUTION An operating procedure, practice, or condition, etc., that may result in damage to equipment, if not carefully observed or followed. Note An operating procedure, practice, or condition, etc., that is essential to emphasize.
WORDING

YOUR RESPONSIBILITY

NATOPS Flight Manuals are kept current through an active manual change program. Any corrections, additions, or constructive suggestions for improvement of its content should be submitted by routine or urgent change recommendation, as appropriate at once.

The concept of word usage and intended meaning adhered to in preparing this Manual is as follows:
NATOPS FLIGHT MANUAL INTERIM CHANGES

Flight Manual Interim Changes are changes or corrections to the NATOPS Flight Manuals promulgated by CNO or NAVAIRSYSCOM. Interim Changes are issued either as printed pages, or as a naval message. The Interim Change Summary page is provided as a record of all interim changes. Upon receipt of a change or revision, the custodian of the manual should check the updated Interim Change Summary to ascertain that all outstanding interim changes have been either incorporated or canceled; those not incorporated shall be recorded as outstanding in the section provided. ORIGINAL 32

1. “Shall” has been used only when application of a procedure is mandatory. 2. “Should” has been used only when application of a procedure is recommended. 3. “May” and “need not” have been used only when application of a procedure is optional. 4. “Will” has been used only to indicate futurity, never to indicate any degree of requirement for application of a procedure.

NAVAIR 00-80R-14

33/(34 blank)

ORIGINAL

1. through hands-on use.2 SCOPE AND PURPOSE Commands listed below may grant waivers to the provisions of this manual in order to develop new procedures or when compliance is impractical. Prerequisites for assignment to this duty include alertness. the contents of all directives cited must be studied and understood. Waivers shall always indicate the purpose for which granted and the time limitations for the waiver. Naval Air System Command (PMA-251) shall administer the afloat and Marine Corps aircraft firefighting programs for the Chief of Naval Operations and has sole responsibility and authority to establish policy. The secondary responsibility is to extinguish and limit the damage to the aircraft. it is generally an indication that the particular procedure. courage. expeditionary airfields and shore-based activities involved in aircraft fire protection. The primary duty of the firefighter is saving life. and to use tools to maintain the level of proficiency necessary to respond to emergency situations and perform primary duties. ORIGINAL .23F or (current editions) and DODI 6055. the cognizant OPNAV sponsor (if applicable). and suppression functions. extinguishing agents. special instructions or waivers will be promulgated by the CNO. Where the need arises. waivers to these provisions shall not be granted except in cases where specific waiver authority has been authorized. and to NAVAIR (PMA-251). physical strength. Firefighting in and around crashed aircraft is a highly specialized field of firefighting. dedication. Waivers may be issued as indicated in the following table: ACTIVITY CNO CMC COMMARFORPAC COMMARFORLANT COMNAVAIRESFOR CNATRA COMNAVAIRSYSCOM Fleet and Fleet Type Commanders COMMARFORRES COMMANDANT USCG ISSUED TO All Commands/Activities All Marine Corps Commands/Activities MARFORPAC MARFORLANT NAVAIRESFOR TRACOM All NAVAIR HQ Activities Fleet Commands MARFORRES All USCG Activities Naval Air Systems Command (PMA-251) and NAVFAC serve jointly as the Navy and Marine Corps senior technical authority for aircraft firefighting and manages this program in accordance with OPNAVINST 5100. and the ability to be an exacting team worker. This manual is not intended to cover every contingency which may arise nor every rule of safety and good practice. Each firefighter will be trained. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Fire and Emergency Services shall administer the shore-based aircraft firefighting program for the Chief of Naval Operations. To perform these tasks it is essential that the material contained herein be studied and assimilated. This manual prescribes minimum firefighting and rescue operating instructions and procedures applicable to all shipboard.3 WAIVERS Firefighting is a highly technical profession. Fire suppression is an important supporting measure. It is essential to reinforce this study with training sessions and drills. or limitation should be revised.1 GENERAL maximum value. prevention. 1.6. how to skillfully apply all equipment. NAVSAFECEN (Code 11).8G and 11320. To achieve 1-1 A copy of all waivers will be forwarded to CNO (N785D1). requirement. agility. Because this instruction promulgates specific guidance and policy of the CNO. When a waiver must be continually renewed.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 CHAPTER 1 Introduction 1.

NAVAIR (PMA-251) shall be advised on each occasion when a new representative is assigned. ORIGINAL 1-2 . Commanders shall designate their Advisory Group representative in writing and forward correspondence to NAVAIR (PMA-251).4 ADVISORY GROUP COMMARFORLANT (FEO) COMNAVRES COMNAVSAFECEN COMNAVSURFPAC CNO (NATOPS Coordinator) CINCPACFLT (Shore Facilities) COMNAVAIRSYSCOM COMNAVAIRLANT CMC (ASL) CINCLANTFLT (Shore Facilities) COMNAVAIRPAC CNATRA/CNET COMCABWEST COMNAVFACENGCOM COMMARFORPAC (FEO) COMMARFORRES COMNAVSURFLANT COMCABEAST COMNAVSEASYSCOM COMMANDANT USCG The following activities comprise the Advisory Group for this manual.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 1.

2. and CO2. or D fire. Research in the past 30 years has indicated the presence of a fourth critical element.2. PKP.2. JP-4 ORIGINAL For many years. attack with application of non-conductive agents (CO2. and temperature.2. 2. 2. cause a temperature increase. fire was considered to be the product of a combination of three elements: fuel.2 CLASSIFICATION OF FIRES . B.3 Class C Fires. Ordnance 9. Fuel.6 Jet Fuels/Aviation Gasoline. Explosive Suppressant Foam. They include: 1. Oils 4. Overheated batteries 10. Gasoline 2. there may be small explosions. enter into the chain reaction. begin to burn. Hydraulic fluid 6. paper and paper products) are extinguished with water in straight or fog pattern. Hazardous. cloth. If fire is deep seated. 2. AFFF can be used as wetting agent. the chain reaction will cause the fire to grow. PKP). AVGAS and JPs constitute the principal problems in aircraft firefighting. and other flammable/combustible liquids) are extinguished with AFFF. As the combustion process continues. 2. textiles and fibrous materials. 2. Jet fuel 3. Halon 1211. 1.2.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 CHAPTER 2 Aircraft Fire Hazards. AVGAS 2. The firefighter should apply water from a safe distance or from behind shelter. oil. more fuel molecules will break down.1 FIRE CHEMISTRY 2. Flares 11. and continue the chain reaction.5 Flammable. Then. reach their ignition point. Oxygen 5. draw additional oxygen.4 Class D Fires.1 Class A Fires. As long as there are fuel and oxygen and as long as the temperature is sustained. Extinguishment tactics are: deenergize and treat as a Class A. When water is applied to burning Class D material. For example. as the fire burns. the increase in temperature causes additional oxygen to be drawn into the flame area. and Fire Accelerating Materials. The fourth element is the chemical chain reaction that takes place in a fire and allows the fire to both sustain itself and grow. Anti-icing fluid 2. or attack with application of fresh or salt water in fog patterns maintaining nozzle at least 4 feet from the energized object. fuel molecules are reduced within the flame to simpler molecules.2. an oxidizing agent. Class A combustibles 8. in a fuel fire. and Ordnance 2. Halon. Class D fires (combustible metals such as magnesium and titanium) are extinguished with water in large quantities such as highvelocity fog. Class B fires (gasoline. Accelerating materials carried on aircraft are of major concern to the aircraft rescue and firefighting crews. A Class C fire involves energized electrical equipment. 2-1 7. Class A fires (burning wood and wood products.2 Class B Fires. Lithium 12. jet fuels.

2. see Appendix B.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 3. If ignited. 2. A number of tests were conducted on external aircraft fuel tanks in which they were exposed to an enveloping fuel fire. Ten-percent JP-4 reduces the flashpoint of the mixture by 90 _F (32 _C). The time to fuel tank failure (releasing fuel) was dependent on the percent of fuel in the tank and ranged from 28 seconds for a 10-percent load to 3-1/2 minutes for a 100-percent load. JP-5 4. For other technical information on the fire hazard properties of aviation fuels.4 OXYGEN SYSTEMS As little as a 2. Liquid oxygen is a strong oxidizer and. it must be emphasized that under aircraft crash impact conditions where fuel mists (fuel-air mixture) are created. ESF is a flexible polyether and polyster polyurethane foam installed in certain aircraft fuel cells to provide explosive protection from projectile penetration in a hostile environment. JP-8. The rate of flame spread is in the order of 100 feet per minute. 2. The firefighting and control measures are the same for the entire group of aviation hydrocarbon fuels. JP-8 is a kerosene grade with a flashpoint of 100 _F (approximately 40 _C). The flashpoint (by closed cup method at sea level) of AVGAS is –50 _F (–46 _C).3 FUEL TANKS 2. 2.7 AVGAS Flashpoint. . Fuel tanks are installed in a variety of places between aircraft structural framework or as a built-in part of the wing.12 Severity After Ignition.3. (See NAVAIR 00-80R-14-1 for exact location on a particular aircraft. JP-8.5-percent mixture of JP-4. it may melt producing flammable liquids. ORIGINAL 2-2 Oxygen systems on aircraft can present hazardous conditions to firefighters during an emergency. 2. JP-4 jet fuel is a blend of gasoline and kerosene and has a flashpoint from –10 _F (–23 _C).3 Fuel Tank Fire with Explosive Suppressant Foam (ESF) Installed.2. Fuel loads can vary from 30 gallons in small aircraft to approximately 50. though in itself it is nonflammable. Fuel tanks are often carried under the floor area in the fuselage of helicopters.2. Although there are differences in the properties of the different fuels now in use. 2. or commercial equivalents in JP-5 greatly reduce the flashpoint below 140 _F.2.1 Tank Location. 2.000 gallons in large jet aircraft. it vigorously supports combustion.2. these tanks generally rupture and fire results. 2.5-percent mixture of JP-4 in JP-5 will reduce the flashpoint by 40 _F (5 _C).2 Fuel Tank Fire Tests. 2. Aircraft that have refueled in flight or ashore from Air Force.3.2. JP-5 fuel is a kerosene grade with a flashpoint of 140 _F (60 _C).9 JP-5 Flashpoint. civilian.11 Fuel-Air Mixtures. The rate of flame spread has also been calculated to be between 700 to 800 feet per minute. The rate of flame spread has been calculated to be between 700 and 800 feet per minute. The rate of flame spread has been calculated to be in the order of 100 feet per minute.2. or Army facilities may contain unsafe fuel mixtures. The tanks did melt or rupture releasing fuel onto the decks. Liquid oxygen is a light blue liquid that flows like water and is extremely cold. It boils into gaseous oxygen at –297 _F (–183 _C) and has an expansion rate of approximately 860 to 1. These studies show that there were no deflagrations.10 JP-8 Flashpoint. Many naval aircraft are provided with external auxiliary fuel tanks located under the wings and fuselages. 2. The lowest flashpoint considered safe for use aboard naval vessels is 140 _F (60 _C). when exposed to an enveloping fuel fire. There is so little difference in the heat of combustion between the various aircraft hydrocarbon fuels that the severity after ignition would be of no significance from the fire safety point of view.8 JP-4 Flashpoint.3. all of the fuels are easily and readily ignitable. Note As little as a 2.) Upon severe impact.

1 Materials in Combination with Liquid Oxygen. This volume shall become a part of the ready reference library of crash and rescue crews ashore and afloat. and dense smoke. This volume provides a single-source reference for cookoff characteristics and summarizes the current available data for in-service naval air-launched weapons. JATO stands for “jet-assisted takeoff. publishes Insensitive Munitions Characteristics of Air-Launched In-Service Weapons.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 2. When aircraft fuel cells equipped with ESF burn they produce potentially toxic gases. they produce toxic gases.5.3 Class A Combustibles.5. and nitrous oxides. Summary cookoff times for these ordnance items are contained in Figures 2-1 through 2-4. Class A combustibles in aircraft fires are best extinguished with AFFF. carbon monoxide. Liquid oxygen forms combustible and explosive mixtures when it comes in contact with flammable or combustible materials such as wood. 2. Blanketing and smothering agents are ineffective. Procedures for fighting fires involving liquid oxygen include cutting off the flow of oxygen or fuel. The fire duration and the type/location of the weapons will determine the reaction severity that may occur. explosive type. or downwind of burning ESF be equipped with a self-contained breathing apparatus. 2. hydrogen chloride. No attempt should be made to extinguish the rocket engine should it ignite.2 Anti-Icing Fluids. typical fast cookoff results. extreme care should be used in approaching the area.5 GENERAL HAZARDS AND PRECAUTIONS 2.1 Rocket Engines (JATO). These gases include carbon dioxide. Summarized are weapons descriptions. intense heat. reaction. 2. (See Chapter 3 for full explanation of uses and efficiency of AFFF. or kerosene. Note If water is not readily available. 2. and apply water until the leak is sealed. The water is rapidly converted to ice by super-cold oxygen and the ice buildup forms a seal stopping the oxygen flow. cloth. These engines burn very intensely for a short time.5. paper. isolate the aircraft if possible. and hydrogen cyanide. If flammables or combustibles are present. and no fire is present.3. 2.5. It is therefore necessary that firefighting and rescue personnel in the immediate vicinity. ORIGINAL . it should be remembered that the alcohol used in aircraft anti-icing systems burns with an almost invisible flame. China Lake.4 Ordnance. The oxygen compartment should be opened and natural venting allowed to occur until the oxygen container contents are depleted to a point of safe removal. use large amounts of water at the seat of the fire.1 Explosive Suppressant Foam. cyanides. These gases include carbon monoxide. An effective method of stopping an oxygen leak (when the oxygen is not already mixed with flammable or combustible materials) is to spray the leak with water fog. continue through to the source of the lox leak. Burning produces toxic gases. NAWCWPNDIV. While not as great as other aircraft hazards. cookoff time.” If this type of rocket engine should be surrounded by fire. 2-3 All air-launch weapons exposed to a fire can cook off either during or after the fire is extinguished. and cookoff test data. It is therefore necessary that firefighting and rescue personnel who enter an aircraft during a fire sequence be equipped with a self-contained breathing apparatus.5.4.) When aircraft cockpit and interior finish materials are burned or charred. hazards. Anti-icing fluids are usually a mixture of about 85-percent alcohol and 15-percent glycerin. The best method of control is by dilution with water. Naval aircraft carry a wide variety of ordnance in support of their assigned missions. oil.

Bomb Cookoff Time Summary ORIGINAL 2-4 .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 2-1.

. deta hydrazine Oxidizers: nitric acid . 2. D Burning ordnance. . . . Fuels: hydrazine. 2. 4. . application arming and/or detonation may occur. Fuels: analine. . D In the event of an aircraft fire. . . in or out of a fire. whereas it is used ashore in lieu of thermally protected ordnance. D Extreme caution should be exercised if air-ground cluster bombs are involved in mishap. Hypergolic fuels will ignite on contact with certain chemical oxidizers and do not require a source of ignition. Personnel safety and fire exposure time of weapons must be considered when expediting postfire evolutions to satisfy operational commitments. . If rotated by agent. . . furfuryl alcohol Oxidizers nitrogen tetroxide ORIGINAL Mixture No. Fuels: hydrazine.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 D Reaction violences shown in Figures 2-1 through 2-5 indicate the range of reactions seen in actual tests. hydrazine. . Nonthermally protected ordnance will not normally be used aboard combatants. . . . . Mixture No. Examples of hypergolic combinations used in missile and rocket propulsion systems are: Mixture No. D Postfire weapons cooling time of 15 minutes only provides an interim time element for weapons cooling and is considered the minimum acceptable cooling time for all weapons. . these devices may be submerged in AFFF. . . 3. anticipate the most violent indicated reaction. . . . . . Water hoselines should not be used for ordnance cooling until after the fire is extinguished. Postfire ordnance cooling (AFFF or water) shall continue for a minimum of 15 minutes to allow the weapon cases to return to safe ambient temperatures. hydrogen Oxidizers: fluorine or chlorine trifluoride . The ordnance handling officer shall keep the crash and salvage officer/crash chief continually updated as to type/quantity of ordnance being used. During firefighting. . . . scattering submunitions over a wide area. . . the ordnance handling officer/air gunner shall confirm the type. . . thereby hampering identification. hydrazine. fore and/or aft. Minimum fast cookoff times for nonthermally protected items can be expected. . . . . . analine.5. . stepped on. .5 Hypergolic Mixtures. . . . Many general purpose bombs may be equipped with rotary vane fuses. . . . Hypergolic mixtures are used as propellants for rockets and missiles. . . . These submunitions will likely arm and/or detonate if moved. . . . . . The use of water hoselines for ordnance cooling may delay extinguishment because of the tendency of water to dilute or wash away the AFFF blanket. . . Fuels: ammonia. and location of all weapons on the aircraft involved and immediately provide this information to the scene leader. 2-5 D Ordnance cooling should be accomplished using a dispersed agent pattern at low velocity. Mixture No. unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine Oxidizers: hydrogen peroxide . may transition to detonation at any time. Canisters will likely fail on impact. . . 1. or run over by vehicles approaching the scene. . furfuryl alcohol. . Because of their size. . quantity. The scene leader shall ensure that AFFF is continuously applied to all weapons exposed to fire. .

Air-Launched Missile Cookoff Time Summary (Sheet 1 of 2) ORIGINAL 2-6 .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 2-2.

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 2-2. Air-Launched Missile Cookoff Time Summary (Sheet 2) 2-7 ORIGINAL .

5. spilled hydrazine should be diluted with equal amounts of water spray to render nonflammable. Hydrazine fuel (H-70) is a blend of 70-percent hydrazine and 30-percent water and is used to power the EPU on F-16 series aircraft. As a minimum. oily. 2. Exhaust gases exiting from the EPU turbine are approximately 1600 _F (871 _C) and basically consist of 40-percent ammonia. In accidents involving these materials. . and 28-percent water. ORIGINAL 2-8 Aircraft crash or emergency landing may result in hydrazine spill or vapor release. Hydrazine is a clear. flame. waterlike liquid with an odor similar to that of ammonia. or oxidizing agents.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 2-3. The flashpoint is 126 _F (52 _C). personnel shall use full respiratory protection and protective clothing. Personnel who may be exposed shall wear positive-pressure. The health hazards include chemical burns. 17-percent nitrogen. Rocket Cookoff Time Summary 2. As opposed to liquid form. hydrazine vapors are much more sensitive to electrical sparks. and frostbite. flame. EPU operation results in noise similar to the rapid firing of a rifle. poisoning.1 Hydrazine 1. Fires involving these materials can best be handled by diluting the fuel and oxidizer with large quantities of water.5. 15-percent hydrogen. self-contained breathing apparatus and protective garments. embers. Hydrazine will readily ignite when exposed to heat. etc.

M61A1 Aircraft Gun/MK 4 Gun Pod Time Summary 2-9 ORIGINAL .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 2-4.

Torpedo and Mine Cookoff Time Summary ORIGINAL 2-10 .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 2-5.

it ignites a fuze on the Mk 45 flare. The LUU-2 flare timer functions mechanically and falls off the flare. H-70 Fuel Spill Management and Neutralization. applying low-velocity fog. Irreversible health effects occur at 80 parts per million for 30 minutes. D Hydrazine is toxic and if vapors are inhaled.O. they must be considered fully armed. an alternate method is to have a fully outfitted hotsuitman cut the shroud lines. 42B1-1-18. CAUTION D If EPU is operating in the hydrazine mode.5. positive-pressure self-contained breathing apparatus shall be worn by personnel in the immediate vicinity of the aircraft. If ignited. If it is not possible to keep the main chute from opening. Ingestion or absorption of hydrazine through the skin can produce nausea. Specific hydrazine cleanup and firefighting instructions are contained in USAF Technical Orders T. The SUU-44/SUU-25 flare dispensers carry eight Mk 45/LUU-2 paraflares. D Contact of H-70 with body tissues can produce local damage resembling alkali burn. if possible. remove personnel to fresh air area at least 100 feet upwind of the aircraft. the Mk 45 or LUU-2 candle should be extinguished by inserting a water applicator tip into the burning end of the candle. The LUU-2 flare utilizes a simple mechanical timer instead of an explosive fuze. nose. and jettison it over the side or remove it to a clear area if ashore. flood with water for 15 minutes at a minimum and seek medical care. a wind force of 35 knots may cause the drogue chute to remove the deployment bag from the main parachute and open the main parachute. When the flares are ejected from the dispenser and the tray separates. The parachute will drag the unrestrained candle tube without causing ignition. General Procedures Handling of H-70. not the candle. 3. Hold the parachute. be kept from opening and all shroud lines should be cut. Such high concentrations are only attainable in enclosed areas such as a hangar and cannot be achieved in open air. and convulsions. The timer is not explosively ejected. pick up the flare by the cold end. 4. ORIGINAL . which will fire within 5 to 30 seconds. The flare will normally extinguish in less than 30 seconds.O. Medical examinations of personnel exposed to H-70 should be accomplished as soon as possible. Hydrazine-Water and T. D If liquid hydrazine is splashed in the eyes or on the skin. dizziness. Immediately remove contaminated clothing. 2. 20 parts per million for 30 minutes. If a fog applicator is not readily available. no effort should be made to hold the candle tube against the pull of the parachute because a 50-pound pull on the shroud lines may actuate the candle igniter. headaches. Emergency limits for exposure to hydrazine vapors are in concentrations of 30 parts per million for 10 minutes. and 10 parts per million for 60 minutes. If odor of ammonia is present. D If a flare is accidentally ejected on the ground or deck. irritation of the respiratory tract will occur.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 IF-16C-2-49GS-00-1.6 Flare Dispensers. 2-11 D When the fuze is ignited. The EPU exhaust gases may cause irritation of the eyes. The parachute must. Personnel shall remain clear of the longitudinal axis (trajectory path) of the casing. Once the tray separates from the flare. and throat. the Mk 45 flare casing is explosively separated and can travel up to 150 feet.

electrolyte (that is released during venting or rupture). 2. CO2 shall not be directed into a battery compartment to effect cooling or displace explosive gases. 2-12 Prior to removing the quick disconnect from the battery. Lithium battery fires are handled differently from burning lithium since little lithium metal is exposed. which could initiate a fire or explosion if battery gases are present. 1. etc. If damaged or abused. They shall be attired in full protective clothing with extinguishing agent available for instant use. a violent reaction may occur.5. 2. communication equipments. Static electricity generated by the discharge of the extinguisher could explode hydrogen/oxygen gases trapped in the battery compartment. Otherwise. Remove the quick disconnect from the battery and. use available extinguishing agent.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Paraflares burn with an intense light. jettison/remove all devices to natural ventilation. execute smoke and fume eliminating procedures and launch/remove the venting device. and fire. The overheated battery presents a hazardous condition to both aircraft and personnel. but smoke. When an overheated battery is detected. missiles. hydrochloric acid. mines. Use water fog to lower the battery temperature. or electrolyte is being emitted from the battery or vent. ensure the battery switch in the cockpit is in the off position. ARFF personnel shall work in teams of two. and take the action indicated. other battery parts. lithium dithionite. Alkaline or nickelcadmium batteries may experience an overheated condition resulting from internal shorting or thermal runaway. When approaching a battery that is in a thermal runaway condition. D Lithium batteries can result in the release of toxic gases. These fires are caused by the burning of such materials as the plastic components. or chemicals produced as a result of electrochemical reactions. ORIGINAL . Lithium batteries are used in many military systems such as sonobuoys.7 Overheated Batteries. Failure to conduct this procedure may result in an electrical arc. in addition to lithium. Note Positive-pressure self-contained breathing apparatus and eye protection should be worn. If flame is present. Gases released during an intentional or unintentional venting are noxious and can be lethal. or CO2. move the battery clear of the aircraft. if possible.5. particulate matter. If pungent odors are detected. ensure the battery switch in the cockpit is in the OFF position. the crash crew should open the battery compartment. If no flame or fire. the gases released could include hydrogen sulfide. 2. Personnel shall wear protective eye covering. these batteries can rupture or vent. If unable to determine which device is venting.8 Lithium Batteries. Halon 1211. and hydrogen. Case rupture or vent may include evolution of large amounts of gas. D Halon fire extinguishers shall not be used to extinguish burning lithium-powered equipment fires. sulfurous acid. thionyl chloride vapors. check for the following conditions. Depending on the lithium battery chemistry involved. Halon 1211 or CO2 is an acceptable fire extinguishing agent once a fire has developed. fumes. sulfur dioxide.

flames may be swept off the surface and extinguished with carbon dioxide fire extinguishers. Other Class D extinguishers may be ineffective on lithium battery fires. SCBAs shall be employed for operations involving a potential fuel vapor inhalation hazard. Note The smoke from burning Otto fuel must be considered as hazardous and toxic as Otto fuel fumes. they shall be flushed immediately with large quantities of water for at least 15 minutes and prompt medical attention obtained. blood pressure changes. freeflowing. Most weapons contain a conventional type of explosive that may detonate ORIGINAL . including nasal turgidity. The nitrate esters in the Otto fuel are known for their acute effects.6 NUCLEAR WEAPONS Personnel shall not be exposed to Otto Fuel II vapor concentrations. depending on impact. Appendix A. Seek prompt medical attention.0 ppm. although nausea may develop after prolonged exposure. It is insoluble in water. All warnings and procedures apply. Solvents shall not be used to cleanse Otto Fuel II from the skin since they speed absorption into the skin and accelerate and magnify the effects of the exposure. Otto II Fuel Safety. A headache lasting for several hours after exposure is the chief symptom of vapor inhalation. All items shall be discarded or thoroughly cleaned using detergent and warm water prior to storing and reuse. Exercise care when removing and handling contaminated clothing and equipment so that personnel will not be exposed to the fuel. The most efficient method of extinguishing an Otto Fuel II fire is to cool the propellant below 250 _F. 2. Both the MK 46 torpedo and the MK 60 Captor Mine contain Otto Fuel II. It is a bright red. For very small Otto fuel fires. If eyes are splashed.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Note A “LITH-X” Model D fire extinguisher should be used on lithium battery fires. oily liquid that is heavier than water. Detailed safety and handling instructions for the Otto fuel are contained in NAVSEA S6340-AA-MMA-010. Skin absorption of Otto fuel may also cause headaches. If Otto Fuel is ingested. For information on protective clothes and cleanup procedures of Otto fuel. Storage and Handling Instructions. the affected personnel shall immediately be removed from the contaminated area and receive medical attention as soon as possible. This is best accomplished by the use of a finely dispersed water fog (neat or AFFF). In the event of overexposure to Otto Fuel II. 2. 2-13 Nuclear weapons resemble conventional weapons in that they are enclosed in a shell or casing. Otto fuel concentrations of less than 1. and dyspnea (difficult breathing).9 Otto Fuel. The weapon or warhead casings are of varying thicknesses and may break up. Because Otto fuel is a monopropellant and contains its own oxidizer. Contaminated clothing shall be removed immediately and contaminated skin areas washed with soap and warm water. Otto Fuel II is composed of a nitrate ester in a solution with a desensitizing agent and a stabilizer. but greater than 0. do not induce vomiting.4 ppm produce a complete nasal blockage in some individuals.5. headaches. combustion cannot be smothered. Water and AFFF are both less dense than Otto Fuel II and will form a layer on the surface of the monopropellant and absorb the heat given off by the fire. Otto Fuel II is a stable liquid mono-propellant used in the propulsion of the MK 46 Torpedo. refer to NAVSEA OP 4522.

2 Composite Materials Reinforced with Boron/Tungsten Fibers. Boron fibers pose less of a problem to unprotected electrical equipment than carbon/graphite fibers because boron fibers are much heavier and thus are less likely to become airborne and also because boron fibers are much less electrically conductive. If the casing ruptures. boron fibers can be released if their epoxy binder burns. should be observed in the event of an aircraft crash/fire incident involving any of the aircraft containing carbon fiber composites. as contained in paragraph 6.7. The MK-50 torpedo’s internal propulsion system is fueled by 16 pounds of lithium. aircraft crash and firefighting units must endeavor to extinguish fires involving carbon fiber reinforced composites as quickly as possible and provide maximum containment of the aircraft debris. The amount of high explosive involved in a detonation may vary from a small amount to several hundred pounds and constitutes a major hazard. Accordingly. General Firefighting Guidance.1 Lithium. containment. 2. However. the exposed pieces of HE can ignite and burn. this material is being used in advanced aircraft to replace heavier metal components. Even when the boiler is activated in the propulsion mode.ness. carbon/ graphite fibers can be released into the atmosphere if their epoxy binder burns. Any aircraft incident involving fire on these types of aircraft must be considered to have potential contamination hazards until positively identified to the contrary. Composite materials that are reinforced with carbon/graphite fibers provide superior stiffness. 2. and ease of fabrication. (See NAVAIR 00-80R-14-1 for aircraft containing composite material. The MK-50 can be launched from ships (FFG-7. especially an explosion.8. Once free.) Unfortunately. containment. all lithium combustion remains within the boiler enclosure. Similarly. lithium remains in a solid state contained in a stainless steel boiler inside the torpedo. Under normal circumstances.7. high strength-to-weight ratio. loose boron fibers are stiff and sharp and thus pose handling problems. Lithium is a highly reactive combustible metal (Class D fire). Until such time as more is known. 2. The firefighting techniques and precautions for combating fires involving nuclear weapons are found in Technical Manual. Approximately 752 _F (400 _C) will cause epoxy binder to ignite or decompose.1 Composite Materials Reinforced with Carbon/Graphite Fibers.8 SPECIAL HAZARDS 2. DD-963) and aircraft (helicopters. SWOP 20-11. As a result. The lithium will present a firefighting problem only if the boiler is breached because of physical damage to the torpedo. Composite materials that are reinforced with boron fibers provide superior stiff. The containment and cleanup function is extremely important and must be treated as a special hazard prevention measure. and thus is a potential hazard at shore airfields and as a fly-on hazard for most air-capable/aviation ships. these small lightweight fibers can be transported up to several miles by air currents and. this material is being used in ORIGINAL 2-14 Inhalation of composite fibers resulting from aircraft fires and/or aircraft material damage may be harmful to personnel.7 COMPOSITE MATERIALS advance aircraft to replace heavier metal components. and cleanup practices for boron fibers are the same as those outlined for carbon/graphite fibers in paragraph 6. the practices for extinguishment. and ease of fabrication.7. can fragment the fibers and cause them to become airborne. Radiological hazards may exist. Respiratory protection should be worn when exposed to these potential hazards. The extinguishment. can damage unprotected electrical/electronic equipment. (See NAVAIR 00-80R-14-1 for aircraft containing composite material.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 upon impact or when subjected to fire. may be present at the site of nuclear weapons mishaps. S3 fixed-wing). As a result. Rupture of the boiler could result in the release of molten lithium because of . Lithium. mechanical agitation. because of their high electrical conductivity. and cleanup. the propulsion agent for the conventional warhead MK-50 torpedo.) Unfortunately. regardless of the particular type of nuclear weapon. high strength-to-weight ratio. 2. Note The nature of shipboard aircraft mishaps and the nonavailability of such protection may prevent all shipboard firefighting personnel from complying with the above warning.7.

A 3/8-inch aluminum plate burns through in less than 3-1/2 minutes. . structural ensembles. Polyethylene packaging material (bubble packs and so forth) present a hazard in that they cannot be extinguished by water only. is not hazardous to firefighters at an upwind standoff distance of 50 feet (the normal standoff distance for flight deck fires involving potential ordnance reactions). Burning lithium in direct contact with an aluminum deck can melt through the deck.2 Polyethylene Packaging Material. If confined. PKP. rapid cooling is essential. flame height is very low (similar to burning lava or charcoal briquettes). such as in a closed magazine. if any. Burning chunks of lithium on the deck may be scooped up with a shovel once the warhead is no longer exposed. This hydrogen ignition may produce a pressure wave of burning lithium that can be scattered a distance of approximately 50 feet. Avoid looking directly at the lithium. AFFF must be used on these materials to preclude a continued reflash. cooling with water or AFFF must be initiated as soon as possible to protect against potential warhead cookoff or other adverse reactions. 2. or CO2 is not effective against burning lithium and will result in a flare-up or explosion. and breathing gear should be worn when attacking a lithium fire and during investigation/ cleanup operations. PKP. Burning lithium on a steel deck may cause warping or cracking of the deck. Molten lithium will cause chemical burns to the skin. hence. apply water to the underside of the deck immediately beneath the lithium. D Proper protective clothing (proximity suits. Flight deck firefighting tests involving the MK-50 and AFFF applied from hoselines and flush deck nozzles have shown that in open air the hydrogen combustion reaction.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 activation of the internal start charge or heat from an exposure fire. The white light emitted by burning lithium can cause eye burns. it is likely that the same torpedo’s warhead or adjacent warheads may be threatened by burning lithium. Do not breathe or expose yourself to the particulate cloud. To forestall damage to the deck. A straight stream of water may also be successful in washing burning lithium overboard or to a safer area for shore installations. If a torpedo’s boiler is breached. 2-15 ORIGINAL D Burning lithium emits a toxic and caustic particulate cloud. hydrogen can ignite with explosive force capable of rupturing doors and bulkheads. flash hoods.8. A fire watch should be placed in the area immediately below the burning lithium. cookoff of exposed warheads. D Application of Halon. Breathing of the particulate may cause damage to the respiratory system. or CO2 to burning lithium should be avoided. Additionally. burning lithium reacts with water (or AFFF) to produce hydrogen gas. Exposure to the particulate cloud may cause burning and damage to the eyes. in the worst case. Burning lithium cannot be extinguished using conventional firefighting agents. Direct application of Halon. burning will result on the surface of the lithium mass. When molten lithium is exposed to the air. or standard Navy shipboard firefighting ensembles) with gloves. The primary concern in any MK-50 fire scenario is spread to adjacent pieces of ordnance and. D The application of water or AFFF on a lithium fire results in a decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen. Liberated hydrogen may violently ignite if confined and allowed to reach its lower explosive limit. Sympathetic chain ignition of multiple pieces of ordnance/torpedoes and eventual mass detonation of warheads could destroy the ship. Though considerable heat and light are released when lithium burns. If possible. attempt to jettison burning lithium (and preferably the torpedo) over the side. In spite of the potential for hydrogen generation.

Personnel handling residues of Viton that have been involved in fire shall wear neoprene gloves to avoid skin contact with these possibly highly corrosive residues that likely include hydrogen fluoride.3 Nonradiological Metals/Compounds. 4. Beta radiation sources may also cause burns to unprotected skin/eyes after prolonged exposure. This rubber-like compound is applied to the aircraft engine exterior and various other areas throughout the aircraft. it poses no significant threat to firefighting or salvage personnel. In small quantities. AM-241 emits potentially hazardous amounts of Alpha and Gamma radiation.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 2. aircraft such as the F/A-18 and F-14D do contain substantial amounts of Viton. thus exposing firefighting personnel ORIGINAL . carbon monoxide. In all cases. AM-241 is a product of plutonium and has many of the same associated hazards. Personnel fighting such a fire should wear a positivepressure self-contained breathing apparatus. Alpha emittance is approximately 5 MeV. Inhalation of Alpha and/or Beta particles is considered the most significant radiological hazard associated with a mishap involving radioactive material. self-contained breathing apparatus and standard firefighting clothing will protect personnel against levels of radiation expected at a mishap site. including hydrogen fluoride. short of catastrophic destruction of the unit. However. 2. The pod is 13″ 72″ and weighs approximately 358 pounds. 2-16 2.9. Those sources do not represent a significant hazard to personnel during normal operations. Gamma emittance is approximately 60 KeV. can be generated in a fire involving Viton.3 Fluoroelastomer (Viton). as protective clothing and instrumentation may be needed for its detection. but in an aircraft mishap or fire this material may mist. and requiring protective measures be taken during firefighting. and shipping it to the licensed repair facility for repair or disposal.2 AMERICIUM 241.9. The FLIR pod is a self-contained system designed to mount on the fuselage over weapons station No. Radioactive sources may be present on or within an aircraft. carbonyl fluoride. and low-molecular-weight fluorocarbon fragments. 2. Entire engine sections shall be processed in accordance with current directives. Cleanup procedures for small pieces of Viton shall include wrapping and packaging for transportation to an authorized hazardous material disposal site. AM-241 is found in the laser optical module of the laser transceiver carried in the forward-looking infrared (FLIR) pod on the F/A-18A/B/C/D aircraft. The following materials are often associated with nuclear weapon mishaps and may present the following health hazards. The possibility of free AM-241 escaping its container is remote. 2. CAUTION Do not attempt to wash away pieces of Viton with water or AFFF as it could increase danger of corrosive residues. Highly toxic products of combustion. Refer to SWOP 20-11 (Special Weapons Ordnance Publication) for mishaps involving nuclear weapons. Fluoroelastomer (Viton) is a vulcanizing compound that may be found in small quantities throughout the aircraft.8. salvage or cleanup operations.9 PERSONNEL HAZARDS/PROTECTION Procedures and safety precautions for handling and disposal of the optical module include wearing gloves and a properly fitted protective mask while double sealing it in plastic bags. Note Viton is halogen based and will selfextinguish if ignition source is removed.1 Radiological. Anyone exposed to fumes from the fire should be moved to fresh air at once and checked by a physician. Recovery of the AM-241 should be left to the accident investigation board.9.

all plastics present varying degrees of toxic hazards because of the gases. Positive-pressure self-contained breathing apparatus is required whenever beryllium fumes or smoke are present. S9086-S3-STM-010. Lead — Pure lead and most of its compounds are toxic. and/or minute particles produced. Inhalation of lead compounds presents a very serious hazard.10 REFERENCE The Naval Ships’ Technical Manual. gray-white nonradioactive. Chapter 555. hazards. Aerospace Emergency Rescue and Mishap Response Information (Emergency Services) readily available. Any fire involving plastics should be approached on the assumption that toxic fumes and particles are present. Lead enters the body through inhalation. Shore-based fire departments supporting ships and/or aircraft should maintain a copy in their libraries. ingestion. and portable equipment. 3. Skin absorption is usually negligible. including sketches and diagrams. fumes. 2.S. Detailed information. should be readily available to aircraft ARFF personnel as a companion document to this NATOPS manual. U. extinguishing agents and systems. This includes all fires involving nuclear weapons. Positivepressure SCBA and firefighter clothing are required to protect personnel from lead compounds. Beryllium — Beryllium is a light. Because beryllium oxidizes easily. 2. 00-105E-9. Navy shore-based fire departments shall have Air Force Technical Order. any fire or explosion involving beryllium will release toxic fumes and smoke. or skin absorption.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 1. Shipboard Firefighting. is provided on the topics of fire chemistry. 2-17/(2-18 blank) ORIGINAL . Plastics — When involved in a fire. hard and brittle metal that resembles magnesium and may be found on some aircraft.

.

Periodic reapplication of AFFF is essential to avoid reflash when working in and around crashed aircraft. degrading its ability to form a vapor seal. The unique extinguishing and securing action of AFFF on flammable liquid fires results from a combination of rapid foam blanketing and vapor sealing when applied properly. ORIGINAL . AFFF can be applied with either approved non-air-aspirating nozzles or air-aspirating foam nozzles. 3. AFFF fire extinguishing efficiency is not critically dependent on foam expansion as is the case with protein-type foam concentrates. Navy Agent Requirements.2 Application. The minimum reserve stock shall exclude the initial load of agent in the tank and agent necessary to satisfy firefighting training requirements.1. During fire extinguishment.3 Fire Extinguishing Requirements Agent Supply 3.1.3. and PKP for each manned apparatus. These concentrates must meet current military specification standards (MIL-F-24385). However. Optimum performance for a 3-percent concentrate is realized when proportioned at 3 parts concentrate to 97 parts water. the AFFF foam blanket rapidly yields a very thin layer of AFFF solution that also extinguishes the fire and forms a vapor seal. optimum performance is achieved when proportioned at 6 parts concentrate to 94 parts water. the variable stream fog nozzle type is preferred because of the rapid stream adjustability afforded the firefighter.1. Note Failure to follow manufacturer storage procedures may cause AFFF to break down and separate. Note Outlying fields using Halon 1211 as a primary agent shall maintain a minimum of two loads of Halon 1211 for each manned apparatus. AFFF is compatible with Halon 1211 and PKP dry chemical firefighting agents. AFFF concentrate is noncorrosive. For a 6-percent concentrate. 3-1 3. The OPNAVINST 4790. only fresh water should be used to reduce corrosion activity. Either fresh water or sea water may be used for proportioning systems. Additionally. one load of Halon 1211.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 CHAPTER 3 Firefighting Agents and Equipment 3. etc. For premixing. these nozzles produce a more fluid foam.1 Firefighting Efficiency.2 series outlines the mandatory procedures that must be followed whenever an aircraft is sprayed with AFFF solution. Current shipboard equipment requires 6-percent concentrate.S.1 AQUEOUS FILM FORMING FOAM AFFF liquid concentrates consist primarily of synthetic fluorocarbon surfactant materials that are noncorrosive and have an unlimited shelf life when stored in a protected area where the temperatures may range from 32 _ _to 120 _ _ F (0 C) F (48 C). Supply departments for air activities should maintain an equal amount of agent. 3. corrosive effects occur because of the corrosive properties of water (particularly saltwater) and the AFFF-induced low-surface tension of the mixture promoting seepage through small cracks. When mixed with water.1 U. Each crash and firefighting organization shall maintain in reserve stock a total of two agent tank loads of AFFF.1. Three-percent and sixpercent AFFF concentrate is approved for naval use. resulting in faster control and extinguishment. restricting further emission of flammable vapors.

Personnel involved in service and maintenance operations shall be trained in the operation of portable fire extinguishers. wheeled.3. Extreme caution shall be exercised to preclude disruption of an AFFF blanket with water. Water is also an effective agent for cooling ordnance or batteries and for extinguishing Class A fires incidental to an aircraft fire. with the degree of fire protection based on the hazard potential involved. Each activity is authorized an additional 10 percent of the total activity requirements shown in Figure 3-1 to meet transient aircraft requirements and to provide spares.3 Portable Extinguisher Training Requirements. and rescue vehicle assigned. The primary flight line extinguishers are 150-pound. 3. Reignition or spread of the fire can result. Halon shall be provided as shown in Figure 3-1. It is generally recognized that within certain limits that the higher the nozzle pressure. wheeled units. The engineering drawing necessary to procure the wand extensions and clamp assemblies can be obtained from NATEC (San Diego).3 AIRFIELD FIRE PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS Water is not generally considered to be a suitable agent for use in combating large aircraft fuel fires without the addition of either foam agents or surfactants. Each crash. The successful use of water may be attributed to: 1) correct methods of application. PKP extinguishers are acceptable. Many procedures for applying water in aircraft firefighting have been explored.1 Fire Protection. This is particularly true when the fire involved is in deep pools or pits. on-site personnel is the first line of defense in protecting naval assets when fire department/ARFF personnel is not on standby at the incident site. 3.2.2 U. PKP. The wand extension and clamp can both be found on drawing number 3487AS100. 2) the ability of a water stream to move the burning fuel to an area sufficiently remote from the aircraft.3. and rescue organization shall maintain a minimum ready stock of one vehicle/equipment load of AFFF. The minimum ready stock shall exclude the initial load of agent in the tank and agent necessary to satisfy firefighting training requirements.3. firefighting.S. The wand extension is shown in Figure 3-2 and is required by on-site personnel to reach fire extinguisher access panels on the V-22.1 Wand Extension for Primary Airfield Extinguishers.3. All personnel who are engaged in aircraftrelated operations will be trained annually by the fire department/ARFF in the operation of all extinguishers in service on the airfield. wheeled Halon 1211 fire extinguishers. aircraft crash fire and rescue organizations are required to procure and utilize wand extensions for the 150-pound. Fire protection is essential during aircraft service and maintenance operations. On-site personnel shall immediately notify the fire department/ARFF unit and use available fire extinguishers or other fire suppression systems until assistance arrives on the scene. and Halon 1211 (total tank capacity) for each designated aircraft crash. skid mounted twin agent units. the smaller the water particles become and the more effective the spray stream becomes. and any installed fire suppression system(s). ORIGINAL 3-2 .2 WATER 3. Marine Corps Requirements. At V-22 aircraft shore-based activities. to cool the aircraft fuselage and provide a heat shield for personnel.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 3.2 Primary Airfield Extinguishers. 3. In the event of a fire or fuel spill. 3. Halon 1211 fire extinguishers. firefighting. and 3) its ability. when properly applied.1. The most successful applications have been obtained by using fog and spray streams. 3. Supply departments for air activities should maintain an equal amount of agent.3.

