Jet Transport

Performance























Edition 2011



Introduction Jet Transport Performance


This brochure is intended to give insight into the flight performance of jet transport aircraft as
well as to refresh essential basic skills, which are required for safe and economic flight
operations.

The brochure has been deliberately created without resorting to theoretical derivations.

To achieve this purposes the brochure covers the following subjects:

- Theory of Flight
- Jet Engine Basics
- Takeoff Performance
- Cruise Performance
- Landing Performance
- Weight and Balance




























The data contained in this publication are for training only. The data must not be used for
any other purpose and, specifically, are not to be used for the purpose of planning
activities associated with the operation of any aircraft in use now or in the future.




All rights reserved. Copies of this publication may be reproduced as training material for students, for use within a
company or organization, or for personal use, but may not otherwise be reproduced for publication or for
commercial gain.


© by Ralf M. Dittmer 3
rd
Edition 2011

Jet Transport Performance Table of Contents
I

1 THEORY OF FLIGHT..........................................................................................................1
1.1 Introduction...................................................................................................................1
1.2 Properties of the Atmosphere........................................................................................1
1.3 Altimetry Principles........................................................................................................3
1.4 The Airfoil or Wing.........................................................................................................4
1.5 Lift and Drag Ratio........................................................................................................6
1.6 Axes of the Airplane in Flight.........................................................................................9
1.7 Airplane Control Surfaces .............................................................................................9
1.8 Loads and Loadfactor .................................................................................................12
1.9 Stability .......................................................................................................................13
1.10 High-Speed Aerodynamics........................................................................................16
1.11 Airspeeds..................................................................................................................21
1.12 Forces Acting on the Airplane ...................................................................................22
1.13 Straight and Level Flight............................................................................................22
1.14 Climb Performance ...................................................................................................23
1.15 Range Performance..................................................................................................26
2 JET ENGINE.....................................................................................................................29
2.1 Development of Thrust................................................................................................29
2.2 Factors Affecting Thrust ..............................................................................................31
2.3 Efficiencies..................................................................................................................35
3 TAKEOFF PERFORMANCE .............................................................................................37
3.1 General .......................................................................................................................37
3.2 The Takeoff Requirements..........................................................................................37
3.3 FAR Takeoff Definition................................................................................................38
3.4 Takeoff Distances Available........................................................................................39
3.5 Takeoff Speeds...........................................................................................................41
3.6 Effect of Flap Position on Takeoff................................................................................43
3.7 Takeoff Flight Path......................................................................................................44
3.8 Improved Climb...........................................................................................................45
3.9 Reduced Thrust ..........................................................................................................46
3.10 Takeoff on Wet and Contamineted Runways ............................................................49
3.11 Takeoff Performance Data ........................................................................................52
4 CRUISE PERFORMANCE ................................................................................................67
4.1 Fuel Requirements......................................................................................................67
4.2 Altitude Capability and Maneuver Capability ...............................................................68
4.3 Step Climb ..................................................................................................................68
4.4 Driftdown and Net Level Off Weight ............................................................................69
4.5 Flight Planning and Enroute Performance Data ..........................................................70
5 LANDING PERFORMANCE..............................................................................................79
5.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................79
5.2 Landing Performance Data .........................................................................................80
6 PERFORMANCE INFORMATION.....................................................................................89
6.1 Performance Data Sources.........................................................................................89
7 WEIGHT AND BALANCE..................................................................................................91
7.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................91
7.2 Definitions...................................................................................................................91
7.3 Calculation of Center of Gravity...................................................................................94
7.4 Index Equation............................................................................................................95
7.5 Load and Trimsheet ....................................................................................................96
7.6 Weight and Balance Information ...............................................................................100

Abbreviations Jet Transport Performance
II
AFM ..................... Airplane Flight Manual
AIP .. Aeronautical Information Publication
ALT ..............................................Altitude
ALTN......................................... Alternate
ASDA ............... Accelerate Stop Distance
Available
CAS...........................Calibrated Airspeed
C
D
................................... Drag Coefficient
CG................................. Center of Gravity
CI ............................................Cost Index
C
L
...................................... Lift Coefficient
CLB.................................................Climb
CP.............................. Center of Pressure
CRZ............................................... Cruise
CWY..........................................Clearway
D ...................................................... Drag
DOI........................... Dry Operating Index
DOW......................Dry Operating Weight
EAS.......................... Equivalent Airspeed
ECON........................................Economy
EGT................ Exhaust Gas Temperature
EPR...................... Engine Pressure Ratio
FAR............ Federal Aviation Regulations
FC.............................. Friction Coefficient
FCOM...... Flight Crew Operations Manual
FF............................................. Fuel Flow
FMC .......... Flight Management Computer
F
N
............................................ Net Thrust
FPPM... Flight Planning and Performance
Manual
G/A......................................... Go-Around
GS.....................................Ground Speed
GW..................................... Gross Weight
HOLD...........................................Holding
IAS ............................. Indicated Airspeed
ISA ....International Standard Atmosphere
JAR................... Joint Aviation Authorities
L.......................................................... Lift
L/D .................................... Lift/Drag Ratio
LDA............... Landing Distance Available
LDG............................................. Landing
LDR............... Landing Distance Required
LTS .........................Load and Trim Sheet
LW................................... Landing Weight
M....................................... Mach Number
MAC................Mean Aerodynamic Chord
MLAW.............Maximum Landing Weight
MSL................................ Mean Sea Level
MTOW............. Maximum Takeoff Weight
MZFW.......... Maximum Zero Fuel Weight
n............................................Load Factor
NAM............................. Nautical Air Miles
OAT................... Outside Air Temperature
OFP......................Operational Flight Plan
OM.............................Operations Manual
PA................................. Pressure Altitude
PDC............ Performance Data Computer
Press ......................................... Pressure
PTOW....... Performance Take-Off Weight
QRH..............Quick Reference Handbook
RAT ....................... Ram Air Temperature
RPM.............. Route Performance Manual
RWC......................Runway Weight Chart
SAT.......................Static Air Temperature
SL............................................ Sea Level
SR.................................... Specific Range
Stab .......................................... Stabilizer
SWY .......................................... Stopway
T .................................................... Thrust
Temp ...................................Temperature
T/O............................................... Takeoff
TAS....................................True Airspeed
TASS................... Assumed Temperature
TAT........................Total Air Temperature
TODA........... Take-Off Distance Available
TOF ................................... Take-Off Fuel
TORA.................. Take-Off Run Available
TOW................................ Takeoff Weight
TSFC.. Thrust Specific Fuel Consumption
TTL .............................. Total Traffic Load
V
1
....................... Takeoff Decision Speed
V
1(MCG)
. Minimum Takeoff Decision Speed
V
2
........................... Takeoff Safety Speed
V
EF
............. Critical Engine Failure Speed
V
LOF
.................................... Lift-Off Speed
V
MCA
.............. Air Minimum Control Speed
V
MCG
...... Ground Minimum Control Speed
V
MU
..................... Minimum Unstick Speed
V
R
....................................Rotation Speed
V
REF
.............................. Reference Speed
V
S
........................................... Stall Speed
W.................................................. Weight
W
A
................................................. Airflow
W
F
.............................................Fuel Flow
ZFW.............................. Zero Fuel Weight

Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight
1
1 THEORY OF FLIGHT
1.1 Introduction
The clean, sleek appearance and the splendid performance characteristics of modern
airplanes reflect the demands of modern travel, business, and industry. The present-day
airplane is clean and sleek because aerodynamic cleanness of line, and efficiency of design,
result in greater range, speed, and payload at the least operating cost. This is especially
important in the functions of large jet transports.

"Performance" is a term used to describe the ability of an airplane to accomplish certain
things which make it useful for certain purposes. For example, the ability of the airplane to
land and take off in a very short distance is an important factor to the pilot who operates in
and out of confined fields. The ability to carry heavy loads, fly at high altitudes at fast speeds,
or travel long distances is essential performance for operators of airline type airplanes.
The chief elements of performance are the takeoff and landing distance, rate of climb, ceiling,
payload, range, speed, maneuverability, stability, and fuel economy. Some of these factors
are often directly opposed: for example, high speed versus shortness of landing distance;
long range versus great payload; and high rate of climb versus fuel economy. It is the
preeminence of one or more of these factors which dictates differences between airplanes
and which explains the high degree of specialization found in modern airplanes.

The various items of airplane performance result from the combination of airplane and
powerplant characteristics. The aerodynamic characteristics of the airplane generally define
the power and thrust requirements at various conditions of flight while powerplant
characteristics generally define the power and thrust available at various conditions of flight.
The matching of the aerodynamic configuration with the powerplant is accomplished by the
manufacturer to provide maximum performance at the specific design condition, e.g., range,
endurance, climb, etc.
1.2 Properties of the Atmosphere
The composition of the earth's atmosphere is a vitally important factor in aerodynamics and
the flight of aircraft. The forces and moments acting on a surface that is moved through the
air are attributable, to a great extent, to the properties of the air mass in which the surface is
operating.

The composition of the earth's atmosphere by volume is approximately 78% nitrogen, 21%
oxygen, and 1% water vapor, argon, carbon dioxide, etc. In the majority of all aerodynamic
considerations, air is assumed to be a uniform mixture of these gases.

Static Pressure. The absolute static pressure of the air is a property of primary importance.
The static pressure of the air at any altitude results from the mass of the air supported above
that level. At standard sea level conditions the static pressure of the air is 14.7 pounds per
square inch (psi), 29.92 inches of mercury (29.92 in.Hg.), or 1013.2 millibars. At 18,000 feet
altitude this static pressure decreases to about 50% of the sea level value, and at 40,000 feet
to about 10% of the sea level value. Pressure decreases with altitude (pressure lapse rate) is
approximately 40 psi, 1 in. Hg, or 33 millibars per 1,000 feet.

Temperature. Many aspects of compressibility and engine performance involve
considerations of atmospheric temperature. Normally with an increase in altitude there is an
overall decrease of temperature in the troposphere (the lower layer of the atmosphere). This
is apparent because the air nearest the earth receives the largest amount of heat. The
variation of temperature with altitude is called the temperature lapse rate, and is expressed in
degrees per thousand feet. On one day the temperature of the air may cool 3°C per thousand
feet and on another day the air may show a decrease of only 1°C. On still another day, the
temperature may increase for a distance of 2,000 or 3,000 feet above the ground (an
Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance
2
example of an inverted lapse rate or inversion), and thereafter cool at the rate of 3°C per
thousand feet. Temperature observations taken day after day over thousands of locations on
the earth show the average lapse rate to be about 2°C per thousand feet. Standard sea level
temperatures are 15°C with a lapse rate of 2°C / 1,000 feet, or 59°F, with a lapse rate of
3.5°F / 1,000 feet.

Figure 1.1 – Pressure and Temperature


PRESSURE



ALTITUDE
(Feet)


TEMP.
(°C)
hPa PSI In.Hg
PRESSURE
RATIO
 = P/Po
DENSITY
 = ρ/ρo
SPEED
of
SOUND
(kt)
ALTITUDE
(metres)
40 000
39 000
38 000
37 000
36 000
- 56.5
- 56.5
- 56.5
- 56.5
- 56.3
188
197
206
217
227
2.72
2.58
2.99
3.14
3.30
5.54
5.81
6.10
6.40
6.71
0.1851
0.1942
0.2038
0.2138
0.2243
0.2462
0.2583
0.2710
0.2844
0.2981
573
573
573
573
573
12 192
11 887
11 582
11 278
10 973
35 000
34 000
33 000
32 000
31 000
- 54.3
- 52.4
- 50.4
- 48.4
- 46.4
238
250
262
274
287
3.46
3.63
3.80
3.98
4.17
7.04
7.38
7.74
8.11
8.49
0.2353
0.2467
0.2586
0.2709
0.2837
0.3099
0.3220
0.3345
0.3473
0.3605
576
579
581
584
586
10 668
10 363
10 058
9 754
9 449
30 000
29 000
28 000
27 000
26 000
- 44.4
- 42.5
- 40.5
- 38.5
- 36.5
301
315
329
344
360
4.36
4.57
4.78
4.99
5.22
8.89
9.30
9.73
10.17
10.63
0.2970
0.3107
0.3250
0.3398
0.3552
0.3741
0.3881
0.4025
0.4173
0.4325
589
591
594
597
599
9 144
8 839
8 534
8 230
7 925
25 000
24 000
23 000
22 000
21 000
- 34.5
- 32.5
- 30.6
- 28.6
- 26.6
376
393
410
428
446
5.45
5.70
5.95
6.21
6.47
11.10
11.60
12.11
12.64
13.18
0.3711
0.3876
0.4046
0.4223
0.4406
0.4481
0.4642
0.4806
0.4976
0.5150
602
604
607
609
611
7 620
7 315
7 010
6 706
6 401
20 000
19 000
18 000
17 000
16 000
- 24.6
- 22.6
- 20.7
- 18.7
- 16.7
466
485
506
527
549
6.75
7.04
7.34
7.65
7.97
13.75
14.34
14.94
15.57
16.22
0.4595
0.4791
0.4994
0.5203
0.5420
0.5328
0.5511
0.5699
0.5892
0.6090
614
616
619
621
624
6 096
5 791
5 406
5 182
4 877
15 000
14 000
13 000
12 000
11 000
- 14.7
- 12.7
- 10.8
- 8.8
- 6.8
572
595
619
644
670
8.29
8.63
8.99
9.35
9.72
16.89
17.58
18.29
19.03
19.79
0.5643
0.5875
0.6113
0.6360
0.6614
0.6292
0.6500
0.6713
0.6932
0.7156
626
628
631
633
636
4 572
4 267
3 962
3 658
3 353
10 000
9 000
8 000
7 000
6 000
- 4.8
- 2.8
- 0.8
+ 1.1
+ 3.1
697
724
753
782
812
10.10
10.51
10.92
11.34
11.78
20.58
21.39
22.22
23.09
23.98
0.6877
0.7148
0.7428
0.7716
0.8014
0.7385
0.7620
0.7860
0.8106
0.8359
638
640
643
645
647
3 048
2 743
2 438
2 134
1 829
5 000
4 000
3 000
2 000
1 000
+ 5.1
+ 7.1
+ 9.1
+ 11.0
+ 13.0
843
875
908
942
977
12.23
12.69
13.17
13.67
14.17
24.90
25.84
26.82
27.82
28.86
0.8320
0.8637
0.8962
0.9298
0.9644
0.8617
0.8881
0.9151
0.9428
0.9711
650
652
654
656
659
1 524
1 219
914
610
305
0 + 15.0 1013 14.70 29.92 1.0000 1.0000 661 0
- 1 000 + 17.0 1050 15.23 31.02 1.0366 1.0295 664 - 305

Table 1.1 – International Standard Atmosphere
Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight
3
Moisture. In general, most weather hazards that interfere with the operation of aircraft are
associated with water in one of its three states-vapor, liquid, or solid. Water vapor is water in
the gaseous state and is not visible. When water vapor changes into liquid droplets, it
becomes visible as clouds, fog, dew, rain, or drizzle. Some water droplets, remaining in the
liquid state at temperatures well be low freezing, change into ice only when disturbed by an
outside force, such as an aircraft in flight. These water droplets are supercooled and cause
structural icing on aircraft. Water in the solid state appears either as frozen water droplets or
as ice crystals such as snow.
1.3 Altimetry Principles
An altimeter (Figure 1.2) is a manometer, which is calibrated following standard pressure and
temperature laws. The ambient atmospheric pressure is the only input parameter used by the
altimeter.
Assuming the conditions are standard, the “Indicated Altitude” (IA) is the vertical distance
between the following two pressure surface:
- The pressure surface at which the ambient pressure is measured (actual aircraft’s
location), and
- The reference pressure surface, corresponding to the pressure selected by the pilot
through the altimeter’s setting knob.

Figure 1.2 – Altimeter

The pressure setting and the indicated altitude move in the same direction: Any increase in
the pressure setting leads to an increase in the corresponding Indicated Altitude (IA).
The aim of altimetry is to ensure relevant margins, above ground and between aircraft. For
that purpose, different operational pressure settings can be selected through the altimeter’s
pressure setting knob (Figure 1.3):
- QFE is the pressure at the airport reference point. With the QFE setting, the altimeter
indicates the altitude above the airport reference point (if the temperature is
standard).
- QNH is the Mean Sea Level pressure. The QNH is calculated through the
measurement of the pressure at the airport reference point moved to Mean Sea
Level, assuming the standard pressure law. With the QNH setting, the altimeter
indicates the altitude above Mean Sea Level (if temperature is standard).
Consequently, at the airport level in ISA conditions, the altimeter indicates the
topographic altitude of the terrain.
- Standard corresponds to 1013 hPa. With the standard setting, the altimeter indicates
the altitude above the 1013 hPa isobaric surface (if temperature is standard). The aim
is to provide a vertical separation between aircraft while getting rid of the local
pressure variations throughout the flight. After takeoff, crossing a given altitude
referred to as Transition Altitude, the standard setting is selected.

The Flight Level corresponds to the Indicated Altitude in feet divided by 100, provided the
standard setting is selected.
Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance
4


Figure 1.3 – Pressure Altitude and QNH

The Transition Altitude is the indicated altitude above which the standard setting must be
selected by the crew.

The Transition Level is the first available flight level above the transition altitude.
The change between the QNH setting and Standard setting occurs at the transition altitude
when climbing, and at the transition level when descending.
The transition altitude is generally given on the Standard Instrument Departure (SID) charts,
whereas the transition level is usually given by the Air Traffic Control (ATC).
1.4 The Airfoil or Wing
An airfoil (wing, control surface, etc.) is a surface designed to obtain a desirable reaction
from the air through which it moves. Thus, we can say that any part of the aircraft which
converts air resistance into a useful force for flight is an airfoil. The profile of a wing is an
excellent example of an airfoil. The top surface of the wing profile has greater curvature than
the lower surface. The difference in curvature of the upper and lower surfaces of the wing
builds up the lift force. Air flowing over the top surface of the wing must reach the trailing
edge of the wing in the same amount of time as the air flowing under the wing. To do this, the
air passing over the top surface moves at a greater velocity than the air passing below the
wing because of the greater distance it must travel along the top surface. This increased
velocity means a corresponding decrease in pressure on the top surface. Thus a pressure
differential is created between the upper and lower surfaces of the wing, forcing the wing
upward in the direction of the lower pressure.

Bernoulli's principle and lift. Airflow and the useful reaction obtained in the wing configuration
is an application of Bernoulli's principle which states that an increase in the velocity of a fluid
over a surface gives a resultant decrease in pressure on the surface. It is relatively easy to
visualize the decrease in pressure along the top surface of a wing due to the greater
curvature, or camber, as it is also referred to. This lifting force is known as induced lift. Within
limits, lift can be increased by increasing the angle of attack, the wing area, the freestrearn
velocity, or the density of air, or by changing the shape of the airfoil.
Creating induced lift on a wing also creates induced drag, a force that acts rearward and at
90°from the upward force of lift. Within limits, drag can be increased by the same factors that
increase lift, namely, by increasing the angle of attack, the wing area, the freestream velocity,
or the density of air, or by changing the shape of the airfoil.

Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight
5
Chord, Angle of Attack, Center of Pressure. The chord of a wing section is an imaginary
straight line which passes through the section from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The
chord line provides one side of an angle which ultimately forms the angle of attack. The other
side of the angle is formed by a line indicating the direction of the relative wind or airstream.
Thus, angle of attack is defined as the angle between the chord line of the wing and the
direction of the relative wind.
The lift force acts upward while the drag force acts rearward. The sum of these two forces is
called a resultant force. The point of intersection of the resultant force line with the chord line
is the center of pressure.
For small angles of attack, the resultant force is comparatively small. Its direction is upward
and back from the vertical, and its center of pressure is well back from the leading edge of
the wing. At positive angles of attack of three or four degrees, the resultant force attains its
most nearly vertical direction. Either increasing or decreasing the angle of attack causes the
direction of the resultant force to be farther from the vertical.


Figure 1.4 – Chord, Angle of Attack and Center of Pressure

Angle of Zero Lift. The zero angle of attack is normally a negative angle of attack, that is, one
which places the chord line of the airfoil below the line which represents the direction of
relative airstream. The angle of zero lift is obtained when the resultant force line is exactly
parallel to the relative wind line. At this angle, the force acting on the airfoil is entirely drag.
This principle could be demonstrated in a wind tunnel test by holding a wing section at the
angle of zero lift and suddenly releasing it. Upon release of the wing section it would neither
lift nor fall, but would move straight rearward in the direction of the relative wind.

Positive Angle of Attack and Stall. During flight, when the angle of attack is gradually
increased toward a positive angle, the lift component increases rapidly up to a certain point
and then suddenly begins to drop off. During this action the drag component increases slowly
at first and then rapidly as lift begins to drop off. Finally, when the angle of attack increases to
approximately 18°to 20°(on most airfoils) the air can no longer flow smoothly over the top
wing surface because of the excessive change of direction required. This is the stalling angle
of attack, sometimes called the burble point. At this point, turbulent airflow, which appears in
small amounts near the trailing edge of the wing at lower angles of attack, suddenly spreads
forward over the entire upper wing surface. The result is a sudden increase in pressure
above the wing accompanied by a sharp loss of lift and a sudden increase in resistance or
drag. The events that take place at the stalling angle of attack or burble point definitely show
that Bernoulli's principle applies only in a smooth or streamlined airflow and not in turbulent
air. The center of pressure at the point of stall is at its maximum forward position, and, as the
wing stalls, the resultant vector is inclined to the rear.

Angle of Incidence. The angle of incidence of a wing is the angle between the longitudinal
axis and the chord of the wing. This is a permanent angle and is sometimes referred to as
Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance
6
the angle of wing setting. The wing is set at a proper angle with the longitudinal axis of the
airplane so that the wing will provide the lift required at the speed at which the plane will
normally operate and with the least amount of drag. Don't confuse the angle of incidence with
the angle of attack explained earlier. The angle of attack is the angle between the wing chord
and the relative wind, and changes to a positive or negative value during flight.

Figure 1.5 – Angle of Zero Lift and Angle of Maximum Lift

Wing Area and Its Efect on lift. The wing area is measured in square feet and includes the
part of the wing blanked out by the fuselage. Wing area is adequately described as the area
of the shadow cast by the wing at high noon. Lift and drag forces acting on a wing are
roughly proportional to the wing area. This means that if the wing area is doubled, with all
other variables remaining the same, the lift and drag created by the wing are doubled. If the
area is tripled, lift and drag are tripled.

The Airfoil, Turbulence, and Skin Friction. The shape of an airfoil determines the amount of
turbulence or skin friction that it will produce. The shape of a wing consequently affects the
efficiency of the wing. Turbulence and skin friction are controlled mainly by the fineness ratio.
This is defined as the ratio of the chord of the airfoil to the maximum thickness. If the wing
has a high fineness ratio, it is very thin wing. A thick wing has a low fineness ratio. A wing
with high fineness ratio produces a large amount of skin friction and a wing with a low
fineness ratio produces a large amount of turbulence. The best airfoil or wing is a
compromise between these two extremes which holds both turbulence and skin friction to a
minimum.
1.5 Lift and Drag Ratio
The efficiency of a wing is measured in terms of the lift over drag (L/D) ratio. This ratio varies
with the angle of attack but reaches a definite maximum value for some particular angle of
attack. At this peak the wing has reached its maximum efficiency. The shape of the airfoil is
the factor that determines the angle of attack at which the wing is most efficient; it also
determines the amount or degree of efficiency. The most efficient airfoils for general use
have the maximum thickness about one-third of the way back from the leading edge of the
wing.

High-lift wings and High-Lift Devices. These have been developed by shaping the airfoils to
produce the desired effect. The amount of lift produced by an airfoil will increase with an
increase in camber. Camber refers to the curvature of an airfoil above and below the chord
line surface. Upper camber refers to the upper surface, lower camber to the lower surface,
Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight
7
and mean camber to the mean line of the section. Camber is positive when departure from
the chord line is outward and negative when the chord line is inward. High-lift wings have a
large positive camber on the upper surface and a slight negative camber on the lower
surface. Wing flaps cause an ordinary wing to approximate this same condition by increasing
the upper camber and by creating a negative lower camber.

Aircraft Velocity effect on Lift and Drag. The wing or airfoil shape cannot be effective unless it
is continually attacking new air. Lift and drag of a wing is proportional to the square of the
velocity. An aircraft traveling 400 mph has four times as much lift as one traveling 200 mph
when the angle of attack and other factors remain the same. It is impossible to travel in level
flight and maintain the same angle of attack when the speed is increased. Lift also increases
at the same time, and the aircraft climbs, or else it will carry a greater load without climbing.
For each angle of attack, an aircraft has a definite speed at which it will fly straight and level.

Lift, Drag, and Air Density. Lift and drag vary directly with the density of the air. When the
density is doubled, lift and drag are also doubled, and vice versa. At an altitude of 18,000 feet
(MSL), the air density is only one-half its sea-level value. In order to maintain sea-level lift
and drag conditions at 18,000 feet (MSL), the aircraft must be flown at a greater true
airspeed for any given angle of attack.

Aircraft operation and Lift/Drag Ratio Aircraft will operate most efficiently at the angle of
attack at which the maximum L/D value occurs.

The angle of attack at which an aircraft flies in level flight depends upon its airspeed and
gross weight. That is, for a given gross weight there is one, and only one, airspeed which will
cause the aircraft to fly at a given angle of attack. When the airspeed is controlled in such a
way as to maintain the most efficient angle of attack, the aircraft is able to fly its maximum
range.

Figure 1.6 – Lift and Drag Ratio
Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance
8
Configuration and drag items The shape or contour of an object is referred to as its
configuration. When an aircraft is equipped with some items that extend into the airstream or
affects the slipstream, this item affects the drag configuration of the aircraft and these items
are referred to as drag items. Drag items include cowl flaps, oil cooler, intercooler flaps,
deicer boots, etc. All of them affect the drag of the aircraft in flight.

Wing Loading. An important function of airplane aerodynamics is the wing loading value
under various configurations of flight. Wing loading is the weight of the airplane in pounds
divided by the wing area in square feet. It is the average weight each square foot of the wing
must support. Wing loading varies with the weight and area of the wing in various airplanes,
and is an important consideration in the airplane design. Wing loading progressively
increases on a given airplane as the load is increased. Increasing speed and maneuvers
increases the load factors or g's. A certain limitation must be established in order not to
overstress the structure during high aircraft loading and high speed. Maneuvers must be kept
within limitations.

Mean aerodynamic chord (MAC). Aerodynamically, the MAC is the mean line between the
upper and lower surface of the airfoil. It is also described as the average length of the wing
chord. The MAC is found by dividing the wing area by the aerodynamic span. The mean air
chord of the wing is used as a reference line for the location of the relative positions of the
wing center of lift and the airplane center of gravity. For weight and balance purposes the
MAC is generally described as the straightline distance from leading edge of the wing
(LEMAC) to the trailing edge of the wing (TEMAC) as measured along the longitudinal axis.

The mean aerodynamic chord is used in loading procedures to determine the static balance
and stability of the airplane.

Figure 1.7 – Low Speed Drag Polar
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9
1.6 Axes of the Airplane in Flight
Whenever the attitude of the airplane changes in flight (with respect to the ground or other
fixed object) it will rotate about one or more of three axes. These axes can be thought of as
imaginary axles around which the airplane turns like a wheel. The three axes intersect at the
center of gravity, and each is perpendicular to the other two.

Longitudinal Axis: an imaginary line that extends lengthwise through the fuselage from nose
to tail. Motion about the longitudinal axis is called roll, and is produced by movement of the
ailerons at the trailing edge of the wing outboard.

Lateral Axis: the imaginary line which extends crosswise from wing tip to wing tip. Motion
about the lateral axis is pitch, and is produced by movement of the elevator at the rear of the
horizontal tail assembly.

Vertical Axis: an imaginary line which passes vertically through the center of gravity. Motion
about the vertical axis is yaw, and is produced by movement of the rudder at the rear of the
vertical tail assembly.
1.7 Airplane Control Surfaces
Ailerons. There are two ailerons, one at the outer trailing edge of each wing, raised or
lowered by the pilot as he moves the wheel in the cockpit to the right or left. The ailerons
control movement of the airplane about the longitudinal axis. This movement is roll, and can
be described as rolling or banking about the longitudinal axis. The aileron controls are so
arranged that when the aileron of one wing is lowered the aileron of the other wing is raised.
The wing with the lowered aileron goes up because of its increased lift, and the wing with the
raised aileron goes down because of its decreased lift. Thus movement of the ailerons
induces a bank or roll attitude about the longitudinal axis. When pressure is applied to the
right on the control wheel, the left aileron goes down and the right aileron goes up, rolling the
airplane to the right. This occurs because the down movement of the left aileron increases
the wing camber (curvature) and thus increases the angle of attack. The right aileron moves
upward and decreases the camber, resulting in a decreased angle of attack. It can be seen
that decreased lift on the right wing and increased lift on the left wing will cause a roll or bank
attitude to the right or clockwise around the longitudinal axis. When pressure is applied to the
left on the control wheel, the right aileron goes down and the left aileron goes up, rolling the
airplane to the left. The lift is now greater on the right wing and less on the left wing, inducing
a roll or bank to the left, or counterclockwise around the longitudinal axis.

Elevators. The elevators control the movement of the airplane about its lateral axis. This
motion, pitch, causes the nose to move up or down as in a climb or glide. The elevators,
which form the rear part of the horizontal tail assembly, are free to swing up or down and are
hinged to a fixed surface, the horizontal stabilizer. Together, the horizontal stabilizer and the
elevators form a single airfoil. A change in position of the elevators modifies the camber of
the airfoil, which increases or decreases lift.
Like the ailerons, the elevators are connected to the control wheel. When forward pressure is
applied on the wheel, the elevators move downward. This increases the lift produced by the
horizontal tail surfaces. This in turn increases lift forces on the tail section and moves it
upward, causing the nose to move downward. Conversely, when back pressure is applied on
the wheel, the elevators move upward, decreasing the lift produced by the horizontal tail
surfaces (or producing a downward force). The tail is forced downward and the nose moves
upward.
The elevators control the angle of attack of the wings. When back pressure is applied on the
control wheel, the tail lowers and the nose raises, increasing the angle of attack. This in turn
increases wing lift and the airplane assumes a climb attitude. When forward pressure is
applied on the control wheel, the tail raises and the nose lowers, decreasing the angle of
attack. This in turn decreases the wing lift and the airplane assumes a glide or dive attitude.
Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance
10

Figure 1.8 – Flight Control Surfaces

Rudder. The rudder controls movement of the airplane about its vertical axis. This motion,
yaw, is the action of the airplane nose moving from right to left. The rudder is a movable
control surface hinged to the vertical stabilizer or fin. Its action is much like the elevators
except that it swings in a different plane-from side to side instead of up and down.

Trim Tabs. Trim tabs are used to keep the aircraft in the desired trim. They are relatively
small, adjustable hinged surfaces located on the trailing edge of the aileron, rudder, or
elevator control surfaces. Airplanes may have trim tabs on the trailing edge of all three
control surfaces or, as in the case of some light airplanes, trim tabs may be installed on only
one or two of the control surfaces. Trim tabs may also be of the fixed type that can be
adjusted on the ground only.

The trim tab is moved in the direction opposite that of the primary control surface to relieve
pressure on the control wheel or rudder pedals. Consider the situation, for example, in which
the pilot wishes to adjust the elevator trim for level flight (i.e., that attitude of the airplane that
will maintain a constant altitude). Assume that backpressure is required on the control wheel
to maintain level flight and that the pilot wants to adjust the elevator trim tab to relieve this
pressure. Since he is holding back-pressure, the elevator will be in the up position. The trim
tab must then be adjusted downward so that the airflow striking the tab will hold the elevators
in the desired position. Conversely, if forward pressure is being held the elevators will be in
the down position, so the trim tab must be moved upward to relieve this pressure. In this
example the pilot is concerned with the tab itself and not the cockpit control. Should the pilot
wish to trim for a noseheavy condition, as in the first example, he would move the cockpit
control toward nose-up. This movement of the cockpit control moves the elevator trim tabs
down, which in turn moves the elevator up. The change in airflow on the horizontal elevator
results in a high pressure above and a low pressure below, which moves the tail section
downward. This in turn causes the nose of the plane to move upward for the desired trim
attitude. Because the center of gravity of the airplane is located at approximately the
intersection of the longitudinal, vertical, and lateral axes, the nose of the airplane moves in
the direction opposite to any induced movement of the tail section.

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11
When the pilot moves the cockpit control toward nose-down, the trim tab moves up and the
elevator down, creating an upward force on the tail and a downward motion of the nose of
the plane.

Rudder and aileron trim tabs operate in the same manner as the elevator trim tabs-to relieve
pressure on the rudder pedals and sideward pressure on the control wheel, respectively.

Wing Flaps. Sometimes referred to as high-lift devices, wing flaps are an airfoil or a portion of
an airfoil attached to the trailing edge of the wing for the purpose of changing the wing
camber. In down position, wing flaps increase the wing camber (in some cases the wing area
also) thus creating an increase in the effective lift of the wing. During the landing maneuver,
with the flaps down, the angle of glide is steepened and the length of the flight path is
decreased, while at the same time the airspeed is reduced for a slower landing speed. On
takeoff, with flaps down, the wing lift is increased at a slower takeoff speed and the angle of
climb is increased, effecting a safe takeoff in a shorter distance along the runway.
On landing, when the wing has lost its lift, the flaps act effectively as an air brake to decrease
the length of the roll on the ground. When the flap is placed in down position, lift is increased
but also the wing drag. In flight the flap constitutes an effective airbrake which affords a
steeper descent for landing without an increase in airspeed. This is of great importance when
approaching small fields (short runways), and especially so when there are obstructions to be
cleared.

When flaps are up or in the retracted position, they have no effect upon the lift characteristics
of the wing.

Stated briefly, the advantages of flaps are:
- Higher lift coefficient, which permits a lower speed in landing, a steeper glide angle
over obstructions, and a shorter landing roll.
- Higher drag coefficient, which permits their use as an airbrake in flight and on the
ground.
- Steeper climbs and glides at reduced airspeed.
- More accurate landings, especially into small fields where obstructions may be a
hazard to flight.
- Increased angle of attack before burble point and the resultant stall are reached.

Wing Slots. An additional way to increase lift and consequently reduce landing speeds is by
preventing the wing from burbling until a greater angle of attack is reached. The automatic
slot accomplishes this advantage. It consists of an auxiliary airfoil housed in the leading edge
of the wing at low angles of attack but free to move forward a definite distance therefrom at
high angles to form a flat nozzle or slot through which a portion of the airstream flows to be
deflected along the upper surface of the wing. The airstream that is deflected along the upper
surface maintains a streamline flow of air to a higher angle of attack and delays the burble
point occurrence. The burble point, in fact, will not be reached until the angle of attack is
nearly double that of a normal stall. It is obvious that lift is improved at angles where the slot
is open and the maximum Coefficient of Lift (C
L
) is not only larger but occurs at a much
higher angle of attack. Consequently, the airplane with slotted wings will have a much lower
stalling speed than one that is not so equipped. The slotted wing is also an effective agent for
securing lateral stability and avoiding unintentional spins.

Slots in the leading edge of the wing may not be of the automatic type. In this case the slot is
simply an opening in the leading edge of the wing that has no means of being closed. At
normal angles of attack the air flows over the wing as usual, but at higher angles of attack the
air flows through the fixed slot or opening and has the same effect on airflow over the upper
surface of the wing as does the automatic slot.

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12
Airplanes may, in some instances, be equipped with a combination of slots and flaps. This
type of installation has many advantages. It permits a much lower landing speed and better
control of the flight path, and it helps to eliminate nose heaviness caused by the use of flaps
alone.
1.8 Loads and Loadfactor
A load factor of one (or one “g”) occurs in straight and level flight when the wings support a
weight equal to the airplane and all of its contents. The load on the wings will remain
constant so long as the airplane is moving at a constant airspeed in a straight line. When the
airplane assumes a curved flight path (all types of turns and pullout from dives) the actual
load on the wings will be much greater be cause of the centrifugal force produced by the
curved flight. This additional load results in the development of much greater stresses in the
wing structure. The lift of the wing must offset centrifugal force on an aircraft in a coordinated
turn.

Airplane strength is measured basically by the total load the wings are capable of carrying
without permanent damage. The load imposed on the wings depends very largely upon the
type of flight being conducted. Additional loads on the wings during flight increase the wing
loading (the weight supported by each square foot of the wing). Wing loading can be
determined by dividing the total square-foot area of the wing by the total weight of the
airplane. Obviously, wing loading will be less in straight and level flight than it will be in
maneuvers where centrifugal force is literally increasing the weight of the airplane.

The load factor is the actual load on the wings at any time, divided by the normal or basic
load (weight of the airplane). A turn is produced by lift of the wing pulling the airplane from its
straight course while overcoming gravity. In this case the wings must produce lift equal to the
weight of the airplane plus the centrifugal force caused by the turn. The increased lift is
normally obtained by increasing the angle of attack (increasing the back pressure on the
control wheel). When the airplane bank steepens, this back pressure on the wheel increases,
and centrifugal force builds up. Any time the airplane flies in a curved flight path, the load
supported by the wings is greater than the weight of the airplane. Thus the load factor
increases. In level flight the load factor is 1.00; in a 20°bank it is 1.06; in a 40°bank it is
1.31; in a 60°bank it is 2.00; and at 80°it increases to 5.76.
For each airplane there is a maximum load factor that should not be exceeded in flight. The
pilot should have the basic information necessary to fly the airplane safely within its structural
limitations. Pilots should be familiar with the situations in which the load factor may approach
maximum, and avoid them in flight. It is important to know the right recovery technique for the
airplane you are flying so that if you inadvertently exceed the permissible load factor in such
maneuvers as dives and steep descending spirals you can minimize the hazards.

The feeling of increased body weight is one indication of a load factor increase. When the
load on the wing increases, the effective weight of the pilot increases. This added weight can
easily be sensed and is a fairly reliable guide to indicate increases in load up to twice the
normal (load factor of 2). When the load approaches three times normal, the pilot notices a
sensation of blood draining from his head and a tendency of his cheeks to sag. Even greater
increases in load may cause the pilot to "dim out" or "black out," with a temporary loss of
vision.

Effect of turbulence on load factors. An additional cause of large load factors is severe
vertical gusts. Severe or strong vertical gusts can cause a sudden increase in the angle of
attack. This results in large wing loads which are resisted by the inertia of the airplane. If
severe turbulence is encountered in flight, the airplane should be immediately slowed down
to the maneuvering speed (found in the airplane operating manual), or less, since the
airplane is designed and constructed to withstand such disturbance at this (the maneuvering)
speed. As a general requirement, all airplanes must be capable of withstanding a gust of
Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight
13
about plus or minus 30 feet per second at maximum level flight speed for normal rated
power. A gust of such intensity occurs infrequently in ordinary flight operations.

The pilot and load factors. During flight the pilot recognizes the degree of a maneuver from
the inertia forces produced by various load factors; the airplane structure senses the degree
of a maneuver principally by the airloads involved. In other words, the pilot recognizes load
factor while the structure recognizes only load.

Speed and load factors. In general, the amount of excess load that can be imposed on the
wing depends on how fast the airplane is flying. At slow speeds the available lifting force of
the wing is only slightly more than the amount necessary to support the weight of the
airplane. Consequently the load cannot become excessive even if the controls are moved
abruptly or the airplane encounters severe gusts. At high speeds, however, the lifting
capacity of the wing (lift increases as the square of the velocity increases) is so great that a
sudden movement of the controls or a strong gust may increase the load beyond safe limits.
Due to this relationship between speed and safety, certain "maximum" speeds have been
established for various airplanes. Every airplane is restricted in the speeds at which it can
safely execute maneuvers and fly in rough air.

Clear Air Turbulence (CAT). Load factors and excessive stresses on the aircraft may occur in
areas of CAT. Extreme wind shear areas (8 knots per 1,000 feet) may cause clear air
turbulence, which is the bumpiness sometimes experienced while flying in cloudless skies at
high altitudes. This bumpiness may be of sufficient intensity to cause serious stresses on the
aircraft and physical discomfort to the crew and passengers. CAT is generally associated
with changing wind velocities with height (vertical wind shear) in and near the maximum wind
speed core of a jet stream. When a pilot encounters significant CAT, he should change
altitude to avoid the strong wind shear and follow procedures established in the specific
operating manual for flight in turbulent air.
1.9 Stability
An aircraft must have satisfactory handling qualities in addition to adequate performance. It
must be stable enough to maintain straight and level flight, and recover from the various
disturbing influences.

It is necessary to provide sufficient stability to minimize the work of the pilot. The aircraft must
have proper response to the controls so that it can achieve its inherent performance. There
are certain conditions of flight which provide the most critical requirements of stability and
control, and these conditions must be understood and respected to accomplish safe, efficient
operation.

Static Stability. An aircraft is in a state of equilibrium when the sum of all forces and all
moments is equal to zero. When an aircraft is in equilibrium there are no accelerations and
the aircraft continues in steady flight. If the equilibrium is disturbed by a gust or deflection of
the controls, the aircraft will experience acceleration due to the imbalance of moment force.
The static stability of an aircraft system is defined by the initial tendency of the aircraft to
return to equilibrium following some disturbance from that equilibrium. If an aircraft is
disturbed from equilibrium and has the tendency to return to it, positive static stability exists.
If the aircraft has a tendency to continue in the direction of the disturbance, negative static
stability, or static instability, exists. An intermediate condition could occur where an aircraft
displaced from equilibrium remains in equilibrium in the displaced position. If an aircraft
subject to a disturbance has neither the tendency to return nor the tendency to continue in
the displaced direction, neutral static stability exists.
The term "static" is applied to this form of stability since the resulting motion is not
considered-only the tendency to return to equilibrium. The static longitudinal stability of an
aircraft can be recognized by displacing the aircraft from some trimmed angle of attack. If the
Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance
14
aerodynamic pitching moments created by this displacement tend to return the aircraft to the
equilibrium angle of attack, the aircraft has positive static longitudinal stability.


Figure 1.9 – Static Stability

Dynamic Stability. Static stability is concerned with the tendency of a displaced aircraft to
return to equilibrium. Dynamic stability, on the other hand, is defined by the resulting motion
with time. If an aircraft is disturbed from equilibrium, the time history of the resulting motion
indicates the dynamic stability of the system. In general, the aircraft will demonstrate positive
dynamic stability if the amplitude of motion decreases with time.
When an aircraft is disturbed, the reduction of amplitude with time indicates that there is
resistance to motion and that energy is being dissipated. The dissipation or "damping effect"
is necessary to provide positive dynamic stability.

All aircraft must demonstrate the required degree of static and dynamic stability. If an aircraft
were allowed to have static instability with a rapid rate of divergence, the aircraft would be
very difficult, if not impossible, to fly. In addition positive dynamic stability is mandatory in
certain areas to preclude objectionable continued oscillations of the aircraft.
1.9.1 Motions of the Airplane
Pitching: motion about the lateral axis. Stability in pitching is called longitudinal stability
because it involves changes in inclination of the longitudinal axis in a vertical plane with no
motion about the longitudinal or vertical axis.

Rolling or Banking: motion about the longitudinal axis. Stability in rolling or banking is called
lateral stability because it involves changes in direction of the lateral axis with no motion
about the lateral or vertical axis.

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15
Yawing: motion about the vertical axis. Stability in yaw gives directional stability because it
involves changes in direction of the longitudinal axis in a horizontal plane with no motion
about the longitudinal or lateral axes.

A given airplane may be stable about one axis and unstable about the other two axes, or
stable about two axes and unstable about the third. When a statement is made that an
airplane is stable or unstable, the statement should be qualified by stating whether the
stability or instability is longitudinal, lateral, or directional.

Aspect Ratio of the Wing. The aspect ratio of a wing is the ratio of the span to the mean
chord; that is, the ratio of the square of the span to the total area of the wing. For practical
purposes, the span of a wing is the maximum transverse distance normal to the relative wind
or the distance between the wing tips. The span, therefore, determines the amount of air
acted upon, and hence is an important factor in the production of lift by a given wing area.
For an airfoil of rectangular plan form the ratio of span to chord is the aspect ratio. Thus an
airfoil having a wing span of 40 feet and a chord of 8 feet would have an aspect ratio of 5 (40
- 8). Very seldom, however, is an airfoil actually rectangular in plan form, owing to the use of
tapered wings, various tip shapes, etc. Consequently, the aspect ratio is defined as the span
squared, divided by the wing area.

If the airfoil were of infinite span the airflow would be direct from leading edge to trailing edge
because there could be no way for the streamlines below the wing surface to flow from this
area of relatively high pressure to that of reduced pressure above the wing. Since the airfoil
is of finite area and span, air on the underside seeks the low pressure region above by
spilling over the wing tips. Vortices or eddies are thus formed at the tips, and they tend to
create a trailing whirlpool of air that may be hazardous to other aircraft that fly into its area of
turbulence. The larger and faster the airplane, the greater the turbulence and area effected
by these wing-tip vortices. This tip vortex increases the drag because of the turbulence which
absorbs energy. In addition, the vortices reduce lift by destroying the section forces of the
airstream above the airfoil and close to the tips. Since these eddies are unavoidable in the
standard wing configuration, the only recourse is to reduce their effect as much as possible.
This is accomplished by increasing the aspect ratio of the wing, creating a wing that is as
long and narrow as possible within structural considerations.

Dihedral of the wing. The principal surface contributing to the lateral stability of an airplane is
the wing. The effect of dihedral of a wing is a powerful contribution to lateral stability, and it
permits stable rolling or banking moments. Visually, dihedral is the apparent upward angle of
the wing from the root source to the wing tips when compared to the horizontal plane.
Dihedral is especially valuable during sideslip maneuvers. If the relative wind comes from the
side, the wing into the wind is subject to an increase in lift. The wing away from the wind is
subject to a decrease in angle of attack and develops a decrease in lift. The changes in lift
effect a rolling moment tending to raise the windward wing. Dihedral thus contributes a stable
roll owing to sideslip.

Since wing dihedral is so powerful in producing lateral stability it is taken as a common
denominator of the lateral stability contributions of all other components. Generally, the
contribution of wing position, flaps, power, etc., is expressed as an equivalent amount of
"effective dihedral" or "dihedral effect."

Sweepback of the wing. Sweepback contributes to the directional stability or weathercock
stability of an aircraft. The wing into the wind has less sweep and a slight increase in drag;
the wing away from the wind has more sweep and less drag. The net effect of these force
changes is to produce a yawing moment tending to return the nose of the aircraft into the
relative wind. This directional stability is usually small but is of some importance to the overall
stability of the aircraft.

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16
Sweepback contributes to lateral stability in the same sense as dihedral. When the swept
wing is placed in a sideslip, the wing into the wind experiences an increase in lift since the
sweep is less and the wing away from the wind produces less lift since the sweep is greater.
The swept wing in a slideslip thus experiences lift changes and a subsequent rolling moment
which tends to right the aircraft. This lateral stability contribution depends on the sweepback
and the lift coefficient of the wing.
1.10 High-Speed Aerodynamics
The study of aerodynamics at low flight speeds is greatly simplified by the fact that air may
experience relatively small changes in pressure with only negligible changes in density. This
airflow is termed incompressible since the air may undergo changes in pressure without
apparent changes in density. Such a condition of airflow is similar to the flow of water,
hydraulic fluid, or any other incompressible fluid. At high speeds in flight the pressure
changes that take place are quite large, and significant changes in air density occur. The
study of airflow at high speeds must account for these changes in air density and must
consider that the air is compressible and that there will be "compressibility effects."

A factor of great importance in the study of high speed airflow is the Speed of Sound. The
speed of sound may be given in units of feet per second (fps), knots, or miles per hour (mph).
The speed of sound is the rate at which small pressure disturbances win be propagated
through the air; this propagation speed is a function solely of temperature.
The speed of sound in knots can be obtained from the following equation, where u is the
temperature ratio T/T
0
:
θ 661.4786 a =
The ratio of the true airspeed to the speed of sound is called Mach Number:
a
V
M
TAS
=
When an object moves through the air mass, velocity and pressure changes occur which
create pressure disturbances in the airflow surrounding the object. Of course, these pressure
disturbances are propagated through the air at the speed of sound. If the object is travelling
at low speed the pressure disturbances are propagated ahead of the object, and the airflow
immediately ahead of the object is influenced by the pressure field on the object. Actually
these pressure disturbances are transmitted in all directions and extend indefinitely in all
directions. Evidence of this "pressure warning" is seen in the typical subsonic flow pattern
illustration, Figure 1.10, which shows upwash and flow direction change well ahead of the
leading edge.

Figure 1.10 – Subsonic Flow Pattern

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17
If the object is travelling at some speed above the speed of sound, the airflow ahead of the
object will not be influenced by the pressure field on the object since pressure disturbances
cannot be propagated ahead of the object. Thus as the flight speed nears the speed of sound
a compression wave will form at the leading edge and all changes in velocity and pressure
will take place quite sharply and suddenly. The airflow ahead of the object is not influenced
until the air particles are suddenly forced out of the way by the concentrated pressure wave
set up by the object. Evidence of this phenomenon is seen in the typical supersonic flow
pattern illustration, Figure 1.11.

Figure 1.11 – Supersonic Flow Pattern

It is to be noted that compressibility effects are not limited to flight speeds at and above the
speed of sound. Since any aircraft will have some aerodynamic shape and will be developing
lift, there will be local flow velocities on the surfaces which are greater than the flight speed.
Thus an aircraft can experience compressibility effects at flight speeds well below the speed
of sound. Since there is the possibility of having both subsonic and supersonic flows existing
on the aircraft it is convenient to define certain regimes of flight, approximately, as follows:
- Subsonic-Mach numbers below 0.75
- Transonic-Mach numbers from 0.75 to 1.20
- Supersonic-Mach numbers from 1.20 to 5.00
- Hypersonic-Mach numbers above 5.00

The principal differences between subsonic and supersonic flow are owing to the
compressibility of the supersonic flow.

Transonic and Supersonic flight. Any object in subsonic flight which has some definite
thickness or is producing lift will have local velocities on the surface which are greater than
the free-stream velocity. Hence, compressibility effects can be expected to occur at flight
speeds less than the speed of sound. The transonic realm of flight provides the opportunity
for mixed subsonic and supersonic flow, and accounts for the first significant effects of
compressibility.

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In the illustration, a conventional airfoil shape is shown. If this airfoil is in flight at Mach 0.50
and at a slight positive angle of attack, the maximum local velocity on the surface will be
greater than the flight speed but most likely less than sonic speed. Assume that an increase
in Mach number to 0.72 would produce first evidence of local sonic flow. This would be the
highest flight speed possible without supersonic flow, and would be termed the critical Mach
number. Thus, critical Mach number is the boundary between subsonic and transonic flight
and is an important point of reference for all compressibility effects encountered in transonic
flight. By definition, critical Mach number is the free-stream Mach number which produces
first evidence of local sonic flow. Therefore, shock waves, buffet, airflow separation, etc., all
take place above critical Mach number.

Phenomena of Transonic flight. The Mach number which produces a sharp change in the
drag coefficient is termed the force divergence Mach number and for most airfoils usually
exceeds the critical Mach number at least 5%. This condition is also referred to as "drag
divergence" or "drag rise."

Associated with the "drag rise" are buffet, trim, and stability changes, and a decrease in
control surface effectiveness. Conventional aileron, rudder, and elevator surfaces subjected
to this high frequency buffet may "buzz," and changes in hinge moments may produce
undesirable control forces. When the buffet is quite severe and prolonged, structural damage
could occur if the operation were in violation of operating limitations. When airflow separation
occurs on the wing as a result of shock wave formation, there will be a loss of lift and
subsequent loss of downwash aft of the affected area. If the wings shock unevenly because
of physical-shape differences or sideslip, a rolling moment will be created in the direction of
the initial loss of lift and will contribute to control difficulty ("wing drop").

If the shock-induced separation occurs symetrically near the wing root, a decrease in
downwash behind this area is a corollary of the loss of lift. A decrease in downwassh on the
horizontal tail will create a diving moment and the aircraft will "tuck under." When these
conditions occur on a swept-wing planform, the wing center of pressure shift contributes to
tile trim change-root shock first moves the wing center of pressure aft and adds to the diving
moment; shock formation at the wing tips moves the center of pressure forward, and the
resulting climbing moment and the tail-downwash--change can contribute to "pitch up."

Since most of the difficulties of transonic flight are associated with shock wave induced flow
separation, any means of delaying or alleviating the shock induced separation will improve
the aerodynamic characteristics. An aircraft configuration may utilize thin surfaces of low
aspect ratio with sweepback to delay and reduce the magnitude of transonic force
divergence. In addition, various methods of boundary layer control, high lift devices, vortex
generators, etc., may be applied to improve transonic characteristics. For example, the
application of vortex generators to a surface can produce higher local surface velocities and
increase the kinetic energy of the boundary layer. Thus a more severe pressure gradient
(stronger shock wave) will be necessary to produce airflow separation.

Phenomena of Supersonic flight. The airplane configuration must have aerodynamic shapes
which will have low drag in compressible flow. Generally, this will require airfoil sections of
low thickness ratio and sharp leading edges and body shapes of high fineness ratio to wave
drag. Because of the aft movement of with supersonic flow, the increase in static will demand
effective, powerful control surfaces controllability for supersonic maneuvering.

