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Joe Diorio's FUSION

Joe Diorio's FUSION

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Published by: Chris Hazlehurst on May 27, 2011
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

An artist, I feel, is a sum total of all the influences and experiences that have touched his life. I would like to thank some of the many people who have shaped mine. VINCENT BREDICE - my teacher, who instilled in me the highest musical values in dealing with melody and technique. From him I learned the ideal of reaching virtuosity, an appreciation for classical music, and most of all, the beauty and romance of the guitar. The late FRED BREDICE - whose musical genius so touched me that all of my life I have attempted to emulate his magical sound and expression. DJANGO REINHARDT, TONY MATTOLA, TAL FARLOW, WES MONTGOMERY, JIMMY RANEY, JIM HALL, CHUCK WAYNE, JOE PASS, JOHNNY SMITH - for their enormous contribution to the advancement of the guitar and for helping me to see my way more clearly. CHARLIE PARKER in my estimation, the greatest improvisor of this century.

SONNY ROLLINS, MILES DAVIS, BUD POWELL,CLIFFORD BROWN, JOHN COLTRANEto these and the many more giants of that era, my humble appreciation for giving me such strong roots. VON FREEMAN, my Chicago brother, along with EDDIE HARRIS, BILLY WALLACE, JODIE CHRISTIAN - who all began to "rattle the chains," leading me to a freer way of playing music. IRA SULLIVAN - whose high-level muslclanshlp swept me away into areas I had never before known and who taught me the true meaning of playing music. TONY CASTELLANO and STEVE BAGBY - two close friends with whom I shared some of the highest musical moments in my life. The late WALLY CIRILLO in my soul. who was truly special to me. His teachings still reverberate

RAVI SHANKAR, BELA BARTOK, STRAVINSKY and all the masters.

I have tried to remember here as many people as possible. Of course, there are many more. May I extend my love and appreciation to them all.
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FOREWORD
Some of the most lyrical, beautiful solos I have ever heard were played by the man who wrote this book. The same man has also thrilled me with his astonishing ability to play "outside" or atonal lines that make sense. These are the result of many, many years of serious study on Joe's part. a study borne of a deep love of the guitar and virtually all forms of music, especially improvisational types. In this book, Joe has written down the essence of his style in the form of solos over a collection of chord progressions to some common standards and jazz tunes. A careful study of these solos should give any guitar player lots of musical food for thought; and a rare chance to share in the music of one who genuinely has the power to inspire. It is an honor to know this sincere, warm and dedicated man. I know of no one who has more feeling or love for music than does Joe Diorio.

Ted Greene

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INTRODUCTION

Throughout my career as a guitar player and teacher, I have found that the three most frequently asked questions have been: 1) How do I improvise over chord changes? 2) How do I play free or atonally? 3) How do I combine these styles? After having answered these complex questions many times, I decided to write some material on this subject. I have presented here two types of solos over the same harmonic progression. The first solo in each set is designed in the Be-Bop style and will give you insight into the technique of developing continuity in our compositions (improvised solos) over a given set of chordchanges. These solos will help you better understand ideas that are used in the style of Be-Bop and how to connect one idea to another melodically, by way of chromatic passages, scales, and chord arpeggios. I have written these solos so that you may extract segments orindividual melodic statements from these progressions and use them in creating your own solos. The second solo in each set will demonstrate the way in which free-style playing isapproached. By the use of wide sounding intervals (which create the outside tonality) combined with the Be-Bop material, we arrive at the FUSION of the two styles. Therefore, the material in this book is designed to widen your improvising sense in two directions. Thesecond type of solo is also constructed so that individual ideas may be extracted and used elsewhere. I have added chord accompaniment for each progression. The solos will sound far riche r when played over these (or similar) chords than if they are heard without any harmonic support at all. Also, these accompaniments will widen and enrich your chord vocabularyand give you insight into melodic and harmonic direction. Some of the solos and chords may seem awkward at first and the wide intervals maypresent a picking problem, but by overcoming these obstacles, your technique will be enhanced and your ability to flow in all directions will be strengthened. May the melodic sense that is in all people find greater expression because of this book. (Be-Bop style)

(Playing with less harmonic restrictions)

JOE DIORIO

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JOE DIORIO'S CREDITS

Joe Diorio is presently on the teaching staff of the Guitar Institute of Technology and has previously taught at the University of Miami. He has recorded with such artists as Sonny Stitt, Eddie Harris, and Ira Sullivan. Joe toured Europe with Ira Sullivan, Steve Bagby, and Tony Castellano, where he played in two jazz festivals - The International Festival Laren, in Holland, and the Jazz Festival Meddelheim in Antwerp, Belgium. He also played and toured with Stan Getz. Joe has done five albums with Spitball Records: Rapport and Solo-Duo with Wally Cirillo, Straight Ahead to the Light with Steve Bagby, and two solo guitar records, Joe Diorio - Solo Guitar and Peaceful Journey.

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.......... CONTEMPORARY SOLO #1 24 25 26 CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT ..............•••.................................•..........•.........................................................•........................ BOSSA NOVA SOLO #1 BOSSA NOVA SOLO #2 ..............• MODERN SWING .............•...... CONTEMPORARY SWING 19 - 20 " 22 CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT " SWING ........•.........••................................................ BE-BOP SOLO #1 CONTEMPORARY SOLO #2 CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT BOSSA NOVA SOLO #3 27 29 30 32 34 - CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT BE-BOP SOLO #2 UL TRA CONTEMPORARY PEACEFUL JOURNEY 37 37 40 42 46 48 - CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT CONTEMPORARY SWING CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT BE-BOP SWING CONTEMPORARY SOLO #3 7 ! •••••••••••••••••••••••••• 0 ••••••••••• 50 52 54 -- ........•••...................•........ 16 17 18 - CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT ...................................................•......EXPLANATION OF NUMBER SYSTEM PHRASING AND SLURRING PHRASING AND PICKING THE TRIPLET PICKING SUGGESTIONS EXPLANATION OF CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT MAJOR AND MINOR SCALE HARMONY ALTERED AND UNALTERED CADENCES 10 10 11 13 FOR SOLOS - - 14 14 14 - SOLOS AND CHORD ACCOMPANIMENTS CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT .....•...........

