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FY2012ScheduleC (1)

FY2012ScheduleC (1)

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget

Adjustments Summary / Schedule C

New York City Council Hon. Christine C. Quinn, Speaker

Committee on Finance Hon. Domenic M. Recchia, Jr., Chair

Finance Division Preston Niblack, Director Jeffrey Rodus, First Deputy Director

June 28, 2011

Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................... 1 CHILDREN’S SERVICES............................................................................................................. 2 CIVIL LEGAL SERVICES............................................................................................................ 4 CRIMINAL JUSTICE SERVICES ................................................................................................ 6 CULTURAL ORGANZIATIONS.................................................................................................. 8 DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ............................................................................................................. 10 EDUCATION ............................................................................................................................... 12 ELECTED OFFICIALS................................................................................................................ 16 FIRE SERVICES .......................................................................................................................... 17 HEALTH AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES AND HHC ................................................... 18
DOHMH, Health Services and Prevention..............................................................................................19 DOHMH, Mental Health and Hygiene....................................................................................................23 Health and Hospitals Corporation ...........................................................................................................26

HIGHER EDUCATION ............................................................................................................... 27 HOMELESS SERVICES ............................................................................................................. 29 HOUSING..................................................................................................................................... 30 LIBRARIES.................................................................................................................................. 35 PARKS AND RECREATION...................................................................................................... 36 SENIOR SERVICES .................................................................................................................... 38 SMALL BUSINESS SERVICES AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT............................... 43 SOCIAL SERVICES .................................................................................................................... 46
Nutrition Services....................................................................................................................................46 Social Services ........................................................................................................................................48

YOUTH AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ...................................................................... 50
Adult Literacy..........................................................................................................................................50 Youth Services ........................................................................................................................................50 Immigrant Services..................................................................................................................................53

FY 2012 BUDGET DISCLOSURES ........................................................................................... 55

Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Fiscal 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary New York City Council Finance Division

INTRODUCTION
Schedule C designates funding for community based not-for-profit and other public service organizations. Expenditure of any funds for each organization identified in Schedule C is contingent upon the satisfactory completion of 1) a detailed initial review process, and 2) all applicable City procurement requirements at the time of contract award. The New York City Council and the Mayor’s Office of Contract Services (MOCS) have established the following initial review for each organization: For all organizations included in Schedule C, the City Council preliminarily reviewed the public purpose for which the funds would be used, and any potential conflicts of interest. In addition, MOCS reviewed the website of and consulted with the State Attorney General’s Office to confirm that all groups – including those receiving $10,000 or less reviewed by the Council – demonstrated compliance with charity registration requirements. For organizations receiving $10,000 or less, the City Council also reviewed past performance, compliance with tax laws, corporate status, any reported investigations, audits, inquiries and other relevant information. In the case of organizations requesting funding in excess of $10,000, MOCS is overseeing an additional prequalification review process. Through this process, MOCS is reviewing each organization to determine whether it meets integrity requirements, and is in compliance with applicable laws and regulations, including charities registration. MOCS is also reviewing each organization to determine whether the organization is qualified to provide the proposed services, and is reviewing and recertifying the qualifications of organizations that were approved during prior fiscal years. Further, for any organization receiving funding through a fiscal conduit, the fiscal conduit must also be approved by MOCS. For those organizations identified in Schedule C with an asterisk, either the MOCS or the Council’s review process has not yet been completed, the State Attorney General’s Office has not yet provided the Council with final verification of the organization’s charitable filing status, or the organization is required to attend the MOCS corporate governance, fiscal management and compliance training. For those organizations identified in Schedule C without an asterisk, the Council has completed its review process and, where applicable, MOCS has preliminarily reviewed or prequalified the organization and any associated fiscal conduit, and the organization has attended the MOCS corporate governance, fiscal management and compliance training, if required to attend. Further restrictions to ensure the appropriate use of City funds will be incorporated through the City’s procurement process.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

CHILDREN’S SERVICES
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Children’s Services
Agency ACS ACS ACS ACS ACS ACS ACS Initiative Structural Deficit -- Child Care Classroom Restoration Structural Deficit -- Child Care Voucher Restoration Additional Child Care Classroom Restoration Day Care Center PEG Restoration Child Protective Staffing PEG Restoration Child Welfare Staffing PEG Restoration Vera Institute of Justice TOTAL Funding $12,024,000 $13,581,000 $10,000,000 $6,435,000 $3,600,000 $1,000,000 $250,000 $46,890,000

Initiative: Structural Deficit -- Child Care Classroom Restoration Agency: Administration for Children’s Services (068) Program Area: Child Care Services Unit of Appropriation: 004 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $12,024,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2012 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding to 72 classrooms slated for closure, as a result of the agency’s structural deficit in its child care budget. City Council funding will be supplemented by funding from the Administration in the amount of $29.2 million for an additional 125 classrooms. Combined restorations between the City Council and the Administration avert the closure of a total of 197 classrooms slated for closure as a result of the structural deficit. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Structural Deficit -- Child Care Voucher Restoration Agency: Administration for Children’s Services (068) Program Area: Child Care Services Unit of Appropriation: 004 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $13,581,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2012 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding for 4,942 child care vouchers for school-age children, who would have been displaced by the proposed reduction of Priority 5 and 6 child care vouchers. City Council funding will be supplemented by funding from the Administration in the amount of $10.9 million for an additional 2,802 child care vouchers for school-age children and 1,168 family day care slots. All school-age vouchers are at a rate of $2,748 per voucher. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Additional Child Care Classroom Restoration Agency: Administration for Children’s Services (068) Program Area: Child Care Services Unit of Appropriation: 004 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $10,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2010 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding to 60 child care classrooms operating with high enrollment, slated for closure. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

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Initiative: Day Care Center PEG Restoration Agency: Administration for Children’s Services (068) Program Area: Child Care Services Unit of Appropriation: 004 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $6,435,000 Boroughs Served: Brooklyn and Queens First Year Funded: 2011 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding to six child care centers, originally slated for closure as part of the Fiscal 2011 PEG Program. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Child Protective Staffing PEG Restoration Agency: Administration for Children’s Services (068) Program Area: Child Protective Services Unit of Appropriation: 001 – Personal Services Amount: $3,600,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2012 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding for 105 Child Protective staff positions, proposed for elimination through attrition in Fiscal 2012. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Child Welfare Staffing PEG Restoration Agency: Administration for Children’s Services (068) Program Area: Child Welfare Services Unit of Appropriation: 001 – Personal Services Amount: $1,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2010 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding for 26 positions in child welfare and juvenile justice, averting layoffs proposed in the Fiscal 2012 PEG program. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Vera Institute of Justice Agency: Administration for Children’s Services (068) Program Area: Juvenile Justice Services Unit of Appropriation: 008 – Other than Personal Services Amount: $250,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2012 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding for the Vera Institute of Justice to provide substance abuse and mental health treatment to youth at risk for probation violation using the Adolescent Portable Therapy treatment program (APT). Designation Method: The City Council has designated the Vera Institute of Justice as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-1941627

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

CIVIL LEGAL SERVICES
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Civil Legal Services
Agency CJC CJC CJC CJC Initiative Citywide Civil Legal Services Unemployment/SSI Program Legal Services for the Working Poor Legal Information for Families (LIFT) TOTAL Funding $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $1,050,000 $485,000 $4,035,000

Initiative: Citywide Civil Legal Services Agency: Miscellaneous Budget - CJC Unit of Appropriation: 002 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $1,500,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2001 Population Targeted: Indigent persons requiring legal assistance Description/Scope of Services: This action provides a combined $1.5 million to the Legal Aid Society ($750,000) and Legal Services for New York City ($750,000). The appropriation is intended to serve as a replacement for lost Interest On Lawyer Accounts (IOLA) funds. It is the Council’s express intent that this appropriation will be utilized to augment overall citywide civil legal services programs in the same manner that State IOLA funding does. These services may include, but are not limited to: direct client representation, including representation in class action cases; the provision of legal advice; community legal education presentations; pro-bono/volunteer lawyer programs; and hotline and other telephone-based legal services. Legal areas in which services may be provided include, but are not limited to: consumer/finance; education; employment; family; juvenile; health; housing; income maintenance; individual rights; and miscellaneous benefits. No prohibitions may be imposed on the types of civil legal services these entities may perform on behalf of their clients, other individuals and/or community groups. This restoration will ensure the provision of civil legal services citywide to, among others, senior citizens, battered women, disabled persons and persons with AIDS. Designation Method: The City Council has designated the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. Organization Legal Aid Society Legal Services NYC Amount $750,000 $750,000 Tax ID# 13-5562265 13-2600199

Initiative: Unemployment/SSI Program Agency: Miscellaneous Budget - CJC Unit of Appropriation: 002 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $1,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2006 Population Targeted: Persons eligible for unemployment/SSI benefits Description/Scope of Services: This action allocates a combined $1 million to Legal Services for New York City ($500,000) and the Legal Aid Society ($500,000) to expand legal advocacy through the Supplemental Security Income Advocacy Project. This funding will also support a new advocacy project of LSNY and LAS for unemployed individuals who have been wrongly denied Unemployment Insurance Benefits (UIB). This funding will support the costs of providing legal representation at hearings before Administrative Law Judges to help disabled individuals and the unemployed receive the Unemployment Insurance Benefits (UIB) and/or the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits they have been wrongly denied.

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Designation Method: The City Council has designated the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. Organization Legal Aid Society Legal Services NYC Amount $500,000 $500,000 Tax ID# 13-5562265 13-2600199

Initiative: Legal Services for the Working Poor Agency: Miscellaneous Budget - CJC Unit of Appropriation: 002 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $1,050,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2005 Population Targeted: Working poor persons requiring civil legal assistance Description/Scope of Services: Among the types of services that will be provided to community members are: “assistance in preventing eviction and foreclosure; improvement of living conditions and removal of hazardous housing conditions in their homes; housing code enforcement actions; organization and representation of tenants groups; help in obtaining emergency grants and benefits to avoid homelessness; assistance for family members in getting appropriate disability benefits such as SSD or SSI; immigration assistance; protection from workplace abuses, such as harassment and violation of fair wage and hour laws; consumer protections from creditors; legal representation of domestic violence victims; assistance with recovering illegal rents and other improper rent charges.” Designation Method: The City Council has designated the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. Organization Church Avenue Merchants Block Association Housing Conservation Coordinators Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation Urban Justice Center MFY Legal Services Amount $239,674 $239,674 $239,674 $239,674 $91,304 Tax ID# 11-2480339 51-0141489 13-2972415 13-3442022 13-2622748

Initiative: Legal Information for Families Today (LIFT) Agency: Miscellaneous Budget - CJC Unit of Appropriation: 002 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $485,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2005 Population Targeted: Persons requiring information in Family Court Description/Scope of Services: This funding will provide LIFT with the necessary resources to operate its Family Court information services programs, including its Education and Information sites located in Family Court entranceways. Designation Method: The City Council has designated LIFT as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-3910567

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

CRIMINAL JUSTICE SERVICES
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Criminal Justice Services
Agency CJC CJC CJC CJC Initiative Alternatives to Incarceration (ATIs) Center for Court Innovation Child Advocacy Centers (Safe Horizon) Sexual Assault Initiative TOTAL Funding $3,350,000 $400,000 $500,000 $150,000 $4,400,000

Initiative: Alternatives to Incarceration (ATIs) Agency: Miscellaneous Budget - Criminal Justice Coordinator (CJC) Unit of Appropriation: 002 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $3,200,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 1997 Population Targeted: Defendants facing incarceration, including youth, women, and individuals with mental illness and/or substance abuse issues. Description/Scope of Services: Alternative-to-Incarceration Programs (ATIs) permit New York judges to sanction defendants through means other than jail or prison. The use of intermediate sanctions, such as community service and substance abuse counseling, saves the City the cost of maintaining jail beds for those who otherwise would be incarcerated. In addition, ATIs provide a range of rehabilitative services for defendants and allow jail beds to be made available for more violent offenders who pose a threat to the community. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount of funding each will receive under this initiative post-Adoption.

Initiative: Center for Court Innovation (CCI) Agency: Miscellaneous Budget - CJC Unit of Appropriation: 002 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $400,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2005 Population Targeted: Community members and court-involved individuals Description/Scope of Services: CCI operates a variety of community courts, drug courts, mental health courts, domestic violence courts, and school justice centers and youth programs throughout the City. This funding will support CCI’s overall operations, as well as its Family and Youth Initiative. Designation Method: The City Council has designated CCI as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-2612524

Initiative: Child Advocacy Centers (Safe Horizon) Agency: Miscellaneous Budget - CJC Unit of Appropriation: 002 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $500,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2005 Population Targeted: Abused children Description/Scope of Services: The sum of $500,000 supports the expansion of services at the three existing CACs (Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island). CACs “work hand-in-hand with law enforcement and child protective services to coordinate and expedite the investigation and prosecution of cases of child sexual abuse. Working with specially trained physicians, representatives from the Administration for Children’s Services, detectives from the NYPD, and members of the District Attorney’s Office, [the Centers] help sexually abused children and their

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

families negotiate the criminal justice and social services systems. The Centers also provide short-term counseling, information and referrals for children and families not involved in current investigations.” Designation Method: The City Council has designated Safe Horizon as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-2946970

Program: Initiative to Address Sexual Assault Agency: Criminal Justice Coordinator Unit of Appropriation: Amount: $150,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2005 Population Targeted: Victims of Sexual Assault Description/Scope of Services: This action would provide $175,000 for the New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault to: “develop a Sexual Assault Awareness Month campaign to raise awareness of the rights and needs of victims, foster discussion about sexual assault and provide opportunity to reach out to victims”; develop a Sexual Assault Examiner program in one hospital in each of two underserved areas; and “distribute a malepositive, anti-sexual violence poster for 11-13 year old boys to junior high and middle schools, after school programs, and other programs that reach young men.” Additionally, funding of $52,500 will be available to each of three different community-based organizations to provide sexual assault-related services and programs, including those that benefit survivors. These groups are: Kingsbridge Heights Community Center (Bronx), St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Crime Victims Treatment Center (Manhattan), and Mt. Sinai Sexual Assault & Violence Intervention Program (Queens). Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative post-Adoption. Organization Kingsbridge Heights Community Center (Bronx) St. Luke's-Roosevelt Crime Victims Treatment Center Intervention Program (Manhattan) Mt. Sinai Sexual Assault & Violence Intervention Program (Queens) Amount $52,500 $52,500 $52,500 Tax ID# 13-2813809 13-2997301 13-6171197

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

CULTURAL ORGANZIATIONS
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Cultural Organizations
Agency DCA DCA DCA DCA Initiative Coalition of Theaters of Color Cultural After-School Adventure (CASA) PEG Restoration - Programs PEG Restoration – Cultural Institution Group TOTAL Funding $700,000 $5,100,000 $9,000,000 $20,548,790 $35,348,790

Initiative: Coalition of Theaters of Color Agency: Department of Cultural Affairs (126) Unit of Appropriation: 003 Amount: $700,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2006 Population Targeted: Supports theaters and cultural organizations primarily in communities of color. Description/Scope of Services: This funding supports the operations and programming of various organizations. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. All groups that are designated to receive funding from this initiative will have their Fiscal 2012 grant awards from DCA amended to include this additional funding. These designations will be made post-Adoption. Organization Billie Holiday Theatre, Inc. Black Spectrum Theatre Company, Inc. Forty Greene Avenue Cultural Center, Inc. - Paul Robeson Theatre Harlem Artist Development League Especially for You - H.A.D.L.E.Y. Players International Arts Relations, Inc. National Black Theatre Workshop, Inc. Negro Ensemble Company New Federal Theatre, Inc. New Heritage Theatre Group, Inc. Society of the Educational Arts, Inc. Thalia Spanish Theatre, Inc. Amount $80,000 $80,000 $50,000 $50,000 $70,000 $80,000 $26,000 $70,000 $70,000 $52,000 $72,000 Tax ID# 11-2336154 51-0135262 11-2627555 13-3611138 23-7212492 13-2632596 13-6216904 13-2814763 13-2683678 11-3210593 23-7448611

Initiative: Cultural After-School Adventure (CASA) Agency: Department of Cultural Affairs (126) Unit of Appropriation: 003 – Cultural Programs Amount: $5,100,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2006 Population Targeted: Youth Description/Scope of Services: This funding supports after-school programs that are in partnership with cultural programs and institutions to provide arts enrichment citywide. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. These designations will be made post-Adoption.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Initiative: PEG Restoration - Programs Agency: Department of Cultural Affairs (126) Unit of Appropriations: 003 Amount: $9,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: N/A Description/Scope of Services: This funding restores a portion of the proposed funding cuts for Fiscal 2012 for the Program Cultural Organizations (Cultural Development Fund--CDF). Designation Method: The restoration will be distributed to the organizations proportionally to their CDF allocation for Fiscal 2012.

Initiative: PEG Restoration – Cultural Institutions Group Agency: Department of Cultural Affairs (126) Unit of Appropriations: 004-017, 019-022, 024 Amount: $20,549,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: N/A Description/Scope of Services: This funding restores a portion of the proposed funding cuts for Fiscal 2012 for the members of the Cultural Institutions Group (CIG). Designation Method: The restoration will be distributed proportionally to the CIG members.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Domestic Violence
Agency ACS CJC CJC CJC Initiative *CONNECT, Inc. Community Empowerment Program Domestic Violence and Empowerment (DoVE) Initiative Legal Services for Domestic Violence Victims Sanctuary for Families - Immigrant Battered Women's Initiative TOTAL Funding $270,000 $2,500,000 $350,000 $475,000 $3,595,000

*The initiative above with an asterisk is potentially eligible for State and/or Federal match funding.

Initiative: CONNECT, Inc. Community Empowerment Program Agency: Administration for Children’s Services (068) Program Area: Preventive services Unit of Appropriation: 006 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $270,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2003 Description/Scope of Services: This action restores funding to the Community Empowerment Program (CEP) operated by CONNECT. CONNECT provides domestic violence education, outreach, technical assistance and training to community and school-based organizations. Designation Method: The City Council has designated CONNECT, Inc. as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 02-0694269

Initiative: Domestic Violence and Empowerment (DoVE) Initiative Agency: Miscellaneous Budget (098) - CJC Unit of Appropriation: 002 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $2,500,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2006 Population Targeted: Domestic Violence Victims Description/Scope of Services: The $2.5 million restoration provided for the DoVE Initiative is to support the neighborhood-based provision of domestic violence services in the most vulnerable and high-incidence areas of New York City. The funds are to be used to support community-based organizations that provide prevention and empowerment workshops, comprehensive service referrals and legal advocacy to victims of domestic violence. Of the $2.5 million total, funding in the amount of $250,000 will be provided to Safe Horizon to administer this program and provide technical assistance. Designation Method: The City Council has designated Safe Horizon as the program administrator for this initiative. The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount of funding each will receive under this initiative post-Adoption.

Initiative: Legal Services for Domestic Violence Victims Agency: Miscellaneous Budget - CJC Unit of Appropriation: 002 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $350,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2001 Population Targeted: Domestic Violence Victims Description/Scope of Services: Groups funded under this initiative will provide comprehensive legal services and information to indigent victims of domestic violence appearing in court.

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Designation Method: The City Council has designated the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. Organization InMotion (formerly the Network for Women's Services) Safe Horizon Sanctuary for Families Amount $100,000.00 $125,000.00 $125,000.00 Tax ID# 13-3688519 13-2946970 13-3193119

Initiative: Sanctuary for Families - Immigrant Battered Women's Initiative Agency: Miscellaneous Budget - CJC Unit of Appropriation: 002– Other Than Personal Services Amount: $475,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2005 Population Targeted: Domestic Violence Victims Description/Scope of Services: This action restores $475,000 to Sanctuary for Families’ Immigrant Battered Women’s Initiative. These funds will be used to support and enhance staff salaries in the Initiative’s legal and clinical programs, as well as OTPS and indirect agency costs. Designation Method: The City Council has designated Sanctuary for Families as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-3193119

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

EDUCATION
Summary of FY 2012 Council Initiatives: Education
Agency DOE DOE DOE CUNY DOE DOE DOE DYCD DOE DOE DOE Initiative Bridge to Tomorrow C.H.A.M.P.S. Council of School Supervisors and Administrators Creative Arts Team Custodial Operations Dropout Prevention & Intervention Full Day Universal Pre-Kindergarten Jill Chaifitz Helpline MOUSE Respect for All Urban Advantage-Science Education TOTAL Funding $1,250,000 $125,000 $300,000 $200,000 $3,000,000 $1,000,000 $2,250,000 $200,000 $275,000 $150,000 $2,000,000 $10,750,000

Initiative: Bridge to Tomorrow Agency: Department of Education (040) Unit of Appropriation: 401 - General Education Instruction and School Leadership - PS Amount: $1,250,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Population Targeted: Job candidates at Workforce1 Centers without a high school diploma or equivalent Description/Scope of Services: This allocation supports the Bridge to Tomorrow program that provides GED assessments, preparation and testing to clients of the Department of Small Business Services at Workforce1 Centers. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: C.H.A.M.P.S. Agency: Department of Education (040) Unit of Appropriation: 401 - General Education Instruction and School Leadership - PS Amount: $125,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2007 Population Targeted: Middle school students Description/Scope of Services: This allocation supports the C.H.A.M.P.S. program that helps to improve fitness levels and overall health of middle school students by increasing opportunities to engage in physical activity. It promotes health-related fitness through before- and after-school sports programs in over 200 middle schools in all five boroughs. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Council of School Supervisors and Administrators (CSA) Agency: Department of Education (040) Unit of Appropriation: 454 - Central Administration - OTPS Amount: $300,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2002 Population Targeted: Members of the Council of Supervisors and Administrators Description/Scope of Services: This allocation supports the CSA’s Executive Leadership Institute (“ELI”) which maintains five borough learning centers and provides professional development and training to principals and other school leadership staff.

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Designation Method: The City Council has designated the Council of School Supervisors and Administrators as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 11-2024569

Initiative: Creative Arts Team Agency: City University of New York (042) Unit of Appropriation: 001 – Community Colleges OTPS Amount: $200,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2005 Population Targeted: New York City youth, parents, and teachers Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to support the Creative Arts Team, which challenges at-risk youth with participatory drama workshops and residencies that foster important learning skills and positive social development. These outreach programs serve a variety of student populations in regular, special education, alternative, and Head Start programs. They are also age-appropriate and tailored for each grade level from Pre-K to high school. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Custodial Operations Agency: Department of Education (040) Unit of Appropriation: 435 – School Facilities -PS Amount: $3,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2010 Population Targeted: School Custodians Description/Scope of Services: This allocation partially restores a budget reduction to custodial allocations and shall mitigate reductions to services provided by DOE custodians. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Dropout Prevention and Intervention Agency: Department of Education (040) Unit of Appropriation: 454 - Central Administration - OTPS Amount: $1,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2008 Population Targeted: New York City public school students at risk of dropping out Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to support dropout prevention and intervention programs. Contracted providers offer a range of student support, school restructuring and professional development services. Designation Method: The City Council has designated the following organizations as the providers for this initiative: Organization El Puente Good Shepherd Services Enact United Way of New York City, Inc. Turnaround for Children Institute for Student Achievement Amount $33,000 $167,000 $250,000 $183,000 $200,000 $167,000 Tax ID # 11-2614265 13-5598710 13-3422660 13-2617681 06-1495529 11-2995109

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Initiative: Full Day Universal Pre-Kindergarten (“UPK”) Agency: Department of Education (040) Unit of Appropriation: 402- General Education Instruction and School Leadership – OTPS Amount: $2,250,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2008 Population Targeted: Four-year old children Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to supplement universal pre-kindergarten programs provided by selected community based organizations by adding funding to extend the two and one-half hour UPK program to a full school day program. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Jill Chaifitz Helpline Agency: Department of Youth and Community Development (260) Unit of Appropriation: 312 – Youth Services-OTPS Amount: $200,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2007 Population Targeted: Parents of New York City School Children Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding to support the Jill Chaifitz Helpline operated by Advocates for Children that provides information to parents of public school children and the public about the policies, programs, and practices of the Department of Education and its schools. Designation Method: The City Council has designated Advocates for Children as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 11-2247307

Initiative: MOUSE Agency: Department of Education (040) Unit of Appropriation: 454 - Central Administration - OTPS Amount: $275,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Population Targeted: Public school students Description/Scope of Services: Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education (MOUSE) prepares and supports students in establishing and managing technical support help desks in their schools. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency. Tax ID#: 13-3973319

Initiative: Respect for All Agency: Department of Education (040) Unit of Appropriation: 454 – Central Administration-OTPS Amount: $150,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Population Targeted: School Leaders and Teachers Description/Scope of Services: This allocation supports an initiative to train school leaders and teachers in every public school in the Department’s student diversity curriculum. The Office of School and Youth Development shall collaborate with its Respect for All Partners to train staff and provide curriculum materials to secondary schools. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

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Initiative: Urban Advantage-Science Education Agency: Department of Education (040) Unit of Appropriation: 454 - Central Administration - OTPS Amount: $2,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2005 Population Targeted: Middle school students and their teachers Description/Scope of Services: This allocation supports the Urban Advantage Program, which is a unique collaboration of seven science oriented institutions to provide professional development for middle school science teachers, school and class-based resources and assist middle school students in completing state-mandated exit projects and requirements. Designation Method: The City Council has designated the American Museum of Natural History as the administrator for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-6162659

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

ELECTED OFFICIALS
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Elected Officials
Agency DAs PAs Initiative District Attorneys Public Administrators TOTAL Funding $308,400 $383,606 $692,006

Initiative: Youth Violence Initiative Agency: New York County District Attorney Unit of Appropriation: 002 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $58,400 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Description/Scope of Services: Funding will be provided to support a summer program to engage neighborhood youth using educational, workforce, and cultural services as alternatives to gang participation. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Staten Island Drug Treatment Court Agency: Richmond County District Attorney Unit of Appropriation: 002 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $250,000 Boroughs Served: Staten Island First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Description/Scope of Services: This action provides $250,000 to the Richmond County District Attorney's Fiscal 2012 Other Than Personal Services budget. Funding will be used to support costs associated with the Staten Island Drug Treatment Court which will benefit from the services of Education & Assistance Corporation's Treatment Alternatives for Safe Communities program (EAC-TASC). Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Public Administrators Agency: Public Administrator Unit of Appropriation: 001 – Personal Services Amount: $383,606 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2004 Description/Scope of Services: This action provides funding to the Public Administrators’ Fiscal 2012 budgets to supplement the agencies’ Personal Services (PS) resources. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agencies.

Organization Public Administrator-New York County Public Administrator-Bronx County Public Administrator-Kings County Public Administrator-Queens County Public Administrator-Richmond County

Amount $87,421 $74,514 $79,609 $73,262 $68,800

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

FIRE SERVICES
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Fire
Agency FDNY Initiative Fire Company Restoration TOTAL Funding $40,903,754 $40,903,754

Initiative: Fire Company Restoration Agency: FDNY Unit of Appropriation: 002 & 006 – Fire Extinguishment/Emergency PS & OTPS Amount: $40,903,754 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2010 Population Targeted: Citywide Description/Scope of Services: This action restores $40,903,754 to maintain operations of 20 Fire Companies and retain 505 firefighter positions. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

HEALTH AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES AND HHC
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Health and Mental Health Services and HHC
Initiative/Restoration DOHMH, Health Services and Prevention Asthma Control Program* Cancer Initiatives* Child Health Clinics (HHC pass-through)* Family Planning* HIV Prevention and Health Literacy for Seniors* HIV/AIDS - Communities of Color (Prevention & Education)* HIV/AIDS - Faith Based Initiative* Infant Mortality* Injection Drug Users Health Alliance (IDUHA)* NYU Dental Van Obesity Intervention Programs* Rapid HIV Testing (HHC pass-through)* Subtotal, DOHMH, Health Services and Prevention DOHMH, Mental Health and Hygiene Autism Awareness Children Under Five Mental Health Initiative Geriatric Mental Health Services Mental Health Contracts Mental Hygiene Contracted Services PEG Restoration - Chemical Dependency/ADUPCT Mental Hygiene Contracted Services PEG Restoration - DD Clinics Mental Hygiene Contracted Services PEG Restoration - Mental Health Providers Suicide Prevention Hotline Young Adult Institute and Workshop, Inc. Subtotal, DOHMH, Mental Health and Hygiene Funding $500,000 $1,425,000 $5,000,000 $350,000 $400,000 $1,125,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $1,000,000 $268,000 $1,300,000 $2,000,000 $17,368,000

$1,250,000 $1,250,000 $2,000,000 $450,000 $700,000 $806,000 $1,150,000 $247,000 $200,000 $8,053,000

Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) HHC Developmental Evaluation Clinic Funding $1,817,000 HHC Client Transportation $78,000 HHC Unrestricted Operating Subsidy $3,000,000 Subtotal, HHC $4,895,000 TOTAL $30,316,000 * The items above marked with an asterisk are potentially eligible for State match funding.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

DOHMH, Health Services and Prevention
Initiative: Asthma Control Program Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Unit of Appropriation: 113 – Health Promotion and Disease Prevention – Other than Personal Services (OTPS) Amount: $500,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: Fiscal 2004 Population Targeted: Children living in District Public Health Office neighborhoods Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding for the Department and community based organizations to provide services in the Managing Asthma in Daycare Program. The Council also provides funding directly to the Department to implement its corticoid steroid pilot program, participate in the NYC Asthma Partnership and to continue its Integrated Pest Management and American Lung Association programs in schools. Designation Method: This allocation will represent a combination of direct agency funding and City Council designations to organizations. These designations will be made post-Adoption and approved by Council Resolution.

Initiative: Cancer Initiative Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Unit of Appropriation: 113 – Health Promotion and Disease Prevention – OTPS Amount: $1,425,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2003 Population Targeted: All Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding for various Council-funded programs that include screening and education for breast, colon and ovarian cancer. The designated organizations are focused on supporting cancer survivors during their recovery. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount of funding each will receive under this initiative. These designations will be made post-Adoption and approved by Council Resolution.

Initiative: Child Health Clinics Agency: Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) (via DOHMH pass-through) Program Area: Health Care Access and Improvement Unit of Appropriation: 117 – Health Care Access and Improvement – OTPS Amount: $5,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2000 Population Targeted: Youth Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding for the Child Health Clinics. This action ensures that child health clinics will remain open, and provide enhanced levels of access and quality care. HHC child health clinics provide the medical attention children need to stay healthy, including immunizations, physicals and treatment for just about everything from the common cold to more serious conditions, like asthma. Families also have access to specialists outside of the center, including a wide range of pediatric subspecialists. Designation Method: This funding is provided to the Health and Hospitals Corporation via an intra-city transfer.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Initiative: Family Planning Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Unit of Appropriation: 113 – Health Promotion and Disease Prevention - Other than Personal Services Amount: $350,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2000 Population Targeted: Teens Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a restoration to provide funding for reproductive health and pregnancy prevention services for uninsured and high-risk teens via Planned Parenthood of New York City (PPNYC). Designation Method: The City Council has designated PPNYC as the provider of this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 13-2621497

Initiative: HIV Prevention and Health Literacy for Seniors Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Disease Prevention and Treatment- HIV/AIDS Unit of Appropriation: 112 – Disease Control and Epidemiology – OTPS Amount: $400,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2008 Population Targeted: Seniors Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to develop tailored HIV prevention and education messages that target the older adult population, aging service providers and health care providers. The AIDS Community Research Initiative of America (ACRIA) provides services under this initiative. Designation Method: The City Council has designated the AIDS Community Research Initiative of America as the provider of this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 13-3632234

Initiative: HIV/AIDS Communities of Color (Prevention & Education) Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Disease Prevention and Treatment- HIV/AIDS Unit of Appropriation: 112 – Disease Control and Epidemiology – OTPS Amount: $1,125,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2006 Population Targeted: Those at-risk of contracting HIV and those living with HIV/AIDS Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to address the disproportionate number of AIDS cases among communities of color and women. This funding is primarily directed to community-based organizations which demonstrate an ability to engage these vulnerable populations, raise awareness of the disease and thereby help lower the rate of HIV/AIDS amongst communities of color and women. Public Health Solutions and Community Resource Exchange, Inc. administer the contracts to a number of organizations. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount of funding each will receive under this initiative. These designations will be made post-Adoption and approved by Council Resolution.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Initiative: HIV/AIDS Faith Based Initiative Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Disease Prevention and Treatment- HIV/AIDS Unit of Appropriation: 112 – Disease Control and Epidemiology – OTPS Amount: $1,500,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2005 Population Targeted: Varied Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding for prevention, education, outreach, advocacy and support services. This funding is directed to local religious institutions and community-based organizations that demonstrate an ability to engage vulnerable populations and to raise awareness of the epidemic, thereby helping to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations as the program administrators of this initiative and will also designate the organizations and the amount of funding each will receive under this initiative. These designations will be made post-adoption and shall be approved by the Council by Council Resolution.

Initiative: Infant Mortality Reduction Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Unit of Appropriation: 113 – Health Promotion and Disease Prevention – OTPS Amount: $2,500,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide – targeting community districts with high infant mortality rates. First Year Funded: Fiscal 2002 Population Targeted: Expectant mothers and women of childbearing age Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to promote women’s health before, during and after pregnancy and works to improve outcomes for infants in order to reduce infant mortality and narrow racial/ethnic disparities in these areas. Designation Method: This allocation will represent a combination of direct agency funding and City Council designations to organizations. These designations will be made post-Adoption and approved by Council Resolution.

Initiative: Injection Drug Users Health Alliance (IDUHA) – Harm Reduction Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Disease Prevention and Treatment- HIV/AIDS Unit of Appropriation: 112 – Disease Control and Epidemiology – OTPS Amount: $1,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2005 Population Targeted: Injection drug users and their families Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to combat the spread of HIV/AIDS as passed through intravenous drug use through enabling sterile syringe access, facilitating Hepatitis C care coordination and through offering overdose prevention and addiction treatment services. Providers under this initiative are part of the Injection Drug Users Health Alliance (IDUHA) that provides clean syringes and referrals to drug treatment programs. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount of funding each will receive under this initiative. These designations will be made post-Adoption and approved by Council Resolution.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Health Care Access and Improvement Unit of Appropriation: 117 - Health Care Access and Improvement – OTPS Amount: $268,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2005 Population Targeted: Youth in public schools Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to provide mobile dental care to medically underserved children citywide. Designation Method: The City Council has designated NYU Medical as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 13-5562308

Initiative: Obesity Intervention Program Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Unit of Appropriation: 113 – Health Promotion and Disease Prevention – OTPS Amount: $1,300,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2007 Population Targeted: Children Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding for a number of obesity prevention programs that provide education and promote physical fitness to curb and prevent obesity in young New Yorkers. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount of funding each will receive under this initiative. These designations will be made post-Adoption and approved by Council Resolution.

Initiative: Rapid HIV Testing Agency: HHC (via DOHMH) Program Area: Disease Prevention and Treatment- HIV/AIDS Unit of Appropriation: 112 – Disease Control and Epidemiology – OTPS Amount: $2,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2006 Population Targeted: HHC Patients Description/Scope of Services: This allocation funding to expand HHC’s HIV rapid testing and counseling services on a routine basis at inpatient units and select outpatient settings at public hospitals and clinics. Designation Method: This funding is provided to the Health and Hospitals Corporation via an intra-city transfer.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

DOHMH, Mental Health and Hygiene
Initiative: Autism Awareness Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Mental Hygiene – Development Disabilities Unit of Appropriation: 121 - Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Amount: $1,250,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2008 Population Targeted: Children affected by Autism Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to provide wraparound services to autistic children in after-school, summer programs and during school closings. The program will also provide forums and training seminars to teach coping skills to families affected by autism. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. These designations will be made post-Adoption and shall be approved by Council Resolution.

Initiative: Children under Five Initiatives Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Mental Hygiene – Mental Health Services Unit of Appropriation: 120 - Mental Health Amount: $1,250,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2005 Population Targeted: Children under the age of five who have either been victims of violence or have been exposed to violence. Description/Scope of Services: This allocation funds community-based outpatient mental health clinics throughout the City to provide mental health treatment for children age five and under. Mental health treatment activities include, but are not limited to, screening and clinical evaluation; individual, small group and child-parent psychotherapy; trauma informed interventions (trauma-informed care is an approach to engaging people with histories of trauma that recognizes the presence of trauma symptoms and acknowledges the role that trauma has played in their lives); and consultation to pediatricians, preschool teachers, child welfare workers. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. These designations will be made post-Adoption and shall be approved by Council Resolution.

Initiative: Geriatric Mental Health Services Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Mental Hygiene – Mental Health Services Unit of Appropriation: 120 - Mental Health Amount: $2,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2006 Population Targeted: Seniors with mental disabilities Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to strengthen the infrastructure of experienced organizations providing a range of mental health services in “non-clinical settings” such as senior centers, drop-in centers, religious institutions, social clubs, and homeless prevention programs and in the home. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. These designations will be made post-Adoption and shall be approved by Council Resolution.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Initiative: Mental Health Contracts Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Mental Hygiene – Mental Health Services Unit of Appropriation: 120 - Mental Health Amount: $450,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2004 Population Targeted: Adults Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding for programs and contracts that provide a range of mental health services. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. These designations will be made post-Adoption and shall be approved by Council Resolution.

Initiative: Mental Hygiene Contracted Services Partial PEG Restoration – Chemical Dependency/ADUPCT Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Mental Hygiene – Chemical Dependency Unit of Appropriation: 122 – Chemical Dependency Amount: $700,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2012 Population Targeted: Varied Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a partial restoration of funding to DOHMH Mental Hygiene Contracted providers administering chemical dependency programs and services. Designation Method: Funding will be provided directly to the Agency to be distributed among the selected contracted providers. The Agency and OMB have been notified of the selected providers and restoration amounts.

Initiative: Mental Hygiene Contracted Services Partial PEG Restoration – DD Clinics Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Mental Hygiene – Mental Retardation/Development Disabilities Unit of Appropriation: 121 – Mental Retardation/Development Disabilities Amount: $806,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2012 Population Targeted: Varied Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a partial restoration of funding to Developmental Disability (DD) Clinics contracted with the DOHMH. Designation Method: Funding will be provided directly to the Agency to be distributed among the selected contracted providers. The Agency and OMB have been notified of the selected providers and restoration amounts.

Initiative: Mental Hygiene Contracted Services Partial PEG Restoration – Mental Health Providers Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Mental Hygiene – Mental Health Services Unit of Appropriation: 120 – Mental Health Amount: $1,150,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2012 Population Targeted: Varied Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a partial restoration of funding to DOHMH Mental Hygiene Contracted providers administering bridger (transition management) programs, psychosocial clubs, recreation programs and adult respite programs.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Designation Method: Funding will be provided directly to the Agency to be distributed among the selected contracted providers. The Agency and OMB have been notified of the selected providers and restoration amounts.

Initiative: Samaritans of New York Suicide Prevention Hotline PEG Restoration Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Mental Hygiene – Mental Health Services Unit of Appropriation: 120 Amount: $247,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2011 Population Targeted: All Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a PEG restoration for Samaritans of New York Suicide Prevention Services which consists of 24-hour suicide prevention hotline that answers nearly 65,000 calls annually. Designation Method: The City Council has designated the Samaritans of New York, Inc., as the provider of this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 13-3164464

Initiative: Young Adult Institute and Workshop, Inc. (YAI) Agency: DOHMH Program Area: Mental Hygiene – Development Disabilities Unit of Appropriation: 121 - Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Amount: $200,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2007 Population Targeted: Developmentally disabled adults Description/Scope of Services: This allocation partially restores YAI's three adult rehabilitation and recreation programs: (1) the Manhattan Evening Adjustment Program (MEAP); (2) the Bronx Evening Adjustment Program (BEAP); and (3) the Alumni Club. These programs provide essential socialization and community inclusion services for adults with developmental disabilities (DD). Designation Method: The City Council has designated Young Adult Institute and Workshop, Inc. as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 11-2030172

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Health and Hospitals Corporation
Initiative: HHC Developmental Evaluation Clinic Funding Agency: HHC Program Area: Mental Hygiene – Mental Retardation/Development Disabilities Unit of Appropriation: 001 – Lump Sum Amount: $1,817,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2011 Population Targeted: HHC patients Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to restore the Developmental Evaluation Clinics (DECs) located at HHC's (1) Morrisania Diagnostic and Treatment Center; (2) Renaissance Health Care Network Diagnostic and Treatment Center; (3) Kings County Hospital; and (4) Queens Hospital Center. HHC’s DECs offer evaluation, diagnosis and targeted treatment for children with cerebral palsy, developmental disabilities and neurological impairments that limit intellectual, academic and communication potential. Designation Method: This funding is provided to the Health and Hospitals Corporation.

Initiative: Partial PEG Restoration for Client Transportation Agency: HHC Program Area: Varied Unit of Appropriation: 001 – Lump Sum Amount: $78,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2012 Population Targeted: HHC patients Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to preserve a program that pays for client transportation to and from visits to HHC clinics. Designation Method: This funding is provided to the Health and Hospitals Corporation.

Initiative: Partial PEG Restoration to Unrestricted Operating Subsidy Agency: HHC Program Area: Mental Hygiene – Mental Retardation/Development Disabilities Unit of Appropriation: 001 – Lump Sum Amount: $3,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: Fiscal 2012 Population Targeted: HHC patients Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a partial restoration to HHC’s Unrestricted Operating Subsidy. This subsidy serves as a lump-sum appropriation to HHC in recognition of the financial challenges of serving uninsured and Medicaid patients. Payments associated with these particular services and patients do not cover the full costs of care. Designation Method: This funding is provided to the Health and Hospitals Corporation.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

HIGHER EDUCATION
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Higher Education
Agency CUNY CUNY CUNY CUNY CUNY Initiative Black Male Initiative Center for Puerto Rican Studies CUNY Nursing Program Dominican Studies Institute Murphy Institute Center for Worker Education TOTAL Funding $2,250,000 $250,000 $500,000 $250,000 $100,000 $3,350,000

Initiative: Black Male Initiative Agency: City University of New York (042) Unit of Appropriation: 001 – Community Colleges OTPS Amount: $2,250,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2007 Population Targeted: Under-represented students Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to support programs and services at several CUNY campuses to recruit and support under-represented groups, particularly black males. Some of the initiatives include transition to college programs, academic enrichment, mentoring, leadership development, and non-violent conflict resolution. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Center for Puerto Rican Studies Agency: City University of New York (042) Unit of Appropriation: 001 – Community Colleges OTPS Amount: $250,000 First Fiscal Year Funded: 2005 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a restoration to the Center for Puerto Rican Studies which was created to archive, preserve, and research Puerto Rican culture. The Center is located at Hunter College in Manhattan. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: CUNY Nursing Program Agency: City University of New York (042) Unit of Appropriation: 001 – Community Colleges OTPS Amount: $500,000 First Fiscal Year Funded: 2010 Description/Scope of Services: This funding will provide professional training for a new class of nurses. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Dominican Studies Institute Agency: City University of New York (042) Unit of Appropriation: 001 – Community Colleges OTPS Amount: $250,000 First Fiscal Year Funded: 2005 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a restoration to the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, which was created to archive, preserve, and research the Dominican culture. The institute is located at City College in Manhattan.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency. Program: Murphy Institute Center for Worker Education Agency: City University of New York (042) Unit of Appropriation: 001 – Community Colleges OTPS Amount: $100,000 First Fiscal Year Funded: 2006 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a restoration to the Murphy Institute Center for Worker Education which provides access to education for working adults and training and education for New York City union members. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

HOMELESS SERVICES
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Homeless Services
Agency DHS DHS Initiative Citywide Homeless Prevention Fund Medical Service Reduction in Adult Shelter PEG Restoration TOTAL Funding $250,000 $1,200,000 $1,450,000

Initiative: Citywide Homeless Prevention Fund Agency: Department of Homeless Services (071) Program Area: Prevention and After Care Unit of Appropriation: 200 – Other than Personal Services Amount: $250,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2007 Population Targeted: Potentially homeless individuals and families Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a restoration for a homelessness prevention program that provides emergency grants to families in crisis at risk of eviction in order to keep them in their homes and avoid the shelter system. Approximately 250 low-income families will be assisted. Designation Method: The City Council has designated the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. Organization Coalition for the Homeless Community Service Society The Bridge Fund Amount $150,000 $50,000 $50,000 Tax ID# 13-3072967 13-5562202 13-3824852

Initiative: Medical Reduction in Adult Shelters PEG Restoration Agency: Department of Homeless Services (071) Program Area: Adult Shelter Operations Unit of Appropriation: 200 – Other than Personal Services Amount: $1,200,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Population Targeted: Homeless adults in shelter Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a restoration of funding for shelter-based medical services in approximately 12 general population adult shelters. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency for current contracts.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

HOUSING
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Housing
Agency HPD HPD HPD HPD HPD HPD HPD HPD Initiative Citywide Task Force on Housing Court Community Consultants Housing Preservation Initiative Mortgage Foreclosure Prevention Program Anti-Eviction & SRO Legal Services PRATT Block by Block Subsidized Housing Information Project (SHIP) Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development TOTAL Funding $500,000 $415,000 $1,250,000 $750,000 $2,000,000 $200,000 $45,000 $100,000 $5,260,000

Program: Citywide Task Force on Housing Court Agency: HPD Unit of Appropriation: 011 – Office of Housing Preservation- Other Than Personal Services Program Area: Preservation-Anti Abandonment Amount: $500,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 1999 Population Targeted: Tenants who attend housing court Description/Scope of Services: Provides for the continuation and enhancement of a contract with the City-Wide Task Force on Housing Court for the provision of information services for tenants and small landlords, which is provided at tables located in the City’s Housing Courts. Allocation Designation: The City Council has designated the City-Wide Task Force on Housing Court as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-3317188

Program: Community Consultants Agency: HPD Unit of Appropriation: 009 – Office of Development – Other Than Personal Services Program Area: Preservation-Anti Abandonment Amount: $415,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 1992 Population Targeted: Low-income housing residents Description/Scope of Services: The Community Consultant program allows neighborhood-based groups to provide the following services: tenant organization; code enforcement advocacy; housing court assistance; apartment repossession; and other housing-related public education. Allocation Designation: The City Council has designated the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Organization Belmont Arthur Avenue Local Development Organization Brighton Neighborhood Association, Inc. Brooklyn Housing and Family Services, Inc. Central Astoria Local Development Coalition, Inc. City-Wide Task Force on Housing Court, Inc. Clinton Housing Development Company, Inc. Community League of the Heights, Inc. El Barrio Operation Fight Back, Inc. Eviction Intervention Services Homelessness Prevention, Inc. Good Old Lower East Side, Inc. Gowanus Canal Community Development Corporation Greater Ridgewood Restoration Corporation Harlem Congregations for Community Improvement, Inc. Housing Conservation Coordinators, Inc. Hudson Guild Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, Inc. MFY Legal Services, Inc. Mount Hope Housing Company, Inc., The Neighborhood Housing Services of East Flatbush, Inc. Neighborhood Housing Services of Jamaica, Inc. Neighborhood Housing Services of the North Bronx, Inc. Neighborhood Initiatives Development Corporation (NIDC) North Brooklyn Development Corporation Northfield Community LDC of Staten Island, Inc. Northwest Bronx Community and Clergy Coalition for Sistas and Brothas United Pueblo En Marcha II, Inc. Queens Community House, Inc. Queensboro Council for Social Welfare, Inc. Ridgewood Bushwick Senior Citizens Council, Inc. Staten Island Center for Independent Living, Inc. Strycker's Bay Neighborhood Council, Inc. United Jewish Council of the East Side, Inc. Vannguard Urban Improvement Association, Inc. West Bronx Housing and Neighborhood Resource Center, Inc. West Side Federation for Senior and Supportive Housing, Inc. Woodside on the Move, Inc.

Amount $23,136 $20,000 $10,117 $13,437 $8,108 $5,000 $9,296 $7,098 $5,462 $11,510 $13,537 $10,658 $10,000 $7,755 $5,000 $5,000 $7,468 $10,000 $20,000 $13,437 $10,000 $10,000 $18,264 $15,860 $15,000 $10,000 $13,437 $13,114 $30,000 $10,000 $5,488 $6,266 $13,114 $10,000 $5,000 $13,438

Tax ID# 13-3020589 11-2435523 11-2412584 11-2652331 13-3317188 13-2851988 13-2564241 13-3248777 13-3311582 13-2915659 11-2498292 11-2382250 13-3516262 51-0141489 13-5562989 13-1628180 13-2622748 13-3419970 13-3098397 23-7398279 13-3098397 13-3110811 11-2555446 13-2974137 13-2806160 13-4010925 11-2375583 11-1817497 11-2453853 13-3266398 13-1943516 13-2735378 11-2442042 13-2941841 13-2926433 11-2435565

Program: Housing Preservation Initiative Agency: HPD Unit of Appropriation: 009 – Office of Development – Other Than Personal Services Program Area: Preservation-Other Agency Services Amount: $1,250,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2008

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Population Targeted: Low-income housing residents Description/Scope of Services: This initiative allows neighborhood-based groups to design and implement a grassroots-based approach to the most critical threats to affordable housing in their individual community. Allocation Designation: The City Council has designated the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. Organization 5th Avenue Committee Asian Americans for Equality Belmont Arthur Avenue Local Development Organization Bridge Street Development Corporation Cypress Hills Local Development Corporation Good Old Lower East Side, Inc. Margert Community Corporation Pueblo En Marcha Mount Hope Housing Company Neighborhood Housing Services of East Flatbush Neighborhood Housing Services of Jamaica Neighbors Helping Neighbors New Settlement Apartments Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation Mutual Housing Association of New York, Inc. Picture the Homeless Pratt Area Community Council Ridgewood-Bushwick Senior Citizens Council Southside United Housing Development Fund Corp. Urban Justice Center West Harlem Group Assistance Amount $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $100,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $150,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $100,000 $50,000 Tax ID# 11-2475743 13-3187792 13-3020589 11-3250772 11-2683663 13-2915659 11-2534700 13-4010925 13-3419970 13-3098397 23-7398279 11-3059958 14-1719016 13-2972415 11-2848938 32-0017919 11-2451752 11-2453853 11-2268359 13-3442022 23-7169558

Program: Mortgage Foreclosure Prevention Program: Center for New York City Neighborhoods Agency: HPD Unit of Appropriation: 009 – Office of Development – Other Than Personal Services Program Area: Preservation-Anti Abandonment Amount: $750,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2007 Population Targeted: Low-income housing residents Description/Scope of Services: This funding supports the Center for New York City Neighborhoods, an independent, not-for profit entity, which coordinates the work of organizations providing technical services citywide, legal services providers, and community based organizations working to assist homeowners who are in danger of losing their homes due to mortgage foreclosure. Allocation Designation: The City Council has designated the Center for New York City Neighborhoods (CNYCN) as the provider for this initiative. CNYCN will award grants to other organizations through a competitive process. Tax ID#: 83-0506416

Program: Anti Eviction and SRO Legal Services Agency: Housing Preservation and Development Unit of Appropriation: 011 Program Area: Preservation-Other Agency Services

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Amount: $2,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 1995 Population Targeted: Low-and moderate-income people faced with illegal eviction; Single Resident Occupancy (SRO) tenants Description/Scope of Services: Legal services and advocacy Designation Method: The City Council has designated the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. Organization Bedford Stuyvesant Community Legal Services Corporation Brooklyn Legal Services Corporation A Goddard Riverside Community Center Legal Aid Society / Civil Division- Bronx Legal Aid Society / Civil Division- Brooklyn Legal Aid Society / Civil Division- Community Law Office Legal Aid Society / Civil Division- Queens Legal Aid Society / Civil Division- Staten Island Legal Services NYC – Bronx Legal Services NYC - Brooklyn Branch Legal Services NYC - Manhattan Legal Services (Includes Harlem branch) MFY Legal Services, Inc. Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation Queens Legal Services Corporation South Brooklyn Legal Services Amount $84,888 $83,074 $310,129 $124,643 $163,963 $262,782 $93,750 $68,750 $87,500 $57,716 $145,556 $173,975 $80,409 $102,294 $160,571 Tax ID# 11-2149962 13-2605599 13-1893908 13-5562265 13-5562265 13-5562265 13-5562265 13-5562265 16-1759590 13-2600199 13-2613958 13-2622748 13-2972415 13-2605604 13-2605605

Program: Pratt Block by Block Agency: HPD Unit of Appropriation: 009 Program Area: Preservation Anti-Abandonment Amount: $200,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Population Targeted: Homeowners, renters Description/Scope of Services: As part of the Speaker's State of the City initiative in 2010, this initiative will provide a one-time grant to the Pratt Center for Community Development to support a pilot program that will provide a block-by-block retrofitting in 5 neighborhoods. Allocation Designation: The City Council has designated Pratt Center for Community Development as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 11-1630822

Program: Subsidized Housing Information Project (SHIP) Agency: HPD Unit of Appropriation: 009 Program Area: Preservation Anti-Abandonment

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Amount: $45,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Population Targeted: Homeowners, renters Description/Scope of Services: As part of the Speaker's State of the City initiative in 2011, this initiative will fund the Furman Center to conduct training and outreach to potential users of a new, comprehensive database of New York City's privately owned subsidized housing that is at risk of losing its affordability status. Allocation Designation: The City Council has designated the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-5562308

Program: Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development Agency: HPD Unit of Appropriation: 009 Program Area: Preservation Anti-Abandonment Amount: $100,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Population Targeted: Homeowners, renters Description/Scope of Services: This funding will support efforts to secure a commitment of permanent affordability in all city-subsidized affordable housing projects. Allocation Designation: The City Council has designated the Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-2775999

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LIBRARIES
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Libraries
Agency NY Public Library (Research) NY Public Library (Branches) Brooklyn Public Library Queens Borough Public Library Initiative Fiscal 2012 Subsidy Restoration Fiscal 2012 Subsidy Restoration Fiscal 2012 Subsidy Restoration Fiscal 2012 Subsidy Restoration TOTAL Funding $4,270,000 $22,692,000 $17,019,000 $17,019,000 $61,000,000

Initiative: Fiscal 2012 Subsidy Restoration Agency: New York Public Library: Research (035) Unit of Appropriation: 001 Amount: $4,270,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide Description/Scope of Services: This funding restores a portion of the proposed funding cut for Fiscal 2012 for the NYPL Research Library. Designation Method: This funding is allocated directly to the New York Public Library.

Initiative: Fiscal 2012 Subsidy Restoration Agency: New York Public Library: Branches (037) Unit of Appropriation: 006 Amount: $22,692,000 Boroughs Served: The Bronx, Manhattan & Staten Island Description/Scope of Services: This funding restores a portion of the proposed funding cut for Fiscal 2012 for the NYPL branch libraries. Designation Method: This funding is allocated directly to the New York Public Library.

Initiative: Fiscal 2012 Subsidy Restoration Agency: Brooklyn Public Library (038) Unit of Appropriation: 001 Amount: $17,019,000 Boroughs Served: Brooklyn Description/Scope of Services: This funding restores a portion of the proposed funding cut for Fiscal 2012 for the Brooklyn Public Library. Designation Method: This funding is allocated directly to the Brooklyn Public Library.

Initiative: Fiscal 2012 Subsidy Restoration Agency: Queens Borough Public Library (039) Unit of Appropriation: 001 Amount: $17,019,000 Boroughs Served Queens Description/Scope of Services: This funding restores a portion of the proposed funding cut for Fiscal 2012 for the Queens Borough Public Library. Designation Method: This funding is allocated directly to the Queens Borough Public Library.

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PARKS AND RECREATION
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Parks and Recreation
Agency DPR DPR DPR DPR DPR Initiative Parks Job Training Restoration Playground Associates Restoration Pools- Restoration of Pools Closures Pools- Maintenance of Pool Season Seasonal Plan Restoration TOTAL Funding $2,900,000 $1,000,000 $546,000 $891,000 $2,483,500 $7,820,500

Program: Parks Job Training Participants Agency: Department of Parks and Recreation Unit of Appropriation: 002 Program Area: Maintenance & Operations – POP Program Amount: $2,900,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Description/Scope of Services: This Council allocation represents a partial PEG restoration for the Department of Parks Job Training Participants program also known as Parks Opportunity Program POP. POP is primarily a program for welfare participants who have reached their five-year benefit level. They are placed in city jobs for eleven and one-half months at which time they also receive training in basic skills. Those placed within DPR receive training either in forestry, security or horticulture through Parks Department’s JTPs program. In addition, soft skills training such as, in resume writing and interviewing are provided. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Program: Playground Associates Restoration Agency: Department of Parks and Recreation Unit of Appropriation: 004 Program Area: Recreation - Citywide Amount: $1,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2008 Description/Scope of Services: This Council allocation is for 30 full-time equivalent playground associates to provide supervised recreation in local parks and playgrounds. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Program: Pools – Restoration of Pool Closure Agency: Department of Parks and Recreation Unit of Appropriation: 002 Program Area: Recreation - Citywide Amount: $546,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Description/Scope of Services: This Council allocation represents a PEG restoration of $546,000 for four City pools scheduled to be closed during the pool season in Fiscal 2012. The four pools are Wagner, Howard, Fort Totten, and West Brighton pool. This allocation will help keep them open during the Fiscal 2012 pool season. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

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Program: Pools – Maintenance of Pool Season Agency: Department of Parks and Recreation Unit of Appropriation: 002 Program Area: Recreation - Citywide Amount: $891,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a PEG restoration of $891,000 to help keep all City pools open during the last two weeks of pool season in Fiscal 2012. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Program: Seasonal Plan Restoration Agency: Department of Parks and Recreation Unit of Appropriation: 002 Program Area: Maintenance & Operations - Citywide Amount: $2,483,500 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a PEG restoration of $2.5 million for seasonal workers including seasonal aides, gardeners and PEP officers for beach patrol at the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) in Fiscal 2012. The Department’s seasonal workers are generally responsible for park maintenance, security and parks cleanliness. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

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SENIOR SERVICES
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Senior Services
Agency DFTA DFTA DFTA DFTA DFTA DFTA DFTA DFTA DFTA DFTA Initiative Case Management Restoration CityMeals on Wheels Elder Abuse Programs -- PEG Restoration Information and Referral Contracts NORC Supportive Service Program Senior Center Core Operating Costs Senior Center Closures – PEG Restoration Senior Services – Borough Presidents’ Discretionary Funding -- PEG Restoration Space Costs for Senior Centers Transportation Operating Costs TOTAL Funding $3,000,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $1,000,000 $900,000 $14,000,000 $1,645,000 $4,100,000 $1,500,000 $2,000,000 $ 29,945,000

Initiative: Case Management Restoration Agency: Department for the Aging (125) Program Area: Case Management Unit of Appropriation: 003 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $3,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2012 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation partially restores funding for DFTA case management programs proposed for reduction in the Fiscal 2012 PEG program. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: CityMeals on Wheels Agency: Department for the Aging (125) Program Area: Senior Centers and Meals Unit of Appropriation: 003 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $1,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2006 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding for CityMeals on Wheels, which provides home-delivered meals to seniors on the weekends and on holidays. This funding is also used to reduce waiting lists for home delivered meals. Designation Method: The City Council designated CityMeals on Wheels as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-3634381

Initiative: Elder Abuse Programs -- PEG Restoration Agency: Department for the Aging (125) Program Area: Senior Services Unit of Appropriation: 003 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $800,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2010 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding for Elder Abuse programs slated for elimination in the Fiscal 2010 PEG Program. Designation Method: The following organizations will receive funding through this initiative.

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Organization Carter Burden Center for the Aging, Inc. Community Agency for Senior Citizens, Inc. JASA Brooklyn (CD 1-9) JASA Brooklyn (CD 7-15) JASA Manhattan JASA Queens A JASA Queens B Neighborhood Self Help by Older Persons Project, Inc. Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc.

Amount $91,520 $81,306 $98,186 $97,039 $86,926 $86,189 $87,125 $92,351 $79,358

Tax ID # 23-7129499 13-3263537 13-2620896 13-2620896 13-2620896 13-2620896 13-2620896 13-3077047 13-6213586

Initiative: Information and Referral Contracts Agency: Department for the Aging (125) Program Area: Senior Services Unit of Appropriation: 003 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $1,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2009 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation partially restores funding for DFTA information and referral contracts. Designation Method: The following organizations will receive funding through this initiative. Organization American-Italian Coalition of Organizations, Inc. (AMICO) - Extended Services Program Bronx Jewish Community Council, Inc. Council of Belmont Organizations, Inc. Emerald Isle Immigration Center Hellenic American Neighborhood Action Committee, Inc. (HANAC) Metropolitan New York Coordinating Council on Jewish Poverty, Inc. Polish and Slavic Center, Inc. United Jewish Council of the East Side, Inc. Amount $94,105 $165,965 $103,914 $56,132 $142,954 $247,765 $96,847 $92,318 Tax ID # 11-2488439 13-2744533 13-2755323 11-2932528 11-2290832 13-2738818 11-2285970 13-2735378

Initiative: NORC Supportive Service Program Agency: Department for the Aging (125) Program Area: Senior Services Unit of Appropriation: 003 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $900,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2007 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding for the Naturally Occurring Retirement Community Supportive Service Program (NORC SSP). The program provides services to seniors who live in NORCs, including social services, medical services, educational/recreational services and volunteer opportunities. Designation Method: The following organizations will receive funding through this initiative.

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Organization Bronx Jewish Community Council, Inc. -- Pelham Parkway Houses NORC BronxWorks, Inc. -- Citizens Advice Bureau NORC Grand Street Settlement, Inc. -BEST NORC Jamaica Service Program for Older Adults, Inc. (JSPOA) NORC Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) -- 1199 Plaza NORC Neighborhood Self Help by Older Persons Project, Inc. -- Morrison Lafayette/Boyton Lafayette NORC Samuel Field YM & YWHA, Inc. -NORC Without Walls Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, Inc. (SAGE) – SAGE Harlem NORC South Brooklyn Youth Consortium, Inc.-South Brooklyn Youth NORC Spring Creek Senior Partners, Inc. -Spring Creek NORC

Amount $180,000 $74,808 $77,922 $45,000 $76,050 $31,500 $92,520 $63,000 $79,200 $180,000

Tax ID # 13-2744533 13-3254484 13-5562230 51-0204121 13-2620896 13-3077047 11-3071518 13-2947657 03-0387372 74-3158439

Initiative: Senior Center Core Operating Costs Agency: Department for the Aging (125) Program Area: Senior Centers and Meals Unit of Appropriation: 003 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $14,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2012 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding for both meals and operating costs of senior centers citywide. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Senior Center Closures -- PEG Restoration Agency: Department for the Aging (125) Program Area: Senior Centers and Meals Unit of Appropriation: 003 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $1,645,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2011 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding to save DFTA senior centers slated for closure in the Fiscal 2011 PEG Program. Designation Method: The following organizations will receive funding through this initiative.

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Organization Aging in America Community Services, Inc. - Glebe Senior Center Central Harlem Senior Citizens Coalition, Inc. - Abyssinnian Center Church on the Hill Older Adult (COTHOA) Luncheon Club, Inc. - Wilson M. Morris Senior Center Citizens Care Committee, Inc. - Harlem Teams Senior Center East Side House, Inc. - Patterson Houses Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc. - Penn Wortman Senior Center Glenridge Senior Citizen Multi-Service & Advisory Center, Inc. - Glenridge Senior Citizen Multiservice Center Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) - Dreiser Senior Center Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) - Holliswood Senior Center Lutheran Medical Center - Shore Hill Housing Senior Center Mid-Bronx Senior Citizens Council, Inc. - Concourse Plaza Wellness Center Presbyterian Senior Services - Ennis Francis Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc. - Rain Bailey Avenue Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc. - Tolentine Zeiser Nutrition Program Spanish Speaking Elderly Council-RAICES - Gowanus Senior Center Union Settlement Association, Inc. - Washington Lexington Senior Center United Jewish Council of the East Side, Inc. - Lillian Wald Houses

Amount $60,000 $25,000 $20,000 $40,000 $60,000 $180,000 $130,000 $150,000 $155,000 $70,000 $180,000 $60,000 $185,000 $145,000 $40,000 $70,000 $75,000

Tax ID # 13-4099045 13-2754783 13-3273604 13-6179568 13-1623989 11-2300840 11-2327136 13-2620896 13-2620896 23-7405105 23-7354073 13-1981482 13-6213586 13-6213586 11-2730462 13-1632530 13-2735378

Initiative: Senior Services -- Borough Presidents’ Discretionary Funding PEG Restoration Agency: Department for the Aging (125) Program Area: Senior Centers and Meals, Senior Services Unit of Appropriation: 003 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $4,100,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2010 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding to support citywide senior services including senior centers, meals, case management, homecare, transportation, and other services. Designation Method: The Borough Presidents will designate the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative post-Adoption.

Initiative: Space Costs for Senior Centers Agency: Department for the Aging (125) Program Area: Senior Centers and Meals Unit of Appropriation: 003 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $1,500,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2007 Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding to address space/facility needs at senior centers. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

Initiative: Transportation - Operating Costs Agency: Department for the Aging (125) Program Area: Senior Centers and Meals Unit of Appropriation: 003 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $2,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Year Funded: 2006

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Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding to support the operating costs (insurance, fuel and maintenance) of existing vans and other existing vehicles that are used by senior centers and other senior programs. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

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SMALL BUSINESS SERVICES AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Small Business Services and Workforce Development
Agency SBS SBS SBS SBS SBS SBS SBS SBS SBS DoITT Initiative Consortium for Worker Education Food Cooperative Expansion Initiative Food Distribution Study Food Retail and Workforce Training and Placement Program High Tech Connect IBZ RFP Restoration Jobs to Build On MWBE Leadership Associations Small Business and Job Development / Financial Literacy Diversity in Media Program TOTAL Funding $1,000,000 $50,000 $50,000 $45,000 $150,000 $96,000 $3,500,000 $600,000 $600,000 $100,000 $6,191,000

Initiative: Consortium for Worker Education (CWE) Agency: SBS Unit of Appropriation: 011 Program Area: Workforce Development: Training Amount: $1,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2006 Population Targeted: Union workers, immigrant, minority and long-term unemployed workers. Description/Scope of Services: These funds are for CWE to provide job training to union workers to improve their employment skills and also provide citizenship classes, ESL, GED, computer literacy and work readiness preparation to immigrant, minority and long-term unemployed workers. Allocation Designation: The City Council has designated CWE as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-3564313

Program: Food Cooperative Expansion Initiative Agency: SBS Unit of Appropriation: 002 Program Area: Business Development Amount: $50,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Population Targeted: Organizations seeking to start food cooperatives Description/Scope of Services: This allocation will fund staff to conduct feasibility and business assessments and provide technical assistance to groups looking to open food cooperatives. Allocation Designation: The City Council has designated the Structured Employment Development Corporation (Seedco) as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-2875743

Program: Food Distribution Study Agency: SBS Unit of Appropriation: 002 Program Area: Business Development Amount: $50,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012

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Description/Scope of Services: This allocation will go to support a study of the City’s food distribution system. Allocation Designation: Funding is provided directly to agency.

Program: Food Retail Workforce Training and Placement Program Agency: SBS Unit of Appropriation: 011 Program Area: Workforce Development: Training Amount: $45,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Population Targeted: Retail food workers Description/Scope of Services: As part of the Speaker's Food Works initiative in 2010, The HOPE Program, Inc. will train the underemployed for food retail career track such as healthy food sourcing, merchandising, and basic professional skills. Allocation Designation: The City Council has designated The HOPE Program as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-3268539

Program: High Tech Connect Agency: SBS Unit of Appropriation: 006 Program Area: Contract Services: Economic Development Corporation Amount: $150,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Population Targeted: Entrepreneurs Description/Scope of Services: This Speaker's State of the City initiative will establish High-Tech Connect to create new entrepreneurship activities and good jobs in NYC. Allocation Designation: The Council has designated the New York City Investment Fund to implement this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-6400434

Initiative: Industrial Business Zone RFP Restoration Agency: SBS Unit of Appropriation: 002 Program Area: Mayor’s Office of Industrial and Manufacturing Businesses Amount: $96,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Population Targeted: Industrial business zone businesses Description/Scope of Services: This is a restoration to industrial business zone businesses. Allocation Designation: This funding will be restored to the agency.

Initiative: Jobs to Build On Agency: SBS Unit of Appropriation: 011 Program Area: Workforce Development: Training Amount: $3,500,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2008 Population Targeted: Unemployed and Under-employed New York City residents Description/Scope of Services: To recruit and transition low-skilled, long-term unemployed and underemployed individuals, prepare them for entry union and non-union jobs, attain credentials enabling them to meet

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general employer standards, and place participants in real job and career prospects at a living wage. Allocation Designation: The City Council has designated CWE as the administrator for this initiative. Tax ID#: 13-3564313

Program: MWBE Leadership Associations Agency: SBS Unit of Appropriation: 005 Program Area: Economic & Financial Opportunity: M/WBE Amount: $600,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2007 Population Targeted: Minority and women-owned businesses Description/Scope of Services: Funding will provide for a range of services including guidance on government contracting for potential or City-certified MWBEs; assistance in connecting MWBEs to potential customers; aid in the development of bids and proposals; assistance in securing project financing and bonding; and the promotion and marketing of the City’s MWBE program. Allocation Designation: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative post-Adoption.

Program: Small Business and Job Development / Financial Literacy Agency: SBS Unit of Appropriation: 002 Program Area: Business Development Amount: $600,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2007 Population Targeted: Small businesses Description/Scope of Services: Funding will provide technical and financial assistance, business counseling and financial literacy education to entrepreneurs and small businesses. Allocation Designation: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative post-Adoption.

Program: Diversity in Media Program Agency: DoITT Unit of Appropriation: 002 Program Area: Workforce Development Amount: $100,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Population Targeted: CUNY Students Description/Scope of Services: Funding will be used by NYC Media to increase diversity in the production industry, provide meaningful workforce development opportunities and critical career training for television production for CUNY students. Allocation Designation: Funding is provided directly to the agency.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

SOCIAL SERVICES
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Nutrition Services
Agency DYCD DYCD DYCD DYCD DYCD DYCD DYCD HRA Initiative Expansion at New Amsterdam Household Composting Program (GrowNYC) Expand Low-Income Farmer’s Markets (Harvest Home) Disconnected Youth Training Program (GrowNYC) Earned Income Tax Credit (Food Bank) EBTs at Food Markets (GrowNYC) Food Pantries Food Pantries TOTAL Funding $45,000 $45,000 $60,000 $65,000 $150,000 $270,000 $570,000 $1,500,000 $2,705,000

Initiative: Expansion at New Amsterdam Market Agency: Department of Youth and Community Development (260) Program Area: Community Development Programs Unit of Appropriation: 005 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $45,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Population Targeted: Food Stamp Recipients and Disconnected Youth Description/Scope of Services: To fund staff to operate EBT/Food Stamp program and to conduct the outreach and public education needed to promote its availability to the communities it will serve and to train and employ disconnected, youth aged 18-24 who lack basic job skills and have difficulty securing employment. Designation Method: The City Council has designated New Amsterdam Public Market as the provider of this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 20-5559159

Initiative: Household Composting Program (GrowNYC) Agency: Department of Youth and Community Development (260) Program Area: Community Development Programs Unit of Appropriation: 005 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $45,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Population Targeted: Food Stamp Recipients Description/Scope of Services: As part of the Speaker's FoodWorks Initiative GrowNYC will create a composting pilot program at selected greenmarkets throughout the City. Designation Method: The City Council has designated GrowNYC as the provider of this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 13-2765465

Initiative: Expand Low-Income Farmer’s Markets (Harvest Home) Agency: Department of Youth and Community Development (260) Program Area: Community Development Programs Unit of Appropriation: 005 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $60,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Population Targeted: Consumers of Emergency Food Description/Scope of Services: As part of the Speaker's Food Works Initiative this allocation will fund marketing

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and outreach to support and expand farmers markets in underserved communities. Designation Method: The City Council has designated Harvest Home as the provider of this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 06-1800512

Initiative: Disconnected Youth Training Program (GrowNYC) Agency: Department of Youth and Community Development (260) Program Area: Community Development Programs Unit of Appropriation: 005 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $65,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Population Targeted: Youth Description/Scope of Services: As part of the Speaker's FoodWorks Initiative … Designation Method: The City Council has designated GrowNYC as the provider of this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 13-2765465

Initiative: Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) Assistance Program Agency: Department of Youth and Community Development (260) Program Area: Community Development Programs Unit of Appropriation: 005 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $150,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Population Targeted: Consumers of Emergency Food Description/Scope of Services: This funding supports Food Bank’s EITC Assistance Program, which provides assessments of refundable federal income tax credit for low income working individuals and families, via its free income tax preparation services. Designation Method: The City Council has designated Harvest Home as the provider of this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 13-3179546

Initiative: EBTs at Food Markets/Council on the Environment Agency: Department of Youth and Community Development (260) Program Area: Community Development Programs Unit of Appropriation: 005 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $270,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2008 Population Targeted: Food Stamp Recipients Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to expand access to Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) at farmers’ markets throughout the City. This funding also supports the Youth Market-Urban Farm stands and the New Farmer Development project. Designation Method: The City Council has designated GrowNYC as the provider of this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 13-2765465

Initiative: Food Pantries Agency: Department of Youth and Community Development (260) Program Area: Community Development Programs Unit of Appropriation: 005 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $570,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2006 Population Targeted: Consumers of Emergency Food

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to support a number of food pantries and soup kitchens that are not a part of the Emergency Food Assistance Program (EFAP), which is administered by the Human Resources Administration (HRA). Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative post-Adoption.

Initiative: Food Pantries Agency: Human Resources Administration (069) Program Area: Emergency Food Programs Unit of Appropriation: 105 – Other than Personal Services Amount: $1,500,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2005 Population Targeted: Consumers of Emergency Food Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents funding to support food pantries citywide. To ensure that hungry New Yorkers have continued access to emergency food programs, $800,000 of the allocation is used for direct purchase of food, $200,000 for technical assistance grants to assist in the automation of food stamp enrollment at food pantries, soup kitchens and other appropriate locations, and $500,000 for capacity expansion efforts at Emergency Food Assistance Program (EFAP) food pantries via Food Bank. Designation Method: The City Council has designated the following organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative. Organization Food Bank for New York City Food Bank for New York City New York City Coalition Against Hunger Amount $1,300,000 $100,000 $100,000 Tax ID# 13-3179546 13-3179546 13-3471350

Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Social Services
Agency HRA HRA HRA HRA HRA Initiative HASA Money Management GMHC - PEG Restoration HASA Nutrition Program Administration - PEG Restoration Teen Relationship Abuse Prevention Program (RAPP) – PEG Restoration HASA Supportive Housing Contract Reduction - PEG Restoration HASA Supportive Housing Case Managers - PEG Restoration TOTAL Funding $200,000 $995,000 $2,000,000 $2,368,000 $2,718,000 $8,281,000

Initiative: HIV/AIDS Services Administration (HASA) Money Management Services PEG Restoration Agency: Human Resources Administration (069) Program Area: HIV and AIDS Administration Unit of Appropriation: 105 – Other than Personal Services Amount: $200,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Population Targeted: HIV/AIDS Services Administration (HASA) Clients Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding for HASA’s contract with Gay Men’s Health Crisis, to administer Representative Payee program, which assists HASA clients who are potentially medically and mentally frail and are unable to manage their finances. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency for its current contract. Initiative: Nutrition Program Administration PEG Restoration

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Agency: Human Resources Administration (069) Program Area: HIV and AIDS Administration Unit of Appropriation: 105 – Other than Personal Services Amount: $995,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2010 Population Targeted: HIV/AIDS Services Administration (HASA) Clients Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding for HASA’s contract with Momentum, to administer its nutrition program, which provides counseling, food, and dietary services to HIV/AIDS clients. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency for its current contract.

Initiative: Teen RAPP PEG Restoration Agency: Human Resources Administration (069) Program Area: Domestic Violence Services Unit of Appropriation: 105 – Other than Personal Services Amount: $2,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Population Targeted: Potential Victims of Domestic Violence Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding for the Teen Relationship Abuse Prevention Program (Teen RAPP) which educates and counsels teens about domestic violence in middle schools and high schools citywide. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency for current contracts.

Initiative: HIV/AIDS Services Administration (HASA) Contracted Supportive Housing PEG Restoration Agency: Human Resources Administration (069) Program Area: Employment Services Contracts and Subsidized Employment and Job-Related Training Unit of Appropriation: 105 – Other than Personal Services Amount: $2,718,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2010 Population Targeted: HIV/AIDS Services Administration (HASA) Clients Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding for approximately 98 HASA contracted supportive housing case management positions supported through HRA/HASA contracts in Scatter Site I and permanent congregate supportive housing programs that were slated for elimination. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency for current contracts.

Initiative HIV/AIDS Services Administration (HASA) Supportive Housing Contract Reduction PEG Restoration Agency: Human Resources Administration (069) Program Area: HIV and AIDS Services Unit of Appropriation: 105 – Other Than Personal Services Amount: $2,368,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Population Targeted: HIV/AIDS Services Administration (HASA) Clients Description/Scope of Services: This allocation restores funding for HASA supportive housing contracts which were slated for across the board reductions of approximately 4.5 percent. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency for current contracts.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

YOUTH AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Adult Literacy
Agency DYCD DYCD Initiative Adult Literacy PEG Restoration Adult Literacy Services Initiative TOTAL Funding $1,000,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000

Initiative: Adult Literacy Services PEG Restoration Agency: DYCD Program Area: Adult Literacy Unit of Appropriation: 005 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $1,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Population Targeted: Adults Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a partial PEG restoration of $1 million to programs to achieve service levels, rates and outcomes as specified for the corresponding service funded in the Department of Youth and Community Development’s Adult Literacy contracts. Designation Method: This allocation is direct funding to DYCD for Adult Literacy providers

Initiative: Adult Literacy Services Initiative Agency: Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD) Program Area: Adult Literacy Unit of Appropriation: 005 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $1,500,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2008 Population Targeted: Adults Description/Scope of Services: This funding creates additional basic literacy, ESOL and GED classes for adults who cannot read, write and speak English, along with support services such as counseling and case management. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative post-adoption. These designations shall be approved by the Council by Council Resolution.

.

Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Youth Services
Agency DYCD DYCD DYCD DYCD DYCD DYCD DYCD DYCD DYCD Initiative PAX Anti-Gun Project YMCA After School Program New York Junior Tennis League Sports & Arts in Schools (SASF) Beacon PEG Restoration OST Option II PEG Restoration After -Three Corporation Runaway and Homeless Youth Services PEG Restoration OST Option I PEG Restoration TOTAL Funding $50,000 $350,000 $800,000 $1,000,000 $2,300,000 $2,200,000 $3,000,000 $7,170,000 $9,950,000 $26,820,000

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Initiative: PAX Anti-Gun Program Agency: DYCD Program Area: Other Youth Programs Unit of Appropriation: 312 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $50,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Population Targeted: Youth Description/Scope of Services: To expand the current SPEAK UP NYC program, which encourages youth to prevent weapons in their communities. Designation Method: The City Council has designated PAX (The Center to Prevent Youth Violence) as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 13-3981512

Initiative: YMCA The Y After School Program Agency: DYCD Program Area: Other Youth Programs Unit of Appropriation: 312 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $350,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2001 Population Targeted: Youth Description/Scope of Services: YMCA’s Virtual Y program, which is now replaced by The Y After School, is an in school/after-school program primarily serving second, third and fourth graders with a focus on literacy, and educational reinforcement that operates three hours a day, five days a week in some of New York’s underserved public elementary schools. Designation Method: The City Council has designated YMCA of Greater New York as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 11-2030172

Initiative: New York Junior Tennis League Agency: DYCD Program Area: Other Youth Programs Unit of Appropriation: 312 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $800,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2001 Population Targeted: Youth Description/Scope of Services: This funding is allocated to the New York Junior Tennis League program, which serves almost youth citywide via its Schoolyard Tennis Program (in-school), its Community Tennis Program (after-school/summer), its Early Morning Winter Program, its Advanced Tennis Team and its educational programs. Every Council District is served under this initiative. Designation Method: The City Council has designated New York Junior Tennis League as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 23-7442256

Initiative: Sports & Arts in Schools Foundation (SASF) Agency: DYCD Program Area: Other Youth Programs Unit of Appropriation: 312 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $1,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2001

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Population Targeted: Youth Description/Scope of Services: This allocation funds the Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation (SASF), which serves approximately 30,000 youth citywide, annually, through its after school and Cooperative Healthy Active Motivated and Positive Students (C.H.A.M.P.S.) programs, a collaboration between SASF, the Council and the Department of Education, that offers after-school sports and fitness programs designed to fight childhood obesity and encourage youth to be more physically active. Designation Method: The City Council has designated Sports & Arts in Schools as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 11-3112635

Initiative: Beacon PEG Restoration Agency: DYCD Program Area: Beacon Community Centers Unit of Appropriation: 312 – Other than Personal Services Amount: $2,300,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Population Targeted: Youth/Adults Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a partial PEG restoration to 66 City tax-levy (CTL) funded Beacon program providers. Beacon programs are multi-service, school-based community centers and serve over 180,000 children and adults a year. There is at least one Beacon program in each Council District. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency for current contracts.

Initiative: Out-of-School Time (OST) Option II PEG Restoration Agency: DYCD Program Area: Out-of-School Time (OST) Unit of Appropriation: 312 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $2,200,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Population Targeted: Youth Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a partial PEG restoration to OST Option II programs that were slated for closure. OST Option II is a public/private match program that provides a mix of academic, recreational and cultural activities for young people for a minimum of 160 hours a year. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency for current contracts.

Initiative: After-Three Corporation Agency: DYCD Program Area: Other Youth Programs Unit of Appropriation: 312 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $3,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 1999 Population Targeted: Youth Description/Scope of Services: The funding supports the expansion of quality after-school education and enrichment programs for school children citywide. Designation Method: The City Council has designated the After-Three Corporation as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 13-4004600

Initiative: Shelter Beds for at Risk, Runaway and Homeless Youth Agency: DYCD Program Area: Other Youth Programs

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Unit of Appropriation: 312 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $7,170,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2006 Population Targeted: At-risk and runaway homeless youth Description/Scope of Services: This allocation supports drop-in, street outreach, emergency shelter beds, and transitional independent living (TIL) beds for runaway and homeless youth citywide. This funding enhances the DYCD’s existing Runaway & Homeless Youth (RHY) program, which provide vulnerable young people the resources and services they need to get off the streets and stabilize their lives. Designation Method The City Council will designate some of the organizations and the amount each will receive under this initiative post-Adoption. The remaining organizations and the amount each will receive will be designated by the agency post-Adoption and the City Council will approve these in a resolution.

Initiative: Out-of-School Time (OST) Option I PEG Restoration Agency: DYCD Program Area: Out-of-School Time (OST) Unit of Appropriation: 312 - Other than Personal Services Amount: $9,950,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2011 Population Targeted: Youth Description/Scope of Services: This allocation represents a PEG restoration for approximately 6,684 OST Option I program slots that were slated for elimination. OST programs are school-based and/or community centerbased, and serve youth in grades K-12; the program operates 36 weeks during the school year, for a minimum of 15 hours per week for elementary school, eight hours per week for middle school, and three hours per week for high school. Designation Method: Funding is provided directly to the agency for current contracts.

Summary of Fiscal 2012 Council Initiatives: Immigrant Services
Agency DYCD DYCD Initiative New York Immigration Center Immigrant Opportunities Initiative (IOI) TOTAL Funding $100,000 $4,000,000 $4,100,000

Initiative: New York Immigration Center Agency: Department of Youth & Community Development (DYCD) Program Area: Community Development Programs Unit of Appropriation: 005 – Other than Personal Services Amount: $100,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2012 Population Targeted: New York City’s immigrant population Description/Scope of Services: This funding will help promote immigrants’ full civic participation, foster their leadership, and provide a unified voice and a vehicle for collective action for New York’s diverse immigrant communities. Designation Method: Designation Method: The City Council has designated The New York Immigration Coalition as the provider for this initiative. Tax ID# for Conduit/Administrator: 13-3573409

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

Initiative: Immigrant Opportunity Initiative Agency: Department of Youth & Community Development (DYCD) Program Area: Community Development Programs Unit of Appropriation: 005 – Other than Personal Services Amount: $4,000,000 Boroughs Served: Citywide First Fiscal Year Funded: 2002 Population Targeted: New York City’s immigrant population Description/Scope of Services: This is a partial restoration of funding to help immigrant adults gain access to information and resources and to strengthen their participation in the democratic process. Specifically, this initiative provides funding for English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes, legal services for recent immigrants to assist with applications for citizenship or permanent residency, and legal services that focus specifically on wage and hour disputes and other workplace issues. Designation Method: The City Council will designate the organizations and the amount of funding each will receive under this initiative post-Adoption.

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Fiscal Year 2012 Adopted Expense Budget Adjustments Summary

FY 2012 BUDGET DISCLOSURES
The following disclosures are made voluntarily by Council Members. The relationships disclosed either do not constitute a conflict of interest under City law or the Council Member is awaiting guidance from the Conflicts of Interest Board in order to determine whether to proceed with sponsorship. Person Involved with Group and Relationship to Member Child Children Children Sibling Child Children Child Child Mother-in-Law

Council Member

Entity Funded New York Junior Tennis League Sacred Heart Youth IS 119 William McKinley IS 259 PTA Brooklyn Arts Exchange 78th Precinct Youth Council PS 215 IS 239 Southside United Housing Corp. Hollis Bellaire Queens Village Bellerose Athletic Association, Inc. Queensborough Community College Auxiliary

Position with Funded Entity Assistant Coach Participants in Sports Program Students Parent Coordinator Student Participate in Sports Program Student Student Program Director

Barron Crowley Crowley Gentile Lander Lander Recchia Recchia Reyna

Weprin

Child

Baseball Player in League Special Events Coordinator at Queensborough Community College

Weprin

Sister-in-law

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FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

James Dickens

71st Precinct Community Council, Inc. AARP Chapter #5393: Upper Manhattan Central Harlem

04-3784543 20-4272552 *

$5,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

Provide senior programs. Enrichment-Knowledge-Empowerment-Gardening-Fresh Vegetables, Tomatoes,Potatoes, Cabbage< Collard Greens. Flowers and Computer Skills.

Aging

Dromm

AARP Chapter #991 Jackson Heights

23-7247760

$3,750 DFTA

Aging

Greenfield

Agudath Israel of America Community Services, Inc.