The aircraft powerplants for supersonic flight must be of relatively high-thrust output. Also, it
is necessary to provide the air-breathing powerplant with special inlet configurations which
will slow the airflow to subsonic speed prior to reaching the compressor face or combustion
chamber. Aerodynamic heating of supersonic flight can provide critical inlet temperatures for
the gas turbine engine as well as critical structural temperatures.

Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight
19

Figure 1.12 – Transsonic Flow Pattern

Control surfaces for transonic and supersonic flight. Trailing-edge control surfaces can be
affected adversely by the shock waves formed in flight above critical Mach number. If the
airflow is separated by the shock wave, the resulting buffet of the control surface can be quite
objectionable. In addition to the buffet of the surface, the change in the pressure distribution
traceable to separation and the shock wave location can create very large changes in control
surface hinge moments. Such large changes in hinge moments create very undesirable
control forces and present the need for an "irreversible" control system. An irreversible
control system employs powerful hydraulic or electric actuators to move the surfaces upon
control by the pilot, and the airloads developed on the surface can not feed back to the pilot.
Of course, suitable control forces would be synthesized by bungees, "q" springs, bobweights,
etc.

Trailing edge control surface. The reduction in effectiveness of the trailing edge control
surface at transonic and supersonic speeds necessitates the use of an all-movable surface.
Application of the all-movable control surface to the horizontal tail is most usual since the
Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance
20
increase in longitudinal stability in supersonic flight requires a high degree of control
effectiveness to achieve required controllability for supersonic maneuvering.

Figure 1.13 – High Speed Drag Polar
1.10.1 Aerodynamic Heating
When air flows over any aerodynamic surface, certain reductions in velocity occur with
corresponding increases in temperature. The greatest reduction in velocity and increase in
temperature will occur at the various stagnation points on the aircraft. Similar changes occur
at other points on the aircraft, of course, but these temperatures can be related to the ram
temperature rise at the stagnation point. While subsonic flight does not produce temperatures
of any real concern, supersonic flight can produce temperatures high enough to be of major
importance to the airframe and powerplant structure.

Higher temperatures produce definite reductions in the strength of aluminum alloy and
require the use of titanium alloys, stainless steels, etc., at very high temperatures. Continued
exposure at elevated temperatures effects further reduction of strength and magnifies the
problems of "creep" failure and structural stiffness.

In high-speed aerodynamics, high flight speeds and compressible flow dictate airplane
configurations which are much different from those of the ordinary subsonic airplane. To
achieve safe and efficient flight operations, the pilot of modem high-speed aircraft must
understand and appreciate the advantages and disadvantages of the configuration. A
knowledge of such fundamentals of high-speed aerodynamics as the foregoing will contribute
much to that understanding.
Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight
21
1.10.2 RAT-SAT-TAT
Air temperature is one of the basic parameters used to establish airplane performance data.
In a static condition, air temperature is relatively easy to measure using a common mercury
thermometer. However, air temperature in flight is affected by adiabatic compression of the
boundary layer air slowing down or stopping in relationship to the airplane. This compression
results in a temperature increase which is commonly referred to as "Ram Rise". The ram rise,
due to full adiabatic compression, may be calculated mathematically as a function of Mach
number.

Static Air Temperature (SAT) is the ambient air temperature. This temperature is often called
Outside Air Temperature (OAT) and is the temperature of the undisturbed or free air (no ram
rise).

It is the temperature most difficult to measure accurately in flight because all temperature
sensors are affected to some degrees by ram rise. Therefore, either the ram rise is obtained
from a chart and subtracted from the instrument reading, or some mechanical means is used
in the temperature measuring system to cancel the ram rise and give a corrected signal to
the instrument. RAT is the commonly used abbreviation of Ram Air Temperature. RAT is
equal to the ambient air temperature plus some ram rise. The proportion of ram rise is
dependent on the ability of the equipment to sense or recover the adiabatic temperature
increase. The sensitivity of the equipment to ram rise is expressed as a percentage which is
called the "recovery factor". If a particular temperature sensor has a recovery factor of 0.80,
the sensor will measure the ambient air temperature plus 80 percent of the ram rise.

RAT will equal SAT when the airplane is stationary. For all practical purposes, the ram rise
may be considered negligible until speeds above 0.30 Mach are reached.

TAT is Total Air Temperature. This temperature is equal to ambient air temperature plus all of
the ram rise. In other words, total air temperature is equal to ram air temperature when the
recovery factor of the temperature sensor is equal to 1.00.
TAT can be obtained by the following equation:
( )
2
0.2KM 1 SAT TAT + =
where:
TAT = Total Air Temperature in Kelvin
SAT = Static Air Temperature in Kelvin
M = Mach Number
K = Probe Recovery Factor
1.11 Airspeeds
1.11.1 Definitions
Indicated Airspeed, VI, IAS - Airspeed indicator reading, as installed in the airplane,
uncorrected for static source position error (assumes zero instrument error).

Calibrated Airspeed, Vc, CAS - Indicated airspeed corrected for static source position error
(Vc = VI + AVp).

Equivalent Airspeed, Ve, EAS - Calibrated airspeed corrected for compressibility (Ve = Vc -
AVc),

True Airspeed, VT , TAS - Equivalent airspeed corrected for atmospheric density effects (VT
= Ve/ ρ ).

Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance
22
True Mach Number, M - Machmeter reading, as installed in the airplane, corrected for static
source position error.
1.12 Forces Acting on the Airplane
Force is defined as any action that tends to produce, retard, or modify motion. The sea or
ocean of air through which aircraft fly has mass and inertia and is capable of exerting forces
on any object moving through it. There are four forces which act on an aircraft as the result of
air resistance, gravity, friction, and other factors. These forces are:
- thrust-the force the aircraft exerts on the air when moving forward;
- drag-the force that acts in opposition to thrust;
- lift-the force that exerts an upward sustentation on the aircraft; and
- gravity (or weight) - the force that tends to pull the aircraft toward the earth; in effect,
a force opposite to lift.

If all four forces were equal, the aircraft would be in a state of equilibrium. This is, of course,
a theoretical conclusion, but in level, unaccelerated flight thrust will equal drag and lift will
equal gravity.

Figure 1.14 – Forces Acting on the Airplane
1.13 Straight and Level Flight
All of the principal items of flight performance involve steady-state flight conditions and
equilibrium of the airplane. For the airplane to remain in steady level flight, equilibrium must
be obtained by a lift equal to the airplane weight and a powerplant thrust equal to the airplane
drag. Thus, the airplane drag defines the thrust required to maintain steady level flight.

All parts of the airplane that are exposed to the air contribute to the drag, though only the
wings provide lift of any significance. For this reason, and certain others related to it, the total
drag may be divided into two parts, the wing drag (induced) and the drag of everything but
the wings (parasite).

The total power required for flight then can be considered as the sum of induced and parasite
effects; that is, the total drag of the airplane. Parasite drag is the sum of pressure and friction
drag which is due to the airplane's, basic configuration and, as defined, is independent of lift.
Induced drag is the undesirable but unavoidable consequence of the development of lift.

While the parasite drag predominates at high speed, induced drag predominates at low
speed. For example, if an airplane in a steady flight condition at 100 knots is then
Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight
23
accelerated to 200 knots, the parasite drag becomes four times as great but the power
required to overcome that drag is eight times the original value.
Conversely, when the airplane is operated in steady level flight at twice as great a speed, the
induced drag is one-fourth the original value and the power required to overcome that drag is
only onehalf the original value.
The wing or induced drag changes with speed in a very different way, because of the
changes in the angle of attack. Near the stalling speed the wing is inclined to the relative
wind at nearly the stalling angle, and its drag is very strong. But at ordinary flying speeds,
with the angle of attack nearly zero, the wing cuts through the air almost like a knife, and the
drag is minimal. After attaining a certain high speed, the angle of attack changes very little
with any further increase in speed and the drag of the wing increase in direct proportion to
any further increase in speed. This does not consider the factor of compressibility drag.
To sum up these changes, for a typical, airplane: As the speed increases from stalling speed
to top speed, the induced drag decreases and parasite drag increases. As a result the total
drag decreases for the first part of the range and then increases again.

When the airplane is in steady, level flight, the condition of equilibrium must prevail. The
unaccelerated condition of flight is achieved with the airplane trimmed for lift equal to weight
and the powerplant set for a thrust to equal the airplane drag.

The maximum level flight speed for the airplane will be obtained when the power or thrust
required equals the maximum thrust available from the powerplant. The minimum level flight
airspeed is not usually defined by thrust requirement since conditions of stall or stability and
control problems generally predominate.

Figure 1.15 – Thrust and Drag
1.14 Climb Performance
Increasing the power by advancing the throttle produces a marked difference in the rate of
climb. Climb depends upon the reserve thrust. Reserve thrust is the available thrust over and
above that required to maintain horizontal flight at a given speed. Thus, if an airplane is
equipped with an engine which produces 20000 pounds total available thrust and the
airplane requires only 13000 lbs thrust at a certain level flight speed, the power available for
climb is 7000 lbs thrust.

Although we sometimes use the terms "power" and "thrust" interchangeably, erroneously
implying that they are synonymous, it is well to distinguish between the two when discussing
climb performance. Work is the product of a force moving through a distance and is usually
independent of time. Work is measured by several standards, the most com mon unit is
called a "foot-pound." If a 1- pound mass is raised 1 foot, a work unit of I foot-pound has
Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance
24
been performed. The common unit of mechanical power is horsepower; one horsepower is
work equivalent to lifting 330,000 pounds a vertical distance of 1 foot in 1 minute. The term,
"power," implies work rate or units of work per unit of time, and as such is a function of the
speed at which the force is developed. "Thrust," also a function of work, means the force
which imparts a change in the velocity of a mass. This force is measured in pounds but has
no element of time or rate. It can be said then, that during a steady climb, the rate of climb is
a function of excess thrust.

When the airplane is in steady level flight or with a slight angle of climb, the vertical
component of lift is very nearly the same as the actual total lift. Such climbing flight would
exist with the lift very nearly equal to the weight. The net thrust of the powerplant may be
inclined relative, to the flightpath but this effect will be neglected here for the sake of
simplicity. Although the weight of the airplane acts vertically, a component of weight will act
rearward along the flight path (see Figure 1.16 below).

If it is assumed that the airplane is in a steady climb with essentially a small inclination of the
flightpath, the summation of forces along the flightpath resolves to the following:

Forces forward = Forces aft

The basic relationship neglects some of the factors which may be of importance for airplanes
of very high climb performance. (For example, a more detailed consideration would account
for the inclination of thrust from the flightpath, lift not being equal to weight, a subsequent
change of induced drag, etc.) However, this basic relationship will define the principal factors
affecting climb performance.

Figure 1.16 - Climb

This relationship means that, for a given weight of the airplane, the angle of climb depends
on the difference between thrust and drag, or the excess thrust. Of course, when the excess
thrust is zero, the inclination of the flightpath is zero and the airplane will be in steady, level
flight. When the thrust is greater than the drag, the excess thrust will allow a climb angle
depending on the value of excess thrust. On the other hand, when the thrust is less than the
drag, the deficiency of thrust will allow an angle of descent.

The most immediate interest in the climb angle performance involves obstacle clearance.
The most obvious purpose for which it might be used is to clear obstacles when climbing out
of short or confined airports.

The maximum angle of climb would occur where there exists the greatest difference between
thrust available and thrust required; i.e., for the propeller powered airplane, the maximum
excess thrust and angle of climb will occur at some speed just above the stall speed.
Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight
25

Of greater general interest in climb performance are the factors which affect the rate of climb.
The vertical velocity of an airplane depends on the flight speed and the inclination of the
flightpath. In fact, the rate of climb is the vertical component of the flightpath velocity.

For rate of climb, the maximum rate would occur where there exists the greatest difference
between power available and power required (see Figure 1.17). The above relationship
mean, that, for a given weight of the airplane. the rate of climb depends on the difference
between the power available and the power required, or the excess power. Of course, when
the excess power is zero, the rate of climb is zero and the airplane is in steady level flight.
When power available is greater than the power required, the excess power will allow a rate
of climb specific to the magnitude of excess power.

It can be said, then, that during a steady climb, the rate of climb will depend on excess power
while the angle of climb is a function of excess thrust.

The climb performance of an airplane is affected by certain variables. The conditlion of the
airplane's maximum climb angle or maximum climb rate occur at specific speeds and
variations in speed will produce variation, in climb performance. Generally, there is sufficient
latitude in most airplanes that small variations in speed from the optimum do not produce
large changes in climb performance, and certain operational considerations may require
speeds slightly different from the optimum. Of course, climb performance would be most
critical with high gross weight, at high altitude, in obstructed takeoff areas, or during
malfunction of a powerplant. Then, optimum climb speeds are necessary.

Figure 1.17 – Power Available and Power Required

Weight has a very pronounced effect on airplane performance. If weight is added to the
airplane, it must fly at a higher angle of attack to maintain a given altitude and speed. This
increases the induced drag of the wings, as well as the parasite drag of the airplane.
Increased drag means that additional power is needed to overcome it, which in turn means
that less reserve power is available for climbing. Airplane designers go to great effort to
minimize the weight since it has such a marked effect on the factors pertaining to
performance.

A change in the airplane's weight produces a twofold effect on climb performance. First, the
weight affects both the climb angle and the climb rate. In addition, a change in weight will
change the drag and the power required. This alters the reserve power available. Generally,
an increase in weight will reduce the maximum rate of climb but the airplane must be
operated at some increase of climb speed to achieve the smaller peak climb rate.
Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance
26

An increase in altitude also will increase the power required and decrease the power
available. Hence, the climb performance of an airplane is affected greatly by altitude. The
speeds for maximum rate of climb, maximum angle of climb, and maximum and minimum
level flight airspeeds vary with altitude. As altitude is increased, these various speeds finally
converge at the absolute ceiling of the airplane. At the absolute ceiling, there is no excess of
power and only one speed will allow steady level flight. Consequently, the absolute ceiling of
the airplane produces zero rate of climb. The service ceiling is the altitude at which the
airplane is unable to climb at a rate greater than 100 feet per minute. Usually, these specific
performance reference points are provided for the airplane at a specific design configuration.
1.15 Range Performance
The ability of an airplane to convert fuel energy into flying distance is one of the most
important items of airplane performance. In flying operations, the problem of efficient range
operation of an airplane appears in two general forms:
- to extract the maximum flying distance from a given fuel load or
- to fly a specified distance with a minimum expenditure of fuel.

A common denominator for each of these operating problems is the specific range; that is,
nautical miles of flying distance per pound of fuel. Cruise flight operations for maximum range
should be conducted so that the airplane obtains maximum Specific Range throughout the
flight.

The specific range can be defined by the following relationship:
Fuel lbs.
miles nautical
S.R. =
or
Fuel/hr of lbs.
miles/hr nautical
S.R. =
If maximum specific range is desired, the flight condition must provide a maximum of speed
versus fuel flow.

The general item of range must be, clearly distinguished from the item of endurance. The
item of range involves consideration of flying distance, while endurance involves
consideration of flying time. Thus, it is appropriate to define a separate term, "Specific
Endurance."
Fuel of lb.
hours flight
S.E. =
If maximum endurance is desired, the flight condition must provide a minimum of fuel flow.

While the peak value of specific range would provide maximum range operation, long range
cruise operation is generally recommended at some slightly higher airspeed. Most long range
cruise operations are conducted at the flight condition which provides 99 percent of the
absolute maximum specific range. The advantage of such operation is that 1 percent of
range is traded for 3 to 5 percent higher cruise speed. Since the higher cruise speed has a
great number of advantages, the small sacrifice of range is a fair bargain. The values of
specific range versus speed are affected by three principal variables:
- airplane gross weight,
- altitude, and
- the external aerodynamic configuration of the airplane.

"Cruise Control" of an airplane implies that the airplane is operated to maintain the
recommended long range cruise condition throughout the flight. Since fuel is consumed
during cruise, the gross weight of the airplane will vary and optimum airspeed, altitude, and
Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight
27
power setting can also vary. Generally, "cruise control" means the control of the optimum
airspeed, altitude, and power setting to maintain the 99 percent maximum specific range
condition. At the beginning of cruise flight, the relatively high initial weight of the airplane will
require specific values of airspeed, altitude, and power setting to produce the recommended
cruise condition (see Figure 1.18). As fuel is consumed and the airplane's gross weight
decreases, the optimum airspeed and power setting may decrease, or, the optimum altitude
may increase. In addition, the optimum specific range will increase. Therefore, the pilot must
provide the proper cruise control technique to ensure that optimum conditions are
maintained.

Figure 1.18 – Effect of Gross Weight

Total range is dependent on both fuel available and specific range. When range and
economy of operation are the principal goals, the pilot must ensure that the airplane will be
operated at the recommended long range cruise condition. By this procedure, the airplane
will be capable of its maximum design operating radius, or can achieve flight distances less
than the maximum with a maximum of fuel reserve at the destination.

The maximum endurance condition would be obtained at the point of minimum power
required since this would require the lowest fuel flow to keep the airplane in steady, level
flight. Maximum range condition would occur where the proportion between speed and power
required is greatest. The maximum range condition is obtained at maximum lift-drag ratio
(L/D max) and it is important to note that for a given airplane configuration, the maximum L/D
occurs at a particular angle of attack and lift coefficient, and is unaffected by weight or
altitude.
Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance
28


1.19 – Thrust Required

Jet Transport Performance Jet Engine
29
2 JET ENGINE
2.1 Development of Thrust
In discussing the ways thrust is developed, it is possible to go into all kinds of minute details.
We could, for example, discuss the compressor component detail, showing how it is
responsible for a certain percentage of thrust. However, it matters little just what details are
necessary if we consider the overall picture of how thrust is developed.

Basically we accelerate a mass of air toward the rear of the engine. This gives us a reaction
in the opposite direction called thrust. Mass can be described as the amount of matter in
anything. The mass of a body is the number of molecules contained in it. Obviously, we
cannot count the number of molecules passing through the engine. We can't even stop the
air as it flows through the engine to weigh it.
2.1.1 Weight of Air Flow
The engine inlet is constructed with a fixed area of so many square feet. If the engine inlet
has 10 square feet and the air is moving at a speed of 130 feet per second, the air flow would
then amount to 1300 cubic feet per second.

One pound of standard air (air on a standard day of 59.0 °F and 29.92 in. of mercury)
occupies about 13 cubic feet. Dividing 1300 cubic feet of volume by 13 cubic feet per pound
gives us about 100 pounds of air per second. This is known as the weight of air flow (w
a
).
2.1.2 Mass Flow From Weight of Flow
When we step on the scales we are measuring the force of gravitational attracion between
the earth and ourselves. The weight of any body is the force of attraction between the earth
and the body. We call this particular force of attraction "gravity".

We know that when a body is subjected to a force it will accelerate as long as there is no
opposing force. If a body is allowed to fall toward the center of the earth with nothing in the
way - no air, no water, no ground - it will go faster and faster until it reaches the center. Each
second that it falls it will be going 32.2 feet per second faster than it was going the second
before. This is often expressed as 32.2 feet per second per second, or 32.2 feet per second
squared. For practical purposes this acceleration due to gravity is a constant and is
designated as "g".

From Newton we know that a force to be generated is proportional to the mass times its
acceleration:
ma F =

The weight of a body is the force of exerted on the body. Thus we can substitute weight for
force, or W for F.

Also, "g" is the acceleration due to gravity, so we can substitute "g" for "a". Now the Newton
formula reads:
mg W =

In other words, the weight of a body equals its mass times the acceleration due to gravity.

If W = mg, then
g
W
m = . In the jet engine we are dealing with weight of air flow, so the new
look on the formular is w
a
/g for mass flow.

Jet Engine Jet Transport Performance
30
2.1.3 Change in Velocity
If we designate the initial velocity of the air available to the engine as V
i
and the velocity at
the jet nozzle as V
J
, V
J
– V
i
will be the amount of the change in velocity. Wa/g = mass flow of
air through the engine. So

( )
a j
A
V V
g
W
÷

will give us the force or thrust resulting from accelerating the mass flow of air.

Figure 2.1 – Change in Velocity
2.1.4 Fuel Flow
One thing else enters into the determining of thrust. We use a considerable amount of fuel in
order to obtain the heat energy to speed up the air mass. Note that the fuel always goes
along with the engine and so has no initial velocity. Because there is a considerable amount
of mass involved in the weight of fuel flow we must add it to the formular to make it really
complete. Our complete formular would now read:

( )
j
F
a j
A
N
V
g
W
V V
g
W
F + ÷ =
2.1.5 Static Pressure in the Jet Nozzle
When high compression ratio engines operate at high airplane speeds the overall
compression ratio is quite high. The pressure in the tailpipe may not all be used in
accelerating the gases through the nozzle with the result that the !static pressure in the
nozzle is higher than ambient air pressure. In this case there is additional thrust due to the
difference in static pressure in the nozzle(P
j
), and ambient pressure (P
am
) multiplied by the
area of the jet nozzle, (A
j
). The complete formula for thrust thus becomes:

( ) ( )
amb j j j
F
a j
A
N
p p A V
g
W
V V
g
W
F ÷ + + ÷ =

The last part becomes effective only under certain conditions and is often omitted in general
discussions.
Jet Transport Performance Jet Engine
31
2.2 Factors Affecting Thrust
If we operated the jet engine in an air-conditioned room we would never have any change in
the quantities in the jet formula. However, the engine must operate efficiently from sea level
to extreme altitudes, from a stand-still to extreme speeds, and under all changes of
atmospheric conditions. Although we can compensate for some of these problems, there are
bound to be some changes in the quantities of the thrust relationship.
2.2.1 Change in Jet Nozzle Velocity as a Variable
In a modern jet engine the jet nozzle is choked; i.e., the gases are passing through it at the
speed of sound. At present, jet nozzles are limited to developing gas velocities up to the
speed of sound, and the speed of sound is controlled by the square root of the absolute
temperature.

The only variation in the speed of ejection at the jet nozzle will be due to a change in exhaust
gas temperature. Of course, if the jet nozzle is not choked there will be considerable change
in jet nozzle velocities due to changes in air speed and atmos- pheric conditions. However,
when the jet nozzle is already operating at sonic velocity there will be less variation in the
speed with which the gases are ejected.
2.2.2 Initial Air Velocity as a Variable
In the test stand or when the aircraft is standing still the engine V
a
must pick up the air mass
and accelerate it from zero speed up to the jet nozzle velocity. However, as soon as the
aircraft begins to move, the initial air velocity begins to in crease along with the air speed of
the airplane. This means that the greater the speed, the less difference there will be between
the initial velocity and the jet nozzle velocity. In the jet formula we are multiplying the mass
flow of air by the difference in velocity developed across the engine. If that difference
decreases, the thrust output will decrease. Thus we see that the increasing V
a
would tend to
have a decreasing effect upon thrust.

Figure 2.3 – Effect of Air Speed on Thrust
Jet Engine Jet Transport Performance
32
2.2.3 Density Effect
Density is the mass per unit of volume or the number of molecules per cubic foot. When
density increases there are more molecules per cubic foot. When density decreases there
are fewer molecules per cubic foot. The number of cubic feet per second we can direct into
the engine is controlled by the fixed engine inlet area, assuming constant RPM. Thus the
mass flow is determined by the density.

In free air a rise of temperature will cause the speed of the molecules to increase so that they
run into each other harder. When they run into each other harder, they move farther apart.
When they are farther apart a given number of molecules will occupy more space. When a
given number of molecules occupy more space we can get fewer through the engine inlet
area. Thus, as temperature increases, thrust decrease.

Figure 2.4 – Effect of Air Pressure and Air Temperature on Thrust

Again in free air when pressure increases it is because there are more molecules per cubic
foot. When there are more molecules per cubic foot we can direct more of them through the
fixed inlet area. More molecules going through the inlet area per second means a greater wa.
As pressure goes up, density goes up. As density goes up, wa goes up and consequently the
thrust goes up.

Density affects thrust proportionately. A 10,000 pound thrust engine on a hot day might
generate only about 8,000 pounds of thrust, while on a cold day the engine might produce as
much as 12,000 pounds of thrust.
2.2.4 Altitude Aspect
The effect of altitude on thrust output is really a function of density. The higher we go the less
air pressure there is and the colder it gets. As pressure decreases thrust decreases, but as
temperature decreases thrust increases. However, the pressure drops off faster than the
temperature so that there is actually a drop off in thrust with altitude.
At about 36,000 feet the temperature stops falling and remains constant while the pressure
continues to fall. As a result, the thrust will drop off more rapidly. This makes 36,000 feet the
optimum altitude for long range cruising, just before the rate of thrust fall off increases.
2.2.5 Ram Effect
Ram is a descriptive word. We must be careful not to draw conclusions from the descriptive
quality of the word that will give us wrong impressions of the effect of ram on engine
perfromance.
Jet Transport Performance Jet Engine
33
As the aircraft picks up speed going down the runway, the air is moving by it at an increasing
speed. It makes no difference whether the aircraft is stationary in a wind tunnel and the air is
blown by it or the aircraft is moving through stationary air.

Figure 2.5 – Effect of Altitude on Thrust

The effect is the same. In front of the engine there is a divergent inlet duct. As the air enters
the duct it will fill up the added space. When this occurs we get a drop in velocity and an
increase in pressure. This is a function of the Bernoulli Theorem.

With the relative velocity of the air turned into pressure, the air molecules have developed
their impact force. The restricted area of the engine inlet causes a pile-up of molecules, thus
increasing the density. When the density increases, we get a corresponding increase in
thrust.

Obviously, any frictional losses in the duct will cause fewer molecules to reach the engine
inlet. Any friction occurring in the duct is a loss to the engine so far as ram is concerned.

A quick summary of ram can be seen from Figure 2.6.

"A" curve represents the tendency for thrust to drop off with air speed due to an increase in
V
a
.

"B" curve represents the thrust generated by ram effect on or increased w
a
.

"C" curve is the result of combining "A" and "B" curves.

Notice that, due to ram, eventually the air speed is such that any losses due to increase in Vi
are made up. Ram will compensate some for loss of thrust due to altitude also. Ram is
important to the jet type of aircraft engine in that it will eventually at high air speeds produce
an increase in thrust by increasing w
a
.

Jet Engine Jet Transport Performance
34

Figure 2.6 – Effect of Ram on Thrust
2.2.6 Water Injection
At first glance it would appear that once the wa is inside the engine there is nothing we can
do to change it. However, by using water injection we can add the mass of water molecules
to the mass flow of air. Even though a water molecule weighs less than an air molecule we
add whatever they weigh to the air already in the engine.

Water has the effect of cooling the air mass inside the engine. However, we maintain the
same pressure because we are adding water molecules to the air. We can expect that water
molecules can be added as long as the constant pressure can be maintained.

Water injection does two things directly. It cools the air mass and maintains the same
pressure by adding molecules to the mass flow. Obviously, if there is little cooling effect, only
a few molecules can be added to the mass flow. Thus on a cold day we can obtain only a
small thrust increase by utilizing water injection, but on hot days a sizeable thrust increase
may be realized.

This effect will also vary considerably with the position of the injection. Water injected at the
inlet will be affected more by outside temperature than if it is injected somewhere farther
back in the engine where the heat generated by compression will counteract a cold outside
temperature.

Not all the increase in thrust with water injection is due to the increase in mass flow. There is
a cycle effect. The increase in wa causes a tendency to slow down the compressor. The fuel
control adds fuel to keep the compressor going at the same speed. The resulting increase in
heat energy hits the turbines and the compressor is speeded up. When the compressor
speeds up it gives a greater weight of air flow. The end result is a realizing of a greater thrust
increase by increased wa than is obtained by the addition of the water molecules.
Jet Transport Performance Jet Engine
35
2.3 Efficiencies
Just how well an engine functions involves us in a discussion of efficiencies. The efficiency of
any engine can be described as the output divided by the input. If we add to the air flowing
through the engine a certain amount of energy, we have given it a potential for doing work.
The amount of work actually done is the output of the engine. This output divided by input is
always less than 100% because a certain amount of inefficiency will always be present.

In a jet engine we are not so much interested in the amount of work actually done by the
engine as in the amount of thrust or force we generate. Force times distance is work. We are
satisfied to worry about how much force is generated regardless of whether it moves
anything or not. For instance, in the test stand we can't allow the engine to go any distance
no matter how much thrust it develops so under these conditions accomplishing work is
impossible.

So we reduce our efficiency to the amount of thrust generated compared to the amount of
energy we use, which in this case is fuel flow.

This brings us to one of the main measures of jet engine efficiency: the amount of thrust
generated divided by the fuel consumption. This is called "Thrust Specific Fuel Consumption"
or TSFC:

N
F
F
W
TSFC =

It is obvious that the more thrust we obtain per pound of fuel the more efficient the engine is.
Specific fuel consumption is made up of a number of other efficiencies. The two major factors
affecting TSFC are propulsive efficiency and cycle efficiency.
2.3.1 Propulsive Efficiency
Propulsive efficiency is the amount of thrust developed by the jet nozzle compared to the
energy supplied to it in a useable form. We should think of the main engine as a machine that
not only gets the energy into the air but tries to get that energy into a form that can be turned
into thrust. The jet nozzle does the best it can with what it has to work with.
2.3.2 Cycle Efficiency
On a much grander scale is the cycle efficiency. Briefly, cycle efficiency is the amount of
energy put into a useable form as compared to the total amount of energy available in the
fuel. It involves combustion efficiency, thermal efficiency, mechanical efficiency, compressor
efficiency, etc. It is, in effect, a measure of the overall efficiency of the engine components
starting with the compressor and going through the combustion chamber and turbine. The job
of these components is to get the energy in the fuel into a form the jet nozzle can turn into
thrust.
Jet Engine Jet Transport Performance
36
Notes:





















































Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
37
3 TAKEOFF PERFORMANCE
3.1 General
The takeoff is a portion of a flight that takes a lot of mental effort. There are many variables
that a pilot has to absorb in very short time: keeping the aircraft straight down the runway,
monitoring engine and flight instruments, take the proper action should a malfunction occur,
rotate at the proper rate and establish a stabilized flight path after liftoff. By the end of a
takeoff roll the aircraft attains a very high level of kinetic energy, so that an abort in this
phase would result in an overrun.

A good understanding of both the operational and the theoretical side (certification, obstacle
clearance requirements) is required.
3.2 The Takeoff Requirements
In the daily operation the maximum takeoff weight is not only a question of performance of
the aircraft alone but also a question of whether the aircraft will be able to meet the
regulatory requirements once it looses the critical engine.

Regulations ask for either a stop or go decision and in both cases the situation must be
survivable. As far as certification is concerned, the regulatory material can be found in FAR
Part 1 and 25.
3.2.1 Introduction
There are six areas that have takeoff performance requirements. They are:
- Field length
- Climb
- Obstacle clearance
- Tire speed
- Brake energy
- Other
3.2.2 Field Length
Three cases are examined to determine the required field length. They are:
- With the failure of one engine at the most critical point, the distance required to
accelerate to reach 35 feet (10.7 m) above the runway at the end of the available
takeoff distance
- The distance required to accelerate to V
1
, have an event occur, and stop with the
available stop distance
- With all engines operative throughout the takeoff, 115% of the distance to reach 35
feet (10.7m) above the runway at the end of the runway.
3.2.3 Climb
The climb limit weight is the maximum weight that still meets the minimum gradient
established by the FARs. The second segment is usually the segment that determines the
climb limit weight. The other two segments are the first and the final segment. For a two
engine jet, the minimum climb gradient for the second segment of flight is 2.4%, The second
segment occurs when the gear is up and the flaps are at the takeoff setting and the power is
at takeoff power.
3.2.4 Obstacle
The airplane's net flight path must clear an obstacle by 35 feet (110.7 m). The net flight path
is the gross (actual) flight path minus 0.8% of gradient for a two engine jet.
Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
38
3.2.5 Tire Speed
The ground speed at the lift-off speed (V
LOF
) must not exceed the maximum speed of the
tires.
3.2.6 Brake Energy
The energy capability of the brakes may not be exceeded by a stop from V
MBE
with both
engines operating. This assumes maximum manual braking. V
1
must be less than or equal to
V
MBE
.
3.2.7 Other Requirements
Besides these several other requirements exist, such as:
- TOW limited by landing weight
- Approach and landing performance
- Enroute limitations
- Minimum Control Speed
- Runway bearing capacity

Takeoff weight limited by structure or zero fuel weight are specific to the aircraft structural
design rather than regulatory performance requirements.
In order to meet the take off requirements the pilot has several tools:
- weight reduction
- flap setting
- thrust setting (e.g. packs off)
- selection of takeoff speeds (e.g. improved climb)
- runway change

Weight reduction is often the only tool left that will allow to meet the requirements under
given ambient conditions, however, it should be considered last.

Figure 3.1 – Takeoff Requirements
3.3 FAR Takeoff Definition
3.3.1 Introduction
The FAR define takeoff field length as the longest distance required by these three
conditions:
- Engine-out accelerate-go distance, this is the distance required to:
- Accelerate with all engines operating
- Have one engine fail at V
EF

- This failure occures at least one second before V
1

- Continue the takeoff
- Lift-off
- Reach a point 35 feet above the runway surface at V
2
.
- Accelerate-stop distance, this is the distance required to:
Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
39
- Accelerate with all engines operating
- Have one engine fail at V
EF

- This failure occures at least one second before V
1

- Recognize the failure
- Put the airplane in a configuration for stopping
- Stop the airplane with the use of maximum wheel brakes with the speedbrakes
extended. NOTE: reverse thrust is not used determine the FAR accelerate-stop
distance.
- Alle-engine do distance, this is 115% of the distance required to:
- Accelerate with all engines operating
- Lift-off
- Reach a point 35 feet above the runway surface at the all engine climb out speed.

Figure 3.2 – Takeoff Definition
3.4 Takeoff Distances Available
3.4.1 Takeoff Run Available (TORA)
The part of the takeoff surface consisting of full strength paved surface capable of carrying
the airplane under all normal operating conditions.
3.4.2 Clearway Length Available
The length of an area beyond the runway, not less than 500ft wide, centrally located about
the extended centerline of the runway and under control of the airport authorities. The
Clearway is expressed in terms of a clearway plane, extending from the end of the runway
with an upward slope not exceeding 1.25% above which no object nor any portion of the
terrain protruders, except that the threshold lights may protrude above the plane, if their
Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
40
height above the end of the runway is not greater than 26 inches and if they are located to
either side of the runway. (FAR Part 1.1)
3.4.3 Stopway Length Available
The length of an area beyond the runway, not less in width than the runway, centrally located
about the extended center line of the runway and designated by the airport authorities for use
in decelerating the airplane during a refused takeoff. A stopway must be capable of
supporting the airplane during a refused takeoff without inducing structural damage to the
airplane. (FAR Part 1.1)

Figure 3.3 – Clearway and Stopway
3.4.4 Takeoff Distance Available (TODA)
The sum of runway length available and clearway length available. If no clearway exists the
takeoff distance available equals the runway length available. (TODA=TORA for no
Clearway)
3.4.5 Accelerate-Stop Distance Available (ASDA)
The sum of runway length available and stopway length available. If no stopway exists the
accelerate-stop distance available equals the runway length available. (ASDA=TORA for no
Stopway)

Figure 3.4 – Distances Available
3.4.6 Balanced Takeoff
The condition, where V
1
is selected to make the required distance to 35ft, assuming a failure
of the critical engine is recognized at V
1
, equal to the accelerate-stop distance required. In
this case the V
1
-speed is called balanced V
1
.
Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
41
3.4.7 Unbalanced Takeoff
The condition, where V
1
is selected to make the required distance to 35ft, assuming a failure
of the critical engine at V
1
, unequal to the accelerate-stop distance required. Such a V
1

selection allows to take advantage of clearway and stopway with unequal lengths available.
3.5 Takeoff Speeds
3.5.1 Definitions
VEF
Critical engine failure speed. V
EF
is the speed at which the critical engine is assumed to fail. It
shall not be less than the V
MCG
determined under FAR Part 25.149 (e).
(FAR Part 25.107 (a)(1))

V1
Takeoff decision speed. It cannot be less than V
EF
plus the speed gained with the critical
engine inoperative during the time interval between the instant the critical engine has failed
and the instant the pilot has recognized and reacted to the engine failure by application of the
first retarding means. (FAR Part 25.107 (a)(2))

VMCG
Ground minimum control speed, is the minimum control speed on the ground, at which, when
the critical engine suddenly becomes inoperative, it is possible to recover control of the
airplane with the use of primary aerodynamic controls alone (without the use of nose wheel
steering) to enable the takeoff to be safely continued using normal piloting skill and rudder
control forces not exceeding 150 pounds. There may be not more than a 30 foot deviation
from the runway center line. (FAR Part 25.149 (e))

Figure 3.5 – VMCG

V1(MCG)
The minimum takeoff decision speed, at which, when the critical engine suddenly becomes
inoperative at V
EF
with the remaining engines at takeoff thrust, it is possible to control the
airplane with primary aerodynamic controls alone and continue the takeoff. This is the V
1

speed which results when V
EF
is set equal to V
MCG
.

VMCA
Air minimum control speed, is the airspeed, at which, when the critical engine is suddenly
made inoperative, it is possible to recover control of the airplane with that engine still
inoperative, and maintain straight flight either with zero yaw or with an angel of bank of not
more than 5 degrees. V
MCA
may not exceed 1.2 V
S
(V
S
determined at the maximum sea level
takeoff weight) with maximum available takeoff thrust. Rudder forces required to maintain
control my not exceed 150 pounds. (FAR Part 25.149 (b)(c)(d))

VR
Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
42
Takeoff rotation speed. V
R
is the speed at which rotation is initated to attain tha takeoff safety
or climbout speed, V
2
, at 35 feet above the takeoff surface. V
R
must not be less than 1.05
times the minimum control speed (air), nor less than V
1
. (FAR Part 25.107(e))

VMU
Minimum unstick speed. V
MU
shall be the speed at which the airplane can be made to lift off
the ground and to continue the takeoff without displaying any hazardous characteristics. V
MU

speeds shall be selected by the applicant for the all engines operating and the one engine
inoperative condition. (FAR Part 25.107(d))

VLOF
Airplane lift off speed. The lift off speed is closely associated to the V
R
speed and is dictated
by that speed. The all engines operating lift off speed must not be less than 110% of V
MU

assuming maximum practicable rotation rate. The one engine inoperative lift off speed must
not be less than 105% of V
MU
. (FAR Part 25.107(f) and FAR Part 25.107(e)(1)(iv))

V2
Takeoff safety speed. V
2
is equal to the actual speed at the 35 foot height as demonstrated in
flight and must be equal to or greater than 120% of the stall speed in the takeoff configuration
or 110% of the minimum control speed (air). (FAR Part 25.107(b)(c))
3.5.2 Certification Requirements
Accelerate-Stop
During the tests for the certification of the airplane, the speed of the airplane is increased to a
given point and an event occurs. This event used to be an engine failure. For determining an
accelerate-stop distance it is more conservative to consider an event rather than an engine
failure. V
1
occurs one second after the event. Many of these test are done. Average times are
calculated for the times taken to do these things:
- Apply the brakes
- Quickly move the throttles to idle
- Apply the speedbrakes.

Next, the increase in velocity from two seconds of additional acceleration is added to the V
1

speed. This is the speed from which the airplane must stop. The increased time is not to be
used for increased time to make the “no go" decision after V
1
. It is added to permit the
"average" pilot to change from the takeoff mode to the stopping mode.

Engine Inoperative Accelerate-Go
Also during the tests for the certification of the airplane, the speed of the airplane is
increased to a given point and an engine is 'failed'. The speed one second later is V
1
. The
accelerate go distance is the distance required to accelerate the airplane after the engine
failure, takeoff, and reach a height of 35 feet (10.7 m).

Figure 3.6 – Transition Time
Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
43
3.5.3 V1 Variations
Standard
For a standard (balanced V
1
) takeoff, the horizontal distance that the airplane goes to climb
to 35 feet (10.7m) is equal to the distance required to stop the airplane from V
1
.

Clearway
If clearway is available, the point where the airplane climbs to 35 feet (10.7m) can be over
that clearway. This permits you to use a higher weight because you have more distance to
use to climb to 35 feet (10.7m). The higher weight requires a lower V
1
to still be able to stop
on the available runway.

Stopway
If stopway is available, you have more distance to stop the airplane from V
1
. This permits you
to use a higher takeoff weight, but requires a higher V
1
to ensure that you can still climb to 35
ft by the end of the runway.
3.5.4 Rejected Takeoff After V1
V
1
is the maximum speed at which you can start the rejected takeoff (RTO) procedure and
still stop the airplane within the remaining field length. This is true under the conditons and
procedures given in the AFM. It is the latest point in the takeoff roll where you can start the
stop procedure.

If an RTO is started at V
1
And the airplane is at the runway limit weight, the airplane’s speed
will be zero at the end of the runway. If the RTO is started after V
1
, the airplane will not stop
on the runway. It is not recommended to do an RTO after V
1
unless the pilot finds that the
airplane is unsafe or unable to fly. The spped at which the airplane goes of the runway
changes with the weight of the airplane. A heavier airplane will have a higher speed than that
of a lighter airplane.
3.5.6 Continued Takeoff Before V1
The FARs give minimum performance standards for the “Go” decision. The FAR “Go”
condition examines the airplane with one engine failed at the most critical part of the takeoff.
In this condition, the airplane must:
- Continue to accelerate
- Rotate
- Lift-off
- Be at V
2
at 35 feet above the end of the takeoff distance

The airplane must be able to be controlled throughout this time. In almost 75% of the RTO
accidents, full takeoff power was available on both engines.
3.6 Effect of Flap Position on Takeoff
3.6.1 Takeoff Field Length
The position of the flaps has an effect on the length of runway that is necessary to takeoff. A
higher number flap setting gives the wing more chamber. This creates more lift than a lower
number flap setting. Because of this, it takes less runway to takeoff at a higher number flap
setting than a lower number flap setting.
3.6.2 Climb Gradient
The position of the flaps also has an effect on the clim gradient. The climb gradient (¸) is in
proportion to (Thrust/Weight)-(Drag/Lift). At a higher flap setting, both the lift and the drag
increase. However the drag increases faster than the lift. This gives a lower climb gradient
than a lower falp setting. Because of this, a lower number flap setting causes a higher climb
angle than a higher number flap setting.
Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
44

Figure 3.7 – Effect of Flap Position on Takeoff
3.7 Takeoff Flight Path
The takeoff flight path begins 35 ft above the takeoff surface at the end of the takeoff
distance and continues to a point of the takeoff where the final segment climb speed and a
height of 1500 ft for 10 min. T/O Thrust (800 ft for 5 min T/O Thrust) is reached, or, after all
takeoff flight path obstacles are cleared.
3.7.1 Net Takeoff Flight Path
The net takeoff flight path is the gross takeoff flight path reduced by 0.8% climb gradient
capability.
The prescribed reduction in climb gradient is applied as an equivalent reduction in
acceleration along level-off part of the takeoff flight path.
The net takeoff flight path must clear all obstacles in the takeoff area by a height of at least
35 ft. However, when making a turn, one wing is below the fuselage, therefore, part of the
airplane is lower than the indicated level. To allow for a turn during takeoff the flight path
must clear any obstacles by a height of at least 50 ft. As the lift component decreases in a
turn, there is an additional decrement of gradient loss taken into account. Mind, that a net
gradient of 1.6% only provides an altitude improvement of 16ft/1000ft or 97ft/NM ground
distance.
3.7.2 Climb Gradient Requirements
A minimum climb gradient is required in each segment of the takeoff flight path as Shown be-
low. Each segment is defined by changes in airplane configuration, speed or power setting.

First Segment
This segment extends from the 35 ft height to the point where the landing gear is fully
retracted at a constant V
2
speed.

Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
45
Second Segment
This segment starts at the point at which the landing gear is fully retracted and continues until
the airplane reaches an altitude of at least 1500 feet above the runway. It is flown at V
2

speed, flaps .in the takeoff position and takeoff power.

Third Segment
The third segment is that portion of the flight path during which the flaps are retracted while
accelerating in level flight to the "Final Segment” climb speed. The acceleration capability
must correspond to gross climb gradient shown in Table 2.
The takeoff flight path profile will vary during this segment depending upon obstacle location
and height, The height to be used during level flight acceleration is determined during the
obstacle clearance analysis and will be provided on runway weight charts.
Flap retraction speeds have been selected to provide adequate margins above the stall
speed. The acceleration in level flight with one engine inoperative will be such that the speed
will not be less than 20% above the stall speed during retraction.

Final Segment
This segment extends from the leveoff height to the end of the takeoff flight path. The
minimum gross height is at least 1500 ft. It is flown at the "Final Segment" climb speed, flaps
up and using maximum continuous thrust. The Final Segment is sometimes called 4
th

segment.

Segment
1 2 3 Final
Number of
engines
Minimum Gross Gradient [%]
2 positive 2.4 1.2
3 0.3 2.7 1.5
4 0.5 3.0 1.7

Table 3.1 – FAR Minimum Climb Gradients
3.8 Improved Climb
3.8.1 Introduction
Improved climb is used to make airplane performance better. It may increase the maximum
allowable takeoff weight when a plane is limited by the climb limitation. To use improved
climb, there must be excess field length, tire speed, brake energy, and obstacle performance.

The improved climb procedure increases the normal V
2
and, because of that, increases the
climb capability to the airplane. V
1
and V
R
must also be increased if V
2
is increased. Because
of the use of higher speeds, there must be sufficient runway available to use improved climb.
3.8.2 Explanation
The FARs require a second segment climb gradient of 2.4%. The second segment of flight
starts when the gear goes up and the flaps and thrust are at takeoff settings. The climb
gradient (¸) is in proportion to (thrust/weight)/(drag/lift). If the weight is increased then the
ratio of (thrust/weight) decreases. To maintain the same gradient, the (drag/lift) ratio must
also decrease. The higher V
2
produces the decrease in the ratio of (drag/lift).

Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
46

Figure 3.8 – Takeoff Flight Path
3.8.3 Technical Considerations
When using improved climb, remember these things:
- Tire speed and brake energy V
1
restrictions must be met
- Obstacle clearance requirements must be met.
- Field length requirements must be met at the higher speeds.
3.9 Reduced Thrust
3.9.1 Introduction
Many times it is not necessary to takeoff at the maximum takeoff weight. It is not necessary
to use the maximum takeoff thrust when you are not at the maximum takeoff weight. The
most wear on the engine occurs during takeoff. When you operate at reduced thrust you use
less than the full thrust rating of the engine for takeoff. This lowers the temperature of the
turbine inlet and increases the engine's life. The results of reduce thrust operation are:
- Increased engine reliability
- Increased airplane dispatch reliability
- Decreased engine operating costs
- Decreased maintenance costs.

There are two ways to get reduced thrust, derate and the assumed temperature method.
Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
47

Figure 3.9 – Improved Climb
3.9.2 Derate
Derate is one way to operate an engine at less than full thrust. When you operate at a derate
it is like having a less powerful engine. Because derate is a separate thrust rating, each
derate thrust level will have its own set of performance charts in the airplane flight manual. If
you operate at a derate the reduced thrust is a new maximum and may not be exceeded.

Derates may be used under any circumstances only if the expected takeoff weight is low
enough to permit the use of reduced thrust. When you use derate, all of the performance
information is calculated at the lower takeoff thrust. Because of this the V
mcg
is lower. Derate
can be used to increase the performance limited weight if the runway is short or is
contaminated with standing water, slush, or ice.


Figure 3.10 – Derate
Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
48
3.9.3 Assumed Temperature
As the ambient takeoff temperature increases, the allowable takeoff weight decreases. If the
takeoff weight is less than the maximum allowable takeoff weight, you may be able to use the
assumed temperature method to reduce the thrust. The assumed temperature method uses
the maximum temperature that meets all the takeoff performance requirements at the
expected takeoff weight for the planned takeoff runway. These requirements include takeoff
distance, climb gradient, and obstacle clearance.

The assumed temperature method is conservative. This is because of the effect of
temperature on true airspeed and on engine thrust. The true airspeed will be less than the
indicated airspeed because the actual temperature is less than the temperature that is
assumed.

Restrictions
There are FAA restrictions on the use of the assumed temperature method. The maximum
thrust reduction permitted is 25% from the chosen thrust rating. The minimum control speeds
must be calculated at the normal thrust for the actual outside air temperature. This is
because the pilot may advance the throttles to the rated takeoff setting. This method is not
permitted when the runway is contaminated by water, ice, slush, or snow. Its use is permitted
on a wet runway it the airline accounts for the reduced braking performance.
The assumed temperature method may be used with a derate. There are times when you
can use assumed temperature and not derate. If the scheduled takeoff weight is less than the
performance limited weight at the full thrust rating but higher than the performance limited
weight at T01 derate could not be used. However, assumed temperature could be used.

lmportant Note
The maximum assumed temperature is dependent on:
- Airport
- Runway
- Flap position
- Wind

For example, an assumed temperature that is used for one runway may not be usable for the
reciprocal runway because of obstacles or runway slope.

Figure 3.11 – Assumed Temperature

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49
3.10 Takeoff on Wet and Contamineted Runways
The previously-discussed performance aspects only concerned dry and wet runways. But
contaminants also affect takeoff performance, and have to be considered for takeoff weight
calculation. The following section aims at defining the ifferent runway states that can be
encountered at takeoff.
3.10.1 Definitions (JAR-OPS 1.480)
Dry Runway: A dry runway is one which is neither wet nor contaminated, and includes those
paved runways which have been specially prepared with grooves or porous pavement and
maintained to retain ‘effectively dry’ braking action even when moisture is present.

Damp Runway: A runway is considered damp when the surface is not dry, but when the
moisture on it does not give it a shiny appearance.

The FAA does not make any reference to damp runways, which are considered as wet,
whereas JAR-OPS 1.475 states that a damp runway is equivalent to a dry one in terms of
takeoff performance. Recently, JAR 25 and JAR-OPS Study Groups came to the conclusion
that a damp runway should be considered closer to a wet one than to a dry one in terms of
friction coefficient (µ). As of today, a JAA Notice for Proposed Amendment (NPA) is under
discussion, so that in the future, a damp runway may have to be considered as wet.

Wet Runway: A runway is considered wet when the runway surface is covered with water or
equivalent, [with a depth less than or equal to 3 mm], or when there is a sufficient moisture
on the runway surface to cause it to appear reflective, but without significant areas of
standing water.
In other words, a runway is considered to be wet, as soon as it has a shiny appearance, but
without risk of hydroplaning due to standing water on one part of its surface. The water depth
is assumed to be less than 3 mm.

Contaminated Runway: A runway is considered to be contaminated when more than 25% of
the runway surface area within the required length and width being used is covered by the
following:
- Standing water: Caused by heavy rainfall and/or insufficient runway drainage with a
depth of more than 3 mm (0.125 in).
- Slush: Water saturated with snow, which spatters when stepping firmly on it. It is
encountered at temperature around 5°C, and its density is approximately 0.85 kg/liter
( 7.1 lb / US GAL).
- Wet snow: If compacted by hand, snow will stick together and tend to form a
snowball. Its density is approximately 0.4 kg/liter ( 3.35 lb / USGAL).
- Dry snow: Snow can be blown if loose, or if compacted by hand, will fall apart again
upon release. Its density is approximately 0.2 kg/liter ( 1.7 lb / US GAL).
- Compacted snow: Snow has been compressed (a typical friction coefficient is 0.2).
- Ice : The friction coefficient is 0.05 or below.
3.10.2 Effect on Performance
There is a clear distinction of the effect of contaminants on aircraft performance.
Contaminants can be divided into hard and fluid contaminants.
- Hard contaminants are : Compacted snow and ice. They reduce friction forces.
- Fluid contaminants are : Water, slush, and loose snow. They reduce friction forces,
and cause precipitation drag and aquaplaning.
Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
50
Reduction of Friction Forces
The friction forces on a dry runway vary with aircraft speed. Flight tests help to establish the
direct relation between the aircraft’s friction coefficient (µ) and the ground speed.
Until recently, regulations stated that, for a wet runway and for a runway covered with
standing water or slush, the aircraft’s friction coefficient could be deduced from the one
obtained on a dry runway, as follows:
µ
wet
= µ
dry
/2 (limited to 0.4)
µ
conta
= µ
dry
/4

As of today, a new method, known as ESDU, has been developed and introduced by post-
amendment 42 in JAR/FAR 25.109. The proposed calculation method of the µwet accounts
for the tire pressure, the tire wear state, the type of runway and the anti-skid efficiency
demonstrated through flight tests. The µ
conta
(water and slush) results from an amendment
based on a flight test campaign. The ESDU model concerns all aircraft types which are not
mentioned above. For snow-covered or icy runways, the following values are considered,
whatever the aircraft type: µ
snow
= 0.2 and µ
icy
= 0.05.

Effective µ and Reported µ
Airport authorities publish contaminated runway information in a document called
“SNOWTAM”, which contains:
- The type of contaminant
- The mean depth for each third of total runway length
- The reported µ or braking action.

The reported µ is measured by such friction-measuring vehicles, as: Skidometer, Saab
Friction Tester (SFT), MU-Meter, James Brake Decelerometer (JDB), Tapley meter, Diagonal
Braked Vehicle (DBV). ICAO Airport Services Manual Part 2 provides information on these
measuring vehicles.

