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A study on career planning and development of employees in banks

Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT(HRM)


Submitted by

G. Suman Jain
ENROLMENT NO: 0209390061 Under the guidance of Prof. CHARLES JAILSINGH, M.COM, M.Phil

DIRECTORATE OF DISTANCE EDUCATION PONDICHERRY UNIVERSITY PONDICHERRY-605014 (2009-2011)

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
First and foremost, I thank the Almighty God. I express my sincere thanks to the managers of banks for granting permission to conduct my project work in his esteemed concern and for helping and providing various information and data. I wish to convey my sincere gratitude to Prof. Charles jailsingh for showing proper direction and giving valuable advice and suggestions for varying and completing this project work. My sincere thanks are due to all the respondents who have helped and cooperated with me during the course of my survey. I am also remembering with deep appreciation and gratitude the encouragement and help received during the preparation and completion of this project work from my beloved family members and friends.

Suman Jain

CERTIFICATE OF GUIDE
This is to certify that the project work titled A Study on career planning and development in banks is a bonafide work of Ms. Suman Jain Enroll No: 0209390061 carried out in partial fulfillment for the award of degree of MBA HRM of PONDICHERRY UNIVERSITY under my guidance. This project work is original and not submitted earlier for the award of any degree/diploma or associate ship of any other university/institute.

Signature of guide

Guides academic qualification, Designation and experience

STUDENTS DECLARATION
I, Ms. Suman Jain hereby declare that the Project Work titled A Study on Career planning and development of employees in bank is the original work of mine and submitted to the Pondicherry University in partial fulfillment of requirements for the award of Master of Business Administration in Human Resource Management. Moreover it is a record of original work done by me under the supervision of Prof. Charles Jailsingh. The information in the project will be kept confidential as this information is for internal project work of Pondicherry University and it will not be used or circulated for external use. Enroll No: 0209390061 Date

Signature of the student G. Suman Jain

TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTERS PARTICULARS PAGE NO

Chapter 1

INTRODUCTION OF THE STUDY

Chapter 2

REVIEW OF LITERATURE OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY NEED FOR THE STUDY LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY INDUSTRY PROFILE

Chapter 3

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Chapter 4

COLLECTION & ANALYSIS OF DATA

Chapter -5

FINDINGS SUGGESTIONS

Chapter -6

CONCLUSION QUESTIONNAIRE Bibliography

LIST OF TABLE TABLE NO


4.1 4.2.1 4.2.2 4.2.3 4.2.4 4.2.5 4.2.6 4.2.7 4.2.8 4.2.9 4.2.10 4.2.11 4.2.12 4.2.13 4.2.14 4.2.15 4.2.16 4.2.17 4.2.18 4.2.19 6

PARTICULARS
Data classification Attaining objectives During work thou dislike giving abilities to organization Coming their job on time Usage of skills Involved in lot of activities Position offering comfortable fit Awareness about career planning Freedom to do their job Risk taking in job Oppurtunities for advancement Reward and reconization Employee encouragement Team spirit Rule and regulation Required facilities provided Safe working environment Decision with superior Clean and hygiene work place

PAGE NO
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

4.2.20 4.2.21

Process of performance appraisal Change in job

51 52

4.2.22 4.2.23 4.2.24 4.3.1 4.3.2 4.3.3 4.3.4 4.4

Objectives Training provided Knowledge sharing Chi-square test Observed frequency Expected frequency Chi-square test Weighted average

53 54 55 56 57 57 58 59

LIST OF CHARTS CHART NO


4.1 4.2.1 4.2.2 4.2.3 4.2.4 4.2.5 4.2.6 4.2.7 4.2.8 4.2.9 4.2.10 4.2.11 4.2.12 4.2.13 4.2.14 4.2.15 4.2.16 4.2.17

PARTICULARS
Data classification Attaining objectives During work thou dislike giving abilities to organization Coming their job on time Usage of skills Involved in lot of activities Position offering comfortable fit Awareness about career planning Freedom to do their job Risk taking in job Oppurtunities for advancement Reward and reconization Employee encouragement Team spirit Rule and regulation Required facilities provided Safe working environment

PAGE NO
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48

4.2.18 4.2.19 4.2.20 4.2.21

Decision with superior Clean and hygiene work place Process of performance appraisal Change in job

49 50 51 52

4.2.22

Objectives Training provided Knowledge sharing

53 54 55

4.2.23 4.2.24

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Chapter -1

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Career planning and development


INTRODUCTION MEANING OF CAREER: A Career has been defined as the sequence of a person's experiences on different jobs over the period of time. It is viewed as fundamentally a relationship between one or more organizations and the individual. To some a career is a carefully worked out plans for self advancement to others it is a calling-life role to others it is a voyage to self discovery and to still others it is life itself. A career is a sequence of positions/jobs held by a person during the course of his working life. According to Edwin B. Flippo,A career is a sequence of separate but related work activities that provide continuity, order and meaning to a persons life. According to Garry Dessler, The occupational positions a person has had over many years. Many of today's employees have high expectations about their jobs. There has been a general increase in the concern of the quality of life. Workers expect more from their jobs than just income. A further impetus to career planning is the need for organizations to make the best possible use of their most valuable resources the people in a time of rapid technological growth and change. CAREER DEVELOPMENT Career development, both as a concept and a concern is of recent origin. The reason for this lack of concern regarding career development for a long time, has been the careless, unrealistic assumption about employees functioning smoothly along the right lines, and the belief that the employees guide themselves in their careers. Since the employees are educated, trained for the job, and appraised, it is felt that the development fund on is over. Modern personnel administration has to be futuristic, it has to look beyond the present tasks, since neither the requirements of the organisation nor the attitudes and abilities of employees are constant. It is too costly to leave 'career' to the tyranny of time and casualty of circumstances, for it is something which requires to be handled carefully through systematisation and professional promoting. Fortunately, there has lately been some appreciation of the value of career planning and acceptance of validity of career development as a major input in organisational development. 12