13-3975090 *

$7,500 DFTA

The Jackson Heights Chapter 991 of AARP provides social, educational and recreational services to seniors living in Jackson Heights, East Elmhurst, Elmhurst and parts of Corona. Meetings usually attract between 35-50 members and are held every other Wednesday. A 2 admission is charged and that covers coffee, cake and a stipend for the person who sets up before and cleans up after each meeting. While funding was sparse this past year we were able to bring in the chorus of PS 69 to provide musical entertainment; Dr Kevin Wong who spoke on balance and falls; Detective Adrienne Johnson who spoke on senior safety as well as discussions among ourselves about current events and community goings on. The meeting enables seniors, the majority of whom, live alone to experience community. It enables them to seek information and help for issues beyond their control. We have been able to help a recent widow to obtain a win-win decision from her coop board that allows her an exemption from house rules and grants her permission to keep a dog in her house; we have been able to provide information on food stamps and available food services in the community both for our members and their neighbors. The meeting is a safe place for seniors to relax, discuss and obtain needed services. A Chapter in Elmhurst is closing in June and we have been in contact with them and are hopeful of integrating some of their members who live near us. The average age is between 82-90 with at least 5 member in their mid 90s. This age demographic precludes us from trips and other events outside the center and is why we try to bring services to our members. Council Funding over the years has enabled us to provide a warm, caring and effective program for our seniors. WE ARE LOOKING TO RESTORE FUNDS CUT OUT OF OUR BUDGET BY NYC/DFTA, TO BUDGET LINES - REC/ED - PRINTING/DUP - REPLACEMENT ITEMS - CONTRACTS FEES - REPLACE 10 YEAR OLD DISFUNCTIONAL COMPUTERS. Moriah Senior Center - 90 Bennett Avenue, New York, NY 10033 The purpose of this funding is to help subsidize DFTAs inadequate budget allotment for RAW Food. As a Glatt Kosher center, servicing all ethnicities, Moriah has had to contend with the higher cost of food to maintain its Kosher standard. In addition, the Citys new requirements for increased fresh produce have also caused increases in our food costs. Funding assistance would help ease the strain on our food budget. Allen Community Senior Center is in need of additional upgrades to replace aging equipment. Two refrigerators must be added/replaced and the steam table must be replaced. Air conditioning is also in need of replacement. In addition, arts and crafts instruction funding is requested. Our request is for needed items that will improve our administrative office, food service operation and expanded program activities. Upgrade of our office telephone system to include individual voice mail, conference calling and integrated answering system. Kitchen needs: additional tables for dining room, commercial meat cutter and microwave , food pans and storage containers, stacking rack for trays, dish dolly, steamtable pan rack and kitchen mats. Program activities: funding for the use of swimming pool for seniors at Southeast Queens Park Association, Bowling at Elmont Lanes and a monthly social activity with entertainment. Funding will support education, outreach and free enrollment in the Safe Return program, which provides support for persons with Alzheimer's disease .

Aging

Jackson

Agudath Israel of America Community Services, Inc.

13-3975090 *

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Comrie

Allen Community Senior Citizens Center, Inc.

11-2326244 *

$11,700 DFTA

Aging Aging

Comrie Garodnick

Alpha Phi Alpha Senior Citizens Center, Inc. Alzheimer's Association, New York City Chapter

23-7436147 * 13-3277408 *

$5,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 1 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Ignizio Mark-Viverito

Alzheimer's Association, New York City Chapter Alzheimer's Association, New York City Chapter

13-3277408 * 13-3277408 *

$3,500 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

The program to be funded is the MedicAlert Alzheimers Association Safe Return. To provide services to District 8 seniors living with alzheimers. St Rosalia-Regina Pacis Neighborhood Improvement Association

Aging Aging Aging

Gentile Gentile Greenfield

American Legion / Amity Post 791 American-Italian Coalition of Organizations, Inc. (AMICO) American-Italian Coalition of Organizations, Inc. (AMICO)

11-6104984 * 11-2488439 11-2649513

$1,000 DFTA $1,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

To support costs for local veterans activities. To provide senior citizens with entitlement benefits services in the 43rd Council District. To provide weekly sessions of health education and chair yoga classes to older adults.

11-2697931

The funds will be earmarked for the Extended Services Program which provides benefits, entitlement services and advocacy to senior citizens and their families. This entails telephone outreach and application assistance ,Information and Referral and Case Assistance. This program is a designated Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Enrollment Site. Aging Aging Lander Rivera American-Italian Coalition of Organizations, Inc. (AMICO) Aquinas Housing Corporation 11-2488439 13-3076810 $3,500 DFTA $42,000 DFTA The funds will cover senior locations for information and referral services and will also cover arts and crafts, and senior trips. These funds are being requested as the local match to an approved federal grant for 515,000 to increase accessibility, mobility and ridership through the integration of mobility management, provide door through door and door-to-door physical support services, provide free coordinated transportation services and resources through a community-based coordinated transportation service council, develop a framework for collaboration between aging services and community transit providers, establish transportation information outreach campaigns, and create a replicable Community-based Coordinated Transportation Service Plan. Door through door is an escorted service. The service area is 110th St. to 218th St. Hudson River to Harlem River. To support the Senior Canonese Opera Program in South Brooklyn. To support the Savvy Senior Program in Council District 43. To fund the Senior Stars program which provides opportunities for seniors to pursue being in the spotlight. Provide Congregate Meals, Transportation, Educational and Recreational Activities, Health Promotion, Nutrition Education, Case Assistance, Entitlements and Benefits to Senior Citizens 60 years and older To assist seniors with government benefits and entitlements, and to support food pantry and assistance services to Seniors in South Brooklyn. Bensonhurst COJO serves all low income residents who come to us for aid regardless of age, race, religion or nationality. However, the majority of the people we serve are seniors, elderly Jewish immigrants, some of whom are holocaust survivors, and mostly all who have resettled here from what was formerly the Soviet Union. We offer citizenship courses and English as a second language classes (ESL). We provide assistance in voter registration and obtaining government benefits and entitlements including Food Stamps, Public Assistance, Medicaid, Social Security and Section 8 housing. We provide much needed translation services to assist in the understanding and completion of forms and important documents, including applications for health insurance, permanent residence (Green Card), and citizenship. Our organization will provide services to the seniors of Abe Stark. Our organization will provide services to the seniors of Abe Stark. Funding will allow our organization to maintain sponsorship services to the 26 satellite sites that meet throughout southern Brooklyn.

Aging Aging Aging Aging

Rodriguez Gentile Gentile Vallone

ARC XVI Fort Washington, Inc. Asian Community United Society, Inc. Association of Informed Voices, Inc. Astoria Performing Arts Center, Inc.

13-2745426 * 26-4164117 11-3595142 * 65-1209580

$28,750 DFTA $3,500 DFTA $1,500 DFTA $7,500 DFTA

Aging Aging

Koppell Gentile

Bedford Park Multi-Service Center for Senior Citizens, Inc. Bensonhurst Council of Jewish Organizations

13-2745303 11-2568013

$24,500 DFTA $1,000 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging Aging

Greenfield Barron Barron Fidler

Bensonhurst Council of Jewish Organizations Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/b/a Millennium Development Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/b/a Millennium Development Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/b/a Millennium Development

11-2568013 11-3199040 11-3199040 11-3199040

$7,500 DFTA $6,000 DFTA $6,000 DFTA $103,750 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 2 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Williams

Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/b/a Millennium Development 11-3199040

$10,000 DFTA

To provide services to the seniors of Midwood such as health wellness classes and computer learning. Hankins and Sexton (HaS) Grace Tenders Mercies Senior Citizen Program. To provide scheduled event days for seniors outtings; provide interaction with seniors, children and young adults; sharing wisdom; teaching to give of self and feeling useful. meetings, birthday parties, bingo, social events, seminars, bus trios in NYC area, coffee/cake The Boro Park Jewish Community Council (BPJCC) was formed in 1997 to address the urgent social services needs of individuals and families residing in Boro Park. To that end the BPJCC presently operates a wide array of social services and programs to assist clients in obtaining government benefits and entitlements with the dual goal of providing immediate relief and simultaneously directing them towards a path of self-sufficiency and independence. We are seeking funds to pay for staff to provide vital social services for seniors and leverage privately raised funding. These services include: advocacy and referral services, counseling clients on benefits and entitlements, processing and renewal of Food Stamps, Medicaid, Child Health Plus, Family Health Plus and Medicare, Supplemental Security Income, Section 8 recertification, home-care,Domestic Violence services, Social Security and Holocaust Services. To effectively serve o! ur diverse target population, services are provided in 7 different languages: Czech, English, Hebrew, Hungarian, Russian, Spanish, and Yiddish. We would utilize Discretionary Funding to enhance the programs and activities offered to the tenants of Quincy Senior Residence -ie; expanding our computer training classes and completing a fitness center in the building. The funding would also allow us to offer our programs to seniors in the community at large and support the salary of the Director of Quincy Senior Residence. To provide cultural services to older adults in the South Bronx by providing participatory arts activities to include performances and workshops Currently, our contract with DFTA provides funding only for personnel, OTPS and meals. There is no funds provided for educational and recreational programs. These fund will be used to provide education and recreational programs. Additive funds to BJCCs basic DFTA contact 12F that provides for additional staff time to conduct outreach to older adults on a building by building basis. This includes screening for benefits, entitlements and other services as well as having a nurse for Additive funds or BJCCs basic DFTA contract ID 12F which provides transportation, IR and case assistance to obtain benefits, entitlements and other services for older adults. Additive funds provide additional staff time and OTPS. The E. Roberts Moore Senior Center will use funds to enhance and continue existing programs. Funds will enable the BronxWorks East Concourse Senior Center to enhance and expand existing programs. Funds will enable the Morris Senior Center to enhance and expand existing programs. Funds will enable the Morris Senior Center to enhance and expand existing programs. Resources will be used to fund a variety of activities, including social and recreational outings, educational opportunities, case assistance, as well as health promotion initiatives. This funding will also be used to hire a part time certified fitness instructor who will provide supervision and technique instruction at our new fitness center. The new fitness center is a part of our healthy aging curriculum.

Aging Aging

Wills Ulrich

Bethel Emanuel Temple Inc Blessed Trinity Parish with the churches of St. Genevieve, St. Thomas More and St. Edmund

06-0983254 * 26-2885471

$5,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging

Lander

Boro Park Jewish Community Council

11-3475993

$13,750 DFTA

Aging Aging

Vann Arroyo

Bridge Street Development Corporation Bronx Council on the Arts, Inc.

11-3250772 * 13-2601303

$10,000 DFTA $7,000 DFTA

Aging

Vacca

Bronx House, Inc.

13-1739935

$15,000 DFTA

Aging

Koppell

Bronx Jewish Community Council, Inc.

13-2744533

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging Aging

Vacca Arroyo Cabrera Cabrera

Bronx Jewish Community Council, Inc. BronxWorks, Inc. BronxWorks, Inc. BronxWorks, Inc.

13-2744533 * 13-3254484 13-3254484 13-3254484

$10,000 DFTA $7,000 DFTA $20,000 DFTA $20,000 DFTA

Aging

Rivera

BronxWorks, Inc.

13-3254484

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 3 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Gentile

Brooklyn Academy of Music

11-2201344

$3,500 DFTA

To supportbe used to sustain Brooklyn Arts Councils operations and to support arts programs Funds will arts and culture programming and transportation for Seniors in Brooklyn. and services for artists, cultural groups, and residents throughout Brooklyn in FY 2012, including: Arts in Education programs that will employ over 200 teaching artists and bring arts education to over 50 schools, senior centers, and afterschool programs throughout NYC, reaching over 23,000 students, teachers, parents/family members, and seniors; Regrant programs for artists and small cultural groups funded by the city, state, and corporate partners that will award approximately 375,000 in 180 grants; Folk Arts projects that preserve and present cultural traditions of artists in Brooklyn’s immigrant-based communities through thematic, research-based public, including our 2012 Half the Sky Festival highlighting women performing artists; Online Artist Registry and Online Directory of Brooklyn Arts Organizations, searchable online databases that provide over 5,600 artists and 740 cultural groups/businesses free web space to promote their work and connect to new opportunities; Community outreach programs that bring free-to-the-public arts to senior and community centers, and other non-traditional spaces; Collaborative Public Programs--from our Scene: Brooklyn film program to BAC Gallery exhibitions and public programs during Dumbo First Thursdays--that offer free/low cost presentations of music, dance, film, and visual arts indoors and outdoors throughout the borough in partnership with other Brooklyn cultural organizations; and

Aging

Levin

Brooklyn Arts Council, Inc.

23-7072915

$6,500 DFTA

Aging

Gonzalez

Brooklyn Chinese-American Association, Inc.

11-3065859

$30,000 DFTA

Aging

Greenfield

Brooklyn Chinese-American Association, Inc.

11-3065859

$12,500 DFTA

Aging

Lander

Brooklyn Chinese-American Association, Inc.

11-3065859

$3,500 DFTA

Career services that will help artists sharpen the skills and connections they need to thrive, The requested funds will go towards facility rental and insurance costs, recreational and educational activities, as well as monthly birthday parties at our Sunset Park Senior Citizens Center. The requested funds will go towards recreational and educational activities, monthly birthday parties, as well as facility rental and insurance costs at our Bensonhurst Senior Citizens Center. The requested funds will be go towards recreational and educational activities, monthly birthday parties, as well as facility rental and insurance costs at our Sunset Park Senior Citizens Center. BCPC requests 3500 in order to implement ElderPride, an LGBTQ friendly and culturally competent series of programs geared to older individuals in mainstream Senior Centers, Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities in each Council District in Brooklyn. BCPC would implement ElderPride, an LGBTQ friendly and culturally competent series of programs geared to older individuals in mainstream Senior Centers, Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities in each Council District in Brooklyn. A 4 part program over 8 weeks brought to individual locations, engaging seniors/staff in fun discussions of all of our “isms”, will combat isolation in LGBTQ seniors giving them resources to turn to, and encourage tolerance acceptance to their hetero-sexual counterparts.

Aging

James

Brooklyn Community Pride Center, Inc.

26-2214534

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Lander

Brooklyn Community Pride Center, Inc.

26-2214534

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 4 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Williams

Brooklyn Community Pride Center, Inc.

26-2214534

$3,500 DFTA

Aging Aging

Wills Gentile

Brooks Senior Center BWICA Educational Fund, Inc.

11-2329979 11-3220104

$12,500 DFTA $1,000 DFTA

BCPC requests 3500 in order to implement ElderPride, an LGBTQ friendly and culturally competent series of programs geared to older individuals in mainstream Senior Centers, Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities in each Council District in Brooklyn. A 4 part program over 8 weeks brought to individual locations, engaging seniors/staff in fun discussions of all of our “isms”, will combat isolation in LGBTQ seniors giving them resources to turn to, and encourage tolerance acceptance to their hetero-sexual counterparts. Provide social, interactive, recreational activities for those sixty and over. Provide hot, nutritionally balanced lunches five days a week. Services to be provided in the SouthEast section of Queens. To provide educational workshops and networking programs to Brooklyn seniors. For over thirty year, BWICA Educational Fund, inc. has provided educational workshops and networking programs to Brooklyn seniors and providers on a borough-wide and local level on issues that champion the improvement of the quality of life for seniors and disabled persons on the federal, state and local levels. For over thirty year, BWICA Educational Fund, inc. has provided educational workshops and networking programs to Brooklyn seniors and providers on a borough-wide and local level on issues that champion the improvement of the quality of life for seniors and disabled persons on the federal, state and local levels. The center shall provide prepared meals, planned activities, organized excursions and other forms of enrichment to members of the senior citizen program. The prepared meals will include breakfast and lunch. The organized excursions will include trips in the local area as well as out of town. The other forms of enrichment include wellness/financial workshops and seminars, dance classes, Wii Sports, Yoga instruction, health screenings, tax preparation assistance and referral services. Our development offers various activities including DFTA sessions for Arts Crafts, and a Ceramics class that meets on Mondays Thursdays. Bingo sessions that meet twice a month and a Floor and Chair Excercise class accompanied by music offered every other Thursday. We recently started a Knitting and Crocheting class that meets twice a month on Wednesdays. Weekly van outings are scheduled taking the residents on local (mall,movies,plays)as well as out of state trips. Periodic health education workshops (The Learning Cube) are scheduled at least once a month. Residents 55 years and older are able to take advantage of programs offered by our development. The funding will go towards the Grandparents support group that strives to provide events for grandparents who are taking care of grandchildren. The funding will allow for trips to museums, shows, and other entertainment. This gives the grandparents an opportunity to relax, have fellowship with others, and realize they are not alone. Please note that grandparents take trips with their grandchildren for additional bonding and an opportunity to do things financially that they could not do themselves. Canaan Senior Service Center has provided social services including advocacy, case assistance, with a variety of social issues, Education and Recreation such as workshops in Nutrition, Mental Health, Hypertension, Diabetes, Stroke Prevention, Walking Class and Computer Education. To fund classes which range from Tai Chi to Opera Appreciation to Latin . TCC is seeking support to fund classes at its 3 centers in Greenwich Village and Lower Manhattan. City Council funding would augment funding from DFTA, from an annual gala and from private donors. Funding will support free public Carnegie Hall music events, including outreach to hospitals and senior centers.

Aging

James

BWICA Educational Fund, Inc.

11-3220104

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Mealy

BWICA Educational Fund, Inc.

11-3220104

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Comrie

C.W. Mixon Senior Outreach Center, Inc.

56-2625535 *

$9,000 DFTA

Aging

Wills

CALBC Housing Development Fund Co., Inc. (d/b/a Calvary Baptist Church Senior Housing)

13-3173604 *

$10,000 DFTA

Aging

Wills

Calvary Baptist Church

11-2480945 *

$5,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Dickens Chin

Canaan Baptist Church of Christ Caring Community, Inc., The

13-6013037 * 13-2980755 *

$5,000 DFTA $8,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Quinn Garodnick

Caring Community, Inc., The Carnegie Hall Corporation

13-2980755 * 13-1923626 *

$25,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 5 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging Aging

Garodnick Mark-Viverito Oddo

Carter Burden Center for the Aging, Inc., The Carter Burden Center for the Aging, Inc., The Catholic Charities Community Services, Archdiocese of New York

23-7129499 * 23-7129499 * 13-5562185

$3,500 DFTA $5,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Funding will support the Carter Burden Luncheon Club & Senior Program, which provides meals, socialization and other activities for seniors. To support making ART work, formerly Elder Craftsmen, an arts and crafts program for seniors. Senior Guild Luncheon Program - meals and health programs

Aging

Rose

Catholic Charities Community Services, Archdiocese of New York

13-5562185

$6,000 DFTA

Under contract with the New York City Department for the Aging, Catholic Charities Community Services, Archdiocese of New York (CCCS) sponsors and administers three (3) Senior Centers in Staten Island which promote healthy living and offer a safe environment for the seniors of Staten Island. CCCS’ Case Management staff interfaces with the Senior Center Staff to bring Social Services and Emergency Food to the members. CCCS’ Senior Guild Luncheon Program at Anderson Avenue boasts the largest membership, consisting of a diverse community from the Port Richmond section of Staten Island, and currently serves an average of 1,125 lunches per month. The program also conducts intergenerational events and activities between the seniors and children within the building and from local schools and offers a wide variety of educational, recreational, and socialization activities offered daily by qualified program staff and consultants. The center is known throughout S.I. for its luncheon program administered by a retired chef who bakes his own bread, makes his own desserts, and offers 2-3 choices per day. The Program has its own bus, which allows seniors the convenience of receiving transportation services between their homes and the center. Since transportation is provided to this center, many seniors are able to attend who live outside of the area. The bus is also used for recreational purposes to ! provide seniors with trips to sporting events, museums, theatres, cultural centers, parks, etc. Funding for this program will allow us to enhance the transportation services offered at the center. It will enable us to hire a Per-Diem Bus Driver (3,500) and fund regular maintenance to the center vehicle (4,000). This will allow the program to use the center bus 250 days per year, even in the absence of the regular driver, and it will allow for the expansion of off-site trips and events. It will also supplement the underfunded budget for regular bus service and repairs.

Aging Discretionary

Page 6 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Under contract with the New York City Department for the Aging, Catholic Charities Community Services, Archdiocese of New York (CCCS) sponsors and administers three (3) Senior Centers in Staten Island which promote healthy living and offer a safe environment for the seniors of Staten Island. CCCS’ Case Management staff interfaces with the Senior Center Staff to bring Social Services and Emergency Food to the members. CCCS’ Stapleton Senior Center, located in NYCHA Stapleton Houses, currently serves an average of 1,167 meals per month (breakfast and lunch). Members are residents of the housing development and surrounding neighborhood as well as a population of younger seniors who travel from other communities. All members share their diverse backgrounds and are united by their common interests in art, music, and fitness. A broad range of educational, recreational, and socialization activities are offered at this center, including music programs that showcase our talented singers and a ceramics program with a professional mixer, kiln, and molds. Since coming to the attention of local organizations as an area of high need, our spirited director has formed collaborative relationships with many local agencies, including the co-located Jewish Community Center, City Harvest (cooking classes and nutrition education), Markham Day Care Center (our seniors read to children at the adjacent child c! are center), Art Lab Inc. (in-house art classes; helps qualified seniors obtain scholarships to study art), and Visiting Nurse Service (blood pressure screenings; lectures on healthy eating). Funding for this program will assist us in purchasing costly low-sodium items (3,000) to meet strict sodium guidelines for which DFTA does not compensate us and allow us to purchase much needed supplies (4,500) for the highly valued exercise programs (weights, mats, videos), ceramics program (slip, paint, glazes, molds), and music programs (electric piano, karaoke machine, sheet music).

Aging

Rose

Catholic Charities Community Services, Archdiocese of New York

13-5562185

$7,500 DFTA

Aging

Rose

Catholic Charities Community Services, Archdiocese of New York

13-5562185

$9,500 DFTA

Under contract with the New York City Department for the Aging, Catholic Charities Community Services, Archdiocese of New York (CCCS) sponsors and administers three (3) Senior Centers in Staten Island which promote healthy living and offer a safe environment for the seniors of Staten Island. CCCS’ Case Management staff interfaces with the Senior Center Staff to bring Social Services and Emergency Food to the members. Characterized by its well-maintained and colorfully decorated premises, CCCS’ West Brighton Senior Center is located within the NYCHA West Brighton Houses. The center offers a wide array of educational, recreational, and socialization activities including grocery shopping, bowling and Atlantic City trips, scrap booking, ceramics, billiards, and card playing. This center has a unique niche in that it also welcomes and accepts those seniors who prefer to maintain their anonymity, sit quietly, and enjoy their meal. The center’s status as a vital asset to this underserved and high-need community is what spared it from being closed last year. Since then, community leaders have taken an active interest in the center and it has experienced a sustained period of revitalization and increased participation as members have gained a renewed appreciation for the program and greater willingness to participate in the multitude of amenities offered. The center is currently serving an a! verage of 1,625 meals per month (breakfast and lunch) which is double the average number of meals that it served last year. In addition, new member registration has surged with 42 new members joining over the last 8 months. Funding for this program will assist us in purchasing costly low-sodium items (3,000) to meet strict sodium guidelines for which DFTA does not compensate us and to purchase an additional freezer (7,000) to accommodate the larger quantity of food that must be ordered to meet the needs of the drastically increased participation in meals service at this site.

Aging Discretionary

Page 7 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Crowley

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$5,000 DFTA

CCNS Woodhaven-Richmond Hill Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, transportation, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS Catherine Sheridan Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities of cultural diversity, transportation, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS Catherine Sheridan Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, transportation, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS The Bay Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, transportation, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS Hillcrest Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities of cultural diversity, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS Bayside Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, transportation, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS St. Charles Jubilee Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program.

Aging

Dromm

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$13,000 DFTA

Aging

Ferreras

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$15,000 DFTA

Aging

Fidler

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Gennaro

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$8,500 DFTA

Aging

Halloran

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$15,000 DFTA

Aging

Levin

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$6,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 8 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Levin

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$6,000 DFTA

CCNS Pete McGuinness Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, transportation, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS Northside Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS Sheepshead Nostrand NORC has developed a supportive community infrastructure that promotes healthy, successful aging. Council Discretionary Funding will be used for program supplies and educational seminars on chronic health diseases such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes; funds are also use for marketing the program and outreach efforts. St. Brendana's Senior Apts are requesting funding to support our senior citizens with ESL and socialization projects. CCNS The Bay Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, transportation, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS Woodhaven-Richmond Hill Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, transportation, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS Seaside Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, transportation, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS Ozone Park Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, transportation, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS Peter DellaMonica Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program.

Aging

Levin

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$6,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Nelson Nelson

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc. Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151 11-2047151

$4,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging

Nelson

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$9,000 DFTA

Aging

Ulrich

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Ulrich

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Ulrich

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Vallone

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$14,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 9 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Vallone

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$23,000 DFTA

CCNS Steinway Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program, to provide supplies needed to operate the program and to help paying rent and utilities. CCNS St. Louis Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS Bayside Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, transportation, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CCNS Glenwood Senior Center serves the elderly by providing enriched and diverse educational and recreational activities, social activities, nutritious meals, and case assistance. Council discretionary funding is needed to enhance and subsidize the services due to budget reduction in the past few years and the increased needs of the elderly. Funds will be used to support educational and recreational services provided to the seniors at the program and to provide supplies needed to operate the program. CenterStage is requesting support to serve our Therapeutic Outreach Program which works with senior citizens, many of whom have dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, at long-term living facilities, senior centers and our onsite facility through music performances combined with conversations which address isolation and depression, as well as providing opportunities for memory enhancement and an outlet for creative expression, ultimately improving the quality of life for the aging or cognitively impaired by prompting memory through music. The program provides housing counseling and assistance in filling various applications such as SCRIE,DRIE,SCHE,HEAP,etc.to seniors. Housing workshops and seminars are also conducted by the organization. The program in many cases is pivotal in alllowing our clients to stay in their home. Seniors on the Move is a Seniors program that meets twice a week, Tuesday and Thursday. There is breakfast and lunch provide. The seniors take trips to various shopping centers as well as cruises and trips to vacation locations. The seniors also, do crafts and participate in various workshops that provide vital information on services available and receive blood pressure as well as monitoring for other diseases that effect our senior population. Beyond The Pain Support Group: Stategies for living a healthy lifestyle in spite of pain experienced with various physical ailments predominantly that of the varied arthritis conditions. Focusing on nutrition, diversion, exercise and mindful spiritual meditation

Aging

Vann

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$4,000 DFTA

Aging

Weprin

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$25,000 DFTA

Aging

Williams

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$7,500 DFTA

Aging

Koo

CenterStage The Queens Center for the Performing Arts

26-4348825 *

$6,000 DFTA

Aging

Vallone

Central Astoria Local Development Coalition, Inc.

11-2652331

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Rose

Central Family Life Center, Inc.

13-3626127 *

$10,000 DFTA

Aging

Dickens

Central Harlem Senior Citizens Coalition, Inc.

13-2754783

$9,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 10 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Halloran

Chabad of Northeast Queens

11-3207716 *

$7,500 DFTA

To help fund the SOS program. Smile On Seniors is a nursing home visitation program. To help fund Chabads senior and youth programming. To help fund the food assistance program and counseling that Chabad offers the community. Assistance in operating the Community Center including making the building available for local civic groups. Organize extracuricular activities,obtaining resources for entertaining, purchase sewing machines, hire consultant.These funds will support interrelations and reduce isolation. Were a volunteer assistance organization, assisting in helping the elderly and handicapped in our community with many of their needs. Funding would be used for the food costs, office supplies, and the trips for the seniors. Funding would be used for the food costs, office supplies, and the trips for the seniors. Chinese-American Planning Council, Inc.s Nan Shan Senior Center provides individuals over the age of 60 with an array of services including the following: congregate meals, wellness programming (exercise class, health workshops, screenings, et cetera), recreational activities (painting, calligraphy, community outings, et cetera), educational programming (English as a Second Language, naturalization classes, et cetera), case management and entitlements/benefits assistance. The Immaculate Conception Friendly Club is a social group for Senior Citizens of the community to gather and enjoy support and fellowship with one another. The group meets twice a month to socialize, share a meal and play a variety of games. The group travels by bus to points of interest throughout the year. Church Street School’s Senior Chorus gives senior citizens the opportunity to socialize with one another through a collaborative artistic process .

Aging Aging Aging Aging

Jackson Lander Chin Chin

Charles A Walburg Multi-Service Organization, Inc. Chaverim of Boro Park, Williamsburg Chinese American Planning Council, Inc. Chinese American Planning Council, Inc.

23-7337180 * 80-0004578 * 13-6202692 13-6202692

$4,500 DFTA $4,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA $6,250 DFTA

Aging

Koo

Chinese American Planning Council, Inc.

13-6202692

$15,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Gennaro Chin

Church of the Immaculate Conception Jamaica New York Church Street School of Music and Art

11-1752022 * 13-3693660

$5,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

Aging

Mealy

Circuit Productions, Inc.

13-2881858

$5,000 DFTA

Circuit Productions, Inc. (CPI) requests 5,000 from Council Member Darlene Mealy’s office for FY12 Expense Funding for “World Beat: A Study of Diverse Cultures in NYC Through Dance and Music.” The “World Beat” series has experienced success, since 2005, in public schools, libraries, museums and senior centers, citywide. CPI will concentrate its resources in the 41st council district, by providing skill-based learning workshops and/or performances for local youths and senior citizens. These intergenerational programs result from an alliance forged among community partners, including the Brooklyn Public Library (BPL), PS40/the George Washington Carver School, and CPI. The primary goal is Arts Exposure. Towards this end theme-based presentations of interactive music and dance performances will be brought to audiences comprising all grades of the elementary school and senior participants from the local community. CPI’! s two-month project will reach an estimated 500 students and 100 adults and seniors. The proposed four 45-minute concerts will be performed at the following sites, including; Brownsville, Eastern Parkway, and Stone Avenue library branches, and PS40. These interactive performances will feature members of the Charles Moore Dance Theatre, including teaching artist and choreographer Jerbean Gilkes who has been affiliated with PS40’s after school program for the past decade. In addition members of Something Positive – A Caribbean Experience will be performing. Lastly, members of the legendary Harlem Blues and Jazz Band whose original alumni actually “jumped” at the Woodside and “stomped” at the Savoy with the bands of Duke Ellington, Cab Calloway, Count Basie, and more. For background information on these live performances CPI will provide as necessary, pre-show and post-show study guides for teachers, students, seniors, and staff.

Aging Discretionary

Page 11 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Ignizio Oddo

Community Agency for Senior Citizens, Inc. Community Agency for Senior Citizens, Inc.

13-3263537 13-3263537

$10,000 DFTA $10,000 DFTA

Aging

Rose

Community Agency for Senior Citizens, Inc.

13-3263537

$45,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Mendez Oddo

Community Service Society of New York Community Service Society of New York

13-5562202 * 13-5562202 *

$3,500 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Dickens Arroyo

Concerned Home Managers for the Elderly, Inc. Concerned Residents Organization, Inc.

13-3275504 * 20-2495043 *

$3,500 DFTA $5,700 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging Aging

Foster Gennaro Gennaro Ferreras

Concourse Village Special Adult Center Congregation Etz Chaim of Kew Garden Hills Congregation Ohr Moshe Corona Congregational Church, Inc.

13-3352725 * 11-2585935 * 11-3616643 11-1802803

$25,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA $6,000 DFTA $18,750 DFTA

CASC Transportation services (NYC DFTA contract 505) provides transportation for food shopping, pharmacy, banking and other as well as some short term medical van transportation services while the senior is awaiting for access-a-ride application to be processed (if qualified). senior transportation program CASC Tansportation programs (DFTA 505)-20,000-transprotation for food shopping, pharmacy, banking New Lane Senior Center (DFTA 537)-20,000-for budget shortfall due to loss of BP discretionary funding cuts Cassidy Coles/Forever Young Senior Centers (DFTA 50R)10,000 Funding from Council Member Mendez in the amount of 3,500 is used to reimburse transportation expenses for older adult volunteers who are serving at nonprofit agencies and health care facilities in the 2nd District. Salary of SI ACES project coordinator A program to help recruit and retain home health aides for older adults by providing the Home Health Aides with benefits, educational/career opportunities and peer mentor ship support. (See attached Summary) CRO would like to keep helping our Seniors in the Communties. We provide programs and services such as health and safety talks. Trips are provided to enhance the quality of life for our seniors. We enrich their leisure time with games, trips, birthday and holiday celebrations. Senior Citizen lectures delivered by their Rabbi. To provide for seniors a place to socialize and interact with each other and younger members of the community. Meals and refreshments are served. Senior Citizen Services Congregate Lunch Education and Recreation Health Promotion Transportation Social Work services Transportation to parades and memorial ceremonies Wreaths for memorial services Color Guard uniform expenses Rent for the meeting hall Placing deceased members names on a monument Chpter Memorisl maintenance and lawn care Cpl. Kivlehan annual memorial mass expense

Aging

Ignizio

Corporal Allen F. Kivlehan Korean War Veterans Association, Inc.

13-3634076

$4,000 DFTA We are requesting fund for Computer classes and Tai Chi classes. The fund will cover the fees of qualified Consultants who will provide instructions for the classes. IR, case assistance, entitlement, medicaid, medicare, social security, supplement security Insurance, Immigration, housing mediator for landlords and tenants, translations of all legal and non legal forms and documents, International pensions and all other matter that may affect the community. The Program assists approx. 4,300 senior/year, providing the frail elderly with regular friendly home visits, telephone assurance, light shopping, accompanying to doctors, senior ctrs., case management, emergency aid, food pantries, vouchers, housing, arranging for home care, meals-on-wheels home attendants, all ensuring that daily maintenance health needs are met.We also arrange for social gatherings for seniors Holocaust survivors. The Program assists approx. 4,300 senior/year, providing the frail elderly with regular friendly home visits, telephone assurance, light shopping, accompanying to doctors, and senior ctrs. The Program assists approx. 4,300 senior/year, providing the frail elderly with regular friendly home visits, telephone assurance, light shopping, accompanying to doctors, senior ctrs., case management, emergency aid, food pantries, vouchers, housing, arranging for home care, meals-on-wheels home attendants, all ensuring that daily maintenance health needs are met.We also arrange for social gatherings for seniors Holocaust survivors.

Aging

Jackson

COTHOA Luncheon Club, Inc.

13-3608860 *

$4,500 DFTA

Aging

Rivera

Council of Belmont Organizations, Inc.

13-2755323

$31,750 DFTA

Aging

Lander

Council of Jewish Organizations of Flatbush, Inc.

11-2864728

$6,000 DFTA

Aging

Nelson

Council of Jewish Organizations of Flatbush, Inc.

11-2864728

$11,000 DFTA

Aging

Williams

Council of Jewish Organizations of Flatbush, Inc.

11-2864728

$10,750 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 12 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging Aging Aging Aging Aging Aging

Oddo James Eugene James Barron Dilan Mealy

Council of Jewish Organizations of Staten Island, Inc. Crown Heights Jewish Community Council, Inc. Crown Heights Preservation Committee Corp. Crown Heights Preservation Committee Corp. Cypress Hills Senior Center Cypress Hills-Fulton Street Senior Citizens Center, Inc. Department for the Aging

13-3525474 23-7390996 * 11-2322490 * 11-2322490 13-6400571 11-2297647 13-6400434

$12,000 DFTA $6,000 DFTA $10,000 DFTA $10,000 DFTA $8,000 DFTA $81,875 DFTA $68,750 DFTA

kosher meals for senior shut-ins Funds are being requested to supplement the funding of our existing Senior Citizen Assistance programs. These funds will be used for activities,Bus maintenance,defray insurance costs for vehicle and supplies for the center. These funds will be used to enhance the activities of the seniors, upkeep of senior bus i.e. Parking, gas, maintanace and help defray insurance costs Senior Programs Senior Conference, operational support, transportation Funds to be designated at a later date. DON DIVIN ADULT RECREATION RECREATION CENTER,PROVIDES: BREAKFAST, LUNCH, TEACHING, COUNCELING FOR THOSE WHO NEED. WE GO TO TRIPS AND PLAY GAMES AT RECREATION TIME. Senior Center that includes a daily lunch program, educational/recreational programming, health and wellness programming, events, trips and social services. Funding requested for FY2012 will be used for a percentage of the salary of a full-time case assistance social worker to counsel and provide services. Wayside Out-Reach Development, Inc. 11-3528680

Aging

Eugene

Don Divin Group

11-3023840 *

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Eugene Brewer

Dorchester Senior Citizens Center, Inc. DOROT, Inc.

11-2305581 13-3264005

$18,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

DOROT’s Homelessness Prevention Program (HPP), established in 1983, responds to the needs of underserved homeless New York City seniors. The HPP offers homeless seniors temporary housing, two meals daily, counseling, and other assistance at its transitional residence, now located at 44 West 87 Street, while finding them permanent homes. Since its inception, the HPP has housed approximately 1,460 clients in its 14-bed transitional residence and relocated them to permanent housing. Funding requested for FY2012 will be used for a percentage of the salary of a full-time case assistance social worker to counsel and provide services, including help to secure permanent housing for homeless seniors participating in the HPP, and to provide continued supportive services to formerly homeless HPP seniors through the Aftercare component. To provide counseling, services and assistance to homeless seniors. to assist us with the salary of the Community Resource CoordinatorHer services

Aging Aging Aging

Dickens Mark-Viverito James

DOROT, Inc. DOROT, Inc. Dorothy Bennett Mercy Center

13-3264005 13-3264005 11-3448950 *

$4,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA $10,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 13 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Vallone

East River Development Alliance, Inc.

86-1096987 *

$3,500 DFTA

ERDA provides a range of services for over 1,000 adults aged 55 and over – including workforce development, tenant advocacy and comprehensive public benefits, financial education and counseling, and free tax preparation assistance. (1) ERDA’s workforce development program provides clients (1 in 6 are over age 55) with case management, a weeklong job training class, staff assisted job search, job retention and career advancement supports, and direct placement assistance in jobs paying on average 12/hour. (2) The Financial Fitness Program provides clients (1 in 6 are over age 55) with one-on-one shortterm crisis and long-term asset building counseling, and community-based workshops, with an emphasis on public housing residents facing rental arrears. After four months, residents on average reduce debt by 5400 and increase savings by 1900. (3) The free tax preparation program ensures clients (1 in 3 are over age 55) can access! all tax dollars for which they are eligible, avoid predatory tax preparation services, and access public benefits and mainstream financial services, including those offered at the ERDA Federal Credit Union (which opened in April 2010 as the first new credit union serving lowincome Queens residents in over 30 years). Since 2005, ERDA has completed tax returns for over 6,000 individuals and secured 12 million in returns – much in the form of the EITC. (4) ERDA’s Comprehensive Benefits Counseling Initiative (1 in 3 are over age 55) connects over 500 clients annually to the Earned Income Disregard, Food Stamps, public health insurance, SSI/SSD, and other public benefits and work supports to which they are entitled. (5) The Tenant Advocacy Initiative protects NYC public housing residents (1 in 3 are over age 55) from unfair eviction, secure fair affordable housing, help preserve public housing, understand residents’ rights and responsibilities, address needed repair and ! language access issues, and to help over 100 households stabilize.

Aging

Van Bramer

East River Development Alliance, Inc.

86-1096987 *

$14,975 DFTA

ERDA provides a range of services for over 1,000 adults aged 55 and over – including workforce development, tenant advocacy and comprehensive public benefits, financial education and counseling, and free tax preparation assistance. (1) ERDA’s workforce development program provides clients (1 in 6 are over age 55) with case management, a weeklong job training class, staff assisted job search, job retention and career advancement supports, and direct placement assistance in jobs paying on average 12/hour. (2) The Financial Fitness Program provides clients (1 in 6 are over age 55) with one-on-one shortterm crisis and long-term asset building counseling, and community-based workshops, with an emphasis on public housing residents facing rental arrears. After four months, residents on average reduce debt by 5400 and increase savings by 1900. (3) The free tax preparation program ensures clients (1 in 3 are over age 55) can access! all tax dollars for which they are eligible, avoid predatory tax preparation services, and access public benefits and mainstream financial services, including those offered at the ERDA Federal Credit Union (which opened in April 2010 as the first new credit union serving lowincome Queens residents in over 30 years). Since 2005, ERDA has completed tax returns for over 6,000 individuals and secured 12 million in returns – much in the form of the EITC. (4) ERDA’s Comprehensive Benefits Counseling Initiative (1 in 3 are over age 55) connects over 500 clients annually to the Earned Income Disregard, Food Stamps, public health insurance, SSI/SSD, and other public benefits and work supports to which they are entitled. (5) The Tenant Advocacy Initiative protects NYC public housing residents (1 in 3 are over age 55) from unfair eviction, secure fair affordable housing, help preserve public housing, understand residents’ rights and responsibilities, address needed repair and ! language access issues, and to help over 100 households stabilize.

Aging Discretionary

Page 14 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Garodnick

East Side Community Group for Senior Services, Inc.

23-7378342 *

$3,500 DFTA

Funding will support Stein Senior Center's heath and wellness program that includes fitness, dance and nutrition classes, as well as blood-pressure monitoring. Stein Senior Center has a comprehensive array of health and wellness programs including yoga, Pilates, arthritis exercise, belly dancing, ballroom dancing, nutrition lectures, blood pressure monitoring, massage, meditation, etc. We have qualified teacher/consultants to provide these services, but our budget doesnt cover the cost of these consultants. We would need these funds for that purpose. Programs to be funded are Melrose - Mott Haven, Patterson, and Mitchell Senior Center

Aging Aging

Mendez Arroyo

East Side Community Group for Senior Services, Inc. East Side House, Inc.

23-7378342 * 13-1623989 *

$5,750 DFTA $28,573 DFTA

Aging Aging

Greenfield Chin

Edith and Carl Marks Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst Educational Alliance, Inc.

11-1633484 * 13-5562210

$5,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Funding will be used for staff coordination for cultural and ed/rec activities and consultants, and staffing for case assistance services. The Marks JCH is providing high level cultural arts programming for seniors, featuring guest lectures, presentations, and performances with well known artists and personalities. In addition, there are plans to continue weekly educational/recreational groups for seniors: Joy of Motion exercise, Musical Masterpieces, and Learning English through Singing, as well as sessions of professional musicians for the popular social dancing programming offered. There is increased need for case assistance services due to the current economic situation, budget cuts in social service areas, and the complexity of managing the local social service system, especially for immigrant seniors. Fundingwould be used to help fund innovative health and wellness programming offered at the Whittaker Center. Funding from Council Woman Mendez would be used to support the creative and innovative health and wellness activities taking place at the Sirovich Senior Center, such as dance, yoga, tai chi, falls prevention workshops, regular health screenings and health education opportunities, all designed to help our community’s older adults improve or maintain good health, prevent medical costs from rising, and increase safety and comfort at home. To enhance Elmcor's senior center programs by providing educational materials, arts and crafts tools and recreational/entertainment activities for seniors.

Aging Aging

Mendez Dromm

Educational Alliance, Inc. Elmcor Youth and Adult Activities, Inc.

13-5562210 11-2224539

$9,500 DFTA $10,000 DFTA

Aging

Van Bramer

Emerald Isle Immigration Center

11-2932528

$7,500 DFTA

Aging

Quinn

Encore Community Services, Inc.

13-3104293 *

$9,500 DFTA

Though our legal assistance program is our flagship program, we also provide a wide-range of other services, including: computer literacy classes taught to varying skill levels, with a special class dedicated to seniors; public seminars on nutrition, census information, general immigration issues, and DV Lottery issues; an ESL-American Civics class that uses life lived in a participatory democracy as the framework for language education; mental health outreach and one-on-one counseling, including Friendly Home Visits to seniors; job skills training and referral services; and senior citizen social and cultural events. Our online immigration law FAQ receives between 50,000 and 70,000 hits each month. All of this makes us something of a one-stop shop for immigrant services, allowing for cost-effective diagnosis of other needs and referrals, both internal and external, to address them. Encore is requesting funding for its Home-Delivered Meals Program. Seniors are offered the choice of daily hot meals or fozen meals delivered twice a week. Kosher meals are also provided. Funding is requested to cover the cost of a kitchen aide; a position critical to the operation of the meals program.

Aging Discretionary

Page 15 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Van Bramer

Failte Care Corp. dba New York Irish Center

55-0869151 *

$7,500 DFTA

Provide food, computer training, arts/crafts, and a social environment to Irish/Irish American Seniors and their friends in the New York area 1) Food: The Center provides, with volunteer support, a weekly lunch to an average of 70 seniors-a balanced meal consisting of all food groups. Also served is Irish tea, coffee and dessert of biscuits and/or cake. 2)Computer Training: 6 computers in our Internet Café are used. The focus of the training is staying in touch e.g. using email, Skype and Facebook. This activity, 100 organized and managed by volunteers, has an important social component to it for our Seniors.15 Seniors on average benefit weekly 3) Arts/Crafts: A weekly session of life affirming creativity is taught by a qualified instructor. On avg. 10 Seniors benefit weekly. 4) Weekly activities club. 5)Environment: The Seniors benefit from all services providedplays, lectures, music and language classes, mixing with all ages from the very old to the very young. The Fathers Heart Ministries is dedicated to restoring dignity and an improved quality of life to the many low-income (working poor), those on fixed incomes (elderly,ill and disabled), homeless, and immigrant individuals in our community. Arts/crafts, educational informational seminars on health and screenings, recreational activities, exercise classes, table games, complete various forms related to receiving benefits/entitlements and housing. Special programs and events are provided to seniors. Funds requested will support classes in restorative yoga, chair yoga, dance as well as art instruction and spanish languge instruction. Project FIND Senior Centers actively promote the concept of healthy aging through the offering of a broad range of activities designed to encourage improved physical strength, stamina, balance, flexibility and confidence. Funds requested will support classes in martial arts, dance, and tai chi. Program is for Seniors and includes outreach to the community for people from all walks of life. They attend seminars, go on trips, recreation activities,health awareness conferences, arts and crafts, plays and special events. All our events are geared toward getting seniors to getting involved. On trips 25-30 people attend. Elderly assistance, bias crime, medical awareness programs for seniors. Teens-at-risk outreach, elderly assistance, biased crime, anti-terrorism awareness, medical awareness programs, 24X6 patrol with radio dispatch to assist all emergencies for elderly people. Assist in case of emergencies, natural disasters, Alzheimers patients search and rescue, etc. Congregate meal site for senior citizens. Provide recreational activities such as dancing and bingo and educational speakers. Provide telephone assistance to governmental agencies, health care poviders, doctors, utilites etc. Availablity of current peridoicals and cable TV provided. Walking groups, coupon swapping intergenerational programs and veteran activities. To increase recreational and educational activities for mature adults 60 years and older. To increase recreational and educational activities for mature adults 60 years and older. Provide senior services to Ebbets Field Senior Center Provide senior services to Fort Greene Jazz 966 Provide senior services to Grace Agard Harewood Senior Center Provide senior services to Willoughby Senior Center

Aging

Mendez

Father's Heart Ministries, Inc., The

22-3495873 *

$4,250 DFTA

Aging Aging

Eugene Brewer

Fenimore Senior Center, Inc. Find Aid for the Aged, Inc.

11-2772287 * 13-2666921 *

$18,000 DFTA $12,000 DFTA

Aging

Quinn

Find Aid for the Aged, Inc.

13-2666921 *

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Sanders Nelson

First Church of God Golden Vessels Flatbush Shomrim Safety Patrol, Inc.

11-2973310 * 20-3244567

$3,500 DFTA $12,000 DFTA

Aging

Williams

Flatbush Shomrim Safety Patrol, Inc.

20-3244567

$7,500 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging Aging Aging Aging Aging

Ulrich Barron Barron James James James James

Forest Park Senior Citizens Center, Inc. Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc. Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc. Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc. Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc. Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc. Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc.

11-2515431 11-2300840 11-2300840 11-2300840 11-2300840 11-2300840 11-2300840

$30,000 DFTA $10,875 DFTA $10,875 $6,500 $6,500 $6,500 $6,500 DFTA DFTA DFTA DFTA DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 16 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Vann

Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc.

11-2300840

$3,000 DFTA

Aging

Vann

Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc.

11-2300840

$3,000 DFTA

Aging

Vann

Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc.

11-2300840

$3,000 DFTA

Aging

Vann

Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc.

11-2300840

$4,000 DFTA

To increase recreational and educational activities for mature adults 60 years and older. Seniors are able to travel to museums, Parks, shopping malls, farmers market, etc. Funds will be used to increase health and wellness activities; computer classes; arts and crafts and virtual games. To increase recreational and educational activities for mature adults 60 years and older. Seniors are able to travel to museums, Parks, shopping malls, farmers market, etc. Funds will be used to increase health and wellness activities; computer classes; arts and crafts and virtual games To increase recreational and educational activities for mature adults 60 years and older. Seniors are able to travel to museums, Parks, shopping malls, farmers market, etc. Funds will be used to increase health and wellness activities; computer classes; arts and crafts and virtual games To increase recreational and educational activities for mature adults 60 years and older. Seniors are able to travel to museums, Parks, shopping malls, farmers market, etc. Funds will be used to increase health and wellness activities; computer classes; arts and crafts and virtual games

Jazz966 was founded 20 years ago by Sam Pinn/ Chairman of Fort Greene Council, Inc. The program keeps jazz alive in the community. Each Friday evening during the months of September through June seniors and the community at large have the opportunity to listen to live jazz at 966 Fulton Street. A different professional artist is featured each week. Aging Vann Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc. 11-2300840 $10,000 DFTA To increase recreational and educational activities for mature adults 60 years and older. Seniors are able to travel to museums, Parks, shopping malls, farmers market, etc. Funds will be used to increase health and wellness activities; computer classes; arts and crafts and virtual games To increase recreational and educational activities for mature adults 60 years and older. Seniors are able to travel to museums, Parks, shopping malls, farmers market, etc. Funds will be used to increase health and wellness activities; computer classes; arts and crafts and virtual games. To increase recreational and educational activities for mature adults 60 years and older. Seniors are able to travel to museums, Parks, shopping malls, farmers market, etc. Funds will be used to increase health and wellness activities; computer classes; arts and crafts and virtual games To provide a Home Delievered Meals program that provides daily meals for frail elderly homebound over the age of 60. Funding will support Grand Street Settlements Asian American Elders Project (AAEP), a division of the Grand Coalition of Seniors. Grand Street Settlement requests funding for the Grand Coalition of Seniors (GCS)to continue to provide comprehensive support services to seniors in the District. The broad range of services offered through GCS include case assistance, congregate meals, referrals for meals-on-wheels for the homebound, housing, health screenings, arts and cultural workshops, and physical and recreational activities. To fund senior English and Computer Classes GCCA at low cost English for Speakers of Other Language (ESOL) classes for seniors.

Aging

Vann

Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc.

11-2300840

$11,000 DFTA

Aging

Williams

Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc.

11-2300840

$6,000 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging

Williams Brewer Chin

Fort Greene Senior Citizens Council, Inc. Goddard Riverside Community Center Grand Street Settlement, Inc.

11-2300840 13-1893908 13-5562230

$6,000 DFTA $15,000 DFTA $4,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Mendez Chin

Grand Street Settlement, Inc. Greater Chinatown Community Association

13-5562230 13-2730313

$9,250 DFTA $4,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 17 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Dickens

Greater Harlem Nursing Home Company, Inc.

13-2739672 *

$5,500 DFTA

Many residents of Greater Harlem Nursing Home and Rehabilitation Center have a diagnosis of Alzheimers or related Dementia. As these diseases progress, the residents become more disoriented, anxious, and there is a noticeable decline in intellectual capacity which is often accompanied by behavioral disturbances, withdrawal, depression, aggression and agitation. In 2007, we introduced a music therapy/dancercise program. The combination of the two provides active excercise with the stimulus of music which has been successful in reaching those with diminished cognative ability. The program enables us to reinforce social, communicative, and cognative abilities as well as physical wellness of a growning population of residents otherwise difficult to reach. Participants in the program are grouped based on their abilities and encouraged to achieve goals specific to each. The program is also a clinical tool used to access resident need! s in order to develop effective individual care-plans and to accurately and timely identify status changes requiring modifications to those plans.

Aging

Jackson

Greater Harlem Nursing Home Company, Inc.

13-2739672

$3,500 DFTA

Aging

Halloran

Greater Whitestone Taxpayers Community Center, Inc.

11-2791048

$5,000 DFTA

The funds will be used to offset the cost of renting wheelchair-accessible buses to transport groups of residents to local venues throughout the five boroughs of New York City. Residents in nursing homes, particularly those with physical ailments are often afflicted with chronic depression leading to deterioration of function and quality of life. GHNH takes pride in the ability to provide diversified leisure activities away from the facility to maintain our residents involvement in the community and thus provide opportunities for socialization and relaxation. The clinical benefits of these outings can be immediately observed in the improved state of mind exhibited by those returning from their outside adventures. Their sense of well being is enhanced and their quality of life is improved. The funds requested will be used to operate a community center for senior citizens. The activities available for the seniors consist of open recearion sessions, arts and crafts, recreational trips, aerobics, dancing, luncheons and excersise. Social gatherings/events are also held outside of our program facility. GRIOT Circle Inc. is the longest running program exclusively targeted to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) senior community of African descent in the United Sates. We serve a freshly made cooked lunch to an average of 100 seniors a day. In addition, we provide health and wellness classes, informational and educational presenta-tions, and recreational and creative opportunitites to stimulate our predominantly low income senior clients physically, mentally and emotionally. We also provide case assistance to help seniors access social services. Maintenance of our Monument and Home Care for Disabled Veterans and their families The purpose of the funds provided by your office is to provide two(2) daily nutritious meals, daily door to door transportation services for senior citizens for their medical appointments, nutritional, recreational activties and shopping, etc. for senior citizens sixty years and older and to provide a safe enviroment to spent time amongst their peers. The Battery Park City Seniors was formed in response to the need to combat the sense of isolation engendered, in large part due to the multi-lane highway that geographically separates Battery Park City from the rest of Manhattan. To hire an ESL/Citizenship Instructor to teach ESL/Citizenship classes to the members of the senior center. To hire an ESL/Citizenship Instructor to teach ESL/Citizenship classes to the members of the senior center. To hire an ESL/Citizenship Instructor to teach ESL/Citizenship classes to the members of the senior residence.

Aging

James

GRIOT Circle Inc

11-3364328 *

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Mendez Ignizio

Gustavus Adolphus Lutheran Church Halloran Memorial Chapter #34, Disabled American Veterans

13-2783642 31-1128984 *

$4,000 DFTA $4,500 DFTA

Aging

Jackson

Hamilton Grange - Convent Avenue

13-1769584 *

$9,500 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging Aging

Chin Chin Chin Chin

Hamilton-Madison House, Inc. Hamilton-Madison House, Inc. Hamilton-Madison House, Inc. Hamilton-Madison House, Inc.

13-5562412 13-5562412 13-5562412 13-5562412

$4,000 DFTA $4,000 DFTA $4,000 DFTA $4,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 18 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Chin

Hamilton-Madison House, Inc.

13-5562412

$4,000 DFTA

Aging

Jackson

Harlem Dowling Westside Center for Children and Family Services

13-3030378

$3,500 DFTA

To support The Southbridge adult program which provides social services, educational and recreational activities for the senior residence. Harlem Dowling West Side Center currently operates an After-School Program at PS 161 (499 West 133rd Street) for 150 students. The agency formed a partnership with the Logan Garden’s Housing Development (450 West 131st Street) in 2006 to create the Intergenerational Program. This program partners 15-20 after-school students with 10 seniors. During their time together the students and seniors engage in a variety of activities, including arts and crafts, journal writing, reading and games. The program currently serves 15 2nd grade students and about 10 seniors. The group meets every Monday from 3:30 pm to 5:15 pm. TO PROMOTE AND ENHANCE THE PRODUCTIVITY AND WELLNESS OF SENIOR RESIDENTS IN THE CENTRAL HARLEM COMMUNITY THROUGH SYNCHRONIZED AND AEROBIC SWIMMING To work for the empowerment, independence, dignity, and quality of life of NYC's diverse older adults and for the support of their families through advocacy, education, and the coordination and delivery service. Funding will support the nurse and case management services provided to residents. Funding will support Carnegie East House's free activities to assist seniors in maintaining socialization, physical and mental health and independence. We seek support for our Healthy Aging Program so that we may continue to expand the number of courses and activities offered and the number of sites where programs are offered in order to increase the number of neighborhood elderly served. The Program promotes the maintenance of physical and mental health with a series of wellness programs (Reiki, Alexander Technique, Chair Yoga, Arthritis exercises, Tai Chi), intellectual stimulation activities and safe environment assessments, all that help the elderly to age in place. All programs are provided free of charge. Heights and Hills currently provides in-home case management services to approximately 1,500 homebound seniors annually. We consistently have a waiting list of between 50 - 150 seniors who need the service, but we do not have enough staff to adequately serve them. We would use these funds to hire a half-time case manager, which would enable us to reduce our waiting list and provide services to this vulnerable population in a more expeditious manner. Heights and Hills currently provides in-home case management services to approximately 1,500 homebound seniors annually. We consistently have a waiting list of between 50 - 150 seniors who need the service, but we do not have enough staff to adequately serve them. We would use these funds to hire a half-time case manager, which would enable us to reduce our waiting list and provide services to this vulnerable population in a more expeditious manner. Heights and Hills currently provides in-home case management services to approximately 1,500 homebound seniors annually. We consistently have a waiting list of between 50 - 150 seniors who need the service, but we do not have enough staff to adequately serve them. We would use these funds to hire a half-time case manager, which would enable us to reduce our waiting list and provide services to this vulnerable population in a more expeditious manner.

Aging

Dickens

Harlem Honey and Bears Swim Team, Inc.

30-0251722

$5,500 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging

Dickens Garodnick Garodnick

Harlem Interagency Council for the Aging, Inc. Health Advocates for Older People Housing Development Fund Company, Inc. Health Advocates for Older People, Inc.

13-3317271 * 13-3436898 13-4165807

$3,500 DFTA $3,500 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

Aging

Lappin

Health Advocates for Older People, Inc.

13-4165807

$3,500 DFTA

Aging

Lander

Heights and Hill Community Council, Inc.

23-7237927

$7,000 DFTA

Aging

Levin

Heights and Hill Community Council, Inc.

23-7237927

$4,000 DFTA

Aging

Levin

Heights and Hill Community Council, Inc.

23-7237927

$17,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 19 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Our Adaptive Living Program (ALP)annually provides rehabilitation services to 225-275 visually impaired clients 55 older in Brooklyn. The ALP goal is to help seniors achieve a greater level of safety, confidence personal independence in their daily lives. Clients’ visual impairments range from some usable vision to total blindness. Most clients’ vision loss is due to severe age-related eye disorders—macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma—that cannot be further corrected. ALP provides an array of individualized services targeted to the specific needs of the clients, to help regain selfsufficiency, restore ability to function and enhance quality of life. Services include: orientation mobility teaching (instruction in safe travel, street crossings, and use of a long white cane); training in home personal management skills (preparing meals, cleaning laundry, grooming, managing money, label! ing medications); enhancement of communication skills (using readers, tape recorders, braille, or large print; providing adaptive equipment—large-button phones, large-face clocks, talking watches, signature guides, bold-line markers other labeling equipment); examinations by a low-vision specialist, providing adaptive devices—hand-held magnifiers, pocket-sized telescopes specialized lighting—to help clients use their residual vision more effectively; and social casework services, including supportive services around adjustment to blindness links to community resources services. All services are provided free of charge. Although we have an ALP contract with the Commission for the Blind Visually Handicapped for these services, only 70 of expenses are reimbursed due to a cap on funds available to support the elderly. Consequently, we face a budget deficit in FY2012 of nearly 95,000 for this program. Council Member funding will help reduce this deficit assist us in continuing to provide these services for Kings County seniors. HANAC Angelo Petromelis Senior Center in College Point in Queens, is a safe, comfortable congregate site for local senior residents, enhancing the participants quality of life, responding to their diverse needs and interests and encouraging their independence as well as their involvement and leadership in the center. Over 785 seniors are provided services annually including 17,500 Congregate meals, 400 Education and Recreational activities, 10 nutrition sessions, 500 friendly telephone calls and transportation. Even though the program is contracted to provide 390 units of transportation, the need is so great that over 1500 units will be provided this year. The Hellenic Senior Program provides enrichment to the Greek and Greek American Senior population. The purpose of the grant will be to assist the St. Eleftherios senior group in Manhattan to improve their quality of life, health and well being by fostering their independence and ability to live in their community by providing socialization through meetings, luncheons, parties, trips, lectures, educational and rectreational activities and referrals to social services. HANAC JVL Senior Center located at GTDT Affordable Housing and its Satelite provides a safe, comfortable congragate site, enhancing the seniors quality of life, responding to diverse needs and interests, encouraging independence, leadership and involvement in the center. The center provides 55,000 meals, 970 ED/REC activities , and 12 nutrition sessions to 2,500 seniors.

Aging

Lander

Helen Keller Services for the Blind

11-1630807

$3,500 DFTA

Aging

Halloran

Hellenic American Neighborhood Action Committee, Inc. (HANAC)

11-2290832

$12,500 DFTA

Aging

Quinn

Hellenic American Neighborhood Action Committee, Inc. (HANAC)

11-2290832

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Vallone

Hellenic American Neighborhood Action Committee, Inc. (HANAC)

11-2290832

$21,750 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 20 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Van Bramer Chin

Hellenic American Neighborhood Action Committee, Inc. (HANAC) Henry Street Settlement

11-2290832 13-1562242

$6,475 DFTA $6,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Mendez Brewer

Henry Street Settlement High Tide Dance, Inc.- Risa Jaroslow and Dancers

13-1562242 13-3260250

$13,500 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

The HANAC Ravenswood Senior Center, is providing a safe, comfortable congregate site for local seniors, enhancing the participants quality of life, responding to their diverse needs and interests and encouraging their independence as well as their involvement and leadership in the center. Over 2100 seniors are provided services annualy including 8,000 congregate breakfasts, 16,000 congregate lunches, 375 Education and Recreational activities and 6 nutrition sessions. We are anticipating providing the same number of services this year 20112012 and this fund will help to subsidize budget cuts. To support the Good Companions Senior Center which allows seniors to meet, socialize and access services. Our Senior Meals services include a lunch, dinner and a Sunday Meals Program. Our Senior Meals Program is especially important in this community where many of the seniors served are isolated from families and many live alone (we are requesting 6,500 for enrichment programs and supplies at the GCSC, 3,500 for the dinner program and 5,000 for the Sunday Meals program). To provide performances, workshops, and classes, our focus on process leads to transformative experiences for our audiences and performers. There are approximately 4,000 older adults (over age 60) living in Highbridge, a neighborhood of 40,000 residents (54 Hispanic and 43 Black), located in the poorest congressional district in the nation. The majority of these older adults are ‘aging in place’ with limited or no supports or alternatives. Many of these seniors are isolated from the community and sources of help due to fear, frailty, logistics, or ignorance. When they have caregivers, the neighbor or family member is, at best, also struggling with the many problems associated with poverty and, at worst, taking advantage of or mistreating the senior citizen. Many older adults have been moving into five new buildings of senior housing in the neighborhood, two of which have been built across the street from our Recreation Center. We will serve seniors through various activities that include community meals, trips, holiday celebrations, intergeneratinal activi! ties and connection to services and resources. Senior activities (non-secretarian): weekly, weather permitting meetings including hot lunch, yoga exercises, cultural and educational lectures, various entertainment, and conversation. Group refers to itself as the Leisure Group. To empower senior citizens as to have a better quality of life by offering programs that provide opportunities for social interaction, awareness of health issues, financial matters, information on public programs and also to act as mentors to the youth Provide counseling for seniors where necessary. Provide transportation free of charge to and from senior center. The center will provide breakfast and lunch at a nominal cost to all seniors. Provide nurse who will check blood pressure and inquire about basic health, and if necessary, recommend further medical checkups, keep records, and show the importance of taking their medicine as recommended. Provide recreational activities, arts and crafts, games, companionship and computer training. Once per month, guest speakers will speak on topic related to seniors and their protection, health, safety, and seniors wellness through food and diet. Once per month, seniors are taken on trips where they are eating out or shopping.

Aging

Foster

Highbridge Community Life Center

13-3015539

$6,000 DFTA

Aging

Gennaro

Hillcrest Jewish Center

11-1639813

$7,250 DFTA

Aging

Koo

HINDU TEMPLE SOCIETY OF NA, THE

23-7071891 *

$11,000 DFTA

Aging

Comrie

Hollis Avenue Congregational Church

86-1100659 *

$8,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 21 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging Aging

Greenfield Oddo Arroyo

Holy Spirit Church Leisure Club Holy Trinity - St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Senior Center Hope of Israel Senior Center, Inc.

11-1633569 * 13-3192971 13-2749857

$4,000 DFTA $8,000 DFTA $8,952 DFTA

The new funding would allow us to:Pay the Church their monthly rent for the use of the basement 2. It will allow us to provide the group members with refreshments 3. We would like to purchase new games and forms of entertainment 4. We are very conscious about shut ins, people of any faiths and we would use some of this to arrange transportation to get them out to be part of the community 5. We would also like to be able to use some of the funding to have some educational workshops for our members, we already have a long lasting relationship with Astoria Federal and they have given these workshops for our members in the past. recreational activities and meals for seniors To facilitate the following arts programs at the senior center: Choral Group; Poetry Workshop; Art Workshop. Fees for the services of teaching artists (independent contractors) to facilitate the following arts programs at the senior center: Painting classes - 40 one and a half hour sessions @ 75 per session - 3,000; Collage Workshop - 20 one and a half hour session @ 75 per session 1,500. Funds for arts and crafts supplies - 500.

Aging

Foster

Hope of Israel Senior Center, Inc.

13-2749857

$6,000 DFTA

HAI’s OmniBuses are specially adapted transit vehicles that accommodate wheelchairs, stretchers and ambulatory passengers. Each OmniBus can hold ten or more people in wheelchairs, 37 frail ambulatory people, people in HAI’s special stretcher beds or combinations of all three. Nursing homes, Senior Centers, rehabilitation centers, and other human service facilities rent HAI’s OmniBuses so that their patients can attend concerts, plays, museums and other cultural opportunities safely and comfortably. In FY10, The OmniBus made nearly 400 trips to destinations like the Horse Races in Belmont, the Bronx Zoo, Brighton Beach, the Staten Island Mall for shopping, the South Street Seaport for dining, City Island for dining, NY Philharmonic in Prospect Park, Empire City Casino, Green Acres Mall, Yankees baseball games, Brooklyn Cyclones games, and The Cloisters to name only a very few. OmniBuses truly allow New Yorkers with physical limitations to go about their lives as normally as possible. In FY10 over 150 NYC nursing homes and senior centers were served by OmniBus. This request is for funding that would allow HAI to offer OmniBus for FREE to senior centers so they may make trips to the supermarket throughout the City. The full price of one trip is 550, which pays for the driver, monitors who assist with boarding, maintenance, and administration. HAI seeks enough total funding Citywide to offer 182 trips spread over 6 months--during the low season (fall and winter). This request is for funding that would allow HAI to offer OmniBus for FREE to senior centers so they may make trips to the supermarket throughout the City. The full price of one trip is 550, which pays for the driver, monitors who assist with boarding, maintenance, and administration. HAI seeks enough total funding Citywide to offer 182 trips spread over 6 months--during the low season (fall and winter).

Aging

Dickens

Hospital Audiences, Inc.

13-6277895

$3,500 DFTA

Aging

Koo

Hospital Audiences, Inc.

13-6277895

$5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 22 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

HAI’s OmniBuses are specially adapted transit vehicles that accommodate wheelchairs, stretchers and ambulatory passengers. Each OmniBus can hold ten or more people in wheelchairs, 37 frail ambulatory people, people in HAI’s special stretcher beds or combinations of all three. Nursing homes, Senior Centers, rehabilitation centers, and other human service facilities rent HAI’s OmniBuses so that their patients can attend concerts, plays, museums and other cultural opportunities safely and comfortably. In FY10, The OmniBus made nearly 400 trips to destinations like the Horse Races in Belmont, the Bronx Zoo, Brighton Beach, the Staten Island Mall for shopping, the South Street Seaport for dining, City Island for dining, NY Philharmonic in Prospect Park, Empire City Casino, Green Acres Mall, Yankees baseball games, Brooklyn Cyclones games, and The Cloisters to name only a very few. OmniBuses truly allow New Yorkers with physical limitations to go about their lives as normally as possible. In FY10 over 150 NYC nursing homes and senior centers were served by OmniBus. This request is for funding that would allow HAI to offer OmniBus for FREE to senior centers so they may make trips to the supermarket throughout the City. The full price of one trip is 550, which pays for the driver, monitors who assist with boarding, maintenance, and administration. HAI seeks enough total funding Citywide to offer 182 trips spread over 6 months--during the low season (fall and winter).

Aging

Williams

Hospital Audiences, Inc.

13-6277895

$3,500 DFTA

Aging

Dromm

India Home, Inc.

20-8747291

$8,000 DFTA

India Home is a non-profit organization working actively in Queens area of New York City since 2008. Our goal is to make a difference in the quality of life for seniors and people with special needs in culturally sensitive environment. Our goal is to add life to the years. India home Inc. serves the health, social, psychological, recreational and cultural needs of seniors in Queens by collaborating with SNAP(Services for Now Adult Persons) in Queens Village, and Sunnyside Community services in sunny side by offering senior center activities two times a week. We provide transportation and nutritious vegetarian lunch to our seniors. We provide the following activities at our centers - Exercise: Yoga and Meditation, Services: Medical, Social and Legal Classes: English, Computers and Citizenship Classes, Recreation: Movies, Music and Games, Groups: Arts, Crafts and Discussion and Trips: Parks, Museums and Beaches. We have been serv! ing over 100 seniors for the past three years. We started caregivers support program in 2010 by collaborating with Sunnyside Community Services. We provide Information and assistance, family support groups, respite and individual counseling to our caregivers. By the end of 2011, we are planning to open two more centers by collaborating with Self Help Inc. India Home is a non-profit organization working actively in Queens area of New York City since 2008. Our goal is to make a difference in the quality of life for seniors and people with special needs in culturally sensitive environment. We started caregivers support program in 2010 by collaborating with Sunnyside Community Services. We provide Information and assistance, family support groups, respite and individual counseling to our caregivers. By the end of 2011, we are planning to open two more centers by collaborating with Self Help Inc.

Aging

Gennaro

India Home, Inc.

20-8747291

$5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 23 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Weprin Chin

India Home, Inc. Indochina Sino-American Senior Citizen Center, Inc.

20-8747291 13-3584616

$10,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

India Home is a non-profit organization working actively in Queens area of New York City since 2008. Our goal is to make a difference in the quality of life for seniors and people with special needs in culturally sensitive environment. Our goal is to add life to the years. India home Inc. serves the health, social, psychological, recreational and cultural needs of seniors in Queens by collaborating with SNAP(Services for Now Adult Persons) in Queens Village, and Sunnyside Community services in sunny side by offering senior center activities two times a week. We provide transportation and nutritious vegetarian lunch to our seniors. We provide the following activities at our centers - Exercise: Yoga and Meditation, Services: Medical, Social and Legal Classes: English, Computers and Citizenship Classes, Recreation: Movies, Music and Games, Groups: Arts, Crafts and Discussion and Trips: Parks, Museums and Beaches. We have been serv! ing over 100 seniors for the past three years. We started caregivers support program in 2010 by collaborating with Sunnyside Community Services. We provide Information and assistance, family support groups, respite and individual counseling to our caregivers. By the end of 2011, we are planning to open two more centers by collaborating with Self Help Inc. To continue develop our elder abuse prevention program which aims to raise awareness of the problem of elder abuse. The Institute for Retirees in Pursuit of Education (IRPE) (under the sponsorship of the B.C. Foundation) is a program that fosters peer learning among retired adults through classes, seminars and cultural activities. It charges only 75 per year for unlimited courses, less than any other lifelong learning program in NYC. IRPE must pay fees to Brooklyn College for administrative services and for room rentals. The requested funds would go toward paying these fees, thus enabling us to keep our costs low so we can continue to serve Brooklynites of all economic situations. Funding will be used to help support our case assistant activity coordinator. This funding will help the Elmhurst/Jackson Heights Senior Center to provide recreational and educational programs to their seniors including workshops on healthy aging and aging in place. The Elmhurst Center provides nutritious meals to 700 seniors daily and is one of the largest in NYC. IPR/HE Elmhurst/Jackson Heights Senior Center: This funding will be used to help supplement case assistance, and educational and recreational activities for hundreds of seniors we serve in the 21st District and that attend our Elmhurst Senior Center. This funding will be used to provide recreational and educational as well as wellness workshops and activities for seniors we serve in the 16th District. These will include: Tai Chi, Walking Club, and more. It will also help support or case assistance and counseling program to help seniors access entitlements and benefits. This funding will be used to provide case assistance to seniors we serve in the 38th District. IPR/HE has provided bilingual services to Sunset Park Hispanic and minority families since 2006. These services include access to entitlements and benefits as well as counseling. This funding will help support case assistance and counseling service in the 7th Council District, which include accessing entitlements and benefits; immigration assistance, workshops and activities IPR/HE has been providing this service to the West Harlem and Washington Heights community for more than 11 years. To support case assistance and home visitations for the IPR/HE Homebound Program located in the Carver Community Center in East Harlem. To support the Betances Senior Center's educational and recreational programs as well as wellness workshops and cultural activities.

Aging

Aging

Williams Chin

Institute for Retirees in Pursuit of Education Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc.

11-1904329 13-2987263

$15,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging

Dromm

Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc.

13-2987263

$7,500 DFTA

Aging

Ferreras

Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc.

13-2987263

$25,000 DFTA

Aging

Foster

Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc.

13-2987263

$25,000 DFTA

Aging

Gonzalez

Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc.

13-2987263

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging

Jackson Mark-Viverito Mark-Viverito

Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc. Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc. Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc.

13-2987263 13-2987263 13-2987263

$2,500 DFTA $9,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 24 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Mark-Viverito Mark-Viverito

Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc. Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc.

13-2987263 13-2987263

$5,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

To support the El Cemi Senior Center security program. To support the UPACA Senior Center recreational and educational activities, case assistance services, and cultural programming. Funding will help underwrite bilingual services for seniors in District 2. Case assistance includes: accessing entitlements, information and referral, advocacy, and crisis intervention, as well as crime victim assistance. IPR/HE Central Offices and Bilingual Hotline Services are located in District 2 in Manhattan and service the entire borough. This funding will help support the Bronx River Senior Center recreational and education programs as well as vital case assistance and counseling services that provide access to entitlements and other benefits for seniors and their families. This funding will help support the James Monroe Senior Center recreational and education programs as well as vital case assistance and counseling services that provide access to entitlements and other benefits for seniors and their families. This funding will help support IPR/HE services at the Soundview Senior Center and Mechler Hall Senior Center, which includes critical case assistance and counseling services for access to entitlements and benefits as well as recreational and educational activities. This funding will be used to help support a case manager and activity coordinator that has been stationed within the Washington Heights community serving predominantly Hispanic and minority seniors and their families for over 10 years. Ms Fredesvinda Coscoso, assists seniors in accessing their entitlements as well as on immigration. for operating and personnel expenses of the Senior Resource Center The Association is a non-profit, non-sectarian organization founded to observe and promote our American heritage as well as those of our Italian ancestors.Membership is open to anyone who wishes to join the Association regardless of religious beliefs or race and need not be a member of St. Mel Church This is our 27th Annual Food Drive. The recipients are submitted to the Foundation by religious leaders, school principals, social workers, our own members, CASC (Community Agency for Senior Services), NALITT Cancer Society and other charitable groups etc.

Aging

Mendez

Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc.

13-2987263

$3,500 DFTA

Aging

Palma

Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc.

13-2987263

$10,000 DFTA

Aging

Palma

Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc.

13-2987263

$15,000 DFTA

Aging

Palma

Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc.

13-2987263

$17,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Rodriguez Jackson

Institute for the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, Inc. Isabella Geriatric Center, Inc.

13-2987263 13-3623808 *

$30,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

Aging

Halloran

Italian American Association of St Mel Roman Catholic Church

11-1646313 *

$3,500 DYCD-CD

Aging

Ignizio

Italian Club of Staten Island, Inc.

13-3428736

$3,500 DYCD-CD

Aging Discretionary

Page 25 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds Since the early 1970s the Newtown (Italian) Senior Centers ability to conduct effective outreach in the community is evident in its ability to attract and maintain an ethnic diversity in its membership reflective of the changing population of its area. Over the years, the Newtown (Italian) Senior Center has been able to adjust its approach to services, nutrition and activities to the population that it serves. The staff and its senior volunteers informally poll the members on what activities they like, what types of food they enjoy, and what the growing trends and needs of those being served in order to plan a schedule of activities, menu, and services that will fit the need and tastes of those in attendance. By tailoring its activities, services and nutrtious meals to the growing needs of the population that it serves, the Newtown (Italian)Senior Center has been able to attract and retain a membership of 2408 senior of different ethnic background; daily attendance is 170-200 plus. The Newtown (Italian) Senior Center promotes a sense of caring and a happy, friendly atmosphere for its members by hiring staff and recruiting volunteers of different ethnic background who could help communicate with all members. At the Newtown (Italian)Senior Center different activites are conducted during each hour of operation on a daily basis. (PLEASE SEE ATTACHED MONTHLY NEWSLETTER). Through all of these activities, English as a Second Language Classes, Wellness Programs and Health Seminars, the senior have the opportunity to socialize, keep thier mind and body fit, preventing depression and overall promoting HEALTHY AGING AND AGING IN PLACE. In order for the Newtown (Italian)Senior Center to continue to offer these wonderful program/activites to our members your support is needed.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Dromm

Italian Senior Citizens Center, Inc.

11-2308129

$7,000 DFTA Each month we would like to host a senior social event called the 55 Club. The event would be held on the last Friday of each month from 11am to 2pm. Activities would include a free catered lunch, a live Jazz band and periodic outings to free cultural attractions. Outreach for the program will be conducted via email blats from contact information gathered at previous events. In addition senior centers and residences will be contacted by telephone and in person. Flyers will also be distributed hand to hand on a daily basis. FOOD--The Kehillah runs a program for older food- insecure residents of Jackson Heights and Elmhurst--a weekend Kosher meals delivery program. This program is very important especially in a neighborhood with almost no other food programs. The weekend Kosher meals program provides weekend meals for elderly home-bound residents. Program participants can choose from a variety of meals, ensuring that there are no allergy problems. Meals are delivered directly to the participant. While the participants are mainly Jewish, the program is open to everyone and we have made a point of informing all local electeds that this service is available to all in need. It is also important to note, that as far as we have been able to determine, this is the only Kosher meals program for the home-bound elderly in the area.

Aging

Dickens

Jackie Robinson Park Conservancy Inc

13-4161600 *

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Dromm

Jackson Heights-Elmhurst Kehillah, Inc.

11-2643410

$15,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 26 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Aging

Van Bramer

Jacob A. Riis Neighborhood Settlement House, Inc.

11-1729398

$21,250 DFTA

Purpose of Funds Queensbridge/Riis Senior Center offers services to seniors 60 and above in the areas of health, nutrition, and social services. We work hard to ensure that every senior is connected to resources and is able to maintain their health and independence in the community. Riis Settlement’s Senior Services utilizes the following strategies to ensure program success: Healthy Living: Health is often the number one concern as people age, and we focus on good nutrition through affordable healthy meals, exercise, health education and individual assistance to ensure access to health providers. Whether a senior needs help understanding their medication or is trying to exercise while using a walker, our caring team of professionals supports their health maintenance goals. Community Connections: Our center is in the heart of the Queensbridge community and is a home away from home. At a time in life when many become isolated – the daily routine of coming to their senior center keeps seniors engaged and connected. Comprehensive Services: Queensbridge/Riis Senior Center has a full array of services seniors need in one place. We celebrate the whole person and recognize that it takes patience, diverse resources and constant contact by caring staff to keep seniors on track to healthy lives. Recreation We are more than just a list of services. We celebrate holidays and birthdays, dance, go to plays and enjoy parks. Queensbridge/Riis Senior Center provides a full array of benefits to seniors so they can stay healthy, connected to their community and able to access the services they need. Our center has an ample commercial kitchen and dining hall, outdoor patio, performance space, computer center, exercise gym, activity spaces and passenger van. The Senior Services Program consists of the following components: Hot Meals Trips Educational Workshops Nursing Services Case Management and Referrals

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Jackson Center is up for renewal on their accreditation with the National Institute of Senior Centers (NISC). With the new focus of the city on healthy aging we would like to continue programming with qualified skilled leaders, and look to increase our healthy aging initiatives. These skilled trainers will offer the seniors a higher level of programming and will allow for evidence based programs. With the ever changing uses of technologies in centers, we will upgrade our systems and networks to better meet the needs of our seniors and to be able to offer state of the art labs and information. We will also upgrade and enhance our web based services and availability. Aging Comrie Jamaica Service Program for Older Adults, Inc. (JSPOA) 51-0204121 $17,050 DFTA

With the continued focus of the city on healthy aging we would like to continue programming with qualified skilled leaders for a special population of mentally frail and look to increase our healthy aging initiatives. These skilled trainers will offer the seniors a higher level of programming and will allow for more evidence based programs. We also continuously need to purchase supplies to support the therapies used with the participants. Supplies are needed for the gardening, aroma and art therapies programs we facilitate. Friendship center will be settling into their new space very soon. Once they move into their new space new programmatic supplies will be needed such as sitting areas, tables, chairs, and other items such as craft supplies for the art therapist to work with. Aging Comrie Jamaica Service Program for Older Adults, Inc. (JSPOA) 51-0204121 $24,250 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 27 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Rockaway Blvd Senior Center will secure and fence the lot located on the property with the building. The empty lot where the surrounding community tends to uses to discard trash and other large objects which becomes our responsibility to discard and clean. The fenced in area will also allow for a secure space for the center vehicle to be securely stored. With the ever changing uses of technologies in centers, we will upgrade our systems and networks to better meet the needs of our seniors and to be able to offer state of the art labs and information. We will also upgrade and enhance our web based services and availability. Aging Wills Jamaica Service Program for Older Adults, Inc. (JSPOA) 51-0204121 $16,250 DFTA

With the continued focus of the city on healthy aging we would like to continue programming with qualified skilled leaders for a special population of mentally frail and look to increase our healthy aging initiatives. These skilled trainers will offer the seniors a higher level of programming and will allow for more evidence based programs. We also continuously need to purchase supplies to support the therapies used with the participants. Supplies are needed for the gardening, aroma and art therapies programs we facilitate. Friendship center will be settling into their new space very soon. Once they move into their new space new programmatic supplies will be needed such as sitting areas, tables, chairs, and other items such as craft supplies for the art therapist to work with. Aging Aging Wills Garodnick Jamaica Service Program for Older Adults, Inc. (JSPOA) James Lenox House Association, Inc. 51-0204121 13-1624148 $17,250 DFTA $3,500 DFTA Funding will support the clinical and health services provided to residents.

Founded in 1964 by Jazz pianist, composer, and educator Dr. Billy Taylor (deceased), and Ms. Daphne Arnstein (deceased) a former supporter of the arts, as the pioneer organization designed for the preservation and propagation of Jazz, Americas Classical Music, Jazzmobile provides education and performance programs of the highest caliber to youth and adults via free outdoor summer mobile jazz concerts, special indoor concerts, composition workshops, jazz appreciation lecture demonstrations and symposia, an annual jazz vocal competition and other special projects designed to promote jazz and its impact on the local, national and international art and culture landscape. Many of our programs are attended by senior citizens, some with limited access to adequate socialization and exercise resulting in depression, one of the most debilitating conditions affecting the quality of life for senior citizens. Jazzmobile seeks to counter this malady by providing a meaningful outlet through our concerts and programs specially designed for our elders. With events and milestones to look forward to, mindset and outlook on life improves. During the months of April, May and June Jazzmobile will offer the senior citizens of New York City a Spring Fling. In the past, we were able to present one quality cabaret-style event that featured a nutritious lunch, a jazz big-band and swing dancers to over 200 seniors within a council member district. The grant will be used to pay for entertainment (the band and swing dancers), rental of the facility, catering, flowers, items for a “goodie bag” for each attendant, marketing, and administrative costs. The programs are free and open to all seniors within the district(s). During the months of April, May and June Jazzmobile will offer the senior citizens of New York City a Spring Fling.

Aging Aging

Dickens James

Jazzmobile, Inc. Jazzmobile, Inc.

13-2614483 13-2614483

$11,750 DFTA $10,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 28 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Founded in 1964 by Jazz pianist, composer, and educator Dr. Billy Taylor (deceased), and Ms. Daphne Arnstein (deceased) a former supporter of the arts, as the pioneer organization designed for the preservation and propagation of Jazz, Americas Classical Music, Jazzmobile provides education and performance programs of the highest caliber to youth and adults via free outdoor summer mobile jazz concerts, special indoor concerts, composition workshops, jazz appreciation lecture demonstrations and symposia, an annual jazz vocal competition and other special projects designed to promote jazz and its impact on the local, national and international art and culture landscape. Many of our programs are attended by senior citizens, some with limited access to adequate socialization and exercise resulting in depression, one of the most debilitating conditions affecting the quality of life for senior citizens. Jazzmobile seeks to counter this malady by providing a meaningful outlet through our concerts and programs specially designed for our elders. With events and milestones to look forward to, mindset and outlook on life improves. During the months of April, May and June Jazzmobile will offer the senior citizens of New York City a Spring Fling. In the past, we were able to present one quality cabaret-style event that featured a nutritious lunch, a jazz big-band and swing dancers to over 200 seniors within a council member district. The grant will be used to pay for entertainment (the band and swing dancers), rental of the facility, catering, flowers, items for a “goodie bag” for each attendant, marketing, and administrative costs. The programs are free and open to all seniors within the district(s). Funds will support the JASA Starrett Senior Centerprovide which provide a wide variety of programs and services. Funding will be used to offer 4-week advanced courses in government relations and entitlement education for graduates of the Institute for Senior Action (IFSA). To fund a wide variety of programs and services including physical fitness classes, health and wellness activities, drama workshop, and educational lectures of interest to the senior participants. JASA Van Cortlandt Senior Center is located in Kingsbridge in the Bronx. The Senior Center is open five days a week, from Monday through Friday, and provides a wide variety of programs and services including physical fitness classes, health and wellness a For the past 33 years, JASAs Joint Public Affairs Committee for Older Adults (JPAC) has reached out to older adults in the community to advocate and mobilize them around issues affecting their lives. JPACs mission is to promote leadership, civic involvement and advocacy. Funding will be used to offer 4-week advanced courses in government relations and entitlement education for graduates of the Institute for Senior Action (IFSA). Funding will also be used toward one-day JPAC cafes and conferences in Manhattan highlighting civic engagement and volunteer opportunities. The Senior Center is open five days a week, from Monday through Friday, and provides a wide variety of programs and services including physical fitness classes, health and wellness activities. The service to be funded, will cover the costs of consultants to teach classes such as physical fitness, computer classes, yoga and lectures of interest, entertainment at parties and refreshments at special events. Aging Nelson Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) 13-2620896 $4,000 DFTA

Aging

Mealy

Jazzmobile, Inc.