EXPLANATION OF NUMBER SYSTEM In the number system used in this book. . The technique _ a pulsating effect. the numbers above the staff indicate positions. and #3 illustrate this principle. P = Pick Example 1 S of accenting every other note in a group of eighth notes gives the music See example #4. major seconds. Remember. Slurring is especially effective with minor seconds. minor thirds. = Slur >- = Accent note '9% rErr Era P P 5 5 P P 5 5 I ~dJjJ aU P 5 I Bossa Nova Solo #1 Bars 5 and 6 -Example 2 Bossa Nova Solo #1 Bars 14 and 15 Example 3 Bossa Nova Solo #2 Bars 13 and-14 ~xample 4 ertf FErf I tITf aU 10 I Swing Bars 1 and 2 . The numbers to the left of the treble sign are bar numbers.and the numbers below the staff show the fingering. Examples #1. PHRASING AND SLURRING Phrasing dynamics are achieved by picking a note and slurring up or down into another note. the first finger determines what position you are in. and _ chromatic passages. #2.

P bars.--3--.PHRASING AND PICKING THE TRIPLET The use of the triplet in adding variety and holding together lines is an essential part 01improvised music. Example #1: In the following the third note. EJ Be-Bop Solo #1 Bar 2 Example #2: All notes are played backward with a sweep. hammer the second note. " r h po A ED = Up or backward Contemporary Solo #2 Bar 1 n= Down F ([ E Bossa Nova #1 Bar 11 Modern Swing 10 Bar 15 11 . "b [:iP Iz =f- ~~~ p E-~ J h po I Bossa Nova Solo #2 Bar 3 L IT bE ~~ p - IT PC "r F Ph po 1:'3--.!h 'P = Pick H = Hammer PO = Pull off J ] J 11 t go m J· I p h po r-3~ Bossa Nova Solo #1 Bar 3 . The following examples will help you better understand the technique of phrasing and picking triplets. and pull off . pick the first note.

Modern Swing Bar 2 r Modern Swing Bar 7 Example #4: Combinations of above-mentioned.PHRASING AND PICKING THE TRIPLET Example #3: Triplets are all to be picked down with a glide. Contemporary Swing Bar 4 Contemporary Swing Bar 25 __xample # 5: Line up fingers on Gb. . Pick Gb. F.. Contemporary S~ing Bars 11 and 12. Eq. : Modern Swing Bar 29 12 . Pull off F and E~.

... up. r-.r-.r-.r-.r-. " etc. r-.. ""r-. In each of the following examples. two or three possible picking corn= binations are shown. These two bars can also be picked alternately..r-.. '~Ited F r-. Example 1 r-. r-.. Bossa Nova Solo #2 Bar 1 Example 2 ~ ..r-...r-. r-. r-. ~r-...r-.rl.r-.I"'l --.r-...Ar-. Contemporary Solo #1 Bar 1 Example 4 r-. ~.-~ Contemporary " "11 Swing ":. " r-. .r-.." " L r-... I 1\ ~ ~....... r-..... r-.t we rffr II r-.r-.. " Bossa Nova Solo # 2 Bar 11 .. Down strokes are used to accent stronger phrases and syncopation. Wider intervals are combinations of down. I r-.b dJP cfrc Contemporary Swing Bar 3 13 .r-.R- Bars 1 and 2 Example 5 r-.r-.r-...r-...r-. r"r 1"'1 r-.r-. r-. am alternate picking.PICKING SUGGESTIONS Alternate picking should be used as often as possible.

C -7 _ 0-7. the V chord is dominant 7th.FINGERING Quite often the same finger is used to play two. MAJOR AND MINOR SCALE HARMONY (as applies to the chord progressions and solos In this book) The most common progression referred to in this book is the IImi7. Sultivate a habit of learning as many Individual ideas as possible in no less than three different olaces. ALTERED AND UNALTERED CADENCES At times. G7 V AbMaj 8° VII This is derived from the III VI he II chord is mi7b5. C-#7 . three. Finger only the cIrcled strings. Imi7. a common progression . 13.it has one or any combination of the following: b5.. A chord is considered altered -. ss. V7. G7b9. Memorize the spelling of each chord. G7. LEARNING SUGGESTIONS When range will permit.0-7. C-#7 0-7b5 II EbMaj7#5 F-7 IV is IImi7b5. A. middle. 5 . the V chord is dominant 7. #9. we can see ~ow th is comes about: C Maj 7 I 0-7 E-7 F Maj 7 IV G7 V A-7 VI B-7b5 VII II III "he II chord is minor. Recognize the notes in every chord and their Interval relationship to the tonic or root. the chords in these progressions will be altered. C Maj/O-7. By looking at the scale harmony in thekeyofC. G~ C#. #5. In minor keys. and the I chord is Major. learn these solos in the bottom. b9. there is Root. Eb.arrnonlc minor scale harmony.F#. all ---Jthers are not to be sounded.. .xarnple: In the chord A13b5. C Maj. . G7#5 #9. and high registers. G7. Root A. in the ey of C. and the I chord is minor usually without 1e #7. V7. which. Although this fingering may seem awkward at first. G7. or four notes in a row. it will increase the independence and flexibility of _3ach finger. xarnple: Unaltered Altered . C Maj 7b5/0-7b5. b7 3. I Maj. would be 0-7. 'EXPLANATION OF CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT FOR SOLOS These chords offer a variety of harmonic alterations that will help improve your ear and ihord vocabulary.

