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INDOOR AIR DEHUMIDIFICATION DESIGN MANUAL

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INDOOR AIR DEHUMIDIFICATION DESIGN MANUAL
The energy crisis of the mid 1970’s gave birth to a movement to conserve energy. Over the ensuing years much has been done to reduce the energy consumption of new and existing buildings. Lighting efficiency has improved so much that today we use ½ the wattage without sacrificing lumens. Improved construction methods, better insulation and high efficiency windows have also helped reduce energy consumption. However, all of these measures have resulted in a reduction of Sensible heat gains while Latent heat gains have increased. This is the reason that humidity related issues have surfaced since the mid 1970’s. One of the methods for dealing with this issue is to dehumidify indoor air. Conventional indoor air dehumidification systems move large volumes of air and are costly to operate. The refrigeration controls are sensitive, susceptible to failure and difficult for field technicians to troubleshoot. Nautica has resolved these problems by developing a more energy efficient and reliable indoor air dehumidification system. Driven by many years of practical refrigeration experience, the Nautica indoor air dehumidification system is designed to be simple and less expensive to install, operate, maintain, troubleshoot and service, and to provide a higher level of comfort. Indoor air dehumidifiers have been around for several decades and the basic concept, to remove humidity by overcooling the air, and then compensate with re-heating, has not changed. The Nautica dehumidifier uses a regenerative heat exchanger to reduce the load on the cooling coil by precooling. This unique feature reduces energy consumption by up to 50% and allows airflow to be cut by up to 70%, while removing the same amount of moisture as conventional dehumidifiers. The refrigerant-side of the system is straight forward, without complicated controls. A small refrigerant charge is used and the system is easy to troubleshoot and repair. Conventional indoor air dehumidifiers reject heat by routing hot refrigerant gas to a reheating coil. This process use automatic solenoid valves, check valves and piping to route the refrigerant hot gas to the appropriate device. On paper it looks good. However, excessive amounts of costly refrigerant are needed to fill the system and the devices in the refrigerant circuit are subject to malfunction if a slight amount of dirt is present. Designing dehumidification systems for indoor air is a specialized area of HVAC design engineering. This design manual provides a simple method for sizing dehumidification equipment for indoor air. Nautica dehumidifiers utilize MSP® heat transfer technology that is compatible with chilled water or refrigerant based systems and can be served by a wide range of conventional chillers and condensing units, using any fuel source.

KEY FEATURES AND BENEFITS
BENEFIT OPERATING SAVINGS INSTALLATION SAVINGS IMPROVED COMFORT HIGH RELIABILITY WIDE RANGE OF SIZES MULTIPLE OPTIONS EXPLANATION OF BENEFIT Energy consumption is up to one-half that of conventional dehumidification systems. No reheating to compensate for over-cooling. Smaller equipment and ductwork. Lower power requirements. Lower humidity promotes greater comfort, and at higher temperatures Complicated and temperamental refrigerant-side controls are eliminated, reducing breakdowns, and simplifying troubleshooting. Precise matching of dehumidification equipment to the load. Dehumidification only, cooling, and heating options also available.

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NAUTICA vs. CONVENTIONAL DEHUMIDIFICATION TECHNOLOGY
FIGURE 1 CONVENTIONAL DEHUMIDIFIER FIGURE 2 REGENERATIVE DEHUMIDIFIER
FAN PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER

FAN

HEATING COIL

COOLING COIL

COOLING COIL

CONDENSED MOISTURE

With conventional dehumidification technology (Figure 1, above), warm humid air, flows through a cooling coil where it is cooled and dehumidified. The dehumidified and cooled air is then reheated through a heating coil prior to entering the conditioned space. In the regenerative dehumidification technology (Figure 2, above), warm, humid air flows through the first pass of an air-to-air heat exchanger for pre-cooling and dehumidification by thermal exchange with the cooler leaving air. The air then passes through a cooling coil for final cooling and dehumidification. The dehumidified and cooled air is then drawn back through the opposite side of the air-to-air heat exchanger to be heated, prior to entering the conditioned space.

As in conventional dehumidification, the regenerative technology uses ordinary refrigerants or chilled water. However, in the energy-efficient regenerative dehumidifier, a lower temperature air enters the cooling coil as a result of pre-cooling and dehumidification through the air-to-air heat exchanger. This innovative combination of an air-to-air heat exchanger with conventional cooling coil results in reduced compressor capacity, requiring half the energy for dehumidification compared with conventional dehumidification systems.

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DR UNIT CONFIGURATIONS
SPLIT SYSTEM SELF CONTAINED (INTEGRAL) UNIT
C O N D

MSPTM COIL

OUTDOOR AND INDOOR UNITS, SELF CONTAINED UNITS

PACKAGED OUTDOOR
MSPTM COIL
MSPTM COIL

SPLIT UNITS, AIR AND WATER COOLED

OUTDOOR UNITS, AIR AND WATER COOLED

CHILLED WATER
MSPTM COIL

PACKAGED WATER COOLED

OUTDOOR AND INDOOR UNITS, CHILLED WATER

OUTDOOR AND INDOOR UNITS, WATER COOLED

Features • Split or packaged units • Indoor & outdoor construction • Air-cooled, water-cooled or chilled water • Heat pumps—water and air source • Double-wall construction • Stainless steel drain pans • Internally isolated fans • Modular designs • All voltage options

Options • Hot water or steam heating coils • Indirect gas heating • Electric heat • Single point electrical connections • Unit mounted disconnect switch • Self-contained control system • High efficiency MSP® heat exchangers • Variable frequency drives • Roof curbs—isolation and standard • Temperature control option

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INDOOR AIR DEHUMIDIFICATION DESIGN STRATEGY
Indoor air dehumidifiers are designed to remove a specific amount of moisture from the air. The amount of moisture to be removed must be calculated. This manual offers a practical method for calculating the moisture load in commercial/industrial applications. There are two basic areas where moisture load must be considered. Moisture generated from indoors: People produce moisture and this varies with the level of activity. Showers, pools, fountains and some commercial processes may also contribute to moisture generated from within a building. Moisture generated from outdoors: Outdoor air contains large amounts of moisture, especially in summer. This moisture-laden air “infiltrates” the building through opening and closing of doors and through cracks and crevices in a building envelope. The amount of infiltration varies with the age and integrity of construction and tightness of windows. Ventilation air also must be considered in moisture load calculations. Ventilation air is typically introduced through air conditioning and heating units. Sufficient ventilation can cause a building to be under “positive pressure”. However, exhaust from bathrooms and other locations will counter the effects of ventilation and cause a building to go under “negative” or “neutral” pressure”. Proper estimation of moisture load requires a thorough study and evaluation of exhaust/ventilation in addition to integrity of construction for estimating infiltration moisture load. State or local codes may supersede the data in the tables herein. Code compliance is especially important for hospitals and health care facilities or for any application that exposes humans to toxic fumes. Refer to codes and/or the Industrial Ventilation handbook.