13-2614483

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Barron Brewer

Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA)

13-2620896 13-2620896

$5,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

Aging

Brewer

Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA)

13-2620896

$6,000 DFTA

Aging

Koppell

Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA)

13-2620896

$18,500 DFTA

Aging

Lappin

Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA)

13-2620896

$7,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 29 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The JASA Senior Alliance Senior Center is open five days a week, from Monday through Friday, and provides a wide variety of programs and services including physical fitness classes, health and wellness activities.The service to be funded that the JASA Senior Alliance Senior Center will request is 4,000 to pay for Computer Classes. Aging Nelson Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) 13-2620896 $4,000 DFTA The Center is open Monday through Friday and provides a variety of activities, including ESL classes, exercise, dance classes (folk, line and Israeli), health and wellness programs. The funds will be used to cover the costs of consultants to teach classes such as physical fitness, lectures, programs of interest to the participants, entertainment for parties. Aging Nelson Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) 13-2620896 $4,000 DFTA Provides Educational and Quality of Life Benefits for the residents of the Scheuer House of Brighton Beach, as well as for those elderly or disabled residents of the surrounding community, wishing to avail themselves of those benefits, at no or nominal charge. Funding will be used to offer entitlement education and outreach to older adults through JPACs 10-week Institute for Senior Action (IFSA) based in Manhattan at the Hudson Guild. In addition, funding will support 2-week IFSA courses based in Brooklyn, the Bronx and Queens, and will be used toward city-wide conferences highlighting civic engagement and volunteer opportunities.

Aging

Nelson

Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA)

13-2620896

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Quinn

Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA)

13-2620896

$6,000 DFTA

JASA Scheuer House of Coney island Senior Center is located in Coney Island neighborhood of Brooklyn The Center is open five days a week, from Monday through Friday, From 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM and provides a wide variety of programs and services including health and wellness activities, lectures of interest to the senior participants, art classes, computer classes in the Center’s fully equipped Computer Lab featuring 8 (eight) computers complete with Internet access, ESL (English as a Second Language) classes for individuals from the Former Soviet Union, referrals for social services, parties, and trips to areas of interest throughout the New York Metropolitan area. The senior center distributes food packages through the FAN Nutrition program on a monthly basis. A snack and a hot kosher nutritious dinner is served daily at 4:00 PM during days of operation. Participation at the Senior Center affords community elders with t! he opportunity to enjoy a meal, socialize with peers, and engage in meaningful volunteer activities, thereby maintaining community engagement and alleviating isolation. Over 100 community elders attend the center each day. The service to be funded is the costs of consultants to teach classes on topics of interests to community elders such as computer, exercise, and others, and bus rental for trips to areas of interest in the New York metropolitan area Aging Recchia Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) 13-2620896 $5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 30 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

JASA Luna Park Senior Center is located in the West Brighton Beach/Coney Island community of Brooklyn. The Senior Center is open five days a week, from Monday through Friday, and provides a wide variety of programs and services including physical fitness classes, health and wellness activities, lectures of interest to the senior participants, art classes, referrals for social services, parties, trips to areas of interest throughout the New York Metropolitan area, and transportation services throughout the Far Rockaway Peninsula. A hot nutritious full course kosher lunch is served daily during days of operation. Participation at the Senior Center affords community elders with the opportunity to enjoy a hot kosher nutritious lunch, socialize with peers, engage in meaningful volunteer activities, thereby maintaining community engagement and alleviating isolation. The Senior Center is a home away from home. Over 70 community elders attend the center each day. The service to be funded will cover the costs consultants to teach Arts and Crafts classes, art supplies for the classes, and for the rental of coach buses for recreational outings to areas of interest in the New York metropolitan area. The services will provide community elders with popular and enjoyable activities. Aging Recchia Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) 13-2620896 $5,000 DFTA JASA’s Coney Island Active Aging (CIAA)- NORC serving approximately 250 older residents of NYCHA O’ Dwyer and Surfside housings. Social services, health support and educational recreational activities are offered to the seniors age 60 in the collaboration with O’Dwyer housing and MJHS. The requesting funding will be used to support monthly group outings and weekly ESL classes. Programs will promote socialization and will decrease social isolation. Trump 4 Us provides a wide range of services to seniors age 60 including case management, health and chore services, health education and recreational and cultural programs. JASA is requesting funding to support monthly concerts, educational presentations and other cultural activities. With these programs seniors will reduce their sense of isolation and promote independent and active living and significantly improved their quality of life. JASA’s TOPS is a NORC program serving approximately 650 older adults, the residents of Trump Village III Estate. JASA in collaboration with VNSNY and Trump Village III, Estate provides social and health support services and group educational and recreational activities to promote successful aging-in –place. The request funding will be used group outings. JASAs Warbasse Cares for Seniors is a NORC Supportive Services Program serving approximately 800 older adults in the Amalgamated Warbasse community. JASA, in collaboration with Amalgamated Warbasse Houses, Inc. and VNSNY,provides social services, health support and group educational/cultural activities to promote successful aging-inplace. The requested funding will be used for cultural and health/exercise programs as well as group outings.

Aging

Recchia

Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA)

13-2620896

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Recchia

Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA)

13-2620896

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Recchia

Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA)

13-2620896

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Recchia

Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA)

13-2620896

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 31 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

JASA Williamsburg Senior Center is located at 202 Graham Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 11206. The Senior Center is open five days a week, from Monday through Friday, and provides a wide variety of programs and services including physical fitness classes, health and wellness activities, and lectures of interest, monthly parties featuring live musical entertainment, trips to areas of interest throughout the New York Metropolitan area, and meaningful volunteer activities. Social work case assistance is provided, including referrals for needed services. A hot, nutritious lunch is provided daily during days of operation. Participation at the Senior Center affords community elders with the opportunity to participate in enjoyable and enriching activities, and enjoy a hot nutritious meal while socializing with peers, thereby maintaining community engagement and alleviating isolation. Approximately 70 community elders attend the center e! ach day. The service to be funded, will cover the costs for consultants to maintain and continue popular cases such as the Yoga and Art, physical fitness classes, entertainment for parties and special cultural events, and program supplies. Funding will also be used to pay for bus rental for recreational outings, tickets to shows and museums, and costs of printing/supplies in order to create outreach materials for the senior center’s programs and services. Aging Reyna Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) 13-2620896 $13,250 DFTA

JASA Brookdale Village Senior Center is located in Far Rockaway, in Queens. The Senior Center is open five days a week, from Monday through Friday, and provides a wide variety of programs and services including physical fitness classes, health and wellness activities, lectures of interest to the senior participants, art classes, computer classes in the Center’s fully equipped Computer Lab featuring 8 (eight) computers complete with Internet access, ESL (English as a Second Language) classes for individuals from the Former Soviet Union, referrals for social services, parties, trips to areas of interest throughout the New York Metropolitan area, and transportation services throughout the Far Rockaway peninsula. A hot nutritious lunch is served daily during days of operation. Participation at the Senior Center affords community elders with the opportunity to enjoy a hot nutritious lunch, socialize with peers, engage in meaning! ful volunteer activities, thereby maintaining community engagement and alleviating isolation. The Senior Center is a home away from home. Over 150 community elders attend the center each day. Services to be funded are consultants to teach classes such as physical fitness, lectures, and for the senior center’s transportation program. The program is vital to provide transportation to senior throughout the Rockaway Peninsula. Aging Sanders Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) 13-2620896 $3,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 32 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

JASA-Roy Reuther Senior Center is located at 711 Seagirt Avenue, Far Rockaway, N.Y. 11691. Roy Reuther Senior Center provides a wide range of programs and services to seniors age 60 including case assistance, recreation/socialization, health and wellness activities including a variety of exercise classes, health screenings, lectures of interest, parties, trips and special events. Activities also include classes such as arts and crafts, dancercise, yoga, lectures on topics of healthy nutrition and health related topics, shows and special evening programs, as well as meaningful volunteer activities. A hot nutritious kosher lunch is served five days a week on days of operation. Support, assistance and referrals with obtaining benefits and entitlements are provided. We are located on the Rockaway peninsula in southern Queens and include the entire peninsula in our catchment area. Transportation is to and from the center, and f! or errands, medical appointments and trips is provided through JASA’s transportation program serving the peninsula. Over 85 community elders, attend the center each day. The services to be funded, in the amount of 10,000 will cover the costs of consultants to teach yoga, arts and crafts, dancercise and knitting crocheting classes, and choral group instructor. Aging Sanders Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) 13-2620896 $8,000 DFTA

JASA Co-op City Senior Center (Dreiser) is located in Co-op City, in the Bronx. The Senior Center is open five days a week, from Monday through Friday, and provides a wide variety of programs and services including physical fitness classes, health and wellness activities, lectures of interest to the senior participants, art classes, computer classes in the Center’s fully equipped Computer Lab featuring 8 (eight) computers complete with Internet access, Spanish Classes for individuals who want to learn a second language, referrals for social services, parties, trips to areas of interest throughout the New York Metropolitan area, and transportation services throughout the Co-op City community. A hot nutritious lunch is served daily during days of operation. Participation at the Senior Center affords community elders with the opportunity to enjoy a hot nutritious lunch, socialize with peers, engage in meaningful volunteer acti! vities, thereby maintaining community engagement and alleviating isolation. Over 200 community elders attend the center each day. The service to be funded, in the amount of 5,000 will cover the costs of consultants to teach classes such as physical fitness and crafts, lectures of interest, entertainment at parties, cultural arts programming, and refreshments at special events. Aging Seabrook Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) 13-2620896 $9,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 33 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

JASA Rockaway Park Senior Center is located in Rockaway Park, Queens. The Senior Center is open five days a week, from Monday through Friday, and provides a wide variety of programs and services including physical fitness classes, health and wellness activities, lectures of interest to the senior participants, referrals for social services, parties, entertainment music, trips to areas of interest throughout the New York Metropolitan area, and transportation services throughout the Far Rockaway peninsula. A hot nutritious lunch is served daily during days of operation. Participation at the Senior Center affords community elders with the opportunity to enjoy a hot nutritious lunch, socialize with peers, engage in meaningful volunteer activities, thereby maintaining community engagement and alleviating isolation. The Senior Center is a home away from home. Over 65 community elders attend the center each day. The service to be funded will cover the costs consultants to teach classes, such as physical fitness and lectures, entertainment at parties, transportation to and from the center, and for the rental of coach buses for recreational outings to areas of interest in the New York metropolitan area. Aging Ulrich Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) 13-2620896 $5,000 DFTA 2.JASA Holliswood Senior Center is located in Holliswood Section of Queens County. The Senior Center is open three days a week, from Tuesday through Thursday, and provides a wide variety of programs and services including physical fitness classes, health and wellness activities, lectures of interest to the senior participants, Mahjong, Canasta and Bridge, referrals for social services, parties, trips to areas of interest throughout the New York Metropolitan area. A hot nutritious lunch is served daily during days of operation. Participation at the Senior Center affords community elders with the opportunity to enjoy a hot nutritious lunch, socialize with peers, engage in meaningful volunteer activities, thereby maintaining community engagement and alleviating isolation. Over 75 community elders attend the center each day. The money will be utilized to cover the costs of consultants to teach classes such as physical fitness, art, pay for lectures and special events, purchase exercise equipment, craft supplies, entertainment at parties, and recreational outings. Aging Aging Aging Weprin Dromm Oddo Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) Jewish Center of Jackson Heights, The Jewish Community Center of Staten Island, Inc. 13-2620896 11-1681124 13-5562256 $5,000 DFTA $15,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA The funding will be used for concerts, lectures, and opera performances for local seniors, and to offset payroll expenses associated with program administration. Beatrice Victor Senior Olympics The Beatrice Victor Senior Olympics (BVSO) is a 6-day series of 21 physical, intellectual, and social competitive activities provided to Staten Island residents who are at least 50 years of age. The JCC of SI serves as the fiscal conduit for BVSO. Senior Kosher program The Beatrice Victor Senior Olympics (BVSO) is a 6-day series of 21 physical, intellectual, and social competitive activities provided to Staten Island residents who are at least 50 years of age. The JCC of SI serves as the fiscal conduit for BVSO. Jewish Community Council of Staten Island 13-5562256

Aging Aging

Ignizio Oddo

Jewish Community Center of Staten Island, Inc. Jewish Community Center of Staten Island, Inc.

13-5562256 13-5562256

$3,500 DFTA $11,000 DFTA

Aging

Rose

Jewish Community Center of Staten Island, Inc.

13-5562256

$5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 34 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Williams Gentile

Jewish Community Council of Canarsie, Inc. Jewish Community Council of Greater Coney Island, Inc.

11-2608645 11-2665181

$7,000 DFTA $3,000 DFTA

Caseworkers and Social Workers will provide comprehensive case management services, information and referrals, tolerance programming and community events. Distribution of food parcels and clothing, support groups, counseling services to at-risk frail elderly, immigrants, disadvantaged families throughout south eastern Brooklyn. Several thousand individuals from all walks of life will be serviced. To support Transportation for At-Risk Elderly in South Brooklyn. Jay-Harama Senior Center respectfully requests 2011-2012 funding in the amount of $25,000 in support of our Health Aging Activitiies. These funds help serve the seniors attending our senior center. One of the main purposes of senior center programs is to defer the need for institutionalization in nursing homes.

Aging

Nelson

Jewish Community Council of Greater Coney Island, Inc.

11-2665181

$12,750 DFTA

Surf Solomon Senior Center respectfully requests funding in support of our Healthy Aging Activities. These funds help serve the seniors attending our senior center. We express gratitude for the consistent support you provided to the Health Promotion, Educational Recreational programs at our center in prior years. These are extraordinary times for nonprofit organizations and the clients we serve. Devastating service reductions are terrifying to the frail elderly clients whose health and welfare depend upon our assistance. Detailed Description and Project Public Purpose One of the main purposes of senior center programs is to defer the need for institutionalization in nursing homes. Both physical and mental stimulation is needed on a regular basis in order to keep senior citizens minds and bodies able to cope with the daily stresses of life. Thus, the importance of Health Aging programs at senior centers. Samples of the very popular activities, in high-demand amongst seniors, that these funds have supported in the past and which are important to continue include: • usic/Recreational Therapy M • rts and Crafts Instruction A • ealth Promotion sessions H • xercise/Tai Chi/Chair Yoga Instruction E • ine and Social Dancing Instruction L • SL and Citizenship Instruction E • rips to Cultural Sites T • omputer Instruction C

Aging

Recchia

Jewish Community Council of Greater Coney Island, Inc.

11-2665181

$7,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 35 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Haber Houses Senior Center respectfully requests funding in support of our Healthy Aging Activities. These funds help serve the seniors attending our senior center. We express gratitude for the consistent support you provided to the Health Promotion, Educational Recreational programs at our center in prior years. These are extraordinary times for nonprofit organizations and the clients we serve. Devastating service reductions are terrifying to the frail elderly clients whose health and welfare depend upon our assistance. Detailed Description and Project Public Purpose One of the main purposes of senior center programs is to defer the need for institutionalization in nursing homes. Both physical and mental stimulation is needed on a regular basis in order to keep senior citizens minds and bodies able to cope with the daily stresses of life. Thus, the importance of Health Aging programs at senior centers. Samples of the very popular activities, in high-demand amongst seniors, that these funds have supported in the past and which are important to continue include: • Music/Recreational Therapy • Arts and Crafts Instruction • Health Promotion sessions • Exercise/Tai Chi/Chair Yoga Instruction • Line and Social Dancing Instruction • ESL and Citizenship Instruction • Trips to Cultural Sites • Computer Instruction Aging Recchia Jewish Community Council of Greater Coney Island, Inc. 11-2665181 $7,500 DFTA Marlboro Senior Center respectfully requests funding in support of our Healthy Aging Activities. These funds help serve the seniors attending our senior center. We express gratitude for the consistent support you provided to the Health Promotion, Educational Recreational programs at our center in prior years. These are extraordinary times for nonprofit organizations and the clients we serve. Devastating service reductions are terrifying to the frail elderly clients whose health and welfare depend upon our assistance. Detailed Description and Project Public Purpose: One of the main purposes of senior center programs is to defer the need for institutionalization in nursing homes. Both physical and mental stimulation is needed on a regular basis in order to keep senior citizens minds and bodies able to cope with the daily stresses of life. Thus, the importance of Health Aging programs at senior centers. Samples of the very popular activities, in high-demand amongst seniors, that these funds have supported in the past and which are important to continue include: • Music/Recreational Therapy • Arts and Crafts Instruction • Health Promotion sessions • Exercise/Tai Chi/Chair Yoga Instruction • Line and Social Dancing Instruction • ESL and Citizenship Instruction • Trips to Cultural Sites • Computer Instruction Aging Recchia Jewish Community Council of Greater Coney Island, Inc. 11-2665181 $7,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 36 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Nelson

Jewish Community Council of Kings Bay, Inc.

11-2714997

$6,500 DFTA

The funds will be used to provide seniors with case management services. The program provides case management services through application assistance, advocacy, and referral services to help economically disadvantaged seniors achieve self-sufficiency 2 days week pgm provides continental breakfast/hot lunch for senior/disabled, enrichment opportunities are (computers,healthy cooking/eating,how to take blood pressure,lectures on current issues,local referral services available, Bible Study for those who want it, movies, excercise, fellowship, trips to the YMCA for aquatic exercises with professional trainer.) Provide senior programs; act as a conduit for Hope City Empowerment, Emmanuel Baptist Church, Duryea Presbyterian Church, and Faith Chapel Baptist Church To provide trips to cultural and or recreation destinations for seniors who would otherwise be unable to visit or participate in these programs. The program is the senior citizen program at Castle Hill Houses Community Center. This program is a vital part of the community, providing meals, case management, exercise, arts crafts, cultural events, education and nutrition classes for 55 years. The program is the senior citizen program at Castle Hill Houses Community Center. This program is a vital part of the community, providing meals, case management, exercise, arts crafts, cultural events, education and nutrition classes for 55 years. KASCS seeks funding to support our Senior College Program that teaches senior citizens, especially immigrants, ESL conversation, US citizenship civics and history, singing, caligraphy, conversational Chinese, and Senior Tai Kwon Do (Senior Martial Arts and Self Defense). KASCS seeks funding to support our Senior College Program that teaches senior citizens, especially immigrants, ESL conversation, US citizenship civics and history, singing, caligraphy, conversational Chinese, and Senior Tai Kwon Do (Senior Martial Arts and Self Defense). Located on 37-06 111st Street in Coroan, the KCS Korean American Senior Center of Corona is currently serving a daily aveage of 150 congregate lunch, social services and educational services to over 5,000 registered members. The center is the only one delilvering Asian food to 90 Asian homebound senior in the entire Queens. Due to budget cut over 50, the program faces with critical questions how to survive and how to continue providinig services. the program survives in FY2011 through active fundraising and support from Council member. This situation will be continued in FY2012. In order to keep at least current level of services, the pgoram needs at least 50,000 in addition to its continued fundraising efforts for meals, supplies and staff. To provide support for senior and veteran programs and activities in the 43rd Council District. The. Mission of KASCA is to help Korean Immigrant empower themself through neccessary education,social and public service.It is our goal to enable recent Korean immigrant to make smooth transition ajusting to new living enviroment to be come productive member in American society accomplished, This goal KASCA provider programs and Korean immigrant has American culture Senior education social need Funding will support the Senior Center at Saint Peter’s Church, which serves more than 3,000 seniors annually with diverse meal, intellectual, health and social programs. St Rosalia-Regina Pacis Neighborhood Improvement Association

Aging

Vann

John Wesley United Methodist Church

11-6002725

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

James Gennaro

Judah International Christian Center, Inc. Kew Gardens Hills Civic Association

11-3352075 11-6105321 *

$21,750 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging

Cabrera

Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club, Inc.

13-1623850

$13,750 DFTA

Aging

Palma

Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club, Inc.

13-1623850

$16,750 DFTA

Aging

Halloran

Korean American Senior Citizens Society of Greater New York, Inc.

11-2455396

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Koo

Korean American Senior Citizens Society of Greater New York, Inc.

11-2455396

$11,000 DFTA

Aging

Ferreras

Korean Community Services of Metropolitan New York, Inc. Korean Community Services of Metropolitan New York, Inc.

23-7348989

$15,000 DFTA

Aging

Koo

23-7348989

$14,750 DFTA

Aging

Gentile

Korean War Veterans Chapter #171

14-1941454

$1,000 DFTA

11-2697931

Aging

Ignizio

Korean-American Senior Citizens Association of New York, Inc.

13-3959398 *

$7,500 DFTA

Aging

Garodnick

Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, Inc.

13-1628180

$20,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 37 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Lappin

Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, Inc.

13-1628180

$14,250 DFTA

We are requesting 20,000 for our East Side Transportation Program which provides transportation services to frail older adults in Community Districts 6 and 8 (14th Street – 96th Street, 5th Avenue to the East River, and on Roosevelt Island). Fund the purchase of equipment and supplies so LFD program participants of varying developmental disabilities can provide hands-on assistance to seniors to do chores that they no longer are able to do or find physically taxing to accomplish allowing them to remain living in their homes. Chores can range from outdoor tasks like lawn mowing and yard cleaning to planting a bed of flowers beautifying their home. Indoor tasks can range from replacing light bulbs and fire detector batteries to seasonal changing of drapes and curtains. Fund the purchase of equipment and supplies for our Intergenerational Horticulture Program. Lifestyles hosts school trips for young children to our on-site greenhouses for seasonal horticulture projects. On the other spectrum, Lifestyles invites senior citizens from senior clubs and residences throughout Staten Island to visit and do projects in our greenhouses. In the greenhouses developmentally disabled participants from our Day Habilitation program will be paired with school children or seniors to work hand-in-hand making center pieces, repot emerging plants, or do other seasonal horticultural projects. Additionally, there are reciprocal visits to schools and senior centers to assist in planting and growing vegetables, and flowering gardens at their own sites.

Aging

Ignizio

Lifestyles for the Disabled, Inc.

13-3740011

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Rose

Lifestyles for the Disabled, Inc.

13-3740011

$5,000 DFTA Funding will support programs for seniors who are at risk of declining vision or have a visual impairment through outreach to local senior centers and community organizations. Funding will go towards keeping seniors in their homes, giving them social services and cultural activities. To fund the Senior Services program which supports the nearly 800 seniors living within our community.

Aging Aging Aging

Garodnick Brewer Brewer

Lighthouse International Lincoln Housing Outreach Lincoln Square Neighborhood Center, Inc.

13-1096620 * 13-3668207 13-1825918

$3,500 DFTA $3,000 DFTA $9,000 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging

Rose Gentile Jackson

LIVING HOPE OUTREACH MINISRIES INC Lutheran Family Health Center's Family Support Center Manhattanville Houses Residents Associations

20-0979823 * 11-1839567 26-3467126

$6,000 DFTA $3,000 DFTA $4,500 DFTA

African Elders Initiative program. This program is intended to provide a Case Management/Advocacy and accompaniment services, home visit, phone contacts, etc. to African Elders living in the Park Hill and Steuben communities in staten Island who suffer the following barriers: language, immobility/transportation, living alone, and cultural barriers. Each of these factors contributes to our elders sense of isolation and desponsency which are not necessarily addressd by the agencies serving seniors on Staten island. We consider this initiative crucial in that there have been occasions when elders in our Community had deid unbeknown to anyone until the body began to decompose. On December 1, 2010 for instance, we went to visit one of the elderly women just to find her dead in her house. This shoulnt be happening to anyone. To support Seniors In Touch. Funds will be used to support the residents association. The purpose of these funds is to provide recreational programs, community cultural and socialization events, transportation and healthy aging services to the senior residents of the 31st District.

Aging

Sanders

Margert Community Corporation

11-2534700 *

$67,750 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 38 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

MTH offers a variety of energizing and stimulating classes for the senior 55 years and older. Our Fine Art program introduces the senior to many different art forms. They use a variety of materials from paint, clay, pencil, molds etc. They find these classes to be a place where they can share their talent and their stories with each other. The Tai Chi and Chair Yoga classes gives the seniors the opportunity to exercise their mind and body and increases their strength, balance and concentration skills. Through the Chair Yoga they learn techniques to reduce stress and promote good health. Aging Crowley Maspeth Town Hall, Inc. 23-7259702 $10,000 DFTA MTH offers a variety of energizing and stimulating classes for the senior 55 years and older. Aging Koslowitz Maspeth Town Hall, Inc. 23-7259702 $7,500 DFTA

Aging Aging

Ignizio Oddo

Meals on Wheels of Staten Island, Inc. Meals on Wheels of Staten Island, Inc.

13-2894978 13-2894978 *

$4,000 DFTA $10,000 DFTA

Meals on Wheels of Staten Island, Inc. provides home delivered meals to frail and disabled elderly residents of Staten Island who are unable to cook or shop for food independently. Our census has grown rapidly to almost 800 people to whom we deliver two meals daily. We also deliver kosher meals prepared by our subcontractor. Never having had a waiting list, we are committed to serving all elderly who are in need. A very important part of our service is the daily contact clients have with our staff person or volunteer deliverer. Our registered nurses review dietary needs and visit meal recipients. Volunteer callers maintain phone contact to reduce isolation. Menus are approved by a registered nutritionist to ensure that all meals meet the 1/3 recommended dietary allowance. Often we are able to identify that a recipient is in distress and in need of an emergency intervention. We feel that we do not only deliver meals but that we! deliver stable nutrition and with it health, wellness, security and a sense of well being. Funding will support agency growth and our ability to serve all in need of meal services, including our supportive services provided by volunteers and our nurses. utility bills, supplies, office expenses Medicare Rights will lead an Enrollment Day in each sponsoring district, educating hundreds of community residents on public benefits for which they might be eligible. For each Enrollment Day, we will work with district staff to identify an appropriate location for the event and to promote the event district-wide. Past events have attracted as many as 300 attendees. On the Enrollment Day, an expert, bilingual Medicare Rights enrollment counselor will lead a presentation for seniors and caregivers and then help seniors complete benefit applications. Following the Enrollment Day, Medicare Rights will provide follow-up toll-free counseling and will pursue casework to ensure that city and state agencies process applications properly and benefits are received.

Aging Aging

Gennaro Chin

Medicare Rights Center Inc Medicare Rights Center, Inc.

13-3505372 * 13-3505372

$5,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA To support Enrollment Day educating hundreds of community residents on public benefits .

Aging Discretionary

Page 39 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Medicare Rights will lead an Enrollment Day in each sponsoring district, educating hundreds of community residents on public benefits for which they might be eligible. If just 20 attendees receive help enrolling in Medicare Savings Programs, we will secure over 80,000 in value for constituents, (This amount factors in the 2011 value of a Medicare Savings Program and the estimated value of the federal Part D drug benefit and its Extra Help subsidy, for which MSP enrollees are automatically eligible.) For each Enrollment Day, we will work with district staff to identify an appropriate location for the event and to promote the event district-wide. Past events have attracted as many as 300 attendees. On the Enrollment Day, an expert, bilingual Medicare Rights enrollment counselor will lead a presentation for seniors and caregivers and then help seniors complete benefit applications. Following the Enrollment Day, Medicare Rights will provide follow-up toll-free counseling and will pursue casework to ensure that city and state agencies process applications properly and benefits are received. Aging Aging Aging Dromm Garodnick Gentile Medicare Rights Center, Inc. Medicare Rights Center, Inc. Medicare Rights Center, Inc. 13-3505372 13-3505372 13-3505372 $3,500 DFTA $3,500 DFTA $1,500 DFTA Funding will support community presentations about the benefits and details of accessing and participating in government programs such as Medicare and SCRIE. To support education, enrollment assistance and counseling services to seniors on public benefits for which they may be elgible. Medicare Rights will lead an Enrollment Day in each sponsoring district, educating hundreds of community residents on public benefits for which they might be eligible. For each Enrollment Day, we will work with district staff to identify an appropriate location for the event and to promote the event district-wide. Past events have attracted as many as 300 attendees. On the Enrollment Day, an expert, bilingual Medicare Rights enrollment counselor will lead a presentation for seniors and caregivers and then help seniors complete benefit applications. Following the Enrollment Day, Medicare Rights will provide follow-up toll-free counseling and will pursue casework to ensure that city and state agencies process applications properly and benefits are received. Aging Aging Greenfield Mark-Viverito Medicare Rights Center, Inc. Medicare Rights Center, Inc. 13-3505372 13-3505372 $6,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

To support a Medicare Enrollment Day for seniors in District 8. Medicare Rights will lead an Enrollment Day in each sponsoring district, educating hundreds of community residents on public benefits for which they might be eligible. Funding is being requested to support an Enrollment Day in Council District 3.. This enrollment day is to educate seniors and caregivers about public programs for which they might be eligible.

Aging

Palma

Medicare Rights Center, Inc.

13-3505372

$3,500 DFTA

Aging

Quinn

Medicare Rights Center, Inc.

13-3505372

$6,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 40 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Medicare Rights will lead an Enrollment Day in each sponsoring district, educating hundreds of community residents on public benefits for which they might be eligible. If just 20 attendees receive help enrolling in Medicare Savings Programs, we will secure over 80,000 in value for constituents, (This amount factors in the 2011 value of a Medicare Savings Program and the estimated value of the federal Part D drug benefit and its Extra Help subsidy, for which MSP enrollees are automatically eligible.) For each Enrollment Day, we will work with district staff to identify an appropriate location for the event and to promote the event district-wide. Past events have attracted as many as 300 attendees. On the Enrollment Day, an expert, bilingual Medicare Rights enrollment counselor will lead a presentation for seniors and caregivers and then help seniors complete benefit applications. Following the Enrollment Day, Medicare Rights will provide follow-up toll-free counseling and will pursue casework to ensure that city and state agencies process applications properly and benefits are received. Aging Weprin Medicare Rights Center, Inc. 13-3505372 $6,000 DFTA

Medicare Rights will lead an Enrollment Day in each sponsoring district, educating hundreds of community residents on public benefits for which they might be eligible. If just 20 attendees receive help enrolling in Medicare Savings Programs, we will secure over 80,000 in value for constituents, (This amount factors in the 2011 value of a Medicare Savings Program and the estimated value of the federal Part D drug benefit and its Extra Help subsidy, for which MSP enrollees are automatically eligible.) For each Enrollment Day, we will work with district staff to identify an appropriate location for the event and to promote the event district-wide. Past events have attracted as many as 300 attendees. On the Enrollment Day, an expert, bilingual Medicare Rights enrollment counselor will lead a presentation for seniors and caregivers and then help seniors complete benefit applications. Following the Enrollment Day, Medicare Rights will provide follow-up toll-free counseling and will pursue casework to ensure that city and state agencies process applications properly and benefits are received. Aging Wills Medicare Rights Center, Inc. 13-3505372 $3,750 DFTA 1. We have an excellent art Class, however, our volunteer instructor recently retired. We now will have to pay an instructor. 2. We need a new improved Brochure advertising our Center. 3. Center Picnic for 150 seniors in the summer. 4. New Bingo Set with Cage. 5. Need new Printer for Center. We wish to treat 100 senior citizens to the Christmas Show Dinner with Transportation in December 2012. To provide handyman services to enable needy seniors and disabled people to live safely and independently by sending handymen to visit their homes. Funding will support legal services through the Manhattan Seniors Project, which helps seniors prevent evictions, resolve problems with housing conditions, access Social Security, Medicare and other benefits to which they are entitled, and resolve consumer debt issues. To provide senior meals and senior services to numerous seniors in the South Bronx community. support of senior congregate meals at Concourse Plaza Upkeep of Monuments, and costs of dinners to wounded veterans, and annual barbeque and holiday parties. Support to seniors through home visits, daily communication, emergency food, clothing, etc. General Social services

Aging Aging Aging

Sanders Wills Brewer

Merrill Park Civic Association of Springfield Gardens, Inc. Merrill Park Civic Association of Springfield Gardens, Inc. Metropolitan New York Coordinating Council on Jewish Poverty, Inc.

11-2304928 11-2304928 13-2738818

$12,500 DFTA $4,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging Aging Aging

Garodnick Arroyo Foster Ignizio Barron

MFY Legal Services, Inc. Mid-Bronx Senior Citizens Council, Inc. Mid-Bronx Senior Citizens Council, Inc. Military Order of the Purple Heart Miller Avenue Block Association, Inc.

13-2622748 23-7354073 23-7354073 13-3720645 * 11-2752769

$3,500 DFTA $8,952 DFTA $6,000 DFTA $4,000 DFTA $26,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 41 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Jackson Rodriguez

Morningside Retirement and Health Services, Inc. Mosholu-Montefiore Community Center, Inc.

13-6206256 13-3622107

$5,000 DFTA $10,000 DFTA

MRHS provides social work services, educational and recreational programs, health promotion programs, nursing services, home health care services, psychiatric consultations, and a doctors’ home visiting program. To pay for consultants to teach cultural, health and educational programs as well as musicians to provide live musical programs. To purchase program supplies. To provide senior services to members of the Bath Beach, Marlboro and Bensonhurst. Funs will be used to purchase refreshment at meetings and social gatherins, bus rides and Gravesend Athletic entertainment. Funds will also be used to renovate meeting facility. Association Nachas is proposing to utilize these funds to continue its comprehensive senior program. This programs consists of social, recreational groups, case management session including entitlement advocacy, and free health screenings and health services. In addition to serving the Nachas senior clientele, Nachas staff would visit senior centers throughout Brooklyn and offer free health screenings and prescreen seniors for their entitlement eligibility. Crucial entitlements such as food stamps, HEAP, and Medicaid would be applied for at each center. Funding will be applied to NCJW, Brooklyn Sections main project, Council Center for Senior Citizens, which provides nutritional, educational, recreational and support services to community seniors age 60 and olders.

Aging

Recchia

Most Precious Blood Roman Catholic Church

11-1690779

$5,250 DFTA

11-3019763

Aging

Lander

Nachas Health and Family Network, Inc.

11-3067201

$7,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Nelson Brewer

National Council of Jewish Women, Inc. - Brooklyn Section 11-1666847 National Council of Jewish Women, Inc. - New York Section 13-1624132

$6,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA To support the Council Senior Center (CSC) which is a community service project of the National Council of Jewish Women New York Section. Senior citizens will be assisted with housing and other entitlement program problems. Trained personnel provide help with applications, delays in approval of applications, landlord tenant disputes, utility bill programs, etc. To provide case assistance, educational and recreational activities throughout the Bronx. For the past 15 years NJCDC has operated a Food Pantry progam helping to assist individuals and families in the surrounding community. With the rising increase in those under and unemployed, as well as other economic challenges to the familys income base,those seeking our program provisions has exponentially increased. To support the Aging Improvement District (AID) initiative and its efforts to improve the quality of life for seniors in East Harlem. Funding for senior trips. To provide services and programming at the Frederick Douglass Senior Center.

Aging Aging

Koppell Arroyo

Neighborhood Initiatives Development Corporation (NIDC) 13-3110811 Neighborhood Self Help by Older Persons Project, Inc. 13-3077047

$10,000 DFTA $7,573 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging Aging

Wills Mark-Viverito Levin Mark-Viverito

New Jerusalem Community Development Corp. New York Academy of Medicine New York City Housing Authority New York City Housing Authority

20-4172472 13-1656674 13-6400571 13-6400571

$10,000 DFTA $10,250 DFTA $8,000 DFTA $10,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 42 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

City Council Discretionary funding will be used to fund a lunch program for the Cooper Park Senior Center. The Cooper Park Senior Center will operate senior meal program which consists of approximately twenty five (25) congregate lunches Monday through Friday. Lunch will be served in the cafeteria of the senior center five days per week from 12 noon1PM. All meals will be prepared in a vendor’s kitchen facility and will be delivered and served in the dining area of the Cooper Park Senior Center, located at 288 Frost Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11206. The seniors will be served hot meals with no more than two cold meals per week. All meals will meet 1/3 of the recommended daily dietary allowance and adhere to US Dietary Guidelines. Meals will be designed to include a variety of food items, ethnic foods, vegetarian substitutions and periodically celebrate cultural events and holidays. Weekly menus will posted, prominently, in a highly visible public location within the Cooper Park Senior Center. Daily attendance of meal recipients will be maintained at the senior center.

Estimated Program Cost:

27,625 (4.25 per meal X 5 days a week X 25 Meals X 52 weeks)

Meal cost will include cooked meals, paper goods, serving utensils and delivery.

Aging Aging Aging

Reyna Brewer Chin

New York City Housing Authority New York Foundation for Senior Citizens, Inc. New York Foundation for Senior Citizens, Inc.

13-6400571 13-2618568 13-2618568

$28,000 DFTA $2,000 DFTA $7,000 DFTA To provide the Home Sharing and Respite Care Program which matches compatible persons free of charge in shared living arrangements . Funds will be used to enhance and expand LaGuardia and Mott Street Senior Centers’ recreational and social programs.

Aging

Dickens

New York Foundation for Senior Citizens, Inc.

13-2618568

$7,500 DFTA

The home sharing component of New York Foundation for Senior Citizens city-wide Home Sharing and Respite Care Program, the only one of its type in New York City, matches compatible persons free of charge in shared living arrangements in dwellings rented or owned by one or more of the participants. One or both matchmates must be aged 60 or over. The programs respite care component provides certified in-home attendants to help frail elderly persons who are attempting to manage at home alone or whose caregivers, have become ill or are temporarily away, to assist them with personal care, meal preparation, shopping, escort services, assistance with light housekeeping and laundry at the low rates of 7.25 per hour on weekdays and 7.50 per hour on weekends plus carfare. Free emergency, temporary in-home attendant respite care is also provided for low income frail elderly whose caregivers experience a sudden inability to provide care on! weekdays after 5 p.m., weekends, holidays and in emergencies.

Aging Discretionary

Page 43 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Foster Garodnick

New York Foundation for Senior Citizens, Inc. New York Foundation for Senior Citizens, Inc.

13-2618568 13-2618568

$6,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

Aging

Lappin

New York Foundation for Senior Citizens, Inc.

13-2618568

$10,000 DFTA

The home sharing component of New York Foundation for Senior Citizens city-wide Home Sharing and Respite Care Program, the only one of its type in New York City, matches compatible persons free of charge in shared living arrangements in dwellings rented or owned by one or more of the participants. One or both matchmates must be aged 60 or over. The programs respite care component provides certified in-home attendants to help frail elderly persons who are attempting to manage at home alone or whose caregivers, have become ill or are temporarily away, to assist them with personal care, meal preparation, shopping, escort services, assistance with light housekeeping and laundry at the low rates of 7.25 per hour on weekdays and 7.50 per hour on weekends plus carfare. Free emergency, temporary in-home attendant respite care is also provided for low income frail elderly whose caregivers experience a sudden inability to provide care on! weekdays after 5 p.m., weekends, holidays and in emergencies. Funding will support the operating costs for the Home Sharing/Respite Care program, which provides home care assistance to seniors. The home sharing component of New York Foundation for Senior Citizens city-wide Home Sharing and Respite Care Program, the only one of its type in New York City, matches compatible persons free of charge in shared living arrangements in dwellings rented or owned by one or more of the participants. The home sharing component of New York Foundation for Senior Citizens city-wide Home Sharing and Respite Care Program matches compatible persons free of charge in shared living arrangements in dwellings rented or owned by one or more of the participants.

Aging

Quinn

New York Foundation for Senior Citizens, Inc.

13-2618568

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Recchia

New York Foundation for Senior Citizens, Inc.

13-2618568

$6,000 DFTA

The home sharing component of New York Foundation for Senior Citizens city-wide Home Sharing and Respite Care Program, the only one of its type in New York City, matches compatible persons free of charge in shared living arrangements in dwellings rented or owned by one or more of the participants. One or both matchmates must be aged 60 or over. The programs respite care component provides certified in-home attendants to help frail elderly persons who are attempting to manage at home alone or whose caregivers, have become ill or are temporarily away, to assist them with personal care, meal preparation, shopping, escort services, assistance with light housekeeping and laundry at the low rates of 7.25 per hour on weekdays and 7.50 per hour on weekends plus carfare. Free emergency, temporary in-home attendant respite care is also provided for low income frail elderly whose caregivers experience a sudden inability to provide care on! weekdays after 5 p.m., weekends, holidays and in emergencies. The requested funds will be used to enhance and expand Dyckman Senior Center’s recreational and social programs and activities such as English as a Second Language (ESL), computer training, arts and crafts, exercise and dance classes, trips and volunteer member recognition parties. These varied social and recreational programs and services enrich the quality of life of the Center’s members and helps them to remain as independent, healthy and active as possible within their own communities. We are a Senior Citizen Center and we serve a congregate lunch everyday at 12pm which we cook on premise. Our center also offers case assistance, transportation, telephone reassurance, health promotion, nutrition education and ed/rec. We provide trips, glee club, billiards, bingo, walking club, exercise classes, sewing and knitting, book club, and flea markets. SATELLITE SENIOR CENTER PROVIDING RECREATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL SERVICES TO SENIORS INCLUDING AEROBICS, LINE DANCE INSTRUCTION, SOCIALS, CULTURAL TRIPS, ENTERTAINMENT, LEGAL SEMINARS, HEALTH FAIRS, BINGO AND NUTRITION COUNSELING.

Aging

Rodriguez

New York Foundation for Senior Citizens, Inc.

13-2618568

$10,000 DFTA

Aging

Vacca

North East Bronx Senior Citizens Center, Inc.

13-2759045

$30,750 DFTA

Aging

Halloran

North Flushing Senior Center, Inc.

11-2741128

$12,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 44 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Northeast Bronx Association Corp Seniors Program: A significant percentage of the voters in our area are senior citizens, who are still very lively, but do not wish to drive and often do wish to socialize with their peers. Our “Seniors Day Out” program has been very popular. The seniors themselves decide the destination and NEBA makes all the arrangements. Previous trips have included Holiday Shopping at various malls and trips to various Casinos. We also arrange luncheons for our seniors throughout the year. They are also considering additional outings that may include a Broadway matinee show, the Botanical Gardens and the Metropolitan Museum. Aging Vacca Northeast Bronx Association Corporation 13-4131325 $3,750 DFTA Helping Hands Senior Center is a program that is dedicated to providing a place where seniors of our community can meet together to pursue mutual interest. Seniors will take part in educational, social and recreational activities that will enhance their dignity, support their independence and encourage their involvement in and with the community. The funds requested will provide four (4) off-site field trips for the senior citizens of International Tower. To provide Access to Senior Planet digital community resources which includes our weekly events calendar. Free technology training in a computer lab in your district, Access to Senior Planet digital community resources,, One-on-one technology support and training at the OATS Exploration Center. To provide technology training in a computer lab in your district and access to Senior Planet digital community resources. •Free technology training in a computer lab in your district, teaching skills from email and internet to health research and accessing government services online. OATS has over 1,000 pages of proprietary curriculum available in English and Spanish. •Access to Senior Planet digital community resources, including our weekly events calendar, resource guide, videoconferences, and specialized content on health, finances, and other essential topics. This service, available online at www.seniorplanet.org, reaches over 16,000 older adults per year. Free event listings in the Senior Planet calendar are a powerful way for organizations in your district, such as arts and cultural institutions, to reach an audience of thousands. •One-on-one technology support and training at the OATS Exploration Center. This new citywide intergenerational technology resource center will be opening in the summer of 2011, and seniors from your district will be welcome (with transportation assistance provided) to explore emerging technologies and get customized assistance with everything from PCs to mobile phones. Aging Dickens Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc. 55-0882599 $9,000 DFTA Funding will support training sessions geared towards helping seniors in Council District 4 to better access and utilize technology as a resource and in their everyday life.

Aging Aging Aging

Eugene Comrie Brewer

Northeastern Conference of Seventh Day Adventists Community Affairs, Inc. NYCHA International Towers Senior Center Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc.

02-0632575 * 13-6400571 55-0882599

$15,000 DFTA $8,750 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Cabrera Chin

Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc. Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc.

55-0882599 55-0882599

$5,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

Aging

Garodnick

Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc.

55-0882599

$3,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 45 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Lander

Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc.

55-0882599

$10,000 DFTA

Aging

Lappin

Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc.

55-0882599

$5,000 DFTA

•Free technology training in community computer labs, teaching skills from email and internet to health research and accessing government services online. OATS has over 1,000 pages of proprietary curriculum available in English and Spanish. •Access to Senior Planet digital community resources, including our weekly events calendar, resource guide, videoconferences, and specialized content on health, finances, and other essential topics. This service, available online at www.seniorplanet.org, reaches over 16,000 older adults per year. Free event listings in the Senior Planet calendar are a powerful way for organizations, such as arts and cultural institutions, to reach an audience of thousands. •One-on-one technology support and training at the OATS Exploration Center. This new citywide intergenerational technology resource center will be opening in the summer of 2011, where seniors will be welcome (with transportation ! assistance provided) to explore emerging technologies and get customized assistance with everything from PCs to mobile phones. This new citywide intergenerational technology resource center will be opening in the summer of 2011, where seniors will be welcome (with transportation assistance provided) to explore emerging technologies and get customized assistance with everything from PCs to mobile phones. •Free technology training in a computer lab in your district, teaching skills from email and internet to health research and accessing government services online. OATS has over 1,000 pages of proprietary curriculum available in English and Spanish. •Access to Senior Planet digital community resources, including our weekly events calendar, resource guide, videoconferences, and specialized content on health, finances, and other essential topics. This service, available online at www.seniorplanet.org, reaches over 16,000 older adults per year. Free event listings in the Senior Planet calendar are a powerful way for organizations in your district, such as arts and cultural institutions, to reach an audience of thousands. •One-on-one technology support and training at the OATS Exploration Center. This new citywide intergenerational technology resource center will be opening in the summer of 2011, and seniors from your district will be welcome (with transportation assistance provided) to explore emerging technologies and get customized assistance with everything from PCs to mobile phones.

Aging Aging

Levin Mendez

Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc. Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc.

55-0882599 55-0882599

$5,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA Free technology training in community computer labs, teaching skills from email and internet to health research and accessing government services online. Free technology training in a computer lab in your district, teaching skills from email and internet to health research and accessing government services online. Access to Senior Planet digital community resources, including our weekly events calendar, resource guide, videoconferences, and specialized content on health, finances, and other essential topics. One-on-one technology support and training at the OATS Exploration Center. Funding is being requested to support free technology trainings in a computer lab in your district, teaching skills from email and internet to health research and accessing government services online.

Aging

Nelson

Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc.

55-0882599

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Quinn

Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc.

55-0882599

$5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 46 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Vann

Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc.

55-0882599

$12,000 DFTA

•Free technology training in community computer labs, teaching skills from email and internet to health research and accessing government services online. OATS has over 1,000 pages of proprietary curriculum available in English and Spanish. •Access to Senior Planet digital community resources, including our weekly events calendar, resource guide, videoconferences, and specialized content on health, finances, and other essential topics. This service, available online at www.seniorplanet.org, reaches over 16,000 older adults per year. Free event listings in the Senior Planet calendar are a powerful way for organizations, such as arts and cultural institutions, to reach an audience of thousands. •One-on-one technology support and training at the OATS Exploration Center. This new citywide intergenerational technology resource center will be opening in the summer of 2011, where seniors will be welcome (with transportation ! assistance provided) to explore emerging technologies and get customized assistance with everything from PCs to mobile phones. •Free technology training in community computer labs, teaching skills from email and internet to health research and accessing government services online. OATS has over 1,000 pages of proprietary curriculum available in English and Spanish. •Access to Senior Planet digital community resources, including our weekly events calendar, resource guide, videoconferences, and specialized content on health, finances, and other essential topics. This service, available online at www.seniorplanet.org, reaches over 16,000 older adults per year. Free event listings in the Senior Planet calendar are a powerful way for organizations, such as arts and cultural institutions, to reach an audience of thousands. •One-on-one technology support and training at the OATS Exploration Center. This new citywide intergenerational technology resource center will be opening in the summer of 2011, where seniors will be welcome (with transportation ! assistance provided) to explore emerging technologies and get customized assistance with everything from PCs to mobile phones. •Free technology training in community computer labs, teaching skills from email and internet to health research and accessing government services online. OATS has over 1,000 pages of proprietary curriculum available in English and Spanish. •Access to Senior Planet digital community resources, including our weekly events calendar, resource guide, videoconferences, and specialized content on health, finances, and other essential topics. This service, available online at www.seniorplanet.org, reaches over 16,000 older adults per year. Free event listings in the Senior Planet calendar are a powerful way for organizations, such as arts and cultural institutions, to reach an audience of thousands. •One-on-one technology support and training at the OATS Exploration Center. This new citywide intergenerational technology resource center will be opening in the summer of 2011, where seniors will be welcome (with transportation ! assistance provided) to explore emerging technologies and get customized assistance with everything from PCs to mobile phones. To provide a no-cost program which include identifying and enrolling in qualified entitlement programs, providing in home case management services and assistance to victims of abuse.

Aging

Weprin

Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc.

55-0882599 *

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Williams

Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), Inc.

55-0882599

$7,000 DFTA

Aging

Brewer

One Stop Senior Services

13-3174492

$7,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 47 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

One Stop Senior Services provides a no-cost program to over 3,500 senior citizens on the Upper West Side, Services include identifying and enrolling in qualified entitlement programs, providing in home case management services and assistance to victims of physical, emotional and financial abuse. All One Stop’s services enable our seniors to live independently and safely at home in the community, Recently One Stop added a RepresentativePayee service so that seniors who can no longer manage their funds or getting to a bank have the security of knowing that bills will be paid appropriately and on time. Many of the older men and women who use One Stop do not have family nearby and their reliance on One Stop’s quality assistance prevents the trauma and tremendous expense of nursing home placement. One Stop is requesting discretionary funds to support the staff working at the organization, including occupancy, communication, supplies and other expenses related to operations to assure the continuation of the critically needed and free services for our clients. Aging Aging Dickens Mark-Viverito One Stop Senior Services One Stop Senior Services 13-3174492 13-3174492 $5,750 DFTA $5,000 DFTA To provide case management, enrollment assistance and other services for District 8 seniors. to comfort and bond members of the community who have lost a spouse or family member. Also, to provide charity work in the community including feeding the homeless, collecting Gravesend Athletic clothing etc.. We also provide a venue for social activity for members. Association

Aging

Recchia

Our Lady of Grace Roman Catholic Church

11-1694947

$5,000 DFTA

11-3019763

Aging Aging

Recchia Halloran

Our Lady of Grace Roman Catholic Church Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament Church

11-1694947 11-3232246 *

$15,000 DFTA $3,750 DFTA

Our membership exceeds 165 members, serving approximately 120-140 Seniors on any give Tuesday. We welcome all ethnic and religious denominations. We provide the seniors with music for their dancing pleasure, bingo, conversation, and refreshments. Some members prefer to play cards and other games. All holidays are celebrated. Once a month a nurse is avai9lable to take blodd pressure and provide relative information. Gravesend Athletic On occasion speakers from various government agencies discuss pertinent issues. Association Hot buffet lunches, dinner parties at local restaurants. Pizza parties at the meeting place. The Park Slope Senior Center is a not for profit Senior Center that proves Congregate Lunch, assists with Services and entitlements, and proves a variety of day to day acitivies promoting Health and wellness programs (Yoga, Tai Chi, Bodies in Motion and Dancexercise), Educational and recreational activities (Creative Writing, Oil Painting, arts and crafts, speakers, Nurtitional Educational and Computers), Trips, and adult games (bingo, billards, Cards and Dominoes). Due to lack of continual funding the computers instructional part of the program and the condition of existing computer have suffered dramatically. Our Senior Members are constantly inquiring when will they be able start the program again. The center is looking to restore and revitalize our computer program with instruction of basic computer usage, acess with WIFI, show the seniors how to use the internet, webcam, research, secure banking, communicate with relativ! es and friends, the possibilities are endless. They will also learn how to produce flyers, greeting cards, and newsletters. Penn South Program for Senior’s is a NORC Supportive Services Program serving approximately 900 older adults in the Chelsea area of Manhattan. The requested funds will be used to support group service activities; weekly discussion groups, creative arts, yoga and bridge classes.

11-3019763

Aging

Lander

Park Slope Senior Citizens Center, Inc.

11-2334269 *

$4,500 DFTA

Aging

Quinn

Penn South Social Services, Inc.

13-3413349

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 48 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Lander

Pesha Elias Bikur Cholim D'Bobov, Inc.

11-2513453

$12,500 DFTA

The Pesha Elias Bikur Cholim D’Bobov meets the challenges by contributing towards medical expenses of patients who cannot possibly afford the high cost of treatment. We also provide many other social services. The responsibilities of our organization range from providing transportation to and from medical facilities, to arrange home care attendants for bedridden invalids. Our Central Kitchen provides fresh and nutritious home cooked meals for those unable to tend for themselves. Funding will be used to support, operate, and maintain a multi-service senior center facility which is the largest in CB5 and serves approximately 60,000 meals annually, 250 seniors daily, and has a client base of nearly 3000. Funding is necessary to provide supplemental kitchen personnel to provide these meals and an additional case assistant to provide entitlement/benefit assistance to our senior population. Funding is also needed for educational, recreational, and health and wellness programs as well as funding needed for costs related to utilities, printing and supplies, communications, and our transportation program, such as vehicle insurance, fuel, and maintenance and repair. Funding will be used to support, operate, and maintain a multi-service senior center facility which is the largest in CB5 and serves approximately 60,000 meals annually, 250 seniors daily, and has a client base of nearly 3000. Funding is necessary to provide supplemental kitchen personnel to provide these meals and an additional case assistant to provide entitlement/benefit assistance to our senior population. Funding is also needed for educational, recreational, and health and wellness programs as well as funding needed for costs related to utilities, printing and supplies, communications, and our transportation program, such as vehicle insurance, fuel, and maintenance and repair. Phipps CDC requests funding from City Council Member Rosie Mendez to support two initiatives in District 2: 1) senior services at our Naturally Occurring Retirement Community and 2) after-school programming at the Phipps Plazas Youth Program. This proposal focuses on the senior programming. Funding will be used for daily operating expenses for senior nutrition program and daily health and wellness programming. Discretionary funds from Councilmember Inez Dickens will be used to cover the daily operating expenses incurred in providing Harlems elderly residents living around the ADC Ennis Francis Apartments with healthy aging programs, activities and nutritious meals to keep them healthy, engaged and connected. The PSS Highbridge Senior Center is a model center in District 16. 20,000 in Discretionary Funding is requested to be used to cover daily operating expenses for the nutrition program and daily programming (health and wellness activities, educational workshops, socialization, etc.) at the PSS Highbridge Senior Center 10,000 for senior nutrition program (food, utensils, supplies, etc.) 10,000 for healthy aging - exercise classes, fitness center (instructors, materials, etc.)

Aging

Crowley

Peter Cardella Senior Citizen Center, Inc.

11-2328536

$20,510 DFTA

Aging

Reyna

Peter Cardella Senior Citizen Center, Inc.

11-2328536

$20,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Mendez Arroyo

Phipps Community Development Corporation Presbyterian Senior Services

13-2707665 13-1981482

$4,500 DFTA $21,000 DFTA

Aging

Dickens

Presbyterian Senior Services

13-1981482

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Foster

Presbyterian Senior Services

13-1981482

$13,750 DFTA The PSS Parkside Senior Center is a model center - offering nutritious meals and innovative programs to keep area elderly residents healthy, engaged and connected. PSS Parkside requests a total of 12,000 in discretionary funds to cover daily operating e Preston Center of Compassion Senior Run program is a response to a serious need to outreach the senior citizens and homebound in the community. PCC staff responses to the needs of the elderly by providing home visits, transportation for shopping and other cultural activities for trips. Escort services for shopping and medical appointments

Aging

Koppell

Presbyterian Senior Services

13-1981482

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Vacca Brewer

Preston Center of Compassion Project Open, Inc.

57-1180937 13-3744003

$13,750 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 49 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Dromm

Queens Community House, Inc.

11-2375583

$15,000 DFTA

As SAGE/Queens is the only GLBT program for older adults in Queens we need to continue to provide services/programs that are responsive to the needs of the participants. Funds would be used to support the enhancement of the program (SAGE/Queens offers counseling, benefits and entitlement review, support groups in addition to the various educational and recreational programs at the site. As SAGE/Queens is the only GLBT program for older adults in Queens we need to continue to provide services/programs that are responsive to the needs of the participants. Funds would be used to support the enhancement of the program (SAGE/Queens offers counseling, benefits and entitlement review, support groups in addition to the various educational and recreational programs at the site. Funds would be used for the enhancement of programming at Pomonok Senior Center. Money would support educational and recreational activities to be led by exercise, computer and lecture consultants. This support provides crucial funding for the activities that sustain more than 1000 seniors annually that enjoy programs at the site Of this request 18,000 would be used to support the enhancement of programs at Forest Hills Senior Center. The funds would be used for educational and recreational activities to be led by exercise, computer and lecture consultants. In addition, we are requesting 6,000 to help us sustain the Social Adult Day Services program that has helped the frail elderly and their families throughout the borough of Queens since 1983. The Pomonok Senior Social Club was formed to provide socialization and networking opportunities for older adults in the Flushing community. The funds received will be used to cover the cost of food/refreshments for weekly gatherings. Funds will be applied to the purchase of snack items (cookies, cakes, juices, fruit etc.). Supplies and transportation to special event venues will also be covered with these funds as well. Supplies refer to small incentives (gifts of candy) and other disposable items (paper products-plates, cups, forks, knives, clothes etc.). Transportation would be provided for all participants of the social club to be taken to restaurant outings. Funds would be used for the enhancement of programming at Rego Park Senior Center. Money would support educational and recreational activities to be led by exercise/dance, computer and lecture consultants. This support also provides critical funding for activities such as healthy aging, health screenings and falls prevention. This site serves an excess of 33,000 meals annually. Of this request 18,000 would be used to support the enhancement of programs at Forest Hills Senior Center. The funds would be used for educational and recreational activities to be led by exercise, computer and lecture consultants. In addition, we are requesting 6,000 to help us sustain the Social Adult Day Services program that has helped the frail elderly and their families throughout the borough of Queens since 1983.

Aging

Ferreras

Queens Community House, Inc.

11-2375583

$15,000 DFTA

Aging

Gennaro

Queens Community House, Inc.

11-2375583

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Gennaro

Queens Community House, Inc.

11-2375583

$6,000 DFTA

Aging

Gennaro

Queens Community House, Inc.

11-2375583

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Koslowitz

Queens Community House, Inc.

11-2375583

$9,000 DFTA

Aging

Koslowitz

Queens Community House, Inc.

11-2375583

$9,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 50 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The Queens Interagency Council on Aging (QICA) is a non-profit, borough-wide organization that speaks with one voice on behalf of seniors and the agencies that serve them to improve the quality of life, health and arts and cultural enrichment of older adults. With a forty year legacy as the only interagency council in Queens County, QICA’s unique role is to bring together seniors, service providers and elected officials to focus on issues relevant to the aging community. We dialogue about specific necessities like accessible transportation, food and shelter, but we also discuss and advocate for wide-ranging concerns like protecting senior services, and affordable healthcare. QICAs programs directly affect 5,000 people and 100,000 indirectly through our affiliated member organizations. QICA presents nine or more major programs throughout the year. Community participation averages one hundred to one hundred and fifty people monthly and one hundred and fifty to three hundred people for conferences. Programs are free and open to the public. The Program Committee of the Board of Directors selects topics for monthly programs and conferences with input from senior citizens, senior center directors, service professionals and agency members. We strive for balanced presentations from experts in the field. To foster greater community collaboration and the sharing of resources, QICA also invites other organizations that have a compelling interest in senior issues to help plan its programs and participate in conferences and other activities. A summary of major 2010 -2011 programs and accomplishments are as follows: OCT. 28th LEGISLATIVE FORUM, NOV. TRANSPORTATION-ACCESS ADVOCACY, DEC. AGING IN PLACE – VANISHING OPTIONS, FEB. HEALTHCARE OPTIONS –ANSWERS TO YOUR HEALTHCARE CONCERNS, FEB. SR SERVICES THREATENED BY PROPOSED TITLE XX BUDGET CUTS, MAR. 40th ANNIV GALA, APR. SALUTE TO SENIOR SERVICE VOLUNTEERS, MAY. CREATIVE AGING CONF., JUN. QICA YR END MTNG. Aging Comrie Queens Interagency Council on the Aging, Inc. 11-2744700 $5,000 DFTA The Queens Interagency Council on Aging (QICA) is a non-profit, borough-wide organization that speaks with one voice on behalf of seniors and the agencies that serve them to improve the quality of life, health and arts and cultural enrichment of older adults. Aging Koslowitz Queens Interagency Council on the Aging, Inc. 11-2744700 $5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 51 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The Queens Interagency Council on Aging (QICA) is a non-profit, borough-wide organization that speaks with one voice on behalf of seniors and the agencies that serve them to improve the quality of life, health and arts and cultural enrichment of older adults. With a forty year legacy as the only interagency council in Queens County, QICA’s unique role is to bring together seniors, service providers and elected officials to focus on issues relevant to the aging community. We dialogue about specific necessities like accessible transportation, food and shelter, but we also discuss and advocate for wide-ranging concerns like protecting senior services, and affordable healthcare. QICAs programs directly affect 5,000 people and 100,000 indirectly through our affiliated member organizations. QICA presents nine or more major programs throughout the year. Community participation averages one hundred to one hundred and fifty people monthly and one hundred and fifty to three hundred people for conferences. Programs are free and open to the public. The Program Committee of the Board of Directors selects topics for monthly programs and conferences with input from senior citizens, senior center directors, service professionals and agency members. We strive for balanced presentations from experts in the field. To foster greater community collaboration and the sharing of resources, QICA also invites other organizations that have a compelling interest in senior issues to help plan its programs and participate in conferences and other activities. A summary of major 2010 -2011 programs and accomplishments are as follows: OCT. 28th LEGISLATIVE FORUM, NOV. TRANSPORTATION-ACCESS ADVOCACY, DEC. AGING IN PLACE – VANISHING OPTIONS, FEB. HEALTHCARE OPTIONS –ANSWERS TO YOUR HEALTHCARE CONCERNS, FEB. SR SERVICES THREATENED BY PROPOSED TITLE XX BUDGET CUTS, MAR. 40th ANNIV GALA, APR. SALUTE TO SENIOR SERVICE VOLUNTEERS, MAY. CREATIVE AGING CONF., JUN. QICA YR END MTNG. Aging Vallone Queens Interagency Council on the Aging, Inc. 11-2744700 $3,500 DFTA Senior services that include medical insurance facilitation for Medicaid and Medicare and for senior programming. QJCC will use part of the funds to enhance its Kosher meals-on-wheels program to the frail and home bound and for its Kosher Food Pantry. The purpose of the Elder Abuse and Domestic Violence Awareness Project is to inform both public and professionals about issues of domestic violence, abuse of people with disabilities, and elder abuse. While there is a strong cadre of people with well developed skills and a strong knowledge base, many in both the professional and the public communities are unaware of these issues. Funds will be used to plan, promote, and administer Health and Safety in the Home and the Community Fairs for seniors within the district. Seniors in St. Albans, Hollis, Cambria Heights, Jamaica, Baisley Park and Queens Village will be specifically served. Trainings will be offered to professionals from throughout the borough. Funds will be used to plan, promote, and administer Health and Safety in the Home and the Community Fairs for seniors within the 24th councilmatic district. Seniors in the Fresh Meadows, Hillcrest, Forest Hills, Flushing, Jamaica and Rego Park communities will be specifically served. Trainings will be offered to professionals from throughout the borough. Additionally, Neighbor News, our community newsletter, will contain important information on issues of health and safety. The QCSW Senior Employment Program places low income people, 55 and older, in not-forprofit agencies and government offices in order to gain work skills, in preparation for nonsubsidized work.

Aging

Halloran

Queens Jewish Community Council, Inc.

23-7172152

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Comrie

Queensboro Council for Social Welfare, Inc.

11-1817497

$10,000 DFTA

Aging

Gennaro

Queensboro Council for Social Welfare, Inc.

11-1817497

$6,000 DFTA

Aging

Koslowitz

Queensboro Council for Social Welfare, Inc.

11-1817497

$2,350 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 52 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Ulrich

Queensboro Council for Social Welfare, Inc.

11-1817497

$3,750 DFTA

The purpose of the Elder Abuse and Domestic Violence Awareness Project is to inform both public and professionals about issues of domestic violence, abuse of people with disabilities, and elder abuse. While there is a strong cadre of people with well developed skills and a strong knowledge base, many in both the professional and the public communities are unaware of these issues. Funds will be used to plan, promote, and administer Health and Safety in the Home and the Community Fairs for seniors within the district. Seniors in Howard Beach, Ozone Park and Woodhaven will be specifically served. Trainings will be offered to professionals from throughout the borough. The purpose of the Elder Abuse and Domestic Violence Awareness Project is to inform both public and professionals about issues of domestic violence, abuse of people with disabilities, and elder abuse. While there is a strong cadre of people with well developed skills and a strong knowledge base, many in both the professional and the public communities are unaware of these issues. Funds will be used to plan, promote, and administer Health and Safety in the Home and the Community Fairs for seniors within the district. Seniors in Astoria and Long Island City will be specifically served. Trainings will be offered to professionals from throughout the borough. The purpose of the Elder Abuse and Domestic Violence Awareness Project is to inform both public and professionals about issues of domestic violence, abuse of people with disabilities, and elder abuse. While there is a strong cadre of people with well developed skills and a strong knowledge base, many in both the professional and the public communities are unaware of these issues. Funds will be used to plan, promote, and administer Health and Safety in the Home and the Community Fairs for seniors within the district. Seniors in Bayside, Little Neck, Douglaston and Queens Village will be specifically served. Trainings will be offered to professionals from throughout the borough. All funding requested will support services provided by the Middle Village Adult Center, a senior citizens center. These include but are not limited to: Daily freshly prepared hot lunches, round trip tranportation services for senior citizens to and from doctors offices, medical facilities, food shopping and this senior center. Full schedule of popular and evidence based health promotion and education/recreation activities including: Aerobics to music, Sit and Be Fit, Line Dancing, Fall Prevention: Tai Chi and Qi Gong, Yoga, Zumba Gold, Zumba Toning, Pilates, Watercolor Painting, Singing, Bingo, Bus Trips, Parties, AARP Driver Refresher Course, health related/educational/legal awareness seminars, Multi-level Computer Training Program. All funding requested will support services provided by the Middle Village Adult Center, a senior citizens center. The Center will provide essential services to pormote the socialization and well-being of seniors. The funds will support the RAIN Tolentine Senior Center. College Seniors Center provides seniors the opportunity to congregate with each other for breakfast and lunch. we provide educational programs, and activities to maintain their health. These activities consist of aerobics, karate, and walking clubs. Assist seniors in accessing and recertifying for all benefits and entitlements such as Food Stamps, Medicaid, HEAP, Housing, etc: Advocacy with landlords and tenants issues; Translate documents and others. RAIN Parkchester Senior Center and we service within our community. We have an array of activities: Congregate breakfast, congregate lunch, case assistants, medicaid assist, education rec., and nutrion rec.

Aging

Vallone

Queensboro Council for Social Welfare, Inc.

11-1817497

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Weprin

Queensboro Council for Social Welfare, Inc.

11-1817497 *

$5,000 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging Aging

Crowley Koslowitz Cabrera Cabrera

Rabbi Israel Meyer Hacohen Rabbinical Seminary of America, Inc. Rabbi Israel Meyer Hacohen Rabbinical Seminary of America, Inc. Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc. Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc.

11-1752021 11-1752021 13-6213586 13-6213586

$20,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA $25,000 DFTA $25,000 DFTA

Aging

Foster

Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc.

13-6213586

$6,000 DFTA

Aging

Palma

Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc.

13-6213586

$7,250 DFTA

Aging

Palma

Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc.

13-6213586

$7,250 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 53 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Rodriguez Seabrook

Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc. Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc.

13-6213586 13-6213586

$10,000 DFTA $7,000 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging Aging

Seabrook Seabrook Vacca Vacca

Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc. Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc. Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc. Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc.

13-6213586 13-6213586 13-6213586 13-6213586

$11,000 DFTA $33,750 DFTA $5,000 DFTA $10,000 DFTA

Center will provide social, cultural and recreational activies as well as intergenerational program to help reduce isolation among seniors, promote their stregths. Funds will be used to support intergenerational programs as well as as social, sultural and recreational activities for seniors. Boston Secor senior Center is a full service center providing nutitious congregate meals, social and recreational activities, and transportation services to seniors who are 60 or older living in the Community Board District 12 area. Funds will be used to support intergenerational programs as well as social cultural and recreational activities for seniors. The funds will be for social, cultural and recreational activites and programs for seniors. Services that will be funded are ceramics and oil paiting instructors - 3,500. 6,500 for printing and supplies. Our program serve the Elderly population with healthy and nutritious meals as well as activities. The funding will be used for consultant fees for the following: computer classes, exercise and aerobics as well as other cultural events. The Retirees of Dreiser Loop,Inc. are an active organization who have been serving the senior community since 1972. The Retirees are a group of seniors with mutual interests, seeking an outlet for their social needs and a forum in which to address community and senior issues and concerns.We currently serve 350 seniors providing health educational workshops, social activities and travel opportunities. Project Share Housing Program for Low Income Seniors Funding will support the Richmond Senior Services Food Pantry Information Center, located at 498 Jewett Avenue, Staten Island. The pantry provides emergency food at no cost to Staten Island residents in need, plus referrals to other community services and entitlements. It currently serves 1200 persons each month. Recipients can access food supplies once a month, with quantities according to the size of their family. Foods are selected from shelves according to preferences and dietary needs. Fresh meats and vegetables are available, as well as recipes, cooking advice and cooking demonstrations. Prescreening for food stamps and other entitlements are also available. Funding will be used to support occupancy costs -rent and utilities. Provide community senior citizens with assistance in applying for and maintaining all benefits and entitlements they are eligible to receive, i.e. Food Stamps, Medicaid, Medicare Savings Program, Medicare Part D plans, HEAP, IT214, NYC 210, SCRIE, EPIC, Metrocards, Access-A-Ride to name a few. We are totally committed to our senior citizen population and are proud of the fact that no senior has ever been turned away from our program. To provide services that include nutritious meals and case assistance instructional classes. To provide services that include nutritious meals and case assistance instructional classes. RBSCC requests funding for transportation, food, and supplies for their annual senior picnic at Sunken Meadow State Park the funds will be uswd to maintain the building and services that go on in the building. 1 the maintenance and upkeep of equiptment 2 the purchase of shopping center certificates for the food pantry program 3 rent and utilities

Aging

Vacca

Regional Aid for Interim Needs, Inc.

13-6213586

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Seabrook Oddo

Retirees of Dreiser Loop , Inc., The Richmond Senior Services, Inc.

01-0677804 13-6217080

$48,000 DFTA $8,000 DFTA

Aging

Rose

Richmond Senior Services, Inc.

13-6217080

$7,750 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging Aging

Crowley Dilan Dilan Levin

Ridgewood Bushwick Senior Citizens Council, Inc. Ridgewood Bushwick Senior Citizens Council, Inc. Ridgewood Bushwick Senior Citizens Council, Inc. Ridgewood Bushwick Senior Citizens Council, Inc.

11-2453853 11-2453853 11-2453853 11-2453853

$16,000 DFTA $10,000 DFTA $16,875 DFTA $10,000 DFTA

Aging

Crowley

Ridgewood Older Adult Center and Services, Inc.

05-0607283

$20,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 54 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Reyna Vann

Ridgewood Older Adult Center and Services, Inc. Risley Dent Towers Senior Program

05-0607283 03-0488703

$25,000 DFTA $4,000 DFTA

the funds will be uswd to maintain the building and services that go on in the building. 1 the maintenance and upkeep of equiptment 2 the purchase of shopping center certificates for the food pantry program 3 rent and utilities Daily senior program which includes arts crafts, trips, workshops, lunch, meet greets, invited speakers. The RNH Telephone Reassurance Program provides daily phone calls to homebound older adults to make sure they remain connected to the community and that they are safe. The calls are made by volunteers who are, themselves, older adults. Senior Center meals and services including health related services. Exercise classes, health education and services provided by an RN to educate and support seniors living with chronic diseases. Riverstone provides the only programming in northern Manhattan that is dedicated to serving people with memory loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, or other conditions. Our two dual-language programs provide daily activities for people with memory loss significant enough to interfere with independent living and for people in the very early stage of memory loss. Together with supports for caregivers, our Memory Center helps prevent unnecessary nursing home placement, enabling families to stay together, in the community, where they want to be. The Memory Center provides therapeutic activities - music, art, writing, movement therapy, exercise - in a safe, nurturing environment; specialized memory enhancement techniques; support groups for caregivers in both Spanish and English; casework services for families to help them with benefits and provide emotional support; and educational forums regarding Alzheimer’s disease for the community. Participants are less depressed and in better physical and mental health because they become involved with friends and enjoy stimulating, therapeutic activities. At the same time, families learn better ways of handling difficult behaviors - repetitive questioning, angry outbursts, wandering – which helps relieve their stress so they are able to keep their loved one at home longer. Most caregiving is done by families so caregiver support is an extremely important function of our program. Riverstone has always relied on public support in order to accept people into its memory programs for a much lower fee that the actual cost of 80/day. Without support from our elected officials, this policy and our ability to meet the growing needs in our community, will be put at risk. Demographic trends show that people over the age of 85 are the fastest growing segment of our population and the incidence of memory loss increases with age. Therefore our Memory Center programs are more important than ever.

Bedford Stuyvesant Family Health Center

11-2412205

Aging

Koppell

Riverdale Neighborhood House, Inc.

13-1740024

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Koppell

Riverdale Senior Services. Inc,

23-7357997 *

$30,750 DFTA

Aging

Jackson

Riverstone Senior Life Services, Inc.

13-3355074

$9,625 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 55 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Riverstone provides the only programming in northern Manhattan that is dedicated to serving people with memory loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, or other conditions. Our two dual-language programs provide daily activities for people with memory loss significant enough to interfere with independent living and for people in the very early stage of memory loss. Together with supports for caregivers, our Memory Center helps prevent unnecessary nursing home placement, enabling families to stay together, in the community, where they want to be. The Memory Center provides therapeutic activities - music, art, writing, movement therapy, exercise - in a safe, nurturing environment; specialized memory enhancement techniques; support groups for caregivers in both Spanish and English; casework services for families to help them with benefits and provide emotional support; and educational forums regarding Alzheimer’s disease for the community. Participants are less depressed and in better physical and mental health because they become involved with friends and enjoy stimulating, therapeutic activities. At the same time, families learn better ways of handling difficult behaviors - repetitive questioning, angry outbursts, wandering – which helps relieve their stress so they are able to keep their loved one at home longer. Most caregiving is done by families so caregiver support is an extremely important function of our program. Riverstone has always relied on public support in order to accept people into its memory programs for a much lower fee that the actual cost of 80/day. Without support from our elected officials, this policy and our ability to meet the growing needs in our community, will be put at risk. Demographic trends show that people over the age of 85 are the fastest growing segment of our population and the incidence of memory loss increases with age. Therefore our Memory Center programs are more important than ever. Funds will be used to restore monies removed from the budget by DFTA for fiscal year 2012. Money will be used for our congregate meal program which provides nutritous hot meals that our seniors depend on to remain healthy. This money will also allow the center to continue using consultants for our health wellness program,nutrition awareness and exercise programs. Funding will be allocated for printing/supplies and equipment needed to support the workshops, activities and educational seminars at the center. Social activities, bus trips will also be provided to encourage daily interaction with peers so the seniors remain vibrant and independent in their community. In 2010, RIDA wishes to support its 10 members who play wheelchair basketball. The team must pay rental fees for facilities to practice and play games and pay for travel to local games and regional tournaments. The Roosevelt island Senior Center is a nonprofit organization, that provides exercise classes, congregate lunch, home delivered lunch, casework services, edcuational classes, and computer classes to the senior citizens on Roosevelt Island. We have been servicing seniors for over 40 years. We aren athletic organization to help maintain the quality of life for seniors. We provide trips, exercise, and information encessary for seniors to maintain a good quality of life.

Aging

Rodriguez

Riverstone Senior Life Services, Inc.

13-3355074

$10,000 DFTA

Aging

Wills

Rochdale Village Social Services, Inc.

11-3397470

$20,000 DFTA

Aging

Lappin

Roosevelt Island Disabled Association

13-3251193

$6,000 DFTA

Aging

Lappin

Roosevelt Island Seniors Association (RISA), Inc.

13-3047204

$25,000 DFTA

Aging

Comrie

Roy Wilkins Senior Dolphins

13-1592005 *

$5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 56 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Van Bramer

Samaritan Village, Inc.

11-2635374

$36,050 DFTA

The Woodside Senior Center will use the requested funds in three areas, Healthy Initiatives 24,000; Mothers Day and Holiday Celebrations 19,750, and Case Work Assistance 40,000. Healthy Initiatives encompasses three programs; 1. Yoga Training Consultant: 2,860. This program helps those seniors with limited mobility learn how to stretch and move and be more flexible. Physical Fitness Trainer: 3,120. Provides exercise classes geared to seniors and their needs. Senior Trips: 5,000. This money will be used to charter buses for various Day Trips during the year. The remainder of the funds 13,020 will be used to provided healthy and nutritious meals. Mothers Day/Hoilday Celebrations: 19,750. This will fund our two annual celebrations, which are held for Center members. Holidays are at times difficult for seniors who are alone and these celebrations with their friends are a great help. Case Work Assistance: 40,000, this will provide f! unds for an On-site Social Worker who will also assist as a benefit/entitlement counselor. CAPE is the only regionalized, fully licensed and third party reimbursable Geriatric Menetal Health Clinic in Queens. Last year, CAPE provided home-based and clinic-based mental health services to 530 clients over the age of fifty residing throughout Queens, who were experiencing the challenges and difficulties of living with a mental disorder. Approximately 70 of the clients served geographically clustered in the communities of Eastern Queens. In addition, the CAPE Program provides a myriad of related services which are critical to its extremely vulnerable population. This program will provides seniors over the age of sixty who reside in the greater Clearview,Whitestone, Le Harve, Bay Terrace, and Flushing Communites with a dedicated transportation service (one full-size passenger van with 14 seats, easy access and in full compliance with prevailing regulations) to be transported from their homes to local shopping centers, pysician appointments, banks, Senior centers, pharmacies and other important destinations within their communites. From Monday thru Friday the availability of consistent reliable and easily arranged transportation(arrangements can be made by phone and door to door pick-ups and drop-offs will be made) will assist these seniors in neighborhoods that historically have been underserved by city and private surface transportaion systems to remain living comfortably in their community while maintaining their independence and dignity. we aim to provide a forum for neighborhood seniors to meet and socialize. we provide coffee and cake daily and hot lunch twice a week. we also try to go out for monthly birthday dinners and organize special events such as holiday parties. Say Ah! seeks funding to continue to bring our health literacy programming to seniors at senior centers, AND to expand our work to serve other vulnerable populations at places convenient to them so that more people gain the skills needed to manage their health and health care in todays complex health care environment. Funding will support Search and Care's core care management services to assist and advocate for the elderly living on the East Side, including a money management program, assistance for seniors accessing healthcare, and providing companionship and socialization activities. Support will enable Search and Care to continue providing comprehensive, professional financial care and advocacy, performed by our Financial Care Specialist (an MBA) for an increasing sector of vulnerable and more indigent elders. To provide no-fee, in-home care management services for vulnerable seniors in East Harlem.

Aging

Gennaro

Samuel Field YM & YWHA, Inc.

11-3071518

$15,000 DFTA

Aging

Halloran

Samuel Field YM & YWHA, Inc.

11-3071518

$20,000 DFTA

Aging

Vacca

San Gennaro Senior Center

43-2061329

$10,500 DFTA

Aging

Quinn

Say Ah!, Inc.

20-8663409

$6,750 DFTA

Aging

Garodnick

Search and Care, Inc.

23-7444790

$3,500 DFTA

Stanley M. Isaacs Neighborhood Center, Inc.

13-2572034

Aging Aging

Lappin Mark-Viverito

Search and Care, Inc. Search and Care, Inc.

23-7444790 23-7444790

$4,500 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 57 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Arroyo

SEBCO Development, Inc.

13-2944013

$14,000 DFTA

To provide daily hot lunches, case management, recreational activities, educationl activities, classes, bus trips and physical fitness programs. We provide social services, apply for benefits, home care, counseling on a walk-in basis to frail and elderly in CD 2. We advocate for elderly in nursing homes and hospitals,provide outreach to home bound frail elderly to enable them to remain at home, making home visits. To provide services to specific needs for seniors, enabling them to live independently in their own homes.

Aging

Mendez

Self Reliance Association of American Ukrainians, Inc.

13-5629116 *

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Brewer

Selfhelp Community Services, Inc.

13-1624178

$3,500 DFTA

Aging

Crowley

Selfhelp Community Services, Inc.

13-1624178

$17,240 DFTA

The Selfhelp Maspeth Senior Center offers innovative programming for seniors in Council District 30. Our request for funding this year will be used to benefit the following programs The need for Evidence Based Health Promotion through the Art Program (3,180) We have seen extremely positive results with our Art program. Participants have taken fewer medications, made fewer doctors visits, and experience less depression. 3,180 will help cover current Art Instructor and supply costs. Increased availability of Yoga Sessions (8670) The “Young Old” who frequent our center often still work and therefore there is demand for Yoga sessions held at night and during non working hours which this grant will enable us to provide. Increased Tai Chi Sessions (4668)Our Tai Chi sessions have seen a very positive response and there is demand for addition classes. Currently we are also offering Tai Chi after hours from 7-8 pm on Thursday night after we found there was a desire for it within the surrounding community. This class also is popular with the often still employed “Young Old. Computer Education (722)The elderly have a need for computer education. Computer skills help with cognitive discipline, and within the community we have seen a desire for computer skills that stretch beyond just emailing or web surfing. We have a need for beginning and advanced instruction.

Selfhelps Case Management Programs tailor services to specific needs for seniors, improving their quality of life and enabling them to live independently in their own homes. Our Selfhelp Project Pilot attends to the needs of seniors over 60 living Manhattans Community Districts 4 and 7. Among the services offered are: Screening for all entitlements and benefits such as Food Stamps, Medicaid and Senior Citizen Rent Increase Exemption (SCRIE) Application assistance Advocacy This year we are asking for a grant to help us to do Heavy Duty Cleaning for clients (5,000) As our senior clients become frailer, household chores become tremendously challenging and difficult to perform. For example, cleaning ovens, washing floors, dusting and cleaning closets can be very strenuous for the elderly. The health implications are significant, as cluttered spaces make dangerous falls more likely and cal lower seniors’ immunity to lifethreatening diseases. By providing heavy duty cleaning services, we seek to alleviate these difficulties and challenges, and make sure that our older clients have access to services that keep their homes, clean, uncluttered and safe. Aging Dickens Selfhelp Community Services, Inc. 13-1624178 $4,250 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 58 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Selfhelp Community Services Northridge/Brulene/Southridge NORC provides case management, social work, transportation, wellness and other congregate services to Senior residents of the Northridge/Brulene/Southridge apt. buildings. Social work is the linchpin of Selfhelp’s NORC model. The social worker assesses seniors’ physical, social, and mental health needs, and manages their referral to both on-site and offsite services, including: home care, meals-on-wheels, housekeeping, health care, education, recreation, transportation, volunteer opportunities, health promotion activities, entitlements programs, and other special programs. These services are designed to provide elders with help that will allow them to live independently in their own homes and continue to participate in community activities. The Northridge/Brulene/Southridge social worker is well-known to NORC clients. Over time, she has developed strong relationships with them, which enhance her ability to manage their care. We request funding to maintain her time on campus at 5 days a week, as we did last year. The extra funding will enable her to provide daily home visits, daily falls prevention assessments, and daily information and referral services. The moments immediately following a fall or medical emergency are crucial, and if the victim is unable to get to a telephone, the consequences can be serious. Thus, for seniors who live alone, the ability to call for help in an emergency is essential to their safety. A Personal Emergency Response System is an electronic device designed to allow elderly and disabled people to more easily summon help in an emergency. Currently, Selfhelp subsidizes a percentage of the ongoing cost of this service to make it affordable for NORC residents. The renewal of funding to Nothridge/Brulene/Southridge NORC will allow us to subsidize PERS services for more than 35 seniors. Due to the addition of new buildings to the NORC Program, this is very much neede The Selfhelp Clearview Senior Center is an important gathering place for seniors seeking nutritional meals, mental health and benefit services, and wellness programming in Bayside and Northeat Queens. The Center is seeking funding to enhance its wellness programming through such activities as Qi Gong, Tai Chi, Dance Fitness, Music Appreciation, Arts and Crafts, and Bridge. All of these activities can demonstrate positive outcomes on our seniors physical well being, balance, circulation, mental accuity and strength. Funding will cover supplies and the cost of instructors Justification for fund requests: Selfhelp Benjamin Rosenthal Prince Street Senior Center has an unduplicated membership of over 1000 people, among which, over 90 are elderly Asian immigrants. Funding will go towards the costs of these most valuable programs. Multi-Ethnic seniors from throughout the Flushing area attend our center for its mix of educational opportunities, meals, and congregate activities. Funding from the City Council will be for: ESL Instruction. The generous funding granted through the City for the past 12 years has enabled Selfhelp to implement its mission in District 29 by helping elderly residents retain their independence, remain in their homes, and stay active in their communities. The Selfhelp Maspeth Senior Center runs a transportation program for our seniors.

Aging

Dromm

Selfhelp Community Services, Inc.

13-1624178

$7,500 DFTA

Aging

Halloran

Selfhelp Community Services, Inc.

13-1624178

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Koo

Selfhelp Community Services, Inc.

13-1624178

$15,000 DFTA

Aging

Koo

Selfhelp Community Services, Inc.

13-1624178

$11,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Koslowitz Koslowitz

Selfhelp Community Services, Inc. Selfhelp Community Services, Inc.