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• III1IIII I . .. 43111 I 1 3"2 I~ D~a7 D~a7 • • .. FOR BOSSA NOVA SOLO #1 AND BOSSA NOVA SOLO #2 lUI I ~ 9~ II: ~ emill Cmill ~ pi ~ -p. A~o(G7~9) G7~9 • P. I Cmill B&13 It A&13&S ~ jiC' G13bS ... I1111 11111 2314 1121 2134 3141 Remember. .1' : I I . ..I ~)lcni:~flII 1III 1£ 8 begins.. . C7~9 Fmill Fmi9 Fmi7 Fmi7/E~ p. ij 111113 p.. • Cmill Cmill Cmi7 • 4 pr p> . - • i ... 1 ".

. . Db Maj. you may wish to extract these lines and use them in your own solos..BOSSA NOVA SOLO #1 In the Key of C minor. G7. Remember. 4 ------- 2 \ .) Bars 5 through 8 and 13 through 15 are examples of lines that work over this progression. Bars 9 through 12 contain a IImi7.u )' ¥ lfmi'1. 1 I I 4 I 1 I 2 ~-4 4?1 -- 1 2I 4 1 t 233 2 1 2 3 I~~ I 3 r Ebmi7 3 4 A ) 13 Ef L J §( E r J I r {Yo J 1 J 0 b Ma 7 G7 () Cy (~ J C\ I ) 0"0 ': : 41231244 33 2 323 12 Dmi7 b5 3 : II 112 3 II I 17 . .. V7. _~ ~i /' .--. 2 4 2 f-J2 _- . 1 r\ U I .. I Mai progression.. '. \ ~LUE. - • • ml'U5 iO@ • 4 43 ~ mi1· F.) Note that the dominant chord G7 is altered to G7b9. V7.. (In the key of Db: Eb-7.--] -. the most common and important progression is D-7b5.~()55\\ tempo: moderate Bossa Nov.. Imi7..Ab7. C-7(also referred to as IImi 7b5..

p\ r 7 fj t OCr T r IF r E [F r DMa9!. Example: Bars 5 .) This 16-bar solo is constructed in four-bar sequences so as to provide material for other solos of your own. \ " 3 31343114 Ab13 ~.12 are in the key of De. r fF r 2 2 2 . Bar 1 in C-7 is constructed mainly in fourths.15 for D-7b5. C-7. (Bars 9 . 7' bt F e rf ~lJt¥T Cmt7 __ or 23342312 3 2 1 3 1 343221211 4 43 3 2 2 14 I 1 DbMa7 u 1 I 4 [rtf Eft r Em~ b ' ~. G7b9.. . BOSSA NOVA SOLO #2 With the use of fourths being interspersed throughout this solo.) 2 t r rr ¥ 2 y. Bars 11 and 12 in DbMaj 7 are constructed in fourths. we create a wider. Bars 5 and 6 are made up of fourths descending chromatically.7 and 13 .sounding tonality.

j......... . . ... I 2134 6 Fmi9 I.. .. ..... .. SbMa9 G/A AP9 .....-1 I 2 333 . 9' 9 9... I III I 1123 2143 1324 121341 1334 1333 1 32" 1...... ....... . Gmi11 0- I F ... 1 4231 .)+.. A1SbS . 0- .~ ... .~ .. 1IIIIIIi . 1 4231 A13~9 II I 1::J 24 1324 1314 t 3 2 Emi11 E~7bS j. Ami11b5 Ami7b5 07~9 01Sb9 j. .... Omi7 4 'I.... j......~. FIG Smi7bS .. ..CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT FOR MODERN SWING AND CONTEMPORARY SWING 2 "b.... .. ...~ ! j. Emi7~5 1 .. 6 ..... .. . ...... t-~l() ... Gmi11 .. ... Sbmi7 ... . .. 19 .. . .....~ s' II 2134 2 4 12134 6 SbMa7 ~b ~ .. .. 10 6 emi11 JOY .......\.. . FMa9 .. ..... .. j... .............. .. ...

..- SbMa9 I .- Emi11 II ..... a 11-7chord shifts to a V7b9 in the Key of Bb..:11 MODERN This popular progression has a beautiful winding through several keys. ..~ 1 ~b F . Bars 1 and 2 and Bars 25 and 26 provide material for the altered dominant A7b9.- 9 .. F- 1 '" • - SbMa6/g I .. SWING way of creating tension and release while In Bars 3 and 4.. A~13~5 F II ~ 4 ~b ..._ - Yo *' *' ....13 have a "Key of F" feeling........ ... .. - .- G7bS .- SbMa7 I .. 5 ..- . I Maj progression Bars 11 . ...7 show a 11-7. .. . - F13b9 I .~ ... " resolve Bar 17 creates tension with the G7#5 chord. ...~ 5 ..- A~13 .... . ..._ . which is released at Bar 19 with the Eb Maj chord. Bars 5 . 1321 6 .. in Eb.... ~ Dmi7bS I 5 3 I 12134 )L ! L~ 11 ...~ 6 ... ~ ~2 i--S - .30 use the #-7b5 and V7b9 chords for the ending climax and beautifully to the tonic.. Bars 27 ... . • - . . 11 *' .V7b9. .. ...•.. Cmi7~5 I 2 341 ~I'.._ - . e A13 9 · t3 1 ".._ ...

ft ...tempo: moderate (not too slow) 2 A7~ " k b JJ JJ ~'~L~'{ ~ ~JJOJ I p iW ~Ef1J) I n JJ JJgn ~ Yo 3 ~\PlU(Ol\\ 2 ~~7).... _ 43 2 1 flU frr r J 421214 34342314 2 3 2 3 I 10 a 4 23 Pc f IT I E r tf U f E' 1 1 2 I 3 3 4 3 I 3 4 3 1 3 5 B~Ma7 1 214 343 14 1 ...