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DATA REQUIRED Ventilation rate Exhaust rate Leakage Door traffic Occupants

GET DATA FROM Building survey & Tables 1 & 5

DATA ENTRY FORM QUANTITY FORMULA

LATENT LOAD BTUH

LINE

VENTILATION CFM x .68 x (outdoor CFM grains-indoor grains) INFILTRATION Building survey CFM Building survey CFM x .68 x (outdoor CFM & Table 2 grains-indoor grains) Building survey CFM x .68 x (outdoor CFM & Table 3 grains-indoor grains) INTERNAL Building survey No. Occupants x latent No. & Table 4 factor (Table 4) Other TOTAL LATENT LOAD Add lines A - F MOISTURE LOAD IN LBS/HR Line G /1,050 CALCULATION PROCEDURE

A B C D E F G H

1) Determine ventilation rate: Using site survey data with input from tables 1 and 5, calculate the required ventilation rate and enter on line A 2) Determine infiltration air volume: a) Exhaust rate: Using site survey data calculate the total exhaust rate and enter on line B. b) Leakage: Using site survey data and Tables 2 and 3, determine infiltration leakage and enter on line C. However, before using the Tables, a system design decision must be made in regard to the use of ventilation. The following cases are possible: i) Case 1 - The space is pressurized by the ventilation air and the infiltration is eliminated or reduced. ii) Case 2 - The space is at neutral pressure and the air handling system does not affect infiltration. (1) This can occur if there are no exhausts or ventilation. (2) This can occur if the ventilation CFM equals the exhaust CFM. iii) Case 3 - The space is under negative pressure from the exhaust systems associated with the space, and infiltration is increased. (1) This can occur if the space is exhausted and ventilation is not used to replace the exhausted air. (2) This can occur if the space is exhausted and ventilation replaces only part of the quantity of air exhausted. c) Door traffic: Using site survey data, calculate infiltration due to door traffic and enter on line D. 3) Determine latent load due to ventilation: Using formula (CFM x .68 x ∆Grains) calculate latent load from ventilation and enter on line C. 4) Determine latent load due to infiltration: Using formula (CFM x .68 x ∆Grains) calculate latent load from ventilation and enter on line C. 5) Determine latent load due to internal gains: a) Occupants: Using site survey data and table 5, calculate the latent load due to occupants and enter on line E. b) Other internal loads: Using site survey data calculate other loads that may contribute to the moisture load and enter on line E. Note: Contact Nautica for help with unusual conditions.

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DEHUMIDIFICATION LOAD CALCULATION TABLES
TABLE 1 – OUTDOOR AIR REQUIREMENTS FOR VENTILATION

Application

Outdoor air Cfm Cfm /person /sq ft

Application

Outdoor air Cfm Cfm /person /sq ft 15 25 15 15
-------------------------

----Food and Beverage Service Specialty Shops Dining rooms 20 ----Barber Cafeteria, fast food 20 ----Beauty Bars, cocktail lounges 30 ----Reducing salons Hotels, Motels, Resorts Dormitories Cfm/room Florists Bedrooms ----30 Clothiers, furniture Living rooms ----30 Hardware, drugs, fabric Baths ----35 Supermarkets Lobbies 15 ----Pet shops Conference rooms 20 ----Sports and Amusement Assembly rooms 15 ----Spectator areas Dormitory sleeping areas 15 ----Game rooms Gambling Casinos 30 ----Ice arenas (playing areas) ----Swimming pools (pool and deck area) Offices Office space 20 ----Playing floors(gymnasium) Reception areas 15 ----Ballrooms and discos Telecommunication centers and data entry 20 ----Bowling alleys (seating areas) Conference rooms 20 ----Theaters Cfm/sq ft Ticket booths Public Spaces 0.05 Corridors and utilities ----Lobbies Public restrooms, cfm/wc or urinal 50 ----Auditorium Locker and dressing rooms ----0.50 Stages, studios Smoking lounge 60 ----Transportation Elevators ----1.00 Waiting rooms Platforms Retail Stores, Sales and Show Room Floors ----Basement and street ----0.30 Vehicles Upper floors ----0.20 Workrooms Storage rooms ----0.15 Meat processing Dressing rooms ----0.20 Malls and arcades ----0.20 Shipping and receiving ----0.15 Warehouses ----0.05 Smoking lounge 60 -----

0.30
---------

15 15
-----

1.00
-------------

15 25
---------

0.50 0.50
---------------------------------------------------------

20 25 25 20 20 15 15 15 15 15 15

Table 1 prescribes supply rates of acceptable outdoor air required for acceptable indoor air quality. These values have been chosen to dilute human bioeffluents and other contaminants with an adequate margin for safety and to account for health variations among people and varied activity levels. Source: ASHRAE Standard 62-1999

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TABLE 2 - INFILTRATION IN LOW RISE COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS (Excluding Door Traffic)
The Table 13A air change values do not include door traffic. Add the Table 13B door infiltration to determine the total infiltration. Low Exhaust CFM Note (2) Tight construction Average construction Poor construction Loose construction High Exhaust CFM Note (2) Tight construction Average construction Poor construction Loose construction SPACE PRESSURIZED CASE 1 Outside air allows the supply CFM to exceed the return and exhaust CFM NEUTRAL PRESSURE CASE 2 No outside air or exhaust or outside air CFM equals exhaust CFM. NEGATIVE PRESSURE CASE 3 Exhaust and no outside air or exhaust exceeds outside air.

AIR CHANGES PER HOUR ... (AC/HR) 7-1/2 mph 15 mph 7-1/2 mph 15 mph Summer Winter Summer Winter Add the net space exhaust 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.3 CFM to the Case 2 0.0 0.3 0.4 0.6 infiltration CFM 0.3 0.5 0.6 1.0 1.2-1.8 2.0-3.0 Do not pressurize 7-1/2 mph 15 mph It is not economical to Make-up air is Summer Winter pressurize the space when recommended. See case 2, 0.2 0.3 exhaust CFM exceeds 10 out-side CFM equals 0.4 0.6 percent of the supply exhaust CFM. 0.6 1.0 CFM. 1.2-1.8 2.0-1.8 DESIGN INFILTRATION CFM Table 13A infiltration CFM = (AC/Hr x Volume Of Space) /60 Total infiltration = Table 13A + Table 13B HIGH RISE BUILDINGS The stack effect is significant in high-rise buildings and infiltration must be analyzed by the methods outlined in the ASHRAE Fundamentals Manual. RESTAURANTS The dining area should be slightly pressurized The excess air supplied to the dining area is usually allowed to ex filtrate through the kitchen. The kitchen may require additional make up air to offset the exhaust air. Data extracted from ACCA Commercial Load Calculation manual N, table 13A Notes on table3: (1) High rise buildings - above 3 stories (2) Low exhausts CFM - toilet and minor exhaust system CFM is less than 20% of the total supply CFM. (3) Use Table 3 for individual rooms or zones or for the entire structure. Note the simultaneous infiltration for the entire building will be about 50% of the total of the individual room infiltration. (4) Construction definitions: Tight construction: Non-opening windows or best quality windows; penetrations in envelope sealed, vapor barrier Average construction: Standard quality windows, major penetrations sealed, vapor barrier, glass area less than 20% of wall area. Poor construction: Below standard windows, no vapor barrier, some unsealed crackage in the skin. Or, average construction with operable glass exceeding 20% of the wall area Loose construction: Obvious crackage at windows and doors, unsealed cracks in the skin, no vapor barrier, and considerable loosely fitting glass.