13-1624178 13-1624178

$32,400 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 59 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Selfhelp’s Kensington office has beenPurpose ofhub for vulnerable Brooklyn seniors for 30 a one-stop Funds years. The Kensington office currently provides a wide range of services to nearly 2,000 Brooklyn seniors. These include: • in-home or in office assessment of all potential needs; •screening for over 40 entitlements and benefits; • assistance in making applications; • short term counseling for information and referral; • case advocacy and follow-up calls; • mental health assessment and referral; and, • ongoing visits, in-home or in-office. The Kensington site also holds community health events, such as those for flu shots and memory clinics. In addition, the program provides access to legal services, cash assistance grants, financial management services, and transportation to and from medical appointments. We request funding to partially pay the salary of a chore worker. Every two weeks, the choreworker visits the client and cleans for two hours. Beyond cleaning, many clients enjoy her company; for those clients who are very isolated this is an important side benefit of services. In addition, the chore services provider has received explicit training for the position, and is bound by a detailed job description and set of guidelines. Her responsibilities include: (-) Changing bed linens, washing and ironing clients laundry, and cleaning clients apartments. (-) Participating in the scheduling of appointments and reporting all problems and issues to supervisor. (-) Performing other duties as assigned during non-scheduled appointment times. (-) Maintaining records of services provided and of apparent condition of client.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Lander

Selfhelp Community Services, Inc.

13-1624178

$5,000 DFTA The Selfhelp Queensview/ North Queensview Naturally Occuring Retirement Community serves seniors residing in the Queensview/North Queensview apts. This funding would benefit these residents of the 22nd Council District in the following way: Personal Emergency Response System- 5,000 The moments immediately following a fall or medical emergency are crucial, and if the victim is unable to get to a telephone, the consequences can be serious. For frail seniors who live alone, the ability to call for help in an emergency is essential to their safety. A Personal Emergency Response System (PERS) is an electronic device designed to allow elderly and disabled people to more easily summon help in an emergency. The tenants receiving these services live alone and would not be able to afford advanced safety net technology like PERS on their own. In addition to installation costs, these systems require monthly monitoring fees that are not supported by Medicare or by most insurance providers. Your continued support will allow our tenants, as well as their family members and caregivers, to continue enjoying the additional safety and peace of mind that this service provides. Car Service- 6,000 Transportation is in great demand among our frail seniors at Selfhelp Queensview/North Queensview NORC, as it enables them to go about their daily lives with greater freedom and independence. Selfhelp contracts with a taxi company to provide car service that enables seniors to attend their doctor appointments, visit family and friends, make shopping trips, and attend memorial services. Many of our frail seniors have age-related physical limitations, such as poor vision and hearing, respiratory conditions, and/or cognitive impairments, which make it very difficult to utilize public transportation. The cab company provides rides to seniors at half-fare, and charges the remainder to the program.

Aging

Vallone

Selfhelp Community Services, Inc.

13-1624178

$7,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 60 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Vann

Senior Ambassador Volunteer Initiative

26-3880415

$20,750 DFTA

To provide programming that protects seniors from social isolation and to organize and educate seniors on important issues affecting them Funds are used to enhance program activities for our members. These include Health and Wellness programs such as YOGA and Excercise, Dance classes, Blood Pressure screening, Nutirition lectures and screening, Discussion groups on topics such as Mental and Physical Health; Current Events; Pshycology etc., Other programs include ESL classes for our Asian and Russian members, Computer classes Arts Crafts, Dance and Music enrichment; Cultural Exchanges and much more including a special program for the Deaf Elderly. Funds are used to enhance program activities for our members. These include Health and Wellness programs such as YOGA and Excercise, Dance classes, Blood Pressure screening, Nutirition lectures and screening, Discussion groups on topics such as Mental and Physical Health; Current Events; Pshycology etc., Other programs include ESL classes for our Asian and Russian members, Computer classes Arts Crafts, Dance and Music enrichment; Cultural Exchanges and much more including a special program for the Deaf Elderly. Funds are used to enhance program activities for our members. These include Health and Wellness programs such as YOGA and Excercise, Dance classes, Blood Pressure screenings and much more including a special program for the Deaf Elderly. Our Mission: to help the disabled and elderly remain in the community with safety and security by providing entitlements that enable them to have financial security. These may include a wide range of entitlements and benefits such as rent relief, Food Stamps, SSI, drug plans, housing, tax credits and a host of other services that provide financial stability. Our second mission to help keep benefits in place. Our agency has on-site applications available so clients do not have to go to different offices for help. These funds will be used to pay for our social work staff that provide direct services to our clients. Funding will enable SPOP to provide more services to hard-to-reach and underserved older adults throughout Manhattan through our programs.

Fort Greene Council Inc

11-2300840

Aging

Greenfield

Senior Citizens League of Flatbush, Inc.

11-2347331

$7,500 DFTA

Aging

Lander

Senior Citizens League of Flatbush, Inc.

11-2347331

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Nelson

Senior Citizens League of Flatbush, Inc.

11-2347331

$4,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Jackson Brewer

Seniors Helping Seniors, Inc. Service Program for Older People, Inc. (SPOP)

13-3111915 13-2947616

$6,500 DFTA $4,500 DFTA

Funds will enable SPOP to provide more services to hard-to-reach and underserved older adults throughout Manhattan through our programs: • POP will provide mental health counseling through its Clinic. SPOP gives their clients the S emotional support, counseling, and connection to the other crucial resources they need so that they may age in place in their community and avoid costly institutionalization. • POP will expand services to older adults who are homebound due to psychological and/or S physical disabilities. SPOP is one of the only organizations to provide comprehensive mental health services in the client’s home and designated senior sites. SPOP’s services to homebound older adults include assessments, medication management and counseling. By providing mental health services at-home, SPOP enables underserved, homebound older adults to have ready access to geriatric mental health professionals and to receive treatment that would otherwise not be available to them. • POP will enhance services for Spanish-speaking older adults. Services are provided at S senior sites in Manhattan, at SPOP’s West 91th Street Clinic and at-home if the older adult is unable to travel due to psychological or physical problems. Aging Aging Aging Dickens Garodnick Lappin Service Program for Older People, Inc. (SPOP) Service Program for Older People, Inc. (SPOP) Service Program for Older People, Inc. (SPOP) 13-2947616 13-2947616 13-2947616 $6,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA $3,500 DFTA Funding will support mental health counseling for seniors both at its clinic, as well as for seniors who are homebound. Funds will enable SPOP to provide more services to hard-to-reach and underserved older adults throughout Manhattan through our programs.

Aging Discretionary

Page 61 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Mark-Viverito

Service Program for Older People, Inc. (SPOP)

13-2947616

$5,000 DFTA

To provide mental health counseling to District 8 seniors, services to the homebound and to expand services to Spanish-speaking older adults. To support essential SAGE programs and services and subsidize significant overhead in delivering these services, including rent, utilities, and other-than-personnel expenses. To support essential SAGE programs and subsidize significant overhead in delivering these services. On behalf of the board, staff, clients, members, and volunteers of Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE), I am writing to request 5,000 in member item funding for FY11-12. As with funds provided by other New York City Council members, your grant will support essential SAGE programs and services in your district and citywide. Two-thirds of our clients are low income or poor, with annual incomes of 20,000 or less. Because SAGE offers most of our programs and services for free, we incur significant overhead in delivering these services, including rent, utilities, and other-than-personnel expenses. Member item support is particularly useful in helping us meet these expenses, many of which are not covered by private sources such as foundation grants. SAGE is the nation’s oldest and largest non-profit organization providing direct services and advocacy for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults. Since 1978, SAGE has pioneered social services, congregate services, and community building programs that tangibly improve the quality of life for LGBT older people in New York City. Likewise, our education and advocacy programs have raised visibility and awareness of LGBT aging concerns among mainstream providers, thus making key services more accessible for an underserved population that has endured a lifetime of discrimination. SAGE offers the most comprehensive slate of direct services for LGBT older adults in New York City, and our constituents in every district in the city. We hope you will consider joining your fellow New York City Council members by generously supporting SAGE through member item funding in FY11-12. Your support is vital in helping us fulfill our mission of ensuring that the marginalized and disenfranchised older adults in New York City’s LGBT community will age with dignity and respect. Thank you for your consideration.

Aging Aging

Brewer Chin

Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, Inc. (SAGE) Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, Inc. (SAGE)

13-2947657 13-2947657

$3,500 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

Aging

Dickens

Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, Inc. (SAGE)

13-2947657

$5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 62 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

On behalf of the board, staff, clients, members, and volunteers of Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE), I am writing to request 5,000 in member item funding for FY11-12. As with funds provided by other New York City Council members, your grant will support essential SAGE programs and services in your district and citywide. Two-thirds of our clients are low income or poor, with annual incomes of 20,000 or less. Because SAGE offers most of our programs and services for free, we incur significant overhead in delivering these services, including rent, utilities, and other-than-personnel expenses. Member item support is particularly useful in helping us meet these expenses, many of which are not covered by private sources such as foundation grants. SAGE is the nation’s oldest and largest non-profit organization providing direct services and advocacy for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults. Since 1978, SAGE has pioneered social services, congregate services, and community building programs that tangibly improve the quality of life for LGBT older people in New York City. Likewise, our education and advocacy programs have raised visibility and awareness of LGBT aging concerns among mainstream providers, thus making key services more accessible for an underserved population that has endured a lifetime of discrimination. SAGE offers the most comprehensive slate of direct services for LGBT older adults in New York City, and our constituents in every district in the city. We hope you will consider joining your fellow New York City Council members by generously supporting SAGE through member item funding in FY11-12. Your support is vital in helping us fulfill our mission of ensuring that the marginalized and disenfranchised older adults in New York City’s LGBT community will age with dignity and respect. Thank you for your consideration. On behalf of the board, staff, clients, members, and volunteers of Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE), I am writing to request 5,000 in member item funding for FY11-12. As with funds provided by other New York City Council members, your grant will support essential SAGE programs and services in your district and citywide. Two-thirds of our clients are low income or poor, with annual incomes of 20,000 or less. Because SAGE offers most of our programs and services for free, we incur significant overhead in delivering these services, including rent, utilities, and other-than-personnel expenses. Member item support is particularly useful in helping us meet these expenses, many of which are not covered by private sources such as foundation grants. SAGE is the nation’s oldest and largest non-profit organization providing direct services and advocacy for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults. Since 1978, SAGE has pioneered social services, congregate services, and community building programs that tangibly improve the quality of life for LGBT older people in New York City. Likewise, our education and advocacy programs have raised visibility and awareness of LGBT aging concerns among mainstream providers, thus making key services more accessible for an underserved population that has endured a lifetime of discrimination. SAGE offers the most comprehensive slate of direct services for LGBT older adults in New York City, and our constituents in every district in the city. We hope you will consider joining your fellow New York City Council members by generously supporting SAGE through member item funding in FY11-12. Your support is vital in helping us fulfill our mission of ensuring that the marginalized and disenfranchised older adults in New York City’s LGBT community will age with dignity and respect. Thank you for your consideration.

Aging

Jackson

Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, Inc. (SAGE)

13-2947657

$3,500 DFTA

Aging

Lander

Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, Inc. (SAGE)

13-2947657

$3,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 63 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging Aging

Lappin Mark-Viverito Mendez

Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, Inc. (SAGE) Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, Inc. (SAGE) Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, Inc. (SAGE)

13-2947657 13-2947657 13-2947657

$5,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

Aging

Quinn

Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, Inc. (SAGE)

13-2947657

$7,500 DFTA

As with funds provided by other New York City Council members, your grant will support essential SAGE programs and services in your district and citywide. Two-thirds of our clients are low income or poor, with annual incomes of 20,000 or less. Because SAGE offers most of our programs and services for free, we incur significant overhead in delivering these services, including rent, utilities, and other-than-personnel expenses. Member item support is particularly useful in helping us meet these expenses, many of which are not covered by private sources such as foundation grants. To provide progamming and services for LGBT seniors in District 8. As with funds provided by other New York City Council members, your grant will support essential SAGE programs and services in your district and citywide. SAGE provides direct and supportive social services, social and recreational activities and community building programs throughout NYC to LGBT older adults. Funding is being requested to continue these services. On behalf of the board, staff, clients, members, and volunteers of Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE), I am writing to request 5,000 in member item funding for FY11-12. As with funds provided by other New York City Council members, your grant will support essential SAGE programs and services in your district and citywide. Two-thirds of our clients are low income or poor, with annual incomes of 20,000 or less. Because SAGE offers most of our programs and services for free, we incur significant overhead in delivering these services, including rent, utilities, and other-than-personnel expenses. Member item support is particularly useful in helping us meet these expenses, many of which are not covered by private sources such as foundation grants. SAGE is the nation’s oldest and largest non-profit organization providing direct services and advocacy for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults. Since 1978, SAGE has pioneered social services, congregate services, and community building programs that tangibly improve the quality of life for LGBT older people in New York City. Likewise, our education and advocacy programs have raised visibility and awareness of LGBT aging concerns among mainstream providers, thus making key services more accessible for an underserved population that has endured a lifetime of discrimination. SAGE offers the most comprehensive slate of direct services for LGBT older adults in New York City, and our constituents in every district in the city. We hope you will consider joining your fellow New York City Council members by generously supporting SAGE through member item funding in FY11-12. Your support is vital in helping us fulfill our mission of ensuring that the marginalized and disenfranchised older adults in New York City’s LGBT community will age with dignity and respect. Thank you for your consideration.

Aging

Van Bramer

Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, Inc. (SAGE)

13-2947657

$5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 64 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

On behalf of the board, staff, clients, members, and volunteers of Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE), I am writing to request 7,000 in member item funding for FY11-12. As with funds provided by other New York City Council members, your grant will support essential SAGE programs and services in your district and citywide. Two-thirds of our clients are low income or poor, with annual incomes of 20,000 or less. Because SAGE offers most of our programs and services for free, we incur significant overhead in delivering these services, including rent, utilities, and other-than-personnel expenses. Member item support is particularly useful in helping us meet these expenses, many of which are not covered by private sources such as foundation grants. SAGE is the nation’s oldest and largest non-profit organization providing direct services and advocacy for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults. Since 1978, SAGE has pioneered social services, congregate services, and community building programs that tangibly improve the quality of life for LGBT older people in New York City. Likewise, our education and advocacy programs have raised visibility and awareness of LGBT aging concerns among mainstream providers, thus making key services more accessible for an underserved population that has endured a lifetime of discrimination. SAGE offers the most comprehensive slate of direct services for LGBT older adults in New York City, and our constituents in every district in the city. We hope you will consider joining your fellow New York City Council members by generously supporting SAGE through member item funding in FY11-12. Your support is vital in helping us fulfill our mission of ensuring that the marginalized and disenfranchised older adults in New York City’s LGBT community will age with dignity and respect. Thank you for your consideration. SNAP is a comprehensive social service agency serving over 7,000 seniors in CBs 7,8,10,11,12,13 and 14. Services include case management, counseling, meals on wheels,transportation, caregiver services, friendly visiting/volunteer services and three vital senior centers - Queens Village, Brookville and Bell Park - that provide education, recreation and classes on many topics including nutrition and health maintenance. SNAP is a comprehensive social service agency serving over 7,000 seniors in CBs 7,8,10,11,12,13 and 14. Services include case management, counseling,meals on wheels, transportation,caregiver services, friendly visiting/volunteer services and three vital senior centers that provide education/recreation and classes on many topics including nutrition and health maintenance. SNAP is a comprehensive social service agency serving over 7,000 seniors in CBs 7,8,10,11,12,13 and 14. Services include case management, counseling, meals on wheels,transportation, caregiver services, friendly visiting/volunteer services and three vital senior centers - Queens Village, Brookville and Bell Park - that provide education, recreation and classes on many topics including nutrition and health maintenance. SJCC provides comprehensive case management services, by experienced, multi-lingual case workers and social workers and aided by our Computerized Benefits Check Up Program. Our case workers aid clients in obtaining benefits such as Medicaid, Medicare, HEAP, SCRIE, Emergency home repairs, legal assistance, food stamps and translation services among many other services. SACSS seeks funding to continue to offer vital services in healthcare, mental health and language assistance to South Asian Senior Citizens in New York City. For Activities that enhance physical, mental and social functioning. Yoga and taichi, arts and crafts, dances

Aging

Williams

Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, Inc. (SAGE)

13-2947657

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Sanders

Services Now for Adult Persons (SNAP), Inc.

11-2591783

$10,000 DFTA

Aging

Weprin

Services Now for Adult Persons (SNAP), Inc.

11-2591783

$52,750 DFTA

Aging

Gennaro

Services Now for Adult Persons Inc

11-2591783 *

$5,000 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging

Nelson Koo Ulrich

Shorefront Jewish Community Council, Inc. South Asian Council for Social Services

11-2986161 11-3632920

$11,500 DFTA $5,000 DFTA $30,000 DFTA

Southeast Queens Multiservice Senior Citizens Center, Inc. 23-7287548

Aging Discretionary

Page 65 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

One program we need funding for is the Social Services Expansion Project, which has two main components: (1) Senior Wellness/Transportation Program (100,000), provides transportation to apartments, food shopping, and recreational outings as well as wellness activities such as massage therapy, yoga and aerobics building on the work at our current Senior Center and two senior buildings; and (2) Los Sures COMPRAS (Community Opportunities Motivating People through Resources and Support) (100,000), to continue to expand and transform our current food pantry and service provision. For our Housing Organizing unit, we would like to request funds for an additional Housing Organizer (35,000), a Youth Organizer to coordinate with S.O.S. (Save Our Southside, a community based anti-displacement group) housing and other issues (35,000), a full-time Office Assistant to help with reporting and setting up a database (30,000), and a part-time consultant to identify funding sources and write proposals (30,000). We would also like to request predevelopment funds for the new building we are planning at our current office site at the corner of South 4th Street and Roebling Street. This site will serve as our office building and will also include 31 units of housing. To move forward on this project, we need funds for architect fees (150,000) and a LEED certified consultant (50,000). Finally, in order to continue to serve our community more efficiently, we would like to request 20,000 in Computer Software to maintain accurate tenant and accounting records, and 50,000 for Marketing purposes to do outreach to members of the community who are in need of affordable housing but dont know where to turn. The funds will be used to support the Raices Corona Senior Center (Council District 21) sponsored by the Spanish Speaking Elderly Council-RAICES for senior services (individuals aged 60 and the disabled under the age of 60 are eligible to participate in all programs offered) to fund various programs to include computer classes, citizenship classes, English as a second language, and various cultural, educational, recreational activities and congregate meals to older adults. The program targets approximately 205 seniors residing in Queens, NY (Council District 21 and its vicinity). The funds will be used to support the Red Hook Senior Center (Council District 38) sponsored by the Spanish Speaking Elderly Council-RAICES for senior services (individuals aged 60 and the disabled under the age of 60 are eligible to participate in all programs offered) to fund various programs to include computer classes, citizenship classes, English as a second language, and various cultural, educational, recreational activities and congregate meals to older adults. The program targets approximately 217 seniors residing in Brooklyn, NY (Council District 38 and its vicinity). The funds will be used to support the Raices Times Plaza Senior Center (Council District 33) sponsored by the Spanish Speaking Elderly Council-RAICES for senior services (individuals aged 60 and the disabled under the age of 60 are eligible to participate in all programs offered) to fund various programs to include computer classes, citizenship classes, English as a second language, and various cultural, educational, recreational activities and congregate meals to older adults. The program targets approximately 549 seniors residing in Brooklyn, NY (Council District 33 and its vicinity).

Aging

Reyna

Southside United Housing Development Fund Corp.

11-2268359

$12,500 DFTA

Aging

Ferreras

Spanish Speaking Elderly Council-RAICES

11-2730462

$20,000 DFTA

Aging

Gonzalez

Spanish Speaking Elderly Council-RAICES

11-2730462

$10,000 DFTA

Aging

Levin

Spanish Speaking Elderly Council-RAICES

11-2730462

$12,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 66 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Vallone Barron

Spanish Speaking Elderly Council-RAICES Spring Creek Gardens Senior Center, Inc.

11-2730462 27-0769080

$10,000 DFTA $8,000 DFTA

The funds will be used to support the Raices Astoria Senior Center (Council District 22) sponsored by the Spanish Speaking Elderly Council-RAICES for senior services (individuals aged 60 and the disabled under the age of 60 are eligible to participate in all programs offered) to fund various programs to include citizenship classes, English as a second language, and various cultural, educational, recreational activities and congregate meals to older adults. The program targets approximately 186 seniors residing in Queens, NY (Council District 22 and its vicinity). Wayside Out-Reach Senior Programs Development, Inc. Enriching Our Elders Program for retirees providing cultural enrichment outings, recreation, resourcing on issues pertinent to the elderly (consumer fraud, legal matters, health and nutrition, etc.) Participants also serve as mentors/advocates for youth, particularly as regards the value of education To provide cultural and recreational activities for seniors. Trips to shows and concerts, Christmas Party and End of Year Party, Coffee, Tea and Pastries Shared at Meetings Program provides a weekly meeting place for seniors to gather with peers in a social setting. We provide catered meals for celebrations,refreshments, table games, lectures and information on senior issues and occassional trips. Program provides a weekly meeting place for seniors to gather with peers in a social setting. We provide catered meals for celebrations,refreshments, table games, lectures and information on senior issues and occassional trips. A program that allows seniors to participate in activities such as exercise, dance, music, arts and crafts, and lunch. bingo, social events, guest speakers giving seminars for seniors, birthday parties, trips within NYC, coffee and cake We service senior citizens from the entire surrounding area with a full daily luncheon, field trips, educational, social, cultural, and recreational programs. We have our own volunteer band, we dance, and sing. Our services are open to everyone. Senior meetings, socializing, coffee, meals Gravesend Athletic Association 11-3019763 11-3528680

Aging

Comrie

St. Albans Congregational Church

11-2077266

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Halloran

St. Andrew's Friendship Club

11-1635086 *

$3,500 DFTA

Aging

Greenfield

St. Athanasius Golden Age Club

11-1639837

$20,000 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging

Recchia Williams Ulrich

St. Athanasius Golden Age Club St. Augustine's Episcopal Church St. Camillus Golden Age Club

11-1639837 * 11-2602182 13-3157561 *

$5,000 DFTA $15,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Gennaro Recchia

St. Demetrios Senior Center St. Finbar's Golden Age Club

11-1666817 11-1631812 *

$6,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 67 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Levin

St. Francis College

11-1635105

$10,000 DFTA

The College’s “For Seniors” program fulfills a vital need among Brooklyn’s senior citizens for an easily accessible venue where they can participate in intellectually and/or physically stimulating activities while having an opportunity to socialize with old friends and make new ones. The program sponsors a year-long menu of free activities that are specifically geared toward the interests and needs of senior citizens in Brooklyn. The program is designed to offer something for everyone. Activities include: §Tai Chi: Seniors can now reap the health benefits of this martial art by enrolling in this his wellness program, whi Classes are conducted in the College’s new state-of-the-art fitness center. §Introduction to Computers and the Internet: Designed especially for those individuals who feel intimidated by the advent of computers and wish to overcome their fears. Given how prevalent computers have been as a means of communication and for obtaining news and information regarding benefits, this course has enormous appeal to local seniors, who don’t have access to quality instruction; § ecreation/Exercise: St. Francis’ pool is available to seniors in weekly two-hour sessions; R Last year with City Council funding Pilates was added a class choice; §Lecture Series: A variety of educational lectures covering such topics as art, history, science, health and philosophy are offered. Recently, the lecture series has hosted such illustrious dignitaries such as Mary Robinson, the former President of Ireland; E.L. Doctorow § eniors’ Writing Project: This workshop offers writers who are senior citizens the S opportunity to develop their fiction and poetry within a supportive, structured learning environment. Open to both experienced and novice writers, this program introduces a variety of writing styles and techniques, while providing immediate feedback on presented material. Assigned readings and writing projects are an integral part of the course. The sea breeze golden age club is designed to serve all seniors in the surrounding areas with meetings, coffee/cake birthdays, special events, parties, senior peer counseling,community updates, information on senior services available. St.Gabriels Senior Center is multi-cultural caribbean Senior Center. The Center is a wellness program with service of 2 hot meals daily, providing educational, social recreational activities such as Exercise/Fitness, Health Nutrition Workshop, Computer classes, assistance in applications for Medicaid, Food Stamps,SCRIE, Housing, Food Nutrition program, artscraft, blood pressure monitoring, walking, bingo, domino, pokeno games. Provide Seniors with a place to meet, have cake,coffee and play cards,scrabble or bingo. We also have a talk table where you can just simply chat. We have luncheons , xmas party,and go to shows. We provide programs and activities to seniors in Crown Heights and we make available information about all activities pertaining to seniors. For example, we provide transportation to the NY State Senior Olympics at Cortland College. We host a picnic every year for seniors in our community. Furthermore, we publish a newsletter and maintain a bulletin board to inform seniors about all activities available for seniors. Refreshments, entertainment, exercise and dance tapes, monthly lunches or treats, parties, games, and books. The St. Luke Golden Age Club is a club for senior citizens which meets in the St. Luke School Hall every Thursday afternoon from 1pm until 4pm. The number of members is approximately 140. The members socialize, play cards, have special holiday parties, go on bus trips, etc. The meetings take place from September to June.

Aging

Ulrich

St. Francis de Salles

11-1631813

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Eugene

St. Gabriel's Episcopal Church

11-2463892 *

$18,000 DFTA

Aging

Dromm

St. Joan of Arc

11-1675278

$3,500 DFTA

Aging Aging

Vann Halloran

St. John's Recreation Center St. Kevin's Senior Club

01-0871740 11-1666886

$5,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

Aging

Halloran

St. Luke's Roman Catholic Church

11-1954969

$3,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 68 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Vallone

St. Margaret Mary Roman Catholic Church

11-1990941

$8,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Eugene Brewer

St. Mark's United Methodist Church St. Martin's Housing Corporation

11-1642727 13-2639529 *

$19,750 DFTA $2,000 DFTA

The St Margaret Mary Senior Program provided Holiday get togethers here and we also provide pantry items for the seniors that are specifically healthy for them. We also try to have casual meetings where we serve food and have some music or entertainment. The issue is to get them out of their apartments and interact. The Seniors Programs mission is to provide service to all who attend the program. The program aims on fostering improvement on the human condition through educational activities (computer,arts and craft healthy eating,music etc.) socialization,exercise,trips,special celebrations and meals. To provide older adults with social services, health services and educational /recreational activities that promote successful aging-in –place. To provide support foer seniors, including quality of life, social services, food, entertainment, and travel for members of the program. Organization will purchase in support of its mission Gravesend Athletic refreshment, entertainment and music as as travel fees for buses, etc.. Association Members attend meetings, socialize, play cards, have coffee and cake, play Bingo, go to a picnic at Pomona and Attend Dinner Shows. Helping Seniors who live in the parish and in our neighborhood; they are provided with food, refreshments and occasionally special luncheons. Cooper Park Houses - The funding will support recreational, cultural and educational activities for Seniorss of Cooper Park Houses (NYCHA). The collaboration of St Raymond Community Outreach (SRCO) and Parkchester Enhancement Program (PEP) will conduct an intergenerational program initiative that brings together two generations, separated by 3-5 decades. Seniors and teens will pair together in one-on-one encounters to explore experiences of each participant in comparable times in their lives. In addition the funding will help support thte activities at the Temple Emanuel at Parkchester senior center

Aging Aging Aging Aging

Recchia Halloran Gennaro Reyna

St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church St. Mel's Leisure Club St. Nicholas of Tolentine St. Nick's Alliance Corporation

11-1631816 * 11-1646313 11-1714878 * 51-0192170

$5,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA $4,000 DFTA $10,000 DFTA

11-3019763

Aging Aging

Palma Gentile

St. Raymond Community Outreach, Inc. St. Rosalia-Regina Pacis Neighborhood Improvement Association, Inc.

13-4043234 11-2697931

$19,000 DFTA $79,750 DFTA To support senior activities and programs in South Brooklyn. To provide support for seniors including quality of life, social services, food, entertainment, and travel for members of the program. Organization will purchase in support of its mission, refreshments served at meetings, muisic Gravesend Athletic and entertainment, travel fees for buses etc.. Association yearly expenses(rent), Holiday and birthday parties, transportation for planned trips in the NYC area. Funding will support the Stanley Isaacs Senior Center meal, education, social and health and wellness programs. Senior Center for support on continued health/wellness activities, food costs for Saturday and week-day snacks and related incraseing food costs. Recreational Programs and Support groups for people w/ disabilites Funds used for recreation and education classes - and health promotion. Arrochar Friendship Club - Health and Nutrition programs New Dorp Beach Friendship Club - Health and Nutrition programs utility bills, office supplies, printing of packets

Aging Aging Aging Aging Aging Aging Aging Aging Aging

Recchia Ulrich Garodnick Lappin Oddo Ignizio Oddo Oddo Oddo

St. Simon and Jude Senior Group St. Virgilius Golden Age Stanley M. Isaacs Neighborhood Center, Inc. Stanley M. Isaacs Neighborhood Center, Inc. Staten Island Center for Independent Living, Inc. Staten Island Community Services Friendship Clubs, Inc. Staten Island Community Services Friendship Clubs, Inc. Staten Island Community Services Friendship Clubs, Inc. Staten Island Inter-Agency Council for the Aging, Inc.

11-1771932 11-1672796 13-2572034 13-2572034 13-3266398 13-2778244 13-2778244 13-2778244 13-2986994

$5,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA $29,250 DFTA $15,000 DFTA $7,000 DFTA $48,250 DFTA $12,500 DFTA $10,250 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

11-3019763

Aging Discretionary

Page 69 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Rose Brewer

Staten Island Inter-Agency Council for the Aging, Inc. Stratford Arms Meal Program

13-2986994 90-0140023

$7,000 DFTA $4,000 DFTA

The Staten Island Inter-Agency Council for Aging (SIIAC) is a collaboration of senior service providers -- the original and continued purpose of the SIIAC is to provide a network for information exchange, public education and resource sharing and is unique in that it is the only umbrella organization for senior service providers on Staten Island acessessed by both the provider and the public as well. Three Directories are updated periodiocally/Housing Alternatives for Seniors/Caregiving Times and the Health Services Directory as well as a monthly newsletter. 5 Seminars on areas of concern eg Access-A-Ride, Medicare -Institutional Care vs. Home Care etc. and a Housing Forum (10th to be held on 4/12/11). Funding is needed to pay our Cook and to pay for food, and food service items

Funding from the NYC Council will support the following activities: Transportation- for our Harbor Hill seniors to come to SP twice a week to get a hot, nutritious meal and to participate in some activities. “My Senior Center” software-this software has revolutionized the work at the Center. Registration is much more smoother. It has shorten lines for lunch and Seniors can choose activities at the Center more efficiently and are in better control of their time spent at the Center. My Senior Center helps us access statistics more easily which makes preparing reports much easier and the information easier to disseminate. Musical Entertainment for Senior Parties-this money is used to pay for a musician for Center parties. General operating expenses associated with maintenance, supplies, and equipment Aging Aging Gonzalez Gentile Sunset Bay Community Services, Inc. Sunset Park Health Council, Inc. 11-2439925 20-2508411 $28,750 DFTA $3,000 DFTA To support Bay Ridge on the Move. Senior Center Program, Childrens Program, Educational Program and Job-training Program,Arts and Cultural Program, Taiwan Center Chorus. As the Senior Center Program is the biggest program among the five programs, and a large number of our senior citizens participate in morning excise, Tai-Chi for mind and body, dances, karaoke,and ping pong playing daily, a large portion of the funding would be used for this program. Home delivered meals for the frail elderly. Tremont Community Senior Center functions as a social, recreational and counseling base for the elderly of the community. The center provides activities such as computer classes, spanish classes, arts crafts, exercise, nutrition education, health promotion screenings and choir rehearsals. The center also provides case assistance. Transportation is available to and from the center and for special and educational trips to the museums, zoo, movie theaters, etc. A nutritional lunch is served each weekday to approximately 70-80 seniors. To maintain the Healthy Aging program. A. Phillip Randolph; Bethune Senior Center; Manhattanville Senior Center/ TO PROVIDE AND COORDINATE AND INSURE THE DELIVERY OF QUALITY SERVICES TO THE ELDERLY. MAKING SURE THAT THEY GET THE MOST HEALTHY CONGREGATE MEALS FOR BREAKFAST AND LUNCH. DAILY INVOLVING THEM IN WELLNESS AND NUTRITIONAL PROGRAMS TO STRENGHTEN THE ELDERLY POPULATION IN MENTAL AND PHYSICAL WELLBEING. To support senior activities and programs in South Brooklyn.

Aging Aging

Koo Lander

Taiwan Center, Inc. Together We Are

11-2857501 27-0213447

$15,000 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Rivera Mark-Viverito

Tremont Community Senior Citizen Service Center, Inc. Union Settlement Association, Inc.

13-2745417 13-1632530

$25,000 DFTA $17,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Jackson Gentile

United Block Association, Inc. United Chinese Association of Brooklyn

13-2548904 37-1469112

$12,500 DFTA $2,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 70 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Greenfield

United Chinese Association of Brooklyn

37-1469112

$20,000 DFTA

The grant will be used to support a Senior Service Program which includes a senior center space rental cost and its direct social services expenses. The center provides the following available services for more than 600 registered members: educational classes: ESL, voter registration, naturalization, health enhancement, crime prevention, Tai Chi; direct services –translation, government welfare application; recreation – Chess, card, Mahjong, Chinese Folk Opera and monthly birthday party celebration; meal – hot lunch. The United Hindu Cultural Council Senior Center has been serving the communities of Richmond Hill, Ozone Park, Queens and beyond for over twenty years. The Senior Center has a large and diverse membership, but caters greatly to the West Indian immigrant community. It emphasizes wellness and physical fitness through a variety of programs such as yoga, meditation, singing and dancing, and is the only vegetarian Senior Center in the U.S.A. The UHCCSC works strongly with a number of community partners to better the community and serve the city in as many ways as possible.

Aging

Ulrich

United Hindu Cultural Council of USA, North America, Inc.

11-3451990

$5,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Wills Chin

United Hindu Cultural Council of USA, North America, Inc. United Jewish Council of the East Side, Inc.

11-3451990 13-2735378

$5,000 DFTA $8,000 DFTA

The United Hindu Cultural Council is an organization located in Richmond Hill, Queens which strives to meet the various socio-economical needs of the growing immigrant populations including Caribbean and South Asian communities in southern Queens and New York City. The organization is comprised of community members, including local businessmen and other professionals and priests from a number of Hindu Temples, Churches, Mosques and Jewish Temples in the areas of Richmond Hill, South Ozone Park, Woodhaven, Hollis, Jamaica and St. Albans and throughout New York City. The UHCC is committed to promoting unity among all people and has been very active in organizing a number of health related, social and cultural events that have been well received by the community. These events include, but are not limited to: voter registration drives, social events, Lectures for seniors and the community about diabetes, heart disease, hypertensi! on, and other health related topics, Cultural programs utilizing music, theatre, and art to celebrate our diversity, Health Fairs, in collaboration with a number of hospitals and community based organizations, Sports days for our youth and seniors, Tutoring and college prep for youth in the community, Educational and recreational youth camps for children, and Cancer prevention programs e.g., mammograms, prostate cancer screening and colorectal screening. Since our first city grant in 2001 our program has grown immensely, but our funding has not. This funding will assist us in the payment of rent and utilities and covering the costs of communication, advertising, updating the phone systems, developing our website, consultants, printing and supplies and fundraising. Currently we have no budget for a many of these essential things. In order for our organization to continue to provide services on a large scale and with reasonable efficiency we need financial assistance in the a! bove listed areas. Funding will be used to provide recreational programs at the UJC Adult Luncheon Club. The funding will be used to provide crucial services at the Lillian Wald Senior Center that are vital to the health and well being of seniors in the community. We will provide daily hot nutritious meals as well as a variety of educational and recreational programming. An updated bi monthly newslestter, for seniors only, with updates on retirement, Social Security, when to apply for Medicare, - Updates on Medicare PartD Prescription Drug Plan, Medicare Savings Plan, Pooled Trust, and how assets affect your homecare. It

Aging

Mendez

United Jewish Council of the East Side, Inc.

13-2735378

$28,500 DFTA

Aging

Levin

United Jewish Organizations (UJO) of Williamsburg

11-2728233

$10,250 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 71 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Lappin

United Neighbors of East Midtown, Inc.

13-3482293

$10,000 DFTA

United Neighbors provides IR, case management, daily money management, benefits entitlements assistance, linkage to public and private programs, volunteers services, weekend home delivered meals. Our organizations mission is to serve the needs of the seniors with love,dedication and commitment. United Senior Center provides social(information and referals, case assitance),nutritional and health services to the seniors. Education and recreation activities are also offer among other activities. USIVO runs the annual Memorial Day Parade on Staten Island which is attended by over 10,000 people. USIVO also holds an annual Military Ball which celebrates our veterans service to the country. St Rosalia-Regina Pacis Neighborhood Improvement Association

Aging

Gonzalez

United Senior Citizen Center of Sunset Park, Inc.

11-2358277

$30,000 DFTA

Aging

Ignizio

United Staten Island Veterans Organization, Inc.

13-3906171

$4,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Gentile Barron

United War Veterans of Kings County, Inc. Unity Plaza Long Island Baptist Senior Club

11-3132145 11-3556789 *

$2,000 DFTA $8,000 DFTA

To support local veteran activities, including the annual Memorial Day Parade in Bay Ridge. The funds requested are to be used for: cultural affairs/events; day trips; and refreshments for the Community Developments Senior Club. To support University Settlement 's extensive network of programs for older adults.

11-2697931

Aging

Chin

University Settlement Society of New York Veterans Committee of Kings and Richmond Counties NY, Inc.

13-5562374

$8,000 DFTA St Rosalia-Regina Pacis Neighborhood Improvement Association

Aging

Gentile

11-3348994 *

$1,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Ignizio Chin

Veterans of the Battle of the Bulge, Chapter 52 VISIONS/Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired

13-4006903 13-1624210

$7,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

To support costs for local veterans activities. Our group provides the maintainance of a monument to The Battle of the Bulge located in Wolfs Pond Park on Staten Island. We are active in local High Schools R.O.T.C. programs as an education tool to teach about The Battle of the Bulge. To providerequesting member item funding in the amount . 10,000 to provide vital services VISIONS is vital services for blind/visually impaired seniors of for 72 blind/visually impaired seniors residing in District 9. This funding will enable VISIONS to provide outreach, vision rehabilitation and mobility training, adapted technology and employment and social programs. Services are also available to non-English speaking people in their language of choice. Agency Background and Mission VISIONS/Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired, incorporated in 1926, (celebrating 85 years of service this year) is a nonprofit rehabilitation and social service organization whose purpose is to develop and implement programs to: assist people of all ages who are blind or visually impaired to lead independent and active lives in their homes and communities AND educate the public to understand the capabilities and needs of people who are blind or visually impaired so that they may be integrated into all aspects of community life. VISIONS fulfills its purpose by providing: Individualized rehabilitation training at home or in the community, Social Services Employment and Training, Job Development, Group and Community Education and Activities. VISIONS programs focus on individuals with low income in the Greater New York Area who are blind or visually impaired, including those with multiple disabilities, elders, limitedEnglish speakers and culturally diverse consumers. Each year, VISIONS provides programs and services for over 5,000 individuals. No fees are charged for consumers who primarily reside in all the boroughs of New York City. VISIONS allocates eighty-seven cents of every dollar is spent on programs and meets all of the Better Business Bureaus (BBB) Wise Giving Standards and is an accredited charity and member of the BBB seal program. VISIONS was recently listed as “one of the best disability agencies” on the “Great Nonprofits website

11-2697931

Aging

Dickens

VISIONS/Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired

13-1624210

$6,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 72 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Garodnick Mark-Viverito

VISIONS/Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired VISIONS/Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired

13-1624210 13-1624210

$3,500 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Funding will support VISIONS multi-lingual vision education and outreach programs for blind and visually impaired seniors, which includes community outreach, vision rehabilitation, mobility training and social and professional support. To provide vital services for blind/visually impaired seniors residing in District 8. VISIONS is requesting member item funding in the amount of 3,500 to provide vital services for 64 blind/visually impaired seniors residing in District 2. This funding will enable VISIONS to provide outreach, vision rehabilitation and mobility training, adapted technology and employment and social programs. Services are also available to non-English speaking people in their language of choice.

Aging

Mendez

VISIONS/Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired

13-1624210

$3,500 DFTA

Aging Aging

Williams Garodnick

VISIONS/Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired Visiting Neighbors, Inc.

13-1624210 23-7379098

$5,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA

VISIONS/Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired promotes the independence of people who are blind or visually impaired. VISIONS serves over 5000 primarily low income and minority individuals annually in all five boroughs of New York City. Currently there are over 260,000 blind or visually impaired seniors (over 55) residing in New York City. Many visually impaired seniors take advantage of the services provided through the Aging Network in the City for case management, case assistance, referrals and information, benefits assessment, health and nutrition information, telephone reassurance, friendly visits and language translation services. Sadly, we are aware of the pending cuts to senior services contemplated in the Mayor’s and Governor’s budgets. These cuts will be confusing and precarious for many seniors, but for blind or visually impaired elders they could be life-threatening. VISIONS already augments the assistanc! e that visually impaired older adults obtain from their local senior centers and aging network providers, enjoying relationships with over 200 senior service providers. In 2010, VISIONS provided services to more than 2,000 clients above the age of 60 and who reside in every city council district. 50 were minorities. VISIONS currently employs 50 full time and 25 part time staff. Half of our staff is devoted to outreach and community services. VISIONS proposes to undertake additional responsibility for outreach, case assistance and information and referral that would be lost should the budget cuts to current senior service providers become a reality in the FY 2012 budget. VISIONS requests 100,000 for the purposes of providing enhanced outreach assistance to blind and visually impaired seniors. Outreach services would be provided to at least 1,000 blind or visually impaired seniors and their caregivers throughout NYC. Funding will support outreach and assistance services to help elderly residents of the East Side remain independent. Support services that enable frail elderly to remain independent, living at home and part of their community. These services include referrals to needed services, companionship to relieve isolation and loneliness and to provide encouragement as the seniors (primarily lowincome) struggle with the challenges of aging, escorts to medical appointments, help with shopping and errands, health advocacy and support to caregivers. Support services that enable frail elderly to remain independent, living at home and part of their community. These services include referrals to needed services, companionship to relieve isolation and loneliness and to provide encouragement as the seniors struggle with the challenges of aging. To provide cabaret-style performances for senior citizens at hospitals, nursing homes, and senior centers. Funding will support the operating costs of Vocal Ease's program, which provides volunteer musical performances for seniors at hospitals, nursing homes and senior centers.

Aging

Mendez

Visiting Neighbors, Inc.

23-7379098

$3,500 DFTA

Aging Aging

Quinn Brewer

Visiting Neighbors, Inc. Vocal Ease, Inc.

23-7379098 37-1469320

$10,000 DFTA $4,750 DFTA

Aging

Garodnick

Vocal Ease, Inc.

37-1469320

$3,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 73 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Jackson

Vocal Ease, Inc.

37-1469320

$3,500 DFTA

Live, on-site cabaret-style performances for senior citizens at hospitals, nursing homes, and senior centers and residences. Each group has a small group of professional singers performing solos, duets, and group numbers with piano accompaniment. The group has a rotating roster of more than 80 professional singers and pianists who volunteer their time for the groups more than 130 yearly performances. No two show or casts are alike. Live, on-site cabaret-style performances for senior citizens at hospitals, nursing homes, and senior centers and residences. Each group has a small group of professional singers performing solos, duets, and group numbers with piano accompaniment. The group has a rotating roster of more than 80 professional singers and pianists who volunteer their time for the groups more than 130 yearly performances. No two show or casts are alike. Live, on-site cabaret-style performances for senior citizens at hospitals, nursing homes, and senior centers and residences. STAR Senior Center is asking the councilman to support our weekly art class where there is an average of 8 people, some of whom come to the center only because of this class. The total about of our request is for 4,200. • he budget for this class is as follows: One instructor once a week for a two hour class at T 35.00 an hour or 70.00 a week for 51 weeks or a subtotal of 3,570. Plus we are asking for 330.00 for art supplies, and 300.00 for transportation and admission fees to a local museum, or a total of 4,200.00

Aging Aging

Mendez Quinn

Vocal Ease, Inc. Vocal Ease, Inc.

37-1469320 37-1469320

$3,500 DFTA $3,000 DFTA

Aging

Jackson

Washington Heights Community Services, Inc.

13-2792876

$3,500 DFTA

Aging

Rodriguez

Washington Heights Community Services, Inc.

13-2792876

$10,000 DFTA

STAR Senior Center is asking the councilmen to support four offerings, an ESL Class, a “Balance”-exercise class, a “Fall Prevention” class, and the cost of transportation admission for field trip. The total request is for 16,000.00 Specifics: • he English as a Second Language (ESL) course: We pay an instructor 25.00 an hour to meet T 3 times a week, 2 hour session with an average attendance of 8 students a class or 6 X 25.00 X 38 weeks a year, or a total 5,650.00 and supplies of 1,030.00. • he Balance class where we pay an instructor 60.00 an hour to meet once a week with an T average attendance of 7 students a class or 60 X 51 or a sub total of 3,060. • Fall Prevention class where we pay an instructor 60.00 an hour to meet once a week with A an average attendance of 7 student a class or 60 X 51 or a subtotal of 3,060.00 • he fourth initiative is to cover bus transportation and admission costs to Platzl Brauhaus in T Pomona, NY for 96 seniors. Two buses for a sub total of 3,200

Aging Discretionary

Page 74 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds WHIPRC works on the front lines of hunger relief for seniors. We seek to fight hunger through our Anti-Poverty Food/Nutrition Program, which promotes the well-being of seniors and families and stabilizes the community. This food subsidy program includes a food pantry, the delivery of weekend meals to the homebound, a hot meal during our weekly program for seniors with dementia, assistance applying for and maintaining food stamps and WIC, and emergency food vouchers for families and individuals in need. The food pantry, for which we are applying for funding, distributes a variety of nonperishable goods, with occasional fresh produce. The nutritional value of each package is in accordance with New York City guidelines.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Our Anti-Poverty Food/Nutrition Program strengthens the economic stability of the neighborhood by enabling clients to leverage money that they would have spent on food to pay their rent, medication, utility bills, and other vital expenses. Decreasing the number of seniors and other residents who go hungry also decreases the crime rate, enables children to study more effectively in school, and enables adults to work more effectively. The emergency food products and subsidies help individuals and families to maintain an adequate level of nutrition while they are unemployed, underemployed or in job retraining programs. Seniors benefit greatly from this program by providing them with vital sustenance. Each food pantry recipient is screened by WHIPRC case workers to determine whether they require, and are eligible for, assistance such as food stamps or WIC, and the clients are educated about various government assistance programs. We incur costs related to rent and utilities of the office and food pantry space, food pantry staff who spend time ordering, distributing, and logging, as well as staff time spent counseling the clients who need further assistance. As such, funding received through this application will be used for both program and operational expenses that in turn will be utilized to assist seniors. Funds to supplement operational expenses for six senior centers, one home delivered meals program and a senior transportation program to transport elderly persons from home to entitlement agencies. Senior Programs Funds to supplement operational expenses for six senior centers, one home delivered meals program and a senior transportation program to transport elderly persons from home to entitlement agencies: senior centers, medical appointments, social recreational activities. Services include Congregate breakfast and lunches, health promotion activities, case management, trips educational, social and recreational activities. Funds to supplement operational expenses for six senior centers, one home delivered meals program and a senior transportation program to transport elderly persons from home to entitlement agencies: senior centers, medical appointments, social recreational activities. Services include Congregate breakfast and lunches, health promotion activities, case management, trips educational, social and recreational activities. To support technology classes at the Manhattan Valley Golden Age Senior Cente. To provide a forum for agencies, professionals and individuals to share experiences and information. Program services includes: Congregate Breakfast, Congregate Lunch, Education and receration activity, information and computer classes for Senior Citizens WMMCC operates a Housing Service Unit the low income family, individuals and seniors. We currently have a senior lunch program. We are a senior day care and a cooling center. The funds will be used to supplement our bills and van insurance which is used for senior citizen transport, trips and shopping.

Aging

Jackson

Washington Heights-Inwood Preservation and Restoration Corporation 13-2944830

$7,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Barron Barron

Wayside Out-Reach Development Inc WORD Wayside Out-Reach Development Inc WORD

11-3528680 11-3528680

$12,000 DFTA $8,000 DFTA

Aging

Mealy

Wayside Out-Reach Development, Inc.

11-3528680

$20,000 DFTA

Aging Aging Aging Aging

Vann Mark-Viverito Brewer Foster

Wayside Out-Reach Development, Inc. West Side Federation for Senior and Supportive Housing, Inc. West Side Inter-Agency Council for the Aging, Inc. William Hodson Community Center, Inc.

11-3528680 13-2926433 23-7058841 13-1660334

$4,000 DFTA $4,000 DFTA $3,500 DFTA $15,000 DFTA

Aging

Jackson

Wilson Major Morris Community Center, Inc.

13-3273604 *

$12,125 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 75 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging Aging

Van Bramer Koslowitz

Woodside on the Move, Inc. Young Israel of Forest Hills

11-2435565 11-2582218

$10,000 DFTA $35,000 DFTA

Woodside on The Move, Inc.’s housing programs will provide services to tenants, landlords, homeowners, and prospective home buyers of western Queens. The purpose of the project is to augment and enhance our existing housing assistance program to seniors, home owners, tenants, and landlords in the Queens Community Board 2 area. Our goal is to expand services to that population for this service year. Outreach services will be provided to local low income tenants and at individual apartment buildings, community meeting locations, housing court, and in other locations as determined by client needs throughout the target service area. Our services activities include: Landlord and tenant mediation, the formation and/or strengthening of tenant associations, advocacy for tenants rights and protections, harassment and eviction threats prevention, support, organizing and advocacy for the preservation of affordable housing and rent regulations, housing and tenancy counseling and community organizing, legal and empowerment educational workshops, and referrals assistance. Among the service lines the grant/subsidy application assistance represents an inner activity aimed at securing affordable housing for these vulnerable groups. workshops include rent reduction proceedings, affordable housing programs, Predatory Equity Firms, Major Capital Improvements and Sub-metering, harassment a! nd eviction prevention, Rent Guidelines Board and the Rent Stabilization Law and on how to form a tenants association. Homeowner assistance services will be provided to low and moderate income home owners with homeownership counseling, homesharing, foreclosure prevention, affordable rental housing, and housing development. Provide Congregate Meals, Nutrition Educcation, Education/Recreation, Health Promotion, Lectures, Parties and Trips to Museums and Places of Interest. We are a Senior Center we serve hot nutritious lunch we provide education, recreation and nutrition education to the elderly.Our objective is to foster proper nutrition, cultural, social and communal activity to enhance the lives of our constituency. The Young Israel of Wavecrest Bayswater Senior Leagues mission is to provide quality and caring services to the elderly who live in the communities on the Rockaway Penninsula and surrounding areas. Our agency improves the lives of the Seniors who participate in our program by offering congregate meals, health promotion, nutrition education and educational and recreational activities. Some of the activities which we offer include: lectures, parties, trips, painting, sewing, arts crafts, AARP Safe Driving Classes, exercise classes, Danceaerobics, Arthritis Management exercise, bingo, movies, discussion groups, accident prevention, and fire safety awareness classes. provide congregate meals, case assistance, nutrition education, transportation, ed/rec, health promotion, lectures, parties and trips to places of interest Provide door to door transportation to the Senior Center for elderly and handicapped seniors who would be homebound and unable to attend without assistance. This enables the seniors to remain active in their community participate in a social, educational and exercise program and lunch program and not need to move from the community. Provide Door to Door transportaion to the Senior Center for elderly and handicapped seniors who would otherwise be homebound and unable to attend. This enables the seniors to remain active i ntheir community, participate in a social, educational and exercise program and was as a lunch program. They can remain vital and active community members who are an asset to the community at large.

Aging

Gennaro

Young Israel of Queens Valley

13-3613262

$10,000 DFTA

Aging Aging

Sanders Nelson

Young Israel of Wavecrest and Bayswater Young Israel Senior Services Inc

11-2342565 13-4136312

$3,500 DFTA $5,000 DFTA

Aging

Greenfield

Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association of Boro Park, Inc.

11-1630917

$13,750 DFTA

Aging

Lander

Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association of Boro Park, Inc.

11-1630917

$5,000 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 76 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Aging

Jackson

Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association of Washington Heights and Inwood

13-1635308

$4,500 DFTA

Aging

Palma

Young Men's Christian Association of Greater New York

13-1624228

$13,000 DFTA

We seek funding to support a portion of the operational expenses at our Weinberg Senior Center that is open six days per week (Sundays through Fridays). Based on our extensive experience and ability to provide congregate senior services, the Y has been pre-qualified, through NYC’s Dept. for the Aging revised procurement process, to apply for contracts to run an Innovative Service Center (ISC) with enhanced programmatic plans and goals. The Senior Center currently prepares and serves approximately 850 hot nutritious meals to an ethnically diverse population of seniors at the YM YWHA of Washington Heights and Inwood (“the Y”) each week. In addition to the on site congregate meal service, the Senior Center also prepares more than 1000 meals per week for delivery to frail elders in the Washington Heights and Inwood community. For some seniors, the Y meal will be the only nutritious meal that they eat. Funding from the NYC Co! uncil would support the seniors by helping us pay for the cost of consumable supplies (e.g. paper plates, napkins, plastic utensils, etc.) that are utilized in the program. The funding requested would support the Glebe Senior Center. This center provides programs geared specifically toward seniors who want to become or remain active, receive a hot lunch, improve their quality of life and have social interactions with their peers and with others. The requested funding will support Bedford-Stuyvesant YMCA’s Older Adults and their continued participation in the Empire State Senior Games in June 2012. The Empire Games are an organized sports and leisure program for New York State residents age 50 and older. The 5,000 request will provide financial support for transportation and miscellaneous cost related to our members participating in the games. The YWCA of Brooklyn requests funding to continue our Senior Fitness Program which provides community-based fitness programs for seniors. With this funding, the YWCA will provide fitness classes and healthy lifestyle activities specifically designed for seniors. The goal of this initiative is to support seniors to maintain full, active, self-sufficient lives.

Aging

Vann

Young Men's Christian Association of Greater New York

13-1624228

$5,000 DFTA

Aging

Levin

Young Women's Christian Association of Brooklyn

11-1630919

$7,500 DFTA

Aging Discretionary

Page 77 of 77

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Gentile Gentile

62nd Precinct Community Council, Inc. 68th Precinct Youth Council, Inc.

11-2957305 * 11-2478910

$2,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth Youth

James Lander Levin Mealy

71st Precinct Community Council, Inc. 78th Precinct Youth Council, Inc. 78th Precinct Youth Council, Inc. 81st Precinct Youth Council

04-3784543 11-2947101 11-2947101 11-3179069 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y $9,000 DYCD-Y $10,214 DYCD-Y

To provide youth programming to foster closer relationships with the 62nd Precinct. To support recreational sports activities to Brooklyn youth. The 71st Precinct Community Councils goals are to bring both community and police officers together via our community outreach and involvement of the Civilian Observation Patrol and our monthly meetings. We host five annual events which the community looks forward to with great anticipation. Baseball, flag-football and basketball; all of our sports are for boys and girls Youth recreational activities; basketball, baseball, and flag football. Funds to support various youth programming such as Youth Council, Junior Youth Council, Explorers and Sports programs. The funds will extend a successful program for Academic Afterschool Support for an additional 90 minutes per week for 130 students at Renaissance Charter School. Funding will support literacy, arts, science, recreational and civics programs for low-income families and youth. To provide two full length SAT and ACT practice exams for 100-200 middle school and hs students at a neighborhood beacon facility. The 104th Precinct Law Explorers provides educational services, leadership skills and responsibility activities for youth. Tp provide educational services, leadership skills and responsibility activities for the youth of the Queens area. Night Out Against Crime is the largest event hosted by the 110th Precinct Community Council. The annual event brings community members and police together. Our objective is to develop a better relationship with our youth and the police officers. We also expose our youth to cultural, educational,entertaining trips, and activities beyond the youths domain. The funding goes towards transportation, trips, locations and activities. The 142nd Street Block Association Youth Workforce Fair is a one-day event designed to acclimate local area at-risk youth ages 14 to 18 to the hard and soft skill sets required to obtain and maintain a job in today’s job market. The event is formatted into morning workshops, a speed mentoring segment where youth discuss career paths with professionals (some of whom originated from the community, successfully overcoming obstacles) and an afternoon job fair. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. The program will provide homework assistance, computer training, arts and crafts, trips, and leadership skills. A Better Jamaicas Family Movies in the Park is a summer series that presents family-friendly movies in four of Jamaicas neighborhood parks -- Cambria Park, Brookville Park, Baisley Pond Park, and St. Albans Park. The films are exhibited on a 25 inflatable screen and begin at dusk - between 8:00 pm and 8:30 pm. Films included in the 2010 line-up included: Happy Feet; Pride; Lemony Snickets A Series of Unfortunate Events; Jaws; Shrek; The Wizard of Oz; Love Basketball; and Sherlock Holmes. To provide an after-school and summer program for a current capacity of 120 children. To support Abundant Waters is an after-school program that assists with the hiring of a learning specialist.

St Rosalia-Regina Pacis Neighborhood Improvement Association

11-2697931

Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth

Dromm Garodnick Gennaro Crowley Reyna

82nd Street Academics 92nd Street Y (Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association) 75th Avenue Playground Volunteer Group, Inc. 104th Precinct Law Explorers 104th Precinct Law Explorers

20-0788352 * 13-1624229 11-3243561 * 33-1058210 * 33-1058210 *

$15,000 DYCD-Y $7,500 DYCD-Y $3,000 DYCD-Y $2,000 DYCD-Y $2,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Dromm

110th Precinct Community Council, Inc.

43-2025653

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Wills

113th Precinct Community Council

11-3218377

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Dickens Foster

142nd Street Block Association, Inc. 1332 Fulton Avenue Day Care Center, Inc.

75-3252444 13-2690309

$5,000 DYCD-Y $35,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth

Wills Chin Quinn

A Better Jamaica, Inc. A Place for Kids, Inc. Abundant Waters, Inc.

11-3804421 13-3624631 13-3706659

$3,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 1 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds The citywide Jill Chaifetz Education Helpline assists parents in all five boroughs who are trying to help their children succeed in school. Helpline staff guide callers in making important educational decisions by disseminating information and advice to parents, family members, and service providers about how to navigate the New York City public school system.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The Helpline is the only independent, comprehensive source of instant, free consultation on almost any public school-related issue, including, for example, accommodations for a student who uses an asthma inhaler; what to do if your school is closing or moving; safety transfers to another school; special education; promotional standards; or options available in bilingual education/ESL. Our Education Helpline is staffed by both English-language and Spanish-language speakers, with additional capacity to serve callers of other languages as needed due to Advocates for Children’s contract with a telephonic interpretation and translation service. With support from the City Council over the past five years, we have been able to hire dedicated Helpline staff and make the Helpline available four days a week from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm, greatly increasing the number of families we can serve. In calendar year 2010, the Helpline assisted 4,036 callers. All staff who work on Helpline undergo an intensive training program on the educational system and are provided with a manual on educational advocacy and services prepared by AFC’s Deputy Director, Director of Legal Services, and the Helpline Supervisors. The Director of Legal Services regularly reviews calls with Helpline staff to ensure that the information provided is legally appropriate and that callers in need of an attorney may have their cases reviewed. Youth Jackson Advocates for Children of New York, Inc. 11-2247307 $4,000 DYCD-Y AFC seeks City Council funding this year so we may continue to provide service to the AFC seeks City Council funding this year so we may continue to provide service to the thousands of people who reach out to us for help and all too often have nowhere else to go. To build a long-term, sustainable youth development program serving boys and girls ages 913 in the Jamaica, Queens community. We will provide a comprehensive program for 15-20 boys, with after school tutoring, basketball, and character development programs.

Youth

Mendez

Advocates for Children of New York, Inc.

11-2247307

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Comrie

African Center for Community Empowerment, Inc.

11-3551349 *

$20,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 2 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The mission of The African Diaspora Film Festival (ADFF) is to expand the traditional views and perceptions of what the Black experience is by showcasing films depicting the richness and diversity of the global Black experience from Peru to Zimbabwe, from New Zealand to Jamaica. The African Diaspora Film Festival seeks to advance public interest in and understanding of the cinema from, about, and related to Africa and the African Diaspora. Consistent with its mission, ADFF has established a festival section targeted specifically towards young people whereby elementary, intermediate and high school students can attend screenings during NYC ADFF at 12 noon on week days free of charge. The Funds are used to subsidize the cost of the tickets so that students and their teachers may attend the festival free of charge. During ADFF 2010 – 1,073 students participated in the School Program. Tickets for this program were subsidized by Council Member Inez E. Dickens through the Department of Education (5,000), and by the DCA (3,600) for a total amount of 8,600. Ticket price for matinee screenings during ADFF 2011 will be 9. To reach its goal of having another 1,500 students see films at no charge, ADFF 2011 needs to raise 13,500 for the school program. ADFF 2011 is seeking 5,000 from council member Inez E. Dickens, 3,500 from New York State Senator Bill Perkins, 5,000 from the DCA for this program (out of a total request of 20,000 to the DCA). Youth Youth Dickens Rose African Diaspora Film Festival African Refuge, Inc. 74-3058513 * 01-0873188 * $3,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y Funds requested will support our After-school youth programs which provide one on one tutoring, homework assistance and drop out prevention services. APT will provide a series of 36 workshops of cultural craft making and storytelling for 800 children ages 5-13. workshops will provide hands on activity that will enable the children to produce practical, educational items such as African doll and jewelry making, Tie dye and Adinkra print making, Kwanzaa, and storytelling from Africa and the Caribbean, that will give them an understanding of various cultures. Also piano and drumming instructional classes, for youth ages 5-18 years. To support the Save Our Youth (S.O.Y.)re-direction youth counseling program. Expansion of food pantry to meet the ever growing needs of Queens community residents. Expansion of Youth LGBT Drop in Center for youth in the Jamaica and Long Island City areas to meet the needs of homeless youth. Yeshiva University is requesting expense funding for the YU Heights Initiative, a program that promotes student involvement in the Washington Heights neighborhood through a variety of venues and opportunities. The Heights Initiative’s goal is to consolidate and streamline the many community service programs that Yeshiva University offers to its student body and the local community. Hundreds of community members from Washington Heights are impacted by over 100 Yeshiva University students who partake in the program. With an increase in funding, more students will be able to volunteer for this incredible opportunity, and more businesses, schools and organizations will be able to partner with YU to increase programming. Please see addendum that has been mailed to Scott Crowley for more information about these programs Funds will cover the cost of trips for the Afterschool program during DOE vacation breaks, end of year and the summer.

Youth Youth

Comrie Sanders

Afrikan Poetry Theatre, Inc. Afrikan Poetry Theatre, Inc.

11-2515828 * 11-2515828 *

$28,000 DCA $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Dromm

AIDS Center of Queens County, Inc.

11-2837894 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Rodriguez Foster

Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University Alianza Dominicana, Inc.

13-1624225 * 13-3402057 *

$8,000 DYCD-Y $27,800 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 3 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Jackson

Alianza Dominicana, Inc.

13-3402057 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Funds will be utilized for a basketball tournament that will involve all of the Alianza sites (6 beacons,OST,Cornerstone programs)and ACDP Beacon, ICS OST, CAS which are all members of the Washington Heights Inwood Youth collective. We will host a Fall/Winter long Sports Tournaments(Basketball, Flag Football and Volleyball).We will have two teams per site, one for the middle school age category and one for high school aged youth. Weill have a male and female league for all three sports tournaments. The cost will be to cover uniforms, referees, sports supplies, trophies,medals,certificates, water and other supplies needed. Funds will be utilized for informational, recreational and incentive driven activities. The funds will cover the cost of trips for the After school program during DOE vacation breaks, end of year and the summer, ( movies, Children’s Museum, bowling, Hall of Science, Victorian Gardens, Planetary, amusement parks and sports events). We will purchase summer camp tee shirts and bags, Christmas toys, games and gifts. The funds will also cover the cost of community and youth events for refreshments, incentives, decorations, transportation, entry fees and miscellaneous expenditures. A 10 administrative fee will be applied To fund various community programs open to all.

Youth

Rodriguez

Alianza Dominicana, Inc.

13-3402057 *

$36,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Weprin

Alley Pond Environmental Center, Inc.

11-2405466

$25,000 DYCD-Y AKA DCC, Inc. provides childcare services to the community in Jamaica and S. Ozone Park. Our mission is to provide a quality education program to eligible families regardless of race, color, creed, sex or nationality. We provide educational services to approximately 161 children, ages six weeks to four years. The program is geared towards the social, emotional, cultural, physical and cognitive development of the children. Through this project, the Center will effectively enhance our programs mission of stimulating a sense of independence, responsibility and curiousity within the child. To provide a safe and structured environment for twenty youths between the ages of fifteen to twenty.

Youth Youth

Comrie Barron

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Epsilon Pi Omega Chapter DCC Inc 22-2547491 * Alpha School Center for Progressive Living, Inc. 11-3631144 *

$7,000 DCA $11,500 DYCD-Y

AileyCamp New York is dedicated to offering 200 at-risk youths an opportunity to stretch their intellectual, creative and social skills through classes in dance, communications and personal development, empowering and preparing them for success in school. Classes include dance techniques, Personal Development, and Creative Communications. (AileyCamp Washington Heights operates in Council Member Jacksons district, and AileyCamp Staten Island operates in Council Member Roses district.) The expense for each Camp is approximately 200,000. The Camp is typically offered at no charge to campers, but 15-25 campers each summer do pay a small fee to participate. Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation is committed to bringing live dance performances to underserved communities. Each year, 750-1250 students attend an Ailey II school time performance at little or no cost. Each performance costs approximately 4,200. These performances take place at the Ailey Citigroup Theater in Council Member Brewers district. American Friends of Mishkan Yecheskel, also known as the People in Need Foundation provides a variety of services. We provide crisis counseling to families in need, teacher mentoring, counseling for children with eating disorders, a hotline for homework assistance for youth. We also have a food distribution program for families who are in need and who meet income guidelines. Funds will be used for operational costs for Bronx One on One Mentoring service.

Youth

Jackson

Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation, Inc.

13-2584273 *

$7,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Greenfield Cabrera

American Friends of Mishkan Yecheskel American Latin Association of NY, Inc.

11-3207880 * 13-4299976 *

$6,000 DYCD-Y $25,714 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 4 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth Youth

Gennaro Garodnick Fidler

American Red Cross in Greater New York Amigos del Museo del Barrio Amity Little League, Inc.

11-1631711 23-7156720 11-2705385

$4,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Nelson

Amity Little League, Inc.

11-2705385

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mendez

Andrew Glover Youth Program, Inc.

13-3267496

$6,500 DYCD-Y

To support an Authorized Provider for Life-Savings Skills (AP Life) program at Townsend Harris High School. Funding will support Classroom Connections, a multi-session program that links the museum's cultural resources with social studies in public schools. FUNDING WILL PROVIDE EQUIPMENT SUCH AS BASEBALLS, BATS CATCHERS GEAR,AND HELMETS AS WELL AS OBTAINING MATERIALS TO MAINTAIN THE FIELD. FUNDING WILL PROVIDE EQUIPMENT SUCH AS BASEBALLS, BATS CATCHERS GEAR,AND HELMETS AS WELL AS OBTAINING CLAY AND OTHER MATERIALS TO MAINTAIN THE FIELD IN GOOD PLAYING CONDITION. We request that the NYC Department of Youth and Community Development consider making a 3,500 grant to enable the Andrew Glover Youth Program to accomplish the following goals in 2011-12:1) East Harlem: 2) Lower East Side: District 1 citywide: AFC educational programs reach out to NYC students and teachers through in-school programs, on-site programs and professional development. Funding will go towards running the after school program for childrens which provides a safe and educational environment for children. To support after-school tutoring and college prep. To promote independence, productivity and family stability by supporting Arab American youth. To support homework help, SAT classes, art activities and cultural programming in Brooklyn. These funds will be utilized to strengthen our after-school program, which provides a vast array of services for Arab American youths. These funds will be utilized to strengthen our after-school program, which provides a vast array of services for Arab American youths throughout Brooklyn, Our program provides homework help, art crafts activities, Arabic language classes, one-on-one tutoring, free SAT college classes and weekend field trips. Additional support will allow us to offer more projects for the kids we serve. One thing they are constantly asking for is more information related to college. For the majority of our kids, they will be the first to ever attend college (or at least the first to attend in the U.S.), and neither they nor their parents are familiar with the process. This project will include a series of workshops on matters related to college, including: selecting a major; finding the right school; career opportunities; and financial aid. Additionally, we would love to include field trips to local colleges (both in the City and further away) so that the students could see the experience of being on a college campus. This would be a tremendous experience for our kids and would help them see the world beyond their own small community. The whole concept of a college awareness program came directly for the youths we serve. They expressed an interest in learning more about college and how the process works. The fundamental goal of our youth program is to help young people pursue all of the academic opportunities available to them.

Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth

Mendez Rivera Gentile Gonzalez Gentile Gonzalez

Anne Frank Center USA, Inc., The Aquinas Housing Corporation Arab American Association of New York, Inc. Arab American Association of New York, Inc. Arab-American Family Support Center, Inc., The Arab-American Family Support Center, Inc., The

13-2991719 13-3076810 * 11-3604756 11-3604756 11-3167245 11-3167245

$3,500 DYCD-Y $24,000 DYCD-Y $3,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth

Lander Ignizio Rose

Arab-American Family Support Center, Inc., The Art Lab, Inc. - The Art School at Snug Harbor Art Lab, Inc. - The Art School at Snug Harbor

11-3167245 13-2977495 13-2977495

$3,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y Funds will be used to provide operating support, which will enable Art Lab to continue to give classes and workshops. To fund the Summer Studio Scholarship Program (SSSP) and allow the Art Lab to continue to provide arts education within its regular classes and workshops.

Youth Discretionary

Page 5 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

James

Arthur Ashe Institute for Urban Health

11-3185372

$5,000 DYCD-Y

The Health Science Academy Health was created to help increase the number of health professionals of color. Both the middle and high school programs are in accord with National Science Education Standards, including: (1) providing students with clearly stated goals and expectations; (2) conducting scientific inquiry that offers students opportunities for experimentation and direct observations; (3) relating scientific inquiry to social issues and students’ everyday life; and (4) connecting science to other school subjects, including history and culture. ArtsConnection is a non-profit arts-in-education organization that has been bringing the arts to public schools for 32 years. Our in-school programs serve 30,000 New York City public school students annually. Professional teaching artists provide in-depth instruction in theatre, dance, music and visual arts to students at over 100 city schools. An after-school music and dance program: Professional artists will conduct workshops in music and dance for children of all ages. Experience teaches us that all children are imaginative and have creative potential. Through music and dance we will encourage students to share their creativity, take risks, learn from their mistakes, and value each other’s unique creative expression. Funding for salary, fringe benefits, insurance, space rental and printing for our Afterschool Fine Arts program. To fund the Youth Leadership Program which consists of 40 NYC Asian Pacific American (APA) public high school students. The Youth Leadership Program consists of 40 NYC Asian Pacific American (APA) public high school students from all five boroughs. The Youth Leadership Program consists of 40 NYC Asian Pacific American (APA) public high school students from all five boroughs. The program will launch with a retreat of 8 full-day sessions focused on exploring identity, team-building, and learning about college readiness. The youth leaders will meet weekly after school for 30 weeks in the 2011-12 school year. They will collectively work on an action research project focused on improving college readiness in schools. They will learn to analyze a problem and identify recommendations to solve it. The Program Coordinator will facilitate these conversations and provide an analytical framework for the youth leaders. They will develop the following skills: critical thinking, public speaking, writing, responsibility, civic engagement, and team work. They will then be split up into groups of 5 students and will be responsible for conducting at least one workshop each for 20-30 student! s on college readiness, reaching at least 400 of their peers. CACF will implement our Parent Leadership Program by empowering 20 immigrant APA parents to promote equity and access for New York City’s APA families. They will meet 1-2 times per month during 2011-12. The parent leaders will be educated on the rights of parents and children in the child welfare, education, and health systems, resources to support their families, and opportunities to become more civically engaged. They will receive training on how to facilitate workshops, outreach to community members, and build coalitions. Parents will then be split up into groups of 5 responsible for organizing at least one workshop each for 10-15 parents focused on the rights of parents and children, reaching at least 50 of their peers. Through these workshops, the parent leaders and their peers will learn about their rights and their children’s rights, determine changes that need to take place in schools and neighborhoods to support their child’s well-being, and take action to mak! e changes. The funds will be used to send 20 youth to a 4-Day Summer Basketball Camp. Funding will support The Youth Leadership Program and implement our Parent Leadership Program .

Youth

Mendez

Arts Connection, Inc.

13-2953240

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth Youth

Mendez Brewer Chin Koo

Arts for Art, Inc. Arts in Action, Inc. Asian American Coalition for Children and Families, Inc. Asian American Coalition for Children and Families, Inc.

13-3991848 * 56-2322737 13-3682471 13-3682471

$3,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y $8,000 DYCD-Y $8,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth

Weprin Chin Ferreras

Asian American Coalition for Children and Families, Inc. Asian Professional Extension, Inc. Asian-American Coalition for Children and Families Inc

13-3682471 13-3650718 13-3682471 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 6 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Koppell Barron

Asphalt Green, Inc. Association of Informed Voices, Inc.

13-6533158 11-3595142

$10,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth Youth

Mark-Viverito Gentile Vallone Halloran

Association to Benefit Children, Inc. Associazioni Siciliane Unite de New York, Inc. Astoria Performing Arts Center, Inc. Auburndale Soccer Club, Inc.

13-3303089 11-3416416 65-1209580 11-2476178 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y $7,000 DYCD-Y $15,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Asphalt Green requests funds to help support the Recess Enhancement Program (REP) in Councilmanic District 11. Funding is for Informed Voices Youth Association and Basketball League serving some 70 youth. To provide services and programming to East Harlem youth, including therapeutic afterschool and summer day camp programs, teen support groups, weekend recreational services, and mentoring. To provide referall and support services, cultural programs and sport programs to youth in South Brooklyn. To offer a free performance program for children: Summer Stars. To provide intramural travel,special needs programs for children ranging in ages from 3-18. We provide intramural travel,special needs programs for approx 900 children ranging in ages from 3-18. Our Goal is to instruct Develop skills Sportsmanship and social goals. Our Special needs program is growing very fast A music therapy program for preschool children with severe to profound hearing loss at The Auditory-Oral School of New York. It is an ongoing component of services at the school to develop childrens residual auditory capacity from their earliest years as a channel for communication, learning, and connection with the environment. Our organization has been successfully running a summer program for the past few years benefitting the communities youth and families as all schools are closed during the summer months. Our program fills the void of the children in the summer months by providing them with a fun filled, educational and a proper supervised environment.

Youth

Weprin

Auburndale Soccer Club, Inc.

11-2476178 *

$7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Nelson

Auditory/Oral School of New York, The

06-1531077

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Greenfield

Bais Yaakov Faigeh Schonberger of Adas Yereim

20-3295496 *

$6,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Dickens

Ballet Theatre Foundation, Inc.

13-1882106

$4,000 DYCD-Y

For more than 10 years, ABT has partnered with public schools and social service organizations in New York City to provide the highest-level arts education instruction, at little or no cost to its partners. Our goal is to introduce ballet to young people who otherwise might not be exposed to classical dance, foster an appreciation for the performing arts, and develop and educate future audiences. As a leading arts educator, ABT looks particularly to serve the most underserved public schools in New York City, where slashed budgets have left students with no arts programming. ABT at School, previously funded at P.S. 208 with an allocation from Councilmember Dickens, is designed to offer arts education initiatives in public school grades 2 to 5. Students in participating schools receive two visits from an ABT Teaching Artist, who leads them through warm-up exercises, movement studies to build coordination skills, balance- and stre! ngth-building exercises, across-the-floor sequences, allegro jumps, and partnering. Teaching Artists incorporate many of the Department of Educations Blueprint for Teaching and Learning in the Arts guidelines that empower and enable the students to practice creativity, responsibility, and independence through hands-on activities. To enhance their understanding of dance, students also receive complimentary tickets to an ABT program at Lincoln Center, where they have the opportunity to see a live ballet performance, often for the very first time. ABT prepares students for what they will see by providing historical background on the ballets being performed and on the Company as a whole, as well as instructing them in related movement structures and discussing the works’ plots and themes. Additionally, ABT distributes study guides so that teachers can continue incorporating the arts into their classrooms. A legislative grant of 5,000 will enable ABT to offer ABT at School at ! two schools of the Councilmembers choice in District 9.

Youth Discretionary

Page 7 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth

Lander Sanders Chin Chin Gentile Gentile Halloran

Bangladesh Institute of Performing Arts, Inc. Battalion Pentecostal Assembly, Inc. Battery Conservancy, Inc. Battery Dance Corporation Bay Ridge Bensonhurst Beautification and Preservation Alliance, Inc. Bay Ridge Community Council Inc Bayside Little League, Inc.

11-3249055 * 36-4391337 * 13-3769101 23-7418859 11-3233233 11-2602994 * 52-1234764

$5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y $20,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y $15,000 DYCD-Y

Bangladesh Institute of Performing Arts (BIPA)requests funds to sustain operations and support arts classes and public performances serving Kensington//borough Park/Coney Island and other residence of Dist 39 with a focus on the Bangladeshi community. BIPA offers affordable classes in traditional Bangladeshi dance,music,instrumental,visual Art form,foreign language(Bangla) and stages students/teachers/emerging artists performance. Building on a successful 18 year history in Queens, BIPA began to offer classes for children(515)in Kensington in 2010, and is now looking to expand its services in Brooklyn in response to high demand. BIPA served 100 students in 2010 and plans to serve more students with an expanded roster of classes in 2011. Depending on enrollment BIPA classes meet weekly for 44 weeks in a year. BIPA also plans a 2 month intensive course during summer vacation. BIPA students are from age 5 to over 18. BIPA is the only cultural organization working to serve and preserve the cultural heritage of Bangladeshi community in Brooklyn. Parents are happy to have an affordable way for their children to learn their history and build arts skills. Bangladeshi housewives bringing their children to class in Kensington have expressed an interest in also receiving music training; BIPA plans to offer classes to interested parents of students for the first time in coming year, and hopes this will serve as an inter-generational activity as mothers help their children practice music at home. All BIPA classes culminate performances of students performing alongside emerging artists. These concerts, usually held in school auditoriums, are free and open to the public and serve as a bridge to forge relationships between different communities, and reach a large number of low-income audience members. The programs to be funded are Gideons Army, Daughters of Purpose and Youth Explosion To provide The Urban Farm at the Battery and recreational program serving students of all ages. To fund The Downtown Dance Festival (DDF) , making live performance available to summer camps for disadvantaged youth. To support youth programming in Bay Ridge and Bensonhurst To support the Halloween Art Window Painting Contest for school age children in South Brooklyn. The funding will be used to supplement the cost of the uniforms and the equipment. The Be Proud Foundation hosting numerous events for YOUTH, such as Appreciation Luncheon For The Police And Fire Department, Toys For Tots, Your Highness Grandmother, Passover Food Distribution, The Russian Culture and Heritage Day and etc.

Youth

Nelson

Be Proud, Inc.

58-2674169

$8,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 8 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Were seeking support for our Foot Soldiers program. Foot Soldiers Rites of Passage (FSROP) is a qualitative program with four year-long phases as participants’ progress through high school. During each phase, students strive to achieve a minimum level of annual service hours: o rep for Adulthood (96hrs) – Teens engage in activities that prepare them for adulthood. P § Increase participants’ Grade Point Average at least 3 points. §Ensure that each of our Foot Soldiers graduate HS or acquire a GED. §Help teens open a bank account, and acquire necessary identification, permits, working papers. §Read at least two non-school required books. o ome Economics (160hrs) – Teens engage in activities that strengthen the family bond. H • onduct household chores at home in which parents sign a form approving satisfactory C completion of work. • nhance participants’ relationship(s) with caregivers through workshops. E o xposure (60hrs) – Many Foot Soldiers are limited to their immediate surroundings in their E general life experiences. Our teens are required to expand their horizons on their own or with PR-G, by attending plays, community events, fundraising walks (i.e breast cancer walk) and going on vacations. §Have teens experience life outside of their comfort zone. §Provide teens the opportunity to attend camping and paint ball trips in other states o ersonal Development (260hrs) – Teens engage in job readiness trainings, workshops and P physical or mental activities which develop their transferable skills, character and sense of community. §Through our Foot Soldiers Services our teens offer neighborhood homeowners a fee-based front yard cleaning service in which they provide year-round recycling, rubbish leaves and litter removal, and snow removal. Youth Vann Bed Stuy's Project Re-Generation, Inc. 01-0596502 $10,000 DYCD-Y Bein-Ish houses youth who are seriously ill that are being treated in the Brooklyn area along with their families, as well as performs "make-a-wish" and summer excursion activities for youth with serious illnesses. Council funding would be used to support operating expenses for the Bein-Ish home, including occupancy, utilities, groceries and cleaning/maintenance costs, as well as the make-a-wish and summer excursion programs. We are requesting funds to support the BALI Intensive Summer Debate and Leadership Training Program. We are requesting funds to support the BALI Summer Intensive Debate and Leadership Training Program for New York City Public High School girls Funding will continue to enhance our valuable youth ervices including comprehensive afterschool programming at two local elementary schools. Funding will continue to enhance our valuable youth ervices including comprehensive afterschool programming at two local elementary schools. To fund a neighborhood beautification program. Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation Funding will allow us to continue to provide recreational activities and educational activities d/ba Millennium in after-school centers. Development Youth activities: trips, entertainment, supplies, food, uniforms, sporting equipment, etc To provide free, subsidized, and discounted performance tickets to eligible youth, school groups, and senior citizens.

Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth

Lander Chin Mendez Fidler Williams Williams

Bein-Ish Bella Abzug Leadership Institute, Inc. Bella Abzug Leadership Institute, Inc. Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/b/a Millennium Development Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/b/a Millennium Development Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/b/a Millennium Development

11-3486377 * 30-0280807 30-0280807 11-3199040 11-3199040 11-3199040

$3,500 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y $105,964 DYCD-Y $7,000 DYCD-Y $7,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth

Fidler Wills Brewer

Bergen Beach Youth Organization Bethany Baptist Church Big Apple Circus, Ltd.

11-2598350 11-2538705 * 13-2906037

$3,750 DYCD-Y $8,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

11-3199040

Youth Discretionary

Page 9 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Dickens Foster

Big Apple Circus, Ltd. Big Apple Circus, Ltd.

13-2906037 13-2906037

$5,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Clown Care, the Big Apple Circuss signature community outreach program, is in residence at 16 pediatric hospitals nationwide, including six in New York. Michael Christensen created the program in 1986, based on his desire to provide a needed service to a chronically underserved population. In partnership with a participating hospitals chief medical and administrative staff, members of the Clown Care team conduct their own version of medical rounds, spreading humors healing power everywhere they go. Currently, 80 committed and talented professional artists go on clown rounds in teams of two, one to five days a week, year-round, making nearly 225,000 visits annually to young patients. There are 25 doctors working in New York, with responsibility for approximately 63,000 of these interactions. All clown doctors are trained in specific hygienic practices and protocols related to interacting with hospitalized children in inpatient w! ards, intensive care units, emergency rooms, and in physical therapy, bone marrow transplant, pediatric AIDS, outpatient and acute care clinics. Pediatric care facilities are constantly challenged to find innovative and effective ways to care for their young patients emotional wellbeing and provide a support system for families and staff. Most of the Circuss hospital partners have Child Life programs that seek to bridge the gap between the familiar environment of home and the sometimes-intimidating environment of the hospital. Clown Care augments and complements these activities with humor and parody in order to reduce the anziety, sadness, and isolation that a child can experience during a hospital stay. The clown doctors presence and antics also directly benefit parents, siblings and other caregivers. While the Clown Care teams are focused on providing relief to patients, they also strive to be fully integrated with the clinical and psycho-social team at all partner facil! ities, helping staff do their respective jobs. Conduct their own version of medical rounds, spreading humors healing power everywhere they go.

Circus for All is an access-to-the-arts program that will provide free, subsidized, and discounted performance tickets to eligible youth, school groups, and senior citizens from all five boroughs during the Big Apple Circuss 2011-2012 New York City engagements at Lincoln Center and Cunningham Park, Queens. Eligible not-for-profit organizations, schools, and senior centers must be dedicated to helping physically and/or economically disadvantaged populations and have an established track record as a service provider. Each year the Circus distributes nearly 60,000 free tickets through Circus for All. Since 1977, with help from government, individual, and institutional support, the Big Apple Circus has provided close to one million complimentary performance tickets to organizations serving children with physical challenges and economic disadvantages. Circus for All remains a powerful way for community-based organizations to enhance their youth and community development programs with cultural opportunities to which their constituents might not otherwise have access. Circus for All is an access-to-the-arts program that will provide free, subsidized, and discounted performance tickets to eligible youth, school groups, and senior citizens from all five boroughs during the Big Apple Circuss 2011-2012 New York City engagements at Lincoln Center and Cunningham Park, Queens. Eligible not-for-profit organizations, schools, and senior centers must be dedicated to helping physically and/or economically disadvantaged populations and have an established track record as a service provider.

Youth

Jackson

Big Apple Circus, Ltd.

13-2906037

$3,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Lappin

Big Apple Circus, Ltd.

13-2906037

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 10 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Mendez Chin

Big Apple Seeds Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City, Inc.

