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FEARLESS

SCWS STUDY GUIDE

JUNE 2007
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Table of Contents
Common Core
101 Naval Heritage and Doctrine ---------------------------------------------------------------------------1 102 Administrative/Command and Control ---------------------------------------------------------------7 103 General Safety -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------14 104 Basic First Aid and Personal Hygiene ------------------------------------------------------------- 26 105 Hazardous Material/Hazardous Waste (HM/HW)/Environmental Safety ----------------- 41 106 Supply/Logistics ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 46 107 Communications/Communications Security Material Systems-------------------------------52 108 Weapons -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 57 109 General Military Tactics-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 64 110 Contingency Operations------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 92 111 Chemical, Biological, and Radiological (CBR) Warfare --------------------------------------- 94 112 Embarkation ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------105 113 Civil Engineer Support Equipment (CESE) ------------------------------------------------------110

NMCB Specific
101 Safety ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------113 102 Administration/Command and Control -------------------------------------------------------------115 103 Supply/Logistics ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 118 104 Communications/Communications Security Material System ------------------------------- 122 105 Weapons -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 133 106 Embarkation ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 152 107 Contingency Operations------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 169 108 Civil Engineer Support Equipment (CESE) -------------------------------------------------------176 109 Construction Operations------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 179 201 Warfare Mission Area ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 186

This study guide has been developed to aid you in your studies for the Seabee Combat Warfare Specialist (SCWS) qualification. It is not all-inclusive; some sections may be outdated and it is only valid for the March 2004 PQS version. It is YOUR responsibility to prepare for your SCWS test and oral board by studying ALL questions in your PQS books. For further assistance and numerous references, log on to NKO. Go to the Seabees and Facilities Engineering community/learning center home page. In the left column, choose Warfare for Seabees (SCW) and PQS. On the next page, choose Warfare SCW PQS References or Warfare list of references (Additional References used in PQS).

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Non-Resident Training Course Enrollment Procedures


Courses required for the SEABEE COMBAT WARFARE Program:
Naval Construction Force (NCF) / Seabee Petty Officer 1 & C (NAVEDTRA 14233) Seabee Combat Handbook Volume 1 and 2 (NAVEDTRA 14234/14235) Naval Safety Supervisor (NAVEDTRA 14167) You can find the courses at: https://www.advancement.cnet.navy.mil/index.asp?window=login Enter your last name, SSN and Date of Birth, OR NKO login and password and then click login. Then scroll down and click on the NRTC Enrollment Web Site on the left side of the page. The next web page should pop up with STUDENT SERVICES. Click on it. Enter your last name, SSN and Date of Birth, and then click submit. Update your information if needed (If not click update data anyway). Then click next. Now you should be able to click on the Enroll in up to 4 Additional Courses. Now click on I Plan To Complete the Course, Continue with Enrollment. Here is where you will find the courses to complete before submitting your request chit to enroll in the SCW Program.

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COMMON CORE 101 NAVAL HERITAGE AND DOCTRINE FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] Naval Doctrine Publication 1, Warfare [b] Naval Doctrine Publication 5, Planning [c] NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 1 [d] NWP 4-04.1, Seabee Operations in the MAGTF [e] http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/rdstethe.htm [f] Blue Jackets Manual, 23rd Edition______________________________________ 101.1 Discuss the conditions that led to the formation of the U.S. Navy. [ref. a, ch. 1]

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General George Washington initiated Americas first sea-based offensive against the British. Washingtons armed vessels provided significant support to colonial efforts, demonstrating the value of military operations at sea The initial continental fleet was comprised from converted merchantmen As Congress continued to commission ships, notable leaders such as John Paul Jones helped to develop a proud and capable Navy. Early fleets were manned by Marines as part of their ships crews. In essence, the first Marines were soldiers detailed for sea service. Congress continued to provide for Marines as long as there was one Navy ship still at sea. Post Revolutionary War Both the Continental Navy and Marine Corps were disbanded. 1790 A fleet of ten boats for the collection of revenue was authorized and became commonly known as the Revenue Marine. 1794 Congress authorized the Department of War to construct six frigates, for the protection of American merchantmen against the Barbary corsairs. 1798 Four years later, in response to renewed aggression by France during its war against Great Britain, Congress finally established the Department of the Navy, authorized the Marine Corps, and began the first significant buildup of naval forces as we know them today. Three maritime services of today Navy Marine Corps Coast Guard 101.2 State the qualities that characterize the Navy/Marine Corps team as instruments to support national policies. [ref. a, ch. 1] The qualities that characterize most modern naval forces as political instruments in support of national policies are the same as those that define the essence of our naval services today. These qualities are READINESS, FLEXIBILITY, SELF-SUSTAINABILITY, and MOBILITY. These qualities permit naval forces to be expeditionary in nature. Naval expeditionary forces draw upon their readiness, flexibility, self-sustainability, and mobility to provide the National Command.

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101.3 Discuss the conditions that led to the creation of the Seabees. [ref. d, ch. 1] Prior to 1941, the Civil Engineer Corps used private contractors to accomplish all overseas construction. The contractors, in turn, hired steelworkers, electricians, carpenters, draftsman, and mechanics from private industry. The Navy realized that, in the event of war, civilian contractors and construction workers could not be used very well outside our own country. As World War II drew near, there was an urgent need for more overseas bases. It became clear there was an urgent need for a combat trained Military Construction Organization. The first constructions units were organized early in January 1942. 101.4 Discuss the significance of March 5, 1942 as it pertains to the Seabees. [ref. c, ch. 1] The name Seabees is derived from the first construction battalions (CBs) that were organized early in January 1942. Officially, permission to use the name Seabee was granted on 05 March 1942. 101.5 Discuss the significance of the following personnel: Admiral Ben Moreell [ref. d, ch. 1] o Father of the Seabees: Rear Admiral Ben Moreell, Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, decided to activate, organize and man construction battalions after the attack of Pearl Harbor, on 7 December 1941. He requested specific authority to carry out his decision. o On 5 January 1942 he gained the authority for the Bureau of Navigation to recruit men for the construction trades for assignment to the Naval Constructions Regiment composed of three Naval Construction Battalions. This was the beginning of the renowned Seabees. CM3 Marvin Shields [ref. d, ch. 1] o Medal of Honor recipient. He is the first Seabee in history to receive the Medal of Honor for his heroic efforts in defense of a Special Forces Camp and Vietnamese District Headquarters at Doug Zoai. SW2 (DV) Robert Stethem [ref. e] o Purple Heart and Bronze Star recipient o Executed in June 1985 during the hijacking of a TWA jet in Lebanon after being singled out by terrorists for being in the military. Throughout his ordeal, Petty Officer Stethem did not yield, instead he acted with fortitude and courage and helped his fellow passengers to endure by his example VADM David Robinson

101.6 State the importance of planning to naval operations. [ref. b, ch. 1] Naval planning is fundamental to leadership. Planning provides the discipline to focus on the objectives, intentions, capabilities, and resources required to accomplish assigned missions. Planning also requires commanders to estimate the capabilities of a potential adversary and to evaluate options.

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101.7 Discuss the significant contributions made by the Seabees during the following: [ref. d, ch. 1] World War II o Created by Admiral Ben Moreell in 1942, the Navys Seabees were founded on the premise that experienced armed construction workers were critically needed in the combat areas of World War II. The construction accomplishments of the Seabees throughout the Pacific theater, in particular, are quite legendary. Using 20-ton bulldozers as wands, Seabees magically reshaped the coral-pocked face of many a Pacific island. Landing shortly after the assault waves, they blasted reefs to make channels for the fleet; leveled hills and laid down landing strips; lashed together pontoons to create artificial docks; and brought to many a remote Pacific island its first roads, storage facilities, and hospitals. On more than one occasion, the Seabees used their bulldozers to entomb nests of enemy snipers and machine gunners menacing Marine or Army forces. o During the wars Pacific island-hopping campaigns, over 10,000 Civil Engineer Corps officers and 240,000 enlisted men served in the Seabees, mostly in NCBs that were components of the five Marine engineer regiments employed from 1942 to 1944. From the construction and defense of Guadalcanals Henderson Field to the Normandy invasion, Seabees participated in most of the major Navy, Marine, and Army assaults, fighting in more than 400 locations in all theaters by the end of the war. o As a prelude to Guadalcanal, Seabees on Espiritu Santo took only 20 days to carve a 6,000-foot airstrip from virgin jungle. Joining the 1st MarDiv in their assault on Cape Gloucester, Seabees bulldozed paths for attacking American tanks. In the Admiralties, Seabees transformed Manus and Los Negros into the largest advanced bases in the Southwest Pacific. At Rabaul, Seabees built a strategic, two-field air base, immense storage and fuel dumps, a floating dry-dock, miles of roads, and a fast torpedo boat base. On Leyte Island, it was the Seabees who installed and operated pontoon barges and causeways that brought General MacArthur and his forces ashore. At Tarawa, Seabees landed with the Marines and, in a mere 15 hours, returned a shellpocked airfield to operational status. On Iwo Jima, Seabees landing with the Fifth Amphibious Corps built fighter airstrips as well as an emergency landing field critically needed by returning damaged bombers. Seabeeinstalled pontoons on Okinawa enabled the amphibious assault to move forward. Once ashore, 55,000 Seabees built port facilities, vast road networks, airfields, POL farms, storage dumps, hospitals, ship repair facilities, a seaplane base, and Quonset villages. o In the Pacific theater alone, the Seabees built 111 major airstrips, 700 square blocks of warehouses, hospitals for 70,000 patients, storage tanks for 100 million gallons of gasoline, and housing for 1.5 million servicemen. Although the Seabees were known as a Naval Reserve organization during the war, it became clear afterwards that the Seabees, having more than proved their worth, would be a valuable addition to the regular Navy. Korea o By June of 1950, the Seabees all but disestablished as only 3,300 men remained on active duty. The Korean War, however, demanded the kind of civil engineering support that only Seabees could provide, and so they were mobilized and expanded to a force of 14,000 men. Seabees supported Marines in the famous Inchon and Wonsan amphibious assaults by constructing vital pontoon causeways within hours of the initial landings. As with their World War II predecessors, airfield construction was a specialty of the Seabees as they were soon found constructing, repairing,

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and maintaining the airfields of the Marine Air Groups, such as K-3 at Pohang, K18 at Kimpo (Seoul), and K-2 at Taegu. Seabee relations with Marines were further cemented by a group of nine Seabees who kept open a 21-mile stretch of road between an isolated Marine intercept squadron and its sole source of supplies. Working around the clock in below-zero temperatures, they kept their promise to rebuild any damaged bridge within 6 hours. o Also during the Korean War, Seabees constructed the Cubi Point Naval Air Station in the Philippines by cutting a mountain in half to make way for a nearly 2-mile-long runway, blasting coral to fill a section of Subic Bay, filling swampland, moving 150foot trees, and relocating a native fishing village. Twenty million man-hours and 5 years went into what was then the largest and most impressive Seabee project. Vietnam o During the Vietnam War, Seabees were employed extensively from the DMZ in the north to the Mekong Delta Region in the south, constructing Marine logistic complexes at Danang, Chu Lai, and Quang Tri to Special Forces camps and Army fire bases in the remote regions, as well as roads, bridges, airfields, warehouses, and hospitals elsewhere. At the initial Marine landings in Vietnam in 1965, there were nearly 10,000 active duty Seabees. At the Wars peak, the Seabee strength grew to 26,000 men organized in twenty-one naval construction battalions, two naval construction regiments, two amphibious construction battalions, two maintenance units, and many civic action teams. o At Chu Lai, the first Seabee battalion arrived in May 1965 to construct a Marine expeditionary airfield within 23 days. Shortly thereafter, it was expanded by adding a parallel taxiway, four cross taxiways, parking aprons, two cantonments, warehouses, hangars, and many other critical facilities. At Phu Bai, the Seabees created an advanced base from a low peninsula jutting 1,500 feet into the South China Sea by raising, widening, and surfacing it into a causeway for cargo-laden landing ships. During 1968s Tet Offensive, Seabees built and fought in direct support of Marine and Army forces by reconstructing two vitally needed concrete bridges. Seabee civic action projects paved roads that provided access between farms and markets; supplied fresh water through hundreds of Seabee-drilled wells; provided medical treatment to thousands of villagers; and constructed numerous schools, hospitals, utility systems, and other community facilities. o In June of 1965, two Seabees were killed when Viet Cong troops attacked and overran a Special Forces camp at Dong Xoai. One of the dead, Construction Mechanic Third Class Marvin G. Shields, was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for carrying a critically wounded man to safety and destroying an enemy machine gun emplacement at the cost of his life. CM3 Shields was the first and only Seabee ever awarded the nations highest distinction for heroism. Post Vietnam o The Seabees distinguished themselves with the largest peacetime construction effort on the British Indian Ocean Territory of Diego Garcia. From 1971 to 1983, they built a remote forward logistic base and naval communications station thousands of miles from CONUS in support of U.S. military operations throughout the Southwest Asian Theater. The mission of the initial contingent, consisting of NMCB and PHIBCB personnel, was to build a temporary Seabee camp; water and electrical distribution systems; messing, laundry, refrigeration, and storage facilities; and a 3,500-foot airstrip. By 1983, the Seabees had completed 220 projects with a construction value well in excess of 220 million dollars. The early, austere airstrip has been expanded three times to a final 12,000-foot length with expanded taxiways, parking aprons, and several new hangars. Immense POL storage facilities for both the Navy and Air Force were also constructed, as were a fuel pier, general

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storage buildings, and expanded personnel support facilities. The need for prepositioned materials to support a rapid deployment force and a more active U.S. presence in Southwest Asia spurred the growth of the forward logistic support site on the island. As a result, Diego Garcia today is home to one of the MPFs three MPSRONs. Persian Gulf War o During Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, nearly 5,000 Seabees from 6 NMCBs were employed in-theater. The Seabees constructed troop bed down facilities for 42,000 personnel, vast storage areas, aircraft parking aprons comprising millions of square feet, ASPs covering hundreds of acres, EPW camps housing up to 40,000 men, many ISBs, and hundreds of miles of roads. Base camps were constructed for the 3rd MAW; MAGs 11, 13, 16, and 26; and the 1st and 2nd MarDivs. In Bahrain, troop bed down and storage facilities, a munitions transfer road, and a 60,000-square foot aircraft parking apron were built for the Marines, Army, and Air Force. Major Seabee tasking included a headquarters complex for I MEF and a 15,000-man troop bed down camp for II MEF. The latter project (the largest wartime, multi-battalion Seabee project since Vietnam) consisted of six 2,500-man modules with each module providing berthing, showers, latrines, galley, office space, roads, and parking areas. PHIBCB personnel offloaded Marine Corps equipment and supplies from MPF shipping. CBU personnel erected and maintained a 500-bed Navy Fleet Hospital at Al Jubail. It was the Seabees who built and maintained the 200-mile, four-lane main supply route near the Kuwaiti border critical to launching and sustaining the famous Hail Mary ground attack plan into Iraq. Seabees supported I MEF in preparation for the assault into Kuwait by providing water and constructing roads and facilities for the Marine division assembly areas. Just before the assault, Seabees dug in the 1st MarDivs command element as the division moved into attack positions. o Once the assault began, Seabees moved into Kuwait and prepared positions for I MEFs CE. Before they were finished Seabee projects included tent camps for 42,000 personnel, three galleys, and 10 aircraft parking aprons, 5 ASPs, two EAFs, two hangars, and several EPW camps. Desert Shield/Desert Storm also saw the largest mobilization of selected Reserve Seabees since Vietnam as three Reserve NMCBs and a Reserve naval construction regiment CE served together with their active counterparts in theater and at other locations worldwide, thus exemplifying the One Navy, Total Force concept.

101.8 Identify and explain the purpose of the following ratings: [ref. f, ch. 1] BU: Perform construction, maintenance, and repair of wood, concrete, masonry structures, and concrete pavement. CE: Install, operate, service, and overhaul electrical generating and distribution systems. CM: Perform maintenance, repair, and overhaul of automotive, material handling, and construction equipment. EA: Perform construction surveying, drafting, planning, estimating, and quality control. EO: Perform operation of automotive material handling, weight handling, and construction equipment. SW: Perform fabrication, assemble, erect, position, and join structural materials. UT: Perform maintenance, and repair of plumbing, heating, steam, compressed air, fuel storage, water treatment and distribution systems, air conditioning, refrigeration equipment, sewage collecting and disposal facilities.

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101.9 State the purpose of the Civil Engineer Corps (CEC). [ref. c, ch. 1]

The CEC is composed of dedicated staff corps officers who are specialists in the field of civil engineering. A Civil Engineer is a professional engineer who performs a variety of engineering work in planning, designing, and overseeing construction and maintenance of structures and facilities, such as roads, airports, bridges, harbors, pipelines, power plants, and water and sewage systems.

COMMON CORE 102 ADMINISTRATIVE/COMMAND AND CONTROL FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] Blue Jackets Manual, 23rd Edition [b] COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCBINST 2000.2, Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) for Communications [c] OPNAVINST 1306.2D, Fleet, Force, and Command Master Chief Program [d] NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 1 [e] 1070 #4 UM-01, Enlisted Distribution and Verification Report Users Manual [f] NAVEDTRA 14261A, Yeoman Basic [g] SECNAVINST 5216.5D, Correspondence Manual [h] MILPERSMAN 15550D, Naval Military Personnel Manual [i] NAVEDTRA 14144, Military Requirements for Chief Petty Officer [j] NAVEDTRA 14351, Legalman [k] OPNAVINST 3100.6G, Special Incident Reporting [l] NWP 10-1-10(A), Operational Reports [m] NWP 10-1-11, Status of Resources and Training System (SORTS) [n] NAVFAC P-1094, Seabee Skills Assessment Manual [o] NWP 4-04.1, Seabee Operations in the MAGTF [p] OPNAV NOTICE 3110, Establishment of First Naval Construction Division (1NCD)__ 102.1 Discuss the following as they apply to the administrative chain of command:

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Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) [ref. a, app. A] o Civilian in charge of the Department of the Navy. o Under the direction and control of the SECDEV. o Responsible for the policies and control of the Department of the Navy. Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) [ref. a, app. A] o Senior military officer of the DON and outranks all other naval officers, unless another naval officer is serving as the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Commander US Atlantic Fleet, Pacific Fleet, and Naval Forces Europe [ref. p] o Depends on where the unit is home-ported or deployed. o For Gulfport it is COMLANTFLT Commander Fleet Forces Command (CFFC) [ref. p] o Concurrent Commander of COMLANTFLT o Responsible for overall coordination, establishment, and implementation of integrated requirements and policies for manning, equipping, and training Atlantic and Pacific fleet units during inter-deployment training cycle. Commander First Naval Construction Division (1NCD)/Naval Construction Forces Command (NCFC) [ref. p] o Reports to COMLANTFLT and COMUSFLTFORCOM Naval Construction Regiment (NCR) [ref. p] o Reports to 1NCD Seabee Readiness Group (SRG) [ref. p] o Reports to 1NCD o Provides military training to homeported NMCBs

102.2 Discuss the role of the following: Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) [ref. a, ch. 9] o The Navys senior enlisted member, assigned to the Chief of Naval Personnel for 3 years. Senior enlisted advisor to the CNO and Chief of Naval Personnel.

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Command Master Chief (CNOCM) [ref. c, sec. B], CMDCM [ref. c, sec. B]

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o Fleet Master Chief [ref. c, sec. B], Force Master Chief [ref. c, sec. B], CNO directed
Fleet Master Chiefs (FLTMCs), Force Master Chiefs (FORMCs), CNODirected Command Master Chiefs (CNOMCs), and Command Master Chiefs (CMDMCs) uphold the highest standards of professionalism and stimulate better communication at all levels of command throughout the Department of the Navy. They strengthen the chain of command by working within it to foster a better understanding of the needs and viewpoints of enlisted members and their families. FLTMCs, FORMCs, CNOMCs, and CMDMCs are the senior enlisted leaders, who report directly to their respective Commanders/Commanding Officers. They participate in formulating and implementing policies concerning morale, welfare, job satisfaction, discipline, utilization, and training of Navy enlisted personnel. By reporting directly to their Commanders, the FLTMCs, FORMCs, CNOMCs, and CMDMCs keep their chain of command aware and informed of sensitive and current issues.

102.3 Describe the duties and responsibilities of the following personnel:


Commanding Officer o Directly responsible for the preparedness and successful completion of all construction projects and disaster recovery operations assigned to the NCF unit by higher authority. Executive Officer o The direct representative of, and principal assistant to, the Commanding Officer. o Executes the policies and instructions of the Commanding Officer and takes precedence over all other persons under the command of the Commanding Officer. Command Master Chief o Provides the Commanding Officer with a senior enlisted assistant who provides a direct channel for communications between the enlisted personnel and the command on issues that cannot be resolved through normal command channels. S-1 Admin Officer o The battalion administrative and personnel Officer is the senior assistant to the XO for administrative details and personnel administration. Its normally divided into two sections. Admin: Reports, Directives, Mail, Classified Material, Clerical Pool, Legal and Officer Records. Personnel: Enlisted Service Records, Personnel Accounting and Check in/out. S-3 Operations Officer o Responsible to the CO to manage the construction and disaster preparedness programs. He is granted direct supervisory authority over the utilization of the battalions construction resources; personnel, equipment and materials. S-4 Supply Officer o The head of the battalion Supply Department. Responsibilities are to procure, receive, store, issue, ship, transfer and account for supply tines, equipage, repair parts and construction materials. Operates the enlisted dining facility and disbursement and accounting for funds for battalion purchases and military pay. Communications Officer

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It is Naval Construction Force (NCF) policy that the command and control of Computer and Information Systems (CIS) used for the transmission of all forms of communications, e.g., voice, digital, or signal, is the responsibility of a unit's commanding officer (CO). The CO delegates the day-to-day leadership and management of CIS to an appointed CIS Officer, known as the COMMO. Company Commander o Responsible for morale and welfare of the men and women assigned to the company. o Training and readiness of the company. o Economical use of materials and funds. o Safety o Recreation o Discipline of the men and women within the company. o Directives, correspondence and reporting. Platoon Commander o Normally a CPO who is responsible for the training, discipline, control, and tactical deployment of the platoon. The Platoon Commander is also responsible for the overall planning, scheduling, safety, quality controls, and project management of those projects assigned to the platoon by the Company commander. Right Guide o Normally a PO1 who performs the administrative functions the platoon commander may direct. The Right Guide is also responsible for the supply and timely re-supply of the platoon in combat and often performs similar tasks on the job site. Squad Leader o Generally a PO1 who carries out the orders of the platoon commander and is responsible to him for discipline, appearance, training, control, and conduct of the squad at all times. In combat, he has the important responsibilities of fire discipline, fire control, and maneuvering the squad. Fire Team Leader o Generally a PO2 who carries out the orders of the squad leader and is responsible for the effective employment of the fire team. His primary responsibility is to control the fire team in combat. In addition the fire team leader is responsible for the care and condition of the weapons and equipment of the fire team. Company Chief o He/She is the primary administrative assistant and technical advisor to the company commander.

102.4 Discuss the mission of the following: [ref. d, ch. 1] Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) o Primarily designed for construction and military support operations to build advance base facilities in support of the armed forces. Functions include projects or repair and operations of facilities and lines of communications during emergencies or under conditions that demand immediate action. Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) o CBMU 202 and CBMU 303 are active duty commands with Command Elements (CE) and active and reserve detachments located in several fleet concentration areas. o Provide camp setup and camp maintenance support to Navy and Marine Corps forces ashore. o Continue CBU Fleet Hospital Mission.

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o Conduct construction readiness training (CRT) and Disaster
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Recovery/Consequence Management (DR/CM) in support of Navy activities ashore. Provide Forward Operating Base (FOB) facility and logistics support to designated Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF), and MEF Engineer Group (MEG) Command Elements, and Naval Special Warfare (NSW) Squadrons. Amphibious Construction Battalion (PHIBCB) o Commissioned naval units whose main function is to provide military and amphibious construction support to the armed forces in military operations. Provides ship to shore transport of fuel, materials, and equipment ISO amphibious ready group, MEF, and MPF operations. Underwater Construction Team (UCT) o Specially trained units that construct, maintain, and repair underwater facilities. Each UCT is capable of performing underwater construction tasks and surveying the sea bottom to select the site for an underwater facility. Civic Action Team (CAT) o A small, highly mobile, air transportable construction unit that can be tailored to accomplish a variety of constructions tasks. o Team carry enough food, tool kits, and automotive and construction equipment to be self-sufficient in the field while performing their construction tasks. Naval Construction Force Support Unit (NCFSU) o Provides logistical support for a Naval Construction Regiment and other supported Naval Construction Force units. Also provides augment construction, engineering, and specialized equipment support for a NCR and other units. NCFSU equipment is maintained both in the active force and in the Reserve 1st Naval Construction Division o The 1NCD has been established to exercise command and administrative control over assigned Regiments and Seabee Readiness Groups and reports to COMLANTFLT/COMUSFLTFOR, COMPACFLT, and USEURCOM. Naval Construction Regiment (NCR) o Exercises administrative and operational control of two or more NMCBs or other NCF units. The NCR assists the NMCBs in achieving the highest possible state of readiness to meet their disaster recovery, contingency, and wartime missions of military construction support of the armed forces. SRG o The SRG provides NMCBs, while at home port, training to achieve the highest possible state of readiness to meet their disaster recovery, contingency, and wartime missions of military construction support of the armed forces. Deployment for Training (DFT) o Typically a small detachment of Seabees from the MB element that participates in specialized/technical construction projects for periods less then the entire deployment cycle.

102.5 Define operational and administrative control. [ref. d, ch. 1]


OPCON is defined as the authority to assign tasks, to designate objectives, and to give any specific directions necessary to accomplish a mission. If required, a specific date for mission completion may be specified. ADCON is defined as the coordination of training, project selection, logistic support, movement of personnel and equipment, furnishing services, supplies, and materials for assigned units.

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102.6 Discuss the purpose of Operational Plans (OPLANs), Operational Orders(OPORDs), and warning orders. [ref. d, chs. 4, 11] OPLAN is a detailed statement of a course of action to be followed to accomplish a future mission. OPORD, may be oral, dictated, or in written form. The most important determining factor of the form and the method of issuing an OPORD is time available for its preparation and distribution. Warning Order is to give advance notice that a unit is to be moved. If time permits, the order is usually issued about 90 days in advance of the departure date. This time period allows subordinate units time to prepare for the move.

102.7 State the purpose and discuss the contents of the Enlisted Distribution Verification Report (EDVR). [ref. e, ch. 1]

Its a monthly statement of a commands enlisted personnel account. Its distributed by the Enlisted Personnel Management Center (EPMAC). This document lists all personnel assigned. Summary by distribution community of the present and future manning status of the activity. Common reference for communicating manning status between an activity and its Manning Control Authority (MCA) Statement of account for verification by the Personnel and Pay Services Unit Identification. Permanent historical record of an activitys enlisted personal account.

102.8 Explain the use of the following: Naval message [ref. f, ch. 4] o Written documents to pass or receive information to and from other units, which requires an immediate response. E-mail [ref. g, sec. D] o Lets individuals and activities exchange information by computer. You may use it for informal communication in place of telephone calls or to transmit formal correspondence within DOD

102.9 Explain what each of the following enlisted service record pages are and what entries are made on each: [ref. h]

Page 2: Emergency Data. o Multipurpose form for both officer and enlisted members. o Part 1 serves as an application of dependency allowances and is used to record military spouse data. Part II provides an immediately accessible, up-to-date record of emergency data for casualty reporting and notification of the next of kin. Page 4: Enlisted Qualification History o Consists of chronological history of your occupational and training related qualifications and your awards and commendations. Page 13: Administrative remarks

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o Serves as a chronological record of significant miscellaneous entries that are not


provided for elsewhere in the service record. Also used to provide more detailed information to clarify entries on other pages of the service record. 102.10 Discuss the purpose and general rules for the following types of counseling: [ref. i, ch. 4] Personnel o Often things can be resolved by the members Chain of Command but drugs/alcohol, behavioral disorders and psychological problems need to be referred. Performance o Required for: advancement in rate qualification for retention and reenlistment selection for responsible assignments selection for special training awards type of discharge received Individual rights o submit input o make a statement

102.11 Explain the use of a report and disposition of offense(s) (NAVPERS Form 1626/7). [ref. j, ch. 5] Used to: o Report offenses o Advises rights to accused o Serves as preliminary inquiry o Records XOI results o Records COs mast results 102.12 Discuss the purpose of the following: Operation Report (OPREP) o Significant event likely to draw national attention. Will likely have impact on Navy Operations, and/or fatalities in the line of duty. Logistical Requirements (LOGREQ) o Reports are used by a command to report logistical requirements to higher headquarters. Format for the report will be issued by the higher unit in the operation Status of Resources and Training System (SORTS) o Is a unit reporting format utilized to summarize a units training and operation readiness to higher headquarters and the theater commanders. (CINC) Situation Report (SITREP) o Used if local interest is expected and minimal impact to Navy Operations will result from the incident. Event not likely to draw national attention (auto accident)

102.13 Explain the difference between a security clearance and access. [ref. b, ch. 1] Clearance - Administrative action that an individual can be trusted with classified materials. Access - No one has a right to have access to classified information solely because of rank, position, or security clearance. Access is based on persons need to know.

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102.14 Discuss the Seabee Skills Assessment Program (SSAP). [ref. n, ch. 1]

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Continuously updating a members skill including, individual general skills, individual rating skills, military skills, and crew skills (construction skills)

102.15 Describe the command relationship between a NCF unit and a Marine Air/Ground Task Force (MAGTF) unit. [ref. o, ch. 1] The NCF unit is placed under the OPCON of the MEF Commander. The OPCON relationship is both mission and situation-dependent, and should be determined through an appropriate engineer staff planning process. The normal employment of the NCF, as based on precedent-setting contingencies, is for the NCF element to be structured as a major subordinate element within the MAGTF organization.

102.16 Discuss your responsibilities and conduct required as a combatant under the Laws of Armed Conflict. [ref. d, ch. 1] Combatants carry weapons and participate in military operations. Noncombatants (civilians, medical, and chaplains) do not. Do not attack enemy troops who are wounded, sick, or surrender. Provide medical care to captures enemy troops. Do not take personal property away from captured enemy troops. Captives may perform work, but nothing that assists your war effort. Use only the appropriate level of force required to affect the mission, and avoid protected property, e.g., religious sanctuaries. Do not alter your weapon to cause more suffering.

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COMMON CORE 103 GENERAL SAFETY FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] OPNAVINST 5100.23F, Navy Occupational Safety and Health (NAVOSH) Program Manual [b] COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCB INSTRUCTION 5100.1, Navy Construction Safety Manual [c] Industrial/Construction Standards 29 CFR 1910/1926 [d] NAVEDTRA 14026, Construction Electrician Basic [e] NAVEDTRA 14167, Naval Safety Supervisor [f] OPNAVINST 3500.39A, Operational Risk Management_______________________ 103.1 Explain the responsibilities of the following personnel as applied to safety: [ref. e, ch. 1]

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Commanding Officer o Responsible for the safety and health of all military and civilian personnel, the safe use and condition of equipment, and the protection of all government property o Ensures compliance with established procedures and work practices o Ensures OSH councils and committees are formed at appropriate command levels o Ensures compliance with current instructions and regulations o Ensures all work places receive a safety inspection at least annually o Establishes a Hazard Abatement Program o Establishes NAVOSH education and training programs o Coordinates occupational health support with the cognizant Naval Hospital or Regional Medical Center o Reviews and signs the Annual Safety Report Executive Officer o Chairman of Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Counsel, assumes the duties of C.O in his/her absence o Acts as Chairman for the OSH Policy Committee Meeting o Enforces the COs safety policies and procedure Safety Officer o Advises the CO on matters pertaining to safety, manages the command safety program, investigates mishaps, monitors projects, shops, and special evolutions for compliance with safety standards o Organizationally on the immediate staff of the CO. A full time assignment. o Maintains complete and accurate records on the accident, injury, occupational illness rate of unit and submits monthly mishap summaries to Division o Develops accident prevention and loss of control measures and programs o Conducts safety and accident investigations, analyzes reports of occupational injuries and or property damage to identify factors or trends o As required, prepares specific safety rules and regulations for approval by the CO o Instruction verification o Reviews and approves all project general and specific safety plans o Organizes and conducts safety inspections and surveys to identify violations, hazards, and deficiencies in operations, facilities, and equipment o Records safety and health violations through an aggressive Hazard Abatement Program o Coordinates actions and follows up on corrective measures taken o Maintains liaison with planning and design officials o Assists supervisors in developing and conducting safety training. Provides consultation services, advice, and guidance

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o o

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Technical authority in the procurement of PPE Conducts hazard analysis of project/shop operations and develops safe working standards and conditions o Consults and maintains liaison with key personnel during various planning evolutions o Submits minutes of OSH Policy and Safety Supervisor committee meetings to the CO for review o TRAINS, EDUCATES, TRACKS, INSPECTS, FOLLOWS UP Department Head/Company Commander o Responsible for safety within their areas of responsibility enforces safety standards. Are assigned as members of the OSH Counsel o Ensures all safety regulations are complied with o Promotes and strengthens the safety program through all levels of supervision by establishing internal training procedures o Plans all work with regards to safety and the safety related equipment or materials needed o Supervises and monitors staff to ensure full compliance with all safety rules and regulation o Picks the right person for the job at hand and ensures they are trained o Reviews work procedures and takes positive action to correct all hazards o Ensures proper tracking of all training and the complete thorough investigation of all mishaps with timely submissions Supervisor o Responsible for the safety of their personnel, develop safety plans, enforce safety standards, ensure adequate PPE is available o Be familiar with safety rules and regulations for jobs and facilities in your area o Enforces safety rules immediately corrects any unsafe act or noted deficiency o Inspects jobs and work areas for hazards and unsafe work habits o Educates and trains personnel, sets the example o Reports all mishaps in a timely manner o Investigates all mishaps, determines the basic causes, and takes corrective actions to prevent repetitive mishaps o Ensures PPE is available and properly being worn at all work sites o Knows personnel limitations, assigns the right person to the task at hand o Posts appropriate signs and warnings Crew Leader o Key people in a successful and aggressive safety program. Responsibilities include but are not limited to o Being familiar with safety rules and regulations o Enforcing safety rules and correcting unsafe acts o Educating and training personnel o Reporting all mishaps and near misses o Ensuring the correct personal protective equipment is available Safety Petty Officer o Monitors safety within their Company/Department/Detail. Initiate preliminary mishap investigation within their area of responsibility o Principle advisor to Company Commander/Department Head/Det OIC o Normally an E-6 or above, must have attended the Safety Managers Course All Hands

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o o o o o o o Responsible for their own safety and the safety of their Shipmates. Everyone should be aware of the hazards to which they are exposed and precautionary measures to prevent personal injury or property damage Reports to work well rested and emotionally prepared for the task at hand Understands and follows safety and health precautions pertinent to work areas Reports to immediate supervisor any unsafe conditions or acts Cautions those who may be endangered by suspected, known, unusual or developing hazards Reports any mishaps to your immediate supervisor Uses all PPE required to complete the task

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103.2 Explain the functions of the Safety Council, Enlisted Safety Committee, and Safety Petty Officer Committee. [ref. e, ch. 1] Safety Council o The Safety Council convenes quarterly to develop recommendations for policy in safety matters and to analyze progress of the overall safety program. The council consists of the commanding officer or executive officer (chairperson), the unit safety officer (recorder), and safety representatives from each department. Enlisted Safety Committee o The Enlisted Safety Committee makes recommendations about the commands safety program to the Safety Council. The safety committee convenes to exchange information; improve communications; review conditions, mishaps, and injuries; and suggest improvements. It makes written safety recommendations to the Safety Council and the commanding officer. These meetings convene monthly to enhance interdepartmental communication in mishap prevention at division and work center levels.

103.3 Discuss the purpose of a mishap investigation and whos responsible for conducting the investigation. [ref. e, ch. 4]

The purpose of a mishap investigation is to determine the primary and contributing causes of the mishap. From those causes we can then plan corrective action to prevent a recurrence of the mishap. To limit mishap losses, we must analyze the frequency of potential mishaps and identify mishap causes. Investigation of mishaps is the responsibility of all levels of supervision, from the first-line supervisor to the commanding officer. Division officers, department heads, or representatives appointed by the commanding officer usually investigate serious injury or major property damage mishaps. First- and second-line supervisors investigate non-disabling injury or minor property damage mishaps.

