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LEARNING STYLES, LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY, AND TECHNOLOGY FOR BEST PRACTICES IN READING PEDAGOGY

Julia Ferguson, Sandra Lipkind, Linda Miglierina

UNIS Center For Scholarship 2010-11

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R EAD I N G S CHOLARSHIP REPORT
UNIS Center For Scholarship 2010-11

Project Description" Purpose and Rationale" Target Audience" Guiding Questions and Outcomes" Research Results: Testing" Research Results: Observational" Strategies for Future Implementation in our Classes" Strategies for Sharing Results with UNIS Faculty" Strategies for Sharing Results with Wider Audience" Final Overview of Budgetary Expenditure" Conclusion" Bibliography"

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Appendices"

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A-C

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Project Description
Improve reading fluency and comprehension in middle school students through best practice guidelines in reading combined with technology.

Purpose and Rationale
UNIS students are multi-lingual learners from many backgrounds and learning styles who need literacy instruction to meet the needs of the 21st century. All UNIS middle school students need explicit reading instruction during these important early adolescent years in order to reach the deeper, more critical and inferential literacy skills required for high school and university.

Target Audience
2010-2011: Middle School ELL (7th & 8th) and Learning Lab (5th & 8th) grade students. Proposal for future: All middle school students in all grades and all subject areas.

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Guiding Questions and Outcomes
OUR
INITIAL QUESTIONS

• What are the current research-based “best practice” guidelines for improving reading skills? • How can technology be used to enhance research-based teaching practices for students with varied learning styles and from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds? • What hardware and software is available and practical to use with best practices for improving students’ reading skills? • What studies can we design to test these programs with our students at UNIS?

OUR 2010-2011

OUTCOMES

• We vastly improved and synthesized our knowledge of best practice research for reading pedagogy and multi-lingual student needs and continue to do so.   • We adopted a Before, During, After (hereafter referred to as “BDA”) approach to integrating technology into reading instruction. (Appendix A) • We explored a variety of software tools and generated a resource guide for teachers, which listed our findings and described the technologies. (Appendix B) • We explored hardware options and implemented their use in the classroom. • We worked with students using the new technologies to help them reflect and take ownership of their learning styles and reading practice to become more discerning, analytical and fluent readers.

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Research Results: Testing
READING
COMPREHENSION AND FLUENCY ASSESSMENT

R E S U LT S W I T H

LEARNING LAB

STUDENTS

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Students were tested with the Great Leaps Reading Intervention. Student C, who had more practice and reinforcement than the others at school and home, started the year at a 1st grade fluency reading level and finished at a 3.5 grade

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Students were tested with a 5th grade reading comprehension test &om CBM (University of Oregon). Student C started the year with a 35% and finished the year with an 85%.

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READING

COMPREHENSION AND FLUENCY ASSESSMENT

R E S U LT S W I T H

ELL

STUDENTS

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Students were tested with a three minute fluency testsection &om the Woodcock Johnson. Student B started the year reading at a mid 4th grade level and finished the year reading at a beginning 8th grade level.

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Students were tested with two Qualitative Reading Inventory tests, one for 6th grade in September and one for 7th grade in March. QRI leveled results were translated into number scores.

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Research Results: Observational
FLUENCY
• For the M3-M4 ELL students, we were impressed with how well they engaged with the fluency work. They liked working with the iPods and MacBooks to record their voices. The varied assignments and guidelines for recording (Appendix C) led the students to become comfortable with this new tool. • For the M1 Learning Lab students, the Great Leaps Reading Program was upgraded and enhanced by using Garageband to record and re-record the students’ oral readings. Students loved working with the iPads and MacBooks. After practice, students were able to use the program independently.

ENGAGEMENT
• Student engagement increased and we have seen students use hardware and web tools introduced in reading lessons for many other assignments and purposes. The reading tools are becoming integral parts of the students’ learning process. • Students are learning to read new multi-modal texts (example online sources that combine words, links, images, and films), and then use these tools to deepen their comprehension.

Strategies for Future Implementation in our Classes
• Use BDA reading approach with technology integration daily. • Create more lessons involving direct instruction for online reading strategies. • Give weekly recording assignments and create a more detailed intervention approach to the recordings. (RTI -Response to Intervention model) • Continue to implement and explore the use of varied Pre-tests/Post-tests to check reading fluency and comprehension. • Create and research a bank of academic vocabulary and implement weekly vocabulary training modules for our students.

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Strategies for Sharing Results with UNIS Faculty
• First we would like to present our findings to Maggie Lascny-Jones to get feedback, and then we would like to present our findings to the Admin Council in June or early September. • In the fall, we would like to present our BDA reading approach to different departments (MESH+L). We would tailor our presentation to teachers in each of the specific subject areas. We would like to encourage cross-curricular direct reading instruction and motivate all teachers to think of themselves as reading teachers. • At that time, we can share ideas, handouts and sample lessons as well as model this research-based approach to technology integration.

Strategies for Sharing Results with Wider Audience
• We began by presenting at the New York State Association of Independent Schools (NYSAIS) Teaching with Technology Conference, April 27, 2011. The feedback we received was positive. Our participants commented that our research-based approach to technology integration and reading was a refreshing change from the other presentations they had attended that day where technology was showcased without the connection to what we know to be best practices in teaching and learning core skills (numeracy, literacy, communication)    • We are currently drafting an article in the hopes of being published in Educational Leadership’s Reading issue coming out in March 2012.   • We plan on continuing the work we have done this year to present at future conferences such as Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), New York Branch of the International Dyslexia Association (NYBIDA) or European League of Middle Level Educators (ELMLE). We are investigating the idea of creating and presenting a workshop for Bank Street.

