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05/25/2012

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Sections

  • Introduction to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI Administrator’s Guide
  • About this guide
  • Who should use this guide?
  • Business Objects information resources
  • What’s New in BusinessObjects Enterprise
  • Welcome to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI
  • About this version
  • Supported products
  • New features
  • End-user experience
  • Report design
  • Developer flexibility
  • System administration
  • Administration overview
  • Central Management Console
  • Logging on to the Central Management Console
  • Navigating within the Central Management Console
  • Setting console preferences
  • Setting the Query size threshold
  • Logging off of the Central Management Console
  • Using the Central Configuration Manager
  • Accessing the CCM for Windows
  • Making initial security settings 3
  • Accessing the CCM for UNIX
  • Making initial security settings
  • Setting the Administrator password
  • Disabling the Guest account
  • Managing universes 3
  • Modifying the default security levels
  • Managing universes
  • Managing universe connections
  • Managing InfoView 3
  • Managing InfoView
  • Managing Web Intelligence
  • Managing Discussions
  • Accessing the Discussions page
  • Searching for discussion threads
  • Sorting search results
  • Deleting discussion threads
  • Setting user rights
  • Architecture overview and diagram
  • Client tier
  • InfoView
  • Central Management Console (CMC)
  • Central Configuration Manager (CCM)
  • Publishing Wizard
  • Import Wizard
  • Application tier
  • Application tier components
  • Web development platforms
  • Web application environments
  • Intelligence tier
  • Central Management Server (CMS)
  • Cache Server
  • File Repository Servers
  • Processing tier
  • Report Job Server
  • Program Job Server
  • Web Intelligence Job Server
  • Report Application Server (RAS)
  • Destination Job Server
  • List of Values Job Server
  • Page Server
  • Data tier
  • Report viewers
  • Information flow
  • What happens when you schedule an object?
  • What happens when you view a report?
  • Choosing between live and saved data 4
  • Choosing between live and saved data
  • Live data
  • Saved data
  • Server management overview
  • Viewing current metrics
  • Viewing current server metrics
  • Viewing system metrics
  • Viewing and changing the status of servers
  • Starting, stopping, and restarting servers
  • Stopping a Central Management Server
  • Enabling and disabling servers
  • Printing, copying, and refreshing server status
  • Configuring the application tier
  • Configuring the Web Component Adapter
  • Configuring the Java Web Component Adapter
  • Configuring the intelligence tier
  • Clustering Central Management Servers
  • Installing a new CMS and adding it to a cluster
  • Copying data from one CMS database to another
  • Copying data from a CMS on Windows
  • Copying data from a Crystal Enterprise 8 APS on Windows
  • Deleting and recreating the CMS database
  • Selecting a new or existing CMS database
  • Setting root directories and idle times of the File Repository Servers
  • Modifying Cache Server performance settings
  • Modifying the polling time of the Event Server
  • Configuring the processing tier
  • Modifying Page Server performance settings
  • Modifying database settings for the RAS
  • Modifying performance settings for the RAS
  • Modifying performance settings for job servers
  • Configuring the Web Intelligence Report Server
  • Configuring the destinations for job servers
  • Enabling or disabling destinations for job servers
  • Configuring the destination properties for job servers
  • Configuring Windows processing servers for your data source
  • Configuring UNIX processing servers for your data source
  • ODBC environment variables
  • Logging server activity 5
  • Logging server activity
  • Advanced server configuration options
  • Changing the default server port numbers
  • Configuring a multihomed machine
  • Adding and removing Windows server dependencies
  • Changing the server startup type
  • Changing the server user account
  • Configuring servers for SSL
  • Server group overview
  • Creating a server group
  • Working with server subgroups
  • Modifying the group membership of a server 6
  • Modifying the group membership of a server
  • Scalability overview
  • Common configurations
  • One-machine setup
  • Three-machine setup
  • Six-machine setup
  • General scalability considerations
  • Increasing overall system capacity
  • Increasing scheduled reporting capacity
  • Increasing on-demand viewing capacity for Crystal reports
  • Increasing prompting capacity
  • Delegating XSL transformation to Internet Explorer
  • Enhancing custom web applications
  • Improving web response speeds
  • Getting the most from existing resources
  • Adding and deleting servers
  • Adding a server
  • Deleting a server
  • BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository overview
  • BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository overview
  • Copying data from one repository database to another
  • Importing data from a Crystal Enterprise 10 or BusinessObjects Enterprise XI CMS
  • Copying data from a Crystal Enterprise 9 repository database
  • Copying data from a Crystal Reports 9 repository database
  • Refreshing repository objects in published reports 8
  • Refreshing repository objects in published reports
  • Firewalls overview
  • What is a firewall?
  • Ports
  • Firewall types
  • Understanding firewall integration
  • Communication between servers
  • Communication between servers and the CMS directory listing service
  • Firewall configuration overview
  • Typical firewall scenarios
  • Configuring the system for firewalls
  • Configuring for Network Address Translation
  • Configuring NAT when application tier is separated from the CMS
  • Configuring NAT when thick client is separated from the CMS
  • Configuring for packet filtering
  • Configuring packet filtering when application tier is separated from CMS
  • Configuring packet filtering when thick client is separated from the CMS
  • Configuring for SOCKS servers
  • Configuring the CMS for SOCKS Servers
  • Configuring the WCA for SOCKS servers
  • Auditing overview
  • How does auditing work?
  • Which actions can I audit?
  • Configuring the auditing database 10
  • Configuring the auditing database
  • Enabling auditing of user and system actions
  • Controlling synchronization of audit actions
  • Optimizing system performance while auditing 10
  • Optimizing system performance while auditing
  • Using sample audit reports
  • Creating custom audit reports
  • Auditing database schema reference
  • Security overview
  • Authentication and authorization
  • Primary authentication
  • Secondary authentication and authorization
  • About single sign-on
  • Security management components
  • Web Component Adapter
  • Security plug-ins
  • Windows NT security plug-in
  • Processing extensions
  • Active trust relationship
  • Logon tokens
  • Ticket mechanism for distributed security
  • Sessions and session tracking
  • WCA session tracking
  • CMS session tracking
  • Environment protection
  • Web browser to web server
  • Web server to BusinessObjects Enterprise
  • Auditing web activity 11
  • Auditing web activity
  • Protection against malicious logon attempts
  • Password restrictions
  • Logon restrictions
  • User restrictions
  • Guest account restrictions
  • What is account management?
  • Default users and groups
  • Default users
  • Default groups
  • Available authentication types
  • Managing Enterprise and general accounts
  • Creating an Enterprise user account
  • Adding a user to groups
  • Modifying a user account
  • Deleting a user account
  • Changing password settings
  • Creating a group
  • Adding users to a group
  • Modifying a group
  • Viewing group members
  • Deleting a group
  • Granting access to users and groups
  • Managing LDAP accounts
  • Configuring LDAP authentication
  • Configuring the Secure Socket Layer authentication for LDAP
  • Mapping LDAP groups
  • Unmapping LDAP groups
  • Viewing mapped LDAP users and groups
  • Changing LDAP connection parameters and member groups
  • Managing multiple LDAP hosts
  • Troubleshooting LDAP accounts
  • Managing AD accounts
  • Mapping AD accounts
  • Unmapping AD groups
  • Viewing mapped AD users and groups
  • Troubleshooting AD accounts
  • Setting up AD single sign-on
  • Configuring IIS for AD single sign-on
  • Managing NT accounts
  • Mapping NT accounts
  • Unmapping NT groups
  • Viewing mapped NT users and groups
  • Troubleshooting NT accounts
  • Setting up NT single sign-on
  • Configuring IIS for NT single sign-on
  • Managing aliases
  • Creating a user and a third-party alias
  • Creating an alias for an existing user
  • Assigning an alias
  • Reassigning an alias
  • Deleting an alias
  • Disabling an aliases
  • Configuring Kerberos single sign-on
  • Setting up a service account
  • Configuring the servers
  • Configuring the Windows AD plug-in for Kerberos authentication
  • Configuring the cache expiry
  • Configuring the IIS and browsers
  • Configuring the BusinessObjects Enterprise clients on the IIS
  • Configuring the Internet Explorer browser on a client machine
  • Configuring IIS for end-to-end single sign-on
  • Configuring IIS for single sign-on to databases only
  • Configuring IIS5 for single sign-on to database only
  • Configuring IIS6 for single sign-on to database only
  • Configuring BusinessObjects Enterprise web applications
  • Configuring web applications for single sign-on to the databases
  • Mapping AD accounts for Kerberos single sign-on
  • Configuring the databases for single sign-on
  • Controlling User Access
  • Controlling user access overview
  • Controlling users’ access to objects
  • Setting object rights for users and groups
  • Viewing object rights settings
  • Setting common access levels
  • Setting advanced object rights
  • Using inheritance to your advantage
  • Inheritance with advanced rights
  • Customizing a ‘top-down’ inheritance model
  • Controlling access to applications 13
  • Controlling access to applications
  • Controlling administrative access
  • Controlling access to users and groups
  • Controlling access to user inboxes
  • Controlling access to servers and server groups
  • Controlling access to universes
  • Controlling access to universe connections
  • Organizing objects overview
  • About folders and categories
  • Working with folders
  • Creating and deleting folders
  • Copying and moving folders
  • Adding a report to a new folder
  • Specifying folder rights
  • Setting limits for folders, users, and groups
  • Managing User Folders
  • Working with categories
  • Creating and deleting categories
  • Moving categories
  • Adding an object to a new category
  • Removing or deleting objects from a category
  • Specifying category rights
  • Managing personal categories
  • Publishing overview
  • Publishing options
  • Publishing with the Publishing Wizard
  • Logging on to BusinessObjects Enterprise
  • Adding objects
  • Creating and selecting a folder on the CMS
  • Moving objects between folders
  • Duplicating the folder structure
  • Adding objects to a category
  • Changing scheduling options
  • Refreshing repository fields
  • Selecting a program type
  • Specifying program credentials
  • Changing default values
  • Changing object properties
  • Entering database logon information
  • Setting parameters
  • Setting the schedule output format
  • Adding extra files for programs
  • Specifying command line arguments
  • Finalizing the objects to be added
  • Publishing with the Central Management Console 15
  • Publishing with the Central Management Console
  • Saving objects directly to the CMS 15
  • Saving objects directly to the CMS
  • Importing information
  • Importing information from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6.x
  • Before importing from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6.x
  • Importing objects from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6.x
  • Importing information from Crystal Enterprise
  • Importing objects from Crystal Enterprise
  • Importing information from Crystal Info
  • Importing objects from Crystal Info
  • Importing with the Import Wizard
  • Specifying the source and destination environments
  • Selecting information to import
  • Importing objects with rights
  • Choosing an import scenario
  • Importing specific objects
  • Finalizing the import
  • Managing objects overview
  • General object management
  • Copying, moving, or creating a shortcut for an object
  • Deleting an object
  • Searching for an object
  • Sending an object or instance
  • Available destinations by object type
  • Changing properties of an object
  • Assigning an object to categories
  • Report object management
  • What are report objects and instances?
  • Setting report refresh options
  • Viewing the universes for a Web Intelligence document
  • Setting report processing options
  • Setting printer and page layout options
  • Applying processing extensions to reports
  • Selecting a processing extension for a report
  • Working with hyperlinked reports
  • Program object management
  • What are program objects and instances?
  • Setting program processing options
  • Specifying environment variables
  • Providing Java programs with access to other files
  • Authentication and program objects
  • Object package management
  • What are object packages, components, and instances?
  • Creating an object package
  • Adding objects to an object package
  • Configuring object packages and their objects
  • Authentication and object packages
  • Scheduling objects overview
  • Scheduling objects
  • About the scheduling options and parameters
  • Scheduling objects using object packages
  • Scheduling an object with events
  • Setting the scheduling options
  • Setting notification for an object’s success or failure
  • Specifying alert notification
  • Selecting a destination
  • Choosing a format
  • Selecting cache options for Web Intelligence documents
  • Scheduling an object for a user or group
  • Managing instances
  • Managing and viewing the history of instances
  • Setting instance limits for an object
  • Overview
  • Creating calendars
  • Adding dates to a calendar
  • Deleting calendars 19
  • Deleting calendars
  • Specifying calendar rights
  • Managing events overview
  • File-based events 20
  • File-based events
  • Schedule-based events
  • Custom events
  • Specifying event rights 20
  • Specifying event rights
  • Troubleshooting overview
  • Documentation resources 21
  • Documentation resources
  • Web accessibility issues
  • Using an IIS web site other than the default
  • Unable to connect to CMS when logging on to the CMC
  • Windows NT authentication cannot log you on
  • Report viewing and processing issues
  • Troubleshooting reports with Crystal Reports
  • Troubleshooting reports and looping database logon prompts
  • Ensuring that server resources are available on local drives
  • InfoView considerations 21
  • Page Server error when viewing a report
  • InfoView considerations
  • Supporting users in multiple time zones
  • Setting default report destinations
  • Licensing overview
  • Accessing license information 22
  • Accessing license information
  • Adding a license key
  • Viewing current account activity
  • Product offering
  • Architecture A
  • Architecture
  • BusinessObjects 6.x
  • BusinessObjects XI
  • Basic terminology
  • Migration
  • Migration and mapping of specific objects
  • Migration of user rights
  • Installation, configuration, and deployment
  • Security
  • Administration
  • Reporting, analysis, information sharing
  • Rights
  • Access levels B
  • Access levels
  • No Access
  • View
  • View On Demand
  • Default rights on the top-level folder B
  • Full Control
  • Default rights on the top-level folder
  • Object rights for the Report Application Server
  • Object rights for the Report Application Server
  • Configuring NTFS permissions
  • Customizing the appearance of Web Intelligence documents
  • What you can do with the defaultconfig.xml file
  • Locating and modifying defaultconfig.xml
  • List of key values
  • Example: Modifying the default font in table cells
  • Server Command Lines
  • Command lines overview
  • Standard options for all servers E
  • Standard options for all servers
  • Central Management Server
  • Page Server and Cache Server
  • Job servers
  • Report Application Server E
  • Report Application Server
  • Web Intelligence Report Server E
  • Web Intelligence Report Server
  • Input and Output File Repository Servers
  • Event Server E
  • Event Server
  • UNIX tools overview
  • Script utilities
  • ccm.sh
  • cmsdbsetup.sh
  • configpatch.sh
  • serverconfig.sh
  • ./serverconfig.sh
  • sockssetup.sh
  • uninstallBOBJE.sh
  • Script templates
  • startservers
  • stopservers
  • silentinstall.sh
  • Scripts used by BusinessObjects Enterprise
  • bobjerestart.sh
  • env.sh
  • env-locale.sh
  • initlaunch.sh
  • patchlevel.sh
  • postinstall.sh
  • setup.sh
  • setupinit.sh
  • International deployments overview
  • Deploying BusinessObjects Enterprise internationally
  • Planning an international BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment
  • Providing a client tier for multiple languages
  • About accessibility
  • Benefits of accessible reports
  • About the accessibility guidelines
  • Accessibility and Business Objects products
  • Improving report accessibility
  • Placing objects in reports
  • Text
  • Color
  • Navigation
  • Parameter fields
  • Designing for flexibility
  • Accessibility and conditional formatting
  • Accessibility and suppressing sections
  • Accessibility and subreports
  • Improving data table accessibility
  • Text objects and data table values
  • Other data table design considerations
  • Accessibility and BusinessObjects Enterprise H
  • Accessibility and BusinessObjects Enterprise
  • Setting accessible preferences for BusinessObjects Enterprise
  • Accessibility and customization
  • Resources
  • Documentation and information services
  • Documentation
  • What’s in the documentation set?
  • Where is the documentation?
  • Customer support, consulting and training I
  • Send us your feedback
  • Customer support, consulting and training
  • How can we support you?
  • Looking for the best deployment solution for your company?
  • Looking for training options?
  • Useful addresses at a glance
  • Index

BusinessObjects Enterprise™ XI Administrator’s Guide

BusinessObjects Enterprise XI

Patents

Business Objects owns the following U.S. patents, which may cover products that are offered and sold by Business Objects: 5,555,403, 6,247,008 B1, 6,578,027 B2, 6,490,593 and 6,289,352. Business Objects, the Business Objects logo, Crystal Reports, and Crystal Enterprise are trademarks or registered trademarks of Business Objects SA or its affiliated companies in the United States and other countries. All other names mentioned herein may be trademarks of their respective owners. Copyright © 2004 Business Objects. All rights reserved.

Trademarks

Copyright

Contents
Chapter 1 Introduction to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI Administrator’s Guide 21 About this guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Who should use this guide? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Business Objects information resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Chapter 2 What’s New in BusinessObjects Enterprise 25

Welcome to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 About this version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Supported products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 New features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 End-user experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Report design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Developer flexibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 System administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Chapter 3 Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise 35

Administration overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Central Management Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Logging on to the Central Management Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Navigating within the Central Management Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Setting console preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Setting the Query size threshold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Logging off of the Central Management Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Using the Central Configuration Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Accessing the CCM for Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Accessing the CCM for UNIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Making initial security settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Setting the Administrator password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Disabling the Guest account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide

3

Contents

Modifying the default security levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Managing universes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Managing universe connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Managing InfoView . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Managing Web Intelligence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Managing Discussions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Accessing the Discussions page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Searching for discussion threads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Sorting search results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Deleting discussion threads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Setting user rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Chapter 4 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture 53

Architecture overview and diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Client tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 InfoView . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Central Management Console (CMC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Central Configuration Manager (CCM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Publishing Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Import Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Application tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Application tier components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Web development platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Web application environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Intelligence tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Central Management Server (CMS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Cache Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 File Repository Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Event Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Processing tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Report Job Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Program Job Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Web Intelligence Job Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

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Web Intelligence Report Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Report Application Server (RAS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Destination Job Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 List of Values Job Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Page Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Data tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Report viewers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Information flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 What happens when you schedule an object? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 What happens when you view a report? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Choosing between live and saved data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Live data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Saved data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Chapter 5 Managing and Configuring Servers 77

Server management overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Viewing current metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Viewing current server metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Viewing system metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Viewing and changing the status of servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Starting, stopping, and restarting servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Stopping a Central Management Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Enabling and disabling servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Printing, copying, and refreshing server status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Configuring the application tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Configuring the Web Component Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Configuring the intelligence tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Clustering Central Management Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Copying data from one CMS database to another . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Deleting and recreating the CMS database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Selecting a new or existing CMS database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Setting root directories and idle times of the File Repository Servers 110 Modifying Cache Server performance settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

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Modifying the polling time of the Event Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Configuring the processing tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Modifying Page Server performance settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Modifying database settings for the RAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Modifying performance settings for the RAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Modifying performance settings for job servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Configuring the Web Intelligence Report Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Configuring the destinations for job servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Configuring Windows processing servers for your data source . . . . . 132 Configuring UNIX processing servers for your data source . . . . . . . . 133 Logging server activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Advanced server configuration options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Changing the default server port numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Configuring a multihomed machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Adding and removing Windows server dependencies . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Changing the server startup type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Changing the server user account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Configuring servers for SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Chapter 6 Managing Server Groups 151

Server group overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 Creating a server group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 Working with server subgroups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Modifying the group membership of a server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Chapter 7 Scaling Your System 157

Scalability overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Common configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 One-machine setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Three-machine setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Six-machine setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 General scalability considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Increasing overall system capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162

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Increasing scheduled reporting capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Increasing on-demand viewing capacity for Crystal reports . . . . . . . 164 Increasing prompting capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Delegating XSL transformation to Internet Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Enhancing custom web applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Improving web response speeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Getting the most from existing resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Adding and deleting servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Adding a server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Deleting a server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Chapter 8 Managing BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository 173

BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Copying data from one repository database to another . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Importing data from a Crystal Enterprise 10 or BusinessObjects Enterprise XI CMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Copying data from a Crystal Enterprise 9 repository database . . . . . 176 Copying data from a Crystal Reports 9 repository database . . . . . . . 177 Refreshing repository objects in published reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Chapter 9 Working with Firewalls 181

Firewalls overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 What is a firewall? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Firewall types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Understanding firewall integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Communication between servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Firewall configuration overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Typical firewall scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Configuring the system for firewalls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Configuring for Network Address Translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Configuring for packet filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Configuring for SOCKS servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199

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Chapter 10

Managing Auditing

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Auditing overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 How does auditing work? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Which actions can I audit? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 Configuring the auditing database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Enabling auditing of user and system actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Controlling synchronization of audit actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Optimizing system performance while auditing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 Using sample audit reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Creating custom audit reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Auditing database schema reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Chapter 11 BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts 227

Security overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228 Authentication and authorization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228 Primary authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 Secondary authentication and authorization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 About single sign-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232 Security management components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 Web Component Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 Central Management Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 Security plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235 Processing extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 Active trust relationship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Logon tokens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 Ticket mechanism for distributed security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 Sessions and session tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 WCA session tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 CMS session tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 Environment protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 Web browser to web server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 Web server to BusinessObjects Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 Auditing web activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247

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Protection against malicious logon attempts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 Password restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 Logon restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 User restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 Guest account restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 Chapter 12 Managing User Accounts and Groups 249

What is account management? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 Default users and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 Default users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 Default groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 Available authentication types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 Managing Enterprise and general accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 Creating an Enterprise user account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Adding a user to groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 Modifying a user account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 Deleting a user account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 Changing password settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 Creating a group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 Adding users to a group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259 Modifying a group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260 Viewing group members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Deleting a group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Disabling the Guest account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Granting access to users and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 Managing LDAP accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 Configuring LDAP authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 Mapping LDAP groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269 Unmapping LDAP groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272 Viewing mapped LDAP users and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272 Changing LDAP connection parameters and member groups . . . . . 272 Managing multiple LDAP hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 Troubleshooting LDAP accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274

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Managing AD accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Mapping AD accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 Unmapping AD groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 Viewing mapped AD users and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 Troubleshooting AD accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 Setting up AD single sign-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 Managing NT accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Mapping NT accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Unmapping NT groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 Viewing mapped NT users and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 Troubleshooting NT accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290 Setting up NT single sign-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292 Managing aliases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294 Creating a user and a third-party alias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294 Creating an alias for an existing user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 Assigning an alias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 Reassigning an alias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297 Deleting an alias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297 Disabling an aliases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298 Configuring Kerberos single sign-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299 Setting up a service account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299 Configuring the servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 Configuring the Windows AD plug-in for Kerberos authentication . . . 301 Configuring the cache expiry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 Configuring the IIS and browsers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 Configuring IIS for end-to-end single sign-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 Configuring IIS for single sign-on to databases only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Configuring BusinessObjects Enterprise web applications . . . . . . . . . 312 Mapping AD accounts for Kerberos single sign-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313 Configuring the databases for single sign-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313

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Chapter 13

Controlling User Access

315

Controlling user access overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316 Controlling users’ access to objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317 Setting object rights for users and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317 Viewing object rights settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319 Setting common access levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 Setting advanced object rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 Using inheritance to your advantage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325 Inheritance with advanced rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328 Customizing a ‘top-down’ inheritance model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 Controlling access to applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349 Controlling administrative access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351 Controlling access to users and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352 Controlling access to user inboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352 Controlling access to servers and server groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353 Controlling access to universes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354 Controlling access to universe connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355 Chapter 14 Organizing Objects 357

Organizing objects overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 About folders and categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 Working with folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 Creating and deleting folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 Copying and moving folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361 Adding a report to a new folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362 Specifying folder rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364 Setting limits for folders, users, and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365 Managing User Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367 Working with categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368 Creating and deleting categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368 Moving categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369 Adding an object to a new category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370 Removing or deleting objects from a category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370

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Specifying category rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371 Managing personal categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372 Chapter 15 Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise 373

Publishing overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374 Publishing options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375 Publishing with the Publishing Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Logging on to BusinessObjects Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Adding objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Creating and selecting a folder on the CMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 Moving objects between folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 Duplicating the folder structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 Adding objects to a category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 Changing scheduling options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 Refreshing repository fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 Selecting a program type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 Specifying program credentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381 Changing default values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381 Changing object properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382 Entering database logon information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382 Setting parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 383 Setting the schedule output format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 383 Adding extra files for programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384 Specifying command line arguments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384 Finalizing the objects to be added . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384 Publishing with the Central Management Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385 Saving objects directly to the CMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387 Chapter 16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise 389

Importing information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 Importing information from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6.x . . . . . . . . . . . 390 Before importing from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6.x . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 Importing objects from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6.x . . . . . . . . . . . 392

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Importing information from Crystal Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396 Importing objects from Crystal Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397 Importing information from Crystal Info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 Importing objects from Crystal Info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 Importing with the Import Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402 Specifying the source and destination environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402 Selecting information to import . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405 Importing objects with rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 Choosing an import scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 Importing specific objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409 Finalizing the import . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 Chapter 17 Managing Objects 415

Managing objects overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416 General object management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417 Copying, moving, or creating a shortcut for an object . . . . . . . . . . . . 417 Deleting an object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419 Searching for an object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419 Sending an object or instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 Changing properties of an object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 Assigning an object to categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424 Report object management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425 What are report objects and instances? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425 Setting report refresh options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426 Viewing the universes for a Web Intelligence document . . . . . . . . . . 427 Setting report processing options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428 Applying processing extensions to reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443 Working with hyperlinked reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447 Program object management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451 What are program objects and instances? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451 Setting program processing options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 453 Object package management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459 What are object packages, components, and instances? . . . . . . . . . 460

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . 479 Selecting a destination . . . . . . 476 Specifying alert notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 510 File-based events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481 Choosing a format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 476 Setting notification for an object’s success or failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 460 Adding objects to an object package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471 Scheduling an object with events . 495 Managing and viewing the history of instances . . . . . . 508 Chapter 20 Managing Events 509 Managing events overview . . . . . . . . . . . 514 14 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 502 Adding dates to a calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 495 Setting instance limits for an object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 512 Custom events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507 Specifying calendar rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463 Chapter 18 Scheduling Objects 465 Scheduling objects overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493 Scheduling an object for a user or group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511 Schedule-based events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 466 Scheduling objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 466 About the scheduling options and parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 502 Creating calendars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 462 Authentication and object packages . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503 Deleting calendars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461 Configuring object packages and their objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 491 Selecting cache options for Web Intelligence documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493 Managing instances . . . . . . . . . . . 473 Setting the scheduling options . . . . . . . .Contents Creating an object package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 498 Chapter 19 Managing Calendars 501 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468 Scheduling objects using object packages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527 Supporting users in multiple time zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 532 Viewing current account activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537 BusinessObjects 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 538 Basic terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 Chapter 21 General Troubleshooting 517 Troubleshooting overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521 Troubleshooting reports and looping database logon prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521 Troubleshooting reports with Crystal Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542 Migration and mapping of specific objects . 519 Web accessibility issues . . . . 527 Setting default report destinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .x . . . . . . . . . . . . . 536 Architecture . . . 519 Unable to connect to CMS when logging on to the CMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 526 Page Server error when viewing a report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 545 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527 Chapter 22 Licensing Information 529 Licensing overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 523 Ensuring that server resources are available on local drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 539 Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530 Accessing license information . . . . . . . . . . 542 Migration of user rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 532 Appendix A From BusinessObjects 6. . . . . . . . . . . . 537 BusinessObjects XI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520 Windows NT authentication cannot log you on . . . . . . . . . .x to BusinessObjects XI 535 Product offering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 531 Adding a license key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contents Specifying event rights . . . 519 Using an IIS web site other than the default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518 Documentation resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527 InfoView considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520 Report viewing and processing issues .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 586 Page Server and Cache Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567 Object rights for the Report Application Server . . . 590 16 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contents Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xml file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 Access levels . . . . 547 Security . . . . . 568 Appendix C Configuring NTFS Permissions 569 Configuring NTFS permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 588 Job servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576 What you can do with the defaultconfig. . . .xml . . . . . . . . . information sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565 View On Demand . . 581 Appendix E Server Command Lines 583 Command lines overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584 Standard options for all servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577 Locating and modifying defaultconfig. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567 Default rights on the top-level folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585 Central Management Server . . . and deployment . . . . . . . 570 Appendix D Customizing the appearance of Web Intelligence documents 575 Customizing the appearance of Web Intelligence documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 554 Reporting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562 Appendix B Rights and Access Levels 563 Rights . . . . . . 565 View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 566 Full Control . 551 Administration . 558 SDK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565 No Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 570 Configuring NTFS permissions for BusinessObjects Enterprise components . . . . . . . 580 Example: Modifying the default font in table cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578 List of key values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . 606 initlaunch. . . . 613 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sh . 605 silentinstall. . . 607 setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610 Planning an international BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sh . . . . .sh . . 605 Scripts used by BusinessObjects Enterprise . . . 604 startservers . . . . . . . . . . 607 Appendix G International Deployments 609 International deployments overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601 serverconfig. .sh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sh . . . . . . 593 Input and Output File Repository Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610 Deploying BusinessObjects Enterprise internationally . 591 Web Intelligence Report Server . . . . . . . . . . . 598 Script utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sh .sh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 606 env. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 602 sockssetup. . . . 606 env-locale. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contents Report Application Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601 configpatch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 605 stopservers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 611 Providing a client tier for multiple languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 607 setupinit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598 cmsdbsetup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598 ccm. . 606 bobjerestart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 606 patchlevel. . . . . . . . . . . .sh . . . . . . . . . .sh . 604 Script templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594 Event Server . . . . .sh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595 Appendix F UNIX Tools 597 UNIX tools overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603 uninstallBOBJE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 607 postinstall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 644 Looking for training options? . . . . . . . . . 642 What’s in the documentation set? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . consulting and training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 643 Looking for the best deployment solution for your company? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617 Accessibility and Business Objects products . . . . 616 Benefits of accessible reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 627 Designing for flexibility . . . 621 Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 616 About the accessibility guidelines . . 643 Customer support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 642 Where is the documentation? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 643 How can we support you? . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636 Accessibility and BusinessObjects Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 618 Improving report accessibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 625 Navigation . . 644 18 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . . . 637 Setting accessible preferences for BusinessObjects Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . 628 Accessibility and conditional formatting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631 Text objects and data table values . . . . 631 Improving data table accessibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630 Accessibility and subreports . . . . . . . . . . . . 642 Send us your feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 638 Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637 Accessibility and customization . . . . 619 Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 632 Other data table design considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 640 Appendix I Business Objects Information Resources 641 Documentation and information services . . . . . . . . . . . . 642 Documentation . . . . . . . . . 629 Accessibility and suppressing sections . . . 619 Placing objects in reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contents Appendix H Creating Accessible Reports 615 About accessibility . . . . . . . 626 Parameter fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . 644 Index 647 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contents Useful addresses at a glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Contents 20 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

Introduction to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI Administrator’s Guide chapter .

Once you install BusinessObjects Enterprise. However. Online versions of these guides are included in the doc directory of your product distribution. with links to online resources. customer support. this guide aims to provide sufficient background and conceptual information to clarify all administrative tasks and features. and maintaining a BusinessObjects Enterprise installation. For more information about the product. and information delivery. or integrating critical information into corporate portals. Internet or corporate portal. Whether it is used for distributing weekly sales reports.Contents About this guide This guide provides you with information and procedures covering a wide range of administrative tasks. This appendix describes the Business Objects documentation. analysis. 22 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . they are also accessible from the BusinessObjects Enterprise Launchpad. and reliable solution for delivering powerful. the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide. BusinessObjects Enterprise is a flexible. Business Objects information resources For more information and assistance. managing. Who should use this guide? This guide is intended for system administrators who are responsible for configuring. Procedures are provided for common tasks. training. interactive reports to end users via any web application— intranet. providing customers with personalized service offerings. and consulting services. BusinessObjects Enterprise delivers tangible benefits that extend across and beyond the organization. Conceptual information and technical details are provided for all advanced topics. consult the BusinessObjects Enterprise Getting Started Guide. as is a general understanding of web server management and scripting technologies. scalable. and the BusinessObjects Enterprise User’s Guide. As an integrated suite for reporting. extranet. see Appendix I: Business Objects Information Resources. BusinessObjects Enterprise provides a solution for increasing enduser productivity and reducing administrative efforts. Familiarity with your operating system and your network environment is certainly beneficial. in catering to all levels of administrative experience.

Contents BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 23 .

Contents 24 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

What’s New in BusinessObjects Enterprise chapter .

and security. Supported products All Business Objects products are now available under the same platform. About this version BusinessObjects Enterprise provides an industry-standard. supplemented by powerful query and analysis. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI provides full support for the management. Thanks to the extensive upgrade and content migration support provided in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. and report design options. security. and data integration capabilities from the Business Objects product line. This version includes a variety of major enhancements spread across our data access methods. administration capabilities. and analysis. and application investments without imposing a new set of standards and processes. delivery.2 What’s New in BusinessObjects Enterprise Welcome to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI Welcome to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI BusinessObjects Enterprise XI is the business intelligence platform that supports the entire range of reporting. BusinessObjects Enterprise is designed to integrate seamlessly with existing data. web. This release extends the robust information infrastructure provided by earlier versions of BusinessObjects Enterprise and Crystal Enterprise. existing customers can leverage their current investments in Business Objects and Crystal technology. It also provides platform-level support for semantic layers. This chapter provides an overview of the new features and enhancements available in this version of BusinessObjects Enterprise. BusinessObjects Enterprise provides full web-based administration and configuration of the entire system. from presentation-quality reporting to in-depth data analysis. data integration. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI brings together features from across the Business Objects product line to meet the diverse needs of users. proven architecture based largely on an enhanced version of the Crystal Enterprise architecture. and interaction for the following products and versions: • • • • Crystal Reports XI BusinessObjects Web Intelligence XI BusinessObjects OLAP Intelligence XI BusinessObjects Data Integrator XI 26 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . querying.

Folders are used as a location to store documents. Categories provide an effective way of classifying documents that makes it easier for users to organize documents. Whether you have an existing BusinessObjects Enterprise system or a Crystal Enterprise system. you will notice a wide range of new features in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI.5. you will notice the addition of categories to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. Folders and categories work together to provide strong navigation capabilities. Excel spreadsheets. By taking advantage of the security and management features of BusinessObjects Enterprise. New features BusinessObjects Enterprise XI represents the full integration of traditional Business Objects and Crystal products. and setting appropriate rights for them. By creating a combination of folders and categories.What’s New in BusinessObjects Enterprise New features 2 For information about these products. you can manage your Office documents the same way you manage your business intelligence documents. Categories If you are upgrading or migrating from an existing Crystal Enterprise deployment. you can import your existing categories with the Import Wizard. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 27 . The categorization of documents enables users to locate information more easily regardless of where it is stored within the system. If you’re migrating from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. consult the documentation provided with each component. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI also supports the following add-in components: • BusinessObjects Enterprise Live Office XI Use Live Office to embed your business intelligence data into Word documents. Users can classify documents by using categories created by themselves and by others. Complimentary to folders. categories are used for classifying documents in BusinessObjects Enterprise. combining the best features of each product line. and PowerPoint presentations. End-user experience BusinessObjects Enterprise XI provides a significantly enhanced user experience for all customers. Then you can share the resulting Office documents securely using BusinessObjects Enterprise. you can organize documents according to multiple criteria and improve both security and navigation.

you could use categories to create an alternate filing system that divides content according to different roles in your organization. and scheduling directly to email or printers. you can share knowledge about the information in the documents.2 What’s New in BusinessObjects Enterprise New features For example. InfoView BusinessObjects Enterprise XI introduces a new InfoView. and you can create subcategories within categories. allowing users to add comments to documents in BusinessObjects Enterprise. such as managers or VPs. You can grant other users access to the threaded discussions to allow new users to keep track of historical comments added to the documents. and interact with information. the new look and feel is designed for intuitive user interaction. For more information on migrating documents. Publishing In BusinessObjects Enterprise 6 systems. the term publishing is related to sending a document to multiple users containing different information depending on the user rights. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide. 28 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . From a single web environment. traditionally provided by the Broadcast Agent Publisher and is now part of BusinessObjects Enterprise XI itself.NET and J2EE versions gives the customer the flexibility of deploying InfoView in their established environment. combined with comprehensive support for the entire product line. you can add discussions to any document in the system either by selecting it from the document list or while the user is viewing the document. including scheduling to different formats.NET (ASPX) version or a J2EE version (JSP). a completely updated business intelligence portal. In BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. InfoView is available as a . The important features provided by the Broadcast Agent Publisher are provided in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. New features allow users to be even more productive. users can view. create. InfoView has been designed to allow users to do most tasks within the BI environment without the need of IT intervention. if you currently organize your files into departmental folders. By adding discussions to documents. You can associate documents with multiple categories. The delivery of both . This functionality. Users familiar with previous versions of InfoView or ePortfolio will see that old features have been fully updated and improved. Through extensive testing and design. Discussions Discussions provide threaded notes on all documents within BusinessObjects XI.

This secure mechanism allows a single report to serve the needs of multiple users by delivering only the specific subsets of information to each user according to their security profile. you can use Import Wizard to import your existing universes and their connection objects. this solution is more manageable and can be applied to all documents designed from secured Universes or Business Views. usability. while Universes are accessible by both Crystal Reports as well as Web Intelligence. Business Views Business Views is a flexible and reliable multi-tier system that enables companies to build detailed and specific Business Views objects that help report designers and end users access the information they require. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI also provides the ability to schedule documents on behalf of others. Crystal ReportsXI provides improved report design. All universe objects and their associated connections are stored and secured in the repository of BusinessObjects Enterprise XI itself. Report design BusinessObjects XI includes Crystal Reports. the leading report design tool in the market. If you’re migrating from an existing BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment. note that the Broadcast Agent Scheduler is no longer required.What’s New in BusinessObjects Enterprise New features 2 Scheduling BusinessObjects Enterprise XI provides scheduling capabilities for both Crystal reports and Web Intelligence documents. Semantic Layer BusinessObjects Enterprise XI includes both Universes and Business Views. If you are migrating from an existing BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. to help make the report design process even simpler. including significant enhancements to parameters to allow for the dynamic generation of lists of values. Note: Business Views can be used only by Crystal Reports. Unlike other techniques that require special programming efforts. They act as a semantic layer between the user and a database.x deployment. You will also notice that scheduling is more integrated in Business Objects XI and includes new features such as business calendars. Universes Universes are patented Business Objects technology. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 29 . and processing.

Prompts can be arranged in a cascade. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI includes an enhanced version of the Unified Web Services provided with the BusinessObjects Crystal Integration Pack. A single prompt definition can be stored in the repository and shared among multiple reports.NET and Java SDKs. Web Services The integration pack Web Services have been updated to support the new BusinessObjects XI platform features: • • • The Web Intelligence documents are served by the BusinessObjects XI Web Intelligence report engine. The LDAP authentication is natively supported. As in the integration pack.NET or Java. The consumers simplify application development. 30 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Developer flexibility BusinessObjects Enterprise development tools BusinessObjects Enterprise provides SDKs for enterprise application developers to build application and portal integration on top of the platform. Note: BusinessObjects Enterprise also continues to support existing development in COM. Unified Web Services includes server components (the providers) and both . Web Farm is support. the BusinessObjects XI Web Services deliver a Session service (Session management. improving both runtime scalability and design time productivity.2 What’s New in BusinessObjects Enterprise New features Dynamic prompts and cascading lists of values Dynamic prompts and cascading lists are now available in Crystal Reports. allowing prompt values to be populated from values in a database. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI provides extensive . category management. although we recommend migrating to . and so on). Recognizing the need for comprehensive support for different development environments. and so on). where one value in a prompt constrains values in subsequent picklists. and a ReportEngine service (Crystal Reports and Web Intelligence document viewing including prompt and drill management). authentication.NET and Java APIs that are used to write applications that consume the provided web services. a BICatalog service (InfoObject list. Report designers no longer need to maintain static prompt lists in individual reports.

and powerful platform by customers and industry experts alike. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 31 . Architecture If you are upgrading from an existing BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. This leads to an increase in efficiency and performance. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI is built on a component. offering dynamic growth. Inbox.5 system. and auditing. Improved query language. you will notice key differences in the architecture of BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. Universes. security. reliable. it provides better flexibility. scalability. Enhanced Page Server One of the many improvements in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI is the enhanced Page Server. Auditing Instead of using a separate auditing component. Java and Web Farms support. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI features built-in auditing features. System administration BusinessObjects Enterprise provides an efficient and scalable architecture for processing. Categories.or services-based architecture. Management The Central Management Console provides users with a centralized point for administering a variety of details including scheduling. and the smart use of resources. As a services-oriented architecture. The Page Server has the ability to grow and create sub processes as required. improved reliability. The service-oriented platform allows current Business Objects products such as Web Intelligence to plug directly into the framework without requiring extensive configuration. and delivering information to your users. managing. fault tolerance. widely recognized as a highly scalable. and extensibility.What’s New in BusinessObjects Enterprise New features 2 BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK has been enhanced to include: • • • • JavaServer Faces for BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI inherits most of the new platform services from the proven Crystal Enterprise architecture. Support for Web Intelligence.

another service identifies the failure and continues the processing. group. If a processing service fails. In a multi-server environment. It applies a mixture of active and passive approaches to maximize server availability and minimize response time for your users. Load balancing Intelligent load balancing algorithms eliminate bottlenecks and maximize hardware efficiency. and object level security is controlled using Access Control Lists (ACL). Security BusinessObjects Enterprise XI provides all of the existing security features currently supported in Crystal Enterprise. you need to balance the load across multiple machines. and authentication. The auditing functionality within BusinessObjects Enterprise has been implemented with the concept of a central auditor and individual server auditees. The auditor role is fulfilled by the Central Management Server (CMS). can be audited depending on the level of detail required. For more information on auditing. while individual services with auditing functionality are considered the auditees. There is no migration or integration of the BusinessObjects Auditor product.2 What’s New in BusinessObjects Enterprise New features The auditing functionality of BusinessObjects Enterprise XI focuses on enabling administrators to gain a better understanding of the users accessing the system and the documents they are interacting with. You can then create reports based on this auditing data. The CMS collects and collates the auditing data from the system interactions and writes the information into the auditing database. security. Redundant components automatically take over the load if the system encounters a hardware failure or excessive wait times. see the auditing chapter of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide. Fault tolerance BusinessObjects Enterprise provides fail-over at the system management level (for scheduling. The enhanced fault tolerance ensures seamless reporting and query analysis for your users. for example). an industry standard 32 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . The system also provides full support for replication of all server components. as well as the individual services. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI includes built-in load balancing across all system management and report processing functions. User. in order to enhance scalability and maintain efficient server performance. This means that the overall system. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI includes enhanced support for session-level failover.

Also. The Central Management Console is a centralized management tool that can be used to administer security. Security can be applied at the object level to all documents. which allows a user’s security context to be retrieved from the host operating system and be used to access BusinessObjects Enterprise and the underlying databases for the reports and documents in the system. please see the BusinessObjects Enterprise XI Installation Guide. and universe restriction sets. and import users and groups from existing BusinessObjects Enterprise and Crystal Enterprise deployments into BusinessObjects Enterprise XI using the Import Wizard. universes. Please see platforms. Migration An administrator will be able to create users and groups. The Import Wizard maps most security rights from current systems directly to new users and groups in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. When LDAP authentication is enabled. categories.What’s New in BusinessObjects Enterprise New features 2 method for controlling cascading security access.txt for more information on supported platforms. the administrator has the option to use Siteminder as an external system for authentication providing single sign-on capabilities to BusinessObjects Enterprise. please see the BusinessObjects Enterprise XI Installation Guide. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 33 . These capabilities require the system to run all components on the Windows operating system and for the users to use Internet Explorer with Active Directory authentication. Business Objects XI has introduced single sign-on for LDAP authentication. For details on how rights are mapped. you can provide end-to-end single sign-on. Business Objects XI now provides single sign-on with Active Directory authentication using the Kerberos protocol. By combining single sign-on and report viewing. connections. you can now configure your deployment to use the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol for all network communication between your BusinessObjects Enterprise XI servers. For details on how rights are mapped or for more information on the Import Wizard.

2 What’s New in BusinessObjects Enterprise New features 34 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise chapter .

the CCM allows you to manage local and remote servers through its Graphical User Interface (GUI) or from a command line.sh) allows you to manage servers from a command line. For an introduction to the CCM. • Publishing Wizard This application allows you to publish your reporting content to BusinessObjects Enterprise quickly. • Central Configuration Manager (CCM) This server administration tool is provided in two forms. see “Using the Central Configuration Manager” on page 42. It offers you a single interface through which you can perform almost every task related to user management. content management. Although this application runs only on Windows. the CCM shell script (ccm. This chapter briefly introduces new BusinessObjects Enterprise administrators to some of the available management tools. and server management. you can use it to publish reports to BusinessObjects Enterprise servers that are running on Windows or on UNIX. see “Central Management Console” on page 37. The remainder of this guide provides technical and procedural information corresponding to each of these management categories. content management. You will typically use the following applications to manage BusinessObjects Enterprise: • Central Management Console (CMC) This web application is the most powerful administrative tool provided for managing a BusinessObjects Enterprise system. It also allows you to specify a number of options on each report that you publish. It also shows you how to make initial security settings. For an introduction to the CMC.3 Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Administration overview Administration overview The regular administrative tasks associated with BusinessObjects Enterprise can be roughly divided into three major categories: user management. In a UNIX environment. see “Publishing overview” on page 374. In a Windows environment. For more information on publishing content to BusinessObjects Enterprise. 36 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . such as setting the password for the system’s default Administrator account. and server management.

Type your User Name and Password. 4. you will need to type your URL accordingly. Select Enterprise in the Authentication Type list. or select BusinessObjects Enterprise Administration Launchpad from the program group on the Windows Start menu.NET Administration Launchpad (or Java Administration Launchpad). For details. This tool allows you to perform user management tasks such as setting up authentication and adding users and groups. Any user with valid credentials to BusinessObjects Enterprise can log on to the CMC and set his or her preferences. see “Controlling User Access” on page 315. users who are not members of the Administrators group cannot perform any of the available management tasks unless they have been granted rights to do so. organize. and set security levels for all of your BusinessObjects Enterprise content. If you changed this default virtual directory on the web server. For complete details about object rights. Logging on to the Central Management Console There are two ways to access the CMC: type the name of the machine you are accessing directly into your browser. you may log on using an account that has been mapped to the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrators group. the CMC enables you to manage servers and create server groups. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 37 . 1. see “Setting the Administrator password” on page 44. Additionally. 3. Click Central Management Console. For this example. you can perform all of these administrative tasks remotely. 2. And it allows you to publish. Tip: On Windows. type Administrator as the User Name. However. you can click Start > Programs > BusinessObjects XI> BusinessObjects Enterprise > BusinessObjects Enterprise .Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Central Management Console 3 Central Management Console You will use the Central Management Console (CMC) extensively to manage your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. Because the CMC is a webbased application.aspx Replace webserver with the name of the web server machine. If you’re using LDAP or Windows NT authentication. To log on to the CMC Go to the following page: http://webserver/businessobjects/Enterprise11/WebTools/ adminlaunch/default. This default Enterprise account does not have a password until you create one.

Windows NT and LDAP authentication also appear in the list. See “CMC preferences” on page 39. Click Log On. Setting console preferences The Preferences area of the CMC allows you to customize your administrative view of BusinessObjects Enterprise. Click OK. Click Go if your browser doesn’t take you directly to the new page. 1.3 Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Central Management Console Windows AD. you can navigate through its areas and pages in a number of ways: • • Click the links or icons on the Home page to go to specific “management areas. For example. 3. however. Home > Users > New User indicates that you’re on the New User page. Navigating within the Central Management Console Because the CMC is a web-based application. You can click the hyperlinked portions of the path to jump quickly to different parts of the application. The CMC Home page appears. you could click Home or Users to go to the corresponding page. you must map your third-party user accounts and groups to BusinessObjects Enterprise before you can use these types of authentication. 38 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . your location within the CMC is indicated by a path that appears above the title of each page. 5. 2. To set the console preference Log on to the CMC and click the Preferences button in the upper-right corner of the CMC. In this example. Once you leave the Home page. Set the preference as required.” Select the same “management areas” from the drop-down list in the title area of the window.

simply the number displayed per page. Maximum number of characters for each page index When a list of objects spans multiple pages. see “Setting the Query size threshold” on page 40. This setting determines the number of characters that are included in each hyperlink. To set the available and default viewers for all users. For details about limiting the number of objects displayed on a page or in a search. the full list is sorted alphanumerically and indexed before being subdivided. select the Unlimited check box. In this example. so threecharacter hyperlinks are used to index the report objects on each page. Note: To specify an unlimited maximum number of characters.Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Central Management Console 3 CMC preferences Viewer This list sets the default report viewer that is loaded when you view a report in the CMC. use this list to specify your time zone. Maximum number of objects per page This option limits the number of objects listed on any page or tab in the CMC. Time zone If you are managing BusinessObjects Enterprise remotely. At the top of every page. Note: This setting does not limit the number of objects displayed. if you select Eastern Time BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 39 . hyperlinks are displayed as an index to each of the remaining pages. see “Configuring the processing tier” on page 115. For instance. the maximum number of characters is set to 3. Measuring units for report page layout Specify inches or millimeters as the measuring units used by default when you customize a report’s page layout on the report object’s Print Setup tab. BusinessObjects Enterprise synchronizes scheduling patterns and events appropriately.

3 Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Central Management Console (US & Canada). when you go to the Objects. and Users management areas of the CMC and when displaying search results in these management areas. To set the Query size threshold Go to the BusinessObjects Enterprise Applications management area of the CMC. Modify this value to specify the maximum number of objects that displayed on the initial pages of the Objects. For more information about time zones. and you schedule a report to run at 5:00 a. if you have numerous objects this can heavily tax your system resources.m. 1. This means that BusinessObjects Enterprise prompts users to use the search function of the CMC if the return size exceeds 500 objects. Folders.m. Folders. every day on a server that is located in San Francisco. Setting the Query size threshold By default. see “Supporting users in multiple time zones” on page 527. You can modify the number of objects displayed by setting the Query size threshold in the Business Objects Applications management area of the CMC. Pacific Time. Click the BusinessObjects Enterprise Central Management Console link. then the server will run the report at 2:00 a. Groups. By default the Query size threshold value is 500. My Password Click the Change Password link to change the password for the account under which you are currently logged on. a list of objects in that management area is displayed. 2. Because BusinessObjects Enterprise loads each of the objects in the list. or Users management areas of the CMC. Groups. 40 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

type the URL for the CMC. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 41 . Note: To modify the number of objects displayed on a page (rather than the total number of objects displayed). Specifying the URL here allows Crystal Reports to get this URL from the CMS in order to call pages in the CMC.Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Central Management Console 3 The Query size threshold page appears. type the maximum number of objects you want to be returned in searches and on the initial pages of the Objects. and Users management areas. Groups. end the session by logging off. 5. Click Update. It needs to call these pages in order to support the previewing of reports and to enable administration tasks to be performed from Crystal Reports. In the Prompt for search if the return size exceeds field. Folders. In the CMC Access URL field. Logging off of the Central Management Console When you have finished using the CMC. see “Setting console preferences” on page 38. 3. The Logoff button is located in the upper-right corner of the console. 4.

If you are managing servers on a remote machine. type the name of the machine you want to connect to. A yellow arrow indicates the server is starting. A red arrow indicates the server is not running. Depending on the configuration of your network. and more. To run the CCM. The servers that are available on the local machine appear in the list. enable. To access the CCM. Click Enable/Disable on the toolbar to log on and enable or disable servers. It also allows you to view and to configure advanced server settings such as default port numbers. CMS database and clustering details. To start the CCM From the BusinessObjects Enterprise program group. SOCKS server connections.3 Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Using the Central Configuration Manager Using the Central Configuration Manager The Central Configuration Manager (CCM) is a server-management tool that allows you to configure each of your BusinessObjects Enterprise server components. you can connect to a remote machine in several ways: • In the Computer Name field. 42 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . use the CCM to manage BusinessObjects Enterprise server components that are running locally or on a remote Windows machine. 1. you must also have NT administrator rights on the machine you are connecting to. click Central Configuration Manager. stop. Servers must be enabled before they will respond to BusinessObjects Enterprise requests. For details. you might be prompted to enter a user name and password. you must have NT administrator rights on the local machine. Note: The status icons do not indicate whether servers are enabled or disabled. see “Enabling and disabling servers” on page 85. This tool allows you to start. To connect to servers on a remote machine Once you have started the CCM. and disable servers. A status icon is displayed for each server: • • • A green arrow indicates the server is running. then press Enter. see: • “Accessing the CCM for Windows” on page 42 Accessing the CCM for Windows From a Windows machine.

To see the command-line help. On the toolbar. To run the CCM. For instance. then click OK. Accessing the CCM for UNIX Run the CCM on your UNIX server to manage BusinessObjects Enterprise server components that are running on that machine. you may want to configure the following security settings before you publish content or provide users with access to BusinessObjects Enterprise: • • “Setting the Administrator password” on page 44 “Disabling the Guest account” on page 44 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 43 . Select the appropriate computer. To view additional help on ccm.sh -enable all Note: The main options for the CCM are covered in more detail in “UNIX Tools” on page 597.sh script also provides a detailed description of its command-line options./ccm. you must have execute permissions on the ccm. Note: You may need to type your user name as domain\username. issue the following command: ./ccm.sh with command-line options to manage one or more servers. click Browse.Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Making initial security settings 3 • • 2.sh -start all . You can run the CCM remotely through a telnet session or locally through a terminal window. log on to the remote machine with an account holding administrative rights. select a remote machine from the list.sh -help | more Making initial security settings To ensure system security./ccm.sh The ccm. To run the CCM Go to the Business Objects directory that was created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise installation: cd INSTALL_ROOT/bobje 2. In the Computer Name field. Run ccm.sh script and on its parent Business Objects directory. 1. the following set of commands starts the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers and enables each server on its default port: . The CCM lists the servers associated with this machine. If prompted.

2. see “Disabling the Guest account” on page 44. Log on to the Central Management Console (CMC) with the Administrator account and use the following procedure to create a secure password for the Administrator account. clear the “User must change password at next logon” check box. you may also want to refer to: Setting the Administrator password As part of the installation. you ensure that no one can log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise with this account. In the Account Name column. BusinessObjects Enterprise creates an Administrator account and a Guest account that do not have passwords. Click Update. In the Enterprise Password Settings area. 4. Note: Do not create a password for the Guest account if you plan to use the anonymous single sign-on or the Sign Up features available in BusinessObjects Enterprise. you also disable the anonymous single sign-on functionality of BusinessObjects Enterprise. 2. 3. 5. 1. If it is selected. enter and confirm the new password. so users will be unable to access InfoView without providing a valid user name and password. In doing so.3 Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Making initial security settings • • • • “Modifying the default security levels” on page 45 Chapter 11: BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts “Available authentication types” on page 252 “Controlling User Access” on page 315 For additional security information. To disable these features. 44 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 1. On the Properties tab. To change the Administrator password Go to the Users management area of the CMC. 3. To disable the Guest account Go to the Users management area of the CMC. select the Account is disabled check box. click Guest. Click the link for the Administrator account. Disabling the Guest account By disabling the Guest account.

see the Designer’s Guide. You can change these default security levels to suit your needs. see “Managing Enterprise and general accounts” on page 253. the Everyone group is granted Schedule access to the top-level folder. For a full description of object rights and inheritance patterns. Click Update. change the entry in the Access Level list for each user or group that is displayed. Managing universes Web Intelligence users connect to a universe. Click Update. To modify top-level security settings Go to the Settings management area of the CMC. and the Administrators group is granted Full Control. Initially. 3. Click the Rights tab. They can do data analysis and create reports using the objects in a universe. For complete information. For more information about user accounts. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 45 . and run queries against a database. 4. As required. without seeing. see “Controlling users’ access to objects” on page 317. 1. See “Controlling access to universes” on page 354.Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Managing universes 3 4. If you are prompted for confirmation. For detailed information. or having to know anything about. the underlying data structures in the database. 2. You can also control who has access rights to a universe. Click Add/Remove to grant different levels of security to additional users or groups. 5. see “Controlling users’ access to objects” on page 317. To view a universe Go to the Universes management area of the CMC. Using CMC. you can view and delete universes. Modifying the default security levels This procedure shows where you can modify the default object rights that users are granted to the top-level BusinessObjects Enterprise folder. 5. You create a universe by using the Designer. 1. click OK.

2. see the Designer’s Guide. you can view and delete connections. To delete a universe connection Go to the Universe Connections management area of the CMC. 2. Click Delete. Using CMC. 2. The Universes page appears. A connection links Web Intelligence to your middleware. See “Controlling access to universe connections” on page 355. 2. The properties page for the universe appears. 1. 46 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 1. 3. 1. Managing universe connections A connection is a named set of parameters that defines how a BusinessObjects application accesses data in a database file. The Connections page appears. The Universe Connections page appears. 3. Select the connection you want to delete. You can also control who has access rights to a connection.3 Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Managing universe connections The Universes page appears. For complete information. Select the universe you want to delete. You must select or create a connection when you create a universe. The properties page for the connection appears. Click the link for the universe you want to view. To delete a universe Go to the Universes management area of the CMC. Click the link for the connection you want to view. To view connections Go to the Universe Connections management area of the CMC. You must have a connection to access data. Click Delete.

Consult the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide for more information. without doing any programming. you must enter the context path of the Web Component Adapter. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 47 . the report is processed by the Report Application Server. If you are using the Java version of InfoView and want users to be able to use the Active X or Java viewers. When users view a report using the Advanced DHTML viewer.Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Managing InfoView 3 Managing InfoView You can use the Business Objects Applications area of the Central Management Console to make minor changes to the appearance and functionality of InfoView. You can also configure settings that control which viewers are available to users.

Click Update. select the options that you want. Click Update. Managing Discussions includes the following tasks: • • • • • “Accessing the Discussions page” on page 49 “Searching for discussion threads” on page 49 “Sorting search results” on page 51 “Deleting discussion threads” on page 51 “Setting user rights” on page 51 48 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . To manage settings for Web Intelligence Go to the BusinessObjects Enterprise Applications management area of the CMC. 3. Click Web Intelligence. To manage settings for InfoView Go to the BusinessObjects Enterprise Applications management area of the CMC. select the options that you want. On the Properties tab.3 Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Managing Web Intelligence 1. 4. Click InfoView. 2. On the Properties tab. 4. 3. 1. The user can select this view format and report panel option in the Web Intelligence Document Preferences tab in InfoView. Managing Discussions BusinessObjects Enterprise administrators are responsible for maintaining the discussion threads and for granting the appropriate access rights to BusinessObjects Enterprise users. make sure you grant access to the “Allows interactive HTML viewing (as per license)” option in order for users to be able use the Interactive view format and use the Query HTML panel. 2. Managing Web Intelligence For the Web Intelligence application.

BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 49 . Click Discussions. Note: To cancel a search and reset the search values back to the default settings. 2. Use the Previous and Next buttons to page through the list of discussion threads. Click Discussions. click Cancel. The Discussions page appears. The Discussions page appears. 2. the Discussions page displays the titles of all discussion threads. Only the root level threads are displayed.Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Managing Discussions 3 Accessing the Discussions page 1. To search for a discussion thread Go to the BusinessObjects Enterprise Applications management area of the CMC. Searching for discussion threads By default. You can search for a specific thread or group of threads. To access the Discussions page Go to the BusinessObjects Enterprise Applications management area of the CMC. Branches from the root level thread are not displayed. 1.

Last modified date. If you search by Thread title or Author. Search by the title of a thread. Search by the date the thread was created. If you search by Creation date or Last modified date. there are the following options. or the author name. • • • 5. exactly match the text that you type into the third field. or the author name. contains: The DMC searches for any discussion threads that contain the search text string within any part of the thread title or the author’s name. Search by the author of a specific thread. Search based on the date a thread was last modified. do not exactly match the text that you type into the third field. Searches are not case sensitive.3 Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Managing Discussions 3. select which of the following criteria you want to search by: • • • • 4. does not contain: The DMC searches for any discussion threads that do not contain the text string within any part of the thread title. • • • • is: The DMC searches for any discussion threads where the thread title. enter the date or dates in the appropriate fields. In the Field name list. is not: The DMC searches for any discussion threads where the thread title. Thread title. Author. Use the third field to further refine your search. From the second list. Click Search to display all the records that match your search criteria. If you selected a text-based search in the first two fields. 50 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . the second field provides you with the following options. Creation date. refine your search. If you selected a date-based search. between: The DMC searches for any discussion threads that were created or modified between the two search dates. after: The DMC searches for any discussion threads that were created or modified after the search date. before: The DMC searches for any discussion threads that were created or modified before the search date. type in the text string. 6.

and choose how many results to display per page. Sort based on the date a thread was last modified. Click Delete. Last modified date. In the third category. Tip: You can use the Select All and Clear All buttons to select or clear all the threads displayed on the page. In the second list. enter how many results you want to be displayed on each page. To sort your results In the Sort by list. 2. see “Accessing the Discussions page” on page 49. 1.Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Managing Discussions 3 Sorting search results You can select how you want your search results to display. or add a note to a report. The selected threads are deleted. To delete a discussion thread On the Discussions page. Click Search. Sort by the title of a thread. 4. Author. Sort by the author of a specific thread. select which threads you want to delete in the results list. select which of the following criteria you want to display: • • • • 2. Deleting discussion threads You can delete any discussion thread. For example you can display them in ascending alphabetical order. select whether you want the records to be displayed in ascending or descending order. 3. see Chapter 13: Controlling User Access. For more information on setting user rights to reports and report objects. Thread title. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 51 . Sort by the date the thread was created. Creation date. For details. 1. Setting user rights Users of the Discussions feature must have the right to view a report in order to create a discussion thread.

3 Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise Managing Discussions 52 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture chapter .

54 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . such as OLAP Intelligence and Report Application Server. or they can run on separate machines. If you are new to BusinessObjects Enterprise. use this chapter to gain familiarity with the BusinessObjects Enterprise framework. These services can be “vertically scaled” to take full advantage of the hardware that they are running on. This configuration is called “horizontal scaling. This configuration is called “vertical scaling. Although the components are responsible for different tasks. the application tier. The “servers” run as services on Windows machines. there are five tiers: the client tier. and scalability the components that make up each of these tiers can be installed on one machine. they are actually services and daemons that do not need to run on separate computers. and the general tasks that each component performs. In BusinessObjects Enterprise. On UNIX. For example. they can be logically grouped based on the type of work they perform.” The important thing to understand is that. reliability. its components. This chapter describes the framework itself. then you may choose to run multiple Report Application Servers on it. and they can be “horizontally scaled” to take advantage of multiple computers over a network environment. This means that the services can all run on the same machine. even though these are called servers. the intelligence tier. you can run the Central Management Server and the Event Server on one machine. To provide flexibility. and the data tier. the processing tier. The following diagram illustrates how each of the components fits within the multi-tier system. while you run the Report Application Server on a separate machine. Other Business Objects products. Note: BusinessObjects Enterprise Standard requires all of the components to be installed on one machine. or spread across many. Consult each product’s installation or administration guides for details about how it integrates with the BusinessObjects Enterprise framework. The same service can also run in multiple instances on a single machine.4 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Architecture overview and diagram Architecture overview and diagram BusinessObjects Enterprise is a multi-tier system. plug in to the BusinessObjects Enterprise framework in various ways. the servers run as daemons.” If the Report Application Server is running on a multi-processor computer.

see Chapter 5: Managing and Configuring Servers and Chapter 7: Scaling Your System. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 55 . and their primary responsibilities: • • • • “Client tier” on page 56 “Application tier” on page 58 “Processing tier” on page 64 “Data tier” on page 68 Tip: When you are familiar with the architecture and want to customize your system configuration. Note: BusinessObjects Enterprise supports reports created in versions 6 through XI of Crystal Reports. Once published to BusinessObjects Enterprise. processed. and displayed in version XI format. reports are saved.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Architecture overview and diagram 4 The remainder of this chapter describes each tier. the key BusinessObjects Enterprise components.

NET. Additionally. InfoView also demonstrates how you can use the BusinessObjects Enterprise . It also allows you to publish. schedule. The client tier includes: • • • • • “InfoView” on page 56 “Central Management Console (CMC)” on page 56 “Central Configuration Manager (CCM)” on page 57 “Publishing Wizard” on page 57 “Import Wizard” on page 57 InfoView BusinessObjects Enterprise comes with InfoView. For more information. publish. and set security levels for all of your BusinessObjects Enterprise content.NET Server Components. This tier is made up of the applications that enable people to administer. Central Management Console (CMC) The Central Management Console (CMC) allows you to perform user management tasks such as setting up authentication and adding users and groups. and keep track of published reports. see the developer documentation available on your product CD. the CMC enables you to 56 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .4 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Client tier Client tier The client tier is the only part of the BusinessObjects Enterprise system that administrators and end users interact with directly. a web-based interface that end users access to view. and view reports and other objects. In the case of . Each BusinessObjects Enterprise request that a user makes is directed to the BusinessObjects Enterprise application tier. The web server forwards the user request directly to an application server where the request is processed by the WCA. organize. InfoView also serves as a demonstration of the ways in which you can use the BusinessObjects Enterprise Software Development Kit (SDK) to create a custom web application for end users.

these settings include default port numbers. The Publishing Wizard publishes reports from a Windows machine to BusinessObjects Enterprise servers running on Windows or on UNIX. on Windows the CCM allows you to add or remove servers from your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. SOCKS server connections. see “Central Management Console (CMC)” on page 56. Because the CMC is a web-based application.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Client tier 4 manage servers and create server groups. enable. This tool allows you to start. CMS database and clustering details. and disable servers. and it allows you to view and to configure advanced server settings. or Crystal Info implementation to BusinessObjects Enterprise. and more. see “Using the Central Configuration Manager” on page 42 and Chapter 5: Managing and Configuring Servers. On Windows. Crystal Enterprise. see the developer documentation available on your product CD. In addition. you can perform all of these administrative tasks remotely. For more information. By assigning object rights to BusinessObjects Enterprise folders. you control who can publish reports and where they can publish them to. On UNIX. Central Configuration Manager (CCM) The Central Configuration Manager (CCM) is a server-management tool that allows you to configure each of your BusinessObjects Enterprise server components. For more information. Publishing Wizard The Publishing Wizard is a locally installed Windows application that enables both administrators and end users to add reports to BusinessObjects Enterprise. For more information. For more information. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 57 . see “Publishing overview” on page 374 and “Controlling users’ access to objects” on page 317. For more information. some of these functions are performed using other tools. reports. stop. groups. see “Importing with the Import Wizard” on page 402. The CMC also serves as a demonstration of the ways in which you can use the administrative objects and libraries in the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK to create custom web applications for administering BusinessObjects Enterprise. and folders from an existing BusinessObjects Enterprise. Import Wizard The Import Wizard is a locally installed Windows application that guides administrators through the process of importing users.

the functionality of the Web Component Adapter (WCA) was provided through the Web Component Server (WCS). Application tier The application tier hosts the server-side components that process requests from the client tier as well as the components that communicate these requests to the appropriate server in the intelligence tier. the application tier includes the following components: • • “Application server and BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK” on page 59 “Web Component Adapter (WCA)” on page 59 Note: In Crystal Enterprise 10 on Windows.NET platforms. the web server communicates directly with the application server and the WCA handles the WCS functionality. both on Windows and Unix platforms. In BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. The application tier includes: • • • “Application tier components” on page 58 “Web development platforms” on page 59 “Web application environments” on page 60 Application tier components For both the Java and .4 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Application tier The Import Wizard runs on Windows. but you can use it to import information into a new BusinessObjects Enterprise system running on Windows or on UNIX. 58 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . The application tier includes support for report viewing and logic to understand and direct web requests to the appropriate BusinessObjects Enterprise server in the intelligence tier. the communication between the web server and the application server was handled through the Web Connector.

both on Windows and Unix platforms.jsp) files It also supports Business Objects applications such as the Central Management Console (CMC) and Crystal report viewers (that are implemented through viewrpt. The application server acts as the gateway between the web server and the rest of the components in BusinessObjects Enterprise. Note: In Crystal Enterprise 10 on Windows. and uses the SDK to convert report pages (. Web development platforms BusinessObjects Enterprise supports the following web development platforms: • • “Java platform” on page 60 “Windows .txt file included with your product distribution for a complete list of tested application servers and version requirements.NET platform” on page 60 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 59 . It also supports InfoView and other Business Objects applications.aspx requests). which then forwards the requests on to the WCA.NET SDK run on a third party application server. the functionality of the Web Component Adapter (WCA) was provided through the Web Component Server (WCS).BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Application tier 4 Application server and BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK BusinessObjects Enterprise systems that use the BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK or the BusinessObjects Enterprise . The web server passes requests directly to the application server. the communication between the web server and the application server was handled through the Web Connector. The WCA has two primary roles: • • It processes ASP. In BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. The application server is responsible for processing requests from your browser.epf files) to HTML format when users view pages with a DHTML viewer. See the Platforms.NET (. The Web Component Adapter (WCA) runs within the application server and provides all services that are not directly supported by the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK.aspx) and Java Server Pages (. Web Component Adapter (WCA) The web server communicates directly with the application server that hosts the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK. the web server communicates directly with the application server and the WCA handles the WCS functionality.

such as InfoView and the sample applications available via the BusinessObjects Enterprise Launchpad.NET Server Components that you can optionally use to simplify the development of custom applications.NET. BusinessObjects Enterprise includes web applications developed in . For more information. the web server communicates directly with the application server and the WCA handles the WCS functionality.aspx) pages. the communication between the web server and the application server was handled through the Web Connector. a Java application server is required to host the WCA and the BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK. Note: For backward compatibility.NET. In BusinessObjects Enterprise XI.NET platform BusinessObjects Enterprise installations that use the .asp).NET Server Components which simplify development of custom BusinessObjects Enterprise applications in ASP.jsp) and ASP.NET applications that use the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDKs in conjunction with third party APIs. the functionality of the Web Component Adapter (WCA) was provided through the Web Component Server (WCS).NET applications.csp) and Active Server Pages (. In this configuration. see the developer documentation available on your product CD.aspx) pages allow you to develop cross-platform J2EE and ASP.4 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Application tier Java platform All UNIX installations of BusinessObjects Enterprise include a Web Component Adapter (WCA). both on Windows and Unix platforms.NET SDK with ASP. Windows .aspx. Note: In Crystal Enterprise 10 on Windows. 60 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .NET (. and a set of . You do not need a Web Component Adapter for custom ASP. This configuration requires the use of a Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) web server. BusinessObjects Enterprise also includes Primary Interop Assemblies (PIAs) that enable you to use the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK and Report Application Server SDK with ASP.NET. It also includes a set of .NET Framework include Primary Interop Assemblies (PIAs) that allow you to use the BusinessObjects Enterprise .jsp) and ASP. Web application environments BusinessObjects Enterprise supports Java Server Pages (. The use of a web server is optional as you may choose to have static content hosted by the application server. BusinessObjects Enterprise continues to l support Crystal Server Pages (.NET (. Java Server Pages (.

the CMS is able to ensure that scheduled jobs run at the appropriate times. • Managing objects The CMS keeps track of the location of objects and maintains the containment hierarchy. The CMS also maintains the BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository. The data stored by the CMS includes information about users and groups. and stores report instances. which includes folders. By communicating with the Job Servers and Program Job Servers. sends requests to the appropriate servers.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Intelligence tier 4 Intelligence tier The intelligence tier manages the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 61 . security levels. and servers. categories. and a separate audit database of information about user actions. manages audit information. It maintains all of the security information. These tasks include enforcing and maintaining the licensing policy of your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. BusinessObjects Enterprise content. refer to the following sections: • • • • “Central Management Server (CMS)” on page 61 “Cache Server” on page 63 “File Repository Servers” on page 63 “Event Server” on page 64 Central Management Server (CMS) The CMS is responsible for maintaining a database of information about your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. the CMS enforces who has access to BusinessObjects Enterprise and the types of tasks they are able to perform. which other components can access as required. This data allows the CMS to perform its four main tasks: • Maintaining security By maintaining a database of users and their associated object rights. and inboxes. For more information.

Note: • It is strongly recommended that you back up the CMS system database. the Central Management Server (CMS) was known as the Crystal Management Server. MSDE is a client/server data engine that provides local data storage and is compatible with Microsoft SQL Server. the CMS acts as the system auditor. You can access the audit database directly to create custom audit reports. the Setup program can install and configure its own Microsoft Data Engine (MSDE) database if necessary. 62 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide. System information should only be retrieved using the calls that are provided in the BusinessObjects Enterprise Software Development Kit (SDK). the CMS is able to maintain a list of server status. The backup procedure depends upon your database software. • Managing auditing By collecting information about user actions from each BusinessObjects Enterprise server. to identify which Cache Server is free to use for a report viewing request. Note: In previous versions of Crystal Enterprise. If you are unsure of the procedure. and “Configuring the auditing database” on page 209. consult with your database administrator. and then writing these records to a central audit database. For details about setting up CMS databases. so the CMS can create its own system database and BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository database using your organization’s preferred database server. See “Creating custom audit reports” on page 217 for more information. see the developer documentation available on your product CD. See the Platforms.txt file included with your product distribution for a complete list of tested database software and version requirements. Report viewers access this list. you provide the CMS with database connectivity and credentials when you install BusinessObjects Enterprise. If you already have the MSDE or SQL Server installed. For more information. • • On Windows. the installation program uses it to create the CMS system database. The CMS database should not be accessed directly. for instance. You can migrate your default CMS system database to a supported database server later. This audit information allows system administrators to better manage their BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment. and also as the Automated Process Scheduler (APS).4 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Intelligence tier • Managing servers By staying in frequent contact with each of the servers in the system. and the audit database frequently. Typically.

see “Configuring the intelligence tier” on page 92. you can also publish reports from within your own code. and CMS clusters. with data that has been refreshed from the database within the interval that you have specified as the default. For more information. the Import Wizard. querying for the size of the entire file repository. For more information about Auditing.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Intelligence tier 4 For details about configuring the CMS. its system database. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 63 . and returns the data to the viewer. File Repository Servers There is an Input and an Output File Repository Server in every BusinessObjects Enterprise implementation. see “Modifying Cache Server performance settings” on page 112. By storing report pages in a cache. The Cache Server then caches the report page for future use. it passes the request along to the Page Server. Cache Server The Cache Server is responsible for handling all report viewing requests. and removing files from the repository. If the Cache Server finds a cached page that displays exactly the required data. The Page Server runs the report and returns the results to the Cache Server. adding files to the repository. BusinessObjects Enterprise avoids accessing the database each and every time a report is requested. The File Repository Servers are responsible for listing files on the server. see “Managing Auditing” on page 203. Tip: If you use the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK. The Cache Server checks whether or not it can fulfill the request with a cached report page. the Cache Server automatically balances the processing load across Page Servers. or a Business Objects designer component such as Crystal Reports or the Web Intelligence Java or HTML Report Panels). the Cache Server returns that cached report page. and the program instances generated by the Program Job Server. querying for the size of a file. The Input File Repository Server manages all of the report objects and program objects that have been published to the system by administrators or end users (using the Publishing Wizard. The Output File Repository Server manages all of the report instances generated by the Report Job Server or the Web Intelligence Report Server. the Central Management Console. If you are running multiple Page Servers for a single Cache Server. If the Cache Server cannot fulfil the request with a cached report page.

and custom events are managed by the Central Management Server. In this case. When the file is newly created in the monitored directory. In larger deployments. the Event Server monitors the directory that you specified. Microsoft Word files. • Event Server The Event Server manages file-based events.4 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Processing tier Note: • • The Input and Output File Repository Servers cannot share the same directories. the Event Server triggers your file-based event: that is. all Input File Repository Servers must share the same directory. all Output File Repository Servers must share a directory. Objects with files associated with them. When you set up a file-based event within BusinessObjects Enterprise. such as text files. Likewise. The processing tier includes: 64 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . are stored on the Input File Repository Server. After notifying the CMS of the event. the Event Server again triggers your file-based event. the Event Server notifies the CMS that the file-based event has occurred. It is the only tier that interacts directly with the databases that contain the report data. the Event Server resets itself and again monitors the directory for the appropriate file. or PDFs. for redundancy. This is because one of the File Repository Servers could then delete files and directories belonging to the other. Processing tier The processing tier accesses the data and generates the reports. there may be multiple Input and Output File Repository Servers. Note: Schedule-based events. When the appropriate file appears in the monitored directory. The CMS then starts any jobs that are dependent upon your file-based event.

If you configure a Job Server to process program objects. Program Job Server A Job Server processes scheduled actions on objects at the request of the CMS. To run a program. You can configure a Job Server to process either report objects or program objects when you add it to your BusinessObjects Enterprise system.NET programs that run against. You can configure a Job Server to process either report objects or program objects when you add it to your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. By definition. including scripts. Once it has generated the report instance. it stores the instance on the Output FRS. it becomes a Program Job Server. To generate a report instance. The Program Job Server processes scheduled program objects. as requested by the CMS. it becomes a Report Job Server. the Program Job Server first retrieves the files from storage on the Input File Repository Server.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Processing tier 4 • • • • • • • • “Report Job Server” on page 65 “Program Job Server” on page 65 “Web Intelligence Job Server” on page 66 “Web Intelligence Report Server” on page 66 “Report Application Server (RAS)” on page 66 “Destination Job Server” on page 67 “List of Values Job Server” on page 67 “Page Server” on page 67 Report Job Server A Job Server processes scheduled actions on objects at the request of the CMS. publish. and perform maintenance work on. Java programs or . the Report Job Server obtains the report object from the Input FRS and communicates with the database to retrieve the current data. as requested by the CMS. and schedule custom applications. and generates report instances (instances are versions of a report object that contain saved data). If you configure a Job Server to process report objects. and then runs the program. BusinessObjects Enterprise. The Report Job Server processes scheduled reports. Therefore the outcome of running a program will be dependent upon the particular program object that is run. Program objects allow you to write. program objects are custom applications. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 65 .

ASP. which it stores on the Output File Repository Server (FRS). The RAS also provides the ad hoc reporting capabilities that allow users to create and modify reports over the Web. Report Application Server (RAS) The Report Application Server (RAS) processes reports that users view with the Advanced DHTML viewer. The Report Application Server also includes an SDK for reportcreation and modification. However. and analyze Web Intelligence documents. The RAS is very similar to the Page Server: it too is primarily responsible for responding to page requests by processing reports and generating EPF pages. which can be viewed in their completed format. or it will refresh the data in the document and then cache the new information.NET. the RAS supports COM.4 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Processing tier Unlike report instances. This file appears when you click a program instance in the object History. program instances exist as records in the object history. As with the Page Server. Depending on the user’s access rights and the refresh options of the document. the RAS uses an internal caching mechanism that involves no interaction with the Cache Server. which will generate the instance of the Web Intelligence document. Web Intelligence Report Server The Web Intelligence Report Server is used to create. and Java viewer SDKs. 66 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . edit. providing you with tools for building custom report interaction interfaces. Web Intelligence Job Server The Web Intelligence Job Server processes scheduling requests it receives from the CMS for Web Intelligence documents. It forwards these requests to the Web Intelligence Report Server. the Web Intelligence Report Server will use cached information. It also processes scheduled Web Intelligence documents and generates new instances of the document. view. BusinessObjects Enterprise stores the program’s standard out and standard error in a text output file. The Web Intelligence Job Server does not actually generate object instances.

a user’s inbox. Lists of values are use to implement dynamic prompts and cascading lists of values within Crystal Reports. you can configure it to process report objects or program objects. it become a Destination Job Server. On demand list of value objects are processed by the Report Application Server. There is never more than one instance of a list-of-values object. For more information. the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 67 . When retrieving data from the database. or outside the system. List of Values Job Server The List of Values Job Server processes scheduled list-of-value objects. The Page Server retrieves data for the report from an instance or directly from the database (depending on the user’s request and the rights he or she has to the report object). If you configure it to send objects or instances. it retrieves the instance from the Output File Repository Server. see “Sending an object or instance” on page 420.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Processing tier 4 Destination Job Server When you add a job server to your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. The Destination Job Server does not run the actual report or program objects. These are objects that contain the values of specific fields in a Business View. for example. for example. The EPF pages contain formatting information that defines the layout of the report. A Destination Job Server processes requests that it receives from the CMS and sends the requested objects or instances to the specified destination: • • If the request is for an object. The Destination Job Server can send objects and instances to destinations inside the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. The List of Values Job Server behaves similarly to the Report Job Server in that it retrieves the scheduled objects from the Input File Repository Server (FRS) and saves the instance it generates to the Output FRS. For more information. by sending a file to an email address. or to send objects or instances to specified destinations. If the request is for a report or program instance. It only handles objects and instances that already exist in the Input or Output File Repository Servers. it retrieves the object from the Input File Repository Server. see the Business Views Administrator’s Guide. Page Server The Page Server is primarily responsible for responding to page requests by processing reports and generating Encapsulated Page Format (EPF) pages. List-of-value objects do not appear in CMC or InfoView.

txt file included with your product distribution for a complete list of tested database software and version requirements. Data tier The data tier is made up of the databases that contain the data used in the reports. (However. if a user’s default viewer is the Advanced DHTML viewer. BusinessObjects Enterprise takes advantage of this behavior by ensuring that the majority of report-viewing requests are made to the Cache Server and Page Server. (For more information on the specific functionality or platform support provided by each report viewer. and new pages are generated as soon as they are required. (This behavior conserves database licenses.NET. ASP.) The Page Server also supports COM. the report is processed by the Report Application Server. See the Platforms. 68 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . and which have different report viewing functionality. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise User’s Guide or the Crystal Reports Developer’s Guide.) All of the viewers fall into two categories: • client-side viewers Client-side viewers are downloaded and installed in the users’ web browser. and Java viewer Software Development Kits (SDKs). Specifically.) The Cache Server and Page Server work closely together. the Page Server responds to page requests made by the Cache Server.4 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Data tier Page Server automatically disconnects from the database after it fulfills its initial request and reconnects if necessary to retrieve additional data. Report viewers BusinessObjects Enterprise includes report viewers that support different platforms and different browsers in the client tier. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports a wide range of corporate databases. The Page Server and Cache Server also interact to ensure cached EPF pages are reused as frequently as possible.

