THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM Major Parts of the Circulatory System

I. Objectives: At the end of the lesson, pupils are expected to: 1. Identify the major parts of the circulatory system. - heart - blood vessels - blood
2. Show awareness on the importance of our heart.

B. Motivation 1. How do nutrients, oxygen and mineral distributed to our body? 2. What are the organs responsible for it? C. Activity Proper 1. Teacher shows poster of the circulatory system and let the pupils identify the 3 major parts of the circulatory system. D. Generalization 1. What are the 3 major parts of the circulatory system? 2. How would you take care of your heart? E. Application 1. Jump for 10 seconds. What happens to your heart beat?

II. Subject Matter: Unit: The Circulatory and Nervous Systems
Topic: The Circulatory System Subtopic: Major Parts of the Circulatory System Concepts: The 3 major parts of the circulatory system are heart, blood vessels and blood: Heart is the pumping station of the body Blood vessels permit the blood to flow to the different parts of the body Blood carries the nutrients to the different parts of our body

V. Evaluation: Differentiate the 3 major parts of the circulatory system. VI. Assignment: 1. What are the 3 kinds of blood vessels? 2. What are the components of our blood?

III.Materials: Poster of the Circulatory System
Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health, pp. 2-3 Juanita M. Cruz, et al

THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM Kinds of blood vessels Components of our blood

IV.Lesson Development:
A. Review 1. What are the different systems in your body?

I. Objectives: At the end of the lesson, pupils are expected to: 1. Identify the 3 kinds of blood vessels – vein, artery, capillary 2. Differentiate the 4 components of our blood – plasma, RBC, WBC, platelet

II. Subject Matter: Unit: The Circulatory and Nervous System Topic: The Circulatory System Subtopics: Kinds of blood vessels Components of our blood Concepts: The 3 kinds of blood vessels are vein, artery and capillary The 4 components of our blood are plasma, red blood cells, white cells and platelets III. Materials: Poster of the Circulatory System
Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI, pp. 11-18 Juanita M. Cruz, et. Al

E. Application 1. What might happen if there is no platelet in our blood? 2. Describe and differentiae plasma, RBC, WBC, platelets

VI. Assignment: 1. What is pulmonary circuit? 2. What is systemic circuit?

THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM Heart, Blood, and Blood Vessels

I. Objectives: 1. Identify the major parts of the circulatory system – heart, blood, blood vessels
2. Show awareness on the importance of our heart. II. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health PELC: 1.1 Pages: 2-3 Concepts: The 3 major parts of the circulatory system are heart, blood and blood vessels 1. Heart is the pumping station of the body 2. Blood carries oxygen and other nutrients to all parts of our body. 3. Blood vessels permit the blood to flow to the different parts of our body. Processes: Generating Communicating Materials: Poster of a circulatory system

IV. Lesson Development: A. Review 1. What are the major parts of the circulatory system?
B. Motivation 1. Why do you think your blood is color red? 2. How long are your blood vessels if put together? C. Activity Proper 1. Let the pupils trace the blood vessels in the poster. 2. Pupils describe the blood vessels and give the different kinds 3. Have the pupils describe their blood if they have seen one. 4. Pupils enumerate and differentiate the different components of our D. Generalization 1. What are the functions of vein, artery and capillary? 2. Differentiate RBC from WBC and plasma from platelets.

III. Procedure:

A. Review 1. What are the different systems found in your body? B. Motivation 1. How do you nutrients, oxygen and other substances distributed to the parts of our body? 2. What are the organs responsible for it? C. Activity 1. Pupils identify the major parts of the circulatory system in the poster D. Discussion 1. Teacher asks the function and description of heart, blood, and blood vessels. 2. Misconception is addressed by the teacher. E. Concept Formation 1. What is the function of our heart, blood and blood vessels? F. Generalization 1. What are the 3 major parts of our circulatory system? 2. How would take care of our heart? G. Application 1. Jump for 15 seconds. Observe what happens to your heart beat.

V. Assignment: 1. Give the different components of our blood.

THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM Four Components of our Blood

I. Objectives: 1. Identify the 4 components of our blood. 2. Differentiate each component of our blood. II. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI by Juanita M. Cruz et. Al PELC: 1.1 Pages: 11-15
Concepts: The 4 components of our blood are RBC, WBC, Plasma and Platelets. 1. RBC – carries oxygen 2. WBC – fights infection 3. Plasma – liquid portion in our blood 4. Platelets – responsible for blood clotting Processes: Inferring Communication Materials: Poster of a circulatory system

IV. Assessment: 1. Give the 3 major parts of the circulatory system.
2. What is the function of each part?

III. Procedure: A. Review 1. What are the major parts of the circulatory system?
B. Motivation 1. Why do you think your blood is color red?

D. What are the different kinds of veins? THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM I. Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI by Juanita M. Discussion 1. How long are your blood vessels if put together? IV. 3. Which component of the blood acts like soldiers? 2. Activity 1.Platelets F. What may happen if you don’t have platelets? III.Plasma . Al PELC: 1.1 Pages: 9-10. Generalization 1. What is the function of RBC? 3. Teacher asks the pupils to trace the blood vessels on the picture/poster. Blood follows either pulmonary or systemic circuit. Teacher asks the components of the blood. Differentiate plasma from platelets. Discussion 1. Teacher let the pupils enumerate and differentiate the blood components. What gives the blood a red color? C. What are the different kinds of veins? V. Application 1. Procedure: A. B. Plasma from Platelets G. veins and arteries are the different kinds of blood vessels. 2. 2.WBC . What are the functions of . Pupils describe the blood vessels and differentiate each kind. Subject Matter: C.RBC . E. 2. Differentiate systemic circuit from pulmonary circuit. Assessment: 1. (more concepts in manila paper) Processes: Generating Communicating Materials: Pictures of pulmonary and systemic circuits Manila paper for concept formation D. Identify the different kinds of blood vessels. 15-18 Concepts: The capillaries. Cruz et. II. Review 1. Concept of Formation 1. Differentiate RBC from WBC. Assignment: 1. Activity 1. Teacher asks pupils to describe a blood if they have seen one. Pupils trace the pulmonary and circulatory circuit. Pupils state the sequence of the blood flow in .2. Objectives: 1. Motivation 1.

D. (vein) 3. Processes: Communicating Inferring Materials: Pictures and posters of nervous system Manila paper for concept formation IV. The teacher asks the pupils what they and what they want to learn about nervous system. It is the largest organ in the nervous system. It is a circuit which involves the lungs. How does blood flow in pulmonary and systemic circuit? G. (capillary) 4. Identify the main parts of the nervous system. Assignment: 1. Brain controls everything we do. (pulmonary) 5. E. Application 1. It is a circuit which involves the different parts of the body.brain . Generalization 1. 2. Objectives: 1. The teacher writes their answers on the board. Review The teacher asks 2-3 pupils to trace the flow of the blood in pulmonary ad systemic circuit. .pulmonary and systemic circuit. Why do you think it is necessary for our circulatory system to have two circuits? II. . What is nervous system? 2. What is pulmonary and systemic circuit? F. It carries the blood away from the heart.nerves THE NERVOUS SYSTEM I. vein and artery? 2. Activity 1. What are capillary. Motivation 1. It is where exchange of gases occurs. Identify the parts of the brain. Concept Formation 1. Discussion 1. B. 2. vein and artery.spinal cord . 2. (systemic) V. The teacher elicits the parts of the nervous system. spinal cord and nerves. What are the parts of the nervous system? III.1 Pages: 34-36 Concept: The 3 main parts of nervous system are brain. (artery) 2. Assessment: 1. How can you learn in school? 2. How can you remember what your teacher is saying? C. Procedure: A. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI PELC: 2. It carries the blood towards the heart. Differentiate capillary.

D. (cerebrum) 2. III. Describe the function of spinal cord and nerve cells. 3. thought. Identify the parts of spinal cord and nerve cells.Procedure A. Objectives: 1. E.2 Pages : 32-36 Concepts : Spinal cord is made up of nerve fibers that carry information to and from the brain. Draw a concept map of the neurons. The teacher corrects/rectifies any misconception of the pupils about the circulatory system. The teacher asks the function of the spinal cord and nerves cells. speech. The teacher shows the poster of the nervous system. Assignment: 1. What are the parts and functions of the brain? F. G. It coordinates sensory messages. al PELC : 2. B. Nerve cells serve as a functional unit of the nervous system Processes: Identifying Communicating Materials: Flashcards Poster of nervous system IV. (medulla oblongata) 5. (thalamus) V. It balances mother movements. It connects the whole brain to the spinal cord. The teacher explains the parts and functions of the brain. What are the main parts of the nervous system? 2. and memory. It controls voluntary actions. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI by Juanita M.2. 2. II. What is nervous system? 2. Generalization 1. (right hemisphere) 3. How are the functions of parts of the brain differ from each other? (Follow-up questions might be asked depending on the answers of the pupils). (cerebellum) 4. Cruz et. SPINAL CORD AND NERVE CELLS . Discussion 1. Review What are the parts and functions of the brain? Why is nervous system considered as the control unit of the body? Motivation Can brain work alone without the nerve cells and spinal cord? C. 2. The pupils describe how the nerves are connected to the different parts of the body. Concept of Formation 1. Presentation 1. Application 1. Assessment: 1. It directs the left side of the body. Why people are declare dead when the brain stops functioning even when the heart is still beating? I.

Why do the words are grouped only into two? C. II. Objectives: 1. What is central and peripheral NS? B. 3. What are the divisions of the nervous system? 2.living things in the environment. 2. How people paralyzed? What part of the nervous system is not working if people are paralyzed? I. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI by Juanita M. What is the basis of classification? 2. Identify biotic and abiotic components of ecosystem. Give an example of an ecosystem. ___________ conducts the nerve signal array from the body. Teacher rectifies any misconceptions. spinal cord and nerve cells classified under? G. Consist of the brain and spinal cord. Assignment: 1. • Biotic components are those living things in the ecosystem • Abiotic components are those non-living things in the ecosystem Processes: Identifying Classifying Materials: Flashcards IV. V. III. ___________ made of nerve fibers which carry information to and from the brain. F. Define ecosystem. What is the function of spinal cord? 3.2. Application 1.1 Pages: 74 Concepts: Ecosystem is the interrelationships of living and non. Review 1. Motivation The teacher shows words on flashcards and let the pupils classify them. 5. Concept Formation 1. Where do brain. Activity ECOSYSTEM . E. Procedure: A. Describe an ecosystem. What are the parts and functions of a nerve cell? 2. Cruz. 1. Which division of nervous system is referred to? (central nervous system) 3. ___________ enlarge portion of the neutron. Assessment: 1. Generalization 1. What is a filament? 4. 4. Pupils point out on the poster the spinal cord and the nerve cells. What is the functional unit of the nervous system? (neurons) 2. 2. What are the parts and functions of spinal cord and nerve cells. et al PELC: 1.

3. 2. 2. bird. How do humans / animals get their food? 2. E. Define food chain and food web 2. Review The pupils answer item number 9-14 of their textbook. Discussion 1. What is the difference between biotic and abiotic components? F. caterpillar. The teacher gives examples of ecosystems. Food web is the interlinked food chain. What makes an ecosystem? 2. et al PELC: 1. Give examples of food chain and food web. Where do plants get their food? C. Differentiate food chain and food web.1. Pupils give examples of ecosystems and identify the components. Application 1. The teacher helps to classify them to living (biotic) and non-living components. Motivation 1. Processes: Defining Differentiating Predicting Materials: Flashcards IV. and eventually to decomposers when they die. 2. Assignment: 1. Pupils identify the biotic and abiotic components. Pupils give the living things and non-living things that they wee in their environment. Cruz.2 Pages: 58-65 Concepts: Food chain is the transfer of solar energy from plants to animals. What is ecosystem? 2. decomposers. Activity 1. II. Objectives: 1. Procedures A. Can we call a place/environment an ecosystem if there is no biotic or abiotic components? FOOD CHAIN AND FOOD WEB I. 3. The teacher together with the pupils defines the ecosystem. Pupils define food chain based from assignment. The teacher shows words: plants. Assessment: 1. What are the components? G. D. snake. . What are the abiotic and biotic components found in an aquarium? • School • Pond • Forest V. Generalization 1. B. What is food chain and food web? 2. Concept Formation 1. III. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI by Juanita M.

Cruz. D. Pupils identify the producers and consumers.both benefit from each other. Pupils arrange the words to forma food chain. Motivation Pupils will predict: 1. Generalization 1. et al PELC: 1. How does energy is transferred to organisms? G.it is a hunter-prey relationship. Review The teacher refreshes the minds of the students about the energy flow in a food chain and food web. What is the main source of energy on earth? 2.3. Concept Formation 1. Pupils give examples of a food chain and a food web. The teacher explains the relationship and gives examples. Activity 1. E. Commensalism .2 Pages: 60-61 Concepts: Symbiosis is a relationship where organisms may be able to get their food and protect themselves by depending on each other. How do animals obtain food for survival? 2. What is the difference between producer and consumer? F. Discussion 1. 4. B. 5. What is symbiosis? 2. V. Identify the three types of symbiosis. 3. Assignment: 1. Teacher adds more words (organisms) to form a food web. Predict what will happen if some organisms or consumers become extinct. II. Mutualism . 2. Processes: Identifying Communication Predicting Materials: MS Powerpoint Presentation Pictures of animals / plants Laptop and LCD projector IV. What is a food chain? 2.both organisms benefits from one another without harming each other. What are the strategies do animals use in getting food? I. Objectives: 1. Pupils read each type of symbiotic relationship. Subject Matter: C. The teacher defines symbiosis and gives the three types 2. Assessment: As a group. Procedure: A. Give examples of animals / plants that shows symbiotic relationship. construct a food web on a forest ecosystem. . Parasitism . Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI by Juanita M. What do you observed in a food chain and a food web? 2. Applications 1. What are the three types of symbiosis? SYMBIOSIS III.

Procedure: A. How do living things which are objects of predation develop defenses? III. Discussion 1. NITROGEN CYCLE I. What food is needed to build and repair muscles and bones of the body? 2. What is the different between a host and a parasite (parasitism) F. Assessment: As a group. 2. What are the symbiotic relationships? 2. 2. Identify the factors involved in a nitrogen cycle. 3. Give examples of parasitism. Pupils read the step-by-step process of nitrogen cycle. Review 1. construct a concept map of the symbiotic relationships V. 1. The teacher shows some pictures. Assignment: 1. Motivation 1. How do animals obtain food for survival? 2. The teacher rectifies any misconception. The teacher explains each step. The teacher introduces the animals showed if the pupils are not familiar with them. 3. Concept Formation 1. . Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI by Juanita M. What are the sources which this food can be drawn? Activity 1. 2. 4. commensalism. Pupils identify the relationship showed on the screen. What are the strategies do use in getting food? G. Discussion Are all bacteria harmful? How do nitrates increased? IV. D.2 Pages: 68-69 Concepts : Nitrates are products of decomposition needed and used by plants.D. B. et al PELC: 1. How is carbon-oxygen cycle occur? C. Objective: 1. and mutualism. Cruz. Nitrogen fixation is a process that occurs when nitrogen-fixing bacteria convert bacteria in the atmosphere into ammonia. II. Generalization The pupils will answer the previous questions from the motivation part. What are the 3 symbiotic relationships? 2. Process: Identifying Inferring Communicating Materials: Flashcards E. Pupils take note of the technical terms. Application 1. 1.

Pupils read the carbon cycle and the teacher will explain. Discussion 1. What are the processes involved in the nitrogen cycle? F. Activity The teacher let the pupils predict how do carbon dioxide or oxygen are produced. Procedures: A. D. Assessment: 1. The teacher explains the step-by-step process. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum by Rebecca R. Processes: Identifying Interpreting Materials: Diagram of oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle and carbon cycle III. Identify the processes involved in a carbon cycle. Concept Formation 1. Where do plants get nitrogen? G. Concept of Formation 1. Draw a nitrogen cycle diagram. Pupils trace the diagram of the nitrogen cycle.2 Pages: 90-91 Concepts: The oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle refers to the manner by which these materials are used and reused in nature. 4. E. Application 1. Will the atmosphere be depleted of carbon dioxide or oxygen? 1. What form of nitrogen can plants utilize? 2. 2. The teacher explains each step in details. OXYGEN-CARBON DIOXIDE CYCLE 3. Review 1. I. What are the two ways which can increase the nitrates in the soil? B. Interpret the diagram of the oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle. Carbon cycle is the circulation of carbon in nature. Objective: 1.3. The teacher shows the diagram and explains the whole cycle using it. 2. E. IV. 4. Label the factors involved. Pupils read the carbon dioxide and oxygen cycle. Fallaria et al PELC: 1. Pupils are given the chance to explain the diagram on their own words. What will happen if there are no decomposers? Predict some outcomes based from the discussions. II. What are the factors involved in a nitrogen cycle? 2. Motivation 1. 2. C. through any compound that has a carbon atom on it. What form of nitrogen can be utilized by the plants? 2. How can bacteria help in the nitrogen cycle? 3. Generalization 1. What is the source of oxygen/carbon dioxide? .