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TABLE 2 - EXAMPLE Example 1, Space pressurized Example 2, Neutral pressure Average construction; 27,000 Cu Ft volume Average construction; 27,000 Cu Ft volume Outdoor air required for occupants = 240 CFM Outdoor air required for occupants = 350 CFM Exhaust systems = 240 CFM Exhaust systems = 670 CFM Sensible load in space = 81,700 Btuh (Line 6 on N-1 form) Sensible load in space = 81,700 Btuh (Line 6 on N-1 form) 350 CFM is greater than 240 CFM. Occupants determine 350 CFM outdoor air requirement. Approximate design TD = 18F Approx. supply CFM = 81700/ (1.1 x 18) = 4126 CFM 240 CFM is less than 10 percent of 4126 CFM Low exhaust CFM; OK to pressurize Summer AC/Hr 0.00 or (0.00 x 27000)/60 = 0 CFM Winter AC/Hr = 0.30 or (0.30 x 27000)/60 = 135 CFM Ventilation required at OA damper = 350 CFM 670 CFM is greater than 350 CFM. Exhaust systems determine 670 CFM outdoor air requirement Approximate design TD = 18F Approx supply CFM = 81700/ (1.1 x 18) = 4126 CFM 670 CFM is approximately 16 percent of 4126 CFM Make up air is not required Summer AC/Hr = 0.40 or (0.40 x 27000)/60 = 180 CFM Winter AC/Hr = 0.60 or (0.60 x 27000)/60 = 270 CFM Ventilation required at OA damper = 670 CFM

TABLE 3 DOOR INFILTRATION
CFM Per Door TYPE OF DOOR Double Door - Glass, Wood, or Metal 1/8" Crack No vestibule Double Door- Glass, Wood, or Metal 1/8" Crack With vestibule Revolving Door Single Door - Glass, Wood or Metal 8 x 8 Segmented O.H. Door 12 x 10 Segmented O.H- Door 12 x 20 Segmented O.H. Door SEASON Winter Summer Winter Summer Winter Summer Winter Summer Winter Summer Winter Summer Winter Summer TRAFFIC RATE = TOTAL ENTRANCES & EXITS PER HOUR PER DOOR (TRAFFIC RATE) @ None 5 10 20 50 100 200 240 280 310 380 590 940 1640 140 160 180 220 340 540 940 150 170 190 230 350 660 1310 90 100 110 130 200 380 750 120 130 140 180 75 80 90 110 60 90 160 370 30 50 90 210 1,000 1,500 600 900 1,600 2,300 1,000 1,400 3,000 4,800 1,800 2,900 Average occupancy # of doors x average length of stay 110 70 20 10 500 300 800 500 1,200 700 250 150 400 220

Data extracted from ACCA Commercial Load Calculation manual N, table 13B Notes: (1) A "double door" is considered as one door, when the traffic rate is calculated, take value directly from table. (2) Values shown assume that the wind is blowing directly at the door and no other windows or doors are open.

TABLE 3 - EXAMPLE
Department store, first floor; 30,000 Sq Ft Four sets of double doors with vestibules Two revolving doors Manager estimated Saturday occupancy = 300 Manager estimated length of stay = 1 Hr. 300 x 2 Traffic Rate = --------------------- = 100 6 x 1.00 CFM per double door CFM per revolving door Winter 660 250 Winter 2640 500 3140 Summer 380 150 Summer 1520 300 1820

4 Double doors 2 Revolving doors Total door CFM

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TABLE 4- HEAT GAIN FROM OCCUPANTS
APPLICATION Assembly hall, Church or School or Auditorium, Theater/Matinee Funeral Parlor Bank Barber shop Beauty parlor Bowling alley Conference room Cocktail lounge, bar, tavern Department stores, retail shops Drug store; Pharmacist’s work area Sales area Dormitory Factory Food services: Dining room Cafeteria, short order, drive-in Kitchen Garage, (repair) Gymnasium; Spectators Participants Hospitals or nursing homes Rooms and wards Operating room Hotel or motel; Bedroom or suite Lobby Conference room Ballroom Laboratory Library Locker rooms Office Private or semi private General Conference room Reception/lobby Recreation facilities; Pool room Racket ball or tennis courts Swimming pools (spectators) Restaurant or cafeteria Dining Area Kitchen Restrooms, public School rooms Classrooms Laboratory Shop DEGREE OF ACTIVITY Seated, at rest Seat, very light work Standing, slow walk, light work Seated, very light work Seated, very light work Bowling or medium heavy work Moderately active work Standing, slow walk, light work Standing, slow walk, light work Light bench work Standing, slow walk, light work Seated, very light work 3 mph walk; moderate work Seated, eating Seated, eating Light bench work 3 mph walk; moderate work Seated, very light work Bowling or medium heavy work Seated, very light work Light bench work Seated, very light work Standing, slow walk, light work Moderately active work Moderate dancing Light bench work Moderately active work Standing, slow walk, light work Seated, very light work Moderately active work Moderately active work Standing, slow walk, light work Light bench work Sports or very heavy work Seated, very light work Seated, eating Light bench work Seated, at rest Seated, very light work Standing, slow walk, light work Light bench work SENSIBLE BTUH 210 230 315 230 230 635-1,000 255 315 315 345 315 230 565 255 255 345 565 230 635-1,000 230 345 230 315 255 405 345 255 315 230 255 255 315 345 1,000-2,000 230 225 345 210 230 315 345 LATENT BTUH 140 190 325 190 190 1,165-2,000 255 325 325 435 325 190 1035 325 325 435 1035 190 1,165-2,000 190 435 190 325 255 875 435 255 325 190 255 255 325 435 1,150-3,000 190 325 435 140 190 325 435

Notes: (1) Based on the normal percentage of men, women and children for the application listed. Source 1985 ASHRAE fundamentals DR 01/07/03