Installing viewers If they haven’t already done so. the application server processes the request. and present report pages that appear in the user’s browser. The application server then passes the .epf file to the client-side viewer. Information flow This section describes the interaction of the server components in order to demonstrate how report-processing is performed.epf and creates DHTML pages that represent both the viewer controls and the report itself. The user will be prompted to reinstall the ActiveX viewer only when a new version becomes available on the server. Client-side viewers Client-side viewers are downloaded and installed in the user’s browser. When a user requests a report. The SDK creates a viewer object on the application server which processes the . The viewer object then sends these pages through the web server to the user’s web browser. The Active X viewer is downloaded the first time a user requests a report. and then remains installed on the user’s machine.epf files and displays them directly in the browser.epf format from the BusinessObjects Enterprise framework. the application server processes the request. users are prompted to download and install the appropriate viewer software before the report is displayed in the browser. When a user requests a report. and retrieves the report pages in .epf format from the BusinessObjects Enterprise framework. This section covers two different scenarios: • • “What happens when you schedule an object?” on page 70 “What happens when you view a report?” on page 71 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 69 . client-side viewers Active X viewer Java viewer zero client viewers DHTML viewer Advanced DHTML viewer All report viewers help process requests for reports. Zero client viewers Zero client viewers reside on the application server. which processes the .BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information flow 4 • zero client viewers The code to support zero client viewers resides in the application tier. and then retrieves the report pages in .

8. The CMS checks to see if the user has sufficient rights to schedule the object. it sends the job to the Program Job Server. the CMS schedules the object to be run at the specified time(s). you can schedule the report to run every night on a recurring basis. If the object is a report. and tells the CMS that it has completed the job successfully. For details. 4. InfoView sends the request to the web server. If the user has sufficient rights. The job server retrieves the object from the Input File Repository Server and runs the object against the database. or on a recurring schedule. The Web Intelligence Job Server then notifies the CMS that the job was completed successfully. The web server passes the web request directly to the application server. it sends the job to the Report Job Server. where it is evaluated by the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK. The job server then saves the instance to the Output File Repository Server. you instruct BusinessObjects Enterprise to process an object at a particular point in time. If the job was for a Web Intelligence document. 6. the CMS will send the job to one of the following job servers: • • • 7. the CMS passes the job to the appropriate job server. which sends the request to the Web Intelligence Report Server. the Web Intelligence Report Server notifies the Web Intelligence Job Server. For example. if you have a report that is based on your web server logs.4 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information flow What happens when you schedule an object? When you schedule an object. When the time occurs. If the object is program. Note: 70 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Depending on the type of object. When a user schedules an object using InfoView. see “Managing events overview” on page 510. 5. the following happens: 1. it sends the job to the Web Intelligence Job Server. thereby creating an instance of the object. Tip: For details about multiple time zones. 3. If the object is Web Intelligence document. The SDK passes the request to the Central Management Server. see “Supporting users in multiple time zones” on page 527. Tip: BusinessObjects Enterprise also allows you to schedule jobs that are dependent upon other events. 2.

and the rights you have to the report. this script communicates with the framework (through the published SDK interfaces) in order to create a viewer object and retrieve a report source from the Report Application Server. the request that begins at the web server must be forwarded to the application server.aspx. What happens when you view a report? This section describes the viewing mechanisms that are implemented in InfoView. this script communicates with the framework (through the published SDK interfaces) in order to create a viewer object and retrieve a report source from the Cache Server and Page Server. When you schedule program objects or object packages. verifies the user’s session and retrieves the logon token from the browser. When evaluated by the application server. See “Scaling Your System” on page 157. the processing flow varies depending upon your default report viewer.aspx. the interaction between servers follows the same pattern as it does for reports. When evaluated by the application server.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information flow 4 • The Cache Server and the Page Server do not participate in scheduling reports or in creating instances of scheduled reports. especially in large installations. In all cases.aspx. This ID is passed as a parameter to a server-side script that. This can be an important consideration when deciding how to configure BusinessObjects Enterprise. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 71 . The processing flow for custom applications may differ. When you view a report through BusinessObjects Enterprise. when evaluated by the application server. • The zero-client Advanced DHTML viewer is implemented through report_view_advanced. hosted by the WCA. • The client-side report viewers (the ActiveX and Java viewers) are implemented through viewrpt. The actual request is constructed as a URL that includes the report’s unique ID. • Users without schedule rights on an object will not see the schedule option in BusinessObjects Enterprise. the type of report. The script then checks the user’s InfoView preferences and redirects the request to the viewing mechanism that corresponds to the user’s default viewer. however. Different report viewers require different viewing mechanisms: • The zero-client DHTML viewer is implemented through report_view_dhtml.

the user must have View On Demand rights to view the report successfully (because the Page Server needs to retrieve data from the database). f. ActiveX. and the user only has View rights. the Cache Server sends the . 1. If the user has sufficient rights. Upon receiving a report-viewing request. the Cache Server checks to see if it has the requested pages cached. That is. If the report is an object.epf pages and forwards them to the Cache Server. e.epf file to the application server. 4. If a cached version of the .epf file is available: a. The Page Server checks with the CMS to see if the user has rights to view the report. The viewer code communicates with the framework in order to retrieve a report page in . The Cache Server sends the .epf files. the Page Server generates the . If a cached version of the . the Page Server retrieves the report from the Input File Repository Server. c.epf files from the Page Server. b. g. If they haven’t already done so. users are prompted to download and install the appropriate viewer software. the Page Server will generate pages of the report instance using the data stored in the report instance. The Cache Server requests new . If the user is granted the right to view the report.epf file is unavailable: a. the Page Server will not retrieve the latest data from the database. If the report is an instance. The Cache Server checks with the CMS to see if the user has rights to view the report. 3. The Cache Server then caches the . Cached pages are stored as Encapsulated Page Format (. depending on how the initial request was made: 72 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Report viewing with the Cache Server and Page Server This section describes the process for viewing a Crystal report when using the zero-client DHTML. This process uses the Cache Server and the Page Server.epf) files.4 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information flow The Crystal Web Request is executed internally through viewer code on the application server. d. or Java viewer. The application server sends the report to the user’s Web browser in one of two ways. 2.epf format from the Cache Server and Page Server. b.epf files to the application server. If the user is granted the right to view the report.

If the user is granted View rights to the report object.epf pages to the application server. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 73 . generates the . the application server forwards the .BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information flow 4 • If the initial request was made through a DHTML viewer (report_view_dhtml. 3.epf file is available: a. The RAS checks with the CMS to see if the user has rights to view the report.epf pages to the application server. the RAS checks to see if it has the requested report data in cache. c. (The RAS has its own caching mechanism. • Report viewing with the Report Application Server (RAS) This section describes the process for viewing a Crystal report when using the Advanced DHTML viewer.epf file is unavailable: a. Upon receiving a report-viewing request. which is separate from the Cache Server. That is. b.aspx). If the user is granted the right to view the report. obtains the data from the database.epf pages. 1. 2. If a cached version of the . The HTML pages are then returned through the web server to the user’s web browser. then the RAS will only ever generate pages of the latest report instance.) If a cached version of the .aspx). b. then the RAS will refresh the report against the database. If the user is granted View On Demand rights to the report object. If the user is granted the right to view the report. Note: The interactive search and filter features provided by the Advanced DHTML viewer are available only if the user has View On Demand rights (or greater) to the report object. The RAS checks with the CMS to see if the user has rights to view the report. This process flow uses the Report Application Server (RAS). caches the . the viewer SDK (residing on the application server) is used to generate HTML that represents both the DHTML viewer and the report itself. d. the RAS returns .epf pages and sends the . the RAS retrieves the report object from the Input File Repository Server. the RAS will not retrieve the latest data from the database. The RAS then processes the report object. If the initial request was made through an Active X or Java viewer (viewrpt.epf pages through the web server to the report viewer software in the user’s web browser.

If the document is set to “refresh on open” and the user has the View On Demand rights. If cached content is available. 5. 4.epf pages from the RAS. 1. 6. The web application server then sends the request to the Web Intelligence Report Server. The web application server sends the request to the application server. InfoView sends the request to the web application server. If the user has the right to view the document. and to check when the document was last updated. 3. Instances are generated when an object is run according to a schedule. 74 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . c. The Web Intelligence Report Server contacts the CMS to check whether the user has the right to view the document. Documents are stored on the Input FRS. b. which creates a new session with the Web Intelligence Report Server. 2. The application server sends the HTML pages through the web server to the user’s web browser. 5. and they are stored on the Output FRS. the Web Intelligence Report Server checks whether it has up-to-date cached content for the document. the Web Intelligence Report Server sends the cached document information to the SDK. The Web Intelligence Report Server obtains the Web Intelligence document from either the Input or Output File Repository Server and loads the document file.4 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information flow 4. Viewing Web Intelligence documents This section describes the process for viewing a Web Intelligence document. the Web Intelligence Report Server refreshes the data in the document with data from the database. The Web Intelligence Report Server checks if the user has rights to use the Web Intelligence application. Note: Which FRS is used depends on whether the request was for a Web Intelligence document that was saved to BusinessObjects Enterprise or for an instance of the document. the viewer SDK generates HTML that represents both the Advanced DHTML viewer and the report itself. the following happens: a. 7. The Web Intelligence Report Server obtains the document information from the CMS and checks what rights the user has on the document. When the application server receives the . If cached content is not available.

For instance. Live data On-demand reporting gives users real-time access to live data.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Choosing between live and saved data 4 Note: If the document is set to “refresh on open” but the user does not have View On Demand rights. 9. d. you may prefer to schedule reports on a recurrent basis so that users can always view recent data (report instances) without hitting the database server. then live reporting is the way to give them the information they need. so they can access information that’s accurate to the second. then all those requests to the database do little more than increase network traffic and consume server resources. e. the choice to use live or saved data is one of the most important decisions you’ll make. however. It then returns the XML to the SDK. If the Web Intelligence Report Server does not have the cached content for the page. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 75 . If the data isn’t rapidly or constantly changing. so you can see your report while the rest of the data is being processed. Whichever choice you make. The viewer script calls the SDK to get the requested page of the document. it returns the cached XML to the SDK. If the Web Intelligence Report Server has cached content for the page. it renders the page to XML using the current data for the document. consider whether or not you want all of your users hitting the database server on a continual basis. however. Choosing between live and saved data When reporting over the Web. In such cases. if the managers of a large distribution center need to keep track of inventory shipped on a continual basis. The Web Intelligence Report Server stores the document file and the new document information in cache. 11. Before providing live data for all your reports. BusinessObjects Enterprise displays the first page as quickly as possible. 10. The viewer script returns the HTML to the browser. The SDK applies an XSLT style sheet to the XML to transform it to HTML. The Web Intelligence Report Server sends the document information to the SDK. The request is passed to the Web Intelligence Report Server. an error message is displayed. 8. straight from the database server. Use live data to keep users up-to-date on constantly changing data.

Saved data To reduce the amount of network traffic and the number of hits on your database servers. Report instances are useful for dealing with data that isn’t continually updated. you can run the report on a similar schedule. Sales representatives then always have access to current sales data. Consequently. you can schedule reports to be run at specified times. users can view that report instance as needed. When the report has been run. see the “Designing Optimized Web Reports” section in the Crystal Reports User’s Guide (version 8. without triggering additional hits on the database. they don’t access the database server directly. reports with saved data not only minimize data transfer over the network. instead. they access the saved data. When users navigate through report instances. For example. Tip: Users require only View access to display report instances.4 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Choosing between live and saved data For more information about optimizing the performance of reports that are viewed on demand. but they are not hitting the database every time they open a report. but also lighten the database server’s workload. 76 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .5 and later). if your sales database is updated once a day. Tip: Users require View On Demand access to refresh reports against the database. and drill down for details on columns or charts.

Managing and Configuring Servers chapter .

• Central Configuration Manager (CCM) The CCM is a program that allows you to view and to modify server settings while Business Objects servers are offline. by default. The default values for these settings have been chosen to maximize the reliability. you use the CMC to change the status of a server. For example. change server settings. the CCM allows you to configure BusinessObjects Enterprise remotely over your corporate network You can accomplish some configuration tasks with both tools. BusinessObjects Enterprise administrative tools BusinessObjects Enterprise includes two key administrative tools that allow you to view and to modify a variety of server settings: • Central Management Console (CMC) The CMC is the web-based administration tool that allows you to view and to modify server settings while BusinessObjects Enterprise is running.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Server management overview Server management overview This chapter provides information on a range of server tasks that allow you to customize the behavior of BusinessObjects Enterprise. while other tasks must be performed with a specific tool. data sharing between reports is disabled. access server metrics. To take advantage of this feature while ensuring that every user receives data that meets your criteria for timeliness. economy. For instance. you can also specify how long data will be shared between users. you use the CCM to stop servers. and consistency of operation of a typical BusinessObjects Enterprise installation. or create server groups. For example. With BusinessObjects Enterprise. enabling data sharing between reports markedly increases system performance when user loads are heavy. you can tune server settings to set your own balance between system reliability and performance. to modify performance settings. and scalability of BusinessObjects Enterprise. The default settings guarantee the highest degree of data accuracy and timeliness. It also includes information on the server settings that you can alter to accommodate the needs of your organization. Because the CMC is a web-based interface. If you prefer to place more emphasis on the efficiency. disabling data sharing means that every user can always assume that they will receive the latest data. predictability. For instance. 78 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . and to change the default server port numbers. When running reports on demand. you can configure your BusinessObjects Enterprise servers remotely over the Internet or through your corporate intranet.

1. you can now access and modify server metrics and settings from your own web applications. your CMS. operating system. number of CPUs. and your current system activity. free hard disk space. The CMC also allows you to view system metrics. For more information. total hard disk space. Tip: For an example of how to use server metrics in your own web applications.Managing and Configuring Servers Viewing current metrics 5 Related topics: • • • For an overview of the multi-tier architecture and the BusinessObjects Enterprise server components. see the “View Server Summary” sample on the BusinessObjects Enterprise Admin Launchpad. see “BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture” on page 53. With the BusinessObjects Enterprise Software Development Kit (SDK). Click the Metrics tab. Viewing current metrics The CMC allows you to view server metrics over the Web. 2. The general information displayed for each server includes information about the machine that the server is running on—its name. which include information about your product version. and local time. For information about creating groups of servers. total RAM. see the developer documentation available on your product CD. To view server metrics Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. Click the link to the server whose metrics you want to view. 3. see “Managing Server Groups” on page 151. Viewing current server metrics The Servers management area of the CMC displays server metrics that provide statistics and information about each BusinessObjects Enterprise server. along with details that are specific to the type of server. The general information also includes the time the server started and the version number of the server. These metrics include general information about each machine. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 79 .

along with the number of connections made to each Page Server. the maximum cache size.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Viewing current metrics This example shows the metrics for an Event Server that is running on a machine called Crystal-E501888. whether or not the database is accessed whenever a viewer’s file (object) is refreshed. 80 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . It also lists the total available hard disk space. and the number of requests that are queued. The Metrics tabs for the following servers include additional. This tab includes a table showing the file name and the last time the event occurred.crystald. and the number of writers for each active file. server-specific information: Input and Output File Repository Servers The Metrics tab of each File Repository Server lists the root directory of the files that the server maintains. Cache Server The Metrics tab of the Cache Server displays the maximum number of processing threads.net. which lists the filename. Each File Repository Server also has an Active Files tab. the total threads running. the number of bytes transferred. Event Server The Metrics tab of the Event Server contains statistics on the files that the server is monitoring. as well as the number of bytes sent and received. the number of readers. and displays the number of active files and active client connections. the minutes between refreshes from the database. the number of current connections. the number of requests served. The Metrics tab also provides a table that lists the Page Servers that the Cache server has connections to. the minutes before an idle job is closed. indicates the maximum idle time. the location of the cache files. the cache hit rate.

along with statistics about current and processed jobs. the current number of processing threads running. The Metrics tab lists current account activity. the total number of requests received. It lists the maximum number of simultaneous report jobs. and the setting for the Report Job Database Connection. Metrics. Click any user’s link to view the associated account details. View the contents of the Properties. To view system metrics Go to the Settings management area of the CMC. Viewing system metrics The Settings management area of the CMC displays system metrics that provide general information about your BusinessObjects Enterprise installation. The Properties tab. and database user name of the CMS database.Managing and Configuring Servers Viewing current metrics 5 Page Server The Metrics tab of the Page Server contains information on how the server is running. 2. the minutes before a report job is closed. the processing mode. however. It also shows the number of open connections. the total number of failed job creations. the number of requests queued. database name. and the names of other cluster members. 1. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 81 . the number of minutes before an idle connection is closed. along with the number of open connections that have been created. the oldest processed data given to a client. The Properties tab includes information about the product version and build. It also shows the number of current connections. the location of temporary files. the total number of requests served. and Cluster tabs. It also lists the data source. Report Application Server The Metrics tab of the Report Application Server (RAS) shows the number of reports that are open. and the total bytes transferred. shows a list of users who have active sessions on the system. the maximum number of database records shown when previewing or refreshing a report. whether a viewer refresh always hits the database. Central Management Server The Metrics tab of the CMS lists only the general information about the machine it is running on. The Cluster tab lists the name of the CMS you are connected to. Job servers and Web Intelligence servers The Metrics tabs of theses servers lists the current number of jobs that are being processed. and the number of reports that have been opened. and the location of its temporary files. the name of the CMS cluster.

For information about CMS clusters. the changes typically do not take effect until your restart the server. To respond to BusinessObjects Enterprise requests. it is not accepting requests from the rest of BusinessObjects Enterprise. Restarting a server Restarting a server is a shortcut to stopping a server completely and then starting it again. because these tasks appear frequently. see Clustering Central Management Servers. A server that is disabled is still running as a process. stopping. and the general procedures are provided for reference. Viewing and changing the status of servers The status of a server is its current state of operation: a server can be started. see Licensing overview. the concepts and differences are explained first. Action Stopping a server Description You must stop BusinessObjects Enterprise servers before you can modify certain properties and settings. 82 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . enabled. or disabled. The remainder of this chapter tells you when a certain configuration change requires that you first stop or restart the server. a server must be started and enabled. This section shows how to modify the status of servers with the CMC and the CCM. and restarting servers Starting. If you have stopped a server to configure it. A server that is stopped is no longer running as a process. however. however. You can change certain settings without stopping the server.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Viewing and changing the status of servers Related topics: • • For more information about licenses and account activity. stopped. you need Starting a server to start it to effect your changes and to have the server resume processing requests. It includes: • • • “Starting. and restarting servers are common actions that you perform when you configure servers or take them offline for other reasons. and restarting servers” on page 82 “Enabling and disabling servers” on page 85 “Printing. and refreshing server status” on page 86 Starting. copying. However. stopping. stopping.

We recommend that you disable Job Servers and Program Job Servers before stopping them so that they can finish processing any jobs they have in progress before stopping.Managing and Configuring Servers Viewing and changing the status of servers 5 For example. Stop. 4. 3. click Start. see “Enabling and disabling servers” on page 85. 1. and the remaining servers are running and enabled. If you want to prevent a server from receiving requests without actually stopping the server process. To start. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 83 . then you must first stop the server. Click Refresh to update the page. if you want to change the name of a CMS. stop. the Event Server is disabled. or Restart. 2. you can also enable and disable servers. Select the check box for the server whose status you want to change. In this example. Stopped is indicated by a server with a red arrow. you terminate the server’s process. the Page Server Server is stopped. The icon associated with each server identifies its status: • • • Running is indicated by a server with a green arrow. Disabled is indicated by a server with a red circle. Once you have made your changes. Depending upon the action you need to perform. you start the server again to effect your changes. For details. A list of servers appears. Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. You may be prompted for network credentials that allow you to start and stop services running on the remote machine. See “Stopping a Central Management Server” on page 84 for more information. thereby stopping the server completely. Tip: When you stop (or restart) a server. You must use the CCM instead. or restart servers with CMC Note: You cannot use CMC to stop the CMS.

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1. 2. 3.

To start, stop, or restart a Windows server with the CCM Start the CCM. Select the server that you want to start, stop, or restart. On the toolbar, click the appropriate button.

Toolbar Action Icon Start the selected server. Stop the selected server. Restart the selected server. You may be prompted for network credentials that allow you to start and stop services. Note: When you provide your network credentials, they are first checked against the machine hosting the CMS. If the server that you want to start, stop, or restart is located on another machine, the same credentials are used to access the other machine. If you supply credentials that are valid on the remote machine but not on the machine running the CMS, then you receive an error message. The CCM performs the action and refreshes the list of servers. To start, stop, or restart a UNIX server with the CCM Use the ccm.sh script. For reference, see “ccm.sh” on page 598.

Stopping a Central Management Server
If your BusinessObjects Enterprise installation has a single Central Management Server (CMS), shutting it down will make BusinessObjects Enterprise unavailable to your users and will interrupt the processing of reports and programs. Before stopping your CMS, you may wish to disable your processing servers so that they can finish any jobs in progress before BusinessObjects Enterprise shuts down. See “Enabling and disabling servers” on page 85 for more information. If you have a CMS cluster consisting of more than one active CMS, you can shut down a single CMS without losing data or affecting system functionality. The other CMS in the cluster will assume the workload of the stopped server.

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Using a CMS cluster enables you to perform maintenance on each of your Central Management Servers in turn without taking BusinessObjects Enterprise out of service. For more information on CMS clusters, see “Clustering Central Management Servers” on page 92.

Enabling and disabling servers
When you disable a BusinessObjects Enterprise server, you prevent it from receiving and responding to new BusinessObjects Enterprise requests, but you do not actually stop the server process. This is especially useful when you want to allow a server to finish processing all of its current requests before you stop it completely. For example, you may want to stop a Job Server before rebooting the machine it is running on. However, you want to allow the server to fulfill any outstanding report requests that are in its queue. First, you disable the Job Server so it cannot accept any additional requests. Next, go to the Central Management Console to monitor when the server completes the jobs it has in progress. (From the Servers management area, choose the server name and then the metrics tab). Then, once it has finished processing current requests, you can safely stop the server. Note: The CMS must be running in order for you to enable and/or disable other servers. 1. To enable and disable servers with CMC Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. The icon associated with each server identifies its status. In this example, the Event Server is disabled (but not stopped), and the remaining servers are running and enabled.

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2. 3. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Select the check box for the server whose status you want to change. Depending upon the action you need to perform, click Enable or Disable. To enable or disable a Windows server with the CCM Start the CCM. On the toolbar, click Enable/Disable. When prompted, log on to your CMS with the credentials that provide you with administrative privileges to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Click Connect. The Enable/Disable Servers dialog box appears.

This dialog box lists all of the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers that are registered with your CMS, including servers running on remote machines. By default, servers running on remote machines are displayed as MACHINE.servertype. In this example, all of the listed servers are currently enabled. 5. 6. To disable a server, clear the check box in the Server Name column. Click OK to effect your changes and return to the CCM.

To enable or disable a UNIX server with the CCM Use the ccm.sh script. For reference, see “ccm.sh” on page 598.

Printing, copying, and refreshing server status
When using the CCM on Windows, you can print and copy the properties of a server, and refresh the list of servers.

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1. 2.

To print the status of a server Start the CCM. Select the server(s).

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3. 4.

Click Print. The Print dialog box appears. Click OK. A brief listing of the server’s properties is printed, including the Display Name, Version, Command Line, Status, and so on.

To copy the status of a server To save the status of a server, you can copy the details from the CCM to a document or to an email message (if you want to send the status information to someone else). 1. 2. 3. 4. Start the CCM. Select the server(s). Click Copy. Paste the information into a document for future reference. To refresh the list of servers To ensure you are looking at the latest information, click Refresh.

Note: Disabled servers may not appear in this list. Click Enable/Disable to view a list of servers and ensure that each is enabled.

Configuring the application tier
This section includes technical information and procedures that show how you can modify settings for the application tier.

The majority of the settings discussed here allow you to integrate BusinessObjects Enterprise more effectively with your current hardware, software, and network configurations. Consequently, the settings that you choose will depend largely upon your own requirements.

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Note: This section does not show how to configure your Web application server to deploy BusinessObjects Enterprise applications. This task is typically performed when you install BusinessObjects Enterprise. For details, see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide. For further troubleshooting, see “Working with Firewalls” on page 181.

Configuring the Web Component Adapter
The WCA provides support for the Central Management Console and CSP applications. The Web Component Adapter is a web application. It does not appear as a server in the Central Management Console or in the Central Configuration Manager. To configure the WCA, edit either of the following files, depending on whether you are running the system on a Java or .NET platform:

• •

On a Java platform edit the web.xml file associated with the WCA. See “Configuring the Java Web Component Adapter” on page 89. On a .NET platform edit the web.config file associated with the WCA. See “Configuring the .NET Web Component Adapter” on page 91.

Configuring the Java Web Component Adapter
To configure the Java WCA you edit the web.xml file associated with the WCA:

• •

Windows: C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\java\applications directory UNIX: WEB-INF subdirectory of the webcompadapter.war archive file stored in the bobje_root/enterprise11/java/applications directory

For example, the context parameter that controls whether a group tree will be generated looks like this:
<context-param> <param-name>viewrpt.groupTreeGenerate</param-name> <param-value>true</param-value> <desctiption>”true” or “false” value determining whether a group tree will be generated.</description> </context-param>

To change the value of a context parameter, edit the value between the <param-value> </param-value> tags. To configure web.xml Note: Your Java Web Application Server may provide tools to allow you to edit web.xml directly from an administrative console.Otherwise use the following procedure to configure web.xml.

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1. 2. 3. 4.

Stop your application server. Extract the web.xml file from the webcompadapter.war archive. Edit the file by using a text editor such as Notepad or vi. Reinsert the file into the WEB-INF directory in webcompadapter.war. Tip: To reinsert web.xml into WEB-INF using WinZip, right-click on the WEB-INF directory that contains your edited web.xml file and select “Add to Zip File...”. Adding the file in this way ensures that it is placed in the correct directory inside the archive.

5.

Restart your application server.

When you install more than one WCA, each webcomponentadapter.war file contains its own web.xml file containing configuration parameters for that WCA. However, you can only set the parameters listed in the following table individually for each WCA. The remaining parameters must be the same for all WCA in your system. Context Parameter display-name cspApplication.defaultPage Description Equivalent to WCA name. The default page that will be loaded if no filename is specified in a particular request. This is the real path to the directory containing the CSP/WAS application(s) that you would like to host. This is a required field. This is the name (or name and port number) of the CMS that you would like your application(s) to connect to. This field defaults to the port that the WCA related servlets are running on. Filename of the logfile including full real path to file, excluding extension. Defaults to WCA with no path File extension of logfile, defaults to .log Determines whether or not the logs will be rotated, defaults to true. If log rolling is turned on, this will govern the max size before logfile is rotated. Accepted suffix: MB, KB and GB.

cspApplication.dir

connection.cms

connection.listeningPort log.file

log.ext log.isRolling log.size

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Context Parameter log.level log.entryPattern

Description The default loglevel is “error.” Please refer to log4j documentation for accepted log entry patterns.

Configuring the .NET Web Component Adapter
To configure the .NET WCA you edit the web.config file associated with the the WCA. This file is located in the following directory:
C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\Web Content\application

For example, the context parameter that controls whether a group tree will be generated looks like this: To configure web.config Note: Your .NET Web Application Server may provide tools to allow you to edit web.config directly from an administrative console. 1. 2. 3. Stop your application server. Edit the web.config file by using a text editor such as Notepad. Restart your application server. Description Equivalent to WCA name. The default page that will be loaded if no filename is specified in a particular request. This is the name (or name and port number) of the CMS that you would like your application(s) to connect to. This field defaults to the port that the WCA related servlets are running on. Filename of the logfile including full real path to file, excluding extension. Defaults to WCA with no path File extension of logfile, defaults to .log Determines whether or not the logs will be rotated, defaults to true.

Parameter display-name cspApplication.defaultPage

connection.cms

connection.listeningPort log.file

log.ext log.isRolling

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Parameter log.size

Description If log rolling is turned on, this will govern the max size before logfile is rotated. Accepted suffix: MB, KB and GB. The default loglevel is “error.” Please refer to log4j documentation for accepted log entry patterns.

log.level log.entryPattern

Configuring the intelligence tier
This section includes technical information and procedures that show how you can modify settings for the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers that make up the intelligence tier.

The majority of the settings discussed here allow you to integrate BusinessObjects Enterprise more effectively with your current hardware, software, and network configurations. Consequently, the settings that you choose will depend largely upon your own requirements. Configuring the intelligence tier includes the following tasks:

• • • • • • •

“Clustering Central Management Servers” on page 92 “Copying data from one CMS database to another” on page 98 “Deleting and recreating the CMS database” on page 108 “Selecting a new or existing CMS database” on page 109 “Setting root directories and idle times of the File Repository Servers” on page 110 “Modifying Cache Server performance settings” on page 112 “Modifying the polling time of the Event Server” on page 114

Clustering Central Management Servers
If you have a large or mission-critical implementation of BusinessObjects Enterprise, you will probably want to run several CMS machines together in a CMS cluster. A CMS cluster consists of two or more CMS servers working together to maintain the system database. If a machine that is running one CMS fails, a machine with another CMS will continue to service

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BusinessObjects Enterprise requests. This “failover” support helps to ensure that BusinessObjects Enterprise users can still access information when there is equipment failure. This section shows how to add a new CMS cluster member to a production system that is already up and running. When you add a new CMS to an existing cluster, you instruct the new CMS to connect to the existing CMS database and to share the processing workload with any existing CMS machines. For information about your current CMS and CMS cluster, go to the Settings management area of the CMC and click the Cluster tab. Before clustering CMS machines, you must make sure that each CMS is installed on a system that meets the detailed requirements (including version levels and patch levels) for operating system, database server, database access method, database driver, and database client outlined in the platforms.txt file included in your product distribution. In addition, you must meet the following clustering requirements:

For best performance, the database server that you choose to host the system database must be able to process small queries very quickly. The CMS communicates frequently with the system database and sends it many small queries. If the database server is unable to process these requests in a timely manner, BusinessObjects Enterprise performance will be greatly affected. For best performance, run each CMS cluster member on a machine that has the same amount of memory and the same type of CPU. Configure each machine similarly:

• •

• • • • • • •

Install the same operating system, including the same version of operating system service packs and patches. Install the same version of BusinessObjects Enterprise (including patches, if applicable). Ensure that each CMS connects to the CMS database in the same manner: whether you use native or ODBC drivers, ensure that the drivers are the same on each machine, and are a supported version. Ensure that each CMS uses the same database client to connect to its system database, and that it is a supported version. Check that each CMS uses the same database user account and password to connect to the CMS database. This account must have create, delete, and update rights on the system database. Run each CMS service/daemon under the same account. (On Windows, the default is the “LocalSystem” account.) Verify that the current date and time are set correctly on each CMS machine (including settings for daylight savings time).

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• •

Ensure that each and every CMS in a cluster is on the same Local Area Network. If you wish to enable auditing, each CMS must be configured to use the same auditing database and to connect to it in the same manner. The requirements for the auditing database are the same as those for the system database in terms of database servers, clients, access methods, drivers, and user IDs. See also Chapter 10: Managing Auditing.

Tip: By default, a CMS cluster name reflects the name of the first CMS that you install, but the cluster name is prefixed by the @ symbol. For instance, if your existing CMS is called BUSINESSOBJECTSCMS, then the default cluster name is @BUSINESSOBJECTSCMS. To modify the default name, see “Changing the name of a CMS cluster” on page 96. There are two ways to add a new CMS cluster member. Follow the appropriate procedure, depending upon whether or not you have already installed a second CMS:

• •

“Installing a new CMS and adding it to a cluster” on page 94 See this section if you have not already installed the new CMS on its own machine. “Adding an installed CMS to a cluster” on page 95 Follow this procedure if you have already installed a second, independent CMS on its own machine. While testing various server configurations, for instance, you might have set up an independent BusinessObjects Enterprise system with its own CMS. Follow this procedure when you want to incorporate this independent CMS into your production system.

Note: Back up your current CMS database before making any changes. If necessary, contact your database administrator.

Installing a new CMS and adding it to a cluster
When you install a new CMS, you can quickly cluster it with your existing CMS. Run the BusinessObjects Enterprise installation and setup program on the machine where you want to install the new CMS cluster member. The setup program allows you to perform an Expand installation. During the Expand installation, you specify the existing CMS whose system you want to expand, and you select the components that want to install on the local machine. In this case, specify the name of the CMS that is running your existing system, and choose to install a new CMS on the local machine. Then provide the Setup program with the information it needs to connect to your existing CMS database. When the Setup program installs the new CMS on the local machine, it automatically adds the server to your existing CMS cluster.

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For complete requirements for CMS added to a cluster, see “Clustering Central Management Servers” on page 92. For complete information on running the Setup program and performing the Expand installation, see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide.

Adding an installed CMS to a cluster
In these steps, the independent CMS refers to the one that you want to add to a cluster. You will add the independent CMS to your production CMS cluster. By adding an independent CMS to a cluster, you disconnect the independent CMS from its own database and instruct it to share the system database that belongs to your production CMS. Before starting this procedure, ensure that you have a database user account with Create, Delete, and Update rights to the database storing the BusinessObjects Enterprise tables. Ensure also that you can connect to the database from the machine that is running the independent CMS (through your database client software or through ODBC, according to your configuration). Also ensure that the CMS you are adding to the cluster meets the requirements outlined in “Clustering Central Management Servers” on page 92. Note: Back up your current CMS database before beginning this procedure. If necessary, contact your database administrator. 1. 2. To add an installed CMS to a cluster on Windows Use the CCM to stop the independent Central Management Server. With the CMS selected, click Specify CMS Data Source on the toolbar. The CMS Database Setup dialog box appears.

3.

Click Select a Data Source; then click OK.

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4.

In the Select Database Driver dialog box, specify whether you want to connect to the production CMS database through ODBC, or through one of the native drivers. Click OK. The remaining steps depend upon the connection type you selected:

5. 6.

If you selected ODBC, the Windows “Select Data Source” dialog box appears. Select the ODBC data source that corresponds to your production CMS database; then click OK. If prompted, provide your database credentials and click OK. The CCM connects to the database server and adds the new CMS to the cluster. If you selected a native driver, you are prompted for your database Server Name, your Login ID, and your Password. Once you provide this information, the CCM connects to the database server and adds the new CMS to the cluster.

The SvcMgr dialog box notifies you when the CMS database setup is complete. 7. 8. Click OK. Start the Central Management Server.

To add an installed CMS to a cluster on UNIX Use the cmsdbsetup.sh script. For reference, see “cmsdbsetup.sh” on page 601.

Changing the name of a CMS cluster
By default, a CMS cluster name reflects the name of the first CMS that you install, but the cluster name is prefixed by the @ symbol. For instance, if your existing CMS is called BUSINESSOBJECTSCMS, then the default cluster name is @BUSINESSOBJECTSCMS. This procedure allows you to change the name of a cluster that is already installed and running. To change the cluster name, you need only stop one of the CMS cluster members. The remaining CMS cluster members are dynamically notified of the change. For optimal performance, after changing the name of the CMS cluster reconfigure each Business Objects server so that it registers with the CMS cluster, rather than with an individual CMS. 1. 2. To change the cluster name on Windows Use the CCM to stop any Central Management Server that is a member of the cluster. With the CMS selected, click Properties on the toolbar.

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For example. if the cluster name was changed to ENTERPRISE. For example. Save the file. Select the Change Cluster Name to check box. if the cluster name was changed to ENTERPRISE. type the name of the cluster. 2. 1. To change the cluster name on UNIX Use the cmsdbsetup. and change the name of the CMS to the name of the CMS cluster. Select the server from the list. 4. For reference. 4. 5. and then click Properties. 1. 2.sh script. see “cmsdbsetup. In the CMS Name box.sh to restart the servers. The name of the cluster begins with the @ symbol. 7. Type the new name for the cluster. Click OK and then start the Central Management Server. Click OK. type @ENTERPRISE. Click the Configuration tab.sh to stop each server. 3. and then start the server. Use a text editor such as vi to open the ccm. Do not include a port number with the cluster name. and then use ccm.config file found in the root directory of your BusinessObjects Enterprise installation.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier 5 3. type @ENTERPRISE in the box. enable any servers that have been disabled by your changes. Click the Configuration tab. Repeat for each Business Objects server in your installation. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 97 .sh” on page 601. If necessary. Go to the Servers management area of the CMC and check that all of your servers remain enabled. 5. 3. All other CMS cluster members are dynamically notified of the new cluster name (although it may take several minutes for your changes to propagate across cluster members). The name of the cluster begins with the @ symbol. Find the -ns command in the launch string for each server. 4. To registers servers with the CMS cluster on UNIX Use ccm. 6. The CMS cluster name is now changed. To register servers with the CMS cluster on Windows Use the CCM to stop a Business Objects server.

migrating a CMS database will include several of the following tasks: • • • • “Preparing to migrate a CMS database” on page 98 “Copying data from a CMS on Windows” on page 100 “Copying data from a Crystal Enterprise 8 APS on Windows” on page 101 “Completing a CMS database migration” on page 104 Preparing to migrate a CMS database Before migrating a CMS database. folders. and Update rights to the destination database. and back up the root directories used by all Input and Output File Repository Servers. Note: Prior to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. Tip: If you want to import users. without deleting the contents of the current CMS database.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier Copying data from one CMS database to another BusinessObjects Enterprise enables you to copy the contents of one CMS database into another database. the destination database is established as the current database for the CMS. Throughout this section. You can migrate CMS data from a different CMS database (versions 8. The destination database is initialized before the new data is copied in. contact your database or network administrator. the CMS was known as Crystal Management Server. take the source and the destination environments offline by disabling and subsequently stopping all servers. you can migrate the data from your current CMS database into a different data source. If necessary.5 through 10 of Crystal Enterprise and version XI of BusinessObjects Enterprise) into your current CMS database. see “Importing with the Import Wizard” on page 402. This procedure is also referred to as migrating a CMS database. Depending on the platform of your system and the version of your CMS database. Delete. Or. and reports from one system to another. Ensure that you have a database user account that has permission to read all data in the source database. the source CMS database refers to the database that holds the data you are copying. Once the data has been copied. Back up both CMS databases. so any existing contents of the destination database are permanently deleted (all BusinessObjects Enterprise tables are destroyed permanently and then recreated). groups. according to your configuration—from the CMS machine whose database you are replacing. Ensure also that you can connect to both databases—through your database client software or through ODBC. and also as the Automated Process Scheduler (APS). and a database user account that has Create. 98 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . this data is copied into the destination database.

your current CMS database is the source environment. license keys that are present in the destination database are retained only if the source database contains no license keys that are valid for the current version of BusinessObjects Enterprise. DB2. Log on with an administrative account to the machine that is running the CMS whose database you want to move. 8. This is the procedure to follow if you want to move the default CMS database on Windows from the local Microsoft Data Engine (MSDE) to a dedicated database server. That is. or 10 of Crystal Enterprise or version XI of BusinessObjects Enterprise) into your current CMS database. the database and database schema are upgraded to the format required by the current version of BusinessObjects Enterprise. your current CMS database is the destination database whose tables are deleted before they are replaced with the copied data. such as Microsoft SQL Server.0. During migration. or Sybase.5. make note of the current root directories used by the Input and Output File Repository Servers in the source environment. which is then established as the active database for the current CMS. you will connect your new Input and Output File Repository Servers to the old root directories. the destination database is initialized before the new data is copied in. After you migrate the database. Its contents are copied to the destination database. Complete the following procedure: • • • • “Copying data from a CMS on Windows” on page 100 “Copying data from a CMS installed on UNIX” on page 103 When you migrate a CMS database from an earlier version of Crystal Enterprise. In this scenario. The database migration does not actually move report files from one directory location to another. When you copy data from one database to another. Informix. thus making the report files available for the new system to process.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier 5 Make a note of the license keys you purchased for the current version of BusinessObjects Enterprise. Log on with an administrative account to the CMS machine whose database you want to replace. License keys in the destination database are replaced with license keys from the source database when the source license keys are valid for the current version of BusinessObjects Enterprise. If you are copying CMS data from a different CMS database (version 8. Oracle. Complete the procedure that corresponds to the version of the source environment: • • “Copying data from a CMS on Windows” on page 100 “Copying data from a Crystal Enterprise 8 APS on Windows” on page 101 If you are copying a CMS database from its current location to a different database server. if your destination database does not contain the four BusinessObjects Note: BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 99 . License keys from earlier versions of Crystal Enterprise are not copied. 9.

specify whether you want to connect to the source CMS database through ODBC. click Autodetect (or explicitly select the version of the source CMS database). and data from the source database will be copied into the new tables. Click Specify. 6. Click Copy data from another Data Source. the tables will be permanently deleted. With the CMS selected. or 10 of Crystal Enterprise or from version XI of BusinessObjects Enterprise. please see “Copying data from a Crystal Enterprise 8 APS on Windows” on page 101. If you are copying data from version 8 of Crystal Enterprise. 100 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . or through one of the native drivers. In the “Source contains data from version” list. are unaffected. 3. The next steps depend upon the connection type you selected: 7. including previous versions of Crystal Enterprise system tables. 1. In the Select Database Driver dialog box. new system tables will be created. The Specify Data Source dialog box appears. You must now specify the source CMS database whose contents you want to copy. click Specify CMS Data Source on the toolbar. Other tables in the database. 2. To copy data from a CMS on Windows Use the CCM to stop the Central Management Server. If the destination database does contain BusinessObjects Enterprise XI system tables. Informix. Copying data from a CMS on Windows Use this procedure if your CMS is installed on Windows and you are copying data from versions 8. 5.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier Enterprise XI system tables. Click OK. these tables are created. 4. then click OK. 8.5. 9.

• You are returned to the Specify Data Source dialog box. and also as the Automated Process Scheduler (APS). then click OK. The SvcMgr dialog box notifies you when the CMS database setup is complete. your Login ID. You are now ready to copy the CMS data. If you selected a native driver. Use this procedure if your CMS is installed on Windows.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier 5 • If you selected ODBC or Informix. or through one of the native drivers. proceed to step 13. If prompted. the Windows “Select Data Source” dialog box appears. when prompted to confirm. 9. 11. • You are returned to the Specify Data Source dialog box. Click OK and. Tip: If the correct destination database already appears in the “Copy to the following data source” field. 15. 14. then click OK. Copying data from a Crystal Enterprise 8 APS on Windows Note: Prior to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. 13. provide your database Server Name. and your Password. Proceed to “Completing a CMS database migration” on page 104. In the Select Database Driver dialog box. then click OK. click Yes. 12. the CMS was known as Crystal Management Server. 10. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 101 . Click OK. You must now specify the destination CMS database whose contents you want to replace with the copied data. Select the data source that corresponds to the source CMS database. Click OK. provide your database Server Name. provide your database credentials and click OK. If you selected a native driver. your Login ID. and you are copying data from a Crystal Enterprise 8 APS system database. If prompted. The next steps depend upon the connection type you selected: • If you selected ODBC. provide your database credentials and click OK. the Windows “Select Data Source” dialog box appears. and your Password. Select the ODBC data source that corresponds to the destination CMS database. then click OK. specify whether you want to connect to the destination CMS database through ODBC. Click Browse.

Select the ODBC data source that corresponds to the destination CMS database. Click OK. then click OK. You must now specify the destination CMS database whose contents you want to replace with the copied data. 102 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . provide your database credentials and click OK. 5. 7. 10. Your administrative rights allow the CCM to read the data source information from the Windows Registry on the CMS machine. 9. 3. then click OK. • CMS ODBC data source Click this option if you do not have administrative rights to the Crystal Enterprise 8 CMS machine. provide your database credentials and click OK. The Specify Data Source dialog box appears.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier 1. Click Specify. The next steps depend upon the connection type you selected: • If you selected ODBC. proceed to step 11. If prompted. You must now specify the source CMS database whose contents you want to copy. You are returned to the Specify Data Source dialog box. In the “Browse data” dialog box. 2. In the Select Database Driver dialog box. or through one of the native drivers. Click OK and use the Browse for Computer dialog box to specify the CMS machine. click Crystal Enterprise 8. In the “Source contains data from version” list. To copy data from a Crystal Enterprise 8 APS on Windows Use the CCM to stop the Central Management Server.0. click one of the following: • CMS machine name Click this option if you have administrative rights to the Crystal Enterprise 8 CMS machine. 6. If prompted. Click Browse. 8. Click Copy data from another Data Source. 4. With the CMS selected. specify whether you want to connect to the destination CMS database through ODBC. the Windows “Select Data Source” dialog box appears. click Specify CMS Data Source on the toolbar. Tip: If the correct destination database already appears in the “Copy to the following data source” field. Use the Windows “Select Data Source” dialog box to select (or create) an ODBC data source that provides the local machine with access to the Crystal Enterprise 8 CMS database.

you cannot migrate directly from a Crystal Enterprise version 8 APS.5. Click OK. Then proceed to “Completing a CMS database migration” on page 104. If your source CMS database uses ODBC. 13. Type yes. See “ccm. or 10 of Crystal Enterprise or from version XI of BusinessObjects Enterprise. when prompted to confirm. the CMS was known as Crystal Management Server. 9. enter the name of your CMS or press enter to select the default name. You are now ready to copy the CMS data. When prompted. 11. • 1. 2. 12. Use this procedure if your CMS is installed on UNIX and you are copying data from versions 8. You are returned to the Specify Data Source dialog box. The script prompts you to confirm that all data in the destination database will deleted. you must first migrate that system to a supported native driver. and also as the Automated Process Scheduler (APS). Note: • On UNIX you can not migrate directly from a source environment that uses an ODBC connection to the CMS database. and then press enter to proceed. Note: Migration of a large source database could take several hours. Type copy to begin the database migration. The SvcMgr dialog box notifies you when the CMS database setup is complete. see “ccm. provide your database Server Name.sh.sh” on page 598. your Login ID.sh to stop the Central Management Server. 4. 3. (See “Copying data from a CMS on Windows” on page 100. Click OK and.sh” on page 598. Tip: For information on finding the name of your CMS. click Yes.) If your CMS is installed on UNIX.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier 5 • If you selected a native driver. then click OK. Proceed to “Completing a CMS database migration” on page 104. Copying data from a CMS installed on UNIX Note: Prior to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. and your Password. Run cmsdbsetup. To copy data from a CMS installed on UNIX Use ccm. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 103 .

Note: Migration of a large source database could take several hours. you are prompted for information about the source CMS database. 9. Reports that depend on a particular server group for processing are not available until servers are added to that group. the script will begin the migration process. To complete a CMS database migration on Windows If errors occurred during migration. The script notifies you when migration is complete. You may add the new servers to the imported groups as appropriate. Press Enter. you are first asked for information about the new destination database. If you type yes. 6. the script gives you the location of a log file explaining the migration results. If you type no. Proceed to “Completing a CMS database migration” on page 104. Now the script asks you if you want to use the current CMS database as your destination. and are then prompted for information on the source database. If errors occurred during the migration. complete these steps before allowing users to access the system. Next the script asks you for the version of your source Crystal Enterprise installation. You can also select autodetect to have the version of the source detected automatically. Reports that depend on a particular server group for scheduled processing will not execute until a job server is added to that group. New servers are automatically detected and added to the servers list (outside of any group) in a disabled state. 8. servers that existed in the source installation do not appear in the migrated install. After entering the source information. The default logging directory is: 104 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Completing a CMS database migration When you finish copying data from the source database to the destination database. When migrating from an older version of Crystal Enterprise. This occurs because there cannot be a mix of old and new servers in a BusinessObjects Enterprise installation. Server groups from the old installation appear in the new system. 1. 7. a db_migration log file was created in the logging directory on the machine where you ran the CCM to carry out the migration.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier 5. The CCM will notify you if you need to check the log file. but they will be empty. You must enable these servers before they can be used.

Make sure your web application server is running. If the old Input and Output File Repository Servers are running on a dedicated machine. 10. keep in mind that you now need to provide the Administrator password that was valid in the older system. you need to make your old input and output directories available to the new Input and Output File Repository Servers. start and enable the Input File Repository Server and the Output File Repository Server. Log on to the Central Management Console with the default Administrator account. Return to the Central Configuration Manager. • • For more information. you can run the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program to upgrade the servers directly. In the CCM. Go to the Servers management area of the Central Management Console and verify that the Input File Repository Server and the Output File Repository Server are both started and enabled. If you migrated CMS data from a different CMS database into your current CMS database. on the Properties tab. 8. 9. 3. 4. check that the Root Directory points to the correct location. 5. see “Setting root directories and idle times of the File Repository Servers” on page 110. Instead. Reconfigure the new Input and Output File Repository Servers to use the old input and output root directories. Use the Central Configuration Manager (CCM) to start the CMS on the local machine. Click the link to each File Repository Server and. Go to the Authorization management area and check that your BusinessObjects Enterprise license keys are entered correctly. Then copy the contents of the original output directory into the root directory that the new Output File Repository is already configured to use. Tip: If you just replaced your CMS database with data from an older system. Then you need not move the input and output directories. 7. You can do this in several ways: • Copy the contents of the original input root directory into the root directory that the new Input File Repository Server is already configured to use.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier 5 C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\Logging\ 2. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 105 . modify the -ns option in both servers’ command lines to have them register with your new CMS. See Appendix E: Server Command Lines for more information. 6. using Enterprise authentication.

Verify that BusinessObjects Enterprise requests are handled correctly. you need to make your old input and output directories available to the new Input and Output File Repository Servers. 13. log on to your CMS with credentials that provide you with administrative privileges to BusinessObjects Enterprise. 14. Because your Central Management Server was stopped when the migration occurred. Start and enable the remaining BusinessObjects Enterprise servers. If you migrated CMS data from a different CMS database into your current CMS database. To complete a CMS database migration on UNIX If errors occurred during migration. 12. If there are objects that require updating. 2. and check that you can view and schedule reports successfully.sh to carry out the migration. The default logging directory is: BusinessObjects_root/logging where BusinessObjects_root is the absolute path to the root Business Objects directory of your BusinessObjects Enterprise installation. click Update. The Update Objects dialog box tells you how many objects require updating. the Update Objects button on the toolbar contains a flashing red exclamation mark. Then copy the contents of the original output directory into the root directory that the new Output File Repository is already configured to use. Objects typically require updating because their internal representation has changed in the new version of BusinessObjects Enterprise. When prompted. or because the objects require new properties to support the additional features offered by BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. 15. Click Update Objects.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier 11. a db_migration log file was created in the logging directory on the machine where you ran cmsdbsetup. otherwise click Cancel. • 106 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 1. If objects in your source database require updating. You can do this in several ways: • Copy the contents of the original input root directory into the root directory that the new Input File Repository Server is already configured to use. you need to update the objects now. The script will notify you if you need to check the log file. Reconfigure the new Input and Output File Repository Servers to use the old input and output root directories.

/ccm. 11.sh to start and enable the remaining BusinessObjects Enterprise servers. Run the ccm. If you migrated a source database from an earlier version of BusinessObjects Enterprise. enter the following command: .sh script again.sh script to start the CMS on the local machine. See Appendix E: Server Command Lines for more information. 3. Objects typically require updating because their internal representation has changed in the new version of BusinessObjects Enterprise. 10. 7. 9. 8. Go to the Servers management area of the Central Management Console and verify that the Input File Repository Server and the Output File Repository Server are started and enabled. keep in mind that you now need to provide the Administrator password that was valid in the older system. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 107 . Tip: If you just replaced your CMS database with data from an older system. Log on to the Central Management Console with the default Administrator account. Use the ccm. 6.sh -updateobjects authentication info See Appendix F: UNIX Tools for information on the authentication information required by ccm. For more information. Go to the Authorization management area and check that your BusinessObjects Enterprise license keys are entered correctly. 4. Instead. modify the -ns option in both servers’ command lines to have them register with your new CMS. using Enterprise authentication. See “ccm. Then you need not move the input and output directories. check that the Root Directory points to the correct location. Use ccm.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier 5 • If the old Input and Output File Repository Servers are running on a dedicated machine. Click the link to each File Repository Server and. Use the ccm. see “Setting root directories and idle times of the File Repository Servers” on page 110.sh” on page 598 for more information. on the Properties tab. or because the objects require new properties to support the additional features offered by BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. you can run the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program to upgrade the servers directly. 5.sh. Ensure that the Java web application server that hosts your Web Component Adapter is running.sh script to start and enable the Input File Repository Server and the Output File Repository Server.

Deleting and recreating the CMS database This procedure shows how to recreate (re-initialize) the current CMS database. 5.sh” on page 601. 6. To recreate the CMS database on UNIX Use the cmsdbsetup. the CMS writes required system data to the newly emptied data source. Consider backing up your current CMS database before beginning.sh script. 3. and check that you can view and schedule reports successfully. Click OK. For reference. Click OK and. 108 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . You can re-initialize the CMS database in your development environment every time you need to clear the system of absolutely all its data. Verify that BusinessObjects Enterprise requests are handled correctly. However.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier 12. when prompted to confirm. This procedure is useful. click Recreate the current Data Source. With the CMS selected. for instance. see “cmsdbsetup. To recreate the CMS database on Windows Use the CCM to stop the Central Management Server. Go to the Authorization management area and enter your information on the License Keys tab. log on to the CMC with the default Administrator account (which will have been reset to have no password). 2. click Specify CMS Data Source on the toolbar. if you need to enter license keys again. In the CMS Database Setup dialog box. you destroy all data that is already present in the database. Start the Central Management Server. 1. contact your database administrator. If necessary. You may need to click the Refresh button in the CCM to see that the CMS has successfully started. your existing license keys should be retained in the database. You are returned to the CCM. if you have installed BusinessObjects Enterprise in a development environment for designing and testing your own. click Yes. The SvcMgr dialog box notifies you when the CMS database setup is complete. custom web applications. 4. Note: Remember that all data in your current CMS database will be destroyed if you follow this procedure. While it is starting. By performing this task. When you recreate the CMS database with the CCM.

If the alternate database is empty. In the Select Database Driver dialog box. If you have restored a CMS database from backup (using your standard database administration tools and procedures) in a way that renders the original database connection invalid. When prompted. see “Clustering Central Management Servers” on page 92. Click Select a Data Source. or through one of the native drivers. If you want to select and initialize an empty database for BusinessObjects Enterprise. For complete details about CMS clusters. for instance. The remaining steps depend upon the connection type you selected: • If you selected ODBC. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 109 . The CMS Database Setup dialog box appears. Select the ODBC data source that you want to use as the CMS database. With the CMS selected. these steps allow you to disconnect from. the CMS uses that data when it starts.) When prompted. and then reconnect to.) Note: These steps are essentially the same as adding a CMS to an existing cluster. Click OK. 6. 1.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier 5 Selecting a new or existing CMS database Follow this procedure if you want to disconnect a CMS from its current database and connect it to an alternate database. If the alternate database already contains BusinessObjects Enterprise system data. then click OK. When you complete these steps. there are no other CMS machines already maintaining the database. click Specify CMS Data Source on the toolbar. the current database. specify whether you want to connect to the new database through ODBC. these steps allow you to select that new data source. there are only a few times when you need to complete these steps: • • • If you have changed the password for the current CMS database. the Windows “Select Data Source” dialog box appears. the CCM initializes it by writing system data that is required by BusinessObjects Enterprise. (This might occur. however. 4. if you restored the original CMS database to a newly installed database server. 5. you will need to reconnect the CMS to the restored database. in this case. Generally. (Click New to configure a new DSN. provide your database credentials and click OK. To select a new or existing database for a CMS on Windows Use the CCM to stop the Central Management Server. none of the data in the current database is copied into the alternate database. you can provide the CMS with the new password. 2. then click OK. 3.

Provide this information and then click OK. The SvcMgr dialog box notifies you when the CMS database setup is complete.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier • If you selected a native driver. and your Password. These root directories contain all of the report objects and instances on the system. see “cmsdbsetup. then one server might damage files belonging to the other. because modifications to the files and subdirectories belonging to one server could have adverse effects on the other server.sh” on page 601 Setting root directories and idle times of the File Repository Servers The Properties tabs of the Input and Output File Repository Servers enable you to change the locations of the default root directories. In other words. Note: • The Input and Output File Repository Servers must not share the same root directory. For reference. if the Input and Output File Repository Servers share the same root directory. Click OK. You may change these settings if you want to use different directories after installing BusinessObjects Enterprise. or if you upgrade to a different drive (thus rendering the old directory paths invalid). To select a new or existing database for a CMS on UNIX Use the cmsdbsetup. Start the Central Management Server. you are prompted for your database Server Name. 7. 110 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . your Login ID.sh script. 8.

• • You can also set the maximum idle time of each File Repository Server. In this example. You must restart the server for the changes to take effect. and all Output File Repository Servers must share the same root directory (otherwise there is a risk of having inconsistent instances). 1. It is recommended that you replicate the root directories using a RAID array or an alternative hardware solution. By default. Before you change this setting. Setting a value that is too high can result the uneasier consumption of system resources such as processing time and disk space. To modify settings for a File Repository Server Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. If you run multiple instances of each server. respectively. it is important to understand that setting a value too low can cause a user's request to be closed prematurely. Click the link to the File Repository Server you want to change. The server will remain idle for a maximum of 15 minutes. all Input File Repository Servers must share the same root directory. 2. Click either Apply or Update: • • Click Apply to submit changes and restart the server so that the changes take effect immediately. The root directory should be on a drive that is local to the server. the File Repository Servers are named Input and Output. Click Update to save the changes. 3. This setting limits the length of time that the server waits before it closes inactive connections.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier 5 • If you run multiple File Repository Servers.” and “Output. Make your changes on the Properties tab. 4. the Input File Repository Server is set to use D:\InputFRS\ as its root directory.” as appropriate. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 111 . their names should be prefixed with “Input.

112 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Click the link to the Cache Server whose settings you want to change. the maximum number of simultaneous processing threads. 1. but the “Maximum Simultaneous Processing Threads” is increased to 50. 2. the maximum cache size.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier Modifying Cache Server performance settings The Properties tab of the Cache Server allows you to set the location of the cache files. To modify Cache Server performance settings Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. the Cache Server retains most of the default settings. the number of minutes before an idle job is closed. In this example. and the number of minutes between refreshes from the database. 3. Make your changes on the Properties tab.

if not all. However. the ideal setting for your reporting environment is highly dependent upon your hardware configuration. When the Cache Server has to handle large numbers of reports. you may wish to decrease the number of threads to improve performance. and your reporting requirements. Before you change this setting. which is large enough to optimize performance for most installations. If your Cache Server responds slowly under high load. it is recommended that you contact your Business Objects sales representative and request information about the BusinessObjects Enterprise Sizing Guide. The default value is 5000 Kbytes. Location of the Cache Files The “Location of the Cache Files” setting specifies the absolute path to the directory on the Cache Server machine where the cached report pages (. or reports that are especially complex. either memory usage is high or CPU utilization is high. Note: The cache directory must be on a drive that is local to the server. particularly in the kernel). If the Cache Server is slow under high load but CPU utilization is low. The default value is set to “Automatic”. You must restart the server for the changes to take effect. increasing the number of threads may improve performance.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier 5 4. a larger cache size is needed. Minutes Before an Idle Connection is Closed The “Minutes Before an Idle Connection is Closed” setting alters the length of time that the Cache Server waits for further requests from an idle connection. Click Update to save the changes. Thus. A Business Objects services consultant can then assess your reporting environment and assist you in customizing these advanced configuration and performance settings.epf files) are stored. your database software. and is acceptable for most. the Cache Server sets the maximum number of threads using the number of processors in your system as a guide. Maximum Cache Size Allowed The “Maximum Cache Size Allowed” setting limits the amount of hard disk space (in KBytes) that is used to cache reports. reporting scenarios. With this setting. Maximum Simultaneous Processing Threads The “Maximum Simultaneous Processing Threads” setting limits the number of concurrent reporting requests that the Cache Server processes. and resource utilization on the machine is high (that is. it is important to understand that setting a BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 113 . Click either Apply or Update: • • Click Apply to submit changes and restart the server so that the changes take effect immediately.

The value that you type must be 1 or greater. 5. To modify the polling time Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. Then click the Configuration tab. Make your changes on the Properties tab. Oldest On-Demand Data Given To a Client (in minutes) The “Oldest On-Demand Data Given To a Client (in minutes)” setting determines how long cached report pages are used before new data is requested from the database. 1. It is important to note that. and for report objects that do not have on-demand subreports or parameters and that do not prompt for database logon information. This “File Polling Interval in Seconds” setting determines the number of seconds that the server waits between polls. the “Viewer Refresh Always Yields Current Data” setting ensures that. This setting is respected for report instances with saved data. all cached pages are ignored. when users explicitly refresh a report. Click the link to the Event Server whose settings you want to change. Return to the Servers management area of the CMC. 2. 4. this setting prevents users from retrieving new data more frequently than is permitted by the time specified in the “Minutes Between Refreshes from Database” setting. The minimum value is 1 (one). Tip: On Windows. you can also change this setting in the CCM. the more resources the server requires.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the intelligence tier value too low can cause a user’s request to be closed prematurely. When disabled. the optimal value is largely dependent upon your reporting requirements. and new data is retrieved directly from the database. Modifying the polling time of the Event Server The Properties tab of the Event Server allows you to change the frequency with which the Event Server checks for file events. the lower the value. Generally. and setting a value that is too high can cause requests to be queued while the server waits for idle jobs to be closed. the default value of 15 minutes is acceptable: as with other performance settings. 3. Viewer Refresh Always Yields Current Data When enabled. Click Update. 114 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Stop the Event Server and view its Properties.

and network configurations. and Web Intelligence Job Servers and Web Intelligence Report Servers. the maximum number of simultaneous report jobs. the settings that you choose will depend largely upon your own requirements. and when to disconnect from the report job database. Consequently. The processing tier includes different job servers. The majority of the settings discussed here allow you to integrate BusinessObjects Enterprise more effectively with your current hardware. the number of database records to read when previewing or refreshing a report. Report Application Servers. the minutes before an idle connection is closed.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 5 Configuring the processing tier This section includes technical information and procedures that show how you can modify settings for the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers that make up the processing tier. Page Servers. the minutes before a processing job is closed. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 115 . the oldest processed data to give a client. software. Configuring the processing tier includes: • • • • • • • • “Modifying Page Server performance settings” on page 115 “Modifying database settings for the RAS” on page 118 “Modifying performance settings for the RAS” on page 120 “Modifying performance settings for job servers” on page 121 “Configuring the Web Intelligence Report Server” on page 122 “Configuring the destinations for job servers” on page 125 “Configuring Windows processing servers for your data source” on page 132 “Configuring UNIX processing servers for your data source” on page 133 Modifying Page Server performance settings The Properties tab of the Page Server in the Central Management Console lets you set the location of temporary files.

is highly dependent upon your hardware configuration. and your 116 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Make your changes on the Properties tab. The ideal setting for your reporting environment. The default value of 75 is acceptable for most. 3. Click the link to the Page Server whose settings you want to change. reporting scenarios. job processing may be slower than usual. To modify Page Server performance settings Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. or job processing may fail. however. if not all. Click either Apply or Update: • • Click Apply to submit changes and restart the server so that the changes take effect immediately. If not enough disk space is available. your database software. You must restart the server for the changes to take effect. Location of Temp Files The “Location of Temp Files” setting specifies the absolute path to a directory on the Page Server machine.This directory must have plenty of free hard disk space. Maximum Simultaneous Report Jobs The “Maximum Simultaneous Report Jobs” setting limits the number of concurrent reporting requests that any single Page Server processes. 2.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 1. 4. Click Update to save the changes.

Setting a value that is too high can cause system resources to be consumed for longer than necessary. it is difficult to discuss the recommended or optimum settings in a general way. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 117 . If it is very important that all users receive fresh data (perhaps because important data changes very frequently) you may need to disallow this kind of data reuse by setting the value to 0. A Business Objects services consultant can then assess your reporting environment and assist you in customizing these advanced configuration and performance settings. Minutes Before an Idle Connection is Closed The “Minutes Before an Idle Connection is Closed” setting alters the length of time that the Page Server waits for further requests from an idle connection. (Note that this setting works in conjunction with the “Report Job Database Connection” setting. Minutes before an Idle Report Job is Closed The “Minutes before an Idle Report Job is Closed” setting alters the length of time that the Page Server keeps a report job active. Thus. This setting is useful when you want to prevent users from running on-demand reports containing queries that return excessively large record sets. it is important to understand that setting a value too low can cause a user’s request to be closed prematurely. Setting a value that is too high can cause system resources to be consumed for longer than necessary.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 5 reporting requirements. Before you change this setting. You may prefer to schedule such reports. it is important to understand that setting a value too low can cause a user’s request to be closed prematurely.) Database Records to Read When Previewing Or Refreshing a Report The “Database Records to Read When Previewing Or Refreshing a Report” area allows you to limit the number of records that the server retrieves from the database when a user runs a query or report. Before you change this setting. and the time elapsed since that data was generated is less than the value set here. Oldest On-Demand Data Given to a Client (in minutes) The “Oldest On-Demand Data Given To a Client (in minutes):” setting controls how long the Page Server uses previously processed data to meet requests. It is recommended that you contact your Business Objects sales representative and request information about the BusinessObjects Enterprise Sizing Guide. then the Page Server will reuse this data to meet the subsequent request. Reusing data in this way significantly improves system performance when multiple users need the same information. When setting the value of the “oldest processed data given to a client” consider how important it is that your users receive up-to-date data. both to make the reports available more quickly to users and to reduce the load on your database from these large queries. If the Page Server receives a request that can be met using data that was generated to meet a previous request.

Click Update to save the changes. Make your changes on the Database tab. all previously processed data is ignored. Click the link to the RAS whose settings you want to change. If you select “Disconnect when all records have been retrieved or the job is closed”. Note that you can set the “Minutes before a Report Job is Closed” above. performance for these reports will be significantly slower than if you had selected “Disconnect when the job is closed”. 1.) Modifying database settings for the RAS The Database tab of the Report Application Server (RAS) in the Central Management Console lets you modify the way the server runs reports against your databases.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier Viewer Refresh Always Yields Current Data When enabled. when users explicitly refresh a report. (The latter option ensures that Page Server stays connected to the database server until the report job is closed. Selecting this option limits the amount of time that Page Server stays connected to your database server. the “Viewer Refresh Always Yields Current Data” setting ensures that. Click either Apply or Update: • • Click Apply to submit changes and restart the server so that the changes take effect immediately. the Page Server will automatically disconnect from the report database as soon as it has retrieved the data it needs to fulfill a request. To modify database interaction settings for the RAS Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. You must restart the server for the changes to take effect. 2. Report Job Database Connection The “Report Job Database Connection” settings can be used to make a tradeoff between the number of database licenses you use and the performance you can expect for certain types of reports. the setting ensures that the Page Server will treat requests generated by a viewer refresh in exactly the same way as it treats as new requests. if the Page Server needs to reconnect to the database to generate an on-demand sub-report or to process a group-by-on-server command for that report. However. and new data is retrieved directly from the database. When disabled. and therefore limits the number of database licenses consumed by the Page Server. 4. 3. 118 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

When the RAS retrieves records from the database. When setting the value of the “oldest on-demand data given to a client” consider how important it is that your users receive up-to-date data. Oldest on-demand data given to a client (in minutes) The “Oldest on-demand data given to a client (in minutes)” setting controls how long the RAS uses previously processed data to meet requests. then the RAS will reuse this data to meet the subsequent request. and you want to prevent them from running queries that return excessively large record sets. Stop the RAS and view its Properties. If it is very important that all users receive fresh data (perhaps because important data changes very frequently) you may need to disallow this kind of data reuse by setting the value to 0. it is retrieved from the database. If the data is not in either cache. and the time elapsed since that data was generated is less than the value set here. This is the default on the RAS. Number of database records to read when previewing or refreshing a report The “Number of database records to read when previewing or refreshing a report” area allows you to limit the number of records that the server retrieves from the database when a user runs a query or report. This setting is particularly useful if you provide users with ad hoc query and reporting tools. If the RAS receives a request that can be met using data that was generated to meet a previous request. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 119 . Number of records to browse The “Number of records to browse” setting allows you to specify the number of distinct records that will be returned from the database when browsing through a particular field’s values. select Database.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 5 Tip: On Windows. The data will be retrieved first from the client’s cache—if it is available—and then from the server’s cache. Report Job Database Connection The “Report Job Database Connection” settings can be used to make a tradeoff between the number of database licenses you use and the performance you can expect for certain types of reports. The “Number of records per batch” setting allows you to determine the number of records that are contained in each batch. From the Option Type list. to support the data needs of users performing ad hoc reporting. the query results are returned in batches. you can also change these settings in the CCM. Click the Parameters tab. Reusing data in this way significantly improves system performance when multiple users need the same information. The batch size cannot be equal to or less than zero.

Stop the RAS and view its Properties. select Server. Make your changes on the Server tab. 3. and setting a value 120 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Click the link to the RAS whose settings you want to change. Tip: On Windows. Minutes Before an Idle Connection is Closed The “Minutes Before an Idle Connection is Closed” setting alters the length of time that the RAS waits for further requests from an idle connection. For more information. and therefore limits the number of database licenses consumed by the RAS. the Report Application Server will automatically disconnect from the report database as soon as it has retrieved the data it needs to fulfill a request. it is important to understand that setting a value too low can cause a user’s request to be closed prematurely. Before you change this setting. Click Update to save the changes. if the RAS needs to reconnect to the database to generate an ondemand sub-report or to process a group-by-on-server command for that report.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier If you select “Disconnect when all records have been retrieved or the job is closed”. performance for these reports will be significantly slower than if you had selected “Disconnect when the job is closed”. (The latter option ensures that RAS stays connected to the database server until the report job is closed. and the maximum number of simultaneous processing threads. 4. you can also change these settings in the CCM.) Modifying performance settings for the RAS The Server tab of the Report Application Server (RAS) in the Central Management Console allows you to modify the number of minutes before an idle connection is closed. From the Option Type list. Click either Apply or Update: • • Click Apply to submit changes and restart the server so that the changes take effect immediately. 2. Click the Parameters tab. Note: The RAS server must have been installed and configured in order to use the List of Values Job Server. To modify performance settings for the RAS Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. 1. Selecting this option limits the amount of time that RAS stays connected to your database server. However. see “Processing tier” on page 64. You must restart the server for the changes to take effect.

The ideal setting for your reporting environment. This method allows for more efficient processing of large. Program Job Server. it limits the number of scheduled objects that the server will process at any one time. 2. the server will be waiting unnecessarily for an idle job to close). BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 121 . if the ReportClientDocument object is not closed explicitly. Modifying performance settings for job servers By default. To modify performance settings for job servers Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. the job servers run jobs as independent processes rather than as threads. 3. Click the link to the job server whose settings you want to change. reporting scenarios.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 5 that is too high can affect the server’s scalability (for instance. Use the following procedure to modify the performance settings for any of the job servers. Maximum Simultaneous Report Jobs The “Maximum Simultaneous Report Jobs” setting limits the number of concurrent reporting requests that a RAS processes. it is difficult to discuss the recommended or optimum settings in a general way. The default value is acceptable for most. Click Update. Maximum Jobs Allowed The “Maximum Jobs Allowed” setting limits the number of concurrent independent processes (child processes) that the server allows—that is. and the Web Intelligence Job Server. Return to the Servers management area of the CMC. Thus. however. if not all. complex reports. 4. 1. A Business Objects services consultant can then assess your reporting environment and assist you in customizing these advanced configuration and performance settings. List of Values Job Server. is highly dependent upon your hardware configuration. You can tailor the maximum number of jobs to suit your reporting environment. and your reporting requirements. that is the Report Job Server. It is recommended that you contact your Business Objects sales representative and request information about the BusinessObjects Enterprise Sizing Guide. Destination Job Server. your database software. Make your changes on the Properties tab. 5.

122 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Make your changes on the Properties tab. and your reporting requirements. 1. Thus. The ideal setting for your reporting environment.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier The default “Maximum Jobs Allowed” setting is acceptable for most. Click Update to save the changes. Configuring the Web Intelligence Report Server Use the following procedure to configure the performance settings for the Web Intelligence Report Server. Temp Directory You can also change the default directory where the server stores its temporary files. your database software. however. Click Apply to submit changes and restart the server so that the changes take effect immediately. is highly dependent upon your hardware configuration. it is difficult to discuss the recommended or optimum settings in a general way. if not all. A Business Objects services consultant can then assess your reporting environment and assist you in customizing these advanced configuration and performance settings. reporting scenarios. Click the link to the Web Intelligence Report Server whose settings you want to change. You must restart the server for the changes to take effect. To modify performance settings for the Web Intelligence report server Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. Click either Apply or Update: • • 5. 2. Return to the Servers management area of the CMC and restart the Job Server. 4. It is recommended that you contact your Business Objects sales representative and request information about the BusinessObjects Enterprise Sizing Guide. 3.

List of Values Batch Size The maximum number of values that can be returned per list of values batch. List of Values Caching Enables or disables caching per user session of list of values in Web Intelligence Report Server. Although there is no limit on the maximum value. if the number of values in a list of values exceeds this size. from sources such the Web Intelligence SDK or the Web Intelligence Job Server. Universe Cache Size The number of universes to be cached on the Web Intelligence Report Server. then the list of values will be returned to the user in several batches of this size or less. Business Objects recommends that you limit it to 30000. Connection Time Out The number of minutes before an idle connection to the Web Intelligence Report Server will be closed. The minimum value that you can enter is 10. unless another server is available to handle the request. The default is for the feature to be on. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 123 .Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 5 Maximum Simultaneous Connections The maximum number of simultaneous connections that the server allows at one time. the user will receive an error message. If this limit is reached. For example.

” Then if the cache size is still exceeds the maximum storage size. Nor does it cache the documents when they are run as a scheduled job. but enter a value for Maximum Number Of Downloaded Documents To Cache when this option deselected. This parameter is taken into account only when the Enable Viewing Caching is set to on. Enable Real Time Caching When this parameter is on. the Web Intelligence Report Server does not cache the Web Intelligence documents when the documents are viewed. Note: To improve system performance. real-time caching is possible for Web Intelligence documents when they are viewed. or when they are generated as a result of having been run as a scheduled job. provided the pre-cache was enabled in the document. the Web Intelligence Report Server will clean up the cache until the amount of cache percentage is reached. Document Cache Size The size (in kilobytes) of the document cache. When the parameter is off. The server also caches the documents when they are run as a scheduled job. Document Cache Duration The amount of time (in minutes) that content is stored in cache. Document Cache Scan Interval The number of minutes that the system waits before checking the document cache for cleanup. the system will delete documents with the oldest “last accessed time. Real-time caching is done only if both this parameter and the Enable Real Time Caching parameters are on. Amount of Cache To Keep When Document Cache is Full If the storage size is bigger than the allocated storage size. When this parameter is off both real-time caching of Web Intelligence documents and viewing of cached Web Intelligence documents is impossible.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier Enable Viewing Caching When this parameter is on. Maximum Number of Downloaded Documents To Cache The number of Web Intelligence documents that can be stored in cache. the Web Intelligence Report Server caches Web Intelligence documents when the documents are viewed. 124 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . set the Maximum Number Of Downloaded Documents To Cache to zero when this option is selected.

Note: On the Destination Job Server. when the system runs a scheduled report or a program object. Configuring the destinations for job servers By default. you have to enable and configure the Unmanaged Disk destination on the Job Server. and Web Intelligence Job Server. you can enable and configure additional destinations on the Destination Job Server. For a job server to store output instances in a destination other than the default. the Inbox destination is enabled by default. For example. Program Job Server. To send a report instance by email. See also “Configuring the destination properties for job servers” on page 126. the system will store one output instance on the Output FRS.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 5 Note: To improve system performance. to be able to schedule a report object for output to an unmanaged disk. Destination Job Server. You also specify a destination when you use the Send to feature. set this value to zero when Enable Real Time Caching is selected. and one at the specified destination. which sends an existing object to a specified destination. In order for the system to work with destinations other than the default. it stores the output instance it creates on the Output File Repository Server (FRS). you have to configure the Email (SMTP) destination on the Destination Job Server. you have to enable and configure the other destinations on the job servers. If you want. the destination must have been enabled and configured on the respective job server. you can specify a different destination. List of Values Job Server. If you do. This allows you to use the “Send to” feature and to distribute reports to users within the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. However. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 125 . but enter a value when Enable Real Time Caching is deselected. Configuring destinations for job servers includes: • • • • “Enabling or disabling destinations for job servers” on page 125 “Configuring the destination properties for job servers” on page 126 “Selecting a destination” on page 481 “Sending an object or instance” on page 420 For information about selecting destinations for objects see: Enabling or disabling destinations for job servers This procedure applies to the Job Server.

Click the link for the job server for which you want to enable or disable a destination. see: • • • • 6. 1. To enable or disable destinations for a job server Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. Click Enable. List of Values Job Server. To disable destinations. Destination Job Server. See also “Enabling or disabling destinations for job servers” on page 125. Select the check box for each destination you want to support. 126 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 1. When a destination is disabled a red circle is shown beside the name. Click the link for the job server whose setting you want to change. Set the properties for the destination. Make sure the destination has been enabled. To set the destination properties for a job server Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. 2. 5. 4. 5. for example. Click the link for the destination whose setting you want to set. 7. For information about the properties for each destination. 3. Click the Destinations tab. Program Job Server. See “Configuring the destination properties for job servers” on page 126. 2. If you enabled the destination. “Inbox destination properties” on page 127 “Unmanaged Disk destination properties” on page 131 “FTP destination properties” on page 130 “Email (SMTP) destination properties” on page 128 Click Update. See “Enabling or disabling destinations for job servers” on page 125. FTP. Configuring the destination properties for job servers This procedure applies to the Job Server. and Web Intelligence Job Server. For a job server to store output instances in a destination other than the default. you have to enable and configure the other destinations on the job servers. you must also configure the destination. click Disable. 4. 3.

rpt file. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 127 . Send List Specify which users or user groups you want to receive instances that have been generated or processed by the job server. the Inbox destination is enabled by default. Send document as Select the option you want: • • Shortcut—The systems sends a shortcut to the specified destination. to the destination. For more information. see “Configuring the destination properties for job servers” on page 126 and “Controlling access to user inboxes” on page 352. If you want. you can enable and configure additional destinations on the Destination Job Server. A user inbox is automatically created when you add a user. the .Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 5 Inbox destination properties The Inbox destination stores an object or instance in the user inboxes on the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. for example. This allows you to use the “Send to” feature and to distribute reports to users within the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. Copy—The system sends a copy of the instance. Note: On the Destination Job Server.

and an account called BusinessObjectsJobAccount has been created on the SMTP server for use by the Job Server. SMTP User Name Provide the Job Server with a user name that has permission to send email and attachments through the SMTP server. (This standard SMTP port is 25.) Authentication Select Plain or Login if the job server must be authenticated using one of these methods in order to send email.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier Email (SMTP) destination properties In this example. Domain Name Enter the fully qualified domain of the SMTP server. Port Enter the port that the SMTP server is listening on. Server Name Enter the name of the SMTP server. the SMTP server resides in the businessobjects. SMTP Password Provide the Job Server with the password for the SMTP server. Plain text authentication is being used. Its name is EMAIL_SERV and it is listening on the standard SMTP port.com domain. 128 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . See also “Configuring the destination properties for job servers” on page 126.

Default File Name (randomly generated) Select this option if you want BusinessObjects Enterprise to generate a random file name.%EXT% extension to the specified filename. Specified File Name Select this option if you want to enter a file name. Add viewer hyperlink to message body Click Add if you want to add the URL for the viewer in which you want the email recipient to view the report. This is similar to selecting File Extension from the list and clicking Add. To. and Message Set the default values for users who schedule reports to this SMTP destination. To add a variable. Add file extension Adds the . Windows will know which program to use to open the file when users want to view the file. the email recipient must log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise to see the report. You can also add a variable to the file name. Subject. If you send a hyperlink. Users can override these defaults when they schedule an object. You can set the default URL by clicking Object Settings on the main page of the Objects management area of the CMC. Users can override this default when they schedule an object. choose a placeholder for a variable property from the list and click Add. Users can override these defaults when they schedule an object.) Users can override this default when they schedule an object.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 5 From Provide the return email address. Cc. By adding an extension to the file name. Attach report instance to email message Clear this check box if you do not want to attach a copy of the report or program instance attached to the email. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 129 .

See also “Configuring the destination properties for job servers” on page 126.com site. Provide the appropriate account only if your FTP server requires it. 130 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . FTP Password Enter the user’s password. Account Enter the FTP account information.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier FTP destination properties In this example. FTP User Name Specify a user who has the necessary rights to upload a report to the FTP server. reports scheduled to this destination are randomly named and uploaded to the ftp. Account is part of the standard FTP protocol. if required. Host Enter your FTP host information. Port Enter the FTP port number (the standard FTP port is 21).businessobjects. but it is rarely implemented.

Destination Directory Type the absolute path to the directory. The directory can be on a local drive of the Job Server machine. Default File Name (randomly generated) Select this option if you want BusinessObjects Enterprise to generate a random file name. To add a variable. or on any other machine that you can specify with a UNC path. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 131 . Unmanaged Disk destination properties An unmanaged disk is disk on a system outside the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. Default File Name (randomly generated) Select this option if you want BusinessObjects Enterprise to generate a random file name.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 5 Destination Directory Enter the FTP directory that you want the object to be saved to. See also “Configuring the destination properties for job servers” on page 126. choose a placeholder for a variable property from the list and click Add. Specified File Name Select this option if you want to enter a file name—you can also add a variable to the file name. A relative path is interpreted relative to the root directory on the FTP server.

