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University of Mount Union Catalogue 2011-2012

University of Mount Union Catalogue 2011-2012

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Requirements for the Major in Economics

Required Economics Courses

Semester Hours

EC 200 Introduction to Microeconomics

3

EC 201 Introduction to Macroeconomics

3

EC 271 Quantitative Methods for Business*

3

EC 272 Business Statistics *

3

EC 360 Intermediate Microeconomics

3

EC 365 Intermediate Macroeconomics

3

97

EC 455 Seminar in Economics (SCE)

3

Any four additional economics courses at the 300 or 400 level

12

Required Departmental Courses

Semester Hours

BA 143 Integrating University and Life Options

1

BA 243 Exploring and Evaluation Life Options

1

BA 343 Pursuing Personal Life and Career Plans

1

AC 202 Financial Accounting

3

or
AC 205 Elementary Accounting I

3

Any one of the following courses

Semester Hours

BA 207 Beyond the Classroom: An International Experience

1

BA 208 Beyond the Classroom:
Social Entrepreneurship and Community Development

1

BA 209 Beyond the Classroom: A Professional Bridge

1

Required Extra-Departmental Courses

Semester Hours

MA 110 Introduction to Finite Mathematics*

3

EH 240W Business and Technical Writing

3

Total

46

*Note: Students may substitute MA120 for MA110 and may substitute MA141 for EC271. Students may also substitute MA 141, MA142, MA123 and
either EC436 or EC437 for the following group of courses: MA110, EC271, and EC272.

Any student choosing to obtain a major in economics will not be permitted to dual major in international business and economics.

**Note: EC 455 Seminar in Economics has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals majoring in economics.

Requirements for the Minor in Economics

Required Courses

Semester Hours

EC 105

Introduction to Economics

3

(designed for majors outside the Department of
Economics, Accounting and Business Administration)*
The completion of both EC 200 and EC 201
can substitute for EC 105.
One additional EC course numbered above EC 201

3

Three additional EC courses at the 300 level or above

9

(excluding EC 435)**

Total

15

The minor in economics is not available to those who major in international business and economics.

*Note: EC 105 can be substituted for both EC 200 and EC 201 as prerequisites for 300 and 400 level courses.
**Note: EC 271 and EC 272 are not eligible to be counted as courses in the economics minor.

Requirements for Honors in Economics

See page 37 for a detailed description of the requirements for graduating with honors in a major. Courses that may be taken for honors in economics
are the following: EC 310, EC 315, EC 327, EC 328, EC 330, EC 375QW, EC 380Q, EC 390, EC 425, EC 435, EC 455.

Course Descriptions

EC 105

Introduction to Economics. An introduction to the tools and techniques of economic analysis. Economics principles and concepts are
used to examine current problems such as pollution, surpluses, shortages, poverty, inflation and unemployment. Designed for majors outside the
Department of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration. May be substituted for both EC 200 and EC 201 as prerequisites for 300 and 400
level courses. Not open to students with credit for both EC 200 and EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. . {GenEd: II,C,3,a.}

EC 170 Quantitative Methods for Business and Economics I. Introduces material concerning systems of equations, matrix algebra and linear
programming as applied to economic and business analysis. Basic skills will be developed to provide the student with a sufficient background to
proceed with the study of more advanced topics. Emphasis of the material presented will be on business and economic applications including computer
solutions to real-world problems. Two lecture sessions and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on math placement exam
or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 172 Quantitative Methods for Business and Economics II. Introduces material concerning applied statistical tests, calculus and regression
analysis. This course will build on skills developed in EC 170 and MA 171. Emphasis of the material will be on business and economic applications,
including computer solutions to real-world problems. Two lecture sessions and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: EC 170 and MA 171. 3
Sem. Hrs.

EC 199 Special Topics in Economics. See All-University 199 course description on page 49.

98

EC 200 Introduction to Microeconomics. An introduction to economic principles and analytical tools needed to think intelligently about social
and economic problems. The course emphasizes concepts and principles and their use in analyzing current economic issues and the consequences of
various existing and proposed government policies. Prerequisite: at least 12 semester hours of college credit. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 201 Introduction to Macroeconomics. An introduction to the activities and impact of government, consumers and business firms on the
national economy including the determination of national income and the use of monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: EC 200, EH 100 and CM 101
or CM 102. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 271 Quantitative Methods for Business. An introduction to quadratic functions and their application to business and economics. A study of
limits, continuity, differentiation, and an introduction to indefinite and definite integrals, including applications to minimization and maximization
problems related to business and economics. Prerequisites: EC 200 (or concurrent) and MA 110, or MA 120, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics
placement examination. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 272 Business Statistics. An introduction to the essential concepts of statistics for economics, accounting and business majors. Concepts
reviewed may include descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling theory, estimation, hypothesis
testing and regression. Emphasizes business and economic applications including computer solutions to real-world business problems. Prerequisite: MA
141 or EC 271. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 299

Special Topics in Economics. See All-University 299 course description on page 49.

EC 310 Health Economics. This course examines how economic analysis can be applied to various components of the health care system.
Microeconomic theory is used to understand the operation of health care markets and the behavior of participants (consumers, insurers, physicians and
hospitals) in the health care industry. International comparisons and the role of the public sector will be included. Prerequisite: EC 105 or EC 200. 3 Sem.
Hrs.

EC 315

Money and Banking. A study of the nature and definition of money, the role of money in the macroeconomy, the supply of and
demand for money, the role of the Federal Reserve System in monetary policy, the deposit insurance system and recent controversies in monetary
theory. Prerequisite: EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 327

International Trade. The microeconomic aspects of international economics: the pure theory of trade, trade in intermediate goods,
trade with imperfect competition, tariffs, quotas, regional integration, multinational corporations and the North-South dialogue. Prerequisite: EC 201. 3
Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1.}

EC 328

International Monetary Economics. The macroeconomic aspects of international economics: foreign exchange rates, the balance of
payments, capital flows, international indebtedness and alternative international monetary systems. Prerequisite: EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1.}

EC 330 Economics of Gender. This course examines the impact of gender differences on economic opportunities, activities and rewards.
Economic issues emphasized are labor force participation, earnings, investment in human capital and gender segregation in the workplace. Cross-
societal comparisons also will be made. Prerequisites: EC 105 or EC 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2.}

EC 360

Intermediate Microeconomic Theory. Emphasizes the development of microeconomic theory and its use in explaining and predicting
certain types of real world phenomena. Topics covered include consumer behavior, economic decision making, prices, production, wages, resource
allocation and economic efficiency. Prerequisites: MA 123, and EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 365

Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory. Topics will include the analysis of consumption, investment and government spending;
monetary and fiscal policy; and the classical, Keynesian and Monetarist views of the macroeconomy. Prerequisites: MA 123, and EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 375QW Development Economics. A study of Third World development problems, such as poverty, inequality, debt burdens and rural
stagnation. Global interdependency and policies for management of food, energy, natural resources, technology and financial flows will be examined.
Prerequisites: EC 105 or EC 201 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1 and III,B.}

EC 380Q Comparative Economic Systems. An examination of the basic institutions of capitalism, socialism and communism from an economic
point of view. The course stresses the development and functioning of present varieties of these “isms.” Special emphasis is given to those countries of
the former Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe which are making the transition from centrally planned socialistic states to market economies.
Prerequisite: EC 105 or EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1 and III,B.}

EC 390

Economies of the Asian Pacific Rim. A survey of economic development in the economies of East Asia, focusing on Japan as the model
for the region, the four tigers – Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore and South Korea – and the newly industrializing economies of Thailand, Malaysia,
Indonesia and the Philippines. The course will include an economic analysis of the factors that contributed to the substantial growth in East Asia from
1960 to 1989 and the subsequent financial crisis that ensued in the 1990s. Prerequisites: EC 105 or EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1.}

EC 399

Special Topics in Economics. See All-University 399 course description on page 49.

EC 400

Independent Study – Economics. Involves the independent investigation of a problem in economics. Open to advanced students
majoring in economics. A prospectus must be submitted for approval prior to registration. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 425

Managerial Economics. A study of the various ways in which microeconomic principles and quantitative tools can be used to aid
managers in making sound decisions. Prerequisites: MA 123, and EC 200. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 435

Advanced Quantitative Tools for Business and Economics. This course will deal with a comprehensive survey of regression theory and
the statistical measurements used and problems incurred in economic modeling. It also will expose students to quantitative methods used in decision
making in business. Such topics as transportation modeling, queuing theory and simulation will be discussed. An emphasis will be placed on practical
applications in the business world. This course has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals majoring in business with a
concentration in quantitative analysis. Prerequisites: MA 123 and MA 141. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 436 Introduction to Econometrics. An introduction to basic econometric concepts and techniques with an emphasis on the empirical
analysis of applications in various fields. It covers linear regression with one regressor, linear regression with multiple regressors and some issues with
multivariate linear regression analysis. Software such as MS Excel, Eviews, and SPSS will be used in the course to carry out the computer-based exercises.
Prerequisites: MA 110 or above and MA 123 or EC 272. 3 Sem. Hrs.

99

EC 437 Operations Research. Modeling and graph theory with applications to linear programming, critical path analysis, transportation and
allocation problems and queuing theory. Prerequisites: EC 272 or MA123 and MA 141. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 450 Seminar in Labor. This seminar deals with the problems of labor relations and labor economics. Key issues dealt with are unemployment,
poverty, race relations and inflation. Current labor problems are emphasized. Prerequisites: EC 201 and MN 200. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 455 Seminar in Economics. An in-depth study of a few contemporary problems and issues such as poverty, welfare, discrimination, crime,
environmental abuse, government, energy and unemployment. Topics will be announced in advance. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis, discussion,
research and reporting. This course has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals majoring in economics. Prerequisites: EC
201 and MA 123 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EC 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49.

EC 499 Internship in Economics. An experience-based course in which students are placed in appropriate businesses or agencies where previous
classroom learning may be integrated with work in their major discipline. The exact location, program and method of education are provided in a
contract drawn between the student, the department faculty internship coordinator and the host internship supervisor. Specific restrictions apply.
Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. Will count as only one course towards the major or minor in economics. 1-15
Sem. Hrs.

Department of Education

The Department of Education’s Teacher Education Program is approved by the Ohio Department of Education for the preparation of competent,
capable and caring teachers in early childhood, middle childhood, intervention specialist, adolescence to young adult, and multiage licenses. Mount
Union’s Department of Education’s Teacher Education Program is also accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
(NCATE). Candidates are able to major and minor in early childhood (CE), middle childhood (ME) and intervention specialist (EI). Candidates are able to
minor in adolescence to young adult (AE) and multiage (M/A).
The early childhood major and license prepare candidates to work with typically developing and included children. The middle childhood major offers
a choice of four different areas of emphasis leading to licensure: language arts, science, social studies and mathematics. The middle childhood major
chooses two areas of emphasis in addition to a minor area of study. The intervention specialist major chooses one area of focus: early childhood
intervention specialist or mild/moderate intervention specialist. The early childhood intervention specialist teaching license is valid for teaching learners
with mild/moderate/intensive education needs from ages 3 through 8 and prekindergarten through grade three. The mild/moderate intervention
specialist teaching license is valid for teaching learners with mild/moderate education needs from ages 5 through 21 and kindergarten through grade 12.
The adolescence to young adult minor, when taken with an appropriate major, offers programs leading to licensure in the following areas: earth science
(geology major); physical science (chemistry/physics major); life science (biology major); integrated mathematics (mathematics major); integrated
language arts (English literature or writing major); and integrated social studies (history major). The multiage minor, when taken with an appropriate
major, leads to licensure in the following areas: French, German, Japanese, Spanish, music, health, physical education and visual arts. In all programs, the
candidate is prepared to meet the requirements for the appropriate Ohio Provisional License. The early and middle childhood generalist and K-12
reading endorsements are available. Licensure course requirements are available in the Teacher Education Program office or on the Teacher Education
Program website.