KC-10. one major AIRCRAFT WITHOUT PASSENGERS crash fire vehicle as specified in paragraph 5. P-3. 707. D. F-4.2 shall be capable of responding to the scene in 3 minutes. C-1.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 TYPE OF OPERATION FIRE PROTECTION REQUIREMENT Note All references to Halon 1211 extinguishers are for the 150-pound wheeled unit. E. AH-1. S-3. F-5. FUELING OF AIRCRAFT WITH PASSENGERS One Halon 1211 Extinguisher. any substitute portable extinguishing unit should have the same extinguishing capability as the Halon unit replaced. SMALL OR MEDIUM TYPE AIRCRAFT C-12. a TAU or major crash fire vehicle as specified in paragraph 5. Figure 3-1. One Halon 1211 Extinguisher per 3 aircraft. Note Fire department/ARFF unit shall be alerted at least 15 minutes prior to commencement of fueling operating. 747. C-141. C-9. H-46. Two D any substitutions are required. For V-22 aircraft. UH-1. F/A-18. A-7. SH-2. C-130. H-3. C-131. T-38. Additionally. H-60 B. Current in-service 150-pound PKP extinguishers are acceptable until Halon units can be placed in service. LARGE TYPE AIRCRAFT One Halon 1211 Extinguisher per 2 aircraft. H-53. The number of passengers on board the aircraft shall be included in the notification. T-44. Airfield Fire Protection Requirements (Sheet 1 of 2) 3-3 ORIGINAL . F-14. Additionally. A-6. CONCURRENT FUELING AND SERVICING OF One Halon 1211 Extinguisher. The minimum tire protection shall be one 150-pound Halon 1211 wheeled unit per every two aircraft fueling points/stations. L-1011. one wand extension per Halon 1211 Fire Extinguisher shall also be provided. As a general rule. TA-4. H-57. AV-8. Note A twin agent unit (TAU) or major aircraft firefighting vehicle as specified in paragraph 5. HOT REFUELING — Transfer of fuel into aircraft tanks with one or more aircraft engines operating. 1-34. DC-10. C-2. KC-135.2 shall be positioned at the aircraft. FLIGHT LINE PARKING AREA A. E-2. V-22 Note D Halon 1211 extinguishers are required for each C-5 aircraft. the substituted unit should be approved by the fire If department or ARFF unit. A-3. C. T-39. The location and response criteria will be determined by the Fire Chief/ARFF Officer. C-20.2 shall be on standby alert during multiple aircraft hot refueling operations.

Note Fire department/ARFF unit shall be notified of daily ordnance loading/unloading schedule to include the amount and type of ordnance. Airfield Fire Protection Requirements (Sheet 2) Figure 3-2. Note Fire department/ARFF unit shall be notified at least 15 minutes prior to commencement of concurrent servicing operations. one major ARFF vehicle shall be positioned at the PATIENTS ON BOARD aircraft for optimum response. HIGH POWER AND NEW ENGINE TURN-UP Two Halon 1211 extinguishers located in immediate vicinity. Note Fire department/ARFF unit shall be notified at least 15 minutes prior to commencement of new engine turn-up. FIRE PROTECTION REQUIREMENT FUELING OR SERVICING OF MEDICAL EVAC. G.One 150-pound Halon wheeled extinguisher. One major ARFF vehicle shall be capable of responding to the site within 3 minutes. Figure 3-1. COMBAT AIRCRAFT ORDNANCE LOADING AREA One Halon 1211 Extinguisher per 2 aircraft. The number of passengers/patients on board the aircraft shall be included in the notification.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 TYPE OF OPERATION F. AdditionUATION FLIGHTS WITH PASSENGERS/ ally. Wand Extension for 150-pound Wheeled Halon 1211 Fire Extinguishers (V-22 only) ORIGINAL 3-4 . H. Turrets shall be manned and agent pumping equipment/systems ready for instant activation.

D Firefighters must use caution in fighting fuel fires and be prepared to back out well before the extinguisher contents are exhausted. 3. 2. The hydrostatic test date shall be recorded on metal or an equally durable material. or other impairments. and Hydrostatic Tests. and CO2 are all rapidly dissipated and no vapor sealing property is developed. Standard 10. Extinguisher shells or cylinders that fail hydrostatic tests shall be turned in for disposal. ORIGINAL . AGENTS.3 Hydrostatic Tests. maintenance. D Halon.3.4 Inspection. corrosion. Records of required extinguisher maintenance shall be kept for a minimum of 1 year. maintenance. D Portable and wheeled Halon. Fire extinguishers maintained by deployable Marine Corps squadrons are the organizational property of these activities.4. Inspections shall ensure that the extinguishers are in their designated locations. 3-5 1. 1. and the recharging of fire extinguishers used in support of the flight line and assigned areas. Maintenance. Maintenance shall be performed in accordance with NFPA Standard 10 and manufacturers’ recommendations. PKP. The fire chief/ARFF officer shall be responsible for ensuring that the required NFPA Standard 10 inspection(s). the siphon tube will not reach the agent and an unsatisfactory discharge will result. and hydrostatic test(s) are completed on all airfield extinguishers. While deployed. Extinguishers with defects shall be turned in for inspection and test in accordance with the procedures specified in NFPA Fire Codes. extinguishers shall be thoroughly examined at least once per year. 2.4. 3.4. training of squadron flight line personnel. confirm that they have not been actuated or tampered with. If at any time an extinguisher shows evidence of corrosion or mechanical damage. Discharge should be continued for a short time after the flames are extinguished to prevent possible reflash and to cool any ignition sources in or near the fire. it shall be subjected to a hydrostatic pressure test in accordance with the procedures set forth in NFPA Fire Codes. NAVFAC Form 11320/3 should be used for this purpose. Using a portable extinguisher at too close a range may scatter the fire and using it at a distance beyond the effective range will simply waste the extinguishing agent.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 3. Personnel turning in an extinguisher for recharge or maintenance shall be issued an equivalent replacement extinguisher. Compressed gas cylinders may have the hydrostatic test date stamped into the metal. the officer in charge of the aircraft firefighting and rescue unit shall assume all responsibilities for airfield fire protection. Standard 10.3. A suitable metallic or metalized decal that can be affixed by a heatless process to the shell of an extinguisher is also acceptable. While deployed. To ensure operability and safety. If the extinguisher is on its side or inverted. PKP. 3. the officer in charge of the aircraft firefighting and rescue unit shall assume all responsibilities for the placement.1 Inspection.3. 3. AND METHODS OF APPLICATION The best application technique varies with the type of extinguishing agent and associated hardware.3.2 Maintenance. and CO2 extinguishers must be discharged in an upright position. so the fuel is always subject to reignition. The agent must be applied correctly at the outset since there is seldom time to experiment. inspection. Nitrogen cylinders provided for inert-gas storage and utilized as an agent expellant shall be hydrostatically tested every 5 years. Extinguishers shall be inspected daily by the using activity in accordance with local fire department instructions. An extinguisher removed from its assigned location to be recharged shall be replaced by an equivalent spare extinguisher during the period of removal. and identify any obvious physical damage. Some fire extinguishers deliver their entire quantity of extinguishing agent within 10 seconds while others are designed to be operated for 30 seconds or longer.4 EXTINGUISHER TYPES. 3.

D use of portable CO2 extinguishers to The inert flammable atmospheres is prohibited. overshooting on both sides. depending on ambient conditions. 5-foot extensions are required.1 Definition.4.4. the liquid CO2 expanding through the nozzle and cone becomes solid (commonly called “snow”).1.1 Halon 1211 (Bromochlorodifluoromethane) Portable and Wheeled Unit Extinguishers 3. Tests indicate that voltages greater than 15 kilovolts can be developed on insulated metal objects from a 1. Initial application must start close to the fire. and asphyxiation) from the natural Halon 1211 product and from the products of decomposition that result through exposure of the agent to the fire. CO2 is a colorless. These extinguishers are intended primarily for use on Class B and C fires.4. a booster charge of nitrogen is added to ensure proper operation. however. These units have an effective discharge range of 10 to 30 feet.to 2-second application of CO2 from an extinguisher. 3.2. and continue to push the leading edge of the fire back until the fire is extinguished. Upon actuation.1. impaired coordination. D discharge of Halon 1211 to extinThe guish a fire may create a hazard to personnel (such as dizziness. Halon 1211 is virtually noncorrosive. It is stored in rechargeable containers designed to hold pressurized carbon dioxide in liquid form at atmospheric temperatures.4. Note Halon 1211 is most effective when reaching the base of the fire in its gaseous form. Halon 1211 extinguishes fires by inhibiting the chemical chain reaction of the combustion process. depending on the extinguisher size and application rate. Fire suppression is accomplished by the displacement of oxygen in the atmosphere to a level below the percent that is required to support combustion. the discharge should be directed at the base of the flames. In using extinguishers of this type in unventilated spaces or confined areas.1 Definition. and is at least twice as effective as CO2 on Class B fires when compared on a weight of agent basis. . electrically nonconductive gas that leaves no residue to clean up. When a portable CO2 extinguisher is discharged.2 Application. This “snow” contacting and separating from the extinguisher cone becomes electrically charged as does the extinguisher itself. ORIGINAL 3-6 D Exposure to CO2 in high concentrations for extended periods of time can be fatal. self-contained breathing apparatus. If the charged “snow” contacts an insulated metal object. faintly sweet smelling. and a discharge time of 15 to 40 seconds. D not use Halon 1211 on Class D fires. operators should use positive-pressure. Although the agent is retained under pressure in a liquid state and is self-expelling. This voltage is sufficient to cause a spark. 3. Halon 1211 extinguishers are marked with a reflective silver band around the tank. nonabrasive. Halon 1211 is effective on Class A fires. odorless gas that is approximately one and one-half times heavier than air. It Do has no blanketing effect and. On all fires. the vapor pressure causes the agent to expand so that the discharge stream consists of a mixture of liquid droplets and vapor. Halon 1211 is a colorless.2 Carbon Dioxide15-Pound Portable Units and 50-Pound Wheeled Extinguisher Units. the possibility of an explosive reaction exists. if it reaches a Class D fire in the liquid state. These units are intended primarily for use on Class B and C fires. On ships certified for helicopter landings. Sweep the agent stream back and forth across the leading edge of the fire. Exposure to the agent is of less concern than is the exposure to the products of decomposition. 3.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 3. it will cause the object to become charged. D inhalation of Halon 1211 can be The fatal.4.

4. These extinguishers are marked with a purple band around the tank. 3-7 3. Aluminized proximity fabrics have been adopted for use in the Navy mishap/rescue program. Agent application should commence at the upwind edge and be directed slowly in a side-to-side sweeping motion. and may cause disorientation. Firefighters’ station/work uniforms shall comply with DODI 6055.2 Application.2 Application.3 Purple-K-Powder Dry Chemical Powder Extinguishers 3. Fire departments/ARFF units should maintain a backup ready stock of protective clothing of approximately 30 percent of total unit requirements. depending on the extinguisher size and application rate.3. the fire chief. and proximity helmet or hood and boots. A complete set of protective clothing includes trousers. The principal base chemical used in the production of PKP dry chemical agent is potassium bicarbonate. but are known as proximity clothing to be worn with firefighter knee-length boots that have safety toes and soles. These extinguishers have a limited discharge range of 3 to 8 feet and a discharge time of 8 to 44 seconds. Discharge time varies from 8 to 60 seconds. its use will not result in permanent extinguishment if reignition sources are present.4. CAUTION D chemical agents will harden after Dry being exposed to moisture.4. coat. gradually moving toward the back of the fire while sweeping the nozzle rapidly from side to side. Note Only protective equipment and clothing that conforms to current NFPA standards shall be used. The ingredients used in PKP are nontoxic. on-site personnel using the extinguisher. and recharging evolutions. the discharge of large quantities may cause temporary breathing difficulty. handling. the stream should be directed at the base of the flame. the supporting facility. in the case of a transient aircraft. D When PKP is used as the fire suppression agent on an aircraft fire and the agent is directed or ingested into an engine or accessory section. ORIGINAL . Firefighters assigned ARFF duties shall be provided with a complete set of protective clothing that meets appropriate NFPA standards. and water repellency characteristics. consequently. It is therefore important to avoid exposing them to any moisture during stowage. 3.6. PKP injected into a jet engine cannot be completely removed without disassembly of the engine to remove deposits that penalize engine performance and restrict internal cooling air passages.1 Definition.3.2. flash hood (sock). aviator summer flight gloves. Metalized protective clothing offers a means of providing protection to firefighters because of its high percentage of reflectivity to radiant heat. or senior fire official shall notify the maintenance officer of the unit involved or. may seriously interfere with visibility. It is important to point out that these garments are not classified as entry suits. Various additives are mixed with the base material to improve its stowage. When used on flammable liquid fires. These extinguishers have a discharge range of approximately 10 to 40 feet.5 PROTECTIVE CLOTHING Aircraft firefighting/rescue protective clothing is a prime safety consideration for personnel engaged in firefighting and rescue work. gradually moving toward the back of the fire. Note ARFF personnel shall wear head protection while performing duties that require the individual to be on the exterior and above ground level on all aircraft firefighting and rescue vehicles. flow. however. Dry chemical agent does not produce a lasting inert atmosphere above the surface of flammable liquid.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 3. gloves. 3.4. These extinguishers are intended primarily for use on Class B fires. depending on extinguisher size.

For adequate protection. If folded.1 Care and Maintenance. rinse and pat dry. The heatreflective ability of aluminized clothing items is reduced when they are stained or otherwise soiled. 2. Rub gently to avoid removal of the aluminum. A completed copy of an SF 368 form and the defective material shall be forwarded to: Commanding Officer Navy Fleet Material Support Office Code 91423 Mechanicsburg. 90 percent of the heat protection is lost and the facepiece should be replaced immediately. replace worn goldcoated facepiece. Keep protective cover in place when carrying or storing the hood to minimize damage to goldcoated surface. scratched.5. the folds should be loose. it is not always possible to prevent agents from getting onto protective clothing. In particular. Avoid touching or wiping gold surface as much as possible. 3.2 Care of Facepiece. Corrosive chemicals will react with the aluminum surface and may etch the metal.120 shall be complied with should protective clothing fail in its intended purpose or have an unreasonably short service life. Clean the clothing with water and wipe dry.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Note NAVSUPINST 4440. and the aluminum surface dried with a clean cloth. 2. Dirt and soot should be sponged off with mild soap and water. 4. AFFF may be removed by sponging clean with mild soap and water. Clean and store in accordance with manufacturers’ specifications. Grease stains may be removed by the use of dry cleaning solvents (isopropanol or perchorenthylene react with the aluminum surface and may etch the metal). 6. Allow the garment to hang to dry in the open or in a place with good circulation.5. The facepiece is not a sun shield. Do not sit on a folded garment. or marred. 1. aluminized protective clothing that has been covered or spotted with agent will have less heat reflection than the suit normally provides. 4. CAUTION An old facepiece shall not be used as a cover to protect a new facepiece. During firefighting operations. 3. Pennsylvania 17055 This note applies only to protective clothing purchased through the supply system. Allow clothing to hang in ventilated location at room temperature. Clean the clothing with water and wipe dry. However. It is imperative that careful attention be given to the following care and maintenance instructions. This item should be kept in excellent condition to maintain the radiated heat-reflective efficiency. when the facepiece’s gold surface becomes worn. Storage should be on hangers with suitable hanging space to prevent metalized fabrics from creasing or cracking. Ensure the gold surface is on the outside as marked on the edge. Inspection criteria for garments shall be: replace/ repair when metal wears off or fabric cracks/tears. 5. 3. ORIGINAL 3-8 . Remove when using hood. In accordance with NFPA 1976 Standard on Protective Ensemble for Proximity Firefighting current edition and only by authorized repair facility approved by the original manufacturer. Clean facepiece without removing it from the hood using a clean soft cloth with mild soapy water. 1. Spraying worn clothing with aluminum serves no useful purpose and is a dangerous practice. Allow the garment to hang in a ventilated location at room temperature. The gold-coated facepiece is a reflective heat shield. 3.

air/mechanical brakes.500 gallons. The aircraft firefighting and rescue vehicles described herein are those presently in use for shipboard and shorebased use by both the Navy and Marine Corps.500/1.1. and in-cab controls for operating the firefighting system.3 P-4A (7180). variable-stream roof turret. Water/AFFF can also be applied from the 100-foot. Five hundred pounds of Halon 1211 are also available on another 100-foot.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 CHAPTER 4 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicles and Associated Equipment 4.2 Oshkosh T-Series Vehicles. 4. The discharge rate is 500 gpm. reel-mounted handline. The water tank capacity is 1. air-over-hydraulic power boost brakes. constant-flow. and in-cab controls for operating the vehicle firefighting systems.1 FIREFIGHTING AND RESCUE VEHICLES diesel-powered trucks with an automatic transmission. Detailed operating. the AFFF concentrate tank has a capacity of 180 gallons. The water storage tank has a capacity of 1. The roof turret is a non-aspirating type. A current listing of those technical manuals is found in Figure 4-1. The operator controls consist of power-assisted steering. power assist with manual override controls. the foam tank holds 156 gallons. transmission range selector.050 gallons. The bumper turret discharges at 250 gpm with a range (solid stream) in excess of 150 feet. a daily preoperational inspection shall be performed on all aircraft firefighting and rescue vehicles and associated equipment. 1-inch handline. Note To ensure optimum operational readiness in accordance with current technical manuals. It has a six-speed. 1-inch. The T-3000 (Figure 4-3). The P-4 is also provided with a 250-gpm bumper turret mounted in front of the cab and controlled hydraulically from within the cab. preset to either 3 percent or 6 percent. The bumper turret is joystick controlled and has a variable pattern. semiautomatic “power shift” transmission. The electrical system is 12-volt negative ground with automatic thermal reset breakers. The water and AFFF concentrate pumps (centrifugal) are powered by the vehicle engine by means of power dividers.1 CF 4000L (7160) Amertek. The following descriptions of the equipment are brief. T-1500 (Figure 4-4). The concentrate and water are carried to each of the discharge points in separate lines and are mixed in venturi inductors before discharge. The P-4 is provided with a 750-gpm manuallymaneuvered. and T-1000 are 4-1 ORIGINAL . 4. fourwheel-drive truck with a 5-speed automatic transmission. maintenance. The Amertek CF 4000L (Figure 4-2) is a diesel-powered.1. The water pump is single-stage centrifugal with an around-the-pump proportioning system.000/1. The operator controls consist of power-assisted steering. The roof turret has variable discharge rate and a variable pattern from straight stream to fully dispersed.000 gallons respectively. transmission range selector. The roof turret is non-aspirating. Two pre-connected hand lines are provided. and repair instructions are contained in technical manuals provided with the vehicles. The brake system is air/drum.1. The P-4A vehicle (Figure 4-5) is diesel powered with optional all-wheel drive. with a separate AFFF concentrate tank. The water storage tank has a capacity of 3. 4. variable pattern with a range (solid stream) in excess of 175 feet.

T. 36A12-12-14-1-1 Overhaul Instruction Navy Supplement. T. Illustrated Parts Breakdown P-15 Operation and Operator Maintenance.O. 36A12-12-14-3-1 Illustrated Parts Breakdown Navy Supplement. T. 36A12-8-16-1 (USAF) Maintenance/Overhaul Instructions.16-2 Organizational Maintenance Manual (USMC only). Publication TM4021 OSHKOSH SERIES** Oshkosh T-Series Operator’s Manual Oshkosh T-Series Service Manual Oshkosh T-Series Parts Catalog **Manuals will be available with delivery of Firefighting Vehicle P-25 Operation and Maintenance Instructions with Illustrated Parts Breakdown. Technical Manuals for Major Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting Vehicles ORIGINAL 4-2 . 36A12-12-14-4 Illustrated Parts Breakdown. T. T.) (USAF) T.O.16-3 P-19A TM 08674A-10/1.O. TM 08674A-20/2 Illustrated Parts Breakdown. NAVFAC P-8-262.O. T. 36A12-12-14-4 P-19 Operation and Operator Maintenance Instructions. P-4A Operating and Maintenance Instruction Navy Supplement. Maintenance and Overhaul Instructions SL-4-08674-24P/4. T.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 AMERTEC CF 4000L Contract No. T. NAVFAC P-8-262. 36A12-8-16-4 (USAF) Note **These manuals are stocked at Naval Publications and Forms Center. NAVFAC P-8-262.O. Operation and Operator Maintenance Instruction TM 08674A-20/2. 36A12-12-14-3 (Overhaul In.O.) (USAF) Overhaul Instruction.O. NAVAIR 19-600-290-6-1 NATEC Electronic Manual #0819LP0293420 Technical Manual Periodic Maintenance Requirements Manual Fire Fighting Vehicle. 36A12-12-14-4-1 Operating and Maintenance Instruction. Volume 1 of 1. NAVAIR 19-600-6-2 NATEC Electronic Manual #0819LP0293430 as indicated. Publication TM4021 Parts Catalog. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania 19120 Figure 4-1. 5801 Tabor Avenue.O.O. Volume 1 of 2.O. Navy Supplement. 36A12-12-14-1 (Operating and Maintenance Inst.O. 36A12-8-16-2 (USAF) Illustrated Parts Breakdown. N47408-89-C-2512 To be published T/A 3000 OSHKOSH Service manual. Organizational Maintenance TM 08674A-24/3. T.16-1 Maintenance and Overhaul Instruction. Navy Supplement. NAVAIR 19-25-514 NATEC Electronic Manual #0819LP0293380 Preoperational Checklist Fire Fighting Vehicle A/S32P-25. 36A12-14-1-1 (USAF) T.

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 4-2. CF 4000L Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicle 4-3 ORIGINAL .

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 4-3. T-3000 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicle ORIGINAL 4-4 .

T-1500 Oshkosh Truck 4-5 ORIGINAL .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 4-4.

P-4A Aircraft/Structural Firefighting and Rescue Vehicle ORIGINAL 4-6 .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 4-5.

The chassis design allows the vehicle to operate in all weather and on off-road terrain. reel-mounted handline. The insulation also provides protection from fire heat.000 gallons and the foam tank holds 130 gallons. six cylinders. CAUTION Tank replenishment for standby or longterm readiness shall be fresh water solution. The P-25 (Figure 4-7) is a self-propelled firefighting vehicle designed for shipboard flight deck use.5 A/S32P-25 Firefighting Vehicle. Dynamic vehicle braking is provided by a hydrostatic drive system when the accelerator pedal is released.200-gallon capacity and the foam tank holds 515 gallons. 4. The single roof turret has a discharge capacity of 500 gpm and the bumper turret discharges agent at 250 gpm. one forward and one rear mounted. The reel is provided with 150 feet of 1-1/4-inch diameter hose.850 pounds. diesel powered vehicle with overall dimensions of 64 x 70 x 190 inches and a gross vehicle weight of 18. or the hand-line. When both the roof turret (750 gpm) and the bumper turret (250 gpm) are operating. The handline has a 75. and the transmission connected to the rear engine powers the rear tandem axles. Water or a combination of water and foam can be used to put out a fire. 4. Each turret has a dual discharge rate of 600 or 1.6 P-19/P-19A (7160). These can be used alone or at the same time. reel-mounted handline. The vehicle’s engine is a turbocharged. 4. and Halon 1211 are carried in tanks built into the vehicle body. The Halon system uses its own handline.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 The handline is mounted in the front center of the vehicle in a compartment under the cab. The vehicle body is mounted on an 8-by-8 tall-wheel-drive chassis. bypassing the water tank. The vehicle body is insulated. the vehicle will deplete its self-contained water supply in 1-1/2 minutes. There are three 20-pound Halon 1211 fire extinguishers stored on the right side of the vehicle. The vehicle contains its own pressure pumps and firefighting equipment. The turrets are hydraulically operated with provisions for manual override. Agents are delivered through the cab-mounted roof turret. By means of controls at the output of each transfer case. The fire4-7 fighting system consists of two separate tanks within the vehicle’s chassis. Four 30-pound PKP dry chemical fire extinguishers are provided with each vehicle. 100 foot handline with a 95-gpm nozzle. Normally. the driver may operate the vehicle on both engines together or either engine separately. two-cycle. One nursing line connection on each side of the vehicle allows the ships mixed AFFF system to flow directly to the vehicle’s water pump. Five hundred pounds of Halon 1211 are also available on another 100-foot long. proportioning system and steering system. The P-19 (Figure 4-8) has a diesel-engine-powered. 237 BHP at 2. The vehicle provides discharge of foam/water agent through the twin turrets or by hose reel handline.1.1. An air motor provides for powered rewind.800 rpm. forced air induction diesel engine (Detroit Diesel Model 6V-53TA) with a displacement of 318 cubic inches. The vehicle and pumping system are powered by two eight-cylinder diesel engines. preventing heat loss from the vehicle interior during cold weather. the vehicle will be powered by both engines and both front and rear tandem axles will be engaged. The hydraulic system provides pressure to the drive system.4 P-15 (7195). The firefighting systems of the vehicle are self-sufficient.200 gpm. foam. The P-15 (Figure 4-6) is a twin-diesel-powered firefighting vehicle that has a limited off-road capability. Water. The firefighting delivery system consists of a turret with a maximum flow rate of 500 gpm and a 1-1/2 inch. ORIGINAL .to 100-gpm discharge capacity. The P-19 has a water capacity of 1. 1-inch diameter. The transmission connected to the front engine drive-line powers the front tandem axles. the bumper turret. The insulated water tank has a 6. AFFF can be applied by using a 100-foot. The handline discharge rate is 100 gpm. the water tank holds 750 gallons and the AFFF tank holds 60 gallons. The vehicle is a two-wheel drive. liquid cooled. 1-inch diameter (60 gpm). 4-by-4 all-wheel-drive chassis. firefighting system.1. A single diesel engine powers the vehicle drive train and water pump. No outside source for extinguishing agents is needed.

P-15 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicle ORIGINAL 4-8 .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 4-6.

A/S32P-25 Firefighting Vehicle 4-9 ORIGINAL .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 4-7.

The fire extinguishing agents are propelled by nitrogen supplied from one or two pressurized cylinders that are mounted on the framework. one containing an AFFF premixed solution and the other containing either PKP or Halon 1211. at hot refueling sites. Extinguishment is obtained by applying agents in a sweeping motion using the chemical agent (PKP or Halon) to gain initial extinguishment. The TAU series of fire extinguishers are dual agent apparatus designed primarily for extinguishing Class B fires and are normally employed aboard ship. is designed as a stationary firefighting apparatus for use at hot refueling sites.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 4-8. ORIGINAL 4-10 4.1 Shore-Based TAUs 1. The TAU is a self-contained unit consisting of a framework with two agent tanks.7. or as a vehicle-mounted TAU. 2. followed by application of AFFF to blanket the combustible liquid and preclude reignition. all-wheel-drive vehicle (equipment code 7102 or CUCV M1028FF Tam Control No. TAUs are available in the various configurations described below. The USMC twinned-agent firefighting system (Model No. The mobile TAU (Figure 4-9) is designed specifically to be mounted on the bed of a lightweight. 4. The TAU employs a noncollapsible dual hose line encased in a cotton jacket and normally mounted on a reel.1. D1082). The skid-mounted TAU-1. which contains 100 gallons of AFFF premixed solution and 200 pounds of chemical agent. P-19 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicle The P-19A is similar in appearance and capabilities and includes a manual mode of operation for the roof turret. and vendorsupplied auxiliary equipment.7 Twin Agent Unit. This firefighting system may be used in a mobile or stationary firefighting application.1. The standard agent capacity is 80 gallons of AFFF premixed solution and 100 pounds of chemical agent. 3. structural firefighting capabilities. 450 PKP/100 AFFF 03638MC) in use within the Fleet Marine Force is skid mounted and contains 100 gallons of AFFF premixed solution and 450 pounds of dry chemical extinguishing agent PKP. .

NAVAIR 00-80R-14

Figure 4-9. Shore-Based TAU 4.1.8 P-10 Rescue Vehicle. The P-10 (Figure 4-10) is a gasoline-engine-driven, four-wheel-drive, crew cab vehicle with a utility body designed to contain various items of firefighting and rescue equipment. It is equipped with emergency lighting mounted atop the cab, in the grille, and at the rear of the body. A speaker is mounted on the cab light bar. The speaker is connected to an electronic siren/public address control console mounted in the cab. Controls for all emergency warning equipment are located in the cab with easy accessibility by the driver. The vehicle is equipped with cab-operated, front adjustable spotlights, two rear floodlights, and two telescoping quartz floodlights. An 8,000-pound power winch is installed on the front of the vehicle. Firefighting and rescue equipment are stowed in the utility body. 4.1.9 Other Rescue Vehicles. The development and deployment of specialized rescue vehicles for site-specific emergency response are recognized. These vehicles allow for the assembly and deployment of rescue personnel with specialized equipment to an emergency site. In addition to the equipment specified in paragraph 4.2.2, the specialized equipment on the rescue vehicle compliments the equipment carried on each individual major firefighting vehicle. 4-11 4.2 EQUIPMENT

4.2.1 Air Bag Rescue and Lifting System. An air bag rescue and lifting system shall consist of bags sufficient in size and quantity to lift normally supported aircraft. This system shall be supplied with accompanying pressure regulators, hoses, valves, and air supply. The system is to be used for expeditious rescue of pinned victims, lifting heavy debris, and other various needs if entry at the immediate mishap scene is inaccessible to heavy equipment (cranes or mechanical lifting devices). Complete operating instructions shall be provided with and accompany each system. 4.2.2 Emergency Rescue Equipment. The rescue equipment listed below should be maintained within the crash, fire, and rescue organization: 1. “Jaws of life” or equivalent 2. Power cutting saw 3. Hydraulic port-a-power 4. Exhaust fans/smoke ejector 5. Air chisel ORIGINAL

NAVAIR 00-80R-14

Figure 4-10. P-10 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicle

ORIGINAL

4-12

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 6. Fire blankets 7. Portable generator system with floodlighting capacity 8. Chain saws 9. Down locks (for each type aircraft assigned) 10. Air bag rescue and lifting system 11. Ejection safety pins (aircraft normally supported) 12. Twenty-pound (or larger) Class “D” fire extinguisher. This equipment should be maintained by the crash, fire, and rescue organization and should be assigned to either major firefighting vehicles or support equipment as designated by the local commander. The following items of equipment should be placed on all major firefighting vehicles as well as other vehicles, as required: 1. Stretcher/backboard 2. Ladder, metal (10 to 24 feet) 3. Pike pole 4. Spanner wrench 5. Pick-head ax 6. Round-point shovel 7. Crash and rescue tool kit (Figure 4-11) 8. Hydrant wrench 9. Positive-pressure, apparatus 10. First-aid kit 11. Fifty feet of 2-1/2- to 3-inch fire hose 12. Twenty-pound Halon 1211 extinguisher 13. Eighteen- or 27-pound PKP extinguisher 14. Two 15-pound CO2 portable fire extinguishers 4-13 self-contained breathing 15. Cribbing 16. Twenty-pound (or larger) Class “D” fire extinguisher 17. Two portable flashlights 18. Haligan tool. 4.2.2.1 Rescue Tools for Remote Outlying Fields. The rescue equipment listed below should be maintained and carried on aircraft firefighting apparatus in use at remote outlying landing fields. 1. Emergency rescue equipment 2. Canvas tool roll 3. Cribbing 4. Portable fire extinguishers. 4.2.3 Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus. Positive-pressure self-contained breathing apparatus shall be available to all firefighters required at the immediate scene of an aircraft mishap (ashore). 4.2.3.1 Respiratory Protection Program. Each activity shall establish and maintain a respiratory protection program, per OPNAVINST 5100.19/ 5100.23 series. 4.2.4 Tires. Worn or defective tires on all major ARFF apparatus shall not be replaced with recaps or retreads. Replacement tires shall be of the appropriate type tread suitable for the local terrain and weather conditions. 4.2.5 Filter Breathing Masks. Provisions should be made to ensure a sufficient number of filter-type breathing masks is available as prescribed for composite materials that are likely to be encountered at the crash site. All personnel involved in mop-up, salvage, or standby operations at the crash site shall be required to wear this mask. 4.2.6 Fire Hoses. Fire hoses shall be inspected, maintained, and tested in accordance with NFPA 1962 or NAVSEA PMS as applicable. ORIGINAL

NAVAIR 00-80R-14

Figure 4-11. Typical Tools in Rescue Kit

ORIGINAL

4-14

This review shall include compliance with response time requirements contained in DODI 6055.1 Minimum Response Requirements Categories 1 Through 4.11 series.” Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting (ARFF) is the approved global name for all U. The two principal fire protection functions at aviation shore activities are aircraft rescue and firefighting protection and structural fire protection. The position title is “firefighter” in lieu of the titles “firefighter. the aircraft rescue and firefighting branch is under the operational and administrative control of the airfield operations officer. it is then under the operational control of the ARFF officer. The Navy Fire and Emergency Services Program Office shall review the established category at shore-based naval activities every 3 years. and rescue functions predicated on the aircraft gross weight assigned at an activity. The station fire chief and/or ARFF officer shall be responsible for the operational readiness. Civilian position descriptions will embrace all duties and responsibilities associated with aircraft and structural firefighting.6.S. The air operations officer or. Marine Corps structural fire departments are under the control of the station fire chief. in his absence.5 and P11000. minimum response shall be determined by the type/gross weight of the aircraft normally supported. When the structural fire department is in support of the aircraft rescue and firefighting branch. is part of the station facilities organization and under their administrative control. For those activities that do not have aircraft assigned. The aircraft rescue and firefighting branch and the structural fire department shall be crosstrained and mutually supporting. These services shall be organized and consolidated in accordance with OPNAVINST 11320. Activity commanding officers should plan for critical incident stress debriefing of emergency response personnel as required. The fire chief/ARFF officer or his designated representative shall have control and direct supervision of all firefighting and rescue operations at the immediate scene of an aircraft emergency and shall be so designated in writing. The combined fire functions will require that civilian and military personnel assigned to the fire protection organization be appropriately trained in both structural and aircraft fire and rescue procedures. the results of which shall be evaluated every 3 years by the Inspector General of the Marine Corps. a designated 5-1 ORIGINAL . 5. mutually supporting organizations. the structural fire department.1. At Marine Corps air stations. technical training. performance. In accordance with Marine Corps Order P5320.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 CHAPTER 5 Airfield Firefighting and Rescue Organization and Operations 5. structural” or “firefighter. airfield.1 FIRE PROTECTION ORGANIZATION assistant exercises overall control of the airfield other than at the immediate scene of an accident. Figure 5-1 contains the minimum response requirements necessary to adequately perform the aircraft crash. the aircraft rescue and firefighting protection and the structural fire protection are two separate. and management of their respective fire protection organizations. however. fire. Navy and MCAS fire protection functions at aviation shore activities. The Marine Corps activities shall be inspected at the discretion of the Commanding General.23 series.

Note Category 4 aircraft emergencies require all assigned manned crash equipment to respond. This requirement does not apply to OLFs where a TAU is the only assigned vehicle.500 gpm for category 4 aircraft. Minimum Response Requirements Note If major ARFF vehicles are out of service for a period of more than 96 hours such that the activity is prevented from providing the minimum response requirements. 5.500 gpm.000 4.000 200.1. The response requirement for category 4 aircraft emergencies at USMC activities shall consist of major ARFF vehicles and a P26 nurse vehicle with a minimum combined capacity of 7. Delivery rate may be based on both roof and bumper turrets.1 P26 Nurse Vehicle in Service.2.2.1. Marine Corps activities shall notify HQMC (ASL-36/36A) via the appropriate chain of command. Temporary use of structural response vehicles (with AFFF capability) may be used to meet minimum airfield fire flow requirements under this condition.500 2.2 Minimum Response Requirements at Category 4 Airfields (USMC Only) 5. In emergency cases where the 7230 vehicles are placed out of service for maintenance/repair.1 Minimum Response Requirements for Visiting Aircraft.1. Truck Capacity/Flow Water TAU** 2. 5.500 Figure 5-1.000 7.000 GPM* N/A 1. the activity shall notify the Navy Fire and Emergency Services Office.000 gallons of water and a delivery rate of 2.1. .000 to 500.000 gallons of water and a minimum agent delivery rate of 2. and/or approximately 200 landings. takeoffs. or touch and go actions occur per month averaged over a 12-month period. * GPM delivery rate based on firefighting and rescue truck on board water/AFFF supply delivered by the roof and bumper turrets.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Gross Weight Category 1 2 3 4 Aircraft Maximum Gross Takeoff Weight in Pounds Up to 10. This provides a minimum capacity of 5. Selective P26 vehicle response to aircraft emergencies that are not category 4 aircraft should be determined by the ARFF officer. Airfield category requirements for support of DOD and contractor operated visiting aircraft not permanently assigned to an activity shall be based on the appropriate category (1 through 4) whenever visiting aircraft utilize the activity’s airfield with 5 or more aircraft on the ground 50 percent of the time.1.000 and above Note A minimum requirement for gross weight categories 2 and 3 above shall consist of a minimum of two major ARFF vehicles and category 4 shall consist of a minimum of three major ARFF vehicles. and the Commanding Officer concerned should curtail or reduce flight operations.000 500.000 1.000 10. ** Or as directed. and TEMC via the appropriate chain of command. the minimum acceptable ARFF vehicle response at category 4 activities shall be five P-19 vehicles. ORIGINAL 5-2 5.2 Permissible Level of Protection When 7230 Vehicles Are Out of Service.000 to 200.

000 7.000 2.000 2.000 7.500 2.000 1.500 1.000 1.000 2.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 2.000 1.000 4.000 2.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 Figure 5-2.000 1.000 2.000 7.000 1.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 1.000 2.000 1.000 1.000 2.500 1.000 7.000 7.000 2.000 1.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 7.500 2.000 2.000 GPM 2. U.500 2.500 2.000 1.000 2.000 1. NAVY Airfield Categories (Sheet 1 of 2) 5-3 ORIGINAL .000 2.000 4.000 2.500 2.000 2.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 2.000 1.000 2.000 1.000 2.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 STATION NAS KEFLAVIK NAS PATUXENT RIVER NAS SIGONELLA NAVSTA NORFOLK NAVSTA ROTA NSA SOUDA BAY NSF DIEGO GARCIA NAVSTA GITMO NAVSTA ROSEVELT ROADS ALF SAN CLEMENTE JRB DALLAS NAF ATSUGI NAF ELCENTRO NALF FENTRESS NALF ORANGE GROVE NAS ATLANTA NAS BRUNSWICK NAS CORPUS CHRISTI NAS FALLON NAS FORT WORTH NAS JACKSONVILLE NAS KEY WEST NAS KINGSVILLE NAS LAKEHURST NAS LEMORE NAS MAYPORT NAS MEMPHIS NAS MERIDIAN NAS NEW ORLEANS NAS NORTH ISLAND NAS OCEANA NAS PENSACOLA NAS WHIDBEY ISLAND NAS WHITING FIELD* NAS WILLOW GROVE NAWS CHINA LAKE NAWS POINT MUGU NSA NAPELS OLF CHOCTAW OLF COUPEVILLE CATEGORY 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 A/CMAX WT 500K AND ABOVE 500K AND ABOVE 500K AND ABOVE 500K AND ABOVE 500K AND ABOVE 500K AND ABOVE 500K AND ABOVE 200–500K 200–500K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K WATER 7.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 2.000 1.000 2.000 2.500 2.000 1.500 1.S.000 2.000 2.

S.000 TAU TAU TAU TAU TAU TAU TAU TAU TAU TAU GPM 1.000 2.000 2 1 1 UP TO 10K TAU N/A 10–200K 2.000 1.000 1.000 1. NAVY Airfield Categories (Sheet 2) ORIGINAL 5-4 .000 1.000 2.000 2.000 1.000 1.000 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Figure 5-2.500 USAF owns the airfield CATEGORY 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 A/CMAX WT 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K 10–200K UP TO 10K UP TO 10K UP TO 10K UP TO 10K UP TO 10K UP TO 10K UP TO 10K UP TO 10K UP TO 10K UP TO 10K WATER 2. U.000 2.000 1.000 2.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 STATION OLF IMPERIAL BEACH OLF SAN NICHOLS ISLAND OLF WEBSTER OLF WHITEHOUSE OLF WILLIAMS OLF BARIN* OLF BREWTON* OLF EVERGREEN* OLF HAROLD* OLF HOLLEY* OLF PACE* OLF SANTA ROSA* OLF SAUFLEY* OLF SILVERHILL* OLF SPENCER* OLF BRAVO NAF MISAWA NAF LAJES PRMF BARKING SANDS NSF THURMONT (CAMP DAVID) SITE 8 ALF CABANIS ALF CROWS LANDING ALF WALDRON NAF MIDWAY ISLAND NAF MOFFETT FIELD NAS AGANA OLF BRONSON OLF MIDDLETON* OLF SUMMERDALE* OLF WOLF* NAS ALAMEDA NAS SOUTH WEYMOUTH ALF FORD ISLAND NADC WARMISTER NAF DETROIT NAS BARBERS POINT NAS BERMUDA NAS GLENVIEW NAVSTA ADAK 2 2 10–200K 10–200K 2.

ORIGINAL . Ordnance handling and special munitions (tonnage) 6.500 1. air facility.000 1.000 2. These change requests should be forwarded to the Commander.4.000 1.000 1. Marine Corps activity requests shall be fully justified and forwarded to the Commandant. U. Aircraft normally supported 2.000 GPM 2. grass strips. Closed field operations.1.1. Airfield Categories Note This reduced capability constitutes an acceptable risk for an interim period while priority efforts are undertaken to return the 7230 vehicle to service. dispersal of aircraft. via the Navy Fire and Emergency Services Office and superiors in the chain of command for technical review and approval. A main base is a secure airfield that is capable of handling all types of aircraft up to and including theater lift assets. Navy requests for airfield category changes shall be initiated and fully justified at the activity level. road segments.000 2.000 Figure 5-3.000 2. 5.000 2. The MAGTF FOB concept enhances responsiveness through basing flexibility. These facilities might be airfields. transport) 9.000 1.000 4. Joint use military/civilian activity 5. helicopter.000 1.000 1. or EAF construction material.000 1.C. and reduced distances to the support area.3 Requests.000 2.000 2.000 2. Hours of operation 8. 5. Naval Air Systems Command (PMA-251). Designated aerial port of entry/aerial port of departure 3.M. Headquarters Marine Corps (Code ASL-45) via the appropriate chain of command.000 1.000 2.S. 5. Additional pertinent factors to support category upgrade/downgrade should be addressed. air site. If 7230 vehicles are out of service for a period of more than 96 hours. Number of aircraft movements by type (e.g.4.1 Main Base. The main base’s function will be to support sustained operations ashore. A secure airfield capable of supporting a detachment or squadron of aircraft. Active DOD exercise deployment site 5-5 4. flat ground. Training command (extra-hazardous) 7.500 1.500 1.000 4. or air point. fighter.4 Minimum Response Requirements for the Marine Air Ground Task Force Forward Operation Base Concept. 5. airfields will be categorized by function into: main base. To provide a common understanding of the basic concept.000 2. Requests for airfield category changes shall include the following information: 1. the commanding officer should consider reducing flight operations for category 4 aircraft.2 Air Facility.1..1.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 STATION MCAS YUMA MCAS CHERRY POINT MCAS MIRAMAR MCAS BEAUFORT MCALF BOGUE MCAS CAMP PENDELTON MCAS FUTENMA MCAS IWAKUNI MCAF KANEOHE BAY MCAS NEW RIVER EAF 29 PALMS MCAF QUANTICO CATEGORY 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 A/CMAX WT 500K AND ABOVE 200–500K 200–500K 10K–200K 10K–200K 10K–200K 10K–200K 10K–200K 10K–200K 10K–200K 10K–200K 10K–200K WATER 7.

tactics. or grass strips. permit the luxuries afforded by a fixed base operation.1. MAGTF and similar aircraft demonstrations should include a minimum response consisting of one major ARFF vehicle. Expeditionary FOBs do not. ARFF protection and structural protection for the ACE base camp. 5.1 Figure 5-4. 5. The air site is a secure location where combat aircraft are pre-positioned to enhance response time.4.4.1. flat ground.2 Lagger Points. one crash structural vehicle should be maintained in a fully manned condition to permit ready response to ACE Base Camp fire emergencies. 1. Establishment of actual ARFF requirements on a case-by-case basis is the responsibility of the MAGTF commander. or expeditionary type training evolution. A thorough review of ARFF requirements should be conducted during the planning phase for any operation. terrain. are normally the combined responsibility of the ACE ARFF organization. matted VTOL pads. pre-deployment workups or deployment training.4. are forward arming and refueling and lagger points. ORIGINAL 5-6 ARFF WATER CAPABILITY/ FLOW RATE ** N/R N/R 1. 2. 3. Secure locations to be utilized for the rendezvous. and logistics allow. and availability of finite ARFF assets within the FMF ARFF units are some of the factors that dictate ARFF support capabilities.1. or a major ARFF vehicle. Air points are tactical designations applied to a predetermined geographic location that will support a specific tactical mission. The objective of the FARP is to minimize flight time to and from the refueling and rearming area by locating it as close to the objective area as mission. facilities that are frequently used for staging aircraft or terminal/departure points shall be equipped with 150-pound Halon 1211 extinguishers. Additional equipment over and above the minimum response should be planned for and provided to support the broad range of fire protection required at some FOBs. enemy.3 Air Site. Practicing autorotations and hot refueling with ordnance (FARP) are hazardous operations. Equipment manned by ARFF personnel not required. adequate safeguards should be maintained in accordance with applicable NATOPS procedures and other published . space. ACE ammunition storage facility and other facilities within proximity of the Main Base or Air Facility. or positioning of flights of aircraft between missions or awaiting completion or activation of an assigned mission.000 gallons/1. When conducting these operations during garrison training.1. time.000 gallons/500 gpm 2. Support of the FARP should be minimized to the greatest extent possible. 4. operations involving AV-8B or MV-22 aircraft should be supported by a minimum of one mobile TAU or CUCV M1028FF manned by a crew of three ARFF personnel.5 Expeditionary FOBs. FARPs are temporary and transitionary in nature and are established for a specific mission. CUCV M1028FF. In addition to those minimum response requirements to support aviation operations. in many cases.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 5. The air sites could be road segments. Minimum response shall include two major ARFF vehicles. During a contingency situation the MAGTF commander may forgo ARFF coverage if it will impede mission accomplishment. Minimum response shall include one major ARFF vehicle. 5.4. ARFF protection “shall” include a minimum response consisting of either a mobile TAU. Tactical and geographical considerations. exercise. At MAGTF FOBs.4 Air Points.4. 5. dispersal of aircraft. marshaling.1. deployment.4. for the purposes of aviation mission planning. Minimum response for FOBs/facilities shall conform to the criteria established in Figure 5-4. Minimum Response Requirements for Active Forward Operating Base Facilities 2.1 Forward Arming and Refueling Point. Air points.4.000 gpm FOB/FACILITY Air Point (1) Air Site (1) Air Facility (2) (4) Main Base (3) (4) ** GPM delivery rate based upon onboard water/ AFFF supply delivered by roof turret. 1. Note Although ARFF support is not required for operation at administrative/tactical landing zones.