103.4 Explain the different types of eye protection and when are they required. [ref. e, ch. 5] All Navy activities that expose personnel to eye hazards shall have a sight conservation program with the following as a minimum: o Identification and evaluation of eye hazard o Prescription protective eye wear program o Procurement and maintenance of safety glasses o Training for employees o Effective program enforcement Types of Eye Protection o Goggles

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o Safety glasses o Permanent walls o Temporary/moveable shields o Signs must be posted in all eye hazard areas Different types of eye protection and uses o Safety goggles: protect from flying particles and dust o Chemical goggles: Protect from splashing liquids, (acids, solvents, etc) o Safety glasses: protect from flying particles (impact, debris) o Welding glasses/goggles: Protect form Ultraviolet radiation (arc flash) o Over-spectacle glasses (planos): Protect from flying particles and impact worn over prescription glasses

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103.5 Discuss the Hearing Conservation Program and when personnel are required to be enrolled. [ref. a, ch. 18] Intended to prevent hearing loss related to exposure to high noise levels Noises greater than 84 dba and peak noises greater than 140 dba require hearing protection. (ear plugs or ear muffs) Noises greater than 104 dba require double hearing protection. (ear plugs and muffs) Personnel are enrolled in the Hearing Conservation Program when they are exposed to noises greater than 84 dba for an 8-hour workweek. Personnel enrolled in the program must have a baseline hearing test (audiogram) and annual testing while in the program When a person is removed from the program they must be tested for documentation of hearing capability Goal is to prevent occupational hearing loss and ensure auditory fitness for duty in the military and civilian workforce o Meeting the goal Noise Measure and Analysis Survey work environments Engineering Control Reduction of noise at the source Hearing Protective devices Single hearing protection is required when exposed to 84 dba or one time decibel peaks of 140 dB or greater Double hearing protection is required when exposed to steady decibel levels exceeding 104 dB Audiometer o Baseline completed at MEPS o Yearly testing on personnel exposed to 84db daily o Five years for personnel not exposed to 84 dB daily o Education o Every one will receive yearly training

103.6 Explain the different types of hearing protection and when are they required. [ref. a, ch. 18] Insert type: Ear plugs, disposable foam or issued triple flange. Circumaural type: Ear muffs o Required for continuous noise levels greater than 84 dba and peak noise levels greater than 140 dba

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Combination: Ear plugs and ear muffs o Required for continuous noise levels greater than 104 dba

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103.7 Explain the maintenance and use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and why it is necessary. [ref. a, ch. 20] Maintenance and use of PPE o Personnel Protective Equipment (PPE) should be maintained in a condition that allows proper use of the equipment o Scratched lenses, dirty, missing components, etc. can lessen the effectiveness of the equipment and deter usage When PPE is not used properly people may be injured. Types of protection o Head protection: protection from impact of falling and flying objects o Foot protection: protection of foot and toe from falling objects such as construction material handling o Eye protection: protection from flying particles or chips, and splashing from liquids o Hand protection: to protect fingers and hand from sharp objects. Shock absorbing gloves for jack hammers o Electrical protection: rubber protective equipment rated for certain voltages for electrical workers o Long sleeves: to protect arms from flying debris and sparks o Life lines: protection from falling heights greater than 6 o Aprons: protection from splashes or sparks at mid section o Respiratory protection: protection from particles, fumes, mists, dusts and vapors

103.8 State the purpose of temporary electrical power sources and explain source inspection and certification requirements. [ref. b, ch. 24] Types of Temporary Power: o Generators, 5kw has to be grounded unless states as double insulated otherwise on the generator o Resistance level must be below 25 ohms to ground for normal set-up, 15 ohms in hazardous atmospheres and 5 ohms in explosive atmospheres o Existing power, checked for proper grounding o Existing power pole, run through a spider box to reduce current. Must also be grounded o All temporary electrical power sources shall only be permitted during emergencies, periods of construction, remodeling, repair to or demolition of structures or similar activities o All temporary sources shall be inspected, certified safe and tagged with the inspectors name, company, and date prior to the first uses. o All sources shall be re-inspected every 14 days after initial inspection and certified safe for continued use on the attached tag o The inspection of temporary power sources shall also be kept in a logbook. This log will contain the same information as the tag, plus it will also contain the exact location of the tag (s). o The primary purpose of the inspection is to ensure that proper grounding is established and that this source can be utilized without endangering the worker

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Temporary electric power is defined as any electric power sources used for construction, renovation, contingency, or emergency operations. Any electric power source we use with hand tools and equipment is considered temporary power. o Temporary power sources are inspected to insure: Proper voltage Proper polarity Adequate ground All generators must be grounded to earth with a minimum of 25 ohms resistance or comply with the National Electric Code when 25 ohms or less can not be achieved

103.9 Explain when Ground Fault Circuit Interruption (GFCI) protection is required. [ref. c, ch. (b)(1) (ii)] Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs) are required to be used with all electric hand tools (drills, saws, concrete vibrators, etc) GFCIs detect a change in the flow of electricity and interrupt the circuit before any harm can be done to personnel. GFCIs must trip at less than .5 milliampres GFCIs must be tested monthly to ensure proper function GFCIs must be plugged directly into to power source and all power drawn from them. All 120 colt, single phase 15 and 20 ampere receptacle outlets on construction sites or shops shall have an approved class A, group I, GFCI unit with a trip level between 3 and 5 mili-amperes Receptacles on two wire, single phase portable or vehicle mounted generators, rated not more than 5 kw, where the circuit conductors of the generator are insulated form the generator from a and all other grounding surfaces do not requires GFCI protection The CTR electrician shall ensure that all GFCIs function correctly, are in good repair and maintains a GFCI inspection log. No repairs to GFCI are authorized GCFIs that are damaged or fail to function correctly will be returned to the manufacturer for repair and/or replacement

103.10 Explain the electrical and power equipment inspection requirements. [ref. b, ch. 24] All tools (electrical, power, hand, etc) will be inspected daily by the operator prior to use. This includes PPE, extension cords, air hoses, hydraulic components etc. Any tool or equipment found defective or damaged must be removed from service until repaired or replaced Powder activated tools must be inspected monthly by a qualified technician with inspection documented and maintained The following tests hall be performed on cord sets, receptacle not part of the permanent wiring of a building or structure, and cord and plug connected equipment required to be grounded. All equipment grounding conductors shall be tested for continuity and shall be electrically continuous Each receptacle and attachment cap or plug shall be tested for correct attachment of the equipment-grounding conductor. The equipment grounding conductors shall be connected to its proper terminal Required times of inspections

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o o o

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Before the first use Before equipment is returned to service after any repair Before equipment is used after any incident which can be reasonably suspected to have caused damage o At intervals not to exceed on month Equipment which has not met the requirements of this paragraph shall not be issued for used and stored in CTR

103.11 Discuss when lockout/tag-out procedures for electrical and energy sources are required. [ref. a, ch. 24] All potential energy sources must be secured prior to working on equipment and machinery Locks and tags are installed to prevent accidental activation of the equipment or energizing the power source while work is being performed Damaged or unsafe equipment or machinery should be locked or tagged out of service to prevent use until repairs are made Only qualified personnel are authorized to perform lockout/tagout. The lockout/tagout log is maintained in the Safety Office. Required when you will be working on any items that will store energy as: o Electrical equipment o Hydraulic o Steam Lockout devices o Locks o Lockout device Tags o Red tags (danger tags) 103.12 Define confined space and discuss the hazards associated with it. [ref. a, ch. 27] Confined spaces are spaces with: o Limited access or egress (not equipped with regular doors or intended for frequent entry) o Poor to no ventilation o Potential to contain harmful gasses or vapors o Low or high oxygen concentration < 19.5% or > 23.5 % Hazards associated with confined spaces o Suffocation o Poisoning o Explosion o Electrocution o Entrapment o Typical injuries (cuts, abrasions, falling slipping, etc) Hazards o Oxygen Deficiency below 19.5 % o Flammable gases or materials Confined Space Program Manager o Only person who can certify a confined space entrance o Lists PPE required to enter a confined space o Constantly monitors work space during job Only Gas Free Engineers are authorized to certify a confined space for entry Once all personnel exit the space for any duration, the space must be re-certified

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All confined spaces with potential hazards require a permit for entry 103.13 Explain who is authorized to certify a confined space as safe for entry/work. [ref. a, ch. 27]

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To render these spaces safe for entry by personnel to perform work, a certified gas-free engineer must conduct an inspection to ensure safe working conditions A qualified gas-free engineer is the only individual authorized to permit entry by personnel

103.14 Discuss the three basic types of respirators and explain their use, care, and selection. [ref. a, ch. 15] Types of Respirators o Supplied Air Respirator Used in oxygen deficient spaces or where hazardous gases are present o Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) Used in oxygen deficient spaces or where hazardous gases are present. Usually when the workers will be on the move o Air Purifying Respirators Used to clean the air you are breathing only. Cannot filter out hazardous gases or provide oxygen to breathe. Care o Inspected prior to each use. o Cartridges shall be changed when they are no longer effective o Disposable respirators shall be damaged to prevent further use prior to disposal Cleaning o Wipe after each use with alcohol swab o Wash monthly with warm soapy water o Maintenance o Fixed by RPPM only Storage o Stored in dry, clean, labeled and air tight bag o Stored laying flat o Replacement criteria Filter replacement schedules will be determined by the RPPM. Replacement depends on the filter type, type of chemical and exposure level to the chemical, temperature, and humidity. Selection o Type of hazards you will be exposed to o Permissible Exposure Limit as set by OSHA o Threshold Limit Value as set by the American Council of Government Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) o MSDS sheet requirements o NIOSH Chemical Guide handbook o Industrial Hygienist department recommendation o Three Basic types Air Purifying Purifies air by filtration (does not provide oxygen) Supplied air Uses a respirator face piece in conjunction with a remote air source, air hose restricts movement, unlimited time limit

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Self Contained Breathing Apparatus Completely self contained allows freedom of movement in harmful environments, has a time limitation Use of respirators o Respirators are used in atmospheres containing harmful fumes, vapors, and gases. Additionally, may be used in atmospheres without sufficient oxygen (supplied air and SCBA) o Respirators must be applicable to the environments in which they are to be used.

103.15 Discuss the importance of the Industrial Hygiene and Work Place Monitoring Program. [ref. a, ch. 8] 104 Industrial Hygiene (IH) personnel recognized evaluates and makes recommendations to control potential workplace hazards. Assess potential health risks faced by Navy personnel Establish and document historical records of exposure levels for Navy personnel Ensure and demonstrate compliance with NAVOSH exposure criteria IH performs work place monitor provides: o Descriptions of the operations, tasks and work practices which take place in each workplace o Lists of hazardous materials used in each work place o Lists of the physical hazards, noise hazards, and sources of non-ionizing radiation. o Existing administrative controls, environmental controls and/or PPE required in each shop IH workplace monitoring o Conducted annually or when a change occurs o Workplaces are monitored by the IH to determine levels of exposure to hazards o Workplaces should be re-evaluated annually to determine any changes in hazard potential. o Workplaces should be monitored when new equipment or processes are introduced.

103.16 Discuss the basic reporting procedures required when an unsafe/unhealthful working condition report is submitted. [ref. a, ch. 10] Reporting Procedures o Report to the Chain of Command o If Chain of Command does not resolve the problem, report to the Safety Office. o If you desire not to verbally report to the Safety Office, you may submit a Report of Unsafe/Unhealthy Working Conditions OPNAV 5100/11. o Once the Safety Office receives the report they have up to 72 hours to investigate the situation. o Alleged imminent danger situations will be investigated within 24 hours. o The Safety Officer will reply in writing to the person submitting the report within 10 working days. Unsafe/Unhealthful Working Conditions o Normally conducted by the Safety Officer Detecting unsafe or unhealthy working conditions at the earliest possible time, then making prompt corrections of those hazards at the lowest possible level are essential to properly resolving unsafe or unhealthful conditions.

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Investigation time limits 24 hours on IDLH, immediately dangerous to life and health 3 days for serious situations Health hazard are referred to Medical Response 10 working days to originator in writing List what is being done Who to appeal to findings to Appeals Copy of 5100/11 Written response Letter stating why you are not happy with the response

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103.17 Explain the importance of properly grounding portable electrical power and distribution systems. [ref. d, ch. 3] Electrical distribution systems require grounding to provide over current protection to the equipment, should the equipment be struck by lightning the grounding method provides a path to ground for the energy instead of through the distribution system All electrical distribution grounding system grounds must read less than 25 ohms to ground resistance or be in accordance with the National Electric Code Protects human life by providing the least path of resistance to ground for electrical current Protects equipment from damage due to prolonged over current conditions Protects the electrical distribution systems from sustaining severe damage

103.18 Discuss the four general classes of fires and what types of extinguishers are used on each. [ref. e, ch. 18] Classes of fires o Class A: Combustible materials such as wood, paper, clothing, etc o Class B: Petroleum products, oil, gas, plastic, etc o Class C: Electrical o Class D: Metal (magnesium, phosphorous) Extinguishing methods o Class A: Water, dry chemical o Class B: Dry chemical, CO2, Foam o Class C: Dry chemical, CO2, Halon o Class D: No known extinguishing method, clear the area and let it burn out Type of Fire o Class A Fires in ordinary combustible materials such as wood, cloth, paper, rubber and many plastics Use water, antifreeze, soda-acid, foam, aqueous film forming foam (AFFF), loaded stream, multipurpose dry chemical and Halon type fire extinguishers o Class B

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Fires in flammable liquids, oils, greases, tars, oil base paints, lacquers and flammable gases Use Halon, CO2, dry chemical, foam and aqueous film forming foam (AFFF) type fire extinguishers Class C Fires which involve energized electrical equipment where the electrical nonconductivity of the extinguishing media is of importance Use Halon, CO2 and dry chemical type fire extinguisher Class D Fires in combustible metals such as magnesium, titanium, zirconium, sodium, lithium and potassium Use the fire extinguisher approved for each specific combustible metal hazard

103.19 Discuss the purpose of safety stand-downs. [ref. e, ch. 1] Safety Stand-downs are to provide specific safety information and training for specific hazards, evolutions, and activities Safety Stand-downs are usually before know potentially dangerous times such as holiday seasons, prior to exercises, etc Additionally, Safety Stand-downs are scheduled after catastrophic mishaps to prevent similar mishaps Provides a forum to release specific safety information or guidance to a large audience Used to focus personnel on specific hazards of their jobs and work conditions Re-enforces safety as the number one priority required in the performance of their jobs Provides time for personnel to reflect on past and current work safety practices and standards

103.20 Discuss the concept of ORM. [ref. f] ORM is a decision making process that enhances operational capability. Naval Warfare Publication 1 states, "Risk management and risk assessment are formal, essential tools of operational planning. Sound decision making requires the use of these tools both in battle and in training." ORM, described in enclosure (1), is a method for identifying hazards, assessing risks and implementing controls to reduce the risk associated with any operation.

103.21 Explain the following as they apply to ORM: [ref. f] Identifying hazards [p. 2] o Begin with an outline or chart of the major steps in the operation (operational analysis). Next, conduct a Preliminary Hazard Analysis by listing all of the hazards associated with each step in the operational analysis along with possible causes for those hazards. Assessing hazards [p. 2] o For each hazard identified, determine the associated degree of risk in terms of probability and severity. Although not required, the use of a matrix may be helpful in assessing hazards described further in paragraph d). Making risk decisions [p. 2] o First, develop risk control options. Start with the most serious risk first and select controls that will reduce the risk to a minimum consistent with mission accomplishment. With selected controls in place, decide if the benefit of the

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operation outweighs the risk. If risk outweighs benefit or if assistance is required to implement controls, communicate with higher authority in the chain of command. Implementing controls [pp. 2, 3] o The following measures can be used to eliminate hazards or reduce the degree of risk. These are listed by order of preference: Administrative Controls - Controls that reduce risks through specific administrative actions, such as: Providing suitable warnings, markings, placards, signs, and notices. Establishing written policies, programs instructions and standard operating procedures (SOP). Training personnel to recognize hazards and take appropriate precautionary measures. Limiting the exposure to a hazard (either by reducing the number of personnel/assets or the length of time they are exposed). Engineering Controls - Controls that use engineering methods to reduce risks by design, material selection or substitution when technically or economically feasible. Personal Protective Equipment - Serves as a barrier between personnel and a hazard. It should be used when other controls do not reduce the hazard to an acceptable level. Supervising [p. 3] o Conduct follow-up evaluations of the controls to ensure they remain in place and have the desired effect. Monitor for changes, which may require further ORM. Take corrective action when necessary.

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COMMON CORE 104 BASIC FIRST AID AND PERSONAL HYGIENE FUNDAMENTALS
References: [a] NAVEDTRA 14295, Hospital Corpsman [b] NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 1_____________________ 104.1 State the sequence to examine an injured person. [ref. b, ch. 10]

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Identify obvious wounds visible at first glance. Take note of them, and then continue with the ABC survey. (It doesnt make sense to work hard to put a tourniquet on a severed limb if the victim is not breathing because of an obstructed airway.) Check that the Airway is open and unobstructed. Check for signs of Breathing (for example; coughing, moaning, talking): Lack of oxygen can lead to brain damage or death in 4-6 minutes. Check for Bleeding: Life cannot continue without an adequate Circulation of blood to carry oxygen to tissues. Do a check from head to toe looking for obvious and hidden wounds. Remember to look for exit wounds and small wounds on the back. When you are finished, start over again at Airway, and then move to Breathing and Circulation. If there are any signs of chemical or biological agent poisoning, you should immediately mask yourself (if not already masked), then the casualty. If it is nerve agent poisoning, administer the antidote, using the casualtys injectors. In a chemically contaminated area, do not expose the wounds.

104.2 State the reason for not moving an injured person unless absolutely necessary. [ref. b, ch. 10] As a general rule, make your initial examination in the position and place you find the victim. Moving the victim before this time could gravely endanger life, especially if there are skull fractures or spine injuries. If the situation is such that you or the victim is in danger, you must weigh this threat against the potential damage caused by premature transportation. If you decide to move the victim, while supporting the neck and head, do it as quickly and as gently as possible to a safe location where proper first aid can be administered.

104.3 Describe the signs, symptoms, and treatment of shock. [ref. b, ch. 10]

Shock is a serious condition that results from a lack of oxygen to important body systems. The most common cause is a lack of circulating blood from blood loss. It is important to realize that the signs of shock may not appear at the onset of the injury, so it always important to constantly reevaluate your patient. Signs/symptoms o Cool, clammy skin o Paleness o Restlessness or nervousness (line moved down) o Thirst o Pulse is weak and rapid o Enlarged pupils o Increased breathing that can be shallow and irregular o Blotchy or bluish skin, especially around the mouth o Nausea or vomiting Treatment

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COMMON CORE
o o o o

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Keep victim calm Try to prevent the victim from seeing their injuries if possible. If victim is conscience and no internal injuries are suspected, you should give the victim small amounts of warm water. If possible, keep the victim warm and elevate their feet 6-12 inches so that theyre higher than the patients head.

104.4 Explain why you should not give an unconscious person anything by mouth. [ref. b, ch. 10] Giving an unconscious person any food or drink can obstruct their airway, decreasing their ability to breath, and may cause choking or vomiting.

104.5 Describe the three types of bleeding. [ref. b, ch. 10] Capillary bleeding is slow and the blood oozes from the wound. Venous bleeding is dark red and flows in a steady stream. Arterial bleeding is bright red and spurts from the wound.

104.6 Explain the four methods for controlling bleeding. [ref. b, ch. 10] Direct pressure o The first method to use when controlling bleeding. In almost every case bleeding can be stopped by direct pressure on the wound. o Use a sterile dressing when available and tie a knot directly over the wound. Do not tie the knot too tight and cut off circulation. Elevation o Raising an injured limb above the level of the heart helps to control the bleeding. Elevation should be used together with direct pressure. o CAUTION: do not elevate a limb when you suspect a fracture. Pressure points o Bleeding from a cut artery or vein can often be controlled by applying pressure to the appropriate pressure point. o The object of the pressure is to compress the artery against the bone, thus slowing down the flow of blood to that area. Tourniquet o Should only be used as a last resort for severe, life threatening bleeding that cannot be controlled by any other method. o Realize that when you apply a tourniquet there is a good possibility that the effected limb will be amputated. o Always use a wide piece of material, about 2, when applying a tourniquet and always apply it as close to the wound as possible. This will improve their chances of a better recovery. o Once you apply a tourniquet, DO NOT loosen or remove it! This could cause further complications from the release of blood clots from the area.

104.7 Discuss the major pressure points of the body. [ref. b, ch. 10] Pressure point: a point where a main artery lies near the skin surface and over a bone or firm tissue. There are 11 principal pressure points on each side of the body. o underside of jaw- for facial bleeding

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o o o o o o o o o o collar bone- for bleeding on upper arm/shoulder biceps- for bleeding between middle of upper arm/elbow wrist- for bleeding of hand (radial and ulnar) pelvis- for bleeding from the thigh (iliac artery) ankle- for bleeding from the foot in front of ear- for bleeding from the temple/scalp knee- for bleeding from between the knee/foot hip- for bleeding from the upper thigh (femoral artery) neck (carotid artery) front of elbow joint (brachial artery)

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104.8 Describe the first aid treatment for a sucking chest wound. [ref. a, ch. 4] This is a penetrating injury to the chest that produces a hole in the chest cavity, causing the lung to collapse and preventing normal breathing. It is imperative the wound be sealed with an airtight dressing to prevent air from entering the chest cavity through the wound. Any material that will form an airtight barrier can be used if it is large enough to cover the wound. If the victims condition deteriorates when you apply the seal, IMMEDIATELY replace it with a regular dressing. After the wound is sealed and dressed, the victim should be placed on their side with the wounded side down unless there is suspected spine or neck injuries. Watch the victim closely for shock and treat accordingly. Do not give victim anything to drink. Transport to treatment facility IMMEDIATELY

104.9 Describe the first aid treatment for a person with a suspected spinal injury. [ref. b, ch. 10] Do not move the victim unless it is absolutely essential. Do not bend or twist the victims body, do not move the head forward, backward, or sideways and do not under any circumstances allow the victim to sit up First aid procedures o If possible, before the patient is moved their neck must be immobilized and they need to be secured to a spine board or firm, flat piece of wood. To move them onto the spine board properly you must use the logroll technique. To do this, roll the patient on their side using 2-3 people while another person maintains inline neck and head stabilization, then place the spine board against the patients back, and roll them back down onto the board. Slide them into position and secure them properly to the board. o Minimize shock o Prevent further injury to the spinal cord o Keep the victim comfortably warm

104.10 Describe the three degrees of burns. [ref. b, ch. 10]

Most commonly result from exposure to fire, chemicals, or electricity. The severity of burns depends on the depth, size and location. Burns are most serious when they are located on the face, neck, hands, and feet. First degree burns o Characterized by redness, mild swelling, and pain o Usually the result of spending too much time in the sun, short contact with chemicals, or minor scalding by hot water or steam.

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Second degree burns o Are deeper than first degree burns and have blisters. o Usually they result from deep sunburns or flash burns from gasoline fires. o Most painful type of burns because the nerve endings are still intact. Third degree burns o The most serious burn because it involves the full thickness of the skin, which may be charred in more severe cases. o These burns can even extend into the bone.

104.11 Describe the first aid treatment for the following burns: White phosphorous burn o A special category of burn is that caused by contact with white phosphorus. o First aid for this type of burn is complicated by the fact that white phosphorus particles ignite upon contact with air. o Treatment Partially embedded particles must be continuously flushed with water while the first aid provider removes them with whatever tools are available, such as tweezers or pliers. Deeply embedded particles that cannot be removed must be covered with a saline soaked dressing. Chemical burn on arm o Flush the area immediately with a lot of cool running water for 5 to 10 minutes to wash away any chemicals. o Remove clothing and jewelry from the victim on which chemicals have spilled. o Flush again with water and gently pat it dry with sterile gauze. Do not rub the area.

o Transport the victim to a medical facility. o Warning: Do not attempt to neutralize any chemical unless the chemical is
positively known and what substance will effectively neutralize it. Alkali burns caused by dry lime o Mixing water and lime creates a very corrosive substance. Dry lime should be removed by brushing the material from the skin and clothing unless massive amounts of water are available for rapid and complete flushing. Acid burns caused by carbolic acid o Wash the affected area with alcohol because carbolic acid is non water-soluble. Then wash the area with large quantities of water. o If alcohol is not available, flushing with water is better than no treatment at all Flash burn to eyes o Flash burns are divided into two classes: direct and indirect o Direct burns, usually called flash burns, are the result of thermal, infrared radiation emitted by a nuclear explosion. o Indirect burns are the result of fires caused by an explosion. Chemical burn to eyes o Symptoms Blindness may persist for 20 to 30 minutes Eyes are irritated and feel like they have sand in them. o Treatment - Apply cold compresses and transport victim to the nearest medical treatment facility.

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104.12 Describe the symptoms and treatment of: [ref. b, ch. 10]

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Heat stroke o Symptom Headache, nausea, dizziness, or weakness Breathing may be deep and rapid and change to shallow and almost absent Flushed, very dry and hot skin, constricted pupils and a fast, strong pulse o Treatment Heat stroke is a true medical emergency. The longer the victim goes without proper treatment the more likely they are to suffer from brain damage or death. The main objective is to get the body temperature down as quickly as possible. Move the patient to a shaded area, loosen their clothing and wet them down. Apply cool compresses to the back of their neck and underarms. Get the victim to a medical treatment facility as soon as possible and continue cooling measures during transport. Heat exhaustion o The most common heat related condition resulting from prolonged exposure to hot conditions. Heat exhaustion involves a serious disturbance of blood flow to the brain, heart and lungs. o Symptoms Victim may appear ashen gray; skin will be cold, moist, clammy, normal or subnormal temperature. Pupils may be enlarged Victim may experience symptoms such as weakness, fatigue, headache, loss of appetite, and nausea. o Treatment Loosen clothing and apply cool wet cloths to the head, armpits, groin, and ankles. Do not chill the victim Transport the victim to a medical facility as soon as possible. Care for the victim as if in shock. Move the victim to an air-conditioned space if possible. Cramps o Heat cramps usually affect people who work in hot environments or who engage in strenuous exercise without acclimating themselves to the conditions. May result from drinking ice water or other cold drinks too quickly or in too large a quantity after exercise. o Symptoms Excessive sweating which can result in painful cramps in the muscles of the abdomen, legs, and arms Muscle spasms caused by heat cramps usually last only a few minutes o Treatment Move to a cool place Give plenty of water to drink Gently massage muscles to relieve the spasms If symptoms do not improve treat for heat exhaustion and transport to a medical facility

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COMMON CORE
104.13 Explain how heat casualties in the field may be prevented. [ref. a, ch. 4] Its the commands responsibility Prevention centers on water and salt replacement Do not consume alcoholic beverages

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104.14 Describe frostbite and immersion foot. [ref. b, ch. 10] Frostbite o Frostbite occurs when ice crystals form in the skin or deeper tissues after sustained exposure to a temperature of 32 degrees F or lower o Depending upon the temperature, altitude, and wind speed, the exposure time necessary to produce frostbite varies from a few minutes to several hours. o The areas most commonly affected are the face and extremities o Symptoms Affected skin reddens ant there is an uncomfortable coldness. Area becomes numb due to reduced circulation Ice crystals form, the frozen extremity appears white, yellow-white, or blotchy blue and white The surface of the skin feels hard, but the underlying tissue is soft WARNING: Never rub frostbitten area or heat a frostbitten area with open fire. Superficial frostbite o The skin and region just below the skin are affected o Surface feels hard but the underlying tissue is soft, allowing it to move over body ridges o Treatment Thaw with body heat or warm water Hands: Place hands under the armpits, against the abdomen, or between the thighs Feet: Feet can be warmed by using the armpit or abdomen of a buddy Other areas: Warm with warm water immersion, skin to skin contact, or warmwater bottles Immersion foot, which may also occur in the hands, is a cold injury resulting from prolonged exposure to wet, cold temperatures just above freezing o It is often associated with limited motion of the extremities and water-soaked clothing o The temperature does not need to be below 32 degrees F to cause injury o Symptoms Early stages, the feet and toes turn pale and feel cold, numb and stiff Walking becomes difficult The feet will swell and become painful If not treated the flesh dies and amputation of the extremity may be necessary o Treatment o Do not rub or massage the injured part o Remove wet clothing o Do not rupture blisters or apply salves or ointments o Clean with soap and water, dry thoroughly, elevate and keep extremity exposed to dry air o Evacuate by litter

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COMMON CORE
104.15 Describe the signs and symptoms of hypothermia. [ref. b, ch. 10]

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Hypothermia is a decrease in the bodys core temperature. It can be caused by continued exposure to low or rapidly dropping temperatures, cold moisture, snow, and/or ice Symptoms o Several stages of progressive shivering o Feelings of sluggishness, drowsiness and confusion o Victim may become unconscious o Victim may go into shock o The lower extremities may freeze Treatment o Victim must be warmed quickly o Move victim to warmth In the field o Place nude victim in a sleeping bag with two volunteers stripped to their underwear to provide body to body heat transfer o This WILL SAVE LIVES in the field HYPOTHERMIA IS A MEDICAL EMERGENCY THE VICTIM NEEDS HEAT!

104.16 Explain how cold injuries can be prevented. [ref. a, ch. 4] Cold weather injuries can be prevented by becoming accustomed to a cold climate, by wearing warm layered clothing, and by maintaining good discipline and training Wearing dry gloves, stocking cap well insulated boots, and keeping the body well hydrated will help the body maintain its normal temperature.

104.17 Describe the symptoms and first aid treatment for a joint dislocation. [ref. a, ch. 4] Description o A bone that has been forcibly displaced from its joint is dislocated o Dislocation are usually caused by falls or blows but are occasionally caused by muscle exertion. The joints that are most frequently dislocated are the shoulder, hip, finger, and jaw Symptoms o Rapid swelling and discoloration o Loss of ability to use the joint o Sever pain and muscle spasms o Possible numbness o Possible loss of pulse below the joint Shock o Treatment o Loosen the clothing around the injured part o Place the victim in the most comfortable position possible o Support the injured part by means of a sling, pillow, bandages, splints, or any other device that will make the victim comfortable o Get medical help as soon as possible

104.18 Explain when and why a cold pack or heat pad would be used on a sprain. [ref. a, ch. 4]

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Treat all sprains as fractures until ruled out by X-rays Try to rest the effected joint as much as possible over the next few days. Apply cold packs for the first 24 to 48 hours to reduce swelling and to control internal hemorrhage Apply a snug, smooth, figure eight bandage to control swelling and to provide immobilization When at rest, keep the effect joint above the level of the heart. After a few days rest the patient should begin range of motion exercises to prevent decreased joint flexibility.

104

104.19 Describe the procedure for removing ticks. [ref. a, ch. 11] The best method for removing ticks is to coat them with petroleum jelly, baking powder paste, or clear nail polish The tick should be pulled off with a pair of tweezers by grabbing the tick by its mouth parts and slowly working it out of the patients skin. This can be very time consuming, so exercise patience. Care should be taken not to crush the tick or break off the head or embedded mouth parts while still in the skin

104.20 Describe the first aid treatment for snake bites. [ref. a, ch. 5] The most important first aid treatment for venomous snakebites is reducing the circulation of blood through the bite area. This will delay absorption of the venom, prevent aggravation of the local wound, and maintain the victims vital signs Wrap a constricting band 2 to 3 inches above the fang marks, or above the nearest joint, but away from the swelling A second constricting band should be placed 2 to 3 inches below the wound Make sure the victim still has a pulse distal to the constricting band. Constricting bands slow the flow of blood but do not act as a tourniquet. Treat for shock o Use a splint to immobilize the victims affected extremity, keeping the involved area at or below the level of the heart o Cover the wound to prevent further contamination o Telephone the nearest medical facility so proper anti-venom can be made available o Transport the victim (and the dead snake) to a medical facility as soon as possible.

104.21 Describe the first aid treatment for fractures. [ref. b, ch. 10] If there is any possibility that a fracture has been sustained, treat the injury as a fracture until an accurate diagnosis can be made. Rough handling of the victim may convert a closed fracture into an open fracture, increase the severity of shock, or cause extensive damage to the blood vessels, nerves, muscles, and other tissues around the broken bone. Do not move the victim until the injured part has been splinted Always splint fracture in the position found unless there is no pulse distal to the fracture. In that case, you may adjust the fractured limb slightly to return blood flow. If this does not work continue splinting in position found.

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COMMON CORE

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To fully immobilize a fracture you must splint the joint above and below the fracture. If this is not accomplished the fracture will still be able to move causing further injury and pain. Never apply force or traction If the victim is to be transported a short distance, or treatment by a medical officer will not be delayed, it is best to leave the clothing on and place emergency splinting over it If the fracture is an open fracture you must control the bleeding before you can deal with the fracture. Treat for shock

104.22 Describe how to reinforce a battle dressing. [ref. a, ch. 3]

Battle dressings may be reinforced by applying additional sterile dressings over the battle dressing and covering the entire dressing with an elastic bandage.

104.23 Explain the following methods for carrying a casualty: [ref. b, ch. 10]

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104

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COMMON CORE

104

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COMMON CORE

104

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COMMON CORE

104

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COMMON CORE

104

104.24 Explain the importance of personal hygiene and cite examples. [ref. b, ch. 10]

Because of close living accommodations in the field, personal hygiene is extremely important. Disease and sickness can spread rapidly and affect an entire battalion in a short period. Good practices o Daily bath or shower prevents body odor and is absolutely necessary for maintaining cleanliness and preventing common skin diseases o Using medicated powders and deodorants helps keep the skin dry o Socks and underwear should be changed daily o The importance of washing you hands at appropriate times can not be overemphasized

104.25 Explain three methods of purifying water in the field. [ref. b, ch. 10] Boiling o Used when disinfecting compounds are not available. To purify a canteen of water by boiling, follow the steps listed below: Boil the water at a rolling boil for at least 15 20 seconds Let the water cool before drinking it. Once the water has cooled, it must be consumed

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Iodine Tablets o Check tablets for physical change. If the tablets are stuck together, crumbled, or have a color other than steel gray, do not use them o Fill canteen with the cleanest, clearest water available. o Add one tablet per 1 quart canteen of clear water, 2 tablets if the water is cloudy o Place cap loosely and wait 5 minutes o Shake canteen, allowing leakage to rinse the threads around the neck of the canteen o Tighten the cap and wait an additional 20 minutes before using the water for any purpose Calcium hypochlorite ampoules o Fill the canteen with the cleanest, clearest water available, leaving an air space of at least 1 below the neck of the canteen o Add one ampoule of calcium hypochlorite to a canteen cup half full of water; stir with a clean stick until power has dissolved o Fill the canteen cap half full of the solution in the cup, and add it to the water in the canteen, place the cap on the canteen and shake it thoroughly o Loosen the cap slightly; invert the canteen to allow the treated water to leak onto the threads around the canteen neck o Tighten the cap and wait at least 30 minutes before using the water

104.26 Describe proper litter bearer procedures. [ref. a, ch. 3] The military uses a number of standard stretchers. The following discussion will familiarize you with the most common types. When using a stretcher, you should consider a few general rules: o Use standard stretchers when available, but be ready to improvise safe alternatives. o When possible, bring the stretcher to the casualty. o Always fasten the victim securely to the stretcher. o Always move the victim FEET FIRST so the rear bearer can watch for signs of breathing difficulty. o Be sure to use proper lifting techniques so as not to become a victim yourself. When raising or lowering the patient, the litter bearer at the patients head calls the lift.

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COMMON CORE 105 HAZARDOUS MATERIAL/HAZARDOUS WASTE (HM/HW)/ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] OPNAVINST 5100.23F, Navy Occupational Safety and Health (NAVOSH) Program Manual [b] NAVEDTRA 14233, Naval Construction Force/Seabee 1 & C [c] NAVEDTRA 14167, Naval Safety Supervisor [d] OPNAVINST 5100.19D, Naval Occupational Safety and Health (NAVOSH) Program Manual for Forces Afloat__________________________________________________ 105.1 Describe the difference between Hazardous Material (HAZMAT) and Hazardous Waste (HW). [ref. b, ch. 7]

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HAZMATs are stand-alone homogenous products that have one or more properties that have been designated as being harmful to the individual and/or the environment. When proper handling procedures are followed, there is minimum risk to the user. Hazardous Wastes tend to be a mixture of unused or spoiled HAZMATs and are difficult to classify, hence they are commonly more dangerous then stand-alone HAZMATs and require specialized training to recover and dispose.

105.2 State the purpose and information contained on the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). [ref. b, ch. 7] A document generated by the manufacturer of the material Communicates to the users the chemical, physical, and hazardous properties of that material In compliance with OSHA hazard communication, standard key information contained includes the following: o Name, address, and emergency contact for the manufacturer o Physical/Chemical Characteristics o Fire and Explosive Hazard Data o Reactivity Data o Health Hazard Data o Precautions for Safe Handling and Use o Control measure

105.3 What are the six categories of HAZMAT? [ref. c, ch. 5] Category A Hazard Level High

Industrial Operations Heavy Equipment Operation and Maintenance Toxic/Hazardous Materials Handling Construction Other: Exposures to heat, cold, diving salvaging heights or other high-risk work Supply/Transportation Medical Mechanics

Moderate

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COMMON CORE

105

RDT&E: Engineers, test mechanics and laboratory personnel involved in the research, development, evaluation and test of systems C D E F Low Administrative, Clerical, Classroom Shipboard Personnel Operating Forces Students

105.4 Explain the storage procedures for incompatible material. [ref. d, ch. C23-C] Stored according to the type of HAZMAT, certain storage procedures must be applied Do not mix flammables and toxic materials, or flammables and corrosives together The safest practice is to draw only the amount of material that can be used that day Storing hazardous materials on the job site requires the use of approved containers Containers must be placed a minimum of 50 feet away from any ignition device or source Plan for the delivery of proper storage equipment before hazardous materials are delivered to the job site

105.5 Explain the general procedures to be followed when a Hazardous Material/Hazardous Waste (HM/HW) spill is discovered. [ref. d, ch. B3-A] The unit must respond immediately Must have an approved response team, equipment, and disposal plan. Reports must be made and tests conducted to ensure no contamination remains Disposal of contaminated soils, etc. must follow strict guidelines

105.6 State the PPE required when handling HM/HW. [ref. c ,ch. 5]

Ensure all personnel understand the following: o What hazard materials are present o What PPE is required for protection from each specific danger Example: Face shield, goggles, gloves, apron, and boots.

105.7 Discuss the disposal limitations for the following: Trash o Rubbish and debris and other debris which can normally be disposed of in a normal landfill Garbage o Food waste which can be disposed of in a normal landfill Plastic o Recycled through DRMO at most military bases Sewage o Only properly disposed of through a sewage treatment plant Oily waste

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o Recycled through DRMO Paint/mineral spirits o Disposed of through DRMO as hazardous waste Metal o Turned in to DRMO for recycling Wood o Landfill or DRMO for recycling

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105.8 Describe required training for all hands with respect to the HM/HW Program. [ref. a, ch. 6] Management personnel o Receive sufficient training to ensure that an aggressive and continuing OSH program is implemented throughout the activity Supervisory personnel o Receive training that enables them to recognize unsafe and unhealthy working conditions and practices in the workplace o Training shall also include the development of skills necessary to mange the activities OSH program at the work unit level Non-supervisory personnel o Training shall include specialized job-safety and health training appropriate to the work performed.

105.9 Describe the purpose of secondary labeling of HAZMAT when removed from the original container. [ref. a, ch. 7] To inform the user by means of words, pictures, symbols, or combination thereof of specific physical and health hazard(s), including target organ effects, of the chemicals(s) in the container(s).

105.10 Define the following terms: [ref. d]

HAZMINCEN o Central Hazardous Materials Center of an installation o Responsible for procurement and inventory management activities. CHRIMP- Consolidated Hazardous Material Reutilization Inventory Management Program o Purpose Reduce costs Protect navy and other personnel from unnecessary exposure to Hazardous Waste and Material Minimizes the Navys long-term risk for liability associated with HW disposal Comply with all Federal, state and local environmental statutes, laws, and regulations. HICS- Hazardous Inventory Control System o Prepares reports for administration purposes of the HAZMAT inventory. A combined program with CHRIMP Both CHRIMP and HICS are being replaced with Hazardous Substance Management System (HSMS). This program provides the same functions.

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COMMON CORE

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105.11 Discuss the aspects of portable containment of oils spills on water. [ref. b , ch. 7] An oil slick on the surface of the water blocks the flow of oxygen from the atmosphere into the water. Booming of spills has proved to be effective in containing spills of liquids on relatively calm and current-free waters. Following containment of oil spills on water, various methods of removing the confined liquid have been used. Absorbents, such as straw, plastics, sawdust, and peat moss are spread on the surface of the spill and then collected and burned on shore. Skimming devices operate on a different principal and must include pumps and separators. o Skimmers scoop up the oil and water and send them through on oil separator and rollers to which only the oil adheres. o The oil is then removed by scraping and compression.

