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PW Show Daily, Day 2, May 25

PW Show Daily, Day 2, May 25

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09/11/2011

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Day

2

Wednesday
May 25, 2011
Publishers Weekly’s Show Daily is produced each day during the 2011 BookExpo in New York.
The Show Daily press office is in room 1C02. PW’s booth is #4234.

A L L

T H E

B U Z Z

O N

B O O K E X P O

A M E R I C A

Book Industry Crowds Are Upbeat
With an industry becoming
more comfortable with
e-books, and the recession
no longer such an issue, an
upbeat tenor returned to
the aisles for the kickoff of
BEA 2011. Since many had
already attended panels
and sessions over the past
few days, the lines for
badges were reasonable
and the Javits layout familiar. There were still lingering complaints about airconditioning, Wi-Fi, and
construction inside Javits,
but overwhelmingly book
publishing professionals
thought BEA got off to a
great start. The consensus
was that traffic was strong
and that excitement about
e-books buoyed the mood.
Ben White, a sales rep for
Macmillan, said he thought
this year’s show was higher
energy than last year’s and
that the interest in e-books
and new technology has
brought “more buzz around
the industry.” Although
Macmillan’s biggest book of
the fall, Jeffrey Eugenides’s
much anticipated novel,
The Marriage Plot, was not
available—White said galleys are not quite ready—it
didn’t decrease traffic
around the FSG booth in
the Macmillan aisle.
Several publishing folks
commented that the booksellers they encountered
were upbeat if “not ebullient,” as Little, Brown publisher Michael Pietsch put
it, and the booksellers
seemed happy to be in New
York. “I’m surrounded by
just the people I want to be
surrounded by. Everyone
has a sense of connection
with what they do,” said
Valerie Lewis, co-owner of
Hicklebee’s Children’s
Books in San Jose, Calif.
Another bookseller,
Jennifer Seigle, who works
at Borders in York, Pa.,

noted that although her
trip to BEA will not affect
her buying decisions, she
appreciated the chance to
meet authors, since she can
then pass along “what they
said about their book.”
Karen Walsh at Houghton
Mifflin Harcourt, who was
“pleasantly surprised” by
first-day attendance, said
she’s taken more bookseller appointments about
author events this year
over last year, which she
found encouraging.
Booksellers move “a lot of
books and tie them in with
school visits,” she added.
This was also the first year
she noticed an immediate
effect from the speed dating panel in terms of galley
requests in the booth.
Pietsch, who had sung
the praises of Chad

Harbach’s The Art of
Fielding at Monday afternoon’s Editors Buzz Panel,
said he was particularly
excited to see how many
women had shown up to get
their galley signed by the

first-time author, given that
the book is, at least on the
surface, about baseball.
Noting that Hachette is
having a particularly good
run on the bestseller lists at
the moment—among oth-

ers there is Tina Fey’s
Bossypants, Michael
Connelly’s The Fifth
Witness, and Lawrence
Block’s latest, A Drop of the
Hard Stuff—Pietsch said
continued on page 4

Teicher in Town Hall
By Judith Rosen
American Booksellers
Association CEO Oren
Teicher broke with tradition
at this year’s annual meeting. Rather than report on
association activities during
the past year, he addressed
the elephant in the Javits
Center, e-books and the turmoil that bricks-and-mortar
booksellers are feeling. “As I
hardly need to remind

everyone here, these are not
normal times in the book
business. We are living
through a period of unprecedented change and staggering challenges. It can no longer be business as usual,” he
said.
Teicher noted that the
slide in the number of indie
bookstores has halted, with
more than 400 new stores
opening since 2005, and that
bricks-and-mortar book-

ABA CEO Oren Teicher

© photo credit

By Rachel Deahl

stores remain the essential
showroom for ensuring the
sale of a broad spectrum of
books. Although e-books
have reached a tipping point
and outsold other formats
for the first time in February,
“ABA in no way believes that
print books are going away,”
he said. “Nothing can
replace the physical book.”
But things must change,
said Teicher, noting that
industry practices go back
more than half a century,
predating I Love Lucy.
Referring to ongoing discussions with publishers, he said
that the ABA is making progress in working together to
create a new, sustainable
business model. As a chilling
reminder of what’s at stake,
he cited statistics after digitalization in the music industry, which has seen a 64%
drop in sales from its peak
year in 2000, and much of
that loss is due to the closing
of physical stores.
The bookstore’s role as
showroom remains vital,
although the scope has
shifted outside the store’s
physical walls to include staff
continued on page 4
www.bookexpoamerica.com

2

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

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MEETING AND EVENTS
8:30–9:30 a.m. Adult Book and Author Breakfast: Diane Keaton. Jeffrey
Eugenides, and Charlaine Harris, with Mindy Kaling as emcee

Passion’s
Blood

9 a.m.–5 p.m. Exhibit Hall
 

9 a.m.–5 p.m. International Rights & Business Center
 

Cherif Fortin
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9 a.m.–5 p.m. Big Ideas at BEA Conference (17 panels) beginning with “The
Three R’s of Google eBooks: Reading, Regions and Retailing” (9–10:30
a.m., room 1E02) and ending with “Emerging Opportunities in the
New Arab World: Perspectives for Publishers and Distributors” (3:30–
4:30 p.m., room 1E17). Other panels include “The Report of My Death
Was Exaggerated”—The Printed Word” (11 a.m.–noon, room 1E15);
“Making the Transition from Publishing to Packaging,” presented by
ABPA (3:30–4:30 p.m., room 1E14); and “Book Reviews Online,” sponsored by the National Book Critics Circle (3:30–4:30 p.m., room 1E15)

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SongSiren.com (10 a.m., Midtown Stage) and ending with “The Education Debate” with author Steve Perry and Joel Klein, former New
York City schools chancellor (4 p.m., Uptown Stage). “My New American Life: Granta’s Best of Young Spanish Language Novelists,” “Paulo
Coelho in Conversation,” and “The Cartoonists” are among the other
events today.
 

4–5 p.m. APA Audiobook & Author Tea: Karin Slaughter, Tony Horwitz,
Brad Meltzer, with Star Jones as emcee. Hosted by the Audio
Publishers Association

Come to the Medallion Press booth #2738 to experience it yourself!

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BEA opens and the crowd rushes in.

Availableer!
this Octob

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Daisy Maryles
MANAGING EDITORS Michael Coffey, Sonia Jaffe Robbins
ART DIRECTORS Clive Chiu, Kenneth Nadel
PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Kagan
STAFF REPORTERS Andrew Albanese, Rachel Deahl, Dick Donahue, Louisa Ermelino,
Lynn Garrett, Sarah F. Gold, Jim Milliot, Calvin Reid, Diane Roback, Judith Rosen,
Mark Rotella, Parul Seghal, John A. Sellers
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Gwenda Bond, Natalie Danford, Lucinda Dyer, Karen Jones,
Hilary S. Kayle, Bridget Kinsella, Claire Kirch, Sally Lodge, Suzanne Mantell,
Shannon Maughan, Diane Patrick, Judith Rosen, Marc Schultz, Wendy Werris, Ada Price
DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL Craig Teicher
PRODUCTION MANAGER Catherine Fick, Kady Francesconi
TECHNOLOGY MANAGER Milan Patel
PUBLISHER Cevin Bryerman
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SHOW DAILY Joseph Murray
SALES REPS: Tory Abel, Ted Olczak, Matt Hurley
BookExpo America is owned by Reed Exhibitions and any of its marks used herein are used
medallionpress.com

www.bookexpoamerica.com

under license from Reed Exhibitions.

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4

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

BEA shows that, for everyone at the
houses and in the bookstores, “the
thrill of finding new writers
remains strong.”
Brian Murray, CEO of
HarperCollins, said he felt there
was palpable excitement in the air
from the two recent announcements coming from B&N, first about
Liberty Media’s offer to buy the
company, and then about the newest iteration of the Nook. Both
announcements, he thought, were
“positive developments for the
industry.” And John Maxwell, president of sales at HC, said he thought
the busy crowds on Tuesday were
thanks in large part to all the preshow scheduling. Between the educational programming at the show
on Monday and IDPF, Maxwell
said that the show felt like it was
well underway instead of just
getting off the ground by midafternoon Tuesday.

Michelle Blankenship at
Bloomsbury was glad to see
“librarians out in such force,”
particularly given all the glum news
lately about library budgets being
slashed. She also added that many of
the independent booksellers she
talked to seemed “hopeful.”
Pulling a statistic that defies any
notion that publishing is dying, or
even floundering, Bob Miller,
president of Workman, said the fact
that one billion books were sold last
year is good news, and that it
speaks to how “there’s room to
connect those books with readers.”
Miller, who called the show “very
busy,” said the irony of BEA is that
the conversation is all about digital
at a show entirely dedicated to
physical books. The effect is
“schizophrenic,” he noted, adding
that technology is now creeping its
way into all conversations. “I think
everyone is looking for ways to use
technology to build their
businesses.” 
—Rachel Deahl,

Autographing draws large crowds 

The Book Industry Crowds
continued from page 1

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

BookStats Points Up
In a preliminary presentation for figures that will appear in July, representatives from the AAP, BISG, and
Bowker explained the new process for
how industry sales are being compiled
and analyzed, at a Tuesday afternoon
panel. The good news is that more than
1,100 publishers have supplied date to
the joint AAP/BISG BookStats project,
more than double the participation
level of any other statistics endeavor.
And in more good news, preliminary
findings from the actual numbers show
that sales, both in units and dollars,
were up in the trade segment between
2008 and 2010. AAP and BISG will present estimated overall sales figure for
various parts of the industry in July
after they have a chance to draw on
more information and analysis from
other industry sources.
Based on the actual figures supplied by the 1,100 publishers, most of
whom are in the trade segment, the
strongest sales gains in the threeyear period came from small and
medium-size publishers. Sales at the
largest publishers showed slight
gains. Adult fiction sales had modest

with reporting by Diane Roback

sales gains, while the children’s/
young adult market had substantial
gains in the period. Bowker’s Kelly
Gallagher noted that sales of adult
nonfiction “are struggling a bit.” BISG
chair and Sourcebooks president
Dominique Raccah noted that in
each of the industry tiers—small,
medium, and large—at least 50% of
the reporting companies posted year
over year gains.
Breakdowns by channel and format
showed few surprises. Hardcover and
paperback sales were down while
e-book sales had exponential growth,
Gallagher noted. Retail chain sales
declined, and independent booksellers held their own in a difficult market,
showing only a very small decline.
Gallagher explained that AAP/
BISG had traded accuracy for speed
in developing final numbers for the
industry. Raccah emphasized that
BookStats will enable publishers to
analyze data in numerous ways,
including allowing publishers to
match their growth against publishers of a similar size. 

—Jim Milliot

© stevekagan.com

Bloomsbury’s George
Gibson subbed for the
voluble Neil deGrasse
Tyson of the Hayden
Planetarium, and
acquitted himself in
his own lively fashion
in a talk with his
author Dava Sobel,
whose forthcoming
book is about
Copernicus.

Teicher in Town Hall
continued from page 1

www.bookexpoamerica.com

sage of the outgoing ABA president,
Michael Tucker, co-owner of Books
Inc., headquartered in San Francisco.
“Not only still here,” he said, “but our
membership has continued to
increase for the past two years.”
That change is necessary to
accomplish booksellers’ continued
existence also arose in the Town
Hall. Christin Evans, co-owner of
Booksmith in San Francisco, quoted
Jeff Hammerbacher, “The best
minds of my generation are thinking about how to make people click
ads [on Facebook].” She said
emphatically: “We need to change
this equation. I think we can do better. It’s been 10 years since the
launch of e-commerce; three years
since the launch of IndieBound; and
six months since Google Books.
None of these could be considered a
success. The ABA today will need to
reinvent itself to be more nimble,
welcoming, and sustainable.” 

—Judith Rosen

9:15 a.m., Attendee Shipping area: a mere
15 minutes into Day 1, many booksellers were
already boxing up a great haul of galleys for
shipping home.

A Tyra Banks fantasy (novel):
the mega-model graced the
Random House booth in
support of Modelland, first in a
trilogy for Delacorte.

© stevekagan.com

picks on bookstore Web sites,
Facebook, Twitter, e-mails, school visits, and off-site events. “The simple
fact is that to most consumers, if you
don’t exist online you simply don’t
exist,” Teicher said. And he hinted at
several new initiatives for selling digital content online beyond Google.
“Simply writing off bookstores as
a relic of an antique era is not only
shortsighted, it is a prescription for
an impoverished publishing community,” said Teicher. The ABA is
considering a variety of new models, including consignment,
extended dating, forgoing returnability, and co-op. “I’m absolutely
convinced,” he said, “that we will be
able to fashion new business models. We’re ready to test some of
these new models starting now.”
“We’re still here,” the headline of
an ad campaign produced by
Northern California booksellers,
served as an underlying theme for
Teicher’s talk and was also the mes-

At Tuesday’s Insight Stages, “PW”
reviews director Louisa Ermelino talked
to Justin Torres, author of “We the
Animals” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt).

PUBL I SHERS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

SRO at Buzz Panel
Speaking to a standing-room-only
crowd at the 4:30 p.m. Buzz Panel on
Monday, six editors made their
pitches about the books they think,
and hope, will edge out the competition this fall. While the offerings felt a
little heavy on the women’s fiction
side—Birds of Paradise, Running the
Rift, The Underside of Joy, and The
Night Circus all seemed primed for
that bookclub sweet spot—the editors proffered new and older writers
as well as a mix of ballyhooed titles.
One of the books that ignited the
crowd the most, and that many
attendees buzzed about afterwards,
was Chad Harbach’s The Art of
Fielding. Michael Pietsch at Little,
Brown, the only male editor on the
panel, sang the praises of the debut
novel, which started something of a
bidding war when he nabbed the title
in February 2010. Harbach is one of
the founders of the literary magazine
N+1 and received an advance
rumored to be more than $600,000.
Apparently people have not stopped
talking about the book—Pietsch
boasted blurbs from authors ranging
from Jonathan Franzen to James

Patterson—and Pietsch said the
work, about a baseball prodigy at a
Michigan liberal arts college whose
life and game fall apart after an
errant toss in practice one day, is
about “perfection, striving, youth...
figuring out who you are and who you
might become.” Adding that the book
has it all—“two love stories, a death,
and a championship season”—
Pietsch noted that reading the work
made him think about what John
Updike said of J.D. Salinger’s Glass
family, and how the author had loved
them more than God did; Harbach,
Pietsch said, seemed to have the
same compassion and love for his
characters.
The other big advance book on the
panel, and the last presented, was
Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus.
Acquired by Alison Callahan at
Doubleday for a rumored $1 million,
the book has already brought in
money for Random House, having
sold in more than 20 countries
abroad and with a possible film deal
in the works at Summit
Entertainment (which produced the
Twilight series). The novel, also a

Lane Smith signing his fall
picture book, “Grandpa
Green” (Roaring Brook).

W E E K LY

debut, is something Callahan said
she read in one five-hour sitting in
the Random House cafeteria and
decided the work was something “I
had to have.” Set in a magical circus
called Le Cirque des Reves, which
crops up around the world without
warning or advance notice, and consisting of otherworldly attractions,
the book is a sweeping love story: the
two young magicians, Celia and
Marco, whose endless dueling creates the circus, wind up falling madly
in love. Calling the novel “a feast for
the senses in every way,” Callahan
noted that the book’s imagery is so
powerful and engulfing that reading
it is “like reading in 3-D.”
Elaine Mason at Norton came to
the panel with an author she’s been
editing for nearly 20 years—Diana
Abu-Jabar. Touting Birds of Paradise
as Abu-Jabar’s breakout hit, Mason
said the work, which follows the
inner turmoil of a Miami clan named
the Muirs whose daughter has run
away, cuts at the core of what it
means to be in a family. “It’s a story of
how members of a family who are lost
to another can find each other again,”
she said, adding that the novel hits on
three topics all readers love: family,
food, and real estate.
Denise Roy at Dutton pulled from
personal experience when she discussed Sere Prince Halverson’s The
Underside of Joy. About a widow who
must grapple with the sudden arrival
of her children’s biological mother,
Roy said the book was rescued from
the slush pile and became a sensation in Europe. When it landed on her
desk, on the one-year anniversary of
the death of her own husband, it
offered what any great book can—a

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

5

sense of catharsis and escape.
In describing Justin Torres’s debut,
We the Animals, Jenna Johnson at
HMH said the novel is one with both
“scope and brevity.” Told from the
point of view of one of the sons of a
Brooklyn family anchored by the volatile and intense relationship
between Puerto Rican mother and
white father, the semiautobiographical book shows, Johnson said, how
the “madness in all of us is both
caused, and alleviated, by our families.” Noting that the in-house enthusiasm for the book is like nothing
she’s ever seen before—Torres’s varied background includes work as a
farmhand, a stint in a mental hospital, and an M.F.A. from the Iowa
Writers Workshop—Johnson said
that “everyone who reads [this book]
finds some personal reality in its
pages.”
Kathy Pories from Algonquin was
on hand to talk up Naomi Benaron’s
Running the Rift, which won the
Bellwether Prize for Fiction. (The
Bellwether is an award given by
Barbara Kingsolver to an unpublished manuscript that speaks to
issues of social justice.) Benaron
worked with African refugees in
Arizona before she started making
regular trips to Rwanda. After falling
in love with the country, she started
putting together the novel, about a
Tutsi runner with his sights set on the
Olympics, who attempts to remain
apolitical in a country besieged by
genocide. The novel, which Pories
said gets across both the beauty of
Rwanda as well as the way the seeds
of genocide grew there, reminded
her of one of her favorite novels, A
Fine Balance.—Rachel Deahl

Hail, Hail Audio Winners
Colson Whitehead leans on a galley
stack of his own upcoming novel
“Zone One” (Doubleday).

At the Celebration of Bookselling lunch,
E.B. White Award winners Peter Brown (l.)
and Tom Angleberger demonstrated how to
fold your own Yoda.

Coffee House Press
author Kirsten
Kaschock (center)
helped attendees
visualize Sleight,
the imaginary art
form that is at the
heart of her earlybuzz first novel of
the same name.

The Audio Publishers Association
held its 16th annual Audies Gala yesterday at New York’s TimesCenter to
celebrate the Audies winners of its
yearly audiobook awards. Referred
to by the APA as the “Oscars of spoken-word entertainment,” the two
biggest Audies this year went to
musician-memoirist Keith Richards
and genre-hopping poet-author
Walter Dean Myers. 
Audiobook of the Year went to
Hachette Audio’s Life by Richards,
narrated by Johnny Depp and Joe
Hurley, with Keith Richards. The
APA recognized the audiobook’s “multipronged marketing
campaign that capitalized
on Depp’s contributions” and
helped introduce a new audience to
the format. Life also wins in
the Biography/Memoir category.
The Distinguished Achievement
in Production award, given to an
audiobook “that represents the best
the format has to offer in listening
excellence,” went to Here in
Harlem: Poems in Many Voices by
Myers. The audiobook, from Live

Oak Media, features a cast of
13, including Ezra Knight, Robin
Miles, and Charles Turner, as well
as “jazz music and sound effects
[that] add to the sense of time and
place.”
Other winners include Alan
Cumming’s reading of Zorgamazoo
by Robert Paul Weston (Penguin
Audio) and Emma Thompson for
narrating her own Nanny
McPhee Returns (Macmillan Audio);
the Fiction award went to Daniel
Woodrell’s Winter’s Bone, narrated
by Emma Galvin (Hachette Audio);
Mystery went to Michael Connelly’s
The Reversal, read by Peter Giles;
Nonfiction went to The Immortal
Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca
Skloot, narrated by Cassandra
Campbell with Bahni Turpin. The
full list of winners, along with sound
clips, can be found at TheAudies.
com. The celebration was hosted by
author Adriana Trigiani (Big Stone
Gap); presenters included filmmaker/author John Waters and
author Thomas Cobb (Crazy Heart). 

—Marc Schultz
www.bookexpoamerica.com

6

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Venice was arguably the world’s
printing capital in the 15th century,
before Italy was a nation. And this
year—the 150th anniversary of
Italy’s unification—Italian publishing appears to be on the rise.
“In the last 10 years, we’ve had
400 publishers attend BEA, promoting Italian language in the U.S.,”
said Pasquale Bova, commissioner
of the Italian Trade Commission, in
his opening remarks at the Global
Market Forum, which this year fo-

cuses on Italy.
Currently, Italy is the smallest
domestic market of Europe’s largest publishers. Nearly four million
people read more than 12 books a
year each—but that’s only 7% of the
population (France has the largest
readership). While Marco Polillo,
president of the Italian Publishers
Association, bemoans these numbers, he is encouraged that Italian
readership is rising. The number of
new titles published has risen from

© steve kagan.com

Italy Expands in
International Trade
Marc Polillo, president, Italian Publishers Assn.

19,700 in 1980 to 58,829 presently—
for a total of 690,279 titles.
Italians still buy their books
through traditional trade channels:
40.4% through chains, 37.9%
through bookstores, and only 4.3%

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Italy is seeing a kind of rebirth of
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Zaninoni, editorial director of
Rizzoli. This is due, he said, to the
“rise of international fiction” generally as well as the “birth of the local
megaseller”—that is, an increase of
Italian authors selling more than
400,000 copies of their books. To
help bring Italian authors to the
U.S., Rizzoli has formed an imprint
called Ex Libris, which will publish
literary fiction and nonfiction, by
Rizzoli as well as other Italian
houses.
Much of the growth in fiction publishing in Italy is thanks to small to
midsize publishers, according to
Michael Reynolds, editor-in-chief of
Europa Editions. He said he’s witnessed an unprecedented “hunt in
Italy for young debut authors.”
While this is all exciting news for
Italian publishers, Chad Post of
Open Letter Press, the enterprising
small U.S. house devoted to publishing literature in translation,
books by foreign writers account
for only 3% of books published in
the U.S. Such a strong turnout
among the Italian houses here
might do something to change that. 

