OM0006-Unit-01-Introduction to Maintenance Management Unit-01-Introduction to Maintenance Management Structure: 1.1 Introduction Objectives 1.

2 History of Maintenance Definition of Maintenance Objectives and Functions of Maintenance 1.3 Functions of Maintenance Management Quality Aspects in Maintenance Maintenance Organisation Initial Level Repeatable Level Defined Level Managed Level Optimized Level 1.4 Improving Maturity in Maintenance Organizations Training Strategy Work Management Resources Management Supervisory Review Quality Assurance Subcontract Management

Commitment of the Maintenance Personnel. Verification of Implementation Metrics and Process Improvement 1.5 Dynamics of a Maintenance Organisation Maintenance Management Perspectives Types of Maintenance Preventive Maintenance Shut-down Maintenance Opportunistic Maintenance 1.6 Summary 1.7 Terminal Questions 1.8 Answers 1.1 Introduction Rising inflation and increased competition have brought with them the need for greater productivity, and recent years have seen more emphasis being placed on productivity improvement. Moreover, sophisticated equipment and capital intensive units and plants are being increasingly used to achieve the pre-set targets of higher production and productivity. Reliability and maintainability features are now being incorporated in the equipment designs. Although modern equipment has higher levels of reliability, it is not possible to keep this equipment in an operating condition at all times because failures do occur even in the most reliable equipment.1 It is also true that such sophisticated equipment, and units or plants, tend to have high probabilities of failure since in many cases they incorporate newer, and therefore not adequately proven, technologies and designs. They also consist of a large number of assemblies, sub-assemblies and components. Failure and malfunctioning of these items of equipment result in a loss of production. Loss of production is undesirable because it results in corresponding loss in revenue. Whenever an item of equipment is down and fails to perform its intended function, or performs in an undesirable fashion, it must be restored to a state where it performs satisfactorily. At the same time all necessary action must be taken to keep, or retain, such equipment in an operating condition and also to prevent failures. Resources, such as spare parts, manpower skills, tools, instruments and facilities, such as hangars in the case of

aircraft maintenance, are utilized for accomplishment of the restoration processes and preventive actions. Thus the requirement for productivity improvement has brought about the pressing need for a significant improvement in the management of maintenance of equipment, units and plants. Objectives: After studying this unit you shall be able · To Define Maintenance · To assess objective and functions of Maintenance · To describe Quality aspect of Maintenance · To assess key process of Maintenance Management 1.2 History of Maintenance Historically, maintenance activities have been regarded as a necessary evil by the various management functions in an organisation. Enormous costs of maintenance, estimated to be between 15 and 40 per cent of the production costs and the trend towards automation have, however, forced managers to pay more attention to maintenance. The evolution of maintenance can be traced from the days prior to World War II. The attitude of the managers then was ‘to fix the equipment when it breaks’. With fewer items of sophisticated equipment around, and hence, the cost of downtime not being high, prevention of equipment failures was not given much attention. Maintenance, in addition to fixing the broken equipment, involved simple activities like cleaning and lubrication. The period after World War II saw the introduction of the word ‘terotechnology’ which was initially defined by the committee on terotechnology as ‘…a combination of management, financial, engineering and other practices applied to physical assets in pursuit of economic life-cycle costs’. Due to rising costs and inflation, focus was on reducing downtime of equipment and hence preventive maintenance came into being as an important activity. This period also saw a number of researchers working on operations research models for preventive maintenance. Importance of planning maintenance activities also grew during this period. Overhauls of equipment were planned and scheduled. Systems for managing maintenance were also introduced. The period after 1980 has seen some of the worst accidents in industrial history. Leakage of methyl isocyanite (MIC) from a battery/cell manufacturing unit in Bhopal in India and the threat to the survival of mankind caused by the nuclear accident at Chernobyl in the erstwhile Soviet Union have only made the manufacturing industries and the like realize the importance of maintenance. The attitude of ignorance towards maintenance has increasingly been replaced by one which recognizes maintenance also as a strategic issue in the organisation. Besides high cost, the other factors which contributed to this change

To live up to the new expectations demanded of maintenance activities. In summary. tools and facilities. The need for reliable equipment has also been realized. which is linked to the overall organizational objectives. · organizing maintenance resources. In case an item of equipment fails it needs to be restored to the same specified operating condition. or return the equipment to an acceptable working condition. · To extend the useful life of the equipment.2. Techniques such as condition monitoring. . Modern maintenance management can be considered to be composed of the following functions: · maintenance planning. 1. in general. or keeping. Performing maintenance activities requires the use of resources such as spare parts. Maintenance. neural networks and Markov chains have been used for controlling and managing maintenance activities. drive for cost reduction and the like.2 Objectives and Functions of Maintenance The objective of any business organisation is to make profits. manpower. The objective of maintenance. including staffing/recruiting. Alternatively the objective should be to minimize the costs – the labour costs and the material costs as well as the loss in revenue due to loss of production. the principal objectives of maintenance would be: · to control the availability of the equipment.2. Obviously. at minimum resource cost. Maintenance can thus be defined as a set of activities. maintenance programmes have to be developed to ensure that physical assets will continue to fulfill their intended functions at a minimum expenditure of resources. safety issues. and planning and scheduling maintenance resources. maintenance activities which do not contribute to preserving or restoring the intended functions of assets should be eliminated. ageing plant and equipment. should. be to maximize the profitability of the organisation by performing activities which retain working equipment in an acceptable condition. The set of tasks or activities that constitute maintenance ranges from simple cleaning operations and lubrication to performing condition monitoring. 1. means preserving. that are related to preserving equipment in a specified operating condition. or restoring failed equipment to a normal operating condition. Performing such activities would obviously extend the useful life of the equipment. an item of equipment in a specified operating condition. The availability and utilization of these resources are of prime importance.1 Definition of Maintenance Maintenance is an element of a complete production system. therefore.include: environmental concerns. regulatory matters. and warranty and liability factors. or tasks.

Maintenance planning includes formulating and identifying ___________ policies. · controlling the performance of maintenance activities. Maintenance is an element of a complete ___________ system. at minimum ________________. . 4. The principal objectives of maintenance would be to control the availability of the equipment. · Budgeting.· directing execution of maintenance plan. Maintenance planning includes formulating and identifying organisation-wide policies that would help achieve higher maintenance productivity such as: · Do we repair the equipment or buy a new one? · Do we perform preventive maintenance or corrective maintenance activities? · Do we employ full-time repair personnel or should we subcontract work? Self Assessment Questions 1. _____________ in addition to fixing the broken equipment. The attitude of ______________ towards maintenance has increasingly been replaced by one which recognizes maintenance. 5. 3. involved simple activities like cleaning and lubrication. 2. · defining processes for performing maintenance.

Once the required resources are available. Other common tasks related to maintenance management include generating reports related to equipment. work and . If the required resources are not available. Any maintenance activity requires resources. This is a statement of maintenance tasks to be carried out in a specified period. The maintenance manager should track the work to completion. This way not only is the downtime cost kept to the minimum but also the resources are utilized effectively. Another important task is creation of a master maintenance schedule.3 Functions of Maintenance Management Responsibility for formulating the maintenance policies lies with top management.1. then the planned maintenance activity cannot be performed. In case the task does not get completed within the estimated time then corrective action would need to be taken to ensure further loss in revenue due to loss in production is minimized. In order to carry out maintenance activities as planned. This will lead to degradation of equipment performance and can also result in its failure. a review by the manager or the maintenance supervisor would be essential to ensure and authorize that the maintenance work has been carried out properly. the maintenance manager needs to organize the required resources and all these resources need to be available in the right quantity and at the right time. The maintenance manager should ensure that the equipment is restored to its normal working condition as quickly as possible. the maintenance activity can be initiated. The top management is also responsible for negotiating and authorizing the service level agreement. Once the activity is complete.

A ‘process’ can be defined as a set of tasks that.3. · the required spare parts in the required quantity. produces the desired result. An effective maintenance process must consider the relationships of all the tasks. · the required tools.costs. 1. 1. the tools and procedures used. measured and improved. A maintenance activity can be considered to be of high quality if: · it restores an item of equipment to its normal working state. · A repository of maintenance processes. without causing · any damage to the equipment or to any of its parts.1 Quality Aspects in Maintenance Quality is not absolute but relative. training and motivation of the people . instruments and facilities for performing the activity.2 Maintenance Organisation Maintenance organisation does not mean only the organisation of people in the maintenance department or their reporting structure.3. the need is for a good maintenance organisation. · an appropriate ‘on-the-job’ training programme for the repair men to enhance their ability to work. · it is initiated on time and the equipment is returned to production at the · required time. · In general. The above-mentioned conditions can be satisfied only when the maintenance organisation has: · skilled and committed repair men available to carry out the required maintenance activity at the required time. and the skill. It also includes activities related to collection and analysis of data related to maintenance and reporting to top management. It is more to do with the maturity of the maintenance process such that high-quality maintenance activities are performed. An important step in addressing the maintenance management problems is to treat the maintenance task as a process that can be controlled. when performed properly. · It incurs not more than the budgeted cost.

the organisation achieves the foundation for continuous improvement in processes. the organisation has to implement a measurement programme to obtain process feedback. cost estimates and plans. organizations at this level need to institutionalize basic management processes. 1.3 Initial Level The organisation operates on an ad hoc basis. 4. In order to improve performance.3. The organisation now has capabilities to face new challenges and achieve success. Determine if the current process is the desired process. defined. 1. Understand the status of the current maintenance process or processes.6 Managed Level . To climb up the maturity level.involved. 1. The performance of these steps calls for a process-oriented organisation and such an organisation develops over a period of time as enunciated by the capability maturity model (CMM). Tools are neither integrated with the process nor uniformly applied. However. 2. Commit resources to execute the plan. To improve the capabilities of the maintenance organisation the following steps8 must be performed consistently: 1. organizations at this level face risks when presented with new challenges. List down required process improvement actions. quality assurance and project tracking and oversight. With this. 5. organizations must have dedicated personnel who take care of the development processes. 3. Plan to perform the required actions.5 Defined Level The organisation has a repository or a set of defined procedures for carrying out development work.4 Repeatable Level Organizations which carry out similar projects with reasonable accuracy with regard to cost and time are at this level. To reach the defined level.3. managed and optimized.*9 The CMM was defined by the software engineering institute (SEI) for software development organizations and it classifies software development organizations into five levels initial.3. The strength to carry out similar activities stems from the prior experience. that is. the most important ones being project management. repeatable. without formalized procedures.3. 1.

To reach the highest level on the CMM. A few key process areas can be readily identified in this regard. 1. They are: · training strategy. The objective is not to classify the maintenance organizations also into one of these levels. Responsibility for formulating the maintenance policies lies with shop Supervisors. · supervisory review. · quality assurance. Any maintenance activity requires resources. 8. . when performed properly. 7. A ‘process’ can be defined as a set of tasks that. · resources management.The organisation has a way by which performance indicators are measured objectively. that is. 10. Since the data collection process is full-fledged.4 Improving Maturity in Maintenance Organizations The key process areas (KPAs) involved in enhancing the capability and maturity of a software organisation. cost estimates and plans. Targets are set for performance and a plan is made out to achieve the pre-set targets. The objective is only to identify the key process areas that would enable maintenance organizations to enhance their capabilities and maturity. 1. Quality is not absolute but relative. the effectiveness of the process can also be determined. The organisation operates on an ad hoc basis. Self Assessment Questions State whether following statement True or False 6. produces the undesired result.7 Optimized Level The organisation has capabilities to identify the weakest links in the development processes and eliminate/improve them. The CMM can be adapted to enhance the capabilities of the maintenance organizations as well. without formalized procedures. the organisation needs to put in place automatic data collection support tools.3. 9. Problems are identified proactively and eliminated. · work management.

The term ‘small activity’ should be defined by the quality assurance personnel because it varies from one organisation to another. The maintenance manager should identify the training needs of his subordinates and get them trained.2 Work Management Any activity. a welder may be re-trained to perform a pipefitter’s job. Resource here means manpower. scheduled and conducted.4. Most maintenance activities are performed in groups. manpower. The required resources should be available at the right time and in the right quantity. It would not be appropriate to track every small activity in the work-breakdown structure to completion.3 Resources Management As mentioned earlier. such as an oil refinery. 1. in one organisation an activity that takes only 15 minutes for completion is considered to be small. can be provided on safety and productivity-related issues. It therefore becomes necessary to train all the maintenance personnel on the aspects of team work. Every maintenance activity should be planned. tools. In some others. Holding resources in excess of requirements is wasteful while non-availability of required resources at the required time is undesirable since this result in loss of revenue due to loss in production. Management of resources is therefore critical to managing the maintenance function. The supervisor’s responsibility is to ensure that the required resources allotted for performing . Individual as well as organisation-wide training programmes should be planned. tools.1 Training Strategy Every maintenance organisation should have a suitable training programme for its personnel. Each of the tasks in the work-breakdown structure should have appropriate resources assigned to it.4.4 Supervisory Review Every maintenance activity should be performed under the charge of a supervisor. a small maintenance activity may take not less than 5 hours. facilities etc. In such a case it is better if some of the available personnel are re-trained on some trades other than those in which they have specialized. scheduled and tracked to completion. maintenance activities require resources in the form of spare parts. This is referred to as the work-breakdown structure. a bull’s eye chart may be appropriate for tracking work. for example. An organisation may not always find suitable people for performing a job. For example. For example. Training. 1. This is the responsibility of the maintenance manager.4. For small activities.· Subcontract management. 1. usage of modern tools etc. Coordination within a group is critical to completion of the maintenance task on time.4. irrespective of the time it consumes. Also the probable time to complete the tasks should be specified. instruments and facilities. is not managed if it is not planned and tracked. 1. A maintenance activity should be broken down into smaller manageable tasks.

They are responsible for collecting data while the maintenance activity is carried out. is expensive. 1. The assessment of the subcontractor can be done by inviting each to present their capabilities and verification of claims through independent references. 1.the maintenance activity are available to the repair gang on time and in the required numbers. Once the activity is complete. Like any other internal maintenance activity. Five important factors need to be taken care of if each of the key process areas mentioned above need to be implemented in the maintenance organisation. This is the work order management process. List of activities. The goals of the subcontract management should be to evaluate and select appropriate subcontractors for performing the maintenance activities.8 Verification of Implementation . and for analyzing them in order to come up with improved routes and work processes. Hiring these specialists on a full-time basis. A better option is to subcontract the work. Yet another goal would be to verify the correctness of the work performed. the supervisor should inspect the equipment in order to ensure that the equipment is performing as desired. 1. subcontracted work should also be managed. The maintenance manager can also visit premises to inspect the capabilities and to get firsthand information. The supervisor should also guide the repair gang in performing the activity. The repair men should be provided with a list of activities that need to be performed as a part of the maintenance. in most cases.4. A few more basic areas like maintenance planning and configuration management would also need to be considered.4.4.6 Subcontract Management A few maintenance activities require specialists at the job. The selection of the subcontractor should be planned. Increasing the ability to perform. Ability of the maintenance personnel can be enhanced by providing them with proper and relevant training. 1. tools etc. The subcontractor manager should select a suitable subcontractor based on a balanced assessment of the capabilities of prospective subcontractors. This involves establishment of policies and top management sponsorship. The supervisor should also report completion of the activity to the maintenance manager so that the actual costs incurred are logged. These factors have also been borrowed from the CMM.4.7 Commitment of the Maintenance Personnel The repair men need to be committed to perform the maintenance activities.5 Quality Assurance The quality assurance personnel should be responsible for identifying the optimum route for performing a maintenance activity.

1. The supervisor should also make use of this opportunity to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the individual repair men and arrange suitable training for them. 2. 14. The resources. Ability of the __________________ can be enhanced by providing them with proper and relevant training. estimated time to complete the work. Gathering metrics on every maintenance activity helps in estimating the time requirements and also the cost.5 Dynamics of a Maintenance Organisation Coordination within the groups is one of the most important factors that determine the effectiveness of any maintenance organisation. materials and tools. Feedback on the maintenance activity performed should be given to the concerned repair men.9 Metrics and Process Improvement This is a continuous process. Measurement of maintenance activity can be in terms of percentage of work complete to date. The maintenance manager. 4. The selection of the ______________should be planned. 3. The maintenance manager is responsible for scheduling maintenance activities. Self Assessment Questions 11. The quality assurance group. 1. Metrics and process improvement is a ___________________. Every maintenance organisation should have a suitable ___________ for its personnel. They are as follows: 1. tools etc. 15. 12.4. An activity is scheduled (as far as possible during the production windows in the case of preventive maintenance) and initiated depending on the availability of the required . The supervisor group. Four entities are important as far as the maintenance activities are concerned. 13. the maintenance productivity and quality of the maintenance work. including manpower. The key process areas (KPAs) involved in enhancing the capability and maturity of a ____________________.The supervisor of the repair men should verify the completion/ implementation of the maintenance activity.

Relatively more time is spent on performing this type of maintenance activity. This maintenance activity also does not incur any loss in production. Since the equipment is being taken out of production this maintenance activity results in loss of production. As the maintenance activity is carried out. this is called corrective maintenance. Due to shortage of resources the maintenance activity is pending. The maintenance manager tracks the activity to completion while the supervisor inspects and ensures the activity is carried out properly. the quality assurance group collects data on the process and analyses them with a view to improving the process. Since the equipment is not in an operating condition this maintenance activity results in considerable loss of production. Ettkin and Jahnig have described the work life cycle for the reactive and proactive perspectives. The equipment is taken out of production for a scheduled maintenance activity. Fix it when it breaks as in cases (4) and (5). The equipment is running and is producing the desired output. The equipment is not wanted for production and is available for maintenance. 4.resources. Prevent it from breaking down as in cases (1). an item of equipment or some part of it can be in one of the five following states: 1. They have divided corrective maintenance into two perspectives – ‘reactive’ and ‘reactive/proactive’ –and have defined preventive maintenance as a ‘proactive’ perspective. 2. Maintenance is being carried out to restore the equipment to an operable condition. 3. The equipment is in a failed condition.1 Maintenance Management Perspectives Kelly has described the dynamics of a production maintenance system considering a large process plant. This is called the ‘production window’. 1. The key distinction among the three perspectives relates to the time interval between the recognition of the need to perform a maintenance activity and the time at which the . At any time. 2. Since the equipment is in use there is no loss in production while performing this maintenance activity. (2) and (3). 5.5. It can be seen from the above that there are two perspectives of maintenance management: 1. This activity involves simple inspection of replaceable parts. The quality assurance group determines the process of performing the maintenance activity in an optimized manner. Maintenance is carried out while the equipment is running. this is called preventive maintenance. The equipment is in a failed condition.

5. results in loss of revenue.activity is actually performed. 1. which are primarily due to loss of production. When an item of equipment is down it results in loss of production which. corrective and other maintenance practices followed in organizations. There is rarely any organisation where only one type of maintenance is used. v scheduling the maintenance task. Performing a maintenance activity requires usage of resources such as manpower. material costs and direct overheads. and indirect maintenance costs. involve the following steps: v planning the maintenance task. the direct costs increase. The preventive actions under such a situation would be to: . Just as there is a trade-off between inventory holding costs and the reordering costs. The level of maintenance activity to be performed is obviously the one where the total cost is minimal. If personnel who operate and maintain the nuclear power plant of the submarine make serious mistakes. make changes and prevent failures. The intention is to detect potential failures early. The following section describes the preventive. which is an indirect cost.5.3 Preventive Maintenance Preventive maintenance is a proactive activity. In the case of the ‘reactive’ perspective. there is a trade-off between the maintenance costs and their benefits. the ship and its entire crew are in mortal danger. The total maintenance cost is the sum of direct maintenance costs. Most situations warrant a considerable mixture of maintenance types. The only difference is that of the time interval. in turn. This is an approach developed to reduce the likelihood of the failure of critical equipment to the minimum possible. in the case of nuclear submarines. is proportional to the loss in revenue. The cost of unavailability. Also the indirect costs resulting due to failure decrease. All the maintenance activities. 1. v performing the maintenance task. the time interval between the recognition and performance is very small as compared to the ‘proactive’ perspective. regardless of the maintenance perspectives. materials and tools. consisting of labour costs. for example. As the level of performing maintenance activity increases.2 Types of Maintenance The return of investment on an item of equipment can be maximized by maximizing its availability. This approach to maintenance becomes essential for any equipment where there are serious dangers to life should a failure occur. Availability of an item of equipment can be defined as the ratio of uptime to the sum of uptime and downtime. The cost of utilization of these resources is a direct maintenance cost. v Evaluation of the performance.

and replacement of those which are worn out. · Inspect each ship and each operation to ensure that every procedure and method is properly understood and executed. or after generation of a fixed cumulative output. This type of maintenance activity is applicable only for those items which exhibit a time-dependent failure . and the commanding officer must promptly report on the corrective actions. These objectives give rise to the following methods of performing preventive · maintenance activities: · fixed-time maintenance. · Condition-based maintenance. hours etc. This approach to maintenance is also important in highly automated plants. the level of distilled water in the battery of an automobile is checked after every 1000 kilometers and the brush ploughs of a grinding mill should be replaced after every 500 hours of running. · servicing. · Replacement of worn-out parts. · Report deviations to the admiral-in-charge.. such as car assembly. For example. · Audit the personnel so that they demonstrate satisfactory performance to their job standards. adjustment and similar activities. Analyze even the most trivial errors to determine what went wrong. · Detect the onset of a failure. Planned · activities are carried out and the main functions are: · inspection of critical parts of the equipment. Primary objectives of this approach to maintenance are to: · Increase the life of critical equipment by preventing failures. where the cost due to loss in production is very high. Fixed-time maintenance is that activity which involves inspection of critical parts of the equipment after a fixed time interval. power plants etc.· Train all the personnel in their own jobs. which includes lubrication. The fixed time should not be based on the calendar units but should be based on a fixed number of running units such as kilometers. These activities can prevent serious errors from occurring.

eddy currents. Damage is caused to other equipment as a consequence of failure. if repair is not economical. and then the parts have to be repaired or replaced. Running maintenance is normally carried out in situations where there is no threat to the life of the maintenance personnel. The costs involved in condition monitoring may vary widely. cracks in the structure of a building etc. on the other hand. This is a proactive-reactive approach to maintenance and results in the following tasks: repair of failed parts of the equipment. which can be measured either visually or by other means. the maintenance-related costs are usually high for the following reasons: The time required is usually much higher than other maintenance types because the cause of failure has to be identified. checking for leaks in fuel-carrying pipes. analysis of acoustic emissions. With this kind of maintenance policy. is a reactive activity and is performed when an item of equipment is not in an operating condition or is operating at a level below its rated capacity. A simple case of condition-based maintenance is the visual examination of the brake pads of an automobile. Corrective Maintenance Corrective maintenance. Complex situations require sensors and other high-tech tools to monitor the vibrations.mechanism. Along with inspection. such as the setting of warning limits for the Solidification of the lubricant. This type of maintenance is called running maintenance. In organizations where there are very few production windows. There is a cost due to loss in production. Corrective maintenance activities are also performed when condition monitoring indicates onset of a failure. as mentioned earlier. It is possible to identify a value of that parameter when action may be taken before full failure occurs. or how the failure can be prevented is not yet known. shock pulses etc. generally occurring in the form of breakdown maintenance. are expensive. corrective maintenance is predominant. This approach is designed to detect the onset of a failure. These methods. the maintenance personnel can also collect data which can be used as inputs by other methods of condition-based maintenance procedures. ultrasonic waves and thermographs also help monitor the condition of the equipment. Techniques such as oil analysis. Since condition monitoring gives sufficient warning of an impending failure it becomes easy for the maintenance manager to plan a corrective activity at a later time. In some situations it is possible to carry out some preventive maintenance activities while the equipment or plant is running. For example. This method of condition-based maintenance is inexpensive. Although. Detailed analysis helps in detecting an impending failure. Condition-based maintenance is also known as predictive maintenance. the time required to perform this activity is . correlating to the onset of failure has been identified. It is an appropriate option for preventive maintenance when the following conditions apply: Prevention of failure is not technically feasible. the solidification of the lubricant is an indicator of the machine’s wearing condition. replacement of failed parts with new ones. The obvious advantage of carrying out running maintenance is that there is no loss in production. A parameter. which the case is when the event leading to failure occurs in a predominantly random manner.

Minor repairs which cannot be performed while the equipment is running.5.5. The cost of utilization of the resources is a indirect maintenance cost. 20. corrective maintenance work is scheduled and carried out.much higher than the preventive actions require. Five entities are important as far as the maintenance activities are concerned. 1. The types of maintenance discussed in this section will help top management decide on questions like: should we carry out preventive actions? Or should we fix the equipment when it breaks? As mentioned earlier. we also realize that failures are unavoidable. as well as major repairs and overhauls. criticality of the equipment and the priority. This approach to maintenance is called opportunistic maintenance. The work is deferred to a later date if the priority is low or the equipment is not so critical. . are carried out after the equipment or plant is shut down. the maintenance department personnel attempt to detect the cause of the failure. it should be closely associated or integrated with the resources management function. Whatever be the choice of the maintenance policy. Trained maintenance personnel also have a role to play in reducing the maintenance time. most situations in organizations warrant a mixture of maintenance types. an emergency maintenance is carried out. repair and replace certain other parts of the equipment. The next chapter describes a few resources management techniques. The cause is usually recorded for future analysis and corrective actions are prescribed. 18. The maintenance work that is carried out is not directed at the primary cause of failure of the equipment or shut-down. While we know that prevention is better than cure. 19. If the priority is high or alternatively if the equipment is critical. 17.4 Shut-down Maintenance Shut-down maintenance can either be a preventive activity or a corrective activity.5 Opportunistic Maintenance The maintenance work that is carried out is not directed at the primary cause of failure of the equipment or shut-down. this can be reduced considerably if the organisation has all the maintenance procedures and systems in place. Shut-down maintenance can either be a preventive activity or a corrective activity. Self Assessment Questions State whether the following statement True or False 16. The maintenance manager is responsible for scheduling maintenance activities. Depending on the availability of resources. When a maintenance activity is carried out on an item of equipment there exists some opportunity to inspect. Once an item of equipment fails. 1.

Plant and equipment availability is of paramount importance and effective management of the maintenance function goes a long way in ensuring the attainment of the objective of maximization of availability 1. False 7. Discuss Dynamics of a Maintenance Organisation. Production 4. Explain Objectives and Functions of Maintenance. it has now come to be accepted as an important function – one of strategic importance – particularly in the capital-intensive continuous-process industries such as power plants. Maintenance 2.1. What are the features of Preventive Maintenance? 1. maintenance of plant and machinery was a thankless job and the maintenance function was considered a necessary evil.7 Terminal Questions 1. 2.8 Answers Self Assessment Questions 1. True . Ignorance 3. This transformation has taken place in about 40 years and has brought about automation and increasing sophistication of plant and equipment. From this state. 4. nuclear power generating stations. Resource Cost 5. 3. Organisation-wide 6.6 Summary Until recently. chemical and fertilizer plants. True 8. 5. and has been hastened by the fact that the loss of one hour of production is much more expensive today than it ever was before. Write a note on History of Maintenance. and integrated iron and steel works. What are the steps involved in Maintenance Organisation.

Maintenance Personnel 14. Training programme 13. Page 3 – Part 1. True 18.2 3.9. False 10.3 Copyright © 2011 SMU Powered by Sikkim Manipal University . False 17.1. Page 2 – Part 1.4.2 4. Subcontractor 15. False Terminal Questions 1.4 5.1 2. .2. Page 10 – Part 1.Page 11 – Part 1. True 20. Software organisation 12. Page 6 – Part 1. False 19. True 11. Continuous Process 16.

1 Introduction Objectives 2.3 Spare Parts Statistical Inventory Theory Models Inventory Costs How Much to Order? When to Order? Selective Inventory Control Procedures Manufacturing Resource Planning The Bill of Materials Master production Schedule Inventory Status File Requirements Pegging Rescheduling Process 2.OM0006-Unit-02-Business Maintenance Unit-02-Business Maintenance Structure: 2.6 Summary 2.5 Effect of Maintenance types on Resources 2.7 Terminal Questions .4 Tools and Facilities 2.2 Man Power 2.

An important issue in manpower is that of determining the optimal number of skilled repair workers. can be used to determine the optimal number of welders. requires some knowledge of the rate of failure (called arrival rate) and the repair distribution. can be used to determine the optimal number of welders.1 Introduction For performing any maintenance activity resources are required. For example. In this study the characteristics of the maintenance resources are discussed. Manan . which utilize the theory of minimizing the total cost of unavailability and labor. An important issue in manpower is that of determining the optimal number of skilled repair workers. rigging etc. Basker. One solution to this problem would be to schedule individual workers rather than repair gangs. However. A Maintenance job is usually performed by a repair gang or repair crew consisting of an optimal mix of skilled workers. Historically. Queuing models and simulation have been used also for determining the optimal number of tools and facilities such that the maintenance costs are minimized. plumbers etc. which utilize the theory of minimizing the total cost of unavailability and labor. a maintenance job may require the services of a welder for just about an hour whereas the same job may require a fitter for more than four hours. The procedures used are similar to those used for determining the optimal number of repair gangs required for carrying out maintenance activities.8 Answers 2. The usage of the models. fitting. Objectives: After studying this unit you shall be able · To explain the characteristics of the maintenance resources · To define techniques used for managing the maintenance resources · To assess comparison of the available resources management techniques 2. plumbers etc. Important among these are maintenance materials (spare parts). not all skills are required for the same amount of time. tools and facilities. Techniques used for managing the maintenance resources are also discussed.2 Man Power Almost all the maintenance activities require skilled personnel and most of the activities require more than one skill such as welding. The disadvantage of assigning a maintenance job to a repair gang or crew is that the manpower utilization within the gang is not effective. manpower. however.2. Queuing models. simulation techniques and queuing models have been used for determining the optimal number of repair gangs required to be deployed in a system. Queuing models.