105.12 Discuss the following: [ref. b, ch. 7] Oil spills o Completely remove all contaminated soil from the site to a facility or landfill that is designed to receive such material Grubbing operations o Large scale clearing in initial stages of a project can produce damaging side effects o Increased soil erosion o Reduction of atmospheric oxygen o Destruction of wildlife habitat o Preventative measures Save as much vegetation as possible Construct shallow trenches around the project Burn only when necessary and after obtaining a burn permit Do not use petroleum-based fuels to start fires. Asbestos o Fibrous material used extensively from the 1930s to the 1960s o Covered by OPNAVINST 5100.23 o THE NCF DOES NOT DO ASBESTOS WORK Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB) o Group of toxic chemicals used extensively as insulators and coolers in electrical equipment, especially transformers o Causes irritation to eyes, skin, and lungs, also suspected of causing cancer. o Accumulate in the environmental and are absorbed into human fat tissues. o Actions Secure the site Notify the activity environmental coordinator and the EPA branch or division Hazardous warning labels o A diamond shaped symbol with 4 segments o The three upper parts reflect hazards relative to health, fire and reactivity. o The lower part reflects the specific hazard peculiar to the material

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COMMON CORE
o The four hazards the labels are designed to illustrate are:
Health Hazard- The ability of the material to either directly or indirectly cause temporary or permanent injury or incapacitation Fire Hazard- The ability of the material to burn when exposed to heat source. Reactivity Hazard- The ability of the material to release energy when in contact with water Specific Hazard- This term relates to a special hazard concerning the particular product or chemical, which was not, covered by other hazard items. The degree of hazard is expressed by a numerical code: 4 = extremely dangerous 3 = dangerous hazard 2 = moderate hazard 1 = slight hazard 0 = no hazard

105

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COMMON CORE 106 SUPPLY/LOGISTICS FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] NAVEDTRA 14326, Storekeeper Basic [b] NAVEDTRA 14233, Naval Construction Force/Seabee 1 & C [c] NAVSUP P-485 (Rev. 3), Afloat Supply Procedures Manual, Vol. I [d] COMNAVSURFLANT/COMNAVSURFPACINST 4400.1J, Surface Force Supply Procedures [e] OPNAVINST 5100.19D, Navy Occupational Safety and Health (NAVOSH) Program Manual for Forces Afloat [f] COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCBINST 4400.3, NCF Supply Manual___________ 106.1 Explain the importance of the Consolidated Shipboard/Shore based Allowance List (COSAL/COSBAL) in relation to the commands mission and sustainability. [ref. a, ch. 1] Coordinated Shipboard/Shore-based Allowance List (COSAL) The COSAL is a supply document that lists the material support required to achieve maximum, self-supporting capabilities for an extended period of time.

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106.2 Discuss the following processes in reference to the COSAL/COSBAL: [ref. f, ch. 2] Validating & updating o Completed monthly with the automated shore interface and during every turnover. o Information on the equipment identification plate is checked against the COSAL o Discrepancies are noted on an OPNAV 4790/CK form and submitted to 3MC o COSAL is changed to reflect correct equipment and the APL, stock, and TOA are updated as appropriate.

106.3 Explain how frequently ordered parts affect demand processing. [ref. c, ch. 6] Every time a part is ordered, SNAP II records the date and quantity. SNAP II periodically reviews the frequency parts are ordered. If a part gets requested very frequently, the quantity kept in stock will eventually be increased.

106.4 Discuss the purpose of the Material Obligation Validation (MOV) Program. [ref. d, ch. 2] It ensures the requirements for the material still exist and the quantity requested is still required. Checks that priorities assigned in the requisition are still valid. Cancels material no longer needed. (FEX material that was not received in time and is no longer needed) Corrects files: Open purchase was made, but receipt was never turned in, so requisition is still open. Internal MOV requires end users to provide copies of receipt to clear the outstanding requisition on file. Frequency o External MOV is initiated by the Inventory Control Point quarterly. o Internal MOV is completed by the Supply Officer for each department on a monthly basis

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COMMON CORE

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106.5 Explain the difference between the two components of the operating target (OPTAR). [ref. d, ch. 7] Has three components and Travel log o Requisition/OPTAR log is similar to a checkbook, every grant and requisition is recorded here. Operations funding is broken down into: o CCG01 Consumables o CCG02 Repair Parts o CCG03 Camp maintenance Travel Log- Tracks deployment per diem and TAD travel 106.6 Discuss the following: Departmental budget o All OM&N money is allocated in categorized funds (01,02,03) which are centrally controlled by supply o The supply officer can choose to divide these funds into departmental budgets in accordance with program manager instructions. o He cannot mix the different pots of money. CHRIMP o This program allows unused HAZMAT to be stored and reissued for future use. o All HAZMAT within a unit is controlled by one central HAZMAT coordinator. o When HAZMAT is received, the coordinator inventories it with a bar code, and then issues it to the requestor o If there is any HAZMAT remaining after the requester is through, it is turned back into the coordinator for possible reissue. o When a new request is generated for that same HAZMAT the unused portion the coordinator is storing is reissued. Defense Reutilization Marketing Office (DRMO) o Material in one of the following three categories may be turned into DRMO Items that need inventory manager disposal authority. Items that do not need inventory manager disposal authority. Scrap or waste. o All materials turned in must have a completed DD Form 1348-1 with the S-4 signature. o Excess material that has been turned into DRMO may be drawn out by any Navy unit which has an allowance or mission requirement for the material. It requires screening and authorization by the supply officer

106.7 State how credit is distributed for erroneously ordered parts when they are turned back in to supply. [ref. d, ch. 7] Navy Stock System Purchases: o When materials are ordered wrong or the received material is the wrong part, then the parts may be returned to supply. o The refund money goes to the TYCOM (NCB). o The only way the unit (NMCB) may get the money back is by requesting additional funds from the TYCOM (NCB) at the end of the fiscal quarter/year, using the return as justification.

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COMMON CORE
106.8 Define the following: [ref. f]

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Minor Property o All Navy-owned property bought for immediate use on shore establishments that costs $300 - $5000 or costs more than $5000 but has a useful life expectancy less than 2 years. o Also, regardless of cost, all classified, sensitive, or highly pilferable equipment is considered Minor Property. Plant Property o Includes property used for the purpose of cutting, abrading, grinding, shaping, forming, joining, testing, heating, treating, or otherwise altering the physical, electrical, or chemical properties of materials components or end items. o Navy-owned property that costs $5000 or more. o Two categories: Class 3- useful life expectancy of two or more years Class 4- industrial plant equipment. Controlled equipage o Equipment requiring special management control. Two general categories: Material which is essential for the protection of life- life preservation, gas masks, firearms, etc. Items of high cost that are easily converted to personal use- computers, fax machines, cameras, etc o Inventoried bi-annually and at every turnover o Requires a custodial signature Project Bill of Material A listing of materials, special tools or equipment, and other services required for a specific construction project. Must have a completed BM before work on a project can begin. Each item on a BM must have o Description of the material, equipment, or service o Stock number or commercial supply source o Line item number o Requisition number o Unit of issue o Required deliver date

106.9 Explain the purpose of the Allowance Change Request (ACR). [ref. b, ch. 6]

An ACR (NAVSUP 1220-2) is used to change the quantity on an allowance list. Typical reasons for an ACR include: o material failure rates other than expected o New operating areas or conditions o Mission assignments require additional support o Technical improvements in equipment, systems or repair parts that can provide additional capabilities An ACR is submitted through the 3M organization to Navy Inventory Control Point (NAVICP) Before submitting an ACR, ensure that a similar request has not been previously denied.

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106.10 Discuss the following forms: [ref. f, ch. 3]

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NAVSUP 1250-1: Supply request form used for NSN materials NAVSUP 1250-2: Requisition/consumption reporting document for procuring non-NSN material DD 1348: Requisition form that can serve as a requisition follow up, modifier, or cancellation request. DD 1149: Requisition invoice/shipping document used for open purchase items, services, or shipping. DD 200: Survey form as well as a report for lost, stolen, or damaged items.

106.11 Define the acronyms and state the responsibilities for the following functional outlets: [ref. f, app. A] ARP- Automotive Repair Parts o Receives, stores, and issues repair parts for CESE and material handling equipment o Validates and updates CESE COSAL o Financial records, reports, and requisition files are normally maintained by Supply. CTR- Central Tool Room o Manages all hand tools, power tools, tradesmans tool kits, and other special tools o Assets are kept under strict security because items are highly pilferable and can be easily converted to personal use. o Inventory management measures include maintenance of separate records for individual items, scheduled physical inventories, and scheduled preventative maintenance. CSR- Central shipping and receiving outlet in the battalion. o Receives all shipments that are not project related (ARP, consumables, etc) o Manages and issues administrative and consumable items in the TOA. o Typically located in Supply spaces MLO- Material Liaison Office o Manages all project funds and materials o Receives, issues, and inventories project materials o Maintains records and accounting o Submits reports of expenditures for project materials at the main body site. o Details manage their own materials o Supply Officer is overall responsible for project materials at all sites, including main body.

106.12 Define the following abbreviations and acronyms: [ref. f, app. P] NSN- National Stock Number o A 13 digit stock number used to identify an item of material in the Federal Supply System o Assigned by the Defense Logistics Service Center, Battle Creek, Michigan COG- Cognizance Symbol o Two position alpha-numeric code o Identifies the Navy inventory manager, or cognizant authority, of the specific category of material that item falls under

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o

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Example- The COG for all CESE is 2C All CESE falls into the same category of material, which means all CESE has the same cognizant inventory manager. APL- Allowance Parts List o Lists all the repair parts installed in the equipment or component to which it applies. o Also lists the equipment or components operating parameters and capabilities. o Each piece of equipment or component has separate APL o APLs are filed in Part II of the COSAL AEL- Allowance Equipage List o Lists all the equipment a specific unit or platform is supposed to have. o Camp Maintenance Guilder Shop would have an AEL o Possible entry on a ship AEL would be life rings. NC- Not Carried o Material the supply department does not stock NIS -Not in Stock o Material the supply department carries, but is out of when requested SIM- Selected Item Management o Inventory Control If a part is requested two or more times in a six month period, it is identified for SIM All SIM items are inventoried quarterly Non-SIM items are inventoried semi-annually.

106.13 Discuss the purpose of a Report of Deficiency (ROD) (SF-364) and the Quality Deficiency Report (QDR) (SF-368), including the situation requiring its submission. [ref. c , ch. 4]

Report of Deficiency (SF-364) o Used to record shipping or packaging discrepancies Material shipped to a wrong activity Erroneous material or unacceptable substitutes Items not received or are received in damaged condition (at least $100 per line item) Wrong quantity shipped (at least $100 per line item) Technical data markings are missing or incomplete Quality Deficiency Report (SF-368) o Documents deficiencies with the quality of the product due to design flaws. Two Categories Category one: Quality deficiency which will cause death or serious injury or illness; would cause loss or major damage to weapon system; directly restricts combat readiness of a unit; or causes production line stoppage. Category two: All other quality deficiencies

106.14 Describe the S4 organization. [ref. f, ch. 1] NEXT PAGE

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106.15 What form is utilized for inventory and accountability of individual 782 infantry 5 equipment? [ref. b, ch. 6] COMCBPAC/COMCBLANT Form4400/5

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COMMON CORE 107 COMMUNICATIONS/COMMUNICATIONS SECURITY MATERIAL SYSTEMS FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] SECNAVINST 5510.30A, Department of Navy Personnel Security Program [b] NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 1 [c] NAVEDTRA 14222, Information Systems Technician Training Series Module 01-Admin and Security [d] NAVEDTRA 14226, Information Systems Training Series Module 5-Comms Center Ops [e] Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) [f] Construction Battalion Battle Skills Guide Book 1, P1160 [g] Communications Security Material Guide, CMS-1A [h] TM 07508A-14, Antenna, AS-2259/GR [i] TM 11-5820-890-8, SINCGARS Ground Combat Net Radio, ICOM Operators Guide [j] Harris Guide, 10415-0108-4100 [k] TM-11-5825-291-13, Satellite Signals Navigation Set, AN/PSN-11 [l] Hazardous Material Users Guide (HMUG)__________________________________

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107.1 Discuss Communications Security (COMSEC) and the role of the Communications Security Material System (CMS) custodian. [ref. c, ch. 3]

Communications security o COMSEC or CMS is a mission that provides security to naval communications and communications material o CMS is an acronym for the system that provides measures to deny unauthorized persons information of value which may be gained by the possession or study of naval telecommunications. o Custodian duties/responsibilities The mission of the CMS is to ensure the proper distribution, handling, control, and security of COMSEC material in use throughout the navy.

107.2 What is meant by the term Two-Person Integrity (TPI)? [ref. c, ch. 3] Personnel are not normally permitted to work alone in areas where top secret information or information controlled under special access program procedures is used or stored and is accessible to those employees.

107.3 Discuss the following terms: Encryption o Encryption is the process of converting intelligible information into an unintelligible form for transmission Access o Having a security clearance means that your are eligible for access to information up to the level shown. Classification o Information is classed when it requires protection in the interest of National Security. Compromise o Any breach or possible breach of Security or classified material is known as a compromise and must be dealt with immediately.

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Need to know o Having access means that you are eligible for accessing material at a certain classification level. Restricted area Exclusion area o Where access to the area means access to classified information because the equipment cannot be covered. Limited area o An area with classified information a visitor could gain access to. Controlled area Next to or surrounds an exclusion or limited area. All of these areas are clearly marked by signs reading SECURITY AREA KEEP OUT Clearance Before a person is allowed access to classified information, he or she must have a security clearance.

107.4 Discuss the proper use of the phonetic alphabet, numerals, and prowords. [ref. f, Attachment 2] Verbal Procedures: During combat activities, thunderstorms, or other high- background noise levels, voice communications may require spelling certain words phonetically. Phonetic alphabet: Phonetic spelling provides clarity and emphasis to ensure the information is received correctly. Numbers are transmitted digit by digit except that exact multiples of hundreds and thousand may be spoken as such. Pro-words: Difficult words or groups within the text of the message may be spelled out using the phonetic alphabet and should be started with the proword I spell phonetically or Figures to follow Precedence Prowords o Flash (Z) o Immediate (O) o Priority (P) o Routine (R) Read Back: Means to transmit the entire transmission back exactly as you received it. Say Again: All of your last transmission. Roger: Means I have received your last transmission satisfactorily. Over: This is the end of my transmission to you and a response is necessary. Figures: Numeral or numbers to follow. I say again: I am repeating transmission or portion indicated.

107.5 Define the following terms: Minimize o A condition wherein normal message and telephone traffic is drastically reduced in order that messages connected with an actual emergency shall not be delayed. EFFI- Essential elements of friendly information o A code that allows us to notify one another of a security breach that has occurred over the circuit. BEADWINDOW

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o Term used to identify an EEFI violation. Example: BEADWINDOW Three
indicates to the transmitting station that the radio operator has violated security. BEADWINDOW procedures are incorporated into the OPORD.

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Regular supersession [ref. g, ch. 2] o Supersession based on a specific, pre -determined supersession date for each edition of material. For example, each edition of a monthly keytape is superseded on the first day of the month after its implementation; each edition of ten -day material is superseded on the 11th, 21st, and the 31st of the month. Irregular supersession [ref. g, ch. 2] o Supersession that is not pre-determined but which occurs as a result of use. Editions and individual segments of irregularly superseded COMSEC material are to be destroyed after the material has been used operationally, when the controlling authority directs supersession, or, in the case of maintenance key, it may be used until the key becomes unserviceable. Irregular supersession is normally associated with one -time pads, test key, maintenance key, publications, and equipment. Emergency supersession [ref. g, ch. 2] o An unplanned change of supersession, usually as a result of a compromise.

107.6 Discuss the following with respect to the communication equipment in the TOA: HF o VHF o UHF High Frequency 2 30 Mhz Very High Frequency 30 300 Mhz

o Ultra High Frequency 300 Mhz 3000 Mhz

107.7 Define the following classification categories: [ref. c, ch. 5] Security classifications: Designations are keyed to the anticipated degree of damage to national security that could result from unauthorized disclosure/compromise. o Confidential Identifiable damage o Secret Serious damage o Top Secret Exceptionally grave damage

107.8 Define the term emergency destruction as it applies to: [ref. c, ch. 3] Communication equipment CMS COMSEC material that must be destroyed in an emergency is divided into three categories: Keying material; COMSEC documents; and COMSEC equipment. An emergency plan consists of both precautionary destruction and complete destruction.

o PRECAUTIONARY DESTRUCTION: When precautionary destruction is ordered,


COMSEC material must be destroyed as follows:

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Keying Material: Superseded keying material must be destroyed first, then keying material that becomes effective in 1 or 2 months. Nonessential Classified COMSEC Documents: This material includes maintenance, operating, and administrative manuals. o COMPLETE DESTRUCTION: When complete destruction is ordered, COMSEC material must be destroyed as follows: Keying Material: Keying material is always destroyed first in the following order: superseded, effective, then reserve. Superseded keying material that has been used to encrypt traffic is the most sensitive of the three categories. If superseded keying material falls into enemy hands, all past intercepted traffic is subject to compromise and analysis. Superseded keying material must be destroyed within 12 hours after supersession. Effective keying material is destroyed after superseded keying material. Reserve keying material is keying material that will become effective within the next 30 days. Reserve keying material is destroyed after effective keying material. Keying material must be stored in priority order for destruction. Top Secret material must be destroyed ahead of Secret material, and Secret material destroyed ahead of Confidential material. This applies to all categories of keying material. COMSEC Documents: COMSEC documents are destroyed next. COMSEC documents include crypto equipment maintenance manuals, operating instructions, general publications, status publications, CMS-holder lists and directories. COMSEC documents contain information on the types of crypto equipments we use, the level of technology we have attained, and the way our COMSEC operations are organized and conducted. COMSEC Equipment: COMSEC equipment is destroyed last. In emergencies, the immediate goal regarding crypto equipment is to render the equipment unusable and unrepairable. The operating and technical manuals for crypto equipments provide details on the techniques for rapid and effective destruction. 107.9 Describe the general characteristics and operator maintenance for AN/PSN-11 Global Positioning System (GPS). [ref. k, ch. 3]

The AN/PSN-11 Precision Lightweight GPS Receiver is a highly accurate Satellite Signals Navigation Set (hereafter referred to as PLGR). The PLGR computes accurate position coordinates, elevation, speed, and time information from signals transmitted by the GPS satellites. The PLGR selects satellites that are 10 degrees or more above the horizon (elevation angle) during initial acquisition. If less than four satellites are available at 10 degrees or more, and elevation angle of 0 degree is used for acquisition. The PLGR is operated stand-alone using prime battery power and integral antenna. It can also be used with an external power source and external antenna. The only authorized operator maintenance on the PLGR is the change out of batteries. 107.10 Discuss the three methods of communications in the defense area and which is most dependable. [ref. b, ch. 11] Wire (telephone) and messengers o Normally the primary means of communications in a defense. These two methods are more secure than radio and provide a better method of secure communications.

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o Two or more wire lines should be installed over different routes to connect two

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units. This allows communications to be quickly reestablished if one line becomes inoperative or is discovered by the enemy. Visual and sound o Signals may be used to supplement wire communications, but only when they do not compromise security.

107.11 Discuss the factors that affect the capabilities of radio communications. [ref. b, ch. 11]

Field radios are for line-of-site communications; any obstruction between the transmitting station and the receiving station may disrupt or block communication. Factors such as a valley, densely wooded areas, towers, low lying areas, and sources of electrical interference are common obstructions that have an adverse effect on radio communications.

107.12 Explain the purpose and use of the STU III/STE telephone. [ref. d, ch. 1]

Purpose: To allow secure voice communication when required Use: Use as authorized as per unit SOP and equipment requirements.

107.13 Discuss the characteristic, shipping, handling, and storage of the following batteries: [ref. e; ref. l, Group 21]

All Batteries are considered Hazmat. DO NOT puncture, burn, or expose to high heat. Always check for leakage and proper battery voltage prior to use. Never leave batteries in equipment while in storage. When palletized for shipment the boxes are on the outside edges of the pallet where they can be easily accessed in case of leaks or fire. An MSDS sheet and an inventory accompany each box. Two person lift usually applies due to weights in excess of 100 pounds. NiCad: Nickel Cadmium rechargeable battery Lithium: Non-rechargeable long life battery Alkaline: Non-rechargeable average life battery

107.14 Explain which radios are used with the following antennas: OE-254 [ref. i] o AN/PRC-119 RF-1912 (TR-72) [ref. h] o AN/PRC-150 AS-2259 [ref. h] o AN/PRC-150

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COMMON CORE 108 WEAPONS FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 1 [b] NAVEDTRA 14324, Gunners Mate [c] FMFM 0-8, Basic Marksmanship [d] TM-1005A-10/1, Operators Manual Pistol Semi-Automatic 9mm M-9_____________ 108.1 State the four rules of weapon safety. [ref. c, ch. 3] Rule 1 Treat every weapon as if it were loaded. Rule 2 Never point a weapon at anything you do not intend to shoot. Rule 3 keep finger straight and off the trigger until you are ready to fire. Rule 4 Keep weapon on SAFE until you intend to fire.

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108.2 Define the four weapon conditions: [ref. c, ch. 3] Condition one o Magazine is inserted, a round must be chambered, and the safety is on. Condition two o Magazine is inserted, a round is chambered, the weapons action is closed, and the hammer is forward. This condition applies to weapons with external hammers except for the M9 service pistol. Condition three o Magazine is inserted, chamber is empty, the action is closed and safety is on. Condition four o All ammo is removed, chamber is empty, the action is closed and the safety is on.

108.3 Discuss the precautions required when handling a weapon. [ref. b, ch. 3] Ensure the weapon is safe by clearing it. This will depend on the type of weapon. In general, make sure the weapon is on safe. The chamber is empty and no magazine is inserted. The weapon is pointed in a safe direction.

108.4 Discuss the following terms, hazards, and immediate actions associated with each: [ref. a, ch. 3] Malfunction o The failure of a weapon to function satisfactorily, usually because of excess friction caused by dirt, improper lubrication or carbon buildup. o Immediate action- you must stop and clean the weapon to correct this problem Misfire o A complete failure to fire, NOT a delay in firing that may be caused by a faulty firing mechanism or a faulty element in the propelling charge explosive train. o Immediate action Strike the forward assist to be sure the extractor has engaged a round Tap upward on the magazine to ensure it is fully seated. Pull the charging handle to the rear. If round is ejected, release handle, strike forward assist and attempt to fire. If round is not ejected, check for a round in the chamber, if it is clear, release handle, strike forward assist and attempt to fire.

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o

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If a round is stuck in the chamber it must be removed before attempting to reload/ re-chamber. Cook off The functioning of any or all of the explosive components of a cartridge chambered in a hot weapon due to the heat from continual firing of that weapon Immediate action Attempt to remove the cartridge before ten seconds elapse. If a cartridge is chambered in a hot weapon and can neither be fired or removed, keep the weapon pointed in a safe direction. Allow for a minimum of 15 minutes to elapse before taking any further action. Stoppage Any interruption in the cycle of functioning caused by faulty action of the weapon or ammunition. Immediate action Strike the forward assist to be sure the extractor has engaged a round. Tap upward on the magazine to ensure it is fully seated. Pull the charging handle to the rear. If round is ejected, release handle, strike forward assist and attempt to fire. If round is not ejected, check for round in the chamber, if it is clear, released handle, strike forward assist and attempt to fire. If a round is stuck in the chamber it must be removed before attempting to reload/re-chamber.

108.5 State the eight steps of operation in a firing cycle. [ref. b, ch. 3]

Feeding: the feeding action places a round in the receiver just to the rear of the chamber. Chambering: takes place as the moving bolt strips the round and forces it into the chamber. Locking: holds the bolt in the forward position for a short period of time to prevent the loss of gas pressure. Firing: the firing pin actually strikes the primer of the cartridge Unlocking: after the round is fired, the bolt unlocks and moves rearward. Extracting: the process of pulling the empty case back out of the chamber. As the bolt moves rearward extraction occurs. Ejecting: as the casing is extracted, ejection occurs as it is thrown out of the weapon. Cocking: the retraction of the firing mechanism against spring pressure so that there will be sufficient energy to fire the next cartridge.

108.6 Explain the differences between semiautomatic and automatic operation. [ref. a,ch.3]

A semiautomatic weapon unlocks, extracts, ejects, cocks and reloads automatically. The trigger must be pulled each time to fire a round. An automatic weapon unlocks, extracts, ejects, cocks and reloads automatically. An automatic weapon will fire as long as the trigger is pulled and rounds are available to fire.

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108.7 Define the following terms: [ref. a]

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Trajectory: The flight path the bullet takes from the weapon to the target. Breech: The rear end of the barrel. Bore: The actual hole in the barrel. It may be rifled or not. Chamber: The enlarged part of the bore at the breech that holds the cartridge. Muzzle: The front or forward end of the barrel. Muzzle velocity: The speed at which the bullet travels when it leaves the muzzle. Maximum range: The greatest distance a round will travel Maximum effective range: The greatest distance at which a weapon may be expected to fire accurately to inflict damage or casualty.

108.8 Discuss small arms ammunition by using color codes:

Orange or red: Tracer rounds Violet: Blank rounds Black: Armor piercing Aluminum: Armor piercing, incendiary. Green: Standard ball ammunition

108.9 State the maximum range, maximum effective range, purpose/tactical employment, types of fire, and types of ammunition of the following weapons: 9mm pistol o semi-automatic o Magazine fed o Recoil operated o Double action or single action firing pistol o Current issue sidearm o Capabilities/Characteristics o Length: 8.54in o Weight: 2.12lbs o Weight fully loaded (15rnd mag): 2.54lbs o Magazine capacity: 15 rounds o Muzzle velocity: 1230/fps o Max effective range: 50m o Ammunition: fires 9mm Ball ammunition o Safety Features The M9 pistol has only ONE safety. It has THREE SAFETY FEATURES. Ambidextrous safety: Allows for safe operation of the pistol by right and left handed users. Lowers the hammer safely without causing an accidental discharge Firing Pin Block: Prevents any motion of the firing pin and is only overcome by pulling the trigger Half Cock Notch: Prevents accidental discharge. If the cocked hammer should fall forward due to a mechanical failure, this would catch on the sear before the hammer would strike the firing pin.

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M-16 rifle o Lightweight o Gas operated o Air cooled o Magazine fed o Shoulder fired o Semi-automatic or fully automatic o Modes of fire Semiautomatic Fire Mode: When a single shot is fired the trigger must be pulled each time. Automatic Fire mode: Rifle will continue to fire as long as the trigger is held back o Selector Level Safe Position: Rifle will not fire Semi position: The trigger must be pulled each shot Auto: Rifle will continue to fire as long as the trigger is held back o Capabilities/Characteristics Length w/flash suppressor: 39in Length of barrel w/flash suppressor: 21in Weight: 7.8lbs Weight fully loaded (30 round ma): 8.79lbs Magazine capacity: 20/30 rounds Muzzle velocity: 3100/fps Max range: 3534m Max effective range: Point Target 550 and Area Target 800m o Rates of Fire Sustained: 12 to 15 rounds per minute Rapid: 150 to 200 rounds per minute Cyclic: 700 to 800 rounds per minute o Ammunition 5.56 Ball: Standard round 5.56 Tracer: Used to mark targets or cause incendiary effects 5.56 Blank: Training round 5.56 Dummy: Totally inert training M203 grenade launcher o Light weight o Single shot o Breech loaded o Pump action o Shoulder fired weapon o Attaches to the M16 rifle o Capabilities/Characteristics Length of Launcher: 15 5/16 in Total weight unloaded: 3 lbs. Total weight loaded: 3.5 lbs. Total weight with M16: 11 lbs. Max range: 400m

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Max effective range (area target): 350m Max effective range (point target): 150 m M-500 [ref. b, ch. 3] o Manually operated o Single shot o Magazine feed (tubular) o Pump action o Shoulder fired weapon o Ammunition type: 12 gauge, 2 2 in 00 buck, military round o Max Effective Range: 50 meters

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108.10 Discuss loading/unloading procedures for the following weapons: 9mm pistol./ M-16 rifle o Keep safety in safe position until ready to fire. o Keep muzzle down range and clear of all troops o Before loading, make sure bore, chamber, and ammunition are clean and dry. o Hold the pistol at the raised pistol position, or place the rifle butt against the thigh o Then, remove the magazine by pressing the magazine catch or release button. o To make absolutely certain the chamber is empty, pull back the slide or bolt and inspect the chamber and verify visually. If it is dark, feel to check. Opening the slide or bolt will eject any round that may have been in the chamber. M203 grenade launcher o M203 Loading Press barrel latch and slide the barrel forward until the barrel stop is engaged Insert casing into chamber Slide barrel assembly sharp rearward until barrel locks Move safety rearward. o M203 Unloading Press barrel latch and move barrel forward Expended casing is automatically extracted and ejected M-500 Shotgun [ref. b, ch. 3] o Single load Ensure the weapon is on safe Press the action lock lever and slide the barrel (fore-end) rearward Insert round into the barrel chamber Slide the barrel closed Weapon is now loaded o Magazine load Ensure weapon is on safe Slide barrel (fore-end) forward Insert round into the magazine Weapon is now loaded without a round in the chamber Open and close barrel to chamber a round o Unloading Open barrel to eject round to unload

108.11 Describe and discuss the six types of grenades: [ref. a, ch. 12]

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Fragmentation o Grenades designed to inflict personnel casualties and damage to light equipment by projecting high velocity fragments from the detonated grenade case o The effective casualty-producing radius is about 15 meters Illumination o Used to illuminate terrain in night time operations o Once pin is pulled, GRENADE MUST BE THROWN! o Grenades used mainly to light up the terrain. o The MK 1 is the only illuminating grenade currently available. o It provides about 55,000 candlepower for a period of 25 seconds. Chemical o Used for incendiary, screening, signaling, training, and riot control purposes o Grenades that are chemical filled munitions designed to be thrown by the individual or projected from the service rifle using a special adapter. o ABC-M25A2, riot control hand grenade is the most commonly used. Filled with a type of tear gas chemical that causes irritation and watering eyes. Incendiary o AN-M14 incendiary Thermite grenade is used to ignite combustible materials and to destroy all types of equipment. o This TH grenade is cylindrical in shape and weights 32 ounces. o Contains filler of 26.5 ounces of Thermite mixture o It uses an igniting delay fuse that sets fire to the Thermite o The Thermite burns at a temperature of about 4,300 deg F Smoke o Grenades that are cylindrical in shape and weigh about 27 ounces. o They can be thrown about 40 yards with an effective casualty radius of nearly 30 yards Practice/training o Used to train personnel in the care, handling, and use of grenades prior to using actual service grenades. o These grenades are used for training personnel in the care, handling, and use of hand grenades before using service grenades. o Practice grenades simulate the functioning of service grenades to provide realism in training.

108.12 Discuss hand grenade safety procedures. [ref. a, ch. 12] All personnel handling casualty producing grenades must wear proper protection Never attempt to defuse hand grenades Do not remove the safety pin until ready to throw Do not attach grenades to clothing or equipment.

108.13 Discuss the placement, arming, safety requirements, coverage, and methods of firing the Claymore mine. [ref. a, ch. 12] Placement o This mine should be positioned so as to afford all friendly personnel, within 100 meters to the rear and sides of the mine, the opportunity to take adequate cover. Arming

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o

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After the M18A1 mine is positioned and properly aimed, it is armed by first opening the blasting cap assembly and unrolling the wire from either the firing position or the mine. o The wire is secured by wrapping a few turns of wire around a leg of the mine and burying it, if possible. Safety requirements o Before attaching the firing device directly, the circuit should be checked for continuity with the test set provided to ensure that the mine will function at the desired time o The firing device has a safety bail with two positions o In the upper (safe) position, it acts as a block between the firing handle and the generator. o In the lower (fire) position, it allows the generator to be activated. o The instructions provided with the M7 bandoleer should be carefully followed by anyone using these mines. Range/Coverage o When detonated, the M18A1 mine will project steel spheres over a 60 degree fan shaped pattern approximately 6 feet high and 50 meters wide to an optimum effective range of 50 meters o These steel fragments re moderately effective up to a range of approximately 100 meters and can travel up to 250 meters Method of firing o M18A1 mine can be in either an uncontrolled or a controlled role. An uncontrolled mine is essentially a booby-trap. This use by Seabees is not authorized. In a controlled role, the operator detonates the mine as the enemy approaches within the killing zone o By using either an electrical or a non-electrical firing system, the operator can control detonation. o In almost all cases, mines employed by Seabees will be fired electrically with the M57 firing device.

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COMMON CORE 109 GENERAL MILITARY TACTICS FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 1 [b] NAVEDTRA 14235, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 2 [c] Blue Jackets Manual, 23rd Edition [d] TM-11-5825-291-13, Satellite Signals Navigation Set, AN/PSN-11 [e] P-1161, Construction Battalion Battle Skills Guide, Book 2 [f] Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Instruction 3121.01A, Standing Rules of Engagement for U.S. Forces [g] OPNAVIST 5530.15A (CH-1), PHYSICAL SECURITY, Physical Security_______

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109.1 State the standard issue 782 gear.


Fighting load carrying equipment o Pistol belt o Suspenders o Field pack o Two ammo pouches o Canteen cover o Entrenching tool (E-tool) cover o Bayonet or K-bar scabbard o First Aid Kit Bivouac equipment o Canteen and cup o First Aid packet o E-tool o Bayonet or K-bar o Mess kit o Poncho & liner o Shelter half Protective equipment o Hat and mosquito net o Helmet and liner o Camouflage cover Special issue equipment o Items that are not essential for a combat load, extra protection or comfort o Flack jacket o Sleeping bag o Sleeping mat o Cot w/insect bar frame o Insect bar

109.2 Describe the construction and the elements of the following dug-in emplacements:

Hasty/skirmishers position o Shallow pit that provides limited protection while firing from the prone position o Made quickly by scraping soil to build a shallow ridge, or parapet, between the rifleman and the enemy o Trench is body-length An improved one man fighting position

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o o o

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Made as small as possible to present smallest target to the enemy Constructed with a water sump, firing step, grenade sump and parapet Built as wide as the occupants shoulders, and as tall as the occupant standing on the firing step o Provides protection form tanks passing over An improved two man fighting position o Essentially two, one-person positions o Close proximity to buddy provides security o Allows one to rest while others sleeps o Since the position is longer than a one-person position, it provides less protection from tanks, bombing, strafing and shelling.

109.3 Explain the general rules of camouflage and how they apply to: General rules o Take advantage of all available natural concealment o Camouflage by altering the form, shadow, texture, and color of objects o Camouflage against both ground and air observations o Camouflage in constant and continuous Fighting position o Before beginning construction, not the terrain and vegetation. The goal is to camouflage the position to this same appearance. o Obtain material from a wide area o Do not use more material than needed o Cover excavated soil with vegetation or dump in streams, ravines or under brush o Inspect the position form the enemys viewpoint o Vary your route to avoid making paths to the position Personal equipment o Field uniforms and equipment are colored to blend in with terrain. Faded or shiny items need to be surveyed or darkened with paint. o When op paint is not available, use mud, charcoal, or crushed grass. o Alter the outline of your helmet with a cloth cover or foliage Individual o All exposed skin, even dark skin, reflects light. o Apply face paint sticks whenever possible, using the following combinations: Loam & light green for light skin personnel in other than snow regions Sand & dark green for dark skinned personnel in other than snow regions Loam & white for all personnel in snow regions Applying paints o Paint shiny areas (forehead, cheeks, nose, chin, hands, wrists, neck) with the darker color o Paint shadow areas (around eyes, under nose and chin) with the lighter color. o Use the buddy system to check application o When paint is not available, use burnt cork, charcoal or lampblack Vehicles o If possible, park under natural cover o Park so the vehicle shape will disappear into natural surroundings o When cut foliage is used ensure it is placed as it grows. The undersides of leaves are lighter than the top. o Replace as soon as it begins to wither

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Drape nets/Camouflage Nets o Easily assemble and provide adequate concealment against direct observation o Can be detected by photographic observation because the artificial camouflage does not blend in with the background completely.

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Buildings o Vary rooflines with wooden framework, then cover with burlap or fine-mesh netting o Erect superstructures over new building to make it resemble surrounding native buildings o For existing structures Cover with screens of garnished netting Paint disruptive patterns over netting, roof, and gable-end walls When the slope of a roof is greater than 30 degrees, netting must cover the whole building. Paint roofs to match surrounding terrain Supply points o Pick spots with good natural overhead cover. Minimize changes to the appearance of the terrain. o Avoid large concentrations of materials o Unload and disperse supplies as quickly as possible o Supply point access roads Access roads and tracks running in and out of the point can be concealed by slinging netting between trees. Control traffic to avoid large convoys Control debris, such as empty boxes, so it does not accumulate and give the position away. Water points o Must camouflage storage tanks, pumps, purification equipment, and personnel o Place burlap covers or foliage over shiny surfaces. o Conceal open areas where vehicles or personnel will have to traverse to get to a water point o Institute a water supply schedule to avoid a concentration of waiting vehicles or personnel

109.4 Discuss cover and concealment Cover o Protection from enemy fire o A hill is natural cover o A parapet is artificial cover Concealment o Protection from observation o Bushes, grass, and shadows are natural concealment o Burlap, tents, or nets are artificial concealment

109.5 State what action should be taken if you are caught in the light of a ground or overhead flare. Overhead flares o When an overhead flare goes off, immediately seek cover as low as possible and do not move until the light burns out Ground flares

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o Move quickly and quietly out of the light 109.6 Discuss the military aspects of terrain as it applies to a defensive force.

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Various combinations of weather and topography give certain qualities to an area. These qualities known as the Military Aspects of Terrain and must be closely evaluated. Reconnaissance o Physical reconnaissance is most reliable, but additional resources include: Arial reconnaissance and photographs Maps of the area Terrain models provided by higher authority Intelligence reports Patrolling Friendly natives, undercover agents, or captured prisoners o Use the acronym KOCOA to remember aspects K- key terrain features Any area that provides a marked advantage over the enemy Terrain that provides superior observation and fields of fire Obstacles that could prevent enemy movement, such as possession of roads, bridges, and rivers Terrain needed for future operations, such as an airfield O- observation and Fields of Fire Observation is the key to: o Deliver effective fire on enemy o Control troop maneuvers o Prevent surprise by enemy Fields of Fire are areas where weapons can be fired effectively upon the enemy Need to extend to the range of the weapon If clearing is necessary, ensure fire lanes do not disclose the defensive position C- Cover and Concealment Apply principals previously discussed to guard position O- Obstacles Obstructions used to stop or disrupt enemy movement Natural obstacles are rivers, mountains, lakes, etc Artificial obstacles include mine fields, barbed wire, trenches, etc A- Avenues of Approach Suitable route of movement to an objective Often the weak spots in a defense Must be effectively covered with weapons fire and barricades May be used by the defending force to launch a counterattack

109.7 Explain the procedures for basic land navigation using a map and lensatic compass With a Compass Rose (picture of compass card) o Place map on a flat surface o Place an open Lensatic compass on the maps compass rose with the sighting wire lying directly over the maps magnetic north line.

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o o

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Turn the map and compass together until the north arrow of the compass is aligned with the index line of the compass The map is now orientated

109.8 State the five basic colors used and how they applied to a military map Black: Man-made features and cultural areas Blue: water features such as lakes and rivers Green: vegetation Red-Brown: all relief features such as contour lines Red: main roads, built up areas and special features, enemy positions 109.9 Describe the grid system on all military maps Military Grid System o Provides a uniform system for referencing and making measurements o Grids are two sets of equally spaced, parallel, straight lines intersecting at right angles, forming a series of squares o Each grid line is a unit of measure, permits linear and angular measurement o Grid is drawn over a geographic projection Reading a Grid Square o Each grid line is labeled on the edge by two digit numbers called Principle Digits. A grid square is identified by the two sets of principle digits that compose the square. o The rule for reading grids is read right first then up o Use a coordinate scale, or protractor, to get a grid coordinate of a point not on a grid square o Ensure the map scale and coordinate scale match o Place the zero-zero point of the scale at the loser left corner of the grid square o Keeping the horizontal line of the scale on top of the bottom horizontal grid line, slide it to the right until the vertical line of the scale touches the point being measured o Read the coordinates RIGHT and UP and add them after the respective set of principle digits Scales o Graphic Scale: Denotes the size of each grid. Found in the legend printed on the map o Ratio Scale: A comparison between map distance and ground distance.