In order to meet the requirements for licensure in all programs, it is critical that the candidate begins the professional education sequence during the
second semester of the freshman year and scrupulously follows the sequences for the appropriate major, minor and general education requirements.
Field experience begins in the spring semester of the freshman year. In order to provide a rich experience, placements are made in varied school and
community agency settings. It is recommended that candidates have access to their own automobiles. All field experience placements are within a 35
mile radius requirement.

Candidates interested in teaching in other states should contact the state Department of Education of the other state(s), for information on reciprocity
and other licensure information. Assistance to teacher education candidates and graduates seeking teaching positions is provided by the Teacher
Education Program office.

In addition to meeting and maintaining the requirements for admission and continuance in the Teacher Education Program (TEP) and for course
requirements and field experiences for the licensure area, teacher candidates must meet the Ohio qualifying scores on PRAXIS II examinations (Principles
of Learning and Teaching (PLT) and Subject Assessments/Specialty Area Tests).

Introduction to the Department of Education’s Teacher Education Program and Licensure Requirements

The Deparment of Education’s Teacher Education Program at the University of Mount Union is based on the guidelines suggested by the Ohio
Department of Education, the Ohio Board of Regents and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). The Teacher Education
Program is guided by a conceptual framework that gives the program “an underlying structure…that gives conceptual meanings through an articulated
rationale to the unit’s operation and provides direction for programs, courses, teaching, candidate performance, scholarship service and unit
accountability” (NCATE, 2008). Mount Union’s Teacher Education Program’s Conceptual Framework focuses on its theme, candidate performance,
program areas and commitments to diversity, technology and assessment.
The theme, Caring Teachers Live What They Believe, has its roots in the synthesized “We Believe” statements collected from Teacher Education
Program faculty, teacher candidates, members of our partner schools and other professional community members. The Teacher Education Program
Advisory Council, Unit Governance Committee, Kappa Delta Pi and SNEA interacted with various drafts of the conceptual framework. This allowed input
from teacher candidates and cooperating teachers, as well as other constituents from our partner schools. Fundamental to understanding the theme is
Martin Haberman’s (1995) belief that only decent people can be prepared to teach, Nel Noddings’ (1995) understanding of the ethic of care, Mount
Union’s mission statement and the Teacher Education Program’s 11 common goals.
The Teacher Education Program has established criteria for candidate performance. Key elements in understanding Mount Union’s Teacher Education
Program’s teacher candidates’ performance are the descriptors competent, capable and caring.
• Competent reflects our commitment to grounding our teacher candidates in knowledge of content, pedagogy and child development
appropriate to each area of licensure.
• Capable reflects the nexus of theory to practice. This criterion refers to the Department of Education’s teacher candidates’ ability to apply
the theories regarding instructional techniques, classroom management, reflection and the varying needs of students in microteaching
situations as well as actual school settings.

100

• Caring reflects the disposition that is most essential to the theme, Caring Teachers Live What They Believe. Our teacher candidates must
demonstrate that they are committed to service and to the betterment of children’s lives.
The Teacher Education Program licensure programs are aligned with state, national and international standards. Licensure standards ensure that only
those teachers who can perform the work will do the work. The standards emphasize performance from the time a teacher enters the classroom
throughout his or her career. The ultimate benefit of this new direction is a better education for Ohio’s students.
These standards increase the rigor in the teaching profession because they:
1. strengthen Ohio’s teacher preparation programs.
2. require successful performance of beginning teachers.
3. achieve higher standards through licensure.
4. intensify professional development.
Licensure requirements are subject to the authority of the Ohio State Department of Education and Ohio law. All program curricula, requirements and
policies are subject to change given the nature of the ongoing review process between Mount Union and the Ohio Department of Education.

Teacher Education Program Mission and Goals

The Department of Education’s Teacher Education Program’s mission statement is derived from the vision expressed in the University’s mission
statement, but it offers a version more particular to the preparation of teacher candidates.
The Department of Education’s Teacher Education Program at Mount Union prepares candidates for meaningful careers in the field of education.
Building upon a solid liberal arts foundation, the Teacher Education Program assists candidates in developing knowledge, skills and dispositions
necessary to become effective and caring teachers in an ever-changing society. The Teacher Education Program’s candidates are prepared to become
reflective, lifelong learners.

This mission is realized for all candidates through the attainment of 11 common goals that are aligned with Ohio Teacher Education and Licensure
Standards, INTASC, PRAXIS and NCATE Program standards. The Teacher Education Program has established programs in early childhood, middle
childhood, intervention specialist, adolescence to young adult and multiage education to assist candidates to:
1. develop an understanding of subject matter areas and to create meaningful learning experiences based on this knowledge.
2. develop an understanding of students’ cognitive, social, physical and emotional development and to create learning opportunities that
support student academic development.
3. recognize and value student diversity and the differences in how students learn and provide instruction to accommodate such diversity.
4. develop instructional plans based on students’ needs, curricular goals and models, subject matter and community.
5. develop pedagogical knowledge and skills and to use this expertise to encourage each student to develop critical-thinking and problem-

solving skills.

6. create a classroom environment that facilitates learning and a climate that encourages fairness, positive social interactions, active
learning and self-motivation.
7. develop effective verbal, nonverbal, written, technological and media communication skills to support and enhance student learning.
8. understand the role of assessment and the use of formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate student learning.
9. develop skills necessary for self-reflection and to use this knowledge to analyze past experiences and to pursue professional
development opportunities.
10. collaborate with students, candidates, parents, community members and professional colleagues in order to support student learning
and development.
11. demonstrate a sense of caring.
Performance-based assessments are used to monitor candidates’ performances and to determine the extent to which candidates meet goals and
standards. The predominant assessment tool relied upon in the Teacher Education Program is the candidate’s assessment profile. The assessment
profile is used as a continuous record keeping system not only for individual candidates but also to determine and to re-examine trends in candidate
development within and across programs. The assessment profile documents candidates’ successful development of content, pedagogical and
professional knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Information from the assessment profile is gathered at transition
points to document goal attainment with the aim of becoming competent, capable and caring teachers. The transition points are program admission,
entry into clinical practice, exit from clinical practice and program completion.

Program Admission

Transition point one, program admission, is the entry stage into the Teacher Education Program. Candidates must be admitted into the Teacher
Education Program in order to take 300-level and 400-level education courses. In order to be accepted into the program, the prospective teacher must
possess certain personal and professional characteristics. For purposes of admission, the standards are as follows: signatures on the Mount Union
Student Code of Conduct and Good Moral Character statements: a minimum of 50 semester hours; the Teacher Education Program application;
declaration of a major/minor and have an advisor assigned in major; a minimum 2.5 overall GPA; EH 100, EH 100I or EH 120, CM 101 or CM 102, MA 110 or
higher with a course grade no lower than C- and a minimum grade of C+ in ED 150; a minimum grade of C in 200-level (AE, CE, ME and EI) courses for the
appropriate program; a minimum grade of C in PY 210; satisfactory field evaluations; evidence of good moral character; positive references including
ones from the advisor and from the vice president for student affairs; no record verification from the Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation
(BCI & I); successful completion of Assessment Profile I; and Specialized Professional Association (SPA) requirements completed. Multiage minors must
meet all course grade requirements. Refer to the specific course requirements in the major section of the Catalogue. Bachelor of music education degree
candidates are required to complete ME 200 and must be approved by the music faculty at the Sophomore Evaluation for continuance in the degree
program. Intervention specialist majors must receive a minimum score of 24 on the Multiple Environment Analysis assignment. Post-baccalaureate
candidates must pass the PRAXIS II Subject Assessments/Specialty Area Tests and/or the Principles of Learning and Teaching Tests (PLT). Transfer
candidates must meet all criteria at each transition point.
The candidate must achieve the acceptable level in Assessment Profile I. In order to complete this level, the candidate must successfully complete
specific and prescribed artifacts that demonstrate acceptable development of the 11 Teacher Education Program goals. Through the use of the
assessment profile, the candidate demonstrates growth in developing content, professional and pedagogical knowledge, skills and dispositions.

Entry into Clinical Practice

The next transition point of candidate assessment takes place prior to admission into clinical practice. Coursework, field/clinical experience

101

evaluations, successful completion of Praxis II Tests and Assessment Profile II are key indicators at this juncture. To be eligible for clinical practice, the
candidate must have been admitted into the Teacher Education Program, submitted a clinical practice application and must have met the following
requirements: maintained admission into the Teacher Education Program; a minimum of 88 semester hours; the clinical practice application; a minimum
overall 2.5 GPA; a minimum major 2.5 GPA (80 percent coursework completed in AYA and MA; 100 percent in CE, ME and EI); all middle childhood
specialty area coursework completed with a minimum of 2.0 GPA; a minimum grade of C in 200-level, 300-level and 400-level (AE, CE, ED, ME and EI)
courses for the appropriate program; a minimum grade of C in CS 218 (all programs except BME); attained a minimum grade of C in MU 430 (BME only);
successful completion of PRAXIS II Subject Assessments/Specialty Areas Tests and the Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) PRAXIS II tests; positive
references; successful completion of Preclinical Impact Unit; satisfactory field evaluations; evidence of good moral character; successful completion of
Assessment Profile II; no record verification from the Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI & I); Specialized Professional Associations
(SPA) requirements completed; and multiage minors must meet all course grade requirements. Refer to the specific course requirements in the major
section of the Catalogue. In Assessment Profile II, the candidate must achieve an acceptable level in all 11 Teacher Education Program goals as well as to
demonstrate a commitment to technology, a commitment to diversity and an impact on P-12 students. This provides documentation of the candidate’s
growth and development of becoming a competent, capable and caring teacher.

Exit from Clinical Practice

At the next transition point, exiting clinical practice, the candidates are commonly assessed by data gathered from clinical practice evaluations and
the assessment profile. These assessments are utilized to assess the candidates’ proficiencies to deliver content; to use the pedagogical, professional
knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to help all students to learn; to positively impact all students; and to exhibit a sense of caring.
In Assessment Profile III, the candidate demonstrates that he/she has performed on the acceptable level during clinical practice all 11 Teacher
Education Program goals, a commitment to technology, a commitment to diversity and an impact on P-12 students. In addition to Assessment Profile III,
additional requirements for exiting clinical practice are as follows: maintained admission in the Teacher Education Program; a minimum 2.5 overall GPA;
successful completion of clinical practice; satisfactory clinical practice evaluations; positive references; successful completion of Assessment Profile III; no
record verification from the Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI & I); and Specialized Professional Assocations (SPA) requirements
completed. Multiage candidates must meet all course grade requirements. Refer to the specific course requirement in the major section of the
Catalogue.

Program Completion

The final transition point for candidates in Mount Union’s Teacher Education Program is program completion. The focus of this period is to ensure
that the candidate has developed content, pedagogical and professional knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to help all students to learn. The
requirements at this transition point are as follows: maintained admission in the TEP; an approved BA, BS or BME degree; successful completion of the
Professional Development Plan (if applicable); a minimum 2.5 overall GPA; a minimum 2.5 GPA in major with all content complete; a minimum grade of C
in all additional licensure requirements; the satisfactory completion of all portions of PRAXIS II (ex: middle childhood endorsement); caring teacher
philosophy statement; professional portfolio; positive references; no record verification from the Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI
& I) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI); and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) requirements completed. Multiage candidates must
meet all course grade requirements. Refer to the specific course requirements in the major section of the Catalogue.