3. 2. Using selective control procedures along with some heuristics. The objective of spare parts management is therefore to minimize the total of inventory holding.1. there is also a cost of ordering a re-supply of spare parts. stock-out and ordering costs.1 Statistical Inventory Theory Models 2. and the number of repair gangs required such that the total costs (sum of labor cost and downtime cost) are minimized. Using the statistical inventory theory models. Using the material requirements planning/manufacturing resources planning (MRP/ MRP-II) technique.and Husband have used the Monte Carlo simulation technique to determine the optimal number of repair workers required to perform the maintenance activities in a shop comprising a finite number of identical machines. Barnett and Blundell have used the Monte Carlo simulation technique to optimize the number of repair gangs and the size of the repair gangs given that the maintenance jobs generate demand for repair workers from three different trades’ mechanics.3.3 Spare Parts The spare parts (maintenance material) problems have been traditionally approached in three ways: 1. 3. In general. electricians and pipe-fitters.1 Inventory Costs Every organization keeps spare parts so that defective and worn-out parts of equipment can be replaced. Maintaining the spare parts in a store also incurs some cost. By holding spare parts in the inventory the funds of the organization are tied up which could have otherwise been invested in other activities. 2. 2. on the other hand. The objective is to determine the number of repair workers needed to constitute a repair gang. two basic questions need to be answered: · How Much to Order? · When to Order? . Newman and Brammer and Malmborg have utilized a material requirements planning/bill of materials approach to manage the manpower resources. In addition to the holding and stock-out costs. not having the required spare part results in a stock-out cost.

the demand for spare parts resulting from the need to perform maintenance activities needs to be satisfied.2. therefore. The total inventory cost TIC = the holding cost + ordering cost.3. These models help determine what has been traditionally known as the optimum order quantity. During this period. The following is an illustration of a basic inventory model which takes into account the holding and the ordering costs.3 When to Order? An order placed with a vendor for re-supply of spare parts takes some time to get filled. 2. . If the annual demand for an item is D. Thus The minimum of TIC can be obtained by differentiating the above equation with respect to Q and equating the resulting derivative to 0.2 How Much to Order? Several models have been developed based on the principle of minimizing the total inventory costs. Then the holding cost is given by where p is the unit price of the item and r is the annual stockholding rate related to the stock value. we have If The annual demand D for an item is 8000 units The cost of placing an order is Rs. The complexity of the problem lies in the fact that neither the demand nor the lead-time is constant. This provision normally takes the form of safety stock which is determined based on the service level. The service level is defined as the probability of not having a stock-out situation.00 The rate of interest is 20 per cent annually Then the optimum order quantity. 100. this is referred to as the lead-time.1. Thus. obtained by utilizing the above equation for Q.00 The unit price of the item is Rs. The maintenance manager must make sufficient provisions to take care of demand during the lead-time because the cost of stock-out is undesirable in any situation. 8.3. Let Q be the ordering quantity. is 1000.1. Mathematical models are however available to determine the timing of placing an order taking into consideration the characteristics of the demand during the lead-time as well as the lead-time itself. where c is the cost per order. then the number of orders to be placed is given by The ordering cost is.

1 Most applications found in the literature make use of a combination of selective inventory control procedures because classification or categorization of items based on just one criterion is inadequate for managing the maintenance materials. During the days when computers were not available. The following paragraphs describe some of the applications involving a combination of selective inventory control procedures. 4) _______________ and queuing models have been used for determining the optimal number of repair gangs.2 Selective Inventory Control Procedures The statistical inventory control techniques require that each item. Ramani and Krishnan Kutty have utilized an ABC×VED classification technique where not only the annual value of usage of the part is taken into account but also the criticality of the part is given importance. Technique Description ABC Pareto rule VED FSN HML SDE Table 2. the safety stock and the minimum and maximum inventory levels require to be determined for each of the items in the stores. 3) Every organization keeps spare parts so that defective and ___________ of equipment can be replaced. This is the principle of the selective inventory control procedures. irrespective of its criticality. The re-order quantity. Several procedures for classifying items into homogeneous groups are available. be given equal importance.Self Assessment Question 1) Maintenance job is usually performed by a _____________or repair crew consisting of an optimal mix. Instead effort was concentrated on a few expensive and fast-moving items. a few of which have been listed. low Unit price of the parts Scarce. Items were categorized into homogeneous groups based on their characteristics. slow and non-moving Usage rate of the parts High. 2) Several models have been developed based on the principle of minimizing the total _____________. medium.3. 2. essential and desirable Criticality of the parts Fast. paying equal attention to all the inventory items was not feasible. difficult and easy to procure Procurement lead-times . By this method the spare parts are classified into nine Basics Of Formulation Annual usage value of the parts Vital.

a part may be called critical if the loss of production caused by non-availability of the part is very high. The second dimension uses an SDE classification. a range of service level is specified. Saha and Mohanty have developed a spare parts stocking policy with an objective of minimizing the downtime of critical equipment. which categorizes the spare parts into groups based on their criticality. VED and the SDE classification procedures which results in eight categories of items as shown in table 2. A three dimensional classification technique has been used for the purpose. and Ni is the standard deviation of the downtime cost (E denotes expectation).6m where m is the maximum quantity of parts requested at any time. There are several ways by which the criticality of a part can be defined. A part may be classified as a critical part if the consequence of running out of stock is severe. The two categories formed on the basis of sales value are high sales value and low sales value. If a substitute part is readily available then the part may be less critical. takes into account the annual usage value Bi of the part i and is given by where Ci is the price of the part and Di is the total annual demand. the stocking policy for a spare part in the V/S/F category is 2. which is based on the procurement leadtime while the third dimension makes use of the FSN classification (usage rate). The second dimension makes use of the criticality aspect of the spare part and is based on the revenue lost due to loss in production (Mi) which is given by where pi is the downtime cost per unit time per failure involving the concerned part. It is the time required to replace or repair the part. Duchessi.2. A reorder point-order quantity technique is used in conjunction with this method for replenishment of parts. The first dimension utilizes a VED classification methodology. while the categories formed on the basis of criticality of the parts are critical and non-critical. which makes use of the ABC classification criteria.categories. For example. the multi-unit spare inventory control. statistical inventory control models or heuristics are utilized to determine the ordering parameters such as the order point and the order quantity. For each of the nine categories. The stocking policies for each of the 27 categories are determined using heuristics. For instance. Tayi and Levy have utilized a two-dimensional classification method. In other words. . The first dimension. These eight categories have been formed by taking only two categories in each of the three dimensions. fi is the number of failures per unit time involving the part i. makes use of a combination of ABC. Although the selective control procedures make the managing of the multiple inventory items easier. in the categories formed on the basis of lead-times are long lead-time and short lead-time. MUSIC-3D. it should be noted that most of the classification criteria are subjective. Moreover.

1 The Bill of Materials The bill of materials defines how one or more items are brought together to make up another item.2 shows the bill of materials for a petrol engine. In addition to this. an inventory status file. Later in this section. The technique is based on the principle of dependent demand. in turn. a bill of materials file. As mentioned earlier in this section. As seen in the figure. defines the constituents of an end-item. semi-finished or finished form. some applications involving management of maintenance inventories are also discussed. It consists of a master production schedule.1 shows the components of MRP. It can also be considered to be an assembly definition. a logic processor and a capacity planning subsystem. in a raw.3. It is an operations as well as a financial system. in general. 2. any manufacturing organization would want to have the following questions answered: · How much to order? · When to order? Both these questions are also answered by the MRP technique. Figure 2. The immediate . The components can either be manufactured in the shop or can be boughtout items.Table 2.3. the piston rings and the bearings.3 Manufacturing Resources Planning The manufacturing resources planning (MRP-II) technique has been used widely for managing production resources. All other constituents of the petrol engine are referred to as items. Figure 2. MRP-II possesses two basic characteristics which go beyond the closed-loop material requirements planning (MRP). the petrol engine is an end-item. The components in the diagram have been described briefly. the application of MRP is also very simple. This section provides a brief overview of the closed-loop technique. It is also a system simulator. The piston assembly. is made up of the piston. the crankshaft assembly and the cylinder assembly.2 2. The central idea of MRP is to time production/acquisition of batches of parts/components so that they are available as they are required in assemblies. An end-item is an item at the highest level of hierarchy in the bill of materials. The demand for an inventory item is termed dependent when it is directly related to. The bill of materials indicates that the engine consist of three subassemblies – the piston assembly.3. or derived from the demand of another inventory item. The bill of materials.

is an item whose parent is the piston assembly. The bill of materials also carries with it some other information such as whether the part is bought out or is manufactured within the organization. The MRP technique uses the bill of materials for computing the requirements through a process called explosion or desegregation.predecessor of an item is called the parent item.1 . Figure 2. for example. The piston.2 two bearings (indicated in parenthesis) go into the making of a piston assembly. As seen from Figure 2. the bill of materials also indicates the quantity of an item that goes into making a parent item. In addition to defining the relationship between items.

The quantity of all the items to be produced in a given period must equal the quantity budgeted in the production plan as shown in Table 2. which is a budget set by the management. It states what end-items need to be produced and how many needs to be produced in a month or week. this can be broken down into 12 production months. In order to make the computation of the requirements easy.3. . This would mean that 0.2 Master production Schedule A master production schedule is a statement of production of end-items for a given planning horizon. The priorities for the production of items specified in the master production schedule are set by the sales plan. Also. This includes raw materials. level codes are assigned such that identical items used in different end-items are maintained at the same level. This is further broken down into a schedule for specific variants of carbide tools such as SPAN 50. the top management has budgeted 6 tones of carbide tools to be produced during the year. The requirement at one level is computed first before proceeding to the next level.3.Figure 2.5 tones of tools need to be produced every month on average. it may so happen that the items are used at two different levels.3.3. The master production schedule indicates the quantity of items to be produced in a given period. As shown in Table 2.2 Every item in the bill of materials is given a number or code such that no two parts have the same number.3. TPAN 75 and CPAN 75 that need to be produced. There may be a case where an item is used in two different end items. The total weight of the variants scheduled for production during the month when totaled equals the budgeted weight as shown in Table 2. 2. Since the demand for carbide tools is all through the year. semi-finished and finished parts. The master production schedule is constrained by the production plan.

2 TPAN 50 0.2 0.3 0. The file is kept up to date by posting the transactions which take place as a result of a receipt or issue of parts into and out of the stores.1 0.5 0.3.0 0.4 0.1 0.2 0.Item code Jan Production Plan Carbide 0. In general.1 0.5 0.5 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.1 0.1 Table 2.5 0.3.2 0. the scrap allowances etc.3 0.5 0.1 0.1 0.5 0. the safety stock. the inventory status file also contains the planning factors such as the procurement or manufacturing lead-times.1 0.5 0.1 0.3.1 2. In addition to the stock data.3.1 0.1 0.1 0.5 Tools Master Schedule SPAN 50 0.3 Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 0. 2.3 0.1 0.5 0. · Quantity on order.1 0.1 0.3 0.4 Requirements Pegging . the inventory status file maintains the following data for every item: · Quantity on-hand.2 CPAN 50 0.1 0.5 0.1 0.5 0.3 0. the batch sizing policy.1 0.3 0.3 Inventory Status File The inventory status file contains up-to-date information about all the materials stocked in the stores.1 0.

materials on order may be received earlier than the due date while in some others the scheduled receipt may not be expected to be in the stock on time. irrespective of its criticality. 7.Explosion is a process concerned with generating gross requirements. The scheduled receipts are taken into account while computing the net requirements.4 Tools and Facilities Queuing models and simulation have been used also for determining the optimal number of tools and facilities such that the maintenance costs are minimized. 9.5 Rescheduling Process Scheduled receipts are orders which have already been released to the shop floor or to the vendors. 2. 6. it becomes necessary to trace the demand for an item to its source and this process is referred to as pegging. 8.5 Effect of Maintenance Types on Resources As mentioned earlier. The manpower requirement is also known precisely. in the case of a proactive perspective the maintenance activity is planned and the timing is also determined well in advance. A master production schedule is a statement of production of end-items for a given planning horizon. Activities such as fixed-time maintenance enable managers to determine the exact number of parts required. The statistical inventory control techniques require that each item. 2. The procedures used are similar to those used for determining the optimal number of repair gangs required for carrying out maintenance activities. Self Assessment Questions State whether following statement True or False. not be given equal importance. The inventory status file will not contain up-to-date information about all the materials stocked in the stores.3. . 5. This uncertainty may result in rescheduling of the receipts. Scheduled receipts are orders which have already been released to the shop floor or to the vendors. For audit purposes.3. The bill of materials defines how one or more items are brought together to make up another item. This is a deterministic situation. In some cases. 2.

statistical inventory theory models and selective control approaches for multi-item inventories for spare parts planning and queuing theory and simulation for manpower planning. This approach to maintenance is called cannibalization. the maintenance activity is neither planned nor scheduled in advance. If a failure occurs and the required resources are not available to restore the equipment to a working state the equipment is kept waiting in the repair queue. and if manpower is a constraint. Consider a situation where two identical items of equipment have failed due to different failure modes. such as the use of ABC and VED classifications. In order to reduce the impact of failures on the profitability of the organization the following techniques are usually adopted: · Increase the number of maintenance personnel.In the case of a reactive perspective.6 Summary The problem of management of maintenance resources has been discussed. Managers in some organizations carry out cannibalization as a last resort in order to meet the production requirements. Selective control procedures. 2. As per the definition of maintenance. If the equipment is critical. Since failures occur randomly it becomes difficult to predict the resource requirements. The basic purpose of this study is to provide the necessary background and present in a proper perspective the need of the development of an MRP based technique for the management of maintenance resources. There are some . explaining the commonly used methods and discussing the work done by researchers working in the area of spare parts management. This perspective has been created by initially discussing the various types of maintenance resources and their characteristics. this happens to be an undesirable situation and should be avoided. does not reduce the number of inoperable parts. In some cases cannibalization is also practiced. however. Statistical inventory theory models and techniques for selective control have been discussed in detail. have been used by industries for spare parts planning. If the required maintenance materials are not available in the stores then one option available is to replace the failed parts of one with the working parts of the other failed item of equipment. · Use standby equipment. · Build-up spare part inventories and tools. and the various models and techniques which are commonly used. if not both. Cannibalization. cannibalization can lead to severe control problems at a later time. then the immediate requirement would be to restore at least one of the items of equipment to a working state. namely. The technique should be able to take into account preventive. condition-based. and corrective maintenance activities (and not just one of them).

5. For example. Briefly summarize effect of maintenance types on resources. Classifying spare parts into homogeneous groups using a classification scheme is difficult since different types of spare parts require different classification schemes. Such classification schemes. statistical inventory control models. 2. or categorization. Repair gang 2. In these cases as well. belts. in turn. are utilized to determine the ordering parameters. Summarize Bill of Materials.7 Terminal Questions 1. ABC and FNS are more appropriate for standard spares such as pulleys. based on just one criterion is adequate. 2. For the above reasons. classification. ABC×FSN. such as the re-order point and order quantity. whereas VED and SDE may be more appropriate for special spare parts (ones which are used on particular equipment). or heuristics. 2. Worn-out parts 4. Define Statistical Inventory Theory Models. such as ABC×VED. 3.8 Answers Self Assessment Questions 1. Explain Man Power. chains. Explain Master production Schedule. Simulation techniques . sprockets and bearings. researchers have suggested the use of multidimensional classifications. Inventory costs 3.fundamental problems encountered in the use of selective control techniques for spare parts management and these are as follows: Such classification is always rather subjective and this is more so in the case of spare parts. and these models have their own shortcomings. give rise to a large number of classes of spares with each class having its own planning and control parameters. VED×SDE×FSN and ABC× VED×SDE. For spare parts. 4.

Refer 2. False 7.1 5. .1 2.1 3. Refer 2. True Terminal Questions 1. True 6.2.2.4 Copyright © 2011 SMU Powered by Sikkim Manipal University .3.2 4.Refer 2.2. Refer 2. True 9. Refer 2.3.5. False 8.

Operations. To fully understand the breadth of Work Management it is important to understand what Work Management is. The Work Management process requires the full support of the entire organization (e.4 Summary 3. selected. Engineering.3 Work Management Process 3. Maintenance. .OM0006-Unit-03-Work Management & Identification Unit-03-Work Management & Identification Structure: 3.g. etc. production. Scope of work includes maintenance. scheduled.5 Terminal Questions 3. and R&D activities. projects. waste management. planned.1 Introduction Our goal is to establish excellence in Work Management.. Planning & Scheduling.6 Answers 3. closed and critiqued.1 Introduction Objectives 3.).2 Functional Requirements Equipment Maintenance Function Work Order Management Function Inventory Management Function Vendor Management Function Subcontractor Management Function General Information Systems Specifications 3. executed. Work Management – A deliberate process in which a scope of work is identified.

Subcontractor management subsystem. Track overall maintenance function performance.Objectives: A maintenance management information system must help you to · Schedule the Maintenance activities. · Plan procurement of resources. manpower and tools would be available. 6. the scope of the system should be clear. 3. .2.2 Functional Requirements Before designing the information system. The functional requirements of the information system should be gathered first. Schedule preventive maintenance work. hiring of subcontractors and arranging facilities. Inventory management subsystem. at the least. 3. 3. Work order management subsystem. 5. 5. 2. A maintenance management information system. Requirements can be gathered by interviewing the prospective users or circulating questionnaires. Vendor management subsystem. Plan maintenance work – ensure materials. 3. Equipment maintenance function. should have the following functions. Store maintenance data including failure and repair data. Update data when a failure or preventive maintenance activity is initiated and completed. 2. · Report on the performance of the overall maintenance system using standard indicators.1 Equipment Maintenance Function The equipment maintenance function needs to perform the following: 1. Predict failures to a chosen level of confidence. 1. · Optimally utilize maintenance resources. 4. 4.

6. 2. Schedule release of planned orders (materials). 5.4 Vendor management function The vendor management function needs to perform the following: . Track status of work in progress. Convert critical maintenance requests into work orders.2. Produce reports as desired by the maintenance manager and top management. 8. Generate work orders for preventive and corrective actions. 4. covering manpower. 3. Schedule work visually. 2. 3. Store and maintain inventory data including skills and tools. Track utilization of manpower. tools and facilities. Print reports as desired by the maintenance manager and top management. Track status of manpower. Plan capacity. 3. Produce reports as desired by the maintenance manager and top management. materials and tools. 7. 6. 3. Alert the maintenance manager to place orders for materials as planned and in the required quantity. 9.3 Inventory management function The inventory management function has to do the following: 1. Create maintenance requests. Update materials inventory data as and when an issue or receipt of materials occurs.2. 3. 4. Track maintenance costs.2. List pending work. tools and facilities.7. 7. 5.2 Work order management subsystem The work order management function is required to perform the following: 1.

3. 2) The work order management function is required to perform Plan capacity. Maintain data related to subcontracts.6 General Information Systems Specifications The general information systems specifications need to perform the following: 1. 3. 6. Self Assessment Questions State whether the statement is true or false. . In order for a system to be efficient.5 Subcontractor management function The subcontractor management function must: 1. 3. Maintain vendor information. Organize skills provided by subcontractors. Cater for three levels of users’ administration. 2. 5. 1) The subcontractor management function must not maintain data related to subcontracts. Validate data entry. 3) The equipment maintenance function needs Schedule preventive maintenance work. Print related reports. 2. Track cost. Devise metrics for evaluation of vendors. top management and middle management. Track progress of subcontracted work. 4.2. Produce reports as desired by maintenance manager. 3. Track quality of subcontracted work.1. 3. 2. Make on-line data entry. each level of management needs to have access to the required information and should be able to extract the data which is needed.2.

The statement of work in the contract provides a description of the mission-related work that DOE expects to be performed. A number of these programs are mandatory. safety and protecting the environment. At the top-level these processes and tools include the contract with DOE and management programs committed to by the contractor to execute the statement of work and requirements in the contract. Contractors develop management programs to execute much of the work of contracts. · Execute the work. Each year DOE and the contractor review the contract and the progress of work as part of the annual budget process. Identify Work Concept This element describes the processes and tools put in place that determines the work that a contractor performs.3 Work Management Process These steps to be followed in work management process are: · Identify the work that needs to be performed. and · Critique the planning. other programs may be developed by the contractor in furtherance of contract execution. Whether mandatory or voluntary on the . they would entail routines used to monitor attributes important to mission execution. · Close the work item after completion. · Select the specific work that will be planned. On a day-to-day basis. scheduling and performance of the work that has been accomplished. · Schedule the work for performance. Mechanics The contract between DOE and the contractor provides the top-level mechanisms for work to be identified. · Plan that work. The statement of work. requirements stated in the contract and the annual budget process form the top-level means of identifying the work that will be performed.4) General information systems specifications will not validate data entry. 5) The vendor management function needs maintain vendor information. 3.

they provide a method to track. Work requests not supporting the current mission. In furtherance of management programs. which are initiated by personnel who identify work that needs to be performed to allow the work item to be entered into a work management system. Routines are executed to monitor equipment. Management The annual budget process provides contractor and DOE management the resources to manage the work that is identified for further planning and execution. This process compares the work accomplished and that which remains to the funding that DOE believes will be available to execute work in the coming years. no contractor has the resources to complete every identified work request. a continuous process. Select Work Concept Management programs identify the operational activities and routines that need to be completed to meet mission deliverables. these management programs provide one of the primary paths for work to be identified. The discovery of new information may result in the need for additional research and development or design changes to existing systems and equipment. prioritize and coordinate the management of several categories of work. While the threshold for identifying work items needs to be sufficiently low to all capture work items. Program and project plans are updated with the information developed during the annual budget process. or improvements.part of the contractor. Other types of work are converted into work requests. an identified project or specific facility need are screened out and no further resources applied to their resolution. operator rounds. On-going assessments or reviews may identify the need for corrective actions. Work is also identified on a daily basis. and similar repetitive procedures. at a high level. From this process the work to be planned and executed in a given year is identified. system and environmental parameters. changes. These routines can include Technical Surveillance Requirements/ Limited Condition of Operations TSR/LCO surveillances. Workers are encouraged to be vigilant in monitoring facility conditions for system or equipment problems. environmental monitoring. therefore. The Select Work element funnels the work requests through a validation or screening process to determine those work items needing to be completed. The schedule is also a tool that ensures that work is properly identified. The identification of work is. They provide the opportunity to proactively manage the identification of emergent work. Work management systems are put in place by contractors to collect work requests into a single place. After the work . These include work requests. contractors often put routines in place. Additional management tools that are used in the work identification process also support other elements of the work management process.

This second type of work will normally be given a relative priority. The work selection process starts with a work validation. Effective work management processes utilize a graded approach to resolving work requests. equipment identification. traded off with lower priority work or put forth as a candidate for additional funding. · Operational Impact: Work requests that have immediate impact on the health and safety of contractor personnel need to be processed rapidly. . and interface with mission requirements. If the work item is a duplicate it should be screened out. Attributes evaluated include: · Work Scope Identification: A clear scope statement is necessary to understand what work activities are necessary. Or the work request may require a documented resolution. Knowledge of these drivers allows effective prioritization of work planning efforts. These tools should be reviewed to determine whether duplicate items are already entered into the system. The work may be simple enough that no initiating work documents are required (so-called “tool pouch” or “quick fix” items). stay in compliance with the established safety basis and operating requirements for that facility or project. or required plant operational modes to facilitate tracking and planning and then entered into the work management system. etc. Work may be tied to contract milestones. Work requests that have equipment impacts must be evaluated and the systems configured to protect equipment and workers. · Work Duplications: Contractors use Work Management Tools to track work orders. This validation process evaluates attributes of the work items to determine if the work item should be processed through the work management system. Location of the work. or. Work requests that are clearly not going to be accomplished due to cost impacts should be screened out at this point. if sufficiently important. A strong validation process incorporates two-way communications with the work request identifiers. or management commitments. Mechanics Work selection is a continuous process to handle the work requests identified on a daily basis. · Need Date: Work requests must clearly indicate any deadline dates and the estimated time period for completing the work. · Work Cost: Work requests may be identified that will require funding that is beyond that available to the contractor. may all provide key information needed to properly validate the work. coded with respect to like components and systems. operational requirements. problem symptoms.request has been validated a formal work order is entered into the work management tools used by the contractor.

Those work requests entered into the work management system result in the generation of work orders. Mature work selection processes incorporate an understanding of a graded approach to work planning.

Management
Contractors need to clearly define who has responsibility and authority to perform the validation activity for their facilities and projects. The validation authority typically resides in the Operations organization because they are responsible for mission execution and normally retain configuration control of the facility systems, structures and components. The work management process descriptions need to define the planning processes used by the contractor staff. Requirements for the type of planning required, based on potential mission impact, hazards analysis and complexity of the work activity, are critical to decision-making during work selection. Plan Work Concept This element describes the process of taking a defined scope of work that has been selected for planning and developing/packaging technical documents to safely and efficiently perform that work. This process includes identification/incorporation of applicable technical specifications and requirements into technical documents, identifying and mitigating job hazards, identifying and obtaining required permits, developing work instructions, and defining post activity acceptance. Mechanics An initial step in planning work is determining what type of work execution vehicle will be used to perform the work. As previously discussed under Work Selection, this decision has often already been made, on a preliminary basis, prior to the initiation of Work Planning; however, it is confirmed as part of this element. Is the work to be performed with a very simple work package where the worker has the knowledge to perform the work and little or no instruction is required or will the work require a work package with more detailed instructions? The following criteria might be used to determine whether work can be performed using a very simple work package: · No medium or high risk activities. · No activities requiring hold points. · Will not alter configuration of equipment from documented design. · Will not present any unusual hazards.

· No hands-on work with radioactive material except incidental or routine work activities that involve low potential of worker exposure or workplace contamination. · No opening of contaminated systems, components, containers. · Minimal external coordination required. · “Skill-of-the-Craft” Work. Such tasks should be documented in a work package by the Field Work Supervisor (FWS) and released to work by operations and documented on the document releasing work.

Management
Work management systems are often put in place to collect work requests and maintain and file documents in a single place. They provide a method to track, prioritize, and coordinate the management of several categories of work. They also provide a means for the work planning organization to interface with the operations organization and ensure that work is moving through the planning pipeline in a manner that supports mission execution. Schedule Work Concept Schedules are tools used by work management organizations to communicate and coordinate work activities. This element describes the processes and tools associated with establishing schedules. Typically, work is identified from various sources (missionrelated commitments, Authorization Basis requirements, maintenance routines, etc.) and flows through a “rolling work week process” (described below) into an integrated schedule. The rolling work week concept is typically established based on either an 8 or 12 week duration.

Mechanics
Most sites have developed a fairly common set of schedules to implement graded approaches to conduct of operations. These commonly include a Plan of the Day (POD) along with a slightly longer view, often one week (so-called Plan of the Week, POW). Various methods exist to move information from longer-term schedules to these two short-term scheduling tools. The rolling work week concept provides an effective tool for managing the development of schedules. It involves setting a specific time frame (or “window”) within a longer-term schedule on which to focus increased management attention. Common time frames are eight to twelve weeks.

· For work that falls within the work window, increased emphasis is placed on planning, detailed schedule concerns and coordination of the work. This time period of increased attention allows: o Optimization of planned outage windows, scheduling all tasks that require particular facility conditions or that impact production commitments; o Development of a detailed technical sequence for complex jobs; o Addressing only items that need to be scheduled in detail, i.e., they require coordination of resources, complex work, etc; o Grouping of similar work to efficiently use resources and equipment by facility mode, available space, system/equipment; and time to verify that parts are available and staged. The work planned during the work window is “Locked-In”, that is, committed to by all concerned, two weeks in advance. This lock-in process adds discipline to the scheduling process and provides focus for final work preparation and coordination. After lock-in, the schedule is under a formal change control process; this encourages people to only lock in work that is truly ready to work. This level of planning and commitment permits the development of precise resource loaded schedules; it supports aligning support resources to the schedule and permits other detailed preparations such as verifying that fully-trained workers are available. This level of planning and scheduling attention also improves task readiness, it allows crews time to review work in advance of working. A formal post work week critique is held to evaluate what got done, what didn’t get done and why. It should be clear from the level of effort inferred above, that the implementation of a rolling work week process requires a commitment from all organizations to make the system work. Work on the rolling work week is facilitated by the existence of schedules that integrate all important work. Management Management tools for a successful scheduling process include: · Senior Management involvement (Frequent and Regular) – Critical Path Meetings · Accountability meeting – weekly schedule commitment meeting · High level schedule change control authority once work is locked in · POD – A daily meeting intended to review facility and schedule status

· POW – A weekly meeting intended to review and status the higher level facility schedule · Rolling work week process – described above · Outages – scheduled periods where equipment systems or facilities are available to perform pre-determined work · Metrics – tools used to measure success of schedule performance · Documentation of key scheduling assumptions – essential to the development of baseline schedules Execute Work Concept This element describes the processes and tools associated with the actual performance of the work. Mechanics For each assigned task. ensures that procedures and references are the latest revision and that all of the required permits are issued and up to date. This work should be completed in parallel with establishing worker protection and industrial safety requirements. Applicable work instruction prerequisites are completed to ensure readiness to work. · Assemble tools and material at job location. the first-level supervisor performs a final review of the work instruction. · Remove insulation. · Complete rigging preparations. · Assemble required test equipment. The execution of work begins when the work package is released for work by Operations and runs through the completion of work in the field or facility. · Build scaffolding and install lead shielding. . This element is centered on the first-level supervisor (the person directly overseeing the work crew) and the crew that is engaged in the performance of the activity. Example components of work execution include the following: Preparations: · Contact job support personnel as required.

the first line supervisor reviews the instructions for a complete and accurate work history and performs post activity testing and any rework identified by the post activity testing. Radiological Work Permit. including expected worker radiological recovery actions · Job-specific hazards and their controls · Applicable precautions and limitations · Required safety equipment · Discuss hold points with employee(s) responsible for the completion of the hold point and employee(s) performing work immediately before or after the hold point · Industrial. Pre-Job Brief: · Scope of the task · Review of prerequisite section of the work instructions · Responsibilities of all participants. the first line supervisor completes all system/equipment checks described in the work instructions to return equipment to service. Management Management tools put in place to monitor work execution include the Plan of the Day or other work progress meeting. field walk-downs. the first-line supervisor oversees and directs the work activities in accordance with the approved work instructions. environmental or radiological hazards of the task from the work document. · Finish prefabrication work. which monitors the day-to-day progress of work execution. The supervisor documents relevant as-found conditions and the work performed. job hazards analysis. water storage/recovery systems). · Set up welding equipment if required. tents. As the work completes. power. and identifies all discrepancies and incomplete work items. · Build contamination control devices (catch basins. or facility knowledge · Potential abnormal events and contingency plans After completing preparations and getting their work crew prepared to perform the job. Formal programs to have management observe work in the field will provide not only .· Provide necessary temporary air. Finally. and water requirements.

including quality. as appropriate. returning (or turning over) equipment and systems to operations. normally in the operations organization. Documentation: · Document work completion against requirements. · Update the files for the affected system/equipment. resolve any deviations.g. Documentation associated with the work evolution can then be signed off. regulatory and safety basis requirements. . documenting the completion of work. · Dispose of excess materials and waste properly. · Update as-built drawings. The system/components can be returned to operations subject to any controls defined in the work instructions. capturing repair history. e. but a more accurate feel for work difficulty and potential coordination issues. .. or authorized incomplete/open work items.status. are satisfied and test results are approved. These steps include the process of verifying that work has been completed. or exceptions have been authorized by the person responsible for accepting the work. calibration and preventive maintenance data into the Work Management System. · Remove all temporary/test equipment and restore system/components to operable status. Important attributes of these processes are discussed below. Verification: · Verify all administrative and technical requirements. a number of sites use standard computerized templates to capture relevant historical information. Schedule updates. an inventory of equipment and parts used and feedback to the work management process. · Ensure condition tags and other documents are in the completed closure package prior to returning it to the Work Management Center. based on work completed also provide feedback on work execution. Mechanics The work closure process can be described as several related steps. Close Work Concept Work can be closed and declared complete when defined requirements in the approved work package have been met.