—Mark Rotella

A Rush for Hell

Bestselling author and pastor
Francis Chan is adding fuel to the
currently hot debate over hell with
Erasing Hell: What God Said About
Eternity and the Things We Make
Up. The July release from David C.
Cook, with a first printing of 250,000
and a six-figure marketing budget,
was announced last Friday. At BEA,
Oasis Audio (4279) is promoting the
simultaneous audio release with a
download card with a QR code that
links to an online video by Chan,
founding pastor of Cornerstone
Church in Simi Valley, Calif., talking about the book.
Steve Smith, Oasis director of
sales and marketing, said it has already begun a social media campaign. Early response from booksellers, including
Christian chains
and Barnes &
Noble, has been
“tremendous,”
Smith says. Chan’s
Crazy Love is
among the 11-year-old audio firm’s
top five sellers.  
Don Pape, trade book publisher at
Cook, said Chan came to the house,
which has published two of his
previous titles. Editors worked
around the clock when the
manuscript arrived Friday; it will
go to the printers this week. 

—Marcia Z. Nelson

You’re cordially invited
to the wedding of the year…
the cookies are baked,
Theandtreetheis decorated,
packages are wrapped, but
the biggest celebration this Christmas
is Gaby Summerhill’s wedding.
Since her husband died three years ago,
Gaby’s four children have drifted apart.
When Gaby announces that
she’s getting married—and that the groom
will remain a secret until
the wedding day—she may finally be able
to bring them home for the holidays.

From bestselling author JAMES PATTERSON

Meet James Patterson,

who will be signing advance copies of THE CHRISMAS WEDDING at

2:00 pm on Wednesday, May 25,
in Booth 3631.

The line will begin at 1:30 pm sharp. The signing is limited to the �irst 250 people,
who will also receive a piece of wedding cake!
LITTLE, BROWN AND COMPANY

Hachette Book Group

8

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

The Book’s Universe for Kids
It was a packed house for Tuesday
morning’s Children’s Book &
Author breakfast, with a host of literary celebrity sightings for the
huge crowd of appreciative booksellers, beginning with Katherine
Paterson, National Ambassador for
Young People’s Literature and twotime Newbery Medalist. Paterson
set the tone for the more than 1,200
book people attending by talking
about the power of books to influence the future course of young
lives. After reciting a poem she’d
written in second grade, Paterson
joked that she knows her writing
“has improved” since then, ascribing it to the act of reading. “Reading
turned me into a writer,” she said.
“More importantly, it has enriched
and challenged my life.” She
recalled a friend reading aloud to
her from Cry the Beloved Country
when she was 16, and how, one
night, “the book came alive for her,”
as she related how Alan Paton’s
1948 novel exploring the racial divisions in South Africa made her
realize the “sins of my people” in
the American South during the Jim
Crow era. “I know my life changed

tion by serious writers. “There
was no Twilight, there was no
Harry Potter,” the author of
What Happened to Goodbye
that night—and it was because
explained. “There’s a secret
of a book,” she declared.
about YA literature that we all
It was a sentiment shared by
know: it’s not ‘other,’ it’s betmaster of ceremonies Julianne
ter,” she insisted. “When writMoore, film actor and author of
ing for teens, you are connectFreckleface Strawberry: Best
ing with them at the beginning
Friends Forever. “I never imagof their reading lives,” she
added. “They’re not yet jaded.”
ined I’d be a master of ceremoPromoting both his picture
nies, or a children’s book
book, Little White Rabbit, and
author—or an actor, for that
Breakfast lineup: Katherine Paterson, Brian Selznick, Sarah
his middle-grade novel,
matter,” she said, recalling
Junonia, Kevin Henkes
being taught to read at age five Dessen, Kevin Henkes and Julianne Moore.
underscored the importance
and spending much of her
of reading by defending picture
youth devouring books. “I read voracalled the deaf “the people of the
books as something that “all chilciously, indiscriminately,” she said.
eye,” as he explained the thought
dren should experience.” Referring
“Reading soothed me, encouraged
processes behind his latest book. “I
to the current debate in the media
me, excited me.” Moore praised
wanted to tell different stories, one
about the possible decline in the
booksellers for knowing that “there’s
with words, one with pictures.”
popularity of picture books, Henkes
a universe inside a book.”
Wonderstruck, with its climactic
declared that he hoped that this
Following Moore, Caldecott Medal
scenes taking place at the American
was not the case, because if it was, it
winner Brian Selznick, who spent
Museum of Natural History, “is filled
is “foolish and shortsighted, motithree years working at Eeyore’s
with references to the classic novel,
vated by the trend of putting test
Books for Children in Manhattan
From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil
scores above all else.”
before publishing his first novel,
E. Frankweiler. “I hope you find all of
After Henkes’s presentation,
declared, “I consider myself a bookthem,” he said.
Moore succinctly summed up the
seller first, a writer/illustrator secSarah Dessen, whose work Moore
morning’s themes, noting, “In life
ond. It’s nice to be speaking to my
praised as “YA fiction at its best,”
there are so many things to wonder
people.” Describing his research into
recalled how she unexpectedly
about. You don’t have to wonder
deaf culture as he wove together the
“stumbled” into writing for teens
about books. We love them, we need
stories of two boys living 50 years
more than a decade ago, when YA
them, and we know it.” —Claire Kirch
apart in Wonderstruck, Selznick
was regarded as less worthy of atten-

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n Andrews McMeel
n Bloomsbury PLC
n Chronicle Books
n Continuum International
Publishing
n Harry N. Abrams
n Hodder Education UK
n International Monetary
Fund
n John Hopkins University
Press
n McGill/Queens University
Press
n McGraw Hill Professional
n MidPoint Trade Books

n New York University Press
n Nicholas Brealey Publishing
n Oxford University Press
n Quayside Publishing Group
n Quercus Publishing UK
n Profile Books UK
n Springer Publishing
Company
n Stenhouse Publishers
n Unbridled Books
n University of North Carolina
n World Bank
n Yale University Press

I suppose in the beginning
it was a love story…

DON’T MISS THE MOST
ANTICIPATED AND CONTROVERSIAL
NOVEL OF THE YEAR!
Sixteen-year-old Zach Patterson and kindergarten teacher Judy McFarland
begin an affair that at first thrills, then corrupts each of them.
As the walls close in, Zach finds himself needing to disentangle himself
from premature adulthood. But the lines between adult and child have
blurred, and life and sanity are unraveling faster and further than anyone
could ever have imagined.

“Coleman creates a stark psychological drama...
it’s dark, fast-moving and nicely creepy with a
solid noirish vibe.”
—Publishers Weekly
“From start to finish, The Kingdom of Childhood kept
me riveted.… Coleman is a gifted storyteller with
the ability to breathe life into characters so real
I felt bereft saying goodbye to them at the end.”
— Elizabeth Flock,
New York Times bestselling author of Me & Emma

Photo by: Peter Ross

“Wow, what a book! The story just spirals and
I completely got caught up in the madness.
Cannot wait to see what readers think about it.”
— Carol Fitzgerald,
co-Founder/President, The Book Report Network

10

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

What’s In a Name
Publishers Weekly’s review of
Carmela Ciuraru’s book, Nom de
Plume: A (Secret) History of
Pseudonyms (Harper, June 14) said,
“This survey of authors who sought
anonymity and privacy is well
researched. Amid informative, illuminating profiles, Ciuraru successfully ferrets out curious literary
charades.”  And she does, focusing
on the intrigue and turmoil behind
the secret identities with narratives
of secrecy, obsession, modesty,
scandal, defiance, and shame.,
according to her publisher.
Ciuraru says she has always been

intrigued by
issues of identity and 
pseudonymity, “For some
writers, it’s a
hoax, a
prank, a
stunt. But for others there’s an awful lot at stake. Perhaps they’re
fighting for respect, hiding something they think is shameful, or
struggling just to keep going.” 
She says she avoided contemporary authors because their stories
are unfinished. “What’s more com-

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

mon now are authors with transparent pseudonyms—openly using
other names to avoid saturating the
market as themselves. Often it’s a
way of showing off your versatility,
or trying out different genres, such
as science fiction or romance.
That’s less interesting to me.”  
Ciuraru is not a pseudonym. Her
anthologies include First Loves:
Poets Introduce the Essential Poems
That Captivated and Inspired Them
(Scribner) and Solitude Poems
(Knopf/Everyman’s Library). She
has a blog about the arts, culture,
and books at http://www.readymade.com/blog/author/ciuraru.
Today, at 3 p.m., she will be in the autographing area signing her book.

Includes

A Write
• Your •
Own
Book

Draw!

Includes

A Write • Your •
Own
Pet Diary

of a

Based on a True sT
sTory
ory

My First Activity Book

Headline to come
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Text to come. Text to come. Text to come. Text to come. Text to
come. Text to come. Text to come. e. Text to come. Text to come.
Text to come. Text to cme. come.

ColoR Fun ANIMALS

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DRaw

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come. Text to come. Text to come. e. Text to come. Text to come.

Read!

Blue Apple

$10.99 US / $0.00 Can

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ColoR Fun FACES

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My First Activity Book

for use on black
and dark colors

for use on blue

Blue Apple
for use on black
and dark colors

for use on blue

www.bookexpoamerica.com

at booth #4427

1. He was the bestselling French author of the 20th century.
2. She dressed like a man and
smoked cigars. 
3. She fantasized about killing her
mother and wrote an autobiographical novel.  
4. He loved photography and collected books about fairies. 
5. She lived with a married man.
6. He had more than 70 pen names.
7. She came from a family of Danish
aristocrats.
8. The novelist Elizabeth Gaskell
published a biography of this author in 1857.
9. He was a convicted criminal.  
10. He said that his pen name came
from a steamboat captain.  

A Newish
Jewish Review

Doodle!

$8.99 US / $9.99 Can

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE
Choose from these pen names to fill
in the answers below: Charlotte
Brontë, Lewis Carroll, Isak
Dinesen, George Eliot, Romain
Gary, Henry Green, O. Henry,
Patricia Highsmith, George Orwell,
Fernando Pessoa, Sylvia Plath,
Pauline Réage, George Sand,
Georges Simenon, Mark Twain.

The Jewish Review of Books (booth
4959) is one of the newer kids on the
book review block, having
launched in February 2010, but it’s
quickly becoming known for smart
pieces that provoke discussion.
Michael Weingrad’s “Why There Is
No Jewish Narnia,” which covered
Lev Grossman’s The Magicians
(Viking, 2009) and Hagar Yanai’s
Ha-Mayim she-bein ha-olamot (The
Water Between the Worlds) (Keter,
2008) and considered the lack of
Jewish fantasy literature in general, engendered responses from
the likes of Neil Gaiman. Ron
Rosenbaum’s “Bob Dylan: Messiah
or Escape Artist?” which reviewed
Seth Rogovoy’s Bob Dylan: Prophet,
Mystic, Poet (Scribner, 2009), was
also highly discussed.
“We made a big splash with our
first issue, and have grown tremendously since then,” says assistant
editor Phil Getz. “We now have over
6,300 subscribers in 29 countries.
Our articles have been linked and
discussed on hundreds of Web sites,
including those of the New York
Times, Chronicle of Higher
Education, the Atlantic, the Wall
Street Journal, and the New
Republic.” The 52-page quarterly
enjoys an 80%-plus renewal rate.
At BEA, the Jewish Review of
Books will be offering a two-yearfor-the-price-of-one subscription to
visitors to its booth, as well as 25%
off all ads purchased there. The
spring 2011 issue, its most recent,
will be featured in the New Title
Showcase.
—Natalie Danford

THE FIRST EARLY REVIEW IS IN...

—BILL OTT, BOOKLIST (starred review)

One man destined to break
the chains of his fate….
IRON HOUSE
MAJOR MARKETING CAMPAIGN
200,000-COPY FIRST PRINTING

Facebook.com/JohnHartAuthor

PICK UP AN
ADVANCE READERS’
EDITION OF IRON HOUSE
AT BOOTH #3352
Today at 11:00am
Limited quantities. While supplies last.

Available as an eBook,
Digital Audio and on CD.
THOMAS DUNNE BOOKS

NATIONAL
ONE-DAY
LAYDOWN
7/12/11

12

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Your Worst Nightmare 
New York Times bestsell-

Celebrate
Enjoy a complimentary donut with
HarperCollins Children’s Books this morning!*

Booth #3339
Wednesday, May 25th
10:30 am – 11:00 am
A delicious new story from #1 New York Times bestsellers

Laura Numeroff
and Felicia Bond

Coming October 4, 2011

Art copyright © 2011 by Felicia Bond

www.bookexpoamerica.com

mousecookiebooks.com

*Limited quantities;
while supplies last.

ing author Ben H.
Winters has paired the
Dashwood sisters with
giant lobsters and octopi
in Sense and Sensibility
and Sea Monsters and
made several contributions to the give-younightmares Worst-Case
Scenario Survival Guide
series. But while most of us can
safely assume we’ll never have to
battle gigantic sea creatures or
stop a runaway cable car, all of us
might someday have to confront
the dreaded bedbug. 
It’s these insidious creatures that
have crawled their way into
Winters’ new novel, Bedbugs
(Sept.). Quirk associate publisher
Jason Rekulak describes it as “an
understated horror story filled
with loving references to
Rosemary’s Baby and other classic
tales of urban paranoia” and promises it “will keep your skin crawling
into the wee hours of the night.” 
Bedbugs features a nice young couple named Alex and Susan Wendt,

who are searching for the
perfect New York City
brownstone. When they
find it in Brooklyn Heights,
they’re happy to overlook
the eccentric landlady and
the handyman who drops
cryptic remarks about the
previous tenants. But as
the cliché goes, if it’s too
good to be true ... and
Susan soon discovers that their
home is teeming with bedbugs. Or is
it? While she awakens every morning with fresh bites, neither Alex nor
their daughter has a single welt.
Exterminators search the property
and find nary a bedbug. The landlady
insists the building is clean. It’s not
long before Susan fears she may be
going mad. But there may be a more
sinister explanation—Susan may be
confronting the bedbug problem
from hell. Literally. 
Winters will sign ARCs and posters today, 2–3 p.m., at the Quirk
booth (4428). For those with a touch
of entomophobia, Quirk is offering
tote bags with a witty commentary
on e-readers.
—Lucinda Dyer

A Union of Bugs
and Grammar
At the Marin School of the
Arts at Novato High
School in California’s Bay
Area, English teacher Sue
Sommer created a photocopied grammar guide
called The Bugaboo
Review, which became a
much-distributed legend
among students and parents. In August, New
World Library will release
an edited version of the original
that anyone or any school can use.
The Bugaboo Review focuses on
the most common pitfalls of the
English language, as well as difficult-to-recall grammar rules and
confusing words Sommer noticed
students stumbling over. Over the
years, it became a common occurrence for the teacher to be contacted by past students to say they still
used the guide or by parents who
wanted copies of their own.
New World Library publisher
Marc Allen discovered the guide
when he visited the school to give a
talk about writing and publishing.
He was impressed by the school itself on a tour—a large jazz orchestra was rehearsing, as was a smaller group of classical chamber music players. He heard from several
students what a great teacher
Sommer was, and then went to
speak to her class. Before his talk,
Sommer handed him a copy of her

“funky” guide, made up of
stapled-together 8½×11in. sheets of paper. He immediately saw its potential to find a broader audience.
“I took one look at it
and wanted to publish it.
It was a great teaching
tool—it was clear and fun,
with buggy illustrations
that made confusing
words much clearer,” says Allen.
He brought it back to the New
World Library offices, and everyone got on board, quickly. “There
was even a bit of a competition to
see who would edit it, because several different editors wanted to
work on it.” But very little editing
was needed, something Allen
chalks up to Sommer writing the
book for many years, adding and
changing every year.
Show attendees can drop by New
World’s booth (4620) to snag free
Bugaboo Review bags.  

—Gwenda Bond

Answers to Nom de Plume
Quiz from Page 10
1. Romain Gary; 2. George
Sand; 3. Sylvia Plath; 4. Lewis
Carroll; 5. George Eliot; 6.
Fernando Pessoa; 7. Isak
Dinesen; 8. Charlotte Brontë; 
9. O. Henry; 10. Mark Twain.

NEW FROM MASTER STORYTELLER AND

NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST

Laini Taylor

Around the world, scorched black
handprints are appearing on doorways.
In a dark and dusty shop, a devil’s
supply of teeth grows dangerously low.
And in the streets of Prague, a young
student is about to be caught in a brutal
otherworldly war.

ONE DAY LAYDOWN:

9 • 27 • 11

978-0-316-1340

2-6 • $18.99 ($
20.99 C

AN)

ATTENTION BOOKSELLERS:
Don’t miss your chance to meet Laini Taylor on Wednesday, May 25th. She will be signing ARCs of
Daughter of Smoke and Bone in booth 3630 starting at 10:30 am. The line will begin at 10:00 am sharp.
Signing limited to the first 200 people.

Also Happening in

Booth 3630

1:00 pm

4:00 pm

All Day!

Be the first to read
the unforgettable
new novel from
National Book
Award finalist
Sara Zarr!

Are you a
Beautiful
Creature? Stop
by and grab a
T-Shirt to declare
your allegiance!

Can you keep
a secret? We
can’t—the final
book in The
Secret Series
arrives 9.20.11!

Wednesday, May 25th
All items available while supplies last!

Looking for more resources for your store? Visit www.LBYR-Booksellers.com!

14

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Overlook’s First 40 Years
first sudoku book from
Overlook. We ended up
with nearly two million
books. True Grit was
unpredictable. [But]
what’s most interesting
is we’re a publisher of
authors. When we
revived the Freddy [the
pig] books, we did all 27
of them. When we buy
one book, we generally
buy the entire backlist.”
In the case of P.G.
Wodehouse, Overlook brought out
nearly 80 titles in hardcover, and
according to Mayer, they outsell the
paperbacks.
In addition, Mayer is proud that
“our percentage of foreign language
books is higher than 10% of our list.”
In 2002, Overlook acquired Ardis, a
leading publisher of Russian
literature, which contributed to the
strength of its Russian list. Earlier
this month, for example, it published
Ludmila Ulitskaya’s novel Daniel
Stein, Interpreter, winner of the
Russian National Literary Prize.
Unlike many small publishers,
Overlook does big visual books. “It’s
no accident that Milton Glaser did
our 40th anniversary poster,” says
Mayer. Or that one of Overlook’s lead
titles for the fall has 250 plates:
William Rubin’s A Curator’s Quest,
about his tenure as head of the
Museum of Modern Art’s
department of painting and
sculpture. And the press recently
expanded its presence overseas by
purchasing Duckworth in England.
At its booth (3439), Overlook is
giving out anniversary posters
and galleys for Alan S. Cowell’s
The Paris Correspondent. YA
novelist Eoin Colfer, author of the
Artemis Fowl series, will sign
ARCs of his crime debut, Plugged,
today, 2–3 p.m. 
—Judith Rosen
© peter mayer for sp

Despite a inauspicious
start, Overlook Press
has thrived for the past
four decades. Founded
in 1971 by Alfred
(“Fredy”) Mayer, a
retired glove
manufacturer, and his
son, Avon Books head
Peter Mayer,
Overlook’s first office
was an apple shed in
Woodstock, N.Y. Its
inaugural list
contained a single title, in German.
But on the strength of that one book,
Aufbau, Penguin agreed to distribute
Overlook, which it does to this day, and
Fredy was encouraged to ask his son,
“Aren’t there some other books we
could do together?”
Mayer, now 75, who headed
Penguin for two decades before
coming to Overlook full-time in 1996,
acknowledges that it was “a mad
way” to start a publishing house, but
it worked. “If we like a book, we just
do it. We don’t have that many rules.
My dad would be pleased to know in
our 40th year we had our first New
York Times bestseller, and it was #1,”
he says, referring to the press’s
success with the movie tie-in of
Charles Portis’s True Grit. Until last
year, the closest that Overlook came
to the bestseller list was Robert
Littell’s The Company, which
reached #16. That’s not to say that its
books haven’t done well, like
Miyamoto Musashi’s A Book of Five
Rings, which sold more than 700,000
copies with Mayer’s tagline: “Japan’s
answer to the Harvard M.B.A.!”
Early on, says Mayer, “we decided
that the image of small companies
is that they get very narrowly
focused. My background was very
catholic. I think our eclectic list is
the result of that unpredictability.
Nobody ever expected to get the

Warner’s Walkabout
Looking for a hero? At BEA, Warner
Bros. Consumer Products is focusing on some new additions to its
family: the superheroes Green
Lantern, Superman, Batman, and
Wonder Woman. In March, Warner
Bros. Consumer Products became
the licensor for DC Entertainment’s
superheroes, which include those
characters as well as DC Super-Pets.
Dave Rupert, senior v-p of global
publishing for Warner Bros.
Consumer Products, says that while
the company doesn’t have a booth at
BEA, it is a strong presence at the
show, which gives it an opportunity to
meet in person with publishers representing these and other characters.
“We attend BEA to discuss with
publishers new content coming from
Warner Bros.,” Rupert says, “such as
www.bookexpoamerica.com

new theatrical films—including the
latest in the Harry Potter series;
Green Lantern; Happy Feet 2; The
Dark Knight Rises, the latest in the
Batman franchise; and Superman—
and new television shows, including
the Green Lantern animated series,
Thundercats, and The Looney Tunes
Show, as well as reviewing such
publishing successes as Scooby-Doo
and DC Super Friends.”
BEA gives Rupert a chance to see
partners and get feedback on content. He adds, “It allows us to see
what formats are getting the most
attention, trends in the market
place, how publishers are managing
multiple licensed brands, and how
the industry is responding as digital
publishing becomes an increasing
focus.” —Natalie Danford

Empowering publishers
large and small
Baker & Taylor is proud to offer cutting-edge,
industry-leading opportunities for publishers.