3 U. 2. Auxiliary Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting Vehicles — Small lightweight vehicles.S. Minimum response requirement — Arrive at the scene of an aircraft mishap on the airfield within 15 minutes after notification by a senior aircraft salvage supervisor with the intent to lift or salvage a mishap aircraft. equipped with assorted power and hand-operated forcible entry tools and field lighting equipment.3.3.. A vehicle-mounted (Code 7102) TAU with the above equipment meets this requirement for all non-FMF fire departments. M998. 5. Marine Corps Air Station Salvage Crane/Support Equipment Requirements. Aircraft capable of carrying hand-held portable fire extinguishers should maintain such extinguishers on board.3 SUPPORT AIRCRAFT FIREFIGHTING AND RESCUE VEHICLES Support aircraft firefighting and rescue vehicles include the following: 1.) that has a water tank (minimum capacity of 1. Naval Facilities Engineering Command. Crane operators should receive the required Department of Transportation training in order to be certified/qualified as a driver/operator.1.1 Category I — Airfield Salvage Crane 1. (Figure 5-5 lists the approved Category II airfields. Note The M1028FF does not meet this requirement. An M1008. Crane lift capacity — Capable of lifting the heaviest tactical/training aircraft assigned. Oshkosh T Series.3. a vehicle mounted turret assembly. and Naval Air Systems Command for technical review and approval. The commanding officer of the cognizant field activity will establish the minimum response requirements for the appropriate public works salvage crane.) 2. Navy Requirements Airfield Salvage Crane 5. Category IIA activities are identified as all auxiliary and/or outlying landing fields and are listed in Figure 5-5. a foam concentrate tank. and a pre-connected hand line. This crane should be stationed at the ARFF unit to provide timely response to an aircraft mishap aboard the airfield. salvage equipment.3.3 Category IIA — Public Works Crane. TEMC. 5-7 ORIGINAL For purposes of this manual. or M1038 should be used as the auxiliary vehicle loaded with rescue equipment and serve as the rescue vehicle. (Figure 5-5 lists the approved Category I airfields. Additional equipment over and above the minimum response should be provided to allow for repair and maintenance or for exceptionally hazardous or intense flight operations. The type and quantity of aircraft firefighting and rescue vehicles assigned will vary with the operational status of the air activities.000 gallons).3. 5. Crane lift capacity — Capable of lifting the heaviest tactical/training aircraft assigned. a foam proportioning system.1.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 directives. etc. multidrive type. .3. Tank Vehicles — Tank vehicles are used to resupply primary firefighting and rescue vehicles (major or combined agent vehicles) with liquid agents for extended periods of operation. 5. a major aircraft firefighting vehicle is defined as: a firefighting vehicle designed and manufactured specifically for aircraft firefighting (e. P-19.g.2 MAJOR AIRCRAFT FIREFIGHTING AND RESCUE VEHICLES 5. The requirement for heavy lift crane support to clear runways and/or assist in salvage operations shall be provided by the ARFF organization.) 2. The minimum response is predicated on the gross weight of the aircraft assigned/supported at the activity.2 Category II — Public Works Crane 1.2 Crash Crane Category Changes. 3. 5. and personnel in order to provide for aircraft salvage operations. Requests for changes in the approved crash crane category shall be initiated and fully justified at the activity level. Ambulance — An ambulance is a properly equipped vehicle for casualty transport in accordance with current directives.1.S. 5. These change recommendations should be forwarded to CNO via the major claimant. Minimum response requirement — Arrive at the scene of an aircraft mishap on the airfield within 45 minutes after notification by a senior aircraft salvage supervisor of the intent to lift or salvage a mishap aircraft.1 U. 5.

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 CATEGORY I ACTIVITIES NAS Cecil Field NAS Corpus Christi NAS Dallas NAS Jacksonville NAS Meridian NAS Oceana NAVSTA Roosevelt Roads NAS Whidbey Island CATEGORY II ACTIVITIES NAS Agana NAS Atlanta NAS Bermuda NWC China Lake NAF Diego Garcia NAS Fallon NAVSTA Keflavik NAS Kingsville NAEC Lakehurst NAS Memphis NAF Misawa NSA Naples NS Norfolk NAS Patuxent River NAS Sigonella NADC Warminister NAS Willow Grove CATEGORY IIA ACTIVITIES OLF Bravo OLF Bronson OLF Choctaw ALF Crows Landing ALF Ford Island OLF Harold OLF Imperial Beach ALF Orange Grove ALF San Clemente OLF Santa Rosa OLF Silverhill NAVDET Souda Bay OLF Summerdale OLF Webster Field OLF Wolf NAF Atsugi NAS Cubi Point NAS Guantanamo Bay NAS Lemoore NAS Miramar NAS Pensacola NAVSTA Rota NAVSTA Adak NAS Alameda NAS Barbers Point NAS Brunswick NAF Detroit NAS El Centro NAS Glenview NAS Key West NAF Lajes NAF Mayport NAF Midway Island NAF Moffett Field NAS New Orleans NAS North Island NAS Point Mugu NAS South Weymouth NAS Whiting Field OLF Barin OLF Brewton ALF Cabaniss OLF Coupeville ALF Fentress OLF Holley OLF Middleton OLF Pace OLF San Nichols Island OLF Saufley Field OLF Site 8 OLF Spencer ALF Waldron OLF Whitehouse Figure 5-5. Approved Airfield Categories I. II. and Crash Crane ORIGINAL 5-8 . IIA.

. .S. . . Aircraft maintenance personnel b. . 5-9 Extra-hazardous flight operations are those which by reason of training. Such other personnel as the commanding officer may designate. fire. . . additional personnel shall be assigned. . 2 persons The type commander may increase the minimum manning as appropriate for each firefighting and rescue vehicle if the primary mission of the aviation facility involves extra-hazardous flight operations. local conditions may dictate an increase in these minimum manning criteria. 2 persons c. 5. . Medical personnel. . 2 persons b. U. During closed field operations. 1.S. 6. . . Staffing for Marine Corps and Navy air activities is determined in Marine Corps Order P5320. . . . 2. The fire chief/fire emergency officer may direct the response of additional vehicles. 5. however. .5 series and in Navy Manpower Engineering Center staffing standard FIR mission area series. and distribute on-duty personnel among the responding vehicles to achieve maximum effectiveness.5 series. Physical conditioning. Mishap board members (aviation safety officer) b. . capability. Crew requirements to operate auxiliary firefighting equipment are: a. The following are required for support operations: a. . . . Rescue vehicle . . . . facilities maintenance should maintain tractor trailer assets necessary for aircraft removal and salvage of aircraft from the airfield to a designated location. Additional support equipment to assist in salvage operations should be identified and positioned to permit a timely response. the heavy lift support shall be provided by facilities maintenance upon request by the ARFF organization. Minimum on-duty requirement for major aircraft firefighting and rescue vehicles necessary to meet the minimum response for U. .4 PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS AND ORGANIZATION 3. . . and rescue personnel to support flight line fire protection when aircraft are present at that activity. EOD personnel g. and agility should be considered when assigning personnel to fire and rescue duties. . . . . . Examples of extra-hazardous flight operations are: any portion of the progressive phases of flight training where instructors are not immediately available to the ORIGINAL . . and administrative functions. ARFF should maintain at least the minimum personnel required to man the assigned category of airfield. support. Additionally. Marine Corps unit manning is in accordance with Marine Corps Order P5320. . Security personnel e. If additional duties are required. Administrative support is required at a mishap site as follows: a. . . if available. 5. . . .5 EXTRA-HAZARDOUS FLIGHT OPERATIONS Sufficient personnel shall be assigned to perform necessary fire. Marine Corps activity minimum on-duty requirement is four personnel. . 4. . . . Photographic personnel f. After normal operating hours. Tank vehicle . intensity or number of aircraft involved increase the potential for an aircraft mishap. . Locally designated crane operators d. Marine Corps ARFF activities shall maintain a minimum crew of seven crash. rescue. Navy activities is three personnel. . Public works transportation division c.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Note If the ARFF salvage crane is out of service for repairs or maintenance. M1028FF . .

000 pounds or less (gross weight category) as the immediate response alert in lieu of a major emergency firefighting vehicle. . and rescue requirements at heliports not assigned an airfield category. and fire chiefs should maintain close coordination in order that the ARFF organization can properly prepare for such operations. ORIGINAL 5-10 HELIPORT FIRE PROTECTION 5. This alert shall be maintained to permit arrival at midpoint of the farthest runway supported within 3 minutes.6. and evaluation. aircraft involved in research. Immediate response alert shall consist of a major ARFF vehicle manned to provide initial fire control capabilities. these forces will assume the condition of readiness of the standby alert and await instructions from the senior fire officer at the scene of the emergency. combined squadron or air wing operations. 5. extremely hazardous cargo flights. a backup standby alert consisting of other medical/ambulance personnel. test. No one person shall perform immediate response alert duty for more than a total of 8 hours in any one 24-hour period. At all times during flight operations. Such preparations may include. stationing a major ARFF vehicle at the site of the extra-hazardous operations in order to respond to an unannounced emergency within 1 minute. security personnel. Determination of whether an activity is conducting extra-hazardous flight operations is the responsibility of the commanding officer or officer in charge. Station commanding officers. so that a major ARFF unit can arrive to any point on the runway within 1 minute. 5. 5. The immediate response alert position is required for those activities with an assigned airfield category. field carrier landings. the standby alert shall assume the condition of readiness of immediate response alert at predetermined strategic positions on the airfield.2 Standby Alert.7. aircraft with hospital litter cases aboard. operation officers.1 Definitions 1. 5. commanding officers of tenant commands. Such an alert shall consist of the remaining complement of manned major aircraft firefighting and rescue vehicles to meet minimum response requirements of the airfield category. at either ground level or elevated on a structure. Upon notification of an emergency. flight test directors. development.7 Note D When the immediate response alert is manned at the above level. unanticipated emergencies and to control such fires until the standby alert can effect rescue and fire extinguishment.6 ALERT REQUIREMENTS The commanding officer of the air facility may increase the manning of immediate response alert to the minimum onboard manning. During flight operations. EOD personnel.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 student. but are not limited to.6. the additional crewman assigned shall respond with the standby alert. This alert shall be strategically located on the airfield in order to observe all takeoffs and landings and to respond immediately to an emergency. and remotely controlled aircraft flight operations. and the structural fire companies shall be maintained in a condition of readiness that will permit prompt response from normal working areas to a standby alert position.1 Immediate Response Alert. The purpose of the immediate response alert is to provide immediate response to observed.6. Note A vehicle-mounted TAU (7102-2/ M1028FF) with a crew of three persons may be utilized where aircraft gross takeoff weight is 10. Heliport — A defined area. D vehicles will not be used as immediP-15 ate response alert vehicles unless absolutely necessary. Upon notification of an anticipated or impending emergency landing. The following paragraphs set the minimum crash. fire. 5. designed for the routine basing and operation of VTOL aircraft. a standby alert shall be maintained.3 Backup Standby Alert. The minimum required staffing for all types of major aircraft firefighting vehicles performing immediate response alert is two firefighters with the exception of ARFF vehicles that require additional personnel to operate. An immediate response alert shall be maintained at all times while landings and takeoffs are being conducted.

but does not provide basing facilities such as fueling or maintenance.4 Heliport Crash Crane Requirements. Helistop — A VTOL facility that provides a designated landing area for routine use. fire.7. Standard and continuous training shall be provided and documented for all personnel through an on-the-job training program. fire and rescue response requirements for heliports are described in Figure 5-6. 5.1 Training Requirements. These requirements may be met with structural fire apparatus.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 2. and rescue equipment assigned on a permanent or temporary basis. Fire protection requirements for heliports are as shown in Figure 5-6. are not required to have manned crash. Minimum Response Requirements for Heliports Not Assigned an Airfield Category 5. Note Any facility defined above. the highest category shall apply at both the airport and the heliport. therefore. The decision to man the Halon 1211 or PKP extinguisher with a qualified military or civilian firefighter on an as-required basis rests with the commanding officer/officer in charge of the facility operating the heliport. and rescue requirements at VTOL landing zones.3 Response Requirements. The crash.2 Fire Protection Requirements. Current in-service CO2 or PKP extinguishers are acceptable until Halon units can be placed in service. There are no crash. Heliports located at nonaviation facilities shall meet the crash crane requirements set forth in this section for category IIA airfields. fire.8 TRAINING Commanding Officers shall ensure that personnel assigned to the Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting organization receive training on hazardous materials to ensure they are familiar with hazardous materials produced during a crash or fire. Helistops are facilities used only for landings and takeoffs and.7. if the heliport is collocated at a category I or II facility. 5. VTOL Landing Zone — Any area that can accommodate the landing and takeoff of a VTOL aircraft but is not specifically designed for routine use. Each such facility should have a 150-pound Halon 1211 or PKP wheeled extinguisher available for fire protection for routine operations. Note D references to Halon 1211 extinguishAll ers are for the 150-pound wheeled units.8. 5. however. and other firefighters. 5. 5-11 Gross Weight Classes Small UH-1 AH-1 SH-2 TH-57 Medium H-3 H-46 H-60 AV-8 Large H-53 V-22 Required Water — AFFF Supply/Application Rate Gallons/GPM 150/60 500/250 750/500 Figure 5-6. conducting MEDEVAC and/or hazardous operations as determined by the activity fire chief/ARFF officer shall revert to standby protection as outlined in Figure 5-6. ORIGINAL . Note Care should be exercised in the utilization of trainees in duty assignments in which they may unnecessarily impede rescue operations or endanger themselves. D departments at helistops shall have Fire the capability to respond to an emergency at the landing area and shall meet the flow requirements outlined in Figure 5-6. 3. aircraft occupants.7.

Aircraft fire hazards. fuel. NAVFAC P-300. and Emergency Vehicle Operator Course or MCO 11240. Aviation fuel fires 2. High Angle Rescue. These subjects will be taught as required by the services’ implementing directives: 1. 5. Course No. Brake and wheel fires 5. Florida — Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue School (Course No. Emergency equipment operation 5. Firefighting operations and tactics 3. Video cameras and compatible video cassette recorders should be provided to all aircraft firefighting and rescue organizations to improve firefighter proficiency by recording and/or reviewing training sessions. . sea-based only) for authorized Navy.8. All military and civilian personnel assigned duties incidental to aircraft firefighting and rescue should attend a formal aircraft firefighting and rescue school.6-M. Marine Corps. C-780-2011. Airfield emergency communication procedures 12. and refueling) are instructed. Confined space rescue. and Goodfellow Air Force Base. Course No. C-780-2010. Electronic equipment fires. All personnel assigned to U. Review and discussion of past mishaps 9. Firefighting and rescue organization 11. Goodfellow Air Force Base.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Driver/operators of emergency aircraft firefighting and rescue equipment shall be properly licensed in accordance with DODI 6055. care. Accessory section fires 3. and civilian personnel. and extinguishment 13. Engine and tailpipe fires 6. 5. 5. San Angelo. Pensacola. Hot drills simulating aircraft fire emergencies 2. Rescue and first-aid procedures 4. at least annually. This training shall be provided and documented by the facility fire chief/ARFF officer. Basic structural firefighting (IFSTA manuals should be used) 10.S. all military personnel shall attend the DOD Firefighting Academy. and composite materials 14.5.6-M. 8. Crash locator maps and on-station/off-station familiarization 6. Aircraft Firefighting Shipboard Team Training Course. Commanding officers shall ensure that all personnel engaged in duties involving aircraft operations (maintenance. C-780-2012. ordnance. in fire prevention and types of extinguishers and their operation. 16.8. Fuselage fires 4. Aircraft Firefighting and Salvage Training Course.8. servicing.3 Training Program Subjects.and shore-based.5 Training Aids.2 Formal Schools. Fundamentals of combustion. Aircraft familiarization 7.4 Fire Prevention and Extinguisher Training. lubricants. or other accredited firefighting school. As a prerequisite for assignment to a shore-based firefighting unit. An aircraft firefighter training program shall include the following subjects.8. Texas — DOD Firefighting School. Maximum utilization of training aids outlined in this manual shall be made.66 series (USMC only). Hazardous material 15. and proper application with reference to the following types of fires: 1. fire control. Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting Training Course. sea. Training within DOD is available at Naval Air Technical Training Center. shore-based only. Navy shore-based fire departments shall be certified by the DOD Firefighter Certifications System in accordance with DODI 6055. NAVSAFECENINST 11240. Preparation of administrative reports ORIGINAL 5-12 5.

at the same time. Programs in stock are normally shipped within 20 working days. Although Halon is one of the most effective firefighting agents and the only “clean” agent currently in use. per member shall be conducted. Training with Halon 1211 for personnel involved in aircraft maintenance.s 6. 1. residual Halon 1211 shall be recycled. ORIGINAL . 2.8 Ejection Seat Training.6 Fire Training. Halon 1211 shall not be discharged during training unless directed at a live fire. Aircrew rescue procedures for the individual aircraft are depicted in the following training films: FILM IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS (FINs) AIRCRAFT F-14 NEW FIN 25769-DN OLD FIN MN-11249 Training films can be obtained on-line at http://dodimagery. It is essential that commanding officers budget for aircraft firefighting and rescue training funds (to include appropriate flammable liquids). it has been identified as an ozone-depleting substance and will no longer be produced after 1 January 1994. 5. To obtain the desired realism. 5. the following controls are required. NAVAIR 00-80R-14-1 4. the number of training fires shall be limited to the minimum necessary to maintain proficiency.afis. 3. 2. and a demonstration of agent application techniques and effectiveness. provide rapid availability for emergency service. 3. 1. a simple search can be conducted by using key words or by the product identification number.mil/ at the DVI homepage select DAVIS/DITIS. night fires shall also be conducted. a minimum of six training fires per quarter. Lectures from squadron safety and maintenance personnel 3.8. extinguishers and vehicle-mounted systems shall not be emptied into the atmosphere. Procedures for aircrew rescue are illustrated in a number of training films. Air Force T. Maintenance instructions 5. care and proper application of the agent. To ensure ARFF personnel are prepared for the unique risk factors encountered while fighting fires during darkness.osd. The program should be revised on a continuing basis to reflect current ejection seat designs as well as modifications to existing installations or procedural changes. aircraft mockup shall be constructed as close to scale and appearance of actual aircraft as practical.8. For this purpose.8. Training programs shall include but not be limited to: 1. When the filmstrip appears. Upon completion of Halon 1211 live fire training.O. servicing.5. Therefore.1 Training with Halon 1211.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 5. Aircraft training films. In developing training ground sites. 4. to assure noninterference with flight operations and. with respect to the airfield. a comprehensive training program is required to maintain the proficiency and experience level of ARFF personnel. Aircraft familiarization classes 2. Training fires and realistic forcible entry into and rescue from burning aircraft shall be conducted to the extent necessary to obtain and maintain the desired standards of proficiency. due consideration should be given to location. 5-13 5. Variance in design and operation of ejection seats is accompanied by differences in methods and procedures for rendering the ejection apparatus safe. Live fire training with Halon 1211 shall be limited to firefighters only. In order to conserve mission-critical assets and limit nonessential discharge of Halon 1211 while maintaining firefighting proficiency.8. These films along with NAVAIR 00-80R-14-1 should be used as part of the training program.7 Training Funds. and refueling shall be limited to instruction on extinguisher operation. An all-weather training ground for actual burn practice and simulated emergency operations is essential to each air activity. 4. Instruction shall be designed to provide the trainee with accurate background knowledge and hands-on practical application to perform ejection seat safetying procedures for the safe extraction of disabled crewmembers.

and the structural fire station. a dual installation shall include the aircraft fire and rescue network and the internal security network. The initiating instrument is generally located at the operation control tower. Hospital or dispensary 5-14 5.).e.2 Secondary Aircraft Emergency Alarm Intercommunication System. 6. as required. 3.1 Primary Aircraft Emergency Alarm Intercommunication System (Crash Phone). One portable transceiver shall be assigned to the duty SAR helicopter on a regular basis. Structural fire and rescue alarm room 4.. 5.. boats. print out all relative information regarding either aircraft or structure (i. and by principal firefighting supervisors and foot parties. 5.2 Wire Communication Systems 5.9. Air operations duty office 5. This system may operate through the regular telephone switchboard.S. Note For U.9. To ensure an effective airfield fire and rescue effort. In addition to the radio equipment authorized above. the following connected stations are recommended: 1. Aircraft Firefighting/Rescue Tactics/Operational Procedures 112770-DM 2. Some ordnance items which are sensitive to radio signals (e. via a terminal/printer. Navy airfield fire stations the Primary Aircraft Emergency Alarm shall be wired to provide simultaneous alarm to the dispatcher and voice notification over the airfield fire station PA system. 1.2. a dedicated emergency fire and rescue radio network shall be provided. A computer-aided dispatch system is recommended for all shore-based fire departments.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 In addition. This system will provide for rapid dispatch of appropriate vehicles to any emergency incident via a predetermined response program. It will also. aircraft fire and rescue alarm room. hydrants. Mobile or portable transceivers on the mutual assistance frequency should be installed in all designated vehicles responding to emergency calls under an established mutual assistance agreement.2. Structural fire organization 3.g. This system is utilized for the simultaneous notification of essential support and administrative personnel. 5. a direct wire intercommunication system shall be installed at the following locations: 1. Fixed-based stations shall be installed in the air traffic control tower. ORIGINAL .9. weapons convoys. Aircraft Firefighting/Rescue Procedures — Military Aircraft Mishap Planning Off Station 112850-DM 4. alarm rooms should be equipped with logging recorders to record all emergency communications from either AM or FM radio or telephonic equipment. EMCON restrictions shall be observed by responding personnel. Such a network requires provision of the following equipment. hero-unsafe) could be initiated by improper emissions control (EMCON). occupancy.9. SAR organization (if applicable). these films are available for general ARFF training: 1. 4. Aircraft fire and rescue alarm room 3. Prevention of Hangar Deck Fires 802161-DN.9 EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS 5. location of building. Portable transceivers shall be available for use in helicopters. Aircraft Firefighting Procedures for Composite Materials 112769-DM 3. When installed.1 Aircraft Fire and Rescue Network. 2. In the case of the fire chief’s vehicle. Aircraft fire and rescue alarm room 2. Air traffic control tower (initiating agency) 2. As a guide. All aircraft fire and rescue vehicles and support vehicles shall have mobile transceivers. Station hospital/dispensary 6. etc.

10. including inactive DOD installations. The home station fire and rescue alarm center and station air traffic control tower should maintain constant communications with all outlying fields’ mobile stations.2 Aircraft Fire and Rescue Response Reporting Requirements. When installed in mobile firefighting and rescue vehicles.4 Notification of an Off-Station Mishap. air traffic control tower. industrial reserve plants. Landing runway and ETA 8.3. EOD personnel 7. When notification of an off-station mishap is received from an outside source. Photographic laboratory 5. The station/person observing an aircraft mishap shall activate the primary crash alarm network or notify the air operation duty officer by fastest available means.10. 5. and the aircraft fire and rescue center. Type of aircraft and whether fire is present 3. will notify by regular telephone or other means. Aircraft rescue boat house (if applicable) 8. .3 Notification of an On-Station Mishap.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 4. Security office 9. Number of personnel aboard 6. real property. and military equipment and other DOD property. The following information shall be provided.6 series.9. 5. Type of aircraft 3. if available: 1. ORIGINAL have VHF FM radio transceivers for the primary emergency communication system. Outlying fields in this category shall 5-15 5. 5.5 Category I Outlying Fields with No Facilities. Aircraft maintenance department 6. Reporting person’s name and telephone number and request that they remain at a designated location and act as guide. Any other pertinent information. Nature of emergency 4. Fuel state 5. as necessary. 5. A daily journal shall be maintained by each aircraft firefighting and rescue organization.1 Mutual Assistance. Station duty officer who will notify by regular telephone those personnel previously designated by the commanding officer.10 MUTUAL ASSISTANCE AND ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS 5. the aviation safety officer and the senior member of the aircraft mishap board 10. Location of the mishap and direction to the scene 2. 5.10. Fire service emergency reporting requirements apply to all DOD components that have responsibilities for the protection of DOD employees. 5. Airfield operations office that. as set forth in DOD Directive 1000. Location 2. Outlying fields lacking an air traffic control tower should be provided a mobile ground-to-air radio and backup radio. obtain the following information: 1. Mutual assistance agreements are encouraged in accordance with Department of Defense Instruction 6055. Each aircraft rescue and firefighting organization shall complete a NFIRS report for each reportable event. Outlying fields shall be provided with telephone communications for secondary communications.2.10.23 series. government-owned industrial plants. Ordnance stores or other hazardous cargo 7. these units should have an effective range for communications with the home station. Inspection of Navy aircraft firefighting operations shall be in accordance with OPNAVINST 11320.9. in turn.9.3 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Daily Journal.4 Navy Aircraft Firefighting Unit Inspections. This journal should be a chronological listing of all pertinent events and be maintained for a minimum of 3 years after the journal is completed. as defined in DOD Directive 4165. The reporting requirements also apply to all DOD components occupying General Services Administration managed buildings.

5. Fire.10. to coordinate fire department support to weapon areas. fire.10. Naval air activities with operating air traffic control towers are required by NAVAIR 00-80T-114 to have such grid map system. area fire marshal/inspector currency and condition during each inspection.10. In order to provide uniform response to those crash areas not visible from the tower. and rescue bill that includes the operational and functional details for both on-station and off-station crash. fire. In order to ensure the grid map system is effective. individual firefighters shall be required to demonstrate a working knowledge of the grid map system. The grid map system shall be readily available on board all ARFF vehicles and all activities on the primary or secondary communication systems (paragraph 5. Marine Corps crash. ORIGINAL 5-16 . all fire departments should develop an additional grid map system based on compass azimuth and mileage out to 15 nautical miles from the airfield. 5. and rescue units will be inspected as directed by the Commandant of the Marine Corps. and Rescue Bill. IFSTA Manual 206 and NFPA 424 may be used for guidance when developing a station crash. An activity’s premishap plan that provides all the necessary elements of the ARFF bill shall satisfy this requirement. fire. a uniform alphanumeric grid map system superimposed on an aerial photo or local base area map shall be maintained by each fire department and ARFF branch. In addition.6 Crash. fire. Each activity shall maintain a crash.9.2).7 Crash Grid Map System.5 Marine Corps Aircraft Firefighting Unit Inspections. and rescue bill. Where practicable.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 5. and to ensure police and security forces adequately support fire suppression operations. and rescue incidents.

6. All other aircraft firefighting vehicles take positions complementing the first arriving vehicle. When emergency vehicles respond from more than one location. ARFF personnel should exercise extreme caution at all military mishap sites.) 6. Presence of hazardous cargo. (See Figure 6-1.1. This position affords the most advantageous location to provide coverage in the control area along both sides of the fuselage. personnel are subjected to less heat and smoke.3 Basic Vehicle Spotting Procedures. Fire location on aircraft or the degree of fire involvement 6. Few. Note Familiarity with field response routes and off-station areas within which an aircraft incident may be expected to occur during landing approach or takeoff shall be maintained. This position affords several advantages. All personnel directly assigned to firefighting vehicles except drivers shall wear full protective clothing. Unless conditions dictate otherwise. The following paragraphs outline points of consideration. . Crew stations and passenger locations within the aircraft 5. 7.1 Response Routes and Vehicle Speed. Terrain and obstacles 2. it is easier to identify the seat of the fire. and fuel vapors. The basic aircraft firefighting vehicle position is at the nose or tail of the involved aircraft. 6. enlarging on the pattern for rescue and total fire extinguishment. the most direct route with the best travel conditions should be utilized.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 CHAPTER 6 Firefighting and Rescue Operations 6. In view of potential ordnance/hazardous cargo aboard military aircraft. the first aircraft firefighting and rescue vehicle to arrive at the scene of an aircraft accident will be the immediate response alert vehicle.1. (See Figure 6-2. aircraft incidents involving fire and rescue procedures are identical.2 Basic Approach. will drift away in the wind. position vehicles and attack from upwind.1. ignited or not.1.4 Use the Wind. Driver protective clothing shall be carried in the vehicle. independent routes are desirable. Presence of ordnance. Type of aircraft 4. The speed of the vehicle in response to an emergency must be that at which the vehicle can respond and maneuver safely. if any.1 TACTICS Firefighting and rescue tactics employed at an accident scene are largely dependent upon many varying factors including: 1. Wind direction 3. Normally. 6. After an alarm has been received. but are not to be interpreted as being in their sequence of importance.) 6-1 ORIGINAL Driver/operators should exercise extreme caution during their final approach to an aircraft mishap site to prevent injury to person(s) inadvertently thrown/ejected from an aircraft. For example. The basic vehicular approach is that which will afford the most efficient control of the fire in the area or location where rescue of personnel is to be performed.

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 6-1. Attack from Tail Using Wind . Fire Control Area ORIGINAL 6-2 Figure 6-2.

8 Handlines. Liquid fuels or their flammable vapors flow to lower elevations. the nozzle person continues to extinguish fire that may hinder rescue or. On aircraft carrying airlaunch weapons.2. CAUTION When AFFF is used as the fire suppression agent on an aircraft fire and the agent is directed or ingested into the engine or accessory sections. however. Handlines are used to control and extinguish fires in shadow areas in and around the fuselage that are not extinguished by the turret.1. GENERAL ENGINE COMPARTMENT FIRES — JET FIXED-WING. the basic vehicle spotting position should be adjusted to keep vehicles from being in the line of fire or the exhaust blast areas.1. (See Figure 6-3. Sweeping the turret from side to side also contributes to quickly covering a larger area of fire. 6. fires in accessory sections result from fuel or hydraulic fluid being introduced into the accessory section compartment and coming in contact with heat generated by an auxiliary power unit (APU) or other equipment. Similarly. 6-3 ORIGINAL Periodic reapplication of AFFF is essential to avoid reflash when working in and around crashed aircraft. The nozzle person advances toward the fire. which is not extinguished by the on-board fire extinguishing systems. In the event a fire occurs in either compartment. Knowledge of accessibility to these areas for application of the extinguishing agent must be gained by aircraft familiarization. directing chemical agent (Halon 1211 or PKP. as available) at the base and then coating the area with AFFF to prevent reflash.9 Using Vehicle-Mounted Twin Agent Unit. Handlines are provided on all aircraft firefighting and rescue vehicles. AND TILT-ROTOR AIRCRAFT These fires result from fuel being introduced into the area between the engine and fuselage or between the engine and nacelle on engines carried in pods. the use of AFFF to prevent further damage outweighs the disadvantages. Turret operators adjust the turret from straight stream to a dispersed pattern. Wherever possible.1. The vehicle approaches from upwind and is positioned to facilitate pulling the nozzles and hoses from the rear. Handlines are also used to extinguish interior cabin fires and for cooling fuselage and ordnance.3. the fire chief or senior fire official shall notify the maintenance officer of the unit involved or. the supporting facility.2.) 6.1.1. In this case. COMPRESSOR COMPARTMENT. the nozzle person advances. depending on reach required. Halon 1211 or CO2 are the extinguishing agents used on these fires. making a rescue path by sweeping from side to side using chemical agent and AFFF.1.) 6. A manned primary airfield extinguisher positioned about the aircraft to serve as the initial ground fire fighting response shall be equipped with the wand extension described in paragraph 3.2 ACCESSORY SECTION. continues toward total extinguishment. The initial attack begins during the approach of firefighting vehicles using the roof turrets and bumper nozzles as soon as the vehicles are within range of the fuel spill and/or aircraft. the attack would be from the quarters with attention directed at expanding the control area to indicate application of agent to cool the air-launch weapons. This wand extension is required to reach the fire extinguisher access panels provided on the V-22 for the engine and midwing compartments. When headway on the fire is gained. attack from uphill. The fast action of the chemical agent and the excellent holding qualities of AFFF will enable the . 6. nozzle persons to advance. After the rescue path has been opened. in the case of a transient aircraft.5 Ordnance Stores. ROTARY-WING.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 6. if rescue has been accomplished. (See Figure 6-4.6 Attack from Uphill.1 V-22 Aircraft Engine Compartment and Midwing Compartment Fires. A dispersed pattern that will reach the seat of the fire covers a larger area in a shorter period of time. 6. fire extinguishing agent shall be directed into the affected compartment through the access panels by use of the wand extension.7 Initial Attack. and coming into contact with the heat generated by the engine. 6. when a fire in an aircraft cannot be extinguished with Halon 1211 or CO2.

Position to be Clear of Line Fire of Ordnance ORIGINAL 6-4 .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 6-3.

these fires may be controlled by windmilling the engine. one firefighter in full protective clothing (hot suit) will open the engine cowling. b. thermal shock may result causing engine damage. Halon 1211 or CO2 may be introduced to the engine accessory section through the engine trim access door on the port side of the engine. When the fire is under control. Engine accessory section fire a. 1.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 6-4. An AFFF handline shall provide fire protection to the firefighter. 6-5 ORIGINAL Internal engine fires usually result when residual fuel is dumped into the engine on shutdown. Note A flathead screwdriver will be required to open the engine trim access doors there are four screws. an extinguishing agent must be directed into the engine. Attack Fire from Uphill 6. . Note A screwdriver may be required to open the engine cowling because of the restrictions of proximity gloves. CAUTION D When CO2 or Halon 1211 is expelled directly into an engine. Application of Halon 1211 or CO2 must be accomplished at a distance so that the Halon 1211 or CO2 enters the fire area in gaseous form. D bypass turbofan engines require High unique techniques to extinguish engine core fires.3 INTERNAL ENGINE FIRES 6. Halon 1211 or CO2 is the primary agent for internal engine fires. S-3B. The following procedures are directed for extinguishing fires in high bypass turbofan engines (TF-34).3.1 S-3A. If starting equipment and qualified starting personnel are immediately available. and US-3A Aircraft Engine Fires. Each screw has to be turned two times to open the door. If this procedure fails or equipment and personnel are not available. ES-3A.

Follow the firefighting procedures prescribed in step 1 above. If this operation does not extinguish the fire.5 TAILPIPE FIRES If a fire occurs in the tailpipe of an aircraft during start or shutdown.4 ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT FIRES 6. D not use CO2 to inert the atmosphere Do in an electronics compartment as it may produce a spark. the following should be performed by the crash crew: 1. Engine fire turbine section engine core a. Halon 1211 or CO2 is the primary agent for combatting Class C fires and has no adverse effect on electrical or electronic components. 6. HOT BRAKES The landing gear is an item of considerable concern during both normal and emergency landings. 2. the source of electrical power must be secured. propeller-driven. When the engine is shut down. apply Halon 1211 or CO2 and AFFF (if required). Some major jet. overheated brakes and wheels are becoming a common occurrence. D Halon 1211 may be used to inert a small electronics compartment provided firefighters do not enter the compartment or do so with self-contained breathing apparatus. Direct Halon 1211 or CO2 into the tailpipe. These fusible plugs are designed to automatically deflate the tires when a temperature of approximately 400 _ F (204 _is reached. into aircraft exhaust section only until the fire is extinguished. Engine fire in compressor section engine core a. 6-6 In combatting electrical fires. CAUTION The source of this fire will probably be burning titanium and can be identified by the sparking effect of this material when it is burning. Hot brakes will normally cool by themselves without the use of an extinguishing agent. (Failure of fusible plugs to C) function properly has occurred. the aircraft engine should be started by authorized personnel in order to attempt extinguishment through exhaust pressures. apply AFFF to both sides of the engine casing to complete extinguishment and provide additional cooling. which will be greatly increased when fire is present. it is important not to mistake hot brakes for brake fires. In order not to endanger the crews needlessly. Most aircraft operating manuals for propeller-driven aircraft recommend that flightcrews keep the propeller turning fast enough to provide an ample cooling air flow.) Releasing the tire pressure will reduce the pressure on the wheel and thus eliminate the possibility of explosion. and turboprop aircraft now have fusible plugs incorporated in the wheel rims.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 2. If fire is not extinguished by the aforementioned methods. 3. This fire is potentially destructive and may possibly burn through the engine casing if immediate fire suppression measures are not taken. With the added weight and landing speeds of modern aircraft and because of the extreme braking required on shorter runways. direct stream of extinguisher agent into intake duct. 6.6 Do not stand directly in front of intake duct or directly in back of tailpipe. Firefighters must possess a thorough understanding of the hazards created by overheated brakes as well as the techniques and equipment developed for coping with this type emergency. ORIGINAL . The heating of aircraft wheels and tires presents a potential explosion hazard involving built-up air pressure in the tires. b. When the engine cowling is open.

1 Wheel Assembly Fires. Danger Zones and Attack Zones in Combatting Wheel Fire (Attack the Fire from Fore and Aft — Do Not Attack from the Side) 6-7 ORIGINAL . Grease and bearing lubricant fires — When ignited. The heating of aircraft wheels and tires presents a potential explosion hazard that is greatly increased when fire is present.6. Figure 6-5. D Placing a smoke ejector close enough to a hot brake to make it effective endangers the firefighter. b. Materials that may contribute to wheel assembly fires are grease. Upon ignition. The following types of fires and hazards may occur around an aircraft wheel assembly: 1. misting fluid will accelerate a fire. and the deterioration of components by heat may cause an explosion. The decision to install landing gear downlocks/pins or other devices is up to the on-scene commander and should be made on a case-by-case basis dependent upon safety and operational necessity. These fires are usually small and should be extinguished quickly with Halon 1211 or water fog. Reignition may occur if the rubber sustains its autoignition temperature or the rubber is abraded and the fire is deep seated. Hydraulic fluids (1) A broken hydraulic line may result in the misting of petroleum-based fluids onto a damaged or hot wheel assembly. c. 2. and tire rubber. a.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 One emergency cooling measure that may be used by the responding fire forces in the event of hot brakes is the use of smoke ejector. bearing lubricants. wheel grease fires can be identified by long flames around the wheel brake/axle assembly. The decision to use such devices is up to the senior fire officer and should be made on a case-by-case basis dependent upon safety and operational necessity. resulting in rapid fire growth and excessive damage to the aircraft if not extinguished rapidly. This explosion is likely to propel pieces of the tire and/or metal through the air at high speeds. additional tire pressure.) D aircraft emergency situations that All require ARFF personnel to perform firefighting/safety-related functions underneath an aircraft present a potential hazard to the firefighter. emergency crews should approach the wheel with extreme caution in a fore or aft direction. D When responding to a wheel fire/hot brakes. (See Figure 6-5. Rubber tires — Rubber from the tires may ignite at temperatures from 500 _ F (260 _ C) to 600 _(316 _ and can develop an F C) extremely hot and destructive fire. Halon 1211 or water fog should be used as early as possible to extinguish the fire. Peak temperatures may not be reached until 15 to 20 minutes after the aircraft has come to a complete stop. never from the side in line with the axle. hydraulic fluid. 6. The combination of increased stress on the brake wheel assembly.

7. Note Since heat is transferred from the brake to the wheel. Rapid cooling of a hot inflated aircraft tire/wheel assembly presents an explosive hazard.1 Preliminary Contamination Assessment 1. CAUTION Halon 1211 may extinguish hydraulic fluid fires.” This hydraulic fluid will not ordinarily ignite. 2.7 INCIDENTS INVOLVING AIRCRAFT CONTAINING COMPOSITE MATERIAL REINFORCED WITH CARBON/ GRAPHITE OR BORON/TUNGSTEN FIBERS CAUTION The vaporized products of Skydrol decomposition will cause severe irritation to the eyes and respiratory tract. (2) Some Navy aircraft and most commercial aircraft incorporate hydraulic systems that contain hydraulic fluid by the trade name of “Skydrol. D When water fog is used on a wheel assembly fire. seek medical attention immediately. 3. therefore. agent application should be concentrated on the brake area. and note pertain to all aspects of wheel assembly firefighting operations: D Rapid cooling may cause an explosive failure of a wheel assembly. These gases are toxic respiratory poisons and eye irritants. an intermittent application of short bursts (5 to 10 seconds) every 30 seconds should be used. good judgment and care must be exercised to prevent injury to firefighting personnel. D Aircraft with beryllium brakes may produce irritating or poisonous gases when involved in a fire. Intermittent application of water fog should be used to extinguish this type fire. The following warnings. Carbon/graphite and boron/tungsten fibers can become airborne as a result of: 1) fires involving these composite materials or 2) a crash/explosion scenario which may fragment sections of aircraft composites. but when high temperatures resulting from fire are reached. 6. but reignition may occur since this agent lacks adequate cooling effect. ORIGINAL 6-8 6. If Skydrol comes in contact with the eyes. caution. the Skydrol will decompose. release of carbon/graphite or boron/ tungsten fibers from composite materials by . D Protective measures must be taken to prevent Skydrol from coming into contact with the eyes. D Effectiveness of Halon 1211 may be severely affected if conditions are such that sufficient agent concentrations cannot be maintained on the fire source. The primary objective is to prevent the fire from spreading upward into wheelwells and wing and fuselage areas. In the event of a fire without high impact or explosion. self-contained breathing apparatus shall be worn when fighting fires associated with hydraulic systems containing Skydrol. D Positive-pressure.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 A broken hydraulic line that causes misting of petroleum-based fluids around an overheated brake assembly can cause a potentially dangerous and destructive fire.

The aircraft debris in this case will be well-charred and the fibers exposed with the reduced volume assumed to have been released into the atmosphere. the following procedure is necessary. 4.3 Interim Containment (Ashore and Afloat). 6-9 ORIGINAL In aircraft mishaps where carbon/graphite or boron/tungsten fibers are suspected. Where possible. it is anticipated that cleanup will be under the direction of the safety officer or air operation officer and may or may not be a function of the crash and fire department. maneuver ship to direct smoke and debris away from parked aircraft. the use of a full-face high-efficiency particulate air/organic vapor combination respirator is appropriate. In the event of a fire followed by an explosion. 2.4 Cleanup (Ashore). 4. Accordingly.2 Extinguishment (Ashore and Afloat) 1. The degree of contamination (fibers released into the atmosphere) is assumed to vary directly with the degree of fire destruction (burning time). Respiratory protection must be selected based upon the quantity of composite materials present at the site as well as the duration of potential personnel exposure. Firefighting and rescue personnel shall wear appropriate respiratory protection during initial response. during this sequence the release of carbon/graphite or boron/tungsten fibers into the atmosphere is very likely dispensed by smoke and air currents. The rotor wash will only serve to spread fibers. Provide interim containment of aircraft debris with the spray pattern of AFFF until debris is cool.7. For situations in the earlier stages of cleanup/investigation when airborne composite material levels are unknown and may be accompanied by vapors released from smoldering debris. ignition. 3. . release of carbon/graphite or boron/tungsten fibers from composite materials into the atmosphere is a virtual certainty. fuel spill.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 exposure to fire is more probable as the epoxy will burn readily in a fuel spill fire and exposed fibers can be broken and carried into the atmosphere via air currents of the smoke. Immediate action is required to prevent damage to electrical/ electronic equipment and facilities downwind. the use of a dust-fume-mist filter respirator may be appropriate. and fire. 6. Pending establishment of local command policy. 3. more permanent containment is specified. the local cognizant industrial hygienist or medical department representative should be consulted for specific guidance. or disposition is directed. 6. Airborne composite fibers constitute a potential respiratory hazard to personnel. Personnel shall use caution when crossing a fire fighting hose to avoid personal injury. in any case. Approach and extinguish fire from the upwind position. helicopters should never be used to control the fire or allowed to fly or hover over the site at altitudes of less than 500 feet. 6.7. Extinguish fire as quickly as possible.7. All personnel not directly involved in firefighting operations should remain upwind and at a safe distance from the mishap. the island structure. The normal sequence of an aircraft crash/fire incident is high impact. Injection of fibers into the helicopter electrical system could cause aircraft failure resulting in a serious mishap. For later stages of cleanup/ investigation when much of the debris has been contained and vapors are no longer being released. If afloat. and the ventilation inlets.