Work critiques take on many forms. · Return unused parts to the warehouse. · Verify required procedure.) process takes selected jobs and critiques them to identify good practices. ranging from individual job post work critiques to critiquing all of the work performed by a group or a facility within a specified time period. the first line supervisor should consult with the work planner and the systems engineer as needed. · Accept the system/equipment for operability and return to service in a timely manner. If there are authorized open items. and incorporated into subsequent work.. Critique Work Concept This element describes the processes and tools associated with performing a critical analysis of work to ensure that issues. Management The first-line supervisor is responsible to verify work completion against requirements defined in the approved work package. the work package should have been changed and procedures amended by the appropriate formal documentation. Improvement opportunities are . and return the system/equipment to the required configuration to support facility operations. improvements or lessons learned are identified. and ensuring completion of the work closure functions. the previous work week (Work Week Critique) period. e. · Release all remaining clearance tags. Mechanics The post work critique (ALARA. Inventory: · Document material used. drawing and training updates are completed prior to placing the component(s) in service. and lessons learned.g.· Retain the closure package in accordance with the Site’s records retention requirements. Return to Operations: · Review work activity and all testing for system/equipment operability. issues. · Evaluate the authorized incomplete/open work items for any operational impact concerns. etc.

Management Management tools for a successful critique process include: · Weekly critique meeting · Regularly scheduled meeting following each work week to critically review performance of the previous work week (attended by Senior Management) . including: § Schedule & Cost Performance § Manpower Utilization § Emergent Work § Backlog · Action Item Tracking: A formal process in which action items from the Work Critique meeting are assigned responsibility & tracked through completion. The report should also include: o A breakdown of the types of work scheduled & accomplished for the week. o Metrics which track and trend the work week elements. · Work Week Critique Meeting: A regularly scheduled meeting used to perform a thorough analysis of the work execution. Issues should be trended to identify programmatic issues. typically covering the previous weeks work activities · Work Week Critique Attendance: Work week critique targeted audience should typically be that of Facility Senior Management.typically formally documented and followed to closure through a commitment tracking system. etc. including the specifics regarding what was accomplished. The work week critique process is a continuous improvement process. Emergent. including Emergency. but was not & what the issues were which prevented that work from being accomplished. The applicable post work critique output should be discussed in the work week critique process described below. · Work Week Critique Report: A formally prepared report which comprehensively addresses the work week being analyzed. what was initially intended to be accomplished. whereby all groups involved in work execution meet to perform a critical analysis of all aspects of the week performance.

Explain briefly Identify Work in Work management Process. 9) Identify describes the processes and tools put in place that determines the work that a ________ performs. Management programs identify the operational activities and routines that need to be completed to meet mission deliverables. normally in the operations organization. . Execute work describes the _______ and ______ associated with the actual performance of the work. 7) _________ can be closed and declared complete when defined requirements in the approved work package have been met. or exceptions have been authorized by the person responsible for accepting the work. 5. 3. Explain components of work execution. Work can be closed and declared complete when defined requirements in the approved work package have been met. 10) ___________________ systems are often put in place to collect work requests. 3. 3. Explain Functional Requirements in Work Management. Explain Schedule Work in Detail. Identify Work describes the processes and tools put in place that determines the work that a contractor performs. 4.4 Summary The Work Management process requires the full support of the entire organization.· Appropriate Metrics including tracking and trending · Standard Critique reports · Action Item Tracking / Accountability · Worker feedback Self Assessment Questions 6) Management tools for a successful critique process include _________. Describe Close Work in Work Management Process.5 Terminal Questions 1. 2. Management programs identify the operational activities and routines that need to be completed to meet mission deliverables.

True 6. True 4. 5 4) Refer Page 8 5) Refer Pages 9. True 3. . Tools 9. Worker feedback 7. 10 Copyright © 2011 SMU Powered by Sikkim Manipal University . False 5. Close Work 8. False 2.1 2) Refer Page 10 3) Refer Page 4. Contractor 10.3. Processes.6 Answers Self Assessment Questions 1. Work management Terminal Questions 1) Refer 3.

and low morale of workers. The breakdown of the machines resulted in a great loss of productive time and also led to several problems such as not being able to meet due dates. one-year back.4 Maintenance Economics Breakdown-time Distribution Preventive versus Breakdown Maintenance (Single Machine) 4. formation of sludge’s and corrosive compounds on the machine parts. failure of insulation in electrical circuits.1 Introduction Objectives 4. misalignment of shafts and pulleys. etc. the machines caused a great deal of anxiety to the management by failing quite frequently and unexpectedly.2 The Maintenance Function 4. The reasons for breakdowns were many: development of high temperature in the bearings. especially while processing important jobs. In the initial stages.1 Introduction The turret lathes and gang drills were acquired second-hand.OM0006-Unit-04-Emergencies or Breakdown Process Paper: ISO 90012000/Qs Elements Unit-04-Emergencies or Breakdown Process Paper: ISO 9001-2000/Qs Elements Structure: 4.6 Terminal Questions 4.7 Answers 4.5 Summary 4. . overheating of motors. breakage and slips of gear and belt drives. and were immediately commissioned.3 Maintenance Strategies Corrective or Breakdown Maintenance 4.

The machine operators can only operate the machine when they are in working condition. Such maintenance is expected to reduce the frequency of machine breakdowns. It improves the systems overall reliability. each crew consisting of two workers. After a long search. or to repair any equipment that has failed. Maintenance is defined as ‘any action that restores failed units to an operational condition or retains non-failed units in an operational state’ or ‘an activity carried out for any equipment or asset to ensure its reliability to perform its functions’. and consequently higher production efficiency. they are to be paid overtime. The maintenance crews can do breakdown maintenance as well as preventive maintenance for all the four machines. Minimizing the failure count or their adverse effects leads to increased safety. to most people. he selected four technicians for employment. Maintenance work on a machine requires both workers of a crew. and cannot attend to any repairs or maintenance. reduced downtime and cost of operation. is any activity carried out on an asset in order to ensure that the asset continues to perform its intended functions.In order to combat these problems. The four workers were divided into two crews.2 The Maintenance Function Maintenance. Machine and component failures can trigger incidents or cause costly production interruptions. Objectives After studying this unit you shall be able to · Explain the functions involved in maintenance · Recognize the strategies of maintenance · Distinguish between preventive and breakdown maintenance · Evaluate the economic aspects of maintenance 4. the proprietor of the workshop advertised for maintenance specialists for the turret lathes and gang drills. Minimizing these adverse effects is the role assigned t maintenance. or to restore to its favorable operating condition. or to keep the equipment running. As he wanted technicians with experience on the specific machines he had. . Preventive maintenance of a machine consists of dismantling the machine and checking all its important parts and making the necessary adjustments and replacements. The technicians accepted the job under the condition that if ever they are required to work in the second shift on a day. availability. the proprietor had considerable difficulty in finding he maintenance specialists.

· Down-time is minimized. management today sees a much larger role for maintenance.1: Evolution of Maintenance Philosophy Table 4. Over the past years. energy efficiency. It ensures that the equipment is able to maintain quality standards. First Generation Second Generation Third Generation · Fix it when broke · Scheduled Overhauls · Condition monitoring · Systems for planning · Design for reliability and and controlling work maintainability · Low-tech computerization · Hazard studies · High-tech computers · Failure modes and effects analysis · Expert systems · Multitasking and teamwork Table 4. · Safety is ensured. the significance of maintenance and its role in plant operation has changed significantly. The evolution in the maintenance thought process is rooted in the changing complexity of industry itself.1 shows the evolution of the maintenance philosophy.The objectives of maintenance are to maintain equipment and facilities in such condition that: · They give trouble-free service and output at rated capacity. in addition to its traditional roles of enhancing plant availability and lowering costs. as well as the quantitative and cost standard of outputs. It determines the risk-safety. Maintenance efficiency is viewed as an integral part of business effectiveness. product quality and customer service profile of the organization. and · The cost of operation and maintenance is minimized. From a simple expectation of keeping equipment running or restoring it to the desired operating condition. environmental integrity. The maintenance function plays a supporting role to effective operations. . The evolution can be seen to cover 3 different generations of thought.

This led to the concept of preventive maintenance. there was an added interest created in the field of maintenance planning and control systems. How Equipments Fail Maintenance is concerned with controlling the condition of equipment. the failure rate keeps decreasing until a relatively low constant level is obtained. In practice. The failures that do occur during the period are truly random. As these components drop out one by one. As this dependence grew. called infant mortalities. or sheer quality deficiency in their manufacture. the weak components from the infant mortality period have either been repaired or replaced. the growth of mechanization and automation has become more complex and even small breakdowns in equipment affect the operation of the whole plant. Third Generation (after the 1980’s) – Since the 80’s. Second Generation (1950-70) – The second generation emerged as the result of growing complexity in equipment and plant design. downtime became a problem and management tried to find means and ways to minimize and prevent these failures. primarily due to the presence of weak or substandard components or design inadequacies in not properly understanding the operating conditions. 4. expert systems and continuous improvement programs have developed. 2. During the infant mortality period. Most equipment that survives infancy will continue to perform with few failures occurring. the failure rate is high. there is a rather high incidence of early failures. First Generation (1930-40) – The first generation represents the earlier days of industrialization where mechanization was low. Factory equipment was basic and repair and the restoration process was simple. this pattern manifests itself when a collection of machinery is subjected to rigorous operation. These have led to major developments in maintenance philosophy based on manufacturing reliability systems. With increase in mechanization. Hence. As maintenance costs started to rise sharply relative to other operating costs.1. industry became increasingly dependent on these complex machines. Among collections of equipment. Downtime did not matter much and no need was felt to treat maintenance as a high priority issue. The reason for the occurrence of these failures is not fully understood. unpredictable and cannot be prevented by additional testing or burn-in of the components. Researchers into the reliability of equipment recognize that within a collection of machines. 3. reliability and availability have become key issues. there is a definite pattern of lifespan. This is the useful period of the machine. Repairing and restoration had become more difficult and special skills and more time was needed to maintain and repair equipment. During this period. fatigue due to flaws in the molecular structure of the metals or plastics involved. but they are thought to be at least partially due to abrupt changes in stress distribution in the components.3 Maintenance Strategies .

Some of the common approaches to maintenance are as follows: · Breakdown maintenance · Preventive maintenance · Predictive maintenance · Proactive maintenance Type of Maintenance Strategy Maintenance ApproachSignificance Fix-it when broke Large maintenance budget Scheduled Maintenance Periodic component replacement Condition-based Maintenance decision Monitoring based on equipment condition Detection of Sources of Monitoring and Failures correcting failing root causes Maintenance Strategy Breakdown Maintenance Preventive Maintenance Predictive Maintenance Proactive Maintenance Although the scope of maintenance will vary depending on the type of industry. b) Generation and distribution of utilities. maintenance functions may be identified as primary or secondary functions. The secondary functions are: a) Maintenance stores.Over the years. etc. many new approaches have been advocated as maintenance strategies that are intended to overcome problems related to equipment breakdown. its size. the prevalent management policies. equipment. buildings and grounds. c) Alteration to existing equipment and buildings. .. The primary functions are: a) Maintenance of existing plant. b) Plant protection. d) New installations of equipment and buildings.

b) Repair and/or replacement of faulty component(s): Once the cause of system failure has been determined. 4. so as to restore it a specified operating state. Corrective maintenance is performed at unpredictable intervals because a components failure time is not known a priori.1 Corrective or Breakdown Maintenance This is one of the earliest maintenance strategies implemented in the industry. · Corrective maintenance may be defined as the repairs carried out to restore equipment.3. · The approach to maintenance is totally reactive. breakdown maintenance. It consists of the action(s) taken to restore a failed system to operational status. · Restoring a failed system usually involves replacing or repairing the component that is responsible for the failure of the overall system. the rectification of the fault should be processed in the same manner as for planned maintenance work schedules. The goals and objectives of corrective maintenance management are. To rectify the problem. . maintenance is activated on breakdown. action must be taken to address the cause. and as the name suggests. a properly designed fault reporting system must be instituted and similarly. Corrective maintenance is typically carried out in three steps: a) Diagnosis of the problem: The maintenance technician must take time to locate the failed parts or otherwise satisfactorily assess the cause of the system failure. corrective maintenance is periodically performed on the equipment. the maintenance technician must verify that the system is again successfully operating. the repair work is performed only after a piece of equipment has failed. It is also called. d) Salvage. · Corrective maintenance strategy has no routine maintenance task and therefore is also described no scheduled maintenance strategy. a) To restore the faulty equipment to a healthy operating state as promptly as possible. and b) To do this in a cost effective manner. c) Verification of the repair action: once the components in question have been repaired or replaced.c) Waste disposal. which has broken down or developed a fault. usually by replacing or repairing the components that caused the system to fail. · However.

the failure of any one of its parts can cause a breakdown of the machine. breakdowns may affect production and thus reduce profits. The growth of __________ and automation has become more complex.· Corrective maintenance in a broader perspective may also include activities related to correcting potential causes for failure or malfunction that might not have been adequately considered when the equipment was designed. if careful observations of repeated failures of an equipment or system suggest that the remedy lies in correcting the system. each part will have a different failure distribution. the practice of attending to machines only after they have broken down may be uneconomical. Such a distribution will show the frequency of maintenance-free running times for a given number of operating hours. _________ Maintenance strategy has no routine maintenance task. management must know how the breakdowntime is distributed. But in the case of a complex machine. For example. A simple machine with few moving parts will probably have breakdowns after a fairly large number of maintenance-free runtime hours. 5. The first generation represents the earlier days of ___________ where mechanization was low. proper feedback to the design department may lead to alterations in design that will reduce or eliminate failures. 2. what are its cost implications? 4. Even where capacity is not a constraint.1 Breakdown-time Distribution In order to establish the cost implications. The decision of maintenance policy is more of an economic decision rather than a technical one. Self Assessment Questions 1. Moreover. 4. The breakdown time distribution of the complex machine probably will . 4. thereby eliminating or at least minimizing the failures. 3.4. and where production interruptions may be negligible. As maintenance is an economic decision. · Where capacity and demand are close. and the adoption of other maintenance practices may reduce interruptions to production. the breakdown maintenance practice may be costlier than other maintenance strategies. Restoring a failed system usually involves _________ or repairing the component. maintenance engineers should be allowed to consider the possibility. Machine and component failures can trigger _________.4 Maintenance Economics Maintenance policy refers to an organization’s policy in respect of the maintenance function of a set of equipments. In such cases. In such a situation.

2 Figure 4.free run-time as the other two but the distribution has much wider variability.2 represents a graphical description of the degree of variability in free-run-time.. say A. In this case. C & D. If we assume that the failure of any one of the sub-systems can cause the failure of the entire system.show greater variability than the simple machine even though it may have the same average. The frequency distribution curve ‘c’ has the same average maintenance. Equipment can be considered as a total system with its sub-assemblies as sub-systems.8. and the ‘run-times free of breakdowns’ as the ‘x’-axis.8 and D = 0. maintenance free run-time as that of the simple machine. . which exceed a given free-run-time. and the reliability factors are A = 0.4 for the percentage of breakdowns.8 ‘0. It also shows that it is only after a few periods of trouble free running. The variability depicted by curve ‘c’ is typical of complicated equipment that needs ‘fine’. the reliability of the total system would equal the product f reliability factors of each of the sub-systems.9 ‘0. B. For example. while curve ‘b’ represents a more complex machine.40). The total system reliability will be the product of the reliability of each individual system. The same data that we have used to plot figure 4. subtract from 100 the figure 4. and plot this against the run-time. C = 0. B = 0.7.7 = 0.8 ‘0. By reliability we mean the probability that the system will give trouble free service. T3 = Average free run time free of breakdowns Figure 4. if the total system has four sub-systems. curve ‘b’ is the exponential distribution and exhibits medium variability and curve ‘c’ exhibits high variability. adjustments before it can give reasonable trouble-free service. Curve ‘a’ depicts the behavior of a simple machine.9. Curve ‘a’ exhibits low variability from the average maintenance free breakdown-time ‘Ta’. i. it would amount to (0.4 can be used to plot the percentage of breakdowns that exceed a given runtime as the ‘y’-axis. Say to obtain the ‘a’ curve in figure. that one can be sure the machine will operate reliably.e.

This can be considered the standard preventive maintenance cycle time. after which the equipment is ready to work. Ideally. preventive maintenance should be performed just a little before normal breakdown is likely to occur. shortening the preventive maintenance cycle can reduce the number of actual breakdowns. In actual practice.Figure 4. When this happens. there will be breakdowns that occur before the equipment is shutdown for preventive maintenance.4: Breakdown-time distributions 4. Since preventive maintenance is meant to reduce the total plant down-time particularly unscheduled event – its timing and frequency are important. The total time period ‘Ta’. over a period of time. If the distribution has greater variability. In such cases. inspected and parts replaced.2 Preventive versus Breakdown Maintenance (Single Machine) Consider a preventive maintenance schedule. The probability of occurrence of a breakdown in the two different cycles depends on the specific breakdown-time distribution of the equipment.4. and the length of the standard preventive maintenance cycle. the situation is slightly different. This preventive maintenance work takes a time ‘Tm’. the machine is shutdown. ’Ts’ can be considered the breakdown cycle.5 gives the percent of time a machine is working for the three distributions of breakdown-time shown in Figure and the ratio of the standard maintenance period to . Figure 4. the running time between the preventive maintenance and the breakdown plus the time taken to repair the breakdown. the average maintenance free run-time. more breakdowns are likely to occur during the course of the standard period. which after a machine has been running for fixed time ‘Tr’. is equivalent to ‘Tr’ (maintenance free run-time) plus ‘Tm’ (the time take to do the preventive maintenance).

In this type of situation. The percentage of machine running time depends on the ratio of the standard maintenance period and the average run-time. there is an optimum value for the standard maintenance period. as there is better predictability of when breakdowns are likely to occur. but only till a peak is reached after which lengthening standard maintenance period seems to reduce the percentage of machine running time. Such a relationship is shown for the three different breakdowns time distributions. like those depicted by curve ‘a’. preventive maintenance is highly benefited to machines whose breakdown time distributions have low variability. Second. there is little gain in . the relation of preventive maintenance time to repair time is important. and hence less availability. a standard preventive maintenance period can be set in such a way that the total downtime is reduced. the machine works for a small percentage of time. ‘Ts’. From figure.5: Present of time when the machine is working and breakdown distribution Certain generalizations can be made from the above three graphs. it can also be seen that for curves ‘b’ and ‘c’ an increase of the ratio results in an increase in the percentage of machine running time.average maintenance-free run-time. It can be seen that for low values of the ratio of standard maintenance period to average maintenance free runtime. In the case of curve ‘a’ (for breakdown-time distribution with low variability). since a low ratio would mean too many machine stoppages. Unless the preventive maintenance time is less than the repair time. This suggests that for breakdown time distribution with low variability. it is assumed that either preventive maintenance or repair puts the equipment in line for a running time of equal length. First. ‘Ta’ for a given breakdown-time distribution. Figure 4. This is obvious. there is a similar increase in machine running-time.

6. We also need to take into account other effects of unscheduled downtime. Initially.5 Summary You need to make decisions at the beginning of each shift regarding maintenance. or more than the time for repair. 8. all the machines are free and have jus had a preventive maintenance done. 9. The breakdown time distribution of the complex machine probably will not show greater variability than the simple machine. Equipment cannot be considered as a total system with its sub-assemblies as subsystems. Maintenance policy will not refer to any organization’s policy. 4. and 3. an increase in the standard period would mean less number of preventive maintenance cycles and more repairs. In general. both in terms of contribution earned by them as well as their criticality because of their propensity to break-down. What are the Maintenance Strategies? . Self Assessment Questions State whether the statement is true or false. Effect on production losses if plant shutdown could have been avoided. such as 1. 10. you will deal with jobs. Additional stoppage time because maintenance crew cannot start repairing immediately after the breakdown has occurred. Since some parts are most important to machines. The percentage of machine running time depends on the ratio of the standard maintenance period.6 Terminal Questions 1. it is better to perform corrective or breakdown maintenance. 7. For a given breakdown time distribution. The probability of occurrence of a breakdown in the two different cycles depends on the specific breakdown-time distribution of the equipment.preventive maintenance. 2. Effects of scheduling preventive maintenance for non-productive days or shifts with no loss of production. 4. when the repair time is equal to maintenance time. the percentage of machine running time continues to increase with the increase of standard preventive maintenance period. If preventive maintenance is equal to.

. False 7. Incidents 6. 4. True 9. Refer 4.3. Refer 4. Explain evolution of Maintenance Policy. True 8. Summarize Breakdown and Corrective maintenance. Refer 4.2. Industrialization 4.3.2. 4. 5.2 5. Replacing 3. Explain Preventive versus Breakdown Maintenance. Refer 4. FalseTerminal Questions 1. Corrective 5.2 2.1 4. Refer 4.1 3. Mechanization 2.7 Answers Self Assessment Questions 1. True 10. Explain Breakdown Time distribution.1 Copyright © 2011 SMU Powered by Sikkim Manipal University . 3.

2 Functions & Feature of Maintenance Engineering 5. Maintenance covers two aspects of systems – operation and performance.1 Introduction Objectives 5.OM0006-Unit-05-Types of Maintenance Systems Unit-05-Types of Maintenance Systems Structure: 5. Maintenance is carried out in anticipation of or in reaction to a failure. replacement of parts or total replacement of .3 Types of Maintenance Systems Routine Maintenance Planned /Scheduled / Productive Maintenance Break down or Corrective / Remedial Maintenance Preventive Maintenance Predictive Maintenance Condition Based Maintenance 5. which can be achieved through repair.1 Introduction Once the machinery is purchased it must be maintained.6 Answers 5. to ensure or restore system performance to specified levels.4 Summary 5. Maintenance is defined as the restoring of an item to its original condition or to working order.5 Terminal Questions 5.

Machineries lose its efficiency after some point of time due to various factors such as wear and tear. misuse etc. Maintenance management also aims at developing a reliable and high quality production system. Through proper maintenance of these machineries. Objectives: After studying this unit you shall be able . based on the practical and economic grounds Maintenance of any kind performed on machinery or equipment is a consequence of the fact that it started deteriorating before failing. retain the productivity and maintain safe working conditions by reducing the probability of accidents. Failure to perform maintenance in time to maintain the availability of the machinery will have serious effects ranging from benign to catastrophic. Types of maintenance /strategies discussed in this unit are: · Routine Maintenance · Planned Maintenance · Break down Maintenance or Corrective Maintenance · Preventive Maintenance · Predictive Maintenance · Condition Based Maintenance · Total Productivity Maintenance The maintenance plan for a company’s assets can be a combination of the above strategies and could be adopted on the same machine. but there is no guarantee here that the exact nature of defect surfaces. aging. Between these alternatives the management decides. Sometimes accelerated testing is used to induce failures and know the behaviour of the systems. It is evident that the best maintenance strategy is selected for reducing breakdowns. Hence a systematic and structured approach to proper & cost effective maintenance is required. Improperly performed maintenance or not carried out in time can escalate the problems because of faulty parts running. operational life can be extended.the devices itself. Developing effective maintenance procedures to restrict such deterioration or failure is vital.

Maintenance management is entrusted with the total task of keeping the machinery. use of robotics and other Computer Integrated systems are developed and deployed for producing high quality products. equipment and services in proper working condition that involves planning. · · · · · Rapid strides in the advancement of manufacturing technology and its processes with higher powers and speeds.2 Functions & Feature of Maintenance Engineering Maintenance Engineering is the function of the production management that is concerned with day-to-day problems of keeping the physical plant in good and acceptable operating condition. breakdown maintenance or preventive maintenance etc. repeatability.. To offer these requirements. high cost CNC machines. Therefore industries have entered into the era of high technology maintenance management to cater to the production requirement of minimum downtime and maximum productivity. requirement of high accuracy. use of complex processes. . 5. high up-time and prolonged mean time between failures (MTBF). like repair. rapid traverses. Flexible manufacturing systems. higher feeds. Such high cost and sophisticated state of art machineries need to operate at optimal levels of performance with high degree of reliability. scheduling and execution of many maintenance activities. etc. have all warranted the use of sophisticated machineries for production. improved productivity.· To explain how systems work at their optimum efficiency · To prepare a plan to preserve the value of the assets by different methods · To calculate how to maximize production capability · To prepare a plan and schedule for maintenance work and prevent failures and breakdowns · To Improve quality of products and productivity · To Use of maintenance staff optimally · To Minimize or avoid accidents by periodical inspection and repairs.

working. cleaning. repairing leaks) which include preventive maintenance and forms part of the annual operating budget.Malfunctioning of machineries/equipment due to failure to upkeep the operating conditions may result in serious repercussions of reduced capacity. lubricate two machines daily] It can be even day to day operational activities to keep the plant running (say: replacement of light bulbs. [say: check all compressors first on Mondays. reliability and maintainability of a plant is very important for the maintenance engineers. These aspects are to recognized by the maintenance department. a cyclic operation recurring periodically. increased production costs.3 Types of Maintenance Systems A way of reducing the plant breakdowns is to select the best maintenance strategy. machines. lubricating systems. and equipment by the maintenance staff to preserve such machineries in as near to its original condition as is practical and to realize its normal life expectancy. outer cleaning.e. Widely adopted maintenance techniques/strategies are: · Routine Maintenance · Planned Maintenance · Break down Maintenance or Corrective/ Remedial Maintenance · Preventive Maintenance · Predictive Maintenance · Condition Based Maintenance · Total Productivity Maintenance [Discussed in detail in Unit-10] 5. inspection etc. small repairs. RM can be classified as: 1) Running maintenance 2) Shut down maintenance. . 1) Running maintenance is the work carried out when the equipment or the machine is performing some operations i.3. Maintenance is the work performed on an asset such as utility.1 Routine Maintenance [RM] RM is a procedure followed regularly i. cleaning of machines. These include say greasing or lubricating the bearings / systems.e. injury to workmen and finally frequent breakdowns etc may lead to protracted delivery of the product thus inviting customer dissatisfaction. Hence the relationship between availability. 5. It includes activities like inspection. production of low quality products.

de-scaling furnaces.3.2 Planned / Scheduled / Productive Maintenance Planned maintenance is the activities carried out according to a predetermined schedule and hence known as scheduled maintenance or productive maintenance. E. thus avoiding a situation of emergency maintenance. boilers 5. Planned maintenance reduces the machine downtime.2) Shut down maintenance: certain minor maintenance activities cannot be carried out when the machine is running and hence carried out by shutting down the machine.1 Advantages a) Simple to establish & follow b) Little or no clerical work c) High degree of prevention by intercepting developing faults d) A more advanced stage calls for ’service instructions on a pre-printed schedule and checklists’. increases productivity as compared to unplanned one and hence it is followed as per the maintenance policy of the company. the emphasis is on machines: a) What does the manufacturer prescribe? b) Is the unit utilised for two or three shifts per day? c) Is it working under normal load? .3. 5.2 Disadvantages a) RM may not provide the service specified by the manufacturer b) May ignore information regarding preceding breakdowns c) Service required for a machine at different frequencies may be ignored d) Similar machines are serviced at same frequency irrespective of usage 5.3. reduces the cost of maintenance. It involves inspection of all machineries.1. repair and carry out all requisite maintenance before actual break down happens. In this type of service.1. overhaul. lubricate.g.

Unforeseen work is reduced. faithful implementation and recording f) Initial list of planned maintenance will be in detail 5.3.3. can be defined as the maintenance which is required when an item has failed or worn out. to bring it back to working order.1 Characteristics of Planned Maintenance a) Instructions are more detailed than in routine maintenance b) Calls for differently timed service for the same unit c) Schedule is drawn with dates d) Establishes the work-load for the crew e) Entails considerable planning effort. replacement of parts. Planned repair/rectifying the problem is carried out when it is more convenient and cost effective after its failure rather than to disrupt the production with RM.3. . Corrective maintenance is carried out on all items where the consequences of failure or wearing out are not significant and the cost of corrective maintenance is not greater than preventative maintenance.2.2.3 Break Down or Corrective/ Remedial Maintenance Breakdown Maintenance is the method of operating the machines to run until they fail and then repair in order to restore them to an acceptable condition. adjustments are shown in overall plan b) Detailed instructions reduce the chance of missing any activity. Also called as ‘on-failure maintenance/corrective maintenance’.d) Are the conditions as good as those envisaged by the manufacturer? e) Do we allow for extra attention owing to corrosion-including conditions? 5. c) Provides as much attention on the equipment for the best judgement of the planner [For details on ‘the principles of planning & scheduled maintenance’ refer Unit 6] 5.2 Advantages of Planned Maintenance Considers all the changes in conditions of use & increased wear of parts a) Inspections.

or where no other strategy will work. etc. Repairs are done after the machine fails and hence this becomes a repair work. Frayed tempers put unnecessary pressures and disturb delivery commitments. Ex: electric motor may not start. Repair is restoring an asset by replacing a part which is broken or damaged. involve hazards. taken after the failure happens.3.1 Characteristics of Break-down Maintenance System · No services except occasional lubrication unless failure occurs · No maintenance men on regular basis · Maintenance done by sub-contractors · No organised efforts to find out reasons · No stock of spares · No budget · No records · Initially it looks economical · Creates internal problems namely: Who to do the repair? From where to get parts? How do we pay for them? Who will go & buy parts? . misuse or improper maintenance. lost output. For example: non-critical low cost equipment. 5. or reconditioning that part to its original or acceptable working condition.3. Here the machine and the work on that machine stops operating. The need for repairs can result from normal wear. o Upset schedule resulting in panicky. drive shaft broken and hence the transmission fails.e. increased downtime. On-failure maintenance can be effective if applied correctly. This system could be called as ‘Operate to Failure (OTP) ’– no predetermined action taken to prevent failure. i. vandalism. Corrective maintenance activities include both emergency repairs (fire fighting) and preventive (or corrective) repairs. The above type of repairing and setting the equipment to working condition can be called as corrective maintenance.Corrective maintenance may be programmed. This method is expensive in terms of maintenance cost.