The main problem is that the resulting friction forces of an aircraft (interaction tire/runway)
depend on its weight, tire wear, tire pressure, anti-skid system efficiency and… ground
speed. The only way to obtain the aircraft’s effective µ would be to use the aircraft itself in the
same takeoff conditions, which is of course not realistic in daily operations.

Another solution is to use one of the above-mentioned vehicles, but these vehicles operate at
much lower speeds and weights than an aircraft. Then comes the problem of correlating the
figures obtained from these measuring vehicles (reported µ), and the actual braking
performance of an aircraft (effective µ).

Precipitation Drag
Precipitation drag is composed of:
- Displacement drag: Produced by the displacement of the contaminant fluid from the
path of the tire.
- Spray impingement drag: Produced by the spray thrown up by the wheels (mainly
those of the nose gear) onto the fuselage.

The effect of these additional drags is to :
- Improve the deceleration rate: Positive effect, in case of a rejected takeoff.
- Worsen the acceleration rate: Negative effect for takeoff.

So, the negative effect on the acceleration rate leads to limit the depth of a fluid contaminant
to a maximum value. On the other hand, with a hard contaminant covering the runway
surface, only the friction coefficient (effective µ) is affected, and the depth of contaminant
therefore has no influence on takeoff performance.

Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
51
Aquaplaning Phenomenon
The presence of water on the runway creates an intervening water film between the tire and
the runway, leading to a reduction of the dry area.

This phenomenon becomes more critical at higher speeds, where the water cannot be
squeezed out from between the tire and the runway. Aquaplaning (or hydroplaning) is a
situation where the tires of the aircraft are, to a large extent, separated from the runway
surface by a thin fluid film. Under these conditions, tire traction drops to almost negligible
values along with aircraft wheels’ braking; wheel steering for directional control is, therefore,
virtually ineffective.

Figure 3.12 – Aquaplaning

Aquaplaning speed depends on tire pressure, and on the specific gravity of the contaminant
(i.e. how dense the contaminant is).
In other words, the aquaplaning speed is a threshold at which friction forces are severely
diminished. Performance calculations on contaminated runways take into account the
penalizing effect of hydroplaning.
3.10.3 Takeoff Performance on Wet Runways
Acceleration Stop Distance
The ASDA definition on a contaminated runway is the same as on a wet runway. Reversers’
effect may be taken into account in the ASDA calculation, as soon as the surface is not dry.
The distances can either be established by calculation or testing.

Takeoff Distance and Takeoff Run
The TODA and TORA definitions on a contaminated runway are similar to the ones on a wet
runway. They can either be established by calculation or testing.

Takeoff Flight Path
On a wet or contaminated runway, the screen height (height at the end of the TODA) is 15
feet. The net takeoff flight path starts at 35 feet at the end of the TODA. So, the gross flight
path starts at 15 feet while the net flight path starts at 35 feet at the end of the TODA.
While the net flight path clears the obstacles by 35 feet all along the takeoff flight path, the
gross flight path can initially be at less than 35 feet above close-in obstacles.
Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
52
Takeoff Weight
The TODA and ASDA requirements differ between wet and contaminated runways on one
side, and dry runways on the other side.

Indeed, on wet and contaminated runways, the screen height is measured at 15 feet rather
than 35 feet on dry runways. Moreover, the use of reverse thrust is allowed for ASDA
determination on wet and contaminated runways, whereas it is forbidden to take it into
account for the ASDA determination on dry runways.

Therefore, it is possible to obtain shorter TODAs and ASDAs on wet and contaminated
runways than on dry runways for the same takeoff conditions. Thus, it is possible to obtain
higher takeoff weights on surfaces covered with water, slush, or snow than on dry runways.
This is why the regulation indicates that:
“JAR-OPS 1.490 (b)(5) On a wet or contaminated runway, the takeoff mass must not exceed
that permitted for a takeoff on a dry runway under the same conditions”.
3.11 Takeoff Performance Data
This section contains the description of the charts and tables which are available to the flight
crew for takeoff performance calculation.
Only those charts and tables which are required during daily operation will be discussed.
3.11.1 Determination of Performance Limited Takeoff Weight
There are four ways for the flight crew to determine the Performance Limited Takeoff Weight:
- With the Airplane Flight Manual (AFM)
- With the Flight Planning and Performance Manual (FPPM)
- With the Route Performance Manual (RPM)
- With chapter PD of FCOM Volume 1

Of those four methods only the last two shall be discussed here. For an explanation of the
AFM method refer to appendix 2 of the AFM and for the FPPM method refer to the FPPM.

Route Performance Manual
The RPM contains the Runway Weight Charts (RWC) for the regular airports. RWCs present
Performance limited Take-off Weight (PTOW) calculations for the specific airplane and
engine combination. It is allowed to interpolate in the wind and the temperature as long as all
data is for the same flaps setting.

Definitions Used on the RWC’s
AD Name of the airport. Presented along with City name in page header of all
RWC’s.
AIP Aeronautical Information Publication.
ASDA Accelerate-stop distance available. The length of the take-off run available
plus the length of the stopway, if such stopway is declared available by the
appropriate Authority and is capable of bearing the mass of the airplane under
the prevailing operating conditions. Presented in page header of all RWC’s.
Clearway Obstacle free surface after the end of TORA used for extending the TODA
used in case of continued takeoff.
Damp RWY A RWY is considered damp when the surface is not dry, but when the
moisture on it does not give it a shiny appearance. For performance purposes,
a damp runway may be considered to be dry.
Dry RWY A dry RWY is one which is neither wet nor contaminated, and includes those
paved RWYs which have been specially prepared with grooves or porous
pavement and maintained to retain “effectively dry” braking action even when
moisture is present.
Contaminated
Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
53
RWY A RWY is considered to be contaminated when more than 25% of the RWY
surface area (whether in isolated areas or not) within the required length and
width being used is covered by the following: Surface water more than 3mm
deep, or by slush, or loose snow, equivalent to more than 3mm of water.
Snow, which has been compressed into a solid mass which resists further
compression and will hold together or break into lumps if picked up
(compacted snow). Ice, including wet ice.
Elev Airport Reference Point elevation. Is presented in page header of all RWC’s.
ICAO ICAO code of the airport. Presented along with IATA code in page header of
all RWC’s.
MTOW Maximum Takeoff Weight (kg).
PTOW Performance limited Takeoff Weight (kg).
RWY RWY denomination or Intersection TKOF position this RWC chart is
calculated. Presented in page header of all RWC’s.
Slope RWY slope (max ±2%), negative - down, positive - up. Presented in page
header of all RMC’s.
Stopway Extension of the runway with limited runway bearing capacity. Used to extent
the ASDA in case of a rejected takeoff.
TODA The length of the take-off run available plus the length of the clearway
available. Presented in page header of all RMC’s.
TORA Take Off Run Available. The length of a runway which is declared available by
the appropriate Authority and suitable for the ground run of an aeroplane
taking off. Presented in page header of all RWC’s.
WED Water Equivalent Depth.
Weight Weight definition have the same meaning as a Mass for the purpose of
Takeoff performance
Wet RWY A RWY is considered wet when the RWY surface is covered with water, or
equivalent, less or equal than 3mm WED or when there is sufficient moisture
on the RWY surface to cause it to appear reflective, but without significant
areas of standing water.

Airport Data
All airport data used in the calculation is the officially declared distances and are presented
as TORA, ASDA, TODA and LDA.
The slope is the difference in elevation between the line-up position and the rwy end divided
by the distance. This is a mean slope used for calculations.
Aerodrome elevation is the elevation of the Airport Reference Point. This is used for deciding
the general pressure altitude, and is not used for obstacle calculations.
Obstacle data is given as distance from brake release point and height above the runway
end, i.e. the end of TORA. When calculating obstacle clearance with TOD shorter than the
TODA, the lift-off point will have another altitude than the runway end.

Runway Aligment Penalities
Runway alignment penalties are included. There are three different line-up methods
considered:
1) Line-up from behind the take-off position.
This assumes that the nose wheel is behind the takeoff position.
2) Line-up with 90°entry – Penalty: TORA/TODA –9,2m; ASDA -20,27m.
This assumes that the aircraft arrives from a taxiway perpendicular to the runway and
makes a 90-degree turn onto the runway. Note that the taxi runway markings will take
the aircraft too far into the runway.
3) Line-up with 180°turn – Penalty: TORA/TODA –14,78m; ASDA -25,85m. This
assumes that backtrack with a full 180 degree turn is made.
Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
54
Engine Failure Procedure
The engine failure procedure / CLP is published in the note in the upper part of the Runway
Weight Chart (RWC).

Acceleration Altitude
The standard acceleration altitude of 1 000’ AGL ft is used. If any special considerations are
in conflict with the standard acceleration height, a non-standard acceleration altitude will be
printed in the note on the RWC.

Aircraft Configuration
The aircraft configuration is shown in the header of the RWC. This includes information
about:
- T/O Flaps 5, 15 or OPT
- A/I OFF or ON
- Packs ON or OFF
- QNH 1013
- 5 minutes takeoff thrust limitation

Limitation Codes
The takeoff weight presented is based on the following limitations:

Limit code Limiting factor
F Field length
O Obstacle limitation
C Climb limitation
T Tire Speed
B Brake energy
V V
mcg
limiting
P 5 min of T/O thrust / Acceleration segment limitation
R V
2
restriction
** Improved Climb
- SCAP Limited

Use of Corrections
The corrections are calculated for each runway.
The corrections are tabulated with a column for each flaps setting used in the Airport
Analysis.

Layout
The following page shows a RWC sample.

Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
55
SAMPLE

Section: 4
Sheet: LEMD
Boeing 737-300 / CFM-56-3B-2
Route Performance Manual
Date: Sep 20,08
TORA 12000 FT
ASDA 12000 FT
Flaps 5
TODA 12000 FT Anti-Ice......OFF
LDA 12000 FT
MADRID
Slope 0%
AD Elev 2000 FT LEMD/MAD 36R
A/C..........AUTO
In case of engine failure climb straight ahead.
TAKEOFF – Dry Runway – Max Structural Weight: 63276 kg (All weight in 100 kg)
OAT
°C
C T10 0 (Calm) H10 H20
66A 392 519F/15-16-22 553F/16-16-22 562F/16-16-22 572F/16-16-22
64A 406 530F/17-18-24 564F/18-18-24 574F/18-18-24 583F/18-18-24
62A 419 541F/19-20-26 575F/20-20-26 585F/20-20-26 595F/20-20-26
60A 432 552F/21-22-28 587F/21-22-28 597F/21-22-28 606F/21-22-28
58A 445 562F/23-24-30 598F/23-24-30 608F/23-24-30 617F/23-24-30
56A 458 572F/24-26-32 608F/25-26-32 618F/25-26-32 628F/25-26-32
54A 472 582F/26-28-34 619F/27-28-34 629F/27-28-34 638F/27-28-34
52A 485 591F/27-30-36 629F/27-30-36 639F/28-30-36 648F/28-30-36
50 497 599F/28-31-38 637F/29-31-38 647F/29-31-38 657F/30-31-38
48 505 605F/30-33-39 644F/30-33-39 653F/30-33-39 663F/31-33-39
46 514 611F/31-34-41 650F/32-34-41 660F/32-34-41 669F/32-34-41
44 522 617F/32-35-42 656F/33-35-42 666F/33-35-42 675F/33-35-42
42 531 623F/33-36-43 662F/34-36-43 672F/34-36-43 682F/34-36-43
40 539 628F/35-38-44 668F/35-38-44 678F/36-3844 688F/36-38-44
38 548 635F/35-39-46 675F/36-39-46 684F/36-39-46 694F/36-39-46
36 557 641F/36-40-47 681F/37-40-47 691F/37-40-47 700F/37-40-47
34 567 647F/37-42-49 687F/38-42-48 697F/38-42-48 707F/38-42-48
32 576 653F/39-43-50 694F/39-43-50 700F/40-43-50 713F/40-43-50
30 585 659F/40-44-51 700F/41-44-51 710F/44-44-51 720F/41-44-51
28 594 665F/41-45-52 707F/42-45-52 717F/42-45-52 727F/42-45-52
26 603 671F/42-47-54 713F/43-47-54 723F/43-47-54 733F/43-47-54
24 604 673F/42-47-54 715F/43-47-54 725F/43-47-54 735F/44-47-54
22 605 675F/42-47-54 717F/43-47-54 727F/43-47-54 737F/44-47-54
20 605 677F/42-47-54 719F/43-47-54 729F/43-47-54 739F/4447-54
18 606 679F/43-47-54 721F/43-47-54 731F/44-47-54 742F/44-47-54
16 606 681F/43-47-54 723F/44-47-54 733F/44-47-54 744F/44-47-54
12 607 685F/43-47-54 728F/44-47-54 738F/44-47-54 748F/44-47-54
8 608 689F/43-47-54 732F/44-47-54 742F/44-47-54 752F/44-47-54
4 608 694F/43-47-54 736F/44-47-54 747F/44-47-54 757F/44-47-54
2 608 696F/43-47-54 739F/44-47-54 749F/44-47-54 759F/44-47-54
0 609 698F/43-47-54 741F/44-47-54 751F/44-47-54 760F/44-47-54
ENG A/I ON CORR A/C OFF CORR KEY:
F: -219kg F: +738kg PTOW Limit /V1 VR V2
C: -170kg C: +1400kg

Limit code: F=Field, O=Obstacle, B=Brakes, T=Tires, V=Vmc, OZ=5 min thrust limit and C=Climb.
JAR-OPS 1 line-up with 90 degr turnaround
Obstacles included in calculation: (Height above runway end / Distance from brake release point)
No obstacles.

Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
56
Instruction for the Use of the RWC’s
a) Enter the RWC at the ambient head or tail wind and OAT. Use interpolation between
the given values, if required.
b) Correct for the QNH, if other than 1013:
Subtract the QNH correction from the Takeoff Weight if QNH < 1013.
Add the QNH correction to the Actual Takeoff Weight if QNH > 1013
c) Correct for engine bleed/anti-ice/anti-skid inoperative, if required.
d) Obtain PTOW.

Example
Given:
Wind Component = 5 kts
OAT = 26°C
Normal Bleed Configuration

Find:
Climb Limited Weight (C) = 60300 kg

Field Length Limited Weight (F) = 71800 kg

Maximum Structural Weight (MTOW) = 63279 kg

The maximum takeoff weight is 60300 kg and it is climb limited.

Method of chapter PD of FCOM Volume 1
Chapter PD of FCOM Volume 1 contains self dispatch performance data intended primarily
for use by flight crews in the event that information cannot be obtained from the airline
dispatch office or from the RWC. The data provided is for a single takeoff flap at max takeoff
thrust. The range of conditions covered is limited to those normally encountered in airline
operation. In the event of conflict between the data presented in this chapter and that
contained in the approved Airplane Flight Manual, the Flight Manual shall always take
precedence.

Determination of Performance Limited Takeoff Weight
These tables provide corrections to the field length available for the effects of runway slope
and wind component along the runway. Enter the Slope Correction table with the available
field length and runway slope to determine the slope corrected field length. Now enter the
Wind Correction table with slope corrected field length and wind component to determine the
slope and wind corrected field length.

Tables are presented for selected airport pressure altitudes and runway conditions and show
both Field and Climb Limit Weights. Enter the appropriate table for pressure altitude and
runway condition with “Slope and Wind Corrected Field Length” determined above and
airport OAT to obtain Field Limit Weight. Also read Climb Limit Weight for the same OAT.
Intermediate altitudes may be interpolated or use next higher altitude.

The Reference Obstacle Limit Weight table provides obstacle limit weights for reference
airport conditions based on obstacle height above the runway surface and distance from
brake release. Enter the adjustment tables to adjust the reference Obstacle Limit Weight for
the effects of OAT, pressure altitude and wind as indicated. In the case of multiple obstacles,
enter the tables successively with each obstacle and determine the most limiting weight.

Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
57
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
Slope Correction
Field Length Slope Corrected Field Length (ft)
Available Runway Slope (%)
(ft) -2.0 -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0
4200 4330 4290 4260 4230 4200 4060 3920 3780 3640
4600 4750 4710 4680 4640 4600 4430 4260 4090 3920
5000 5180 5130 5090 5040 5000 4800 4590 4390 4190
5400 5600 5550 5500 5450 5400 5170 4930 4700 4460
5800 6030 5970 5910 5860 5800 5530 5270 5000 4740
6200 6450 6390 6330 6260 6200 5900 5600 5310 5010
6600 6880 6810 6740 6670 6600 6270 5940 5610 5280
7000 7300 7220 7150 7070 7000 6640 6280 5920 5560
7400 7720 7640 7560 7480 7400 7010 6610 6220 5830
7800 8150 8060 7970 7890 7800 7380 6950 6530 6100
8200 8570 8480 8390 8290 8200 7740 7290 6830 6380
8600 9000 8900 8800 8700 8600 8110 7620 7140 6650
9000 9420 9320 9210 9110 9000 8480 7960 7440 6920
9400 9850 9740 9620 9510 9400 8850 8300 7750 7200
9800 10270 10160 10040 9920 9800 9220 8630 8050 7470
10200 10700 10570 10450 10320 10200 9590 8970 8360 7740
10600 11120 10990 10860 10730 10600 9950 9310 8660 8020
11000 11550 11410 11270 11140 11000 10320 9640 8970 8290
11400 11970 11830 11690 11540 11400 10690 9980 9270 8560
11800 12400 12250 12100 11950 11800 11060 10320 9580 8830

Wind Corrections
Slope Corrected Slope & Wind Corrected Field Length (ft)
Field Length Wind Component (kts)
(ft) -15 -10 -5 0 10 20 30 40
4200 2280 2920 3560 4200 4400 4610 4840 5080
4600 2640 3290 3950 4600 4810 5030 5270 5510
5000 3000 3670 4330 5000 5220 5450 5690 5940
5400 3370 4050 4720 5400 5630 5870 6120 6370
5800 3730 4420 5110 5800 6040 6290 6540 6800
6200 4090 4800 5500 6200 6450 6700 6970 7230
6600 4460 5170 5890 6600 6860 7120 7390 7660
7000 4820 5550 6270 7000 7270 7540 7820 8090
7400 5190 5920 6660 7400 7680 7960 8240 8530
7800 5550 6300 7050 7800 8090 8380 8670 8960
8200 5910 6670 7440 8200 8500 8790 9090 9390
8600 6280 7050 7830 8600 8910 9210 9520 9820
9000 6640 7430 8210 9000 9320 9630 9940 10250
9400 7000 7800 8600 9400 9730 10050 10370 10680
9800 7370 8180 8990 9800 10130 10460 10790 11110
10200 7730 8550 9380 10200 10540 10880 11220 11540
10600 8090 8930 9760 10600 10950 11300 11640 11970
11000 8460 9300 10150 11000 11360 11720 12070 12400
11400 8820 9680 10540 11400 11770 12140 12490 12840
11800 9180 10060 10930 11800 12180 12550 12920 13270



Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
58
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
Takeoff Field & Climb Limit Weights - Dry Runway
Flaps 5
Sea Level Pressure Altitude
Corr
Field
Field Length Limited Weight (1000 kg)
Length OAT (°C)
(ft) -40 14 18 22 24 26 28 30 42 46 50
4600 55.1 50.1 49.8 49.5 49.3 49.2 49.0 48.8 45.8 44.8 43.9
5000 57.3 52.3 51.9 51.6 51.4 51.3 51.1 50.9 47.9 46.9 45.9
5400 59.4 54.3 53.9 53.6 53.4 53.3 53.1 52.9 49.8 48.7 47.7
5800 61.4 56.2 55.8 55.5 55.3 55.1 55.0 54.8 51.6 50.5 49.5
6200 63.3 58.0 57.6 57.3 57.1 56.9 56.7 56.6 53.3 52.2 51.2
6600 65.0 59.6 59.3 58.9 58.8 58.6 58.4 58.2 54.9 53.9 52.8
7000 66.7 61.2 60.9 60.5 60.3 60.2 60.0 59.8 56.4 55.4 54.3
7400 68.2 62.7 62.3 61.9 61.7 61.6 61.4 61.2 57.8 56.7 55.6
7800 69.8 64.1 63.8 63.4 63.2 63.0 62.8 62.6 59.1 58.0 56.9
8200 71.3 65.5 65.2 64.8 64.6 64.4 64.2 64.0 60.5 59.4 58.2
8600 72.7 66.8 66.5 66.1 65.9 65.7 65.5 65.3 61.7 60.6 59.4
9000 74.0 68.1 67.7 67.3 67.1 66.9 66.7 66.5 62.9 61.7 60.5
9400 75.2 69.2 68.8 68.4 68.2 68.0 67.8 67.6 63.9 62.8 61.6
9800 76.0 70.3 69.9 69.5 69.3 69.1 68.9 68.7 65.0 63.8 62.6
10200 76.0 71.4 71.0 70.6 70.4 70.2 70.0 69.8 66.0 64.8 63.6
10600 76.0 72.5 72.0 71.6 71.4 71.2 71.0 70.8 67.0 65.8 64.6
11000 76.0 73.5 73.1 72.7 72.5 72.2 72.0 71.8 68.0 66.7 65.5
Climb
Limit
64.4 63.7 63.5 63.5 63.4 63.4 63.3 63.2 57.5 55.7 54.0

2000 FT Pressure Altitude
Corr
Field
Field Length Limited Weight (1000 kg)
Length OAT (°C)
(ft) -40 14 18 22 24 26 28 30 42 46 50
4600 52.1 47.4 47.1 46.8 46.6 46.4 46.0 45.5 42.6 41.7 40.7
5000 54.3 49.5 49.1 48.8 48.7 48.5 48.0 47.5 44.6 43.6 42.7
5400 56.3 51.4 51.1 50.7 50.6 50.4 49.9 49.4 46.4 45.4 44.4
5800 58.3 53.2 52.9 52.6 52.4 52.2 51.7 51.2 48.1 47.2 46.1
6200 60.1 55.0 54.7 54.3 54.1 54.0 53.5 52.9 49.8 48.8 47.8
6600 61.8 56.6 56.3 56.0 55.8 55.6 55.1 54.5 51.4 50.4 49.4
7000 63.4 58.2 57.8 57.5 57.3 57.1 56.6 56.1 52.9 51.8 50.8
7400 64.9 59.5 59.2 58.8 58.7 58.5 57.9 57.4 54.1 53.1 52.0
7800 66.4 61.0 60.6 60.2 60.1 59.9 59.3 58.8 55.4 54.4 53.3
8200 67.8 62.3 62.0 61.6 61.4 61.2 60.7 60.1 56.7 55.6 54.5
8600 69.2 63.6 63.2 62.8 62.6 62.5 61.9 61.3 57.9 56.8 55.7
9000 70.4 64.8 64.4 64.0 63.8 63.6 63.0 62.5 59.0 57.9 56.7
9400 71.6 65.8 65.5 65.1 64.9 64.7 64.1 63.5 60.0 58.9 57.7
9800 72.7 66.9 66.5 66.1 65.9 65.8 65.2 64.6 61.0 59.9 58.7
10200 73.8 68.0 67.6 67.2 67.0 66.8 66.2 65.6 62.0 60.9 59.7
10600 74.9 69.0 68.6 68.2 68.0 67.8 67.2 66.6 62.9 61.8 60.6
11000 76.0 70.0 69.6 69.2 69.0 68.8 68.2 67.5 63.9 62.7 61.5
Climb
Limit
61.2 60.6 60.5 60.4 60.4 60.3 59.4 58.5 53.0 51.3 49.7
With engine bleed for packs off, increase field limit weight by 350 kg and climb limit weight by 1000 kg.
With engine anti-ice on, decrease field limit weight by 250 kg and climb limit weight by 200 kg.
With engine and wing anti-ice on, decrease field limit weight by 250 kg and climb limit weight by 825 kg.
Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
59
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
Takeoff Obstacle Limit Weight
Flaps 5
Sea Level 30°C & Below, Zero Wind
Based on engine bleed for packs on and anti-ice off
Obs Reference Obstacle Limit Weight (1000 kg)
Height Distance from Brake Release (1000 ft)
(ft) 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30
10 61.1
50 55.9 60.7 63.8
100 52.1 56.5 59.9 62.2 64.3
150 49.0 53.6 56.8 59.4 61.5 63.1 64.4
200 46.7 51.2 54.5 57.1 59.2 61.0 62.4 63.5 64.4
250 44.7 49.1 52.5 55.2 57.3 59.1 60.7 61.9 62.9 63.7 64.4
300 41.4 47.3 50.7 53.5 55.6 57.4 59.0 60.4 61.5 62.4 63.2 63.8
350 45.8 49.1 51.9 54.1 55.9 57.5 58.9 60.2 61.2 62.0 62.7
400 44.1 47.6 50.4 52.7 54.6 56.2 57.6 58.8 60.0 60.9 61.6
450 40.4 46.3 49.0 51.4 53.4 55.0 56.4 57.6 58.8 59.8 60.6
500 45.1 47.8 50.1 52.1 53.9 55.3 56.5 57.7 58.7 59.6
550 43.9 46.7 49.0 51.0 52.8 54.3 55.5 56.6 57.7 58.6
600 39.9 45.6 47.9 50.0 51.7 53.3 54.6 55.7 56.7 57.7
650 44.6 47.0 49.0 50.8 52.3 53.7 54.8 55.8 56.8
700 43.6 46.1 48.0 49.8 51.4 52.8 54.0 55.0 55.9
750 38.8 45.2 47.2 49.0 50.5 51.9 53.2 54.2 55.2
800 44.2 46.4 48.1 49.7 51.1 52.3 53.5 54.4
850 42.6 45.6 47.3 48.9 50.3 51.6 52.7 53.7
900 44.8 46.6 48.2 49.6 50.8 52.0 53.0
950 44.0 45.9 47.5 48.9 50.1 51.3 52.3
1000 41.6 45.2 46.8 48.2 49.5 50.6 51.7
Obstacle height must be calculated from lowest point of the runway to conservatively account for runway slope.

OAT Adjustments
Reference Obstacle Limit Weight (1000 kg)
OAT(°C) 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 64
30&below 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
32 -0.5 -0.6 -0.6 -0.7 -0.8 -0.8 -0.9 -1.0
34 -1.0 -1.1 -1.3 -1.4 -1.5 -1.6 -1.8 -1.9
36 -1.5 -1.7 -1.9 -2.1 -2.3 -2.5 -2.7 -2.9
38 -2.0 -2.2 -2.5 -2.8 -3.0 -3.3 -3.5 -3.8
40 -2.5 -2.8 -3.1 -3.5 -3.8 -4.1 -4.4 -4.8
42 -3.0 -3.4 -3.8 -4.2 -4.5 -4.9 -5.3 -5.7
44 -3.5 -4.0 -4.4 -4.9 -5.3 -5.7 -6.2 -6.6
46 -4.0 -4.5 -5.0 -5.6 -6.1 -6.6 -7.1 -7.6
48 -4.5 -5.1 -5.7 -6.3 -6.8 -7.4 -8.0 -8.5
50 -5.1 -5.7 -6.3 -7.0 -7.6 -8.2 -8.8 -9.5

Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
60
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
Pressure Altitude Adjustments
Alt OAT Adjusted Obstacle Limit Weight (1000 kg)
(ft) 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 64
S.L.&below 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1000 -1.3 -1.5 -1.7 -1.8 -2.0 -2.1 -2.3 -2.4
2000 -2.7 -3.0 -3.3 -3.6 -3.9 -4.2 -4.5 -4.9
3000 -3.9 -4.3 -4.8 -5.2 -5.6 -6.0 -6.5 -6.9
4000 -5.2 -5.7 -6.2 -6.8 -7.3 -7.8 -8.4 -8.9
5000 -6.2 -6.8 -7.5 -8.2 -8.9 -9.6 -10.3 -11.0
6000 -7.1 -8.0 -8.9 -9.7 -10.6 -11.4 -12.3 -13.1
7000 -8.1 -9.2 -10.2 -11.2 -12.2 -13.2 -14.2 -15.2
8000 -9.1 -10.3 -11.5 -12.6 -13.8 -15.0 -16.1 -17.3

Wind Adjustments
Wind OAT & ALT Adjusted Obstacle Limit Weight (1000 kg)
(kts) 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 64
15 TW -8.4 -8.1 -7.9 -7.6 -7.4 -7.1 -6.9 -6.7
10 TW -5.6 -5.4 -5.3 -5.1 -4.9 -4.8 -4.6 -4.4
5 TW -2.8 -2.7 -2.6 -2.5 -2.5 -2.4 -2.3 -2.2
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
10 HW 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.3
20 HW 1.6 1.5 1.3 1.2 1.1 0.9 0.8 0.6
30 HW 2.4 2.2 2.0 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.2 1.0
40 HW 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.5 2.2 1.9 1.7 1.4
With engine bleed for packs off, increase weight by 450 kg.
With engine anti-ice on, decrease weight by 1150 kg.
With engine and wing anti-ice on, decrease weight by 2650 kg.

Example
The following example will illustrate the use of the tables in Chapter PD of FCOM Volume 1:
Given:
Field Length Available (TODA) = 8600 ft
Runway Slope = -0.5%
Wind Component = 5 kts
OAT = 26°C
Pressure Altitude = 0 ft
Obstacle: 22000 ft form brake release at 200 ft height.

Find:
Slope Corrected Field Length = 8700 ft
Slope & Wind Corrected Field Length = 8856 ft
Field Length Limited Weight = 66700 kg

Climb Limted Weight = 63400 kg

Obstacle Limited Weight = 63500 kg
Wind Adjustment for Obstacle Limited Weight = +300 kg
Adjusted Obstacle Limited Weight = 63800 kg

The lowest weight is the Climb Limited Weight

Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
61
3.11.2 Takeoff Speeds
Takeoff Speeds can be obtained from:
- Runway Weight Chart
- QRH Chapter PI (Performance Inflight)

The speeds presented in the Takeoff Speeds table can be used for all performance
conditions provided adjustments are made to V
1
for clearway, stopway, brake deactivation,
improved climb, contaminated runway situations, brake energy limits or obstacle clearance
with unbalanced V
1
. These speeds may be used for weights less than or equal to the
performance limited weight.

Normal takeoff speeds, V
1
, V
R
, and V
2
, with anti-skid on, are read from the table by entering
with takeoff flap setting, brake release weight, and appropriate column. The appropriate
column is obtained by entering the Column Reference chart with the airport pressure altitude
and the actual temperature. If an Altitude Adjustment chart is provided, adjust the takeoff
speeds appropriately. Slope and wind adjustments to V
1
are obtained by entering the Slope
and Wind V
1
Adjustment table.


SAMPLE
Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
62
SAMPLE
3.11.3 Takeoff N1
The Takeoff N1 Table can be found in the QRH section PI.10.11.
To find Max Takeoff %N1 based on normal engine bleed for air conditioning packs on (Auto),
enter Takeoff %N1 Table with airport pressure altitude and airport OAT and read %N1. For
packs off operation, apply the %N1 adjustment shown below the table. No takeoff %N1
adjustment is required for engine and wing anti-ice.

Takeoff %N1
Based on engine bleed to packs on (Auto) and anti-ice on or off
Airport
OAT
Airport Pressure Altitude (ft)
°C °F -1000 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000
55 131 93.2 93.8 93.8 93.8
50 122 93.8 94.3 94.3 94.3 93.9 93.6
45 113 94.2 94.7 94.7 94.6 94.6 94.6 94.7 94.4 94.2
40 104 94.6 95.2 95.2 95.1 95.0 95.1 95.1 95.2 95.1 94.9
35 95 95.2 95.6 95.6 95.6 95.5 95.7 95.7 95.7 95.6 95.5
30 86 95.2 96.1 96.1 96.0 96.0 96.3 96.2 96.1 96.0 96.0
25 77 94.4 95.3 95.8 96.2 96.5 96.7 96.6 96.6 96.5 96.4
20 68 93.6 94.5 95.0 95.4 95.9 96.6 97.1 97.1 97.0 96.9
15 59 92.8 93.7 94.2 94.6 95.1 95.8 96.3 96.8 97.2 97.5
10 50 92.0 92.9 93.4 93.8 94.2 95.0 95.4 95.9 96.4 96.8
5 41 91.2 92.1 92.5 92.9 93.4 94.1 94.6 95.1 95.5 96.0
0 32 90.3 91.2 91.7 92.1 92.6 93.3 93.7 94.2 94.7 95.1
-10 14 88.7 89.6 90.0 90.4 90.8 91.5 92.0 92.5 92.9 93.4
-20 -4 87.0 87.8 88.3 88.7 89.1 89.8 90.2 90.7 91.1 91.6
-30 -22 85.2 86.0 86.5 86.9 87.3 88.0 88.4 88.9 89.3 89.7
-40 -40 83.5 84.3 84.7 85.1 85.5 86.2 86.6 87.1 87.4 87.9
-50 -58 81.7 82.5 82.9 83.2 83.7 84.3 84.7 85.2 85.6 86.0
%N1 Adjustments for Engine Bleeds
PACKS OFF 1.0%
3.11.4 Reduced Thrust
Regulations permit the use of up to 25% takeoff thrust reduction for operation with assumed
temperature reduced thrust. To find the maximum allowable assumed temperature enter
table 1 with airport pressure altitude and OAT.

Compare this temperature to that at which the airplane is performance limited as determined
from available takeoff performance data.

Next, enter center table 2 with airport pressure altitude and the lower of the two temperatures
previously determined to obtain a maximum takeoff %N1.

Do not use an assumed temperature less than the minimum assumed temperature shown.
Enter the %N1 Adjustment table with OAT and the difference between the assumed and
actual OAT to obtain a %N1 adjustment. Subtract the %N1 adjustment from the maximum
takeoff %N1 found previously to determine the assumed temperature reduced thrust %N1.

Takeoff with assumed temperature reduced thrust is not permitted when:
- runway is contaminated with ice, slush, snow, or standing water;
- anti-skid is inoperative; or
- PMC is off.

Use of this procedure is not recommended if potential windshear conditions exist.
Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
63




Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
64
Example
Find the Reduced Thrust for the following conditions:
Airport = Madrid Runway 36R
Zero Wind
OAT = 18°C
Actual Takeoff Gross Weight = 56500 kg

Solution
Enter Runway Weight Chart with Actual Gross Weight and find in the OAT column TASS =
34°C.

Enter Table 1 and find Maximum Assumed Temperature of 58°C. Use the lower temperature
(34°C) for further calculations.

From Table 2 find Maximum N1 which is 95.6%.

Enter Table 3 with Actual OAT (18°C) and the difference between TASS and OAT (16°C) and
obtain N1 Adjustment: 3.1%

The Reduced Takeoff N1 is: 92.5%
3.11.5 Computer Generated Takeoff Analysis
Today some operators are using computer software to calculate takeoff performance, either
by using a standard personal computer or by transmitting the takeoff data via ACARS to the
flight crew. The following is an example of such a computer generated takeoff analysis.

No. Description Remarks
1
TODC

2
14JUN11 09:15 B737-800W
Date and Time of generation, Airplane Type
3
EDDF/07L B-ON A-OFF
Airport ICAO/Runway B = Bleeds / A = Anti-Ice
4
080/005 1017 4000/13123
Wind Direction/Speed, QNH, TORA[m]/[ft]
5
OAT=+20C
OAT
6
RWY COND DRY
Runway Condition
7
MTOW= 78999 KG STR
Structural MTOW
8
FLAPS 05
Flap Position
9
ACT TOW 75000 KG
Actual TOW
10
MAX TOW 78999 KG STR
Maximum Allowable TOW
11
MAC - 12.5
MAC
12
STRUCTURE - 78999
Structural Weight Limit
13
FIELD - 86182
Field Length Limited Weight
14
CLIMB - 85296
Climb Limited Weight
15
OBSTACLE - 85296
Obstacle Limited Weight
16
IMP CLIMB - -----
Improved Climb Limited Weight
17
FULL THRUST- 78999 KG
Full Rated Takeoff Data
18
DERATE01- 77972 KG OBS
Derated Takeoff Data with Limitation Code
19
D01 ASS TEMP 33 C OBS
Assumed Temperature based on Derate 01

Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance
65

TODC

14JUN11 09:15 B737-800W
EDDF/07L B-ON A-OFF
080/005 1017 4000/13123
OAT=+20C
RWY COND DRY
MTOW= 78999 KG STR

------------------------
FLAPS 05
ACT TOW 75000 KG
MAX TOW 78999 KG STR
------------------------

MAC - 12.5
STRUCTURE - 78999
FIELD - 86182
CLIMB - 85296
OBSTACLE - 85296
IMP CLIMB - -----

FULL THRUST- 78999 KG
V1 - 147
VR - 149
V2 - 156
ACCL ALT STD 1350 FT
MIN - MAX V1 99 - 149

DERATE01- 77972 KG OBS
V1 - 149
VR - 150
V2 - 155
ACCL ALT STD 1350 FT
MIN - MAX V1 106 - 150

D01 ASS TEMP 33 C OBS
V1 - 150
VR - 150
V2 - 155
ACCL ALT STD 1350 FT
MIN - MAX V1 131 - 150

-- Eng Fail Procdure --
STD. At 1900 turn LEFT
to MTR HP. 110.0 MTR HP:
Inbound 241DEG, RIGHT
turn.



Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance
66
Notes:





















































Jet Transport Performance Cruise Performance
67
4 CRUISE PERFORMANCE
4.1 Fuel Requirements
4.1.1 FAA Fuel Requirements
Domestic
FAR 121.639 covers fuel requirements for domestic air carriers for all operations. It states
that no person may dispatch or takeoff an airplane unless it has enough fuel:
- To fly to the airport to which it is dispatched
- Thereafter, to fly to and land at the most distant alternate airport (where required) for
the airport to which dispatched; and
- Thereafter, to fly for 45 minutes at normal cruising fuel consumption.

International
FAR 121.645 covers turbine powered airplanes, other than turbo propeller, flag and
supplemental air carriers and commercial operators. It states for any flag air carrier,
supplemental air carrier, or commercial operator, operation outside of the 48 contiguous
United States and the District of Columbia, unless authorized by the administrator in the
operations specifications, no person may release for flight or takeoff a turbine engine
powered airplane, other than a turbo propeller powered airplane, unless, considering wind
and other weather conditions expected, it has enough fuel:
- To fly to and land at the airport to which it is released
- After that, to fly for a period of 10 percent of the total time required to fly from the
airport of departure to, and land at, the airport to which it was released
- After that, to fly to and land at the most distant alternate airport specified in the flight
release, if an alternate is required, and
- After that, to fly for 30 minutes at holding speed at 1500 feet above the alternate
airport (or the destination airporl, if no alternate is required) under standard
conditions.
4.1.2 ICAO Fuel Requirements
The Internation Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) gives fuel requirements in annex 6 to the
convnetion on international civil aviation, part 1 - international commercial air transport.
Section 4, Flight Operations, Subsection 3, Flight Preperation, Paragraph 6, Fuel and Oil
Supply contains the following:

4.3.6.1 All aeroplanes. A flight shall not be commenced unless, taking into account both the
meteorological conditions and any delays that are expected in flight, the aeroplane carries
sufficient fuel and oil to ensure that it can safely complete the flight. In addition, a reserve
shall be carried to provide for contingencies.

4.3.6.3 Aeroplanes equiped with turbo-jet engines.

4.3.6.3.2 A) When an alternate aerodrome is required:

To fly to and execute an approach, and a missed approach, at the aerodrome to which the
flight is palnned, and thereafter:
- To fly to the alternate aerodrome specified in the flight plan, and then
- To fly for 30 minutes at holding speed at 1500 ft above the alternate aerodrome under
standard temperature conditions, and approach and land; and
- To have an additional amount of fuel sufficient to provide for the increased
consumption on the occurrence of any of the potential contingencies specified by the
operator to the satisfaction of the state of the operator (typically a percentage of the
trip fuel – 3% to 6%).
Cruise Performance Jet Transport Performance
68
4.2 Altitude Capability and Maneuver Capability
The maximum altitude which an airplane can fly is limited by either the thrust of the engines
(Altitude Capability) or by the ability of the wing to generate enough buffet-free lift (Maneuver
Capability).

Since the thrust which the engine can generate depends on the temperature, Altitude
Capability is also dependent on temperature. Altitude Capability is given for various weights
and three different temperatures.

The Maneuver Capability represents the ability of the wing to generate enough lift for the
weight of the airplane. To ensure that there is a sufficient safety margin, a "g" limit is normally
specified. For a given weight and "g" margin, the Maneuver Capability table shows the
maximum altitude at which the airplane can fly.

The "g" margin is also expressed in terms of the level flight bank angle which corresponds to
the given "g" loading. For example, an airplane flying in a 39 degree bank while maintaining a
level flight altitude will generate a loading of 1.3 g.

Figure 4.1 – Buffet Boundary
4.3 Step Climb
There is an optimum altitude to fly a plane at based on its weight. As the weight of a plane
changes, so does its optimum altitude. Therefore, as fuel burns during cruise, the optimum
altitude changes. In addition, as fuel burns off, the airplane's tendency is to climb.

Typically airlines are not allowed to do a climbing cruise, i.e. allow the airplane to climb as
fuel burns off. Rather they must fly at specified altitudes. For this reason a step climb is used.

A step climb starts at an altitude that is above optimum altitude (typically 2000 feet above
optimum altitude) and stays at that altitude until it is a given amount under the optimum
altitude (again, typically 2000 feet). At this point, the airplane will climb and be above
optimum altitude again. The typical climb is 4000 feet to again be 2000 feet above optimum.
Jet Transport Performance Cruise Performance
69
This method keeps planes at specified altitudes yet lets planes climb in increments to save
fuel.

Figure 4.2 – Step Climb
4.4 Driftdown and Net Level Off Weight
4.4.1 General
If an engine fails in flight, the maximum altitude at which the airplane can fly will be reduced.
Regulations require that the airplane be able to clear all terrain by a given amount when an
engine falls. The amount of clearance required depends upon whether the terrain can be
cleared in level flight with one engine inoperative or while the airplane is descending (drifting
down) following an engine failure.
4.4.2 Net Flight Path
For most normal cruise weights and altitudes, an airplane will not be able to maintain its
cruise altitude following an engine failure. It will begin to descend. To remain as high a
possible, the pilot will use maximum continuous thrust on the remaining engine and slow
down to the optimum driftdown speed. The airplane will then descend along what is called
the optimum driftdown profile. The optimum driftdown profile will keep the airplane as high as
possible during the descent.

Regulations require that the actual airplane performance be calculated in the most
conservative airplane configuration and then further decreased by a 1.1 percent climb
gradient for two engine airplanes, 1.4 percent for three engine airplanes, and 1.6 percent for
four engine airplanes. This reduced gradient is called the enroute net flight path and is used
to ensure enroute obstacle clearance.
4.4.3 Driftdown
During the driftdown phase of flight following an engine failure, the airplane must have a net
flight path capable of clearing all obstacles within 5 statue miles of the intended flight track by
at least 2000 feet vertically.
4.4.4 Level-Off
Following a driftdown, an airplane will level off when it reaches some altitude. This altitude is
called the Net Level-Off altitude and depends on the atmospheric temperature and the weight
of the airplane. The Net Level-Off altitude must clear all obstacles within 5 statue miles of the
intended flight track by at least 1000 feet.
Cruise Performance Jet Transport Performance
70
4.4.5 Landing
The net flight path of the airplane must have a positive gradient at 1500 feet above the airport
where the airplane intends to land following an engine failure.
4.4.6 Practical
The net flight path is greatly influenced by the weight of the airplane. A maximum enroute
weight based on the net flight path is usually determined for the obstacles and temperatures
on each route. To ensure enroute obstacle clearance in level flight:
- Determine the maximum enroute weight which will give a net flight path which will
clear all obstacles by 1000 feet,
- Compare this weight to the predicted actual weight of the airplane at that point in the
flight to ensure obstacle clearance.

For most routes, the Net Level-Off altitude will clear all enroute obstacles and the driftdown
profile is not calculated.

For flights over very high terrain, the Net Level-Off weight may be insufficient for the flight. In
this case the driftdown profile is calculated for each limiting obstacle, and critical points along
the flight track are determined. If an engine failure occurs prior to a critical point, then the
flight will have to divert along another route with lower terrain. Flights over these types of high
terrain require careful analysis of the various tracks and alternate airports available.


Figure 4.3 – Driftdown
4.5 Flight Planning and Enroute Performance Data
4.5.1 Trip Fuel
Fuel for the flight is determined as an amount to fulfil the minimum requirements set in JAR-
OPS and any extra fuel requested by the Commander.

Definitions
Taxi Fuel: A quantity to cover engine start and ground manoeuvres until take-off run. The
amount may be increased if required by local conditions.

Trip Fuel: Fuel required to fly from the aerodrome of departure to the flight plan destination,
based on “Planned Operating Conditions”. This amount shall include fuel for take-off, climb,
cruise, descent, approach and landing.
Jet Transport Performance Cruise Performance
71

Contingency Fuel: A quantity of fuel to cover unforeseeable deviations from “Planned
Operating Conditions". The higher amount of the following shall be carried as contingency
fuel:
- 5% of the planned trip fuel or, in the event of replanning, trip fuel for the remainder of
the flight or
- an amount to fly for 5 minutes at holding speed at 1500 ft (450 m) above the
destination aerodrome in standard conditions

Alternate Fuel: Fuel required to fly from destination to the alternate based on “Planned
Operating Conditions”. Alternate fuel will include fuel for missed approach at destination,
climb, cruise, descend, approach and landing at alternate.

Final Reserve: For aeroplanes with turbine power final reserve fuel comprises fuel to fly for
30 minutes at holding speed at 1500 ft (450 m) above aerodrome elevation in standard
conditions, calculated with the estimated weight on arrival at the alternate or the destination,
when no alternate is required.

Extra Fuel: Fuel in addition to minimum block fuel, at the discretion of the Commander.

Additional Fuel: Additional fuel shall permit:
- Holding for 15 minutes at 1500 ft (450 m) above aerodrome elevation in standard
conditions when a flight is operated in IFR without a destination alternate, and
- Following a possible engine-failure or loss of pressurization at the most critical point
along the route, the aeroplane to descend as necessary to an adequate aerodrome,
hold there for 15 minutes at 1500 ft above aerodrome elevation and make an
approach and landing, if the normal amount of fuel carried is not sufficient for such an
event.

Minimum Block Fuel: Taxi Fuel + Trip Fuel + Contingency Fuel + Alternate Fuel (if required)
+ Final Reserve + Additional Fuel (if required)

Block Fuel: Minimum Block Fuel + Extra Fuel. The actual total amount of fuel on board before
engine start.

Evaluation of fuel required for flight
To evaluate fuel required for flight, follow the following steps:

Step 1
ZFW + Extra Fuel (if required) → Holding Planning Table → Min Reserve Fuel
(Pressure altitude = Pressure altitude of alternate + 1500 ft)
Step 2
LW
AT ALTERNATE
= ZFW + Min Reserve Fuel + Extra Fuel
LW
AT ALTERNATE
→ Trip Fuel and Time Table → Alternate Fuel
Step 3
LW
AT DESTINATION
= LW
AT ALTERNATE
+ Alternate Fuel + Contingency Fuel (5 minutes at holding
fuel consumption)
LW
AT DESTINATION
→ Trip and Time Table → Trip Fuel
Step 4
Contingency Fuel = 5% of Trip Fuel
If 5% of Trip Fuel is more than 5 minutes at holding fuel consumption go to Step 3 and use
new Contingency Fuel to determine LW
AT DESTINATION
.
Step 5
TO Fuel = Trip + Contingency + Alternate + Min reserve + Extra Fuel
Step 6
Block Fuel = TO Fuel + Taxi Fuel
Cruise Performance Jet Transport Performance
72
SAMPLE

Example
Calculate the Takeoff Fuel for the following conditions:
ZFW = 48000 kg
Extra Fuel = 0 kg
Alternate Elevation = 0ft
Alternate Distance = 150 NAM
Segment Distance = 1200 NAM at Flight Level 330

Find
Holding Fuel = 1135 kg. LW
AT ALTERNATE
= ZFW + Min Reserve Fuel + Extra Fuel = 49135 kg.

Alternate Fuel = 1300 kg. LW
AT DESTINATION
= LW
AT ALTERNATE
+ Alternate Fuel + Contingency
Fuel = 50624 kg.

Trip Fuel from table = 6400 kg, and Adjustment for LW = +400 kg. Trip Fuel = 6800 kg

Summary
Holding Fuel = 1135 kg 00:30
Alternate Fuel = 1300 kg 00:30
Trip Fuel = 6800 kg 02:59
Contingency Fuel = 340 kg 00:09
TAKEOFF FUEL = 9575 kg 04:08
Taxi Fuel = 200 kg
BLOCK FUEL = 9775 kg

Trip Fuel and Time

Pressure Altitude (feet)
Air 29000 31000 33000 37000
Dist FUEL TIME FUEL TIME FUEL TIME FUEL TIME
NM 1000 KG HR:MIN 1000 KG HR:MIN 1000 KG HR:MIN 1000 KG HR:MIN
200 1.5 00:38 1.5 00:38 1.5 00:38 1.5 00:38
400 2.6 01:06 2.5 01:06 2.5 01:06 2.4 01:06
600 3.6 01:35 3.5 01:34 3.5 01:33 3.4 01:34
800 4.7 02:03 4.6 02:02 4.5 02:01 4.3 02:02
1000 5.8 02:31 5.7 02:30 5.5 02:29 5.3 02:30
1200 6.9 02:59 6.7 02:57 6.6 02:57 6.4 02:59
1400 8.0 03:27 7.8 03:25 7.6 03:25 7.4 03:27
1600 9.2 03:54 8.9 03:52 8.7 03:52 8.5 03:55
1800 10.3 04:22 10.0 04:20 9.8 04:20 9.5 04:23
2000 11.5 04:49 11.2 04:47 10.9 04:48 10.6 04:51
2200 12.7 05:17 12.3 05:15 12.0 05:16 11.8 05:19
2400 13.9 05:44 13.5 05:43 13.1 05:43 13.0 05:47
2600 15.1 06:11 14.7 06:10 14.3 06:11
2800 16.3 06:39 15.9 06:38 15.5 06:39
3000 17.6 07:06 17.0 07:05 16.6 07:07
3200 18.8 07:33 18.3 07:33 17.9 07:35
3400 20.1 08:01 19.5 08:00 19.1 08:02

Jet Transport Performance Cruise Performance
73
SAMPLE
SAMPLE

Fuel Required Adjustments (1000 kg)
Reference
Fuel Required
Landing Weight (1000 kg)
(1000 kg) 30 35 40 45 50
2 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 0.0 0.1
4 -0.6 -0.4 -0.2 0.0 0.2
6 -0.9 -0.6 -0.3 0.0 0.4
8 -1.2 -0.8 -0.4 0.0 0.5
10 -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.7
12 -1.8 -1.2 -0.6 0.0 0.9
14 -2.1 -1.5 -0.7 0.0 1.1
16 -2.5 -1.7 -0.8 0.0 1.3
18 -2.8 -1.9 -1.0 0.0 1.6
20 -3.1 -2.1 -1.1 0.0 1.8
22 -3.4 -2.3 -1.2 0.0 2.1
Based on 280/.74 climb, Long Range Cruise speed and .74/250 descent.

GS
TAS Distance Sector
Distance Air
×
=

Short Trip Fuel and Time Required

Landing Weight (1000 kg) Time
Air Distance (NM)
30 35 40 45 50 HR:MIN
FUEL (1000 kg) 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7
50
ALT (ft) 13000 13000 11000 11000 11000
00:14
FUEL (1000 kg) 0.8 0.8 0.9 0.9 1.0
100
ALT (ft) 25000 23000 23000 21000 19000
00:22
FUEL (1000 kg) 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.3
150
ALT (ft) 35000 33000 31000 29000 27000
00:30
FUEL (1000 kg) 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6
200
ALT (ft) 37000 37000 37000 35000 33000
00:37
FUEL (1000 kg) 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8
250
ALT (ft) 37000 37000 37000 37000 35000
00:45
FUEL (1000 kg) 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.1
300
ALT (ft) 37000 37000 37000 37000 35000
00:52
FUEL (1000 kg) 1.8 1.9 2 2.2 2.3
350
ALT (ft) 37000 37000 37000 37000 35000
00:58
FUEL (1000 kg) 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.4 2.6
400
ALT (ft) 37000 37000 37000 37000 35000
01:05
FUEL (1000 kg) 2.1 2.3 2.5 2.6 2.9
450
ALT (ft) 37000 37000 37000 37000 35000
01:13
FUEL (1000 kg) 2.3 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.1
500
ALT (ft) 37000 37000 37000 37000 35000
01:20
Based on 280/.74 climb, Long Range Cruise speed and .74/250 descent.
Cruise Performance Jet Transport Performance
74
SAMPLE
Holding Planning

Flaps Up
GW Total Fuel Flow (kg/h)
1000 Pressure Altitude (ft)
kg 1500 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 37000
64 2870 2830 2780 2730 2700 2690 2680
62 2800 2740 2700 2650 2610 2610 2590
60 2720 2660 2620 2570 2530 2520 2500
58 2640 2590 2540 2490 2450 2440 2420
56 2570 2510 2460 2410 2370 2360 2330 2380
54 2490 2430 2380 2330 2290 2280 2250 2270
52 2420 2360 2310 2250 2210 2190 2170 2180
50 2340 2280 2230 2170 2130 2110 2090 2080 2120
48 2270 2210 2150 2100 2050 2030 2000 2000 2020
46 2200 2130 2080 2020 1970 1960 1920 1920 1930
44 2130 2060 2010 1940 1900 1880 1840 1840 1850
42 2070 2010 1950 1890 1830 1800 1770 1760 1770
40 2010 1950 1900 1830 1780 1750 1700 1690 1700
38 1970 1910 1850 1780 1720 1690 1650 1630 1640
36 1920 1860 1800 1740 1680 1640 1600 1580 1590
This table includes 5% additional fuel for holding in a racetrack pattern.
4.5.2 Operational Flight Plan (OFP)
Before each flight an operational flight plan must be prepared by dispatchers or by the flight
crew. It is normally obtained through a computerized process.