Use of a high-efficiency vacuum cleaner is recommended whenever possible for cleanup of debris rather than use of systems of lower efficiency. if needed for accident investigation. If this is not possible. NSN 7930-00-141-5888. Use a sealed industrial vacuum. 6. 3. It is available in the supply system as Wax. 4. If aircraft/equipment/clothing are dosed with the aircraft debris. a thorough detergent/water washdown should be performed to remove any remaining residual material. the doors and windows of surrounding buildings should be closed to minimize the probability of having wind-blown fibers enter areas with electrical/ electronic equipment. based upon extent of exposure. transporting the wreckage must be planned. Only acrylic floor wax should be used. To assist mishap investigators. Safety glasses with sideshields shall be worn when full-face respirators are not in use and eye contact with fibers/debris is of concern. store in a remote location. If this is not feasible. bypassing highly populated and industrial areas. Polyethylene sheeting and tape should be used as a means of containing debris present on larger composite components where the use of chemical binders may not be warranted or feasible. 6-10 Keep handling of the fibers at a minimum. washing down. 7. and/or plowing the debris under. Floor. P-W-155C. b. Water Emulsion. 2. ORIGINAL . Full-face respirator should be worn in areas significantly contaminated with airborne fibers/debris. Showers and change room facilities should be available after particularly “dirty” investigation/cleanup operations. aircraft parked along the planned route must have their canopies and access doors closed and engine inlet and exhaust covered. they must be vacuumed and/or washed down prior to further use or before movement into the ship structure. Decontamination of the immediate area of the aircraft wreckage may require vacuuming. directing the residue over the side.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 5. Appropriate ship maneuvering to direct the smoke and debris away from parked aircraft and the island structure can materially reduce fiber contamination and reduce the cleanup process to: a. 2. Pending establishment of local command policy. 1. If wrapping and secure taping of the aircraft wreckage is not possible. Note The local cognizant industrial hygienist or medical department representative should be consulted for detailed health hazard control guidance. This wax can be easily stripped by mishap investigators. Disposable coveralls and shoe covers should be considered for many operations involving mishap investigation/cleanup. handlers must wear leather palm gloves.5 Cleanup (Afloat). 6. store debris collected in sealed plastic (garbage) bags and dispose in accordance with local EPA requirements or. Aircraft/facilities/equipment that have been “dosed” with debris from the aircraft fire must be vacuumed and/or washed down. CAUTION Do not put power to or start up dosed aircraft or electrical/electronic equipment until decontamination by vacuuming and/or washdown is completed. it is anticipated that cleanup will be under the direction of the air officer with the following recommended procedure. and removing wreckage to a safe parking area.7. the preferred method of fiber containment is to wrap the damaged parts in plastic sheets or place in plastic bags. a more permanent containment than that provided by AFFF can be obtained using acrylic floor wax. Washing down with saltwater. taping securely. Following the vacuuming process. 1. Covering the aircraft parts containing carbon fiber composites. In addition.

or a suitable orifice can be made. compressed air drill. 6.8 INTERNAL FIREFIGHTING ON LARGE FRAME. designed-in or forced. day/night conditions. Safety glasses with sideshields shall be worn when full-face respirators are not in use and eye contact with fibers/debris is of concern. and Cargo Aircraft Emergency Response Plans. Appropriate agent should be introduced through other openings. based upon extent of exposure. To achieve success. Showers and change room facilities may be necessary for particularly “dirty” investigation/cleanup operations. Agent must be introduced in order to provide a survivable atmosphere within seconds after arrival of the first ARFF vehicle. 6. large amounts of agent may be needed to deluge the fire area. Full-face respirator should be worn in areas significantly contaminated with airborne fibers/debris. Once the agent is introduced it should be bounced off the fuselage ceiling so that a sprinkler effect will be produced. Using a window rather than going through the fuselage may be considered in safeguarding the occupants as normally firefighters will be able to see if areas adjacent to the penetration are still occupied. bayonet. Local solid waster disposal authorities shall be consulted for approved burial sites/techniques for composites or composite-contaminated materials. and cargo aircraft firefighting and rescue operations. 4. highly toxic smoke. 6. sometimes within a few minutes of a Class A fire occurring. cooling and reaching fire areas between seats and/or cargo that would normally be difficult to extinguish. Response plans shall provide for interior and exterior firefighting operations for ARFF and structural fire companies. air gun.8. Full scale tests have shown that a relatively small fire of interior materials can quickly fill an entire cabin with a thick black. passenger.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 3. shut down system and provide temporary filtration at inlets leading to compartments with electrical/electronic equipment. crew/passenger evacuation efficiency. etc.. This makes the use of some type of penetrator nozzle or applicator imperative. Ignition of the materials of the cabin interior and the contribution of the internal fire to the overall post-crash scenario offer particularly severe compounding effects.g. e. Response plans should incorporate the integrated emergency incident management system to 6-11 ORIGINAL The primary mission of an ARFF service is to save lives. AND PASSENGER/CARGO AIRCRAFT The immediate need may be to get agent inside the aircraft to control/extinguish the fire. The applicator can be inserted quickly through open aircraft windows. This will buy time until firefighters can enter the fuselage equipped with SCBA and handlines. depending on the fire situation and configuration of the aircraft. Use of a high-efficiency vacuum cleaner is recommended whenever possible for clean up of debris rather than use of systems of lower efficiency. Following the vacuuming process. The influence of burning interior materials on survivability and evacuation is directly related to the extent of structural damage. even while passengers/aircrew are evacuating the aircraft. Polyethylene sheeting and tape should be considered as a means of containing debris present on larger composite components where the use of chemical binders may not be warranted or feasible. Disposable coveralls and shoe covers may be necessary for many operations involving mishap investigation/cleanup. take immediate action to verify filtration system is properly operating. Flashover conditions are a feature of aircraft internal fires and this can occur very quickly. Time is not on the side of the firefighters. Doors or escape windows may not be immediately available for entry because passengers will be evacuating. If the system is not operating properly. Emergency response plans shall be developed for large frame. 8. The protection of the integrity of the fuselage and the safeguarding of escape routes to allow passengers and crew to reach a safe area is paramount.1 Large Frame. Several types are available. 7. a thorough detergent/water washdown should be performed to remove any remaining residual material. . the local cognizant industrial hygienist or medical department representative should be consulted for detailed health hazard control guidance. Warn adjacent aircraft/ships that the smoke may contain hazardous electrical contaminants. impact injuries. In addition. If ventilation inlets are known to be contaminated. Passenger. 5.

overhead sprinkling shall have been activated concurrent with hose team attacks. ventilation tactics.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 ensure effective deployment of additional resources for large frame. Experience and training of ARFF and structural companies. the preferred method is to advance to the seat of the fire and apply agent directly into the seat of the fire for extinguishment. Note If conditions become too severe for these direct attack techniques. 6. 5. LFA familiarization (e.2 Fog Attack. and smoke from an advanced fire makes access increasingly difficult. 6. The following conditions indicate the use of fog attack to gain control: 1. construction. firefighters must withdraw until the effect or overhead sprinklers. 6-12 6.3 Direct Attack from Access. After assessing the fire. Where overhead gases are burning (applicable in low overhead.9.9. Emergency medical response and hospital disaster plans. 8. and cargo aircraft incidents. oxidizers.1. Emergency response plans should consider the following: 1. 3. Access to the fire may be straight forward in the early stages of the fire.g. 4. fog ORIGINAL . 6. and fuel load. 2. and identify emergency response deficiencies.9. 3. an agent cannot be applied directly to the seat of the fire. 6.9.9 HANGAR DECK FIREFIGHTING attack to control the fire. Incorporation of positive pressure ventilation operations in LFA incidents. and direct attack from the access. systems. Post-exercise critique for lessons learned. small volume hangars such as LPDs and air-capable ships) 2. egress points). and cargo aircraft should be conducted annually to exercise the plan. There are three distinct techniques available during a direct attack: direct attack at the seat of the fire. Availability of extinguishing agent for resupply. 9. prepare personnel. and/or indirect attack create tenable conditions for renewed direct attack. and initiate response plan changes and improvements. When direct access to the seat of the fire is available. Type and frequency of LFA operations. passenger. If high heat denies access to the fire but the fire can be reached by a hose team from an access. gases. passenger.1 Determine Direct Attack Technique. agent can be applied to the seat of the fire from the access. Where the seat of the fire is obstructed.. Joint emergency response exercises and training with mutual aid agencies. 6. When entry can be made into the bay but direct access to the seat of the fire is not possible.1. the OSL must determine the best technique to use. Note When conditions 1 or 3 exist. Experience and training of mutual aid response agencies. Experience and training in integrated emergency incident management. Command post-communications capabilities and identification. passenger capacity. Emergency response exercises on large frame. firefighters may use fog attack to gain control of the fire.1 Direct Attack at the Seat of the Fire. 10.1. 11. but heat. Where multiple seats of the fire are growing such that one seat would grow out of control while agent is being applied to another seat of the fire. Emergency response plans should be consistent with nationally recognized consensus standards and be incorporated in the overall disaster plan. 7.

Crash and salvage personnel should be trained and qualified to perform the functions of every other member of the team. and Rescue Organization and Operations 7.7 Aviation Fuel Officer.2. 7. Hangar deck firefighting and rescue team. and training the crash. training. 7.2 MANNING 7. and Rescue Officer (Air Boatswain). and training the hangar deck firefighting and rescue team and maintaining and operating assigned equipment. and make minor emergency repairs to the flight deck and associated equipment.3 Duties and Procedure Requirements.1. Aviation fuel repair team 2. The IWO’s duties apply to initial emergency response only and do not include authority to set flight quarters or to have aircraft moved for other than emergency conditions.6 Integrity Watch Officer. Within the ship damage control organization are three repair teams in the air department: 1. and rescue team (both flight and hangar deck) and maintaining and operating assigned equipment on the flight deck.1. Crash. fight fires on.1. clear away wreckage. and personnel rescue. The Air Boss is responsible for aircraft firefighting.1. Salvage. The IWO assumes the duties of the ACHO when aircraft integrity watch is set. salvage.4 Aircraft Crash. 7. and Rescue Team. jettison. ORIGINAL . 7. salvage. The ACHO is responsible for coordinating aircraft movement on the flight/hangar decks during aircraft crash and fire evolutions and acting on or relaying communications from the scene leader to PriFly control. From its station in the island structure it serves to effect rescue of personnel from damaged aircraft on the flight deck.3 Aircraft Handling Officer. The following aircraft firefighting team organization and duties are essential to meet the training and procedure requirements contained herein.2. 7. Other responsibilities include overseeing aviation fuel repairs occurring on the flight/hangar decks and coordinating activities with damage control central.1 Air Department Repair Teams. and rescue team is the flight deck repair team. The Air Boatswain is responsible for organizing. 7-1 7. salvage. Figure 7-1 is a guideline only and should be adapted to meet local requirements.1. The aviation fuel officer is responsible for the organization.1 ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS 7.2 Team Organization During Normal Flight Operations.5 Hangar Deck Officer.1. supervising. The hangar deck officer is responsible for the organizing.2. salvage. Salvage. and rescue team 3.1 Crash. 7. and operation of the aviation fuel repair team.2 Air Officer (Air Boss). Note Additional personnel shall be assigned as necessary to support extended flight operations and to provide the fire protection listed herein during periods when the ship is not at flight quarters. supervising. 7.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 CHAPTER 7 Aviation Ship (CV/CVN) Crash. Fire.1. The crash. 7.

When in place.2.3.2. Figure 7-1.4 Hose Team/Deployment. Note The hose team leader shall only provide direction to the hose team and not operate the hose.2.2 MFFV Driver and Operator. The scene leader is a trained individual in the vicinity of an incident who understands the requirements of the emergency and accepts responsibility for directing all available firefighting assets at the scene.2. 7.3. ORIGINAL 7-2 7. AFFF hoses shall be deployed to the scene using maximum personnel participation. The driver.3. . and one handline operator for the P-25 provide immediate response and initial fire. ** Applicable to jettison stations with portable coaming and safety nets with lowering capability. Note The scene leader shall maintain visual contact for hand signal and voice communications with hose team leaders and overhaul personnel.1 Scene Leader. turret operator.3. 7. Team Organization During Normal Flight Operations 7.3 Hose Team Leader. The hose team leader is responsible for the direction of one hose team under the supervision of the scene leader. a hose team shall consist of one AFFF hose with a minimum of five persons (maximum seven) on each 2-1/2-inch hose and a minimum of three persons (maximum five) on each 1-1/2-inch hose.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 FUEL SPILL SCN LDR — S/W NZL — MFFV MFFV* MFFV* MFFV MFFV* MFFV* — — S/W S/W S/W S/W — AS RQD A/C CRASH (SALVAGE) SCN LDR SPRVSR CRANE FRKLFT SLING SLING EQUIP SLING SLING DOLLY DOLLY DOLLY EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP A/C IN CATWALK SCN LDR SPRVSR CRANE FRKLFT SLING SLING EQUIP SLING SLING DOLLY DOLLY DOLLY EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP A/C JETTISON SCN LDR SPRVSR CRANE FRKLFT SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD COAMING** COAMING** COAMING** COAMING** NETS** HELO IN WATER SCN LDR SPRVSR HELO KIT HELO KIT EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD NAME RATE ABHC ABH-1 ABH-2/3 ABH-2/3 ABH-3 ABH-3 ABH-3 ABHAN ABHAN AN AN AN AN AN AN AA AA RMNDR NC FIRE SCN LOR SPRVSR CRANE FRKLFT MFFV MFFV MFFV MFFV MFFV MFFV EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP Notes: * Normally one MFFV will respond to fuel spill while the other MFFVs cover flight ops.fighting actions.

4 Aviation Squadrons.3. shall muster with the background assistance leader. An AFFF station consists of a 600-gallon AFFF concentrate tank. proximity suits shall be available for a minimum of two SCBAequipped hotsuitmen.9 Medical Personnel. Additional V-4 personnel shall be dispatched to isolate affected stations/quadrants of the JP-5 system and notify flight deck control when affected systems are isolated. and location of all weapons on the flight/hangar deck and/or aircraft. communication. 7-3 7. NAVBRIDGE. Messengers are responsible for relaying information from the scene leader to flight deck/hangar deck control. Properly equipped EOD/weapons personnel shall be stationed in flight deck control. The air gunner/air wing ordnance officer shall maintain a status board that confirms type. 7. all air wing personnel shall provide immediate assistance in all firefighting or training evolutions. The background assistance leader will provide further support as required. 7.6 Rescue Personnel.1 AFFF Proportioning System. valves. Note In each hangar bay. The plug person operates the station at the direction of the hose team.11 Aviation Fuels Personnel Repair. and CONFLAG stations).8 Background Assistance Leader. Hose Station Operator (Plug Person).3. D personnel on the hose team should be All positioned on the outside of the hose in relation to the aircraft to aid in mobility. typically a single-speed injection and a balanced pressure AFFF proportioning system.3. 7.10 EOD/Weapons Personnel.5 Messengers. Additionally. 7. The SOPVs are activated by electrical switches at user locations (PriFly. Saltwater and AFFF flow is controlled by hydraulically operated valves which are actuated by solenoid-operated pilot valves (SOPVs). The AFFF plug person also maintains direct communications with the injection station operator. 7. D personnel shall wear gloves during All firefighting evolutions.2.2. Medical personnel shall report to the background assistance leader for assignments. hangar deck and embarked squadron personnel not actively engaged at the fire scene.3. quantity. Aircraft squadrons are to provide a senior maintenance representative for technical assistance to be included in the background assistance leader’s detail. This person organizes and dispatches background assistance personnel in support of the scene leader.3. and maintains direct communication on the Sound-powered Phone X50J with the AFFF station operator. ORIGINAL . 7. and necessary piping.7 AFFF.2.3.2.2. These personnel shall respond to the background assistance detail and be available to provide technical assistance and systems repair. Personnel shall not enter enclosed fuel stations without a self-contained breathing apparatus. hose stations.3. CVN-72 has a two-speed pump system in lieu of balanced pressure proportioning. This information shall be provided to the scene leader and aircraft handling officer.3. 7.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Note D Minimum manning requirements should be enforced for hose teams involved at the fire scene to minimize exposure to ordnance hazards. 7.2. electrical controllers. Rescue personnel shall be available for immediate response and properly attired in firefighting proximity clothing (hotsuits).2. or involved in other critical duties. Note All flight deck.3 EQUIPMENT 7.2. Rescue personnel should always work in pairs as directed by the scene leader. They shall respond to the scene to provide technical assistance and weapons cooling temperature checks and weapons disposal as required. and decrease interference between hose team members.

as a minimum of 100 psi at the inlet is optimum for proper proportioning. depending on the demand. forward and aft of the bomb farm). 7.1 Equipment for Saltwater and AFFF Hose Outlets (Hangar and Flight Decks) 1.3. Note Emergency lighting shall be checked daily.3. Alternate stations should be designated. Hose downstream of the eductor is typically limited to 150-feet on the same deck or one deck above the saltwater outlet. Hoses shall be of sufficient length to permit reaching all areas on the flight deck and adjacent weather decks from at least two outlets. Flight deck AFFF hose outlets are located in catwalks and in the vicinity of the island. Emergency lighting is provided at each hose reel station. Nozzles on 1-1/2-inch saltwater lines and those used with AFFF in-line eductors are 95 gpm models.3 Hose Control Devices. A pushbutton control is located adjacent to each AFFF hose station. 7.3. All nozzle gpm flow ratings are based on 100 psi pressure at the nozzle inlet. Hose control devices shall be attached to AFFF hose outlets near large concentrations of weapons (i. AFFF.3. Hoses 3. Hangar bay AFFF hose outlets are located port and starboard in the general vicinity of the AFFF injection stations from which they are supplied.3. Vari-nozzles ORIGINAL 7-4 4.2 AFFF Hose Outlets. A pushbutton control is located adjacent to each AFFF hose station.3 Hose Outlets.e. the two-speed pump supplies the deck-edge nozzles. Nozzles on 1-1/2-inch AFFF hoses on flight and hangar decks are the 125 gpm units. 60 gpm. The two-speed pump operates at 27 or 65 gpm. Highdemand systems such as hangar bay sprinklers are served by the high-speed output. This system supplies all services other than flight deck sprinkling. Hose outlet valves 2. Flow rates are 250 gpm for all 2-1/2-inch hose lines. Spanner wrenches (2) 5. Vari-nozzles are used on all AFFF and saltwater hose lines. The balanced pressure proportioning system supplies deck edge nozzles on the CVs.3. Deck-edge nozzles are supplied by the single-speed system on CVNs and by the balanced pressure system on CVs. On selected CVs.3. CV/CVN flight decks have an AFFF firefighting system consisting of flush-deck and deckedge nozzles installed in combination with the saltwater washdown system. Locating the eductor at the outlet allows the plug person to handle transferring the pickup tube between AFFF containers and moves this activity off to the side. The low-rate output will supply hose lines and small sprinkler systems. This in-line eductor may be placed anywhere in the hose line but is recommended to be near or on the saltwater outlets.2 Vari-Nozzles and In-Line Eductors. One Halon 1211. or system shutdown. 7. controls are located in PriFly and on the NAVBRIDGE. The station consists of one 1-1/2-inch hose reel and one 2-1/2-inch hose outlet with hose and nozzle preconnected.3. The balanced pressure proportioning utilizes a 65 gpm pump and a balancing valve to mix AFFF concentrate and seawater at a nominal 6 percent over a wide range of flows. 7. Controls for the flight deck fixed fire extinguishing system are located in both PriFly and on the navigation bridge. or one CO2 and one PKP extinguisher (AFFF outlets on flight deck). 7.. This injection pump serves the flush-deck and cannon-type nozzles. 7. On CVN 72 and follow-on ships CMWD is controlled only from the navigation bridge.3.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 The injection pump system supplies the flush-deck nozzles on the flight deck and on CVNs the deck-edge nozzles. AFFF from the concentrate tank is injected into the saltwater (injection point is on the 03 level just downstream of the saltwater control valve) via a positive displacement pump. . Excess concentrate from the pump is diverted back to the tank as necessary to maintain a nominal 6 percent AFFF solution.4 AFFF Flight Deck Fire Extinguishing Systems. The controls allow for selection of salt water. The portable in-line eductors are stowed in repair lockers and are used to mix sea water and AFFF concentrate from 5-gallon containers to produce AFFF solution for combatting fires.

7.3. One bolt cutters (36-inch) d. and high-torque screw adaptors and other tools unique to type aircraft embarked 4. the controls on the island ends will not activate the system unless a switch on the panel in flight deck control is in the ON position. One pair cable cutters (14-inch) c. Each group is supplied from two risers: one from a port AFFF station and one from a starboard AFFF station. Two hacksaws (12 spare blades) i.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 7. AFFF is supplied via a single speed pump system described in paragraph 7. Crash and rescue tool inventory containing the following: a. The number and spacing of the deck edge nozzles are of a design that provides adequate coverage regardless of the placement of bomb skids and carts. immediate employment AFFF handlines should be initiated to assist with fire extinguishment and simultaneous weapons cooling. Aluminized fire protection suits (12 complete sets) a. and on the fore and aft ends of the island. 7. Crash and rescue tool inventories containing the firefighting/rescue tools and equipment listed below shall be maintained for use in emergencies. Two pair pliers (6-inch and 10-inch) f. One pinch bar (26-inch) m. CO2.6 Hangar Deck AFFF Sprinkler System. NATOPS Aircraft Salvage Manual (Afloat). flight deck control. All equipment shall be inspected daily prior to commencement of flight operations. or upon activation of the weapons area sprinkler system. 3. Special tools required for hoist panel removal a.3. Four Halon 1211. Controls to start and stop flow to individual sprinkler groups are located in the conflagration (CONFLAG) stations and along each side of the hangar deck in the vicinity of the related sprinkler group. One drift punch (10-inch) h. One torque wrench (150. One 10K port-a-power jack ORIGINAL . Two 3/8-inch speed handles with various reed and prince.3. Two gasoline portable forcible entry saws (with 10 spare blades per portable saw) n. Two pry bars (36-inch and 60-inch) l. phillips. The sprinkler system is divided into groups that can be individually actuated. Ground locks for each type aircraft assigned (AVCAL items) k. SHIPALTS are in progress to remove this switch and modify wiring such that the panel and island control switches can activate the bomb farm zone at all times. Controls to start and stop flow are located in PriFly. Requirements for 7-5 salvage equipment can be found in NAVAIR 00-80R-19.3. Note On some carriers. In the event of a bomb farm/weapons staging area conflagration.to 190-foot-pounds) b. One side cutting pliers (10-inch) e.5 Flight Deck Weapons Staging Area (Bomb Farm) AFFF Sprinkler System. The system is used to rapidly extinguish an aviation fuel spill fire prior to heat buildup sufficient to initiate weapons cookoff conditions. AFFF sprinkler systems are installed in the overhead of the hangar deck. A backup ready stock of four aluminized fire protection suits shall be maintained. This switch shall be maintained in the ON position at all times and should be a daily check item. 2. One ball peen hammer (1-1/2-pound) g.4. 1. One 1/2-inch drive socket set o. Two crash/fire axes j. NAVBRIDGE. The weapons staging area is protected by an AFFF sprinkler system consisting of deck edge nozzles.7 Tool Inventory. or PKP and three fresh water portable extinguishers.

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 p. Two each reed and prince screwdrivers (8 inch) q. Two V-blade rescue knives and 12 spare blades r. One 4-pound grapnel hook trailed with 12-foot chain s. One battery-powered megaphone t. Two safety flashlights 4. Two flashlight, safety, two-cell u. One portable welding kit v. One portable oxygen acetylene cutting kit w. One Halligan tool x. Minimum of six positive-pressure selfcontained breathing apparatus with six spare air bottles y. Minimum of six safety harnesses 11. Wrench, vice grip (10-inch) z. Powered extracation tool aa. Screwdriver (12-inch) reed and prince ab. Speed handles (3/8-inch with various reed and prince, phillips and high torque screw adapters) ac. 7/32 t-handle. 7.3.8 Crash Crane. All CVs/CVNs shall have a crane with a lift and roll capability for immediate response of moving the heaviest aircraft supported. There shall be a manufacturer aircraft hoisting sling available for immediate response of each aircraft type embarked. The Air Boatswain shall notify the TYCOM, via the Chain of Command, of any aircraft embarked without a required manufactured hoisting sling. 7.3.9 Crash Forklift. A 20,000-pound lift capacity forklift shall be maintained on the flight deck during air operations for use in effecting rescue/aircraft salvage. ORIGINAL 7-6 12. Wrench, adjustable (12-inch) 13. Key head screw (7/32) 14. Bolt cutters 15. Battery powered megaphone 16. Ball peen hammer (1-1/2-pound) 17. Tool roll, canvas 18. Minimum of two SCBAs with four spare cylinders will be pre-positioned in each hangar bay 19. Tapered plugs (6), 3 wooden, 3 rubber. 20. Non-conductive extension ladder. Note A typical tool roll/kit shall contain pockets or straps to maintain the tools in an orderly manner. The tool roll/kit may be of local design and manufacture. 5. Hacksaw (with six blades) 6. Knife, rescue, V-blade (with six sets of blades) 7. Pliers, lineman 8. Pliers, rib joint, water pump (10-inch) 9. Screwdriver, common (8-inch) 10. Screwdriver, phillips (8-inch) 7.3.10 Hangar Deck Salvage Forklift. A 15,000-pound lift capacity forklift shall be maintained on the hangar deck. 7.3.11 Hangar Deck Tool Inventory 1. Aluminized fire protection suits (six complete sets) 2. Crash/fire axes 3. Halligan tool

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 7.4 MOBILE FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT 7.4.7 Limited Flight Operations 1. Single launch and recovery — One MFFV shall be manned and positioned in the vicinity of flight operations. 2. Carrier qualifications (CARQUALs) — During CARQUALs, one MFFV shall be manned and positioned for a downwind approach to the touch-and-go area, and one MFFV shall be positioned in the FLY 1 area for a downwind approach to aircraft refueling and the best view of the bow catapults. CAUTION MFFVs shall not be used to tow aircraft under any circumstances. 7.4.8 Maintenance Turnups 1. Flight deck maintenance turnups — When not at flight quarters, one MFFV shall be manned and centrally located to the aircraft conducting the maintenance turnup. Note The duties and responsibilities are primary in nature, no other duties shall be assigned while aircraft are embarked. 2. Hangar deck maintenance turnups — One MFFV shall be manned and positioned in the immediate vicinity of the aircraft. Note If there is no MFFV available, an AFFF hose line shall be manned in the immediate vicinity of the aircraft turning up. 7.4.9 Ordnance Handling Evolutions, Underway Replenishment. One manned MFFV shall be in the vicinity for each concentrated weapons loading evolution. 7.4.9.1 MFFV Drivers. MFFV drivers should be equipped with SRC 22/47 headsets. 7.5 TRAINING REQUIREMENTS

7.4.1 MFFV Requirements. Three MFFVs should be provided to support flight operations. The MFFVs should be positioned as follows during flight quarters. Note If only one MFFV is available, an AFFF hoseline shall be manned to cover aircraft refueling and turn-up operations. 7.4.2 Launch 1. Ships with two MFFVs operational — During prelaunch starts, checkouts, and launch, position one MFFV at a location that will provide the best view of the FLY 2 area and the bow catapults. Position the second MFFV at a location that will provide the best view of the FLY 3 area and the waist catapults. 2. These units shall be positioned, manned, and running from the time “start engines” is announced until the launch is completed. 7.4.3 Recovery 1. Ships with two MFFVs operational — One MFFV shall be positioned so that a downwind approach can be made to the landing area. One shall be positioned in the FLY 1 area. 2. These units shall be manned and running from commencement of recovery until recovery is completed. 7.4.4 Respot. One MFFV shall patrol the entire flight deck during all respots, rearming, and/or refueling evolutions. 7.4.5 Hangar Deck. During flight quarters, a minimum of one MFFV shall be available in each hangar bay to respond to a hangar deck fire. 7.4.6 Fueling. The MFFV-assigned roving patrol on the flight deck fulfills the requirements for portable fire extinguishers during JP-5 refueling operations. 7-7

All personnel assigned duties incidental to flight operations shall attend a formal aviation firefighting school as required by OPNAVINST 3541.1 series. ORIGINAL

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 7.5.1 Embarked On-the-Job Training Requirements. The air officer shall ensure that all personnel assigned duties incidental to flight operations (including embarked aviation activities) receive continuous training in the following areas: 1. Organization and leadership of the crash, salvage, and rescue team 2. Fire reporting procedures 3. Communications 4. First-aid and self-aid 5. AFFF/saltwater station operation on flight and hangar decks including hangar deck sprinkler system 6. Aircraft firefighting procedures 7. Hazardous ordnance procedures 8. MFFVs (familiarization) 9. Catapult steam smothering 10. Portable Halon 1211, PKP, and CO2 extinguishers (operation and location) 11. Appropriate firefighting actions to perform until assistance arrives 12. Basic handling of composite materials and hazardous materials produced after a crash or fire. Air Department Training Team (ADTT) will be responsible, under the direction of the Air Officer, for the training of flight deck, hangar deck, air wing, and emergency response personnel. 7.5.2 Crash, Salvage, and Rescue Crewmember Training. Personnel assigned as crash, salvage, and rescue crewmembers shall attend (as a team) the Aircraft Firefighting Shipboard Team Training (AFSTT) Course C-780-2012 once during an 18-month cycle or whenever the team experiences a greater than 40-percent turnover. They shall also ORIGINAL 7-8 cooling and jettison receive additional (in-depth) training to include the following: 1. MFFVs. 2. Personnel rescue procedures. 3. Hazardous ordnance cookoff times, weapons cooling, and jettison procedures. 4. Mobile crash handling equipment. 5. Aircraft entry (normal, manual, forced, and emergency). 6. Aircraft hoisting equipment. 7. Maintenance of crash handling equipment. 8. Crash dolly usage. 9. Boat and aircraft crane (when applicable). 10. Aircraft salvage procedures. 11. Aircraft jettison procedures. 12. Emergency flight and hangar deck repairs. 13. Aircraft familiarization. 14. A minimum of two assigned personnel shall receive formal training/certification in basic oxygen, acetylene, and arc welding. 15. SCBA. 7.5.2.1 Hazardous Material Training. Commanding officers should ensure that all personnel assigned to the crash fire rescue organization receive in-depth formal training on hazardous materials to ensure they are capable of handling hazardous materials produced after a crash or fire. A minimum of four assigned personnel shall receive formal HAZMAT training (NEC 9595) or equivalent. 7.5.3 Drills. Drills shall be conducted with sufficient frequency to maintain the level of proficiency in the fundamentals of aircraft firefighting and salvage operations as specified in FXP 4, Ship Exercises. Note Crash and salvage personnel shall be crosstrained to meet the requirements listed herein.

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Crash and salvage teams should utilize available facilities (e.g., fleet training centers, naval air stations, etc.) whenever possible to fight live fires for the purpose of continuing individual personnel qualifications and team training. 7.5.4 Conduct of Drills. The following information shall be provided to the scene leader by the exercise observer when conducting drills. 1. Class of fire, location, and aircraft damage 2. Type(s) of ordnance hazard(s) 3. Casualties (personnel and material) 4. Hose teams should attack the fire from a 45_ angle 5. Fire under control (when initial equipment is at scene) 6. Fire extinguishment. 7.5.5 Drill Sequence of Events. For training purposes, the scene leader shall utilize the following checklist when fighting aircraft fires (simulated) on the flight or hangar deck. Sequence should be followed to the maximum practicable extent in combating actual fires (quotes indicate report to be made). Note Scene leader can change sequence to fit situation. Additional procedures for aircraft fires on the hangar deck can be referenced in paragraph 7.7.7. 1. Initial response equipment at scene (MFFVs, four AFFF hose teams). 2. “Nozzle on, move in.” Note Back out the P-25 as soon as practical to maximize range of hose teams, to reduce noise for commands between scene/hose leaders, and make crash and salvage personnel available for salvage. 3. “Fire under control”/“weapon cooling in progress” (if required). Note Hose control devices shall be deployed on all drills involving weapons. 4. Effect “rescue”/“casualties”/“safe seats” (if required). 5. “Fire out”/continue weapons cooling for 15 minutes. 6. “Nozzle off, back out.” 7. “EOD to scene”/“weapons saved.” 8. “Overhaul” of residual fire, remove liquid oxygen converters (if required). Note LOX removal procedures are preplanned to avoid bringing LOX to populated scene areas. 9. “Set reflash watch.” 10. With squadron maintenance personnel present, turn scene over to crash team leader, commence salvage operations, and defuel (if required). 11. “Estimated time to ready deck.” 12. Conduct FOD walkdown. Hazardous material shall be brought to the attention of the background assistance detail leader who will delegate its removal to cognizant personnel. 13. “Ready deck.” Personnel shall use caution when crossing a firefighting hose to avoid personal injury. 7-9 14. Debrief. ORIGINAL

11. 9. Debrief. 4. “Nozzle off. 8. four AFFF hose teams).NAVAIR 00-80R-14 7. CONFLAG station(s) with capability of actuating all fixed firefighting systems on the hangar deck shall be continuously manned when aircraft are spotted on the hangar deck. back out. salvage. 10. 12. Sequence should be followed to the maximum practical extent in combating actual fires (quotes indicate reports to be made). Turn scene over to fuels repair personnel. the remaining team shall commence fighting the fire from the door. 13. A decision to conduct flight operations when discrepancies are known to exist in firefighting equipment shall be made only by the commanding officer.5. 3. Discrepancies shall be reported to the commanding officer via the air officer as soon as they are detected. Note D Appropriate liaison shall be coordinated with cognizant engineering department officers with responsibilities for firefighting services affecting the hangar deck and flight deck. move in.6.6 FLIGHT QUARTERS PREPARATION Personnel shall not enter enclosed fuel stations without a self-contained breathing apparatus. Effect “rescue”/“casualties” (if required). The crash.” 6. D Appropriate liaison shall be coordinated with cognizant AIMD (IMA) officers regarding responsibilities that affect operational and intermediate maintenance of MFFVs. 7. Set reflash watch. “Fire under control”/“Fuels repair on scene”/ “Station isolate” and all electrical power secured. “Nozzle on. 5. Note Hose team response shall be one team to firefighting porthole for cooling. FOD walkdown. 7. A minimum of one CONFLAG station in each hangar bay shall be manned during all ordnance loading/ off-loading evolutions. They shall report the results of the inspection to the aircraft handling officer.6 Drill Sequence of Events for Fuel Station Fires. ORIGINAL 7-10 . 2. Overhaul. Ready deck.1 CONFLAG Stations. to reduce noise for commands between scene/hose leaders. Fuels repair personnel to commence repair operations. 1. report estimate damage/time of repair. and crash and salvage personnel available for salvage.” Note Back out P-25 as soon as practical to maximize range of hose teams. “Fire out. and rescue officer and the hangar deck officer shall ensure inspection of their respective areas when flight quarters is sounded to evaluate the readiness and availability of firefighting equipment. For training purposes the scene leader shall utilize the following checklist when fighting fuel station fires on the flight or hangar deck. Initial response equipment at the scene (MFFVs.” 7.

have been inspected.2 AFFF Proportioning System Manning Requirements.3.6. and the ship’s air gunner shall advise the aircraft handling officer of the status of their respective AFFF services. On these ships. The cognizant engineering department officer has reported to the air officer via the cognizant air department representative that engineering department firefighting equipment and engineering installations. Overhead AFFF sprinkling group d. and rescue officer.1 Inspection and Reporting. aligned. 2. and/or hangar deck. ORIGINAL .3. Hangar deck services — The four types of services installed for hangar deck protection are: a. Flight deck services — The types of services installed for flight deck protection are: a. The following manning of the AFFF system during flight quarters shall be observed: 1. AFFF proportioning and injection stations need not be continuously manned except as noted in paragraph 7.6. the AFFF tank is full (top of the sight glass) of AFFF concentrate. When an aircraft emergency occurs on the flight. associated with hangar and flight deck firefighting. 7. Flight quarters — As early as possible before the first launch.6. 3. Nonflight quarters posture — During this period. An AFFF system service shall be considered operable if: 1. 7.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 7. salvage. word shall be passed on the 1 MC announcing system. Lower stage weapons elevator AFFF flooding system. Upper stage weapons elevator AFFF flooding system e.3 AFFF Proportioning System Manning Requirements 7. 1. the crash.3.3 Conditions for Operable AFFF Services. At this time. 2. The flight deck or hangar bay service and the associated second deck station are aligned properly (valves and electrical power). 2. the flush-deck and deck-edge nozzles in one group are considered a single service. 7-11 1. The capability to perform systems maintenance should be considered during this period. 2. Hose stations: one 1-1/2-inch hard rubber hose b. All AFFF proportioning and 03-level injection stations shall be aligned and filled for remote operation from all applicable control stations. Flush-deck sprinkling group (includes fantail sprinkling groups) c. Bomb farm sprinkling.6.3.6. hangar deck officer.6. the personnel designated in the battle bill shall immediately man assigned AFFF stations.3. The following inspection and reporting procedures shall be observed during all periods aircraft are embarked. Hose stations: one 1-1/2-inch hard rubber hose and one 2-1/2-inch soft hose connected to the outlet b. a group of flight deck nozzles supplied by one group control valve is one “outlet”). Note Discrepancies and changes in systems status shall be reported to the commanding officer via the air officer as soon as they are detected. In specifying the readiness requirements for AFFF systems. Hose stations: one 2-1/2-inch soft hose c. Deck-edge sprinkling group d. 7. a service is defined as one AFFF “outlet” (for example. and found to be operable.2 Services Defined. Note On CVNs the flush-deck and deck-edge sprinkling groups are supplied by the same control valve. the systems readiness requirements are applicable to those AFFF services within areas of the flight and hangar decks used to park the aircraft.

The following are the maximum inoperable AFFF services permitted on the hangar deck. PMS checks or post-repair testing indicates that a service will not operate from all remote control stations. . Flow tests demonstrate a minimum of 90 percent of the nozzles in a flight deck sprinkling group are unplugged. 6.3. 4. 2. ORIGINAL 7-12 Note If the firemain is in ZEBRA segregation condition. Whenever one or more AFFF system hangar bay services are not operable (a hose or a sprinkling group). All flight deck and hangar deck AFFF system services should be operable as outlined in paragraph 7.6. provided inoperable services of the same type. In this case. and the provision of item 5 of paragraph 7.6. Note Figure 7-2 is a decision flowchart of the above information and should be used in identifying inoperable services. The ship’s information book (damage control section) contains specific guidelines for proper firemain segregation conditions. Each group is one service. Adjacent services are defined as sprinkling groups that share a common boundary or hose stations next to each other around the hangar bay perimeter. Backup MFFV requirements also are given. During flight quarters.3 or item 4 of paragraph 7. 3. the service must be continuously manned at the inoperable remote control station and at the local or remote control station. indicating that the service can be successfully actuated from all local and remote control stations. the criteria apply only to the aircraft “parking area” of all hangar bay sprinkling group deck areas that are to contain parked aircraft. 3. When aircraft are embarked. one MFFV shall be operable and stationed on the hangar deck. One supply to hangar bay sprinkling groups that have two supplies may be inoperable. A minimum of 75 percent of the installed fire pump capacity shall be available in each of the YOKE firemain groups to provide adequate AFFF coverage for flight quarters.3. PMS checks and post-repair testing have been satisfactorily completed.3. all flight deck and hangar deck AFFF system services should be operable. 1.6.3. but can be actuated manually or from another remote control station. the criteria given below should be applied to the entire hangar deck. discrepancy reports for inoperative services should include an evaluation of effect on the total hangar and flight deck system. it may be necessary to shift to YOKE condition for major fires involving multiple AFFF stations to assure adequate firemain capacity. This requirement applies regardless of the firemain segregation condition in effect. 3. Each group is one service. are not adjacent to each other. 7. 7. 5.3 is met. A maximum of one hangar bay sprinkling group can be inoperable at a time. 4. A group may contain flush deck and/or deck edge nozzles.4 General Readiness Requirements 1.6.3.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 either the provision of item 3 of paragraph 7.5 Readiness Requirements — Hangar Deck. Weapons elevator flooding systems are not to be considered when determining adjacent service.3.6. such as hoses. Therefore. and the ship has set nonflight quarter conditions.6. There is no limit on the number of groups which may be in this condition. During nonflight quarter conditions. Communications must be established between all manned stations. Hoses and lower stage weapons elevator flooding systems supplied by a maximum of two second deck AFFF stations may be inoperable. 2. AFFF supply services (such as concentrate tanks and proportioners) may also be the supply source of flight deck outlets. Flow tests demonstrate a minimum of 90 percent of the nozzles in a hangar sprinkling group are operational.3 is fully implemented.3.

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 7-2. Aircraft Carrier Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Identification of Inoperable Services 7-13 ORIGINAL .

7. 7. If the flight or hangar deck has inadequate AFFF coverage to permit parking of aircraft during nonflight quarter conditions: 1.6. During nonflight quarter conditions it is not required that the MFFV be manned. engine running. provided inoperable services of the same type. Qualified MFFV operators must be aboard and available to go to the MFFV when called on the 1 MC announcing system. such as inoperable hoses supplied by one station. The following are the maximum inoperable AFFF services permitted on the flight deck.8 Procedures Concerning Inadequate AFFF Coverage During Nonflight Quarters Posture. Weapons elevator flooding systems are not to be considered when determining adjacent services. 3. Adjacent services are defined as sprinkling groups sharing a common boundary or hose stations next to each other around the flight deck perimeter. Note D Figure 7-4 is a decision flowchart of the above information and should be used to determine readiness of the flight deck. aircraft fueling/defueling. Accomplish repairs and retest of defective AFFF system equipment. Submit a casualty report indicating the conditions in the AFFF systems and the planned actions. flush-deck nozzle group. 2. upper stage weapons elevator flooding systems. the air officer shall notify . or hot work in any hangar bay sprinkling group deck areas containing an inoperable service.6 are exceeded. During nonflight quarter conditions. During flight quarters.6. Backup mobile equipment requirements also are given.3. one MFFV shall be manned. Submit a casualty correction report when the corrective action is completed. 7. 2.1 Notification. the criteria apply only to the “parking areas” that are to contain parked aircraft. Do not permit aircraft maintenance. aircraft fueling/defueling. Postpone flight quarters and flight operations until requirements can be met.3. ORIGINAL 7-14 7. 3.6. Note Figure 7-5 is a decision flowchart of the above information. 4.3.6 Flight Deck Readiness Requirements.5 and 7. and stationed on the flight deck. D When the maximum inoperable AFFF services permitted in paragraphs 7. are not adjacent to those from a second inoperable station. or hot work in any “parking area” sprinkling groups containing an inoperable service.6. Whenever one or more AFFF system flight deck services are not operable. Submit a casualty correction report when the corrective action is completed. Accomplish repairs and retest of defective AFFF system equipment.6.7 FIREFIGHTING PROCEDURES 7.3.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Note Figure 7-3 is a decision flowchart of the above information and should be used to determine AFFF hangar deck readiness. the following actions are required. 1. If the flight or hangar deck has inadequate AFFF coverage to permit flight quarters: 1. and hoses) supplied from two of the second deck AFFF stations may be inoperable. 7. If postponement of flight quarters is restrictive to the ship mission. the commanding officer may elect to conduct flight quarters and permit no aircraft maintenance.7 Procedures Concerning Inadequate AFFF Coverage to Permit Flight Quarters. Reporting of a mishap should be accomplished by the most expeditious method in accordance with the ship’s operating instructions.3. 2. Submit a casualty report indicating the conditions in the AFFF systems and the planned actions. In the event of a pending emergency. All or any combination of the services (deck-edge nozzle group. the criteria given below apply to the entire flight deck.

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 7-3. Aircraft Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Maximum Inoperable AFFF Services Permitted on the Hangar Deck 7-15 ORIGINAL .

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 7-4. Aircraft Carrier Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Maximum Inoperable AFFF Services Permitted on the Flight Deck ORIGINAL 7-16 .

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 7-5. Aircraft Carrier Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Inadequate AFFF Coverage Available 7-17 ORIGINAL .

D Personnel shall exercise extreme caution when approaching an aircraft prior to engine shutdown. All preplanning and training shall be directed toward providing the following minimum initial response to an actual mishap or drill: 1. 7. 12. . or CO2) 11. On the contrary. Forcible entry equipment 9. Two spare 1-1/2-inch and two spare 2-1/2-inch hose control devices (with appropriate varinozzles attached). such as wind change and/or other disruptions. Four AFFF hoses Note When the MFFV is nursed at the scene.7. 5. ordnance cooling. Immediate communications should be established on the X50J sound power circuit with the AFFF injection station. Note When fire occurs on the flight and/or hangar deck. Two spare hose rolls 8. Note It is emphasized that nothing herein is intended to discourage immediate firefighting action by individuals while awaiting the arrival of organized teams. Messengers/phone talkers 10. Accordingly. 7.1 Scene Leader. He shall direct firefighting teams in weapons cooling as specified in paragraph 2. designated personnel shall man assigned AFFF injection stations. Individual actions that should occur on initial response are as follows.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 flight and hangar deck personnel by use of the 3 and 5 MC announcing systems and flight warning alarm. Two stretchers/two first-aid kits 7. The accident alarm shall be sounded to notify flight deck personnel of an actual on-deck aircraft mishap. word shall be passed on the 1 MC announcing system. The scene leader assumes command and directs available personnel and equipment in firefighting procedures and tactics. MFFV(s) 2.4.2. At this time. 1-1/2-inch AFFF hose reels and variable pattern nozzles are specifically designed and installed for rapid deployment by one person. Two portable extinguishers (Halon 1211.5. Note Personnel shall be assigned to monitor charged fire hose(s) restrained with HOSE control device(s). Scene leader 3.7.2 Minimum Initial Response. and personnel rescue as the situation requires. PKP. These personnel shall ensure prompt response to conditions that affect the fire stream. the training provided to all air department and embarked aviation personnel should cover activation procedures and firefighting techniques for emergency operation of 1-1/2-inch hose reels by the first person on the scene. Hose team leaders 4. if necessary. it can be considered the equivalent of one AFFF hose team. Two rescue persons (hotsuit men) 6. AFFF hose(s) for weapons staging area(s) (bomb farm) protection properly manned ORIGINAL 7-18 D scene leader shall immediately make The an appraisal in regard to the presence of hazardous ordnance and request confirmation from flight deck control.