TextStream offers publishers the most comprehensive print-ondemand (POD) and print-to-order (PTO) services in the industry.
Publisher Alley is Baker & Taylor’s exclusive online data tool,
providing you current and complete sales analysis – from
detailed bibliographic data and review and award citations to
daily sales and demand and inventory updates.
Blio, powered by Baker & Taylor, revolutionizes the digital
reading experience and brings to life entire categories of
content that do not translate on black-and-white ereaders.
As the most advanced, flexible and engaging ereader software
application in the marketplace, Blio offers a transformational
ereading experience.
eMarketing Solutions
• eARCs (Electronic Advance Reading Copies)
• Microsites
• Targeted email newsletters
• Web ads
• Webinars

Visit us at booth 2724 to experience
the next generation of Baker & Taylor services.
www.baker-taylor.com

16

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Flowers for
the First Ladies
Sellers Publishing hopes to get
show attendees buzzing about
Nancy Clarke’s My First Ladies:
Twenty-five Years as the White
House Chief Floral Designer (Oct.).
Written with Christie Matheson,
the book offers a behind-the-scenes
glimpse into White House life, with
a special focus on the personalities
of first ladies from Rosalynn Carter
through Michelle Obama. Clarke’s
position as chief floral designer
allows her to comment on the

varying styles
and preferences
of different
administrations,
as well as to
share humorous
and touching
moments that
readers may
never have heard before.
When the proposal for the title
came in, it initially focused more on
how-to sections for floral design.

“Permission
to Change!”
At the age of 40 New York Times best-selling
author Tosca Reno reinvented herself. She
left a destructive marriage, lost her excess
weight, solved her health problems and
became the woman she’d always wanted
to be. Now 52, gorgeous and successful,
she helps other women make the changes
they want in their own life: “Just like I did,
many women give their lives over entirely to
others. One day they realize they’ve become
someone they don’t recognize and don’t
want to be. In my series of books I give them
permission to change, to become who they
want to be … no matter what age!”

Tosca Reno will be signing
her latest books
The Eat-Clean Diet ® Stripped,
on Tuesday, May 24 at 1:00 pm
®
The Eat-Clean Diet Cookbook 2,
on Wednesday, May 25 at 2:00 pm

at Robert Kennedy Publishing

Booth #3616

W E E K LY

But senior editor Megan
Hiller immediately saw the
potential for a more
personal approach. “We
discussed shifting the
focus, jettisoning the
how-to aspect and
emphasizing the book’s
appeal as a lively memoir
of Nancy Clarke’s years in
the White House,” says
Hiller.
That lively side includes
everything from
“witnessing a naked Hillary
Clinton dash from the shower in
the White House residence, to her
description of working intimately
with Laura Bush on Jenna’s Texas

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

wedding,” says Hiller. She notes
that 100 photos—such as of Lady
Diana dancing with John Travolta,
and President Obama looking at
the flower shop refrigerator—along
with personal letters and
comments about the author from
the first ladies themselves.
The publisher expects the title to
prove its biggest seller to date, and
to further that, it has printed 1,200
advance reader copies. About half
of those will be available to show
attendees, and Clarke is on hand to
sign today, 2:30–4:30 p.m., in the
Sellers booth (3679). The rest of the
ARCs will be sent to the ALA
conference to introduce the title to
the library market.  —Gwenda Bond

Life Is Like a
Game of Poker

Bookselling is a lot like poker: it’s
all in the luck of the draw. Some
seasons, publishers deal you a
great hand, their books fly out
the door, and you rake in the
cash. Some seasons, you’re stuck
with books that just don’t sell.
And then there’s the competition
from chain stores, mass market
retailers,
and online
retailers,
all of them
vying for
that pot of
book sales.
Speaking
of luck of
the draw,
Medallion
Press is
going to
deal
booksellers
a July
publication that’s certain to be a
royal flush: All In by Jerry Yang.
In All In, Yang, the winner of
an $8.25 million pot in the 2007
World Series of Poker, tells his
incredible life story, from his
childhood in a Thai refugee camp
after his family fled Laos after the
Vietnam War, to immigrating to
America and living in poverty, to
becoming world poker champ
two years after he learned to play
the game.
Since winning the $8.25 million
four years ago, Yang has donated
more than $800,000 to worthy
causes, such as Ronald McDonald
House and Feed the Children.
Since then, he’s continued to
spread the wealth in other ways,
by raising funds for charity.
Yang, who will be appearing in
the autographing area today, 10:30–
11:30 a.m., at Table 7, has some
useful tips for poker players.
Booksellers might want to take
heed:
—Claire Kirch

18

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

From
Scrooge to
Weddings

PUBL I SHERS

inspiration and history,” says Gail
Halladay, director of marketing at
Shadow Mountain.
One of the publisher’s most
anticipated titles is The Wedding
Letters (Sept.), Jason F. Wright’s
follow-up to his New York Times
The busy schedule for Shadow
bestseller The Wednesday Letters,
Mountain Publishing this week
which focuses on the love story of
highlights a list packed with
the original characters’ grandson.
everything from Scrooge to
Wright will sign at 2 p.m. today at
weddings.
Table 17. Following that signing,
“Although we’re known
Shadow Mountain will hold a
nationally for Fablehaven and
wedding reception with Wright in
Leven Thumps, and will be
its booth (2942) at 3:30 p.m. today,
releasing another children’s
complete with free wedding cake.
fantasy series this August entitled
Coming up on the fall list is R.
Janitors, we also span the breadth
William Bennett’s Jacob T. Marley
of cookbooks
adult fiction
to
(Oct.),
a Wicked-style
Book
Expo showtodailies
p.2.qxd:Layout
1 10/5/11
15:56 twist
Pageon
1 the

W E E K LY

beloved classic A
Christmas Carol.
Attendees can drop
by the booth to meet
the famed literary
character as well as
have an ARC signed
by the author at 10
a.m. today. Also today,
at noon, Academy
Award–winning
director Kieth Merrill
will drop by the booth
to sign his debut
novel, The Evolution of Thomas
Hall, which released this month
and tells the story of an artist
commissioned to paint conflicting
murals.

Severn House
Recent Starred Reviews

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Bestselling author
Obert Skye kicked off
a new series last
month that continues
the adventures of
Geth and his friend
Clover from the
popular Leven
Thumps books. The
author signs the new
book, Beyond Foo:
Geth and the Return
of the Lithens, at 10
a.m. tomorrow at
Table 2 in the autographing area,
and will also sign afterward at 11
a.m. in the publisher’s booth.
And National ForeWord Reviews
Book of the Year winner Lisa
Mangum will be on hand to sign
copies of June’s The Forgotten
Locket, the final volume in the
Hourglass Door trilogy, tomorrow.
Attendees can catch her signing at
10 a.m. at Table 1, or at 11 a.m. in the
publisher’s booth.
Pointing to the titles being featured,
Halladay observes, “The diversity
shows we’re more than just a children’s publisher.”
—Gwenda Bond

Who’s 40 Now?

The Shirt on His Back
ISBN 978 0 7278 8010 9

www.bookexpoamerica.com

World War Two Will Not Take Place
ISBN 978 0 7278 8003 1

Ziggy, the familiar, frumpy, and
much-beloved everyman of comics
is turning 40. And Andrews McMeel
will be honoring the occasion with
the June publication of Ziggy, a
hardcover collection featuring
selected panels spanning all four
decades of the celebrated cartoon.
“We are thrilled to be celebrating
Ziggy’s 40th anniversary,” says
Kirsty Melville, publisher and
president of Andrews McMeel
Publishing’s book division. “A
mainstay in popular culture, Ziggy
has a secure spot in the hearts of
millions of fans and has endeared
himself to us for his optimistic
outlook despite all odds, and for
lending himself to a variety of
charitable endeavors, including
World Food Day, the Leukemia &
Lymphoma Society, and Autism
Speaks.”
Devoted Ziggy fans
will be delighted to
know that one of
BEA’s favorite
collectibles, the
Ziggy lithograph,
will once again be
available. Tom
Wilson Jr. will be
signing a special 40th anniversary
edition lithograph today at Table 5
in the autographing area, 1–2 p.m.
(this is a ticketed event, and tickets
will be distributed beginning at 7
a.m. in the Javits lobby), and he will
be doing an in-booth (3674) signing,
2:30–3:30 p.m. Visitors to the AMP
booth can also pick up one of a
limited number of the popular (and
million-selling) Posh series of
puzzle books. 
—Lucinda Dyer

20

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

40 Is the New
30 for IPG

To mark its 40th anniversary this
year, Independent Publishers Group
is doing what a lot of us do when we
hit middle age and assess both
where we’ve been and where we’re
headed: the book distribution
company is giving itself a little
makeover. IPG is rebranding itself by
officially rolling out a new logo and
revamping its Web site.
Mark Suchomel, IPG’s president,
describing the company’s original

PUBL I SHERS

logo and Web site as “staid” and
“outdated,” explains that the new
logo and new Web site will better
reflect the company’s more complex
personality as it enters its fifth
decade.
“How people regard us has not
caught up with the reality of who we
are,” Suchomel insists. “We’re more
technologically savvy, more hip,
more at the forefront of providing
strong marketing and distribution
services.”
Suchomel says that while IPG was
founded in Chicago in 1971 by David
and Mona White to distribute books
from about a dozen independent
small presses, the company has
become “so much more than print

W E E K LY

books” since being acquired in 1987
by IPG CEO Curt Matthews and his
wife, Linda, then and now the
publishers of Chicago Review Press.
The company, which currently has
165–170 employees, distributes
books and other products, including
audiobooks, DVDs, cards, and
posters, for hundreds of
independent publishers all over the
world through six distribution
programs. “And we’ve been selling
e-books for the past 10 years,”
Suchomel declared, showing that
the company is as hip as Suchomel
claims, because he was among those
paying attention 10 years ago.
Suchomel explains that the role of
a book distribution company has

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

changed a lot in the past 40 years,
just as the entire industry itself has
changed. “We’re much more of a
marketing company now,” he says,
describing IPG personnel as working
closely with client publishers
throughout the entire process of
positioning their books in the
marketplace.
Of course, every birthday requires
a party with cake and champagne,
and IPG’s big 4-0 is no exception. The
birthday party will be held in booth
2738, at 3:30 p.m. today. No need to
bring presents, because IPG will be
the one handing out gifts to
booksellers helping them celebrate.
—Claire Kirch

Channeling
Helen
Keller

Readers on the hunt for inspirational
reads will want to check out
Swedenborg Foundation Press’s two
big titles this season, Helen Keller’s
How I Would Help the World (Apr.)
and Grant Schnarr’s The Guardian
Angel Diary (May).
The first book by the famed blind
and deaf humanitarian was originally
published as an introduction to one of
Swedenborg’s works, True Christian
Religion. Swedenborg executive
editor Joanna Hill was at a gathering
last summer when a woman said she
had recently had a dream about
angels
clamoring for
Helen Keller’s
writings to help
the world. Hill
contacted Ray
Silverman, who
had edited an
earlier book by
Keller, and he
signed on to the
project and has
contributed an
introduction.
The press’s other major title, The
Guardian Angel Diary, is an unusual
novel, drawing from minister and life
coach Schnarr’s real-life experience
counseling young people. The story
follows 16-year-old Nicole Bealart,
who is diagnosed with brain cancer
and begins writing a journal that
allows her to communicate with her
guardian angel. The book has
already garnered the endorsement
of Dr. Mehmet Oz, bestselling author
and host of The Dr. Oz Show, and
Schnarr recently appeared on Dr.
Oz’s radio show to promote the title.
Silverman will be appearing at
Table 9 in the Religion, Faith, Family
salute area today at 1 p.m. .
Schnarr will be signing at 10 a.m.
tomorrow at Table 4 in thesame area.
Both authors will be available in the
Swedenborg booth (2946) before and
after their appearances.
—Gwenda Bond

22

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

An Amazing Return of
1,000 PLACES TO SEE
BEFORE YOU DIE
And a one-year promotion
that kicks off with

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Spotlight
O N CHILDREN

®

A Trip for Two
to Costa Rica
Please visit us at
Booth #4152 to enter*

ALSO AT THE BOOTH:
WEDNESDAY:

11:00 AM DAN ROLLMAN
& COREY HENDERSON,
authors of the forthcoming
THE RECORDSETTER BOOK
OF WORLD RECORDS,
will be leading visitors in an
attempt to set a new world record
2:00 PM
RUFUS BUTLER SEDER,
author of GALLOP!, WADDLE!,
and the forthcoming
THE WIZARD OF OZ:
A SCANIMATION BOOK,
will be signing copies of
STAR WARS SCANIMATION

THURSDAY:

10:00 AM SOPHIE BLACKALL,
author of Big Red Lollipop
and The Ivy and Bean series,
signing a beautiful poster
to celebrate her forthcoming
first book for grown-ups,
MISSED CONNECTIONS

P.S. And don’t forget the tote.
*For more information, please visit
www.workman.com/2011-BEA-sweeps.html

Browsing the Booths,
Chapter 2
For those navigating the children’s
booths, here’s a preview of new books
on display, authors to greet, and
goodies being given away.
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (3438)
welcomes Chris Van Allsburg to its
booth today, 11 a.m.–noon, to sign
limited-edition posters from The
Chronicles of Harris Burdick:
Fourteen Amazing Authors Tell the
Tales (HM). Also available are ARCs
of this October release, which
compiles stories written by
children’s book luminaries to
accompany Van Allsburg’s
illustrations from his 1984 picture
book, The Mysteries of Harris
Burdick. The publisher is handing
out samples of its mailable Send-aStory books (HMH Books),
as well as ARCs of and
chocolate kisses
celebrating Catherine
Gilbert Murdock’s
Wisdom’s Kiss, a YA
fantasy. Other giveaways
include ARCs of Au
Revoir, Crazy European
Chick (Houghton Mifflin)
by Joe Schreiber; Linda
Urban’s Hound Dog True
(Harcourt); Jessica Rules
the Dark Side (Harcourt)
by Beth Fantaskey; Blood
Wounds (Harcourt) by
Susan Beth Pfeffer; In the
Forests of the Night (Clarion), book
two of Kersten Hamilton’s the
Goblin Wars; and The Inquisitor’s
Apprentice (Harcourt) by Chris
Moriarty.
Visitors to DK Publishing’s booth
(3264) will learn about a trio of fall
releases. Highlighted are The LEGO
Ideas Book by Daniel Lipkowitz,
offering advice from LEGO master
builders; LEGO Star Wars
Character Encyclopedia by Simon
Beecroft, which features a Star
Wars minifigure; and The Incredible
Pop-Up Body Book, which includes a
fold-out human body model with
movable limbs.
Today, 9–10 a.m., Chronicle (4452)
hosts Katherine Paterson, two-time
Newbery medalist and the current
National Ambassador for
Children’s Literature. She and cutpaper artist Pamela Dalton will sign
copies of their collaboration,
Brother Sun, Sister Moon, a
reimagining of a hymn by St.
Francis of Assisi. The publisher is

www.bookexpoamerica.com
show daily ad wednesday ƒ.indd 1

5/11/11 3:34 PM

giving away a gatefold announcing
the book’s June publication and is
holding a raffle for a piece of
original art by Dalton. Other
giveaways include retail display
cards and buttons promoting Hervé
Tullet’s Press Here; “See the World
Differently” tote bags featuring art
by Julia Rothman; and ARCs of two
fall novels, The Orphan of Awkward
Falls by Keith Graves and Promise
the Night by Michaela MacColl.
At booth 2463, Barefoot Books
staffers are pleased to share news of
the house’s 10 new fall titles.
Heading up the list are The Barefoot
Books World Atlas by Nick Crane,
illus. by David Dean; Monster
Stories, four novels by Fran Parnell,
illus. by Sophie Fatus, launching the
publisher’s first early
reader series; and Anna
Witte’s Lola’s Fandango,
illus. by Micha Archer,
about a Spanish girl who
discovers her own talents,
which includes a music
CD recorded by pan-Latin
ensemble Sol y Canto.
Disney Book Group
(3332–3333) is celebrating
the 10th anniversary of
Eoin Colfer’s Artemis
Fowl series with a raffle
for an iPad and signed
copies of books in the
series. The author will be
at the booth to draw the winning
entry today at 4 p.m. Costumed
characters of Mo Willems’s
Elephant and Piggie are making
their first-ever appearance, on
hand all three days of the fair, and a
costumed likeness of Josh Lewis’s
Super Chicken Nugget Boy will be
at the booth on Thursday.
Giveaways include Elephant and
Piggie kazoos, mustaches
promoting Mustache! by Mac
Barnett, illus. by Kevin Cornell;
posters based on Bob Shea’s
Dinosaur vs. the Library; floating
pens promoting Heroes of Olympus
2: Son of Neptune by Rick Riordan;
and copies of Marvel: The Avengers:
Iron Man Is Born and Marvel: Thor
Junior Novel.
YA fans will find a number of Flux
titles spotlighted at Llewellyn’s booth
(2525). Thursday’s giveaways include
copies of Karen Mahoney’s The Iron
Witch, a debut fantasy novel that
pubbed in January, and samplers of
its sequel, The Wood Queen, due next

1
3
7
3
#
th
oo
B
WINE WARS

HESITATION KILLS

DEADLY INDIFFERENCE

BECOMING JEWISH

By Mike Veseth
ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHERS
JUNE 2011

By Jane Blair
ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHERS
JUNE 2011

By Michael D. Brown and Ted Schwarz
TAYLOR TRADE PUBLISHING
JUNE 2011

By Steven Carr Reuben and
Jennifer S. Hanin
ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHERS
SEPTEMBER 2011

INSURGENTS, RAIDERS, AND
BANDITS

By Allison Barrie
ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHERS
OCTOBER 2011

WHAT THE BIBLE REALLY
TELLS US

IN COUNTRY

By John Arquilla
IVAN R. DEE, PUBLISHER
JUNE 2011

BREAST CANCER FIELD
MANUAL

DAWN OF THE BELLE EPOQUE

LINCOLN, INC.

BEN BEHIND HIS VOICES

By Mary McAuliffe
ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHERS
JUNE 2011

By Jackie Hogan
ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHERS
NOVEMBER 2011

By T.J. Wray
ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHERS
OCTOBER 2011

By Randye Kaye
ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHERS
AUGUST 2011

By John Prados
IVAN R. DEE, PUBLISHER
OCTOBER 2011

AMGLISH IN, LIKE, TEN EASY
LESSONS
By Arthur E. Rowse
ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHERS
OCTOBER 2011

The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is located in booth #3713

24

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

January; also, copies of After
Midnight, the inaugural YA novel by
romance author Lynn Viehl, released
this month. Among the featured fall
books are Skyship Academy: The
Pearl Wars by Nick James, a first
novel and Flux’s first science fiction
adventure title; and Scott Tracey’s
Witch Eyes, a debut paranormal
novel.
Walter Wick fans will want to
drop by Scholastic’s booth (2752–
2753), where one of the models
photographed in his Can You
See What I See? Toyland
Express (Cartwheel) is on
display. The publisher is
giving away prints featuring a
scene from this search-andfind story about a toy train.
Other giveaways include
ARCs and tote bags for Brian
Selznick’s Wonderstruck
(Scholastic Press); posters for
Bailey (Scholastic Press) by
Harry Bliss; ARCs, posters, and
bookmarks for Dav Pilkey’s
Super Diaper Baby 2: The
Invasion of the Potty Snatchers
(Blue Sky); ARCs and key chains
for Wolves of Mercy Falls, book 3:
Forever (Scholastic Press) by
Maggie Stiefvater; posters for
Not Inside This House! (Orchard)
by Kevin Lewis, illus. by David

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Ercolini; and
posters and
fly swatters
for Tedd
Arnold’s Fly
Guy (Cartwheel).
Also available are ARCs of
Stiefvater’s The Scorpio Races
(Scholastic Press); Floors (Scholastic
Press) by Patrick Carman; Flyaway
(Chicken House) by Lucy
Christopher; 13 Gifts (Scholastic
Press) by Wendy Mass; and Pie

which
encourages
readers to
discover the
missing
number to complete rhymes. The
book is a follow-up to this Israeli
artist’s Big Cat, Small Cat and I
Dream of Elephants.
Visitors to Lerner’s booth (2158)
can pick up ARCs and e-galleys of a
number of fall releases. These
include Brooklyn, Burning

(Scholastic Press) by Sarah Weeks.
At booth 4406, Abbeville Kids is
showcasing a pair of spring 2011
books. In Flip-o-storic, a board
book illustrated by Sara Ball that
is a companion to Flip-o-saurus,
kids turn over flaps to create
imaginary prehistoric beasts.
Also on display is Dog Number 1,
Dog Number 10 by Ami Rubinger,

(Carolrhoda Lab), a love story by
Steve Brezenoff; In Trouble
(Carolrhoda Lab), a YA novel by
Ellen Levine set in the 1950s;
Ultraviolet (Carolrhoda Lab), a
paranormal YA novel by R.J.
Anderson; You Will Call Me Drog
(Darby Creek) by Sue Cowing, about
a boy who finds a talking hand
puppet; Agent Amelia #1: Ghost

Spotlight

on children

Diamond! (Darby Creek) by Michael
Broad, launching a series about a
young secret agent; Way-Too-Real
Aliens #1: Escape from Planet Yastrol
(Darby Creek) by Pamela F. Service,
which introduces a young writer
who learns that the alien creatures
from his stories actually exist; and
Tricky Journeys #1: Tricky Coyote
Tales (Graphic Universe), a
collection of Native American
stories by Chris Schweizer, illus. by
Chad Thomas.
Marshall Cavendish (2561) is
celebrating its recent
partnership with the PJ
Library—a nonprofit
organization dedicated to
helping establish family
libraries to encourage reading
to children at bedtime and
building Jewish identity—to
create Shofar Books, a
hardcover imprint launching in
the fall. Debut titles are The
Golem’s Latkes, retold by Eric A.
Kimmel, illus. by Aaron Jasinski;
Hanukkah, Oh Hanukkah!, illus. by
Olga and Aleksey Ivanov; and Many
Days, One Shabbat by Fran
Manushkin, illus. by Maria
Monescillo. Booksellers visiting the
booth can enter a raffle to win a
signed lithograph from Sleep, Big
Bear, Sleep! by Maureen Wright,

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Great Cinematic Fiction from
Henry “Box” Brown’s story is one of the most incredible tales of escape
in the history of the Underground Railroad. The Disappearing Man takes
readers and viewers into a world they have never seen before—the urban
slavery system, which was worlds apart from the plantation system that
most people are familiar with from books and film.