109.10 Explain resection and intersection. [ref. a, ch. 5]

Resection: o Locating the unknown position of the user by sighting on two or three known features is called resection. Resection can be done with or without a compass. Intersection o Locating an unknown point by successively occupying at least two, but preferably three, known positions and sighting on the unknown point is called intersection. It is used to locate features that are not defined on the map or which are not readily identifiable. The two methods of intersection are the map and compass method and the straightedge method.

109.11 Explain the procedures to use the AN/PSN-11 (plugger) for basic land navigation. [ref. d, ch. 4]

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Navigation (nav) is using the PLGR to find your present position, relative to other points. The PLGR provides azimuth, range, and steering information in a variety of formats. NAV Display Modes. There are four nav display modes that may be accessed and selected (see display at right). The nav display mode selected determines the type of information shown on the nav displays. Changing the nav display mode changes the format of the nav displays. The nav information displayed for each nav display mode selected (except CUSTOM) is shown. This gives the user the most useful information for a certain mission profile: SLOW, 2D FAST, 3D FAST, or CUSTOM. SLOW NAV Mode. In SLOW nav mode, the PLGR performs two-dimensional (2D) nav. SLOW nav mode is used for land or sea nav, when the user can not maintain the minimum speed necessary (approximately 1.5 kph) for GPS to compute navigation parameters that depend on velocity. 2D FAST NAV Mode. In 2D FAST nav mode, the PLGR performs two-dimensional (2D) nav. 2D FAST nav mode is used for land or sea nav, when the user can maintain the minimum speed necessary for GPS to compute navigation parameters based on velocity. Since these users travel horizontally, TTG2 and MMD2 are based on horizontal range. 3D FAST NAV Mode. In 3D FAST nav mode, the PLGR performs three-dimensional (3D) nav. 3D FAST nav mode has an APPROACH sub-mode. 3D FAST nav mode is used for air nav, when the user can travel in three dimensions and can maintain the minimum speed necessary for GPS to compute navigation parameters based on velocity. Therefore, TTG3 and MMD3 are based on slant range.

109.12 Discuss the use and care of the following: [ref. a, ch. 5] Topographic map o Portrays terrain and landforms in a measurable form as well as the horizontal positions of the features represented o Vertical positions, or relief, are normally represented by contours. o Care of maps Fold the map properly Carry it in a waterproof packet Use light lines when marking Lensatic compass o Use Defining an Azimuth Compasses are used to describe direction The most common military method of describing direction is through azimuths An azimuth is a horizontal angle, measured in a clockwise manner from a north base line. o Azimuth Azimuths are described in terms of degrees or mils One circle has 360 degrees or 6400 mils o Use Center Hold Method Open the cover of the compass so it forms a straight edge with the compass base

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Pull the eyepiece as far to the rear as possible, perpendicular to the compass base. Align the slot in the eyepiece with the hairline sighting wire in the cover and with the target Read the azimuth by glancing down at the dial through the lens. Use Compass to Cheek Method Open the cover of the compass so it forms a right angle with the compass base Pull the eyepiece up to form a 45-degree angle to the compass base. Place the compass to the cheek so the user can align the slot in the eyepiece with the hairline sighting wire in the cover and with the target Read the azimuth by looking down at the dial through the lens. Night Method Compass features at night use Luminous markings Bezel ring three degrees or 53 1/3 mils per click Using the Bezel ring Set the azimuth before it gets dark Turning the ring to the left increases the azimuth Left decreases the azimuth Care Use non-permanent markers when possible. Handle the compass with care The dial is set at a delicate balance and shock could damage it Close and return the compass to its case when not in use Never take readings near metal or communications gear

109.13 Utilizing BAMCIS, describe the planning process for issuing a five-paragraph order. [ref. e, Task 2-3]

Begin planning o Issue the Patrol Warning Order Arrange for reconnaissance and coordination o Acquire the necessary maps and aerial photos for a map or photoreconnaissance. o Coordinate with other units the movement of the patrol within, through, and beyond friendly lines. o Provide patrol information, including Size Routes Time of departure and return Challenge and password Call signs and frequencies o Request information on the following: Known or suspected enemy activity Friendly positions and activity Locations of FOs, LPs and OPs. Signals for firing the final protective fires (FPF) Call signs and frequencies Challenge and password, and the running password Verify locations of the point of departure (POD), point of return (POR), and the assembly area.

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o Request that a guide be provided for crossing friendly lines, if necessary. o Coordinate the plan for reentry o Request ammunition, special equipment, water, and rations. o Coordinate the method for casualty evacuation. o Collect intelligence about the enemy. Make the reconnaissance o Study the terrain on the map and/or aerial photographs and identify: Terrain features that could be navigation aids Danger areas and obstacles Tentative checkpoints and rally points Complete the plan o Assign each fire team and individual a specific duty. Ensure that at least one Seabee is assigned as a navigator. Ensure that at least two Seabees are assigned as pace counters. o Finalize the route selection Make frequent changes to the route if the patrol is to be conducted daily or periodically. o Finalize procedures for the following: Patrol formation and order of movement Departure and reentry of friendly lines Actions at checkpoints, rally points, danger areas, and upon enemy contact o Ensure that arms and ammunition have been obtained. o Ensure that patrol members have the required uniform and equipment. o Determine the procedures for handling enemy prisoners of war (EPWs). o Determine the type of signals to be used. o Identify communication security measures, call signs, frequencies, code words, and reporting times used for communications with the higher authority. o Determine the challenge and password for use within the patrol. o Determine your position as the patrol leader (PL) and the position of the assistant patrol leader (APL) within the patrol. Issue the Patrol Order Supervise preparations o Check with team leaders to verify that assigned tasks are being accomplished. o Conduct initial and final inspections. o Conduct rehearsals.

109.14 Discuss the five-paragraph order. [ref. a, ch. 11]

Efficient way of stating concept of operations and orders to subordinates. Remember the acronym SMEAC. o Situation Divided into three categories Enemy Forces o Size, location, capabilities, and recent activities Friendly forces o Mission of higher, supporting and adjacent units o Identify who is providing security Attachments o Types and size of attachments

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o Time they attach

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o Mission
States mission in clear and concise statements Mission is unit specific- what we are to accomplish o Execution Assigns definite tasks to each element of the command, organic or attached, that contributes to carrying out the whole mission No restrictions are set on the number of paragraphs, although information is typically divided into three areas Concept of operation Brief summary of the tactical plan the unit is to execute Tasks Or missions, for each unit, to include the reserve if applicable If this is the squad leaders SMEAC, each fire team would be tasked in this section Coordinating instruction Actions upon contact, MOPP level, route, etc o Administration and logistics Addresses all administrative, supply, or transportation concerns Beans- distribution of food Bullets- quantity of ammo and re-supply information Band-Aids- location of corpsman, med-evac plan Bad guys- POW handling instructions o Command and signal Chain of command and communications information given in two parts Communications instructions- typically an annex of standard reports, but also includes passwords and countersigns, radio call signals, frequencies, etc Chain of command- gives precedence of command and location of command posts. Below is a sample of a 5 paragraph order:

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109.15 Define and discuss the following reports: [ref. b, ch. 2]

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SALUTE report is an initial report of enemy activity. It is used when enemy is spotted but not engaged or when a firefight first breaks out. o Size of the enemy unit o Activity of the enemy o Location of the enemy unit o Uniform worn by the enemy o Time of each activity noted o Equipment used or carried by the enemy SPOT o Detailed report of an enemy engagement o Always follow a SALUTE up with a SPOT report after engagement has ended o Report includes All information contained in a SALUTE Friendly and enemy KIA or WIA POWs and enemy equipment

109.16 Describe the purpose of a security and reconnaissance patrol Security Patrols o Provide physical security Reconnaissance patrols o Defensive technique used to Detect enemy movement toward the units position Locate or observe an enemy position Discover enemy avenues of approach Supplementary patrol information o What are the two categories of patrols and what is their purpose? Reconnaissance and Combat Reconnaissance patrols are typically conducted to gather information about a location, characteristics of friendly or hostile positions and installations, terrain, and obstacles. Combat patrols are assigned missions that usually include engaging the enemy. They are fighting patrols. Combat patrols are employed in both the offensive and defensive combat operations. o What are the three types of reconnaissance patrols and describe the purpose of each? Route, Area, and Zone Route reconnaissance is a directed effort to obtain detailed information of a specified route and all terrain from which the enemy could influence movement along that route. Area reconnaissance is a directed effort to obtain detailed information concerning the terrain or enemy activity within a prescribed area such as a town, ridge line, woods, or other features critical to operations. Zone reconnaissance is a directed effort to obtain detailed information concerning all routes, obstacles, terrain, and enemy forces within a zone defined by boundaries. o What are the different types of combat patrols? Raid, Contact, Ambush, Security, and Urban

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Raid patrols are a surprise attack on an enemy force or installation with the attacking force withdrawing after accomplishment of the mission. Contact patrols establish and/or maintain contact to the front, flanks or rear. Ambush patrols are a surprise attack from a concealed position upon a moving or temporarily halted target. Security patrols are assigned missions that may or may not require them to engage the enemy. They are in the proximity of defensive positions, on the flanks of advancing units, or in rear areas. Urban patrols are overt in nature, with their presence readily apparent to the local populace.

109.17 State the twelve patrol planning and preparations steps Patrol leader uses 12 steps to plan a patrol o Study the mission o Plan use of time o Study the terrain and situation o Organize the patrol o Select personnel, weapons, and equipment o Issue the warning order o Coordinate o Make reconnaissance o Complete detailed plans o Issue patrol order o Supervise, inspect, rehearse, and re-inspect o Execute the mission

109.18 Discuss the priorities of establishing a defense Commanders Intent dictates the priorities o Considers four defensive principles of war Surprise Security Unity of command Mass o Applies these to the units mission and situation to develop priorities. In general, priorities follow the acronym SAFE. S- security A- place automatic and crew-served weapons F- clear fields of fire E- emplacements

109.19 Describe a perimeter defense to include the three echelons of a defense Forward Defense Area (FDA) o Area where frontline defensive positions are dug Security Area o Area in front of FDA

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Security patrols roam this area o Listening/observation posts are placed here Reserve Area o Area behind FDA that reserve forces occupy o

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109.20 Define and discuss the following: Call for fire for indirect weapon support o Request for indirect fire, as in mortars or artillery support, is termed Call for Fire Observer requesting support calls into Fire Direction Control (FDC) FDC plots the request on a firing board and transposes the information into firing data FDC announces this data to the mortar crew as fire commands There are six elements of a call for fire: Observer identification Target location Method of engagement Warning order Target description Method of fire and control o Fire commands for direct weapon support Instructions used to direct and control fire of a squad Used when a squad leader decides to fire on a target Use the acronym ADDRAC Alert- alert the unit that a command is coming Direction- indicate the targets location Description- Give a very brief description of the target Range- To the target to be engaged Assignment- Tell who is to fire on the target Control- (fire control) give the signal to open fire Supplementary call for fire and CAS information o What are the three types of missions when you call for fire? Polar, Grid, and Shift. o Target Location

Grid is used for a 6- or 8-digit coordinate (an 8-digit grid preferred). Polar is used for observer to target direction, distance, and up/down vertical shift (if greater than 30 meters).

Shift used for observer to target direction, left/right lateral shift, add/drop range shift, and up/down vertical shift (if greater than 30 meters). Call for Fire Examples The following table lists types of missions and examples of calls for fire for each.

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CALL FOR FIRE FORMAT CARD

Describe how close air support is requested. o Typically, close air support (CAS) briefings are presented in the 9-line brief format. This format is used when detailed coordination is required. However, if Marines need immediate air support and they are unfamiliar with the 9-line brief, they should establish communication with the aircraft and then talk it on to the target. o The CAS briefing form (9-line briefing form) shown is used to pass data to the pilot. o Omit data not required; do not transmit line numbers. Units of measure are standard unless otherwise specified. o *Denotes minimum essential information required in a limited communication environment. Bold denotes read-back items when requested.

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Terminal controller: ________________________, this is ________________________ (aircraft call sign) (terminal controller) *1. IP/BP: _____________________________________________________________ *2. Heading: ________________________ (magnetic). Offset ___________ (left/right) *3. Distance: __________________________________________________________ *4. Target elevation: __________________________________________ (in feet MSL) *5. Target description: ___________________________________________________ *6. Target location: _____________________________________________________ (latitude/longitude or grid coordinates or offsets or visual) 7. Type mark: ________________________ Code: _________________________ (WP/laser/IR/beacon) (actual code) Laser to target line: ____________________________________________degrees *8. Location of friendlies: _______________________________________________ Position marked by: __________________________________________________ 9. Egress ____________________________________________________________ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Remarks (as appropriate): ________________________________________________ (Threats, Hazards, Weather, Restrictions, Ordnance Delivery, Attack Heading, Danger Close, SEAD) Time on target: TOT _____________________________________________________ OR Time to target: Stand by ____________________ plus _________________ . . . Hack. Line 1. IP/BP. Initial point is used for fixed-wing aircraft. It is the 515 nautical mile run-in to the target. A battle position is used for rotary-wing aircraft. It is 3,0005,000 meters from the target. It is a large area (1000 x 1000 m or >) from which a rotary-wing aircraft engages the target. In some instances, an informal airspace coordination area (ACA) may have to be established to allow the rotarywing aircraft to run-in closer (5001500 meters) to the target. Line 2. Heading. The heading is given in degrees magnetic from IP (or center of the BP) to the target. The Offset (left or right) indicates the side of the IP to target line that aircrews can maneuver in while in the target area. Saying degrees magnetic after the number is not necessarydegrees magnetic is understood. Line 3. Distance. The distance from the IP/center of the BP to the target. It is given in nautical miles to the nearest tenth (e.g., 12.3 nautical miles) to fixed-wing aircraft and in meters to the nearest hundred (e.g., 3200 meters) for rotary-wing aircraft. Saying nautical miles after the number is not necessary nautical miles are understood. Line 4. Target elevation. The target elevation is given in feet above mean sea level. If the map contour interval is in feet, take the elevation directly from the map. If the map contour is in meters, convert it to feet. Line 5. Target description. The target description contains the number, type of target, and degree of protection. It is a brief, concise description of the target. It includes target activity and configuration that may assist its identification. For example, 4 APCs on road, stationary. . . . Bunker complex. . . . Tank column in open, moving north to south. Line 6. Target location. The target location is a 6-digit grid coordinate. Target location can be given as a UTM grid coordinate or as latitude and longitude. Any Marine Corps CAS aircraft can accept a UTM grid coordinate. Line 7. Type mark. The type of mark used: e.g., WP (white phosphorus), RP (red phosphorus), laser (include 4-digit code), illumination on the deck, HE, mirror flash. If no mark is available, the pilot is

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guided onto the target using available references (e.g., roads, streams, open areas, prominent terrain).

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Line 8. Location of friendlies. Cardinal direction (north, south, east, west) and distance (in meters) from the target to the nearest friendly position, which is frequently the forward air controllers position. Example: SW 1500. Line 9. Egress. Instructions the aircraft will follow to exit the target area after engaging the target. It includes direction to turn out of the target area and a control point to which the aircraft will fly. Use the word Egress before giving egress instructions. Example: Egress east, then south to Georgia. Remarks. If applicable, additional threats, hazards, weather, final attack heading, artillery gun target lines, etc., can be given here. Time on target. Time on target (TOT) is the synchronized, universal clock time when ordnance will hit the target. There is no time HACK for TOT. TOT is the preferred towing method. The Naval Observatory (DSN 762-1401) or a global positioning system (GPS) can provide a common time reference. If neither is available, the terminal controller can still execute a TOT mission by synchronizing time using a watch as a reference. It is passed to the aircraft as a number of minutes past the hour (e.g., 1624 would be 24 and communicated as Time on target 24). 109.21 Discuss the elements of a fire plan sketch. Fire plan sketch has three combat positions: Primary firing position Backbone of the defense, receives the full force of the enemys attack Alternate firing position Fall back position used if the primary position is in danger of being over run Should have the same sector of fire as primary Supplementary firing position Sector of fire covers the flank or rear Supplementary fire plan information: NEXT PAGE

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109.22 Discuss sectors of fire and fire discipline

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Area assigned to an individual, unit, or crew served weapon to defend o Pie shaped section with edges called lateral limits o Lateral limits extend from the firing position to an easily identifiable terrain feature Sectors of fire o Two stakes are placed near the firing position to indicate lateral limits during darkness o Sectors of fire interlock to ensure mutual support by adjacent units Fire Discipline o The ability to efficiently apply fire on a target o Dependent on the ability of the leader, the discipline and control of the crew and includes: The ability to select and designate targets. Preserve element of surprise by opening fire at the desired moment only Regulate the rate of fire Shift from one target to another Adjust and cease-fire

109.23 Discuss the duties and responsibilities of the following members of a squad: A squad is composed of 14 people o 1 squad leader o 1 grenadier o 3 fire team leaders o 3 automatic riflemen o 3 riflemen #1 o 3 riflemen #2 Squad leader o PO1 with an M16, but only fires in critical situation o Responsible for the training, appearance, discipline and readiness of the squad o Controls fire discipline, fire control, and maneuvering Grenadier o PO3 armed with an M203 o Responsible for the employment and care of the 203 o Remains close to the squad leader in combat Fire team leader o PO2 with an M16, but only fires in critical situations o Leads and controls fire team o Acts as the assistant squad leader Automatic rifleman o PO3 with a fully automatic M16 o Backbone of the fire team, provides heavy fire power o Acts as the assistant fire team leader Rifleman number 1 o E3 with an M16 whose primary duty is to carry extra ammo for the automatic rifleman o Protects flank and acts as a scout o Takes control of the automatic rifle if automatic rifleman becomes a casualty

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Rifleman number 2 o E3 or E2 with an M16 o Acts as point man and occasionally a scout o Protects the flank of the fire team

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109.24 Discuss an individuals responsibility under the Code of Conduct There are six articles of the code o Article I- I am an American, fighting in the forces, which guard my country and our way of life. I am prepared to give my life in their defense. o Article II- I will never surrender of my own free will. If in command, I will never surrender the members of my command while they still have the means to resist. o Article III- if I am captured, I will continue to resist by all means available. I will make every effort to escape and aid other to escape. o Article IV- If I become a Prisoner of War, I will keep faith with my fellow prisoners. I will give no information or take part in any action, which might be harmful to my comrades. If I am senior, I will take command. If not, I will obey the lawful orders of those appointed over me and will back them up in every way. o Article V- when questioned, should I become a prisoner of war, I am required to give my name, rank, service number, and date of birth. I will evade answering further questions to the utmost of my ability. I will make no oral or written statements disloyal to my country and its Allies or harmful to their cause. o Article VI- I will never forget that I am an American, fighting for freedom, responsible for my actions, and dedicated to the principles which made my country free. I will trust in my God and in the United States of America.

109.25 Describe the procedures for handling detainees/Enemy Prisoner of War (EPW)

Potentially a valuable source of information Remember the 6-Ss in handling EPWs o Search: for weapons and documents o Secure: ensure escape is impossible o Silence: do not allow EPWs to talk to each other o Segregate: into groups by rank, gender, and status (deserter, civilian, EPW, etc) o Speed: timely deliver of information obtained from EPWs is essential o Safeguard: protect EPWs from harm

109.26 Describe force protection/threat conditions. [ref. g, app. A]

THREATCON ALPHA. This condition applies when there is a general threat of possible terrorist activity against personnel and facilities. The nature and extent of which are unpredictable, and circumstances do not justify full implementation of THREATCON BRAVO measures. However, it may be necessary to implement certain measures from higher THREATCONS resulting from intelligence received or as a deterrent. The measures in this THREATCON must be capable of being maintained indefinitely. THREATCON BRAVO. This condition applies when an increased and more predictable threat of terrorist activity exists. The measures in this THREATCON must be capable of being maintained for weeks without causing undue hardship, affecting operational capability, and aggravating relations with local authorities. THREATCON CHARLIE. This condition applies when an incident occurs or intelligence is received indicating some form of terrorist action against personnel facilities and is

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imminent. Implementation of measures in this THREATCON for more than a short period probably will create hardship and affect the peacetime activities of the unit and its personnel. THREATCON DELTA. This condition applies in the immediate area where a terrorist attack has occurred or when intelligence has been received that terrorist action against a specific location or person is likely.

109.27 Discuss who defines rules of engagement, how it applies and who is responsible for enforcing. [ref. f, encl. A]

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff defines rules of engagement Applies to US forces o During military attacks against the US and o During ALL military operations, contingencies, and terrorist attacks occurring outside US territory o Not to be confused with Rules for Use of Force (peacetime operations within US territory) Everyone is responsible for enforcing ROE.

109.28 Describe circumstances when deadly force would normally be authorized Deadly force is only used as a last resort Authorized under the following conditions: o Self defense or defense of others when lesser means will not work o Defense of property vital to national security o Defense of property dangerous to others (weapons, ammunition, etc) o To prevent the escape of a prisoner likely to cause death or serious bodily injury to another

109.29 State the eleven general orders of a sentry 1. To take charge of this post and all government property in view 2. To walk my post in a military manner, keeping always on the alert and observing everything that takes place within sight or hearing 3. To report violations of orders I am instructed to enforce 4. To repeat all calls from posts more distant from the guardhouse than my own 5. To quit my post only when properly relieved 6. To receive, obey and pass on to the sentry who relieves me all orders from the commanding officer, officer of the day, and officers and noncommissioned officers of the guard only. 7. To talk to no one except in the line of duty 8. To give the alarm in case of fire or disorder 9. To call the corporal of the guard in any case not covered by instructions 10. To salute all officers and all colors and standards no cased. 11. To be especially watchful at night, and during the time for challenging, to challenge all persons on or near my post and to allow no one to pass without proper authority 109.30 Describe the three classes of wire entanglement Tactical wire o Used to hamper enemy aggression o Placed along the front of the defensive line

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Protective wire o Prevents close surprise attacks o Placed around each fighting position at hand grenade range (35-50 meters) Supplementary wire o Placed to conceal the exact line of tactical wire

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109.31 State the purpose of the following: Triple standard concertina fence o Consists of two lines of concertina serving as the base, with a third resting on top o On average, a platoon can place 984 foot section in an hour Double-apron fence o Two types 4 and 2 pace fence, which is more common and more effective, and 6 and 3 pace fence A 984 foot section usually requires 1 hours for a platoon to complete Low wire entanglement o A 4 and 2 pace double apron fence constructed with medium pickets instead of long pickets in the fence center line o Used when concealment of the barrier is essential Tanglefoot o Used to slow enemy movement

109.32 Discuss the following actions when isolated in an enemy area: Evasion o Know the enemys location! o Look for signs of group movement, such as crushed grass, cigarette butts, footprints, broken branches, etc o Look for workers in the field, indicates no immediate threat o Absence of children in a village, indicative of pending action o Absence of young men in a village, may mean the village is under enemy control o Be patient, cautious, and avoid overconfidence o Conserve strength by avoiding exhaustion o Retain items of identification such as dog tags. If captured without them, you may be treated as a spy. o Evasion Travel Tips Use firearms only in an emergency Avoid people as long as possible When you approach friendly lines, make sure you identify yourself as friendly. Survival o Size up the situation o Undue haste makes waste o Remember where you are o Vanquish fear and panic o Improvise o Value living o Act like the natives o Learn the basic skills

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Escape o If you are captured, try and escape as soon as possible. Your physical condition will be at its best o Fall back on the Code of Conduct

109.33 Discuss the following basic fire team formations Column o Used when speed and control are governing factors o Favorable for fire and maneuver to either flank o Vulnerable to fire from the front because its own fire in that direction is limited. Wedge o Used when the enemy contact is possible, but not certain o Provides all around protection, flexibility and is easy to control Skirmishers (right or left) o Used when assaulting a known enemy position o Because the fire teams are in line, it provides maximum fire power to the front o Hard formation to control Echelon (right or left) o Used primarily to protect an exposed flank o Permits heavy firepower to the front and the direction of the echelon o Hard formation to control and slow moving

109.34 Discuss the fundamentals of a successful ambush. Surprise attack from a concealed position upon a moving or temporarily halted target. Success of an ambush is contingent upon: o Early warning of target approach o Holding fire until target is in the kill zone o Open fire at proper time o Lifting or shifting supporting fires o Initiation of the correct action if the ambush is compromised o Timely and orderly withdrawal from ambush site

109.35 Discuss immediate actions during enemy contact in a convoy. [ref. b, ch. 5] Drivers attempt to drive through the killing zone. Personnel return fire immediately. When vehicles are clear of the killing zone, they are halted. Occupants dismount and take immediate offensive action against the enemy positions. Subsequent vehicles approaching the killing zone halt short of the zone. Occupants debark and take immediate offensive action against the enemy positions. If hardened vehicles are forced to halt in the killing zone, all available weapons are used to return fire immediately. Occupants remain in the vehicle. On the first perceptible slackening of enemy fire, occupants dismount. When riding in a soft vehicle and caught in a killing zone, occupants dismount immediately. In both cases, occupants dismount under the covering fires of the four corner sentries, who initially remain aboard. The occupants then deploy to the side directed by the vehicle commander and take the enemy under fire to cover the dismount of the four sentries.

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After dismounting, if no cover is available, an immediate frontal assault against the enemy is employed. The most logical course of action after dismounting is to take cover, immediately establish a base of fire, and use a maneuver element against the enemy ambush positions. Speed of execution is critical.

109.36 Discuss challenge and password. [ref. a, ch. 11] The commanding officer directs the use of the countersign. Sentries of an interior guard may use the countersign, but countersigns are primarily for use by sentries or persons defending tactical areas. When a countersign is prescribed, the highest headquarters within a zone or area devises it. The authority to designate a countersign may be delegated to subordinate units for their immediate use when necessary; however, these units must notify higher headquarters of such action without delay. Only one countersign can be used within a command during a specified period. The choice of words or sounds for the countersign is made with care. When possible, words are selected that are difficult for the enemy to pronounce. The word selected for the secret challenge, or countersign must not suggest the word selected for the password. Doing this minimizes the possibility of an unauthorized person guessing the password. (For example, the secret challenge, ATOMIC, suggests the password BOMB.) The initiative for use of the countersign rests with the challenging sentry. Positive recognition of each person claiming authority to pass is the main consideration of the sentry. When he does not visually recognize the challenged person or party, he uses the countersign to make a positive recognition. When there is any doubt as to the authority of the challenged person to pass, even if he gives the correct password, he is detained for further action by the corporal of the guard. When the sentry recognizes the challenged person or party before using the countersign and there is no doubt the person or party has authority to pass, the sentry does not use the countersign. Mutual identification is essential. If the person challenged does not recognize the secret countersign, he should not give the password. When a secret challenge and password are prescribed, the secret challenge is given by the sentry after the person is advanced to be recognized. The person challenged should then give the password. Both the secret challenge and the password are given in a low tone in a sentence to prevent them from being heard by others. For example, a sentry observes a person approaching his post during the time for challenging. When the person is still far enough away from the sentrys post for the sentry to take effective measures should the person rush him after being challenged, he commands, HALT! WHO GOES THERE? After receiving an answer (such as, Lieutenant Jones, Company B) indicating the person is friendly and may be authorized to pass, the sentry says, Advance, and be recognized. When Lieutenant Jones reaches a point where the secret challenge, spoken in a low tone, can be heard only by him, the sentry again commands, HALT! then he gives the secret challenge or countersign, in the form of a sentence in a low tone (for example, LOOK AT THE BLUE SNOWFLAKE IN THE MUD). After receiving the correct password from Lieutenant Jones (for example, MY BROTHER BOUGHT A ROOSTER FOR HIS WIFE YESTERDAY) and otherwise satisfying himself that the Lieutenant is authorized to pass, the sentry says, Advance, Lieutenant Jones and salutes, if appropriate. If Lieutenant Jones is one of a party challenged and is the person advanced according to the procedures discussed here, the sentry then tells Lieutenant Jones to bring up his men and identify each individual before he passes.

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109.37 Describe the procedures to establish a LZ. [ref. b, ch. 3]

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LANDING ZONE/SITE/POINTS o A helicopter landing zone (LZ) is a specified ground for landing helicopters to embark or disembark troops or cargo. A landing zone is designated by a code name. It may include one or more landing sites. o Depending upon the terrain and the size of the Seabee unit, you can divide the LZ into several landing sites. A landing site is a specific location within a landing zone in which a single flight of helicopters may land to embark or disembark troops or cargo. Landing sites are designated by color, such as landing site red. A landing site contains one or more landing points. o A helicopter landing point is an area within a landing site where an individual helicopter can land. Landing points are designated by two-digit numbers, such as landing point 12. For pathfinder purposes, the landing points are identified by the use of smoke or air panels. For night operations, you can mark the landing points with some type of low-intensity light. A general rule is to position landing points ten times as far from an obstacle as the obstacle is high (10:1 ratio). o NOTE: In most cases, a Seabee unit will be required to construct a landing zone with one landing site and one landing point for resupply, troop movement, or medical evacuations. PREPARATION OF THE LANDING ZONE o When planning the preparation of an LZ, you should take several factors into consideration. First, you should know what type of helicopters will be using the landing zone. The Combat Operation Center (COC) can provide this type of information. Second, you must consider the Seabee units position in relation to the enemy. Security troops must establish a 360-degree perimeter around the landing zone to defend the LZ. A third factor is the time it will take to prepare the landing zone. And a fourth factor considered is the equipment needed to prepare the LZ. o Approaches and Exits The ground approaches to the LZ and exits from the LZ must be free of major obstacles that might obstruct landing or takeoffs, such as tall trees, telephone poles, or power lines. Approaches and exits should also be clear of obstructions that are 10 meters or higher, extending at least 50 meters in the direction of approach and exit paths. The rule of thumb for determining the distance required between the landing point and a high obstruction is a 10:1 ratio. This means that the distance a landing point is located from a tree is ten times the height of the tree. o Ground Obstacles Obstacles on the ground, such as stumps or rocks, should not exceed 1 foot in height on level ground and should be less on sloping ground. o Gradient (Slopes) Ground slope has a considerable effect on selecting a landing site or landing point within the LZ. A helicopter cannot land safely in locations where the ground slopes more than 14 degrees. When pilots land on a slope, they prefer to land uphill because of the tail down attitude of the helicopter. o Surface Conditions Mud, excessive dust, and loose debris are considered undesirable surface conditions for helicopters. Mud causes a helicopter to become bogged down. Excessive dust reduces visibility and compromises the location of the site. Loose debris is dangerous because they are sucked up into the rotor blades or turbine intakes, causing serious damage.

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o Shallow water, less than 18 inches deep and with a firm bottom, can be used as a landing site.

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Winds When the wind at ground level exceeds 10 knots, the helicopter must land into the wind. LANDING SITE DIMENSIONS o Landing site dimensions vary, depending on the number of landing points required. For each landing point, a fuselage safe circle is cleared of all obstacles, such as stumps, rocks, or bushes. Clear a rotor safe circle of all obstacles that could obstruct the rotor blades. When there is to be more than one landing point within the landing site, separate the landing points so the helicopters can simultaneously land safely in the landing site.

109.38 Discuss the purpose of combat hand and arm signals in the field. [ref. b, ch. 11]

Signals are used to transmit commands or information when voice communication is difficult or impossible or when silence must be maintained. Leaders should repeat signals to their units whenever necessary to ensure prompt and correct execution of orders. A leader giving arm and hand signals should remember that these are an order of command. The signal is given smartly. Leaders must be aware of their location to ensure the signal can be seen by the intended unit. When a movement is to be executed by particular unit(s), a signal appointing the unit(s) precedes the signal for the actual movement. If a movement is to be executed in unison, the signal for the movement should be followed by the signal READY. After the READY signal is acknowledged, the movement is executed at the same time that the arm is lowered. Signals requiring a change of direction have no connection with the direction in which the person giving the signal is facing. The direction of movement is shown by the direction in which the arm of the signaler points. Column formation: Raise either arm to the vertical position. Drop the arm to the rear, describing complete circles in a vertical plane parallel to the body. The signal may be used to indicate either a troop or vehicular column.

Echelon left/right: The leader may give this signal either facing towards or away from the unit. Extend one arm 45 degrees below the horizontal, palms to the front. The lower arm indicates the direction of echelon. (Example: for echelon right, if the leader is facing in the direction of the forward movement, the right arm is lowered; if the leader is facing the unit, the left is lowered.) Supplementary commands may be given to ensure prompt and proper execution.

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Skirmishers left/right: Raise both arms lateral until horizontal, arms and hands extended palms down. If it is necessary to indicate a direction, move in the desired direction at the same time. When signaling for fire team skirmishers, indicate skirmishers right or left by moving the appropriate hand up and down. The appropriate hand does not depend on the direction the signaler is facing. Skirmishers left will always be indicated by moving the left hand up and down; skirmishers right, the right hand.

Wedge formation: Extend both arms downward and to the side at an angle of 45 degrees below the horizontal, palms to the front.

Fire team: The right arm should be placed diagonally across the chest.

Squad: Extend the hand and arm toward the squad leader, palm of the hand down; distinctly move the hand up and down several times from the wrist, holding the arm steady.

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Platoon: Extend both arms forward, palms of the hands down toward the leaders (or units) for whom the signal is intended, and describe large vertical circles with hands.

Close Up: Start the signal with both arms extended sideward, palms forward, and bring palms together in front of the body momentarily. When repetition of this signal is necessary, the arms are returned to the starting position by movement along the front of the body.

Open Up/extended: Start the signal with the arms extended in front of the body, palms together, and bring the arms to the horizontal position at the sides, palms forward. When repetition of this signal is necessary, the arms are returned along the front of the body to the starting position and the signal is repeated until understood.

Halt/Stop: Carry the hand to the shoulder, palm to the front; then thrust the hand upward vertically to the full extent of the arm and hold it in that position until the signal is understood.

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Dismount/Take cover: Extend the arm sideward at an angle of 45 degrees above the horizontal, palm down, and lower it to side. Both arms may be used in giving this signal. Repeat until understood.

Hasty Ambush Left/Right: Raise fist to shoulder level and thrust it several times in the desired direction.

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COMMON CORE 110 CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] https://ncf.navy.mil/abfcview/AbfcViewAbout.cfm [b] COMCBPAC/COMCBLANT Instruction 10914.2, Maintenance Management Program for Naval Construction Force (NCF) Camps [c] NAVEDTRA 14265, Utilitiesman Basic, Vol. 1 [d] NAVEDTRA 14259, Utilitiesman (Advanced) [e] NAVEDTRA 14233, Naval Construction Force/Seabee 1 & C___________________ 110.1 Explain the fundamentals of a tent camp layout in relation to the following: [ref. c, ch. 2]

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Latrines from messing facilities / Latrines from water supplies o Latrines must be 100 yards from the nearest natural water source and food service areas. The site should be reasonably near the user, but 50 feet from sleeping areas. Garbage pits from water supplies / Garbage pits from messing facilities. o A garbage pit must be at least 100 yards away from a water source and 30 yards away from messing facilities.

110.2 Discuss the purpose of leach fields. [ref. d, ch. 10] Used to dispose sewage and gray water into the ground Constructed of 4 to 6 inch perforated pipe Laid out in a herringbone pattern with the laterals at right angles to the main distribution pipe.

110.3 Discuss the following as it pertains to camp maintenance: [ref. b] Trouble desk o The purpose of the camp maintenance desk is to receive all customer service calls. o The trouble desk coordinates the maintenance calls and tasks with the people who provide the maintenance service. o The trouble desk attendant enters all customer trouble calls into the trouble desk log and fills out Emergency Service Authorization (ESA) forms. Three types of work o Emergency Service work All work requiring immediate action or any minor work requiring less than 16 man-hours and $100 in material costs is classified as emergency service work. o Specific Job Order Orders are written to cover work for which individual job costs are desired Specific job orders take more than 16 man-hours to complete o Standing Job Order Standing job orders are large repetitive jobs that require over 40 man-hours to complete o Operators Inspection Performed by the operator assigned to the equipment The main purpose for using operating logs is to continuously record data on equipment performance.

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o

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Control Inspection A control inspection reviews all camp facilities to determine the maintenance required during a deployment to preserve or improve the condition of the camp structures and property.

110.4 Discuss the following: [ref. c] Potable water o Water that does not contain pollution, contamination, or infective agents ad is considered satisfactory for drinking Chlorination o Chlorination is the most common method of disinfecting potable water. o Water from systems where sanitary, physical, operating, defects, or other special hazards are known to exist must be chlorinated to specific bacterial levels. Residual of at least 2.0 ppm Super Chlorination o Super Chlorination is the application of chlorine in dosages far in excess of the chlorine demand for disinfecting. o Super Chlorination is accomplished by chlorinating the water in a container or distribution system to at least 100 parts per million (ppm)

110.5 Discuss the three parts of the Advanced Base Functional Component (ABFC) system and explain their relationships. [ref. e, ch. 4] Part 1, Component Site Plan o Component is defined as a grouping of personnel and materials that has a specific function or mission at an advanced base. o Example: NMCB is a component Part 2, Facility Drawings o Lists and describes by assembly number that assembly requirement for each facility o Example: 250 Man Tent Camp Assembly drawings o Lists line-item requirements by nation Stock Number (NSN) for each assembly. o Example: Tent 16 x 32

110.6 Describe the ABFC View Program and how it facilitates contingency planning. [ref. a] The ABFC View Program is a web-based database that consists of Navy wide TOAs. They can be viewed as components, facility, or assemblies. The database structure allows the user to view all or just a piece of a component or facility, which allows for rapid task tailoring during contingency planning.