Teacher Education Program Monitoring

In order to be accepted into, to continue in or exit from the Teacher Education Program at each transition point, the candidate must document the
completion of all requirements for that particular transition point. The Teacher Education Program Administrative Support Analyst documents all
qualifications and the completion of transition-point requirements. All updated information is maintained in a candidate database and file. In order to
ensure equity, all of the candidates’ applications (traditional undergraduates, transfers and post-baccalaureates) will be formally reviewed during a
Subcommittee on Teacher Education meeting held in January, May August or December. The Department of Education chair will notify each candidate
in writing via a formal letter of the status of the decision.

Due Process

In order to eliminate bias and to ensure a fair and equitable practice, all candidates (traditional undergraduates, transfers and post-baccalaureates) will
be formally reviewed during a Subcommittee on Teacher Education meeting. Based on the recommendations of the subcommittee, the Department of
Education chair notifies candidates in writing if they are permitted or not permitted to advance to the next transition point. An individual conferences
will be scheduled with the candidate if requested. If the candidate wishes to submit new or additional information that had not been considered when
the application was reviewed, he/she may submit an appeal in writing to the Subcommittee on Teacher Education. The appeal must be submitted to the
Teacher Education Program office within the time frame determined by the Subcommittee on Teacher Education and prior to the next scheduled
meeting. The candidate will be notified in writing within 30 days of the receipt of appeal regarding the status of the decision.

Retention in the Teacher Education Program

All candidates must demonstrate satisfactory progress toward completion of licensure at each transition point. All requirements are indicators of
growth in becoming a competent, capable and caring teacher. If a candidate is not making satisfactory progress as described in the assessment plan at
each transition point, the candidate will be notified of his/her suspension and/or removal from the Teacher Education Program. During this time, the
candidate works with his/her education advisor. The candidate may reapply for readmission upon meeting the prescribed requirements. The candidate
has the right to submit an appeal in writing to the Subcommittee on Teacher Education. The appeal must be submitted to the Teacher Education
Program office within the time frame determined by the Subcommittee on Teacher Education and prior to the next scheduled meeting. The candidate
will be notified in writing of recommendations within 30 days of the receipt of appeal.

Higher Education Report Card

The Higher Education Report Card is a federal requirement of Title II for all colleges and universities offering teacher preparation. Mount Union is
proud to announce that in the eleventh year of reporting, the 2009-2010 academic class of new teachers continued to perform successfully on PRAXIS II
tests required to obtain licensure. This information will continue to serve as a benchmark as the University builds upon its rich tradition of preparing new
educators.

102

Requirements for the Major in Early Childhood Education

Required Courses

Semester Hours

ED 150W Foundations of Education

3

CE 200

Introduction to Early Childhood Education

3

CE 250

Education of Young Children

3

CE 315

Teaching Social Studies to Young Children

3

CE 320

Teaching Mathematics to Young Children

3

CE 322

Family-Community Collaboration

1

CE 335

Teaching Science to Young Children

3

CE 325

Teaching Emergent Readers and Writers

3

CE 345

Content Area Reading and Writing Instruction in

3

Early Childhood Education
CE 380W Classroom Structures and Behavior Management

3

CE 411

Best Practice in Eartly Childhood Education

3

CE 465

Preclinical and Best Practice in Early Childhood

2

Total

33

Additional coursework is necessary for licensure.

Requirements for the Minor in Early Childhood Education

Required Courses

Semester Hours

ED 150W Foundations of Education

3

CE 200

Introduction to Early Childhood Education

3

CE 250

Education of Young Children

3

CE 380W Classroom Structures and Behavior Management

3

Any One from the Following Courses

Semester Hours

CE 315

Teaching Social Studies to Young Children

3

CE 320

Teaching Mathematics to Young Children

3

CE 335

Teaching Science to Young Children

3

Total

15

Requirements for the Major in Middle Childhood Education

Required Courses

Semester Hours

ED 150W Foundations of Education

3

ME 200W Introduction to Middle School

3

ME 250

Middle School Community Field Experience/Seminar

1

ME 325

Teaching Reading and Writing in the Middle School

3

ME 345

Content Area Reading and Writing in the Middle School 3

ME 350

Middle School Field Experience/Seminar

1

ME 411

Best Practice in Middle Childhood Education

3

ME 465

Preclinical Practice – Middle School

2

Any Two from the Following Courses

Semester Hours

(which relate directly to the teacher candidate’s chosen areas of emphasis)
ME 315

Teaching Social Studies in the Middle School

3

ME 320

Teaching Mathematics in the Middle School

3

ME 335

Teaching Science in the Middle School

3

ED 340

Phonics, Processes and the Structure of Language

3

(only language arts area of emphasis).

Total

25

Additional coursework is required for licensure.

Requirements for the Minor in Middle Childhood Education

Required Courses

Semester Hours

ED 150W Foundations of Education

3

ME 200W Introduction to Middle School

3

ME 250

Middle School Community Field Experience/Seminar

1

ME 345

Content Area Reading and Writing in the Middle School 3

Any Two from the Following Courses

Semester Hours

ME 315

Teaching Social Studies in the Middle School

3

ME 320

Teaching Mathematics in the Middle School

3

103

ME 325

Teaching Reading and Writing in the Middle School

3

ME 335

Teaching Science in the Middle School

3

Total

16

Requirements for the Major in Intervention Specialist

Required Courses

Semester Hours

ED 150W Foundations of Education

3

CE 200

Introduction to Early Childhood Education

3

CE 322

Family-Community Collaboration

1

EI 200

Introduction to Intervention Specialist

3

EI 205

Language Acquisition, Behavior and Disability

3

EI 210

Low Incidence Exceptionalities

3

EI 300

The Family and Child with a Disability

2

EI 310

Intervention Specialist General Curriculum

3

EI 330

Intervention Specialist General Methods

3

EI 400

Behavior Management

3

EI 411

Best Practice in Intervention Specialist

3

EI 465

Preclinical and Best Practice in Intervention Specialist

2

Total

32

Additional coursework is required for licensure.

Requirements for the Minor in Intervention Specialist

Required Courses

Semester Hours

ED 150W Foundations of Education

3

EI 200

Introduction to Intervention Specialist

3

EI 205

Language Acquisition, Behavior and Disability

3

EI 210

Low Incidence Exceptionalities

3

EI 310

Intervention Specialist General Curriculum

3

Total

15

Requirements for the Minor in Adolescence to Young Adult Education

Required Courses

Semester Hours

ED 150W Foundations of Education

3

AE 201

Introduction to Adolescent Education

3

AE 262

Conceptual Issues Related to Teaching Adolescents

3

AE 372

Assessment, Instructional Design and Evaluation

3

of Adolescent Education

AE 465

Preclinical Practice – Adolescence to Young Adult

2

Any One from the Following Courses

Semester Hours

AE 350

Teaching Social Studies Methods

3

AE 360

Teaching Science Methods

3

EH 300

Teaching Writing

3

MA 395

The Teaching of Mathematics

3

Total

17

Additional coursework is required for licensure. Those not desiring to do clinical practice or pursue a license may substitute ED 355 or another
approved education course for AE 465.
Each licensure area also requires coursework in disciplines other than education. This additional coursework should be carefully chosen and scheduled
to fulfill general education requirements (or other University requirements) when appropriate. Please refer to Catalogue listings of specific department
course grade requirements. It is essential that a candidate wishing to minor in education consult an advisor in the Department of Education early in the
first year at Mount Union.

Requirements for the Minor in Multiage Education

Required Courses

Semester Hours

ED 150W Foundations of Education

3

ME 200W Introduction to Middle School

3

AE 262

Conceptual Issues Related to Teaching Adolescents

3

AE 372

Assessment, Instructional Design and Evaluation in

3

Adolescent Education
CE 332 Developmentally Appropriate Practice for Multiage

3

Areas

ED 355

Content Area Reading

3

104

Total

18

Additional coursework is required for licensure.

Each licensure area also requires coursework in disciplines other than education. This additional coursework should be carefully chosen and scheduled
to fulfill general education requirements (or other University requirements) when appropriate. Please refer to Catalogue listings of specific department
course grade requirements. It is essential that a candidate wishing to minor in education consult an advisor in the Department of Education early in the
first year at Mount Union.

Requirements for Honors in Education

Candidates are eligible to enter the Honors Program in education if they have at least a 3.5 grade-point average in their education major, education
minor or permission from the Honors Review Board.
To receive honors in education, a candidate must have at least a 3.5 grade-point average at graduation and honors credit in courses that total a
minimum of 12 semester hours. For permission to register for an honors course, a completed application form must be filed with the director of honors
programs by the end of the 12th week of classes of the semester prior to taking the course. Candidates must earn a “B+” or higher in their honor courses
to earn honors credit. Either CE 410, ME 410 or EI 410 is a requirement for honors in education. Candidates may take any 300 level or above courses for
honors in education.

Adolescence to Young Adult Course Descriptions

AE 201

Introduction to Adolescent Education. This course focuses on the modern secondary school from the perspective of structure,
curricular learning, teacher and student. Emphasis is placed upon the role of the secondary teacher and how he/she affects the education and
development of the adolescent. Issues of race, gender, diversity and their impact on the modern secondary school will be studied. Twenty clock hours
of field experience in a secondary school are required. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

AE 262

Conceptual Issues Related to Teaching Adolescents. The professional practice of the secondary teacher is examined in this course.
Candidates analyze the various roles that are now used to define exemplary teaching performance. These include: lifelong learner, collaborator, problem
solver, communicator, group member, decision maker, value analyzer, integrator of instructional design, thinker, organizer, leader, risk taker and
reflective practitioner. Twenty clock hours of field experience in a secondary school are required. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester)

AE 335

Methods in Adolescent Education. This is a multidisciplinary methods course for candidates who are preparing to teach in adolescence
to young adult programs. Content includes: theories, models and strategies for teaching diverse learners, planning instruction, creating effective
learning environments and collaboration with parents and other professionals. Emphasis is placed on helping the candidate to develop the professional
knowledge base necessary for success in accordance with the requirements of state and other educational agencies. Twenty clock hours of field
experience in a secondary school are required. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs.

AE 350

Teaching Social Studies to Adolescents. Using NCSS/NCATE and Ohio Model guidelines as the framework, candidates focus on
establishing and maintaining learning environments that provide all students with an interdisciplinary understanding of social studies. Background for
teaching social studies, instructional strategies, classroom management, planning instruction, assessment and professional development will be
covered. The candidate will integrate the social studies content with inquiry processes that result in development of life-long problem solving skills. To
be taken prior to or concurrently with preclinical practice. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall
semester)

AE 360 Teaching Science to Adolescents. A national and state standards-based study of objectives, content, materials, technology and
methods of instruction essential to the teaching of science to adolescent to young adult students is undertaken. It will stress discovery, inquiry and
process-oriented science and will include an overview of current science curricula materials, classroom methodology and management regarding the
teaching of science for all types of learners, ideas about science/technology/society and examples of science activities. Candidates will be exposed to
science education philosophy, hands-on experiences with science equipment and materials and alternatives for sciencing in different classroom
situations. Successful completion of 20 clock hours of field experience in a secondary school is required. Prerequisites: Admission into the Teacher
Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

AE 372

Assessment, Instructional Design and Evaluation in Adolescent Education. This course builds on the “theory base” developed in AE
335. Assessment techniques and standards are examined for their roles in the planning of instruction. Portfolios, performance-based assessments,
rubrics, essential questions and understanding, validity, context and authenticity are included. Planning, evaluating and the integrating of instruction
are also incorporated. Clinical experiences are conducted in the classroom. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs.
(typically offered spring semester)

AE 405W Advanced Techniques of Instructional Management. This course introduces candidates to a wide variety of tested strategies, activities
and tools for creating positive dynamic learning environments. Research-based principles including the most recent information on brain-compatible
teaching is incorporated. Current theories and models of classroom management including “assertive discipline,” “choice theory” and “building
community” are incorporated with a goal of helping candidates proactively address common disciplinary issues before they become major problems.
Strategies for working with “parents as partners” are also incorporated. Assignments are specific to the candidate’s individual licensure area. This course
should be taken concurrently with preclinical practice. Prerequisite: appropriate methods course(s) in licensure area. 3 Sem. Hrs.