Example: Computerized flight plan for an B737-300 from Frankfurt to Timisoara

No. Heading Description
1 25MAY08 Date of Flight Plan
2 EDDF-LRTR From – To
3 RJ1234 Flight Number
4 YR-RLT/B733 Tail Sign and Type
5 STD/STA Scheduled Time of Departure and Arrival
6 PIC Name of Commander
7 FO Name of First Officer
8 C/A Names of Cabin Crew
9 TOW / LW / ZFW Weight on which OFP is based
10 FL350 M074 AVG WC Flight Level, Mach Number, Average Wind Component
11 Trip Time/Dist/Fuel
12 Approved by Commanders Signature
13 ATIS Departure Enter ATIS for departure
14 ATC Clearance Enter ATC clearance
15 Fuel MIN/ACTUAL Calculated minimum Takeoff Fuel, enter Actual Takeoff Fuel
16 AWY Airway
17 WPT Waypoint name
18 MSA Minimum sector Altitude
19 FREQ Frequency of NAV aid
20 C/S Course
21 DST Distance
22 ET Estimated Time
23 ETO Estimated Time
24 ATO Actual Time
25 FUEL EST Estimated fuel
26 ACT Actual remaining fuel
27 FUEL TIME Fuel and time tabulation
28 ALTERNATES Alternate airports
29 ATS FPL FILED Filed ATS flight plan

Jet Transport Performance Cruise Performance
75
25MAY08 EDDF-LRTR RJ1234 YR-RLT/B733 STD/STA......./.......

PIC...................... FO....................................

C/A......................................................................

TOW 52987 LW 50031 ZFW 47804 FL350 M074 AVG WC+0

TRIP TIME/DIST/FUEL 0135/579/2956

APPROVED BY COMMANDER....................................................

ON CHOCKS............ LANDING.................PAYLOAD...................

OFF CHOCKS........... AIRBORNE................PAX..../......

BLOCK TIME........... FLT TIME................CARGO........ MAIL........

ATIS DEPARTURE...........................................................

.........................................................................

ATC CLEARANCE............................................................

.........................................................................

FUEL MIN/ACTUAL 5183/.....

AWY WPT MSA FREQ C/S DST ET/ETO/ATO FUEL EST/ACT

OFF FRANKFURT
SID WUR 110.2 44 6/.../... 5020/...
UL126 DINKU 20 34 5/.../... 4884/...
UL603 TEGBA 20 55 8/.../... 4667/...
UL605 STEIN 20 214 31/.../... 3823/...
UL605 SIDRU 20 32 5/.../... 3687/...
UL605 BUG 20 113.4 103 16/.../... 3252/...
UL605 TEGRI 20 64 10/.../... 2980/...
UL605 ARD 20 109.0 10 2/.../... 2926/...
B48 TSR 20 408 23 3/.../... 2844/...
STAR TIMISOARA

ALT............ DIV FUEL............ FUEL REMAINING..............

ATIS ARRIVAL.............................................................

.........................................................................

NOTES....................................................................

.........................................................................

.........................................................................

FUEL TIME
TAXI 250
TRIP FUEL 2956 01:35
CONTINGENCY 148 00:05
ALTERNATE LRAR 829 00:21
FINAL RESERVE 1000 00:30
MINIMUM BLOCK 5183 02:31
EXTRA FUEL
BLOCK FUEL

ALTERNATES MIN BLOCK/TIME DIV FUEL DIST/ TIME/ FUEL FL
LRAR 23 00:21 829 90
LROD 86 00:30 1139 100

ATS FPL FILED:
FPL-........-I
-B733/M-SRYW/C
-EDDF
-UL126 DINKU UL603 TEGBA UL603 SIDRU UL605 ARD
-LRTR0135 LRAR
REG/........ SEL/............)


Cruise Performance Jet Transport Performance
76
SAMPLE
4.5.3 Enroute Performance
To ensure a safe flight over the mountainous terrain, the flight must be planned in such a
way, that in case of engine failure, the aircraft can clear the most critical terrain en route with
acceptable safety margins.

Climb
There is no problem with all engines operative to reach and maintain the minimum safe
altitude with the maximum take-off weight even in the worst ISA + 20 conditions.
For one engine inoperative climb, after flap retraction and all obstructions are cleared, on the
FMC ACT ECON CLB page select ENG OUT prompt and the FMC calculates for the actual
gross weight:
- N1 for maximum continuous thrust;
- Maximum altitude, and
- Climb speed.

If appropriate FMC page is not available, use V
CLEAN
or approx 210Kts and check Long
Range Cruise Altitude Capability with 100ft/min residual rate of climb (QRH PI.13.7).

Long Range Cruise Altitude Capability
100 ft/min residual rate of climb
Pressure Altitude (ft) Weight
(1000 kg)
ISA + 10°C
& below
ISA + 15°C ISA + 20°C
64 9500 7200 4900
60 12300 10200 7900
56 15200 13200 11000
52 18000 16200 14100
48 20900 19200 17400
44 24000 22300 20600
40 27000 25600 24000
36 30000 28800 27500
32 33200 32200 31000
With engine anti-ice on, decrease altitude capability by 1400ft.
With engine and wing anti-ice on, decrease altitude capability by 5300ft.

NOTE: Planning operations in mounting area on aerodromes/routes where the climb
performance is critical, the sec. 4.11 of AFM to be consulted.
Jet Transport Performance Cruise Performance
77
SAMPLE

Driftdown
If an engine failure occurs during cruise/descent, on FMC CRZ page select ENG OUT
prompt and the FMC calculates for the actual gross weight:
- N1 for maximum continuous thrust;
- Maximum altitude, and
- Descent speed.

If appropriate FMC page is not available, use V
CLEAN
or approx 210Kts and check Drift–down
Level off altitudes with 100 ft residual rate of climb table (QRH, PI.13.5).

Driftdown Speed/Level Off Altitude
100 ft/min residual rate of climb
Optimum Weight (1000 kg)
Driftdown
Level Off Altitude (1000 ft)
Start Level Speed ISA + 10°C ISA + 15°C ISA + 20°C
Driftdown Off (KIAS) & below
64 61 235 16200 15000 13600
60 57 228 18200 17200 15900
56 53 220 20400 19300 18200
52 49 212 22700 21700 20600
48 46 204 25100 24100 23100
44 42 196 27400 26600 25700
40 38 187 29900 29200 28400
Includes APU fuel burn

Cruise Performance Jet Transport Performance
78
Notes:





















































Jet Transport Performance Landing Performance
79
5 LANDING PERFORMANCE
5.1 Introduction
Landing weights limited by field length and the climb gradient. The maximum landing weight
is the lower of these two limiting weights.
5.1.1 Climb Limit
The climb limit weight is the maximum weight that still meets the minimum gradient
established by the FARs. For a two engine aircraft the gradient is 2.1% for approach and
3.2% for landing. The conditions for the approach climb gradient are:
- one engine inoperative
- go-around thrust
- approach flaps
- landing gear up.

The conditions for the landing gradient are:
- all engines operative
- go-around thrust
- landing flaps
- landing gear down.
5.1.2 Field Length Limit
The field length limit weight is determined during flight test. For a dry runway the required
distance is 167% of the demonstrated stopping distance. For a wet runway the distance
required is 115% the dry runway, no reverse thrust, maximum manual braking, from 50 feet
above the runway distance.

Figure 5.1 – Approach and Landing Requirements

Segment
Approach Landing
Number of
engines
Minimum Gross Gradient [%]
2 2.1 3.2
3 2.4 3.2
4 2.7 3.2

Table 5.1 – FAR Minimum Approach and Landing Climb Requirements
Landing Performance Performance and Weight & Balance
80
5.2 Landing Performance Data
5.2.1 General
Maximum Landing Weight (MLW) could be limited either by:
- Maximum certified structural landing weight;
- Aircraft performance
- Landing weight field limit weight;
- Climb limit weight (approach and landing climb, go-around climb for Low Visibility
instrument approaches).

The most limiting of these requirements defines the maximum allowable landing weight for
dispatch.

Presentation
Landing performance is presented in a way of diagrams or tables in AFM and QRH.
For planning purposes the following criteria must be fulfilled:
- Be able to land on the expected runway in expected wind and runway conditions.
- Be able to land on the longest runway in zero wind conditions;
- When gusty winds are forecasted, average wind speed plus 50% of the gust factor
shall be used.
5.2.2 Landing field limit weight
General
The Landing field limit weight is the maximum weight for which the landing distance available
(LDA) is equal to the landing distance required (LDR).
DRY runway LDR is the flight test demonstrated landing distance plus an additional margin of
67%.
WET runway LDR is a “dry runway LDR” increased further by an additional margin of 15%.
CONT/LOW FRICTION runway – same as wet.
The performance is based on the weather/runway conditions and the following assumptions:
- Engines Idle on all engines before touch down
- Wing flaps Landing setting
- Landing Gear Down
- Speed brake Selected After Touchdown
- Wheel Brakes Full Braking with Anti-skid ON
- Runway Paved Runway
- Airspeed VREF
- Reverse Not used

The following considerations do not directly accounted but protected by the margins used to
define the LDR:
- Runway slope
- Non-standard temperature
- Approach speed.

NOTE: For more detailed information refer to FCOM, Performance Dispatch, Landing and
Flight Planning and Performance Manual, Landing, Landing Field Length Limit 1.3.1.
Jet Transport Performance Landing Performance
81
SAMPLE
SAMPLE

Landing Landing Field Limit Weight - Dry Runway
Flaps 30
Anti-skid Operative and Automatic Speedbrakes
Category "A" Brakes
Wind Corrected Field Length (ft)
Field
Length
Wind Component (kts)
(ft) -15 -10 -5 0 10 20 30 40
3000 2690 3000 3210 3400 3600 3780
3400 2790 3070 3400 3620 3830 4040 4240
3800 2880 3130 3440 3800 4030 4260 4480 4700
4200 3190 3470 3810 4200 4440 4680 4920 5160
4600 3510 3820 4180 4600 4850 5110 5360 5620
5000 3830 4160 4550 5000 5270 5530 5800 6080
5400 4140 4500 4920 5400 5680 5960 6250 6540
5800 4460 4850 5290 5800 6090 6380 6690 6990
6200 4780 5190 5660 6200 6500 6810 7130 7450
6600 5090 5530 6030 6600 6910 7240 7570 7910
7000 5410 5880 6400 7000 7330 7660 8010 8370
7400 5730 6220 6780 7400 7740 8090 8450 8830
7800 6050 6560 7150 7800 8150 8510 8890 9290
8200 6360 6910 7520 8200 8560 8940 9330 9750
8600 6680 7250 7890 8600 8970 9370 9780 10210
9000 7000 7590 8260 9000 9380 9790 10220 10670
9400 7310 7940 8630 9400 9800 10220 10660 11120
9800 7630 8280 9000 9800 10210 10640 11100
10200 7950 8620 9370 10200 10620 11070
10600 8270 8970 9740 10600 11030

Field Limit Weight (1000 kg)
Wind Corr
Field Length
Airport Pressure Altitude (ft)
(ft) 0 2000 4000 6000 8000
3400 36.4 34.4
3800 41.8 39.4 37.3 35.1
4200 47.1 44.5 42.1 39.6 37.6
4600 51.8 49.3 46.9 44.2 41.9
5000 55.3 53.4 51.2 48.7 46.2
5400 58.3 56.5 54.6 52.6 50.2
5800 61.1 59.2 57.3 55.5 53.6
6200 63.7 61.8 59.9 58.0 56.1
6600 66.2 64.2 62.1 60.2 58.3
7000 66.2 64.1 62.1 60.2
7400 65.9 63.9 61.9
7800 67.7 65.6 63.6
8200 67.3 65.2
8600 66.7
Decrease field limit weight by 7700 kg when using manual speedbrakes.
Landing Performance Performance and Weight & Balance
82
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
Landing Landing Field Limit Weight - Wet Runway
Flaps 40
Anti-skid Operative and Automatic Speedbrakes
Category "A" Brakes
Wind Corrected Field Length (ft)
Field
Length
Wind Component (kts)
(ft) -15 -10 -5 0 10 20 30 40
3000 3000 3220 3440 3640 3830
3400 3050 3400 3640 3860 4080 4290
3800 3110 3420 3800 4050 4290 4520 4750
4200 3170 3450 3790 4200 4460 4710 4960 5210
4600 3490 3790 4170 4600 4870 5140 5410 5670
5000 3810 4140 4540 5000 5280 5570 5850 6130
5400 4120 4480 4910 5400 5690 5990 6290 6590
5800 4440 4820 5280 5800 6110 6420 6730 7050
6200 4760 5170 5650 6200 6520 6840 7170 7500
6600 5070 5510 6020 6600 6930 7270 7610 7960
7000 5390 5860 6390 7000 7340 7690 8050 8420
7400 5710 6200 6760 7400 7750 8120 8490 8880
7800 6030 6540 7130 7800 8170 8550 8940 9340
8200 6340 6880 7500 8200 8580 8970 9380 9800
8600 6660 7230 7880 8600 8990 9400 9820 10260
9000 6980 7570 8250 9000 9400 9820 10260 10720
9400 7290 7920 8620 9400 9810 10250 10700 11180
9800 7610 8260 8990 9800 10230 10670 11140 11630
10200 7930 8600 9360 10200 10640 11100 11580 12090
10600 8250 8940 9730 10600 11050 11530 12030 12550

Field Limit Weight (1000 kg)
Wind Corr
Field Length
Airport Pressure Altitude (ft)
(ft) 0 2000 4000 6000 8000
3800 35.2
4200 39.8 37.6 35.5
4600 44.4 42.0 39.7 37.4 35.4
5000 48.9 46.4 43.9 41.3 39.2
5400 52.7 50.4 48.0 45.3 42.9
5800 55.6 53.8 51.6 49.1 46.6
6200 58.2 56.4 54.6 52.5 50.2
6600 60.7 58.8 56.9 55.1 53.2
7000 63.0 61.1 59.2 57.3 55.4
7400 65.2 63.2 61.2 59.3 57.4
7800 67.3 65.1 63.1 61.1 59.1
8200 66.8 64.7 62.7 60.7
8600 66.3 64.2 62.3
9000 67.8 65.7 63.7
9400 67.2 65.1
9800 66.4
10200 67.7
Decrease field limit weight by 7700 kg when using manual speedbrakes.
Jet Transport Performance Landing Performance
83
5.2.3 Climb Limit Weight
Climb performance limits for landing ensure a minimum climb gradient capability in the
certified approach and landing configurations in case of goaround becomes necessary at any
point during the landing approach.

Approach and landing climb limit weight accounts for:
- Airport temperature
- Airport pressure altitude
- Engine bleed
- Icing conditions

Approach climb requirements:
- Minimum gradient in approach configuration shall not be less then 2.1%.
- Approach configuration is based on the approach flaps setting 15 deg.,
- landing gear up, one engine inoperative, and the operating engine at go-around
thrust.
- Normally it is not a limiting factor until aerodrome temperature exceeds 45°C and
field elevation 3000 ft.

Landing climb:
- Minimum gradient in landing configuration shall not be less then 3.2 %.
- Landing configuration is based on the landing flaps setting 30 or 40 deg., landing gear
down, all engines operative, the engines are at go-around thrust.

Landing Performance Performance and Weight & Balance
84
SAMPLE
Landing Climb Limit Weight
Valid for approach with Flaps 15 and landing with Flaps 40
Based on engine bleed for packs on, APU operating and anti-ice off
Airport Landing Climb Limit Weight (1000 kg)
OAT Pressure Altitude (ft)
°C -1000 0 2000 4000 6000 8000
54 55.0 53.9
52 56.1 54.9
50 57.2 56.0 51.7
48 58.0 56.8 52.5
46 58.8 57.7 53.4 49.3
44 59.7 58.6 54.2 50.2
42 60.6 59.5 55.1 51.0 47.3
40 61.5 60.4 56.0 51.7 48.2
38 62.6 61.3 56.8 52.7 48.9 45.0
36 63.6 62.2 57.7 53.6 49.7 45.8
34 64.7 63.2 58.6 54.5 50.5 46.6
32 65.7 64.1 59.5 55.4 51.3 47.4
30 65.8 65.1 60.5 56.4 52.2 48.2
28 65.8 65.3 61.5 57.3 53.0 48.9
26 65.9 65.4 62.4 58.3 53.8 49.6
24 65.9 65.4 62.4 59.3 54.6 50.3
22 66.0 65.5 62.5 60.0 55.4 51.0
20 66.0 65.5 62.5 60.1 56.2 51.7
18 66.0 65.6 62.6 60.1 57.1 52.5
16 66.0 65.6 62.6 60.2 57.2 53.4
14 66.0 65.7 62.7 60.2 57.2 54.1
12 66.0 65.7 62.7 60.3 57.2 54.1
10 66.0 65.7 62.7 60.3 57.3 54.1
-40 66.0 66.0 63.4 61.0 57.9 54.7
With engine bleed for packs off, increase weight by 1250 kg.
With engine anti-ice on, decrease weight by 400 kg.
With engine and wing anti-ice on, decrease weight by 5500 kg.
When operating in icing conditions during any part of the flight with forecast landing temperature below 8°C, decrease weight by
5100 kg.

Go-Around Climb
The climb gradient in the go-around configuration is greater of 2.5%, or the published
gradient for the specific airport, based on one engine inoperative and landing gear up.

For more detailed information refer to FCOM, Performance Dispatch and Flight Planning and
Performance Manual.
Jet Transport Performance Landing Performance
85
SAMPLE
Go-Around Climb Gradient
Flaps 15
Based on engine bleed for packs on and anti-ice off
Reference Go-Around Gradient (%)
Reference Go-Around Gradient (%)
OAT
Airport Pressure Altitude (ft)
°C 0 2000 4000 6000 8000
50 3.39 2.33 1.12 0.12
46 3.86 2.72 1.71 0.66
42 4.31 3.16 2.07 1.18 0.11
38 4.75 3.61 2.56 1.57 0.56
34 5.27 4.07 3.04 2.00 0.98
30 5.81 4.55 3.53 2.41 1.37
26 5.84 5.03 3.97 2.81 1.74
22 5.87 5.06 4.40 3.22 2.11
18 5.90 5.09 4.42 3.63 2.48
14 5.93 5.11 4.45 3.64 2.83
10 5.94 5.14 4.47 3.66 2.85

Gradient Adjustment for Weight (%)
Weight Reference Go-Around Gradient (%)
(1000 kg) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
60 -2.00 -2.22 -2.45 -2.67 -2.89 -3.12 -3.34
55 -1.34 -1.48 -1.63 -1.77 -1.92 -2.06 -2.21
50 -0.50 -0.55 -0.60 -0.65 -0.71 -0.76 -0.81
47.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
45 0.61 0.67 0.74 0.8 0.87 0.94 1.01
40 2.03 2.24 2.45 2.67 2.89 3.12 3.36
35 3.97 4.37 4.78 5.21 5.66 6.13 6.62

Gradient Adjustment for Speed (%)
Speed Weight Adjusted Go-Around Gradient (%)
(KIAS) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
VREF -0.55 -0.59 -0.63 -0.66 -0.69 -0.71 -0.72 -0.73 -0.73 -0.73 -0.72 -0.70 -0.67 -0.64
VREF+5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
VREF+10 0.19 0.20 0.21 0.22 0.23 0.24 0.24 0.25 0.26 0.26 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27
VREF+20 0.47 0.48 0.50 0.51 0.52 0.53 0.53 0.53 0.53 0.52 0.51 0.50 0.49 0.47
VREF+30 0.56 0.57 0.58 0.58 0.58 0.57 0.56 0.54 0.52 0.49 0.46 0.42 0.38 0.33
With engine bleed for packs off, increase gradient by 0.3%.
With engine anti-ice on, decrease gradient by 0.1%.
With engine and wing anti-ice on, decrease gradient by 1.2%.
When operating in icing conditions during any part of the flight with forecast landing temperatures below 8°C, decrease gradient
by 0.8%.
Landing Performance Performance and Weight & Balance
86
5.2.4 Contaminated/Low Friction RWY
When landing on contaminated/low friction runway the following criteria shall be met:
- No tailwind;
- Landing flap setting 40 shall be used;
- Engine anti-ice on (if required by RWY contaminant);
- Speed brakes, anti-skid/wheel brakes shall be serviceable.

There are no tables for contaminated runway in QRH and Low Friction Runway landing
distances having the same friction coefficient are used instead as they give more
conservative result (with assumption that a contaminant layer on the contaminated runway
surface creates an additional drag during landing roll in comparison with the slippery
runway).
For Low Friction/Contaminated Runway actual landing distances without reversers see
following tables.
To obtain LDR - actual landing distance from the graph/tables shall be multiplied by
coefficient 1.67.

Malfunctions
In case of malfunctions that effect landing performance, QRH, Performance In-flight –
Advisory information, Non-Normal Configuration Landing Distance Tables shall be used to
determine the un-factored (actual) distance for different RWY conditions.
To obtain LDR - actual landing distance given in the tables and corrected appropriately, if
required, should be multiplied by coefficient 1.67.

Landing Speeds
V
REF
for actual landing weight shall be taken directly from FMC or AFM 4.13.
Speed VREF +10 increases landing distance by 110 m.
Jet Transport Performance Landing Performance
87
SAMPLE
Normal Configuration Landing Distance
Flaps 30

Landing Distance and Adjustments (m)
DRY
Ref Dist Weight Adj
Alt
Adj
Wind Adj per
10kts
Slope Adj per
1%
Temp Adj per
10°C
VREF
Adj
Reverse
Thrust Adj
Braking Config
48000kg
Landing
Weight
Per 5000kg
above/below
Ref Weight
Per
1000ft
above
Sea
Level
Head
Wind
Tail
Wind
Down
Hill
Up Hill
Above
ISA
Below
ISA
Per
10kts
above
VREF
One
Rev
No
Rev
Max MAN 790 95/-45 15 -25 105 10 -5 15 -15 65 15 40
Max AUTO 825 85/-50 20 -30 110 10 -5 20 -15 75 10 15
Auto 3 1000 125/-80 30 -45 170 15 -5 30 -20 110 10 20
Auto 2 1430 160/-130 45 -70 260 15 -15 45 -40 165 5 20
Auto 1 1645 185/-160 55 -85 315 50 -45 50 -45 145 130 155
Good Reported Braking Action (FC > 0.4)
Max MAN
1080 85/-80 30 -45 175 25 -20 25 -20 85 55 190
Max AUTO 1080 85/-80 30 -45 175 25 -20 25 -20 85 55 190
Auto 3 1220 105/-95 35 -55 195 15 -10 35 -30 125 15 75
Auto 2 1585 155/-140 50 -75 275 25 -20 50 -40 155 25 25
Auto 1 1750 185/-165 55 -90 325 55 -50 50 -45 145 170 205
Medium Reported Braking Action (FC = 0.30 – 0.35)
Max MAN 1430 130/-120 40 -70 280 60 -45 40 -30 110 140 595
Max AUTO 1430 130/-120 40 -70 280 60 -45 40 -30 110 140 595
Auto 3 1455 130/-120 40 -75 285 50 -30 40 -35 135 110 565
Auto 2 1695 165/-155 50 -85 320 50 -40 50 -40 150 65 370
Auto 1 1810 185/-175 60 -90 340 70 -55 55 -45 140 190 425
Poor Reported Braking Action (FC = 0.15 – 0.25)
Max MAN 1795 175/-165 55 -105 430 130 -85 50 -40 125 280 1670
Max AUTO 1795 175/-165 55 -105 430 130 -85 50 -40 125 280 1670
Auto 3 1795 175/-165 55 -105 430 130 -80 50 -40 130 280 1670
Auto 2 1900 185/-175 60 -110 445 120 -80 50 -45 140 210 1565
Auto 1 1965 205/-190 65 -115 455 135 -90 55 -50 140 280 1535
Reference distance is for sea level, standard day, no wind or slope, VREF30 approach speed and two engine detent reverse
thrust.
Max manual braking data valid for auto speedbrakes. Autobrake data valid for both auto and manual speedbrakes.
For max manual braking and manual speedbrakes, increase reference landing distance by 85 m.
Actual (unfactored) distances are shown.
Includes distance from 50 ft above threshold (305 m of air distance).



Landing Performance Performance and Weight & Balance
88
SAMPLE
Normal Configuration Landing Distance
Flaps 40

Landing Distance and Adjustments (m)
DRY
Ref Dist Weight Adj
Alt
Adj
Wind Adj per
10kts
Slope Adj per
1%
Temp Adj per
10°C
VREF
Adj
Reverse
Thrust Adj
Braking Config
48000kg
Landing
Weight
Per 5000kg
above/below
Ref Weight
Per
1000ft
above
Sea
Level
Head
Wind
Tail
Wind
Down
Hill
Up Hill
Above
ISA
Below
ISA
Per
10kts
above
VREF
One
Rev
No
Rev
Max MAN 790 95/-45 25 -25 100 10 -5 15 -10 65 15 40
Max AUTO 810 85/-50 20 -25 110 10 -5 20 -15 75 10 15
Auto 3 970 125/-75 30 -40 165 10 -5 30 -20 110 10 20
Auto 2 1375 190/-150 40 -70 250 15 -10 40 -40 160 5 20
Auto 1 1570 190/-150 55 -85 305 50 -40 50 -40 140 120 150
Good Reported Braking Action (FC > 0.4)
Max MAN 1050 95/-75 25 -45 175 25 -15 25 -20 85 50 175
Max AUTO 1050 95/-75 25 -45 175 25 -15 25 -20 85 50 175
Auto 3
1170 110/-90 30 -50 195 15 -5 30 -25 125 15 70
Auto 2 1515 155/-135 45 -70 265 25 -20 45 -40 145 25 25
Auto 1 1665 185/-155 55 -85 315 50 -45 50 -45 135 150 195
Medium Reported Braking Action (FC = 0.30 – 0.35)
Max MAN 1375 135/-110 40 -70 275 60 -40 35 -30 105 125 540
Max AUTO 1375 135/-110 40 -70 275 60 -40 35 -30 105 125 540
Auto 3 1395 135/-110 40 -70 280 50 -30 40 -30 130 105 520
Auto 2 1615 165/-145 50 -80 310 45 -40 45 -40 135 65 335
Auto 1 1715 185/-165 55 -90 330 65 -50 50 -45 135 165 400
Poor Reported Braking Action (FC = 0.15 – 0.25)
Max MAN 1715 180/-155 55 -105 420 125 -80 45 -40 120 250 1495
Max AUTO 1715 180/-155 55 -105 420 125 -80 45 -40 120 250 1495
Auto 3 1715 180/-155 55 -105 420 125 -75 45 -40 125 250 1495
Auto 2 1815 190/-165 55 -110 435 115 -75 50 -45 135 190 1400
Auto 1 1865 205/-180 60 -110 445 125 -85 50 -45 135 245 1385
Reference distance is for sea level, standard day, no wind or slope, VREF40 approach speed and two engine detent reverse
thrust.
Max manual braking data valid for auto speedbrakes. Autobrake data valid for both auto and manual speedbrakes.
For max manual braking and manual speedbrakes, increase reference landing distance by 75 m.
Actual (unfactored) distances are shown.
Includes distance from 50 ft above threshold (305 m of air distance).


Jet Transport Performance Performance Information
89
6 PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The following chapter contains a summary of the Performance Information which will be used
by the Flight Crew during daily normal operations.
6.1 Performance Data Sources
There are a number of manuals from which the Flight Crew can get information about the
airplane performance. These manuals are:
- Airplane Flight Manual (AFM)
- Flight Crew Operations Manual (FCOM)
- Quick Reference Handbook (QRH)
- Flight Planning and Performance Manual (FPPM)
- Operations Manual Part B (OM-B)
- Route Performance Manual (RPM)

AFM
The AFM is the Official Source for Regulatory Performance. It contains the following
sections:
- Section 1: Certificate Limitations
- Section 2: Emergency Procedures
- Section 3: Normal and Non-normal Procedures
- Section 4: Performance

FCOM
The primary audience is Flight Crew.
- Volumes 1 and 2 + Quick Reference Handbook (QRH)
- May cover multiple airframes
- May include multiple airframe/engine combinations
- All performance data is in tabular format

Volume 1 contains:
- Revision Record
- List of Effective Pages
- Bulletin Record
- Service Bulletins
- Limitations
- Normal & Supplementary Procedures
- PERFORMANCE DISPATCH (Chapter PD)

Volume 2 contains:
- Systems Information

QRH
Primary crew reference on flight deck
- Quick Action Index (front cover)
- Annunciated Index (EICAS Messages)
- Normal Checklist
- Checklist Introduction
- Non-normal Checklist (by system)
- Maneuvers
- PERFORMANCE INFLIGHT (Chapter PI)
- Index
- Evacuation checklist (back cover)

Performance Information Jet Transport Performance
90
FPPM
Source of performance information primarily for dispatchers and flight operations engineers.
The FPPM is in 8.5 x 11 inch format, and much of the performance is presented in graphs. It
contains:
- Takeoff and Landing
- Flight Planning:
- Simplified flight planning
- Driftdown
- Enroute:
- All Engines
- Engine Inoperative
- Non-standard Configuration:
- Gear Down

OM-B
The OM-B is the airline produced company flight manual for the specific airplane. It contains
in chapter 4 the Performance data and in chapter 5 the Flight Planning data.

RPM
The Route Performance Manual contains the Runway Weight Charts (RWCs) for the regular
airports.

Notes:





























Jet Transport Performance Weight & Balance
91
7 WEIGHT AND BALANCE
7.1 Introduction
In air carrier operations, balance of the airplane is of prime importance and must be
thoroughly understood by the pilot. Stability of an aircraft in flight can be easily upset by
improper loading or by the placement of weights at aircraft stations not in accordance with
the loading procedures for that particular aircraft.

There are several methods used in computing weight and balance of aircraft:
- by slide rule, if the slide rule is designed specifically for the particular aircraft;
- by formulas which can be applied generally to all aircraft;
- by "block and expanded" systems in which variations in anticipated loads can be
corrected up to the scheduled departure time of the aircraft;
- by common weight and balance principles plus basic formulas as well as
mathematical calculations with the aid of long-hand arithmetic, a slide rule, or
standard circular computer; and
- by an index system.

The last method is the basis for the weight and balance solutions in this chapter.
7.2 Definitions
Algebraic signs: When computing weight and balance where the datum is at the leading edge
of the wing, the rudder pedals, or other position aft of the nose of the airplane, care must be
taken to use the proper plus or minus signs (+ or -). Items placed ahead of the datum would
be at a minus arm, and items placed aft of the datum would be at a plus arm. On large
aircraft the datum is generally at the nose or forward of the nose section. Therefore, all items
placed in the aircraft will be at a plus arm. Note: When working weight and balance problems,
always visualize the nose of the aircraft to your left.

Aircraft weight check: This consists of checking the sum of the weights of all items of useful
load against the authorized useful load (maximum weight less empty weight) of the aircraft.

Arm or moment arm: the horizontal distance (in inches) from the datum to the center of
gravity of an item (occupant, baggage, etc.). A plus (+) arm indicates the item is located aft of
the datum; a minus (-) arm indicates the item is forward of the datum.

Basic Index (BI): Center of gravity at basic weight (BW) expressed as an index value.

Center of gravity: generally known as the balance point of an aircraft. It is an imaginary point
about which the nose-heavy and tailheavy moments are exactly equal in magnitude. Any
assumed position of the center of gravity will be along the longitudinal axis, at the inter
section of the lateral and vertical axes.

Datum: an imaginary vertical plane or line from which all horizontal measurements are taken
for balance purposes with the aircraft in level flight attitude. The datum can be at the leading
edge of the wing, or nose of the aircraft, or ahead of the nose of the aircraft, or rudder
pedals, etc. If not specified, the datum can be located in any convenient position on the
aircraft. Generally, the manufacturer designates the datum position, which remains fixed
throughout the life of the airplane.

Dry Operating Index (DOI): Center of gravity at dry operating weight expressed as an index
value. Basic index (BI) corrected for the balance influence of the loads included in Dry
Operating Weight (DOW).

Weight & Balance Jet Transport Performance
92
Dry Operating Weight (DOW): The total weight of an aircraft ready for a specific type of
operation excluding all usable fuel and traffic load. Operational Empty Weight plus items
specific to the type of flight, i.e. catering, newspapers, pantry equipment, extra crew etc…

Empty weight: includes all operating equipment (structure, powerplants, fuel tanks, etc.) with
a fixed location and actually installed in the aircraft. Generally, fixed ballast, unusuable fuel,
undrainable oil, and hydrualic fluid are included in the empty weight check of the aircraft. The
condition of the aircraft should be such that the empty weight condition can be easily
repeated.

Empty weight center of gravity: established by weighing the aircraft with suitable scales in a
closed hangar and in level flight attitude.

Empty weight center of gravity range: determined so that when the empty weight center of
gravity falls within this range the specification operating center of gravity limits will not be
loading arrangements.

Equipment changes: The registered owner of an aircraft is responsible for a continuous
record of each aircraft. In order that a computed weight and center of gravity location can be
established at any time, all changes affecting the weight, center of gravity location, and
equipment must be listed.

Equipment list: a complete list of the equipment included in the ccrtificated empty weight;
found in either the approved airplane operating manual or the weight and balance data.

Full oil: the quantity of oil shown in the aircraft specifications as oil capacity.

Installation of ballast. Ballast is sometimes permanently installed for center of gravity balance
purposes as a result of the installation or removal of equipment items. Ballast should not be
used to correct a nose-up or nose-down tendency of the aircraft.

Landing Weight (LW) : The weight at landing at the destination airport. It is equal to the Zero
Fuel Weight plus the fuel reserves.

Loading schedule. This should be kept with the aircraft, and usually forms a part of the
airplane flight manual.

Manufacturer’s Empty Weight (MEW): The weight of the structure, power plant, furnishings,
systems and other items of equipment that are considered an integral part of the aircraft. It is
essentially a “dry” weight, including only those fluids contained in closed systems (e.g.
hydraulic fluid).

Maximum Landing Weight (MLW): Maximum weight for landing as limited by aircraft strength
and airworthiness requirements.

Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW): Maximum weight at brake release as limited by aircraft
strength and airworthiness requirements.

Maximum Taxi Weight (MTW): Maximum weight for ground maneuver as limited by aircraft
strength and airworthiness requirements. (It includes weight of taxi and runup fuel.)

Maximum Zero Fuel Weight (MZFW): Maximum weight allowed before usable fuel must be
loaded in the aircraft as limited by strength and airworthiness requirements.

Minimum Flight Weight (MFW): Minimum weight for flight as limited by aircraft strength and
airworthiness requirements.
Jet Transport Performance Weight & Balance
93

Mean Aerodynamic Chord (MAC): the mean chord of the airfoil or wing. For weight and
balance purposes it is used to locate the center of gravity range of the aircraft. MAC data can
be found in the aircraft specifications, flight manual, or aircraft weight and balance records.

Moment. The moment of an item about the datum is obtained by multiplying the weight of the
item by its horizontal distance from the datum.

Operating center of gravity range: the distance between the forward lind rearward center of
gravity limits shown in the aircraft specifications.

Operational Empty Weight (OEW): The manufacturer’s weight empty plus the operator’s
items, i.e. the flight and cabin crew and their baggage, unusable fuel, engine oil, emergency
equipment, toilet chemicals and fluids, galley structure, catering equipment, seats,
documents, etc…

Figure 7.1 – MAC Definition

Tare: the weight of chocks, blocks, etc., used when weighing the aircraft and included in the
scale weight readings. Tare must be deducted from the scale readings to obtain the actual or
net weight of the aircraft.

Takeoff Weight (TOW): The weight at takeoff at the departure airport. It is equal to the
landing weight at destination plus the trip fuel (fuel needed for the trip), or to the zero fuel
weight plus the takeoff fuel (fuel needed at the brake release point including reserves).

Take-off fuel (TOF): The weight of the fuel on board at take-off.

Trip fuel: The weight of the fuel necessary to cover the normal leg without reserves.

Total Traffic Load (TTL): The total weight of the passengers, baggage and cargo, including
non-revenue loads.
Weight & Balance Jet Transport Performance
94

Figure 7.2 – Moment

Unit weights: Unless otherwise noted, unit weights used in weight and balance computations
in actual practise as well as in the written exams are: fuel - 6 lbs. per U.S. gallon; oil – 7 1/2
lbs. per U.S. gallon; water - 8 lbs. per U.S. gallon; crew and passengers - 170 lbs. per
person.

Useful load: found by subtracting the empty weight from the maximum permissible weight of
the aircraft. Useful load consists of the flight crew, passengers, baggage, cargo, etc., unless
otherwise noted.

Weight and balance extreme conditions: the forward and rearward center of gravity limits for
the particular aircraft.

Weighing point: When required to locate the empty weight center of gravity by weighing the
aircraft, it is first necessary to obtain horizontal measurements between the points on the
scales at which the airplane's weight is concentrated. In usual weighing practice, a vertical
line passing through the centerline of the wheel axles locates the point on the scales at which
the weight is concentrated.

Zero Fuel Weight: the sum of Dry Operating Weight and Payload.
7.3 Calculation of Center of Gravity
Center of gravity, C.G., is the point around which no motion or rotation occurs if the object, or
group of objects, is theoretically supported at that point.
The sum of the forces and moments produced by the distribution of weight of a group of
objects about their combined C.G. would be equal to zero if the objects could be supported at
exactly that location.
To determine the location of the C.G. for a group of objects we need to determine the point at
which the group of objects would be in balance if they were supported at that location. Refer
to Figure 40.

Example:
W1 = 2000 lbs
d1 = 240 inches
W2 = 1500 lbs
d2 = 400 inches

D = 309 inches
Jet Transport Performance Weight & Balance
95

Figure 7.3 – Calculation of Center of Gravity
7.4 Index Equation
When loading an airplane, summation of moments is necessary to accurately determine the
center of gravity for the loaded airplane:
- Moment due to airplane empty weight
- Moment of all items that are loaded:
- Flight and cabin crew
- Passengers, carry-on and baggage
- Cargo
- Fuel
- etc.

An Index Equation is used to simplify the presentation of moment data on the loading
schedule.

Index is moment scaled to a convenient magnitude that is easy to add and subtract based on
a scale which is offset such that the index values are typically positive

The Index Equation has the following form:

Index:
( )
K
C
Ref.Sta Sta W
I +
÷
=

W = Weight actual
Sta = Station horizontal distance in inches or meters from station zero to the
location of the weight.
Ref. Sta = Reference station/axis. Selected station around which all index values
are calculated.
K = Constant used as a plus value to avoide negative index figures.
C = Constant used as a denominator to convert moment values into index
values.
I = Index value corresponding to respective weight.

Normally the following values are choosen for the Boeing 737-300 when the weights are in
kilograms:

Ref Sta at = 648.5 inches from zero
K (constant) = 40
C (constant) = 30000
Length of MAC = 134.5 inches
LEMAC at = 625.6 inches from zero
Weight & Balance Jet Transport Performance
96
SAMPLE
Now the equation becomes:

( )
40
30000
5 . 48 6 Sta W
I +
÷
=
7.5 Load and Trimsheet
Two types of Load and Trimsheets are in use:
- Computer Generated
- Manually Calculated
7.5.1 Computer Generated Loadsheet

L O A D S H E E T CHECKED: DATE EDNO
ALL WEIGHTS IN KILOGRAM APPROVED: 31JUL09

FROM/TO FLIGHT A/C REG VERSION CREW TIME
TSR_FRA RJ1234 YR-RLT 0/130 2/3 0955
WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION
LOAD IN COMPARTMENTS 3500 1/1500 4/2000
PASSENGER/CABIN BAG 10248 TTL 122
TOTAL TRAFFIC LOAD 13748
DRY OPERATING WEIGHT 34056
ZERO FUEL WEIGHT 47804 MAX 48307
TAKE OFF FUEL 12000
TAKE OFF WEIGHT 59804 MAX 63276
TRIP FUEL 8500
LANDING WEIGHT 51304 MAX 52888

***************************************************************************
BALANCE AND SEATING CONDITIONS LAST MINUTE CHANGES
DOI 36.82 DEST SPEC CL/CPT PLUS MINUS
LIZFW 52.81 .... .... ...... .... .....
MACZFW 23.00 .... .... ...... .... .....
LITOW 49.68 .... .... ...... .... .....
MACTOW 20.64 .... .... ...... .... .....
LILAW 49.66 .... .... ...... .... .....
MACLW 21.23 .... .... ...... .... .....
LMC TOTAL +/-

TRIM BY COMPARTMENT
0A30.0B46.0C46

UNDERLOAD BEFORE LMC 503

***************************************************************************
END OF LOADSHEET
Jet Transport Performance Weight & Balance
97


No. Heading Description
1 LOADSHEET Loadsheet Document identifier, weight units
2 CHECKED Loadsheet agent’s signature
3 DATE Date
4 ED NO Edition number
5 APPROVED Approved Signature of authorized person (PIC)
6 FROM/TO
Three-letter IATA codes of departure &
landing airports
7 FLIGHT Flight Number
8 A/C REG Registration
9 VERSION A/C version & divider position
10 CREW Crew version cockpit/cabin
11 TIME Time of loadsheet generation
12 LOAD IN COMPARTMENTS
Total weight in baggage compartments and
distribution
13 PASSENGER/CABIN BAG
Total weight of passengers and number of
passengers divided into specified groups and
categories
14 TOTAL TRAFFIC LOAD
The total weight of passengers, baggage, cargo
and mail
15 DRY OPERATING WEIGHT DOW
16 ZERO FUEL WEIGHT
Sum of Dry Operating Weight and Total Traffic
Load
17 TAKEOFF FUEL
Take Off Fuel
The amount of fuel on board less the fuel
consumed before takeoff.
Note: If after refuelling actual fuel on board minus
expected taxi fuel differs from the take-off fuel
presented on the loadsheet the same procedure
as for traffic load LMC (OM-B 6.2.4) to be applied
18 TAKEOFF WEIGHT Sum of 16 and 17
19 TRIP FUEL
The amount of fuel planned to be consumed from
take-off to landing
20 LANDING WEIGHT 18 minus 19
21
BALANCE AND SEATING
CONDITIONS
Section contains balance information for dry and
loaded aircraft. Standard abbreviation are used
22 LAST MINUTE CHANGES
Destination of LMC / Kind of LMC / Class or
Compartment / on or off load indicator / weight of
LMC. At the bottom of this section the Total LMC
weight is presented.
23 TRIM BY COMPARTMENT
Changes of DOI due to passengers’ position. All
specified cabin sections are presented. Depends
on aircraft version.
24 UNDERLOAD BEFORE LMC Difference between maximum and actual weight

Weight & Balance Jet Transport Performance
98
7.5.2 Manual Loadsheet

Jet Transport Performance Weight & Balance
99

No. Description Remarks
1 General Flight Data
2 Dry Operating Weight From OM-B 6.4
3 DOW Adjustment From OM-B 6.4
4 Corrected DOW 2 ± 3
5 Total Passenger Weight
6 Baggage Weight
7 Freight
8 Mail
9 Total Traffic Load 5+6+7+8
10 Zero Fuel Weight 9+4
11 LMC Field
12 Takeoff Fuel
13 Takeoff Weight 10+12
14 LMC Field
15 Performance Limited Takeoff Weight From OM-B Chapter 4
16 Trip Fuel
17 Landing Weight 13-16
18 LMC Field
19 Performance Limited Landing Weight From OM-B Chapter 4
20 LMC Field
21 Passengers M = Male F = Female C = Children
22 Load agents name and signature
23 Commanders name and signature
24 Crew version From OM-B 6.4
25 Group From OM-B 6.4
26 Dry Operating Index From OM-B 6.4
27 DOI Correction From OM-B 6.4
28 Corrected DOI 28 ± 27
29 Number of passengers in compartment 0a
30 Number of passengers in compartment 0b
31 Number of passengers in compartment 0c
32 Weight in forward compartment
33 Weight in aft compartment
34 DOI scale Enter DOI from28
35 Compartment scales
36 Fuel index scale From 38
37 Stabilizer trim setting scale
38 Fuel index table
39 Center of Gravity field

Weight & Balance Jet Transport Performance
100
7.6 Weight and Balance Information
Weight and Balance Information can be found in OM-B Chapter 6 (Weight and Balance) as
well as in Chapter 7 (Loading).
7.6.1 Weight and Balance
Chapter 6 of the OM-B contains the following information:

6.1 Weight and Balance Calculation System
6.1.1 System Definition
6.1.2 Standard Weights
6.2 Instructions for Completion of Weight and Balance Documentation
6.2.1 General
6.2.2 Computer Generated Loadsheet
6.2.2.1 Example
6.2.2.2 Description
6.2.3 Manual Loadsheet
6.2.3.1 Example
6.2.3.2 Description
6.2.4 Last Minute Changes (LMC)
6.2.4.1 General
6.2.4.2 Limitations
6.2.4.3 Electronic Loadsheet
6.2.4.4 Manual Loadsheet
6.3 Weight and Center of Gravity Limitations
6.3.1 Weight Limitations
6.3.2 Center of Gravity
6.4 Dry Operating Weight and Index
7.6.2 Loading
Chapter 7 of OM-B contains the following topics on Loading:

7.1 Loading Instructions
7.1.1 General
7.1.2 Normal Loading Instructions
7.1.3 Cargo Compartments
7.1.3.1 Distribution of Cargo
7.1.3.2 Designation
7.1.3.3 Limitations
7.1.3.4 Flight Kit
7.1.3.5 Dimensions
7.2 Distribution of Passengers
7.2.1 Standard Seating Plan
7.3 Transportation of Live Animals
7.4 Special Loading Instructions
7.4.1 Transportation of Childeren and Disabled Persons
7.4.2 Transportation of electrically Wheelchairs
7.4.3 Transportation of Weapons
7.4.4 Transportation of Radioactive Material
7.4.5 Transportation of Live Human Organs (LHO)



Jet Transport Performance Weight & Balance
101
SAMPLE
Dry Operating Weight and Index

WEIGHTS: KG; INDEX: KG.INCH
DRY OPERATING WEIGHT AND INDEX
CREW
2/4
PANTRY
A
CREW
2/5
PANTRY
A
CREW
3/4
PANTRY
A
A/C
REG.
SEATS
WEIGHT INDEX WEIGHT INDEX WEIGHT INDEX
YR-RLT 130 34306 37.0 34393 38.1 34403 35.9
YR-ARR 130 34056 36.8 34143 37.9 34153 35.7
YR-TMI 130 34176 36.9 34263 38.0 34273 35.8
YR-TMS 130 33976 36.7 34063 37.8 34073 35.6
YR-IER 130 34056 36.8 34143 37.9 34153 35.7
DRY OPERATING WEIGHT AND INDEX
CREW
3/5
PANTRY
A
CREW
2/0*
NO
PANTRY

A/C
REG.
SEATS
WEIGHT INDEX WEIGHT INDEX
YR-RLT 130 34490 37.0 33308 34.0
YR-ARR 130 34240 36.8 33058 33.8
YR-TMI 130 34360 36.9 33178 33.9
YR-TMS 130 34160 36.7 32978 33.7
YR-IER 130 34240 36.8 33058 33.8

Dry Operating Weight includes Basic Weight, Crew, Crew Baggage and Pantry

- Dry Operating Weight and Index does not include nose gear & main gear spare wheel & tire, tool box ect.
- Refer to Adjustment Table below

Index Formular: [Wt(kg) x [H.arm(inch) – 648.5]] / 30000 + [40]

DRY OPERATING WEIGHT & INDEX ADJUSTMENT TABLE
Nose Gear Wheel and Tire 32 kg / 0.23
Main Gear Wheel and Tire 120 kg / 0.86
Tool Kit Box 47 kg / 0.34
FLIGHT KIT TOTAL +200 kg / +1.44
Dry Operating Weight and Index does NOT
include the Flight Kit. Check if Flight Kit is
located in AFT Compartment.

Use Load and Trim Sheet Form B D043A630-RJet, October 2010

Weight & Balance Jet Transport Performance
102
7.6.3 Passenger Standard Weights
To avoid having to weigh each passenger and baggage, a standard weight is used for Load
and Trim sheet calculation.

For all flights, the standard weight of passengers including hand baggage is the following:

Type of flight All adult Male Female
Adult - All flights except holiday charters (*) 84 kg 88 kg 70 kg
Adult - Holiday charters (*) 76 kg 83 kg 69 kg
Children - All flights 35 kg 35 kg 35 kg
Infants
(*) Holiday charter means a charter flight solely intended as an element of a holiday travel package.

Table 7.1 – Passenger Standard Weights

Corrections have to be made if the actual weight of passengers with their hand baggage is
known or if the average weight can be estimated as obviously different than the standard
weight given above.