Career development refers to set of programs designed to match an individuals needs, abilities, and career goals with current and future opportunities in the organization. Where career plan sets career path for an employee, career development ensures that the employee is well developed before he or she moves up the next higher ladder in the hierarchy. CAREER PLANNING Career Planning is a relatively new personnel function. Established programs on Career Planning are still rare except in larger or more progressive organizations. Career Planning aims at identifying personal skills, interest, knowledge and other features; and establishes specific plans to attain specific goals. Aims and Objectives of Career Planning: Career Planning aims at matching individual potential for promotion and individual aspirations with organizational needs and oppurtunities. Career Planning is making sure that the organization has the right people with the right skills at the right time. In particular it indicates what training and development would be necessary for advancing in the career altering the career path or staying in the current position. Its focus is on future needs and oppurtunities and removal of stagnation, obsolescence, dissatisfaction of the employee.

OBJECTIVE OF CAREER PLANNING


To attract and retain the right type of person in the organization. To map out career of employees suitable to their ability and their willingness to be trained and developed for higher positions. To have a more stable workforce by reducing labour turnover and absenteeism. It contributes to man power planning as well as organizational development and effective achievement of corporate goals. To increasingly utilize the managerial talent available at all levels within the organization. To improve employee morale and motivation by matching skills to job requirement and by providing opportunities for promotion. It helps employee in thinking of long term involvement with the organisation. To provide guidance and encourage employees to fulfill their potentials. To achieve higher productivity and organizational development. To ensure better use of human resource through more satisfied and productive employees. To meet the immediate and future human resource needs of the organisation on the timely basis.

NEED FOR CAREER PLANNING


13 To desire to grow and scale new heights. Realize and achieve the goals. Performance measure. High employee turnover.

To educate the employees It motivates employees to grow. It motivates employees to avail training and development. It increases employee loyalty as they feel organization cares about them.

ADVANTAGES OF CAREER PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT


In fact both individuals and the organization are going to benefit from career planning and development. So the advantages are described below: For Individuals 1. The process of career planning helps the individual to have the knowledge of various career opportunities, his priorities etc. 2. This knowledge helps him select the career that is suitable to his life styles, preferences, family environment, scope for self-development etc. 3. It helps the organization identify internal employees who can be promoted. 4. Internal promotions, up gradation and transfers motivate the employees, boost up their morale and also result in increased job satisfaction. 5. Increased job satisfaction enhances employee commitment and creates a sense of belongingness and loyalty to the organization. 6. Employee will await his turn of promotion rather than changing to another organization. This will lower employee turnover. 7. It improves employees performance on the job by taping their potential abilities and further employee turnover. 8. It satisfies employee esteem needs. For Organizations A long-term focus of career planning and development will increase the effectiveness of human resource management. More specifically, the advantages of career planning and development for an organization include: 1. Efficient career planning and development ensures the availability of human resources with required skill, knowledge and talent. 2. The efficient policies and practices improve the organizations ability to attract and retain highly skilled and talent employees. 3. The proper career planning ensures that the women and people belong to backward communities get opportunities for growth and development. 4. The career plan continuously tries to satisfy the employee expectations and as such minimizes employee frustration. 5. By attracting and retaining the people from different cultures, enhances cultural diversity. 6. Protecting employees interest results in promoting organizational goodwill.

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CAREER PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT PROCESS


Chart1.1: Career planning & Development process

1. Identifying individual needs and aspirations: Its necessary to identify and communicate the career goals, aspiration and career anchors of every employee because most individuals may not have a clear idea about these. For this purpose, a human resource inventory of the organization and employee potential areas concerned. 2. Analyzing career opportunities: The organizational set up, future plans and career system of the employees are analyzed to identify the career opportunities available within it. Career paths can be determined for each position. It can also necessary to analyze career demands in terms of knowledge, skill, experience, aptitude etc. 3. Identifying match and mismatch: A mechanism to identifying congruence between individual current aspirations and organizational career system is developed to identify and compare specific areas of match and mismatch for different categories of employees. 4. Formulating and implementing strategies: Alternative action plans and strategies for dealing with the match and mismatch are formulated and implemented. 5. Reviewing career plans: A periodic review of the career plan is necessary to know whether the plan is contributing to effective utilization of human resources by matching employee objectives to job needs. Review will also indicate to employees in which direction the organization is moving, what changes are likely to take place and what skills are needed to adapt to the changing needs of the organization