AE 465 Preclinical Practice – Adolescence to Young Adult. In this course, the candidate spends 12-13 hours per week for seven to eight weeks
(90 hours) in a secondary school setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to the preclinical
practitioner’s major field of study. The preclinical practitioner is a teaching assistant and works closely with school personnel in non-instructional, clinical
and instructional activities designed to promote readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group
seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator and include preparation of the portfolio (PORT II). The preclinical practitioner will make a
choice of completing preclinical practice in a diverse or non-diverse setting. Clinical practice will be completed in the opposite setting. The course is
graded S/U. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester)

AE 466

Multiage Preclinical Practice – Adolescence to Young Adult. In this course, the candidate spends 12-13 hours per week for seven to
eight weeks (90 hours) in a secondary school setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to the preclinical
practitioner’s major field of study. The preclinical practitioner is a teaching assistant and works closely with school personnel in non-instructional, clinical

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and instructional activities designed to promote readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group
seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator and include preparation of the portfolio (PORT II). The preclinical practitioner will make a
choice of completing preclinical practice in a diverse or non-diverse setting. Clinical practice will be completed in the opposite setting. The course is
graded S/U. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester)

AE 470

Clinical Practice – Adolescence to Young Adult. The candidate assumes all responsibilities of teaching in a secondary school setting
from the first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester. This course is graded S/U. Group seminars are arranged by the field placement
coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s setting for clinical practice (diverse or nondiverse) will be the opposite of the preclinical choice. Prerequisite:
Admission into Clinical Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester)

AE 471

Clinical Practice – Adolescence to Young Adult (Multiage). The candidate assumes all responsibilities of teaching in a secondary
school setting from the first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester. This course is graded S/U. Group seminars are arranged by the
field placement coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s setting for clinical practice (diverse or non-diverse) will be the opposite of the preclinical choice.
Offered every semester. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs.

Early Childhood Course Descriptions

CE 200

Introduction to Early Childhood Education. An introduction to the field of early childhood education, based on standards set by the
National Association for Education of Young Children (NAEYC), includes the diversity of its historical and disciplinary roots; an in-depth study of
developmentally appropriate practice (DAP) including how it is informed, implemented and evaluated; and a review of the Code of Ethical Behavior. The
inclusivity of DAP, as informed by guidelines set by the Council for Exceptional Children(CEC), will also be studied. Prerequisite: ED 150W. 3 Sem Hrs.

CE 250

Education of Young Children. Examination is made of the legislation and public policy that influence early childhood education. This
course introduces candidates, in collaboration with parents and other professionals, to the development of IEPs (Individual Education Plans) and IFSPs
(Initial Family Service Plans), allowing them to play an initial role in interagency collaboration, referral and consultation. Candidates learn the
relationship of IEPs and IFSPs to curriculum and early childhood practice. Thirty clock hours of field experience in an inclusion kindergarten are required.
Prerequisite: CE 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester)

CE 315

Teaching Social Studies to Young Children. The candidate explores methods of teaching the social sciences to young children
between the ages of 3 and 8, drawing upon Ohio’s Model Competency-Based Program and “Expectations of Excellence” and the National Council for the
Social Studies (NCSS) curriculum standards. These serve as guidelines for interdisciplinary and multicultural lesson design. The incorporation of history,
civics and geographical themes, in addition to appropriate use of children’s literature and technological resources in the designing of units, lessons and
assessment to meet the needs of a variety of learners, will also be studied. If not taken concurrently with SO 311, 20 clock hours of community agency
and family field experience are required. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

CE 320

Teaching Mathematics to Young Children. This course includes a national and state standards-based study of the goals, content,
material, technology and methods of teaching mathematics to young children between the ages of 3 and 8. Emphasis is placed on the young child’s
natural mathematical development. Lessons are created based on play-centered activities, student exploration and ongoing assessment. Mathematical
content for the young child is integrated throughout the course. A minimum of 20 clock hours of primary grade field experience is required to enhance
in-class activities. Prerequisites: Completion of one mathematics course within the General Education Requirements and admission into the Teacher
Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

CE 322

Family – Community Collaboration. This is a one-week intensive placement in collaboration with a family of a young child receiving
special services through a county board of mental retardation or a public school system. The primary focus is to provide candidates with the opportunity
to observe, create and use communication and appropriate assessment strategies for the diverse needs of learners, families and communities. Through
guided reflective journals, candidates will demonstrate respect for the reciprocity in collaborative relationships. Prerequisites: Admission into the
Teacher Education Program. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered every semester)

CE 325

Teaching Emergent Readers and Writers. This course offers a study of theories of language acquisition and the development of
narrative reading and writing. Attention is given to issues, purpose, materials, technology and processes for teaching emergent and early reading and
writing. A firm knowledge base and skills in planning, delivery and assessment of content based on Ohio Department of Education’s Competency-Based
Language Arts model are developed. This course is designed to provide students with a theoretical foundation in the teaching of the language arts
strands (reading, writing, listening, viewing, visual representation and speaking). These strands are seen as interactive processes through texts and trade
books in a rich literacy environment. The impact on individual differences on emergent reading and writing is emphasized. Primary grade field
experiences are required. CE 345 and ED 340 should be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs.
(typically offered spring semester)

CE 326 Teaching Emergent Literacy. A study of the theories, purposes, materials, technology, and processes for teaching reading and writing in
preschool and primary school. Emphasis is on emergent literacy development and the developmental process that is influenced by various factors and is
sensitive to individual differences (diversity, exceptionalities). Field experiences in primary and preschool levels. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher
Education Program and ME 325. 3 Sem. Hrs.

CE 332

Developmentally Appropriate Practice for Multiage Areas. The centrality of play and integration of the Ohio Models are emphasized
in the course. Learning the key elements of the fine arts of drama, music, creative movement, dance and visual arts as well as physical education
appropriate for young children is enhanced in the course for candidates pursuing multiage licenses. Not required for BME candidates. Prerequisite:
Admission into the Teacher Education Program and senior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

CE 335

Teaching Science to Young Children. A national and state standards-based study of objectives, content, materials, technology and
methods of instruction essential to the teaching of science to young children between the ages of 3 and 8 is undertaken. Emphasis is placed on lesson
development based on play-centered activities, exploration and hands-on experiences. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in one or completion of
two science courses (one physical and one life) within the General Education Requirements and admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem.
Hrs. (typically offered spring semester)

CE 340 Teaching Mathematics and Science in the Elementary School. This course focuses on the integration of mathematics and science in
the elementary school (grades 4 and 5). It addresses the Ohio Academic Content Standards and Teacher Education Program goals. Candidates will

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explore the dynamic context and needs of mathematics and science classrooms, and design engaging lessons that integrate mathematics and science,
including the use of inquiry and technology to meet the needs of diverse learners (e.g. ELL exceptionalities, learning styles, etc). Field experience is
required in order to complete course assignments. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs.

CE 345 Content Area Reading and Writing Instruction in Early Childhood Education. A study of the emerging process of expository reading
and writing. This course reviews the methods, material, technology and study skills applicable to content area reading and writing for young children
between the ages of 3 and 8. A firm knowledge base and skills in planning, delivery and assessment based on the Ohio Department of Education’s
Competency-Based Language Arts model are developed. A focus on the understanding of interaction of language arts strands as influenced by various
factors and sensitive to the individual differences (cultural, linguistic, gender and exceptionalities) is made. Special emphasis is placed on themed
curriculum and integrating various types of literature in the content areas. Primary grade field experiences are required. CE 325 and ED 340 should be
taken concurrently. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester)

CE 350 Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies in the Elementary School. This course focuses on the integration of language arts and
social studies in the elementary school (grades 4 and 5). It addresses the Ohio Academic Content Standards and Teacher Education Program goals.
Candidates will explore the dynamic context and needs of language arts and social studies classrooms and design engaging lessons that integrate
language arts and social studies, including the use of literature and technology to meet the needs of diverse learners (e.g. ELL exceptionalities, learning
styles, etc). Field experience is required in order to complete course assignments. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem.
Hrs.

CE 370 Early Childhood-Meeting Individual Needs in Reading. Understanding of the assessment process and various assessment approaches,
procedures useful in assessment and diagnosis and the remediation of reading, writing and language problems are emphasized. Special attention is
given to portfolio usage, performance assessment and the alignment of assessment with curriculum and instruction. A focus on the diverse and
exceptional needs of students is included. The field experience includes an intensive case study which incorporates reading assessment, diagnosis, and
remediation of a school-aged student. Field experience with a primary grade student is required. Prerequisite: CE 325 or CE345. Admission into the
Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs.

CE 380W Classroom Structures and Behavior Management. This course considers theories, basic principles and procedures of classroom
structure and behavior management. Management of inclusion settings also is addressed. Behavioral assessment, self-assessment and self-control skills
are emphasized. A sensitivity to possible differences between classroom behavioral expectations and the home environment is developed.
Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. Corequisite: CE 465. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

CE 410 Research Design. This course affords students the opportunity to participate in the community of scientific research and scholarship in
education as part of their University experience. It furthers excellence in performance and achievement while drawing from and developing scientific
capabilities in a broad spectrum. Students engage in proposing an original piece of research along with a pilot study and/or actual research, which will
be presented in a public forum. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs.

CE 411 Best Practices in Early Childhood Education. Emphasis in the course is placed on “best practice” teaching that is aligned with the
NAEYC standards through Developmentally Appropriate Practice. The course focus is on teacher decision making that draws on three bodies of
knowledge: what teachers know about how children develop and learn, what teachers know about the individual children in their group and knowledge
of the social and cultural context in which those children live and learn. Early childhood majors must take this course concurrently with CE 465. This
course is the SCE for early childhood majors. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program and senior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically
offered fall semester)

CE 465 Preclinical Practice - Early Childhood. In this course the candidate spends 12-13 hours per week for seven to eight weeks (90 hours) in
a preschool, kindergarten or primary grade setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to early childhood
education. The candidate is a teaching assistant and works closely with school personnel in instructional, clinical and non-instructional activities
designed to promote readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group seminars are arranged by
the field placement coordinator. This course is graded S/U. The preclinical practitioner will make a choice of completing preclinical practice in a diverse
or non-diverse setting. Clinical practice will be completed in the opposite setting. The early childhood education candidates will provide artifacts of their
individual practice in regards to the National Association for the Education of Young Children’s (NAEYC) Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP).
This course is taken concurrently with CE 411. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

CE 466 Multiage Preclinical Practice – Early Childhood. In this course the candidate spends 12-13 hours per week for seven to eight weeks (90
hours) in a preschool, kindergarten or primary grade setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to the
candidate’s major field of study. The candidate is a teaching assistant and works closely with school personnel in non-instructional, clinical and
instructional activities designed to promote readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group
seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator and include preparation of the portfolio (PORT II) as well as workshops in identification of
communicable diseases, abuse and neglect and first aid and CPR. This course is graded S/U and is taken concurrently with CE 380W only for early
childhood majors and CE 332 for applicable multiage minors. The preclinical practitioner will make a choice of completing preclinical practice in a diverse
or non-diverse setting. Clinical practice will be completed in the opposite setting. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem.
Hrs. (typically offered every semester)

CE 470

Clinical Practice - Early Childhood Education. The candidate assumes all responsibilities of teaching in a kindergarten through grade 3
setting from the first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester. This course is graded S/U and is required for early childhood licensure.
Group seminars to enable collaboration, evaluation and reflection are arranged by the field placement coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s setting for
clinical practice (diverse or non-diverse) will be the opposite of the preclinical choice. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical
Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs.