When the passenger checked baggage (loaded in the cargo compartment) are not weighed,
the following standard weight per piece of checked baggage is used:

Type of flight Baggage standard weight
Domestic flights 11 kg
Within the European region 13 kg
Intercontinental flights 15 kg
All other 13 kg

Table 7.2 – Standard Baggage Weights
Jet Transport Performance Weight & Balance
103
Notes:





















































Bibliography Jet Transport Performance
104


- “Jet Transport Performance Methods”, D6-1420, The Boeing Company

- “Introduction to Jet Engine Fundamentals, Pratt & Whitney

- “Airplane Performance”, Deutsche Lufthansa AG

- “Performance Engineers Training Manual”, The Boeing Company

- “The Flight Engineers Manual”, Zweng Company

- “Flight Crew Operations Manual (FCOM) Boeing 737-3/4/5” D6-27370, The Boeing
Company

Jet Transport Performance Index
105
Additional Fuel................................................................................ 71
Aerodynamic Heating..................................................................... 20
AFM................................................................................................ 89
Ailerons............................................................................................. 9
Air Density ........................................................................................ 7
Air Flow........................................................................................... 29
Airfoil............................................................................................. 4, 6
Airplane Flight Manual.............................................................. 56, 89
Airspeeds........................................................................................ 21
Alternate Fuel ................................................................................. 71
Altimetry............................................................................................ 3
Altitude Capability........................................................................... 68
Angle of Attack ................................................................................. 5
Angle of Incidence............................................................................ 5
Angle of Zero Lift .............................................................................. 5
Approach and Landing Requirements ........................................... 79
Aquaplaning.................................................................................... 51
ASDA.............................................................................................. 40
Aspect Ratio ................................................................................... 15
Assumed Temperature................................................................... 48
Atmosphere ...................................................................................... 1
Balanced Takeoff ........................................................................... 40
Banking........................................................................................... 14
Block Fuel ....................................................................................... 71
Brake Energy.................................................................................. 38
Buffet Boundary.............................................................................. 68
Calibrated Airspeed/CAS ............................................................... 21
Center of Gravity ............................................................................ 94
Center of Pressure ........................................................................... 5
Chord................................................................................................ 5
Clear Air Turbulence ...................................................................... 13
Clearway......................................................................................... 39
Climb .............................................................................................. 37
Climb Gradient................................................................................ 43
Climb Gradient Requirements........................................................ 44
Climb Performance......................................................................... 23
Computer Generated Loadsheet.................................................... 96
Contingency Fuel ........................................................................... 71
Cruise Control................................................................................. 26
Cruise Performance ....................................................................... 67
Derate............................................................................................. 47
Dihedral .......................................................................................... 15
DOI ........................................................................................... 91, 96
DOW............................................................................................... 92
Driftdown .................................................................................. 69, 77
Dry Operating Index ....................................................................... 91
Dry Operating Weight..................................................................... 92
Dynamic Stability............................................................................ 14
Efficiencies ..................................................................................... 35
Elevators........................................................................................... 9
Equivalent Airspeed/EAS............................................................... 21
Extra Fuel ....................................................................................... 71
FAR Takeoff Definition ................................................................... 38
FCOM....................................................................................... 56, 89
Field Length.................................................................................... 37
Final Reserve ................................................................................. 71
Flight Crew Operations Manual...................................................... 89
Flight Planning and Performance Manual ...................................... 89
FPPM........................................................................................ 89, 90
Friction Coefficient.......................................................................... 50
Fuel Flow........................................................................................ 30
Fuel Requirements......................................................................... 67
High-Lift Devices .............................................................................. 6
High-Speed Aerodynamics ............................................................ 16
Improved Climb ........................................................................ 45, 47
Index Equation ............................................................................... 95
Indicated Airspeed/IAS................................................................... 21
Jet Engine....................................................................................... 29
Jet Nozzle....................................................................................... 30
Landing Performance..................................................................... 79
Landing Weight .............................................................................. 92
Lateral Axis....................................................................................... 9
LEMAC ............................................................................................. 8
Lift and Drag Ratio ........................................................................... 6
Load and Trimsheet ....................................................................... 96
Loadfactor....................................................................................... 12
Longitudinal Axis .............................................................................. 9
MAC............................................................................................ 8, 93
Mach Number ................................................................................. 16
Maneuver Capability....................................................................... 68
Manual Loadsheet .......................................................................... 98
Maximum Landing Weight........................................................ 80, 92
Maximum Takeoff Weight .............................................................. 92
Maximum Taxi Weight ....................................................................92
Maximum Zero Fuel Weight ...........................................................92
Mean aerodynamic chord.................................................................8
Moisture ............................................................................................3
Net Flight Path ................................................................................69
Net Level Off Weight.......................................................................69
Net Takeoff Flight Path...................................................................44
OAT.................................................................................................21
Obstacle..........................................................................................37
OM-B.........................................................................................89, 90
Operational Flight Plan...................................................................74
Operations Manual Part B..............................................................89
Outside Air Temperature ................................................................21
Performance Information................................................................89
Performance Limited Takeoff Weight .............................................52
Pitching ...........................................................................................14
Power Available..............................................................................25
Power Required ..............................................................................25
QFE...................................................................................................3
QNH..................................................................................................3
QRH................................................................................................89
Quick Reference Handbook ...........................................................89
Ram Air Temperature.....................................................................21
Ram Effect ......................................................................................32
Range Performance........................................................................26
RAT.................................................................................................21
Reduced Thrust ........................................................................46, 62
Rolling.............................................................................................14
Route Performance Manual............................................... 52, 89, 90
Rudder ............................................................................................10
Runway Weight Charts.............................................................52, 90
SAT.................................................................................................21
Skin Friction......................................................................................6
Specific Endurance.........................................................................26
Specific Range................................................................................26
Speed of Sound ..............................................................................16
Stall ...................................................................................................5
Standard Weights .........................................................................102
Static Air Temperature....................................................................21
Static Pressure .................................................................................1
Static Pressure (Jet Nozzle) ...........................................................30
Static Stability .................................................................................13
Step Climb ......................................................................................68
Stopway ..........................................................................................40
Straight and Level Flight.................................................................22
Subsonic .........................................................................................17
Supersonic................................................................................17, 18
Sweepback .....................................................................................15
Takeoff Flight Path....................................................................44, 46
Take-off Fuel...................................................................................93
Takeoff Performance ......................................................................37
Takeoff Performance on Wet Runways..........................................51
Takeoff Requirements ....................................................................37
Takeoff Speeds.........................................................................41, 61
TAT .................................................................................................21
Taxi Fuel .........................................................................................70
TEMAC .............................................................................................8
Temperature .....................................................................................1
Theory of Flight .................................................................................1
Thrust........................................................................................29, 31
Thrust Specific Fuel Consumption .................................................35
Tire Speed ......................................................................................38
TODA..............................................................................................40
TORA..............................................................................................39
Total Air Temperature.....................................................................21
Total Traffic Load............................................................................93
Transonic ..................................................................................17, 18
Trip Fuel..........................................................................................70
True Airspeed/TAS.........................................................................21
True Mach Number.........................................................................22
TSFC...............................................................................................35
Unbalanced Takeoff........................................................................41
Vertical Axis ......................................................................................9
Water Injection................................................................................34
Weight and Balance........................................................................91
Weight and Balance Information ..................................................100
Wet/Contaminated Runway............................................................49
Wing Area .........................................................................................6
Wing Flaps......................................................................................11
Wing Loading....................................................................................8
Yawing ............................................................................................15
Zero Fuel Weight ......................................................................92, 94















































































Printed in Germany

Introduction

Jet Transport Performance

This brochure is intended to give insight into the flight performance of jet transport aircraft as well as to refresh essential basic skills, which are required for safe and economic flight operations. The brochure has been deliberately created without resorting to theoretical derivations. To achieve this purposes the brochure covers the following subjects:       Theory of Flight Jet Engine Basics Takeoff Performance Cruise Performance Landing Performance Weight and Balance

The data contained in this publication are for training only. The data must not be used for any other purpose and, specifically, are not to be used for the purpose of planning activities associated with the operation of any aircraft in use now or in the future.

All rights reserved. Copies of this publication may be reproduced as training material for students, for use within a company or organization, or for personal use, but may not otherwise be reproduced for publication or for commercial gain. © by Ralf M. Dittmer 3 Edition 2011
rd

Jet Transport Performance

Table of Contents

1 THEORY OF FLIGHT..........................................................................................................1 1.1 Introduction ...................................................................................................................1 1.2 Properties of the Atmosphere........................................................................................1 1.3 Altimetry Principles........................................................................................................3 1.4 The Airfoil or Wing.........................................................................................................4 1.5 Lift and Drag Ratio ........................................................................................................6 1.6 Axes of the Airplane in Flight.........................................................................................9 1.7 Airplane Control Surfaces .............................................................................................9 1.8 Loads and Loadfactor .................................................................................................12 1.9 Stability .......................................................................................................................13 1.10 High-Speed Aerodynamics........................................................................................16 1.11 Airspeeds..................................................................................................................21 1.12 Forces Acting on the Airplane ...................................................................................22 1.13 Straight and Level Flight............................................................................................22 1.14 Climb Performance ...................................................................................................23 1.15 Range Performance ..................................................................................................26 2 JET ENGINE .....................................................................................................................29 2.1 Development of Thrust................................................................................................29 2.2 Factors Affecting Thrust ..............................................................................................31 2.3 Efficiencies..................................................................................................................35 3 TAKEOFF PERFORMANCE .............................................................................................37 3.1 General .......................................................................................................................37 3.2 The Takeoff Requirements..........................................................................................37 3.3 FAR Takeoff Definition ................................................................................................38 3.4 Takeoff Distances Available ........................................................................................39 3.5 Takeoff Speeds...........................................................................................................41 3.6 Effect of Flap Position on Takeoff................................................................................43 3.7 Takeoff Flight Path......................................................................................................44 3.8 Improved Climb...........................................................................................................45 3.9 Reduced Thrust ..........................................................................................................46 3.10 Takeoff on Wet and Contamineted Runways ............................................................49 3.11 Takeoff Performance Data ........................................................................................52 4 CRUISE PERFORMANCE ................................................................................................67 4.1 Fuel Requirements......................................................................................................67 4.2 Altitude Capability and Maneuver Capability ...............................................................68 4.3 Step Climb ..................................................................................................................68 4.4 Driftdown and Net Level Off Weight ............................................................................69 4.5 Flight Planning and Enroute Performance Data ..........................................................70 5 LANDING PERFORMANCE..............................................................................................79 5.1 Introduction .................................................................................................................79 5.2 Landing Performance Data .........................................................................................80 6 PERFORMANCE INFORMATION .....................................................................................89 6.1 Performance Data Sources .........................................................................................89 7 WEIGHT AND BALANCE ..................................................................................................91 7.1 Introduction .................................................................................................................91 7.2 Definitions ...................................................................................................................91 7.3 Calculation of Center of Gravity...................................................................................94 7.4 Index Equation ............................................................................................................95 7.5 Load and Trimsheet ....................................................................................................96 7.6 Weight and Balance Information ...............................................................................100

I

Abbreviations

Jet Transport Performance

AFM ..................... Airplane Flight Manual AIP .. Aeronautical Information Publication ALT ..............................................Altitude ALTN......................................... Alternate ASDA ............... Accelerate Stop Distance Available CAS...........................Calibrated Airspeed CD ................................... Drag Coefficient CG.................................Center of Gravity CI ............................................Cost Index CL ...................................... Lift Coefficient CLB .................................................Climb CP .............................. Center of Pressure CRZ............................................... Cruise CWY..........................................Clearway D ...................................................... Drag DOI........................... Dry Operating Index DOW ......................Dry Operating Weight EAS.......................... Equivalent Airspeed ECON........................................Economy EGT................ Exhaust Gas Temperature EPR...................... Engine Pressure Ratio FAR............ Federal Aviation Regulations FC .............................. Friction Coefficient FCOM...... Flight Crew Operations Manual FF............................................. Fuel Flow FMC ..........Flight Management Computer FN ............................................ Net Thrust FPPM ... Flight Planning and Performance Manual G/A......................................... Go-Around GS.....................................Ground Speed GW..................................... Gross Weight HOLD ...........................................Holding IAS ............................. Indicated Airspeed ISA ....International Standard Atmosphere JAR ................... Joint Aviation Authorities L ..........................................................Lift L/D .................................... Lift/Drag Ratio LDA ............... Landing Distance Available LDG............................................. Landing LDR............... Landing Distance Required LTS .........................Load and Trim Sheet LW................................... Landing Weight M ....................................... Mach Number MAC ................Mean Aerodynamic Chord MLAW .............Maximum Landing Weight MSL................................ Mean Sea Level MTOW............. Maximum Takeoff Weight MZFW .......... Maximum Zero Fuel Weight n ............................................Load Factor NAM ............................. Nautical Air Miles OAT................... Outside Air Temperature OFP......................Operational Flight Plan OM .............................Operations Manual II

PA................................. Pressure Altitude PDC ............Performance Data Computer Press .........................................Pressure PTOW ....... Performance Take-Off Weight QRH..............Quick Reference Handbook RAT ....................... Ram Air Temperature RPM.............. Route Performance Manual RWC ......................Runway Weight Chart SAT.......................Static Air Temperature SL ............................................ Sea Level SR.................................... Specific Range Stab .......................................... Stabilizer SWY .......................................... Stopway T .................................................... Thrust Temp ...................................Temperature T/O............................................... Takeoff TAS....................................True Airspeed TASS ................... Assumed Temperature TAT........................Total Air Temperature TODA........... Take-Off Distance Available TOF ................................... Take-Off Fuel TORA.................. Take-Off Run Available TOW ................................ Takeoff Weight TSFC .. Thrust Specific Fuel Consumption TTL .............................. Total Traffic Load V1 ....................... Takeoff Decision Speed V1(MCG) . Minimum Takeoff Decision Speed V2 ........................... Takeoff Safety Speed VEF ............. Critical Engine Failure Speed VLOF .................................... Lift-Off Speed VMCA .............. Air Minimum Control Speed VMCG ...... Ground Minimum Control Speed VMU ..................... Minimum Unstick Speed VR ....................................Rotation Speed VREF.............................. Reference Speed VS........................................... Stall Speed W .................................................. Weight W A................................................. Airflow W F.............................................Fuel Flow ZFW.............................. Zero Fuel Weight

Jet Transport Performance

Theory of Flight

1 THEORY OF FLIGHT 1.1 Introduction The clean, sleek appearance and the splendid performance characteristics of modern airplanes reflect the demands of modern travel, business, and industry. The present-day airplane is clean and sleek because aerodynamic cleanness of line, and efficiency of design, result in greater range, speed, and payload at the least operating cost. This is especially important in the functions of large jet transports. "Performance" is a term used to describe the ability of an airplane to accomplish certain things which make it useful for certain purposes. For example, the ability of the airplane to land and take off in a very short distance is an important factor to the pilot who operates in and out of confined fields. The ability to carry heavy loads, fly at high altitudes at fast speeds, or travel long distances is essential performance for operators of airline type airplanes. The chief elements of performance are the takeoff and landing distance, rate of climb, ceiling, payload, range, speed, maneuverability, stability, and fuel economy. Some of these factors are often directly opposed: for example, high speed versus shortness of landing distance; long range versus great payload; and high rate of climb versus fuel economy. It is the preeminence of one or more of these factors which dictates differences between airplanes and which explains the high degree of specialization found in modern airplanes. The various items of airplane performance result from the combination of airplane and powerplant characteristics. The aerodynamic characteristics of the airplane generally define the power and thrust requirements at various conditions of flight while powerplant characteristics generally define the power and thrust available at various conditions of flight. The matching of the aerodynamic configuration with the powerplant is accomplished by the manufacturer to provide maximum performance at the specific design condition, e.g., range, endurance, climb, etc. 1.2 Properties of the Atmosphere The composition of the earth's atmosphere is a vitally important factor in aerodynamics and the flight of aircraft. The forces and moments acting on a surface that is moved through the air are attributable, to a great extent, to the properties of the air mass in which the surface is operating. The composition of the earth's atmosphere by volume is approximately 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, and 1% water vapor, argon, carbon dioxide, etc. In the majority of all aerodynamic considerations, air is assumed to be a uniform mixture of these gases. Static Pressure. The absolute static pressure of the air is a property of primary importance. The static pressure of the air at any altitude results from the mass of the air supported above that level. At standard sea level conditions the static pressure of the air is 14.7 pounds per square inch (psi), 29.92 inches of mercury (29.92 in.Hg.), or 1013.2 millibars. At 18,000 feet altitude this static pressure decreases to about 50% of the sea level value, and at 40,000 feet to about 10% of the sea level value. Pressure decreases with altitude (pressure lapse rate) is approximately 40 psi, 1 in. Hg, or 33 millibars per 1,000 feet. Temperature. Many aspects of compressibility and engine performance involve considerations of atmospheric temperature. Normally with an increase in altitude there is an overall decrease of temperature in the troposphere (the lower layer of the atmosphere). This is apparent because the air nearest the earth receives the largest amount of heat. The variation of temperature with altitude is called the temperature lapse rate, and is expressed in degrees per thousand feet. On one day the temperature of the air may cool 3°C per thousand feet and on another day the air may show a decrease of only 1°C. On still another day, the temperature may increase for a distance of 2,000 or 3,000 feet above the ground (an 1

Theory of Flight

Jet Transport Performance

example of an inverted lapse rate or inversion), and thereafter cool at the rate of 3°C per thousand feet. Temperature observations taken day after day over thousands of locations on the earth show the average lapse rate to be about 2°C per thousand feet. Standard sea level temperatures are 15°C with a lapse rate of 2°C / 1,000 feet, or 59°F, with a lapse rate of 3.5°F / 1,000 feet.

Figure 1.1 – Pressure and Temperature
PRESSURE ALTITUDE (Feet) 40 000 39 000 38 000 37 000 36 000 35 000 34 000 33 000 32 000 31 000 30 000 29 000 28 000 27 000 26 000 25 000 24 000 23 000 22 000 21 000 20 000 19 000 18 000 17 000 16 000 15 000 14 000 13 000 12 000 11 000 10 000 9 000 8 000 7 000 6 000 5 000 4 000 3 000 2 000 1 000 0 - 1 000 TEMP. (°C) - 56.5 - 56.5 - 56.5 - 56.5 - 56.3 - 54.3 - 52.4 - 50.4 - 48.4 - 46.4 - 44.4 - 42.5 - 40.5 - 38.5 - 36.5 - 34.5 - 32.5 - 30.6 - 28.6 - 26.6 - 24.6 - 22.6 - 20.7 - 18.7 - 16.7 - 14.7 - 12.7 - 10.8 - 8.8 - 6.8 - 4.8 - 2.8 - 0.8 + 1.1 + 3.1 + 5.1 + 7.1 + 9.1 + 11.0 + 13.0 + 15.0 + 17.0 hPa 188 197 206 217 227 238 250 262 274 287 301 315 329 344 360 376 393 410 428 446 466 485 506 527 549 572 595 619 644 670 697 724 753 782 812 843 875 908 942 977 1013 1050 PSI 2.72 2.58 2.99 3.14 3.30 3.46 3.63 3.80 3.98 4.17 4.36 4.57 4.78 4.99 5.22 5.45 5.70 5.95 6.21 6.47 6.75 7.04 7.34 7.65 7.97 8.29 8.63 8.99 9.35 9.72 10.10 10.51 10.92 11.34 11.78 12.23 12.69 13.17 13.67 14.17 14.70 15.23 In.Hg 5.54 5.81 6.10 6.40 6.71 7.04 7.38 7.74 8.11 8.49 8.89 9.30 9.73 10.17 10.63 11.10 11.60 12.11 12.64 13.18 13.75 14.34 14.94 15.57 16.22 16.89 17.58 18.29 19.03 19.79 20.58 21.39 22.22 23.09 23.98 24.90 25.84 26.82 27.82 28.86 29.92 31.02 PRESSURE RATIO  = P/Po 0.1851 0.1942 0.2038 0.2138 0.2243 0.2353 0.2467 0.2586 0.2709 0.2837 0.2970 0.3107 0.3250 0.3398 0.3552 0.3711 0.3876 0.4046 0.4223 0.4406 0.4595 0.4791 0.4994 0.5203 0.5420 0.5643 0.5875 0.6113 0.6360 0.6614 0.6877 0.7148 0.7428 0.7716 0.8014 0.8320 0.8637 0.8962 0.9298 0.9644 1.0000 1.0366 DENSITY  = ρ/ρo SPEED of SOUND (kt) 573 573 573 573 573 576 579 581 584 586 589 591 594 597 599 602 604 607 609 611 614 616 619 621 624 626 628 631 633 636 638 640 643 645 647 650 652 654 656 659 661 664 ALTITUDE (metres)

0.2462 0.2583 0.2710 0.2844 0.2981 0.3099 0.3220 0.3345 0.3473 0.3605 0.3741 0.3881 0.4025 0.4173 0.4325 0.4481 0.4642 0.4806 0.4976 0.5150 0.5328 0.5511 0.5699 0.5892 0.6090 0.6292 0.6500 0.6713 0.6932 0.7156 0.7385 0.7620 0.7860 0.8106 0.8359 0.8617 0.8881 0.9151 0.9428 0.9711 1.0000 1.0295

12 192 11 887 11 582 11 278 10 973 10 668 10 363 10 058 9 754 9 449 9 144 8 839 8 534 8 230 7 925 7 620 7 315 7 010 6 706 6 401 6 096 5 791 5 406 5 182 4 877 4 572 4 267 3 962 3 658 3 353 3 048 2 743 2 438 2 134 1 829 1 524 1 219 914 610 305 0 - 305

Table 1.1 – International Standard Atmosphere 2

Water in the solid state appears either as frozen water droplets or as ice crystals such as snow. above ground and between aircraft. change into ice only when disturbed by an outside force. When water vapor changes into liquid droplets. liquid. In general. 1. which is calibrated following standard pressure and temperature laws. The QNH is calculated through the measurement of the pressure at the airport reference point moved to Mean Sea Level. it becomes visible as clouds. Assuming the conditions are standard.3):  QFE is the pressure at the airport reference point. the standard setting is selected.2 – Altimeter The pressure setting and the indicated altitude move in the same direction: Any increase in the pressure setting leads to an increase in the corresponding Indicated Altitude (IA).  QNH is the Mean Sea Level pressure. and  The reference pressure surface. These water droplets are supercooled and cause structural icing on aircraft. assuming the standard pressure law. For that purpose. most weather hazards that interfere with the operation of aircraft are associated with water in one of its three states-vapor. such as an aircraft in flight. provided the standard setting is selected. Figure 1. the altimeter indicates the altitude above the airport reference point (if the temperature is standard). The aim is to provide a vertical separation between aircraft while getting rid of the local pressure variations throughout the flight. remaining in the liquid state at temperatures well be low freezing. rain. Some water droplets. the altimeter indicates the topographic altitude of the terrain. at the airport level in ISA conditions.  Standard corresponds to 1013 hPa. fog. With the QNH setting. The aim of altimetry is to ensure relevant margins. crossing a given altitude referred to as Transition Altitude. the altimeter indicates the altitude above Mean Sea Level (if temperature is standard). Consequently. 3 . different operational pressure settings can be selected through the altimeter’s pressure setting knob (Figure 1. corresponding to the pressure selected by the pilot through the altimeter’s setting knob. After takeoff. the altimeter indicates the altitude above the 1013 hPa isobaric surface (if temperature is standard). With the QFE setting. the “Indicated Altitude” (IA) is the vertical distance between the following two pressure surface:  The pressure surface at which the ambient pressure is measured (actual aircraft’s location).Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight Moisture. The Flight Level corresponds to the Indicated Altitude in feet divided by 100. dew. With the standard setting. Water vapor is water in the gaseous state and is not visible.3 Altimetry Principles An altimeter (Figure 1. The ambient atmospheric pressure is the only input parameter used by the altimeter. or solid.2) is a manometer. or drizzle.

Thus a pressure differential is created between the upper and lower surfaces of the wing. by increasing the angle of attack. Creating induced lift on a wing also creates induced drag. The top surface of the wing profile has greater curvature than the lower surface. Within limits. and at the transition level when descending. control surface. namely. the freestrearn velocity.3 – Pressure Altitude and QNH The Transition Altitude is the indicated altitude above which the standard setting must be selected by the crew.4 The Airfoil or Wing An airfoil (wing. the air passing over the top surface moves at a greater velocity than the air passing below the wing because of the greater distance it must travel along the top surface. as it is also referred to. the wing area. Bernoulli's principle and lift. Thus. Air flowing over the top surface of the wing must reach the trailing edge of the wing in the same amount of time as the air flowing under the wing. the freestream velocity. The transition altitude is generally given on the Standard Instrument Departure (SID) charts. or by changing the shape of the airfoil. drag can be increased by the same factors that increase lift. Airflow and the useful reaction obtained in the wing configuration is an application of Bernoulli's principle which states that an increase in the velocity of a fluid over a surface gives a resultant decrease in pressure on the surface. or the density of air. or the density of air. The Transition Level is the first available flight level above the transition altitude. It is relatively easy to visualize the decrease in pressure along the top surface of a wing due to the greater curvature. etc. This increased velocity means a corresponding decrease in pressure on the top surface. we can say that any part of the aircraft which converts air resistance into a useful force for flight is an airfoil. The change between the QNH setting and Standard setting occurs at the transition altitude when climbing. lift can be increased by increasing the angle of attack. or camber. The profile of a wing is an excellent example of an airfoil. 4 . forcing the wing upward in the direction of the lower pressure.Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance Figure 1. or by changing the shape of the airfoil. 1. This lifting force is known as induced lift. To do this. whereas the transition level is usually given by the Air Traffic Control (ATC). the wing area. The difference in curvature of the upper and lower surfaces of the wing builds up the lift force.) is a surface designed to obtain a desirable reaction from the air through which it moves. Within limits. a force that acts rearward and at 90° from the upward force of lift.

This is a permanent angle and is sometimes referred to as 5 . This is the stalling angle of attack. The result is a sudden increase in pressure above the wing accompanied by a sharp loss of lift and a sudden increase in resistance or drag. suddenly spreads forward over the entire upper wing surface. The events that take place at the stalling angle of attack or burble point definitely show that Bernoulli's principle applies only in a smooth or streamlined airflow and not in turbulent air. Upon release of the wing section it would neither lift nor fall. that is. At this angle. and its center of pressure is well back from the leading edge of the wing. Figure 1. This principle could be demonstrated in a wind tunnel test by holding a wing section at the angle of zero lift and suddenly releasing it. The point of intersection of the resultant force line with the chord line is the center of pressure. The zero angle of attack is normally a negative angle of attack. The chord line provides one side of an angle which ultimately forms the angle of attack. At positive angles of attack of three or four degrees. which appears in small amounts near the trailing edge of the wing at lower angles of attack. turbulent airflow. The lift force acts upward while the drag force acts rearward. when the angle of attack increases to approximately 18° to 20° (on most airfoils) the air can no longer flow smoothly over the top wing surface because of the excessive change of direction required. Positive Angle of Attack and Stall. and. Thus. but would move straight rearward in the direction of the relative wind.4 – Chord. The other side of the angle is formed by a line indicating the direction of the relative wind or airstream. Center of Pressure. sometimes called the burble point. The center of pressure at the point of stall is at its maximum forward position. During this action the drag component increases slowly at first and then rapidly as lift begins to drop off.Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight Chord. Angle of Attack. During flight. The chord of a wing section is an imaginary straight line which passes through the section from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The sum of these two forces is called a resultant force. The angle of zero lift is obtained when the resultant force line is exactly parallel to the relative wind line. Angle of Attack and Center of Pressure Angle of Zero Lift. At this point. Either increasing or decreasing the angle of attack causes the direction of the resultant force to be farther from the vertical. as the wing stalls. the resultant vector is inclined to the rear. the resultant force is comparatively small. angle of attack is defined as the angle between the chord line of the wing and the direction of the relative wind. one which places the chord line of the airfoil below the line which represents the direction of relative airstream. For small angles of attack. the lift component increases rapidly up to a certain point and then suddenly begins to drop off. The angle of incidence of a wing is the angle between the longitudinal axis and the chord of the wing. the resultant force attains its most nearly vertical direction. the force acting on the airfoil is entirely drag. when the angle of attack is gradually increased toward a positive angle. Finally. Its direction is upward and back from the vertical. Angle of Incidence.

Turbulence. The shape of a wing consequently affects the efficiency of the wing. 6 . This ratio varies with the angle of attack but reaches a definite maximum value for some particular angle of attack. Camber refers to the curvature of an airfoil above and below the chord line surface. This is defined as the ratio of the chord of the airfoil to the maximum thickness. This means that if the wing area is doubled. lift and drag are tripled. At this peak the wing has reached its maximum efficiency. The wing area is measured in square feet and includes the part of the wing blanked out by the fuselage. The Airfoil. A wing with high fineness ratio produces a large amount of skin friction and a wing with a low fineness ratio produces a large amount of turbulence.5 – Angle of Zero Lift and Angle of Maximum Lift Wing Area and Its Efect on lift. Turbulence and skin friction are controlled mainly by the fineness ratio. and changes to a positive or negative value during flight. The amount of lift produced by an airfoil will increase with an increase in camber. the lift and drag created by the wing are doubled. The angle of attack is the angle between the wing chord and the relative wind. with all other variables remaining the same. Don't confuse the angle of incidence with the angle of attack explained earlier. If the wing has a high fineness ratio. A thick wing has a low fineness ratio. If the area is tripled.5 Lift and Drag Ratio The efficiency of a wing is measured in terms of the lift over drag (L/D) ratio. and Skin Friction. The most efficient airfoils for general use have the maximum thickness about one-third of the way back from the leading edge of the wing. Wing area is adequately described as the area of the shadow cast by the wing at high noon.Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance the angle of wing setting. High-lift wings and High-Lift Devices. The shape of the airfoil is the factor that determines the angle of attack at which the wing is most efficient. Upper camber refers to the upper surface. it also determines the amount or degree of efficiency. The shape of an airfoil determines the amount of turbulence or skin friction that it will produce. The wing is set at a proper angle with the longitudinal axis of the airplane so that the wing will provide the lift required at the speed at which the plane will normally operate and with the least amount of drag. The best airfoil or wing is a compromise between these two extremes which holds both turbulence and skin friction to a minimum. 1. These have been developed by shaping the airfoils to produce the desired effect. Lift and drag forces acting on a wing are roughly proportional to the wing area. lower camber to the lower surface. it is very thin wing. Figure 1.

Figure 1. Lift and drag vary directly with the density of the air. for a given gross weight there is one. An aircraft traveling 400 mph has four times as much lift as one traveling 200 mph when the angle of attack and other factors remain the same. Aircraft operation and Lift/Drag Ratio Aircraft will operate most efficiently at the angle of attack at which the maximum L/D value occurs. When the airspeed is controlled in such a way as to maintain the most efficient angle of attack. an aircraft has a definite speed at which it will fly straight and level.Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight and mean camber to the mean line of the section. Lift also increases at the same time. and Air Density. and the aircraft climbs. That is.6 – Lift and Drag Ratio 7 . In order to maintain sea-level lift and drag conditions at 18. The wing or airfoil shape cannot be effective unless it is continually attacking new air. The angle of attack at which an aircraft flies in level flight depends upon its airspeed and gross weight. the aircraft is able to fly its maximum range. At an altitude of 18. airspeed which will cause the aircraft to fly at a given angle of attack. For each angle of attack. the aircraft must be flown at a greater true airspeed for any given angle of attack. High-lift wings have a large positive camber on the upper surface and a slight negative camber on the lower surface.000 feet (MSL). or else it will carry a greater load without climbing. Camber is positive when departure from the chord line is outward and negative when the chord line is inward. Wing flaps cause an ordinary wing to approximate this same condition by increasing the upper camber and by creating a negative lower camber. Lift. the air density is only one-half its sea-level value. Aircraft Velocity effect on Lift and Drag. lift and drag are also doubled. Lift and drag of a wing is proportional to the square of the velocity.000 feet (MSL). and only one. and vice versa. When the density is doubled. Drag. It is impossible to travel in level flight and maintain the same angle of attack when the speed is increased.

It is the average weight each square foot of the wing must support. Mean aerodynamic chord (MAC).Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance Configuration and drag items The shape or contour of an object is referred to as its configuration. Maneuvers must be kept within limitations. intercooler flaps. All of them affect the drag of the aircraft in flight. For weight and balance purposes the MAC is generally described as the straightline distance from leading edge of the wing (LEMAC) to the trailing edge of the wing (TEMAC) as measured along the longitudinal axis. Aerodynamically. A certain limitation must be established in order not to overstress the structure during high aircraft loading and high speed. It is also described as the average length of the wing chord. Drag items include cowl flaps. this item affects the drag configuration of the aircraft and these items are referred to as drag items. the MAC is the mean line between the upper and lower surface of the airfoil. Wing loading varies with the weight and area of the wing in various airplanes. Wing Loading. and is an important consideration in the airplane design. Wing loading progressively increases on a given airplane as the load is increased. oil cooler. When an aircraft is equipped with some items that extend into the airstream or affects the slipstream. etc. The MAC is found by dividing the wing area by the aerodynamic span. The mean air chord of the wing is used as a reference line for the location of the relative positions of the wing center of lift and the airplane center of gravity.7 – Low Speed Drag Polar 8 . The mean aerodynamic chord is used in loading procedures to determine the static balance and stability of the airplane. deicer boots. Wing loading is the weight of the airplane in pounds divided by the wing area in square feet. Increasing speed and maneuvers increases the load factors or g's. An important function of airplane aerodynamics is the wing loading value under various configurations of flight. Figure 1.

The wing with the lowered aileron goes up because of its increased lift. and is produced by movement of the rudder at the rear of the vertical tail assembly. when back pressure is applied on the wheel. pitch. This motion. These axes can be thought of as imaginary axles around which the airplane turns like a wheel. When back pressure is applied on the control wheel. The three axes intersect at the center of gravity.6 Axes of the Airplane in Flight Whenever the attitude of the airplane changes in flight (with respect to the ground or other fixed object) it will rotate about one or more of three axes. the left aileron goes down and the right aileron goes up. This in turn decreases the wing lift and the airplane assumes a glide or dive attitude. This in turn increases wing lift and the airplane assumes a climb attitude. the elevators move downward. This occurs because the down movement of the left aileron increases the wing camber (curvature) and thus increases the angle of attack. Motion about the longitudinal axis is called roll. Elevators. resulting in a decreased angle of attack. and each is perpendicular to the other two. This in turn increases lift forces on the tail section and moves it upward. the elevators are connected to the control wheel. The ailerons control movement of the airplane about the longitudinal axis. the elevators move upward. causing the nose to move downward. A change in position of the elevators modifies the camber of the airfoil. When pressure is applied to the left on the control wheel. The elevators control the angle of attack of the wings. When forward pressure is applied on the wheel. It can be seen that decreased lift on the right wing and increased lift on the left wing will cause a roll or bank attitude to the right or clockwise around the longitudinal axis. and the wing with the raised aileron goes down because of its decreased lift.7 Airplane Control Surfaces Ailerons. The tail is forced downward and the nose moves upward. and is produced by movement of the elevator at the rear of the horizontal tail assembly. There are two ailerons. This movement is roll. inducing a roll or bank to the left. the right aileron goes down and the left aileron goes up. The right aileron moves upward and decreases the camber. Vertical Axis: an imaginary line which passes vertically through the center of gravity. Motion about the lateral axis is pitch. decreasing the lift produced by the horizontal tail surfaces (or producing a downward force). the tail lowers and the nose raises. The aileron controls are so arranged that when the aileron of one wing is lowered the aileron of the other wing is raised. Together. The elevators. which increases or decreases lift. the horizontal stabilizer and the elevators form a single airfoil.Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight 1. This increases the lift produced by the horizontal tail surfaces. the horizontal stabilizer. and can be described as rolling or banking about the longitudinal axis. raised or lowered by the pilot as he moves the wheel in the cockpit to the right or left. 1. Like the ailerons. the tail raises and the nose lowers. When pressure is applied to the right on the control wheel. Conversely. The elevators control the movement of the airplane about its lateral axis. are free to swing up or down and are hinged to a fixed surface. rolling the airplane to the right. or counterclockwise around the longitudinal axis. The lift is now greater on the right wing and less on the left wing. 9 . rolling the airplane to the left. which form the rear part of the horizontal tail assembly. and is produced by movement of the ailerons at the trailing edge of the wing outboard. Longitudinal Axis: an imaginary line that extends lengthwise through the fuselage from nose to tail. Thus movement of the ailerons induces a bank or roll attitude about the longitudinal axis. Motion about the vertical axis is yaw. one at the outer trailing edge of each wing. causes the nose to move up or down as in a climb or glide. When forward pressure is applied on the control wheel. Lateral Axis: the imaginary line which extends crosswise from wing tip to wing tip. increasing the angle of attack. decreasing the angle of attack.

Trim tabs may also be of the fixed type that can be adjusted on the ground only. yaw. Should the pilot wish to trim for a noseheavy condition. as in the first example. rudder. They are relatively small. so the trim tab must be moved upward to relieve this pressure. the nose of the airplane moves in the direction opposite to any induced movement of the tail section.8 – Flight Control Surfaces Rudder. which in turn moves the elevator up. adjustable hinged surfaces located on the trailing edge of the aileron. Assume that backpressure is required on the control wheel to maintain level flight and that the pilot wants to adjust the elevator trim tab to relieve this pressure. which moves the tail section downward. or elevator control surfaces. 10 .. Its action is much like the elevators except that it swings in a different plane-from side to side instead of up and down. This in turn causes the nose of the plane to move upward for the desired trim attitude. if forward pressure is being held the elevators will be in the down position. Consider the situation.e. This motion. Since he is holding back-pressure. he would move the cockpit control toward nose-up. vertical. Airplanes may have trim tabs on the trailing edge of all three control surfaces or. trim tabs may be installed on only one or two of the control surfaces. that attitude of the airplane that will maintain a constant altitude). as in the case of some light airplanes. is the action of the airplane nose moving from right to left. for example. Trim Tabs. The rudder is a movable control surface hinged to the vertical stabilizer or fin.Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance Figure 1. in which the pilot wishes to adjust the elevator trim for level flight (i. Because the center of gravity of the airplane is located at approximately the intersection of the longitudinal. This movement of the cockpit control moves the elevator trim tabs down. The trim tab is moved in the direction opposite that of the primary control surface to relieve pressure on the control wheel or rudder pedals. In this example the pilot is concerned with the tab itself and not the cockpit control. The trim tab must then be adjusted downward so that the airflow striking the tab will hold the elevators in the desired position. The change in airflow on the horizontal elevator results in a high pressure above and a low pressure below. The rudder controls movement of the airplane about its vertical axis. and lateral axes. Conversely. the elevator will be in the up position. Trim tabs are used to keep the aircraft in the desired trim.

In down position. Rudder and aileron trim tabs operate in the same manner as the elevator trim tabs-to relieve pressure on the rudder pedals and sideward pressure on the control wheel. Sometimes referred to as high-lift devices. in fact. while at the same time the airspeed is reduced for a slower landing speed. lift is increased but also the wing drag. On landing. creating an upward force on the tail and a downward motion of the nose of the plane. the trim tab moves up and the elevator down. which permits their use as an airbrake in flight and on the ground. a steeper glide angle over obstructions. Consequently. wing flaps increase the wing camber (in some cases the wing area also) thus creating an increase in the effective lift of the wing. but at higher angles of attack the air flows through the fixed slot or opening and has the same effect on airflow over the upper surface of the wing as does the automatic slot. The airstream that is deflected along the upper surface maintains a streamline flow of air to a higher angle of attack and delays the burble point occurrence. the angle of glide is steepened and the length of the flight path is decreased. When the flap is placed in down position. In this case the slot is simply an opening in the leading edge of the wing that has no means of being closed. the wing lift is increased at a slower takeoff speed and the angle of climb is increased. During the landing maneuver. will not be reached until the angle of attack is nearly double that of a normal stall. It consists of an auxiliary airfoil housed in the leading edge of the wing at low angles of attack but free to move forward a definite distance therefrom at high angles to form a flat nozzle or slot through which a portion of the airstream flows to be deflected along the upper surface of the wing. The automatic slot accomplishes this advantage. When flaps are up or in the retracted position. Wing Slots. and a shorter landing roll. wing flaps are an airfoil or a portion of an airfoil attached to the trailing edge of the wing for the purpose of changing the wing camber. respectively. Stated briefly. Wing Flaps. with the flaps down. The burble point.  Higher drag coefficient. and especially so when there are obstructions to be cleared.  Increased angle of attack before burble point and the resultant stall are reached. On takeoff.  More accurate landings. Slots in the leading edge of the wing may not be of the automatic type. effecting a safe takeoff in a shorter distance along the runway. The slotted wing is also an effective agent for securing lateral stability and avoiding unintentional spins. At normal angles of attack the air flows over the wing as usual. especially into small fields where obstructions may be a hazard to flight. the advantages of flaps are:  Higher lift coefficient.Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight When the pilot moves the cockpit control toward nose-down. In flight the flap constitutes an effective airbrake which affords a steeper descent for landing without an increase in airspeed. the airplane with slotted wings will have a much lower stalling speed than one that is not so equipped. when the wing has lost its lift. An additional way to increase lift and consequently reduce landing speeds is by preventing the wing from burbling until a greater angle of attack is reached.  Steeper climbs and glides at reduced airspeed. 11 . with flaps down. they have no effect upon the lift characteristics of the wing. which permits a lower speed in landing. It is obvious that lift is improved at angles where the slot is open and the maximum Coefficient of Lift (CL) is not only larger but occurs at a much higher angle of attack. the flaps act effectively as an air brake to decrease the length of the roll on the ground. This is of great importance when approaching small fields (short runways).

In this case the wings must produce lift equal to the weight of the airplane plus the centrifugal force caused by the turn. or less. When the airplane assumes a curved flight path (all types of turns and pullout from dives) the actual load on the wings will be much greater be cause of the centrifugal force produced by the curved flight. The load imposed on the wings depends very largely upon the type of flight being conducted. The load factor is the actual load on the wings at any time. and it helps to eliminate nose heaviness caused by the use of flaps alone. This results in large wing loads which are resisted by the inertia of the airplane. in a 20° bank it is 1. the pilot notices a sensation of blood draining from his head and a tendency of his cheeks to sag. Additional loads on the wings during flight increase the wing loading (the weight supported by each square foot of the wing). in a 60° bank it is 2.00. the load supported by the wings is greater than the weight of the airplane. this back pressure on the wheel increases. The pilot should have the basic information necessary to fly the airplane safely within its structural limitations.00. the effective weight of the pilot increases. and centrifugal force builds up. Any time the airplane flies in a curved flight path. The increased lift is normally obtained by increasing the angle of attack (increasing the back pressure on the control wheel). the airplane should be immediately slowed down to the maneuvering speed (found in the airplane operating manual). The feeling of increased body weight is one indication of a load factor increase. divided by the normal or basic load (weight of the airplane). Thus the load factor increases. This additional load results in the development of much greater stresses in the wing structure. In level flight the load factor is 1. and at 80° it increases to 5." with a temporary loss of vision. Severe or strong vertical gusts can cause a sudden increase in the angle of attack. be equipped with a combination of slots and flaps. all airplanes must be capable of withstanding a gust of 12 . An additional cause of large load factors is severe vertical gusts. When the airplane bank steepens. Pilots should be familiar with the situations in which the load factor may approach maximum. wing loading will be less in straight and level flight than it will be in maneuvers where centrifugal force is literally increasing the weight of the airplane. For each airplane there is a maximum load factor that should not be exceeded in flight. Effect of turbulence on load factors. It permits a much lower landing speed and better control of the flight path. The load on the wings will remain constant so long as the airplane is moving at a constant airspeed in a straight line. If severe turbulence is encountered in flight. Airplane strength is measured basically by the total load the wings are capable of carrying without permanent damage. 1. since the airplane is designed and constructed to withstand such disturbance at this (the maneuvering) speed. When the load on the wing increases. This added weight can easily be sensed and is a fairly reliable guide to indicate increases in load up to twice the normal (load factor of 2). and avoid them in flight.31.Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance Airplanes may. in a 40° bank it is 1. in some instances. A turn is produced by lift of the wing pulling the airplane from its straight course while overcoming gravity.8 Loads and Loadfactor A load factor of one (or one “g”) occurs in straight and level flight when the wings support a weight equal to the airplane and all of its contents. Even greater increases in load may cause the pilot to "dim out" or "black out.76. When the load approaches three times normal. It is important to know the right recovery technique for the airplane you are flying so that if you inadvertently exceed the permissible load factor in such maneuvers as dives and steep descending spirals you can minimize the hazards. As a general requirement. This type of installation has many advantages. Wing loading can be determined by dividing the total square-foot area of the wing by the total weight of the airplane.06. Obviously. The lift of the wing must offset centrifugal force on an aircraft in a coordinated turn.

Every airplane is restricted in the speeds at which it can safely execute maneuvers and fly in rough air. If the 13 . and recover from the various disturbing influences. certain "maximum" speeds have been established for various airplanes. 1.Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight about plus or minus 30 feet per second at maximum level flight speed for normal rated power.9 Stability An aircraft must have satisfactory handling qualities in addition to adequate performance. he should change altitude to avoid the strong wind shear and follow procedures established in the specific operating manual for flight in turbulent air. If an aircraft is disturbed from equilibrium and has the tendency to return to it. the aircraft will experience acceleration due to the imbalance of moment force. and these conditions must be understood and respected to accomplish safe. If the equilibrium is disturbed by a gust or deflection of the controls. CAT is generally associated with changing wind velocities with height (vertical wind shear) in and near the maximum wind speed core of a jet stream. Load factors and excessive stresses on the aircraft may occur in areas of CAT. positive static stability exists. neutral static stability exists. however. A gust of such intensity occurs infrequently in ordinary flight operations.000 feet) may cause clear air turbulence. When an aircraft is in equilibrium there are no accelerations and the aircraft continues in steady flight. The static longitudinal stability of an aircraft can be recognized by displacing the aircraft from some trimmed angle of attack. At slow speeds the available lifting force of the wing is only slightly more than the amount necessary to support the weight of the airplane. At high speeds. Clear Air Turbulence (CAT). negative static stability. An aircraft is in a state of equilibrium when the sum of all forces and all moments is equal to zero. The pilot and load factors. An intermediate condition could occur where an aircraft displaced from equilibrium remains in equilibrium in the displaced position. the airplane structure senses the degree of a maneuver principally by the airloads involved. Speed and load factors. There are certain conditions of flight which provide the most critical requirements of stability and control. The aircraft must have proper response to the controls so that it can achieve its inherent performance. Extreme wind shear areas (8 knots per 1. If the aircraft has a tendency to continue in the direction of the disturbance. exists. When a pilot encounters significant CAT. the amount of excess load that can be imposed on the wing depends on how fast the airplane is flying. The static stability of an aircraft system is defined by the initial tendency of the aircraft to return to equilibrium following some disturbance from that equilibrium. Due to this relationship between speed and safety. During flight the pilot recognizes the degree of a maneuver from the inertia forces produced by various load factors. which is the bumpiness sometimes experienced while flying in cloudless skies at high altitudes. or static instability. It is necessary to provide sufficient stability to minimize the work of the pilot. If an aircraft subject to a disturbance has neither the tendency to return nor the tendency to continue in the displaced direction. Consequently the load cannot become excessive even if the controls are moved abruptly or the airplane encounters severe gusts. In other words. In general. the lifting capacity of the wing (lift increases as the square of the velocity increases) is so great that a sudden movement of the controls or a strong gust may increase the load beyond safe limits. This bumpiness may be of sufficient intensity to cause serious stresses on the aircraft and physical discomfort to the crew and passengers. efficient operation. It must be stable enough to maintain straight and level flight. The term "static" is applied to this form of stability since the resulting motion is not considered-only the tendency to return to equilibrium. Static Stability. the pilot recognizes load factor while the structure recognizes only load.

Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance aerodynamic pitching moments created by this displacement tend to return the aircraft to the equilibrium angle of attack.9. Static stability is concerned with the tendency of a displaced aircraft to return to equilibrium. the aircraft will demonstrate positive dynamic stability if the amplitude of motion decreases with time. The dissipation or "damping effect" is necessary to provide positive dynamic stability. the time history of the resulting motion indicates the dynamic stability of the system. if not impossible. to fly. Figure 1.9 – Static Stability Dynamic Stability. the aircraft has positive static longitudinal stability. 14 . the reduction of amplitude with time indicates that there is resistance to motion and that energy is being dissipated. When an aircraft is disturbed. the aircraft would be very difficult. In general. Dynamic stability. Stability in pitching is called longitudinal stability because it involves changes in inclination of the longitudinal axis in a vertical plane with no motion about the longitudinal or vertical axis. All aircraft must demonstrate the required degree of static and dynamic stability.1 Motions of the Airplane Pitching: motion about the lateral axis. 1. on the other hand. is defined by the resulting motion with time. If an aircraft were allowed to have static instability with a rapid rate of divergence. In addition positive dynamic stability is mandatory in certain areas to preclude objectionable continued oscillations of the aircraft. Rolling or Banking: motion about the longitudinal axis. Stability in rolling or banking is called lateral stability because it involves changes in direction of the lateral axis with no motion about the lateral or vertical axis. If an aircraft is disturbed from equilibrium.

Stability in yaw gives directional stability because it involves changes in direction of the longitudinal axis in a horizontal plane with no motion about the longitudinal or lateral axes. Very seldom. If the airfoil were of infinite span the airflow would be direct from leading edge to trailing edge because there could be no way for the streamlines below the wing surface to flow from this area of relatively high pressure to that of reduced pressure above the wing. This directional stability is usually small but is of some importance to the overall stability of the aircraft. the greater the turbulence and area effected by these wing-tip vortices. the vortices reduce lift by destroying the section forces of the airstream above the airfoil and close to the tips. In addition. The changes in lift effect a rolling moment tending to raise the windward wing. or stable about two axes and unstable about the third. is expressed as an equivalent amount of "effective dihedral" or "dihedral effect. is an airfoil actually rectangular in plan form. Dihedral is especially valuable during sideslip maneuvers. Vortices or eddies are thus formed at the tips. Since these eddies are unavoidable in the standard wing configuration. Since the airfoil is of finite area and span. Thus an airfoil having a wing span of 40 feet and a chord of 8 feet would have an aspect ratio of 5 (40 . divided by the wing area. etc. the aspect ratio is defined as the span squared. and it permits stable rolling or banking moments. Dihedral thus contributes a stable roll owing to sideslip. Aspect Ratio of the Wing. The wing away from the wind is subject to a decrease in angle of attack and develops a decrease in lift.8). Since wing dihedral is so powerful in producing lateral stability it is taken as a common denominator of the lateral stability contributions of all other components. and hence is an important factor in the production of lift by a given wing area. the wing away from the wind has more sweep and less drag. The wing into the wind has less sweep and a slight increase in drag. etc. Visually.Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight Yawing: motion about the vertical axis. For an airfoil of rectangular plan form the ratio of span to chord is the aspect ratio. This is accomplished by increasing the aspect ratio of the wing. If the relative wind comes from the side. When a statement is made that an airplane is stable or unstable. The aspect ratio of a wing is the ratio of the span to the mean chord. therefore. The span. Generally. Dihedral of the wing. the wing into the wind is subject to an increase in lift. The principal surface contributing to the lateral stability of an airplane is the wing. air on the underside seeks the low pressure region above by spilling over the wing tips. Consequently. and they tend to create a trailing whirlpool of air that may be hazardous to other aircraft that fly into its area of turbulence. flaps. the only recourse is to reduce their effect as much as possible. determines the amount of air acted upon. lateral. that is. A given airplane may be stable about one axis and unstable about the other two axes. For practical purposes. The net effect of these force changes is to produce a yawing moment tending to return the nose of the aircraft into the relative wind. 15 . The larger and faster the airplane. The effect of dihedral of a wing is a powerful contribution to lateral stability. various tip shapes. however.. power. creating a wing that is as long and narrow as possible within structural considerations. or directional. This tip vortex increases the drag because of the turbulence which absorbs energy. the span of a wing is the maximum transverse distance normal to the relative wind or the distance between the wing tips. the contribution of wing position. the ratio of the square of the span to the total area of the wing. Sweepback contributes to the directional stability or weathercock stability of an aircraft. dihedral is the apparent upward angle of the wing from the root source to the wing tips when compared to the horizontal plane." Sweepback of the wing. the statement should be qualified by stating whether the stability or instability is longitudinal. owing to the use of tapered wings.

The speed of sound in knots can be obtained from the following equation. these pressure disturbances are propagated through the air at the speed of sound. The speed of sound may be given in units of feet per second (fps). and significant changes in air density occur.10 – Subsonic Flow Pattern 16 . hydraulic fluid.Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance Sweepback contributes to lateral stability in the same sense as dihedral. or any other incompressible fluid. and the airflow immediately ahead of the object is influenced by the pressure field on the object. If the object is travelling at low speed the pressure disturbances are propagated ahead of the object. Evidence of this "pressure warning" is seen in the typical subsonic flow pattern illustration." A factor of great importance in the study of high speed airflow is the Speed of Sound. This airflow is termed incompressible since the air may undergo changes in pressure without apparent changes in density. At high speeds in flight the pressure changes that take place are quite large. Figure 1. Of course. or miles per hour (mph). this propagation speed is a function solely of temperature. The swept wing in a slideslip thus experiences lift changes and a subsequent rolling moment which tends to right the aircraft. Figure 1. Such a condition of airflow is similar to the flow of water. the wing into the wind experiences an increase in lift since the sweep is less and the wing away from the wind produces less lift since the sweep is greater. This lateral stability contribution depends on the sweepback and the lift coefficient of the wing. The speed of sound is the rate at which small pressure disturbances win be propagated through the air.10 High-Speed Aerodynamics The study of aerodynamics at low flight speeds is greatly simplified by the fact that air may experience relatively small changes in pressure with only negligible changes in density. knots.10. which shows upwash and flow direction change well ahead of the leading edge. 1. The study of airflow at high speeds must account for these changes in air density and must consider that the air is compressible and that there will be "compressibility effects. Actually these pressure disturbances are transmitted in all directions and extend indefinitely in all directions. When the swept wing is placed in a sideslip. where  is the temperature ratio T/T0: a  661. velocity and pressure changes occur which create pressure disturbances in the airflow surrounding the object.4786 θ The ratio of the true airspeed to the speed of sound is called Mach Number: M VTAS a When an object moves through the air mass.

approximately.75 to 1. Evidence of this phenomenon is seen in the typical supersonic flow pattern illustration. as follows:  Subsonic-Mach numbers below 0. Thus as the flight speed nears the speed of sound a compression wave will form at the leading edge and all changes in velocity and pressure will take place quite sharply and suddenly. compressibility effects can be expected to occur at flight speeds less than the speed of sound.00  Hypersonic-Mach numbers above 5. there will be local flow velocities on the surfaces which are greater than the flight speed. the airflow ahead of the object will not be influenced by the pressure field on the object since pressure disturbances cannot be propagated ahead of the object. Since there is the possibility of having both subsonic and supersonic flows existing on the aircraft it is convenient to define certain regimes of flight. Figure 1. and accounts for the first significant effects of compressibility.00 The principal differences between subsonic and supersonic flow are owing to the compressibility of the supersonic flow.11 – Supersonic Flow Pattern It is to be noted that compressibility effects are not limited to flight speeds at and above the speed of sound. Transonic and Supersonic flight.20 to 5. Any object in subsonic flight which has some definite thickness or is producing lift will have local velocities on the surface which are greater than the free-stream velocity. The airflow ahead of the object is not influenced until the air particles are suddenly forced out of the way by the concentrated pressure wave set up by the object. 17 .75  Transonic-Mach numbers from 0. Figure 1.11. Thus an aircraft can experience compressibility effects at flight speeds well below the speed of sound. The transonic realm of flight provides the opportunity for mixed subsonic and supersonic flow.20  Supersonic-Mach numbers from 1. Hence.Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight If the object is travelling at some speed above the speed of sound. Since any aircraft will have some aerodynamic shape and will be developing lift.