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CAREER PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT STAGES 1.Exploration Almost all candidates who start working after college education start around mid-twenties. Many a time they are not sure about future prospects but take up a job in anticipation of rising higher up in the career graph later. From the point of view of organization, this stage is of no relevance because it happens prior to the employment. Some candidates who come from better economic background can wait and select a career of their choice under expert. 2. guidance from parents and well-wishers. Establishment This career stage begins with the candidate getting the first job getting hold of the right job is not an easy task. Candidates are likely to commit mistakes and learn from their mistakes. Slowly and gradually they become responsible towards the job. Ambitious candidates will keep looking for more lucrative and challenging jobs elsewhere. This may either result in migration to another job or he will remain with the same job because of lack of opportunity. 3.Mid-Career stage This career stage represents fastest and gainful leap for competent employees who are commonly called climbers. There is continuous improvement in performance. On the other hand, employees who are unhappy and frustrated with the job, there is marked deterioration in their performance. In other to show their utility to the organization, employees must remain productive at this stage. climbers must go on improving their own performance. Authority, responsibility, rewards and incentives are highest at this stage. Employees tend to settle down in their jobs and job hopping is not common. 4.Late-Career stage This career stage is pleasant for the senior employees who like to survive on the past glory. There is no desire to improve performance and improve past records. Such employees enjoy playing the role of elder statesperson. They are expected to train younger employees and earn respect from them. 5.Decline stage This career stage represents the completion of ones career usually culminating into retirement. After decades of hard work, such employees have to retire. Employees who were climbers and achievers will find it hard to compromise with the reality. Others may think of life after retirement

LIMITATIONS OF CAREER PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT


Despite planning the career, employees face certain career problems. They are: 1.Dual Career Families:With the increase in career orientation among women, number of female employees is on increase. With this, the dual career families have also been on increase. Consequently, one of those family members might face the problem of transfer. This has become a complicated problem to organizations. Consequently other employees may be at disadvantage.

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2.Low ceiling careers:Some careers do not have scope for much advancement. Employees cannot get promotions despite their career plans and development in such jobs.

3.Declining Career Opportunities:Career opportunities for certain categories reach the declining stage due to the influence of the technological or economic factors. Solution for such problem is career shift.

4. Downsizing and careers:Business process reengineering, technological changes and business environmental factors force the business firms to restructure the organizations by and downsizing. Downsizing activities result in fixing some employees, and degrading some other employees.5. Career planning can become a reality when opportunities for vertical mobility are available. Therefore, it is not suitable for a very small organization. 5.Others:Several other problems hamper career planning. These include lack of an integrated human resources policy, lack of a rational wage structure, absence of adequate opposition of trade unions, lack of a good performance reporting system, ineffective attitudinal surveys, etc.

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Chapter-2

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REVIEW OF LITERATURE
A literature review is a description of the literature relevant to a particular field or topic. It gives an overview of what has been said, who the key writers are, what are the prevailing theories and hypotheses, what questions are being asked, and what methods and methodologies are appropriate and useful. As such, it is not in itself primary research, but rather it reports on other findings

High impact career development


By: Bonnie Hagemann ( CEO, Executive development associates, Inc., Oklahoma city, USA) As todays work place evolves companies are forced to make changes within the organization in order to keep up trends in the workplace. In a recent study, the BCG partnering with the society for HRM, identified eight new trends in the workplace and how companies should approach these changes. These can be categorized into three groups:Development and retaining talent Managing talent improving leadership managing balance between the employees personal life Anticipating change Managing demographics Managing change in cultural transformation Enabling the organization Globalization Creating an environment of learning Transforming hr departments into strategic partners

Case study
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Authors: Krysia Wrobel, Emory University; Patricia Raskin, Ph.D., Columbia TeachersCollege; Vivian Maranzano, Columbia Teachers College; Judith Leibholz Frankel,Executive Recruiter; Amy Beacom, Columbia Teachers College. Date: 09/08/03 Career stages are typically defined as evolutionary phases of working life. The concept of career stage evolved as psychoanalysts (Erikson), developmental psychologists (Buehler, Levinson, Piaget), and sociologists (Form, Miller) independently studied stages of life and work (Super,1957). Develop mentalists concentrated on stages of psychological development while sociologists identified periods of individuals' working lives, and by combining these two foci career stages first emerge in the literature. For example, the Exploratory Stage defined by Buehler (1933), a German develop mentalist, and the Initial Work Period classified by sociologists Form and Miller (1949) both describe the experience of adolescents' exploration of work. As a developmental stage, the Exploratory Stage represents the time period in which had adolescents define their adult identities through spousal, social, and career choices, while the Initial Work Period describes the first jobs adolescents take to explore the world of work. In this way, the contributions of both psychologists and sociologists created a framework for understanding careers using the concept of career stage. However, while these early models of career stage provide a useful structure to conceptualize career development, many of the early theorists assumed career stages to be linear and stable. Current researchers (e.g., Hall and Schein) have updated the concept of career stage to encompass modern, varied patterns of career development. These patterns tend to be more fluid and dynamic.

Christine. A. Nwuche1 Hart .O. Awa2


Abstract: Employees are veritable sources of competitive advantage and planning and developing their careers is beneficial to both the organization and the employees. This study focuses on whether organizations in Nigeria give premium to career planning and development activities; the programmes engaged in and the perceived effectiveness of programmes generally. The investigation, which adopted a cross sectional survey and utilized structured questionnaire and interviews, centred on 10 firms in Rivers State, Nigeria. Data generated were analysed using descriptive statistics, specifically percentages and means, and simple regression. The results indicate that organizations recognize the need to invest in people and do embark on career planning and development programmes but employees do not perceive programmes as overly effective. Also, although firms recognize employees as important assets for organization success, they do not give as much attention to personal needs of employees as they do corporate needs. This is potentially counterproductive. Thus, we recommend the full incorporation of employees needs in career development activities so as to address the issues of employability of employees and long term competitiveness of organizations.