CE 471

Clinical Practice - Early Childhood Education (Multiage). The candidate assumes all responsibilities of teaching in a kindergarten
through grade 3 setting from the first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester. This course is graded S/U. Group seminars to enable
collaboration, evaluation and reflection are arranged by the field placement coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s setting for clinical practice (diverse or
non-diverse) will be the opposite of the preclinical choice. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs.

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Education Course Descriptions

ED 150W Foundations of Education. This is the first course taken in the professional sequence for candidates in all teaching fields and licensure
areas. A wide range of topics is explored including historical and philosophical foundations of American education, the role of the teacher, instruction
and curriculum and issues impacting students in the schools. A key component of the course will be the candidate’s definition, exploration and
evaluation of the mission to teach at the early, middle and adolescent levels. Thirty clock hours of field experience are required. This course is a
prerequisite for all other early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence to young adult and multiage candidates. This course should be taken in the
spring semester of the freshman year. Prerequisite: Must be prospective education major/minor or have permission from the chair of the Department of
Education. 3 Sem. Hrs.

ED 199

Special Topics in Education. See All-University 199 course description on page 49.

ED 213 Comparative Education. The course focuses on educational practices and global trends (historical, economic, social and cultural forces)
that influence education. Case studies will be utilized to stimulate discussion to help students develop a global perspective of universal educational
problems. The course is designed to have a central theme to further opportunities for comparison, e.g. creativity, pedagogy, assessment, curriculum, etc.
The course addresses the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Ohio Department of Education’s goals that deal with
diversity. Prerequisite: ED 150W. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1} (typically offered spring semester)

ED 215

Multicultural Education. This course introduces the conceptual, theoretical and philosophical issues in multicultural education. The
underlying theme is that education is a social concept that should be made more accessible and equitable to all students. Lectures, discussion, projects,
guest speakers and field trips are among the instructional modalities. Upon completion of this course, teacher candidates will have the basic
understanding of the theoretical and fundamental underpinnings of multicultural education and be better equipped to accommodate students from
different cultures in their classrooms. This course addresses the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Ohio
Department of Education’s goals for diversity. Prerequisite: ED 150W or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs.

ED 299

Special Topics. A course designed to permit the offering of special subjects appropriate to the education program at the sophomore
level. Such offerings will fill special needs of specific students, take advantage of the expertise of a visiting professor or serve as an initial experimental
offering of a contemplated regular course. Regular or frequently recurring topics are not offered under this title. Prerequisite: As established by the
department. May be repeated as new topics are presented. Credit variable, 1-4 Sem. Hrs.

ED 340

Phonics, Processes and the Structure of Language. This course focuses on the nature, role and elements of phonics and phonemic
awareness with the language arts processes. A firm knowledge and skill base in planning, instruction and assessment based on the Ohio Department of
Education’s Competency-Based Language Arts Model curriculum is developed. Emphasis is on the developmental processes of listening, speaking,
reading, writing and the structure of language. Special attention is given to work recognition, vocabulary and comprehension strategies utilized by
fluent readers. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester)

ED 355

Content Area Reading. Emphasis is placed on the development and adaptation of reading, writing and study skills as applied to the
content areas. Objectives, content, materials, technology, methods and evaluation necessary in promoting reading at the middle, adolescent and
multiage levels are developed. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester)

ED 399

Special Topics. See All-University 399 course description.

ED 400

Independent Study in Education. This course is available to juniors or seniors majoring and minoring in education. The candidate, in
consultation with a member of the Department of Education, will select a topic or problem and do an in-depth study. Prerequisite: Admission into the
Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs.

ED 420 Reading Professionalism and Practicum. Candidates develop professional knowledge and dispositions. They work with colleagues to
observe, evaluate, reflect, and provide feedback on instructional reading practices. They participate in, initiate, implement, and evaluate reading
professional development programs. Additionally, candidates collaborate with other educational professionals while utilizing assessment and
instructional practices. Candidates participate in an extensive reading field experience (minimum 40 clock hours). Group seminars for curriculum
development, collaboration, and reflection are arranged. Candidates complete requirements aligned with the International Reading Association
standards. Prerequisites: ME326 or CE326 and Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 1 Sem. Hr.

ED 480 Post-graduate Clinical Practice. This course is designed for the post graduate who has completed requirements in a new (additional)
teaching/licensure area. The practitioner assumes full responsibilities of teaching in his/her new respective teaching/licensure area for a minimum of 30 to
60 hours. The hour and credit requirements for clinical practice will be determined by the transcript reviewer and by the field placement coordinator on an
individual basis. Clinical practitioners will register for 1 semester hour for 30 hours of clinical practice and 2 semester hours for 60 hours. The course is
graded S/U. Prerequisites: Completion of all Mount Union Teacher Education Program requirements and approval by the transcript reviewer and by the
field placement coordinator 1-2 Sem. Hrs.

ED 494

Honors Seminar. See All-University 494 course description.

Intervention Specialist Course Descriptions

EI 200

Introduction to Intervention Specialist. A study of the role and the function of the special educator dealing with mild/moderate
learners in self-contained, mainstreamed and inclusion settings and issues in definition, identification and placement procedures. The course addresses
the unique needs of young children (P-grade 3) with disabilities in the classroom, and transitions from one placement to another as well as an in-depth
study of developmentally appropriate practice (DAP) including how it is informed, implemented and evaluated and individually appropriate practice.
Knowledge of major researchers and historians, variations in beliefs, traditions and values across cultures and current practices in the field will be
addressed. Prerequisite: ED 150W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EI 205

Language Acquisition, Behavior and Disability. An overview of language, both typical and atypical, emphasizing terminology,
acquisition, development, physiological and psychological systems, impact on learning, assessment and intervention strategies including augmentative
communication, that are available to teachers. Prerequisites: ED 150W and EI 200. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EI 210

Low-Incidence Exceptionalities. This course focuses on the methods teachers use to organize curriculum and implement assessment
and instruction to ensure maximum learning for students with low-incidence disabilities. Candidates are exposed to the curriculum emphasis of low-

108

incidence disabled students such as life, vocational and social skills and the functional academics. Candidates are required to identify and define various
low-incidence disabilities including young children with multiple and intense needs, medically fragile children and those with complex behavioral issues.
They will be expected to complete field experiences, lesson planning and curriculum implementation, consultation and research of available journals
and resources for teaching students with low-incidence disabilities. Placement and accommodation issues in integrated educational settings are also
included. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EI 300

The Family and Child With a Disability. In this course, the focus is on the process of interactive teaming, designed to support students
with disabilities within the context of standards-based reform. Candidates will learn about the process of teaming and collaboration with professionals,
students and their families and apply this process to students with various types of disabilities. At the end of this course, the candidate will have a solid
understanding of the roles and responsibilities of members of a collaborative team and have a strong list of resources to support students with
disabilities and their families. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

EI 310

Intervention Specialist General Curriculum. This course offers candidates an introduction to inclusive environments and services as
well as other classroom characteristics such as self-contained and resource rooms. Legal and ethical considerations relating to special education are also
discussed. Candidates will have an understanding of formal and non-formal evaluation methods to assess young children (P-3), grades 4-6 and grades 7-
12 with mild/moderate disabilities which include standardized and state and federally mandated alternative assessment practices. The course examines
the role of the teacher in the team-based assessment and multi-factored evaluation processes for both early intervention and the IEP (Individual
Education Plans) in K-12. This course will involve practical application and discussion. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3
Sem. Hrs.

EI 330

Intervention Specialist General Methods. Methods for designing and implementing instruction for students with mild/moderate
disabilities. Topics include individualized programming for young children (P-3), grades 4-6 and grades 7-12, designing and managing environments,
social interactions, materials, critical teaching behaviors, non-biased meaningful assessment in decision making and skills and knowledge strategy in
mathematics, reading and writing. Candidates will participate in a variety of activities to demonstrate the skills and knowledge acquired in the classroom
setting. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EI 370

Intervention Specialist-Meeting Individual Needs in Reading. Understanding of the assessment process and various assessment
approaches, procedures useful in assessment and diagnosis and the remediation of reading, writing and language problems are emphasized. Special
attention is given to portfolio usage, performance assessment and the alignment of assessment with curriculum and instruction. A focus on the diverse
and exceptional needs of students is included. This field experience includes an intensive case study which incorporates reading assessment, diagnosis
and remediation of a school-aged student. Field experience with a special needs student is required. Prerequisite: CE 325 or ME325. Admission into the
Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EI 400

Behavior Management. This course considers theories, basic principles and procedures of classroom structure and behavior
management. Management of inclusion settings also is addressed. Behavioral assessment, self-assessment and self-control skills are emphasized. The
course covers topics related to collecting data, using data to make decisions, analyzing data, graphing data and applying principles of behavior
management and instruction to children and youth. Sensitivity to possible differences between classroom behavioral expectations and the home
environment is developed. Candidates expand their knowledge of basic applied behavior analysis principles and develop skills for remediating behavior
problems using functional behavioral assessment. Candidates learn the techniques and skills needed to address current inclusive classroom
management issues as well as how to develop effective teaching strategies for an inclusive classroom. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher
Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

EI 410

Research Design. This course affords candidates the opportunity to participate in the community of scientific research and scholarship
in education as part of their University experience. It furthers excellence in performance and achievement while drawing from and developing scientific
capabilities in a broad spectrum. Candidates engage in proposing an original piece of research along with a pilot study and/or actual research, which will
be presented in a public forum. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EI 411

Best Practices in Intervention Specialist. This course constitutes the Senior Culminating Experience for intervention specialist majors.
Emphasis in the course is placed on “best practice” teaching that is aligned with the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) standards. Intervention
specialist majors must take this course concurrently with EI 465. Those candidates seeking early childhood intervention specialist licensure will focus on
the NAEYC standards in cooperation with the CEC standards. Those candidates seeking mild/moderate intervention specialist license will focus on the
areas of concentrations’ Specialized Professional Association (SPA) standards in cooperation with the CEC standards. Prerequisites: Admission into the
Teacher Education Program and senior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

EI 465

Preclinical Practice – Intervention Specialist. In this course the candidate spends 12-13 hours per week for seven to eight weeks (90
hours) in a special education setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to the candidate’s major field of
study. The candidate is a teaching assistant and works closely with school personnel in non-instructional, clinical and instructional activities designed to
promote readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group seminars are arranged by the field
placement coordinator. This course is graded S/U. The preclinical practitioner will make a choice of completing preclinical practice in a diverse or non-
diverse setting. Clinical practice will be completed in the opposite setting. The intervention specialist candidates will provide artifacts of their individual
practice in regards to the Council for Exceptional Children’s Standards. This course is taken concurrently with EI 411. Prerequisite: Admission into the
Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

EI 470

Clinical Practice - Intervention Specialist. The candidate assumes all responsibilities of teaching in a special education setting from the
first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester. This course is graded S/U and is required for intervention specialist licensure. Group
seminars to enable collaboration, evaluation and reflection are arranged by the field placement coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s setting for clinical
practice (age range and diverse or non-diverse) will be the opposite of the preclinical choice. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs.
(typically offered fall semester)

Middle Childhood Course Descriptions

ME 200W Introduction to the Middle School. This course is an introduction to the history, philosophy, social/cultural influences and organization
of the middle school. The course emphasizes the role of the teacher in the middle school and the relationship between the diverse needs of the young
adolescent and the curriculum. Twenty clock hours of field experience are required. Prerequisite: ED 150. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

109

ME 250 Middle School Community Field Experience/Seminar. Directed on-site observation and participation in various educational, social,
health and community settings are featured. The emphasis is on how the teacher collaborates with social and community services and families in
diverse settings to enhance the education of the young adolescent. Thirty clock hours of field experience are required. This course is to be taken spring
semester of the sophomore year. 1 Sem. Hr.