3.4 Preventive Maintenance PM is a regularly scheduled maintenance activity. preventative maintenance is carried out only on those items where a failure would . In line with management’s policy on obtaining the best value from the maintenance funds.3. 5. with an objective to anticipate problems and correct them before they occur.3.3.3.3.3. detection and prevention of incipient failure.3 Advantages 1) Low cost if correctly applied 2) Requires no advanced planning other than ensuring spares availability 5. This is normally programmed. Preventive maintenance is carried out to prevent an item failing or wearing out by providing systematic inspection.2 Objectives of BD/Corrective Maintenance 1) To put back machinery back to work and minimize production interruptions 2) To control costs of maintenance crew to the minimum 3) To control cost of the operations of repairing 4) To control costs of repair & replacement parts to minimum 5) To control investment cost on purchase of standby or back up machines 6) To carry out appropriate repair intermittently at each malfunction to improve the life of the machine.4 Disadvantages 1) No warning of failure – safety risk 2) Uncontrolled plant outage – production losses 3) Requires large standby maintenance team 4) Secondary damage – longer repair time 5) Large spares stock requirement 6) Provision of standby plant 5.5.

Periodic Inspections . repair and major overhaul. PM’s prerequisites are: a) Proper design and installation of equipment b) periodical inspection of plant and machinery to prevent breakdowns c) repetitive servicing and overhaul d) lubricate. etc. fire alarms. but it is found that a greater number of machine failures are at the peak when machine gets progressively worse over a period say months/ years. sub-station transformers. lubrication. Many of these items are also subject to a statutory requirement for inspection and preventive maintenance.g. clean and up keep To achieve prevention of break-downs planned service is carried out with the explicit additional objective of detecting wear points and ensure perfect functioning by replacing parts Here the safe overhaul interval is selected. e. lifts. checking.result in expensive consequences. 2) Condition-based Maintenance [explained below] 3) Opportunity Maintenance (find out the opportune moment for maintenance) The preventive maintenance is carried out at irregular intervals and this interval is determined by seeing the actual condition of the machine. It is much economical to carry out preventive maintenance. 2. item replacement. battery back up at sub-station. circuit breakers. -To avoid breakdown & ensure smooth production following time based activities are practiced: 1. isolators. etc. electricity supply.. distribution transformers. Daily Maintenance – Cleaning.g. so that the major break downs are avoided & minimizes possibility of unanticipated production interruptions. Routine & planned maintenance includes Preventive maintenance actions. Preventive maintenance could be grouped as: 1) Fixed-time Maintenance (FTM) – Here actions carried out at regular intervals (calendar time) e.

2.4. Reduces total down time 5.3. Reduces total maintenance cost 5. Increases reliability 3. daily maintenance etc and programming the activities with work content.4. Reduces unplanned work 6.3.3.1 Preventive Maintenance System is 1.3 Requirements of Preventive Maintenance Program 1) Good maintenance management department with experienced personnel 2) To firm up plan of PM in consultation with shop personnel 3) A good lubricating and cleaning schedule 4) Detail procedures on maintenance work 5) Proper records maintained along with manuals. More expensive due to more planning &replacement of parts before failing. Use of recommended Grades of oils 4.3.4. Reduces total work-load 4. Restoration to recover deterioration 5.2 Features of PM 1) Proper identification of items in each machineries which warrants fixed time maintenance. parts list etc 6) Adequate stock of spare parts . cost estimates etc 2) Use of check lists by maintenance staff and inspectors 3) Identify and allocate well qualified crew & inspectors for making repairs 4) Use of budgeting system for major replacements/ repair 5) Proper procedures laid out for meeting the PM objectives in full 5.

diagnosis system. Reduction in breakdown frequency 4. Identifying the job to be taken & appropriate case register 2. Preparation of maintenance schedule and detail program of work with time frame for completion 6. Preparation of schedule of maintenance 3. Improves productivity due to lesser breakdowns 5.5 Advantages of Preventive Maintenance 1.4 Steps involved in Preventive Maintenance 1. Preparation of job specification 5. repair procedures etc 11) Suppliers recommendations for up keep of machineries. Preparation of history card of all the repair work carried on such a machine and the remarks there on 4. Maintenance is planned well in advance 2. 5. Labor used cost effectively . Higher safety for workers 7.3.4. probable causes.4. Improves reliability of the machineries 6. Preparation of inspection chart 7. Preparation of maintenance report on the work done 8.a guide showing problems.3. Reduction in wear and tear of machines and increase in their life 3. Feed back on the corrective action/ repair work done and its results 5.7) Properly training maintenance crew Adequate space around machinery for maintenance work 9) Previous data on failure etc of each machine/equipment 10) Systematic approach.

Preventive maintenance is designed to prevent or at least to minimize failures/breakdowns and reduce the need for corrective maintenance.3. Minimizes breakdowns and hence minimum inventory hold ups 10. It is possible to have planned shutdowns and repair 9. are used to predict ensuing troubles/problems in machineries. Preventive maintenance program controls the repair costs as well as the overall life of the equipment where as in corrective maintenance brings back to the original life depending on the extent of damage the earier breakdown has brought into the equipment. 5. Maintenance activity and costs increased 2. .6 Disadvantages/limitations 1. resistance gauges etc. amplitude meters.7 Differences between Corrective and Preventive Maintenance 1. Maintenance sometimes induces failures (infant mortality) 5.4. temperatures.4. Applicable only to age related deterioration 4.3. Sensitive instruments like vibration analyzer. Less breakdown costs. Identification of parts and its nature and cost involved in repairs is possible 5. whereas.8. audio gauges. corrective maintenance is carried out to repair the equipment after fault occurs/ breakdown happens. 12. sensors for pressure. Conditions of the machinery can be checked on line periodically or on continuous basis and maintenance crew can take decision & plan overhaul/repair as warranted.3.5 Predictive Maintenance Predictive Maintenance is one of the modern approaches to preventive maintenance where in sensitive instruments are used to predict anticipated failure of machines & equipment. Leaser rejection and better quality 11. 2. Less stand by equipment requirement 13. Unnecessary and invasive maintenance is carried out 3.

e. The intervals should be carefully selected as over maintenance or under maintenance are both detrimental and hence undesirable.) Measuring of physical parameters may not be enough to detect the destructive effects on a machine or process. temperature. wear debris analysis. Over maintenance or too frequent maintenance increases extensive downtime resulting in added costs on men. when status or condition so demands It is beneficial to follow a system which is not calendar based but condition based.Predict failures well in advance by monitoring parameters and by use of certain techniques (like vibration. etc. pump cavitations. which are indicative of malfunctions to decide on corrective treatment. Hence an optimal maintenance interval has to be arrived at. maintenance is on a pre-determined cycle whereas in a Predictive Maintenance system maintenance is done only. (which otherwise cause heavy penalty costs. health and safety hazards etc) will result in 1) Maximizes the online operations 2) Minimizes downtime 3) Increased plant and Personnel safety 4) Optimal maintenance The above is achieved by continuous plant / equipment monitoring & diagnosing the actual condition by means of online non-destructive testing methods. material and time. i. Under maintenance or too long intervals between two successive checks may result in high incidence of failures. A major part of the predictive maintenance involves the ongoing analysis to ensure wear levels that damage the machine are within limits Good ability to predict impending failures well in time to prevent breakdowns. Main difficulty is in making the correct choice of preventive maintenance intervals based on OEM’s recommendations and own -experiences. 1) Similar to health monitoring of senior executives to check symptoms. oil condition. rotor imbalance. incorrect installation. 2) If corrective treatment is not adopted at the right time. analysis and tribology. In a Preventive Maintenance system. it may result in serious breakdowns. misalignments. we should have a continuous knowledge of the machines based on certain critical predetermined / pre-formulated parameters .

An ability to forecast the machine behavior by Condition Monitoring is a pre-requisite for Predictive Maintenance Operators who work with equipment every day can listen to equipment and identify changes in noise levels and vibrations. In the Condition based maintenance (also known as Dynamic predictive maintenance or Diagnostic maintenance) the plant is maintained just after some problems arisen.A given machine can continue to be kept in operation as long as the monitored parameters continue to remain within the laid down limits. it implies that the particular part needs replacement and a special attention. etc. smell and through their experience on the existing condition of the equipment/aggregate. if practiced effectively. The main function of condition monitoring is to provide the knowledge of a machine and its rate of change. 5. A sense of confidence is created amongst production and maintenance personnel when they analyze the monitored data and predict that the machines are operated safely till they reach maximum permissible limits. temperature soars. can save around 30% of maintenance costs and with a bonus of 15% savings in energy costs. Temperature changes can be photographed . CBM involves recording some measurement that gives an indication of the condition (ex: increase in vibration levels. to cut downtime. When permissible limits are reached and warning signals are issued by the measuring devices. more universal and better predictive tools and instruments are added in the system. With rapid developments in machining technology through CNC controlled machines. increased leakages etc) CBM is a continuous or periodic measurement and interpretation of data to indicate the condition of an item to determine the need for maintenance. but much before the possible breakdown. Between the ‘action limit and the maximum permissible time limit’.3. there is enough time available for the maintenance crew to make adequate advance preparations. Predictive Maintenance. FMS with artificial intelligent devices and computer simulations and modeling. thus making predictive maintenance more economical as compared to preventive and corrective maintenance strategies.6 Condition Based Maintenance CBM relies on the fact that the majority of failures do not occur instantaneously but develops over a period of time. Predictive Maintenance is very cost effective where cost of unplanned breakdowns is very high. It is just like a hammer used to strike a wheel to listen for that distinctive sound to say whether there is crack in wheel rim or not. Condition monitoring is merely a tool that is used by crew through touch.

Condition monitoring is dependent on sensors and transducers for measuring different parameters. unbalance in rotors. overheating of motors c) Current sensors – cutting load monitored by sensing spindle Condition Monitoring is achieved by the operator’s senses to detect abnormalities Visual – Leakages.through IR thermograph. which are to be controlled by maintenance a) Vibration Sensors – to track tool wear/ breakages. etc.6. CNC systems have built – in diagnostics which continuously monitor the system hardware to ensure normal functioning.1 Condition Monitoring Methods There are two methods used namely: 1. which gives warning that something is ‘not right’. corrosion Audible – Unusual noise. Chatter Smell – Smoke. misalignments. Condition Checking & Monitoring a) Trend Monitoring: . This type of maintenance check on performance is vital as the future failures in safety systems can have more catastrophic effects. contaminated cutting fluid Touch – Excessive bearing temperature State-of-the-art CNC systems facilitates adaptive Controls with signals from appropriate transducers. mechanical looseness b) Thermostats – hydraulic oil temperature. gear defects. Trend Monitoring. Action limit curve shows the prescribed for monitoring parameters during normal operations. if other parts of the system fail. An investigation can then be carried out to identify the exact problem. are displayed on the screen well in time to facilitate corrective action without disruption of production. low battery voltage. alarms.3. Curve when extrapolated can indicate maximum & safe permissible limits 5. 2. Indications like over – temperature.

Detection (when) of the developing fault at an early stage 2. This may be done by . Prognosis (forecast) subsequent measurement which will then establish the trend and enable the repair schedule to be planned. accelerometer. 2) Vibration Monitoring: Involves the attachment of a transducer (velocity. Diagnosis (what) of its origin so that spare parts can be ordered 3. using some suitable indicator & is used as a measure of machine condition at that time. proximity probes) to record vibration level 3) Wear Debris monitoring: This works on the principle that the working surfaces of a machine are washed by the lubricating oil and any damage is detected from particles of wear debris in the oil. e) Selecting Methods of monitoring Five main techniques of conditioning monitoring 1) Visual monitoring: inspection & recording of surface appearance. 5) Corrosion monitoring: Is applied to fixed plant containing aggressive materials. c) Condition Monitoring: Includes three stages: 1. d) Economics of Condition Monitoring: The savings. to monitor the rates of internal corrosion of the wall of the plant. b) Condition Checking: Condition checking is where a check measurement is taken with the machine running. · Reduces the cost of maintenance · Capital invested can be recovered faster. to indicate variations in the conditions of the machine or its components.Trend monitoring is the continuous monitoring or regular measurement and interpretation of data collected during machine operation. 4) Performance and behavior monitoring: Involves checking the performance of a machine to see whether it is behaving correctly. which can be made by the application of CM: · Avoiding losses of output due to breakdown of machinery.

5. Allows shutdown before severe damage occurs 4.3 Advantages 1. overall cost of failure. sound. operating conditions.6.drilling a hole through the wall and drilled coupon of material is observed for corrosion. Cost of examination. standardizations planned. Establish for each part of the machine the severity limits of the machine condition parameter (Vibration.3.3. 7.6. Maintenance can be planned. Spares can be assembled 5.2 Implementation of Condition Based Maintenance: Involves: 1. The hole is then plugged with a suitable leak proof material. Maximises equipment availability 2. failure statistics (MTBF-MTTR). Selecting critical machines for CM 3. 5. 6. Labour can be organised 8. Some forms of inspection utilising human senses can be inexpensive 3.6. standby availability of machine. 7. Production can be modified to extend unit life 5. Training examiners for the above jobs. Listing and numbering of machine to have identification and location details 2.4 Disadvantages 1) Thermograph & Oil Debris Analysis [specialised equipment and training] . Select proper examining technique. 5. To arrive at best interval for examination considering the criticality of process.3. contamination etc) to be measured. Establishing programs and methods specifying the parts to be examined 4. Recording data 8. cost of maintenance. Cause of failure can be analysed 6.

3) Time is required for trends to develop to know machine condition Self Assessment Questions 1) Which of the following is not a common cause of equipment breakdowns? a) Improper preventive maintenance b) Inadequate lubrication c) Improper setups of jigs. fixtures and tools d) All the above 2) Which of the following is not an objective of remedial maintenance? a) To put back machinery back to work and minimize production interruptions b) To control costs of maintenance crew to the minimum c) To control cost of the operations of repairing d) Replacing the faulty machine when it starts malfunctioning.2) Requires careful choice of the correct technique. e) To control costs of repair & replacement parts to minimum f) To carry out appropriate repair intermittently at each malfunction to improve the life of the machine. 3) Irregular preventive maintenance do not include a) Repairs b) Overhauls c) Reduction of noise levels and vibrations d) Clean up of leakages etc on all the machine aggregates daily 4) RM is a procedure followed regularly i. a _______________ recurring periodically 5) In the following list find out which one is considered as disadvantage of routine management: .e.

9) Characteristics of Break-down Maintenance System-fill the missing one: 1. 6) Planned maintenance is the activities carried out according to a ______________ and hence known as scheduled maintenance or productive maintenance 7) Characteristics of Planned Maintenance-fill up the missing one: 1) Instructions are more detailed than in routine maintenance 2) Calls for differently timed service for the same unit 3) Schedule is drawn with dates 4) ___________________________ 5) Entails considerable planning effort. Initially it looks economical . No maintenance men on regular basis 3. Maintenance done by sub-contractors 4. faithful implementation and recording 6) Initial list of planned maintenance will be in detail Breakdown Maintenance is the method of operating the machines to run ______________ and then repair in order to restore them to an acceptable condition. ______________________ 5. No services except occasional lubrication unless failure occurs 2.1) Simple to establish & follow 2) Little or no clerical work 3) High degree of prevention by intercepting developing faults 4) RM may not provide the service specified by the manufacturer 5) A more advanced stage calls for ’service instructions on a pre-printed schedule and checklists’. No stock of spares 6.

Maintenance is of three main categories: breakdown. Daily Maintenance – Cleaning.4 Summary Poorly maintained machines/equipment has severe negative impact on the productivity and the quality of the output in a production unit. Restoration to recover deterioration 11) Predictive Maintenance is one of the modern approaches to preventive maintenance where in __________ are used to predict ____________ of machines & equipment. predictive and remedial maintenance. preventive.which one is not the recommended practice? 1. with JIT inventory and sophisticated processes. using high technology machines. To counter this. Periodic Inspections 3. 13) There are two methods used namely-Which is the second one 1) Trend Monitoring. 12) CBM relies on the fact that the majority of failures do not occur instantaneously but develops over a period of time.7. Breakdown or remedial maintenance is undertaken when a machine breaks down or malfunctions. 2. . etc. and predictive. In planning. CBM involves recording some ___________ that gives an indication of the condition. lubrication. Use of recommended Grades of oils 5. In the present high tech production. checking. Preventive maintenance is undertaken before need for maintenance arises and aims at minimizing the anticipated breakdowns. Creates internal problems namely: Who to do the repair? From where to get parts? How do we pay for them? Who will go & buy parts? 10) To avoid breakdown & ensure smooth production following time based activities are practiced. any stoppage due to breakdown in any part of the system will affect the entire production process. 2) ____________________ 5. maintenance managers have to decide on a proper balance between preventive. Predictive maintenance is a type in which the vital attributes of a system are monitored continuously and any deviations from the accepted limits are taken to rectify the problem. Check all the machines at firmed up time intervals 4. maintenance has been given more importance in the operational plans.

What is condition based maintenance. Distinguish between preventive and breakdown maintenance 12. What are the advantages & disadvantages of breakdown/corrective maintenance? 8. CBM is a continuous or periodic measurement and interpretation of data to indicate the condition of an item to determine the need for maintenance. accidents and minimizing the costs of maintenance activities? 5. What are the characteristics & objectives of breakdown/corrective maintenance? 7. What are the important functions of maintenance department 5. What are the advantages of Planned Maintenance? 6.In the Condition based maintenance (also known as Dynamic predictive maintenance or Diagnostic maintenance) the plant is maintained just after some problems arisen. Organizations have realized the importance of maintenance and its planning. Discuss the advantages and limitations of preventive maintenance 11. Which enables them to reduce breakdowns. What is meant by planned/scheduled/productive maintenance and what emphasis it pays in maintaining the machine/equipment 4. Describe the procedures of preventive maintenance program 10. State the objectives of maintenance management? 2. Define preventive maintenance and state its objectives 9. but much before the possible breakdown. Outline the various types of maintenance 3. Where this type is applicable. 14. Explain briefly the condition based monitoring methods 15. Total productivity maintenance is practiced to improve the productivity of the equipment by minimizing the number of breakdowns and malfunctions.5 Terminal Questions 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages of condition based maintenance? 5. What is predictive maintenance? What are its advantages over preventive maintenance? 13.6 Answers .

Refer 5.4 .4 8.4. (4) RM may not provide the service specified by the manufacturer 6. Refer 5. d) Replacing the faulty machine when it starts malfunctioning 3. measurement 13. Cyclic operation 5. Refer 5.2. c) Reduction of noise levels and vibrations 4. anticipated failure 12. (4) No organised efforts to find out reasons 10. Condition Checking & Monitoring Terminal Questions 1. Sensitive instruments. Predetermined schedule 7.3. Refer 5. Not occur.4. Until they fail 9.Self Assessment Questions 1.2 5.2 6.4 4.4.3 3.4.3. Refer 5. Refer 5.1 & 5.2 2.2 7.3. (4) Establishes the work-load for the crew 8.3 & 5.4.3. Refer 5. (3) Check all the machines at firmed up time intervals 11. d) All the above 2. Refer 5.4.4.

4.4.5 13. Refer 5.4.6 14. Refer 5.9.4.6 11.3 & 5.6.6. Refer 5.6. Refer 5.Refer 5.4.5.1 15.7 12.4 10.4. Refer 5.4. Refer 5.4.4 Copyright © 2011 SMU Powered by Sikkim Manipal University . .4.4.4.5 & 5.4.

3 Planning Vision & Mission 6.13 Six Maintenance Scheduling Principles 6.8 Productivity. Project work 6.6 Planning System 6. Specialization & Coordination of Planning 6.2 Functions of Maintenance Planning 6.11 Summary of Maintenance Planning 6.OM0006-Unit-06-Maintenance Planning and Scheduling Unit-06-Maintenance Planning and Scheduling Structure: 6.12 Maintenance scheduling principles 6.10 Planning Preventive & Predictive Maintenance.1 Introduction .7 How much Planning will help? 6.16 Answers 6.15 Terminal Questions 6.9 Maintenance Planning Principles 6.5 Benefit of Planning 6.1 Introduction Objectives 6.14 Summary of Maintenance Scheduling 6.4 Functions of Maintenance Planner 6.

shops. but certainly brings together many aspects of maintenance. Planning and scheduling promotes labor productivity by examining potential delays and scheduling work. tool rooms. In addition. planning is very essential. qualified personnel. Other tools used are work order system. Where does planning fit into? What principles make it work? How planning is required to be done? How to provide additional resources for planners and personnel for maintenance activities? Etc. performance. engineers. The planning system is designed with procedures to be followed over time through a systematic job plans. Objectives: After studying this unit you shall be able to · Prepare a plan for maintenance · Analyse the benefits of planning for maintenance · Examine the principles of maintenance planning . teamwork. tools. and project maintenance is essential. Planning concentrates on adding value. and safety. and other vendors to cater to the common maintenance tasks on critical equipment and safety equipment. The final improvement to over 50% can be achieved through special aids. tool room facilities. data collection and research of certain processes etc. consideration of reliability maintenance as preventive maintenance. Here procedure already in the file or important information that persons who worked on that equipment have recorded previously. storeroom support. The plant has better control over work that is scheduled. management. By implementing fundamental planning and scheduling system. as they leverage their expertise into job plans. To achieve the desired maintenance efficiency. and maintenance measurement. are included in the job plans. control of inventories. planners. leadership. If detailed procedures and checklists contribute to better reliability. are the subjects being discussion. organizations could improve maintenance productivity to about 40%. The planner should also give more attention to critical equipment and safety areas. Planning does not solve everything.All manufacturing units having varieties of machineries and equipments require maintenance to keep them up in good working conditions and for sustaining and achieving higher productivity. it is preferred for the organization to become a procedure-based one with teams of experienced technicians. predictive maintenance. communication.

6.· Distinguish between preventive and breakdown maintenance planning.3 Planning Vision & Mission The mission of planning revolves around doing the right jobs that are ready to go. · The planner specifies appropriate craft skills required for that particular job. . For ex: Planner has to judge whether the defective valve should be repaired or replaced. procedure for accomplishing task and identify any parts and special tools required. a planner develops a work plan after receiving a work request. the maintenance planning initiates action. thus enabling a better control over their work. Coordinating function is the key to achieve competitive edge. · The planned information gives the supervisors a reference for expected work and time for completion and helps to have a control through on problems that might lessen productivity. · The planner considers the proper scope of work for the job. · Planner does preparatory planning for the crew supervisor and craft persons who executes the work. The work plan is nothing but the information a planner makes ready for the technician to execute the work. and labor time estimate. · Crew personnel are then assigned the job for execution and avoid problems such as delays stemming by insufficient skills/ not having required materials or tools. identification of craft skill required. The work plan includes a job scope. 6. For this the maintenance planning will have the following functions: · Coordinating mechanism within the maintenance department. · The planner identifies appropriate materials for the specified job and checks whether they are available or be specially obtained. · Once the work order is received. To prepare a job in advance. · The time estimates made by planner gives the idea to crew personnel to judge how much work is assigned and what work is there.2 Functions of Maintenance Planning Maintenance management uses planning as a tool to reduce unnecessary job delays through advance preparation. · Maintenance planning brings together or coordinates the effort of many other aspects of maintenance.

The entire maintenance organization should be committed to schedule proactive works. for easy understanding and identifying the proper parts for his next work. and it controls and coordinates and brings resources to leverage productivity. seals. 4) Planners evolve good planning methodology that increases maintenance productivity. A work crew is ready to go immediately to scheduled work assignments as all instructions. 2) The planner writes work instructions on how to do the job. but ready handle judiciously the reactive type of work also. release of the work orders to proceed etc. 3) With preparatory work. parts. bearings etc) along with their identification numbers. improve on past jobs. Planning is Information central. 9) Planner provide a bill of materials or an illustrated parts diagram both to the stores person and craft men. Arrange parts required to be placed in a convenient location nearer to the job site before the job starts. Work plans avoid anticipated delays. tools.4 Functions of Maintenance Planner 1) Maintenance planning involves identifying parts and tools that are necessary for maintenance jobs. crew starts their work as per job. Doing the right jobs involves job priorities.The planning mission states “Doing the right jobs & ready to go”. so that technicians need not wait for parts to arrive. arrangements are ready. planning sets the stage for the maintenance force to act upon quickly. crew schedules. 6) The planner reserves such required parts in the store to ensure their availability. 6. It also involves identifying the actual work scope. planner initiate action to organize and get them. With proper planning or preparation efforts for each job. and allow advance scheduling through which the supervisors will assign and control the proper amount of work. work involved. A planning mission statement is: “To increase the Maintenance crew’s ability to complete the work orders quickly”. without wasting time. considering the safety aspects of the job. method of maintenance. . 5) The planner writes a job plan that identifies parts needed (such as gaskets. 7) If parts are not in the inventory. clearances.

5) Creates data and information on machineries and equipment and its maintenance methodology for future reference and analysis. fork lifts. procedures for assigning proper amount of work to all the skilled/unskilled crews. 6. resulting benefit achieved are the improved productivity and overall effectiveness or efficiency in maintenance. with identification numbers. Hence the purpose of planning is to focus on high productivity through an organized planning & scheduling principles. craft and skill level required.6 Planning System In a proper planning system. anticipated parts & tools. 3) Planner evolves a system and procedure for each type of maintenance work.7 How Much Planning Will Help? a) Tangible Help: • Planning provides tangible help for organization to achieve: .5 Benefit of Planning As planning consists of arranging parts and the necessary tools for maintenance work and provide necessary guidelines by use all the inputs effectively through a maintenance system. Institute a control system that contributes to managing productivity. the maintenance process has the following steps: 1) Receives request from the concerned section for the maintenance work. 4) Skill levels and time estimates on jobs and proper scheduling are included in the subject work order.10) Planner is required to coordinate with vendors & ensure material supply along with the quality control on vendor supplies. 2) Planner plans work order. pallets etc for easy movement of identified parts and tools to work site in advance. 7) Prepares Schedules for maintenance works and follow track until complete. time estimates. 6. 11) Planner identifies special tools needed by the craft man for maintenance activities and reserve such tooling and other accessories at the place of work. 6) Establishes through work order system. 12) Planner will arrange material handling equipments like crane. 6. specify job scope.

one can calculate and measure the actual amount of increased maintenance productivity. also known as wrench time. 6. Further if there are three crews working with . To determine if any of the delay time could be avoidable requires planner’s assistance for analyzing such nonproductive time. could achieve a remarkable reliable plant capacity within a year through superior availability and a drastic improvement in work force productivity. -Work force is freed up. where in the planning addresses and reduces delays. But it proved the other way as seen from the above examples. In addition. thus using the freed 10 trained personnel for other productivity improvement activities.-Amount of work accomplished rises.8 Productivity. thus frees technicians for more productive work. -Extra labor power can be reallocated to added value activities. where the management created an exclusive planning group. The industry’s average productive maintenance time was less than 30% (the measure of wrench time) when a typical maintenance technician has spent less than 20% on the real work and it is found that the balance time is spent on other nonproductive tasks. Practically the total maintenance work was completed by 35 personnel as compared to previous year’s statistics of using around 45 personnel for the same output. intangible benefits of planning were seen in providing a better control of maintenance work. Specialization & Coordination of Planning a) The specific benefit of planning in Wrench time improvements · There are organizations who feel that the planning work is part and parcel of the maintenance crew. Is this wrench time a reality? Instances are there in which experienced workforce moved from average 35% wrench time to 55% with fine tuned planning. Improvement here was only possible with the planning in place. • • Through proper planning. b) Improving the Wrench Time and Productivity · Work activities are classified differently. The practical result of planning-example: In a power station. · The maximum performance target for wrench time was shown at an average of around 55%. c) “World class” wrench time · Statistical work sampling studies measures productive time. Analysis of the nonproductive time is one of the most valuable work-sampling. Crew will plan their work and then executes.

The principles of having planning as a separate department in order to focus on the future work and consequent use of planner’s expertise to create estimates. electricians. 1) Company organizes planners into a separate department. Industry to this day continues to use specialization. for which they train and maintain separate groups of mechanics. 4) Planner expertise dictates job estimates. 2) Planners concentrate on future work. 6. the other two crew reached a wrench time of 50%. as compared to 3x30=90%]. which is essential for a competitive edge. Loading these specialists to achieve higher wrench times also requires a sound planning and proper coordination. Decisions making at each crossroads on the alternative ways to conduct planning and execute is essential and ultimate success of planning depends on this situational oriented decision. then total productivity is 100 % [2x 50% +0= 100%. Six principles greatly contribute to the overall success of planning. which spells the importance of planning jobs for maintenance.wrench time of 30%. and if one is allocated to planning job and with whose instance. Each principle identifies important crossroads. There is a methodology of work measurement what is commonly known as wrench time and this frequently misunderstood principle and hence must be made clear to everyone concerned. b) Specialization and Productivity: · Experienced crew are specializing in a particular field and achieving the specified goals. These principles must be understood by all concerned to have effective planning process. and instrument technicians. Specialization increases productivity per person. 5) Planners recognize the skill of the crafts. 3) Planners base their files on the component level of systems.9 Maintenance Planning Principles The principles or paradigms that are evolved over the maintenance mission will profoundly affect planning. But experience has shown that a single planner can plan maintenance jobs for more than 20 persons. recognizing skill of the craftsman and measuring performance must be understood by every one concerned with production. .

or other helpful information so that future work plans and schedules might be improved. · Planners report to a different supervisor/ lead planner who will be responsible to provide direction and ensure consistency within the planning group. · Planners use personal experience and develop work plans to avoid anticipated work delays and quality or safety problems. secure file system based on equipment tag numbers. plan changes. Principle 1: [The Company organizes planners into a separate department] · The planners are organized into a separate department from craft maintenance crews to facilitate specialization in planning and focus on future work. Principle 2: [Focus on Future Work] · The vision of planning is to increase labor productivity by preparing the jobs in advance. the lack of planning effort may decrease the number of work assignments to crew members · The company organizing planners to a separate group. · Because planning contributes to scheduling. The Planning Department concentrates on future work and provide the crew to plan their work in advance and remove backlogs · After job completion. which helps planners to become specialized in all the tools and techniques of planning · Planners need to work closely to ensure proper execution of work with consistency. The feedback consists of any problems. Principle 3: [Component Level Files] · Planning maintains a simple. . Matching identify tags on the machineries are also arranged. The planners ensure that the feedback information is properly filed to aid future work. especially on repetitive maintenance tasks. · The planners must be engaged in preparing work that has not yet begun. The supervisor has an obligation to complete the assigned work in an expeditious manner with a minimum of interruptions · The crew focuses exclusively on executing assigned work. feedback is given by the lead technician or supervisor to the Planning Department.6) Work sampling of direct work time provide measure of planning effectiveness. The file system enables planners to utilize equipment data and information and their experience on previous work to prepare and improve work plans.