. Bars 1 and 2 are constructed in fourths._____X ~""tE\ . 25 . study them to learn about playing through altered chords. .. Bar 13 note the fourths..' A 3 emi7 I ~~W 4~ 3 -_ j .9 contain a combination Bars 10 .= f BbMa7 q reEF 5 I 2 II SWING CONTEMPORARY This solo melodically fuses tonal and atonal music. (Note the syncopation...12 are Be-Bop oriented. b2 ery* r rt \l §t:EjT I~ 9 --. built on minor seventh chords (C-7 and F-7). t \j ~ 2 \' -It. .G7~9 2144 2414 u3~. 12 1242 . built on the altered dominant chord A7b9. of fourths winding around thirds and seconds.. are somewhat unusual.32.{d~~ I ..) Bars 3 and 5 are also constructed Bars 6 . in fourths. _ The last eight bars.

PEtE Ebrvta7 3 . 332211 fEft 2 .. 34 [f .. 2 1 5 . 2 3 231 1 16 . 1231 . 3 2 .. 21.... 1 22 '" I 10 1 ...... 1 tf3tr 2 F7#9 ... 2 .... 2 . 2 . 1 1 2 333 2 '0' t 10 Eur ffu I.. 1 2 "3 4 G7#9 tJ 2 4 2122 ¥--f . 1 2 1 . 3 1 3 22 X ... I .~[(r E~a7 1133 F~ JJ J 14" l0i ~...P Emi7 A7 3 tnB 'rVEr ~~ 2 3 . 2 22. FE ..1'. 1 1 24 :J 3 2322 1 3 3 .

..~ G13 III 1 23" 13141 1 23" t .. Cmi11 .... A7b9 I 13141 ......~ ...~ 5 IIII 11111 7 10 1°11 1244 I 3411 12114 2314 .~ Bmi7bS 1314 .......... . .. .. I 23 II I I I 2 ~ . ..~ ... Bmi7/Ft . Ami11 Ami6/9 .. .. ..... .... E7 sus.. ....~ ... 2 3U Ami6 II 3 "21 2 3 ... .. Dmi11 . .....- Bmi1'S .... 5 ..... . . 54 ..... Ami#S . . E7~9 II 3 1" 3 Ami .. 2 F13 . ........ E7~9 . 3 t ... .. 3 1" .. I~•......... .. ~ ... E7/ 3lJ .. . ... .......... Ami6/9 ".. .... . to 2 5 a .. ... .... 4 Ami7 IIII 333 2 13" 13U 4 2 . E7/E 2I 2 3 3U ~ .. .. GO/G .... Arni6 I 1324 9 .CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT FOR SWING AND CONTEMPORARY SOLO #1 I' ::::)jr' tr '_ - .... .... _.... . .. . Ami6 ..

'_/ ._. :11 5 I 34111 ....... . f~ ~ ...9 21311 09+11 ttl 1 II I I - -------. • • • . 9 7 5 6 2 314 21113 231 1 1 12243 1234 09 CMa6/9 Ami6/9 E7-tg$S E7+9 5 . - i t I .. y\/\ ~ .--. . Ami6/9 Amil7/9 I :. • . C7~S B7PS I 2 34t 5 I 2 341 ~ • • 70 . Omi7 3142 3 121 I 24 fr'F f¥rr 34 I I 341 114 25 . B~'PS ~ .c.. ....._ ~. I ~ II SWING So that your lower register playing will be enhanced.. Amt6/9 I 12131 6 ... .~. .4t I 3411t B .. learn ttiis ·soro'an octave lower.~ I :. • ....~ ..

-1 i ~ II: tp1? 133 5 Ami? 7 iifP 1134 2124 ~ t I eft . ~_ Bars 6 . Bar 2 contains close-sounding fourths.. 2 =1 -& -& I II SOLO #1 CONTEMPORARY Bar 1 contains wide-sounding fourths.d9· tetr 3323 9 Ami7 I PrEr rEEl 4 14 1 1 224 . 7 4433 2213 . :_l-· .3-. Bml?bs j?~ ttt I pnft (~tt 4123 • Ami...16 are Be-Bop oriented}inside feeling). opening up in Bar 5 with a large major seventh skip from F to E...J Bmi7i)s 7 Iftr 14 21 I a 12 Arfli7~ .". We now look at how this minor key solo begins with the use of fourths . briefly touching outside at Bars 9 and 10. rEtf! 3431214324 4 ct1 tJ f:.. ~!Jw-rv-. 7~ I "3"" 1J2 frrf 12344144 5 Dmi7 4 5. .-'7 7& tilt ~f!U1 rEEF 3 4 1 . . . Bars 3 and 4 are closely knitted.& ttTr A79 2231 ~ 1 5 [rtf . 2 3 1 4 Bmi7~~. .

.~ . .. C13b9 1 "231 8 9 3 2 6 6 5 4 .... Omi11 OD7DS 2 34 1 13141 C7sus. . I .. . . 28 ...... ~ Ami7~S 013P9 ~ ~ ~ II1IIIII 2 3" I 4321 2 3U 07~9'5 • . . FMa7 I 1 234 .. 8 .....IIII 1333 1112 1423 2 314 AMa7 F#mi11 Bmi7 p E7D9 AMa7 i . 9 1 342 AMa9 I 4 1 11I ~ ~~ ..... . 07b9 2 314 2 341 ... .. ........ ............ :11 .......... .......... .... . ... .. . . FMa7 I 1 3" 2 . ..... . .... C13 I 1 1234 B ....... . Gmi11 JO 8 .

