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One Place Through Time: Interpreting Individuals at Stones River National Battlefield

Kristen Baldwin Deathridge and Katie Merzbacher Middle Tennessee State University 26 May 2010

Inspiration

Translating Inspiration into Action

Translating Inspiration into Action
Fort Vancouver: *Native Americans *Hudson’s Bay Company *Company Village *Oregon Trail *US Army *National Park Service

Translating Inspiration into Action
Fort Vancouver: *Native Americans *Hudson’s Bay Company *Company Village *Oregon Trail *US Army *National Park Service Stones River: *Native Americans *Trail of Tears *pre-Civil War Plantation owners *Confederate Soldier *Contraband Detainee *Union Occupying Soldier *Member of USCT *Resident of Cemetery Community *National Park Service

One Place Through Time: Life at Stones River
In this exhibit, you will meet people who have experienced life at Stones River. Historians often use the historical record-including things written or made by people, like journals, letters, recordings, and photographs--to learn what life was like. These valuable accounts People leave clues behind in the can describe how people worked, what their archaeological record and in the historical record. Used together these hobbies were, the difficulties and pleasures of clues can teach us about the people who their lives, and other details. lived at, or visited, Stones River. Who left written records? What if there are no written records? *Only people who were taught to write *Another way of learning about the past is could leave journals or letters. Sometimes through the archaeological record. even when someone wrote things down, Archaeologists study old trash and things lost these documents did not survive. The story people who lived a long time ago. They use by of these people is still important so we these objects, called artifacts, to find out have to learn about their lives in different what people ate, the types of things they ways. purchased, how they built their homes, and more.
You can learn about people the same way that historians and archaeologists do. Get to know them by exploring the artifacts, images, and other records in this exhibit.

Sergeant William Holland
William Holland was born a slave in Kentucky in the mid-1920s. He had little or no schooling and was unable to read or write. He joined the USCT in 1864. When his unit arrived at Stones River, Sgt. Holland helped to construct the National Cemetery here in 1866. After the Civil War, Holland chose to stay at Stones River and he was paid $1 a day to care for the Cemetery grounds. In 1867, Holland purchased land near the National Cemetery in the community that was growing up around it. He raised his children on this land and was buried on it in 1909. You can see his resting place on the grounds today.

What is the USCT?
The USCT, United States Colored Troops, were African Americans who fought for the Union Army during the Civil War. They were led by White officers and Black soldiers had little opportunity for advancement.

What do these documents tell us Since Sgt. Holland did not write himself, historians can look at documents that others wrote about him. We can learn from about what Sgt. Holland did?
the pension record below that Holland served in the USCT from 1864 until 1866.

What do these artifacts tell us about Sgt. Holland’s life?

This serves as a place-holder until artifacts connected with Sgt. Holland can be brought to light. Perhaps these can be used to show how and why Holland cared for this place.

One Place Through Time: Interpreting Individuals at Stones River National Battlefield
Kristen Baldwin Deathridge and Katie Merzbacher Middle Tennessee State University 26 May 2010