. These planners rely greatly upon their personal skill and experience in addition to existing information in the files to develop job plans. · Planners give information to supervisor for scheduling control. The planners and technicians work together over repeated jobs to develop better procedures and checklists.· The majority of maintenance tasks are repetitive over a period of time. · Supervisors must train technicians with deficient skills and give proper support and guidance · Technicians must execute the job precisely as planned for three reasons. · Supervisors and plant engineers are trained to access these files to gather information they need with minimal planner assistance. The planners also use their own expertise to formalize best practices on individual job plans. Any recommended deviations from the job plan must be approved by planning before execution. Principle 4: [Estimates Based on Planner Expertise] · Planners use personal experience and file information to develop work plans to avoid anticipated work delays after considering quality and safety problems. · Routine maintenance offers the highest potential for planner contribution to company success because more intricate or unusual maintenance tasks receives necessary help from plant engineering department Principle 5: [Recognize the Skill of the Crafts] · The Planning Department recognizes the skill of the crafts. File cost information assists in making repair or replace decisions. The plan dictates the skill set necessary to accomplish the work given the state of the job plan. · This principle dictates that planners depend on the workforce being sufficiently skilled when he is putting a minimum level of detail into the initial job plans. The planner’s responsibility is to firm up the scope of the work request including clarification of the originator’s intent wherever necessary. · Plant must choose from among its best craft persons to be planners. The planner calls for a minimum craft skill on a job plan. · Craft technicians use their expertise to make the specified repair or replacement. · The planner then plans the general strategy of the work (such as repair or replace) and includes procedure if it is not already there in the file.

This principle holds that delays in technician’s job should be avoided. statistical observational techniques & study. Starting with a basic system. · Principle 6 dictates that measuring how much time craft technicians actually spend on their job site versus other activities performed such as obtaining parts or tools. Principle 6: [Measure Performance with Work Sampling] · Wrench time is the primary measure of workforce efficiency and of planning and scheduling effectiveness.· Finally. 6. The time that employees spend at their job sites working is called direct or productive work. Delays such as waiting for assignment. These reduce the incidence of reactive maintenance work and to increase plant reliability. What is actually important is the analysis of the nonproductive time. and project work and their relationship to the development of the planning principles and practices are discussed here. coordination with other crafts. tools. parts. Wrench time analysis is an indicator. · Work sampling to determine wrench time gives this measure of how much planning is helping in the process. This determines the effectiveness of the maintenance planning program. not the control of planning or the work force. Projects The concepts and importance of preventive maintenance. · Measuring wrench time thus gives an overall indication of how well the other principles have been implemented or accepted. . a) Preventive Maintenance [PM] and Planning · The planning department studies and issues PM’s schedules and reviews them periodically. instructions.10 Planning Preventive & Predictive Maintenance. clearance. planners visualize the types of work orders to be released for preventive maintenance tasks for the next week. the planning system counts on the skilled technicians giving feedback on job plans so that their expertise and the planner’s expertise both contribute to adding information to future plans. or equipment information are all deducted. predictive maintenance. Planning can adopt preferred maintenance for higher effectiveness. travel. Wrench time is the proportion of available time-to-work time during which the craft technicians are on productive working on a job site. Wrench time is measured accurately with a properly structured.

Planning for parts encourages the replacement of fasteners based on the technician’s decisions. · Emphasis in all PMs is to inspect the equipment for abnormal situations. PM plans can include rags for wiping and removing old grease when parts are dissembled. · Cleanliness helps reduce contamination sources and such clean surfaces to reveal the presence of new leaks. · The scope should extend beyond simple repair and replacement of parts to improve equipment reliability as well. on the work done. For this. lubrications etc. as improper lubrication leads to total damage to equipment. · The planner should allow some extra time in the work order on all PM work for making unspecified excessive cleaning. and duration. · The planner must receive feedback to improve the PM work order itself. tightening of bolts. The dirt and grime also add undesirable insulation conditions that may affect equipment performance. Lubrication. which are contributing to more than 50% of all breakdowns. b) Predictive Maintenance [PdM] and Planning · Planning plans and schedules PdM work orders. · Lubrication is important part of a PM program. Many do value assigning with experienced personnel to perform PM work orders. repairs. The plan should also list anticipated parts and special tools. For ex: tightening of fasteners in the coupling if he found they are loose. Predictive maintenance (PdM) uses technology not available to the regular maintenance work force. · This requirement of corrective maintenance is ‘TLC’ i. · Planners should also review the histories and feedback from all work orders to determine if additional PM work orders are needed. . and Cleanliness. or minor repairs. the technician is empowered to make any minor equipment adjustments or minor repairs during execution of the PM.· A planner should plan each of the PMs with scope and craft requirements such as numbers of persons. small adjustments. Tightness. PdM personnel make the call on the creation of new work orders. work hours.e. · PdM technology greatly moves the plant’s reliability upward as the predictions in predictive maintenance show an important capacity for growth in accuracy. · PM plans should specify torque requirements or attach torque charts where appropriate and include torque wrenches as a special tool.

c) Project Work and Planning · Similar to PdM. · Planners should insist that PdM uses the same equipment tag numbers for ease communication problems. · Planners should be able to estimate and commit the project schedules with plant engineering and scheduler assistance. The planning effort has mainly focused on making individual jobs ready to go by identifying and planning around potential delays. · Planners should insist to utilize standards set by PdM for certain jobs. The application of maintenance planning makes possible the dramatic improvement in maintenance productivity. Consideration of six basic principles greatly boosts the planning program efforts toward success. so that PdM personnel may quickly climb the learning curve. · Plant normally has the personnel to implement such maintenance project work with the productivity prescribed in the planning and scheduling system. the company has to make a decision regarding alternate ways to conduct planning.11 Summary of Maintenance Planning Effective maintenance is vital to provide reliable plant capacity. · The PdM group can update the technology of the maintenance force. which involves alignment criteria. bearing clearances. · Planners must vigorously pursue collecting documentation to establish files and also overview position regarding the project replacement or overhaul. At each crossroads. The decision the company makes regarding each situation determines the ultimate success of planning.· Planners must accept PdM work orders for jobs and translate them into the appropriate scope for the maintenance crews. but difference is in the larger nature of projects. or other rebuild tolerances. 6. Each principle resolves a crossroads decision that affects the planning effort. Plants treat projects as outages and planned as long-range scheduling. with active participation and assistance from the planning group. planning group plans and schedules work orders to implement projects as regular jobs. . · Planners should facilitate PdM when work on equipment is in process.

or travel categories. lunch. it is practical to retrieve information when needed. This aligning of the work to accomplish the desired effective and efficient maintenance led to the principles of scheduling. . the principles or paradigms in order to evolve effective scheduling will come through effective planning process. When work orders are received. tools. instructions. efficiently. break. They solved the problems by addressing symptomatic of tools. Planners need to avoid continually being interrupted to resolve problems for jobs already under way. Planners need to focus on future work not yet begun. Plnners must possess the experience of top level technicians in order to scope jobs. and safely. and estimate times adequately. and then measure schedule compliances. utilize files.12 Maintenance Scheduling Principles Scheduling principles envisages the vision. The crews worked on the planned jobs and work sampling study made on it indicated a wrench time of 25% only and further plant could do better job if improved upon. having component level files. Only when planning keeps a separate file for each piece of equipment. file history help technicians to avoid previously faced problems. using planner expertise to create estimates. The planned work packages increases the maintenance department’s ability to complete work orders effectively. The principles used for planning and scheduling are for achieving the forecasted skill levels. and measuring planning performance with work sampling for technician’s direct work time. focusing on future work. allowing the crew supervisor to handle day’s work. Because most jobs are repetitive. Maintenance needed certain methodology to assigning enough work through the planning process. which is discussed below. gave a clear picture of how technicians are completing their work. the schedules and job priorities for every forecasted work available. . are all in the total system. recognizing the skill of the crafts. 6. but also exists for excessive startup. parts availability problems or not properly planning issues Companies placed an emphasis on planning and also they doubled the parts availability in stores to reduce ordering needs. and shutdown Wrench time concept of measuring the work for each hour of the day. the technicians would scope out the jobs with their social & other times. The analysis revealed that the large delay times not only for parts. Wrench time will measure whether the objectives of planning are met or not in reducing job delays.The principle of having planning as a separate department.

6. · Advance scheduling of enough work for the entire week sets the goal for maximum utilization of the available craft hours. Does the job require mechanics or machinists? Does the job require three helpers to assist a certified electrician? Etc that are necessary for advance scheduling. Schedule assigns planned work for every forecasted work hour available.13 Six Maintenance Scheduling Principles Six principles that greatly contribute to the overall success of scheduling are: 1. The entire plant must respect the importance of schedules and job priorities. as they create a framework for successful scheduling of planned work. 5. Principle 1: [Planners plan the jobs for lowest required skill levels] § Essential part of Principle 1 is that job plans identify the lowest skill necessary to complete the work with the contention that the supervisor will have higher skill capability also. · The priority may be reviewed periodically and adjusted in coordination with crew. Schedule compliance of wrench time. craft work hours per level. 3. lowest required craft skill level. Crew supervisor matches personnel skills and tasks 6. Principle 2 [Entire plant respect the importance of schedules and job priorities] · Weekly and daily schedules must be adhered to by the crew as per the priorities mentioned in the work orders to prevent undue interruption in schedules. if required while assigning individuals to execute job plan. Plant priority plays a larger role in creating the schedule of work and all involved should treat it as a serious matter. Planners plan the jobs for lowest required skill levels. Crew supervisors forecast available work hours one week ahead by the highest skills available. It also ensures that a sufficient and the right work are assigned. . provides the measure of scheduling effectiveness. and job duration. planners and the plant manager.Routine maintenance needs the use of principles. § Job plans provide information about the number of persons required. The appropriate priority for the work is based on established plant guidelines. Each principle sets guidelines on how the maintenance should handle different scheduling process. 2. 4.

· Over assigning and under assigning work are common and acceptable in industries. · Scheduler uses a forecast of maximum capabilities of the crew for coming week.· Inefficiency peeps through the interruption by low priority jobs coming in way of urgent jobs progressing. forecast of highest skill. and reactive jobs as a guide. If a true emergency arises.e. . · Scheduling plan is for performing all the works available in the system. · First two principles are the prerequisites of the principle-3 scheduling · Scheduler selects the week’s worth of work from the overall plant backlog. · Crew supervisor matches personnel skills and tasks. This includes proactive work. crew work load is 1000 worthy labour hours. Principle 3 [Develops week’s schedule for each crew & craft hours required] · Develops a week’s schedule for each crew based on craft hours required. · Scheduler assigns work plans for the crew to execute during the following week for 100% of the forecasted hours i. and information from job plans. Principle 5: [The crew supervisor matches personnel skills and tasks] · Crew supervisor develops a daily schedule one day in advance using current job progress. As these may cause unique problems it is better to be avoided. Principle 4: [A week’s schedule will assign work for all the available work hour] · A week’s schedule will assign work for the total work hours. job priorities. new high priority. · Scheduler also uses job priority and job plan information. · Preference is given to completing the higher priority work by utilizing whatever skills available than working on completing the lower priority work. after considering the tasks that are being interrupted · Principle 4 brings all the three previous scheduling principles together. · Consideration is also given to multiple jobs on the same equipment or system and of proactive versus reactive work available. it is better to delay identified job in full rather than completing half. It allows for emergencies/high priority/ reactive jobs by scheduling sufficient amount of work hours.

This increases flexibility in choosing jobs. . Six basic principles form the foundation of successful scheduling and make schedules and priority systems important. allow crew supervisors to make daily schedules. job plans must plan for the lowest required skill level. Work sampling or wrench time is the best measure of scheduling performance. Adhering to schedules is important as interrupting jobs leads to overall inefficiency. He will ensure that each technician receives assignments totalling to full day’s work Principle 6: [Wrench time is the primary measure of workforce efficiency] · Wrench time is the primary measure of workforce efficiency and of planning and scheduling effectiveness. · Schedule compliance is the measure of adherence to the one week schedule and its effectiveness. crew supervisor is the best judge to create the daily crew work schedule. In case of delay in actual job progress and the incidence of unexpected reactive work in place. · Each day the crew supervisor assigns the next day’s work to each technician. The priority system must properly identify the right jobs to start.· Crew supervisor handles the current day’s work and any other problems in emergency maintenance · Although individual jobs show a wide variance between planned and actual times. Knowing of the lowest skills required for jobs and the highest skills available allows developing a schedule with proper work for the week. or technician instructions · Scheduling aims at reducing delays. When setting craft and time requirements. Maintenance dept also tracks schedule compliance. Work sampling or wrench time studies quantify delays & gives measures of planning and scheduling effectiveness.14 Summary of Maintenance Scheduling Maintenance management must consider main scheduling in the maintenance planning strategy to avoid problems of improved efficiency. 6. · Planning individual jobs can reduce delays such as waiting to obtain certain parts. assigns work for all available labour hours. and track schedule compliance. it relatively balances by week end. tools. scheduler to develop schedule in advance.

crew schedules. which one is not relevant? · Coordinating mechanism within the maintenance department. 4. 2. a planner develops a …………… after receiving a work request. · A maintenance planner does preparatory planning for the craft persons · The planner identifies appropriate materials for the specified job and checks whether they are available or must be specially obtained. The planners and crew had to deal differently with urgent reactive work by developing job plans for reactive work. Principle 6 sets overall indicators for scheduling control. and safely. A planning mission statement may be: …………………………………. Principles 1 and 2 are prerequisites for scheduling. Further working to the maintenance planning based on the six planning principles along with the six scheduling principles will help improve the productivity. The planning mission statement could be ……………………………. through advance preparation. Out of the maintenance planning functions. Maintenance management uses planning as a tool to reduce …………………. · To arrest the leakages and keep up the lubrication system · The planner specifies the appropriate craft skills required for that particular job. efficiently. . Hence use of planned and scheduled work packages increases the maintenance department’s ability to complete work orders effectively. 3. 5. In the maintenance process given below which one not the step to be considered.Schedule based on the wrench time has to be practiced. · Crew personnel are assigned the job for execution · The time estimates are made by planner · Maintenance planning brings together or coordinates the effort of many other aspects of maintenance. This involves job priorities. To prepare a job in advance. Self Assessment Questions 1. . and works such as preventive maintenance/ breakdown work and release of the work orders to proceed... Principles 3 through 5 establish basis of scheduling process.

as well as specifying anticipated parts and tools. Wrench time is the primary measure …………………………………………… Wrench time is the proportion of available time to. b) Planners concentrate on future work. d) Planner expertise dictates job estimates. 6. 8. b) A planner plans the work order by specifying job scope. . Fill in (c) below: a) The amount of work accomplished rises. . c) Planner evolves a system and procedure for each type of maintenance work d) Skill levels and time estimates on jobs and proper scheduling are included in the subject work order. Planning provides tangible help. c) Planners base their files on the component level of systems. e) Fix up the wages for each of the work based on the skill level f) Creates data and information on all machineries and equipment and its maintenance methodology for future reference and analysis.work time during which the craft technicians are on productive working on a job site. Statistical work sampling studies measures ……………. c) ……………………………………………… 7. b) The work force is freed up. Specialization increases ………………………. Six principles greatly contribute to overall success of planning. procedures for assigning proper amount of work to all the skilled/unskilled crews h) Prepares Schedules for the maintenance works and follow track until complete. craft and skill level required. per person 9. time estimates. with all their identification numbers. Which is sixth one? a) The company organizes planners into a separate department. also known as wrench time..a) Receives request from the concerned section for the maintenance work. g) He establishes through work order system.

Why planning process is essential for efficient maintenance management? 2. Planners plan the jobs for lowest required skill levels. Just as in planning. ……. Explain briefly the functions of maintenance planning. ……………………………………………. e.. ………. Companies strive to do more preventive maintenance.. predictive maintenance. 3. f) ……………………………………….e) Planners recognize the skill of the crafts. for every forecasted work available. The principles used for planning and scheduling are for achieving the forecasted higher skill levels.. 12. Schedule compliance joins wrench time to provide the measure of scheduling effectiveness. and then measure schedule compliances 15. a. This requirement of corrective maintenance is ‘TLC’ i. The PdM technology has the potential of greatly moving the plant’s ……….. d.e. b. Crew supervisors forecast available work hours one week ahead by the highest skills available. work and to increase plant reliability.15 Terminal Questions 1. The crew supervisor matches personnel skills and tasks] f. and such clean surfaces to reveal the presence of new leaks. 6. six principles that greatly contribute to the overall success of scheduling are discussed below. ………. and project work to lessen the ……………………. What are the benefits of maintenance planning? .. 13. c. ………………….. 11. The entire plant must respect the importance of schedules and job priorities. Improper lubrication leads to total ………. Fill in the missing principle. to equipment. 14. upward as the predictions involved in predictive maintenance show an important capacity for growth in accuracy. allowing the crew supervisor to handle day’s work. 10. Cleanliness helps reduce ……………. which are contributing to more than 50% of all breakdowns.

(sl. workforce efficiency and of planning and scheduling effectiveness. Explain as to how the maintenance planning will help improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the organization 5. Productivity 9. 9. 7. Incidence of reactive maintenance 11. Work sampling for direct work time provides the primary measure of planning effectiveness 10.no:4)To arrest the leakages and keep up the lubrication system 3. What is wrench time? How it is recognized as a maintenance work measure? 6. 5. Why scheduling after proper planning is essential for effective maintenance and meeting the dead line and avoid delays? 10. Work plan 2. Unnecessary job. Productive time. The extra labor power can be reallocated to added value activities. “To increases the Maintenance Department’s ability to complete work orders quickly”. and Cleanliness . Lubrication. Tightness. no: e) Fix up the wages for each of the work based on the skill level 6.4. 7. Explain briefly the planning approaches in preventive and predictive maintenance processes. What are the maintenance planning principles? How they contribute to the success of planning? 8. (sl. Explain how the specialization in areas of maintenance will help improve the productivity of the maintenance crew. Doing right jobs which are ready to go 4.16 Answers Self Assessment Questions 1. 8. Explain briefly how the use of six principles will greatly contribute to the overall success of scheduling 6.

7 5.9 8.7 (c) 6.1 2.8 (b) 7. Refer 6. Reliability 14. Refer 6. Refer 6. Contamination sources. Refer 6. Refer 6.2 3.5 4. Refer 6.12 10.12.10 a & b 9. Terminal Questions 1. (For d): The schedule assigns planned work for every forecasted work hour available. The schedules and job priorities 15. Refer 6. damage 13. Refer 6.Refer 6.13 Copyright © 2011 SMU Powered by Sikkim Manipal University . . Refer 6.

3 Organization & Processes 7. organizations have tried and tested different approaches for bringing changes that can result in improvements in both the function and the cost.5 Universal Principles for higher Productive Maintenance 7.10 Terminal Questions 7.1 Introduction Objectives 7.1 Introduction Automating the maintenance program is a complex task as it requires integrating of people. The new system will become a platform for continuous improvement and will generate long term benefits .7 ACE Team Benchmarking Process 7.4 Benefits of using ‘UMS’ with Planner’s Functions 7.8 Overall Craft Effectiveness & its Measurement 7. Using a state-of-the-art maintenance management.11 Answers 7.2 Planner’s Function in Maintenance & Benefits 7. process and systems.9 Summary 7.OM0006-Unit-07-Universel Maintenance Practices Unit-07-Universel Maintenance Practices Structure: 7.6 Work Measurement for High-Productivity Maintenance Universal Maintenance Standards [UMS] Five Levels of Data in Ums 7.

satisfied customers. theory. · Explain the benefits of UMS · Adopt the ACE system of Benchmarking 7. Improving Wrench time of the Crew in Maintenance 6. field checks jobs when . close communication with supervisors. some of which are listed below: 1. especially when sophisticated high tech machineries and equipments are used for production. Improving the Overall craft effectiveness [OCE] for productivity. cost reduction and its measurement 5.2 Planner’s Function In Maintenance & Benefits The planner’s role is varied in nature such as: maintain a backlog of ready-to-work jobs for each technician. Achieving excellence in Maintenance Engineering and Management Objectives: After studying this unit you shall be able to: · Outline the functions to be performed by the maintenance planner. higher quality. a detail analysis and adopting certain state of art principles and improve maintenance productivity are all the focus areas for the above said disciplines. on-time delivery and ultimately. For achieving the above said prerequisites. as the maintenance represents variable operating cost which includes physical plant value. materials and overhead. Higher productivity maintenance means better customer service. How the Maintenance. maintenance labour.The analysis and application of work measurements to ensure improved productivity and cost reduction in maintenance should be the prime consideration by the management. Benchmarking the best practices 3. systems and techniques of Universal Maintenance Standards [UMS] 2. are the concepts. Engineering or Industrial Engineering managers spearhead their achievements of dramatic productivity improvements by adopting different methods of work measurements in managing and controlling their activities. Use of the state of art principles. Implementing new techniques of measurement. principles and theory of new measurement techniques. Adopting ACE system for benchmarking and improvements 4.

Importance of work measurement and the standard for the job should be established. time reporting on the performance including delays. 7. Planners develop all the data.3 Organization & Processes The tasks for a maintenance work measurement program fall into two categories namely 1) Organization and 2) Process a) Organization with planner in the forefront Planner maintains and allocates the work and knows all the ratios required for accomplishing the jobs and have good maintenance skills and experience and capabilities to work as the ultimate expert system. 7. identifies special tools. Both the planners and the maintenance crew should examine to see how the UMS times could be applied. plans safety requirements. cost of the items. unrealized opportunity etc. materials. The planner also develops bench marks and maintains the data library. and time to do the work. plans work content. issue of stores taking too long. life cycle cost reductions d) on time completion of jobs e) continuous improvements f) improved service to customers. Hence the measurement provides information to determine the savings potential and also justify the maintenance work measurement program. The normal ratio of planners to technicians used is 20 to 30:1. and make available to the crew a set of basic processes and craft operations for the process before establishing bench marks. the same can be raised to around 80% when a planning function is integrated with UMS times to work together. crafts needed. etc as well as the stores process to check the inventory value. crew size.needed. do the training. verifies priority. While the maintenance departments without planners can achieve around 50-60% Productivity. or too many stock-outs. In addition the resultant productivity improvement that accrues are the benefits to organization in a) cost reductions b) downtime reduction. . b) Processes Processes involve data development and work order planning. They can also establish a computerized maintenance management system. requisitions non-stock or out-of-stock items. are validated. based on a formal planning function and the Universal Maintenance Standards.4 Benefits of Using ‘Ums’ with Planner’s Functions It is found that when a planner’s function is integrated with the UMS resultant impact is of improving the overall maintenance effectiveness.

which can be accurately planned. It is universal.1 Universal Maintenance Standards [UMS] .7.6 Work Measurement for High-Productivity Maintenance 7. The standard crew size is one and any other size is exceptions to the general rule. Lord Kelvin saw this in his scientific investigation of the laws of physics. Together the customer and maintenance crew decide the priority (based on resources available) and urgency of each task compared to other existing current works. if followed. lead to the lasting results. They highlight problems or roadblocks for completion of the project. e) Crew Size The optimum crew size for a maintenance job is the smallest that can perform the work using a specific method and execute in a safe & efficient manner. d) Customer/Service Relationship The customer decides what is needed from an operational viewpoint. maintenance is no exception b) Measurement Before Control The measurement of an activity is basic to its control. and maintenance decides how the service should be provided. 7. but also helps growth in value added processes. Frederick Taylor’s principle applies to all work.6. c) Activity Responsibility The responsibility for each activity of a work order is necessary to ensure that the work order continues to move toward resolution without delay. This principle is also universal. f) Timeliness Large maintenance jobs are divided into smaller work orders. Timely accomplishment is also universal phenomenon. Hence the Universal Standards serve the special needs of maintenance work through the following principles: a) Scientific Principle Best productivity results when each worker has a definite job to do in a definite way within a definite time.5 Universal Principles for Higher Productive Maintenance There are several principles that.

as these standards offered flexibility and could be applied not just in one location. or one country. engineers adopted new methods for analyzing and assigning standards to maintenance work. Even though parts are different. If it is a low volume work done by multi skilled crew. government. pipe. commercial. If the time to perform similar tasks is known. education or healthcare. instrument. Applying the specific standards to the daily maintenance workload requires answers for: which task standard is required. utilities. or tasks. how much rust is present on them etc. There are at least four to five hundred different jobs. HVAC. masonry. Hence breaking long jobs down into elements have resulted in a large number of elements. called ‘Universal Maintenance Standards’ (UMS).The principles adopted for above said requirements are based on the application of work measurement in maintenance. paint. Each element requires further study followed by application of stopwatch time or a predetermined time system analysis to determine the exact time required for each through the method selected. IT management etc. industry or service enterprise. in each of skills of fourteen types of jobs: mechanical. finance. Techniques: The UMS system is based on three important techniques: 1) Range-of-time. service. A simple task such as removing and replacing a part may take more or less time depending on how tight the bolts are. time taken for threading a one-inch nut on to a bolt by hand operation takes almost same time like that of screwing in a light bulb into the holder. availability of such standards. then the time . carpenter. custodial. but everywhere where maintenance work is performed –manufacturing. automotive. some unique characteristics are revealed. the motion pattern for two tasks may be same and also time to perform the work is almost the same. The range-of-time technique recognizes the variable nature of maintenance works. This range of time is same in 95 % of situations and hence standard average time is applied and practiced 2) Work content comparison. weld. labour. to what volume of work etc. is it realistic to measure. sheet metal. b) Evolution of Universal Maintenance Standards (UMS) In the early 1950’s. The combination of many elements requiring different maintenance tasks and varieties of skills warrants developing and maintain a library of enormous number of standards. machining. For example. electrical. to what precision. the result is that the crew does longer cycle work compared to other production workers. which in turn depends on: a) Nature of Maintenance works: In maintenance works.

4) bench marks and 5) spread sheets. 7. This system analyzes and classifies data into basic motions and establishes a relationship between the motions and the time required to perform them. 3) Organizing the data UMS data is organized in a building block fashion. 5) Spread Sheets.that can be applied to any other similar task with + or – 5%. Similar craft data for other skilled craft operations such as painting. whether the how clamping of part is done etc are recorded in the table for further use as standards. electrical. 3) craft operations. machining could be made available for the crew of maintenance 4) Bench Marks Using UMS. pipefitting. For instance. 2) Basic Operations Basic motions are grouped together to form basic operations. distance moved. Spread sheet fills the additional needs of finding quickly the . which are pooled as weld craft operations data. The variables like weight of the part. Five levels of data in the UMS library. 3) Craft Operations Some operation times are unique to a certain craft. where work measures are dividing into basic motions such as reach. common to all crafts. Each of these motions are recorded and these data becomes the established times for future reference and standardization. Two widely used predetermined time systems are ‘Methods-Time Measurement’ and ‘Operation Sequence Technique’. a planner is able to establish planning times for a large number of jobs using relative sample data of the benchmark jobs and publicise the data along with the step-by-step process. body motions. welding operations are made up of manual handling. move. By using spread sheets. position and release. 2) basic operations.6. namely 1) basic motions. grasp. engineers can typically apply standards to all maintenance work with bench marks covering all the crafts and through the use of spread sheets they can substantially reduce the data library compared to the one with direct standard method. machine settings and arc striking time etc. using the work content comparison technique is possible.2 Five Levels of Data in Ums 1) Basic Motions The foundation of UMS data is the predetermined time system for basic motions. carpentry. becomes the standardization process and hence these are universally adopted.

The ACE System is used to develop maintenance performance standards. and in mechanical fields like Belt drives. 2) Objective of ACE Team Benchmarking Process Objective is to determine the reliable planning times for a number of selected “benchmark” jobs and to gain a consensus on the predetermined work content time. bringing control systems. material handling equipment. The allowances applied to these set times to get a single UMS time calculation for use by the crew.7 ACE Team Benchmarking Process “A Consensus of Experts” (ACE). ACE Team Benchmarking Process parallels the UMS approach in that the range of time and the work content times for a representative number of benchmarked jobs are established. reducers and gear boxes. the technique which was formulated and developed by the ‘The Maintenance Excellence Institute’ [TMEI]. Ex: Benchmarking and firming up the task can be easily done in areas like lighting. continuous improvement and the changing of times in performance and methods. in generators. the standards are established. These Benchmarked jobs are then arranged into different time categories on spreadsheets for various craft work areas. and lubrication and service. 7. reasonable estimate of maintenance “work content” time from a group of experienced crafts people. which are reliable and a well-accepted planning times for the entire maintenance crew. Spreadsheets include brief descriptions of the benchmark jobs and represent pure wrench time. All work order times released for the jobs and it consists of four components: job preparation time. 1) ACE System & UMS Using predetermined standard data. in motors. Here the emphasis is placed on improving current repair methods. outlines a new and highly recommended methodology for establishing ‘team-based maintenance performance standards’. supervisors and planners . job site time and allowances for personal. area travel time. which is called as ‘Reliable Planning-Time standards’. say within 95% confidence range. which are then imposed on the maintenance force. 3) ACE System: a Team-Based Approach ACE Team process is to obtain the most reliable. who have performed these jobs earlier and have requisite experience to improve upon them. compressors. have developed a bench marking process for the major work areas/types of maintenance operations. This new Benchmarking Tool through ACE. rest and minor unavoidable delays. a team of relatively small in number.appropriate one for an application or finding the right bench mark for comparison. Spreadsheets are then provided for each work group having a time slots or range of times. clutches and brakes.

planners and other knowledgeable people to do two things. as its application promotes a commitment to quality repair procedures. which will provide the management with a valuable input data for backlog determination.and provides an excellent means to evaluate repair method. b) Investment for Planners: The planner’s activity with the team approach of ACE system will establish maintenance performance standards. risks analysis on jobs that leads to improvements. safety practices. safety and quality b) Establish work content time for selected “benchmark jobs” for planners and others to use in developing reliable planning time.8 Overall Craft Effectiveness [OCE] & Its Measurement a) Craft Performance element of Overall Craft Effectiveness Determining the required standard hours of a technician require a trail run of the task under standard operating conditions. effective storerooms and . supervisors. 5) ACE Team Benchmarking Process: ACE System is a true team-based process that utilizes skilled crafts people. preventive/predictive maintenance. Other methods used include reasonable estimates. technicians. budgeting and costing. manpower planning. 7. 4) Recommendation of ACE System ACE Team overcomes many inherent difficulties associated with developing maintenance performance standards and hence recommended as the standard process for modern maintenance management. and engineered standards such as Universal standards. a) Improve current repair methods. c) How OCE impacts the bottom line: Craft Labor Improving Overall Craft Effectiveness is getting maximum value from craft labor resources and higher craft productivity. historical data. scheduling. Computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) could also be practiced. 6) The ACE System Supports Reliability Improvement: ACE Team process can contribute significantly to reliability. Best practices such as effective maintenance planning/scheduling. Labour standards will be the baseline for determining craft productivity and improved methods.

planned maintenance and more productive “wrench time”. fire fighting mode Waiting on parts and searching parts or part information Waiting for asset info. h) Craft Service Quality (CSQ) Another element affecting the overall Craft Effectiveness relates to the quality of the repair. where certain jobs possibly require a call back to the initial repair thus requiring another trip to fix it right the second . 8. e) Productive Wrench Time: Pure wrench time is just the actual output/work done and do not include the miscellaneous waste time caused due to any or many of the following: 1. 6. 3. 4. how efficient the hands-on craft work is done compared to an established planned time or performance standard. 5. Craft performance is directly related to individual craft skills and overall trades experience. Measuring and improving overall craft effectiveness (OCE) is one of the components of continuous improvements d) Effective Craft Utilization (CU): Craft Utilization or pure wrench time relates to measuring how effective the work is planned and craft resources scheduled so that these assets are doing value-added. 9. shop clean up time Lack of effective planning and scheduling Craft Utilization (or wrench time) is measured as the ratio of: CU %=100x [Total Productive hours or wrench time]/ [Total craft hours allotted x amount paid] f) Improve Wrench Time original Significant tangible benefits can be realized by increasing the wrench time. This element includes quality of the actual work. productive work (wrench time). Running from emergency to emergency in a reactive. repair instructions. 2. drawings. Effective planning/ scheduling is the key to increase wrench time and craft utilization.e. g) Craft Performance Another key element of OCE is the craft performance i.continuous parts support will all contribute to proactive. Waiting for the equipment to be shut down for work start Waiting for contractor support to arrive at job site Waiting on other crafts to finish their job Travelling to/from job site Make-ready. 7. the personal motivation and effort of each craftsperson. 20 to 30 % can be expected from more effective maintenance planning & scheduling. documentation etc.