2 2 ..3 Bar 4 Bars 5 . and altered 11-7..-_---'-0 'L!_7 4'J I~ 29 ----- 1 .._ .. 2 .. .1 U ~ L . ~. A Maj 7]) found often' "cl standard tunes. 1 2 1 . bCrt:· -. v '_ \\ 1 3 • Gmt?"it5-·~7./ tk ..V7.... . 3 ~ 7 1\ @) - FMa7 1 1 1 1. .1 I 3 B 13 ~ 3 r .V7/11-7.. 3 2 1 . ' LlJI! J~ ~~~ 2 . II. B-7..&.20 Bars 21 .._. r 1 ~ ~II%. r<: _ tempo: moderate to brisk _' -.AA7 II BE-BOP SOLO #1 Combinations of 11-7.8 I I :342 Ff-...22 Bar 24 Bars 25 .7 Bar 8 Bars 9 . I 3 iD I ~ 1 .. make up the majority of this chord progression: Bars 1 .... I Maj 7. r~ 2 E7 b 9 1 . F#-7. -:» 5 --_..mI7~ '-. I Maj 7.31 Bars 13 . 2 _ 1 . E7. This is a very common modulation and progression (I..11 Bar 12 Bars 17 . VI.. ~ J 113 .. I [A Maj 7.. ~'1 __ 2 .27 Bar 28 Bars 30 . 3 ..16 are a modulation up a major third to the Key of A Major.._~ • r-: Gor -... .. • tr - - ___ 3 ... V... 3 Ami7 ~ 4 'If - D-.V7._ ._ FMa7 -- Gmt7 32 3 1 .ig "(. .

..14: fourths By wavering inside and outside of the tonality. r r EPt .. 2I1 F 5 n aU 1 . and because of that fact.. it helps us improvise atonally while diatonic harmony is being played (the same set of chord changes "as Be-Bop Solo #1).7: fourths and fifths Bars 11 . this solo gives us clear insight into the fusion of traditional and Avant Garde music. Gmi7 1 . 2 'i ~ Err cr CJ 5 ~ F~ e G7 . 5 C7P9 FMa7 1 3 ... Bars 3 .'. 1 ~EtF lEU. ucr::sr== I~ C7bg FMa7 2 321 1 Ami7b 5 07b9 :11 I e II SOLO #2 I CONTEMPORARY This solo does not always identify with the harmony.-3-. 30 ..

.... :I .... 2 . I I 2I . 1 2 'tEW I I .\ 2 L-3~ 1 2 1 1 F Mal . . 112 2 I 3 I J7 Gmi? 7 7 C7 :I 121 4 I" .2 3 8 b13 4 5 Ami? I I I I ... 2I t2 '11 ...--4 .. 4 a 1 4 ... I1 6 E7b9 AMa7 n . I I 2 .. ...... D?bg 3 Gmt7b5 1 I 33 I I I a I a I .ferr D~9 ... I 10 5 4 5F Ma? 9 D~ P 5 fa-tV rrff dCr rf "IT Ffmi7 8mi7 iMa7 . Ami? 44134314 ctt! #IS JJ 1p11 5 4 3 1131 .. I t I C7be 31 . 3 3431 21 4 2 III 1 1 I I .... I 2 .~ 5 ItCrr 4422 3311311' 1 2 1 1 .

.. 'N~c.......... ..... .. ... .~- ..... . ~I G13 Omi7 .... ~I • B7 sus • ..... GMa9 Gmi9 C13 C#mi 11 jV .. G13 . ~." 5 OMa9 I A 13119/BP v v p ~ I 2134 IIII Ami7 v Ami7 • 09 D7~9 v v ..F Ma7 7~S II Ami7 5 07 9 I. j~ 6 • GMa7 . I 213" til' If: III1III . F#7!15/C~ .... 11111111 "311 2143 1 234 2 3<61 2 341 13141 1 23" •.. .. B7#5 • I -.. Omi7 .. . • v ..... II 1 43 F Ma7 t CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT FOR BOSSA NOVA SOLO #3 ....

.. C9bS .. I I I I 21 B'7 IIIIII SUS.... . Ami11 jV .. . Ami11 . ... G9 6 21 .. I .... G7 III 2 314 2 III 5 5 14111 SUS. . B~9 A7 sus.) 11111 2131 B'o B'o .. A9 G7 SUS. ....10 I I 3i2 1 342 1 ~34 9 IIIIII 2314 1... . ... GMa7 GMa13 Gmi7 . Ami11 F D7~9 1111112111 2 333 3 421 31411 ~ 341 11111 21314 "' ## ... B7#Sb9 .... C9 C#mi.11 F . F#mt11/B I F .. 04 04 G9 Gmt7 FMa9/A 3 4 I 231 t jV EbMa13 F r- 33 . .J2-i 1324 8 7 5 5 11111..

6.18. 13 . A7 SUS.. ~ :11 Dmi11 G9 BOSSA NOVA SOLO #3 This solo is mainly built around the creating of melodies with motifs. Dmi7 G7 • 1 Hi • II 3 421 2 0 3 42 ~ # ~ ~ .44. Examples: Bars 3 . which are small musical ideas or themes. 34 .11111111 3 4211 31211 41111 13211 1124·') 1243 11121 1324 DMa9 DMa9 Ami11 Ami11 Sb7 SUS. and 37 .