The messengers position them-selves directly behind the scene leader.2. Ensures external electrical power to aircraft involved is secured 13.4 AFFF Hose Teams. All attempts should be made to position the vehicle upwind of the fire. Ensures immediate assignment of personnel to provide nursing/replenishment hose to the initial response MFFV at the scene 7-19 3. Provides medical personnel and stretcher bearers 8. Provides personnel to other areas if additional fires occur 9. Ensures one person (plug person) is stationed at each AFFF control box. Assembles additional personnel not required at scene 2. Assembles two backup AFFF hoses properly manned 6. hose teams should maintain a profile as low as possible. and requests assistance commensurate with the gravity of the incident. advises the commanding officer.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Note The scene leader should evaluate the fire and make recommendations to PriFly for maneuvering the ship to provide favorable wind conditions. 7. These teams attack the fire and/or cool personnel and ordnance as directed by the hose team leaders.8 Weapons Staging Area (Bomb Farm) Fire Response AFFF Hose Team(s).7. Hose teams should maintain a position and stance which affords the most effective and safe hose handling techniques (See NSTM Figure 555-7. 7. Note During hangar deck fires when OBAs are being utilized. Effects the removal of aircraft adjacent to the scene 7.7.2.7. Rescue personnel are positioned in proximity to the scene leader.3 Air Officer. 14. AFFF plug person also maintains direct communication with the injection station operator.2. Dispatches fresh firefighting personnel to relieve fatigued hose team members.2. background assistance will establish an OBA control. The air officer assesses the fire situation. Designated driver/operators shall immediately position the vehicle at the scene of a fire in a location that will afford the most efficient control of the fire. ORIGINAL . heat. and provide protection for personnel rescue. and maintenance representatives are available.6 Messengers. and explosion hazards. 7. Ensures adequate flow of messengers to the scene leader 4.7. Note Due to smoke. The scene leader should evaluate the threat and recommend activation of bomb farm AFFF sprinkling and/or adjacent flush-deck sprinkler zones as appropriate. 7.2. Ensures fuel repair. properly manned AFFF hose team(s) shall be deployed forward and/or aft of the weapons staging area to conduct rapid fire extinguishment or provide weapons cooling protection. 7. messengers are no longer required. In the event of a fuel spill or fire on the flight deck when ordnance is stowed in a weapons staging area. and explosion hazards.7. heat. as required 5. cool ordnance. as necessary 12.7. Dispatches support personnel as required by scene leader 10. electrician.7 Background Assistance Leader 1. Note Due to smoke.2. 7.7.2 MFFV Driver/Operators. Once the OSL and BGA have established communications with sound-powered phones. 7.2. hose teams should maintain a profile as low as possible. Coordinates manning of appropriate elevators. as necessary 11.1 for illustrations of nozzleman techniques).5 Rescue Personnel.

3 Nursing/Replenishment of MFFVs 7.7. 7.4.4 Rescue 7. ORIGINAL . Specific guidance for each situation cannot be provided since vehicle repositioning and/or redeployment as a result of additional fires may be necessary.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 7.2 Rescue Personnel 1. Rescue team personnel should work in pairs throughout the rescue and salvage effort.7. The background assistance personnel will provide immediate first-aid to casualties and evacuate them as necessary.7.g.7.1 Nursing/Replenishment Considerations. D Information of aircraft entry. the decision to nurse/replenish MFFVs from an AFFF fixed system outlet should be coordinated by the scene leader. After initial minimum response actions are completed. catwalks. 7. 7-20 1.4.1 Rescue Path. and personnel removal may be found in NAVAIR 00-80R-14-1.3 Mobile Firefighting Vehicle (MFFV) Training. He reports the commencement and completion of the rescue and the number of casualties. Note Rescue and firefighting evolutions should be conducted simultaneously once a rescue path is provided.1 Scene Nursing/Replenishment Coordination.7. All preplanning and training should be directed toward a “worst-case” scenario. Note D Trained rescue personnel shall effect the rescue of aircrews and passengers. Adequate fire protection shall be maintained for rescue persons during rescue evolutions.3. Type fire and number of AFFF hose teams responding to the scene 3. The following considerations are provided for the scene leader in determining whether or not nursing/replenishment will be effected: 1. gun tubs) for additional casualties.7. 7. Personnel shall be provided for direct hookup of the nursing/replenishment hose to the initial response MFFV.7. Location and initial position of the vehicle relative to the fire scene 2. shipboard fire drills should include the requirement to practice nursing/replenishment of mobile vehicles. 2. Note Nursing/replenishment of MFFVs is highly recommended for multiaircraft mishaps and a single aircraft mishap that spreads to one or more aircraft with or without weapons involvement.3.2 Vehicle Support Functions Nursing/Replenishment 3. 7. Length of hose and firemain pressure. Multifirefighting deployment capability exists through utilization of turret and handlines and requires minimum personnel 5. A 2-1/2-inch and/or 1-1/2-inch reducing adapter shall be carried on the vehicle to facilitate nursing/replenishment from either size fixed AFFF hose station outlet. engine shutdown procedures.3. ejection seat safetying.4.7.1. Investigate the surrounding area (e.. When an adequate rescue path is provided.7. Each rescue effort should be directed toward evacuating one incapacitated person at a time.3 Background Personnel. Personnel support from background assistance will be required to move the nursing/replenishment hose to the fire scene. Vehicle mobility requirements 4. 2. 7. Accordingly.3. 7. the scene leader will direct the rescue of personnel.

Salvage.7. The decision to commit these assets will normally be made by the air officer. and AFFF for MFFVs should be made available.7.7. Close all weapons elevator doors/hatches.7 Hangar Deck. 7.1 Response to the Scene. updating the estimate. Initial response personnel without OBA/positive pressure breathing apparatuses shall be immediately relieved by the Background Assistance/ Repair Party personnel with OBA/positive pressure breathing apparatuses. 8. 7. and first-aid kits. mass casualty reactions may be required. 7-21 7. A constant resupply and augmentation of portable extinguishers. 4. Close all doors and hatches from the hangar to the interior of the ship. as necessary.1 Air Officer.3 together with all available stretcher bearers.2 Background Assistance Detail.6. Upon completion of rescue. to ensure no residual fire exists.5.2.8 Multiaircraft CONFLAG. for fire containment and casualty control.7.4.7. Note As a result of a multiaircraft CONFLAG. and Rescue Officer. 7. Utilize ship’s direction to maximize ventilation efforts. 7. 5.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 7.4 Completion of Rescue. Leave all hangar deck lights on. The scene leader gives estimated ready deck time to PriFly if salvage operations are not required or turns command of the scene over to the crash. 7. This detail assembles to commence FOD walkdown.1 Scene Leader. the scene leader continues to direct the hose teams until the fire is extinguished. and rescue officer to effect removal of aircraft. many additional requirements must be considered in establishing procedures for life safety.7. Close fire and elevator doors immediately. restore gear. 6. Background assistance should be established in the adjacent hangar bay. and rescue officer.8. Return elevators to the flight deck level. 2. 3. contingent upon the on-scene leader requirements. Note In the event of a fire on either the flight or hangar deck. The initial response to the scene shall include equipment and personnel stipulated in paragraphs 7.7. sufficient personnel from the unaffected area shall stand by to provide personnel and equipment augmentation. damage control.2 Crash.7. The air officer should activate appropriate zone(s) of the flight deck sprinkling system for any ORIGINAL Note Cross ventilate to facilitate venting of smoke.7. 7. stretchers. This officer estimates time to ready deck and reports to PriFly.2 and 7. Hose teams shall cool weapons involved in the fire for a minimum of 15 minutes or until the ordnance has been reported to be at safe ambient temperature by EOD/weapons personnel. and fire suppression. the scene leader sets the reflash watch. The following additional procedures for aircraft fires on the hangar deck shall be followed: 1. shall be the same with the following additions. . 7. The air officer shall have the overall responsibility for the firefighting effort on the flight deck.5 Weapons Cooling. as outlined above.7.7. as necessary.5.8.6. salvage. Cooling teams shall be posted on opposite sides of doors of affected bay. 7. one with a portable fire extinguisher and one with a Halligan tool/crash axe. salvage. When completed. The actions. In the event of multiaircraft CONFLAG on the flight or hangar deck. and provide personnel to the crash.6 Estimated Ready Deck/Salvage 7. 7.7.7. The scene leader directs two personnel attired in complete proximity suits.4.8. hoses.1 Scene Leader.7.5 Residual Fire Overhaul/Reflash Watch 7.2 Additional Actions to Cover Mass Casualty Scene.7. 7.

7. The air wing commander provides personnel to assist the air department in firefighting. hotter fire of growing intensity and very high radiant heat. at least one upwind zone should be activated. hose teams. more fire is generated to further degrade and open additional fuel cells.7. Supervisory personnel and fire parties should take advantage of every opportunity to drill and acquire knowledge of their ship’s fixed and mobile firefighting equipment. This officer establishes the area for collection and disposition of personnel casualties. ORIGINAL . in that as more fuel is fed from ruptured tanks.4 CONFLAG Station Operator.9. and firefighting procedures specified within this manual. The CONFLAG operator should activate appropriate zone(s) of the sprinkling system when multiaircraft or spill fires are judged beyond the capability of the initial hose team. casualty evacuation. 7. Specific procedures for jettison shall be included in the ship operating instructions based upon assigned equipment and in accordance with NAVAIR 00-80R-19.3 Aircraft Debris Pile/Running Fuel Fires. controlling. the initial response MFFV shall simultaneously fight the fire.2 Aircraft Handling Officer. The medical officer processes personnel casualties. and rescue techniques are well defined. Approximately 15 knots relative windspeed provides optimum distribution of AFFF from the flight deck extinguishing system. and MFFV/halon handline operators along with effective use of the ship’s fixed AFFF flush deck systems. Upon arrival to the scene.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 multiaircraft fire or when a spill fire is judged to be beyond the capability of the initial hose team/firefighting vehicle.7 AirWing Commander. This type of three-dimensional fire normally results during catastrophic aircraft crashes when the fuselage and wing fuel cells have been torn open. 7. These situations allow aerated fuel to rain downward and into deepseated aircraft debris. Flight and hangar deck aircraft firefighting.2.3 Hangar Deck Officer. The embarked squadron commanders provide personnel to assist the air department in firefighting.2.6 Embarked Squadron Commanders.9. 7-22 It is conceivable that a situation that dictates the jettison of an aircraft may arise. Aircraft Salvage Manual.2 Initial Response MFFV Operations. and damage assessment and repair. 7. This results in a higher.7. 7. planning. and relays all information from the scene leader to PriFly control. 7. Note The following suggested procedures are recommended for training purposes.8.2.7. 7. casualty evacuation.9 AIRCRAFT FIREFIGHTING TACTICS AND PROCEDURES 7. and teamwork by both ship’s company and embarked air wing personnel. These debris pile/running fuel type fires can easily become selfgenerating.8.7.2.8.2.8 JETTISON Note Only the Commanding Officer may authorize the jettisoning of aircraft. Containing.8. and damage assessment and repair. The following procedures discuss certain additional situations not discussed in detail elsewhere in the manual. The hangar deck officer shall man the applicable CONFLAG control station. Success will continue to depend on training. and combating this type of fire requires a highly organized effort among the scene leader.1 Introduction. cool the cockpit area. 7. designates the aircraft/weapons elevator used for movement of casualties.7. leadership.5 Medical Officer. which often shields the fire from direct attack by AFFF hose teams. and cool exposed ordnance until relieved. crash. The hangar deck officer will activate appropriate zone(s) of the hangar sprinkling system for any multiaircraft fire or when a spill fire is judged to be beyond the capability of the initial hose team.2. Often one or more aircraft may be involved.8.8. In addition to activation of the zone in which fire is located.9. 7. aircraft configurations. 7. 7. fuel and weapons loads. but no two fire situations will be identical.

as necessary. they shall relieve ordnance cooling teams who are locked in position. The teams should be directed in their approach to provide both high-point cooling and low-point AFFF firefighting coverage. Accordingly. The teams shall then evacuate the scene leaving one firefighter to tend the nozzle. until the fire is out. Crash crews and flight deck personnel should familiarize themselves with the various types of ordnance carried by embarked aircraft. When the hose teams have achieved their close-in attack positions. D soon as practical. D MFFV operators and responding AFFF hose teams should approach with the wind at their backs and extinguish outlying pool and residual fires. at least one upwind zone shall be activated. the temperatures generated can cause wing-mounted weapons ejection cartridges to explode. the MFFV halon handline operator should enter between the two center low-point AFFF hose teams and expel a full charge of Halon 1211 directly into the seat of the fire for minimum of 5 seconds. This is accomplished by a coordinated advance combined with a methodical sweeping of the fire area. the hose team shall lock their agent on that particular weapon or weaponry as a weapons cooling team. 7.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Note D addition to AFFF flush deck zones In activated at the scene. ordnance cooling As teams shall lock in place hose control devices for extended cooling and personnel safety. personnel shall squat in position to lower the team’s physical silhouette should a deflagration or explosion occur. As AFFF hose teams arrive on the scene.4 AFFF Ordnance Cooling Teams. The cooling of fire-exposed weapons shall continue for 15 minutes after all residual fire/smoke has ceased or until EOD/ weapons personnel have determined that weapons have reached safe ambient temperatures. the scene leader should assemble his hose teams close together for a coordinated attack on the weakest and most advantageous point of approach to the debris fire.9. Once the team is in place. Once fire-exposed ordnance is identified. or they are relieved by other cooling teams or by the on-scene leader. The cooling of fire-involved ordnance is one of the most important aspects of aircraft firefighting operations. the MFFV and hose teams should respond accordingly. information derived from the aircraft weapons status board in flight deck control shall be passed to the on-scene leader and EOD/weapons personnel to enable the accountability of all accident-involved weapons. 7. During catastrophic aircraft debris pile/running fuel type fires. As the ship turns to provide quartering winds. they shall knock down fire and smoke to enable identification of fire-exposed ordnance. As containment of the fire is achieved. Note D firefighting hose teams shift their As positions to enable firefighting coverage or to take advantage of shifting wind directions. D Ordnance cooling hose team leaders shall ensure minimum manning of hose team personnel immediately upon lock on for weapons cooling. thus dropping weapons to the deck level and into or under aircraft debris.5 Fire-Involved Ordnance Training. ORIGINAL . This is best accomplished with two nozzles on wide fog pattern to block the radiant heat and two nozzles on narrow fog pattern to knock down and extinguish the fire. They shall remain locked on the weaponry until 7-23 hose control devices are installed. and the intensity and high radiant heat of the fire have been diminished. Their approach should be dedicated to getting as close to the seat of the running fuel fires as possible. This procedure should be repeated.9. Note AFFF hose teams shall continue cooling all fire-related debris to prevent reflash from deep-seated embers or super-heated metal parts until relieved by the scene leader. as presented in Chapter 2 of the manual.

or ruptured seals. In the shipboard environment pressurized 2-1/2-gallon freshwater extinguishers should be kept readily available for this purpose. Depending upon the amount of ignited fuel and wind directions.1.9. The fire should be attacked from the windward side of the aircraft with Halon 1211 first being introduced directly into the tail-pipe assembly. CO2 and AFFF should be utilized for the control and extinguishment of aircraft engine wet start/residual fires if Halon 1211 is unavailable or the foregoing procedures have proven unsuccessful. If this procedure fails to extinguish the fire. paragraph 2. Liquid oxygen converter bottles may leak or vent because of overheating. Note The use of salt water to cool liquid oxygen converter leaks is not recommended. During flight deck operations. except in extreme or fire-related circumstances. As stated in Chapter 2. smoke. and heat may exit from the intake or exhaust areas of the aircraft. Halon 1211 should be the initial agent of choice. crash impact. freshwater fog should be sprayed on the area to ice over and seal the leak prior to removal. If the above procedures are not successful and fire extinguishing agents are brought into play. Halon 1211 should be introduced into the aircraft intake. Aircraft residual fires on shutdown can often be extinguished by windmilling the engine with a jet start unit. If fresh water is not readily available. the on-scene identification and cooling procedures of dedicated hose teams. Firefighters with AFFF hoses should be placed at a safe distance in ready positions during the venting process. wet starts may also occur when the aircraft is being rapidly turned around from the previous mission in preparation for the next mission’s launch. and natural venting allowed to occur until the oxygen container contents are depleted to a point of safe removal.6 Liquid Oxygen Converter Bottles. the receipt and reporting of information concerning them. A fire of this type more often occurs during initial engine startup during cold weather operations. and the realistic verbal or other means of communication among flight deck control. and no fire is present.7 Aircraft Engine Wet Start Fires. improper installation. 7. the on-scene leader. and EOD/weapons personnel at the scene.9.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Note All aircraft fire training drills should incorporate the following: various types of simulated fire exposed ordnance. the aircraft should be isolated. PKP should be used as a last resort. ORIGINAL 7-24 . Wet starts are normally brought under control by the director signaling the pilot to increase engine rpms to blow the fire out. fire. 7. Note Halon 1211 should be utilized as the initial agent of choice because of its clean agent qualities. LOX converter compartment opened. These fires are caused when an accumulated residual fuel ignites within the engine or tail assembly area.4.

Crash. salvage. Navy Combatant Ships. Fire. The hangar deck officer is responsible for organizing.1. and fight fires on and make minor emergency repairs to the flight deck and associated equipment. 8. and Rescue Team. Figure 8-1 is a guideline only and should be adapted to meet individual ship requirements.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 CHAPTER 8 Amphibious Aviation Ships (LHA/LHD)* Crash.) 8-1 ORIGINAL . and rescue team (both flight and hangar deck) and maintaining and operating assigned equipment on the flight deck. and Rescue Officer (Air Boatswain). 8.5 Hangar Deck Officer. Salvage.S. jettison. The IWO’s duties apply to initial emergency response only and do not include authority to set flight quarters or have aircraft moved in other than emergency conditions. The Air Boss is responsible for aircraft firefighting.2 MANNING 8. The IWO assumes the duties of the ACHO when aircraft integrity watch is set. The ACHO is responsible for coordinating aircraft movement on the flight/hangar decks during aircraft crash and fire evolutions and acting on or relaying communications from the scene leader to PriFly control. and Rescue Organization and Operations 8.3 Aircraft Handling Officer. The crash team is also the flight deck repair team.1.1. and operation of the aviation fuel repair team. or first class petty officer. Aviation fuel repair team 2. 8. The Air Boatswain is responsible for organizing. 8.1 Crash.1.6 Integrity Watch Officer (IWO).4 Aircraft Crash. and training the hangar deck firefighting and rescue team and maintaining and operating assigned equipment. Coast Guard.2 Air Officer (Air Boss).2. Salvage. chief. It serves to effect rescue of personnel from damaged aircraft. and training the crash.2 Team Organization During Normal Flight Operations. and rescue team 3. clear away wreckage. salvage. The crash and salvage officer may be the flight deck officer. Hangar deck firefighting and rescue team. Characteristics and Capabilities of U.1. Within the ship damage control organization are three repair teams in the air department: 1. 8. 8. Each individual assigned should be cross-trained in all aspects of crash and salvage. supervising. Other responsibilities include overseeing aviation fuel repairs occurring on the flight/ hangar decks and coordinating activities with damage control central. A wellorganized crash and salvage team shall be assigned individual responsibilities during flight operations. including U. 8. supervising. 8. The aviation fuel officer is responsible for the organization.1. the LHA and LHD are amphibious assault ships. training.1 Air Department Repair Teams and Repair Party.1 ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS 8. * Tactically.7 Aviation Fuel Officer. salvage. (See NWP 11-1.2. and personnel rescue.S.1.

2 MFFV Driver and Operator. The hose team leader is responsible for the direction of one hose team under the supervision of the scene leader. Figure 8-1.2.3 Duties and Procedure Requirements. AFFF hoses shall be deployed to the scene using maximum personnel participation. . a hose team shall consist of one AFFF hose with a minimum of five persons (maximum seven) on each 2-1/2-inch hose and a minimum of three persons (maximum five) on each 1-1/2-inch hose.2. turret operator. 8.4 HoseTeam/Deployment. Team Organization During Normal Flight Operations Note Additional personnel shall be assigned as necessary to support extended flight operations and to provide the fire protection listed herein during periods when the ship is not at flight quarters.3.2.1 Scene Leader.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 A/C CRASH (SALVAGE) SCN LDR SPRVSR CRANE FRKLFT SLING SLING SLING DOLLY EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP NAME RATE ABHC ABHC/1 ABH-2 ABH-2 ABH-3 ABH-3 ABHAN ABHAN AN AN AA AA FUEL SPILL SCN LDR SPVSR S/W NZL — MFFV MFFV MFFV MFFV S/W S/W S/W S/W A/C FIRE SCN LDR SPRVSR CRANE FRKLFT MFFV MFFV MFFV MFFV EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP A/C IN CATWALK SCN LDR SPRVSR CRANE FRKLFT SLING SLING SLING DOLLY EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP A/C JETTISON SCN LDR SPRVSR CRANE FRKLFT SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD HELO IN WATER SCN LDR SPRVSR HELO KIT HELO KIT EQUIP EQUIP EQUIP AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD AS RQD Note After providing required equipment.2.3. Note The scene leader shall maintain visual contact or hand signal and voice communications with hose team leaders and overhaul personnel.2. A minimum of one person for initial response eventually establishing a minimum of the three persons on each 1-1/2-inch or 1-3/4-inch hose. When in place. 8. Note The hose team leader shall only provide direction to the hose team and not operate the hose. The following aircraft firefighting team organization and duties are essential to meet the training and procedure requirements contained herein. 8. and five persons on a 2-1/2-inch hose. The driver. all personnel perform duties as directed by the supervisor.3. ORIGINAL 8-2 8.3. 8.3 Hose Team Leader. and one handline operator for the P-25 provide immediate response and initial firefighting actions. The scene leader is a trained individual in the vicinity of an incident who understands the requirements of the emergency and accepts responsibility for directing all available firefighting assets at the scene.

1.9 Medical Personnel. 8. Note In the hangar bay. Halon 1211.3. They shall respond to the scene to provide technical assistance and weapons cooling temperature checks and weapons disposal as required. 8.1 and 8. 8.2.3. 8. Medical personnel shall report to the background assistance leader for assignments. 8.11 Aviation Fuels Repair Personnel. shall muster clear of the scene with the background assistance detail leader to provide additional support as required.3. Rescue personnel shall be available for immediate response and properly attired in firefighting proximity clothing (hotsuits).3.1 Halon 1211.6 Rescue Personnel. and 18 pounds.1. Rescue personnel shall always work in pairs as directed by the scene leader. D personnel in the hose team should be All positioned on the outside of the hose in relation to the aircraft to aid in mobility.2. D personnel shall wear gloves during All firefighting evolutions. all embarked squadron personnel shall provide immediate assistance in all firefighting or training evolutions. 8. respectively.2. CO2.3. communication. quantity.3 EQUIPMENT 8.10 EOD/Weapons Personnel. This information shall be provided to the scene leader and aircraft handling officer.2. Properly equipped EOD/weapons personnel shall be stationed in flight deck control.3. and location of all weapons on the flight/hangar deck and/or aircraft. This person organizes and dispatches background assistance personnel in support of the scene leader.3.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Note D Minimum manning requirements should be enforced for hose teams involved at the fire scene to minimize exposure to ordnance hazards.3.4 Marine and Navy Aviation Squadrons/ Detachments. The air gunner/air wing ordnance officer shall maintain a status board that confirms type.8 Background Assistance Leader. Additional V-4 personnel shall be dispatched to isolate affected stations/quadrants of the JP-5 system and notify flight deck control when affected systems are isolated. CO2. .2. and decrease interference between hose team members. or Dry Chemical Extinguishers. Messengers are responsible for relaying information from the scene leader to flight deck/hangar deck control. 8. The plug person operates the station at the direction of the hose team leader. These personnel shall respond to the background assistance detail and be available to provide technical assistance and system repair.3.2. Note All flight deck or hangar deck and embarked squadron personnel not actively engaged at the fire scene or involved in other critical duties. or dry chemical extinguishers shall be provided in accordance with paragraphs 8. the size of these extinguishers shall be 20. 15. ORIGINAL Personnel shall not enter enclosed fuel stations without a self-contained breathing apparatus. maintains direct communication on the sound-powered X50J with the AFFF station operator. Additionally.3.2. As a minimum. Marine and Navy aviation squadrons/detachments are to provide a senior maintenance representative for technical assistance to be included in the background assistance leader’s detail. 8.2. 8-3 8. proximity suits shall be available for a minimum of two SCBAequipped hotsuitmen.5 Messengers.2.7 AFFF Hose Station Operator (Plug Person).

hangar deck.4 Hose Outlets. Note Emergency lighting shall be checked daily. Hangar bay AFFF hose outlets are located port and starboard in the general vicinity of the AFFF injection stations from which they are supplied. All nozzle gpm flow ratings are based on 100 psi pressure at the nozzle inlet.3. electrical controllers. Balanced pressure proportioners are installed on LHDs and LHAs. This in-line eductor may be placed anywhere in the hose line but is recommended to be near or on the saltwater outlets as a minimum of 100 psi at the inlet is optimum for proper proportioning. 8.4. Locating the eductor at the outlet allows the plug person to handle transferring the pickup tube between AFFF containers and moves this activity off to the side. The SOPVs are activated by electrical switches at user locations (PriFly.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 8. Saltwater and AFFF flow is controlled by hydraulically operated valves that are actuated by SOPVs.3.1. Balanced pressure proportioners supply a foam piping loop which serves all AFFF systems (AFFF flight deck. 8. Nine Halon or CO2 extinguishers on LHAs and LHDs shall be permanently fitted with insulated extension pipes approximately 7-feet long. Note Helicopter operations require one 15-pound CO2 portable unit with 7-foot extensions per spot. One Halon 1211.3. as necessary.1. vehicle stowage.000 gallons.3. One Halon 1211 or one CO2 and one PKP extinguisher shall be mounted at each AFFF hose station on the flight deck and gallery walkway areas and shall be readily available to all flight deck areas. 8. Hoses shall be of sufficient length to permit reaching all areas on the flight deck and adjacent weather decks from at least two outlets. The balance pressure proportioner mixes AFFF concentrate with saltwater at a nominal 6-percent over a wide range of flows.3. hose stations). Hoses 4.2. 8. The portable in-line eductors are stowed in repair lockers and are used to mix sea water and AFFF concentrate from 5-gallon containers to produce AFFF solution for combating fires.1 Equipment for Saltwater and AFFF Hose Outlets (Hangar and Flight Decks) 1.2 Hangar Extinguishers. valves. Nozzles on 1-1/2 inch saltwater lines and those used with AFFF in-line eductors are 95 gpm models.3. and necessary piping.3. Extinguishers on weather deck shall not have tags or labels of any kind which could be caught by air currents and present a hazard to aircraft and personnel.1 Balanced Pressure Proportioner.000 gallons). The station consists of one 1-1/2-inch hose reel and one 2-1/2-inch hose outlet with hose and nozzle preconnected. Flow rates are 250 gpm for all 2-1/2-inch hose lines. Nozzles on 1-1/2 inch AFFF hoses on flight and hangar decks are the 125 gpm units. A ORIGINAL 8-4 pushbutton control is located adjacent to each AFFF hose station. and machinery space systems). One Halon 1211 or CO2 and PKP extinguisher shall be mounted near each AFFF hose station and shall be readily available to all hangar areas. well deck.3.2 AFFF Proportioning Systems. 8. NAVBRIDGE. .3 AFFF Hose Outlets. to maintain nominal 6-percent AFFF. An AFFF station consists of an AFFF concentrate tank (LHA — 1. 8. or one CO2 and one PKP extinguisher (AFFF outlet only).2 Vari-Nozzles and In-Line Eductors. Vari-nozzles are used on all AFFF and saltwater hose lines. A pushbutton control is located adjacent to each AFFF hose station. Controls are located in PriFly and on the NAVBRIDGE. Hose downstream of the eductor is typically limited to 150-feet on the same deck or one deck above the saltwater outlet. JP-5 pump room.1 Flight Deck Extinguishers. LHD — 2. Spanner wrenches (two) 5.4. Flight deck AFFF hose outlets are located in catwalks and in the vicinity of the island. 8. Vari-nozzles 3. an AFFF pump/proportioning unit. Excess AFFF concentrate from the pump is diverted back to the AFFF concentrate tank. Emergency lighting is provided at each reel station. Hose outlet valves 2.

Controls to start and secure the flight deck systems are located in PriFly and on the NAVBRIDGE. 8. Screwdriver. The system is used to rapidly extinguish an aviation fuel spill fire prior to heat buildup sufficient to initiate weapons cookoff. metal cutting 11. Pliers. Pliers. In the event of a bomb farm/weapons staging area conflagration. The number and spacing of nozzles are of a design that provides adequate coverage regardless of the placement of bomb skids and carts. salvage. Controls to start and stop flow to individual groups are located in the conflagration (CONFLAG)stations and around the hangar bay in the vicinity of the related sprinkler group.3 Hose Control Devices.3. The flight deck crash. and damage control central. 8. two-cell 5. Hacksaw (with six blades) 6. rescue.8 Crash and Rescue Tool Kit. Saw. ORIGINAL . All equipment shall be inspected daily prior to commencement of flight operations.9 Crash Locker.7 Flight Deck Weapons Staging Area (Bomb Farm) AFFF Sprinkler System (LHA. Alternate stations should be designated. phillips (8-inch) 16.3.4. 8. phillips (4-inch) 15. A crash locker containing the firefighting/rescue tools and equipment listed below shall be maintained for use in emergencies. Axe. Wrench. Knife. or activation of the weapons staging area sprinkling system. 8-5 1. LHD).5 AFFF Flight Deck Fire Extinguishing System.. Note A typical tool roll/kit shall contain pockets or straps to maintain the tools in an orderly manner. Screwdriver. safety. the nozzles are supplied from the foam loop.3. rib joint. common (8-inch) 14. vice grip (10-inch) 18. Flush-deck nozzles are installed to provide AFFF coverage on the flight deck. may also be in flight deck control. lineman 8. and. The designated weapons staging area is protected by an AFFF sprinkling system discharging through deck edge nozzles. 7/32-inch hex tip with holder 21. adjustable (12-inch) 19. V-blade (with 12 sets of blades) 7. depending on ship class. Halligan tool 3. Ground locks for each type aircraft assigned (AVCAL items) 12. The flush-deck nozzles can also be operated to flow saltwater only as part of the washdown countermeasures system. Screwdriver. Tool roll. common (4-inch) 13. The tool kit shall contain the tools listed below (as a minimum). 8.e. water pump (10-inch) 9. Hose control devices shall be attached to AFFF hose outlets near large concentrations of weapons (i. Control switches to start and stop flow are in PriFly and on the island or superstructure for all ships. immediate employment of AFFF handlines should be initiated to assist with fire extinguishment and simultaneous weapons cooling. Quick release fastener tool 10. Cable cutter (14-inch) 4. 3/16-inch hex tip with holder. AFFF sprinkler systems are installed in the overhead of the hangar deck and are divided into groups which can be activated individually. Wrench. 1/4-inch speed handle 20. Requirements for salvage equipment can be found in NAVAIR 00-80R-19 NATOPS Aircraft Salvage Manual (Afloat).6 Hangar Deck AFFF Sprinkler System. NAVBRIDGE. forward and aft of the bomb farm).3. The tool roll/kit may be of local design and manufacture. and rescue team and the hangar deck rescue team shall each maintain a minimum of one tool kit.3. 8. Screwdriver. Flashlight.3. crash (serrated) 2. canvas 17. On LHAs and LHDs.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 8.

High-efficiency vacuum cleaner. One battery-powered megaphone s. Crash box containing the following: a. safety. One 10-K port-a-power jack v. Four portable extinguishers (Halon 1211. phillips. 8. One drift punch ab. two-cell . Minimum of four safety harnesses x. Minimum of four positive-pressure selfcontained breathing apparatus and four spare cylinders w. Crash/fire axes 3. Two pair pliers (6-inch and 10-inch) f.to 190-pound foot torque wrench aa. One Halligan tool c. One ball peen hammer (1-1/2-pound) g. One bolt cutters d.11 Crash Forklift. Two fire axes i. and high torque screw adaptors u. Two common screwdrivers (8-inch and 12-inch) p. A manufacturer’s aircraft hoisting sling shall be available for immediate response of each aircraft type embarked. 8. One side cutting pliers (10-inch) e. Two safety flashlights t. Two hacksaws (12 spare blades) h. One 4-pound grapnel hook trailed with 12-foot chain ORIGINAL 8-6 r. Halligan tool 4. Ground locks for each type aircraft assigned (AVCAL items) j. One pair cable cutters (14-inch) b. A 15. Two 3/8-inch speed handles with various reed and prince. One 1/2-inch drive socket set n.000-pound lift capacity forklift shall be maintained on the flight deck during air operations for use in effecting rescue/aircraft salvage. One 8-inch and one 12-inch reed and prince screwdrivers o. All LHAs/LHDs shall have a crane with a lift and roll capability for moving aircraft. Aluminized fire protection suits (six complete sets) Note A backup ready stock of two complete sets of aluminized fire protection suits will be maintained on board. Welding equipment y.3.3. The Air Boatswain shall notify the TYCOM.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 1. Two V-blade rescue knives and four sets of spare blades q. Aluminized fire protection suits (5 complete sets) 2. Two portable rotary forcible entry saws (with 10 spare blades each) m. via the Chain of Command. One portable oxygen acetylene kit z. Two flashlight.10 Crash Crane. Two pry bars (36-inch and 60-inch) k. 2. PKP. or CO2) 3.3. One pinch bar (26-inch) l. 8.12 Hangar Deck Tool Inventory 1. One 150. Note Crash and salvage teams shall have two designated welders. of any aircraft embarked without a required manufactured hoisting sling.

Bolt cutter 14. 8. water pump (10-inch) 9. Tapered plugs (6). rescue. The MFFVs should be positioned as follows during flight operations.4. Tool roll. 8-7 CAUTION MFFVs shall not be used to tow aircraft under any circumstances. Screwdriver. 8. canvas 17. For ships with two MFFVs operational. vice grip (10-inch) 12.8 Extended Flight Operations.7. and launch.4.2 Launch. phillips (8-inch) 11. Underway Replenishment. Wrench.4. Screwdriver. phillips. 8. running and positioned in the immediate vicinity of the area from which the flight operations will occur. helicopter engine auxiliary power plant starts. 3 rubber 19.4. Pliers. a minimum of one MFFV shall be manned. The MFFV-assigned roving patrol on the flight deck fulfills the requirements for portable fire extinguishers during JP-5 refueling operations. ORIGINAL .4 Operations. 8. common (8-inch) 10. and high torque screw adaptors 20.9 Maintenance Turnups. The tool roll/kit may be of local design and manufacture.4. Pliers. or any time rotors are to be engaged. During limited flight operations.4 MOBILE FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT 8. checkouts. and positioned in accordance with paragraph 8. Hacksaw (with six blades) 6. 8. adjustable (12-inch) 13. rib joint.4. 8. Note A typical tool roll/kit shall contain pockets or strips to maintain the tools in an orderly manner. The MFFVs shall be manned and running from the commencement of the launch and/or recovery until the evolution is completed. One manned MFFV shall be in the vicinity for each concentrated weapons loading/ offloading evolution. V-blades (with six sets of blades) 7.7 Limited Flight Operations. such as single aircraft launch or recovery.4. lineman 8. during prelaunch starts.4. one MFFV shall be manned and positioned so that it may readily respond anywhere on the flight deck. Minimum of two SCBAs with four spare cylinders shall be prepositioned in the hangar bay 18. 3 wooden.5 Respot. Battery powered megaphone 15.4.3 Recovery. Two P-25s shall be provided to support flight operations. One MFFV shall be positioned in the immediate vicinity of the aircraft for maintenance turnups. 8.4.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 5. The MFFVs shall be positioned so that an unobstructed downwind approach can be made to a maximum number of the landing spots in use.1 MFFV Requirements.6 Fueling. 8. Two 3/8-inch speed handles with various reed and prince. The equipment shall be manned. position one MFFV at a location that will provide the best view of the fly 1 area and midships. 8.10 Ordnance Handling Evolutions. Position the second MFFV at a location that will provide the best view of the fly 2 area and midships. Knife. 8. Wrench. During the respot. Non-conductive extension ladder. Ball peen hammer (1-1/2-pound) 16. running.4.

All personnel assigned duties incidental to flight operations shall attend a formal aviation firefighting school as required by OPNAVINST 3541. SCBA. 8. Appropriate firefighting actions to perform until assistance arrives 11. 8. and emergency response personnel. Personnel assigned as crash.2 Crash. Aircraft salvage procedures 6. ORIGINAL 8-8 cooling and jettison 11. and jettison procedures 4. and arc welding 15. and rescue team 2. Mobile crash handling equipment 5. Fire reporting procedures 3. Commanding officers should ensure that all personnel assigned to the crash fire rescue organization receive in-depth formal training on hazardous materials to ensure they are capable of handling hazardous materials produced after a crash or fire.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 8. and Rescue Crewmember Training. Basic handling of composite and hazardous materials produced after a crash or fire.5 TRAINING REQUIREMENTS 8. acetylene. Aircraft entry (normal. and emergency) 6.1 series. Boat and aircraft crane (when applicable) 10. MFFVs 9. Hazardous ordnance cookoff times. 8. Hazardous ordnance procedures 8. hangar deck. and rescue crewmembers shall attend (as a team) the Aircraft Firefighting Shipboard Team Training Course C-780-2012 once during a 18-month cycle or whenever the team experiences a greater than 40-percent turnover. Aircraft jettison procedures 12.2. First-aid and self-aid 5. PKP and Halon 1211 extinguishers (operation and location) 10. Communications 4.5. Crash dolly usage 9. They shall also receive additional (in-depth) training to include the following: 1. Aircraft firefighting procedures 7.1 Hazardous Material Training.5. Aircraft hoisting equipment 7. A minimum of two assigned personnel shall receive formal training/certification in basic oxygen. The air officer shall ensure that all personnel assigned duties incidental to flight operations (including embarked aviation activities) receive continuous training in the following areas: 1.5. MFFV 2. salvage. Personnel rescue procedures 3. Portable CO2. Aviation Training Team (ATT) will be responsible. Organization and leadership of the crash. Maintenance of crash handling equipment 8. AFFF/saltwater station operation on flight and hangar decks including hangar deck sprinkler systems .1 Embarked On-the-Job Training Requirements. air wing. manual. under the direction of the Air Officer. Drills shall be conducted with sufficient frequency to maintain the level of proficiency in the fundamentals of aircraft firefighting and salvage operations as specified in FXP 4. forced. Salvage. salvage. Aircraft familiarization 14. Emergency flight and hangar deck repairs 13. weapons cooling.5.3 Drills. for the training of flight deck.

“Estimated time to ready deck. With squadron maintenance personnel present. AFFF hose teams). fleet training centers. 8. 6.5. 2. 5. “Nozzle on. Class of fire. The following information shall be provided to the scene leader by the exercise observer when conducting drills. Fire extinguishment. hazardous material shall be brought to the attention of the background assistance detail leader. and crash and salvage personnel available for salvage. Dminimum of two drills per month shall A be conducted.” 7.5. “Nozzle off. Note Scene leader can change sequence to fit situation. Hazardous ordnance 4.” 14. Initial response equipment at scene (MFFVs..) whenever possible to fight live fires for the purpose of continuing individual personnel qualifications and team training. Sequence should be followed to the maximum practicable extent in combating actual fires (quotes indicate report to be made). to reduce noise for commands between scene/hose leaders.” Personnel shall use caution when crossing a firefighting hose to avoid personal injury.7. salvage. 1. For training purposes. 11. 4. and aircraft damage 2. “Set reflash watch. back out. weapons cooling for 8-9 ORIGINAL . etc. Note Back out P-25 as soon as practical to maximize range of hose teams. Conduct FOD walkdown.5 Drill Sequence of Events. and defuel (if required). as required. 9. “Fire under control”/“weapon cooling in progress” (if required). the scene leader shall utilize the following checklist when fighting a fire (simulated) on the flight or hangar deck. D Crash and salvage teams should utilize available facilities (e. 8. and rescue personnel shall be cross-trained to meet the requirements listed herein. “Overhaul” of residual fire.” 8.g.6. who will delegate its removal to cognizant personnel. location. Effect “rescue”/“casualties”/“safe seats” (if required).4 Conduct of Drills. Note Hose control devices shall be deployed on all drills involving weapons. Additional procedures for aircraft fires on the hangar deck can be referenced in paragraph 8. 1. Casualties (personnel and material) 3. Debrief. move in. 13.” 12. naval air stations. “Ready deck. turn scene over to crash team leader. 3. “Fire out”/continue 15 minutes.” 10. commence salvage operations. “EOD to scene”/“weapons saved.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Note D Crash. Fire under control (when initial equipment is at scene) 5.

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 8. “Nozzle off.6. The following manning of the AFFF system during flight quarters shall be observed. 5. At this time.2 AFFF Proportioning System Manning Requirements. 8.6 Drill Sequence of Events for Fuel Station Fires. Manually operated AFFF proportioning stations shall be manned continuously during flight quarters (see item 4 in subparagraph 8. Turn scene over to fuels repair personnel. and crash and salvage personnel available for salvage. All AFFF proportioning stations shall be aligned and filled for remote operation from deck-edge and/or hangar deck controls.4). 3. Salvage. “Fire under control”/“Fuels repair on scene”/ “Station isolate” and all electrical power secured. to reduce noise for commands between scene/hose leaders. 8. 12. CONFLAG station(s) with capability of actuating all fixed firefighting systems on the hangar deck shall be continuously manned during flight quarters and when aircraft are spotted on the hangar deck. 11.6 FLIGHT QUARTERS PREPARATION The Aircraft Crash.” Note Back out P-25 as soon as practical to maximize range of hose teams. and Rescue Officer and the Hangar Deck Officer shall ensure inspection of their respective areas when flight quarters is sounded to evaluate the readiness and availability of firefighting equipment and shall report the results of the inspection to the aircraft handling officer. report estimate damage/time of repair. 8-10 Personnel shall not enter enclosed fuel stations without a self-contained breathing apparatus. back out. A minimum of one CONFLAG station in the hangar shall be manned during all ordnance loading/offloading evolutions. Set reflash watch. “Nozzle on. Discrepancies shall be reported to the commanding officer via the air officer as soon as they are detected. Fuels repair personnel to commence repair operations. Sequence should be followed to the maximum practical extent in combatting actual fires (quotes indicated reports to be made. D Appropriate liaison shall be coordinated with cognizant AIMD (IMA) officers regarding responsibilities that effect operational and intermediate maintenance of MFFVs. FOD walkdown.3.6. 2. 10. Note D Appropriate liaison shall be coordinated with cognizant engineering department officers with responsibilities for firefighting services affecting hangar deck and flight deck.” 7. the personnel designated in the battle bill shall man assigned AFFF proportioning stations. Ready deck. When an emergency occurs on the flight and/or hangar deck. 13.1 CONFLAG Stations. 1. 8. four AFFF hose teams). 2.5. word shall be passed on 1 MC announcing system. A decision to conduct flight operations when discrepancies are known to exist in Firefighting Equipment shall be made only by the commanding officer. Overhaul. Effect “rescue”/“casualties” (if required).6.) 1. move in. 9. 3. “Fire out. 4. 8. Initial response equipment at the scene (MFFVs. For training purposes the scene leader shall utilize the following checklist when fighting fuel station fires on the flight or hangar deck. ORIGINAL . Debrief.” 6.

2 Services Defined. 3.6. Hangar deck services — The three types of services installed for hangar deck protection are: a.3 or item 4 of paragraph 8. Note Discrepancies and changes in systems status shall be reported to the commanding officer via the air officer as soon as they are detected. PMS checks or post-repair testing indicates that a service will not operate from all control stations. 8.3 AFFF Proportioning and Reporting System Inspection Note On Amphibious Assault Ships the flushdeck and deck-edge sprinkling groups are supplied by the same control valve. associated with hangar and flight deck firefighting.3. indicating that the service can be successfully actuated from all control stations.6.3.3.3 is fully implemented. Deck-edge sprinkling zone d. 2. and rescue officer. and the provision of item 5 of paragraph 8.6.3 Conditions for Operable AFFF Services. hangar deck officer. Flush-deck sprinkling zone (includes fantail sprinkling groups) c. PMS checks and post-repair testing have been satisfactorily completed. salvage. 8. On these ships.6.1 Inspection and Reporting.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 8. The capability to perform systems maintenance should be considered during this period. the crash. 2. a service is defined as one AFFF “outlet” (for example. Nonflight quarters posture — During this period. Hose stations: one 1-1/2-inch noncollapsible rubber hose and/or one 2-1/2-inch soft hose connected to the outlet b.6. In this case. the AFFF tank is full (top of the sight glass) of AFFF concentrate. and deemed operable. either the provision of item 3 of paragraph 8. Lower stage weapons elevator AFFF flooding system. Hose stations: one 1-1/2-inch noncollapsible rubber hose and/or one 2-1/2-inch soft hose b. and the ship’s air gunner shall advise the aircraft handling officer of the status of their respective AFFF services. a zone of flight deck nozzles supplied by one zone control valve is one “outlet”). . but can be actuated manually or from another control station. An AFFF system service shall be considered operable if: 1. 1. 8-11 ORIGINAL 8.3.6.3 is met. The following inspection and reporting procedures shall be observed when aircraft are embarked. 4. 1. The cognizant engineering department officer has reported to the air officer via the Air Boatswain that engineering department firefighting equipment and engineering installations. Upper stage weapons elevator AFFF flooding system e. the systems readiness requirements are applicable to those AFFF services within areas of the flight and hangar decks used to park the aircraft. Bomb farm sprinkling. Overhead AFFF sprinkling group c. In specifying the readiness requirements for AFFF systems.3. aligned.6. The flight deck or hangar bay service and the associated second deck station are aligned properly (valves and electrical power).3. the flush-deck and deck-edge nozzles in one zone are considered a single service. Flight deck services — The types of services installed for flight deck protection are: a. Flight quarters — As early as possible before the first launch. the service must be continuously manned at the inoperable control station and at an operable control station. have been inspected. 2. Communications must be established among all manned stations.