It is gained value that can be calculated and estimated and then measured. Profit-centred in-house maintenance in combination with the wise use of high quality contract maintenance services will be the key to the final evolution that occurs. Organization should not indiscriminately cut craft labour resources when increase OCE is warranted. patch jobs or inferior repair parts/materials. the overall Craft Effectiveness and provide value added maintenance services all the time with a profit oriented approach Self Assessment Questions 1. new techniques of measurement. then Overall Craft Effectiveness Factor can be determined by multiplying each of these three elements: Overall Craft Utilization = [Craft utilization (%) x Craft performance (%) x Craft service quality (%)] i) Where Can We Apply OCE Gained Value Maintenance operations that continually fight fires and react to emergency repairs never have enough time to cover all the work (core requirements) that needs to be done. Organizations should recognize maintenance as a core business requirement and should establish the necessary core competencies for survival. implementation of certain state of art principles. For improving maintenance productivity. Craft Service Quality will suffer due to hasty repairs. If the internal core competency for maintenance is not present it must be regained and ensure that they are profit-centred maintenance providers by understanding clearly the UMS. OCE is increased people asset availability and capacity.time. b) Benchmarking the best practices. . K) Maintenance is For ever Maintenance is a core requirement for profitable survival and total operations success. c) Adopting ACE system for benchmarking and improvements d) ……………………………………………………………. and a detail analysis of: a) Universal Maintenance Standards. When reliable data is present for all elements. In relation to OEE. Measuring and improving Overall Craft Effectiveness and the value received from improving craft assets is an important part of total asset management. j) Think Profit-Centred Maintenance leaders and crafts people must develop the “profit” mindset to be competitive and stay in business.

verifies priority. based on a formal planning function and the. close communication with supervisors. requisitions non-stock or out-of-stock items. The UMS system is based on three important techniques: a) Range of time b) …………………………… c) organizing the data 7. ACE Team Benchmarking Process parallels the UMS approach in that the …………………….. plans crew size. 8. The planner’s role is varied in nature such as: maintain a backlog of ready-to-work jobs for each technician.. Downtime reduction and its savings c. Continuous improvement opportunities and gain in competitive advantage f. Cost reduction and its total savings b. 5. …………….. when once the ‘work content times’ for a representative number of ‘benchmark jobs’ are established. a team of relatively small number of representatives. have developed a bench marking process for the major work areas/types of operation. The Universal Standards serve the special needs of maintenance work through the following principles: a) ………………… b) Measurement before controls c) activity responsibility d) customer/service relationship e) Crew size f) Timeliness 6. identifies special tools. Life cycle cost reductions d. Hence the measurement provides information to determine the savings potential and also justify the maintenance work measurement program. checks jobs when needed. . ……………………………….e) Improving the Wrench time of the Crew in Maintenance 2. 4. Contributes in meeting other goals and objectives in the strategic plan. . who have performed these jobs and have the requisite experience to improve upon them. and e) spread sheets... Improved services to customers g. materials. …………………………………………… e. The resultant productivity improvement that accrues because of integrating planner’s function with UMS will substantially benefit the organization in the following areas of operations/ functions: a.. ………………. and time to do the work. ………………………………. 9. Five levels of data in UMS are: a) basic motions b) Basic operations c) Craft operations d) ……………….. 3.

. organizations have tried and tested different approaches for bringing changes that can result in improvements in both the function and the cost.... time from a group of experienced crafts people.9 Summary By using a state-of-the-art maintenance management..... supervisors and planners and provides an excellent means to evaluate repair method.10.]/ [Total craft hours allotted x amount paid] 19. Best practices such as effective maintenance planning/scheduling. Overall Craft Utilization = [Craft utilization (%) x ........ technicians.. safety practices... supervisors. The new system will become a platform for continuous improvement and will generate long term benefits . preventive/ predictive maintenance. effective storerooms and continuous parts support will all contribute to proactive..... 17. Improving ……………………….. ACE Team process is to obtain the most reliable.. risks analysis on jobs that leads to improvements....... .. 15.... Craft Utilization (or wrench time) is measured as the ratio of: [ ...... a) ……………………………………………………………………. ACE Team process can contribute significantly to ……………… as its application promotes a commitment to quality repair procedures. reasonable estimate of maintenance ………………….. ACE System is a true team-based process that utilizes skilled crafts people.... 16. b) Establish work content time for selected “benchmark jobs” 13. Craft Utilization or pure wrench time relates to measuring how effective we are in planning and scheduling craft resources so that these assets are doing …………………... 14. 18... Spreadsheets are then set up with each work group having a time slots or …………………….... 11.. and do not include the miscellaneous waste time caused due to any of the reasons..... 12... (%) x Craft service quality (%)] 7.. within the 95% confidence range.. planned maintenance and more productive ……………….... is getting maximum value from craft labor resources and higher craft productivity... Pure wrench time is just the ……………………….... . Spreadsheets include brief descriptions of the benchmark jobs and represent ………………...... planners and other knowledgeable people to do two things.....

productive work (wrench time). measurements by using UMS and . principles and theory of new measurement techniques that are used are: a)Universal Maintenance Standards. b) Benchmarking the best practices c) ACE system for benchmarking and improvements d) Overall craft effectiveness for improved productivity and cost reduction and its measurement e) Improving the Wrench time of the Crew f) Achieving excellence in Maintenance Engineering and Management The resultant productivity improvement and benefits that accrues because of integrating planner’s function with UMS are: a) cost reductions b) downtime reduction. These Benchmarked jobs are then arranged into different time categories on spreadsheets for various craft work areas. For gaining the internal core competency in maintenance. Pure wrench time is just the actual output/work done Measuring and improving Overall Craft Effectiveness and the value received from improving our craft assets an important part of total asset management. who have performed these jobs earlier and have the requisite experience to improve upon them. For achieving high productive maintenance.Higher productivity maintenance means better customer service. Overall Craft Utilization = [Craft utilization (%) x Craft performance (%) x Craft service quality (%)] Maintenance is a core requirement for profitable survival and total operations success. The Universal Standards serve the special needs of maintenance work through the following principles: a) Scientific control b) Measurement before controls c) activity responsibility d) customer/service relationship e) Crew size f) Timeliness The Universal Maintenance Standards offered flexibility and could be applied not just in one location. is a team of relatively small number of representatives. on-time delivery and ultimately. higher quality. life cycle cost reductions d) on time completion of jobs e) continuous improvements f) improved service to customers. Craft Utilization or pure wrench time relates to measuring how effective the craft resources so are doing value-added. Improving Overall Craft Effectiveness is getting maximum value from craft labor resources and higher craft productivity. organizations should clear understand of the Overall Craft Effectiveness. but everywhere where maintenance work is performed and is based on three important techniques: a) Range of time b) work content comparison c) organizing the data “A Consensus of Experts” (ACE). the concepts. The ACE System is used to develop maintenance performance standards. or one country. industry or service enterprise. satisfied customers. develops a bench marking process for the major work areas / types of operation. which are reliable and a well-accepted planning times for the entire maintenance crew.

providing value added maintenance services on a most profitable manner are essential processes. 7.10 Terminal Questions 1. Why application and analysis of work measurements are important in maintenance management? 2. Which are all the concepts, techniques and principles used in measurement of work effectiveness and efficiency in maintenance? 3. Why planner’s role is vital to maintenance and how it improves the effectiveness? 4. Explain briefly the categories to which the tasks of work measurements can be grouped? 5. Explain the benefits that accrue to organization by integrating planner’s works with UMS? 6. Universal Standards serve the special needs of maintenance work through principlesWhich are these universal principles used for higher productive maintenance? 7. What are the three important techniques on which the UMS depends? 8. Explain briefly the five levels of UMS library and how each one is very important criteria for work measurement and analysis? 9. Explain the importance of using spread sheets and bench marks in work measurement to improve maintenance effectiveness? 10. “New Benchmarking Tool through ACE technique outlines a new and highly recommended methodology for establishing ‘team-based maintenance performance standards’, which is called as ‘Reliable Planning-Time standards” –explain how ACE will serve the organization’s needs in maintenance? 11. What is meant by Ace Benchmarking system and to what type of process it is recommended? 12. Explain overall performance effectiveness and how it helps in analyzing the performance of wrench times? 13. What is meant by effective craft utilization and productive wrench time & what are the factors constituting the craft utilization? 7.11 Answers

Self Assessment Questions 1. Improving the Overall craft effectiveness 2. Plans work content 3. On-time completion benefits 4. Universal Maintenance Standards 5. Scientific control 6. Work content comparison 7. Bench marks 8. A Consensus of Experts 9. Range of time concept 10. Range of time and pure wrench time 11. Work content 12. Improve current repair methods, Safety and quality 13. Reliability 14. Overall Craft Effectiveness 15. Wrench time 16. Value-added-productive work. (Wrench time) 17. Actual output/work 18. Total Productive hours or wrench time 19. Craft performance Terminal Questions: 1. Refer 7.1 2. Refer 7.1

3. Refer 7.2 4. Refer 7.3 5. Refer 7.4 6. Refer 7.5 7. Refer 7.6.1.(c) 8. Refer 7.6.2 9. Refer 7.6.2 10. Refer C 11. Refer 7.7.5 12. Refer 7.8 13. Refer 7.8. (d), (e), (f) Copyright © 2011 SMU Powered by Sikkim Manipal University .

3 Documentation Management and Control Role of the Document Controller Types of QMS Documents Document Numbering Document Versioning Document Content 8.1 Introduction Before an organization begins creating QMS documentation.1 Introduction Objective 8.4 QMS Documentation Process 8. Overall strategy for creating QMS documentation.7 Answers 8. . Planning for such documentation is performed during the planning phase for a specific project. Planning for QMS documentation refers to planning for “infrastructure level” QMS documentation.2 Documentation Strategy 8.5 Summary 8.6 Terminal Questions 8. Planning for QMS documentation should address the following three elements: 1. it must plan for it.OM0006-Unit-08-System Operations and Documentation Unit-08-System Operations and Documentation Structure: 8.

Process for creating QMS documents. Documentation management and control mechanisms. and dissemination of QMS documentation. approval. Document creation can proceed unhindered once the necessary guidelines are in place to support the creation. made available to users. the primary users of an organization’s QMS documentation are its employees. changed in a controlled manner. and archived when obsolete (to prevent unintentional use). Documentation strategy This is perhaps the most critical element of QMS documentation planning. A wellthought-out.2. rational approach to documenting your QMS will enable you to rapidly develop a QMS that works and has sufficient but not excessive detail. and. providing mechanisms to ensure that documentation in the organization is uniquely identifiable reviewed and approved by the appropriate authority prior to release. This entails answering questions such as: · What types of QMS documents are required? · How should the QMS documents be logically structured? · How should the QMS documents be uniquely identified? · Who should review and approve documents? · How should changes to QMS documents be identified and controlled? · How should superseded (or obsolete) documents be handled? . and 3. perhaps most importantly. After all. review. Brainstorming the documentation strategy entails obtaining answers to the following questions: · What approach should be adopted for documenting the QMS (top down or bottom-up)? · Up to what level of detail should processes be documented (breadth and depth of documentation)? · How can the QMS documentation be kept relatively stable and immune from minor changes in the organization or its processes? Documentation management and control Documentation management and control are a key element of an organization’s QMS. will provide you with a documentation set that is usable. not outside parties. not one written primarily to appease external quality auditors. Agreeing upon such issues up front will facilitate the creation of the QMS documentation. kept current.

and other needed documentation..e.2 Documentation Strategy The top-down approach to implementing and documenting the QMS is highly recommended (as opposed to the bottom-up approach). Objectives: After going through this unit you will be able to: · Describe what is documentation strategy · Outline a documentation strategy for a unit or an enterprise · Construct a process map for documentation · Compose a QMS for a documentation process 8. Similarly. approval. the overall process that results in a delivered product the product development process may be documented in a product development procedure and/or in a product development process map. review. Another important issue that needs to be addressed regards level of detail.. What is the right level of detail to include in the documentation so that it enables correct and . the process that results in a formalized set of product requirements may be identified as the product requirements definition sub process that is documented in a product requirements definition procedure. rework. virtual) repository? · How employees should be provided access to controlled QMS documentation. For example. The procedures describing the sub processes and their interaction should be supported by additional QMS documentation. For example. the process that results in a formal documented design for the product may be identified as the product design sub process that is documented in a product design procedure.e. how should the QMS documentation repository be published? · How should the published QMS documentation be organized to maximize ease of use for employees? Documentation process The third element of QMS documentation planning entails the establishment of a process for the creation. as appropriate.· How should documents of external origin be controlled? · Should the QMS documentation be stored in a physical (i. a product design guidelines document. Within the product development process. the product design sub process should be supported by QMS documentation such as a design document template. hardcopy) repository or an electronic (i. that is. and final release of QMS documents.

as opposed to referring to individuals by name. Therefore. For example. QMS documents should be written so that they need minimum change.consistent process execution. . Include all information that is specifically required to be documented as per the applicable quality management system standard. complexity of the process being documented. Creating more QMS documentation is not necessarily the right solution. refer to them by the “function performed. organizations should be careful in how they respond when process execution deviates from requirements. or conducting employee training to emphasize key aspects of a process. if your organization has a product test department that is called “system test department. operation. it is far more convenient to revise one QMS document than to revise multiple documents.” you need not revise your QMS documents if the functional responsibilities for testing the product still reside with this group. but might result from unclear or ambiguous QMS documentation.” then refer to this department as the test department. Include only as much information as is necessary to ensure effective planning. Do not document details of an activity in more than one QMS document. 3. review of existing QMS documentation to identify and correct deficiencies. type of activities. and competency level of employees executing the processes. Sometimes. Such an organizational change can have a huge impact on the QMS documents. To minimize the impact of such reorganizations. state that the requirements document is produced by the requirements engineer. If this department subsequently is renamed the “independent verification and validation department. 2. state in procedure Y that detailed description regarding that activity can be found in procedure X. instead of referring to departments by name. and control of processes. Often departments in organizations are renamed or merged into other departments. for minor operational or organizational changes. or other factors. is the preferred solution. and minimizes impact (on QMS documentation) of minor changes in the business processes and organizational structure? Any breakdown or inconsistency in process execution does not necessarily result from insufficient QMS documentation.” For example. Other factors that have a bearing on extent of QMS documentation include size of the organization. if any. If an activity is described in a procedure X. and another procedure Y needs to refer to the same activity. Below are some guidelines to follow to ensure QMS documentation has the right amount of detail: 1. In the event of any change in the execution in that activity. instead of saying that Mark Peterson produces the product requirements document. Some useful tips to accomplish this are: • • • Always refer to roles (or functional areas) that are involved in the execution of a process. inadequate employee training.

such as procedures.3 Documentation Management and Control 8. 4. 5.g. 3. Generally. However. For example. Depending on the size of an organization and/or its number of locations. Self Assessment Questions 1. Documentation process of __________ planning entails the establishment of a process for the creation. department Y’s procedure refers to department X’s work instructions. Implementation-level QMS documents typically are more prone to changes in content. and enforce an organization’s documentation management and control function.1 Role of the Document Controller Before discussing different elements of document management and control. the document controller function may be centralized or distributed. 2. type of activities. The ________________ to implementing and documenting the QMS is highly recommended. Certainly it is quite inconvenient for department Y to revise its procedure when department X revises its work instructions such that the reference from department Y’s procedure becomes inaccurate. in case of companies with more than one location (or very large companies in a single location). refer only to its highlevel QMS documents. _____________ should be written so that they need minimum change..• When referring to another department’s QMS documents. QMS documentation includes ______ of the organization. monitor. Document controllers are people who coordinate. Avoid references to another department’s work instructions or similar implementation-level documents. Verifying that documents submitted for storage and publishing are: . title. company quality manual and operating procedures) in a centralized location. it is best to control documents that affect an entire company (e. QMS documentation that pertains to a specific location (or a specific function) may be controlled locally. A document controller’s responsibilities generally include. A controlled document is one that is formally approved and is under formal version control. 8. it is necessary to introduce the concepts of controlled documents and document controller. and scope than are high-level documents. but are not limited to: 1.3. Documentation __________ and control are a key element of an organization’s QMS.

this task generally is performed by the document controller. an approved document change request should be available) 7. such as the document author and management personnel from the affected area. Ensuring that all controlled documents are stored in a secure location. the document controller should verify that the document version accurately reflects the magnitude of change in the latest version. Alternatively. Maintaining a master list of controlled documents. Authorizing internal documents for external release after verifying that approvals for the release have been obtained from relevant management personnel. Verifying that the documents are correctly numbered. Verifying that all changes made to previously approved documents are clearly identified. This includes withdrawing copies of obsolete controlled documents. 12. Verifying that changes made to previously approved documents were properly authorized (that is. This is necessary because the document author may make document changes in addition to those that were authorized. they adhere to standardized templates when applicable) b. 8. 6. In the correct format (that is. Notifying affected personnel in the event of a change to a previously approved document (or release of a new document) 9. This includes clearly identifying documents of external origin and storing them in a secure location.3. Duly approved c. when errors or discrepancies are observed. Controlling documents of external origin. a document number may be generated automatically. 3.2 Types of QMS Documents Quality Manual . Correctly storing and publishing (or distributing) controlled documents. Accompanied by review records (when required) 2. Notifying appropriate personnel. In case of changes to previously approved documents. 11. When document numbers are issued manually for new documents. 8. 5. 4. for revised documents. Verifying that the documents are correctly versioned.a. 10.

This approach entails describing the high-level product development process map of the organization. answer why the organization is implementing a QMS) and describe how the organization ensures quality in its daily operations. This can be demonstrated by senior management approval on the quality manual. prefer to structure their manual to mimic the structure of the applicable quality management system standard. employees invariably prefer such a quality manual. and other parties (such as third-party auditors). followed by separate sections briefly describing each key process in the QMS. such as ISO 9001:2000. Such details should be embedded in the appropriate QMS documents. as needed. Senior management should realize that it is responsible for the manual’s content. along with a reference to related QMS documentation. organizations structure their Quality Manual in one of two ways: 1) Standard-based quality manual Most organizations that are implementing a QMS in accordance with the requirements in a particular quality management system standard.A quality manual is the highest-level QMS document and is intended primarily to provide an overview of an organization’s QMS. However. . the quality manual references relevant. it is preferable to exclude details regarding the organization’s processes from the quality manual. Each section (or subsection) in the quality manual describes how requirements in the corresponding section (or subsection) in the quality management system standard are adhered to in the organization. and not in the context of a quality management system standard. A significant advantage of this structure is that it is not alien to employees. QMS documentation in explaining adherence to each quality management system standard requirement. The quality manual must reflect the QMS accurately and be kept current at all times. in the case of smaller companies. An organization’s quality manual is an invaluable document for its employees. The QMS is explained in the context of the organizational business processes. Therefore. 2) Process-based quality manual This structure is being used increasingly in organizations that have successfully transitioned to taking a process-oriented view of their QMS. Typically. In case of medium and large product development companies. which must be referenced. customers (and potential customers). employees typically relate more closely to organizational processes than to the requirements in a quality management system standard. it may be appropriate to include the procedures in the quality manual itself. Such quality manuals follow a top-down approach to describing the organization’s QMS. from the quality manual. When appropriate. This includes describing the purpose and scope of each process. and consequently it gains wider acceptance for daily operations. It therefore should reflect the organization’s commitment to quality (in other words. Such a quality manual includes separate sections (or subsections) for each of the requirements sections (or subsections) in the quality management system standard.

Due to the intradepartmental nature of work instructions. Procedures are useful for communicating process information at all levels of management between departments. As a general rule of thumb. and they constitute the first level of documentation below procedures. practitioners typically need additional process documents. they should be documented and jointly reviewed by practitioners involved in executing the tasks documented. called work instructions. They provide a step-by-step description of tasks to be executed in order to accomplish each activity in the process. The decision to document a process in a procedure is made by the respective process owner in consultation with the quality assurance department. it is a good candidate for splitting into separate procedures. When each activity in a process is performed. they should undergo cross-functional review by all departments involved in the process (or areas affected by the process) being documented. Procedures are not intended to provide the how to implementation details regarding a process. When process practitioners do not have the requisite training or are otherwise unskilled for creating effective process .Procedure A procedure is a documented high-level description of a process. Procedures constitute the first level of documentation below the quality manual. Work instruction A work instruction is a documented low-level description of a process. and Where the activities are performed. Work instructions typically are intradepartmental and are intended primarily for use by process practitioners. because organizational processes typically span multiple departments. Work instructions describe how activities in a process are executed. They serve as critical reference documents for anyone interested in knowing what a process entails. Procedures are usually interdepartmental. to execute their tasks. a procedure should not be longer than three pages. Who performs the activities (roles and responsibilities). If a longer procedure is needed. Because a procedure is intended to contain relatively high-level information regarding a process. competent. and experienced personnel for providing information on the execution of specific tasks. They describe: What activities comprise a process. Due to the interdepartmental nature of procedures. The practitioners have firsthand experience performing the tasks and therefore typically are the most knowledgeable. They also serve as a valuable starting point for training process practitioners. This helps ensure that the procedure accurately reflects the process and the interaction between various departments.

the greater the likelihood of inconsistency in process execution. The need to document a procedure or work instruction may be determined by using criteria such as: Complexity Is the process or the activities in it sufficiently complex that that it needs to be supported by a documented procedure or work instruction? Or.g.g. . the work instructions should be documented with direct input and active involvement of the process practitioners. the sequence of tasks to be performed during engine assembly for a passenger vehicle)? Need for consistency Are there expectations regarding a high degree of discipline and consistency in executing a set of tasks (e. work instructions can help ensure consistency and minimize errors. The decision to create a work instruction is made by the line manager or process owner who is responsible for the tasks. processes that are relatively straightforward and without inherent complexity (or sophistication) can be described adequately in a well-documented procedure such that competent personnel can faithfully execute them without compromising quality of process output. when new personnel or personnel with varying levels of competence are executing a process. the core description of tasks in a work instruction should be limited to about four or five pages in length. and to ensure consistency in process execution.documentation. Not every procedure needs to be supported by underlying work instructions. As a general rule of thumb. Work instructions should be created on an as-needed basis when a need exists to provide detailed step-by-step guidance for process execution. such as the PMC representative for the department. is there need to elaborate and provide further explanation on a process documented in a procedure by creating a work instruction (e. the sequence of inspections to be performed before final approval for release of electronic wire assemblies)? Competence of personnel Is the competency level of the personnel executing the process such that it needs to be augmented with appropriate documentation to ensure the process is correctly executed? (For example. to minimize variation..) Size of organization Is the process executed by several personnel and/or in multiple locations? The greater the number of personnel involved in a process or the greater the number of locations at which a process is executed. In many cases. in order to secure buy-in of the practitioners and to ensure that the documentation accurately reflects practice. In such a case.. this task may be performed by another appropriate person.

Therefore. A form is used to record information.3. Once released. An example of a document numbering convention is shown in Table 1. one must not only know what document to use. This is because the information contained in the new revision of the document is to some extent different from that contained in the previous revision. It is recommended that forms and templates have brief instructions embedded in them to guide the user regarding the expected content in each section of the document. a unique document number and version should be assigned to each document. but also what revision level of that document to use. They help in ensuring consistency of format and content within a particular type of document. Templates and forms A template is a skeleton for a document intended to be populated with specific information from use. Table 1 . but retained for archival purposes).4 Document Versioning Documents. The decision to create a template or form for use across departments should be made by the respective process owner in consultation with the quality assurance department (for reasons described earlier). The organization should devise a document numbering convention that meets its needs. for documenting procedures. 8. The numbering convention should be published in a QMS document. Any change or set of changes made to a document since its last release necessitates that the new revision level of the document be formally identified. due to their very nature. For example. directly in the fields provided. documenting an agreed way of executing a process can help. evolve. The procedure author would start with the procedure template and populate it with information for the process being documented. and should be enforced by the personnel in charge of (or tool used for) issuing the document numbers. while the decision to create a template or form for departmental use may be made by the respective line manager. Templates serve as guides for communicating the expected structure and content of a document. it is strongly recommended that a procedure template first be established. either for review or for use (after approval). such as procedures or work instructions. a document typically will undergo revisions until it is withdrawn from use (or considered obsolete.3 Document Numbering In order to uniquely identify and control each QMS document.3.Past problems Have there been instances in the past where inconsistencies in employees have been observed in process execution? In such cases. 8.

Example of a Document Numbering Convention Document number format: AAA-BB-CCCC-DDDD where, AAA: Three-character identifier for department that is the document originator For example, “ENG” may denote engineering, “MKT” may denote marketing, “EXT” may denote the document is of external origin, and so on. BB: Two character identifier for document type. For example, “PR” may denote procedure, “TP” may denote template, “CH” may denote checklist, and so on. CCCC: Four-character alphanumeric identifier for project, product, or task. DDDD: Four-digit sequential number between 0001 and 9999. This sequential number uniquely identifies a specific document (irrespective of its version). 8.3.5 Document Content Following are some guidelines regarding document content (for examples, refer to sample QMS documents in the Appendices): 1. All QMS documents and records should have the same “look and feel.” Consistency in templates and forms can be ensured by following some general guidelines, such as:

The same header and footer on all templates and forms, with information such as:

a) Document title b) Document number c) Document version d) A statement to indicate the company proprietary nature of the document

Each QMS document, when appropriate, should use the same title page, containing the following:

– Standard information, (e.g., organization’s name and logo). The title page also can include a unique logo to indicate that it is a QMS document. This enables quick identification of QMS documents. – Customizable information, (e.g., document title) 2. Each QMS document or record should contain content as per the guidance contained in the associated form or template. Each QMS document must identify its purpose and

scope clearly. Correctness of the document content should be reviewed and enforced during document review meetings. 3. Deletions from the template and forms should not be allowed. If a particular section is not required, it should be marked “not applicable.” 4. Insertion of additional sections in a document created by using a standard form or template should be allowed when necessary; however, certain rules should be established to handle addition of new sections. Self Assessment Questions State whether following statement True or False. 6. All QMS documents and records should have the same “look and feel”. 7. A work instruction is a non-documented low-level description of a process. 8. A procedure is a documented high-level description of a process. 9. A quality manual is the highest-level QMS document. 10. A template is not a skeleton for a document intended to be populated with specific information from use. 8.4 QMS Documentation Process Now that all the necessary elements of a documentation management system have been described, you are ready to begin creating QMS documents. What documentation process should be followed to create, review, and approve QMS documents? This section describes a high-level documentation process that ties together some of the key elements of document management and control. Step 1: Identify suitable document author The first step is to identify a document author who possesses appropriate subject matter expertise. Typically, a management person from the function tasked to create the document selects a suitable document author. Step 2: Create draft version of the document The document author creates a draft version of the document by using the applicable template (if one is available). Step 3: Review the draft document

Once a draft version of the document has been prepared, it is circulated for review to appropriate reviewers (or functions) that are considered stakeholders in a document. The review may be in the form of an informal and/or formal review. Step 4: Rework the document as per reviewer feedback After receiving the feedback from the reviewers, the author reworks the document in accordance with comments provided by the document reviewers. Step 5: Approve and publish the document Once the document rework is complete, and it has been determined that a rearview is not required, the document is circulated for approval to the identified approvers. Once all the required approvals have been obtained, the author submits the master copy of the document along with the review record to the document controller. The document controller stores the document in the controlled repository and makes copies available for use. 8.5 Summary Documentation strategy is perhaps the most critical element of QMS documentation planning. Documentation management and control are a key element of an organization’s QMS, providing mechanisms to ensure that documentation in the organization is uniquely identifiable reviewed and approved by the appropriate authority prior to release. A template is a skeleton for a document intended to be populated with specific information from use. 8.6 Terminal Questions 1. Explain briefly different steps in documentation. 2. Define some guidelines in Documentation Strategy. 3. Explain types of QMS documents. 4. Summarize Document Content. 5. Explain QMS Documentation Process. 8.7 Answers Self Assessment Questions 1. Management 2. QMS documentation

Refer 8. QMS documents 4. Refer Pages 9. Top-Down approach 5.3 Copyright © 2011 SMU Powered by Sikkim Manipal University . True 7. .3. Refer 8. Refer 8.2. 10 5. Page 4 3.1. True 9. Refer 8.2 4.0 2. False 8. False Terminal Questions 1. True 10. Size 6.