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COMMON CORE 111 CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, AND RADIOLOGICAL (CBR) WARFARE FUNDAMENTALS
References: [a] TM EE168-DB-OMP-010, Operators and Unit Maintenance Manual (including Repair Parts and Special Tool List) for Alarm, Chemical Agent, Automatic, M-22 [b] NAVEDTRA 14057, Damage Controlman [c] NAVEDTRA 14235, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 2 [d] TM 3-4240-346-109, Chemical Biological Mask Type, M-40A [e] NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 1 [f] FM 3-4, NBC Protection [g] NAVMED P-5041, Treatment of Chemical Agent Casualties and Conventional Military Chemical Injuries [h] FM 3-3, Chemical and Biological Contamination Avoidance [i] FM 3-5, NBC Decontamination [j] Multiservice Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (NBC) Protection [k] TM SS200-AP-MMO-010, Operator Manual for Joint Service Lightweight Integrated Suit Technology (JSLIST) Chemical Protective Ensemble [l] FM 3-7, NBC Field Handbook___________________________________________ 111.1 Explain the following: [ref. b] Chemical warfare o Intended for use in military operations to kill, seriously injure, or incapacitate man due to its physiological effects. o U.S. Policy: We will not use chemical weapons for any reason. (Chemical Warfare Convention) o Three types of antipersonnel agents Casualty (nerve, blister, blood, choking) Incapacitating (Depressants and stimulants) Harassing (tear and vomiting gases) o Delivery of Chemical Weapons Bursting type: Ground Burst Air Burst Spray Thermal Biological warfare o The intentional release of living organisms or substances produced by living organisms to cause death or disease to man, domestic animals, crops, etc. o They cause diseases such as typhoid fever, cholera, and influenza. o Warfare types: bacteria, rickets, viruses, and fungi. o U.S. Policy: We will not use biological weapons for any reason. Radiological warfare o The employment of nuclear weapons to destroy property and personnel

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o Nuclear weapons produce explosions of great force and heat and
release nuclear radiation. Their primary purpose is the mass destruction of property and personnel. Routes by which agents enter the body o Skin o Through secondary means such as water and food o Eyes and linings of the mouth and nose

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111.2 Describe the purpose of the following: [ref. b, ch. 9] MCU-2/P (protective mask) o Protects face, eyes, nose, throat and lungs from CBR agents or contamination o Offers no protection against carbon monoxide or ammonia o Filters the air removing particles of dust that may be radioactive or otherwise contaminated o Purifies the air of many poisonous gases Chemical protective overgarment o Provides protection against persistent (liquid) nerve, blister, and biological agents. o Contact with petroleum, oils, and lubricants degrade protection. Wet-weather clothing o Provides protection against alpha/beta radiological contamination when worn with battle dress and anti-flash gear o This should be worn over the Saratoga suit when there is a probability of getting wet. Atropine/Pralidoxime Chloride (Oxime) o Used to counteract the effects of and relieve the symptoms of nerve agents only. Pocket dosimeter o Size and shape of a fountain pen. o Measure exposure to radiation over a period of time.

111.3 Describe the operation and maintenance of the M-40A mask: [ref. d] Operation and maintenance remain the same as the MCU-2P. Only differences are the face shield, the universal secondary skin found on the M-40, and eyeglass inserts.

111.4 Explain the six types of chemical warfare agents and their physical symptoms Nerve Agents o VX, Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), and Tabun (GA) [V and G Agents] o Used as a quick-action casualty agent. When absorbed into the body though inhalation or through the skin, they disrupt the nervous system. o Symptoms Runny nose Tightness of chest with difficulty in breathing Contraction of pupils (Miosis) Nausea, cramps, headache, coma and convulsions

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Symptoms can take place in 30 seconds when the dose is sufficiently heavy Blister Agents o Mustard (H), Arsenicals [Lewisite (L)], Urticants [Phosgene Oxime (CX)] o Used as a delayed-action casualty agent o Symptoms Eyes Redness and inflammation Watery Skin Skin starts to turn red after several hours Blisters appear on the skin Throbbing pain and swelling may be observed Blood Agents o Hydrogen Cyanide, Cyanogen Chloride, Arsine o Used as a quick-action casualty agent o Symptoms Range from convulsions to coma Interfere with the ability of oxygen-carrying cells to transfer oxygen to other body tissues Irritating effect on nasal passages Choking Agents o Phosgene (CG), Diphosgene (DP), Chlorine (CL) o Used as a delayed-action casualty agent o Symptoms Low Concentrations Produce an action on the respiratory system that results in the accumulation of fluid in the lungs Higher concentration Produce death for the same reason, but the upper respiratory tract may be involved as well Vomiting Agents o Symptoms Cause violent, uncontrollable sneezing, cough, nausea, vomiting, and a general feeling of body discomfort. Tear Agents o Symptoms Act primarily on the eyes, causing intense pain and considerable flow of tears High concentrations affect the upper respiratory tract and lungs and cause nausea and vomiting

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111.5 Describe the following types of nuclear explosions Air burst o Fire ball does not touch the earth o All materials in fireball vaporized

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o Maximize blast and thermal effect over large area Surface burst o Fireball touches earth o Surface material vaporized and lifted in the air o Produces large amount of fallout o Range of blast less than air burst Underwater burst o Practically all thermal radiation absorbed o Large base surge is formed which billows up several hundred feet

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111.6 Describe the following effects of nuclear explosions Blast o o Primary blast injuries result from the direct action of the air shock wave on the human body Secondary blast injuries are caused mainly by collapsing buildings and by timber and other debris flung about by the blast

Burns o Primary burns are a direct result of the thermal radiation from the bomb o Secondary burns are the result of fires caused by the explosions o Flash blindness Nuclear radiation o Alpha particles Heaviest of all known radiation +2 charge Range of 0 to 3 in the air. Internal hazard will not penetrate skin/clothing Taken through ingestion o Beta particles Enter through the skin or ingestion, carried in contaminated dust, dirt, or bomb residue -1 charge Range of 6 to 10 in the air Is an internal/external hazard. Requires more protection than Alpha. o Gamma Rays Pure energy which can penetrate every region of the body. No charge You cannot stop Gamma. You can only reduce intensity and exposure levels by shielding with something heavily dense like lead. o Neutrons Have the greatest penetrating power of the nuclear radiation hazards It can be stopped by 1 to 2 feet of water, cadmium, wax, oil, or polyethylene. Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) phenomenon

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o o An EMP is an intense burst of radio-frequency radiation generated by a nuclear explosion The strong, quick-rising surges of electric current induced by EMP in power transmission lines and long antennas could burn out most unprotected electrical and electronic equipment.

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111.7 Define Mission Oriented Protective Posture (MOPP) and discuss the levels MOPP MASK LVL OVERGARMENT OVERBOOTS WITH HOOD GLOVES_ 1 WORN, OPEN OR CARRIED CARRIED CARRIED CLOSED BASED ON TEMPERATURE ______________________________________________________________ __________ 2 SAME AS MOPP 1 WORN CARRIED CARRIED ______________________________________________________________ __________ 3 SAME AS MOPP 1 WORN WORN, HOOD CARRIED OPEN OR CLOSED BASED ON TEMP ______________________________________________________________ ____________ 4 WORN, CLOSED WORN WORN, HOOD WORN CLOSED

111.8 Describe the correct procedures for inspecting, maintaining, and donning the chemical protective ensemble Inspect and Maintain CPO o CPO inspection o Ensure the bag is solid and not soft when squeezing the bag. o Expiration date o Tears CPO Maintenance o Keep dry o Store in bag when not worn o Avoid POLs o Maximum number of washes is 6. Gloves and Boots o Inspect for wear and tears Donning the Chemical Protective Overgarment

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Don the trousers and tighten the waist by using the hook and pile fasteners o Bring the straps over your shoulders and cross them across your chest. Insert straps into the belt loops and secure them snugly o Don the smock o Secure bottom of smock with hook and pile fasteners Donning the overboots o Attach the laces to the toe loop, making sure that the laces are centered o Put a lace through each of the holes on the sides of the boot and pull them up snug o Cross the laces over the instep o Put one lace through each of the holes at the heal, inserting them from inside to outside and pulling the laces snug o Again cross the laces over the instep o Thread the laces through the holes on the side again from inside to outside o Cross the laces over the instep one more time and pull them snug o Wrap the laces behind the ankle and back to the front. Tie the laces securely Notes o Trousers are worn over the boots o White cotton undergloves and black, butyl rubber chemical protective outer gloves are worn under the sleeves o The use of M9 tape at the wrists and ankles is a common procedure to protect against loosening of hook and pile seals and to provide additional sealant protection o MCU-2P Mask Maintenance o Remove the canister. Keep that dry. o Clean with warm soapy water o Air dry before storing in carrier o Replace damaged or worn parts o Pre-fit mask prior to storing in mask carrier o Test drinking tube o Conduct negative pressure test Donning the Mask o Open mask carrier with left hand o Hold bottom of mask carrier with your left hand while removing the mask with your right hand o Slide your thumbs inside the facepiece under all of the head harness straps. Grasp the top of the facepiece and thrust your chin forward o Hold your head still while you raise the mask to your out-thrust chin and bring the harness over the back of your head. o Center the head pad o Grasp the tab ends of the lower straps and tighten them. o Close the outlet valve with the heel of your hand. Breathe out forcibly to clear the mask.

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o Test the mask for fit and for possible leakage by placing your palms over the canisters. When you inhale normally, the mask should collapse against your face.

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111.9 Describe the colors and markings of the NATO biological, chemical, and radiological marker signs

All signs measure 11 across the top and 8 along the sides of the triangle. The signs come in the STANAG 2002 marking kit. o CHEMICAL Yellow triangle with GAS written in 2 red block letters Write the date, time and agent name (if known) on the front of the triangle o BIOLOGICAL Blue triangle with the letters BIO in red 2 block letters Write the date, time of detection and name of agent if known on the front of the triangle o RADIOLOGICAL White triangle with the word ATOM written in 2 black letters Write the dose rate, date/time of reading and the date/time of burst (if known) on the front of the sign

111.10 Describe the color the M-9 chemical agent detector tape turns after it comes in contact with a liquid or blister agent

Detects the presence of liquid nerve and blister agents Spots or streaks on the tape appear pink, red-brown, red-purple, or any shade of red, indicate it has been exposed to a chemical agent

111.11 Describe the colors that M-8 paper turns after it comes in contact with a liquid nerve or blister agent. [ref. e, ch. 9] This paper turns colors when the paper touches a chemical agent. o V-type nerve agent turns the paper dark green o G-type nerve agent turns it yellow o Blister agent turns it red. Person who reads it must not be colorblind.

111.12 Explain the following as it applies to nerve agents: [ref. g, sec. F] Symptoms o Contraction of Pupils (Miosis) o Unexplained runny nose o Unexpected sudden headache o Drooling o Tightness in chest/difficulty in breathing o Localized sweating/muscle twitching in contaminated area of the skin o Stomach cramps o Nausea

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Contents of Nerve Agent Antidote Kit (NAAK) MK1 o Auto-injectors o 1ea Atropine (Green plastic needle end, yellow safety cap) o 1ea 2PAM Chloride (Black needle end, gray safety cap) o 3 NAAK Kits plus 1 CANA are issued to each person. CANA is only used during buddy aid and when convulsions are present. If it has flanges, its CANA. Treatment (self and buddy aid) o Treatment self Don the protective mask Remove a NAAK from the protective mask carrier Inject the meaty part of the thigh with the first injector from the kit (atropine) hold against the thigh for at least 10 seconds Follow immediately with second injector of 2-pam chloride and hold for at least 10 seconds. Bend needle to from a hook and place on the protective outergarment Massage injection site if time permits Wait 10 15 minutes before administering second series of injections (no more than two) o Treatment buddy Mask the casualty Using the casualties NAAK administer three sets of injections immediately and in rapid succession in the thigh muscle of the leg. Hook the expended auto-injectors to the overgarment pocket flap of the casualty Administer the back pressure arm-lift method of artificial ventilation if breathing is difficult or has ceased Administer CANA after third set if hes undergoing convulsions

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111.13 Describe the steps and procedures in utilizing the M-295 and M-291 decontamination kits. [ref. i, ch. 2]

M291 Skin Decontamination kit (Replaces the M258A1) o Wallet-like pouch with 6 decon packets o Black, reactive, and absorbent resin powder o Attached strap for inserting finger. Pat powder onto skin. M-295 is a large version of the M291 and is used for equipment decon

111.14 State how long the Joint Service Lightweight Integrated Suit Technology (JSLIST) suit will provide protection from chemical agents once it is removed from the packaging under the following conditions: [ref. k, par. A] Wash/wear life for chemical protective readiness: o Uncontaminated environment (whichever comes first).............. 6 launderings/45 days of wear/120 calendar days after removal from factory vacuum-sealed bag

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Wear life for chemical protective readiness, once chemically contaminated...................................................................... 24 hours

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111.15 Discuss laundering procedures for the JSLIST. [ref. k, par. A] For mission-ready JSLIST chemical protective overgarment, the following cleaning precautions must be adhered to, or chemical/biological exposure in real-life scenarios may result: o Do not starch, bleach, dry clean, or steam press any items. o Do not attempt stain removal on mission-ready items, as it may result in damage to clothing (stain removal only authorized on training items). o CAUTION: Prior to laundering and drying, make sure all slide fasteners are engaged and all hooks are fastened to prevent rips and tears during laundering. o Laundering. Approved laundering methods are as follows: Field laundering. Refer to FM 10-280 (Appendix A, Formula II), Mobile Field Laundry Clothing Exchange and Bath Operations. Navy personnel refer to NAVEDTRA 10176 (Formula III), Ships Serviceman 3. Machine (home)/hand laundering. Use permanent press wash cycle, or hand wash using warm water 90-110F (3243C) and mild non-phosphate laundry detergent. Stain removal. Stain removal is only authorized for training items; it is not authorized for mission-ready items. Refer to FM 21-15 (Chapter 2 and Appendix D), Care and Use of Individual Clothing and Equipment, for instructions on stain removal. o Drying. Approved drying methods are as follows: Field tumble drying. Use FM 10-280 (Appendix A, Formula II), ), Mobile Field Laundry Clothing Exchange and Bath Operations. Shipboard personnel refer to Naval Ships Technical Manual, Chapters 470 and 655, concerning dryers installed on specific ship classes. Machine (home) drying. Tumble dry, at low temperature 110-120F (43-48C) and remove immediately from dryer. Hang drying. To drip dry, remove from water and place on rust-proof hanger. Do not puncture JSLIST chemical protective overgarment when hang drying on a clothesline, on rust-proof hangers, or for the purpose of identification, since puncturing will compromise CB protection. o Record of laundering. Always mark the next laundering record box on the clothing garment label (see Chapter 1), with an indelible marker, after any laundering. For field laundry, the laundry operation personnel are responsible for marking the garment.

111.16 Discuss the following types of decontamination: [ref. c, ch. 6] Immediate

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Skin decon To include yourself and your weapon o Operator spray down Operational o Allows a force to fight longer and sustain its mission while contaminated. o Removal of gross contaminants o MOPP gear exchange o Jiffy (Dahlke Decon) Thorough o Detailed troop and equipment decon o Reduce contaminants to a negligible risk o o

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111.17 Discuss the procedure for setting up a personnel decontamination line. [ref. l, ch. 3] The PDS is set up in a secure, uncontaminated area upwind from the contaminated site. o Personnel from both the decontamination and the supported unit operate the PDS under the supervision of the Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Defense Officer. o Removing contaminated MOPP gear, decontaminating the Protective mask and weapon are the major actions in the Detailed Troop Decontamination (DTD). The web gear is buried since it can not be fully decontaminated. o The CBR Team is responsible for setting up, operating, and closing the DTD in a thorough decon site. o The CBR office recommends to the COC the general location of the DTD within the decon site

111.18 Discuss the procedure for setting up a detailed equipment decontamination line. [ref. l, ch. 3]

Stations should be 30 50m apart Station 1: Initial wash o Remove gross contamination and dirt from vehicles. Station 2: Decontaminant Application o Need an ample supply of HTH Bleach. o Vehicle is divided into 4 parts. A member of the scrubbing team is assigned to each part of the vehicle starting at the top and working toward the undercarriage. Station 3: Interior Decon Station 4: Rinse Decontamination Site Considerations o Ample water supply (adjacent to streams lakes that are not contaminated) o Good drainage to control the contamination that washes off. o Off the main route (Avoid spreading of contamination) o Upwind from the contaminated area.

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111.19 Discuss the duties and responsibility of the following CBR team: [ref. i, ch. 4; ref. j, ch. 4] Personal DECON o Set up and operate the Detailed Troop Decontamination Vehicle DECON o Set up and operate the Detailed Equipment Decontamination/Jiffy Decon Survey/monitor team o Find/Identify contamination or monitor movement/levels of existing contamination.

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111.20 State the purpose and the optimum location of the M-22 chemical alarm. [ref. a] Purpose o The ALARM, CHEMICAL AGENT, AUTOMATIC: M22 detects and senses chemical Warfare nerve (G or V-Series) and blister (HSeries) agents in the air and provides a visual and audible warning via the built-in display and audible alarm or the ABCA-M42 Alarm Unit. The M22 bar-graph display indicates the concentration levels of the hazardous agent vapors detected by agent class. o Basic Components M88 Detector Unit, M42 Remote Alarm, the M28 Power Supply or Battery (BA5590) and the M281 Mounting Kit o Optimum Location M88 Placed Upwind M42 Placed downwind inside camp Maximum of 5 M42 Alarms can be attached to 1 M88. Maximum distance from M42 to M88 is 400m When fixed emplacement, M88 is placed 150 meters forward of the FLOT and 300 meters between power sources.

111.21 Explain the three types of CBR surveys and their uses. [ref. h, ch. 5] Point Survey o Get directly to the pointed area (Grid coordinate) Route survey o Routes and specific points may be surveyed if that information is usually found during recon operations o If conducted, the survey team goes to a specific point or points along a route and tests for the presence of liquid contamination with M8 paper or M9 detector tape Area survey o The goal of an area surveillance mission is to provide a tailored detection capability in those tactical situations where it is impractical to employ remote point samplers, such as M8A1 system.

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111.22 Describe what type of standard decontamination agent reacts violently with liquid mustard agent? [ref. i, app. D]

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Super Tropical Bleach (STB) reacts violently by igniting spontaneously upon contact with liquid mustard agent STB should not be inhaled or come in contact with the skin. STB gives off toxic vapors upon contact with G agents.

111.23 Discuss the following as it relates to CBR: [ref. j, ch. 2] Chemical o Pre-attack actions Extended wear of protective clothing. (The individual may have to adapt to wearing protective clothing and equipment for extended periods.) M9 Chemical Agent Detector Paper. Attach to clothing. If spots or streaks on the paper appear pink, red-brown, redpurple or any shad of red, assume it has been exposed to a chemical agent. Individuals must remain alert and constantly aware of the chemical threat. Protection of Individual Equipment. Keep equipment and supplies organized and covered o Attack Stop breathing. Close eyes. Don protective mask Give the alarm Continue the mission and wait for further orders Assist others when the situation permits o After-attack Remain in protective gear and continue your mission Give first aid to casualties in the immediate vicinity when the situation and mission permit Await the commanders orders for unmasking Issue the NBC 1 Report. Nuclear Attack Actions o Pre-attack actions Fighting position The deeper the fighting hole, the more protection it provides An overhead covering of earth or other material will help reduce the amount of thermal and initial nuclear radiation and fallout material from reaching the individual Cover must be sturdy enough to withstand the blast wave Field Shelters Tunnels, caves and storm drains provide effective shelter. Vehicles made of steel provide some protection.

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Supplies and Equipment Equipment and supplies not being worn should be placed in the fighting hole to prevent them from becoming missiles.

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o Attack
Drop flat on the ground facedown or to the bottom of a fighting hole. Close your eyes Protect exposed skin from heat by putting your hands and arms near or under your body. Keep your helmet on. Remain down until after the blast has passed and debris has stopped falling. Stay clam, check for injury, check weapons and equipment for damage, and prepare to continue mission o After-attack Begin fallout monitoring Bathe and change clothes as soon as possible Avoid breathing dust (place handkerchief or similar cloth over mouth) Remember run off water is contaminated. 111.24 Explain and discuss the following dosimetry equipment: [ref. h, ch. 4] IM 143

o It is a direct reading instrument capable of detecting and recording


a total dose of up to 600 roentgens. It is termed a pocket dosimeter and is about the size and shape of a fountain pen. IM 9 o Pocket dosimeter that measures from 0 to 200 milliroentgens. PP4276 o Charger for the IM143 and IM9 that also zeros it out. ANPDQ1 o Multi-function Radiac set. Handheld electronic monitoring device containing an internal gamma detector and measurement probes for Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Neutron, and X-ray.

112 EMBARKATION FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] NAVEDTRA 14233, Naval Construction Force/Seabee 1 & C [b] AMC Pamphlet 36-101, Vol. I, AMC Affiliation Program Equipment Preparation Course [c] AMC Pamphlet 36-101, Vol. II, AMC Affiliation Program Airlift Planners Course [d] NAVFAC P-1041, Container Operations Manual for the Naval Construction Force

107

COMMON CORE
[e] COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCBINST 4627.1, NCF MPF Operations [f] MCRP 4-11.3F, Convoy Operations Handbook [g] P-1039, Naval Construction Force Mobilization Manual [h] NWP 4-04.1, Seabee Operations in the MAGTF______________________________ 112.1 Describe the organization and makeup of an air detachment and state its required deployable time frame. [ref. h, ch. 2] Air Detachment (P25MCA) o 89 people o 34 pieces of CESE o 250 300 short tons of cargo o Deploy within 48 hours o Self sufficient for 30 days (except for food, fuel and ammo) o Repairs war damage and / or construct urgent projects

110

112.2 Explain the operations of the Mount Out Control Center (MOCC). [ref. a, ch. 4] Controls, coordinates, and monitors the movement of all personnel, supplies, and equipment to an embarkation staging area.

112.3 Define the following as applied to embarkation: [ref. c, Glossary] ACL (Allowable Cabin /Cargo load) o Amount of passengers/cargo that may be transported by a specific aircraft. ALCE (U.S. Air Force Airlift Control Element) o Supports airlift missions where command control, mission reporting, and / or support functions are limited or do not exist. Marshalling o Process by which units move equipment, cargo, and personnel to temporary staging area near embarkation points. AACG (Arrival Airfield Control Group) o Responsible for receiving all airlifted items and movement from airfield to deployment site. DACG (Departure Airfield Control Group) o Responsible for controlling the flow of personnel, cargo, and equipment from the marshalling area to the aircraft.

112.4 Describe how equipment and cargo are to be prepared for air/sea/rail movement. [ref. b, ch. 7] CESE o o o o o o Cargo Cleaned Mechanically inspected Reduced height (remove ROPs) Mobile loaded (if necessary) Weighed, and marked with center of balance Staged

108

COMMON CORE
Inventoried Palletized 463L aircraft pallet (AIR) 40 X 48 wood pallet (SEA) o Containerized in appropriate ISO container o Weighed and marked/staged 463L Pallet o Exterior dimension 108 X 88Usable dimension 104 X 84 o Maximum cargo height 96 o 10,000 lbs. max (netted load) 7,500 lbs. preferred weight o Weight: 290 lbs./ Two green nets (sides) and one yellow net (top) 65lbs o Aluminum shell with a balsa wood interior o Able to be locked into the aircraft rail system o o o o

110

112.5 State the four types of Air Mobility Command (AMC) organic aircraft and their primary use and mission. [ref. c, chs. 3 thru 5, 8] C-130 Hercules o Tactical aircraft used for in-theater operations o Planning ACL 25,000 lbs. o Maximum cargo dimensions 115 X 105 o Six 463L pallet positions o Maximum seating for 90 passengers, but limited to 74 passenger over water C-141B Starlifter (PHASED OUT) o Strategic aircraft used for global movement o Planning ACL 50,000 lbs. o Maximum cargo dimension 117 X 105 o Thirteen 463L pallet positions o Maximum seating capacity for 200 passenger, but limited to 153 passengers over water C-17 Globemaster III o Strategic/tactical aircraft used for inter-theater and in-theater transportation of troops and outsized cargo o ACL 90,000 lbs. o Maximum cargo dimension 196W x 143H o Eighteen 463L pallet positions in the logistics restraint rail system o Eleven 463L pallets in the aerial delivery rail system o Minimum runway 3,000 ft o Maximum seating for 102 passengers C-5 Galaxy o Global strategic aircraft used for inter-theater transport of troops and outsized cargo. o Planning ACL 150,000 lbs. o Maximum cargo dimensions 228W x 162H

109

113/105

COMMON CORE
Thirty six 463L pallet positions Maximum seating for 343 passengers, but limited to 329 passengers over water 112.6 Describe what is on the Convoy Commanders checklist. [ref. f, app. A] o o Mission Requirements Reconnaissance Route Selection Liaison and Coordinate Convoy Organization Convoy Organization (Continued) Movement Plan Security Enroute Security Enroute (Continued) Service Support Communications Convoy Commanders After-Action Report

110

112.7 Explain how convoy road routes are classified. [ref. f, app. D]

Green: Relatively safe from hostile activity Yellow: Subject to limited activity Red: Hostile activity is imminent

112.8 What factors determine the speed at which a convoy will move? [ref. f, ch. 4] Normal speed at the lead of the column in a combat situation is 5 to 10 miles per hour (mph) below posted speed limits with a maximum speed that allows for regaining lost distances. The rate of speed is determined by: o Physical condition and level of training of the vehicle operators. o Types and mechanical condition of the convoy vehicles. o Degree of urgency the move requires. o Condition of the road net (dust, mud, snow, and ice). o Physical characteristics of the roadway along the route (grades, sharp turns, congestion). o Weather conditions

112.9 Describe the different types of cargo containers that may be used for unit movements. [ref. d, ch. 12] Kit and mount-out boxes o 20W x 48L o 250 lbs. per box TRICONS o 6 x 8 x 8 Standard 20 o 8 x 8 x 20 Configured 20 o 8 x 8 x 20 o with built-in cabinets

110

COMMON CORE
Flatrack o 8 x 8 x 20 o Open ended Half Height o 8 x 4 x 20 SIXCON o 61/2 x 8 x 4 o used to transport fuel and water

110

112.10 Define the following as applied to Maritime Prepositioning Force (MPF). [ref. e, ch. 1]

Survey, Liaison, and Reconnaissance Party (SLRP) o The SLRP deploys to the AAA at the direction of the CMPF. The SLRP is a task organization consisting of survey and liaison personnel to provide/gather information concerning the AAA for the CMPF and the MEF and deploying MAGTF commanders. These assessments include, but are not limited to: Site reconnaissance of the AAA. Development of security requirements. Verification of the layout of the AAA. o The SLRP forms the initial element of the Advance Party and is disestablished when the Arrival Assembly Operations Group (AAOG) is established and activated for operations. Off-load Preparation Party (OPP) o The OPP is a task organization of maintenance and equipment operators from the MAGTF elements and the NSE. Upon completion of off-load preparations, the OPP becomes the nucleus of the ship's debarkation teams. The task organization and duties for the OPP is provided in Chapter 6. It deploys aboard MPS and performs off-load preparations (i.e. installs and charges vehicle batteries) while the ship (or MPSRON) is underway. Its function is to ensure that all MAGTF/NSE vehicles and equipment are prepared for off-load as well as preparing and testing the ships cranes and MHE for offload operations. Advance Party o The Advance Party is formed from personnel from the SLRP augmented by individuals and equipment from the deploying elements of the main body. The Advance Party establishes the AAOG, the Landing Force Support Party (LFSP) (including its subordinate organizations and the surge and throughput drivers), and the Arrival and Assembly Operation Elements (AAOEs). Main Body o The Main Body consists of the remaining forces not involved in the arrival and assembly operation (e.g. combat forces). o Arrival of the Main Body too early can create a severe vulnerability for the forces ashore. Therefore, the Main Body arrival must be carefully timed to allow all personnel and equipment needed for the Advance Party organizations to arrive in the AAA before the Main Body begins to deploy and so as not to draw down on the logistics support for the off-load/throughput operations. For example,

111

COMMON CORE
adequate meals, medical support, water production/storage, etc. must be ashore and available from prepositioned assets prior to the influx of personnel from the Main Body. If not properly executed, the flow of the Main Body can result in significant logistics problems for the MAGTF. The Main Body will flow in a sequenced priority required to stand up the MAGTF for subsequent employment.

110

112.11 Discuss the MPF. [ref. e]

The maritime pre-positioning concept calls for the ships of the MPSRON to be forward-deployed with the combat equipment and sustaining supplies for a MAGTF (up to a MEF). When the MPF operation is ordered, the Marines, Sailors, and Seabees of the MAGTF, NSE, and NCR are airlifted by the Air Mobility Command (AMC) to the arrival and assembly area where the MPSRON ships are off-loaded and the combat units are assembled with their equipment and supplies. Fixed wing aircraft and CH53E helicopters (if feasible) are flight ferried/self deployed to a suitable airfield in the designated arrival and assembly area. Once the equipment and supplies have been offloaded and issued to the units, command, control, and communications have been established, and the MAGTF commander has stated that he is combat ready, the MPF operation will be terminated and operational control of the MAGTF will be transferred to the numbered fleet commander, joint/combined task force commander, or the geographic Commander, Marine Forces (COMMARFOR), which ever is appropriate, for subsequent operations ashore. A fully capable MEF Forward sized MAGTF can be combat ready in a maximum of ten days after commencement of the off-load and, because of the maritime pre-positioning of supplies and equipment, can be self-sustaining for 30 days in most classes of supply.

112.12 Describe the purpose of shipper declaration of hazardous goods. [ref. b, ch. 7] DD From 1387-2 is the shipper declaration of hazardous goods form and its use ensures hazardous goods will be properly packaged, marked, and handled in a safe manner. It also acts a custody receipt for special handling materials.

112.13 Discuss the information found on a Time-Phased Force Deployment Data (TPFDD). [ref. g, app. 3]

The Joint Operation Planning and Execution System data base portion of an operation plan; it contains time-phased force data, non-unit-related cargo and personnel data, and movement data for the operation plan, including: o In-place units o Units to be deployed to support the operation plan with a priority indicating the desired sequence for their arrival at the port of debarkation. o Routing of forces to be deployed. o Movement data associated with deploying forces.

112

COMMON CORE
o o Estimates of non-unit-related cargo and personnel movements to be conducted concurrently with the deployment of forces. Estimate of transportation requirements that must be fulfilled by common-user lift resources as well as those requirements that can be fulfilled by assigned or attached transportation resources.

110

113

COMMON CORE 113 CIVIL ENGINEER SUPPORT EQUIPMENT (CESE) FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] NAVFAC P-300, Management of Civil Engineering Support Equipment [b] COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCBINST 11100.1, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Equipment Management [c] NAVEDTRA 14081, Equipment Operator, Basic___________________________ 113.1 Discuss the following terms: [ref. a, app. B]

113

CESE (Civil Engineer Support Equipment) o Is industrial equipment that is typically non-portable shop equipment costing more than $1,000 MHE (Material Handling Equipment) Forklifts WHE (Weight Handling Equipment) Cranes POL (Petroleum, Oil and Lubricants) Fuels, motor oils, etc

113.2 Explain the importance of proper operator equipment maintenance and operation. [ref. b, ch. 3] Proper maintenance is the care given and the work performed to keep vehicles and equipment in safe and serviceable operating condition during their normal service life. Maintenance helps detect minor deficiencies before they lead to costly repairs. The first sign of vehicle trouble should be detected by the operator during one of the three daily inspections. These inspections occur before, during, and after operations. o During Operators Inspections- Consists of the operator using knowledge of the equipment and his or her senses to detect indications needing attention. o Be aware of the following indications of possible failure: The smell of burning rubber, grease or clutches The sound of unusual noises The unusual fluctuations or readings on instruments and gauges The feel of drag, pull, or vibration. The loss of tire air pressure or rocks in the tires. After operation inspection and service require the operator to first perform proper shutdown procedures o After shutdown, operators must perform the following: Check equipment cleanliness Drain air tanks and cover exhaust stacks Close doors, window, and hoods Set the brakes and chock the wheels Block dump beds for draining Top off fuel tanks if the tanks are less than full Report any defects on the trouble report.

113.3 Explain the procedures in filling out and submitting an operators inspection guide trouble report and vehicle trip ticket. [ref. b, ch. 2] Motor vehicle utilization record o Used for each item of automotive equipment and trailers on a daily or trip basis o Commonly called a trip ticket o Official authorization to operate a vehicle, whether it is driven by the requester or driven by a pool operator.

COMMON CORE

113

The NAVFAC Form 9-11240/13 is issued by the Dispatcher prior to issuing trip tickets. The form is to be completed according to the instructions contained thereon, and returned to the Yard Boss for review and initials. The NAVFAC Form 9-11240/2 is completed prior to issuing the DD Form 1970 (figure 2-3). The Yard Boss reviews all Trouble Reports (Hard Cards) to determine deficiencies that require immediate attention. Any safety deficiency warrants immediate repairs. o If deficiencies are not the operator's responsibility, the vehicle will be turned in to the shop for repairs and will not be dispatched until deficiencies are corrected. o If deficiencies are the operator's responsibility the Yard Boss will instruct the operator to make the required repairs. When repairs have been made and have been inspected by the Yard Boss, the vehicle may be dispatched. o After repairs have been made, or if no repairs are required, a trip ticket, DD Form 1970, may be issued. The Dispatcher maintains a file of Trouble Reports (Hard Cards) that have discrepancies by PM group. When the vehicle goes into the shop for scheduled PM, these cards will accompany the vehicle to the inspection stations to insure that the inspector has a history of the vehicle since the last PM. Each NAVFAC Form 9-11240/13 contains the following: o USN number. o Date. o Total miles/hours. o Appropriate items checked. o Adequate description of trouble. o Operator's signature. o Any other items required locally.

113.4 Describe the difference between organic and augment CESE beep stickers and how they are used. [ref. b, ch. 3] The difference between the Organic and Augment CESE BEEP Stickers are: o The Organic BEEP sticker has a red background with a 2-inch white numbers and the Augment BEEP sticker has a white background with 2-inch red numbers. o The Organic CESE is part of the TOA and the Augment CESE is not part of the Battalion TOA.

113.5 State the purpose of a Standard Forms 91 and DD-518. [ref. c, ch. 6] The SF 91 is a Motor Vehicle Accident Report. o Obtain and properly spell names and street addresses of persons involved in the mishap and all witnesses to the accident. o Carefully note weather conditions, road conditions, position of the vehicle involved, and other details. o Describe all events of the accident in detail to the point that a person although never having been at the scene, could visualize the accident. o State visible damage, such as "crushed right rear wheel or crumpled fender." The DD-518 is an accident identification card.

113.6 State the purposes and uses of the following licenses: [ref. b, ch. 2, sec. 5] OF/346

COMMON CORE
o The military drivers license which lists the vehicles you are authorized to drive.
Can be from 1 ton pick-up truck to 20 ton tractor. GOOD FOR 3 YEARS.

113

11260/2 o Heavy construction equipment license. Maintained with your license record in the license examiners office. It lists all the construction equipment you are authorized to operate. GOOD FOR 2 YEARS.

NMCB SPECIFIC 101 SAFETY FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] OPNAVINST 3500.39A, Operational Risk Management________________________ 101.1 Discuss the concept of Operational Risk Management (ORM). [p. 2]

101

ORM is a decision making process that enhances operational capability. Naval Warfare Publication 1 states, "Risk management and risk assessment are formal, essential tools of operational planning. Sound decision making requires the use of these tools both in battle and in training." ORM, described in enclosure (1), is a method for identifying hazards, assessing risks and implementing controls to reduce the risk associated with any operation.

101.2 Explain the following as they apply to ORM: Identifying hazards [p. 2] o Identify Hazards - Begin with an outline or chart of the major steps in the operation (operational analysis). Next, conduct a Preliminary Hazard Analysis by listing all of the hazards associated with each step in the operational analysis along with possible causes for those hazards. Assessing hazards [p. 2] o Assess Hazards - For each hazard identified, determine the associated degree of risk in terms of probability and severity. Although not required, the use of a matrix may be helpful in assessing hazards described further in paragraph d). Making risk decisions [p. 2] o Make Risk Decisions - First, develop risk control options. Start with the most serious risk first and select controls that will reduce the risk to a minimum consistent with mission accomplishment. With selected controls in place, decide if the benefit of the operation outweighs the risk. If risk outweighs benefit or if assistance is required to implement controls, communicate with higher authority in the chain of command. Implementing controls [pp. 2, 3] o Implement Controls - The following measures can be used to eliminate hazards or reduce the degree of risk. These are listed by order of preference: Administrative Controls - Controls that reduce risks through specific administrative actions, such as: Providing suitable warnings, markings, placards, signs, and notices. Establishing written policies, programs instructions and standard operating procedures (SOP). Training personnel to recognize hazards and take appropriate precautionary measures. Limiting the exposure to a hazard (either by reducing the number of personnel/assets or the length of time they are exposed). Engineering Controls - Controls that use engineering methods to reduce risks by design, material selection or substitution when technically or economically feasible. Personal Protective Equipment - Serves as a barrier between personnel and a hazard. It should be used when other controls do not reduce the hazard to an acceptable level. Supervising [p. 3]

NMCB SPECIFIC
o

101

Supervise - Conduct follow-up evaluations of the controls to ensure they remain in place and have the desired effect. Monitor for changes, which may require further ORM. Take corrective action when necessary.

NMCB SPECIFIC 102 ADMINISTRATION/COMMAND AND CONTROL FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] NWP 4-04.1, U.S. Navy, Seabee Operations in the MAGTF [b] NAVEDTRA 14235, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 2 [c] Commanders Policy Memorandum #3-06, Seabee Engineer Reconnaissance Teams (SERT) [d] NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 1 [e] Blue Jackets Manual, 23rd Edition_________________________________________ 102.1 Discuss the function of the following companies within the battalion: [ref. d, ch. 1]

102

Alfa [p. 1-10] o Responsible for the operation and maintenance of the automotive, construction and materials-handling equipment assigned to the battalion. Bravo [p. 1-10] o Responsible for water, sanitary sewer, and power distribution systems, fuel systems, and communications projects. Bravo Company serves as a mini public works department providing for maintenance and operation of the units camp. Charlie/Delta [p. 1-10] o The battalions general construction company. They are the prime contractors and occasional subcontractors; normally equal in strength and capabilities; they function as prime contractors for vertical construction. Headquarters [pp. 1-10 thru 1-12] o The administrative and military organization for all enlisted personnel assigned to the NMCBs executive and special staffs. They provided support to the line companies in construction and disaster recovery operations.

102.2 Describe the mission of Seabee Engineer Reconnaissance Teams (SERT). [ref. c] The SERTs primary mission is to collect and assess engineering intelligence and project information for the supported or parent unit for design and tasking of constructed work. The team must be able to perform this mission in a hostile environment, mounted or dismounted, during day or night, in the full range of projected operational environments, and must possess long-range voice and data communications capability.

102.3 State the purpose of and describe the following: Combat Operation Center (COC) [ref. b, pp. 1-6 thru 1-16] o A COC is capable of collecting, processing, displaying, evaluating, and disseminating tactical information and is manned by watch standers at CBR, Operations, and Fire Support Coordinator desks. The COC has an organic communications capability that provides visual and internal/external, tactical and secure, voice and data communications systems. NMCBs can also implement OPSEC measures. Alternate Combat Operation Center (ACOC) [ref. b, p. 1-8] o Requires the same information and set-up as COC; assumes control of battalion if COC is destroyed.

NMCB SPECIFIC

102

Company Command Post (CP) [ref. a, ch. 5] o The CP is capable of collecting, processing, displaying, evaluating, and disseminating tactical information that is in its AOR to the COC and is manned by a watch stander and a member of the Companys senior leadership. Air Detachment (AIRDET) [ref. a, pp. 2-10, 2-11] o The mission of the Air DET, as an advance element of an NMCB, is to repair war damage and construct urgent projects as required by major operational plans or as tasked by a MAGTF commander. Although its taskings are mission-dependent, the Air DET generally spans the scope of possible NMCB construction taskings. Refer to Appendix B for specific construction capabilities. o Organization. Typically commanded by a Navy CEC Lieutenant, an NMCB Air DET is a task-organized, advance element of the NMCB typically organized as illustrated in Figure 2-2. The personnel and equipment of an Air DET can be tailored to specific projects. It typically is composed of 89 personnel and 39 items of CESE and equates to 250 to 300 STs (approximately 14 C-141, 8 C-17, or 5 C-5 lift equivalents) of strategic airlift. The Air DET may also have its personnel and equipment TOA tailored to a mission-specific role and configured for deployment on tactical (e.g., C-130 or C-17) airlift. o Concept of Employment. The NMCB Air DET can deploy by strategic lift with the assets listed in Appendix C within 48 hours and may either be employed independently or with other Seabee elements. The Air DET is an augmentation unit capable of supporting the short-term engineering requirements of forward-deployed MEUs on little advance notice. It should be considered as the lead echelon of an NMCB.