Comics
&
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Novels

Mario Ruiz
1:30 - 2:30

signing in booth
TODAY • Booth #4947

KingstoneMedia.com

Booth #4947

26

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

illus. by Will
Hillenbrand.
Their new
collaboration,
Sneeze, Big
Bear, Sneeze! is a featured fall title,
as are 10 Turkeys in the Road by
Brenda Reeves Sturgis, illus. by
David Slonim; and My Name Is Not
Easy by Debby Dahl Edwardson, the
first release in a teen fiction line
edited by Melanie Kroupa.
Peachtree is spreading word of
two fall titles at booth 2955. The
Cheshire Cheese Cat: A Dickens of a
Tale by Carmen Agra Deedy and
Randall Wright, illus. by Barry
Moser, is a middle-grade novel
about the alliance between a cat and
mice in Victorian England. And the
publisher is giving out signed
galleys of Krista Russell’s debut
novel, Chasing the Nightbird,
starring a teen whose plan to join
the crew of a whaling ship is
sabotaged when he’s kidnapped and
forced into servitude.
At booth 4478, WriteGirl, a Los
Angeles nonprofit creative writing
organization that pairs professional
women with at-risk teenagers, is
hosting a book signing this morning
at 11 a.m. Keren Taylor, WriteGirl’s
founder, and Kim Purcell will
autograph copies of Pens on Fire:
Creative Writing Experiments for
Teens from WriteGirl, a roundup of
more than 200 writing projects.
Skyhorse (3425) unveils its new
children’s imprint, Sky Pony Press
at BEA. The line, which will include
fiction, nonfiction, and classics,

launches in
the fall with 17
titles. Leading
the list are
Eric Battut’s
The Little Pea, about an
independent-minded pea’s
journey; Classic Fire Trucks and
Fire Fighting Gift Set by Teddy
Slater, illus. by Mones, which
includes a toy truck; The Balloon
Tree by Phoebe Gilman, the tale of
a princess determined to save her
kingdom; and Mark Bergin’s It’s
Fun to Draw Safari Animals.
Scanimation fans can meet
author Rufus Butler Seder at
Workman’s booth (4152) today at 2
p.m., when he’ll be signing copies of
Scanimation: Star Wars, published
last May. Seder’s Scanimation: The
Wizard of Oz is due out in
September. Sophie Blackall,
illustrator of the Ivy and Bean series,
will be at the booth tomorrow, 10–11
a.m., to sign posters promoting
Missed Connections, her fall adult
title. Also spotlighted at the booth is
a November release, How to Feed a
Hungry Giant by Caitlin Friedman,
illus. by Shaw Nielsen, a pop-up
picture book about a boy who finds a
giant in his backyard.
Celebrating its 70th anniversary
this year, Barron’s, at booth 3538,
is featuring Puss in Boots, retold by
Stella Gurney, illus. by Gerald
Kelley. It contains numerous
interactive elements, including a
miniature booklet and a final
pop-up illustration.

Spotlight

on children

In-Booth Signings & Giveaways

Come visit us at booth 3352!
Wednesday, May 25th
9:00 am

Galley Giveaways:
Across Many Mountains,
Yangzom Brauen (St. Martin’s Press)
Tides of War, Stella Tillyard
(A Frances Coady Book/Henry Holt)

10:00 am

Galley Giveaways:
The Emperor of Lies,
Steve Sem-Sandberg

(Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

Emory’s Gift, W. Bruce Cameron
(Forge Books)

10:30 am

in-Booth siGninG:
Mary e. Pearson,
The Fox Inheritance

(Henry Holt Books for Young Readers*)

11:00 am

Galley Giveaways:
Puppy Diaries, Jill Abramson

—Sally Lodge

(Times Books)

Iron House, John Hart
(Thomas Dunne Books)

Never Knowing, Chevy Stevens
(St. Martin’s Press)

11:30 am

in-Booth siGninG:
Bill willingham,

Down the Mysterly River
(Starscape)

2:00 pm

Galley Giveaways:
Dead End in Norvelt, Jack Gantos

(Farrar Straus Giroux Books for Young Readers*)

Trick of the Light, Louise Penny
(Minotaur Books)

2:30 pm

in-Booth siGninG:
tom Perrotta, The Leftovers
(St. Martin’s Press)

3:00 pm

Galley Giveaways:
Glow, Amy Kathleen Ryan
(St. Martin’s Griffin)

*Part of Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group 
Pleasenote: Only a limited quantity of galleys are available for signings and giveaways, and will be
distributed on a first-come, first-serve basis. Author signings will last thirty minutes (or until galleys
run out). The Tom Perrotta signing will last one hour.

Storey Time for Kids
Best known for its adult titles for
DIYers on gardening, crafts,
animal raising, and cooking,
Storey Publishing in North
Adams, Mass., has begun
introducing project-driven books
in the same categories for kids.
Rather than create a separate
children’s imprint, Storey’s books
for kids are catalogued and sold
alongside those for their adult
counterparts. “The big premise
for us,” says Storey president Pam
Art, “is that we’re not going to
diverge too far from adult
categories. If we stay in the same
categories, we can sell them into
the same accounts and keep them
in alignment with our message:
practical information in harmony
with the environment.”
At its booth (4152), Storey is
showcasing two fall children’s
books that fit Art’s criteria, one on
farming and the other on horses—
My First Farm Friends: Books in a
Barn, written and illustrated by
Betsy Wallin, is Storey’s first set of
board books, and Pop-Out-andPaint Horse Breeds: Create Paper
Models of 10 Different Breeds by
Cindy A. Littlefield. “We’ve seen an

www.bookexpoamerica.com
PW BEA show daily 5_25_11.indd 1

5/5/11 5:26 PM

interest in our
books from a new
generation, and
some are young
parents,” says
editorial director
Deborah
Balmuth,
explaining the
decision to
expand into publishing for the very
young. With My First Farm Friends,
wannabe farmers can play with the
barn box that holds all four board
books describing a typical day in
the life of a chicken, goat, cow, and
pig. There are also four standup
animals that can be used with the
barn.
Pop-Out-and-Paint Horse Breeds,
which is geared to children ages
8–12, contains templates for body
types of 10 different breeds, which
can then be painted with distinctive
markings and glued together to
create a standup figure. A mane
and tail can be fashioned from
embroidery floss or yarn. Like My
First Farm Friends, it’s part of
Storey’s effort to incorporate an
activity into each of its children’s
books. 
—Judith Rosen

APA lifeTOOlS®

BOOTH # 3033

Resources for Self-Knowledge and Better living

Wheels Down

How to find Mental Health Care
for your Child

Adjusting to Life After Deployment
Bret A. Moore, PsyD, ABPP,
and Carrie H. Kennedy, PhD, ABPP
2011. 184 pages. Paperback.

Ellen B. Braaten, PhD
2011. 265 pages. Paperback.

List: $19.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0898-2

List: $19.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0872-2

APA STyle®
Publication Manual of the
American Psychological Association®
SiXTH eDiTiON
2010. 272 pages.

Paperback: List: $28.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0561-5
Hardcover: List: $39.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0559-2
Lay-Flat Spiral Binding: List: $36.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0562-2

Displaying your findings

A Practical Guide for Creating Figures, Posters,
and Presentations
SiXTH eDiTiON
Adelheid A. M. Nicol and Penny M. Pexman
2010. 191 pages. Paperback.
List: $19.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0707-7

Presenting your findings

NEW!

Reporting Research in Psychology

How to Meet Journal Article Reporting Standards
Harris Cooper
2011. 137 pages. Paperback.

A Practical Guide for Creating Tables
SiXTH eDiTiON
Adelheid A. M. Nicol and Penny M. Pexman
2010. 171 pages. Paperback.
List: $19.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0705-3

List: $27.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0916-3

Self-Help Books for Kids … and the Adults in Their lives

Russell’s World

A Story for Kids About Autism
Charles A. Amenta, III, MD
Illustrated by Monika Pollak
40 pages. 8" x 8". Full-color illustrations. Ages 4-8.
Hardcover: List: $14.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0975-0
Paperback: List: $9.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0976-7

Shy Spaghetti and excited eggs

A Kid’s Menu of Feelings
Marc Nemiroff, PhD, and Jane Annunziata, PsyD
48 pages. 8" x 10". Full-color illustrations. Ages 4-8.
Hardcover: List: $15.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0956-9
Paperback: List: $10.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0957-6

Max Archer, Kid Detective

Good Night Giants

Heinz Janisch
Illustrated by Helga Bansch
32 pages. 8" x 10". Full-color illustrations. Ages 4-8.
Hardcover: List: $14.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0950-7

The Case of the Wet Bed
Howard J. Bennett, MD
Illustrated by Spike Gerrell
48 pages. 6" x 9". Full-color illustrations. Ages 6-10.
Hardcover: List: $14.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0953-8
Paperback: List: $9.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0954-5

On your Own

My Diary

A College Readiness Guide
for Teens With ADHD/LD
Patricia O. Quinn, MD, and w
Theresa E. Laurie Maitland, PhD
Illustrated by Bryan Ische
112 pages. 5½" x 8½". Black & white illustrations.

The Totally True Story of ME!
Gilles Tibo
Illustrated by Josée Bisaillon
48 pages. 8" x 10". Full-color illustrations. Ages 8-12.
Paperback: List: $12.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0958-3

Paperback: List: $14.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-0955-2

SAleS RePReSeNTATiVe SHOW SPeCiAl:
45%, Free Freight on orders placed at APA’s booth (certain exclusions apply – see APA staff for details).
www.apa.org/pubs

28

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Movie Time for Judy Moody
Judy Moody’s humorous mood
swings and adventures have won
her many fans since her first
appearance in 2000. Published by
Candlewick, Megan McDonald’s
original Judy Moody spawned eight
subsequent novels starring this
character, plus three featuring her
and her spunky brother, Stink (who
is featured in his own series, now
totaling eight books); two activity
books; a coloring book; and a
journal—all illustrated by Peter H.
Reynolds. The series is now
available in 22 languages, has won
more than 30 awards, and has a
worldwide in-print tally of 14
million copies.
On June 10, Judy hits the big
screen with the release of Judy
Moody and the NOT Bummer
Summer, a film produced by
Smokewood Entertainment and
distributed by Relativity Media. The
screenplay was co-written by
McDonald, who is at BEA to help
celebrate the film’s debut and
Candlewick’s six tie-ins. The movie
introduces a brand-new story line
that follows Judy and Stink’s
unexpectedly adventure-filled

summer with their eccentric aunt.
Acknowledging that writing a
screenplay is “completely
different” from writing a novel,
McDonald says she “watched lots of
kids’ movies to get into the spirit”
before tackling the
project with
co-writer Kathy
Waugh. “She is one of
my oldest friends
and a brilliant
screenwriter, and
collaborating with
her has always been
a pipedream of
mine,” says
McDonald. “This
taught me a whole
new way of thinking
visually, since you
have to create each
scene with very few words and lots
of action. The best thing I learned to
do was play the movie inside my
head—over and over.”
Helping to give Judy Moody new
life on-screen was “really a thrill,”
notes McDonald, who was on the
set every day of the movie’s threemonth filming. “I had input each

W E E K LY

step of the way, and the crew
went to painstaking effort to
make sure every detail was
true to the book, which makes
me feel very lucky,” she says.
The movie’s producer, Sarah
Siegel-Magness, read the first
Judy Moody book aloud with her
daughter years ago, after the girl’s
school librarian recommended it
to her. “I think it’s
kind of neat that
Sarah wanted to
make a movie about
the book—and that it
all started with a
librarian getting the
book into her
daughter’s hand,”
says McDonald.
McDonald’s visit to
BEA is part of her
10-city tour to
promote the movie
and Candlewick’s tieins, which include
Judy Moody and the NOT Bummer
Summer, a novelization released
this week with a 250,000-copy first
printing; Judy Moody Goes to
Hollywood, a behind-the-scenes
look at the film, which has a
150,000-copy first printing; So You
Want to Catch Bigfoot? a “field
guide” by Morgan Jackson, illus.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Spotlight

on children

by Mark Fearing; Judy Moody and
the Thrill Points Race and Judy
Moody and the Poop Picnic,
chapter books by Jamie Michalak;
and Judy Moody’s Thrill-a-delic
Hunt for Bigfoot, an activity book
by Jackson.
McDonald will autograph copies
of the novelization today, 10–11
a.m., at a ticketed signing at Table
28. This afternoon at 2 p.m., she’ll
appear on the Midtown Author
Stage with Jordana Beatty, who
plays Judy Moody in the film, and
Parris Mosteller, who plays Stink.
The movie trailer will be shown,
and a discussion among the author
and actors will follow, along with a
q&a with the audience.
After that event, McDonald,
Beatty, and Mosteller will be at
Candlewick’s booth (2452), 2:20–3
p.m., giving out tie-dye cupcakes,
posing for photos, and signing mini
movie posters. Other Judy Moody
giveaways include boas, T-shirts,
pencils, bookmarks, and
sunglasses. The publisher is also
holding a raffle for movie tie-in
goodies. 
—Sally Lodge

100 Delicious Recipes to ...

1. Make Yourself, 2. Wrap with Style, 3. Give with Pride

100 delicious
recipes for every
occasion

to make yourself
& wrap with style

dinah corley

photography by alison shaw

Gourmet Gifts is the first food-gifting
book to give equal weight to the recipes
and their wrappings. Author Dinah Corley
offers up 100 scrumptious and splendidly
crafted projects, perfect for cooks and
crafters, with step-by-step instructions.

Publication: November 2011
304 pgs • 9 x 8 • 4-color photos
978-1-55832-435-0 • $19.95 PB

Come celebrate our new distribution partnership with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt!
Bring your business card to Meeting Room 6066 and be eligible to win a $500 Apple Gift Card.
One entry per person. Entries will be accepted May 24 and 25. Winner will be selected on morning of May 26.
Choose almost anything that Apple offers in its huge collection of Mac and iPod products at any
Apple Store in the U.S., the Apple Online Store, or Apple Telesales.

www.bookexpoamerica.com

Permanence Matters focuses on preserving books for future generations by printing them on paper that lasts. Learn more at Booth 4380.

GlatfelterBookExpo11Ads.indd 2

5/13/11 9:37 PM

32

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Cut the cost,

and the time, of shipping books
around the world.

Introducing
gps Global Print SolutionsSM
The first truly global book manufacturing network
Edwards Brothers is pleased to announce the formation of a book
manufacturing partnership with market leaders in the United
Kingdom, Australia, and Singapore to provide publishers with a onestop solution for printing around the globe. With gps Global Print
SolutionsSM you’ll submit one order, load one file, and pay one invoice.
And you’ll be billed in US dollars, regardless of final destination,
making budgeting and international transactions easier to manage.
Why ship when you can gps? Ask your EB sales representative for
details or visit www.edwardsbrothers.com

One order. One invoice. One file.

www.bookexpoamerica.com

W E E K LY

William
Joyce Is
Back
More than a decade has passed
since William Joyce, author and
illustrator of George Shrinks, Santa
Calls, and other titles, has published
a children’s book. His fans will be
pleased to learn that he is back. The
Guardians of Childhood, a series of
seven picture books and six chapter
books that tell the formative stories
of such childhood icons as Santa
Claus, the Tooth Fairy, and the
Sandman, debuts in September
from Atheneum. The inaugural
releases are a picture book, The
Man in the Moon, which
has a 350,000-copy
announced first
printing, and a chapter
book, Nicholas St. North
and the Battle of the
Nightmare King,
coauthored by Joyce
and Laura Geringer
and illustrated by Joyce,
which has a 150,000copy initial print run.
Joyce is also
returning to BEA after a
long absence. “I am very
stoked to be here,” he
says. “I’ve been away
too long but for all the
best reasons. I’ve been
working very hard on
this book project, and
now I’m ready to show
everyone my stories.” He will be
doing just that today at 3:30 p.m.,
when he signs copies of The Man in
the Moon at the Simon & Schuster
booth (3652–3653).
Joyce originally conceived of the
Guardians of Childhood in the early
1990s, when his children were very
young. “I realized that I had to start
sharing the stories of childhood
icons with them, and I was excited
about it,” he recalls. “I remember as
a kid asking my parents how Santa
Claus and the Sandman do what
they do, and I was very perturbed
that they didn’t have much to offer.
‘They just do it—no one needs to
know how or why,’ they’d tell me.
But I wanted to have something
more satisfying to tell my kids. I
wanted to find a mythology for these
icons. What if they all knew each
other? What if they all worked
together?”
For years, Joyce mulled over the
idea, while keeping very busy. In
addition to writing and illustrating
his other picture books, he created
the Emmy-winning animated TV
series Rolie Polie Olie, developed
character concepts for Toy Story
and A Bug’s Life, and made
animated films, including Robots
and Meet the Robinsons. He is now

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Spotlight

on children

writing, designing, and producing
The Leaf Men, a Fox Animation
feature film based on his book. And
18 months ago, he cofounded
Moonbot Studios, whose first
animated short film, The Fantastic
Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore,
premiered in February. (Starring a
book-loving man, the film was
inspired by—and written for—the
late Bill Morris, a longtime pillar of
HarperCollins and beloved friend
and mentor to Joyce.)
Over time, the concept for the
Guardians of Childhood expanded
and, says Joyce, “the idea got so big
and ungainly in my mind that I
couldn’t find a way to
get started. The longer I
spent on it, the richer it
got—and even more
daunting. I realized that
this was going to take
years.”
Yet the Guardians of
Childhood concept
eventually gelled, and
Joyce decided that the
series would include
chapter books as well
as picture books. “I
realized how much
fun it was to imagine
an entire world for
each of these icons,
and it was hard to get
enough into just a
picture book,” he
explains. “I found the
narratives lending themselves to
something longer.” Though he
had never before penned a novel,
Joyce notes, “I’ve worked in long
form before, with motion
pictures, which have a three-arc
structure.”
Joyce also came to envision
bringing together the characters
featured in the individual
Guardians of Childhood books on
the big screen, and when a number
of major studios expressed interest
in the project, he selected
DreamWorks Animation, which will
release Rise of the Guardians in fall
2012. Directed by Peter Ramsey and
codirected by Joyce, the film
features the voices of Chris Pine,
Hugh Jackman, Jude Law, Alec
Baldwin, and Isla Fisher.
The author is thrilled to be part of
the film project. “Writing and
illustrating is a pretty isolated
endeavor, and collaborating with
really talented people on the film
has been one of the glories of my
creative life,” Joyce says. “I love
filmmaking, and animation has a
sense of craftsmanship and an
esprit de corps that somehow feels
old-school, even with the new
technology. It feels like publishing in
—Sally Lodge
a sense.” 