Procedures: A. Objective: 1. Enumerate the importance of forest ecosystem. 3. Motivation 1. What must we do to have a cleaner supply of oxygen in the air? Identifying Predicting Materials: Manila Paper III. They maintain clean. Processes: . B. How does oxygen-carbon dioxide occur? 2. Give the importance of a forest. Assignment: 1. What is oxygen-carbon dioxide/ carbon cycle? F. et al PELC: 1. 2. why forest is an ecosystem.2 Pages: 96-98 Concepts: Forest is an area not less than one hectare and 60 meters wide consisting of trees. The teacher utilizes “Number Heads Together” as CLS. food and protection for animals and other living things. Review 1. What are the processes involved in a carbon cycle? G. Generalization 1. Evaluation: Interpret the diagram of oxygencarbon dioxide cycle and the carbon cycle. Pupils are grouped and enumerate the importance of a forest. Fallaria. cool environment. The teacher rectifies/explains further any given answer. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum by Rebecca R. Explain briefly the carbon cycle. 2. 3. Random numbers are called to give one importance of a forest. Pupils describe and identify the components of a forest. 2. E.2. C. What are the importance of a forest? F. V. OXYGEN-CARBON DIOXIDE CYCLE I. The teacher introduces the word forest. The group members brainstorm and list the importance of a forest. Application 1. Activity 1. IV. Generalization 1. The groups are given 10 minutes to discuss and list their answers. How does oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle occur? 2. 2. 3. They prevent floods and soil erosion. Forest provides shelter. The teacher asks. D. Reporting / Discussion 1. plants and animals. Describe what a forest is. Application II.

2. Pupils take turn in completing the answer. OXYGEN-CARBON DIOXIDE CYCLE I. 2. Why is forest good for environment? V. . plants. 2. It destroys 80% of their natural habitat. Evaluation: 1.1. Animals. Pupils go to their own group and discuss the effects of deforestation. The secretary of the group lists the effects of deforestation. II. B. C. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI by Rebecca R. IV. humans. 2. Describe the effects of deforestation. Pupils answer or complete the table on the board based from their assignment. Define deforestation. Procedures: A. Review 1. Fallaria. They will write all the benefits derived by humans/man. Predict what will happen to animals living in the forest if it was destroyed. animals and environment from the forest. The groups are given time to discuss and list their answers. Assignment: Complete the table to determine the value of forest to our country. The teacher rectifies/explains further any given answer. et al PELC: 2 Pages: 98-99 Concepts: Deforestation is the indiscriminate cutting of trees in our forest with replacing them. 2. Beneficiary of Forest 1. and the environment are severely affected by deforestation. Animals 3. Random number is called to share the group’s answer to the class. Reporting and Discussion 1. Activity 1. Motivation 1. Environment Benefits Derived Processes: Defining a process (deforestation) Completing a given table Predicting Communicating Materials: Manila paper Flash cards III. 3. Plants 2. Give examples of products that are derived from a forest. D. Objectives: 1. what will happen if forests are continuously depleted by man’s harmful activities? Enumerate the importance of forest ecosystem. 3. How does a forest prevent flash flood in the plains? 3. Man 4. Based from your answers on the board. Number Heads Together is utilized for group sharing.

OXYGEN-CARBON DIOXIDE CYCLE I. E. Assignment: 1. What are their effects? F. II. Evaluation: . Identify some human activities that disrupt the cycles in an ecosystem. humans and the environment? F. 2. kaingin.4. What is deforestation? 2. Application How can global warming affect organism on earth? IV. Review 1. Application 1. 3. Evaluation: Complete the table below: Course Animals Man Environment Effects of Deforestation C. 2. The groups are given time to discuss. How can you prevent global warming? chemical fertilizers and explosives in fishing are some human activities that can disrupt an ecosystem. Motivation 1. They will identify the different human activities that can disrupt an ecosystem. Pupils go to their own groups. The teacher rectifies/explains any given answer. What are the human activities that disrupt the cycles in an ecosystem? D. et al PELC: 2 Pages: 99-101 Concepts: Deforestation. What is deforestation? 2. Objective: 1. The teacher explains greenhouse effect and global warming. What do the pictures show? Activity 1. V. The teacher shows pictures about the different activities of mankind. burning of fossil fuels. and the use of E. What are the different human activities that can effect/disrupt ecosystem? 2. How does it affect animals. What are the effects of deforestation? IV. Pupils are called randomly to present their outputs. Reporting/Discussion 1. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI by Rebecca R. Fallaria. Processes: Communicating Predicting Identifying Materials: Pictures III. Generalization 1. Procedures: A. B. Generalization 1. 2.

The teacher writes any ‘new’ terms on the word cards/cartolina strips.Choose two human activities that disrupt ecosystem. Addressing and rectifying of misconceptions will be done. The teacher explains further any given answer. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI by Rebecca R. Objective: 1. F. Discussion 1. 2. and the use of chemical fertilizers and explosives in fishing are some human activities that can disrupt an ecosystem. Activity 1. Procedures: A. C. 3. Be able to explain them. or the cycle of nutrients in the ecosystem. V. Each representative explains their answer in front of the class. The teacher shows the class about oil spill and a denuded forest. Additional information is given. burning of fossil fuels. Generalization 1. Processes: Communicating Predicting Identifying Materials: Pictures Word cards/flash cards E. Pupils guess what do the pictures depict? D. Assignment: . Drill The teacher will let the pupils read and answer their summative test. 2. the pupils consolidate the lesson learned. B. Evaluation: Make a mind map of the different human activities that disrupts the ecosystem. Application How can you prevent the disruption of ecosystem in your own simple ways? III. Based from the pupils’ presentation and from the teacher’s additional information. II. Motivation 1. The teacher calls a representative from each group to present their answers based from the previous activity yesterday. V. et al PELC: 2 Pages: 99-101 Concepts: Deforestation. G. Review Pupils review their answers about the different human activities that disrupt the activity IV. kaingin. 2. Falloria. 3. Assignment: How can you prevent the disruption of ecosystem? OXYGEN-CARBON DIOXIDE CYCLE I. Explain the different human activities that disrupt the ecosystem.

migration and birth effect population? V. • Population constantly changes. Discussion 1. 2. What comes in your mind when you hear the word population? 4. Teacher explains the other two charts. Materials: Science textbook Manila paper E. What is population? 2. C. Processes: Describing conditions in an over populated area. Enumerate the causes of population change. Write the answer on your notebook. . Objectives: 1. Assignment: Answer page 109. Generalization 1. Have you been to a crowded place like Quiapo. How does rapid population growth affect resources or the satisfaction of one’s basic needs? III. Teacher let the class read the issue. • A rapid increase in population growth increases the demand for basic needs. Review 1. What are the different human activities that disrupt the cycles in ecosystem? IV. Evaluation: 1. 2. B. Pupils open their books on page 88 and interpret the chart. Pupils define population through discussion. 2. What are the factors that affect population change? G. How can death. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health by Juanita M. et al PELC: 2 Pages: 88-90 Concepts : • Population is the number of particular group of organisms living in a specific area or place. Motivation 1. I. Pupils differentiate the meaning of birth. Application 1. death and migration. Divisoria and other supermarkets during rush hour? Activity 1. Cruz.Answer page 109. Drill The teacher let the pupils answer item 1-10 f their summative test. 3. II. Procedures: A. items 1-5. What are the problems which may occur due to rapid population growth? 2. Part B. Pupils infer the different major courses of population change. POPULATION D. F. 3. part A of your Science textbook. Define population. Inferring on the effects of rapid population growth.

POPULATION 2. . water. What does the picture show? Application In your own simple ways. POPULATION C. Assignment: Answer page 110 of your Science textbook. water. Activity 1. F. How does overpopulation affect people and the environment? I. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI by Rebecca R. Increasing population means more users. and air may become polluted and eventually affects the people living in it. Processes: Describing Enumerating Inferring Materials: Laptop LCD projector pictures G. et al PELC: 2 Pages: 103-106 Concepts: Overpopulation affects the environment. 2. 2. There are more wastes produced and released in the environment. The teacher rectifies the given answer/output of the pupils. Motivation The teacher flashes a picture of a child drinking the urine of a cow. 2. III. The groups discuss the effects of overpopulation. What problem is created when the supply of food. Objectives: 1. Drill Pupils answer items 11-20 of their summative test. air. Follow-up questions are asked to elicit the correct concept/explanation from the pupils. Generalization 1. Evaluation: 1. B. E. The pupils form their groups. and space does not increase but the population does? V. Enumerate the different effects of over population. II. how can you minimize the effect of overpopulation? IV. What do you think the child is doing? Why? D. Infer that population affect one’s health and that of the community. Review The teacher gives 5-item exercise using the LCD projector. Fallaria. Discussion 1. 3. the teacher does number heads together. Pictures which shows the effects of overpopulation will flashed on the screen. Procedure: A. Land. 1. After giving 10 minutes.

natural) that would upset or alter ecological balance? B. These include responsible parenthood. and sustainability of the earth’s ecosystem. II. In groups. Motivation Knowing all the effects of overpopulation. The teacher explains/asks follow-up questions to guide the pupils informing the right science concepts. Evaluation: What are the different strategies to solve overpopulation problems? V. Procedure: A. Objective: 1. Sustained ecological D. II. Objective: 1. Explain how it can be done. et al PELC: 2. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI by Rebecca R. good function. et al PELC: 2 Pages: 107-109 Concepts: There are different ways to solve overpopulation. 4. We must maintain the integrity. Describe the different strategies to solve overpopulation problems. improving food supply and maintaining balance life in the ecosystem. Review What are the different events (artificial. Teacher writes on the board the different problems that are related to overpopulation. reuse and recycle are also important in maintaining a balance ecosystem. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI by Rebecca R. Identify the different ways of maintaining balance of life in the ecosystem. POPULATION C. E. Generalization How can you help in solving the problems related to overpopulation? F. 1. Fallaria. 3. Pupils share/contribute their outputs to the whole class. Assignment: List down materials that can be recycled. pupils are asked to come up with the different ways on how to solve them. I. . reused. Fallaria. why do you think the companies are still imposing the use of recycled materials? III. Pupils discuss their answers along with their leaders. Discussion IV. and reduced.1 Pages: 108-109 Concepts: Our most fundamental role as human beings is to uphold our ecosystems. Reduce. 2. 2. Teacher facilitates the sharing of answers with the use of NHT as CLS.I. do you think the community can do something to solve or prevent the problems related to overpopulation? How? Activity 1. Application If recycling bottles/containers is more expensive than producing a new one.

3. synthetic fibers. II. Objectives: 1. Cruz. pupils draw the different ways which they know on how to maintain the balance of life in ecosystem. Evaluation: Make a mind map of the different ways on balancing the ecosystem. Procedures: A. preservatives. Reporting/Discussion 1. and insecticides are materials commonly used at home. Activity 1. Additives. The teacher gives additional strategies or ways in balancing the ecosystem which are not mentioned. Each group are given time to finish their work. D. Review What are the different strategies to solve over population? B. I. 3. IV. solvent. Leaders assign certain roles to each member. et al PELC: 1 Pages: 113-117 Concepts: Materials may be natural or synthetic (manmade). Using manila paper. plastic. soap. MATERIALS COMMONLY USED AT HOME C. How do you think these animals can be protected. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health by Juanita M. 1. Materials used at home preserve food and enhance its flavor and presentation. 2. Application Do you think the government is doing enough precautions/preventions to maintain the balance in ecosystem? Why? III. Motivation The teacher shows pictures of wild animals. and maintain cleanliness and good health. Identify materials commonly used at home. Generalization . Questions are asked to help the presenters explain the thought of their drawing. What can you see on the pictures? 2. Describe how these materials are used. Pupils present their work in front of the class. Processes: Identifying Communicating Materials: Manila paper Pictures of wild animals Pupils share to the class the things they had learned in today’s discussion. Processes: Identifying E. 2. Assignment: Make a poster about the importance of keeping our ecosystem balance. V. paint.balance assures the survival of future generations. F. 2. pesticides.

Evaluation 1. ___________ causes the blood to move throughout the body. Assignment: Answer 3. 2. Application 1. Motivation 1. insecticides. 3. E. Generalization 1. plastic. Pupils do Activity 3. ____________ is the largest artery in our heart. healthy. How are they used? F.2. Pupils are given 15 minutes to accomplish the table. Discussion 1. How are the materials in your home classified? 2. synthetic. What do you use in keeping yourselves clean. Pupils show their output to the class. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI by Juanita M. I. II. B. III. page 113 of your Science textbook. Which is better to use natural or synthetic materials? Why? IV. 4. Objective: 1. What are the different materials found in your home? . B. Review 1. ___________ are thick blood vessels through which the oxygen rich blood moves away from the heart. Discussion is based from the output of the pupils. 2. Procedure: A. ___________ microscopic blood vessels that connect the smallest arteries to the smallest veins. et al PELC: 1 Pages: 113-117 Concepts: Household materials found at home are pesticides. etc. Classify the materials commonly used at home. D. soap. The teacher discusses the different materials commonly used at home.Describing Materials: Pentel pen Manila paper MATERIALS COMMONLY USED AT HOME III.1 on page 112 of their textbook. Drill 1. and strong? Activity 1. Processes: Observing Describing Classifying Materials: Manila paper Flashcards C. 3. What are the examples of natural preservatives? V. paint. Cruz. Review Pupils answer 1-5 of Exercise A in Lesson 18. 5. What are the examples of food additives? 2. ___________ carries the blood (de oxygenated) to the heart. Procedure: A. 2. solvent.

paint synthetic 2. 3. The use of pesticides improves the yields of crops such as stem borers and sugarcane. fungicides Processes: Predicting Classifying Materials: Manila paper Describing E. solvent. Motivation 1. The teacher explains that the words (material) can be classified under the following: . . paint. 2. et al PELC : 1 Pages : 113-117 Concepts: Pesticides are poison used in farms to effectively control pests such as stem borers. F. Describe how pesticides and insecticides are used. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI by Juanita M. Pesticides can be grouped into three 1.1 What is your basis in grouping the flashcards? 4.pesticides .insecticides . 3. insecticides. Pupils infer the common characteristics or characteristics which each classification has in common. Pupils arrange the words based from the materials they are made of. Application How do improved products differ from natural products? IV.soap . Activity 1. A relationship where one is harmed and the other is benefitted. The teacher show different words using flashcards. and synthetic materials. Drill 1. Discussion 1. Procedures: A. Assignment: Describe how pesticides and insecticides are used. PESTICIDES AND INSECTICIDES I. II. What special materials found at home? 2. soap. How materials can be classified? G.solvent . Generalization 1. Objective: 1. Write 3 materials that you know which can be classified under III. Cruz.C. The teacher explains each classification of materials. V. The teacher asks: 3. A relationship where both of the organisms benefit from each other. D. insecticides 3. What characteristics are common to them? pesticides. The teacher encourages the pupils to explain how they come up with the classification. Evaluation: 1. herbicides 2. 2.

Discussion 1. What do you think farmers usually do to increase the yield of their crops? D. 4. It is a hunter-prey relationship. In applying insecticides what are the things that you should do? IV. Application 1. Processes: Observing Identifying Describing Materials: Manila paper III. This is the relationship when one organism while the other organisms neither benefit nor harmed. Drill 1. II. Tell when materials are harmful. Cruz. How pesticides are applied? 2. How can pesticides increase the yield of the farmers? 2. Evaluation: 1. What are the different pesticides? G. How are the materials in your home can be classified? C. Review 1. 2. They are responsible for breaking down dead organisms. 4. B. Assignment: 1. What precautions you can do? F. E. Rice plant – worm – bird – man Which is the primary consumer? . Generalization 1. Procedures: A. 3. The teacher acknowledges any given answer. An example is the lion and the rabbit 5. 2. 3. Describe how malathion and DDT can be used? V. Activity 1. pupils look for their partners and try to think for some ways to increase the yield of the farmers.3. et al PELC: Pages: 113-117 Concepts: Insecticides are harmful to the soil. Teacher asks the class to share to the class their answer. Motivation 1. Pesticides are also harmful to the organisms. Objective: 1. Organisms that can make their own food. Organisms that eat both plants and animals. When does materials become harmful? HARMFUL MATERIALS I. A relationship which an orchid and a butterfly has. Using Think-Pair-Share. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI by Juanita M. Aquatic organisms are affected.

buildings and furniture. What is common in their labels? C. Which house looks beautiful? Activity 1. The teacher will write it on the board. Pupils give what they know and what they want to know about pesticides. Activity 1. Cruz. Pupils share their outputs. G. They will brainstorm about how materials become harmful. Motivation 1. et al PELC: Page: 116 Concepts: Paints protect and decorate home. Describe how soap and solvents are used. Dutch Boy and other paints. F.5. Pupils read the different components of Boysen. 1. One is beautifully painted while the other house is not. Wellcoat. II. How are materials become harmful? 2. Refining of pupil’s answer will be done.insecticides V. 2. Are they clean? Polluted? If they are polluted. D. Discussion . Procedures: A. 2. Give specific example. E. They make the paints less visions so they are easy to apply. D. Assignment: Look for the common materials found in your home.zonrox .crude oil . Turpentine and thinner are solvents commonly used in paints. Generalization 1. Do they come with solvents like turpentine/thinner? IV. Review: How are materials become harmful? B. 2. 2. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI by Juanita M. Application Look at the creeks or canals near your barangay. Discussion/Sharing 1. Review How pesticides are used? SOAP AND SOLVENT I. Objective: 1. Motivation The teacher shows 2 houses. Processes: Describing Communicating Materials: Pictures of paints and solvents C.soap . what materials polluted these creeks/canals (body of water)? III. Evaluation: When do the following materials become harmful? . Which is the tertiary consumer? B. Pupils find their partners.

