P. 1
Bosch Visions Hell Heaven

Bosch Visions Hell Heaven

|Views: 23|Likes:
Published by severogog

More info:

Published by: severogog on Jun 14, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/06/2013

pdf

text

original

Visions of HELL and HEAVEN

by Hieronymus Bosch

Hieronymus (Jerome) Bosch
(1450 – 1516)
Born and lived in s’Hertogenbosch (southern Belgium = Flanders) From a family of painters

Little is known about Bosch.  We  have about 25 works by him,  some signed, none dated.

.

1452 ‐ first datable book printed.The 1450’s – an interesting decade. ‐ Leonardo born. 1453 – Copernicus – De Revolutionibus. . Constantinople falls to the Ottomans.

*1477 – Mary of Burgundy  marries Maximilian of  Germany  – a Hapsburg. . *Hapsburgs rule Iberia and  most of Europe north of the  Alps.“THE NORTHERN RENAISSANCE” Political instability *Netherlands ruled by Dukes of  Burgundy.

Economic prosperity.Religious unrest – criticism of the  Church leading to Luther’s 95  theses (1517) the Reformation  and religious wars. .

.

.

.

.

  Alchemy and  Astrology were a part of science  in general and medicine in  particular and had religious  goals. .Religious views colored the  experience of life.

. A moralistic view of life. The struggle of the weak self  against the worldly  temptations.Bosch’s concerns were with  human nature particularly how  it’s functioning was impeded by  the stain of original sin.

 wrote  The Praise of Folly.Erasmus of Rotterdam. . in 1509. based on the premise  that the natural state of mankind is  STUPIDITY. Bosch agrees and paints THE SHIP OF FOOLS. a sarcastic analysis of  sins and follies.

.

.

 a monk  who lived near Utrecht and who  wrote (1420’s) the Imitation of  Christ ‐ How to progress from worldly  attachments to moral perfection  and union with God. .Bosch also probably influenced  by Thomas a’ Kempis.

“The Garden of Earthly Delights” .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The delights of unbridled sexuality. The consequences of heresy. An allegory of alchemy. . Etc. Etc.The “meanings” of “The Garden” – central panel Admonition of children of Adam & Eve. A feminist orientation.

 occurring at  Christ’s Second Coming: THE LAST JUDGMENT . heresy.Sociologically – since the Middle  Ages. etc.  impurity. leading to  damnation in hell. great fear about sin.

. the West (main)  entrance of almost all churches  had a graphic portrayal of the LJ.By 1200.

The Saved in          Paradise Christ in majesty Judging The Damned in Hell .

.

.

” On Christ’s left: “The wicked suffer the torments of the damned. perpetually groaning and trembling” At the bottom: “O sinners. roasting in the midst of flames and demons.Conques On Christ’s right: “The assembled saints stand before Christ.” . know that you will suffer a dreadful fate. full of joy. if you do not mend your ways.

.

Where did Bosch get his visual  images? .

Earlier pictures?.g. e. Dirk Bouts .

.

Literary sources? THE VISION LITERATURE i. .e. imaginary (visionary) visits to  the next world.

E. Aenead ‐ c.C.E. Apocalypses ‐ Peter (II century) Paul (III century) Hildegard of Bingen‐ Dante . 15 B.Visions: Gilgamesh ‐ c. 2000 B.C.

 through which wicked spirits  harried with fiery whips the souls of  those who.“And I saw a horrendous place. full of  fiery thorns and spikes and horrible  worms.” Hildegarde of Bingen (1098‐1179) . while they were in their  bodies in the world stood for all kinds of  Injustice.

 Heaven. Purgatory. . His  soul is guided by an angel. to  Hell. and  the rewards of penitence.The Vision of Tondal – 1149 An Irish Knight has a seizure. i.e. He learns the dangers of sin. a morality scenario.

  had his head down and his feet upwards to the upper teeth… Inextinguishable  flames  also  belched  forth  from  his  mouth.  His mouth was open  and  so  wide  that  it  seemed  to  him  that  it  could  contain  nine  thousand  men.  It was no wonder that both  the  crying  and  howling  of  the  multitude  in  his  stomach  were  heard  through his mouth since there were many thousands of men and women  atoning in dire torment inside. just the opposite.    Moreover.  In its enormous magnitude this beast exceeded all the mountains  he had ever seen.  in  his  mouth  he  had  two  very  unusual  parasites  with  turned heads.Vision of Tundale “After  they  had  labored  much  and  completed  the  shadowy  journey.  His eyes seemed like burning hills.    An  incomparable stink also came from his mouth.” .  and  into  this  flame  condemned  souls  were  compelled  to  enter. the other.  Tundale saw  an  incredibly  large  and  horrible  beast  not  far  from  them.  One of them had his head against the upper teeth of this  beast and his feet down to the lower teeth.

The only illustrated Tondal. . sister of  Richard III) a bibliophile. Illustrated by Simon Marmion. (Duchess of Burgundy.  in Ghent. Commissioned by Margaret of York. 1474.

.

Where is Bosch’s Vision of  Tondal? Lost? .

.

“The School of Bosch” .

.

Paintings collected by nobility and  royalty. Pieter Bruegel the Elder (1525‐69)  was his greatest imitator. .Bosch’s legacy Well‐known if not famous in his time. Many imitators – “School of Bosch”. Reputation spread by engravings.

.

.

Summary Hieronymus Bosch was uniquely  gifted. . inventing his own  surrealistic style.

Bosch had a moralizing outlook  on life. sarcasm. to analyze people’s  motivations and actions during a  turbulent time on the very eve of  THE REFORMATION. etc. allegory. .  parody. He used satire. more Medieval than  Renaissance.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->