OM0006-Unit-09-Machine Life and Depreciation
Unit-09-Machine Life and Depreciation Structure: 9.1 Introduction Objectives 9.2 Functional Reliability of Facilities 9.3 Weibull Distribution Curve [Failures and its Analysis] 9.4 Life of Equipment a) Bathtub Curve and MTBF b) Breakdown Time Distribution c) Reliability and Variability of the Equipments 9.5 Critical Analysis 9.6 Maintenance Performance Ratios 9.7 Maintenance Systems 9.8 Reliability and Availability Concepts 9.9 How good is Reliability Performance? a) Root Cause Failure Analysis b) Reliability Centred Maintenance c) Failure Modes Effects Analysis & Total Productivity Maintenance 9.10 Maintenance Economics 9.11 Preventive Vs Breakdown Maintenance

9.12 Measurement of Maintenance Performance 9.13 Asset Life Cycle Management 9.14 Equipment Replacement Plans 9.15 Depreciation & Capital Expenditure based on Life Cycle 9.16 Summary 9.17 Terminal Questions 9.18 Answers to SAQ & Terminal Questions 9.1 Introduction The main function of the maintenance department is to monitor and control the condition of machineries and equipments and improve their functional reliability. The reliability theories on equipment performances have shown that there is a definite pattern of performance in their lifespan. This pattern manifests itself when different machineries are subjected to rigorous operations during the life span. The typical characteristics of the lifespan show a particular behaviour pattern of a bathtub and hence it is called as ‘bathtub curve’, which is discussed later. Objectives: After going through this unit you will be able to: · Describe what are failures in maintenance · Analyze failures through Weibull distribution curve · Discuss Reliability Performance · Construct a measure for performance 9.2 Functional Reliability of Facilities One of the most important objectives of Maintenance management is to improve functional reliability of the production facilities. The functional reliability refers to the consistency of the degree of performance of the machine, equipment or service operation. When it is said that a machine is having 97% reliability means that 97% of the machine time is utilized in performing the standard production for which it is meant for, and the remaining 3% of non performing may be

due to breakdowns or sub-standard performance. Therefore it is the duty of the plant maintenance crew to strive to maintain and increase the functional reliability of the production facilities. The objective of FMEA ( ) and reliability analysis of the plant and equipment is to ensure to excellence in performance of critical assets and achieve the business goals. The application of standard procedures and structured approach to analyse and practice effective method/s required to maintain all the operating plant assets. This process enables the maintenance managers to plan, review and optimise the maintenance operations that have direct impact on plant availability, thereby improving the overall plant performance and minimizing catastrophic failures. The functional reliability of facilities to be maintained or improved upon by the maintenance management requires the use of certain concepts, reliability methodologies, analysis, tools and techniques and measures. Some of these are listed: a) Determinate the appropriate level of maintenance services required. b) Identify specific actions based on equipment failures analysis & risk assessment. c) Prevention and reduction of potential failures by properly identifying defects and implementing corrective actions prior to failure d) To deploy sufficient staff to provide adequate repair and maintenance facilities. e) To provide for the stand-by equipment for key operations and also reasonable slacks in the production system to create some parallel path in a critical situation f) To adopt preventive Maintenance system to replace critical parts, before they fail. g) Each of the above involves costs. The cost involved should be justified on the basis of cost-benefit analysis. The cost of attaining reliability must be lower than the cost advantage available out of the production stoppages, idle machine and labour time, scrap, poor quality, loss of goodwill to keep delivery promises etc. h) Maintenance extends the useful life of assets by reducing wear and tear. i) Maintenance keeps up operational readiness of equipments for emergencies. j) Maintenance contributes a great deal to safety of manpower using the facilities. k) It prevents wastage of spares, tools and materials.

or sheer quality deficiency in their manufacture. b) Useful Performance phase: Next phase is the useful period of performance with a better reliability. called the ‘Weibull distribution graph’ (after Weibull developed it). and or not adjusted the operating conditions adequately.l) More automation calls for sophisticated Maintenance. This behaviour pattern reflects ‘hyper-exponential distribution’.3 Weibull Distribution Curve [Failure & Its Analysis] For better maintenance planning and control. there are three phases in the equipment performance namely a) Infant mortality phase b) Useful performance phase c) Ageing phase. because of its shape. This is the useful period of the machine. it is important to know the nature and occurrence of failures over a period of time for the equipment in use. This type of breakdowns may be due physical characteristics of the . Once this phase is over. the weak components from the infant mortality period have either been repaired or replaced. Most equipment that survives infancy stage will continue to perform better with very few failures. The graph of the failure pattern. c) Ageing Phase: Here the rate of failure increases until the equipment succumbs and is characterized by the rapid wear and tear of more and more components until major breakdown happens. fatigue due to flaws in the molecular structure of the metals. is primarily due to abrupt changes in stress distribution in the components. The high rate of failure at infant mortality stage is primarily due to the presence of weak or substandard components or design inadequacies. It is also commonly called as ‘Bath Tub Curve’. As per the graph. The failure is random and unpredictable. is shown below. which is called the infant mortality. the failure rate dips as the components adjust to the system until it reaches a relatively low constant level. 9. During this period. a) Infant Mortality phase: Newly installed equipment shows high rate incidence of early failures during initial phase of its life. poor installation.

4 Life of Equipment a) Bathtub Curve and MTBF · Weibull distribution or Bath Tub Curve. · From these. availability. Depending upon the complexity of the machine and severe aging processes because of extreme wear and tear results in an ultimate failure. 9. This ageing failure graph shows a bell-shaped normal distribution pattern.e. . · Figure below represents the degree of variability in free run time. Negative exponential and Normal exponential. by which the system reliability. These causes being external to the equipment and the probability of failing is relatively constant. shown above. and may be earlier or later. the failure of any one part may result in the complete machine breakdown. the failure fall into a negative exponential distribution. · The availability (A) = [Cumulative time of operation in the normal working condition(Tn)] / the cumulative down time (Td)] i. A= [Tn] / [Tn+Td] b) Breakdown time distribution: · It is essential to know how the breakdown time is distributed in order to establish the cost implications in maintenance. can be assessed. or how the machine is used. This ultimate may occur at ‘mean’ or ‘average’ time. anticipated life etc. the breakdown time distribution of a complex machine will reflect a greater variability than that of a simple machine even if they have the same average maintenance free run time. · A simple machine having few moving parts may have breakdowns happenings after a large number of maintenance free run time hours. Distribution shows the frequency of maintenance free running time with respect to total operating hours.materials used. Mean Time between Failure (MTBF) can be computed. its statistics will help as a diagnostic tool in identifying the exponential nature of the availability and the reliability of equipment. In other words. · When the failures are recurrent. but in a complex machine. is a combination of three distributions: Hyper exponential. This means that each part in a particular machine will have different failure distribution.

the resultant graph is shown below. before establishing reliability. . and ‘runtimes free of breakdowns’ on the ‘x’ – axis. · By reliability. 0. It can be observed that the Curve A shows lower degree of variability. Curve C has the same average maintenance free runtime as the other two. curve B exhibits moderate variability while Curve C indicates greater degree of variability from average breakdown time Ta.6. the frequency distribution. For example: if the total system has four sub systems having the reliability factors of 0. Curve B of the complex machine.8.While curve A depicts the behaviour of a simple machine.7. then the total product reliability is multiple of all these systems i. but the distribution shows wider variability. 0.and 0. converting the information into the breakdown time distributions versus the percentage of breakdowns that exceeds a given run time. c) Reliability and Variability of the Equipments · Equipment can be considered as a total system and the failure of any one of the sub system can cause failure of the entire system. Here the data can be recast in the diagram. The variability by Curve C is typical of complicated equipment that needs fine adjustments before it starts giving trouble free service. · When the above reliability factors are plotted in a diagram showing the percentage of breakdowns that exceed a given runtime on the ‘y’ – axis.9. Hence the reliability of the total system depends on the product reliability factors of each of the sub systems. we mean the probability that any system gives a trouble free service. 0.e.4.

it is a corrective maintenance to restore the machine/parts to acceptable condition again. to replace it. Focus is not only concentrated on availability but also the reliability . electrical or other fault quickly and to correct them. the repair maintenance crew endeavours to locate mechanical. Preventive Maintenance When a sudden breakdown occurs in a machine. but the two types of planned maintenance could be carried out. 9.6 Maintenance Performance Ratios Some of the ratios used in measuring the effectiveness of Maintenance functions are: a) Waste Index = [Waste Quantity] / [Output Quantity] b) Productivity of Maintenance = [Product output] / [Maintenance Cost] c) Maintenance Cost index = 100 x [Maintenance cost] / [Capital Cost] d) Breakdown maintenance index = [Break down hours] / [Man hours available] e) Downtime index = 100 x [Downtime hours] / [Production hours] 9. In other words. may contribute to 80 to 85% of the total breakdown time.7 Maintenance Systems The ad hoc unplanned emergency maintenance is not recommended. to locate the faulty/broken part. This activity may take a few minutes. It is the job of the maintenance crew to identify and quickly eliminate or simplify or improve upon these defects.9. Repair Maintenance 2. namely: 1. Fundamental differences between the strategies discussed earlier and the proactive maintenance discussed now are: 1.5 Critical Analysis Critical analysis of maintenance problems is essential to know as to how serious is the problem for taking quick actions. here too is that the small percentage of around 15-20% defects in equipment. the function presupposes the previous breakdowns and actions of disassembling the equipment. to reassemble the equipment and then check and restore to its functional capacity. or even a few days as the work involved depends on the size and complexity of the equipment. As in other types of probabilities. In this type of repair maintenance. the nature of the fault and availability of repair staff etc.

S = Speed performance] Manufacturing reliability model consists of a) process reliability b) equipment reliability and c) reliability maintainability. but when failures occur.8 Reliability and Availability Concepts Reliability and availability have become key issues. T = Time performance. There is a push towards zero downtime or zero in-service breakdowns. Use of improved maintenance tools such as Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM). Manufacturing reliability can be defined as a manufacturing system’s capability to operate to its expected operations. more complex the equipment/ the raw material/ high tech processing. quality and speed) · Mean production loss (MPL) Thus the reliability index is expressed in terms of the running continuously without production losses. For example. a CNC machine can be very good at 90%. but the liquid packaging machine may be best at +75% reliability. Q = Quality performance. then lower is the reliability. fix the problem as fast as possible. Using the above definition.2. and manufacture the quality product at the speed required. Root Cause Failure Analysis (RCFA). the formula used to measure manufacturing reliability (MR) is: MR = [% T] x [% Q] x [% S] [Where. 3. . There are many ways to measure reliability.9 How Good Is ‘Reliability Performance’? In industrial processes. a tissue processing machine may give a good reliability of +98%. and others. 9. where as a less complex automatic lathe may be rated best at + 98%. Say in a paper processing. 9. the overall reliability performance of the total process is less and is dictated by the complex machine with lesser reliability. This index is the volume of quality products you measure in the production line divided by the theoretical volume of quality product you could achieve from the same line. · Mean Time between Failure (MTBF) · Measure of mean time between production Loss (MTBPL) (Production losses include loss due to time.

the team finds as many causes for the fault as possible and classify them into non contributing and contributing. preventive maintenance is highly beneficial to machines whose breakdown time distributions are having low variability. 9. planning and organisational leadership. a standard preventive maintenance period can be set in such a way that the total downtime is reduced. customer service. RCM provides a flow diagram that tells what type of maintenance to be used. Through a fault tree analysis. This practice has impact on many aspects of business. Through brainstorming sessions.a) Root cause failure analysis: · The root cause failure analysis (RCFA) method brings a knowledgeable team together to investigate certain failures using evidence left behind from the fault. · While RCM is driven by preventive maintenance strategies.10 Maintenance Economics Maintenance refers to an organisation’s policy in respect of the maintenance function of a set of equipments. hygiene. As maintenance is an economic decision. Non contributing causes are removed from the list and contributing factors are taken for analysis. When implemented together they complement each other and provide the greatest overall benefit to the facility. production. Answering to seven questions on all the potential modes of failure will uncover the predictive maintenance strategy requires to mitigate the consequences of the failure. . the team checks for the logical flows and determine what changes are to be made to prevent causes from reoccurring. In this situation. It has relevance to high volume production and can improve a company’s maintenance system and help improve the overall productivity of the processes. engineering. RCFA is driven by maintenance prevention strategies. quality. what are its cost implications? 9. c) Failure Modes Effects Analysis & Total Productivity Maintenance · Total productive maintenance (TPM) and failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) are other maintenance tools used for improving the reliability through proactive maintenance.11 Preventive Vs Breakdown Maintenance Certain generalizations on type of maintenance can be made to improve the reliability: a) First. b) Reliability centred Maintenance · The purpose of reliability centred maintenance (RCM) is to determine the maintenance requirements of any physical assets in its operating contexts. The decision of maintenance policy is more of an economic decision rather than a technical one.

or more than the time for repair. There is little gain in the preventive maintenance. the relation of preventive maintenance time to repair time is important.12 Measurement of Maintenance Performance Organizations seeking excellence in their maintenance practices should constantly endeavour to measure and improve upon the performance criteria’s of maintenance. Companies should recognize this fact that maintenance of its assets is to be encouraged as the process will provide advantages in enhancing quality initiative. Additional stoppage time because the maintenance crew cannot start repairing immediately after the breakdown has occurred. d) We need to take into account other effects of unscheduled down-time. it is better to perform corrective or breakdown maintenance. 3) direct labour value . Effects of scheduling preventive maintenance for non-productive days with no loss of production. Effect on production losses if plant shutdown can be avoided 3. the percentage of machine running time continues to increase with the increase of standard preventive maintenance period. Hence maintenance and management of assets is the core to any business. reduces costs and eliminate waste. Analysis of data of the existing conditions with respect to down time production loss. if the maintenance time is less than the repair time and If the preventive maintenance is equal to. 2. etc are required to be done and evaluated.b) Second. increases capacity. existing maintenance facilities. such as 1. maintenance cost breakdown. c) In general. Some metrics that may help in evaluation are: a) Maintenance man hours as percentage of total man hours b) Shutdown. overhauls and renovations c) Production asset and loss d) Continuous reliability improvements e) Maintenance cost as a ratio of percentage of 1) gross asset value 2) sales value. when the repair time is equal to maintenance time. nature of repair breakdowns. 9.

14 Equipment Replacement Plans The systematic equipment development program includes: 1) emergence of equipment replacement 2) classification of equipment replacement 3) assignment of responsibility for equipment replacement 4) selection of the equipment 5) follow up. Factors that are considered while taking decision to replace machine and equipment can be classified as a) Technical factors b) Cost factors. b) Maintenance phase: operating environment for each asset is defined and performance goals at the lowest cost are firmed up. 9. as evolved by some companies for better results consists of three phases: a) Asset Acquisition Phase: here asset may be new or replaced or change of major components changed before operating activities in this asset is firmed up. Asset life cycle management system. Asset dependability and its reliability are to be established. c) Disposal Phase: when the asset is no longer capable of delivering the required operational performance or cannot be maintained cost effectively to achieve the required level of dependability. a) Technical factors that dictates replacement 1) Wear and tear of equipment 2) Obsolescence caused by new invention . companies are required to produce more products of higher quality from fewer resources and hence maintaining higher reliability of assets has been a challenging task for the management.f) Safety and regulatory compliance 9. then the asset is disposed off as it has reached the end of its lifecycle.13 Asset Life Cycle Management In high tech production.

having a short life. old or new. repair and maintenance costs. consumes high power etc 4) Automation requirement for processes 5) To eliminate slack time through line balancing 6) Reduced safety 7) Reliability of performance b) Cost Factors: 1) High repair cost 2) Lesser place requirement 3) Probable economic life of the new machine 4) Consumption of less power 5) Reduction in labour cost because high productive machines purchased 6) Flexibility requirement not in the existing equipment Methods used for replacement after analysis: The replacement analysis becomes more complex due to many technical factors and qualitative considerations. While the annual operating costs include wages to operator.3) Unsuitability of equipment due to size of the work. material losses etc. Hence the time for replacement depends on the condition and characteristics of the equipment. 2) By Using Barnes Formula: this formula is used for equipment. will pay not only for equipment but also for any unamortized value for next few years. 1) Minimum annual cost method: here the decision to replace the machine (unwanted or life is completed) is based on the operating and capital costs. accuracy. X = (No. Here the replacement is not advocated unless savings due to the use of new equipment. The main ingredients of the annual cost are depreciation and interest charges. rate of output. power consumption. of years the equipment will pay for itself) = [A+B] / [(E-F) DG + H – C] . speed of operations. Some important methods or replacement of old and unused machineries are 1) minimum annual cost method 2) by using Barnes formula 3) MAPI (Machinery and allied institute) method.

· An annual depreciation charge is shown as an expense in the Profit and Loss account. F = estimated labour cost per unit with new equipment. whilst revenue expenditure is that spent on day to day business expenses. but shown in the Balance Sheet · Depreciation is an attempt to spread the cost of an asset over its useful economic life. G = estimated working days per year for new equipment and H = savings or losses per year in fixed charges other than interest] 3) MAPI method: here the analysis is divided into 35 heads & three main groups.10000.15 Depreciation & Capital Expenditure based on Life Cycle · This requirement falls into the following groups: a) Calculation of depreciation b) Calculation of profit/loss on disposal c) Accounting for depreciation and disposals Calculation of Depreciation · Capital expenditure is that spent on purchase or improves on fixed assets. Capital expenditure is not recorded in the Profit and Loss account. Straight Line method 1) A fixed percentage on cost each year. The two most commonly used methods are straight line method and reducing balance method. For example. it has the business cost of Rs. D = number of units product per day by new equipment. kept in use for 8 years. Additionally. E = labour cost per unit in old equipment. MAPI method concentrates on the comparison of the rate of return of the proposed new project and similar returns when the proposed project is not implemented within next year. · Depreciation should be calculated in a way which most closely reflecting the manner in which the asset is being used up.9000 with the income that asset has generated. B = depreciated value of the old equipment. if an asset is purchased for Rs.[where A = cost of new equipment.9000. the value of the asset in the balance sheet should be reduced by each year’s charge. Depreciation tries to apply the accruals by matching that Rs.1000. C = interest charge of new equipment. 9. It emphasizes on immediate return. 2) The same monetary amount each year . and then sold for Rs.

[Note that the expected residual value is ignored & it will have been incorporated into the choice of 20% as an appropriate rate] b) Calculation of Profit/Loss The depreciation charged each year is based on estimates of useful life and residual value. Calculate the depreciation to be charged for each of the first 3 years of the machine’s life.30000. at the end of which it will be sold for Rs. the net cost is simply divided by the expected life.30000 – Rs. . · [Note that the policy could have been expressed as “straight line at %” or “Depreciation at % pa on cost” – here the percentage is calculated as = Rs.4800) x 20% =Rs.Reducing Balance method 1) A fixed percentage on net book value each year 2) A reducing monetary amount each year Example: 1 a) Straight line method A machine is purchased for Rs.2850 / Rs. the annual charge for every year of the machine’s life is Rs.3840 and so on.30000 x 100.6000) x 20% =Rs.6000 – Rs.4800 c) Year 3 (Rs. This over or under provision of depreciation is shown in the Profit and Loss a/c as a profit or loss on the disposal of fixed assets.2850.30000 – Rs. 2850) · So. This may reveal that two much or too little depreciation has been provided over the asset’s life. On disposal. ] Reducing balance method (the charge for depreciation reduces each year) a) Year 1 Rs. the actual disposal proceeds will show the true net cost of the asset.30000 – Rs.1500) / 10 = Rs.1500. i.e. (Rs. using: (i) The straight line method (ii) The reducing balance method at 20% pa Solution · Under the straight line method. It is expected that this machine will be used for 10 years.e. 6000 b) Year 2 (Rs. i.30000 x 20%= Rs.

2. equipment or service operation.2520 [sale price of Rs. and is depreciated using the reducing balance method at 20% pa. In practice. acquisition or disposal may occur part way through the accounting year.03-2009 (20%) =5120 · Net book value at 31. The main function of the maintenance department is to monitor and control the condition of machineries and equipments and improve their ____________________.2007 (20%) =8000 · Net book value at 31. Calculate the profit or loss arising on this disposal.Example: 2 An asset is purchased on 1 January 2006 for Rs.03.03-2008 =25600 · Depreciation y/e 31. the disposal occurred exactly 3 years after the acquisition. . Solution · Sales proceeds must be compared to the net book value on the date of disposal.03-2008 (20%)= 6400 · Net book value at 31. The asset is sold on 1 January 2009 for Rs.03.40000. there is a profit on disposal of price of Rs.2007 =32000 · Depreciation y/e 31. The functional reliability refers to the ____________________ of the machine. 23000 – 20480 (book value) = Rs. which necessitates decision regarding depreciation (may be proportionate) · A popular depreciation policy would be: A full year’s charge in the year of acquisition but none in the year of disposal Self Assessment Questions Fill up the blanks with appropriate words: 1. 2520] c) Accounting for depreciation and disposals · In the above example. · Original cost 40000 · Depreciation y/e 31.23000.03-2009 =20480 · Thus.

The graph of the failure pattern. is shown below. Most equipment that survives infancy stage will continue to perform better with very few failures. It is also commonly called as ____________________. As per the graph. This is the useful period of the machine. 4. The objective of FMEA ( ) and reliability analysis of the plant and equipment is to ensure to ____________________ of critical assets and achieve the business goals. here too is that the small percentage of around 15-20% defects in equipment. For better maintenance planning and control. Hence the reliability of the total system depends on the _________________ of each of the sub systems.3. 5. there are three phases in the equipment performance namely a) Infant mortality phase b) Useful performance phase c) _____________________ 6. but in a complex machine. As in other types of probabilities. Newly installed equipment shows high rate incidence of early failures during initial phase of its life. 9. and manufacture the quality product at the speed required. The failure of any one of the sub system can cause failure of the __________________. 11.. In the ____________ . 7. because of its shape. called the ‘Weibull distribution graph’ (after Weibull developed it). _________________ of maintenance problems is essential to know as to how serious is the problem for taking quick actions. Manufacturing reliability can be defined as a manufacturing system’s ____________. may contribute to of the ____________ total breakdown time 10. 8. it is important to know the nature and occurrence of failures over a period of time for the equipment in use. the failure of any one part may result in the ____________________ . which is called the______________. . the rate of failure increases until the equipment succumbs and is characterized by the rapid wear and tear of more and more components until major breakdown happens. Reliability and availability have become key issues. In the performance phase is the ______________ period of performance with a better reliability. The formula used to measure manufacturing reliability (MR) is: MR = ………………………. A simple machine having few moving parts may have breakdowns happenings after a large number of maintenance free run time hours.

reliability methodologies. The functional reliability of facilities to be maintained or improved upon by the maintenance management requires the use of certain concepts. Reliability and availability have become key issues. 13. Asset life cycle management system. The purpose of reliability centred maintenance (RCM) is to determine the __________________ in its operating contexts. The functional reliability refers to the consistency of the degree of performance of the machine. The reliability theories on equipment have shown that there is a definite performance pattern their lifespan. availability. RCM provides a flow diagram that tells what type of maintenance to be used. equipment or service operation. Some important methods or replacement of old and unused machineries are 1) minimum annual cost method 2) by using ____________________ 3) ____________________ method. .16 Summary The main function of the maintenance department is to monitor and control the condition of machineries and improve their functional reliability. can be assessed. The objective of FMEA ( ) and reliability analysis of the plant and equipment is to ensure to excellence in performance of critical assets and achieve the business goals. analysis. S = Speed performance ] 12. anticipated life etc. 9. as evolved by some companies for better results consists of three phases: a) Asset Acquisition Phase: b) Maintenance phase: c) ____________________ 14. T = Time performance. and manufacture the quality product at the speed required. by which the system reliability. Q = Quality performance. Therefore it is the duty of the plant maintenance crew to strive to maintain and increase the functional reliability of the production facilities.[Where. Manufacturing reliability can be defined as a manufacturing system’s capability to operate to its expected operations. Mean Time between Failure (MTBF) can be computed. This pattern manifests itself due to rigorous operations during the life span. The replacement analysis becomes more complex due to many technical factors and the qualitative consideration. tools and techniques and measures.

There are many ways to measure reliability. there must be equipment replacement plan after considering the cost impact and other technical factors.For better maintenance planning and control. The purpose of reliability centred maintenance (RCM) is to determine the maintenance requirements of any physical assets in its operating contexts. Equipment can be considered as a total system and the failure of any one of the sub system can cause failure of the entire system. called the ‘Weibull distribution graph’ and known as ‘Bath Tub Curve’. as evolved by some companies for better results consists of three phases: a) Asset Acquisition Phase b) Maintenance phase c) Disposal Phase Based on the life cycle analysis. Hence the reliability of the total system depends on the product reliability factors of each of the sub systems. it is important to know the nature and occurrence of failures over a period of time for the equipment in use. The graph of the failure pattern. because of its shape. shows three phases in the equipment performance namely · Infant mortality phase · Useful performance phase · Ageing phase. Asset life cycle management system. · Mean Time between Failure (MTBF) · Mean time between production Loss (MTBPL) · Mean production loss (MPL) Companies should recognize this fact that maintenance of its assets is to be encouraged as the process will provide advantages in enhancing quality initiative. reduces costs and eliminate waste. increases capacity. . Total productive maintenance (TPM) and failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) are other maintenance tools used for improving the reliability through proactive maintenance. However the methodology to be used depends on the best alternative within the organizations objectives.

How this helps in replacement plans? 9.18 Answers Self Assessment Questions 1. Why it also called as bathtub curve? What are the three phases in the life span of equipment? 4) Explain briefly how the life of the equipment is depicted by the variability and availability factors in a) Bathtub Curve and MTBF.Capital expenditure based on the life cycle and the depreciation either by straight line or reducing method is used for a comprehensive decision by the management. Consistency of the degree of performance 3. Bath Tub Curve 5. Ageing phase . b) Breakdown time distribution: and c) Reliability and Variability of the Equipments 5) What are maintenance performance index? How they help in measuring maintenance efforts? 6) There are many ways of measuring reliability and availability. Explain few of them? 7) What are the factors considered in measurement of maintenance measurements? How they are evaluated? Briefly explain the three phases of asset life cycle management. 9. 9) What are the technical and cost factors to be considered while planning replacement of old machineries? 10) Explain briefly the depreciation methods used in capital expenditure on plant and machineries. Functional reliability 2.17 Terminal Questions 1) Define functional reliability? 2) What are the maintenance management concepts. Excellence in performance 4. methodology used for maintaining the functional reliability? 3) Explain briefly the ‘Weibull distribution curve.

Infant mortality. Refer 9. Refer 9.14 10. Maintenance requirements of any physical assets 13. Critical analysis. Disposal Phase: 14. Refer 9.13 9. = [% T] x [%Q] x [%S] 12. MAPI Terminal Questions 1. Entire system. Complete machine breakdown.4 5.2 2.8 7. Useful. Capability to operate to its expected operations 11. Refer 9.12 8.6. Product reliability factors 9.6 6. Refer 9.15 Copyright © 2011 SMU Powered by Sikkim Manipal University .3 4. . Refer 9.2 3. 8. Refer 9. Refer 9. 80 to 85% 10. Refer 9. Barnes formula. Ageing phase 7. Refer 9.

11 Implementation of TPM & Steps in TPM program Steps in TPM program 10.3 Goals 10.10 Zero Loss Concepts 10. 10.1 Introduction Objectives 10.12 Eight pillars of TPM Autonomous maintenance Kobetsu Kaizen Planned Maintenance Quality Maintenance .7 Other Related issues with TPM 10.4 Objectives of TPM 10.5 TPM and its Features 10.OM0006-Unit-10-Total Productivity Maintenance Unit-10-Total Productivity Maintenance Structure: 10.8 Overall Effectiveness of Equipment [basis of TPM] 10.9 Types of Losses.6 Evolution of Maintenance Methods 10.2 Total Productivity Maintenance 10.

repairing.17 Terminal Questions 10. But with the enlarged scope of maintenance functions when very high cost state of art machineries and equipments are used for higher productivity. Earlier the maintenance management was viewed as a function with a lesser status compared to manufacturing and its role was restricted to one of carrying out breakdown repair when a machine breaks down. to keep a machine. The Japanese have virtually eliminated machine breakdowns by applying Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) techniques to their .13 Relevance of TPM to TQM framework 10.16 Summary 10. High tech preventive maintenance routines are performed by experts at frequent intervals and machines are continually upgraded and modified for closer tolerances. adjusting. faster set ups and fewer adjustments. material handling equipment and other transport vehicles in proper working conditions. Health. Environment TPM in offices 10. machine failures cannot be tolerated. thus leading to breakdowns and production losses. inspecting.1 Introduction Manufacturers invest huge capital on productive machines and equipments for production of the desired products. This will increase the life of the machines and they perform better during their entire life span.Development Management Education & Training Safety. a more sophisticated well managed preventive – maintenance type programs such as TPM or Reliability centred maintenance (RCM) has warranted. but they often neglect the very important function of complete maintenance. Equipment maintenance is basic to competitive manufacturing.18 Answers 10. Because JIT [Just-inTime] production lines operate very close to capacity in every process.15 Role of TPM in WC-production 10. Maintenance covers all those functions such as monitoring. cleaning. a facility.14 Benefits of TPM 10. etc.

relying on team work. Reliability and TPM principles call for avoiding crisis. consensus building and continuous improvement. Machines are cleaned and lubricated frequently by the operators who run those machines. It first evolved in Nippon Denso a major supplier of the Toyota car company. 10. Here the new quality approach of “prevention at source” was translated to the maintenance environment through the concept of TPM.2 Total Productive Maintenance [TPM] TPM had its genesis in the Japanese car industry in 1970’s. to achieve total customer satisfaction. TPM is a well defined and organised maintenance program which places a high value on team work. minimising costs and continuously improving processes for manufacturing. Objectives: After studying this unit you will be able to: · Outline the features of TPM · Explain the types of losses related to maintenance · List and explain the steps involved in TPM · Comment on the methods of TPM propounded by experts on Quality.machines. maximising capacity. 10. TPM is defined as the means to achieve high level of productivity.3 Goals · Prevention of equipment deterioration · Maintain the equipment in optimal condition · Establishing basic equipment conditions · Operator is competent to operate machine/ equipment · Elimination of quality defects · Elimination of equipment failure · Elimination of cost losses . efficiency and effectiveness with zero loss concepts through total participation of all employees with self managing abilities in practices.