Drill What (are) circulatory system? B.3 Science Ideas: Heart is the pumping station of the body. Assignment: Recall the different parts of the nervous system. Cruz. Evaluation: 1. Processes: Recalling Enumerating Materials: D.1. Procedures: A. 2. The other major parts of the circulatory system are heart. What are the different parts and functions of the circulatory system? V. How are they different from each other? F. The teacher asks question and particular number of pupils will answer the question. Motivation Why do you think your heart beats faster when you are doing an extraneous exercise? Activity 1. Generalization What is paint made of? How about solvent? What is paint for? How is solvent used? F. Enumerate the important functions of the part of circulatory system. 2. CIRCULATORY SYSTEM I. Why should iron be painted? 2. Discussion This will be done every after a question asked. Pupils go to their own group. What are the major parts of circulatory system? 2. II. Application 1. . C. Recall the parts of the circulatory system. How is solvent used? V.1 Pages: 2. IV. 3. et al PELC: 1. What do you think is the best paint to use based from their components? E. Ask them the best paint for building. Assignment: Interview construction workers. Number Heads Together will be done. The group having the most number of points will receive a reward. III. How does it affect the body? IV. Generalization 1. blood vessels and the blood. Application 1. What do you think will happen if one of the major parts of circulatory system malfunctioned? 2. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI by Juanita M. How is nail polish removed? Picture of the circulatory system and each part. E. Objective: 1. Evaluation: 1.

Molecules are combination of two or more C.(NOTE: This lesson is intended to review/refresh the past lesson about circulatory system in preparation for their P. Based from the different objects showed how can you classify the different objects. Pupils describe the different objects. Assignment: What is the 4th state of matter? Materials: Metacards. Discussion 1. The teacher list on the board their descriptions. Procedures: A. How do the different objects classified? I. Construct models of molecules. How can you differentiate solid from liquid. insecticides become harmful? B. Atoms are building blocks of matter. Teachers show metacards of the board. Identify the three states of matter II. Generalization 1. ex. What are solids. liquid. The teacher shows examples of solid. Pupils arrange the metacards. Processes: Identifying Comparing Classifying IV. E.T. liquid. Villana Pages: 125127 Concepts: All matter is made up of tiny units called atoms. Motivation 1. II. et al Pages: Concepts: There 3 states of matter-solid. 2. D. Fallaria. Give examples of solid. 2. solid from gas and liquid from gas. liquids and gases? 2. of solid. Objectives: 1. What are the 3 states of matter? 2. gas? V. They are so tiny that you cannot see them. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI by Rebecca R. Liquid has indefinite shape and volume. Objectives: 1. gas MOLECULES III. Solid has a definite shape and volume. liquid and gas. Activity 1. I. 2. Identify the building building blocks of matter. Subject Matter: Reference: Cyber Science VI by Hayda M. Evaluation: 1. zonrox. Atoms can join together to form molecules.) STATES OF MATTER 3. liquid and gas. They may classify the words into 3 groups. . Gas has indefinite shape and volume. Review When do the pesticides. 2.

The teacher explains that matter is made up of tiny units called matter. 2. 2. What is atom? 2. V. What are the intrinsic properties of matter? a. What is plasma? B. Checking of Assignments: 1. The components of atoms is also discussed. volume and density. Generalization 1.atoms. What are molecules? How are they formed? . Assignment: 1. What do you call the tiniest thing that you have seen? 2. Objectives: 1. What is matter? 2. What are the states of matter? C. water molecule and oxygen molecule. The teacher explains how molecules are formed. • Volume refers to the amount of space occupied by the matter. IV. Evaluation: Evaluation is done during the discussion and generalization. 3. Motivation 1. Identify the common properties of matter. What is the tiniest matter that you have ever seen? Presentation 1. E. Example. II. The common properties to all kinds of matter are mass. How are the three states of matter different from the other? F. Discussion 1. 3. Review 1. Procedures: A. If you combine the different atoms. Subject Matter: Reference: Cyber Science VI by Hayda M. Participate enthusiastically in the activities. what is formed? 3. Volume c. Processes: Identifying Describing Constructing Materials: Pentel pen Coconut midrib Clay of different colors G. Density b. What are the different molecules that you know? 2. How are the three states of matter different from the other? Application 1. Pupils output is also checked. Villana Page: 31 Concepts: • A property tells exactly what the substance is like. Pupils construct models of molecules using clay of different colors and coconut midribs. I. • Matter is the amount of matter contained in an object. Mass MATTER D. III.

salt. Do you think the volume changes? 3. 3. volume and density. What are the components of an atom? B. Activity 1. syringe 2. The pupils observe what will happen to the rice grain. NOTE: If the gas/water can be compressed then the volume changes and vice versa. Generalization 1. 2. water. Objective: 1. Differentiate the 3 common properties of matter. Prompting is done to arrive at the desired answers. Relate that any description the pupils made is actually same with telling the properties of an object. Procedures: A. Review 1. Assignment: 1. C. IV. Evaluation: 1.1 Why do you think the rice grains floats? III. volume. Presentation 1. The teacher let the pupils describe an object. G. • Physical properties of matter are the characteristics . Evaluation is carried out during the discussion of the result of the activity. What is atom? 2. 2. Pupils determine whether the volume of gas and water changes.• Density measure the amount of matter in a given volume. spoon. The teacher pour sprite in a clear container. What are the physical properties of matter? MATTER I. Discussion 1. Then. Villana Page: 131 Concept: D. What happens to the volume of gas/water when compressed? 2. Pupils will relate how the density of matter determines whether an object floats or not. The teacher promptly briefly discusses mass. E. The teacher lists all their answer until mass. Motivation 1. V. How does the density of matter determine whether an object floats or not? F. rice grains. Application 1. Subject Matter: Reference: Cyber Science VI by Hayda M. The teacher asks what are the common properties of matter. and density are elicited. container. 2. II. What are the common properties of matter? 2. Processes: Identifying Comparing Inferring Communicating Materials: Egg. Identify the physical properties of matter. she pours some rice grain. 2. sprite.

porosity. sponge 2. hardness. volume or phase. paper 2. E. the teacher elicits the physical properties of matter. coins. malleability are examples of the physical properties of matter. Pupils describe some objects. 2. Assignment: Bring the following: 1. From the descriptions. sponge. What are the different physical properties of matter? F. clasticity. rubber (clasticity) 5. 3. The teacher explains the different property of matter. salt. What is the difference between the mass and the volume? 3. . • Solubility.of matter that can be observed or measured without changing the identity of the substance. What are the common properties of matter? 2. II. Show that materials may change in size. rock (hardness) 2. I. How can the physical property of a matter affect its usage? III. glass (brittleness) 3. brittleness. Generalization 1. The pupils try to explain why they thought the object matter is under or exhibit that physical property of matter. ductility. Procedures: A. wire. copper (ductility) 4.1 Concepts: • Physical change changes the appearance of a D. Motivation 1. Review 1. IV. rubber band. Processes: Identifying Comparing Materials: Clay. What is density? B. rocks. Pupils give different examples of matter under each of the physical property. Observe that no new material is formed when physical change takes place. Teacher explains that all the description that the pupils have mentioned are referring to the physical properties of matter. 2. clay 3. Teacher writes all the descriptions. shape. Subject Matter: Reference: Discover Science 6 by: Academe Pages: 247-248 PELC: 1. Evaluation: Identify the physical property possessed by the following: 1. 2. Presentation 1. flexibility. sponge (porosity) V. water PHYSICAL CHANGE C. Application 1. Objectives: 1. Discussion 1.

Review 1. 3. E. I. Objectives: 1. The teacher asks the pupils if they observe any new materials formed while doing the activity. Generalization 1. Subject Matter: Reference: Discover Science 6 by Academe Page: 248 PELC: 1. 2. The teacher let the pupils infer that all the . What are chemical changes? C. CHEMICAL CHANGE Tear/Sharpen/ Cut Bend the ff: 1. B. 2. the original substance is gone. 2. does it fall under physical change? Why? III.2. shell. II. sharpener. pencil. Assignment: 1. Discussion 1. Application 1.2 Concepts: A chemical change produces new substances with new properties. Pupils perform the following activity: What Changes Occur? Size Shap Volu e me IV. volume or phases without changing its chemical components. Have you been to a parlor/barber shop? 2. The teacher gives examples of matter and the pupils give its physical properties. clay. • Some materials change in size. V. egg. Explain what changes occur. In changing the phases of water-solid-liquid-gas.substance but does not affect its chemical properties. Processes: Inferring Communicating Observing Materials: Paper. Procedures: A. 2. What are the changes that may occur in a physical change? F. The teacher discusses the correct answer. manila paper materials in the activity undergone changes. Once a chemical change takes place. Observe that a new material is formed when chemical change takes place. Give examples of physical change. What is physical change? 2. Show how chemical changes take place in materials. Pupils group themselves into 5. clay paper egg shell pencil D. What do you usually do inside? Activity 1. 2. Evaluation: 1. 4. 3. Motivation 1.

Describe.2 Concepts: . Motivation 1. II.Processes: Observing Inferring Communicating Materials: Rusty iron nail. 2. C. match. what happen to the paper? What is formed? What is produced? D. What happen to the exposed surface of the apple? Examine. What can you see on the iron. Discussion 1. Did you ever experience doing activities then accidentally came up with something interesting? Activity 1.Procedures: A. III. The pupils are grouped into 5. What happen when you pour the vinegar on the baking soda? What is formed? What is produced? I. Application 1. Describe how certain changes in materials have good effect in the environment. Station 1: Station 2: Station 3: vinegar Station 4: Station 5: paper Apple Rusty iron nail Baking soda + Milk + vinegar Burning of E. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI Juanita M. When burning the paper. What are the different chemical changes that occur in your body? 2. What are the changes that may occur in a chemical change? F. Assignment: Explain the effects of change in materials to the environment. Cruz. Review 1. What is chemical change? 2. V. What are the changes that may occur in an object? B. Examine the iron nail. 4. Objectives: 1. Rectification of misconceptions of the pupils is done when necessary. What are the changes occur in a chemical change? Give examples. 3. 2. vinegar. ice bag. Before the pupils proceed to their stations. everybody is aware of their roles and responsibilities. Five stations are set-up. baking powder. milk. The teacher discusses the correct answer. What is physical change? 2. 2. et al Pages: 122-125 PELC: 2. What happen when you pour the vinegar on the milk? What is formed? What is produced? 5. Generalization 1. test tubes. apple. CHEMICAL CHANGE Questions and Observations 1.

energy is either released or absorbed. • Materials produce a beneficial when heated or mixed with another substance. Evaluation: It is done during the discussion and reporting period. D. F. What are the different changes which may occur in a chemical change? B. Procedures: A. The teacher will let the pupils read their textbook. et al Pages : 122-125 PELC: 2. Review 1. Generalization 1. What are the different good effects of changes in the environment? 2. What are the effects of changes (Physical/Chemical) in our daily life? Activity 1. Leaders present their answers. energy is either released or absorbed. In the reaction.• Chemical reactions alter or change the properties of the interacting substance. What are the good effects of physical/chemical change? IV. E. What is chemical change? 2. Materials become Processes: Describing Inferring Communicating Materials: Pentel pens.1 Concepts: Chemical reactions alter or change the properties of the interacting substance. manila paper/A3 bond papers C. Assignment: What are the bad effects of changes in the environment? CHEMICAL CHANGE III. 2. Describe how certain changes in materials have good effect in environment. II. Cruz. Processes: Describing Inferring Communicating Materials: Pentel pens. . manila paper/A3 bond paper Into the Future: Science and Health VI. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI by Juanita M. The teacher may elaborate each good effect that the pupils presented. In the reaction. Motivation 1. I. Discuss/Reporting 1. pages 123-125 for additional information. Objectives: 1. V. The pupils go to their own group and brainstorm about the different good effects of changes in the environment. Application 1.

F. Describe how certain changes in materials have bad effect in the environment. 3. manila paper. Assignment: . soil and water. Objectives: 1. 2. what do you think will happen? IV. Discussion/Reporting 1. Procedures: A. pages 123-125 for additional information. E. Review 1.2 Concepts : Certain changes in materials can have different bad effects in the environment. et al Pages : 125-130PELC : 2.III. D. Processes: Describing Inferring Communicating Materials: Pentel pens. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health V by Juanita M. What are the bad effects of changes in the environment? CHEMICAL CHANGE I. Application 1. Do you think all the changes in the materials are beneficial to our environment? 2. II. Generalization 1. III. What are the effects of changes in our daily life? Activity 1. Into the Future: Science and Health VI. Pupils go to their groups and discuss about the different harmful effects of changes in C. When do such changes becomes harmful? Activity 1. adhesive tape C. Prompting questions will also be asked. The pupils give the summary of the lesson based from their outputs which they presented. The pupils go to their own group and brainstorm about the different good effects of changes (in materials) in the environment. V. What are the different changes which may occur in a chemical change? B. What are the good effects of changes in materials in our environment? B. Procedures: A. Evaluation: It is done during the discussion and reporting period. Motivation 1. The teacher may elaborate each good effect that the pupils presented. What if there is only physical/chemical change that can occur in all the materials. Motivation 1. This may lead to pollution of air. Cruz. Review 1. Leaders present their answers 2. What is chemical change? 2. The teacher will let the pupils read their textbook.

run and jump? 2. Evaluation: Evaluation is done during discussion/reporting proper. 2. E. V. • Living things need energy to carry out life processes and stay alive. Pupils open their notebooks and let their classmates check their assignments. run towards the end of the room and jump up and down. Members of each groups consolidate their answer on a manila paper.materials in our environment. How can you minimize the harmful effects of changes that occur in materials? • Energy is the capacity to do work. Pupils give the summary of the lesson from their outputs. Application 1. pupils read page 125-130 of their Science textbook. She may discuss further some vague ideas/information. D. Plants make their own food by the process called photosynthesis. II. Pupils present their consolidated answers. Anything which is able to do work is said to possess energy. The teacher asks volunteers to lift a bag. Objectives: 1. Discussion/Reporting 1. a. Into the Future: Science and Health VI ENERGY III. Assignment: For additional information. Why do you think they were able to lift the bag. The food produced by plants becomes their source of energy. 2. It is measured in joules. Procedures: A. Generalization 1. F. Into the Future Manila paper IV.. What are the different harmful effects of changes in our environment? Motivation 1. Review 1.1 Concepts: C. Presentation I. Processes: Identifying Describing Inferring Materials: Science textbook. Recall the meaning of energy. Checking of Assignments 1. Pupils infer that energy is used in order to do any work. • Animals get their energy by eating other living things. Subject Matter: Reference: My Pals are Here: Energy P5-6 by Koh Siew Luan et al Pages: 8-11 PELC: 1. Teacher asks questions to scaffold and prompt the presenters. . Infer how plants and animals obtain energy. 2. B. Teacher explain each item. 2. D.

How do animals obtain energy in order to stay alive? V. The teacher explains the process of photosynthesis? 3. the greater its kinetic energy. Kinetic energy of moving objects can be used to do work. pictures from MPaH! IV. Objectives: 1. How do plants and animals obtain energy? 2. battery. Motivation 1. Discussion 1. The teacher explains that the sun is the main source of energy. III. How do animals obtain energy? B. What are the forms of energy? Bring bottles for the next activity. The faster an object moves. The teacher introduces the word energy. What is the main source of energy? 2.) 2. ball bottled water Manila paper. Subject Matter: Reference: My Pals are Here! Energy P5 & 6 By Koh Siew Luan. Review 1. Application 1.1. The teacher shows a picture of a surfer and a rolling waves. List examples of kinetic and potential energy. The energy stored in an object due to its position is also called potential energy. Kinetic energy of an object depends on its mass and on its speed. How do plants obtain energy? 3. et al Pages: 14-17 PELC: 1. Evaluation: 1. What is energy? 2. biscuits. 2. The teacher will also relate food chain in obtaining energy. Identify the 2 forms of energy. Assignment: 1. Processes: Identifying Listing Observing Materials: Spring. • Potential Energy is a stored energy. Do you think only living things need energy? Why? II. . Procedures: A. E. What do living things need to stay alive? 3.Do you think they possess energy? Why? ENERGY I. How do plants obtain their food? 2. (For section 1 and 2). How do plants and animals obtain energy? G. .1 Concepts: • A moving object has movement energy or kinetic energy. In what form does energy exist? 2. the teacher will just recall what energy is. Generalization 1. F.

Assignment: 1. 1. 2. What are the 2 forms of energy? 2. Review 1.1 Concepts : PE exists in 3 forms. Pupils define and give additional inputs about the 2 forms of energy (based from their homework). • Chemical energy is found in food. These are gravitational PE.Evaluation: 1. What is potential energy? 4. Processes: Identifying Describing Inferring Materials: Pictures from MPaH! Manila paper D. Is it true that the faster an object moves. 2. IV. II.C. What is kinetic energy? 3. Identify the 3 forms of potential energy. I. Motivation 1. Checking of Assignment Pupils exchange notebooks and check the assignments of their seatmates. B. F. Does the potential energy of an object change when it is lifted higher? Find out. • Gravitational PE is an object has because of its position above the ground. POTENTIAL ENERGY . • Clastic PE is found in a stretched rubber band. and clastic potential energy. Presentation 1. Give examples of PE & KE. Application 1. What are the 2 general classifications of energy? 2. bow or compressed spring. Pupils make a concept map of energy which include potential and kinetic energy. Chemical PE. et al Pages: 16-19 PELC : 1. Discussion Pupils give example of potential and kinetic energy. the more kinetic energy it has? The pupils perform an activity by rolling a ball towards the bottled water with different speed. Objective: 1. 2. The teacher explains the 2 forms of energy based from the pictures and materials presented. Generalization 1. batteries and fuels. V. Subject Matter: Reference: MPaH! Energy: P5 & P6 by Koh Siew Luan. Procedures: A. List forms of energy under each form. Pupils explain why they think the examples they gave possessed either kinetic or potential energy. Group the following together: battery used to operate a calculator rubber band stone on the top of the table spring C. III. List examples of kinetic and potential energy. E. The teacher explains further if necessary.