One supply to hangar bay sprinkling groups that have two supplies may be inoperable. 8. Weapons elevator flooding systems are not to be considered when determining adjacent service.5 and 7. Whenever one or more AFFF system flight deck service is not operable. The following are the maximum inoperable AFFF services permitted on the flight deck. Note Figure 8-3 is a decision flowchart of the above information and should be used to determine AFFF hangar deck readiness. Note Figure 8-2 is a decision flowchart of the above information and should be used in identifying inoperable services.6.6. During flight quarters. one MFFV should be operable and stationed on the hangar deck. Whenever two or more AFFF system hangar bay services is not operable (a hose or sprinkling group). Backup MFFV requirements also are given.3. Hoses and lower stage weapons elevator flooding systems supplied by a maximum of two second deck AFFF stations may be inoperable.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 5. engine running. During nonflight quarter conditions. Adjacent services are defined as sprinkling groups that share a common boundary or hose stations next to each other around the hangar bay perimeter. the criteria apply only to the “parking areas” that are to contain parked aircraft. A zone may contain flush deck and/or deck edge nozzles. and stationed on the flight deck. ORIGINAL 8-12 4. are not adjacent to those from a second inoperable station. 2. During flight quarters.6. During nonflight quarter conditions it is not required that the MFFV be manned. 3. . and hoses) supplied from two of the second deck AFFF stations may be inoperable. such as hoses. During nonflight quarter conditions. such as inoperable hoses supplied by one station. Weapons elevator flooding systems are not to be considered when determining adjacent services. the criteria apply only to the aircraft “parking area” of all hangar bay sprinkling group deck areas that are to contain parked aircraft. 6. The following are the maximum inoperable AFFF services permitted on the hangar deck. upper stage weapons elevator flooding systems.4 Readiness Requirements — Hangar Deck. the criteria given below should be applied to the entire hangar deck.3. Adjacent services are defined as sprinkling zones sharing a common boundary or hose stations next to each other around the flight deck perimeter.3.5 Flight Deck Readiness Requirements. 2. 8. Flow tests demonstrate a minimum of 90 percent of the nozzles in a flight deck sprinkling zone are unplugged. the criteria below apply to the entire flight deck. Therefore. Note D Figure 8-4 is a decision flowchart of the above information and should be used to determine readiness of the flight deck. Backup mobile equipment requirements also are provided. provided inoperable services of the same type. Each zone is one service.6 are exceeded. 1.6. one MFFV shall be manned. There is no limit on the number of groups that may be in this condition. the following actions are required. AFFF supply services (such as concentrate tanks and proportioners) can also be the supply source of flight deck outlets. All or any combination of the services (deck-edge nozzle zone. Each group is one service. flush-deck nozzle zone. D When the maximum inoperable AFFF services permitted in paragraphs 7. A maximum of one hangar bay sprinkling group can be inoperable at a time. provided inoperable services of the same type. Flow tests demonstrate a minimum of 90 percent of the nozzles in a hangar sprinkling group are operational. 1. are not adjacent to each other.3. Qualified MFFV operators must be aboard and available to go to the MFFV when called on the 1 MC announcing system. discrepancy reports for inoperative services should include an evaluation of effect on the total hangar and flight deck system.

Aircraft Carrier Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Identification of Inoperable Services 8-13 ORIGINAL .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 8-2.

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 8-3. Aircraft Carrier Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Maximum Inoperable AFFF Services Permitted on the Hangar Deck ORIGINAL 8-14 .

Amphibious Aviation Ships Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Maximum Inoperable AFFF Services Permitted on the Flight Deck 8-15 ORIGINAL .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 8-4.

8. 2.3. aircraft fueling/defueling. Submit a casualty report indicating the conditions in the AFFF systems and the planned actions. Submit a casualty report indicating the conditions in the AFFF systems and the planned actions.7. 1. A minimum of 75 percent of the installed fire pump capacity shall be available in each of the YOKE firemain groups to provide adequate AFFF coverage for flight quarters.6.6. If the flight or hangar deck has inadequate AFFF coverage to permit flight quarters: 1. Submit a casualty correction report when the corrective action is completed. designated personnel shall man assigned AFFF injection stations. and the ship has set nonflight quarter conditions.3. Postpone flight quarters and flight operations until requirements can be met. all flight deck and hangar deck AFFF system services should be operable. Accomplish repairs and retest of defective AFFF system equipment.3. If the flight or hangar deck has inadequate AFFF coverage to permit parking of aircraft during nonflight quarter conditions: 1.6. Note If the firemain is in ZEBRA segregation condition. Submit a casualty correction report when the corrective action is completed. Immediate communications should be established on the X50J sound power circuit with the AFFF injection station. it may be necessary to shift to YOKE condition for major fires involving multiple AFFF stations to assure adequate firemain capacity. word shall be passed on the 1 MC announcing system. Note When fire occurs on the flight and/or hangar deck. 3. Do not permit aircraft maintenance. When aircraft are embarked. The accident alarm shall be sounded to notify flight deck personnel of an actual on-deck aircraft mishap. Scene leader .8 General Readiness Requirements 1. Accomplish repairs and retest of defective AFFF system equipment. ORIGINAL 8-16 2. aircraft fueling/defueling. 8.6 Procedures Concerning Inadequate AFFF Coverage to Permit Flight Quarters. 3.3. the commanding officer may elect to conduct flight quarters and permit no aircraft maintenance. or hot work in any “parking area” sprinkling groups containing an inoperable service. the air officer shall notify flight deck personnel by use of the 3 and 5 MC announcing systems and the flight warning alarm.7 Procedures Concerning Inadequate AFFF Coverage During Nonflight Quarters Posture. FIREFIGHTING PROCEDURES 8. 2. At this time. If postponement of flight quarters is restrictive to the ship’s mission.6. All preplanning and training shall be directed toward providing the following minimum initial response to an actual mishap or drill. The ship’s information book (damage control section) contains specific guidelines for proper firemain segregation conditions. or hot work in any hangar bay sprinkling group deck areas containing an inoperable service.3. Note Figure 8-5 is a decision flowchart of the above information.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 8.7 8. Reporting of a mishap should be accomplished by the most expeditious method in accordance with the ship’s operating instructions.1 Notification. 8. 4. This requirement applies regardless of the firemain segregation condition in effect. 3. In the event of a pending emergency. MFFV(s) 2. All flight deck and hangar deck AFFF system services should be operable as outlined in paragraph 8.7.2 Minimum Initial Response.

Aircraft Carrier Flight and Hangar Deck AFFF Firefighting Readiness Requirements — Inadequate AFFFF Coverage Available 8-17 ORIGINAL .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure 8-5.

7. ORIGINAL 8-18 D Personnel shall exercise extreme caution when approaching an aircraft prior to engine shutdown. as necessary. and provide protection for personnel rescue.2. pressure change.1 Scene Leader. PKP. for fire containment and casualty control.2.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 3. Two stretchers/two first-aid kits 7. Two portable extinguishers (Halon 1211.5. The decision to commit these assets will normally be made by the air officer. and/or other disruptions. Hose team leaders 4.4. These personnel shall ensure prompt response to conditions which affect the fire stream. All attempts should be made to position the vehicle upwind of the fire. The scene leader assumes command and directs available personnel and equipment in firefighting procedures and tactics. Forcible entry equipment 9. The individual actions that should occur on initial response are as follows. ruptured hose. 12. The air officer assesses the fire situation. Two spare 1-1/2-inch hose control devices (with appropriate vari-nozzles attached) Note Personnel shall be assigned to monitor charged fire hose(s) restrained with hose control device(s). 8. D scene leader shall make an immediThe ate appraisal regarding the presence of hazardous ordnance and request confirmation from flight deck control.2 MFFV Driver/Operators. Messengers/phone talkers 10. Note In the event of a fire on either the flight or hangar deck. or CO2) 11. AFFF hose(s) for weapons staging area(s) (bomb farm) protection. 5. Note The scene leader should evaluate the fire and make recommendations to PriFly for maneuvering the ship to provide favorable wind conditions.7. Accordingly.7. sufficient personnel from the unaffected area shall stand by to provide personnel and equipment augmentation. 8. such as wind change. Note It is emphasized that nothing herein is intended to discourage immediate firefighting action by individuals while awaiting the arrival of organized teams. He shall direct firefighting teams in weapons cooling as specified in paragraph 2. and personnel rescue as the situation requires. cool ordnance. advises the commanding officer.2. 8. Two rescue persons (hotsuitmen) 6. On the contrary. . 1-1/2-inch AFFF hose reels and variable pattern nozzles were specifically designed and installed for rapid deployment by one person. properly manned. Four AFFF hoses Note When the MFFV is nursed at the scene it can be considered the equivalent of one AFFF hose team.3 Air Officer. Two spare hose rolls 8. the training provided to all air department and embarked aviation personnel should cover activation procedures and firefighting techniques for emergency operation of 1-1/2-inch hose reels by the first person on the scene. if necessary. and requests assistance commensurate with the severity of the incident. Designated MFFV driver/operators shall immediately position the vehicle in a location that will afford the most efficient control of the fire. ordnance cooling.

Assembles two backup AFFF hoses properly manned 6. properly manned AFFF hose team(s) shall be deployed forward and/or aft of the weapons staging area to conduct rapid fire extinguishment or provide weapons cooling protection.7. When initial minimum response actions have been completed.4 AFFF Hose Teams. Provides medical personnel and stretcher bearers 8. and maintenance representatives are available.8 Weapons Staging Area (Bomb Farm) Fire Response AFFF Hose Team(s). as necessary 11.7. as required 5. AFFF plug person also maintains direct communication with the injection station operator.7 Background Assistance Leader 1. Rescue personnel are positioned in proximity to the scene leader.7.7. The messengers position themselves directly behind the scene leader.3 Nursing/Replenishment of MFFVs 8.1 Scene Nursing/Replenishment Coordination. Hose teams should maintain a position and stance which affords the most effective and safe hose handling techniques. Effects the removal of aircraft adjacent to the scene 7. Provides personnel to other areas if additional fires occur 9. Specific guidance for each situation cannot be provided since vehicle repositioning and/or redeployment as a result of additional fires may be necessary.2 Nursing/Replenishment Considerations The following considerations are provided for the scene leader in determining whether or not nursing/replenishment will be effected: . Ensures immediate assignment of personnel to provide nursing/replenishment hose to the initial response MFFV at the scene 3. Assembles additional personnel not required at scene 2. These teams attack the fire and/or cool personnel and ordnance as directed by the hose team leaders. The scene leader should evaluate the threat and recommend activation of flush-deck sprinkler zones appropriate.7. heat. Dispatches fresh firefighting personnel to relieve fatigued hose team members.2.2. Dispatches support personnel as required by scene leader 10.2. Ensures fuel repair. 8. Ensures external electrical power to aircraft involved is secured 13. 8. Coordinates manning of appropriate elevators.6 Messengers. Note Nursing/replenishment of MFFVs is highly recommended for multiaircraft mishaps and a single aircraft mishap that spreads to one or more aircraft with or without weapons involvement. Note Due to smoke. 8. Location and initial position of the vehicle relative to the fire scene 2. and explosion hazards.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 8. Multifirefighting deployment capability exists through utilization of turret and handlines and requires minimum personnel 5.1 for illustrations of nozzleman techniques). Ensures one person (plug person) is stationed at each AFFF control box.2. as necessary 8-19 1. hose teams should maintain as low a profile as possible.5 Rescue Personnel.7. 8.7. ORIGINAL 12. Type fire and number of AFFF hose teams responding to the scene 3. Vehicle mobility requirements 4. In the event of a fuel spill or fire on the flight deck when ordnance is stowed in a weapons staging area. the decision to nurse/replenish MFFVs from an AFFF fixed system outlet should be coordinated by the scene leader.3. Ensures adequate flow of messengers to the scene leader 4. Length of hose and firemain pressure.2.7. (See NSTM Figure 555-7. 8.3. 8. electrician.

Close fire and elevator doors immediately. 3. When an adequate rescue path is provided.2 Aircraft Crash.5 Residual Fire Overhaul/Reflash Watch 8. Upon completion of rescue. and personnel removal may be found in NAVAIR 00-80R-14-1.5. When completed.7. Accordingly. Personnel shall be provided for direct hookup of the nursing/replenishment hose to the initial response MFFV.7.1 Rescue Path. The following additional procedures for aircraft fires on the hangar deck shall be followed: 1.4. one with a portable CO2/Halon fire extinguisher and one with a Halligan tool/crash axe.7. and Rescue Officer. Personnel support from background assistance will be required to move the nursing/replenishment hose to the fire scene. A 2-1/2-inch to 1-1/2-inch reducing adapter shall be carried on the vehicle to facilitate nursing/ replenishment from either size fixed AFFF hose station outlet. 8. 8.7. 8. D Information on aircraft entry. gun tubs) for additional casualties.5 Weapons Cooling.7. the scene leader continues to direct the hose teams until the fire is extinguished. Note Rescue and firefighting evolutions should be conducted simultaneously once a rescue path is provided. Hose teams shall cool weapons involved in the fire for minimum of 15 minutes or until the ordnance has been reported to be at safe ambient temperature by EOD/weapons personnel. 8. The background personnel will provide immediate first-aid to casualties and evacuate them. Request ship execute a turn in order to position the open door to leeward. engine shutdown procedures.7. catwalks.3 Vehicle Support Functions Nursing/Replenishment Note D Trained rescue personnel shall affect the rescue of aircrews and passengers. This officer estimates time to ready deck and reports to PriFly updating the estimate.5. .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 8.7. Return elevators to the flight deck level.7. 2. The scene leader directs two personnel attired in complete proximity suits. as necessary.2 Rescue Personnel 1. Adequate fire protection shall be maintained for rescue persons during rescue evolutions. ORIGINAL 8-20 Note Leave one elevator door open approximately 3-feet to facilitate venting of smoke. 8. 8.4. 1. 8. as necessary. to ensure no residual fire exists. the scene leader will direct the rescue of personnel. 2.4. Salvage. shipboard fire drills should include the requirement to practice nursing/replenishment of mobile vehicles. All preplanning and training should be directed toward a “worst-case” scenario.4. 8. the scene leader sets the reflash watch.4 Completion of Rescue.1 Scene Leader.4 MFFV Training.6 Hangar Deck.3. ejection seat safetying.7.4. Investigate the surrounding area (e.7. 2. He reports the commencement and completion of the rescue and the number of casualties.7.4 Rescue 8.3 Background Personnel..7.3. Rescue team personnel shall work in pairs throughout the rescue and salvage effort.g. 8. Each rescue effort should be directed toward evacuating one incapacitated person at a time.

2. shall be the same with the following additions.1 Response to the Scene.3 Medical Officer.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 3.2 Aircraft Handling Officer. Leave all hangar deck lights on. 8. In addition to activation of the zone in which fire is located. and teamwork by both ORIGINAL . The embarked squadron commanders provide personnel to assist the air department in firefighting. 8. The air wing commander provides personnel to assist the air department in firefighting. 8-21 8.1 Air Officer.) Note During hangar deck fires when OBAs are being utilized. damage control.7. The air officer shall have the overall responsibility for the firefighting effort on the flight deck.7. and relays all information from the scene leader to PriFly control. contingent upon the on-scene leader requirements. outlined above.7.7. 8.5 Air Wing Commander.7. and rescue techniques are well defined. 5.8 JETTISON It is conceivable that a situation that dictates the jettison of an aircraft may arise.7.7. leadership. Close all doors and hatches from hangar to interior of ship. hoses.7.7. 6. Note Only the commanding officer may authorize the jettison of an aircraft. 8. 8. stretchers. mass casualty reactions may be required. many additional requirements must be considered in establishing procedures for life safety. 8. The hangar deck officer will activate appropriate zone(s) of the hangar sprinkling system for any multiaircraft fire or when a spill fire is judged to be beyond the capability of the initial hose team. at least one upwind zone should be activated. In the event of mass casualties or a CONFLAG on the flight or hangar deck.7.1 Introduction. casualty evacuation.4 CONFLAG Station Operator.2 Individual Actions at the Scene. Flight and hangar deck aircraft firefighting.2 together with all available stretcher bearers.4 Embarked Squadron Commanders.2. The air officer should activate appropriate zone(s) of the flight deck sprinkling system for any multiaircraft fire or when a spill fire is judged to be beyond the capability of the initial hose team/firefighting vehicle.7.7 Mass Casualty/CONFLAG. Approximately 15 knots relative wind speed provides optimum distribution of AFFF from the flight deck extinguishing system. Close all weapons elevator doors/hatches. 8. A constant resupply and augmentation of portable extinguishers. and AFFF for MFFVs should be made available. This officer establishes the area for collection and disposition of personnel casualties. and damage assessment and repair. 8. and first-aid kits. background assistance will establish an OBA control.9. but no two fire situations will be identical. The medical officer pro- 8. Specific procedures for jettison shall be included in the ship operating instructions based upon assigned equipment and in accordance with NAVAIR-00-80R-19. cesses personnel casualties.7. 8.9 AIRCRAFT FIREFIGHTING TACTICS AND PROCEDURES 8.7. The initial response to the scene shall include equipment and personnel stipulated in paragraph 8. The CONFLAG operator should activate appropriate zone(s) of the sprinkling system when multiaircraft or spill fires are judged beyond the capability of the initial hose team. Background assistance shall be established in a smoke-free environment (flight deck/flight deck triage.3 Hangar Deck Officer.7.7. 8. Note As a result of a multiaircraft CONFLAG.7. The individual actions. designates the aircraft/weapons elevator to be used for movement of casualties. 4.7. Success will continue to depend on training. crash.2.7.7. and extinguishment of fire. planning.2.7. casualty evacuation. and damage assessment and repair. The hangar deck officer shall man the applicable CONFLAG station.

or they are relieved by other cooling teams or by the on-scene leader.2 Initial Response MFFV Operations. the initial response MFFV shall simultaneously fight the fire. Often one or more aircraft may be involved. and cool exposed ordnance until relieved. until the fire is extinguished. Note The following suggested procedures are recommended for training purposes. These situations allow aerated fuel to rain downward and into deepseated aircraft debris. 8-22 8. Their approach should be dedicated to getting as close to the seat of the running fuel fires as possible. wind at their backs and extinguish outlying pool and residual fires. as necessary. the MFFV and hose teams should respond accordingly. This type of three-dimensional fire normally results during catastrophic aircraft crashes when the fuselage and wing fuel cells have been torn open. aircraft configurations. As the ship turns to provide quartering winds. which often shields the fire from direct attack by AFFF hose teams. Note AFFF hose teams shall continue cooling all fire-related debris to prevent reflash from deep-seated embers or super-heated metal parts until relieved by the scene leader. 8. fuel and weapons loads. Containing. Upon arrival to the scene. and the intensity and high radiant heat of the fire have been diminished. This is accomplished by a coordinated advance combined with a methodical sweeping of the fire area. Once fire-exposed ordnance is identified. they shall knock down fire and smoke to enable identification of fire-exposed ordnance. When the hose teams have achieved their close-in attack positions. This results in a higher.9. These debris pile/running fuel type fires can easily become selfgenerating. As containment of the fire is achieved. and combatting this type of fire requires a highly organized effort among the scene leader and hose teams along with effective use of the ship’s fixed AFFF flush deck systems. in that as more fuel is fed from ruptured tanks.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 ship’s company and embarked air wing personnel.9. at least one upwind zone shall be activated.3 Aircraft Debris Pile/Running Fuel Fires. 8.9. As AFFF hose teams arrive on the scene. Supervisory personnel and fire parties should take advantage of every opportunity to drill and acquire knowledge of their ship’s fixed and mobile firefighting equipment. This is best accomplished with two nozzles on wide fog pattern to block the radiant heat and two nozzles on narrow fog pattern to knock down and extinguish the fire. controlling. Note D addition to AFFF flush deck zones In activated at the scene.4 AFFF Ordnance Cooling Teams. They shall remain locked on the weaponry until hose control devices are installed. the hose team shall lock their agent on that particular weapon or weaponry as a weapons cooling team. This procedure should be repeated. hotter fire of growing intensity and very high radiant heat. crash crewman with portable Halon 1211 or PKP extinguisher should enter between the two center low-point AFFF hose teams and expel a full charge of Halon 1211 or PKP directly into the seat of the fire for a minimum of 5 seconds. The teams should be directed in their approach to provide both high-point cooling and low-point AFFF firefighting coverage. more fire is generated to further degrade and open additional fuel cells. D MFFV operators and responding AFFF hose teams should approach with the ORIGINAL . and firefighting procedures specified within this manual. The following procedures discuss certain additional situations not discussed in detail elsewhere in the manual. cool the cockpit area. the scene leader should assemble his hose teams close together for a coordinated attack on the weakest and most advantageous point of approach to the debris fire.

CO2 and AFFF should be utilized for the control and extinguishment of aircraft engine wet start/residual fires if Halon 1211 is unavailable or the foregoing procedures have proven unsuccessful. Crash crews and flight deck personnel should familiarize themselves with the various types of ordnance carried by embarked aircraft.9. the temperatures generated can cause wing-mounted weapons ejection cartridges to explode. as presented in Chapter 2 of the manual. PKP should be used as a last resort.9. Once the team is in place. The cooling of fire-involved ordnance is one of the most important aspects of aircraft firefighting operations. A fire of this type more often occurs during initial engine startup during cold weather operations.5 Fire-Involved Ordnance Training. Note Halon 1211 should be utilized as the initial agent of choice because of its clean agent qualities. During catastrophic aircraft debris pile/ running fuel type fires.6 Aircraft Engine Wet Start Fires. The fire should be attacked from the windward side of the aircraft with Halon 1211 first being introduced directly into the tailpipe assembly. personnel shall kneel in position to lower the team’s physical silhouette should a deflagration or explosion occur. Depending upon the amount of ignited fuel and wind directions. Wet starts are normally brought under control by the director signaling the pilot to increase engine rpms to blow the fire out. ordnance cooling As teams shall lock in place hose control devices for extended cooling and personnel safety. ORIGINAL The cooling of fire-exposed weapons shall continue for 15 minutes after all residual fire/smoke has ceased or until EOD/weapons personnel have determined that weapons have reached safe ambient temperatures. Aircraft residual fires on shutdown can often be extinguished by windmilling the engine with a jet start unit. and EOD/weapons personnel at the scene. the on-scene identification and cooling procedures of dedicated hose teams. wet starts may also occur when the aircraft is being rapidly turned around from the previous mission in preparation for the next mission’s launch. the receipt and reporting of information concerning them. D soon as practical. and the realistic verbal or other means of communication among flight deck control. If this procedure fails to extinguish the fire. Halon 1211 should be the initial agent of choice. fire.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Note All aircraft fire training drills should incorporate the following: various types of simulated fire exposed ordnance. D Ordnance cooling hose team leaders shall ensure minimum manning of hose team personnel immediately upon lock-on for weapons cooling. The teams shall then evacuate the scene leaving one firefighter to tend the nozzle. Accordingly. During flight deck operations. thus dropping weapons to the deck level and into or under aircraft debris. 8. and heat may exit from the intake or exhaust areas of the aircraft. 8. These fires are caused when an accumulated residual fuel ignites within the engine or tail assembly area. Halon 1211 should be introduced into the aircraft intake. the on-scene leader. 8-23/(8-24 blank) . smoke. information derived from the aircraft weapons status board in flight deck control shall be passed to the on-scene leader and EOD/weapons personnel to enable the accountability of all accident-involved weapons. Note D firefighting hose teams shift their As positions to enable firefighting coverage or to take advantage of shifting wind directions. If the above procedures are not successful and fire extinguishing agents are brought into play. they shall relieve ordnance cooling teams who are locked in position.

.

Respot (LPD only) 4. * The LPD. and Rescue Organization and Operations 9. The air-capable ship flight deck crash. Launch 2.1 ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS 9. and Salvage Supervisor (LPD)/Damage Control Assistant. Rescue. 9.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 CHAPTER 9 LPD* and Other Air-Capable Ships Crash. and personnel rescue operations occurring on the flight deck and hangar.1. In air-capable ships other than the LPD. He is also responsible for the material maintenance readiness and operation of assigned equipment. is an amphibious warfare ship. In air-capable ships other than the LPD. these duties are a function of the damage control assistant. The aircraft crash. and salvage supervisor is responsible for the organization and training of flight deck/landing platform firefighting and rescue teams and for aircraft salvage and jettison operations. It serves to fight aircraft fires on the flight deck. 9. The crash team is also the flight deck/landing platform repair team. and Rescue Team. 9. rescue.1.4 Aircraft Crash. effect the rescue of personnel as required. Recovery 3. 9. and salvage team organization is considered minimal for effecting firefighting and rescue functions during flight operations. The damage control assistant shall ensure that each station is fully equipped.1.3 Air Officer (LPD)/Helicopter Control Officer (Others). is responsible for accomplishing the training required to establish and maintain proficiency in the fundamentals of aircraft firefighting and rescue operations. salvage. The air officer is responsible for the direction and coordination of aircraft movement on the flight deck/landing platform as required during aircraft crash and fire evolutions.1. He acts on and relays communications from the scene leader to the bridge and damage control central. On an LPD. rescue. The following crash. Fire. Salvage. these duties are normally a function of the helicopter control officer or the flight deck officer. In air-capable ships the helicopter control officer/flight deck officer under the supervision of the damage control assistant directs all aircraft firefighting and rescue operations on the flight deck and vicinity. Defuel 9-1 ORIGINAL . and perform salvage or jettison procedures as the situation dictates.1 Responsibilities. that each item of equipment is in working order. 9. amphibious transport dock. jettison. as directed by the engineering officer.1 Crash. The damage control assistant.2 Team Organization During Flight Operations.2. and that assigned personnel are familiar with the exact stowage location and proper use of the equipment. These duties and responsibilities are primary in nature and shall be manned for all evolutions including: 1. fire and rescue team functions as a specialized damage control party.2. Fuel 5.2 Air Officer (LPD)/Helicopter Control Officer. the air officer has the overall responsibility for aircraft firefighting.2 MANNING 9.

The requirement for phone talkers may be eliminated if communications can be established and maintained by using other reliable means.2.9 requirements for Medical Personnel). One AFFF station or eductor operator (plug person).2. Messengers/Phone talkers (as required). 1. HIFR operations. Maintenance turnups 7. 2.5 for further minimum initial response requirements. 4.1 LPD Minimum Requirements 1. he/she moves up to handle ORIGINAL 9-2 Ship Minimum 9. Additional personnel shall be assigned (as necessary) to support extended flight operations or multiple platform VERTREP (such as to double-ended missile ships). Two rescue persons (hotsuitmen) 3. The Commanding Officer shall determine the mode of communication based on ship’s configuration.6. (Refer to paragraph 9. sufficient personnel shall be maintained available on deck to man two complete hose teams and stations.3.5. This team shall be designated on the ship’s watchbill and respond immediately upon sounding of the flight deck crash alarm or emergency flight quarters. 7. . 5. Scene leader 2.3 Background Assistance Detail (AirCapable Ships). Additional back-up fire party personnel shall be designated for emergency response.2.2. a primary flight quarters crash and rescue party shall be manned when an aircraft is over the deck as follows.2. One AFFF hose team (typically manning a hose rigged with an in-line inductor for a back-up hose) 3. Two rescue persons (hotsuit men). The Commanding Officer shall determine the mode of communication based on ship’s configuration. rescue. The third hose team member assigned to each hose may be designated to perform this function. Two AFFF station/outlet operators (plug persons).2 Air-Capable Requirements 1.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 6.1 requirements for AFFF System). 4. Messengers/phone talkers (as required). (Refer to paragraph 9. MFFV with driver and operator. Note The ship’s battle bill and helicopter operations bill shall reflect these minimum requirements.2. Personnel from the flight deck crew (LSE. 6.2. Note One fully manned hose team shall be used for maintenance turnups without rotors engaged. This team may be comprised of Air Detachment personnel when aboard ship due to their proximate location to the flight deck.2. Aircraft crash. and salvage supervisor. 4. Corpsman (refer to paragraph 9. the hose while minimizing additional personnel exposed to hazards. AFFF Proportioner station operator. AFFF monitor operator 8. Chock and Chainmen. Corpsman (refer to paragraph 9.) 9. The requirement for phone talkers may be eliminated if communications can be established and maintained by using other reliable means.3. 3.9 requirements for Medical Personnel). fuel crew) may be trained and designed to man the second hose team provided all gear is properly staged for their immediate response. For flight operations. Additionally. 9. Background assistance leader 2. Only one fully manned hose team is required for maintenance turnups when rotors are not engaged. Upon the occurrence of a casualty and activation of the hose. 8. VERTREP operations 5. Two AFFF hose teams.

tool roll. 9. In it may become necessary to set general quarters to protect the ship. Knowing the locations of all required equipment (e. D members of the primary flight quarAll ters crash and rescue party shall wear applicable flight deck clothing as specified in NWP-3-04. 8. Providing stretcher bearers for casualty removal. Providing one manned AFFF hose (for a back-up hose). and accepts responsibility for directing all available firefighting assets at the scene. 9.3.g. 9. and maintenance personnel are available. 7. 9.2. Crash and rescue party billets should be filled.3.2. extra hoses. portable extinguishers). D Ships with aircraft embarked should maintain a flight quarters capability during general quarters. Ensuring external power is secured to the aircraft involved. and a minimum of three persons (maximum five) on each 1-1/2-inch hose. LPD. LSD). The background assistance leader should be positioned so that the entire flight deck or crash scene is in view. 9-3 ORIGINAL CAUTION MFFVs shall not be used to tow aircraft under any circumstances.1 Scene Leader. communication.1M. 2. 5. 6. who understands the requirements of the emergency.2 LPD MFFV Crew. and decrease interference between hose team members.2. The following aircraft firefighting team organization and duties are essential to meet the training and procedure requirements contained herein.3 Background Assistance Leader. . The scene leader is a designated trained individual in the vicinity of an incident. a hose team shall consist of the AFFF hose with a minimum of five persons (maximum seven) on each 2-1/2-inch hose. Effecting the removal of aircraft near the scene (multispot ships only.. anticipating personnel and equipment requirements.2. AFFF hoses shall be deployed to the scene using maximum personnel participation. as needed. whenever possible. Helicopter Operating Procedures for Air-Capable Ships.3 Duties and Procedure Requirements. 4. The background assistance leader supports the scene leader. Note The scene leader shall maintain visual contact for hand signal communications with hose team leaders and overhaul personnel.3. 3.2.3. D personnel should wear gloves during All firefighting evolutions.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Note Dthe event of a flight deck crash or fire. Note D teams should be minimally manned Hose to reduce exposure to ordnance hazards. D embarked helicopter detachment can The man the background assistance detail. Responsibilities shall include but are not limited to: 1. When in place. 9. medical. This crew provides immediate response and initial firefighting actions.4 Hose Team/Deployment. with personnel who are not assigned to damage controlrelated general quarters stations. Ensuring flow of messengers to the scene leader. D personnel on the hose team should be All positioned on the outside of the hose in relation to the aircraft to aid in mobility. Assembling and positioning support personnel not required at the scene to combat any additional fires and to provide support to the scene leader. Ensuring fuel repair.

Hose team leader is positioned directly behind the nozzleman and is responsible under the direction of the scene leader for his hose team. Saltwater and AFFF flow is controlled by hydraulically operated valves that are controlled by solenoid operated pilot valves. Rescue personnel should always work in pairs as directed by the scene leader. The balanced pressure proportioner mixes AFFF concentrate with saltwater at a nominal 6 percent over a wide range of flows. DDG 51 Class. and weapons disposal as required.3.3.. to maintain a nominal 6-percent AFFF solution.9 Medical Personnel.2.3.2 Balanced Pressure Proportioners. 9.6 Messengers. Aurora turbine booster pumps are installed in some of these systems to allow proportioning down to 60 gpm. 9.5 Hose Team Leader.2. 9. Balanced pressure proportioners are installed on LPDs. Upon the occurrence of a casualty and activation of the hose. These individuals shall be positioned with the background assistance detail near the background assistance leader upon sounding of the flight deck crash alarm or announcement of emergency flight quarters to provide medical assistance as required. and ancillary piping and controls. the Air-Capable Ship Aviation Facilities Bulletin Number 1 series specifies minimum equipment requirements to support flight operations.2. The corpsman may continue routine medical duties while remaining ready to respond immediately when an emergency or injury occurs on the flight deck.7 Rescue Personnel. Messengers are responsible for relaying information between the scene leader and appropriate control centers. Following are some of the types of proportioners used aboard ships. The pilot valves are activated by pushbuttons.2.11 Aviation Fuel Persons.3. 9. and report same to the ship’s designed control station (i. The low-rate output serves AFFF handlines and small sprinkler system demands. A typical station consists of a 300-gallon AFFF concentrate tank (some ships may have 50-gallon tanks with 5-gallon cans stowed at the station). Air Wing/helicopter detachments shall provide a senior maintenance representative for technical assistance.3 EQUIPMENT A general description of firefighting agents and equipment is found in NAVSHIPS Technical Manual.10 EOD/Weapon Personnel. ORIGINAL 9-4 9.1. all squadron personnel shall provide immediate assistance in all firefighting or training evolutions. Air-capable ships vary in system capacity and available 5-gallon cans stowed at the station. LSD 49 Class and most air-capable ships.1 AFFF Proportioning Stations. The hangar bay sprinkler system and other large sprinkler systems are served by the high-speed output.4 Air Wing/Helicopter Detachments (Ships with Aircraft Embarked).3.1. These individuals shall respond to the background assistance detail and be available to provide technical assistance and systems repair. The most important element in the system is the proportioning unit. The FP 180 has a delivery range of 60 to 180 gpm. 9.3. 9. Properly equipped EOD/weapons personnel shall be available to respond to the scene to provide technical assistance. 9.2. The two-speed pump (LSD 41 Class) injects AFFF concentrate into the saltwater supply line at one of two rates (27 or 65 gpm). as necessary. bridge). Additionally.3. weapons cooling temperature checks. Chapter 555 (formerly Chapter 9930).3. 9.1. This type of proportioner is rapidly being phased out by balanced pressure proportioner units being installed in new construction and backfit.2.2. 9.3. tower. 9.3.2. depending on the demand.3.3 Two-Speed Pump. a proportioning unit.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 9. 9. .e.1 FP 180 Proportioners. Excess AFFF concentrate from the pump is diverted back to the AFFF concentrate tank. When flight quarters is set the corpsman will ensure the space designated for the collection and treatment of those injured on the flight deck is prepared and that needed equipment is staged.8 AFFF Hose/Station Operator. he/she moves up to handle the hose while minimizing additional personnel exposed to hazards. Additionally. This person activates the station and charges the hose. The rescue personnel shall be available and properly attired in NFPAcompliant proximity clothing.

9. Hose outlet valves 2. Some ships are equipped with helicopter hangars.3. then use 95 gpm nozzles).3. The portable in-line eductors are stowed in repair lockers and are used to mix sea water and AFFF concentrate from 5-gallon containers to produce AFFF solution for combating fires. Vari-nozzles are used on all AFFF and saltwater hose lines. the 1-1/2-inch AFFF hose reel station can be activated and firefighting efforts initiated by one person until help arrives. Flow rates are 250 gpm for all 2-1/2-inch hose lines. Nozzles on 1-1/2-inch saltwater lines and those used with AFFF in-line eductors are 95 gpm models. 9. on weather deck and below from at least two outlets. 9-5 ORIGINAL . Sprinkler on/off controls are typically located inside and outside the hangar. Push button controls are located in the helicopter control station and typically at a second location in the flight deck area or on the navigation bridge.2 AFFF Hose Outlets. 9. Hose downstream of the eductor is typically limited to 150 feet on the same deck or one deck above the saltwater outlet. by ship design. The routing of fire hoses through doorways will be permitted where there is a positive mechanical means of securing the door in the open position and the helicopter operations bill specifies that. The Flight Deck AFFF sprinkler system is designed to rapidly extinguish an aviation fuel spill fire prior to heat buildup sufficient to initiate weapons cookoff conditions.3 Hose Outlets. or one CO2 and one PKP extinguisher (AFFF outlet only). One Halon 1211. when required. Spanner wrenches (2) 5. Air-capable ships’ flight decks have an AFFF firefighting system consisting of flush deck and/or deck edge nozzles (nozzles also used for CMWD). AFFF sprinkler systems are installed in the overhead of the hangar in air-capable ships having hangars for embarked helicopters.3. A pushbutton control is located adjacent to each AFFF hose station. Hose outlets shall be of quantity and location to permit reaching all areas. Vari-nozzles 3. hose reels serving the flight deck must be routed through hatches. as a minimum of 100 psi at the inlet is optimum for proper proportioning. Note Exceptions to the above requirements are permitted where.1 Equipment for AFFF and Saltwater Hose Outlets in Air Operations Areas 1. Hoses 4. AFFF hose outlets are normally located within the hangar area. 9.3.2 Vari-Nozzles and In-Line Eductors.3.4 AFFF Flight Deck Fire Extinguishing System. Helicopter landing platform AFFF outlets are located port and starboard adjacent to the landing area. The routing of fire hoses through hatches and scuttles is not permitted.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 9. the door must be secured in the open position to permit the hose to pass through. Nozzles on 1-1/2-inch AFFF hoses on flight and hangar decks are the 125 gpm units (unless an FP 180 proportioner supplies two 1-1/2-inch hard lines.5 Hangar Deck AFFF Sprinkler System. Emergency lighting is provided at each hose reel station. This in-line eductor may be placed anywhere in the hose line but is recommended to be near or on the saltwater outlets.3. 9.3. All nozzle gpm ratings are based on 100 psi pressure at the nozzle inlet. For initial response.3. controls are located in PriFly/ Helo-Control and on the NAVBRIDGE. Locating the eductor at the outlet allows the plug person to handle transferring the pickup tube between AFFF containers and moves this activity off to the side. Note Helicopter operations require two additional CO2 15-pound portable units with 5-foot extensions. The station normally consists of one 1-1/2-inch hose (reel/station) or one 2-1/2-inch hose outlet. and in helicopter control on some ship classes. It shall be used for any aircraft crash on board that causes a rupture of a fuel bladder and/or when a fuel spill fire is detected.

The number and spacing of nozzles are of a design that provides adequate coverage regardless of the placement of bomb skids and carts. Dzus key. safety. adjustable (12-inch) 17. The system is used to rapidly extinguish an aviation fuel spill fire prior to heat buildup sufficient to initiate weapons cookoff. Axe. 9. two-cell 5.7 Tool Roll. Flashlight. Wrench. The following manning and positioning of the MFFV during flight quarters shall be accomplished. 15. . common (4-inch) 11.8 Firefighting Clothing Requirement. Saw. Screwdriver. Note A backup ready stock of one complete set of aluminized fire protection suit shall be maintained onboard. LPD — Four complete sets 2. vice grip (10-inch) 16. rescue.9.3.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 9. A crash and rescue tool kit containing a minimum of one each of the tools listed below shall be immediately available for use by the crash. Screwdriver.3. 1. Screwdriver. The MFFV shall be manned and positioned so that an unobstructed approach can be made to a maximum number of the landing spots in use. 9.1 Launch. rib joint. 9.2 Recovery. 9. The tool roll/kit may be of local design and manufacture. Screwdriver. canvas ORIGINAL 9-6 9.3. Cable cutter (14-inch) 4. Man and position an MFFV at a location that will provide the best view of the launch area. metal cutting 10. Control switches to start and stop flow are in PriFly and on the superstructure. fire 2.9 MFFV (LPD Only). Tool roll. 9.9. MFFVs shall be manned and running from the commencement of the launch and/or recovery until the evolution is complete. In the event of a bomb farm/weapons staging area conflagration or activation of the weapons staging area sprinkling system. common (8-inch) 12. The designated weapons staging area is protected by an AFFF sprinkling system discharging through deck edge nozzles. water pump (10-inch) 9. Knife. Wrench. Note A typical tool roll/kit shall contain pockets or straps to maintain the tools in an orderly manner.3.3. phillips (8-inch) 14. Other air-capable ships — Two complete sets. Pliers.9. immediate employment of AFFF handlines should be initiated to assist with fire extinguishment and simultaneous weapons cooling.6 Flight Deck Weapons Staging Area (Bomb Farm) AFFF Sprinkler System (LPD). Halligan tool 3. NFPA-compliant aluminized fire protection suits include: 1.3. lineman 8.3 Operations. Pliers. V-blade (with six sets of blades) 7. Hacksaw (with six blades) 6. rescue. CAUTION MFFVs shall not be used to tow aircraft under any circumstances. Note Shipboard TAU-2H may be mounted on the rear of an MD-3A tow tractor for flight deck use. Requirements for the tool roll are in addition to those outlined elsewhere in this section. The tool roll shall be inspected daily (prior to flight quarters) for completeness and to ensure that tools are usable. and salvage team. phillips (4-inch) 13.3.

9 Ordnance Handling Evolutions. and rescue team 2. Aircraft salvage procedures. 2.4 TRAINING REQUIREMENTS 9. 9. 9. During limited flight operations. 4. Communications 4. Self-contained breathing apparatus shall be made available to all firefighters/salvage personnel required in the immediate vicinity of an aircraft mishap. During extended flight operations (over 1 hour). the MFFV shall be manned and positioned so that it may readily respond anywhere on the flight deck. and Halon 1211 extinguishers (operation and location) 9.1 series. 9.9. 7. Fire reporting procedures 3. Rescue. All preplanning and training should be directed toward a “worst case” scenario. The MFFV. a minimum of one MFFV shall be manned and centrally located on the flight deck during maintenance turnups.3. Appropriate firefighting actions to perform until assistance arrives 10. When not at flight quarters.9. or any time rotors are to be engaged. Personnel rescue procedures. Maintenance of assigned). manned. Hazardous ordnance/weapon cooling 7.1 Embarked On-the-Job Training Requirements.4. positioned. AFFF and saltwater station operation on flight deck and hangar 8. 3. ORIGINAL . Aircraft jettison procedures. 9.6.4.9. 5. training shall include the following: 1. continuous engine operation of the MFFV is not desired.7 Extended Flight Operations. helicopter engine auxiliary powerplant starts. Aircraft familiarization. One MFFV shall be manned in the immediate vicinity of the aircraft for maintenance turnups. rescue. Crash dollies (when assigned). General firefighting 6. As a minimum. 9. The air officer in an LPD or the damage control assistant in other air-capable ships shall be responsible for conducting a continuous training program for all personnel assigned to flight operations (including embarked aviation activity personnel). UNREP.4 Respot. such as single-aircraft launch or recovery. PKP.8 Maintenance Turnups. One MFFV shall be manned in the vicinity of each concentrated weapons loading/offloading evolution. Organization and leadership of crash.3.9.10 Breathing Apparatus Requirements. First-aid and self-aid 5.9.6 Limited Flight Operations. During respot. 9. Basic handling of composite materials and hazardous materials produced after a crash or fire. and Salvage Crewmember Training. shall be considered to fulfill the requirements for portable fire extinguishers during JP-5 refueling operations on the flight deck. a minimum of one MFFV shall be manned and positioned in the immediate vicinity of the area from which the flight operations will occur. 9. 9.2 Crash.3. 6.9.5 Fueling.3.3. and salvage crewmembers shall receive additional in-depth training to include the following: 1.3. The equipment shall be manned and ready with engines checked periodically and positioned in accordance with paragraph 9.3. fire.9. Mobile crash handling vehicles (when assigned). Portable CO2.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 9. 9-7 mobile equipment (when All personnel assigned duties incidental to flight deck operations shall attend a formal aviation firefighting school as directed by OPNAVINST 3541. and operating as described above. Personnel assigned as crash.3.