In this example. Tip: Running a service under an Administrator account does not inadvertently grant administrative privileges to another user. this account is irrelevant in relation to the server’s task of processing reports against your data source. Password Type the password for the user. the report processing servers by default log on to the local system as services with the Windows “LocalSystem” account. This account does not grant the service any network permissions.” the file name of each object includes the object owner’s name. In the majority of cases. 132 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . refer to the platform. because users cannot impersonate services.txt file included with your installation. However. see “Changing the server user account” on page 146. User Name Specify a user who has permission to write files to the destination directory. When each instance runs. the variable is replaced with the appropriate information. To add a variable. This account determines the permissions that each service is granted on the local machine. These cases arise either because the server needs additional network permissions to access the database.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier Specified File Name Select this option if you want to specify a file name—you can also add a variable to the file name. Each file name will be randomly generated. This table lists the various database/ driver combinations and shows when you must complete additional configuration. and a user name and password have been specified to grant the Job Server permission to write files to the remote directory. For example. there are certain cases when you must change the logon account used by the processing servers. you can change it to a Windows user account with the appropriate permissions. if you prefer. For a complete list of supported databases and drivers. Configuring Windows processing servers for your data source When started on Windows. when you add the variable “Owner.) Thus. choose a placeholder for a variable property from the list and click Add. For details on changing the user accounts. or because the database client software is configured for a particular Windows user account. (The database logon credentials are stored with the report object. you can usually leave each server’s default logon account unchanged or. the destination directory is on a network drive that is accessible to the Job Server machine through a UNC path.

The SYBPLATFORM environment variable must define the platform architecture. LIBPATH on IBM AIX. The server loads the client software at runtime in order to access the database that is specified in the report. The server locates the client software by searching the library path environment variable that corresponds to your operating system (LD_LIBRARY_PATH on Sun Solaris. you must install the appropriate database client software on each Job Server and/or Page Server machine that will process the reports. Click the appropriate link to jump to that section: • • Native drivers “Native drivers” on page 133 “ODBC drivers” on page 134 If you design reports using native drivers. additional environment variables may be required for the Job Server and Page Server to use the client software. ensure that the reporting environment configured on the server accurately reflects the reporting environment configured on the Windows machine that you use when designing reports with Crystal Reports. Whether your reports use native or ODBC drivers. Use the DB2 instance initialization script to ensure that the DB2 environment is correct. • DB2 The DB2INSTANCE environment variable must define the DB2 instance that is used for database access.txt file included with your product distribution for a complete list of tested database software and version requirements. Sybase The SYBASE environment variable must define the top-level directory of the Sybase client installation. See the Platforms. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 133 .Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 5 Configuring UNIX processing servers for your data source The Job Servers and Page Server support native and ODBC connections to a number of reporting databases. software. Depending on your database. These include: • • Oracle The ORACLE_HOME environment variable must define the top-level directory of the Oracle client installation. so this variable must be defined for the login environment of each Job Server and Page Server. and so on). This section discusses the environment variables. and configuration files that must be available to the servers in order for them to process reports successfully.

Note: • Detailed documentation covering the various ODBC drivers is included in the Merant Connect ODBC Reference (odbcref.pdf).bnd. As an example. BusinessObjects Enterprise installs ODBC drivers for UNIX.1.7/ lib:opt/sybase/lib:$LD_LIBRARY_PATH setenv ORACLE_HOME /opt/oracle/app/oracle/product/8.export SYBASE SYBPLATFORM=sun_svr4.7/ lib:opt/sybase/lib:$LD_LIBRARY_PATH. their filenames are iscsso. you must set up the corresponding data sources on the Job Server and Page Server machines. creates configuration files and templates related to ODBC reporting.1.1. In addition. and the Oracle client is installed in /opt/oracle/app/oracle/product/8. your database administrator must first bind the UNIX version of the driver to every database that you report against (and not just each database server).bnd. This is installed below the crystal/enterprise/platform/odbc directory.export ORACLE_HOME SYBASE=/opt/sybase. add these commands to the crystal user’s login script: setenv LD_LIBRARY_PATH /opt/oracle/app/oracle/product/8. • 134 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . The Sybase database client is installed in /opt/sybase.export LD_LIBRARY_PATH ORACLE_HOME=/opt/oracle/app/oracle/product/8. This section discusses the installed environment. along with the information that you need to edit. iscswhso. modify the syntax accordingly: LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/opt/oracle/app/oracle/product/8. The bind packages are installed below the crystal/enterprise/platform/odbc/lib directory.7. you must ensure that each server is set up properly for ODBC.export SYBPLATFORM ODBC drivers If you design reports off ODBC data sources (on Windows). During the installation. it is also located in the doc directory of your product distribution. If you report off DB2 using ODBC.7.1.7 setenv SYBASE /opt/sybase setenv SYBPLATFORM sun_svr4 If the crystal user’s default shell is a Bourne shell.1. and sets up the required ODBC environment variables. suppose that you are running reports against both Sybase and Oracle. If the crystal user’s default shell is a C shell. You installed BusinessObjects Enterprise under the crystal user account (as recommended in the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide). see the documentation included with your database client software.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier Note: For complete details regarding these and other required environment variables.

isrrwhso.bnd. include the clientless ODBC driver for Informix connectivity. Because Crystal Reports runs on Windows.ini file that was created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise installation.odbc. The ODBCINI environment variable is defined as the path to the . The UNIX version does. ensure also that the Windows version of the driver has been bound to each database. Thus. ODBC_HOME. however. • On UNIX.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 5 isrrso. Modify the environment variables in the env. BusinessObjects Enterprise does not include the Informix client-dependent ODBC driver (CRinf16) that is installed on Windows. The BusinessObjects Enterprise installation includes a file called env.odbc.bnd.csh script only if you have customized your configuration of ODBC. The ODBC_HOME environment variable is set to the INSTALL_ROOT/ bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc directory of your installation. In this file. and isurwhso. and so on). The BusinessObjects Enterprise installation completes most of the required information—such as the location of the ODBC directory and the name and location of each installed ODBC driver—and shows where you need to provide additional information. Working with the ODBC system information file The system information file (. ODBC environment variables The environment variables related to ODBC reporting are: the library path that corresponds to your operating system (LD_LIBRARY_PATH on Sun Solaris.bnd.ini) is created in the HOME directory of the user account under which you installed BusinessObjects Enterprise (typically the crystal user account).ini Tip: A template of the system information file is installed to INSTALL_ROOT/ BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 135 . the environment for the Job Server and Page Server is set up automatically: • • • The INSTALL_ROOT/bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc/lib directory of your installation is added to the library path environment variable. isurso. The main ODBC configuration file that you need to modify is the system information file. LIBPATH on IBM AIX.bnd. you define each of the ODBC data sources (DSNs) that the Job Server and Page Server need in order to process your reports.csh that is sourced automatically every time you start the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers with the CCM. and ODBCINI. bobje/defaultodbc.

The value of dsn must correspond exactly to the name of the System DSN (on Windows) that the report was based off. and on UNIX you may need to specify this value with the LogonID option. The PDF is installed below the crystal/enterprise/platform/odbc directory. The second section sequentially defines each DSN that is listed in the first section.so InstallDir=/opt/bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc As shown in the example above.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier The following example shows the contents of a system information file that defines a single ODBC DSN for servers running on UNIX. The beginning of each definition is denoted by [dsn]. • 136 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Note: For detailed documentation on each ODBC driver. some Windows drivers store a UID value in the registry. [CRDB2] marks the beginning of the single DSN that is defined in the file.ini\dsn However. This DSN allows the Job Server and Page Server to process reports based on a System DSN (on Windows) called CRDB2: [ODBC Data Sources] CRDB2=MERANT 3. and there must be one entry for every DSN that is defined in the file. For example. The options that you must define depend upon the ODBC driver that you are using. Each DSN is defined through a number of option=value pairs.out TraceDll=/opt/bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc/lib/ odbctrac. lists all the DSNs that are defined later in the file.70 DB2 ODBC Driver Database=myDB2server LogonID=username [ODBC] Trace=0 TraceFile=odbctrace. the options for a particular ODBC driver on UNIX may not correspond by name to the options available for a Windows version of the same driver. In the example above. These pairs essentially correspond to the Name=Data pairs that Windows stores for each System DSN in the registry: \\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ODBC\odbc. Each entry in this section is provided as dsn=driver.70 DB2 ODBC Driver [CRDB2] Driver=/opt/bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc/lib/crdb216. it is also located in the doc directory of your product distribution.pdf).so Description=MERANT 3. denoted by [ODBC Data Sources]. the system information file is structured in three major sections: • The first section. see the Merant Connect ODBC Reference (odbcref.

LogonID=. and so on). Edit the file and provide the corresponding values that are specific to your reporting environment. The standard options that are commonly required for each driver are included in the file (Database=.70 Oracle8 ODBC Driver ServerName= ProcedureRetResults=1 LogonID= [CRSS] Driver=/usr/local/bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc/lib/ crmsss16. [ODBC Data Sources] CRDB2=MERANT 3.so Description=MERANT 3.so Description=MERANT 3.70 Sybase ASE ODBC Driver CRTXT=MERANT 3. it completes some fields and sets up a number of default DSNs—one for each of the installed ODBC drivers.70 Text ODBC Driver [CRDB2] Driver=/usr/local/bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc/lib/ crdb216. When the installation creates the system information file. includes ODBC tracing information.70 Oracle8 ODBC Driver CRSS=MERANT 3. You need not modify this section. denoted by [ODBC].70 SQL Server ODBC Driver CRSYB=MERANT 3.Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier 5 • The final section of the file.70 Informix Dynamic Server ODBC Driver CROR8=MERANT 3.70 DB2 ODBC Driver Database= LogonID= [CRINF_CL] Driver=/usr/local/bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc/lib/ crifcl16.so Description=MERANT 3.so Description=MERANT 3.70 DB2 ODBC Driver CRINF_CL=MERANT 3. This example shows the entire contents of a system information file created when BusinessObjects Enterprise was installed to the /usr/local directory.70 Informix Dynamic Server ODBC Driver ServerName= HostName= PortNumber= Database= LogonID= [CROR8] Driver=/usr/local/bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc/lib/ cror816.70 SQL Server ODBC Driver Address= Database= QuotedId=Yes LogonID= BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 137 .

To create the corresponding DSN. 138 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .so InstallDir=/usr/local/bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc Adding a DSN to the default ODBC system information file When you need to add a new DSN to the installed system information file (. so they can process reports that are based off the SalesDB System DSN (on Windows). Then add the corresponding [dsn] definition just before the [ODBC] section.so Description=MERANT 3. the new DSN is available to the Job Server and Page Server. The report is based off a System DSN (on Windows) called SalesDB.70 Text ODBC Driver Database= [ODBC] Trace=0 TraceFile=odbctrace.70 Oracle8 ODBC Driver ServerName=MyServer ProcedureRetResults=1 LogonID=MyUserName Once you have added this information.out TraceDll=/usr/local/bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc/lib/ odbctrac.ini) file.so Description=MERANT 3.so Description=MERANT 3.odbc. first add the new DSN to the bottom of the [ODBC Data Sources] list. first append this line to the [ODBC Data Sources] section of the system information file: SalesDB=MERANT 3.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Configuring the processing tier [CRSYB] Driver=/usr/local/bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc/lib/ crase16.70 Oracle8 ODBC Driver Then define the new DSN by adding the following lines just before the system information file’s [ODBC] section: [SalesDB] Driver=/usr/local/bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc/lib/ cror816. For example. suppose that you have a Crystal report that uses ODBC drivers to report off your Oracle8 database.70 Sybase ASE ODBC Driver NetworkAddress= Database= LogonID= [CRTXT] Driver=/usr/local/bobje/enterprise11/platform/odbc/lib/ crtxt16.

Managing and Configuring Servers Logging server activity 5 Logging server activity BusinessObjects Enterprise allows you to log specific information about BusinessObjects Enterprise web activity. BusinessObjects Enterprise logs to the syslog daemon as a User application. each of the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers is designed to log messages to your operating system’s standard system log. The programmatic information logged to these files is typically useful only to Business Objects support staff for advanced debugging purposes. You can view the results with the Event Viewer (in the Application Log). • In addition. The important point to note is that these log files are cleaned up automatically. see “Configuring the Web Component Adapter” on page 89. This example shows two messages logged to the syslog daemon on UNIX: • Each server also logs assert messages to the logging directory of your product installation. On UNIX. the default logging directory INSTALL_ROOT/bobje/logging directory of your installation. BusinessObjects Enterprise logs to the Event Log service. the default logging directory is C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\Logging On UNIX. For details on locating and customizing the web activity logs. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 139 .On Windows NT/2000. The location of these log files depends upon your operating system: • • On Windows. so there will never be more than approximately 1 MB of logged data per server. Each server prepends its name and PID to any messages that it logs.

) The Web Component Adapter is not a server. and then listens for BusinessObjects Enterprise requests. Thus. you view and modify server command lines with the CCM. If so. When started and enabled.config file. which is installed in the crystal directory. you can instruct each server component to listen on a specific port (rather than dynamically selecting any available port). On UNIX. depending upon your reporting environment. you view and modify server command lines (also referred to as launch strings) in the ccm. BusinessObjects Enterprise communication on these ports should not conflict with third-party applications that you have in place. registers with this port on the CMS. the CMS is set up to use default port numbers. If necessary. See “Configuring the Web Component Adapter” on page 89. The Command field appears on each server’s Properties tab. This ports fall within the range of ports reserved by Business Objects (6400 to 6410).listeningPort context parameter in web. On Windows. it is possible that your custom applications use these ports.xml. 140 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . you can change the default CMS port. (Although unlikely. However.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Advanced server configuration options Advanced server configuration options This section includes additional configuration tasks that you may want to perform. you can configure its listening port by changing the connection. each of the other BusinessObjects Enterprise servers dynamically binds to an available port (higher than 1024). The default CMS port number is 6400. It includes: • • • • • • “Changing the default server port numbers” on page 140 “Configuring a multihomed machine” on page 143 “Adding and removing Windows server dependencies” on page 144 “Changing the server startup type” on page 145 “Changing the server user account” on page 146 “Configuring servers for SSL” on page 146 Changing the default server port numbers During installation.

see “Configuring a multihomed machine” on page 143 or “Configuring for Network Address Translation” on page 190. because it maintains a list that includes the host name and port number of each server that is started. -requestPort Specifies the secondary port Specifies the port on which that the CMS uses for identifying other servers and for registering with itself and/ or a cluster. The server registers this port with the CMS. Specifies the CMS that the server will register with. See “Configuring the Web Component Adapter” on page 89. The default is 6400. In both cases. the CCM displays default port numbers on each server’s Configuration tab. Other Servers Used only in multihomed environments or for certain NAT firewall environments.” The CMS functions as the nameserver in BusinessObjects Enterprise. (The -ns option stands for “nameserver.Managing and Configuring Servers Advanced server configuration options 5 This table summarizes the command-line options as they relate to port usage for specific server types. (-port number has no meaning for these servers). and thus available to accept BusinessObjects Enterprise requests. to ensure that each server connects to the appropriate port of the CMS. This displayed port corresponds to the -port option. For details. consider the following: • CMS port number. the server listens for BusinessObjects Enterprise requests. see Appendix E: Server Command Lines.) You must also set the name and port number of the CMS with the connection.xml. specify -port interface only. n/a -ns Before modifying any port numbers. For servers other than the CMS. you may wish to specify -port interface:number for the CMS and -port interface for the other servers. For more information. this default port is not actually in use (each server registers its -requestPort number with the CMS instead). • • BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 141 . enabled. Selected dynamically if unspecified.cms context parameter in web. On Windows. you must change the -ns option in every other server’s command line. Option -port CMS Specifies the primary BusinessObjects Enterprise port on which the CMS listens for requests from all other servers. If you are working with multihomed machines or in certain NAT firewall configurations. Selected dynamically if unspecified.

xml.) 3. To change the default CMS port for BusinessObjects Enterprise servers Use the CCM (on Windows) or ccm. To change the port a server registers with the CMS Use the CCM (on Windows) or ccm.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Advanced server configuration options 1. 4. See “Configuring the Web Component Adapter” on page 89. 3. The CMS begins listening on the port specified by number. use the -requestPort option in conjunction with -port interface (where interface is the server’s fully qualified domain name). each server registers itself with the CMS by IP address. Having the servers register by name can be useful if a NAT firewall resides between the server and the CMS. It then registers with the CMS and begins listening for BusinessObjects Enterprise requests on the new port. By default. Replace number with the port that the CMS is listening on. 142 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 5. The host name must resolve to a valid IP address within your network. Add (or modify) the following option in the command line of all of the remaining non-CMS BusinessObjects Enterprise servers: -ns hostname:number Replace hostname with the host name of the machine that is running the CMS. (The default port is 6400. The server binds to the new port specified by number. 2. For more information. 2.cms context parameter in web.sh (on UNIX) to stop all the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers.sh (on UNIX) to stop the server. see “Configuring for Network Address Translation” on page 190. Add (or modify) the following option in the CMS command line: -port number Replace number with the port that you want the CMS to listen on. Start and enable the server. Replace number with the port that you want the server to listen on. Set the name and port number of the CMS with the connection. This typically provides the most reliable behavior. Start and enable all the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers. If you need each server to register with the CMS by fully qualified domain name instead. and the non-CMS servers broadcast to that port when attempting to register with the CMS. Add (or modify) the following option in the server’s command line: -requestPort number 1. rather than by name.

you might want to bind the File Repository Servers to a private address that is not routable from users’ machines. change the binding order so that the card at the top of the binding order is the one you want the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers to bind to. Configuring a multihomed machine A multihomed machine is one that has multiple network addresses. For instance. see “Changing the default server port numbers” on page 140. Add the following option to both of their command lines: -port interface:port If the machine has multiple network interfaces.xml.) • BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 143 . If you have multiple interface cards. If the machine has a single network interface.listeningPort context parameter in web. Tip: This section shows how to restrict all servers to the same network address. replace port with 6400 for the CMS. each with a single IP address. use the -port command-line option to specify a IP address for the BusinessObjects Enterprise server. If your interface card has multiple IP addresses. (See “Configuring the Web Component Adapter” on page 89. Advanced configurations such as this require your DNS configuration to route communications effectively between all the BusinessObjects Enterprise server components. Configuring the CMS to bind to a network address When you use the -port command-line option to configure the CMS to bind to a specific IP address. each with one or more IP addresses. interface must be the IP address that you want the server to bind to. interface can be the fully qualified domain name or the IP address of the interface that you want the server to bind to. To configure the WCA. you must also include the port number these servers use (even if the server is using the default port).Managing and Configuring Servers Advanced server configuration options 5 You may also need to specify -port interface when BusinessObjects Enterprise is running on a multihomed machine. You may accomplish this with multiple network interfaces. If you change the default port numbers. the DNS must route communications from the other BusinessObjects Enterprise servers to the private address of the File Repository Servers. In this example. Note: • To retain the default port numbers. but it is possible to bind individual servers to different addresses. For details. or with a single network interface that has been assigned multiple IP addresses. use interface:port when setting the connection. you will need to make additional configuration changes.

To add a dependency to the list. each server in BusinessObjects Enterprise is dependent on at least three services: the Event Log. so you need only add the following option to their command lines: -port interface Replace interface with the same value that you specified for the CMS. With the server selected. NT LM Security Support Provider. and Remote Procedure Call (RPC) services. 144 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . and that the DNS resolves the value to the appropriate network address. click Add. Adding and removing Windows server dependencies When installed on Windows. check to ensure that all three services appear on the server’s Dependency tab. and Remote Procedure Call (RPC). Click the Dependency tab. 4. NT LM Security Support Provider. Ensure that each server’s -ns parameter points to the CMS. 1. at least three services should be listed: Event Log. 2. click Properties on the toolbar. If you are having problems with a server.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Advanced server configuration options Configuring the remaining servers to bind to a network address The remaining BusinessObjects Enterprise servers select their ports dynamically by default. 3. To add and remove server dependencies Use the CCM to stop the server whose dependencies you want to modify. As shown here.

as required. Click OK. Manual requires you to start the server before it will run. Restart the server. there are three startup types: • • • Automatic starts the server each time the machine is started.Managing and Configuring Servers Advanced server configuration options 5 The Add Dependency dialog box provides you with a list of all available dependencies. Disabled requires you to change the startup type to automatic or manual before it can run. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 145 . Changing the server startup type When installed on Windows. 6. As with other Windows services. Select the dependency or dependencies. 5. select it and click Remove. 7. To remove a dependency from the list. each server is configured to start automatically. and then click Add.

Click Apply. and then click OK. 2. 1. Start the server. Configuring servers for SSL You can use the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol for all network communication between clients and servers in your BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment. 4. 2. To change the server startup type on UNIX On UNIX. change it in the Central Configuration Manager (CCM). With the server selected. all reports processed by this server will be formatted using the printer settings associated with the user account that you enter. Changing the server user account If the incorrect user account is running on a server on Windows. the server process will log on to the local machine with this user account. Click the Startup Type list and select Automatic. click Properties on the toolbar. 3. Stop the server whose startup type you want to modify. 3. 5. See “setupinit. In addition. Enter the Windows user name and password information. When started. Tip: The Program Job Server must be configured to use the Local System account. Click OK. this requires root privileges. Clear the System Account check box. or Manual.5 Managing and Configuring Servers Advanced server configuration options 1. 4.sh” on page 607. To change the server startup type on Windows Start the CCM. or a user account that has the right “Act as part of the operating system”. Restart the server. 6. To set up SSL for all server communication you need to perform the following steps: 146 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Click Properties. To change a server’s user account Use the CCM to stop the server. 5. 6. Disabled.

consult the SSLC documentation.cnf file's certificate and private_key options. use the SSLC command line tool to create a key file and a certificate file for each machine in your deployment.req) and a private key (privkey. Choose the number of days that suits your security needs. 4.exe command line tool. a Certificate Authority (CA) certificate request (cacert.cnf file. it is installed by default in C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\win32_x86. Configure the location of these files in the Central Configuration Manager (CCM) and your web application server.req -out cacert. cakey. type the following command: sslc x509 -in cacert.Managing and Configuring Servers Advanced server configuration options 5 • • • Deploy BusinessObjects Enterprise with SSL enabled. that expires after 365 days.pem private_key = $dir/private/cakey.pem -out cakey. By default.cnf file.pem -req -signkey cakey.pem BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 147 .cnf file are: certificate = $dir/cacert. cacert. stored in the same folder as the SSLC command line tool. Open the sslc. 1. for example. Type the following command: sslc req -config sslc.pem -days 365 This command creates a self-signed certificate.) 2. To create key and certificate files for a machine Run the SSLC. Creating key and certificate files To set up SSL protocol for your se. Perform the following steps based on settings in the sslc. 3.req This command creates two files. To decrypt the private key.pem).pem.pem files in the directories specified by sslc. Note: For more information about using the SSLC command line tool.cnf -new -out cacert.rver communication. • Place the cakey.pem and cacert. The SSLC tool is installed with your BusinessObjects Enterprise software. Create key and certificate files for each machine in your deployment. (On Windows.pem This command creates the decrypted key. the settings in the sslc. 5. type the following command: sslc rsa -in privkey. To sign the CA certificate.pem.

5 Managing and Configuring Servers Advanced server configuration options • • Create a file with the name specified by the sslc. The file can be empty. Create the directory specified by the sslc. Note: By default.txt. 11. Store the following key and certificate files in a secure location (under the same directory) that can be accessed by the machines in your BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment: • • • • the trusted certificate file (cacert.key) the passphrase file 148 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 9. Create a text file for storing the plain text passphrase used for decrypting the generated private key. type the following command: sslc req -config sslc.pem in servercert. choose a large number.pem -out servercert. To create a certificate request and a private key. Make a copy of the private key copy privkey.req This command creates the servercert.pem -out cacert. Create a file with the name specified by the sslc. Note: To ensure that you can create and sign more certificates.pem server.cnf file's serial setting. which contains the signed certificate. 8. Use the following commands to convert the certificates to DER encoded certificates: sslc x509 -in cacert.der) the generated server certificate file (servercert.cnf file's new_certs_dir setting.cnf -days 365 -out servercert. type the following command: sslc ca -config sslc.) • 6. such as 11111111111111111111111111111111.der -outform DER sslc x509 -in servercert.der -outform DER 10.pem file.der) the server key file (server.key To sign the certificate with the CA certificate.cnf -new -out servercert. Ensure that this file provides an octet-string serial number (in hexadecimal format).cnf file's database setting. this file is $dir/index.req 7.

1. 3.protocol=ssl -DcertDir=d:\ssl -DtrustedCert=cacert. right-click a server and choose Properties. you need to provide the Central Configuration Manager (CCM) and your web application server with the secure location. Note: Make sure you provide the directory for the machine that the server is running on. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 149 .key -Dpassphrase=passphrase. 1. 2.oci.der -DsslKey=client. Configuring the SSL protocol After you create keys and certificates for each machine in your deployment.txt 2. run the sslconfig tool from the command line and follow the configuration steps. If you have an IIS web application server.Managing and Configuring Servers Advanced server configuration options 5 This location will be used to configure SSL for the CCM and your web application server. In the Properties dialog box. run the Java SDK with the following system properties set: -Dbusinessobjects. click the Protocol tab.orb. 4.der -DsslCert=clientcert. To configure the SSL protocol in the CCM In the CCM. and store them in a secure location. Provide the file path for the directory where you stored the key and certificate files. Repeat steps 1 to 3 for all servers. To configure the SSL protocol for the web application server If you have a J2EE web application server.

5 Managing and Configuring Servers Advanced server configuration options 150 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

Managing Server Groups chapter .

Placing processing servers close to the database server that they need to access improves system performance and minimizes network traffic. when you manage a group of servers. configure objects to use specific server groups for scheduling. and so on. After creating server groups. Thus. and then add servers to the group. so the object is always processed by the same servers. If you group your servers by type. You can associate an object with a single server group. server groups are a powerful way of customizing BusinessObjects Enterprise to optimize your system for users in different locations.6 Managing Server Groups Server group overview Server group overview Server groups provide a way of organizing your BusinessObjects Enterprise servers to make them easier to manage. file servers. and schedule destinations that are appropriate to users who work in a particular regional office. you might want to create a group of Page Servers that process reports only against the DB2 database server. processing servers need to communicate frequently with the database containing data for published reports. or for viewing and modifying reports. Creating a server group To create a server group. or for objects of different types. If you then configured the appropriate reports to always use this Page Server group for viewing. and configure your servers in the organize Server Groups area—just as you would in the organize Servers area. obtain metrics. you can easily set up default processing settings. And you can associate scheduled objects with a particular server group to ensure that scheduled objects are sent to the correct printers. you can configure objects to be processed by servers that have been optimized for those objects. That is. For example. if you had a number of reports that ran against a DB2 database. you need only view a subset of all the servers on your system. server groups prove especially useful when maintaining systems that span multiple locations and multiple time zones. recurrent schedules. For details. If you group your servers by region. see “Specifying servers for scheduling” on page 430 or “Specifying servers for viewing and modification” on page 432. The only difference is that you see only the servers that you added to the server group. you would optimize system performance for viewing these reports. 152 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . you need to specify the name and description of the group. You can change the status. Therefore. More importantly.

Click New Server Group. 5. then click the > arrow. 4. type a name for the new group of servers. On the Servers tab.Managing Server Groups Creating a server group 6 1. Use the Description field to include additional information about the group. Click OK. To create a server group Go to the Server Groups management area of the CMC. 2. Tip: Use CTRL+click to select multiple servers. click Add/Remove Servers. In the Server Group Name field. 3. Select the servers that you want to add to this group. Click OK. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 153 . The New Server Group Properties tab appears. 8. 7. 6.

1. This group is the parent group. To make one server group a member of another Go to the Server Groups management area of the CMC. so use whichever method proves most convenient.6 Managing Server Groups Working with server subgroups This example adds the servers to a server group called Northern Office Servers. select the server groups that you want to add as subgroups. 5. In the Available server groups list. view server metrics. You are returned to the Servers tab. which now lists all the servers that you added to the group. Then. A subgroup is just a server group that is a member of another server group. 2. and change the properties of the servers in the group. first create a group for each region. On the Member of tab. and add each regional group to the corresponding country group. create a group for each country. You can now change the status. then click the > arrow. and add the appropriate servers to each regional group. On the Subgroups tab. Working with server subgroups Subgroups of servers provide you with a way of further organizing your servers. click the Member of button. In the Available server groups list. Click the group that you want to add to another group. or you can make one server group a member of another. The results are the same. which now lists all the server groups that you added to the parent group. if you group servers by region and by country. For example. 3. 154 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 4. To organize servers in this way. 3. Click the group that you want to add subgroups to. 1. Click OK. then click the > arrow. 2. 4. To add subgroups to a server group Go to the Server Groups management area of the CMC. select the server groups that should include your group as a member. For more information. then each regional group becomes a subgroup of a country group. You are returned to the Subgroups tab. click Add/Remove Groups. There are two ways to set up subgroups: you can modify the subgroups of a server group. see “Server management overview” on page 78.

The “Modify Member Of” page appears. The “Member of” page lists any server groups that the server currently belongs to.Managing Server Groups Modifying the group membership of a server 6 This example makes the Job Servers group a member subgroup of the Northern Office Servers group. 4. 1. you can click the server’s “Member of” link to add it to all three regions at once. To modify a server’s group membership Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. 5. click the server’s Member of link. 2. Modifying the group membership of a server You can modify a server’s group membership to quickly add the server to (or remove it from) any group or subgroup that you have already created on the system. Move server groups from one list to another to specify which groups the server is a member of. 3. Click OK. suppose that you created server groups for a number of regions. Click the Member of button. Instead of having to add the CMS individually to each regional server group. In the Server Group column. For example. which now lists all the server groups that the initial group is now a member of. You are returned to the “Member of” tab. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 155 . Locate the server whose membership information you want to change. Click OK. 5. 6. You might want to use a single Central Management Server (CMS) for multiple regions.

6 Managing Server Groups Modifying the group membership of a server 156 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

Scaling Your System chapter .

you specify the existing CMS whose system you want to expand. and you select the components that want to install on the local machine. For details. The setup program allows you to perform an Expand installation. see “Common configurations” on page 159. 158 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .7 Scaling Your System Scalability overview Scalability overview The BusinessObjects Enterprise architecture is scalable in that it allows for a multitude of server configurations. ranging from stand-alone. A Business Objects Services consultant can then assess your reporting environment and assist in determining the configuration that will best integrate with your current environment. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide. This chapter details common scalability scenarios for administrators who want to expand beyond a stand-alone installation of BusinessObjects Enterprise. The flexibility offered by the product’s architecture allows you to set up a system that suits your current reporting requirements. to large-scale deployments supporting global organizations. however. that the optimal configuration for your deployment will vary depending upon your hardware configuration. Tip: If you are adding new hardware to BusinessObjects Enterprise by installing server components on additional machines. your deployment may not be officially supported. It is recommended that you contact your Business Objects sales representative and request information about the BusinessObjects Enterprise Sizing Guide. and are recommended for the majority of deployments. During the Expand installation. and your reporting requirements. Note: If you customize or expand your system beyond these common configurations without first contacting Business Objects Services. run the BusinessObjects Enterprise installation and setup program. your database software. without limiting the possibilities for future growth and expansion. Follow these steps when you need to add server components to a machine that is already running BusinessObjects Enterprise. For details. This chapter also provides the related procedures for adding and deleting servers from your BusinessObjects Enterprise installation. These three scenarios have received the most testing. single-machine environments. It must be emphasized.

and installs all BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on a single machine. and server configuration. For a UNIX installation (or for a Windows installation that uses the BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK).Scaling Your System Common configurations 7 Common configurations This section details the common ways in which you should begin to scale.txt file included with your product distribution for a list of supported database servers. this section does assume familiarity with the BusinessObjects Enterprise architecture. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 159 . however. dedicated machine. see “Adding a server” on page 169. For details. Run the CMS database on your database server. migrate the CMS database to a supported database server. installation. you may also want to run one or more BusinessObjects Enterprise servers in multiple instances on that machine. As a baseline. which they do not have to share with database and web server processes. This section describes the following common configurations: • • • “One-machine setup” on page 159 “Three-machine setup” on page 160 “Six-machine setup” on page 160 One-machine setup This basic configuration separates the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers from the rest of your reporting environment and from your web server. your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. this section assumes that you have not yet distributed the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers across multiple machines. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide. See the Platforms. The scenarios described are those that have been most thoroughly tested by Business Objects. If you are still using the MSDE CMS database on Windows. For preliminary installation information. These are the general steps to setting up this configuration for the default Windows installation of BusinessObjects Enterprise: • • Install all of the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on a single. or expand. This grants the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers their own set of processing resources. install your BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on the same machine as your Java web application server and the Web Component Adapter. Tip: If you are deploying multi-processor machines.

the Event Server is installed on the same machine as the CMS. These are the general steps to setting up this configuration for the default Windows installation of BusinessObjects Enterprise: • Install the CMS and the Event Server on one machine. or if you need to take one or two machines offline completely. Six-machine setup This third configuration mirrors the three-machine setup. In addition. the Report Application Server (RAS). Destination Job Server. Web Intelligence Job Server. This grants the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers their own set of processing resources. For a UNIX installation (or for a Windows installation that uses the BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK). In general. You maintain the logical breakdown of processing based on the types of work performed by each server. you need not interrupt BusinessObjects Enterprise requests in order to service the system. and the Input and Output File Repository Servers on the third machine. List of Values Job Server.7 Scaling Your System Common configurations Three-machine setup This second configuration divides the BusinessObjects Enterprise processing load in a logical manner. • • Install the application server. this scenario prepares your system for further expansion to provide redundancy. Program Job Server. if a server stops responding. however. but you increase the number of available machines and servers for redundancy and fault-tolerance. you prevent the server components from having to compete with each other for the same hardware and processing resources. based on the types of work performed by each server. with at least 2 GB RAM installed on each machine. the Web Component Adapter and the Cache Server on the second machine. Note: It is recommended that you use three multi-processor machines (dualCPU or better). the Event Server should be installed on the machine where your monitored. which they do not have to share with database and web server processes. install the Java web application server and the Web Component Adapter on the same machine as your Cache Server. Install the Page Server. file-based events occur. For instance. Tip: Here. In this way. Note: As with the one-machine setup. the Web Intelligence Report Server. the Report Job Server. install your BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on machines that are separate from your web server and database servers. 160 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

Scaling Your System Common configurations 7 This tested configuration is designed to meet the reporting requirements of 85% of all deployment scenarios. and RAS on the remaining machine. Ensure that each CMS accesses the CMS database in exactly the same manner (the same database client software. • Install a second application server and Web Component Adapter on the fifth machine. along with a second Cache Server. Verify that BusinessObjects Enterprise is functioning correctly. see “Three-machine setup” on page 160. contact your Business Objects sales representative for additional assistance. This grants the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers their own set of processing resources. the Event Server should be installed on the machine where your monitored. Destination Job Server. however. so they share the task of maintaining the CMS database. file-based events occur. and so on). Web Intelligence Report Server. If you have further requirements or more advanced configuration needs.xml file is configured correctly for each WCA. Program Job Server. Consult your web application server documentation for information on load-balancing and clustering your application servers. Report Job Server. along with a pair of Input and Output File Repository Servers. This machine must have a fast network connection (minimum 10 Mbps) to the CMS that you have already installed. can access your reporting database in exactly the same manner. along with any ODBC DSNs that are required for your reports. the same database user name and password. These are the general steps to setting up this configuration for the default Windows installation of BusinessObjects Enterprise: • • Install the three-machine setup first. Cluster the two CMS services. which they do not have to share with database and web server processes. Note: It is recommended that you use six multi-processor machines (dualCPU or better). Web Intelligence Job Server. the Event Server is installed on the same machine as the CMS. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 161 . Ensure that the web. Install a second CMS/Event Server pair on the fourth machine. • Note: As with the one-machine setup. including the Web Intelligence Report Server. List of Values Job Server. install your BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on machines that are separate from your web server and database servers. Install a second Page Server. In general. For details. with at least 2 GB RAM installed on each machine. Tip: Here. Ensure that all Page Servers and job servers. Install and configure any required database client software similarly on each machine.

However. to provide server redundancy and faulttolerance. and provides a number of ways in which you might modify your configuration accordingly.7 Scaling Your System General scalability considerations General scalability considerations This section provides information about system scalability and the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers that are responsible for particular aspects of your system. you should ideally install each cluster member on its own machine. at some point. Each subsection focuses on one aspect of your system’s capacity. it is strongly recommended that you contact your Business Objects sales representative and request information about the BusinessObjects Enterprise Sizing Guide. in a server component querying the CMS for information that is stored in the CMS database. A Business Objects Services consultant can then assess your reporting environment and assist in determining the configuration that will best integrate with your current environment. discusses the relevant components. General scalability considerations include the following: • • • • • • • “Increasing overall system capacity” on page 162 “Increasing scheduled reporting capacity” on page 163 “Increasing on-demand viewing capacity for Crystal reports” on page 164 “Increasing prompting capacity” on page 165 “Enhancing custom web applications” on page 166 “Improving web response speeds” on page 166 “Getting the most from existing resources” on page 167 Increasing overall system capacity As the number of report objects and users on your system increases. you can increase the overall system capacity by clustering two (or more) Central Management Servers (CMS). When you cluster two CMS machines. you instruct the new CMS to share in the task of maintaining and querying the CMS database. For more information. see “Clustering Central Management Servers” on page 92. You can install multiple CMS services/daemons on the same machine. CMS clusters can improve overall system performance because every BusinessObjects Enterprise request results. Before modifying these aspects of your system. 162 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

there are a number of ways in which you can improve the performance of the report itself. This is a useful way of minimizing the processing load that your database server is subject to at any given point in time. Then. Use event-based scheduling to create dependencies between large or complex reports. when you schedule recurrent reports. Depending upon your network configuration. you can specify that it be processed by a particular server group to ensure that especially large reports are distributed evenly across resources. these strategies may improve the processing speed of the Job Server. there are several strategies you can adopt to maximize your system’s processing capacity: • Install the Job Server in close proximity to (but not on the same machine as) the database server against which the reports run. For instance. When designing reports in Crystal Reports. you can use Schedule events to ensure that the reports are processed sequentially. consider distributing the processing load through the use of server groups. by modifying record selection formulas.Scaling Your System General scalability considerations 7 Increasing scheduled reporting capacity Increasing Crystal reports processing capacity All Crystal reports that are scheduled are eventually processed by a Job Server. Ensure also that the File Repository Servers are readily accessible to all Job Server (so they can read report objects from the Input FRS and write report instances to the Output FRS quickly). You can expand BusinessObjects Enterprise by running individual Report Job Servers on multiple machines. Increase the hardware resources that are available to a Job Server. For instance. using the database server’s resources to group data. Verify the efficiency of your reports. consider moving the Job • • • • BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 163 .5 and later). If the Job Server is currently running on a machine along with other BusinessObjects Enterprise components. each containing one or more Job Servers. If some reports are much larger or more complex than others. and so on. you might create two server groups. or by running multiple Report Job Servers on a single multi-processor machine. For more information. nightly basis. if you run several very complex reports on a regular. incorporating parameter fields. If the majority of your reports are scheduled to run on a regular basis. see the “Designing Optimized Web Reports” section in the Crystal Reports User’s Guide (version 8. because there is less distance for data to travel over your corporate network.

see the “Designing Optimized Web Reports” section in the Crystal Reports User’s Guide (version 8. For most requests. Note: When deciding whether to increase the number Web Intelligence Report Servers. 164 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . you can increase capacity in the following ways: • • Increase the maximum allowed size of the cache. incorporating parameter fields. One Web Intelligence Job Server can be used to drive multiple Web Intelligence Report Servers. by modifying record selection formulas. Increasing on-demand viewing capacity for Crystal reports When you provide many users with View On Demand access to reports. or by running multiple Web Intelligence Report Servers on a single multi-processor machine. you allow each user to view live report data by refreshing reports against your database server. If your reporting requirements demand that users have continual access to the latest data. When running multiple Web Intelligence Report Servers. and the Cache Server stores recently viewed report pages for possible reuse. the Page Server retrieves the data and performs the report processing. you don’t need to duplicate the Web Intelligence Job Server.7 Scaling Your System General scalability considerations Server to a dedicated machine. Verify the efficiency of your reports. However. the Report Job Server.5 and later). If the new machine has multiple CPUs. When designing reports in Crystal Reports. using the database server’s resources to group data. there are a number of ways in which you can improve the performance of the report itself. For more information. a Web Intelligence Job Server must exist in the same group as the Web Intelligence Report Servers. the Cache Server and Page Server. see “Modifying Cache Server performance settings” on page 112. You can expand BusinessObjects Enterprise by running individual Web Intelligence Report Servers on multiple machines. However. the Report Application Server (RAS) processes the request. if users use the Advanced DHTML viewer. keep in mind that Web Intelligence Report Server processes both scheduling and viewing requests. Increasing Web Intelligence document processing capacity All Web Intelligence documents that are scheduled are eventually processed by a Web Intelligence Job Server and Web Intelligence Report Server. For details. and so on. whereas requests for Crystal reports are processed by three separate servers. you can install multiple Job Servers on the same machine (typically no more than one service/daemon per CPU). if you are working with server groups.

you can instruct the Web Intelligence Report Server to delegate the transformation of XML to XSL to the browser. In CMC you can then create a RAS server group and assign the dedicated RAS to the RAS server group. set the CLIENT_XSLT variable in webiviewer. The Page Server has been re-designed to optimize the processing capability of a machine. and Report Application Servers on the system. you can add a RAS server that will be dedicated to processing list-of-value objects. the XSL transformation delegation is not activated. Restart the application server. It does this regardless of whether the list-of-value object was scheduled or whether data needs to be retrieved from the data base. It is therefore no longer recommended that you install multiple Page Servers on one machine. Increase the number of Page Servers. You can do this by installing additional Page Servers on multiple machines. For instance. primarily during document display. • Increasing prompting capacity When reports use a list of values. but also during display of the portal itself. By default. each containing one or more Cache Server/Page Server pairs along with one or more Report Application Servers.0 browser. Delegating XSL transformation to Internet Explorer If your users access InfoView via the Internet Explorer 6. In Business View Manager. the RAS processes the list-of-values objects for the report when the report is being viewed. and then distribute the processing load through the use of server groups. 1. you then assign the list-ofvalues objects to be processed by the RAS server group. Cache Servers. To delegate XSL transformation to the browser for document display: On the application server. do not install more than one Page Server per machine. you might create two server groups.properties. You can then specify individual reports that should always be processed by a particular server group.Scaling Your System General scalability considerations 7 • Increase the number of Page Servers that service requests on behalf of Cache Servers. This substantially decreases the load on the server. However. located in the WEB-INF\classes subfolder of the application server as follows: CLIENT_XSLT=Y 2. To avoid contention with other applications that use the RAS. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 165 .

For details. consider distributing administrative efforts by developing web applications for delegated content administration. for instance. see “Increasing scheduled reporting capacity” on page 163 and “Increasing on-demand viewing capacity for Crystal reports” on page 164. If the web server is indeed limiting web response speeds. Use the administrative tools provided with your web server software (or with your operating system) to determine how well your web server performs. If web response speeds are slowed only by report viewing activities. see “Increasing overall system capacity” on page 162. department. To improve the scalability of your system. • • 166 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . be sure to check the developer documentation available on your BusinessObjects Enterprise product CD for performance tips and other scalability considerations. These are some common aspects of your deployment that you should consider before deciding how to expand BusinessObjects Enterprise: • Assess your web server’s ability to serve the number of users who connect regularly to BusinessObjects Enterprise. In addition. If you are running a large deployment. Take into account the number of users who regularly access your system. be sure to review the libraries and APIs. consider increasing the web server’s hardware. ensure that you have set up a CMS cluster. incorporate complete security and scheduling options into your own web applications. You can also modify server settings from within your own code in order to further integrate BusinessObjects Enterprise with your existing intranet tools and overall reporting environment. you may need to investigate a number of areas to determine exactly where you can improve web response speeds. content.7 Scaling Your System General scalability considerations Enhancing custom web applications If you are developing your own custom desktops or administrative tools with the BusinessObjects Enterprise Software Development Kit (SDK). You can grant select users the ability to manage particular BusinessObjects Enterprise folders. The query optimization section in particular provides some preliminary steps to ensuring that custom applications make efficient use of the query language. Improving web response speeds Because all user interaction with BusinessObjects Enterprise occurs over the Web. users. You can now. and groups on behalf of their team. or regional office.

without bringing down the entire system. If the application server is currently running on the web server. or on a single machine with other BusinessObjects Enterprise components. consider moving the application server to a dedicated machine. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 167 . • • Getting the most from existing resources One of the most effective ways to improve the performance and scalability of your system is to ensure that you get the most from the resources that you allocate to BusinessObjects Enterprise. consider the following options: • Increase the hardware resources that are available to the application server. If you are using the default Windows installation of BusinessObjects Enterprise. and scalability. Note: BusinessObjects Enterprise does not support the sessionreplication functionality provided by some Java web application servers. This also provides you with the benefits of being able to take one WCS machine offline for service. don’t forget that BusinessObjects Enterprise depends upon your existing IT infrastructure. The Web Connector distributes the processing load evenly across WCS hosts: each new BusinessObjects Enterprise session is sent to the least used WCS. Optimizing network speed and database efficiency When thinking about the overall performance and scalability of BusinessObjects Enterprise. set up two (or more) WCS machines to take advantage of the dynamic load balancing that is built into the Web Connector components. clustering. If the new machine has multiple CPUs. Make sure that your network has the bandwidth and speed necessary to provide BusinessObjects Enterprise users with acceptable levels of performance. you can install multiple application servers on the same machine (typically no more than one per CPU). Consult the documentation for your web application server for information on loadbalancing. BusinessObjects Enterprise uses your network for communication between servers and for communication between BusinessObjects Enterprise and client machines on your network.Scaling Your System General scalability considerations 7 If you find that a single application server inadequately services the number of scripting requests made by users who access your system on a regular basis. Consult your network administrator for more information. Consider setting up two (or more) application servers.

go to the Viewers area. Enabling data sharing reduces the number of database calls. 3. Using the appropriate processing server When users view a report using the Advanced DHTML viewer. then the performance of BusinessObjects Enterprise may suffer. see “Setting report viewing options” on page 428. If the ability to modify reports is not needed at your site. For more information on configuring BusinessObjects Enterprise to optimize report viewing in your system. On the Properties tab. Select Web Desktop. For simple report viewing you can achieve better system performance if users select the DHTML viewer. Consult your database administrator for more information. These report viewers process reports against the Page Server. Clear the option labeled Allow users to use the Advanced DHTML Viewer. or the Java viewer. Disabling the Advanced DHTML Viewer In the Central Management Console. you can disable the Advanced DHTML viewer for all users of BusinessObjects Enterprise. For details on data sharing options for reports. select Business Objects Applications. This means that some users may see “old” data when they view a report on demand. If your databases are not optimized for the reports you need to run. 168 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Optimizing BusinessObjects Enterprise for report viewing BusinessObjects Enterprise allows you to enable data sharing. or refresh a report instance that they are viewing. to get full value from data sharing. Click Update.7 Scaling Your System General scalability considerations BusinessObjects Enterprise processes reports against your database servers. The Report Application Server is optimized for report modification. the Active X viewer. see the planning chapter in the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide. which permits different users accessing the same report object to use the same data when viewing a report on demand or when refreshing a report. the report is processed by the Report Application Server rather than the Page Server and Cache Server. thereby reducing the time needed to provide report pages to subsequent users of the same report while greatly improving overall system performance under load. 1. However. you must permit data to be reused for some period of time. 2. 4.

and you select the components that you want to install on the local machine. It includes the following sections: • • “Adding a server” on page 169 “Deleting a server” on page 171 Tip: If you are adding new hardware to BusinessObjects Enterprise by installing server components on new. you specify the existing CMS whose system you want to expand. run the BusinessObjects Enterprise installation and setup program from your product distribution. you must log on as an Administrator of the local machine. To add a Windows server Note: To complete this procedure. You can run multiple instances of the same BusinessObjects Enterprise server on the same machine. click Add Server. During the Expand installation. On the toolbar. The setup program allows you to perform an Expand installation.Scaling Your System Adding and deleting servers 7 Adding and deleting servers This section shows how to add and delete servers from a machine that is already running BusinessObjects Enterprise components. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide. 2. 1. Start the CCM on the BusinessObjects Enterprise machine upon which you want to install a new server. Adding a server These steps add a new instance of a server to the local machine. additional machines. Click Next. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 169 . The Add Business Objects Server Wizard displays its Welcome dialog box. 3. For details.

7. Change the default Display Name field if you want a different name to appear in the list of servers in the CCM. 4. 6.” prefix is required by the system. the wizard always precedes the server name you type with an “Input. Note: The display name for each server on the local machine must be unique.” or “Output. depending upon the type of server that you are installing.SERVER02. The “Set Configuration for this server” dialog box appears.” prefix. So. 5. The contents of this dialog vary slightly. the CCM actually names the server Input. do not remove the prefix. 170 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Each server on the system must have a unique name. Click the Server Type list and select the kind of server you want to add. Click Next. This Server Name is displayed when you manage servers over the Web in the Central Management Console (CMC). The default naming convention is HOSTNAME. This “Input. if you add an Input FRS with the name SERVER02.7 Scaling Your System Adding and deleting servers The “Server Type and Display Name Configuration” dialog box appears. If you subsequently modify the server’s name through its command line. Change the default Server Name field if required.servertype (a number is appended if there is more than one server of the same type on the same host machine). When you add Input or Output File Repository Servers.

11. Confirm the summary information is correct.Scaling Your System Adding and deleting servers 7 8. or modify them to suit your environment. Use the CCM (or the CMC) to start and then to enable the new server when you want it to begin responding to BusinessObjects Enterprise requests. With the server selected. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 171 . but it is neither started nor enabled automatically. see “serverconfig. do not modify them. 2. see “Viewing and changing the status of servers” on page 82. For details. click Yes. Deleting a server 1. See “Enabling auditing of user and system actions” on page 210 for more information. Tip: Auditing in BusinessObjects Enterprise is enabled on a per server basis. Click Next to accept any other default values. For reference. If your CMS is not listening on the default port (6400). To delete a Windows server Start the CCM on the BusinessObjects Enterprise machine that you want to delete a server from.sh” on page 602. as in CMSname:port# 9. Note: If port number options are displayed in this dialog box. 10. change ports through each server’s command line. then click Finish. click Delete Server on the toolbar. 4.sh” on page 602. 3. include the appropriate port number. see “Changing the default server port numbers” on page 140. Stop the server that you want to delete from the system. Type the name of the CMS that you want the server to communicate with. To add a UNIX server Use the serverconfig. For reference.sh script. When prompted for confirmation. see “serverconfig. To delete a UNIX server Use the serverconfig. For details. If you add a new server to your BusinessObjects Enterprise installation you must enable auditing of actions on each new server. The new server appears in the list. If you do not. Instead. the actions performed on the new server will not be audited.sh script.

7 Scaling Your System Adding and deleting servers 172 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

Managing BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository chapter .

it is also saved to the BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository. You can refresh a report’s repository objects with the latest version from your BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository when you publish reports to BusinessObjects Enterprise. The BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository is now hosted by the Central Management Server (CMS) system database. For example. This procedure is also referred to as migrating a BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository database. bitmaps. Importing data from a Crystal Enterprise 10 or BusinessObjects Enterprise XI CMS You may want to import repository objects from a Crystal Enterprise 10 installation. this data is copied into the destination database. you can refresh a report’s repository objects on demand over the Web. See the rest of this chapter for details. or version 10 of Crystal Enterprise) into your current CMS database. you can migrate the repository data from your current CMS database into a different data source. move your existing Crystal Repository to the Central Management Server database. Copying data from one repository database to another BusinessObjects Enterprise enables you to copy the contents of one repository database into another database. or you may want to import repository objects from one BusinessObjects Enterprise XI installation to another. Or. custom functions. the source CMS database refers to the database that holds the data you are copying. you may have repository data on a test system that you want to move onto a production server. Throughout this section. You can migrate repository data from a different repository database (from version 10 of Crystal Reports.8 Managing BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository overview BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository overview The BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository is a database in which you manage shared report elements such as text objects. and custom SQL commands. 174 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Alternatively. Before publishing reports that reference repository objects. When you save any Business View.

BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 175 . When an object is copied from the source CMS to the destination CMS. Also. replicating the folder hierarchy of the source system on the destination. the names of top-level folders must be unique. you add all repository objects from the source CMS into the destination CMS without overwriting objects in the destination. copies of all non-Business View objects from the source repository that have titles that match titles of objects in the destination. you add all objects in the source CMS to the destination CMS. or you can update the destination with the contents of the source CMS. and all objects originally in the destination repository. regardless of the options set. If an object in the source repository has the same unique identifier as an object in the destination. You can choose to merge the contents of the source repository into the destination repository. the object in the destination is overwritten. at a minimum. You have selected “Automatically rename top-level folders that match top-level folders on the destination system. However. Merging repositories When you merge the contents of the source repository with the destination repository. This is the safest import option. all repository objects from the source system with a unique title are copied to the destination repository. the folder or folders that contain the object are also copied. If an object from the source has the same title as an object in the destination.” The end result is a destination repository that contains all objects from the source repository that have unique titles.Managing BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository Copying data from one repository database to another 8 Use the Import Wizard to copy repository data from the source CMS. Selecting “Automatically rename top-level folders that match top-level folders on the destination system” allows these folders to be renamed on the destination repository. Updating the destination repository When you update the contents of the destination repository using the source repository as a reference. the object is imported to the destination repository if: • • The object is not a Business View. Renaming these folders would change the unique identifier associated with the Business View. Note: Top-level folders containing Business Views are not renamed. and the objects in such folders to be copied to these renamed folders. All of the objects in the destination repository are preserved. causing the Business View functionality to fail.

user groups. servers. server groups. the copy fails.8 Managing BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository Copying data from one repository database to another All object titles in a folder must be unique. When you copy repository objects into BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. Copying data from a Crystal Enterprise 9 repository database In Crystal Enterprise 9. If the Wizard finds identical objects (that is. click Repository Migration Wizard. begin by making a backup copy of the source repository database. only the most recent version of each object is copied. Note: Reports configured to use the source repository will now refer to the destination data source. By default. If you want these objects to be copied. regardless of the options set. Then replace the repository by importing its contents into the CMS database using the Repository Migration Wizard. the source objects will not be copied.” Note: System Objects (users. select the check box “Automatically rename objects if an object with that title already exists in the destination folder. 2. neither the source nor the destination database is overwritten. and event management for these objects to fail. 176 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . are not renamed when you import them from one CMS to another. When you use the Repository Migration Wizard. 1. See “Importing with the Import Wizard” on page 402 for full instructions on using the Import Wizard to copy objects from one BusinessObjects Enterprise XI repository to another. Changing the names of these objects would cause user management. In a BusinessObjects Enterprise environment. You must run the wizard on the machine containing your source repository. events. click the name of the repository that you want to import. objects with the same unique identifier) in the source and destination repositories. the Crystal Repository database was hosted on a separate database server that you could connect to through ODBC. server management. if copying an object from the source CMS to the destination CMS would result in more than one object in a folder with the same title. To copy repository data from Crystal Enterprise 9 From the BusinessObjects Enterprise program group. Objects from the source repository will be added to the destination repository database. and calendars). From the Source list in the Select Source Repository dialog.

4. The Select Destination Data Source dialog appears. select the items that you want to copy to your BusinessObjects Enterprise repository database. and then Finish to complete the transfer and close the Repository Migration Wizard. reporting success or failure for each object. Type the UserID and Password of a user with administrative rights to the repository database. Click Next. then click Next. it was located in the following directory of your Crystal Reports installation: C:\Program Files\Common Files\Crystal Decisions\2. 6. 7.Managing BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository Copying data from one repository database to another 8 3. Copying data from a Crystal Reports 9 repository database The Crystal Repository shipped with Crystal Reports 9 was an Access database (Repository. Click Next. Type the User Name and Password of an Enterprise account that provides you with administrative rights to the CMS.0\bin\ BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 177 . BusinessObjects Enterprise exports the selected repository objects from your BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository. From the “Source Repository Objects” list. type the name of the destination data source’s Central Management Server. In the CMS field. 5. Click Next.mdb). By default.

2. select the items that you want to copy to your BusinessObjects Enterprise repository database. When you copy repository objects into BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. When you use the Repository Migration Wizard. 3. You must run the wizard on the machine containing your source repository. neither the source nor the destination database is overwritten.8 Managing BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository Copying data from one repository database to another Begin by making a backup copy of this default database. If you created security for your repository database. Then replace the default repository by importing its contents into the CMS database using the Repository Migration Wizard. If the Wizard finds identical objects in the source and destination repositories. only the most recent version of each object is copied. To copy repository data from Crystal Reports 9 From the BusinessObjects Enterprise program group. 5. the source objects will not be copied. Click Next. 178 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Log on to the CMS using a user name with administrative rights to BusinessObjects Enterprise. click the name of the repository that you want to import. 4. type a User id and Password valid for the repository database. 1. Click Next. Objects from the source repository will be added to the destination repository database. From the “Source Repository Objects” list. From the Source list in the Select Source Repository dialog. Note: Reports configured to use the source repository will now refer to the destination data source. click Repository Migration Wizard.

To delete an existing folder from your repository. 8. BusinessObjects Enterprise exports the selected repository objects from your Crystal Reports repository. • 7. select it. and then Finish to complete the transfer and close the Repository Migration Wizard. • To add objects to a new folder. and then click “Delete the item/folder”. you will want to update the published Crystal reports that reference those repository objects. reporting success or failure for each object.Managing BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository Refreshing repository objects in published reports 8 6. Select the folder in your destination repository where objects from your source directory will be placed. When you refresh a report in this way. the old repository objects stored in the report are replaced with the latest versions from the BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository. select “Insert a new folder”. Click Next. Click Next. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 179 . and then type the name of the folder. Refreshing repository objects in published reports As you update objects stored in your BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository.

4. You can also refresh repository objects when you publish reports. select it now and click Update. you can refresh multiple reports simultaneously using the Report Repository Helper. 5. For more information.rpt files. To refresh a published report’s repository objects Go to the Objects management area of the CMC. click the Refresh Options link.8 Managing BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository Refreshing repository objects in published reports Note: Although refreshing with the repository is faster. 1. Click the link to the report you want to refresh. The Report Repository Helper is available from Administrative Tools area in the BusinessObjects Enterprise Admin Launchpad. see “Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise” on page 373. Verify that the Use Object Repository when refreshing report check box is selected. For details. Note: If the check box is cleared. you can update repository objects at that time. 180 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . On the Properties tab. you can also refresh reports by setting options that compare reports to their original source . 2. 3. Tip: Once you have enabled repository refresh for each report. Click Refresh Report. see “Setting report refresh options” on page 426. Tip: If you use Crystal Reports to open reports directly from your BusinessObjects Enterprise folders.

Working with Firewalls chapter .

Packets are typically too small to contain all the data that is sent at any one time. TCP/IP packets have the following layers: • Application layer (for example. each containing a portion of the overall data. A firewall can enforce a security policy. TCP/IP and packets TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) is the communications protocol used on the Internet. so multiple packets are required. When data is sent by TCP/IP. It also prevents attackers from getting close to your other defenses. the packets are constructed such that a layer for each protocol is wrapped around each packet. 182 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . telnet. What is a firewall? A firewall is a security system that protects one or more computers from unauthorized network access. proceed directly to “Understanding firewall integration” on page 186. Typically. a firewall protects a company’s intranet from being improperly accessed through the Internet. The units of data transmitted through a TCP/IP network are called packets. and HTTP). This chapter provides general information about what a firewall is and types of firewalls: • • “What is a firewall?” on page 182 “Firewall types” on page 183 If you are already familiar with firewalls and the configuration used in your network.9 Working with Firewalls Firewalls overview Firewalls overview BusinessObjects Enterprise works with firewall systems to provide reporting across intranets and the Internet without compromising network security. A firewall also can’t set itself up correctly or protect against completely new threats. Typically. FTP. A firewall can’t protect against malicious insiders or connections that don’t go through it. A firewall restricts people to entering and leaving your network at a carefully controlled point. and be a focus for security decisions. some basic networking terms are described here: • • “TCP/IP and packets” on page 182 “Ports” on page 183 If you are already familiar with these topics see “Understanding firewall integration” on page 186. log Internet activity. To help explain how firewalls work.

Valid port numbers range from 0 to 65536. When a service or daemon initially is started. you communicate with the web server on port 80. but ports 0 to 1024 are reserved for use by certain privileged services. which is the pre-assigned port for HTTP communication. Network Access layer (for example. Note: Business Objects will be moving away from supporting SOCKS proxy servers. When any client program wants to use that server. These headers are used to determine the packet’s destination and to ensure that it arrives intact. when you visit a typical HTTP site over the Web. we recommend you switch to a different firewall method. Firewall types Firewalls primarily function using at least one of the following methods: • • • “Packet filtering” on page 184 “Network Address Translation” on page 184 “SOCKS proxy servers” on page 185 BusinessObjects Enterprise works with these firewall types. As a result SOCKS proxy servers are still supported in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI.Working with Firewalls Firewalls overview 9 • • • Transport layer (TCP or UDP). At the application layer. For instance. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 183 . ports allow a client program to specify a particular server program on a computer in a network. Other application processes are given port numbers dynamically for each connection. the packet consists simply of the data to be transferred. the process is reversed: the layers are sequentially removed until the transferred data is available to the destination application. If you are using SOCKS proxy servers now. each layer adds a header to the packet. SOCKS proxy servers will be deprecated in a future release of BusinessObjects Enterprise. ethernet and ATM). Ports Ports are logical connection points that a computer uses to send and receive packets. High-level applications that use TCP/IP have ports with pre-assigned numbers. With TCP/IP. When the packet reaches its destination. Internet layer (IP). preserving the data from the previous level. As the packet moves through the layers. it must also request to bind to the designated port number. it binds to its designated port number.

9 Working with Firewalls Firewalls overview Packet filtering Packet filtering rejects TCP/IP packets from unauthorized hosts and rejects connection attempts to unauthorized services. public IP addresses for use external to that network. The firewall maintains a translation table to keep track of the address conversions that it has performed. NAT is also called IP masquerading. When an incoming response arrives at the firewall. Once the translation is complete. Stateless packet filters do not retain information about connections in use. they make determinations packet-by-packet based only on the information contained within the packet. Stateful packet filters remember the state of connections at the network and session layers by recording the established session information that passes through the filter gateway. Firewalls that employ packet filtering will work with BusinessObjects Enterprise. instead. Packet filtering can reject packets based on the following: • • • • • The address the data is coming from. NAT can also be described as a simple proxy. Because this type of firewall essentially sends and receives data on behalf of internal hosts. NAT hides internal hosts by converting their IP addresses to an external address. As outgoing packets are routed through the firewall. the firewall sends the data payload on to its original destination. The data contained within the packet. The session and application ports being used to transfer the data. thus. The filter then uses that information to discriminate valid return packets from invalid connection attempts. The main purpose of NAT is to hide internal hosts. The address the data is going to. NAT makes it appear that all traffic from your site comes from one (or more) external IP addresses. Typically there are two types of packet filtering: • Network Address Translation Network Address Translation (NAT) converts private IP addresses in a private network to globally unique. 184 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . the firewall uses this translation table to determine which internal host should receive the response.

If you are using SOCKS proxy servers now. SOCKS servers work by listening for service requests from internal clients. When the SOCKS server receives a response from the internal server. external computers have no way to address an internal host that is protected using a dynamically translated IP address. A SOCKS server redirects connection requests from computers on one side of it to computers on the other side of it. and relays data between the internal and external networks. • BusinessObjects Enterprise and static translation NAT can be configured so that they work together. or IP masquerade) shares a small group of external IP addresses amongst a large group of internal clients for the purpose of expanding the internal network address space. For example. SOCKS is a networking protocol that enables computers on one side of a SOCKS server to access computers on the other side of a SOCKS server without requiring a direct IP connection.Working with Firewalls Firewalls overview 9 There are two basic types of NAT: • Static translation (port forwarding) grants a specific internal host a fixed translation that never changes. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 185 . A SOCKS server typically authenticates and authorizes requests. Because a translation entry does not exist until an internal client establishes a connection out through the firewall. SOCKS proxy servers will be deprecated in a future release of BusinessObjects Enterprise. This effectively hides the identity and the number of clients on the internal network from examination by anyone on the external network. SOCKS proxy servers Note: Business Objects will be moving away from supporting SOCKS proxy servers. we recommend you switch to a different firewall method. As a result SOCKS proxy servers are still supported in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. if you run an email server inside a firewall. Dynamic translation (automatic. it returns that response to the original client as if it were the originating external server. the SOCKS server sends the requests to the internal network as if the SOCKS server itself was the originating client. establishes a proxy connection. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports and works with SOCKS servers. When an external request is made. Note: Some protocols do not function correctly when the port is changed. you can establish a static route through the firewall for that service. These protocols will not work through a dynamically translated connection. hide mode.

Where applicable. such as the Report Application Server SDK or the Viewer SDK). See “Architecture overview and diagram” on page 54 for a listing of these servers. When a BusinessObjects Enterprise server first connects to the BusinessObjects Enterprise framework. it registers its IP address and port number with the CMS. BusinessObjects Enterprise connections include: • • “Communication between servers and the CMS directory listing service” on page 186 “Communication between the application tier and CMS” on page 187 Some examples also apply to communications between a BusinessObjects Enterprise server and the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK (or other BusinessObjects Enterprise SDKs.9 Working with Firewalls Understanding firewall integration Understanding firewall integration This section gives a conceptual overview of internal communications between BusinessObjects Enterprise servers and the implications for firewall configuration. By default this port number is dynamically chosen. 186 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Communication between servers and the CMS directory listing service The Central Management Server (CMS) manages a directory listing service for the application server and the servers in the Intelligence tier and the Processing tier. see “Configuring the system for firewalls” on page 190. It also reviews the most common firewall scenarios. It includes: • • “Communication between servers” on page 186 “Typical firewall scenarios” on page 188 For detailed step-by-step instructions on how to configure your system to work in a firewalled environment. these examples are indicated in the descriptions. When one BusinessObjects Enterprise server needs to communicate with another. Communication between servers It is helpful to understand the basics of internal communications between BusinessObjects Enterprise servers before configuring your BusinessObjects Enterprise system to work with firewalls. it contacts the directory listing service on the CMS to obtain the connection information. The first server then uses this information to communicate directly with the second server.

before running a scheduled report. You can use the -requestport command to configure the CMS to reply with a fixed port number for subsequent communications. To do so: 1. Subsequent communications continue using this address and second port number. Note: • • • Communication between the application tier and CMS Not all BusinessObjects Enterprise components use the directory listing service on the CMS to make their initial connections with other elements of BusinessObjects Enterprise.Working with Firewalls Understanding firewall integration 9 For example. Using the -requestport command. rather than using one that is dynamically selected. This communication model is also used when a BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK or the WCA communicates directly with a server in the Intelligence tier or the Processing tier. you can configure any BusinessObjects Enterprise server to register a fixed port number with the CMS. All subsequent communications between the two servers continues using the same address and port. Communications between the CMS and the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK and WCA follow another model. The WSA contacts the CMS using a pre-defined address and port number. The CMS replies with its address and a second port number. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 187 . the Job Server must communicate with the Input File Repository Server (FRS) to obtain the report object. rather than one that is dynamically selected. 2. which by default is selected dynamically. The Job Server uses this information to connect directly to the Input FRS. Using the -port option. The CMS replies to the Job Server with the IP address and port number of the Input FRS. See “Communication between the application tier and CMS” on page 187. 3. see “Changing the default server port numbers” on page 140 for additional configuration information. Note: • Before changing the default port numbers. rather than using the pre-defined default value (port 6400 for the CMS). The Job Server contacts the CMS and requests connection information for the Input FRS. you can also customize the CMS to listen on a specific port for initial communications.

Configure its components to use fixed addresses and ports. so you need only configure each component to be aware of the location and type of the proxies that they communicate with. Typical firewall scenarios If all users of your BusinessObjects Enterprise system are on your internal network. and how to configure both BusinessObjects Enterprise and your firewalls in order to provide this access. Configure your firewall to allow communications to the services behind the firewall using these addresses and ports. The process is similar when you configure your BusinessObjects Enterprise system to communicate across SOCKS proxy filters. Firewall configuration overview By default BusinessObjects Enterprise uses dynamically chosen port numbers for communications between components. their communication is uninterrupted by firewalls. and no additional configuration is required. This section outlines the following common firewall scenarios: • • 188 “Application tier separated from the CMS by a firewall” on page 189 “Thick client separated from the CMS by a firewall” on page 189 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . you must consider where to place each BusinessObjects Enterprise component. there is no need to perform any special configuration of your firewalls or of BusinessObjects Enterprise. If the components reside on the same computer. you must: 1. it assumes that the components reside on separate computers. 2. You must change this default when you place a stateful firewall that uses packet filtering or Network Address Translation (NAT) between BusinessObjects Enterprise components because these firewalls provide protection by permitting communications from outside the firewall with only specified addresses and ports inside the firewall.9 Working with Firewalls Understanding firewall integration • You may also change the default port that the CMS uses to listen for initial communications from the Configuration tab of the Properties dialog in the Central Configuration Manager. To enable BusinessObjects Enterprise to communicate across such a firewall. But BusinessObjects Enterprise provides direct support for SOCKS proxy filters. if you need to provide access to BusinessObjects Enterprise to external users. However. Simply place all BusinessObjects Enterprise components on computers inside your firewall. Note: When this section mentions firewalling different BusinessObjects Enterprise components.

Application tier separated from the CMS by a firewall In most cases. you should be able to support BusinessObjects Enterprise in wide variety of contexts. the DMZ is set up between two firewalls: an outer firewall and an inner firewall. You may chose to place your application server in the DMZ. or by using the Import Wizard or Publishing Wizard.Working with Firewalls Understanding firewall integration 9 These scenarios are general cases: once you understand the firewalling issues involved. You must configure your CMS. your File Repository Servers. and your firewall if you want to support this network configuration. Note: Placing your application server in the DMZ is less secure than placing it on your internal network. see: • • “Configuring NAT when thick client is separated from the CMS” on page 195 “Configuring packet filtering when thick client is separated from the CMS” on page 198 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 189 . Typically. while placing the CMS and all other BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on the internal network. For more information. clients access protected information through a web server running in a Demilitarized Zone (DMZ). the thick clients communicate directly with the CMS. you may prefer to place your BusinessObjects Enterprise application server on your internal network. BusinessObjects Enterprise requires that the CMS and the remaining server components are not separated from one another by firewalls. this operation fails. see: • • • “Configuring NAT when application tier is separated from the CMS” on page 190 “Configuring packet filtering when application tier is separated from CMS” on page 196 “Configuring for SOCKS servers” on page 199 Thick client separated from the CMS by a firewall You can publish reports or analytic objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise by saving these objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise from within Crystal Reports or OLAP Intelligence. For maximum security. For more information. However. A DMZ is a network area that is neither part of the internal network nor directly part of the Internet. This means that if there is a firewall between the computer running one of these thick clients and the CMS.

you need to configure these components to communicate properly through the firewall. Depending on your system configuring. Configuring for Network Address Translation If you use Network Address Translation (NAT) only on the outer firewall of the DMZ. you must ensure that whenever a BusinessObjects Enterprise server passes an address across the firewall to the application server. it passes a fully qualified domain name (FQDN) that is routable by the firewall. Note: If you have multiple BusinessObjects Enterprise servers of a given type. however. BusinessObjects Enterprise cannot communicate across a firewall whose IP translation is dynamic.9 Working with Firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls This section gives practical step-by-step instructions for configuring your BusinessObjects Enterprise system to work in a firewalled environment. and then specify a firewall rule for the server. see “Understanding firewall integration” on page 186. the overall procedure for configuring your system to work with firewalls will not change. Configure each server as described in the section that describes your firewall environment. Note: You can configure BusinessObjects Enterprise to communicate properly across NAT firewalls that use static IP translation. then no special configuration is required for BusinessObjects Enterprise to communicate properly. 190 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . It includes: • • • “Configuring for Network Address Translation” on page 190 “Configuring for packet filtering” on page 195 “Configuring for SOCKS servers” on page 199 For a conceptual overview of communications between BusinessObjects Enterprise components and of supported firewall configurations. configuring for Network Address Translation can include one or both of the following tasks: • • “Configuring NAT when application tier is separated from the CMS” on page 190 “Configuring NAT when thick client is separated from the CMS” on page 195 Configuring NAT when application tier is separated from the CMS If the application server is separated from the CMS and other BusinessObjects Enterprise servers by NAT. if you separate BusinessObjects Enterprise components using NAT. However.

Configuring BusinessObjects Enterprise for Network Address Translation when the application tier is separated from the CMS by a firewall includes: • • • • “Configuring the CMS” on page 191 “Configuring the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers” on page 192 “Configuring the hosts files” on page 193 “Specifying firewall rules for NAT” on page 194 Configuring the CMS 1. This machine must be routable from the application server. To configure the CMS on Windows Start the CCM. for example /export/home/ businessobjects.sh. To configure the CMS on UNIX Run ccm. For the -requestport command. 4. 3. Therefore. In the Command box. substitute your new port number for the default value of 6400.Working with Firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls 9 Ports The application server must be able to communicate with every BusinessObjects Enterprise server behind the firewall. The application server must be a Tomcat or IIS server. If you change the default port number of the CMS you must perform additional system configuration. Start the Central Management Server. Before changing the port number. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 191 . you must open a port on the firewall for each server. Tip: If you want to customize the CMS so that it listens on a port other than the default. By default the script and the ccm. On the toolbar. Stop the Central Management Server. click Properties. add the following option: -port FQDN:6400 -requestport portnum For the -port command. 5. see “Changing the default server port numbers” on page 140. substitute any valid free port number for portnum. Click OK to return to the CCM. replace FQDN with the fully qualified domain name of the machine that is running the CMS. 6.config file are installed in the Business Objects install directory. 1. 2.

config file to insert the following command line: -port FQDN:6400 -requestport portnum For the -port command.sh. 3. for example /export/home/ businessobjects. Configuring the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers The procedure for configuring the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers varies for Windows and UNIX. Use ccm. By default the script and the ccm. 5.sh to start the Central Management Server.config file are installed in the Business Objects install directory. add the following option: -port FQDN -requestport portnum For the -port command. 7. Stop the Central Management Server. replace FQDN with the fully qualified domain name of the machine that is running the CMS. For the -requestport command. replace FQDN with the fully qualified domain name of the machine that is running the server. In the Command box. 4. On the toolbar. 1. • • 1. Click OK to return to the CCM. Stop the server. “To configure BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on Windows” on page 192 “To configure BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on UNIX” on page 192 To configure BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on Windows Start the CCM. 2. 4. For the -requestport command. Repeat for each BusinessObjects Enterprise server. 192 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . If more than one server is installed on the same machine. Start the server. each server on that machine must use a unique port number. substitute any valid free port number for portnum. 3. This machine must be routable from the application server. To configure BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on UNIX Run ccm. click Properties. This machine must be routable from the application server. substitute any valid free port number for portnum. Edit the ccm. 6.9 Working with Firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls 2.

If more than one server is installed on the same machine. Repeat for each BusinessObjects Enterprise server. Edit the ccm. 1. 3. This machine must be routable from the application server. “To configure the hosts files on Windows” on page 193 “To configure the hosts files on UNIX” on page 193 To configure the hosts files on Windows Open the hosts file using a text editor like Notepad. Use the internally routable IP address of the machine and its externally routable fully qualified domain name. Stop the server. The procedure for configuring the hosts file is different for Windows and UNIX. This is necessary to enable communication between servers inside the firewall. you must configure the hosts file so that the server can map the FQDN it receives from the Central Management Server (CMS) to an internally routable IP address. Save the hosts file. To configure the hosts files on UNIX Note: Your UNIX operating system must be configured to first consult the hosts file to resolve domain names. Open the hosts file using an editor like vi.Working with Firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls 9 2.config file to insert the following command line: -port FQDN -requestport portnum For the -port command. The hosts file is located at \WINNT\system32\drivers\etc\hosts. 5. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 193 . For the -requestport command. 4. each server on that machine must use a unique port number. before consulting DNS. Consult your UNIX systems documentation for details. 3. substitute any valid free port number for portnum. Use ccm. Configuring the hosts files On each machine running a BusinessObjects Enterprise server. The hosts file is located at \etc\hosts. replace FQDN with the fully qualified domain name of the machine that is running the server.sh to start the server. See: • • 1. 2. Follow the instructions in the hosts file to add an entry for each machine behind the firewall that is running a BusinessObjects Enterprise server or servers.

Use the translated IP address of the machine and its fully qualified domain name. Specifying firewall rules for NAT When there is a firewall between the application server and the rest of the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers you need to specify the inbound access rules and one outbound rule. Save the hosts file. The outbound rule is needed because the application server may register listeners with any of the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers For details of how to specify these rules. Whenever more than one server is installed on the same machine. and actualIPaddress is the actual internal IP address for the a server. add a route from the translated IP address to the actual internal IP address: route add translatedIPaddress actualIPaddress 3. each server on that machine must use a unique port number. Where translatedIPDaddress is the actual translated IP address. For details about the rules see: • • “Inbound Rules” on page 194 “Outbound Rules” on page 195 The fixed port numbers specified in the chart are the port numbers you specify for servers using -requestport. See “Configuring the CMS” on page 191.9 Working with Firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls 2. Add an entry for each machine behind the firewall that is running a BusinessObjects Enterprise server. and “Configuring the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers” on page 192 for details. Inbound Rules Source Computer Application server Application server Application server Any Any Port Any Any Any Any Any Destination Computer Port CMS CMS Other BusinessObjects Enterprise server CMS Other BusinessObjects Enterprise Server 6400 Action Allow Allow Allow Reject Reject fixed fixed Any Any Note: There must be one inbound firewall rule for each BusinessObjects Enterprise server behind the firewall. consult your firewall documentation. 194 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 4. On the firewall machine.

These listeners may initiate communication with the application server. follow the detailed steps in “Configuring NAT when application tier is separated from the CMS” on page 190 but: • • Configure only the Central Management Server and the Input File Repository Server. This section includes: • • “Configuring packet filtering when application tier is separated from CMS” on page 196 “Configuring packet filtering when thick client is separated from the CMS” on page 198. For full instructions. or by using the Import or Publishing Wizards. However. You do not need to establish an outbound firewall rule. Establish inbound firewall rules for communication between the Crystal Reports or OLAP Intelligence machine and the CMS and Input File Repository Server. Configuring NAT when thick client is separated from the CMS You can publish reports or analytic objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise by saving these objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise from within Crystal Reports or OLAP Intelligence. if you separate BusinessObjects Enterprise components using packet filtering. if there is a firewall between the computer running one of these thick clients and the Central Management Server (CMS). this operation fails. then no special configuration is required for BusinessObjects Enterprise to communicate properly. you need to configure them to communicate properly through the firewall. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 195 .Working with Firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls 9 Outbound Rules Source Computer Machines hosting BusinessObjects Enterprise server Port Any Destination Computer Port Application server Any Action Allow This outbound rule is needed because the application server may register listeners on servers behind the firewall. However. Configuring for packet filtering If you use packet filtering only on the outer firewall of the DMZ. Configuring your BusinessObjects Enterprise system to support this configuration when the firewall uses Network Address Translation (NAT) is very similar to configuring your system to support a NAT firewall between the application tier and the Central Management Server.

substitute any valid free port number for portnum. 196 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . See: • • 1. Before changing the port number. On the toolbar. If more than one server is installed on the same machine. 4. 6. 2. Tip: If you want to customize the CMS so that it listens on a port other than the default.config file are installed in the BusinessObjects install directory. Stop the first server. add the following option: -requestport portnum For the -requestport command. This includes: • • “Configuring the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers” on page 196 “Specifying firewall rules for packet filtering” on page 197 Configuring the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers The procedure for configuring the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers varies for Windows and UNIX. For example: -port cmsport -requestport portnum If you change the default port number of the CMS you must perform additional system configuration. By default the script and the ccm. 5. you must configure the CMS and every BusinessObjects Enterprise server inside the inner firewall to respond to communications from the application server on a fixed port. 7. each server on that machine must use a unique port number.9 Working with Firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls Configuring packet filtering when application tier is separated from CMS If your firewall performs packet filtering. “To configure BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on Windows” on page 196 “To configure BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on UNIX” on page 196 To configure BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on Windows Start the CCM. Click OK to return to the CCM. 3.sh. Repeat for each BusinessObjects Enterprise server behind the firewall. for example /export/home/ businessobjects. see “Changing the default server port numbers” on page 140. 1. click Properties. To configure BusinessObjects Enterprise servers on UNIX Run ccm. In the Command box. also add -port cmsport to the command line. where cmsport is the new port number for the default value of 6400. Start the server.

Edit the ccm. Tip: If you want to customize the CMS so that it listens on a port other than the default. 3.Working with Firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls 9 2. Stop the server. Use ccm. substitute any valid free port number for portnum. If more than one server is installed on the same machine. see “Changing the default server port numbers” on page 140. If you change the default port number of the CMS you must perform additional system configuration. The outbound rule is needed because the application server may register listeners with any of the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers. each server on that machine must use a unique port number.config file to insert the following command line: -requestport portnum For the -requestport command. Before changing the port number.sh to start the server. also add -port 6400 to the command line. For details about the rules see: • • “Inbound Rules” on page 198 “Outbound Rules” on page 198 The fixed port numbers specified in the chart are the port numbers you specify for the CMS and other BusinessObjects Enterprise servers using -requestport. consult your firewall documentation. 5. 4. Repeat for each BusinessObjects Enterprise server. For details of how to specify these rules. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 197 . substituting your new port number for the default value of 6400. Specifying firewall rules for packet filtering When there is a firewall between the application server and the rest of the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers you need to specify the inbound access rules and one outbound rule.