Visit the Harlequin booth and meet
your favorite authors!
Wednesday May 25 • Booth 4638
IN-BOOTH SIGNINGS
Time

Event

11:00-11:45 am

Contemporary Romance Lori Foster
Kristan Higgins
Delilah Marvelle
Jennifer Blake
Victoria Dahl

When You Dare
My One and Only
Prelude to a Scandal
By His Majesty’s Grace
Good Girls Don’t

12:00-12:45 pm

Harlequin TEEN

Julie Kagawa
Gena Showalter
Maria V. Snyder
Kady Cross

The Iron Queen
Twisted
Outside In
The Girl in the Steel Corset

1:00-1:45 pm

Thriller/Suspense

Andrea Kane
Brenda Novak
Rick Mofina
Laura Caldwell
Joshua Corin
Carla Neggers
Marta Perry

The Girl Who Disappeared Twice
Inside
In Desperation
Claim of Innocence
Before Cain Strikes
The Whisper
Vanish in Plain Sight

2:00-2:45 pm

Nonfiction

Kimberly Snyder
The Beauty Detox Solution
Sarah Matheny
Peas & Thank You
Ann Blumenthal Jacobs, Love for Grown-Ups
Patricia Ryan Lampl &
Tish Rabe

10:00-10:45 am Fresh Fiction

Author

Susan Mallery
Emilie Richards
Deborah Cloyed
Rebecca Coleman
Deanna Raybourn
Diane Chamberlain

Title

Already Home
Sunset Bridge
The Summer We Came to Life
The Kingdom of Childhood
The Dark Enquiry
The Midwife’s Confession

OFFICIAL BEA AUTHOR AUTOGRAPH SESSIONS
Time

11:00-12:00 pm
11:30-12:30 pm
11:30-12:30 pm
1:00-2:00 pm
2:00-3:00 pm

Table
25
24
26
25
25

Author

Julie Kagawa
Linda Lael Miller
Carla Neggers
Emilie Richards
Rick Mofina

Title

The Iron Queen
Creed’s Honor
Saint’s Gate
Sunset Bridge
In Desperation

www.Harlequin.com • www.HarlequinforLibraries.com

11_209_PWDaily_May25.indd 1

5/13/11 3:18:19 PM

34

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

A Historical Imprint
This afternoon, if you
see Ben Franklin
partying at the Perseus
booth (4415), don’t be
alarmed—you’re not
dreaming. After all,
who better than a
founding father to help
celebrate the launch of
Regnery History, the
new Regnery
Publishing imprint.
Actually, “Ben” is
author Mark Skousen,
a direct descendant of
Benjamin Franklin, and he compiled
and edited the two-volume The
Compleated Autobiography by
Benjamin Franklin, which Regnery
published in 2007. At 3 p.m. today at
the Uptown Insight Author Stage,
Skousen—in the persona and
costume of Ben Franklin—will
interview Chris De Rose, author of
Founding Rivals: Madison vs. Monroe
and the Election That Created the
Bill of Rights and Changed a Nation,
one of the forthcoming Regnery
History titles.
Regnery History plans to publish
new history, biography, and military
history titles, mostly as hardcovers

and e-books. As Alex
Novak, the imprint’s
newly named associate
publisher, points out,
“Our readers overlap
with Regnery’s readers
of nonfiction current
events. We did the
current events titles on
a rush schedule,
typical of our
nonfiction list. But we
decided that in order
to get the right sell-in
and the right publicity,
we should take more time because
history titles are less current-events
driven.”
Novak described some of the
imprint’s other fall titles: “Omar
Bradley: General at War by Jim
DeFelice—it’s the first objective fulllength biography. Bully! The Life and
Times of Theodore Roosevelt by Rick
Marschall includes over 200 vintage
political cartoons, since the author is
a collector; they’re in full color, and
many are reproduced for the first
time.”
Another fall title is the paperback
edition of Warren Kozak’s LeMay:
The Life and Wars of General Curtis

W E E K LY

LeMay, originally published by
Regnery. “Books like those,” Novak
explains, “fit into the mold of the
controversial. We are looking for
misunderstood historical figures,
mysteries, and controversies. People
come to us with less-thanconventional history topics, and we
say there’s a market for it.” Novak
didn’t travel far to get his current job;
for 10 years, he was marketing
director at Regnery. “So I’ll still wear
some of my old hats,” he says.
Regnery History, Novak notes,
“will not be historical books for
conservatives; it’s more for
nonpartisan readers, whoever loves
history, and loves a good story.” 

—Diane Patrick

What’s in
Store?

What is the future of book publishing?
If only Dr. Margaret J. Pearson could
predict! Pearson, the author of a new
translation of the I Ching—The
Original I Ching: An Authentic
Translation of the Book of Changes
(Tuttle, Sept.)—is a true believer in the
power of the popular and time-tested
“fortune-telling” book. But when it

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

comes to outright prediction, she
explains that that is not how it works. “I
Ching readings are a method of
gaining insight,” she says. “I don’t
know the future either. But if someone
wants to know the future of their
publishing house, this process could
help them gain clarity on the timing of
a particular decision. That’s what
kings and queens used it for.”
Pearson, who teaches early
Chinese intellectual history at
Skidmore College, spent 14 years
working on her translation and,
among other
goals, aimed
to eliminate
the
antifemale
stance
rampant in
the standard
Bollingen
version. “Not
in the text but
in the
footnotes. We
know more
now about
what early
China was like. People use the I
Ching when they’re vulnerable, and
some Jungian therapists use it
during therapy. I couldn’t bear the
bias and undertook my own

CELEBRATING 40 YEARS OF INDEPENDENT PUBLISHING

The Overlook Press
Visit us at Booth #3439
and enter our drawing for a
signed & framed
40th anniversary
commemorative poster
by Milton Glaser

www.overlookpress.com
Join the celebration on our blog, The Wingèd Elephant, and on Facebook and Twitter

www.bookexpoamerica.com

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

translation.”
Tuttle, whose specialty is books
that bring the East to the West, is
hosting some guided coin readings
by Pearson today. “I look forward to
dealing with publishing
professionals, people with open
minds,” she says. “I’m not saying it
will solve all your problems—the
world is not like that—but the book
was created for people doing
something worth doing, and facing
good things and bad things. It can be
very encouraging.”
If you’re interested in an I Ching
reading, stop by the Tuttle booth
(2838), 10:30 a.m.–noon. The
publisher will be passing out three
Chinese coins for use in the
readings, along with a limited
number of ARCs, and Pearson will be
conducting readings for groups of 10
to 15 people.
“People can ask questions about
the next thing they are going to do. I
will talk about formulating questions.
All these people are in the midst of
making decisions. I don’t need to
know the question, I’m just helping
people find their own answers, for
instance, if they’re thinking about
hiring a certain person or publishing
a certain book in a certain year.
Should I retire now? is a good
question.” 
—Suzanne Mantell

PUBL I SHERS

A Crafty
Business

These days it’s rare for a publisher to
announce a 47% increase in trade
book sales, but thanks to its new Stash
Books imprint, 28-year-old C&T
Publishing can lay claim to that
triumph for 2010.
C&T publisher Amy Marson
attributes the success to finding the
right niche. “Our acquisitions editor,
Susanne Woods, found an opening in
the marketplace and got some really
great designers,” Marson tells Show
Daily. “Stash Books appeals to the
younger, hipper craft sewers who
have a lot of confidence in their
ability but need inspiration. They are
adventurous crafters.”
Books like Socks Appeal, which
came out last June, and Little Birds,
which was published last May, have
sold 20,000 and 15,000 copies,
respectively. “For craft books, that’s
amazing,” claims Marson. “And we
believe that as long as you are doing
something with your hands, you are
doing something good for yourself.”
The company is also looking to
nonbook products to generate
income. In the past year, the press
created four different iPhone apps. It
has already sold more than 10,000

W E E K LY

copies of its first one,
Quick & Easy Block Tool,
which features more than
500 traditional quilting
blocks, in print and e-book
formats. It’s also launching
a new sewing and quilting
pattern Web site soon
called PatternSpot.com.
C&T has more than 300
designers signed up to sell patterns
on this new Internet service in a
revenue-sharing deal with the
company. Marson explains: “The
consumer goes on the site; they
download a pattern, and they can
start making their project right
away. This will help us not only to
generate revenue but will also be a
way for us to watch trends, see what’s
hot, and find new authors.”
With C&T’s wide-ranging success, it’s
no surprise that it was recently cited by
Book Business magazine as one of the
Top 10 Book Publishing Companies to
Work For. “Our employees feel that we
have an environment that allows them
to be really creative, and we reward
them for their efforts,” says Marson. “We
work hard to have a culture that is
positive, has a sense of humor, and
makes people want to come to work
every day.”
Marson, who has been C&T’s
publisher for the past eight years,

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

35

tells Show Daily that when
the economy started
tanking in 2008, she told
her employees, “Unless we
change the way we do
business, there will be no
business. We need to break
out of the status quo and
figure out ways to do things
differently.” The company
collected 80 ideas and implemented
65 of them, saving more than $100,000
on two ideas alone in color copying
and in-house publishing. “That’s also
how we launched our first blog, and
how we decided to do the apps,” says
Marson. The company continues to
reward such ideas with cash awards
called SQBIs (pronounced SKWEEbees). “That stands for Status Quo–
Busting Ideas,” Marson explains.
For BEA, C&T will feature a Stash
Books entry titled Deploy That Fabric
by Jen Eskridge. Her husband is in the
military, and she developed 23
projects to “upcycle” used uniforms so
family members can have a memento
from their service member with them
all year round—from quilts or purses
to Christmas stockings. The author
will be signing finished books today at
the C&T booth (3604). Notes Marson,
“It’s a great way to celebrate your
military service family member.” 

—Hilary S. Kayle

www.bookexpoamerica.com

Wed525_BAIShowDaily11_spread_Layout 1 5/13/11 5:06 PM Page 2

Find out more about Audiobooks from
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Tom Clancy
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DRAGON’S TIME
Anne McCaffrey
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FLAT BROKE
Gary Paulsen
One Sale July 12
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WHEN PASSION RULES
Johanna Lindsey
On Sale June 14
Read by Rosalyn Landor

THE TWO DEATHS OF DANIEL HAYES

Marcus Sakey
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Meg Gardiner
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THE EVOLUTION OF CALPURNIA TATE by Jacqueline Kelly Read by Natalie Ross CHILDRENS TITLES FOR AGES 8-12
THE MAGICIAN'S ELEPHANT by Kate DiCamillo Read by Juliet Stevenson CHILDRENS TITLES FOR AGES 8-12
THE MAGICIAN'S ELEPHANT by Kate DiCamillo Read by Juliet Stevenson SOLO NARRATION—FEMALE
ZORA AND ME by Victoria Bond and T.R. Simon Read by Channie Waites TEENS
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WILL GRAYSON, WILL GRAYSON by John Green and David Levithan Read by MacLeod Andrews and Nick Podehl TEENS
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Tues524_BAIShowDaily11_spread_Layout 1 5/13/11 4:24 PM Page 3

BrillianceAudio

Author Signings
TODAY

BOOTH #

4466

Meet Author

SHARON LECHTER

10AM–11AM
TODAY

Signing FREE copies of the print book
& unabridged audiobooks on MP3-CD

NAPOLEON HILL'S OUTWITTING THE DEVIL
WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

Meet Author

GREG REID

10AM–11AM
TODAY

Signing FREE copies of the unabridged audiobook on MP3-CD

NAPOLEON HILL—THE ROAD TO RICHES
WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

Also Meet DONALD
GREEN
Executive Director of the Napoleon Hill Foundation

DR.
CHARLES
JOHNSON
Chairman of the Board of the Napoleon Hill Foundation

38

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

Riding High
at Skyhorse

Bucking a fast-changing publishing
landscape and an unreliable
economy, Skyhorse Publishing is
expanding its reach. Last year the
Manhattan-based house showed up
at BEA with one imprint; this year,
it brings five: Skyhorse, Arcade,
Sports Publishing, Allworth Press,
and Sky Pony Press, this last a
totally new enterprise dedicated to
children’s books.
The company’s optimism has a
solid basis: Skyhorse netted $11
million in sales last year and was
named by PW in March as America’s
fastest-growing small publisher.
“We’ve had growth in all segments
of the business, even with the
decreased size of Borders,” says
associate publisher Bill
Wolfsthal, who has been
with the company since
its founding in 2006, after
a stint as executive
director of special
markets at Harry
Abrams. “We’ve done
well with the bookstore
chains. Barnes & Noble is
a huge supporter of our
program. We’ve seen
growth from Amazon
every year we’ve been in
business.”
Skyhorse’s mission
from the start was to
publish books for niche
markets that could be
easily defined, and to
keep titles in print for a
long time; the house list is
up to 600 titles, and almost all are
still available, Wolfsthal says. Its
first two books were The Gigantic
Book of Fishing Stories, and Abby
Lee’s Diary of a Sex Fiend. “The
fishing book was for fishermen. Sex
Fiend, which started as a blog about
a woman’s sex life, is for men and
women interested in the sex lives of
others. All of our bestsellers follow
this pattern. Mini Farming is for
people who want to raise their own
food. Shooter’s Bible is for people
who buy and collect guns. The
Baseball Maniac’s Almanac is for
baseball fans.”
Wolfstahl says Skyhorse is happy
with the kind of midlist books that
other publishers aren’t interested
in anymore, books that sell 10,000
or 15,000 copies a year. “Not enough
for Simon & Schuster,” he says.
The company anticipates
continued robust growth with the
new imprints. Arcade, which was
purchased out of bankruptcy last
summer, brought with it the rights
to 600 titles. The Arcade spring list
has 40 books, either new or revised
backlist; the fall/winter catalogue
will have 70 new titles. Lead titles at
BEA include Five Works by Octavio
www.bookexpoamerica.com

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Paz, Yoo Hoo, Mrs. Tannenbaume
by John Jacobsen, and Perfume by
Jean-Claude Ellena. A recent
arrangement with Jeanette Seaver,
who founded Arcade with her late
husband, Dick, brings her in as
consulting editor.
Sports Publishing was also
bought out of bankruptcy, and
included the rights to 700 titles, all
regional sports books. The spring
list has 40 new or updated and
revised titles, including books on
the Green Bay Packers, the New
York Yankees, and the Oklahoma
Sooners. Allworth, which
specializes in business books for
artists of all kinds, was a moneymaking company when owner Tad
Crawford agreed to a sale.
Crawford will join Skyhorse as
publisher of the Allworth imprint
and oversee an expanded number
of titles, 40 or 50, up from 20.
Featured on the fall list are Brand
Thinking and Other Noble
Pursuits and How to Think
Like a Great Graphic
Designer.
Sky Pony Press is
starting with 15 new titles,
as well as books
previously published by
Skyhorse and Arcade.
Featured on the fall list
are The Little Pea,
about a tiny garden pea
on a mission to embrace
the diversity of the
world, and a princess
fantasy called The
Balloon Tree.
Also on the fall list is
a reissue of Newbery
Medal–winning author
Maia Wojciechowska’s
A Kingdom in a Horse,
which has been out of print.
Founded by Tony Lyons from the
Lyons Press family, Skyhorse took
its name from one of the first
editors, Brando Skyhorse. “We
couldn’t use Tony’s name, since it
was already in use, and Wolfstahl is
almost unpronounceable to
everyone,” Wolfsthal says.
“Brando’s name was great. It
reflected our optimism and the fact
that we do sports books, horse
books, aviation books.” Brando
Skyhorse, who is no longer with the
company, recently won the 2011
PEN/Hemingway Prize for a
distinguished first book of fiction
with The Madonnas of Echo Park, a
collection of interlinked stories
about the lives of MexicanAmericans in a neighborhood of
Los Angeles.
The company’s sales to the book
trade are handled by W.W. Norton.
“We couldn’t have grown the way
we have without their advice,
support, and hard work,”
Wolfsthal says. To pick up the
catalogues from Skyhorse and its
imprints, pay a visit to the Norton
booth (3424, 3425, 3524). 

—Suzanne Mantell

THE DEBUT
NOVEL BY:

JEREMY WAGNER

“An ancient and evil song written in hieroglyphics is discovered in a long lost pyramid;
when this song is transcribed and performed for the world to hear, it will bring the
Apocalypse upon the Earth, and Kirk Vaisto, a most gifted guitarist, soon
finds himself caught between the forces of divine
good and monumental evil...”
Advance praise for THE ARMAGEDDON CHORD:
“Jeremy Wagner is an up-and-coming voice in the realm of horror fiction. His talent shines
through this debut novel, and I can’t wait to see what his next offering will be. A real pageturner, THE ARMAGEDDON CHORD strikes just the right note!”
-- Yasmine Galenorn, New York Times/USA Today Bestselling Author (The Otherworld Series)
“THE ARMAGEDDON CHORD is like the DA VINCI CODE with a heavy-metal soundtrack!”
-- Katherine Turman, Journalist (Rolling Stone, LA Times, etc.) and Co-author of Louder
Than Hell—An
Unflinching Oral History of Heavy Metal
He
“THE ARMAGEDDON CHORD is a wild phantasmagoric thrill ride that will satisfy lovers of
the darkest fantasy fiction and the heaviest of metal."
-- Peter Blauner, New York Times Bestselling Author (The Intruder, Slipping Into Darkness)
“THE ARMAGEDDON CHORD…think the flat-out nasty fun of Joe Lansdale or a Clive
Barker-ian epic-magical-realism landscape..."
-- Decibel Magazine
“Wagner combines a world of classic adventure and intrigue with a dash of rock'n'roll
mystique for a unique take on the thriller format.”
--Joel McIver, Author of Justice For All: The Truth About Metallica
“Jeremy Wagner is the king of the new breed of horror! THE ARMAGEDDON CHORD
strikes a low chord of death right through the reader’s frontal lobe.”
-- Chris Barnes, Six Feet Under (vocalist)

Author:

Jeremy Wagner

In Booth Autographing Session: Fang Bangers

Booth: 4480 (Horror Writer’s Association)
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 @ 10:00AM - 11:00AM
Available from Knight Romance Publishing *Trade Paperback *Limited/Special Edition Hardcover *eBook
www.knightromancepublishing.com | www.jeremy-wagner.com | www.TheArmageddonChord.com

40

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Authors

AT T H E SHOW
Diane Keaton

Photo © Jonathan Alpeyrie 2010

Mom Was Her Inspiration

Lauren will be signing galleys of Liesl & Po,
her first novel for middle grade readers,
and copies of Delirium,
her bestselling teen novel

As one of the screen’s most respected
actresses, Oscar-winner Diane Keaton has
starred in The Godfather (parts I, II, and III),
Annie Hall, Baby Boom, and Something’s Gotta
Give—with more to come. Always compelling
on screen, she credits her mother, Dorothy
Keaton Hall, with being the most important and
the most influential person in her life. Keaton’s
first memoir, Then Again, due from Random
House in November, is really two stories
intertwined, Keaton’s and her mother’s. This
morning, she will share some of their stories at the Book & Author Breakfast.
Then Again is based on the depth and nuances of the mother-daughter
relationship, and is both a memoir and a tribute as Keaton tells Show Daily.
“I wrote it because in some way I wanted my mother’s voice to be heard.”
After her mother passed away in 2008 following a long battle with
Alzheimer’s disease, Keaton and her siblings started reading her vast
collection of journals, notebooks, and scrapbooks—which included every
clipping of her famous daughter’s work. “My mother documented our family.
That’s why this came to be a story about what it’s like to be a mom.” She adds,
“My mother was insecure and very sensitive, yet strong and powerful as a
mother, and she gave so much. It took me so long to accept the fact that
mother was a separate person, and I didn’t deal with it as much as I should
have. Now I wish I had.”
Keaton credits her mother’s journals with helping her “find a forum” for
the book, and she says she really enjoyed the “writing, rewriting, and
editing” process—particularly the editing. Because both stories are told side
by side, “It was such a learning process to blend in one with another. I had
her words and my words, so I was able to mix and match.”
Keaton says she also did not mind putting in the time required. “I am like
my mother and father. I like to work. I get up early and have a lot of
discipline, and I’ll just work. I am not bored by it.” A busy mother of two
herself, she adds, “I’d take my daughter swimming and work in the car—half
the time my office was the back of the car, which I really enjoyed.”
What does Keaton hope readers take away from the book? “Appreciate
your mother. It’s unbelievable what they do for us.” 
—Karen Jones

Harlan Coben

Join Lauren Oliver and
Wildwood creators
Colin Meloy and Carson Ellis
For a Moderated Discussion
about Middle Grade Novels

Today from 11:30 — 12:00 PM
at the Uptown Stage
An Imprint of HarperCollins Publishers
www.harpercollinschildrens.com

www.bookexpoamerica.com

Launching His First
YA Series

Harlan Coben is a household name among
adult mystery readers. The Edgar winner’s
last four novels all debuted in the top slot on
the New York Times bestseller list, and there
are more than 47 million copies of his books in
print worldwide. Coben plans to broaden his
audience base with Shelter: A Mickey Bolitar
Novel, due from Putnam in September with a
250,000-copy announced first printing.
The novel kicks off a series that has a close
connection to Coben’s Myron Bolitar mystery series. Mickey is Myron’s
nephew and appears in Live Wire, the latest installment of that adult series.
In fact, the final chapters of Live Wire are retold in the YA novel. “But the
events have a completely different meaning in Shelter, since they are told
from Mickey’s perspective,” Coben explains.
“I realized that Mickey had stories to tell that I didn’t want to tell in an
adult fashion,” says Coben about his decision to pen a YA series starring this
teenage character. “I wanted to write about something that Mickey himself
would have to handle, and I think that as a mystery it is as tight as anything
I’ve ever written—but it has a little bit of a mythology to it, which is something
I’ve never really done before. I didn’t want to do supernatural or magic,
vampires or werewolves. In Shelter, after Mickey starts at a new high school,
the only real friend he makes disappears, and he goes in search of her. The

© batricelegrand

Available
October 24th

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

PUBL I SHERS

mythology in the story surrounds an old lady who lives in a creepy old
house.”
Coben notes that the character of Mickey was “ridiculously easy” for him
to write. “In fact, he came out fully formed, which sometimes happens—but
not always,” says the author. “I am so fired up about this book. It’s a new way
of telling stories for me, which is great because I’m always trying to change
up what I’m doing. And the early response to the novel has been very
exciting!”
That includes the reaction from readers close to Coben’s heart. His four
children, ages nine to 17, all read Shelter within 24 hours of the final version’s
arrival. “That is so cool for me,” says Coben. “I really wanted to write
something that all of them could read, and even my nine-year-old daughter
read it in less than a day. I’m thrilled about that! I think now my kids are a
little more excited about what I do.”
Coben says he’s “happy to get the buzz going at BEA about this book. I can’t
wait to hand it to booksellers and everyone else who loves YA.” The author
will be signing ARCs of Shelter today, 11 a.m.–noon, at Table 19.  —Sally Lodge

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

41

rom some of the
F
biggest names in teen
and children’s fiction

Walter Dean
Myers
Teams Up with Son to
Honor America

Frequent father-son collaborators Walter Dean
Myers and Christopher Myers celebrate the
history, people, and spirit of this country in We
Are America: A Tribute from the Heart, released
by Collins earlier this month.
Walter Dean Myers conceived of the book
project in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist
attacks. “There was a wave of patriotism after
9/11, and it occurred to me that the definition that surfaced then of what it
meant to be an American largely didn’t include women or people of color,”
he recalls. “I began thinking about people in history who have defended our
country in various ways. It seems that people who are on my side of the
political spectrum, which is vaguely leftist, are expected to be very good at
criticism but aren’t expected to praise our country. I am an American and I
love this country, and I decided I needed to take responsibility for my
country’s history, present, and future.”
In preparation for writing his free-verse tribute to his country, Myers
reread many American historical documents. “As I read writings and
speeches, I realized that these people, living through the drama of their
times, were saying it better than I could,” says the author. “So I decided to
include their words in the text as well.” Among the individuals Myers quotes
are Shawnee chief Tecumseh, lawyer Andrew Hamilton, abolitionist and
orator Frederick Douglass, and poet Emma Lazarus.
Though the text of We Are America was mostly completed before Myers
showed it to his son, he explains, “When I began to see what Christopher was
doing in his art, I made some changes to accommodate his work. If you’re
working with a good illustrator, they add to the book in ways that sometimes
require adjusting the language.” Created over a three-year period,
Christopher Myers’s outsize paintings measure 3×10 feet. “When he was a
boy, we used to go to Mexico often, and Christopher was really impressed
with the murals he saw there,” says the author. “I could see that connection
in his art for this book. I think it works very well.”
Walter Dean Myers has also penned a new YA novel, Carmen, based on the
novella that inspired the celebrated opera. Published in April by Egmont
USA, this contemporary story centers on a strong-willed chica in Spanish
Harlem. “If I can help young people forge a connection between their lives
and classical literature, and make a work like Carmen part of the culture of
urban America, then I’ve done something good,” he reflects.
Father and son sign copies of We Are America today, 10:30–11 a.m., at Table
17. Following that, 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m., Walter Dean Myers will be at Table 5,
—Sally Lodge
autographing copies of Carmen. 