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TABLE 5 – OCCUPANCY ESTIMATES** Application Occupancy Persons /100 sq ft Application Specialty Shops Barber Beauty Reducing salons Florists Hardware, drugs, fabric Supermarkets Sports and Amusement Spectator areas Game rooms Playing floors(gymnasium) Ballrooms and discos Bowling alleys (seating areas) Theaters Ticket booths Lobbies Auditorium Stages, studios Transportation Waiting rooms Platforms Vehicles Workrooms Meat processing 25 25 20 8 8 8 Occupancy Persons /100 sq ft

Food and Beverage Service Dining rooms 70 Cafeteria, fast food 100 Bars, cocktail lounges 100 Hotels, Motels, Resorts Dormitories Lobbies 30 Conference rooms 50 Assembly rooms 120 Dormitory sleeping areas 20 Gambling Casinos 120 Offices Office space 7 Reception areas 60 Telecommunication centers and data entry 60 Conference rooms 50 Public Spaces Smoking lounge 70 Elevators Retail Stores, Sales and Show Room Floors Basement and street 30 Upper floors 20 Storage rooms 15 Malls and arcades 20 Shipping and receiving 10 Warehouses 5 Smoking lounge 70

150 70 30 100 70 60 150 150 70 100 100 150 10

**Estimated Maximum (Net occupiable space), Source: ASHRAE Standard 62-2001

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TABLE 6a - PEAK CLIMATE CONDITIONS FOR MAKEUP AIR DEHUMIDIFICATION DESIGN
STATE/CITY ALABAMA Anniston Birmingham Dothan Huntsville Mobile Montgomery Muscle Shoals/Florence Ozark, Fort Rucker Tuscaloosa ALASKA Adak, NAS Anchorage, Elmendorf AFB Anchorage, Fort Richardson Anchorage, lnt'I Airport Annette Barrow Bethel Bettles Big Delta, Ft. Greely Cold Bay Cordova Deadhorse Dillingham Fairbanks, Eielson AFB Fairbanks, Int'l Airport Galena Gulkana Homer Juneau Kenai Ketchikan King Salmon Kodiak, State USCG Base Kotzebue McGrath Middleton Island Nenana Nome Northway Port Heiden Saint Paul island Sitka 13 213 377 131 112 13 151 643 1,283 102 43 56 95 548 453 151 1,578 72 23 95 95 49 1 12 16 338 46 361 23 1,722 95 30 66 19 -13 -19 -14 13 -41 -28 -49 -45 6 -4 -36 -20 -33 -47 -33 -44 0 4 -22 13 -24 7 -36 -47 18 -51 -31 -34 -6 -2 59 69 69 68 71 53 68 72 70 62 67 61 67 74 72 73 63 64 70 64 74 66 67 70 69 57 69 64 66 57 55 58 62 64 62 65 54 62 66 65 56 63 62 62 66 65 66 62 59 63 59 64 61 61 64 63 56 65 61 62 59 52 610 630 400 643 220 203 551 299 171 19 18 28 15 26 24 16 28 20 143 135 144 135 142 139 137 146 142 84 83 83 83 83 85 82 85 84 ELEV. DB WINTER GR/LB DB SUMMER Valdez Yakutat ARIZONA Flagstaff Kingman Page Phoenix, Int'I Airport Phoenix, Luke AFB Prescott Safford, Agri Center Tucson Winslow Yuma ARKANSAS Blytheville, Eaker AFB Fayetteville Fort Smith Little Rock, AFB Texarkana CALIFORNIA Alameda, NAS Arcata/Eureka Bakersfield Barstow/Daggett Blue Canyon Burbank/Glendale Fairfield, Travis AFB Fresno Lancaster/Palmdale Lemoore, Reeves NAS Long Beach Las Angeles Marysville, Beale AFB Merced, Castle AFB Mount Shasta Mountain View, Moffet NAS Ontario Oxnard, Pt. Mugu NAWS Paso Robles Red Bluff Riverside, March AFB 13 217 492 1,926 5,285 774 62 328 2,346 236 39 105 112 187 3,543 39 942 7 837 354 1,539 95 40 30 32 28 21 39 31 30 22 30 40 43 31 30 16 36 35 39 26 29 34 30 85 78 92 103 74 108 85 92 92 101 101 99 86 90 76 83 113 103 81 94 104 80 70 64 84 81 70 80 76 85 80 89 76 75 85 81 74 74 80 74 76 82 79 79 256 1,250 463 312 390 12 6 13 16 20 149 136 134 141 143 88 85 85 86 85 7,011 3,389 4,278 1,106 1,089 5,043 3,117 2,556 4,882 207 1 22 20 34 35 15 21 31 10 40 93 112 92 118 130 104 111 116 95 136 65 77 74 82 85 71 77 76 71 87 STATE/CITY Talkeetna ELEV. 358 33 30 DB WINTER -28 4 -3 GR/LB 71 60 67 DB 64 59 58 SUMMER

16 74 62 Sacramento, Mather Field Source: ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals 1997

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TABLE 6b - PEAK CLIMATE CONDITIONS FOR MAKEUP AIR DEHUMIDIFICATION DESIGN
STATE/CITY CALIFORNIA CONT'D Sacramento, McClellan AFB Sacramento, Metro Salinas San Bernardino, Norton AFB San Diego, Int'l Airport San Diego, Miramar NAS San Francisco San Jose Int'l Airport Santa Barbara Santa Maria Stockton Victorville George AFB COLORADO Alamosa Colorado Springs Craig Denver Eagle Grand Junction Limon Pueblo Trinidad CONNECTICUT Bridgeport Hartford, Brainard Field Windsor Locks. Bradley Fld DELAWARE Dover, AFB Wilmington FLORIDA Apalachicola Cape Canaveral NASA Daytona Beach Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood Fort Myers Gainesville Hlomestead AFB Jacksonville, Cecil Field NAS Jacksonville, Int'I Airport Jacksonville, Mavport Naval Key West Melbourne 20 10 36 23 16 151 7 82 30 16 20 36 31 38 34 46 42 30 48 31 29 34 55 38 148 145 141 147 147 143 150 138 142 147 149 85 84 84 85 84 84 87 84 85 86 85 30 79 14 10 141 132 84 82 16 20 180 8 2 3 126 228 119 79 71 81 7,543 6,171 6,283 5,331 6,539 4,839 5,364 4,721 5,761 -17 -2 -20 -3 -13 2 -6 -1 -2 87 92 77 96 88 93 96 104 96 62 66 66 69 64 70 67 71 71 75 23 85 1,158 30 420 16 56 10 240 26 2,874 31 31 33 34 44 39 37 35 34 32 30 27 85 84 82 107 111 104 76 85 96 80 83 102 84 82 69 83 77 78 67 77 74 70 78 78 ELEV. DB WINTER GR/LB DB SUMMER STATE/CITY Miami. Int'I Airport Miami, New Tamiami A Milton, Whiting Field NAS Orlando Panama City, Tyndall AFB Pensacola, Sherman AFB Saint Petersburg Sarasota/Bradenton Tallahassee Tampa, int'I Airport Valparaiso, Eglin AFB Vero Beach West Palm Beach GEORGIA Albany Athens Atlanta Augusta Brunswick Columbus, Fort Benning Columbus, Metro Airport Macon Marietta, Dobbins AFB Rome Savannah Valdosta, Moody AFB Valdosta, Regional Airport Waycross HAWAII Ewa, Barbers Point NAS Hilo Honolulu Kahului Kaneohe, MCAS Lihue Molokai IDAHO Boise Burley Idaho Falls Lewiston Mountain Home, AFB 2,867 4,150 4,741 1,437 2,995 3,317 2 -5 -12 6 0 -1 79 90 88 76 79 86 72 75 71 72 71 69 49 36 16 66 10 148 449 59 61 61 59 67 60 60 126 130 125 127 138 132 128 83 79 80 80 81 80 80 194 810 1,033 148 20 233 397 361 1,070 643 49 233 203 151 27 20 18 21 30 23 23 23 21 15 26 30 28 29 141 133 133 135 147 142 139 136 134 134 139 142 144 134 83 82 82 84 86 85 82 83 82 83 84 85 83 84 ELEV. 13 10 200 105 16 30 10 30 69 10 85 26 20 DB WINTER 46 45 28 37 33 28 43 39 25 36 30 39 43 GR/LB 144 145 148 142 160 150 156 153 142 144 149 141 143 DB 83 83 86 83 86 85 86 87 83 85 85 85 84 SUMMER