Configuring packet filtering when thick client is separated from the CMS You can publish reports or analytic objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise by saving these objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise from within Crystal Reports or OLAP Intelligence. each server on that machine must use a unique port number. Configuring your BusinessObjects Enterprise system to support this configuration when the firewall uses packet filtering is very similar to configuring your system to support a packet filtering firewall between the application tier and the Central Management Server (CMS).9 Working with Firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls Inbound Rules Source Computer Application server Application server Application server Any Any Port Any Any Any Any Any Destination Computer Port CMS CMS Other BusinessObjects Enterprise server CMS Other BusinessObjects Enterprise servers 6400 Action Allow Allow Allow Reject Reject fixed fixed Any Any Note: There must be an inbound firewall rule for each BusinessObjects Enterprise server behind the firewall. These listeners may initiate communication with the application server. or by using the Import or Publishing Wizards. follow the detailed steps in “Configuring packet filtering when application tier is separated from CMS” on page 196 but: • Configure only the Central Management Server and the Input File Repository Server to use fixed port numbers for communication. However. Whenever more than one server is installed on the same machine. Outbound Rules Source Computer Machines hosting BusinessObjects Enterprise server Port Any Destination Computer Port Application server Any Action Allow This outbound rule is needed because the application server may register listeners on servers behind the firewall. this operation fails. if there is a firewall between the computer running one of these thick clients and the CMS. For full instructions. 198 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 199 . There is limited support of SOCKS for the UNIX installation of BusinessObjects Enterprise. As a result SOCKS proxy servers are still supported in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. or for a Windows installation that uses the BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK. BusinessObjects Enterprise provides direct support for SOCKS proxy server firewalls on Windows installations that use the BusinessObjects Enterprise .Working with Firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls 9 • Establish inbound firewall rules for communication between the Crystal Reports or OLAP Intelligence machine and the CMS and Input File Repository Server.NET SDK. Note: The EBUS layer of the Java SDK does not support communications using the SOCKs protocol. complete these steps regardless of the location of your SOCKS server(s). SOCKS proxy servers will be deprecated in a future release of BusinessObjects Enterprise. If you are using SOCKS proxy servers now. Configuring for SOCKS servers Note: Business Objects will be moving away from supporting SOCKS proxy servers. Configuring the WCA for SOCKS servers When configuring your WCA for SOCKS. as required. we recommend you switch to a different firewall method. You can configure the Web Component Adapter to communicate through a SOCKS server. but the Java SDK has no support for SOCKS. Therefore only perform the test cases that utilize socks when using IIS on a windows deployment This list describes when to use the procedures that are provided in the remainder of this section: • • Configuring the CMS for SOCKS Servers Complete these steps if one or more SOCKS servers separate the WCA from the CMS. The means that applications written using the Java SDK cannot be on the outside of a firewall from any components that must be accessed. Therefore you may be able to configure your system to support a custom CSP application and SOCKS. so you don’t need to configure them separately. if the only means of traversing the firewall is using the SOCKs protocol. You do not need to establish an outbound firewall rule. The remaining server components automatically obtain their SOCKS configuration from the CMS. BusinessObjects Enterprise requires that the CMS and the remaining server components are not separated from one another by firewalls. but you cannot use JSP pages through a SOCKS firewall.

repeat steps 4 to 8 for each additional server. on the toolbar. In the Server Port field. so you don’t need to configure them separately. Select the CMS and. Click OK in all three dialog boxes to return to the CCM. 1.9 Working with Firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls Configuring the CMS for SOCKS Servers Complete these steps if one or more SOCKS servers separate the application server from the CMS. The remaining BusinessObjects Enterprise servers automatically obtain their SOCKS configuration from the CMS. 4. and then enter your user name and password. Stop all of the Business Objects servers. click Add. 7. 3. 8. see “Scalability overview” on page 158. 6. type the Server Name or IP Address of your SOCKS server. see “For more information about each of these topics. Start the BusinessObjects Enterprise server components. To configure the CMS on Windows Start the CCM. To configure the CMS on UNIX The UNIX version of BusinessObjects Enterprise includes a utility that allows you to configure BusinessObjects Enterprise servers to work with SOCKS servers. Select the SOCKS version that you are running (Ver 4 or Ver 5). select the authentication check box. 9.” on page 602. 200 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . in order. Then click Up and Down to order the SOCKS servers from the outermost (closest to the application server or Web Component Server) to the innermost (closest to the CMS). including the Central Management Server. 2. If you are using version 5 and you would like to secure access to the server. For details. 10. Configuring the WCA for SOCKS servers Complete these steps if one or more SOCKS servers separates the Web Component Adapter (WCA) from the Central Management Server (CMS). type the number of the port that the SOCKS server is listening on. If you have more than one SOCKS server. Click OK. In the SOCKS Proxy dialog box. 5. click Properties. On the Connection tab. as required. These steps provide the WCA with the required information about each SOCKS server. from the outermost to the innermost.

User:Password@SOCKSserver:Port/ CMSmachine:Port c. f. g. For details. The Properties dialog box appears. e.xml deployment descriptor file associated with the webcompadapter. 2. Configure the BusinessObjects Enterprise server: BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 201 . b.sh” on page 603. c. See: • • 1. See “Configuring the Web Component Adapter” on page 89 for details on editing web. Double-click the CMS. Start the server again.xml.socksUri” value-“*”/> Add the following SOCKS server information: *Socks://Version. Repeat step 3 for all the BusinessObjects Enterprise server. Save the file. The procedure for configuring the WCA is different for Windows and Unix. Edit the file C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\Web.config. d. b. Click Configuration tab.Working with Firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls 9 The outermost SOCKS server is the one closest to the web server. The innermost SOCKS server is the last SOCKS server that the WCA communicates with before the CMS. “To configure the WCA on UNIX” on page 201 “To configure the WCA on Windows” on page 201 To configure the WCA on UNIX Run the sockssetup. 3. Go to the line: <add key=”connection. a. see “sockssetup. This URI tells your WCA how to contact the CMS through your SOCKS server(s). Stop the CMS. To configure the WCA on Windows Add the SOCKS information to the WCA.sh script to configure the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers and WCA to work with the SOCKS servers. Enter the SOCKS information. Start the CCM.war to insert a SOCKS URI (universal resource identifier). a. Edit the web. 1.

9 Working with Firewalls Configuring the system for firewalls 202 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

Managing Auditing chapter .

This information lets you be more proactive in managing the operation and deployment of your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. How does auditing work? The Central Management Server (CMS) acts as the system auditor. they make a correction to the time stamp they record in their log files for subsequent audit actions. Then you must enable auditing of that action in the Servers management area of the Central Management Console. you must first determine which server controls that action. while each BusinessObjects Enterprise server that controls actions that you can monitor is an auditee.10 Managing Auditing Auditing overview Auditing overview Auditing allows you to monitor and record key facts about your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. Each auditee provides a time stamp for the audit actions that it records in its log file. If differences exist. As the auditee. When the CMS receives these records it writes data from the log files to the central auditing database. while helping you better evaluate the value that BusinessObjects Enterprise provides to your organization. the CMS periodically broadcasts its system time to the auditees. the CMS controls the overall audit process. Having information about who is using your system and which objects they are accessing allows you to answer system-level questions like “which groups within the company use our BusinessObjects Enterprise system the most?” or “how many concurrent user licenses are we using at any given time?” Auditing also allows you to better administer individual user accounts and reports by giving you more insight into what actions users are taking and which reports they are accessing. At regular intervals the CMS communicates with the auditee servers to request copies of records from the auditee’s local log files. To ensure that the time stamps of actions on different servers are consistent. 204 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Each server writes audit records to a log file local to the server. As the auditor. The auditees then compare this time to their internal clocks. The CMS also controls the synchronization of audit actions that occur on different machines. To audit an action in BusinessObjects Enterprise. Once the data is in the auditing database you can run pre-configured reports against the database or design custom reports to suit your own needs. the BusinessObjects Enterprise server will then begin to record these audit actions in a local log file.

see “Reference list of auditable actions” on page 205). see the “Auditing database schema reference” on page 218. (For a complete list of auditable actions. In a CMS cluster. Reference list of auditable actions This list contains a complete list of the audit actions you can enable in BusinessObjects Enterprise. and a variety of other parameters more fully documented in “Auditing database schema reference” on page 218. the name and user group of the user who initiated the action. to help you find the server where you enable auditing of these actions. The CMS acts as both an auditor and as an auditee when you configure it to audit an action that the CMS itself controls.Managing Auditing Auditing overview 10 Note: • • • You must configure the auditing database on the CMS before you can begin to audit. For each action. the cluster will nominate one CMS to act as system auditor. See “Using sample audit reports” on page 214 or “Creating custom audit reports” on page 217 for more information. or to answer more complex queries such as “how many concurrent licenses are we using at a given time?”. Once you have collected this data. another CMS from the cluster will take over and begin acting as auditor. access data. Which actions can I audit? You can use auditing to track the actions of individual users of BusinessObjects Enterprise as they log in and out of the system. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 205 . For step by step instructions on how to enable audit actions. and the data that is recorded for each audit action. For more information about the actions that are audited. see “Enabling auditing of user and system actions” on page 210. See “Configuring the auditing database” on page 209. you can use a custom or pre-configured report to view the raw data. or create file-based events. the server where it was performed. If the machine that is running this CMS fails. You can also monitor system actions like the success or failure of scheduled objects. It is organized according to the types of actions that you can audit. BusinessObjects Enterprise records the time of the action.

a custom application that uses RAS SDK.) A report has been viewed successfully. (The name. RAS A report fails to open. BusinessObjects Enterprise Server CMS Crystal reports A folder is modified. or description of a folder is modified. Read Document. A folder is deleted. • • A report is opened successfully using: the Advanced DHTML viewer. Save document to repository.10 Managing Auditing Auditing overview User Actions Actions Folders A folder is created. A report is saved successfully (using a custom application based on the RAS SDK). Get list of universes. which triggers a request to the server for the list of available universes. Selection of universe. A report has been created successfully using: • a custom application that uses the RAS SDK. Cache Server A report could not be viewed. User opens an existing Web Intelligence document. A report fails to save using a custom application based on the RAS API. A report fails to be created. A user has selected a universe as they create a new Web Intelligence document. 206 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Web Intelligence Web Report Server Intelligence • A user has begun creating a new Web Intelligence documents document. location. or as they edit an existing Web Intelligence document. • • • A user has saved a Web Intelligence document within BusinessObjects Enterprise.

Generate SQL. Web Intelligence • User manually refreshes a Web Intelligence documents document. (An object has failed to be sent to a destination. Edit document. BusinessObjects Enterprise Server Web Intelligence Report Server • • User enters “Edit document” mode for an existing Web Intelligence document. Drill out of scope. • Server generates an SQL query in response to a user action that requires data to be retrieved from a database. A user logon fails. A concurrent user logon succeeds. CMS Send an object to a destination Destination Job Server BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 207 .Managing Auditing Auditing overview 10 Actions Refresh document. Get page. • Users A list of values is retrieved from the database to populate a picklist associated with a prompt used to filter the data in a document.) A job failed but will try to run again. Apply format. and triggers a call to the database for more data. User logs off. User applies a formatting change to an existing Web Intelligence document in a query panel. or the user opens a Web Intelligence document that is set to “refresh on open”. A named user logon succeeds. (A user has successfully sent an object to a destination.) A job has failed to run. • User drills past the scope of the data currently in memory. A job has been run successfully. List of values. • Server renders the pages of a Web Intelligence document in response to a user request to display all or part of a document. A user’s password is changed.

or a scheduled List of Values. Job Servers For example. (The name. and “Communication with a running instance is lost. Tip: To audit every failure of a scheduled Crystal report. CMS File-based events Note: You do not need to enable this option to audit every failure of a scheduled Web Intelligence document.) System Actions Actions Scheduled objects BusinessObjects Enterprise Server A job has been run successfully. enable auditing of “A job has failed to run” on the Job Server. Event Server (Event is created. or filename of an event is modified.) An event is unregistered. A job failed but will try to run again. a scheduled Crystal report has run successfully. and registered with system) An event is updated. An event is triggered. For example. a scheduled Crystal report has failed to run.” on the Central Management Server. For example. and the scheduled time for running the report expired. a scheduled Crystal report has failed to run because communication with the instance was lost. A job has failed to run. description. Communication with a running instance is lost. a scheduled program. (Event is removed from system. Event Server 208 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .10 Managing Auditing Auditing overview Actions File-based events BusinessObjects Enterprise Server An event is registered.

Managing Auditing Configuring the auditing database 10 Configuring the auditing database Before you audit actions within BusinessObjects Enterprise. then click OK. See the Platforms. 3. You can use any database server supported for the CMS system database for your auditing database. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 209 . server services are configured to run under the System account. • If you selected ODBC. 6.) To configure the auditing database on Windows Start the Central Configuration Manager (CCM). Stop the CMS. It is recommended that you develop a back up strategy for your auditing database. Note: • The CMS system database and the auditing database are independent. By default. (See “Installing a new CMS and adding it to a cluster” on page 94 for more information on CMS clusters. Select the ODBC data source that you want to use as the auditing database. 2. or you can install these databases on separate servers. provide your database credentials and click OK. (Click New to configure a new DSN. If necessary. 5. Click Specify Auditing Data Source. and not a User DSN or File DSN. When prompted. which only recognizes System DSNs. The remaining steps depend upon the connection type you selected: • 1. specify whether you want to connect to the new database through SQL Server (ODBC). Click OK. the Windows “Select Data Source” dialog box appears. In the Select Database Driver dialog box.txt file included with your product distribution for a complete list of tested database software and version requirements. Note that connection names are case sensitive. If you choose. If you have a CMS cluster. every CMS in the cluster must be connected to the same auditing database. contact your database administrator for more information. you can use different database software for the CMS system database and the auditing database. you must configure your Central Management Server to connect to an auditing database.) Use a System DSN. 4. or through one of the native drivers. using the same connection method and the same connection name.

5. Then you must enable auditing on the server from the Servers management area of the Central Management Console (CMC). you will only collect audit information about actions that occur on that server. you are prompted for your database Server Name. Note: You can also configure the auditing database using the Properties option for the CMS. For example. Click OK. and then click Specify. and then supply the requested information about your database server. Enter the port number of the CMS when prompted (the default value is 6400). 8. 4. select Properties. see “UNIX Tools” on page 597. Run cmsdbsetup. 210 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . If you have multiple BusinessObjects Enterprise servers of a given type. Run serverconfig.10 Managing Auditing Enabling auditing of user and system actions • If you selected a native driver.sh to start the CMS. and then go to the Configuration tab. When the CMS starts. Choose the selectaudit option. Stop the CMS. 3. 1.sh to stop the CMS. your Login ID. If you enable auditing on only one Central Management Server. 7. To configure the auditing database on UNIX For more information on UNIX scripts. it will create the auditing database. 2. enable auditing of concurrent user logons on each of your Central Management Servers. and your Password. Select “Write server audit information to specified data source”.sh. The SvcMgr dialog box notifies you when the auditing database setup is complete. be sure to enable identical audit actions on every server.sh. 7. if you are interested in the total number of concurrent user logons. Start the CMS. Use ccm. it will create the auditing database. Enabling auditing of user and system actions To audit an action in BusinessObjects Enterprise you must first determine which BusinessObjects Enterprise server controls the action. When the CMS starts. Use ccm. Provide this information and then click OK. Choose the “Modify a server” option. Doing so ensures that you collect information on all user or system actions in your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. 6. and enable auditing. Select the CMS.

) Click Update. Ensure that your audit log file is located on a hard drive that has sufficient space to store the log files. Click the server that controls the action that you wish to audit. Note: You must configure the auditing database before you can collect data on audit actions. For example. 1.) 3. (See the “Reference list of auditable actions” on page 205 to find the correct server. 2. To enable audit actions Go to the organize Servers area of the CMC. See “Configuring the auditing database” on page 209 for instructions. You only need to enable auditing on the Job Server where the reports are processed. if you are interested in the success or failure of only one kind of scheduled report and you have configured your system so that these reports are processed on one particular Job Server. (See “Optimizing system performance while auditing” on page 213 for information on adjusting the size of log files. 6. Tip: BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 211 .Managing Auditing Enabling auditing of user and system actions 10 In some special cases you may wish to enable auditing on only one server of a given type. Select the Auditing is enabled check box. 7. Select the audit actions that you wish to record. 4. Click the Auditing tab. it is not necessary to enable auditing on every Job Server in your system. 5.

Only one CMS in the cluster acts as the auditor. If these options are different than those of the original auditor. The auditees compare this time to their internal clocks. The auditee does not adjust the system time of the machine on which it is running. if you want to track the total number of concurrent logons to your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. For more accurate and robust time synchronization. audit behavior may not be what you expect. For more information. This correction affects only the time stamp that the auditee records in its audit log file.” on the Central Management Server. and “Communication with a running instance is lost. This built-in method of time synchronization will be accurate enough for most applications. see “Central Management Server” on page 586 in “Server Command Lines” on page 583. You can change the interval using the command-line option -AuditeeTimeSyncInterval minutes You can turn off this option by setting minutes to zero.10 Managing Auditing Controlling synchronization of audit actions • To audit every failure of a scheduled Crystal report. However. you must enable logging of concurrent logons on every Central Management Server in your system. if this CMS fails. 212 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . By default. and then turn off internal synchronization by setting -AuditeeTimeSyncInterval 0 Tip: If you have a CMS cluster. The CMS periodically broadcasts its system time to the auditees in UTC (Coordinated Universal Time). and then make the appropriate correction to the time stamp (in UTC) they record for subsequent audit actions. For example. This CMS will apply its own command-line options. the CMS broadcasts its system time every 60 minutes. apply the same command-line options to each server. or a scheduled List of Values. Auditing is enabled independently on each server. another CMS takes over auditing. a scheduled program. enable auditing of “A job has failed to run” on the Job Server. configure the auditee and auditor machines to use an NTP (Network Time Protocol) client. enable identical audit actions on every server that supports those actions. • Controlling synchronization of audit actions The CMS controls the synchronization of audit actions that occur on different machines. If you want to audit all actions of a given type. Otherwise your audit record will be incomplete.

For example. if you frequently need up-to-date information about audited actions. you may only need to review audit results periodically (weekly. and to decrease the number of audit records in each batch.Managing Auditing Optimizing system performance while auditing 10 Optimizing system performance while auditing Enabling auditing should have minimal effect on the performance of BusinessObjects Enterprise. where minutes is between 1 and 15. all audit records are quickly transferred to the auditing database. -auditMaxEventsPerFile number (number has a default value of 500 and must be greater than 0). (The default value is 200. for example). these options can create a backlog of records stored in audit log files. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 213 . choosing these options may have an impact on the performance of BusinessObjects Enterprise. However. However. For example. However. every time interval.) The CMS requests audit records from each audited server every audit interval. thereby increasing the length of time that it takes these records to get transferred to the central auditing database. The maximum number of records that an audited server will store in a single audit log file. increasing the audit interval reduces frequency with which the CMS writes events to the auditing database. Increasing the maximum number of audit events stored in each audit log file reduces the number of file open and close operations performed by audited servers. depending upon activity levels in your system. In this case you can choose to increase the audit interval. where number is between 50 and 500. When this maximum value is exceeded. Note: Log files remain on the audited server until all records have been requested by the CMS. Decreasing the audit batch size decreases the rate at which records are moved from the audit log files on the audited servers to the auditing database. you can optimize system performance by fine-tuning these command-line options: • • • -AuditInterval minutes. In this case. Choosing these options minimizes the impact that auditing has on the performance of BusinessObjects Enterprise. Changing each of these options has a different impact on system performance.) The CMS requests this fixed number of records from each audited server. the server opens a new log file. (The default value is 5. You can use these options to optimize audit performance to meet your needs. and you can always report accurately on the latest audit actions. -AuditBatchSize number. Alternatively. you can choose a short audit interval and a large audit batch size.

They are available on your product CD. See “Configuring the auditing database” on page 209 for instructions. The sample audit reports were created using a ODBC connection to a database server named AuditData (that is. and a database called AuditData. If you have not already configured your auditing database. Note: To create this folder. Click Report Samples. the DSN was AuditData). first publish them to BusinessObjects Enterprise. see “Server Command Lines” on page 583. Note: If you have recently enabled auditing. or over a weekend). To use sample audit reports Create a folder called “admin reports” inside the Report Samples folder to hold the sample auditing reports. 3. For more information on changing command-line options. and then enable auditing of the user and server actions needed to provide data for the sample reports. 214 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . see “Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise” on page 373. You can create an auditing database that uses these names. Publish the sample audit reports to the “admin reports” folder within BusinessObjects Enterprise.) For more information about publishing. Finally. Next configure an auditing database. ensure that the sample reports are configured to use database connection information valid for your auditing database. (The sample audit reports are in Samples > Reports > AdminReports on your product CD. go to the Folders management area of the Central Management Console (CMC). the sample audit reports may contain little or no data the first time you view them. Using sample audit reports BusinessObjects Enterprise ships with several sample audit reports created using Crystal Reports. To use these sample reports. or you can use a database server name and database name of your choice. 1. do so now. 2. but means that at times your audit reports may not contain records of the most recent audit actions.10 Managing Auditing Using sample audit reports This backlog is cleared at times of low system activity (such as overnight. You can now use the sample reports to view auditing data collected about user and system actions on your installation of BusinessObjects Enterprise. and then click New Folder.

5.Managing Auditing Using sample audit reports 10 4. Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. Enable auditing of the actions that are included in the sample audit report. From the Crystal Enterprise Admin Launchpad. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 215 . 7. select the Central Management Console (CMC). 6. Note: The description of the sample reports indicates which audit actions to enable for each report. BusinessObjects Enterprise will now begin to collect data on audit actions. Go to the Folders management area of the CMC. Click Report Samples. See “Enabling auditing of user and system actions” on page 210 for instructions. then admin reports to display the list of sample audit reports.

Click the name of a report that you want to use. Configure the report to use your auditing database. 9.” 216 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . click the Database link. from the Process tab. If the server name. then.10 Managing Auditing Using sample audit reports 8. database name. or database logon information for your auditing database are different than the values originally specified for the sample report. click “Use custom database logon information specified here.

in the box.See your Crystal Reports User’s Guide for full instructions on creating reports.Managing Auditing Creating custom audit reports 10 10. and then type DatabaseName. The sample audit report is now configured to use your auditing database as its data source. you can use Crystal Reports to create custom audit reports of user and system actions. 16. 11. Type a User name and Password for a user with administrative rights to the auditing database. Consult the Designer’s Guide and the Web Intelligence guides for details. Make sure you select the same database driver that you used when configuring the auditing database. Click Update. Alternatively. Click Specify a custom table prefix.dbo. You may now view the report in BusinessObjects Enterprise. click the Parameters link. With this information. Click the value of any parameter to specify a default value for that parameter. 12. 14. 15. Type the Server name (DSN) and Database name that you specified for your auditing database. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 217 . 13. Click Update. From the Process tab. where DatabaseName is the name of the database that you specified above. so that you can create your own Web Intelligence documents. Creating custom audit reports This section contains information to help you understand the auditing database and the information it records about audit actions. you may wish to use Designer to create a universe against the auditing database. or to indicate that the user should be prompted for a parameter value when the report is run.

Time for start of action in UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) to the nearest millisecond. You may want to correct this time to your local time zone when creating audit reports. and includes any correction necessary to synchronize with CMS time. Duration. Name of user who performed the action. Combined with the Event_ID to form the primary key for the Audit_Event table. Audit_Event table This table stores one record per action that is audited. Event_ID User_Name Start_Timestamp Duration 218 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Field Server_CUID Description Server process ID. Combined with Server_CUID to form the primary key for the Audit_Event table. in seconds. as shown in the following entityrelationship diagram. The time stamp is created by the server recording the action in its log file. A unique ID generated by the server to identify the audit event. of the action that is audited.10 Managing Auditing Creating custom audit reports Auditing database schema reference The Audit database contains six tables.

Info Object ID of object associated with the action. Foreign key for the Event_Type table. when a user logon fails. For example. There may be more than one record in this table for each audit action recorded in the Audit_Event table. the first will have a Detail_ID of 1. if the Detail_Type_Description were “universe name”. This number uniquely identifies an object. Object_CUID Error_Code Audit_Detail table The Audit_Detail table records more information about each audit action recorded in the Audit_Event table. Foreign key for the Detail_Type table. Combined with the Event_ID and the Detail_ID to form the primary key for the Audit_Detail table. That is. Number that uniquely identifies the type of detail about the audit action that the entry represents. and the second will have a Detail_ID of 2. if there are two details associated with a particular audit action. the detail text would contain the name of that universe. Combined with Server_CUID and the Detail_ID to form the primary key for the Audit_Detail table.Managing Auditing Creating custom audit reports 10 Field Event_Type_ID Description Number that uniquely identifies the type of action the entry represents. the reasons for that failure are recorded as audit details. Field reserved for error codes generated by the Web Intelligence Report Server. Event_ID Detail_ID Detail_Type_ID Detail_Text BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 219 . For example. Information about the audit detail being recorded. A unique ID generated by the server to identify the audit event. Field Server_CUID Description Server process ID. The Detail_ID field is used to number the individual details associated with each audit action.

the host name. The default friendly name is hostname. Machine name of the server that produced the action. these events are ordered according to the server that generates each type of event. Primary key for the Server_Process table. The server’s friendly name is the name displayed in the CMC. Event_Type table reference The following tables list the Event_Type_ID and Event_Type_Description of all events that can be audited in your system.10 Managing Auditing Creating custom audit reports Server_Process table The Server_Process table contains information about the servers running within your BusinessObjects Enterprise system which can generate audit events. Event_Type_Description Description of the type of audit event. Application_Type_ID A unique ID that identifies the type of application Server_FullName Friendly name of the server that produced the action. 220 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Field Event_Type_ID Description Number that uniquely identifies the type of audit event that the entry represents. That is. Event_Type table The Event_Type table contains a static list of the kinds of events that can be audited in your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. For your convenience.servertype. This table provides information roughly equivalent to that provided by AuditIDs and AuditStrings in Crystal Enterprise 10. Server_Version Version of BusinessObjects Enterprise on server that produced the action. Foreign key to the Application_Type table. that generated the audit action. Field Server_CUID Server_Name Description Server process ID.

Managing Auditing Creating custom audit reports 10 CMS audit events Event_Type_ ID Event_Type_Description Description 65537 65538 65540 65541 65539 65542 Concurrent user logon succeeded. Logon failed because there was no valid license key available. The user logged on successfully. User logon failed. 65544 65545 Folder modified. A folder is deleted. The name. using a named user license. even though creating a user creates a user folder. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 221 . Description User successfully viewed a Crystal report that has saved or live data. using a concurrent user license. Cache Server audit events Event_Type_ ID Event_Type_Description 196609 196610 Crystal report viewed successfully. A new folder is created. Note: This action must be audited by the CMS as Job Servers are not aware of losing communications with a job. The user logged on successfully. or description of the folder was changed. Note that this audit string will be recorded when a user account (and therefore the user’s folder) is deleted. Named user logon succeeded. A scheduled report or scheduled program failed to run because communication with the running instance was lost. User logged off. New folder created. Note that this audit string will not be recorded when a new user account is created. Reason: Unresponsive Job Server Child process. User password has been changed. but was not successful. A report could not be viewed. or an existing folder is copied. and the scheduled time for running the job expired. location. User attempted to view a Crystal report. 65543 Folder deleted. Job failed.

Events are updated when a user modifies the name or description of the file-based event. Event_Type Event_Type_Description Description _ ID 327681 Job successful. The job will be retried by the CMS at a later time. 327682 327683 Job failed. the audit messages give you information about the status of scheduled actions. Job failed. or by the system. The scheduled job did not complete successfully. For example.10 Managing Auditing Creating custom audit reports Job Server audit events For scheduled objects. the audit messages can tell you if a scheduled report ran successfully. The scheduled job did not complete successfully. For the Destination Job Server. File-based event was initiated. the audit messages give you information on whether an object was sent to a destination. Event Server audit events Event_Type_ ID Event_Type_Description Description 262145 Event registered User creates a file-based event that can be used to schedule objects. see “Scheduling objects” on page 466. Job will be retried by the CMS. Event object was modified by a user. For more information on scheduling jobs. 262146 262147 Event unregistered Event updated 262148 Event triggered 222 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . as requested by a user. User deletes a file-based event. The object ran as scheduled (or requested) and the job completed successfully.

Consult your RAS SDK documentation for details. For example. A new report was created and saved. Note: In a few cases. and to create reports using custom applications developed with the RAS SDK. The report could not be opened by the RAS. you may see this message when the database driver for the report is not present on the client machine A processing extension associated with the report aborts viewing. 458756 Report could not be opened. An existing report was saved. or fails.Managing Auditing Creating custom audit reports 10 Report Application Server audit events The Report Application Server (RAS) is used to view reports opened with the Advanced DHTML viewer. Consult your RAS SDK documentation for details. The machine running the RAS ran out of space in its temporary directory. this Event_Type_ID may be generated when the report opens but cannot be viewed. The report used Business Views and the user did not have permissions to refresh the underlying data connections. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 223 . Note: This Event_Type_ID is generated when a custom application created using the RAS SDK saves a report (using the Save method). This may occur when: • • • • 458754 Report was saved to the CMS. Event_Type_ ID Event_Type_Description 458753 Description Report was opened for User opened a report for viewing or viewing and/or modification modification. Note: 458755 Report was created and saved to the CMS • This Event_Type_ID is generated when a custom application created using the RAS SDK saves a new report (using the Save As method). There are problems with the database setup for the report.

User applies a formatting change to a document. in a query panel.10 Managing Auditing Creating custom audit reports Event_Type_ ID Event_Type_Description 458757 Report could not be saved to the CMS. User selects a universe as part of a document creation workflow. 19 Document refresh 21 List of values 22 28 40 Edit document Apply format Get page 224 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . A list of values is retrieved from the database to populate a picklist associated with a prompt used to filter the data in a document. User has moved into Edit document mode. or user opens a Web Intelligence document that has the “refresh on open” document property assigned. Web Intelligence Report Server audit events Event_Type_ ID Event_Type_Description Description 6 9 11 13 Get list of universes Save document to repository Read document Selection of universe User accesses a list of universes as part of a document creation workflow. User opens an existing Web Intelligence document. User manually refreshes a Web Intelligence document. A newly created report could not be saved by RAS. Consult your RAS SDK documentation for details. Description An existing report could not be saved by RAS. User saves a Web Intelligence document to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Note: This Event_Type_ID is generated when a custom application created using the RAS SDK cannot save a new report (using the Save As method). 458758 Report could not be created in the CMS. This event occurs when a user opens the query panel. User action results in a request to server to generate the necessary data and layout to display all or part of a Web Intelligence document.

The description of the application generating the audit event. and triggers a call to the database for more data. User drills past the scope of the data currently in memory.Managing Auditing Creating custom audit reports 10 Event_Type_ ID Event_Type_Description Description 41 42 Generate SQL Drill out of scope Appears when a user refreshes a document. Application_Type_Description Application_Type table reference Application_Type_ID Application_Type_Description 1 8 11 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 Unknown Application Web Intelligence Report Server Central Management Server (CMS) Cache Server Report Job Server Report Application Server (RAS) Event Server Program Job Server Destination Job Server Web Intelligence Job Server BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 225 . Field Name Application_Type_ID Description A unique ID that identifies the type of application that generated the audit action. the applications that can be audited are servers. Application_Type table The Application_Type table contains a static list of the applications that can produce audit events. In BusinessObjects Enterprise XI.

The description of the type of audit detail generated by the audit event. These reasons are listed as entries in the Detail_Type table.10 Managing Auditing Creating custom audit reports Detail_Type table The Detail_Type table contains a static list of the standard details that can be recorded about audited events. The information in the Detail_Type table is equivalent to the information that was recorded in variable AuditStrings in Crystal Enterprise 10. 226 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . For example. Field Detail_Type_ID Detail_Type_Description Description Number that uniquely identifies the type of audit detail that the entry represents. a user logon can fail for a number of different reasons.

BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts chapter .

228 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . LDAP. users. it focuses on conceptual information and provides links to key procedures. granular object rights. instead. The current release supports features such as distributed security. and Windows AD authentication in order to protect against unauthorized access. Each of the components and key terms is discussed in greater detail later in this chapter. this chapter details the security features and related functionality to show how the framework itself enforces and maintains security. thus enabling you to detect potential security concerns. and groups.11 BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Security overview Security overview The BusinessObjects Enterprise architecture addresses the many security concerns that affect today’s businesses and organizations. Because BusinessObjects Enterprise provides the framework for an increasing number of components from the Enterprise family of Business Objects products. see “Managing User Accounts and Groups” on page 249. this chapter does not provide explicit procedural details. For procedures that show how to set object rights for your BusinessObjects Enterprise content. Authentication and authorization Authentication is the process of verifying the identity of a user who attempts to access the system. For procedures that show how to set up authentication. and third-party Windows NT. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports dynamically loaded processing extensions. and authorization is the process of verifying that the user has been granted sufficient rights to perform the requested action upon the specified object. BusinessObjects Enterprise allows you to log various web statistics. Related topics: • • • For key procedures that show how to modify the default accounts. As such. for monitoring and auditing purposes. To allow for further customization of security. single sign-on. This section describes the authentication and authorization processes in order to provide a general idea of how system security works within BusinessObjects Enterprise. see “Making initial security settings” on page 43. passwords. and other security settings. see “Controlling User Access” on page 315. resource access security. And.

see “Available authentication types” on page 252. While active. This section uses InfoView as a model and describes its default behavior. The user’s web browser sends the information by HTTP to your web server.BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Authentication and authorization 11 Because BusinessObjects Enterprise is fully customizable. The authentication type may be Enterprise. the authentication and authorization processes may vary from system to system. depending upon which type(s) you have enabled and set up in the Authorization management area of the Central Management Console (CMC). the appropriate security plug-in to authenticate the user against the user database. The WCA stores the user’s information in memory in a WCA session variable. you can customize the system’s behavior to meet your needs. this script communicates with the SDK and. or LDAP authentication). see the developer documentation available on your product CD. the CMS grants the user an active identity on the system and the system performs several actions: • • • The CMS stores the user’s information in memory in a CMS session variable. Windows NT. if the user specifies Windows NT. If the security plug-in reports a successful match of credentials (including a match to an appropriate group membership for Windows NT. this session consumes one user license on the system. the SDK uses the corresponding security plug-in to authenticate the user. For instance. which routes the information to the Web Component Adapter (WCA). For procedures that show how to set up the different authentication types. The Central Management Server (CMS) uses the BusinessObjects Enterprise security plug-in to verify the user name and password against the system database. or Windows AD authentication. For complete details.aspx and runs the script. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 229 . LDAP. LDAP. if the user specifies Enterprise Authentication. this session stores information that allows BusinessObjects Enterprise to respond to the user’s requests. Alternatively. or Windows AD Authentication. the SDK ensures that the BusinessObjects Enterprise security plug-in performs the authentication. Primary authentication Primary authentication occurs when a user first attempts to access the system. The CMS generates and encodes a logon token and sends it to the WCA. Windows AD. Internally. The WCA passes the user’s information to logon. If you are developing your own BusinessObjects Enterprise end-user or administrative applications using the BusinessObjects Enterprise Software Development Kit (SDK). The user provides a user name and password and specifies an authentication type. ultimately. While active.

BusinessObjects Enterprise retrieves users’ credentials and group information directly from the Windows NT or Windows AD system. When a user attempts to access an object on the system. see “Available authentication types” on page 252. run. The WCA sends the logon token to the user’s web browser. For details. the WCA ensures that the user has a valid logon token: • • If there is a valid logon token. or otherwise act upon an object that is managed by BusinessObjects Enterprise. you should note that the WCA here instantiates the InfoStore object and stores it in the WCA session variable. if you are developing your own client application and you prefer not to store session state on the WCA. its encoded information serves as the user’s valid ticket for the system. the WCA performs a series of security-related steps. the WCA proceeds to its next task. Until the logon token expires. Each of these steps contributes to the distributed security of BusinessObjects Enterprise. • Secondary authentication and authorization Secondary authentication is the process of double-checking the identity of each user who attempts to view. The session variable does not contain the user’s password. see “Logon tokens” on page 243. because each step consists of storing information that is used for secondary identification and authorization purposes. In a single sign-on situation. and the web browser caches the token in a cookie. Before fulfilling the user’s request. users are not prompted for their credentials. However. the primary authentication process is repeated. First. LDAP. This is the model used in InfoView. schedule. 230 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Hence. the web browser sends the request by HTTP to the WCA. 1. Note: • The third-party Windows NT. Authorization is the process of verifying that the user has been granted sufficient rights to perform the requested action upon the specified object. and Windows AD security plug-ins work only once you have mapped groups from the external user database to BusinessObjects Enterprise.11 BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Authentication and authorization Note: • • • If you are familiar with the SDK. If there is no valid logon token. you can design your application such that it avoids using WCA session variables. For more information about logon tokens.

see “Calculating a user’s effective rights” on page 328. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 231 . the authentication algorithm followed by the WCA maintains system security in the fewest number of steps. • If a different server component must process the request. the WCA checks internally for an active WCA session that matches the user’s logon token: • • If the corresponding WCA session variable remains in memory. BusinessObjects Enterprise does not have to prompt the user for credentials. The Page Server passes the logon token to the CMS to ensure that the user is authorized to refresh the report. the WCA queries the CMS database for a list of the reports that the user is authorized to see. For instance. here. the user is logged back on with the logon token. For details about how the CMS calculates a user’s effective rights to an object. For instance. This secondary authentication and authorization process begins similarly to initial identification. thereby providing the most efficient response to the user’s initial request. That server component then queries the CMS database for the rights associated with the object that the user requested. If the WCA session variable has timed out. Second. it queries the CMS database for the rights associated with the object that the user requested. the WCA displays an appropriate message. and the CMS and the WCA recreate the required session variables. The SDK authenticates the user against the appropriate user database. the WCA proceeds to its next task. because the encoded logon token contains the required information. the WCA sends the request and the user’s logon token to the appropriate server component. In this case. The WCA then dynamically lists the reports in an HTML page. Note: If the user does not have the right to perform the requested action. For details about setting object rights.BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Authentication and authorization 11 2. if the user requests a list of reports in a specific folder. Third. the WCA passes the request along to the Page Server. 3. if the user attempts to refresh a report’s data. however. and sends the page to the user’s browser. the WCA ensures that the appropriate server component actually processes the user’s request: • If the WCA can process the request itself. see “Controlling User Access” on page 315.

Within the context of BusinessObjects Enterprise. When they log on to the operating system. Windows AD. which it is by default. At its most basic level. Single sign-on to BusinessObjects Enterprise can be provided by BusinessObjects Enterprise. see “Disabling the Guest account” on page 44. Single sign-on to BusinessObjects Enterprise was already supported in previous versions of Crystal Enterprise and continues to exist in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. For information on configuring single sign-on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. see: • • • • “Managing Enterprise and general accounts” on page 253 “Setting up NT single sign-on” on page 292 “Configuring LDAP authentication” on page 263 “Setting up AD single sign-on” on page 282 232 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . it refers to a situation where a user can access two or more applications or systems while providing their log-on credentials only once. a logon token is created.11 BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Authentication and authorization About single sign-on The term single sign-on is used to describe different scenarios. anyone can log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise as Guest and will have single sign-on access to BusinessObjects Enterprise. we distinguish the following levels of single sign-on: • • • “Single sign-on to BusinessObjects Enterprise” on page 232 “Single sign-on to database” on page 233 “End-to-end single sign-on” on page 233 Single sign-on to BusinessObjects Enterprise Single sign-on to BusinessObjects Enterprise means that once users have logged on to the operating system they can access BusinessObjects Enterprise without having to provide their logon credentials again. The system uses this token to authenticate the users and grant them access to BusinessObjects Enterprise and its components. or by different authentication tools such as Windows NT. When the Guest user account is enabled. The term “anonymous single sign-on” also refers to single sign-on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. For more information. or LDAP with SiteMinder. but it specifically refers to the single sign-on functionality for the Guest user account. thus making it easier for users to interact with the system.

viewing reports and Web Intelligence documents. when they log on to the operating system. to provide users with even easier access to the resources they need. in particular. It includes: • • • “Web Component Adapter” on page 234 “Central Management Server” on page 234 “Security plug-ins” on page 235 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 233 . in particular “Configuring IIS for single sign-on to databases only” on page 309. These components work together to authenticate and to authorize users who access BusinessObjects Enterprise.BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Security management components 11 Single sign-on to database Once users are logged on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. and single sign-on access to the databases at the back-end. and its other objects. the CMS. In BusinessObjects Enterprise XI single sign-on to the database is supported through Windows AD using Kerberos. to have access to BusinessObjects Enterprise and to be able to perform actions that require database access. Security management components System security within BusinessObjects Enterprise is distributed across most components. Thus. and third-party authentication tools. such as SiteMinder and Kerberos. but it is managed primarily by the WCA. This section discusses the key components as they relate to system security. single sign-on to the database enables them to perform actions that require database access. such as viewing reports. End-to-end single sign-on End-to-end single sign-on refers to a configuration where users have both single sign-on access to BusinessObjects Enterprise at the front-end. and “Configuring web applications for single sign-on to the databases” on page 313. For more information see “Configuring Kerberos single sign-on” on page 299. the security plug-ins. its folders. See “End-to-end single sign-on” on page 233. Single sign-on to the database can be combined with single sign-on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. without having to provide their logon credentials again. For more information. see “Configuring Kerberos single sign-on” on page 299. if you don’t want the LocalSystem account for the IIS to be trusted for delegation. In BusinessObjects Enterprise XI end-to-end single sign-on is supported through Windows AD and Kerberos. users need to provide their logon credentials only once. You may want to use single sign-on to the database rather than end-to-end single sign-on.

If the logon token is missing. or Windows AD credentials. When users log on. and object rights that define user and group privileges. The WCA is also responsible for maintaining the user’s session state in the WCA session variable. When you first set up your system. The CMS supports third-party authentication. The WCA ensures that each user has a valid logon token for the system. The CMS also responds to authorization requests made by the rest of the system. the Central Management Server (CMS) performs a number of important tasks. This session variable contains information that BusinessObjects Enterprise uses when fulfilling user’s requests. When a user requests a list of reports in a particular folder. the CMS allows you to create user accounts and groups within BusinessObjects Enterprise. This data includes security information. the WCA initiates the primary authentication process. so users can log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise with their current Windows NT.11 BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Security management components • “Processing extensions” on page 241 Note: Because these components are responsible for additional tasks. or if it has expired. For details. For details. As such. the CMS authorizes the request only when it has verified that the user’s account or group membership provides sufficient privileges. LDAP. see “Sessions and session tracking” on page 244. group memberships. The majority of these tasks rely upon the database that the CMS uses to keep track of BusinessObjects Enterprise system data. the WCA receives all HTTP requests that are sent to BusinessObjects Enterprise from users’ web browsers. or a Windows AD server). Central Management Server In relation to system security. an LDAP directory server. Web Component Adapter The WCA is the gateway between the web server and the remaining BusinessObjects Enterprise components. the CMS allows you to reuse existing user accounts and groups that are stored in a third-party system (a Windows NT user database. 234 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . the CMS coordinates the authentication process with its security plug-ins. several of the components discussed in this section are described in additional detail in “BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture” on page 53. the CMS then grants the user a logon token and an active session on the system. see “Primary authentication” on page 229. And. with its thirdparty security plug-ins. such as user accounts.

LDAP. Security plug-ins facilitate account creation and management by allowing you to map user accounts and groups from third-party systems into BusinessObjects Enterprise. they choose from the available authentication types that you have enabled and set up in the Authorization management area of the CMC: Enterprise (the system default). or if your system uses the BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK. Moreover. once you map a Windows NT. The security plug-ins dynamically maintain third-party user and group listings. Then. or Windows AD group into BusinessObjects Enterprise. see “Calculating a user’s effective rights” on page 328. When you make subsequent changes to the third-party group membership. LDAP. Security plug-ins Security plug-ins expand and customize the ways in which BusinessObjects Enterprise authenticates users. BusinessObjects Enterprise currently ships with the system default BusinessObjects Enterprise security plug-in and with the Windows NT. You can map third-party user accounts or groups to existing BusinessObjects Enterprise user accounts or groups. Note: The Windows NT and Windows AD security plug-ins cannot authenticate users if the BusinessObjects Enterprise server components are running on UNIX. you make all of your settings in the CMC. see “Central Management Server (CMS)” on page 61.BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Security management components 11 For details about the CMS and how it calculates a user’s effective rights to an object. all users who belong to that group can log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. So. For more information about the CMS and the CMS database. because the mapped users and groups are treated as if they were Enterprise accounts. the security plug-in dynamically creates an alias for that new user when he or she first logs on to BusinessObjects Enterprise with valid NT credentials. you need not update or refresh the listing in BusinessObjects Enterprise. Each security plug-in offers several key benefits. or Windows AD. For instance. or you can create new Enterprise user accounts or groups that corresponds to each mapped entry in the external system. LDAP. and some from an LDAP directory server. custom groups within BusinessObjects Enterprise. and Windows AD security plug-ins. Each security plug-in acts as an authentication provider that verifies user credentials against the appropriate user database. you might map some user accounts or groups from Windows NT. When users log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Windows NT. if you map a Windows NT group to BusinessObjects Enterprise. when you need to assign rights or create new. security plug-ins enable you to assign rights to users and groups in a consistent manner. For example. and then you add a new NT user to the NT group. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 235 .

see “Disabling the Guest account” on page 44. For details on setting up Enterprise users and groups. this plug-in sets up two default Enterprise accounts: Administrator and Guest. and have their membership in a mapped NT group verified before the CMS grants them an active BusinessObjects Enterprise session. Users are authenticated against the Windows NT user database. and users are allowed or disallowed access to the system based solely on that information. Single sign-on The BusinessObjects Enterprise authentication provider supports anonymous single sign-on for the Guest account. This plug-in allows you to create and maintain user accounts and groups within BusinessObjects Enterprise. user names and passwords are authenticated against the BusinessObjects Enterprise user list.11 BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Security management components BusinessObjects Enterprise supports the following security plug-ins: • • • • “BusinessObjects Enterprise security plug-in” on page 236 “Windows NT security plug-in” on page 236 “LDAP security plug-in” on page 238 “Windows AD security plug-in” on page 240 BusinessObjects Enterprise security plug-in The BusinessObjects Enterprise security plug-in (secEnterprise. see “Managing Enterprise and general accounts” on page 253. 236 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . you disable this default behavior. For details on setting these passwords. In this case.dll) allows you to map user accounts and groups from your Windows NT user database to BusinessObjects Enterprise. it also enables the system to verify all logon requests that specify Enterprise Authentication. Neither account has a default password. For details. If you assign a secure password to the Guest account. or if you disable the Guest account entirely. when users connect to BusinessObjects Enterprise without specifying a user name and password. Thus. it also enables BusinessObjects Enterprise to verify all logon requests that specify Windows NT Authentication. see “Making initial security settings” on page 43.dll) is installed and enabled by default when you install BusinessObjects Enterprise. Windows NT security plug-in The Windows NT security plug-in (secWindowsNT. the system logs them on automatically under the Guest account. Default accounts When you first install BusinessObjects Enterprise.

except for the Import Wizard. For information on mapping Windows NT users and groups to BusinessObjects Enterprise.BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Security management components 11 This plug-in is compatible with NT 4 and Windows 2000 Active Directory user databases (when Windows 2000 Active Directory is configured in non-native mode only). the Windows NT security plug-in queries the operating system for the current user’s credentials when the client is launched. and your NT user account is added to the group. Once you have mapped your NT users and groups. the user must be running a Windows operating system. You can also create your own applications that support NT authentication. the security plug-in obtains the security context for the user from the authentication provider. or over the Web. you must use the Windows AD security plug-in. thereby allowing authenticated NT users to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise without explicitly entering their credentials. If a Windows 2000 Active Directory user database is configured in native mode and contains universal groups that span several domains. The Business Objects NT Users group is then mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Default account If you install BusinessObjects Enterprise on Windows as an Administrator of the local machine. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 237 . The single sign-on requirements depend upon the way in which users access BusinessObjects Enterprise: either via a thick client. Note: The Windows NT and Windows AD security plug-ins cannot authenticate users if the BusinessObjects Enterprise server components are running on UNIX. and the application must use the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK. see “Windows AD security plug-in” on page 240. In both scenarios. or if your system uses the BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK. In this scenario. Single sign-on The Windows NT security plug-in supports single sign-on. A new NT group (called Business Objects NT Users) is created on the local machine. and grants the user an active BusinessObjects Enterprise session if the user is a member of a mapped NT group: • To obtain NT single sign-on functionality from a thick-client application (such as the Publishing Wizard). all of the BusinessObjects Enterprise client tools support NT authentication. For information on the Windows AD security plug-in. see the developer documentation available on your product CD. see “Managing NT accounts” on page 284. For more information. The result is that you can log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise with your usual NT user credentials. then this plug-in is enabled by default.

For details on configuring IIS for single sign-on. authorization. In addition. Note: IIS performs the Challenge/Response authentication for every web page viewed.11 BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Security management components • To obtain single sign-on functionality over the Web. Design your own web applications accordingly (or modify InfoView) if you want to use NT single sign-on. 238 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . and alias creation. as opposed to Windows NT authentication. For information on mapping your LDAP users and groups to BusinessObjects Enterprise. and have their membership in a mapped LDAP group verified before the CMS grants them an active BusinessObjects Enterprise session. For information on NT single sign-on. LDAP authentication for BusinessObjects Enterprise is similar to NT and AD authentication in that you can map groups and set up authentication. This can result in severe performance degradation. the user must be running Internet Explorer on a Windows operating system. the system must use Microsoft components only. Also as with NT or AD authentication. see “Managing LDAP accounts” on page 262. see “Setting up NT single sign-on” on page 292. User lists and group memberships are dynamically maintained by BusinessObjects Enterprise.” which uses Enterprise authentication. Users are authenticated against the LDAP directory server. Note: InfoView provides its own form of “anonymous single sign-on. and can assign LDAP aliases to existing users if the user names match the Enterprise user names. Map users and groups from the LDAP directory service. Specifically. Internet Explorer and IIS engage in Windows NT Challenge/Response authentication before IIS forwards the user’s credentials to BusinessObjects Enterprise. You can specify that BusinessObjects Enterprise use a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) connection to communicate to the LDAP directory server for additional security. you can do the following: • • • Implement LDAP authentication when BusinessObjects Enterprise is running on Windows or on UNIX. Specify multiple host names and their ports. it also enables the system to verify all logon requests that specify LDAP Authentication. LDAP security plug-in The LDAP security plug-in (secLDAP. see “Setting up NT single sign-on” on page 292.dll) allows you to map user accounts and groups from your LDAP directory server to BusinessObjects Enterprise. you can create new Enterprise accounts for existing LDAP users. and the web server must be running Internet Information Server (IIS). In this scenario.

If desired.500 operations and features. Before deploying LDAP authentication in conjunction with BusinessObjects BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 239 . the LDAP security plug-in provided with BusinessObjects Enterprise can communicate with your LDAP server using an SSL connection established using either server authentication or mutual authentication. the LDAP server has a security certificate which BusinessObjects Enterprise uses to verify that it trusts the server. and the LDAP server must also verify the client certificate before a connection can be established. and use LDAP in your existing networked computer systems. Refer to your LDAP documentation for more information. you can use LDAP authentication (along with Enterprise. More about LDAP Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP). Based on an open standard. a member group may be located in a directory tree as follows: cn=BusinessObjects Enterprise Users. LDAP is based on the X. both the LDAP server and BusinessObjects Enterprise have security certificates. any client with the proper authorization can access its directories. You can also create your own applications that support LDAP authentication. ou=Enterprise Users A. but always performs basic authentication when verifying users’ credentials. enables users to share information among various applications. all of the BusinessObjects Enterprise client tools support LDAP authentication. while the LDAP server allows connections from anonymous clients. LDAP is an alternative to DAP because it uses fewer resources and simplifies and omits some X. Note: The LDAP security plug-in provided with BusinessObjects Enterprise can be configured to communicate with your LDAP server via SSL. and Windows AD authentication). It also enables users to be authorized when attempting to access objects in BusinessObjects Enterprise. The directory structure within LDAP has entries arranged in a specific schema. a common. With mutual authentication. Because LDAP is application-independent.500 standard. except for the Import Wizard. which uses a directory access protocol (DAP) to communicate between a directory client and a directory server. o=Research. With server authentication. NT. and the organization name (O). Each entry is identified by its corresponding distinguished name (DN) or common name (CN). LDAP provides a means for accessing and updating information in a directory. Other common attributes include the organizational unit name (OU).BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Security management components 11 Once you have mapped your LDAP users and groups. LDAP offers you the ability to set up users to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise through LDAP authentication. For example. As long as you have an LDAP server (or servers) running. applicationindependent directory.

the security plug-in obtains 240 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . For more information. all of the BusinessObjects Enterprise client tools support AD authentication. This plug-in is compatible with Windows 2000 Active Directory domains running in either native mode or mixed mode. which is currently available at http:// www. Note: • • • AD authentication only works for servers running on Windows systems. In both scenarios. Single sign-on The Windows AD security plug-in supports single sign-on. AD authentication and aggregation is not functional without a network connection. see the developer documentation available on your product CD.11 BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Security management components Enterprise. except for the Import Wizard.html Windows AD security plug-in Windows AD security plug-in enables you to map user accounts and groups from your Windows 2000 Active Directory (AD) user database to BusinessObjects Enterprise. AD authentication and aggregation may not continue to function if the administration credentials become invalid (for example. Users are authenticated against the Windows AD user database. Note that in order to use the Windows AD security plug-in. For details. For information on mapping Windows AD users and groups to BusinessObjects Enterprise.faqs. it also enables BusinessObjects Enterprise to verify all logon requests that specify Windows AD Authentication. Once you have mapped your AD users and groups. thereby allowing authenticated AD users to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise without explicitly entering their credentials. see RFC2251. ensure that you are familiar with the differences between these LDAP types. You can also create your own applications that support AD authentication. The single sign-on requirements depend upon the way in which users access BusinessObjects Enterprise: either via a thick client. see “Managing AD accounts” on page 275. if the administrator changes his or her password or if the account becomes disabled). see “Managing AD accounts” on page 275.org/rfcs/rfc2251. the CMS needs to run under a user account that has the “Act as Part of the Operating System” right. See your Windows 2000 documentation for more information. and have their membership in a mapped AD group verified before the Central Management Server grants them an active BusinessObjects Enterprise session. For information on mapping Windows AD users and groups to BusinessObjects Enterprise. or over the Web.

Design your own web applications accordingly (or modify InfoView) if you want to use AD single sign-on. The developer’s code first determines the user who owns the processing job. as opposed to Windows AD authentication. Processing extensions BusinessObjects Enterprise offers you the ability to further secure your reporting environment through the use of customized processing extensions. Specifically.so file extension). In this scenario. A processing extension is a dynamically loaded library of code that applies business logic to particular BusinessObjects Enterprise view or schedule requests before they are processed by the system. On UNIX systems. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 241 . A typical example is a report-processing extension that enforces row-level security. the user must be running a Windows operating system. For information on AD single sign-on. dynamically loaded libraries are often referred to as shared libraries (. the BusinessObjects Enterprise administration SDK essentially exposes a “handle” that allows developers to intercept the request. dynamically loaded libraries are referred to as dynamic-link libraries (. Note: BusinessObjects Enterprise provides its own form of “anonymous single sign-on. Developers can then append selection formulas to the request before the report is processed. and the web server must be running Internet Information Server (IIS).dll file extension). see “Setting up AD single sign-on” on page 282.BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Security management components 11 the security context for the user from the authentication provider. the user must be running Internet Explorer on a Windows operating system. and the application must use the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK. This type of security restricts data access by row within one or more database tables. Through its support for processing extensions.” which uses Enterprise authentication. Page Server. You must include the file extension when you name your processing extensions. the Windows AD security plug-in queries the operating system for the current user’s credentials when the client is launched. and grants the user an active BusinessObjects Enterprise session if the user is a member of a mapped AD group: • To obtain AD single sign-on functionality from a thick-client application (such as the Publishing Wizard). The developer writes a dynamically loaded library that intercepts view or schedule requests for a report (before the requests are processed by the Job Server. or Report Application Server). • To obtain single sign-on functionality over the Web. the system must use Microsoft components only. Note: On Windows systems.

In this case. a trust relationship between two domains is generally a connection that allows one domain accurately to recognize users who have been authenticated by the other domain. Once the user has been authenticated and granted an active session. 242 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . the active trust relationship provides the basis for BusinessObjects Enterprise’s distributed security. The code then generates and appends a record selection formula to the report in order to limit the data returned from the database. As such. For details. Active trust relationship In a networked environment. For more information. The CMC provides methods for registering your processing extensions with BusinessObjects Enterprise and for applying processing extensions to particular object.11 BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Active trust relationship then it looks up the user’s data-access privileges in a third-party system. all other BusinessObjects Enterprise components can process the user’s requests and actions without prompting for credentials. Note: In the current release. the processing extension serves as a way to incorporate customized row-level security into the BusinessObjects Enterprise environment. the active trust relationship allows users to access their BusinessObjects Enterprise resources without ever having to explicitly provide credentials to BusinessObjects Enterprise. see the Business Views Administrator's Guide. Tip: When combined with single sign-on functionality.rpt) objects. processing extensions can be applied only to Crystal report (. For more information. the active trust relationship works similarly to provide each user with seamless access to resources across the system. Tip: In BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. the trust relationship allows users to access resources in multiple domains without repeatedly having to provide their credentials. Included in the SDK is a fully documented API that developers can use to write processing extensions. While maintaining security. see the developer documentation available on your product CD. see “Applying processing extensions to reports” on page 443. you can also set and enforce rowlevel security through the use of Business Views. you configure the appropriate BusinessObjects Enterprise server components to dynamically load your processing extensions at runtime. Within the BusinessObjects Enterprise environment. By enabling processing extensions.

Logon tokens A logon token is an encoded string that defines its own usage attributes and contains a user’s session information. BusinessObjects Enterprise addresses distributed security by implementing a ticket mechanism (one that is similar to the Kerberos ticket mechanism).BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Active trust relationship 11 When single sign-on functionality is combined third party ticket mechanisms. stateless environments. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 243 . the active trust relationship allows users to access BusinessObjects Enterprise and other network resources without ever having to explicitly provide credentials to the system. The CMS grants tickets that authorize components to perform actions on behalf of a particular user. The logon token’s usage attributes are specified when the logon token is generated. Number of logons This attribute restricts the number of times that the logon token can be used to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. for instance. he or she receives a logon token from the CMS. or transfer of trust (the ability to allow another component to act on behalf of the user). other BusinessObjects Enterprise components can read the logon token from the user’s web browser. This use of the logon token provides the distributed security that is required for load balancing to be implemented in conjunction with effective fault-protection. to support features such as load balancing. the ticket is referred to as the logon token. This logon token is most commonly used over the Web. such as Kerberos or SiteMinder. The current logon token usage attributes are: • • Number of minutes This attribute restricts the lifetime of the logon token. Ticket mechanism for distributed security Enterprise systems dedicated to serving a large number of users typically require some form of distributed security. In BusinessObjects Enterprise. Both attributes hinder malicious users from gaining unauthorized access to BusinessObjects Enterprise with logon tokens retrieved from legitimate users. These attributes allow restrictions to be placed upon the logon token to reduce the chance of the logon token being used by malicious users. When the user makes a new request. When a user is first authenticated by BusinessObjects Enterprise. An enterprise system may require distributed security. The user’s web browser caches this logon token.

As soon as you move from one web page to another. Consequently. the user is prevented from unnecessarily consuming resources on both Web Component Adapters. the user’s logon token is used to route all of the user’s requests to the WCA that is storing the user’s session. consequently. The client application logs the user on with the valid logon token. BusinessObjects Enterprise uses two common methods to store session state: • Cookies—A cookie is a small text file that stores session state on the client side: the user’s web browser caches the cookie for later use. your web browser retains the state of each session in memory only for as long as any single Web page is displayed. In this scenario. its configuration. For this reason. Web sites and Web applications must somehow store the state of one session if they need to reuse its information in another. 244 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . thus. and the remaining WCA can authenticate the user and create a new. in addition. active session without prompting the user for his or her credentials. when the original WCA is brought back online. the nature of HTTP limits the duration of each session to a single page of information. In this way. If the WCA that is storing the user’s active session is taken offline. a session is a client-server connection that enables the exchange of information between the two computers. but the system does not have to repeatedly prompt the user for his or her credentials. The BusinessObjects Enterprise logon token is an example of this method. security is maintained while providing optimal performance: the user’s identity is verified. the user’s active identity is not immediately accessible by the other WCA. If one WCA ceases to respond to a user’s requests. The remaining WCA can then authorize and carry out the user’s request. the logon token again serves a critical purpose. By doing so. the system automatically resumes its load balancing responsibilities by routing each subsequent request to the least used WCA. A session’s state is a set of data that describes the session’s attributes. or its content. InfoView and the CMC are designed such that the request is redirected to the remaining WCA. the logon token enables the system’s load-balancing and fault-tolerance mechanisms to maintain a secure environment without affecting the user’s experience. the state of the first session is discarded and replaced with the state of the next session. When you establish a client-server connection over the Web.11 BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Sessions and session tracking The user’s active identity is stored as a session variable on the WCA that processed the request. Sessions and session tracking In general.

the system should destroy the session variable as soon as the user has finished working on the system. or until the WCA session variable is released. if they do not log off explicitly. or until 20 minutes after the user’s last request (whichever occurs first). This handles scenarios where client-side components shut down irregularly. the system neither has to prompt the user for the information a second time nor has to repeat any task that is necessary for the completion of the next request. because the interaction between a web browser and a web server can be stateless. you should note that a WCA session is an instance of an InfoStore object. you should note that a CMS session is an instance of an EnterpriseSession object.aspx pages to timeout earlier if the default of 20 minutes is not desired. the system should preserve the session variable while the user is active on the system. To address this issue. When a user logs on. WCA session tracking The WCA implements session tracking similarly to most web servers. So long as the session is maintained. he or she is granted a CMS session. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 245 . BusinessObjects Enterprise implements session tracking. The WCA session is designed to notify the CMS on a recurring basis that it is still active. Note: If you are familiar with the SDK. CMS session tracking The CMS implements a simple tracking algorithm. The WCA session timeout can be programmatically configured in the server-side . When BusinessObjects Enterprise grants a user an active identity on the system.BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Sessions and session tracking 11 • Session variables—A session variable is a portion of memory that stores session state on the server side. so the CMS session is retained so long as the WCA session exists. By default. If the WCA session fails to communicate with the CMS for a ten-minute time period. the CMS destroys the CMS session. to ensure security and to minimize resource usage. And. Note: • • If you are familiar with the SDK. However. which the CMS preserves until the user logs off. it can be difficult to know when users leave the system. the WCA retains the session until the user explicitly logs off. Ideally. information such as the user’s authentication type is stored in a session variable. The server-side script pages (Crystal Server Pages) programmatically save variables to the WCA session.

and other such mechanisms. some degree of security is usually required. or application servers. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports firewalls that use IP filtering or static network address translation (NAT). 246 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . refer to your web server documentation. Ensuring that only valid users retrieve information from the web server. These tasks are typically handled by web servers through various security mechanisms. You must secure communication between the web browser and the web server independently of BusinessObjects Enterprise. web servers.11 BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Environment protection Environment protection Environment protection refers to the security of the overall environment in which client and server components communicate. For complete details on BusinessObjects Enterprise and firewall interaction. Relevant security measures usually involve two general tasks: • • Ensuring that the communication of data is secure. Although the Internet and web-based systems are increasingly popular due to their flexibility and range of functionality. environment protection is divided into two areas of communication: • • Web browser to web server Web server to BusinessObjects Enterprise Web browser to web server When sensitive data is transmitted between the web browser and the web server. or SOCKS proxy servers. For details on securing client connections. Web server to BusinessObjects Enterprise Firewalls are commonly used to secure the area of communication between the web server and the rest of the corporate intranet (including BusinessObjects Enterprise). Windows NT Challenge/Response authentication. and it supports a multitude of configurations. including the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol. see “Working with Firewalls” on page 181. Supported environments can involve multiple firewalls. they operate in an environment that can be difficult to secure. When you deploy BusinessObjects Enterprise.

so you can easily report off the data or import it into other applications. or punctuation. and so on—that you want to record. however. port number.BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Auditing web activity 11 Auditing web activity BusinessObjects Enterprise provides insight into your system by recording web activity and allowing you to inspect and to monitor the details. lower case letters. • Must contain at least N characters By enforcing a minimum complexity for passwords. numbers. Generally. because the process of simply guessing a valid user name and password remains a viable way to attempt to “crack” the system. The auditing data is logged to disk and stored in comma-delimited text files. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 247 . Protection against malicious logon attempts No matter how secure a system is. you decrease a malicious user’s chances of simply guessing a valid user’s password. your external system will enable you to place similar restrictions on the external accounts. date. The various restrictions listed below apply only to Enterprise accounts—that is. there is often at least one location that is vulnerable to attack: the location where users connect to the system. BusinessObjects Enterprise implements several techniques to reduce the probability of a malicious user achieving access to the system. or Windows AD). You can enable the following options: • Enforce mixed-case passwords This option ensures that passwords contain at least two of the following character classes: upper case letters. Password restrictions Password restrictions ensure that Enterprise users create passwords that are relatively complex. The WCA allows you to select the web attributes—such as time. LDAP. IP address. It is nearly impossible to protect this location completely. the restrictions do not apply to accounts that you have mapped to an external user database (Windows NT.

even if a malicious user does guess or otherwise obtain another user’s credentials. they are valid only for a limited time. when users connect to BusinessObjects Enterprise without specifying a user name and password. To prevent dictionary attacks. With the speed of modern hardware. Additionally. Firstly. because password changes are based on each user’s first logon time. If you assign a secure password to the Guest account. see “Disabling the Guest account” on page 44. malicious programs can guess millions of passwords per minute. the malicious user cannot easily determine when any particular password will change.11 BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts Protection against malicious logon attempts Logon restrictions Logon restrictions serve primarily to prevent dictionary attacks (a method whereby a malicious user obtains a valid user name and attempts to learn the corresponding password by trying every word in a dictionary). In addition. any malicious user attempting a dictionary attack will have to recommence every time passwords change.0 second) between logon attempts. BusinessObjects Enterprise provides several customizable options that you can use to reduce the risk of a dictionary attack: • • • Disable accounts after N failed attempts to log on Reset failed logon count after N minute(s) Re-enable account after N minute(s) User restrictions User restrictions ensure that Enterprise users create new passwords on a regular basis. the system logs them on automatically under the Guest account. For details. Thus. And. BusinessObjects Enterprise has an internal mechanism that enforces a time delay (0. 248 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .5–1. Guest account restrictions The BusinessObjects Enterprise authentication provider supports anonymous single sign-on for the Guest account. You can enable the following options: • • • Must change password every N day(s) Cannot reuse the N most recent password(s) Must wait N minute(s) to change password These options are useful in a number of ways. or if you disable the Guest account entirely. you disable this default behavior.

Managing User Accounts and Groups chapter .

12

Managing User Accounts and Groups What is account management?

What is account management?
Account management can be thought of as all of the tasks related to creating, mapping, changing, and organizing user and group information. The Users and Groups management areas of the Central Management Console (CMC) provide you with a central place to perform all of these tasks. In the Users area, you can specify everything required for a user to access BusinessObjects Enterprise. To create user accounts, specify the following:

• • • • • • •

Account name (required) Full name Email Description Password settings Connection type Group membership

In the Groups area, you can create groups that give a number of people access to the report or folder. This enables you to make changes in one place instead of modifying each user account individually. To create groups, specify the following:

• • • • •

Group name (required) Description Users who belong to the group Subgroups that belong to the group Group membership

After the user accounts and groups have been created, you can add report objects and specify rights to them. When the users log on, they can view the reports using InfoView or their custom web application. For more information on objects and rights, see “Controlling users’ access to objects” on page 317.

Default users and groups
This section lists and describes the different types of default users and groups that are found within BusinessObjects Enterprise.

Default users
For procedures on managing users, see “Managing Enterprise and general accounts” on page 253.

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BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide

Managing User Accounts and Groups Default users and groups

12

Administrator
The Administrator user belongs to the Administrators and Everyone groups. This user can perform all tasks in all BusinessObjects Enterprise applications (for example, the Central Management Console, Central Configuration Manager, Publishing Wizard, and InfoView). By default, the Administrator is not assigned a password. For security reasons, it is highly recommended that you create a password for the Administrator user as soon as possible. See “Setting the Administrator password” on page 44. Note: To use the Central Configuration Manager, your operating system account may require certain rights on the local machine. For more information, see “Using the Central Configuration Manager” on page 42.

Guest
The Guest user is a member of the Everyone group. This user can view reports that are found within the Report Samples folder. Generally, the Guest user accesses reports through InfoView. This account is enabled by default. To disable this default setting, see “Disabling the Guest account” on page 261. By default, the Guest user is not assigned a password. If you assign it a password, the single sign-on to InfoView will be broken. Note: If users in multiple time zones use the Guest account, see “Supporting users in multiple time zones” on page 527.

Default groups
In addition to organizing users and simplifying administration, groups enable you to determine the functionality a user has access to. In BusinessObjects Enterprise, the following default groups are created. For procedures on managing groups, see “Managing Enterprise and general accounts” on page 253.

Administrators
Users who belong to the Administrators group are able to perform all tasks in all of the BusinessObjects Enterprise applications (Central Management Console, Central Configuration Manager, Publishing Wizard, and InfoView). By default, the Administrator group contains only the Administrator user. Note: To use the Central Configuration Manager, your operating system account may require certain rights on the local machine. For more information, see “Using the Central Configuration Manager” on page 42.

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Managing User Accounts and Groups Available authentication types

BusinessObjects NT Users
When you install BusinessObjects Enterprise on Windows, BusinessObjects Enterprise creates a BusinessObjects NT Users group. This group is also added to Windows on the local machine and the user who installed BusinessObjects Enterprise is automatically added to this group. When NT authentication is enabled, BusinessObjects NT Users can use their NT accounts to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. By default, members of this group are able to view folders and reports.

Everyone
Each user is a member of the Everyone group. By default, the Everyone group allows access to all the reports that are found in the Report Samples folder.

Universe Designer Users
Users who belong to this group are granted access to the Universe Designer folder and the Connections folder. They can control who has access rights to the Designer application. You must add users to this group as needed. By default, no user belongs to this group.

Available authentication types
Before setting up user accounts and groups within BusinessObjects Enterprise, decide which type of authentication you want to use:

Enterprise authentication Use the system default Enterprise Authentication if you prefer to create distinct accounts and groups for use with BusinessObjects Enterprise, or if you have not already set up a hierarchy of users and groups in a Windows NT user database, an LDAP directory server, or a Windows AD server. See “Managing Enterprise and general accounts” on page 253.

Windows NT authentication If you are working in a Windows NT environment, you can use existing NT user accounts and groups in BusinessObjects Enterprise. When you map NT accounts to BusinessObjects Enterprise, users are able to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise applications with their NT user name and password. This can reduce the need to recreate individual user and group accounts within BusinessObjects Enterprise. For more information, see “Managing NT accounts” on page 284.

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LDAP authentication If you set up an LDAP directory server, you can use existing LDAP user accounts and groups in BusinessObjects Enterprise. When you map LDAP accounts to BusinessObjects Enterprise, users are able to access BusinessObjects Enterprise applications with their LDAP user name and password. This eliminates the need to recreate individual user and group accounts within BusinessObjects Enterprise. For more information, see “Managing LDAP accounts” on page 262.

Windows AD authentication If you are working in a Windows 2000 environment, you can use existing AD user accounts and groups in BusinessObjects Enterprise. When you map AD accounts to BusinessObjects Enterprise, users are able to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise applications with their AD user name and password. This eliminates the need to recreate individual user and group accounts within BusinessObjects Enterprise. For more information, see “Managing AD accounts” on page 275.

Note: You can use Enterprise Authentication in conjunction with either NT, LDAP, or AD authentication, or with all of the three authentication plug-ins.

Managing Enterprise and general accounts
Since Enterprise authentication is the default authentication method for BusinessObjects Enterprise, it is automatically enabled when you first install the system. When you add and manage users and groups, BusinessObjects Enterprise maintains the user and group information within its database. This section focuses on the following account management tasks:

• • • • • • • • • •

“Creating an Enterprise user account” on page 254 “Modifying a user account” on page 256 “Deleting a user account” on page 256 “Changing password settings” on page 257 “Creating a group” on page 258 “Modifying a group” on page 260 “Viewing group members” on page 261 “Deleting a group” on page 261 “Disabling the Guest account” on page 261 “Granting access to users and groups” on page 262

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Note: In many cases, these procedures also apply to NT, LDAP, and AD account management. For specific information on NT authentication, see “Managing NT accounts” on page 284. For specific information on LDAP authentication, see “Managing LDAP accounts” on page 262. For specific information on AD authentication, see “Managing AD accounts” on page 275.

Creating an Enterprise user account
When you create a new user, you specify the user’s properties and select the group or groups for the user. For information on setting rights for the user, see “Granting access to users and groups” on page 262. 1. 2. 3. 4. To create a user account Go to the Users management area of the CMC. Click New User. Select the Enterprise authentication type. Type the account name, full name, email, and description information. Use the description area to include extra information about the user or account. 5. Specify the password information and settings. Options include:

• • •

Password Enter the password and confirm. This is the initial password that you assign to the user. The maximum password length is 64 characters. Password never expires Select the check box. User must change password at next logon This check box is selected by default. If you do not want to force users to change the password the first time they log on, clear the check box.


6.

User cannot change password Select the check box.

Select the connection type.

Concurrent User Choose Concurrent user if this user belongs to a license agreement that states the number of users allowed to be connected at one time.

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Named User Choose Named user if this user belongs to a license agreement that associates a specific user with a license. Named user licenses are useful for people who require access to BusinessObjects Enterprise regardless of the number of other people who are currently connected.

7.

Click OK. The user is added to the system and is automatically added to the Everyone group. You can now add the user to a group or specify rights for the user. See “Adding a user to groups” on page 255, Chapter 13: Controlling User Access. An inbox is also automatically created for the user. The user is also automatically assigned an Enterprise alias, for example, secEnterprise:bsmith. For more information, see “Managing aliases” on page 294.

Adding a user to groups
Use the following procedure to add a user to one or more groups directly from the user page. Note: You can also add users to a group from the group page. See “Adding users to a group” on page 259. 1. 2. 3. To add a user to a group Go to the Users management area of the CMC. Under Account Name, click the link to the user whose properties you want to change. Click the Member of tab to specify the group or groups the user should belong to. Note: All BusinessObjects Enterprise users of the system are part of the Everyone group. 4. 5. Click the Member of button to view the available groups. In the Available groups area, select the group(s) that the new user should be a member of. Use SHIFT+click or CTRL+click to select multiple groups. 6. 7. Click the > arrow to add the group(s); click the < arrow to remove the group(s). Click OK. The “Member of” tab appears and lists the groups in which the user is a member.

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Modifying a user account
Use this procedure to modify a user’s properties or group membership. Note: The user will be affected if he or she is logged on when you are making the change. 1. 2. 3. To modify a user account Go to the Users management area of the CMC. Under Account Name, click the link to the user whose properties you want to change. Make the required changes, as necessary, in the available fields. In addition to all of the options that were available when you initially created the account, you now can disable the account by selecting the “Account is disabled” check box. You can also assign aliases. For more information, see “Managing aliases” on page 294. 4. Click Update.

Deleting a user account
Use this procedure to delete a user’s account. The user might receive an error if they are logged on when their account is deleted. When you delete a user account, the Favorites folder, personal categories, and inbox for that user are deleted as well. If you think the user might require access to the account again in the future, select the “Account is disabled” check box in the Properties page of the selected user, instead of deleting the account. See “Modifying a user account” on page 256. Note: Deleting a user account won’t necessarily prevent the user from being able to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise again. If the user account also exists in a third-party system, and if the account belongs to a third-party group that is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise, the user may still be able to log on. For details, see “Deleting an alias” on page 297 and “Disabling an aliases” on page 298.

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1. 2. 3. 4.

To delete a user account Go to the Users management area of the CMC. Select the check box associated with the user you want to delete. Click Delete. The delete confirmation dialog box appears. Click OK. The user account is deleted.

Changing password settings
Within the Central Management Console, you can change the password settings for a specific user or for all users in the system. For information, see “Protection against malicious logon attempts” on page 247. The various restrictions listed below apply only to Enterprise accounts—that is, the restrictions do not apply to accounts that you have mapped to an external user database (Windows NT, LDAP, or Windows AD). Generally, however, your external system will enable you to place similar restrictions on the external accounts. 1. 2. 3. To change user password settings Go to the Users management area of the CMC. Click the user whose password settings you want to change. The Properties tab appears. Select or clear the check box associated with the password setting you wish to change. The available options are:

• • •
4. 1. 2. 3.

Password never expires User must change password at next logon User cannot change password

Click Update. To change password settings Go to the Authentication management area of the CMC. Click the Enterprise tab. Select the check box and enter the value related to the password setting.

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The table below identifies the minimum and maximum values for each of the settings you can configure: Recommended Maximum 100 days 100 passwords 100 minutes 100 failed 100 minutes 100 minutes

Password Setting Must contain at least N characters Must change password every N days Must wait N minutes to change password Disable account after N failed attempts to log on Reset failed logon count after N minutes Re-enable account after N minutes 4. Click Update.

Minimum 1 day 0 minutes 1 failed 1 minute 0 minutes

0 characters 64 characters

Cannot reuse the N most recent passwords 1 password

Creating a group
Groups are collections of users who share the same account privileges. For instance, you may create groups that are based on department, role, or location. Groups enable you to change the rights for users in one place (a group) instead of modifying the rights for each user account individually. Also, you can assign object rights to a group or groups. For information on object rights, see “Managing objects overview” on page 416. For information on granting users and groups administrative rights to other groups, see “Granting access to users and groups” on page 262. After creating a new group, you can add users, add subgroups, or specify group membership so that the new group is actually a subgroup. Because subgroups provide you with additional levels of organization, they are useful when you set object rights to control users’ access to your BusinessObjects Enterprise content. 1. 2. 3. 4. To create a new group Go to the Groups management area of the CMC. Click New Group. On the Properties tab, enter the group name and description. Click OK.

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Adding users to a group
Use the following procedure to add users to a group, directly from the group page. Note: You can also add a user to groups from the user page. See “Adding a user to groups” on page 255. 1. 2. 3. 4. To add users to a group In the Groups management area of the CMC, click the link for the group. Click the Users tab. Click Add Users. Select the users to add to the group; then click the > arrow. Tip:

• • •
5.

To select multiple users, use the SHIFT+click or CTRL+click combination. To search for a specific user, use the Look For field. If there are many users on your system, click the Previous and Next buttons to navigate through the list of users.

Click OK. The Users tab appears. It lists all of the users who belong to this group.

Adding subgroups
You can add an existing group as a subgroup to another group. A subgroup inherits the rights of the parent group. Note: Adding a subgroup is similar to specifying group membership. See “Specifying group membership” on page 260. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. To add subgroups In the Groups management area of the CMC, click the link for the group. Click the Subgroups tab. Click Add/Remove Subgroups. Select the groups that should be members of this new group; then click the > arrow. Click OK.

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Specifying group membership
You can make a group a member of another group. The group that becomes a member is referred to as a subgroup. The group that you add the subgroup to is the parent group. A subgroup inherits the rights of the parent group. Note: Adding a subgroup is similar to specifying group membership. See “Specifying group membership” on page 260. 1. 2. 3. 4. To make a group a member of another group In the Groups management area of the CMC, click the link for the group. Click the Member of tab. Click the Member of button. Select the parent groups that this new group will be a member of; then click the > arrow. Any rights associated with the parent group will be inherited by the new group you have created. 5. Click OK.

Modifying a group
You can modify a group by making changes to any of the settings. Note: The users who belong to the group will be affected by the modification if they are logged on when you are making changes. 1. 2. 3. To modify a group In the Groups management area of the CMC, click the link for the group. Under the Group Name column, click the link to the group whose configuration you want to change. Make the necessary changes in one of the four tabs:

• • • •
4.

Properties Users Subgroups Member of

Depending on which tab you have selected, click OK or Update after you have made your changes.

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Viewing group members
You can use this procedure to view the users who belong to a specific group. 1. 2. 3. To view group members In the Groups management area of the CMC, click the link for the group. Click Users. Click Refresh. Note: It may take a few minutes for your list to refresh if you have a large number of users in the group or if your group is mapped to an NT user database, LDAP user directory, or AD user directory.

Deleting a group
You can delete a group when that group is no longer required. You cannot delete the default groups Administrator and Everyone. Note: The users who belong to the deleted group will be affected by the change if they are logged on when the group is deleted. To delete a third-party authentication groups, such as the BusinessObjects NT Users group, use the Authentication management area in CMC. See “Unmapping LDAP groups” on page 272, “Unmapping AD groups” on page 280, and “Mapping NT accounts” on page 284. 1. 2. 3. 4. To delete a group Go to the Groups management area of the CMC. Select the check box associated with the group you want to delete. Click Delete. The delete confirmation dialog box appears. Click OK.

Disabling the Guest account
By disabling the Guest account, you ensure that no one can log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise with this account. By disabling the Guest account, you also disable the anonymous single sign-on functionality of BusinessObjects Enterprise, so users will be unable to access InfoView without providing a valid user name and password.

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

To disable the Guest account Go to the Users management area of the CMC. In the Account Name column, click Guest. On the Properties tab, select the Account is disabled check box. Click Update. If you are prompted for confirmation, click OK.

Granting access to users and groups
You can grant users and groups administrative access to other users and groups. Administrative rights include: viewing, editing, and deleting objects; viewing and deleting object instances; and pausing object instances. For example, for troubleshooting and system maintenance, you may want to grant your IT department access to edit and delete objects. For more information about granting rights to users and groups, see “Controlling access to users and groups” on page 352.