ME 315 Teaching Social Studies in the Middle School. This course includes a study of the objectives, content, materials and methods of
instruction essential for teaching social studies in the middle school. Emphasis is placed on developing a firm knowledge base that includes an
understanding of content and skills in social studies based on Ohio’s Model Competency-Based Program. Reflective decision making on selection and
integration of the six strands in the Ohio model, appropriate to the candidates’ levels and different settings, is also emphasized. This course also focuses
on the multicultural and diversity aspects of teaching. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring
semester)

ME 320 Teaching Mathematics in the Middle School. A national and state standards-based (NCTM, NNSA and Ohio Standards) study of the
goals, content, materials, technology and methods of teaching mathematics in the middle school is emphasized. A minimum of 20 clock hours of middle
school field experience is required to enhance in-class activities. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically
offered spring semester)

ME 325 Teaching Reading and Writing in the Middle School. This course focuses on the theories, issues, purposes, materials, technology and
processes for teaching narrative reading and writing in the middle school. A firm knowledge and skill base in planning, instruction and assessment,
based on the Ohio Department of Education’s Competency-Based Language Arts Model curriculum, is developed. This course is designed to provide
candidates with a theoretical foundation of knowledge about teaching the language arts strands (reading, writing, listening, speaking) as interactive
processes, through traditional and literature-based texts. Emphasis is on the emergent (developmental) process that is influenced by various factors and
is sensitive to individual differences (e.g., diversity, exceptionality). Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically
offered every semester)

ME 326 Teaching Adolescent and Young Adult Literacy. A study of the theories, purposes, materials, technology, and processes for teaching
reading and writing in the middle and secondary school. Emphasis is on adolescent and young adult literacy development and the developmental
process that is influenced by various factors and is sensitive to individual differences (diversity, exceptionalities). Field experiences in middle and
secondary levels. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and CE 325. 3 Sem. Hrs.

ME 335 Teaching Science in the Middle School. A national and state standards-based study of objectives, content materials, technology and
methods of teaching science in the middle school is emphasized. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically
offered spring semester)

ME 345 Content Area Reading and Writing in the Middle School. Emphasis is placed on the development, purpose, methods, materials,
technology and processes of teaching reading and writing and study skills, applicable to the content areas in the middle school curriculum. A firm
knowledge base and skills in planning, instruction and assessment, based on the Ohio Department of Education’s Competency-Based Language Arts
Model curriculum, is developed. The understanding of reading and writing, as well as the other language arts strands as interactive processes influenced
by various factors and sensitive to individual differences (e.g., diversity, exceptionality), is emphasized. Special attention is given to unit integration and
integrating various types of literature (e.g., multicultural, gender studies) in the content areas. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education
Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

ME 350 Middle School Field Experience/Seminar. This course provides a directed on-site educational observation and participation experience
in a middle school environment. A weekly seminar addressing issues in the middle school is included. Thirty clock hours of field experience are required.
This course is to be taken spring semester of the junior year. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 1 Sem. Hr.

ME 370 Middle School- Meeting Individual Needs in Reading. Understanding of the assessment process and various assessment approaches,
procedures useful in assessment and diagnosis and the remediation of reading, writing and language problems are emphasized. Special attention is
given to portfolio usage, performance assessment and the alignment of assessment with curriculum and instruction. A secondary focus is on the diverse
and exceptional needs of students. IDEA, the nature and needs of exceptional children, as well as IEP development are included. The field experience
includes an intensive case study which incorporates reading assessment, diagnosis and remediation of a school-aged student. Field experience with a
middle grade student is required. Prerequisite: ME 325 or ME345. Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring
semester)

ME 410 Research Design. This course affords students the opportunity to participate in the community of scientific research and scholarship in
education as part of their University experience. It furthers excellence in performance and achievement, while drawing from and developing scientific
capabilities in a broad spectrum. Students engage in proposing an original piece of research along with a pilot study and/or actual research, which will
be presented in a public forum. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs.

ME 411 Best Practices in Middle Childhood Education. The course focus is on teacher decision-making that draws upon the knowledge, skills
and dispositions of middle school educators to develop healthy, productive and ethical students. The content is aligned with the NMSA and state
standards, as well as “best practice” research to improve the educational experiences of young adolescents. Middle childhood majors take this course
concurrently with ME 465. This course is the SCE for middle childhood majors. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program and senior
standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

ME 465 Preclinical Practice – Middle School. In this course the candidate spends approximately 12-13 hours per week for seven to eight weeks
(90 clock hours) in a middle school setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to one of the candidate’s
areas of emphasis. The candidate works closely with school personnel in non-instructional, clinical and instructional activities designed to promote
readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group seminars, collaboratively arranged by the
instructor and field placement coordinator, include preparation of the portfolio (PORT II). This course is taken concurrently with ME 411. The preclinical
practitioner will complete the field experience in a diverse or non-diverse setting. Clinical practice is completed in the opposite setting. This course
focuses on the nexus between theory and practice. Based on state and national middle school standards, as well as “best practice” research, the course
emphasizes such topics as classroom management, collaborating in teams to create and teach interdisciplinary units appropriate for a diverse
population, advising middle school students in a teacher-based guidance program, etc. This course is taken concurrently with CE 411 and is graded S/U.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

110

ME 466 Multiage Preclinical Practice-Middle School. In this course the candidate spends approximately 12-13 hours per week for seven to
eight weeks (90 clock hours) in a middle school setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to one of the
candidate’s areas of emphasis. The candidate is a teaching assistant and works closely with school personnel in non-instructional, clinical and
instructional activities designed to promote readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group
seminars, arranged by the field placement coordinator, include preparation of the portfolio (PORT II). This course is graded S/U and is taken concurrently
with ME 400. The preclinical practitioner will make a choice of completing preclinical practice in a diverse or non-diverse setting. Clinical practice will be
completed in the opposite setting. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester)

ME 470

Clinical Practice - Middle Childhood Education. The candidate assumes full responsibilities of teaching in a middle school setting from
the first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester with placement in two areas of emphasis. A special emphasis is on self-reflection,
professional development and a commitment to lifelong learning. This course is graded S/U and is required for the middle childhood licensure. Group
seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s setting for clinical practice (diverse or nondiverse) will be the
opposite of the preclinical choice. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester)

ME 471

Clinical Practice – Middle Childhood Education (Multiage). The candidate assumes full responsibilities of teaching in a middle school
setting from the first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester. A special emphasis is on self-reflection, professional development and
a commitment to lifelong learning. This course is graded S/U. Group seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s
setting for clinical practice (diverse or nondiverse) will be the opposite of the preclinical choice. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs.
(typically offered every semester)

Department of Engineering

The goal of the Department of Engineering is to offer programs that provide technical breadth and depth in an engineering discipline and are
integrated with the overall mission of Mount Union. These programs will prepare graduates to become leaders in the engineering profession. The
Department of Engineering will seek accreditation for the Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering programs after the first students graduate per
the timeline specified by ABET.

Requirements for the Major in Civil Engineering

The civil engineering program focuses on applying the principles of engineering, basic science, and mathematics to four technical areas in civil
engineering, conducting civil engineering experiments and analyzing and interpreting the results, and designing a system, component, or process in
more than one civil engineering context. The required courses listed below are for the first two years of the major. Please refer to
www.mountunion.edu/civil-engineering for current required courses and course descriptions.

Required Courses *

Semester Hours

EGE 110 Introduction to the Engineering Profession

2

EGE 120 Introduction to Engineering Analysis & Problem Solving

4
EGE 210 Statics and Dynamics 4
EGE 220 Thermal Sciences I 4
EGE 230 Material Science 2
EGE 240 Mechanics of Materials 2

Required Extra-Departmental Courses*
CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry

4
MA 141 Calculus I 4
MA 142 Calculus II

4

MA 241 Calculus III

4

MA 333 Differential Equations and Linear Algebra

4
PH 101 General Physics I 4
PH 102 General Physics II

4

*Required courses for the first two years of the program.

Requirements for the Major in Mechanical Engineering

The mechanical engineering program focuses on applying the principles of engineering, basic science, and mathematics to model, analyze, design,
and realize physical systems, components, or processes and to work professionally in both thermal and mechanical systems. The required courses listed
below are for the first two years of the major. Please refer to www.mountunion.edu/mechanical-engineering for current required courses and course
descriptions.

Required Courses*

Semester Hours

EGE 110 Introduction to the Engineering Profession

2

EGE 120 Introduction to Engineering Analysis & Problem Solving

4
EGE 210 Statics and Dynamics 4
EGE 220 Thermal Sciences I 4
EGE 230 Material Science 2
EGE 240 Mechanics of Materials 2

Required Extra-Departmental Courses*
CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry

4
MA 141 Calculus I 4

111

MA 142 Calculus II

4

MA 241 Calculus III

4

MA 333 Differential Equations and Linear Algebra

4
PH 101 General Physics I 4
PH 102 General Physics II

4

Course Descriptions

EGE 110

Introduction to the Engineering Profession. A highly interactive seminar style course that explores all aspects of the engineering
profession, including engineering disciplines, challenges, education, and employment; creativity and design; and the professional responsibilities of
engineers. Student teams make presentations that discuss the relevance of course topics to current events. 2 Sem. Hrs.

EGE 120

Introduction to Engineering Analysis and Problem Solving. A hands-on introduction to the practice of engineering and the use
of engineering tools to solve problems and design products. Students will complete individual and team assignments using hardware and software
platforms. Prerequisites: EGE 110 and MA 141. (MA 141 may be taken concurrently.) 4 Sem. Hrs.

EGE 210

Statics and Dynamics. The study of force systems in two and three dimensions to explore the principles of equilibrium applied to
various bodies and simple structures, the motion of a particle, and the kinematics and kinetics of plane motion of rigid bodies. The principles of work and
energy and impulse and momentum are also introduced. Course makes extensive use of vector methods. Prerequisites: MA 141 with a grade of C or
better, PH 101, and MA 142. (MA 142 may be taken concurrently.) 4 Sem. Hrs.

EGE 220

Thermal Sciences I. Introduction to the fundamental concepts of heat, power, and fluid motion. Presents property relationships for
incompressible substances, simple pure substances, and ideal gases. Applies the first and second laws of thermodynamics to the analyses of processes
for open and closed systems. Fluid applications include fluid statics, incompressible fluid flow, and energy losses in pipes. Prerequisites: MA 142, CH
111W, and EGE 210. 4 Sem. Hrs.