Charlaine Harris

Ellen Hopkins (Crank)
will moderate a panel
about teen bullying
Wednesday, May 25th at 12:00 pm
The Uptown Stage
Also participating:
Megan Kelley Hall
(Sisters of Misery)

Lisa McMann
(Wake)

Maryrose Wood
(The Poison Diaries)

Hitting aTriple Play

A decade ago, Charlaine Harris’s first novel featuring Sookie Stackhouse
was released and did well enough to merit more titles in her southern
vampire series. But she never expected that to translate into megabestselling author status, a beloved TV series based on her books with HBO’s
True Blood, or a coveted featured speaker spot at today’s Author Breakfast.
She sums up her reaction to all this wild success simply: “It’s disconcerting,”

www.epicreads.com • www.dearbully.com
www.bookexpoamerica.com

PW_Bully3.indd 1

5/13/11 4:58 PM

42

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Authors
AT THE S H OW

© sigrid

estrada

says Harris, laughing.
This was one overnight success story “many
years in the making.” Harris published her first
novel 30 years ago, a stand-alone mystery with
no fantasy elements whatsoever. She went on
to write many more mysteries, but after they
failed to gain traction with readers, found
herself mulling which direction to take her
career. She decided to tackle paranormal
romance, even though there wasn’t much of it
being published yet.
“At that time, there was almost no one—
besides Laurell K. Hamilton—writing
paranormal. It was a bold move and I felt like
that’s what I needed,” says Harris. “I thought it
was time to shake up my career a little.”
And shake it up she did. Adding “a little bit of everything” to the mix,
Harris wrote and sent off the first Sookie Stackhouse novel to her agent...
only to have it rejected over and over. Still, Harris didn’t give up. “I felt like it
had a future. I knew it was the best thing I’d ever written,” she says. She
credits her agent with sticking with the project, until finally it was picked up
by a junior editor at Ace. Once it was published, she realized it was
developing a following through word of mouth, especially when the
publisher quickly came back with an offer for more books.
“It was very exciting to think I’d finally hit the right topic, with the right
publisher, and the right market,” says Harris. “It’s hard to hit all three at the
same time.”

75

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

The series currently has more than 20 million copies in print, and the 11th
book, Dead Reckoning, was published earlier this month. The novel is
notable as another milestone—it’s the first of the series’ final three books.
The decision to end on a high note was Harris’s own. “I appreciate the
success and opportunities, but I feel like I’d be repeating myself if I
continued.”
Dead Reckoning begins with Sookie witnessing the firebombing of her
workplace, Merlotte’s, and becoming determined to find the culprit—while
navigating danger and vampire intrigue, of course. Harris says working
toward the end of the series has proved unexpectedly to be fun. “Now that I
have a goal—satisfying the reader by concluding the many, many story lines
I’ve started over the years—it’s very energizing.”
As for what’s next, there are too many opportunities for Harris to say yet.
Her earlier books now sell well, a “constant delight” to the author.
Meanwhile, True Blood will be back with a fourth season next month, and a
comic book adaptation of the first novel in her Harper Connelly series, Grave
Sight, is due out then too. “So many projects I could do that I’m like a kid on
Christmas morning,” says Harris. “What do I open first?”
For this week, she plans to enjoy her time at BEA. “All those people and
books in one place sounds just great to me,” says Harris.
—Gwenda Bond

Michael Moore
Life’s a Box of Chocolates

Michael Moore says before he became famous as a filmmaker and author,
he often felt like a real-life Forrest Gump. “I’m just a guy from Flint,
Michigan,” he explains, “but I’ve always had this uncanny knack for
crossing paths with people or events that I never intended to happen.” For
instance, there’s the time, when he was 11 years old, that he found himself
trapped on a U.S. Senate elevator with Sen. Robert Kennedy. Seven years
later, Moore became the youngest person elected to public office in the U.S.
when he won a seat on Flint’s board of education. While touring a cemetery
in Bitburg, Germany, in 1985, Moore encountered a “dazed and confused”
President Ronald Reagan. Then there’s the time, while changing planes in

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2206

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

MAY

MAY

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BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Authors
AT THE S H OW

Vienna, when his “star aligned, unfortunately,
with the star” of the Palestinian terrorist
leader Abu Nidal. During a visit to Berlin in
1989, Moore joined up with “some crazies”
who’d begun chiseling on a huge wall dividing
the city in two.
“I’ve not told any of these stories before,”
Moore insists, explaining that the time is right
for him to move in a new direction after filming
10 critically acclaimed documentary movies
and writing seven bestselling books, all of them
highly controversial takes on hot-button
political or cultural issues.
“With the election of Barack Obama, I’m no
longer in the minority,” Moore notes. “The
country has changed direction. It was time to take a break and write the
book I’ve always wanted to write.” Moore’s as-yet-untitled “antimemoir,” will
be published by Grand Central in September as a collection of 20 nonfiction
short stories recounting specific incidents in Moore’s past that he swears are
absolutely true. In fact, Moore explains, with every book he’s written, he’s
hired professional fact-checkers who’ve never worked for him before to
“challenge everything” in the manuscript. “My work, when I turn it in, is
airtight,” he claims, although, he admits, this book reminds him somewhat of
the Japanese film Rashomon, as some memories of his childhood differ from
those of his two sisters.
Not all of the vignettes in Moore’s memoir involve chance encounters with
celebrities or being swept up in historic events, Moore tells Show Daily. One

Have you

seen

us lately?

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

of his favorite vignettes is the tale of how a priest at St. Paul’s Seminary in
Saginaw, Mich., taught a teenage Moore how to perform an exorcism.
Laughing as he recalls the incident, Moore declares, “I could write a whole
book of how I trained to be a Roman Catholic priest and why it didn’t work
out.” Moore will talk about his life and times at the Uptown Insight Stage
today, 10 a.m.–11:30 am. 
—Claire Kirch

Mindy Kaling
A ‘Beautiful’ Person

Mindy Kaling admits to being “a little nervous”
about following in Jon Stewart’s footsteps as
master of ceremonies for this morning’s (25th)
Book & Author Breakfast. A needless worry.
Kaling not only has the star power for the job
(she’s a co-executive producer as well as
playing chatty Kelly Kapoor on the hit NBC
show The Office), she has some serious
credentials as a writer.
In addition to being an Emmy-nominated
and Writer’s Guild of America award-winning
writer for The Office, Kaling co-wrote and
co-starred in the play Matt & Ben, which was named the New York
International Fringe Festival’s Best Overall Production in 2002, was on
Rolling Stone’s Hot List for Hot Play, and named one of Time magazine’s Top
Ten Theatrical Events of 2003. And her first book, Is Everyone Hanging Out
Without Me? (And Other Concerns), is due this November from Crown.
Not surprisingly, Kaling is a lifelong and passionate reader. She grew up
in Cambridge, Mass., the daughter of Indian immigrants (a physician
mother and architect father) “who were suspicious of after-school activities
like sports.” So her afternoons were spent at the local library, where she
happily read her way from the Babysitters Club to Robert Cormier (“I was
fixated on dark stories about outcast boys.”) While Kaling says, she “always
identified myself as a funny kid— except for a period in my teens, when like

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• In the past four years, we’ve launched five New York Times bestsellers, ten Wall Street Journal bestsellers, and numerous USA Today
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Binky’s Back!

“Fans will celebrate; aliens will quiver in fright.”
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46

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Authors
AT THE S H OW

so many people in comedy, I wasn’t remotely funny,” she was also an honor
student who entered Dartmouth as a Latin major but graduated with a
degree in playwriting.
Kaling describes Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns)
as “one-third memoir, one-third revenge fantasy, and one-third comedy
essay,” and turns her formidable wit on everything from her favorite men
(“anyone written by Aaron Sorkin, Sherlock Holmes, 19th-century hunks like
Mr. Darcy, and NBA players”) to life in the writers’ room of The Office (“when
it’s 2:30 in the morning, and you realize you’ve consumed 3,500 calories that
day in nonorganic, preservative-laden food ”) and how much she loves her
mom. In April, Kaling was surprised by a real-life revenge fantasy of her own.
The formerly plump and bookish grade-schooler was named one of People
magazine’s 2011 Most Beautiful People. Sweet.
You can meet Kaling (and pick up an autograph) at 10:30 a.m. in the
—Lucinda Dyer
Random House booth (4420). 

Coe Booth
Returns to the World of Tyrell

Tyrell, Coe Booth’s first novel, centers on a teen living in a South Bronx
homeless shelter who faces difficult choices. His father is in jail, and his
mother is pressuring him to become involved with drug dealing to bring in
money. The novel received multiple starred reviews, won a 2007 L.A. Times
Book Prize for Young Adult Fiction, and was named an ALA Best Book for
Young Adults. Booth revisits Tyrell’s gritty world in Bronxwood, due in
September from Scholastic/PUSH.

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

The sequel, Booth explains, takes place
seven months after Tyrell concludes. “His father
is out of prison and is reemerging into Tyrell’s
life,” she says. “There’s a tug-of-war between
the two—they have a very complicated
relationship. Tyrell respects his father but
doesn’t want to be controlled by him any longer.
In addition to going through all that, his little
brother is in foster care, and it’s summer and
Tyrell is looking for love.”
Booth had no difficulty retrieving Tyrell’s
voice for Bronxwood. “I don’t really leave a
world when I finish writing a book, and I kept
wondering what Tyrell was doing,” she says. “I
love writing Tyrell’s voice, and I slid right back
into it quite effortlessly. It’s fun to pretend to be a boy and have all that Bronx
slang going on.”
Though she too grew up in the Bronx, Coe didn’t draw upon her own
childhood to create Tyrell’s world, but her postcollege work with families
and teens in crisis did come into play. “I was raised in a stable, normal family,
but I feel very comfortable writing about Tyrell’s experiences,” she notes.
“Having worked with families going through what his family is going
through, I knew what I was talking about. I knew the world, but I had to find
the writing itself, and the characters.”
Booth targets a younger audience with the book she’s currently writing, a
middle-grade novel that is also set in the Bronx and stars a 12-year-old boy. A
student she encountered on a school visit inspired the story. “My muse was
this smart-alecky kid with a sneaky little face,” she explains. “I thought he
was adorable, and something about him triggered a story—I knew
immediately I wanted to write about someone like him.”
At BEA for the first time, Booth is pleased that she is at last a bona fide
attendee. “In the past, I’ve met people for dinner who’d been at BEA that
day—I was the after-party person, kind of pretending I’d been there,” she
quips. “This year, I’m really looking forward to meeting booksellers—and I

Author signings, adorable giveaways & more!

Available August

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Distributed by National Book Network

BOOTH 3604

in the NBN Pavilion
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WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

don’t have to pretend anymore!”
Booth is signing ARCs of Bronxwood this afternoon, 3:30–4 p.m., at Table 20.
—Sally Lodge

Susan Orlean
After discovering that 1950s TV hero Rin Tin Tin
was a real dog, The Orchid Thief author, Susan
Orlean, embarked on what turned into a sevenyear project, Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend
(Simon & Schuster). “It was sort of irresistible.
It’s partly a curiosity about why does something
get remembered,” says Orlean. “I feel I have
always known of Rin Tin Tin,” she writes in the
opening of the book, “as if it was introduced to
me by osmosis. It became part of my
consciousness, like a nursery lullaby you can
sing without knowing why.”
Orlean credits her Welsh springer spaniel with inspiring her to write more
animal stories—and add more animals to her home. She now has cats,
chickens, ducks, turkeys, and 12 Black Angus cattle. “I think the idea of
writing about animals has always appealed to me,” says Orlean, “because I
love animals and they’re a wonderful foil for writing about people. I’ve
written about people and plants, which to me is a fascinating relationship.
This is one step further; it’s really rich.”
One reason the book took so long to complete was the amount of history
Orlean had to tackle to tell the story of Rin Tin Tin, a German shepherd
puppy found in France during World War I by Cpl. Lee Duncan. After the war,
he brought him back to the U.S., where he continued to be a star. “It was a
real education for me,” says Orlean. “I had never thought about WWI that
much, but my favorite books of the last decade were the Pat Barker
[Regeneration] trilogy.” In researching German shepherds, Orlean learned

© gasper tringale

Fascinated with RinTinTin

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

47

that they’re a relatively recent breed, dating from the late 1800s. “I was
flabbergasted that you can trace them back to one dog,” she says. “The
German shepherd would have to stand as one of the all-time engineering
feats in the animal world. Once they were developed, they were popular all
over the world.”
Another strand of the story is orphans. In addition to Duncan, others
connected with the story of the famous German shepherd, like Bert Leonard,
the production manager who worked on the TV series, and Daphne
Hereford, who founded the first Rin Tin Tin museum, seemed to have a hole
in their families that the dog filled. “It’s such a story of orphans,” says Orlean,
adding that being an orphan was a recurring theme in television.
Orlean also found that Rin Tin Tin functions as a Zelig figure or Forrest
Gump. “Every time you turn around, he’s there. That’s what made it so
interesting,” she says. “It’s almost a bellwether, seeing how we relate to our
home, our space, our neighbors.”
Orlean will be signing ARCs of Rin Tin Tin at the Simon & Schuster booth
(3653) today, 2–3 p.m. The book will launch in October with a two-night event
at the New York Film Festival. 
—Judith Rosen

Kevin Sorbo
A Herculean Mind Effort

Need some inspiration this morning? Then visit the Perseus booth (4106),
where between 10:30 and 11:30 a.m. actor Kevin Sorbo will sign copies of his
memoir, True Strength (Da Capo Press, Oct.), which chronicles a health crisis
that he had to keep secret for the sake of his career.
Sorbo is best known for his leading roles in TV’s Hercules: The Legendary
Journeys, which ran from 1995 through 1999, and Andromeda, which ran
from 2000 through 2005. In 1997, at the height of his career, he suffered a
series of debilitating strokes—but his condition was kept a secret from the
press. “The studio was as afraid as I was to let the public know, until I proved
that I could handle it. It’s now been 14 years, and between Hercules and
Andromeda, I shot 250 hours of TV and another 30 or so movies. So I’ve not

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48

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Authors
AT THE S H OW

been a liability.”
True Strength, Sorbo says, is about the
recovery process. “When I had my illness, I
realized—after going through it for two and a
half years—that the doctors saved my life, but if
I’d listened to them I wouldn’t have lasted for
three months! I have a very strong will, and I
didn’t let their words discourage me. I hope
people take away that the mind can be a very
healing tool, and that they can push themselves
beyond what any doctors say they can do. The
message is that we always wallow in self-pity
when bad things happen to us, but here’s an
alternative.”
The notes Sorbo took over a 10-year period
during and after his recovery, formed the basis of the book; the actual
writing of it, he says, began about 18 months ago. One of the challenges of
writing the book was deciding whether to do it chronologically, or some
other way. “In the end, I did it like the Memento movie, moving between time
periods. I liked the way the movie was pieced together. It was a beautiful
jigsaw puzzle. I want to put the reader into different times in my life, but
without confusing them.” In general, though, “Writing this book has been
very therapeutic for me; it’s emptied out all the garbage that’s been in my
body all these years.”
True Strength is Sorbo’s first book, but now he’s pumped: “I’ll tell you, it
showed me that I have more books in me. Now, I want to write about the
movie business.”
—Diane Patrick

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Vatsala and Ehud
Sperling
CreatedTheir
Own Ashram

Eleven yearsafter Ten Speed
Press published Vatsala and
Ehud Sperling’s A Marriage
Made in Heaven: A Love Story in
Letters, which chronicled the
couple’s yearlong courtship
through written
correspondence, (Vatsala from
her native India and Ehud from
Vermont), they have revised
and caught the reader up with
their relationship and the parenting of a son in For Seven Lifetimes: An EastWest Journey to a Spiritually Fulfilling and Sustainable Marriage (Inner
Traditions, owned by Ehud).
Vatsala says she gave up a successful and prestigious career as a
homeopathic doctor to marry Ehud and join him in his rural life in America
with just one purpose in mind: “To sustain a healthy and happy household in
which the spouses feel nurtured and so do the children.” Before they even
met, Vatsala had sent Ehud 20 dos and don’ts regarding marriage and made
it clear that she wanted traditional vows that included the words “love,
honor, and obey.” Ehud immediately points out, “That gets a lot of women to
flip out.” That, and the fact that it was an arranged marriage.
“If you expect your husband to put you and the family ahead of his own
wishes,” he asks, “so what, actually, are you obeying?” Gender roles, he says,
are important in marriage. Vatsala says women are the trainers of the alpha
male. “By allowing him to be who he is, he serves the household perfectly,”
she explains. “My job as wife and mother is to allow this to happen. I did not
have to lose my identity to hold onto this new idea.” Aside from caring for the

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50

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Authors
AT THE S H OW

household, Vatsala writes children’s books and recently sat for the exam to
become a homeopathic doctor in the United States.
The couple says they combined the basic ideas from their cultural
traditions (he’s Jewish and she’s Hindu), along with the central philosophies
of most religious and cultural traditions to create a marriage that fosters
spiritual growth for both parties. They apply a similar ideology to child
rearing. Ehud calls their son a “Hindjew.” He points to how the Hindu
tradition of child rearing is divided into seven-year intervals: the first seven
years, a child is treated as a god (not judged on merits); the next seven years,
as a king or queen (as the ego develops); from 14 to 21, as a slave (learning to
serve others); and from 21 on, as a friend (having grown into a self-knowing
being who cares for others).
The central question in a marriage and in raising children, say the
Sperlings, is: how can we help each other on this journey? “Some people go
to the ashram,” says Ehud. What the authors are trying to do with their book
is share an example of how two people created an ashram in their home.
The Sperlings will be signing today at Table 10, 1–2 p.m., and tomorrow, in
the Inner Traditions booth (4328), 10–11 a.m. 
—Bridget Kinsella

Tom Perrotta
Life After ‘Rapture’

Tom Perrotta began writing his postapocalyptic novel The Leftovers (St.
Martin’s, Aug. 30) during the economic crash of 2008, when Americans began
a journey through psychological trauma after losing their jobs and their
homes.

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

The premise of Perrotta’s new book is: What
if the Rapture actually happened? “I became
aware at the time that there are moments
when people can’t conceive of a future,”
Perrotta says. “We were experiencing an
epidemic of grief that I’m not sure we’ve
recovered from yet.” He poured this concept of
lingering grief into the narrative of The
Leftovers, which focuses on four members of a
family that survives a world-shattering event in
which people randomly disappear, dividing the
world into Before and After. “I believe that the
basic human condition is to be bystanders of
disaster,” Perrotta comments, adding that what
most people don’t realize is that the biblical
Rapture is followed by seven years of
tribulation.
Perrotta has written about evangelical Christianity before, in The
Abstinence Teacher, but in his new book he treats the Rapture “as more or
less a secular event, rather than a fulfillment of a Christian biblical
prophecy.” In The Leftovers, the Garvey family, the book’s main characters,
aren’t religious at all until the mass disappearances occur. The book charts
the spiritual journeys that two members of the family begin after the
traumatic event. There is humor in the novel that is typical of Perrotta’s
writing, but the author found himself taking a stylistic turn as he progressed
with the book. “I wanted to write a funny postapocalyptic book, but the grief
in the story added a different dimension,” says Perrotta.
The Leftovers is something of a departure for Perrotta, who is also the
author of the highly acclaimed novel Little Children. “I’ve been writing long
enough now that I’ve become a different writer,” he says. “The books are not
so much about me. I’m trying to work on bigger canvases and broaden my
audience in the process.” His hope is that his longtime readers will come
along for the experience of The Leftovers, but that the novel also might
appeal to a different group. “The premise of the book might interest readers
who gravitate toward the intersection of genre fiction and literary fiction—

MIDPOINT
BOOK SALES & DISTRIBUTION

www.bookexpoamerica.com

52

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Authors
AT THE S H OW

people who liked The Road or The Handmaid’s Tale or Never Let Me Go.”
Perrotta signs ARCs today at 2:30 p.m. in St. Martin’s booth (3352). 