Managing LDAP accounts
To use LDAP authentication, you need to first ensure that you have your respective LDAP directory set up. For more information about LDAP, refer to your LDAP documentation. For more information on the LDAP security plugin, see “LDAP security plug-in” on page 238. Note: When you install BusinessObjects Enterprise, the LDAP authentication plug-in is installed automatically, but not enabled by default. This section describes tasks related to LDAP accounts in BusinessObjects Enterprise. In particular, it includes information on:

• • • • • • •

“Configuring LDAP authentication” on page 263 “Mapping LDAP groups” on page 269 “Unmapping LDAP groups” on page 272 “Viewing mapped LDAP users and groups” on page 272 “Changing LDAP connection parameters and member groups” on page 272 “Managing multiple LDAP hosts” on page 273 “Troubleshooting LDAP accounts” on page 274

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each supported server type’s server attribute mappings and search attributes are already set. The first screen of the wizard asks for information about your LDAP host. By default. “Configuring the Secure Socket Layer authentication for LDAP” on page 264. 5. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports LDAP authentication for user and group accounts. Select your server type from the LDAP Server Type list. ensure that you have your LDAP directory set up. When you map an LDAP account. Type your LDAP host and port information in the Add LDAP host (hostname:port) field (for example. For more information on multiple hosts. Click Show Attribute Mappings if you want to view or change any of the LDAP Server Attribute Mappings or the LDAP Default Search Attributes. then click Add. Before users can use their LDAP user name and password to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Configuring LDAP authentication includes the following main steps: • • • • “Configuring the LDAP host” on page 263. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 263 . you can choose to create a new BusinessObjects Enterprise account or link to an existing BusinessObjects Enterprise account. If you want to remove a host. 2. 3. “myserver:123”). The LDAP Configuration Wizard will lead you through the setup of LDAP authentication. highlight the host name and click Delete.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing LDAP accounts 12 Configuring LDAP authentication To simplify administration. To configure the LDAP host Go to the Authentication management area of the CMC. step by step. Before setting up and enabling LDAP authentication. refer to your LDAP documentation. For more information. Repeat this step to add more than one LDAP host of the same server type if you want to add hosts that can act as failover servers. Click the LDAP tab. 4. “Configuring LDAP single sign-on with SiteMinder” on page 267. and then click “Start LDAP Configuration Wizard”. “Configuring LDAP mapping options” on page 267. you need to map their LDAP account to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Click Next. refer to “Managing multiple LDAP hosts” on page 273. Configuring the LDAP host 1.

• Enter another distinguished name and password in the “LDAP Referral Credentials” area if all of the following apply: • • • The primary host has been configured to refer to another directory server that handles queries for entries under a specified base. Configuring the Secure Socket Layer authentication for LDAP Note: This section describes the CMC related information for configuring SSL for LDAP only. 7. Therefore if you have multiple referral hosts. 8. Click Next. A group from the host being referred to will be mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Click Next. refer to http:// www. Click Next. For additional information or for information on configuring the LDAP host server. 9. Enter the number of referral hops in the Maximum Referral Hops field. 10. Enter the credentials required by the LDAP hosts. Proceed with configuring the Secure Socket Layer. only one set of referral credentials can be set. type the distinguished name (for example. 264 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .com or your LDAP vendor documentation. In the Base LDAP Distinguished Name field. If this field is set to zero. no referrals will be followed.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing LDAP accounts 6. you must create a user account on each host that uses the same distinguished name and password. 12. Although groups can be mapped from multiple hosts. o=SomeBase). leave this area blank—BusinessObjects Enterprise servers and clients will bind to the primary host via anonymous logon. type the distinguished name and password for a user account that is authorized to administer your LDAP server. The host being referred to has been configured to not allow anonymous binding.techsupport. If your LDAP Server allows anonymous binding.businessobjects. • In the “LDAP Server Administration Credentials” area. 11.

Tip: Java applications (such as the Java version of InfoView) always use this option. • Accept server certificate if it comes from a trusted Certificate Authority and the CN attribute of the certificate matches the DNS hostname of the server This is the highest security option.crystald. BusinessObjects Enterprise does not verify the certificate it receives. BusinessObjects Enterprise must find the Certificate Authority that issued the certificate in its certificate database. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 265 . Otherwise. it must receive and verify a security certificate sent to it by the LDAP host.rd. • Always accept server certificate This is the lowest security option.net:389. or Mutual Authentication) your LDAP hosts uses to establish a connection with BusinessObjects Enterprise. Click Next until the screen of the wizard asks for the Secure Socket Layer authentication information. If you selected Server Authentication or Mutual Authentication. using CN =ABALONE:389 in the certificate would not work. and then click Start LDAP Configuration Wizard.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing LDAP accounts 12 1. skip to step 2. To verify the certificate. if you entered the LDAP host name as ABALONE. Before BusinessObjects Enterprise can establish an SSL connection with the LDAP host (to authenticate LDAP users and groups). 3. Click Next. choose one of the following options: 2. Click the LDAP tab. That is. it must receive and verify a security certificate sent to it by the LDAP host. go to the Authentication management area of the CMC again. To verify the certificate. To configure the Secure Socket Layer authentication If necessary. Before BusinessObjects Enterprise can establish an SSL connection with the LDAP host (to authenticate LDAP users and groups). BusinessObjects Enterprise must find the Certificate Authority that issued the certificate in its certificate database. It must also be able to confirm that the CN attribute on the server certificate exactly matches the host name of the LDAP host as you typed it in the “Add LDAP host” field in the first step of the wizard. • Accept server certificate if it comes from a trusted Certificate Authority This is a medium security option. regardless of the setting you choose. Server Authentication. it must receive a security certificate from the LDAP host. Before BusinessObjects Enterprise can establish an SSL connection with the LDAP host (to authenticate LDAP users and groups). Select the type of SSL authentication (Basic (no SSL).

Then type your values for the path to the certificate and key database files. In the SSL host box. 4. 5. you must next add the host name of each machine in your BusinessObjects Enterprise system that uses the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK. for any machine whose name you do not explicitly add to the list of SSL hosts. starting with the default host. the password for the key database. The settings for the default host are used: • • • for any setting (for any host) where you leave the “Use default value” box checked. Type a nickname for the client certificate in the cert7.db if you selected mutual authentication. Now configure the SSL settings for each SSL host in the list. and then click Add. Then type the appropriate values in the boxes on the right.) Type the host name of each machine in the SSL Host box. select its name in the list on the left. Therefore if you select this option you cannot use a failover LDAP host. • To select settings for the default host. 266 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing LDAP accounts Tip: The host name on the server security certificate is the name of the primary LDAP host. first clear the Use default value boxes. (This includes the machine running your Central Management Server and the machine running your WCA. To select settings for another host.

skip to step 2. type the name of each Policy Server. Click the LDAP tab. Otherwise. Otherwise. For more information about SiteMinder and how to install it. Configuring LDAP single sign-on with SiteMinder SiteMinder is a third-party user access and authentication tool that you can use with the LDAP security plug-in to create single sign-on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Click Next.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing LDAP accounts 12 6. Enter the name of the Web Agent and the Shared Secret. 4. In the Policy Server Host box. In order to use SiteMinder. Configuring LDAP mapping options 1. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 267 . If you selected SiteMinder. To configure LDAP for single sign-on with SiteMinder If necessary. The next screen of the wizard controls how BusinessObjects Enterprise maps LDAP users to BusinessObjects Enterprise users. go to the Authentication management area of the CMC again. To configure LDAP mapping options If necessary. Click Next. and then click Start LDAP Configuration Wizard. and then click Start LDAP Configuration Wizard. Proceed with configuring LDAP for single sign-on. configure the SiteMinder hosts: 2. skip to step 2. you need to configure the single sign-on authentication for the LDAP plug-in. Click Next. and then click Add. Enter the shared secret again. For each Policy Server Host. refer to the SiteMinder documentation. • • • 5. Click the LDAP tab. Authentication and Authorization port numbers. specify the Accounting. Select the type of single sign-on authentication (Basic (no SSO) or SiteMinder). 7. Click Next until the screen of the wizard asks for the LDAP single sign-on authentication. 2. 6. Proceed with configuring the LDAP options. 1. go to the Authentication management area of the CMC again. Click Next until the screen of the wizard asks you to map the LDAP users to BusinessObjects Enterprise users. 3.

268 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Select either: • Assign each added LDAP alias to an account with the same name Use this option when you know users have an existing Enterprise account with the same name. but only a few of them will use BusinessObjects Enterprise. New LDAP accounts are added for users without BusinessObjects Enterprise accounts. Instead. BusinessObjects Enterprise does not automatically create aliases and Enterprise accounts for all users. or • No new aliases will be added and new users will not be created Use this option when the LDAP directory you are mapping contains many users. or for all users if you selected the “Create a new account for every added LDAP alias” option. Update Options allow you to specify if LDAP aliases are automatically created for all new users. or who do not have the same name in their Enterprise and LDAP account. Select either: • New aliases will be added and new users will be created Use this option to automatically create a new alias for every LDAP user mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. that is. 3. Users who do not have an existing Enterprise account. or • Create a new account for every added LDAP alias Use this option when you want to create a new account for each user. if required) only for users who log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing LDAP accounts New Alias Options allow you to specify how LDAP aliases are mapped to Enterprise accounts. are added as new LDAP users. it creates aliases (and accounts. LDAP aliases will be assigned to existing users (auto alias creation is turned on).

Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing LDAP accounts 12 4. 1. specify your LDAP group (either by common name or distinguished name) in the Add LDAP group (by cn or dn) field. Named user licenses are associated with specific users and allow people to access the system based on their user name and password. Mapping LDAP groups Once you have configured LDAP authentication using the LDAP configuration wizard. 5. See “Configuring LDAP authentication” on page 263. you can map LDAP groups to Enterprise groups. or 700 users. This type of licensing is very flexible because a small concurrent license can support a large user base. To map LDAP groups using BusinessObjects Enterprise Go to the Authentication management area of the CMC. This provides named users with access to the system regardless of how many other people are connected. 500. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 269 . Select either: • New users are created as named users New user accounts are configured to use named user licenses. Concurrent licenses specify the number of people who can connect to BusinessObjects Enterprise at the same time. depending on how often and how long users access BusinessObjects Enterprise. In the “Mapped LDAP Member Groups” area. Click Finish to save your LDAP settings. or • New users are created as concurrent users New user accounts are configured to use concurrent user licenses. a 100 user concurrent license could support 250. the LDAP summary page appears. Click the LDAP tab. If LDAP authorization is configured. The LDAP Server Summary page appears. You must have a named user license available for each user account created using this option. 2. 3. For example. click Add. New User Options allow you to specify properties of the new Enterprise accounts that are created to map to LDAP accounts.

Users who do not have an existing Enterprise account. 4. New Alias Options allow you to specify how LDAP aliases are mapped to Enterprise accounts.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing LDAP accounts You can add more than one LDAP group by repeating this step. highlight the LDAP group and click Delete. To remove a group. Select either: • Assign each added LDAP alias to an account with the same name Use this option when you know users have an existing Enterprise account with the same name. that is. or who do not have the same name in their Enterprise and LDAP account. LDAP aliases will be assigned to existing users (auto alias creation is turned on). 270 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . are added as new LDAP users.

or for all users if you selected the “Create a new account for every added LDAP alias” option. New LDAP accounts are added for users without BusinessObjects Enterprise accounts. New User Options allow you to specify properties of the new Enterprise accounts that are created to map to LDAP accounts. 5. 500. 7. it creates aliases (and accounts. For example. if required) only for users who log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. This provides named users with access to the system regardless of how many other people are connected. Named user licenses are associated with specific users and allow people to access the system based on their user name and password. This type of licensing is very flexible because a small concurrent license can support a large user base. a 100 user concurrent license could support 250. or • New users are created as concurrent users New user accounts are configured to use concurrent user licenses.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing LDAP accounts 12 or • Create a new account for every added LDAP alias Use this option when you want to create a new account for each user. BusinessObjects Enterprise does not automatically create aliases and Enterprise accounts for all users. Update Options allow you to specify if LDAP aliases are automatically created for all new users. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 271 . Select either: • New users are created as named users New user accounts are configured to use named user licenses. depending on how often and how long users access BusinessObjects Enterprise. or • No new aliases will be added and new users will not be created Use this option when the LDAP directory you are mapping contains many users. Concurrent licenses specify the number of people who can connect to BusinessObjects Enterprise at the same time. Instead. 6. Click Update. or 700 users. Select either: • New aliases will be added and new users will be created Use this option to automatically create a new alias for every LDAP user mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. You must have a named user license available for each user account created using this option. but only a few of them will use BusinessObjects Enterprise.

If LDAP authorization is configured. The users in this group will not be able to access BusinessObjects Enterprise. 3. disable or delete the user’s Enterprise account.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing LDAP accounts Unmapping LDAP groups Similar to mapping. 1. Click Delete. 4. To restrict access. To unmap LDAP groups using BusinessObjects Enterprise Go to the Authentication management area of the CMC. Changing LDAP connection parameters and member groups After you have configured LDAP authentication using the LDAP configuration wizard. clear the “LDAP Authentication is enabled” check box and click Update. 1. see “Configuring LDAP authentication” on page 263. Tip: To deny LDAP Authentication for all groups. it is possible to unmap groups using BusinessObjects Enterprise. In the “Mapped LDAP Member Groups” area. the Mapped LDAP Member Groups area displays the LDAP groups that have been mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. the LDAP summary page will appear. you can change LDAP connection parameters and member groups using the LDAP Server Configuration Summary Page. see “Managing Enterprise and general accounts” on page 253. For information on configuring LDAP authentication using the LDAP configuration wizard. To change connection settings Go to the Authentication management area of the CMC. For more information. 5. select the LDAP group you would like to remove. Click Update. 2. 272 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . If LDAP authorization is configured. Click the LDAP tab. Viewing mapped LDAP users and groups You can view your LDAP mapped groups in BusinessObjects Enterprise by clicking the LDAP tab (located in the Authentication management area). Note: The only exceptions to this occur when a user has an alias to an Enterprise account.

Click Update.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing LDAP accounts 12 2. the LDAP Server Configuration Summary page appears. so ensure that you add the primary host first. Change your Alias and New User options. 10. Subsequent hosts are treated as failover hosts. Click Update. 6. If LDAP authorization is configured. enter all hosts when you configure LDAP using the LDAP configuration wizard (see “Configuring LDAP authentication” on page 263 for details. 9. and each LDAP host must refer to all additional hosts from which you wish to map groups. For more information about LDAP hosts and referrals. 7. Delete currently mapped groups that will no longer be accessible under the new connection settings. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 273 . To add multiple LDAP Hosts. 4. Map your new LDAP member groups. see your LDAP documentation. Managing multiple LDAP hosts Using LDAP and BusinessObjects Enterprise. followed by the remaining failover hosts. 5. Click Update. In the LDAP Server Configuration Summary area. you can add fault tolerance to your system by adding multiple LDAP hosts. The primary LDAP host and all failover hosts must be configured in exactly the same way. BusinessObjects Enterprise uses the first host that you add as the primary LDAP host. Change your connection settings. Note: • The order in which the hosts are communicated with matters. Click Update. On this page you can change any of the connection parameter areas or fields. 8. Click the LDAP tab. go to the Authentication management area of the Central Management Console and click the LDAP tab. You can also modify the Mapped LDAP Member Groups area. click the name of the LDAP host to open the page that enables you to add or delete hosts.) Or if you have already configured LDAP. 3.

refresh the user list. see “Configuring LDAP authentication” on page 263. and the account belongs to a group account that is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. and that LDAP user account is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. the user will not be able to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. see “Configuring LDAP authentication” on page 263. if the user also has an account that uses Enterprise authentication. • Disabling an LDAP user account If you disable an LDAP user account. For more information. either map the group to BusinessObjects Enterprise. see “Viewing mapped LDAP users and groups” on page 272. For more information. you cannot use the highest level of SSL security (that is. and the account belongs to a group account that is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. If you create a new LDAP user account. see “Viewing mapped LDAP users and groups” on page 272. • Creating a new LDAP group account • If you create a new LDAP group account. see “Configuring LDAP authentication” on page 263. For more information. For more information.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing LDAP accounts • If you use failover LDAP hosts. the user can still access BusinessObjects Enterprise using that account. add it to BusinessObjects Enterprise. 274 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . If you create a new LDAP group account. Troubleshooting LDAP accounts Creating a new LDAP user account • If you create a new LDAP user account. or add the new LDAP user account to a group that is already mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. However. and the account does not belong to a group account that is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. you cannot select “Accept server certificate if it comes from a trusted Certificate Authority and the CN attribute of the certificate matches the DNS hostname of the server. and the group account does not belong to a group account that is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise.”) For more information. refresh the group list.

the users who belong to that group will not be able to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. see the developer documentation available on your product CD.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing AD accounts 12 Disabling an LDAP group account If you disable an LDAP group account. all of the BusinessObjects Enterprise client tools support AD authentication. You can also create your own applications that support AD authentication. if the user also has an account that uses Enterprise authentication. However. Note: • • • • AD authentication only works for servers running on Windows systems. the user can still access BusinessObjects Enterprise using that account. Users cannot log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise using AD authentication via the Java SDK. if the administrator changes his or her password or if the account becomes disabled). AD authentication and aggregation is not functional without a network connection. Once you have mapped your AD users and groups. AD authentication and aggregation may not continue to function if the administration credentials become invalid (for example. Managing AD accounts This section provides an overview of AD authentication and the tasks related to managing it. and that LDAP group account is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. For information on how AD authentication works in conjunction with BusinessObjects Enterprise. except for the Import Wizard. see “Windows AD security plug-in” on page 240. For more information. “Mapping AD accounts” on page 276 “Unmapping AD groups” on page 280 “Viewing mapped AD users and groups” on page 280 “Troubleshooting AD accounts” on page 281 “Setting up AD single sign-on” on page 282 Managing AD accounts includes the following tasks: • • • • • BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 275 .

276 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . see “Setting up AD single sign-on” on page 282. 5. select the Single Sign On is enabled check box. enter the name and password of the domain user account you’ve set up on your AD server for BusinessObjects Enterprise to use when authenticating AD users and groups. To map AD users and groups Before starting this procedure. because users who use one of the web applications would automatically have the same access privileges as the IIS machine account. For details. 4. you can choose to create a new BusinessObjects Enterprise account or link to an existing BusinessObjects Enterprise account. Ensure that the Windows Active Directory Authentication is enabled check box is selected. you must have created a domain user account on your AD server for BusinessObjects Enterprise to use when authenticating AD users and groups. 1. their AD user account needs to be mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Go to the Authentication management area of the CMC. before users can use their AD user name and password to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. In the “AD Administration Credentials” area. If you will be using single sign-on. 2. Click the Windows AD tab. As well. Failing to configure IIS could compromise your system security if the account that IIS runs under belongs to a mapped group. When you map an AD account. Note: If you select this option. 3. ensure that you have the appropriate AD domain and group information. However.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing AD accounts Mapping AD accounts To simplify administration. you must also configure the IIS for single sign-on. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports AD authentication for user and group accounts.

Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing AD accounts 12 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 277 .

278 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . enter the AD domain\group in the Add AD Group (Domain\Group) field. 8. users from the default domain do not have to specify the AD domain name when they log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise via AD authentication. Therefore they will not be able to access BusinessObjects Enterprise. . Groups can be mapped using one of the following formats: • • NT name (DomainName\GroupName) DN (cn=GroupName. dc=com) Note: If you want to map a local group. This means that local users who belong to a mapped local group will not be mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Click Add. Groups from the default domain can be mapped without specifying the domain name prefix. you can use only the NT name format (\\ServerName\GroupName).. or who do not have the same name in their Enterprise and AD account. check rights. New Alias Options allow you to specify how AD aliases are mapped to Enterprise accounts. that is. In the “Mapped AD Member Groups” area. Note: • • 7. 9. Users who do not have an existing Enterprise account.. or • Create a new account for every added AD alias Use this option when you want to create a new account for each user... The group is added to the list. 6. map groups. are added as new AD users. dc=DomainName. Complete the Default AD Domain field. Select either: • Assign each added AD alias to an account with the same name Use this option when you know users have an existing Enterprise account with the same name.. By entering the Default AD Domain name.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing AD accounts Administration credentials can use one of the following formats: • • NT name (DomainName\UserName) UPN (user@DNS_domain_name) Administration credentials must be entered to enable AD authentication. and so on. Windows AD does not support local users. AD aliases will be assigned to existing users (auto alias creation is turned on)..

Note: You can also add AD users individually by adding them as a new user in BusinessObjects Enterprise and selecting Windows AD authentication. or for all users if you selected the “Create a new account for every added AD alias” option. This provides named users with access to the system regardless of how many other people are connected. or 700 users. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 279 . This type of licensing is very flexible because a small concurrent license can support a large user base. For example. 11. see “Creating a user and a third-party alias” on page 294. For details. Select either: • New aliases will be added and new users will be created Use this option to automatically create a new alias for every AD user mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. but only a few of them will use BusinessObjects Enterprise. if required) only for users who log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. New User Options allow you to specify properties of the new Enterprise accounts that are created to map to AD accounts. • New users are created as concurrent users New user accounts are configured to use concurrent user licenses.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing AD accounts 12 10. You must have a named user license available for each user account created using this option. a 100 user concurrent license could support 250. or • No new aliases will be added and new users will not be created Use this option when the AD directory you are mapping contains many users. 500. depending on how often and how long users access BusinessObjects Enterprise. Instead. Concurrent licenses specify the number of people who can connect to BusinessObjects Enterprise at the same time. it creates aliases (and accounts. Select either: • New users are created as named users New user accounts are configured to use named user licenses. Named user licenses are associated with specific users and allow people to access the system based on their user name and password. BusinessObjects Enterprise does not automatically create aliases and Enterprise accounts for all users. Update Options allow you to specify if AD aliases are automatically created for all new users. New AD accounts are added for users without BusinessObjects Enterprise accounts.

clear the “Windows Active Directory Authentication is enabled” check box and click Update. Under Group Name. Viewing mapped AD users and groups 1. it is possible to unmap groups using BusinessObjects Enterprise. 2. In the “Mapped AD Member Groups” area. 2. Click Update. The users in the deleted group will no longer be able to access BusinessObjects Enterprise. click the hyperlink to a Windows AD group Click the Users tab. Go to the Groups management area of the CMC. 3. Unmapping AD groups Similar to mapping. 3. disable or delete the user’s Enterprise account. 280 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 4. select the AD group you would like to remove. users cannot be viewed from the Windows AD tab. 1. see “Managing Enterprise and general accounts” on page 253. 13. For more information. 5. Click the Windows AD tab. Note: The only exceptions to this occur when a user has an alias other than the one assigned for AD authentication. Click Update. A message appears stating that it will take several seconds to update the member groups. Tip: To deny AD authentication for all users. To unmap AD groups using BusinessObjects Enterprise Go to the Authentication management area of the CMC.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing AD accounts 12. Click Delete. Note: You can view the groups by clicking the Windows AD tab from the Authentication management area and then viewing the “Mapped AD Member Groups” area. Click OK. To restrict access.

This is the simplest method and it doesn’t require any extra steps. User accounts are automatically created for AD users who are added to an AD group when these users successfully log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. You can go to the Windows AD tab in the Authentication management area and select the option to add all new aliases and create all new users. and the account belongs to a group account that is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. but the user won’t be added until he or she logs on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. In this case all AD users will be added to BusinessObjects Enterprise. see “Viewing mapped AD users and groups” on page 280. Note that you must click Update to ensure that new users are imported properly. ensure that you update the user list by clicking Update in the Windows AD tab found in the Authentication management area. For information on viewing AD users and groups. Choose the method that works best for your situation: When the new AD user logs on to BusinessObjects Enterprise and selects AD authentication. • Adding an AD group account to a mapped AD group • When you add an AD group account to an AD group that was previously mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. the system will add the user to BusinessObjects Enterprise.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing AD accounts 12 Troubleshooting AD accounts Creating a new AD user account • If you create a new AD user account. you need to click Update in the Windows AD tab (found in the Authentication management area). You can add the new user to BusinessObjects Enterprise and select Windows AD authentication. there are three ways you can get the new AD account into BusinessObjects Enterprise. see “Mapping AD accounts” on • • • BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 281 . Note: The nested AD group will not get mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise by this operation. and the AD group to which the account belongs is already mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. • When you have added a new account in AD. and you would like the users of this nested group to get imported into BusinessObjects Enterprise. The user is added and is automatically assigned a Windows AD alias. See “Creating a user and a third-party alias” on page 294. For details. and then click Update.

Modify the web. Setting up AD single sign-on Installation of the Active Directory plug-in for BusinessObjects Enterprise enables you to use AD single sign-on. However. change the access and authentication settings for the Enterprise virtual directory as follows: • • Deselect the Anonymous access and Basic authentication check boxes. By default. Restart your IIS server. 2. To configure the IIS web server for AD single sign-on Using the documentation included with your IIS server. Ensure that Integrated Windows authentication check box is selected. Note: • • • • • AD single sign-on is not supported on client machines running on Windows 98. See “Modifying the web. 282 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . AD single sign-on is not enabled. Note: You must also enable AD single sign-on in the CMC. if the AD group contains many users who don’t require access to BusinessObjects Enterprise.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing AD accounts page 276. see “Enabling AD single sign-on in CMC” on page 283. Configuring IIS for AD single sign-on 1. for AD single sign-on to work. 3.config file for AD single sign-on” on page 283 Note: For information on how to set up end-to-end single sign on with AD and Kerberos. Setting up AD single sign-on to BusinessObjects Enterprise includes the following tasks: “Configuring IIS for AD single sign-on” on page 282 “Enabling AD single sign-on in CMC” on page 283 “Modifying the web. Note: For AD single sign-on to function correctly.config file. see “Configuring Kerberos single sign-on” on page 299. you have to configure the IIS Business Objects virtual directory. However. For details. you may want to add the user individually instead. make sure you complete all tasks listed in “Setting up AD single sign-on” on page 282.config file for AD single sign-on” on page 283.

Click the Windows AD tab.config file for AD single sign-on Add the following lines to the <system. make sure you complete all tasks listed in “Setting up AD single sign-on” on page 282. 1.config file to make sure Windows authentication is enabled.web> block in the C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\Web Content\Enterprise11\InfoView\Web. Click Update.config file: • • 3.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing AD accounts 12 Enabling AD single sign-on in CMC 1. <identity impersonate="true" /> <Authentication mode="Windows" /> Add the following lines to the <system. you must also configure the IIS for single sign-on. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 283 .config file for AD single sign-on Make the following modifications to the web. Modifying the web.<remove name=“WindowsAuthentication”/> --> Note: For AD single sign-on to function correctly.config file: • • 2. <identity impersonate="true" /> <Authentication mode="Windows" /> Comment out the following line in the <httpModules> block in the C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\Web Content\Enterprise11\InfoView\Web. make sure you complete all tasks listed in “Setting up AD single sign-on” on page 282. 2. To enable the Windows AD plug-in for single sign-on in CMC Go to the Authentication management area of the CMC. For details. Note: For AD single sign-on to function correctly. 4. 3. because users who use one of the web applications would automatically have the same access privileges as the IIS machine account. To modify the web. Note: If you select this option.config file as shown: <!-. see “Configuring IIS for AD single sign-on” on page 282.web> block in the C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\Web Content\Enterprise11\WebAdmin\Web. Select the Single sign-on is enabled check box. Failing to configure IIS could compromise your system security if the account that IIS runs under belongs to a mapped group.

before users can use their NT user name and password to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Select the BusinessObjects NT Users group. 284 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . you can choose to create a new BusinessObjects Enterprise account or link to an existing BusinessObjects Enterprise account. by using the User Manager in Windows NT or Computer Management in Windows 2000. or 2003 accounts. However. You can map NT accounts to BusinessObjects Enterprise through Windows. NT authentication is installed and enabled by default. or 2003 machine. “Mapping NT accounts” on page 284 “Unmapping NT groups” on page 288 “Viewing mapped NT users and groups” on page 289 “Troubleshooting NT accounts” on page 290 “Setting up NT single sign-on” on page 292 Managing NT accounts includes the following tasks: Mapping NT accounts To simplify administration. 2. NT accounts refer to Windows NT. 1. 2000.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing NT accounts Managing NT accounts This section provides an overview of NT authentication and the tasks related to managing it. When you map an NT account. Note: NT accounts refer to both Windows NT and 2000 accounts. their NT user account needs to be mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. or through the CMC. To map NT users and groups using Windows NT From the Windows Administrative Tools program group. If you install BusinessObjects Enterprise on a Windows NT. click User Manager. Note: Ensure that you have selected the domain that contains the BusinessObjects NT Users group. see “Windows NT security plugin” on page 236. For information on how NT authentication works in conjunction with BusinessObjects Enterprise. 2000. Note: • • • • • • • NT authentication only works for servers running on Windows systems. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports user and group accounts that are created using Windows NT.

ensure you have the NT domain and group information. click Computer Management. select Local Users and Groups. 3. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 285 . From the User menu. 4.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing NT accounts 12 Note: The BusinessObjects NT Users group is created automatically in Windows NT when you install BusinessObjects Enterprise on Windows NT. click Properties. Click OK to complete the process. then click Add. Click the Groups folder. 6. 2. 7. Tip: Users will now be able to log on to InfoView using their NT account if they use the following format: \\NTDomainName\NTusername or NTMachineName\LocalUserName Users do not have to specify the NT Domain Name if it is specified in the “Default NT Domain” field on the Windows NT tab. Click Add. 6. Under System Tools. 3. Click Add. 5. 5. Tip: Users will now be able to log on to InfoView using their NT account if they use the following format: \\NTDomainName\NTusername or NTMachineName\LocalUserName Users do not have to specify the NT Domain Name if it is specified in the “Default NT Domain” field on the Windows NT tab. Select the group(s) and/or user(s). then click Add. To map NT users and groups using Windows 2000 From the Windows Administrative Tools program group. 1. Click OK to add the group(s) and/or user(s). Go to the Authentication management area of the CMC. select Properties. 1. 7. Click OK or Apply (and then Close) to complete the process. To map NT users and groups using BusinessObjects Enterprise Before starting this procedure. 8. Select the BusinessObjects NT Users and from the Action menu. Select the group(s) and/or user(s). Click OK to add the group(s) and/or user(s). 4.

Ensure that the NT Authentication is enabled check box is selected. Note: By typing the default NT Domain Name.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing NT accounts 2. 3. Complete the Default NT Domain field. 5. To change the Default NT domain. Also. click the domain name. 286 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . If you will be using single sign-on. users do not have to specify the NT Domain Name when they log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise via NT authentication. For details. Click the Windows NT tab. Failing to configure IIS could compromise your system security if the account that IIS runs under belongs to a mapped group. you must also configure the IIS for single sign-on. select the Single Sign On is enabled check box. you don’t have to specify the NT domain name when you map groups. because users who use one of the web applications would automatically have the same access privileges as the IIS machine account. see “Setting up NT single sign-on” on page 292. Note: If you select this option. 4.

enter the NT domain\group in the Add NT Group (NT Domain\Group) field. or • Create a new account for every added NT alias Use this option when you want the system to create a new account for each user. Update Options allow you to specify if NT aliases are automatically created for all new users. but only a few of them will use BusinessObjects Enterprise. if required) only for users who log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. that is. NT aliases will be assigned to existing users (auto alias creation is turned on). you must type \\NTmachinename\groupname. For example. 7. Select either: • Assign each added NT alias to an account with the same name Use this option when you know users have an existing Enterprise account with the same name. 8. Click Add. Instead. BusinessObjects Enterprise does not automatically create aliases and Enterprise accounts for all users. are added as new NT users. New Alias Options allow you to specify how NT aliases are mapped to Enterprise accounts. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 287 . the new user will be bsmith01. Users who do not have an existing Enterprise account. In the Mapped NT Member Groups area. The group is added to the list. Select either: • New aliases will be added and new users will be created Use this option to automatically create a new alias for every NT user mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. The system ensures that the users are created with unique names. New NT accounts are added for users without BusinessObjects Enterprise accounts. or for all users if you selected the “Create a new account for every added NT alias” option.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing NT accounts 12 6. it creates aliases (and accounts. Note: If you want to map a local NT group. 9. or • No new aliases will be added and new users will not be created Use this option when the NT directory you are mapping contains many users. or who do not have the same name in their Enterprise and NT account. if BusinessObjects Enterprise user bsmith already exists and an NT user with the same is added.

You must have a named user license available for each user account created using this option. click User Manager. 11. 1. 5. 3. 288 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing NT accounts 10. 4. Unmapping NT groups Similar to mapping. To restrict access. Named user licenses are associated with specific users and allow people to access the system based on their user name and password. Select the user(s) or group(s). Select either: • New users are created as named users New user accounts are configured to use named user licenses. depending on how often and how long users access BusinessObjects Enterprise. disable or delete the user’s Enterprise account. To unmap NT users and groups using Windows NT From the Administrative Tools program group. Note: The only exceptions to this occur when a user has an alias to an Enterprise account. Click OK. it is possible to unmap groups using the administrative tool in Windows NT/2000. This provides named users with access to the system regardless of how many other people are connected. click Properties. Select BusinessObjects NT Users. Click OK. For more information. From the User menu. 2. Concurrent licenses specify the number of people who can connect to BusinessObjects Enterprise at the same time. 500. New User Options allow you to specify properties of the new Enterprise accounts that are created to map to NT accounts. see “Managing Enterprise and general accounts” on page 253. For example. 12. • New users are created as concurrent users New user accounts are configured to use concurrent user licenses. This type of licensing is very flexible because a small concurrent license can support a large user base. Click Update. The user or group will no longer be able to access BusinessObjects Enterprise. A message appears stating that it will take several seconds to update the member groups. or 700 users. a 100 user concurrent license could support 250. then click Remove. or BusinessObjects Enterprise.

select Local Users and Groups. Click the Groups folder. The users in this group will not be able to access BusinessObjects Enterprise. Select the user(s) or group(s). Under System Tools. 2. then click Remove. Note: The only exceptions to this occur when a user has an alias to an Enterprise account. The user or group will no longer be able to access BusinessObjects Enterprise. Select BusinessObjects NT Users. Click Delete. The method you use depends on the way the groups and users have been mapped. Click the Windows NT tab. 4. 4. click Properties. select the NT group you would like to remove. For more information. 2. To unmap NT users and groups using Windows 2000 From the Administrative Tools program group. 3. Viewing mapped NT users and groups There are two methods to view mapped users and groups in BusinessObjects Enterprise. Tip: To deny NT Authentication for all groups. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 289 . 7. To unmap NT groups using BusinessObjects Enterprise Go to the Authentication management area of the CMC.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing NT accounts 12 1. To restrict access. Click Update. 5. click Computer Management. Note: The only exceptions to this occur when a user has an alias to an Enterprise account. see “Managing Enterprise and general accounts” on page 253. From the Action menu. 6. disable or delete the user’s Enterprise account. see “Managing Enterprise and general accounts” on page 253. For more information. In the Mapped NT Member Groups area. 5. disable or delete the user’s Enterprise account. 3. To restrict access. 1. clear the “NT Authentication is enabled” check box and click Update. Click OK or Apply (and then Close) to complete the process.

• 290 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing NT accounts To view users and groups that have been added using Windows NT/ 2000 or BusinessObjects Enterprise 1. Click the Users tab. If you create a new NT user account. then click BusinessObjects NT Users. 2. Click the Windows NT tab. The “Mapped NT Member Groups” area displays the groups that have been mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. refresh the user list. Click Refresh. see “Viewing mapped NT users and groups” on page 289. 3. then select the appropriate group. add it to BusinessObjects Enterprise. 2. Note: You can view the groups and users by selecting the appropriate group from the Groups management area and then clicking the Users tab. and the account belongs to a group account that is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. If you added users and groups through the CMC. For more information. 5. Troubleshooting NT accounts Creating a new NT user account • If you create a new NT user account. Go to the Authentication management area of the CMC. To view users and groups that have been added using BusinessObjects Enterprise 1. Click OK. 6. For more information. and the account does not belong to a group account that is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. If you added users and groups through Windows NT/2000. 4. see “Mapping NT accounts” on page 284. Go to the Groups management area of the CMC. Click OK to the message which states that accessing the user list may take several seconds.

• Disabling an NT user account • If you disable an NT user account (using Windows Administrative Tools). the user can still access BusinessObjects Enterprise using that account. and the NT group to which the account belongs is already mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. You can go to the Windows NT tab in the Authentication management area and select the option to add all new aliases and create all new users. add it to BusinessObjects Enterprise. if the user also has an account that uses Enterprise authentication. However. See “Creating a user and a third-party alias” on page 294. For more information. the system will add the user to BusinessObjects Enterprise. refresh the group list. there are three ways you can get the new NT account into BusinessObjects Enterprise. you may want to add the user individually instead. and the group account does not belong to a group account that is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. but the user won’t be added until he or she logs on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. This is the simplest method and it doesn’t require any extra steps. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 291 . see “Mapping NT accounts” on page 284. and the account belongs to a group account that is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. the user will not be able to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise using the mapped NT account. see “Mapping NT accounts” on page 284. In this case all NT users will be added to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Choose the method that works best for your situation: • When the new NT user logs on to BusinessObjects Enterprise and selects NT authentication. However. You can add the new user to BusinessObjects Enterprise and select Windows NT authentication. if the NT group contains many users who don’t require access to BusinessObjects Enterprise.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing NT accounts 12 Adding an NT account to a mapped NT group When you have added a new account in NT. see “Viewing mapped NT users and groups” on page 289. For more information. For details. The user is added and is automatically assigned a Windows NT alias. and then click Update. If you create a new NT group account. • • Creating a new NT group account • If you create a new NT group account.

However. Note: This feature is available if you are using a Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS) web server and users are using Internet Explorer as their web browser. when you launch the CMC.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing NT accounts Setting up NT single sign-on You can configure BusinessObjects Enterprise to allow users to use various BusinessObjects Enterprise applications without being prompted to log on. refer to the tutorial for an example on creating a web application that uses single sign-on. the user can select Windows NT from the Authentication list and click Log On without entering his or her user name or password. You can disable this feature—for more information. Design your own web applications accordingly (or modify InfoView) if you want to use NT single sign-on. Setting up NT single sign-on to BusinessObjects Enterprise includes the following tasks: • • • “Configuring IIS for NT single sign-on” on page 292 “Enabling NT single sign-on in CMC” on page 293 “Modifying the web. With single sign-on enabled. When a user launches InfoView. You are not required to enter any additional information. Configuring IIS for NT single sign-on 1. he or she can log on using the Guest account (Enterprise authentication). see “Configuring Kerberos single sign-on” on page 299.” which uses Enterprise authentication. see “Disabling the Guest account” on page 261.txt file included with your product distribution for a complete list of version requirements. as opposed to Windows NT authentication. Users need only to enter their NT user name and password information once at the beginning of the NT session. change the access and authentication settings for the Enterprise virtual directory as follows: • • Deselect the Anonymous access and Basic authentication check boxes.config file for NT single sign-on” on page 293 Note: BusinessObjects Enterprise does not support the Kerberos protocol for Windows NT. BusinessObjects Enterprise provides its own form of “anonymous single signon. See the Platforms. if you have set up NT single sign-on. To configure the IIS web server for NT single sign-on Using the documentation included with your IIS server. BusinessObjects Enterprise is designed to display a logon page. In the developer documentation. even when you disable the Guest account. NT authentication occurs in the background. 292 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Ensure that the Integrated Windows authentication check box is selected. For information on how to set up end-to-end single sign on with AD and Kerberos. For instance.

To modify the web. Note: If you select this option. Failing to configure IIS could compromise your system security if the account that IIS runs under belongs to a mapped group. make sure you complete all tasks listed in “Setting up NT single sign-on” on page 292. Click Update. <identity impersonate="true" /> <Authentication mode="Windows" /> Add the following lines to the <system. Enabling NT single sign-on in CMC 1.config file: • • <identity impersonate="true" /> <Authentication mode="Windows" /> BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 293 . Restart your IIS server. Modifying the web. Click the Windows NT tab. you must also configure the IIS for single sign-on. For details. See “Modifying the web. Modify the web. To enable the Windows NT plug-in for single sign-on in CMC Go to the Authentication management area of the CMC.web> block in the C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\Web Content\Enterprise11\WebAdmin\Web.web> block in the C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\Web Content\Enterprise11\InfoView\Web.config file for NT single sign-on Make the following modifications to the web.config file for NT single sign-on Add the following lines to the <system.config file: • • 2. Select the Single Sign On is enabled check box. Note: For NT single sign-on to function correctly.config file.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing NT accounts 12 2. 3. make sure you complete all tasks listed in “Setting up NT single sign-on” on page 292. 3. see “Configuring IIS for NT single sign-on” on page 292. 2. because when users access one of the web applications they would automatically have the same access privileges as the IIS machine account. 4.config file to make sure Windows authentication is enabled. 1. Note: For NT single sign-on to function correctly.config file for NT single sign-on” on page 293.

config file as shown: <!-.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing aliases 3. 294 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . This is useful when a user has a third-party account that is mapped to Enterprise and an Enterprise account. By assigning an alias to the user. an alias enables a user to log on via more than one authentication type. Managing aliases includes: • • • • • • “Creating a user and a third-party alias” on page 294 “Creating an alias for an existing user” on page 296 “Assigning an alias” on page 296 “Reassigning an alias” on page 297 “Deleting an alias” on page 297 “Disabling an aliases” on page 298 Creating a user and a third-party alias When you create a user and select an authentication type other than Enterprise. after you map your third-party accounts to BusinessObjects Enterprise. In CMC. For example. make sure you complete all tasks listed in “Setting up NT single sign-on” on page 292. you can link the accounts using the assign alias feature. A user can have any combination of BusinessObjects Enterprise. LDAP. Managing aliases If a user has multiple accounts in BusinessObjects Enterprise. or NT aliases. Comment out the following line in the <httpModules> block in the C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\Web Content\Enterprise 11\InfoView\Web. the user can log on using either a third-party user name and password or an Enterprise user name and password. the system creates the new user in BusinessObjects Enterprise and creates a third-party alias for the user. You can also reassign an alias in BusinessObjects Enterprise.<remove name=”WindowsAuthentication”/> --> Note: For NT single sign-on to function correctly. the alias information is displayed at the bottom of the properties page for a user. Thus. you can use the Reassign Alias feature to reassign an alias to a different a user. AD.

assign. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 295 . bsmith. 5. secWindowsNT:ENTERPRISE:bsmith. 1. and it must belong to a group that is already mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. and reassign aliases to user. The format of the account name must agree with the format required for the authentication type. for example. The user is added to BusinessObjects Enterprise and is assigned an alias for the authentication type you selected. The New User Properties page appears. the following criteria must be met: • • • The authentication tool needs to have been enabled in CMC. The user account must exist in the third-party authentication tool. you can add. 6. To create a user and add a third-party alias Go to the Users management area of the CMC. Select the authentication type for the user. 4.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing aliases 12 Note: For the system to create the third-party alias. 2. If required. Click New User. Select the connection type for the user. 3. Click OK. The New User Properties page appears. Windows NT. for example. Type in the third-party account name for the user. for example.

and it must belong to a group that is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. 2. Note: If a user has only one alias and you assign that last alias to another user. Click the link for the user you want to assign an alias to. 4. Click OK. The format of the account name must agree with the format required for the authentication type. The Assign Alias page appears. 296 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . When you view the user in CMC. To assign an alias from another user Go to the Users management area of the CMC. 5. personal categories. You cannot assign or reassign Enterprise aliases. Click New Alias. you move a third-party alias from another user to the user you are currently viewing. The New Alias page appears. 1. An alias is created for the user. Click Assign Alias. the one that was already assigned to the user and the one you just created. To create a new alias for a user Go to the Users management area of the CMC. and inbox for that account. Type in the account name for the user. or an alias for a third-party authentication tool. Select the authentication type for the user. The user account must exist in the third-party authentication tool. 6. at least two aliases are shown. The alias can be an Enterprise alias. Assigning an alias When you assign an alias to a user. 3.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing aliases Creating an alias for an existing user You can create aliases for existing BusinessObjects Enterprise users. Note: For the system to create the third-party alias. for example. 1. Windows NT. and the Favorites folder. the system will delete the user account. the following criteria must be met: • • • The authentication tool needs to have been enabled in CMC. Click the link for the user that you want to add an alias to. 3. 2.

Click the > arrow. Note: If a user has only one alias and you reassign that alias to another user. The alias for bsmith has now been assigned to the user jbrown. Click the Reassign Alias button for the alias. for example. To search for a specific alias. 1. Select the alias you want in the list of available aliases. Click OK. and the Properties page for user jbrown is displayed. for example. Click OK. 2. and inbox for that account. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 297 . The Reassign Alias page appears. In the list. Click the link for the user whose alias you want to reassign.Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing aliases 12 4. Reassigning an alias When you reassign an alias. You cannot assign or reassign Enterprise aliases. you move a third-party alias from the user that you are currently viewing to another user. 4. 5. If a user has only one alias and you delete that alias. bsmith. and the Favorites folder. the system automatically deletes the user account and the Favorites folder. 3. jbrown. personal categories. The user bsmith can no longer use this alias. and inbox for that account. The user jbrown can now log on using the third-party user account and authentication method. 5. use the Look For field. Tip: • • 6. click the name of the user that you want to assign the alias to. To reassign an alias to another user Go to the Users management area of the CMC. personal categories. use the SHIFT+click or CTRL+click combination. the alias is removed from the system. To select multiple aliases. the system will delete the user account. Deleting an alias When you delete an alias.

and if the account belongs to a group that is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Click the link for the user whose alias you want to delete. Note: Deleting a user’s alias does not necessarily prevent the user from being able to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise again. then BusinessObjects Enterprise will still allow the user to log on. clear the Enabled check box for the alias you want disable. and if the account belongs to a group that is mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise. it is best to disable the alias. Click the name of the user whose alias you want to disable. depends on which Update Options you have selected for the authentication tool in the Authentication management area of CMC. To disable an alias Go to the Users management area of the CMC.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Managing aliases 1. Click Update. See also “Deleting an alias” on page 297. 3. If the user account still exists in the third-party system. Whether the system creates a new user or assigns the alias to an existing user. 298 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . To prevent a user from accessing BusinessObjects Enterprise altogether. Repeat this step for each alias you want to disable. 4. The alias is deleted from the system. then BusinessObjects Enterprise will still allow the user to log on. disable all aliases for that user. Disabling an aliases You can prevent a user from logging on to BusinessObjects Enterprise using a particular authentication method by disabling the user’s alias associated with that method. To delete an alias Go to the Users management area of the CMC. In the Alias area on the Properties page. 1. The user can no longer log on using the type of authentication that you just disabled. Note: Deleting a user from BusinessObjects Enterprise does not necessarily prevent the user from being able to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise again. 2. 2. 3. Click the Delete Alias button for the alias. To ensure a user can no longer use one of his or her aliases to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. If the user account still exists in the third-party system.

For general information about the levels of single sign-on that are supported in BusinessObjects Enterprise. You can either create a new domain account or use an existing domain account. The service account will be used to run the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers. 7. before you can proceed you must have set up the service account. It requires a Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) web server and users require Internet Explorer (IE) as their web browser. 4. “Setting up a service account” on page 299 Note: The order in which you complete these steps is not important. 6. However. 2. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 299 . 3. This must be a domain account that has been trusted for delegation. However. See the Platforms. Configuration process overview Configuring end-to-end single sign-on using Kerberos includes the following main steps: 1. 5. you require a service account. you could use a user or computer domain account. BusinessObjects Enterprise currently supports single sign-on to the database with Windows AD using Kerberos for the Windows platform only. “Configuring the servers” on page 300 “Configuring the Windows AD plug-in for Kerberos authentication” on page 301 “Configuring the IIS and browsers” on page 303 “Configuring IIS for end-to-end single sign-on” on page 305 “Configuring BusinessObjects Enterprise web applications” on page 312 “Configuring the databases for single sign-on” on page 313 Setting up a service account To configure BusinessObjects Enterprise for end-to-end single sign-on using Kerberos and Windows AD authentication. see “About single sign-on” on page 232. Note: Instead of a service account. it is recommended you use a service account.Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on 12 Configuring Kerberos single sign-on This section tells you how to set up end-to-end single sign-on to your BusinessObjects Enterprise system and its back-end databases by using Kerberos and Windows AD authentication.txt file included with your product distribution for a complete list of version requirements.

300 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . set up the domain service account. Double-click Act as part of the operating system. you may have to first add a service principal name (SPN) for the domain account. and then click OK.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on To set up the service account On the domain controller. Click Add. depending on whether you are using Windows 2000 or Windows 2003: • • In Windows 2000. then click User Rights Assignment. refer to http://msdn. This must be done on each machine running the following servers: • • • • CMS Page Server Report Application Server Web Intelligence Report Server To configure the server machines Note: To complete this procedure. Click Start > Administrative Tools > Local Security Policy. you must grant the service account the right to act as part of the operating system. In Windows 2003. For detailed instructions. Click Local Policies. 2. Double-click the service account. 1. 3. ensure that the following two options have been selected for the account: • • Trust this user for delegation to specified service only Use Kerberos only If you are using Windows 2003. Note: The procedure for setting up a domain service account varies. ensure that the Account is trusted for delegation option has been selected for the account. 5.microsoft. you require a service account that has been trusted for delegation. See “Setting up a service account” on page 299. Configuring the servers Configuring the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers includes: • • “Configuring the server machines” on page 300 “Configuring the servers to use the service account” on page 301 Configuring the server machines In order to support end-to-end single sign-on. 4.com.

5. for example. c. The Properties dialog box is displayed. Start the CCM. On the Properties tab: a. See “Setting up a service account” on page 299.Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on 12 6. For detailed instructions. Configuring the Windows AD plug-in for Kerberos authentication In order to support Kerberos single sign-on. Configuring the servers to use the service account In order to support Kerberos single sign-on. Click Apply. and then click OK. and then click OK. see “Controlling users’ access to objects” on page 317. you have to configure the Windows AD security plug-in in the CMC to use Kerberos authentication. Start the server again. Double-click the server you want to configure. 7. you require a service account that has been trusted for delegation. Enter the user name and password for the service account. This includes: • Ensuring Windows AD authentication is enabled. 6. Repeat steps 2 through 5 for each BusinessObjects server that has to be configured. b. 3. Repeat the above steps on each machine running a BusinessObjects Enterprise server. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 301 . you must use CCM and configure the following servers to log on as the service account: • • • • CMS server Page Server Report Application Server Web Intelligence Report Server To configure a server Note: To complete this procedure. 2. Ensure that the Local Policy Setting check box is selected. deselect the System Account check box. the CMS server. 4. In the Log On As area. 1. Stop the server you want to configure.

6. c. See “Setting up a service account” on page 299. Note: For related information about configuring the Windows AD plug-in. Ensure that the Windows Active Directory Authentication is enabled check box is selected. In the Service Principal Name box. it does not require any other rights. b. 302 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . This account requires read access to Active Directory only. 2. 4. See “Mapping AD accounts” on page 276. Enabling Kerberos single sign-on and setting the service principal name (SPN) to use a service account. Click Update. Click Update. Select the Single sign-on is enabled check box. 5. Note: This must be the same account that you use to run the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers. To configure the Windows AD security plug-in Go to the Authentication management area of the CMC. it does not require any other rights. map the AD group for the AD users who require access to BusinessObjects Enterprise via AD authentication and single sign-on. Select the Cache Security context (required for SSO to database) check box. Enter the name and password for the account and the default AD Domain. • • • Select the Use Kerberos authentication check box. 3. 1. In the “Mapped AD Member Group” area. Set up the AD administrator account: a. Click AD Administrator Name. 8. see “Managing AD accounts” on page 275. Under Authentication Options select the following: 7. Note: The AD Administrator account requires read access to Active Directory only. enter the service principal name of the service account.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on • • Setting up an AD Administrator account. Click the Windows AD tab.

Use the following procedure to change these settings when needed. Regardless of whether the cache expiry for the server is greater or less than that of the ticket. the system renews the ticket until the CMS cache expiry is reached. This includes: • • “Configuring the BusinessObjects Enterprise clients on the IIS” on page 304 “Configuring the Internet Explorer browser on a client machine” on page 304 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 303 . Click the link for the server. If the CMS cache expiry is zero. Page Server.Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on 12 Configuring the cache expiry When the system is using AD and Kerberos single sign-on. the system will use the globally set ticket expiry. the ticket will expire when the lowest expiry value is reached. To configure the servers in CMC Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. the ticket will expire when the CMS cache expiry is reached. The system comes configured with default values for the server cache expiry. The CMS uses the cache expiry as follows: • • • If the CMS cache expiry is greater than that of the ticket. If the CMS cache expiry is less than that of the ticket. it uses the cache expiry for certain BusinessObjects Enterprise servers to determine whether a logon ticket is still valid. whichever has the lowest value. 3. you have to configure the BusinessObjects Enterprise clients. The other servers use either their cache expiry or the ticket expiry. Type in a new cache expiry value. 4. Note: If you are running multiple instances of a server. 5. Click the Single Sign-On tab. 1. Configuring the IIS and browsers In order to support Kerberos end-to-end single sign-on. Report Application Server. Click Update. you can control the cache expiry for each instance individually. and Web Intelligence Report Server. 2. This applies to the CMS.

d. Note: You can automate the following steps through a registry key. 3. Click OK. For details. 2. See also “Configuring IIS for single sign-on to databases only” on page 309. in the Internet Information Services window. This includes: • • Setting up the client machines for integrated Windows authentication. Click Tools > Internet Options. Navigate to the Security settings. Click the Advanced tab. you have to configure the Internet Explorer (IE) browser on the BusinessObjects Enterprise client machines. b. you do not need to configure the browser for single sign-on. 7. Right-click businessobjects and select Properties. To configure the clients for Windows authentication On the IIS. refer to you Windows documentation. 5. 1. and then click OK again.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on Configuring the BusinessObjects Enterprise clients on the IIS To support Kerberos single sign-on. On the Directory Security tab. 1. c. Note: If configuring the IIS for single sign-on to the database only. The Internet Options dialog box appears. Configuring the Internet Explorer browser on a client machine To support Kerberos end-to-end single sign-on. click Edit. 6. Enable integrated windows authentication: a. and then click Apply. 304 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . open an Internet Explorer browser window. 4. 2. expand the tree on the left and go to businessobjects under Default Web Site. Repeat the above for crystalreportviewer. Turn off Anonymous Access. Click the Enable integrated windows authentication option. Adding the IIS to the trusted sites. Turn on Integrated Windows Authentication. To configure the IE browser on the client machines On the client machine. you have to configure the BusinessObjects clients on the IIS to use integrated Windows authentication.

the worker processes of the IIS have to run under a domain account that is trusted for delegation. and then click Add.Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on 12 3. Click OK. For more information. You can enter the full domain name of the site: a.exe worker process to run as a domain account that has been trusted for delegation. Click Advanced. depending on whether you are using IIS5 or IIS6: • • “Configuring IIS5 for Kerberos end-to-end single sign-on” on page 305 “Configuring IIS6 for Kerberos end-to-end single sign-on” on page 307 Note: Instead of configuring the IIS worker processes for end-to-end single sign-on you can configure them to use single sign-on to the database only. 5. You may want to do this. f. and then click OK twice more to close the Internet Options dialog box. Click Sites. you have to set the IIS and the Aspnet_wp. see: • • “Configuring IIS for single sign-on to databases only” on page 309 “Configuring web applications for single sign-on to the databases” on page 313. Add the IIS to the Trusted sites. b. c. Close the Internet Explorer browser windows and then open them again for the changes to take effect. 4. if you don’t want to run the IIS worker processes under an account that has been trusted for delegation. for example. Refer to either of the following procedures. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 305 . Type in the web site for the IIS. The Internet Options dialog box appears. e. Configuring IIS for end-to-end single sign-on To support Kerberos end-to-end single sign-on. Click Tools > Internet Options. d. Repeat the above steps on each BusinessObjects Enterprise client machine. Configuring IIS5 for Kerberos end-to-end single sign-on To support Kerberos end-to-end single sign-on. Click the Security tab.

and it may expire. 3. add an SPN for HTTP access on the web server machine: setspn -A HTTP/serverhost.NET web applications on the web server to run as privileged system accounts. 2.domainname. Each approach has advantages and disadvantages: • • If you use a machine domain account. refer to the Microsoft web site: www. which would result in an error condition. Note: For security reasons. depends on how you want to manage your system security. config file: 1. set the domain account of the IIS machine to be trusted for delegation. depending on whether you want to use a machine or user domain account: • • “To run the IIS5 worker process under the machine domain account” on page 306 “To run the IIS5 worker process under a user domain account” on page 307 To run the IIS5 worker process under the machine domain account On the domain controller.microsoft. Changing this property can take several minutes to propagate. but the password could be exposed or modified. If you use a user domain account you have more control over the rights for the account.domainname.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on You can run the IIS either under the machine domain account or under a user domain account. Set the Aspnet_wp. 306 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . To do this.exe account to run as a machine domain account will cause all ASP.domainname.NET\Framework\version\CONFIG\machine. if access is via www. Which approach you use.com but the machine name is web.com.exe to run as a machine domain account.com serverhost For example. nor can it be exposed or modified. For complete information about security risks associated with system or user domain accounts. • • userName="SYSTEM" Password="AutoGenerate" In the above path name.com. change the following parameters in the <processModel> block in the \WINDOWS\Microsoft. make sure that the account which the IIS helper processes run under does not belong to a mapped group. Refer to either of the following procedures. version represents the software version. If the machine name for the web server is different from the name that is used to access it. Note: Configuring the Aspnet_wp. the password will be automatically generated and won’t expire.

To run the IIS5 worker process under a user domain account Set the Aspnet_wp. make sure that the account which IIS helper processes run under does not belong to a mapped group. you have to set the IIS and w3wp. nor can it be exposed or modified. if access is via www.Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on 12 1. and it may expire. refer to the Microsoft web site: www.microsoft. but the password could be exposed or modified. and password is the password for the domain account. Each approach has advantages and disadvantages: • • If you use a machine domain account. To do this. If you use a user domain account you have more control over the rights for the account.com serverhost For example. Which approach you use. 2.config file: • • userName="domainaccount" Password="password" Where domainaccount is a domain account that you have set to be trusted for delegation. which would result in an error condition. In the above path name.domainname. Note: For security reasons.com.NET\Framework\ version\CONFIG\machine. If the machine name for the web server is different from the name that is used to access it. version represents the software version.exe to run as a user domain account that has been trusted for delegation.domainname. depending on whether you want to use a machine or user domain account: BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 307 .exe worker process to run as an account that has been trusted for delegation.com. change the following parameters in the <processModel> block in the \WINDOWS\Microsoft. add an SPN for HTTP access on the web server machine: setspn -A HTTP/serverhost.com but the machine name is web. depends on how you want to manage your system security. the password will be automatically generated and won’t expire. Refer to either of the following procedures. Configuring IIS6 for Kerberos end-to-end single sign-on To support Kerberos for end-to-end single sign-on. You can run the IIS either under the machine domain account or under user domain account.domainname. For complete information about security risks associated with system or user domain accounts.

make sure that the account which the IIS worked processes run under does not belong to a mapped group. add an SPN for HTTP access on the web server machine: setspn -A HTTP/serverhost.domainname. Note: Configuring the w3wp. c. In the tree panel on the left.domainname. and then click Apply. d. On the Identity tab select LocalSystem from the list. Type in a name for the application pool.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on • • “To run the IIS6 worker process under the machine domain account” on page 308 “To run the IIS6 worker process under a user domain account” on page 309 To run the IIS6 worker process under the machine domain account On the domain controller. if access is via www. e.exe worker process: a.com. 3. g.com but the machine name is web. skip step 1. Right-click the application pool you created. 1. Configure the account for the w3wp. If the machine name for the web server is different from the name that is used to access it. On the Directory tab select the new application pool name from the list. f.NET web applications on the web server to run as privileged system accounts. Right-click InfoView and select Properties.com serverhost For example. set account of the IIS machine to be trusted for delegation. and select Properties. Note: For security reasons. 308 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . b.exe account to run as a LocalSystem account will cause all ASP. expand machine name > Web Site > Default Web Site > businessobjects > EnterpriseXX. right-click the machine name and select Application Pool > New.domainname. See also “Configuring IIS for single sign-on to databases only” on page 309. Changing this property can take several minutes to propagate! If you don’t want to use end-to-end single sign-on but want to provide single sign-on to the database. 2. In the Internet Service Manager window. and then click Apply.

When users log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. but the account does not have to be trusted for delegation. if access is via www. See also “Configuring IIS for single sign-on to databases only” on page 309.com. depending on whether you are using IIS5 or IIS6: • • “Configuring IIS5 for single sign-on to database only” on page 310 “Configuring IIS6 for single sign-on to database only” on page 311 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 309 .com. and password is the password for the domain account. skip step 1. add an SPN for HTTP access on the web server machine: setspn -A HTTP/serverhost.domainname.config file: • • userName="domainaccount" Password="password" In the above path name. Note: If you don’t want to use end-to-end single sign-on but want to provide single sign-on to the database.domainname. you can choose whether you want to provide end-to-end single sign-on. or whether you want users to provide their logon credentials when they log in to BusinessObjects Enterprise. 2. make sure that the account which the IIS worker processes run under does not belong to a mapped group. For more information. For security reasons. see http://msdn.com but the machine name is web.domainname. For example. Refer to either of the following procedures.com serverhost 3. the system generates a logon token to provide single sign-on access to the databases. Configuring IIS for single sign-on to databases only When using Kerberos with Windows AD. 1. Add the domain account to the IIS_WPG local group. To do this. version represents the software version. To run the IIS6 worker process under a user domain account Set the w3wp.exe to run as a user domain account that has been trusted for delegation. To use single sign-on to the databases only Configure the IIS worker processes to run as a domain account in order for the network to recognize their accounts.Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on 12 1. and give it the relevant rights to access the needed files.Microsoft. Where domainaccount is a domain account that you have set to be trusted for delegation. If the machine name for the web server is different from the name that is used to access it.NET\Framework\ version\CONFIG\machine. change the following parameters in the <processModel> block in the \WINDOWS\Microsoft.

Each approach has advantages and disadvantages: • • If you use a machine domain account. 1. change the following parameters to the <processModel> block in the \WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET web applications on the web server to run as privileged system accounts. config file: • • userName="SYSTEM" Password:="AutoGenerate" In the above path name.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on 2. you do not need to configure the browser for single sign-on.exe worker process to run as a domain account. To do this. depends on how you want to manage your system security.com. the password will be automatically generated and won’t expire. For complete information about security risks associated with system or user domain accounts. Note: • • Configuring the Aspnet_wp. refer to the Microsoft web site: www. Which approach you use. but the password could be exposed or modified. Clear the Single Sign On is enabled check box on the Windows AD page in the Authentication management area in CMC. and it may expire. See “Configuring web applications for single sign-on to the databases” on page 313. version represents the software version. 2. 3. See “Configuring the Internet Explorer browser on a client machine” on page 304. 310 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . which would result in an error condition. but the account does not have to be trusted for delegation. Configuring IIS5 for single sign-on to database only To support single sign-on to the database only.exe to run as a machine domain account.exe account to run as a machine domain account will cause all ASP. You can run the IIS worker process either under the machine domain account or under a user domain account. For security reasons. Configure the web applications for single sign-on to the database instead of end-to-end single sign-on.microsoft. Note: If configuring the IIS for single sign-on to the database only. If you use a user domain account you have more control over the rights for the account. nor can it be exposed or modified. you have to set the Aspnet_wp.NET\Framework\version\CONFIG\machine. make sure that the account which IIS runs under does not belong to a mapped group. To configure the IIS5 for single sign-on to databases only Make sure IIS is running as a domain account Set the Aspnet_wp.

Each approach has advantages and disadvantages: • • If you use a machine domain account. d. Type in a name for the application pool.Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on 12 3. In the Internet Service Manager window. On the Directory tab select the new application pool name from the list. add an SPN for HTTP access on the web server machine: setspn -A HTTP/serverhost. nor can it be exposed or modified. Right-click InfoView and select Properties. Configure the account for the w3wp. the password will be automatically generated and won’t expire. Configuring the w3wp. b. depends on how you want to manage your system security.com.com but the machine name is web. g. and then click Apply.domainname. you have to set the w3wp. and select Properties. and then click Apply.domainname.microsoft. if access is via www. You can run the IIS worker process either under the machine domain account or under a user domain account. 1. expand machine name > Web Site > Default Web Site > businessobjects > EnterpriseXX. right-click the machine name and select Application Pool > New. To configure the IIS6 for single sign-on to databases only Make sure IIS is running as a domain account.exe worker process to run as a machine or user domain account. In the tree panel on the left.NET web applications on the web server to run as privileged system accounts. 2. Right-click the application pool you created. e. If the machine name for the web server is different from the name that is used to access it. For complete information about security risks associated with system or user domain accounts. f. Which approach you use. which would result in an error condition. Configuring IIS6 for single sign-on to database only To support single sign-on to the database only. and it may expire. Note: • BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 311 .com. On the Identity tab select LocalSystem from the list. refer to the Microsoft web site: www. but the account does not have to be trusted for delegation.exe account to run as a machine domain account will cause all ASP. If you use a user domain account you have more control over the rights for the account.com serverhost For example.exe worker process: a. c.domainname. but the password could be exposed or modified.

edit the respective Web.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on • 3. Configuring BusinessObjects Enterprise web applications In order for the end-to-end single sign on to work. Note: If you want to use single sign-on to the databases instead of end-toend single sign-on. add an SPN for HTTP access on the web server machine: setspn -A HTTP/serverhost. To do this. you have to set both the CMC and InfoView web applications to impersonate the user. you have to set the BusinessObjects Enterprise web applications to not impersonate a user. make sure that the account which IIS runs under does not belong to a mapped group.config file: • • 3. <identity impersonate="true" /> <Authentication mode="Windows" /> Enable Windows authentication by commenting out the following line in the C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\Web Content\Enterprise 11\InfoView\Web. See “Configuring web applications for single sign-on to the databases” on page 313.com serverhost For example. For security reasons.domainname.web> block in the C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\Web Content\Enterprise11\WebAdmin\Web. 1. To configure the web applications for full single sign-on Add the following lines to the <system.web> block in the C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\Web Content\Enterprise11\InfoView\Web. See “Configuring web applications for end-to-end single sign-on” on page 312. Configuring web applications for end-to-end single sign-on In order to use up end-to-end single sign-on. you have to configure the BusinessObjects Enterprise web applications to impersonate the user. if access is via www.config files on the IIS as follows. <identity impersonate="true" /> <Authentication mode="Windows" /> Add the following lines to the <system.<remove name=”WindowsAuthentication”/> --> 312 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .com but the machine name is web.domainname.com.config file: • • 2.domainname. If the machine name for the web server is different from the name that is used to access it.config as shown: <!-.

Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on 12 Configuring web applications for single sign-on to the databases If you want to use single sign-on to the databases instead of end-to-end single sign-on. Configuring the databases for single sign-on This section provides information that is specific to setting up single sign-on to SQL Server databases. you have to set BusinessObjects Enterprise web applications to not impersonate the user. 1.web> block in the Web Content\Enterprise 11\WebAdmin\Web.config files on the IIS as follows. For general information and for information about single sign-on to other supported databases. Note: If you want to use single sign-on to the database only.txt file included with your product distribution for a complete list of tested database software and version requirements. Note: For security reasons. refer to the database vendors support documentation. See “Mapping AD accounts” on page 276. Mapping AD accounts for Kerberos single sign-on In order for the Kerberos single sign-on to work. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 313 . the users will have single sign-on access to the databases associated with BusinessObjects Enterprise. <identity impersonate="false" /> <Authentication mode="Windows" /> Set InfoView to not impersonate the users.config file: • • 2. by adding the following lines to the <system. To configure the web applications for single sign-on to the databases Set the CMC to not impersonate the user by adding the following lines to the <system. edit their Web.web> block in the Web Content\Enterprise 11\InfoView\Web. ensure that the mapped groups do not contain the domain account that the IIS is running under. Once they are logged on. see also “Configuring IIS for single sign-on to databases only” on page 309. See the Platforms. Users will now be able to log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise by providing their logon credentials in the InfoView or CMC logon dialog box and selecting Windows AD authentication. you must map the groups containing the AD users that are to have access to BusinessObjects Enterprise to a BusinessObjects Enterprise group.config file: • • <identity impersonate="false" /> <Authentication mode="Windows" /> Note: Make sure you set identity impersonate to false. To do this.

and then click OK. In Windows 2003. b. you have to configure to be trusted for delegation. the machines running SQL Server database must be trusted for delegation. On the Accounts tab. no additional configuration is required. ensure that the following two options have been selected for the account: Trust this user for delegation to specified service only and Use Kerberos only. 2. 3. If SQL Server is running under a service account. and serviceaccount is the name of the SQL Server service account. Computer is trusted for delegation Click Apply. • • In Windows 2000.12 Managing User Accounts and Groups Configuring Kerberos single sign-on Configuring SQL Server for single sign-on In order for Kerberos single sign-on to work. Set the machine running SQL Server as follows: • a. c. Right-click the domain account and select Properties. 314 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . ensure that the Account is trusted for delegation option has been selected for the account. When SQL Server shuts down. To run SQL Server under a service account In Active Directory. make sure the following options are selected: • 1. How to set up security delegation varies. Select Start > Programs > Administrative Tools > Active Directory Users and Computers. set up the SQL Server service account for security delegation: a. Add an SPN for the service account of the SQL Server: setspn -A MSSQLSvc/host:port serviceaccount Where host:port is the name of the machine running SQL Server and the port that. the system automatically un-registers the SPNs for the LocalSystem account. If you are using Windows 2003. SQL Server registers itself when it starts and the system registers the SPN. you may have to first add a service principal name (SPN) for the domain account. depending on whether SQL Server has been configured to run under the LocalSystem account or under a service account: • If SQL Server is running under the LocalSystem account.

Controlling User Access chapter .

To set rights within the Central Management Console (CMC). or Inherited. When you need to disable inheritance or to customize security levels for particular objects. applications. Explicitly Denied. When granted. users. and other features in BusinessObjects Enterprise. the right is denied by default. schedule reports. Each access level grants a set of rights that combine to allow users to accomplish common tasks (such as view reports. Most importantly. subgroups can inherit rights from parent groups. users. if a right is left “not specified. Whether or not you use access levels. Users require specific licensing and rights to create or modify reports through the Report Application Server (RAS). you can also take advantage of the inheritance patterns recognized by BusinessObjects Enterprise: users can inherit rights as the result of group membership. Additionally. see “Setting common access levels” on page 320. This “denial based” design assists in ensuring that users and groups do not automatically acquire rights that are not explicitly granted. The BusinessObjects Enterprise security model is designed such that. or groups. and to provide your IT people with administrative access to servers and server groups. servers. It is recommended that you use the predefined access levels whenever possible. user. because they can greatly reduce the complexity of your object security model. you can set security levels that affect individual users and groups. the Advanced Rights pages allow you to choose from the complete set of available object rights.13 Controlling User Access Controlling user access overview Controlling user access overview Rights are the base units for controlling users’ access to objects. Each right can be Explicitly Granted. you first locate the object. 316 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . to delegate user and group management to different departments. if contradictory settings result in a right being both granted and denied to a user or group. and both users and groups can inherit rights from parent folders. For more information. Rights allow you to control access to your BusinessObjects Enterprise content. Using rights. the advanced object rights allow you to explicitly deny any user or group the right to perform a particular task. and so on). To facilitate administration and maintenance. For details. or server and then you specify the rights for different users and groups. see “Object rights for the Report Application Server” on page 568. each right provides a user or group with permission to perform a particular action. BusinessObjects Enterprise includes a set of predefined access levels that allow you to set common security levels quickly.” the right is denied by default.

and other objects users and groups can access using BusinessObjects Enterprise. When you set rights at the folder level. For each object. Tip: For detailed tutorials that walk you through sample implementations of object rights. reports. For example. you can control users’ access to specific content. By setting object rights. You can ensure that confidential employee records can be accessed only by the human resources department. To facilitate administration. report objects. You control which folders. you can also set user and group rights at the folder level. Setting object rights for users and groups Object rights enable you to set access levels for your users and groups. these limits will be in effect for all objects that inherit rights from the folder (including any objects found within the subfolders). You set security settings at the object level. For objects that can be scheduled. you can use rights to make sure that you are the only one who can access your reports. program objects. For detailed information on the different “access modes” for object rights and information on inherited rights. BusinessObjects Enterprise includes a set of predefined rights (“access modes”) that allow you to set common security levels quickly. you can grant or deny access to users and groups in your system. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 317 . see “Customizing a ‘top-down’ inheritance model” on page 331. and other BusinessObjects Enterprise objects. you can set rights for each object.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 Controlling users’ access to objects To secure the content that you publish to BusinessObjects Enterprise. see “Controlling users’ access to objects” on page 317. the security settings are also reflected in the object instances object. These include the following: • • • • • • • Inherited Rights No Access View Schedule View On Demand Full Control Advanced In addition to setting user and group rights for report objects from the Objects management area. You can set rights for folders.

6. The Rights tab appears. 2.13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 1. Click OK. Click the > arrow to add the group(s) or user(s). 3. Select the group(s) or user(s) you would like to add or remove. 4. 1. 2. 5. Click the Rights tab. Click the Rights tab. Select an option in the Select Operation list. To add groups or users to an object’s rights settings In the Objects management area of the CMC. 318 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . To change a group or user’s report rights In the Objects management area of the CMC. Click Add/Remove. 7. click the < arrow to remove the group(s) or user(s). The Rights tab appears. select an object by clicking its link. select an object by clicking its link.

then click the object’s Rights tab. Go to the Folders management area in the CMC to browse your folder hierarchy for an object. In this example. That is. report. Click the link that corresponds to the folder or other object whose rights you want to see. This section shows how to locate the rights for any object and briefly explains the information displayed on the Rights tab. users have not been specified individually. For more information. When you change an entry in the Access Level column. The Name column lists all users and groups who have been given rights to the object. Viewing object rights settings Use the CMC to view the object rights that a user or group has to any folder. see “Setting common access levels” on page 320. The Object column shows whether the entry is a User or a Group. then click Update. If you select Advanced from the list. you grant or deny granular rights from the Advanced Rights page. users have been divided into two groups—Everyone and Administrators—which have been granted rights to the folder object. or other BusinessObjects Enterprise object. For more information. or go to the Objects management area in the CMC to view a list of all the objects on the system.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 3. A page similar to the following appears: This example shows the rights for the Report Samples folder. Click Add/Remove to add or remove a user or group to this object. The Net Access column is BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 319 . the Net Access column shows the effective rights that each user or group has to the object. see “Setting advanced object rights” on page 322. You can locate any given object in several ways. The Access Level column shows how each user’s or group’s rights are determined. click Update to effect your changes. The Net Access column displays the net effect of whatever is selected in the Access Level column. instead. both groups possess Inherited Rights. You can change the rights for either group by selecting a predefined access level (or by selecting Advanced) from the list in the Access Level column. Change the access level for a group or user by selecting a right from the appropriate list in the Access Level column. In this case.

The Net Access column shows that the rights inherited from the parent folder are equivalent to the Schedule access level. In this example. View.13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects particularly useful when you are working with inheritance. and Full Control. For more information. For a complete listing of the object rights that make up each access level. View On Demand. Tip: By default. because it allows users to inherit the greatest rights when they belong to multiple groups: • When you assign an access level to a group. This is important. The available predefined access levels are No Access. the Everyone group inherits rights from a parent folder—one that is not displayed on this screen. • 320 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .” The system then denies the “not specified” rights by default. see “Access levels” on page 565. then he or she inherits the combination of each group’s rights. Click Cancel to exit without making changes. Instead. each access level grants some rights and leaves the other rights “not specified. the Schedule access level includes and adds to the rights that are granted by the View access level. The Advanced Rights page displays the user’s full array of object rights that have been specified explicitly and/or inherited. you prevent the user from inheriting rights that he or she may have otherwise acquired by virtue of group membership. Tip: If you want to view the individual object rights that make up a user’s (or group’s) Net Access. Although access levels grant predefined sets of object rights. they do not explicitly deny any object rights. Setting common access levels An access level is essentially a predefined set of object rights. users or groups who have rights to a folder will inherit the same rights for any object that you subsequently publish to that folder. Consequently. Schedule. he or she inherits the greatest possible rights. For detailed tutorials that walk you through sample implementations of object rights. each access level builds upon the rights granted by the previous level. If the user is a member of multiple groups. see “Customizing a ‘top-down’ inheritance model” on page 331. Then publish objects to that folder. In other words. Thus. each user in the group will have at least that level of access to the object. When you assign an access level directly to a user. when a user is a member of multiple groups. click the corresponding Access Level list and select Advanced. you ensure that the user has only that level of access to the object. For example. BusinessObjects Enterprise provides a set of access levels that allow you to set common object security levels quickly. Access levels are based on a model of increasing rights: beginning with No Access and ending with Full Control. the best strategy is to set the appropriate rights for users and groups at the folder level first. see “Setting advanced object rights” on page 322.

Users can then log on to the CMC and add. and copy the object or folder. set parameters and database logon information. The user cannot. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 321 . It is the only access level that allows users to delete objects (folders. and the CMC enforce this right by ensuring that the object is not visible to the user. • Schedule The user or group is able to view the object or folder and its contents. however. • View If this access level is set at the folder level. the Publishing Wizard. without being members of the actual Administrators group. Instead. If this access level is set at the object level. add contents to the folder. schedule the object or refresh it against its data source. this access level is designed to provide a user or group with administrative control over one or more folders or objects. For more information. the user can view the object. They can also schedule to different formats and destinations. objects. and all generated instances of the object. it allows you to customize a user’s or group’s access to an object by selecting from the complete range of available object rights. see “Setting advanced object rights” on page 322. and remove content as required. and all generated instances of each object. • Advanced This access level does not include a predefined set of object rights. and pause the scheduling of instances that they own. including the object rights that are set on the folder or object. edit. InfoView. the user or group is able to view the folder. delete. and instances). and to generate instances by scheduling the object to run against the specified data source once or on a recurring basis. the user gains the right to refresh data “on demand” against the data source. Basically.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 This list provides a brief description of each access level: • No Access The user or group is not able to access the object or folder. pick servers to process jobs. The user or group can view. Full Control This access level grants all of the available advanced rights. • • View On Demand In addition to the rights provided by the Schedule access level. the objects contained within the folder. This access level also allows users to modify all of the object’s properties. the history of the object.

3. in the future. Use advanced rights. Tip: For detailed tutorials that walk you through sample implementations of object rights. To set an access level for a user or group Go to the Objects or Folders management area of the CMC. If the user or group is not listed. In the Access Level column. see “Rights and Access Levels” on page 563. Then publish objects to that folder. 6. For a detailed listing of the object rights that make up each access level. Locate the object whose rights you want to modify. 5. View On Demand. use advanced rights to explicitly deny a user or group any right that should not be permitted to change when. or Full Control) that is appropriate for the user or group. Tip: By default. see “Object rights for the Report Application Server” on page 568. the best strategy is to set the appropriate rights for users and groups at the folder level first. if you need to customize a user’s or group’s rights to a particular object or set of objects. View. In the Name column. The result is an increased flexibility as you define security levels for objects that you have published to BusinessObjects Enterprise. 322 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . users or groups who have rights to a folder will inherit the same rights for any object that you subsequently publish to that folder. and then click its Rights tab. the CMC allows you to make Advanced object rights settings for any user or group. These Advanced settings enable you to choose from a complete set of granular object rights. Setting advanced object rights To provide you with full control over object security. or if you want to customize the default inheritance patterns. Consequently. Schedule. for instance. Note: In the developer documentation. you make changes to group memberships or folder security levels. Most importantly. 4. click Add/Remove. Add the appropriate user or group and click OK. 2. You are returned to the object’s Rights tab. select the access level (No Access. see “Customizing a ‘top-down’ inheritance model” on page 331. 1. For details. Click Update. locate the user or group whose rights you want to specify.13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects Note: There is no predefined access level to grant users the rights required to create or modify reports through the Report Application Server (RAS). access levels are referred to as roles. Click the link to the object.

BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 323 . you must disable inheritance entirely when you need to explicitly grant a right that has been denied elsewhere to the user or group. click the list and select Advanced. Add the appropriate user or group and click OK. click the Advanced link in the Net Access column. To view or set advanced rights Go to the Objects or Folders management area of the CMC. 3. The available object rights are displayed in the Advanced Rights page. For complete details. If the user or group is not listed. You are returned to the object’s Rights tab. locate the user or group whose rights you want to specify. If the Access Level is already set to Advanced. and then click its Rights tab. click Add/Remove. Locate the object whose rights you want to modify. 1. The next step depends upon the entry that already appears in the Access Level list for this user or group: • • If the Access Level is not already set to Advanced. see “Priorities affecting advanced inheritance settings” on page 330. 4. 5. Click the link to the object. In the Name column. 2.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 Note: Because of the relative priorities assigned by BusinessObjects Enterprise to granted and denied rights. This example shows advanced rights being applied to the Guest user for an Employee Profile report.

if the Guest user’s rights should change on the report’s parent folder. Regardless of any future changes to the user’s group membership. click OK. the Guest user will retain these rights. Tip: For scalability and manageability. this demonstrates how you can use explicit rights to override a group’s rights for a particular group member. you can explicitly grant or deny any given right. BusinessObjects Enterprise treats it as having been denied. This demonstrates how inheritance can facilitate future changes to the overall security model. The Inherited column serves as an indicator to show how inherited rights affect the Guest user’s effective rights to this report object. so the rights are denied by default. the rights will also change for this report object. Again.” “Schedule the document to run.) In this example. This demonstrates how you can use explicit rights to override a group’s rights for a particular group member. some rights may remain “not specified”—that is. the user or group will automatically inherit the right at this level. even if its group membership is modified or changed completely. Because group inheritance is disabled. The remainder of the Advanced Rights page lists all available object rights and shows how each right applies to the Guest user. In this example. it is recommended that you leave as many rights as possible inherited.13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects The first two options specify which types of inheritance affect the Guest user’s rights to this object. these rights are not specified. the Guest user may inherit any rights that he or she has been granted to this report’s parent folder. The Explicitly Denied column works similarly to the Explicitly Granted column. because the system automatically updates those rights as you modify and update your security settings throughout the folder and group hierarchies. A user or group can be granted or denied a right by virtue of inheritance. or you can specify that you want certain rights to be inherited. the Guest user has been explicitly denied eleven rights (the right to “Add objects to the folder. To customize the overall security levels. Currently. they are neither granted nor denied. When you have made your changes on the Advanced Rights page. an explicitly denied right always prevents a user from performing the associated action. However.” and so on). If an inherited right is labelled as “Not Specified”. In this example. The Guest user is currently granted eleven rights to this report (the right to “View objects. the Guest user has two inherited rights (the right to “View document instances that the user owns” and to “Pause and Resume document instances that the user owns”). But. 324 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . The Explicitly Granted column shows which actions the Guest user is allowed to perform on this report. the Guest user cannot inherit rights by virtue of group membership. (And if the right is later granted for a parent group or object. In addition.” “Edit objects.” and so on).