05-0548432 13-5600383

$4,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

will pay for 25-30 elementary school youth to attend 1-3 seasons of soccer for free. Youth come from Childrens Wkshop, Earth, PS 110, NEST, Neighborhood, PS 20, and other schools and a few from local shelters clientele or ex-clientele). Program take place at the Baruch Field and the Christie street fields. Funds will also help the development of year four of the LYS Middle School League to expand from 8 to 10 Downtown Schools (Thompkins Square Middle School, TASS, SALK, East Side Community, ICE) with 6 girls teams and 8 boys (over 150 youth). Funds will allow us to provide mentoring services to NYC youth. Funds will allow us to provide mentoring services to NYC youth, many of whom are disabled, pregnant or parenting, immigrants, and arrested children. Additionally, we will be able to provide educational support and training of other youth organizations across all 5 boroughs. We served close to 3,000 last year, and we aim to serve the same number this year. Funding will support mentoring services for New York City youth. Funds will allow us to provide mentoring services to NYC youth, many of whom are disabled, pregnant or parenting, immigrants, and arrested children. Additionally, we will be able to provide educational support and training of other youth organizations across all 5 boroughs. We served close to 3,000 last year, and we aim to serve the same number this year. Funds will be utilized for providing a free clinic and offsetting costs for intramural programs for participants (girls and boys). The funds will be used to help fund our main program, Support, Service and Success. The funds will be used to help fund our main program: Support, Service and Success. This program, since its inception in 1999, has allowed our organization to help our student/athletes to enter and successfully complete high school and college. Through our ever expanding network, our student/athletes have often been able to receive scholarships to both high school and college. Through our program, students develop the leadership skills needed to improve their communities and develop into self-sufficient adults with the skills to solve complex social problems. Bay Ridge Bensonhurst Beautification Preservation Alliance Inc

Youth Youth

Dickens Garodnick

Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City, Inc. Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City, Inc.

13-5600383 13-5600383

$3,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth

Mendez Crowley Dilan

Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City, Inc. Blau-Weiss Gottschee, Inc. Bonnie Boys Club (a.k.a. Bonnie Youth Club)

13-5600383 11-6074351 * 11-6075963

$3,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $20,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Eugene

Bonnie Boys Club (a.k.a. Bonnie Youth Club)

11-6075963

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Brewer

Border Crossers, Inc.

26-2671377

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth

Gentile Ferreras Halloran Ignizio Koo Oddo

Boy Scouts of America - Greater New York Council Boy Scouts of America - Greater New York Council Boy Scouts of America - Greater New York Council Boy Scouts of America - Greater New York Council Boy Scouts of America - Greater New York Council Boy Scouts of America - Greater New York Council

13-1624015 13-1624015 13-1624015 13-1624015 13-1624015 13-1624015 *

$1,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $12,514 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y $6,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

To subsidize overnight camping programs for Troup 20. Funding will be used to carry out Scouting programs, including Cub Scout and Boy Scout programs, to underprivileged youth. Funding will be used to carry out Scouting programs, including Cub Scout and Boy Scout programs, to underprivileged youth. Funding will be used to carry out Scouting programs, including Cub Scout and Boy Scout programs, to underprivileged youth. Funding will be used to carry out Scouting programs, including Cub Scout and Boy Scout programs, to underprivileged youth. Funding will be used to carry out Scouting programs, including Cub Scout and Boy Scout programs, to underprivileged youth.

11-3233233

Youth Discretionary

Page 11 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Jackson Reyna

Boys and Girls Club of Harlem Breakthrough New York, Inc.

13-3012951 27-0628927 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

In Working for Children: Safe and Smart After-School Programs (2000), experts reported, “children who are left alone when school ends have more difficulties with their class work than those who participate in after-school programs. Not only is the latter group of students more likely to succeed academically, they are also much more self-confident.” Other studies have linked after-school programs to improved behavior at school and an overall increased interest in learning. This proposal respectfully requests a grant of 45,000 from Council Member Robert Jackson to support after school programming at three of the Boys Girls Club of Harlem’s four locations serving children 6 to 18. The Club’s after school programs supports the goals of the Council agenda by promoting literacy, providing quality after school programs to assist working parents, and career planning and job training. To support under-served, public middle and high school students on the path to college. The funds provided by this grant will allow BBT to provide free rehearsals and choreography workshops to selected BBT students who partake in the Annual Festival. In addition to their weekly lessons all students who participate in the festival also participate in special weekend workshops where BBT’s resident choreographer, Edouard Kouchnarev, choreographs original dance pieces for the students. To support an enrichment program for young people with an outlet for developing academic and social skills in a supportive environment. An initiation of After School Homework Help including Kindergarteners, First Graders and Second graders, servicing a maximum of 10 children atfor its “Family First Nights®” program. The Broadway League is respectfully requesting 5,000 our local library This past year over 200 families were served working with different community organizations in all five boroughs, including the Bronx YMCA at ELLIS Preparatory Academy in your district. The Broadway League created Family First Nights as a way to introduce families from underserved communities to live theatre and encourage children to develop a life-long appreciation for the art form, an opportunity many participants may not otherwise have. Working with Council Member Rodriguez, the Broadway League will partner with a local social service agency to identify families and coordinate program logistics. Families in the program commit to attend the theatre together three times over the course of a year and coordinate with the local social service agency to arrange transportation. Families will take part in post-performance discussions with the cast and production staff of the shows, and are given packets with information on the theatre and the specific show. Sponsors of the program are invited to join the families at their designated location before departing for photos and an opportunity to meet the participants. Families have recently attended performances of MEMPHIS, IN THE HEIGHTS, THE COLOR PURPLE, BILLY ELLIOT, THE ADDAMS FAMILY, SHREK, THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA, HAIRSPRAY and many other Broadway productions. By engaging families in repeated experiences through multiple productions, Family First Nights offers the opportunity to make live theatre part of their cultural heritage, as well as educate children on the many non-performing job opportunities available in our industry. The Broadway League is the national trade association for the Broadway industry. The League’s 700-plus members including theatre owners and operators, producers, presenters, and general managers help bring Broadway to more than 30 million people in New York each year.

Youth Youth

Nelson Rose

Brighton Ballet Theater Company, Inc. Brighton Heights Reformed Church

11-3195590 13-5596812

$10,000 DYCD-Y $8,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Nelson

Brighton Neighborhood Association, Inc.

11-2435523

$6,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Rodriguez

Broadway League, Inc., The

13-0951470

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 12 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The Broadway League is respectfully requesting 5,000 in Fiscal Year 2012 for the “Family First Nights®” program. This past year over 200 families were served working with different community organizations in all five boroughs. The Broadway League created Family First Nights as a way to introduce families from underserved communities to live theatre and encourage children to develop a life-long appreciation for the art form, an opportunity many participants may not otherwise have. Working with Council Member Weprin, the Broadway League will partner with a local social service agency to identify families and coordinate program logistics. Families in the program commit to attend the theatre together three times over the course of a year and coordinate with the local social service agency to arrange transportation. Families will take part in postperformance discussions with the cast and production staff of the shows, and are given packets with information on the theatre and the specific show. Sponsors of the program are invited to join the families at their designated location before departing for photos and an opportunity to meet the participants. Families have recently attended performances of MEMPHIS, IN THE HEIGHTS, THE COLOR PURPLE, BILLY ELLIOT, THE ADDAMS FAMILY, SHREK, THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA, HAIRSPRAY and many other Broadway productions. By engaging families in repeated experiences through multiple productions, Family First Nights offers the opportunity to make live theatre part of their cultural heritage, as well as educate children on the many non-performing job opportunities available in our industry. The Broadway League is the national trade association for the Broadway industry. The League’s 700-plus members including theatre owners and operators, producers, presenters, and general managers help bring Broadway to more than 30 million people in New York each year. To provide services at a youth drop in center for LGBTQ youth of the Bronx and Northern Manhattan. The funds provided will to used to allow us to continue to operate a Tween/Teen Center in our agency. This past year, over 300 Tweens and Teens were served in a variety of recreational and physical education program (gym)including a monthly Saturday night program for Tweens. Some of our non recreational/educational programs include: SAT Prep Course/College Readiness – Students will prepare for the college entrance exam by learning strategies and techniques specifically designed to boost their score. The Readiness Seminars – Class is designed to introduce job readiness and employment skills to youth including attitude, skills, behavior, and more. High School Entrance Exam Prep – Participants will learn strategies, techniques, and timing to effectively take the high school entrance exam. Bay Ridge Bensonhurst To provide and support aquarium educational programs to promote the hobby of freshwater Beautification Preservation fish and plants, marine fish and corals and the proper care of aquatic creatures. Alliance Inc

Youth Youth

Weprin Mark-Viverito

Broadway League, Inc., The Bronx Community Pride Center, Inc.

13-0951470 06-1552851

$5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Vacca

Bronx House, Inc.

13-1739935

$75,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Gentile

Brooklyn Aquarium Society, Inc.

11-2461838

$1,500 DYCD-Y

11-3233233

Youth Discretionary

Page 13 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Lander

Brooklyn Arts Exchange, Inc.

11-3071458

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Reyna

Brooklyn Ballers Sports, Youth and Educational Corp.

65-1209020

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Gonzalez

Brooklyn Children's Museum

11-2495664

$7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mealy

Brooklyn Children's Museum

11-2495664

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Vann

Brooklyn Children's Museum

11-2495664

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Williams

Brooklyn Children's Museum

11-2495664

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Gonzalez

Brooklyn Chinese-American Association, Inc.

11-3065859

$25,000 DYCD-Y

Two free youth festivals. YOUTHWORKS for young people ages 7-18. Provides free coaching on weekends by professional artists in dance,theater, music in coaching clinics which culminate in a two day fully produced performance of students original works. Students are taught production, press. TEEN ARTS CONFERENCE brings over 200 teens from throughout the city together for two days of free workshops in dance, theater, auditioning, higher educational opportunities and culminates in an evening performance. Teaching artists are provided with professional development workshops. Basketball Tournament the overall organization and travel costs, Food and beverages to provide to the participants, Cultural Events tickets around the city, and rental fees to hosts basketball tournament practices and meets, and to pay staff salaries for the Group leaders, Directors, administrative staff. The museum provides educational, cultural and science programs for children and youth. School and camp programs were attended by more than 27,000 children in FY10. The free Museum Team after school program serves 250 participants with museum based education programs, college preparation and part-time employment. Total annual museum attendance is 230,000. The museum provides educational, cultural and science programs for children and youth. School and camp programs were attended by more than 27,000 children in FY10. The free Museum Team after school program serves 250 participants with museum based education programs, college preparation and part-time employment. Total annual museum attendance is 230,000. The museum provides educational, cultural and science programs for children and youth. School and camp programs were attended by more than 27,000 children in FY10. The free Museum Team after school program serves 250 participants with museum based education programs, college preparation and part-time employment. Total annual museum attendance is 230,000. The museumprovides educational, cultural and science programs for children and youth. School programs were attended by more than 20,000 children in FY10.The free Museum Team after school program serves 250 participants with museum based education programs, college preparation and part-time employment. Total annual museum attendance is 230,000. The requested funds will be used toward BCAs After-School Enrichment Program at P.S 94 including: hiring several Recreational Specialists, purchasing arts and crafts supplies and taking students on field trips. BCPC requests 5,000 toward programming, outreach development expenses associated with our new after-school youth leadership program Brooklyn Youth United Against Hate(BYU), now in development. Youth from through out the Borough will meet at the YWCA to develop implement meaningful programs services to decrease intolerance, provide a safe space for LGBTQ youth.Envisioned programs include:career leadership development,tutoring, mentoring,peer professional counseling,social support cultural workshops. Geared to all high school aged students.

Youth

Mendez

Brooklyn Community Pride Center, Inc.

26-2214534

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 14 of 151

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Brooklyn Evolution Development Corporation (BEDC) is dedicated to providing educational services to at-risk youth in the areas of science, technology and art. BEDCs Science Technology After-School Program provides tutoring services to middle school students primarily focused in the following communities in Brooklyn: Flatbush, East Flatbush, Flatlands, East New York, Brownsville and Canarsie. BEDCs classes provide -- tutoring in Science and Math, mentoring, computer training (i.e. web design, microsoft word application instruction, typing and graphic arts), workshops (i.e. health, science and technology),and art program instruction in collaboration with the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts (MoCADA). The Science Technology After-School program will be conducted at variety of middle schools in the target communities from 3-6pm and students will receive 4-6hours of targeted one-onone tutoring instruction each week. In most cases the schedule will break down as follows: 34pm -- homework assistance; 4-6pm -- targeted instructional learning assistance. In collaboration with MoCada student participants will receive art instruction such as, still life drawings, basic photography, water color painting and dance.

Youth

Williams

Brooklyn Evolution Development Corporation

11-3456119 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

BHS will reproduce and distribute poster-sized copies of The Plan of the City of New York in North America, a map created by Bernard Ratzer in the late 1760s, to classrooms throughout Brooklyn. The reproductions of the map will be accompanied by historical context, lesson plans and classroom activities that will enable students and teachers throughout Brooklyn to deepen their understanding of and engagement with Brooklyn history. According to map historian Paul E. Cohen, the Ratzer map “is perhaps the finest map of an American city and its environs produced in the 18th century.” Lieutenant Bernard Ratzer was a British engineer and surveyor who was commissioned by the British Army to make military maps; his work mostly involved surveying terrain and creating maps to be used by the British military during the French and Indian War and the Revolutionary War. In late 1767 Ratzer conducted extensive surveying of Manhattan and Kings County. Ratzer’s map was the first to provide a detailed view of the predevelopment topography of Manhattan as well as a detailed rendering of the then agrarian landscape of Brooklyn and Queens and a small portion of New Jersey. In addition to its topographical detail, the map also shows major roads and country lanes, as well as names of property owners. The map has many recognizable names: the Road to Flatbush, Red Hook, Bedfore and in Manhattan, Turtle Bay. Other areas on the map have entirely different names than their current nomenclature, and in some cases, there are two names, indicating clearly that New York was in a lively period of transition. With a legislative grant of 10,000, BHS will be able to reproduce and distribute copies of The Plan of the City of New York in North America to classrooms throughout Brooklyn. The posters and accompanying material will enable students and teachers throughout Brooklyn to interpret the richly textural history of Brooklyn and connect contemporary Brooklyn with its agrarian roots.

Youth

Lander

Brooklyn Historical Society, The

11-1630813

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 15 of 151

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Purpose of Funds Brooklyn Philharmonic, under the leadership of new Artistic Director Alan Pierson, aims to continue its Education and Community programming in Brooklyn’s 39th district in FY12. Brooklyn Phil’s programs develop musical thinkers through active participation and fulfill NY State Standards in Music and the five strands of the NYC Music Blueprint. These programs offered in the 39th district include SCORE at Brooklyn School for Collaborative Studies; a Senior Center concert at Cobble Hill Senior Center; and School Time Concerts, attended last season by PS 130, PS 230, PS 179, and the Hannah Senesh School.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

SCORE, previously called the School Residency Initiative, is a twelve week music composition residency bringing professional teaching artists and musicians directly into the classroom. Through the lens of their academic subjects, students compose their own music and are empowered by hearing their work performed by Brooklyn Phil musicians. School Time Concerts (STC), our full orchestra performances, are programmed to include elements that students can innately relate to, regardless of their previous musical experiences. This season’s program features the music of Brooklyn and New York composers George Gershwin, Duke Ellington, and Leonard Bernstein. In advance of the concerts, teachers receive a study guide and are invited to participate in a free workshop to assist them in preparing their students for experience. Senior Center Tours by Brooklyn Phil soloists and duets feature music ranging from Bach to Cole Porter. Percussionist William Trigg and vocalist Mary Trigg gave 11 senior center concerts throughout Brooklyn in November 2010, including Cobble Hill Senior Center. Thanks in part to support from Councilman Lander, SCORE school fees and STC’s ticket prices are low and Senior Center Tours are free. Larger support could allow us to increase our offerings in District 39. Youth Lander Brooklyn Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 11-1773636 $3,500 DYCD-Y Community Service is one of the core components of the Brooklyn Steppers program. Each year, participants are required to participate in service projects throughout New York City.Through monthly workshops, high school juniors and seniors learn about careers in the music and arts industries, and are guided and supported through the college application and admissions process. Youth James Brooklyn Steppers, Inc., The 27-1223035 $8,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 16 of 151

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The Brooklyn Steppers program is designed to support the full development of youth in Purpose of week during the school year (September – Brooklyn. Each member attends three sessions a Funds June), and a 6-week summer program. These sessions include: Academic Assistance, Artistic Instruction, Career Development, College Planning, Community Service and Performing Opportunities. Academic Assistance includes peer-tutoring and homework help, monthly personal development workshops, mentoring and exciting cultural trips and experiences. Our program has made a tremendous impact on the educational experiences of youth in Brooklyn, as exampled by this year’s 100 college admissions rate. Graduates have gone on to attend Bethune-Cookman College, Brooklyn College, Hampton University, Hobart William and Smith Colleges, and Howard University. The Brooklyn Steppers Marching Band have grown to be recognized the world over, having played for nearly all of New York’s major sports teams, heads of state, and corporate titans. Students receive individual and group instruction on a musical instrument and in dance from music educators and trained professionals. The Brooklyn Steppers have performed on televisions Law and Order, at Carnegie Hall and at the Inaugural Parade for President Barack Obama. Community Service is one of the core components of the Brooklyn Steppers program. Each year, participants are required to participate in service projects throughout New York City. Through service, students develop a sense of civic responsibility and learn the value of giving. Through monthly workshops, high school juniors and seniors learn about careers in the music and arts industries, and are guided and supported through the college application and admissions process. program is designed to support the full development of youth in The Brooklyn Steppers Brooklyn. Each member attends three sessions a week during the school year (September – June), and a 6-week summer program. These sessions include: Academic Assistance, Artistic Instruction, Career Development, College Planning, Community Service and Performing Opportunities. Academic Assistance includes peer-tutoring and homework help, monthly personal development workshops, mentoring and exciting cultural trips and experiences. Our program has made a tremendous impact on the educational experiences of youth in Brooklyn, as exampled by this year’s 100 college admissions rate. Graduates have gone on to attend Bethune-Cookman College, Brooklyn College, Hampton University, Hobart William and Smith Colleges, and Howard University. The Brooklyn Steppers Marching Band have grown to be recognized the world over, having played for nearly all of New York’s major sports teams, heads of state, and corporate titans. Students receive individual and group instruction on a musical instrument and in dance from music educators and trained professionals. The Brooklyn Steppers have performed on televisions Law and Order, at Carnegie Hall and at the Inaugural Parade for President Barack Obama. Community Service is one of the core components of the Brooklyn Steppers program. Each year, participants are required to participate in service projects throughout New York City. Through service, students develop a sense of civic responsibility and learn the value of giving. Through monthly workshops, high school juniors and seniors learn about careers in the music and arts industries, and are guided and supported through the college application and admissions process.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Levin

Brooklyn Steppers, Inc., The

27-1223035

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mealy

Brooklyn Steppers, Inc., The

27-1223035

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 17 of 151

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Council Member

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EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

The Brooklyn Steppers program is designed to support the full development of youth in Purpose of week during the school year (September – Brooklyn. Each member attends three sessions a Funds June), and a 6-week summer program. These sessions include: Academic Assistance, Artistic Instruction, Career Development, College Planning, Community Service and Performing Opportunities. Academic Assistance includes peer-tutoring and homework help, monthly personal development workshops, mentoring and exciting cultural trips and experiences. Our program has made a tremendous impact on the educational experiences of youth in Brooklyn, as exampled by this year’s 100 college admissions rate. Graduates have gone on to attend Bethune-Cookman College, Brooklyn College, Hampton University, Hobart William and Smith Colleges, and Howard University. The Brooklyn Steppers Marching Band have grown to be recognized the world over, having played for nearly all of New York’s major sports teams, heads of state, and corporate titans. Students receive individual and group instruction on a musical instrument and in dance from music educators and trained professionals. The Brooklyn Steppers have performed on televisions Law and Order, at Carnegie Hall and at the Inaugural Parade for President Barack Obama. Community Service is one of the core components of the Brooklyn Steppers program. Each year, participants are required to participate in service projects throughout New York City. Through service, students develop a sense of civic responsibility and learn the value of giving. Through monthly workshops, high school juniors and seniors learn about careers in the music and arts industries, and are guided and supported through the college application and admissions process. program is designed to support the full development of youth in The Brooklyn Steppers Brooklyn. Each member attends three sessions a week during the school year (September – June), and a 6-week summer program. These sessions include: Academic Assistance, Artistic Instruction, Career Development, College Planning, Community Service and Performing Opportunities. Academic Assistance includes peer-tutoring and homework help, monthly personal development workshops, mentoring and exciting cultural trips and experiences. Our program has made a tremendous impact on the educational experiences of youth in Brooklyn, as exampled by this year’s 100 college admissions rate. Graduates have gone on to attend Bethune-Cookman College, Brooklyn College, Hampton University, Hobart William and Smith Colleges, and Howard University. The Brooklyn Steppers Marching Band have grown to be recognized the world over, having played for nearly all of New York’s major sports teams, heads of state, and corporate titans. Students receive individual and group instruction on a musical instrument and in dance from music educators and trained professionals. The Brooklyn Steppers have performed on televisions Law and Order, at Carnegie Hall and at the Inaugural Parade for President Barack Obama. Community Service is one of the core components of the Brooklyn Steppers program. Each year, participants are required to participate in service projects throughout New York City. Through service, students develop a sense of civic responsibility and learn the value of giving. Through monthly workshops, high school juniors and seniors learn about careers in the music and arts industries, and are guided and supported through the college application and admissions process.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Vann

Brooklyn Steppers, Inc., The

27-1223035

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Williams

Brooklyn Steppers, Inc., The

27-1223035

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 18 of 151

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FC EIN

The GRAMMY® Award-winning Brooklyn Youth Chorus Academy was founded in 1992 with a mission of helping young people of all backgrounds realize their potential as musicians and individuals. BYCA now stands as one of the country’s leading youth choruses, providing a comprehensive music education program of unparalleled quality to students of all cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. BYCA is exceptional for its experiential approach to music education; for its inclusive approach to helping children succeed musically; for its commitment to diversity, both musical and cultural; and for the extraordinarily high quality of its concert performances. BYCA has performed with a wide-range of world-class performers such as the New York Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra, Elton John, Alicia Keys and Lou Reed. Few music organizations combine a commitment to broad service and inclusiveness with such high artistic goals. BYCA is both an educational institution and a group of progressively advanced performing ensembles. We serve over 325 students each year who study and perform as part of a choral ensemble grouped by age, skill and experience. BYCA respectfully requests the funding from the New York City Council to support and expand its Financial Aid Program. BYCA keeps tuition low, from 650-875 per year, and ensures that no student is turned away due to an inability to pay. BYCA continues to raise its commitment to offering financial aid in the face of rising need, currently offering over 85,000 in financial aid to roughly 100 students and nearly a third of our chorister population. An alltime record for BYCA. We seek to strengthen and further expand our financial aid program in FY 12 by offering support to additional 25 disadvantaged youngsters who would otherwise not be able to attend our program. The impact of this increased financial aid support will be as follows: Youth Youth Levin Wills Brooklyn Youth Chorus Academy Brooks Memorial United Methodist Church 11-3129249 * 11-1832868 $8,500 DYCD-Y $7,000 DYCD-Y • rovide 125 young people from low-income families access to high-quality music educat P Provide a safe/nurturing/fun filled environment for community youth through rec/ed, reading, musical activities during the summer and school year. The Brotherhood/Sister Sol plans to use this funding toward the general operation of our programs. Monies will be used to support the operations of our daily after school programming, Rites of Passage programs, youth organizing, leadership training, job training, community outreach and other program areas as needed. The Brotherhood/Sister Sol plans to use this funding toward the general operation of our programs. Monies will be used to support the operations of our daily after school programming, Rites of Passage programs, youth organizing, leadership training, job training, community outreach and other program areas as needed.

Youth

Dickens

Brotherhood/Sister Sol, The

13-3857387

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Jackson

Brotherhood/Sister Sol, The

13-3857387

$6,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Rose

Brothers Care, Inc.

26-1622585

$8,000 DYCD-Y

April 16, 2011 2 Golden Easter Egg Hunt catering to approximately 35 children ages 3-9 there are 5 special golden eggs each worth a 100.00 gift certificate to Toys-R-Us. June 2011 1st Annual Fishing 101 Expedition (ages10-16) Our 10th Annual West Brighton Harmony Day event will be held July 16, 2011. We will cater to over 1500 people. In August we will host our 2nd Annual Back To School Supply Give Away with the Staten Island Urban League The NYC Parks Department we will catered to over 100 children , November 2011 we will host our 3rd Annual Turkey Giveaway we will give away approximately 200 turkeys with full trimmings. December 2011 we will host our 4th Annual Xmas Toy Giveaway. We will cater to over 500 less fortunate children ages infant-15. We also have a website www.brotherscareinc.com and a facebook page brotherscareinc with pictures and information from our yearly ongoing Events our email address is www.brotherswhocar! e@aol.com

Youth Discretionary

Page 19 of 151

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Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Reyna

Bushwick Improvement Society, Inc.

11-2478788 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Horace Greene CCC and Stagg Street Center for Children are operated under the sponsorship of the Bushwick Improvement Society, Inc. (BIS). As provided for in the Certificate of Incorporation and the by-laws of the Bushwick Improvement Society, Inc., our mission is to provide Child Care and educational services to low-income working and non-working families of the Bushwick and Williamsburg communities of Brooklyn, New York. The BIS at Stagg Street Center for Children is located in community school district 14 of the Department of Education and Horace Greene CCC in district 32. Both programs offer pre-school and schoolage services for children ranging in age from two years –to twelve years old. Funding for this program is primarily from the Agency for Child Development, but both programs also provide Universal Pre-Kindergarten classes and both have a contract with the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) which is unde! r USDA to provide food services to all children. We are requesting funding in three specific areas of extreem need in our programs. First, we need funding for our literacy and cultural volunteers to have a background fingerprint clearance(10 X 115.00=1150.00)in order to work with our children and families. Second we desparatly need to bring in a health Prfesional to provide suppervision for Medicals and MAT certified staff members.(2000.00 for 12 Months) And finally our schoolage afterschool programs are in need of games and equipment(600.00 X 2= 1200.00) for a total of 4350.00.

Big Green Theater is a community-based program that combines an environmental education initiative with the presentation of a full-scale theatrical performance within the Green Theater/Eco Theater movement. Big Green Theater’s co-project managers and teaching artists teach playwriting and environmental education to local students in an after school setting, and help them construct and write plays about relevant, community-based environmental issues. These students will then have the opportunity to work with skilled artists at The Bushwick Starr as we professionally produce their plays. It is our goal to encourage the kids to think creatively about re-directing any kind of activity or production in an environmentally friendly way. The Bushwick Starr works with an ensemble of trained actors, directors, and designers to stage the students’ plays. We ask these professionals to challenge themselves to work within the Green Theater movement. For example: use only recycled materials for sets, costumes, props, etc.; design sets with disassembly in mind; avoid foams or plastics; and utilizing online ticketing and programming (no more paper programs!). Through the process of creating Big Green Theater, we educate our artists on environmental issues in the theater to show that one can continue to make creative work while thinking “green.” Youth Levin Bushwick Starr Inc., The 26-4546315 * $3,500 DYCD-Y The organization has been in existence for 67 years to promote baseball as a recreational activity. The club intends to educate youth through baseball in building character, promoting good citizenship, developing the health of mind and body and provide academic athletic scholarships to participants. Purchase Equipment, uniforms, league fees Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/ba Millennium Development

Youth Youth

Fidler Oddo

Cadets Baseball Club, Inc. Cadets Baseball Club, Inc.

11-2668901 * 11-2668901 *

$2,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

11-3199040

Youth Discretionary

Page 20 of 151

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Legal Name of Organization

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* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Wills

Calvary Baptist Church

11-2480945 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y

We are a faith-based program under the auspice of Calvary Baptist Church, created to serve children, youth, and young adults here in South Jamaica. We also conduct workshops for our volunteers to learn how to work with the children and teens and seminars for parents to improve their parenting skills. We operate a number of programs for the children of our community, including: a six to eight week summer camp, a back-to-school carnival with school supplies, Santa Comes to Calvary, our International Childrens Day carnival, and an Easter Egg Hunt. We also operate program for teens that include: academic, recreation, and social development, mentoring, homework help, computer lab, motivational and inspirational speakers, Boy and Girl Scouts, basketball, dance, drilling, singing, step, community service and health and fitness. Our program, primarily operates out of Calvary Baptist Church and our annex, the Imani Youth House. We do, however, take exposure trips to include parks, museums, other churches, schools, college fairs and other activities. We have travel as far away as Africa and California, Virginia and upstate New York and as close as the Queens Museum of Art and Madison Square Garden. The Caribbean American Sports and Cultural Youth Movement Inc. (CASYM) is a not-forprofit, community-based youth organization that was founded in 1983. Since its inception, the aim of the organization has been to instill confidence, responsibility, and integrity in its youth membership, through academic, recreational, social, and cultural activities. Some of the areas that are utilized as a means to fulfill this aim are dance, drama, basketball, soccer, GED preparation, homework assistance, and music.

Youth

Eugene

Caribbean American Sports and Cultural Youth Movement (CASYM), Inc. 11-2778372 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y

The Caribbean American Sports Cultural Youth Movement (CASYM) has enjoyed significant growth since it was founded in 1983. CASYM started with a soccer program. Since then, CASYM launched arts, cultural, and educational programs to meet the needs of the young people primarily in the Crown Heights and Flatbush communities as well as surrounding communities. The programs were first offered in three schools. In the last four years CASYM has expanded to now provide its program to schools in various community districts. CASYM is seeking funding for general operational support to aid the mission and programs of CASYM. Your financial contribution will enable CASYM to fulfill its mission to enrich lives of young people through the arts, continue and strengthen its current programs, and explore the potential of expanding existing programs. Today CASYM serves thousands of young people in the various community districts. Providing its program to schools in various community districts and more recently working with various nursing and rehabilitation centers such as Dr. Susan Smith McKinney, providing steelpan as a therapy for the residents. CASYM is a community-based youth development and arts organization dedicated to supporting the creative, educational, and vocational development of at-risk youth of the African Diaspora. CASYM was founded by parents of Caribbean backgrounds to serve young people in the Crown Heights community. Since it was founded, CASYM has continually sought to enhance the lives of the young people it serves. They are typically from lowincome households. CASYM offers programs in dance, drama, and music. The programs are structured to teach responsibility, provide positive role models and mentors, and encourage professionalism and good citizenship. The organization received a citation from former Brooklyn Borough President Howard Golden. CASYM works with and has collaborated with the seven public and parochial schools in the Crown Heights community; t

Youth

Mealy

Caribbean American Sports and Cultural Youth Movement (CASYM), Inc. 11-2778372 *

$20,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 21 of 151

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Purpose of Funds The Caribbean American Sports and Cultural Youth Movement Inc. (CASYM) is a not-forprofit, community-based youth organization that was founded in 1983. Since its inception, the aim of the organization has been to instill confidence, responsibility, and integrity in its youth membership, through academic, recreational, social, and cultural activities. Some of the areas that are utilized as a means to fulfill this aim are dance, drama, basketball, soccer, GED preparation, homework assistance, and music.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The task of engaging the minds of our young people and challenging them to reach their full potential is very essential in today’s world. There is tremendous pressure to succeed in an environment that rarely provides many opportunities to do so. New and effective programs are required, and CASYM has taken the responsibility to provide these programs. For the past 15 years, CASYM has been efficiently implementing and managing programs at various schools throughout New York City. Most notable where successful steelpan programs have been implemented are at PS 123 in Queens, PS 285, PS 219, PS 189, PS 161, PS 91, and PS 397 in Brooklyn. One of the most noteworthy achievements for CASYM has been the successful implementation of the steelpan program as a music credit at Prospect Heights High School. In addition, the youth organization has conducted lectures and demonstrations and performed at colleges and universities such as Princeton, Yale, Harvard, NYU Columbia, Rutgers,! Pace, and Brooklyn College. The proposed music program utilizes instructors that are extremely qualified with approximately 15 years of teaching experience and extensive performance credentials. In addition, the instructors hold a combination of music diplomas, certificates, and accredited degrees. Caribbean American Sports and Cultural Youth Movement (CASYM), Inc. 11-2778372 * The steelpan music program is part of CASYM’s cultural enrichment goals and focuses on historical aspects of the steelpan movement, music theory and performance proficiency, and

Youth

Williams

$9,314 DYCD-Y

Carroll Gardens Association, Inc. is requesting funding to support the CGA Training Center. The Training Center will offer Computer Training and serve as a venue for a variety of events that include job fairs, symposiums, round tables, and workshops. The Computer Literacy Training is a six-week training program in Microsoft Office that equips participants to learn about computer basics, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The entire training has 36 sessions, with each session lasting 2 hours. Classes will be held 3 times a week over 6 weeks. Students will receive a Computer Literacy Certificate after successfully passing the Certificate Test. Over the funding year, we plan to conduct 8 cycles that will train a total of 64 participants. The Computer Training Curriculum follows: •Week 1: Introduction, Hardware, Software, Internet, Storage, Ram, Motherboard Speed. IBM vs Mac. ,Windows, Saving, Pull Down Menus, Margins, Portrait, Landscape, Fonts, Backspace Key, Delete Key, Space Bar, Date Feature, Enter Key, Tool Bars, Scroll Bars, Insertion Point, Minimize, Maximize, Close, Spellcheck/Grammar, Thesaurus, Insert Text, Overtype, Undo, Show/Hide Codes. •Week 2: Indenting Text, Hanging Indents, Inserting Symbols, Borders, Shading, Bullets. •Week 3: Working with Templates, Paragraph Spacing, Cut and Paste, Mail Merge •Week 4: Working with Columns, Inserting and Formatting Pictures, Picture Effects, Inserting Tables, Drawing Tables, Formatting a Table •Week 5: Introduction to Excel, Basic Math Operands and Functions •Week 6: Introduction to PowerPoint, working with slides, creating a presentation, using PowerPoint to design Graphic Images The requested funds will be used to pay for the staff that will support the CGA Training Center, as well as supplies, software and equipment upgrades as needed. Youth Lander Carroll Gardens Association, Inc. 11-2573432 * $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 22 of 151

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* Amount ($)

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Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Brewer Oddo

Cash Camp, Inc. (d/b/a World of Money Org.) Catholic Charities Community Services, Archdiocese of New York

20-3813654 * 13-5562185

$3,500 DYCD-Y $5,500 DYCD-Y

To support the financial education of underserved young people ages 9 - 18, in the New York Tri-State area. SI CYO After School Program

Youth

Vallone

Catholic Charities Neighborhood Services, Inc.

11-2047151

$4,500 DYCD-Y

The funds for the G.E.D. program located at the Queens North Community Center formerly known as Flowers with Care will provide for: a BA counselor and incentives to support consistent participation by students in G.E.D. classes as well as enhancement activities to strengthen their academic and vocational skills. The funds will support the successful completion of participants G.E.D. Students who are enrolled in the G.E.D. program are assigned enrichment classes after their core G.E.D. classes including but not limited to: Improvisational Acting, Computer Skills, Playwriting. English or Math Tutoring is available to the students who need additional assistance for the G.E.D. and/or seek it to prepare for their college entrance. During the 2:30-4pm time period, individual tutoring, recreational activities or job/college assistance is available to all students. On a weekly basis, the program features a Leadership Speaker Serie! s that brings professionals from the city to the site to speak about their educational and professional history and how their experiences have shaped their definition of leadership and what kind of leader they have become. There are parent/child workshops to improve communication as well as ESL classes are available not only to the parents but to all members of the family. The program also sponsors college tours to local community and four-year colleges of interest to students and field trips that that enhance team-building skills, problem-solving, and offer a fun respite from the daily academics on site. CAE teaches practical strategies to help people prevent, respond to, and heal from domestic violence, rape, and sexual harassment. We focus on adult and teen women, children, LGBT individuals and survivors—helping them to build skills to break cycles of violence in their lives and communities. With your support, CAE will reach 110 women, teens, and children in District 38 at organizations including Trinity Healing Space, Center Against Domestic Violence; Sunset Park Alliance for Youth; and Center for Family Life.

Youth

Gonzalez

Center for Anti-Violence Education (CAE), Inc., The

11-2444676

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 23 of 151

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Purpose of Funds CAE seeks increased support of our violence prevention, self-defense, and empowerment programs for adult and young women and LGBT individuals—most of whom are survivors of violence. For over 35 years, CAE’s programs have helped people build skills and self-esteem, learn verbal and physical self-defense strategies, and heal from past abuse. With your support, CAE will reach 100 diverse individuals in District 39, and achieve the following:

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

• iven the ongoing epidemic of violence, CAE will provide a three-week LGBT violence G prevention course that addresses the many issues of violence LGBT communities face, including harassment, bias crimes, and relationship abuse. Through the course people break isolation and build community. • aintain our unique after-school program, Power, Action, Change for Teens (PACT). PACT M focuses on recognizing dangerous situations, relationship abuse, sharing prevention strategies, de-escalation skills, and building physical skills and power. Teens build confidence to be active and set boundaries, and develop leadership skills. • Increase the number of workshops we offer through our self-defense courses for both adult and teen women. This core program was cut back due to reduced funding; to meet the need we seek to reinstate additional workshops. This is the only such course in NYC that offers free childcare. • ilot a new program focusing on pre-teen girls, an important and vulnerable population P when it comes to coping with harassment and learning to avoid dangerous relationships. Participants in CAE’s programs achieve increased: self-esteem and confidence; understanding of the right to be respected and live free from all forms of violence; ability to identify abuse and set boundaries where appropriate; skills to de-escalate and resolve conflicts; understanding of the importance of telling a trusted adult when you have been hurt; knowledge of available resources; and understanding of the importance of civic involvement. Youth Lander Center for Anti-Violence Education (CAE), Inc., The 11-2444676 $3,500 DYCD-Y For over 35 years, CAE has developed and implemented programs that help people build skills to break cycles of violence. CAE seeks renewed support of our unique and powerful violence prevention, self-defense, and empowerment programs for teen women and children in District 33. Your support will help 125 young people learn how to avoid and prevent potentially harmful relationships, build safety skills and self-confidence, and protect themselves using their voice and physical self-defense strategies. Our childrens program helps young people build a strong foundation by providing the support they need to develop self-esteem, prevent violence, and increase their ability to make healthy life choices. We focus on bullying, transportation safety, and other youthspecific issues. Through interactive games, role plays, discussions, and physical activities arts, children practice ways to identify abuse, set boundaries, de-escalate conflicts, and seek support from peers and adults. Our program for teen women focuses on recognizing dangerous situations, relationship abuse, sharing prevention strategies, de-escalation skills, conflict resolution, and building physical skills and power. It increases teens’ confidence to be active, set boundaries, speak up on their own behalf, and on behalf of each other. Partner organizations include: Dwa Fanm; Girls for Gender Equity; Urban Assembly Institute of Math Science; Sadie Nash Leadership Project. Participants in CAE’s programs achieve increased ability to identify at least: three nonphysical violence prevention strategies; three physical violence prevention techniques; and one safe place/resource they can go to seek support. Participants also experience increased self-esteem; understanding of the right to be respected and live free from violence; ability to identify abuse/set boundaries; understanding of the importance of telling a trusted adult if you have been hurt; and knowledge of available resources.

Youth

Levin

Center for Anti-Violence Education (CAE), Inc., The

11-2444676

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 24 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Lappin

Center for Arts Education, The

13-3938080

$6,500 DYCD-Y

The Center for Arts Education (CAE) respectfully requests discretionary funding to support its Parents As Arts Partners (PAAP) program at one or more public schools in your council district, and/or funding towards a Citywide Initiative that will support the implementation of PAAP to benefit schools in all five boroughs, including those in your district. The Summer Fun Childrens Series provides, free entertainment featuring artists specializing in childrens performances in the field of music, storytelling and theater for over 15 years After School Tutorial Program - CFLC provides after school tutoring for children in grades 1 5. Tutoring is available in reading, math, writing and all elementary studies. CFLC also assist in test preparation. We serve the Stapleton, Concord and Parkhill areas of Staten Island, but also include the entire North Shore. The population that we serve includes African American, Hispanic and Mexican and the African community of Parkhill. The Central Queens Y provides a supportive safey net for over 1500 youth each year through a comprehensive and integrated service delivery system. Program and service components include: job training and placement, leadership development,community service,educational and GED classes, intervention and prevention services, summer youth employment programs, tutoring, mentoring and organized sports leagues.

Youth

Vallone

Central Astoria Local Development Coalition, Inc.

11-2652331

$5,714 DYCD-Y

Youth

Rose

Central Family Life Center, Inc.

13-3626127 *

$8,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koslowitz

Central Queens YM & YWHA, Inc.

11-1633509

$15,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Rodriguez

Centro Altagracia de Fe y Justicia

16-1765323

$10,000 DYCD-Y

This expansion of our current community organizing porgram would consist of week-long service projects for youth, ages 13-18, to be conducted during the school breaks in the summer and mid-winter. The intended service projects would be conducted at various locations within Community Board 12, such as senior center, parks, churches, CBOs, etc. Each service day would conclude with a reflectionary session, giving the participants an opportunity to share their experiences as well as receive additional information regarding some of the big picture questions. For example, participants working on a project at a senior center, would reflect on the perceptions, treatment and care of the elderly in our society. The Gan Israel summer DAY CAMP is a winner among childrens camps, growing rapidly from year to year due to the incredible environment it offers. The children have a full day to enjoy a very wide range of educational, ethical and cultural activities. The uniqueness of our camp, thanks to our experienced staff and exceptional programs, attracts public school children most of whom would otherwise pass the summer on the streets. The day camp serves children of low-income families. No child is turned away for lack of funds. The Purpose of Funds goes to the youth library. We offer an after school program to assist students with their homework and story time/ video hour for children of all ages.

Youth

Greenfield

Chabad Lubavitch of Kensington

11-3157035 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koppell

Chabad Lubavitch of Riverdale

13-3697594

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 25 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Chai Lifeline’s department of volunteer services provides ongoing training to 800 community volunteers (for this particular award) and implements socialization and recreational programs that build coping strategies and self esteem, develop social skills, and provide outlets for stress-free recreation for approx.1,000 (unduplicated) children (ill children and their siblings) and their parents throughout the five boroughs. Training focuses on building an understanding of the impact of life-threatening illness, chronic disorders, catastrophic injuries and bereavement in young families. Volunteers learn specific social skills that enable them to provide support and encouragement. Volunteers encourage families to participate in socialization programs, including Big Brothers/Big Sisters visits; family days at amusement parks; creative arts workshops for children; and recreational activities designed to build skills and peer friendships. Youth Greenfield Chai-Life Line 11-2940331 $5,000 DYCD-Y Chazaq provides a wide range of youth services including after school programs, trips, lectures, counseling, homework assistance a magazine and web site. The funds from this program will be used to support the after school program. This provides teenagers with a range of supervised social and recreational programs. Food is provided. Individual and group counseling and homework assistance are part of the program. To support a school program, classroom chess, after-school chess clubs, summer chess camps, and scholastic tournament program. To provide Classroom Chess, After-School Chess Clubs, Summer Chess Camps, Scholastic Tournament Program, College Bound Program, Project Chess and a Teacher Training Institute. School Program: Citywide, 50 elementary and middle schools participate; 13,000 students learn to play chess annually. Classroom Chess: Schools are assigned a Chess-in-the-Schools trained instructor who annually teaches 250 to 300 students in each school. Materials to learn and play chess are provided. After-School Chess Clubs: Clubs, open to all students at each school and offer advanced chess instruction. Club size: 20 to 90 students. Summer Chess Camps: Open all students in the School Program. Scholastic Tournament Program: Twenty-five weekend and Monday holiday tournaments held at public schools. Tournaments are open to all New York City children with 400-750 competing in each tournament. We sponsor about 300 students on school teams in the School Program to compete in national tournaments. College Bound Program: College Bound provides comprehensive college preparatory services.100 of the class of 2010 graduated from high school on time and 95 of seniors entered college in the fall. Programming includes: academic enrichment, college guidance, social development and chess. The Middle School Initiative offers college tours and cultural events for our younger students. Project Chess, Teacher Training Institute: Project Chess trains York City public school educators to effectively teach chess in the classroom and after-school. Training includes workshops, materials, and tournaments. All New York City public school teachers are eligible. More than 1,000 teachers have participated. Youth Comrie Chess-in-the-Schools, Inc. 13-6119036 $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koslowitz

Chazaq Organization

26-3598999

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Arroyo

Chess-in-the-Schools, Inc.

13-6119036

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Brewer

Chess-in-the-Schools, Inc.

13-6119036

$6,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 26 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

School Program: Citywide, 50 elementary and middle schools participate; 13,000 students learn to play chess annually. Classroom Chess: Schools are assigned a Chess-in-the-Schools trained instructor who annually teaches 250 to 300 students in each school. Materials to learn and play chess are provided. After-School Chess Clubs: Clubs, open to all students at each school and offer advanced chess instruction. Club size: 20 to 90 students. Summer Chess Camps: Open all students in the School Program. Scholastic Tournament Program: Twenty-five weekend and Monday holiday tournaments held at public schools. Tournaments are open to all New York City children with 400-750 competing in each tournament. We sponsor about 300 students on school teams in the School Program to compete in national tournaments. College Bound Program: College Bound provides comprehensive college preparatory services.100 of the class of 2010 graduated from high school on time and 95 of seniors entered college in the fall. Programming includes: academic enrichment, college guidance, social development and chess. The Middle School Initiative offers college tours and cultural events for our younger students. Project Chess, Teacher Training Institute: Project Chess trains York City public school educators to effectively teach chess in the classroom and after-school. Training includes workshops, materials, and tournaments. All New York City public school teachers are eligible. More than 1,000 teachers have participated. Youth Youth Youth Youth Dickens Garodnick James Koo Chess-in-the-Schools, Inc. Chess-in-the-Schools, Inc. Chess-in-the-Schools, Inc. Chess-in-the-Schools, Inc. 13-6119036 13-6119036 13-6119036 13-6119036 $4,000 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $6,000 DYCD-Y Funding will support the annual Chess Challenge tournament in District 4 at Robert F. Wagner, Jr. Middle School. School Program: Citywide, 50 elementary and middle schools participate; 13,000 students learn to play chess annually. School Program: Citywide, 50 elementary and middle schools participate; 13,000 students learn to play chess annually.

Youth Discretionary

Page 27 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

School Program: Citywide, 50 elementary and middle schools participate; 13,000 students learn to play chess annually. Classroom Chess: Schools are assigned a Chess-in-the-Schools trained instructor who annually teaches 250 to 300 students in each school. Materials to learn and play chess are provided. After-School Chess Clubs: Clubs, open to all students at each school and offer advanced chess instruction. Club size: 20 to 90 students. Summer Chess Camps: Open all students in the School Program. Scholastic Tournament Program: Twenty-five weekend and Monday holiday tournaments held at public schools. Tournaments are open to all New York City children with 400-750 competing in each tournament. We sponsor about 300 students on school teams in the School Program to compete in national tournaments. College Bound Program: College Bound provides comprehensive college preparatory services.100 of the class of 2010 graduated from high school on time and 95 of seniors entered college in the fall. Programming includes: academic enrichment, college guidance, social development and chess. The Middle School Initiative offers college tours and cultural events for our younger students. Project Chess, Teacher Training Institute: Project Chess trains York City public school educators to effectively teach chess in the classroom and after-school. Training includes workshops, materials, and tournaments. All New York City public school teachers are eligible. More than 1,000 teachers have participated. Youth Lander Chess-in-the-Schools, Inc. 13-6119036 $3,500 DYCD-Y School Program: Citywide, 50 elementary and middle schools participate; 13,000 students learn to play chess annually. Classroom Chess: Schools are assigned a Chess-in-the-Schools trained instructor who annually teaches 250 to 300 students in each school. Materials to learn and play chess are provided. After-School Chess Clubs: Clubs, open to all students at each school and offer advanced chess instruction. Club size: 20 to 90 students. Summer Chess Camps: Open all students in the School Program. Scholastic Tournament Program: Twenty-five weekend and Monday holiday tournaments held at public schools. Tournaments are open to all New York City children with 400-750 competing in each tournament. We sponsor about 300 students on school teams in the School Program to compete in national tournaments. College Bound Program: College Bound provides comprehensive college preparatory services.100 of the class of 2010 graduated from high school on time and 95 of seniors entered college in the fall. Programming includes: academic enrichment, college guidance, social development and chess. The Middle School Initiative offers college tours and cultural events for our younger students. Project Chess, Teacher Training Institute: Project Chess trains York City public school educators to effectively teach chess in the classroom and after-school. Training includes workshops, materials, and tournaments. All New York City public school teachers are eligible. More than 1,000 teachers have participated. Youth Levin Chess-in-the-Schools, Inc. 13-6119036 $6,214 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 28 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

School Program: Citywide, 50 elementary and middle schools participate; 13,000 students learn to play chess annually. Classroom Chess: Schools are assigned a Chess-in-the-Schools trained instructor who annually teaches 250 to 300 students in each school. Materials to learn and play chess are provided. After-School Chess Clubs: Clubs, open to all students at each school and offer advanced chess instruction. Club size: 20 to 90 students. Summer Chess Camps: Open all students in the School Program. Scholastic Tournament Program: Twenty-five weekend and Monday holiday tournaments held at public schools. Tournaments are open to all New York City children with 400-750 competing in each tournament. We sponsor about 300 students on school teams in the School Program to compete in national tournaments. College Bound Program: College Bound provides comprehensive college preparatory services.100 of the class of 2010 graduated from high school on time and 95 of seniors entered college in the fall. Programming includes: academic enrichment, college guidance, social development and chess. The Middle School Initiative offers college tours and cultural events for our younger students. Project Chess, Teacher Training Institute: Project Chess trains York City public school educators to effectively teach chess in the classroom and after-school. Training includes workshops, materials, and tournaments. All New York City public school teachers are eligible. More than 1,000 teachers have participated. Youth Mealy Chess-in-the-Schools, Inc. 13-6119036 $5,000 DYCD-Y School Program: Citywide, 50 elementary and middle schools participate; 13,000 students learn to play chess annually. Classroom Chess: Schools are assigned a Chess-in-the-Schools trained instructor who annually teaches 250 to 300 students in each school. Materials to learn and play chess are provided. After-School Chess Clubs: Clubs, open to all students at each school and offer advanced chess instruction. Club size: 20 to 90 students. Summer Chess Camps: Open all students in the School Program. Scholastic Tournament Program: Twenty-five weekend and Monday holiday tournaments held at public schools. Tournaments are open to all New York City children with 400-750 competing in each tournament. We sponsor about 300 students on school teams in the School Program to compete in national tournaments. College Bound Program: College Bound provides comprehensive college preparatory services.100 of the class of 2010 graduated from high school on time and 95 of seniors entered college in the fall. Programming includes: academic enrichment, college guidance, social development and chess. The Middle School Initiative offers college tours and cultural events for our younger students. Project Chess, Teacher Training Institute: Project Chess trains York City public school educators to effectively teach chess in the classroom and after-school. Training includes workshops, materials, and tournaments. All New York City public school teachers are eligible. More than 1,000 teachers have participated. Youth Rodriguez Chess-in-the-Schools, Inc. 13-6119036 $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 29 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

CAPP’s Child Safety Workshop is a primary prevention and crisis intervention program that provides children with abuse prevention education and offers an opportunity for children who have experienced abuse to get help and begin the intervention process immediately. Last year, 24,800 children throughout the five boroughs of New York City attended the Child Safety Workshop, 407 families were referred for intervention, including 147 abuse reports to Child Protective Services. A grant of 9,000 will educate an additional 600 children about physical and sexual abuse in the neighborhoods within your City Council District. Statistical data over the last few years indicates that prevention programs like CAPP’s Child Safety Workshop are having an important impact on our community. Because of programs like ours, we are beginning to see evidence of a decline in the number of reported child sexual abuse cases in the United States. We are making incredible progress and all of us have a role to play in the efforts to end child abuse. Youth Dickens Child Abuse Prevention Program, Inc. 11-2864750 $4,000 DYCD-Y A grant of 9,000 will educate an additional 600 children about physical and sexual abuse in the neighborhoods within your City Council District. Youth Palma Child Abuse Prevention Program, Inc. 11-2864750 $7,000 DYCD-Y

The Child Center of NY transforms the lives of more than 18,000 children and families a year, thus insuring their emotional well-being and success in life. The agency also contributes to the economy of Queens County by employing almost 900 individuals. I am writing to ask that you allocate 5,000 in FY ’12 funds to keep these vital safety net services in place at The Child Center’s programs in your district. These are: 1) Counseling for Children, Families and Teens in Child Family Clinic Plus, which provides education about emotional issues, screening, assessment and treatment. 2) Child Development at our Day Care Center and Head Start Collaboration, which provides quality early childhood education for children, ages three and four, and supports for their parents.3) Youth Development at our After-School Program. The funds we are requesting will be used as follows: (a) to increase staff time, including youth and parent workers who will reside in the district, thus improving our child-staff ratio or serving more children (b) to provide staff, including youth and parent workers, with training that will improve instructional quality and therapeutic outcomes; and (c) to purchase additional curricula and supplies for the programs. Youth Ferreras Child Center of New York, Inc., The 11-1733454 $5,000 DYCD-Y Requested funds will be used: (a) to increase staff time, including youth workers who will reside in the district, (b) to provide staff, including youth workers, with training that will improve instructional quality and therapeutic outcomes; (c) to purchase program supplies I am writing to ask to allocate funds to keep vital safety net services in place at programs in your district.

Youth

Gennaro

Child Center of New York, Inc., The

11-1733454

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koo

Child Center of New York, Inc., The

11-1733454

$6,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 30 of 151

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The Child Center of NY transforms the lives of more than 18,000 children and families a year, thus insuring their emotional well-being and success in life. The agency also contributes to the economy of Queens County by employing almost 900 individuals. I am writing to ask that you allocate 7,500 in FY12 funds to keep these vital safety net services in place at The Child Center’s programs in your district. These are: 1) Counseling for Children, Families and Teens in our Outreach to Schools with Asian Students, where bi-lingual and bi-cultural staff assist new immigrant children and their families with a host of issues. MS 74, 61-15 Oceania Street, Bayside PS 46, 64-45 218th Street, Bayside Cardozo High School, 57-00 223 Street, Bayside 2) Youth Development at our After-School Program providing safe, enriching and fun activities for children and youth at: MS 74, 61-15 Oceania Street, Bayside (150 youth), which we hope will stay open The funds we are requesting will be used as follows: (a) to increase staff time, including youth workers who will reside in the district, thus improving our child-Staff ratio or serving more children (b) to provide staff, including youth workers, with training that will improve instructional quality and therapeutic outcomes; and (c) to purchase additional curricula and supplies for the programs. The Child Center of NY transforms the lives of more than 18,000 children and families a year, thus insuring their emotional well-being and success in life. The agency also contributes to the economy of Queens County by employing almost 900 individuals. Funds to keep these vital safety net services in place at The Child Center’s programs in your district would be at our Beacon at MS 72, our Beacon at MS 226, and for community violence reduction efforts in the community. In your district are as follows: 1) Counseling for Children, Families and Teens at our Children’s Mental Health Clinic 115-15 Sutphin Boulevard, South Jamaica And in Child Family Clinic Plus, which provides education about emotional issues, screening, assessment and treatment, on-site at schools and child abuse prevention agencies, including: PS 48, 155-02 108th Avenue, Jamaica 2) Youth Development at our Beacon Schools, which provide a broad range of after-school, weekend, evening and summer activities for 1,300 individuals (children and adults) each, including: MS 72, 133-25 Guy Brewer Boulevard, Jamaica MS 226, 121-10 Rockaway Boulevard, South Ozone Park And our After-School and Summer Program for 180 children at: PS 223, 125-20 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica And the Teen Impact Prevention Project, teen led outreach, education groups and counseling for youth at risk of contracting the HIV virus, premature pregnancy, or being the victim of teen dating violence at 115-15 Sutphin Boulevard, South Jamaica 3) Home Visiting to prevent psychiatric hospitalization for youngsters at imminent risk, through home based crisis intervention and skills building, including WAIVER-115-15 Sutphin Boulevard, South Jamaica Funds will be used as follows: (a) to increase staff time, including youth workers who will reside in the district, thus improving our child-Staff ratio or serving more children (b) to provide staff, including youth workers, with training, and (c) program supplies

Youth

Weprin

Child Center of New York, Inc., The

11-1733454

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Wills

Child Center of New York, Inc., The

11-1733454

$16,214 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 31 of 151

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

City Council Discretionary Funds will be for the Create Success Educational Program. Create Success is a multi facet educational program that provides academic support, crisis intervention, counseling, mentoring and recreational and creative arts activities to disadvantaged children and youth at risk of educational failure. Beside the basic educational aspects of homework help, mini lessons and tutoring, the program addresses other social issues that hinder a child’s ability to achieve success. Our College Bound arm of the Create Success program provides SAT prep classes and mentorship to High School students that have no accessibility or affordability to these services. Youth Youth Gonzalez Arroyo Children of the City Children's Aid Society, The 11-3308972 13-5562191 $20,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y To support after-school and youth development programs at Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School.

Youth

Dickens

Children's Aid Society, The

13-5562191

$4,500 DYCD-Y

The Children’s Aid Society respectfully requests 10,000 to support two groundbreaking programs at our Hope Leadership Academy (HLA): The YES program, which provides summer employment for 15 – 20 youth, often at the offices of elected officials, to youth who have completed our Corporate Workplace Program; and, Women’s Wellness Day, which brings together women and girls from the Harlem community to provide them with a day of mental, physical, and spiritual rejuvenation through workshops, performances, and artistic projects. Building on the success of our programs for older youth at our nearby Drew Hamilton and Frederick Douglass Centers, the HOPE Leadership Academy (HLA) is our exclusively teen center that gives adolescents a safe place to process their feelings on violence and victimization, and shows them how to derive strength from their experiences so that they are empowered rather than hopeless. Whether youth are in-s! chool or out-of-school, HLA has made a tremendous difference in the lives of more than 300 underserved mostly African American and Latino teens. Your support would cover the onetime costs of materials and supplies for Women’s Wellness Day and stipends for three summer interns, and materials and supplies for trainings and workshops for the YES program. The Children’s Aid Society (CAS) respectfully requests 10,000 to strengthen our youth programs at PS 8, Mirabal Sisters Campus, and the Drew Hamilton Center, all CAS sites in Council Member Jackson’s district. These programs serve more than 700 youth annually, keeping them safe, engaged and exposing them to new skills and opportunities, while providing critical services to families. Youth in these programs gain challenging, hands-on educational, volunteer, and service experiences as well as access to health and well-being services. The Council Member’s support would enhance some of our most popular projects at these programs including the NASA space camp, youth council, arts, science, and transition to high school support Proposed FY 2012 funding from the City Council would be used for salaries of the part-time staff members who work with participants including the Teen Program Coordinator, 4 group leaders, 4 group workers, and art and cooking specialists. Most staff members are Deaf, and all are fluent in American Sign Language and experienced working with special needs youngsters. To provide programming to youth at the East Harlem and Frederick Douglass Centers as well as local schools. The Children’s Aid Society respectfully requests 10,000 to support our Youth Council. The Youth Council reverses negative teen stereotypes and provides opportunities for youth to advocate for their peers on issues of shared concern through civic awareness and engagement. Your support of 10,000, covering the cost of portions of trips, supplies, and the conference, will ensure that the Youth Council continues to transform and empower the youth in our communities into our society’s next generation of effective citizens and leaders.

Youth

Jackson

Children's Aid Society, The

13-5562191

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Lappin Mark-Viverito

Children's Aid Society, The Children's Aid Society, The

13-5562191 13-5562191

$25,000 DYCD-Y $11,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Palma

Children's Aid Society, The

13-5562191

$7,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 32 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Rodriguez

Children's Aid Society, The

13-5562191

$8,000 DYCD-Y

The Children’s Aid Society respectfully requests 15,000 to support our after-school and youth development programs at PS 152, PS 5, and Salome Urena de Henriquez Campus. The program at PS 152 provides 260 youth with invaluable after-school opportunities, such as arts, sports, technology, and science. Sixty-nine children are currently on the waitlist. Our after-school program at PS 5 serves 240 youth and has a waitlist of 103 students. SUMA serves 200 youth after-school. Each of these schools is also a Children’s Aid Society community school. Our community schools offer comprehensive health, dental, mental health and social services to students, in addition to extensive after-school, enrichment, evening, weekend, holiday and summer programming, and classes for adults. This model has a proven track record of positive outcomes, including improved student achievement, improved mental and physical health, higher teacher and st! udent attendance, and increased parental involvement. Your support will give families valuable child care that can ease the challenges of this tough economic time. More than that, our after-school program covers a wide variety of disciplines and interests, such as character education, career development, arts, sports and life skills, so that every child finds a program that builds on his/her strengths and fills any learning gaps. With your support of these programs, more than 700 youth in your district will be safe, engaged, learning and on the path to a healthy adolescence and successful education. The Children’s Aid Society respectfully requests 10,000 for its Goodhue Center to strengthen enriching recreational and educational services to 50 youth in a five day a week after school program for pre-teens and a two evening a week teen program. In both programs, youth will be involved in a variety of sports, arts, computer technology, and educational activities that include homework help and tutoring. These programs are designed to help youth develop communication skills, and positive social relationships with peers and adults, and to strengthen their self-esteem through participation in age appropriate, challenging and enriching activities. Free Art Island Outpost, a free, family-focused, weekend art program during the summer of 2011. Funding will support the Children's Museum's free family-focused art, music and culture program serving thousands of New York City children and their families for a summer weekend on Governors Island. CMA is requesting funding for Free Art Island Outpost, a free, family-focused, weekend (Friday through Sunday) art program on Governors Island during the summer of 2011. CMA is requesting funding for our Accessible Arts Program, which provides free or low-cost art experiences to thousands of under-served and low-income New York children and parents including evening and after-school art programs. We ask for funding towards perishable supplies vital to school needs and daily functions, like cleaning supplies, art supplies and copy paper.

Youth Youth

Rose Chin

Children's Aid Society, The Children's Museum of the Arts, Inc.

13-5562191 13-3520970

$8,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Garodnick

Children's Museum of the Arts, Inc.

13-3520970

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Lappin

Children's Museum of the Arts, Inc.

13-3520970

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Quinn Dickens

Children's Museum of the Arts, Inc. Children's Storefront

13-3520970 13-2940671

$3,500 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 33 of 151

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The programs for Families with Special Needs at Queens Branch, established in 1996, currently serve more than 150 families. It includes IRA (Individualized Residential Alternatives), FSS (Family Support Services), MSC (Medicaid Service Coordination) and RESPITE (After-school program). Baby Johns mom was devestated when she learned about Johns Autism diagnosis. With the help of CPC and the system, John is handsome 10-year old boy who plays the piano. With the fund from City Council, CPC will be able to help more children like John. Thank you for your consideration.

Youth

Koo

Chinese American Planning Council, Inc.

13-6202692

$6,500 DYCD-Y We are requesting an SRA Reading Lab for our youngest students in Kindergarten to second grade. Last year we purchased one for our upper grades. We are also requesting funds for our cultural dance program for Dance teacher and costume and props and through our performances we will introduce the Asian culture to our very diverse community. The support of the NYC Council will be used to cover expenses related to the CNC/LTS AllStars Program, a comprehensive youth development program that provides basketball instruction/competition, mentoring, education and college guidance to over 150 local youth ages 11-19. The program operates at the IS 49 Beacon Center in Stapleton, and will soon begin operating at a second site, St. Margaret-Mary’s school in New Dorp. Program activities will include: Recreational, Instructional and Competitive Basketball including clinics, individual and smallgroup instruction, fundamentals camps, team practices, and competition in local, regional and national tournaments and leagues. Basketball Coaching and Mentoring, including monitoring and supporting participants’ progress in school-based sports programs and assisting with the college recruiting process. Educational Support, including academic planning, resources and referrals and advocacy to support students in meeting academic goals. Enrichment activities such as reading, writing, and self-exploration activities, life skills workshops, study skills workshops, trips, team- building, and community service activities. College preparation and guidance to support high school students in preparing for the SAT and selecting, applying to, gaining acceptance and matriculating in college and competing in collegiate level sports programs. Through these activities, the CNC/LTS All-Stars program will achieve the following outcomes: • 150 youth will engage in ongoing sports activity and improve their sport-related skills • 60 youth will participate in local and regional competitive basketball tournaments • 50 youth will receive ongoing educational support, improving their behavior and participation in school • 25 high school students will participate in intensive college preparation and guidance activities, increasing their motivation and preparation to go to college. To fund the youth development program for at risk adolescents and school age youth.

Youth

Koo

Chinese American Planning Council, Inc.

13-6202692

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Rose Barron

Choice Not Chance Determines our Destiny Inc Christopher Rose Community Empowerment Campaign, Inc.

58-2637888 * 11-3423612

$3,500 DYCD-Y $5,214 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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* Amount ($)

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Fiscal Conduit Name

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1. Youth development program for at risk adolescents and school age youth while out of school including tutoring, homework help, college advise and preparation, gang prevention education and cultural explorations. 2. provide support group for parents and family members of victims of crime (those who have lost a loved one - particularly a child due to street violence. Support groups are held twice per month at Miller Evangelical Church, 1110 President Street, Brooklyn, NY 11225. 3. Provides family support services through the Infant Mortality Reduction Initiative (IMRI) offering case management, preconception education and home visiting services to teens (male and female)and women of child bearing age to reduce the risk of infant mortality. The funds granted would go towards the general operating costs of the group as well as cost of special activities for the members. General operating costs include but are not limited to: supplies, weekly meeting materials, curriculum subscriptions, planning materials, advertisement, mailing materials and refreshments. Cost of special activities for the group include but are not limited to: specialty training for paid staff and volunteers, guest speakers, community service events, social outings, retreat and annual local and regional youth conferences, all including transportation where applicable To fund the After School Arts Academy that engages public school children in high quality, cutting edge arts education.

Youth

Williams

Christopher Rose community Empowerment Campaign, Inc.

11-3423612 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Gennaro Chin

Church of the Immaculate Conception Jamaica New York Church Street School of Music and Art

11-1752022 * 13-3693660

$5,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Levin Williams

Citizen Schools Inc Citizens For A Better Community

04-3259160 * 11-3630592 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Citizen Schools works to change life trajectories for low-income students. We do this by partnering with public middle schools in low income, high-need communities and extend their learning day by 3 hours each day (a 35 increase over the regular school day). In that time, we work on academic support; 21st Century skills like teamwork, leadership, public speaking; and, most importantly, we help learning come to life for students through our apprenticeship model. Apprenticeships are taught by professionals in the private and public sector over a 10-week period on subjects that they are passionate about. For instance this past semester we had law students teach public speaking through a mock trial apprenticeship and a few teams of Google engineers teach math through video game design. At the end of the apprenticeship, the students present what they learned in a final product called a WOW! in front of an audience. Each WOW! incorpo! rates the content of the apprenticeship and ensure students are developing and using those 21st century skills. Part of what makes us unique and successful is that we have full-time staff in the school during the school day. They prepare for the 3-6pm program time by integrating into the school during the day. They observe teachers as they demonstrate both pedagogical and content knowledge, so that they can teach more effectively during the academic blocks of the Citizen Schools program. That way, when a teacher teaches fractions in a certain way, our staff knows that method as well and can streamline communication with the school staff and students. Additionally, our staff knows when tests are, both school and standardized, and can help students prepare in whichever way makes the most sense. This presence in the school also strengthens our school and community relationships. Our ultimate goal is to transform public education, so that all children are graduating from high school ready for college, work and civic life in the 21st Century. Block beautification and annual youth Family Day in Paerdegat Park

Youth Discretionary

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* Amount ($)

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Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Mealy

City Parks Foundation

13-3561657

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Arroyo Mark-Viverito

City Year New York, Inc. City Year New York, Inc.

22-2882549 * 22-2882549 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y $8,000 DYCD-Y

City Parks Foundation will offer 3 free concerts, free tennis and track and field instruction, and education programs. CityParks Tennis provides free equipment and instruction to youth ages 5-16, twice a week, for six weeks every summer. This free program lets young people learn the sport and progress through three levels of instruction, with additional opportunities to build their knowledge and skills through tournaments, clinics, and an advanced training academy. Hundreds of graduates have won college scholarships, achieved regional and national rankings, and a talented handful has even played at the US Open. CityParks Track Field offers a variety of track and field events, including short distance running with hurdles, javelin, shot put, and long jump, to youth ages 5 to 16, twice a week, for six weeks. The program culminates with a citywide track meet held at Icahn Stadium on Randall’s Island, where our young athletes! compete individually and in teams representing their home park in six track and field events. Learning Gardens rehabilitates abandoned lots and turns them into vibrant community gardens, where we offer structured educational lessons to school children and community groups. CPF educators provide structured lessons during the academic year, a six-week summer program, a growing number of high-school internships, and workshops, festivals and family days that are open to all community members. For elementary and middle school classes, the program offers a continuous series of interdisciplinary lessons in the classroom, in the winter, and in the garden in the warmer months. In addition, Learning Gardens also provides the teachers of participating classes with high-quality professional development workshops and sustained technical support, enabling them to effectively integrate garden lessons into their everyday teaching practice, thereby impacting students and classes for years to come. City Year New York’s Afterschool Heroes program in Hunts Point/ Mott Haven offers 70 middle school youth a safe, educational environment, facilitated by 25 idealistic AmeriCorps members. To support the Afterschool Heroes program for East Harlem middle school youth.

CITYarts and LitWorld unite to provide a very much needed, long-term art project for the youth in Polo Grounds, Harlem that will uplift the spirits of the under-served youth, foster children, and girls clubs that use the community center. Through this project, the participants will learn artistic skills that will enable and empower them to transform their own community and instill in them a sense of pride and ownership of a space where they spend much of their time. The collaboration will kick-off with a series of art workshops that will engage and excite youth to design and paint a large mural at the Polo Grounds Community Center, one of the Children’s Village sites. The mural and art workshops will work to transform the lives of the youth and their families by strengthening relationships, building teamwork skills, and introducing them to the joy and pride of the creative process and its results. We ultimately intend to create a 33 foot exterior mural on the entrance of the Polo Grounds Community Center on the theme of “community identity.” The mural will be designed by the Girls Club at the center and painted by youth and their families in Polo Grounds as well as volunteer groups citywide. The collaboration with LitWorld will challenge the girls to incorporate their personal stories into the design, connecting the creative right side of the brain with the logical left. The mural will serve as a reminder of everything the youth accomplished through the process. It is our hope that youth build leadership skills through the mural process and help to encourage a sense of community pride in the individuals living in Harlem. Youth Jackson City-ARTS, Inc. 13-2766701 * $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Chin

CityKids Foundation, The

13-3453226 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth Youth

Foster Chin Mealy Chin

Claremont Neighborhood Centers, Inc. Class Size Matters Clothed With Love, Inc. Coalition for the Homeless

13-6016450 * 20-2169746 * 06-1621793 * 13-3072967 *

$12,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $8,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

To offer free after school, weekend, and summer programs through arts and educational programs . Our current programs are Afterschool, Summer Camp, Young and Older Fathers Program, ABE/GED Preparation,Tutoring Svc. are provided Recreation, Drama, SYEP, Counseling, Parenting Classes To provide advocacy on efforts to reduce class size and increase parental involvement in NYC public schools. Funds to support the “Back to School” event to give away free of charge over 660 backpacks to date. To fund Bound for Success, an after-school program for homeless children . We are requesting support for the 2011-12 season to present over 40 world class cultural and arts education programs to more than 60,000 Brooklyn adults, children, and multigenerational families at highly affordable prices ranging from 7 to 45 and five public performances free of charge. BCBC serves numerous multi-ethnic and traditional populations of Brooklyn, embracing the cultural, economic, and demographic diversity of the borough through its programming, pricing, and marketing. Our target audiences include: A) first, second and third-generation African-American and Caribbean-American, Russian, Jewish, and Latino patrons; B) seniors; C) students ranging from Pre-K level to advanced degrees; D) Brooklynites from all economic levels, from Cobble Hill Brownstoners to single parent households from East New York. We offer live music, dance, and theater performances, providing Brooklynites the opportunity to experience arts from around the world directly in their neighborhood. FY12 season highlights include the National Dance Theatre Company of Jamaica, The Moscow Festival Ballet, Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters, Improvised Shakespeare, and others. SchoolTime, BCBC’s series of weekday matinees, is one of the largest arts-education programs in Brooklyn. Its objective is to expose children pre-K thought 12th grade to culturally relevant and educationally enriching programming at affordable 7 tickets (free tickets for chaperons). Most of the performances are literacy-based and/or curriculum-based (history, social sciences, and science). BCBC assists teachers with integrating live performing arts into school curricula by publishing study guides on our website. SchoolTime will include 30 performances, projected to serve 40,000 schoolchildren from over 250 schools. Over 80 of the students served are minorities, 77 come from New York City public schools. 33 of the public schools are Title I schools. A large number of schoolchildren served are your constituents.

201142747793

Youth

Vann

College Community Services, Inc.

11-6025023 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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College Summit is a nationally recognized nonprofit dedicated to increasing the college enrollment rate of students in low-income communities. Our program delivers professional development and support for teachers/counselors; Leverages and trains influential students (Peer Leaders) through four-day summer workshops and ongoing training to spark schoolwide college interest; Provides an in-school structure for every senior to develop a postsecondary plan through a year-round class and curriculum; Builds college-going culture by serving students starting in the 9th grade with a year-round class for 9th, 10th and 11th grades and curriculum; Adheres to rigorous performance-based metrics; Uses data to manage, evaluate, and continually improve programming to drive success; and achieves consistent, verifiable results. College Summit New York has partnerships with 40 public schools in all five New York City boroughs, impacting 5,000 students in the 2010-11 academic year. Since 2005, College Summit has helped nearly 17,000 New York City students prepare for college success. College Summit students are low-income, as defined by free/reduced lunch criteria (on average, more than 60 of students are eligible for the free/reduced lunch program at College Summit partner schools), and primarily from populations underrepresented in postsecondary education (42 Black/African-American, 42 Hispanic/Latino, 9 Asian/Pacific Islander, 6 White, 1 American Indian/Other). In District 33 we are seeking funding for our work for the 2011-12 academic year, at Brooklyn Preparatory Academy, Cobble Hill School for American Studies, and Metropolitan Corporate Academy, where we serve 300 students collectively. We proudly report that at Cobble Hill, over two-thirds of Peer Leaders in the Class of 2009 enrolled in college. Additionally, at Brooklyn Prep., 82 of Peer Leaders in the Class of 2010 enrolled in college. Youth Levin College Summit, Inc. 52-2007028 * $3,500 DYCD-Y College Summit is a nationally recognized nonprofit dedicated to increasing the college enrollment rate of students in low-income communities. Our program delivers professional development and support for teachers/counselors; Leverages and trains influential students (Peer Leaders) through four-day summer workshops and ongoing training to spark schoolwide college interest; Provides an in-school structure for every senior to develop a postsecondary plan through a year-round class and curriculum; Builds college-going culture by serving students starting in the 9th grade with a year-round class for 9th, 10th and 11th grades and curriculum; Adheres to rigorous performance-based metrics; Uses data to manage, evaluate, and continually improve programming to drive success; and achieves consistent, verifiable results. College Summit New York has partnerships with 40 public schools in all five New York City boroughs, impacting 5,000 students in the 2010-11 academic year. Since 2005, College Summit has helped nearly 17,000 New York City students prepare for college success. College Summit students are low-income, as defined by free/reduced lunch criteria (on average, more than 60 of students are eligible for the free/reduced lunch program at College Summit partner schools), and primarily from populations underrepresented in postsecondary education (42 Black/African-American, 42 Hispanic/Latino, 9 Asian/Pacific Islander, 6 White, 1 American Indian/Other). In District 10 we are seeking funding for our work for the 2011-12 academic year, at Bronx Engineering and Technology Academy (BETA) and Gregorio Luperon High School where we serve over 500 9th through 12th grade students collectively. In 2009, 80 of BETA Peer Leaders enrolled in college. As of March 2010, 84 of the Peer Leaders at Gregorio Luperon have applied to at least one college and 74 of those students have completed their Financial Aid forms. Youth Rodriguez College Summit, Inc. 52-2007028 * $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 38 of 151

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Council Member

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EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Brewer

Common Cents New York, Inc.

13-3613229

$3,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ferreras

Common Cents New York, Inc.

13-3613229

$5,000 DYCD-Y

To fund The Penny Harvest program which teaches children civic responsibility during the school day. The Penny Harvest program teaches children civic responsibility during the school day. Working directly with teachers, the program improves school culture, reinforces academic subject matter and results in thousands of small grants to local charities. Common Cents sponsors the program in 750 public schools providing each school with educational tools, curriculum, professional development and hands-on support from staff trained in service learning. Funding will support operating expenses for Penny Harvest, a service-learning opportunity where New York City students raise money for grants and then decide the grant recipients. The Penny Harvest program teaches children civic responsibility during the school day. Working directly with teachers, the program improves school culture, reinforces academic subject matter and results in thousands of small grants to local charities. Common Cents sponsors the program in 750 public schools providing each school with educational tools, curriculum, professional development and hands-on support from staff trained in service learning.

Youth

Garodnick

Common Cents New York, Inc.

13-3613229

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Vann

Common Cents New York, Inc.

13-3613229

$9,714 DYCD-Y The Vocational Program provides intensive classes in woodworking, plumbing, electrical, optical, HVAC, automotive and Health CPR. The courses combine the theory and practical application of each area. They are taught by instructors with years of experience. To launch the CEN Microsoft Certification Progam, Computer building summer camp for kids and Apprenticeship Program.

Youth Youth

Greenfield Cabrera

Community Center of the Rockaway Peninsula, Inc. Community Empowerment Network

11-3064561 * 06-1796457 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y $7,500 DYCD-Y

CLOTH is seeking funding for two distinct programs. CLOTH is seeking funding up to 20,000 in discretionary funding for its After School Program for elementary school children. Program provides a safe consistent learning environment for community children during out of school time. Family engagement and outreach is key component. The program helps foster a sense of community engagement and from an early age which we will believe will help students to remain connected to school as they grow and ultimately lead to a higher number completing high school. CLOTH is also seeking funding up to 20,000 toward a summer education community service project, the Anti-Gun Violence/Peace Promotion Mural, which will involve high school students and benefit the community-at-large. Students will work full time with 2 professional artists and be involved in research on violence and peaceful conflict resolution. Community involvement is key in this project which is a collaboration with the American Friends Service Committee. Youth Jackson Community League of the Heights, Inc. 13-2564241 * $6,000 DYCD-Y Funding will be used to support Dwyer Cultural Center, a premiere multimedia cultural destination in Harlem dedicated to preserving, celebrating and documenting Harlem’s history and traditions through exhibitions, performances, workshops and public programs for intergenerational audiences. Funding will be used to support Making a Difference, a unique arts and community learning program which connects young people to positive role models and improves literacy skills through workshops in the literary, performing and visual arts that celebrate neighborhood culture and traditions.

Youth

Dickens

Community Works, Inc.

13-3580813 *

$8,714 DYCD-Y

Youth

Fidler

Community Works, Inc.

13-3580813 *

$15,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

CYCSI manages an Afterschool Program at PS 176Q that provides a strong academic component Monday to Thursdays and social activities which includes music, drama, art, sports and dance on Fridays. This funding request is to support the Homework Assistance and Music segments of the program with three instructiors. We are continuing to enhance these segments due to parents increasing concern about the quality of their childrens education in light of reduced DOE funding, over crowded classrooms and reduction in enrichment programs. We would like three licensed teachers for the testing grades (3-5) to provide instruction during homework assistance and more importantly to provide classroom (smaller class size,1:7) tutoring during March and April to prepare students for the NYC ELA and Math tests. We would also like to add a credentialed musician to support the music segment of the program on Fridays and Spring Break. Funding Request: - 2 licensed teachers, 5 hours per week for 40 weeks during 2011.12 School Year plus 6 hours per day, for six days during spring break 2012. - Music instructor, 3 hours per week, 40 weeks during 2011.12 plus 4 hours per day, six days during spring break 2012. To provide experiential learning workshops about health and urban agriculture. To propose a 2-week Chinese language and culture immersion summer day-camp. Scholarships for 15-20 families participating in Congregation Beth Elohims Summer Day Camp. The camp operates during summer months when school is not in session to help working families. Camp operates five days a week. It is a general recreational day camp offering activities in swimming, nature, arts crafts, sports, music, gymnastics and circus arts. Campers go on trips twice a week in and around New York City. Campers are grouped according to grade and benefit from the group experience, including the positive interaction with their peers and adults. Communal Youth Program - social activities supervised by teenagers in our Annex. The primary thrust of our program The Friday Night Chill is to develop an atmosphere where community volunteers meet and socialize with youth who have dropped out of school or have other family or social problems, (at-risk children) with the objective of creating a dialogue and relationship so as to assist such at-risk children in getting back into school, providing employment and/or counseling and resolving family/relationship problems. Small Worlds After-School Program picks up children from several local schools. Upon arrival to our Center, the children are provided with a well balanced, nutritious meal while school is in session. After their meal, the children engage in a variety of educational, creative and physical activities that encourage and nurture school age children to gain confidence and independence. This program is designed to supplement the childs learning in school through a creative array of educational and recreational activities. Each child is given the opportunity to make decisions, gain self-awareness from relationships with peers, and develop their potential. When school is not in session, and during the summer, we offer a full day program that provides opportunities for exploration in a variety of areas, such as movement, art, dance, and various sports. Weekly outings take the children to the city, movies, plays,bowling, state parks, a! musement parks, restaurants and museums. Funding received will be used to pay for salaries in order to operate the above mentioned program.

Youth Youth Youth

Sanders Mark-Viverito Chin

Community Youth Care Concrete Safaris, Inc. Confucius Institute at Pace University

77-0695007 * 20-4976317 * 13-5562314 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Lander Gennaro

Congregation Beth Elohim Congregation Etz Chaim of Kew Garden Hills

11-1672755 11-2585935

$3,500 DYCD-Y $6,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Greenfield

Congregation Kehal Premishlan, Inc.

11-2505552

$20,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Reyna

Conselyea Street Block Association, Inc.

11-2347180

$15,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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* Amount ($)

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Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Garodnick

Constitutional Education Foundation, Inc.

13-3513266

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Funding will support teacher workshops and curriculum development to introduce the branches of government to students though the study of contemporary issues, culminating in a courtroom role-play(TCW) teaches today’s young people (in grades 5-12) howclass. The Constitution Works to demonstrate the constitutional questions explored in to become tomorrow’s informed and active citizens through its classroom program that develops habits of research and civic discourse and assist students in every educational, career, and civic endeavor they undertake. TCW’s teacher workshops and staff development familiarize educators with our purpose and activities while engaging them in innovative instructional and learning strategies. Our curriculum materials introduce the branches of government through the study of contemporary issues. Each unit provides the facts of a given case, applicable Constitutional provisions, and information about relevant Supreme Court precedent. Finally, in dramatic role-plays, students address the constitutional questions they have probed in class, taking on the roles of Supreme Court justices, attorneys, senators or presidential advisors in presenting their arguments at the United States Bankruptcy Court. As part of their participation students spend 15-50 classroom hours (depending on grade/reading level) preparing for their culminating experience while simultaneously enhancing critical thinking and many basic academic skills as follows: • Reading the Constitution and actual Supreme Court precedent and applying synthesized information to the issue at hand. • Writing and editing their arguments in preparation of delivering their oral arguments at a historic site. • Developing cooperative learning skills such as compromise, group work, active listening and team planning. • Engaging in activities that address New York State standards in Social Studies, English Language Arts and Career Development.

Youth Youth

Mealy Oddo

Constitutional Education Foundation, Inc. Constitutional Education Foundation, Inc.

13-3513266 13-3513266

$5,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Now more than ever we realize the importance of meaningfully engaging young people in Teacher Workshops - Mock Supreme Court hearings and debates To provide over 50,000 underserved families access to New York’s cultural institutions and the educational resources in order to improve their children’s education. To fund a group mentoring program for at-risk high school students that meets weekly to consider a variety of issues of importance to teens.

Youth Youth

Brewer Brewer

Cool Culture, Inc. Cornerstone Learning Center

16-1636968 13-3779813 *

$2,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth

Vallone Cabrera Mark-Viverito

Corpus Christi Sports and Youth Association Council for Unity, Inc. Council for Unity, Inc.

11-1666228 11-2880221 11-2880221

$5,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $25,714 DYCD-Y

Corpus Christi Sports Youth is a community based program teaching boys girls the basic fundamental skills of playing basketball. In addition, children play in established leagues in the fall winter; most notably the CYO. Teams also participate in various seasonal tournaments throughout the borough (i.e. Variety Boys Girls Club) Spring summer provides an opportunity for younger players to work on basic skills in our instructional program. The Teen Drama Club trains a considerable part of the year to perform their annual play. In addition, members volunteer to perform numerous hours of community outreach. To provide gang and violence prevention and intervention activities in the Bronx. To offer gang/youth violence prevention and Intervention workshops for at-risk youth. CACAJ is providing an After school Services (September-June, 10 month for 65-70 students ages 5-13, which include transportation, liability insurance,snack, hot supper,rent, mentors, tutoring, extra curricular activities (drama, sports, music, dance, dress design)

Youth

Koslowitz

Council of Aid for Central Asian Jews (CACAJ)

11-3383509

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Eugene

Council of Peoples Organization, Inc.

75-3046891

$6,000 DYCD-Y

COPO’s Youth Empowerment Program serves young people from low-income immigrant families in NYC with a broad array of age-appropriate educational enrichment activities. It provides a safe environment away from gangs and drugs where youngsters can receive academic and career-related support as they develop life skills. The free services are available throughout the summer and after the school day ends In Leadership development and confidence building COPO program provide services throughout the community. The youths survey community needs, compile reports and present the results to elected officials and leaders. They work on the beautification of the area they live, participate in graffiti removal and planting trees. They volunteer in The Mayor’s office, at Borough Halls, and for the City Council’s community programs.COPO request 338,000 to work wit h 100 youths

Youth

Lander

Council of Peoples Organization, Inc.

75-3046891

$6,000 DYCD-Y

COPO’s Youth Empowerment Program serves young people from low-income immigrant families in NYC with a broad array of age-appropriate educational enrichment activities. It provides a safe environment away from gangs and drugs where youngsters can receive academic and career-related support as they develop life skills. The free services are available throughout the summer and after the school day ends. Last year, more than one hundred young people participated. The program components include: education and training; community service; sports and recreation. In the Education and training COPO staff members serve as resources as students tackle their homework assignments. Individual tutoring is available and students are offered basic instruction for computer operations and the internet. They have use of the computer lab with internet access to conduct research, utilize word processing, and spreadsheet applications. Students may! open free email accounts. A book club meets regularly inspiring a love of reading. The young people select fiction and non-fiction works from a range of genres. Refreshments and Sports provide a “hook” for reluctant readers. COPO also holds informational seminars addressing topics such as college, scholarship availability, responsibilities associated with being an adult, good health, and hygiene practices. As a part of our vocational and career training program, COPO provides workshops and seminars –such as resume writing- and refers participants to available free training programs. In Leadership development and confidence building COPO program provide services throughout the community. The youths survey community needs, compile reports and present the results to elected officials and leaders. They work on the beautification of the area they live, participate in graffiti removal and planting trees. They volunteer in The Mayor’s office, at Borough Halls, and for th! e City Council’s community programs.COPO request 338,000 to work wit h 100 youths COPO’s Youth Empowerment Program serves young people from low-income immigrant families in NYC with a broad array of age-appropriate educational enrichment activities. It provides a safe environment away from gangs and drugs where youngsters can receive academic and career-related support as they develop life skills. The free services are available throughout the summer and after the school day ends.