EGE 230

Material Science. Introduction to the structure, processing, properties, and performance of engineering materials, including
metals, glasses, ceramics, and composites. Prerequisite: CH 111W. 2 Sem. Hrs.

EGE 240

Mechanics of Materials. Introduction to the behavior of materials, including stress/strain at a point, principle stresses and strains,
stress-strain relationships, determination of stresses and deformations in situations involving axial loading and flexural loading of straight members.
Prerequisite: EGE 210. 2 Sem. Hrs.

Department of English

The objectives of the Department of English are to educate students in written and oral expression, linguistics, the cultural significance of literature
and literary history. The department prepares majors for teaching, graduate study and professional and business careers.

Requirements for the Major in English: Literature

Required Courses

Semester Hours

EH 295W Human Experience in Literature and Language I

3

EH 296W Human Experience in Literature and Language II

3

EH 310

Critical Theory and Rhetoric

3

EH 430

English Seminar (SCE)

3

One additional literature course at the 200, 300 or 400 level

3

Any One from the Following Language, Theory and History

Semester Hours

Courses

EH 340

Literacies

3

EH 385

Introduction to Linguistics

3

EH 390

Seminar in Language, Theory and History

3

EH 405

History of the English Language

3

EH 444

Seminar in Linguistics

3

Any One from the Following Pre-1800 British Literature Courses Semester Hours
EH 315

The English Renaissance

3

EH 328

Medieval English Literature

3

EH 410

Shakespeare

3

EH 413

Chaucer

3

Any One from the Following Post-1800 British Literature Courses Semester Hours
EH 332

Neoclassicism and Romantic Literature

3

EH 345

Victorian and Early 20th Century Literature

3

Any One from the Following Early American Literature Courses

Semester Hours

EH 371

Early American Literature

3

EH 372

19th Century American Literature

3

Any One from the Following Contemporary American Literature

Semester Hours

Courses

112

EH 352

American Postmodernism

3

EH 373

20th Century American Literature

3

Any One from the Following Literature Genre Courses

Semester Hours

EH 335

Studies in the Literary Essay

3

EH 350

Studies in Drama

3

EH 356

Studies in Autobiography

3

EH 360

Studies in Poetry

3

EH 365

Studies in the Novel

3

EH 380

Studies in the Short Story

3

Any One from the Following Writing Genre Courses

Semester Hours

EH 216

Writing Fiction

3

EH 217

Writing Poetry

3

EH 243

Writing Drama

3

EH 247

Writing Literary Nonfiction

3

EH 392

Seminar in Creative Writing

3

Total

36

Note: A student may not major in English: literature and minor in English.

Requirements for the Major in English: Writing

Required Courses

Semester Hours

EH 295W Human Experience in Literature and Language I

3

EH 296W Human Experience in Literature and Language II

3

EH 310

Critical Theory and Rhetoric

3

EH 435

English Seminar (SCE)

3

Any Two from the Following Language, Theory and History

Semester Hours

Courses

EH 319

Issues and Methods in Rhetoric and Composition

3

EH 340

Literacies

3

EH 385

Introduction to Linguistics

3

EH 390

Seminar in Language, Theory and History

3

EH 405

History of the English Language

3

EH 444

Seminar in Linguistics

3

An approved literature course at the 200 level or above

3

Any Four from the Following Writing Courses

Semester Hours

Professional Writing (choose 3-9 credit hours)
EH 240W Business and Technical Writing

3

EH 245W Argumentative Writing

3

EH 330

Theories and Practices of Editing

3

EH 391

Seminar in Professional Writing

3

CM 250W Introduction to Journalism

3

CM 255

Introduction to Public Relations

3

CM 256

Print Production and Design

3

CM 350

Advanced Journalism

3

Creative Writing (choose 3-9 credit hours)
EH 216

Writing Fiction

3

EH 217

Writing Poetry

3

EH 243

Writing Drama

3

EH 247

Writing Literary Nonfiction

3

EH 392

Seminar in Creative Writing

3

Any of the Following Practicum/Application Courses

Semester Hours

Totaling Six Hours
EH 300

Teaching Writing

3

EH 301

Writing Center Practicum (can be repeated three times) 1

EH 302

Calliope Practicum (can be repeated three times)

1

EH 317

Writing Workshop

3

EH 450

Independent Study

3

EH 499

Internship

3

Total

36

113

Note: A student may not major in English: writing and minor in English.

Requirements for the Minor in English

Required English Courses

Semester Hours

EH 295W Human Experience in Literature and Language I

3

Four additional EH courses beyond EH 100/EH 120

12

No more than one 100-level EH course (excluding EH 100/120)
At least two EH courses at the 300-level or above

Total

15

Requirements for Honors in English

Students are eligible to enter the Honors Program in English: literature or the Honors Program in English: writing if they have at least a 3.5 grade point
average in the major or permission of the Honor Review Board.
To receive honors in English: literature or honors in English: writing, a student must have at least a 3.5 grade point average in the major at graduation
and honors credit in courses that total a minimum of 12 semester hours. One of the courses may be EH 494 Honors Thesis/Project that may be taken for
three to six credit hours. For permission to register for an honors thesis/project, a completed Honors Application and Registration form must be filed
with the director of Honors Programs by the end of the 12th week of classes of the semester prior to doing the thesis. Students must earn at least a “B+”
in the course to earn honors credit.

Other courses students may take for honors in English: literature or honors in English: writing include any 200 level or above course required for the
major. For permission to register for a course with honors in the major, a completed Application and Registration form must be filed with the director of
Honors Programs by the end of the third week of classes of the semester in which the course is taken. Students must earn at least a “B+” in the course to
earn honors credit. Please see page 35 of this Catalogue for more information about the Honors Program.

Course Descriptions

EH 100

College Writing. A course requiring a research paper and frequent written assignments related to classroom discussions and readings.
Individual conferences help students formulate, organize and express ideas. EH 100 is a prerequisite to all other English courses and does not count
toward a major or minor in English. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,1.}

EH 100I College Writing Intensive. This course is designed to meet the needs of students who lack wide experience in writing for the academic
community. The purposes of the course are to help students improve their writing abilities, develop and gain confidence in their analytical abilities and
discover and develop their own academic voices. The course will fulfill the same requirements as EH 100, but it will entail two additional hours of class
time and more personal attention. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,1.}

EH 120

Advanced College Writing. A course in expository writing, including research writing, for the exceptionally strong student writer. This
course meets all requirements met by EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,1.}

EH 130

Introduction to Poetry. An introduction to the nature and function of poetry as a literary genre. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing
and understanding patterns of cultural, ethical and aesthetic experience as these are reflected in a variety of poems by a diverse range of authors.
Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.}

EH 135

Introduction to Fiction. An introduction to the study of fiction through the analysis and interpretation of representative examples. A
thematic focus may be used to provide a basis for comparing writing from diverse periods and places. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.}

EH 140

Popular Literature. This course is designed to provide scholarly background to genres that have gained wide readership in various
historical periods. The focus of the course will alternate each time it is taught among the following: detective fiction, science fiction, gothic fiction and
romance. In each case, students will be provided with historical background and critical strategies for approaching these popular genres. Prerequisite:
EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.}

EH 147W Introduction to Literary Non-Fiction. An introduction to the genre of literary non-fiction through the analysis and interpretation of
representative examples. Extensive reading and discussion of essays, from short, journalistic pieces to longer, book-length pieces. This course may be
taught either thematically or historically. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, A, 1.}

EH 199

Special Topics in English. See All-University 199 course descriptions on page 49.

EH 210

Children’s Literature. A course exploring the scope, importance and content of literature for children. Students will be exposed to the
techniques of evaluation and methods of presenting and studying literature with children. Priority is given to students seeking licensure in inclusive
early childhood education. Prerequisite: EH 100, ED 150W and CE 200 [CE 200 may be taken concurrently]. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, A, 1.}

EH 216

Writing Short Fiction. An exploration of the creative process; directed writing of short fiction. Small group conferences as well as

regular classes. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 217

Writing Poetry. An exploration of the creative process; directed writing of poems. Small group conferences as well as regular classes.
Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH 216 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 235

Practical English Grammar. A study of grammatical conventions and standard vocabulary of written English; emphasis will be on the
application of grammar, punctuation, conventions and usage. This course includes required writing assignments. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 240W Business and Technical Writing. A course examining the rhetorical foundations of business, professional and technical writing.
Emphasis will be given to such rhetorical elements as style, audience, purpose and convention and how these varying contextual factors affect the
creation and reception of professional and technical writing. Prerequisite: EH 100, EH 100I or EH 120. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 243

Writing Drama. An exploration of the unique challenges of writing drama, conducted in a workshop environment in which students
write and share original one-act plays. In addition to writing drama, the course will include a study of the elements of drama, dramatic theory and the
analysis of published one-act plays. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs.

114

EH 245W Argumentative Writing. The study of argument as a rhetorical mode of communication. Emphasis will be given to analysis,
argumentative structure (claim, premise, evidence and warrants), research and the examination and production of effective written arguments across
disciplines. Prerequisite: EH 100, EH 100I or EH 120. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 247 Writing Literary Non-Fiction. An exploration of the creative process; directed writing of literary non-fiction. Small group conferences,
workshops and full class meetings. Prerequisites: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 250

African-American Literature. An introduction to works of poetry, prose and fiction by African-American writers. Special attention will be
placed on those historical factors and literary traditions which shaped African-American literature and eventually led to works by authors such as
Hughes, Hurston, Morrison, Petry, Walker and Wright. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1 or II,D,2.}

EH 255Q Native American Literature. This course will focus on the literature of Native Americans which is not covered by traditional genre and
period courses. It will deal with the distinctive geographical settings, social concerns and political issues related to the Native American experience.
Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1; II,D,2 and II,B.}

EH 257

Canadian Literature. This course will focus on the literature of Canada through a study of representative fiction, drama and poetry. It
will deal with the distinctive geographical, historical, social and political concerns of Canadians as seen through their literature. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3
Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.}

EH 260

Post-Colonial Literatures. A comprehensive exploration of literatures emerging in the wake of the colonial experience in Asia, Africa
and/or the Americas. Texts and regional/thematic focus may vary but could include authors such as Amilcar Cabral, Aime Cesaire, Franz Fanon, Trinh
Minh-ha, Gayatri Spivak, Edward Said or Leopold Sedar Senghor. The course will address the ways in which social and political experiences affect artistic
choices, issues of cultural imperialism, the synthesis of indigenous and imposed cultural traditions, and notions of literature as a means of resistance or
liberation from the historical perspectives of both the colonized and the colonizers. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1 or II,D,2.}

EH 261

Literature for Adolescents. A survey of literature appropriate for readers in grades four through nine. The course will include a wide
selection of works ranging from traditional folk tales to contemporary fiction. The goal is to help class members establish personal criteria for judging
both appropriateness and merit of material suitable for this age level. Whenever possible, connections will be made between analysis of literature and
presentation of literature in middle school classrooms. Priority is given to students seeking licensure in middle childhood education. Prerequisite: EH
100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.}

EH 265

Gender and Literature. This course will use a wide range of literature including writers whose works have directly addressed gender
issues as well as writers whose works have indirectly reflected these issues to explore how cultural expectations about gender and gender roles affect the
lives of women and men. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1 or II,D,2.}

EH 270 American Regional Literatures. An introduction to works of poetry, prose and fiction by regional writers. Attention will be placed on
the historical and social factors which shaped the literary traditions of a particular area. Texts and regional/thematic selections of the course will vary but
could focus on the literature of the following: the American South, Appalachia, the American West, the Caribbean, the Gilded Age in New England.
Prerequisites: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, A, 1.}

EH 295W The Human Experience in Literature and Language I. In this foundational course for minors and majors in English, students are
introduced to central concepts and practices of English studies, with emphases on critical and interpretive reading and writing. This course will foster
the imagination, develop critical literacy and promote local and global perspectives. Students will gain useful and valuable creative, interpretive and
analytical writing skills. Prerequisite: EH 100/120. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1}

EH 296W The Human Experience in Literature and Language II. This course, the second foundational course, is required for majors and is open
to other interested students. Students of English language and literature will engage with a range of ideas studied in the field of English while also
exploring a common body of historic contexts and conventions, critical methods and professional standards. Students will develop their skills in
interpreting and analyzing texts as well as their competence in writing. Prerequisites: EH 100/120 and EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 299

Special Topics in English. See All-University 299 course description on page 49.