Career development
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Personal career management and planning By: Robert H. Rouda & Mitchell E. Kusy This is the fourth in a series of articles which originally appeared in Tappi Journal in 199596, to introduce methods addressing the development of individuals and organizations through the field of Human Resource Development. (The article has been updated, and is reproduced with permission of the copyright owner.) There is an increasing need for individuals to take charge of the development of their own learning and careers for a variety of reasons: There is increasing rate of change of our organizations and in the knowledge and skills we need to perform our jobs. Career ladders are rapidly shrinking or disappearing as reorganizations lead to flatter structures. There is an ever-increasing need for us to keep learning to keep up with the rapid growth in knowledge and the rate of change of our workplace environments. And, involvement in one's own development fosters greater commitment to the process than other-directed activities.

Reasons to Make a Career Change


Should a Career Change Be in Your Future? By: Dawn Rosenberg McKay The average person can expect to change careers several times in his or her lifetime. One reason for all these career changes is that people often don't make informed choices. While making an informed decision regarding your career is a good way to help insure that the career you choose is right for you, it doesn't guarantee it. Even if you follow all the prescribed steps and choose a career that is right for you, it may not remain your best choice forever. Here are some reasons to consider leaving your current career for a new one. You Should Consider a Career Change If .. Your Life Has Changed: When you chose your career your life may have been different than it is today. For example you may have been single then and now you have a family. The crazy schedule or the frequent travel that is typical of your career Institute of Management Studies may not suit your new lifestyle. You should look for an occupation that is more "family friendly.

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Chapter -3

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RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Research comprises defining and redefining problems, formulating, hypothesis or suggested solutions; collecting, organizing and evaluating data, making deductions and at last carefully testing the conclusions to determine whether they fit the formulating hypothesis or not. Research is an important pre-requisite for a dynamic organization. The research methodology is a written game plan for conducting research. It may be understood as science of studying. In it the various steps are described that are adopted by a researcher in studying his research problems.

Research design:
A research design is purely and simply the frame work of plan for a study that guides the collection and analysis of data. It is a blue print for a complete study. It resembles the architects blue print map for constructing a house. There are three types of research design namely. Exploratory Descriptive Causative

The type of research carried out for this project is Descriptive in nature. Descriptive Research Studies a r e t h o s e s t u d i e s , w h i c h a r e c o n c e r n e d w i t h specific predictions, with narration of facts and characteristics concerning individual, group or situation or used to describe the phenomena already exists. The main characteristic of this method is that the researcher has no control over the variables; he can only report what has happened or what is happening. The methods of research utilized in descriptive research are survey methods of all kinds, including comparative and co relational methods. AREA OF STUDY The units selected for the purpose of study are hundred employees from different banks SAMPLING DESIGN I.A sample design is a definite plan for obtaining a sample from a given population. The sample of 100 employees is taken. The population: - the employees were categorized as middle level and low level employees II. Sampling Unit Individual employees from different banks III. Sample Size

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This refers to the some chosen units out of whole population. Although large samples are more reliable but due to shortage of time some representative of these different banks had been selected. Sample size: the target group included respondents drawn from Indian bank, union bank of India, state bank of India, Indian overseas bank and 100 employees were taken as the sample respondent. IV. Sampling Technique This refers to procedure by which the samples have been chosen for the purpose of data collection. Judgmental Sampling technique was used in which researcher choose any item from the whole population which he thinks or take as the typical and true representative of the population. STEPS OF METHODOLOGY USED 1. collection of data 2.organisation of data 3.presentation of data 4.analysis of data. DATA COLLECTION The task of data collection begins after a research problem is being defined and research design chalked out. Data types: a) Primary Sources The primary data are those which are collects fresh and for the first time, and thus happen to be original in character. The primary source of collecting the data was through interview method in which the researcher personally interviewed the respondents. Direct observation was made to understand the commitment among employees. Each respondent was asked to fill a questionnaire covering the personal data of the respondents such as age, year of experience, income. The questionnaire also included dimensions relating to organizational commitment among employees. The time duration to fill the questionnaire was 15-20 minutes. b) Secondary Sources The secondary data are those which have already been collected by someone and which have already been passed through the statistical process. Data is also collected from:i. HR Manual. ii. Various Books, Magazines. iii. Internet.

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TOOLS AND ANALYSIS


Statistical Tools Following are the statistical tools involved in the research project. Weighted AVERAGE method is used to sum up the views of the various respondents to obtain mean score for the particular statement. This gives a picture of respondents expression on particular point. Total score = Number of Respondents * weighted Average Mean score = Total score Frequency Percentage analysis is used to give a tabulated representation of the respondents viewpoint. Number of responses Percentage = ------------------------------------------ x 100 Total number of employees

Chi square test is used to substantiate the results arrived using earlier methods. The formula for chi square analysis. X2 Where, = (O-E) 2 --------E O = observe value E = Expected value Degree of Freedom = (n-1) (c-1) If calculated value < Tabulated value Accept null hypothesis If calculated value > Tabulated value reject null hypothesis SCOPE OF THE STUDY This study is made to know the Career Planning & Development Programs in banking industry, that may have planned and implemented for the betterment of employees. It also attempts to analyze the views and attitudes of Executives on such programs. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY 1. To study the impact of organizational support on career planning and development of employees. 2. To study the career planning of employees in banking industry. 3. To analyze the awareness of the employees about their career and its development. 4. To suggest appropriate measures to improve the efficiency of employees. 25

LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY 1. The study was restricted to banking industry . 2. This study is conducted with a sample size of 100 respondents. hence the findings of this study cannot be generalized. 3. The findings of this study are subject the bias and prejudice of the respondents. Hence objectivity cannot be ensured. 4. The accuracy of finding is limited by the accuracy of the statistical tools used for the analysis .