Report. such as Crystal report objects. Note: This is only one type of object inheritance. These rights are grouped based on what type of file they apply to. and Web Intelligence Document. On the Advanced Rights pages.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 Tip: For detailed tutorials that walk you through sample implementations of object rights. Available rights are displayed for every object on the system for purposes of inheritance. Text. these groups make it easier to see where the rights will be applied. the “View objects” right is a base right: it applies equally well to folders. The four groups are General. these rights may apply to objects that inherit rights from the folder. Base rights and available rights The BusinessObjects Enterprise system defines a set of base rights that apply to all objects in the system. For more information. to reports. Additionally. and to other BusinessObjects Enterprise objects. each type of object provides an additional set of rights that apply only to that object type. the “Refresh the report’s data” right is displayed for the folder object so that you can grant a user the right to refresh the data in all reports for which the user inherits rights from this folder. you will find that all of the available rights are displayed for every object on the system. however. For example. the “Refresh the report’s data” right applies only to report objects. For example. so that you can set object security at the folder level (rather than repeating the same settings for every object in the folder). The Central Management Server (CMS) is the component that keeps track of available rights. When you are setting rights for folders. you can set up BusinessObjects Enterprise such that you can integrate new users and new content quickly and easily. you can reduce the amount of time it takes to secure the content that you have published to BusinessObjects Enterprise. By taking advantage of the ways in which object rights are inherited. see “Customizing a ‘top-down’ inheritance model” on page 331. For example. Although certain object-specific rights do not strictly apply to the folder object itself. In other words. see “Group and folder inheritance” on page 326. the object-specific right “Refresh the report’s data” appears in the Report folder because it only applies to report objects. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 325 . In addition to these base rights. Using inheritance to your advantage In regards to object rights. The list of available rights includes the base rights and all other object-specific rights that have been provided by particular object types. BusinessObjects Enterprise recognizes two types of inheritance: group inheritance and folder inheritance.

Folder inheritance allows users to inherit any rights that they have been granted on an object’s parent folder. Note: If you need to disable or modify inheritance patterns for a particular folder or object within your folder hierarchy. Then publish objects to that folder. if you create a user called Sample User. thus. When group inheritance is enabled for a user who belongs to more than one group. For example. Tip: By default. the Sales group will have View On Demand access to all of the reports. Group and folder inheritance Group inheritance allows users to inherit rights as the result of group membership. users or groups who have rights to a folder will inherit the same rights for any object that you subsequently publish to that folder. and you need only set the object rights once. Consequently. and the user is denied any right that remains completely “not specified”. Folder inheritance proves especially powerful when you organize BusinessObjects Enterprise content into a folder hierarchy that reflects your organization’s current security conventions. By default. at the folder level. it is recommended that you enable and disable inheritance with access levels whenever possible (instead of with advanced rights). suppose that you create a folder called Sales Reports. Additionally. the best strategy is to set the appropriate rights for users and groups at the folder level first. Group inheritance proves especially powerful when you organize all of your users into groups that coincide with your organization’s current security conventions. see “Customizing a ‘top-down’ inheritance model” on page 331. and add it to an existing group called Sales. 326 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . and you provide your Sales group with View On Demand access to this folder. you can do so with access levels or with advanced rights. then Sample User will automatically inherit the appropriate rights for each of the reports and folders that the Sales group has been added to. For detailed tutorials that walk you through sample implementations of object rights. the user is granted only those rights that are granted in one or more groups (explicitly or through access levels) and never explicitly denied. the rights of both groups are considered when the system checks credentials. every user that has rights to the Sales Reports folder will inherit the same rights to the reports that you subsequently publish to this folder. Consequently.13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects To facilitate administration. The user is denied any right that is explicitly denied in any group. For example. it is recommended that you make your initial settings at the top-level BusinessObjects Enterprise folder and disable inheritance only when necessary.

Schedule. Because you have disabled all inheritance. see “Inheritance with advanced rights” on page 328. 6. To disable inheritance with an access level Note: This procedure disables group and folder inheritance for a user account. click Add/Remove. Add the appropriate user or group and click OK. Click the link to the object. 6. 1. View On Demand. Locate the object whose rights you want to modify. You are returned to the object’s Rights tab. 2. For details. Locate the object whose rights you want to modify. ensure that both types of inheritance are enabled in the parent folder’s advanced rights settings. You can alternatively enable one or both types of inheritance with Advanced rights settings. Click Update. In the Access Level column. and then click its Rights tab. locate the user whose rights you want to specify. click Add/Remove. View. Add the appropriate user and click OK. or Full Control) that is appropriate for the user. 2. The Net Access column now displays the effective rights that the user or group has inherited for this object. 3. If the user or group is not listed. folder inheritance. see “Setting advanced object rights” on page 322.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 Enabling and disabling inheritance with access levels With access levels. this procedure does not prevent group members from inheriting rights by virtue of membership in other groups. Click the link to the object. you can enable or disable group inheritance. 4. and then click its Rights tab. In the Access Level column. You are returned to the object’s Rights tab. To enable inheritance with an access level Go to the Objects or Folders management area of the CMC. Go to the Objects or Folders management area of the CMC. For details. The Net Access column now displays the effective rights that the user has to the object. Click Update. select Inherited Rights for the user or group. the Net Access entry equals the Access Level entry. locate the user or group whose rights you want to specify. select the access level (No Access. 3. When applied to a group. If the user is not listed. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 327 . or both. 1. Note: If the entry displayed in the Net Access column is Advanced. In the Name column. In the Name column. 5. 4. 5.

To calculate the user’s effective rights. is provided for administrators and/or system architects who prefer to know exactly how the CMS calculates the rights a user has to any object. As the result. If folder inheritance is enabled for the user. the CMS determines the rights that the user has to the object’s parent folder. keep in mind that you can always assign a user a specific set of rights. but also the ways in which a user’s effective rights are calculated by the CMS. it is useful to understand not only the types of inheritance that are available. If the user possesses sufficient rights. Tip: When modifying inheritance patterns with Advanced rights settings. 2. Although the calculations performed by the CMS can become quite complex. Calculating a user’s effective rights When a user attempts to perform an action on a BusinessObjects Enterprise object. The CMS checks the rights that have been directly granted or denied to the user’s account. or by explicitly applying an Advanced setting in which both types of inheritance are disabled. the CMS permits the user to perform the requested action. and easy to maintain.13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects Inheritance with advanced rights When you apply an Advanced set of object rights to a user or group for a particular object. The CMS determines 328 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . The CMS immediately denies any right that is explicitly denied. consistent. Note: You see the “Username will inherit rights from its parent groups” option if you are setting rights for a user. see “Customizing a ‘topdown’ inheritance model” on page 331. On the Advanced Rights pages. the CMS determines the user’s rights to that object. there are several ways to keep your object security model clear. you can enable or disable group and folder inheritance together or individually. this option does not appear if you are setting rights for a group. either by explicitly applying a predefined access level. This sequence of steps. the CMS follows a complex algorithm. The algorithm is described here and then illustrated in a different way using pseudocode: 1. and its various possible outcomes. Tip: If an individual user’s account has not been assigned any rights to the object. then group inheritance is enabled by default. the settings for inheriting rights from parent folders or groups serve as powerful tools that allow you to customize inheritance patterns in many ways. To take full advantage of inheritance patterns and Advanced rights settings. see “Group and folder inheritance” on page 326. you can make all your object rights settings at the group level to save administrative effort. For more information on the two types of inheritance. For complete details on setting up a system that makes sense for your BusinessObjects Enterprise system.

you reduce this algorithm to three different steps (1. and folder inheritance is enabled for a group that the user belongs to. When you disable folder inheritance for a user. 3.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 3. The CMS denies any right that is explicitly denied (even if the right had already been explicitly granted). then the CMS determines the rights that the group has to the parent folder. 5. This provides you with the least complicated way of ensuring that a user has only those rights that you have explicitly granted to him or her for a particular object. As the result. Thus. the CMS grants the user only those rights that he or she has been explicitly granted. when both types of inheritance are enabled. In both cases. This pseudocode is provided as another way to illustrate and describe the algorithm that the CMS follows in order to determine whether a user is authorized to perform an action on a particular object: IF { (User granted right to object = True) OR [ (Inherit Parent Folder Rights = True) AND (User granted right to parent folder = True) ] OR [ (Inherit Group Rights = True) AND (Group granted right to object = True) ] OR [ (Inherit Group Rights = True) AND (Group granted right to parent folder = True) ] } BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 329 . the CMS grants the user only those rights that are explicitly granted in one or more locations and never explicitly denied. and 5). The CMS completes the algorithm by denying any rights that remain “Not Specified. The CMS denies any right that is explicitly denied in any group (even if the right had already been explicitly granted). the CMS determines the rights specified on the object for each of the groups that the user belongs to. When you disable both types of inheritance for a user.” 4. The CMS denies any right that is explicitly denied in any group (even if the right had already been explicitly granted). 2. you reduce this algorithm to two steps (1 and 5). When you disable group inheritance for a user. you reduce this algorithm to three steps (1. the CMS grants the user only those rights that are explicitly granted in one or more locations and never explicitly denied. If group inheritance is enabled for the user. these rights by ascending the inheritance tree to the level at which the inherited rights begin to take effect. If group inheritance is enabled for the user. and 5).

They have been summarized here for reference. or you could remove the Manager user from the Sales group. For the same folder. Because denied rights take precedence. there are several important considerations to keep in mind. The Manager user is a member of the Sales group. 330 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects AND { (User denied right to object = False) AND [ (Inherit Parent Folder Rights = False) OR ((Inherit Parent Folder Rights = True) AND (User denied right to parent folder = False)) ] AND [ (Inherit Group Rights = False) OR ((Inherit Group Rights = True) AND (Group denied right to object = False)) ] AND [ (Inherit Group Rights = False) OR ((Inherit Group Rights = True) AND (Group denied right to parent folder = False)) ] } THEN { User action authorized = True } ELSE { User action authorized = False } Priorities affecting advanced inheritance settings When you modify inheritance patterns with advanced rights. To remedy this situation. In this scenario. Denied rights take precedence over granted rights. the Manager user is effectively denied the ability to see the folder. these considerations appear elsewhere in this chapter. Where relevant. you could clear the “Respect current security by inheriting rights from parent groups” check box on the Advanced Rights page for the Manager user. This can cause seemingly contradictory results when inheritance is enabled. the “View objects” right has been explicitly granted to a Manager user. Suppose that the “View objects” right is explicitly denied to a Sales group for a particular folder of reports. and the “Respect current security by inheriting rights from parent groups” check box is selected. so long as the user account inherits rights from its parent group (Sales). the Manager user is both granted and denied the “See object” right to the folder.

users and groups cannot access any objects on the system. To this purpose. As you add folders and subfolders to the system. or you can create new groups that correspond to those used in the tutorial. the Inherited Rights column may label certain rights as “Not Specified. you will specify the object rights that particular groups have to certain folders on the system. inheritance.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 Rights that are not specified are denied by default. However. in order to secure particular BusinessObjects Enterprise content. On the Advanced Rights page for any object. You can use your own Enterprise. To prevent possible security breaches. you can customize your object-level security environment in many ways. and advanced rights. all users and groups are first granted rights to all objects on the system. this section provides two tutorials that shows how to set up object security from the top-level folder (the root folder) down: • “Setting up an open system of decreasing rights” on page 334 This detailed tutorial creates an open security model. NT. This section recommends two general ways of setting up object security such that you achieve the desired security levels without complicating future administrative tasks. Customizing a ‘top-down’ inheritance model With the flexibility offered by object rights. so too can that system become more difficult and time-consuming to maintain. In each tutorial. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 331 . If you do so. you reduce the administrative efforts now and later. By making all of your security settings at the group and folder levels. you increase the rights of users and groups. BusinessObjects Enterprise automatically denies rights that are not specified. By default. see “Creating groups for the tutorials” on page 332. For details on setting up these groups and subgroups. each user will inherit the appropriate rights for every folder and object on the system. as required.” This entry denotes rights that are neither granted nor denied by inheritance. After finishing each tutorial. you decrease the rights of users and groups. • “Setting up a closed system of increasing rights” on page 346 This shorter tutorial creates the basis for closed security model. or LDAP groups when following along with these tutorials. By default. you may decide to add users to each group and to publish objects to each folder. as required. in order to grant access to particular BusinessObjects Enterprise content. As you add folders and subfolders to the system. as the complexity of any security system increases.

so these two procedures show only how to create the remaining groups for the tutorials. 6. 4. Sales Japan. Sales Japan. 3. and Sales Report Designers. you need only create the Sales group and its Sales USA. Click New Group. Tip: Click the Users tab if you want to add your own users to this group. Use this description for the group: This group contains all users who work in Sales (worldwide). and Sales Managers subgroups. The Marketing group is added to the system and the page is refreshed. 332 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects Creating groups for the tutorials The object security tutorials make use of eight Enterprise groups. Sales. In the Description field. 5. Click OK. The Sales group has four additional subgroups: Sales USA. 1. To create the Sales and Marketing groups Go to the Groups management area of the CMC. Note: For the shorter tutorial entitled “Setting up a closed system of increasing rights” on page 346. The Administrators and Everyone groups are created by default when you install BusinessObjects Enterprise. type This group contains all users who work in Marketing. Sales Managers. Repeat steps 1 to 5 to create another group called Sales. The new group’s Properties tab appears. In the Group Name field. type Marketing. Everyone. 2. and Marketing. The four primary groups are named Administrators.

Tip: Click the Users tab if you want to add your own users to this group. then click the > arrow. The Modify Member of page appears. The Sales group is added to the “Sales USA is a member of” list. Click the Member of tab. then click the Member of button. 2. type This group contains all users who work in Sales in the USA. Click OK. 5. as displayed here: BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 333 . 7.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 1. To create the Sales subgroups Go to the Groups management area of the CMC. 4. 3. In the Group Name field. type Sales USA In the Description field. Click New Group. In the Available groups list. 6. select Sales. The Sales USA group is added to the system and the page is refreshed.

As you add folders and subfolders to the system. Click OK. The Sales USA group is now a member (or subgroup) of the Sales group. You are returned to the “Member of” tab. If you now return to the Groups management area of the CMC.13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 8. Use the following values for the Group Name and Description fields: Group Name Sales Japan Description This group contains all users who work in Sales in Japan. 334 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Sales Report Designers This group contains all users who design and publish reports for the Sales teams. as required. in order to secure particular BusinessObjects Enterprise content. Repeat steps 1 to 8 to create the remaining Sales subgroups for the tutorials. Setting up an open system of decreasing rights This tutorial shows how to create an open security model. all of the new groups are displayed as follows: You are now ready to proceed to either of the object security tutorials: • • “Setting up an open system of decreasing rights” on page 334. wherein groups of users are first granted rights to all objects on the system by default. 9. you decrease the rights of users and groups. “Setting up a closed system of increasing rights” on page 346. Sales Managers This group contains all users who manage a Sales team.

you are creating folders for several groups within your organization. you minimize the need to repeatedly customize object rights throughout your folder hierarchy. If the staff member is also a Manager. Administrators require Full Control access to all folders and objects on the system. Sales staff can also view reports for their own regions. The Marketing group needs Full Control access to its own set of folders that no other user can access (other than Administrators). Sales Managers are allowed to refresh most reports against the database to view the most recent data. With this procedure. The Sales groups need a hierarchy of folders containing worldwide reports. you set security on the top-level folder in order to meet your first three security requirements: • • • Everyone must be able to view the majority of your reports. regional reports. less detailed tutorial. you also need to give some users the ability to add subfolders and to publish reports. and management reports: • • • • All Sales staff can view worldwide reports. Sales Managers require Full Control access to the management reports. by setting rights here first.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 In this scenario. report. You have some reports that you want to add to the system immediately. Administrators require Full Control access to all folders and objects on the system. he or she can view and refresh reports from all regions. or other object that you add to this top-level folder will by default inherit rights from this folder. Sales Report Designers require custom administrative privileges to all Sales folders. For a shorter. Changing default rights on the top-level folder The first step is to set object rights on the top-level BusinessObjects Enterprise folder. Each subfolder. see “Setting up a closed system of increasing rights” on page 346. Sales Managers are allowed to refresh most reports against the database to view the most recent data. These are your security requirements for each folder: • • • • • Everyone must be able to view the majority of your reports. This folder serves as the root for all other folders and objects that you add to the system. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 335 . Because some groups plan to add their own reports later. So.

You are returned to the Rights tab on the Settings page. your system meets your first three security requirements. and so on. 3. This provides the Sales Managers group with sufficient rights to refresh reports. 336 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Now that you have created an open basis for your object security model. subfolders. 5. Ensure that you grant the Sales Managers group View On Demand access. 6. and select View. You now need to reduce the rights of the Everyone group and to increase the rights of the Sales Managers.13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 1. In the Available groups list. 8. customer list reports. for instance. or reports that you subsequently publish to BusinessObjects Enterprise. The Everyone. The rights for the Everyone group are reduced and the View access level is now displayed in the Net Access column. purchasing order reports. The Add/Remove page appears. the Everyone and the Administrators groups are granted access to this folder. Decreasing rights to a private folder Another security requirement for this tutorial is that the Marketing group needs Full Control access to their own set of folders that no other user can access. To accomplish this. 4. create folders for all of your generally accessible inventory reports. then click OK. In the Select Operation list. Click Add/Remove. Click Update. Click the > arrow. you will proceed to restricting access to certain folders within the system. To change the rights on the top-level folder Go to the Settings management area of the CMC. Click the Access Level list that corresponds to the Everyone group. By default. you will create a private folder called Marketing Only and ensure that only the appropriate group of users has access to its contents. 2. You might. 7. change the Access Level list and click Update. Click the Rights tab. Administrators. Now. click Add/Remove Groups. select Sales Managers. Now you will customize the top-level rights for the Sales Managers group. and Sales Managers groups will initially inherit these rights for any folders. If necessary.

The Net Access column shows that you have granted the Marketing group Full Control access to this folder. 14. type Marketing Only In the Description field. 13.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 1. then click OK. Click New Folder. and export reports to all available destinations and formats. 5. They can add and delete reports. Click the Rights tab. you need to customize the rights that various Sales groups have to a hierarchical set of Sales folders. 6. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 337 . The Net Access column shows that you have secured this folder from all users other than Administrators. and subfolders. select the following rights for each group: • • • 8. To decrease rights to a private folder Go to the Folders management area of the CMC. 4. To complete this tutorial. Click Add/Remove. 10. and they can view. 11. 2. Administrators: (Inherited Rights) Everyone: No Access Sales Managers: No Access Click Update. click Add/Remove Groups. The Marketing group is granted access to the folder. in the Folder Name field. In the Select Operation list. You are returned to the Rights tab. you will grant the Marketing group Full Control access to this folder. 12. The Add/Remove page appears. select Marketing. folders. In the Available groups list. 7. Click the Access Level list that corresponds to the Marketing group. and select Full Control. You need to change the default setting to grant them Full Control access. you will see how to create multiple folders quickly when you publish a set of reports to BusinessObjects Enterprise. 9. In the Access Level column. Members of this group now have the ability to perform all tasks in this folder. 3. On the Properties tab. Next. Click Update. type This folder is accessible only to Marketing. Before setting the rights for each group. Click the > arrow. Click OK. schedule.

as in the earlier sections of this tutorial. so the folder for those reports requires the lowest level of security. Arrange your reports (. To create a set of folders while publishing reports On your local hard drive.rpt files) in the new folders on your local hard drive. However. 338 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . you must place at least one report file in each of the folders that you have created on your local hard drive. en. all Sales staff can view the worldwide reports. or jp. you will first create a set of folders that places the most general content at the top of the directory tree. In this case. create a set of folders that correspond to the folders you want to add to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Note: To complete this procedure. for example. de. The management reports will be located in subfolders of each of the regional folders. depending upon your version of BusinessObjects Enterprise). the Publishing Wizard will not create the appropriate directories on the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. regional reports. fr. Because this tutorial sets up a system of decreasing rights.13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects Publishing a set of folders and reports The final security requirements for this tutorial are related to the Sales group and its subgroups. If you do not have any of your own reports. The regional reports will go in subfolders that are accessible only to users who belong to the appropriate regional Sales group. Otherwise. The sample reports are typically installed to C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\Samples\language \Reports (replace language with. You could create this set of folders using the CMC. if you already have a set of reports. and management reports. the Sales folders are named and arranged hierarchically as follows: 2. use some of the sample reports included with BusinessObjects Enterprise. They require a hierarchy of folders containing worldwide reports. 1. For this tutorial. the Publishing Wizard provides the quickest way to add content and create folders at the same time.

The Select A File dialog box appears. type your BusinessObjects Enterprise credentials. 8. when it appears. 4. 5. and then click OK. In the System field. In the User Name and Password fields. Click Add Folders. From the Authentication list. 7. Select the top level Worldwide Sales folder that you created on your local hard drive.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 3. Select the Include subfolders check box. From the BusinessObjects Enterprise XI Programs group. 9. select the appropriate authentication type. type the name of the CMS to which you want to add objects. start the Publishing Wizard and. 6. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 339 . Click Next. click Next. 10.

Name the folder Worldwide Sales and ensure that it is located at the top of the directory tree. as shown here: 340 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 11. All of the reports are added to the list. The Specify Location dialog box appears. In the Specify Location dialog box. 12. click New Folder.13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects You are returned to the Select A File dialog box. Click Next. 13.

17. For more information on the rest of the Publishing Wizard. Proceed through the rest of the Publishing Wizard and make any desired changes to your reports. 16. 15. The Confirm Location dialog box appears. Click Next. click Next to accept all the default values. Click Next. The actual report files are arranged in the appropriate folders. Click Finish to close the Publishing Wizard. then click Next. You can see here that the Regional Sales folders will be created below the Worldwide Sales folder. see “Publishing with the Publishing Wizard” on page 376. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 341 . it displays a summary: 18. When the Publishing Wizard has added the reports and folders to the system. Tip: If you are publishing sample reports for the purpose of this tutorial. The Specify Folder Hierarchy dialog box appears. Select Duplicate the folder hierarchy to duplicate the local folder hierarchy on the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. and the Managers Only folders will be created as additional subfolders.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 14.

In the Select Operation list. 3. 2. You are returned to the Rights tab. click Add/Remove Groups. 5. In the Available groups list. select Sales and Sales Report Designers. then click OK. Click the link to the Worldwide Sales folder. 4. Sales Report Designers require custom administrative privileges to all Sales folders. he or she can view and refresh reports from all regions. you are ready to set the object rights for each level of reporting content. 342 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . If the staff member is also a Manager. Setting the base rights on the Sales folders Now that you have used the Publishing Wizard to add reports and create the appropriate folders and subfolders. 1. Sales staff can also view reports for their own regions. To set the base rights on the Worldwide Sales folder Go to the Folders management area of the CMC. click Add/Remove. Tip: Use CTRL+click to select multiple groups. 6. The security requirements are as follows: • • • • All Sales staff can view worldwide reports. Sales Managers require Full Control access to the management reports.13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects You are now ready to set each Sales group’s object rights for the new set of Sales folders. Click the > arrow. On the folder’s Rights tab.

You will use advanced rights to make these changes in the next procedure. 5. For now. In the Access Level column. 8. 2. To create a group of Sales folder administrators If you are not already there. 1. Click Apply. Creating a group of folder administrators This section of the tutorial shows how to provide a particular group of users with a customized level of administrative control over a set of folders. In the Access Level list for the Sales Report Designers group. clear the “Worldwide Sales” will inherit rights from its parent folders check box. select the following rights for each group: • • • • • Administrators: Inherited Rights Everyone: No Access Sales: View Sales Managers: Inherited Rights Sales Report Designers: This group requires additional rights to publish content to this folder. you can accomplish this with the Full Control access level. uses advanced rights to grant the Sales Report Designers group a particular set of administrative privileges to all Sales folders. 3. select the following rights: 4. go to the Rights tab of the Worldwide Sales folder.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 7. so group members can administer all the Sales folders. In general. The Advanced Rights page appears. the advanced rights that you specify will be the only rights that group members have to the folder. This example. Click Update. you will not let any group member delete objects that have been added to a Sales folder. • • Modify the rights users have to objects Delete objects BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 343 . In the Explicitly Denied column. Now that you have disabled all rights inheritance. You now need to grant the Sales Report Designers group a set of advanced rights. however. leave the Access Level list with the default settings. To ensure that you completely break all inheritance patterns. select Advanced. The Net Access column is updated to show your new security settings. However. You will use this page to grant group members a high level of control over the folder and its contents.

if you prefer to retain all administrative control over report-processing servers. You are returned to the Rights tab for the Worldwide Sales folder. If the staff member is also a Manager. 2. you will proceed to decrease rights as you descend the folder hierarchy.JP folder. 6. you could deny the “Define server groups to process jobs” right. Decreasing rights to the Sales subfolders Recall that the security requirements for the regional sales reports are as follows: • • Sales staff can view reports for their own region and can refresh these reports against the database to view the most recent data. Now that you have set object rights on the uppermost Sales folder. Click the > arrow. you could deny the “Copy objects to another folder” right. 1. to prevent these folder administrators from copying confidential reports to public folders. The Net Access column now shows that the Sales Report Designers group has Advanced rights to this folder. 5.JP folder and click its Rights tab. You are returned to the Rights tab of the Regional Sales . In the Explicitly Granted column. select all remaining rights. then click OK. Tip: Click the Advanced link in the Net Access column when you need to review or modify a set of advanced rights that have already been applied to a user or group. select Sales Japan. In the Available groups list. click Add/Remove Groups. In the Select Operation list. select the following rights for each group: • • • Administrators: Inherited Rights Everyone: Inherited Rights Sales: No Access 344 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . To decrease rights to the regional Sales folders Go to the Regional Sales . 3. You will use the various Sales groups to decrease rights appropriately for each Regional Sales folder. Click OK. In the Access Level column. 7. For instance. Click Add/Remove. Or.13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects Tip: You may choose to explicitly deny additional rights to suit your needs. he or she can view and refresh reports from all regions. 6. 4.

The Net Access column shows your new security settings. and all other users are prevented from accessing the folder (except for Administrators). select the following rights for each group: • • • Administrators: Inherited Rights Everyone: Inherited Rights Sales: Inherited Rights BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 345 .JP folder and click its Subfolders tab. 2. Sales Managers. 1. Members who do not belong to one of these groups are completely restricted from the folder. 7. and Sales Report Designers groups all have Full Control access to the folder. The Sales Report Designers retain their advanced rights.USA folder. Click the link to the Managers Only folder and click its Rights tab. In the Access Level column. 5. Repeat steps 1 to 6 for the Regional Sales . The Rights tab of this Managers Only folder now shows that the Administrators. In the Access Level column. but grant View On Demand access to the Sales USA group (instead of to the Sales Japan group). Go to the Regional Sales . Administrators: Inherited Rights Everyone: Inherited Rights Sales: Inherited Rights Sales Japan: No Access Sales Managers: Full Control Sales Report Designers: Inherited Rights Click Update. which allows them to refresh reports against the database to view the latest data. 3. 8. the Sales Japan and the Sales Managers groups have View On Demand access. You are now ready to complete the tutorial by customizing security for the final level of Sales folders—the Managers Only folders. As required. To decrease rights to the Managers Only folders Go to the Regional Sales . Click the link to the Managers Only folder and click its Rights tab. select the following rights for each group: • • • • • • 4. 6. Sales Japan: View On Demand Sales Managers: Inherited Rights Sales Report Designers: Inherited Rights Click Update.Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 • • • 7.USA folder and click its Subfolders tab.

You can access these applications from the Client Samples area of the Crystal Enterprise Launchpad. You have now reached the end of this tutorial. Administrators require Full Control access to all folders and objects on the system. The Rights tab of this Managers Only folder shows again that the Administrators. the results are essentially incompatible with the design of InfoView.13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects • • • 8. as required. by contrast. The Sales groups need a hierarchy of folders containing management reports and regional reports: • • Only the Sales Managers can view the management reports and all regional reports. and then gradually increases access to subfolders further down the folder hierarchy. Sales staff can only view reports for their own region. you are creating folders for several groups within your organization. In this scenario. they have no way of browsing its subfolders (even if they have Full Control over those subfolders 346 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . These are your security requirements for each folder: • • • The majority of your reports should be inaccessible to most users. if users cannot access a top-level folder. The closed security model works best when you deploy a web desktop or other application that provides users with a list of all reports and/or folders to which they have access. Setting up a closed system of increasing rights This tutorial shows how to set up the basis for a closed security model. Sales Managers: Full Control Sales Report Designers: Inherited Rights Sales USA: No Access Click Update. Members who do not belong to one of these groups are completely restricted from the folder. Sales Managers. you increase the rights of users and groups. so they can access their BusinessObjects Enterprise content. and Sales Report Designers groups all have Full Control access to the folder. The sample Report Thumbnail Client and the Inframe Client applications provide examples that are compatible with a closed security model. Thus. InfoView. wherein groups of users are first denied rights to all objects on the system by default. Because this scenario first completely restricts access to the top-level folders. As you add folders and subfolders to the system. adheres to a hierarchical view of the system’s folder structure.

report. With this procedure. You need only reduce the rights of the Everyone group. Click the Rights tab. be able to search for reports by name or description. by setting rights here first. So. This procedure gives the Everyone group No Access to all published content. To change the rights on the top-level folder Go to the Settings management area of the CMC. users will need to search for specific reports by name or description. see “Setting up an open system of decreasing rights” on page 334. you have to break all inheritance patterns in order to grant the same right further down the folder hierarchy. This folder serves as the root for all other folders and objects that you add to the system. 2. Administrators require Full Control access to all folders and objects on the system. Note: If users access reports through BusinessObjects Enterprise. they will be unable to browse subfolders once you make this initial security setting. or other object that you add to this top-level folder will inherit rights from this folder by default. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 347 .Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects 13 and their contents). you minimize the need to repeatedly customize object rights throughout your folder hierarchy. The rights for the Everyone group are reduced and No Access is displayed in the Net Access column. This is how you set the basis for a closed security model. Do not use advanced rights to explicitly deny rights to the Everyone group (or any other group) at the top-level folder of your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. Restricting access from the top-level folder The first step is to set object rights on the top-level BusinessObjects Enterprise folder. and select No Access. Users will. Click Update. If you implement this closed security model in conjunction with InfoView. more detailed tutorial. you set security on the top-level folder in order to meet your first two security requirements: • • The majority of your reports should be inaccessible to most users. because once a right has been explicitly denied. 1. Each subfolder. For a lengthier. however. Click the Access Level list that corresponds to the Everyone group. 4. 3.

13 Controlling User Access Controlling users’ access to objects Now. click Add/Remove Groups. your system meets your first two security requirements. In the Available Groups list. type Management Reports Click OK. In the Select Operation list. then click OK. in the Folder Name field. and select View. Click the Access Level list for the Sales Managers group. 6. 348 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . you create the folder hierarchy and set access levels in order to meet the remaining security requirements: • • 1. They require a hierarchy of folders containing management reports and regional reports. Only the Sales Managers can view the management reports and all regional reports. the most secure content will be stored at the top of the directory tree. As required. and the Administrators group retains Full Control in order to maintain the system. Because this tutorial sets up a system of increasing rights. Now that you have created a closed basis for your object security model. you will increase access to certain folders within the system. Click Update. On the Properties tab. You are returned to the Rights tab of the Management Reports folder. Sales staff can only view reports for their own region. To provide minimal access to the management reports Go to the Folders management area of the CMC. With these procedures. 2. On the Rights tab. The Everyone group is prevented from seeing all subsequently published content. Increasing access by descending the folder hierarchy The remaining security requirements for this tutorial are related to the Sales group and its subgroups. Click New Folder. 8. 3. the Everyone and Administrators groups have inherited the rights that you set on the top-level BusinessObjects Enterprise folder. The Rights tab now shows that the Sales Managers group has View access to this folder and to any objects that you subsequently publish to it. click Add/Remove. 9. 5. Click the > arrow. 10. The new folder is created and the page is refreshed. 7. select Sales Managers. 4.

On the Properties tab. click New Folder. in the Folder Name field.JP Click OK. 8. click Add/Remove. 6. and Sales Managers groups automatically inherit the appropriate rights for this folder. The new folder is created and the page is refreshed. In the Available Groups list. 7. The Rights tab now shows that the Sales Japan group has View access to this folder and to any objects that you subsequently publish to it. Click the > arrow. click Add/Remove Groups. You are returned to the Rights tab of the Management Reports folder. Repeat this procedure to create a subfolder called Regional Reports USA and to provide the Sales USA group with View access to the folder. 4. When you finish. select Sales Japan. To provide selective access to the regional reports If you are not already there. Everyone. then click OK. 5. The Administrators.Controlling User Access Controlling access to applications 13 Now you need only create folders for the regional reports and grant access to the appropriate regional Sales groups. You have now reached the end of this tutorial. the Rights tab of the Regional Reports . Click Update. 9. you can grant users or groups the ability to: • • • change their preferences organize folders search BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 349 . type Regional Reports . In the Access Level list for the Sales Japan group. 1. On the Rights tab. 2. For InfoView. 11. select View.USA folder shows that you have set the rights as required for this tutorial. Controlling access to applications You can use rights to control users’ access to certain features in BusinessObjects Enterprise applications. go to the Management Reports folder. On the Subfolders tab. You can grant or deny users access to the Central Management Console. 3. 10. In the Select Operation list.

you may want to deny your users the ability to organize their own folders. click Advanced. To grant access to a Business Objects application’s features Go to the BusinessObjects Enterprise Applications management area of the CMC. Click Add/Remove to add users or groups you want to give access to the features. On the Add/Remove page. Click the link for the application whose access rights you want to change. Click the Rights tab. 5. 7. select the Add Users operation. 8. Click OK. select Add/ Remove Groups. Note: By default. Tip: If you have many users on your system. 6. 3. 4. 1. Add Users. On the Rights tab. 350 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .13 Controlling User Access Controlling access to applications • • filter object listings by object type view the Favorites folder For example. then use the “Look for” field to search for a particular account. 2. in the Select Operation list. Select the user or group you want to grant access to the features. if you have already created your users’ folders using a standard naming convention. all users have access to these features. or Remove Users.

choose Inherited. This section describes how to grant rights for managing users. Or you may have one administrator who handles high-level management of BusinessObjects Enterprise. Note: For the Web Intelligence application. Explicitly Granted. For each feature. The user can select this view format and report panel option in the Web Intelligence Document Preferences tab in InfoView. servers. make sure you grant access to the Allows interactive HTML viewing option in order for users to be able use the Interactive view format and use the Query HTML panel. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 351 . With all of the tasks facing a BusinessObjects Enterprise administrator. you may want people from different departments to manage their own BusinessObjects Enterprise users and groups. or Explicitly Denied for the user or group.Controlling User Access Controlling administrative access 13 9. 10. you can use rights to divide administrative tasks between functional groups within your organization. but you want all server management to be handled by people in your IT department. Click OK. it can be very helpful to delegate responsibility to other managers and groups. Controlling administrative access In addition to controlling access to objects and settings. and server groups. groups. For example.

352 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . then use the “Look for” field to search for a particular account. To choose specific rights. only the user and the administrator have the right to access a user’s inbox. By default. as required. 1. 10. On the Rights tab. Add Users. You can also send existing report objects or instances to a user’s inbox by using the “Send to” feature. The Add/Remove page appears. For more information. 8. Click Add/Remove to add users or groups that you want to give access to the selected user or group. 3. Click Update. The inbox has the same name as the user. choose Advanced. or Remove Users. In the Select Operation list. Note: For complete details on the predefined access levels and advanced rights. see “Selecting a destination” on page 481. select the Add Users operation. When scheduling a report. see “Rights and Access Levels” on page 563. Click the Rights tab. Click OK. 6. change the Access Level for each user or group. 4. 9. select Add/Remove Groups. 2. Select the user or group you want to grant access to. 5. and “Sending an object or instance” on page 420. the system automatically creates an inbox for that user. Controlling access to user inboxes When you add a user. Use the following procedure to change the access rights to a user’s inbox as needed. To grant access to a user or group Go to the Users or Groups management area of the CMC. Select the user or group you want to grant access to the specified user or group. you can specify that you want the system to store the report instances in the inbox of one or more users. 7. Tip: If you have many users on your system.13 Controlling User Access Controlling administrative access Controlling access to users and groups You can delegate user and group administration to the appropriate people in your organization by granting specific access rights. User inboxes can serve as destinations for scheduled reports.

To grant a user access to another user’s inbox Go to the Inbox management area of the CMC. 2. Or you may want different groups within your organization to have control over their own server management. To grant access to a server or server group Go to the Servers or Server Groups management area of the CMC. Note: For complete details on the predefined access levels and advanced rights. you may need to provide access to other people using those servers. see “Rights and Access Levels” on page 563. However. you may want to limit server management to the BusinessObjects Enterprise administrator. allowing them to perform tasks such as starting and stopping servers. You may also want to delegate BusinessObjects Enterprise server administration tasks to other people. Click the Rights tab. as required. 7. 3. 10. Click Add/Remove to add users or groups that you want to give access to the selected user or group. Controlling access to servers and server groups You can use rights to grant people access to servers and server groups. 3. 1. To choose specific rights. 4. Select the server or server group you want to grant access to. 6. you need to grant them rights to the servers. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 353 . change the Access Level for each user or group. Click Update. 2. choose Advanced. Select the inbox you want to grant access to. Many organizations have a group of IT professionals dedicated to server management. Depending on your system configuration and security concerns. In the Select Operation list. Select the user or group you want to grant access to the specified inbox. The Add/Remove page appears.Controlling User Access Controlling administrative access 13 1. On the Rights tab. 5. select Add/Remove Groups. Click the Rights tab. Click OK. If your server team needs to perform regular server maintenance tasks that require them to shut down and start up servers. or Remove Users. Add Users. 9. 8.

To control who has access to a universe Go to the Universes management area of the CMC. You are returned to the object’s Rights tab. 354 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . select the Add Users operation. choose Advanced. 3. Controlling access to universes You can use rights to grant people access to universes. select Add/Remove Groups. The next step depends upon the entry that already appears in the Access Level list for this user or group: • • If the Access Level is not already set to Advanced. allowing them to create and view Web Intelligence documents that use universes and connections.13 Controlling User Access Controlling administrative access 4. 9. 5. If the Access Level is already set to Advanced. change the Access Level for each user or group. Click Update. If the user or group is not listed. 6. 1. In the Name column. Add the appropriate user or group and click OK. Click the Rights tab. locate the user or group whose rights you want to specify. Click Add/Remove to add users or groups that you want to give access to the selected server or server group. or Remove Users. as required. The Add/Remove page appears. In the Select Operation list. Select the user or group you want to grant access to the specified server or server group. then use the “Look for” field to search for a particular account. Click OK. click Add/Remove. Click the link for the universe. Note: For complete details on the predefined access levels and advanced rights. click the list and select Advanced. click the Advanced link in the Net Access column. 4. On the Rights tab. 8. 2. To choose specific rights. Tip: If you have many users on your system. 5. Add Users. see “Rights and Access Levels” on page 563. 7.

You are returned to the object’s Rights tab. If the Access Level is already set to Advanced. In the Name column. Click the Rights tab. You are returned to the object’s Rights tab. Add the appropriate user or group and click OK. 2. click Add/Remove. locate the user or group whose rights you want to specify. The next step depends upon the entry that already appears in the Access Level list for this user or group: • • If the Access Level is not already set to Advanced. In the Name column. Add the appropriate user or group and click OK. If the user or group is not listed. click the list and select Advanced. 2. 3. If the user or group is not listed. You can either set the rights to all universes by using the Rights button on the Universe Connections page. The next step depends upon the entry that already appears in the Access Level list for this user or group: • • If the Access Level is not already set to Advanced. 5. 4. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 355 . To view or set the access levels for all universe connections Go to the Universe Connections management area of the CMC. 4. Click the link for the connection. click the Advanced link in the Net Access column. 3. click Add/Remove. allowing them to create and view Web Intelligence documents that use universes and universe connections. click the Advanced link in the Net Access column. locate the user or group whose rights you want to specify.Controlling User Access Controlling administrative access 13 Controlling access to universe connections You can use rights to grant people access to universe connections. or you can set the rights to individual universe connections. Click the Rights button. 1. If the Access Level is already set to Advanced. 1. To view or set who has access to a specific universe connection Go to the Connections management area of the CMC. click the list and select Advanced.

13 Controlling User Access Controlling administrative access 356 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

Organizing Objects chapter .

You can use folders to separate content into logical groups. you could organize your content into departmental folders. or even your database table structure. Because you can set security at the folder level. you can organize data according to multiple criteria and improve both security and navigation. because you can set object rights and limits once at the folder or category level. such as managers or VPs. About folders and categories Folders and categories provide you with the ability to organize and facilitate content administration.14 Organizing Objects Organizing objects overview Organizing objects overview Creating an intuitive and logical organizational structure is the key to ensuring that your users can find the information they need quickly and easily. Creating and deleting folders There are several ways to create new folders in BusinessObjects Enterprise. and setting appropriate rights for them. such as departments. 358 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . This organizational model allows you set security on groups of documents based on department or job role. Working with folders Folders are objects used to organize documents. By combining folders and categories. regions. For example. Then use categories to set up an alternate system of organization. BusinessObjects Enterprise provides two methods for organizing content: folders and categories. new objects that you add to a folder or category inherit the object rights that are specified for the folder or category. They are useful when there are a number of reports that a department or area requires frequent access to. and then use categories to create an alternate filing system that divides content according to different roles in your organization. you can use folders as a tool for controlling access to information. go to the Folders management area to create new folders and to add subfolders to the existing hierarchy of folder objects. It’s good practice to set up folders that represent a structure that already exists in your organization. rather than setting them for each report or object. By default. In the Central Management Console (CMC).

Subfolders. On the Properties tab. Limits. This example creates a new Marketing folder: 4. You can now use the Objects. and its Properties tab is refreshed. in effect. and keywords of the new folder. and Rights tabs to add objects and to change settings for this folder. This method provides you with an efficient way of creating multiple folders and subfolders at the same time. Click New Folder. Folders created in this way are. Creating a new folder This procedure shows how to create a new folder at the top of your folder hierarchy. description. you can duplicate your local directory structure on the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. 2.Organizing Objects Working with folders 14 Tip: When you publish local directories and subdirectories of reports with the Publishing Wizard. subfolders of the top-level (or root) BusinessObjects Enterprise folder. 3. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 359 . type the name. 1. see “Publishing with the Publishing Wizard” on page 376. Click OK. The new folder is added to the system. For details. Go to the Folders management area of the CMC.

Click New Folder. and its Properties tab is refreshed. The new folder is added to the system. The initial level of folders is displayed. Go to the Folders management area of the CMC. Tip: You can browse through existing subfolders to add a new folder elsewhere in the folder hierarchy. On the Properties tab. 2. Click OK. The Subfolders tab appears. 4. In the Title column. Subfolders. and Rights tabs to add objects and to change settings for this folder. 3.14 Organizing Objects Working with folders Creating a new subfolder at any level 1. When you have found the right parent folder. You can now use the Objects. Click the Subfolders tab. 6. type the name and description of the new folder. go to its Subfolders tab. 360 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Limits. 5. click the link to the folder where you want to add a subfolder.

all of the folder’s object rights are retained. When you move a folder. Click Delete. Tip: Select multiple check boxes to delete several folders from their parent folder. For instance. Then make your selection on the parent folder’s Subfolders tab. Then make your selection on the parent folder’s Subfolders tab. If the folder you want to copy or move is not at the top level. Instead. For instance. reports. depending upon whether you copy or move the folder: • When you copy a folder. If the folder you want to delete is not at the top level. To delete folders Go to the Folders management area of the CMC. if you move a private Sales folder into a publicly accessible folder. all subfolders. the newly created folder does not retain the object rights of the original. the contents of the new Sales folder will be accessible to all users who have rights to the Public folder. Tip: Select multiple check boxes to copy or move several folders from their parent folder to a different folder. the Sales folder will remain inaccessible to most users. • 1. Select the check box associated with the folder you want to delete. 2. if you copy a private Sales folder into a Public folder. and click OK to confirm. 1.Organizing Objects Working with folders 14 Deleting folders When you delete a folder. and other objects contained within it are removed entirely from the system. the objects contained within it are also copied or moved. Copying and moving folders When you copy or move a folder. Select the check box associated with the folder that you want to copy or move. locate its parent folder. To copy or move a folder Go to the Folders management area of the CMC. the copy inherits the object rights that are set on its new parent folder. 2. locate its parent folder. 3. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 361 . BusinessObjects Enterprise treats the folder’s object rights differently.

4. and Show Subfolders to browse the folder hierarchy. to the new destination. Click Copy/Move. Next. Tip: If there are many folders on your system. Select the Destination folder from the list. The folder you selected is copied or moved. or click Previous. The Copy/Move Folder page appears. Adding a report to a new folder You can add objects individually to any folder in a number of ways. Follow this procedure to add a report to a new folder that you have just created. as requested. use the “Look for” field to search. For complete information on publishing reports and other objects. Click OK. Select the action to perform: • • 5. 362 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .14 Organizing Objects Working with folders 3. see “Publishing overview” on page 374. Move to: Moves the folder. 6. Copy to: Makes a copy of the folder.

2. To add a report to a new folder Once you’ve created the new folder. type the full path to the report. click Browse to perform a search.Organizing Objects Working with folders 14 1. The New Object page appears. 4. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 363 . Click New Object. Preview the first page of the report and save your changes. 3. clear the Generate thumbnail for the report check box. open the report in Crystal Reports and click Summary Info on the File menu. On the Report tab. Select the “Save preview picture” check box and click OK. click its Objects tab. in the File name field. If you do not know the path. Tip: To display thumbnails for a report. If you do not want the user to see a thumbnail preview of the report in BusinessObjects Enterprise.

Click OK. Specifying folder rights Follow this procedure to change the object rights for a new folder that you have just created. The Add/Remove page appears. 364 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . To specify rights for a new folder Once you’ve created the new folder. use the “Look for” field to search. Ensure that the correct folder name appears in the Destination field. For details about setting up the BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository. Next. and Show Subfolders to browse the folder hierarchy.14 Organizing Objects Working with folders 5. see “BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository overview” on page 174. select the Use Object Repository when refreshing report check box to update these objects now. 2. By default. 7. 6. click its Rights tab. see “Controlling users’ access to objects” on page 317. The report is published to BusinessObjects Enterprise. For complete information on object rights. If the report references objects in your BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository. Click Add/Remove to add groups or users to this folder. 1. Tip: If there are many folders on your system. or click Previous. new objects that you add to a folder inherit the object rights that are specified for the folder.

Tip: If you have many users on your system. select the Add Users operation. You are returned to the Rights tab. Change the Access Level for each user or group. The example above shows the options that are available when you are working with groups. you can limit the number of instances that remain on the system for each object or for each user or group. In the Select Operation list. select Add/Remove Groups. 7. The page is refreshed and displays options that depend upon whether you are working with users or with groups. Add Users. 4. you can also limit the number of days that an instance remains on the system for a user or group. see “Controlling users’ access to objects” on page 317.Organizing Objects Working with folders 14 3. Setting limits for folders. then use the “Look for” field to search for a particular account. or Remove Users. At the folder level. 6. You set limits to automate regular clean-ups of old BusinessObjects Enterprise content. as required. Click Update. Click OK. 5. users. see “Setting instance limits for an object” on page 498. Select the user/group whose rights you want to specify and click the arrows to specify whether the user/group does or does not have access to the folder. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 365 . Follow this procedure to enforce default limits on a folder that you have just created. Note: For complete details on the predefined access levels and advanced rights. For more information on limits. and groups Limits allow you to delete report instances on a regular basis. Limits that you set on a folder affect all objects that are contained within the folder.

(The default value is 100. Modify the available settings according to the types of instance limits that you want to implement. click Add/Remove in this area. (The default value is 100.) • Delete excess instances for the following users/groups To limit the number of instances per user or group. Select from the available users and groups and click OK. and click Update after each change. select this check box.) • Delete instances after N days for the following users/groups To limit the age of instances per user or group. Then type the maximum age of instances in the Maximum Days column. Select from the available users and groups and click OK. click Add/Remove in this area. Then type the maximum number of instances in the Instance Limit column. 2.14 Organizing Objects Working with folders 1. Then type the maximum number of instances that you want to remain on the system. To limit instances at the folder level Once you’ve created the new folder. (The default value is 100.) 366 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . click its Limits tab. The available settings are: • Delete excess instances when there are more than N instances of an object To limit the number of instances per object.

these folders are referred to as the Favorites folders. By default. Unless you have View access (or greater) to a subfolder. Click the User Folders link. and to keep a maximum of 25 instances that belong to any member of the Administrators group. two settings have been combined to keep a maximum of 50 instances of any object in the folder. These folders are organized within the CMC as User Folders. Each subfolder corresponds to a user account on the system. Within InfoView. he or she is redirected immediately to his or her Favorites folder. When a user logs on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. there are User Folders for the Administrator and Guest accounts. (Users can change this default behavior my modifying their Preferences. 3. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 367 . To view the User Folders Go to the Folders management area of the CMC. it will not appear in the list. 2. When you log on to the CMC and view the list of User Folders. A list of subfolders appears. click the Subfolders tab. If it is not already displayed.Organizing Objects Working with folders 14 In this example.) 1. Managing User Folders BusinessObjects Enterprise creates a folder for each user on the system. you will see only those folders to which you have View access (or greater).

2. 368 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . type the name and description of the new category. you can create administrative categories. Creating and deleting categories There are several ways to create new categories in BusinessObjects Enterprise. Go to the Categories management area of the CMC. If you have the appropriate rights. go to the Categories management area to create new categories and to add subcategories to the existing hierarchy of category objects. Click Update. In the Title column. and its Properties tab is refreshed.x” on page 390. Creating a new category 1. 2. see “Importing information from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. or other users who have been granted access to these categories. Note: For information about importing existing categories. and you can create subcategories within categories. Go to the Categories management area of the CMC. 4. In the Central Management Console (CMC). Subcategories. On the Properties tab. The new category is added to the system. Creating a new subcategory at any level 1. 3. BusinessObjects Enterprise provides two types of categories: • • Administrative (or corporate) categories are created by the administrator. and Rights tabs to add objects and to change settings for this category.14 Organizing Objects Working with categories Working with categories Like folders. The initial level of categories is displayed. categories are objects used to organize documents. You can now use the Documents. Click New Category. click the link for the category where you want to add a subcategory. Personal categories can be created by each user to organize their own personal documents. You can associate documents with multiple categories.

type the name and description of the new folder. the Sales category will remain inaccessible to most users. If the category you want to move is not at the top level. Select the check box associated with the category that you want move. All of the category’s object rights are retained. any object assigned to the category maintains its association with it. 5.Organizing Objects Working with categories 14 3. Click the Subcategories tab. locate its parent category. Click New Category. 1. 6. On the Properties tab. and Rights tabs to add objects and to change settings for this category. the reports and other objects contained within the category are not deleted from the system. Tip: You can browse through existing subcategories to add a new category elsewhere in the hierarchy. Select the check box associated with the category you want to delete. go to its Subcategories tab. Moving categories When you move a category. You can now use the Documents. 2. Deleting categories When you delete a category. 2. To move a category Go to the Categories management area of the CMC. Unlike folder deletion. When you have found the right parent category. To delete categories Go to the Categories management area of the CMC. The new category is added to the system. if you move a private Sales category into a publicly accessible category. Click Delete. Then make your selection on the parent category’s Subcategories tab. 4. For instance. Subcategories. If the category you want to delete is not at the top level. locate its parent category. and click OK to confirm. Tip: Select multiple check boxes to delete several categories from their parent category. Then make your selection on the parent category’s Subcategories tab. Click Update. 3. and its Properties tab is refreshed. all subcategories within it are remove entirely from the system. 1. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 369 .

Select the check box for the object or objects you want to remove or delete. The category you selected is moved to the new destination. 370 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . use the “Look for” field to search. Adding an object to a new category You can add objects individually to any category in a number of ways. and Show Subcategories to browse the category hierarchy. 1. see “Publishing overview” on page 374. or click Previous. 1. Click the Objects tab. Follow this procedure to add a report to a new category that you have just created. Click the link for the category from which you want to remove or delete an object. The Move page appears. 4. When you delete an object. Tip: If there are many categories on your system. To add a report to a new category Once you’ve created the category. 5. you remove it from the category only.14 Organizing Objects Working with categories Tip: Select multiple check boxes to copy or move several categories from their parent category to a different category. Click Move. click its Documents tab. The New Document page appears. 2. 3. you remove it from the category and also delete it from the system. To remove or delete objects from a category Go to the Categories or Personal Categories management area of the CMC. Removing or deleting objects from a category You can either remove or delete objects from a category. Select the Destination category from the list. 2. 4. Click New Document. Next. For complete information on publishing reports and other objects. Click OK. When you remove an object. 3.

5. see “Controlling users’ access to objects” on page 317. The page is refreshed and displays options that depend upon whether you are working with users or with groups. Click Add/Remove to add groups or users to this category. Add Users. as required. 3. To specify rights for a new category Once you’ve created the category. 1. In the Select Operation list. the object continues to exist in the system. Click Delete to remove the object from the category and at the same time delete it from the system. For complete information on object rights. Click OK. depending on what you want to do: • • Click Remove to remove the object from the category only. see “Controlling users’ access to objects” on page 317. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 371 . then use the “Look for” field to search for a particular account. Tip: If you have many users on your system. Note: For complete details on the predefined access levels and advanced rights. click its Rights tab. 7. Select the user/group whose rights you want to specify and click the arrows to specify whether the user/group does or does not have access to the category. 4. select Add/Remove Groups. Click Update. Specifying category rights Follow this procedure to change the object rights for a new category that you have just created. The Add/Remove page appears. or Remove Users. Click either of the following buttons. new objects that you add to a category inherit the object rights that are specified for the category.Organizing Objects Working with categories 14 5. The example above shows the options that are available when you are working with groups. Change the Access Level for each user or group. select the Add Users operation. 6. You are returned to the Rights tab. In this case. By default. 2.

372 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . A list of the user’s personal categories appears. edit. Click the user account whose personal categories you want to view. you can view. 1. see “Managing User Accounts and Groups” on page 249.14 Organizing Objects Working with categories Managing personal categories If you are granted the appropriate rights. To view the Personal Categories Go to the Personal Categories management area of the CMC. and delete users’ personal categories. 2. For more information.

Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise chapter .

BusinessObjects Enterprise queries the CMS for the location of the object file. The Input File Repository Server stores the new object below the \Enterprise\FileStore\Input\ data\ directory. Thus. Are adding multiple objects or an entire directory. When you publish an object to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Adobe Acrobat PDFs. When a user schedules an instance of any object. For details. rich text format files. OLAP Intelligence. Performing tasks remotely. only these three types of objects have instances. and Web Intelligence). as well as object packages. Microsoft PowerPoint files. see “Publishing with the Publishing Wizard” on page 376. Save directly to your Enterprise folders when you are: • • • Designing reports with Crystal Reports. Microsoft Excel files. programs. Creating other objects with BusinessObjects Enterprise plug-in components. see “Saving objects directly to the CMS” on page 387. which consist of report and/or program objects. and hyperlinks. the appropriate server component then retrieves and processes the object file from the Input File Repository. text files. There are several types of objects that you can publish to BusinessObjects Enterprise: reports (from Crystal Reports. an entry is made in the Central Management Server (CMS) database. 374 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Use the Central Management Console (CMC) when you are: • • • • Publishing a single object. programs. Note: Only reports. For details. For details. The processed instance is stored by the Output File Repository Server below the \Enterprise\FileStore\Output\data\ directory. see “Publishing with the Central Management Console” on page 385. and object packages can be scheduled. Taking care of other administrative tasks. You can publish objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise in three ways: • Use the Publishing Wizard when you: • • • Have access to the locally installed application. Microsoft Word files.15 Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Publishing overview Publishing overview Publishing is the process of adding objects such as reports to the BusinessObjects Enterprise environment and making them available to authorized users. Using the OLAP Intelligence Application Designer.

The report instance the users see is based on the selection criteria (parameters and record selection formulas) and schedule set by the administrator. Each unique report page is cached separately. or you can choose to let users set the schedule themselves (on demand). Drawbacks • • Allowing users to update the data in the report (on demand) This option is recommended for smaller reports that use parameters and selection formulas. processed. reducing the number of times the database is hit (and thus system resources are used more effectively). Drawbacks BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 375 . or have frequent data changes. Benefits • • • Users are able to determine the frequency in which the data in the report is updated. require separate database logon credentials. this affects when data is refreshed and what data users see.Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Publishing overview 15 Note: BusinessObjects Enterprise supports reports created in versions 6 through XI of Crystal Reports. Multiple users generating reports at the same time increases the load on the system and the number of times the database is hit. It’s possible that the Cache Server can contain many copies of the cached report. you specify how often an object is run. Publishing options During the publishing process.) Each publishing option has potential benefits and drawbacks: • Specifying the data that users see (recurring) This option is recommended for objects that are accessed by a large number of people and that do not require separate database logon credentials. allowing multiple users to access the report at the same time. The report instance is static (contains saved data) and is stored on the Cache Server. Once published to BusinessObjects Enterprise. reports are saved. and displayed in version XI format. each of them being generated by hitting the Page Server and database. Benefits • • Users view the same instance of the report. For RPT report files. You can choose to set a schedule (recurring). (You cannot schedule OLAP Intelligence reports (CAR files).

6. This section of the guide features a series of procedures to help you through the Publishing Wizard. Navigate to and select the object you want to add. For example. From the Authentication list. Only the screens applicable to the objects or folders you are publishing appear. Click Next. 32-bit Windows application. Note: Depending on the rights assigned by your BusinessObjects Enterprise administrator. Click Next.15 Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Publishing with the Publishing Wizard Publishing with the Publishing Wizard The Publishing Wizard is a locally installed. Tip: Ensure the appropriate file type is listed in the Files of type field. it will appear in the folder you specified in InfoView (or other web desktop) and in the Objects management area of the CMC. you may not be able to publish objects using the Publishing Wizard. you can choose to also add its subfolders by selecting the Include Subfolders check box. 4. depending on the type of object you are adding. 4. The Select Files dialog box appears. 376 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . The wizard is made up of a series of screens. If you are adding a folder. Once the object has been published. Logging on to BusinessObjects Enterprise 1. click either Add Files or Add Folders. 3. 5. 2. Click Next. From the BusinessObjects Enterprise XI program group. select the appropriate authentication type. by default this value is set to Report (*. 3. the settings for parameters and schedule format do not appear when you publish OLAP Intelligence applications. In the User Name and Password fields. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for each of the objects you want to add. type your BusinessObjects Enterprise credentials. click Publishing Wizard. 2. In the System field. In the Select Files dialog box.rpt). type the name of the CMS to which you want to add objects. Adding objects 1.

Click Next. The new object package appears and can be renamed. Note: From the wizard. The Confirm Location dialog box appears. Only the folders that you have full control access to will appear. To add a new object package to the CMS. existing folders are yellow. 1. then click Next. select a parent folder and then click the New Folder button. click the folder you want to add the objects to. The new folder appears and can be renamed. 2. Creating and selecting a folder on the CMS To add the selected objects. The Specify Location dialog box appears. select the item and click the Delete button. you must create or select a folder on the host CMS.Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Publishing with the Publishing Wizard 15 Note: If the Specify Object Type dialog box appears. choose a file type for each unrecognized object. (New folders are green. To add a new folder to the CMS. To delete a folder or object package. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 377 . In the Specify Location dialog box. see “Duplicating the folder structure” on page 378. you can delete only new folders and object packages. select a parent folder and then click the New Object Package button. Click + to the left of the folder to view the subfolders.) If you are adding multiple objects and want to place them in separate directories.

And you can right-click objects to rename them. By default. move objects to the desired folders by selecting each object and then clicking Move Up or Move Down. 378 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Click Next when you are finished. you are asked if you want to duplicate the existing folder hierarchy on the CMS. In the Confirm Location dialog box. You can display the objects’ local file names by clicking the “Show file names” button. 2. To delete a folder or object packages. objects are displayed using their titles.15 Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Publishing with the Publishing Wizard Moving objects between folders 1. The Specify Categories dialog box appears. You can drag-and-drop objects to place them where you want. Duplicating the folder structure If you are adding multiple objects from a directory and its subdirectories. choose a folder hierarchy option. In the Specify Folder Hierarchy dialog box. 1. To place all of the objects in a single folder. select Put the files in the same location. You can also add folders and object packages by selecting a parent folder and clicking the New Folder or New Object Package button. select it and click the Delete button.

Adding objects to a category If you want to add the selected objects to a category. you can create or select a category on the host CMS. select the item and click the Delete button. 2. In the Specify Categories dialog box. Click Next. To add a new category to the CMS. select Duplicate the folder hierarchy. The new category appears and can be renamed. To delete a category or to remove an object from a category. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 379 . Note: From the wizard. 1. Click + to the left of the folder to view the subfolders. Note: This dialog box appears only for objects that can be scheduled. The object is not run again until you reschedule it. select a parent category and then click the New Category button. 1. click the category you want to add the objects to. existing categories are blue. choose the object that you want to add to the category. program. 2. (New categories are green. you can delete only new categories. and/or object package that you are publishing to run at specific intervals. In the File list. Select one of three intervals: • Run once only Selecting the “Run once only” option provides two more sets of options: • when finished this wizard This option runs the object once when you’ve finished publishing it. select the object you want to schedule. Click Next. The Specify Schedule dialog box appears.Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Publishing with the Publishing Wizard 15 To recreate all of the folders and subfolders on the CMS as they appear on your hard drive. Choose the topmost folder that you want to include in the folder hierarchy. The Confirm Location dialog box appears. In the Specify Schedule dialog box. 2.) 3. Changing scheduling options The Specify Schedule dialog box allows you to schedule each report. then click the Insert File button.

You can choose to refresh an object’s repository fields if the object references the repository. 1. To complete this task.15 Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Publishing with the Publishing Wizard • • • at the specified date and time This option runs the object once at a date and time you specify. it leaves the task of scheduling up to the user. The “Pick a recurrence schedule” dialog box appears. Refreshing repository fields The BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository is a central location which stores shared elements such as text objects. The options in this dialog box allow you to choose when and how often the object runs. Let users update the object This option does not schedule the object. Run on a recurring schedule Once you have selected this option. Tip: Click the Enable All button if you want to refresh all objects that reference the repository. 380 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . click the Disable All button if you want to refresh none of the objects. Instead. Click Next when you are finished. bitmaps. In the Specify Repository Refresh dialog box. and then select the Use Object Repository when refreshing report check box if you want to refresh it against the repository. custom functions. Select the appropriate options and click the OK button. Click Next after you have set the schedule for each object you are publishing. see “What are report objects and instances?” on page 425. The object is not run again until you reschedule it. universes. For details about program objects and program object types. Note: The Specify Repository Refresh dialog box appears only when you publish report objects. 3. 2. and custom SQL commands. Selecting a program type The Program Type dialog box appears only when you publish program objects. click the Set Recurrence button to set the scheduling options. the Publishing Wizard needs to connect to your BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository database from the local machine. For details. select a report. see “BusinessObjects Enterprise Repository overview” on page 174.

Once you have specified the type of each program you are adding. your object may not schedule properly if the database logon information is not correct.sh. The rights of the program are limited to those of the account that it runs as. select a program. Java You can publish any Java program to BusinessObjects Enterprise as a Java program object.com. Specifying program credentials 1. Changing default values You can publish objects without changing any of the default properties. They generally have a .bat. Click Next through the wizard’s remaining dialog boxes. or if the parameter values are invalid. Script Script program objects are JScript and VBScript scripts. 2. The Change Default Values dialog box appears. In the Program Credentials dialog box. In the User Name and Password fields. or you can go through the remaining screens and make changes. The Program Credentials dialog box appears. 3. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 381 . 2. • • 3. In the Program Type dialog box. They generally have file extensions such as: .jar file extension. . click Next. You can publish any executable program that can be run from the command line on the machine where the Program Job Server is running. batch files. or shell scripts. Once you have specified the user credentials for each program to run as. Note: If you use the default values. 2. 1. To publish objects without making modifications Select Publish without modifying properties. . select a program. click Next. Specify one of three program types: • Binary/Batch Binary/Batch programs are executables such as binary files. . specify the user credentials for the account for the program to run as.exe.Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Publishing with the Publishing Wizard 15 1.

If objects you are adding are of this type. Entering database logon information Some objects use data sources that require logon information. Select the Generate thumbnail image check box if you want users to see a thumbnail of a report object before they open it. Tip: The “Generate thumbnail image” check box is available only if the object is an RPT file and was saved appropriately. Click Next. To display thumbnails for a report. 1. Select the “Save preview picture” check box and click OK. 2. Changing object properties 1. follow these steps. Enter a new title or description. To review or modify objects before publishing Select Review or modify properties. Click Next. double-click the object. In the Review Object Properties dialog box. open the report in Crystal Reports and click Summary Info on the File menu.15 Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Publishing with the Publishing Wizard 1. In the Specify Database Credentials dialog box. 4. 382 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 3. Preview the first page of the report and save your changes. 2. or click + to the left of the object to expose the database. The Review Object Properties dialog box appears. select the object you want to modify. The Specify Database Credentials dialog box appears if it is needed.

BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 383 . For some of the formats. Where applicable. The Specify Format dialog box appears. Before such an object can be scheduled. Depending on the type of parameter you have chosen. For example. Microsoft Word. Setting parameters Some objects contain parameters for data selection. Select the database and change the logon information in the appropriate fields. 2. 1. Select a format from the list (Crystal Report. select the object whose schedule format you want to change. 3. If the database does not require a user name or password. enter the number of lines per page. If you want to set the prompts to contain a null value (where possible). Click Next after you have finished editing the prompts for each object. Note: Enter user name and password information carefully. Click Next. In the Set Report Parameters dialog box. 1. then click Set Prompts to NULL. In the Specify Format dialog box. the object cannot retrieve data from the database. 2. 3. 4. you can customize the schedule format options. The object’s prompts and default values appear in a list on the right-hand side of the screen. 3. select the object whose prompts you want to change. and so on).Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Publishing with the Publishing Wizard 15 2. different dialog boxes appear. if you select Paginated Text. If it is entered incorrectly. The Set Report Parameters dialog box appears if it is needed. click Next. Click Edit Prompt to change the value of a prompt. you must set the parameters in order to determine the default prompts. Setting the schedule output format You can choose an output format for each scheduled report that you publish. Adobe Acrobat. customize the schedule format options. Once you have completed the logon information for each object using a different database. leave the fields blank. Microsoft Excel.

Select a program. 2. When the processing is done. 2. 3. using the same format you would use at the command line itself. They are passed directly to the command-line interface. Click Finish to close the wizard. and run as specified.15 Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Publishing with the Publishing Wizard Adding extra files for programs Some programs require access to other files in order to run. The Command line for Program dialog box appears. Specifying command line arguments For each program. click Next. After ensuring all the objects you want to publish have been added to the list. you can specify any command-line arguments supported by your program’s command-line interface. scheduled. The objects are added to the CMS. 1. without parsing. Once you have specified all necessary command-line arguments for each program. Finalizing the objects to be added After you have provided all of required information for the objects. type the command-line arguments for your program. the Publishing Wizard displays a final list of the objects that it is going to publish. 384 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . In the Command line area. To view the details for an object. click Next. 1. 3. 2. you are returned to the final screen of the Publishing Wizard. click Next. 3. 1. select it from the list. Click Add to navigate to and select the necessary file. Once you have added all necessary extra files for each program. Select a program.

1. 3. 2. you can publish objects over the Web from within the CMC. On the left side of the page. Enter the object’s properties. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 385 . Click New Object. To add an object with the CMC Go to the Objects management area of the CMC. The New Object page appears. with the Report properties displayed.Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Publishing with the Central Management Console 15 Publishing with the Central Management Console If you have administrative rights to BusinessObjects Enterprise. 4. click the type of object you want to add.

Adobe Acrobat. Select Executable. open the report in Crystal Reports and click Summary Info on the File menu. Program. Tip: • • • URL Hyperlink Run Java programs as Java program objects. Use Object Report Repository when refreshing report Program Type Program Select this option to automatically refresh an object's repository fields against the repository each time the report runs. 386 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Java. Microsoft Excel. Hyperlink Report Description Type the full path to the object. Run all other programs as Executable program objects. Preview the first page of the report and save your changes. or Script. clear the “Generate thumbnail for the report” check box. Type the URL address of the page you want the hyperlink object to link to. Run JScript and VBScript programs as Script program objects. Rich Text Object Package. If you do not want the user to see a thumbnail preview of the report in BusinessObjects Enterprise. Text. Hyperlink Object Package. Select the “Save preview picture” check box and click OK. or click Browse to perform a search. Title Description Generate thumbnail for the report Type the name of the object. Type a description of the object. Microsoft PowerPoint. Microsoft Word.15 Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Publishing with the Central Management Console The properties that appear vary according to the type of object you are adding: Property File name Object Types Report. Tip: To display thumbnails for a report.

select it and click Show Subfolders. In the Save As dialog box. the database logon information. select the category from the list. you can now modify the object’s properties. such as Crystal Reports or OLAP Intelligence. Click OK. after designing a report in OLAP Intelligence. click Enterprise Folders. 6. To search for a specific folder or object package.Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Saving objects directly to the CMS 15 5. If you want to place the object in a category. Tip: • • To expand a folder. Note: Only report and program objects can be published to object packages. you can use the Save As command to add objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise from within the designer itself. log on to the Central Management Server (CMS). then. such as its title and description. When the object has been added to the system. use the Look For field. user rights. For instance. click Save As on the File menu. the CMC displays the Properties screen. Specify the folder where you want to save the report and click Save. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 387 . scheduling information. Saving objects directly to the CMS If you have installed one of the Business Objects designer components. when prompted. Ensure that the correct folder or object package name appears in the Destination field. If necessary. 7. and so on.

15 Publishing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Saving objects directly to the CMS 388 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise chapter .

rather than global system settings. and reports to your new BusinessObjects Enterprise system. groups. The Import Wizard runs only on Windows. use the Import Wizard to import existing user accounts. But a user-level “must change password at next log on” restriction is imported with the user account. Web Intelligence documents. depending upon the product from which you are importing information. the Import Wizard imports settings that are specific to each object. For details. universes.x Crystal Enterprise 10 Crystal Enterprise 9 Crystal Enterprise 8. a global “minimum number of characters” password restriction is not imported.x If you have upgraded from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. connection objects.5 The functionality provided by the Import Wizard varies. folders. and third-party documents to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. For instance. universe restriction sets. groups. Importing information from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. 390 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .x” on page 390 “Importing information from Crystal Enterprise” on page 396 “Importing information from Crystal Info” on page 400. see “Importing with the Import Wizard” on page 402. see the section for the product from which you are importing information: • • • “Importing information from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. categories. but you can use it to import information from a source environment that is running on Windows or UNIX to a new BusinessObjects Enterprise system that is running on Windows or on UNIX.x.16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing information Importing information The Import Wizard is a locally installed Windows application that allows you to import existing user accounts. For procedural details. You can import information from any of these products: • • • • • • • BusinessObjects Enterprise XI BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. In general.5 Crystal Enterprise 8 Crystal Info 7.

Note: The Import Wizard modifies BusinessObjects Enterprise 6.key files. The name and configuration details for the data sources must match the data sources in the source deployment.x installation directory).x repositories to make them consistent with version 6. • • • • • installdir/nodes/<name of node>/mycluster/locdata Map this folder for access to the . installdir/nodes/<name of node>/mycluster/mail Map this folder if you are importing the content of users’ Inbox folders.5 format before importing data into BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. you need to perform the following steps: • • Make sure the Import Wizard is deployed on a Windows machine. • • Stop all servers in the source deployment. Use the Custom installation if you want to install only the Import Wizard on a machine. you will need to restore them from your backup copies. map drives to the following folders (where installdir represents the BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. On the machine that is running the Import Wizard. installdir/nodes/<name of node>/mycluster/user Map this folder if you are importing personal documents and categories. If you need to access the repositories from a 6. Start the following servers in the BusinessObjects Enterprise XI deployment: • • Central Management Server Input File Repository Server and Output File Repository Server BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 391 .x source environment.x 16 Before importing from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. create data sources on the destination machine for every domain that is part of the source deployment. Back up all repositories in the source deployment. If you are importing from a BusinessObjects Enterprise 6.x deployment.x Before you use the Import Wizard to import data into the new BusinessObjects Enterprise XI system.Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing information from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6.

the associated connections are imported automatically.x. • • 392 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . This may involve installing database drivers or configuring connection settings on the machine. You can also use this option if you want to import a subset of selected universes and their dependencies. It also imports universe restriction sets associated with the universe (if the restriction sets are associated with users or groups that are being imported). the Import Wizard also imports connection objects associated with the universe. Each universe folder will be named after the corresponding Business Objects 6. connections. When you import BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. and objects that are associated with the documents you are importing.x The following sections describe what happens to objects that have been imported from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. Generally. ensure that the Import Wizard can access the database the same way that the BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. this option imports only the objects used by the Web Intelligence documents that you are importing. There are two ways to import the universes: • • Import all universes. Import only universes. They are converted into connection objects.x universes. You must import all the universes in one batch.x into BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. the Import Wizard automatically selects the associated universe for import. When you select a Web Intelligence document to import. When you import a universe from a domain. Known as document dependency.x Importing objects from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. When you import a universe.x universe domain. it is placed in the corresponding domain folder. Note: • Universe domains are converted into folders under the Universe folder. connections.x accesses it. the Import Wizard imports the object if it is an object type that is supported by BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. Universes You can import universes into the BusinessObjects Enterprise repository. an imported object will not overwrite an object with the same name that is already stored in the BusinessObjects Enterprise XI CMS database.16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing information from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. By default. You can select additional universes for import. You cannot select individual universes or connections to import. and associated objects. When you import connection objects from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6.

x users and groups can be migrated to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. a personal category. you must configure the connections on the destination machine via the Control Panel before you import the connection objects. If no principal users or groups are selected for import.x user profile BusinessObjects Enterprise XI default group Added to the Everyone group. they are converted into objects. Because of the differences between restriction sets in BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. You must use the exact same name and settings as the connection used on the source machine when you created the domain key.x user. • • All user profiles General Supervisor BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 393 . When restriction sets are migrated. Universe restriction sets are migrated using both object names and object IDs to identify universe components. Added to the Administrators group. For each BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. if you import SQL Server connection objects from a BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. They remain connected to the universes that they were connected to on your existing installation. Universe restriction sets The Import Wizard automatically migrates all universe restriction sets that are associated with the imported universes for any of the selected users and groups being imported.x source environment. the Import Wizard may create additional restriction sets on the destination deployment in order to preserve the restriction sets for all imported users. Users are imported into the BusinessObjects Enterprise repository.x are mapped to default groups in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI as follows: BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI creates a user folder. no restriction sets are imported. and an Inbox folder. • • If a selected universe is a derived universe. Users and groups All existing BusinessObjects Enterprise 6.Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing information from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. then all relevant core universes and their connections will also be imported.x 16 For example. For more information about importing universes. see “Selecting information to import” on page 405.x and BusinessObjects Enterprise XI (and how they handle rights aggregation). User profiles from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6.

If a BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. Note: • • The Import Wizard migrates external users and groups (LDAP or Windows AD users and groups. Objects corresponding to the universes and documents contained in these domains are imported to these folders. By default. The “Enforce rights fidelity” option ensures that the effective rights match between the source and destination environments. Added to the Everyone group. BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. for example).x BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. If effective rights in the source and destination environments do not match for a principal on an object. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI creates folders for Categories and Personal Categories and preserves the hierarchy of subcategories. For each imported user. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide. Folders. 394 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Corporate (or administrative) categories are imported as categories under the Categories folder. domains. selected personal categories are imported to a new subfolder (named after the user) under the Personal Categories folder. but not added to the Administrators group.x user profile BusinessObjects Enterprise XI default group Granted appropriate rights on all imported objects. the right will not be granted to the user.x right does not map exactly to a BusinessObjects Enterprise XI right. Added to the Universe Designer Users group. Whenever possible.16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing information from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. select all users and groups that are principals on the selected object and ensure that you select the “Enforce rights fidelity” option in the Import Wizard. For more information about the migration of security settings.x security settings are preserved in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. Added to the Universe Designer Users group. • • • • Supervisor Designer Supervisor-Designer User/Versatile If you want to preserve security settings that are assigned to an imported object. and categories Universe and document domains are converted to folders named after the respective domains. the Import Wizard sets the effective rights as determined by aggregation rules in the source deployment for the principal user or group on the object in the destination deployment.

Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing information from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. You can select individual corporate categories and import Web Intelligence documents grouped by corporate category. Documents (and universes) cannot be imported without importing the domain. it may require significant processing time. Instructions are in the Report Migration Utility guide. Note: If you import a large number of Web Intelligence documents from your existing BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. These documents are added to the user’s Favorites folder.x suite.rep) documents.x.wid) format—in a separate procedure—before migrating the system. Therefore.rep documents to . Documents To have access to a Web Intelligence document from the Import Wizard. you can use the Report Migration Utility.rep documents to Web Intelligence (. and the user must be a member of the group to which the document is assigned. To migrate . the document's domain is also imported.wid format.x deployment. Inbox rights • • • Everyone [Add Document] Administrators [Full Control] Owner [Full Control] Personal Documents You can import BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. Inbox documents Version 6.rep) documents BusinessObjects (. are not supported in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. the user must be granted access to the document in BusinessObjects Enterprise 6.x Personal documents to BusinessObjects Enterprise. You can select which domains or documents you want to import into BusinessObjects Enterprise. When you select a document. BusinessObjects (.x 16 Personal categories can be imported only as part of a batch import. also known as “full-client” documents. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 395 . you must migrate your .x Inbox documents are migrated to the user’s Inbox folder in BusinessObjects Enterprise. delivered with the BusinessObjects 6.

and Excel. User A owns an object and has Full Control rights while User C has View rights on the same object. events. As another. the Full Control right for that user is discarded when the object is imported. folders. the Administrator becomes the new owner of the objects. you have the additional option of importing calendars. If User D runs the Import Wizard and brings the object across along with User C. If the user is not brought across. and *. Events and server groups can also be imported from a version 8. even if the user already exists in the destination system. and report instances to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. the wizard makes appropriate modifications to the object (in most cases. but User C still has View rights on the object. the Import Wizard maps all rights for the user on the source system to the existing user on the destination system. The Import Wizard migrates these documents into BusinessObjects Enterprise XI if the format is supported.5 or 9 installation. groups. if any of an object’s dependencies are not imported. In the case of objects brought across without their owners. 396 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . the object becomes owned by the Administrator: User A loses Full Control rights. but not User A. Supported formats are: Adobe Acrobat PDF.x to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. all rights information for that user is discarded. You can also use the Import Wizard to import information from an existing version XI installation to a new version XI installation. Importing information from Crystal Enterprise If you have upgraded from Crystal Enterprise. Word. use the Import Wizard to import existing user accounts. Note: Always import users if you want to bring across the associated rights for an object. For example. and server groups. repository objects.16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing information from Crystal Enterprise Third-party documents BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. When using the Import Wizard. Timestamps Timestamps are not migrated from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. When doing so.txt documents. more involved example.x supports third-party (agnostic) documents. If the user already exists. the dependency is removed). Microsoft PowerPoint. RTF. report objects. but the user is not imported. if a user has Full Control rights on an object.

Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing information from Crystal Enterprise 16 Importing objects from Crystal Enterprise The following sections describe what happens to the objects that are imported from a Crystal Enterprise 8. Aliases If a user in the destination system has an alias that is identical to a user who is being imported. and the imported user loses that particular alias. if the object will not overwrite an object that is already in the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. the wizard imports all users as Concurrent Users. if the source environment uses Named User licensing. the wizard imports all users as Concurrent Users. the destination user keeps all aliases. the wizard first checks the number of Named User license keys in the destination environment. If you import a group that already exists in the destination environment. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 397 .x system. However. For more information about licensing. the group is migrated to the destination BusinessObjects Enterprise XI environment. see “Licensing overview” on page 530. Note: BusinessObjects Enterprise XI does not include a New Sign-Up feature. then the Import Wizard imports the object. Users and groups The Import Wizard imports users and groups and their hierarchical relationships. If the source environment uses Concurrent licensing. User licensing can affect the behavior of the Import Wizard. A user or group is imported only if it does not exist already by name. Windows AD When importing users that employ Windows Active Directory authentication. if your Crystal Enterprise source environment includes users that belong to the New Sign-Up group. Generally. If there are enough Named User licenses in the destination environment. Active Directory authentication must also be enabled on the destination system. However. ensure that the administrative credentials are the same on both the source and destination systems. the list of group members is updated with any additional users who were members of the group in the source environment. These additional users are added to BusinessObjects Enterprise if their accounts do not exist already. the wizard imports all users as Named Users. If there are not enough Named User licenses in the destination environment.