155 86 Mullan Source: ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals 1997

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TABLE 6c - PEAK CLIMATE CONDITIONS FOR MAKEUP AIR DEHUMIDIFICATION DESIGN
STATE/CITY IDAHO CONT'D Pocatello ILLINOIS Belleville, Scott AFB Chicago, Meigs Field Chicago, O'Hare Int'I .A Decatur Glenview, NAS Marseilles Moline/Davenport IA Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield West Chicago INDIANA Evansville Fort Wayne Indianapolis Lafayette, Purdue Univ Peru, Grissom AFB South Bend Terre Haute IOWA Burlington Cedar Rapids Des Moines Fort Dodge Lamoni Mason City Ottumwa Sioux City Spencer Waterloo KANSAS Concordia Dodge City Ft Riley, Marshall AAF Garden City Goodland Russell salina Topeka 1,483 2,592 1,066 2,890 3,688 1,864 1,273 886 -4 0 -2 -3 -3 -4 -3 -2 133 120 136 118 111 126 132 84 79 86 79 74 83 85 699 869 965 1,165 1,122 1,214 846 1,102 1,339 879 -4 -11 -9 -13 -6 -15 -5 -11 -16 -14 136 136 133 133 134 135 136 135 134 132 85 84 85 84 83 84 84 86 84 84 387 827 807 607 810 774 584 3 -4 -3 -5 -3 -2 -3 137 131 137 139 142 130 144 86 83 84 85 85 83 86 453 623 673 682 653 738 594 663 768 741 614 758 3 -4 -6 -2 -3 -5 -8 -6 -4 -10 -4 -7 141 132 130 140 330 135 134 137 138 132 139 138 87 84 84 86 85 85 85 85 84 84 86 85 4,478 -7 83 70 ELEV. DB WINTER GR/LB DB SUMMER STATE/CITY Wichita, Airport Wichita, McConnell AFB KENTUCKY Bowling Green Covington/Cincinnati Airport Fort Campbell, AAF Fort Knox, Godman AAF Jackson Lexington Louisville Paducah LOUISIANA Alexandria, England AFB Baton Rouge Bossier City, Barksdale AFB Lafayette Lake Charles Leesville, Fort Polk Monroe New Orleans, lnt'l Airport New Orleans, Lakefront A Shreveport MAINE Augusta Bangor Brunswick, NAS Caribou Limestone, Loring AFB Portland MARYLAND Camp Springs, Andrews AFB Baltimore, BWI Airport Lex Park, Patuxent River NAS Salisbury MASSACHUSETTS Boston East Falmouth, Otis Angb Weymouth, S Weymouth NAS Worcester MICHIGAN Alpena Detroit, Metro 692 663 764 -7 0 -2 116 125 125 79 83 83 30 131 161 1,010 7 11 6 0 119 125 129 119 80 78 82 78 282 154 39 52 13 11 16 13 134 132 136 144 83 83 84 84 351 194 75 623 745 62 -3 -7 -2 -14 -13 -3 113 111 111 112 107 114 77 78 78 76 75 79 89 69 167 43 33 328 79 30 10 259 27 27 22 28 29 27 22 30 35 22 147 145 144 146 148 144 147 151 150 139 86 84 84 84 84 83 86 86 85 84 548 876 571 755 1,381 988 489 413 7 1 9 9 7 4 6 7 136 132 143 138 135 130 134 143 84 84 85 85 83 83 85 86 ELEV. 1,339 1,371 DB WINTER 2 2 GR/LB DB SUMMER 129 133 83 84

139 87 Flint Source: ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals 1997