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INDUSTRY PROFILE
Banking industry: India has a strong and vibrant banking sector comprising state-owned banks, private sector banks, foreign banks, financial institutions and regional banks including cooperative banks, rural banks and local area banks. In addition there are non-banking financial companies (NBFCs), housing finance companies, Nidhi companies and chit fund companies which play the role of financial intermediaries. Since the launch of the economic liberalisation and global programme in 1991, India has considerably relaxed banking regulations and opened the financial sector for foreign investment. India is also committed to further open the banking sector for foreign investment in pursuance to its commitment to the World Trade Organisation (WTO). As monetary authority of the country, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) regulates the banking industry and lays down guidelines for day-to-day functioning of banks within the overall framework of the Banking Regulation Act, 1949, Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999 and Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) policy of the government.. State-owned banks The Indian banking sector is dominated by 28 state-owned banks which operate through a network of about 50,000 branches and 13,000 ATMs. The State Bank of India (SBI) in the largest bank in the country and along with its seven associate banks has an asset base of about Rs. 7,000 billion (approximately US$150 billion). The other large public sector banks are Punjab National Bank, Canara Bank, Bank of Baroda, Bank of India and IDBI Bank. The public sector banks have overseas operations with Bank of Baroda topping the list with 51 branches, subsidiaries, joint ventures and representative offices outside India, followed by SBI (45 overseas branches/offices) and Bank of India (26 overseas branches/offices). Indian banks, including private sector banks, have 171 branches/offices abroad. SBI is present in 29 countries followed by Bank of Barod (20 countries) and Bank of India (14 countries). Private sector banks India has 29 private sector banks including nine new banks which were granted licences after the government liberalised the banking sector. Some of the well known private sector banks are ICICI Bank, HDFC Bank and IndusInd Bank. Yes Bank is the latest entrant to the private sector banking industry. In terms of reach the private sector banks with an asset of over Rs 5,700 billion (about US$124 billion) operate through a network of 6,500 branches and over 7,500 ATMs. Foreign banks: As many as 29 foreign banks originating from 19 countries are operating in India through a network of 258 branches and about 900 ATMs. With total assets of more than Rs 2,000 billion ( about 44 billion US dollars) they are present in 40 centres across 19 Indian states and Union Territories. Some of the leading international banks that are doing brisk business in 27

India include Standard Chartered Bank, HSBC Bank, Citibank N.A. and ABN-AMRO Bank. In addition, 31 foreign banks (as on September 15, 2006) belonging to 14 countries were operating in India through their representative offices. Foreign banks operating in India: 1. ABN-AMRO Bank N.V. (24 branches) 2. Abu Bhabi Commercial Bank Ltd. (2 branches) 3. Arab Bangladesh Bank Ltd. (1 branch) 4. American Express Bank (7 branches) 5. Antwerp Diamond Bank N.V. (1 branch) Regional banks: Rural areas in India are served through a network of Regional Rural Banks (RRBs), urban cooperative banks, rural cooperative credit institutions and local area banks. Many of these banks are not doing well financially and the government is currently engaged in restructuring and consolidating them. Local area banks were of recent origin and as on March 31, 2006 four such banks were operating in the country. Financial institutions India has seven major state-owned financial institutions which include Industrial Development Bank of India (IDBI), Industrial and Financial Corporation of India (IFCI), Tourism Finance Corporation of India (TFCI), Exim Bank, Small Industries Development Bank of India (SIDBI), National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) and National Housing Bank (NHB). These institutions provide term loans and arrange refinance. There are also specialised institutions like the Power Finance Corporation (PFC), Indian Railway Finance Corporation (IRFC), Infrastructure Development Finance Company (IDFC) and state-level financial corporations. Non-banking financial companies India also has a vibrant NBFC sector comprising 13,000 NBFCs that are registered with the RBI and fund activities like equipment leasing, hire purchase etc. Out of the total about 450 NBFCs are allowed by the RBI to collect funds from the public. Large NBFCs have an asset base of about Rs 3,000 billion (about 65 billion US dollars). Recent developments: State Bank of India has acquired 76 per cent stake in Giro Commercial Bank, a Kenyan bank for US$7 million. Bank of Baroda is planning to acquire a bank in Africa to consolidate its presence in the continent. Canara Bank is helping Chinese banks recover their huge non-performing assets (NPA). ICICI bank is in the process of taking over Sangli Bank, a private sector bank based in Maharashtra. 28

The RBI has recently allowed the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, Banche Popolari unite S.c.r.l. (based in Italy), Vneshtorgbank (Russian trade bank), Promsvyazbank (Russian commercial bank), Banca Popolare di Vicenza (Italian bank), Monte Dei Paschi Di Siena (Italian bank) and Zurcher Kantonalbank (Swiss bank) to set up representative offices in India. GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS: Although the banking companies are registered under the Companies Act, 1956 they are regulated by the RBI which grants licence to companies for operating a bank, opening branches and off site ATMs, fixes statutory liquidity ratio (SLR) and cash reserve ratio (CRR), and lays down other conditions for day-to-day operations. The RBI permission is also needed for board level appointments in banks. With regard to interest rates, individual banks are free to fix rates with the exception of savings bank rate which is decided by the RBI. The individual banks are free to fix lending rates...