398 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Supported reports are always imported with their parent folders. the object rights are discarded. To ensure that existing folders are not overwritten. Crystal Info Views. so as not to overwrite existing folders. or Business Views. the Import Wizard appends a number to the end of any duplicated folder names to indicate the number of copies. and the scheduling patterns that you have set up in the source environment are imported automatically. the ownership properties of its objects and instances are reset to your current administrative account. When this option is selected. ownership is reflected by an object’s SI_OWNERID property and by a scheduled instances’s SI_SUBMITTERID properties. the associated object rights are imported for every user or group who is imported at the same time. If you don’t import the user account. you can ensure that a particular user account retains ownership of its objects and scheduled instances by importing the user along with the content. make sure you choose the “Automatically rename top-level folders that match top-level folders on the destination system. However. LDAP authentication must also be enabled on the destination system. whether or not they exist already in the destination environment. the Import Wizard appends a number to the end of any duplicated folder names to indicate the number of copies. Folders Folders are imported. if you import a folder called Sales Reports when a folder called Sales Reports already exists. Rights When you import folders and reports from one BusinessObjects Enterprise system to another. In the SDK. For example. You can import the report instances for each report object. OLAP data sources. When you import content from one deployment to another. the Host list and Base LDAP name need to be the same on both the source and destination systems. ODBC data sources. suppose that you import a report that explicitly grants View On Demand rights to the Everyone group in the source environment—but you do not import the Everyone group. then the imported folder is added to BusinessObjects Enterprise with the name Sales Reports(2).16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing information from Crystal Enterprise LDAP When importing users that employ LDAP authentication. If the user or group is not imported at the same time. whether or not they exist already in the destination environment. Report objects The Import Wizard can import Crystal report objects only if they are based on native drivers.” option in the “Please choose an import scenario” dialog box. For instance.

the object is imported without the dependency and no longer waits for. the report objects are added to the existing group and the source system’s server group is not imported. When importing server groups. if the server group exists on the destination system. the report loses that restriction and will run under any server group. Instead. if a report is scheduled to run only under server group A and that server group is not imported. Note: • • When importing report objects associated with a server group. For more information about how to do this. you might notice odd behavior on the destination system with the individual jobs involved until they run or time out. then the corresponding object rights are imported and applied to the existing user or group. suppose that you import the report and the Everyone group. In this case. The same logic applies for events: if an object is set up to wait for an event or to trigger an event. the wizard does not bring across the servers that belong to that group. the event. the Import Wizard imports the object rights along with the report. you need to import the event at the same time as the object. For instance. and it is a different type (for BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 399 . So the newly imported report in the destination environment will explicitly grant the View On Demand right to the Everyone group.5 or later system. If you do import the appropriate user or group. or triggers. modifying the example above. you have the additional option to import events and server groups from the source environment. You need to import the server group at the same time as the objects that use it to keep the relationship between them. the report inherits any rights that have been set on its parent folder.Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing information from Crystal Enterprise 16 In this case. Note: • If Event A is being imported from the source system but there is already an Event A on the destination system. For example. Objects that have server group restrictions lose the restrictions if the objects are imported and the server group is not. Events and server groups When you use the Import Wizard to import information from a Crystal Enterprise 8. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide. and it already exists by name in the destination environment. the newly imported report in the destination environment will not grant the same explicit rights to the Everyone group. If you have jobs scheduled or pending on a server or server group that you are importing. You need to manually add servers to the imported group in the Central Management Console (CMC). Otherwise.

if the Crystal Info object is of a type that is supported within BusinessObjects Enterprise. and if the Crystal Info object will not overwrite an object that is already in the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. Generally. see “Licensing overview” on page 530. the wizard first checks the number of Named User license keys in the destination environment. If the source environment uses Concurrent licensing. If there are not enough Named User licenses in the destination environment. These additional users are added to BusinessObjects Enterprise if their accounts do not exist already. However. the event should work as expected. the list of group members is updated with additional users who were members of the Crystal Info group. User licensing can affect the behavior of the Import Wizard. then the Import Wizard imports the object. you need to manually reset the event server and file name information on the event in the destination system. the wizard imports all users as Concurrent Users. the wizard imports all users as Named Users. If there are enough Named User licenses in the destination environment. If you import a group that already exists in BusinessObjects Enterprise. the wizard imports all users as Concurrent Users. since servers are not imported. the wizard removes the dependency on Event A from the object when it is imported. Users and groups The Import Wizard imports users and groups and their hierarchical relationships as they exist in Crystal Info. • Events are based on Event Servers and. For more information about licensing. A user or group is added to BusinessObjects Enterprise only if it does not exist already by name. 400 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Note: Users who are accessing your Crystal Info implementation when you are importing objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise might experience a delay. if the source environment uses Named User licensing.16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing information from Crystal Info example. a File event instead of a Custom event). Once this is set. Importing information from Crystal Info Importing objects from Crystal Info The following sections describe what happens to objects that have been imported from Crystal Info to BusinessObjects Enterprise.

the rights associated with the report are not transferred. whether or not they exist already in BusinessObjects Enterprise. However. If the owner of the report is not an administrator. the Import Wizard appends a number to the end of any duplicated folder names to indicate the number of copies. you can publish them to BusinessObjects Enterprise with the Publishing Wizard. only the ownership. or OLAP data sources. whether or not they exist already in the destination environment. Choose a specific folder where you want to save these reports. For example. you are prompted to save the report files. when a folder called Sales Reports already exists in BusinessObjects Enterprise. the report will be transferred and the View On Demand access mode will be associated with the report. make sure you choose the “Automatically rename top-level folders that match top-level folders on the destination system” option in the “Please choose an import scenario” dialog box.Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing information from Crystal Info 16 Folders Folders are imported. If the owner of a report is the Administrators group. if you import a folder called Sales Reports. which differ from the user rights used within Crystal Info. so as not to overwrite existing folders. When you import reports based on a Crystal Info View. Report objects The Import Wizard can import Crystal report objects only if they are based on native drivers. the Administrators group will have Full Control access to it. You can then run a conversion utility on all reports in that folder to convert them to use metadata. Rights BusinessObjects Enterprise enforces security through object rights. After converting the reports. To ensure that existing folders are not overwritten. When this option is selected. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 401 . Supported reports are always imported with their parent folders. Consequently. then the imported folder is added to BusinessObjects Enterprise with the name Sales Reports(2). the Import Wizard does not import any of the folder security that is set up within the Crystal Info environment. ODBC data sources. Recurrence patterns that cannot be automatically recreated within BusinessObjects Enterprise are written to the log file created by the Import Wizard. If you transfer reports from Crystal Info to BusinessObjects Enterprise. The Import Wizard can import successful instances and some recurring instances from Crystal Info systems. the Import Wizard appends a number to the end of any duplicated folder names to indicate the number of copies.

1. Before starting this procedure. query objects. and Crystal reports based on query files. 402 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Importing with the Import Wizard The Import Wizard provides a series of screens that guide you through the process of importing user accounts. Holos Applications. The screens that appear depend on the source environment and the types of information that you choose to import. Open OLAP cubes. When you import information. To specify the source and destination environments From the BusinessObjects Enterprise program group. Click Next. and reports. click Import Wizard. or you can update the destination with the contents of the source CMS. Such objects include report packages. You can choose to merge the contents of the source repository into the destination repository. and the Import Wizard copies the requested information from the source to the destination. The overall process is divided into the following procedures: • • • • • • “Specifying the source and destination environments” on page 402 “Selecting information to import” on page 405 “Importing objects with rights” on page 407 “Choosing an import scenario” on page 407 “Importing specific objects” on page 409 “Finalizing the import” on page 414 Specifying the source and destination environments This procedure shows how to specify a source environment and a destination environment using the initial screens of the Import Wizard. groups. You then select the information that you want to import. folders. you first connect to the Central Management Server (CMS) of your existing installation (the source environment) and specify the CMS of your new BusinessObjects Enterprise system (the destination environment). 2.16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing with the Import Wizard Other objects The Import Wizard cannot import Crystal Info objects that are not supported by BusinessObjects Enterprise. Info cubes. ensure that you have the Administrator account credentials for both the source and the destination environment.

select the product from which you want to import information. In the Source list. Crystal Enterprise 10 or earlier. This example imports information from BusinessObjects Enterprise XI.5 Crystal Enterprise 8 Crystal Enterprise 8. The available options are: • • • • • • • Crystal Info 7.5 Crystal Enterprise 9 Crystal Enterprise 10 BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. Type the User Name and Password that provide you with administrative rights to the source environment.x BusinessObjects Enterprise XI You are prompted for administrative account information. or BusinessObjects Enterprise XI: • • In the CMS Name field.Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing with the Import Wizard 16 The “Specify source environment” dialog box appears. 4. The fields that appear depend on the type of source environment you chose. 3. If your source environment is Crystal Info. type the name of the source environment’s CMS (Central Management Server). BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 403 .

The “Choose objects to import” dialog box appears.x: • • 6. The “Specify destination environment” dialog box appears. Type the User Name and Password of an Enterprise account that provides you with administrative rights to the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. Type the User Name and Password that provide you with administrative rights to the source environment. In the Domain key file field. 8. then click Next. 404 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Note: You must have the General Supervisor profile. provide the full path of the domain file for the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. Click Next. 7. type the name of the destination environment’s Central Management Server. If your source environment is BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. or click the browse button to select the domain file. In the CMS Name field.16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing with the Import Wizard 5.

If you have not already started the Import Wizard. select the check box (or boxes) corresponding to the information you want to import: • Import users and user groups • • • • • • • • • • • • • Import inbox documents Import personal categories Import personal Web Intelligence documents Import favorite folders for selected users Import application rights Import corporate categories Import corporate Web Intelligence documents Import folders and objects • Import discussions associated with the selected reports Import events Import server groups Import repository objects Import calendars Import universes Note: The options available depend on the version of the source environment. All object can be imported from BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. see “Specifying the source and destination environments” on page 402. 3. and Web Intelligence documents can be imported from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. If the “Import personal documents and inbox documents” dialog box appears. 1. Click Next. Repository objects and calendars can be imported from Crystal Enterprise 10. If the “Import universe and connection objects” options dialog box appears. choose an import option: BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 405 .Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing with the Import Wizard 16 Selecting information to import This procedure shows how to select the users.5 or later. categories. 2. Events and server groups can be imported from Crystal Enterprise 8. groups. Note: You do not need to provide a path for corporate documents because they are stored in the repository.x. Universes. and reports that you want to import. provide the paths for your personal and/or inbox documents. 4. To choose which objects to import In the “Choose objects to import” dialog box. folders.

Click Next. The “Import Object Principals Option” dialog box appears.16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing with the Import Wizard • • Import all universes. this option imports only the objects used by the Web Intelligence documents that you are importing. This option imports all universes from the source environment in one batch. 5. Known as document dependency. You cannot select individual universes or connections to import. Import only the universes and connection objects that are associated with the documents you are importing. You can also use this option if you want to import a subset of selected universes and their dependencies. and associated objects. 406 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . connections.

The “Please choose an import scenario” dialog box appears. 1. To preserve the rights from the source system. the Import Wizard prompts you to either merge or update users and groups that have the same name on both the source and destination systems. The setting also affects how the system handles duplicate objects. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 407 . users and groups from the source system overwrite users and groups that have the same name on the destination system. Choosing an import scenario You can merge the source and destination systems. or you can add the source system’s information to the destination system without merging.Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing with the Import Wizard 16 Importing objects with rights If you import objects that already have rights assigned to them. enable the rights fidelity setting in the Import Wizard. If you enable rights fidelity. If you do not enable rights fidelity. To enable rights fidelity In the “Import Object Principals Option” dialog box. 2. the rights on the destination system will closely match those on the source system. Proceed to “Choosing an import scenario” on page 407. Click Next. If you enable rights fidelity. only the update option is available. If you enable rights fidelity. select the “Enforce rights fidelity” option. you need to import the users and groups that have been granted these rights.

Also. To merge the source and destination systems. If an object in the source system has the same unique identifier as an object in the destination. Updating the destination system You can add the source system’s information to the destination system without merging. all objects from the source system with a unique title are copied to the destination system. choose the type of import you want. All of the objects in the destination system are preserved. Note: This is the safest import option. at a minimum. the Import Wizard adds all objects from the source system into the destination CMS without overwriting objects in the destination. see “Importing data from a Crystal Enterprise 10 or BusinessObjects Enterprise XI CMS” on page 174. When you update the contents of the destination system using the source system as a reference.16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing with the Import Wizard Merging systems If you merge the source and destination systems. To choose an import scenario In the “Please choose an import scenario” dialog box.” 408 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 1. For more information about merging and updating systems. you add all objects in the source system to the destination CMS. the object in the destination is overwritten.” To add the source system’s information to the destination system without merging. choose “I want to merge the source system into the destination system. choose “I want to update the destination system by using the source system as a reference.

select the groups that you want to import. groups. Note: • Ensure that the third party authentication is configured the same way on both the source and destination environments. 4. you are prompted to choose the specific objects you want to import. Click Next. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 409 . In the Groups list. and click Next. proceed to “Finalizing the import” on page 414. folders. Importing specific objects If you chose to import users. Web Intelligence documents. choose how you want to map third-party groups. This example imports all but one of the users in the Administrators group. select specific members of any group. universes. In the Subgroups and Users list. categories. 3. To select users and groups If you chose to import users and groups. If the “Information collection complete” dialog box appears. the “Select Users and Groups” dialog box appears. or repository objects. Click Next. 1.Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing with the Import Wizard 16 2. You can import all of the objects or select individual objects. proceed to “Importing specific objects” on page 409. If the “Import Groups Option” dialog box appears. domains. If you are prompted to select specific objects for import. 2.

the “Select Domains and Web Intelligence documents” dialog box appears. • To select categories If you chose to import categories.16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing with the Import Wizard • If you are importing third-party (or external) users and groups from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. • To select domains and Web Intelligence documents If you chose to import Web Intelligence documents. 410 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . The Import Wizard imports the selected categories and the objects that belong to the categories. Select the check boxes for the categories that you want to import.x. see “Managing User Accounts and Groups” on page 249. Select the check boxes for domains or individual documents that you want to import. then click Next. the “Select categories” dialog box appears. For information about setting alias creation and assignment for LDAP and Active Directory users. you need to determine how these users will be handled upon import into BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. then click Next.

To select universes or universe folders If you chose to import a subset of the universes from the source environment. Before you can import connection objects from BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. Select the check boxes for the universes that you want to import. the “Select Universe Folder and Universes” dialog box appears.Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing with the Import Wizard 16 1. then click Next.x. ensure that the Import Wizard can access the database the same way that the source environment BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 411 . its connection objects are imported automatically. Note: When you import a universe.

Tip: You can also choose to “Import all instances of each selected report and object package.x source environment. If the universe uses a connection object that is associated with a secure connection that was created with the “Use Business Objects username and password” option selected. provide your connection information. You can enable SSO only for connections that support Kerberos SSO in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. Then click Next. To select folders and objects If you chose to import folders and objects.16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing with the Import Wizard accesses it. and click Next. If your database supports Kerberos authentication. if you import SQL Server connection objects from a BusinessObjects Enterprise 6. You must use the exact same name and settings as the connection used on the source machine when you created the domain key. and you can enable Single Sign-On for database access during viewing and designing. you must configure the connections on the destination machine via the Control Panel before you import the connection objects. 2. For example. Select the check boxes for the folders and reports that you want to import. Select the connection object. but you do not need to provide SSO information for described connections. the “Select Folders and Objects” dialog box appears. the “Connection SSO Option” dialog box appears. and if SSO is not enabled. You can specify logon credentials for access when scheduling. This may involve installing database drivers or configuring connection settings on the machine. these credentials will also be used for access when viewing Web Intelligence documents or designing universes.” This example imports the Report Samples folder and a subset of its contents. you can specify logon credentials for database access during scheduling. 412 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Note: • • • • SSO can be enabled.

Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing with the Import Wizard 16 • To select repository objects If you chose to import repository objects. the “Import repository objects options” dialog box appears. Choose an importing option for repository objects. then click Next. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 413 .

Note: The information that appears in the Detail Log is also written to a text file called ImportWiz. Otherwise.16 Importing Objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise Importing with the Import Wizard Finalizing the import 1. a title that describes the imported information. click Done. If the import summary shows that some information was not imported successfully.log. this directory is: C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\win32_x86\ The log file includes a system-generated ID number. and a field that describes the action and the reason why it was taken. click View Detail Log for a description of the problem. 414 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . which you will find in the directory from which the Import Wizard was run. 2. When the “Information collection complete” dialog box appears. The “Import Progress” dialog box displays status information and creates an Import Summary while the Import Wizard completes its tasks. click Finish to begin importing the information. By default.

Managing Objects chapter .

Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Web Intelligence documents. which consist of report and/or program objects. copying. Microsoft Excel files. using filters. 416 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . • “Program object management” on page 451 This section explains program objects and instances. specifying alert notification. After publishing objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise. This chapter is broken up into four sections: • • “Report object management” on page 425 This section explains report objects and instances. see “Managing User Folders” on page 367. this section explains how to create an object package and how to add objects to an object package. Use folders to organize and facilitate object administration for you and your users. as well as object packages. such as moving. and how to set object rights for users and groups. programs. updating parameters.17 Managing Objects Managing objects overview Managing objects overview There are several types of objects that can exist in BusinessObjects Enterprise: reports. and hyperlinks. • “Object package management” on page 459 This section explains object packages and instances. how to modify object properties. rich text format files. It also describes how to search for objects. and security considerations for program objects. Microsoft Word files. For more information. text files. changing database information. and working with hyperlinked reports. Tip: • • Go to the Object management area by clicking the Objects link on the CMC Home page. this section covers type-specific program object configuration. Additionally. Microsoft PowerPoint files. and how to manage them through the Central Management Console (CMC). “General object management” on page 417 This section describes general object management concepts that apply to all objects. you manage them through the Central Management Console (CMC) by going to the Objects management area. Managing report objects includes applying processing extensions. and how to manage them through the Central Management Console (CMC). Additionally. and deleting objects. and how to manage them through the Central Management Console (CMC).

See Chapter 14: Organizing Objects. The shortcut inherits object rights from its parent folder. they are not able to schedule that report even through a shortcut that allows them full rights. See “Scheduling objects using object packages” on page 471. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 417 . for example. For example. The new copy of the object inherits all object rights from its new parent folder. the shortcut object rights do not override the rights of the original object. access route for an object. if a user does not have rights to schedule a report. moving. The object retains its original set of object rights.Managing Objects General object management 17 General object management This section describes general tasks related to managing objects and their instances. moving. or to create a shortcut to an object within BusinessObjects Enterprise: • “Copy” creates another copy of the object in a different location. You can also create a shortcut to give users access to the object when you don’t want them to access the folder that the actual object is located in. However. Note: For information setting the rights for an object. when scheduling objects by using an object package. selecting a folder (and any subfolders) by clicking the appropriate link(s). more convenient. or creating a shortcut for an object” on page 417 “Deleting an object” on page 419 “Searching for an object” on page 419 “Sending an object or instance” on page 420 “Changing properties of an object” on page 422 “Assigning an object to categories” on page 424 Tip: You can also manage an object by going to the Folders management area in the CMC. You use copy. or creating a shortcut for an object Use this procedure to copy or move an object. “Create shortcut” enables you to create an alternate. to copy the objects to the package. It includes the following sections: • • • • • • “Copying. • • “Move” changes the location of the object from one folder to another. see “Setting object rights for users and groups” on page 317. and selecting the object that is located under the Object Title column. Copying.

To copy. For more information on folder rights. 418 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . or create a shortcut for. Select one of the following options: • • • Copy to Move to Create shortcut in Tip: You may want to create a shortcut if you want to give someone access to an object without giving that user access to the entire folder that the object is located in. move. The Copy/Move/Create Shortcut page appears. select it and click Show Subfolders. After you create the shortcut. 5. Click Copy/Move/Shortcut.17 Managing Objects General object management 1. use the Look For field. Tip: • • To expand a folder. move. users who have access to the folder where the shortcut is located can access this object and its instances. then click OK. Select the appropriate destination folder. 2. 4. Select the check boxes associated with the object(s) you want to copy. 3. see “Specifying folder rights” on page 364. or create a shortcut for an object Go to the Objects management area of the CMC. To search for a specific folder or object package.

Click Delete. In the Text field. you have the option of deleting object instances. Note: When you delete an object. 3.Managing Objects General object management 17 Deleting an object This procedure explains how to delete either a single object or multiple objects. which deletes all of the objects and instances that are stored in that folder. For more information. 2. Select the check boxes associated with the object(s). type the text to search for. To search for an object or objects Go to the Objects management area of the CMC. 4. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 419 . 3. To delete an object Go to the Objects management area of the CMC. Searching for an object The search feature enables you to search for specific text within object titles or descriptions. Specify the search criteria. specify the object field to search (title or description) and the matching method to use (is. all of its existing instances and scheduled instances will be deleted. does not contain). In the “Search for” fields. 1. 2. 1. see “Managing and viewing the history of instances” on page 495. Click Search. rather than the object itself. As well. You can also delete a folder (by selecting a folder and clicking Delete in the Folders management area). Click OK. is not. contains.

1. for example. and then select the check boxes for the instances you want to send. You can send an object. To send an object or an instance to a destination Go to the Objects management area of the CMC. It does not cause the system to run the object and create new instances. Not all types of objects can be sent to all destinations.17 Managing Objects General object management Sending an object or instance You can use the “Send to” feature to send existing objects or instances of an object to different destinations. Select the check boxes for the objects that you want to send. 420 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . The “Send to” function handles existing objects or instances only. 3. Instances with a status or Recurring or Pending are scheduled and do not contain any data yet. For details about which types of objects can be sent to which destinations. see See also “Available destinations by object type” on page 421. Select only instances with a status of Success or Failed. 2. or a shortcut to the object or instance. The Send to page appears. or you can send instances of an object. To send an instance of the object. a Word or Excel file. nor does it refresh the data for a report instance. You can send either a copy of an object or instance. a report instance. for example. You can also select the destination. click the link for the object. Click Send to. FTP or Inbox. Click the History tab. for example.

you can the temporary instances that are created when you send an object or instance. The system sends the selected objects or instances to the specified destinations. or to an Email destination within BusinessObjects Enterprise. 6. deselect Clean up temporary objects created after objects have been sent.Managing Objects General object management 17 4. The following table summarizes which objects cannot use certain destinations. Click Send. select the Set this destination as the selected object’s scheduling destination option. For example. Available destinations by object type Most destinations can be used for most types of objects. If you want. you must specify additional parameters for the destination information. If you select this option. Note: Send Web Intelligence documents to the “Inbox” destination only. See “Available destinations by object type” on page 421 and “Selecting a destination” on page 481. If you want the destination to become the default destination for the object. By default. The system will update the destination information for the object when you click Send. Unm. DIsk Yes Yes Email (SMTP) FTP Yes Yes File Yes Yes Link Yes Yes Inbox File Yes Yes Yes Link Yes Yes Yes Object type Report Object Package Program BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 421 . In some cases recipients must have access to the BusinessObjects Enterprise system to be able to open the object. but there are some exceptions. for a Web Intelligence document you cannot specify an unmanaged disk destination. If you want to keep these 5. Select the destination option you want: • • Each selected object’s scheduling destination Sends the objects or instances to the destination specified on the Destination pages for the objects. A new destination for all selected objects Allows you to specify a destination. this option is selected and the system deletes any temporary objects or instances after they have been sent.

Microsoft Excel. View button For Microsoft Word. As well. and the date it was created. 2. select an object by clicking its link. you can see the last times the object was modified and/or run. Text. On the Properties page. 3. Click Update. and object packages). For objects that can be scheduled (reports. and Rich Text objects. Provided that you have the appropriate software installed on your browser machine. a View button appears on the Properties page. Microsoft PowerPoint. DIsk Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes - Email (SMTP) FTP Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes File Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Link Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Inbox File Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Link Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Changing properties of an object In the Properties page of an object. change any of the properties as required. you cannot click Reset to undo changes. you can modify an object’s title and description. you can click the View button to open and view the object. programs. its location. 422 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . To change the properties of an object In the Objects management area of the CMC. Adobe Acrobat. 1. you can view its file name. Note that once you have clicked Update.17 Managing Objects General object management Object type Web Intelligence document Excel file Word file PDF file Text file RTF file PowerPoint file Hyperlink Unm.

Note: A thumbnail is a graphical representation of the first page of a report.Managing Objects General object management 17 Preview button Similarly. a Preview button appears. The Show report thumbnail checkbox does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. administrators have rights at the Full Control level (the highest rights setting) for all report objects. For details about object rights. the user will need to have rights at the Schedule level or higher. then a thumbnail will not be stored on BusinessObjects Enterprise. Show report thumbnail option For reports. BusinessObjects Enterprise connects to the report’s data source(s) if no cached pages are available. If the original report does not contain a thumbnail. see “Report object management” on page 425. the “Show report thumbnail” check box is selected by default.) By default. To use the Preview function. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 423 . for report objects and Web Intelligence documents. clear the Show report thumbnail check box. The Preview button enables you to view a report on demand with all of your current report settings. (To preview a report with saved data. the user will need to have rights at the View level or higher. If you do not want a thumbnail preview of this report to be available in InfoView or another web application.

Click OK. the object package instance in the History will appear as Failed. The Available Categories list includes all corporate or personal categories and their subcategories. Repeat this step for each category that you want the object to be assigned to. In the Available Categories list. select an object by clicking its link. 1.17 Managing Objects General object management Scheduled package fails upon individual component failure option For object packages. or subcategories within categories. The Assign Corporate Categories page appears. Click Assign Categories. You can also assign objects to a category by using the categories page. A category can be a corporate or a personal category. skip this step. click the Personal link. If you do not want the object package instance to fail if one of the objects fails. see “Removing or deleting objects from a category” on page 370. Assigning an object to categories Like folders. You can associate objects with multiple categories. categories are objects used to organize documents. 5. clear the “Scheduled package fails upon individual component failure” check box. 2. Note: To remove an object from a category. Otherwise. Use the following procedure to assign an object to a category by using the objects page. 4. Click the Categories tab. For complete information. 6. the “Scheduled package fails upon individual component failure” check box is selected by default. select the category that you want the object to belong to and use the arrow buttons to move to the Assigned Categories list.) This means that if one of objects in a package fails. See “Adding an object to a new category” on page 370. 424 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . see Chapter 14: Organizing Objects. (A component is an object in an object package. 3. To assign an object to a category In the Object management area of the CMC. To assign an object to a personal category.

and how to manage them through the Central Management Console (CMC). Typically. For more information about scheduling. It includes the following sections: • • • • • “What are report objects and instances?” on page 425 “Setting report refresh options” on page 426 “Setting report processing options” on page 428 “Applying processing extensions to reports” on page 443 “Working with hyperlinked reports” on page 447 Note: Most information in this section also applies to Web Intelligence document objects. What are report objects and instances? A report object is an object that is created using a Business Objects designer component (such as Crystal Reports or OLAP Intelligence). Scheduled instances When you schedule an object. report objects are designed such that you can create several instances with varying characteristics.Managing Objects Report object management 17 Report object management This section explains report objects and instances. Both types of objects can also contain saved data. A scheduled instance contains object and schedule information. even though both instances originate from the same report object. the system creates a scheduled instance for the object. see Chapter 18: Scheduling Objects. such as InfoView or a custom web application. You can schedule objects either from CMC or by using a BusinessObjects Enterprise application. you can schedule one instance that contains report data that is specific to one department and schedule another instance that contains information that is specific to another department. A report object or Web Intelligence document object can be made available to everyone or to individuals in selected user groups. For example. if you run a report object with parameters. Both types of objects contain report information (such as database fields). BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 425 . Scheduled instances appear on the History page of the respective object and have a status of Recurring or Pending. It does not contain any data yet. A Web Intelligence document object Web Intelligence is created using the Report panel and HTML Query panel in InfoView. Any exceptions have been identified.

Those changes do not affect any existing scheduled instances or object instances. if a prompt appears only in the source . The instance contains actual data from the database. processed. BusinessObjects Enterprise compares the report object stored in BusinessObjects Enterprise with the original . the new default settings are displayed. Where report elements are the same in the source report and the report object. the report refresh settings allow you to control which settings in the report object are updated with values from the source .rpt file. It appears on the History page of the object and has a status of Success or Failed.rpt file stored in the Input File Repository Server. Any changes that you have made to the default value of the parameter in BusinessObjects Enterprise are overwritten. and displayed in version XI format. then BusinessObjects Enterprise updates the default value of the prompt in the report object. then refreshing the report adds the prompt to the report object. You can then change these settings as needed for the scheduled instance you want to create. overwriting any changes you’ve made in BusinessObjects Enterprise. You can set report refresh options that determine which settings of a report object are updated when you refresh it in BusinessObjects Enterprise.rpt file. the system runs the object and creates an object instance. 426 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Setting report refresh options Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. For example. Making changes to an object Any changes you make to the an object (by making the changes and then clicking Update) affect the default settings for the object only.rpt and the report object and you have selected the “Prompt Values” option. Once published to BusinessObjects Enterprise. whether you use CMC or an application such as InfoView. BusinessObjects Enterprise deletes or adds report elements in the report object to make it match the . reports are saved. If a prompt appears in both the source . The next time you schedule the object.17 Managing Objects Report object management Object instances At the specified time.rpt file. When you refresh a report object. Note: BusinessObjects Enterprise supports reports created in versions 6 through XI of Crystal Reports. This holds true no matter which report refresh options you select.

For more information. listing the universes that are used by the document. 4. To view the universes for a Web Intelligence document In the Objects management area of the CMC. see “Refreshing repository objects in published reports” on page 179. Choose the report elements that you want to refresh from the source report file. BusinessObjects Enterprise ensures that changes to the metadata describing a prompt is updated in the report object. 2. The Universes page appears. 3. Click Refresh Report. clear the appropriate report refresh option. 2. On the Properties page. To set a report object’s refresh options In the Objects management area of the CMC. select a Web Intelligence document object by clicking its link. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 427 . 1. BusinessObjects Enterprise ensures that changes to either the default value of a prompt or to the current value of a prompt are updated in the report object when the report is refreshed. For example.Managing Objects Report object management 17 To preserve your changes to the values of report elements when you refresh a report. Note: • • • If you select Prompt Values. click the Universes link. select a report object by clicking its link. If you select “Use Object Repository when refreshing report”. click the Refresh Options link. “Can be null” is a prompt option. In CMC you can view which universes are used by a Web Intelligence document. A universe is a representation of the information available in the database. repository objects in the report object will be refreshed against the repository. If you select Prompt Options. On the Properties page. 1. Viewing the universes for a Web Intelligence document You build queries for Web Intelligence documents using objects in a universe.

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Setting report processing options
For each object you can set several processing options. These options appear on the Process page for the object. Setting the report processing options includes the following tasks:

• • • • • • • •

“Setting report viewing options” on page 428 “Specifying servers for scheduling” on page 430 “Specifying servers for viewing and modification” on page 432 “Changing database information” on page 434 “Updating parameters” on page 437 “Using filters” on page 439 “Setting printer and page layout options” on page 441 “Applying processing extensions to reports” on page 443

Setting report viewing options
Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. The report viewing options available in BusinessObjects Enterprise allow you to balance users’ need for up-to-date information with the need to optimize data retrieval times and overall system performance. BusinessObjects Enterprise allows you to enable data sharing, which permits different users accessing the same report object to use the same data when viewing or refreshing a report. Enabling data sharing reduces the number of database calls, thereby reducing the time needed to generate a report instance for subsequent users of the same report, while greatly improving overall system performance under load. You can control data sharing settings on either a per-report or a per-server basis:

If you specify which servers a report uses for viewing, you can use perserver settings to standardize data sharing settings for groups of reports, and centrally administer these settings. (See “Specifying servers for viewing and modification” on page 432.) Per-report settings permit you to specify that particular reports will not share data. They also allow you to tailor the data sharing interval for each report to meet the needs of that report’s users. In addition, per-report settings enable you to decide on a report-by-report basis whether it is appropriate to allow users to access the database whenever they refresh reports.

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Data sharing may not be ideal for all organizations, or for all reports. To get full value from data sharing, you must permit data to be reused for some period of time. This means that some users may see “old” data when they view a report on demand, or refresh a report instance that they are viewing. The default report viewing options for BusinessObjects Enterprise emphasize data freshness and integrity. By default, when you add a report to BusinessObjects Enterprise it is configured to use per-server settings for report sharing. The default server settings ensure that users always receive up-to-date information when they refresh a report, and guarantee that the oldest data given to any user is 0 minutes old. If you choose to enable perreport settings, the default settings allow data sharing, allow a viewer refresh to retrieve fresh data from the database, and ensure that the oldest data given to a client is 5 minutes old. Tip: Disabling the sharing of report data between clients is not the same as setting the “Oldest on-demand data given to a client” to 0 minutes. Under high load, your system may receive more than one request for the same report instance at the same time. In this case, if the data sharing interval is set to 0 but the “Share report data between clients” option is enabled, BusinessObjects Enterprise shares data between the client requests. If it is important that data not be shared between different clients (for example, because the report uses a User Function Library (UFL) that is personalized for each user), disable data sharing for that report. For details on setting report viewing options on a per-server basis, see:

• • • •

“Modifying Cache Server performance settings” on page 112 “Modifying Page Server performance settings” on page 115 “Modifying performance settings for the RAS” on page 120 “Configuring the Web Intelligence Report Server” on page 122

For more information on configuring BusinessObjects Enterprise to optimize report viewing in your system, see the planning chapter in the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide. Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. 1. 2. 3. 4. To set report viewing options for a report In the Objects management area of the CMC, select a report by clicking its link. Click the Process tab. In the “Data Refresh for Viewing” area, click “Use report specific viewing settings.” Then select the options that you want to set for this report. Click Update.

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Specifying servers for scheduling
You can specify the default servers that BusinessObjects Enterprise will use to run an object, and to schedule and process instances. When specifying your servers, you have three options:

• • • • •

Use the first available server. Use the servers that belong to a selected group first (and, if the servers from that group aren’t available, use any available server). Use only servers that belong to a specific group.

Depending on the type of object, BusinessObjects Enterprise uses the following servers: Crystal reports are run on the Report Job Server. Web Intelligence documents are run on the Web Intelligence Report Server.

By selecting a particular server or server group, you can balance the load of your scheduling, because specific objects can be processed by specific job servers. You must first create server groups by using the Server Groups management area in the CMC, before you can select servers that belong to a selected group. You can also set the maximum number of jobs that a job server will accept. For more information, see “Modifying performance settings for job servers” on page 121. Also, you can balance the load of your scheduling, because specific objects can be processed by specific job servers. You must first create server groups by using the Server Groups management area in the CMC, before you can select servers that belong to a selected group. You can also set the maximum number of jobs that a job server will accept. For more information, see “Modifying performance settings for job servers” on page 121. Note:

If you choose the “Use the first available server” option, the Central Management Server (CMS) will check the job servers to see which one has the lowest load. The CMS does this by checking the percentage of the maximum load on each job server. If all of the job servers have the same load percentage, then the CMS will randomly pick a job server. If you are scheduling a program object that requires access to files stored locally on a Program Job Server, but you have multiple Program Job Servers, you must specify which server to use to run the program. See “Specifying servers for viewing and modification” on page 432 for information on specifying the servers used to view or modify an object. To specify the servers to use for an object In the Objects management area of the CMC, select an object by clicking its link.

• •

1.

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2.

Click the Process tab.

3.

In the “Default Servers To Use For Scheduling” area, choose from one of the three options:

• •

Use the first available server BusinessObjects Enterprise will use the server that has the most resources free at the time of scheduling. Give preference to servers belonging to the selected group Select a server group from the list. This option will attempt to process the object from the servers that are found within your server group. If the specified servers are not available, then the object will be processed on the next available server.

Only use servers belonging to the selected group This option ensures that BusinessObjects Enterprise will only use the specified servers that are found within the selected server group. If all of the servers in the server group are unavailable, then the object will not be processed.

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4. 5.

Click Update. In the “Default Servers To Use For Viewing” area, repeat the activities from steps 3 and 4. Note: “Default Servers To Use For Viewing” applies only to report objects.

Specifying servers for viewing and modification
You can specify the default servers that BusinessObjects Enterprise will use when a user views or modifies a report or Web Intelligence document. When specifying your servers, you have three options:

• • • • •

Use the first available server. Use the servers that belong to a selected group first (and, if the servers from that group aren’t available, use any available server). Use only servers that belong to a specific group.

Depending on the type of object, BusinessObjects Enterprise uses the following servers: Crystal reports are run on the Cache Server and Page Server, or the Report Application Server, depending on which viewer is used. Web Intelligence documents are run on the Web Intelligence Report Server.

By selecting a particular server or server group, you can balance the load of your viewing, as specific reports can be processed using specific servers. You must first create server groups by going to the Server Groups management area in the CMC before you are able to select servers that belong to a selected group. You can also set the maximum number of jobs a server will accept. For more information, see “Modifying Cache Server performance settings” on page 112, “Modifying Page Server performance settings” on page 115, or “Modifying performance settings for the RAS” on page 120.

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Note:

If you choose the “Use the first available server” option, the Central Management Server(CMS) will check the servers to see which one has the lowest load. The CMS does this by checking the percentage of the maximum load on each server. If all of the servers have the same load percentage, then the CMS will randomly pick a server. See “Specifying servers for scheduling” on page 430 for information on specifying Job Servers used to schedule an object. To specify the servers to use for a report object In the Objects management area of the CMC, select an object by clicking its link. Click the Process tab.

1. 2.

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3.

In the “Default Servers To Use For Viewing” area, choose from one of the three options:

• •

Use the first available server BusinessObjects Enterprise will use the server that has the most resources free at the time of viewing. Give preference to servers belonging to the selected group Select a server group from the list. This option will attempt to process the object from the servers that are found within your server group. If the specified servers are not available, then the object will be processed on the next available server.

Only use servers belonging to the selected group This option ensures that BusinessObjects Enterprise will only use the specified servers that are found within the selected server group. If all of the servers in the server group are unavailable, then the object will not be processed.

4.

Click Update.

Changing database information
Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. You can select your database type and set the default database logon information on the Database page for a report. The Database page displays the data source or data sources for your report object and its instances. You can choose to prompt the user for a logon name and password when he or she views a report instance. 1. 2. To change database settings In the Objects management area of the CMC, select a report object by clicking its link. Click the Process tab, and then click the database link.

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The Database page appears.

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3. 4.

In the Data Source(s) list, select the data source. Select Use original database logon information from the report or Use custom database logon information specified here. If you select the first option, you can specify a user name and password to be used with the original report database. If you select the second option, you can specify a server name (or a DSN in the case of an ODBC data source), a database name, a user name, and a password for a number of predefined database drivers, or for a custom database driver that you’ve specified. If you’ve changed the default table prefix in your database, specify a custom table prefix here. For a complete list of supported databases and drivers, refer to the
platform.txt file included with your installation.

5.

Select the database logon option you want.

Prompt the user for database logon The system will prompt users for a password when they refresh a report. Note: This option has no effect on a scheduled instance. Also, BusinessObjects Enterprise only prompts users when they first refresh a report; that is, if they refresh the report a second time, they will not be prompted.

Use SSO context for database logon The system will use the user’s security context, that is, the user’s logon and password, to log on to the database. Note: For this option to work, you must have your system configured for end-to-end single sign-on, or for single sign-on to the database. For more information, see “Configuring Kerberos single sign-on” on page 299.

Use same database logon as when report is run The system will use the same database logon information as was used when the report was run on the job server.

6.

Click Update.

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Updating parameters
Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. Parameter fields (with preset values) enable users to view and to specify the data that they want to see. If a report contains parameters, you can set the default parameter value for each field or fields (which is used whenever a report instance is generated). Through a BusinessObjects Enterprise application such as InfoView, your users are either able to use the report with the preset default value(s) or choose another value or values. If you do not specify a default value, users will have to choose a value when they schedule the report. Note: The Parameters link is available only if the report object contains parameters. 1. 2. To view parameter settings In the Objects management area of the CMC, select a report object by clicking its link. Click the Process tab, and then click the Parameters link.

3.

Under the Value column, select the value associated with the parameter you want to change. A page opens that allows you to change the parameter value. Depending on the parameter value type, you either type a value in the field or choose a value from a list. If there is a list, you can also click Edit to type a new value.

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4. 5.

Select the Clear the current parameter value(s) check box if you want to clear the current value that is set for the specified parameter. Select the Prompt the user for new value(s) when viewing check box if you want your users to be prompted when they view a report instance through a BusinessObjects Enterprise application such as InfoView. Click Update.

6.

Updating prompts for Web Intelligence document objects
Note: This feature does not apply to Crystal reports objects. See “Updating parameters” on page 437 instead. Prompt fields (with preset values) enable users to view and to specify the data that they want to see. If a report contains parameters, you can set the default prompt value for each field or fields (which is used whenever a report instance is generated). Through a BusinessObjects Enterprise application such as InfoView, your users can either use the report with the preset default value(s) or choose another value or values. If you do not specify a default value, users will have to choose a value when they schedule the report. Note: The Prompts link is available only if the Web Intelligence document object contains prompts.

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1. 2. 3. 4.

To update the prompts for a Web Intelligence document object In the Objects management area of the CMC, select a report object by clicking its link. Click the Process tab, and then click the Prompts link. The Prompts page appears, showing a dialog box with prompts. Select the prompt and enter a value for the prompt. Repeat this step for every prompt whose you want to change. Click Update.

Using filters
Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. In the Filters page, you set the default selection formulas for the report. Selection formulas are similar to parameter fields in that they are used to filter results so that only the required information is displayed. Unlike parameters, end users will not be prompted for selection formula values when they view or refresh the report. When users schedule reports through a web-based client such as InfoView, they can choose to modify the selection formulas for the reports. By default, if any formulas are set in the CMC, they will be used by the web-based client. For more information on selection formulas, see the Crystal Reports User’s Guide. In addition to changing selection formulas, if you have developed your own processing extensions, you can select the processing extensions that you want to apply to your report. For more information, see “Applying processing extensions to reports” on page 443. When you use filters in conjunction with processing extensions, a subset of the processed data is returned. Selection formulas and processing extensions act as filters for the report. 1. 2. To use filters In the Objects management area of the CMC, select a report object by clicking its link. Click the Process tab, and then click the Filters link. The Filters page appears.

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When printing a report. the second area specifies custom layout settings for changing the page size and orientation (regardless of whether the report instance is printed or not). BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 441 . The Print Setup page contains two areas: the first area specifies whether or not a report instance is printed. You can choose to print a report instance when scheduling it. You can choose to print a report (each time it runs) using the Job Server’s default printer or a different printer.Managing Objects Report object management 17 3. Click Update. BusinessObjects Enterprise prints your report after it is processed. Repeat this step until you have selected the processing extensions you want. In the processing extensions area. 4. select a processing extension you want from the Available Processing Extensions list. By selecting the Printer destination. See “Changing the server user account” on page 146 for information on changing the user account. • Record Selection Formula Use the Record Selection Formula to create or edit a record selection formula or formulas that limit the records used when you or a user schedules a report. 5. and the page range. report instances are always printed in Crystal Reports format. you can set the number of copies and the page range. Specifying a printer Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. Update or add new selection formulas. • Group Selection Formula Use the Group Selection Formulas to create or edit a group selection formula or formulas that limit the groups used when you or a user schedules a report. the printer to use. the number of copies. and if printed. Setting printer and page layout options Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. and move it to the Use these Processing Extensions list. Note: The Job Server must run under an account that has sufficient privileges to access the printer you specify.

This does not interfere with the format selected when scheduling the report. type: lp -d printername Note: Ensure that the printer you are using (on UNIX) is “shown” and not “hidden. 2. Leave Default printer selected if you want to print to the Job Server’s default printer.” 6. select a report object by clicking its link. The report instances are automatically sent to the printer in Crystal Reports format. and so on. in the “Specify a printer” field. and printername is the name of your printer. but also to the overall look of the report. click the Print Setup link. Enter a printer’s path and name. When viewing or scheduling a report instance to any format. 4. The settings you choose in this section of the Print Setup page affect how you’ll see a report instance when displaying it. and choose the print page range. If your job server is using Windows. the font metrics and other layout settings of the display and/or the printer). select Specify a printer. type: \\printserver\printername Where printserver is the name of your printer server. On the Process tab. The overall look is affected by the properties of the device for which the report is displayed in (that is. otherwise. Select Print in Crystal Reports format using the selected printer when scheduling if you want report instances to be sent directly to a printer. For instance. To assign a printer In the Objects management area of the CMC. Note: Page layout settings are not specifically related only to scheduling a report to a printer.17 Managing Objects Report object management 1. Specifying page layout Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. type the print command that you normally use. If your job server is running on UNIX. select the number of copies. you can first specify page layout criteria such as page orientation. The Print Setup page appears. 5. Click Update. 442 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . page size. 3. in the “Specify a printer” field.

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1. 2.

To set a report’s page layout In the Objects management area of the CMC, select a report object by clicking its link. On the Process tab, click the Print Setup link. The Print Setup page appears.

3.

Make your settings according to the type of layout you want. The options are as follows:

• •

Report file default Choose this option if you want the page layout to conform to the settings that were chosen for the report in Crystal Reports. Specified printer settings Choose this option if you want the page layout to conform to the settings of a specified printer. You can choose the Job Server’s default printer or another printer. For information about specifying another printer, see “Specifying a printer” on page 441. When you choose this option, you can print scheduled report instances only to the printer you specify in the “Specified printer settings” area. In other words, you cannot set your report to display with one printer’s setting and then print to a different printer.

Custom settings Choose this option if you want to customize all page layout settings. You can choose page orientation, page size, measurement units (inches or millimeters), page width, and page height.

4.

Click Update.

Applying processing extensions to reports
Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports the use of customized processing extensions. A processing extension is a dynamically loaded library of code that applies your business logic to particular BusinessObjects Enterprise view or

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schedule requests before they are processed by the system. This section shows how to register your processing extension with BusinessObjects Enterprise, and how to apply an available processing extension to a particular report object. For general information about processing extensions and how you can use them to customize report processing and security, see “Processing extensions” on page 241. For information on writing your own processing extensions with the Processing Extension API, see the developer documentation available on your product CD. Note: On Windows systems, dynamically loaded libraries are referred to as dynamic-link libraries (.dll file extension). On UNIX systems, dynamically loaded libraries are often referred to as shared libraries (.so file extension). You must include the file extension when you name your processing extensions. Also, file names cannot include the \ or / characters.

Registering processing extensions with the system
Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. Before you can apply your processing extensions to particular objects, you must make your library of code available to each machine that will process the relevant schedule or view requests. The BusinessObjects Enterprise installation creates a default directory for your processing extensions on each Job Server, Page Server, and Report Application Server (RAS). It is recommended that you copy your processing extensions to the default directory on each server. On Windows, the default directory is C:\Program
Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\win32_x86\ProcessExt. On UNIX, it is the bobje/processext

directory. Tip: It is possible to share a processing extension file. For details, see “Sharing processing extensions between multiple servers” on page 447. Depending upon the functionality that you have written into the extension, copy the library onto the following machines:

• • •

If your processing extension intercepts schedule requests only, copy your library onto each machine that is running as a Job Server. If your processing extension intercepts view requests only, copy your library onto each machine that is running as a Page Server or RAS. If your processing extension intercepts schedule and view requests, copy your library onto each machine that is running as a Job Server, Page Server, or RAS.

Note: If the processing extension is required only for schedule/view requests made to a particular Server Group, you need only copy the library onto each processing server in the group.

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1. 2.

To register a processing extension with the system Go to the Objects management area of the CMC. Click Object Settings.

3. 4.

In the Name field, type a display name for your processing extension. In the Location field, type the file name of your processing extension along with any additional path information:

• •

If you copied your processing extension into the default directory on each of the appropriate machines, just type the file name (but not the file extension). If you copied your processing extension to a subfolder below the default directory, type the location as: subfolder/filename

Note: Although the actual file name must include the .dll or .so extension (as appropriate to the server’s operating system), you must not include the file extension in the Location field. 5. 6. Use the Description field to add information about your processing extension. Click Add. You can now select this processing extension to apply its logic to particular objects. For details, see “Selecting a processing extension for a report” on page 445. Tip: To delete a processing extension, select its check box and click Delete. (Make sure that no recurring jobs are based on this processing extension because any future jobs based on this processing extension will fail.)

Selecting a processing extension for a report
Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. 1. 2. To select a processing extension for a report Go to the Objects management area of the CMC. Click the link to the report object that you want to apply your processing extension to.

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3.

Click the Process tab, and then click the Filters link.

4.

Select your processing extension in the Available Processing Extensions list. Note: Your processing extensions appear in this list only after you have registered them with the system. For details, see “Registering processing extensions with the system” on page 444. Tip: You may apply more than one processing extension to a report object. Repeat steps 4 and 5 for each processing extension; then use the up and down arrows to specify the order in which the processing extensions should be used.

5.

Click Update. Your processing extension is now enabled for this report object.

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Sharing processing extensions between multiple servers
Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. If you want to put all processing extensions in a single location, you can override the default processing extensions directory for each Job Server, Page Server, and RAS. First, copy your processing extensions to a shared directory on a network drive that is accessible to all of the servers. Map (or mount) the network drive from each server’s machine. Note: Mapped drives on Windows are valid only until you reboot the machine. For details, see “Ensuring that server resources are available on local drives” on page 526. If you are running servers on both Windows and on UNIX, you must copy a .dll and an .so version of every processing extension into the shared directory. In addition, the shared network drive must be visible to Windows and to UNIX machines (through Samba or some other file-sharing system). Finally, change each server’s command line to modify the default processing extensions directory. Do this by adding “-report_ProcessExtPath <absolute path>” to the command line. Replace <absolute path> with the path to the new folder, using whichever path convention is appropriate for the operating system that the server is running on (for example, M:\code\extensions, /home/shared/code/extensions, and so on). The procedure for making this modification depends upon your operating system:

• •

On Windows, use the CCM to stop the server. Then open the server’s Properties to modify the command line. Start the server again when you have finished. On UNIX, run ccm.sh to stop the Job Server/Page Server. Then edit ccm.config to modify the server’s command line. Start the server again when you have finished. For reference, see “ccm.sh” on page 598.

Working with hyperlinked reports
Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. Crystal Reports lets you use hyperlinks to navigate from one report object to another. You can move to a Report Part within the report itself, to other report objects or their parts, or to specific instances of reports or Report Parts. This navigation is available only in the new script-based DHTML viewers (zeroclient, server-side viewers) included in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. By linking directly from one object to another, the required data context is passed automatically so that you navigate to the object and data that is relevant.

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Initially, when you add hyperlinks between reports in Crystal Reports, you create a link from one file directly to another. However, when you publish linked report files simultaneously to the same object package, the links are modified to point to managed report objects. (Each link is changed, so that it references the appropriate destination report by Enterprise ID, rather than by file path.) Also, the modified links become relative inside the object package. When you schedule the object package, BusinessObjects Enterprise processes its reports, and again modifies hyperlinks within each report instance: hyperlinks between report objects in an object package are converted to hyperlinks between report instances in a specific instance of the object package. For more information on object packages, see “Scheduling objects using object packages” on page 471. To view hyperlinked reports, you must publish both the home and destination reports to the same BusinessObjects Enterprise system. (A home report is one that contains a hyperlink to another report: the destination report.) Note: For information about how to create hyperlinks between report objects, see the Crystal Reports Online Help.

Publishing and hyperlinking reports
Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. To avoid breaking hyperlinks between reports, it is best to publish the reports first and then to create the hyperlinks. 1. 2. 3. 4. To publish and then hyperlink reports Create the reports, without hyperlinks, in Crystal Reports. Publish them to BusinessObjects Enterprise. Use Crystal Reports to log on to your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. Create the hyperlinks between the home and destination reports. See the Crystal Reports Online Help.

Crystal Reports automatically determines what type of link—relative or absolute—to establish between the reports. In BusinessObjects Enterprise, relative links are those between reports in the same object package, and absolute links are links to specific report objects or instances.

Publishing reports with existing hyperlinks
Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. The recommended method for creating hyperlinked reports is first to publish the individual reports, then create hyperlinks between them. See “Publishing and hyperlinking reports” on page 448.) However, because this is not always

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possible, use the following procedure to publish reports after they have been hyperlinked. When you publish reports this way, the hyperlinks are converted to relative links.

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To publish reports with existing hyperlinks Using the Publishing Wizard, publish the reports (that are linked to each other) to the same object package. Note: If you publish hyperlinked reports independently of each other, rather than publishing them simultaneously to the same object package, all hyperlinks between the reports will break. You must re-establish the links using Crystal Reports and save the report back to BusinessObjects Enterprise. (For more information, see the Crystal Reports Online Help.)

Viewing hyperlinks in a report
Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. You can view a list of the links in a report by clicking the Links link on the report’s Properties page. The links are listed as either relative or absolute. In BusinessObjects Enterprise, relative links are those between reports in the same object package, and absolute links are links to specific report objects or instances. 1. 2. To view a list of links in a report object In the Objects management area of the CMC, select the report object by clicking its link. Click the Properties tab, and then click the Links link. The Links page appears.

Viewing hyperlinked reports
Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports navigation between hyperlinked reports only with script-based viewers, specifically the DHTML and Advanced DHTML viewers in InfoView. To change your preferred viewer in the CMC, click the Preferences button in the upper-right corner of the CMC, and select the appropriate viewer from the Viewer list. For information on how to change your preferred viewer, see the BusinessObjects Enterprise User’s Guide. Parameter information is not carried over between the home and destination reports. That is, when you view a destination report by clicking a hyperlink in a home report, you are prompted to enter any parameters that the destination report requires.

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Security considerations
To view hyperlinked reports through BusinessObjects Enterprise, you must have the appropriate rights both in BusinessObjects Enterprise and at the database level. In BusinessObjects Enterprise, to view a destination report through a hyperlink in a home report, you must have View rights to the destination report. When the hyperlink points to a report object, you must have View On Demand rights to be able to refresh the data against the data source. For information about setting the levels of access to objects, see “Setting common access levels” on page 320. Database logon information is carried over between hyperlinked reports. If the credentials you specified to view the home report are not valid for the destination report, you are prompted for a valid set of database logon credentials for the destination report.

Program object management
This section explains program objects and instances, and how to manage them through the Central Management Console (CMC). It includes the following sections:

• •

“What are program objects and instances?” on page 451 “Setting program processing options” on page 453

What are program objects and instances?
A program object is an object in BusinessObjects Enterprise that represents an application. Publishing a program object to BusinessObjects Enterprise allows you to use BusinessObjects Enterprise to schedule and run the program object and to manage user rights in relation to the program object. For information about publishing program objects, see “Publishing overview” on page 374. When you publish a program object or its associated files to BusinessObjects Enterprise, they are stored in the Input File Repository Server (FRS). Each time a BusinessObjects Enterprise program runs, the program and files are passed to the Program Job Server, and BusinessObjects Enterprise creates a program instance. Unlike report instances, which you can view in their completed format, program instances exist as records in the object history. BusinessObjects Enterprise stores the program’s standard out and standard error in a text output file. This file appears when you click a program instance in the object History.

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Program types Three types of applications can be published to BusinessObjects Enterprise as program objects:

Executable Executable programs are binary files, batch files, or shell scripts. They generally have file extensions such as: .com, .exe, .bat, .sh. You can publish any executable program that can be run from the command line on the machine that runs the Program Job Server.

Java You can publish any Java program to BusinessObjects Enterprise as a Java program object. For Java program objects to have access to Java SDK objects, your class must implement the IProgramBase interface from the BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK (com.businessobjects.sdk.plugin.desktop.program.IProgramBase). For details, see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK Guide.

Script Script program objects are JScript and VBScript scripts. They are run on Windows using an embedded COM object and can—once published— reference the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK objects. For details, see the BusinessObjects Enterprise COM SDK Guide. Note: Script program objects are not supported on UNIX.

Note: As the administrator, you can choose to enable or disable any of the types of program objects. For details, see “Authentication and program objects” on page 458. Once you have published a program object to BusinessObjects Enterprise, you can configure it in the Objects management area of the CMC. For each type of program object (Executable, Java, or Script) you can choose to specify command-line arguments and a working directory. For executable and Java programs, there are additional ways, both required and optional, to configure the program objects and provide them with access to other files. Tip: Program objects allow you to write, publish, and schedule scripts or Java programs that run against BusinessObjects Enterprise, and perform maintenance tasks, such as deleting instances from the history. Furthermore, you can design these scripts and Java programs to access BusinessObjects Enterprise session information. This ensures that the scheduled program objects retain the security rights or restrictions of the user who scheduled the job. (Your scripts or java programs require access to the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK. For details, see the BusinessObjects Enterprise COM SDK Guide or the BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK Guide.)

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Setting program processing options
For each object you can set several processing options. These options appear on the Process page for the object. Setting the program processing options includes the following tasks:

• • • • •

“Specifying command-line arguments” on page 453 “Setting a working directory for a program object” on page 454 “Configuring executable programs” on page 455 “Configuring Java programs” on page 456 “Authentication and program objects” on page 458

Specifying command-line arguments
For each program object you can specify command-line arguments on the Parameters page for the object. You can specify any argument that is supported by the command-line interface for your program. Arguments are passed directly to the command-line interface, without parsing. 1. 2. To specify command-line arguments In the Objects management area of the CMC, select the program object by clicking its link. Click the Process tab, then click the Parameters link. The Parameters page appears.

3.

In the Arguments field, type the command-line arguments for your program, using the same format you would use at the command line itself. For example, if your program has a loops option, to set the loops value to 100, you might type -loops 100

4.

Click Update.

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Setting a working directory for a program object
By default, when a program object runs, BusinessObjects Enterprise creates a temporary subdirectory in the Program Job Server’s working directory, and uses this subdirectory as the working directory for the program. The subdirectory is automatically deleted when the program finishes running. You can specify an alternative working directory for the program object by modifying the Working Directory field on the Parameters page of the object. Or, you can modify the default setting for the working directory for the Program Job Server. Note: The account under which the program runs must have appropriate rights to the folder that you set as the working directory. The level of file permissions required depend on what the program does; however, the program’s account generally needs read, write, and execute permissions to the working directory. For information about setting credentials for an account under which a program object will run, see “Authentication and program objects” on page 458 1. 2. 3. To set a working directory for a program object In the Objects management area of the CMC, select the program object by clicking its link. Click the Process tab, then click the Parameters link. The Parameters page appears. In the Working Directory field, type the full path to the directory that you want to set as the program object’s working directory. For example, on Widows, if you created a working directory named working_directory, type C:\working_directory On UNIX, type /working_directory 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. Click Update. To modify the default working directory for the Program Job Server Go to the Servers management area of the CMC. Click the link for Program Job Server. The Properties page appears. In the Temp Directory field, type the full path to the directory you want to set as the working directory for the Program Job Server. Click Update.

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Configuring executable programs
When you publish an executable program object to the CMC, you can:

• •

Configure the object to have access to external or auxiliary files. See “Providing Java programs with access to other files” on page 457. Customize environment variables for the shell in which BusinessObjects Enterprise runs the program. See “Specifying environment variables” on page 456.

Providing executable programs with access to other files
Some binary files, batch files, and shell scripts require access to external or auxiliary files to run. Aside from setting a working directory for the program object, there are two ways to provide access to these files:

• •

If a required file is on the same machine as the Program Job Server, you can specify the full path to the file. Alternatively, if the file is not located on the Program Job Server, you can upload the file to the File Repository Server, which will pass the files to the Program Job Server as necessary. To specify paths to required files In the Objects management area of the CMC, select the executable program object by clicking its link. Click the Process tab, then click the Parameters link. The Parameters page appears. In the External Dependencies field, type the full path to the required file and click Add. Repeat step 3 for each file required. Click Update.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Tip: To edit or remove external dependencies that you have specified, select the file path (in the list of external dependencies on the Parameters page) and click the appropriate button, either Edit or Remove. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. To upload required files In the Objects management area of the CMC, select the executable program object by clicking its link. Click the Process tab, then click the Auxiliary Files link. The Auxiliary Files page appears. Click Browse to navigate to the required file, then click Add File. Repeat step 3 for each required file. Click Update.

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where name is the environment variable name and value is the value for the environment variable. you can provide the Java program with access to other files located on the Program Job Servers. Additionally. 456 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . you might type:PATH=$PATH:/usr/bin Note: BusinessObjects Enterprise sets your environment variables using the syntax that is appropriate for your operating system. The Parameters page appears. all name values on UNIX must be typed in upper-case. and you can specify Java Virtual Machine options. you might type: path=%path%. However. 4. click the link for the program object. Configuring Java programs To successfully schedule and run Java programs in BusinessObjects Enterprise. you must specify the required parameters for the program object. select the file(s) (in the list of external dependencies on the Parameters page) and click Remove File(s). For example. either Edit or Remove. you can configure your program by adding or modifying environment variables. then click the Parameters link. To add an environment variable In the Objects management area of the CMC. Any changes you make to environment variables exist only in the temporary shell in which BusinessObjects Enterprise runs the program. Use the form name=value. 1. Click Update. on UNIX you must follow convention.c:\usr\bin On UNIX. Tip: To edit or remove environment variables that you have specified. Modifications to an existing environment variable override this variable. and use the appropriate case. In the Environment Variables field. type the environment variables you want to set. rather than append to it. 2. Specifying environment variables In the CMC. and click the appropriate button. For example. when the program exits. the environment variables are destroyed. Thus. Click the Process tab.17 Managing Objects Program object management Tip: To remove auxiliary files that you have specified. you can set the path variable to append a user’s bin directory to the existing path: • • On Windows. See “Setting required parameters for Java programs” on page 457. See “Providing Java programs with access to other files” on page 457. 3. select the variable (in the list of environment variables on the Parameters page).

In the Class to run field.class file that implements the IProgramBase interface from the BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK. click the link for the Java program object. type the full paths to the locations of any Java library files that are required by the Java program. then click the Parameters link. Note: The Java Runtime Environment must be installed on each machine that is running a Program Job Server.Managing Objects Program object management 17 Setting required parameters for Java programs To successfully schedule and run a Java program. Click Update. The Parameters page appears. type the base name of the . you must provide BusinessObjects Enterprise with the base name of the . To specify required parameters for Java programs In the Objects management area of the CMC. if the file name is Arius. 3. type Arius 4. and stored on the Program Job Server. 1. Click Update. For example. In the Classpath field. 2. 3.IProgramBase). 4. To provide Java programs with access to other files In the Objects management area of the CMC. Providing Java programs with access to other files You can provide Java programs with access to files.businessobjects. You must separate multiple paths with the classpath separator that is appropriate to your operating system: a semi-colon for Windows.class.sdk. 2.desktop. The Parameters page appears. click the link for the Java program object. Click the Process tab. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 457 .program. Click the Parameters tab.class file that implements the IProgramBase from the BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK (com. 1. a colon for UNIX. such as Java libraries.plugin. located on the Program Job Server.

it runs under the default system account. you can configure the types of program objects available for use. The Logon page appears. 2. when you schedule a program object. and assign it appropriate rights. 1. To provide default credentials. then click the Program Objects tab. the program can make to files. 4. 3. Thus. The level of file permissions for the account under which a program object runs will determine what modifications. the administrator. you must protect the system against abuse.17 Managing Objects Program object management Authentication and program objects Be aware of the potential security risks associated with the publication of program objects. Alternatively. which generally has rights locally but not across the network. Click Update. Click the Process tab. Click the Program Objects tab. As the administrator. Note: By default. and you can configure the credentials required to run program objects. You can control the types of program objects users can run. Select the type or types of program objects you want users to run. the job fails if credentials are not specified. Enabling or disabling a type of program object As a first level of security. Authentication on all platforms In the Objects management area of the CMC. This feature allows you. 458 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . to have the program object run as that account. and the rights of the program will be limited to those of the user. If you choose not to specify a user account for a program object. the program will run under that user account. then click the Logon link. To enable or disable a type of program object In the Objects management area of the CMC. to set up a specific user account for the program. For details. To specify a user account for a program object In the Objects management area of the CMC. click Object Settings. 1. click the link for the program object. to give the program access to the system. Click “Schedule with the following operating system credentials” and provide a default user name and password. 2. see “Controlling users’ access to objects” on page 317. click Object Settings in the Objects management area. you must specify credentials for the account under which the program runs. if any. users who publish program objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise can assign their own credentials to a program object.

4. For Java programs./solaris_install/bobje/enterprise11/JavaSDK/crystalprogram.policy On UNIX. The Java Policy Tool has two code base entries. to suit your specific needs. type the credentials for the user account under which the program should run. BusinessObjects Enterprise forces the use of a Java Policy File. It includes: • • • • • “What are object packages. By default. Note: • • The settings for the Java Policy are universal for all Program Job Servers running on the same machine. and instances?” on page 460 “Creating an object package” on page 460 “Adding objects to an object package” on page 461 “Configuring object packages and their objects” on page 462 “Authentication and object packages” on page 463 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 459 . Click Update. Authentication for Java programs BusinessObjects Enterprise allows you to set security for all program objects. Use the Java Policy Tool (available with the Java Development Kit) to modify the Java Policy File.. components. In the User Name and Password fields. a typical location on Windows is: C:\Program Files\Business Objects\BusinessObjects Enterprise 11\conf\crystal-program.Managing Objects Object package management 17 3. The first entry points to the BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK and allows program objects full rights to all BusinessObjects Enterprise JAR files. a typical location is . The second code base entry applies to all local files. the Java Policy File is installed to the Java SDK directory in the BusinessObjects Enterprise install root directory. and how to manage them through the Central Management Console (CMC).policy Object package management This section explains object packages and instances.. For example. which has a default setting that is consistent with the Java default for unsecure code. It uses the same security settings for unsecure code as the Java default for unsecure code.

Tip: • 460 To expand a folder. For example. components. such as Excel. Click New Object. PowerPoint. if you run an object package. select it and click Show Subfolders. you can only view them by opening their object package. Think of them as folders you can schedule. Acrobat. see “Working with hyperlinked reports” on page 447. The Object Package tab appears. then click the Object Package tab. Component objects are not autonomous. type a description of the object package. For hyperlinked report instances in object package instances. then remove a report object from the object package. The object package instance contains individual instances of each of its component objects. cannot be added to object packages. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 2. Future instances of the object package. Creating an object package 1. 5. Rich Text. type the name of the object package you want to create. and thereby create an instance. Text. the hyperlinks point to the other report instances in the same object package instance. the existing object package instance does not change. and Hyperlink objects.17 Managing Objects Object package management What are object packages. In the Description field. 3. They have more limited configuration options than other objects. along with all of their contents.) Placing multiple objects in a single object package allows you to schedule them simultaneously. will reflect the change. however. Ensure the correct folder name appears in the Destination field. 4. rather than to component objects. Component instances are tied to object package instances. For details about hyperlinked reports. This field is optional. Note: You cannot place object packages in the top level folder or inside other object packages. In the Title field. Word. it still contains the report instance from the report object that you removed. and instances? Object packages function as distinct objects in BusinessObjects Enterprise. For reports. (NonBusinessObjects Enterprise objects. BusinessObjects Enterprise creates an object package instance each time it runs an object package. and they do not appear in the list of all objects on the first page of the Objects management area of the CMC. object packages allow users to view synchronized data across reports. Object packages can be composed of any combination of report and program objects that are published to the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. Rather. Go to the Objects management area of the CMC.

see “Copying. Note: You publish objects to new or existing object package using the Publishing Wizard. For programs. However. after you have created an object package. 3. or Script. Specify the file name or. object settings. set whether to generate a thumbnail for the report. user rights. You can now modify the properties. or creating a shortcut for an object” on page 417. the component and the original are separate entities. and notification for the object package. To search for a specific folder. When you copy an object into an object package. the CMC displays the Properties page. A list of object tabs appears. 1. Click the appropriate tab. Note that you can add only report objects or program objects to an object. Set the appropriate properties. Adding objects to an object package In the CMC. you cannot move the existing objects themselves. Java. Click OK. view an object package by clicking its link. 4. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 461 . or between object packages. You can add previously unpublished objects directly to the object package. Click the Objects tab. once you create the copy of the original object inside the object package. or you can copy existing objects into the object package. For details. You can only move copies of existing objects into the object package. contents. Click OK. 6. Changes in one object are not reflected in the other. • • 7. 5. destination. use the Look For field. scheduling information. To publish a new object directly to an object package In the Objects management area of the CMC. or click browse to navigate to the object you want to publish. 2. For reports. Note: When the object package has been added to the system. and whether to use the Object Repository when refreshing the report. set the program type: Executable. you can add report and/or program component objects to it. Report or Program. then click the New Object button.Managing Objects Object package management 17 • 6. moving. For details on copying objects. the component object retains the same settings as the original object. see “Publishing with the Publishing Wizard” on page 376.

that is. see: • • • • “General object management” on page 417 “Report object management” on page 425 “Program object management” on page 451 Chapter 18: Scheduling Objects Configure for an object package yes --yes Scheduling server ----yes --Configure for individual objects in a package yes yes yes -View & Modify server yes yes yes yes -yes yes Configuration tabs and links Properties tab Refresh Options Links History tab Process tab Database Parameters Filters Print Setup Schedule tab Notification Alert Notification 462 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . but you cannot specify destinations for the individual objects in the package. it will save the output instances to the destination you specified for the object package. The parameters are identified by tab or link. For information on how to set or modify these parameters. for the individual objects in the object package. Note: Because the objects in an object package are copies of objects that exist outside the package.17 Managing Objects Object package management Configuring object packages and their objects Object packages are intended to save you time scheduling objects that have similar scheduling requirements. As a result. you have to specify the destination for an object package. When the system runs the object package. you configure some parameters at the object package level. and some at the object level. For example. the changes you make will not affect the objects outside the object package. The following table indicates which configuration parameters you can modify for an object package or for individual objects in a package.

) BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 463 . For database authentication. it initially inherits the database logon information of the original report. (If you copied the report into the object package. including all of its component objects. Consequently. You enter your Enterprise authentication only once to schedule the object package.Managing Objects Object package management 17 Configuration tabs and links Format Destination Schedule For Categories tab Corporate Personal Rights tab Configure for an object package -yes yes n/a yes yes yes Configure for individual objects in a package yes --n/a yes yes -- Authentication and object packages Object packages simplifies both Enterprise and database authentication. you must have scheduling rights for each of the objects inside the object package. the component instance(s) fail(s). If you attempt to schedule a package that contains one or more component objects to which you do not have schedule rights. you specify database logon information for each report component object in the object package.

17 Managing Objects Object package management 464 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

Scheduling Objects chapter .

You can schedule report objects. It does not contain any data yet. see Chapter 17: Managing Objects. It does not contain any data yet. This chapter contains the following sections: • • • “Scheduling objects” on page 466 This section provides information on how to schedule objects. Scheduled instances appear on the History page of the respective object and have a status of Recurring or Pending. Web Intelligence documents. Scheduling objects When you schedule an object. Scheduled instances appear on the History page of the respective object and have a status of Recurring or Pending. When the system runs the object. Output instances also appear on the History page of an object and have a status of Success or Failed. for example. and object packages. it creates an output instance for the object. In order for a program object to be successfully scheduled and run. “Managing instances” on page 495 This section describes how to manage instances for an object. Scheduled instances use the settings that are presently configured for the object in CMC. “Setting the scheduling options” on page 476 This section describes the options on the different Schedule pages for an object. A program instance is a text file that contains the standard out and standard error produced when the program object was run. such as Notification. For details. you must provide logon information for the account that the program object will run as.18 Scheduling Objects Scheduling objects overview Scheduling objects overview Scheduling an object lets you run it automatically at specified times. A report instance contains actual data from the database. the system creates a scheduled instance for the object. or Destination. the system creates a scheduled instance for the object. 466 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . For details about object types and object management. When you schedule an object. program objects. see “Authentication and program objects” on page 458. A scheduled instance contains object and schedule information. a report or program instance. A scheduled instance contains object and schedule information.

Select the recurrence pattern you want. For a list and descriptions of the Run options and parameters. Note: If a Web Intelligence document has been set to “refresh on open” then the system will access the database to obtain the latest information each time a user views the document. see “Run options and parameters” on page 469. Friday. 5. You can view the scheduled instance on the History page for the object. whereas CMC enables you to manage and administer objects in addition to scheduling objects and viewing reports. see “Scheduling an object with events” on page 473. see “Recurrence patterns” on page 469. they must use a web-based client such as InfoView or a custom web application. select Weekly. Click Schedule. InfoView is designed primarily to schedule objects and view reports. Set any of the other schedule options and parameters as required. Therefore. 4. Wednesday. The new settings on the Schedule tab for the object are saved. select an object by clicking its link. The Schedule page appears. For a list and descriptions of the recurrence patterns. select “Every week on” and then specify Monday. click Update. Specify the Run option and parameters that you want. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 467 . showing the default settings for the object. For example. See also “Managing and viewing the history of instances” on page 495. 1. For details. For details. 2. it may not be advantageous to schedule Web Intelligence documents that are set to “refresh on open”. For example. 3. Many scheduling options allow you to schedule an instance with events. see “Setting the scheduling options” on page 476. The system creates a scheduled instance and it will run the instance according to the schedule information you just specified. 6.Scheduling Objects Scheduling objects 18 For end users to schedule and run objects. Note: To save the schedule settings as the new default setting for the object. To schedule an object In the Objects management area of the CMC. because running the document at scheduled times will not reduce the number of database hits. Click the Schedule tab.

you choose the recurrence pattern that you want. The Run options list and related parameters appear to the right of the recurrence patterns. and then the run option (for example. “Every week on”). For example. you select Daily or Weekly. The recurrence patterns appear on the left of the Schedule page. 468 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . You then specify additional parameters to control exactly when and how often the object will be run.18 Scheduling Objects Scheduling objects About the scheduling options and parameters When you schedule an object.

what time. what time. See Chapter 19: Managing Calendars. but for a complete description. Once—The object will be run only once. Not all parameters apply in all cases. The calendar must have been previously created. or when a specified event has occurred.” To see all the Run options for a recurrence pattern.Scheduling Objects Scheduling objects 18 Which run options and parameters are available depends on the recurrence pattern you selected. if you select Daily. You can specify on which days of the month. their function is the same. You can specify what time as well as a start and end date. You can specify which days. Daily—The object will be run every day. but when they apply. such as start and end dates. It can be run once a week or several times a week. and a start and end date. Run This list always appears. you can select to run the object “Once each day” or “Every X day(s). It can be run now or in the future. and a start and end date you want it to run.” If you select Monthly. The names of the recurrence patterns. Weekly—The object will be run every week. you can choose from the following recurrence patterns: • • • • • • On demand—The object will only be run when a user request it to be run. and fields are generally self explanatory. Monthly—The object will be run every month or every several months. Run options and parameters This section describes the Run parameters for scheduling an object. It can be run once or several times a day. options. You can specify which calendar. Calendar—The object will be run on the dates specified in a calendar. refer to the software. For example. see: • • “Recurrence patterns” on page 469 “Run options and parameters” on page 469 Recurrence patterns When scheduling an object. but the options vary depending on which recurrence pattern you select. you can select to run the object “On the Nth day of the month” or “On the first Monday of the month. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 469 . In many case the same parameters appear.

the system will run the report every hour. See also “Scheduling an object with events” on page 473. you could specify to run the report every 4 (X) hours and 30 (N) minutes. For example. after the Start Date has passed. The number of times the system attempts to process an object if the first attempt is not successful. Number of retries allowed Always applies. if you select the “Daily” recurrence pattern and the “Every X hour(s). but not all. After that. Available Schedule Events Applies to all Run options that include “with events. Retry interval in seconds Always applies. You can select one or several events. if you specify a start date that is three months into the future. For example. in seconds. the system no longer runs the object. End Date Applies to most. A successful run of the object will trigger the events that you specified. The system will run the object only when those events have been successfully completed. and Chapter 20: Managing Events. but not all recurrence patterns and Run options. even if all the other criteria are met. N minute(s)” Run option. the number is zero. that the system will wait before it attempts to process the object again if the first attempt is unsuccessful. The system will run the object according to the schedule that you specified. The default is the current date and time. You can then changes these values as needed.” Select an event and click the Add button to move it to the “Events to wait for” box. This list of events contains schedule events only.18 Scheduling Objects Scheduling objects X and N variables Applies to certain Daily and Monthly recurrence patterns only. You can select one or several events. You cannot trigger file or custom events.” Select an event and click the Add button to move it to the “Events to trigger on completion” box. Specify a different End Date if required. recurrence patterns and Run options. If you don’t change the X or N value. Once the End Date has passed. to ensure an object will be run indefinitely. the system won’t run the object until the start date has passed. the system displays their default values. Start Date Applies to most. the system will run the report at the specified time. By default. See also “Scheduling an object with events” on page 473. 470 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . as soon as it can. The default is the current time and a date in the distant future. When you select a Run option that contains these variables. Available Events Applies to all Run options that include “with events. The period.

For more information about configuring objects. assign the object package to a category. see “Publishing overview” on page 374. For information about publishing hyperlinked report objects. • 1. This procedure describes how to use the CMC to schedule objects by using object packages. f. d. For example. see “Object package management” on page 459. b. Select a destination for the object package. See also “Publishing with the Central Management Console” on page 385. Then. Finally. you must configure it through the Print Setup link available on the report object’s Process tab. Click New Object. Type the package name and a description. it allows users to view synchronized data across instances. such as report and program objects. For details on configuring object packages. Go to the Objects management area of the CMC again. c. and then you can schedule that object packages as you would any object. If you want. 2. In terms of reports and Web Intelligence document. and Web Intelligence documents. you can publish objects directly to an object package. and then click the Object Package tab. If the object package already exist. They can contain any combination of objects that can be scheduled. For details on publishing directly to an object package. First you publish an object package. if you want a report object in an object package to print when scheduled. Using object packages simplifies authentication. skip this step. you copy existing objects into the object package. Otherwise: a.Scheduling Objects Scheduling objects 18 Scheduling objects using object packages You can schedule objects in batches using the object packages feature. e. see “Working with hyperlinked reports” on page 447. Alternatively. you schedule the object package as you would any object. To schedule objects using object packages Go to the Objects management area of the CMC. Note: • You must configure the processing information of each of the components of an object package individually. see “Managing Objects” on page 415. Click OK. Object packages function as distinct objects in BusinessObjects Enterprise. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 471 .

Click Copy/Move/Shortcut. 6. use the Look For field. 5. Object packages are indicated by [square brackets]. select it and click Show Subfolders. and then click OK. 4. See “Scheduling objects” on page 466. Select the check boxes associated with each object you want to place in the object package. 472 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . they must be copied to the object package. Schedule the object package. Tip: • • • 7.18 Scheduling Objects Scheduling objects 3. Select the object package you created as the Destination for the objects. Select Copy to. To expand a folder. The Copy/Move/Create Shortcut page appears. Note: Existing objects cannot be moved into an object packages. To search for a specific folder or object package.

When the object is run. the event won’t be triggered if the instance fails. see “Recurrence patterns” on page 469. If the event is triggered before the start date of the object. the object will run only when the event is triggered. the object will have a specified time frame in which it can be processed. if the event is based on the instance being run successfully. For a schedule-based event. For a sample scenario on when you would use a schedule-based event. 3. A schedule-based event is triggered by another object being run. The event must be triggered within this specified time for the object to run. Click the Schedule tab. for example. For example. To schedule an object to run based on events In the Objects management area of the CMC. the object will not run because not all of the conditions will have been met. If you want a scheduled object to trigger an event. Scheduling objects to trigger an event You can also schedule an object which triggers a schedule-based event upon completion of the object being run. see “Schedule-based events” on page 512. the object will be run only when the additional condition (that is. Also. Note: To schedule an object with events. if you schedule a weekly report object that runs every Monday. For example. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 473 . and if the event is not triggered before the end date occurs. You can tell an object to wait for any. if the event is triggered outside of the 24-hour period.Scheduling Objects Scheduling objects 18 Scheduling an object with events When you schedule an object with events. monthly. Scheduling objects based on an event When you schedule an object that waits for a specified event. first ensure that you have created the event. or all of the three event types: file-based. the object will not run. and schedule-based. you must choose a schedule-based event. See “Managing events overview” on page 510. select Weekly. 2. custom-based. then the report will not run. if you choose a weekly. or calendar schedule. 1. the event must be triggered within the 24-hour period on Monday. select an object by clicking its link. For a list and descriptions of the recurrence patterns. Note: A file-based event is triggered upon the existence of a specified file. If you have specified an end date for this object. Select the recurrence pattern you want. A custom-based event is triggered manually. and only when the rest of the schedule conditions are met. the event) occurs. BusinessObjects Enterprise will trigger the specified event.

In the Run list. Click the Schedule button to schedule the object. 6. For example. click Update. If you don’t click Update. “with events.18 Scheduling Objects Scheduling objects 4. 8.” 5. see “Run options and parameters” on page 469. End Date. the report object above is set to wait for a Custom-based event to occur before the report is processed. select a run option that contains the words. 7. In the Available Events area. Start Date. any changes you made to the scheduling information are not saved. select from the list of events and click Add. and so on). To update the default scheduling information. 474 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Select and complete the schedule parameters for your object (scheduling option. For a list and descriptions of the Run options and parameters.

Scheduling Objects Scheduling objects 18 1. see “Recurrence patterns” on page 469. select an object by clicking its link. select from the list of events and click Add. “with events. Monthly. To schedule an object to trigger an event In the Objects management area of the CMC. 5. or by Calendar. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 475 . 2. Click the Schedule tab. In the Run list. 3. select a recurrence pattern: Once. In the Available Schedule Events area. Daily.” Select and complete the schedule parameters for your object (scheduling option. From the list on the left of the page. Start Date. Weekly. 6. select a run option that contains the words. and so on). For a list and descriptions of the recurrence patterns. End Date. 4.

it would take too much time to manually check the reports and contact the users who need the information. 476 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . You can send notification using audit or email notification. You can also combine multiple notification methods. Setting the scheduling options BusinessObjects Enterprise allows you to control the process and schedule settings for an object. the report object above is set to trigger a Schedule-based event only if the report is successfully processed. any changes you made to the scheduling information are not saved. and provide different notification settings for successful and failed instances.18 Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options For example. 7. click Update. With thousands of reports. Using notification settings in BusinessObjects Enterprise. Click the Schedule button to schedule the object. To update the default scheduling information. If you don’t click Update. you may have a large number of reports that run every day. and you can automatically inform users when new report instances run successfully. For example. 8. You need to check each instance to make sure it ran properly. Setting the scheduling options includes the following tasks: • • • • • • “Scheduling objects” on page 466 “Setting notification for an object’s success or failure” on page 476 “Specifying alert notification” on page 479 “Selecting a destination” on page 481 “Choosing a format” on page 491 “Scheduling an object for a user or group” on page 493 Setting notification for an object’s success or failure You can set scheduling options that automatically send notification when an object instance succeeds or fails. and then send out emails to the users who need to know that the new report is available. you can set each object to automatically notify you when the report fails to run properly. Note: You can only select schedule-based events in this list.