—Wendy Werris

Jeremy Wagner
From Heavy Metal to Papyrus

Jeremy Wagner does not think it’s such a
stretch for a heavy metal rock star to try to
break into publishing. “There are so many
similarities between the book industry and the
music industry,” the guitarist in the band
Lupara explains. Soon after graduating from
high school, Wagner and his first band, Broken
Hope, recorded a demo tape and shopped it
around, looking for a manager and a record
deal. Writing a query letter, sending out sample
chapters, and trying to find a publisher after
writing his debut novel, The Armageddon
Chord, took him right back to those early days
in his career, he says.
To be published in August by KRP Publishing,
a year-old small press specializing in
paranormal romance and fiction, The Armageddon Chord is a fast-paced
read set in a world Wagner knows very well: a heavy metal guitarist
transcribes an ancient song from hieroglyphics and soon finds himself

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

enmeshed in an apocalyptic struggle between the forces of good and evil for
world domination. It is, says freelance journalist Katherine Turman, “like
The Da Vinci Code with a heavy-metal soundtrack.”
Wagner has always been a prolific writer. While playing with Broken
Hope, he would build upon lyrics he’d written, weaving them into short
stories. “The songs I wrote were like little pieces of flash fiction, if you will.
It just came naturally,” he says. His short fiction already has been
published in several magazines and in two anthologies. And at this stage in
his life, Wagner, 40, prefers to write fiction rather than put out albums and
tour; he’s already writing full-time. Like the “extreme heavy metal” song
lyrics he used to write, which were “100% horror based,” Wagner’s writings
tend toward horror. “It’s a realm that’s always fascinated me,” he tells
Show Daily, describing himself as fascinated by “monsters and anything
creepy or scary.” A voracious reader too, Wagner recalls as a child reading
the mysteries, thrillers, and horror fiction paperbacks he’d find on his
mother’s nightstand. “I can remember when Jaws came out in paperback,”
he says. “The cover blew me away. It was the first adult novel I ever read. I
was six or seven.”
A love of reading isn’t an anomaly at all among those who like to listen to
the dense sounds of the heavy metal music he performs, Wagner explains.
“It’s amazing how many heavy metal fans love fiction or books in general.”
Wagner will sign ARCs of The Armageddon Chord and give away limitededition guitar picks today in the authors’ autographing area, 2:30–3:30 p.m.,
at Table 22. 
—Claire Kirch

Jeffrey Lyons
A Den Full of Stars

For a glimpse at the glamorous side of BEA, head to the Abbeville booth
(4406) today, 2–3 p.m., for a signed copy of movie critic Jeffrey Lyons’s Stories
My Father Told Me: Notes from “The Lyons Den” (June).
Jeffrey Lyons is no stranger to famous people—as the cohost of three
national movie review shows—Sneak Previews, MSNBC’s At the Movies, and
Reel Talk—he’s profiled everyone from Clint Eastwood to Cate Blanchett.

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www.atlantyca.com
13/05/11 11:04

In 1996

less than half of all American high school students
had ever used the Internet.

Facebook

would not be invented until several years in the future.

Everyone

wants to know what will happen to them
by the time they turn 30.
Emma & Josh
are about to find out.

And so are you.
one time only galley giveaway.

one of the season’s most highly anticipated novels.

Penguin Booth 3252
Wednesday, May 25 at 2:00 pm

54

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Authors
AT THE S H OW

But he’s a bit of a piker compared to his father, the late Leonard Lyons, who
for 40 years penned a column titled “The Lyons Den” for the New York Post
that chronicled the lives of the famous, including artists, athletes, movie
stars, politicians, musicians, and writers. Leonard Lyons knew everyone.
Coauthor of three baseball books and a book on movies for children,
Jeffrey Lyons is making his first visit to BEA. Stories My Father Told Me
features a selection of the 12,479 columns that the elder Lyons contributed to
the paper, chosen by his son. (Leonard turned out an impressive 1,000 words
a day.) Jeffrey has included some of his own work as well, along with a
foreword by Charles Osgood, anchor of CBS News Sunday Morning since
1994.

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Jeffrey Lyons reports that in picking which of
his father’s columns to include, he “went by the
biggest names who were mentioned often and
took the timeless stories: funny, amazing,
informative, newsworthy in their time and
ours. There were many more I could have
included, but the book would have been much
too heavy and cumbersome.”
He began reading his father’s column as a
preteen in 1956, when it had already been in
existence for 22 years. He was nonplussed at
the time by the constant presence of famous
faces in their New York home. Lyons recalls,
“As a small boy it seemed just normal, until Joe
DiMaggio came to our home for the first of
several visits. Then Steinbeck. Then Orson
Welles. And then many others.”
As Lyons notes of his father’s time in his introduction to the book, “There
were no faxes, nor e-mails, word processors, Internet, computers, laptops,
cellphones, and until the midsixties no electric typewriters.” And
that’s not the only difference
between that era and the present.
Lyons says, “Today there is no
privacy, no discretion. We live,
sadly, in the age of Snooki and that
ilk—just famous-for-being-famous
people of no talent. Also, we have
TMZ and intrusive cameras
everywhere.” 
—Natalie Danford

GABBS
In Historic

BOSTON
August 10 –11, 2011

John B. Hynes Veterans Memorial Convention Center
The Plaza Level - Hall B
Time to register for GABBS, the Great
American Bargain Book Show! An overstock,
remainder, bargain and value book show where you
can save on new books and book related product,
additional media venues, and gift items discounted
from 75% to 90% off retail. Also, industry panels
and bookseller seminars to help improve your
sales. Visit www.gabbs.net for updates.

Register Online At
www.gabbs.net
Pre-registration
$25.00 ($20.00 ea. additional person)

Registration @ The Door
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www.bookexpoamerica.com
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2011 BookExpo Ad.indd 1

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BookExpo America and register for

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For your convenience
GABBS has reserved a block of rooms at
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Call 1-888-627-7054 and ask for the
GABBS Room Block.
Rooms must be secured by July 15, 2011 for this rate.
Or visit www.gabbs.net/hoteltravel.aspx

5/2/11 4:19:46 PM

Duff
McKagan
Bass Guitarist
Tells All
What makes a wildly successful
rock star take up book writing, such
a solitary and relentlessly difficult
occupation? What rewards lie in
store? Duff McKagan, the punk
rocker revered as the bass guitarist
(and cofounder) of Guns N’ Roses,
Velvet Revolver, and Loaded, and
now the author of the tell-all
memoir It’s So Easy and Other Lies
(S&S/Touchstone, Oct.), blames his
newfound passion on the clarity the
written word brings to his thoughts.
His long descent into drug addiction
lent an urgency to his appreciation.
“I found I could express myself in
a more fluid and direct way than
talking,” he says. “I could write
something, look at it, and say,
‘That’s exactly what I meant.’ That’s
what keeps me coming back. I am
happy when I write something and
think, ‘That’s the best word I could
have found.’ I like goofy, nerdy stuff
like that.”
McKagan’s writing career was
launched three years ago, when
Italian Vogue and then Playboy and
Seattle Weekly tapped him for
articles. “I had written a couple of
times in the Weekly about my
addiction, what it was like. People
would ask me how much I drank,
how many drugs I took. But I was
getting blank stares, so I started
writing about how I got there.
People also asked how I got sober.
So this is my story.”
The most challenging thing about
writing the book, he says, was

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56

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Catherine Gibson
announces
her latest book

Self-doubt and the normal anxieties of being a teenager are issues
that cause Stefan to second guess his abilities on and off the playing field. Having a mentor who understands and encourages him
is key to nudging Stefan toward a path of success and confidence.
Confined to a wheelchair, Coach Bob is a well-respected football
coach at the local high school. Active and involved, Coach helps
his students grow as athletes and as individuals. Recognizing potential talent mingled with a lack of confidence, Coach Bob
shares his own story with Stefan.
He offers the right amount of encouragement, support and advice
to Stefan who learns that what you want in life is up to you and
achieving your goals depends on how hard you want to work to
accomplish them.

Visit the website
www.forchildrenwithlove.com

HOR
AUTNING:
SIG ay 25,
M IPBA
Visitooth
B

Local Author Wins Gold Medal
at Mom’s Choice Awards and the
Silver Medal at the IBPA Awards
Catherine Gibson, a local children's book author, was recently honored in New York City at the Independent Publisher Book Awards
convention, honoring children's book authors for numerous literary
achievements. Cathy received a silver medal for her book, Through
Sophie's Eyes, in the "Interactive—Children" category.
Through Sophie's Eyes is a story about a deaf girl who wants to take
dancing lessons with hearing children. Initially, the girls in Sophie's
class are not accepting of Sophie and the fact that she is different.
As the story progresses, the girls discover what it is like for Sophie
to not be able to hear. Sophie perseveres, learns to dance and the
girls in her class learn to accept her, forging a new and special
friendship. The book has easy to read graphics that show the finger
spell alphabet and how to put examples of these words together in
sign language.

Contact Catherine Gibson
by going to
www.forchildrenwithlove.com
www.bookexpoamerica.com

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Authors
AT THE SH OW

revisiting “dark places,” such as when he
would look in the mirror and think it was all
someone else’s fault. “In my sober life I thought
I had done a thorough job of taking
responsibility for myself, but I hadn’t been as
thorough as I thought.” The book, he says,
should make the reader uncomfortable once
in a while, as it recreates the pain and chaos of
addiction.
Cormac McCarthy stands foremost among
McKagan’s literary influences. “He’s a genius.
My house is pink and fluffy all the time, with
three women [a wife and two young daughters]
and two dogs, and as a guy I need to get some of
my dark stuff out. Cormac helps exorcise some
of that. Also,” McKagan adds, “Hunter S. Thompson.”
BEA, book tours, readings—it’s all new to McKagan. “As a musician, a tour
to me means two years. I had to laugh when my publicist asked, Can you do
two weeks. I look forward to it. This is really fun.” McKagan will be signing a
70-page excerpt from his book at the Simon & Schuster booth (3652 ,3653)
today at 11:30 a.m. 
—Suzanne Mantell

Lillian Luterman and
Jennifer Bloom
Books Are Cool for School

Booksellers freely admit it:
sometimes it’s difficult to get
teenagers interested in
reading, when there are so
many high-tech gadgets vying
for their attention. How about if
booksellers start talking up that
lifelong readers typically fare
extremely well in terms of
college admissions? That’s
what mother-daughter college
admissions consultants Lillian
Luterman and Jennifer Bloom
tell Show Daily. Luterman and
her daughter are the authors of
In! College Admissions and
Beyond: The Experts’ Proven
Strategy for Success (Abbeville),
a handbook that explains their
strategies in the increasingly
competitive world of college admissions.
“It is absolutely more difficult to get into college now,” Luterman declares.
“There are more kids applying, and colleges generally have the same
number of seats for incoming students. It’s also easier to apply, and there’s a
huge inpouring of international students. Everyone want to come to
American schools; we have the best educational system in the world.”
Their advice? College-bound students should take advantage of any
opportunity to improve their odds of getting into the college of their choice.
Reading provides students with an excellent advantage over their peers who
prefer other leisure activities. “Every time I have a student sitting on my
couch, and they tell me they love to read, I know a couple of things: they’re
going to do very well on the verbal sections of the SAT or the ACTs, and
they’re naturally curious,” Bloom says.
Luterman and Bloom explain that success in getting into college boils
down to applying to colleges where applicants are on par with other
applicants. But make sure to stand out from the rest of the applicants in one
area. They work with clients to identify and develop each student’s unique
hobbies or pursuits, and claim a 95% success rate in helping clients get into
their preferred schools.
Luterman and Bloom will sign copies of College Admissions and Beyond
today in Abbeville’s booth (4406), 2–3 p.m. Abbeville is also sponsoring a card
drop/sign-up giveaway for a one-hour free college consulting session with
Luterman and Bloom.   
—Claire Kirch

more

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BooTh 4338

58

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

A Chat with

with classics like Peter Pan. One of my earliest
memories is being terrified by my father’s lively
rendition of Beowulf, so the standards do seem to
have been high.

hink fairy tales are only for children? Bosh—not
when bestselling romance writer Eloisa James is
telling the tale. Her latest series for Avon, based on
classic fairy tales, began with A Kiss at Midnight (a
Cinderella story) and continued in January with When
Beauty Tamed the Beast. James has loved fairy tales
since she was a child and spoke with Show Daily
about the unlikely inspiration for the series.
James will be signing When Beauty Tamed the Beast
today, 10–10:30 a.m., atTable 15 in the autographing
area; 2:30–3:30 p.m., she’ll be joining Julia Quinn and
Connie Brockway at the Romance Writers of America booth (3774) to sign The
Lady Most Likely.

Growing up, did you prefer the darker versions of
stories like Beauty and the Beast or the “we don’t
want to frighten the children” adaptations?

Eloisa James
T

You’ve credited your father, Robert Bly, with inspiring your fairy tales series.
Iron John and Cinderella seem a rather unexpected literary pairing.
I wouldn’t say that my inspiration comes as much from Iron John itself as
from the fact that while Dad was working out the ideas behind Iron John,

he talked compulsively about fairy stories. He loved to challenge me and
my siblings to “explain” such stories in cultural terms—to rewrite them in
a way that made them socially relevant.
Can a fairy tale really be reimagined as a story of male empowerment?

Why not? I think of a fairy story as a malleable plot, waiting to be given
meaning by its current author. All the stable boys who triumphantly carry
out difficult tasks in order to marry a princess could be seen as
empowering their gender—but also, depending on the storyteller, their
class or their race. My father was interested in male empowerment; I’m
not. Our stories are very different.
As both your parents are writers, were there high literary standards for fairy
tale reading when you were a child?

We read the Arthur Lang colored fairy tale collections over and over, along

Darker! Children’s stories are frank about deeply
frightening aspects of life—the people with
shining teeth, lurking in dark parts of the forest
growing at your back door.
The beast of When Beauty Tamed the Beast is Piers
Yelverton, earl of Marchant, a brilliant, lame, and
impossible to get along with doctor. Can we assume
that you’re a fan of Hugh Laurie and House?

I do love Hugh Laurie—and the screenwriters of House. What inspired me,
thinking of the show, was the idea of a doctor unable to carry out hundreds
of tests that House prescribes. I poked around for a doctor with House’s
brilliance and arrogance, found one who published a book in 1812 lauding
his own brilliance, and built a plot around his expertise in scarlet fever.
The story of Dido and Aeneas plays a part in A Kiss at Midnight and When
Beauty Tamed the Beast includes references to T.S. Eliot as well as
Shakespeare. Some would consider this heady stuff for fairy tale novels.

I think we underrate the intellectual curiosity of the American public. In
my novels, I’ve included lines of poetry by Shakespeare, Eliot, and
Catullus, as well as the 17th-century poet Richard Barnfield and the
18th-century poet Christopher Smart. I’ve written books inspired by a 1607
play called The Hog Has Lost His Pearl, and the life of Clara Josephine
Wieck Schumann, probably the foremost female composer of the 19th
century. After every novel I am barraged by readers asking for more
information, more lines, more poetry. “Where does Catullus live? I’d like
to meet him.”
Do you have a short list of must read fairy tales... for adults.

Anything by Neil Gaiman or Michael Chabon. 

—Lucinda Dyer

He put his life on the line.
He’d do it again in a heartbeat.

Exalt Press New York

Get Semper Cool at booth #2939
Visit the booth for daily giveaways and raffles. Meet the author
at the Author Autographing Area at 10 a.m. tomorrow, May 26th.

www.bookexpoamerica.com

PUBL I SHERS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Authors
AT THE S H OW

Rebecca Coleman
Lust over Romance

Despite The Kingdom of Childhood being her
third novel, 34-year-old Rebecca Coleman is far
from jaded. She describes everything that’s
happened in the past few months as “the
powerball jackpot of getting a book published.”
After her new novel was named a semifinalist in
the 2010 Amazon Breakthrough Novel Contest,
she found agent Stephany Evans, president of
FinePrint, who sold it to Mira, which is putting a
lot of muscle behind it, including a 50-foot banner
in the main hall at the Javits Center.
As for the plot, it came to her while she was
doing laundry and heard a newscast of what has
become an all-too familiar story: a school teacher
seducing a student. “I really wanted to put a different twist on it,” says Coleman,
who researched female teachers who have sex with male students. “A lot of the
women were lonely, in their 30s and 40s, and going through a crisis. Many were
victims of childhood sexual abuse.”
To keep her main character, 43-year-old Judy McFarland, from being too
sympathetic when she starts an affair with 16-year-old Zach, Coleman built in a
different set of childhood traumas. Then she ratcheted the tension by placing
them in a Waldorf School, which places a premium on nurturing children.
Coleman is also careful to tell the sex scenes from Zach’s point of view, never
Judy’s or that of an omniscient narrator. “There’s a lot of sex in the book, for

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

59

sure,” acknowledges Coleman. “Because this is a story about a sexual affair
between two people who shouldn’t be together, the reader has to understand
why they are together, the lust. It’s one of the places where I felt I pushed the
boundaries.”
There are some parallels to another story about two people who shouldn’t be
together, middle-aged Humbert Humbert and 12-year-old Dolores Haze. “Lolita
is one of my favorite books,” says Coleman. “In it one major element that’s
missing, not that it would fit with that story, is you never know what’s going on
from Dolores’s perspective. So when I started this story, I knew I wanted to put
in the point of view of the victim.”
A mother of four, Coleman has only one concern about the book. “People tend
to conflate the protagonist with the author. That’s pretty scary with this book.”
Coleman will be signing books twice during the show: today, 11:30 a.m.–12:30
p.m., and at the Harlequin booth (4638) tomorrow, 10–10:45 p.m. 

—by Judith Rosen

Ruthe Rosen
A Journey of Loss and Hope

When Ruthe Rosen, author of Never Give Up:
Finding Hope and Purpose in Adversity
(Cypress House, June) lost her teenage
daughter to brain cancer in 2006, she turned
away from despair and chose instead to use the
experience to create the Let It Be Foundation,
which assists families facing similar
circumstances of terminal illness in young
people.
Rosen first self-published Never Give Up the
year her daughter, Karla, died, but because
she had no professional guidance in the
venture, that edition of the book eventually fizzled. “It did receive wonderful
reviews, though, which inspired me to give publishing one more try,” says
Rosen, who lives with her husband and two sons in Southern California.

introduCing...

REGNERY HISTORY
A New Imprint From Regnery Publishing

We are proud to announce Regnery Publishing’s newest imprint—Regnery History—
which will publish books in the categories of history, military, and biography.
Please help us celebrate the launch at BookExpoAmerica with an author interview event
and a booth reception starting Wednesday at 3 pm.

yo u a r e i n v i t e d. . .

to Meet Ben Franklin!
JAM E S MAD I S O N

F O U N D I N G R I VA L S :

Madison Monroe
VS.

th e Bi l l of Rig hts an d
t h e E l e c t i o n t h at S av e d a N at i o n
CHRIS DeROSE

JAM E S M O N RO E

Come see Founding Father Benjamin Franklin
in person as he interviews Chris DeRose, author of
Regnery History’s upcoming book: Founding Rivals:
Madison vs. Monroe, the Bill of Rights,
and the Election That Saved a Nation.

Wednesday, May 25th @ 3:00 pm

reCePtion
to FoLLoW
All are invited to join us at the Regnery/
Regnery History Booth to celebrate the launch
of Regnery History and meet the publishers.

Wednesday, May 25th @ 3:30 pm
Perseus Distribution Pavilion (Booth #4415)

Uptown Author Insight Stage on the main show floor
of the Javits Center

For more information on Regnery History, including upcoming titles,
please visit www.RegneryHistory.com.

www.bookexpoamerica.com

60

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Authors
AT THE S H OW

Eventually she hired the consulting team of Kent Carroll and Jody
Blanco; they helped facilitate the sale of Never Give Up to Joe Shaw at
Cypress House.
Rosen is a former flight attendant and sales director for a nail-care
company who now devotes her time to sharing her journey of loss and
hope as a public speaker and family advocate. Never Give Up chronicles
Karla’s yearlong battle with cancer and her unflagging optimism and
courage as she faced death. “We’ve transformed the memory of Karla’s
positive attitude into a legacy of service to others,” Rosen explains.
“People ask me why I keep doing it, and I tell them that if I can live

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

without my soul mate, I can do something for others in need.” She will be
touring for the book in August and September. Today she will be signing in
the autograph area at Table 4, 4–5 p.m.
The foundation has already provided support to 30 families, and its
fund-raising efforts continue. “When a child becomes ill and is facing death,
the entire family is affected and needs help. Many people don’t realize
this, and it’s been my mission since Karla died to let the families know that
there is hope and meaning even in the most painful times. We try to
give them a sense of normalcy in their lives while their time is consumed
with the child’s illness.” Let It Be, which provides such services to f
amilies as housekeeping, grocery shopping, meal preparation, and
guidance in meeting the needs of siblings, is now active in four California
cities, and Rosen hopes to expand its outreach nationally. “I’m excited
to see how many more lives the foundation will impact once the
book is published. I want people to know that they can and will get
through their loss.” 