102.4 Identify and explain the purpose of the following ratings in a Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB): [ref. e, pp. 23 thru 35]

SK: Store Keeper, manages the Battalions TOA RP: Religious Programmer, manages the Battalions library on deployment, administrative assistant to the Battalion Chaplin, and provides defensive protection to the Chaplin in combat. BM: Boatswains Mate, Typically a Chief who is the CMAA and responsible for the quarterdeck, security, and drug testing within the command. SH: Ships Serviceman, runs the command barbershop and procures and issues uniforms. CS: Culinary Specialist, operates the command mess during deployment and works in the general mess during homeport. LN: Legalman, the command liaison for military legal matters. MR: Machinery Repairman, assigned to A Co for the repair and manufacture of metalwork. MA: Master at Arms, performs security, quarterdeck watch, and assists CMAA. NC: Career Counselor, assists Seabees with career goals/decisions. HT: Hull Technician, certified welder assigned to A Co for the repair of metal work. HM: Hospital Corpsman, provides basic medical care and administratively assists the Battalion Medical Officer in the performance of the mission. PS: Personnelman, maintains the enlisted service records and assists personnel on administrative issues. Assists Battalion personnel with official military pay issues. DT: Dental Technician provides basic dental care and administratively assists the Battalion Dental Officer in the performance of the mission. MC: Photographer, photographically records the history of the Battalion and assists the PAO in developing media coverage of the Battalion.

NMCB SPECIFIC

YN: Yeoman, administrative assistant to senior Officers. ET: Electronics Technician, repair and maintain communication equipment. GM: Gunners Mate, Maintains the Battalion Armory and performs weapon repairs. IT: Information Technician, maintains and operates the Battalions computer assets. PC: Postal Clerk, processes incoming and outgoing mail for the Battalion.

102

NMCB SPECIFIC 103 SUPPLY/LOGISTICS FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] Seabee Logistics Training Guide, Module 2A [b] COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCBINST 4400.3, Seabee Supply Manual [c] NAVSUP P-485, Afloat Supply, Vol. 1 [d] EBUSOPSOFFINST 4200.1, Department of Navy Policies and Procedures for the Operation and Management of the Government Commercial Purchase Card Program

103

103.1 State the purpose of the NMCB Table of Allowance (TOA) as it relates to the following: [ref. a, app. 1]

P25MC: Consists of a 125 man Core module, when combined with an MCA provides a 250 man self-sustaining camp, 3 cores per P25, 24 pieces of CESE per core. P25MCA: Air Det capable pack up (TA41) reinforced to support 125 man camp, 3 cores per P25, 34 pieces of CESE per core. P25MH: Used to enhance the capability of a Core. Provides A Co shop tools, 49 pieces of CESE, and water well capability. P25MB: Used to enhance main body capabilities. Provides B/C Co shop tools, 42 pieces of CESE, ABM, and H Co support items. P25FIE: Fly-in Echelon. Personal fighting gear, weapons, and radios for SLRP, OPP, AP and MB air movements. P25AP: NMCB advanced party, 69 personnel, (5 days) self-sufficient.

103.2 Discuss the purpose of the MicroSNAP SFM Program. [ref. c, p. 1-74] SFM is the supply/financial component of the MicroSNAP computer program that: o Manages budgets o Produces financial reports o Processes requisitions o Automatically process stock re-orders

103.3 State the purpose of the Non-Operational Ready-Supply/Anticipated Non-Operational ReadySupply (NORS/ANORS) Program. [ref. b, pp. 3-6, 3-7] When a piece of CESE is deadline or anticipated to be, it is designated as NORS or ANORS. o NORS: Not Operationally Ready-Supply (CUCV brakes are out and there are not replacement parts in stock) When a part is designated NORS: Requisition processing is given top priority (A) Delivery date is expedited (potentially overnight rush) o ANORS: Anticipated Not Operationally Ready-Supply (tire is extremely worn but still safe and there are not replacement tires in stock.) When a part is designated ANORS: Requisition processing is given high priority (B) Required delivery date assigned is before the date deadline is anticipated.

NMCB SPECIFIC
103.4 Describe the duties and responsibilities of the Material Liaison Officer (MLO) within the battalion organization. [ref. c, p. 1-9]

103

The MLO Officer is responsible for procuring, receiving, stowing, issuing, shipping, transferring, and accounting for all construction project materials Is also responsible for maintaining related inventory, accountability, financial records, and files.

103.5 Explain the procedures for receipt and storage of project material within the MLO office. [ref. b, pp. 4-1 thru 4-4] When materials are received, they are separated either by the requisition serial number or by the supplementary address/project number Construction material must be protected from the weather, job site damage and theft Only material that can be used during a 2 week period may be requisitioned from MLO

103.6 Describe the procedures for issuing project material from the MLO office. [ref. b, pp. 6-2, 6-3] All material is requisitioned from the MLO on a 1250-1 Personnel must give the MLO the 1250s in advance so the MLO can process the paperwork, draw the materials out of storage, and prepare it for pick-up or delivery to the job site

103.7 State the intended purpose of the Camp Maintenance Store Room (CMSR). [ref. b, p. 1-9] CMSR houses repair parts for in-camp preventive maintenance.

103.8 Explain the uses of the Government Purchase Card Program (GPCP). [ref. d, p. 2] Government credit card o Used for local purchase when a requisition cannot be filled through the Navy Stock System and the purchase cost is less than $2,500. o Only trained cardholders are authorized to make purchases. o Must be approved by Approving Official prior to the buy. Purchase examples: o Consumables paper, pencils o Services- commercial printing, repair contracts.

103.9 Discuss how the Operating Target (OPTAR)/budget impacts your unit. [ref. c, pp. 9-5, 9-6]

OPTAR funds are used for operation and maintenance- Navy (OM&N) needs ONLY. o Cannot buy project materials with this money. NMCB OPTARs are divided into four categories: o 01 - Consumables and Services o 02 - Maintenance Repair Parts (CESE) o 03 - Camp Maintenance o 04 - Deployment Per Diem o NOTE: Funds cannot be transferred between these different pots of money.

NMCB SPECIFIC

103

103.10 Discuss the difference between organic and augment tools, equipment, and repair parts. [ref. b, pp. 2-3, 2-21 thru 2-23] ORGANIC Tools Tools that are included in a basic allowance of tools. This basic allowance of tools enables an activity to carry out operational requirements. Allowance items are selected to provide support in a contingency situation. Organic allowances are not designed to meet every need. AUGMENT Tools Tools NOT in TOA may be requested when an assigned project requires more specific tools to accomplish task.

Class I - Subsistence
Class II - Clothing, Individual Equipment, Tools, Admin. Supplies

A - Nonperishable C - Combat Rations R - Refrigerated S - Other Nonrefrigerated W - Water A - Air B - Ground Support Materiel E - General Supplies F - Clothing G - Electronics M - Weapons T - Industrial Supplies A - POL for Aircraft W - POL for Surface Vehicles P - Packaged POL

Class III - Petroleum, Oils, Lubricants

Class IV - Construction Materials

A - Construction B - Barrier

Class V - Ammunition

A - Air Delivery W - Ground

Class VI - Personal Demand Items


A - Air B - Ground Support Materiel D - Admin. Vehicles G - Electronics J - Racks, Adaptors, Pylons K - Tactical Vehicles L - Missiles M - Weapons N - Special Weapons X - Aircraft Engines

Class VII - Major End Items: Racks, Pylons, Tracked Vehicles, Etc.

NMCB SPECIFIC
Class VIII - Medical Materials

103
A - Medical Materiel B - Blood / Fluids

Class IX - Repair Parts

A - Air B - Ground Support Materiel D - Admin. Vehicles G - Electronics K - Tactical Vehicles L - Missiles M - Weapons N - Special Weapons X - Aircraft Engines

Class X - Material For Nonmilitary Programs

NMCB SPECIFIC 104 COMMUNICATIONS/COMMUNICATIONS SECURITY MATERIAL SYSTEM FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 1 [b] TM-11-5820-890-10-8, SINCGARS Ground Combat Net Radio, ICOM [c] Construction Battle Skills Guide, P-1160, Book 1, All Hands [d] Motorola 68P81044C05-A, XTS 5000 Operators Guide [e] NAVEDTRA 14235, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 2 [f] Harris Guide 10515-0103-4100 (Rev. A), AN/PRC-150(V)(C), Man Pack Radio (Operators Manual) [g] TM 11-5805-749-12, Switchboard, Telephone, SB-3614A(V)/TT Operators Manual [h] TM 11-5805-650-12, Telephone Set, T-838/PT Operators and Organizational Maintenance Manual____________________________________________________ 104.1 Discuss the general characteristics, operator maintenance, and antenna systems for the following: AN/PRC-119A-E [ref. c, p. 358] o General Characteristics VHF SINGARS Radio 30 to 87.975 MHz freq 2320 channels/freqs Sends and receives secure voice and digital data 6 COMSEC channels/ 6 frequency hopping channels 8 single channels (SC) for plain text Transmits 200 meters to 10 kilometers or more Batteries last 4 (BB690) to 30 (BA5590) hrs depending on type & use o Antenna Systems 3ft tape up to 5 miles 10ft whip- up to 10 miles OE-254- up to 36 miles AN/PRC-150 [ref. f, pp. 1-1 thru 1-8] o General Characteristics Long range secure radio No external encryption device required Requires 2 BA-5590 or 2 BB-690 Batteries Smaller and lighter than AN/PRC-104 Frequency Range: 1.6-59.999 MHz Modes of Operation: Lower Side Band (LSB) Upper Side Band (USB) Amplitude Modulation Equivalent (AME) Continuous Wave (CW) Modulation Frequency Modulation (FM) Power Output: 1, 5, 20 Watts PEP/avg. HF 1, 5, 10 Watts PEP/avg. FM Pre-Set Channels: 200

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NMCB SPECIFIC
o Data Rate: 39 tone data to 2400 bps Serial tone data to 2400 bps (TX), 75 bps (RX) FSK data to 600 bps Embedded US Type I Encryption VINSON (Voice & Data) ANDVT/KYV-5 (Voice & Data) KG-84C (Data) Antenna Systems 10 ft Whip Antenna NVIS Antenna- AS 2259 Dipole Antenna

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AN/VRC-90A [ref. b, p. 2-19] o Vehicle mounted communication o General Components Receiver-Transmitter (RT) (RT-1523/A/B/C/D/E) Mounting Base (MB) (MT-6352/A), part of installation kit Vehicular Amplifier Adapter (VAA) (AM-7239/A/B/C/D/E) Handset (HS) (H-250), part of installation kit Loudspeaker (LS) (LS-671), part of installation kit Power Amplifier (PA) (AM-7238/A/B) Cable (W2), connects RT ANT to PA Cable (W4), connects RT to VAA Antenna Cable (CG-3856), part of installation kit Loudspeaker Cable (CX-13292), part of installation kit Power Cable, part of installation kit o Antenna Systems Vehicular Antenna (AS-3900/3916) OE-254 AN/GRA-39 [ref. a, pp. 11-12, 11-13] o Radio Set Control Group AN/GRA-39 provides the capability of remotely controlling a radio set up to a distance of 2 miles, using standard field wire. Remote control allows us to operate the radio set at the desired installation, yet locate the radio set in the best position for more efficient communication between the remote and the local control unit operators. It also provides a buzzer system so the operators may alert one another. The major components of the AN/GRA-39 are the local control unit and the remote control unit. o General Components BAG CW-598: Used for storage and transportation of the AN/GRA-39. Sling, carrying bag, and case: Used for transportation of the bag. Auxiliary sling: Used for carrying either the remote or the local receiver/exciter unit separately. Control Group C-2328: Used to transmit or receive over the remote radio set.

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Control Group C-2329: Connects to the radio being remoted. Connects to the radio audio connector.

AN/VRC-92A [ref. b, p. 2-19] o Used as a base station o Longer VHF ranges of 10 km to 40km with a 50 watt output o Requires power supply for stationary operations o Capable of retransmit use o General Components Two Receiver-Transmitters (RT) (RT-1523/A/B/C/D/E). Mounting Base (MB) (MT-6352/A), part of installation kit. Vehicular Amplifier Adapter (VAA) (AM-7239/A/B/C/D/E). Two Handsets (HS) (H-250), part of installation kit. Two Loudspeakers (LS) (LS-671), part of installation kit. Two Power Amplifiers (PA) (AM-7238/A/B). Power Amplifier Mount (PA Mt) (MT-6353). Cable (W2), connects RT ANT to PA. Two Cables (W4), connect RTs to VAA. Three Cable (CG-3856), 1 connects PA to antenna (5) (2 are in installation kit). Cable (CX-13291), connects RT-B PA Mt to VAA. Cable (CX-13298), connects RT-A to RT-B for RXMT. Cable (CX-13303), connects RT-B PA Mt to MB. Two Loudspeaker Cables (CX-13292), part of installation kit. o Antennae Systems Vehicular Antenna (AS-3900/3916), part of installation kit. OE-254 VHF handheld SABER 1 fascinator [ref. d, p. 1] o General Characteristics Handheld secure radio VHF radio with 2.5 - 6 watts Need radio interface box to fill (ZATI) VHF - 138 to 174 MHz Range - 1 to 3 miles XTS-5000 portable radio [ref. d] o General Characteristics Handheld secure radio VHF radio with 1 - 6 watts Crypto fill via cable VHF - 136 to 174 MHz Range - 1 to 3 miles Radio Operator Maintenance

NMCB SPECIFIC
o Antennas

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Make sure antennas are clean Check antenna elements for damage Make sure the (ground strap) is securely installed to the vehicle and antenna base Cables and cable connectors Check cables for cuts, cracks, and breaks Make sure cable connectors are secure Make sure cable connectors are securely attached to cables Controls and switches Make sure each control moves smoothly while you operate your radio. Make sure all knobs are secure on their shafts. If a switch has detents, make sure each position has a solid feel to it. Mounting and assembly hardware Check for loose nuts, bolts, and screws Check for corrosion, rust, and deterioration of all metal parts. Cleaning Keep radio as clean as possible Preparation for movement Manpack Radio- If you wont be using your radio, remove and stow the antenna and handset Vehicular Radio- Make sure the antenna is properly tied down for movement

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104.2 Discuss the general characteristics and operator maintenance of the following interconnecting wire communication assets: SB-3614A [ref. g] o The SB-3614A switchboard is a tactical, ruggedized, 30-terminal automatic switchboard. It provides rapid automatic service to various interfaces. The basic switchboard may be operated as a 30-terminal single switchboard or may be connected with additional switchboards to form a 60 or 90 line system. The operator monitors, answers, initiates, extends, preempts, and releases calls through actuation of a four-byfour pushbutton keypad and other functional pushbuttons. Any connection can be broken down manually, through operator intervention and action, or automatically, by a subscriber going on hook (hanging-up). o The operator can provide call assistance and one-time call privileges as specified below without affecting the normal privileges or restrictions of the calling party. Call completion assistance. Directory and routing information. Trouble reporting. Call completion to or from outside networks requiring manual interface or with which the subscriber does not have direct dial access. Busy and no answer condition verification. Conference call set up. One-time precedence/preemption privileges. Test tone connection to any line or trunk.

NMCB SPECIFIC
o Up to 18 of the terminals may be connected as 4-wire trunks or E&M dial pulse or
o

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DTMF lines or trunks. The switchboard provides fully automatic operation with DTMF touch tone subsets and 2- and 4-wire automatic trunks. It also provides limited automatic operation with rotary dial pulse subsets. In the case of common battery signaling or ringdown lines and trunks without DTMF capability, the switchboard provides call extension service through the operator. TA-312/PT [ref. c, p. 354] o 2 wire tactical phone o Talks up to 14 miles wet, up to 22 miles dry o Operates on 2 D cells o Press to talk handset o Hand crank to call distant stations o Talk 4 miles in ear piece with dead batteries TA-838/PT [ref. h] o The TA-838/PT telephone set is a ruggedized, solid state field telephone. It can be used as a desk telephone or installed vertically. The telephone set uses 16 pushbutton keys arranged in a 4 by 4 keyset configuration. A tone ringer (miniature loudspeaker horn) sounds when an incoming ringing signal is received. The volume is controlled by the RING VOLUME control. The LED RING indicator lamp can glow when an incoming ringing signal is received. The lamp is controlled by its ON-OFF switch. o It can be configured as a subscriber telephone set connected to the switchboard by 2wire or 4-wire lines, or connected directly to another Telephone Set by 4-wire lines, or used as an extension telephone set. Wire connections to the extension telephone set must be the same as the wire connections from the subscriber telephone set to the switchboard. o General technical information Transmission frequency range: 300 to 3,500 Hz. Distance ranges with DC supervision: The telephone set is located less than 4 miles from the switchboard. Distance ranges with AC supervision: The telephone set can be located more than 4 miles from the switchboard. Battery power for arctic operations: 4 each BA-3042/U. Battery power for all other operations: 4 each BA-42 or equivalent (Type C flashlight cell). Dimensions: Packaged (6 high by 10 deep by 6 wide). Weight: 6.5 pounds.

104.3 Discuss the use of the AN/CYZ-10 communications security material system equipment. [ref. b, pp. 3-1 thru 3-4] AUTOMATED NET CONTROL DEVICE (ANCD) (AN/CYZ-10) o Capable of receiving, storing, and transferring data from ANCD to ANCD, from ANCD to SINCGARS radios, and from ANCD to other compatible communications/electronic equipment. The ANCD is used primarily for handling of COMSEC keys, FH data, sync time, and signal operating instructions (SOI) information. For SINCGARS applications, the ANCD replaces COMSEC devices such as KYK- 13, KYX- 15, and KOI- 18 as well as electronic counter counter-measure (ECCM) fill MX- 18290. o A typical ANCD data load at the operator level consists of two loadsets (COMSEC keys and FH data for all six radio channels), each good for 30 days of operation, plus 60

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days of SOI information, structured in five ten-day editions, containing two 5-day sets each. CAPACITIES When used for a single or special purpose, an ANCD can store as many as 20 load sets (COMSEC and FH data), and two or more division-wide editions (10 days each). The number of smaller unit SOI editions that can be stored in an ANCD depends entirely on the size of the SOI extract. An ANCD will also store as many as 120 COMSEC keys (traffic encryption key [TEK] or key encryption key [KEK]), or 280 transmission security keys (TSKs).

104.4 Discuss the tactical employment and purpose of NMCB communication systems. Tactical employment loops: o Rifleman o Fire Team leader o Squad Leader o Platoon Leader o Company CP o COC o Regiment o MAGTF Purpose: Strong coordination between rifleman up to MAGTF and beyond can ensure a victorious outcome for any combat mission assigned to a Seabee organization.

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104.5 Discuss the procedure for installing communications security material system information into the AN/PRC-119A-E. [ref. b, pp. 5-29 thru 5-32] NEXT PAGE

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NMCB SPECIFIC 105 WEAPONS FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 1 [b] TM-08521A-1011A-MK19, 40mm Grenade Machine Gun, MOD 3 [c] NAVEDTRA 14235, Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol. 2 [d] TM-SW215-B4-MMO-010, Operators and Maintenance Manual for AN/PVS-12A, Night Vision, Individual Weapon [e] FM 23-99, Mortars [f] NAVEDTRA 14324, Gunner's Mate [g] FM 23-9, M16A1 and M16A2 Rifle Marksmanship [h] TM-SW215-AK-MMO-010, Night Vision Sight, Individual Goggles [i] NAVSEA OP 4067, Operator Manual for AN/VPS-11, Pocket Scope Night Vision Device [j] Construction Battle Skills Guide, P-1162, Book 3, E7 and Above Individual Skills [k] TM-SW215-BC-MMO-010, Operators and Maintenance Manual for AN/PVS-12A, Night Vision, Crew Served Weapons [l] Construction Battle Skills Guide, P-1163, Book 4, Crew/Team Skills [m] Construction Battle Skills Guide, P-1160, Book 1, All Hands [n] FM 3-22.68, Department of the Army Crew-Served Machine Guns, 5.56mm and 7.62mm____________________________________________________________ The following items apply to the 7.62mm M240B machine gun:

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105.1 Describe the characteristics of the machine gun. [ref. n, pp. 3-1 thru 3-3]

Air-cooled, Belt-fed, Gas-operated, Fully Automatic weapon, Fires from open bolt Position and is Crew served o Length................................49 inches o Weight ...............................27.6 pounds o Maximum range ................3,725 meters

105.2 Discuss loading/unloading procedures. [ref. n, pp. 3-28, 3-29] The M240B machine gun is loaded from the closed bolt position. The M240B is fired, unloaded, and cleared from the open bolt position. The safety must be placed on F before

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the bolt can be pulled to the rear. Before belted ammunition can be used, it must be linked with the double link at the open end of the bandoleer. It must be free of dirt and corrosion. Loading Two methods, raised cover and closed cover o Raised cover method preferred method Gunner ensure the bolt is to the rear and the safety lever is on safe (S) Gunner raises the cover Team leader places the first round of the bandoleer and places it over the feed aperture Gunner then closes the cover and places the safety lever on fire (F) Weapon is now loaded and ready to fire o Closed cover method alternate method Gunner ensures bolt is forward safety lever is on fire (F) and the cover remains closed Team leader takes a bandoleer of ammunition and inserts the first round into the feedtray The weapon is now loaded Gunner pull bolt to the rear and slides cocking handle forward The weapon is now ready to fire Unloading o Gunner ensures bolt is to the rear and the safety is on safe (S) o Gunner raises the cover o Team leader removes the ammunition and links from the feedtray o Gunner then raises the feedtray and visually inspects the receiver and chamber to ensure no rounds remain o Once the feedtray, receiver and chamber have been cleared of all ammunition and links the weapon is considered to be unloaded

105.3 State the following capabilities/ nomenclature:

Proper employment [ref. j, pp. 3-1 thru 3-8] o Analyze the operation order using METT-T SALUTE DRAW-D and KOCOA o Consider the characteristics of the machine guns to be employed o Consider employment of the machine guns in defense o Consider employment of machine guns in the offense o Direct the employment of the machine guns Final Protective Line (FPL)/Principal Direction of Fire (PDF) [ref. j, pp. 3-1 thru 3-8] o Assignment of a Final Protective Line (FPL) Position machine guns to the flanks to provide fire across the unit's front. Ensure the position provides interlocking grazing fires within an assigned sector Ensure that FPL dead space can be covered by alternate weapons (munitions, M203 grenade launchers, mortars, claymore mines) o Assignment of a Principal Direction of Fire (PDF) Ensure the position covers likely avenues of approach and obstacles o Maximum effective range: 1,100 meters with tripod and T&E Area Tripod..................................................1,100 meters Bipod...................................................800 meters Point Tripod..................................................800 meters

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Bipod...................................................600 meters Suppression...............................................1,800 meters o Safeties [ref. n, p. 3-5] The safety mechanism is located on the pistol grip just behind the trigger well. When the safety is pushed to the right, the letter S is visible indicating the weapon is on safe. When pushed to the left, the letter F is visible on the safety indicating the weapon is on fire. The safety can only be engaged when the bolt is in the rear position. On the S position, the bolt cannot be released to go forward. o Ammunition types 7.62 mm ball 7.62 mm tracer 7.62 mm armor-piercing (not authorized for training) 7.62 mm blank 7.62 mm dummy o Rates of fire Sustained ..............................100 rounds per minute fired in 6- to 9-round bursts and 4 to 5 seconds between bursts (barrel change every 10 minutes) Rapid......................................200 rounds per minute fired in 10- to 13-round bursts and 2 to 3 seconds between bursts (barrel change every 2 minutes) Cyclic .650 to 950 rounds per minute in continuous bursts (barrel change every minute) o Types of mounts [ref. n, pp. 3-33 thru 3-36] M122A1 Tripod: provides a stable mount for the M240B, and it permits a higher degree of accuracy and control. The tripod is recommended for marksmanship training and defensive employment. The M122A1 tripod consists of the tripod and flex-mount with T&E mechanism. Weight of M122A1 tripod with/flex-mount is 20 pounds. Bipod Assembly: used to fire from the prone position. The butt stock in conjunction with the gunners non-firing hand provides support for the weapon when firing in the bipod mode. The gas cylinder holds the bipod in place. 105.4 Name the four types of positions that might be employed in a defensive posture. [ref. c, p. 4-6] Primary Fighting Position o The primary fighting position is the best available position from which the assigned sector of fire can cover. Individuals, fire teams, squads, and crew-served weapons are assigned primary positions. Alternate Fighting Position o Alternate positions are not normally assigned to individuals or squads within the platoon. They are used primarily by crew-served weapons. An alternate position is located so that a crew-served weapon can continue to cover the original assigned sector of fire when the primary position becomes unsuited for carrying out that mission. Supplementary Fighting Position o Supplementary positions are prepared to guard against attack from directions other than those from which the main attack is expected. A supplementary position is a secondary position that does not cover the same sector of fire as the primary position. Supplementary positions are for security reasons and ensure protection, when occupied against surprise enemy attack from an unexpected direction.

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Movements to supplementary positions and concealed routes are covered to avoid enemy detection. Battle Position o The battle position is where the main effort of defense is concentrated. Companies and platoons are assigned battle positions. The battle position is made up of a series of sectors of fire that support and interlock one another. Based on the battle position of the company, platoon battle positions are assigned a right and left limit of fire in which gunfire can be delivered.

105.5 Name the members of a gun team and state what they are responsible for carrying into a combat situation. [ref. a, p. 1-17] Team leader o Usually a PO2, responsible for effective employment of the gun o Responsible for changing the barrels during firing o Carries spare barrel kit, M122 tripod, one bandoleer of ammo and armed with a 9mm pistol Gunner o Usually a PO3. Actually fires and maintains the gun o Carries the gun, one bandoleer of ammo and armed with a 9mm pistol Ammo 1 o Usually a CN, acts as the supply person for the team o Caries one box of ammo, spare barrel case with T&E. Armed with an M16 Ammo 2 o Usually a CA o Carries two boxes of ammo. Armed with an M16

The following items apply to the 40mm machine gun (MK 19): 105.6 Describe the characteristics of 40mm machine gun. [ref. a, p. 3-31]

Air-cooled, Belt-fed, Blow-back operated, Automatic weapon, Fires from open bolt position and is crew-served

105.7 Discuss loading/unloading procedures. [ref. b, p. 2-15] Loading o Keep the weapon pointed down range o Make sure the bolt is forward. If not take the weapon off safe and ease the charging handles forward o Open the cover o Insert the first round through the feed throat o Place the first round into the feeder. Female link first o Push the round across the first pawl o Move the slide assembly to the left o Close the cover o Unlock and grasp the charging handles and charge weapon Un-loading o Place weapon on safe

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o o o o

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Open cover Remove remaining rounds and inspect chamber Once clear, close cover Place weapon on fire and use charging handles to ride bolt forward or press trigger sending bolt forward

105.8 State the following capabilities/nomenclature: Proper employment [ref. l, pp. 3-8 thru 3-12] o Conduct a leader's reconnaissance of the assigned area. o Consider placing firing positions in areas where the mission can be accomplished. o Look for mounted firing positions. o Choose dismounted firing positions when the terrain prevents vehicles from moving into position or if the vehicle cannot be concealed. o Identify firing positions. o Move vehicle into position o Ensure that the machine guns are properly laid. o Ensure that the firing positions are properly prepared and occupied o Ensure that range cards are prepared for each position. FPL/PDF [ref. j, pp. 3-8 thru 3-12] o NOTE: The MK19 heavy machine gun does not fire an FPL. o Assign a Principal Direction of Fire (PDF) Assign a PDF only when the terrain does not allow for effective FPL fires. Ensure the PDF covers the most likely avenues of approach. NOTES: The PDF may fall within the sector of fire or comprise one of its boundaries. o Location of machine guns must be changed daily/nightly or whenever needed. Arming range [ref. a, p. 13-32] o M383 HE round: 18 to 36 meters o M918 TP round: 18 to 30 meters Maximum effective range o (area target) [ref. a, 13-31] 2212 meters o (point target) [ref. a, 13-31] 1500 meters Rate of fire [ref. a, 13-32] 325 to 375 rounds per minute Safety [ref. b, p. 2-17] o Thumb switch with Safe and Fire positions Ammunition types [ref. c] o M383 HE: High explosive, designed to inflict personnel casualties. Arming distance of 18 to 36 meters. 15 meter casualty radius o M430 HEDP: High explosive, dual purpose o M385E4 / M385A1: Training Practice with propellant. Maximum range 2200 meters

The following items apply to the .50 caliber M2 HB machine gun: 105.9 Describe the characteristics of the .50 caliber M2 machine gun. [ref. a, p. 13-18]

Air-cooled, Belt-fed, Recoil-operated, Can be set for automatic or semi automatic fire, and is crew served The weapon has no safeties

NMCB SPECIFIC
105.10 Discuss loading/unloading procedures. [ref. a, pp. 13-26, 13-27]

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Loading automatic mode o Make sure the gun is clear o Close the bolt o Close feed cover o Lock down the bolt latch release o Insert ammo o Cock the gun (the gun is now half-cocked) o Re-cock the gun (the gun is now fully cocked) Loading semi-automatic mode o Make sure the gun is clear o Close the bolt o Close feed cover o Rotate bolt latch release lock in the up position to the right o Insert the ammo o Cock the gun (the gun is now half-cocked) o Re-cock the gun (the gun is now fully cocked) o To fire another round you must push the bolt release allowing the bolt to go home Un-loading o Place the gun in single shot mode o Pull the slide handle to the rear and lock bolt rearward o Open the feed cover o Clear all remaining links or rounds o Inspect chamber insuring it is clear o Press the bolt latch release and ride the bolt forward o Close the feed cover and pull the bolt to the rear

105.11 State the following capabilities/nomenclature: Proper employment [ref. j, pp. 3-8 thru 3-12] o Conduct a leader's reconnaissance of the assigned area. o Consider placing firing positions in areas where the mission can be accomplished. o Look for mounted firing positions. o Choose dismounted firing positions when the terrain prevents vehicles from moving into position or if the vehicle cannot be concealed. o Identify firing positions. o Move vehicle into positions. o Ensure that the machine guns are properly laid. o Ensure that the firing positions are properly prepared and occupied. If you must use a hide position, perform the following steps. o Ensure that range cards are prepared for each position. b. FPL/PDF [ref. j, pp. 3-8 thru 3-12] o FPF Ensure that the FPL achieves the maximum flanking fire. Ensure that the FPL obtains the maximum grazing fire. Grazing fire should parallel the expected long axis of the enemy assault waves. Ensure interlocking fires are used to cover any gaps in the FPL and to provide mutual support between adjacent units.

NMCB SPECIFIC
o Employ obstacles to slow down the enemy when reaching the FPL, if possible.

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PDF Assign a PDF only when the terrain does not allow for effective FPL fires. Ensure the PDF covers the most likely avenues of approach. Maximum range [ref. a, p. 13-19] 6800 meters (M2 Ball) Maximum effective range [ref. a, p. 13-19] 1800 meters Direction of feed [ref. a, p. 13-26] Load so double end loop on ammo belt clicks into the feedway.

Rates of fire [ref. a, p. 13-19] o Sustained: 40 rounds (or less) per minute o Rapid: 40 rounds (or more) per minute o Cyclic: 450 550 rounds per minute

105.12 Discuss setting headspace and timing on the .50 caliber machine gun. [ref. a, pp. 13-28, 1329] Head space o Distance between the bolt face and the base of the seated cartridge. o Correct when: Recoiling groups are fully forward No independent rearward movement between the bolt, barrel and barrel extension o Must be checked and set before the gun is fired o When barrel is replaced o When correct setting is in doubt Headspace gauge o Tool used to check and set headspace o Has a GO NO GO reading Headspace adjustment o Insert the GO side of the gauge between the bolt and rear of the barrel (T-slot) o The gauge should enter freely up to the center ring o Remove the gauge and place the NO-GO side in the T-slot o If the NO-GO side does not enter, the headspace is set correctly Headspace too tight o The GO side of the gauge cannot enter freely o Pull back on the charging handle o While holding it back, unscrew the barrel one notch (click) o Ease the bolt forward o Recheck the headspace with the gauge Headspace too loose o If it is too loose the NO-GO side of the gauge will enter freely o To adjust if follow the same procedures as if it were too tight, but tighten the barrel Timing o Ensures that firing takes place when the recoiling parts are between .020 and .116 inches out of the battery (fully forward) Correct when:

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Recoiling parts are locked together Firing takes place just before the recoiling parts are in the battery The gun fires on the FIRE gauge and WILL NOT on the NO-FIRE gauge o Timing adjustment Check with the FIRE (.020 in) and NO-FIRE (.11 in) gauges Must be checked and/or set each time headspace is adjusted and whenever timing is questionable o Timing adjustment steps Check headspace first Ensure gun is cocked and bolt is forward Raise the extractor Retract the bolt far enough to insert the FIRE gauge Place it between the extension and the trunnion block Allow the barrel extension to close on the gauge Depress the trigger, the firing pin should release Retract the bolt far enough to remove the FIRE gauge, cocking the gun and allow the bolt to go forward Retract the bolt far enough to insert the NO-FIRE gauge, place it in the same position Depress the trigger, the firing pin should not release o Timing late The firing pin will not release when the FIRE gauge is in place. If this happens perform the following Remove FIRE gauge Remove backplate assembly Locate and turn the trigger bar adjusting nut one notch to the right Reinstall the backplate assembly Reinsert the FIRE gauge and test again o Timing early The firing pin will release when the NO-FIRE gauge is in place IF this happens perform the following: Perform the same steps as if it were late except turn the trigger bar adjusting nut on the notch to the left.

105.13-105.17 pertains to mortars (REMOVED) The following items apply to the 40mm M203 grenade launcher: 105.18 Describe the characteristics of the 40mm M203 grenade launcher. [ref. a, p. 13-1]

Lightweight, Single-shot, Breech-loaded, Pump-action, Shoulder-fired weapon Attaches to the M16 rifle

105.19 Describe the different firing positions. [ref. a, p. 13-3] Standing o Used with targets less than 100 meters. Face target then half right, right hand pistol grip left on magazine Kneeling

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Good for level ground or ground that slopes upward towards target. Place body perpendicular to target. Same firing position as standing

Prone o Same as with the rifle. When firing long range place butt of weapon on the deck holding the 40 mm grenade launcher

105.20 State the following capabilities/nomenclature: Proper employment [ref. l, pp. 4-18 thru 4-24] o Place the weapon in condition 4 o Ensure that the M203 grenade launcher is assembled and functioning for firing. o Select the correct ammunition. o Place the weapon in condition 4. o Use proper firing techniques. o Field zero the M203 grenade launcher. o Estimate range to target. o Respond to fire commands. o Engage targets effectively. o Place the weapon in condition 4. Ammunition type [ref. a, p. 13-4] o HE round Designed to inflict personnel casualties. 5 meter casualty radius with a danger radius of 30 meters. Arms within 14 meters to 27 meters. o HE air burst Lands on the deck and bounces up 2 meters to explode. Arms within 14 meter to 27 meters. o HEDP High explosive, can penetrate 2 of steel. 5 meter casualty radius o TP Training rounds with flash signature. Danger radius of 20 meters. Maximum range [ref. a, p. 13-1] 400 Meters Maximum effective range o (area target) [ref. a, p. 13-1] 350 Meters o (point target) [ref. a, p. 13-1] 150 Meters

The following items apply to the M500 12-gauge shotgun: 105.21 Describe the characteristics of the M500 12-gauge shotgun. [ref. f, p. R3-27]

Manually operated, Single-shot, Magazine-feed (tubular), Pump-action, Shoulder fired weapon

105.22 Discuss loading/unloading procedures. [ref. f, p. R3-26] Single load o Ensure the weapon is on safe o Press the action lock lever and slide the barrel (fore-end) rearward o Insert round into the barrel chamber o Slide the barrel closed o Weapon is now loaded

NMCB SPECIFIC
Magazine load o Ensure weapon is on safe o Slide barrel (fore-end) forward o Insert round into the magazine Loading o Weapon is now loaded without a round in the chamber o Open and close barrel to chamber a round Unloading o Open barrel to eject round to unload

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105.23 State the following capabilities/nomenclature: [ref. f, p. R3-25]

Length: 39 Safeties: Safety switch on top Ammunition type: 12 gauge, 2 2 in 00 buck, military round

The following items apply to the 5.56mm M16 rifle: 105.24 Describe the characteristics of the 5.56mm M16 rifle. [ref. a, pp. 3-1 thru 3-3]

Lightweight, Gas-operated, Air-cooled, Magazine-fed, Shoulder fired, Semi-automatic or fully automatic

105.25 Discuss loading/unloading procedures. [ref. a, pp. 3-8, 3-9] Loading o Ensure weapon is on safe o With the bolt locked to the rear, insert a magazine o Release the bolt catch and allow the bolt to go forward. This chambers a round from the magazine. o The weapon is now loaded and in condition one. Un-loading o Ensure the rifle is on safe o After the last shot the bolt should lock to the rear. If so, just remove the magazine and inspect the chamber. o If the bolt does not lock to the rear, pull the charging handle rearward and lock the bolt rearward using the bolt catch. o Repeat the second step to complete the unloading process

105.26 State the following capabilities/nomenclature: Proper employment [ref. m, pp. 1-36 thru 1-44] o Apply the basic marksmanship fundamentals. o Place the weapon in condition 4. o Prepare the M16A3 service rifle for firing. o Estimate the range to target. o Engage the target using field-firing techniques. o Perform the fundamentals of marksmanship.