You can also set scheduling options for individual objects within an object package. To monitor object successes and failures from a more general perspective. which will trigger an event based on success or failure of the object package. About notification You can set notification at the object level. it is still considered a successful instance because the program object ran. To change this setting. You can select unique notification options for each object. If the program runs. you can set only event notification. • Object packages An object package may fail if one of its components fails. The conditions required for an instance’s success or failure depend on the type of object you schedule: • Report and Web Intelligence document objects A report instance runs successfully if it doesn’t encounter any errors while processing the report object or accessing the database. BusinessObjects Enterprise does not monitor problems with the program object’s code. but does not perform the tasks it is supposed to. but you can set any type of notification for the individual objects in the object package. the program must run in order to succeed. click the object package’s Properties tab and clear the “Scheduled package fails upon individual component failure” option. A report instance may fail if the user does not provide the correct parameters or logon information. You can also schedule object packages with events on the Schedule tab. For object packages. For example. • Program objects For program objects. the instance is considered a failure. see “Schedule-based events” on page 512. sending different types of notification for different conditions. Note: You cannot set audit or email notification for object packages. then the notification fails and the object instance is recorded as a failure in the object’s history.Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options 18 Determining an object’s success or failure When you schedule an object. if an email notification sends a message to an invalid email address. the scheduled instance either succeeds or fails. If notification fails. then the object instance fails. If the program does not run. You can choose to notify using: BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 477 . For more information about events. use the auditing functionality within BusinessObjects Enterprise.

Choose the specific settings for the notification. • Email notification You can send an email as a notification of an object instance’s success or failure. To set notification for an instance’s success or failure Select a object in the Objects management area of the CMC. when it fails to run. If you use auditing to monitor your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. it will be labelled “Not in use”. See “Configuring the destinations for job servers” on page 125 Note: Notification of a scheduled object’s success or failure is not the same as alert notification. it will be labelled “Enabled”. you could send your administrator an email if the report fails. In this case. If not.it’s just about whether or not the report object instance has failed or succeeded. For more information about configuring the auditing database and enabling auditing. then click the Notification link. When you select audit notification. 4. alert notification can send an email to you whenever a specific value in the report exceeds $1000000. but when the report succeeds you can automatically send a notification to everyone who needs the report to let them know it is now available. 2. or both. Note: If the notification type is already being used. Alert notification must be built into the design of the report. Note: To enable email notification. For example. Click the notification type (or types) you want to use. You can send an email when the instance fails and when it succeeds. Click the Schedule tab. You can choose the sender and recipients of the email message. the notification has nothing to do with the contents of the report . You can choose to have a notification sent to the auditing database when the job runs successfully. see “Managing Auditing” on page 203.18 Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options • Audit notification To use audit notification. you must have the Email SMTP destination enabled and configured on the job servers. you can use audit notification. information about the scheduled object is written to the auditing database. For example. 3. you must configure the auditing database and enable auditing for the servers. 478 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 1. Note: For the job servers you can also set audit notification on the Auditing tab.

In BusinessObjects Enterprise. that appear when certain conditions are met by data in a report. select “Set the vales to be used here” and provide the From and To email addresses. the alert is triggered and its message is displayed.” “Cc. You can configure email delivery options. See “Configuring the destinations for job servers” on page 125. Alerts are triggered in the report object even if you disable alert notification. Alerts are custom messages.” and “From” fields for the email. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 479 .” Email notification Choose whether you want to send a notification when the job fails or when it succeeds. the email subject line. 5. To specify the contents and recipients of the email notification. Click Update. set a URL for the viewer you want the email recipient to use. messages are sent through an SMTP server. created in Crystal Reports. If you enable alert notification.” To send a record when the job fails. Note: • • • The Alert Notification link is available only if the report object contains alerts. and the message. Note: By default. If the alert condition (as defined in Crystal Reports) is true. and set the maximum number of alert records to send. see “Email (SMTP) destination properties” on page 128. you must have the Email SMTP destination enabled and configured on the job servers.Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options 18 Audit notification To send a record to the auditing database when the job succeeds. add subject and message information. Specifying alert notification Note: This feature does not apply to Web Intelligence document objects. To enable alert notification. the notification is sent to the server’s default email destination. Alerts may indicate action to be taken by the user or information about report data. you can choose to send alert notification when scheduling a report. select “A job has failed to run. For details on how to change the default email settings. specify the “To. select “A job has been run successfully.

If you select the first option. 4. 2. 480 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . To set alert notification In the Objects management area of the CMC. You can change these settings in the Servers management area. BusinessObjects Enterprise will deliver the alert notification using the Job Server’s default settings. select a report object by clicking its link. 3. see “Configuring the destinations for job servers” on page 125. Clear the Enable alert notification check box if you do not want to send an alert notification. and then click the Alert Notification link. For more information. Select either Use the Job Server’s defaults or Set the values to be used at schedule time here. Click the Schedule tab.18 Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options 1. The Alert Notification page appears.

org/ 6. Alternatively. you can select the default viewer by clicking Use default.Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options 18 If you select the second option. Subject Complete the subject field. if required. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 481 . Message Type a short message. You can set the default URL by clicking Object Settings on the main page of the objects management area of the CMC. Selecting a destination Using BusinessObjects Enterprise. Note: Separate multiple addresses or distribution lists using semicolons. Tip: The Alert Name and Status fields are set in Crystal Reports. 7. you can specify the email settings: • • • • • From Type a return address or distribution list. see http://www. replace spaces in the path with %20. Cc Type the addresses or distribution list that you wish to send a copy of the alert notification to. The viewer URL appears in the hyperlink that is sent in the alert notification email. For more information. it always stores the output instance on the Output FRS. you can configure an object or instance for output to a destination other than the default Output File Repository Server (FRS). see the developer documentation available on your product CD. Being able to choose an additional destination gives you the flexibility to deliver instances across your enterprise system or to destinations outside your enterprise system. Type the maximum number of alert records to be included in the alert notification. 5. To Type the addresses or distribution list that you wish to send the report to. Type the URL for the viewer in which you want the email recipient to view the report. For example. Use this field to limit the number of records displayed. Note: You must use World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) URL encoding when typing the viewer URL. For more information. The hyperlink in the alert notification displays a report page that contains the records that triggered the alert.w3. When the system runs an object. Click Update.

name or title of the object. you cannot specify Unmanaged Disk as a destination for a Web Intelligence document. for object packages and Web Intelligence documents you cannot do this. Note: You can also configure object instances to be printed after they have been run. However. The following destinations are available: • • • • • “Default destination support” on page 483 “Unmanaged Disk destination support” on page 483 “FTP support” on page 485 “Email (SMTP) support” on page 487 “Inbox support” on page 490 Note: You can change the destination setting for an object or instance either in the Central Management Console (CMC) or in InfoView. or the date and time information. For program and report objects you can specify any of the available destinations. you can set an object to have its output automatically delivered by email to other users. because the recipients must have access to the BusinessObjects Enterprise system to be able to open these types of objects. these settings are also reflected in the default scheduling settings for InfoView. See “Setting printer and page layout options” on page 441. DIsk No No Email (SMTP) FTP No No File No No Link No Inbox File Link - 482 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . When you specify a destination other then “Default. When you specify the destination settings through the CMC. you can use a combination of ID. Object type Report Object Package Program Web Intelligence document Unm.18 Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options For example. For example.” BusinessObjects Enterprise generates a unique name for the output file or files. To generate a file name. The following table summarizes which destinations you can configure for which types of objects. owner information.

you must have the destination enabled and configured on the job servers. For servers using Windows. Note: • • • 1. you can configure the objects for output to an unmanaged disk. the location can also be a Universal Naming Convention (UNC) path. See “Configuring the destinations for job servers” on page 125. 1. Click Update. then click the Destination link. Select Default from the Destination list. for an object package you can configure the individual objects in the object package for output to Unmanaged Disk. you cannot specify Unmanaged Disk as a destination. If you want to save instances to the FRS only and not to any other destinations. To use a destination. select an object by clicking its link. If the object is a Web Intelligence document or an object package. select that option. The Destination page appears. To set your destination to default In the Objects management area of the CMC. Click the Schedule tab. 4. select an object by clicking its link. To set your destination to unmanaged disk In the Objects management area of the CMC. 3. The Destination page appears. However. In that case. the system will save an output instance to both the Output File Repository Server and the specified destination. 2. The processing server must have sufficient rights to the specified location. The location must be a local or mapped directory on the processing server.Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options 18 Default destination support By default. then click the Destination link. object instances are saved to the Output File Repository Server (FRS). BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 483 . Unmanaged Disk destination support When scheduling objects. 2. Click the Schedule tab.

If you select the second option.18 Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options Select Unmanaged Disk from the Destination list. Select either Use the Job Server’s defaults or Set the values to be used at schedule time here. 4. mapped location. 484 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . You can change these settings in the Servers management area. select the Clean up instance after scheduling option. 3. you can set the file name properties and enter user information: • Destination Directory Enter a local location. the system automatically deletes the report or program instance from the Output File Repository Server to keep the number of instances on the server to a minimum. For more information. If you select the first option. BusinessObjects Enterprise will schedule an object using the Job Server’s default settings. If you want. When that option is selected. see “Configuring the destinations for job servers” on page 125. or a UNC path.

If you specify an FTP destination. Click the Schedule tab. Password Type the password for the user. the variable will be replaced with the specified information from the instance. Click Update. choose a placeholder for a variable property from the list and click Add. you can configure the objects for output to a File Transfer Protocol (FTP) server. For example. However.Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options 18 • • Default File Name (randomly generated) Select this option if you want BusinessObjects Enterprise to generate a random file name. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 485 . you must have the destination enabled and configured on the job servers. To connect to the FTP server. you must specify a user who has the necessary rights to upload files to the server. the system will save an output instance to both the Output File Repository Server and the specified destination. for an object package you can configure the individual objects in the object package for output to FTP. its file name will include the object owner’s name. 1. 5.” when you schedule an object. To set an FTP server as the destination In the Objects management area of the CMC. 2. FTP support When scheduling objects. then click the Destination link. See “Configuring the destinations for job servers” on page 125. If the object is a Web Intelligence document or an object package. • • User Name Specify a user who has permission to write files to the destination directory. The Destination tab appears. Specified File Name Select this option if you want to specify a file name—you can also add a variable to the file name. if you add the variable “Owner. To add a variable. Note: To use a destination. you cannot specify FTP as a destination. select an object by clicking its link. When the instance is run. Note: You can specify a user name and password only for servers using Windows.

4. select the Clean up instance after scheduling option.18 Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options 3. When that option is selected. Select either Use the Job Server’s defaults or Set the values to be used at schedule time here. BusinessObjects Enterprise will schedule an object using the Job Server’s default settings. You can change these settings in the Servers management area. If you select the first option. If you want. Select FTP from the Destination list. 486 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . the system automatically deletes the report or program instance from the Output File Repository Server to keep the number of instances on the server to a minimum. 5. For more information see “Configuring the destinations for job servers” on page 125.

Account is part of the standard FTP protocol. for example. Account Enter the FTP account information. Provide the appropriate account only if your FTP server requires it. you can set the FTP and file name properties: • • • • • Host Enter the FTP host information. choose a placeholder for a variable property from the list and click Add. • • • Destination Directory Enter the FTP directory that you want the object to be saved to. When you select the Email (SMTP) destination. Email (SMTP) support With Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) mail support. if required. to one or more email destinations. Click Update. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) encoding. Specified File Name Select this option if you want to enter a file name—you can also add a variable to the file name. a report instance. Port Enter the FTP port number (the default is 21).Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options 18 If you select the second option. FTP Password Enter the user’s password. you can choose to send the instances of an object. To add a variable. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 487 . Default File Name (randomly generated) Select this option if you want BusinessObjects Enterprise to generate a random file name. 6. the system will send a copy of the output instance as an attachment to the email addresses you specified. FTP User Name Specify a user who has the necessary rights to upload an object to the FTP server. the system will save the instance to the Output File Repository Server as well as email it to the specified destinations. After it has run the object. but it is rarely implemented.

2. then click the Destination link. The Destination page appears. 1. Select Email (SMTP) from the Destination list 4. Note: If the object is a Web Intelligence document. Click the Schedule tab. select the Clean up instance after scheduling option. See “Configuring the destinations for job servers” on page 125.18 Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options Note: To use a destination. To send an object by email In the Objects management area of the CMC. 488 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . If you want. select an object by clicking its link. you cannot specify Email (SMTP) as a destination. 3. you must have the destination enabled and configured on the job servers.

the system automatically deletes the report or program instance from the Output File Repository Server to keep the number of instances on the server to a minimum. 6. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 489 . Click Update. Select either Use the Job Server’s defaults or Set the values to be used at schedule time here.Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options 18 5. BusinessObjects Enterprise will schedule an object using the Job Server’s default settings. If you select the second option. You can set the default URL by clicking Object Settings on the main page of the Objects management area of the CMC. To add a variable. • Subject Complete the subject field. You can change these settings in the Servers management area. you can specify the email settings and the file name properties: • From Enter a return address. Separate multiple addresses with semicolons. see “Configuring the destinations for job servers” on page 125. • Specified File Name Select this option if you want to enter a file name—you can also add a variable to the file name. if required. • To Enter an address or addresses that you wish to send the object to. choose a placeholder for a variable property from the list and click Add. • Default File Name (randomly generated) Select this option if you want BusinessObjects Enterprise to generate a random file name. When that option is selected. If you select the first option. • Add viewer hyperlink to message body Click Add if you want to add the URL for the viewer in which you want the email recipient to view the object. • Message Type a short message. • Attach object instance to email message Clear this check box if you do not want a copy of the instance attached to the email. For more information. • Cc Enter an address or addresses that you wish to send a carbon copy of the object to.

you must have the destination enabled and configured on the job servers. 490 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Click the Schedule tab. 2. select an object by clicking its link. you can choose to send a shortcut. Note: To use a destination. the system will save the instance to both the Output File Repository Server and the inboxes you specified.18 Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options Inbox support When scheduling objects. then click the Destination link. To send an object to inboxes In the Objects management area of the CMC. 3. See “Configuring the destinations for job servers” on page 125. The Destination tab appears. Instead of sending the actual file to the inboxes. Select Inbox from the Destination list. In this case. you can configure objects for output to the inboxes of users. 1.

6. If you selected “Set the values to be used at schedule time here. For more information. For more information on destinations. Copy The system will send a copy of the instance. see “Selecting a destination” on page 481. You can select from the following formats: • • • WebIntelligence Microsoft Excel Adobe Acrobat BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 491 . rather than send a copy of the instance itself. you can select the format that the document will be saved in when it is generated. If you want. Type the name and then click Find now.” set the parameters for that option. Select the processing option that you want: • Use the Job Server’s defaults BusinessObjects Enterprise will schedule the object with the job server’s default settings. • Set the values to be used at schedule time here BusinessObjects Enterprise will schedule the object with the parameters you specify. Look for Use this feature to search for a specific user or users group. You can select individual users or user groups. This format will be saved to the destination you have selected. Shortcut The system will send a shortcut to the instance. When that option is selected. Choosing a format Web Intelligence document formats For Web Intelligence documents. Click Update. 5.Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options 18 4. the system automatically deletes the report or program instance from the Output File Repository Server to keep the number of instances on the server to a minimum. select the Clean up instance after scheduling option. see “Configuring the destinations for job servers” on page 125. Send List Operation Specify who must receive the report instance. otherwise skip this step: Send Document as • • • • 7.

This does not conflict with the format you select when scheduling the report. Tab-separated Values. the Character-separated Values format places a specified character between values. The difference between Excel and Excel (Data only) is that Excel attempts to preserve the look and feel of your original report. while Excel (Data only) saves only the data. In contrast. For example. you can select the format that a report instance will be saved in when it is generated by BusinessObjects Enterprise.18 Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options Crystal report formats For Crystal report objects. the Tab-separated Text format attempts to preserve the formatting of the report. The Tab-separated Values format places a tab character between values. you can enter characters for the separator and delimiter. and Character-separated Values. • • 492 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . This format will be saved to the destination you have selected for the report object and its instances. Each of these two formats produce data lists. you specify certain formatting properties for the report. you can also select the two check boxes: “Same number formats as in report” and “Same date formats as in report. if you select Character-separated Values. with each cell representing a field.” Note: • If you choose to print the report when it is scheduled (by checking the “Print in Crystal Reports format using the selected printer when scheduling” check box on the Print Setup page). see “Selecting a destination” on page 481. For more information on destinations. Paginated Text. the report instance is automatically sent to the printer in Crystal Reports format. You can select from the following formats: • • • • • • • • • • • • Crystal Report Microsoft Excel Microsoft Excel (Data Only) Microsoft Word (RTF) Adobe Acrobat Rich Text Editable Rich Text Plain Text Paginated Text Tab-Separated Text Tab-Separated Values Character-separated Values For Excel.

Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options 18 1. Select the format you want. 2. 1. The Format page appears. On the Schedule tab. you can choose to have the system cache the report on the Web Intelligence Report Server by selecting a cache format for the document. 3. click the Caching Options link. It is intended to be used for either of the following types of objects: • • Crystal reports that are based on Business Views Web Intelligence documents that use Universes BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 493 . Click Update. If you select a different format. On the Schedule tab. To select a format for the report In the Objects management area of the CMC. Select a format from the Format list. The Caching Options page appears. 5. Complete any fields that appear below the list and select (where appropriate) the check boxes that appear. select a report object by clicking its link. 3. click the Format link. If you don’t select a cache format. 4. then the system won’t cache the document when it runs the document. Selecting cache options for Web Intelligence documents When the system runs a scheduled Web Intelligence document it stores the the instance it generates on the Output File Repository Server. the Cache Options link is disabled for the object. Click Update. In addition. the format you specified on the Schedule tab for the object must be WebInteligence. select Web Intelligence object by clicking its link. 4. 2. Scheduling an object for a user or group The Schedule For feature allows you to generate reports that contain data for specific users only. To select a cache format for Web Intelligence documents In the Objects management area of the CMC. Note: To select a cache option.

Each instance will contain data that is relevant to the individual user only. 1. The Schedule For page appears. select one or more users or groups and add them to the “Groups to be added to the scheduling list” by using the arrow buttons. 5. you can schedule a sales report and on the Schedule For page you can specify the users names for all your sales representatives. To change the Schedule For settings for an object In the Objects management area of the CMC. the system runs the report object and generates the individual report instances. Otherwise. Click Update. Schedule only for myself Schedule for specified users and user groups If you selected Schedule for specified users and user groups. 2. The system will run the object and generate multiple instances of the report or document. 494 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 3. For example. Each instance would contain sales information for the individual sales representative only. At the specified time. Select who you want to schedule the object for. click the Schedule For link.18 Scheduling Objects Setting the scheduling options Using the Schedule For feature you can schedule an object and specify for which users you want the system to run the object. select a report object by clicking its link. skip this step. • • 4. On the Schedule tab.

Each instance contains data that is current at the time the report is processed. Managing and viewing the history of instances The History page displays all of the instances for a selected object. that is. Unlike report instances. will have a status of Success or Failed. the Arguments column lists the command-line options that were or will be passed to the command line interface for each instance. run. See “Setting instance limits for an object” on page 498. To manage storage space. For report objects. and refresh instances. The Run By column indicates which user scheduled the instance. or to provide a time limit for the instances. Essentially. Output instances. program BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 495 . From the History page. You can view specific report instances on the History page of the report object. The system has not yet run these instances. The Status column displays the status of each instance.Scheduling Objects Managing instances 18 Managing instances To view or manage instances. a report instance is created when a report object is scheduled and run by the Job Server. go to the History page for the object. the Format column displays which format the report is. That page lists the scheduled instances and the output instances for an object: • • Scheduled instances will have a status of Recurring or Pending. pause. you can also choose to delete. See “Managing and viewing the history of instances” on page 495. and the instances do not contain any data yet. BusinessObjects Enterprise creates a program instance each time that a program object is scheduled and run by the Program Job Server. or will be stored in and the Parameters column indicates what parameters were or will be used for each instance. That is. it is good practice to limit the number of possible instances for an object. BusinessObjects Enterprise creates instances from objects. which indicate whether they were run successfully: • • A report instance contains actual report data. The Instance Time column displays the title of the instances and the date of the last update for each instance. actual report or program instances. A program instance stores the program’s standard out and standard error in a text output file. For program objects. a report instance is a report object that contains report data that is retrieved from one or more databases. which can be viewed in their completed format.

“Viewing an instance” on page 496 “Pausing or resuming an instance” on page 497 “Deleting an instance” on page 498 “Sending an object or instance” on page 420 To manage instances In the Objects management area of the CMC. Viewing an instance 1. In this case you don’t need to select an instance first. Pause.18 Scheduling Objects Managing instances instances exist as records in the object history. Note: To refresh the list. This file appears when you click a program instance in the object History. 2. Click the History tab. Send to. 4. If you click Run Now. Resume. BusinessObjects Enterprise stores the program’s standard out and standard error in a text output file. click the check box in the column heading. To view an instance Select a object in the Objects management area of the CMC. For information about the Send to button. or Delete. see “Sending an object or instance” on page 420. 496 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . select an object by clicking its link. 3. Managing instances includes the following tasks: • • • • 1. Select an instance or instances by selecting the appropriate check boxes. The History tab appears. Click the History tab. click Refresh. 2. To select all instances. Click either Run Now. the system schedules the object to be run immediately. The scheduled job will have a status of Pending.

3. To resume an instance after pausing it Go to the History page for an object. Select the check box for the scheduled instance you want to resume. For example. 2. you can resume the scheduled object. 3. 1. 3.Scheduling Objects Managing instances 18 The History page appears. When the job server is running again. 1. instances that have a status of Recurring or Pending. and the object from failing because the job server is not running. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 497 . Select the check box for the scheduled instance you want to pause. if a job server is down for maintenance reasons. Click Resume. that is. You can also use the Instance Manager tool to view a list of instances by status or by user. This prevents the system from running the object. click the instance you want to view. Pause and resume can be applied to scheduled instances only. you may want to pause a scheduled instance. Access the Instance Manager by clicking its link in the Administrative Tools area of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administration Launchpad. 2. Pausing or resuming an instance You can pause and then resume an instance as needed. In the Instance Time column. Click Pause. To pause and resume an instance Go to the History page for an object.

1. 498 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . the object will not inherit the limits of the folder. you can set the limits for the selected object and its instances. which have a status of success of failed. To delete an instance Go to the History page for an object. see “Setting limits for folders. that is.18 Scheduling Objects Managing instances Deleting an instance You can delete instances from an object as needed. Click Delete. and report or program instances. In addition to setting the limits for the objects from the Objects management area. you can also set limits at the folder level. You set limits to automate regular clean-ups of old BusinessObjects Enterprise content. you can also limit the number of days that an instance remains on the system for a user or group. When you set limits at the folder level. On the History tab. users. To set limits for instances In the Objects management area of the CMC. Setting instance limits for an object In the Limits page. Select the check box for the instance or instances you want to delete. you can limit the number of instances that remain on the system for the object or for each user or group. 2. For information on setting folder limits. click the Limits link. 2. and groups” on page 365. the object limits will override the limits set for the folder. You can delete both scheduled instances. At the object level. these limits will be in effect for all objects that reside within the folder (including any objects found within the subfolders). Note: When you set the limits at the object level. which have a status of recurring or pending. 1. select an object by clicking its link.

Select from the available users and groups and click OK. Click Update.) • Delete excess instances for the following users/groups To limit the number of instances for users or groups. Then type the maximum age of instances in the Maximum Days column.Scheduling Objects Managing instances 18 The Limits page appears. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 499 . select this check box. Select from the available users and groups and click OK.) 4. (The default value is 100. The options are as follows: • Delete excess instances when there are more than N instances of an object To limit the number of instances per object. click Add/Remove in this area. Make your settings according to the types of limits you want to set for your instances. 3. click Add/ Remove in this area. (The default value is 100.) • Delete instances after N days for the following users/groups To limit the number of days that instances are saved for users or groups. (The default value is 100. Then type the maximum number of instances that you want to remain on the system. Then type the maximum number of instances in the Instance Limit column.

18 Scheduling Objects Managing instances 500 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

Managing Calendars chapter .

runs the job on the run dates as scheduled. BusinessObjects Enterprise will run the job every day you have specified as a “run” day in your calendar. on which the report object cannot be run. You can apply calendars to any object that can be scheduled. Tip: It is good practice to create a calendar for users to use as a template for creating new calendars. you can add run dates to it using the Dates tab. They can copy this template calendar and modify it as necessary. program objects. By providing calendars for your users. you can create more complex processing schedules than you can with the standard scheduling options. if you want a report object to run every business day except for your country’s statutory holidays. For example. Calendars are particularly useful when you want to run a recurring job on an irregular schedule. go to the Calendars management area to create new calendars and to modify existing calendars. combining unique scheduling dates with recurring ones. A calendar is a customized list of run dates for scheduled jobs. Calendars also allow you to create more complex processing schedules. To create a calendar. When users schedule objects. You can set up as many calendars as you want in BusinessObjects Enterprise. including report objects. For example. Calendars you create appear in the Calendar selection list available when you choose to schedule an object using a calendar. Managing calendars includes: • • • • “Creating calendars” on page 502 “Adding dates to a calendar” on page 503 “Deleting calendars” on page 507 “Specifying calendar rights” on page 508 Creating calendars In the Central Management Console (CMC). and object packages. you need to provide a name and description. they can use a calendar to run the job on a predefined set of dates.19 Managing Calendars Overview Overview Calendars make it easy for you to schedule complex recurring jobs efficiently. you can create a default Weekdays calendar that includes all days as run dates except weekends and company holidays. 502 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . When the calendar is created. you can create a calendar with the holidays marked as “non-run” days. When you apply the calendar to a job. or if you want to provide users with sets of regular scheduling dates to choose from.

BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 503 . Click the Dates tab. 2. See “Recurring dates” on page 506. To add dates to a calendar Go to the Calendars management area of the CMC. The new calendar is added to the system. 1. or monthly view of the calendar. quarterly. You can now use the Dates tab to add run dates to this calendar. Adding dates to a calendar You can add dates to a calendar using a number of different formats. You can choose specific dates using a yearly. 3. This example creates a calendar for Canadian employees that schedules an object on all weekdays except statutory Canadian holidays. see “Adding dates to a calendar” on page 503. On the Properties tab. 4. 2. or you can choose recurring dates using general formats based on the day of the month or week.Managing Calendars Adding dates to a calendar 19 1. Click Update. To create a calendar Go to the Calendars management area of the CMC. 3. Click New Calendar. and its Properties tab is refreshed. type the name and description of the new calendar. Click the link for the calendar you want to change. For details.

The dates are applied to the months specified between the Start and End Dates. by Day of Week allows you to add general recurring dates based on the day of the week. click a month to open it in Monthly format. click the day again. where you can add run dates to specific days. To add the new dates to the calendar. In the “Select a calendar displaying format” list. you can click the Previous Year and Next Year buttons. The dates are applied to the months specified between the Start and End Dates. To add a date from the Yearly format. 504 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Tip: For the Monthly and Generic Monthly. Week 1 starts on the Sunday of the week of the Start Date you specify. • Generic Monthly. by Day of Month Generic Monthly. by Day of Month allows you to add general recurring dates based on the day of the month. • Monthly Monthly displays the calendar’s run dates for the current month. choose from one of the five calendar format options: • Yearly Yearly displays the calendar’s run dates for the year. by Day of Week Generic Monthly. where you can add run dates to specific days. 6. Click the days of the month that you want to include as run days for the calendar. To add a date from the Quarterly format. click a month to open it in Monthly format. • Generic Monthly. To remove a run day. it does not display currently selected dates from the calendar. it only allows you to add new dates and update the schedule. Note that this format does not display the currently selected dates from the calendar. 5. This format allows you to add new dates and update the schedule. You can change the displayed month using the Previous Month and Next Month buttons. • Quarterly Quarterly displays the calendar’s run dates for the current calendar quarter. click Update. you can select multiple dates at once by clicking the row or column headings. To change the year displayed.19 Managing Calendars Adding dates to a calendar 4. You can change the displayed quarter using the Previous Quarter and Next Quarter buttons. See also “Specific dates” on page 505 and “Recurring dates” on page 506. by Day of Week formats.

BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 505 . Objects that use the edited calendar are automatically updated to run on the revised date schedule. BusinessObjects Enterprise checks all currently scheduled instances in your system. where you can select specific days as run dates. You can add specific dates in the Monthly calendar format. which displays the run dates for the current month. The Quarterly format displays the run dates for the current quarter. Quarterly. Specific dates To add a specific date to a calendar. The Shipping department can now check the inventory after each shipment by scheduling a report that uses the calendar to run at the end of each shipping day. if your company ships products according to an irregular schedule that cannot be defined using the daily or weekly settings. click a month to open it in the Monthly format. Note: When you change an existing calendar. and Monthly formats to add dates to the calendars. The Yearly format displays the run schedule for the entire year. displaying the new dates. In all three formats. use the Yearly. To add dates for the Yearly and Quarterly calendar formats. the Yearly format will automatically appear. you can change the displayed time range by clicking the previous and next buttons. For example. You can also view the Monthly format for the calendar. you can create a list of these dates in a “Shipping dates” calendar.Managing Calendars Adding dates to a calendar 19 If you added dates using a generic format.

you must use the Yearly. to schedule a report object to run on the first four days of every month. use the generic Monthly formats. Quarterly. by Day of Week format. To view existing run dates. use the Generic Monthly. Although you can set a recurring schedule using the standard scheduling options. To add every second and fourth Friday to the calendar. the generic formats are used to add dates to the calendar. You can add the generic dates based on the day of the week or the day of the month. the Yearly format appears with the new run dates. Then.19 Managing Calendars Adding dates to a calendar Recurring dates To create a recurring pattern of monthly run dates. by Day of Month format to add the first four days of the month to this calendar. calendars allow you to specify several different recurring run patterns at once. When you update the calendar. You can also run instances on dates that do not follow the pattern by adding individual days to a calendar. use the Generic Monthly. 506 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . For example. or Monthly format. and on the second and fourth Friday of every month. first create a new calendar object and name it.

Managing Calendars Deleting calendars 19 Deleting calendars When you delete a calendar. Tip: Select multiple check boxes to delete several calendars. because the calendar no longer exists. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 507 . the system won’t be able to schedule the objects again. To delete a calendar Go to the Calendars management area of the CMC. change the scheduling information for the objects either by selecting a different calendar or a different recurrence pattern. After that. To ensure the objects continue to be run. 1. and click OK to confirm. 3. 2. See “Scheduling objects” on page 466. any objects that are scheduled according to the deleted calendar will be run one more time by the system. Select the check box associated with the calendar you want to delete. Click Delete.

Click Update. Select the calendar you want to grant access to. On the Rights tab. Click the Rights tab. or Remove Users. Click Add/Remove to add users or groups that you want to give access to the selected calendar. To grant access to a calendar Go to the Calendars management area of the CMC. see “Rights and Access Levels” on page 563. change the Access Level for each user or group. 2. select the Add Users operation. In the Select Operation list. Select the user or group you want to grant access to the specified calendar. 7. To choose specific rights. your finance team may use a series of financial tracking dates that aren’t useful for other departments. 508 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . so you can use rights to hide calendars that aren’t applicable to a particular group. The Add/Remove page appears. calendars are based on current security settings. inheriting rights from the users’ parent folders. choose Advanced. 10. then use the “Look for” field to search for a particular account. Click OK. By default. 5. For complete details on the predefined access levels and advanced rights. select Add/Remove Groups. Follow this procedure to change the rights for a calendar. 8. Add Users. you may have specific sets of dates that you want to be available only for certain employees or departments. 1. If you have many users on your system.19 Managing Calendars Specifying calendar rights Specifying calendar rights You can grant or deny users and groups access to calendars. 3. 9. as required. For example. Users will only be able to see the calendars they have the rights to see. 4. 6. Depending how you organize your calendars.

Managing Events chapter .

For instance. For details. • Schedule events When you define a schedule-based event. you select an object whose existing recurrence schedule will serve as the trigger for your event. Basically. The scheduled job is then processed only when the event occurs. In this way. For details.20 Managing Events Managing events overview Managing events overview Event-based scheduling provides you with additional control over scheduling objects: you can set up events so that objects are processed only after a specified event occurs. 510 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . you create a shortcut for triggering an event manually. your custom event occurs only when you or another administrator clicks the corresponding “Trigger this event” button in the CMC. see “File-based events” on page 511. This chapter shows how to create events in the Events management area of the Central Management Console (CMC). That is. or you might want a particular sales summary report to run only when a detailed sales report runs successfully. You can create three kinds of events: • File events When you define a file-based event. see “Schedule-based events” on page 512. see “Custom events” on page 514. you might want certain large reports to run sequentially. you specify a filename that the Event Server should monitor for a particular file. you might want to make some reports dependent upon the regular file output of other programs or scripts. once you create an event. • Custom events When you create a custom event. When the file appears. For instance. the Event Server triggers the event. you can select it as a dependency when you schedule an object. schedule-based events allow you to set up contingencies or conditions between scheduled objects. For details. Working with events consists of two steps: creating an event and scheduling an object with events.

a daily report that is dependent upon a file-based event will run. In this case. the event must occur within the time frame established when you actually schedule the event-based report. once a day (so long as the file that you specify appears every day). the Event Server triggers the event. Click New Event. When the log file appears. at most. suppose that you want your daily reports to run after your database analysis program has finished and written its automatic log file. If you want an event to be triggered multiple times. Before scheduling an object that waits for a file-based event to occur. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 511 . Then you can schedule the object and select this event. The Central Management Server (CMS) then releases any schedule requests that are dependent on the event. File-based events File-based events wait for a particular file (the trigger) to appear before the event occurs. Note: For information on scheduling an event-based object in the Objects management area of the CMC.Managing Events File-based events 20 When working with events. see “Scheduling an object with events” on page 473. you specify the log file in your file-based event. For more information on scheduling an object with events. 1. keep in mind that an object’s recurrence schedule still determines how frequently the object runs. To create a file-based event Go to the Events management area of the CMC. File-based events are monitored by the Event Server. For instance. you must remove and recreate the file each time. the event is triggered and the reports are processed. 2. the event is triggered only when the file is removed and then recreated. The New Event page appears. In addition. For instance. and then schedule your daily reports with this event as a dependency. see “Scheduling an object with events” on page 473. you must first create the file-based event in the Events management area of the CMC. When the file that you specify appears. To do this. Note: If the file already exists prior to the creation of the event. the event is not triggered.

7. the directory should be on a local drive. When you create this type of event. Note: Type the absolute path to the file that the Event Server should look for (for example. In the Server list. 6. That is.20 Managing Events Schedule-based events 3. Click OK. 4. select the Event Server that will monitor the specified file. The drive and directory that you specify must be visible to the Event Server. The second object is 512 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . you must associate your schedule-based event with at least two scheduled objects. a schedule-based event is triggered when a particular object has been processed. or /home/folder/filename). The first object serves as the trigger for the event: when the object is processed. Most importantly. the event occurs. or it can be based simply on the completion of the job. Schedule-based events Schedule-based events are dependent upon scheduled objects. Ideally. Type a filename in the Filename field. C:\folder\filename. Complete the Description field. it can be based on the success or failure of a scheduled object. select File. Type a name for the event in the Event Name field. 8. In the Type list. 5.

To do this. For more information on scheduling objects with events. you schedule reports R1 and R2 with events. You specify the “Success” option for the event. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 513 . To create a schedule-based event Go to the Events management area of the CMC. In the Type list. suppose that you want report objects R1 and R2 to run after program object P1 runs. and reports R1 and R2 are subsequently processed. For instance. 1. 3. Then. Schedule program P1 with events. and set program P1 to trigger the schedule-based event upon successful completion. which means that the event is triggered only when program P1 runs successfully. Complete the Description field. and select your new schedule-based event as the dependency. The New Event page appears. 2. the schedulebased event is triggered. when program P1 runs successfully. Now. this second object runs. Click New Event. you create a schedule-based event in the Events management area. 5. select Schedule.Managing Events Schedule-based events 20 dependent upon the event: when the event occurs. Type a name for the event in the Event Name field. see “Scheduling an object with events” on page 473. 4.

514 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . and one set runs in the afternoon. For more information on event-based scheduling. you might schedule two sets of event-based program objects to run daily—one set runs in the morning. Custom events are useful because they allow you to set up a shortcut that. you may have a scenario where you want to schedule a number of reports. create a new custom event. Success or Failure The event is triggered upon completion of a specified object. Failure The event is triggered only upon non-successful completion of a specified object. as required. For example. Note: You can trigger a custom event multiple times. In the “Event based on” area. If you neglect to trigger the event in the morning and trigger it only in the afternoon. see the developer documentation available on your product CD. BusinessObjects Enterprise then runs the reports. both sets of programs run at that time. triggers any dependent schedule requests. For more information. the remaining set of programs is run. Click OK. Custom events A custom event occurs only when you explicitly click its “Trigger this event” button. when clicked. To do this. when you trigger the event again in the afternoon. return to the event in the CMC and trigger it manually. Tip: When developing your own web applications. you can trigger Custom events from within your own code.20 Managing Events Custom events 6. regardless of whether that object was processed successfully or not. When you first trigger the related custom event in the morning. one set of programs is run. When you update the data in the database and you need to run the reports. select from three options: • • • Success The event is triggered only upon successful completion of a specified object. and schedule the reports with that event. but you want to run them after you have updated information in your database. see “Scheduling an object with events” on page 473. For instance. 7. an object based on a custom event runs only when the event is triggered within the time frame established by the object’s schedule parameters. As with all other events.

Complete the Description field. you may have specific events that you want to be available only for certain employees or departments. 3. schedule an object that is dependent upon this event.Managing Events Specifying event rights 20 1. In the Type list. 1. so you can use rights to hide events that aren’t applicable to a particular group. inheriting rights from the users’ parent folders. Click the Rights tab. By default. Select the event you want to grant access to. 4. Follow this procedure to change the rights for an event. To grant access to an event Go to the Events management area of the CMC. Click New Event. For example. by granting only the ITadmin group access to IT-related events. 2. select a custom event by clicking its link. you may want certain events to be triggered only by management or IT. Click Trigger this event. events are based on current security settings. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 515 . 2. Users will only be able to see events they have the rights to see. 5. Click OK. Depending how you organize your events. To trigger a custom event Go to the Events management area of the CMC. Note: Before you trigger this custom event. To create a custom event Go to the Events management area of the CMC. this makes the event list easier for the HRadmin group to navigate. 3. For example. A message appears: “This event has been triggered. In the Event Name column. 3. 2. 6.” Specifying event rights You can grant or deny users and groups access to events. select Custom. 1. Type a name for the event in the Event Name field. those events won’t appear for a user from the HRadmin group.

The Add/Remove page appears. 8. 5. 516 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . 9. In the Select Operation list. On the Rights tab. change the Access Level for each user or group. Select the user or group you want to grant access to the specified event. select the Add Users operation. choose Advanced. 11. as required. then use the “Look for” field to search for a particular account. Note: For complete details on the predefined access levels and advanced rights. 6. Click OK.20 Managing Events Specifying event rights 4. To choose specific rights. If you have many users on your system. see “Rights and Access Levels” on page 563. Add Users. 7. Click Update. 10. or Remove Users. select Add/Remove Groups. Click Add/Remove to add users or groups that you want to give access to the event.

General Troubleshooting chapter .

and take note of the exact steps that cause the problem to recur. see BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide and “Web accessibility issues” on page 519. database servers. see “Report viewing and processing issues” on page 521. patch levels. use the sample reports and sample data included with the product to confirm whether or not the same problem exists. database servers. For details. and reporting environments. verify your database connectivity and functionality from each of the affected machines. included with your product distribution. For instance. If the problem is isolated to one machine. For details. open the report in Crystal Reports on the server machine and check that you can refresh the report against the database. • • Determine whether the problem is isolated to one machine or is occurring on multiple machines. web servers. including operating system versions. For details. For details. and appropriate server software. Verify that the problem is reproducible. On Windows. • If the problem relates to connectivity or functionality over the Web. Use Crystal Reports to verify that the report can be viewed properly. see if it runs on another.txt file. Thus. consider the following key points when troubleshooting: • Ensure that client and server machines are running supported operating systems. This chapter includes general troubleshooting steps along with solutions to some specific configuration issues. If the Job or Page Servers are running on Windows. if a report fails to run on one processing server. consult the Platforms.21 General Troubleshooting Troubleshooting overview Troubleshooting overview BusinessObjects Enterprise is designed to integrate with a multitude of different operating systems. Look for solutions in the documentation included with your product. pay close attention to any configuration differences in the two machines. and general network integration. any troubleshooting that you may need to undertake will likely reflect the particularities of your deployment environment. • • 518 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . In general. database clients. network and firewall configurations. If the problem relates to report viewing or report processing. see “Documentation resources” on page 519. check that BusinessObjects Enterprise is integrated properly with your web environment.

com/ Documentation resources The BusinessObjects Enterprise Release Notes are provided in the root directory of your product distribution. Access the HTML versions from the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator Launchpad. BusinessObjects Enterprise also includes a number of manuals. BusinessObjects Enterprise also sets up several application mappings on the default site.txt file. user forums.” If you are using a web site other than the default.businessobjects. For more information. you must copy the virtual directory configuration from the default web site to the web site you are using. CHM and PDF files are located in the doc directory of your product distribution. Restart the web server once you have made these changes. as is the Platforms. the BusinessObjects Enterprise installation creates virtual directories on the Internet Information Server (IIS) “Default Web Site. or from within the CMC or InfoView. These can be viewed and copied from the default web site to the web site you are using. These documents list supported third-party software along with any known issues or implementation-specific configuration details. files and updates. Web accessibility issues Using an IIS web site other than the default On Windows. Additional Compiled HTML Help (CHM) files are provided with the following client tools: • • • • • Central Configuration Manager Publishing Wizard Repository Migration Wizard Import Wizard Crystal Report Offline Viewer Press F1 or click Help to launch the online help from within these applications. see BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide.General Troubleshooting Documentation resources 21 • Check out the Business Objects Customer Support technical support web site for white papers. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 519 . and Knowledge Base articles: http://support.

Users must log on to BusinessObjects Enterprise with a valid Windows NT user name. the following error message appears: Unable to connect to CMS (<servername>) to retrieve cluster members. Investigate these common solutions: • Ensure that the specified authentication type corresponds to the user name and password provided on the log on page. Please make sure your logon information is correct. users must log on to the client machine with a valid NT domain user account before logging on to BusinessObjects Enterprise. use the CCM to restart it. • • • • 520 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Microsoft Internet Explorer users must provide a valid Windows NT user name. The web server and all BusinessObjects Enterprise components must be running on Windows NT/2000 for Windows NT authentication to work. then users must use Microsoft Internet Explorer. It must be in the form of Domain\User if the user account does not reside in the default domain of the CMS. In addition. To log on with a Windows NT user name.21 General Troubleshooting Web accessibility issues Unable to connect to CMS when logging on to the CMC If you attempt to log on to the CMC while the Central Management Server (CMS) is not running. the following error occurs: NT Authentication could not log you on. This error may occur for various reasons. If Windows NT Integrated security (NT Challenge/Response) is enabled in Internet Information Services (IIS) and in the Web Component Adapter (WCA). verify that the authentication type is set to Windows NT Authentication and not Enterprise. (If the CMS was already started. It must be in the form of Domain\User if the user account does not reside in the default domain of the CMS. Use the CCM to start the CMS. Netscape users must provide a valid Windows NT user name in the form of Domain\User. Logon can not continue. If your account is in any domain other than "DOMAIN NAME" you must enter your user name as DomainName\UserName.) Windows NT authentication cannot log you on When you attempt to log on to the Central Management Console (CMC) or to InfoView.

the DSN configurations. change the Page Server or Job Server to use a valid domain account with enough rights to view or process the report. take note of the database client and version you are running. If the reports are based off ODBC data sources. Page Server. By locating the step where Crystal Reports is unable to open. In particular. and the accounts under which the processing servers are running. If you follow these steps and the problem persists.General Troubleshooting Report viewing and processing issues 21 Report viewing and processing issues When troubleshooting reports. see if it runs on another. and RAS machines in order to speed up the troubleshooting of reports and database connectivity. but runs successfully when scheduled. For instance. if a report fails to run on one processing server. including operating system versions. and the versions of the MDAC layer. or when a report is viewed on demand over the Web. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 521 . Note: The exact steps and menu options may differ. and the driver name and version that you are using to connect. you may be able to locate the source of the problem. depending on your version of Crystal Reports. If the report database server is on a remote machine. check the database client configurations. Check to see if the Page Server or Job Server is running under an account that has the appropriate access rights to the report database server. the drivers and versions. pay close attention to any configuration differences in the two machines. If the report fails when viewed on demand. but fails when scheduled. Before you call. 1. you can install Crystal Reports on all Job Server. you use Crystal Reports to simulate the steps that are performed by the BusinessObjects Enterprise processing servers when a scheduled report is processed. refresh. compare the ODBC driver versions. If the problem is isolated to one machine. To troubleshoot a report Start Crystal Reports on the appropriate machine: • • If the report runs successfully on demand. it is especially useful to determine whether the problem is isolated to one machine or is occurring on multiple machines. the database server version that you are connecting to. and general network integration. patch levels. Troubleshooting reports with Crystal Reports On Windows. contact Business Objects technical support. start Crystal Reports on the Job Server. start Crystal Reports on the Page Server. or save the report. In this way.

If the database credentials are valid. click Log On/Off Server. Note any ODBC errors that are produced. 5. 2. Export the report to Crystal Reports format (or any other desired format). 8. and then save the report. change the parameter values or record selection formula accordingly. On the File menu. Crystal Reports will report an error. As this happens. Click Enterprise Folders and log on to your CMS. and other objects). If the values are invalid. subreports. clear the “Save Data with Report” check box. and the Input File Repository Server. click Open. Verify resource allocation in case the machine is running out of memory or disk space. check these possible causes: • • • If the report fails. Crystal Reports will report any errors that it encounters within the report (such as formulas. click Verify Database. the temporary files increase in size. Check the join information. the report’s SQL statement is evaluated at this time. If you cannot log on to the database server. Test your database connection and authentication. 522 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . On the Database menu. ensure that the database credentials provide READ rights to all tables in the report. If the SQL statement is valid. 3. If not. If the report fails in all cases. If you cannot open the report. check the configuration of the database client software and ensure that the report contains a valid database user name and password.21 General Troubleshooting Report viewing and processing issues • • If the report fails when viewed on demand with the Advanced DHTML viewer. verify network connectivity between the server you are working on. the CMS. On the Database menu. 7. If the report’s parameters or record selection need to be modified by BusinessObjects Enterprise users when they schedule or view the report. Open the report from the CMS. Go to the last page of the report. 4. Verify that the tables used in the report match the tables in the database. Correct any issues reported by Crystal Reports. On the File menu. if current data is not returned from the database. 6. first complete these troubleshooting steps on one processing server. data begins to return to Crystal Reports. Refresh the report and. then verify whether or not the problem is resolved on all processing servers. start Crystal Reports on the RAS. repeat the steps on a different processing server.

RAS. because users cannot impersonate services. Tip: Running a background application under an Administrator account does not inadvertently grant administrative privileges to another user. BusinessObjects Enterprise servers require access to various local and/ or remote resources and to the database server. 1. see “Configuring Windows processing servers for your data source” on page 132. 9. Experience shows that running the Page Server.General Troubleshooting Report viewing and processing issues 21 This step ensures that Crystal Reports is able to create temporary files that are required in order to complete the processing of a report. To troubleshoot reports and looping database logon prompts Verify the report with Crystal Reports. 2. 3. Change the server’s logon account. the report will not display. or schedule the report for processing. Repeat the activity that caused the original report to fail: view the report on demand over the Web. Close Crystal Reports. 12. 11. Regardless of the credentials provided by the user. Close the report. save it back to the CMS. test database connectivity by opening the report in Crystal Reports on the server. Job Server. Verify the server’s access to ODBC Data Source Names (DSNs). or RAS machine. Job Server. 10. If the report now refreshes successfully. This section provides a series of troubleshooting steps that should resolve this problem and others that are specific to reports and database connectivity. For details. Troubleshooting reports and looping database logon prompts A common issue when viewing reports over the Web is a persistent database logon prompt that is displayed repeatedly by the user’s browser. To change a server’s logon account. see “Troubleshooting reports with Crystal Reports” on page 521. If you have the Crystal Reports Designer installed on the Page Server. and Web Component Adapter (WCA) under a Domain Administrator account allows them to access the components necessary to connect successfully to data sources. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 523 . Use Crystal Reports to verify the report. This problem is typically caused by the configuration of the Page Server or the Report Application Server (RAS).

If you are not using ODBC. and so on). and set up each System DSN identically on every Job Server. depending upon the database that you are reporting off of. 4. you can instead change each ODBC DSN so that it implements SQL Server Login instead of NT authentication.) To retain the access control levels that are set up within the database. 524 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Determine the configuration of the database client software. the Job Server. Insufficient NTFS rights on the server may cause a number of problems to arise when you view reports over the Web. see “Configuring Windows processing servers for your data source” on page 132. Page Server. changing each server’s logon account to that of a Domain Administrator account should resolve such problems. BusinessObjects Enterprise does not pass endusers’ NT tokens through to the database server. and RAS machine that will process the report.21 General Troubleshooting Report viewing and processing issues Base reports off System DSNs (and not File or User DSNs). This information is stored in the Windows registry. and RAS. 5. the processing server must have permission to access the corresponding DSN configuration. For the minimum set of NTFS permissions required by BusinessObjects Enterprise. each server’s logon account determines the level of access it is granted by the database. If the report is based off an ODBC data source. see “Configuring NTFS Permissions” on page 569. Additional configuration may be required. As in step 2. Page Server. the database client software must be installed on each machine that will process reports. many database clients store their configuration in the registry below HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE. (In this scenario.INI Consult your Windows documentation for information about working with the registry. Verify the NTFS permissions granted to the Job Server. If you report against a database that uses NT authentication for access control (Microsoft SQL Server. Check whether or not NT authentication is performed by the database. Sybase. the BusinessObjects Enterprise services cannot use the database client software to communicate with the database. For details. On Windows. The Job Server. 6. If your database client stores its configuration below HKEY_CURRENT_USER. Page Server. Page Server. and RAS must run under a Windows NT/2000 domain user account that has access to the appropriate database tables. and RAS require Full Control or Special Access to the ODBC registry subkey: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ODBC\ODBC.

see “Modifying Page Server performance settings” on page 115. 11. BusinessObjects Enterprise servers are generally most affected by the TMP and TEMP environment variables. If a database connection is not closed quickly. If all database client licenses are in use. ensure that the report references its data source with the appropriate UNC path. 12. Therefore. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 525 . On Windows. you may need to perform additional configuration. Check for problems with particular data sources. it is recommended that you create System Environment variables if they do not already exist. Ensure that you have enough database client licenses. they cannot access the User Environment variables that are created by default. Check the available environment variables. Check that database connections are closed in a timely fashion.General Troubleshooting Report viewing and processing issues 21 7. Use multi-threaded database drivers. Crystal Reports now includes a number of thread-safe native and OLEDB drivers. However. Download the latest instructions from the Business Objects Customer Support Knowledge Base. 8. ODBC connections are typically recommended because they provide multithreaded connections to the database. Ensure that servers have access to remote databases through UNC paths. To decrease the “Minutes Before an Idle Job is Closed” setting. A list of these thread-safe drivers is available in the Crystal Reports Release Notes. if you design a report off a PC database that resides on a network drive. For example. Consult your Windows documentation for details. the database may not service another request until the connection has been closed. Multi-threaded database drivers allow the processing servers to connect to the database without having to wait for the database to fulfill initial requests. Reference remote data sources with UNC paths. the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers are unable to retrieve data from the database. For details. Environment variables are used by the operating system to govern and manage system files for particular users. 9. 10. Because the servers are run as services. instead of through mapped drives. see “Ensuring that server resources are available on local drives” on page 526. If your report is based on a Lotus Notes database.

you can specify the root directory for each File Repository Server.21 General Troubleshooting Report viewing and processing issues IBM offers several client applications for connecting to DB2. if you configure a server to use a mapped drive. because UNC paths can limit performance due to limitations in the underlying protocol. When you log off the local machine. The recommended client is IBM DB2 Direct Connect. or the directory from which the Job Servers load processing extensions. Although some BusinessObjects Enterprise servers can recognize and use UNC paths. and hence to the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers running on the local machine. check the Knowledge Base for the latest information. However. but. it is available to the entire operating system. when you restart the local machine. many can be configured to use specific directories to store files. whose ODBC drivers were written for actual programmatic interaction with products like BusinessObjects Enterprise. In all cases. Note: Changing a server’s log on account from the LocalSystem account to a Windows NT/2000 user account with network privileges will not resolve the problem. the servers may retain access to the mapped drive for some time (Windows will release the drive mapping if no application maintains a persistent connection to the mapped resource). For example. So. the mapped drive is accessible to the LocalSystem account. However. when you log on and map a local or network drive. because the servers do not actually log on to the network with that 526 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . once a drive is mapped. Tip: If your report runs against a PC database that resides on a network drive. servers cannot access mapped resources when the machine is restarted. do not configure the servers to access network resources in this manner. the directory that you specify must be on a local drive (such as C:\InputFRS or C:\Cache). the mapped drive is not restored until you log back on. In this case. See the Business Objects Customer Support Knowledge Base for discussions of this and other DB2 clients. Use local drives instead. Ensuring that server resources are available on local drives When the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers are running on Windows. the service must run under a domain user account with network permissions. the temporary directories for the Cache and Page Servers. Similarly. If you encounter problems with any other specific data sources. Drives are mapped according to your user profile when you log on to Windows NT/2000. then the report itself must reference its data source through a UNC path. see “Configuring Windows processing servers for your data source” on page 132. For details. Do not use Universal Naming Convention (UNC) paths or mapped drives. the server may appear to function correctly.

(If the Page Server was already started and enabled. the destination that is set in the CMC will be selected. For more information about using specific time-zone properties in your custom web applications. Use the CCM to start the Page Server and then enable it. Page Server error when viewing a report When you attempt to run or preview a report. which is available as a Client Sample on the Crystal Enterprise User Launchpad. Instead. a report's destination that is set in the CMC will be the selected destination when a report is scheduled in InfoView. but not others (such as ODBC User Data Source Names and mapped drives). Thus. To view or modify the time-zone setting for any user account.General Troubleshooting InfoView considerations 21 account.) InfoView considerations Supporting users in multiple time zones Avoid granting Schedule access to the default Guest account if you deploy InfoView for users in different time zones. If the user selects the Default destination setting in BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 527 . the servers perform “account impersonation. use the CCM to restart it. when a user schedules another instance in InfoView. Setting default report destinations By default. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK documentation. [On Page Server : <servername>. Please try to reconnect later. use the Preferences Manager. ensure that each user who is allowed to schedule reports has a dedicated account on the system. Dedicated accounts are recommended because the default Guest account does not allow users to modify account preferences that would affect other users. Instead.Cacheserver] This error indicates that the Page Server is not started and enabled.” This provides access to some profile-specific resources (such as printers and email profiles). Note that the destination set in InfoView applies only to the scheduled instance. unless the user changes the Destination option. the following error message appears: There are no Page Servers connected to the Cache Server or all the connected Page Servers are disabled. and that each user's InfoView preferences include the appropriate time-zone setting. A user can also select alternate destinations in InfoView by updating the Destination option.

528 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . The Default destination setting in InfoView is equivalent to the Default destination setting in the CMC. reports are processed on the Job Server and sent to the File Repository Server.21 General Troubleshooting InfoView considerations InfoView.

Licensing Information chapter .

This provides named users with access to the system regardless of how many other people are connected. RAS Report Modification licenses are also available. For more information about licenses. be sure to delete the Evaluation key prior to adding any new license keys or product activation keycodes. these licenses add standard report-creation and report-modification wizards to InfoView. you could purchase a named user license for each of the 25 managers and a concurrent license for 175 general users. thereby providing you with tools for building your own webbased reporting and query tools. In addition. Named user licenses are associated with specific users and allow people to access the system based on their user name and password.22 Licensing Information Licensing overview Licensing overview BusinessObjects Enterprise is a scalable product that provides you with the ability to add license keys as the demand for report information increases in your organization. You may want to purchase named user licenses for people in your organization who require access to BusinessObjects Enterprise at all times. You can purchase concurrent. Processor licenses are based on the number of processors that are running BusinessObjects Enterprise. 500. count the number of processors on any servers running any component of BusinessObjects Enterprise. a 100 user concurrent license could support 250. BusinessObjects Enterprise Embedded or RAS Report Modification licenses enable the Report Application Server’s Software Development Kit (SDK) for report-creation. For example. sessions. 530 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . For example. and session handling see “BusinessObjects Enterprise Security Concepts” on page 227. so users can create and modify reports over the Web in an ad hoc fashion. and processor licenses. named. or 700 users depending on the frequency with which the system is accessed and the number and size of the reports. This type of licensing is very flexible because a small concurrent license can support a large user base. Concurrent licenses specify the number of people who can connect to BusinessObjects Enterprise at the same time. To determine the number of processor licenses you require. Note: If you are upgrading from a trial version of the product.

and processor licenses associated with each key. named. To purchase additional license keys: • • Contact your Business Objects sales representative.businessobjects. 2. Select a license key. For details. The details associated with the key appear in the Licensing Information area. Contact your regional office.com/company/contact_us/ BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 531 . Go to the License Keys management area of the CMC. 1.Licensing Information Accessing license information 22 Accessing license information The License Keys tab identifies the number of concurrent. go to: http://www.

2. Viewing current account activity 1. The key is added to the list. along with additional job metrics. 1. Note: Key codes are case-sensitive.22 Licensing Information Adding a license key Adding a license key Note: If you are upgrading from a trial version of the product. This tab displays current license usage. 532 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Click the Metrics tab. Click Add. 2. Go to the Settings management area of the CMC. Go to the License Keys management area of the CMC. be sure to delete the Evaluation key prior to adding any new license keys or product activation keycodes. Type the key in the Add Key field. 3.

NET SDK RAS support for processing extensions Distributed servers Ability to define users/ personalization Concurrent users Third-party authentication support Events Object distribution (Destinations) BusinessObjects Enterprise Mobile Desktop Server group re-direction Express X X X X X X X X X X X X Professional X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 533 .Licensing Information Viewing current account activity 22 Feature Crystal Repository refresh Insert subreport Unicode support Setting locale of the Report Engine New viewer architecture Smart Tags Exporting page ranges New Excel export options OLAP integration Export drill down views Embed URL link to report in email Set database location Custom printer settings Java SDK .

22 Licensing Information Viewing current account activity 534 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide From BusinessObjects 6.x to BusinessObjects XI appendix .

InfoView • • • • • • • • • Web Intelligence Crystal Reports OLAP Intelligence OLAP Intelligence Designer Central Management Console (CMC) Developer Suite Performance Management (formerly Application Foundation) Data Integrator Import Wizard The Application Foundation suite and Data Integrator are available to complement the BusinessObjects 6.x to BusinessObjects XI Product offering Product offering Here is a list of the applications in each version’s offering. Several other applications allow you to add objects to the repository as well.x column and those in the BusinessObjects XI column are not necessarily equivalent: In BusinessObjects 6. those in the BusinessObjects 6.x In BusinessObjects XI • • • Designer Supervisor Supervisor over the Web • • • Designer Business View Manager Central Management Console Several applications allow you to add • Publishing Wizard objects to the repository. • • • • • • • • • • Administration Console Auditor InfoView BusinessObjects BusinessQuery WebIntelligence WebIntelligence for OLAP Data Sources Broadcast Agent Developer Suite • • • Central Configuration Manager Central Management Console Auditing is incorporated in the Central Management Console.A From BusinessObjects 6. but are not part of it. Although the applications in each row belong to the same area of functionality.x suite. 536 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

portal pages.x to BusinessObjects XI Architecture A Architecture The overall architecture of the two systems is organized in a similar manner. as well as the Business Objects components hosted on them (server SDKs.x BusinessObjects 6. as well as the additional components that implement business logic (portal workflows. scheduling. The application services layer provides the essential framework and services to the processing layer. The processing layer contains report engines. WILoginServer. The database tier is made up of the databases containing the data used in documents and reports. and WIStorageManager. and HSAL). repository access. Dispatcher.x is organized five logical layers: • • • • • The client tier contains products or features that run on the end-user’s computer (either as a standalone application or in the web browser).From BusinessObjects 6. servlets. etc.). BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 537 . such as WISessionManager. BusinessObjects 6. The presentation layer contains the web and application servers.

In a BusinessObjects 6. • The application tier includes the web and application servers. • The processing tier accesses the data and generates reports.x to BusinessObjects XI Architecture BusinessObjects XI BusinessObjects XI is organized into five tiers: • The client tier contains client applications. rather than a provider of shared services such as WIQT.x processing layer. 538 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . as well as the Business Objects components hosted on them.x reports only.A From BusinessObjects 6.x system. maintaining security information. • The data tier is made up of the databases containing the data used in reports. This layer contains fewer “servers. There are no strict equivalents for these servers in the BusinessObjects 6. routing requests to the appropriate processing layer services. with each server processing requests for a specific type of object.x context. which plays a shared role in several types of processing workflows. which processes WebIntelligence 6. Transactional workflows are therefore simplified. and storing report instances for rapid report viewing. this corresponds a dedicated role such as WIReportServer. managing audit information. • The intelligence tier manages the BusinessObjects XI system.” or processes. than the BusinessObjects 6.

In BusinessObjects XI The repository exists here as well. it does not actually store physical copies of the objects. such as Web Intelligence WID files. it also contains pointers to the physical objects. universe UNV files and third-party documents. Although the security domain itself is not imported.). The repository database actually contains the data associated with the security. stored in storage associated with the File Repository Servers. groups. See “Migration” on page 542. It can also contain universe and document domains. Repository domains The repository must have a security domain. Crystal Reports RPT files. When universe and document domains are imported from a BusinessObjects 6. universe and document domains. they are made into folders in the CMS database. Making sure the repository database has enough space is therefore critical.x Repository The BusinessObjects 6. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 539 . Although the repository database stores specific information about the objects published to it. The CMS is the central service/daemon in the BusinessObjects Enterprise XI system (see its entry further along in this table).From BusinessObjects 6.x suite uses a repository — a database that is stored in a relational database management system.x to BusinessObjects XI Basic terminology A Basic terminology Here are some of the main differences in terminology between the two releases: In BusinessObjects 6. as one of the databases maintained by the Central Management Server (CMS). The repository is used to secure access to your data warehouse and to provide an infrastructure for distributing information to be shared by users. you can import its contents (user rights. security.x deployment. folders. categories and parameters. servers. etc. including users.

or server machines.1. In addition it maintains the repository and audit databases. The CMC’s ability to enable/disable and even group servers. for example.x Business Objects servers At a minimum. The CMS serves as the central nervous system of the BusinessObjects Enterprise intelligence layer. A few examples of modules are: Broadcast Agent Manager (which manages Schedulers) • WIStorageManager • • • • • A few examples of servers are: Job Server the File Repository Servers Web Intelligence Report Server WIReportServer 540 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . In BusinessObjects XI Central Management Servers (CMS) The CMS is a single service which provides framework services. the Business Objects server back end must be installed on the cluster’s primary node and all secondary nodes. security levels. Disabling the CMS is roughly equivalent to disabling the Session Stack (starting with version 6.A From BusinessObjects 6. This installs all the processing layer modules on the server machines. Servers Processes in the BusinessObjects Enterprise XI system are called servers. the set of core processing modules enabled or disabled as a group). and services. not actual Business Objects servers. They run as services under Windows. and as daemons under UNIX. and also is responsible for maintaining the database (CMS database) containing system information. concerns processes. Modules Processes used in Business Objects transactions which can be configured through the Administration Console are called modules. such as users/groups. security management.x to BusinessObjects XI Basic terminology In BusinessObjects 6. administers scheduling tasks.

• Optional secondary nodes run the ORB components required to communicate with the primary node and start Business Objects processes on the secondary node(s). as well as optional services. Both primary and secondary nodes are considered cluster nodes. Schedule-based and custom events.x Clusters A cluster is one or more Business Objects servers which provide the functional processing for a given BI portal. are managed by the CMS. Other processes (servers) can be installed and run on other machines. which instructs the Job Server to process the job on a schedule managed by the CMS. the new cluster is given the name of the is a primary node. Clusters can contain the following elements: The distinction between primary and secondary nodes does not apply. prefaced by “@”. it workload with any existing CMS machines. By default. it is called a distributed deployment. WIReportServer Corporate documents page File Watcher allows the processing of a scheduled task only when a specified file is present in a specified location. In BusinessObjects XI CMS clusters A Central Management Server cluster (CMS cluster) consists of two or more CMSs working together to maintain the system databases and repository.x to BusinessObjects XI Basic terminology A In BusinessObjects 6. you central coordinator amongst all the nodes in the cluster. Web Intelligence Report Server Public folder The Event Server manages file-based events. There is one and instruct the new CMS to connect to the existing only one primary node in a cluster. When you add a new CMS to a deployment • The primary node serves as the containing a previously. the Session Stack must be activated in order for the server to contribute to cluster processing. The CMSs can be on the same machine or on different ones. WebIntelligence Application servers Broadcast Agent Web Intelligence Web application servers Scheduling functions are handled by the CMS.installed CMS. first installed CMS. Each server hosts the entire set of Business Objects modules. This means that at a minimum only the CMS component must be installed and activated on the machine. When a cluster contains more than one server machine.From BusinessObjects 6. if CMS database and to share the processing the cluster contains only one node. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 541 . on the other hand. A CMS cluster is called an expanded deployment.

A From BusinessObjects 6. delivered with the BusinessObjects 6. Password Validity settings 542 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .x to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI: Object User properties Specific migration information These properties are not mapped. • WebIntelligence OLAP • • • • Custom applications and interfaces created using the SDK Broadcast Agent Scheduler or Publisher tasks BusinessObjects Auditor Timestamps Migration and mapping of specific objects Here is some important information about migrating specific objects from BusinessObjects 6. • • • • Identification Strategy Logon Enable Real Time User Rights Update Enable Password Modification flag This maps to the User cannot change password property. you use the Import Wizard. This Wizard and how to use it is described in the BusinessObjects Enterprise XI Installation Guide. categories. which when True.rep documents to . Instructions are in the Report Migration Utility guide.5 suite.x. you can use the Report Migration Utility.wid format. universes. This property must be reset manually by the administrator at the global level. means what it says. Here is a summary of what the Import Wizard does and doesn’t import: The Import Wizard imports: The Import Wizard doesn’t import: • • • • • • Users and groups WebIntelligence reports Universes Connections Categories Security • BusinessObjects documents To migrate . documents. universe restriction sets. and reports from BusinessObjects 6. users and groups.x to BusinessObjects XI Migration Migration To import repository objects such as domains.

Most BusinessObjects 6. are not mapped to the Administrators group.x map to appropriately-named user groups.x continue to refer to them in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. Document and universe domains become folders with the same name. User profiles Groups External groups Inbox documents Personal documents Categories Domains BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 543 . General Supervisors become members of the Administrators groups. on the other hand. Both personal and corporate categories are imported. Administrators need to create dynamic groups. where only the BusinessObjects administrator and their owners have access to them. you can select individual categories and subcategories to import into BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. User and group access to these folders is equivalent to the rights they had on the BusinessObjects 6. The Company group maps to the Everyone group. After migration. which manage all document instances that have been scheduled or published to the repository. object levels in BusinessObjects 6.x user profiles map to default groups in the new system. For example. Any personal or corporate categories that referred to these documents in BusinessObjects 6. Personal documents are imported to the user’s Favorites folder.x domains. Supervisors. If Inbox already includes duplicate documents. they are also migrated to the File Repository Servers. but instead simply granted the appropriate rights on all imported objects. The Import Wizard maps static LDAP groups. Inbox documents are imported to the Inbox folder. Users with the User/Versatile profile are added to an Object Level Security group based on their Object Security levels. Documents and universes cannot be imported unless their domain is imported as well.From BusinessObjects 6. When you import corporate categories.x to BusinessObjects XI Migration A Object Object Security level Specific migration information Expressed as limit rights set on the universe folder. Dynamic groups are mapped with Enterprise authentication.

x user profiles map to default groups in the new system. on the other hand. Administrators need to create dynamic groups.x domains. When you import corporate categories. Supervisors. are not mapped to the Administrators group. object levels in BusinessObjects 6. After migration.x continue to refer to them in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. they are also migrated to the File Repository Servers. For example. The Company group maps to the Everyone group. you can select individual categories and subcategories to import into BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. Documents and universes cannot be imported unless their domain is imported as well. The Import Wizard maps static LDAP groups. Users with the User/Versatile profile are added to an Object Level Security group based on their Object Security levels. Inbox documents are imported to the Inbox folder.A From BusinessObjects 6. but instead simply granted the appropriate rights on all imported objects. Both personal and corporate categories are imported. which manage all document instances that have been scheduled or published to the repository. General Supervisors become members of the Administrators groups.x to BusinessObjects XI Migration Object Object Security level Specific migration information Expressed as limit rights set on the universe folder. Any personal or corporate categories that referred to these documents in BusinessObjects 6. where only the BusinessObjects administrator and their owners have access to them. If Inbox already includes duplicate documents. Personal documents are imported to the user’s Favorites folder. Most BusinessObjects 6. Document and universe domains become folders with the same name. User and group access to these folders is equivalent to the rights they had on the BusinessObjects 6.x map to appropriately-named user groups. Dynamic groups are mapped with Enterprise authentication. User profiles Groups External groups Inbox documents Personal documents Categories Domains 544 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .

From BusinessObjects 6. Delegated Administration does not support “modes”. BusinessObjects XI provides the ability to specify global rights for Web Intelligence. A delegated administrator may nonetheless be able to view imported objects (such as connections) that were previously hidden in the source deployment. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 545 . etc. imported “delegated administrators” will inherit the rights specified for the Everyone group for access to such objects. General supervisors can limit other supervisors’ access by setting their scope management setting to Standard. each of which defines a different level of access to user/group information and management. in particular. Import attempts to set rights in the destination deployment that are at least as restrictive as the effective rights in the source deployment.g. Scope management Migration of user rights Key security features provided by BusinessObjects 6. Although this feature is mapped to the Delegated Administration feature in Business Objects Enterprise XI.). and core universe ID • For Web Intelligence reports: universe ID Scope management is a Supervisor option which allows you to control the extent of the access that all supervisors are granted to users and user groups.x universe IDs are updated to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI IDs and CUIDs: • For universes: Universe ID. calendars.x (as applied to the integrated components) are available in BusinessObjects XI. and Performance Manager applications.x to BusinessObjects XI Migration A Object Universes Specific migration information Users can choose between importing all universes and connections. It is recommended to verify effective rights on imported objects for “delegated administrators” after import and to set appropriate rights for access to objects that only exist in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI and not in BusinessObjects 6. the two features are not strictly equivalent. BusinessObjects 6. Along with the ability to specify rights at the object level.x (e. Dashboard Manager. By default. WebIntelligence documents that used a BusinessObjects 6. events. Secured or Extended mode. or only those associated with the WebIntelligence reports being imported. connection ID. This is true for all restrictions that limit modification and administration of objects.x universe use the same universe in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI.

A From BusinessObjects 6. then denied If unspecified or denied anywhere.x Migrated to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI as.x Default Value in Version XI Aggregation Rules Aggregation in Version 6.x Rules in Version XI If granted (or unspecified) anywhere: granted If unspecified or denied anywhere.. then hidden If disabled anywhere.. then disabled Otherwise. domain folder.) Enabled Denied Security Command Right • • • If hidden anywhere. Product Access (PA) right Security Command right Domain Access right Document/Universe Access right Right to view application object Right to application object. then denied Denied Denied 546 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . to maintain greater system security: Right Type (6.x) Product Access (PA) Right Default Value in Version 6.x to BusinessObjects XI Migration The following identifies the migration path for integrated rights: Right Type in BusinessObjects 6. then denied Granted Denied (The Designer and Supervisor PA right is set to Denied on the root folder at install time. then denied Domain Access Right Document/ Universe Access Right Granted Denied If granted (or unspecified) anywhere: granted If granted anywhere: granted If unspecified or denied anywhere. enabled • • Hidden in 6.x = denied in XI If unspecified or denied anywhere. or content object Right to view domain folder Right to view content object Different default and aggregate rules The fundamental default and aggregate rules governing rights change radically in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI.

You can distribute a single deployment’s transactional capabilities on the same machine by creating multiple instances of a “server”. The other “servers” in the intelligence layer. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 547 . you must install Business Objects server on the node machine.x to BusinessObjects XI Installation. and deployment A Installation. and deployment: In BusinessObjects 6. or you can install on additional machines to distribute the load. you add additional cluster nodes to a cluster. configuration. This capability offers you the ability to scale your system vertically (more services on the same machine) or horizontally (more machines). Initial installation options • Desktop • • Server Custom • • • • • Client Server The Server option provides three installation options: New Expand Custom Distributed deployments To distribute processing. such as the Job Server. configuration. To add a cluster node. in which Business Objects servers are hosted on Windows and UNIX machines. At a minimum. In BusinessObjects XI The CMS “servers” in a BusinessObjects Enterprise XI cluster must all be running on machines running the same operating system and version. configuration. the Session Stack must be activated on each cluster node to share the transaction load. can be hosted on machines running completely different (but supported) operating systems. however. and deployment Here is an overview of key differences in installation. This installs the entire set of processes required for system processing on each machine.5 supports heterogeneous clusters.x Server operating systems BusinessObjects 6. The CMS does not need to run on each machine.From BusinessObjects 6.

which includes the repository. see “Deploying web applications on application servers. is an integral part of BusinessObjects Enterprise installation.x to BusinessObjects XI Installation. in this table. you can select or create a new CMS database at any time using the Central Configuration Manager (CCM). After installation. If the application server is hosted on a machine which is neither a primary nor secondary node. the installation procedure automatically installs and configures Microsoft Data Engine (MSDE) as the CMS database. and the sample reports are published to the system. In BusinessObjects XI Setting up the CMS database. In a New server installation. Not all applications require the WCA. the default user and group accounts are created. The WCA allows your application server to run BusinessObjects Enterprise applications making Crystal Web Requests. the client and server components are installed. InfoView doesn’t need it unless users will be viewing OLAP Intelligence documents. For information on deploying web For information on deploying web applications on application servers. the servers are started as services on the local machine. You configure the ORB on the application server machine either by installing the Configuration Tool on that machine. configuration. Installing BusinessObjects Enterprise XI on the same machine as the application server is called a server-side installation.A From BusinessObjects 6. and to host the Central Management Console. then using it to configure the server as a client node of the cluster. For example. and you do not choose to connect the CMS to an existing database. and deployment In BusinessObjects 6. if you install a Central Management Server in a Windows environment. or by configuring the ORB manually. MySQL is installed.x Installation and the repository Repository creation is completely independent of the installation of Business Objects software. 548 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Command-line installation Application servers Application servers communicate with the Business Objects cluster through the ORB. see “Deploying web applications” on page 550 applications” on page 550 in this table. In similar circumstances in UNIX environments. you must configure the ORB on it in order to allow it to communicate with the cluster. When you perform this installation. When the installation is complete. Silent installation You must install a Web Component Adapter (WCA) on any machine hosting an application server.

License keys are stored in the CMS database. When you install the first Central Management Server (typically a New install). At the installation of each additional CMS. You configure the cluster’s primary node and then its secondary nodes. as well as add or delete them. License key management Before installation. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 549 . you copy your license key to a directory to which all nodes or application client machines have access. Configuring clusters and the ORB You create clusters and configure their ORB on their nodes using the Configuration Tool. You can view your deployment’s current license keys. This makes it part of the cluster. using the CMC. the web server must be able to communicate with the machine that runs your Web Component Adapter (WCA). During installation. you specify the name of the first CMS you installed. OLAP You install Web Intelligence for OLAP Data Sources using the standard installation process. In BusinessObjects XI If you connect BusinessObjects Enterprise to a web server. you must install a third-party connector to the cluster’s application server. in this table. OLAP Intelligence is installed separately. The subsequent machines on which you install the CMS become part of a CMS cluster named <@Name of First CMS>.From BusinessObjects 6. see web servers. This creates a cluster of one and sets the cluster up for subsequent Expand installs. For information on deploying web For information on deploying web applications on applications on web servers. configuration. and deployment A In BusinessObjects 6. see “Deploying web applications” on “Deploying web applications” on page 550 page 550 in this table. which add additional CMSs to the cluster.x to BusinessObjects XI Installation. you specify where these XML files are located. you can define it as a cluster.x Web servers To configure the web server to work with a cluster.

you must create a new. This database will be configured during the install. After repository creation. This allows the server to connect to it. the Business Objects web applications are deployed automatically on the web and/or application server. the Configuration Tool can deploy the applications automatically on web and application servers. unless you are deploying to an existing Java application server. 550 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide . Deploying web applications You can deploy web applications in three ways: • If you’re using IIS or Tomcat/Apache. • You can use the wdeploy tool. • You can manually deploy the application on all other supported web and/or application servers.A From BusinessObjects 6. J2EE only Custom web applications developed using the SDK Custom web applications developed using the SDK Although not part of the BusinessObjects 6. empty database on your database server prior to running the installation. Otherwise. installation can install and configure MSDE (Windows) or mySQL (UNIX) for use as the CMS database.x to BusinessObjects XI Installation. and deployment In BusinessObjects 6. you must copy the bomain. If you choose a New installation and are using IIS or Apache/Tomcat.x suite. To use your own database server.x In BusinessObjects XI • • • • • Available web applications Administration Console InfoView Auditor Supervisor over the Web • • • • Central Management Console InfoView Performance Manager applications (formerly Application Foundation). configuration. a command-line utility that you can run on all other supported application and/ or web servers.key file corresponding to the repository on each node in the cluster. If you do not have a supported database client on the machine. Whenever you add a new CMS to a cluster in an Expand installation. you define the connection to the initial CMS’s database. Application Foundation applications can also be deployed. you must deploy web applications manually. Repository creation You create the repository after installation and configuration. using the Supervisor application.

Through BusinessObjects 6. BusinessObjects. Implementing an authentication method is broken down into selecting an authentication mode. then its source.x to BusinessObjects XI Security A In BusinessObjects 6. Security BusinessObjects 6. The use of Unicode databases. Unicode databases In BusinessObjects XI Multiple instances of the same service can run on the same machine (providing vertical scaling). External then Repository. administrators of BusinessObjects 6. or External.From BusinessObjects 6. In BusinessObjects XI. or on separate machines (for horizontal scaling).x.x applications use a very different security model than that provided with BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. is supported as a data source for Web Intelligence reports. Connection Server.exe (Windows)/bolight (UNIX). store information in different languages and centralize all the information in a company. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 551 .x Multiple service instances In BusinessObjects 6. and as such. and WIReportServer. security is much more granular. You use the Administration Console to set the number of instances in each process pool. are designed to be multi-instance on cluster nodes. which can All CMS databases must support the Unicode protocol. authentication is defined for an entire cluster and/or all desktop users.5. When users log into the system. when you create the user’s account. but may enter their authentication method as well. You can choose between Microsoft AD or an LDAP user management system for external authentication sources. You implement an authentication method for each user.x systems are encouraged to read with attention the documentation shipped with BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. certain modules such as WIQT. BusinessObjects 6.1.5 also supports multiple Business Objects servers on the same UNIX box. which must run on the same operating system within a single cluster. The single exception is the Central Management Server. which can be Repository. they specify their username and password. in any mixture of supported operating systems. Unicode databases are not supported for repositories or BusinessObjects documents.

users are automatically created. Each CMS is configured either at installation or subsequently using the Central Management Console (CMC) to connect to a specific database. You select the authentication method for each user at the creation of the user’s account. the Central applications where to find the repository’s management Server (CMS) verifies the user security domain.key tells Business Objects There is no bomain. using the CMC. or authentication modes. So if you are not using complex scenarios in which users can log on with both NT and LDAP authentications.x In BusinessObjects XI bomain. you set authentication/authorization for the entire cluster using the Security Configuration Tool. At login. 552 BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide .x to BusinessObjects XI Security In BusinessObjects 6. or create new aliases then assign them to exiting users in the system.key The bomain. You can even assign multiple aliases.key file.A From BusinessObjects 6.1.5. to a single user. Configuring authentication and authorization You set authentication/authorization for the entire cluster using the Security Configuration Tool. Setting the authentication and authorization methods Up through version 6. Windows NT or Active Directory. you don’t need to create the settings for each user individually. name and password against the security information stored in the CMS database. You configure authentication in the Authentication management area of the CMC. If you import external users via LDAP.

categories. and role level security at the object level. that you could allow a group to refresh document A. group. Because of the use of Access Control Lists (ACL). the imposition of restrictions is much more granular. folders. BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator’s Guide 553 . Note: If you use SiteMinder. universes.x) Windows NT authentication Single-Sign-On (SSO) To enable SSO. You cannot restrict access at the object level. This means. See below. you must use LDAP for external user management. For example. but not refresh document B.From BusinessObjects 6. but is available for certain authentication modes. such as SAP authentication. Single Sign-On is not a mode in itself. the restriction will apply regardless of the documents being used. but not create documents. • • • Enterprise authentication (automatically enabled when you install the system.x to BusinessObjects XI Security A In BusinessObjects 6.x In BusinessObjects XI • • • • Available authentication modes Business Objects standard Windows-NTLM (similar to BusinessObjects XI Windows NT authentication) Single Sign-On • LDAP authentication Basic authentication (user Windows AD authentication authentication is delegated to the web server) Other authentication modes are available through add-in products. to documents. Authorization You can use security commands in Supervisor to restrict user and group access to functionalities in Business Objects products. if you grant a group the right to refresh. and similar to Business Objects standard in version 6. you must use Netegrity SiteMinder. You can apply user. for example. and connections. Single Sign-On to BusinessObjects Enterprise can be provided through the use of third-party sys