Make a concept map of PE. battery 5. MECHANICAL ENERGY . It is the energy that enables body to do work. List more examples of PE from under the 3. List the uses of mechanical energy. et al Pages : 172 and 182 PELC : 1. bow 3. biscuits 4. What are the 3 forms of PE? 2. Presentation 1.What kind of energy was used to move his/her muscle? C. III. Presentation 1.3 forms. G. Give examples of each form.1 Concepts : • Mechanical Energy is inherent in moving bodies. . II. IV. How do you obtain the information on how much energy a type of 5 food provides? Through the “nutrition information” found on its packaging. Villana. Definition of each form will be given. The teacher asks for more examples. Based from the give examples on the motivational part. I. coal V. The teacher defines mechanical energy. 2. Application 1. Assignment: 1. B. Procedures: A. Identify the sources of mechanical energy. Generalization 1. Machines possess mechanical energy too. Objectives: 1. What are the 3 forms of PE? 2. mechanical energy is used to do work. The teacher explains that there are 3 forms of PE 2. Give examples. Motivation 1. 2. why do / how do the materials are classified? 2. F. Subject Matter: Reference: Cyber Science 6 by Hayda M. electric fan E. Discussion 1. Review 1. The teacher asks a volunteer to perform an exercise in front of the class.food like vegetables and fruits skater on the top of a ramp D.What made him/her move? . Processes: Identifying Listing Communicating Materials: Manila paper. fruits on the top of the tree 2. • When your muscles move. Evaluation: Identify what form of PE are the following: 1.

What are the uses of mechanical energy? B. Procedures: A. The teacher asks the pupils to rub their pens against their hair and let them pick the pieces of tiny paper. Evaluation: 1. V. • Electricity can be static or current. Generalization Pupils make a concept map ME on the board. Processes: Describing Enumerating Observing Materials: Ballpen. Review 1. What are the other sources of ME? 2.1 Concepts: • Electrical energy is the most useful form of energy in our lives. What are the different sources of ME? 2. E. IV. Subject Matter: Reference: Cyber Science VI by Hayda M. tiny pieces of paper. Assignment: 1. Can you live conveniently? Why? Presentation 1. ELECTRICAL ENERGY I. What activities you cannot do without electric current? 2. It is the widely used form of energy. Objectives: 1. What are the uses of electrical energy? 3. Discussion 1. Give the different uses of ME in our daily living. Application Look around you and draw examples of the uses of ME in your notebook. Generalization . Describing how electrical energy is generated. D. manila paper E. What are the uses of ME? Without electrical energy. 2. What is mechanical energy? 2.2. How do you think the electrical energy is generated? 2. D. machines and appliances will not work. What is electrical energy? 2. Discussion 1. II. III. The teacher will now explain static and current electricity. Number Heads Together is done as cooperative learning strategy. Villana. Some examples of materials that makes use of ME are also cited/showed. 2. Enumerating uses of energy. F. What are the uses of electrical energy? C. et al Pages: 174 and 184 PELC: 1. Motivation Have you experienced a day or two of “blackout”? 1.

Objectives: 1. whistle V. What are the sources of electrical energy? 2. Summative Test: Materials: Manila paper III. Processes: Describing Enumerating Identifying Materials: Manila paper. Pupils have to do/make a concept map of what they have learned. List some uses of sound energy. Objectives: . How important is sound energy? Imagine the world without sound.What do you observe on the opening of the whistle? IV. What are the advantages? IV. Procedures: A. Giving Directions D. Answer the questions correctly. Application 1. How now you feel? Presentation 1. Preparatory Activities Pupils prepare for the test B. . or soft like a whisper. Describe how sound energy is formed. Sound is used in many ways such as in communication and in studying the physical world. Assignment: 1. Follow the directions carefully. particularly the ultrasonic waves. Review 1. F. Sounds can be loud like a thunder. C. Evaluation: 1. Study sound energy. The teacher asks a volunteer to blow a whistle. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI by Rebecca R. Passing of their Answer Sheets III. It is all around us. What are the modes of transportation which make use of electrical energy? 2.1. 2. What is sound energy? 2. it is widely used in technology. Motivation 1. II. 1. Testing Proper E. SOUND ENERGY I. Assignment: 1. Procedures: A. 2. What are the uses of electrical energy? B.1 Concepts: Sound is the result of mechanical energy that causes something to vibrate. List/enumerate the uses of electrical energy. Recalling of Standards in Taking the Test C. What are the uses of sound energy? I. Fallaria et al Pages: 152-153 PELC: 1. Now. How does electrical energy generated? 2. Cite how electrical energy is used. II.

V.How does the air flow? = Air rushing past an obstacle fast enough to cause turbulence generates sound waves.1 Concepts: • Radiant energy can travel through an empty space (vacuum). It is produced by nuclear reactions. Make a concept map of sound energy. • The sun and the stars are the sources of radiant energy. How can sound prevent accidents? IV. Objectives: 1. D. Cite some uses of radiant energy. What are the uses of sound energy? 2. Application 1. 2. 2. The teacher explains how sound is formed and produced. Radiant energy maybe in the form of light. What is radiant energy? 2. How can sound be used in medical field or in communication? - II. radiation. Reporting/Discussion 1. radio waves. Evaluation: 1. Leader of each group reports their output. Discussion 1. When do you usually use sound? 3. 2. Motivation 1. Assignment: 1. What are the uses of radiant energy? III. The teacher briefly explains radiant energy. Generalization 1. Fallaria et al Pages: 153-155PELC: 1. x-rays and gamma rays. 2. What are the uses of sound energy? B. Include how sound energy is generated and its uses. Processes: Describing Enumerating Predicting Materials: Manila paper E. infrared waves. What are the uses of sound energy? F. Pupils are given 15 minutes to list the different uses of radiant energy based from their prior knowledge. Review 1. What is the most important form of energy? Why? Activity 1. ultraviolet. How is sound energy generated? 2. What is sound energy? 2. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI by Rebecca R. Procedures: A. RADIANT ENERGY I. (Pupils may put their fingers on their neck and feel their vocal cords) D. Describe radiant energy. . Teacher asks questions that lead the answers of the C.

Assignment: 1. V. Evaluation: 1. what is the dreaded event that occurred in Japan? . What are the uses of sound? B. The teacher relates and explains further nuclear energy in connection with the atomic bomb dropped in Japan. The teacher explains nuclear energy. Motivation During WW II.pupils to the right science concept. How is nuclear energy generated? III. Review 1. What is radiant energy? 2. What is nuclear energy? 2. How can radiant energy from the sun causes changes in earth’s weather condition? combining particles from the nucleus of an atom. Discussion 1. picture of nuclear power plant on a folder. Based from all the different inputs.America dropped atomic nuclear bomb in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. IV. • Nuclear energy can be both helpful and harmful to man. Generalization . Fallaria et al Pages: 161-162 PELC: 1. Misconceptions are rectified. • Nuclear fission is the splitting of a nucleus while nuclear fusion is the combination of light nuclei to form a heavier nucleus. Objectives: 1. pupils consolidate their answers/outputs. D. What are different uses of nuclear energy? NUCLEAR ENERGY I. Describe how nuclear energy is formed. Japan. Presentation 1. Procedures: A. Application 1. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI by Rebecca R. What is nuclear energy? 2. 2. E. 2. Enumerate/cite some uses of radiant energy.1 C. how it is formed and the different uses. 2. II. Cite some uses of nuclear energy. The teacher writes on the board all the consolidated answer (uses of radiant energy) F. What is sound energy? 2. Generalization 1. 3. Concepts: • Nuclear energy comes from either splitting or E. Processes: Describing Communicating Enumerating Materials: Manila paper.

Procedures: A. 2. THERMAL ENERGY I. Subject Matter: Reference: Cyber Science VI by Hayda M. II. V. Motivation 1. tripod stand. Pupil 1 walks around the room. Do you think it is worthy to produce electricity in a nuclear power plant knowing the dreadful side effects on our environment? Materials: Manila paper.1 Concepts: Heat energy is a common form of energy present in everybody due to motion of its molecules. The teacher asks for 2 volunteers. F. What is nuclear energy? 2. Processes: Describing Enumerating Observing Inferring . What are the uses of heat/thermal energy? C. Discussion 1. The teacher let the pupils answer the question in the 2 activities. Describe how heat/thermal energy is formed. Hand boiler (alcohol) • Why do you think the alcohol goes up of the container? • What causes the alcohol to boil? 2. • Which among the 2 pupils feel hotter? Activity Before the activity. Objectives: 1. Evaluation: Make a concept map of nuclear energy. What are the uses of nuclear energy? B. Enumerate the sources of heat/thermal energy. Review 1. Assignment: 1. Pupil 2 runs around the room. wire gauze. They will also enumerate its uses. Include its meaning and uses.1. Application Nuclear power plant can produce trillion times of energy more than any other power plant. It is also called thermal energy. Boiling water (beaker) • What happens to the water in the beaker as it becomes hotter? • What causes the water to boil? • What happens to the molecules of water as it becomes hotter? D. Pupils describe nuclear energy. Villana Page: 176 PELC: 1. alcohol lamp. beaker III. hand boiler. Pupils share to the class their answers/observations. 1. What is heat/thermal energy? 2. 2. the teacher briefly relates the movement of the 2 pupils to the movement of molecules in any given matter. IV.

What are the sources of heat energy? F. This is to develop awareness on them. What is heat energy? 2. guitar Are these forms present in the material all at the same time? ENERGY I. Motivation Identify the form/s of energy used by the following objects/materials: a. It may be transformed from one C. electric fan b. Procedures: A. Cite some examples of how energy is being transformed. toy car. Based from our 2 activities. Generalization 1. candle. Turn the lever of the flashlight. Application 1. Objective: 1. What are the different sources of heat? V. The teacher rectifies any misconceptions. 4. • • form into another. Evaluation: 1. What are the different forms of . how would you describe heat energy? 2. the teacher will briefly explains first the law of conservation. What is produced? 1. A motor is a device that transforms electrical energy to mechanical energy. Assignment: 1. prior to that. flashlight. II. E. It is also for them to know/realize and evaluate their own observations.2.1. Investigate change in energy. Mechanically operated flashlight 1. But.2 Materials: Mechanically operated flashlight. How is heat/thermal energy produced? 2. Review 1. A generator is a device that transforms mechanical energy to electrical energy Processes: Identifying Observing Investigating IV. What is conservation of energy? 2. Cite some ways of producing heat. 1. Group Activity Each group is given one gadget/object to investigate the transformation of energy. MP3 Concepts: • Energy cannot be created nor destroyed. Pupils check their answers. Subject Matter: Reference: Cyber Science VI Page: 201 PELC: 1. How is heat energy/thermal energy produced? B. III. television c. but the total amount of energy never changes.3.

5. 2 . What are conduction.1 Switch on the MP3. Name 3 energy transformations of objects/gadgets found in your home. beaker. V. Subject Matter: Reference: Cyber Science VI Pages: 206-207 PELC: 1. Evaluation: Complete the concept map below on energy transformation of a moving car. What form of energy is produced? Arrange the sequence of energy of energy production. 1 .Are all the forms of energy present in the materials all at the same time? IV. Toy car 2. . which gives 4 . convection and radiation? HEAT ENERGY I. Objective: 1. 4.energy produced? Arrange the sequence of energy production. What form of energy is produced? Arrange the sequence of energy production. is changed to 3 . Discussion Answers from the activity will be discussed.1 Switch on the toy car. Assignment: 1. Identify the different ways on how heat energy can be transferred. What form of energy is produced? Arrange the sequence of energy production. candle. match stick. . Cite evidence that energy can be transformed. . alcohol lamp. Leading questions will be asked to help the pupils arrived at the correct concept.1. Lighted bulb (flashlight) 5. which is released into environment 5 2 . What form of energy are produced? Arrange the sequence of energy production. D.2 Materials: Tripod stand. manila paper Concepts: E. Generalization 1. 2. Application How is energy transformed from one form to another. 3. 2. Lighted candle Lit the candle using a match stick. II. black pepper. MP3 4. How can you show that energy can be changed from one form to another? F. Switch on the flashlight. .

What is law of conservation of energy? 2. Review 1. wind blows (convection) 2. Activity Before the activity. • Convection is a method of heat transfer that depends upon the movement of the material that is heated. • Radiant is a method of heat transfer in which energy is transmitted by waves through space. the teacher briefly discuss the 3 methods of energy transfer. Cold air from a cooler place blows to the heated place. Application Can you recall how a breeze is created? . Objective: 1. Discussion Answer from the activity will be discussed. . What do you observe on the black pepper? Draw your observation. Procedures: A. Lighted candle If you put your hand near the lighted candle (necessary precaution should be observed). What are the methods of heat transfer? Differentiate each method from one another. Measure the speed/velocity of an objection motion. Evaluation: Identify the method of heat transfer. 1. B. • Conduction is a method of heat transfer by direct contact of a part of a body with the source of heat. Boiling water with black pepper. What method of heat transfer is observed? 3. cooking lechon (radiation) 3.Warm air rises. what form of energy is always produced? Where does it usually go? C. 1. F. microwave oven (radiation) 4. IV. what do you feel? What method of heat transfer is observed? D. Processes: Identifying Observing Investigating 2. III. Show the arrangement/sequence of energy transformation that occur in a battery operated toy car. Spoon in a beaker of hot water What happens to the handle of the spoon after few minutes? What method of heat transfer is observe? E. Leading questions will be asked to help them arrived at the correct science concepts. Generalization 1.Heat always transfers travels or flows from a high temperature to a low temperature. This method happens in liquids and gases. boiling water (convection) MOTION I. hot compress (conduction) 5. Motivation During the transformation of energy.

Pupils identify the distance and time – the two components of speed. V. What is the formula? F. What is the speed of light/sound? Which travels faster in an empty space? III. Application 1. 3. Give an example of speed/velocity. How about the slowest? Presentation 1. ACCELERATION I. 2. Teacher’s Manual Pages: 119-120 PELC: 2. Motivation 1. Define acceleration. What are the 3 methods of heat transfer? 2. Do you know the fastest land mammal? fastest fish. The teacher elaborates the units of measurement of time and distance. The teacher let the pupils derived the formula based from the given situations a. • Velocity is the speed of a moving object in a specified directions. How IV. Assignment: 1. Generalization 1. manila paper Concepts: • The speed of an object is measured in terms of distance and time. Evaluation: 1. II. Give examples of objects/gadgets which undergo any method of heat transfer. Processes: Defining Identifying Calculating/Measuring fast can a racing car run? 2. • Distance is expressed in meters and time in seconds.II. E. Speed and velocity are differentiated. What is the speed of Jerry if he runs zoom in 50 seconds? 2. Subject Matter: . How fast could Lydia run? b. C. Objectives: 1. Review 1. A racing car can run 200km per hour. 2. Subject Matter: Reference: Science and Health VI. Procedures: A. Calculate the acceleration of a moving object. Make a venn diagram which compares speed from velocity. The teacher asks a volunteer to run around the room and let them compute the speed. insect? 2.1 Materials: Timer. Lydia de Vega negotiated a 100meter distance in 12 seconds. Discussion 1. B. How does speed differ from velocity? 2. D.

Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI Pages: 186-188 PELC: 2.2 Materials: Manila paper, pictures Concepts: • Acceleration is the change in velocity over time. Deceleration is negative acceleration. • Acceleration is caused by an applied force and is affected by the mass of a body. Processes: Defining Calculating III. Procedures: A. Checking of Assignments Pupils check their answers on pages 177 and 188 of their Science textbook. B. Review A man runs at 200-meter cast. If it took in 18 seconds, what is his velocity? Motivation When you are biking on an uphill or downward road, does the bikes velocity change from time to time? Presentation 1. The teacher introduces the word acceleration. 2. The teacher presents a problem situation. A car moves from rest (0) to 20mls in 10 seconds. What is the acceleration of the car? 3. The teacher show the stepby-step way of solving the problem. Then, she will give another problem

which the pupils will solve. • A bicycle moves from rest to 40mls in 5 seconds. What is the acceleration? • What is its acceleration if it takes the bus 20 seconds to stop and pick up passengers on its route? – deceleration. E. Discussion 1. The teacher let the pupils infer the difference between acceleration and deceleration based from the given examples. F. Generalization 1. What is acceleration? 2. What are the factors that you should know for you to calculate the acceleration of a moving object? G. Application 1. When do cars accelerate or decelerate?

C.

D.

IV. Evaluation: 1. A train is travelling at a speed of 30 mls. What is its acceleration if it takes the train 3 seconds to stop? 2. A car travelling at 15 mls. increases its speed to 25 mls. in 5 seconds. What is its acceleration? V. Assignment: Activity 5.3 of their Science textbook, Into the Future: Science and Health VI, page 188.

MASS AND SHAPE OF AN OBJECT

I. Objective:

1. Infer that mass and shape of an object affect its movement.

II.

Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI Pages: 178-179 PELC: 2.0 Materials: Tin cans, clay, match box Manila paper
Concepts: • Mass and shape of an object affect its movement. • The heavier the object is, the slower the movement of an object. Processes: Identifying Predicting Communicating Inferring

same line. Push them one-by-one. Which do you think moved farther? (NOTE: Some amount of force should be used on both match boxes). B. SHAPE 1. Given 2 pieces of clay of the same size. Mold the clay into a circle and a square/cube. 2. Roll slide the cubeshaped clay and the spheroid clay applying the same amount of force. Which reached a greater distance?

D.

III. Procedures: A. Review 1. What is acceleration? 2. How do you get the acceleration of a moving object?
B. Motivation 1. Utilizing Think-Pair-Share, pupils discuss their assumptions of the factors that affect the movement of an object. 2. The teacher writes on the board their answers. Leading questions will be asked. C. Group Activity Procedures and Observations: A. MASS 1. Given 2 tin cans with different weight. Push the tin cans oneby-one applying the same force. Which moved farther? Why? 2. Put the 2 matchboxes on the

Discussion The teacher discusses the correct answers from the activity.

E. Generalization Based from the activities that you performed, what conclusion can you make? F. Application What is the advantage of knowing that shape/mass of an object affects its movement?

IV. Evaluation: 1. How can mass/shape of an object affects its movement? V. Assignment: 1. What are the other external factors that affect the movement of an object?
AIR PRESSURE

I. Objective: 1. Describing how air pressure affects the movement of objects.

B.

II.

Subject Matter: Reference: North Indiana University (Online) PELC: 3.0
Materials: Paper strips, tin cans Concepts: • Air pressure affects the movement of an object. It is the result of “press” of air. • Air can be a force from a push. Processes: Describing Observing Communicating Inferring

Crashing Soda Cans/Tin Cans 1. Hang the soda cans making sure that they are few centimeters apart. 2. Blow a strong burst of air between the soda cans. Observe the result. 2.1. What do you observe? Describe. 2.2. What causes the object to move? Describe.

D. Discussion 1. How do air pressure affects the movement of objects? The teacher will elaborate and discuss the answers from the activity E. Generalization 1. Describe how air pressure can affect the movement of an object. F. Application 1. How does air balloon floats on the sky? What external factors are involved?

III. Procedures: A. Review 1. How can mass affect the movement of an object? 2. Why do you think wheels are round?
B. Motivation 1. Why do objects move? The teacher elicits responses by providing prompts, such as: What would make a paper sway? Activity The teacher briefly discuss what air pressure is. A. Paper Strips 1. Take the strip of paper and hold it near your mouth. 2. Blow air across the top of it. Observe the result. 2.1. What do you observe? Describe. 2.2. What causes the object to move? How?

IV. Evaluation: Sketch how air pressure affects the movement of objects. Describe your work. V. Assignment: 1. How can friction affect the movement of objects?

C.

FRICTION

I. Objectives: 1. Describe how friction affects the movement of objects.

Generalization Describe how friction affect the movement of objects. How can air pressure affect the movement of an object? B. 2. Processes: Describing Observing Communicating Inferring 3. Assignment: Name some examples which you think friction is beneficial and some examples which friction is not beneficial. matchboxes Concepts: • Friction is a force that opposes motion. The teacher discusses the correct answer of the questions from the activity. • Friction is present even in two smooth surfaces. Given the plain inclined boards with smooth and rough surfaces. Objective: . Application Why are there some patterns found in the soles of the shoes? C. How does friction affect the movement of objects? ____________ D. 3. Make a prediction. III. The effects of friction is up for the pupils to discover through the activity.II. Discussion 1. IV. Give examples of activities in which friction is present. Motivation 1. Evaluation: 1. V. What is friction? 2. Procedures: A. F. Procedures and Observations: 1. Will the matchbox can move faster on the smooth surface or on the rough surface? __________ ______________________________ E. How do different surface types influence the amount of friction? 2. Review 1.1 Which surface does the matchbox car move faster? Why? ________ __________________________ 4. Get the materials from the teacher. test on which surface can the matchbox car has a greater speed. What surface has a greater/produce a greater friction? _________________ 5. It makes an object difficult to move across a surface. I. Subject Matter: Reference: North Indiana University (Online) PELC: Materials: Inclined planes with smooth and rough surfaces. What would make an object stop/slow down? Activity The teacher briefly discuss the meaning of friction.

Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI Pages: 153-160 PELC: 1.1. electrical. Evaluation: Please refer to Workbook on Science VI. What is energy? 2. Procedures: A. DIFFERENT FORMS OF ENERGY I. Generalization Pupils consolidate what they have learned. Subject Matter: Reference: Test Questions Adopted from Second Periodical Test Materials: Test Papers/Manila paper Concepts: Changes in Matter: Physical and Chemical Energy transformations Processes: Identifying Describing Evaluating V. These include mechanical. What are the different forms of energy? 2. Presentation 1. Pupils are given a chance to answer or explain their answers in every item.2 Materials: Bond paper. Motivation 1. Objective: 1. II. Lesson 38. Presentation 1. IV. After reading the questions and answering. What are the different forms of energy? B. radiant. The teacher guides the answers of the pupils. II. Processes: Identifying Describing Evaluating III. Cite some forms of energy and their uses which you usually encounter in your daily living. III. Review the least mastered skills about the different forms of energy. C. This is to master the concept related to the lesson. Enrich the pupils about the different forms of energy. C.Passing of concept maps and projects B. sound. Procedures: A. chemical. Checking of Assignments . page 62. nuclear and heat energy. the teacher tries to explain the correct answer. pad paper Concepts: There are different forms of energy. D. The teacher asks the pupils to identify the different forms of energy that they know. Review 1. Discussion 1. Assignment: Pupils may continue in doing their concept maps about the different forms of energy. 2. .

Generalization 1. Application 1. II. Discussion 1. The teacher shows the transformation of energy in electric fan. Objective: 1. The teacher posts one object/gadgets. IV. Discussion 1. What do you think is the most important form of energy? III. Application 1. Evaluation: Please refer on page 62 of Workbook on Science 6. manila paper Concepts : E.2. How is the energy from the food we eat is transformed when we are dancing and singing? . Pupils discuss the given examples. Processes: Identifying Generating Evaluating E. Pupils take note how each form of energy is transformed into other forms. C. Energy cannot be created nor destroyed. Identify the different forms of energy that are transformed in given objects/gadgets. D. Subject Matter: Reference: Cyber Science VI Pages: 200-201 PELC : 1. VI. Motivation 1. DIFFERENT FORMS OF ENERGY I. Pupils consolidate everything they have learned about the forms of energy through a definition concept map. What does a swinging pendulum show? Presentation 1. Procedures: A.2 Materials : Metacards. Pupils go to their respective groups. What are the forms of energy? 2. Each group is given a chance to answer and show to the class their answers. What are the uses of the different forms of energy? B. Review 1. D. 3. 2. 2. It can only be transformed into another form of energy. lighted candle and a computer. The teacher may elaborate the different forms of energy. Assignment: Pupils may continue do their assignment about the definition concept maps of the different forms of energy. F. The group must show the transformation of energy. Pupils give examples of objects/gadgets which produce different forms of energy. What is law of conservation of energy? F. 2. Generalization 1.

D. Pupils refer to their concept maps. Objective: 1. radiant. Show the transformation of energy.B. How did you construct your concept maps? 2.2 Materials: Construction paper Colored paper Concepts: There are different forms of energy. What is energy? 2. Do you find it useful definition concept maps? What are the advantages? IV. Assignment: Look for 3 appliances in your home. What are the different forms of energy that you usually encounter? Activity 1. calculator c. Motivation 1. What are the different forms of energy? . electrical. buzzer b. sound. chemical. Objective: 1. pupils construct a definition concept map of every form of energy. Construct concept maps of the different forms of energy. C. II. ultrasound V. Based from the previous discussions. Application 1. battery d. Discussion 1. V. II. Evaluation: Evaluation is based from the output of the pupils. nuclear and heat energy. a. DIFFERENT FORMS OF ENERGY I. Describe the interior layers of the earth. Show the transformation of energy. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI Pages: 162-170 PELC: 1. Assignment: What are the different interior layers of the earth? INTERIOR LAYERS OF THE EARTH I. Subject Matter: Reference: Cyber Science VI Pages: 238-239 PELC: 1. IV. Review 1. Processes: Identifying Describing E. These include mechanical. cellphone e.1 Materials: Eggs cut into half (crosswise) III. Procedures: A. Each item of energy is discussed. How did you connect each idea from one another? F. Evaluation: 1. Generalization 1.

Pacific. The teacher discusses the different compositions of every layer. It is the largest earth’s layer. What is the layer beneath the crust? 3. E. Procedures: A. What are the compositions of each layer? F. The teacher associates the egg to the interior layer of the earth. Motivation 1. What layer is found in the innermost part of the earth? V. The teacher explains that the layers of the egg resemble the interior layers of the earth. It is made up of continental and oceanic crust. D. IV. . • The mantle extends to about 3. The teacher shows an egg. manila paper Concepts: • The seven crustal plates of the Earth are Eurasian. Identify the different crustal plates. 2. What are the different interior layers of the earth? 2. Africa and American plates. Objective: 1. B. Pupils describe the egg. Assignment: 1. 2.000km down under the earth’s crust. Review Pupils answer item number 1-8 of their Second Periodical Test. Application 1. Australian. Generalization 1. CRUSTAL PLATES I. The teacher draws the different layers of the earth on the board.2 Materials: Science textbook. Indian. Discussion 1. C. Presentation 1. Antarctic. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future Pages: 199-201 PELC: 1. Evaluation: 1. II. Pupils describe the different layers of the earth. Processes: Identifying Describing Inferring 2. • The core is located in the center of the earth. The teacher discusses the correct answer. What is the importance of knowing the earth’s interior layer? III. • The crust is the outermost layer of the earth. 3. Find out why the earth’s interior is very hot. What are the different interior layers of the earth? 2.Manila paper Concepts: • There are three interior layers of the earth.

How do the different crustal plates move? 2. ruler Concepts: • A plate is a rigid block of Earth’s crust about 50-150 km thick. Motivation 1. twist. Review 1. What are the evidences which supports the continental drift theory? EARTHQUAKE I. 7. What are the different crustal plates? E. and shearing. 2. The teacher shows picture of Pangea. or break. B. What are the different interior layers of the earth? 2. III. manila paper. The teacher explains the theories involved on how the sea floor was developed. tilt. Generalization 1. Procedures: A. pencil. tension. 4. Review . Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI Pages: 197-199 PELC: 2. Processes: Identifying Describing Identify the seven crustal plates: 1. In what crustal plate is the Philippines situated? IV. clay. Assignment: 1. 5. 3. D.2 Crusty Plates in their notebooks. 2. Describe how an earthquake occurs. Describe each layer of the earth.• The crustal plates float over a liquid so called asthenosphere. The three types of stress that cause the deformation of the rock layers in the tectonic plates are compression. Application 1. they can bend. • When rock layers are under stress. 2. Discussion 1. F. Presentation 1. The teacher explains that before there is only one great land mass which drifted apart (continental drift theory) V. II. 6. The teacher explains how the plates move. Enumerate the 7 major crustal plates in the world.1 Materials: Books. Objective: 1. Pupils do Activity 6. What are the different theories which explain the development of sea floor? 2. Processes: Describing Identifying Demonstrating Communicating Predicting C. Procedures: A. Evaluation: III. 3.

mountains and falls are formed? 2. Pupils are encouraged to predict on how the different plates move? 2. Pupils do Activity 6. Presentation 1. What do you call the upper mantle where the crustal plates float? B. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI Pages: 197-198 PELC: 2.Name the different crustal plates. Pupils are encouraged to predict. Evaluation: 1. Motivation 1. on page 202. The teacher explains that formation of trenches. D. • In a divergent boundary. 2. Illustrate the three types of movement in the crustal plates. Every group performs the activity. Application Using two pieces of ruler. Motivation 1. What is “Ring of Fire”? Describe. II. show how the crustal plates move. B. How does an earthquake occur? 2. IV. I. Procedures: A. Assignment: 1. two plates slide passively past each other with no creation or destruction of lithosphere. 2. F. What are the 3 types of stress? 3.3. mountains. The teacher may ask the pupils to demonstrate using the clays. Presentation 1. Processing: Identifying Describing Predicting Inferring C. volcanoes is caused by the movement of crustal plates which also produces earthquake. Generalization Pupils describe how earthquake occurs by describing the movement of the crustal plates. the teacher shows the different crustal movements which cause earthquakes. Pupils share to the class their answers. two plates move apart and a space is left between the plates. . How does an earthquake occur? III. Did you ever wonder how the trenches. Discussion 1. Using the clays. Objective: 1. clay Concepts: • Two plates meet and collide in the convergent zone. CRUSTAL PLATES C. What might happen if the crust is under stress? 2. The teacher shows the pictures of different plate V. • In a transform fault.2 Materials: Pictures of the different plate boundaries. E. Review 1.

Differentiate intensity from the magnitude of an earthquake. 2. V. • Mercalli scale is used to determine the earthquake intensity while the Richter scale is used to measure the relative sovereignty of an earthquake.3 Materials: Manila paper. Discussion 1. How are they formed? F. The teacher shows the Mercalli and Richter scale chart. II. What do seismologists used to determine the sovereignty and intensity of an earthquake? Presentation 1. What type of movement caused each type of boundaries? 3. • The effects or degree of destruction of an earthquake is called intensity. Pupils illustrate in their notebooks the different movements of crustal plates. What are different plate boundaries? 2. D. Procedures: A. Illustrate the types of movements of the tectonic plates.boundaries. Review 1. Discussion EARTHQUAKE Intensity and Magnitude C. Be able to share to the class next week. Subject Matter: D. Processes: Describing Comparing Inferring E. Assignment: Find out Marikina fault. What are the different plate boundaries? 2. B. Reference: Science Spectrum VI Pages: 202-203 PELC: 2. Pupils try to explain each level on the chart. The teacher asks pupils to show to the class how the different movements (based from the pictures/drawings) of the tectonic plates create boundaries. The teacher explains the different land formations which are caused by the plates movements. . Application 1. picture of seismograph Concepts: • The total amount of energy released by an earthquake is called magnitude. IV. Generalization 1. Motivation 1. 2. Evaluation: 1. It tells the relative sovereignty of an earthquake. Objective: 1. Plate boundaries are where the tectonic plates meet. III. Differentiate focus from epicenter. What are the different plate boundaries? 2. I.

Differentiate intensity from magnitude. Motivation 1. Leaders report their output. C. Pupils now infer the difference between the 2 scales. Assignment: 1. Generalization 1. the leader for the day will report their output in front. What do you think may happen if there’s an earthquake? 2. After giving enough time. . 3. Pupils go to their assigned group and discuss their answers. Concepts: • Earthquakes affect the inhabitants of tectonically active regions.1. 3. II. and dams. The teacher writes on the board all their observations. Reporting/Discussion 1. 5. What does Mercalli/Richter scale measure? V. Pupils describe/state their observations. What is the difference between magnitude and intensity? 2. The teacher let the pupils observe the descriptions on the 2 scales. They can also trigger devastating landslides. 4. The teacher explains that the Mercalli is used for measuring the intensity of an earthquake. Processes: Describing Communicating Generalizing E. What is Richter scale? Mercalli scale? F. Application What is the importance of knowing the intensity or magnitude of an earthquake? III. The teacher may ask the class based from their prior knowledge. They destroy buildings. What is the difference of magnitude and intensity? 2. Review 1. Procedures: A. • There are also some other earthquake related disasters triggered by an earthquake such as fires and tsunamis.4 D. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI Pages: 204-205 PELC: 2. IV. Objective: 1. (watching news about the effect of an earthquake) Presentation 1. bridges. Draw seismograph in your notebook. Describe the effects of an earthquake. Richter is used for measuring the sovereignty of an earthquake. EARTHQUAKE I. 2. What is used to measure the intensity/magnitude of an earthquake? B. Evaluation: 1. roads. 2. What are the effects of earthquake? 2.

Practice precautionary measures. Generalization Based from all the reported information/output. loss of property. What are the different precautionary measures before. Processes: Identifying Enumerating Demonstrating IV. What are the other earthquake related disasters? V. 2. F. Discussion 1. the teacher leads the class in consolidating their answers. PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES I. Motivation 1. Review 1. and after) must be observed to prevent further loss of lives and limbs. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI Pages: 205-206 PELC: 2. C. D. Pupils accomplish the checklist on page 207 of their Science textbook.5 Concepts: • Philippines is an earthquake country. What are the effects of an earthquake? B. Objectives: 1. and after earthquakes to minimize psychological damage. What do you usually do when you heard from the news that there is a typhoon approaching Philippine Area of Responsibility? Presentation 1. Procedures: A. The teacher discusses and clarifies some vague ideas. E. 3. Generalization 1. Enumerate precautionary measures before. 2. 2. Describe the effects of an earthquake. The teacher goes in details of every precautionary measure. We must learn to live knowing preventive measures and at proper safety awareness level. E. Assignment: What are the different precautionary measures during and after an earthquake? III. Application Can you stop/prevent the effects of an earthquake? Why? How? • We must plan and act properly before. during. and less of lives. during and after an earthquake. Evaluation: 1. The teacher let the pupils explain how do they perform each guideline if their answer is Yes. 2. II. The leader presents their output and explains them. during and after an earthquake? .2. during. The teacher points out that precautionary measures in case of earthquake (before.