EH 300 Teaching Writing. This course introduces students to both theoretical and practical issues involved in teaching writing. Theoretical
issues include: rhetorical and literacy issues, composing process research, various perspectives on writing and approaches to its teaching. Practical issues
include: planning and structuring a writing class; sequencing and designing writing assignments; responding to and evaluating writing; conducting and
managing a writing class; conducting peer workshops and student conferences; and using available resources and technologies. Prerequisite: EH 295W
(can be taken concurrently). 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 301 Writing Center Practicum. This practicum will look at the myriad writing situations a tutor must deal with including basic writing skills,
writing across the curriculum matters, technological issues and tutoring advanced and ESL writers. Intended for Writing Center tutors; however, able
writers with an interest in teaching writing may register for this course with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Writing Center tutor or permission
of the instructor. 1 Sem. Hr. (repeatable up to 3 Sem. Hrs.)

EH 302 Calliope Practicum. This practicum will allow students interested in participating in the production and management of the literary
magazine of the Department of English to expand on and explore pertinent relevant topics including visual design, editing and publicity to increase the
quality, visibility and viability of the magazine. Prerequisite: EH 100/120. 1 Sem. Hr. (repeatable to 3 Sem. Hrs.)

EH 310 Critical Theory and Rhetoric. An advanced introduction to critical and rhetorical theory. The course will introduce students to the
major periods of critical and rhetorical theory so that students can develop a historically informed understanding of contemporary critical and rhetorical
issues. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 315

The English Renaissance. A study of representative poetry, prose and drama (excluding Shakespeare) from approximately 1500-1660.
Some attention will be given to the Renaissance and Reformation movements outside England as background to the English literature of the period.
Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 317 Writing Workshop. An opportunity for students to study, in-depth, an area of writing (poetry, fiction, drama and/or literary non-
fiction/critical essay). Class will provide an intensive workshop experience for students to receive feedback on their writing from the instructor and other
members of the class. Prerequisites: a 200-level writing course (EH 216, 217, 240, 243, 245 or 247). 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 319 Issues and Methods in Rhetoric and Composition. This course explores research topics, methodologies, techniques and resources in

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the scholarly area of rhetoric and composition. It also offers a survey of current research in the field including research issues and problems. Prerequisite:
EH 295W (can be taken concurrently). 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 326

Women and Literature. A study of the contributions of women authors to literary tradition with a focus on the images of women in
literature and a discussion of feminist criticism. Specific authors, titles and topics will vary, and the focus may be arranged thematically or
chronologically. Prerequisites: EH 100, EH 295W or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 328

Medieval English Literature. This course will focus on the culture and literary texts of the English Middle Ages. Through a selection of
medieval prose, poetry and drama ranging through religious, learned, courtly and popular works, the course will explore “solace and sentence”-
literature which entertains and literature which asks fundamental social, political, ethical and intellectual questions as well. Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH
295W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 330 Theories and Practices of Editing. An introduction to and application of the skills and techniques necessary for a career in professional
editing. Students will also examine textual and literary approaches to editing given particular rhetorical contexts. Emphasis will be placed on how to
make editorial judgments that promote editorial standards without violating authorial intent. Topics covered will include: visual and textual document
design, editorial design, copy editing, proofreading and plain language principles. Specialized publishing and editing computer applications will be
utilized. Prerequisite: EH 240W or EH 245W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 332

Neoclassicism and Romanticism. This course will concentrate on English literature written during the Restoration and 18th century
(often called the Neoclassical Age) and the first third of the 19th century (the Romantic period). Representative authors are Dryden, Pope, Swift, Defoe,
Johnson, Radcliffe, Blake, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Percy and Mary Shelley, Coleridge, Keats and Byron. Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH 295W. 3
Sem. Hrs.

EH 335

Studies in The Literary Essay. An advanced study of the literary essay. The course will raise formal questions concerning the literary
essay as well as introduce students to critical theories about this genre. The class will typically focus on a literary period, a region or nation, selected
authors or a theme – at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EH 295W.
3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 340

Literacies. This course will focus on the history, theory and practice of “literacy” or the acquisition and use of written discourse.
Emphasis will be given to exploring literacy as a cultural phenomenon as it is situated within a larger historical, political and ideological context. Topics
may include: orality and literacy, writing as a technology, literacy as a situated practice and multiple literacies. Prerequisite: EH 295W (can be taken
concurrently). 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 345

Victorian and Early 20th Century Literature. A study of the novel, popular fiction, non-fictional prose, poetry and melodrama of the
Victorian period and early 20th century. Special attention will be given to such representative authors as Arnold, Browning, Tennyson, Dickens, Carlyle,
Hardy, Conrad, Eliot and Joyce. Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 350 Studies in Drama. An advanced study of drama. The course will raise formal questions concerning drama as well as introduce students
to critical theories about this genre. The class will typically focus on a literary period, a region or nation, selected authors or a theme – at the discretion of
the instructor. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 352 American Postmodernism. A study of the variety of literary texts written in America since World War II. Representative authors may
include Barth, Gass, Pynchon, DeLillo, Morrison, Reed, LeGuin and Silko. Prerequisites: EH 100/120; EH 295W or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 356 Studies in Autobiography. An advanced study of the autobiography. The course will raise formal questions concerning the
autobiography as well as introduce students to critical theories about this genre. The class will typically focus on a literary period, a region or nation,
selected authors or a theme – at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with
EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 360 Studies in Poetry. An advanced study of poetry. The course will raise formal questions concerning poetry as well as introduce students
to critical theories about this genre. The class will typically focus on a literary period, a region or nation, selected authors or a theme – at the discretion of
the instructor. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 365 Studies in the Novel. An advanced study of the novel. The course will raise formal questions concerning the novel as well as introduce
students to critical theories about this genre. The class will typically focus on a literary period, a region or nation, selected authors or a theme – at the
discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 371

Early American Literature. A study of the origins of American literature in indigenous and immigrant genres. Students will be
introduced to Native American creation narratives and other oral narratives, to immigrant journals, spiritual autobiographies, and captivity narratives and
to slave narratives as foundations for a distinctive American literature. Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 372

19th Century American Literature. A study of American fiction, poetry, non-fiction prose and oral narrative during the 19th century.
Representative authors may include Poe, Emerson, Douglass, Thoreau, Melville, Stowe, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Dunbar and James. Prerequisites: EH
100 and EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 373

20th Century American Literature. A study of literature written in America during the 20th century. Authors studied might include
Frost, Pound, Hemingway, Hurston, Faulkner, Stevens, Hughes, O’Conner, Albee, Rich, Morrison, Pyncheon and Barth. Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH
295W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 380

Studies in the Short Story. An advanced study of the short story. The course will raise formal questions concerning the short story as
well as introduce students to critical theories about this genre. The class will typically focus on a literary period, a region or nation, selected authors or a
theme – at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 385 Introduction to Linguistics. An introduction to the elements of language – phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics –
and how these elements are essential to understanding what language is and how we use language. In addition, the course will explore language
acquisition and language variety (dialects of a language). Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 390 Seminar in Language, Theory and History. An advanced topics course offering a theoretical and historical approach to the study of the
interrelationship between writing, language and literature in the field of English studies. Intended for literature and writing majors. Can be repeated for
different topics. Prerequisite: EH 295W (can be taken concurrently). 3 Sem. Hrs.

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EH 391

Seminar in Professional Writing. An advanced seminar focusing on topics in the fields of organizational, technical, medical, legal and
business rhetoric, writing and communication. Intended for literature and writing majors. Can be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: EH 240W or
EH 245W. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 392

Seminar in Creative Writing. An advanced seminar focusing on aesthetic topics in the field of creative writing. Intended for literature
and writing majors. Can be repeated for different genres. Seminar will focus on the aesthetic elements of craft. Prerequisites: EH 100/120 and a 200-level
creative writing course (EH 216, 217, 243 or 247). 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 399 Special Topics in English. See All-University 399 course description on page 49.

EH 405 History of the English Language. A study of the evolution of the English language from its roots in Proto-Indo-European to its present
form. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 410 Shakespeare. A study of a representative selection of Shakespeare’s tragedies, comedies and history plays. Prerequisites: EH 100, EH
295W, junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 413

Chaucer. A study of The Canterbury Tales and other poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer primarily in Middle English. Prerequisites: EH 100, EH
295W, junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 430

English Seminar. A conference course for senior English majors in selected topics in English and American literature with emphasis on
individual research. This course is the Senior Culminating Experience for the English major. Prerequisites: EH 100, EH 295W, EH 296W and senior
standing. Juniors with outstanding performance in the major may take this course with the permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 435 The Senior Portfolio. An opportunity for senior writing majors to explore, in depth, an area of writing which best reflects their intended
field(s) of expertise. Students will spend part of the semester working independently (e.g., reading and writing in their intended field), and the remainder
of the semester assembling a senior portfolio (ideally across at least two genres) to represent their work as professional writers. Students also will be
responsible for producing a reflective, critical introduction to their portfolios which examines the progress of their individual endeavors over the course
of the previous four years. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a writing major. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 440

Topics in African-American Literature. An advanced study of literature in the African-American tradition. Topics will vary, but the
course may focus on specific periods (Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance, The Black Arts Movement), genres (Orality and the African-American
Poetic Tradition), or topics (Violence and the Black Imagination, Women Writers of the African Diaspora). Prerequisites: EH 100, EH 250 or permission of
the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 442

Topics in Gender and Literature. An advanced study of the relationship of gender to literature. The specific topics will vary, but the
course may focus on specific periods (Gender and Medieval Literature), genres (Gender and Authorship in the 19th Century Novel) or topics (Men and
Women as Readers of Fiction). Prerequisites: EH 265 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 444 Seminar in Linguistics. An advanced study of current issues in linguistics. While specific topics will vary, the course will focus on one to
three current issues or approaches. Prerequisites: EH 295W and EH 385 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 450

Independent Study. Open to senior English majors who wish to pursue a topic related to the study of language or literature. Study may
be taken on an interdepartmental basis with permission of the departments involved. A prospectus and preliminary bibliography of the project must be
submitted for departmental approval prior to registration. 3 Sem. Hrs.

EH 494

Honors Thesis/Project. A research/project course designed to meet the needs of the individual student seeking honors in English at
graduation. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, and approval of the instructor, department chair and the Honors Review Board. Credit variable, 3-6
Sem. Hrs.

EH 498

Internship (Internal). Students are provided with a significant learning experience outside the classroom setting. Although the
program is designed to be fundamentally an educational experience, professionally productive work will constitute an integral part of the internship.
Specific arrangements and requirements will vary with the program. A contract will specify the activities with which the student will be involved. Taken
under satisfactory/unsatisfactory grade option only. Only one internship may be taken for credit but may, in certain cases, be repeated for audit. Credit
variable, 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

EH 499

Internship in English. See All-University 499 course description on page 49.

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