Youth

Nelson

Council of Peoples Organization, Inc.

75-3046891

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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Youth

Williams

Council of Peoples Organization, Inc. Council on the Environment of New York City, Inc. D/B/A GrowNYC Council on the Environment of New York City, Inc. D/B/A GrowNYC Council on the Environment of New York City, Inc. D/B/A GrowNYC

75-3046891

$5,000 DYCD-Y

COPO’s Youth Empowerment Program serves young people from low-income immigrant families in NYC with a broad array of age-appropriate educational enrichment activities. It provides a safe environment away from gangs and drugs where youngsters can receive academic and career-related support as they develop life skills. The free services are available throughout the summer and after the school day ends. Last year, more than one hundred young people participated. The program components include: education and training; community service; sports and recreation. In the Education and training COPO staff members serve as resources as students tackle their homework assignments. Individual tutoring is available and students are offered basic instruction for computer operations and the internet. They have use of the computer lab with internet access to conduct research, utilize word processing, and spreadsheet applications. Students may! open free email accounts. A book club meets regularly inspiring a love of reading. The young people select fiction and non-fiction works from a range of genres. Refreshments and Sports provide a “hook” for reluctant readers. COPO also holds informational seminars addressing topics such as college, scholarship availability, responsibilities associated with being an adult, good health, and hygiene practices. As a part of our vocational and career training program, COPO provides workshops and seminars –such as resume writing- and refers participants to available free training programs. In Leadership development and confidence building COPO program provide services throughout the community. The youths survey community needs, compile reports and present the results to elected officials and leaders. They work on the beautification of the area they live, participate in graffiti removal and planting trees. They volunteer in The Mayor’s office, at Borough Halls, and for th! e City Council’s community programs.COPO request 338,000 to work wit h 100 youths Funding will be used to support the Environmental Education program and to support the Learn It Grow It Eat It (LGE).

Youth Youth Youth

Brewer Lappin Quinn

13-2765465 13-2765465 13-2765465

$3,500 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y Funding will be used for GrowNYC. Funding will be used to support GrowNYC's Youthmarket program which is a network of youth-run farm stands in underserved neighborhoods in NYC. The Boys Scholarship Program is CBTB’s endeavor to promote male participation in dance by two means: 1) financial support, and 2) gender specific curriculum. Full scholarships for male students are offered in the Boys Scholarship Program. The curriculum is specially designed to address gender specific needs—such as emphases on upper body strength and greater physical energy output while teaching ballet fundamentals, introductory acrobatics, modern dance technique and dance composition.

Youth Youth

Nelson Mark-Viverito

Covenant Ballet Theatre of Brooklyn Inc Creative Arts Workshops for Kids, Inc.

26-1136590 13-3638436

$5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y To support Summer Art Works 2011, which will hire teens to paint large scale community murals along the Harlem River. This request is to supplement funding for youth counselor to coordinate counseling for young people referred through our various social service and prevention programs. Support projects and local neighborhood groups serving youth and elders through cultural, academic and athletic programs. To support an After-school basketball league for several District 3 middle schools. CHLDC seeks supports for its CH/ENY Beacon at IS 302 and our Cypress Hills Intergenerational Services Program and Ladders of Leadership (LL) initiative.

Youth Youth Youth Youth

James Eugene Brewer Dilan

Crown Heights Jewish Community Council, Inc. Crown Heights Youth Collective, Inc. CS Parent Association d/b/a The Computer School Parent Association Cypress Hills Local Development Corporation

23-7390996 * 11-2506422 * 13-4144056 11-2683663

$10,000 DYCD-Y $30,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y $22,714 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 43 of 151

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The DePhillips Athletic Club (“DAC”) seeks support of funds for general support of our youth athletic programs. DAC’s mission for which we request these funds would be used towards fees that are incurred for use of school gyms, field locations, equipment, umpire and referee fees, and to lessen the burden of league fees for the parents. Our organization, established in 1949, is serving the Bayside, Whitestone, Flushing, Little Neck and Douglaston community with our sports programs. We are a non-profit organization committed to helping our student athletes with any form of assistance that may help them with their future goals. DAC’s main goal is to make a difference in the lives of these young athletes by building up their self-esteem, skills and confidence and allow them to have fun. DAC doesnot discrimminate against any child regardless of the skill level and ability. Youth Halloran DAC ATHLETIC CLUB 11-6080807 * $7,500 DYCD-Y

The DePhillips Athletic Club (“DAC”) seeks support of funds for general support of our youth athletic programs. DAC’s mission for which we request these funds would be used towards fees that are incurred for use of school gyms, field locations, equipment, umpire and referee fees, and to lessen the burden of league fees for the parents. Our organization, established in 1949, is serving the Bayside, Whitestone, Flushing, Little Neck and Douglaston community with our sports programs. We are a non-profit organization committed to helping our student athletes with any form of assistance that may help them with their future goals. DAC’s main goal is to make a difference in the lives of these young athletes by building up their self-esteem, skills and confidence and allow them to have fun. DAC doesnot discrimminate against any child regardless of the skill level and ability. Youth Weprin DAC ATHLETIC CLUB 11-6080807 * $7,500 DYCD-Y We are applying for 9,500 to establish a dance residency at Benjamin Banneker Academy K670 in District 35. Funding will provide a dance program serving approximately 200 public school students from low and middle class income brackets, culminating in final school performances reaching 500-800 students, school administrators, teachers and parents.

Youth

James

Dancewave, Inc.

11-2726558

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 44 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Youth

Levin

Dancewave, Inc.

11-2726558

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Purpose of Funds We are applying for $9,500 to establish a dance residency at PS 321 or MS 447 in District 33. Funding will provide a dance program serving approximately 200 public school students from low and middle class income brackets, culminating in final school performances reaching 500-800 students, school administrators, teachers and parents. Recent studies show that dance experiences of this nature are extremely effective in providing not only a physical outlet for teens, but improving academic performance, building confidence, reducing obesity, and improving SAT scores. Dancewave has witnessed these benefits first-hand: our company members have a 100% college acceptance rate and many receive scholarships to top-tier universities. Unfortunately, an increasing number of NYC public schools lack arts programming, physical education classes, or gymnasium space, and only 8% of NYC elementary schools provide the level of arts education mandated by the state. With budget cuts forcing a massive 20% layoff of public school arts teachers next year, Council support is vital to filling this gap. Dancewave is a licensed DOE vendor with a strong, 10-year track record of bringing professional dance teaching artists to teach dance in the public

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Dare 2 Dream Leaders, Inc. is seeking funding to help delivery our creative writing and self sufficiency series. Through hands on programs, youth will gain real world skills needed to be economically and socially independent. Funding will help cover general supplies for the participants, printing and copying of course materials, consultant fees for the creative arts instructor and rental space for the final production. Critical thinking encompasses most of our daily lives and at times suppresses our creative abilities. Generating new ideas and bringing them to the table is essential in today’s ever changing environment. With this in mind, D2D aims to help youth age 11-18 develop their artistic talents and life skills through creative expression. Our after school sessions will provide students with a safe, positive learning environment where they are free to express their feelings and interact with other students who have like interests. Over a period of 36 weeks, students will engage in three tracks of artistic development. During the first twelve weeks, students will learn the basics of creative writing. The second track will be full of drama! What better way to gain public speaking skills then through improvisation, monologues and scene study. The last 12 weeks will focus on putting it all together. The final production will include casting, set design, technical rehearsal and of cour! se the final show. The self sufficiency series will shed light on the concepts of goal setting and budgeting. Many adults, let alone youth truly understand the value of money and what the difference is between needs and wants. They are unaware that financial mistakes can haunt you for years. This series will cover budgeting, savings, credit scores, self development, career development and the importance of networking. Youth Williams Dare 2 Dream Leaders, Inc. 27-4229065 * $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 45 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Sanders

Deerfield Area Association, Inc. Developing Opportunities Through Meaningful Education (DOME) Project, Inc.

11-2877303 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Brewer

13-3060257

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth sports day activities, annual trip for seniors and telephone charges. To fund the Juvenile Justice Program that provides young people with guidance toward educational and vocational opportunities to both prevent at-risk youth from involvement with criminal activity. DIHR is requesting expense money to pay for the cost of outreach materials, including online/website outreach that will make 1:1 interaction possible increase listserv capacity. For families who do not have easy access to computers, mailings are required. Materials for community school resource fairs, workshop presentations, up-to-date informative literature, brochures the salary needed to create the materials are included in our request.

Youth

Jackson

DIHR, Inc. (Dignity, Independence and Human Rights)

13-3357622

$3,500 DYCD-Y

We would like to request support for our Job readiness after school program at The Urban Assembly School for Law and Justice. The program is funded by the Dept of Youth and Community Development. The program has three main components, academic assistance, job readiness workshops and paid internships. Students receive tutoring in the subjects they need help with, receive assistance to help them succeed in their employment search (resume preparation, mock interviews, etc), and are then placed in paid internships related to their career goals. Current internship placements include the Brooklyn President Borough Office, law firms, and medicine-related institutions). The metrics used to assess the program are related to the participants academic improvement. We collect report cards and monitor each student via case notes, homework assistance and communication with the school day academic counselor. Youth Levin Directions For Our Youth, Inc. 06-1308851 $3,500 DYCD-Y Activities to be provided:____ Monday through Friday between the hours of 3:PM and 6:PM students receive academic tutoring in various subject areas by staff members. Upon completion of assignments,students engage in recreational activites that may include board games, puzzles, arts,and crafts. Provide prevention and intervention to at risk youth with a series of empowerment seminars dealing with bullies, gangs, peer pressure, violence, building self-esteem, etc., job readiness services to low to no income individuals provide them with workforce-related training, resume preparation, presentation skills, communication skills, appropriate attire mock interviews, job placement assistance job retention/with a 90 placement rate for those in the program that are job ready. Our organization also provides entrepreneurship training and musical instruction on how to create beats, write lyrics, record songs produce music .Doing It The Wright Way, Inc., also provides recreation to seniors in need summer program for children 6-13 yrs. old. Program to be funded is our After-School Program. The After School Programs main goal is to provide quality services in a compassionate and caring manner, where parents and children are treated with respect and dignity. The After School program not only provides children with a learning opportunity, it also helps them to improve their self-confidence. In addition, to enhance and enrich the lives of children as they become young adults, while working as a team towards common goals. The After School Program offers quality educational, recreational and cultural programs that promote the social, physical, intellectual and emotional development of children and youth, as well as the family as a whole.

Youth

Eugene

Ditmas Park Youth Group

26-2442377

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Comrie

Doing It the Wright Way, Inc.

11-3468717

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ferreras

Dominico-American Society of Queens, Inc.

06-1389895

$25,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 46 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Quinn

Door, The - A Center of Alternatives, Inc.

13-6127348

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Arroyo

Downtown Bronx Economic Development Corporation

04-3758932 *

$15,714 DYCD-Y

Today, The Door’s arts programs include a variety of classes such as painting, drawing and printmaking; photography, filmmaking and graphic arts; live music instruction; DJ/Turntablism, electronic music production and recording; and dance and drama. All classes share the same immediate goal: to provide positive exposure to the arts to low-income youth with profound needs from widely diverse backgrounds. Arts participants also have the opportunity to extend their learning through internships with Door arts staff. SIEMBRA is a community-driven initiative that brings the youth of the community together to build the necessary resources and infrastructure for an accessible and affordable food oasis. 1. DYCD FUNDING: The funds are used to fund the payment of a full orchestra (22 musicians, a conductor and a narrator) plus their transportation to the sites with their instruments in order to mount Introduction to the Orchestra for elementary age school children and their teachers in low income neighborhoods. 2. DFTA: Concerts for Seniors- the grant request covers fees for the Downtown Chamber Players (fl, violin . piano, cello) to travel to various senior centers and nursing homes to provide free concerts as well as our Caring Community Chorus of seniors to visit many centers though-out the city with an uplifting repertory Our program caters to children traditionally overlooked by the soccer community. These funds will be used for the certified licensed coaches that will run the program. Youth Basketball League After-School Youth Boxing & Mentoring Program Project based arts after-school program in which professional artists partner with classroom teachers and community educators to help students learn how to express, write and perform their own stories Dwarf Giraffe Athletic League provides athletic programs for children ages 4 through 18 for approximately 900 families. We currently host spring and fall boys baseball, travel summer boys baseball, spring girls softball, fall basketball for both girls and boys, spring boys basketball and co-ed spring fall developmental lacrosse. Our programs are generally 8-12 weeks long and are played several days a week. Mark DeGarmo Dancers/Dynamic Forms Inc. (MDDF)’s Lets Dance! project at PS 15Roberto Clemente School serves 4 classes of up to 100 grades PreK-5 students and their teachers for a total of 16 45-minute to 60-minute lessons. MDDFs Lets Dance! program includes dance skills-based methods and curriculum drawn from modern dance, creative movement, and world dance forms. Students will follow-up their experiential dance studio learning with reflection and analysis through class discussion to improve listening, understanding, and oral communication skills. Community Board 3/Council District 2/East Village-Lower East Side Neighborhood of Manhattan will be served. This grant will allow us to hire 3 part-time interns working 25 hours per week. The interns work under supervision of a Sr. Counselor and will participateand help facilitate group sessions, conduct seminars and coordinate recreational activities for our clients. To support and enhance our curriculum , to provide Sign Language, Music (musical instruments), and Physical Education Programs, office supplies ,janitorial supplies and installation of an Inter-com system for 4 classroom to provide a safe way of communication throughout the building. To develop a website. Instrument and choral instruction, development of group work ethics, promotion of civic responsibility and community consciousness, a sense of responsibility through accomplishment in a diverse and wholesome setting. Expenses: Transportation,rent,uniforms,salaries,musical instruments.

Youth

Mendez

Downtown Music Productions, Inc.

13-3310731

$3,714 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth

Quinn Oddo Rose

Downtown United Soccer Club, Inc. Dr. Theodore A. Atlas Foundation, Inc. Dr. Theodore A. Atlas Foundation, Inc.

13-4130051 13-4012789 * 13-4012789 *

$15,000 DYCD-Y $9,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koppell

DreamYard Project, Inc.

13-3759661

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Halloran

Dwarf-Giraffe Athletic League

11-2523053 *

$15,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mendez

Dynamic Forms, Inc.

13-3440226 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Nelson

Dynamic Youth Community, Inc.

11-2503506 *

$9,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ferreras

East Elmhurst Day Care Center, Inc.

11-2250437 *

$9,800 DYCD-Y

Youth

Williams

East Flatbush Ecumenical Council

06-1483609 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 47 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth Youth

Mark-Viverito Barron Oddo

East Harlem Tutorial Program, Inc. East New York Kidspower, Inc. East Shore Little League

23-7439789 * 11-3308030 * 51-0237392 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y $25,500 DYCD-Y $8,000 DYCD-Y

To provide tutoring, mentorship and other services to East Harlem young people. Purchase equipment, uniforms, The hallmarks of the Idlewild Saltmarsh Environmental Science Learning Center are hands-on inquiry-based in-school workshops and field trips to Idlewild for schools in Queens, NY with special outreach to the schools in Districts 27, 28 and 29; Summer workshops and workshops during President’s Week and Spring break for children; and weekend/evening workshops, tours and recreational activities for families, and adults. Workshops are available on a wide variety of ecological/environmental topics. To provide after school care for youth with an emphasis on academic enrichmeent, cultural arts and sport activities. Funding will support the 14th Street Y's Daddy & Me program, a free swim course that serves families in The Educational Alliance's Head Start program, as well as other programs at the 14th Street Y. ECNA offers an an after school program where youth come to the center for tutoring, games, refreshments, trips and much more.The program is safe alternative to the street and run by experienced counselors. To prevent and address teen dating violence, STEPS Teen Services programming provides counseling and healthy relationship education in nine public schools; a court mandated 12and 26- week healthy relationship curriculum for teen males who have been charged with misdemeanors for abusive behavior; and counseling and case management to teens from our offices in East Harlem. Funding will be used to support a series of performance classes and master classes at Kaufman Center. We teach the fundamentals of the sport and sportsmanship. Through proper guidance and exemplary leadership, the Elmjack Little League baseball program assists youth in developing the qualities of citizenship, discipline and physical well-being. By instilling the virtues of character, courage and loyalty the Elmjack Little League program is designed to develop superior citizens rather than superior athletes. We teach the fundamentals of the sport and sportsmanship. Through proper guidance and exemplary leadership, the Elmjack Little League baseball program assists youth in developing the qualities of citizenship, discipline and physical well-being. By instilling the virtues of character, courage and loyalty the Elmjack Little League program is designed to develop superior citizens rather than superior athletes. We teach the fundamentals of the sport and sportsmanship. Through proper guidance and exemplary leadership, the Elmjack Little League baseball program assists youth in developing the qualities of citizenship, discipline and physical well-being. By instilling the virtues of character, courage and loyalty the Elmjack Little League program is designed to develop superior citizens rather than superior athletes.

Youth Youth

Sanders Gentile

Eastern Queens Alliance Edith and Carl Marks Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst

20-1723492 * 11-1633484

$3,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Garodnick

Educational Alliance, Inc.

13-5562210

$8,714 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koslowitz

Educational Center for New Americans, Inc.

11-3173201 *

$24,214 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Ferreras Brewer

Edwin Gould Services for Children & Families Elaine Kaufman Cultural Center - Lucy Moses School for Music and Dance

13-5675643 13-1991118

$7,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Dromm

Elmjack Community Little League, Inc.

11-2733609

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ferreras

Elmjack Community Little League, Inc.

11-2733609

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Vallone

Elmjack Community Little League, Inc.

11-2733609

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 48 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

EYDC will function as a School of Creative Arts and will offer the following services: • lasses in areas such as: dance, mime, vocal, instruments, gymnastics, fitness C • eekly classes with the time span of forty-five minutes to an hour W • lass workshops every three months C • Individual training when requested or needed • combination of professional lessons in ballet, modern, and jazz in all dance classes A • essons on face paint application for mime classes L • afety techniques in gymnastic classes S • Individual trainers for fitness classes • ne Recital to conclude the school year O Youth Williams Emmanuel Youth Development Corporation 11-3110107 * $5,000 DYCD-Y

Teen Scene provides a safe haven out-of-school recreational program for approximately 40 at-risk youth ages 13-19, residing in the Park Hill/Clifton-Concord community of Staten Islands North Shore. Youth engage in indoor recreational activities designed to increase their peer-to-peer interactions, cultural awareness, adult-teen relations and foster improved self-esteem. Youth Youth Rose Chin Empowerment Zone Enact, Inc. 14-2009368 * 13-3422660 * $8,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y Program days and hour are Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 5:30 pm to 8:30 pm. To provide creative drama workshops or community school performances at a New York City public school.City Council discretionary support in the amount of 5,000 for programming in ENACT seeks District 10. ENACT will seek additional support from city and state government, the Department of Juvenile Justice, the United Way of New York City, and private corporate/family foundations. These combined funds will help annually 10,000 school-based staff, students, and family members in New York City’s under served schools to build vital social and emotional skills. ENACT’s Bullying Prevention Program employs a research-based approach, which received the American Group Psychotherapy Association’s prestigious Aaron Stein Memorial Award in 2005 and the National Association of Drama Therapy’s Research Award in October, 2010. Through a comprehensive program evaluation finished in January of 2011 and led by Dr. Robert Horowitz from the Center for Arts Education Research at Columbia University’s Teachers College, the ENACT program has been proven to effect vital student growth in the areas of: 1) social and emotional learning, 2) school engagement, and 3) artistic development. ENACT team members – which include trained actors (teaching artists), licensed social workers, and educators– combine proven drama therapy and social/emotional learning techniques to “tap into” each student’s innate creative side and teach bullying prevention. ENACT seeks funding to provide an auditorium community performance and four days of creative drama workshops at Gregorio Luperon High School for Science and Mathematics in City Council District 10. ENACT has provided programming at Luperon High School during the 2009-10 school year and currently, during the 2010-11 school year. ENACT would like to continue this dynamic and supportive partnership with an ENACT Bullying Prevention program. The budget will be tailored to create an ENACT Bullying Prevention program that fits the needs of the school, students, families and staff (budget available at request, EIN: 13To provide afterschool math and literacy assistance to students.

Youth Youth

Rodriguez Arroyo

Enact, Inc. Episcopal Social Services of New York, Inc.

13-3422660 * 13-3709095 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y $15,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 49 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Mendez

Episcopal Social Services of New York, Inc.

13-3709095 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Today, 50 families participate at Virginia Day Nursery, located at 464 East 10th Street, Lower East Side. Such a grant would supplement public subsidies from the New York City Administration for Children’s Services, helping to close funding gaps between the amount of public support available and the actual cost of providing quality early childhood education services that include developmental enrichment, socioemotional support, and parenting workshops. The additional expense funding from the Council will also allow the early childhood program at Virginia Day to offer parent workshops which educate parents about ongoing developmental assessments for their children as they grow into their preschool years. ESS’ After-School Program aims to improve students’ academic performance through academic enrichment, socioemotional support, and mentoring. Funding would provide much needed math and literacy assistance to students at both PS 36 and PS 138. Today, 55 families participate at Marcy Children’s Center, located at 494 Marcy Avenue, Brooklyn. Such a grant would supplement public subsidies from the New York City Administration for Children’s Services, helping to close funding gaps between the amount of public support available and the actual cost of providing quality early childhood education services that include developmental enrichment, socioemotional support, and parenting workshops. The additional expense funding from the Council will also allow the early childhood program at the Center offer parent workshops which educate parents about ongoing developmental assessments for their children as they grow into preschool years. Like you, we understand that disorders such as Asperger’s and autism often go undetected, especially in low income communities. To support family programs with attention to children such as: "Back to School Party" with donations of backpacks and school supplies; "End of School Celebration" at Central Park Zoo (Dept of Parks and Recreation donating admissions and Witchcraft boxed lunches), and " Read to Your Child" a program led by Dr. Angela Parrino, noted educator and children's book writer. Evidence seeks council discretionary funding to support the costs of mounting its 6th annual Summer Dance Workshop Series at Medgar Evers College and Preparatory School in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. Council funding will help to cover the costs of dance instructor and musician fees, administrative support, studio rental and hospitality for the annual Series. Families United for Racial Economic Equality respectfully requests funding to support youth development activities for our FUREEous Youth program. The programs to be funded are our Jammin Jumpers Double Dutch team, and our summer basketball tournament, Hoop Connection, which is held at the Ronald edmonds park in Clinton Hill. The program/service to be funded will provide 50 children and youth with Rites Of Passage programs. ROP is an innovative program that assists children and youth develop life skills. It further prevents delinquency, drug and substance abuse, teen pregnancy etc. The curriculum also provides a heavy parent leadership component (enhancing parenting skills). Included in program are educational field trips, cultural performing arts, and conflict resolution skills. The primary goal of KidZone is to provide free meals to the hungry children, teens and their family members in our community. KidZone is an after-school, open recreation program which also functions as a soup kitchen. The proposed funding will be used for youth between the ages of 5 and 15 in our Summer Day Camp and After-School Program. We provide a safe environment for children to explore, learn and grow emotionally and physically healthy. The funds will be used directly for their enrichment activities, cultural, educational and recreational trips including amusement parks.

Youth

Palma

Episcopal Social Services of New York, Inc.

13-3709095 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Vann

Episcopal Social Services of New York, Inc.

13-3709095 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Lappin

Eviction Intervention Services Homelessness Prevention, Inc.

13-3311582 *

$15,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

James James

Evidence, Inc. Families United for Racial and Economic Equality (FUREE)

11-3334921 * 20-0092728 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

James

Families United, Inc.

11-3388067 *

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Eugene

Family Renaissance, Inc.

11-3190985 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mendez

Father's Heart Ministries, Inc., The

22-3495873 *

$4,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Foster

Featherbed Lane Improvement Association, Inc.

13-2851606 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 50 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Soccer Camp: Several Professional soccer coaches/counselors, supervised by a head coach will teach children the fundamentals and advances soccer skills. This program also provides organized activities during the summer months and prepares children for team activities in the coming fall. Seventy children between ages 5-15 participated. This activity is held on the FIAO Soccer Field. Soccer Field: To maintain a facility for neighborhood soccer playing. We have at present local High / Elementary Schools and Cosmopolitan Junior Soccer League (composed of over 32 youth teams) that use this facility for practice and home games, year round. Liability insurance, lime for lining boundaries, basic ground mantenance with water supply and a field supervisor are the basic necessities. This facility accommodates over 1500 children per season. 11-3102847 * $8,000 DYCD-Y Baseball league for kids 5-18 years of age. There are no fee to join the league. Donations only. They provide 300 kids a chance to learn and play baseball. Kid practice 2 times a week and play regular games on Saturday and Sunday. The programs trains the participants in baseball and football and has them conpede in conpetitive sports. FSH’s After-School Ice Skating and Education Program provides at-risk girls from the economically disadvantaged Harlem neighborhood with vital fitness and educational opportunities that build self-worth, promote physical health, discourage high-risk behaviors, and boost academic success in school. Since our founding in 1997, FSH boasts a 100 high school graduation rate among FSH seniors and a 0 pregnancy rate for all. More than 2/3 of our students come from low-income families or families living at/below the poverty level; 72 identify as black, 15 as Latina, and 13 as multiracial; 43 are 6–9 years old, the rest 10–18. Each year, about 70 of girls return to the program from the previous year, and our daily attendance rate is generally a very high 95. To participate in the program, all girls must achieve or maintain a “B” grade average or better in school. FSH provides tutoring and homework assistance to support the girls academically, and last season 94 met or exceeded this goal! In addition, girls participate in a series of 4 age-appropriate 6-week educational workshops on Financial Literacy, Communication Public Speaking, Nutrition Fitness, and Skating Theory History that also strengthen their core academic skills. Girls also participate in cultural field trips; fitness and dance classes; college preparation workshops; mentoring, internship, and leadership opportunities; career week; and, new this season, a 16-week SAT test preparation program. For the ice skating component, FSH provides each girl with skating instruction, equipment, and attire. Students measure their skills development with the Ice Skating Institute (ISI) Standards tests, and we emphasize that each of their successes on the ice models how they can set goals and pursue success in all other aspects of their lives. Last season, 96 passed at least one ISI test level, 13 passed two, and one student passed three. Youth Dickens Figure Skating in Harlem, Inc. 13-3945168 * $6,000 DYCD-Y Funding would be applied to ice time and classroom rental expenses.

Youth

Vallone

Federation of Italian American Organizations of Queens, Inc.

Youth Youth

Mendez Reyna

Felix Millan Little League Field of Dreams Sports Club

13-3533678 * 20-8945226 *

$7,000 DYCD-Y $7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 51 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

FSH’s After-School Ice Skating and Education Program provides at-risk girls from the economically disadvantaged Harlem neighborhood with vital fitness and educational opportunities that build self-worth, promote physical health, discourage high-risk behaviors, and boost academic success in school. Since our founding in 1997, FSH boasts a 100 high school graduation rate among FSH seniors and a 0 pregnancy rate for all. More than 2/3 of our students come from low-income families or families living at/below the poverty level; 72 identify as black, 15 as Latina, and 13 as multiracial; 43 are 6–9 years old, the rest 10–18. Each year, about 70 of girls return to the program from the previous year, and our daily attendance rate is generally a very high 95. To participate in the program, all girls must achieve or maintain a “B” grade average or better in school. FSH provides tutoring and homework assistance to support the girls academically, and last season 94 met or exceeded this goal! In addition, girls participate in a series of 4 age-appropriate 6-week educational workshops on Financial Literacy, Communication Public Speaking, Nutrition Fitness, and Skating Theory History that also strengthen their core academic skills. Girls also participate in cultural field trips; fitness and dance classes; college preparation workshops; mentoring, internship, and leadership opportunities; career week; and, new this season, a 16-week SAT test preparation program. For the ice skating component, FSH provides each girl with skating instruction, equipment, and attire. Students measure their skills development with the Ice Skating Institute (ISI) Standards tests, and we emphasize that each of their successes on the ice models how they can set goals and pursue success in all other aspects of their lives. Last season, 96 passed at least one ISI test level, 13 passed two, and one student passed three. Youth Youth Jackson James Figure Skating in Harlem, Inc. First Baptist Church of Crown Heights 13-3945168 * 11-2033058 * $4,500 DYCD-Y $7,000 DYCD-Y Funding would be applied to ice time and classroom rental expenses. Since 1982, The First Baptist Church of Crown Heights Scholarship Fund diligently raised money for students to receive scholarships to fo to college. We provide athletic services for local community. And the grant will be used for further developement of youth soccer. We have 170 children in our organization. Any child ages 4 to 17 years old who wants to join our after school program can do so. Youth: FDC provides 3 afterschool programs for 350 youth and a summer camp for an additional 120. We are requesting funds from our local council members to support the work FDC does in the community and specifically during afterschool hours. Delegation Funds: FDC is specifically requesting funds to operate a community teen center. Our goal is to provide a safe space where teens can go in the evenings and receive comprehensive services including Leadership Building Life Skills training, recreation activities, and enhanced educational services. The program would serve 50 high school age youth each evening. Teens-at-risk outreach, bias crime, anti-terrorism awareness, and 24X6 patrol with radio dispatch to assist all emergencies for youth. FYA provides services to the boys and girls in our community in their leisure time, by providing a safe and orderly environment.We train young student athletes in basketball in skills to enhance their development FYAs golds are for our students to be convinced to choose college, rather than choosing gangs. Our students choose conflict of resolution, than violence in our community. The Florence E. Smith Community Center Youth Program will provide an after-school mentoring and instruction in various art form, including creative writing, dance and art. The program will also provide monthly family movie night.

Youth

Nelson

First Chernomorets USA, Inc.

11-3586786 *

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Eugene Nelson

Flatbush Development Corporation Flatbush Shomrim Safety Patrol, Inc.

51-0188251 * 20-3244567

$22,000 DYCD-Y $12,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mealy

Flatbush Youth Association, Inc.

11-3287922 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ferreras

Florence E Smith Community Center, Inc.

11-2623861 *

$7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 52 of 151

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

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* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Funds are requested to support a FREE Earth Day youth initiative in April 2012 to increase awareness of environment and conservation issues through the arts for kids and teenagers. This environmental activity will include free arts workshops for children and youth using recyclable materials. Flushing Town Hall will partner with schools and youth groups to encourage NYC’s youth to live “green.” Youth Gennaro Flushing Council on Culture and the Arts Inc 11-2652182 * $7,500 DYCD-Y Funds will be used for purchasing educational materials and classroom supplies, office supplies, expenses related to support parents workshops/staff development, expenses related to school trips and consultants fees for the program enhancements. Family bonding and strengthening through working on building a box car together. It is to build skills and improtance of teamwork. To teach working on something through to fruition. Funds will be used to keep the cost of registration affordable, and will allow our organization to provide equipment rentals to those individuals/families that can not afford it. THE ORGANIZATION PROVIDES A SAFE AND SECURE ENVIRONMENT FOR THE YOUTH OF OUR AREA TO PARTICIPATE IN BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL PROGRAMS Youth soccer and basketball league for children between ages 4 and 17 year olds. We promote the teaching of teamwork and sportsmanship along with learning the fundamental of the sport. Most of all we want the children to have a positive experience and to have fun. The Forest Park Sports Clinics provide a safe fun and supportive environment where children age 7-14 have the opportunity to learn a new sport and develop sportsmanship while participating in healthy activities. Karate, Handball, Basketball and Skateboarding will be offered. We would like to engage the senior population in participating in activities that foster mental and physical awareness. We would present 4 afternoons of live theatre and live bands with dancing at Oak Ridge in Forest Park during the fall. We would present a concert as part of our 2011 summer concert series at the George Seuffert Bandshell.

Youth

Koo

Flushing Day Care Center, Inc.

11-2196556

$7,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ferreras

Flushing Meadow Soap Box Derby, Inc.

11-2737828

$7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Crowley Koslowitz

Forest Hills Football League, Inc. Forest Hills Little League

11-3057287 52-1277708

$10,000 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koslowitz

Forest Hills Youth Athletic Association, Inc.

26-4164715

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ulrich

Forest Park Trust, Inc.

31-1558645

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Dromm

Forestdale, Inc.

11-1631747

$3,500 DYCD-CD

Forestdale is a non-profit organization dedicated to the children, youth and families of Queens. Funds received will be used for operating expenses for our four main programs: foster care, where the safety and healthy development of children and youth are provided for while permanent families are secured; support for teens who are pregnant and parenting, where reproductive health treatment and education are made available to adolescent mothers; family crisis intervention for youth in precarious family situations; and the Fathering Initiative, where youth who are also noncustodial fathers learn to be better dads and reconnect with their children. Forestdale will utilize funds to deliver programs to foster care youth during a time in which intervention is critical, administering preventive services program for adolescents who are pregnant and parenting and who need to assistance accessing public assistance programs like Medicaid. Forestdale also plans to expend City resources on programs to help youth address problems such as unemployment, truancy and homelessness – all risk factors for foster care removal.

Youth Discretionary

Page 53 of 151

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Gennaro

Forestdale, Inc.

11-1631747

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Forestdale is a non-profit organization dedicated to the children and families of Queens. Funds received will be used for operating expenses for our four main programs: foster care, where the safety and healthy development of children are provided for while permanent families are secured; support for teens who are pregnant and parenting, where reproductive health treatment and education are made available to adolescent mothers; family crisis intervention, where families in danger of entering the foster care system are given preventive aid; and the Fathering Initiative, where noncustodial fathers learn to be better dads and reconnect with their children. In total, Forestdale touches the lives of approximately 1,700 people each year through our initiatives for stronger families, educational excellence and health literacy. Fort Washington Collegiate Church has successfully melding its scouting programs to offer a viable and robust scouting program to both boys and girls from ages 9 to 21. BSA Troop 729 Venture Crew is a 501(c)(3) organization, composed entirely of volunteers, that renders direct services to needy boys and girls in Washington Heights. The objective of the Venture Crew is to maintain a core of older scouts, fourteen to eighteen, at an age when they typically disengage from adults and younger siblings. We provide opportunities throughout the year that encourage them to continue through the higher ranks of scouting, trained to be responsible leaders in our community and role models for younger scouts. The year culminates around an annual two-week summer trek of strenuous backpacking, hiking or canoeing in someplace far removed from Washington Heights. In past summers our scouts have been to high adventure bases in Maine, northwestern Ontario, British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Utah, Wyoming, Catalina and the Dakotas. Our year round fundraising insures that every scout, regardless of financial circumstances, will be able to attend these activities. Venture Prep Venture Prep is a program for younger girls (5th - 8th grade) that encourages leadership, community involvement, and environmental awareness. Adult volunteer leadership helps our girls learn to work as a team so they can tackle anything from a 10-mile hike to a community service project. The Hendrick Hudson Troops Association of Washington Heights/Inwood provides funding and equipment for the other sponsored scout units serving youth in northern Manhattan

Youth

Jackson

Fort Washington Collegiate Church

13-5564117 *

$7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 54 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Fort Washington Collegiate Church has successfully melding its scouting programs to offer a viable and robust scouting program to both boys and girls from ages 9 to 21. BSA Troop 729 Venture Crew is a 501(c)(3) organization, composed entirely of volunteers, that renders direct services to needy boys and girls in Washington Heights. The objective of the Venture Crew is to maintain a core of older scouts, fourteen to eighteen, at an age when they typically disengage from adults and younger siblings. We provide opportunities throughout the year that encourage them to continue through the higher ranks of scouting, trained to be responsible leaders in our community and role models for younger scouts. The year culminates around an annual two-week summer trek of strenuous backpacking, hiking or canoeing in someplace far removed from Washington Heights. In past summers our scouts have been to high adventure bases in Maine, northwestern Ontario, British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Utah, Wyoming, Catalina and the Dakotas. Our year round fundraising insures that every scout, regardless of financial circumstances, will be able to attend these activities. Venture Prep Venture Prep is a program for younger girls (5th - 8th grade) that encourages leadership, community involvement, and environmental awareness. Adult volunteer leadership helps our girls learn to work as a team so they can tackle anything from a 10-mile hike to a community service project. The Hendrick Hudson Troops Association of Washington Heights/Inwood provides funding and equipment for other sponsored scout units serving youth in northern Manhattan

Youth Youth

Rodriguez Gentile

Fort Washington Collegiate Church Fourth Avenue Presbyterian Church/The Children's Community Chorus

13-5564117 11-2693994

$4,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y To provide an after-school choral program for disadvantaged youth in South Brooklyn. Our program name is: Self-Awareness Program for Young People. This is an existing afterschool program in operation in partnership with Public School PS 189M, which was created four years ago as a response to violence in the public schools of our area. The main purpose of this after-school program is to build up Self-esteem and to keep students out of the streets and out of trouble. The Self-Awareness Program for Young People uses The Arts and recreational activities as an alternative outlet for the youth in our community, to deal with violence, anger and frustration.

Youth

Rodriguez

Fraternidad de Los Angeles, Inc.

58-2672102 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 55 of 151

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Fresh Youth Initiatives is requesting support for Community Youth in Action, a comprehensive youth development program that provides youth with a range of services, supports and opportunities settings to help them develop life skills and leadership skills. Our goal for the upcoming year are to recruit and enroll 250 youth in the various components of CYA who will provide 10,000 hours of service to the community. Our service activities, which include beautification projects (graffiti removal, mural painting, park cleanups, community gardens) and distribution projects (food, clothing and sleeping bags for the homeless and the Helping Hands Food Pantry, which is NYC’s only youth-led food pantry) directly benefit 2,500 community members each year and improve the quality of life for countless others. Not only does CYA address pressing community needs such as poverty, hunger and blight, the program also helps program participants along the path to self-sufficiency by helping them to develop the skills and values to grow into successful adults. Our program is preventive in nature because it provides healthy alternatives to risky behavior such as truancy, delinquency, gang activity, sexual activity, and experimentation with drugs and alcohol; however, at its core, our program is designed to help young people thrive. By providing them with service learning and providing educational support and a range of enrichment activities, we help young people develop the values, skills and resiliency that they will need to overcome barriers to success, enabling them to break the negative cycle of poverty, unemployment and low educational attainment that plagues the community. A discretionary award from the New York City Council will be used to cover program expenses, including salary support for program staff, food for the Helping Hands Food Pantry, paint and gardening supplies, transportation, stipends, incentives and educational materials for participants Fresh Youth Initiatives is requesting support for Community Youth in Action, a comprehensive youth development program that provides youth with a range of services, supports and opportunities settings to help them develop life skills and leadership skills. Our goal for the upcoming year are to recruit and enroll 250 youth in the various components of CYA who will provide 10,000 hours of service to the community. Our service activities, which include beautification projects (graffiti removal, mural painting, park cleanups, community gardens) and distribution projects (food, clothing and sleeping bags for the homeless and the Helping Hands Food Pantry, which is NYC’s only youth-led food pantry) directly benefit 2,500 community members each year and improve the quality of life for countless others. Not only does CYA address pressing community needs such as poverty, hunger and blight, the program also helps program participants along the path to self-sufficiency by helping them to develop the skills and values to grow into successful adults. Our program is preventive in nature because it provides healthy alternatives to risky behavior such as truancy, delinquency, gang activity, sexual activity, and experimentation with drugs and alcohol; however, at its core, our program is designed to help young people thrive. By providing them with service learning and providing educational support and a range of enrichment activities, we help young people develop the values, skills and resiliency that they will need to overcome barriers to success, enabling them to break the negative cycle of poverty, unemployment and low educational attainment that plagues the community. A discretionary award from the New York City Council will be used to cover program expenses, including salary support for program staff, food for the Helping Hands Food Pantry, paint and gardening supplies, transportation, stipends, incentives and educational materials for participants

Youth

Jackson

Fresh Youth Initiatives, Inc.

13-3723207

$9,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Rodriguez

Fresh Youth Initiatives, Inc.

13-3723207

$13,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 56 of 151

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Three teachers of environmental education will provide 50 1-1/2 hour nature-related programs. Youth Ignizio Friends of Blue Heron Park, Inc. 13-3073882 * $3,500 DYCD-Y Native plant specialist/gardener will provide 5 months of garden/landscaping services. Family Fun Day other public events i.e. Crafty Totten Kids Nature Kids Korner. Family Fun Day held in early summer provides inflatable rides/games, children/s story telling, arts much more. CTK a yr-round arts crafts workshop conducted by FOFTP volunteers, NKK Rangers instruct children in natural elements in Park teach ecological crafts. To support historic education programming for youth at New Utrecht High School. Friends of Payson Avenue operates the Washington Heights Inwood Youth Council to empower youth in the community to become advocates of change for their community. The Funding will go towards supporting recruitment efforts, training and local policy development Services the families and children surrounding Queensbridge Park. Events held: Bicycle Parade, Super Soaker, Childrens Festival, Its My Park Day and Family Day. Needs: Food, Refreshments, Equipment rentals, condiments, utensils, paper goods, charcoal, printer paper printer ink and bbq grill. Funds to the NY Transit Museum will support two types of education programs serving NYC youth; guided school programs for students and free weekend workshops for visiting families. Both programs are free with Museum admission (4/child). Needy groups that cannot afford even this price are encouraged to apply to the Transit Museums fee waiver program, One for All, in which corporate supporters underwrite a group visit. Museum admission covers only a small portion of the costs associated with these guided education programs, all of which have an interactive or hands-on component. The costs include salary and training for 11 part-time Museum educators (including 2 special needs educators), art supplies and materials for hands-on workshops and take-home projects, fees for visiting artists and guest performers, costumes and props for performers. During the school year a growing and loyal base of teachers from across NYC repeatedly bring their classes for guided programs that tie into curricular units for different grades. Each summer the Museum develops a fun tour and activity for NYCs camps, with group bookings regularly at capacity. On weekends these educational programs are adapted and augmented to serve families who regularly return. Thanks in part to FY11 NYCC discretionary funds, the Transit Museum launched a new youth education program of costumed story-telling in vintage cars, where actors dressed in garb of the decade bring to life the history of NYC mass transit. This new program serves 2nd grade school groups, summer camp groups and weekend family visitors. New characters are being developed for FY 12. In addition, the Museum will open a science exhibit in Fall 2011 about how electricity powers NY’s subways. New school programs that teach this science to 4th and 8th graders, for whom it is part of NYS standards, will also be supported by discretionary funds. Youth Levin Friends of the New York Transit Museum 11-3299408 $7,000 DYCD-Y Because of the distructive behavior of the teens in our Park 10 years ago, we developed a Youth Group to redirect thier actions. The teens work in the Park doing such chores as sweeping, raking, weeding , planting and raking leaves in the fall. They are paid a stipend for the hours worked. They also help when we hold musicals for set up and at our festivals. The program has been successful in that destructive behavior is down to a minimum To fund the Main Stage Program and Tinkerbell Theatre.

Youth Youth

Halloran Gentile

Friends of Fort Totten Parks, Inc. Friends of Historic New Utrecht

32-0176967 11-3407104

$7,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Rodriguez

Friends of Payson Avenue, Inc.

55-0905663 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Van Bramer

Friends of Queensbridge Park

27-2157246

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Rose Brewer

Friends of Westerleigh Park Frog & Peach Theatre Company, Inc., The

13-4176426 13-3916149

$2,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 57 of 151

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Comrie Brewer

From Cardboard to Canvas, Inc. Fund for the City of New York, Inc.

41-2229446 13-2612524

$3,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

From Cardboard To Canvas Inc., provides weekend Visual Art program for approximately (20)children ages 7-19, in St.Albans community and surrounding areas. Presently, they meet on weekends at a local church.They learn to create artwork in the following categories: monochromatic drawing, multicolored drawing, pastels, watercolor, oils or acrylic, as well as designing on fabric such as their own T-Shirts. NYC Community Cleanup is a citywide initiative that puts low-level offenders to work with the goal to create meaningful community service work projects. Launched in 1998, the Red Hook Youth Court trains local teenagers to serve as jurors, judges and attorneys, handling real-life cases involving their peers. The goal of the Court is to use positive peer pressure to ensure that young people who have committed minor offenses pay back the community and receive the help they need to avoid further involvement in the justice system. Part of the Red Hook Community Justice Center, the Youth Court handles cases involving young people, ages 10 to 18, who have been cited for low-level offenses, such as vandalism, fare evasion, assault and truancy. The Red Hook Youth Baseball League is a unique effort to provide kids in the low-income neighborhood of Red Hook with positive programs to fill their free time and an opportunity to become more active in their community. The program is run by the Red Hook Community Justice Center with the goals of promoting sportsmanship, discipline, and leadership among local youth, improving the quality-of-life in Red Hook by engaging young people in community service projects, and encouraging voluntary participation by parents and community members. City Council funding will support baseball equipment and supplies for community service projects in the neighborhood.

Youth

Gonzalez

Fund for the City of New York, Inc.

13-2612524

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Gonzalez

Fund for the City of New York, Inc.

13-2612524

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Lander

Fund for the City of New York, Inc.

13-2612524

$3,500 DYCD-Y

This proposal seeks a renewal in funding for LAMPcamp, a summer program in media literacy developed and operated by The LAMP which would be hosted by the Prospect Park Y at the Park Slope Armory. Designed for at-risk students between 12 and 17 years old, the program is a response to increasing evidence that American youth are spending more time with media than ever before, but are not learning the critical thinking skills which should accompany such a sizable spike in media use. For example, a recent study by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that young people consume a total of 10 hours and 45 minutes of media content per day—an increase from 8 hours and 33 minutes in 2004. Furthermore, the racial disparity of media use among teens continues to grow, with black and Hispanic teens using over 13 hours of media content per day. Coupled with additional research showing that heavy media users receive lower grades in school and a! re more likely to get in trouble, it is clear that teens in general need to learn healthy media habits in order to be more responsible citizens of their digital and physical communities.

Youth Discretionary

Page 58 of 151

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Launched in 1998, the Red Hook Youth Court trains local teenagers to serve as jurors, judges and attorneys, handling real-life cases involving their peers. The goal of the Court is to use positive peer pressure to ensure that young people who have committed minor offenses pay back the community and receive the help they need to avoid further involvement in the justice system. Part of the Red Hook Community Justice Center, the Youth Court handles cases involving young people, ages 10 to 18, who have been cited for low-level offenses, such as vandalism, fare evasion, assault and truancy. The project helps young people avoid criminal records while simultaneously holding them accountable for their actions by requiring them to pay back the community for their offenses. Sanctions include community service, letters of apology, or skill building workshops on topics like conflict resolution and goal setting. Youth can also be linked to job training and after school programs so they can avoid further disciplinary action in their schools and communities. To date, over 480 young people have served as members of Red Hook’s Youth Court. In 2010, the Court heard 152 cases and maintained a compliance rate of 90. City Council funding would support on-going operations of the project, specifically member stipends and metrocards for program participants. Reel Works Teen Filmmaking provides free after school and in-school filmmmaking workshops for at-risk Brooklyn teens. Reel Works requests NYC Council support to provide summer youth employment for youth engaged in Reel Works Productions, our career development that trains youth for jobs in NYCs 5 billion film television industries.

Youth

Lander

Fund for the City of New York, Inc.

13-2612524

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Lander

Fund for the City of New York, Inc.

13-2612524

$3,500 DYCD-Y

The Greenpoint Youth Court is a unique youth leadership program which trains local teenagers to serve as jurors, judges and attorneys, handling real-life cases involving their peers. The goal of the Court is to use positive peer pressure to ensure that young people who have committed minor offenses pay back the community and receive the help they need to avoid further involvement in the justice system. The project handles cases involving young people, ages 10 to 18, who have been cited for low-level offenses, such as vandalism, fare evasion, assault and truancy. The Youth Court receives referrals from local schools, the New York City Department of Probation, and the New York City Police Department. The project helps young people avoid criminal records while simultaneously holding them accountable for their actions by requiring them to pay back the community for their offenses. Respondents admit responsibility for their actions, and a jury of their peers imposes sanctions that emphasize accountability, repairing harm done to the community, and providing respondents with meaningful activities. Sanctions include community service, letters of apology, essays or skill building workshops on various topics such as conflict resolution and goal setting. In 2010, the Greenpoint Youth Court heard 142 cases and maintained a compliance rate of 91. City Council funding would support on-going operations of the project, specifically member stipends and metrocards for program participants. To support the Attendance Court, a truancy prevention program which provides students and their families with supportive community resources to keep chronically absent students out of family court.

Youth

Levin

Fund for the City of New York, Inc.

13-2612524

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mark-Viverito

Fund for the City of New York, Inc.

13-2612524

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 59 of 151

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Mendez

Fund for the City of New York, Inc.

13-2612524

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Day One is requesting 5,000 to support our preventive education and direct services programs. This allocation will support the salaries of a bilingual community educator, social worker and attorney in your district.

Bushwick IMPACT is a neighborhood-based early childhood family resource center directly serving 600 parents and children every year. We serve an additional 300 families through information and awareness campaigns. Since our opening in 2005 we have helped 2000 families give their children the strong start they deserve. IMPACT seeks funding for our Read Aloud program, a comprehensive, full service approach to increasing early education readiness and parental involvement in children’s learning and development. The twiceweekly on-site Read Aloud is a two-hour program for parents and children between the ages of 18 months and three years. It consists of 30 minutes of social time, in which nutritious snacks are served, children engage in supervised free play, and parents meet with IMPACT’s trained Parent Advocates about information, referrals and system navigation assistance to resources and services that support family stabi! lity. The group activity consists of 45 minutes of singing, music-making, movement and book reading. The final 45 minutes consist of: a learning circle (interactive facilitated dialogue around child development and early learning); an information session (resource sharing about community-based opportunities, such as early intervention and child care/head start enrollment); or book lending (IMPACT registers families for library cards, loans books, and provides weekly book-borrowing from the Brooklyn Public Library’s Bibliobus). The community-wide Read Alouds are held in summer months in parks. The reading, music and movement time provides a free learning opportunity for large numbers of unaffiliated parents and children in everyday contexts. Community-wide programs also include book distributions and information and referrals to community resources, including IMPACT. Families increase understanding about child development, learning special needs, interact positively wi! th their children, read to their children access essential resources. Youth Reyna Fund for the City of New York, Inc. 13-2612524 $7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 60 of 151

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Council Member

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* Amount ($)

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Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Day One is requesting 5,000 to support our preventive education and direct services programs. This allocation will support the salaries of a bilingual community educator, social worker and attorney in your district. With your support, Day One will conduct coeducational workshops for 500 young people and professionals who work with youth, and will respond to calls from your constituents for legal assistance and counseling. Day One is a highly cost effective organization, and our unique services will help New York City’s young people build safe and healthy relationships throughout their lives. The Community Education Program brings Day One’s interactive workshops to 5,000 youth and 500 adults each year in New York City schools and social service agencies. We highlight the warning signs of abuse, and ways to seek assistance or to help a friend. Day One staff also trains caregivers, teachers and social service providers to offer supportive guidance to youth who might disclose an abusive relationship. Adult trainings also discuss mandated reporting, identify local resources, and incorporate skill-building related to communicating successfully with young victims. Day One’s preventive programs link directly to our Direct Services program, which provides bilingual crisis counseling, case management, information and legal representation in Family Courts. Individual and group counseling for young survivors help build the strength and stability for young people seeking legal protection in the justice system. Day One accompanies clients to file police reports and advocates with police and district attorneys on behalf of victims seeking protective orders. Day One’s advocacy in the criminal system ensures prosecutors are aware of a victim’s needs, prioritize young victims as they would adults, and have the information they need to prosecute each case. Youth Williams Fund for the City of New York, Inc. 13-2612524 $5,000 DYCD-Y Funding will support operating expenses for Getting Out and Staying Out, a program that provides training, counseling and education to young men during and after incarceration. To reach students traditionally underserved, programming is provided free of charge, and we target schools with inclusion programs for children with special needs and a high number of students with English as a second language.

Youth

Garodnick

Getting Out and Staying Out, Inc.

06-1711370

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Quinn

Gilgamesh Theatre Group, Inc.

13-3680874

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 61 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, a separate 501(c)(3) organization chartered by the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), offers research-based, age-appropriate educational programs that focus on the positive development of girls, ages 5 to 17, in a single-sex environment. Girls who participate in our programs throughout their elementary, intermediate and high school years are involved in curricula that become incrementally more challenging, helping to empower them to become self-confident individuals and leaders. This year, we will provide programs that promote positive youth development to more than 23,000 New York City girls with the assistance of more than 7,800 adult volunteers. For the 2012 fiscal year, our Council is seeking funding to support our School Break programs and Troop-Building efforts city-wide. School Break programs target girls living in low-income communities where adult volunteerism is minimal. They are designed to offer girls free, alternative, short-term, programming during out-of-school time hours that will help engender a strong sense of self and acceptance among the girls living in these communities and, in turn, help mitigate participation in risky behavior. Through our programs, girls participate in an array of activities that may include an Introduction to Girl Scouting, our Nursing Patch Program, Scouts for a Million Trees NYC (an environmental stewardship program), Design Squad (an engineering program), and Girls Build (an urban planning/architecture program). It is our hope that School Break programs will lead to the formation of more permanent troops once the parents and/or the staff of the community organizations and schools at which we host our programs see what a difference they make in the lives of the girls we serve. However, whether a Troop forms or not, our primary goal is to ensure that all our New York City girls can positively interact in a supportive, girls-only environment and learn positive values. The Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, a separate 501(c)(3) organization chartered by the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), offers research-based, age-appropriate educational programs that focus on the positive development of girls, ages 5 to 17, in a single-sex environment. Girls who participate in our programs throughout their elementary, intermediate and high school years are involved in curricula that become incrementally more challenging, helping to empower them to become self-confident individuals and leaders. This year, we will provide programs that promote positive youth development to more than 23,000 New York City girls with the assistance of more than 7,800 adult volunteers. For the 2012 fiscal year, our Council is seeking funding to support our School Break programs and Troop-Building efforts city-wide. School Break programs target girls living in low-income communities where adult volunteerism is minimal. They are designed to offer girls free, alternative, short-term, programming during out-of-school time hours that will help engender a strong sense of self and acceptance among the girls living in these communities and, in turn, help mitigate participation in risky behavior. Through our programs, girls participate in an array of activities that may include an Introduction to Girl Scouting, our Nursing Patch Program, Scouts for a Million Trees NYC (an environmental stewardship program), Design Squad (an engineering program), and Girls Build (an urban planning/architecture program). It is our hope that School Break programs will lead to the formation of more permanent troops once the parents and/or the staff of the community organizations and schools at which we host our programs see what a difference they make in the lives of the girls we serve. However, whether a Troop forms or not, our primary goal is to ensure that all our New York City girls can positively interact in a supportive, girls-only environment and learn positive values.

Youth

Dickens

Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, Inc.

13-1624014

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Halloran

Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, Inc.

13-1624014

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 62 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, a separate 501(c)(3) organization chartered by the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), offers research-based, age-appropriate educational programs that focus on the positive development of girls, ages 5 to 17, in a single-sex environment. Girls who participate in our programs throughout their elementary, intermediate and high school years are involved in curricula that become incrementally more challenging, helping to empower them to become self-confident individuals and leaders. This year, we will provide programs that promote positive youth development to more than 23,000 New York City girls with the assistance of more than 7,800 adult volunteers. For the 2012 fiscal year, our Council is seeking funding to support our School Break programs and Troop-Building efforts city-wide. School Break programs target girls living in low-income communities where adult volunteerism is minimal. They are designed to offer girls free, alternative, short-term, programming during out-of-school time hours that will help engender a strong sense of self and acceptance among the girls living in these communities and, in turn, help mitigate participation in risky behavior. Through our programs, girls participate in an array of activities that may include an Introduction to Girl Scouting, our Nursing Patch Program, Scouts for a Million Trees NYC (an environmental stewardship program), Design Squad (an engineering program), and Girls Build (an urban planning/architecture program). It is our hope that School Break programs will lead to the formation of more permanent troops once the parents and/or the staff of the community organizations and schools at which we host our programs see what a difference they make in the lives of the girls we serve. However, whether a Troop forms or not, our primary goal is to ensure that all our New York City girls can positively interact in a supportive, girls-only environment and learn positive values. To provide support for girl scout troops in council district 7.The Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, a separate 501(c)(3) organization chartered by the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), offers research-based, age-appropriate educational programs that focus on the positive development of girls, ages 5 to 17, in a single-sex environment. Girls who participate in our programs throughout their elementary, intermediate and high school years are involved in curricula that become incrementally more challenging, helping to empower them to become self-confident individuals and leaders. This year, we will provide programs that promote positive youth development to more than 23,000 New York City girls with the assistance of more than 7,800 adult volunteers. Our Council is seeking funding to support existing troops, as well as School Break programs and Troop-Building efforts in District 7. School Break programs target girls living in lowincome communities where adult volunteerism is minimal. They are designed to offer girls free, alternative, short-term, programming during out-of-school time hours that will help engender a strong sense of self and acceptance among the girls living in these communities and, in turn, help mitigate participation in risky behavior. Through our programs, girls participate in an array of activities that may include an Introduction to Girl Scouting, our Nursing Patch Program, Scouts for a Million Trees NYC (an environmental stewardship program), Design Squad (an engineering program), and Girls Build (an urban planning/architecture program). It is our hope that School Break programs will lead to the formation of more permanent troops once the parents and/or the staff of the community organizations and schools at which we host our programs see what a difference they make in the lives of the girls we serve. However, whether a Troop forms or not, our primary goal is to ensure that all our New York City girls can positively interact in a supportive, girls-only environment and learn positive values.

Youth

Ignizio

Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, Inc.

13-1624014

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Jackson

Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, Inc.

13-1624014

$9,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 63 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Koo

Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, Inc.

13-1624014

$6,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Lappin Oddo

Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, Inc. Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, Inc.

13-1624014 13-1624014

$4,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

For the 2012 fiscal year, our Council is seeking funding to support our School Break programs and Troop-Building efforts city-wide. School Break programs target girls living in low-income communities where adult volunteerism is minimal. The Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, a separate 501(c)(3) organization chartered by the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), offers research-based, age-appropriate educational programs that focus on the positive development of girls, ages 5 to 17, in a single-sex environment. School Break & Girl Scout Troop Programs in 50th CD The Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, a separate 501(c)(3) organization chartered by the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), offers research-based, age-appropriate educational programs that focus on the positive development of girls, ages 5 to 17, in a single-sex environment. For the 2012 fiscal year, our Council is seeking funding to support our School Break programs and Troop-Building efforts city-wide. They are designed to offer girls free, alternative, shortterm, programming during out-of-school time hours that will help engender a strong sense of self and acceptance among the girls living in these communities and, in turn, help mitigate participation in risky behavior Funding will be used to support our School Break programs and Troop-Building efforts. They are designed to offer girls free, alternative, short-term, programming during out-of-school time hours that will help engender a strong sense of self and acceptance among the girls living in these communities and, in turn, help mitigate participation in risky behavior. In keeping with Council Member James work with the Urban Network and commitment to increasing a range of opportunities for urban youth, GGE respectfully requests 15,000 to help us to continue providing these unique and effective services to inner city youth, their families, and communities. Funds will be used to support outreach and attendance for girls from low-income families in New York City Council Districts to attend our Summer Experiential Education and Development (SEED) Program, a 2 week residential academic/social enrichment program. SEED is a goal oriented program that focuses on helping to lessen the summer learning gapthe erosion of knowledge and development that disadvantaged children experience at a higher rate, due largely to reduced opportunities for positive summer activities and enrichment. Funds will be used to support outreach and attendance for girls from low-income families in New York City Council Districts to attend our Summer Experiential Education and Development (SEED) Program, a 2 week residential academic/social enrichment program. SEED is a goal oriented program that focuses on helping to lessen the summer learning gapthe erosion of knowledge and development that disadvantaged children experience at a higher rate, due largely to reduced opportunities for positive summer activities and enrichment. Funds will be used to support outreach and attendance for girls from low-income families in New York City Council Districts to attend our Summer Experiential Education and Development (SEED) Program, a 2 week residential academic/social enrichment program. SEED is a goal oriented program that focuses on helping to lessen the summer learning gapthe erosion of knowledge and development that disadvantaged children experience at a higher rate, due largely to reduced opportunities for positive summer activities and enrichment. Funds will be used to support outreach and attendance for girls from low-income families in New York City Council Districts to attend our Summer Experiential Education and Development (SEED) Program, a 2 week residential academic/social enrichment program.

Youth

Palma

Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, Inc.

13-1624014

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Quinn

Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, Inc.

13-1624014

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

James

Girls for Gender Equity, Inc.

04-3697166

$8,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Dickens

Girls' Vacation Fund, Inc. (d/b/a Girls Quest)

13-1954024

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Jackson

Girls' Vacation Fund, Inc. (d/b/a Girls Quest)

13-1954024

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mealy

Girls' Vacation Fund, Inc. (d/b/a Girls Quest)

13-1954024

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Palma

Girls' Vacation Fund, Inc. (d/b/a Girls Quest)

13-1954024

$5,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 64 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Weprin

Glen Oaks Little League

11-3047106 *

$7,500 DYCD-Y

The Glen Oaks Little League serves approximately 275 boys and girls by giving them the opportunity to play both baseball and softball. The GO Project is requesting funds to support further expansion of our programming from 350 students to 450 students for the 2011-2012 program year beginning in July. To fund the Goddard Riversides After School Program which provides daily activities for children ages 5-12 years. The after-school of GBP is in its third year. We offer unique learning opportunities beyond the general academic curriculum. This program enables the youth of a low socio economic community to enrich their musical training and develop new perspectives in the performing arts. Our vision is to continue to administer youth development initiatives in Brooklyns underserved communities thru music. Funding is for the purpose of teaching at-risk and disadvantage youth and young adults age 5 to 24 the art of Golf. Currently GELOY operates in 2 public schools and 4 New York City Housing Authority community centers located in Brooklyn New York. GELOY is a borough wide program servicing the Bed-Sty, Brownsville, East New York, and Bushwick Brooklyn Areas. Funds will be used for program golfing booklets, golfing equipment, golfing cart for site visitation, caps and tee-shirts for golf participants, for office supplies, utilities, printing, postage, golfing trips, entrance fees and much more. Funding to support Good Shepherd Services After-School/Out-of-School-Time (OST) programs providing year-round activities during after-school hours at 15 sites throughout Bronx and Brooklyn.

Youth Youth

Mendez Brewer

GO Project, Inc., The Goddard Riverside Community Center

27-1411019 * 13-1893908

$3,500 DYCD-Y $9,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Williams

GODS BATTALION OF PRAYER

11-2412215 *

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mealy

Golf Elite League of Youth, Inc.

33-1057846

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Cabrera

Good Shepherd Services

13-5598710

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Levin

Good Shepherd Services

13-5598710

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Good Shepherd Services is requesting support for our Automotive High School Young Adult Borough Center (YABC)/Learning-To-Work (LTW), Downtown Brooklyn YABC/LTW and our Brooklyn Access GED/LTW, which are all part of the Department of Education’s (DOE) Office of Multiple Pathways to Graduation Network (OMPG). DOE’s OMPG was established in September 2005 with the goal of significantly increasing the graduation rates and expanding connections to college and career opportunities, for over-age and under-credited high school students. Having served this group effectively at Good Shepherds’ South Brooklyn Community High School since 1980, Good Shepherd was part of the inspiration behind the development and implementation of this groundbreaking DOE program. Now the largest provider in the OMPG network, our programs include 10 YABCs for over-aged and undercredited youth who need an afternoon-evening program, 5 pre-GED/GED mode! ls that address the needs of youth who are not eligible or able to engage in a full day program and 3 Transfer Schools, based on Good Shepherd’s nationally recognized model, which offer a full day year-round academic program for students who were excessively truant or had dropped out of high school. Good Shepherd operates 16 LTW components within these three program models that offer paid internships and career readiness skills to students. During the 2009-2010 school year, the OMPG programs in City Council District 33 served over 1,000 students and placed approximately 300 of these students in LTW internships. Good Shepherd Services is requesting a grant to support the continued implementation of Good Shepherd Services’ Sanctuary® Model at the Euphrasian Residence. To instill the children of the community the ideals of good sportsmanship, honesty, loyalty, courage, and respect of the authority. So that they may be well adjusted, stronger, and healthy happier youth and will grow up to be decent healthy trustworthy citizens. Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/ba Millennium Development

Youth

Mendez

Good Shepherd Services

13-5598710

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Fidler

Good Shepherd Sports Program

11-1850521 *

$3,000 DYCD-Y

11-3199040

Youth Discretionary

Page 65 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Vallone

Goodwill Industries of Greater New York and Northern New Jersey

13-1641068

$18,000 DYCD-Y

The funds will support our afterschool and summer program for youth ages 5-13. Childern participate in homework help and tutoring, computer, art, dance, recreational and educational trips and othe enrichment activities.

Youth Youth Youth

Lander Rose Foster

Gowanus Canal Conservancy, Inc. Grace Foundation of New York Grace Memorial Community Outreach Inc

26-0681729 13-4131863 13-4150913 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

This program will enlarge and enhance the federal and city-funded project of the Gowanus Canal Conservancy to build the “6th Street Green Corridor” of engineered rain gardens designed to help curb the problems of excess storm water runoff into the Gowanus Canal. That project site is located a few minutes walk from Intermediate School 51, the largest middle/junior-high school in northwest Brooklyn. The school and its students will benefit from our proposed education program by learning from and supporting the Green Corridor. During the three years after construction is complete, the COnservancy will monitor the performance of the project. These NYC students will be involved in the monitoring of this demonstration project, doing real science and engineering by measuring and reporting on the functionality of the system. We propose to design and present an instructional and training program for students at IS 51 which will add ! new components to their science and technology curricula, and provide them with field experiences and real-world experiments. Students will gain by meeting and learning from genuine science and engineering professionals, acquiring new real-world hands-on skills and academic skills. The students in this program will learn about new vocations as they interact with superb role models, and improve their motivation and personal goals and sense of voluntarism. Some will be motivated to apply for admission to elite high schools such as Brooklyn Tech, and set their eyes on college science and engineering. The school will gain by developing a new program that can serve as an additional magnet to attract students and families that are looking for something beyond the ordinary. The funds requested here from the Council Expense Budget will make a profound impact on the student participants, and provide important monitoring support to an innovative new project close to home. After school and weekend recreation, social skills, support programs for children and families impacted by Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Our organization would like to continue its annual trip to Franklin Museum which targets youth of certain age groups in order to epand their horizon. We are requesting funds to help us continue to serve healthy snacks in our afterschool program and healthy meals at our Wed. night meal for the underserved adults in our community. Our afterschool program is 4 days a week/3.5 hours a day, and we have approximately 50 children grades 1 - 5 in the program.They receive homework help, math and reading enrichment, arts activities, and exercise. Our Wed. night meal serves approximately 50 guests each week, adults in difficult circumstances in the community.

Youth

Mendez

Graffiti Community Ministries, Inc

13-3861124 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 66 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The goal is to continue supporting the community based Graham-Windham Beacon Center technology center and to create a safe haven for the children, youth and families during the after-school hours and on weekends. In addition, by providing the computer literacy classes to help low-income communities—specifically in the Harlem neighborhood, the program will bridge the digital divide to so many youth that do not have access to computer technology.The program will connect the entire school community—administrators, teachers, parents and students—to bring technology and the tools to use it to students’ homes and to the after school classroom learning experiences. Through this holistic approach, students are empowered to not only stay in school but also to thrive in their future careers. This on-going commitment continues to ensure an enduring spirit of hope and positive change for the entire Beacon and after-school community with free computer literacy training The computer center goes beyond the traditional school curriculum and offers each child the opportunity to prepare for their future life now. Our childrens classes are both fun and educational. We strive to engage the childs interest in computers and to advance their computer knowledge. Classes are designed to touch on all areas of education through computer technology. Students participate in fun group projects with focus on Microsoft Office software such as Word, Excel and PowerPoint; engage with multimedia; learn to create photo galleries; paint the screen with their fingers!; travel and safely explore the World through the Internet; and even record music! Youth Jackson Graham-Windham Beacon Center 13-2926426 * $8,000 DYCD-Y The funds from this grant are us to support the entire organization. We use the funds to purchase equipment, rent gym and office space as well as maintain three baseball and softball field facilities. We purchase and maintain field supplies and equipment, purchase infield clay as well as maintain a very large amount of security fencing. We also use the funds to pay utility expenses at all our facilities. All of our staff are volunteers and no one involved with the organization receives pay for their services. We are a nonprofit little league, servicing boys girls, ages 4-18, since 1953. We provide a healthful, safe environment to keep kids off the streets, and teach them the value of teamwork, sportsmanship and how to prepare for the future so they can make in our society, so when they take their places in the world, they will be capable. Macedonia Child Development Center is serving low income families, is licensed by NYC Department of Health, and is funded by NYCs Children Services. We open 8 am to 6 pm, total 35 children age from 2.6 years old to 6 years old. The Program provides learning skills to the young children such as social skill, language development, fine and gross motor skill, physical development. To fund a Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP) serving over youths 4-21 years of age in the CB5, District 30 area. This year the Greater Ridgewood Youth Council, Inc operated 7 OST programs, a Beacons, a Universal Pre-K, Councilmanic and a Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP) serving over 6,000 youths 4-21 years of age in the CB5, District 30 area. The Universal Pre-K services 180 4 year olds. The OST programs and the Beacon services about 100 youth during the school year and 100 youth during the Summer. The funding will be utilized to enhance these programs.

Youth

Recchia

Gravesend Athletic Association

11-3019763

$76,714 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ignizio

Great Kills Little League

13-6197291 *

$20,714 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Koo Crowley

Greater Flushing Community Council, Inc. Greater Ridgewood Youth Council, Inc.

23-7006635 11-2518141

$5,500 DYCD-Y $27,714 DYCD-Y

Youth

Reyna

Greater Ridgewood Youth Council, Inc.

11-2518141

$9,214 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 67 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Reyna Reyna

Greater Ridgewood Youth Council, Inc. Greater Ridgewood Youth Council, Inc.

11-2518141 11-2518141

$10,000 DYCD-Y $21,000 DYCD-Y

This year the Greater Ridgewood Youth Council, Inc operated 7 OST programs, a Beacons, a Universal Pre-K, Councilmanic and a Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP) serving over 6,000 youths 4-21 years of age in the CB5, District 30 area. The Universal Pre-K services 180 4 year olds. The OST programs and the Beacon services about 100 youth during the school year and 100 youth during the Summer. The funding will be utilized to enhance these programs. To support CYO sports programming in Council District 34 - Brooklyn & Queens The funds requested will be used to opperate a community center in Queens at a New York State armory for the youth of the Greater Whitestone area. The activities available for the youth consist of open recreation sessions, structured sessions with instruction in sports like basketball, fitness training and sicial interaction with peers. Occasional social gatherings are offered for youth to inter-act with each other, family members and parents. The Children’s Safety Project (CSP) provides psychiatric counseling and support services citywide to children, adolescents, young adults and their non-offending family members who are dealing with physical or sexual abuse, domestic violence or other crimes. The League enables and supports them by providing the opprotunity to play organized baseball and softball in our community. Funding to support GVYC’s Out-of-School-Time programs on the Lower East Side at the JOY Center and at Essex Street Academy. We are requesting funding to support the West Fourth Street Summer Basketball League. Funding from your office would support the operations of the League. A portion of the money will be used to assist in purchasing personalized uniforms, GVYC T-Shirts, back packs, trophies, as well as other requests 10,000 for summer and after-school programs in Groundswell respectfully miscellaneous costs. 2011/2012. Summer Leadership Institute (SLI) is a 7 week program consisting of 6 teams of up to 15 youth and 2 artists. Several upcoming projects will be located in District 39. Groundswell will work on a Parks for People initiative to transform a blacktop schoolyard into a green play space for school children and neighborhood use in Borough Park, with Trust for Public Land and PS164K as community partners. As part of an ongoing partnership with Department of Transportation, Groundswell will create a mural about traffic safety at a dangerous intersection in Kensington. Groundswell will also create a mural at Brooklyn House of Detention partnering with the NYC Department of Corrections and directly involving formerly incarcerated or court-involved youth. Special sponsors include, Court-LivingstonSchermerhorn (CLS) BID and Hersha Hospitality. Groundswell’s after-school programs, based out of our studios in Councilman Lander’s district, include: Teen Empowerment Mural Apprenticeship (TEMA)—Youth create public art for communitybased organizations. Two TEMA groups meet weekly after-school Oct - May for 3 hours per session. Voices Her’d Visionaries (VHV)—Young women conceive and create works of public art that reflect issues of concern to girls and women. This program is both after-school and part of the SLI. TurnStyle/Segue—Youth fulfill community service requirements by working with Groundswell staff/artists. Graduates of TurnStyle can join our Segue program in which they learn the necessary skills for participation in Groundswell’s art-making programs.

Youth

Halloran

Greater Whitestone Taxpayers Community Center, Inc.

11-2791048

$7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth

Quinn Quinn Chin

Greenwich House, Inc. Greenwich Village Little League Greenwich Village Youth Council, Inc.

13-5562204 13-3577081 13-3301412

$5,000 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Quinn

Greenwich Village Youth Council, Inc.

13-3301412

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Lander

Groundswell Community Mural Project

11-3427213

$7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 68 of 151

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Groundswell respectfully requests 10,000 for summer and after-school programs in Purpose of Funds 2011/2012. Our programs develop skills in four key areas: Creativity; Collaboration; Critical Thinking and Compassion, and how to use art as a tool for social change. Programs include: Summer Leadership Institute (SLI): A summer job program where 6 teams of up to 15 youth each spend 7 weeks working with artists and community partners, learn job skills, examine local issues and create public art on a local topic. Upcoming projects include a mural at Brooklyn House of Detention partnering with NYC Dept. of Corrections, Court-LivingstonSchermerhorn BID and Hersha Hospitality group are both special sponsors, and a mosaic at PS164 through the Trust for Public Land. Teen Empowerment Mural Apprenticeship (TEMA)—Youth create public art for community organizations. Two groups meet weekly throughout the school year. Current programs are creating a mural for Lutheran Medical Center in Sunset Park and a mural for the DOT in Downtown Brooklyn. Voices Her’d Visionaries (VHV)—Young women conceive and create works of public art that reflect issues of concern to girls and women. This program is both after-school and part of the SLI. This year’s project explores how relationships are affected by technology. TurnStyle/Segue— In partnership with the Center for Court Innovation, in Greenpoint and Red Hook, youth arrested for minor offences (e.g. graffiti and truancy) fulfill community service hours by working after school with our staff and artists. Upon graduation from TurnStyle, youth can join our Segue program in which they learn the necessary skills for participation in Groundswell’s art-making programs. Portfolio Development—An after-school program in which youth from other Groundswell programs complete a portfolio of work to strengthen their post-secondary applications.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Levin

Groundswell Community Mural Project

11-3427213

$5,000 DYCD-Y We are seeking funding for our Groundwork for Success program in Bedford-Stuyvesant. Groundwork for Success (GWS) is a four-year program that prepares local high school students for success in high school and college. GWS begins to work with young “scholars” the summer before they enter ninth grade and continues to develop their talents throughout their time in high school. The Chayeinu program is an after school program for children ages 8 - 12 that suffer from low self-esteem and social isolation issues. The individuals involved in this program help build the self-esteem of these children and help them function in social situations. We are having severe difficulty covering the costs of this program and there are many children on the waiting list.

Youth

Vann

Groundwork, Inc.

73-1625176

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Lander

Guardians of the Sick

11-6003433

$8,714 DYCD-Y For these adolescents who are on the streets, the Our Place in New York drop-in centers are a refuge offering nutritious meals and the warmth of non-judgmental, compassionate volunteers and professionals.The existence of so many at-risk youth has enabled a very comprehensive network of out-of-school/ in-trouble youth thereby giving a youth at risk a valid escape from the environment against which they are rebelling.

Youth

Nelson

Guardians of the Sick

11-6003433

$15,000 DYCD-Y We seek funding to develop a Caribbean Heritage Summer Camp serving youth of the greater Flatbush community. This project is a community asset development strategy that builds capacity in at risk communities. It partners community groups and a local school to provide another meaningful summer program for kids who would not have this opportunity. Empowering the young people to stage performances for community events for seniors and other outreach centers in the community.

Youth

Eugene

Guyana Cultural Association of New York, Inc.

11-3624294

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 69 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

We are seeking funding for the development of a Childrens Tent /Day Camp for the 2011 Guyana Folk Festival. Guyana Cultural Association of New York, Inc. in its commitment to its mission to preserve, propagate and promote the cultural expression of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana, South America has reached out to the Diaspora. This extension of boundaries has caused intersections not only with second and earlier generations of Guyanese living in the USA but also with those of the total Caribbean Basin resident here. As GCA has explored the commonalities among these groups it has found that the children and youth define themselves as one. Thus they practice and enjoy many similar games, stories, myths, legends and histories. This common experience was seen clearly in 2010 when, under the Children’s Tent, more than 200 children and youth gathered to create art both verbal and tactile. In a relaxed and parent approved atmosphere, they painted, they drew, they molded, they played games, they sang and they listened to folksongs and stories reflective of their heritage. In 2011, GCA will be expanding on the venture of 2010. In addition to the aforementioned exercises, GCA plans to include the following: Techniques associated with social and ethnic dancing Techniques used in the tradition of kitemaking Techniques used in the construction of traditional toys An introduction to the historiography of the peoples of the Caribbean: a pictorial overview A greater variety of the folk games, including the traditional ring games, of the Caribbean A greater variety of the oral traditions of the region Youth Williams Guyana Cultural Association of New York, Inc. 11-3624294 $5,000 DYCD-Y HAUP is requesting funds to fund a program for immigrant youth. This program provides leadership actvities. homework assistance, academic enhancement, and preparation for the NYS high stakes exams. The program serves students in elementary and middle school and has been in existence for 8 years. We would like to expand the program to serve more students. The additional funds would allow for 1 additional certified teacher and additional assistants. Many parents are asking are requesting the program. However, we have to limit the number due to limited funds. Funding will help include piano lessons as part of its Music School starting in September 2011. To fund the rentals of violins for the participants in the Hamilton-Madison House Music School. To provide rentals of violins for the participants in the Hamilton-Madison House Music School. Provide organized sports to girls and young women as an alternative healthy option to fun instead of falling victim to the streets, unwanted pregnancies, drugs gangs and street violence. T broaden the horizons of underprivileged youth and give them opportunities to compete in the same aren'a as other youth in the same. A broad range of successfully employed persons and entrepreneurs from the Harlem community will be invited to share their life/career experiences with students. The students will be guided in setting goals and realization strategies. A guided bus tour of Historic Harlem and lunch with the elders will serve to culminate the experience.

Youth Youth Youth Youth

Williams Chin Chin Chin

Haitian Americans United for Progress, Inc. Hamilton-Madison House, Inc. Hamilton-Madison House, Inc. Hamilton-Madison House, Inc.

11-2423857 * 13-5562412 13-5562412 13-5562412

$5,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Dickens

Harlem All Starz Cheer and Gymnastic Center

56-2583992 *

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Jackson

Harlem Council of Elders, Inc.

13-3731386

$4,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 70 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Dickens

Harlem Dowling Westside Center for Children and Family Services

13-3030378

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Harlem Dowling West Side Center currently operates an After-School Program at PS 125 (425 West 123rd Street) for 95 students. The agency formed a partnership with the Mannie L. Wilson Senior Towers (565 Manhattan Avenue) in 2007 to create an Intergenerational Program. This program partners 20 after-school students with 8 seniors. During their time together the students and seniors engage in a variety of activities, including arts and crafts, poetry, reading and music. The students visit the senior center once per week for one hour. Students also take part in service learning activities twice per week for two hours. During service learning students discuss what activities they want to participate in with the seniors during the week. Students also talk about the importance of community service and civil responsibility. Finally, students craft gifts for the seniors that they present to them during holidays. These activiti! es are led by an Activity Specialist. HJTEP serves over 600+ students during the school year and summer, we provide Grassroots to High Perfromance level tennis instruction. While offering opportunities for selfdevelopment, highlighting education and a positive code of behavior. The Harlem Knights Youth Football Program is a Community-Based organization established to enthance the lives of children in Harlem, NY. To instill in our youth the hunger for academic excellence; to encourage the practice of morals, personal integrity, courtesy, sportsmanship, and ultimately the unshakeable commitment to their own future and the fate of their community and nation. to provide uniform and equipment for youths

Youth

Dickens

Harlem Junior Tennis League

13-3076419 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Dickens Dickens

Harlem Knights Football League, Inc. Harlem Little League

13-4124833 * 13-3548568 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Dickens

Harlem Live, Inc.

13-4050560 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

HarlemLIVE provides students with a strong foundation of journalism and media skills. With the onset of new media, we respond to rapid growth within a digital world including engaged and informed youth. Mentored by media professionals who volunteer their time with our organization we teach and encourage students to harness the power of emerging media technologies and involve the public in positive social change. All operations of HarlemLIVE media are organized and produced by our students. They research and write articles, interview sources, photograph, shoot, manage and support all content. This includes the production of HL’s web magazine www.harlemlive.org and tv show HL on Air.

Youth

Jackson

Harlem Live, Inc.

13-4050560 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

HarlemLIVE provides students with a strong foundation of journalism and media skills. With the onset of new media, we respond to rapid growth within a digital world including engaged and informed youth. Mentored by media professionals who volunteer their time with our organization we teach and encourage students to harness the power of emerging media technologies and involve the public in positive social change. All operations of HarlemLIVE media are organized and produced by our students. They research and write articles, interview sources, photograph, shoot, manage and support all content. This includes the production of HL’s web magazine www.harlemlive.org and tv show HL on Air.

Youth Discretionary

Page 71 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

In its 37 year history, HARLEM WEEK has offered, free of charge to the general New York City public, an array of programs focusing on Health in New York City in general and Harlem Senior Citizens in particular. For the entire year of 2011. HARLEM WEK JOINED The Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce is holding a healthy living initiative. As one of the key activities in 2010. , HARLEM WEEK, in conjunction with the New York City Council: New York Department of Parks Recreation: the Office of Congressman Charles B. Rangel; and many other medical and educational organizations, held its Third Annual Harlem: 5K “Health WalkA-Thon” and its Second Annual Percy E. Sutton Harlem 5K run which had over 10,000 participants. These programs will continue throughout all of 2011. A copy of the 2010 Harlem Healthy Living, Walk-A-Thon and Harlem 5K run brochures are attached. In addition to its health related programs, HARLEM WEEK for many years has sponsored major events for senior citizens, children’s swimming, youth tennis and its annual NYC Children’s Festival on August 15 and 16, 2010. Youth Jackson Harlem Week, Inc. 13-3058019 $5,000 DYCD-Y If granted funding, it will be put towards purchasing sports equipment for the organization for recreational purposes, and will also be used to take our your members on recreational and educational trips. After School Program - Children ages 5 to 12 are picked up at their schools and brought to Hartley House for activities including, reading, tutoring, supervised homework, computers, gym art and outdoor play in our courtyard. Haven Ministries serves approximately 40 school age children K-12 throughout the Rockaway Community. Participation is open to all residents on a walk-in basis or by recommendation from the local schools or other community organizations. We will provide group mentoring and worshops on developing non-violenceconflict resolution. Program promotes anti-bullying and cultural sensitivity workshops. Program will be provided Mon-Fri 5pm-9pm as services are needed. Youth Youth Sanders Gentile Haven Ministries Heartshare Human Services of New York 11-3380221 11-1633549 * $3,500 DYCD-Y $4,500 DYCD-Y To support the McKinley Beacon Program. Monies will be used to provide 6 special events (recreational and culturally enriching) for developmentally disabled young adults throughout the Bronx. Approximately 50 youths will be served with dinners, lectures, social gatherings, as well as sub Family Services: child care, youth job opportunity, summer program, immigration services, citizenship services, tenants organizing, entitlement services, training, cultural celebrations. The HANAC Corona Beacon is a year round program located in P.S.19Q in Corona Queens. It is a school-based community center offering young people and their families diverse opportunities to grow and participate acrively in the life and spirit of their community. The Beacon offers youth and adults a mix of social, recreational and ecucational services at no cost during nontraditional hours. Some of the activities offered are reading and writing, math readness, homework help, youth council, baseball, basketball,Youth Naval Cadets, Intervention and Prevention Counseling, parents committee group, dance, soccer, E.S.L., G.E.D.preparation and many more.

Youth

Dickens

Harlem Youth Marine, Inc.

13-3536496

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Quinn

Hartley House, Inc.

13-1656652 *

$10,214 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koppell

Hebrew Institute of Riverdale

13-1740456 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Jackson

Heights Center for Immigrant Advocacy, The

13-3878787

$5,214 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ferreras

Hellenic American Neighborhood Action Committee, Inc. (HANAC)

11-2290832

$7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 72 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth Youth

Vallone Vallone Chin

Hellenic American Neighborhood Action Committee, Inc. (HANAC) Hellenic Orthodox Community of Astoria Henry Street Settlement

11-2290832 11-1666821 13-1562242

$25,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

The Councilmatic After School program is providing youth a safe and supervised environment with educational and recreational programs including homework help, ESOL tutoring, athletics/team sports, arts and crafts and table games. Two schools PS 171 and St. Catherines both in Queens, provide services to 80 youth, 40 at each site. The Communities to be served are faced with an increase number of single parent households and households requiring two incomes, resulting in large numbers of youth home alone without supervision which this program addresses. After school recreational program for school age children. Children will learn the importance of teamwork, citizenship, cooperation, etc through sports. To support The Sol Lain Athletic Association, which is a sports and recreational program that serves the low-income youth. Funding will help support our Expanded Horizons College Preparation and Retention Program (3,500) as well as our youth program located at the Boys and Girls Republic (BGR) (4,000). To build upon our Ground-Up curriculum by providing additional design education programming outside of public school hours . To provide critical on-site supportive services during the after-school hours. To allow us to continue critical on-site supportive services during the after-school hours, from 9am-8pm for low-income at-risk LGBTQ youth. Funding will support mental, physical and emotional support services and case management for Hetrick-Martin TheLGBTQ youth. Institute, Inc., the nation’s oldest and largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth service agency in the United States, respectfully requests 10,000 in FY2012 City Council member item funding. This support for HetrickMartin will allow us to continue critical on-site supportive services during school time and during the after-school hours, from 9am-8pm for low-income at-risk LGBTQ youth from ages 12-24 years of age. These youth are high-risk and vulnerable because of traumatic experiences of discrimination and abuse and/or rejection by their families due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. Hetrick-Martin’s Supportive Services Department is overseen by mental health practitioners with experience in education/instruction, harm reduction, and working with LGBTQ youth and their families. Hetrick-Martin provides the following services: •Comprehensive intake: mental, physical and emotional health client assessment; •Case management •Referrals to other agencies when needed; •Mental health support and individual counseling; •Family counseling; •Peer group support sessions; •Intake assessments and pre/post testing for HIV Prevention Services and onsite HIV/STI/Pregnancy testing services; •Wrap-around pantry support providing needy and impoverished youth with warm showers, laundry services, food bags, and a fully-stocked wardrobe; and •A daily hot meal. Thanks in part to generous past support from the New York City Council, last year, HetrickMartin served over 1,500 youth from nearly 300 zip codes across New York City. Our Supportive Services Department provided over 1,000 youth with mental health services, such as emergency shelter, legal advocacy, healthcare referrals, and substance abuse treatment. Our hot meal program served an all-time high of 8,554 hot meals. HMI witnessed an over 30 increase in services provided to youth, providing nearly 45,000 discrete services to young people in need.

Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth

Mendez Chin Arroyo Chin Garodnick

Henry Street Settlement Hester Street Collaborative, Inc. Hetrick-Martin Institute, Inc. Hetrick-Martin Institute, Inc. Hetrick-Martin Institute, Inc.

13-1562242 20-0774906 13-3104537 13-3104537 13-3104537

$7,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Lander

Hetrick-Martin Institute, Inc.

13-3104537

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 73 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

The Hetrick-Martin Institute, Inc., thePurpose oldest and largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, nation’s of Funds transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth service agency in the United States, respectfully requests 10,000 in FY2012 City Council member item funding. This support for HetrickMartin will allow us to continue critical on-site supportive services during school time and during the after-school hours, from 9am-8pm for low-income at-risk LGBTQ youth from ages 12-24 years of age. These youth are high-risk and vulnerable because of traumatic experiences of discrimination and abuse and/or rejection by their families due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. Hetrick-Martin’s Supportive Services Department is overseen by mental health practitioners with experience in education/instruction, harm reduction, and working with LGBTQ youth and their families. Hetrick-Martin provides the following services: •Comprehensive intake: mental, physical and emotional health client assessment; •Case management •Referrals to other agencies when needed; •Mental health support and individual counseling; •Family counseling; •Peer group support sessions; •Intake assessments and pre/post testing for HIV Prevention Services and onsite HIV/STI/Pregnancy testing services; •Wrap-around pantry support providing needy and impoverished youth with warm showers, laundry services, food bags, and a fully-stocked wardrobe; and •A daily hot meal. Thanks in part to generous past support from the New York City Council, last year, HetrickMartin served over 1,500 youth from nearly 300 zip codes across New York City. Our Supportive Services Department provided over 1,000 youth with mental health services, such as emergency shelter, legal advocacy, healthcare referrals, and substance abuse treatment. Our hot meal program served an all-time high of 8,554 hot meals. HMI witnessed an over 30 increase in services provided to youth, providing nearly 45,000 discrete services to young people in need.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Mealy

Hetrick-Martin Institute, Inc.

13-3104537

$10,000 DYCD-Y The Hetrick-Martin Institute, Inc., the nation’s oldest and largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth service agency in the United States, respectfully requests 10,000 in FY2012 City Council member item funding. This support for HetrickMartin will allow us to continue critical on-site supportive services during school time and during the after-school hours, from 9am-8pm for low-income at-risk LGBTQ youth from ages 12-24 years of age. Funds will go towards providing Supportive Services to LGBTQ youth ages 12-24 throughout the NYC metropolitan area. Summer Camp: defray bus expenses for campers and staff to cultural, sports and entertainment sites. To support the health education programming in Manhattan Valley schools.

Youth Youth Youth Youth

Mendez Quinn Gennaro Mark-Viverito

Hetrick-Martin Institute, Inc. Hetrick-Martin Institute, Inc. Hillcrest Jewish Center Hispanic Community Organization for Life, Inc.

13-3104537 13-3104537 11-1639813 26-2563572

$3,500 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 74 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Hollaback!’s new youth development and leadership program will train the next generation of social justice leaders to take over the New York City chapter of Hollaback!. Ten young women and LGBTQ individuals will be selected for this citywide training program. The program is designed to provide training, support and assistance to these youth members in order to maximize their success. Street harassment affects women and LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer) folks of all ages, but through our work, we have learned that this issue is particularly significant for young people, who often shoulder the shame and embarrassment well into their adulthood. In a recent survey of the site’s subscribers, we found that 85 of Hollaback’s 50,000 unique monthly users are under the age of 30. Ten youth leaders will receive a year-long comprehensive training that includes research, community organizing, advocacy, media, social media, and leadership development. They will work together to develop and execute a project that will help to educate people on how to deal with street harassment, and will build awareness as to why it matters. Our goal is to engage and train youth to be the future leaders of the movement to end street harassment – and eventually – the world. Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth Lander Weprin Crowley Crowley Gennaro Mark-Viverito James Hollaback, Inc. Hollis Bellaire Queens Village Bellerose Athletic Association, Inc. Holy Child Jesus Sports Holy Child Jesus Sports Holy Family Youth Council, Inc. Hoops by the River, Inc. HOPE Program, Inc., The 27-3199988 23-7204542 * 11-1639802 11-1639802 11-2544381 * 27-1453959 13-3268539 $3,500 DYCD-Y $7,500 DYCD-Y $4,500 DYCD-Y $3,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y Youth Baseball/Softball program Sports teams in Track, Basketball and Volleyball for 300 kids To provide a structured dance, music, acting and stage program for teens during the summer months. PROVIDE ATHLETIC SPORTS ACTIVITIES FOR BOYS AND GIRLS FROM PRE-K - 12 GRADE, SOCCER,SWIMMING,BASKETBALL,SOFTBALL AND BOWLING. To support HBTR's basketball program, Drug Awareness Day and Stop the Violence Day. The HOPE Program provides very poor Brooklyn residents with the skills and support services they need to secure, maintain and grow in jobs. Hugs For Harlem is a summer program that will put on Basketball tourament for the youths. We will continue to help the youths in our computer program teaching how to use them. Hugs For Harlem will continue to mentor and talk to the youths about the problems they face in their community. Funds support the Humane Living Program (HLP), a unique in-classroom program that integrates humane and character education as a way to teach students respect and responsibility.

Youth

Jackson

Hugs for Harlem, Inc.

41-2090276

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Arroyo

Humane Education Advocates Reaching Teachers (HEART), Inc. 41-2055310

$8,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 75 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

HEART requests support to continue, and further expand, its Humane Living Program (HLP) to students in District 25. The HLP is HEART’s primary direct service initiative that addresses animal welfare, environmental protection and social justice issues. It is a unique in-classroom program that integrates humane and character education as a way to teach students respect, responsibility and empathy toward all living beings and the environment. The curriculum is divided into four age-appropriate versions: K-3rd grade, 4th - 6th grade, 7th-8th grade, and high school. Through creative, interactive lessons, students learn to develop critical thinking and decision-making skills based on compassion, tolerance, and integrity. The HLP was introduced in NYC schools in January of 2006 in an 18-month assessment phase to document the effectiveness of this new program. Since then, the program’s reputation has grown, and it is increasingly welcome in educational venues throughout NYC. We have served over 10,000 students since the HLP’s inception. The HLP informs students about critical issues and motivates students to take personal action to help make the world a better place. For example, the HLP for grades 4-6 examines issues such as sweatshops, migrant farming, pet overpopulation, dog fighting, factory farming, pollution, global warming, endangered species and habitat protection. The program teaches students how animal welfare, social justice and environmental ethics are all inter-connected, which is a powerful construct in fostering compassion and respect. Experiential learning and civic action projects are incorporated into our programs. Students engage in activities such as writing letters to legislators and owners of sweatshops, volunteering at soup kitchens and animal shelters, organizing neighborhood litter cleanups, and starting school recycling clubs. Youth Dromm Humane Education Advocates Reaching Teachers (HEART), Inc. 41-2055310 $3,500 DYCD-Y HEART requests support to continue, and further expand, its Humane Living Program (HLP) to students in District 18. It is a unique in-classroom program that integrates humane and character education as a way to teach students respect, responsibility and empathy toward all living beings and the environment.

Youth

Palma

Humane Education Advocates Reaching Teachers (HEART), Inc. 41-2055310

$15,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 76 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Eugene

Ifetayo Cultural Arts Academy, Inc.

11-3027538

$6,000 DYCD-Y

We are requesting 50,000 for our Rites of Passage (Rites) and Arts Education (AE) programs. Our Rites programs offer an educational healing model for youth self-realization, enabling over 220 youth ages 8-21 to break the cycle of poverty and grow into healthy, independent, compassionate, and self-confident men and women. The curriculum concentrates on the following areas: personal and professional development, literacy and verbal communication, cultural and spiritual exposure, community service and intergenerational exchange, health and wellness development, and financial education. Our AE Program is an integrated arts curriculum offering instruction in Poetry Creative Expressions, Creative Writing/Theater, African Drum, African Dance, Modern Dance, and Hip Hop to students in grades pre-K-high school. Imeinu dba Rachels Place is a NYS Certified Transitional Independent Living (TIL)residential facility for runaway and homeless girls ages 16-21. Funds will be used to offset costs to maintain our facility, including mortgage costs, house repair, and equipment maintenance. Also, funds will be used to develop our programs for our residents, including educational services, vocational training, independent living skills building, and recreational activities. To support ISS’s afterschool program at PS 34 in order to provide a more enriched suite of activities.

Youth Youth

Nelson Chin

Imeinu, Inc. Immigrant Social Service, Inc.

26-0774611 13-2689273 *

$5,214 DYCD-Y $5,214 DYCD-Y

ITSOCs Youth Transition Empowerment program works to reduce the re-entry of children and youth into the foster care system and facilitates exit from the foster care by (1) offering a continuum of services to youth exiting care in order to prevent homelessness and promote successful independent adulthood, and (2) working with families to prevent the re-entry of their children into foster care. During 2010 January through December, ITSOC received 14 new unduplicated referrals. We serviced 34 youth in total. Of the 34 youth served, 31 were active participants.In the past eight years, we have assisted a total of 177 young people of which 60 are males, 117 are females and 91 children ages 0-10. The recent integration of the New York City’s Department of Juvenile Justice with the Administration for Children Services ACS) created a new need for service provisions for the Juvenile Justice youth population. This organization was app! roached in the spring of 2010 to assist in the service delivery of juvenile justice youth, specifically to provide prevention/intervention aftercare services to youth who are first time offenders and their families. ITSOC has become a critical community resource for a number of youth and their families that seek to take control of their futures and become participating members of our society. We see both a need and an opportunity to make a bigger impact by providing services to more youth, over the course of the next year. Additional funding will further our goal to provide a growing number of youth transitioning from foster care as well as youth exiting the juvenile justice system with supportive services. Accomplishments: In May 2010, we are pleased to announce that another of our program participants graduated from college. This is the third young person in the past year; she graduated from Norwalk Community College with an associate degree in legal administration. Youth Dickens In the Spirit of the Children, Inc. 13-4000928 $4,000 DYCD-Y To help develop its support group program and to sustain the program for the long term and enhance its effectiveness in addressing the families’ needs. Youth Chin Indochina Sino-American Senior Citizen Center Inc 13-3584616 $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 77 of 151

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds Service: Provide a progressive, grassroots, current-events newspaper and website to 3,000 kids in grades 4-7 in the district to inspire a passion for social justice and learning and to help form the next generation of community leaders and activists.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

IndyKids newspaper and website is requesting funds in order to produce, print and deliver 250 copies of this current-events resource five times per year to 12 public elementary and middle schools in each of 5 city council districts, and to maintain a news website for ongoing discussion of current-events. IndyKids is not yet widely distributed to the schools in these districts. For teachers who want to introduce a variety of perspectives in their classroom, IndyKids is an invaluable resource. There are few current-events news sources that cover social and political issues for kids at the elementary grades. There are even fewer media sources that highlight issues of economic and social justice, and the perspectives of people of color. IndyKids is a free, ad-free newspaper, website and teaching tool that produces content monthly with 5 print and 4 online editions. IndyKids highlights the work of community organizers and activists and tackles economic, political and social issues in language that is accessible to kids. It provides a valuable, multicurriculum teaching tool, with a teacher’s guide, that can be integrated into a variety of classroom settings. IndyKids covers topics such as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, immigrant workers, kids with disabilities, LGBTQ rights and global economic inequality. IndyKids features kids from around the world and includes New York City children’s voices – through letters to the editor, interviews and articles – on many of these issues. “IndyKids has really made teaching current events a lot easier. The kids are finally motivated to read, and more importantly, to discuss and get active. -John Yanno, 6th grade teacher, Brooklyn The Girls & Boys Projects is dedicated to bringing gender-based empowerment programs to young people in public schools and community-based organizations throughout New York City and beyond. Our programs engage youth around gender and other social issues through democratic, learner-centered workshops creating a safe space for young people to find their voices, develop self and social awareness, think critically about the world around them, and become change activists in their communities. To provide after school tutoring to students, ages 5 through 12. To promote the Children and Family programs at the 40th Annual International African Arts Festival whichh focus on the culture of Africa. To support ICD’s free Therapeutic Recreational Summer Camp for special needs students in East Harlem. ICD’s Youth Employment Services (YES) program is a unique, integrated, year-round program that combines educational and vocational programming with mental health services and lifeskills training for adolescents and youth ages 16-21. We provide sports programs and classes to approx.750-1200 children from ages 6-17. Our goal is to help develop their skills and knowledge in the area or organized sports programs and other instructional affiliates such as: Basketball, Baseball, Softball, Soccer, Hockey Volleyball and most of all we are loking to KEEP THEM OFF THE STREETS Funding will support the Educational Guidance Program, which provides guidance, resources and support services for pregnant and parenting teens while helping them complete secondary school and pursue postsecondary education.

Youth

Dromm

IndyKids Inc

33-1129680 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth Youth

Mendez Rose Barron Mark-Viverito

Institute for Labor the Community Interdenominational Christian Fellowship Inc International African Arts Festival International Center for the Disabled (ICD), Inc.

13-3974310 * 87-0791382 * 11-2953522 13-5562990

$3,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y $20,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mendez

International Center for the Disabled (ICD), Inc.

13-5562990

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Nelson

Interparish Sports Association, Inc.

20-2695257

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Garodnick

Inwood House

13-5562254

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 78 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Lappin

Inwood House

13-5562254

$6,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Quinn

Inwood House

13-5562254

$3,500 DYCD-Y

We are seeking funding for our Educational Guidance Program where pregnant and parenting teens are provided with dedicated, specialized resources to help them complete secondary school and pursue postsecondary education. Our Education Specialist provides guidance, resources, and support, while helping our young people re-enroll in school or a GED program and connecting them to other resources. We are seeking funding for Teen Choice (TC), our comprehensive sexuality education and disease prevention program, designed to assist young people in making a healthy transition to adulthood. To that end, funding would go towards providing much needed scholarships to children on Roosevelt Island who otherwise would not be able to participate in our programs.

Youth

Lappin

Island Kids

13-3755714

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Dromm

Jackson Heights Arts Club, Inc.

11-2688282

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Maintaining an Art Studio-teaching facility in the center of Jackson Heights, a multi-racial community, which provides beginners to advanced students, children and adults, a place to create and learn about art through affordable classes in all media. Children ages 8 to 14 are eligible for weekly 2-hour instruction in all areas of visual arts. Class sessions are 8 weeks in duration at a cost of 65 are given on Saturday and sometimes Sundays at the Club Studio located at St. Marks Church in Jackson Heights. Exhibitsd and shows strengthen this program. An annual holday party is held for the children. Presenting a year-round Calendar of Visual Arts Events that include indoor/outdoor exhibitions, special gallery showings and painting demonstrations by known artists in the ClubAcademy offers afterschooland nearby neighborhoods. Riis Studio, in Jackson Heights and summer services to youth in the areas of tutoring and homework assistance, academic enrichment, recreation, arts, jobs and careers. We believe that every child can reach their greatest potential if given the opportunity to learn and grow in a supportive environment. Riis Settlement’s Youth Services utilizes the following strategies to ensure program success: High aspirations: We set ambitious expectations in order to meet the high aspirations of the youth we serve. Riis Academy youth have a variety of goals: to become leaders in their community, go on to college or get a good job. Whether they are on the path to becoming a teacher or are working on an apprenticeship in a local carpentry shop, we support their goals every step of the way. Community-based: Our educational team represents the diversity of the community we serve. Some have come through our programs themselves or live in the very neighborhood we are serving. All staff sees themselves as a catalyst for community change. Kid friendly and supportive: Riis Academy is a welcoming and safe place where youth share in a well balanced meal and fun activities under the supervision of caring adults who let “kids be kids”. Parents as partners: Parents are our partners. Hard working and caring, they share our commitment to building bridges to success for youth. Riis Academy provides a full array of opportunities to youth throughout the year and through their years in school. We provide: after school programming; summer day camp; summer jobs, and; international cultural exchanges with Denmark. Riis Academy is western Queens’ largest youth service provider, with trained educational professionals serving over N/A

Youth Youth

Van Bramer Weprin

Jacob A. Riis Neighborhood Settlement House, Inc. Jamaica Estates Holliswood Little League, Inc.

11-1729398 11-2482609 *

$49,000 DYCD-Y $7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 79 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Brewer Dromm

Jazz at Lincoln Center, Inc. Jewish Center of Jackson Heights, The

13-3888641 11-1681124

$3,000 DYCD-Y $15,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koslowitz

Jewish Child Care Association

13-1624060

$15,000 DYCD-Y

To fund its WeBop program which provides an early jazz music experience for children. The funding will be used for concerts, lectures, and opera performances for local youth, and to offset payroll expenses associated with program administration. Expense funding will provide summer internship stipends to at least 20 students. Summer interns will work roughly 25 hours per week over a six-week period, including 30 hours for training and 120 hours at their placements. To engage school age children and accompanying adults in the exploration of history through interactive exhibitions for children and related educational programs. Outreach, Finding, recruiting and evaluating youth at risk, find jobs and other occupations, counseling, mentoring and other supportive services,and providing them a youth center. GPAC: The Genesis Project for Single-Parent Families These are support groups for single-parent families where parents can discuss challenges and share strategies with other single parents for helping their children talk about their feelings in a constructive way. Children are included in activities at every meeting, and are invited to parties and other social situations for parents and children to form connections.

Youth

Brewer

Jewish Children's Learning Lab, Inc.

13-3817786

$3,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Reyna

Jewish Coalition For Youth Education & Support, Inc.

27-3152656 *

$2,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Brewer

Jewish Community Center in Manhattan, Inc., The

13-3490745

$3,500 DYCD-Y

The JCC is requesting financial support to assist us in our plan to improve Staten Island students interest and education in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). The United States lags significantly behind other advanced nations in educational performance in science and math. Part of the President’s Speech last month addressed this concern, with the President stating that the first step in winning the future is encouraging American innovation, and we need to teach our kids that it’s not just the winner of the Super Bowl who deserves to be celebrated, but the winner of the science fair. Through the JCC STEM Program, students will engage in innovative and hands-on techniques to introduce these more complex areas of study and to learn how to think scientifically. We believe that providing a strong foundation in these academic areas will give students the opportunity to pursue secondary education, post-secondary education, and careers that support the expanding need for scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and experts in technology. Planned activities of the JCC STEM Program include: Mad Science Workshops, Technology Classes, Engineering Workshops and Music as well as the Music and Math Tutoring Program. Youth Youth Ignizio Ulrich Jewish Community Center of Staten Island, Inc. 13-5562256 $10,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y The JCCRP currently operates a very well attended Basketball program and requests funding for the growth and continuance of this program. The JSC wants to provide a youth program for disadvantaged youngsters whereby we would be offering programs designed to address academic abilities as well as self-esteem and social skills through enriching educational activities, mentoring, arts and crafts, and homework help. Physical health is emphasized though sports activities)i.e. swimming, phys. ed.), cooking classes with an emphasis on nutrition Funding will support the Jewish Museum's multi-generational Family Day programs, which include interactive and intergenerational art activities, collaborative creative workshops, family tours and musical performances. WOOD BASEBALL BAT FIELD EQUIPMENT FIELD SUPPLIES fIELD TOOLS BASEBALL EQUIPMENT Youth Fidler Joe Torre East Highway Little League 11-6037753 * $3,500 DYCD-Y Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/ba Millennium Development

Jewish Community Council of the Rockaway Peninsula, Inc. 11-2425813

Youth

Sanders

Jewish Community Services Coalition, Inc.

11-4081036

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Garodnick

Jewish Museum, The

13-6146854

$10,000 DYCD-Y

11-3199040

Youth Discretionary

Page 80 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Ferreras

Jose Encarnacion Baseball Little League, Inc.

57-1152940

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Children attend baseball practices throughout the year and play games with other agesappropriate leagues from local area. Also, during the summer, most students will also be provided with the opportunity to play with other boroughs leagues as part of an exchange program. delivers financial education programs to students in grades K-12 that inspire JA New York and prepare them to be successful in a 21st century global economy. Curricula content focus on three key areas—work readiness, financial literacy and entrepreneurship. Corporate and community volunteers teach our curricula in in-school, after-school and summer programs. Our programs help students to: •Grasp the free enterprise system through lessons relevant to their life experience •Understand their roles in the local and global economy •Realize the importance of completing their education •Recognize the connection between staying in school and becoming productive, successful adults We are supported wholly by contributions—corporate, foundation, and individual---as well as special events. All our programs and services are provided free of charge. Costs average 1,000 per class. During the 2009-2010 school year alone nearly 4,500 volunteers reached over 60,000 students in 2,653 classes. We believe that your funding will help strengthen the partnership between JA New York and NYC school children by enabling us to expand our efforts in your district. Our curricula support real-world competencies. Whether it is a kindergartener learning fundamental concepts related to saving, selling, and spending; a fifth grader learning about profit and productivity; a middle school student learning about personal finance, budgeting, and entrepreneurship; or a high school student learning about business operations, banking, investment and personal career goals, JA programs teach real-world skills. Programs align with NYC and NYS curriculum standards to help teachers achieve their students’ learning objectives. Below are our achievements in District 33 for the first half of the academic year alone, July 2010 – December 2010: Students Reached 1,019; Classes Taught: 36; Volunteers: 73; Junior tennis Clinic provides group lessons in a structured environment where youth have the opportunity to learn about sportsmanship, discipline and how the rigors of practice and concentration on the tennis court can be transferred to their academic studies in the classroom. To support grants to college-bound youth who have performed extraordinary volunteerism in Bay Ridge, Dyker Heights and Bensonhurst.

Youth

Levin

Junior Achievement of New York Inc

13-3031828 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

James Gentile

Junior Tennis Clinic, Inc. Kassenbrock Brothers Memorial Scholarship Fund, Inc., The

06-1229839 23-7183877

$5,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Gennaro

Kehilat Sephardim of Ahavat Achim

11-3101774 *

$7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Gonzalez

Kentler International Drawing Space, Inc.

11-3621398

$10,000 DYCD-Y

the activities that are provided at our center are for educational and social events purposes. we serve over 5400 community members and have supported and promoted educational youth programs for over a decade in russian, hebrew, english and bukharian languges. Our services also includedelievery of meals for the fortunate and home visits to the disabled and elderly. We provide counceling services as well. our program takes place @ 150-62 78th Rd Flushing NY 11367 ON THE FIRST FLOOR BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 3-7 PM from MonThursday and Saturday learning programthat provides extra studying opurtunities for our youth and community. our program provides services like math , english, hebrew, science tutoring. the purpose of this program is to provide our youth a relaxing and social environment to help them succed and prepare for the future. K.I.D.S. Art Education Program offers art workshops for local public school students at all grade levels and after school workshops for local youth. Led by professional Teaching Artists, school groups take field trips to the gallery to explore the exhibitions and art on view. Students are led in a group discusion about the work and are then led in a related art making workshop.

Youth Discretionary

Page 81 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Comrie

Kickers Youth Sports Association of South East Queens, Inc. 11-2988905 *

$22,714 DYCD-Y

We provide sports, cultural, educational, mentoring and youth leadership training activities to youth in Southeast Queens. Sports activiteis are provided through the team sports soccer other activities are provided through linkages with schools, other non-profit organizations in the areas such as Lions Club and Veterans organizations. We provide sports, cultural, educational, mentoring and youth leadership training activities to youth in Southeast Queens. Sports activiteis are provided through the team sports soccer other activities are provided through linkages with schools, other non-profit organizations in the areas such as Lions Club and Veterans organizations. To provide after school programs at PS 191 and Hudson Honors Middle School. In FY 12, Kids Creative requests a discretionary grant to help us continue our after school classes at PS 11 and to begin new summer classes.

Youth Youth Youth

Sanders Brewer Quinn

Kickers Youth Sports Association of South East Queens, Inc. 11-2988905 * Kids Creative 404, Inc. Kids Creative 404, Inc. 75-3139502 75-3139502

$7,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Wills

King of Kings Foundation, Inc.

03-0583790

$5,000 DYCD-Y

The proposed activities addressed the root causes of youth violence, and develop viable solutions to the problems that continue to have a detrimental effect on our communities. To provide community members with the information, tools, skills, and network necessary to access and utilize existing prevention and intervention resources effectively, as well as to troubleshoot everyday situations and conflicts peacefully. Encourage children, youth and young adults to create community building blocks that will “NOT” include narcotics, gangs or other criminal activities. Reducing disruptive behavior and violent incidents within our libraries, community centers, and schools. “The Anti-Drug-Anti Gang Warriors Tour” in conjunction with Operation S.N.U.G. will give today’s youth a clear outlook of the results of selling drugs and to dispel the myth that the sale of drugs and gang activity equal happiness, riches and prosperity. The Kings Bay YM-YWHA will organize monthly cultural events such as concerts, theater performance and events celebrating the diversity of the community it serves. Sports equippment, uniforms,trophies, and scoreboads for organized youth sports programs To help fund a comprehensive model providing youth with leadership skills, conflict mediation, guys girls group counseling, recreation, tutoring, literacy through the arts (poetry and dance), SAT preparation, individual counseling, job readiness, certification opportunities, contextual ESL, substance abuse and pregnancy prevention. A comprehensive model providing youth with leadership skills, conflict mediation, guys girls group counseling, recreation, tutoring, literacy through the arts (poetry and dance), SAT preparation, individual counseling, job readiness, certification opport Our request is for the continuation of obesity prevention programming in FY12 under the project name, Get Fit, Get Light. We have been engaged in obesity prevention for for several years because the national youth obesity crisis is much accentuated in the Bronx. Basically what we do is incorporate nutrition and health instruction into physical education programming that includes regular and rigorous exercise. A new additon in FY12 is to teach from 7 refrigerator rules for good nutrition and health that we will put on a refrigerator magnet and will send home with Get Fit, Get Light participants for posting on the family refrigerator. Our request is for the continuation of obesity prevention programming in FY12 under the project name, Get Fit, Get Light. We have been engaged in obesity prevention for for several years because the national youth obesity crisis is much accentuated in the Bronx.

Youth Youth

Nelson Nelson

Kings Bay YM-YWHA, Inc. Kings Bay Youth Organization, Inc.

11-3068515 11-6020722

$7,000 DYCD-Y $5,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Cabrera

Kingsbridge Heights Community Center, Inc.

13-2813809

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koppell

Kingsbridge Heights Community Center, Inc.

13-2813809

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Cabrera

Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club, Inc.

13-1623850

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Palma

Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club, Inc.

13-1623850

$20,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 82 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Koppell

Knox Gates Neighborhood Association, Inc. Korean Community Services of Metropolitan New York, Inc. Kwatny Foundation, Inc. La Asociacion Benefica Cultural Father Billini, Inc.

13-3020575

$15,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth

Koo Barron Ferreras

23-7348989 81-0606748 * 11-2548753 *

$5,714 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $7,500 DYCD-Y

Knox Gates Neighborhood Association (KGNA) believes in the healing power of community. Together, our neighborhood organized to create a safe space to learn self reliance, respect for others, and the skills to live full, cooperative, and productive lives. Youth Volunteer Internship Program is a comprehensive program that works with youth for multiple years to promote positive futures in New York City. Our goal is to support youth as they create their own success. The program provides contact football and cheer for ages 5-15. After-school program will target students who are at-risk of failing will benefit tremendously from homework help/tutoring.

Youth Youth Youth

Dromm Dilan Brewer

Latin American Cultural Center of Queens, Inc. Latin Souls Baseball Organization, Inc. Learning Leaders, Inc.

11-2997255 * 11-2862824 * 13-2658549

$8,000 DYCD-Y $9,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

The LACCQ is requesting funds for a recreational program for individuals and families of scarce financial resources residing in Queens. This program, Domingo del Recuerdo or Sunday to Remember was created in 1996 after several members of the community expressed to our Directors their frustration for the lack of free cultural activities available on Sundays. These individuals indicated that their families dressed up to go to church and then they have no place to go because they lacked the financial resources to pay for movies, concerts or other cultural events. The LACCQ agreed to have the program once a month and to make it easier to remember we decided to have the program always on the last Sunday of the month. This program supports the mission of the Center by providing the participants the opportunity to experience art in its different expressions, thru music, dance, etc. This program allows families and individuals the oppo! rtunity to celebrate their native cultures and traditions, as well as to discover other cultural traditions in this multicultural borough, the majority of the participants in this program are first generation, residing in the US and lack the benefit of an extended family. This program provides them the opportunity to network, make new friends and establish a support group for hard times and good times. Thru this program the Center also provides work to talented artist and the artists have the opportunity to meet new, enthusiastic audiences that appreciate their talent. We have also discovered a few retired artists that enjoy attending the program and showcasing some of their talents. Each month a different format is presented depending on the interests of the participants, it may be a concert, a dance, a fashion show, poetry reading, sing-a longs or a visit to a cultural institution in Queens. Some of the venues we use are free and some are paid In March 27, 2011 the member! s will attend the Center’s celebration Youth baseball To provide family education and volunteer programs in 111 Manhattan (M)public schools . Learning Leaders (LL) provides family education and volunteer programs in 14 Queens District 25 public schools (D25) helping build the social capital of parents by equipping them to navigate school choice and transitions, work with children at home, and further their own personal and educational development. We are seeking funding for the newly established Leave It Better Kids Garden (under Green Thumb) located at 1970 Grand Avenue. The organization would use the money to provide homework, Math and English tutorial and provide recreational services to the youth and adult in lefrak city community. Lcyaa has been providing these services since 1991 and over 6 years since obtaining a license for children ages five to thirteen. To assist developmentally disabled individuals (some of whom have intensive behavioral issues) and their families, by offering classes in computer training, yoga, arts and crafts, and music therapy. The project for which the Lewis H. Latimer House Museum is requesting funding is for the technological upgrade of the Museum Laboratory.

Youth Youth

Koo Cabrera

Learning Leaders, Inc. Leave It Better Foundation Inc

13-2658549 27-3994291 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Dromm

Lefrak City Youth and Adult Activities Association, Inc.

11-3106422

$29,964 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Nelson Koo

Lenny's Lighthouse, Inc. Lewis H Latimer Fund Inc

26-0595266 11-2983131 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y $6,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 83 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Brewer Lappin

Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Inc. Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Inc.

13-1847137 13-1847137

$3,500 DYCD-Y $7,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Brewer Brewer

Lincoln Square District Management Association, Inc. Lincoln Square Neighborhood Center, Inc.

13-3922300 13-1825918

$3,500 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

To help audiences to understand and appreciate a wide range of arts disciplines, and to take away the knowledge that the arts are for everyone. Lincoln Center respectfully requests support for education and community outreach programs serving District 5 schools and healthcare facilities. To help underwrite stipends for up to 6 student ambassadors, including high school college students, who will work with experienced retirees we employ, at our Neighborhood/Tourist Information Carousels. To support Our Children YES Program which provides a camp program for 60 children is run each summer. Literacy Inc. (LINC) develops community partnerships to support and sustain reading success by age 8, a critical time for children to master reading. We work with school, family, business and community partners in New York City’s low-income neighborhoods to produce reading programs that promote emerging literacy skills. Funding from Council Member Dickens will support 2 LINC family literacy programs in Harlem: 1) monthly PJ Nights at the Harlem Branch of the New York Public Library (9 W 124 St), which encourage parents to establish a nightly bedtime reading routine, and 2) monthly Summer Reading at Marcus Garvey Park, where families gather to read, play literacy games, and do activities.

Youth

Dickens

Literacy, Inc. (LINC)

13-3911331

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Literacy Inc. (LINC) develops community partnerships to support and sustain reading success by age 8, a critical time for children to master reading. We believe that all children deserve to learn to read, and that every community already has the resources to support early literacy. LINC works with school, family, business and community partners in New York City’s low-income neighborhoods to produce reading programs that promote emerging literacy skills. LINCs four program areas are: 1. Reading Partner Programs pair young readers with older children, community members, and senior citizens, giving children more reading time through a positive, supportive experience 2. Parent Programs train parents to support reading development in their own homes and in their communities 3. Community-Based Literacy Celebrations are high-energy themed reading events for children and families 4. Partnerships and Collaborations with cultural organizations that share our goal to improve the literacy development of children. Funding from Council Member Jackson will support LINCs menu of literacy support programs in Inwood, Washington Heights, and Harlem. Family literacy events will be held at NYPL Washington Heights Branch Library, NYPL George Bruce Library, and 4841 Broadway. Schoolbased literacy support services will be provided to PS/IS 210. Youth Jackson Literacy, Inc. (LINC) 13-3911331 $4,000 DYCD-Y Little Branches of Borinquen is an After School Program that have been in existence for over 30 years.We are a non-profit organization based on Baton Twirlers,Pom-Pom girls, Drum Players and folklore Dancing. The program teaches our youth how to play and use Trixon Drums,Tenor Drums, Cymbals, Batons. they are also taught Marching Stands. They enjoy performing at Block Parties, Parades, festivals. the group is available for requests. UNIFORM AND EQUIPMENT PURCHASES FOR LITTLE LEAGUE PROGRAM

Youth Youth

Rivera Halloran

Little Branches of Borinquen, Inc. Little League Baseball of College Point NY, Inc.

13-4049877 20-8304163 *

$15,214 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 84 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Vann

Little Sun People, Inc.

11-3081207

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Quinn Chin

Loco-Motion Dance Theatre for Children, Inc. Lower East Side Conservancy, Inc.

13-3803693 13-4107463

$3,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mendez

Lower East Side Girls Club, The

13-3942063

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Little Sun People, Inc.(LSP)is a community based early childhood day care designed to foster the development and education of children ages 2 through 5 years old. LSP has been in continuous existence and service the Bedford Stuyvesant and surrounding communities since 1980. The day care services are provided to children of all communities. The funds will be used to subsidize expenses incurred for supplies/equipment,admission fees to events and bus service to transport children on trips to cultural events, zoos, parks, puppet shows, etc. We are seeking funding to sponsor 15 children (boys and girls) from P. S. 3 to take dance classes at our studio at 155 Christopher Street with us after-school Monday through Friday from 3:30 - 6:00. To fund, “A Day in the Life of an Immigrant Child,” which students become historically immersed in the immigrant experience of America from 1880 to 1930. The Lower Eastside Girls Club requests funding to sponsor a Social Justice Training Program for Manhattan teens that focuses on grassroots points of entry and civic engagement opportunities for youth. In order to provide recreational and cultural activities for the youth of South Ozone Park as well as any other youth that would like to participate. In order to provide organized activities whereby the youth may develop a positive attitude and healthy self-esteem. Crosswalk Youth is designed to help youth learn more about themselves and the community they live in. When we gather, we find ways to serve the community through outreach and education. We provide a program that is relevant to what youth are currently facing in their schools and homes, give them tools to cope and teach them how they can make a difference in the lives of others. Our Out of School Time Program at our clubhouse site at Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. This clubhouse serves approximately 230 youth ages 6-18 daily and 900 youth annually. Program and Services focus on our six core areas: Character and Leadership Development, Sports and Fitness, Socila Recreation and the Arts, Education, Career and Employment, Health and Life skills. We foster a love of theater through exposure to all aspects of theater production both onstage and behind the scenes

Youth

Wills

LP Fam's Youth Organization, Inc.

11-3489299

$6,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Comrie

Lutheran Church of Our Savior

11-2663842

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Eugene Crowley

Madison Square Boys & Girls Club, Inc. Maggie's Little Theater at St. Margaret Parish

13-5596792 11-1723800

$7,714 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

Magnolia will continue its signature Tree Corp program of caring for neighborhood trees, and offer free workshops for teens and adults in self-improvement, life skills and ecology. The workshops are designed to communicate the core values and objectives of the Hattie Carthan Tree Corps Program. This knowledge will help participants learn to value and appreciate the art of living with nature including the power, influence and protection of trees. The three prime areas of focus will be: a) learning about the urban environment and its relationship to improved physical health b) the green movement including recycling, organic eating, healthy water choices c) life skills for personal and educational development. These components communicate the importance of working on self,community and the natural environment. DYCDs support will be used to provide partial payments for MTECs executive director and executive assistant. Fiscal support will also be directed toward engaging three professional consultants as Tree Corps instructors. And additional instructors for weekend programming during the year. Budget expenses also include consumable program supplies, insurance coverage, utility and telephone costs. Youth Vann Magnolia Tree Earth Center of Bedford Stuyvesant, Inc. 23-7303098 $15,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 85 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Make the Road New York (MRNY) seeks City Council support of 20,000 from City Council Member Daniel Dromm for our LGBTQ Justice Project. MRNY combats institutional homophobia and transphobia, employment discrimination and hate crimes, and the harassment, isolation and invisibility of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in lowincome communities of color. MRNY’s LGBTQ Justice Project is one of the few New York City groups founded, led and constituted by low-income LGBTQ people of color who are organizing around public policy issues that have an impact at the city, state and national levels. Its workshops and trainings reach more than 500 community members and thousands of teachers and students each year. With renewed support, MRNY will do the following in CD25: 1) Engage 15 additional LGBTQ youth in leadership development programming, 2) Expand the reach of Spanish language homophobia and transphobia workshops to 50 more young Latino community members, and 3) Continue our Safe Schools Campaign at two Queens High Schools. Youth Dromm Make the Road New York 11-3344389 $12,500 DYCD-Y

MOUSE respectfully requests 5,000 in discretionary funds from Council Member Inez Dickens to build the capacity of the MOUSE Squad Program to prepare youth to play a leadership role in the improvement of their schools and communities. In particular, funds will be used to support key programmatic improvements and services that have been essential to ensuring that as MOUSE Squad grows and continues to reach more underserved students and schools, we maintain focused on providing high quality 21st century educational and professional experiences for our students. MOUSE invests in infrastructure and service delivery tools that expand and improve recruitment; training; monitoring and ongoing support for program participants, as well as continued assessment and evaluation of program impact. Thus far in FY11, the demographics of MOUSE Squad students are Latino/a (25); AfricanAmerican (21); Caucasian (18); Other (19); Asian (14); American Indian/Native American (2); Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (1).28 of MOUSE Squad students are female and 72 are male.The average percentage of students at MOUSE Squad participating schools in New York City eligible for free and reduced lunch is 83. MOUSE aims to ensure that our programs are being offered to high need communities. 13-3973319 13-3973319 $4,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y Funding will support the youth technology support program in NYC public schools, including Robert F. Wagner, Jr. Middle School.

Youth Youth

Dickens Garodnick

Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education (MOUSE), Inc. Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education (MOUSE), Inc.

Youth Discretionary

Page 86 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

MOUSE respectfully requests 5,000 in discretionary funds from Council Member Stephen Levin to build the capacity of the MOUSE Squad Program to prepare youth to play a leadership role in the improvement of their schools and communities. In particular, funds will be used to support key programmatic improvements and services that have been essential to ensuring that as MOUSE Squad grows and continues to reach more underserved students and schools, we maintain focused on providing high quality 21st century educational and professional experiences for our students. MOUSE invests in infrastructure and service delivery tools that expand and improve recruitment; training; monitoring and ongoing support for program participants, as well as continued assessment and evaluation of program impact. Thus far in FY11, the demographics of MOUSE Squad students are Latino/a (25); AfricanAmerican (21); Caucasian (18); Other (19); Asian (14); American Indian/Native American (2); Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (1).28 of MOUSE Squad students are female and 72 are male.The average percentage of students at MOUSE Squad participating schools in New York City eligible for free and reduced lunch is 83. MOUSE aims to ensure that our programs are being offered to high need communities. 13-3973319 $3,500 DYCD-Y MOUSE respectfully requests 5,000 in discretionary funds from Council Member Rosie Mendez to build the capacity of the MOUSE Squad Program to prepare youth to play a leadership role in the improvement of their schools and communities. To provide cultural based after-school programs at two (2) sites. With this proposal, MCC Theater respectfully requests funding to support its Youth Company (YC), a free afterschool theater arts program for New York City public high school students. To provide music education to East Harlem young people. It is universally recognized that youth leadership development is key to building civic capacity and long-term community sustainability in NYC’s inner-city neighborhoods. The purpose of these funds is to provide programs that teach useful skills and build the selfconfidence of young people and ensure capable, effective leaders for the next generation. PEEC provides our youth with unmatched enrichment opportunities in a relaxed, natural environment. Our program is designed to inspire outstanding youth to reach their full leadership potential. Additionally, recent national trends including an increase in youth civic service and new emphasis on civic education in schools indicate a growing need for leadership training to ensure young people are prepared to participate in political and civic life. Innovative community program, that will bring a variety of school children together in District 11, for afterschool activities, including music and health nutrition services that will help eliminate obesity, high blood pressure and asthma. These funds will be used for administration of the program, a martial arts instructor and for permit fees to use the Center which was transferred to the DOE in 2000. We will provide activities for 30 teens including basketball, martial arts, recreation and life skills workshops. The program runs Monday through Friday from 6:30 to 8:30 pm. The martial arts program runs all year. The basketball program runs during the spring and summer. The recreation and life skills workshops are offered on Fridays during the school year.

Youth

Levin

Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education (MOUSE), Inc.

Youth Youth

Mendez Barron

Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education (MOUSE), Inc. Man Up!, Inc.

13-3973196 03-0553092 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y $72,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Quinn Mark-Viverito

Manhattan Class Company, Inc. Manna House Workshops, Inc.

13-3391844 13-2615433

$4,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Sanders

Margert Community Corporation

11-2534700 *

$75,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Seabrook

Marias Gems

13-1613163 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Rivera

Mary Mitchell Youth and Family Center, Inc.

13-3385032

$25,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 87 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Fidler

Mary Queen of Heaven

11-1952301 *

$3,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Greenfield Crowley

Masores Bais Yaakov Maspeth Town Hall, Inc.

11-2902382 23-7259702

$5,000 DYCD-Y $30,000 DYCD-Y

Funds are used to purchase equipment and other items necessary for the coaches to conduct the seasonal sports activities organized by the organization. The High Jump program is an After-School program that provides a wide variety of activities for the children of the entire community. Activities include music,dance,art,sports,mentoring,homework helpers,etc. Experienced staff provide a conducive environment for the children to be safe and enjoy. This is a proactive approach to prevent Children At Risk. To provide youth programs in a safe and nurturing atmosphere for the children of the community. In our continued effort to engage young people in creative dialogue about alternatives to violence, Mass Transit Street Theater (MTSTV) is producing a new play called “Solid Ground.” This multimedia production, created and performed by young artists from

Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/ba Millennium Development

11-3199040

Youth

Koppell

Mass Transit Street Theater, Inc.

13-6533451

$8,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Comrie

Me Nobody Knows, The

86-1122707

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Bringing Broadway to Queens (BBQS) is a Theatrical Presentation that has the level of excellence, talent and integrity of any Broadway Production but just so happens to be running in Queens at JPAC Performing Arts Theatre. Each original production targets youth byway of the arts, education and mentorship. We combine modern day scenarios with historical events that have occurred throughout the Afican American History and put a twist on it so the youth of today have a platform to express themselves as well as learn history like its never been taught. In presenting these original works we come full circle to address the issues, peer pressure, profane language and behavior that is prevalent amongst our youth in our schools and communities. Educate, Articulate and Stop the Hate....in is our slogan to promote the series of productions we have waiting to be released. Our goal is to reach todays generation by building self-esteem and e! ncouraging respect of self and others. Every Childs life is a message and we want them to be aware of the message they are leaving and the changes they can make one day at a time. Change is not an event its a process and the platform these productions will exemplify offer that and so much more. The impact each child can have in their homes and communities will be a positive one after participating or viewing one of these signature works.

Youth Discretionary

Page 88 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Lander

Mekimi

55-0870419

$15,000 DYCD-Y

Mekimi was founded 7 years ago to fill the entertainment needs of bedridden children. In just a few years, it has expanded its services and has grown into a flourishing network of 12 chapters, serving more than 2,500 children and young adults. Next year we plan on servicing over 3,000 children and young adults. Our goal is to strengthen patients’ resolve to live and fight disease, mitigate the anxiety and boredom experienced during a hospital stay, and enrich the lives of children and young adults suffering the debilitating effects of serious and long term medical conditions and to be a supportive force for patients on the long journey to recovery. The purpose of these funds will be used to provide a medically supervised weekend retreat for sick children and their families. The weekend will take place in a resort setting and provide emotional healing to patients and families. In addition, the funds will be used to provi! de educational services for patients such as professional tutors to go to the home or hospital providing tutorial sessions for patients who are missing school because of their illness. We will also offer mentorial services, thereby fostering a healthy self image. Mekimi also provides educational DVDs on a variety of topics, thus make learning exciting and intriguing. Both DVDs and DVD players are loaned to patients. In addition, we will use the funds to provide volunteer training classes and seminars which consists of teaching the volunteer, how to be sensitive to the sick child, deal with HEPA regulations, how to feed and give out medications to the sick child, and etc.. This coming year, we plan to further enhance and expand our program to meet the needs of additional patients and their families. It plans to establish larger office accommodations, and to meet the human service needs of the patients and families it serves.

Youth

Williams

Mekimi

55-0870419

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Mekimi was founded 7 years ago to fill the entertainment needs of bedridden children. In just a few years, it has expanded its services and has grown into a flourishing network of 12 chapters, serving more than 2,500 children and young adults. Next year we plan on servicing over 3,000 children and young adults. Our goal is to strengthen patients’ resolve to live and fight disease, mitigate the anxiety and boredom experienced during a hospital stay, and enrich the lives of children and young adults suffering the debilitating effects of serious and long term medical conditions and to be a supportive force for patients on the long journey to recovery. The purpose of these funds will be used to provide a medically supervised weekend retreat for sick children and their families. The weekend will take place in a resort setting and provide emotional healing to patients and families. In addition, the funds will be used to provi! de educational services for patients such as professional tutors to go to the home or hospital providing tutorial sessions for patients who are missing school because of their illness. We will also offer mentorial services, thereby fostering a healthy self image. Mekimi also provides educational DVDs on a variety of topics, thus make learning exciting and intriguing. Both DVDs and DVD players are loaned to patients. In addition, we will use the funds to provide volunteer training classes and seminars which consists of teaching the volunteer, how to be sensitive to the sick child, deal with HEPA regulations, how to feed and give out medications to the sick child, and etc.. This coming year, we plan to further enhance and expand our program to meet the needs of additional patients and their families. It plans to establish larger office accommodations, and to meet the human service needs of the patients and families it serves. A video program where youth will learn editing, filming, directing and script writing with an emphasis on gang related violence, teen sexual practices and teen health issues. Funding for a year round after-school program in traditional Chinese music for youth aged 7 through 18 years.

Youth Youth

Rose Chin

Men Who Build, Inc. Mencius Society for the Arts, Inc.

20-2395035 * 56-2343092

$8,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 89 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth Youth Youth

Nelson Chin Brewer Oddo

Metropolitan New York Coordinating Council on Jewish Poverty, Inc. Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance, Inc. Middle School 243M - The Center School Parent Teacher Association Mid-Island Little League, Inc.

Met Council along with service sites under its network of 25 local Jewish Community Councils provide Youth services and information and referral, Child HeaLth Plus enrollment, etc. to those in need throughout New York City. 13-2738818 13-4355067 20-8278187 23-7032781 * $22,500 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y To fund The City of Water Day Festival, a free event held each summer to celebrate the world-class potential of the New York City waterfront To provide an after school program that assits children in homework help, access to computers, tutoring for exams and sports activities. New Fencing for Fields

Youth Youth

Ulrich Gentile

Midori Foundation, Inc., The (d/b/a Midori and Friends) Midtown Management Group, Inc., The

13-3682472 13-3192793

$31,714 DYCD-Y $8,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Nelson

Midwood Development Corporation

11-2420752

$5,500 DYCD-Y

Midori Friends respectfully requests an appropriation of 32,000 from Local Initiative funds (DCA or DOE) to present Adventure Concerts and Musical Learning Workshops to students at PS146Q, PS207Q, and PS232Q featuring professional ensembles which represent a range of world musical cultures including China, Africa, India, Brazil, Spain, Mexico, and Japan among many others. Musical Learning Workshops are scheduled as residencies ranging from 3-10 weeks, and typically feature a kick-off Adventure Concert followed by a series of interactive workshops with the performing artists. Prior to in-school concerts and workshops, classroom teachers receive detailed study guides including hands-on activities for students, ideas for making cross-curricular connections, and supplemental materials. Artists then visit individual classrooms to prepare students for their participation in a culminating Adventure Concert performance, where they hav! e the opportunity to perform alongside professional artists for their families and school communities. During all of these activities, students increase their appreciation and knowledge of music and its role in other cultures, are inspired by musicians as role models, and—with their families—share positive educational experiences across generations. To support youth programming in the 43rd Council District. The funds requested will help us continue to provide a safe, nurturing after school environment for 100 students at our after school sites at PS 197 and PS 193. The daily 3 hour program consists of homework help, team building, and other critical skills for elementary aged students.

Youth Discretionary

Page 90 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Currently, Mind-Builders conducts weekly classes in music and dance for 390 students ages 3 to adult. Group dance classes includePurpose of Funds Modern/Jazz, and African. Private Ballet, Tap, Hip Hop, and group music classes include piano/keyboard, violin/Suzuki violin, saxophone, flute, clarinet, voice, guitar/bass, and drum. Performances for the public will be offered at midyear and at the end of the school year PYT is Mind-Builders touring musical theater company of 20 predominantly African American and Latino youth between the ages of 14 and 21. Free training is provided 3 hours per day 2 to 3 days per week under the guidance of artist/professional instructors. Free shows that highlight students original work will be performed for the public, in schools and community centers throughout New York. The Community Folk Culture Program trains 20 young people ages 14-21 to identify, document, and present the traditions of 20 folk artists discovered in their families, borough, and city. This free program provides interns with training in interview skills, field research, and video/audio/photographic documentation. They do 2-5 presentations for community and school groups citywide. Workshops are conducted 2 days per week, 10 months per year. Mind-Builders also offers Arts in Education programs for Saint Brendan School and Good Shepherd Services, Leadership Conflict Resolution Workshops for youth, and Marketing Internships for older teens. St. Dominic Home places students in our music dance programs as part of their family support program. In early 2012, Mind-Builders will relocate to its newly renovated facility, with double the class space, performance space, and enrollment capacity. Enrollment could approach 1,000 students, with expanded class offerings and guest artist/master classes. Weekly public performances in the new on-site theater will expand audiences and keep the building operating six to seven days per week.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Seabrook

Mind Builders Creative Arts Center, Inc.

13-2988157

$7,000 DYCD-Y The Fresh Start Program was designed in partnership with Community Partnership Referrals Resources. Fresh Start is an alternative to incarceration program for at risk, misunderstood youth. We provide prevention and intervention techniques through four core components: Individual Counseling, Social Development, Life Skills, and Community Service. The Queens District Attorney’s Office has partnered with The Fresh Start Program to begin the QDA Youth Diversion Program. The Queens DA’s office hand selects participants they feel are in need of a fresh start. Fresh Start then completes a psychosocial evaluation to ensure there are no circumstances that would prevent the participant from completing the program successfully. Fresh Start, the QDA’s office, and the defendant’s attorney then determine if the program is a good match for all parties. Once the defendant has been accepted, he or she signs a contract pleading guilty to all charges in the case and agree to participate in the QDA Youth Diversion Program. Participants are held accountable for what they do in school, at home, in the program and within the community. Community service is required at minimum of twice a month. Each participant receives at least one individual counseling session per week and is involved in 2-3 group sessions during the week. Failure to participate, arrive on time, or be respectful during school, program or community service is considered an infraction of the program. Each participant engages in a series of (3) phases: Anti-Crime, life skills and leadership. Participants will have increased awareness and critical thinking skills in the areas of personal and social development. Through therapeutic activities and outreach, participants sharpen problem resolution, communication and decision making skills. The participants also learn job readiness, public speaking, financial literacy and college preparation to prepare them for life after the Youth Diversion Program.

Youth

Weprin

Misunderstood Youth Development Center Corp., The

25-1916166

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 91 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth Youth

Gonzalez Cabrera Koppell

Mixteca Organization, Inc. Mosholu Preservation Corporation Mosholu-Montefiore Community Center, Inc.

11-3561651 13-3109387 13-3622107

$25,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $25,714 DYCD-Y

Mixteca will provide the following programs to improve the audlt employability readiness and assist youth in education; English for Speakers of other of other languages and after school tutoring for elementary and mill for elementary and middle school students, participants will benefit low-incom latino Immigrant families. Funding will be used to support our youth journalism program, which trains Bronx high school students to be journalists. Art, Dance, Homework Help, Sports, Recreation, Boys to Men Group, Girl Talk Group, Money Matters Group, Teen Leadership, Lounge Game Room Youth activities include Math and Literacy Skills classes, dance, ceramics, computers, lounge game room, and counseling services. Out of School Youth Adults receive GED test prep classes. Additional Adult activities include computers, dance, and ceramics. Clerical services are needed to answer phones, do data entry, filing and other duties. MASK (Mothers and Fathers Aligned Saving Kids) Inc. will provide the following services to the parents of youth who are deemed to be “At-Risk” and to the youth themselves. 1. Community Outreach – MASK will facilitate a series of seminars and community meetings on subjects related to the recognition of youth who are engaging in self destructive behavior and what can be done to mitigate the effect of this behavior on the structure of the family. 2. Parenting Skills Workshops / Support Groups – MASK will facilitate a series of workshops / parent support groups designed to enhance the parenting skills of guardians / caregivers of “At-Risk” youth. These workshops will deliver to the guardians / caregivers the tools to engage their youth in a positive manner. These seminars / group sessions will be around three basic issues; Eating Disorders, Molestation and “At-Risk” behavior. 3. GED Classes – Pre GED and GED classes for youth who are no longer attending school. These services are targeted to the neighborhoods known as Boro Park, Flatbush, Midwood, Sheepshead Bay and Brighton Beach, and are also known as Community Boards 12, 13, 14 and 15. This funding will be utilized to pay for the staff necessary to provide the services. The staff will consist of a group of trained facilitators who will deliver the program as well as program supervision and advertisement / outreach to the community and printed materials for the program participants. Additionally GED classes will be funded through this contract; these classes will allow the youth participants to prepare for the GED examination. MASK (Mothers and Fathers Aligned Saving Kids) is a 501 ( c ) 3 non profit organization dedicated to providing services to the families of “At-Risk” youth who reside in NY State in a holistic as well as culturally sensitive manner. These services are provided in a manner that Computer literacy classes; Summer camp; community outreach programs,(GED; preparation for job training;planned parenthood and general counseling.) To support educational , cultural and outreach activities and programming for youth. To support youth theater productions. Funding will support the free fall weekend celebration that will include public access and tours to permanent and temporary exhibits, as well as open studio workshops in painting, drawing, print-making and sculpture at the Academy. NAACP NEQ will provide youth development services for youth between the ages of 11 to 18 in the areas of leadership, financial literacy and educational enrichment through interactive and experiential learning. At National Dance Institute (NDI), we are committed to providing every student with a sequential and comprehensive education in the arts.

Youth

Seabrook

Mosholu-Montefiore Community Center, Inc.

13-3622107 *

$48,214 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth Youth

Lander Wills Gentile Gentile

Mothers Aligned Saving Kids (MASK), Inc. Mt Zion Baptist Church Muslim American Society of New York, Inc. Narrows Community Theater

11-3495018 11-2911165 * 36-3885457 51-0167270

$12,000 DYCD-Y $6,000 DYCD-Y $2,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Garodnick

National Academy of Design National Association for the Advancement of Colored People - Northeast Queens Branch National Dance Institute, Inc.

13-1628183 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Gennaro Lappin

54-2166928 * 13-2890779

$3,214 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 92 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Mendez Palma

National Dance Institute, Inc.

13-2890779

$3,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Neighborhood Initiatives Development Corporation (NIDC) 13-3110811

Youth Youth Youth

Vacca Garodnick Mendez

Neighborhood Initiatives Development Corporation (NIDC) 13-3110811 New Alternatives for Children Inc New Alternatives for LGBT Homeless Youth 13-3149298 27-2151000 *

$56,714 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Based on NDI’s acclaimed SWAT Team (Scholarships for the Willing, Achieving and Talented) enrichment program, NDI offers after-school opportunities for meaningful arts education experiences in New York City public schools. Funding for these programs will allow children with an interest in dance, music and the visual arts to experience the joy and discipline of the arts. NDI’s after-school program challenges each child to reach his or her fullest potential. Prep for Success -- a high school drop-out prevention/life skills building program -- at the Stevenson HS campus. 1. Prep for Success -- a high school drop-out prevention/life skills building program -- at Columbus HS campus and surrounding middle schools. The students are taught the “Seven Habits of Highly Effective Teens” -- learning life goal planning, better study and social interaction skills. After the workshops, students plan and carry out a community service project or internship. Funding will support programs and services for low-income families caring for children with severe disabilities and medical complications. The New Alternatives Case Management Clinic provides high-quality intensive case management services to 150 LGBT homeless youth per year.

Youth Youth Youth

Wills Dickens Cabrera

New Haven Ministries New Heritage Theatre Group, Inc. New Horizon Program Inc., The

11-3453034 * 13-2683678 13-3748233 *

$8,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

New Haven Ministries (NHM) is positioned to become a vital change agent in the community of South Richmond Hill. Research shows that there are missed opportunities in positive school engagement when educational institutes fail to consider what “sparks” students’ interest and passion in the deliverance of curricular; whereby, hindering the achievement of “holistic” outcomes education is purposed. “Sparks” being a metaphor to describe the internal animating force that propels development forward. (Finding the Student Spark, Search Institute Insights Evidence, November 2010, Vol. 5, No.1) Interestingly enough, “Creative Arts” are the number one most common “Spark” amongst American teenagers (ibid). Nonetheless, not a common denominator found in urban Public Schools. Thus, capitalizing on aforementioned research NHM has designed a 2012 Community and Youth Development Initiative: “URBAN YOUTH PRODUCERS” Mentor, Media, and Communication Fellowship ! (UYP MMCF) that provides area residents Arts-In-Education, Access-In-Service Learning, and Positive Role Model Relationships. UYP MMCF niche is the ability to challenge young people to use the very gifts, talents, and abilities that “spark” the fire within, to achieve success in academia: literacy (reading, writing, and verbal communication skills) and higher learningcritical thinking skills. Simultaneously, promoting discipline and accountability through selfactualization and self-determination. Moreover, bolstering young people’s chance of becoming viable members of South Richmond Hill by eliminating risk factors via the integration of “40-Developmental asset builders.” Search Institute identifies said developmental assets as being the building blocks of healthy development: External Assets (Support, Empowerment, Boundaries Expectations, and Constructive Use of time) and Internal Assets (Commitment to Learning, Positive Values, Social Competencies, and P! ositive Identity). Further, Impac Youth Program To provide educational assistance to supplement school work such as tutoring program in reading,math and basic skills. Bay Ridge Bensonhurst Beautification Preservation Alliance Inc

Youth

Gentile

New Utrecht Liberty Pole Association

11-6029983

$1,000 DYCD-Y

To support historic and cultural events for students in Southwest Brooklyn. Crime prevention for youth, community service supervision, anti graffiti work, greening and planting of neighborhoods, artistic murals, programs and services for students and seniors, city tree distribution, 9/11 Day Of Service, fingerprinting of children

11-3233233

Youth

Vallone

New York Anti-Crime Agency A.K.A.Community Anti-Crime Graffiti Program 20-8955479

$13,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 93 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Quinn

New York Cares, Inc.

13-3444193

$3,500 DYCD-Y

The grant would support our Youth and Adult Education programs in Speaker Quinn's district. Our Youth Education program includes literacy and math skills tutoring, science and writing clubs, college prep, and others and is run before school hours, after school hours and on the weekends. Funds would support The New York Center for Childrens direct service programs for abused children. NYCCs direct services include forensic/medical evaluations, individual and group therapy, tutoring, follow-up case tracking, and community outreach. After School Programs NYCIDs After School programs operating in PS 21, McKee, Port Richmond High School serve to aid students in achieving educational success, social skills, and interpersonal skills. Personal Advocates are assigned to students to mentor, check progress both academically and otherwise, and help to resolve any obstacles a student may have. To fund an after-school enrichment program designed to engage underserved minority African American and Latino high school students in the rewards of academic pursuits in the Arts, Humanities and Sciences. ACT-SO is an after-school enrichment program designed to engage underserved minority African American and Latino high school students in the rewards of academic pursuits in the Arts, Humanities and Sciences. The Mission of New York City ACT-SO is to end the vicious cycle of low expectations and low scholastic achievement that plagues minority communities throughout the city. Our goal is to encourage earnest effort so students gain the confidence and skills they will need to thrive as adults.This is the only enrichment program in New York City whichan after-school enrichment program designed to engage underserved minority ACT-SO is offers workshops in 26 academic subjects. African American and Latino high school students in the rewards of academic pursuits in the Arts, Humanities and Sciences. Through a variety of activities, incentives and rewards, students are supported by coaches and mentors in the development of projects for competition in any of 26 categories. In 1977, award winning journalist, historian and civil rights activist Vernon Jarrett (1918-2004), conceptualized an “Olympics of the Mind” competition with much of the same fanfare as an athletic or beauty contest. The program of workshops, coaching and competition was adopted by the NAACP as a national program. Today, there are approximately 350 local programs across the country with 1,200 students competing each year. The New York City ACT-SO began in 1987. The Mission of New York City ACT-SO is to end the vicious cycle of low expectations and low scholastic achievement that plagues minority communities throughout the city. Our goal is to encourage earnest effort so students gain the confidence and skills they will need to thrive as adults. The New York City ACT-SO is the most ambitious program in the country. It offers a year long, after school program that includes weekly coaching workshops. Every coach is accomplished in her/his field and works to nurture and support students to enhance their knowledge and skills in the selected category. The year culminates in a local competition “Olympics of the Mind” and an awards ceremony. In addition to the weekly coaching workshops, students are invited to go on bus trips to sites of interest outside of New York City and within the City to museums, stage performances and specialized libraries. We have also invited professionals to conduct workshops in job preparation and opportunities for scholarship for travel overseas and college. This is the only enrichment program in New York City which offers workshops in 26 academic subjects.

Youth Youth

Lappin Oddo

New York Center for Children New York Center for Interpersonal Development

95-4502444 23-7085239

$13,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Rose

New York Center for Interpersonal Development

23-7085239

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Brewer

New York City ACT-SO, Inc.

20-2538102

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Eugene

New York City ACT-SO, Inc.

20-2538102

$7,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Williams

New York City ACT-SO, Inc.

20-2538102

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 94 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth Youth

Brewer Garodnick Cabrera

New York City Center, Inc. New York City Center, Inc. New York City Christian Athletic League

13-2867442 13-2867442 80-0390499 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y $7,500 DYCD-Y

To fund an after-school program in which students will have the opportunity to have an indepth experience with a Director to learn a scene and song from an Encores! show and to create their own original work. Funding will support City Center's Fall for Dance Festival, which makes accessible various dance performances at significantly reduced prices. To provide recreational means as well as character developing skills to kids in urban areas.

Youth Youth

Dromm Mark-Viverito

New York City Parents of Lesbians and Gay Men, Inc. (d/b/a PFLAG New York City) New York City Parents of Lesbians and Gay Men, Inc. (d/b/a PFLAG New York City)

13-3049626 13-3049626

$15,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

PFLAG NYC requests funds for its Safe Schools Program and support services to LGBT youth. Free to schools, the Safe Schools Program brings community speakers into classrooms to foster dialogue about LGBT issues and promote tolerance, combat anti-LGBT harassment, and support youth and families. As young people come out at younger and younger ages, the Safe Schools Program provides an essential resource to school officials, teachers, and counselors who are ill-equipped to handle the needs of LGBT youth and to educate the wider community of students and families. PFLAG NYC fields calls from all over the city both for programs that meet requirements of diversity education under the Respect for All Program and the Chancellors Regulation on Bias-Related Harassment, as well as emergency intervention programs that respond to bullying and hate crimes in schools. Maximum funding would allow for the hiring of a full-time coordinator to ac! celerate the expansion of the number of schools reached and speaker recruitment and training. To offer the Safe Schools Program and support services to LGBT youth in local schools.

Youth Youth Youth Youth

Weprin Ulrich Barron Chin

New York City Parents of Lesbians and Gay Men, Inc. (d/b/a PFLAG New York City) New York Families for Autistic Children, Inc. New York Junior Tennis League, Inc. New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

13-3049626 11-3442879 23-7442256 23-7442256

$5,000 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Eugene

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$9,000 DYCD-Y

PFLAG NYC requests funds for its Safe Schools Program and support services to LGBT youth. Free to schools, the Safe Schools Program brings community speakers into classrooms to foster dialogue about LGBT issues and promote tolerance, combat anti-LGBT harassment, and support youth and families. As young people come out at younger and younger ages, the Safe Schools Program provides an essential resource to school officials, teachers, and counselors who are ill-equipped to handle the needs of LGBT youth and to educate the wider community of students and families. PFLAG NYC fields calls from all over the city both for programs that meet requirements of diversity education under the Respect for All Program and the Chancellors Regulation on Bias-Related Harassment, as well as emergency intervention programs that respond to bullying and hate crimes in schools. Maximum funding would allow for the hiring of a full-time coordinator to ac! celerate the expansion of the number of schools reached and speaker recruitment and training. Recreational programs for children and families with developmental disabilities, with specific focus on those with autism. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule.

Youth Discretionary

Page 95 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Ferreras Garodnick

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc. New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256 23-7442256

$5,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Gennaro Gentile

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc. New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256 23-7442256

$6,000 DYCD-Y $3,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Halloran

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$5,200 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ignizio

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koo

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$8,000 DYCD-Y

The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule. Funding will support free tennis programs for beginner and intermediate children at MS 167 and MS 104. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule. To provide recreational and education tennis programs for beginners and intermediate players. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provide The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule. Tennis camp at IS 2R The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in Council District 3 during the summer, fall, winter or spring.

Youth

Koppell

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$7,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koslowitz

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Lappin

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Mendez Oddo

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc. New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256 23-7442256

$3,500 DYCD-Y $9,214 DYCD-Y

Youth

Palma

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Quinn

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 96 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Rivera

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Rodriguez

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Seabrook

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$25,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ulrich

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Weprin

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Williams

New York Junior Tennis League, Inc.

23-7442256

$5,000 DYCD-Y

The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule. The funds will be used to provide free recreational tennis and educational programs for beginner and intermediate players, ages 6-18 years in the council members district during the summer, fall, winter or spring. Loaner racquets and balls will be provided to all participants. Special events, team tennis tournaments and trips are a regular part of the summer schedule. Summer - Soccer program Winter - Volleyball, Basketball, Indoor Soccer and Badminton programs

Youth

Weprin

New York Mayalee Sports Club

11-2970755

$7,500 DYCD-Y Youth Cadet program consists of quasi-military training for young men and women ages 12 to 18 years old. Participants undergo physical and mental health exercises, shaping them for a better future. Wilderness camping trips and sight-seeing tours led by military personnel are offered every summer and on weekends and vacation days during the school year. The Color Guards unit leads processions for parades, cultural events and military functions throughout the city. Equipment and uniforms are purchased for all cadets. Youth Cadet program consists of quasi-military training for young men and women ages 12 to 18 years old. Participants undergo physical and mental health exercises, shaping them for a better future. Wilderness camping trips and sight-seeing tours led by military personnel are offered every summer and on weekends and vacation days during the school year. The Color Guards unit leads processions for parades, cultural events and military functions throughout the city. Equipment and uniforms are purchased for all cadets. Funding will support running-based youth development and health programs for New York City school-aged children.

Youth

Dromm

New York Military Youth Cadets, Inc.

11-3581787

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Ferreras Garodnick

New York Military Youth Cadets, Inc. New York Road Runners, Inc.

11-3581787 13-2949483

$7,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 97 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth Youth

Rose James Mark-Viverito

New York Urban League, Inc. New York Walkers Club, Inc. New Yorkers Against Gun Violence Education Fund

13-1671035 * 20-5620848 13-3808186 *

$5,500 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Levin

Nicholas Naquan Heyward Jr Memorial Foundation Inc

26-0462728 *

$5,500 DYCD-Y

Absolute Success-Project Ready Program engages students in a comprehensive college readiness curriculum that emphasizes rigorous academic reinforcement through inclassroom and after-school tutoring, understanding how to prepare and apply for college, and taking action through participation in college tours and fairs. We incorporate Individual College Development Plans to develop goals for achieving post secondary success, to evaluate student’s progress in the program and to provide evaluative data on the achievements and/or adjustments that need to be made to the program. The youth development component features three distinct components: topical classroom presentations, module-based leadership workshops, and student-designed presentations, workshops and conferences. The classroom presentations are designed to increase attendance, improve academic performance, decrease behavioral issues, reduce dropout rates, and decrease s! uspensions while keeping students engaged in the after school component. During enrollment, students meet with principal and guidance counselors to conduct pre-college assessment that includes evaluation of the student’s class load, introduction of the data collection methods and discuss expectations and objectives of the program. Throughout the program, students work with peers, attend several joint workshop sessions with parents and participate in a two-hour afterschool tutorial. Students receive approximately one hour in youth development, one hour college readiness and two hours afterschool tutoring per week. Highly Motivated is a peer-to-peer education project of New York WEB Centers PRIDE Program. To support youth leadership development programming for Bronx young people interested in gun violence prevention. Nicholas Naquan Heyward Jr Memorial Foundation, Inc. hosts two community events every summer. The Foundation hosts a 3 month long basketball tournament for Brooklyn Youth, ages 5-17. The Foundation also hosts a memorial day in August which provides basketball, arts and crafts, face-painting, a toy guns for gift exchange, voter registration, and entertainment for children.

Youth Discretionary

Page 98 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The purpose of the funds will be used to provide and promote education and good mental health in 27,28,31 Council District, Community Board 12 14 through training in sports activities and the Performing Arts to at risk and low income families ages 5-21 years old. The goal of our program is to provide youth and adults in our community with specified training in the areas of Little League Baseball, Musical training in drums, piano, guitar, voice and dance movement. Through these disciplines and teaching methods, the participating students benefit on many levels. The academic and social skills honed in the academy produces a technically rounded and cultured individual. The workshops will be designed to ensure that each child is given the opportunity to reach their full potential, fostering self-esteem and self-awareness. Each child is instructed in a cooperative and safe environment, which hones communication and group dynamics skill that are essential professional qualities, which will be needed for the global job market. And for the adult citizens of our community the reflex exercise associated with the performance techniques will increase blood circulation and heart strength, their dexterity and mental focus benefits as well. The programs are designed to introduce the arts and sports to every child with special emphasis on disadvantage at risk youth. The target market is youth and adults in the surrounding community center area. Once the program is approved flyers will be drafted and disseminated throughout the community, information will be passed on through the community Board, local billboards, stores, as well as word of mouth. The concept of the music school has been forged through years of discipline in teaching music and performance across the world. With this method youth and adults can learn basic music theory in a few months. All instructors involved with the workshops are dedicated professional performers, and recording artist. The Missi NEQJCC in collaboration withother JCCs, Youth Boards, Community Partners, Local Ys, cultural and ethnic organizations provides programs, training and forums that foster a better understanding of differences and similarities among different ethnic groups to eliminate antisemitism and ethnic discrimination. For example, we partnered with Borough President Helen Marshalls Youth Board to unite youth from a multitude of ethnic and religious backgrounds to participate in a sports/recreation program that culminated in a session about the proliferation of gun violence and the responsibility of all youth to end such senseless actions.

Youth

Wills

Nicole Paultre Bell When It's Real, It's Forever Fund, Inc., The

20-8945512

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Halloran

Northeast Queens Jewish Community Council, Inc.

54-2144283

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 99 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Rivera

Northwest Bronx Community and Clergy Coalition for Sistas and Brothas United

13-2806160

$10,000 DYCD-Y

The funds will support our youth leadership program called Sistas Brothas United (SBU) Youth Program of the Northwest Bronx Community Clergy Coalition. SBU is an 11 year old, youth-led organization of low-income middle and high school students in the Northwest Bronx. SBU develops the leadership ability of young people through intensive leadership development training program that trains young people in civic engagement and community education. Key problems that this program will address are: • ecruitment of area teenagers by local gangs/groups and lack of decision-making power R and ownership teenagers have of their lives as a result of the shortage of positive alternatives for teenage civic leadership and • vercrowded, under-resourced and low-performing schools in our area that do not prepare O our high school students for college or the workplace. NWBCCC/SBU proposes to work with at least 300 junior high and senior high school students, primarily with teenagers and young adults ranging in age from 12 to 20. The majority of teenagers will fall between the ages of 14 and 17. Additional youth will be brought into contact with our programs, either through direct outreach to their high schools or through community involvement in our youth activities. Program participants come from families whose income would be ranked “low” or “very low” according to federal guidelines. All teenagers will be invited to enroll in the SBU academic support and college access program. Students will take part in workshops/trainings focusing on leadership and organizing, political education and college preparation. They will also be invited to participate in other activities such as mentoring, conflict mediation, college visits and retreats. SBU will recruit teenagers who live in the Northwest Bronx. Workshops/activitieswill also t! ake place at various middle and high schools in coordination with school counselors, teachers and school administrators. All participants are suppor We seek funds to expand our programs at PS 63 M and PS 78 X to reach at least 40 classes (900 students). Our vision is to provide ongoing dance education at all levels K-5 so that students have opportunities to build on their dance skills and creative experiences year to year. We also seek to build partnerships with 2 new schools to serve underserved populations and expand our organizational capacity. Funding to support Technology Service Corps, NPowers innovative workforce development program and Technology Service Program. Oasis at AMPARK provides low-cost afterschool programming for middle income children in grades K-5. We provide homework help, recreational activities, including arts and crafts, theater, music video making, sports and cooking. We operate between the hours

Youth Youth

Mendez Arroyo

Notes in Motion, Inc. Npower New York, Inc.

32-0005633 13-4145441

$3,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koppell

Oasis Community Corporation

11-3599459

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 100 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Ohel currently operates a foster care program which contracts with and is funded by New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services (ACS) and the NYS Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS) for children who have been abused and/or neglected. Youth in foster care are among our nation’s most vulnerable, typically entering foster care as a result of extreme physical abuse and neglect coupled with the trauma caused by the disruption to their family and home environment. These children face a wide range of social and psychological problems that can make it difficult for them to develop into viable, productive young adults. Many of these children have serious emotional, psychological, and developmental problems which can lead to conflict with their families and/or cannot be adequately addressed in regular foster homes. Ohel is committed to providing specialized services including: • intensive crisis intervention services, • integrative treatment approach, • ecreation and camp opportunities allowing foster children these opportunities like all r children, • ransportation services to facilitate birth parent and child visits in order to expedite t permanency for children • sychiatric and psychological treatment, p • educed child/case manager ratio. r Crisis intervention services and psychiatric and psychological treatment for foster children, coupled with preventive activities, results in an increased level of permanency for foster children and a decrease in child abuse or neglect. A number of these specialized services to children in foster care are not covered by City and State funding. Youth Lander OHEL Children's Home and Family Services, Inc. 11-6078704 $8,000 DYCD-Y At Ohr HaLimud’s Multi- Sensory Learning Center we provide 1:1 tutoring and language therapy for children and young adults who have dyslexia and cannot read, write, spell or comprehend on grade level.

Youth

Nelson

Ohr Halimud - The Multi-Sensory Learning Center

05-0548204

$12,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 101 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The Old Stone House played a pivotal role in the Battle of Brooklyn in August 1776. The House and the surrounding park have been part of the evolving history of New York City as a farmhouse, ball field, active recreation site and cultural center for more than 300 years. The Old Stone House is an active link connecting Brooklyn’s citizens with their past. It is the only Revolutionary-era historic site in New York City that offers a full schedule of educational programming, and is easily accessible to schools throughout Brooklyn and lower Manhattan. Our gardens offer a unique opportunity to link the current pedagogical focus on hands-on environmental education with our historic landscape of useful and native plants. Programs present educators with new tools and a fresh approach to history-based education, including a focus on civics, individual choice, diversity and cross-curricular opportunities. Many Brooklyn public schools cannot afford place-based educational opportunities that require significant travel or admission fees. These schools in particular are targets for the Old Stone House’s Revolutionary, Colonial-era, and environmental education programs. Last year, OSH served more than 6,000 students from Brooklyn and Lower Manhattan schools, and provided professional development for more than 100 New York City school teachers. General visition numbered more than 29,000 for programs including theater, music and film, as well as community events including recycling, gardening, recreation training programs and meeting and rehearsal space for small and medium sized organizations. Funding will support the openhousenewyork weekend, which provides access to over 200 important historical and cultural sites for free. The funds would be used to support three specific elements of our Youth Employment and Training Program: • ublic Speaking and Debate Day. Trainees will participate in 10 weeks worth of training P which will culminate in Public Speaking and Debate Day at either the Brookly Marriott or Brooklyn Sheraton Hotel. • peed Networking. OBT will partner with Morgan Stanley, JP Morgan, Moodys Investment S Services to provide six, seven-minute networking interviews to trainees and corporate employees. • ervice Learning. Trainees will volunteer in at Prospect Park, Coalition for the Homeless, S Food Change, and others to learn teamwork, help their community, and build their resumes. Note: These services will be provided to out-of-school youth ages 17-24 Funds would pay for In Step Consulting to provide coaching to prepare students for our Public Speaking and Debate Day, in addition to one of the hotel venues listed above to conduct Debate Day.

Youth Youth

Levin Garodnick

Old Stone House of Brooklyn Open House New York, Inc.

11-3032836 * 02-0540261

$4,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Gonzalez

Opportunities for a Better Tomorrow

11-2934620

$20,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 102 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The funds would be used to support three specific elements of our Youth Employment and Training Program: • ublic Speaking and Debate Day-Trainees will participate in 10 weeks’ worth of training in P Public Speaking which will culminate in Debate Day at either the Brooklyn Marriott or the Brooklyn Sheraton Hotel • peed Networking-OBT will partner with Morgan Stanley, JP Morgan, Moody’s Investment S Services and Goldman Sachs to provide six, seven-minute networking interviews to trainees and corporate employees. • ervice Learning-Trainees will volunteer for Prospect Park, Coalition for the Homeless, St. S Johns Bread and Life, Williamsburg Resident Green Committee and with various other agencies to learn teamwork and learn the essence of community giving. Funds will also pay for In Step consulting to provide coaching to prepare students for Public Speaking and Debate Day in addition, to one of the hotel venues listed above to conduct Debate Day. Youth Reyna Opportunities for a Better Tomorrow 11-2934620 $5,000 DYCD-Y ECUADORIAN SCHOLARS FUND: The Ecuadorian community is the fourth most numerous in New York City. Out of the 202,000 Ecuadorians who live in it, only 8.5 has a Bachelor’s Degree, or higher, which is equivalent to less than 2 of all Latinos in all of the United States. 2001 is the third consecutive year Juventud Ecuatoriana Organization (JUVE) is carrying out its scholarships contest, which aims to financially benefit Ecuadorian students (or from Ecuadorian descent) living in the states of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, regardless of immigration status. It is through awarding these scholarships that JUVE seeks to alleviate the financial burden attending college represents to the majority of them. It is through these scholarships that JUVE intends to make it possible for these students to develop as professionals with the hope that in doing so, they will live better and give back to the community that saw, and helped them, grow. Youth Ferreras Organización Juventud Ecuatoriana, Inc. 20-8630120 * $6,414 DYCD-Y Our Childrens Foundation respectfully requests a grant of 9,500 to support our youth programs out-of-school activities. For 42 years, Our Childrens Foundation has provided educational enhancement to the underprivileged children who need this support the most. The Foundation reaches out to hundreds of boys and girls from New York Citys most underserved communities, offering them academic and cultural enrichment in its state-ofthe-art facility. At Our Childrens Foundation young people ages 6 to 21 receive free tutoring, counseling and guidance. Here, they discover new talents and develop new skills 365 days a year. Whether they are studying computers, conflict resolution, or photography our members are discovering all that life can hold for them and preparing themselves for bright futures. www.the5dollarplay.com is the ticket to expose children to theater. Out of all the other theatrical venues throughout New York City the www.the5dollarplay.com is the most economical. The purpose of this project is to provide various affordable educational theatrical venues to school children throughout the New York City metropolitan area. We will educate children via an artistic medium and expose children to theater who may otherwise not have the opportunity. This project will also have artistic venues for the senior citizen community. We are a youth soccer organization through the Catholic Youth organization program we proved soccer instruction to children between ages of 4 to 15 years of age. We have two seasons of league play an indoor season and summer camp that we offer to the youth in the queens area.

Youth

Dickens

Our Children's Foundation, Inc.

13-3210299

$7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Williams

Our Firefighters' Children's Foundation

54-2064625

$9,400 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ulrich

Our Lady of Grace Church

11-1639827 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 103 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth

Crowley Koslowitz Vallone Mendez Oddo

Our Lady of Hope Our Lady of Mercy Our Lady of Mount Carmel Queens CYO Our Lady of Sorrows Our Lady Queen Of Peace

11-2202490 11-1633520 11-1646314 13-3743218 * 13-2695170

$6,000 DYCD-Y $6,000 DYCD-Y $7,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y $4,500 DYCD-Y

We are an thletic organization offering many different sport activities to the children in the community. Space rental fees for practices and games (PS 101 and PS 144), league registration fees, referee fees, uniforms, equipment and awards. Serving the youth of Western Queens thru sports and recreation programs OLS Kids Sparkle is a youth sports program dedicated to teaching inner city kids respect, teamwork and discipline through the friendly competition of sports. After School Robotics Program. Oval Community Youth Program Inc. (OCYP)sports program’s mission is to increase baseball, football and sofball participation and to provide a structured program that emphasizes on Commitment, Discipline, Hard work, Fairness, Leadership, Respect, Responsib

Youth

Koppell

Oval Community Youth Program, Inc.

26-0877270

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Oval Community Youth Program Inc. (OCYP)sports program’s mission is to increase baseball, football and sofball participation and to provide a structured program that emphasizes on Commitment, Discipline, Hard work, Fairness, Leadership, Respect, Responsibility, and Teamwork and ultimately engages the players in positive activities. One of our primary objectives is to expose today’s youth with a well-structured baseball, football and softball program that will keep them physically, emotional, socially and positively active in their communities We provide indoor and outdoor comprehensive baseball, football and softball clinic for all students, ages 5 through 18. These clinics introduce students to the fundamentals of the sports and the importance of teamwork. players have the opportunity to show their skills, abilities and talents to others by participating in local, state and international tournaments. To support a Little League Baseball program

Youth Youth

Rivera Ulrich

Oval Community Youth Program, Inc. Ozone Howard Little League

26-0877270 51-0256117 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 104 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Vallone

Pancyprian Association, Inc.

13-3101081

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Eleftheria is the Pancyprian Association's youth soccer division which was founded 30 years ago by a few concerned parents in Astoria who saw the need for an after-school activity for many children who would otherwise be glued to the television set or to video games, or worse, they could be hanging out with the wrong crowds and be led astray. Through soccer the children learn discipline, hard work, teamwork, and sportsmanship on and off the field. Eleftheria is a member of the Cosmopolitan Junior Soccer League and is run by volunteers. The children practice twice a week and play outdoors on weekends from the first week of August to the middle of December and then again from March to the middle of June. From December to the end of March they practice indoors in the gyms of P.S. 122 and play in indoor tournaments. The PANCYPRIAN YOUTH SOCCER TEAMS is a community based club and over the years provided many services to the community and as a result the past few years we have seen the participating numbers to grow significantly. The participating players are coming from different parts of the Queens area and are from various cultures and ethnicities.The funds will be used to purchase uniforms and supplies for over 175 players for 10 youth soccer teams from the ages of 5 to 19 years of age; to provide the coaches with the proper training for licencing and seminars in order to train and prepare the young players for the we! ekly games; to provide the facilities and supplies for the training sessions as well as for the cultural and communinty gatherings and events. There is a welcome gathering at the beginning of the season (August or September), a Christmas Party, another event for the Spring season and finally the award festival at the end of the season to congratulate the young athletes for their accomplishments during the year. During these events, we provide the supplies, the food, the trophies and anthing else required to be a successful event. To provide reduced-price and free tickets to NYC children for our shows in all 5 boroughs.

Youth

Chin

Paper Bag Players, Inc., The

13-1972960

$4,000 DYCD-Y We intend to use the money to pay admission fees for school trips. For example, as part of the second grade curriculum, the students study New York City history. The second grade goes to the Tenement Museum. This money will pay for admissions to places such as the Tenement Museum. To fund a youth centered financial literacy program to empower public school’ youths to gain the necessary financial money management skills to help them succeed in life.

Youth

Levin

Parent Teacher Association of Public School 261K

11-3134458 *

$9,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Brewer

ParentJobNet, Inc.

20-1966758

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Dickens

ParentJobNet, Inc.

20-1966758

$3,500 DYCD-Y

PJN will provide free ESL classes throughout the school year in schools that serve parents from zip codes 10026, 10027, 10037, and 10025. PJN will continue to offer a free Job Readiness Workshop at CS 133 and a Job Readiness/Computer class at PS 125. Parents in Councilwoman Dickens district will also be invited to attend free monthly networking events. PJN will continue its career counseling and economic development program by partnering with local small businesses to identify job opportunities for local public school parents.