· To achieve higher reliability/flexibility of equipment and reduce cost through eliminating wastages. · Restoring equipment to a like-new condition · Improve maintenance efficiency and effectiveness · On job training of the labour to improve their job skills · To have a sound equipment maintenance management · Effective use of preventive and predictive maintenance technology · Achieve TPM with active participation & involvement in all levels · “Value Added” activity that the equipment is contributing to your products. delivery and services. ensuring total effectiveness of the plant for higher quality and lesser downtime. means elimination of micro operational issues · Achieve zero loss Concept – [zero breakdown. but spreads across as a company-wide culture. reduction in equipment life cycle cost. losses. · Reduction in manufacturing costs.5 TPM-Its Features TPM no longer confines to the maintenance department. 10. · Achieve manufacturing excellence. cost. · Increase plant efficiency. .4 Objectives of TPM The principle objectives of TPM are: · Eliminate all breakdowns of machines and equipment to ensure trouble free continuous production. defect.10. · Producing products for customer satisfaction in quality. waste and accident-free operations] in all the resources over the entire life cycle of a production system through team work and by overlapping small group activities. · Maximise asset and equipment effectiveness through OEE [overall equipment effectiveness] and OPE. · Boosting morale of employees.

including housekeeping. TPM is one of the most valuable strategies for those who want to be competitive & meet the World Class Competition 10. · Speed losses due to idling and minor stoppages caused by abnormal operations of censors. · Defect losses due to reduced yields in processing TPM includes three main elements: · Regular preventive maintenance. through total participation of all employees with self-managing abilities in practice. · Speed losses due to discrepancies between designed and actual speeds · Defect losses due to process defects that cause scrap & quality problems.6 Evolution of Maintenance Methods What are the other maintenance methods that are universally practiced by industries. leading to another innovative & modern practice under company-wide maintenance practice of TPM? How this evolution has happened and other related issues are briefly given below a) Breakdown Maintenance / Emergency / Corrective Maintenance: Break – down maintenance or emergency maintenance is a remedial or corrective maintenance practice that is undertaken when equipment fails and require repair on an . organizing. · Downtime for setups and adjustments. effectiveness with zero loss concept.TPM is a method designed to eliminate the losses caused by break-down of machines and equipments by identifying and attacking all causes of its breakdowns and system down time due to such breakdowns. TPM is a means to achieve high level of productivity. · Periodic pre-failure replacement or overhauls and · Intolerance for breakdowns or unsafe conditions. monitoring and controlling practices through a unique ‘8-Pillars Method’. efficiency. to achieve total customer satisfaction There are six types of losses found in a manufacturing firm: · Downtime due to equipment failure. blockages etc. TPM paves way for an excellent planning.

This idling will increase the production cost. servicing and replace parts to ensure that the system does not fail during normal operation. to uncover potential problems and to make repairs. Obviously this is not an ideal way of keeping quiet until that breakdown happens. maintenance costs and resultant delay in supply of products to customers as promised.7 Other Related Issues a) Improve Repair Capabilities: For reliability and a sound preventive maintenance practices. that results in loss of production due to idling of machinery and labour and reduces system capacity. When the distributions curve exhibits a narrow standard deviation. the preventive maintenance will be more expensive and incidental if it is other way. . firms should build up a level of repair capability in order to get the system back in operation much faster. Failure of equipment or machineries may occur at different phases. Well trained maintenance crew. Preventive maintenance policies and techniques must emphasize on all employees to accept the responsibility for the maintenance and perform all the activities to their capability. A study is made on each machine on the MTBF (mean time between failures) distribution. b) Preventive maintenance Preventive maintenance is the activity that is planned and programmed on a regular basis to inspect the system. There exists a relationship between the maintenance costs and the cost of failures with which the level of maintenance Vis-a-Vis frequency of maintenance could be firmed up. 10. This reduces the frequency of machinery break downs and consequent loss of production Break down of a machine in production line can be costly if it means shutting down the entire plant. A good maintenance facility should have the following features: 1. especially when mass production or continuous production is planned. This promotes employee empowerment and system performance c) Productive maintenance or Predictive maintenance – This is an extended preventive maintenance method that tries to reduce the chances of breakdowns by using modern monitoring and analysis techniques such as computer aided monitoring and forecasting and diagnose the condition of the equipment during operation. Here. A high failure rate known as the infant mortality exists during the initial working of the machine and then settles in. the productive maintenance tries to identify signs of equipment deterioration or imminent failure and to take corrective action before it fails.emergency or priority basis to set it right.

because of perceive product quality and the exceptional reliability. Ability to establish a repair plan and priorities. schedule disruptions etc. Reliability is a time based concept of quality. firms can reduce inventories.2. Specialists work with cross-functional teams & backup responsibility to handle difficult or unusual problems. The ability of the equipment for operation is determined by mean time between failure (MTBF) and mean time to repair (MTTR) that is: Availability = MTBF / [MTBF + MTTR] d) Equipment problems and competitiveness: Equipment problems and break downs have a direct affect on production costs. Ability to identify the cause of break downs 6. Ability to design ways to extend MTBF b) Maintenance responsibilities a) Traditional: Maintenance is a functional support activity & employees rely on specialists for custodial services. e) Role of operators in TPM . issues are closely related with maintenance and maintainability. Further these machines may have possible immediate effects such as variability of output. safety hazard. product quality and production schedules. they can improve operator safety and reduce injuries from equipment mal functions. Since the reliability is concerned with the elapsed time between failures of a product. This will ultimately shorten the life of machines and cause high repair costs. Ability and authority to do material planning. Adequate resources. preventive and repair maintenance. c) Reliability and Maintainability – an overview: Quality is multi – dimensional but reliability is a key component of quality. Japanese automobile manufacturers have been highly successful in the US market and could gain a high market share. 4. It is the probability that a product will operate adequately for a given period in its intended application. accidents to operators. Reliability considers the performance of a product over time. At the same time. idling of both machines and the workers using those machines for their work. b) Employee ownership TPM: Front-line associates have first responsibility for maintenance in their work places. 3. Hence by reducing equipment mal functions and break downs. 5. Malfunctioning of machines cause deterioration and results in inefficiency.

10. Restores deteriorated equipment through improvements / related maintenance 2. f) Role of maintenance department in TPM process: 1. 2. Perform basic equipment maintenance by cleaning of machines.1 Objectives of OEE: a) It helps see a problem so that it can be fixed.1. Diagnose and perform repairs for the problems identified. C) Reduction of minor stoppages and adjustments on aggregates as well as the complete machine.8. thus developing the capability to operate similar equipment / machines 10. In case the problem is an unknown entity. D) Collect data to track equipment performance and document all the data recorded along with production control chart and work order systems. Understand the manufacturing process to successfully achieve the above. To identify design weaknesses and improve equipment for error free operations 3. Maintain work order system to provide data for calculation of MTBF (mean time before failure) and MTTR (mean time to repair) 6. Implement periodical maintenance system that is planned on the data collected from the machine.8 Overall Equipment Effectiveness [OEE]-Key Indicator of TPM · OEE is a way of measuring how the six major losses shown below are affecting the equipment or in other words a way of measuring the amount of “Value added” activity that the equipment is contributing to the product. periodic diagnostic tests apart from performing appropriate maintenance system to avoid predicted equipment failure 5. 3. Data collected must be complete for proper implementation. B) Perform change over and setup the complete machine. checking functions of the basic machine AND safety devices. Ensure maintenance is treating the root cause of the problem and not symptoms 7. Thorough data analysis. Basic skill levels required by operators include: A) Monitoring and maintaining critical process parameters. manufacturer and also the operators 8. replacement of filters lubrication of aggregates. . obtain information before such problems are attacked. Improve technical maintenance skills of all maintenance personnel through systematic training and work assessments 4.

b) It helps visualize ‘Six big losses’ with their targets for meeting OEE.8. out of which 423 numbers were rejected. Short breaks – 2 short breaks of 15 min each. 1) Planned and unplanned downtimes. [Target=minimize] 2) Set up down time[Target=zero] 3) Reduced speed of the machines [Target=minimize] 4) Minor unrecognized stoppages [Target=zero] 5) Reject and rework [target=zero] 6) Start up down time and yield from the system [Target= minimize] Availability [(Time available for production – Downtime)] / [Time available for production] Performance Efficiency = [Actual Production or Capacity)] / [Ideal Production or Capacity] Quality Yield [Total Parts Produced-Quantity out of specifications] / Total Quantity produced.2 OEE example: A manufacturer working for 8 hours shift with the production data and scheduled breaks is as follows: Shift length = 8 hours. Ideal rate of production – 60 parts per min. Lunch break – one lunch break of 30 min. Overall Equipment Efficiency [OEE] = [Availability x Performance Efficiency x Quality yield] 10. Number of parts produced – 19271.88 . · Planned production time 480 – 15 -15-30 = 420 min Operating time = planned production time – downtime = 420 -47 = 373 min · Good quality parts produced = total produced – rejection = 19271 – 423 = 18848 · Availability = A = operating time / planned production time = 373 / 420 = 0. Downtime of machines – 47 min.

9 Types of Losses (16) There are 16 types of losses that can be categorized into three namely: Category 1: a) Equipment losses: includes down time losses due to 1) machine failure/breakdown.10 Zero-Loss Concept: TPM is based on the elimination of the above said 16 losses along with other five zero loss concepts depicted below: . 12) waiting for quality confirmation.861 · Quality= (total parts produced – rejection) / total parts produced) = 18848 / 19271 = 0. 11) waiting for instructions.748 i. 3) planned shutdown downtime] b) Performance losses: 4) start up losses.e. c) Quality loss: 7) process errors 8 rework/scrap Category 2: Manpower losses: 9) cleaning and checking. 2) set up/adjustment time. 6) reducing the capacity. 13) any management losses.978 = 0.978 · OEE Composite = Availability * performance * quality = 0. 74. 10) waiting for materials. Category 3: Material losses: 14) material yield 15) energy losses 16) consumable material losses 10. 5) minor stopping /idling.861 * 0.888 * 0.8 % 10.· Performance = P = parts produced / (ideal production * operating time) = 19271 / (60 * 373 )= 0.

Plant audit and initial assessment 2. even for new areas of operations. b) Jishu Hozen. h) Safety and environment committee 4.11 Implementation of TPM Implementing TPM company. This stresses the need to shift focus from equipment to the processes within which it is used. f) Office TPM. Company commitment 3. c) Kaizen. Formation of committees and sub committees for a) promotion and steering of TPM. Reaching Excellence in TPM program by Promotion. Selection of pilot lines 5.10.11. e) Quality maintenance. Focus on 8 pillars. 6. 10.12 Eight Pillars of TPM . d) Planned maintenance.wide is a major project that requires support from top management. The TPM program team oversees initial planning and coordination of all TPM efforts though ultimately this responsibility is transferred to the maintenance department. g) Education and training.1 Steps in TPM program 1. The main focus on equipment maintenance is for improvement of the overall production system. Implementation in each of the identified areas is managed directly by a target area committee with assistance from a TPM program team. monitoring and reviewing TPM results and raising levels and revising standards 10.

Uninterrupted operation of equipment 2. Eliminate the defect at source through active employee participation 4. Flexibility with operators to operate and maintain other equipments 3. Increase the use of JH Objectives of JH: . Reduce oil consumption 2. 10.In the above house. 8 Pillars supports a strong structure of TPM for achieving higher productivity is depicted in the following picture.12. Reduce process time 3. Step wise implementation of JH activities JH Targets: 1.1 Pillar-1: Autonomous Maintenance: (Jishu – Hozen) Autonomous maintenance is a phrase coined by the Japanese institute of plant maintenance (JIPM) to describe the shift towards the machine operators maintaining their own machine / equipment JH Policy: 1.

set rules to be followed. Other steps considering the aspects like a) Cooperation from all production related department. Here operator has to apply and ask for 5 why’s. establish standards for data collection based on the production control chart and develop standards for easy reference. electrical. Initial cleanup It must be closely aligned with 7S of the company and there must be commitment of both the staff and the management for the house keeping. Train operators on function and troubleshooting: Operators. control or prevent deterioration of production equipment 2. Develop standards and data collection: Create standards for clean up and checking of machines. lubrication and mechanical should be clearly understood by all in the production line for quick redressing. Similarly the orderliness of tool availability and display of visual boards can be maintained. 4. Increase access and ease of inspection and maintenance 4. JH audit. quick response. broken / worn out belt. replace cracked parts or worn out seals etc and repair and setup the machine. Standards for monitoring key process parameters: To develop methods and standards for routine verification of key process parameters / standards operating conditions. first line supervisor should be trained to understand the basic of the equipment and the functions and the systems working in the machines namely Hydraulic. In case modification is required for easy inspection / elimination of debris / contamination etc a new aggregate covers may be created 3. switch not operating properly etc. 7. Here the operator executes routine verification and adjustments 5. Improve predictability through data analysis and communication Steps to Implement JH: 1. 2. Provide spare parts and tools: Here all the spare parts should be leveraged at the point of use after considering the inventory levels. Improve skill levels and personal growth throughout the company 5. Examples of such defects are: Crack in the housing leakages. should be followed to achieve effective results . Cleaning of all the surroundings and using Japanese 5S principles for orderly keeping the parts etc. Stabilise. Repair sources of defect (outside of machines). Prevent degradation related failures 3. 6. team leaders.1. Operators should identify and tag the sources of defects / waste that arisen out of the machine operations. pneumatic. electronic.

MTBF. Overall Online efficiency (OOE) and Overall Plant efficiency (OPE) 3) Decrease Costs: through controls in inventory and WIP 4) Reduction in customer complaints: reduce total downtime and ensure quick deliver to customers 5) Zero accidents: total safety and all actions to save money. MTTR. optimize spare parts location etc. 10. 2) Increase in productivity by improving Overall Equipment efficiency (OEE). 2) Do the necessary change. Quick change time reduction. optimize machine set ups.2 Pillar-2.8. These steps are: Step 1: Quick Win Shop floor projects: this is a team based approach targeting specific problem areas and realizing immediate benefits Step 2: Critical analysis: analyze what else needs to be changed to make it fixed and create action plans. Step 3: Implementation action plan to sustain and develop further possible improvements.12. Here an emphasis is on transferring knowledge and creating self sufficient team for results. 3) Check whether successful or not.3 Pillar: 3: Planned Maintenance [Pm] For Zero Loss · Planned maintenance is a systematic management by maintenance department. Zero accidents and Zero defects. Here it is aimed at eliminating all 16 losses in the workplace. 10. 3) reduce spare parts inventory.Kobetsu Kaizen (Focussed Improvements) 1) PDCA Cycle: Kaizen: here maintenance team should 1) Plan each step. There are three steps that aim at quick but short term process improvements supported by long term organizational change. which uses maintenance work cycle activities of preventive/predictive/corrective or breakdown maintenance techniques. All out JH: Repeat the cycle 1 – 6 above of the process of managing and monitoring the TPM. · Planned maintenance policy includes a) achieve and sustain availability of machines. 4) Act as required to proceed further to improve upon the system/process. It is aimed at having trouble free machines and equipment producing defect free products for total customer satisfaction. 4) improve reliability and maintainability of machines. 2) optimise maintenance costs. Six steps followed by planned maintenance are: .12. Verify the progress made in TPM efforts in planned versus emergency work.

12. are analysed. 3) Reduction in spare parts consumption 4) Reduction in oil and power consumption 5) Reduction in repair cost 6) Reduction in number of inspection points etc 10. Focus is on eliminating non-conformances in a systematic manner. b) policy of .12. Here also aim is at defect free product to satisfy the customer.1) Equipment evaluation and recording of present status 2) Restore deterioration and improve on weak links 3) Builds information management systems 4) Prepare time based information and parts and map out a plan 5) Prepare predictive system plan by introducing diagnostic techniques 6) Evaluation of planned maintenance. 2) Improvement in MTBF and MTTR. root cause is found and improvement action on the process/design are ensured.4 Pillar-4-Quality Maintenance for Zero Defects This is a process for controlling the condition of equipment and its components that affect variability in product quality. Here the customer end defects are known through customer complaints and in-house defects known through the quality control personnel. Benefits from Planned Maintenance 1) Reduction in downtime due to breakdowns.5 Pillar-5-Development Management This refers to the learning process that happens in TPM implementation and during different types of maintenance practices. when a) ease of manufacture. Results achieved through this pillar are: 1) Improved customer satisfaction and reduction in future complaints 2) Reduction in defects and improved quality 3) Reduction in inspection time 10.

reworks etc. Unsafe conditions like electrical points. The methodology adopted is for understanding of the present machine structure. Health & Environment [Zero Accidents] Here the focus is to create a safe work place and a surrounding areas that is not detrimental to process or procedures. c) design.development of new technologies. health and hazards. It is aimed to have multi skilled & revitalized employees. d) manufacturing. Point by point safety audit. a) planning b) implementation. skills and techniques through a training environment. unsafe working without wearing gloves. 10. Here the focus is on improvement of the knowledge. skilled workers. engineers and managers are in a position to fulfil the expanded role to be played in successful implementation of TPM. safety guards. Development of management involves four phases. providing safe environment place a vital role.6 Pillar-6-Trining & Education [Flow Of Controls] Through training and education provides the skill and knowledge apart from the experience that enables operators. too hot areas.12. whose morale is high and who are eager to work and perform the required functions effectively and independently. noise generations and any such unsafe potential areas must be identified and action taken to make them safe. safety training and monitoring the improvements through Kaizen. unsafe storage/stacking. This systematic education and training will result in: 1) Reduction in downtime. incorporate planned maintenance sheets to eliminate defects. Poka-Yoke etc will all result in getting the following benefits: 1) Reduction in accident 2) Reduction in noise 3) Create excellent house-keeping & a good looking workshop through 5S action 4) Reduction in downtime because of breakdowns etc 5) Saving in energy consumption 6) Reduction in industrial waste . c) determination of detailed specifications etc are answered.12. Some examples of unsafe acts by employees are 1) use of worn out tools. The continuous training is on safe working. operating machines without proper training etc.7 Pillar-7: Safety. and design validation 10. breakdowns attributed to lack of knowledge and skills 2) Reduction in further downtime after gaining the knowledge and skills 3) Reductions achieved after training on the number of defects. goggles etc. e) initial phase production.

2) reduction in repetitive works. It identifies and eliminates losses. the following strengthen the view that TPM is relevant to TQM: . other safety practices f) M: number of kaizen activities in office areas with improvements not visible TPM is a long range living program. accounting. TPM aims at keeping the current plant and equipment at its highest productive level through cooperation of all. 5) reduction in n umber of files. 4) reduction in inventory carrying costs. invoices. 6) reduction in customer complaints. as a strategy. PQCDS&M principles in Office TPM: a) P: production output loss due to want of materials. It is followed to improve productivity and efficiency in the office administration. stores. In TPM the barrier between maintenance & production personnel is removed. marketing and sales outlets with high inventories. manpower etc b) Q: mistakes in cheques.13 Relevance of TPM to TQM Framework Good maintenance is fundamental to a productive manufacturing system. Since achieving total productivity is one of the major objectives of TQM. bills. Therefore the Office TPM addresses the seven major losses namely: 1) processing loss 2) communication loss 3) idle loss 4) set up loss 5) accuracy loss 6) non-value added loss 7) cost loss including areas as procurement. payroll. Here the whole organization should focus. etc d) D” logistic losses due to delay in support function. payment to suppliers. cost of inventory carrying. we can infer that total productive maintenance is an extension of TQM philosophy to the maintenance function. cost of logistics.8 Pilar-8-Office Tpm [Raise Levels & Select Other Areas] Office TPM includes analysing processes and procedures towards increased office automation. 10. to follow all the principles and procedures laid out in ‘Seven Pillars of TPM’ and achieve the desired overall improvements for the benefit of the organization. 7) reduced man power 8 clean and pleasant work environment and 10) reduction in equipment due to emergency despatches/purchases.12. customer returns etc c) C: buying cost.10. Further. 3) reduction in administration costs. in information etc e) S: safety in material handling. Benefits accrued because of office TPM are 1) Better utilization of work areas.

by using the principles of 5S. Here too the operators take the responsibility of cleaning their machines and work areas. zero breakdowns. tidy and well organised work area will result in better performance Maintenance is the key to achieve zero loss. morale and pollution control by involving everyone in the process. Process capacity cannot be made available at the cost of quality. zero accidents and zero defects. Direct benefits: . scheduling and control of operations depend to a large extent on process capacity and process capability. 4) Benefits can be categorized into two types namely: 1) Direct and 2) Indirect a. This developed by JIPM (Japanese Institution of Plant Maintenance) during late 1960’s combines the American practice of PM with Japanese concept of Total Quality Control [TQC] and Total employee involvement [TEI] 1) TPM aims for greater manufacturing competitiveness through improved effectiveness of machines and equipments. repairs. 10. · TPM is continuous improvement activity. A comprehensive TPM program aspires to implement process capability and its maintenance. Clean. since it aims at cost reduction and quality improvements for internal requirements and for customer satisfaction. TPM is a value adding activity. 2) TPM increases production capacity. · TPM can have a great impact on the operations decision making process. defects. 3) TPM also contributes to improvements in safety. Housekeeping is another area in JIT production system. smell etc spot problems before they develop. vibration. TPM aims at the introduction of new and creative ideas which will optimise quality standards and reduce waste and costs to the organisation concerned.· TQM is aimed at satisfying customer requirements.14 Benefits of TPM An added benefit is that with the added responsibility of all maintenance activities. In view of the above. process reliability and reduces the cost of lost production time. The planning. shortened equipment life and inventory. operators develop a sense of ownership for the machines and give special attention to upkeep the machines for sound. in other words working with a zero sum philosophy. there is a direct link between TPM and TQM and also the relevance of a comprehensive maintenance policy is proved for successful TQM implementation.

Preventive maintenance requires understanding and maintaining all the physical elements of manufacturing – machine components. The following results were reported from a typical firm after implementing TPM. the entire process or . . Indirect benefits: a) Higher confidence level among the employees b) Favourable change in the attitude of the operators c) Horizontal deployment of a new concepts in all areas d) The workers get a feeling of owning the machine. 4) Delivery: Inventory turnover increased by 150% 5) Morale: Improvement suggestions increased by 105% 6) Safety: Accidents reduced to nil 7) Environment: No pollution created 10. maintenance cost reduced by 15 -30%. 1) Productivity: Breakdowns reduced by 85% 2) Quality: Defect rate reduced by 50% 3) Cost: Labour cost reduced by 25%.15 Role Of TPM In World Class Manufacturing Most of the world class manufacturing firms have implemented JIT systems and TQM philosophy to achieve excellence in manufacturing and to have ability to compete globally. Therefore if any equipment breaks down. Reliable.a) Increase in productivity and overall plant efficiency b) Elimination of customers complaints c) Elimination of accidents d) Achieve goals by working as a team b. well functioning machines and equipments are a pre requisite for JIT and TQM to be successfully implemented in any manufacturing firm. energy reduced consumption reduced by 20%. equipment and systems so that they consistently perform at the levels required of them.

Maintenance covers all those functions such as ……………… etc. to keep a machine. material handling equipment and other transport vehicles in proper working conditions. to achieve ……………………. efficiency and effectiveness with zero loss concepts through total participation of all employees with self managing abilities in practices. easier to maintain and perform better. engineers. This will facilitate implementation of an effective preventive maintenance program which is essential for a JIT system Self Assessment Questions Fill up the blanks with appropriate words in the following statements: 1) Equipment maintenance is basic to competitive manufacturing. TQM requires quality at the source which implies that machines must be reliable and well functioning. Improved equipment functioning has a positive impact on product quality. machinists and operators redesign and reconfigure equipment to make it more reliable. Identify.production line comes to a halt. It first evolved in Nippon Denso a major supplier of the Toyota car company. • Prevention of equipment deterioration • Maintain the equipment in optimal condition • Establishing basic equipment conditions • Operator’s incompetency . In world class companies quality circles form an important component of TQM. Here the new quality approach of ………………… was translated to the maintenance environment through the concept of TPM. 3) TPM is defined as the means to achieve high level of productivity. Preventive maintenance is a stepping stone to a higher level of maintenance referred to as “total productive maintenance” (TPM). Preventive maintenance practices reduce the breakdown of machines and will keep them in good working condition. 4) GOALS: one among following is not an applicable goal. In TPM operators / workers perform basic equipment repairs and preventive maintenance. The involvement of workers in quality circles provides the opportunity for them (members of quality circles) to study maintenance problems. 2) TPM had its genesis in the Japanese car industry in 1970’s. a facility.. In world class companies the responsibility for repairs and preventive maintenance is assigned to workers. while teams of maintenance staff.

.• Elimination of quality defects • Elimination of equipment failure • Elimination of cost losses 5) There are six types of losses found in a manufacturing firm. What is that? • P: production output loss due to want of materials. Education & Training.) X (…………)] 8 Out of Eight pillars of TPM. blockages etc. TPM in Offices. Development Management. Identify them Autonomous Maintenance. ………. 9) Autonomous maintenance is a phrase coined by the Japanese institute of plant maintenance (JIPM) to describe the shift towards the machine operators ……………………… 10) PQCDS&M principles in Office TPM: In the list below principle D is missing.. g) Defect losses due to reduced yields in processing 6) OEE is a way of measuring how the six major losses shown below are affecting the equipment or in other words a way of measuring the amount of ……………………. b) Downtime for setups and adjustments. two are missing in the following list. d) Habitual absenteism by employees e) Speed losses due to discrepancies between designed and actual speeds f) Defect losses due to process defects that cause scrap & quality problems.. manpower etc . c) Speed losses due to idling and minor stoppages caused by abnormal operations of censors. 7) Overall Equipment Efficiency-Fill in the other two factors: [OEE] = [Availability x ( ………. Safety. that the equipment is contributing to the product. ……………. One among the following is not the type of loss considered in maintenance. Kobetsu-Kaizen. Health & Environment. Identify a) Downtime due to equipment failure.

. machines are cleaned and lubricated frequently by the operators themselves who run the machines. customer returns etc • C: buying cost. A comprehensive maintenance program consists of breakdown maintenance. stores. 4) Ability and authority to do material planning. For the above type of TPM. bills. invoices. The frequency of preventive maintenance must be balanced with the cost of equipment failure and keep the total costs of preventive and breakdown maintenance put together at the lowest level possible. Preventive maintenance is a well planned program which involves inspection to uncover potential problem and make the necessary repairs before any breakdown occurs.16 Summary Japanese firms which implemented JIT production and TQM concepts cannot witness any machine failures that affect quality and delayed production schedules. Only five are listed. 10. payroll. etc •? • S: safety in material handling. organization should have the features of 1) Well trained maintenance crew. 3) Reduction in inspection time 12) For the above type of TPM. and total productive maintenance or reliability centred maintenance. 4) Ability and authority to do material planning. cost of inventory carrying. organization should have the following six features. 5) ……………………. and …………….. 3) Ability to establish a repair plan and priorities.• Q: mistakes in cheques.2) Adequate resources. . other safety practices • M: number of kaizen activities in office areas with improvements not visible 11) Results achieved through pillar number Four are: 1) Improved customer satisfaction and reduction in future complaints 2) Reduction in ……………. 3) Ability to establish a repair plan and priorities. 6) Ability to design ways to extend MTBF. cost of logistics. 2) Adequate resources. Which is the sixth one? 1) Well trained maintenance crew. preventive maintenance. They applied TPM techniques to visually eliminate machine breakdowns. While breakdown maintenance is remedial or corrective maintenance or equipment repair when breakdown occurs. In the TPM approach to maintenance management..

by adopting any of the maintenance systems discussed above. idle time. defects. What are the objectives of TPM? 2. formation of a target committee and program team to oversee initial planning and coordination of all TPM efforts and then transfer the responsibility to the maintenance department. decrease in productivity. Equipment problems have a direct impact on production costs. which may result in inefficiency of machines. high repair costs. Implementing TPM company-wide is major project requiring top management support. continuous improvement and has a strong strategic relevance like TQM. Benefits of TPM includes increase in production capacity and process reliability. an important component of TQM provides the opportunity for workers to study maintenance problems and suggest effective maintenance activities which are essential for JIT systems. Explain briefly the evolution of maintenance practices leading to TPM. accidents to workers. high WIP inventories and so on. TPM contributes to improved safety. Discuss on the guiding features of TPM? 3. especially with the latest TPM as a final and long range solution. shortened equipment life and inventory. TPM has great relevance to TQM in improvement of productivity and quality. poor quality of outputs. Reduction in costs of lost production. Quality circles.5) Ability to identify the cause of break downs 6) Ability to design ways to extend MTBF. 5. What is total productive maintenance? Is it different from total preventive maintenance? . safety hazards.17 Terminal Questions 1. product quality and production schedules. TPM helps to maintain process capability. stoppage of production. high standards of quality and reliability. All these help to improve manufacturing competitiveness of world class companies. 10. employee morale and pollution control. repairs. TPM identifies and attacks all causes of malfunctions and eliminates all consequent losses due to breakdowns. Distinguish between breakdown maintenance and preventive maintenance. 4.

Prevention at source 3. What are the six zero concept that are to be considered while approaching elimination of 16 Losses? 10. What is meant by ‘Overall Equipment Effectiveness’? What are its constituents? How the six losses are addressed through OEE? 8.6. inspecting. cleaning. Describe the role of total productive maintenance in world class manufacturing.18 Answers Self Assessment Questions 1. 10.e. Habitual Absenteeism by employees – [Sl. no-(d)] 5. 4. Discuss the relevance of total productive maintenance to TQM framework. Total customer satisfaction. What are the benefits accrued to a firm by practicing TPM? 17. adjusting. 9. Explain briefly as to how planned maintenance under Eight pillars of TPM help achieve zero loss? 14. Focussed Improvements and what steps are used to achieve improvement? 13. repairing. What are the relative issues that are recognized by maintenance department before attempting introduction of TPM in the plant? 7. Operator’s incompetency-[Sl. What are the constituents of Kobetsu Kaizen i. What are the unsafe practices and how these are controlled by practicing good and healthy. 16. Which are the eight pillars that support TPM in an organization? 11. etc 2. no (d)] . Monitoring. safe environment under TPM? 15. What is ‘Autonomous Maintenance? What are its objectives and steps involved in implementing? 12. Explain briefly the sixteen types of losses that are to be considered for elimination by the maintenance department while planning TPM activities.

payment to suppliers. Maintaining their own machine / equipment 10. 10.1 12.8 8. 10.3 14. in information etc’ 11. Ref. Ref. Ref. 10.7 7.6.12. 10. Performance Efficiency & Quality yield 8. 10.13 . “Value added” – activity 7. Ref. Planned Maintenance & Quality Maintenance 9. 10. Ref. Ability to identify the cause of break downs Terminal Questions: 1. Ref. 10. 10.12. Ref.6 5. 10. Ref.‘logistic losses due to delay in support function. 10. Defects and improved quality 12.6 6.9 9. Ref. 10. Ref. 10. Ref. Ref. 10.2 13.6 4. 10.4 2.12. Ref.7 15.12 11.12. D.10 10. Ref.5 3. Ref. 10.

15 Copyright © 2011 SMU Powered by Sikkim Manipal University . 10.16.14 17. Ref. 10. Ref. .

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