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100 Boat Designs Reviewed

100 Boat Designs Reviewed

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Published by: Erdem Hacipoğlu on Jun 03, 2011
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10/01/2013

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A Double-Ended Sloop

---------Design by Joel White --------
Commentary by William Garden

i

Tshould qualify this design review at the start by
I confessing that 1 am a certifiable boat nut. I love all

JL boats.

Joel White's neat little double-ender that we're
reviewing here reminds me of the term "vice free," an
expression I've come across in New Zealand and one
that brings to mind a lovely, docile sort of yacht.
Vice free is a great term; its opposite (vice riddled?)
brings to mind some vicious sort of down-by-the-head
thing — probably manned by a crew of ruffians
crouched along the weather rail, badmouthing the
competition. The vice-riddled boat embodies all sorts
of nasty spinnaker broaches, heavy weather helm, poor
sail-carrying power, and a steady leak over my bunk.
All this vice requires as a cure some sort of detoxifi-
cation tank full of riggers and carpenters. The rudder
must be shifted, ballast added, winglets attached to
the keel, and perhaps a set of ballast tanks implanted.
The mast will be moved and cosmetic surgery per-
formed on the diving forebody, (and the crew's mouths
will be washed out with soap) — all this in order to
eliminate nightmares of death-roll broaches, sinkings,
broken rudder stocks, or sudden by-the-lee uncon-
trolled goosewinged runs off towards disaster.
Vice free is a great term for my kind of boat.
Let's get into an evaluation of Joel's sloop. A quick
look brings out some endearing features that will bear
thought and study. First off, she has a nice canoe stern,
which I always find appealing. With that as a hook,
we're well into it. Further study turns up many good
features in a thoughtfully presented and highly pro-
fessional set of drawings.
A full-bodied hull form of 23 to 24 feet on the water-
line is a nice size, since it allows standing headroom
plus good internal volume with enough space avail-
able for several possible variations in interior layouts.

Let's climb down below and look around. The basic,
simple layout has a pleasant saloon, good seating, and
reasonable stowage — particularly so since the for-
ward berth will accept stowage overflow when she's
doing any offshore voyaging. Canvas berths are always
appealing, and they will be a great boon to a tired crew.
One's clothes can be folded on the day settee then
stowed between settee and canvas berth above. This,
plus the lockers, will do much toward keeping a tidy
ship on long cruises.
At sea in rough weather, my choice of an off-watch
berth would probably be the cabin sole, well chocked
off with a sail bag. Now, shipmates, Joel has devel-
oped a vessel to suit his clients' needs, a plan that
works out very well and that can be followed on the
drawings. But let's digress from an account of her as
drawn and ease off into what I would ask for if Joel
were designing her for my own use.
A voyage aboard this sturdy double-ender is pleas-
ant to contemplate. I've already bunked down on the
cabin sole, it's blowing fresh, and down here there's
no lower spot on which to be thrown. Temperature is
foggy damp and a gas stove wouldn't do. My solid
fuel heater has the cabin warm and dry, the lid is
secured, and a closed pot of stew is chocked off in the
corner fiddle. As wet weather morale boosters, a snug
cabin and dry socks are difficult to beat. The heating
stove, incidentally, fits nicely into the forward star-
board locker space. The galley range, or Primus, is rel-
egated to major cooking tasks.
For my galley, Joel has reversed the positions of
hanging locker and ice box from those shown in the
drawings. This allows engine heat to keep the locker
dry, and gives better access to the icebox top when it's
used as a galley sideboard or chart table. I also asked
him to put a bridge deck in my ship in order to fit an

— 97-

A Double-Ended Sloop

athwartships galley counter under it. This is a nice
area for dish and galley lockers.
Let's go back to the main cabin. The weather has
eased off, and we're ready to eat a proper meal. The
centerline table is a mixed blessing. (I was going to say
a pain in the ass.) So I've jettisoned the beautiful teak
table and replaced it with a sturdy folding one. It has
concave edges fore and aft, and it's fitted port or star-
board at mid-length of the settees. We're eating partly
sidesaddle with the passageway clear for transit. With
this arrangement, the cabin looks half again as large.
But for those of you who prefer centerline tables, the
neat details in Joel's drawings here are well worth
studying.

The minor below-deck items noted above were
requested of the architect prior to my placing the order,
so we have remained on excellent terms — although
I'm suspicious of a little black book that seems to be
used for adding up dollar signs.
Now we've wandered around below looking at
things, so let's get on up and look over her deck lay-
out. The bridge deck provides a nice spot on which to
stretch out athwartships — particularly so since I've
also spent some money on a dodger over the forward
end of the cockpit. This is a great shelter when the
spray is flying.
Joel has just written down some more numbers with
dollar signs attached, but we'll continue.
I like the plank bulwarks and the good shipshape
stanchion details. We've agreed to put the mainsheet
horse and traveler aft on the gallows, and we'll add
small weather cloths port and starboard from the gal-
lows forward to the first stanchion.
As for the rigging, forward we must have a strong
roller furling system, and on the main an equally good
jiffy reef. Maybe we'll use the seven-eighths rig with
the headboard coming to jibstay terminal height when
one reef is down. And maybe we'll add another pair
of winches in the cockpit while we're spending all
this money. Nice deep seats in the cockpit. We've made
the coamings a couple of inches higher for my bad
back.

We'll fit double anchor rollers forward and use a
good heavy plow. For singlehanding, the rode will
lead aft via snatch blocks to the cockpit winch — handy
to the helmsman when getting underway. Pulpits look
well made and extra strong. Full marks for a good pul-
pit aft and a good lazarette that accommodates fend-
ers, warps, and other cruising gear.
Let's talk about the lines. There is a spidsgatter look
to the waterlines — nicely formed, good freeboard,
ends well balanced, and a lovely body plan. There is
a good deck line and a pleasing run to the trunk cabin.
The body plan is downright Junoesque.
For my ship, I'd have Joel plumb up the rudder stock
and move it back to the waterline. Also, I'd like him
to scoop out some deadwood aft to trim wetted sur-
face and add some leading edge — and, I'd like a steer-
ing vane swivel bearing on the sternpost. When we're
plunging along cold, wet, and tired, and wondering
why we left home, we'll have some shelter behind the
dodger while the vane keeps her charging along.
So we come to the construction plan — well thought
out, showing Joel's wealth of experience as a naval
architect and as a boatbuilder. Lots of good detail delin-
eated in a clear style.
Strip construction is a practical method for an ama-
teur builder, because a couple of strakes can be put on
during an evening, and the material is relatively light
and easy to handle. Epoxy or resorcinol glue can be
used with nonferrous or galvanized common nails as
the edge fasteners. The strips are slightly hollowed
concave and convex to match, or bevels can be taken
and a few plane cuts will trim the strip for a fair glue
line. A skin of epoxy and Dynel will seal her off for a
tight, dry hull. The sheathing should be done while
she's still upside down, prior to fitting the deadwood.
In summary, this is a really fine little ship. She is
well within the capabilities of handy backyard builders,
and she won't prove to be too small after the first sea-
son's cruise. We'll give her a "10."

Joel White can be reached at the Brooklin Boat Yard,
P.O. Box 143, Brooklin, ME 04616.

-99-

Particulars 29'
Double-Ender

LOA 29'4"
LWL
Beam
Draft
Displ

23'7"
'2"
4'2"
10,525 lbs
Sail area 430 sq f t

Construction section at
Station 7 (looking aft)
shows 1 'A-inch by 1
'/»-
inch cedar strip planking
and a laminated keel.

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