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Respond to the fire commands. Engage the target. Assume field firing positions. Fire the M16A3 service rifle while wearing the field protective mask. Fire the M16A3 service rifle at night. Perform immediate action. Perform remedial action. o UNLOAD, SHOW CLEAR". FPL/PDF [ref. m, pp. 1-102 thru 1-105] o FPL: NEXT PAGE o o o o o o o

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Maximum range [ref. g, p. 2-3] 3600 Meters Maximum effective range [ref. g, p. 2-3] o (point target): 550 meters o (area target): 800 meters Safeties [ref. a, pp. 3-3, 3-4] o The rifle will not fire when selector is in safe mode Magazine capacity [ref. g, p. 2-3] o 20 to 30 rounds depending on magazine Types of ammunition [ref. g, p. 2-2] o 5.56mm Ball- standard round o 5.56mm Tracer- Used to mark targets or cause incendiary effects o 5.56mm Blank- Training round o 5.56mm Dummy- Totally inert for training Rates of fire [ref. g, p. 2-3] o Semi-automatic- 45 rounds per minute o Automatic- 90 rounds per minute o Sustained- 12 to 15 rounds per minute Modes of fire [ref. g, p. 2-3] o Semi-automatic Fire mode- The trigger must be pulled for each shot o Automatic Fire mode- Rifle will continue to fire as long as the trigger is held back

The following items apply to grenades: 105.27 Describe the six different types of grenades. [ref. a, pp. 12-1 thru 12-3] Fragmentation (M67)

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o

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Used to produce casualties by high velocity projection of fragments o Effective casualty producing radius is 15 meters Chemical (M25A2 CS) o Used for incendiary, screening, signaling, training, and riot control purposes Smoke o Used to screen movement, mark targets and signal o Types M15 WP grenade M34 WP grenade M8 Smoke grenade Illumination (MK1) o Used to illuminate terrain in night time operations o Once the pin is pulled THE GRENADE MUST BE THROWN! Incendiary (AN-M14) o Used to ignite combustible material and destroy all types of equipment Practice (M57) o Used to train personnel in the care, handling, and use of grenades prior to using actual service grenades

105.28 Discuss hand grenade safety procedures. [ref. a, p. 12-8] All personnel handling casualty producing grenades must wear proper protection Never attempt to de-fuse hand grenades Do not remove the safety pin until ready to throw Do not attach grenades to clothing or equipment Riot control grenades should not be thrown within 5 meters of personnel Smoke grenades should not be used in closed areas Wait 5 minutes before approaching a dud Wait 30 minutes before approaching a chemical grenade

105.29 Discuss the uses of fragmentation and chemical hand grenades. Fragmentation Grenade o Used to produce casualties by high velocity projection of fragments Chemical grenade o Used for incendiary, screening, signaling, training and riot control purposes

105.30 Describe the M18A1 Claymore mine. [ref. a, pp. 12-9, 12-10] A directional, fixed-fragmentation mine that is designed primarily for use against massed infantry attacks It is equipped with a fixed plastic, slit type sight, adjustable legs and two detonator wells

105.31 Discuss the placement, arming, and safety requirements of the Claymore mine. [ref. a, pp. 12-9 thru 12-12] Placement o Should be sighted on a point 8 high at a distance of 50 meters Arming o Pull tape tab from blasting cap

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o Lay wire between mine and firing position, wrap wire around leg of mine and bury if
possible o Insert cap into either detonating well and lock with shipping plug-priming adapter o Recheck aiming of mine Safety requirements o The safety bail on the firing device has two positions. When up it is in the safe position. Down is in the fire position.

105.32 Describe the coverage and methods of fire. [ref. a, p. 12-12] Effective coverage o Placement no closer than 5 meters and no farther apart than 45 meters o A preferred lateral and rearward separation distance is approximately 25 meters. o The first 50m at a 60 degree angle is considered the kill zone o 100m is moderately effective o 250m is dangerous o 100m behind the mine is the danger area Methods of fire o Controlled The mine is detonated using the M57 firing device. But, can be detonated by non-electrical means. o Uncontrolled An uncontrolled mine is a booby trap and is NOT AUTHORIZED BY THE SEABEES

The following items apply to the 84mm M136 (AT-4): 105.33 Describe the 84mm M136 (AT-4). [ref. a, p. 14-20]

Lightweight, Self contained anti-armor weapon, Man-portable, Right shoulder fired only Free flight fin stabilized cartridge packed in an expendable launcher One piece

105.34 Describe the different firing positions. [ref. a, pp. 14-30 thru 14-32] Standing o Used when firing on moving or stationary targets from behind a protective barrier such as a wall or barricade. Most unstable and exposed position Kneeling o Used for firing on moving or stationary targets. Maximum use of support is essential for stability Sitting o Used for firing on stationary targets. More suitable than kneeling position Prone o The least stable position. Affords the most protection o The danger area extends for 60 meters with a 90 degree angle behind the weapon o The weapon must not have any obstructions closer than 5 meters to the rear of the weapon

105.35 State the following capabilities/nomenclature: [ref. a]

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Length [p. 14-21] 40 Weight [p. 14-21] Fully loaded = 14.8 lbs Maximum range [p. 14-21] 2100 Meters Maximum effective range [p. 14-21] 300 Meters

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Controls [p. 14-22] o Transport Safety Pin: Blocks the movement of the firing pin and prevents it from striking the cartridge percussion cap o Cocking lever: When the cocking lever is in the SAGE position, there is no contact between the firing rod and the trigger. o Forward Safety: Prevents the firing rod from striking the firing pin. Ammunition [p. 14-22] o Tactical cartridge, 18 long, high explosive, anti-tank (HEAT) Misfire procedures [pp. 14-26, 14-27] o Causes A complete failure to fire caused by a faulty firing mechanism or faulty element in the propellant charge. o Action Shout misfire Maintain sight picture Release safety catch Re-cock the weapon Check back blast area and attempt to fire Repeat if necessary If still fails, release safety catch and return cocking lever to the safe position Reinsert the transport safety pin, lay weapon on the ground and notify chain of command. Minimum arming range [p. 14-21] 10 Meters Safety [pp.14-32, 14-33] o Take care in selecting positions for firing. Avoid areas that could cause you to fire through a screen of brush or trees o Impact with a twig or branch may deflect the rocket or cause it to detonate o You must try to obtain concealment, but not at risk of safety o To prevent the rocket from striking the fore ground and causing serious injury to personnel, maintain the launcher in the firing position until the rocket has left the launcher o Avoid the blast of flame and ejected residue to the rear of the launcher o Remove flammable material, such as dry vegetation, from the back blast area o Keep personnel and ammunition clear of the rear danger area unless adequate shelter protection is provided o Sand or loose dirt in the back blast area can also reveal your position to the enemy. o Do not fire rockets at temperatures below 40F or above 140F o Never fire a damaged weapon

105.36 Describe the use and purpose of the range card as it relates to each weapon [ref. c, pp. 4-17 thru 4-22] Cards are the basis for the fire plan at the company level. Each crew served weapon will have one

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o

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All supporting fires, security sectors and defensive coordination are planned using the machine guns fire as the base from which to build o Two cards are prepared, one for the gun and the other goes to higher HQ o Cards should be passed on to relieving units o Patrols can use your card to locate FPLs and identify dead space o Cards must be neat and prepared using universal format Weapons symbols o Single dot for the gun and a solid arrow extending out along the FPL or PDF. Magnetic Orientation Line and Location Grid Coordinates o A means for other to positively locate you gun position. The line is drawn from a prominent terrain feature that is located behind friendly lines. The grid coordinates are recorded next to the dot in the machine gun symbol Sector Limits o Drawn as broken lines ending in arrowheads. If using an FPL only one sector limit will be drawn because one will be the same as the FPL. Grazing fire o If an FPL is used, a heavy shaded are is drawn along the inside of the FPL. This will indicate the limits of grazing fire obtainable. Any dead space is shown by breaks in the shading. Record the near and far limits of the dead space in meters or record the range next to the ends of the shaded areas Terrain features o Draw only those terrain features that significantly add to the clarity of the range card. If the feature is drawn, draw it to the correct perspective. Location of friendly troops or equipment o Draw any friendly positions or equipment that is either in or near the sector limits of the machine gun Targets o Draw targets to perspective and label then with a number o The number one target will either by the FPL or the left sector limit o If the FPL is on the right sector limit, number all other targets sequentially from right to left o All other times number from left to right o One method is to record data directly on the sketch along the leading line to the target o The other method is to use the data block of the card

105.37 Discuss the effectiveness and employment of early warning devices and pyrotechnics. [ref. a, pp. 12-11 thru 12-13] Trip Flares o Used primarily to illuminate and to give warning of attacking or infiltrating enemy troops o Place along a likely avenue of approach and activated by the enemy o Normally not used in any other operation other than defensive Booby Traps o Can be explosive or non-explosive. Used primarily to incapacitate, wound, or kill unsuspecting person when they disturb an apparently harmless object. o Improvised Constructed from standard firing devices, explosives, weapons, missiles or other material used for other purposes o Manufactured

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Standard devices made at a factory. Made to look like useful objects (gooks, pipes, bottled drinks) Explosive Devices o Booby traps laid along paths and trails to delay and frustrate patrols and foot troops o Most are improvised with either pressure release, pull or pull release devices Grenade Trap: Setup with a wire to pull pin when tripped over Grenade in can: grenade in can with pin removed. Trip wire pulls grenade from can Mud ball mine: grenade packed in mud. Mud dries and cracks grenade explodes Non-explosive devices o All are improvised with locally available material. Either pressure release, pull or pull release devices o Types Punji stakes Bamboo spikes placed in the ground protruding just enough to produce injury. Foot Traps Small pits combined with spike boards placed along paths or trails Deadfalls Various devices are suspended above jungle paths and trails. Designed to fall or swing in an arc and strike victims as they pass below.

105.38 Discuss the integration of the NMCB weapons systems into an overall defensive fire plan. [ref. c, pp. 4-1 thru 4-27] Automatic Rifleman o M16 rifle, backbone of the defense of the squad. Positioned first by the squad leader. The remainder of the fire team is positioned around the AR. Rifleman o M16 rifle, positioned so they can cover the entire fire team sector. The position must provide support and protection for the AR Grenadier o M203 grenade launcher, positioned to cover dead space in the defense M240B o Support the rifleman in the offense and defense. Provide heavy volumes of controlled fire. Provide FPFs. Cover likely avenues of approach. Provide grazing fire. M2 .50 Cal Machine Gun o Provide protection for motorized movement. Destroy lightly armored vehicles. Defend against low-flying hostile aircraft MK19 40mm Grenade Launcher o Used to provide direct and indirect firing. Role is similar to the M60E3 and M2. AT-4 o Used against armored personnel carriers. Can be used to disable a battle tank (mobility kill) if struck properly.

105.39 Discuss the various rates of fire: [ref. g, p. 4-2]

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Rapid: Greater than 40 rounds per minute, fired in bursts of six to nine rounds, at 5-10 second intervals. Sustained: The rate at which the weapon could reasonably be fired indefinitely without failing. Cyclic: This is the mechanical rate of fire, or how fast the weapon "cycles" (loads, locks, fires, unlocks, ejects). Measurement of the cyclic rate assumes that the weapon is being operated as fast as possible and does not consider operator reloading time (magazine changes etc). When the trigger is squeezed, the rate at which rounds are fired is the cyclic rate.

105.40 Explain the various class of fire: [ref. a, pp. 3-30, 3-31] Grazing o Not less than 1m above and no higher than 68 above the ground. Can exist for 700m over level or evenly sloping ground Plunging o Fire that strikes the ground from above at a considerable level. Beaten zone is considered the danger space. Overhead o Fire delivered over the heads of troops. Usually plunging fire overhead. Fixed o For targets requiring only one aiming point. Continuous as long as target remains in the zone of fire Traversing o Distributed in width by changing the horizontal direction of the gun. Firing a burst each time the gun changes direction Searching o Distributed in depth by changing the elevation of the gun. Used against deep targets, firing a burst each time elevation changes Combined searching and traversing o Distributed in width & depth by changing the elevation direction of the gun. Swinging traverse o Delivered against targets to wide to cover the traversing hand wheel. Also used on targets moving so rapidly across the gunners front they cannot maintain effective fire using the traversing hand wheel . Cannot be fired from bipod or vehicles. Free o Delivered from the tripod mount against targets requiring rapid and major changes in direction and elevation. Can also be used from a vehicle mount when the target cannot be covered adequately by aiming points. Cannot be fired from bipod mount.

105.41 Discuss the use and purpose of the following Night Observation Devices (NOD): AN/PVS-7C (night goggles) [ref. h] o Hand held or head mounted night vision system that enables walking, driving, weapon firing, short range surveillance, map reading and vehicle maintenance in both moonlight and starlight. o Range- min 9.8 AN/PVS-11 (pocket scope) [ref. i] AN/PVS-12A (M240B, M16, M60, M14) [ref. d]

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o The AN/PVS-12A, Night Vision Individual Weapon Sight System provides the

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infantry and support weapons with high performance observation, target acquisition and aiming capabilities during night operations. The Sight is capable of focusing on targets from 82 feet to infinity. The AN/PVS-12A is submersible, which permits the transportation of the AN/PVS-12A unprotected in two (2) atmospheres (66 feet) of seawater. The Sight is a high performance night vision system for nighttime target acquisition. The Sight uses a GEN III, 18 mm image intensifier tube configured in accordance with MIL-I-49428. Mounting hardware, which can easily be changed to other type mounts, are provided for attachment to the M16 and M14 Rifles. AN/PVS-20 (MK19, M2) [ref. k] o The AN/PVS-20, Night Vision Individual Weapon Sight System provides the infantry and support weapons with high performance observation, target acquisition and aiming capabilities during night operations. The Sight is capable of focusing on targets from 82 feet to infinity. The AN/PVS-20 can be used on the M2 .5 Cal. Machine Gun, and Mk38 Mod 0 25mm Machine Gun System. Mounting brackets and reticule cells are available for each type of weapon. The Sight may also be used as a tripod mounted observation device.

105.42 State TOA weapons allotment: [ref. c, app. III-1]

M2 - 6 M240B 16 MK19 6 M203 48 M224 6 M500 - 24

NMCB SPECIFIC 106 EMBARKATION FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCBINST 3122.1, Embarkation Manual [b] COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCBINST 4627.1, Naval Construction Force Maritime Prepositioning Force Operations Instruction [c] ABFC View Program, https://ncf.navy.mil/abfcview/abfcviewabout.cfm [d] MCRP 4-11.3F, Convoy Operations Handbook [e] AMC Pamphlet 36-101, Vol. I, AMC Affiliation Program Equipment Preparation Course___________________________________________________________ 106.1 Explain the operations of the battalion Mount Out Central Control (MOCC). [ref. a, p. 3-1]

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The Mount Out Control Center controls, coordinates, and monitors the movement of all personnel, supplies, and equipment to the embarkation staging area. The steps for CESE preparation are as follows: o Dispatch o Collateral o Shop o Pre-Start/Initial Inspection o Fuel/de-fuel o Check Air Certification Letter Defines the steps for preparing CESE for loading onto Aircraft o Reduction (As required) o Wash o Final Inspection Process Tracked in the MOCC o CESE Prep o Supply Prep o Mobile Loading o Weighing and Marking o HAZMAT Certification o Load Planning o Chalks/Sorties o AACG/DACG o JI

106.2 Discuss who is responsible for the operation of the battalion MOCC. [ref. a, p. 3-1] The XO is responsible for the operations in the MOCC The S-3 works with the XO to control the MOCC

106.3 Describe the elements of an embarkation organization. [ref. a, p. 1-1] The Battalion Embarkation Officer is responsible to the CO for an orderly and efficient embarkation. Officers who have other primary duties requiring attention during mount-out should not be designated as the NMCB Embarkation Officer. Embarkation provides a junior officer the opportunity to learn the principles of equipment operation and maintenance; equipment capabilities and limitations; battalion organization and allowance; communications procedures; and planning. The Battalion Embarkation Officer and assistant will be appointed in writing by the CO.

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The Battalion Embarkation Officer is responsible for the following: o Knowing the location of all supplies, equipment, and vehicles assigned to the battalion. o Maintaining the MOCC files with current data. (See Chapter 3, paragraph 302.) o Training sufficient personnel outside of the embarkation staff to perform embarkation functions during the actual mount-out. o Maintenance of a current turnover file so that in the event the officer is incapacitated or absent during an embarkation, the assistant may readily assume the duties with a minimum of lost effort. o Conducting training for the embarkation staff to increase their proficiency in embarkation. o Preparing and maintaining a template file of all current homeport/deployment site equipment/attachment Tab A equipment attached to the battalion. o Coordinating through the S3 all requirements associated with battalion movement. o Validating/updating of the Preliminary Load Plans (PLP) for the deployment of the Air DET and Air Echelon on C-130, C-141B, C17, KC135, and C-5 type aircraft within 30 days of arrival at the deployment site. Develop the PLP using the current CESE Tab A, Equipment List, and TOA Materials and Supplies. o Validating the CALM/CAEMS System data base as changes are received to the CESE Tab A. o Maintaining a current roster with copies of training certificates of completion and letters of appointment on all battalion embarkation staff members. o Ensuring that all detachments (to include Deployments-for-Training (DFTs)) are assigned qualified embarkation personnel; Air/Sea Load Planner(s) and Hazardous Cargo Certifiers to support redeployment needs per COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCBINST 1500.1A. o Scheduling and conducting at a minimum one homeport and one deployed mobilization CPX within the battalion, as stated in Chapter 1, paragraph 103. o Maintaining a complete embarkation library in accordance with Annex B. BATTALION EMBARKATION CHIEF o The Battalion Embarkation Chief will be assigned as a primary duty for a 14-month period and will be appointed in writing by the CO and is responsible for the following. Assignment and efficient use of battalion assets for deployment and redeployment by air, land, and sea. Advising and assisting the Battalion Embarkation Officer in the execution of the duties as listed in paragraph 204 above. Maintaining close liaison with Regimental and Brigade Embarkation Staffs to keep current on all embarkation issues. BATTALION EMBARKATION PETTY OFFICER o The Battalion Embarkation Petty Officer will be assigned as a primary duty for a 14month period and will be appointed in writing by the CO. This billet should be filled with a senior first class Equipment Operator or Construction Mechanic. The Embarkation Petty Officer is responsible for the following: Assignment and efficient use of battalion assets for the deployment and redeployment by air, land, sea, and/or any combination thereof. Assists the Battalion Embarkation Chief in the execution of his duties as listed in paragraph 205 above.

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DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES DURING MOUNT-OUT CO Briefs the staff personal on the mission and gives his intent for completing the mission. XO is in charge of the MOCC. S1 ADMIN AND PERSONNEL will write correspondence and handle message traffic Verify page 2s, dependent care certificate, and SGLI. The S1 is the senior assistant to the XO for administrative details and personnel administration. S2/S7 INTEL AND TRAINING Maintain library of contingency plans and maps, Supporting plans for combat support and disaster recovery, Operate the armory. Scheduling and monitoring technical and military training in the NMCB. Schedule classrooms, ranges, and spaces for training. S3 Operations Office is the alternate for MOCC in the event the XO is not with the command. He has direct supervisory authority over the utilization of the battalions construction resources, personnel, equipment and materials. S4 Supply Department responsibilities are to procure, receive, store, issue, ship, transfer and account for supply items, equipage, repair parts and construction materials. Operates the Enlisted Dining Facility, disbursing, and accounting for funds for battalion purchases and military pay. S6 Communication Department will maintain and ensure communication is at the MOCC, Alpha Co, Pallet building area, Staging area, DACG, and all Security posts. ALPHA CO will preparation all CESE. Drivers, Ammo/Hazmat drivers, Forklift Operators, Staging Area, AACG and DACG convoys. Preparation of Equipment Dispatch: Issue hard card Collateral: All collateral is mounted on CESE. Wash rack: CESE is cleaned for air shipment. 1st Inspection: CESE is given a safety inspection. Shop: Mount DTO parts and safety items, complete fueling/defueling, complete PM, Final Inspection: Quality control inspection is done. Wash rack: If needed after returning from shop. Dispatch: Trip ticket is issued. Mobile load: Items are loaded into/onto that can be secured properly. Weight and Balance: CESE is weighed and center of balance is marked. Load planners: load the aircraft with the CALM program to priority and size of aircraft. Staging area: CESE, pallets and chalks is Joint inspected. Frustrated chalks are moved to holding area and repaired or replaced. After the JI the CESE and Pallets belong to the AMC REP. Our DACG will assist the Aircrew with loading. Call forward: CESE and pallets wait for aircraft. Ready line: the point the aircraft is loaded. Our AACG fly with the aircraft. Bravo Co will perform security at all points in the mount out, using access list from S1. Provide at least 6 personnel per wash rack and 4 personnel at the staging area for cleaning of the CESE.

NMCB SPECIFIC
Charlie Co will build 463L pallets. After pallet building is done the crew goes to the mobile load staging areas and assists Alpha Co until the JI is done.

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HEADQUARTERS Co will assist all Ss codes and provide message writers, communications personnel, and have watches in Admin and Personal during the Mount out operation. EAs will do weight and balance. AIRDET will plan do rehearsals and inspection. X-1 Chaplain gives counseling and family support. X-2 Dental ensures that Air Det is deployable by dental codes. Member needs no dental work. Member needs minor work; no facility is needed, but is Deployable. Member needs work facility is needed and is deployable. Member needs surgical/extensive dental work or a T-2 exam. Deployable. X-3 Legal completes power of attorneys and wills. X-4 Medical checks and verifies medical records. Gives special Vaccines and medicines as needed for the location of operations.

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106.4 Define the following as applied to Maritime Prepositioning Force (MPF): [ref. b] SLRP [pp. 5-2 thru 5-13] o The Survey, Liaison, and Reconnaissance Party (SLRP) is a task organization comprised of representatives from the staffs of the CMPF, MPF MAGTF, NCR, and CNSE. The SLRP conducts initial reconnaissance, establishes liaison with in theater authorities, and initiates preparations for the arrival of the remainder of the FIE and the MPSRON. The mission of the SLRP is to determine suitability of the port, beach, airfields, and road/rail networks to support arrival of the MPF MAGTF; to designate areas for unit arrival and assembly operations in accordance with the off-load and AA Plan; and to conduct liaison and coordination with US, allied, and Host Nation authorities in support of the MPF operation. OPP [pp. 6-2 thru 6-8] o The Off-load Preparation Party (OPP) is a temporary task organization of maintenance, embarkation and equipment personnel embarked on each ship to prepare the ship's cranes and lighterage and embarked Navy and Marine Corps equipment and supplies for off-load. AP [pp. 7-2 thru 7-9] o The Advance Party is made up of various task organizations from each element of the MAGTF (ACE, GCE, CE, CSSE, NCF, FH, EAF) that arrive in the AAA in advance of the Main Body. The function of the Advance Party is to command and control the off-load, throughput, and reception of the equipment, supplies and the remainder of the FIE. MB [p. 1-8] o The Main Body consists of the remaining forces not involved in the arrival and assembly operation (e.g. combat forces). o Arrival of the Main Body too early can create a severe vulnerability for the forces ashore. Therefore, the Main Body arrival must be carefully timed to allow all personnel and equipment needed for the Advance Party organizations to arrive in the AAA before the Main Body begins to deploy and so as not to draw down on the logistics support for the off-load/throughput operations. For example, adequate meals, medical support, water production/storage, etc. must be ashore and available from prepositioned assets prior to the influx of personnel from the Main Body. If not properly executed, the flow of the Main Body can result in significant logistics problems for the MAGTF. o The Main Body will flow in a sequenced priority required to stand up the MAGTF for subsequent employment.

106.5 Discuss the organic TOA capability for self-sustainability. [ref. c] The P25M contains the entire TOA for an NMCB and can be viewed in its entirety or by component using the ABFC View Program accessible via the SOP on ncf.navy.mil.

106.6 Explain the procedures to calculate the center of balance for Civil Engineer Support Equipment (CESE). [ref. e, pp. 4-6 thru 4-24] NEXT PAGE

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106.7 Explain the four types of shoring used during embarkation operations. [ref. e, ch. 6] Sleeper [pp. 6-6, 6-7] o Use sleeper shoring under the frame or axles of vehicles that weigh over 20,000 pounds and are equipped with soft, low pressure, balloon-type, off road tires. Use sleeper shoring to prevent the vehicle from bouncing up and down and possibly

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pulling the tie-down rings out of the aircraft floor. The base of the sleeper shoring (area contacting the aircraft floor) must be large enough to support the entire weight of the vehicle its beneath without exceeding the P.S.I. limitation of the aircraft floor. Rolling [p. 6-1] o Use rolling shoring to protect the aircraft parking ramp, and the cargo floor and loading ramps of cargo airplanes from damage when transporting a vehicle across it. Most vehicles shipped by air do not exceed weight limitations, and consequently, do not require rolling shoring. Vehicles with cleats, studs, or other gripping devices and treads that allow concentrated contact require rolling shoring. Cleated or lugged wheels can easily cause damage to the aircraft floor or soft surfaces. The total weight of the vehicle is transferred to the small, concentrated, contact area of the cleats or lugs. Vehicles that have concentrated contacts require rolling shoring thick enough to prevent damage to the cargo floor. In all cases, the minimum thickness is inch. Parking [pp. 6-3 thru 6-6] o Use parking shoring to protect the aircraft floor from damage during flight. Any vehicle requiring rolling shoring also requires parking shoring. Each aircraft has specific floor weight limitations that apply to wheeled and non-wheeled items of cargo. If the vehicle exceeds these weight limitations, you must provide parking shoring before the item can be transported by air. There is no need for you to learn the mathematical processes required to calculate shoring requirements. But, here are some general considerations regarding parking shoring you may want to remember when planning an airlift movement: The minimum thickness of parking shoring is inch. Use parking shoring to protect the aircraft floor or ramps from concentrated contact such as blades, buckets, fork-lift tines, steel wheels, trailer tongue supports, etc. All trailers with a tongue that could rest on the aircraft floor should be shipped with parking shoring, whether connected to or disconnected from its prime mover. Most pneumatic tires do not normally require parking shoring. The ones that do are usually narrow and/or very heavy. Contact your affiliated TALCE if you are unsure about shoring requirements. Always use parking shoring when rolling shoring is used. Always use parking shoring on 463L pallets when you load items that have sharp edges or protrusions that could damage the pallets aluminum surface. Contact your affiliated TALCE for guidance about specific vehicle or aircraft limitations. Approaching [p. 6-8] o Approach shoring has a specific application. Use approach shoring to decrease the approach angle of aircraft loading ramps. This is because some items of cargo will strike the aircraft or ground during loading/offloading operations. Extremely tall and long items may also contact the top of the aircraft cargo compartment without a reduced approach angle provided by approach shoring. Although there is no standard method for the user to calculate when and how much approach shoring to use, most helicopters, all 40K-loaders, and many long vehicles with limited ground clearance will require approach shoring.

106.8 Explain the purpose of a Joint Inspection (JI). [ref. e, pp. 7-2 thru 7-13] All equipment must be properly prepared and documented before it can be loaded on any aircraft.

NMCB SPECIFIC
106.9 Describe the following vehicle convoys: [ref. d,]

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March column: Typically consists of 30 vehicles and comprises the entire convoy. Serial column: Typically used when the March column is very large and allows for greater command and control by dividing the March column into more manageable components. Unit column: A subset of the Serial column or March column, depending on the convoy size and allows for greater command and control by dividing the March or Serial column into more manageable components.

106.10 Identify four convoy elements related to the convoy task organization. [ref. d, p. 1-1] Convoys are task-organized to meet the requirements of the assigned mission. A transport element, an escort or security element, various support elements, and a command and control element are generally included. The specific organization is situation dependent. The tactical situation, enemy capabilities, as well as other planned options should be assessed in developing the convoy task organization.

106.11 Identify planning requirements for vehicle convoys. [ref. d, pp. 1-1 thru 1-13] The following list covers the major planning topics, for detailed information go to ref. d. o Warning Order o Movement Order o Task Organization o Liaison and Coordination o Route reconnaissance and selection o Movement Control o Logistics Support o Communication o Distance, Time, and Rate of Movement o Convoy Staging o Traffic Control o March Discipline o Movement Execution o Night Movements

106.12 Describe vehicle convoys logistics and security requirements. [ref. d, pp. 1-4, 1-11]
Logistics

o The amount of logistic support for a convoy will be affected by the size of the
convoy and the distance to be traveled. Planning corresponds to logistic procedures in SOPs. Logistic support in the form of vehicle recovery and repair, fuel, food, road repair, and medical assistance may be coordinated with and provided by units located in the areas the convoy transverses. Logistic support will be required at the convoys destination for billeting, messing, refueling, minor equipment repairs, ammunition resupply, cargo transfer, and vehicle security. For large convoys, advance coordination at the convoy destination must be made to ensure that logistic support is met. To establish airborne radio relay or retransmission sites to ensure that adequate communications are maintained at all times. Security o Control capabilities will be reduced at night. At the same time, the convoys vulnerability to ambush or harassing fire will be increased. Compromise between

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the need for both security and control. Increasing the size of security forces for night movement creates a greater noise and control problem. Decreasing the security forces permits better control and noise discipline. Carefully consider the requirements for security and control. Regardless of the choice, most vehicles, including escorts, will be road-bound. If an attack is encountered, the best reaction, as in daytime operations, is dependent upon the type of attack. Dispersion and extended intervals offer the best protection from air and artillery attacks. Rapidly clearing or evading the killing zone, along with a high volume of return fire, is the best protection from ambush. Night immediate-action drills should be rehearsed and all convoy members should receive refresher training in night security and night defensive techniques.

NMCB SPECIFIC 107 CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCBINST 3300.1, Rapid Runway Repair [b] ABFC View Program, https://ncf.navy.mil/abfcview/abfcviewabout.cfm [c] NAVEDTRA 14233, Naval Construction Force/Seabee 1 & C [d] COMCBPAC/COMCBLANTINST 11014.2, Maintenance Management Program for Naval Construction Force (NCF) Camps [e] FM 5-277, Bailey Bridge [f] TM-08676A-23/2, Medium Girder Bridge, Marine Corps [g] AFMAN 10-219, Vol. 4, Rapid Runway Repair Operations [h] NAVEDTRA 14081, Equipment Operator, Basic_____________________________

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107.1 Describe the duties and responsibilities of the following Rapid Runway Repair (RRR) teams and state what type of equipment is necessary to perform their mission under Battle Damage Repair (BDR)/RRR. [ref. a, ch. III] MOS [Annex C] o MOS SELECTION The minimum operating strip is the smallest section of the runway required for launching and recovering an aircraft. Based upon the damage assessment data reported after an attack of the air base, the RRR command center must determine the locations of potential MOSs and estimate which one would require the least apparent amount of time and effort to repair. The RRR command center may recommend possible MOS location alternatives to Station command center, but the Station command center will determine its final location. Currently, the minimum dimension of the MOS for fighter aircraft is 50 feet wide by 5,000 feet long, as required by the Air Force. For cargo aircraft, specifically a C141B and aircraft of the Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF), the MOS must be at least 90 feet wide by 7,000 feet long. Actual MOS dimensions, which are based on the requirements of the NATOPS Manual, should be established by Station Air Operations Departments. A MOS may be located on the main runway, on a parallel taxiway, on an aircraft parking apron, or even on an alternate launch and recovery surface on or off base. The MOS location affects launch or recovery status by restricting the flight approach of aircraft or by limiting air traffic control and access. o MOS ACCESS ROUTES In order to get aircraft to and from an MOS, access routes are required. Access routes from aircraft shelter or parking areas to the MOS must be restored and maintained to a minimum width of 25 feet for fighter aircraft. The access route must be a smooth surface free of debris. AM-2 matting, FRP matting, or compacted crushed stone are excellent expedients which can serve to maintain and repair access routes. Access routes must be widened to 60 feet when the air base is upgraded to accept large cargo aircraft. o MOS DETERMINATION FACTORS. The following should be considered when determining possible MOS alternatives: The number and location of craters. The primary MOS should be selected in an area with as few bomb craters as possible to minimize the amount of work and time required to establish the MOS.

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The amount, location, and severity of airfield pavement spalling. Again, the primary MOS should be selected in an area with as few spalls as possible to minimize the amount of work and time required to establish the MOS. The amount and location of UXO. The primary MOS should be selected in an area with the least amount of UXO. If EOD personnel are limited, UXO may be a greater problem to the RRR operation than bomb craters or spalls. The amount of bomb crater and spall damage to taxiways and/or access routes to the MOS. Given several possible MOS locations with equivalent damage, the one with the least damaged access routes should be selected to minimize the total repair time of the primary MOS and access routes. BATTALION MOS SELECTION RESPONSIBILITIES. The Battalions primary responsibility in MOS selection is to assist in the determination of potential MOS alternatives in the RRR command center and to assist in presenting them to the Station command center. The Battalion should be prepared to assist in the determination and plotting of MOSs for the Station. The Station Commanding Officer, or his designated representative in the Station command center, will select the primary MOS from the available options.

DAT [Annex B] o DAMAGE ASSESSMENT PRIORITIES. The Station BDR/RRR plan should provide the damage assessment priority of the various Station facilities. The Battalion should integrate those priorities in its RRR plan and DAT assignments. In general, the priority of the areas to be assessed will most likely be: Runways and taxiways, aircraft maintenance facilities, aircraft parking, loading, and refueling areas. In these areas, all craters, spalls, and UXO must be reported. Station command and control, and communications facilities. Key utility substations or facilities. Medical and decontamination facilities. POL storage and pumping facilities. o DAT TEAM COMPOSITION RRR DAT Composition. The DATs should normally consist of three Battalion personnel augmented with one EOD technician and one Public Works or Air Operations representative to aid the assessment, record information, and communicate data to the Station/Battalion command center. Each DAT shall have a communicator assigned to it who is trained in radio procedures and operation. The EOD expertise is necessary to accurately identify and classify UXO and oversee the activities of the DAT in the hazardous UXO environment. The ranking Battalion member of the team will be the team leader. Regardless of rank, however, the EOD technician takes charge and directs the teams movement through areas with UXO. Facilities DAT Composition. In general, the facility DATs should have at least one electrician/utilitiesman and a builder/steelworker. Also, the presence of UXO and chemical agents may require EOD and disaster preparedness personnel participation. Manning will probably be limited during a contingency response, so the minimum number of persons necessary to evaluate damage should be assigned. The Station should have the primary responsibility for manning the facility DATs. Battalion DAT Team Distribution. At a minimum, the Battalion should be prepared to provide personnel for the following number of RRR DATs depending on the site:

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o Battalion Main Body:..4 DATs Large NMCB Detail: (>100 Personnel)3 DATs Air DET or Medium/Small NMCB DET:...2 DATs

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RRR DAMAGE ASSESSMENT INFORMATION. During RRR damage assessment, the DATs gather two types of information: The location and description of pavement damage caused by bombs or cannon fire and the locations and descriptions of UXO.

Pavement Damage Data. Pavement damage to potential MOS surfaces will also be recorded on the same scaled drawings as the UXO reports. The following information is included in each report:

Damage type (crater, single spall, spall field, etc.) Location (by grid coordinates or in relation to known reference markers) Size (crater diameter, spall field dimensions) UXO Data. The UXO that may influence aircraft operations must be accurately located, reported, and recorded in sufficient detail for the RRR command center to determine the risk to aircraft operations. All UXO within 300 feet of repair operations or aircraft operating surfaces must be identified. Holes of entry for subsurface UXO must be also reported. Thus, scaled drawings must show sufficient adjacent area to include the 300-foot, UXO radius-of-effect is included in the DAT report: Location, Quantity, Size, Shape, Color, Distinctive markings, Fuse type and condition DAMAGE ASSESSMENT PREATTACK ACTIONS. Existing pavement markings on the runways/taxiways will most likely be destroyed or covered with debris after an attack. The Battalion should fabricate a marking system consisting of large stakes for use as station markers to assist in determining the location of damage and UXO after the attack. The stakes should be installed prior to an attack and be placed far enough off the runway and taxiway surfaces so that they will survive an attack but still be visible from the runway surface. In addition, the stakes should be placed at 100 feet intervals and have visible station markings. DATA ASSESSMENT REPORTING PROCEDURES. The DATs will report the following information on each report: Identification call sign of DAT Time of report Damage assessment data The DATs should report this damage data using the standard Air Force reporting format as outlined in reference (b).

Crater/Spall [Annexes E, F] o CRATER REPAIR OPERATIONS GENERAL. In basic terms, crater repairs consist of clearing debris from the crater, removing damaged pavement, backfilling the crater and installing Foreign Object Damage (FOD) cover. The debris clearing, pavement removal, and backfilling procedures are generally the same regardless of the FOD cover utilized. The Battalion should plan on using a menu approach to FOD cover installation, i.e., using all available FOD cover at each site, even if this means using several different types to accomplish the airfield repairs.

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o CRATER PREPARATION REQUIREMENTS. The specific actions which must be


accomplished during the crater preparation phase of the crater repair are: Clearing debris from the crater diameter perimeter. Determining the actual crater diameter versus the apparent crater diameter, i.e., the extent of crater pavement damage/upheaval. Removing the upheaved pavement. Removing large ejecta from inside the crater, as required. Backfilling the crater with ballast rock, fill, or clean ejecta. Backfilling the crater with crushed stone. Compaction of the crushed stone. Installing FOD cover. References (a) through (d) give detailed procedural guidance for the execution of the crate repair procedures listed above. The Battalion shall ensure that all personnel are familiar with the required procedures for their specifically assigned RRR tasks. SPALL REPAIR SPALL REPAIR PROCEDURES. Recommended spall repair procedures are a combination for rapid setting cements and pea grave. The recommended types of rapid setting cements are either regulated set cement (such as Ideal Cement Companys REG SET), or a magnesium phosphate cement (such as SET 45), or a high early strength type cement (such as PYRAMENT). SPALL REPAIR PRECAUTIONS. The following precautions must be taken in making spall repairs: Ensure that there is no water or ice in the spall cavity prior to filling the spall. If water or ice exists in the spall cavity, the repair teams should remove both before proceeding with the spall repair. However, if small amounts of water or small pieces of ice cannot be removed from the spall cavity, the repair should be removed and replaced as soon as weather and operational conditions permit. In the interim, any such aircraft spalls should be continually monitored to detect deterioration of the spall repair, with particular emphasis on checking for the shrinkage or loosening of the spall repair and the presence of FOD. If deterioration occurs, the original repair will have to be removed and replaced. Care must be taken to ensure that the regulated set cement does not set up prior to installation in the spall cavity. The quality of stored regulated set cement should be checked as a pre-attack action to ensure that it has not set up or deteriorated while in storage. Most of the regulated set cements pose no greater safety hazard than normal concrete. However, the Battalion personnel should read the manufactures information to determine whether or not any special safety precautions are required. SPALL REPAIR TRAINING. The Battalion should conduct spall repair training in homeport and on deployment. Particularly on deployment, the Battalion shall seek opportunities to conduct spall repair training by patching damaged Station pavement or roadways with a regulated set cement-pea gravel mixture.

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107.2 Describe the following methods of RRR: Folded Fiberglass Matting (FFM) [ref. g, p. 5.8.2] o This procedure, which is currently the primary MOS repair method, involves the installation of an anchored FFM over a crater which was prepared with a layer of well-compacted crushed stone. Crater preparation is essentially identical to that used with the AM-2 matting system. Again, this is the principle method of RRR employed for MOS repairs at overseas MOBs (figure 5.4). Procedural details regarding FFM installation are provided in Technical Manual T.O. 35E2-3-1. AM-2 aluminum matting [ref. g, p. 5.8.1] o AM-2 aluminum matting is hand-assembled and anchored over the crater which was prepared with a layer of crushed stone. This repair surface is the most manpower intensive of the two primary RRR techniques Crushed stone repair [ref. a, Annex E, ch. 3] o See answer to question 107.1.c and omit last step. Cretemobile [ref. h, pp. 14-3, 14-4] o The trailer-mounted crete mobile carries the cement, sand, and coarse aggregates in divided bins, mounted on the unit. The cement is carried in a separate bin, located across the rear of the unit, and the sand and aggregate are carried on each side of the unit. Water is carried in a single tank, mounted in front of the aggregate bins, and is pumped to the mix auger. Sand and aggregates are proportioned accurately by weight or volume and dropped simultaneously with a mixture of cement from the material feed system into the charging end of the mix auger/conveyor at the rear of the unit. At this point, a predetermined amount of water enters the mix auger. This action of the combined auger and paddle homogenizer mixes the ingredients and water rapidly, thoroughly, and continuously to produce a continuous flow of uniformed quality concrete. o The mixing action is a continuous process that can proceed until the aggregate bins are empty. On the other hand, mixing and delivery may be stopped at any time and then started again at the will of the operator. This permits production to be balanced to the demands of the placing and finishing crews and other job requirements.