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Chapter-4

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COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA


DATA CLASSIFICATION

Table 4.1 shows the data classification of the respondents S.NO Particulars factor No of respondent 75 25 percentage

Age

Adult (2140)yrs Mid-life(40-55) Male Female

75% 25%

Gender

63 37

63% 37%

Marital status

Married Unmarried

60 40

60% 40%

Qualification

B.com B.A M .com others

30 32 25 23

30% 32% 25% 23%

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Percentage analysis:
Table 4.2.1 views of the respondents about attaining objectives a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.1 Attaining objectives options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 56 27 15 2 0 100 Percentage 56 27 15 2 0 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above chart it is found that most of the employees strongly agreed to their attaining career objectives, whereas none was strongly disagreeing in doing so.

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Table :4.2.2 view of respondents in doing the work even when they dont like options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 15 42 33 7 3 100 percentage 15 42 33 7 3 100

a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.2

Doing work even when they dont like

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is observed that 42% of the employees agreed to doing work even when they dislike it while only 3% strongly disagreed with the statement.

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Table 4.2.3 view of respondents about giving their abilities to the organization options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 60 43 7 0 0 100 Percentage 60 43 7 0 0 100

a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.3

Giving their abilities to the organization

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is found 60% of the respondents strongly agreed to using their abilities for the organization.43% agreed whereas none of the respondent disagreed to the statement.

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Table 4.2.4 view of respondents about completing their work on time Options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 22 37 19 18 4 100 percentage 22 37 19 18 4 100

a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.4

completing their work on time

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is interpretated that 22% of the employees strongly agreed to completing their job on time, 37% strongly agreed, 19% remained neutral, 18% and 4% disagreed and strongly diaagreed respectively in conpleting their job on time.

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Table 4.2.5 view of respondents on usage of skills a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.5 Usage of skills Options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 27 34 14 20 5 100 percentage 27 34 14 20 5 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is analysed that the respondents strongly agreeing to using their skills are 27%, agreed 34%, 14% neither agreed nor disagreed.

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Table 4.2.6 view of respondents in involving in lot of activities as part of the job a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.6 Involving in lot of activities as part of the job options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 30 35 15 15 7 100 percentage 30 35 15 15 7 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above chart it is found that 30% of the employees strongly agreed to involving themselves in activities, whereas 7% was strongly disagreeing in doing so.

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Table 4.2.7 view of respondents on positions offering comfortable fit options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 15 27 7 33 18 100 percentage 15 27 7 33 18 100

a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.7

Positions offering comfortable fit

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is interpretated that 15% of the employees strongly agreed on positions offering comfortable fit, 27% strongly agreed, 7% remained neutral, 33% and 18% disagreed and strongly disagreed respectively on positions offering comfortable fit.

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Table 4.2.8 view of respondents on awareness of career planning a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.8 Awareness of career planning Options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 12 27 20 25 15 100 Percentage 12 27 20 25 15 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above chart it is found that 12% of the employees strongly agreed to having awareness of career planning activities, whereas 15% was strongly disagreeing in doing so.

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Table 4.2.9 view of respondents on their freedom in their job a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.9 Freedom in their job Options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 18 32 10 27 13 100 percentage 18 32 10 27 13 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is analysed that the respondents strongly agreeing to having freedom in doing their job are 18%, agreed 32%, 10% neither agreed nor disagreed, 27%disagreed and 13% strongly disagreed .

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Table 4.2.10 view of respondents in taking risk in their job a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.10 Taking risk in the job Options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 27 31 8 20 14 100 percentage 27 31 8 20 14 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is interpretated that 27% of the employees strongly agreed totaking risk in their job, 31% strongly agreed, 16% remained neutral, 20% and1 4% disagreed and strongly disagreed respectively in taking risk.

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Table 4.2.11 view of respondents opportunities for advancement a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.11 Respondents opportunities for advancement Options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 21 45 21 11 2 100 percentage 21 45 21 11 2 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above chart it is found that 21% of the employees strongly agreed to having opportunities for advancement , whereas only 2% was strongly disagreeing to it.

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Table 4.2.12 view of respondents on reward and recognisation a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.12 Reward and recognisation Options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 35 52 16 3 2 100 Percentage 35 52 16 3 2 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is analyzed that the respondents strongly agreeing to having reward and recognisation are 35%, agreed 52%, 16% neither agreed nor disagreed, 3%disagreed and 2% strongly disagreed.

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Table 4.2.13 view of respondents on encouragement for good performance a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.13 Encouragement for good performance Options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 32 43 15 7 3 100 percentage 32 43 15 7 3 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is interpretated that 22% of the employees strongly agreed to encouragement on good performance, 37% strongly agreed, 19% remained neutral, 18% and 4% disagreed and strongly diaagreed respectively in encouragement on good performance.

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Table 4.2.14 view of respondents on team spirit in organization a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.15 Team spirit in organization Options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 33 42 11 21 3 100 Percentage 33 42 11 21 3 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is analysed that 33% respondents strongly agreeing to having team spirit in the organization , agreed 42%, 11% neither agreed nor disagreed, 21%disagreed and 3% strongly disagreed .

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Table 4.2.15 view of respondents on level of satisfaction a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.15 Level of satisfaction Options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 23 66 7 3 1 100 percentage 23 66 7 3 1 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above chart it is found that 23% of the employees strongly agreed to level of satisfaction, whereas only 1% was strongly disagreeing to it.