12. Gmt7 ".19 .7 Ami7 t--E if 2 4 1 2 2 32 1. Note bars 7 .."OO" ".28 we are in the Key of F. 3 the quarter note triplet I I lused throughout this piece may be II II II I'~ EJ r~~ 5 0 Ma7 1 3 13 3 tempo: Bossa Nov. 1 5 0 Ma7 ==::r--23 22 3 Bbo #' ~ ~ ~~ ~ : I Lt¥ 21 2 r 3 - Amt7 1 .At Bars 25 .n~J) 12 3 1 F#7#5 7 I 7 [! I 2 rEEf Efef 14214121 89 B7bg Bmi7/E E9 5 . At Bars 29 . interpreted} ~) ideas.. (medium) . 3 2 3 6 . Tied in around these motifs are contemporary For easier counting. and 32 .-3--. .1"\ f' ) 3 .31 we are in the Key of Eb..--J~ 35 . 1 1 j e 2 i 'F CF !~ .fir 6 fff ~~o 2 1 \'Wl\\l~\' (ff\.[Orr I J113 A7 B~7 Dmi7 b- 2 1 .- C9 .36..25.

-:::: 0" 2 12142124121 F r I CEU ::::--.. '0 G7 Bmi 7 43 4 E9 3 Bb 7 Ed) I II A7 ~[)!! 42 F r r« iJ..0.121 2 ~-..t 33 1 1 Ec~12 11 123 1 14321241 2432 3 1241 2 ..~.. 1 333 -- _. I 3 1 42 2 3 I 4 3 I1 2 1 5 D Ma7 1 I 3 Gie..:::Dmi7 .._ r .. 3 b .--3---. 1 ..-3-. r-J"j""" 13 1 q) .1 3 . 1 4 2 I] Om!7 G7 _---.-~~ FMa7 4 a 2 23 2 431 lIJ/\ '" Amt7 F-mt-7\~--------B~7/A~ 5 ~~3la.... \.

CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT FOR BE-BOP SOLO #2 3 .. In Chorus #1.. .. ~ ~ j. 37 .4 make up one phrase.~ C13 j..~ Eo P- ~ j.. ..~ . the same being true for Bars 5 and 6 and for Bars 7 .. ~ j. ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ •~ " 3 8 Fmi7 .. ... Bars 1 . ~ . I I I I E9+11 . . G13 ...Sonny Rollins vintage.. II I I I 1312 2 341 3 421 1 1241 2 341 3 1 ~ 4 1 24 Cmi7 .. .. v ... Bars 11 and 12 form one phrase and will also function as a turn-around in other situations..~ j. .. E~13 E?9 . y ......II: II I I I I 3214 3 421 1342 21:)4 1324 3 4 3 5 6 B~9 B~9 E~13 j... . 6 6 4 5 231 . ..~ F7~5 B~9 .. ~ ~ ~ :11 BE-BOP SOLO #2 These two choruses are of the Charlie Parker ... ~ 5 IIIIII 1342 1342 1324 1 234 6 9 8 7 8 A"13 G13 C9 a..~ ..... I I.~ Eo j...~ 3 . B~9 ~ ~ B~ 13 ~ • j.. C7b5 a. . a.......... • ... . F13 a..... ~ j... ~ 36 ..10.. ..

. and also the 2 or 4 bars at the end of a tune before it returns to the beginning.-8 ct·· . tempo.. moaerete 1"b~ B~7 121 '0 ""gh. .10.. E~6 69 2114 2 3 .. and 11 and 12. 7 . 9 tm 4113 4 124 3 10 emi7 34431431 1t Ett! HEf 1 a "132 38 .. 2 EO "1 3 .ng. can be played down an octave. Chorus #2 has the same layout. Bars 5 . 1 2 •• I rr[f au ::Cmt7 .4 make up one phrase as is the same with Bars 5 and 6.12 may be played up an octave higher.8 6 In Chorus #1. Chorus #2.(A turn-around is the 2 or 4 bars at the first ending returning back to the beginn. 5 _ 2 . Bars 1 . the entire solo.

~b F7 Bb7 emi7 c#O . - t Ci . Cmi7 F7 2323 41 3 II Improvise on Chorus 3. 2 113 B~Ma6/9 I IIIIIII BDMa7 Cmi7 C#mi7 Dmi7 Emi7 1 1 2 3 5 6 6 Fmi7 E7 39 ... ~~~~ 1" 1 4 it¥._a. I 14 14 1 13" 1"" 1 j tar ~. ~b CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT FOR ULTRA CONTEMPORARY II 6 4 Bbmll1 11111 III 1342 3 () E~13 EO 2314 EO 2314 5 '!i~. 7~ 7 E 10 ~ ___ .~I tea we f 6 B' 13.F13 IO~ ~tJ . b ll B ~7 E~6 EO B~7 e Eb7 EO Bb7 Dmi7 G7 Cmt7 .

.. Cmi7 ~ . This technique of taking small ideas and moving them around to different tonalities can add great color to any solo. DP7 .. - :11 ULTRA CONTEMPORARY (3 CHORUSES) Remember that The 12-Bar Blues Frame is used for an excursion into atonal playing.. we can see how melodic patterns can emerge.. C9 .. and using the same interval construction (Bars 1 and 2. F9 . and Bar 9). Chorus #1: By taking a four-note motif (the first four notes of Bar 1)... these lines will stretch the Blues Harmony to the outside limits. Bar 8. F9 ~ .. 40 . C7 ~b .. Gmi11 '" . E~13 Ebmi11 Dmi11 . Omi7bS 2 34' 2 341 Ob7bS 2134 ..6 I IIII 1314 3 14 3 24 3 8 8 10 14 1324 E~7 Bbmi7 F#O E~ 7 E~9 abmi III 11 1 2 1 231 13 11 11 1324 . C13 Cmi11 .. 11 E b13 EO 13 III1IIII 1 342 1324 1 234 11111 11111 13 11 11 10 9 8 8 SbMa7 S~Ma7 ..