Assume that an increase in Mach number to 0. For example. vortex generators. etc.. shock formation at the wing tips moves the center of pressure forward. Because of the aft movement of with supersonic flow. Aerodynamic heating of supersonic flight can provide critical inlet temperatures for the gas turbine engine as well as critical structural temperatures." Since most of the difficulties of transonic flight are associated with shock wave induced flow separation. and a decrease in control surface effectiveness. critical Mach number is the boundary between subsonic and transonic flight and is an important point of reference for all compressibility effects encountered in transonic flight." Associated with the "drag rise" are buffet. Phenomena of Supersonic flight. This would be the highest flight speed possible without supersonic flow. and would be termed the critical Mach number. trim. buffet..Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance In the illustration. 18 ." and changes in hinge moments may produce undesirable control forces. Phenomena of Transonic flight. If this airfoil is in flight at Mach 0.50 and at a slight positive angle of attack. this will require airfoil sections of low thickness ratio and sharp leading edges and body shapes of high fineness ratio to wave drag. This condition is also referred to as "drag divergence" or "drag rise. there will be a loss of lift and subsequent loss of downwash aft of the affected area. An aircraft configuration may utilize thin surfaces of low aspect ratio with sweepback to delay and reduce the magnitude of transonic force divergence. various methods of boundary layer control. Thus. a rolling moment will be created in the direction of the initial loss of lift and will contribute to control difficulty ("wing drop"). The Mach number which produces a sharp change in the drag coefficient is termed the force divergence Mach number and for most airfoils usually exceeds the critical Mach number at least 5%. all take place above critical Mach number. airflow separation. Conventional aileron. A decrease in downwassh on the horizontal tail will create a diving moment and the aircraft will "tuck under. By definition. critical Mach number is the free-stream Mach number which produces first evidence of local sonic flow. When airflow separation occurs on the wing as a result of shock wave formation. The airplane configuration must have aerodynamic shapes which will have low drag in compressible flow. any means of delaying or alleviating the shock induced separation will improve the aerodynamic characteristics. it is necessary to provide the air-breathing powerplant with special inlet configurations which will slow the airflow to subsonic speed prior to reaching the compressor face or combustion chamber. the application of vortex generators to a surface can produce higher local surface velocities and increase the kinetic energy of the boundary layer. Thus a more severe pressure gradient (stronger shock wave) will be necessary to produce airflow separation. rudder. When the buffet is quite severe and prolonged. may be applied to improve transonic characteristics. Therefore.72 would produce first evidence of local sonic flow. Also. and elevator surfaces subjected to this high frequency buffet may "buzz. structural damage could occur if the operation were in violation of operating limitations. the wing center of pressure shift contributes to tile trim change-root shock first moves the wing center of pressure aft and adds to the diving moment. shock waves. and the resulting climbing moment and the tail-downwash--change can contribute to "pitch up." When these conditions occur on a swept-wing planform. If the shock-induced separation occurs symetrically near the wing root. the maximum local velocity on the surface will be greater than the flight speed but most likely less than sonic speed. powerful control surfaces controllability for supersonic maneuvering. the increase in static will demand effective. a decrease in downwash behind this area is a corollary of the loss of lift. If the wings shock unevenly because of physical-shape differences or sideslip. In addition. and stability changes. The aircraft powerplants for supersonic flight must be of relatively high-thrust output. Generally. etc. high lift devices. a conventional airfoil shape is shown.

The reduction in effectiveness of the trailing edge control surface at transonic and supersonic speeds necessitates the use of an all-movable surface. Trailing-edge control surfaces can be affected adversely by the shock waves formed in flight above critical Mach number. Application of the all-movable control surface to the horizontal tail is most usual since the 19 . Of course. suitable control forces would be synthesized by bungees. etc.Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight Figure 1. Trailing edge control surface. "q" springs. the resulting buffet of the control surface can be quite objectionable. In addition to the buffet of the surface. Such large changes in hinge moments create very undesirable control forces and present the need for an "irreversible" control system.12 – Transsonic Flow Pattern Control surfaces for transonic and supersonic flight. the change in the pressure distribution traceable to separation and the shock wave location can create very large changes in control surface hinge moments. If the airflow is separated by the shock wave. and the airloads developed on the surface can not feed back to the pilot. An irreversible control system employs powerful hydraulic or electric actuators to move the surfaces upon control by the pilot. bobweights.

the pilot of modem high-speed aircraft must understand and appreciate the advantages and disadvantages of the configuration. In high-speed aerodynamics.. etc. Similar changes occur at other points on the aircraft. high flight speeds and compressible flow dictate airplane configurations which are much different from those of the ordinary subsonic airplane. Continued exposure at elevated temperatures effects further reduction of strength and magnifies the problems of "creep" failure and structural stiffness. 20 . but these temperatures can be related to the ram temperature rise at the stagnation point. While subsonic flight does not produce temperatures of any real concern. Figure 1.13 – High Speed Drag Polar 1. supersonic flight can produce temperatures high enough to be of major importance to the airframe and powerplant structure. certain reductions in velocity occur with corresponding increases in temperature. To achieve safe and efficient flight operations. The greatest reduction in velocity and increase in temperature will occur at the various stagnation points on the aircraft. A knowledge of such fundamentals of high-speed aerodynamics as the foregoing will contribute much to that understanding.10.Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance increase in longitudinal stability in supersonic flight requires a high degree of control effectiveness to achieve required controllability for supersonic maneuvering. Higher temperatures produce definite reductions in the strength of aluminum alloy and require the use of titanium alloys. at very high temperatures. stainless steels. of course.1 Aerodynamic Heating When air flows over any aerodynamic surface.

the sensor will measure the ambient air temperature plus 80 percent of the ram rise.00. 21 . the ram rise may be considered negligible until speeds above 0.11 Airspeeds 1. as installed in the airplane. air temperature in flight is affected by adiabatic compression of the boundary layer air slowing down or stopping in relationship to the airplane. Vc. Calibrated Airspeed.10. TAT can be obtained by the following equation: TAT  SAT 1  0.30 Mach are reached. either the ram rise is obtained from a chart and subtracted from the instrument reading. uncorrected for static source position error (assumes zero instrument error). VT . Equivalent Airspeed. RAT is equal to the ambient air temperature plus some ram rise. RAT will equal SAT when the airplane is stationary. The sensitivity of the equipment to ram rise is expressed as a percentage which is called the "recovery factor". CAS .Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight 1. VI. may be calculated mathematically as a function of Mach number.11. RAT is the commonly used abbreviation of Ram Air Temperature. EAS . However. This compression results in a temperature increase which is commonly referred to as "Ram Rise". Therefore. This temperature is equal to ambient air temperature plus all of the ram rise.2 RAT-SAT-TAT Air temperature is one of the basic parameters used to establish airplane performance data.Equivalent airspeed corrected for atmospheric density effects (VT = Ve/ ρ ). TAS .2KM2 where: TAT SAT M K = = = = Total Air Temperature in Kelvin Static Air Temperature in Kelvin Mach Number Probe Recovery Factor   1. TAT is Total Air Temperature. air temperature is relatively easy to measure using a common mercury thermometer. If a particular temperature sensor has a recovery factor of 0. Ve. For all practical purposes. due to full adiabatic compression. Static Air Temperature (SAT) is the ambient air temperature. In a static condition. IAS . True Airspeed.80. total air temperature is equal to ram air temperature when the recovery factor of the temperature sensor is equal to 1.Airspeed indicator reading. It is the temperature most difficult to measure accurately in flight because all temperature sensors are affected to some degrees by ram rise.Calibrated airspeed corrected for compressibility (Ve = Vc Vc).Indicated airspeed corrected for static source position error (Vc = VI + Vp). The ram rise. In other words. or some mechanical means is used in the temperature measuring system to cancel the ram rise and give a corrected signal to the instrument. This temperature is often called Outside Air Temperature (OAT) and is the temperature of the undisturbed or free air (no ram rise).1 Definitions Indicated Airspeed. The proportion of ram rise is dependent on the ability of the equipment to sense or recover the adiabatic temperature increase.

the aircraft would be in a state of equilibrium. Induced drag is the undesirable but unavoidable consequence of the development of lift. equilibrium must be obtained by a lift equal to the airplane weight and a powerplant thrust equal to the airplane drag. These forces are:  thrust-the force the aircraft exerts on the air when moving forward.Machmeter reading. basic configuration and. of course. For this reason. retard. There are four forces which act on an aircraft as the result of air resistance.  lift-the force that exerts an upward sustentation on the aircraft. induced drag predominates at low speed. All parts of the airplane that are exposed to the air contribute to the drag. a force opposite to lift. the total drag of the airplane.the force that tends to pull the aircraft toward the earth. the total drag may be divided into two parts. and other factors. the airplane drag defines the thrust required to maintain steady level flight. gravity. if an airplane in a steady flight condition at 100 knots is then 22 . For the airplane to remain in steady level flight. unaccelerated flight thrust will equal drag and lift will equal gravity. corrected for static source position error.13 Straight and Level Flight All of the principal items of flight performance involve steady-state flight conditions and equilibrium of the airplane. in effect. a theoretical conclusion. though only the wings provide lift of any significance. is independent of lift.14 – Forces Acting on the Airplane 1. M . as installed in the airplane. as defined.  drag-the force that acts in opposition to thrust. The total power required for flight then can be considered as the sum of induced and parasite effects. friction. The sea or ocean of air through which aircraft fly has mass and inertia and is capable of exerting forces on any object moving through it. If all four forces were equal. For example. 1. While the parasite drag predominates at high speed. and  gravity (or weight) . Parasite drag is the sum of pressure and friction drag which is due to the airplane's. or modify motion. Thus. and certain others related to it. the wing drag (induced) and the drag of everything but the wings (parasite).Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance True Mach Number. but in level. This is.12 Forces Acting on the Airplane Force is defined as any action that tends to produce. Figure 1. that is.

it is well to distinguish between the two when discussing climb performance. the condition of equilibrium must prevail. the angle of attack changes very little with any further increase in speed and the drag of the wing increase in direct proportion to any further increase in speed.pound mass is raised 1 foot. if an airplane is equipped with an engine which produces 20000 pounds total available thrust and the airplane requires only 13000 lbs thrust at a certain level flight speed. with the angle of attack nearly zero. the most com mon unit is called a "foot-pound. Climb depends upon the reserve thrust.15 – Thrust and Drag 1.14 Climb Performance Increasing the power by advancing the throttle produces a marked difference in the rate of climb. Figure 1. Although we sometimes use the terms "power" and "thrust" interchangeably. the parasite drag becomes four times as great but the power required to overcome that drag is eight times the original value. because of the changes in the angle of attack. airplane: As the speed increases from stalling speed to top speed. for a typical. The minimum level flight airspeed is not usually defined by thrust requirement since conditions of stall or stability and control problems generally predominate. Work is the product of a force moving through a distance and is usually independent of time. level flight. Thus. Reserve thrust is the available thrust over and above that required to maintain horizontal flight at a given speed. Work is measured by several standards. To sum up these changes. when the airplane is operated in steady level flight at twice as great a speed. The maximum level flight speed for the airplane will be obtained when the power or thrust required equals the maximum thrust available from the powerplant. a work unit of I foot-pound has 23 . After attaining a certain high speed. and the drag is minimal. Near the stalling speed the wing is inclined to the relative wind at nearly the stalling angle. This does not consider the factor of compressibility drag.Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight accelerated to 200 knots. the power available for climb is 7000 lbs thrust. the induced drag is one-fourth the original value and the power required to overcome that drag is only onehalf the original value. the wing cuts through the air almost like a knife. Conversely. and its drag is very strong. erroneously implying that they are synonymous. When the airplane is in steady." If a 1. As a result the total drag decreases for the first part of the range and then increases again. But at ordinary flying speeds. The unaccelerated condition of flight is achieved with the airplane trimmed for lift equal to weight and the powerplant set for a thrust to equal the airplane drag. The wing or induced drag changes with speed in a very different way. the induced drag decreases and parasite drag increases.

the vertical component of lift is very nearly the same as the actual total lift. to the flightpath but this effect will be neglected here for the sake of simplicity. the rate of climb is a function of excess thrust. "power. "Thrust. or the excess thrust. the deficiency of thrust will allow an angle of descent. and as such is a function of the speed at which the force is developed. The term.000 pounds a vertical distance of 1 foot in 1 minute. When the thrust is greater than the drag. for the propeller powered airplane. that during a steady climb.16 . means the force which imparts a change in the velocity of a mass. one horsepower is work equivalent to lifting 330. On the other hand. (For example. The maximum angle of climb would occur where there exists the greatest difference between thrust available and thrust required. If it is assumed that the airplane is in a steady climb with essentially a small inclination of the flightpath. 24 . the summation of forces along the flightpath resolves to the following: Forces forward = Forces aft The basic relationship neglects some of the factors which may be of importance for airplanes of very high climb performance. the angle of climb depends on the difference between thrust and drag. this basic relationship will define the principal factors affecting climb performance. a more detailed consideration would account for the inclination of thrust from the flightpath. level flight. a subsequent change of induced drag. The net thrust of the powerplant may be inclined relative. a component of weight will act rearward along the flight path (see Figure 1.e. lift not being equal to weight. Although the weight of the airplane acts vertically." implies work rate or units of work per unit of time. The most immediate interest in the climb angle performance involves obstacle clearance. It can be said then. for a given weight of the airplane. The common unit of mechanical power is horsepower. Of course.) However." also a function of work. Such climbing flight would exist with the lift very nearly equal to the weight. This force is measured in pounds but has no element of time or rate.16 below). the excess thrust will allow a climb angle depending on the value of excess thrust. Figure 1.Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance been performed. the inclination of the flightpath is zero and the airplane will be in steady. When the airplane is in steady level flight or with a slight angle of climb.. when the thrust is less than the drag.Climb This relationship means that. etc. The most obvious purpose for which it might be used is to clear obstacles when climbing out of short or confined airports. i. the maximum excess thrust and angle of climb will occur at some speed just above the stall speed. when the excess thrust is zero.

there is sufficient latitude in most airplanes that small variations in speed from the optimum do not produce large changes in climb performance. If weight is added to the airplane. and certain operational considerations may require speeds slightly different from the optimum. in climb performance. the rate of climb is the vertical component of the flightpath velocity. or during malfunction of a powerplant. The above relationship mean. Figure 1. For rate of climb. Of course.Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight Of greater general interest in climb performance are the factors which affect the rate of climb. This increases the induced drag of the wings. when the excess power is zero. 25 . the rate of climb depends on the difference between the power available and the power required. Generally. it must fly at a higher angle of attack to maintain a given altitude and speed. A change in the airplane's weight produces a twofold effect on climb performance. The climb performance of an airplane is affected by certain variables. It can be said. the weight affects both the climb angle and the climb rate. at high altitude. Increased drag means that additional power is needed to overcome it. climb performance would be most critical with high gross weight. The conditlion of the airplane's maximum climb angle or maximum climb rate occur at specific speeds and variations in speed will produce variation. for a given weight of the airplane. the rate of climb will depend on excess power while the angle of climb is a function of excess thrust. optimum climb speeds are necessary. or the excess power. Of course. The vertical velocity of an airplane depends on the flight speed and the inclination of the flightpath. This alters the reserve power available. When power available is greater than the power required. then. the excess power will allow a rate of climb specific to the magnitude of excess power. In addition. the rate of climb is zero and the airplane is in steady level flight. Generally. an increase in weight will reduce the maximum rate of climb but the airplane must be operated at some increase of climb speed to achieve the smaller peak climb rate. a change in weight will change the drag and the power required.17). Airplane designers go to great effort to minimize the weight since it has such a marked effect on the factors pertaining to performance.17 – Power Available and Power Required Weight has a very pronounced effect on airplane performance. the maximum rate would occur where there exists the greatest difference between power available and power required (see Figure 1. as well as the parasite drag of the airplane. In fact. that during a steady climb. which in turn means that less reserve power is available for climbing. First. in obstructed takeoff areas. Then. that.

At the absolute ceiling. the gross weight of the airplane will vary and optimum airspeed. the flight condition must provide a maximum of speed versus fuel flow. these specific performance reference points are provided for the airplane at a specific design configuration. The service ceiling is the altitude at which the airplane is unable to climb at a rate greater than 100 feet per minute. A common denominator for each of these operating problems is the specific range.  or nautical miles lbs." S. The general item of range must be. the small sacrifice of range is a fair bargain. nautical miles of flying distance per pound of fuel. "Specific Endurance. of Fuel If maximum endurance is desired. The advantage of such operation is that 1 percent of range is traded for 3 to 5 percent higher cruise speed. and 26 . As altitude is increased. The specific range can be defined by the following relationship: S. the problem of efficient range operation of an airplane appears in two general forms:  to extract the maximum flying distance from a given fuel load or  to fly a specified distance with a minimum expenditure of fuel.R. Thus. While the peak value of specific range would provide maximum range operation. maximum angle of climb. In flying operations. Fuel S. The values of specific range versus speed are affected by three principal variables:  airplane gross weight.15 Range Performance The ability of an airplane to convert fuel energy into flying distance is one of the most important items of airplane performance. the flight condition must provide a minimum of fuel flow. of Fuel/hr If maximum specific range is desired. Hence.R. The speeds for maximum rate of climb. long range cruise operation is generally recommended at some slightly higher airspeed.  altitude. Most long range cruise operations are conducted at the flight condition which provides 99 percent of the absolute maximum specific range. altitude. these various speeds finally converge at the absolute ceiling of the airplane. the absolute ceiling of the airplane produces zero rate of climb. while endurance involves consideration of flying time. Consequently. Cruise flight operations for maximum range should be conducted so that the airplane obtains maximum Specific Range throughout the flight. clearly distinguished from the item of endurance. Since the higher cruise speed has a great number of advantages.  flight hours lb. there is no excess of power and only one speed will allow steady level flight.Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance An increase in altitude also will increase the power required and decrease the power available. it is appropriate to define a separate term. The item of range involves consideration of flying distance.E. that is. Since fuel is consumed during cruise.  nautical miles/hr lbs. and maximum and minimum level flight airspeeds vary with altitude. "Cruise Control" of an airplane implies that the airplane is operated to maintain the recommended long range cruise condition throughout the flight. Usually. and  the external aerodynamic configuration of the airplane. the climb performance of an airplane is affected greatly by altitude. 1.

or can achieve flight distances less than the maximum with a maximum of fuel reserve at the destination. the relatively high initial weight of the airplane will require specific values of airspeed. In addition. The maximum endurance condition would be obtained at the point of minimum power required since this would require the lowest fuel flow to keep the airplane in steady.18 – Effect of Gross Weight Total range is dependent on both fuel available and specific range.18). the optimum specific range will increase. Therefore. and is unaffected by weight or altitude. altitude. 27 . At the beginning of cruise flight. "cruise control" means the control of the optimum airspeed. the optimum altitude may increase. the airplane will be capable of its maximum design operating radius. the optimum airspeed and power setting may decrease. As fuel is consumed and the airplane's gross weight decreases. The maximum range condition is obtained at maximum lift-drag ratio (L/D max) and it is important to note that for a given airplane configuration. and power setting to produce the recommended cruise condition (see Figure 1. When range and economy of operation are the principal goals. or. By this procedure. altitude. the pilot must provide the proper cruise control technique to ensure that optimum conditions are maintained. Generally. Figure 1. level flight. and power setting to maintain the 99 percent maximum specific range condition. the maximum L/D occurs at a particular angle of attack and lift coefficient. the pilot must ensure that the airplane will be operated at the recommended long range cruise condition. Maximum range condition would occur where the proportion between speed and power required is greatest.Jet Transport Performance Theory of Flight power setting can also vary.

Theory of Flight Jet Transport Performance 1.19 – Thrust Required 28 .

the air flow would then amount to 1300 cubic feet per second. 2. Thus we can substitute weight for force. However. it matters little just what details are necessary if we consider the overall picture of how thrust is developed.92 in. This gives us a reaction in the opposite direction called thrust.2 feet per second faster than it was going the second before. Each second that it falls it will be going 32. no water. We know that when a body is subjected to a force it will accelerate as long as there is no opposing force. Dividing 1300 cubic feet of volume by 13 cubic feet per pound gives us about 100 pounds of air per second.1. discuss the compressor component detail. We call this particular force of attraction "gravity". If W = mg. Also. Mass can be described as the amount of matter in anything. If the engine inlet has 10 square feet and the air is moving at a speed of 130 feet per second. Obviously. For practical purposes this acceleration due to gravity is a constant and is designated as "g". no ground . we cannot count the number of molecules passing through the engine. so the new g look on the formular is wa/g for mass flow. The mass of a body is the number of molecules contained in it. From Newton we know that a force to be generated is proportional to the mass times its acceleration: F  ma The weight of a body is the force of exerted on the body. We could. it is possible to go into all kinds of minute details. so we can substitute "g" for "a". the weight of a body equals its mass times the acceleration due to gravity.Jet Transport Performance Jet Engine 2 JET ENGINE 2.1 Weight of Air Flow The engine inlet is constructed with a fixed area of so many square feet.2 feet per second per second. In the jet engine we are dealing with weight of air flow. 2. This is known as the weight of air flow (wa).it will go faster and faster until it reaches the center.1 Development of Thrust In discussing the ways thrust is developed. One pound of standard air (air on a standard day of 59. The weight of any body is the force of attraction between the earth and the body. We can't even stop the air as it flows through the engine to weigh it. If a body is allowed to fall toward the center of the earth with nothing in the way .2 feet per second squared.2 Mass Flow From Weight of Flow When we step on the scales we are measuring the force of gravitational attracion between the earth and ourselves. This is often expressed as 32. or W for F. showing how it is responsible for a certain percentage of thrust.no air. or 32.1. 29 . Now the Newton formula reads: W  mg In other words.0 °F and 29. of mercury) occupies about 13 cubic feet. for example. "g" is the acceleration due to gravity. Basically we accelerate a mass of air toward the rear of the engine. then m  W .

Figure 2. Our complete formular would now read: FN  WA Vj  Va   WF Vj g g 2.1.1 – Change in Velocity 2. Wa/g = mass flow of air through the engine.4 Fuel Flow One thing else enters into the determining of thrust. The complete formula for thrust thus becomes: FN  WA Vj  Va   WF Vj  A j p j  pamb  g g The last part becomes effective only under certain conditions and is often omitted in general discussions.1. Note that the fuel always goes along with the engine and so has no initial velocity. and ambient pressure (Pam) multiplied by the area of the jet nozzle. In this case there is additional thrust due to the difference in static pressure in the nozzle(Pj). (Aj). So WA Vj  Va  g will give us the force or thrust resulting from accelerating the mass flow of air. 30 .Jet Engine Jet Transport Performance 2. VJ – Vi will be the amount of the change in velocity.1. Because there is a considerable amount of mass involved in the weight of fuel flow we must add it to the formular to make it really complete.3 Change in Velocity If we designate the initial velocity of the air available to the engine as Vi and the velocity at the jet nozzle as VJ. We use a considerable amount of fuel in order to obtain the heat energy to speed up the air mass. The pressure in the tailpipe may not all be used in accelerating the gases through the nozzle with the result that the !static pressure in the nozzle is higher than ambient air pressure.5 Static Pressure in the Jet Nozzle When high compression ratio engines operate at high airplane speeds the overall compression ratio is quite high.

the thrust output will decrease. In the jet formula we are multiplying the mass flow of air by the difference in velocity developed across the engine.Jet Transport Performance Jet Engine 2. the engine must operate efficiently from sea level to extreme altitudes. the initial air velocity begins to in crease along with the air speed of the airplane. and the speed of sound is controlled by the square root of the absolute temperature. the gases are passing through it at the speed of sound. there are bound to be some changes in the quantities of the thrust relationship. the less difference there will be between the initial velocity and the jet nozzle velocity. However. However. from a stand-still to extreme speeds.e. The only variation in the speed of ejection at the jet nozzle will be due to a change in exhaust gas temperature.1 Change in Jet Nozzle Velocity as a Variable In a modern jet engine the jet nozzle is choked. Thus we see that the increasing Va would tend to have a decreasing effect upon thrust. when the jet nozzle is already operating at sonic velocity there will be less variation in the speed with which the gases are ejected.3 – Effect of Air Speed on Thrust 31 . 2..2 Initial Air Velocity as a Variable In the test stand or when the aircraft is standing still the engine Va must pick up the air mass and accelerate it from zero speed up to the jet nozzle velocity. 2. Although we can compensate for some of these problems.2. This means that the greater the speed.2 Factors Affecting Thrust If we operated the jet engine in an air-conditioned room we would never have any change in the quantities in the jet formula. At present. However. If that difference decreases.2. and under all changes of atmospheric conditions. Figure 2.pheric conditions. if the jet nozzle is not choked there will be considerable change in jet nozzle velocities due to changes in air speed and atmos. Of course. as soon as the aircraft begins to move. jet nozzles are limited to developing gas velocities up to the speed of sound. i.

When density increases there are more molecules per cubic foot.3 Density Effect Density is the mass per unit of volume or the number of molecules per cubic foot. More molecules going through the inlet area per second means a greater wa. In free air a rise of temperature will cause the speed of the molecules to increase so that they run into each other harder.4 Altitude Aspect The effect of altitude on thrust output is really a function of density.000 pound thrust engine on a hot day might generate only about 8.Jet Engine Jet Transport Performance 2. as temperature increases.2.000 pounds of thrust.4 – Effect of Air Pressure and Air Temperature on Thrust Again in free air when pressure increases it is because there are more molecules per cubic foot. 2. When they are farther apart a given number of molecules will occupy more space. The number of cubic feet per second we can direct into the engine is controlled by the fixed engine inlet area. When density decreases there are fewer molecules per cubic foot. We must be careful not to draw conclusions from the descriptive quality of the word that will give us wrong impressions of the effect of ram on engine perfromance. As density goes up.5 Ram Effect Ram is a descriptive word. As pressure goes up. but as temperature decreases thrust increases. However. When there are more molecules per cubic foot we can direct more of them through the fixed inlet area. A 10. they move farther apart. This makes 36.2. assuming constant RPM.000 feet the temperature stops falling and remains constant while the pressure continues to fall.000 feet the optimum altitude for long range cruising. the thrust will drop off more rapidly. When they run into each other harder. Figure 2. As a result. just before the rate of thrust fall off increases. 32 .2. density goes up. The higher we go the less air pressure there is and the colder it gets. 2. At about 36. wa goes up and consequently the thrust goes up. Density affects thrust proportionately. When a given number of molecules occupy more space we can get fewer through the engine inlet area. Thus the mass flow is determined by the density.000 pounds of thrust. As pressure decreases thrust decreases. the pressure drops off faster than the temperature so that there is actually a drop off in thrust with altitude. thrust decrease. Thus. while on a cold day the engine might produce as much as 12.

Figure 2. "B" curve represents the thrust generated by ram effect on or increased wa. In front of the engine there is a divergent inlet duct. any frictional losses in the duct will cause fewer molecules to reach the engine inlet. This is a function of the Bernoulli Theorem. The restricted area of the engine inlet causes a pile-up of molecules. With the relative velocity of the air turned into pressure. the air is moving by it at an increasing speed. "C" curve is the result of combining "A" and "B" curves. we get a corresponding increase in thrust.5 – Effect of Altitude on Thrust The effect is the same. due to ram. "A" curve represents the tendency for thrust to drop off with air speed due to an increase in Va. It makes no difference whether the aircraft is stationary in a wind tunnel and the air is blown by it or the aircraft is moving through stationary air. Notice that. When the density increases. eventually the air speed is such that any losses due to increase in Vi are made up. Any friction occurring in the duct is a loss to the engine so far as ram is concerned. As the air enters the duct it will fill up the added space. thus increasing the density. Ram will compensate some for loss of thrust due to altitude also. When this occurs we get a drop in velocity and an increase in pressure. A quick summary of ram can be seen from Figure 2. Obviously. the air molecules have developed their impact force. Ram is important to the jet type of aircraft engine in that it will eventually at high air speeds produce an increase in thrust by increasing wa. 33 .Jet Transport Performance Jet Engine As the aircraft picks up speed going down the runway.6.

Not all the increase in thrust with water injection is due to the increase in mass flow. The fuel control adds fuel to keep the compressor going at the same speed. It cools the air mass and maintains the same pressure by adding molecules to the mass flow. When the compressor speeds up it gives a greater weight of air flow. However. Water injection does two things directly. Thus on a cold day we can obtain only a small thrust increase by utilizing water injection.Jet Engine Jet Transport Performance Figure 2.6 – Effect of Ram on Thrust 2. but on hot days a sizeable thrust increase may be realized. by using water injection we can add the mass of water molecules to the mass flow of air. we maintain the same pressure because we are adding water molecules to the air. However. if there is little cooling effect. The increase in wa causes a tendency to slow down the compressor. Even though a water molecule weighs less than an air molecule we add whatever they weigh to the air already in the engine. The resulting increase in heat energy hits the turbines and the compressor is speeded up. Obviously. There is a cycle effect. The end result is a realizing of a greater thrust increase by increased wa than is obtained by the addition of the water molecules. only a few molecules can be added to the mass flow. This effect will also vary considerably with the position of the injection. Water has the effect of cooling the air mass inside the engine.2.6 Water Injection At first glance it would appear that once the wa is inside the engine there is nothing we can do to change it. 34 . Water injected at the inlet will be affected more by outside temperature than if it is injected somewhere farther back in the engine where the heat generated by compression will counteract a cold outside temperature. We can expect that water molecules can be added as long as the constant pressure can be maintained.

compressor efficiency. So we reduce our efficiency to the amount of thrust generated compared to the amount of energy we use. cycle efficiency is the amount of energy put into a useable form as compared to the total amount of energy available in the fuel. in effect. 2. We should think of the main engine as a machine that not only gets the energy into the air but tries to get that energy into a form that can be turned into thrust.3. The job of these components is to get the energy in the fuel into a form the jet nozzle can turn into thrust. Specific fuel consumption is made up of a number of other efficiencies. The two major factors affecting TSFC are propulsive efficiency and cycle efficiency. in the test stand we can't allow the engine to go any distance no matter how much thrust it develops so under these conditions accomplishing work is impossible. 35 . This brings us to one of the main measures of jet engine efficiency: the amount of thrust generated divided by the fuel consumption. This is called "Thrust Specific Fuel Consumption" or TSFC: TSFC  WF FN It is obvious that the more thrust we obtain per pound of fuel the more efficient the engine is. a measure of the overall efficiency of the engine components starting with the compressor and going through the combustion chamber and turbine. In a jet engine we are not so much interested in the amount of work actually done by the engine as in the amount of thrust or force we generate. we have given it a potential for doing work. mechanical efficiency. If we add to the air flowing through the engine a certain amount of energy. Briefly. thermal efficiency.3 Efficiencies Just how well an engine functions involves us in a discussion of efficiencies. The efficiency of any engine can be described as the output divided by the input.2 Cycle Efficiency On a much grander scale is the cycle efficiency. Force times distance is work. For instance. The amount of work actually done is the output of the engine. The jet nozzle does the best it can with what it has to work with.3. which in this case is fuel flow. etc. We are satisfied to worry about how much force is generated regardless of whether it moves anything or not.Jet Transport Performance Jet Engine 2. It is. 2. It involves combustion efficiency.1 Propulsive Efficiency Propulsive efficiency is the amount of thrust developed by the jet nozzle compared to the energy supplied to it in a useable form. This output divided by input is always less than 100% because a certain amount of inefficiency will always be present.

Jet Engine Notes: Jet Transport Performance 36 .

3. By the end of a takeoff roll the aircraft attains a very high level of kinetic energy. monitoring engine and flight instruments. The net flight path is the gross (actual) flight path minus 0. have an event occur. A good understanding of both the operational and the theoretical side (certification.4 Obstacle The airplane's net flight path must clear an obstacle by 35 feet (110. rotate at the proper rate and establish a stabilized flight path after liftoff.4%. and stop with the available stop distance  With all engines operative throughout the takeoff.1 Introduction There are six areas that have takeoff performance requirements.2. The second segment is usually the segment that determines the climb limit weight.2 The Takeoff Requirements In the daily operation the maximum takeoff weight is not only a question of performance of the aircraft alone but also a question of whether the aircraft will be able to meet the regulatory requirements once it looses the critical engine. the minimum climb gradient for the second segment of flight is 2.7 m). They are:  With the failure of one engine at the most critical point. 3. 115% of the distance to reach 35 feet (10. They are:  Field length  Climb  Obstacle clearance  Tire speed  Brake energy  Other 3.2. Regulations ask for either a stop or go decision and in both cases the situation must be survivable. 3. the distance required to accelerate to reach 35 feet (10. so that an abort in this phase would result in an overrun. take the proper action should a malfunction occur.2.3 Climb The climb limit weight is the maximum weight that still meets the minimum gradient established by the FARs.2.7m) above the runway at the end of the runway.1 General The takeoff is a portion of a flight that takes a lot of mental effort. 37 . The second segment occurs when the gear is up and the flaps are at the takeoff setting and the power is at takeoff power. obstacle clearance requirements) is required.Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance 3 TAKEOFF PERFORMANCE 3. There are many variables that a pilot has to absorb in very short time: keeping the aircraft straight down the runway. 3. For a two engine jet. As far as certification is concerned.2 Field Length Three cases are examined to determine the required field length.8% of gradient for a two engine jet. The other two segments are the first and the final segment.7 m) above the runway at the end of the available takeoff distance  The distance required to accelerate to V1. the regulatory material can be found in FAR Part 1 and 25.

2. This assumes maximum manual braking.1 – Takeoff Requirements 3. it should be considered last.3. 3. improved climb)  runway change Weight reduction is often the only tool left that will allow to meet the requirements under given ambient conditions. 3. such as:  TOW limited by landing weight  Approach and landing performance  Enroute limitations  Minimum Control Speed  Runway bearing capacity Takeoff weight limited by structure or zero fuel weight are specific to the aircraft structural design rather than regulatory performance requirements. Figure 3.Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance 3.1 Introduction The FAR define takeoff field length as the longest distance required by these three conditions:  Engine-out accelerate-go distance. V1 must be less than or equal to VMBE.5 Tire Speed The ground speed at the lift-off speed (VLOF) must not exceed the maximum speed of the tires.2.  Accelerate-stop distance.3 FAR Takeoff Definition 3.2. however.6 Brake Energy The energy capability of the brakes may not be exceeded by a stop from VMBE with both engines operating. In order to meet the take off requirements the pilot has several tools:  weight reduction  flap setting  thrust setting (e. this is the distance required to: 38 . packs off)  selection of takeoff speeds (e. this is the distance required to:  Accelerate with all engines operating  Have one engine fail at VEF  This failure occures at least one second before V1  Continue the takeoff  Lift-off  Reach a point 35 feet above the runway surface at V2.g.7 Other Requirements Besides these several other requirements exist.g.

Jet Transport Performance       Takeoff Performance  Accelerate with all engines operating Have one engine fail at VEF This failure occures at least one second before V1 Recognize the failure Put the airplane in a configuration for stopping Stop the airplane with the use of maximum wheel brakes with the speedbrakes extended. if their 39 .4 Takeoff Distances Available 3. NOTE: reverse thrust is not used determine the FAR accelerate-stop distance.25% above which no object nor any portion of the terrain protruders. Alle-engine do distance.2 – Takeoff Definition 3. not less than 500ft wide. Figure 3. except that the threshold lights may protrude above the plane. extending from the end of the runway with an upward slope not exceeding 1. this is 115% of the distance required to:  Accelerate with all engines operating  Lift-off  Reach a point 35 feet above the runway surface at the all engine climb out speed. The Clearway is expressed in terms of a clearway plane. 3. centrally located about the extended centerline of the runway and under control of the airport authorities.4.4.1 Takeoff Run Available (TORA) The part of the takeoff surface consisting of full strength paved surface capable of carrying the airplane under all normal operating conditions.2 Clearway Length Available The length of an area beyond the runway.

4.1) Figure 3.3 – Clearway and Stopway 3. A stopway must be capable of supporting the airplane during a refused takeoff without inducing structural damage to the airplane. centrally located about the extended center line of the runway and designated by the airport authorities for use in decelerating the airplane during a refused takeoff. equal to the accelerate-stop distance required. where V1 is selected to make the required distance to 35ft.4 Takeoff Distance Available (TODA) The sum of runway length available and clearway length available.6 Balanced Takeoff The condition. not less in width than the runway. (ASDA=TORA for no Stopway) Figure 3.3 Stopway Length Available The length of an area beyond the runway. If no stopway exists the accelerate-stop distance available equals the runway length available.4 – Distances Available 3. (TODA=TORA for no Clearway) 3. If no clearway exists the takeoff distance available equals the runway length available. (FAR Part 1.1) 3. assuming a failure of the critical engine is recognized at V1.4.5 Accelerate-Stop Distance Available (ASDA) The sum of runway length available and stopway length available.4. (FAR Part 1.Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance height above the end of the runway is not greater than 26 inches and if they are located to either side of the runway. 40 . In this case the V1-speed is called balanced V1.4.

is the minimum control speed on the ground. There may be not more than a 30 foot deviation from the runway center line.Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance 3. it is possible to recover control of the airplane with the use of primary aerodynamic controls alone (without the use of nose wheel steering) to enable the takeoff to be safely continued using normal piloting skill and rudder control forces not exceeding 150 pounds. at which.4. at which.149 (e).7 Unbalanced Takeoff The condition. VMCA Air minimum control speed. This is the V1 speed which results when VEF is set equal to VMCG. where V1 is selected to make the required distance to 35ft. unequal to the accelerate-stop distance required. It shall not be less than the VMCG determined under FAR Part 25. (FAR Part 25.149 (e)) Figure 3.5. Such a V1 selection allows to take advantage of clearway and stopway with unequal lengths available. it is possible to recover control of the airplane with that engine still inoperative.107 (a)(1)) V1 Takeoff decision speed.107 (a)(2)) VMCG Ground minimum control speed.149 (b)(c)(d)) VR 41 .5 – VMCG V1(MCG) The minimum takeoff decision speed. (FAR Part 25. is the airspeed.5 Takeoff Speeds 3.2 VS (VS determined at the maximum sea level takeoff weight) with maximum available takeoff thrust. It cannot be less than VEF plus the speed gained with the critical engine inoperative during the time interval between the instant the critical engine has failed and the instant the pilot has recognized and reacted to the engine failure by application of the first retarding means. when the critical engine is suddenly made inoperative. and maintain straight flight either with zero yaw or with an angel of bank of not more than 5 degrees. it is possible to control the airplane with primary aerodynamic controls alone and continue the takeoff. assuming a failure of the critical engine at V1. 3. VMCA may not exceed 1. when the critical engine suddenly becomes inoperative at VEF with the remaining engines at takeoff thrust. VEF is the speed at which the critical engine is assumed to fail. (FAR Part 25. at which. (FAR Part 25. Rudder forces required to maintain control my not exceed 150 pounds.1 Definitions VEF Critical engine failure speed. when the critical engine suddenly becomes inoperative.

VR is the speed at which rotation is initated to attain tha takeoff safety or climbout speed. V2 is equal to the actual speed at the 35 foot height as demonstrated in flight and must be equal to or greater than 120% of the stall speed in the takeoff configuration or 110% of the minimum control speed (air). (FAR Part 25.107(b)(c)) 3.Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance Takeoff rotation speed. This is the speed from which the airplane must stop. V2. This event used to be an engine failure. the speed of the airplane is increased to a given point and an engine is 'failed'. takeoff.7 m). VMU speeds shall be selected by the applicant for the all engines operating and the one engine inoperative condition. The increased time is not to be used for increased time to make the “no go" decision after V1. The accelerate go distance is the distance required to accelerate the airplane after the engine failure.107(e)) VMU Minimum unstick speed. V1 occurs one second after the event. The all engines operating lift off speed must not be less than 110% of VMU assuming maximum practicable rotation rate. The speed one second later is V1. Engine Inoperative Accelerate-Go Also during the tests for the certification of the airplane.6 – Transition Time 42 . Many of these test are done. VMU shall be the speed at which the airplane can be made to lift off the ground and to continue the takeoff without displaying any hazardous characteristics. (FAR Part 25. VR must not be less than 1. For determining an accelerate-stop distance it is more conservative to consider an event rather than an engine failure. (FAR Part 25. The one engine inoperative lift off speed must not be less than 105% of VMU.2 Certification Requirements Accelerate-Stop During the tests for the certification of the airplane. Average times are calculated for the times taken to do these things:  Apply the brakes  Quickly move the throttles to idle  Apply the speedbrakes. the speed of the airplane is increased to a given point and an event occurs. at 35 feet above the takeoff surface.107(d)) VLOF Airplane lift off speed. the increase in velocity from two seconds of additional acceleration is added to the V1 speed. Next. and reach a height of 35 feet (10. nor less than V1. The lift off speed is closely associated to the VR speed and is dictated by that speed.5.05 times the minimum control speed (air).107(e)(1)(iv)) V2 Takeoff safety speed. It is added to permit the "average" pilot to change from the takeoff mode to the stopping mode. Figure 3.107(f) and FAR Part 25. (FAR Part 25.

It is the latest point in the takeoff roll where you can start the stop procedure.7m) can be over that clearway. If the RTO is started after V1. the airplane must:  Continue to accelerate  Rotate  Lift-off  Be at V2 at 35 feet above the end of the takeoff distance The airplane must be able to be controlled throughout this time. 3. a lower number flap setting causes a higher climb angle than a higher number flap setting. This permits you to use a higher takeoff weight.5. it takes less runway to takeoff at a higher number flap setting than a lower number flap setting. The climb gradient () is in proportion to (Thrust/Weight)-(Drag/Lift).3 V1 Variations Standard For a standard (balanced V1) takeoff. full takeoff power was available on both engines. However the drag increases faster than the lift. In almost 75% of the RTO accidents.4 Rejected Takeoff After V1 V1 is the maximum speed at which you can start the rejected takeoff (RTO) procedure and still stop the airplane within the remaining field length. 3. 3. It is not recommended to do an RTO after V1 unless the pilot finds that the airplane is unsafe or unable to fly.5. At a higher flap setting.6 Effect of Flap Position on Takeoff 3. 43 . Clearway If clearway is available. you have more distance to stop the airplane from V1.7m) is equal to the distance required to stop the airplane from V1. A higher number flap setting gives the wing more chamber. The higher weight requires a lower V1 to still be able to stop on the available runway. This permits you to use a higher weight because you have more distance to use to climb to 35 feet (10.6.6 Continued Takeoff Before V1 The FARs give minimum performance standards for the “Go” decision. Because of this.Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance 3.7m). 3. If an RTO is started at V1 And the airplane is at the runway limit weight. the airplane will not stop on the runway. both the lift and the drag increase.5. This gives a lower climb gradient than a lower falp setting. A heavier airplane will have a higher speed than that of a lighter airplane. The spped at which the airplane goes of the runway changes with the weight of the airplane. This creates more lift than a lower number flap setting. Because of this. but requires a higher V1 to ensure that you can still climb to 35 ft by the end of the runway. the point where the airplane climbs to 35 feet (10. The FAR “Go” condition examines the airplane with one engine failed at the most critical part of the takeoff. the airplane’s speed will be zero at the end of the runway.2 Climb Gradient The position of the flaps also has an effect on the clim gradient.1 Takeoff Field Length The position of the flaps has an effect on the length of runway that is necessary to takeoff. Stopway If stopway is available.6. This is true under the conditons and procedures given in the AFM. In this condition. the horizontal distance that the airplane goes to climb to 35 feet (10.

therefore. that a net gradient of 1.7.1 Net Takeoff Flight Path The net takeoff flight path is the gross takeoff flight path reduced by 0. Each segment is defined by changes in airplane configuration.Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance Figure 3. 3. after all takeoff flight path obstacles are cleared. T/O Thrust (800 ft for 5 min T/O Thrust) is reached. one wing is below the fuselage.7. speed or power setting. First Segment This segment extends from the 35 ft height to the point where the landing gear is fully retracted at a constant V2 speed. However. The net takeoff flight path must clear all obstacles in the takeoff area by a height of at least 35 ft. As the lift component decreases in a turn.8% climb gradient capability. Mind.7 – Effect of Flap Position on Takeoff 3. there is an additional decrement of gradient loss taken into account.6% only provides an altitude improvement of 16ft/1000ft or 97ft/NM ground distance. The prescribed reduction in climb gradient is applied as an equivalent reduction in acceleration along level-off part of the takeoff flight path. To allow for a turn during takeoff the flight path must clear any obstacles by a height of at least 50 ft.2 Climb Gradient Requirements A minimum climb gradient is required in each segment of the takeoff flight path as Shown below. part of the airplane is lower than the indicated level.7 Takeoff Flight Path The takeoff flight path begins 35 ft above the takeoff surface at the end of the takeoff distance and continues to a point of the takeoff where the final segment climb speed and a height of 1500 ft for 10 min. or. 44 . when making a turn. 3.

4 1.2 Explanation The FARs require a second segment climb gradient of 2.in the takeoff position and takeoff power.5 0.Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance Second Segment This segment starts at the point at which the landing gear is fully retracted and continues until the airplane reaches an altitude of at least 1500 feet above the runway. 3. The higher V2 produces the decrease in the ratio of (drag/lift).2 0. Flap retraction speeds have been selected to provide adequate margins above the stall speed. The height to be used during level flight acceleration is determined during the obstacle clearance analysis and will be provided on runway weight charts. The Final Segment is sometimes called 4th segment.1 Introduction Improved climb is used to make airplane performance better. Because of the use of higher speeds. Number of engines 2 3 4 Segment 2 3 Final Minimum Gross Gradient [%] positive 2. there must be excess field length. Final Segment This segment extends from the leveoff height to the end of the takeoff flight path. and obstacle performance.7 1. To maintain the same gradient. To use improved climb. 45 . flaps . It is flown at V2 speed. flaps up and using maximum continuous thrust. The climb gradient () is in proportion to (thrust/weight)/(drag/lift). brake energy.0 1. The improved climb procedure increases the normal V2 and. It may increase the maximum allowable takeoff weight when a plane is limited by the climb limitation. because of that.4%. The minimum gross height is at least 1500 ft. If the weight is increased then the ratio of (thrust/weight) decreases. The acceleration capability must correspond to gross climb gradient shown in Table 2.1 – FAR Minimum Climb Gradients 3. The second segment of flight starts when the gear goes up and the flaps and thrust are at takeoff settings. tire speed.5 3. The takeoff flight path profile will vary during this segment depending upon obstacle location and height.8 Improved Climb 3.7 1 Table 3. V1 and VR must also be increased if V2 is increased. Third Segment The third segment is that portion of the flight path during which the flaps are retracted while accelerating in level flight to the "Final Segment” climb speed.8. increases the climb capability to the airplane. The acceleration in level flight with one engine inoperative will be such that the speed will not be less than 20% above the stall speed during retraction. there must be sufficient runway available to use improved climb.3 2.8. It is flown at the "Final Segment" climb speed. the (drag/lift) ratio must also decrease.

When you operate at reduced thrust you use less than the full thrust rating of the engine for takeoff.3 Technical Considerations When using improved climb.9. derate and the assumed temperature method.8 – Takeoff Flight Path 3. The most wear on the engine occurs during takeoff. It is not necessary to use the maximum takeoff thrust when you are not at the maximum takeoff weight.9 Reduced Thrust 3. There are two ways to get reduced thrust.8.1 Introduction Many times it is not necessary to takeoff at the maximum takeoff weight. 46 .  Field length requirements must be met at the higher speeds. 3. This lowers the temperature of the turbine inlet and increases the engine's life.Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance Figure 3. The results of reduce thrust operation are:  Increased engine reliability  Increased airplane dispatch reliability  Decreased engine operating costs  Decreased maintenance costs. remember these things:  Tire speed and brake energy V1 restrictions must be met  Obstacle clearance requirements must be met.

slush.2 Derate Derate is one way to operate an engine at less than full thrust. When you use derate. When you operate at a derate it is like having a less powerful engine.Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance Figure 3. or ice. Derate can be used to increase the performance limited weight if the runway is short or is contaminated with standing water.9 – Improved Climb 3. Derates may be used under any circumstances only if the expected takeoff weight is low enough to permit the use of reduced thrust. each derate thrust level will have its own set of performance charts in the airplane flight manual. If you operate at a derate the reduced thrust is a new maximum and may not be exceeded. Because of this the Vmcg is lower. all of the performance information is calculated at the lower takeoff thrust.10 – Derate 47 .9. Because derate is a separate thrust rating. Figure 3.

ice. Figure 3. The assumed temperature method is conservative.3 Assumed Temperature As the ambient takeoff temperature increases.Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance 3. The assumed temperature method uses the maximum temperature that meets all the takeoff performance requirements at the expected takeoff weight for the planned takeoff runway. or snow. lmportant Note The maximum assumed temperature is dependent on:  Airport  Runway  Flap position  Wind For example. The maximum thrust reduction permitted is 25% from the chosen thrust rating. This method is not permitted when the runway is contaminated by water. Its use is permitted on a wet runway it the airline accounts for the reduced braking performance. If the scheduled takeoff weight is less than the performance limited weight at the full thrust rating but higher than the performance limited weight at T01 derate could not be used. This is because the pilot may advance the throttles to the rated takeoff setting.11 – Assumed Temperature 48 . and obstacle clearance.9. Restrictions There are FAA restrictions on the use of the assumed temperature method. If the takeoff weight is less than the maximum allowable takeoff weight. There are times when you can use assumed temperature and not derate. climb gradient. slush. The assumed temperature method may be used with a derate. These requirements include takeoff distance. The true airspeed will be less than the indicated airspeed because the actual temperature is less than the temperature that is assumed. you may be able to use the assumed temperature method to reduce the thrust. This is because of the effect of temperature on true airspeed and on engine thrust. the allowable takeoff weight decreases. However. assumed temperature could be used. The minimum control speeds must be calculated at the normal thrust for the actual outside air temperature. an assumed temperature that is used for one runway may not be usable for the reciprocal runway because of obstacles or runway slope.

10 Takeoff on Wet and Contamineted Runways The previously-discussed performance aspects only concerned dry and wet runways. a damp runway may have to be considered as wet. Damp Runway: A runway is considered damp when the surface is not dry.125 in). 49 . which are considered as wet. JAR 25 and JAR-OPS Study Groups came to the conclusion that a damp runway should be considered closer to a wet one than to a dry one in terms of friction coefficient (µ). a runway is considered to be wet.  Slush: Water saturated with snow.475 states that a damp runway is equivalent to a dry one in terms of takeoff performance.4 kg/liter ( 3. but when the moisture on it does not give it a shiny appearance. and loose snow. and its density is approximately 0. As of today. The FAA does not make any reference to damp runways. They reduce friction forces. They reduce friction forces. 3.10.  Ice : The friction coefficient is 0. Recently. or when there is a sufficient moisture on the runway surface to cause it to appear reflective. and cause precipitation drag and aquaplaning.10. But contaminants also affect takeoff performance. Contaminants can be divided into hard and fluid contaminants. The water depth is assumed to be less than 3 mm. Wet Runway: A runway is considered wet when the runway surface is covered with water or equivalent.85 kg/liter ( 7. so that in the future. It is encountered at temperature around 5°C. [with a depth less than or equal to 3 mm]. Its density is approximately 0. but without risk of hydroplaning due to standing water on one part of its surface. In other words.7 lb / US GAL). The following section aims at defining the ifferent runway states that can be encountered at takeoff.  Wet snow: If compacted by hand.05 or below. but without significant areas of standing water. as soon as it has a shiny appearance. Its density is approximately 0. whereas JAR-OPS 1. which spatters when stepping firmly on it.  Compacted snow: Snow has been compressed (a typical friction coefficient is 0. or if compacted by hand. snow will stick together and tend to form a snowball.480) Dry Runway: A dry runway is one which is neither wet nor contaminated.35 lb / USGAL).1 lb / US GAL).  Dry snow: Snow can be blown if loose.Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance 3. 3.  Hard contaminants are : Compacted snow and ice.2). slush.2 Effect on Performance There is a clear distinction of the effect of contaminants on aircraft performance.2 kg/liter ( 1. and have to be considered for takeoff weight calculation. a JAA Notice for Proposed Amendment (NPA) is under discussion.  Fluid contaminants are : Water.1 Definitions (JAR-OPS 1. will fall apart again upon release. and includes those paved runways which have been specially prepared with grooves or porous pavement and maintained to retain ‘effectively dry’ braking action even when moisture is present. Contaminated Runway: A runway is considered to be contaminated when more than 25% of the runway surface area within the required length and width being used is covered by the following:  Standing water: Caused by heavy rainfall and/or insufficient runway drainage with a depth of more than 3 mm (0.

known as ESDU. The only way to obtain the aircraft’s effective µ would be to use the aircraft itself in the same takeoff conditions.  Worsen the acceleration rate: Negative effect for takeoff. tire pressure. the negative effect on the acceleration rate leads to limit the depth of a fluid contaminant to a maximum value. Effective µ and Reported µ Airport authorities publish contaminated runway information in a document called “SNOWTAM”. The ESDU model concerns all aircraft types which are not mentioned above. the tire wear state. Precipitation Drag Precipitation drag is composed of:  Displacement drag: Produced by the displacement of the contaminant fluid from the path of the tire. as follows: µwet = µdry/2 (limited to 0.Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance Reduction of Friction Forces The friction forces on a dry runway vary with aircraft speed. ICAO Airport Services Manual Part 2 provides information on these measuring vehicles. 50 . anti-skid system efficiency and… ground speed.2 and µicy = 0.4) µconta = µdry/4 As of today. Tapley meter. with a hard contaminant covering the runway surface. For snow-covered or icy runways. for a wet runway and for a runway covered with standing water or slush. The main problem is that the resulting friction forces of an aircraft (interaction tire/runway) depend on its weight. regulations stated that.05. The reported µ is measured by such friction-measuring vehicles. So.109. Saab Friction Tester (SFT). The µconta (water and slush) results from an amendment based on a flight test campaign. the following values are considered. a new method. Then comes the problem of correlating the figures obtained from these measuring vehicles (reported µ). which is of course not realistic in daily operations. MU-Meter. The effect of these additional drags is to :  Improve the deceleration rate: Positive effect. but these vehicles operate at much lower speeds and weights than an aircraft. James Brake Decelerometer (JDB). On the other hand. Another solution is to use one of the above-mentioned vehicles. whatever the aircraft type: µsnow = 0. only the friction coefficient (effective µ) is affected. and the depth of contaminant therefore has no influence on takeoff performance. Flight tests help to establish the direct relation between the aircraft’s friction coefficient (µ) and the ground speed. the aircraft’s friction coefficient could be deduced from the one obtained on a dry runway. Diagonal Braked Vehicle (DBV). has been developed and introduced by postamendment 42 in JAR/FAR 25. in case of a rejected takeoff. and the actual braking performance of an aircraft (effective µ). Until recently. which contains:  The type of contaminant  The mean depth for each third of total runway length  The reported µ or braking action. The proposed calculation method of the µwet accounts for the tire pressure. as: Skidometer.  Spray impingement drag: Produced by the spray thrown up by the wheels (mainly those of the nose gear) onto the fuselage. tire wear. the type of runway and the anti-skid efficiency demonstrated through flight tests.