5 Drill Sequence of Events. or 3. forcible. 11.4. 9. For training purposes. 9. 10. 4. Debrief. 2.4. Drills shall be conducted with sufficient frequency to maintain the level of proficiency in the fundamentals of aircraft firefighting and salvage operations as specified in FXP 4. “Nozzle on. 2.” 8. and aircraft damage 2. and emergency).6. Type(s) of ordnance hazard(s) 4. “Fire under control”/“weapon cooling in progress” (if required).3 Drills. All other class ships shall conduct drills monthly. “Fire out”/continue 15 minutes.2. move in.” 11. At least one formally trained/certified individual from ship’s force should be designated to assist the crash and salvage rescue team with basic oxygen. back out. 3. Effect “rescue”/“casualties”/“safe seats” (if required).” Personnel shall use caution when crossing a firefighting hose to avoid personal injury. Personnel shall use caution when crossing a firefighting hose to avoid personal injury. the scene leader shall utilize the following checklist when fighting a fire (simulated) on the flight deck. “EOD/weapons to scene”/“weapons safed. “Estimated time to ready deck. 9.” 13. ORIGINAL 9-8 9. and emergency). “Set reflash watch.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 8. 5.4 Conduct of Drills. Note A minimum of two recorded drills per month shall be conducted for ships certified as Class 1. 1. 9. “Overhaul” of residual fire. acetylene. and ARC welding when necessary. Fire extinguishment. Casualties (personnel and material) 3. combined with the procedures in paragraph 9.4. Aircraft entry (normal. location. Fire under control (after all minimum response equipment and personnel are at the scene) 5. 9.4.” 7. “Nozzle off. 12. forcible. High-efficiency vacuum cleaner. Initial response equipment at scene (MFFV. Commanding officers should ensure that all personnel assigned to the crash fire rescue organization receive in-depth formal training on hazardous materials to ensure they are capable of handling hazardous materials produced after a crash or fire. “Ready deck. This sequence. 6. Crewmember release (normal.” 10. The following information shall be provided to the scene leader by the exercise observer when conducting drills.1 Hazardous Material Training. should be followed to the maximum practicable extent in combating actual fires (quotes indicate report to be made): 1. Class of fire. weapons cooling for . FOD walkdown. two AFFF hose teams).

via the 1 MC. 9. AFFF proportioning stations shall be manned when an emergency occurs on the flight deck. In this case. the system readiness requirements are applicable to those AFFF services within areas of the flight deck used to park the aircraft. In specifying the readiness requirements for AFFF systems. and either the provision of item 2 or 3 below is fully implemented. Discrepancies shall be reported to the bridge as soon as they are detected. A decision to conduct flight operations when discrepancies are known to exist in firefighting equipment shall be made only by the commanding officer. Overhead AFFF sprinkling group. The following manning of the AFFF system during flight quarters shall be observed.5. in accordance with daily PMS MRC.5.1. the service must be continuously manned at the inoperable remote control station and at the local or remote control station.1. indicating that the service can be successfully actuated from all local and remote control stations. For flight deck AFFF nozzle groups to be operable.2 Flight Quarters.4 Services Defined. Hose stations (one 1-1/2-inch hose) 2.5. PMS checks and postrepair testing have been satisfactorily completed. 9. hangar deck.5 FLIGHT QUARTERS PREPARATION system maintenance should be considered during this period. Flush-deck nozzles 3. They shall report the results of the inspection to the commanding officer via the air officer or helicopter control officer.1 Flight Deck Services.1.5. 9.5.5. and salvage supervisor or the damage control assistant shall inspect their flight operations areas when flight quarters is sounded to ensure the readiness and availability of firefighting equipment. or damage control assistant of the status of AFFF services. Hose stations 2.4.1 Inspection and Reporting. Deck-edge nozzles. The types of services installed for flight deck VERTREP/HIFR area protection are: 1.4. respectively.3 Conditions for Operable AFFF Services.1. and the provision of item 4 is met. 9. to man AFFF proportioner stations.1. helicopter control officer. or in the HIFR or VERTREP area. The flight deck or hangar service and the associated firemain services are aligned properly (valves and electrical power) and the AFFF tank is full (top of the sight glass) of AFFF concentrate. 9.1. the cognizant officer shall advise the air officer. a service is defined as one AFFF “outlet” (for example. PMS checks or postrepair testing indicates that a service will not operate from all remote control stations. The types of services installed for hangar protection are: 1.5.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 9. Communications must be established among all manned stations. The following inspection and reporting procedures shall be observed during all periods of aircraft operation. a group of flight deck nozzles or a hose station supplied by one group control valve from the firemain is one “outlet”). 9. 3. 9-9 ORIGINAL The aircraft crash. 2. but can be actuated manually or from another remote control station.3 Nonflight Quarter Posture. All AFFF stations shall be filled and aligned for remote control operation. Word of such an emergency shall be passed on via the 1 MC announcing system.1. During this period. rescue. 1.1 AFFF System. The capability to perform . An AFFF system service shall be considered operable if: 1.2 Hangar Services. 9.5.4. Note An announcement shall be made. at least 90 percent of the nozzles must be unplugged. 9. 4. Note Discrepancies and system operability changes shall be reported immediately to the commanding officer via the air officer. 2. As early as possible before the first launch.

it is not required that the vehicle be manned. all flight deck and hangar AFFF system services should be operable. aircraft fueling/defueling.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 5. If the flight deck.5. When aircraft are aboard ship. 3. The following are the maximum inoperable AFFF services permitted in the flight deck. it may be necessary to shift to YOKE condition for major fires involving multiple AFFF stations to assure adequate firemain capacity. For LPD.1. During flight quarters. aircraft fueling/defueling. 9. The ship’s information book (damage control section) contains specific guidelines for proper firemain segregation conditions. 2.5. and stationed on the flight deck. During nonflight quarters conditions. Accomplish repairs and retest of defective AFFF system equipment. HIFR area. the commanding officer may elect to conduct flight quarters and permit no aircraft maintenance. 2.5.1. If the flight deck has inadequate AFFF coverage to permit parking of aircraft during nonflight quarters conditions: 1. or hose stations) may be inoperable provided that completely operable adjacent services of the same type are available. Backup mobile equipment requirements are also given for the LPD. the criteria apply only to the “parking area” having installed AFFF nozzles (flush-deck/deck-edge) that are to contain parked aircraft.5. 2. Submit a casualty correction report when the corrective action is completed. 3. Submit a casualty report indicating the conditions in the AFFF system and the planned actions. Flow tests demonstrate a minimum of 90 percent of the nozzles in a hangar sprinkling group are operational.” that group must be operable to meet readiness requirements. 9. 9. Any combination of AFFF services (flush-deck nozzles. 4. the criteria given below apply to the entire flight deck. During nonflight quarters conditions. Adjacent services are defined as nozzle groups sharing a common boundary or AFFF hose stations next to each other serving the flight deck and/or around the flight deck perimeter. During flight quarters. an MFFV shall be operable.1. Accomplish repairs and retest of defective AFFF system equipment. If postponement of flight quarters is restrictive to the ship mission.5 Flight Deck Readiness Requirements. Do not permit aircraft maintenance.1. all flight deck and hangar AFFF system services should be operable.4 General Readiness Requirements 1. Submit a casualty correction report when the corrective action is completed. Submit a casualty report indicating the conditions in the AFFF system and the planned actions. A minimum of 75 percent of the installed fire pump capacity shall be available in each of the YOKE firemain segregations to provide adequate AFFF coverage for flight quarters. ORIGINAL 9-10 Note Where fixed AFFF nozzle systems (flushdeck or deck-edge) consist of a single “group. or hot work in any “parking area” containing an inoperable AFFF service. 2.7 Procedures Concerning Inadequate AFFF Coverage During Nonflight Quarters Posture. A qualified operator must be aboard and available to go to the vehicle when called on the 1 MC announcing system. whenever one or more AFFF system flight deck services are not operable. Note If the firemain is in ZEBRA segregation condition.6 Procedures Concerning Inadequate AFFF Coverage to Permit Flight Quarters. Postpone flight quarters and flight operations until requirements can be met. deck-edge nozzles. referred to as nonflight quarters conditions. or hot work in any deck area containing an inoperable AFFF service. Each group is one service.4. 3. . manned. or VERTREP area has inadequate AFFF coverage to permit flight quarters: 1. This requirement applies regardless of the firemain segregation condition in effect. 1. 9.

The fastest entry point and evacuation route for the pilot and copilot rescue is through their respective entryways. If difficulty is encountered in operating the harness quick release. Move forward as the fire line recedes. At this time. The objectives are to cool ordnance (if involved). The hose team provides clearance for the rescue personnel to approach the aircraft.6. The accident alarm shall be sounded to notify flight deck personnel of an actual on-deck aircraft mishap. The hangar overhead AFFF sprinkling system may be inoperable providing: 1.6 FIREFIGHTING PROCEDURES The nozzle should be directed from waist level. The following are the maximum inoperable services permitted in the hangar.2 Cockpit Entry. The initial application of AFFF should be made from a distance that allows the agent to fall or descend on the fire area.6. The rescue person removing the pilot from the cockpit should carefully lower him to another rescue person. In the event of a pending emergency. cut.6. the team shall concentrate on evacuating one person at a time. Each team of rescue persons shall maintain a two-man buddy system throughout the rescue. the on-scene leader shall continue to direct extinguishment of the fire.8 Hangar Readiness Requirements. 9-11 Activation of the saltwater countermeasure system without AFFF will degrade the effectiveness of AFFF.1.) A fog pattern of AFFF should be used on burning fuel. if necessary. word shall be passed on via the 1 MC announcing system. rescue the occupants and to extinguish the fire. 9.3 Cabin Entry. 9. Note When fire occurs on the flight and/or hangar deck. The aircrew and passengers in the cabin can best be evacuated through the cabin door. If rescue persons become wet during entry. The rescue person should enter the cockpit and release the pilot/copilot lap belt and shoulder harness. the rescue crew shall ensure members’ limbs are free of controls to prevent further injury.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 9.6. hose teams shall continuously cool rescue persons to prevent scalding. designated personnel shall man assigned AFFF proportioning stations. The on-scene leader shall assess the severity of the helicopter fire and direct the fire parties to approach the fire as rapidly as possible with the wind to their backs. Additional information concerning aviation fuels is contained in Chapter 2 and Appendix B.2 Approaching and Entering a Burning Helicopter 9. Locations are shown in NAVAIR 00-80R-14-1. Reporting of a mishap should be accomplished by the most expeditious method in accordance with the ship’s operating instructions. During removal of the occupants. 9. moving the nozzle from side to side for maximum distribution. Immediate communications should be established on the X50J sound power circuit with the AFFF proportioning station.2. as shown in NAVAIR 00-80R-14-1.5. The pilot’s helmet ICS cord should be disconnected at the cable assembly junction (pigtail) or. 9. In multiple casualty rescues. 2. Note During personnel rescue from cabin area. (Detailed information on AFFF is contained in Chapter 3. 9.1 Notification. the air officer shall notify flight deck personnel by use of the 3 and 5 MC announcing systems and the flight warning alarm. Hangar AFFF hoses are operable.2.1 Approach.2. When directed by the on-scene leader. the rescue persons shall work (as a team) to evacuate the aircrew and passengers. ORIGINAL . the V-blade knife should be used to cut the straps. No aircraft are within the hangar.6.

and 2-5. necessary to simultaneously control a fire quickly and cool the ordnance. Reporting of a mishap to the commanding officer should be accomplished by the most expeditious method in accordance with the ship operating instructions. refer to Chapter 2.2.7 Ordnance.6. the on-scene leader should instruct the fire party to direct AFFF into the engine compartment to extinguish the fire.2. 9. The Flight Deck AFFF sprinkler system is designed to rapidly extinguish an aviation fuel spill fire prior to heat buildup sufficient to initiate weapons cookoff conditions.2.4 Forced Entry. Special caution should be exercised when effecting forced entry in the vicinity of passenger or crew stations and fuel cells 9. This maneuver is time-consuming and dangerous. The nickel-cadmium battery. On-scene Leader or other supervisor as designed by the Commanding Officer. the director shall signal the pilot to increase engine rpms in an effort to blow the fire out.2. Forced entry into a burning helicopter should be the last resort in attempting to rescue occupants. If the fire persists.6.6.6 Battery Fires. ORIGINAL .5 Engine Compartment Fires. heat subjection.6. the fireguard. the air 9-12 9.6. and others. such as type of explosive.3 Hangar Deck Fires.6. installed in helicopters.” For specific instructions regarding battery fires. Keep the 5-foot extension clear of the rotor blades.2.4. shall direct the agent into the engine so that it enters the compartment slots in the gaseous form. attempt to extinguish a small fire with a hose line or portable extinguisher prior to activating the hangar sprinkler system.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 9. may experience a condition known as “thermal runaway. It shall be activated for any aircraft crash onboard that causes a rupture of a fuel bladder and/or when a fuel spill fire is detected.5. thickness of container. In the event of a pending emergency. He shall direct firefighting teams in weapon cooling as specified in paragraph 2. The scene leader shall make an immediate appraisal regarding the presence of hazardous ordnance and request confirmation from helicopter control. Landing Safety Officer (LSO). upon direction. 9. therefore.) It is. 2-4. (See paragraph 2. For more detailed information concerning ordnance. Combating aircraft fires involving ordnance and the prevention of ordnance cookoff is paramount. The station may be activated from any available location upon direction of the Helicopter Control Officer (HCO). On ships equipped with hangar sprinkler systems. refer to Chapter 2. Many variations exist in factors causing cookoff of conventional ordnance. If the fire is not extinguished. He shall have a Halon 1211 or CO2 fire extinguisher with 5-foot extension ready for immediate use.4 Emergency Techniques Note The emergency techniques and procedures outlined herein shall be utilized commensurate with equipment assigned.5. The decision to commit saltwater hoses for further weapon cooling shall not be made until all residual fire/smoke has ceased. Flight Deck Director (FDD).8 Flight Deck AFFF Sprinkler System. 9. Should an engine wet-start fire occur. A fire guard shall be posted for all engines starts.6. Enlarging the control area to encompass the location of the ordnance stores will be necessary. 9.4 and Figures 2-3.

Rescue personnel are positioned in proximity to the scene leader.6 Rescue 9.1 Rescue Path.5 Rescue Personnel. When adequate fire protection is provided.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 officer/helicopter control officer shall notify flight deck personnel by use of the flight deck announcing system and flight warning alarm.4 AFFF Hose Teams. The requirement for phone talkers may be eliminated if communications can be established and maintained by using other reliable means. AFFF proportioner station operator 8. 9. PKP. 9.6. Scene leader 2. The requirement for phone talkers may be eliminated if communications can be established and maintained by using other reliable means.2 Scene Leader.6.1 Air Officer/Helicopter Control Officer.5. All preplanning and training shall be directed toward providing the following minimum initial response personnel and equipment to an actual mishap or drill. He reports the commencement and completion of the rescue and the number of casualties.6. advises the commanding officer.3 MFFV (LPD). . 9. This officer assesses the fire situation. Two portable extinguishers (Halon 1211. The Commanding Officer shall determine the mode of communication based on ship’s configuration. Exercise extreme caution when approaching an aircraft mishap prior to engine/rotor blade shutdown. Attempts should be made to maintain the vehicle’s position upwind of the fire during subsequent ship maneuvers without jeopardizing hose teams or associated equipment.6 Messengers/Phone Talkers. Corpsman 6.5 Minimum Initial Response.5.6. or CO2). 9-13 9.5. Messengers/Phone talkers (as required). 9. Crash and rescue tool kit (tool roll) 11. 7.6. The individual actions that should occur on initial response are discussed in the following paragraphs. These individuals position themselves directly behind the scene leader or as required.6. and requests assistance commensurate with the severity to the incident. 9.5. The accident alarm shall be sounded to notify flight deck personnel of an actual on-deck aircraft mishap.6.6. 9. These teams extinguish the fire and/or cool personnel and ordnance as directed by the hose team leaders. 9. MFFV (LPD) 9. The MFFV operator shall immediately position the vehicle in a location at the scene of the fire that affords the most efficient control of the fire and ordnance cooling while providing protection for personnel rescue. ORIGINAL Note The scene leader shall evaluate the fire and make recommendations to the bridge for maneuvering the ship to provide favorable wind conditions. 1. Two AFFF hose teams (three AFFF hose teams if ordnance cooling is required) 4.6. the scene leader will direct the rescue of personnel.5. The scene leader assumes command and directs available firefighting assets with guidance from the air officer or HCO. Background assistance leader 3. Two rescue persons 5.6. Two spare hoses 10. The Commanding Officer shall determine the mode of communication based on ship’s configuration.5.

engine shutdown procedures. ejection seat safetying. 9.. 9. the scene leader sets the reflash watch.2 Rescue Personnel 1. Investigate the surrounding area (e. They will also investigate the surrounding area (e. Rescue team personnel should work in pairs throughout the rescue and salvage effort. 9. The decision to commit these assets will normally be made by the commanding officer via the air officer/helicopter control officer/ damage control assistant.2 Salvage Operations.) for additional casualties. D Information on aircraft entry.6. damage control. The scene leader directs two persons to ensure no residual fire exists. ORIGINAL 9-14 In the event that a helicopter fire becomes uncontrollable. These persons shall be attired in complete aluminized proximity gear and shall be equipped with a portable fire extinguisher and a Halligan tool. many additional requirements must be considered in establishing procedures for life safety.7 Residual Fire Overhaul/Reflash Watch 9.1 Scene Leader. catwalks. In the event of mass casualties or a CONFLAG on the flight deck.6. etc. jettison of the helicopter may be required.4 Weapons Cooling.7.6. thus endangering the ship.g.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 9. 1. The ship using a high-speed. 9. and personnel removal may be found in NAVAIR 00-80R-14-1.6.6.6. 2. There is no established procedure for jettison of the helicopter under these circumstances. The aircraft crash. After receiving their report. Hose teams shall cool weapons involved in the fire for a minimum of 15 minutes or until the ordnance has been reported to be at a safe ambient temperature by EOD/Weapons personnel.6. Note After an aircraft fire has been extinguished and overhauled. gun tubs) for additional casualties. rescue. The background assistance personnel will provide immediate first-aid to casualties and evacuate them.8 Mass Casualty/CONFLAG. 9. Note D Trained rescue personnel shall affect the rescue of air crews and passengers. .7 JETTISON Adequate fire protection shall be maintained for rescue persons during rescue evolutions. Upon completion of rescue.6.7. catwalks. Each rescue effort should be directed toward evacuating one incapacitated person at a time. Note Rescue and firefighting evolutions should be conducted simultaneously if fire protection is provided. and extinguishment of fire. and salvage supervisor/scene leader proceeds with the restoration of equipment and area based on the condition at the scene and operational requirements. the scene leader continues to direct the fire teams until the fire is extinguished and then reports fire out. Methods that can be considered are presented below: Note Only the commanding officer may authorize the jettison of aircraft. Local procedures for salvage operations shall be included in the ship operating instructions based upon assigned equipment and in accordance with NAVAIR 00-80R-19. 9. 9. Crash and salvage teams on air-capable ships shall have a designated welder assigned and welding equipment available.6. the aircraft should be secured to the deck to assist the aircraft mishap investigation board.5 Completion of Rescue. gun tubs.g.3 Background Assistance Personnel.6.6. full-rudder turn to create centrifugal forces of sufficient magnitude to roll the helicopter over the side of the ship..6.

2-1/2. 2. When the hose teams have achieved their close-in attack positions. D MFFV operators and responding AFFF hose teams should approach with the wind at their backs and extinguish outlying pool and residual fires. These debris pile/running fuel type fires can easily become self-generating. This is accomplished by a coordinated advance combined with methodical sweeping of the fire area. 9-15 ORIGINAL The jettison of a burning helicopter is an extremely dangerous evolution.and/or 1-1/2-inch. the scene leader should coordinate the attack at the most advantageous point of approach. 3. Flight and hangar deck aircraft firefighting. hose teams. leadership. at least one upwind zone shall be activated. The teams should be directed to provide both cooling and AFFF coverage. and rescue techniques are well defined. The approach should be dedicated to getting as close to the seat of the running fuel fires as possible. These situations allow aerated fuel to rain downward into deep-seated aircraft debris.8. as necessary. but no two fire situations will be identical. Note D addition to AFFF flush deck zones In activated at the scene. more fire is generated to further degrade and open additional fuel cells. with an optimum of four. cool the cockpit area.1 Introduction.8.8 AIRCRAFT FIREFIGHTING TACTICS AND PROCEDURES 9. in that as more fuel is fed from ruptured tanks. During fire drills and actual fire-related aircraft mishaps the initial response MFFV shall simultaneously fight fire. As the fire is contained. until the fire is out. and combatting this type of fire requires a highly organized effort among the scene leader. Success will continue to depend on training. which often shields the fire from direct attack by AFFF hose teams. This results in a higher. where available. aircraft configurations. crash. As the ship turns to provide quartering winds. 9. controlling. hotter fire of growing intensity and very high radiant heat. AFFF hose teams should be employed. fuel and weapons loads. Note The following suggested procedures are recommended for training purposes. Often one or more aircraft may be involved. fire exposed ordnance until relieved or nursed by dedicated AFFF hose teams. and in worst case. planning. Containing. A minimum of two. A forklift.2 Initial On-Scene MFFV Operations (LPD Only). This type of three-dimensional fire normally results during catastrophic aircraft crashes when the fuselage and wing fuel cells have been torn open. A 3/4-inch cable around three sides of the periphery of the deck with the bitter end secured at one corner of the deck and the other end attached to a capstan. This is best accomplished with two nozzles on wide fog pattern to block the radiant heat and two nozzles on narrow fog pattern to knock down and extinguish the fire. and the intensity and high radiant heat of the fire have been diminished. The following procedures discuss certain additional situations not discussed in detail elsewhere in the manual. This procedure should be repeated.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 9. and teamwork by both ship’s company and embarked air wing personnel. and MFFV/halon handline operators along with effective use of the ship’s fixed AFFF flush deck systems. the MFFV and hose teams must respond accordingly.8. . Taking up the cable will pull the helicopter to the side of the ship and overboard. Local procedures for jettison shall be included in the ship operating instructions based upon assigned equipment and in accordance with NAVAIR 00-80R-19. Supervisory personnel and fire parties should take advantage of every opportunity to drill and acquire knowledge of their ship’s fixed and mobile firefighting equipment. 9.3 Aircraft Debris Pile/Running Fuel Fires. the MFFV halon handline operator should enter between the two center low-point AFFF hose teams apply Halon 1211 into the seat of the fire for a minimum of 5 seconds. Attempt to extinguish the fire first. and firefighting procedures specified within this manual.

introducing Halon 1211 directly into the intake.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Note Continued cooling by AFFF hose teams of all surrounding fire-related debris is extremely important to prevent reflash. as depicted in Chapter 2 of the manual. ORIGINAL . they shall knock down fire and smoke to enable identification of fire-exposed ordnance. they shall relieve ordnance cooling teams who are locked in position. on-scene identification and cooling procedures of dedicated hose teams. D During catastrophic aircraft debris pile/ running fuel type fires. AFFF. Aircraft residual fires on shutdown can often be controlled by wind-milling the engine.8. and communication among flight deck control. smoke.8. fire. use Halon 1211 to attack the fire from the windward side of the aircraft. The cooling of fire-involved ordnance is one of the most important aspects of aircraft firefighting operations. Dpractical.5. As AFFF hose teams arrive on the scene. and EOD/weapons personnel at the scene.or five-bar padeyes. All aircraft fire training drills should incorporate various types of simulated fire-exposed ordnance. All weapons shall be accounted for. ordnance cooling teams shall If lock in place hose control devices for extended cooling and personnel safety. D firefighting hose teams shift their As positions to enable firefighting coverage or to take advantage of shifting wind directions. 9-16 The cooling of fire-exposed weapons shall continue for 15 minutes after all residual fire/smoke has ceased or until EOD/weapons personnel have determined that weapons have reached safe ambient temperatures. and PKP should be utilized for control and extinguishment of aircraft engine wet start/residual fires only if Halon 1211 is unavailable or unsuccessful. Depending upon the amount of ignited fuel and wind direction. The teams shall then evacuate the scene. receipt and reporting of relevant ordnance information. 9. Note CO2. the temperatures generated can cause wing-mounted weapons ejection cartridges to explode. One firefighter shall monitor the nozzle from a safe distance. Once fire-exposed ordnance is identified. the hose team shall lock their agent on that particular weapon or weaponry as a weapons cooling team. and heat may exit from the intake or exhaust areas of the aircraft. They shall remain locked on the weaponry until relieved by other cooling teams or the on-scene leader.8. 9. Once the team is in place.5 Fire-Involved Ordnance Training.4 AFFF Ordnance Cooling Teams. thus dropping weapons on the deck or into aircraft debris.1 Aircraft Fire Training Drills. 9. Wet starts are normally brought under control by the director signaling the pilot to increase engine rpms to blow the fire out.6 Aircraft Engine Wet Start Fires. personnel shall kneel in position to lower the team’s physical silhouette should a deflagration or explosion occur. If the above procedures are not successful. 9. D Ordnance cooling hose team leaders shall ensure minimum manning of hose team personnel immediately upon lock-on for weapons cooling. the on-scene leader. These fires are caused when accumulated residual fuel ignites within the engine or tail assembly area.8. Note D control devices shall be deployed Hose on all ships configured with four. A fire of this type more often occurs during initial engine startup. Crash crews and flight deck personnel should familiarize themselves with the various types of ordnance carried by embarked aircraft.

5A 5100.1 3710.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 APPENDIX A References INSTRUCTIONS ORIGINATOR AIRLANT/PAC NAVAIR OPNAV OPNAV OPNAV OPNAV NAVSUP NAVSUP NAVAIR OPNAV OPNAV OPNAV OPNAV INSTRUCTION NO.55 4400.23 11320.1 3128. (Series) 00-80T-103 00-80T-105 00-80T-113 17-1-114 AI-NAOSH-SAF-000/ P-5100-1 P-300 P-306 P-1021 MD-403 TITLE NATOPS Conventional Weapons Handling Procedures Manual (Ashore) CV NATOPS Manual Aircraft Signals NATOPS Manual Inspection and Proofload Testing of Lifting Slings and Restraining Devices for Aircraft and Related Components NAVAIROSH Requirements for the Shore Establishment Management of Transportation Equipment Testing and Licensing of Weight Handling and Construction Equipment Operators Navy Shore Establishment Fire Protection/Prevention Program Navy Drivers Handbook A-1 ORIGINAL .6 4030. Reporting of TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS ACTIVITY NAVAIR NAVAIR NAVAIR NAVAIR NAVAIR NAVFAC NAVFAC NAVFAC NAVFAC PUBLICATION NO.4 3120.7 3750. (Series) 3100.23 11320.8 5100.25 SUBJECT Air Department Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Facilities Certification in Naval Ships Operating Aircraft Certification of Aviation Facilities in Naval Ships Operating Aircraft Damage Control Training Requirements NATOPS General Flight and Operations Instructions The Naval Aviation Safety Program Performance Oriented Packaging of Hazardous Materials Reporting of Nonconforming and Quality Deficient Material Obtained Through the Supply System Distribution of NAVAIR Technical Publications Navy Safety and Occupational Safety and Health Program Navy Occupational Safety and Health Programs Manual Shore Activities Fire Protection Program Fire and Related Emergencies at Naval Shore Activities and MARCOR Facilities.189 5605.28 3541.

Fire Hose.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS ACTIVITY NAVSEA NAVSEA NAVSEA NAVSEA NAVSUP NWC MIL-SPEC PUBLICATION NO. Storage. Six Percent. Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) Liquid Concentrate. 0535-LP-004-0001) Insensitive Munitions Characteristics of Air-Launched In-Service Weapons Fire Extinguishing Agent. Combination Aqueous Film Forming Foam.O. Firefighting — Ships OTTO II Fuel Safety.) 00-105E-9 ORIGINAL A-2 . Chapter 555. Chapter 079. Water Spray or Adjustable Technical Manual Emergency Rescue Information MIL-SPEC USAF MIL-N-24408 (Series) Technical Order (T. Volume 2 — Practical Damage Control NAVSHIPS Technical Manual. for Fresh and Sea Water Nozzle. General Firefighting Guidance NAVSHIPS Technical Manual. and Handling Instructions Introduction of Navy Stock List of Publications and Forms (Stock No. (Series) SWOP 20-11 S9086-CN-STM-020 S9086-S3-STM-010 S6340-AA-MMA-010 P-2002 TP-6914 MIL-F-24385 (Series) TITLE Special Weapons Ordnance Publication.

1 lb/sq. *In fuel mists (fuel-air mixtures). per min. in. Note Figures vary for some of these values in different data sources. 325 _ F (163 _ C) 450 _ F (232 _ C) 100 ft.4% 7. 0.0 lb/sq. (or less) 135 _ _ F (57 C) 485 _ F (252 _ C) 700 to 800 ft. 2.16% 7.6% –50 _ +30 _ F to F –46 _ –01 _ C to C +825 _ 960 _ F to F +441 _ 516 _ C to C Boiling Points Initial End *Pool Rate of Flame Spread 110 _ _ F (43 C) 325 _ F (163 _ C) 700 to 800 ft.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 APPENDIX B Summary Data on the Fire Hazard Properties of Aviation Fuels Gasoline Kerosene Grades JET A JP-5 JP-6 –40 _ F –40 _ C Blends of Gasoline and Kerosene Characteristics Freeze Point AVGAS –76 _ F –60 _ C JET A-1 JP-8 –58 _ F –50 _ C JP “B” and JP-4 –60 _ F –51 _ C Vapor Pressure (Reid — ASTM D323-58) Flash Point (by Closed-Cup Method at Sea Level) Flash Point (by Air Saturation Method) Flammability Limits Lower Limit Upper Limit Temperature Range for Flammable Mixtures Auto-Ignition Temperature 1. B-1/(B-2 blank) ORIGINAL . the rate of flame spread in all fuels is very rapid. +95 _ F +35 _ C +440 _ F +227 _ C 0. in. per min.0 to 3.63% to to to to +100 _ F +38 _ C +480 _ F +249 _ C –50 _ F –46 _ C –75 _ –85 _ F to F –59 _ –65 _ C to C +95 _ F +35 _ C to to None +145 _F +63_C –10 _ F –23 _ C to to -60 _ F –51 _ C +30 _ F –1 _ C 5. in. Those shown herein are average figures based on the latest available information.74% 5.0 lb/sq. per min.32% to to to to +165 _ F +74 _ C +475 _ F +246 _ C –10 _ F –23 _ C +470 _ F +243 _ C 1.5 to 7.

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The aircraft lubricating and hydraulic systems present the hazards of ignition of lubricants on hot engine and exhaust surfaces. their presence intensifies a fire. the hazard of brake and tire fires is increased. combustible materials also ignite more readily. When flammable hydraulic fluids are used to raise and lower landing gear. its distribution within the aircraft. hydraulic system. C-1 ORIGINAL .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 APPENDIX C Aircraft Systems Basic knowledge of the various systems within an aircraft is important because of the potential hazards created by these systems. Electrical systems within aircraft are potential fire hazards from the viewpoint of wiring faults or electrical malfunctions. Component systems within an aircraft include the fuel system. they should be guarded against in the event of a crash. and anti-icing and deicing system. Anti-icing in aircraft uses alcohol and glycerine to accomplish its purpose. all system and potential hazards should be carefully recognized and considered. oxygen system. and the ease with which it ignites. When preplanning an aircraft accident response. The fuel system is classed as the most dangerous because of the fuel load. In an oxygenenriched atmosphere. The hazard associated with the oxygen system in an aircraft is that although gaseous and liquid oxygen are stable materials and nonflammable. Solid propellant inert gas generator fire extinguishing systems discharge an inert gas mixture that appears as voluminous white smoke as the mixture is expelled from the aircraft. electrical system. Knowing the color-code scheme allows firefighters to be properly cautious when encountering such piping while entering a damaged aircraft. Although these systems are not the worst fire hazard on board. installed fire extinguishing system. Color code designations for piping for some of the systems of the aircraft are shown in Figure C-1.

Color-Coded Functional Identification Tapes ORIGINAL C-2 .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Figure C-1.

Navy Figure D-1. Signal: U. Navy Hand raised. Signal: U. Navy/NATO Arm held out.S. Navy Describes a large figure eight with one hand and points to the fire area with the other hand. Pilot should be given a cut engine or continuous turn-up signal. Conforms to ICAO signal. thumb turned downwards.S. Navy/NATO Left hand raised vertically overhead. thumb up.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 APPENDIX D General Aircraft Handling Signals SIGNAL DAY Makes rapid fanning motion with one hand in front of face and points to wheel with other hand. NIGHT Same as day except with wands. Signal: U.S. Navy/NATO Same as day except with wands. Signal is meant for information only. REMARKS Signal: U. Hold one hand open. with palm forward. The other hand indicates to personnel concerned and gestures towards aircraft. Signal: U. as appropriate.S. Same as day except with wands.S. Same as day except with wands. hand below waist level.S. General Aircraft Handling Signals (Sheet 1 of 4) D-1 ORIGINAL . motionless and high above head. Same as day except with wands. palm toward aircraft. Same as day except with wands. Signal: U.

Signal: U. Navy/NATO Figure D-1. Navy/NATO Also used for spot turns for airborne aircraft.S. Signal: U. Execute beckoning arm motion angled backwards. Also used for spot turns for airborne aircraft. Navy/NATO ON — Arms above head. General Aircraft Handling Signals (Sheet 2) ORIGINAL D-2 . Signal: U.crossed. NIGHT Same as day except with wands. Signal: U. Same as day except right hand repeatedly moved with wands. Navy/NATO Arms extended from body Same as day except and held horizontal to shoul. Same as day except left arm is repeatedly moved with wands.S. Navy/NATO Point left arm downward. REMARKS Conforms to ICAO signal.with wands. Same as day except with wands. ON — Arms above open palms and fingers head then wands raised with palms toward air.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 SIGNAL DAY Arms above head in vertical position with palms facing inward. swept forward and upward repeatedly to shoulder height. palms facing forward. then uncrossed. Conforms at size ICAO signal. upward-backward. Speed of arm movement indicating rate of turn. Conforms to ICAO signal. ders with hands upraised and above eye level. OFF — Reverse of above. Signal: U. then fist closed.S.S.S. Navy/NATO Arms by sides. Signal: U. Speed of arm movement indicating rate of turn. OFF — Crossed wands. craft. Point right arm downward. upward-backward. palms facing backwards. Rapidity indicates speed desired of aircraft.S. Conforms to ICAO signal.

Raise and lower horizontal wand. with wands. Signal: U. raised suddenly to meet horizontal palm of left hand. Navy/NATO Indicated by vertical movement of arms. Grasp thumb with other hand and rock as if adjusting throttle. thumb extended upward. lowered suddenly to meet horizontal palm of left hand. Same as day except with wands. Signal: U.S. Navy/NATO Right fist.S. Signal: U. Signal refers to rewind (retract) of the arresting system to battery position. Navy/NATO Figure D-1.S.S. Hold RED wand horizontally across chest.S. Signal refers to rewind (retract) of the arresting system to battery position. Same as day except with wands. Navy/NATO Hands held at 11 o’clock and Same as day except 1 o’clock. General Aircraft Handling Signals (Sheet 3) D-3 ORIGINAL . Navy Right fist. thumb extended downward. Signal: U.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 SIGNAL DAY Arms crossed above the head palms facing forward. Signal: U. Navy/NATO Hold one fist at waist level. REMARKS Signal: U.S. GREEN wand is off. Same as day except with wands. thumb extended up. NIGHT Same as day except with wands.

Same as day except with wands. General Aircraft Handling Signals (Sheet 4) ORIGINAL D-4 . Navy/NATO Either arm and hand level with shoulder. Signal: U. The wand in the left hand is held vertical. Navy/NATO Arms down.S. NIGHT Same as day except with wands.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 SIGNAL DAY Indicated by vertical movement of one arm. With arms and hands in “INSTALL DOWN LOCKS” position. Same as day except with wands. the right hand unclasps the left forearm.S. swing arms from extended position inwards.S. arm remaining bent. Conforms to ICAO signal.S. Navy/NATO Arms down. Navy Figure D-1. swing arms from extended position outwards. palm down.S. REMARKS Signal refers to rewind (retract) of the arresting system to battery position. hand moving across the throat. Navy/NATO With arms above head. Same as day except with wands. fists closed. Hand is moved sideways.S. the right hand clasps left forearm and the left fist is clenched. Signal: U. Signal: U. thumbs extended outwards. Conforms to ICAO signal. Signal: U. Signal: U. thumbs extended inwards. Navy/NATO except the right wand is placed against left forearm. Same as day except with wands. Similar to day signal Signal: U. fists closed. Other arm pointing to engine.

the best method of control is _________. practice. E. when should water handlines be used for ordnance cooling? ___________ 25. an activity must submit an Automatic Distribution Requirement List (ADRL) request to ___________. During an aircraft fire. Advisory Group members shall be designated in writing to ________. 27. 10.. _________ has been used only when application of a procedure is mandatory. or condition. Fires involving hypergolic mixtures can best be handled by _________. 16.1. etc. _________ shall not be used to extinguish burning lithium-powered equipment fires. 15.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 APPENDIX E NATOPS Test Question Bank E. 20. etc. 28. or condition.1 QUESTIONS 14.. 7. _____________ has been used when application of a procedure is recommended. 9. 23. 24. _________ and _________ are ineffective procedures for fighting fires involving liquid oxygen. 12. 13. “May” and “need not” have been used only when application of a procedure is ___________. Routine change recommendations are submitted directly to the model manager on OPNAV Form ___________. never to indicate any degree of requirement for application of a procedure. “Will” has been used only to indicate ___________. The model manager for this manual is ___________. Post fire cooling (AFFF or water) shall continue for a minimum of _________ to allow the weapon cases to return to safe ambient temperatures. 5. For more information on protective clothes and cleanup procedures of Otto fuel. E-1 19. refer to _____________.___________ 18. practice. 4. which is _____________. etc. 17. Name two commands that may issue waivers to the provisions of this manual. Fuel. that may result in ___________ if not carefully observed. 6. 22. 11. Interim changes to this manual are promulgated by ___________. For anti-icing fluid hazards. To automatically receive both this manual and future changes. 21. practice. 8.. that may result in ___________ if not carefully observed or followed. Is this document classified? 2. 3. Class D fires are extinguished with _______. Recommended changes to this manual may be submitted by ___________. 26. A note is an operating procedure. An activity must submit an ADRL report on floppy disk at least once every ___________ months.1 Aircraft Ordnance Fire Hazards. NATOPS review conferences are held in accordance with ___________. Anti-icing fluids that are a mixture of 85 percent alcohol and 15 percent glycerin burn with an __________ flame. or condition. and 1. ORIGINAL . A Class C fire involves ___________. Revised _____________ is indicated by a black vertical line in either margin of the page or adjacent ___________. A caution is an operating procedure. A warning is an operating procedure.

_____. 46. 31. Anyone exposed to fumes from a viton fire should be ____________. 38. 36. ORIGINAL E-2 44. See NAVAIR Manual _____________ for aircraft containing composite material. 32. PKP extinguishers are intended primarily for use on ___________ fires. Extinguishers with defects shall be turned in for inspection and test in accordance with the procedures specified in ______. and ____ of their respective fire protection organizations. The primary flight line extinguishers are ____ pounds. 52. AFFF is compatible with _______ and __________dry chemical firefighting agents. Reignition or spread of the fire can result. such as: _________. Fire hoses shall be inspected. The station fire chief and/or ARFF officer shall be responsible for the _____. 50. What rescue equipment shall be maintained and carried on aircraft firefighting apparatus in use at remote outlying landing fields? 57. . Halon 1211 portable and wheeled unit extinguishers are intended primarily for use on Class _______ fires.1. and ________. 47. ______ should plan for critical incident stress debriefing of emergency response personnel as required. The use of portable CO2 extinguishers to inert flammable atmospheres is prohibited. 54. 53. 45. A/An ________ power winch is installed on the front of the P-10 vehicle. Extreme caution shall be exercised to preclude disruption of an AFFF blanket with ______. 41. True /False. What does AFFF stand for? 34. Approximately what temperature will cause epoxy binder to ignite or decompose__________ 30. 56. The TAU series of fire extinguishers are dual agent apparatus designed primarily for extinguishing Class ___________ fires. 55. True/False. Personnel involved in service and maintenance operations shall be trained in the operation of fire extinguishing equipment. The P-4A vehicle is diesel powered with a six speed automatic transmission. 51. Nitrogen cylinders provided for inert-gas storage and utilized as an agent expellant shall be hydrostatically tested every _______. PKP extinguishers have a discharge time from ___________ to ___________. The handline discharge rate on the P-15 is _____. 48. _____. 40. ________. 39. Halon 1211 extinguishers are marked with a _______. Fire protection requirement for flight line parking of small and medium type aircraft is _________. Which reference manual refers to mishaps involving nuclear weapons? ___________ E. 35.1. 42.2 Firefighting Agents and Equipment 33. ________. maintained. 37.1.3 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicles and Associated Equipment 49. E. 59. The water storage tank on the P-4A has a capacity of ___________. An old facepiece can be used as a cover to protect a new facepiece. 43. and tested in accordance with ______ or _____ as applicable. True/False. CO2 extinguishers have a limited discharge range of ___________ to ___________ feet. The brake system on the Amertek CF 4000L is ___________.4 Airfield Firefighting Organization and Operations and Rescue 58. E.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 29. Clean a facepiece using a _____. The insulated water tank on the P-15 has a ______ capacity.

5 Firefighting and Rescue Operations 77.000 pounds. To ensure an effective airfield fire and rescue effort. Whenever possible attack from ________ . fire and rescue bill. the _______. Driver/operators of emergency aircraft firefighting and rescue equipment shall be properly licensed in accordance with ________. 88. 63.______. 87. 80. 84. 82. ____ may result causing ________. 4. wheel grease fires can be identified by________ . 2. _______. The object of the FARP is to ______. 85. E. 3. 67. 83. ______. The required for heavy lift crane to support clearing runways and/or assist in salvage operations shall be provided by the _______.000 to 500. 71. ______. ______.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 60. 70.1. or ________should be used as the auxiliary vehicle loaded with rescue equipment and serve as the rescue vehicle. ORIGINAL .______. For purposes of this manual. position vehicles and attack from _______. True/False _____ 73. _______. Marine Corps unit manning is in accordance with Marine Corps Order ______series. When CO2 or Halon 1211 is expelled directly into an engine. 72. When ignited. Unless conditions dictate otherwise. 81. A ________ is a VTOL facility that provides a designated landing area for routine use. Mutual assistance agreements are encouraged in accordance with ______. 86. then the firefighter should direct the extinguishing agent into the _____. A/An _______ . but does not provide basing facilities such as fueling or maintenance. There are no crash. A GPM delivery rate of _______ is required for aircraft 200. One emergency cooling measure that may be used by the responding fire forces in the event of hot brakes is the use of _____. 62. True/False ________ 69. a dedicated emergency fire and rescue _______shall be provided. The basic aircraft firefighting vehicle position is at the _________or _________ of the involved aircraft. True/False ________ 78. 61. ________. ______and ______may be used for guidance when developing a station crash. Crew requirements for Rescue Vehicles are ________ .______. and rescue requirements at ________ landing zones. 66. P-15 vehicles will never be used as immediate response alert vehicles. Internal engine fire usually result when _____. If a tailpipe fire cannot be extinguished by directing CO2 or Halon 1211 into the tailpipe. Halon has been identified as an ozone-depleting substance. Airfields will be categorized by function to: 1. and _______vehicles are designated major firefighting and rescue apparatus.______. E-3 74. 68. 79. 64. Outlying fields in Category 1 shall have _______ for the primary emergency communication system. 65. Some hydraulic fluids with the trade name Skydrol will decompose at high temperature and its vaporized products will cause ____________. fire. A ______may be required to open the engine cowling because of the restrictions of proximity gloves. 75. All personnel directly assigned to firefighting vehicles shall wear full protective clothing. and _______ or ________ series. 76. Water fog used on a wheel assembly fire should be applied in short bursts of _______.

and Rescue Organization and Operations 92. Only the _______ may authorize the jettisoning of aircraft. During flight quarters. The _____ contains specific guidelines for proper firemain segregation conditions. All MFFV preplanning and training should be directed toward _______ mishaps or incidents. Rescue personnel should always work in _______ as directed by the scene leader. There should be at least three hose outlets with hoses of sufficient length to reach all areas of the flight and hangar decks. 104. The hose team leader shall not man the hose. 95. 91. 99. 103. immediate communications should be established on the _______ with the AFFF injection station. 114. 106. Qualified MFFV operators must be aboard and available to go to the MFFV when called on the _____ announcing system. 98. PKP should be used as a last resort in fighting engine wet start fires. and damage assessment and repair. True/false ______ 96.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 89. 113. 97. Personnel shall not enter enclosed fuel stations without a _______. _______ is recommended to maximize MFFV firefighting assets initially on the scene. 111. Fire. In addition to AFFF flush deck zones activated at the scene. The weapons staging area is protected by an AFFF sprinkler system consisting of ________ . at least one _______ shall be activated. 107. The scene leader should evaluate the fire and make recommendations to _______. 100. When fire occurs on the flight and/or hangar deck. Personnel assigned as crash._______ 2. 108. salvage. 101. _______and _______ should be used as a means of containing debris present on larger composite components where the use of chemical binders may not be warranted or feasible. Requirements for salvage equipment can be found in _______ . A _______ lift capacity forklift shall be maintained on the flight deck during air operations for use in effecting rescue/aircraft salvage. True/False _______ 115. True/False _______ 94. Controls for emergency lighting are located in ________ and ________ . The _______ and _______ provide personnel to assist the air department in firefighting. ________ 3. 112. 110. The use of salt water is recommended to cool liquid oxygen converter leaks. MFFV drivers should be equipped with ________ headsets. 105. E. True/False. 109. What three repair teams are in the air department? 1. The messengers position themselves _______. True/false _______ ORIGINAL E-4 .1. and rescue crewmembers shall attend _____ (as a team). 102. casualty evacuation. _______ 93. a minimum of two MFFVs shall be available in each hangar bay to respond to a hangar deck fire.6 Aviation Ship (CV/CVN) Crash. Do not put power to or start up dosed aircraft or electrical/electronic equipment until decontamination by _______ and/or ______ is completed. Handlers of fibers must wear what type of gloves? _______ 90.