107.3

Explain the fundamentals of a typical battalion tent camp layout. [ref. b, DWG 6027643] Tactical o sufficient space for command dispersion o concealment from ground and air observation o protection from bombing and strafing attacks o protection from mechanized attack Sanitary o water supply o drainage o shade o access o site not occupied by other units in last 2 months

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107.4

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State the purposes of the project safety plans contained in the project package. [ref. c, p. 240] The Quality Control plan o Provide customer satisfaction with a product that fulfills the requirement for which it was intended o Provide craftsperson accountability for quality construction, and economical use of material within the Naval Construction Force The Project Safety plans o The safety plan lists the hazards and corrective action to be taken from the back of the CAS sheets o The crew leader must ensure that the crew is properly trained and aware of all safety conditions present

107.5 Explain the purpose of maintaining operator logs for camp equipment. [ref. d, p. 4-3] Daily operators logs are kept on some equipment. The main purpose for using operating logs is to continuously record data of equipment performance.

107.6 Discuss the following transportable bridges: Bailey [ref. e, p. 1-5] o Through-type metal truss bridge with heavy timber decking, roadway carried between two main girders o Highly mobile and versatile bridge, can span a variety of gaps o Transported in 5-ton dump and 40 ton trailer o Quickly assembled by manpower, 30 40 personnel o 126 wide, can span up to 210 o Configuration Single / Single bridge, 100 Double / Single bridge 140 Double / Double bridge 180 o Launched and de-launched via roller system o Additional bays are added to counter balance during launching and de-launching o Components Truss panel form girder, 5 x 10 panel Transom main support, 10 x 20 flange beam Stringer 10 steel beam Chess 2 x 8 x 14 wood decking Rollers launching & de-launching Bearing & base Ramps Various pins, clamps, braces, tie plates, bolts, jacks, and carrying bars and tongs Medium girder [ref. f, pp. 1-8 thru 1-13] o MGB is a two girder deck bridge o Launched and de-launched via roller system and 5 ton dump o Three types of MGBs Single story MGB Double story MGB

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o o o o o o

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Linked reinforced MGB Transported to site via 5 ton dump & 40 ton trailer Crew size 24 to 32 personnel Bridge is formed with 2 main girders from a number of panels pinned together Roadway is formed by hanging deck units between girders and connecting ramps at each end 13 2 wide bridge used for light vehicle loads

107.7 Discuss heavy timber construction: [ref. b] Bunker [Assembly 14003] o Total M-Hr = 891 BU = 340 SW = 40 EO = 3 CN = 508 Bridge [Assembly 13202] o Total M-Hr = 560 BU = 560 Tower [Assembly 13606] o Total M-Hr =191 BU = 127 EO = 64

NMCB SPECIFIC 108 CIVIL ENGINEER SUPPORT EQUIPMENT (CESE) FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] NAVFAC P-300, Management of Civil Engineering Support Equipment [b] COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCBINST 11200, Equipment Management (Red Book) [c] NAVFAC P-307, Management of Weight Handling Equipment________________ 108.1 State the purpose of the Battalion Equipment Evaluation Program (BEEP) [ref. b, p. 166]

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To pass on all special knowledge of CESE maintenance and operations techniques. To provide the relieving battalion with a realistic and in-depth condition evaluation of CESE allowance, facilities, tools and materials. To use the full expertise and efforts of the two equipment forces to provide the relieving battalion and detachments with the best Alfa Company operation possible. To provide the Brigade Equipment Office with up to date condition codes for scheduling timely CESE replacements.

108.2 Discuss the purpose of the following publications and instructions: P-300 [ref. a, p. iii] o To assist management at all levels in properly discharging their responsibilities in the efficient management of the transportation program. The instructions, guides, procedures, and criteria are provided for exercising both technical and management controls to attain full and cost effective utilization of funds, personnel, and equipment. COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCBINST 11200 [ref. b, Signature Page] o To establish policy, assign actions and give a guidance for the Naval Construction Force Equipment Management Program (RED BOOK) P-307 [ref. c, p. 2] o To maintain the level of safety and reliability built into each unit of applicable equipment by the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) o To ensure optimum service life o To provide training and qualification standards for all personnel involved with maintenance, inspection, test, certification, engineering, rigging and operation of WHE o To ensure the safe lifting and controlling capability of WHE and promote safe operation practices through the inspection test certification, qualifications and operation requirements prescribed herein

108.3 State the purposes and uses of the following licenses: [ref. b, ch. 2, pp. 66-69] OF/346 o The military drivers license, which lists the vehicles you are authorized to drive. Used for the 1- ton pick-up truck through the 20-ton tractor. GOOD FOR 3 YEARS. 11260/2 o Heavy construction equipment license that is maintained with your license record in the license examiners office. It lists all the construction equipment you are authorized to operate. GOOD FOR 2 YEARS.

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108.4 Describe the term deadline and its effects on availability. [ref. a, ch. 4, sec. 2] The term "deadline" applies to any item of equipment that, in the opinion of the Maintenance Supervisor, parts cannot be obtained, or equipment cannot be safely operated within a period of 72 hours or more without endangering the operator or equipment performance. Overall availability decreases with equipment on deadline.

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108.5 Describe the purpose of equipment layup (3M). [ref. a, app. N] Place equipment in live storage when there is no foreseeable need for the equipment for a period of two preventive maintenance (PM) cycles or 80 working days. All cranes, however, shall be maintained in an active status under control of the crane crew. The CESE eligible for live storage must be in A4 condition.

108.6 Describe the responsibilities of the following: [ref. b] Equipment yard supervisor [ch. 2, pp. 35, 36] o The Yard Boss manages the equipment yard and the CESE parked in it; establishes and enforces traffic control through the yard, such as stop signs, speed limits, and one-way-traffic flow; maintains and establishes parking lines and areas, such as ready-line and waiting-entry-into-shop line; is in charge of the vehicle refueling station and equipment wash rack; and ensures that all operator maintenance procedures are performed correctly to reduce equipment breakdowns. o The "Yard Boss" determines operator liability because he is familiar with the equipment and should know what dents and damages are new. o Working with the Dispatcher, the "Yard Boss" cycles and exercises equipment not otherwise used during that week in accordance with P-300, appendix J, paragraph 3b. He must ensure accurate entries are entered into the Cycle Log. (The log will contain these columns at a minimum: Date, USN Number, Beginning and Ending hours/miles and Total Time Cycled). o The Equipment Yard Supervisor shall ensure that all operators are performing prestart R checks of CESE prior to dispatching, and shall ensure that all Operators Inspection Guide and Trouble Reports (NAVFAC Form 9-11240/13) and post operational R checks are properly completed prior to returning the trip ticket to dispatch. o The Yard Boss and Crew will be responsible to assist the Work Centers and conduct all other maintenance requirements. The Yard Boss will supervise operators performing maintenance requirements and provide the Dispatcher/Work Center Supervisors feedback of completed /not completed requirements. Cost control supervisor [ch. 3, p. 95] o The Cost Control Clerk controls the Preventive Maintenance Program as directed by the Maintenance Supervisor. They should be a senior mechanic, knowledgeable in their rating and possess proficient administrative skills. They personally supervise the Preventive Maintenance Clerk and the Direct Turnover Clerk. They are the administrative link between the Maintenance Supervisor and all forms, reports and EROs that must be approved/signed. Preventive maintenance clerk [ch. 3, 95] o The Preventive Maintenance Clerk controls the PM program directed by the Maintenance Supervisor. The PM Clerk places all CESE into PM groups, prepares the PM schedule, and maintains the PM record cards with each vehicle's preventive maintenance history. The PM Clerk also controls ERO flow, maintains an ERO log,

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maintains and updates equipment history jackets, and ensures the equipment status board in the Maintenance Office mirrors the one in Dispatch. The PM Clerk also summarizes the total cost of repair parts and labor expended, and makes appropriate entries on the ERO. The ERO log and equipment status boards may be in an approved electronic format. Direct turnover clerk [ch. 3, 95] o The Direct Turnover (DTO) Clerk maintains the maintenance program repair parts status and accountability records, and is the liaison between the Supply Office and the shop. All requisitions for Not in Stock (NIS) and Not Carried (NC) material must pass though the DTO Clerk, who maintains the Direct Turnover (DTO) log and the repair parts summary sheets. The DTO Clerk is responsible for the DTO parts and storage bins. He also maintains the deadline file and the deadline status board. Collateral equipment custodian [ch. 2, p. 53] o To control collateral equipment, the custodian shall do the following: Inventory. Maintain an accurate up-to-date location list of the unit's Collateral equipment using the CB 60 Form. Order. Shortages and replacements shall be ordered when required. Ensure that appropriate records are maintained for each requisition submitted. This is done through proper use of the CB 60 Form. Manage. Sub-custody of component collateral equipment is assigned to the operator or crew leader by signature on a CB 60 Form on an as needed basis. Dispatcher [ch. 2, pp. 34, 35] o The Dispatcher, normally an EO1, holds a key equipment management position in the unit, and controls the day to-day equipment assignments and CESE usage. The Dispatcher's primary duties are to receive and evaluate requests for vehicles and then dispatch suitable equipment from authorized resources. It is the dispatcher's responsibility to check the operator's Vehicle Operators Identification Card (OF346) and license, when applicable, prior to issuing a trip ticket. Dispatchers must provide for the most economical use of manpower and equipment while ensuring equipment safety, security, and proper use.

NMCB SPECIFIC 109 CONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS FUNDAMENTALS


References: [a] Crew Leader Handbook, 1-1 [b] NAVFAC P-445, Construction Quality Management Program_______________ 109.1 Discuss project scope. [ref. a, pp. 15-17, 15-18]

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Project scope is a broad description of what is to be built. It includes the purpose of the structure, general finishes, general construction, and general utilities descriptions.

109.2 Discuss the following levels: [ref. a] Level I [p. 1-1] o Level I construction management is used at the Operations Officers (S3) or detail OICs level. The primary concern of S3 is management of the units overall tasking. The timeline for a Level I bar chart will show months of the deployment and the line items will be several individual projects. Level II [p. 3-1] o Level II construction management is used at the company level. Each company may have several projects to manage. The easiest way for the company commander to manage these projects is with a Level II bar chart. The timeline for a Level II bar chart will show weeks and the line items will be Master Activities for one individual project.

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Level III [pp. 3-5, 3-6] o Level III construction management is used at the crew leaders level. The crew leaders focus is on his/her particular project. The day-to-day activity of the project is managed by the crew leader. The timeline for a Level III bar chart will show days and the line items will be Construction Activities.

109.3 Discuss the importance of generating and maintaining complete and accurate Construction Activity Summary Sheets (CASS). [ref. a, p. 2-12]

All of the resource requirements identified during the estimating stage are summarized for each construction activity on the front of a CAS sheet. In addition to the activity description, the scheduled dates, duration and manday estimates, PEF, DF, travel time , and ME are also added. On the back are the safety, quality control and environmental requirements. Use the space at the bottom of the back page for manday and duration calculations. The CAS sheets contain all of the information for completing material and equipment plans. It is imperative that the crew leader documents EVERYTHING (calculations, assumptions, forming plans, significant events, etc.) about the activity. Additional documents may be attached to the back of the CAS sheet if necessary.

109.4 Discuss Field Adjustment Requests (FAR)/Design Change Directives (DCD) and who would submit and approve. [ref. a, p. 12-3]

The Resident Officer-in-Charge of Construction (ROICC) is responsible for inspection and surveillance of ongoing Seabee projects and for reviewing daily QC reports to ensure compliance with the plans and specifications. ROICC provides Quality Assurance (QA). It is ROICCs responsibility to monitor our QC program. The ROICC will approve our QC plan before start of any construction. Any discrepancies noted will be corrected before work can start on the project. The ROICC office also has to approve any battalion recommended Field Adjustment Requests (FARs) or customer requested changes. Any ROICC directed changes will be forwarded to the battalion on a Design Change Directive (DCD). Scope changes require the approval of the customers major claimant and changes that require 50 or more mandays of additional direct labor or increase the cost of the project by $500 or more require approval of higher headquarters. The ROICC also conducts the final inspection and accepts only those facilities built in accordance with the plans and specifications. The QC staff provides direct liaison between the battalion and the ROICC on all matters, such as change requests and project specifications questions. No field changes can be made without a request being forwarded through QC and being approved in writing by the ROICC. Change requests must include the same level of detail as the original specification. The Engineering Division can provide assistance on sketches. A log of all FARs must be kept in the project package. DCDs must also be kept in the project package. Clarification of prints or specification may be directed to ROICC on a Request for Information (RFI) form. A log of all RFIs must be kept in the project package.

109.5 Discuss Request for Information (RFI). [ref. a, pp. 12-4 thru 15-72]

Used for clarification of plans or specifications only. The RFI can be used for any inquiry concerning the project. Further direction may be given to submit a FAR in response to an RFI, but does not constitute a change until the FAR is approved.

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109.6 Discuss a project scope change. [ref. a, pp. 15-71, 15-72]

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Any site condition that differs from the conditions outlined in the project plans and specifications. This condition is not a FAR or a DCD and when encountered one should immediately submit an RFI to the ROICC.

109.7 Describe the purpose of the Naval Construction Force (NCF) Quality Control Program (QCP). [ref. a, p. 12-1]

The purpose of the NCF Quality Control Program (COMSECONDNCB/ COMTHIRDNCBTINST 4355.1) is to prevent discrepancies where the quality of workmanship and materials fail to match the requirements in the plans and specifications.

109.8 Describe the 3-phase concept of the Construction Quality Management Program (CQM). [ref. b, pp. 2-10 thru 2-13]

The Three Phases of Control, Preparatory, Initial and Follow up, is the backbone of the Construction Quality Management Program o The Three Phases of Control shall adequately cover both on-site and off-site work and shall include the following for each definable feature of work. A Definable Feature of Work is a task that is separate and distinct from other tasks and requires separate quality control requirements. A DFOW is identified by different trades or disciplines and is an item or activity on the construction schedule. Each specification section could be considered a definable feature of work. But, there frequently is more than one definable feature of work under a particular section. Preparatory Phase (Prior to beginning work on each DFOW) o The Contractor is required to notify the Contracting Officer at least 2 workdays in advance of each preparatory phase. This phase shall include a meeting conducted by the QC Manager and attended by the QC specialists, the superintendent, and the foreman responsible for the definable feature. The results of the preparatory phase actions must be documented in the daily CQC Report and/or in the o Preparatory Phase Checklist. The following functions must be performed prior to beginning work on each definable feature of work: Review each paragraph of the applicable specification sections Review the Contract drawings Verify that appropriate shop drawings and submittals for materials and equipment have been submitted and certified by the QC Manager, and approved. Verify receipt of approved factory test results, when required Review the testing plan and ensure that provisions have been made to provide the required QC testing Examine the work area to ensure that the required preliminary work has been completed Examine the required materials, equipment and sample work to ensure that they are on hand and conform to the approved shop drawings and submitted data Discuss construction methods, construction tolerances, workmanship standards, and the approach that will be used to provide quality construction by planning ahead and identifying potential problems for each definable feature of work

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Review the safety plan and appropriate activity hazard analysis to ensure that applicable safety requirements are met, and that required Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are submitted. Initial Phase (Once work begins for each DFOW) o The Contractor must also notify the Contracting Officer at least 2 workdays in advance of each initial phase. The QC Manager conducts the initial phase with the QC Specialists, the superintendent, and the foreman responsible for that definable feature of work when construction crews are ready to start work on a definable feature of work. The QC Manager observes the initial segment of the definable feature of work to ensure that the work complies with Contract requirements. The results of the initial phase must be documented in the daily CQC Report and in the initial phase checklist. The initial phase must be repeated for each new crew to work on-site, or when acceptable levels of specified quality are not being met. o Perform the following for each definable feature of work: Establish the quality of workmanship required Resolve conflicts Ensure that testing is performed by the approved laboratory Check work procedures for compliance with the Safety Plan and the appropriate activity hazard analysis to ensure that applicable safety requirement are met Prime and subcontractor foremen document all Initial Phase Checklists and include with the CQC Report. Follow-up Phase (Performed daily) o The Follow-Up phase is performed on each activity of work identified on the schedule for on-going work daily or more frequently as necessary until the completion of each definable feature of work and documented in the daily CQC Report. o The Follow-Up includes checks on the following: Ensure the work for each activity is in compliance with Contract requirements Maintain the quality of workmanship required Ensure that testing is performed by the approved laboratory Ensure that rework items are being corrected Perform safety inspections Prime and Subcontractors document follow-up phase for each activity using the CQC Report and the Contractor Production Report.

109.9 Explain the purpose and processes of quality control. [ref. a, pp. 12-1 thru 12-5]

The purpose of the NCF Quality Control Program COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCBTINST 4355.1) is to prevent discrepancies where the quality of workmanship and materials fail to match the requirements in the plans and specifications. Processes o Ensuring Quality. The crew leader is responsible for developing an aggressive QC plan for his project to ensure the quality of construction meets the standards in the plans and specifications. o Establish Quality Requirements. The crew leader must review the plans and specifications and identify the quality criteria which must be complied with.

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to safe and quality construction.

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o Select Construction Methods. Proper construction methods are absolutely essential o Identify Required Training and Equipment. Many activities require specialized
training or qualifications. o Ensure Personnel Awareness. In order to perform the work satisfactorily the crew must understand what the QC requirements are. o Evaluation of Work Completed. A daily QC inspection report is required for all projects. The purpose of this report is to document that the required checks, tests and inspections were performed. o Identify required tests. You must identify the project testing requirements before the work begins in order to schedule and complete the tests efficiently. o ROICC Interface. The Resident Officer-in-Charge of Construction (ROICC) is responsible for inspection and surveillance of ongoing Seabee projects and for reviewing daily QC reports to ensure compliance with the plans and specifications. ROICC provides Quality Assurance (QA). It is ROICCs responsibility to monitor our QC program. The ROICC will approve our QC plan before start of any construction. Any discrepancies noted will be corrected before work can start on the project. The ROICC office also has to approve any battalion recommended Field Adjustment Requests (FARs) or customer requested changes. Any ROICC directed changes will be forwarded to the battalion on a Design Change Directive (DCD). o Biweekly QC Meetings. The battalion will establish biweekly meetings with the ROICC. The meetings need not be biweekly if situations dictate otherwise. The attendees at these meetings will be a ROICC representative, the QC organization, the company commanders or ops chiefs and an S3 representative. Pre-construction Conferences (PreCon) o Prior to commencement of work, a preconstruction conference will be arranged by the ROICC with representatives from the NCF unit. The pre-construction conference should be attended by the ROICC, the ROICC quality assurance representative, client representatives and NCF supervisory personnel directly concerned with the project including QC and safety representatives. Items to be covered during the conference should include as a minimum: Outstanding questions regarding plans and specifications Unusual field conditions Excavation permits Review of QC plan Review of safety plan Review of construction schedule Schedule of required utility outages and procedures for obtaining them Procedures for connecting new utilities/ Arrangements for temporary utilities Identification of project supervisors, ROICC representatives, and limits of their respective authorities Normal working hours Point of contact for both the ROICC and NCF unit for problems occurring outside normal working hours Environmental protection requirements and procedures Procedures for resolving problems relating to plans, specifications, field adjustment requests (modifications) and other items that may arise Procedures for reporting job progress Procedures for continuing the project in the event the NCF unit is called away for a contingency

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Historical sites requirements and procedures Red-line Drawings o The crew leader is responsible for maintaining a set of drawings on the project site which have any field changes marked in red. Material Testing and Inspection o Any material tests which are required by the specifications will be performed by the Engineering Division. The crew leader should include these tests in the QC plan and coordinate with Engineering as far as when they are required.
Other QC Forms o Rebar bending schedules and concrete forming plans need to be prepared by the crew leader early in the planning process.

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References: [a] OPNAVINST 3501.115D, Projected Operational Environment (POE) and Require Operational Capabilities (ROC) for the Naval Construction Force Series [b] NWP 4-04.1, U.S. Navy, Seabee Operations in the MAGTF [c] NAVFAC P-1049, Naval Construction Force Mobilization Manual [d] OPNAVINST 5450.46K, Naval Construction Force Policy Statement___________ 201.1 MISSION STATEMENT 201.1.1 State and discuss the NMCB mission. [ref. b, p. 2-6]

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Mission. The mission of the NMCB is to provide responsive military construction support to Navy, Marine Corps, and other forces in military operations; to construct and maintain base facilities; to repair battle-damaged facilities, and to conduct limited defensive operations as required by the circumstances of the deployment situation. It can also accomplish disaster control and recovery efforts when required. Specifically, mission areas of the NMCB include the following: o Performing horizontal and vertical construction simultaneously while defending their project sites from hostile forces. o Deploying an Air DET with air-liftable supplies and equipment within 48 hours of notification. (Refer to paragraph 2.3.8 below for additional information on the NMCB Air DET.) The remainder of a deployed NMCB can embark within 6 days. o Conducting active defensive operations against overt or clandestine enemy attacks directed toward unit personnel, convoys, camps, and facilities under construction. o Performing intermediate maintenance on organic and assigned augment equipment simultaneously with construction effort.

MOBILITY (MOB) 201.1.2 Define the term MOB. [ref. c, pp. 7-1, 7-2] Mobilization Process o Mobilization is the process whereby a nation makes the transition form a normal state of peacetime preparedness to a war-fighting posture. It involves the assembly, organization and application of the nations resources for national defense. The mobilization process encompasses all activities necessary to systematically and selectively prepare for war. o NMPS process o Release, Depreservation, and Shipment of Prepositioned War Reserve Material Stock (PWRMS) and/or Final Title stocks stored at either NCBC Gulfport, MS or Port Hueneme, CA. o Outfitting, Readying, and Training of NCF Personnel. The general planning policies, concepts, and assumptions, which were used in the development are as follows: o Unit Table of Allowance (TOA) equipment and material will already be forward deployed (four TOAs at existing deployment sites), are deployed aboard the MPF(E), or will be deployed by air, rail, or sea from a supporting NCBC. o Unit personnel will deploy by air (except ship riders). o Mobilized unit personnel will stay at NCBC Gulfport, MS and Port Hueneme, CA, until scheduled to deploy. Personnel will be mobilized as specified in the TPFDD

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which are structured to provide adequate activation and training time in order to deliver unit personnel for deployment on the specified dates. All unit personnel going through NCBC Gulfport, MS and Port Hueneme, CA, will receive initial outfitting of selected individual combat and survivability gear from the homeport NCR/PWRMS and will receive refresher combat/survivability/unit training. Deployment scheduling will be as required by the OPLAN(s) being executed. Depending on specific OPLAN requirements, selected mobilizing unit personnel may be available to assist NCBC Gulfport, MS and Port Hueneme, CA, in the depreservation, breakout, staging and shipment of TOA equipment/material and in providing necessary personnel support functions. Logistics Support Mobilization Plans (LSMPs) will address whether or not selected mobilizing unit personnel (by unit, rate, number, and time-frame) are required. Such use shall not conflict with OPLAN deployment schedules or with initial outfitting/refresher training. All essential services currently being provided to tenant commands by NCBC Gulfport, MS and Port Hueneme, CA, will continue at a level commensurate with the tenant command's mobilization mission. New services will not be provided unless pre-mobilization support agreements are in place. All non-essential work will be deferred as required to meet the mobilization peak workload. During a full mobilization, NCBC Gulfport, MS and Port Hueneme, CA, will activate their supporting Augments, Personnel Mobilization Teams (PERSMOBTEAMS), and in mobilization mode will work two 10-hour shifts, 6 days per week.

201.1.3 Discuss the role of the NMCB in a MOB mission. [ref. a, encl. 7] NEXT PAGE

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201.1.4 Discuss the role of an NMCB in support of amphibious operations. [ref. b, p. 4-3] Seabee Support Of Amphibious Operations o General. The amphibious operation, an attack launched from sea by naval and landing forces embarked in ships or craft involving a landing on a hostile shore, is one of the most decisive tools of power projection by naval expeditionary forces. The task organization for conducting amphibious operations, as determined by the mission, is the ATF and consists of both a naval force and a landing force with organic aviation and logistic support. For additional information, refer to NWP 302.1/FMFM 1-8, Ship-to-Shore Movement.

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Concept of Amphibious Operations o Naval Force. The Naval Beach Group (NBG) is one of four key components of the naval force that also includes the transport group, movement groups, and control groups. The NBG is a permanently organized command that in addition to providing beach master units (BMUs) and displacement landing craft/LCAC assault craft units, also provides PHIBCBs to the ATF to support the landing of a MEF. It provides Navy elements to the CATF and the Commander, Landing Force (CLF) in support of waterborne ship-to-shore movement and landing force support party (LFSP) operations. During MPF operations, the NBG commander becomes commander of the NSE and directs the naval cargo handling and port group element. o Landing Force. The LF is the highest troop echelon in the ATF and encompasses the entire MAGTF. Besides the GCE, ACE, and CSSE, a MAGTF involved in amphibious operations also consists of the tactical logistics group (a temporary LF organization advising the CATF and CLF of LF requirements during ship-to-shore movement) and the LFSP (a temporary LF organization established to provide the LF with initial combat support and CSS during ship-to-shore movement until relieved by the CSSE). The mission of the LFSP, task-organized from the NBG and other Navy organizations as directed by CATF, is to: Facilitate the landing and movement of troops, equipment, and supplies across beaches and landing zones, ports, and airfields. Facilitate the establishment of the CSSE, ACE, and NBG ashore. Assist in the beaching, extraction, and salvage of landing craft and amphibious vehicles. Assist in the evacuation of casualties and EPW personnel. o MAGTF Movement. Strategic lift constraints and tactical considerations dictate that some MAGTFs be echeloned into the landing area. While MEU(SOC)s from forward-deployed amphibious ready groups are employed as single units, MEF is divided into two echelons: the AE and the AFOE. The AFOE, normally required in the AOA within 5 days after commencement of the assault landing, may arrive on schedule with some elements required as early as D-day, or may remain in a specified operating area until called forward by the CLF. A portion of the AFOE may include air-transportable personnel to assemble with their equipment on MPF ships. o Engineer Support of Amphibious Operations. Engineer support during the early phases of the amphibious assault is directly influenced by the ability to land engineer equipment. Under extreme conditions, the use of landing craft air cushion during the ship-to-shore movement may be required. The Seabee Role in Amphibious Operations o Concept of Employment. Not all component Seabee organizations may be employed during amphibious operations. Normally employed under OPCON of the CATF, PHIBCBs and UCTs conduct construction missions that assist with the shipto-shore movement of personnel, equipment, and supplies. Those Seabee units normally under OPCON of the MAGTF commander, such as the NMCB, NCFSU, and elements of a UCT, may be located in either the AE or the AFOE. The priority given to construction tasks assigned to Seabee units will determine the echelon in which the NCF will be employed, to be decided by the CATF and CLF. Additional Seabee organizations may be assigned to the CATF and employed within the AOA. Examples of tasks requiring immediate priority are water well drilling and establishing or enhancing forward operating bases for fixed-wing aircraft. o Seabee Capabilities. Air-transportable, task-organized Seabee units such as the NMCB and UCT Air DETs are available for deployment upon 48 hours notice. Although extensive horizontal construction cannot be efficiently addressed with

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equipment that is transported by air, priority construction projects can be initiated by the Air DETs days prior to the arrival of MSC shipping. Additionally, local contractual acquisition of heavy engineer equipment may be possible to augment air-transported Seabee assets in a secure environment. o Seabee Tasks. As part of their primary mission, PHIBCBs, UCTs, and NMCBs provide development of the beach support area and beach throughput, and enhance the reception, staging, onward movement, and integration (RSO&I) to support the AFOE. Examples of the engineer effort required for the amphibious operation include the following: Advise commanders on suitable locations for pontoon causeway piers and for beaching amphibious vehicles and landing craft. Within the beach support area, facilitate the landing and movement of troops, equipment, and supplies across beaches and into LZs, ports, and airfields. Construct helicopter LZs, FARPs, casualty evacuation stations, and EPW holding facilities. Establish multi-class (e.g., Classes I, III, and V) supply dumps, to include operation of the AAFS and AABFS. Construct and maintain beach lateral and exit roads. COMMAND, CONTROL, AND COMMUNICATION (CCC) 201.1.5 Discuss battalion command and control within the Marine Air/Ground Task Force (MAGTF). [ref. b, pp. 1-16 thru 1-19] Concepts Of The Naval Construction Force o Command and Control. COMSECONDNCB and COMTHIRDNCB, as operational type commanders under CINCLANTFLT and CINCPACFLT, respectively, serve the fleet CINCs as the principal advisors for the direct utilization of the Seabee organizations and capabilities under their command. Headquarters for both NCBs (COMSECONDNCB is located in Norfolk, VA and COMTHIRDNCB is located in Pearl Harbor, HI) are situated close to the fleet CINCs. These NCBs exercise operational and limited administrative control of their assigned Seabee units, both active and Reserve. They also provide directive policy guidance for subordinate units in such areas as leadership and discipline, administration; contingency planning and readiness; military and technical training; unit deployment, employment, and scheduling; operational effectiveness; development of operational doctrine, tasking and procedures; equipment management; and logistics support. When SECOND NCB and THIRD NCB units deploy, their OPCON may shift to the appropriate fleet, joint, or unified combatant commander. However, COMSECONDNCB and COMTHIRDNCB always maintain administrative control of

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o OPCON of NCF Units. The USMC/USN Terms of Reference state that OPCON is
the only command and support relationship appropriate and authorized when Seabee units are employed within the MAGTF organization. ADCON usually remains with the Seabee units parent NCB. OPCON of Seabee units provides the MAGTF commander with authority to direct the forces assigned so that the commander may: Accomplish specific missions or tasks that are usually limited by function, time, or location. Deploy the Seabee units concerned as appropriate. Retain or assign tactical control of those Seabee units. OPCON does not include authority to assign separate employment of elements of the units concerned. Neither does it, by itself, include administrative or logistic control. OPCON of those Seabee organizations not governed by the TOR, but employed in theater, may also be exercised by commands other than those which have ADCON, such as the unified CINCs, CJTFs, or component commanders. 201.1.6 Discuss battalion command and control during joint operations in peacetime and wartime [ref. d, pp. 6-8] Combatant Command (COCOM) o Is the nontransferable command authority over assigned forces vested only in the commanders of combatant commands by Title 10 U.S.C. Section 164, or as directed by the President in the Unified Command Plan (UCP). COCOM is the authority to perform those functions of command involving organizing and employing commands and forces, assigning tasks, designating objectives, and giving authoritative direction over all aspects of military operations, joint training, and logistics necessary to accomplish the missions assigned to the command. Reference (h) provides additional explanation. OPCON o Is the operational control inherent in COCOM and is the authority to perform those functions of command over subordinate forces involving organizing and employing commands and forces, assigning tasks, designating objectives, and giving authoritative direction necessary to accomplish the missions assigned to the command. Only the COCOM chain of command or National Command Authority (NCA) delegates OPCON.

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ADCON o Is the administrative control over subordinate or other organizations with respect to administration and support, including organization of naval forces, control of resources and equipment, personnel management, unit logistics, individual and unit training, readiness, mobilization, demobilization, and discipline and other matters not included in the operational missions of the subordinate or other organizations. Specifically included in ADCON are command of peacetime support and employment of NCF forces (other than OPCON during theater CINC peacetime exercises and training), and readiness reporting (SORTS). In accordance with reference (h), the Department of the Navy is responsible for all logistic and administrative support of NCF forces assigned to or attached to joint commands and combatant commanders. ADCON of NCF forces is delegated as described in this Policy Statement: All Service forces (except as noted in 10 U.S.C. 162) are assigned to combatant commands by the Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) Forces for Unified Commands memorandum, reference (i). A force assigned or attached to a combatant command may be transferred from that command only as directed by SECDEF and under procedures prescribed by SECDEF and approved by the President. Reference (h) provides further explanation for transferring, reassigning and attaching units to other combatant commands. Reference (i) assigns the NCBs to the Commanders In Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command (ACOM) and U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM). The Commanders In Chief, U.S. Atlantic and Pacific Fleets (CINCLANTFLT and CINCPACFLT) are assigned ADCON over all NCF units assigned to and including their respective NCBs. o ADCON includes command, control and coordination of peacetime operations and support performed by forward-deployed units and shall remain under their respective Fleet CINCs, exercised via their NCBs. Fleet CINCs / NCBs are authorized to delegate ADCON of assigned units to maximize efficiency of command and control (for example, an NCR should be delegated ADCON of subordinate NMCBs and assigned NCF units). o Specific Seabee resources are forward deployed in accordance with reference (i). The Fleet CINCs and NCBs shall coordinate OPCON relationships with the associated theater CINC exercising COCOM over the forward-deployed resources. o As specified in references (h) and (i), in the event of a major emergency in the geographic combatant commanders area of responsibility (AOR), or theater, requiring the use of all available forces, that geographic combatant commander may assume direct OPCON of all forces (including forward deployed NCF units) located within the assigned AOR. Forward deployment of NCF units provides close geographic proximity to locations where a contingency may occur, minimizing lift requirements and maximizing prompt logistical support and responsiveness. Reporting relationships of NMCBs o Forward deployment requirements for NMCBs are specified in reference (i). Rotation of NMCBs shall be planned by both NCBs and the Fleet CINCs, and approved by the CNO (N44). When not deployed, NMCBs are under the ADCON/OPCON of the NCBs reporting via their NCRs. When forward deployed, NMCBs shall be under the OPCON of the AOR theater CINC via the Navy service component commander serving that CINC and OPCON NCR Forward deployed NMCBs remain under the ADCON of the NCBs reporting via the NCRs. o NMCBs may be assigned OPCON to a Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) or a Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF) in accordance with reference (j).

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201.1.8 Describe the Seabees role in advanced base and camp construction. [ref. c, p. 12-2]

Naval Mobile Construction Battalions (NMCBs) construct advance base facilities in support of the Navy, Marine Corps, and other armed services engaged in military operations. NMCBs are rapidly deployable, self-sustaining units with the exception of Class IV construction materials that are provided by supported commander, and are capable of performing vertical, horizontal and specialized construction. NMCBs construct advance base facilities and are capable of defensive combat operations, including fire support coordination, passive defensive measures, convoy defensive tactics, and the ability to defend themselves and their project sites against personnel and light armor/infantry vehicles. Additional functional capabilities include repair, maintenance, and capital improvement of shore facilities and lines of communication during contingency, emergency or disaster recovery operations.

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NMCBs may operate in small task organized detachments that are geographically dispersed throughout the theater, as a single NCF element in support of the area or force commander, or in coordination with other NMCBs as part of an NCR. NMCBs are organized into one headquarters and four line companies with full wartime strength of 25 officers and 787 enlisted. Each line company includes a weapons platoon using heavy machine guns and lightweight antitank weapons. The headquarters company has mortar capability. CESE includes construction, weight handling, and general-purpose vehicles. There are currently nine active duty NMCBs, three of which are continuously forward deployed to Okinawa, Guam, Roosevelt Roads, and Rota, Spain. When not deployed or in movement, remaining active duty NMCBs perform planning and training at their homeports at NCBC Gulfport, MS or NBVC Port Hueneme, CA. Peacetime manning of active NMCBs is below wartime strength, and each has a dedicated reserve augment unit that may be activated through presidential recall during a crisis situation.

NON-COMBAT OPERATIONS (NCO) 201.1.9 Discuss battalion operations during a peacetime deployment. [ref. c, p. 12-3] When forward deployed during peacetime, the active NMCBs perform project construction (primarily for skills training and readiness) in support of Fleet CINCs under the coordination and project management of the NCBs. Deployed NMCBs also support Combatant CINCsponsored Joint Exercises and Deployment for Training (DFT) Programs, as approved by the Fleet CINCs. There are currently 12 reserve NMCBs. Once fully mobilized, reserve NMCBs have the same contingency missions and required operational capabilities as active NMCBs. Because of their rapid deployment, self-sustainment and self-defense capabilities, their task specific organizational flexibility, and often, their geographic proximity, NMCBs (both active and reserve) may be tasked with providing emergency assistance, disaster recovery, or humanitarian relief support. Each NMCB shall be capable of forming, employing, and exercising command and control of independent detachments, teams or parties of up to 50 percent of the NMCB in size as required in support of tailoring to meet assigned objectives. Each Detachment shall be under the command of an officer in charge (OIC). Additional detachments and smaller work details may be required concurrently of the same NMCB.

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COMMAND AND CONTROL WARFARE (C2W) 201.1.11 Discuss battalion administrative and operational control in homeport. [ref. d, pp. 7, 8] See reference information for 201.1.6

201.1.12 Discuss NMCB administrative control when forward deployed. [ref. d, p. 8] See reference information for 201.1.6

201.1.13 Discuss NMCB operational control within the MAGTF and a Naval Construction Regiment (NCR). [ref. b, pp. 1-17, 2-4] OPCON of NCF Units. o MAGTF The USMC/USN Terms of Reference state that OPCON is the only command and support relationship appropriate and authorized when Seabee units are employed within the MAGTF organization. ADCON usually remains with the Seabee units parent NCB. OPCON of Seabee

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units provides the MAGTF commander with authority to direct the forces assigned so that the commander may: Accomplish specific missions or tasks that are usually limited by function, time, or location. Deploy the Seabee units concerned as appropriate. Retain or assign tactical control of those Seabee units. o OPCON does not include authority to assign separate employment of elements of the units concerned. Neither does it, by itself, include administrative or logistic control. OPCON of those Seabee organizations not governed by the TOR, but employed in theater, may also be exercised by commands other than those which have ADCON, such as the unified CINCs, CJTFs, or component commanders. NCR o Organization. Normally commanded by a Navy CEC Captain, a deployable, operational NCR CE consists of a staff organized into the following departments: Executive, Administrative, Intelligence, Operations, Supply, and Readiness. The NCR CE typically has OPCON over two to four assigned NMCBs and an NCFSU. However, if the mission and engineering requirements warrant such, one or more Air DETs from a UCT may also be assigned to augment the NCR task organization. o Concept of Employment. The NCR CE is task-organized and equipped for employment as an assigned force in support of MEF-sized operations when two or more NMCBs operating in a specific area are assigned to support the MEF. The NCR CE is structured to provide air or surface deployable elements in support of a specific military operation. Generally, the NCR CE: Maintains an organic TOA (TA11) capable of sustaining operations planned or envisioned under contingency or general war conditions for 60 days without resupply, except that Class I material is limited to 5 days, Class III is limited to 3 days, and Class V is limited to 15 days. Organic Class IV is limited to only those materials required to construct the command elements base camp. Resupply past the timeframes noted is the responsibility of the supported MAGTF. Is capable of performing its mission using basic individual protective measures in a CBR-contaminated environment for 30 days. o Tasks. The NCR CE is a command and control organization that plans, monitors, directs, coordinates, and controls construction operations for all subordinate NMCBs, NCFSUs, and other attached units.