They can either be established by calculation or testing. the gross flight path can initially be at less than 35 feet above close-in obstacles. Aquaplaning (or hydroplaning) is a situation where the tires of the aircraft are. virtually ineffective. as soon as the surface is not dry. wheel steering for directional control is. Reversers’ effect may be taken into account in the ASDA calculation. how dense the contaminant is). Figure 3. In other words. Takeoff Flight Path On a wet or contaminated runway. Performance calculations on contaminated runways take into account the penalizing effect of hydroplaning. The net takeoff flight path starts at 35 feet at the end of the TODA. 3. Under these conditions. the aquaplaning speed is a threshold at which friction forces are severely diminished.3 Takeoff Performance on Wet Runways Acceleration Stop Distance The ASDA definition on a contaminated runway is the same as on a wet runway. the screen height (height at the end of the TODA) is 15 feet. therefore. the gross flight path starts at 15 feet while the net flight path starts at 35 feet at the end of the TODA. tire traction drops to almost negligible values along with aircraft wheels’ braking. So. 51 . to a large extent. This phenomenon becomes more critical at higher speeds. leading to a reduction of the dry area. While the net flight path clears the obstacles by 35 feet all along the takeoff flight path. Takeoff Distance and Takeoff Run The TODA and TORA definitions on a contaminated runway are similar to the ones on a wet runway.e.10. separated from the runway surface by a thin fluid film.Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance Aquaplaning Phenomenon The presence of water on the runway creates an intervening water film between the tire and the runway.12 – Aquaplaning Aquaplaning speed depends on tire pressure. and on the specific gravity of the contaminant (i. The distances can either be established by calculation or testing. where the water cannot be squeezed out from between the tire and the runway.

it is possible to obtain higher takeoff weights on surfaces covered with water. 3.11 Takeoff Performance Data This section contains the description of the charts and tables which are available to the flight crew for takeoff performance calculation. The length of the take-off run available plus the length of the stopway. Indeed. Route Performance Manual The RPM contains the Runway Weight Charts (RWC) for the regular airports. or snow than on dry runways. the takeoff mass must not exceed that permitted for a takeoff on a dry runway under the same conditions”. Only those charts and tables which are required during daily operation will be discussed. Presented along with City name in page header of all RWC’s. slush. but when the moisture on it does not give it a shiny appearance. it is possible to obtain shorter TODAs and ASDAs on wet and contaminated runways than on dry runways for the same takeoff conditions.1 Determination of Performance Limited Takeoff Weight There are four ways for the flight crew to determine the Performance Limited Takeoff Weight:  With the Airplane Flight Manual (AFM)  With the Flight Planning and Performance Manual (FPPM)  With the Route Performance Manual (RPM)  With chapter PD of FCOM Volume 1 Of those four methods only the last two shall be discussed here. Dry RWY A dry RWY is one which is neither wet nor contaminated. For an explanation of the AFM method refer to appendix 2 of the AFM and for the FPPM method refer to the FPPM. Damp RWY A RWY is considered damp when the surface is not dry. on wet and contaminated runways. RWCs present Performance limited Take-off Weight (PTOW) calculations for the specific airplane and engine combination. Clearway Obstacle free surface after the end of TORA used for extending the TODA used in case of continued takeoff.490 (b)(5) On a wet or contaminated runway. Definitions Used on the RWC’s AD Name of the airport. For performance purposes. ASDA Accelerate-stop distance available. if such stopway is declared available by the appropriate Authority and is capable of bearing the mass of the airplane under the prevailing operating conditions. Contaminated 52 .Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Weight The TODA and ASDA requirements differ between wet and contaminated runways on one side. This is why the regulation indicates that: “JAR-OPS 1. whereas it is forbidden to take it into account for the ASDA determination on dry runways. Thus. the screen height is measured at 15 feet rather than 35 feet on dry runways. Presented in page header of all RWC’s. a damp runway may be considered to be dry. the use of reverse thrust is allowed for ASDA determination on wet and contaminated runways. Moreover. and dry runways on the other side. Therefore. 3.11. It is allowed to interpolate in the wind and the temperature as long as all data is for the same flaps setting. AIP Aeronautical Information Publication. and includes those paved RWYs which have been specially prepared with grooves or porous pavement and maintained to retain “effectively dry” braking action even when moisture is present.

Jet Transport Performance RWY Takeoff Performance Elev ICAO MTOW PTOW RWY Slope Stopway TODA TORA WED Weight Wet RWY A RWY is considered to be contaminated when more than 25% of the RWY surface area (whether in isolated areas or not) within the required length and width being used is covered by the following: Surface water more than 3mm deep. ASDA. There are three different line-up methods considered: 1) Line-up from behind the take-off position. the lift-off point will have another altitude than the runway end. Snow. This assumes that the aircraft arrives from a taxiway perpendicular to the runway and makes a 90-degree turn onto the runway. which has been compressed into a solid mass which resists further compression and will hold together or break into lumps if picked up (compacted snow). negative . The slope is the difference in elevation between the line-up position and the rwy end divided by the distance. RWY slope (max ±2%). Water Equivalent Depth. Is presented in page header of all RWC’s. This is used for deciding the general pressure altitude. Ice.27m. Presented in page header of all RMC’s. Take Off Run Available. or loose snow. The length of a runway which is declared available by the appropriate Authority and suitable for the ground run of an aeroplane taking off. Used to extent the ASDA in case of a rejected takeoff. This assumes that backtrack with a full 180 degree turn is made. Note that the taxi runway markings will take the aircraft too far into the runway. Obstacle data is given as distance from brake release point and height above the runway end. ASDA -20.down. Weight definition have the same meaning as a Mass for the purpose of Takeoff performance A RWY is considered wet when the RWY surface is covered with water.78m.85m. Maximum Takeoff Weight (kg). Airport Data All airport data used in the calculation is the officially declared distances and are presented as TORA. 2) Line-up with 90° entry – Penalty: TORA/TODA –9.e. RWY denomination or Intersection TKOF position this RWC chart is calculated. Runway Aligment Penalities Runway alignment penalties are included. or by slush. ICAO code of the airport. less or equal than 3mm WED or when there is sufficient moisture on the RWY surface to cause it to appear reflective. Presented along with IATA code in page header of all RWC’s. 53 .2m. Airport Reference Point elevation. i. The length of the take-off run available plus the length of the clearway available. or equivalent. This is a mean slope used for calculations. Presented in page header of all RMC’s. Presented in page header of all RWC’s. Performance limited Takeoff Weight (kg). TODA and LDA. the end of TORA. ASDA -25. but without significant areas of standing water. Presented in page header of all RWC’s. and is not used for obstacle calculations.up. equivalent to more than 3mm of water. Extension of the runway with limited runway bearing capacity. positive . When calculating obstacle clearance with TOD shorter than the TODA. 3) Line-up with 180° turn – Penalty: TORA/TODA –14. Aerodrome elevation is the elevation of the Airport Reference Point. including wet ice. This assumes that the nose wheel is behind the takeoff position.

15 or OPT  A/I OFF or ON  Packs ON or OFF  QNH 1013  5 minutes takeoff thrust limitation Limitation Codes The takeoff weight presented is based on the following limitations: Limit code F O C T B V P R ** Limiting factor Field length Obstacle limitation Climb limitation Tire Speed Brake energy Vmcg limiting 5 min of T/O thrust / Acceleration segment limitation V2 restriction Improved Climb SCAP Limited Use of Corrections The corrections are calculated for each runway.Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance Engine Failure Procedure The engine failure procedure / CLP is published in the note in the upper part of the Runway Weight Chart (RWC). If any special considerations are in conflict with the standard acceleration height. Acceleration Altitude The standard acceleration altitude of 1 000’ AGL ft is used. This includes information about:  T/O Flaps 5. The corrections are tabulated with a column for each flaps setting used in the Airport Analysis. Layout The following page shows a RWC sample. Aircraft Configuration The aircraft configuration is shown in the header of the RWC. 54 . a non-standard acceleration altitude will be printed in the note on the RWC.

Section: 4 Sheet: LEMD Date: Sep 20..... O=Obstacle...08 MADRID Flaps 5 LEMD/MAD 36R Anti-Ice...AUTO TAKEOFF – Dry Runway – Max Structural Weight: 63276 kg (All weight in 100 kg) OAT C T10 0 (Calm) H10 H20 °C 66A 392 519F/15-16-22 553F/16-16-22 562F/16-16-22 572F/16-16-22 64A 406 530F/17-18-24 564F/18-18-24 574F/18-18-24 583F/18-18-24 62A 419 541F/19-20-26 575F/20-20-26 585F/20-20-26 595F/20-20-26 60A 432 552F/21-22-28 587F/21-22-28 597F/21-22-28 606F/21-22-28 58A 445 562F/23-24-30 598F/23-24-30 608F/23-24-30 617F/23-24-30 56A 458 572F/24-26-32 608F/25-26-32 618F/25-26-32 628F/25-26-32 54A 472 582F/26-28-34 619F/27-28-34 629F/27-28-34 638F/27-28-34 52A 485 591F/27-30-36 629F/27-30-36 639F/28-30-36 648F/28-30-36 497 50 599F/28-31-38 637F/29-31-38 647F/29-31-38 657F/30-31-38 48 505 605F/30-33-39 644F/30-33-39 653F/30-33-39 663F/31-33-39 46 514 611F/31-34-41 650F/32-34-41 660F/32-34-41 669F/32-34-41 44 522 617F/32-35-42 656F/33-35-42 666F/33-35-42 675F/33-35-42 42 531 623F/33-36-43 662F/34-36-43 672F/34-36-43 682F/34-36-43 40 539 628F/35-38-44 668F/35-38-44 678F/36-3844 688F/36-38-44 38 548 635F/35-39-46 675F/36-39-46 684F/36-39-46 694F/36-39-46 36 557 641F/36-40-47 681F/37-40-47 691F/37-40-47 700F/37-40-47 34 567 647F/37-42-49 687F/38-42-48 697F/38-42-48 707F/38-42-48 32 576 653F/39-43-50 694F/39-43-50 700F/40-43-50 713F/40-43-50 30 585 659F/40-44-51 700F/41-44-51 710F/44-44-51 720F/41-44-51 28 594 665F/41-45-52 707F/42-45-52 717F/42-45-52 727F/42-45-52 26 603 671F/42-47-54 713F/43-47-54 723F/43-47-54 733F/43-47-54 24 604 673F/42-47-54 715F/43-47-54 725F/43-47-54 735F/44-47-54 22 605 675F/42-47-54 717F/43-47-54 727F/43-47-54 737F/44-47-54 20 605 677F/42-47-54 719F/43-47-54 729F/43-47-54 739F/4447-54 18 606 679F/43-47-54 721F/43-47-54 731F/44-47-54 742F/44-47-54 16 606 681F/43-47-54 723F/44-47-54 733F/44-47-54 744F/44-47-54 12 607 685F/43-47-54 728F/44-47-54 738F/44-47-54 748F/44-47-54 8 608 689F/43-47-54 732F/44-47-54 742F/44-47-54 752F/44-47-54 4 608 694F/43-47-54 736F/44-47-54 747F/44-47-54 757F/44-47-54 2 608 696F/43-47-54 739F/44-47-54 749F/44-47-54 759F/44-47-54 0 609 698F/43-47-54 741F/44-47-54 751F/44-47-54 760F/44-47-54 KEY: ENG A/I ON CORR A/C OFF CORR F: -219kg F: +738kg PTOW Limit /V1 VR V2 C: -170kg C: +1400kg SAMPLE Limit code: F=Field.. JAR-OPS 1 line-up with 90 degr turnaround Obstacles included in calculation: (Height above runway end / Distance from brake release point) No obstacles.OFF A/C. B=Brakes.. V=Vmc... 55 . OZ=5 min thrust limit and C=Climb.. T=Tires.Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance Boeing 737-300 / CFM-56-3B-2 Route Performance Manual TORA 12000 FT ASDA 12000 FT Slope 0% TODA 12000 FT AD Elev 2000 FT LDA 12000 FT In case of engine failure climb straight ahead..

Add the QNH correction to the Actual Takeoff Weight if QNH > 1013 c) Correct for engine bleed/anti-ice/anti-skid inoperative. 56 . Tables are presented for selected airport pressure altitudes and runway conditions and show both Field and Climb Limit Weights. if other than 1013: Subtract the QNH correction from the Takeoff Weight if QNH < 1013.Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance Instruction for the Use of the RWC’s a) Enter the RWC at the ambient head or tail wind and OAT. Now enter the Wind Correction table with slope corrected field length and wind component to determine the slope and wind corrected field length. if required. if required. Enter the appropriate table for pressure altitude and runway condition with “Slope and Wind Corrected Field Length” determined above and airport OAT to obtain Field Limit Weight. the Flight Manual shall always take precedence. In the event of conflict between the data presented in this chapter and that contained in the approved Airplane Flight Manual. Enter the Slope Correction table with the available field length and runway slope to determine the slope corrected field length. pressure altitude and wind as indicated. The Reference Obstacle Limit Weight table provides obstacle limit weights for reference airport conditions based on obstacle height above the runway surface and distance from brake release. Also read Climb Limit Weight for the same OAT. b) Correct for the QNH. Enter the adjustment tables to adjust the reference Obstacle Limit Weight for the effects of OAT. Example Given: Wind Component = 5 kts OAT = 26°C Normal Bleed Configuration Find: Climb Limited Weight (C) = 60300 kg Field Length Limited Weight (F) = 71800 kg Maximum Structural Weight (MTOW) = 63279 kg The maximum takeoff weight is 60300 kg and it is climb limited. Intermediate altitudes may be interpolated or use next higher altitude. Use interpolation between the given values. The range of conditions covered is limited to those normally encountered in airline operation. The data provided is for a single takeoff flap at max takeoff thrust. Method of chapter PD of FCOM Volume 1 Chapter PD of FCOM Volume 1 contains self dispatch performance data intended primarily for use by flight crews in the event that information cannot be obtained from the airline dispatch office or from the RWC. enter the tables successively with each obstacle and determine the most limiting weight. Determination of Performance Limited Takeoff Weight These tables provide corrections to the field length available for the effects of runway slope and wind component along the runway. In the case of multiple obstacles. d) Obtain PTOW.

0 3640 3920 4190 4460 4740 5010 5280 5560 5830 6100 6380 6650 6920 7200 7470 7740 8020 8290 8560 8830 Wind Corrections Slope Corrected Field Length (ft) 4200 4600 5000 5400 5800 6200 6600 7000 7400 7800 8200 8600 9000 9400 9800 10200 10600 11000 11400 11800 SAMPLE 40 5080 5510 5940 6370 6800 7230 7660 8090 8530 8960 9390 9820 10250 10680 11110 11540 11970 12400 12840 13270 57 .Jet Transport Performance Slope Correction Field Length Available (ft) 4200 4600 5000 5400 5800 6200 6600 7000 7400 7800 8200 8600 9000 9400 9800 10200 10600 11000 11400 11800 Slope Corrected Field Length (ft) Runway Slope (%) -1.5 0 0.5 3780 4090 4390 4700 5000 5310 5610 5920 6220 6530 6830 7140 7440 7750 8050 8360 8660 8970 9270 9580 2.0 4330 4750 5180 5600 6030 6450 6880 7300 7720 8150 8570 9000 9420 9850 10270 10700 11120 11550 11970 12400 -1.0 4260 4230 4200 4060 3920 4680 4640 4600 4430 4260 5090 5040 5000 4800 4590 5500 5450 5400 5170 4930 5910 5860 5800 5530 5270 6330 6260 6200 5900 5600 6740 6670 6600 6270 5940 7150 7070 7000 6640 6280 7560 7480 7400 7010 6610 7970 7890 7800 7380 6950 8390 8290 8200 7740 7290 8800 8700 8600 8110 7620 9210 9110 9000 8480 7960 9620 9510 9400 8850 8300 10040 9920 9800 9220 8630 10450 10320 10200 9590 8970 10860 10730 10600 9950 9310 11270 11140 11000 10320 9640 11690 11540 11400 10690 9980 12100 11950 11800 11060 10320 Takeoff Performance SAMPLE -15 2280 2640 3000 3370 3730 4090 4460 4820 5190 5550 5910 6280 6640 7000 7370 7730 8090 8460 8820 9180 Slope & Wind Corrected Field Length (ft) Wind Component (kts) -10 -5 0 10 20 30 2920 3560 4200 4400 4610 4840 3290 3950 4600 4810 5030 5270 3670 4330 5000 5220 5450 5690 4050 4720 5400 5630 5870 6120 4420 5110 5800 6040 6290 6540 4800 5500 6200 6450 6700 6970 5170 5890 6600 6860 7120 7390 5550 6270 7000 7270 7540 7820 5920 6660 7400 7680 7960 8240 6300 7050 7800 8090 8380 8670 6670 7440 8200 8500 8790 9090 7050 7830 8600 8910 9210 9520 7430 8210 9000 9320 9630 9940 7800 8600 9400 9730 10050 10370 8180 8990 9800 10130 10460 10790 8550 9380 10200 10540 10880 11220 8930 9760 10600 10950 11300 11640 9300 10150 11000 11360 11720 12070 9680 10540 11400 11770 12140 12490 10060 10930 11800 12180 12550 12920 -2.5 1.5 4290 4710 5130 5550 5970 6390 6810 7220 7640 8060 8480 8900 9320 9740 10160 10570 10990 11410 11830 12250 1.0 -0.

1 54.7 63.8 64.2 SAMPLE 60.4 52.1 57.4 62.6 63.4 55.5 51.8 57.6 71.4 56.1 61.3 53.9 71.5 59.9 66.2 51.0 62.5 61.7 63.9 51.3 60.4 71.6 61.0 66.9 76.0 64.7 42.8 56.8 63.0 64.0 70.1 53.8 57.8 66.8 74.8 71.6 52.3 63.0 59.2 69.0 SAMPLE Field Length Limited Weight (1000 kg) 2000 FT Pressure Altitude Corr Field Length (ft) 4600 5000 5400 5800 6200 6600 7000 7400 7800 8200 8600 9000 9400 9800 10200 10600 11000 Climb Limit -40 52.9 54.0 48.2 64.9 70.6 65. With engine anti-ice on.6 64.6 61.1 47.7 52.2 65.5 61.5 49.7 55.0 69.9 63.5 63.7 59.4 48.8 47.3 51.8 66.8 53.6 72.1 52.0 60.8 57.8 54.0 57.8 65.0 18 47.9 63.2 66.9 59.0 68.6 53.6 64.2 59.4 62.6 65.0 73.1 60.6 67.3 59.8 59.5 51.4 14 50.9 58.6 58.4 48.0 66.8 66.1 56.6 64.0 57.7 18 49.3 66.9 63. decrease field limit weight by 250 kg and climb limit weight by 825 kg.5 50.7 With engine bleed for packs off.5 63.6 62.4 72.1 52.6 63.2 42 45.9 61.7 50.6 22 46.6 56.0 71.2 59.6 62.8 50.Dry Runway Flaps 5 Sea Level Pressure Altitude Corr Field Length (ft) 4600 5000 5400 5800 6200 6600 7000 7400 7800 8200 8600 9000 9400 9800 10200 10600 11000 Climb Limit Jet Transport Performance Field Length Limited Weight (1000 kg) -40 55.9 58.7 58.5 66.3 56.0 72.7 57.0 68.7 60.7 49.6 69.5 60.9 58.3 57.1 49.5 66.1 58.0 64.3 50 40.6 65.3 54.6 64.4 47. decrease field limit weight by 250 kg and climb limit weight by 200 kg.8 60.1 58.4 72.6 66.0 62.5 63.6 45.2 76.3 71.1 55.7 66.7 68.7 65.4 52.5 55.1 55.4 28 49.0 75.2 70.8 64.0 61.8 28 46.9 55.2 48.5 55.7 56.9 54.6 46.2 52.5 51.5 54.9 63.2 62.5 52.9 56.3 57.0 69.5 67.0 65.8 65.8 69.4 60.5 56.5 64.2 67.8 68.8 64.4 65.4 OAT (°C) 26 49.8 51.9 67.2 68.6 53.8 64.8 59.4 60.2 55.1 70.9 60.2 72.3 55.4 60.5 70.5 14 47.7 61.1 68.0 49.5 67.2 59.3 68.8 67.3 58.1 49.9 45.7 57.7 60.8 63.2 61.4 65.3 62.4 51.4 51.7 56.4 50.5 57.0 72.2 62.6 57.0 51.0 56.8 68.1 54.7 73.1 69.5 22 49.8 60.0 46 41.0 61.5 67.1 61.9 65.7 50 43.6 68.1 67.3 30 48.0 67.7 62.3 60.8 71.5 66.8 62.4 49.7 58.5 61.1 57.3 61.5 49.4 58.7 64.6 56.6 55.5 42 42.4 61.1 55.3 63.8 49.8 65.0 55.1 65.9 60.2 54.8 50.6 72.6 63.8 61.9 67.5 46 44.5 73.7 68.2 64.2 58.9 68.4 71.6 60.5 61.4 56.6 44.2 71.7 69.9 52.0 63.3 65.5 24 49.1 63.6 57.7 62.2 69.2 62.9 68.2 24 46.9 61.1 66.2 52.9 53.1 51.2 70.3 54.3 60.4 46.4 60.0 OAT (°C) 26 46.0 76.0 56.3 59.9 59.1 65.8 70.7 67.2 68.4 60. increase field limit weight by 350 kg and climb limit weight by 1000 kg.7 43.2 63.8 50.6 54.1 61.9 47.2 61.0 65.6 61.9 59.7 58.5 47.8 66.6 59.3 70.8 63.3 56.6 62.9 54.4 63.0 53.0 61.6 58.0 76.9 55.8 51.2 66.0 76.7 51.8 52.4 58.1 67.4 64.4 53.8 48.3 55.4 53.8 60.3 58.7 50.7 44.0 63.8 51.4 55.3 54.0 59.4 69. 58 .0 62.4 67.8 69.2 60.9 53.6 48.4 57.9 49.Takeoff Performance Takeoff Field & Climb Limit Weights .5 63.9 48.4 64.8 68.5 58.9 62.9 65.8 46.9 54.7 53.2 53.0 69.4 54.1 56.6 68.2 69.3 72.6 60. With engine and wing anti-ice on.3 56.2 30 45.7 74.3 58.

5 49.6 55.7 41.4 -3.7 56.1 55.7 -6.3 50.6 56.7 53.7 62.6 53.6 -0.7 Obstacle height must be calculated from lowest point of the runway to conservatively account for runway slope. OAT Adjustments OAT(°C) 30&below 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 SAMPLE 59 .0 -7.4 -1.4 58.5 55.1 -5.7 51.2 53.7 59.9 52.8 -0. Zero Wind Based on engine bleed for packs on and anti-ice off Obs Height (ft) 10 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 750 800 850 900 950 1000 Takeoff Performance 8 61.6 63.3 51.8 55.4 53.5 -5.8 -3.6 -6.8 57.4 49.6 38.6 64.0 47.6 57.2 54.6 -8.7 52.0 47.1 -3.1 57.4 50.5 51.5 -2.6 63.6 44.5 60.5 -4.4 55.7 54.8 49.1 49.9 48.6 43.8 64.3 49.9 -5.3 53.0 -3.0 50.6 -0.8 55.0 -1.8 64 0 -1.0 46.4 -3.1 55.3 46.3 61.1 49.1 52.4 -4.5 52.5 -2.6 45.1 45.0 53.5 -3.7 -6.9 61.5 -5.0 57.2 57.3 45.2 -8.5 -1.8 -1.8 46.5 54.2 53.4 55.7 56.3 54.9 59.3 51.9 48.2 60.7 45.9 -1.8 -3.7 -0.0 51.7 50.5 56.2 58.6 59.4 62.1 -5.5 64.1 51.9 39.2 52.1 47.8 59.1 40.5 61.6 53.6 -7.6 58.7 -1.3 -1.8 62.0 60.8 54.4 60.4 -8.0 46.8 -4.1 -4.2 42.7 -6.3 -3.6 -1.6 44.1 -2.5 53.9 -3.1 -1.8 -7.4 12 63.9 -2.7 -2.7 57.7 44.0 52.0 48.0 49.9 60.2 59.9 -2.6 46.7 49.1 43.0 -5.9 57.2 47.5 -1.7 52.0 54.4 63.0 41.2 -2.5 -9.6 54.2 55.3 -7.2 -4.5 46.1 47.9 45.9 -5.7 56.5 -2.0 -3.7 -6.3 -5.2 46.1 49.2 62.8 -4.9 50.4 62.9 54.8 64.3 45.0 -4.8 51.3 -4.1 47.6 51.5 52.8 58.9 52.3 -2.3 -6.8 50.6 -8.7 48.1 -6.9 47.8 44.4 57.8 49.0 -1.4 52.5 -3.8 -5.2 -4.0 58.Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Obstacle Limit Weight Flaps 5 Sea Level 30°C & Below.6 50.0 59.5 59.5 -4.5 -2.5 62.1 50.0 -5.6 60.8 51.1 Reference Obstacle Limit Weight (1000 kg) 40 44 48 52 56 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 -0.2 44.4 45.7 61.8 -0.3 55.9 Reference Obstacle Limit Weight (1000 kg) Distance from Brake Release (1000 ft) 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 SAMPLE 36 0 -0.7 56.9 55.6 48.0 47.1 61.2 63.9 56.0 -4.9 51.2 49.8 54.8 -4.6 56.2 63.3 51.3 52.0 53.4 10 60.8 57.0 48.4 50.8 44.0 -2.7 55.4 61.5 50.6 -7.

0 -8.2 -6.5 0.5 -1.9 -4.9 1.7 64 -6.2 -6.8 0.9 -6.6 -2.6 -6.2 1. With engine anti-ice on.L.2 -12.3 -11.7 -6.4 -4.&below 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 36 0 -1.8 -2.5 0.4 1.5 -4.7 0.2 -5.9 -5.3 -8.6 -13.9 -5.2 -10.4 -7.9 0.8 -7.0 -6.4 -8.1 Jet Transport Performance SAMPLE 64 0 -2.9 -11.3 -9.6 1.8 -15.2 -11.7 -3.0 -13.5 -8.4 -12.1 -9.3 -7.0 1.2 -13.3 0.9 -9.8 -2.1 -2.4 1.4 2.3 -3.6 1.2 2.6 -3.2 -10.2 1.8 -7.1 -6.1 0.1 -7.0 2.6 -5.7 0.4 -2. Find: Slope Corrected Field Length = 8700 ft Slope & Wind Corrected Field Length = 8856 ft Field Length Limited Weight = 66700 kg Climb Limted Weight = 63400 kg Obstacle Limited Weight = 63500 kg Wind Adjustment for Obstacle Limited Weight = +300 kg Adjusted Obstacle Limited Weight = 63800 kg The lowest weight is the Climb Limited Weight 60 .0 -2.4 SAMPLE With engine bleed for packs off.6 -7.6 1.7 -1.0 1.3 3.8 -8.8 1.3 1.3 Wind Adjustments Wind (kts) 15 TW 10 TW 5 TW 0 10 HW 20 HW 30 HW 40 HW OAT & ALT Adjusted Obstacle Limit Weight (1000 kg) 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 -8.Takeoff Performance Pressure Altitude Adjustments Alt (ft) S. Example The following example will illustrate the use of the tables in Chapter PD of FCOM Volume 1: Given: Field Length Available (TODA) = 8600 ft Runway Slope = -0. increase weight by 450 kg.4 -2.4 -6.3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.2 -7.7 -4.2 0 0.6 -10.2 -14.0 -3.7 -10.5 -2.6 -11.0 -16.8 2.1 OAT Adjusted Obstacle Limit Weight (1000 kg) 40 44 48 52 56 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 -1. decrease weight by 1150 kg.9 -4.5 2.5 -12. With engine and wing anti-ice on.5 1. decrease weight by 2650 kg.8 -5.2 -4.5 -5.9 -9.2 -17.6 -2.8 -4.1 -15.1 -4.9 -7.4 -5.2 3.9 -8.3 -4.3 -2.3 -5.5 -2.6 0.2 -8.3 -3.7 2.1 -8.5% Wind Component = 5 kts OAT = 26°C Pressure Altitude = 0 ft Obstacle: 22000 ft form brake release at 200 ft height.7 -2.

Normal takeoff speeds. contaminated runway situations. adjust the takeoff speeds appropriately. Slope and wind adjustments to V1 are obtained by entering the Slope and Wind V1 Adjustment table. The appropriate column is obtained by entering the Column Reference chart with the airport pressure altitude and the actual temperature. If an Altitude Adjustment chart is provided.Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance 3. brake energy limits or obstacle clearance with unbalanced V1. VR. and appropriate column. These speeds may be used for weights less than or equal to the performance limited weight. V1. with anti-skid on. and V2. brake deactivation. brake release weight. SAMPLE 61 . improved climb.11.2 Takeoff Speeds Takeoff Speeds can be obtained from:  Runway Weight Chart  QRH Chapter PI (Performance Inflight) The speeds presented in the Takeoff Speeds table can be used for all performance conditions provided adjustments are made to V1 for clearway. are read from the table by entering with takeoff flap setting. stopway.

7 88.4 Reduced Thrust Regulations permit the use of up to 25% takeoff thrust reduction for operation with assumed temperature reduced thrust. apply the %N1 adjustment shown below the table.5 91.1 94.7 87.2 95.0 95.7 0 93.8 94.9 92.3 94.1 95.2 83. enter Takeoff %N1 Table with airport pressure altitude and airport OAT and read %N1.2 94.6 96.3 94.5 89.0 96.0 %N1 Adjustments for Engine Bleeds PACKS OFF 1.1 95.9 95.3 87.8 88.8 92.4 94.6 87.9 2000 93.3 94.0 91.2 93.3 82.0 96.6 94.4 93.  anti-skid is inoperative.0 90.3 91.6 96.6 96.3 85.2 95.2 93.2 89.6 97.7 94.0 86. Next. 62 .2 94. For packs off operation.4 94.2 93.4 85.4 95.6 89.1 83.5 81. Takeoff %N1 Based on engine bleed to packs on (Auto) and anti-ice on or off Airport OAT °C °F 55 131 50 122 45 113 40 104 35 95 30 86 25 77 20 68 15 59 10 50 5 41 0 32 -10 14 -20 -4 -30 -22 -40 -40 -50 -58 Airport Pressure Altitude (ft) -1000 93.9 86.0 94.7 92.2 90.5 94.7 92.5 93.6 95.7 90.7 82. Use of this procedure is not recommended if potential windshear conditions exist. or standing water.7 4000 93.5 95.6 93.6 92.7 96.6 95. Takeoff with assumed temperature reduced thrust is not permitted when:  runway is contaminated with ice.5 96.1 85.1 87.5 96.7 86.7 87.8 94.8 92.3 86.0 95.1 96.4 88.8 95.9 85. Do not use an assumed temperature less than the minimum assumed temperature shown. snow.7 96. or  PMC is off.2 96.9 95. Compare this temperature to that at which the airplane is performance limited as determined from available takeoff performance data.1 95.0% 3.1 95. To find the maximum allowable assumed temperature enter table 1 with airport pressure altitude and OAT.1 90.1 95.1 91.5 97.8 94.2 3000 93. No takeoff %N1 adjustment is required for engine and wing anti-ice.8 95.4 92.7 96.4 95.2 95.0 96.6 94.8 94.8 89.6 97.Takeoff Performance Jet Transport Performance 3.5 96.3 Takeoff N1 The Takeoff N1 Table can be found in the QRH section PI.6 84.9 97.1 93.9 92.5 83.4 91. slush.1 96.7 96.3 5000 6000 7000 8000 SAMPLE 94. To find Max Takeoff %N1 based on normal engine bleed for air conditioning packs on (Auto).4 96.1 96.1 89.6 90.7 95.0 84.10.8 96.6 93.2 95. Enter the %N1 Adjustment table with OAT and the difference between the assumed and actual OAT to obtain a %N1 adjustment.9 95.2 95.5 90.3 96.1 95.7 95.3 95.6 95.1 93.11.7 92.2 95.6 96.11.11.6 95.2 94.6 95.9 87.0 94.0 97.4 92.2 84.0 96. enter center table 2 with airport pressure altitude and the lower of the two temperatures previously determined to obtain a maximum takeoff %N1. Subtract the %N1 adjustment from the maximum takeoff %N1 found previously to determine the assumed temperature reduced thrust %N1.4 86.0 85.3 94.5 1000 93.2 92.5 84.2 88.3 88.9 94.9 91.7 95.1 94.8 95.0 88.2 96.8 86.

Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance 63 .

QNH.6%. From Table 2 find Maximum N1 which is 95. The following is an example of such a computer generated takeoff analysis. Airplane Type Airport ICAO/Runway B = Bleeds / A = Anti-Ice Wind Direction/Speed. Enter Table 1 and find Maximum Assumed Temperature of 58°C. either by using a standard personal computer or by transmitting the takeoff data via ACARS to the flight crew. Use the lower temperature (34°C) for further calculations.5 78999 86182 85296 85296 ----78999 KG 33 C OBS B737-800W A-OFF 4000/13123 Remarks Date and Time of generation.11.77972 KG OBS 64 . TORA[m]/[ft] OAT Runway Condition Structural MTOW Flap Position Actual TOW Maximum Allowable TOW MAC Structural Weight Limit Field Length Limited Weight Climb Limited Weight Obstacle Limited Weight Improved Climb Limited Weight Full Rated Takeoff Data Derated Takeoff Data with Limitation Code Assumed Temperature based on Derate 01 DERATE01.5% 3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Description TODC 14JUN11 09:15 EDDF/07L B-ON 080/005 1017 OAT=+20C RWY COND DRY MTOW= FLAPS ACT TOW MAX TOW MAC STRUCTURE FIELD CLIMB OBSTACLE IMP CLIMB FULL THRUSTD01 ASS TEMP 78999 KG STR 05 75000 KG 78999 KG STR 12. No.Takeoff Performance Example Find the Reduced Thrust for the following conditions: Airport = Madrid Runway 36R Zero Wind OAT = 18°C Actual Takeoff Gross Weight = 56500 kg Jet Transport Performance Solution Enter Runway Weight Chart with Actual Gross Weight and find in the OAT column TASS = 34°C.1% The Reduced Takeoff N1 is: 92.5 Computer Generated Takeoff Analysis Today some operators are using computer software to calculate takeoff performance. Enter Table 3 with Actual OAT (18°C) and the difference between TASS and OAT (16°C) and obtain N1 Adjustment: 3.

MAX V1 99 . RIGHT turn. 110.150 D01 ASS TEMP V1 VR V2 ACCL ALT STD MIN .MAX V1 106 .149 DERATE01.Jet Transport Performance Takeoff Performance TODC 14JUN11 09:15 B737-800W EDDF/07L B-ON A-OFF 080/005 1017 4000/13123 OAT=+20C RWY COND DRY MTOW= 78999 KG STR -----------------------FLAPS 05 ACT TOW 75000 KG MAX TOW 78999 KG STR -----------------------MAC STRUCTURE FIELD CLIMB OBSTACLE IMP CLIMB 12.MAX V1 33 C OBS 150 150 155 1350 FT 131 .0 MTR HP: Inbound 241DEG. 65 .78999 KG V1 147 VR 149 V2 156 ACCL ALT STD 1350 FT MIN . At 1900 turn LEFT to MTR HP.77972 KG OBS V1 149 VR 150 V2 155 ACCL ALT STD 1350 FT MIN .5 78999 86182 85296 85296 ----- FULL THRUST.150 -.Eng Fail Procdure -STD.

Takeoff Performance Notes: Jet Transport Performance 66 .

3. part 1 . In addition.2 ICAO Fuel Requirements The Internation Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) gives fuel requirements in annex 6 to the convnetion on international civil aviation. and  Thereafter. 4.1. Section 4. Subsection 3. to fly to and land at the most distant alternate airport specified in the flight release.1. and thereafter:  To fly to the alternate aerodrome specified in the flight plan. Flight Preperation. no person may release for flight or takeoff a turbine engine powered airplane.1 FAA Fuel Requirements Domestic FAR 121. Fuel and Oil Supply contains the following: 4. other than turbo propeller. or commercial operator. other than a turbo propeller powered airplane. 67 .3. It states for any flag air carrier. if no alternate is required) under standard conditions.3 Aeroplanes equiped with turbo-jet engines.3. a reserve shall be carried to provide for contingencies. if an alternate is required.6.639 covers fuel requirements for domestic air carriers for all operations. and  After that.6. unless.2 A) When an alternate aerodrome is required: To fly to and execute an approach. operation outside of the 48 contiguous United States and the District of Columbia. taking into account both the meteorological conditions and any delays that are expected in flight.1 Fuel Requirements 4. and approach and land. and a missed approach. to fly for 45 minutes at normal cruising fuel consumption. It states that no person may dispatch or takeoff an airplane unless it has enough fuel:  To fly to the airport to which it is dispatched  Thereafter.645 covers turbine powered airplanes.international commercial air transport. unless authorized by the administrator in the operations specifications.Jet Transport Performance Cruise Performance 4 CRUISE PERFORMANCE 4.3. 4. A flight shall not be commenced unless. 4. it has enough fuel:  To fly to and land at the airport to which it is released  After that. and land at. International FAR 121. and then  To fly for 30 minutes at holding speed at 1500 ft above the alternate aerodrome under standard temperature conditions. considering wind and other weather conditions expected. to fly to and land at the most distant alternate airport (where required) for the airport to which dispatched. to fly for 30 minutes at holding speed at 1500 feet above the alternate airport (or the destination airporl.6. Paragraph 6.1 All aeroplanes. supplemental air carrier. to fly for a period of 10 percent of the total time required to fly from the airport of departure to. Flight Operations. at the aerodrome to which the flight is palnned. the airport to which it was released  After that. the aeroplane carries sufficient fuel and oil to ensure that it can safely complete the flight. and  To have an additional amount of fuel sufficient to provide for the increased consumption on the occurrence of any of the potential contingencies specified by the operator to the satisfaction of the state of the operator (typically a percentage of the trip fuel – 3% to 6%). flag and supplemental air carriers and commercial operators.

as fuel burns off. Figure 4. Rather they must fly at specified altitudes.3 g. as fuel burns during cruise.e. the Maneuver Capability table shows the maximum altitude at which the airplane can fly. 68 . the airplane will climb and be above optimum altitude again. Altitude Capability is given for various weights and three different temperatures. In addition. To ensure that there is a sufficient safety margin. Therefore. an airplane flying in a 39 degree bank while maintaining a level flight altitude will generate a loading of 1. allow the airplane to climb as fuel burns off. Typically airlines are not allowed to do a climbing cruise. the airplane's tendency is to climb. i. so does its optimum altitude. the optimum altitude changes. For example. Since the thrust which the engine can generate depends on the temperature. A step climb starts at an altitude that is above optimum altitude (typically 2000 feet above optimum altitude) and stays at that altitude until it is a given amount under the optimum altitude (again. a "g" limit is normally specified. The Maneuver Capability represents the ability of the wing to generate enough lift for the weight of the airplane. Altitude Capability is also dependent on temperature. As the weight of a plane changes. The typical climb is 4000 feet to again be 2000 feet above optimum.Cruise Performance Jet Transport Performance 4.2 Altitude Capability and Maneuver Capability The maximum altitude which an airplane can fly is limited by either the thrust of the engines (Altitude Capability) or by the ability of the wing to generate enough buffet-free lift (Maneuver Capability).3 Step Climb There is an optimum altitude to fly a plane at based on its weight. typically 2000 feet). The "g" margin is also expressed in terms of the level flight bank angle which corresponds to the given "g" loading.1 – Buffet Boundary 4. For this reason a step climb is used. For a given weight and "g" margin. At this point.

This altitude is called the Net Level-Off altitude and depends on the atmospheric temperature and the weight of the airplane.2 Net Flight Path For most normal cruise weights and altitudes. It will begin to descend.4 Level-Off Following a driftdown. The amount of clearance required depends upon whether the terrain can be cleared in level flight with one engine inoperative or while the airplane is descending (drifting down) following an engine failure. the airplane must have a net flight path capable of clearing all obstacles within 5 statue miles of the intended flight track by at least 2000 feet vertically. This reduced gradient is called the enroute net flight path and is used to ensure enroute obstacle clearance.4. 69 . The airplane will then descend along what is called the optimum driftdown profile.1 percent climb gradient for two engine airplanes. the maximum altitude at which the airplane can fly will be reduced. 4. Figure 4. 4.4. the pilot will use maximum continuous thrust on the remaining engine and slow down to the optimum driftdown speed. The optimum driftdown profile will keep the airplane as high as possible during the descent.2 – Step Climb 4. 1. Regulations require that the airplane be able to clear all terrain by a given amount when an engine falls. an airplane will level off when it reaches some altitude. Regulations require that the actual airplane performance be calculated in the most conservative airplane configuration and then further decreased by a 1.4 Driftdown and Net Level Off Weight 4.6 percent for four engine airplanes.4. and 1.4 percent for three engine airplanes.1 General If an engine fails in flight.3 Driftdown During the driftdown phase of flight following an engine failure.Jet Transport Performance Cruise Performance This method keeps planes at specified altitudes yet lets planes climb in increments to save fuel. 4. To remain as high a possible. an airplane will not be able to maintain its cruise altitude following an engine failure.4. The Net Level-Off altitude must clear all obstacles within 5 statue miles of the intended flight track by at least 1000 feet.

Figure 4. This amount shall include fuel for take-off.4. Flights over these types of high terrain require careful analysis of the various tracks and alternate airports available.5 Flight Planning and Enroute Performance Data 4.  Compare this weight to the predicted actual weight of the airplane at that point in the flight to ensure obstacle clearance. For most routes. 70 .5. descent. If an engine failure occurs prior to a critical point. the Net Level-Off altitude will clear all enroute obstacles and the driftdown profile is not calculated. approach and landing. Definitions Taxi Fuel: A quantity to cover engine start and ground manoeuvres until take-off run. A maximum enroute weight based on the net flight path is usually determined for the obstacles and temperatures on each route. based on “Planned Operating Conditions”. and critical points along the flight track are determined. The amount may be increased if required by local conditions. To ensure enroute obstacle clearance in level flight:  Determine the maximum enroute weight which will give a net flight path which will clear all obstacles by 1000 feet. Trip Fuel: Fuel required to fly from the aerodrome of departure to the flight plan destination.6 Practical The net flight path is greatly influenced by the weight of the airplane.3 – Driftdown 4.1 Trip Fuel Fuel for the flight is determined as an amount to fulfil the minimum requirements set in JAROPS and any extra fuel requested by the Commander. the Net Level-Off weight may be insufficient for the flight. cruise.4. In this case the driftdown profile is calculated for each limiting obstacle. then the flight will have to divert along another route with lower terrain.5 Landing The net flight path of the airplane must have a positive gradient at 1500 feet above the airport where the airplane intends to land following an engine failure. 4.Cruise Performance Jet Transport Performance 4. For flights over very high terrain. climb.

follow the following steps: Step 1 ZFW + Extra Fuel (if required) → Holding Planning Table → Min Reserve Fuel (Pressure altitude = Pressure altitude of alternate + 1500 ft) Step 2 LW AT ALTERNATE = ZFW + Min Reserve Fuel + Extra Fuel LW AT ALTERNATE → Trip Fuel and Time Table → Alternate Fuel Step 3 LW AT DESTINATION = LW AT ALTERNATE + Alternate Fuel + Contingency Fuel (5 minutes at holding fuel consumption) LW AT DESTINATION → Trip and Time Table → Trip Fuel Step 4 Contingency Fuel = 5% of Trip Fuel If 5% of Trip Fuel is more than 5 minutes at holding fuel consumption go to Step 3 and use new Contingency Fuel to determine LW AT DESTINATION. descend.Jet Transport Performance Cruise Performance Contingency Fuel: A quantity of fuel to cover unforeseeable deviations from “Planned Operating Conditions". Alternate fuel will include fuel for missed approach at destination. Extra Fuel: Fuel in addition to minimum block fuel. The higher amount of the following shall be carried as contingency fuel:  5% of the planned trip fuel or. if the normal amount of fuel carried is not sufficient for such an event. calculated with the estimated weight on arrival at the alternate or the destination. Step 5 TO Fuel = Trip + Contingency + Alternate + Min reserve + Extra Fuel Step 6 Block Fuel = TO Fuel + Taxi Fuel 71 . Evaluation of fuel required for flight To evaluate fuel required for flight. the aeroplane to descend as necessary to an adequate aerodrome. Additional Fuel: Additional fuel shall permit:  Holding for 15 minutes at 1500 ft (450 m) above aerodrome elevation in standard conditions when a flight is operated in IFR without a destination alternate. when no alternate is required. at the discretion of the Commander. Final Reserve: For aeroplanes with turbine power final reserve fuel comprises fuel to fly for 30 minutes at holding speed at 1500 ft (450 m) above aerodrome elevation in standard conditions. hold there for 15 minutes at 1500 ft above aerodrome elevation and make an approach and landing. climb. cruise. trip fuel for the remainder of the flight or  an amount to fly for 5 minutes at holding speed at 1500 ft (450 m) above the destination aerodrome in standard conditions Alternate Fuel: Fuel required to fly from destination to the alternate based on “Planned Operating Conditions”. Minimum Block Fuel: Taxi Fuel + Trip Fuel + Contingency Fuel + Alternate Fuel (if required) + Final Reserve + Additional Fuel (if required) Block Fuel: Minimum Block Fuel + Extra Fuel. approach and landing at alternate. The actual total amount of fuel on board before engine start. in the event of replanning. and  Following a possible engine-failure or loss of pressurization at the most critical point along the route.

Trip Fuel from table = 6400 kg.3 06:11 15.5 02:01 5.Cruise Performance Jet Transport Performance Example Calculate the Takeoff Fuel for the following conditions: ZFW = 48000 kg Extra Fuel = 0 kg Alternate Elevation = 0ft Alternate Distance = 150 NAM Segment Distance = 1200 NAM at Flight Level 330 Find Holding Fuel = 1135 kg.5 04:23 10.9 05:44 15.5 01:33 4. Alternate Fuel = 1300 kg.0 05:47 SAMPLE 72 .7 06:10 14.7 02:03 5.5 05:43 13.8 02:31 6.5 01:06 3.1 05:43 14.8 05:19 13.6 02:57 7.2 04:47 10.5 04:49 12.6 07:06 18. and Adjustment for LW = +400 kg.6 03:25 8.3 05:15 12.8 07:33 20.5 00:38 2.5 00:38 2.8 04:20 11.4 02:59 7.7 03:52 10.9 03:52 8.7 05:17 13.0 03:27 9.4 01:06 3.9 06:38 15.5 01:34 3.0 04:20 9.3 02:02 5.4 01:34 4.6 07:07 18.9 04:48 12.6 01:06 3. LW AT ALTERNATE = ZFW + Min Reserve Fuel + Extra Fuel = 49135 kg.5 02:29 6.5 08:00 19.5 03:55 9.1 08:02 37000 FUEL TIME 1000 KG HR:MIN 1.0 07:05 16.1 08:01 Pressure Altitude (feet) 31000 33000 FUEL TIME FUEL TIME 1000 KG HR:MIN 1000 KG HR:MIN 1.2 03:54 10.3 02:30 6.3 04:22 11.6 01:35 4.7 02:57 6.7 02:30 5.6 02:02 4. LW AT DESTINATION = LW AT ALTERNATE + Alternate Fuel + Contingency Fuel = 50624 kg.4 03:27 8.8 03:25 7.5 00:38 1.5 01:06 2.3 06:39 17.5 06:39 17.3 07:33 17.1 06:11 16.9 02:59 8. Trip Fuel = 6800 kg Summary Holding Fuel Alternate Fuel Trip Fuel Contingency Fuel TAKEOFF FUEL Taxi Fuel BLOCK FUEL = = = = = = = 1135 kg 1300 kg 6800 kg 340 kg 9575 kg 200 kg 9775 kg 00:30 00:30 02:59 00:09 04:08 Trip Fuel and Time Air Dist NM 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 2200 2400 2600 2800 3000 3200 3400 29000 FUEL TIME 1000 KG HR:MIN 1.9 07:35 19.0 05:16 13.5 00:38 2.6 04:51 11.

0 0.3 2.8 1.9 -2.0 0.1 2.9 37000 37000 37000 1.1 -3.74/250 descent.74 climb.1 -2.4 -0.6 1.0 19000 1.0 0.1 37000 2.0 0.5 2.5 1.2 37000 37000 37000 2.4 0.2 33000 31000 29000 1.2 -1.6 -0.8 0. Long Range Cruise speed and .5 -2.0 35000 1.0 0.6 -0.9 0.4 37000 37000 37000 2.5 37000 37000 35000 1.6 -0.7 1.9 37000 37000 37000 50 0.8 37000 2.2 -0.1 -0.6 0.1 35000 Time HR:MIN 00:14 00:22 00:30 00:37 00:45 00:52 00:58 01:05 01:13 01:20 SAMPLE Based on 280/.1 35000 2.2 37000 1.9 23000 23000 21000 1.8 -3.8 35000 2.6 13000 11000 11000 0.4 1.1 SAMPLE Air Distance  Based on 280/.6 35000 2.0 0.6 37000 1.1 0.4 -0.5 -1.74/250 descent.2 0.0 0.6 37000 37000 37000 2.5 2.5 0.6 33000 1.3 27000 1.3 40 -0.5 13000 0.1 1.2 1.3 1.8 -1.2 2.1 -2.7 37000 37000 37000 1.9 35000 3.0 0.2 -0.3 -0.7 0.1 1.8 -1.7 2.8 2.5 -1.4 37000 1.3 37000 Landing Weight (1000 kg) 35 40 45 0.0 0.2 45 0.9 1.0 -1.Jet Transport Performance Cruise Performance Fuel Required Adjustments (1000 kg) Reference Fuel Required (1000 kg) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 Landing Weight (1000 kg) 30 -0.5 -0.6 0.6 1.74 climb.8 25000 1.1 -1. Long Range Cruise speed and .8 -2.0 37000 2.9 2 2.7 -0.3 1.0 0.7 -1. Sector Distance  TAS GS Short Trip Fuel and Time Required Air Distance (NM) 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 FUEL ALT FUEL ALT FUEL ALT FUEL ALT FUEL ALT FUEL ALT FUEL ALT FUEL ALT FUEL ALT FUEL ALT (1000 kg) (ft) (1000 kg) (ft) (1000 kg) (ft) (1000 kg) (ft) (1000 kg) (ft) (1000 kg) (ft) (1000 kg) (ft) (1000 kg) (ft) (1000 kg) (ft) (1000 kg) (ft) 30 0.3 35000 2.3 -0. 73 .7 11000 1.4 35 -0.2 -1.0 -1.9 -1.0 50 0.

enter Actual Takeoff Fuel Airway Waypoint name Minimum sector Altitude Frequency of NAV aid Course Distance Estimated Time Estimated Time Actual Time Estimated fuel Actual remaining fuel Fuel and time tabulation Alternate airports Filed ATS flight plan 74 .Cruise Performance Jet Transport Performance Holding Planning Flaps Up GW 1000 kg 64 62 60 58 56 54 52 50 48 46 44 42 40 38 36 Total Fuel Flow (kg/h) Pressure Altitude (ft) 15000 20000 25000 2730 2700 2690 2650 2610 2610 2570 2530 2520 2490 2450 2440 2410 2370 2360 2330 2290 2280 2250 2210 2190 2170 2130 2110 2100 2050 2030 2020 1970 1960 1940 1900 1880 1890 1830 1800 1830 1780 1750 1780 1720 1690 1740 1680 1640 1500 2870 2800 2720 2640 2570 2490 2420 2340 2270 2200 2130 2070 2010 1970 1920 SAMPLE 5000 2830 2740 2660 2590 2510 2430 2360 2280 2210 2130 2060 2010 1950 1910 1860 10000 2780 2700 2620 2540 2460 2380 2310 2230 2150 2080 2010 1950 1900 1850 1800 30000 2680 2590 2500 2420 2330 2250 2170 2090 2000 1920 1840 1770 1700 1650 1600 35000 37000 2380 2270 2180 2080 2000 1920 1840 1760 1690 1630 1580 2120 2020 1930 1850 1770 1700 1640 1590 This table includes 5% additional fuel for holding in a racetrack pattern.5. 4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Heading 25MAY08 EDDF-LRTR RJ1234 YR-RLT/B733 STD/STA PIC FO C/A TOW / LW / ZFW FL350 M074 AVG WC Trip Time/Dist/Fuel Approved by ATIS Departure ATC Clearance Fuel MIN/ACTUAL AWY WPT MSA FREQ C/S DST ET ETO ATO FUEL EST ACT FUEL TIME ALTERNATES ATS FPL FILED Description Date of Flight Plan From – To Flight Number Tail Sign and Type Scheduled Time of Departure and Arrival Name of Commander Name of First Officer Names of Cabin Crew Weight on which OFP is based Flight Level. Example: Computerized flight plan for an B737-300 from Frankfurt to Timisoara No. Average Wind Component Commanders Signature Enter ATIS for departure Enter ATC clearance Calculated minimum Takeoff Fuel. It is normally obtained through a computerized process. Mach Number.2 Operational Flight Plan (OFP) Before each flight an operational flight plan must be prepared by dispatchers or by the flight crew.