.: ll3 I . Chorus 2 EftF ttcr ..... lOr.. 232I 4 h..~ E 5 ~ . 1 irt r 4412 3213 -'ri I._~ ~~ ~~b.. 3 .... 21123 .. 32 l 1221 I ._ 10 ~! 3 _l b.. and are dominated by fourth and fifth patterns extended into long lines..Chorus 1 tempo: moderate 10 bright I 11 . . 1 . 4 rfPr 3 5 w... 1 122 1 2I 12" Choruses #2 and #3 are a good mixture of inside and outside playing... 4t) 10 __ .- i ... 423 .. I F!=rr 4 tar I r[u 1 2 3 .j .' lj I 1 ~ 21 Em 1234 E 1132 Fr~r aPr JjJJ 1242 1 11" 3 I 41 . ~ 5 2 111 1 1 3 ..... 3 3 2411 3 2 1 1 itti I rrtf 3 2414 33 22 4234 ErU 1211 2 3 ..

Hold the arpeggios (which are shown in the diagrams) as long as possible. the E and B strings are open. and bring out the melody which is on the first beat of each measure... Improvise I~ on Chorus 4.. ~ . 2 I . For the most part.qhorus 3 3 5 5 4424 1222 5 era 4 433 1rrf 2211 I ~t]4J 23 12 3 _ 441 2 3 JJjJ 1 3 5 13 1 42 4 . PEACEFUL JOURNEY " This original composition is in the Classical style and should be played rubato. producing a singing effect. _ 42 .

. _... > 0 e[erl'fLf 0 0 1 6> _ ..r[ r .-l:..._ 1431 r Lf _. J 1 2 4 1 1 3 ~ 4 3 1 4 0 0 0 4 i 0 4 0 0 4 . .. 0 140414 u 40140414 40140414 43 . ~> I 3 21 1321 4 31 4 21 > 5> 1 0 0 0 ..... 1421 0 efer' 0 0 1 1 u .11 3 12 11 2 34 ~ 10~ 4J 2 I • 0 • 0 0 2 10 _ _ i 4 .r c[cr'[ _ _..-0 0 0 4 I 341 6 _ 1 4 0 1 4 3 1 2 z 403 r 241 311 3 14 1 2_ 1\7> -j > 1 7> 1'1 1 1 1 2> rit ard -_ 401 > .

5> ---.31 2021 CEL.43 tempo /\ q) 9~ • 9 0 > .12 i .612 312 2 341 . 2._ ~.Ii 312 ritard 1... 0 1 0 0 • r 0 ] 2 0 0 3 0 = " " " ~jEEJSPflr 2.312 9~ ~9 ~ 2 8> o 3 1 _r-- 23" pI fErrlr~rr 101.I_ - 312 Ul 311 ~ q) ~:> I 1 4 7 :> 7 2 "~3 1 1 2 • 1 2 t--~~2 3 1 o " 1 1 3 14 44 .

.II 2 14 3 :> 14 1\ tJ 2:> . 10::~ 4 2 3 . r- :> ..10. . HJ • 3 1 2 0 0 0 :> . 1"' .... 0 0 0 4 r 4 2 1 f I 0 4 0 0 4 4 I 3 I 1 " 3 12 1". 4 ~r 0 • 0 1 4 0 0 4 2:> ill...- 6:::0 0 0 4 403 r 4 0 I 2 2 4 - 1 4 3 14 o 4 3 1 4 401 4 r !' ~ r :1 004 o 40 I 4 4314 4214 r !' r r I 0 0 4 45 .

.-& S Ii II CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT FOR CONTEMPORARY SWING 46 .... J 0 0 0 . .. 3 .... - ~ t. .... I ~I 1 I 0 0 0 .0 3 .. 3 ..1\2 > tJ .t I :> 2> ~I 2 --0 0 0 .-:: > :0 ~ ::=:--.. 4&.. I ...

. Ami7~S A'9"s Gmi11 rr Gb~S Fmt11 8~13~9 .. .. pi ~I 47 . ..... . ~b • o. o. B'Ma7 I I 342 IIIIII 2 341 21311 IIIII 4 3 3 1 2 341 11111 3 4211 "" .... • _.... • _... . •. ~ r ... o.... .3 " IIIII E'Mag E'Ma13 r 3 3 3 Dmi7 D'7 Cmi7 II 131 2 I 4 23 Cmi7 Cmi# 7 ~12 ~ ....... Emi7'S _. _. . ... I IIIIII A9 A7'9 Omi 11 IV 2 O'g'S r Cmt7 89'S _... . I ...... _.. I 0 1 3 III I 1121 1 234 I 3 I 11 311 2 333 1 333 Cmt 11 F7#s 8b Ma9 4 Gmt7 Gmi7/F • r • '... 3 I .... • •... • .

. also.6 . - . (If they present a problem.. " at the beginning of this book.12). Reading the text. . "Phrasing and Picking the Trip/et. is a good example of how melody can still be touched upon while playing the fast Bars 9 .) The fast 16th note passages give us the feel of doubling up (Bars 9 .. 5 Omi7#5 ~ ~ ~ I I 144 3 4211 I OP13 ~ II' 0 ~I ~ ~I- 3 6 5 8 Cmi 11 ~ II 1111I ..P" 7 2131 F7b9 ~ ~:II r- 1 II CONTEMPORARY SWING This solo is in great contrast to the Slow Bossa since we now incorporate 16th notes. slow them down to 8th notes. Emi7~5 I 2 341 . Here.16). 5 EPmi7 I " 3 r 6 o ~ ~ . will help you better understand the technique of picking the 8th and 16th note triplets in this piece. r ~I .