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TABLE 6d - PEAK CLIMATE CONDITIONS FOR MAKEUP AIR DEHUMIDIFICATION DESIGN
STATE/CITY MICHIGAN CONT'D Grand Rapids Hancock Harbor Beach Jackson Lansing Marquette, Sawyer AFB Marquette/Ishpeming, A Mount Clemens, Angb Muskegon Oscoda, Wurtsmith AFB Pellston Saginaw Sault Ste. Marie Seul Choix Point Traverse City MINNESOTA Alexandria Brainerd, Pequot Lakes Duluth Hibbing International Falls Minneapolis-St. Paul Redwood Falls Rochester Saint Cloud Tofte MISSISSIPPI Biloxi, Keesler AFB Columbus, AFB Greenwood Jackson McComb Meridian Tupelo MISSOURI Cape Girardeau Columbia Joplin Kansas City Poplar Bluff Spickard/Trenton Springfield 33 220 154 331 413 308 361 341 899 981 1,024 479 886 1,270 31 20 20 21 23 21 18 6 -1 3 -1 8 1 3 151 141 148 142 141 139 137 141 137 137 137 144 139 86 85 86 84 83 84 83 86 85 85 86 85 83 1,424 1,280 14 1 7 1,352 1 184 837 1,024 1,319 1,024 791 -20 -24 -21 -25 -29 -16 -17 -17 -20 -10 123 108 110 116 112 124 135 128 125 92 82 81 77 78 78 83 83 81 83 70 804 1,079 600 1,001 873 1,220 1,424 581 633 633 719 669 725 591 623 0 -9 9 -3 -3 -11 -13 3 3 0 -9 0 -12 0 -3 126 116 113 134 127 113 111 131 122 120 115 132 111 106 117 81 79 82 83 81 77 77 83 80 80 78 83 76 74 80 ELEV. DB WINTER GR/LB DB SUMMER STATE/CITY St. Louis, Int'l Airport Warrensburg. whiteman AFB MONTANA Billings Bozeman Butte Cut Bank Glasgow Great Falls, lnt'l Airport Great Falls, Malmstrom AFB Havre Helena Kalispell Lewistowm Miles City Missoula NEBRASKA Bellevue, Offutt AFB Grand Island Lincoln Norfolk North Platte Omaha, Eppley Airfield Omaha, Wso Scottsbluff Sidney Valentine NEVADA Elko Ely Las Vegas, Int'I Airport Mercury North Las Vegas, Nellis AFB Reno Tonopah Winnemucca NEW HAMPSHIRE Concord Lebanon Mount Washington Portsmouth, Pease AFB NEW JERSEY 66 8 131 81 344 597 6,266 102 -8 -7 -23 4 118 113 90 123 79 79 58 85 5,135 6,263 2,178 3,310 1 870 4,400 5,427 4,314 -5 -6 27 24 28 8 7 1 84 82 102 102 106 77 83 79 68 64 79 72 79 69 67 68 1,047 1,857 1 188 1,552 2,785 981 1,332 3,957 4,304 2,598 -5 -8 -7 -11 -10 -7 -8 -11 -8 -16 141 127 136 129 118 136 134 102 97 110 85 82 84 83 80 85 84 76 73 79 3,570 4,475 5,545 3,855 2,297 3,658 3,527 2,598 3,898 2,972 4,167 2,628 3,189 -13 -20 -22 -21 -22 -19 -17 -25 -18 -12 -18 -19 -9 83 83 76 77 91 81 84 84 80 82 85 95 82 71 69 61 67 74 69 71 72 68 69 71 76 68 ELEV. 564 869 DB WINTER 2 1 GR/LB 138 139 DB 85 86 SUMMER

134 84 Atlantic City Source: ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals 1997

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TABLE 6e - PEAK CLIMATE CONDITIONS FOR MAKEUP AIR DEHUMIDIFICATION DESIGN
STATE/CITY NEW JERSEY CONT'D Millvile Newark Teterboro Trenton, McGuire AFB NEW MEXICO Alamogordo, Holloman AFB Albuquerque Carlsbad Clayton Clovis, Cannon AFB Farmington Gallup Roswell Truth Or Consequences Tucumcari NEW YORK Albany Binghamton Buffalo Central Islip Elmira/Corning Glens Falls Massena New York, JFK Airport New York La Guardia A Newburgh Niagara Falls Plattsburgh, AFB Poughkeepsie Rochester Rome, Griffiss AFB Syracuse Watertown White Plains NORTH CAROLINA Asheville Cape Hatteras Charlotte Cherry Point, Mcas Fayetteville, Fort Bragg Goldsboro, Johnson AFB Greensboro 2,169 10 768 30 243 108 886 11 26 18 24 22 22 15 128 147 130 146 139 139 79 83 82 87 84 84 292 1,631 705 98 955 328 213 23 30 492 591 236 167 554 505 407 325 440 -7 -2 2 11 -2 -10 -15 11 13 6 4 -9 2 1 -5 -3 -12 7 118 118 118 129 122 127 118 125 129 130 125 115 126 123 117 120 118 128 79 77 78 79 81 81 80 80 81 82 81 79 82 81 80 80 78 80 4,094 53 15 3,294 4,970 4,295 5,502 6,470 3,668 4,859 4,065 20 13 19 1 10 8 -1 14 22 9 106 98 121 98 114 94 94 111 94 109 72 68 76 72 75 69 65 73 71 73 82 30 10 135 10 10 10 11 134 127 134 132 81 81 84 83 ELEV. DB WINTER GR/LB DB Hickory Jacksonville, New River Mcaf New Bern Raleigh/Durham Wilmington Winston-Salem NORTH DAKOTA Bismarck Devils Lake Forgo Grand Forks, AFB Minot, AFB Minot, lnt'I Airport Wlliston OHIO Akron/Canton Cincinnati, Lunken Field Gleveland Columbus, Int'I Airport Columbus, RickenbckrAFB Dayton, Int'l Airport Dayton, Wright-Paterson AFB Findlay Mansfield Toledo Youngstown Zanesville OKLAHOMA Altus. AFB Enid, Vance AFB Lawton, Fort Sill/Post Field McAlester Oklahoma City, Tinker AFB Oklahoma City, W. Rogers A Tulsa OREGON Astoria Eugene Hillsboro Klamath Falls Meacham Medford 23 374 203 4,091 4,055 1,329 13 25 21 19 4 -9 21 30 81 83 90 85 67 81 76 69 74 79 74 66 75 65 1,378 1,306 1 188 771 1,293 1,302 676 13 5 12 10 10 9 9 132 130 135 141 138 129 137 84 85 83 85 87 83 87 1,237 482 804 817 745 1,004 823 810 1,296 692 1,184 899 0 5 1 1 3 -1 1 -2 -1 -2 -1 2 125 132 125 128 130 129 136 132 128 129 122 130 80 82 82 82 83 82 84 81 81 82 80 82 1,660 1,453 899 912 1,667 1,716 1,906 -21 -23 -22 -20 -21 -20 -24 109 108 122 118 109 106 103 79 78 82 81 80 78 78 SUMMER STATE/CITY ELEV. 1,188 26 20 440 33 971 DB WINTER 18 23 22 16 23 18 GR/LB 133 145 144 134 146 134 DB 80 86 86 82 85 81 SUMMER

132 82 North Bend Source: ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals 1997