................... 2844/.....2 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 113...........................) 75 .......... 3823/................ FL350 M074 AVG WC+0 ATIS DEPARTURE...... 3687/.................. 2926/........................... 4884/.................... ATC CLEARANCE.PAX....................................................... .. 8/............... ...../............../... 31/....... ON CHOCKS..... 3/..................... .................../........ OFF CHOCKS..../......................... 5/....................................... Cruise Performance PIC..... FUEL REMAINING.....Jet Transport Performance 25MAY08 EDDF-LRTR RJ1234 YR-RLT/B733 STD/STA.. SEL/................................................... FLT TIME.... ALT............... FUEL MIN/ACTUAL 5183/........................... 4667/........................................./........PAYLOAD...... 10/............................... MAIL......... 16/...................... 2/....... AWY OFF SID UL126 UL603 UL605 UL605 UL605 UL605 UL605 B48 STAR WPT FRANKFURT WUR DINKU TEGBA STEIN SIDRU BUG TEGRI ARD TSR TIMISOARA MSA FREQ C/S DST ET/ETO/ATO FUEL EST/ACT 110... BLOCK TIME.................. .4 109............................................... AIRBORNE................................... 5/................... TOW 52987 LW 50031 ZFW 47804 TRIP TIME/DIST/FUEL 0135/579/2956 APPROVED BY COMMANDER..-I -B733/M-SRYW/C -EDDF -UL126 DINKU UL603 TEGBA UL603 SIDRU UL605 ARD -LRTR0135 LRAR REG/.................. FUEL 250 2956 148 829 1000 5183 TIME 01:35 00:05 00:21 00:30 02:31 TAXI TRIP FUEL CONTINGENCY ALTERNATE LRAR FINAL RESERVE MINIMUM BLOCK EXTRA FUEL BLOCK FUEL ALTERNATES LRAR LROD MIN BLOCK/TIME DIV FUEL DIST/ 23 86 TIME/ 00:21 00:30 FUEL 829 1139 FL 90 100 ATS FPL FILED: FPL-.........../............. 3252/..../........... NOTES............../............................./.....0 408 44 34 55 214 32 103 64 10 23 6/. LANDING...... ATIS ARRIVAL............................. DIV FUEL...........CARGO................................................................../............................/.................. 5020/.......................... .......................... 2980/.......... C/A................................ FO....

NOTE: Planning operations in mounting area on aerodromes/routes where the climb performance is critical.Cruise Performance Jet Transport Performance 4.  Maximum altitude. Long Range Cruise Altitude Capability 100 ft/min residual rate of climb Weight (1000 kg) 64 60 56 52 48 44 40 36 32 Pressure Altitude (ft) ISA + 10°C & below 9500 12300 15200 18000 20900 24000 27000 30000 33200 ISA + 15°C 7200 10200 13200 16200 19200 22300 25600 28800 32200 ISA + 20°C 4900 7900 11000 14100 17400 20600 24000 27500 31000 SAMPLE With engine anti-ice on. 4. If appropriate FMC page is not available. the aircraft can clear the most critical terrain en route with acceptable safety margins. the flight must be planned in such a way.7). Climb There is no problem with all engines operative to reach and maintain the minimum safe altitude with the maximum take-off weight even in the worst ISA + 20 conditions.3 Enroute Performance To ensure a safe flight over the mountainous terrain. on the FMC ACT ECON CLB page select ENG OUT prompt and the FMC calculates for the actual gross weight:  N1 for maximum continuous thrust. the sec. after flap retraction and all obstructions are cleared. that in case of engine failure. With engine and wing anti-ice on. use VCLEAN or approx 210Kts and check Long Range Cruise Altitude Capability with 100ft/min residual rate of climb (QRH PI. decrease altitude capability by 5300ft. and  Climb speed.5. For one engine inoperative climb.13. decrease altitude capability by 1400ft.11 of AFM to be consulted. 76 .

use VCLEAN or approx 210Kts and check Drift–down Level off altitudes with 100 ft residual rate of climb table (QRH. If appropriate FMC page is not available. and  Descent speed.5). on FMC CRZ page select ENG OUT prompt and the FMC calculates for the actual gross weight:  N1 for maximum continuous thrust. Driftdown Speed/Level Off Altitude 100 ft/min residual rate of climb Weight (1000 kg) Start Driftdown 64 60 56 52 48 44 40 Level Off 61 57 53 49 46 42 38 Optimum Driftdown Speed (KIAS) 235 228 220 212 204 196 187 Level Off Altitude (1000 ft) ISA + 10°C & below 16200 18200 20400 22700 25100 27400 29900 ISA + 15°C 15000 17200 19300 21700 24100 26600 29200 ISA + 20°C 13600 15900 18200 20600 23100 25700 28400 SAMPLE Includes APU fuel burn 77 .  Maximum altitude.13. PI.Jet Transport Performance Cruise Performance Driftdown If an engine failure occurs during cruise/descent.

Cruise Performance Notes: Jet Transport Performance 78 .

5.2 2.1% for approach and 3.2 2. For a wet runway the distance required is 115% the dry runway.1 3. no reverse thrust. The maximum landing weight is the lower of these two limiting weights. For a two engine aircraft the gradient is 2.4 3.1.1 Climb Limit The climb limit weight is the maximum weight that still meets the minimum gradient established by the FARs. The conditions for the approach climb gradient are:  one engine inoperative  go-around thrust  approach flaps  landing gear up.2 Field Length Limit The field length limit weight is determined during flight test. from 50 feet above the runway distance. 5. maximum manual braking.Jet Transport Performance Landing Performance 5 LANDING PERFORMANCE 5.1. For a dry runway the required distance is 167% of the demonstrated stopping distance.1 – Approach and Landing Requirements Number of engines 2 3 4 Segment Approach Landing Minimum Gross Gradient [%] 2.2% for landing.2 Table 5. The conditions for the landing gradient are:  all engines operative  go-around thrust  landing flaps  landing gear down.1 – FAR Minimum Approach and Landing Climb Requirements 79 .1 Introduction Landing weights limited by field length and the climb gradient.7 3. Figure 5.

5.2.1 General Maximum Landing Weight (MLW) could be limited either by:  Maximum certified structural landing weight. Landing Field Length Limit 1. 80 .  When gusty winds are forecasted. The most limiting of these requirements defines the maximum allowable landing weight for dispatch. go-around climb for Low Visibility instrument approaches). WET runway LDR is a “dry runway LDR” increased further by an additional margin of 15%.Landing Performance Performance and Weight & Balance 5. Presentation Landing performance is presented in a way of diagrams or tables in AFM and QRH. Landing.2.  Climb limit weight (approach and landing climb. DRY runway LDR is the flight test demonstrated landing distance plus an additional margin of 67%.2 Landing field limit weight General The Landing field limit weight is the maximum weight for which the landing distance available (LDA) is equal to the landing distance required (LDR). For planning purposes the following criteria must be fulfilled:  Be able to land on the expected runway in expected wind and runway conditions.  Aircraft performance  Landing weight field limit weight. Landing and Flight Planning and Performance Manual.  Be able to land on the longest runway in zero wind conditions. average wind speed plus 50% of the gust factor shall be used. The performance is based on the weather/runway conditions and the following assumptions:  Engines Idle on all engines before touch down  Wing flaps Landing setting  Landing Gear Down  Speed brake Selected After Touchdown  Wheel Brakes Full Braking with Anti-skid ON  Runway Paved Runway  Airspeed VREF  Reverse Not used The following considerations do not directly accounted but protected by the margins used to define the LDR:  Runway slope  Non-standard temperature  Approach speed.3. NOTE: For more detailed information refer to FCOM. Performance Dispatch.1. CONT/LOW FRICTION runway – same as wet.2 Landing Performance Data 5.

6 67.3 53.6 41.6 56.4 56.1 58.1 51.8 47.2 66.4 41.Jet Transport Performance Landing Performance Landing Landing Field Limit Weight .9 63.9 62.6 55.9 51.4 39.1 65.2 4000 37.7 81 . 37.6 57.7 66.2 62.9 67.1 63.2 61.9 46.3 2880 3190 3510 3830 4140 4460 4780 5090 5410 5730 6050 6360 6680 7000 7310 7630 7950 8270 8000 SAMPLE Decrease field limit weight by 7700 kg when using manual speedbrakes.6 44.5 49.5 58.1 39.3 58.2 54.0 60.2 53.7 52.2 50.2 2000 34.1 63.3 42.8 55.1 46.2 61.5 59.7 6000 35.4 44.1 64.6 65.2 66.9 65.8 64.3 61.3 59.2 48.3 60.Dry Runway Flaps 30 Anti-skid Operative and Automatic Speedbrakes Category "A" Brakes Wind Corrected Field Length (ft) Field Length (ft) 3000 3400 3800 4200 4600 5000 5400 5800 6200 6600 7000 7400 7800 8200 8600 9000 9400 9800 10200 10600 Wind Component (kts) -15 -10 2790 3130 3470 3820 4160 4500 4850 5190 5530 5880 6220 6560 6910 7250 7590 7940 8280 8620 8970 -5 2690 3070 3440 3810 4180 4550 4920 5290 5660 6030 6400 6780 7150 7520 7890 8260 8630 9000 9370 9740 0 3000 3400 3800 4200 4600 5000 5400 5800 6200 6600 7000 7400 7800 8200 8600 9000 9400 9800 10200 10600 10 3210 3620 4030 4440 4850 5270 5680 6090 6500 6910 7330 7740 8150 8560 8970 9380 9800 10210 10620 11030 20 3400 3830 4260 4680 5110 5530 5960 6380 6810 7240 7660 8090 8510 8940 9370 9790 10220 10640 11070 30 3600 4040 4480 4920 5360 5800 6250 6690 7130 7570 8010 8450 8890 9330 9780 10220 10660 11100 40 3780 4240 4700 5160 5620 6080 6540 6990 7450 7910 8370 8830 9290 9750 10210 10670 11120 SAMPLE Field Limit Weight (1000 kg) Wind Corr Field Length (ft) 3400 3800 4200 4600 5000 5400 5800 6200 6600 7000 7400 7800 8200 8600 Airport Pressure Altitude (ft) 0 36.

9 59.6 58.4 58.6 42.1 60.6 50.7 82 .3 61.4 50.2 55.9 48.1 63.8 61.8 56.7 64.5 39.4 48.2 60.4 39.8 6000 8000 3170 3490 3810 4120 4440 4760 5070 5390 5710 6030 6340 6660 6980 7290 7610 7930 8250 3110 3450 3790 4140 4480 4820 5170 5510 5860 6200 6540 6880 7230 7570 7920 8260 8600 8940 Field Limit Weight (1000 kg) Wind Corr Field Length (ft) 3800 4200 4600 5000 5400 5800 6200 6600 7000 7400 7800 8200 8600 9000 9400 9800 10200 SAMPLE Decrease field limit weight by 7700 kg when using manual speedbrakes.2 39.Wet Runway Flaps 40 Anti-skid Operative and Automatic Speedbrakes Category "A" Brakes Wind Corrected Field Length (ft) Field Length (ft) 3000 3400 3800 4200 4600 5000 5400 5800 6200 6600 7000 7400 7800 8200 8600 9000 9400 9800 10200 10600 Wind Component (kts) -15 -10 -5 3050 3420 3790 4170 4540 4910 5280 5650 6020 6390 6760 7130 7500 7880 8250 8620 8990 9360 9730 0 3000 3400 3800 4200 4600 5000 5400 5800 6200 6600 7000 7400 7800 8200 8600 9000 9400 9800 10200 10600 10 3220 3640 4050 4460 4870 5280 5690 6110 6520 6930 7340 7750 8170 8580 8990 9400 9810 10230 10640 11050 20 3440 3860 4290 4710 5140 5570 5990 6420 6840 7270 7690 8120 8550 8970 9400 9820 10250 10670 11100 11530 30 3640 4080 4520 4960 5410 5850 6290 6730 7170 7610 8050 8490 8940 9380 9820 10260 10700 11140 11580 12030 40 3830 4290 4750 5210 5670 6130 6590 7050 7500 7960 8420 8880 9340 9800 10260 10720 11180 11630 12090 12550 SAMPLE Airport Pressure Altitude (ft) 0 35.2 63.7 63.3 2000 37.2 53.2 65.0 51.2 35.1 62.3 59.7 65.1 57. 37.3 49.6 54.1 52.Landing Performance Performance and Weight & Balance Landing Landing Field Limit Weight .3 45.9 46.2 42.1 66.8 4000 35.9 52.2 61.1 64.4 67.0 65.7 62.7 55.2 65.4 59.3 63.7 43.4 53.2 67.7 67.4 57.0 46.7 66.3 67.6 56.5 55.8 44.4 41.1 66.

all engines operative. 83 .2.1%.  Normally it is not a limiting factor until aerodrome temperature exceeds 45° C and field elevation 3000 ft.  Approach configuration is based on the approach flaps setting 15 deg. and the operating engine at go-around thrust..2 %.. the engines are at go-around thrust. Landing climb:  Minimum gradient in landing configuration shall not be less then 3. landing gear down.Jet Transport Performance Landing Performance 5. one engine inoperative.3 Climb Limit Weight Climb performance limits for landing ensure a minimum climb gradient capability in the certified approach and landing configurations in case of goaround becomes necessary at any point during the landing approach. Approach and landing climb limit weight accounts for:  Airport temperature  Airport pressure altitude  Engine bleed  Icing conditions Approach climb requirements:  Minimum gradient in approach configuration shall not be less then 2.  landing gear up.  Landing configuration is based on the landing flaps setting 30 or 40 deg.

5 60.0 45.4 65. 84 .9 54.6 54.5 60.2 65.9 62.0 8000 45.7 62. For more detailed information refer to FCOM.4 48.4 56.5 57. With engine and wing anti-ice on.7 60.9 66. or the published gradient for the specific airport.8 65.4 52.7 60.1 57.8 65.5 57.5%.7 60.9 65.8 52.5 55.6 65.2 58.6 60.2 50.1 54.7 48. decrease weight by 5500 kg.3 65.4 58.4 61.2 58.1 57.7 With engine bleed for packs off.3 54.1 56.7 48.7 60.5 55.7 56.1 60.3 61.7 65.7 62. decrease weight by 5100 kg.6 62.0 51.0 55.5 62.9 56.2 57.8 52.2 65.8 59.3 60.0 66.5 62.6 47.5 53. increase weight by 1250 kg.4 62.5 62.9 SAMPLE -1000 55.5 56.1 54.5 50.0 65.0 56.7 52.0 47.0 66.2 57.6 61.0 51.3 57.6 64.2 65.0 58.6 62.0 66.6 63.0 57.7 53.9 49.0 66.1 54.4 49.0 66. based on one engine inoperative and landing gear up.4 54. Go-Around Climb The climb gradient in the go-around configuration is greater of 2.7 53.2 48.0 63.4 59.3 51. Performance Dispatch and Flight Planning and Performance Manual.1 59.0 51. With engine anti-ice on.2 57.8 46.7 65. APU operating and anti-ice off Airport OAT °C 54 52 50 48 46 44 42 40 38 36 34 32 30 28 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 -40 Landing Climb Limit Weight (1000 kg) Pressure Altitude (ft) 0 2000 4000 6000 53.3 57.0 66.7 63.6 49.3 53.6 60.2 65. When operating in icing conditions during any part of the flight with forecast landing temperature below 8°C.0 66.5 64.6 54.7 62.3 66. decrease weight by 400 kg.4 62.8 65.2 65.3 58.1 51.4 51.1 65.Landing Performance Performance and Weight & Balance Landing Climb Limit Weight Valid for approach with Flaps 15 and landing with Flaps 40 Based on engine bleed for packs on.3 56.6 50.2 61.2 59.3 53.

03 3.20 0.36 6.27 0.38 13 -0.Jet Transport Performance Landing Performance Go-Around Climb Gradient Flaps 15 Based on engine bleed for packs on and anti-ice off Reference Go-Around Gradient (%) OAT °C 50 46 42 38 34 30 26 22 18 14 10 0 3.66 6.03 3.12 -1.50 0 0.71 0.72 -0.24 0.52 0.53 0.21 5.45 2.27 5.53 0.75 5.04 2. decrease gradient by 0.52 0.47 3.74 2.12 4.89 3.33 1.09 4.55 0 0.39 3.86 4.97 1 -2.40 3.57 0.16 2.00 4.14 4.06 -0.01 3.49 0.81 5.45 3.27 0.73 -0.00 -1.37 1. decrease gradient by 1.89 -3.06 4.11 0.70 -0.3%.46 11 12 -0.07 3.5 45 40 35 0 -2.67 2.71 -0.77 -1.42 0.12 0.93 5.56 1.67 0 0 0.45 -2.50 0.26 0.19 0.48 0.52 0.53 2.72 1.63 5.59 -0.37 Reference Go-Around Gradient (%) 2 3 4 5 -2.66 8000 0.66 -0.87 0.2%. increase gradient by 0.51 0.07 1.63 0 0 0.64 5.12 2.87 5.22 5. With engine and wing anti-ice on.98 1.56 0.72 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.8%.8 0.41 5.81 5.55 3.83 2.24 0.1%.90 5.26 0.25 0.55 0 0.69 -0.60 -0.54 0.84 5.76 0 0 0 0 0.27 0.22 0.56 1 2 -0. When operating in icing conditions during any part of the flight with forecast landing temperatures below 8°C.13 6 -3.53 0.61 2. decrease gradient by 0.33 With engine bleed for packs off.85 Gradient Adjustment for Weight (%) Weight (1000 kg) 60 55 50 47.57 0.11 4.18 3.73 -0.48 2.34 -0.92 -2.53 0.58 0.94 Reference Go-Around Gradient (%) Airport Pressure Altitude (ft) 2000 4000 6000 2.65 -0.47 0.63 -1.50 0.27 0.21 0.67 2.97 2.66 3.58 0.21 -0.42 3.56 0.24 4.58 Gradient Adjustment for Speed (%) Speed (KIAS) VREF VREF+5 VREF+10 VREF+20 VREF+30 Weight Adjusted Go-Around Gradient (%) 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -0.71 -0.31 4.23 0. 85 .64 0 0.22 -1.81 0 1.61 2.67 -2.51 0. With engine anti-ice on.73 -0.62 SAMPLE 0 -0.74 0.47 0.34 -2.49 0.48 -0.78 5.94 2.57 4.11 2.

Speed VREF +10 increases landing distance by 110 m.  Speed brakes. Malfunctions In case of malfunctions that effect landing performance.2. To obtain LDR .  Engine anti-ice on (if required by RWY contaminant). Landing Speeds VREF for actual landing weight shall be taken directly from FMC or AFM 4. QRH. if required. anti-skid/wheel brakes shall be serviceable. To obtain LDR .Landing Performance Performance and Weight & Balance 5.actual landing distance given in the tables and corrected appropriately. Non-Normal Configuration Landing Distance Tables shall be used to determine the un-factored (actual) distance for different RWY conditions.  Landing flap setting 40 shall be used. There are no tables for contaminated runway in QRH and Low Friction Runway landing distances having the same friction coefficient are used instead as they give more conservative result (with assumption that a contaminant layer on the contaminated runway surface creates an additional drag during landing roll in comparison with the slippery runway). Performance In-flight – Advisory information. For Low Friction/Contaminated Runway actual landing distances without reversers see following tables. 86 .67.actual landing distance from the graph/tables shall be multiplied by coefficient 1.67. should be multiplied by coefficient 1.13.4 Contaminated/Low Friction RWY When landing on contaminated/low friction runway the following criteria shall be met:  No tailwind.

Max manual braking data valid for auto speedbrakes.35) Max MAN Max AUTO Auto 3 Auto 2 Auto 1 1430 1430 1455 1695 1810 130/-120 130/-120 130/-120 165/-155 185/-175 40 40 40 50 60 -70 -70 -75 -85 -90 280 280 285 320 340 60 60 50 50 70 -45 -45 -30 -40 -55 SAMPLE 155/-140 185/-165 40 40 40 50 55 1795 1795 1795 1900 175/-165 175/-165 175/-165 185/-175 55 55 55 60 -105 -105 -105 -110 430 430 430 445 130 130 130 120 -85 -85 -80 -80 50 50 50 50 -30 -30 -35 -40 -45 110 110 135 150 140 140 140 110 65 190 595 595 565 370 425 Poor Reported Braking Action (FC = 0. VREF30 approach speed and two engine detent reverse thrust. Autobrake data valid for both auto and manual speedbrakes. Includes distance from 50 ft above threshold (305 m of air distance). no wind or slope. For max manual braking and manual speedbrakes.Jet Transport Performance Normal Configuration Landing Distance Flaps 30 Landing Distance and Adjustments (m) Alt Wind Adj per Slope Adj per Temp Adj per Adj 10kts 1% 10°C Per 1000ft Head Tail Down Above Below above Up Hill Wind Wind Hill ISA ISA Sea Level 15 -25 105 10 -5 15 -15 20 30 45 55 -30 -45 -70 -85 110 170 260 315 10 15 15 50 -5 -5 -15 -45 20 30 45 50 -15 -20 -40 -45 Landing Performance DRY Braking Config Ref Dist Weight Adj VREF Adj Per 10kts above VREF 65 75 110 165 145 Reverse Thrust Adj One Rev 15 10 10 5 130 No Rev 40 15 20 20 155 48000kg Per 5000kg Landing above/below Weight Ref Weight 790 825 1000 1430 1645 95/-45 85/-50 125/-80 160/-130 185/-160 Max MAN Max AUTO Auto 3 Auto 2 Auto 1 Good Reported Braking Action (FC > 0. standard day. 87 . increase reference landing distance by 85 m.15 – 0.25) Max MAN Max AUTO Auto 3 Auto 2 -40 -40 -40 -45 125 125 130 140 280 280 280 210 1670 1670 1670 1565 Auto 1 1965 205/-190 65 -115 455 135 -90 55 -50 140 280 1535 Reference distance is for sea level. Actual (unfactored) distances are shown.4) Max MAN Max AUTO Auto 3 Auto 2 Auto 1 1080 1080 1220 1585 1750 85/-80 85/-80 105/-95 30 30 35 50 55 -45 -45 -55 -75 -90 175 175 195 275 325 25 25 15 25 55 -20 -20 -10 -20 -50 25 25 35 50 50 -20 -20 -30 -40 -45 85 85 125 155 145 55 55 15 25 170 190 190 75 25 205 Medium Reported Braking Action (FC = 0.30 – 0.

Includes distance from 50 ft above threshold (305 m of air distance).25) Max MAN Max AUTO Auto 3 Auto 2 120 120 125 135 250 250 250 190 1495 1495 1495 1400 Auto 1 1865 205/-180 60 -110 445 125 -85 50 -45 135 245 1385 Reference distance is for sea level. Actual (unfactored) distances are shown. VREF40 approach speed and two engine detent reverse thrust.35) Max MAN Auto 3 Auto 2 Auto 1 1375 1375 1395 1615 1715 135/-110 135/-110 135/-110 165/-145 185/-165 40 40 40 50 55 -70 -70 -70 -80 -90 275 275 280 310 330 60 60 50 45 65 -40 -40 -30 -40 -50 Max AUTO SAMPLE 35 35 40 45 50 -30 -30 -30 -40 -45 1715 1715 1715 1815 180/-155 180/-155 180/-155 190/-165 55 55 55 55 -105 -105 -105 -110 420 420 420 435 125 125 125 115 -80 -80 -75 -75 45 45 45 50 -40 -40 -40 -45 105 105 130 135 135 125 125 105 65 165 540 540 520 335 400 Poor Reported Braking Action (FC = 0. Max manual braking data valid for auto speedbrakes. standard day. For max manual braking and manual speedbrakes. Autobrake data valid for both auto and manual speedbrakes.Landing Performance Normal Configuration Landing Distance Flaps 40 Performance and Weight & Balance DRY Braking Config Ref Dist Weight Adj 48000kg Per 5000kg Landing above/below Weight Ref Weight 790 810 970 1375 1570 95/-45 85/-50 125/-75 190/-150 190/-150 Max MAN Max AUTO Auto 3 Auto 2 Auto 1 Landing Distance and Adjustments (m) Alt Wind Adj per Slope Adj per Temp Adj per Adj 10kts 1% 10°C Per 1000ft Head Tail Down Above Below above Up Hill Wind Wind Hill ISA ISA Sea Level 25 -25 100 10 -5 15 -10 20 30 40 55 -25 -40 -70 -85 110 165 250 305 10 10 15 50 -5 -5 -10 -40 20 30 40 50 -15 -20 -40 -40 VREF Adj Per 10kts above VREF 65 75 110 160 140 Reverse Thrust Adj One Rev 15 10 10 5 120 No Rev 40 15 20 20 150 Good Reported Braking Action (FC > 0.30 – 0. increase reference landing distance by 75 m. no wind or slope.4) Max MAN Max AUTO Auto 3 Auto 2 Auto 1 1050 1050 1170 1515 1665 95/-75 95/-75 110/-90 155/-135 185/-155 25 25 30 45 55 -45 -45 -50 -70 -85 175 175 195 265 315 25 25 15 25 50 -15 -15 -5 -20 -45 25 25 30 45 50 -20 -20 -25 -40 -45 85 85 125 145 135 50 50 15 25 150 175 175 70 25 195 Medium Reported Braking Action (FC = 0.15 – 0. 88 .

1 Performance Data Sources There are a number of manuals from which the Flight Crew can get information about the airplane performance.  Volumes 1 and 2 + Quick Reference Handbook (QRH)  May cover multiple airframes  May include multiple airframe/engine combinations  All performance data is in tabular format Volume 1 contains:  Revision Record  List of Effective Pages  Bulletin Record  Service Bulletins  Limitations  Normal & Supplementary Procedures  PERFORMANCE DISPATCH (Chapter PD) Volume 2 contains:  Systems Information QRH Primary crew reference on flight deck  Quick Action Index (front cover)  Annunciated Index (EICAS Messages)  Normal Checklist  Checklist Introduction  Non-normal Checklist (by system)  Maneuvers  PERFORMANCE INFLIGHT (Chapter PI)  Index  Evacuation checklist (back cover) 89 .Jet Transport Performance Performance Information 6 PERFORMANCE INFORMATION The following chapter contains a summary of the Performance Information which will be used by the Flight Crew during daily normal operations. 6. It contains the following sections:  Section 1: Certificate Limitations  Section 2: Emergency Procedures  Section 3: Normal and Non-normal Procedures  Section 4: Performance FCOM The primary audience is Flight Crew. These manuals are:  Airplane Flight Manual (AFM)  Flight Crew Operations Manual (FCOM)  Quick Reference Handbook (QRH)  Flight Planning and Performance Manual (FPPM)  Operations Manual Part B (OM-B)  Route Performance Manual (RPM) AFM The AFM is the Official Source for Regulatory Performance.

The FPPM is in 8. RPM The Route Performance Manual contains the Runway Weight Charts (RWCs) for the regular airports. and much of the performance is presented in graphs. Notes: 90 .Performance Information Jet Transport Performance FPPM Source of performance information primarily for dispatchers and flight operations engineers. It contains in chapter 4 the Performance data and in chapter 5 the Flight Planning data.5 x 11 inch format. It contains:  Takeoff and Landing  Flight Planning:  Simplified flight planning  Driftdown  Enroute:  All Engines  Engine Inoperative  Non-standard Configuration:  Gear Down OM-B The OM-B is the airline produced company flight manual for the specific airplane.

etc.2 Definitions Algebraic signs: When computing weight and balance where the datum is at the leading edge of the wing. etc. 7. balance of the airplane is of prime importance and must be thoroughly understood by the pilot.  by "block and expanded" systems in which variations in anticipated loads can be corrected up to the scheduled departure time of the aircraft. The last method is the basis for the weight and balance solutions in this chapter. Generally.Jet Transport Performance Weight & Balance 7 WEIGHT AND BALANCE 7. care must be taken to use the proper plus or minus signs (+ or -). Any assumed position of the center of gravity will be along the longitudinal axis. or rudder pedals. or nose of the aircraft. Basic Index (BI): Center of gravity at basic weight (BW) expressed as an index value.  by formulas which can be applied generally to all aircraft. or standard circular computer. all items placed in the aircraft will be at a plus arm. and items placed aft of the datum would be at a plus arm. 91 . Arm or moment arm: the horizontal distance (in inches) from the datum to the center of gravity of an item (occupant. Aircraft weight check: This consists of checking the sum of the weights of all items of useful load against the authorized useful load (maximum weight less empty weight) of the aircraft. A plus (+) arm indicates the item is located aft of the datum. a minus (-) arm indicates the item is forward of the datum. Dry Operating Index (DOI): Center of gravity at dry operating weight expressed as an index value.  by common weight and balance principles plus basic formulas as well as mathematical calculations with the aid of long-hand arithmetic. Items placed ahead of the datum would be at a minus arm. Therefore. or other position aft of the nose of the airplane. It is an imaginary point about which the nose-heavy and tailheavy moments are exactly equal in magnitude. Stability of an aircraft in flight can be easily upset by improper loading or by the placement of weights at aircraft stations not in accordance with the loading procedures for that particular aircraft. the datum can be located in any convenient position on the aircraft. or ahead of the nose of the aircraft.). the manufacturer designates the datum position. Note: When working weight and balance problems. Datum: an imaginary vertical plane or line from which all horizontal measurements are taken for balance purposes with the aircraft in level flight attitude. There are several methods used in computing weight and balance of aircraft:  by slide rule. On large aircraft the datum is generally at the nose or forward of the nose section. The datum can be at the leading edge of the wing. if the slide rule is designed specifically for the particular aircraft. which remains fixed throughout the life of the airplane.1 Introduction In air carrier operations. If not specified. Center of gravity: generally known as the balance point of an aircraft. the rudder pedals. a slide rule. baggage. at the inter section of the lateral and vertical axes. always visualize the nose of the aircraft to your left. Basic index (BI) corrected for the balance influence of the loads included in Dry Operating Weight (DOW). and  by an index system.

and hydrualic fluid are included in the empty weight check of the aircraft. It is essentially a “dry” weight. Empty weight center of gravity range: determined so that when the empty weight center of gravity falls within this range the specification operating center of gravity limits will not be loading arrangements.g. In order that a computed weight and center of gravity location can be established at any time. Installation of ballast. fuel tanks. Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW): Maximum weight at brake release as limited by aircraft strength and airworthiness requirements. systems and other items of equipment that are considered an integral part of the aircraft. It is equal to the Zero Fuel Weight plus the fuel reserves. etc. unusuable fuel. hydraulic fluid). catering. Operational Empty Weight plus items specific to the type of flight. Equipment list: a complete list of the equipment included in the ccrtificated empty weight.Weight & Balance Jet Transport Performance Dry Operating Weight (DOW): The total weight of an aircraft ready for a specific type of operation excluding all usable fuel and traffic load. extra crew etc… Empty weight: includes all operating equipment (structure. all changes affecting the weight. Full oil: the quantity of oil shown in the aircraft specifications as oil capacity.) with a fixed location and actually installed in the aircraft. fixed ballast. 92 . Maximum Landing Weight (MLW): Maximum weight for landing as limited by aircraft strength and airworthiness requirements. Loading schedule. Ballast should not be used to correct a nose-up or nose-down tendency of the aircraft. center of gravity location. and usually forms a part of the airplane flight manual. Minimum Flight Weight (MFW): Minimum weight for flight as limited by aircraft strength and airworthiness requirements. power plant. This should be kept with the aircraft. pantry equipment. Empty weight center of gravity: established by weighing the aircraft with suitable scales in a closed hangar and in level flight attitude. Landing Weight (LW) : The weight at landing at the destination airport. found in either the approved airplane operating manual or the weight and balance data. newspapers. including only those fluids contained in closed systems (e. Manufacturer’s Empty Weight (MEW): The weight of the structure.e. Equipment changes: The registered owner of an aircraft is responsible for a continuous record of each aircraft. furnishings. The condition of the aircraft should be such that the empty weight condition can be easily repeated. powerplants.) Maximum Zero Fuel Weight (MZFW): Maximum weight allowed before usable fuel must be loaded in the aircraft as limited by strength and airworthiness requirements. i. Generally. and equipment must be listed. (It includes weight of taxi and runup fuel. undrainable oil. Ballast is sometimes permanently installed for center of gravity balance purposes as a result of the installation or removal of equipment items. Maximum Taxi Weight (MTW): Maximum weight for ground maneuver as limited by aircraft strength and airworthiness requirements.

Takeoff Weight (TOW): The weight at takeoff at the departure airport. It is equal to the landing weight at destination plus the trip fuel (fuel needed for the trip). blocks. galley structure. documents. MAC data can be found in the aircraft specifications.. including non-revenue loads. Operational Empty Weight (OEW): The manufacturer’s weight empty plus the operator’s items. engine oil. i.Jet Transport Performance Weight & Balance Mean Aerodynamic Chord (MAC): the mean chord of the airfoil or wing. catering equipment. seats. etc. unusable fuel. etc… Figure 7. used when weighing the aircraft and included in the scale weight readings. 93 . Tare must be deducted from the scale readings to obtain the actual or net weight of the aircraft. For weight and balance purposes it is used to locate the center of gravity range of the aircraft. Trip fuel: The weight of the fuel necessary to cover the normal leg without reserves. Moment. Take-off fuel (TOF): The weight of the fuel on board at take-off. baggage and cargo. flight manual.e. Total Traffic Load (TTL): The total weight of the passengers. the flight and cabin crew and their baggage. emergency equipment. The moment of an item about the datum is obtained by multiplying the weight of the item by its horizontal distance from the datum. or aircraft weight and balance records. Operating center of gravity range: the distance between the forward lind rearward center of gravity limits shown in the aircraft specifications. or to the zero fuel weight plus the takeoff fuel (fuel needed at the brake release point including reserves).1 – MAC Definition Tare: the weight of chocks. toilet chemicals and fluids.

cargo. passengers. baggage. Example: W1 = 2000 lbs d1 = 240 inches W2 = 1500 lbs d2 = 400 inches D = 309 inches 94 . is theoretically supported at that point. per person.. Weighing point: When required to locate the empty weight center of gravity by weighing the aircraft. per U.8 lbs. crew and passengers . Weight and balance extreme conditions: the forward and rearward center of gravity limits for the particular aircraft. Useful load: found by subtracting the empty weight from the maximum permissible weight of the aircraft. gallon.Weight & Balance Jet Transport Performance Figure 7.2 – Moment Unit weights: Unless otherwise noted.170 lbs. it is first necessary to obtain horizontal measurements between the points on the scales at which the airplane's weight is concentrated. gallon. The sum of the forces and moments produced by the distribution of weight of a group of objects about their combined C. C. water . Refer to Figure 40. would be equal to zero if the objects could be supported at exactly that location. per U.6 lbs. 7. unless otherwise noted.G. or group of objects.S. unit weights used in weight and balance computations in actual practise as well as in the written exams are: fuel .S. oil – 7 1/2 lbs. etc. a vertical line passing through the centerline of the wheel axles locates the point on the scales at which the weight is concentrated. per U.G.S. Zero Fuel Weight: the sum of Dry Operating Weight and Payload.G.3 Calculation of Center of Gravity Center of gravity. gallon. is the point around which no motion or rotation occurs if the object. To determine the location of the C.. Useful load consists of the flight crew. In usual weighing practice. for a group of objects we need to determine the point at which the group of objects would be in balance if they were supported at that location.

Index value corresponding to respective weight.4 Index Equation When loading an airplane.6 inches from zero 95 .5 inches from zero = 40 = 30000 = 134. Reference station/axis.Sta  K C Weight actual Station horizontal distance in inches or meters from station zero to the location of the weight. An Index Equation is used to simplify the presentation of moment data on the loading schedule. carry-on and baggage  Cargo  Fuel  etc.5 inches = 625. Constant used as a denominator to convert moment values into index values. Selected station around which all index values are calculated. Constant used as a plus value to avoide negative index figures. summation of moments is necessary to accurately determine the center of gravity for the loaded airplane:  Moment due to airplane empty weight  Moment of all items that are loaded:  Flight and cabin crew  Passengers.3 – Calculation of Center of Gravity 7. Index is moment scaled to a convenient magnitude that is easy to add and subtract based on a scale which is offset such that the index values are typically positive The Index Equation has the following form: Index: W Sta Ref. Sta K C I = = = = = = I W Sta  Ref.Jet Transport Performance Weight & Balance Figure 7. Normally the following values are choosen for the Boeing 737-300 when the weights are in kilograms: Ref Sta at K (constant) C (constant) Length of MAC LEMAC at = 648.

...... ........ ..66 ....... ... ... .........68 ... ........... . .1 Computer Generated Loadsheet L O A D S H E E T ALL WEIGHTS IN KILOGRAM FROM/TO FLIGHT TSR_FRA RJ1234 CHECKED: APPROVED: DATE 31JUL09 EDNO A/C REG YR-RLT WEIGHT LOAD IN COMPARTMENTS 3500 PASSENGER/CABIN BAG 10248 TOTAL TRAFFIC LOAD 13748 DRY OPERATING WEIGHT 34056 ZERO FUEL WEIGHT 47804 TAKE OFF FUEL 12000 TAKE OFF WEIGHT 59804 TRIP FUEL 8500 LANDING WEIGHT 51304 VERSION CREW 0/130 2/3 DISTRIBUTION 1/1500 4/2000 TTL 122 TIME 0955 MAX 48307 MAX 63276 MAX 52888 *************************************************************************** BALANCE AND SEATING CONDITIONS LAST MINUTE CHANGES DOI 36....... ... MACZFW 23.. LITOW 49.... ... . ...... ...... . .0C46 UNDERLOAD BEFORE LMC 503 SAMPLE *************************************************************************** END OF LOADSHEET 96 .00 .Weight & Balance Now the equation becomes: Jet Transport Performance I W Sta  648. MACLW 21. . .. MACTOW 20. .. .. LILAW 49... .. ............ ...64 ... . LMC TOTAL +/TRIM BY COMPARTMENT 0A30.5 Load and Trimsheet Two types of Load and Trimsheets are in use:  Computer Generated  Manually Calculated 7.....81 .23 ...........82 DEST SPEC CL/CPT PLUS MINUS LIZFW 52...0B46.. ...5.5  40 30000 7.

cargo and mail DOW Sum of Dry Operating Weight and Total Traffic Load Take Off Fuel The amount of fuel on board less the fuel consumed before takeoff. Changes of DOI due to passengers’ position. Standard abbreviation are used Destination of LMC / Kind of LMC / Class or Compartment / on or off load indicator / weight of LMC. All specified cabin sections are presented. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Heading LOADSHEET CHECKED DATE ED NO APPROVED FROM/TO FLIGHT A/C REG VERSION CREW TIME LOAD IN COMPARTMENTS PASSENGER/CABIN BAG TOTAL TRAFFIC LOAD DRY OPERATING WEIGHT ZERO FUEL WEIGHT 17 TAKEOFF FUEL 18 19 20 21 TAKEOFF WEIGHT TRIP FUEL LANDING WEIGHT BALANCE AND SEATING CONDITIONS LAST MINUTE CHANGES 22 23 24 TRIM BY COMPARTMENT UNDERLOAD BEFORE LMC Description Loadsheet Document identifier. Difference between maximum and actual weight 97 . weight units Loadsheet agent’s signature Date Edition number Approved Signature of authorized person (PIC) Three-letter IATA codes of departure & landing airports Flight Number Registration A/C version & divider position Crew version cockpit/cabin Time of loadsheet generation Total weight in baggage compartments and distribution Total weight of passengers and number of passengers divided into specified groups and categories The total weight of passengers. Depends on aircraft version. baggage.2. Note: If after refuelling actual fuel on board minus expected taxi fuel differs from the take-off fuel presented on the loadsheet the same procedure as for traffic load LMC (OM-B 6.4) to be applied Sum of 16 and 17 The amount of fuel planned to be consumed from take-off to landing 18 minus 19 Section contains balance information for dry and loaded aircraft.Jet Transport Performance Weight & Balance No. At the bottom of this section the Total LMC weight is presented.

Weight & Balance Jet Transport Performance 7.2 Manual Loadsheet 98 .5.

Jet Transport Performance

Weight & Balance

No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

Description General Flight Data Dry Operating Weight DOW Adjustment Corrected DOW Total Passenger Weight Baggage Weight Freight Mail Total Traffic Load Zero Fuel Weight LMC Field Takeoff Fuel Takeoff Weight LMC Field Performance Limited Takeoff Weight Trip Fuel Landing Weight LMC Field Performance Limited Landing Weight LMC Field Passengers Load agents name and signature Commanders name and signature Crew version Group Dry Operating Index DOI Correction Corrected DOI Number of passengers in compartment 0a Number of passengers in compartment 0b Number of passengers in compartment 0c Weight in forward compartment Weight in aft compartment DOI scale Compartment scales Fuel index scale Stabilizer trim setting scale Fuel index table Center of Gravity field

Remarks From OM-B 6.4 From OM-B 6.4 2±3

5+6+7+8 9+4

10+12 From OM-B Chapter 4 13-16 From OM-B Chapter 4 M = Male F = Female C = Children

From OM-B 6.4 From OM-B 6.4 From OM-B 6.4 From OM-B 6.4 28 ± 27

Enter DOI from28 From 38

99

Weight & Balance

Jet Transport Performance

7.6 Weight and Balance Information Weight and Balance Information can be found in OM-B Chapter 6 (Weight and Balance) as well as in Chapter 7 (Loading). 7.6.1 Weight and Balance Chapter 6 of the OM-B contains the following information: 6.1 Weight and Balance Calculation System 6.1.1 System Definition 6.1.2 Standard Weights 6.2 Instructions for Completion of Weight and Balance Documentation 6.2.1 General 6.2.2 Computer Generated Loadsheet 6.2.2.1 Example 6.2.2.2 Description 6.2.3 Manual Loadsheet 6.2.3.1 Example 6.2.3.2 Description 6.2.4 Last Minute Changes (LMC) 6.2.4.1 General 6.2.4.2 Limitations 6.2.4.3 Electronic Loadsheet 6.2.4.4 Manual Loadsheet 6.3 Weight and Center of Gravity Limitations 6.3.1 Weight Limitations 6.3.2 Center of Gravity 6.4 Dry Operating Weight and Index 7.6.2 Loading Chapter 7 of OM-B contains the following topics on Loading: 7.1 Loading Instructions 7.1.1 General 7.1.2 Normal Loading Instructions 7.1.3 Cargo Compartments 7.1.3.1 Distribution of Cargo 7.1.3.2 Designation 7.1.3.3 Limitations 7.1.3.4 Flight Kit 7.1.3.5 Dimensions 7.2 Distribution of Passengers 7.2.1 Standard Seating Plan 7.3 Transportation of Live Animals 7.4 Special Loading Instructions 7.4.1 Transportation of Childeren and Disabled Persons 7.4.2 Transportation of electrically Wheelchairs 7.4.3 Transportation of Weapons 7.4.4 Transportation of Radioactive Material 7.4.5 Transportation of Live Human Organs (LHO)

100

Jet Transport Performance

Weight & Balance

Dry Operating Weight and Index

WEIGHTS: KG; INDEX: KG.INCH DRY OPERATING WEIGHT AND INDEX A/C REG. SEATS CREW 2/4 WEIGHT 34306 34056 34176 33976 34056 PANTRY A INDEX 37.0 36.8 36.9 36.7 36.8 CREW 2/5 WEIGHT 34393 34143 34263 34063 34143 PANTRY A INDEX 38.1 37.9 38.0 37.8 37.9 CREW 3/4 WEIGHT 34403 34153 34273 34073 34153 PANTRY A INDEX 35.9 35.7 35.8 35.6 35.7

YR-RLT YR-ARR YR-TMI YR-TMS YR-IER A/C REG.

130 130 130 130 130

DRY OPERATING WEIGHT AND INDEX

YR-RLT YR-ARR YR-TMI YR-TMS YR-IER

SAMPLE
130 130 130 130 130 34490 34240 34360 34160 34240 37.0 36.8 36.9 36.7 36.8 33308 33058 33178 32978 33058 34.0 33.8 33.9 33.7 33.8

SEATS

CREW 3/5 WEIGHT

PANTRY A INDEX

CREW 2/0* WEIGHT

NO PANTRY INDEX

Dry Operating Weight includes Basic Weight, Crew, Crew Baggage and Pantry Dry Operating Weight and Index does not include nose gear & main gear spare wheel & tire, tool box ect. Refer to Adjustment Table below

Index Formular: [Wt(kg) x [H.arm(inch) – 648.5]] / 30000 + [40] DRY OPERATING WEIGHT & INDEX ADJUSTMENT TABLE Nose Gear Wheel and Tire 32 kg / 0.23 Main Gear Wheel and Tire 120 kg / 0.86 Dry Operating Weight and Index does NOT include the Flight Kit. Check if Flight Kit is Tool Kit Box 47 kg / 0.34 located in AFT Compartment. FLIGHT KIT TOTAL +200 kg / +1.44 Use Load and Trim Sheet Form B D043A630-RJet, October 2010

101

For all flights.1 – Passenger Standard Weights Corrections have to be made if the actual weight of passengers with their hand baggage is known or if the average weight can be estimated as obviously different than the standard weight given above.All flights except holiday charters (*) Adult . When the passenger checked baggage (loaded in the cargo compartment) are not weighed. the following standard weight per piece of checked baggage is used: Type of flight Domestic flights Within the European region Intercontinental flights All other Baggage standard weight 11 kg 13 kg 15 kg 13 kg Table 7. a standard weight is used for Load and Trim sheet calculation.2 – Standard Baggage Weights 102 . All adult 84 kg 76 kg 35 kg Male 88 kg 83 kg 35 kg Female 70 kg 69 kg 35 kg Table 7.3 Passenger Standard Weights To avoid having to weigh each passenger and baggage.Holiday charters (*) Children .Weight & Balance Jet Transport Performance 7. the standard weight of passengers including hand baggage is the following: Type of flight Adult .All flights Infants (*) Holiday charter means a charter flight solely intended as an element of a holiday travel package.6.

Jet Transport Performance Notes: Weight & Balance 103 .

The Boeing Company “The Flight Engineers Manual”. D6-1420. Deutsche Lufthansa AG “Performance Engineers Training Manual”.Bibliography Jet Transport Performance       “Jet Transport Performance Methods”. Zweng Company “Flight Crew Operations Manual (FCOM) Boeing 737-3/4/5” D6-27370. The Boeing Company “Introduction to Jet Engine Fundamentals. Pratt & Whitney “Airplane Performance”. The Boeing Company 104 .

..................................................................................................10 Runway Weight Charts.......69 Net Takeoff Flight Path ....8 Yawing ..........................................................................91................................................71 FAR Takeoff Definition ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 5 Angle of Incidence..................................................................................................................................................................29 Airfoil...................................... 5 Chord ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 67 High-Lift Devices . 6 Airplane Flight Manual...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................37 Takeoff Speeds...................................................................................................................................................................................25 QFE.........................................................................34 Weight and Balance.... 62 Rolling ................................................................ 96 DOW ...............................................................................13 Step Climb ........................................................................................................................... 18 Sweepback ... 89............52 Pitching ................................................................92 Mean aerodynamic chord .........................................................................................................40 TORA .........................................25 Power Required .....................29.................................................... 45............................................................................................30 Static Stability ...................................................................................................... 5 Approach and Landing Requirements ................................................................39 Total Air Temperature............................... 52.............................................................................16 Stall ............................................................................................................................................. 20 AFM ..........................5 Clear Air Turbulence ........................................................................................................................................... 68 Angle of Attack ........................................................................ 6 Load and Trimsheet .....21 Reduced Thrust ..........................................................................................................................44.............................................................................44 OAT.................................................................... 94 105 ...21 Center of Gravity ........................................ 31 Thrust Specific Fuel Consumption ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 90 Operational Flight Plan ..................40 Aspect Ratio .............................................................................................................................................................................................80..70 True Airspeed/TAS ................................................................ 94 Center of Pressure ..........................................................................93 Transonic .............................................................................................................................................................................14 Power Available ............92....................................................................................................................37 Climb Gradient...............................49 Wing Area ..............................................................................................17...................................................................... 79 Aquaplaning.........71 Brake Energy......................11 Wing Loading..................3 Net Flight Path .....................................89 Ailerons................................100 Wet/Contaminated Runway.............. 90 Rudder ..................................37 OM-B...................................................................................................................................................... 91 Dry Operating Weight....21 Taxi Fuel .......................................................... 90 SAT ....96 Contingency Fuel .............................................................. 96 Loadfactor........................................................................................... 92 Lateral Axis.................................................................................................................................21 Skin Friction .......................................................51 Takeoff Requirements .................................9 Equivalent Airspeed/EAS ........... 77 Dry Operating Index ....................... 71 Flight Crew Operations Manual..............................................................................................................................................46.............................................................21 Static Pressure ...........39 Climb ........................1 Theory of Flight ..................................6 Wing Flaps.................3 Altitude Capability.........51 ASDA .......................................................................................................................................................................89 Flight Planning and Performance Manual...................................................................89 Ram Air Temperature ........................................................................................................................................................ 43 Climb Gradient Requirements...............................................89 Performance Limited Takeoff Weight .................................30 Fuel Requirements ..................................................................... 93 Mach Number .........15 Zero Fuel Weight ... 26 Cruise Performance ..............................................................................................................................................................102 Static Air Temperature..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................69 Net Level Off Weight............................................................... 50 Fuel Flow .......................................................................................................... 67 Derate ...............................................................14 Route Performance Manual...........................................................92 Maximum Zero Fuel Weight ............. 89 Field Length........................................ 90 Friction Coefficient................................................................................................................................. 71 Cruise Control............................... 13 Clearway................3 QNH ...........................................................................70 TEMAC ..........................................9 LEMAC ....................................30 Landing Performance ............................................................................................ 5 Angle of Zero Lift ....................................8 Lift and Drag Ratio ...........................................................................................................................................................15 Assumed Temperature....................................29 Jet Nozzle...........................................................................................................................................................37 Takeoff Performance on Wet Runways................................................................................17.................................................................................................................................................................................................21 Performance Information ........................ 23 Computer Generated Loadsheet............................................................................................ 95 Indicated Airspeed/IAS...................................................................................................................................89..................................................................................................................................................................38 TODA .............56.................................12 Longitudinal Axis ..............................................................................................................1 Thrust.......................................8.......................................14 Block Fuel........................................................92 Driftdown .........89 Outside Air Temperature .......89...............................................5 Standard Weights ....................16 Improved Climb ............................. 21 Jet Engine.................... 38 FCOM ..........................................................................................................................................................................................32 Range Performance...............................................................3 QRH .................21 Alternate Fuel .................................................................Jet Transport Performance Index Additional Fuel.................................................................91 Weight and Balance Information ..... 68 Manual Loadsheet .............................................................. 46 Take-off Fuel.74 Operations Manual Part B .........................................................37 Final Reserve .....................................................26 Speed of Sound .. 89 Airspeeds.............................................................................................................................21 Obstacle..................................44 Climb Performance...................................35 Unbalanced Takeoff.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................15 DOI .................................................................................. 48 Atmosphere ......................................................................................................................................................................... 18 Trip Fuel...................................................................................................................................................................22 Subsonic ........................................................................................... 89 FPPM....................................6 Specific Endurance................................................................... 61 TAT ......................................................38 Buffet Boundary....................................................................... 71 Altimetry...............................................................................................................35 Elevators.................................26 RAT .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 71 Aerodynamic Heating ............................................69..........56...................................................................................................................93 Takeoff Performance ........................................................................................................................................................................... 14 Efficiencies .............................92 Maximum Taxi Weight ............................................................................... 6 High-Speed Aerodynamics ....................................7 Air Flow.15 Takeoff Flight Path..............................................21 Total Traffic Load................................................................................................................... 98 Maximum Landing Weight..............................................68 Stopway .............................4.......... 92 Maximum Takeoff Weight ..............47 Dihedral ..................................................................................................21 Ram Effect ..........................21 Extra Fuel ............................................8 Temperature ...................................................................................................................... 9 MAC...................................................................................... 47 Index Equation ............................9 Air Density ................................40 Straight and Level Flight.....................22 TSFC.......................................................................................................................21 True Mach Number...................... 16 Maneuver Capability.......................................................................................................................35 Tire Speed ............17 Supersonic .................................................................................................... 92 Dynamic Stability.............. 40 Banking...............9 Water Injection..............................41 Vertical Axis ..........................26 Specific Range...... 68 Calibrated Airspeed/CAS .....................................................................52..................41..............................................................1 Static Pressure (Jet Nozzle) .......................... 79 Landing Weight .......................................................................................................................................................................1 Balanced Takeoff ......................................................................89 Quick Reference Handbook ...........8 Moisture ..............

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