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An Islamic Treasury of Virtues

An Islamic Treasury of Virtues

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Published by Ebtessam
FOR EWORD
One way of presenting Islam is by means of
interpretation, that is, by scholarly additions and
explanations which make Islamic teachings more
understandable and, in consequence, more
effective. This has always been, and always will be,
a part of Islamic daw’ah.
But another way of presenting Islam is to translate
it into another language without any alterations,
additions or explanations. This is the method
adopted in this book, in which the sayings and
deeds of the Prophet Muhammad, upon whom be
peace, and his Companions have been collected and
presented in a simple, straightforward style. The
only additions are the separate headings under
which the different sayings and incidents appear.
For centuries the lives of the Prophet and his
Companions have served as models of a truly God
fearing existence for all mankind, and will continue
to do so until Doomsday. Hence God’s preservation
of this page of history with such exactitude that
anyone who is sincere about learning from their An Islamic Treasury of Virtues
Foreword
~ 35 ~
example can know, even today, every detail of how
they lived and died.
The present book, being a judicious selection from the
deeds and saying which make up this model, gives an
authentic picture of the Islamic way of life. With this
book to throw light on the traditions of the Prophet
and his Companions, one can pattern one’s life in such
a way as to be certain of receiving God’s succour and
blessings during one’s life time, and His rewards in
the Hereafter for the good deeds done in this life.
Besides being an aid to personal study and
individual training, this book will be of great
benefit when read out at gatherings and in
mosques, providing, as it does, valuable material
for congregational recitations.
Maulana Wahiduddin Khan
February 14, 1985
The Islamic Centre
1, Nizamuddin West Market
New Delhi-110013
FOR EWORD
One way of presenting Islam is by means of
interpretation, that is, by scholarly additions and
explanations which make Islamic teachings more
understandable and, in consequence, more
effective. This has always been, and always will be,
a part of Islamic daw’ah.
But another way of presenting Islam is to translate
it into another language without any alterations,
additions or explanations. This is the method
adopted in this book, in which the sayings and
deeds of the Prophet Muhammad, upon whom be
peace, and his Companions have been collected and
presented in a simple, straightforward style. The
only additions are the separate headings under
which the different sayings and incidents appear.
For centuries the lives of the Prophet and his
Companions have served as models of a truly God
fearing existence for all mankind, and will continue
to do so until Doomsday. Hence God’s preservation
of this page of history with such exactitude that
anyone who is sincere about learning from their An Islamic Treasury of Virtues
Foreword
~ 35 ~
example can know, even today, every detail of how
they lived and died.
The present book, being a judicious selection from the
deeds and saying which make up this model, gives an
authentic picture of the Islamic way of life. With this
book to throw light on the traditions of the Prophet
and his Companions, one can pattern one’s life in such
a way as to be certain of receiving God’s succour and
blessings during one’s life time, and His rewards in
the Hereafter for the good deeds done in this life.
Besides being an aid to personal study and
individual training, this book will be of great
benefit when read out at gatherings and in
mosques, providing, as it does, valuable material
for congregational recitations.
Maulana Wahiduddin Khan
February 14, 1985
The Islamic Centre
1, Nizamuddin West Market
New Delhi-110013

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Published by: Ebtessam on Jun 08, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/02/2013

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“I have seen people among the Prophet’s
companion to whom the world meant less than the
dust under their feet.” Thus spoke Hasan Basri to
his awed contemporaries. He was well qualified to
judge, for he had met a large number of them,
seventy of whom had fought at Badr. He told them
of how they wore simple, homespun camel hair
garments, and were so preoccupied with righteous
living that they seemed lost to the world. “Were
they to see the best among you, they would think:
“These people do not believe in the Day of
Judgement.”

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