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TABLE 6f - PEAK CLIMATE CONDITIONS FOR MAKEUP AIR DEHUMIDIFICATION DESIGN
STATE/CITY OREGON CONT'D Pendleton Portland Redmond Salem Sexton Summit PENNSYLVANIA Allentown Altoona Bradford Du Bois Erie Harrisburg Philadelphia, Int'I Airport Philadelphia, Northeast A Philadelphia, Willow Gr NAS Pittsburgh, Allegheny Co. A Pittsburgh, Int'l Airport WiIkes-Barre/Scranton Williamsport RHODE ISLAND Providence SOUTH CAROLINA Beaufort, Mcas Charleston Columbia Florence Greer/Greenville Myrtle Beach, AFB Sumter, Shaw AFB SOUTH DAKOTA Chamberlain Huron Pierre Rapid City Sioux Falls TENNESSEE Bristol Chattanooga Crossville Jackson Knoxville Memphis 1,519 689 1,880 433 981 285 9 15 7 12 13 16 125 134 134 140 131 81 82 80 85 82 1,739 1,289 3 742 3,169 1,427 -13 -17 -14 -11 -16 124 126 116 104 127 84 84 81 76 84 39 49 226 148 971 26 243 28 25 21 23 19 25 24 145 145 134 142 130 150 136 85 84 82 85 81 87 83 62 5 124 80 384 1,503 2,142 1,818 738 308 30 121 361 1,253 1,224 948 525 5 5 -6 0 2 9 11 11 10 4 2 2 2 123 119 116 116 122 130 132 135 131 122 121 120 125 81 79 75 76 79 82 83 83 83 79 80 79 80 1,496 39 3,077 200 3,842 3 22 1 20 21 74 83 71 81 76 71 75 68 75 70 ELEV. DB WINTER GR/LB DB SUMMER TEXAS Abilene Amarillo Austin Beaumont/Port Arthur Beeville, Chase Field NAS Brownsville College Station/Bryan Corpus Christi Dallas/Fort Worth, Int'l A Del Rio, Laughlin AFB EI Paso Fort Worth, Carswell AFB Fort Worth, Meacham Field Guadalupe Pass Houston, Hobby Airport Houston, Inter Airport Junction Killeen, For Hood Kingsville, NAS Laredo Lubbock Int'I Airport Lubbock Reese AFB Lufkin Marfa McAlIen Midland/Odessa San Angelo San Antonio, Int'I Airport San Antonio, Kelly AFB San Antonio, Randolph AFB Sanderson Victoria Waco Wichita Falls, Sheppard, AFB UTAH Cedar City Ogden, HiIl AFB Salt Lake City VERMONT Burlington 341 1,165 -11 -10 115 111 79 78 5,623 4,787 4,226 2 6 6 93 91 92 68 72 73 1,791 3,606 620 23 190 20 322 43 597 1,083 3,917 650 709 5,453 46 108 1,713 1,014 49 509 3,241 3,337 289 4,859 108 2,861 1,909 794 689 761 2,838 118 509 1,030 16 6 25 29 28 36 22 32 17 28 21 18 19 13 29 27 19 20 31 32 11 11 23 15 34 17 20 26 27 27 23 29 22 14 123 112 137 152 155 146 141 148 132 136 114 141 135 102 147 144 130 137 149 138 120 122 143 110 146 120 123 139 145 138 123 145 135 129 81 76 81 86 86 83 82 84 82 82 73 85 83 71 84 83 80 81 85 82 77 78 83 72 83 76 80 81 83 82 79 83 83 82 STATE/CITY Nashville ELEV. 591 DB WINTER 10 GR/LB 134 DB 83 SUMMER

143 87 Montpelier/Barre Source: ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals 1997

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TABLE 6g - PEAK CLIMATE CONDITIONS FOR MAKEUP AIR DEHUMIDIFICATION DESIGN
STATE/CITY VIRGINIA Fort Belvoir Hampton, Langley AFB Lynchburg Newport News Norfolk Oceana, NAS Quantico, Mcas Richmond Roanoke Sterling Washington, National A WASHINGTON Bellingham Hanford Olympia Quillayute Seattle, lnt'l Airport Spokane, Fairchild AFB Stampede Pass Tacoma, McChord AFB Walla Walla Wenatchee Yakima WEST VIRGINIA Bluefield Charleston Elkins Huntington Martinsburg Morgantown Parkersburg WISCONSIN Eau Claire Green Bay La Crosse Madison Milwaukee Wausau WYOMING Big Piney Casper Cheyenne, Warren AFB 6,969 5,289 6,142 -22 -13 69 85 60 66 906 702 663 866 692 1 201 -18 -13 -14 -11 -7 -15 125 124 132 126 127 120 82 82 83 83 83 79 2,858 981 1,998 837 558 1,247 860 5 6 -2 6 8 4 4 120 129 121 132 130 124 132 75 81 78 82 81 79 82 157 732 200 203 449 2,461 3,967 322 1,204 1,243 1,066 15 5 18 23 23 1 3 18 4 3 4 81 73 81 76 78 77 70 79 82 78 78 73 72 73 65 71 68 63 71 74 75 75 69 10 938 43 30 23 13 177 1,175 322 66 12 21 12 18 20 22 16 14 12 9 15 139 141 129 139 135 139 136 737 123 130 137 86 85 81 84 83 85 87 84 80 83 83 ELEV. DB WINTER GR/LB DB SUMMER STATE/CITY Cody Gillette Lander Rock Springs Sheridan Worland ELEV. 5,095 4,035 5,558 6,759 3,967 4,245 DB WINTER -14 -16 -14 -9 -14 -22 GR/LB 76 88 81 78 88 94 DB 70 73 69 62 71 75 SUMMER

-7 90 66 Source: ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals 1997

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SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS
GENERAL Furnish and install an indoor air dehumidifier. Performance and specifications shall meet or exceed that shown on the equipment schedule. Units shall be manufactured by Nautica Dehumidifiers, Inc., 200-19 East Second Street, Huntington Station, NY 11746. (www.nauticadehumid.com). Alternate manufacturers must meet or exceed energy efficiency of specified unit and must be evaluated by engineer twelve days prior to bidding. PRINCIPLE OF OPERATION/DESIGN INFORMATION The unit shall be designed to treat recirculated air by filtering, removing moisture, and reducing the relative humidity level of the discharge air in summer and preheating in winter. Indoor air dehumidifier shall be Nautica model ________. System efficiency shall be a minimum of 6.0 pounds of condensed water per KwH of compressor power consumption. Dehumidifier air volume shall not exceed 45 cfm per pound of condensed moisture per hour. Standard rating conditions are: Inlet air 80°F / 60% RH. Dehumidifier shall be capable of removing ____ pounds of moisture per hour with inlet conditions of ____ DB and _____ % RH. Dehumidifier air volume shall be ______ cfm. PRODUCT The makeup air dehumidifier shall be a (Pick One - PACKAGED, SPLIT, MODULAR) system. Unit will require a single electrical connection. Disconnect switch(es) shall be furnished by Division 16 contractor. Unit shall include the following components: (PICK APPROPRIATE PARAGRAPH) – Series DHRxx: supply fan, MSP® dehumidifying coil, heater, controls, condensing unit. Modular indoor air dehumidifier. Single supplier for single source responsibility shall provide all components for makeup air dehumidifier system. Unit shall include: MSP® dehumidification coil section, separate supply fan, heater, controls, and split condensing unit. Unit will require multiple electrical connections. Disconnect switches to be furnished by Division 16 contractor. UNIT CONSTRUCTION Base shall be fabricated of minimum 14-gauge mill galvanized steel floor-sheet continuously welded to side channels and suitably braced on the underside to carry the loading presented by internal components. Base shall be insulated on both the underside and in the web area of the side channels. Insulation shall then be covered with an 18-gauge mill galvanized cover sheet. Units for outdoor applications shall have painted exterior. Roof shall be pitched ¼” per foot for drainage. Units for indoor applications shall have unpainted galvanized finish. Cabinet shall be double wall (Pick one – 1” or 2”), constructed of 20-gauge galvanized steel exterior with 20-gauge galvanized steel interior skin. Insulation shall be sandwiched between interior and exterior surfaces. All interior wall openings and seams that could allow passage of humid air into the insulated space shall be double-sealed to prevent the possibility of internal wall condensation. Access shall be provided for inspection and service access to all components. Insulation shall be 1" thick, 3-pound density, fiberglass and shall comply with NFPA-90A for flame spread, smoke development and fuel contribution.