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Table 4.2.16 view of respondents on organization rules and regulation a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.16 Organization rules and regulations Options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 25 54 8 10 3 100 percentage 25 54 8 10 3 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is analyzed that 25% respondents are strongly agreeing to following rules and regulations, 54% agreed %, 8% neither agreed nor disagreed, 10%disagreed and 3% strongly disagreed

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Table 4.2.17 view of respondents on facilities provided a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.17 Facilities provided Options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 28 42 8 19 11 100 percentage 28 42 8 19 11 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is interpretated that 28% of the employees strongly agreed to facilities provided, 42% agreed, 8% remained neutral, 18% and 4% disagreed and strongly disagreed respectively in facilities provided.

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Table 4.2.18 view of respondents on safe working environment a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.18 Safe working environment options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 61 33 3 2 1 100 Percentage 61 33 2 3 1 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above chart it is found that most of the employees strongly agreed to having safe working environment, whereas only 1% was strongly disagreeing to it.

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Table 4.2.19 view of respondents on clean and hygienic work environment a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.19 Clean and hygienic work environment options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 21 35 14 23 7 100 percentage 21 35 14 23 7 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is interpretated that 21% of the employees strongly agreed tohaving better working conditions,35% agreed, 14% remained neutral, 23% and 7% disagreed and strongly disagreed respectively.

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Table 4.2.20 view of respondents on discussion with superiors a. b. c. d. e. options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 17 36 23 16 8 100 percentage 17 36 23 16 8 100

Chart 4.2.20 Discussion with superiors

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is analyzed that 17% respondents are strongly agreeing to having discussions with the superiors , 36% agreed %, 23% neither agreed nor disagreed, 16%disagreed and 8% strongly disagreed.

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Table 4.2.21 view of respondents on performance appraisal a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.21 Performance appraisal options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 18 55 21 4 2 100 percentage 18 55 21 4 2 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above chart it is found that 18% of the employees strongly agreed to performance appraisal, 55% agreed whereas only 2% was strongly disagreeing to it.

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Table 4.2.22 view of respondents on change of job a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.22 Change of job options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 15 60 15 7 3 100 percentage 15 60 15 7 3 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above table it is interpretated that 15% of the employees strongly agreed to change the job if the task alloted is monotonous ,60% agreed, 15% remained neutral, 7% disagreed and 3% strongly disagreed .

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Table 4.2.23 view of respondents on training provided by organization a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.23 Training provided by organization options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 21 63 14 2 0 100 percentage 21 63 14 2 0 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above chart it is found that 21% of the employees strongly agreed on training provided to them, 63% agreed and nobody strongly disagreed to it.

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Table 4.2.24 view of respondents on knowledge sharing activities a. b. c. d. e. Chart 4.2.24 Knowledge sharing activities options Strongly Agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total No of respondents 25 65 6 4 0 100 Percentage 25 65 6 4 0 100

INTERPRETATION: From the above chart it is found that most of the employees agreed in sharing their knowledge within the team.

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4.3 Chi square- one way calculation Table 4.3.1 To test whether there is any significant difference in opinion among the respondents towards attaining the career objectives, O Strongly agreed Agreed Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total 100 20.94 27 15 2 0 20 20 20 20 7 -5 -18 -20 49 25 324 400 .49 .25 3.24 4 56 E 20 O-E 36 (O-E)2 1296 (O-E)2/E 12.96

Null Hypothesis (H0)There is no significant different in opinion among the respondents towards attaining the career objectives. Alternate hypothesis (H1)There is significant difference in opinion among the respondents towards attaining the career objectives. Result Calculated value : 20.94 Tabulated value : 9.488 Interpretation Since the calculated value is more than the tabulated value, Alternate hypothesis is accepted. Hence there is significant difference in opinion among the respondents towards attaining the career objectives.

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Chi-square test-two way calculation


Table 4.3.2 to test whether there is any significant difference in opinion among male and female towards taking risk in the job. Observed frequency Taking risk Strongly agreed Agreed Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total Expected frequency of any cell E= (row total for the row of that cell) * (column total for the row of that cell) (Grand total) Table 4.3.3 showing expected frequency Taking risk Strongly agreed Agreed Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total Male 17.01 19.53 5.04 12.60 8.82 51.7 Female 9.99 11.47 2.96 7.40 5.18 58.3 Total 27 31 16 22 14 100 Male 20 21 4 10 8 63 Female 7 10 4 10 6 37 Total 27 31 8 20 14 100

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Table 4.3.4 table showing the calculation of chi-square test.

O Strongly agreed Agreed Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total 21 4 10 8 20

E 17.01 19.53 5.04 12.6 17.01

O-E 2.99 1.47 -1.04 -2.6 9.01

(O-E)2 8.94 2.16 1.0816 6.76 81.18

(O-E)2/E 0.525 0.102 0.214 0.536 4.772 6.149

Null Hypothesis (H0)There is no significant different in opinion among male and female towards taking risk in the job. Alternate hypothesis (H1)There is significant difference in opinion among male and female towards taking risk in the job. Result Calculated value : 6.149 Tabulated value : 9.488 Interpretation Since the calculated value is less than the tabulated value, null hypothesis is accepted. Hence there is no significant difference in opinion among male and female towards taking risk in the job.

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4.4 Weighted average analysis Table 4.4.1 views of respondents regarding the constant training provided to enhance the career . options a. b. c. d. e. Strongly Agree (5) Agree (4) Neutral (3) Disagree(2) Strongly disagree(1) Total Total score ---------------------No of respondents 403 ------------100 No of respondents 21 63 14 2 0 100 Total score 105 252 42 4 0 403 4.03 Mean score

Mean score:

Interpretation: Most of the respondents consider the constant training provided to enhance the career is satisfying.