—Wendy Werris

Lisa Bloom
Women: Get Your
Smart Back

HISTORY

BUSINESS

POLITICS

ENTER TO WIN • BEATLES STEREO BOX SET • BOOTH # 2233
www.turnerpublishing.com

You’re Not Getting Older,

We’re Getting
Younger!

Since 1999, Oasis Audio has produced the finest
in inspirational and business audio books. This summer,
we enter the young adult market. Stop by booth #4279
to learn more about our new YA line with these and
other groundbreaking titles and register to win an iPod
loaded with Oasis Audio titles.
Also learn more about our in-house CD replication
and studio production ser vices.
w w w. o a s i s a u d i o . c o m

www.bookexpoamerica.com

LIFE

It’s one thing to report on Supreme
Court cases,
but quite
another to
cover celebrity
sex tapes and
drunken starlet
antics. When
television legal
analyst Lisa
Bloom—who
has worked for
such networks
as Court TV,
CNN, and CBS
News—saw the changing paradigm of
what news directors thought their
women viewers wanted, she decided it
was time to write a book that would be
a wakeup call for women across the
country. “Most women are pretty
conversant about lip plumpers and
wrinkle fillers, but they’re not
knowledgeable about the things that
most of us would agree are important,”
Bloom tells Show Daily. “So rather
then just throw up my hands and say,
‘Well that’s just the way it is,’ I thought
somebody has to do something about
this. So I decided to write a book.”\
In Think: Straight Talk for Women to
Stay Smart in a Dumbed-Down World
(Vanguard, June ), Bloom exposes how
the tabloid media pervades women’s
lives and redirects their priorities.
Bloom’s mother, feminist lawyer
Gloria Allred, and other crusading
women like her are also featured in
her book. “We owe them a debt,”
Bloom declares. “They didn’t kick
down doors for us to spend our time
e-mailing pictures of kittens on
Facebook.” Bloom explains how to
make better use of our time. “Become
the CEO of your own life; take charge
of the information you need.”
Bloom makes a big push for reading
books: “Books allow your mind to
unfurl. The more time we spend with
tabloid media, the more we start to
believe that ‘boob jobs’ matter. ”
She will be signing at the Perseus/
Vanguard booth (4106) today at 11 a.m.
—Hilary S. Kayle

L. RON HUBBARD PRESENTS:

WRITERS OF THE FUTURE
For twenty-seven years, L. Ron Hubbard’s Writers of the Future Contest has discovered and
nurtured a steady stream of new authors who have changed the face of SF. Chosen by an impressive
panel of judges drawn from the biggest names in the genre, taught at a remarkable week-long workshop, and
celebrated at world-class venues such as the Kennedy Space Center, the United Nations and the Science Fiction
Museum, Contest winners are given the best possible foundation for a long-standing writing career.

• WINNING STORIES AND ILLUSTRATIONS PUBLISHED IN AN ANNUAL ANTHOLOGY
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INCLUDING #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERS
• CONTEST DETAILS AT WRITERSOFTHEFUTURE.COM

L. RON HUBBARD CENTENNIAL PARTY
JOIN US FOR THE CELEBRATION • WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2:00 PM

Representing the literary, theatrical and musical works of L. RON HUBBARD

AuthorServicesInc.com
© 2011 Author Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Writers of the Future (word and logo) are trademarks owned by the L. Ron Hubbard Library.

SEE US AT BOOTH 3460

Publisher of the fiction works of L. RON HUBBARD

GalaxyPress.com

FA Yanks PW Print Ad:Yanks PW Print Ad

5/18/11

5:59 PM

Page 1

by Kelly Moss
A New Christmas Classic. The perfect book
for kids asking
“Is there a Santa?”
Available July 2011
Get a signed copy at the
New Shelves Distribution
Booth

#4232
Today from

1:30 – 2:30
WIN A

FREE iPAD2!

Palmary Press. For more information:
info@newshelvesdistribution.com

Stop by Booth #4232
and leave your business card for
Thursday’s drawing!

“This book is a home run.
It captures what it takes to be a champion.
It’s a must read for everyone.”
- Wade Boggs, Hall of Famer

On Sale Now in Bookstores and Other Locations Across the Nation
Nearly 300 pages of game photographs and the author’s interviews of Yankee greats.
This stunning book highlights the components that go into the making of a
Championship Heart, not just in baseball... but in life.

PUBL I SHERS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Another GPS Model
These days, when people talk about
digital, they often mean e-books, For
a printer, though, digital is an
integral part of the process of
making a physical book. Edwards
Brothers, masters of the short-tomedium print run, is announcing a
new global initiative with printing
partners around the world that
allows its book publishing customers
to print books anywhere with one
order, one invoice, and one file.
Just as a GPS can guide you in
your car, EB thinks its GPS, or
Global Print Solutions program,
can help publishers print the right
quantity, at the right time, and in
the right place. With the rising costs
of fuel, EB CEO John Edwards says
the ability to run small print runs
around the world with its partners
in North and South America,
Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia
makes even more sense than when
EB first started building printing
partnerships in other countries 10
years ago. “And it’s
environmentally friendlier,” says
Edwards.
EB is a 118-year-old family-owned
business headquartered in Ann

Arbor, Mich., with two printing
facilities in North Carolina and 10
digital printing operations in North
America. Edwards says he has seen a
lot of changes in the book business,
but today’s emphasis on cutting costs
by driving down print runs is
unparalleled. “When we help our
customers manage their inventory,
they can use those resources to bring
out more titles,” says Edwards.
EB does all kinds of printing, from
web offset to short run and printon-demand, with its average print
run 2,000. Although e-books usually
are synonymous with digital,
Edwards does not think e-books
will ever totally replace printed
books. “I just heard a statistic today
that said that 50% of the revenue in
the music industry is still in
physical CD sales,” he says.
No Edwards is forced into the
family business, but if he thought
tree books were history, Edwards
might not have encouraged his
college-age daughter—the eldest in
the fifth generation of Edwards to
work at EB—to clock in last summer
in its digital book center. 

—Bridget Kinsella

Will I be Able To Change in This Changing
World of Publishing? Find out the answer to
this and other pressing questions with a coin
reading by author Dr. Margaret J. Pearson on
Wednesday, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm.
Coins and books provided on a limited basis.
978-0-8048-4181-8 hc $18.95
SEPTEMBER 2011

AUTHOR
EVENT

SEPTEMBER 2011

SEPTEMBER 2011

978-4-8053-1118-9 hc $27.95

978-0-8048-4147-4

Come share Matcha Mochi
cupcakes and tea on
Tuesday, 3:00 pm.

978-0-8048-4089-7

AUGUST 2011

New Fall Cookbooks!

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

63

64

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

A New O’Keeffe Book
The 20 paintings Georgia O’Keeffe
produced while visiting Hawaii in
1939 have been collected in book
form for the first time as Georgia
O’Keeffe’s Hawaii by Patricia
Jennings and Maria Ausherman
(Koa Books, Oct.) in a special
format that includes
remembrances of the artist by
Jennings, who was O’Keeffe’s
12-year-old guide through the
islands and eventually became her
surrogate daughter.
O’Keeffe stayed on a sugar
plantation in rural Hana, Maui,
during part of her three-month visit
to Hawaii; Jennings’s father was the
manager of the estate. Her mother,
a rather cold and distant woman,
was away during this time. It fell
upon young Jennings to be
O’Keeffe’s guide and companion,
taking her to hidden waterfalls,
lush valleys, and overgrown jungles
that would otherwise have been
difficult for O’Keeffe to find. This
unlikely pair overcame initial
difficulties in their relationship to
develop a close bond.
Koa publisher Arnie Kotler is

proud of
Georgia
O’Keeffe’s
Hawaii
and the
chance to
showcase the paintings that have
been unavailable for many years.
“There was a 79-page show
catalogue by Jenny Seville
published by the Honolulu
Academy of the Arts in 1990 for
the Georgia O’Keeffe: Paintings of
Hawaii exhibition, but that has
long been out of print,” Kotler
says.
The book also includes vintage
photos of the artist on Maui and her
correspondence about the trip.
Ausherman, a New York City art
historian and teacher,
corresponded with Jennings after
she discovered the Seville
catalogue and the two became
friends, meeting in Hawaii as often
as possible to work on the book. “I
believe O’Keeffe did some of her
best work in Hawaii, and it’s clear
that Patricia provided her with
views of landscapes and flowers she

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

would not otherwise have
discovered,” says Ausherman.
Jennings is now 84, a greatgrandmother, and lives on the Big
Island of Hawaii, where she will be
promoting the book. Ausherman
will sign ARCs today in the
autographing area at 4 p.m. 

—Wendy Werris

Authors Step
Up to Bat

Two friends with a long history in
publishing have teamed up on Right
Off the Bat: Baseball, Cricket,
Literature, and Life (Paul Dry, May), a

new book that celebrates the
relationship between baseball and
cricket.
A die-hard Yankees fan, Evander
Lomke worked in the publishing
industry for more than 30 years,
editing some 1,200 titles, and is now
the executive director of the
American Mental Health
Foundation, which includes
overseeing its publishing line.
Martin Rowe, a devoted fan of
England’s cricket team, is the

cofounder of Lantern Media, as well
as the author of two novels.
Their collaboration, fittingly
enough, was born at a previous
BEA, when Rowe had a
conversation with publisher Paul
Dry of Paul Dry Books. Dry
suggested Rowe do a book about
writing, and Rowe countered by
suggesting one about cricket and
baseball. He took the idea to
Lomke, and the rest, as they say, is
history.
Today, at noon, in the Lantern/
Steiner booth (3533) the authors will
be signing copies “to anyone who can
convincingly demonstrate a
knuckleball or a forward-defensive
stroke,” jokes Rowe. He also
promises demonstrations of sports
moves and lengthy praise for their
favorite sports
heroes. “And
we’ll even have a
cricket bat and
cricket ball and
baseball and bat
with us, so you
can try your
hand at the late
cut or the insideout swing,” he
says.
—Gwenda Bond

NANCY CLARKE
Author of

My First Ladies

will be signing ARCs of her Fall 2011 book

Meet the Authors!
Booth #3580

Sellers Publishing
Booth 3679
2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
WEDNESDAY MAY 25

Patricia Eubank
photo credit: Len Spoden

Halloween 123s

In My First Ladies,
Nancy Clarke, the
White House chief
floral designer, reveals
the inside story of her
twenty-five years with
six first ladies:






Michelle Obama
Laura Bush
Hillary Clinton
Barbara Bush
Nancy Reagan
Rosalynn Carter

Tuesday, May 24, 10:00 am

Edward Grinnan
The Promise of Hope
Tuesday, May 24, 11:00 am
Wednesday, May 25, 3:00 pm

Mark Kimball Moulton
Thanksgiving Graces
Wednesday, May 25, 2:00 pm

sellerspublishing.com • (800-625-3386)
contact Jeff Hall - jhall@rsvp.com
www.bookexpoamerica.com

65

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Wednesday In-Booth Author Signings
Booth 3129

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

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Coming September 2011
United States of Banana
Giannina Braschi
A vibrant allegorical novel
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Wednesday 11:00 am -12:00 pm

Coming November 2011
Unraveling Anne
Laurel Saville
One woman’s journey to
understand the exceptional yet
tragic life of her mother

Wednesday 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Coming September 2011
Carry Yourself Back to Me
Deborah Reed
A violent murder crushes a
songwriter when her brother is
named the lead suspect

Wednesday 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

www.bookexpoamerica.com

booth 4338

66

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Trust Is a Five-Letter Word
from
Audio
Bookshelf

Always unabridged

audiobookshelf.com
(free shipping)
or
JesusMyFather_BEAadResize:Layout 1

800-234-1713
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5/16/11

We don’t like to
point fingers at
anyone, but
booksellers,
beware: there’s a
lot of spinning
going on inside
Javits this week.
BEA exhibitors
have a vested
interest in getting
you excited about
their latest
releases,
persuading you to
order huge
quantities, even to
schedule their authors for
in-store events. One size does
not fit all, especially when it
comes to books and authors.
Trust us. Quest Books, an
imprint of the Theosophical Publishing House, may be able to
help booksellers tell the difference between truth and truthbeing-stretched by eager publishers. At booth 4629a they’re handing out galley copies of Just Trust
Me: Finding the Truth in a World

of Spin (Sept.). In
Just Trust Me, G.
Randy Kasten, a
California litigation
attorney with 25
years’ experience,
explains how to discern fact from fiction in all your personal and professional dealings with
others so as not to
be taken for a ride.
Kasten thinks
that booksellers are
in a unique
situation when it
comes to interacting with
publishers. He says, “Fake sales
enthusiasm is easy to spot, but
sincere enthusiasm is more
insidious. Unlike car dealerships
that are stuck with selling what a
factory puts out, publishers
choose exactly what they take on,
then invest in bringing books to
market. So publishers naturally
tend to believe in their books. The
challenge is getting the bookseller
to agree.” 
—Claire Kirch

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www.bookexpoamerica.com

save the
date
BEA 2012
The business of content.
It all starts at BEA.
June 4, 2012 > CIROBE Remainders Pavilion,
Conference & Special Events
June 5-7, 2012 > Exhibits, Conference & Special Events
June 4-5, 2012 > IDPF
June 5-7, 2012 > BlogWorld & New Media Expo NY
Javits Center, New York, NY
www.bookexpoamerica.com
Get in on the buzz on our social media sites!

Sponsored by
Produced & Managed by

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5/12/11 1:47 PM

68

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Reclaiming
Your Outer
Child
John Duffy, a clinical psychologist
from Chicago, didn’t set out to be a
specialist in parent-teenager relationships, but that’s the turn his
career took, and he is really glad of
it. So glad, he has written a guidebook for parents, so they will be
able to appreciate their adolescent
offspring and be glad about them,
too. The Available Parent: Radical
Optimism for Raising Teens and
Tweens (Cleis Press/Viva Editions,
May) doesn’t have radical advice,
but it does contain a healthy dose
of optimism and lots of practical
suggestions.
 “The mythology is that teens are
mean and unpredictable and
closed off, but that’s not what I’ve
found,” says Duffy, the father of a
15-year-old. “I’ve found them to be
very empathic, engaged, interesting, really thoughtful, smarter than
people think, and funny. And not so
closed off. And eager to share their
thoughts and ideas.” The week of
Osama bin Laden’s death, for
instance, Duffy got all sorts of ques-

PUBL I SHERS

tions about the event from his
young patients. “It can be surprising how much teens think about
things. They don’t let on. Teens can
surprise with their insight. From
the outside it seems as if they don’t
care at all.”
So what’s the problem? Parents
believe the mythology, and get anxious and worried, clamp down and
try to control the situation, Duffy
says. “We micromanage. We tell
instead of listening. Teens and
tweens get the message and close
down. Teens I see in my practice ask
me, ‘Would you listen to someone
who is always lecturing at you?’
That’s where the title of the book
comes from. I encourage parents to
change their vibe with kids, to be
open and available to them in a positive way at least some of the time.
Otherwise, you’ve established no
sense of goodwill and your teens are
far less likely to heed your words.”
At 2 p.m. this afternoon, Duffy
will be at his publisher’s booth
(4625A) to give a 15–20-minute seminar and coaching session entitled
“Understanding Your ScreenAger.”
He will also answer questions and
sign copies of his book. At 4 p.m.,
Duffy will sign copies of The
Available Parent in the autographing area. 
—Suzanne Mantell

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Official BEA On-Site
Addendum
Booth # 3032
Academia Rossica
76 Brewer Street
London, W1F 9TX United Kingdom
+44 207 2875712
Website: www.academia-rossica.org
Booth # 4607a
Archaia Entertainment
1680 Vine Street, Suite 912
Los Angeles, CA 90028-8838
310-734-5669
Booth # 2542
Ariella Books
Ausstellungs - und Messe GmbH
Reineckstrasse 3
Frankfurt, 60313 Germany
0114/9 692102278
Fax: 0114/9 692102227
Booth # 2203
Atiz Innovation, Inc.
1680 Vine Street, Suite 1208
Los Angeles, CA 90028
323-469-0436
Toll-Free Phone: 800-501-6035
Booth # 4490
Book Country
375 Hudson Street, 5th Floor
New York, NY 10014
212-366-2926
Website: www.bookcountry.com
Booth # 2159
Digital Tech Frontier

Popar Books
2740 S Hardy Drive, Suite 2
Tempe, AZ 85282
480-220-3589
Toll-Free Phone: 888-587-7529
Fax: 480-706-1680
Website: www.poparbooks.com
Booth # 2202
Ectaco
3121 31st Street
Long Island City, NY 11106
718-728-6110
Fax: 718-728-4023
Website: www.ectaco.com
Booth # MR6000
HarperCollins
International Sales
10 East 53rd Street
New York, NY 10022
212-207-7000
Fax: 212-207-6998
Booth # 4491
Hawk’s Nest Publishing, LLC
84 Library Street
Mystic, CT 06355
860-536-5868
Fax: 860-536-0032
Booth # MR6026
Meeting Room Security
383 Main Avenue
Norwalk, CT 06851
203-840-5614
Fax: 203-840-9827

He put his life on the line.
He’d do it again in a heartbeat.

Exalt Press New York

Get Semper Cool at booth #2939
Visit the booth for daily giveaways and raffles. Meet the author
at the Author Autographing Area at 10 a.m. tomorrow, May 26th.

www.bookexpoamerica.com

70

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Booth # 2023
New Education Options/Mindspan
New Life Options
14431 Ventura Boulevard, Suite 312
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
818-742-5099
Fax: 818-990-5414
Booth # 4624b
New Horizon Press
P.O. Box 669
Far Hills, NJ 07931
908-604-6311
Toll-Free Phone: 800-533-7978
Fax: 908-604-6330
Website: www.
newhorizonpressbooks.com
Booth # 4610, 4612
PGW Backlist
1700 4th Street
Berkeley, CA 94710

PUBL I SHERS

510-809-3700
Fax: 510-809-3777
Booth # 4609, 4611, 4613, 4615
PGW Meeting Area
1700 4th Street
Berkeley, CA 94710
510-809-3700
Fax: 510-809-3777
Booth # 4608
PGKids
1700 4th Street
Berkeley, CA 94710
510-809-3700
Fax: 510-809-3777
Booth # MR6000
Penguin Group Inc., USA
345 Hudson Street, 4th Floor
New York, NY 10014
212-366-2000
Fax: 212-366-2940

W E E K LY

Booth # 2882
Per Annum, Inc.
Nannini Flat Specs
558 8th Avenue, Suite 203
New York, NY 10018
212-647-8700/101
Toll-Free Phone: 800-548-1108
Fax: 212-647-8716
Website: www.perannum.com
Booth # 2880
RetroGraphics Publishing
34A Woodbine Street
Bergenfield, NJ 07621
201-501-0505
Fax: 201-338-8107
Website: www.
retrographicspublishing.com
Booth # 4656
Waverley Books
144 Port Dundas Road

Kate McMullan’s
is back in print!
AUTHOR
SIGNING
2:00-3:00 PM
Visit
Capstone
Booth
#2952
and get the truth behind the most famous Greek myths!

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 , 2011

Glasgow, G4 OHZ United Kingdom
01144 0141
Booth # 2025
Wire Products Corp
1319 West Lee Street
Greensboro, NC 27403
336-275-0515
Toll-Free Phone: 800-334-0807
Fax: 336-274-4284
Website: www.wireproductscorp.com
Booth # 4700
World Trading Center
95 Sherwood Avenue
Farmingdale, NY 11753
631-777-3550
Fax: 631-777-3271
Booth # 3032
The Yeltsin
Presidential Centre
23 B3 Bolshaya Polyanka Street
Moscow, 119180 Russia
+7-495-229-7589
Website: www.yeltsincenter.ru
Booth # 3438
Zest Books
35 Stillman Street, Suite 121
San Francisco, CA 94107
415-777-8654
Fax: 415-777-8653
Website: www.zestbooks.net

Rights &
Business
Center

Booth # RC155
Del Commune
Enterprises
285 West Broadway, Suite 310
New York, NY 10013
212-226-6664
Booth # RC154
Phaidon Press, Inc.
180 Varick Street
RM 1420
New York, NY 10014
212-652-5400
Fax: 212-652-5410
Booth # RC28
Right Rights
Book Agency, Inc.
1231 Notre-Dame, Suite 102
Lachine, Quebec H8S 2C7 Canada
514-639-5345
Fax: 514-639-3289
Website: www.rightrights.com
Booth # RC151
Susanna Lea Associates
331 West 20th Street
New York, NY 10011
646-638-1435
Fax: 646-638-1436
Booth # RC156
Taller del Exito, Inc.
1669 Northwest 144th Terrace,
Suites 209, 210
Sunrise, FL 33323
954-846-9494
Fax: 954-846-9484
Website: www.tdee.com
Booth # RC153
Tuttle-Mori Agency
Fuji Building, 8F
2-15 Kanda Jimbo Cho Chiyoda-Ku
Tokyo, 101 Japan
011 81 332304081
Fax: 011 81 332345249
Website: www.tuttlemori.com
Booth # RC152
Vision Street Publishing
1575 N Park Drive
Weston, FL 33326
954-626-3789
Fax: 954-626-3794

www.bookexpoamerica.com

Avoiding someone at BEA?
We can help.

Come to Disney Book Group

BOOTH #3332-3333
to get

© Disney

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