Gmi7 Cg Fmi7 prff 2 123 Cf4 43 41 12" Cmt7 " 3" " 23 t r : Emi7bS J 21"2 4" " 3 " 23 " 3 2 4 412 rfroL "" 22 \ b9 A7 49 .

~~~~ cY Ma6/9 Dmi 11 G7bg CMa7 6/9 CMa6/9 CMa6/9 CMa6/9 50 .g~'~~·~~~~~~r~~~~~.26 5 I4I 42 I 4 2 234 I 4 I 21 Er eJt fff v3 3" I L-3__J Cmi7 Dmt7 EbMa7 fur ffr 2 F7 II 24I CHORD ACCOMPANIMENT FOR BE-BOP SWING AND CONTEMPORARY SOLO #3 3 i.~4~~~~~ o bMa7 Fmt 11 1IIIII I I 23 IIIII 1 1 12 I I I 24 2 34 1 2 3 I4 I iI 44444 2 1 13 I Fmi 11 Bbmi 11 sbmi 11 Eb7 Eb7bg AbMa7 6/9 ~a6/9 liillilli6/9 j4~.~.~~~r~~~.g'~II:~.

- 51 .11117111.... GMa9 GMa7 • _JO 11111111 .. • . .. __ 111113 1423 111113 1423 1324 I 1234 111'?1 13 . . 2 Fmi 11 Fmi7 Sbmi11 B~mi7 Sbmi11 Eb13 A~Mai 6/9 AbMa7 .gli _ . _JO j. _JO Iliiilli Ami 11 Ami11 013 07bg GMa7 GMa7 I ..71 A~Ma6/9 Amil1 07~9 GMa9 C13 Bmi11 E7b9 .

_. . ). Try learning this solo by taking one key at a time..J ..23 Bars25-36 up in major thirds.4 13 ~ ffff8ftft 34I2 Eb7 E'tbs A'Ma7 O'Ma7 r 1j'j1] E1J U ItP -.. ~t~ Fe rr UU 2-331 2414 B~mi7 I frEf ffp*= 2341 24. Y _ . 2' 4 J-.20 Bars 21 .28. Ma6/9 II .V7. 18. 15.4 6.. .. G to E Maj. g IllIi Bbmt11 ". BE-BOP SWING By modulating Bars 1 . 33 . _- - )-}''O J J. /. this solo passes through several keys. Cmt11'5 rr- B~mi 11 E~7~9 r- ~ ~~ ~ I r- ._.5 Bars 6 .8 Bars 9 ..12 14. Fmi7 .. 24 3"'-' Il ~J'" 4 . 19 21 -23 26 . 5 Omi7 I 4.~ 6 i •~ • ~ P- ~ I P- ~ • ~ P- ~ 41 £ 12 = ~I " ~ ~ '112 AJ. 7 10 .13 Bars 14 . Key Key Key Key Key Key of of of of of of Ab C Eb G E Ab Bars Bars Bars Bars Bars Bars 2.~ 2 314 ~~------------~------------~ 11 A~Ma6/9 I C7~9 i . 4 5? .. 17... . Key of Ab Up a major third to Up a minor third to Up a jnajor third to Down a minor third Back to Ab the key of C Eb. Examples: Each key is mostly made up of the 11-7. I .35 . . I Maj 7 progression.

.~ ~JJJ 42 4!) '3 4 I 2 4124 3412 .:~~ 3 11. • . ~t~r r [Er rt 8 Cmi7 I 421 432 6 Sbmi7 I q £t!§2tJ ifJ 3--1 3/1 3-1 53 . 242242 1412 31..4 Ami7 a C#mi7 3413 erU rtoE'Er r-3-. ~ .. .r1 241 4 8 EbMa7 ~ 'II...3 Cmi7 I [ j E-r 2331 24 CIiF.. ~_ II...._ J Fmi7 10/\ L 3~ 234 • ~"'f:.

7 Bmi7 14 1 344 1 324 24 t" 13 42 3411 Ami7 13 2 07 2 GMa7 224 4 1 I 44 Errr I tEte ftt~ 1 07 . they have become a standard part of improvising on this harmony..-1. and 27. - With wide-sounding fourth and fifth intervals. 11.-. (Carefully read the text pertaining to the Be-Bop Swing for a clear understanding of the key changes. tempo: moderate to bright r ':) - ' " )__.7 1 Emi7 8 13 2144 13 313 2144 4 1 421 1214 ~"~~t~9 T ~fr~H~r~rE~~~18~rrr~f~~~~§: 1~.) Note the added chords at Bars 3.::_.7 G7 3443 13 4422 1244 Cmi7 8 1112 4 3412 344 10 13 Fmi. 'T '.~_ Fmi. J-4_ '- "\ '..CONTEMPORARY j~: " SOLO #3 ~r • _I.~ir~f~i~ --_f 1131 4131 0~a7 Omi... we pray through the same chord progression as in the Be-Bop Swing solo..

7. 1222 I 4123 44 1 112 ~~ 34 "Ir ~7..w b..-e::~.tftf lEt f I lltr ~ ~ GMa7 1144 3322 1134 GMa7 4 323 87 221\ i} I oW .. .joIi EMa7 I...Emi7 100/ 2 24 t:- ~Ma7 281\ I 12 !:10 ~:~ _~ D~Ma7 5 6 .w . .4 4 1 3 pp.. "1 1 . • ..I~~8 rEftt rftr 44331143 6 5 6 34/\ B I i7 ~ 7 A13 ~ ~J 3 et. 4 3 3 2414 I 1 24 1 4 Gmi7 . 1 143 4433 V . 44 13 1 1 22 . AbMa7 2 @) 1 1134 "Vol ----I II J: H Sbmi7 1 143 8-7 ~5 -& C7~9 ..~1Ir C.? I (rTf ~. ... I 55 . 2 ~.22 CI ~ .

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