Objectives: 1. What is volcano? 2. Active volcanoes are those that have erupted within the last 600 years. E. Evaluation: 1. Pupils describe how a volcano is formed based from their answers in the activity. What are volcanic islands? How are they formed? III. during and after an earthquake. How is volcano formed? C. IV. Assignment: 1. It expels magma accompanied by rumblings in the ground. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI Pages: 210-212 PELC: 3. 2. Procedure: A. 2. 2. Motivation What are the famous volcanoes found in the Philippines? Presentation 1. Discussion 1. How are volcanoes formed? 2. The teacher discusses the result of the activity. What are the precautionary measures before. The teacher asks the pupils to describe a volcano. Evaluation: 1. 2. Volcanoes may either be active or inactive. Describe how a volcano is formed.2 Concepts: A volcano is a mountain or hill will vent extending from the top down to the Earth’s interior.F. V. during and after an earthquake? B. Application Draw the formation of volcano in your notebook.5. V. Find out more volcanoes under the sea. Application 1. The pupils dramatize/roleplay the different measures to be done during after an earthquake. 1. II. Processes: Defining Describing Predicting Inferring D. 3. Pupils work on Activity 6. INACTIVE AND ACTIVE VOLCANO I. Differentiate between active and inactive volcano. Differentiate active volcano from an inactive volcano. IV. How are volcanoes formed? Where does it originated? 2. List the different precautionary measures before. Formation of a Volcano. Assignment: 1. Teacher introduces words related to the formation of volcano. Explain/describe your drawings using 2-3 sentences. Review VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS . Generalization 1. What are the two kinds of volcanoes? F.

Based from the activity. What are the dangers brought about by volcanic eruptions? D. B. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum Pages: 211-212 PELC: 3. 1. Describe how a volcano erupts. III. 1. water. It can caused (volcanic dust) respiratory diseases/ailments and poor visibility.2.3. Differentiate active and inactive volcanoes. Evaluation 1. beaker.1. candle and water? 1. What is represented by sand. II. tripod stand. The teacher asks if the pupils have any idea on how a volcano erupts.4.3 Materials: Beaker. describe how a volcano erupts. describe how a volcano erupts. 2. 3. 1. Objectives: 1. Describe how a volcano erupts. Processes: Describing Defining Observing Inferring Communicating 1. How does volcano erupt? 2.2. Generalization 1. Pinatubo eruption? C. Review 1. Procedures: A. Pupils find a partner (ThinkPair-Share) and think of the possible dangers and benefits which volcanic eruptions may give. wire gauze Alcohol lamp. What are the beneficial/harmful effects of volcanic eruption? F. Volcanic eruptions can make the soil fertile and can develop into new land forms. Motivation 1. sand Concepts: Volcanoes may erupt quietly or violently. Activity 1. Volcanic eruptions can destroy life and property. IV. 2. What are the beneficial and harmful effects of volcanic eruption? VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS Precautionary Measures . Discussion 1. Application 1. wire gauze and alcohol lamp. What are the beneficial/harmful effects of Mt. 1. tripod stand.1. The teacher discusses the correct answer from the activity. The teacher helps the pupils consolidate their answers on the board. E. Based from the activity. How are volcanoes formed? 2. Pupils share their ideas in the class.I. Name the beneficial/harmful effects of volcanic eruptions. The teacher shows/simulates volcanic eruption using candle.

during and after volcanic eruptions. I. Assignment: Research about lahar and how it affected the lives of people in Northern Luzon. The teacher clarifies and rectifies any vague ideas. D. Practice precautionary measures before and after volcanic eruptions. How can you prevent harmful effects brought about by volcanic eruptions? V. 3. F. Answer the questions correctly. Pupils proceed to their own groups. The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) is a government agency which monitors earthquakes and volcanic activities. 2. Procedures: A. 2. Motivation How can we prevent or minimize the harmful effects brought about by volcanic eruptions? Presentation 1. Each item must be discussed/demonstrated by the group who contributed it. Application 1. Review What are the harmful/beneficial effects of volcanic eruption? B. Evaluation: 1.4 Materials: Manila paper Concepts: Certain precautionary measures must be observed in order to prevent loss of lives and reduce property destruction during volcanic eruptions. What must you do when a volcano erupts and it happened that you are outside your house? III. 2. II. C. The teacher helps the pupils in consolidating their answers based from the information written on the board. 2. Objectives: 1. 3. They also issue warnings to people living in the surrounding areas of a volcano. Discussion 1. The teacher goes in every details of what are written on the board. Enumerate precautionary measures before and after volcanic eruptions. E. Enumerate precautionary measures that we had discussed before. . during and after volcanic eruption. the teacher asks a representative from each group to write their ideas on the board.I. 2. Follow the directions carefully. After the given time. The members of every group brainstorm about the precautionary measures IV. Generalization 1. Objectives: 1. Processes: Identifying Enumerating Communicating before. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI Pages: 218-220 PELC: 3.

Passing of Pupils’ Answer Sheets IV. are you going to bring with you some thick jacket? Why? III. II. Summative Test: Material: Test questions written in manila paper III. Preparatory Activities B. Presentation 1.II. Assignment: Study about the next topic. 3. bodies of water. CLIMATE C. Explain how each factor affects the climate of the place. 3. The teacher shows latitude and bodies of water on the globe. Identify the factors that the climate of a place. Recalling of Standards C. Pupils formulate their own definition of latitude based from the globe. D. Generalization 1. Processes: Identifying Communicating Explaining Inferring E. Pupils convey their observations. How can the following affect the climate? . The teacher and pupils discuss their predictions. manila paper Concepts: Climate is the average of all weather conditions that prevail in a particular area for a long period of time. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI Pages: 231-234 PELC: Materials: Globe. I. latitude. Pupils will first predict how the different factors affect the climate. 4. What are the different factors that affect the climate of a certain place? 2. The teacher clarifies vague ideas. The teacher shows the globe and asks pupils to describe/observe the globe. 2. Application When you go mountain climbing/hiking. and amount of rainfall. A. Objectives: 1. What are the different factors that affect the climate of a place? 2. 2. Review What are the different precautionary measures during a volcanic eruption? Motivation Why do countries have different climate? B. climate. The factors that affect the climate of a place are as follows: altitude. Testing Proper E. Evaluation: 1. Giving Directions D. Procedures: A. How can they affect the climate? F. Procedures: IV. 2. Discussion 1. wind system.

Checking of Assignments Pupils share to the class the effect of global warming in our climate. bodies of water. F. The Coriolis effect diverts the cold air’s direction and turns it to the right towards the Philippines from the northeast monsoon. The teacher explains the result of the activity.1. Assignment: Try to predict what will happen to the Earth’s climate without Coriolis effect. attitude latitude wind system bodies of water amount of rainfall amount of rainfall affect the climate of a place? C. Generalization How does the Earth’s rotation affect the wind system? G. B. Procedures: A.11.a. Motivation 1. 2. Processes: Identifying Describing Communicating E. Discussion 1. Explain how the Earth’s rotation affects the wind system. Review How do altitude. latitude. How can global warming affect our climate? D. How do winds move? 2. The teacher let the pupils predict why the world’s winds do not move up and down. 2. e. ROTATION OF THE EARTH I. chalk Concepts: The earth’s rotation causes the winds to blow sideward instead of directly downward or upward in a straight path. Application What is the significance of Coriolis Effect? III.2. Why do you think the chalk fall in that direction? V. Pupils answer questions related in the activity. Assignment: 1. and IV. wind system. The teacher discusses the answer. What causes the wind to move that way? Presentation 1. In what direction does the piece of chalk fall? 2. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI Pages: 222 -223PELC: Materials: Globe. What causes the wind to blow sideward? 2. What are the 2 reasons why winds do not move up and down? V. d. II. 3. Evaluation: 1. b. The teacher demonstrates Activity 6. Objective: 1. 2. . c.

2. 2. II. What are the two kinds of seasons in the Philippines? 2. Identify the two seasons of the Philippines. Application 1. How does earth’s rotation affect the wind system? 2. Pupils do Activity 6. How can you describe each season? F. Objectives: 1. The teacher asks pupils to locate Philippines on the globe. world map. III. It takes 365 days or one year to complete one revolution. Why do we have only two seasons? V. What causes the wind to blow sideward? B. They have to tell the possible climate/season of that country. Motivation How does the earth move/rotate and revolve? IV. 4. Pupils predict the importance of the imaginary lines. How many seasons do Philippines have? 3. Presentation 1. Procedures: A.knowing the country’s location. the northeast monsoon. The Philippines has two pronounced seasons: wet and dry A particular season is influenced by its location. Pupils give example of country and its location. Processes: Identifying Describing Observing D.12. Evaluation: 1. Science textbook Concepts: As the earth revolves around the sun. E. C. Describe the causes of the seasons in the Philippines. Review 1. Follow-up questions will be asked: .How far is it from the equator? From the poles? . Its direction is counter clockwise. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future: Science and Health VI Pages: 228-229 PELC: Materials: Globe. Pupils observe and describe the lines they see? 3.SEASONS OF THE PHILIPPINES Pupils demonstrate their answers by using themselves as models. and the trade winds. How does location of a country affect its season? 2. The teacher names the imaginary lines that can be seen on the globe. it maintains its inclination at 23 ½° on its axis. 2. Assignment: . Discussion 1. Generalization 1. what can you infer about its climate? I. the southwest monsoon. Where can you find the Philippines on the globe? 2.

Why do other countries in the temperature zone experience four seasons? 2. Pupils make use of globe and a flashlight. Motivation Other countries are located in the temperate zone. Review 1. What kind of season has most leaves falling from trees? 3. fall. What causes the occurrence of four seasons in other countries? 2. What are the things people would do on the different season? III. How many seasons does Philippines have? 2. Describe each of the four seasons. E. Assignment: 1. manila paper Concepts: Countries in the temperate experience four seasons in a year. 2. What are these four seasons? F.2. Pupils give examples of countries found in the temperature region. Generalization 1. summer. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI Pages: 242-244 PELC: Materials: Globe. 2.1. Name countries that are found in the temperate region. winter and spring. Pupils do Activity 6. D. . The teacher explains the four different seasons. C. Do you think they also experience wet and dry seasons? IV. namely. Do you think the rays of the sunlight are the same in all parts of the Earth? Discussion 1. Procedures: A.1. FOUR SEASONS IN OTHER COUNTRY I. What part of the globe receives direct and vertical rays of the sun (flashlight)? 1. 2. Pupils predict the effect of the uneven amount of light on the different countries. 1. Application 1. Pupils draw the four positions of the Earth as it revolves around the sun. Evaluation: 1. What are the four seasons? 2. How will you describe each season? B. 3. Processes: Identifying Describing Observing Presentation 1. II. The occurrence of the four seasons is caused by the tilting of the Earth on its axis and its revolution around the sun.14. Objectives: 1. Identify the four seasons in other countries. Which season is similar in both hemispheres? V. flashlight. Describe each of the four seasons.

namely summer. F. Why do they move? Presentation 1. C. tension and shearing. The teacher may clarify some vague questions by giving some leasing questions. Motivation 1. Australian. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum VI Pages: 242-244 PELC: Materials: Globe. D. Generalization Pupils consolidate what they have learned. After reading and answering the questions. Antarctic. Review the least mastered skills about the different crustal plates and its movement. V. What is seafloor-spreading theory? B. Demonstrate how the crustal plates move using rulers. Explain the causes of the four seasons. This is to help the pupils master the concepts related to the lesson. Processing: Identifying Describing Demonstrating 2. Evaluation: 1. twist. Assignment: Draw in your notebook the different crustal plates and its movement. tilt. Discussion 1. or break. When rock layers are under stress. List the different crustal plates. winter. II. Indian. E. Subject Matter: Reference: Workbook on Science VI Materials: Photocopy of workbook Concepts: The seven crustal plates of the Earth are Eurasian. What is continental drift theory? 2. Pacific. . Application What are the results of the movement of the different plates? IV. The three types of stress that cause the deformation of the rock layers in the tectonic plates are compression. pen. and spring. 2. Procedures: A. Pupils are given a chance to answer and explain their answers in every item. CAUSES OF FOUR SEASONS III. Africa. Objective: 1. II. the teacher explains the correct answer. manila paper Concepts: Countries in the temperature experience four seasons in a year. and American plates. they can bend. fall. I. Objective: 1. How do crustal plates move? 2.CRUSTAL PLATES I. Review 1.

Drill Pupils answer page 24/A of their NAT reviewer. D. fall. The teacher gives additional information and clarifies misconception. Discussion 1. . Activity 1. How many seasons does Philippines have? 2. Pupils explain their drawing using 4-5 sentences. II. Procedures: A. Processes: Identifying Enumerating Explaining III. 2. The occurrence of four seasons is caused by the tilting of the earth on its axis and its revolution around the sun. Processes: Identifying Enumerating Explaining IV. Evaluation: 1. What are the four seasons? 3. B. colored pens Concepts: Countries in the temperate experience four seasons in a year. Objectives: 1. items 1-8. How many seasons does Philippines have? 2. Application 1. Draw the different activities people do during each season. What are the different activities which Filipinos do during each season? III. V. 2. B.The occurrence of four seasons is caused by the tilting of the earth on its axis and its revolution around the sun. They brainstorm about the position of the earth as it revolves around the sun. Pupils work with their partners. pentel pen. Describe each season. Review 1. Pupils draw the position of the earth around the sun. Describe each season. (inclination of the earth must be evident). 3. Research the different activities people do during each season. Describe wet and dry season. E. Subject Matter: Reference: Science Spectrum Materials: Manila paper. Review the different causes of four seasons. Procedures: A. what do you think will happen? C. The teacher let the pupils draw the earth at four positions in its orbit around the sun on the board. Drill Pupils answer page 23/A of their NAT reviewer. C. What causes the occurrence of four seasons? F. I. Assignment: 1. winter and spring. Motivation 1. 2. Generalization 1. If the earth is perpendicular to its axis. namely summer. items 9-20. Review 1. What causes the four seasons? 2.

1. 1. Prepare for a quiz tomorrow. Drill Pupils answer items 21-30 of their NAT reviewer. maps Concepts: Climate is the average of all weather conditions that prevail in a particular area for a long period of time. latitude. V. The occurrence of seasons is caused by the tilting of the earth on its axis and its revolution around the sun. Objective: . What are the different causes of four seasons? G. The teacher let the pupils enumerate them. Assignment: 1. the teacher let the pupils form their groups. B. Activity 1. Briefly explain and describe the drawing. 2. 2. The factors that affect the climate of a place are as follows: altitude. 2. The group which gave the correct answer has the chance to ask question. Draw the different activities which people do during each season.D. II. The first groups answer the question. Enumerate the different activities which people do during the four seasons. Pupils recall the different causes of four seasons. Leaders assigned for the day explain their works on the front. 2. 3. Application 1. Based from the previous discussions. Generalization 1. IV. Review the least mastered skills about climate and seasons. Discussion 1. 3. The teacher let the pupil recall their past lessons last year. These are about climate and seasons in the different countries. pen. I. Evaluation: 1. F. and amount of rainfall. Research on the internet the different activities which people do in the antic and Antarctic region. E. Procedures: A. III. bodies of water. Draw on the manila paper all the activities that people do during the four seasons. Activity 1. CLIMATE AND SEASONS C. Review 1. 3. The teacher instructs the class/pupils to proceed to their own groups. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future PELC: Materials: Into the Future textbook Pieces of paper. wind system. Pupils are given 5 minutes to formulate their questions about their past lessons. The teacher may ask followup questions if the drawing is not clearly conveyed to the class.

hardness and texture of a rock depend on the kinds of mineral it is made of. Discussion Discussion is done during the question and answer activity. Application Pupils list down the things they have learned/recalled about the topics and share with their partners. Identify the characteristics of minerals that make up rocks. What are the different causes of seasons? Motivation What made up earth’s crust? Presentation 1. Others are made up of different minerals. shape. V. 2. III. Drill Pupils answer item number 2130 of their Science NAT reviewer. Processes: Identifying Describing Observing Communicating E.1 Materials: Pictures. The teacher guides. Discussion 1. Objective: 1. Any vague question/answer will be discussed thoroughly by the teacher or by the group which is assigned to ask. F. Assignment: 1. Subject Matter: Reference: Exploring Science Pages: 237-238 PELC: 17. Generalization . Procedures: A. Review 1.4. II. D. The teacher facilitates the activity. D. IV. Evaluation: Evaluation is done during the activity proper. B. The teacher leads the pupils in knowing the different characteristics of minerals. F. How rocks formed? 2. 3. Generalization The teacher asks volunteers to consolidate the ideas/lessons based from the activity. 2. The teacher let the pupils identify the characteristics of minerals that made up rocks. What are the different types of rocks? C. manila paper Concepts: Rocks are made up of minerals. The color. Some rocks are made up of mostly one E. This will help the teacher know the prior knowledge of the pupils. mineral. What is season? 2. MINERALS I. The teacher presents the characteristics of the minerals that make up rocks. They are mixtures of minerals. The pupils discuss each characteristic of minerals that make up rocks. clarifies and adds additional inputs based from the discussion among the pupils.