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MSP® DEHUMIDIFYING COIL Unit shall be furnished with a MSP® dehumidifying coil. Coil to comprise a cooling coil for dehumidifying the air, air-to-air heat exchangers for precooling and reheating the air and a manifold assembly to direct the air through its intended path. Dehumidifiers using hot gas for reheat shall not be acceptable. Air-to-Air heat exchanger shall be stationary, plate-type utilizing MSP® (multiple small plate) technology. The heat transfer media shall be constructed of 3000 series aluminum. To ensure complete drainage of condensate and no standing water, heat exchangers shall be positioned so that condensate flows downward through the heat exchanger, at an angle between vertical and 45 degrees. Pressure drop through air-to-air heat exchangers shall be no greater than 0.25” Wc, with 77% sensible efficiency, equal mass flow rates, 70 deg Fahrenheit temperature difference and 50% RH on the condensing pass Cooling coil shall be ARI-rated direct expansion or chilled water type with 3/8”, ½”, or 5/8” OD copper tubes, aluminum fins. Air shall pass through a minimum of 6 rows of coil. Fin spacing shall not exceed 12 fins per inch. Coil position shall be arranged to ensure that each circuit is exposed to equal loads. DX coils shall have pressure-type brass distributors and solder connections shall be provided. Coil face velocity shall not exceed 500 FPM. DX coils shall be provided with externally equalized thermostatic expansion valve for maximum cooling effectiveness. Condensate drain pan shall be insulated heliarc welded minimum 18-gauge stainless steel type 304. Pan shall be pitched to ensure no standing water. Thermostatic expansion valve shall be provided for maximum cooling effectiveness. FAN Fans shall be licensed to bear the AMCA seal and tested in accordance with AMCA Standard 210. Fans shall be as rated on the equipment schedule. Fans shall have heavy gauge housings and wheels, and shall be both statically and dynamically balanced. Fan assembly shall be isolated from the unit casing with vibration isolators. Outlet of fan shall be separated from the unit casing with a flexible discharge connection. V-belt drive shall be furnished with a service factor of 1.2 times the motor horsepower. Supply fans delivering air volumes of 3000 cfm or above shall be backward inclined centrifugal type. HEATER (PICK APPROPRIATE PARAGRAPH) Electric heating coil shall be designed for direct exposure to the airstream. Heater shall be open wound helically coiled nickel/chrome alloy elements set in galvanized steel frames with sealtite insulators and stainless steel terminations. Contactors and protective devices shall be included. Heater shall be indirect-fired gas type with multiple stages. Heat exchanger and burner shall be stainless steel for 100% outside air duty. Provide hot water coil for heating supply air. Installing contractor shall provide hot water control valve and piping accessories. CONDENSING UNIT (PICK APPROPRIATE PARAGRAPH) Provide air-cooled condensing unit. Unit shall be provided with 5-year compressor parts only warranty. Condensing unit capacity shall be as specified on the schedule. Unit shall be factory charged. Compressor electrical circuit shall be equipped with overload protection, high and low pressure safety controls. Provide packaged water-cooled condensing unit. Unit shall be provided with 5-year compressor parts only warranty. Condensing unit capacity shall be as specified on the schedule. Unit shall be factory charged. Compressor electrical circuit shall be equipped with overload protection, high and low pressure safety controls. CONTROL SYSTEM Control system shall be designed to optimize energy consumption and provide precise control of humidity. Control system shall be complete with humidistat and freeze control. Panel shall include unit controller to cycle compressor(s) for dehumidification and to stage heater.

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AIR COOLED SPLIT DEHUMIDIFIER SELECTION CHART
MODEL CAPACITY AIRFLOW POWER CONDENSING UNIT LB/H SCFM KW NOMINAL TONS DRIA-4A 48-240A 180.0 6,720 26.00 20.0 32-180A 130.5 4,480 18.68 15.0 28-150A 106.6 3,920 15.68 12.5 24-120A 92.1 3,360 12.80 10.0 16-090A 65.6 2,240 8.91 7.5 15-072A 52.3 2,100 7.14 6.0 10-060A 40.3 1,400 5.97 5.0 09-048A 33.8 1,260 4.97 4.0 08-042A 30.1 1,120 4.24 3.5 06-036A 25.3 1,000 3.84 3.0 06-030A 22.9 1,000 3.11 2.5 * Moisture Removal Efficiency For use in indoor swimming pools, specify "coated units" MRE * LB/KWH 6.92 6.99 6.80 7.20 7.36 7.32 6.75 6.80 7.11 6.58 7.38

SPECIFY “COATED” UNITS FOR INDOOR POOLS AND OTHER CORROSIVE ENVIRONMENTS.

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AIR COOLED SPLIT PIPING

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SUCTION LINE

LIQUID LINE

MSPTM COIL

AIR COOLEDPACKAGED DEHUMIDIFIER SELECTION CHART
MODEL CAPACITY AIRFLOW POWER LB/H SCFM KW DRIP-4A 48-240** 189.4 6,720 22.84 32-156** 122.8 4,480 14.63 24-121** 95.5 3,360 10.95 16-81** 63.6 2,240 7.39 12-56** 43.6 1,680 6.23 10-49** 38.6 1,400 5.51 9-44** 34.8 1,260 4.76 8-41** 32.7 1,120 4.64 6-30** 23.3 1,000 3.22 4-22** 17.3 1,000 2.56 * Moisture Removal Efficiency ** Insert Heat rejection configuration (Figures 1-4) For use in indoor swimming pools, specify "coated units" MRE * LB/KWH 8.29 8.39 8.72 8.61 7.00 7.00 7.31 7.05 7.24 6.75

SPECIFY “COATED” UNITS FOR INDOOR POOLS AND OTHER CORROSIVE ENVIRONMENTS.

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HEAT REJECTION OPTIONS FOR PACKAGED UNITS
FIGURE 1 - WATER REJECTION (W)
C O I L

FIGURE 3 - INDOOR REJECTION (A)
C O I L

MSP ® COIL

MSP ® COIL

POOL WATER HEATING CIRCUIT
COMPRESSOR

COMPRESSOR

CONDENSER

FIGURE 4 - OUTDOOR/INDOOR REJECTION
A IR CO OLE D CO NDE NS E R

FIGURE 2 - WATER/INDOOR REJECTION

MSP® COIL

C O I L

MSP ® COIL

C O I L

WATER LOOP COMPRESSOR
COMPRESSOR

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