Hose control devices shall be deployed on all ships configured with ______. MCS. All members of the primary flight quarters crash and rescue party shall wear applicable flight deck clothing as specified in ______. True/false_______ E-5 129. via the ______ to man AFFF proportioner stations. If difficulty is encountered in operating the harness quick release. The FP 180 has a delivery range of ______. 119. 126. 125. 140. 122. Within the ship damage control organization are two repair parties and one repair team in the air department. Activation of the saltwater countermeasure system without AFFF will _____ the effectiveness of AFFF. True/False _______ 138. 142. Halon 1211 should be used as the initial agent of choice when fighting engine fires. 137. 143. 139. 4. and Rescue Organization and Operations 132. 131. ORIGINAL .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 E. 144. and LHAs mixes AFFF with saltwater at a nominal 5 percent over a wide range of flows._____ 127. _______ supports the scene leader as required. 134. and Rescue Organization and Operations 116. Fire. An announcement shall be made. A backup ready stock of _______ complete sets of aluminized fire protection suits will be maintained on board. Emergency lighting should be checked weekly._______. Hose control devices shall be deployed on all drills involving _______. True/False ______ 117. 3. Equipment for Saltwater and AFFF Hose Outlets (Hangar and Flight Decks) include: 1. True/false _______ E. True/False _______ 121._______ . LPDs require _______ complete sets of aluminized fire protection suits. Balanced pressure proportioners installed on LHDs. 124. 133. it can be considered the equivalent of one AFFF hose team. During a fire or drill.1. 2. The types of services installed for hangar protection are: 1.7 Amphibious Aviation Ships (LHA/LHD/ MCS) Crash._______. A minimum of _____ percent of the installed fire pump capacity shall be available in each of the YOKE firemain groups to provide adequate AFFF coverage for flight quarters. _______._______. rescue personnel are positioned ______. A ______ shall be posted for all engine starts.____ 3. A minimum of _____ drills per month shall be conducted. MFFV requirements for LPH flight operations are _______ and _______ . Air capable ship minimum requirements for AFFF hose teams are________. 135. The crash rescue tool kit shall be inspected weekly for completeness.8 LPD and Other Air Capable Ships Crash.1. If an MFFV is nursed at a fire scene. _______ is positioned directly behind the nozzleman._____ 2. 5. Wet starts are normally brought under control by the director signaling the pilot to _______ . What is the minimum and maximum manning requirements on a 1-1/2-inch hose? 118. 123. True/False 120. 136.______ 141.______ 2. the ______ should be used to cut the straps. The _______ operates the AFFF station at the direction of the hose team leader. Fire. Name the three AFFF hangar deck services available 1. 130. 128.

2. By dilution with water (Page 2-3. Bldg. Bldg. NAVSEA OP 4522. NAVAIR 00-80R-14-1 (Page 2-14.1). 30. Aqueous Film Forming Foam (Page 3-1. (Page 32).2). . 21. (Page 32). Paragraph 3. Box 357031. San Diego. 24. 13. CNATRA. Appendix A (Page 2-13.5.O. Paragraph 2. COMMARFORRES and COMMANDANT USCG (pick two) (Page 1-1. CA 92135-7031 (Page 31). An almost invisible flame (Page 2-3. (Page 32). OPNAVINST 3710.7. Essential to emphasize. 31. CNO or NAVAIRSYSCOM. 27. P. 35. Paragraph 2. 25. 47123 Buse Road. Paragraph 2. Commanding Officer. 4. Commander. Code 3. (Page 32). 18. After the fire is extinguished (Page 2-5. (Page 32). Shall. 15 minutes (Page 2-5.2).3).1 Aircraft Ordnance Fire Hazards. 15. (Page 32). Paragraph 2. 34. E.8 warning).8. 3.3). Naval Air Technical Data and Engineering Service Command. (Page 32).5. 8. Paragraph 2. 14. Injury or death. CNO. 752 _F (400 _C) (Page 2-14. Water (Page 3-2. 20. Paragraph 2. Futurity. (Page 32).5 warning). 12 months (Page 31).5.1). and 1.7. 90.4). (Page 32). 6. such as high velocity fog (Page 2-1. 12. MD 20670-1547 (Page 32).5. 29. Patuxent River.2). Suite 348. 26. Optional.4 warning). Anyone. Paragraph 2. Text.5. CMC. Halon fire extinguishers (Page 2-12.1. Water in large quantities. 10. 11.5. Damage equipment. COMMMARFORLANT. Fuel. No. Fleet and Fleet Type Commanders. 2272. affected text.1).3). Paragraph 3. COMNAVAIRSYSCOM.2. Diluting the fuel and oxidizer with large quantities of water (Page 2-8.2 ANSWERS E. NAVAIR (PMA-251) (Page 1-2. 23. Paragraph 2. Halon 1211. COMMARFORPAC. 7.1). PKP (Page 3-1. 2. Paragraph 1. Blanketing smothering agents (Page 2-3.2). Paragraph 3.3A. Paragraph 2. It’s unclassified (Cover).2 Firefighting Agents and Equipment 33. ORIGINAL E-6 19.7 (Page 32).NAVAIR 00-80R-14 NATOPS Test Question Bank Answers E. Paragraph 2. Should. 3710/6 (4-90). NAS North Island. warning). Paragraph 1.9). (Page 32). SWOP 20-11 (Special Weapons Ordnance Publication) (Page 2-16.4). 32.9. 22. Moved to fresh air at once and checked by a physician (Page 2-16. COMNAVAIRESFOR. 9. Paragraph 2. 28.2. Paragraph 2. 5. (Page 32).2 warning).4.2. 17. Paragraph 2. Naval Air Systems Command (PMA-251). Energized electrical equipment (Page 2-1. 16.

1.4.2).3.7).3. VTOL (Page 5-11. Figure 5-1). 68. ARFF organization (Page 5-7. Paragraph 4. Portable fire extinguishers (Page 4-13.4 Airfield Firefighting Organization and Operations and Rescue . 8 to 60 seconds (Page 3-7. Air Point (Page 5-5.1).2).3. Helistop (Page 5-10.1.1 (Second note)).1. Figure 3-1).4.1). 8000-Pound (Page 4-11.1).1.3 Aircraft Firefighting and Rescue Vehicles and Associated Equipment 49. Emergency rescue equipment b.1. Paragraph 4. P-4A. E-7 67. Portable fire extinguishers.3). 40.5. Paragraph 4.1). Paragraph 5. 61. NFPA 1962. P-19A. 2 persons (Page 5-9. Clean soft cloth with mild soapy water (Page 3-8. 150 (Page 3-2. Paragraph 5.4. 47. Paragraph 5. NFPA Fire Codes.500 gallons (Page 4-1.3. a. Cribbing d. Paragraph 3.4). E. Paragraph 5. 55.3).500 (Page 5-2. False (Page 3-8.2. 69.2.5.1. Standard 10 (Page 3-5.2).1. Paragraph 5. Paragraph 5. Paragraph 4. Paragraph 5. 65. Canvas tool roll c. 51.2). Paragraph 3.6).2. Paragraph 3. Paragraph 4.1.1.2. Paragraph 4. Minimize flight time to and from the refueling and rearming area by locating it as close to the objective area as METT-TS-L allow (Page 5-6. 56.7. 1. Air/drum (Page 4-1. False (Page 4-1. Amertek CFL 1000.1). Paragraph 5. and any installed fire suppression system(s) (Page 3-2. 63. 54. 59.1).2.1).2). 48. 1. Paragraph 3. 41. Paragraph 5.2). 53.2. 52.8). 64. 45. 5 years (Page 3-5. and management (Page 5-1.3). 44.4.7). 39.1.3). False (Page 5-10. 57.3. Paragraph 4. Paragraph 3. wheeled units. Class B (Page 3-7. 46.3. Activity Commanding Officers (Page 5-1.4. E. 6.4). skid mounted twin agent units. Paragraph 3. Air Site 4. NAVSEA PMS (Page 4-13.1). 43. B (Page 4-10.4. ORIGINAL 58. Air Facility 3. Paragraph 3. P5320. technical training. Paragraph 4. 62. Paragraph 3.1 warning). 66. Paragraph 4.3). 38. 3 to 8 (Page 3-7. 37. Paragraph 3. 42. P-15.2. Paragraph 3. B and C (Page 3-6. Paragraph 3.6. One Halon 1211 extinguisher per 3 aircraft (Page 3-3. and Oshkosh T-3000 (Page 5-7. Paragraph 5.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 36. M998. 100 gpm (Page 4-7.200 gallons (Page 4-7.1). Paragraph 5. Main Base 2.4.4). 60. 50. or M1038 (Page 5-7. Paragraph 3. Operational readiness. Paragraph 5.4).4. Reflective silver band around the tank (Page 3-6.2). 1. 70. M1008. performance.1.4). True (Page 3-6.4.4.3.5 (Page 5-9.1).

5. 88.2.1. Paragraph 5.7. 105.10. NATOPS Aircraft Salvage Manual (Afloat) (Page 7-5. Paragraph 7. Paragraph 7.5 Firefighting and Rescue Operations 77. SRC 22/47 Headsets (Page 7-7. 76. 98. and rescue team c. Paragraph 7.3.3). NAVFAC P-300 and NAVSAFECENINST 11240. E.2). (Page 7-5. .6). Paragraph 7. VHF FM radio transceivers (Page 5-15.6. Self-contained breathing apparatus. X50J sound power circuit (Page 7-14.2.6). PriFly (Page 7-18. 107. 94.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 71. Vacuuming. True (Page 5-13. E. Paragraph 6.4).6).7). 85.7. NAVAIR 00-80R-19.3.2.6).10.2. 86.1).5). (Page 6-7.5 and Emergency Vehicles Operators Course or MCO 112 40. False (Page 6-1. 103. 87.9).5). Smoke ejector (Page 6-6. 84.4.3). 90. ORIGINAL E-8 91. 75. Paragraph 6.6.5. Thermal shock. Paragraph 6. second warning). The Aircraft Firefighting Shipboard Team Training (AFSTT) Course C-780-2012 (Page 7-8. Paragraph 7. 72. Paragraph 7.6). 109. Paragraph 7. Paragraph 6.2). Paragraph 6. Paragraph 7.5. 96. (Page 7-10. 104.6 Aviation Ship (CV/CVN) Crash. 106.3. step 6). Paragraph 6. False (Page 7-4. Note). Deck edge nozzles.66 (Page 5-11.3. Upwind (Page 6-1.6.3.3 caution).5).6 series (Page 5-15.000 pound (Page 7-6.4 note).1. 93. 74. 97.9. Paragraph 7.1).4). Paragraph 7. Paragraph 7.5). Paragraph 6. Paragraph 5. Uphill (Page 6-3. Paragraph 5.3. Directly behind the scene leader (Page 7-19. Paragraph 7. Paragraph 5. Leather palm gloves (Page 6-9.1). False (Page 7-7. Severe irritation to the eyes and respiratory tract. 82. salvage.3. On the NAVBRIDGE (Page 7-4. Warning).2. IFSTA Manual 206.5. Paragraph 6. 83. Residual fuel is dumped into the engine on shutdown (Page 6-5. Intake duct (Page 6-6.6. Paragraph 7.1).5. Paragraph 6. Polyethylene sheeting.3). Fire. 5 to 10 seconds. Department of Defense Instruction 6055. NFPA 424 (Page 5-16.7. Nose or tail (Page 6-1. 73. Engine damage (Page 6-5. 80.1). and Rescue Organization and Operations 92. 79. Pairs (Page 7-3.3. Paragraph 7.1. Paragraph 6. Hanger Deck firefighting and rescue team (Page 7-1.1).4. Screwdriver (Page 6-5. 99.1). Ship’s Information Book (Damage Control Section) (Page 7-12. 78. 20. a. Paragraph 6.9. PriFly. 108.6). Paragraph 7. Paragraph 5.1.5).1.2).6. Paragraph 6. 102. Paragraph 7. Paragraph 7. 1 MC (Page 7-14. 100.1). True (Page 7-2.4. 30 seconds (Page 6-7. Paragraph 6. Paragraph 6. Paragraph 7. 81. Crash.1. Tape (Page 6-11. Long flames around the wheel brake/axle assembly (Page 6-7. Washdown (Page 6-9.2.7.6). 95. Nursing (Page 7-9.8. Paragraph 5. Radio network (Page 5-14.8.3).1.3.1).7.7.9. Paragraph 6. 101. Aviation fuel repair team b.3. 89.1).

Worst-case (Page 7-20. Paragraph 9.8).2.2. Paragraph 9.3. 118.6. 122. Background assistance leader (Page 9-3.5).1). Helicopter Operating Procedures for Air-Capable Ships (Page 9-2.3.9). Paragraph 7. Paragraph 7.9. Note). second Warning).6). Paragraph 9.6.1).3.1).2.3). Paragraph 9. Commanding Officer (Page 7-22. and Rescue Organization and Operations 116. Spanner Wrenches (two) 5. Paragraph 8. Four-or five-bar padeyes (Page 9-16. Weapons (Page 8-9. or one CO2 and one PKP Extinguisher (AFFF outlet only) (Page 8-4.7. Paragraph 8.8). Degrade (Page 9-11.2).2.2).3. E-9/(E-10 blank) .1). Upwind zone (Page 7-22. 123.3. Two P-25s (Page 8-7. lower stage 144.7.5). The Air Wing Commander (Page 7-22. Paragraph 7.7. False (Page 8-23. 1. Paragraph 7.3. Fire guard (Page 9-12.4). 4 (Page 9-6. One Halon 1121. Paragraph 9. E. and Rescue Organization and Operations 132.2.3.5.3). Paragraph 8. Plug person (Page 8-3.6. Paragraph 7.6).3).3.6. Hose stations: one 1-1/2 inch non-collapsible rubber hose and/or one 2-1/2 inch soft hose. Hoses 4.8. 129.1. Paragraph 8. Paragraph 8.5). 130. 111. 135.9. V-blade knife (Page 9-11. 133.4. Note).7. Hose outlet valves 2. 128. Paragraph 9. 114. Paragraph 9.7). NWP-3-04.7. 124.2). Vari-nozzles 3. Paragraph 9.1). weapons elevator AFFF flooding system (Page 8-11.3). 137. 139. 112.3).3). True (Page 7-24.9. E. 75 (Page 8-16. Paragraph 9. Minimum of 3 persons maximum of 5 (Page 8-2.6. Note). Hose team leader (Page 9-4. Fire. 138. 60 to 180 gpm (Page 9-4.2.3. False (Page 7-24. Paragraph 7. 141.2.7 Amphibious Aviation Ships (LHA/LHD/ MCS) Crash.9.2.7).2.3. 2 (Page 8-8.4.4. 131.2).6.8. Paragraph 8.2. Fire. 143.2.6).8.8 LPD and Other Air Capable Ships Crash. 113. overhead AFFF sprinkling group. Hose stations (one 1-1/2-inch hose) 2. 119. In close proximity to the scene leader (Page 8-19.9. Increase engine RPMs to blow the fire out.Paragraph 8. Paragraph 8.2.5. 125.1). Paragraph 9.3. 121. False (Page 9-6. False (Page 8-1.5.3.2. 115.4.2).2. Paragraph 8. Paragraph 9.2. 140. Paragraph 8.5). Paragraph 8. Paragraph 8. Embarked Squadron Commanders (Page 7-22. ORIGINAL 136.3. 1 MC (Page 9-9. Paragraph 8. 134. (Page 8-23. 126.3. 117.1. 2 (Page 8-5. 120.1 M. Paragraph 8. Overhead AFFF sprinkling group (Page 9-9. True (Page 8-16. 1. Paragraph 8. False (Page 8-4. False (Page 8-4. 142.1.8).1.2.7).7. Two (Page 9-2.2.NAVAIR 00-80R-14 110. 127. Paragraph 7. Paragraph 8.5. Paragraph 9. Paragraph 9.

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. . . . . . . 7-22. . . 5-16 Fire training drills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-21. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Inspection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 V-22 aircraft engine compartment and midwing compartment fires . . . . . . . 7-22. . . . . . . . . . . 9-15 AFFF ordnance cooling teams . . . . . . . . . . . . rotary-wing. . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Primary airfield extinguishers . . . . . . 9-4 ORIGINAL A A/S32P-25 firefighting vehicle . . . . . 8-1. . . . . 5-2 TOR . 3-2 Fire protection . . . . . 8-21 Liquid oxygen converter bottles . . . . . . . and rescue officer (air boatswain) . . . . . . 9-2 Department repair teams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4. . . 5-16 Firefighting tactics and procedures . . . . . 7-22. . 9-5 Hose station operator (plug person) . . . . . 7-22. . . . . . . 6-3 Additional actions to cover mass casualty scene . . . . . . . . . . . and passenger/cargo . . 9-16 Fire and rescue network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-21 Advisory group . . . and salvage supervisor (LPD)/damage control assistant . . . . . . . . 8-18. . . . . . . . . 9-9 and Repair party . 9-16. . . . . . . . . . . . 8-23 Initial response MFFV operations . . . . . . . 8-20 Debris pile/running fuel fires . . . . . . . . . 9-4 Proportioning system(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-22 Introduction . . . 4-7 Accessory section. 4-11 Capable ship minimum requirements . 5-6 Wing commander . . . . . . . . . . . . and hydrostatic tests . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Minimum response requirements for visiting . . . . . 8-3. . 9-15 Handling officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-24. . . . . . . 7-23. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 INDEX Page No. 7-4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-23. . . . . . . . . . . . general engine compartment fires jet fixed-wing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14 Ordnance cooling teams . . . . . . . . . . . 7-24 Airfield fire protection requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-21 Wing/helicopter detachments (ships with aircraft embarked) . . . . . . . . . . . 7-21. . . . . 7-19. . . . . . . . . . 8-22 Engine wet start fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5 Portable extinguisher training requirements . . . . . . 9-13 Points . . . . . . 8-4 Proportioning system inspection and reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4 Hose outlets . . . . . 3-2 Air wing/helicopter detachments (ships with aircraft embarked) . . . . salvage. . . . 8-11 Proportioning system manning requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 Officer/helicopter control officer . . . . . . . . 1-2 AFFF: Flight deck fire extinguishing system . . . . . rescue. . . . . . . . 8-22 Aircraft engine wet start fires . . 7-23. . . . . . . 5-15 Fire and rescue response reporting requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-23. . . . . . . . . . 8-19. . . 8-10 System . . . . . . . . . 9-4 Index-1 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11. . Aircraft: Crash. . . . . . . . . . 9-4 Hose teams . . . 7-3. . . 8-22 Proportioning stations . . . 7-22. . 7-24. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16 Firefighting and rescue daily journal . . . 8-21. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1. . maintenance. . . 8-1. . . . . . 5-6 Site . . . . . . 7-22. . . . . . . . . 6-3 Aircraft firefighting tactics and procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 Officer (air boss) . . . . . . 9-1 Crash. 7-3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22. Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22. . . . 8-5. . . . . . 9-5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and tilt-rotor aircraft . . 7-19. . . . . . 8-1. . . . . . . . . . compressor compartment. 7-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-21 Officer (LPD)/helicopter control officer (others) . . . . . . 8-23 Fire-involved ordnance training . . 8-21 Internal firefighting on large frame. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 Air: Bag rescue and lifting system . . . . . . . . . . 9-16. 7-1 Facility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-22 Aircraft debris pile/running fuel fires . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9. . . 2-2 Jet fuels/aviation gasoline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10 (Ashore) . . . . . . . . . . 8-11. . . . C Cabin entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Application . . . . 3-6 Care: and Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 JP-4 flashpoint . . 8-3 Squadrons . . . . . 2-14 Reinforced with boron/ tungsten fibers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 Class C fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and fire accelerating materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14 Composite materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 Firefighting efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Severity after ignition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-20. . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 Immediate response alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 Backup standby alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 Battery fires .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 JP-8 flashpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20 Backup standby alert . . . . . 8-19 Assistance personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6. . . 5-7 Category I outlying fields with no facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9 Cockpit entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 Class D fires . . . . . . 9-9 Conduct of drills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 Category IIA — public works crane . . hazardous. . . . . . . 9-4 Fuels personnel repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 Reinforced with carbon/ graphite fibers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 Category II — public works crane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 Flammable. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12 Breathing apparatus requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Class A fires . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Cleanup: (Afloat) . . . . . 7-3. 2-1 Class C fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 JP-5 flashpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3. . . 2-1 AVGAS flashpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4 Basic: Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3 Fuels repair personnel . . 2-2 Aviation: Fuel officer . 2-1 Fuel-air mixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 Application . . . . . 9-2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9. . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1. . 5-7 CF 4000l (7160) Amertek . . . . . . . . 3-1 Fire extinguishing agent supply requirements . . . 9-7 ORIGINAL Index-2 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11 Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11. 2-1 Class B fires . . . . . . 3-1 Attack from uphill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 Americium 241 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 Category I — airfield salvage crane . . . . . . 7-19. . . . . . . . 8-3. . . . . . . . . . . . 7-21. 6-3 Avgas flashpoint . . . . . . 2-16 Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14 Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 Balanced pressure proportioner . . . . . . . . . . 9-8 B Background: Assistance detail (air-capable ships) . . . . . . . . . 6-1 Vehicle spotting procedures . . . . . . . 7-21 Assistance leader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 Approach . . . . . . . . 5-10 Standby alert . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11 Aqueous film forming foam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 of Facepiece . . . . 9-12 Completion of rescue . 8-20. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alert requirements . . . . . . . . 2-14 Conditions for operable AFFF services . . . . . 2-1 Class B fires . . . . 4-1 Class A: Combustibles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 Fuel persons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 Class D fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 Classification of fires . . . . 9-11 Carbon dioxide15-pound portable units and 50-pound wheeled extinguisher units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-6 Anti-icing fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 Approaching and entering a burning helicopter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9-8 Duties and procedure requirements . . Emergency communication systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9. . . . . . . . . . LHD) . . . . . . . . . 9-4. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4. . . . . . . . . . 8-10 Drills . . 9-7 Squadron commanders . . . 6-6 Embarked: On-the-job training requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6 Hangar deck tool inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5 Air bag rescue and lifting system . . . . 7-6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3 E Ejection seat training . 9-12 Cockpit . . . . 9-4 AFFF flight deck fire extinguishing systems . . . . 8-21 Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3 Hangar deck AFFF sprinkler system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12 EOD/weapon personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6 Crash forklift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6. . . . . . . . 7-8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-13 Index-3 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8 for fuel station fires . . . . . 4-13 Tires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . or dry chemical extinguishers . . 7-20 Crash Crane . . . . . . 7-5 Estimated ready deck/salvage . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5 AFFF proportioning system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9. . . . . . . . 8-5. . 7-1. 7-21 Salvage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12 Entry: Cabin . . . . . . 7-4. . . . . . . 4-13 Firefighting clothing requirement . . . . . . 8-6 Hose outlets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11. . . . 5-15 Category I outlying fields with no facilities . 8-5. . 8-4. . . . 7-5. . . . . 8-21 Emergency: Communication systems . . . . . . 8-5 Salvage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10 Considerations Nursing/replenishment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and salvage crewmember training . . . . . . CO2. . 7-6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12 From access . . . . . . . 5-16 Wire communication systems . 5-15 Aircraft fire and rescue network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5 Emergency rescue equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 Filter breathing masks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6 Grid map system . . . . 7-4. . . . . 8-2. . . . . . . . . . 4-13 Fire hoses . . 9-4 for AFFF and saltwater hose outlets in air operations areas . . 4-13 Tool roll . . . . . . . . . 9-6 for Saltwater and AFFF hose outlets (hangar and flight decks) . . . . . . . . 8-8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15 Rescue equipment . . . . . . 8-4. and rescue bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6. . . . . . 7-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7 Crash and rescue tool kit . . . 9-5 AFFF hose outlets . . . . . . 9-6 Tool inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3. . . . . . 7-8. . . . . . . 8-1. . . . . . . . . . 7-10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3. 8-4. 9-5 Hangar deck salvage forklift . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22. . . . . . . 8-5 Rescue. 3-7. . . . 8-8 Salvage. . . . . . 7-5. . . . . . 5-16 Locker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 Techniques . . . . 3-6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6 Flight deck weapons staging area (bomb farm) AFFF sprinkler system (LHA. 9-5 MFFV (LPD only) . . 6-12 Drill sequence of events . . 8-5. . . 5-7 Fire. . 8-3 Equipment . . . . . . . 8-6 Crash locker . . . . . . . 7-21 ORIGINAL D Definition . 5-16 Notification of an off-station mishap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CONFLAG Station operator . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7 and Rescue tool kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 Breathing apparatus requirements . . . . 6-12 Direct attack: At the seat of the fire . . . . . 5-10 Determine direct attack technique . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8. . . . . . . . . 7-3. 7-4. . . . . 5-15 Engine compartment fires . . . . . . . 9-6 Halon 1211. . . 7-6. . . . 8-5 Crash crane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14 Electrical and electronic equipment fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 Forklift . . . . . . . . 8-6 Crane category changes . . . . . . . . . . . . and rescue crewmember training . . . . and rescue officer . . 7-8. . . . . 9-1 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and rescue team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4 Self-contained breathing apparatus . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . 7-14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 Minimum response requirements for the marine air ground task force forward operation base concept . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Protection organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 P-10 rescue vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9 Extinguisher types. . . . . . . . 4-1 A/S32P-25 firefighting vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . hazardous. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-16 Nursing/replenishment of MFFVs . . . . . . agents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6 Efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-20. . . . 4-7 P-19/P-19A (7160) . . . . . . . . . 7-23. . . . . . 7-21 Notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-14. . . . . . . . . . 2-11 Flight quarters . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6 Halon 1211 (bromochlorodifluoromethane) portable and wheeled unit extinguishers . . 8-10. . . . . LHD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 Hoses . . . . . . . . . . 8-16 Multiaircraft CONFLAG . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14 Firefighting: Clothing requirement . . . . . . . 9-11 Estimated ready deck/salvage . . . . . . 2-1 Flare dispensers . . . . . 8-20 Fire-involved ordnance training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-18. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 P-4A (7180) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6 Purple-K-powder dry chemical powder extinguishers . . 4-1 Firefighting and rescue vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8 Flight deck: AFFF sprinkler system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9 Weapons staging area (bomb farm) AFFF sprinkler system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12 and Rescue network . . . . 5-9 Page No. 2-3 Extended flight operations . . . . . . . . 7-10. . . . 5-12 Fire protection organization . . . . . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19 Rescue . . . . . 5-6 Explosive suppressant foam . . . . 2-1 Extinguishing agent supply requirements . . . . 7-21 Hangar deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-20. . . . . . . . . 9-7 Extinguishment (ashore and afloat) . . . . . 5-5 Fire protection requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10 F Filter breathing masks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11. 5-1 Minimum response requirements at category 4 airfields (USMC only) . . . . . . 5-15 and Rescue response . . . . . . . . 9-16 Prevention and extinguisher training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and methods of application . . . 8-10. . . . . 8-4 Readiness requirements . . . . . . . . . and Rescue daily journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-23. . . . . . . 7-21. 5-16 and Rescue vehicles . . . . . Expeditionary fobs . . . . 8-20 Residual fire overhaul/ reflash watch . . . . . . . . 3-1 and Rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-14. 4-13 Fire: Chemistry . . . . 5-2 Minimum response requirements categories 1 through 4 . . . . . 5-14 Training drills . . . 8-5 Weapons staging area (bomb farm) AFFF sprinkler system (LPD) . . . . . . . . . and fire accelerating materials . . . . . . . . 3-5 Carbon dioxide15-pound portable units and 50-pound wheeled extinguisher units . . . . . . . . 8-16. . . . . . . . 5-5 Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11 AFFF proportioning system manning requirements . . . . . . . . . . 8-20 Mass casualty/CONFLAG . . . . . . . E-8 ORIGINAL Index-4 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 Other rescue vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 Extra-hazardous flight operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-21 Minimum initial response . . . 9-16 Flammable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 P-15 (7195) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8 AFFF proportioning system inspection and reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 Oshkosh T-series vehicles . . 4-13 Involved ordnance training . . . . . . . . 9-13 Extinguishers . . 9-9 Preparation . 5-12 Fire training . . 7-10. 8-7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-21. . . . . . . . 4-10 Firefighting procedures . . . . . . . 8-12. . . . . . . . . 9-10 Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 Protection requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5 Weapons staging area (bomb farm) AFFF sprinkler system (LHA. . . 9-6 Flight quarters preparation . . . . . 4-1 Twin agent unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-3. . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13 Protection . . . . . . . 4-7 CF 4000l (7160) Amertek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . 2-3 Flare dispensers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . or dry chemical extinguishers . . 6-9 Extinguishment (ashore and afloat) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9 CONFLAG stations . . . . . . . 9-8 Heliport crash crane requirements . and hydrostatic tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Class A combustibles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6 FP 180 proportioners . . . . . . . . . . 6-12 Hazardous material training . . . . . . 5-12 Heliport crash crane requirements . . . . . . . . 8-10 Fluoroelastomer (Viton) . . . . . . . 2-2 Fuel tank(s): Fire tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 Hangar: Extinguishers . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5 Outlets . . . . . . . . . 6-9 ORIGINAL H Halon 1211 (bromochlorodifluoromethane) portable and wheeled unit extinguishers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CO2. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4 Readiness requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Individual actions at the scene . . . . 2-2 Fire with explosive suppressant foam (ESF) installed . . . 7-6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-22 Inspection . . . . . . . . . . 9-3 Hot brakes . . . . . . 2-3 Otto fuel . . . . . . . 3-6 Halon 1211. . . . . . . . . . Officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12 Response requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5 Hypergolic mixtures . . . 2-11 Hypergolic mixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5 Fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10 Cleanup (ashore) . . . . . 2-2 Tank location . . 7-22. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12 Rocket engines (JATO) . . 9-15 Response MFFV operations . . . . . . . 2-5 Lithium batteries . . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . . . . . 5-12 Hose: Control devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12 Determine direct attack technique . . . . . . 8-5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4. . . . . . 6-12 Forced entry . 8-1 Interim containment (ashore and afloat) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13 Forward arming and refueling point . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9 Preliminary contamination assessment . . 2-12 Ordnance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6 Hangar deck firefighting . . . . . . . . . 3-5 and Reporting . . . . . 2-3 I Immediate response alert . . . . . 6-7 Hydrazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 Fire protection requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5 G General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12 Formal schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6 Tool inventory . . . . . 2-13 Overheated batteries . . . . . . . . . 9-9 Integrity watch officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . 9-5 Team leader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-21. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9 Interim containment (ashore and afloat) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AFFF system . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4. . . . . . . . . 9-9 Hangar deck . . . . . . . . 3-5 Maintenance. . . . . . 2-8 Hydrostatic tests . . . . . . 2-3 Anti-icing fluids . . . . . . 6-6 Wheel assembly fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Cleanup (afloat) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-21 Initial: Attack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 On-scene MFFV operations (LPD only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10 General hazards and precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-21 Salvage forklift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 Definitions . . . . . . . . . 7-2. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12 Heliport fire protection . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 Incidents involving aircraft containing composite material reinforced with carbon/graphite or boron/tungsten fibers . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-13 Index-5 5 . . . . 9-4 Fuel-air mixtures . . . . . . . 8-20 AFFF sprinkler system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Fueling . . . . . 8-7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11. . . . . . . . . 2-16 Fog attack . 9-11 Services . . . . 8-16. . . . . 7-5. . . . 8-3 Handlines . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 Readiness requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8. . . . . . . 7-12. . . 7-4. 8-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4 Team/deployment .

. . . . . . . . . . 2-1 Jettison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 Duties and procedure requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-21. . . . . . . . . 7-7. . . 6-11 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal engine fires . . . . . . . . 5-16 and Navy aviation squadrons/ detachments . . . 9-13 Response requirements at category 4 airfields (USMC only) . . 5-5 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7 Recovery . 3-5 Turnups . . . . . . and rescue team . . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 Lithium batteries . . . . . . . . . . . and cargo aircraft emergency response plans . . . . . . . . 2-2 JP-8 flashpoint . . . . . 8-21 Personnel . . . . . . . . 7-7. . . . . . . . . . . . . and passenger/cargo aircraft . . . 7-2. . . . . 7-7. . . . . . . . 2-2 L Lagger points . . . . . . . . 8-2 Marine and navy aviation squadrons/ detachments . . . . . . . . . 5-1 Response requirements for the marine air ground task force forward operation base concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2 Driver/operators . . . . . . . . 7-7. . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12 LPD MFFV crew . 8-19. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1. . . . 7-24 Lithium . S-3B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7. 8-3 Team organization during normal flight operations . . . . 8-7. 8-7 MFFV requirements . . . 7-3 Crash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6 Limited flight operations . . . . 9-7 Liquid oxygen converter bottles . . . . . 2-2 JP-5 flashpoint . . . . . 9-15 JP-4 flashpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7. . . . . . . . and US-3A aircraft engine fires . . . . . . . 7-19. 8-7 Fueling . . . . . . . 8-7 Ordnance handling evolutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marine: Corps aircraft firefighting unit inspections . . . . passenger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7 Limited flight operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20 Minimum: Initial response . . . 7-7 (LPD) . . . . . . . . . . 6-5 S-3A. . . . . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7. . 8-7 (MFFV) training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5 Internal firefighting on large frame. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-18 Drivers . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Medical: Officer . . . . . . . . . 9-2 M Main base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 ORIGINAL Index-6 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 Manning . . . . 8-3 Mass casualty/CONFLAG . . . . . 7-7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . salvage. . 7-3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14 MFFV: Driver and operator . . . . . . 9-7 Major aircraft firefighting and rescue vehicles . . . . 5-2 Response requirements categories 1 through 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22. . . . . . underway replenishment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7 Training . . . . . ES-3A. . . 7-7. . . . . . 8-7 Respot . . . 5-5 Response requirements for visiting aircraft . . . . . . . 5-2 Mobile firefighting equipment . . 7-22. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7. . . . . 7-18. . . . . . . . 7-7. . . . . . . . . . . 8-7 J Jet fuels/aviation gasoline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7 Extended flight operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14 (LPD only) . . . . . . 8-3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1. 9-6 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-21. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Large frame. . . . . . . . . . 7-7. . . . . . . . . . . 5-6 Large frame. . . . . . . 8-15 Materials in combination with liquid oxygen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and cargo aircraft emergency response plans . . 7-19. . . . . . 9-4 Messengers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 Aviation squadrons . . . . passenger. . 6-11 Launch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3 Minimum requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7 Hangar deck . 7-20 Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7 Maintenance turnups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7 Launch . . . . 8-7. . . 8-16. . . . . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . . . . . . 9-4 Messengers/phone talkers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . unrep . 9-1 Aircraft crash. . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . salvage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 Aircraft handling officer . 2-13 Nursing/replenishment: Considerations . . 9-6 Airfield firefighting and rescue organization and . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and rescue organization and . E-7 Amphibious aviation ships (LHA/LHD/MCS) crash. . . . . . . . . . Crash grid map system . 7-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 P-19/P-19A (7160) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-8 Extended flight . 2-3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12 Handling evolutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16 Notification . . . . . . . 7-20. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7. . . . 8-1 Hangar deck officer . . . . . . . 8-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 N Navy aircraft firefighting unit inspections . . . 8-1 Air officer (LPD)/helicopter control officer . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 Oshkosh T-series vehicles . . . . . . . . . . E-9 Aviation ship (CV/CVN) crash. . . . . . . . . and rescue officer (air boatswain) . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 Nuclear weapons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7 LPD and other air capable ships crash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . rescue. . . . 8-22 Limited flight . . . . 8-1 Aviation fuel officer . . . 7-14. . . . . . . . 5-9 Firefighting and rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aircraft fire and rescue response reporting requirements . . . 4-1 Permissible level of protection when 7230 vehicles are out of service . Navy aircraft firefighting unit inspections . . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . 2-16 Radiological . . . . . . . . . . . . . fire. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 Aircraft crash. . 7-1. . . . Crash. . . . . . . . . E-9 Organization and . . . . . . . . . 8-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . fire. 8-19 of MFFVs . . . . . . . . . . . . . Team organization during flight . . 8-7. . . . . . . 9-15 P P-10 rescue vehicle . . . . . . . 2-16 Nonradiological metals/compounds . . . . . . . . . 9-1 Salvage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and rescue organization and . . . . . . . . 9-1 Air department repair teams . . . . . E-5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-21 5-16 5-16 5-16 5-16 5-16 5-16 5-16 5-16 5-16 Page No. . . Multiaircraft CONFLAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12 Oxygen systems . 2-16 Americium 241 . . . . . . Mutual assistance and administrative requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 P-15 (7195) . . . . . . . underway replenishment . . Aircraft firefighting and rescue daily journal . . . . . . . . . E-3. . . . 8-1 Responsibilities . . . . . . 7-20. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 P26 nurse vehicle in service . . . . fire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mutual assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 Otto fuel . . . . . . . 9-11 Notification of an off-station mishap . . . . E-2. . . . 9-7 Stores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and rescue bill . . . . . . 8-19 O Operations . E-4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mutual assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7 Handling evolutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2 Personnel hazards/protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Materials in combination with liquid oxygen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 Organization and operations . . . . . . . 8-1 Integrity watch officer . 9-1 Team organization during normal flight . . . . . . . . 2-16 ORIGINAL Index-7 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 Ordnance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and salvage supervisor (LPD)/damage control assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9 Nonradiological metals/compounds . . . 8-7. . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . 7-22. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 Air officer (LPD)/helicopter control officer (others) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and rescue organization and . . . . . 4-1 Other rescue vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-8 Initial response MFFV . . . . . . . . . . Marine corps aircraft firefighting unit inspections . . . . . . . . 5-2 P-4A (7180) . . 2-13 Overheated batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7 Extra-hazardous flight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . . fire. . . . . . . . . . . 7-1. . 8-1 Air officer (air boss) . . . . . . . . 5-16 Nonflight quarter posture . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . . . . . .

. . 8-20. . . . . . 6-1 to the Scene . 7-7. . . . 9-10 Hangar readiness . . . . . . . . . 7-21. . . . . . . . . . . 8-20. . . . . . . . . 5-12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12 Recovery . . . . . . . 7-7. . 2-15 Portable extinguisher training requirements . . 2-17 Requests . . . . . . . . 8-7. . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Q Questions . . . . . . . . . . . 7-14. . . . . . . . 8-20. . . . . . . . . . . 7-7. . S-3B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ES-3A. 9-3 Embarked on-the-job training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-21 Responsibilities . . . . . . 1-1 Secondary aircraft emergency alarm intercommunication system . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20. . . . 5-12 MFFV . . 3-2 Alert . . . . . 9-14 Tools for remote outlying fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2. . . . . . . . . . 7-19. . . . . . . . 2-2 Shore-based TAUs . . . . . 9-1 Respot . . . . . . . . 8-16. . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Preliminary contamination assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13 Services defined . . . . . 8-3. . . . . . . 8-20. Personnel requirements and organization . 9-11 Protective clothing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5 Salvage operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Response: Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6 Reference . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 Purple-K-powder dry chemical powder extinguishers . . . . . . . 9-6 Fire extinguishing agent supply . . . . . . 5-10 Breathing apparatus . . 7-3. . . 9-3. 6-1 Firefighting . . . . 2-14 Polyethylene packaging material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7 Duties and procedure . . . . . . . . . 5-12 Routes and vehicle speed . 8-10 Aircraft fire and rescue response reporting . . . . . . . . . . 5-15 Self-contained breathing apparatus . . . . . . . 7-14. . . . . 9-11 Heliport crash crane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-15 Scene leader . . . . 2-14 Fluoroelastomer (Viton) . . . . 8-19 Scope and purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9 Polyethylene packaging material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14 Scene nursing/replenishment coordination . . . E-1 S S-3A. . . . . . . . . . . 7-11. . 9-7 Firefighting clothing . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 Fire protection . . . . . . . . 9-4. . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7 Mutual assistance and administrative . . . . . . . 5-5 Rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10 Special hazards . . . . . . . . . 5-15 Airfield extinguishers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11. 7-7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13 Residual fire overhaul/ reflash watch . . . . . 7-21. . . . . 9-14 Respiratory protection program . . . . . . . 7-12. . . . 7-20. . . . . . . . . . 9-15 Basic vehicle spotting . 5-16 Response . 7-2. . . . 9-7 Requirement: AFFF proportioning system manning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-20. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 Airfield fire protection . . . . . . . 8-8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Procedures: Aircraft firefighting tactics and . . . . . . and US-3A aircraft engine fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13 ORIGINAL Index-8 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16 Lithium . . . . . . . . . 9-7 Rocket engines (JATO) . . 8-19. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-20. . . . 2-15 R Radiological . . . . 5-12 Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22. 7-11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 Care and maintenance . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . 9-14 Path . . . 3-7 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9 Severity after ignition . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11 Concerning inadequate AFFF coverage to permit flight quarters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-16. . . . . 8-7. . 5-12 Flight deck readiness . . . 8-8. . . . . . . . . . . 8-2. . . . . . . . . . 8-18. . . . . 8-21. . . . . . . 7-21. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Primary: Aircraft emergency alarm intercommunication system (crash phone) . . . . . 8-16. . . . . . . . . . . 7-18. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16 Readiness requirements — hangar deck . . . . . 7-20. . . . . 7-14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14 Personnel . . . . 7-8. . . . . . . . . . 3-8 Care of facepiece . . 9-11 Concerning inadequate AFFF coverage during nonflight quarters posture . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Handlines . . . . . Ordnance stores . . . . . . . . 2-2 Tanks: Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6 Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 Crash grid map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and hydrostatic . . . . . . . . 5-15 Page No. . 2-2 Secondary aircraft emergency alarm intercommunication . 8-1 Technique Determine direct attack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13 Fire training . . . . . . . . 9-7 Training with Halon 1211 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Attack from uphill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14 Training program subjects . . . . . 5-14 Fire prevention and extinguisher training . . . . . 5-13 Ejection seat training . . . . . . . . . . 9-8 Crash. . 8-9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9. . . . . . . . 9-9 AFFF flight deck fire extinguishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7 Conduct of drills . . . . 9-4 T Tactics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5. . . 9-13 Flight deck weapons staging area (bomb farm) AFFF sprinkler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14 Twin agent unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 U. 5-12 Aids . . . . 5-13 Funds . . . . . . . 3-5 Tires . . . . . . . . . . . . Use the wind . . . . . 2-2 Hydrostatic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9. . . . Tailpipe fires . . . 8-8. . . 9-5 Oxygen . 8-5. . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . 8-10 Drills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12. 8-8. . . . . . . . . .S. Basic vehicle spotting procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . salvage. . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10. . . . . . . . . . . Response routes and vehicle speed . . . . . . . . . . . . Using vehicle-mounted twin agent unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8 Drill sequence of events for fuel station fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5 Roll . . . . . . . . . 7-8. maintenance. . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4. . . . . . . . . . 7-8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 6-3 6-1 6-1 6-3 6-3 6-3 6-1 6-1 6-3 6-6 Index-9 9 ORIGINAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9. . Initial attack . . . . . 7-8. . . . 5-14 Formal schools . . 5-10 Stations: AFFF proportioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 Standby alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1. . . . . . . . . . . 4-10 Two-speed pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and rescue crewmember training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4 Air bag rescue and lifting . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10 Support aircraft firefighting and rescue vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4 CONFLAG . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Team organization During flight operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 System(s): AFFF . . . . . . . 5-15 Flight deck AFFF sprinkler . . . . . . 8-8. . . 9-1 During normal flight operations . . . . . . . 5-14 Program subjects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12 Tests: Fuel tank fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13 Tool: Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7 Drill sequence of events . . . . . . 7-3. 5-13 Training aids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5 AFFF proportioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13 Training funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5 Hangar deck AFFF sprinkler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tank location . . . . . . . 5-13 Training requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 Emergency communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8 Embarked on-the-job training requirements . Basic approach . 5-7 Crash crane category changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7. 3-5 Inspection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Speed: Response routes and vehicle . 8-5. . . . . . . . 7-10. . . . . . . .

. 6-3 W Waivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-21. 3-2 Weapons: Cooling .S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 Unit: Twin agent . . . . 6-1 Using vehicle-mounted twin agent unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10 Using vehicle-mounted twin agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 Use the wind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 Wire communication systems . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20. . . . . . . 7-20. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NAVAIR 00-80R-14 Page No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14 Staging area (bomb farm) fire response AFFF hose team(s) . Vehicle nursing/replenishment support functions . 9-5 ORIGINAL Index-10 10 . 8-20 U U. . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 Vari-nozzles and in-line eductors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19 Wheel assembly fires . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Water . . . . . . . . . . . Page No. . . . . . . . . 7-4. . . . 3-2. . . 3-1. . . 5-15 V V-22 aircraft engine compartment and midwing compartment fires . . . . . . 7-19. . . . . . . . . . 1-1 Wand extension for primary airfield extinguishers . . . . . . . . . . . . .

NAVAIR 00-80R-14 LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES Effective Pages Original Original Original Original Original Original Original Original Original Original Original Original Page Numbers 1 (Reverse Blank) 3 (Reverse Blank) 5 (Reverse Blank) 7 (Reverse Blank) 9 (Reverse Blank) 11 thru 21 (Reverse Blank) 23 thru 29 (Reverse Blank) 31 thru 33 (Reverse Blank) 1-1 thru 1-2 2-1 thru 2-17 (Reverse Blank) 3-1 thru 3-8 4-1 thru 4-14 Effective Pages Original Original Original Original Original Original Original Original Original Original Original Original Page Numbers 5-1 thru 5-16 6-1 thru 6-12 7-1 thru 7-24 8-1 thru 8-23 (Reverse Blank) 9-1 thru 9-16 A-1 thru A-2 B-1 (Reverse Blank) C-1 thru C-2 D-1 thru D-4 E-1 thru E-9 (Reverse Blank) Index-1 thru Index-10 LEP-1 (Reverse Blank) LEP-1/(2 blank) 1/(2 blank) ORIGINAL .

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