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Final Overview of Budgetary Expenditure
WORKSHOPS:
" Teach21 - Workshops at the School at Columbia University&  & & $300.00&

S O F T WA R E :

3 $100 iTunes Gift Cards& & & & & & &   & $300.00

H A R D WA R E :  

LiveScribe Smart Pens & Notebooks& & & & & & & & & & & & & $532.95 $4795.00 Mac Equipment (P0 #35869)& & & & 5 iPads 1 Macbook Pro (13in) 2 iTouches (32GB) & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & &         & $1888.65

Mac Equipment (po #)& & & & &

3 iPod Touches (32GB)&

Brookstone Bluetooth Keyboard Portfolios (iPad covers)&& 3 Ultra HD 4GB Flip Camera & & & & & & & &

7 Logitech Premium USB Headset 350&

TOTAL & &

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$7816.60

( T O T A L D O E S N O T I N C L U D E S O M E S H I P P I N G - W E A R E WA I T I N G O N F I N A L P O N U M B E R S )

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Conclusion
This scholarship grant has both inspired and excited us throughout the year. We have been enriched by the research, challenged by the learning curve with new technology, and thrilled by the access and opportunity to try out new hardware and software applications. Our regular meetings for collaboration and progress with this grant have given us important insights, such as the fact that key academic skills, like reading, can provide interdisciplinary connections that are deep and rich for both student and teacher learning. We are very pleased with the sampling of outcomes and can’t wait for September to continue to put into practice all we have learned this year. Thank you so very much for giving us this opportunity to improve reading instruction for middle school students at UNIS.

http://tinyurl.com/unisreadingproject

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Bibliography
PERIODICALS
Carrey, Benedict. “Come On I Thought I Knew That.” New York Times [New York] 18 Apr. 2011, online ed., sec. D4: n. pag. NYTimes.com. Web. 23 Apr. 2011. Rebora, Anthony. “Can Reading Be Saved   Interview with Kelly Gallagher.” Education Week Teacher. N.p., 4 Apr. 2011. Web. 23 Apr. 2011. <http://www.edweek.org///‌/‌/‌/‌gallagher.h04.html>.

BOOKS
Beers, Kylene, Robert E. Probst, and Linda Rief, eds. Adolescent Literacy Turning Promise Into Practice. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2007. Print. Glascow, Neil A., and Thomas C.S. Farrell. What Successful Literacy Teachers Do: 70 Research-based Strategies for Teachers, Reading Coaches, and Instructional Planners. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, 2007. Print. Harvey, Stephanie, and Anne Goudvis. Strategies that Work. Portland, Maine: Stenhouse Publishers, 2000. Print. Jacobs, Heidi Hayes, ed. Curriculum 21 Essential Education For a Changing World. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2010. Print. Powell, William, and Ochan Kusuma-Powell. Making the Difference: Differentiation in International Schools. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: Overseas Schools Advisory Council, 2007. Print. Rasinski, Timohty V. The Fluent Reader. New York: Scholastic Professional Books, 2003. Print. Schudt Caldwell, JoAnne, and Lauren Leslie. Intervention Strageties to Follow Informal Reading Inventory Assessment: So What Do I Do Now? Boston, MA: Pearson Education,  2009. Print. Ulin, David L. The Lost Art of Reading: Why Books Matter in a Distracted Time. Seattle, WA: Sasquatch Books, 2010. Print. Wendling, Barabar J., and Nancy Mather. “Reading Fluency and Vocabulary and Reading Comprehension.” Essentials of Evidence-Based Academic Interventions. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons, 2009. 52-120. Print. Young, Terrell A., and Nancy L. Hadaway, eds. Supporting the Literacy Development of English Learners Increasing Success in All Classrooms. Newark, DE: International Reading Association, 2006. Print.

A U D I OV I S UA L
Coehllo, Elizabeth. “Teaching in the Quadrants: A Framework for Differentiated Instruction for English Language Learners.” ECIS  ESL and Mother Tongue Conference. Radisson SAS  Dusseldorf, Germany. 3 Mar. 2011. Address. Cummins, Jim. “Teacher and Student Identity Intersections in International School Contexts.” ECIS  ESL and Mother Tongue Conference. Radisson SAS  Dusseldorf, Germany. 4 Mar. 2011. Address. Early, Margaret. “Multimodality and multilingualism: power, access and change in pedagogy.” ECIS  ESL and Mother Tongue Conference. Radisson SAS  Dusseldorf, Germany. 5 Mar. 2011. Address. Jacobs, Heidi Hayes. “Curriculum Mapping and Differentiated Instruction.” NYPL. New York Public Library  NY, NY. 19 Oct. 2010. Address.

WEB

SITES

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E

-SOURCES

Abilock, Debbie. “Twenty First Century Literacies: Online Reading Strategies.” NoodleTools.com. NoodleTools, 27 Mar. 2011. Web. 25 Apr. 2011. <http://www.noodletools.com/////_files/_document.html>. “Clearinghouse.” Curriculum 21. Heidi Hayes Jacobs, 2011. Web. 25 Apr. 2011. <http://www.curriculum21.com/>.

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Early, Margaret. “Dual Language Literacy Practices; Transitional ESL Literary Essay Project.” The Multi Literacy Project A research co-aboration of students, educators and researchers. University of British Columbia, n.d. Web. 9 Apr. 2011. <http://multiliteracies.ca>. Linder, Suzanne. “Strategy guide  Reading Online.” ReadWriteThink.org. International Reading Association, 2011. Web. 25 Apr. 2011. <http://www.readwritethink.org/ional-development/guides/online-30096.html>. “Student Research Online:  Tips and Strategies.” Online Schools. Online Schools, 2011. Web. 25 Apr. 2011. <http://www.onlineschools.org/to-succeed/research/>.

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