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Chapter-5

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Findings
The chapter highlights major inference drawn from the study results and also presents certain workable suggestions for implementation. Most of the employees have felt that they are successful in attaining their career objective. Very few employees disagreed to do the work even though inspite of not liking it. Almost all the employees agreed upon the organization providing a safer environment. Though most of the employees used to complete their job on time, there were few who disagreed. It has been found that employees will look forward to change in job if the job allotted to them is monotonous. Many of the employees felt their efforts are not been encouraged and recognized. Most of the employees considered the constant training provided to them is enhancing their career. Among the respondents very few disagreed to not following the rules and regulations of the organization. Half of the employees were not satisfactory with the working condition provided. Majority of the respondents were happy with their growth in the organization.

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Suggestions
Awareness about career planning and development has to be made among employees. Proper training and development activities have to be provided to the employees. The organization must improve upon their working conditions. Employees should be motivated with rewards and recognisation. Superiors must encourage their subordinates to perform better. Trust and good faith have to be inculcated in employees through team building exercises.

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CHAPTER-6

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Conclusion
Career planning and development programs as we find from the study plays crucial role in employee as well as organizations development. Career planning is an integral part of every organization. It motivates and inspires employees to work harder and keeps them loyal towards the organization. Career planning helps an employee know the career opportunities available in organization. This knowledge enables the employee to select the career most suitable to his potential and this helps to improve employees morale and productivity. On the basis questionnaire and personal interviews with the employees It was also found that promotion is the major reason that sticks them with the current job. Employees also prefer sound recognisation as well as proper training. So for conclusion, the objectives of the study, to get the overall knowledge about actually what the career planning and development is, the scope of such programs in the banking industry are adequately fulfilled. And study concludes that in banking industry because of its monotonous task and due to tough pressure as well as more stress and frustration, need to be handling the careers of most valuable asset that is the People. Conclusively that was worthwhile to choose such topic as project, which is not only important for an employee and employer, But for the researcher also to select the career, a in particular line and may be a particular industry in which one wants to make the career and get enough chances of advancement in career.

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Questionnaire
CAREER PLANNING AND DEVELOPMANT OF EMPLOYEES IN BANK Respected Respondents, I am G. Suman Jain, final year student of Master of Business Administration (Human Resource Management) at Loyola College Twinning Program affiliated with Pondicherry University. As a part of my masters degree, I undertake the project work in IV Semester. I am doing a study on Career Planning and Development of employees. I request you to kindly furnish the necessary information and give us your frank and honest option. I assure you that the information collected will be used only for academic purpose.

Thanking you for your cooperation. Yours faithfully, G. Suman Jain

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Please indicate your agreement with the following proportions concerning your job. Name : Qualification : Marital Status : Age : Years of experience : years Single Married Mid life Adults (40-55) years 6 to 10 years 11 to 15

Adult (21-40) years Less than 5 years

More than 15 years

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The response is collected on a five point scale 1 = strongly agree 2=agree 3=neutral 4=disagree 5=strongly disagree

No

particulars

Strongly agreed

Agreed

Neutral

Disagre e

Strongly disagree

1. 2. I have been successful in attaining my career objectives 3. 4. It is important for me to work hard, even if I dont like the work 5. 6. I will give the best of my abilities to the organization. 7. 8. I always wish to complete my job on time 9. 10. I have used all the skills in my job

4 5

1 1

2 2

3 3

4 4

5 5

11. 12. I have been involved in lot of activities which are part of my job

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13. 14. 15. I have been positions offered for a comfortable fit.

16. 17. I am aware of career planning exercise done in banks 18. I have the freedom to do what I want in my job

3 3

10

I am afraid to take risks in my job

4 11 My manager encourage me to take up creative job 1 2 3 5

12

This qualities have been recognized and rewarded in my work place The company encourages employee for good performance

13

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14

There is a high level of team spirit in my organization I have good growth in my organization

15 All facilities require to my job is provided 17 18 Company provides me a safer environment My workplace has clean and hygienic environment 19 20 I frequent discuss with team supervisors to plan ahead for my advancement The performance appraisal process paves for good advancement in career I constantly look forward for change in job if allotted task is monotonous Opportunities for advancement are encouraged 23 24 Constant training is provided by my organization to enhance my career Supervisor encourages for knowledge sharing activities within the team

4 4

1 1

2 2

3 3 4

5 5

1 1

2 2

3 3

4 4

5 5

21

22

1 1

2 2

3 3

4 4

5 5

25

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BIBLOGRAPHY
360 degree feed back and competency mapping by Radha Sharma Taking charge of your career(paperback- 2004) by Kannan R Armstrong M. (2001). A Handbook of Human Resource Management Practice (8th ed.). London: KoganPage. Baruch, Y. (2003). Career Systems in Transition: A Normative Model for Career Practices. Personnel review, 32(2), 231-251. Beardwell, I. and Holden, L. (1997). Human Resource Management: A Contemporary Perspective (2nd ed.). London: Pitman. Cascio, W. (2003). Managing Human Resources, Productivity, Quality of Life, Profits (6th ed.). New York: McGraw Hill. Chen, C. (2004). Positive Compromise: A New Perspective for Career Psychology. Australian Journal of career development, 13(2), 17-27. Cummings, T. and Worley C. (2005). Organization Development and Change (8th ed.). Ohio: South-Western. International Business and Management Vol. 2, No. 2. 2011, pp. 117-127 Websites www.cscanada.net www.indiaedu.com www.zcareer.com www.scribd.com www.banking.com

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