Procedures: A. The color.1 Materials: Rocks. V. What does it look like? 2. 4. This refers to the quality of light that the surface of the mineral reflects. Collect 3 rocks samples. manila paper Concepts: Motivation The teacher shows a rock and let the pupils describe it. Application 1. . Subject Matter: Reference: Exploring and Protecting Our World Pages: 236-241 PELC: 1. Do you think all the descriptions that you mentioned apply on other rocks as well? D. shape. III. observe the different rocks you collected. B. This is a mineral’s resistance to scratching. This is a break along an irregular surface. 5. Describe your rock samples based on the following properties. hardness. shape. G. Some rocks are made up of mostly one mineral while others are made up of different minerals. Objectives: 1. This is the orderly arrangement of atoms in a mineral. Identify their most common characteristics. Processes: Describing Classifying Observing Communicating IV. What are the characteristics of minerals that make up rocks? C. Leaders of the day guide and direct their members. Collect samples of different rocks. They are mixtures of minerals. Pupils consolidate the different characteristics of minerals which they have learned. Review 1. Procedures and Questions: 1. Drill Pupils answer items 31-40 of their Science NAT reviewer. 1. Observe how rocks differ in shape. Evaluation: Identify the following: 1. 2. 2. magnifying lens. It is the color of the mineral in its powdered form. harness and texture. 2.1. ROCKS I. 3. hardness and texture. What determines the usage of the rocks? Why do you think so? Rocks are made up of minerals. II. Group Activity Pupils go to their own group. and texture of a rock depend on the kinds of mineral it is made of. Using a magnifying lens/rocks. Assignment: 1. Classify rocks according to color. What is a rock? 2. color.

2.1. color 2.2. size 2.3. hardness 2.4. texture 3. How do rocks differ? E. Discussion 1. The teacher let the pupils share their observations on the different rocks samples. 2. The teacher together with the pupils discuss the result of the activity. F. Generalization 1. How do rocks differ? 2. How can you classify the rocks? G. Application 1. How can you classify the rocks?

Reference: Exploring and Protecting our World Pages: 242-243 PELC: 1.2.1 Materials: Rocks, manila paper Concepts: Igneous rocks are called volcanic or fine-formed rocks. Geologists group rocks according to how they are formed. When a volcanic erupts, the lava that comes out hardens into rocks. Rocks that form from magma trapped below the earth’s surface are called intrusive rocks. Rocks that formed from cooled lava on the earth’s surface are called extrusive rocks. Processes: Describing Observing Communicating

IV. Evaluation: Evaluation is done during the activity proper and during the discussion. Additional/follow-up questions can be made to ensure mastery of the lesson. - What common characteristics do rocks have? - How can you classify rocks? - How will you determine the color, shape, hardness and texture of rocks? V. Assignment: 1. How are rocks formed? 2. What are the different types of rocks?

III. Procedures: A. Drill Pupils answer item 1-10, Set B of their Science NAT review.
B. Review 1. How do rocks differ? 2. How can you classify rocks? Motivation What are the ways in which different rocks were formed? Presentation 1. The teacher explains that rocks are formed in different ways. 2. The teacher explains the first group of rocks-igneous rocks.

C.

D. ROCKS

I. Objective: 1. Describe how igneous rocks are formed. II. Subject Matter:

E. Discussion

1. The teacher discusses how igneous rocks are formed. (For higher sections, the teacher let the pupils infer the formation of igneous rocks). 2. Samples of igneous rocks are also elaborated and discussed. F. Generalization Pupils consolidate what they have learned. - How are igneous rocks formed? G. Application What type of rock is usually found nearby volcanoes? Why?

Study and review sample questions in their NAT reviewer in preparation for the NAT.

ROCKS

I. Objective: 1. Describe how igneous rocks are formed. II. Subject Matter: Reference: Exploring and Protecting our World Pages: 242-243 PELC: 1.2.1
Materials: Sample of igneous rocks Manila paper Concepts: Igneous rocks are called volcanic or fire formed. Geologists group rocks according to how they are formed. When a volcano erupts, the lava that comes out hardens into rocks. Rocks that are formed from magma trapped below the earth’s surface are called intrusive rocks. Rocks that are formed from cooled lava on the earth’s surface are called extrusive rocks. Processes: Describing Observing Communicating

IV. Evaluation: 1. What are igneous rocks? 2. How are igneous rocks formed? 3. Differentiate extrusive from intrusive rocks. V. Assignment: 1. How are sedimentary rocks formed? 2. Collect samples of igneous rocks.

I. Objectives: 1. Answer questions correctly. 2. Follow the directions carefully. II. Summative Test: A. Preparatory Activities B. Recalling of Standards C. Giving Directions D. Testing Proper E. Passing of Pupils’ Answer Sheets

III. Procedures: A. Drill Pupils answer item 20-40, Set B of their Science NAT reviewer.
B. Review 1. How do rocks differ?

III. Assignment:

2. How can you classify rocks? C. Motivation What are the different ways in which rocks formed? Presentation 1. The teacher explains that rocks are formed in different ways. 2. The teacher explains the first classification-igneous rocks.

II.

Subject Matter: Reference: Internet (geology.com) PELC: 1.2.1
Materials: PowerPoint presentation, LCD projector, rocks Concepts: Igneous rocks are formed from the solidification of molten rock material. There are two basic types: 1.) intrusive igneous rocks such as diorite gabbro, granite and pegmatite that solidity below earth’s surface, and 2.) extrusive igneous rocks such as andesitic, basalt, obsidian, pumice, riyolite, and scoria that solidity on or above Earth’s surface. Processes: Identifying Describing Observing

D.

E. Discussion 1. The teacher discusses how igneous rocks are formed. (For higher sections, the teacher let the pupils infer the formation of igneous rocks). 2. Samples of igneous rocks are shown. Descriptions, similarities in appearance are discussed. F. Generalization Pupils consolidate what they have learned. - How igneous rocks are formed? G. Application What types of rocks are usually found nearby volcanoes? Why?

III. Procedures: A. Review 1. How are igneous rocks formed?
B. Motivation 1. What do you think are the common characteristics of different igneous rocks? C. Presentation 1. The teacher shows the different igneous rocks on the projector. 2. Pupils try to describe the rocks. Discussion 1. The teacher let the pupils examine the rocks samples. 2. Pupils describe the rocks.

IV. Evaluation: 1. What are igneous rocks? 2. How are igneous rocks formed? 3. Differentiate intrusive from extrusive rocks. V. Assignment: 1. Study the formation of rocks.

ROCKS

D.

I. Objective: 1. Describe the different igneous rocks.

EARTHQUAKE I. V. Application 1. .3 Materials: Textbook Concepts: The total energy released by an earthquake is called magnitude. Generalization 1. 3. Study the different rocks formations. It tells the sovereignty of an earthquake. Assignment: 1. and Richter scale measure? V. What is the difference between magnitude intensity? G. The effect or degree of destruction of an earthquake is called intensity. What do Mercalli. Pupils state the difference. Procedures: A. Assignment: Study the formation of sedimentary rocks. 2. Review 1. Motivation 1. The teacher briefly explains the effect of an earthquake. Processes: Describing Comparing E. Evaluation: Pupils describe the rocks orally as it is shown on the screen and on the rock specimen. How/Why does it occur? (These are based from the previous mock test? C. Presentation 1. Recall the difference between intensity and magnitude of an earthquake. II. What measures earthquake? D. Evaluation: 1. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the future PELC: 2. Generalization 1. Application What are the common uses of igneous rocks? III. What is the importance of knowing the magnitude and intensity of an earthquake? IV. The teacher elaborates the reasons why an earthquake happens. Objective: 1. How would you describe the different rocks (igneous) samples? F. E. IV. The teacher explains the similarities of the rock samples. F. The teacher may add some inputs if there are some lacking information stated/given by the pupils. The teacher let the pupils recall the uses of Mercalli and Richter Scale.3. Differentiate magnitude from intensity? 2. 2. Discussion 1. What is an earthquake? 2.

Subject Matter: References: Into the Future Internet (geology. 3. . How do rocks differ? 2. . Generalization 1. How are rocks are formed? Presentation 1.2.com) PELC: 1. (CLS: ThinkPair-Share) 2. LCD projector. Describe how igneous rocks are formed.ROCKS - I. Review 1. Application 1. Motivation 1. How do we classify rocks? B.How igneous rocks are formed? . The teacher explains that rocks are classified based on how they are formed.How are the different examples of igneous rocks? F. Please refer to the attached worksheets. There are two basic types: 1.For higher sections. basalt and pumice that solidify on or above Earth’s surface.) intrusive igneous rocks such as diorite. Enumerate samples of igneous rocks. PowerPoint presentation. The teacher will discuss the first classification of rocksigneous. IV.com/earth. and 2. What are sedimentary rocks? 2.1 Materials: Worksheets. Rock samples are composed of intrusive and extrusive rocks. Discussion 1. The teacher shows on the screen the different rocks samples.) extrusive igneous rocks such as andesitic. Assignment: 1. granite and pegmatite that solidify below Earth’s surface. II. Pupils share to the class what they have learned. C. Objectives: 1. What type of rock is usually found nearby volcanoes? Why? III. rock samples Concepts: Igneous rocks are formed from the solidification of molten rock material. Procedures: A. Pupils infer the differences between the formation of intrusive and extrusive rocks. the teacher let the pupils infer how igneous rocks are formed. E. The teacher discusses how igneous rocks are formed. 2. (www. Venn diagram is suggested I comparing intrusive and extrusive rocks. 2. The teacher discusses the different samples of igneous rocks. Evaluation: Crossword puzzle about the meaning and formation of igneous rocks. 3. D.scienceteachers.htm) V. How are sedimentary rocks formed? .

chemical and organic sedimentary rocks. E. The teacher discusses the second classification of rockssedimentary. D. The teacher discusses how sedimentary rocks are formed. .) clastic sedimentary rocks such as breccia. 2.) chemical such as rock salt and some lime stones.2 Materials: Worksheets.2. The teacher let the pupils predict the differences among clastic. What are the different examples of igneous rocks? B. salts (chemical). Presentation 1. What are the different examples of sedimentary rocks? (CLS: Travelling star. Enumerate samples of sedimentary rocks. that form when dissolved materials precipitate from solution. II. How are sedimentary rocks formed? 2. 2. 3. Motivation . conglomerate. . (CLS: ThinkPair-Share) 2. chemical and organic sedimentary rocks. Objectives: 1. Procedures: A. There are three basic types of sedimentary rocks: 1. how about sedimentary rocks? C.ROCKS I. sandstone and shale.For higher sections. The teacher shows on the screen the different sedimentary rock samples. Pupils infer the differences on the formation of clastic. The teacher discusses the compositions of sedimentary rocks – debris from mechanically weathered rocks (clastic). These are clastic. and remains of plants/animals (organic). chemical and organic sedimentary rocks. If igneous rocks are formed from the solidification of molten rocks. LCD projector Concepts: Sedimentary rocks are formed by accumulation of sediments.The rock samples are classified further into three. Describe how sedimentary rocks are formed. 4. Processes: Identifying Describing Enumerating Observing Inferring 1. and 3. Generalization 1. the teacher let the pupils infer how sedimentary rocks are formed. that are formed from mechanical weathering debris. Subject Matter: References: Into the Future Internet (geology.) organic such as coal and some lime stones which form accumulation of plant or animal debris. Review 1. T-P-S) III. How are igneous rocks formed? 2. 2.com) PELC: 1. Discussion 1.

Review 1. . Heat and pressure can change any rock several times. . Describe how metamorphic rocks are formed. the heat and pressure turn igneous and sedimentary rocks into metamorphic rocks. D. 4. Procedures: A. Where can we usually find sedimentary rocks? IV. How are metamorphic rocks formed? 2. Evaluation: Identify the following: 1. They are formed mechanical weathering debris.com) PELC: 1. Scientists call changed rocks metamorphic rocks. What are the different examples of sedimentary rocks? B. 2. Do rocks deplete someday? Presentation 1. . Instead. The teacher shows on the screen the different metamorphic rock samples. Processes: Identifying Describing Inferring Interpreting III. ROCKS I. They are formed when dissolved materials precipitate from solution.The rock samples are classified further into two. These are foliated and non-foliated metamorphic rocks. Discussion 1. The teacher discusses the third classification of rocksmetamorphic. Type of rock which is formed due to the accumulation of sediments. PowerPoint presentation. 2. 3.For higher sections. How metamorphic rocks are formed? But often they do not melt. This is the process of compacting of sediments.3 Materials: LCD projector.F. rocks samples Concepts: Metamorphic rocks form from igneous rocks or sedimentary rocks. (CLS: T-P-S) C. Application 1. II. Assignment: 1. What are metamorphic rocks? 2. These are tiny particles come from weathered rocks. the teacher let the pupils infer how metamorphic are formed. V. Motivation 1. 5.2. Objectives: 1. Subject Matter: References: Into the Future Internet (geology. They are formed from the accumulation of living organisms. 6. How are sedimentary rocks formed? 2. Interpret the rock cycle diagram. 2. The teacher discusses how metamorphic rocks are formed. The teacher may give clue such as heat and pressure.

II. How are metamorphic rocks formed? 2. Evaluation: Igneous Rocks Cooling/solidificati on magma Weatheri ng erosion sediment s Compaction / cementatio n melting Weathering/eros ion Metamorphi c Rocks Heat & pressure Sedimentary Rocks III. When the metamorphic rocks undergo weathering/erosion. Application Where can we usually find metamorphic rocks? ROCK CYCLE I. State the rock cycle. these may turn to sediments which may form into sedimentary rocks. igneous rocks are transformed into tiny particles called sediments. The teacher discusses the formation of metamorphic rocks based from the rock cycle diagram. manila paper Concepts: When magma cools down and solidifies. Thus. What are the uses of rocks? 2. This cycle continuous.com) PELC: 1. it underwent melting. igneous rocks are produce. When the sediments are compacted and cemented. 4.2. metamorphic rocks are produced. pupils interpret the diagram. 3. What are the agents of weathering? C. However. magma is produced.2. The teacher let the pupils predict the differences between foliated and nonfoliated metamorphic rocks. Motivation Do rocks deplete someday? What are the sources of rocks? Presentation V. Procedures: A. E.For higher sections. If the heat and pressure are applied on the sedimentary rocks. sedimentary rocks are formed. Assignment: 1. What are the different examples of metamorphic rocks? F. Processes: Identifying Communicating Enumerating IV. igneous rocks undergo the process of weathering/erosion. Objectives: 1. . . after cooling and solidification. Generalization 1. The teacher shows the diagram. Review What are the different classifications of rocks? How are they classified? B. Subject Matter: Reference: Internet (geology.3 Materials: Diagram of rock cycle.

Pupils present their outputs. 3. The teacher gives additional inputs and rectifies misconceptions if necessary. Pupils go to their own groups and discuss the different agents of weathering. how do you think this granite rock can be transformed into: a) sedimentary rock b) metamorphic rock. Procedures: A. . E. Subject Matter: Reference: The Grolier Science Encyclopedia Pages: 32-33 Materials: Pictures. Review 1. Processes: Identifying Communicating Explaining III. The teacher let the pupils predict the formation of rocks (For higher sections). Application If I have a granite rock. (For lower sections) 2. Generalization The pupils state the step-by-step process of rock cycle. How are rocks broken down into tiny pieces? 2. carbon dioxide and organic acids and is accelerated by warm temperatures. F. by a freeze-andthrow action. 2. What are the different processes involved? B. . Leaders explain their drawings which depict the different forces that contribute to weathering of rocks.1. Physical weathering occurs when rocks are fractured and broken apart. The teacher presents the rock cycle diagram. Chemical weathering occurs when rocks are affected by water.Higher sections need not used the rock cycle diagram. Is it possible for the rocks to stay the same all throughout? Presentation 1. 2. Explain how some forces contribute to the weathering of rocks. 3. How does rock cycle occur? 2. and c) pumice rock (igneous rock)? Weathering is a complex process whereby rocks are broken down into sediments. The teacher elicits from the class the different agents of weathering. What are the agents of weathering? C. II. for example. Pupils draw on the manila paper the forces/agents of weathering. IV. manila paper Concepts: D. Motivation 1. Objective 1. ROCKS I. Discussion 1. Assignment: 1. 3. Their predictions are written on the board which will serve as the basis of the rock cycle process. Leaders of the group explain how the rock cycle occurs.

color. color. Heat it for 3 minutes. 2. I. mass. mass. Generalization Pupils consolidate what they have learned. temperature and brightness. Assignment: 1. Follow-up activity: Get an empty soda can. Prepare for a quiz tomorrow. color. pupils list down what they know. V. Application What do you think will happen if all the rocks do not weather? Do you think that is possible? Processes: Describing Communicating Inferring III. The teacher group the pupils.How do stars differ F. ROCKS C. 3. 2. E. 3. temperature and brightness. The teacher may ask the pupils to elaborate what they know. Infer that stars differ in size. Generalization 1. Presentation 1. Why do stars differ? . The teacher proceeds to what students want to learn about stars.E. As a group. What are the different agents of weathering? B. Motivation 1. and brightness. The teacher checks misconceptions. Pupils present/write on the board their XWL output. mass. temperature. D.) IV. 2. what they want to know about stars. What did you observe? 2. Discussion 1. Procedures: A. the teacher asks two-three volunteers to consolidate what they have learned. The teacher guides the pupils inferring that stars differ in their size. Immediately put the hot soda can in a cold basin of water. Evaluation: Draw some examples of agents/forces that contribute to the weathering of rocks. Objective: 1. Based from all the presentations. Below the drawing. (It greatly depends on the pupils inputs on what they know about the stars. These serve as guides as the teacher starts a new topic. Review 1. They differ in many features such as size. The teacher asks the pupils to give predictions on the questions or on the things they want to know about the stars. II. . Application 1. write a brief explanation on how they help in weathering rocks. F. Subject Matter: Reference: Cyber Science Pages: 332-333 PELC: Concepts: Stars are similar in their general composition and characteristics but they vary in different ways.

muscular. lymphatic. 4. 52. 3. How do the different body systems work? C. 1. Stars differ in size. Different body systems form an organism. The teacher let the pupils recall the different body systems. Pupils infer/predict the functions of the different body systems based from the different organs involved. How can you apply in building/constructing a house the different body system? 2. Stars contain rock particles. Stars have the same size as of our sun. How are they similar to one another? A. Presentation 1. 3. V. circulatory. Stars shine with the same temperature. 5. Review the different body systems. Processes: Identifying Enumerating Communicating E. DIFFERENT BODY SYSTEMS I. respiratory and digestive system. Application 1. How are they similar to one another? B. The teacher elaborates the functions of the different systems for a better understanding. 2. F. Evaluation: Answer the following questions with True or False. Why do stars differ? 2. Discussion 1. 2. Stars have the same temperature. Subject Matter: Reference: NAT Reviewer Pages: 23-24. 2. State the functions of the different body systems. Generalization Pupils consolidate the functions of different body systems through an organizational chart. Pupils enumerate the different organs under each body system. immune. D. Can our body function well without one of our systems? IV. endocrine. Evaluation: 1. II. 2. Procedures: . Our body systems are nervous. What are the classifications of stars according to their size and color? Review 1. Objectives: 1. skeletal. IV. Assignment: 1. Motivation 1. 83-84 PELC: Concepts: Organs grouped together forms a body system. What are the different classifications of stars? UNIVERSE III.2. The teacher checks if pupils were able to state the correct functions of the different body systems.