Youth Discretionary

Page 105 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Shake, Rattle Roll is a parent-child, academic enrichment program that makes quality music education accessible to all families. Parents participate alongside their children and learn literacy development and scientific exploration strategies that they can integrate into their lifestyles. During the program, the children and parents make real musical instruments out of authentic materials - like West African shekere gourds and Native American calf-skin frame drums. They get to keep these instruments to continue practicing the rhythm patterns that they learned as well as a reminder of what they can achieve together. Professional folkloric percussionists teach the children and parents how to play a variety of drum and percussion instruments focusing on the folkloric music of West Africa, Native America, Cuba, Brazil, China, and India. They also look at the world map to locate the region of study and increase their geographi! c awareness. Professional teachers present folktales - demonstrating literacy development strategies - and facilitate scientific exploration relevant to the music portion of the workshop. On program days, the parents and children may remain at the Brooklyn Childrens Museum for more shared academic enrichment. In addition to helping parents support their children academically, this program improves the quality of life and builds community for both the parents and children. It continues to be a parent-child program that fathers participate in comfortably and willingly. To fund an overhaul of our garden, which runs along Columbus Avenue, between 83rd 84th Streets. parkchester little league is a youth baseball orgnazion that provides youth baseball to the community for boys and girls age 5 to 16 funding is for uniforms equipment bats baseballs and field equipment To provide after-school sports activities and create a safe and healthy environment for children and teens in Brooklyn. The Parkville Youth Organization is dedicated to provide organized, adult supervised sports programs, such as baseball, football, soccer and softball to children ages 4 to 14 in the metropolitan new York City area. We are also lending ourselves to facilitate the development of our community by reaching out to other groups to utilize our sports facilities to benefit quality of life programs such as free concerts and school day camps. The Parkville Youth Organization is dedicated to provide organized, adult supervised sports programs, such as baseball, football, soccer and softball to children ages 4 to 14 in the metropolitan new York City area. We are also lending ourselves to facilitate the development of our community by reaching out to other groups to utilize our sports facilities to benefit quality of life programs such as free concerts and school day camps. The Parkville Youth Organization is dedicated to provide organized, adult supervised sports programs, such as baseball, football, soccer and softball to children ages 4 to 14 in the metropolitan new York City area. We are also lending ourselves to facilitate the development of our community by reaching out to other groups to utilize our sports facilities to benefit quality of life programs such as free concerts and school day camps. PDM have been servicing the communtiy of Brooklyn, Queen and Manhattan with outstading theater productions. We have provided our community with broadway production plays for our community to enjoy as well as provided seasonal jobs for young and the old. We are here to service the community of all boroughs with the spirit of excellence.

Youth Youth

Vann Brewer

Parents as Primary Teachers, Inc. Parents of Public School 9, Inc.

02-0658108 13-4106823

$10,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Palma Gentile

Parkchester Little League Parkville Youth Organization, Inc.

13-6162741 11-2204831

$5,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Gonzalez

Parkville Youth Organization, Inc.

11-2204831

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Greenfield

Parkville Youth Organization, Inc.

11-2204831

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Lander

Parkville Youth Organization, Inc.

11-2204831

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mealy

PDM Performing Arts Corporation

75-3032931 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 106 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Brewer

Peace First New York, Inc.

04-3323467

$5,000 DYCD-Y

To build effective school climates by focusing on two major efforts within schools: teaching children cooperation and funds would go toward supporting general operations of the New York program: a weekly curriculum delivery to students. ·To provide financial assistance to first generation youth to pursue their dream of higher education. ·To provide sports leadership and mentorship to youth in the community. ·Semi-Annual (Feb/May) community outreach program featuring NYC area youth tournament. ·Provide hands on job experience for youth to apply their NBA knowledge in a real “basketball game”. Youth will serve as scorebook keeper, time clock and 24 sec shoot clock operator for which they will receive a stipend. To provide sector based training opportunities for young adults to enter careers in the IT field .

Youth Youth

Dickens Arroyo

Pelham Fritz Basketball League, Inc., The Per Scholas, Inc.

13-3759258 04-3252955

$8,500 DYCD-Y $30,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ferreras

Per Scholas, Inc.

04-3252955

$6,500 DYCD-Y

Per Scholas has two digital inclusion programs. These programs are committed to empowering families, seniors and teachers through technology and digital literacy training. We believe that if every teacher uses technology in the classroom and students in lowincome schools have access to home computers, the entire learning experience will be improved. Inspired by the limitless opportunities to learn through technology, the Comp2Kids program was initiated in 2002 and distributes free computers and training to middle school students and their families. In 2009, Comp2Kids launched the 20,000 Children by 2012 Campaign. This campaign seeks to connect 20,000 families to technology by 2012. In 2010, 3,000 families were served in 27 Title I middle school schools in New York. Additionally last year Per Scholas created the Digital Families program which distributed computers and provided training to 700 low-income students, grades 4-8, and their families residing in the Upper Manhattan and Bronx Empowerment Zone.

Youth

Jackson

Per Scholas, Inc.

04-3252955

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Per Scholas has two digital inclusion programs. These programs are committed to empowering families, seniors and teachers through technology and digital literacy training. We believe that if every teacher uses technology in the classroom and students in lowincome schools have access to home computers, the entire learning experience will be improved. Inspired by the limitless opportunities to learn through technology, the Comp2Kids program was initiated in 2002 and distributes free computers and training to middle school students and their families. In 2009, Comp2Kids launched the 20,000 Children by 2012 Campaign. This campaign seeks to connect 20,000 families to technology by 2012. In 2010, 3,000 families were served in 27 Title I middle school schools in New York. Additionally last year Per Scholas created the Digital Families program which distributed computers and provided training to 700 low-income students, grades 4-8, a! nd their families residing in the Upper Manhattan and Bronx Empowerment Zone. Per Scholas: Computer Recycling Program With advancement in technology, there has been an increase in adoption and decrease in lifetime of IT products. In a 2006 report, the International Association of Electronics Recyclers projected that with the curre To provide computers and technology training to District 8 families.

Youth Youth

Koppell Mark-Viverito

Per Scholas, Inc. Per Scholas, Inc.

04-3252955 04-3252955

$10,000 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 107 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Levin

Pesach Tikvah/Hope Development Inc.

11-2642641

$5,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mendez

Phipps Community Development Corporation

13-2707665

$3,500 DYCD-Y

After School Respite Program - provides daily recreational programs in a warm and nurturing setting for children with serious developmental disabilities including Down syndrome, autism and cerebral palsy. At the same time we provide desperately needed respite to their families; at the times of day and year when it is difficult, if not impossible, to care for the children at home. The children love coming, and the program makes it possible for parents to care for them at home. Weve lately had an influx of children with extremely severe disabilities, who require one-on-one support and wheelchair transportation. Funding is urgently needed to cover the higher costs associated with these very needy children. Phipps CDC requests funding from City Council Member Rosie Mendez to support two initiatives: 1) senior services at our Naturally Occurring Retirement Community and 2) afterschool programming and summer camp at the Phipps Plazas Youth Program. This application focuses on the youth services request.

Youth Youth Youth

Rivera Barron Cabrera

Phipps Community Development Corporation Pine Street Block Association and Community Garden Police Athletic League, Inc.

13-2707665 11-3805241 13-5596811

$20,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y $20,000 DYCD-Y

Phipps Summer Camp at Crotona Park West provides enriching recreation and education activities for 165 elementary and middle school children over the course of six weeks in the summer. The camp offers children an opportunity to explore their talents, interests, and the world around them. Each week, the participants go swimming and take a field trip to a variety of arts, cultural, or recreation institutions in and around the city. For the past three years, the camp has also included an intensive literacy curriculum that weaves reading, storytelling, and performance into a variety of activities with the ultimate goal of increasing childrens motivation to read. Summer camp is an important resource in our community. Not only does it combat summer learning loss among low income children, but provides a safe and nurturing environment for children while their parents work. Funds will be used for Youth Community programming. PAL proposes to provide at least one Juvenile Crime Prevention Program in District 14. PAL provides a Teen Impact Center for 100 young people at the Florence E. Smith Community Center. This is a “safe haven” within the community where young people respectfully connect with their peers and positive adult role models, including New York City Police Department (NYPD) officers. The goal of Teen Impact Centers is to prevent crime victimization, as well as juvenile delinquency and other negative youth behaviors in high risk communities. PAL works directly with NYPD Precinct Commanders and Borough Commanders to identify areas of high juvenile crime rates, and to establish centers where teenagers would gain the most benefit from having a safe and supervised place to in their community where they can just be a teen. Activities include: Volleyball; Basketball; Boot Camp Fitness; Fitness Activities; Crime Prevention Workshops; Team-Building Activities; and Arts-Learning Workshops.

Youth

Ferreras

Police Athletic League, Inc.

13-5596811

$8,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 108 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

PAL proposes to operate a Summer Play Street in District 7. Play Streets are a place where children ages 6 to 15 are engaged in safe, fun and structured adult-supervised youth development activities. Play Streets bring all the components of a summer camp experience to children free of charge, weekdays between 9:00am and 5:00pm for seven weeks each summer. The schedule is designed to accommodate working families in the community in need of child care during the summer. Through collaborations with governmental organizations such as the NYC Department of Transportation, the NYPD, FDNY and the National Guard, Play Street activities are designed to reinforce school lessons, foster creativity, build positive character traits, encourage teamwork, and develop leadership skills. Play Streets is a measurable, goal-oriented program with the following objectives: 1.Engage youth in group/team recreational activities that increase physical activity and foster sportsmanship and positive peer and adult relationships. 2.Reduce risk-taking behaviors among youth and foster life skills. 3.Embrace the community and neighborhood in which we serve and to help children/families become more familiar with community resources. In 2010, PAL provided Play Streets for 605 youth at 4 sites in District 7. Youth Jackson Police Athletic League, Inc. 13-5596811 $5,000 DYCD-Y PAL’s After School program provides homework help, academic enrichment, leadership training, life skills development, sports, arts learning, night center and community service projects for 146 youth at PS 214.

Youth

Koo

Police Athletic League, Inc.

13-5596811

$6,000 DYCD-Y

PAL proposes to operate a Summer Play Street in District 41. Play Streets are a place where children ages 6 to 15 are engaged in safe, fun and structured adult-supervised youth development activities. Play Streets bring all the components of a summer camp experience to children free of charge, weekdays between 9:00am and 5:00pm for seven weeks each summer. The schedule is designed to accommodate working families in the community in need of child care during the summer. Through collaborations with governmental organizations such as the NYC Department of Transportation, the NYPD, FDNY and the National Guard, Play Street activities are designed to reinforce school lessons, foster creativity, build positive character traits, encourage teamwork, and develop leadership skills. Play Streets is a measurable, goal-oriented program with the following objectives: 1.Engage youth in group/team recreational activities that increase physical activity and foster sportsmanship and positive peer and adult relationships. 2.Reduce risk-taking behaviors among youth and foster life skills. 3.Embrace the community and neighborhood in which we serve and to help children/families become more familiar with community resources. In 2010, PAL provided a Play Street for 308 youth in District 41 at Rewald Salgada Park. Youth Mealy Police Athletic League, Inc. 13-5596811 $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 109 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Palma

Police Athletic League, Inc.

13-5596811

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Quinn

Police Athletic League, Inc.

13-5596811

$3,500 DYCD-Y

PAL proposes to provide at least one Juvenile Crime Prevention Program in District 18 during FY 12. Juvenile Crime Prevention Programs include Summer Play Streets and Teen Impact Centers. If funded, PAL will work with the Council Member, NYPD and other community leaders to place a Play Street, Teen Impact Center or both depending on need and funding. PALs After School program provides homework help, academic enrichment, leadership training, life skills development, sports, arts learning, night center and community service projects for 121 youth at the Duncan Center. PAL’s After School program provides homework help, academic enrichment, leadership training, life skills development, sports, arts learning, night center and community service projects for 125 youth at the Webster-Giannone Center. The schedule accommodates working families in the community in need of child care between the time children are let out of school and parents get home from work. Activities are designed to reinforce school lessons, foster creativity, build positive character traits, encourage teamwork, and develop leadership skills. Using report cards, surveys, activity logs and cardio tests as measures, PAL has expanded its evaluation to include tracking outcomes of all aspects of the after school program. Young people taking part in the after school program are expected to demonstrate the following: -Improved engagement in school/learning. -Increased academic performance -Improved attitudes about healthy lifestyles nutrition -Increased physical activity -Increased attainment of physical education standards -Increased physical fitness -Increased engagement in arts learning -Improved self-expression and communication -Expanded global and cultural awareness

Youth

Rivera

Police Athletic League, Inc.

13-5596811

$10,000 DYCD-Y PAL's After School program provides homework help, academic enrichment, leadership training, life skills development, sports, arts learning, night center and community service projects for 130 youth at the Armory Center. Currently, there is a waiting list for the After School program at the Armory Center. The schedule accommodates working families in the community in need of child care between the time children are let out of school and parents get home from work. Activities are designed to reinforce school lessons, foster creativity, build positive character traits, encourage teamwork, and develop leadership skills. Using report cards, surveys, activity logs and cardio tests as measures, PAL has expanded its evaluation to include tracking outcomes of all aspects of the after school program. Young people taking part in the after school program are expected to demonstrate the following: -Improved engagement in school/learning. -Increased academic performance -Improved attitudes about healthy lifestyles nutrition -Increased physical activity -Increased attainment of physical education standards -Increased physical fitness -Increased engagement in arts learning -Improved self-expression and communication -Expanded global and cultural awareness

Youth

Rodriguez

Police Athletic League, Inc.

13-5596811

$5,214 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 110 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

PAL proposes to provide at least one PurposeCrime Prevention Program in District 22 during Juvenile of Funds FY12. Juvenile Crime Prevention Programs include Summer Play Streets and Teen Impact Centers. If funded, PAL will work with the Council Member, NYPD and other community leaders to place a Play Street, Teen Impact Center or both depending on need and funding. Play Streets are a place where children ages 6 to 15 are engaged in safe, fun and structured adult-supervised youth development activities. Play Streets bring all the components of a summer camp experience to children free of charge, weekdays between 9:00am and 5:00pm for seven weeks each summer. The schedule is designed to accommodate working families in the community in need of child care during the summer. Play Street activities are designed to reinforce school lessons, foster creativity, build positive character traits, encourage teamwork, and develop leadership skills. Teen Impact Centers are “safe havens” within the community where young people respectfully connect with their peers and positive adult role models, including NYPD officers. The goal of Teen Impact Centers is to prevent crime victimization, as well as juvenile delinquency and other negative youth behaviors in high risk communities. Activities include: Volleyball; Basketball; Boot Camp Fitness; Fitness Activities; Crime Prevention Workshops; Team-Building Activities; and Arts-Learning Workshops. Play Streets and Teen Impact Centers are measurable, goal oriented programs with the following objectives: 1.Engage youth in group/team recreational activities that increase physical activity and foster sportsmanship and positive peer adult relationships. 2.Reduce risk-taking behaviors among youth foster life skills. 3.Embrace the community and neighborhood in which we serve to help children/families become more familiar with community resources.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Vallone

Police Athletic League, Inc.

13-5596811

$10,000 DYCD-Y PAL’s After School program provides homework help, academic enrichment, leadership training, life skills development, sports, arts learning, night center and community service projects for 124 youth at the Wynn Center. The schedule accommodates working families in the community in need of child care between the time children are let out of school and parents get home from work. Activities are designed to reinforce school lessons, foster creativity, build positive character traits, encourage teamwork, and develop leadership skills.

Using report cards, surveys, activity logs and cardio tests as measures, PAL has expanded its evaluation to include tracking outcomes of all aspects of the after school program. Young people taking part in the after school program are expected to demonstrate the following: -Improved engagement in school/learning. -Increased academic performance -Improved attitudes about healthy lifestyles nutrition -Increased physical activity -Increased attainment of physical education standards -Increased physical fitness -Increased engagement in arts learning -Improved self-expression and communication -Expanded global and cultural awareness Youth Vann Police Athletic League, Inc. 13-5596811 $10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 111 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

PAL proposes to operate a Summer Play Street in District 45. Play Streets are a place where children ages 6 to 15 are engaged in safe, fun and structured adult-supervised youth development activities. Play Streets bring all the components of a summer camp experience to children free of charge, weekdays between 9:00am and 5:00pm for seven weeks each summer. The schedule is designed to accommodate working families in the community in need of child care during the summer. Through collaborations with governmental organizations such as the NYC Department of Transportation, the NYPD, FDNY and the National Guard, Play Street activities are designed to reinforce school lessons, foster creativity, build positive character traits, encourage teamwork, and develop leadership skills. Play Streets is a measurable, goal-oriented program with the following objectives: 1.Engage youth in group/team recreational activities that increase physical activity and foster sportsmanship and positive peer and adult relationships. 2.Reduce risk-taking behaviors among youth and foster life skills. 3.Embrace the community and neighborhood in which we serve and to help children/families become more familiar with community resources. In 2010, PAL provided Play Streets for 381 youth ages 6 to 15 in District 45 at Fox Playground and Paerdegat Park. Youth Williams Police Athletic League, Inc. 13-5596811 $6,000 DYCD-Y To fund a technology-based an interactive program that transmits reliable information to, and communications from, parents schools, the police, and other governmental and nongovernmental organizations to help increase the safety of children. PortSide NewYork is an innovative non-profit running diverse programs about water issues and the waterfront. Our “H2O Arts” youth programs offer youth-oriented events and workshops, tours of our ship, and events for school and afterschool programs. Funds will be used toward programs, dinners, tutoring classes, Basketball Clinics, Thanksgiving drive, Feed the hungry, Educational Preparation. The program for the STARS Series Program, an after-school program promoting physical activity, healthy living and wellness for elementary and middle school girls. The program for which funding is being requested is the STARS Series Program, an afterschool program promoting physical activity, healthy living and wellness for elementary and middle school girls.

Youth

Brewer

Police Liaison Group, Inc.

13-3690574

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Lander Brewer

PortSide NewYork, Inc. Positive Influence, Inc.

20-0176184 56-2519776

$3,500 DYCD-Y $7,214 DYCD-Y

Youth

Cabrera

PowerPlay NYC, Inc.

13-4045021

$9,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mendez

PowerPlay NYC, Inc.

13-4045021

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 112 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The program for which funding is being requested is the STARS Series Program, an afterschool program promoting physical activity, healthy living and wellness for elementary and middle school girls. PowerPlay’s trained coaches lead the Star Series program onsite at community-based organizations, public schools, public park recreation centers and NYCHA community centers providing girls with (i) opportunities to learn sports skills and be physically active, (ii) encouragement and support, (iii) multiple opportunities to learn teamwork, (iv) health and wellness learning activities, and (iv) a safe space for discussion and expression. Girls in NYC participate in sports at half the rate that boys do. PowerPlay’s STARS Series program provides a girls’ only space in which girls can learn fundamental sport skills so they become comfortable with, and enjoy, being physically active. The girls are taught the fundamentals of a variety of sports. The first 45 minutes is dedicated to sports skills development and a modified (or full) game to practice those skills. The remaining time is used for a facilitated discussion focusing on health and wellness, including topics such as nutrition, getting enough sleep, bullying, self esteem, body image, saying no to smoking, drugs and alcohol, etc. Each girl receives a “GoGirlGo” Guide and Scrapbook as part of the program. Last year, after participating in STARS Series, more than 85 of the girls enrolled reported that they (i) had more confidence, (ii) felt better about themselves, (iii) were more active and(iv) were taking better care of themselves. PowerPlay respectfully requests a 4,500 Member Item allocation from Councilmember Vann to expand programming in Council District 36, where PowerPlay is currently providing programming at St. Johns PS 636. A 4,500 allocation will allow PowerPlay to serve up to 50 girls during the school year at two organizations. Core After School Program Components Program Model: (Snacks are served each day during the weekday and Saturday’s) 1. Academic enhancement- Academic Instructional Service Academy (AISA): tutoring, reading/English math instructions and LAB on Saturdays - Homework assistance, Lab tutoring. This academic enhancement will be scheduled to take place during the week afterschool starting from 3:00 p.m. The proposed number of youth to be served is 50 2. Leadership development training - Job readiness career development, Civics justice, financial management, Behavior modification, and etc. This leadership development training will be scheduled to take place during the week after-school starting from 5:30 p.m. The proposed number of youth to be served is 50 3. Recreation Cultural- Basketball softball tournaments, Arts craft, Chess, Games, Step dance competitions Shows and other related activities. The recreational and cultural aspect of the program will be scheduled to take place during the week after-school starting from 4:30 p.m. and Saturdays The proposed number of youth to be served is 50 4. Grassroots Outreach Initiatives – events shows, trips tournaments and community meetings. The proposed number of youth to be served is 100 Youth Comrie Project Hope, The New Directions, Inc. 11-3327651 $25,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Vann

PowerPlay NYC, Inc.

13-4045021 *

$7,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 113 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Core After School Program Components Program Model: (Snacks are served each day during the weekday and Saturday’s) 1. Academic enhancement- Academic Instructional Service Academy (AISA): tutoring, reading/English math instructions and LAB on Saturdays - Homework assistance, Lab tutoring. This academic enhancement will be scheduled to take place during the week afterschool starting from 3:00 p.m. The proposed number of youth to be served is 50 2. Leadership development training - Job readiness career development, Civics justice, financial management, Behavior modification, and etc. This leadership development training will be scheduled to take place during the week after-school starting from 5:30 p.m. The proposed number of youth to be served is 50 3. Recreation Cultural- Basketball softball tournaments, Arts craft, Chess, Games, Step dance competitions Shows and other related activities. The recreational and cultural aspect of the program will be scheduled to take place during the week after-school starting from 4:30 p.m. and Saturdays The proposed number of youth to be served is 50 4. Grassroots Outreach Initiatives – events shows, trips tournaments and community meetings. The proposed number of youth to be served is 100 Youth Weprin Project Hope, The New Directions, Inc. 11-3327651 $7,500 DYCD-Y Young adults and collegiate from the immigrant community participate in leadership building activities including workshops, retreats and planning sessions. In addition, disadvantaged families are able to access food packages and fresh produce from our emergency food pantry. One-on-one Tutoring, mentoring and life skills coaching to middle school students, during after school and Saturdays during the Summer months. The Prospect Park Alliance, in partnership with the City of New York and the community, restores, develops, and operates the Park for the enjoyment of all New Yorkers. The Alliance is dedicated to serving visitors through its facilities and programs, caring for the Parks natural environment, and preserving its historic design. Prospect Park’s 585 acres of meadows, waterfalls, forest, lakes, and athletic facilities comprise a masterwork of urban green space. The Alliance requests Member Expense items to support Youth and Environmental Programs in the Park. Specifically, with this funding, school groups from the members district can come to educational programs at the Prospect Park Audubon Center or Lefferts Historic House.

Youth Youth

Koslowitz Cabrera

Project Lead, Inc. Promise Land Community, Inc.

13-3761446 56-2649589 *

$14,000 DYCD-Y $25,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Eugene

Prospect Park Alliance, Inc.

11-2843763 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 114 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

We wish to support the students of our school by providing high quality professional texts to our teachers to help to better facilitate collaboration in curriculum planning and the use of Web 2.0 tools throughout our school. Our librarian will offer in-service professional development to the staff to facilitate cooperative curriculum development, techniques for collaboration between the teachers and the librarian, and integration of current technology into the curriculum. Numerous state studies have shown that student achievement increases as effective collaboration between the school librarian and the classroom-teachers increases: Fourth Graders tend to score higher on reading tests when their schools have well developed library media center programs, particularly when librarians collaborate with classroom teachers (Iowa 2002), student test scores were higher the more time librarians worked cooperatively with classroom teacher! s, the more they taught information literacy independently, and the more they provided inservice training to teachers (Pennsylvania 2000), and teachers were three times more likely to rate their literacy teaching as excellent when they collaborated with librarians (Idaho 2009). Another factor contributing to student achievement is parental involvement. Research on family involvement has found that parents of low socioeconomic status and minority urban parents who are involved in schools have been responsive to services that provide them with opportunities to maintain or enhance their parenting capacity (Howland 2006). In order to truly create a library for all, we have been developing a small “Parenting” collection focusing on parenting skills, child development, literacy, and family activities and fun. We wish to build this into a strong parent resource. Parental involvement at our school has recently taken a big upswing centered on family literacy events (Brad Lander attended our Seussprise Party) and workshops sponsored by our library. Youth Youth Youth Lander Brewer Ignizio PTA of Public School 32K Public School 75M Parent Teacher Association, Ltd. Public School 42 Summer Fun Camp 73-1721398 * 13-3497284 13-6400434 $3,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y To fund an Afterschool Program serves the PS75 elementary school community by providing recreational childcare. Self-sustaining (non-profit)recreational summer camp which serves all students ages 4-11. We respectfully request a 20,000 grant in support of our Paint Club program in your district. Each year, working with 700 underperforming public school students and 2,400 corporate and community volunteers, we transform struggling schools and nearby under-resourced community facilities. We paint dignity and respect in schools, homeless shelters, health clinics, NYCHA community centers, and police precincts. While visibly revitalizing schools and neighborhoods, we put high-risk students on a path to becoming productive citizens and members of our workforce We respectfully request a 20,000 grant in support of our Paint Club program in your district. Each year, working with 700 underperforming public school students and 2,400 corporate and community volunteers, we transform struggling schools and nearby under-resourced community facilities. We paint dignity and respect in schools, homeless shelters, health clinics, NYCHA community centers, and police precincts. While visibly revitalizing schools and neighborhoods, we put high-risk students on a path to becoming productive citizens and members of our workforce. PIP is providing out of school services in the arts for students in the neighborhood of Brooklyn College including P.S. 217. Students will explore Flips Fantastic Journals with author-illustrator Angelo DeCesare. They will create puppets and book arts projects based on the characters in his books.

Youth

Gennaro

Publicolor Inc

13-3912768

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Jackson

Publicolor, Inc.

13-3912768

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Williams

Puppetry In Practice, Inc.

11-3228052

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 115 of 151

FY 2012 Schedule C

Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Mealy

Purelements: An Evolution in Dance, Inc.

20-5332584

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Purelements Project AIRE Program: Purelements developed Project AIRE: Artistic Influences, Revitalizing Education to pinpoint and implement the positive effect art education has on stimulating and enhancing student achievement in NYCDOE public schools. This arts education program is designed to use multiple art forms that enhance artistic skill, classroom performance and influence global citizenship. Through partnerships with Purelements’ teaching artists and the school staff and administrators, a customized arts curriculum is built to effectively serve the schools population. A diverse selection of program themes within Project AIRE have provided schools with enriching supports during and after school, and helped direct student success over the past five years through a rigorous instruction methodology that connects each participants physical, artistic, cultural and academic pursuits. Our After School Program currently serves 60 students in and around the Crown Heights Brooklyn Community. We would use the funds given to us to purchase additional computers, a smartboard, computer supplies software and classroom equipment. Our After School Program currently serves 60 students in and around the Crown Heights Brooklyn Community. We provide After School care which include Tutoring services, home work assistance, computer workshops training, art craft activities etc. We would use the funds given to us to purchase additional computers, a smart board, computer supplies software, classroom equipment etc. We provide baseball youth programs for the summer. we trained and play conpetive baseball in the summer Funding is requested to partially cover costs associated with this program including transportation for mentors and children, access to weekly excursion events, cameras, bookstore certificates, etc. The College covers all overhead and supervisory positions and raises the remaining funds from private sector sources. This program provides the children with a safe place for continuing to learn after the regular school day is over, therefore helping to alleviate latch key problems for children and parents. QCCC is committed to directing youngsters energies in a more positive manner of social interaction with peers and parents. Funding will be used to sustain staffing at Generation Q, a drop in center for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth and their allies. Funding will be used to provide 4 free SAT preparation classes and college counseling drop-in hours with a trained college counselor; referral services for youth employment To support Pride not Prejudice educational outreach theater company. To fund Pride not Prejudice which is an educational outreach theater company. We are requesting funding to bring our Pride Not Prejudice awareness presentations back to Queens. Pride not prejudice presentations bring awareness into schools using theater and honesty to workshop issues affecting our students. We have six presentations covering HIV and STDs, Addiction, Homophobia and racial discrimination, Sex and teen pregnancy and bullying. Pride not Prejudice is our educational outreach theater company, founded in 2007 having documented proof of success. We will bring a combination of our presentations to schools into your district. J-CAP provided successful youth criminal justice diversion/dropout prevention services for over 15 years in high need SE Queens areas. Seeking funding to renew alternative to CJ diversion linkage w/ local precincts and schools;family mediation;conflict resolution;tutoring;GED/Voc.Ed.; socialization activities, and family unification services.

Youth

Eugene

Q Kingdom Ministries, Inc.

11-3201956

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth

James Dilan Reyna

Q Kingdom Ministries, Inc. Quebradillas Baseball Organization, Inc. Quebradillas Baseball Organization, Inc.

11-3201956 45-0491693 * 45-0491693 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y $9,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Gennaro

Queens College Foundation, Inc.

11-6080521 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Gennaro Dromm

Queens Community Civic Corporation Queens Community House, Inc.

22-2183327 11-2375583

$8,500 DYCD-Y $15,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth

Koslowitz Arroyo Chin

Queens Community House, Inc. Queens Lesbian and Gay Pride Committee, Inc. Queens Lesbian and Gay Pride Committee, Inc.

11-2375583 11-3146598 11-3146598

$24,000 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ferreras

Queens Lesbian and Gay Pride Committee, Inc.

11-3146598

$7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mendez

Queens Lesbian and Gay Pride Committee, Inc.

11-3146598

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Wills

Queens Village Committee for Mental Health for J-CAP Inc

11-2140888 *

$15,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 116 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Koo

Rachel Carson Community Association, Inc.

11-3368609

$8,000 DYCD-Y

Funds are used for Homework Assistant, Sports, ESL and Computer classes. The center is staffed by volunteers, teachers and professional substance abuse counselors who provide counseling and referrals to youth at-risk as needed. The Raider Youth Football Organization builds character in children 6-16 through the ideas of good citizenship, sportsmanship, honesty, loyalty, courage, respect and fellowship while keeping the welfare of the children foremost and free of ambition for personal glory. We teach the love of the sport and the skills necessary to participate fully and competitively in a program designed to strengthen the individual both physically and mentally. Rainbow After School Program, Inc. wants to expand one of our programs, “Rainbow’s Fun with Science”. The students will conduct various experiments from making a garden journal sketchbook, to making a mechanical object move. Rainbows Fun with Science will service a minimum of 150 students. To provide educational programs for children. Reach Out and Read of Greater New York (ROR GNY) prepares Americas youngest children to succeed in school by partnering with doctors to prescribe books and encourage families to read together. ROR GNY is requesting support to sustain ROR GNY program sites in the Council Members District through the purchase of new, developmentally and culturally ageappropriate childrens books for families living in poverty. Funds requested will be used to purchase 4,651 books. Reach Out and Read of Greater New York (ROR GNY) prepares Americas youngest children to succeed in school by partnering with doctors to prescribe books and encourage families to read together. ROR GNY is requesting support to sustain ROR GNY program sites in the Council Members District through the purchase of new, developmentally and culturally ageappropriate childrens books for families living in poverty. Funds requested will be used to purchase 4,651 books. ROR GNY is requesting support to sustain ROR GNY program sites in the Council Members District through the purchase of new, developmentally and culturally, age-appropriate books for families living in poverty. Funds requested will be used to purchase 4,651 books. The mission of Reach Out and Read of Greater New York (ROR GNY) is to prepare Americas youngest children to succeed in school by partnering with doctors to prescribe books and encourage families to read together. ROR GNY is requesting support to sustain ROR GNY program sites in the Council Members District through the purchase of new, developmentally and culturally, age-appropriate books for families living in poverty. Funds requested will be used to purchase 4,651 books. Reach Out and Read of Greater New York (ROR GNY) mission is to help America’s youngest children to succeed in school by partnering with doctors to prescribe books and encourage families to read together. ROR GNY is requesting support to sustain ROR GNY program sites in the Council Member’s District through the purchase of new, developmentally and culturally age appropriate childrens books for families living in poverty. Funds requested will be used to purchase 4,651 books. Our Agency provides service that assist the summer youth as well as edcuational service, and annual community trips.

Youth

Halloran

Raider Youth Football, Inc.

20-0111495 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Palma Greenfield

Rainbow After School Programs, Inc. Reach for the Stars Learning Center

13-3716492 * 20-3042280

$18,214 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Dickens

Reach Out and Read of Greater New York, Inc.

13-4080045

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Jackson

Reach Out and Read of Greater New York, Inc.

13-4080045

$4,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koo

Reach Out and Read of Greater New York, Inc.

13-4080045

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Levin

Reach Out and Read of Greater New York, Inc.

13-4080045

$4,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Mendez Reyna

Reach Out and Read of Greater New York, Inc. Reaching Across the World Ministries

13-4080045 11-3572515 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 117 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth Youth

Arroyo Cabrera Mark-Viverito

Reading Excellence and Discovery (READ) Foundation, Inc. Reading Excellence and Discovery (READ) Foundation, Inc. Reading Excellence and Discovery (READ) Foundation, Inc.

13-4091062 13-4091062 13-4091062

$5,000 DYCD-Y $20,000 DYCD-Y $7,000 DYCD-Y

Since 2000, the Reading Excellence and Discovery (READ) Foundation has helped over 8,750 kindergarten and first grade students improve their reading skills by a full year. An independent longitudinal study has found that the majority of READ students continue on grade level through the third grade proving that success starts early. At the same time, READ has provided more than 6,300 teens with meaningful community service and employment opportunities. This year, we will serve over 1,200 students and employ more than 850 teens in partnership with more than 30 schools and community based organizations. Support from the New York City Council will help keep READ affordable, by helping defray the cost of compensation for tutors, teachers and READ staff and program supplies and materials, READ provides a targeted literacy intervention for kindergarten and first grade students, who have been identified by their teachers as struggling with learning to read. READ trains tutors to apply a structured research-based one-to-one tutoring program over the course of 50 sessions. To ensure success, students are individually assessed for appropriate placement within the curriculum and progress at their own pace. Tutors must attend and actively participate in a 2.5 hour long training prior to beginning instruction. READ’s staff trains tutors on the principles and guidelines of the curriculum, our data collection system and strategies for working with young students. Our program combines 45 minutes of one-to-one tutoring with 45 minutes of homework help for a total of 1.5 hours each day for 50 days. Summer programs run for 3.5 hours each day and consist of two 45 minute tutoring sessions and two sessions of literacy enrichment. Two teachers facilitate the program at each school. They receive training in curriculum, methodology and analysis of student progress data. READ site coordinators make regular visits to ensure consistency. Funds will help keep READ affordable, by helping defray the cost of compensation for tutors, teachers and READ staff. To support educational programming to help East Harlem children improve their reading skills. Support from the New York City Council will help keep READ affordable, by helping defray the cost of compensation for tutors, teachers and READ staff and program supplies and materials, READ provides a targeted literacy intervention for kindergarten and first grade students, who have been identified by their teachers as struggling with learning to read To fund an in-school teacher-training program that teaches public elementary-school teachers in New York City to teach reading, writing, and spelling. Funding will support reading proficiency training and lesson materials for teachers instructing students in grades k-3 in participating Manhattan schools. Funding will support the Asthma Free School Zone and Smoke-free Is Smart program in eight local public schools in order to prevent and reduce tobacco use through assistance to the schools, including a curriculum for students and parents and staff development. Like our well-established 165-school Asthma Free School Zone core program, our Smoke-free Is Smart program uses a school-wide approach to protect health by preventing and reducing tobacco use.

Youth Youth Youth

Palma Brewer Garodnick

Reading Excellence and Discovery (READ) Foundation, Inc. Reading Reform Foundation of New York Reading Reform Foundation of New York

13-4091062 13-3081223 13-3081223

$3,500 DYCD-Y $2,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Garodnick

Real World Foundation, Inc.

57-1147217

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mendez

Real World Foundation, Inc.

57-1147217

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 118 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Wills

Recreational Inner-City Sports and Recreation (RISE)

11-3168473

$6,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Gonzalez

Red Hook Initiative, Inc.

20-3904662

$7,214 DYCD-Y

Recreational and Educational Services includng the following: Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Gang Awareness Prevention Violence Reduction Mentoring Fatherhood Program Funding will be used to support our Education Advocate and academic enrichment programming for youth from the Red Hook Houses. RHI will provide tutoring services daily from 3:30pm - 7:00pm Monday through Thursday and from 3:30pm - 6pm on Fridays throughout the school year. Summer programs will focus on academic enrichment and hands-on learning. Over the course of the fiscal year, RHI will serve over 200 youth with academic enrichment, educational advocacy, college readiness programming, and homework help. TREA, Teens for Racial and Ethnic Awakening (TREA), is a program run for teens by teens during after-school hours (on Thursdays from 6:00-8:00 PM and the teen mentors meet on various other days right after school, from 3:15-5:15.) In TREA, teens and young adults talk about issues that relate to their lives and that help to improve inter-group relations in their neighborhoods. It is a group that tries to create a comfortable environment where young people can freely express themselves, learn about others cultures, and explore issues at the local, national, and global levels. TREA, Teens for Racial and Ethnic Awakening (TREA), is a program run for teens by teens during after-school hours (on Thursdays from 6:00-8:00 PM and the teen mentors meet on various other days right after school, from 3:15-5:15.) In TREA, teens and young adults talk about issues that relate to their lives and that help to improve inter-group relations in their neighborhoods. It is a group that tries to create a comfortable environment where young people can freely express themselves, learn about others cultures, and explore issues at the local, national, and global levels. Funding will support core services for families with children with disabilities and the service providers who support them, including trainings, direct services, information and referral services and advocacy. Our program is designed to impact, empower and impart knowledge to our youth my means of job training, mentoring, tutoring, music and general life application skills. Through these means we we will empower our youth to be self sufficient, responsible adults and leaders of tomorow. A boys and girls youth sports program.. we have Swimming, Softball, Baksetball and Track. Ages from 5yrs old to 19yrs old. we have in-house programs and participate in CYO and other local sports leagues. Funds will be utilized towards the purchase uniforms and baseball equipment for the respective teams of our organization. Annual Children's Basketball Tournament The Ridgewood Bushwick Youth Center is requesting funds for general operating support needed for our Center. To provide Instuctional,Minors, Majors, Seniors, we purchase baseballs,softballs, uniforms and equipment for the teams. Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/ba Millennium Development

Youth

Dromm

Renaissance Charter School, The

11-3550391

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ferreras

Renaissance Charter School, The

11-3550391

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Garodnick

Resources for Children with Special Needs, Inc.

11-2594790

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Wills

Resurrection Celebration Center Inc., The

11-3507969 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth

Fidler Ferreras Oddo Dilan Crowley

Resurrection Sports Association Reyes D'Oleo Baseball League, Inc. Richard Willis Memorial Fund Ridgewood Bushwick Senior Citizens Council, Inc. Ridgewood, Glendale, Middle Village, Maspeth Little League

11-1635113 * 26-1870774 13-3949376 * 11-2453853 * 90-0147560

$2,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $4,000 DYCD-Y $75,000 DYCD-Y $12,000 DYCD-Y

11-3199040

Youth Discretionary

Page 119 of 151

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Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

STREB requests funding from CouncilPurpose of FundsLevin to support the company’s Member Stephen ACTION CLUB, a once-monthly interactive evening event for teens held at the company’s home space, the STREB LAB FOR ACTION MECHANICS (SLAM) located in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. ACTION CLUB is directly aligned with the concept, spirit and energy of the company and its home space, SLAM. Describing her vision, Streb has said, “SLAM allows us to experiment with action, format, structure, time and community. SLAM occupies a former garage; the modern day incubator for many American inventions and discoveries -- rock roll, hi tech hardware and software; a place where people feel free to experiment, fix that which is broken or even wreck in the service of creation.” STREB feels that given the culture it has developed at SLAM, it has something truly unique to offer adolescents and teens. In response, it designed the ACTION CLUB, a skill building and social networking program, offering young adults, in an environment that is both safe but values risk-taking and the pushing of boundaries, an outlet for physical activity and a chance to engage with others from diverse backgrounds. During each ACTION CLUB session, participants learn action moves, have opportunities for guided sessions on trapeze and trampoline, produce music, take photos, create video. Food, beverages and a DJ add to the club atmosphere. STREB’s goals for ACTION CLUB are to: • ngage a diverse group of 13 to 16 year olds; e • ave teens participate in live-time action, having positive physical, artistic, and social h interactions, thereby addressing a need for physical and art education; • reate a “special” for teenagers to gather; c • rovide a platform for teens to achieve their “personal best,” to become innovators and p inventors; Riverdale Community Center, Inc. is seeking support for its free comprehensive out-of-school time programs which offers a wide variety of academic, remedial, social, cultural and recreational opportunities for over 250 under-served, urban youth in the Nor Educational, recreational and fitness programs includes singing science and sports The RNH Teen Program will help youth build the foundations for their educational and professional futures while gaining meaningful social experiences. Tutoring and homework assistance will be provided to school children with volunteers from local high sc

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Levin

Ringside, Inc.

13-3268549

$7,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Koppell Koppell

Riverdale Community Center, Inc. Riverdale Jewish Center

13-2899410 13-1880804

$10,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koppell

Riverdale Neighborhood House, Inc.

13-1740024 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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Council Member

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EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds Music Memory, Riverside Symphony’s widely valued educational program, is a direct outgrowth of the orchestra’s mission to bring quality music to the widest possible audience. Designed to combat a deficit of high quality arts-education curricula in New York City public schools, particularly in underserved areas, Music Memory, launched in 1999, has addressed this dearth by serving 6,000 to 10,000 third- through sixth-grade students annually.

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Its goals aligned with the Blueprint, Music Memory is designed to help children 1. Listen and respond actively to music 2. Acquire knowledge of music terms 3. Learn about composers, their times and the cultural significance of their music 4. Make connections to other disciplines 5. Enjoy a meaningful cultural experience with their classmates The program seeks to impart focused listening skills through exposure to 16 carefully selected and diverse pieces. Guided by their music teachers, students engage in a wide range of artistic activities including creative and structured movement, singing, and performing on rhythm and melody instruments. As the children learn about the structure and instrumentation of each piece, they delight in their newly acquired ability to identify the works and their composers upon hearing only brief excerpts. Schools participating in the program are invited to send five-member teams (along with classmate cheering sections) to participate in the annual Citywide Finals Competition, a name-that-tune-type event in which students identify the works and composers they have studied on the basis of excerpts performed onstage by Riverside Symphony. To view a video that features excerpts from last year’s Citywide Finals, please visit http://vimeo.com/13243886. Riverside Symphony also provides free specialized training sessions for all music teachers who participate in the program. These professional development workshops are led by master-teacher Paula Bing, who has worked extensively with the Blueprint. Baseball program provided for youth of ages 4-17y.o. Also free program for middle schools in the Williamsburg and Bushwick sections of Brooklyn. Provide travel baseball for under privilaged youths of Williamsburg and Bushwick. provide free baseball programs for middle schools in brooklyn. provide travel baseball for under privlaged youths of ages 4-17 in williamsburg and bushwick Rochdale Village Social Service Youh Programming is designed to provide safe recreational youth activities at Community Center

Youth

Rodriguez

Riverside Symphony, Inc.

13-3168350 *

$3,500 DCA

Youth Youth Youth

Levin Reyna Wills

Roberto Clemente Little League, Inc. Roberto Clemente Little League, Inc. Rochdale Village Social Services, Inc.

11-3291220 * 11-3291220 * 11-3397470

$8,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $15,000 DYCD-Y

Begun in 1998, kidsmART is the only free arts-based after-school program located in Rockaway. Five days per week, at two sites, kidsmART provides an alternative to gang activity, loitering, violence and delinquency. kidsmART after-school program provides services for over 400 Rockaway children annually. The program offers art education and academic assistance and is licensed by the NYS Office of Children and Family Services. RAA offers art education to children and adults in a variety of mediums, including but not limited to, digital photography, painting, creative writing, culinary arts and furniture design. Finally, RAA hosts 8-10 art exhibits annually. Exhibits are housed in the sTudios 6 7 galleries and are open to the public for free. The artwork of local and international artists are displayed. Youth Ulrich Rockaway Artists Alliance, Inc. 11-3217121 $15,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 121 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Sanders

Rockaway Ravens Sports, Inc.

20-0132418

$3,500 DYCD-Y

The purpose of the funding is to help the underpriveledge children of the Rockaway community to be apart of a great organization. The children would be taught the fundamentals of sportsmanship, leadership and discipline through sports. The funding would help to pay for the uniforms and equipment for the youth as well as help towards their traveling to their away or long distance games. RMH NY is a 24-hour facility that provides temporary housing to pediatric cancer patients and their families. In addition to temporary housing, we provide Education Programs, Family Support Programs, Daily Volunteer Activity Program for Families, Camp Ronald - Summer Day Camp; laundry facilities on each guest floor, four kitchens, dining area, living room area, chapel, two terraces, one atrium, playroom and two computer rooms. Rosedale Little League provides baseball and softball for children ages 5-17 for the children in the community of Rosedale, Cambria Heights, Laurelton and Springfield Gardens. We offer the opportunity to learn the game of baseball and softball in a supervised, safe atmosphere, where the emphasis on knowledge and respect of the games, sportsmanship, respect for others and the ideal of fair play not matter what race, religion or disability. Funding from CM Mendez could offer a summer scholarship for two of those students

Youth

Lappin

Ronald McDonald House of New York, Inc.

13-2933654 *

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Sanders

Rosedale Little League Baseball, Inc.

52-1251209

$8,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mendez

Rosies Theater Kids Inc

33-1194964 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y Roundabout Theatre Company’s after-school program, Student Production Workshop (SPW), is designed for students who are most at risk of dropping out of high school. After school GED curriculum development, review and testing; basic computer training; scholarship awards for academic performance at college, high school and junior high; mentorship; counseling. To provide a summer camp where children can continue to develop social, personal, physical and creative skills. This is accomplished through a variety of activities such as sports, games, arts and crafts, and cooking etc. The children also take trips to the local park and movie theater. Snacks and drinks are also provided for the children. To provide sports training and competition through CYO and childrens clinics. Funding will support suicide prevention training for teachers, students and staff in Manhattan public schools. Each year, the Samuel Field YMYWHA works collaboratively with the community of MS 216 though its highly regarded and effective Beacon Program that provides a safety net and supportive services sysem to over 2500 youth and their families through a comprehensive and integrated community-school based model.

Youth

Lappin

Roundabout Theatre Company, Inc.

13-6192346

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Williams

Rugby Family Services

11-3223904

$8,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth

Crowley Crowley Garodnick

Sacred Heart School Sacred Heart School Samaritans of New York, Inc.

11-2202799 11-2202799 13-3164464

$5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Gennaro

Samuel Field YM & YWHA, Inc.

11-3071518

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 122 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Halloran Arroyo

Samuel Field YM & YWHA, Inc. Sauti Yetu Center for African Women

11-3071518 20-1209795

$12,000 DYCD-Y $15,000 DYCD-Y

The CAP Connects Program provides children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders and their families who reside in the greater Whitestone and Clearview communities with a comprehensive and multi-faceeted service delivery system that includes, after-school, weekend and school holiday programs, family suppport groups, family respite, entitilement counseling, advocacy, family holiday programs and trips, intergenerational programs, sibling support services, care giver support services, organized and inclusive sports leagues and social skills training. This program is uniquely designed to meet the complex and diverse needs of the over 100 children on the Autism Spetrum who participate annually. Each child is treated as an individual and is provided with the critical opportunity to reach and maximize their full potential within a responsive and acessible community-based infra-structure. The program also is designed to meet the needs of f! amilies who are faced with the difficult task of raising their children in an environment which generatres many challenges related to educational, behavioral, economic, emotional and child care issues. CAP Connects has earned recognition throughout the city and country as being a highly innovative and effective model of addressing the ever increasing need to serve children on the Spectrum and their families within the context of their own communities. To provide general operating support for its youth programming and services.

Youth

Foster

SCAN-New York Volunteer Parent - Aides Association, Inc.

13-2912963 *

$21,414 DYCD-Y

The SCAN Literacy Arts Program will couple the existing interests of young people in hip hop’s spoken word, dance forms, and drama, with their need to be build skills as writers, analytic thinkers, and thoughtful readers. The SCAN Literacy Arts Program will provide afterschool literacy arts classes as well as an intensive Saturday program. The program will take place at the Mullaly Park Academy Community Center located at 40 East 164th Street. The program will combine literacy development activities with hip hop performing arts instruction that will encourage young people to write, research history, work in drama and film-making, and develop visual arts pieces that resonant with their individual and group messages. The program will work with 3young people drawn from the South Bronx. The SCAN Literacy Arts Program will also build on existing SCAN programming including leadership development and violence prevention programming! , the Reach for the Stars college readiness initiative, as well as sports and recreational programming at its Mullaly Park Academy site. These combined services will create a comprehensive support network for its participants.

Youth Discretionary

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Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

We request 20,000 in total to support two programs: 12,000 for the teen evening program and 8,000 for Healthy Living Program. Teen Evening Program The evening program serves 60 teens in Williamsburg and Greenpoint. Activities include open gym, computer/media lab, socials events and community service. Events include movie nights and service and internship opportunities. By providing access to caring adults and positive activities, we provide a safe haven and nurture personal and social growth of teens. SSA also provides one of the only open spaces available that allows for a variety of physical activity in a neighborhood that sorely lacks green space and where the vast majority of schools lack quality gyms. Healthy Family Living Program The Healthy Living Program for parents and families is a new program launched in fall 2009. The New York City Department of Health Mental Hygiene’s Community Health Profile of the Williamsburg/Bushwick area indicates that residents exhibit high rates of obesity (28) and diabetes (14). The program will offer family-based workshops that focus on healthy cooking, eating and fitness education (zumba, yoga, etc.) for 20 to 30 families. Many of our families are strained financially and pressed for time and consequently find it difficult to model healthy living behaviors for their children. The six-week workshops will be offered in three cycles. Partner organizations include the Williamsburg Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and Innovative Wellness Education. Youth Reyna School Settlement Association, Inc. 11-1646304 $15,000 DYCD-Y The Science Schools Initiative teaches math, reading comprehension, logic, and test taking skills to low-income middle school students in Upper Manhattan and the South Bronx so they can gain entry to NYCs best public high schools and succeed at those schools. Over the course of the year, we tutor from the fundamentals in these subjects to ensure our students have a strong foundation up to the advanced techniques they need for the Specialized High Schools Admissions Test (SHSAT).

Youth

Rodriguez

Science Schools Initiative, Ltd.

20-8365360

$9,000 DYCD-Y

The Parent-Child Home program is a proven early literacy school readiness program that prepares children to succeed in school by developing language and pre-literacy skills in two and three year old toddlers. The program features home visits to reach families who are challenged by poverty, low levels of education, language and literacy barriers and other obstacles to healthy child development and educational success. Parents improve their verbal interaction with their children, strengthen their parenting skills, and learn that they are their child’s first and foremost teacher. Baby Me is a developmental playgroup that strengthens parent-child bonds and decreases isolation. The playgroups forge connections among families, creating and sustaining valuable parent networks within the community. Both programs give parents support, guidance and education to be attentive, nurturing and protective parents. Youth Mealy SCO Family of Services 11-2777066 $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 124 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Rose Arroyo

Seamen's Society for Children and Families SEBCO Development, Inc.

13-5563010 13-2944013

$8,000 DYCD-Y $8,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Vacca

Service Alliance for Youth, Inc.

13-3354150

$20,000 DYCD-Y

Seamens Family Day Care program has been in existence on Staten Island since 1970. The 35 family day care providers in the Network provide quality day care for children, infants to age 4 from 8am to 6pm. The program ensures that children are supervised by a trained and licensed family day care provider, receive structured, educational activities, healthy, nutritional meals and snacks. Funds will be used to purchase educational supplies, manipulative toys to enhance motor skills, educational and recreational trips for the children and day care equipment. Funds will be used to pay the salary of the full-time Camp Director for the SEBCO Summer Day Camp Program. Flag and tackle football and cheerleading for children 5 to 14 years old. Instruction in the techniques and skills for the above mentioned activities. Enhancement of social interaction and physical fitness. Program funding will support Sports and Culture Days hosted by Sesame Flyers International, to provide 200 youth who reside in CBs 17 18 with an opportunity to experience Caribbean culture through various activities and other presentations. These events promote teamwork, physical fitness and self confidence. Other activities and holiday celebrations will present Caribbean culture through performances of steel pan, African-Carbibbean dance and other forms of culture. Other activities include Steelpan Extravaganza which provides youth of various backgrounds and nationalities opportunities to gain self mastery as they learn to play the steel pan instrument and perform in community showcases to demonstrate the skills they have learned Program funding will support Sports and Culture Days hosted by Sesame Flyers International, to provide 200 youth who reside in CBs 17 18 with an opportunity to experience Caribbean culture through various activities and other presentations. These events promote teamwork, physical fitness and self confidence. Other activities and holiday celebrations will present Caribbean culture through performances of steel pan, African-Carbibbean dance and other forms of culture. Other activities include Steelpan Extravaganza which provides youth of various backgrounds and nationalities opportunities to gain self mastery as they learn to play the steel pan instrument and perform in community showcases to demonstrate the skills they have learned To provide free weekend tickets for needy children and families to attend The Shadow Box Theatre’s “shadow puppets-&-people” musical, . Were a non-for-profit foundation that caters to youth ages 13-19 in the area of education and socialization. Organized activities (e.g)male and female mentoring, trips, sports, dance, arts and crafts as well as help with home work.

Youth

Eugene

Sesame Flyers International, Inc.

11-2692485

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Mealy Brewer

Sesame Flyers International, Inc. Shadow Box Theatre, Inc., The

11-2692485 13-2725580

$10,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mealy

Shannon T Braithwaite, Inc.

26-4085306 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth Youth

Lander Greenfield Crowley

Shema Kolainu - Hear Our Voices Shmira Civilian Volunteer Patrol of Boro Park, Inc. Shooting Stars of Queens, Inc.

11-3503085 11-3260405 * 20-0019695

$7,000 DYCD-Y $15,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y

Art and Music Program: One of the serious problems children with autism face is sensory integration dysfunction (DSI), a barrier to their ability to process information and interpret the external world. DSI may cause a misperception of touch and/or pain (hyper- or hyposensitive) and self-imposed isolation, general irritability, distractibility, frustration and hyperactivity, influencing speech/communication, academic acuity and physical dexterity. Children with DSI respond well to sensory stimulation therapy, such as art and activities that require touch, hearing and aromas. Art and Music is used in many ways to stimulate responses, teach children to interact with each other and their environment, and calm the child who is hyperactive and easily over-stimulated. Art therapy is part of an open-ended, multi-sensory experience for our children that can radically change behaviors and produce amazing outcomes. Children with autism and sensory integration disorder (DSI) are often repelled by textured foods, unable to wear a garment because it causes pain, experience neurological over-stimulation that may prevent sleep and cause unexpected behaviors; DSI affects movement and balance, perception of body positioning, movement of muscles and joints and fine motor control. This grant will help us help these children overcome these problems while developing an appreciation for the arts – music, painting, movement and creative expression, using a variety of sensory therapeutic objects and experiences. Since art therapy is an allied health profession, it is used to encourage development in social/emotional, cognitive/learning, and perceptual-motor areas. The arts provide a wide variety of functional opportunities for the exceptional child, adolescent and adult in medical, institutional and educational settings because they are nonverbal forms of communication. The money would be used to provide our students with tools, equipment and supplies for art and music therapy Program by volunteer safety organization to train children in public safety including funding for a bicycle etching day program. To support a Girls basketball program that participates in AAU tournaments in the tri-state area.

Youth

Levin

Smack Mellon Studios Inc

11-3375393 *

$4,500 DYCD-Y

Our Summer Arts Intensive provides an opportunity for up to fifteen atrisk students aged 1215 to gain a comprehensive understanding of the many disciplines that make up the visual arts. This four-week art-making program will take place in August 2012. To select the program participants, Smack Mellon will advertise the program to students at local public schools in Brooklyn and Queens, particularly those high schools who are also participating in our Art Ready program. Our Programs Manager visits the schools and gives presentations about the program to actively recruit students and we will work with faculty and school administrators to inform as many students as possible about this opportunity, and together we will actively recruit applicants. Fifteen students from a variety of NYC neighborhoods including Brownsville, Bedford-Stuyvesant, Crown Heights, East New York, Harlem and the Bronx participated this past summer. Participating students will get hands-on experience working in painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, film, video and photography with support from exceptional professional artists, and also have an opportunity to exhibit their work to the public at Smack Mellon. Teaching artists who have participated in the past include: photographer Jessica Ann Peavy, installation artist Sonya Blesofsky, painter David Ellis, and media artist Michael Paul Britto. Artists are paid a stipend of 1200 per week for their work. The strength of this program is its multi-prong approach to teaching kids about making art; each stage of the program builds upon the last and advances learning.

Youth Discretionary

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Eugene

Society for Haitian Research, Inc.

11-3439457 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

This program is intended to serve the youth between the ages of 13-21 in the following areas: Language Fluency, Technological skills, social skills, respect for self, others, and community. It will help them acquire needed skills such as problem solving, and using specific protocols that help to promote civility. Issues involving teenage pregnancy, school exemplary performance, recreation, work, school and parental relationships, will be among the workshops that will be available on an ongoing basis.This program also intends to fill in a language and skill gap among teens and will target newly arrived immigrant teens to develop their awareness of leadership opportunities and cultural attraction that the city and their neighborhoods offer. Overview: Weeksville Heritage Center is a historic site and community cultural center that preserves the legacy of a free African American community founded in 1838. Historic Weeksville residents built their own schools, businesses, and mutual aid societies to spur economic development among African Americans. Since 1971, our organization has been a stabilizing force in Central Brooklyn; most recently this has manifested in a new 30 million Education and Cultural Arts Building. When the building opens in early 2012, it will provide unprecedented access to high caliber performing and visual arts, and will bring additional jobs and amenities to underserved Central Brooklyn residents. The new building will be a cornerstone of community development for Crown Heights. Use of Funds: Weeksville Heritage Center requests funds to support our core education, arts, and preservation programs, including: • istoric House Tours: given to public and independent school groups throughout the year. H • rtist Residency Programs for High School Students: in Past Forward students learn the A architectural history of Bedford-Stuyvesant Weeksville over 10 weeks. The residency culminates in an exhibition of student-created audio walking tour podcasts, architectural drawings, clay models, and still photographs. In Reading Remix students read and analyze a work of literature and learn graphic design skills to create visual representations of their literary interpretations. • reen Weeksville: environmental, gardening and nutrition education for elementary G students at PS 243 and high school students at Boys Girls High School. Both programs utilize Weeksville’s on-site Kitchen Garden as an outdoor classroom. • he Garden Party: a free summer evening concert series that includes craft food and film T screenings, each Saturday in July. • amily Day Harvest Festivals: all-day celebrations with workshops, activities, and local F vendors that happen in August and November annually. To provide bilingual theater and educational experiences to children in the 43rd Council District. Through its School Community Partnerships, Third Street seeks to develop quality arts education programs that allow students to achieve the following outcomes: 1.) to learn to sing, play an instrument or dance; 2.) to perform; 3.) to gain an understanding of the fundamentals of music or dance; and 4.) in the process of achieving the first three goals, to experience the joy of artistic expression and achievement through the arts. The Songs of Love Foundation’s (SOL) mission is to bring joy, alleviate suffering and provide uplifting, personalized songs of love on CD for children coping with life-threatening illness and lifetime disability. A “song of love” is recorded onto a CD in the childs favorite style of music and preferred language, with with lyrics celebrating their favorite activities and people they love.

Youth Youth

Vann Gentile

Society for the Preservation of Weeksville and BedfordStuyvesant History Society of the Educational Arts, Inc. (SEA)

23-7330454 11-3210593

$10,000 DYCD-Y $3,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mendez

Society of the Third Street Music School Settlement, Inc.

13-5596825

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koslowitz

Songs of Love Foundation

11-3314191

$1,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 127 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Weprin Crowley

Songs of Love Foundation South Asian Youth Action

11-3314191 13-3943630

$5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

The Songs of Love Foundation’s (SOL) mission is to bring joy, alleviate suffering and provide uplifting, personalized songs of love on CD for children coping with life-threatening illness and lifetime disability. A “song of love” is recorded onto a CD in the childs favorite style of music and preferred language, with with lyrics celebrating their favorite activities and people they love. To offer Academic and College Acces, Leadership Development, Art, Sports, and Counseling to asian youth. SAYA! is the only organization in nation dedicated to providing non-sectarian comprehensive youth development services to South Asian youth. We offer: Academic and College Access (SAT Prep, tutoring, college guidance, job readiness), Leadership Development (co-ed and girls only), Art (dance, photography), Sports, and Counseling SAYA! is the only organization in nation dedicated to providing non-sectarian comprehensive youth development services to South Asian youth. We offer: Academic and College Access (SAT Prep, tutoring, college guidance, job readiness), Leadership Development (co-ed and girls only), Art (dance, photography), Sports, and Counseling SAYA! is the only organization in nation dedicated to providing non-sectarian comprehensive youth development services to South Asian youth. We offer: Academic and College Access (SAT Prep, tutoring, college guidance, job readiness), Leadership Development (co-ed and girls only), Art (dance, photography), Sports, and Counseling SAYA! is the only organization in nation dedicated to providing non-sectarian comprehensive youth development services to South Asian youth. We offer: Academic and College Access (SAT Prep, tutoring, college guidance, job readiness), Leadership Development (co-ed and girls only), Art (dance, photography), Sports, and Counseling SAYA! is the only organization in nation dedicated to providing non-sectarian comprehensive youth development services to South Asian youth. We offer: Academic and College Access (SAT Prep, tutoring, college guidance, job readiness), Leadership Development (co-ed and girls only), Art (dance, photography), Sports, and Counseling

Youth

Dromm

South Asian Youth Action

13-3943630

$9,750 DYCD-Y

Youth

Greenfield

South Asian Youth Action

13-3943630

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koslowitz

South Asian Youth Action

13-3943630

$4,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Weprin

South Asian Youth Action

13-3943630

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Wills

South Asian Youth Action

13-3943630

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

The funds will be used to support, develop, and sustain South Bronx Uniteds Education Through Soccer Program. South Bronx Uniteds activities serve at-risk youth by using soccer as a hook to engage youth and turn them towards a focus on their education, their character and leadership skills, and their health and wellness. The Education Through Soccer program directly addresses students’ academic needs and personal and leadership development. Youth who participate in the Travel Soccer Program are required to attend an After School Tutoring program, which operates five days a week. Students work with volunteer tutors on homework, study skills, and test preparation. The program also plays an essential role in providing youth with a positive environment to spend afterschool time, an alternative to the streets. In fact, afterschool between 3 and 6 pm is the most common time for youth to commit crimes or become victims of crime and to smoke, drink or use drugs (Fight Crime Invest in Kids, 2007). The After School Tutoring program complements the College Prep Program where the goal is to increase college awareness, improve college preparation, assist with graduation requirements, and assure students’ admission into college. Program activities include college nights, campus visits, test preparation, and college application assistance and counseling. South Bronx United also assists with secondary school placement having helped place students in schools depending on their unique needs and situations, including the Manhattan Country School and English Language Learners and International Support (ELLIS) Preparatory Academy. The Character Development Program helps youth develop leadership skills through events, workshops, and forums. These programs are the key to ensuring all youth graduate high school and attend college. South Brooklyn Youth Consortium Coney Goes Green STEEM initiative which is to have urban youth especially girls and minorities increase their proficiency in Science,Technology, Engineering, Entrepreneurship and Math, actively engage in formal and informal STEEM activities, pursue careers in the fields of Science, and to use Science to shape a better world and a healthy planet. The SQBGC after-school and summer program serves youth ages 6-18. Services include homework help and tutoring, technology, social recreation, sports and athletics and youth development. We also offer specialized programs in martial arts, film club, robotics, SAT and College Prep as well as fine and performing arts. The SQBGC after-school and summer program serves youth ages 6-18. Services include homework help and tutoring, technology, social recreation, sports and athletics and youth development. We also offer specialized programs in martial arts, film club, robotics, SAT and College Prep as well as fine and performing arts. The SQBGC after-school and summer program serves youth ages 6-18. Services include homework help and tutoring, technology, social recreation, sports and athletics and youth development. We also offer specialized programs in martial arts, film club, robotics, SAT and College Prep as well as fine and performing arts.

Youth

Foster

South Bronx United Soccer Club Inc

26-4064041 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Recchia

South Brooklyn Youth Consortium, Inc.

03-0387372

$75,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koslowitz

South Queens Boys and Girls Club, Inc.

11-1966067

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Ulrich

South Queens Boys and Girls Club, Inc.

11-1966067

$50,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Weprin

South Queens Boys and Girls Club, Inc.

11-1966067

$5,714 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

1.Memebership in USA Wrestling (includes insurance coverage for members competing in the USA Wrestlingsantioned clubs and events) 2.A coaching staff certified by USA Wrestling, first aid and CPR training 3.Instructions in the wrestling techniques used by todays elite scholastic, collegaite, and Olympic competitiors 4.A regimen for achieving physical conditioning 5.Stratgies for performing under pressure 6.Methods for setting and achieiving goals 7.Healthy weight management practies 8.An alternative to unproductive activities(video games,hanging out,gang involvement and unwed teem pregnancy 10.Enhanced self assurance Youth Wills Southeast Queens Kids Wrestling Association 11-3827161 $12,000 DYCD-Y The enrichment and expansion of two New York City Council-funded programs: 1) the City Council Sports and Arts Summer Camp program (providing free sports and fitness, visual and performing arts, and academic enrichment activities to underserved children) and 2) the C.H.A.M.P.S. Middle School Sports and Fitness League for NYC public schools. The enrichment and expansion of two New York City Council-funded programs: 1) the City Council Sports and Arts Summer Camp program (providing free sports and fitness, visual and performing arts, and academic enrichment activities to underserved children) and 2) the C.H.A.M.P.S. Middle School Sports and Fitness League for NYC public schools. To support sports and fitness programming to underserved youth and public school students. The enrichment and expansion of two New York City Council-funded programs: 1) the City Council Sports and Arts Summer Camp program (providing free sports and fitness, visual and performing arts, and academic enrichment activities to underserved children) and 2) the C.H.A.M.P.S. Middle School Sports and Fitness League for NYC public schools. The enrichment and expansion of two New York City Council-funded programs: 1) the City Council Sports and Arts Summer Camp program (providing free sports and fitness, visual and performing arts, and academic enrichment activities to underserved children) and 2) the C.H.A.M.P.S. Middle School Sports and Fitness League for NYC public schools. The enrichment and expansion of two New York City Council-funded programs: 1) the City Council Sports and Arts Summer Camp program (providing free sports and fitness, visual and performing arts, and academic enrichment activities to underserved children) and 2) the C.H.A.M.P.S. Middle School Sports and Fitness League for NYC public schools. The enrichment and expansion of two New York City Council-funded programs: 1) the City Council Sports and Arts Summer Camp program (providing free sports and fitness, visual and performing arts, and academic enrichment activities to underserved children) and 2) the C.H.A.M.P.S. Middle School Sports and Fitness League for NYC public schools. The enrichment and expansion of two New York City Council-funded programs: 1) the City Council Sports and Arts Summer Camp program (providing free sports and fitness, visual and performing arts, and academic enrichment activities to underserved children) and 2) the C.H.A.M.P.S. Middle School Sports and Fitness League for NYC public schools. Summer Camp Program The enrichment and expansion of two New York City Council-funded programs: 1) the City Council Sports and Arts Summer Camp program (providing free sports and fitness, visual and performing arts, and academic enrichment activities to underserved children) and 2) the C.H.A.M.P.S. Middle School Sports and Fitness League for NYC public schools.

Youth

Gennaro

Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation, Inc.

11-3112635

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Halloran Gentile

Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation, Inc. Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation, Inc.

11-3112635 11-3112635 *

$7,500 DYCD-Y $2,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koo

Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation, Inc.

11-3112635 *

$6,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koslowitz

Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation, Inc.

11-3112635 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Levin

Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation, Inc.

11-3112635 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Mealy

Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation, Inc.

11-3112635 *

$10,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Mendez Oddo

Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation, Inc. Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation, Inc.

11-3112635 * 11-3112635 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Palma

Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation, Inc.

11-3112635 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 130 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Quinn

Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation, Inc.

11-3112635 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

The enrichment and expansion of two New York City Council-funded programs: the City Council Sports and Arts Summer Camp program the C.H.A.M.P.S. Middle School Sports and Fitness League for NYC public schools. The enrichment and expansion of two New York City Council-funded programs: 1) the City Council Sports and Arts Summer Camp program (providing free sports and fitness, visual and performing arts, and academic enrichment activities to underserved children) and 2) the C.H.A.M.P.S. Middle School Sports and Fitness League for NYC public schools. The enrichment and expansion of two New York City Council-funded programs: 1) the City Council Sports and Arts Summer Camp program (providing free sports and fitness, visual and performing arts, and academic enrichment activities to underserved children) and 2) the C.H.A.M.P.S. Middle School Sports and Fitness League for NYC public schools. The funding will be used to secure educational services to increase positive outcomes of test scores. The St. Athanasius Youth Program has been providing an after school and summer sports program for over 50 years. Sports include Baseball, Basketball, Girls Softball and Sports-ARama (various gym type games) for boys and girls ages 4 through 17. Funding will be used to supplement cost of uniforms, sports equipment (bats, balls, protective gear, helmets, gloves, chest protectors, etc.), utilities and baseball field maintenance supplies to properly maintain our private field to ensure a safe playing surface. Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/ba Millennium Development Bergen Basin Community Development Corporation d/ba Millennium Development

Youth

Weprin

Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation, Inc.

11-3112635 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Williams Sanders

Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation, Inc. 11-3112635 * Springfield Gardens Methodist Church Community Service Agency 11-2161877 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth

Greenfield

St. Athanasius Youth Program, Inc.

11-2773596

$20,714 DYCD-Y

Youth

Fidler

St. Bernard Roman Catholic Church

11-1984544 *

$1,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Basketball league developed for ages 5 to 18 years of age

11-3199040

Youth

Fidler

St. Columba Youth Council

11-2220139 *

$2,000 DYCD-Y

The program is supervised recreational activities for children. They include 2-hand touch football, basketball, baseball, softball and a basketball camp Sports Program (CYO) offers league basketball and track as well as other recreational sports to all children ages 6-18. Youth Group provides a safe space for all children to hang out with programs, recreational games, food and discussion. Youth outreach program targeting youth of the community ages 6-21 years. Areas of focus: afterschool tutoring and mentoring programs for at-risk youth, leadership development, talent development, rites of passage, self-esteem and career development, gang awareness workshops Youth outreach program targeting youth of the community ages 6-21 years. Areas of focus: afterschool tutoring and mentoring programs for at-risk youth, leadership development, talent development, rites of passage, self-esteem and career development, gang awareness workshops To provide team sports for boys and girls in various sports activities including basketball, volleyball, baseball for ages 6-16 throughout the Astoria community A Developmental Basketball program as well as a CYO Team Basketball Program for both boys and girls. The Developmental Program takes place on Saturday mornings. The CYO teams have a weeknight practice and participate in competitions and tournaments on the weekends. Sports Program & Boy/Girl Scout Program- Equipment & Utilities for Community Room

11-3199040

Youth

Halloran

St. Fidelis Roman Catholic Church

11-1899721

$8,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Eugene

St. Gabriel's Episcopal Church

11-2463892 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Williams Vallone

St. Gabriel's Episcopal Church St. Joseph Roman Catholic Church

11-2463892 * 11-1631815 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Halloran Oddo

St. Luke's Roman Catholic Church St. Margaret Mary

11-1954969 13-2693090

$5,000 DYCD-Y $4,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

Page 131 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth Youth

Vallone Crowley

St. Margaret Mary Roman Catholic Church St. Margaret's Sports Association

11-1990941 11-1723800 *

$18,000 DYCD-Y $8,000 DYCD-Y

The Youth Outreach Program provides services to inner-city youth of a very diverse community. We are able to expose the youth to museums, ice skating trips, casual get togethers, Senior Youth dinners where the youth serve and interact with the Senior citizens. We also purchase food items for the outreach program. To provide 5 different team sports activities for children; baseball, softball, track, soccer and basketball St. Mel's Athletic Association provides ocer 250 grade school children with after-school sports activities inclusing, basketball, baseball, softball, and volleyball. Teach the children responsibility, teamworkm sportsmanship and the value of excerside. To provide a safe environment and to help build teamwork, sportsmanship and leadership skills for the youth in our community. The funding will support Youth recreational, education and cultural activities for Cooper Park Houses. To support after-school activities and programs in South Brooklyn. To offer a program where the youth are taught the importance of following instructions and participating as a team in a team sport. Funding will support the Stanley Isaacs Neighborhood Center after school program that provides safe community-based and educational care for children. After school in the Isaacs/Holmes Houses is a community based program that keeps young children safe and provides both guidance and educational support in the after school hours. To support the Family First family literacy program and other services to PS 112 families.

Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth Youth

Halloran Gennaro Reyna Gentile Crowley Garodnick

St. Mel's Athletic Association St. Nicholas of Tolentine St. Nick's Alliance Corporation St. Rosalia-Regina Pacis Neighborhood Improvement Association, Inc. St. Stanislaus Athletic Association Stanley M. Isaacs Neighborhood Center, Inc.

11-1646313 11-1714878 * 51-0192170 11-2697931 11-1981305 13-2572034

$5,000 DYCD-Y $7,000 DYCD-Y $10,000 DYCD-Y $46,714 DYCD-Y $8,000 DYCD-Y $20,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth

Lappin Mark-Viverito

Stanley M. Isaacs Neighborhood Center, Inc. Stanley M. Isaacs Neighborhood Center, Inc.

13-2572034 13-2572034

$3,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

The SIBFL is a non proffit youth football and cheerleading orginization with an anual membership of over 800 boys and girls ages 5-14 and over 800 adult parent and volunteer members. Our mission is to make every effort to ensure that each child with a desire to participate gets the opportunity to play without regard to prior experience, athletic ability, size or economic situation. We believe this commitment to participation separates us from all other leagues in our community. This commitment allows us to instill the values of honesty, loyalty, integrity, teamwork, discipline, sportsmanship, fitness, respect, trust, and self esteem in our young participants. These are the same values that have allowed thousands of our graduates to become some of the most successful and active members of our community and society. Not only have many of our past participants gone on to the highest levels of college and professional sports, but more importantly many have gone on to be successful businessmen, professionals, doctors, educators and political leaders that shape our community today. Undoubtedly, their successes could be traced back to the values learned and fostered while participating in Staten Island Boys Football League. Youth Youth Youth Ignizio Oddo Gentile Staten Island Boys Football League, Inc. Staten Island Boys Football League, Inc. Staten Island Children's Museum 23-7167904 23-7167904 * 23-7379930 $10,000 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y $3,500 DYCD-Y Purchase uniforms and supplies To support creative play opportunities, art workshops and cultural enrichment programs.

Youth Discretionary

Page 132 of 151

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Source

Council Member

Legal Name of Organization

EIN

* Amount ($)

Agency

Purpose of Funds

Fiscal Conduit Name

FC EIN

Youth

Ignizio

Staten Island Children's Museum

23-7379930

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Youth Youth Youth

Ignizio Oddo Oddo Oddo

Staten Island Ice Hockey Association, Inc. Staten Island Ice Hockey Association, Inc. Staten Island Lightning Basketball Club, Inc. Staten Island Little League

13-2939069 13-2939069 13-4016802 13-6162802 *

$4,000 $5,000 $4,500 $3,500

DYCD-Y DYCD-Y DYCD-Y DYCD-Y

Youth

Rose

STATEN ISLAND RISING STARS

65-1321528 *

$2,500 DYCD-Y

To provide hands-on creative play opportunities, art workshops and cultural enrichment programs to over 250,000 annual visitors. To provide thematic museum learning experiences, primarily to families with young children using interactive exhibits and programs that intergrate the arts, sciences and humanities. Programming enables children to gain a better understanding of self, community and environment. Programming encourages active participation, as well as stimulating observation, curiosity, the excitment of discovery and a spirit of inquiry and exploration. Programming also emphasizes family participation and access to all including those with special needs. Programs range from art, dance and theater workshops, cooking and nutrition programs, storytelling, and cultural, science and pet care demonstrations To increases the opportunity for a Staten Island youth to learn how to ice skate and participate in a structured ice skating, hockey program. To eliminate the need for Staten Island youth to travel off Staten Island to receive this highly specialized training and instruction. Ice Hockey instruction gym fees Challenger League for Disabled Children Learning basketball leadership and teamwork at our camp in Staten Island, New York. Staten Island Rising Stars is a basketball camp that has been in existence for more than 40 years, teaching basic to advanced skills to young basketball players. We cater our instruction to the skill level of each player and strive to instill in all players the idea that hard work is needed to accomplish any goal. Street Corner Resources Incorporated (SCR) is respectfully requesting 20,000 for the production of a yearlong series of Voices, reaching out and impacting thousands of young listeners in Manhattan and the Bronx. We call this project voices because it will use the voices of young people to reach out and engage and hopefully motivate other young folk. Voices will provide an engaging learning opportunity for young men and women, ages 16 to 21 that are at risk of gang involvement, dropping out of school, teen pregnancy and a host of other issues. The Play/Write Program will consist of a series of arts-integrated creative writing workshops, bookended by two full-school theater assemblies in several NYC public elementary schools. By working with students to write stories, and then by adapting these young authors’ original works into fully-staged theater pieces, Story Pirates’ professional actors and teaching artists will help children learn the power of creative expression and will collaborate with NYC public school teachers to extend high-impact arts and theater tactics to future lesson plans.

Youth

Dickens

Street Corner Resources, Inc.

26-0149521

$6,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Palma

Striking Viking Story Pirates, Inc.

02-0720786

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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Summer on the Hill (SOH), a year-round, after-school program, has a mission to enrich the education of promising, low-income public school students from the Bronx, Washington Heights, and Harlem, prepare them for rigorous schools and colleges, and offer guidance to their parents. Since 1994, SOH has served 875 students and families. SOH works with students from 3rd to 12th grade – for as long as 10 years – in year-round Grade 3-8 and High School Programs. We have inspired students to stay focused on their education, placed 100 students in such top schools as Bronx Science, and placed 97 of our 2004-2010 HS graduates in 90 colleges and universities, including six Ivy League universities. Two-thirds of students are the first in their families to go to college. Grade 3-8 Program: a yearly six-week summer session bridged by a mandatory academic year program on 18 Saturdays. 190 students attend public schools while participating in: • ummer Program: 14 periods/week of language arts and eight periods/week each of math S and science. Swimming, tennis, visual and performing arts classes. • cademic year Saturday Program: Accelerated language arts, math, and science classes A taught by experienced teachers, who write report cards that are sent to students’ homes and schools. • Individual guidance on school choices for all 8th graders and interested younger students. • dmissions: SOH recruits from all Bronx and upper Manhattan schools. Nominated students A participate in an extensive admissions process. High School Program for Grade 3-8 alumni: 50 students participate in 18 Saturday SAT classes college tours, individual college counseling/essay critique, and workshops. SOH trains 25 HS students to mentor Grade 3-8 children in the summer program. SOH college graduates are entering the fields of education, finance, medicine, technology. Without the academic preparation and guidance provided by SOH, it is unlikely they would have reached their levels of achievement. Summer on the Hill (SOH), a year-round, after-school program, has a mission to enrich the education of promising, low-income public school students from the Bronx, Washington Heights, and Harlem, prepare them for rigorous schools and colleges, and offer g

Youth

Jackson

Summer on the Hill

65-1232087

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Youth

Koppell

Summer on the Hill

65-1232087

$5,000 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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Youth Youth

Foster Reyna

Summer Search Foundation Sun of Justice Cadets, Inc.

68-0200138 * 26-1432017 *

$5,000 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Through the Summer Search intervention, low-income NYC high school students develop specific habits and skills that lead to increased post-secondary educational outcomes in the long term. All students participate in each element of our program model: 1) Two full scholarships to summer experiential programs. The first summer program, following sophomore year of high school, is a wilderness expedition and the second, following junior year, may be an academic program, a community service trip, or a family home-stay in another country. 2) Year-round one-on-one mentoring by trained full-time staff. This allows students to prepare emotionally for these life-changing experiences, integrate what they learn into new communication and social networking skills, receive the support they need to navigate the college counseling process and follow through on the desire to achieve beyond what they see others achieving around them. 3) Ind! ividualized college and financial aid counseling that demystifies the college application process through workshops, access to information, and ongoing support. Services include a full-time, on-staff college counselor, fully subsidized SAT tutoring, admissions advising, and financial aid counseling for students and their families. 4) Long-term support network for students following high school and into college as well as their professional careers. Compared to more affluent peers, Summer Search students do not have a social network through which they can explore professional development, networking opportunities and summer internships. Ongoing support from our program and Summer Search volunteers helps students build these skills, and open doors to these opportunities. Summer Search provides the opportunity for world exposure and an increased sense of selfworth, and then helps students translate this into life skills that are critical to future achievement in post-secondary education and beyond. WE TARGET THE CHILDREN OF ALL OF BROOKLYN. WE HAVE FEILD TRIPS, CAMPING, PARADES, COMMUNITY SERVICE. EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOPS.

Youth

Van Bramer

Sunnyside Community Services Center, Inc.

51-0189327

$40,000 DYCD-Y

SCS is requesting funding to support our youth and family services. SCS serves more than 2,600 youth each year. Youth programs include: two after-school programs that provide academic and cultural enrichment, recreation, and leadership development; a Beacon Community Center in Elmhurst where children, teens, and families engage in educational and recreational activities; a Family Literacy Program that enables parents and children of immigrant families to develop important English language and literacy skills; a College Readiness Program that helps youth who are disadvantaged in the college application process prepare for and succeed in higher education; and a Green Jobs Internship Program provided in partnership with Trees New York that connects underserved youth to opportunities in a growing job sector and prepares them to be stewards of the environment.

Youth Discretionary

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Youth

Van Bramer

Sunnyside Drum Corps, Inc.

11-2715699 *

$3,500 DYCD-Y

Our organization is a community based marching band whose membership includes and is open to boys and girls of all races, religions, creeds, ethnic background and socio-economic status, which: (1) teaches basic fundamentals of music in a structured environment, (2) offers the ability of its members to practice and play a variety of instruments and/or perform other marching and/or drum corps related skills (currently a variety of percussive instruments e.g. snare drums, tenor drums, bass drums, cymbals, bell lyre/glockenspiel, and flag carrying routines; we have had in the past and are looking to redevelop, based on youth interest, horn/trumpet lines, cheerleading/pom-pom/dance squads, competitive baton twirling sections, and rifle and drill teams), (3) allows for its members the opportunity to showcase their talents and abilities and show civic pride through participation in a variety of parades and standing performances in multiple venues, (4) offer its members the opportunity to assume/perform leadership and service roles among their peers and to work together as a team and performing unit, (5) provide an alternative and/or additional recreational outlet to sports teams, hanging out or playing on a computer, and to allow additional opportunities for those who may be musically inclined to hone and showcase their skills.

Youth Youth

Gentile Crowley

Sunset Park Health Council, Inc. Swim Strong Foundation, Inc.

20-2508411 37-1526132

$3,500 DYCD-Y $5,000 DYCD-Y

Project TRACK is an after school college prep program at the Secondary Schools for Law and Journalism. The program provides drop out prevention case management services to 9th graders, as well as college access counseling, college trips, SAT and PSAT test prep classes, and conflict resolution workshops to all high school students. We are seeking 5,000 to fund an overnight college trip for 30 11th graders during the April break. These trips are instrumental in helping students to understand what college offers and how they can access a college education. Students also return with a clearer sense of their goals for the future and a renewed sense of purpose in their school work. The funds would be used to pay for a coach bus, in addition to food and lodging for the 30 youth that participate in the program We provide low to no cost swim lessons for families that otherwise couldnt afford them. Drowning is the 2nd largest cause of death for children 14 and under...it IS preventable! We provide low to no cost swim lessons for families that otherwise couldnt afford them. Learn to Swim programs in Far Rockaway. Drowning is preventable!

Youth Youth

Koo Sanders

Swim Strong Foundation, Inc. Swim Strong Foundation, Inc.

37-1526132 37-1526132

$6,000 DYCD-Y $7,500 DYCD-Y

Youth Discretionary

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Youth

Gentile

Symphony Space, Inc.

13-2941455

$2,000 DYCD-Y

The Symphony Space Global Arts: Cultural Literacy and Heritage (GA) program helps make connections between the arts of Asian, African, Latin American, and Native American cultures, American History, and social studies. In the Global Arts program, assemblies, workshops, and semester-long courses are available, tailored to a schools need. Global Arts reaches and engages New York City schoolchildren in spite of obstacles such as the struggling economy and strained arts funding in the schools. Workshops and assemblies provide students with an overview of the culture or art form selected. The workshops take place in a classroom in one 45-60 minute period and feature interactivity between students and the teaching artists. Assemblies are similar in content and duration to the workshops, but are less interactive so as to include several classes in an auditorium or assembly space setting. The semester long program offers instruction over a five-month period and includes: • ne half-day staff development workshop O • ix to eight in-class workshops led by professional artists S • n artist-led museum tour A • concert at Symphony Space A • esource materials. R Global Arts uses the arts to understand and appreciate cultural differences and how the arts are reflective of a society. It addresses all four New York State Learning Standards in the Arts and the NYC Blueprint. Teaching artists are all practicing professionals. To increase availability, schools are charged less than the cost. TADA!’s mission is to provide high-quality musical theater productions performed by talented kids for family audiences. While NYC is a culturally-rich mecca for the performing arts, a majority of programs are not geared towards families, and those that are have become too expensive for city residents. TADA! musicals are performed by our Resident Youth Ensemble with a Subsidized Ticket Program that makes the first 30 seats in each house available at only 8 per child. Non-profit groups receive a rate as low as 6 per child. And, the 65 Resident Youth Ensemble Members receive an array of free youth development benefits and theater training, which cost TADA! an average of 10,000 per member, per year. Discretionary support would subsidize those tickets and help provide scholarships for our ensemble members. TADA!’s mission is to provide high-quality musical theater productions performed by talented kids for family audiences. TADA!’s mission is to provide high-quality