Online shopping is the process whereby consumers directly buy goods or services from a seller in real-time, without

an intermediary service, over the Internet. If an intermediary service is present the process is called electronic commerce. An online shop, eshop, e-store, internet shop, webshop, webstore, online store, or virtual store evokes the physical analogy of buying products or services at abricksand-mortar retailer or in a shopping mall. The process is called Business-toConsumer (B2C) online shopping. When a business buys from another business it is called Business-to-Business (B2B) online shopping. Both B2C and B2B online shopping are forms of e-commerce. in 1990 Tim Berners-Lee created the first World Wide Web server and browser.[1] It opened for commercial use in 1991. In 1994 other advances took place, such as online banking and the opening of an online pizza shop by Pizza Hut.[1] During that same year, Netscape introduced SSL encryption of data transferred online, which has become essential for secure online shopping. Also in 1994 the German company Intershop introduced its first online shopping system. In 1995 Amazon launched its online shopping site, and in 1996 eBay appeared.[ In recent years, online shopping has become popular; however, it still caters to the middle and upper class. In order to shop online, one must be able to have access to a computer, a bank account and a debit card. Shopping has evolved with the growth of technology. According to research found in the Journal of Electronic Commerce, if one focuses on the demographic characteristics of the in-home shopper, in general, the higher the level of education, income, and occupation of the head of the household, the more favourable the perception of non-store shopping., Enrique.(2005) The Impact of Internet User Shopping Patterns and Demographics on Consumer Mobile Buying Behaviour. Journal of Electronic Commerce Research, An influential factor in consumer attitude towards non-store shopping is exposure to technology, since it has been demonstrated that increased exposure to technology increases the probability of developing favourable attitudes towards new shopping channels.[2] Online shopping widened the target audience to men and women of the middle class. At first, the main users of online shopping were young men with a high level of income and a university education. This profile is changing. For example, in USA in the early years of Internet there were very few women users, but by 2001 women were 52.8% of the online population.] Designers of online shops should

computer shopping enriches the information environment of virtual shopping by providing additional product information.consider the effects of information load.[9] . which can be the result of increased information diversity.[9] Two major sub-dimensions have been identified for information load: complexity and novelty. Mehrabian and Russel (1974) introduced the concept of information rate (load) as the complex spatial and temporal arrangements of stimuli within a setting. whereas the complexity dimension has the potential to induce impulse purchases. etc. as well as various alternatives and attributes of each alternative.[8] The notion of information load is directly related to concerns about whether consumers can be given too much information in virtual shopping environments. such as comparative products and services. suppressing.[10] Complexity refers to the number of different elements or features of a site. Novelty involves the unexpected. new. or unfamiliar aspects of the site. A research by Huang (2000) showed that the novelty dimension kept consumers exploring the shopping sites. Compared with conventional retail shopping.

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