The balloon has stopped expanding and remaining the same. Application Pupils choose one theory and try to explain his/her opinion about it. • Big Bang Theory states that the universe began as one dense concentration of matter that exploded with its fragments continuously moving away from one another. 3. stimulates their thinking. D. How did the universe begin? 2. . • Steady State Theory states that the universe stopped expanding and remained the same. Identify the theories about universe. 3. (Group activity can be done on higher sections. The teacher will conduct demonstration about Big Bang Theory using a balloon. E. Procedures: A. 2. The Big Crunch Theory through magnet and iron filings. 2. Steady Theory by inflating a balloon. Review How do stars differ? How are they different from one another? . Does she/he agree? III.The dots on the balloon appear to move farther from each other as it is inflated. Will it ever end? . The teacher discusses the different theories. manila paper B. Subject Matter: Reference: Exploring the World of Science VI Pages: 365-366 PELC: Concepts: Astronomers gave three possible explanations of the origin of the universe. Generalization 1.) 2. Pupils state their observations. II. • The Nebular or Dust Cloud Theory states that heavenly bodies came from spinning dust/clouds in space. How did the universe originate according to astronomers? . • The Big Crunch Theory believes that the universe started from explosion of a dense huge ball of hydrogen but contracted due to force of gravity. Discussion 1. . C. At the same time. Presentation 1.Pupils do/construct a concept map. F. Motivation 1. Processes: Identifying Describing Communicating Materials: Pictures.I. The teacher let the pupils identify the different theories presented by the activity/demonstrations conducted. Describe the universe origin. Objectives: 1.The teacher elicits pupils’ prior knowledge.

What are the different space probes and their missions? Processes: Describing Enumerating Materials: Photographs/pictures of space probes. III.12. Some of these probes are as follows: Luna 1. universe started as one very hot and dense ball of gas. Evaluation: Choose 3 space probes and tell their missions. Uranus. Evaluation Answer the following: 1. II. F. Mariner 10. (Big Bang Theory) 2. and other heavenly bodies. Assignment: 1. Subject Matter: Reference: Exploring the World of Science VI Pages: 368-371 PELC: Concepts: Several space probes were sent into outer space to gather important data about the planets. Pupils are encouraged to share their findings. Enumerate some space probes and their missions. their moons. Viking 1 and 2. The teacher discusses the different mission of space probes. I. The teacher points out that the greatest achievement in space exploration is the landing of man on moon. Venera 9. What do you think is the effect? IV. Voyager 1 and 2 took photographs of Jupiter. Pupils present their answers on Activity 7. Generalization Pupils summarize their findings in a table. . Saturn. 2. What theory could possibly explain the disappearance of about 2/3 of the galaxies in the universe? (Big Crunch Theory) 3. and Neptune. search for Space Probe Missions. Objective: 1. This should include the names of the space probes.(Pupils are welcomed and encouraged to recite). E. 2. Which states that the universe came from spinning dust? V. According to this theory. Application Imagine that these space probes where not successful. Which tend to explain the increasing size of our Milky Way? (Big Bang Theory) 4. IV. Pioneer-Venus 2. SPACE PROBES D. missions and their findings/remarks. Motivation How do scientists study and learn more about the nearby planers? Presentation 1. C. Procedures: A. Discussion 1. and Voyager 1 and 2. Review What are the different theories about the origin of the universe? B.

3. space probes. Application 1. Objective: 1. Pupils predict its function. STARS I. Objective: 1. tools and equipment used to study our universe. red and C. The teacher shows the picture of Hubble Telescope. The teacher present the different instruments scientist used in exploring the universe. Motivation Before space probes were sent to space. Evaluation: Pupils are evaluated through their concept maps. pictures Discussion 1. space stations. Modern man uses artificial satellites. 2. Identify modern space facilities. Assignment: 1. Generalization The pupils make a concept map to consolidate the different astronomical instruments. V. II. Infer that size and color affect the brightness of stars. MODERN SPACE FACILITIES I. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future Pages: 264-267 PELC: Concepts: The universe is composed of billions of galaxies. E. Review What are the different space probes and their missions? B. Collect pictures of the different astronomical instruments and its function. III. and radio telescopes to explore the vast universe. Draw in your notebook the different space probes. what do you think are the instruments which scientist used to study heavenly bodies? Presentation 1.V. Assignment: 1. Processes: Identifying Describing Materials: PowerPoint presentation. D. II. . IV. The teacher starts the discussion by explaining that telescopes (refracting) was first invented by Galilee Galilee. The teacher gives a brief background. The teacher adds the evolution of telescopes and other astronomical instruments. Procedures: A. 2. F. 2 boxes with 2 big holes and 2 small holes. Subject Matter: Reference: Exploring the World of Science VI Page: 3 PELC: Materials: LCD projector.

B. light bulbs on a socket. The teacher calls out for a certain number. Also. Processes: Describing Predicting Inferring III. Evaluation: Modified T/F 1. 2. 3. Based on the activity. Procedures: A. C. the brighter it is. the color of the star ranges from blue to red. 3. The teacher will let the pupils observe which hole seem brighter. Pupils recapitulate the lesson. Concepts: The color of the star affects its brightness. Which seems brighter? Part B – Size and Brightness 1. The bluer the star. the dimmer it is. The teacher shows a matrix to recapitulate the lesson. Size affects the brightness of the stars. F. Which among the two cellophanes exposes a brighter light? 3. D. IV. Generalization 1. Which seems brighter? 2. What are the similarities with the three? 3. Application 1.Do they look like the diamonds on the sky? 1.I wonder how stars really look like … . What do you observe? 2. Leaders get the materials from the teacher. The teacher will also explain the different classifications of stars according to their sizes. the brighter it is. The teacher gives the groups time to perform the activity and answer the questions on the worksheets. Group Activity The teacher reminds the pupils of the rules for group work. the dimmer it is. Pupils sing Twinkle. Review 1. 3. The teacher review the different instruments used by astronomers to gather information about space. Pupils go to their own groups. 2. . Cover the bulb with a box with 2 big holes and 2 small holes. 4. What are the differences between the three? 4. What can you observe? 2. 2. red and blue cellophanes attached. size of the stars is another factor. The bluer the star. The teacher shows 2 bulbs on a socket. Pupil assigned with that particular number will share his answer in class. Motivation 1. Twinkle Little Star . The bigger the star. Discussion 1. Part A – Color and Brightness 1.blue cellophanes/paper. The redder the star. 2. E.

Passing of Answer Sheets IV. It is as large as a school bus. Discussion 1. Pupils look for the meaning of apparent and absolute magnitude. B. II. The teacher presents the picture of Hubble that depicts its orbit around the earth. It is considered as “eve in the sky”. Describe Hubble Telescope. Giving Directions D. Presentation 1. The teacher gives the details. The smaller the star. Objectives: 1. D. Review 1. The telescope was launched last April 24. Preparatory Activities Pupils prepare for the test. What is the meaning and application of apparent and absolute brightness? III. 5. The teacher let the pupils predict the structures/features of Hubble. Assignment: 1. Summative Test Material: Manila paper III. pictures of Hubble Telescope and pictures taken by Hubble Concepts: Hubble Telescope was invented by Edwin Hubble. Our sun is an example of neutron star. The teacher let the pupils infer the importance of Hubble based on its features. Testing Proper E. 2. Procedures: A. Are all telescopes found on earth? 2. Assignment: 1. Processes: Identifying Describing Communicating V. the brighter it is. State the importance of Hubble Telescope II.4. Subject Matter: Reference: Internet . Follow directions carefully. Answer questions correctly. 3. Motivation 1. I. The pupils explain on their own words how they understand the information about Hubble. HUBBLE TELESCOPE I. 2. How big are telescope? C. Objectives: 1. 2. Procedures: A. The teacher elaborates pupils’ explanation. 3. 1990. Recalling of Standard in Taking a Test C. What is the relationship of the color/size of the star to its brightness? B. 2. PELC: Materials: LCD projector.

State that size. Pupils compare the brightness of the star according to size. pictures. Motivation 1. and distance. Imagine that Hubble Telescope was not yet discovered/invented. 14. The bluer. Describe Hubble Telescope in 5 words. B. size and its distance. (one variable only). II. Presentation/Group Activity 1. 2009. What is constellation? 2. PELC: Concepts: The brightness of a star is affected by its color. Discussions 1. Assignment: Research on the internet some latest pictures captured/taken by Hubble. 21. F. color and distance of the star to its brightness? V. What are the different constellations? . November 7. Procedures: A. color. STAR I. What are the features of Hubble Telescope? 2. Application 1. Generalization 1. color and distance affect the brightness of the star. Generalization Pupils create a matrix of comparisons between the size. 2. Pupils conduct the same activity (last Thursday) but another variable is added which is the distance. the brighter it is. Evaluation: What is the relationship of the size. Describe Hubble Telescope. D. the bigger and the near the star. LCD projector. color and distance of the star. color and distance affect the brightness of the star? IV. Who invented the Hubble Telescope? 2. Give the importance of the telescope. IV.E. 2. Pupils compare the brightness of the stars according to the 3 variables that were changed. Review 1. Objective: 1. F. Materials: E. how far do you think the explorations on the outer space have gone? Powerpoint presentation. Evaluation: 1. V. Enumerate the importance/ contributions of Hubble Telescope. light source III. Subject Matter: Reference: Handouts given by Ateneo during the 3 consecutive Saturdays. Application How do size. Do you observe the lamp post at night? Which seems brighter? Which seems dimmer? C. Assignment: 1.

3. color and distance to the brightness of the star? B. The pupils present their answers. Pupils share with their seatmates the lessons they learned in the discussion. Evaluation: (It is done during discussion proper were pupils presented their answer) V.2. digestive. Procedures: A. nervous. Generalization 1. Living things interact with each other through symbiotic relationships in order to survive. Motivation What are the components of the ecosystem? Group Activity 1. Objective: 1. 2. IV. III. 2. I. D. Processes: Identifying Describing Communicating E. Subject Matter: Reference: Exploring Science VI Pages: 5-50 C. respiratory. Review What is the relationship of size. Review the concepts relating to ecosystem. Subject Matter: Reference: NAT Review Pages: 23-28 Materials: Answer sheets and NAT Reviewer Concepts: Ecosystem is the interaction of both living and non-living things. F. Recall the different functions of human body systems. The teacher gives the pupils enough time to answer all the question. excretory and lymphatic system. II. endocrine. These include integumentary muscular. Discussion 1. Objective: 1. What are the different ecosystems? Give its component. The teacher asks 2 volunteers to share to the whole class what they learned. Pupils discuss the different questions before answering the questions. Assignment: Pupils research about the different cycles that occur on the environment. . FUNCTIONS OF HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS I. Concepts: There are different systems that form an organism. Application 1. The teacher calls for volunteers. skeletal. circulatory. The teacher and the pupils discuss the answer in every item. II.

the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are examples of galaxies. Describe the Hubble Telescope? B. Application 1. The teacher discusses the different function based from the output of the pupils. GALAXY III. The teacher let the pupils consolidate their answers in an essay form. The teacher will give credit to those groups with elaborated answers. 2. Pupils brainstorm on how the different systems in our body work together. Objectives: 1. Draw the different organs that are involved. Procedures: A. D. 3. Activity IV. 2. Review 1. E. pictures.Processing: Identifying Describing Enumerating Materials: NAT Reviewers Choose 3 human body systems. V. Review 1. What is ecosystem? 2. Generalization 1. Who discovered Hubble Telescope? 2. Pupils present their answers. Pupils make a concept map of the different human body systems. I. II. 2. Andromeda. and billions of stars and appears as a hazy patch of light from a great distance. Assignment: . Evaluation: Pupils answer their NAT reviewer that asked about human body systems. Procedures: A. The Milky Way. Discussion 1. Name the common galaxies. How are the different human body systems work if you are eating? III. Subject Matter: Reference: Internet PELC: Materials: LCD projector. Processes: Describing Inferring C. Motivation How do our organs and systems work? Group Activity 1. PowerPoint presentation Concepts: A galaxy is made up of dust. Our solar system is a part of the Milky Way galaxy. F. gases. Motivation Hazy patches of light and clouds are found in the space between stars. What do you think are they? C. What are the components of ecosystem? B. State that our solar system is a part of the Milky Way galaxy.

and Voyager 1 and 2. Saturn. Discussion 1. Give examples of spiral galaxy. a.9 Space Distance. Why did the dots and bits of paper appear as such from a far distance? Pupils must observed that the farther they move from the board. Procedures: A. Uranus and Neptune. How are they classified? F. 3. III. Processes: Describing Enumerating E. Enumerate some space probes and their missions. elliptical. II. Marinerio. How are galaxies classified? 2. Activity SPACE PROBES C. The teacher shows a picture of Milky Way. Application 1. The teacher presents pictures of galaxy. What makes up a galaxy? 3. Generalization 1. Viking 1 and 2. Materials: Photographs of some space probes and their latest discoveries. Let the pupils define galaxy. and other heavenly bodies. 2 The pupils identify the kind of galaxy where it belongs. Pupils do Activity 7. the closed the dots and bits of paper appear to one another until only one shape is viewed from a far. Evaluation: 1. Some of these space probes are as follows: Luna 1. Motivation 1. The teacher points out the solar system belongs to Milky Way galaxy. LCD projector Concepts: Several space probes were sent into outer space to gather important data about the planets.- 1. PowerPoint presentation. The teacher asks the pupils in a free-wheeling discussion what they know about space explorations made after 1957. . What are galaxies? 2. their moons. 2. Review 1. Pupils describe and compare the different kinds of galaxies. 3. IV. How are they classified? V. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future Pages: 271-273 PELC: D. Pioneer & Venus 2. 2. Voyager 1 and 2 took photographs of Jupiter. Venera 9. Assignment: Pupils draw the 3 kinds of galaxies (spiral. What are the common galaxies that you know? B. Objective: 1. I. and irregular) and let them cite examples of each. How many dots and bits of paper did you see from different distances? b.

12. Pupils infer some problems solved by the spacesuit. Include their missions. 2. The teacher let the pupils enumerate the achievements and problems man met in space exploration. 1969. What are their missions and findings? B. Concepts: Man’s greatest achievement in space exploration is his landing on July 19. Show a picture of an astronaut wearing a spacesuit and walking in outer space. Pupils do Activity 7. Pupils work on Activity 7. Application 1. II. Assignment: 1. Evaluation: Make a table of different space probes. Search for Space Probe Missions.1. 2. Discussion 1. The teacher points out that the greatest achievement in a space exploration in the landing of man on the moon. Pupils check their work as they brainstorm about the different achievements and possible problems encountered by the astronauts. 2. Pupils discuss their output. Activity 1. Procedures: A. Objectives: 1. Space Achievements. Pictures of astronaut wearing a space suit and pictures of space craft in outer space. Pupils will just consolidate their answers. Review 1. and escape from the Earth’s gravity. Subject Matter: Reference: Into the Future Pages: PELC: Materials: D. V. 3.13. SPACE TRAVEL I. 2. Processes: Identifying Describing Inferring E. disposal of waste. What are the different space probes and their missions? F. What are their missions and findings? III. weightlessness. D. C. Why do you think the first space probes were not sent to explore Mars? IV. Teacher add inputs about the missions of the space probes mentioned in their text. food intake. . Discussion 1. extreme heat and radiation. Motivation 1. What are the different space probes? 2. Some problems man met in space travel include: airlessness. Find out the latest space probes sent into space? 2. Describe the major problems in space travel. Generalization 1.

Write a brief description of it.E. Pupils consolidate the lesson they have learned using a matrix. Assignment: 1. This includes the major problems encountered by astronauts and the solution to these problems. How were the astronauts able to solve some of the significant problems related to space travel? V. What are the different significant space problems encountered by astronauts? 2. Application If the astronauts were not able to solve these problems. Evaluation: 1. do you think space exploration have gone this far? IV. Generalization 1. F. Find out the detailed structure of a spacecraft’s cabin. .

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